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Sample records for acute neuronal death

  1. Nicotinamide reduces acute cortical neuronal death and edema in the traumatically injured brain.

    PubMed

    Hoane, Michael R; Gilbert, David R; Holland, Michael A; Pierce, Jeremy L

    2006-11-06

    Previous studies have shown that administration of nicotinamide (Vitamin B(3)) in animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and ischemia significantly reduced the size of infarction or injury and improved functional recovery. The present study evaluated the ability of nicotinamide to provide acute neuroprotection and edema reduction following TBI. Groups of rats were assigned to nicotinamide (500mg/kg) or saline (1.0ml/kg) treatment conditions and received contusion injuries or sham surgeries. Drug treatment was administered 15min following injury. Brains were harvested 24h later and either processed for histology or water content. Frozen sections were stained with the degenerating neuron stain (Fluoro-Jade B) (FJ) and cell counts were performed at the site of injury. Additional brains were processed for water content (a measure of injury-induced edema). Results of this study showed that administration of nicotinamide following TBI significantly reduced the number of FJ(+) neurons in the injured cortex compared to saline-treated animals. Examination of the water content of the brains also revealed that administration of nicotinamide significantly attenuated the amount of water compared to saline-treated animals in the injured cortex. These results indicate that nicotinamide administration significantly reduced neuronal death and attenuated cerebral edema following injury. The current findings suggest that nicotinamide significantly modulates acute pathophysiological processes following injury and that this may account for its beneficial effects on recovery of function following injury.

  2. Cellular NAD depletion and decline of SIRT1 activity play critical roles in PARP-1-mediated acute epileptic neuronal death in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengjun; Yang, Xue; Lin, Youting; Qiu, Xiaoxue; Li, Hui; Zhao, Xiuhe; Cao, Lili; Liu, Xuewu; Pang, Yuejiu; Wang, Xuping; Chi, Zhaofu

    2013-10-16

    Intense poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation was implicated as a major cause of caspase-independent cell death in the hippocampal neuronal culture (HNC) model of acute acquired epilepsy (AE). The molecular mechanisms are quite complicated. The linkage among neuronal death, cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) levels, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) translocation, SIRT1 expression and activity were investigated here. The results showed that PARP-1 over-activation caused by Mg²⁺-free stimuli led to cellular NAD depletion which could block AIF translocation from mitochondria to nucleus and attenuate neuronal death. Also, SIRT1 deacetylase activity was reduced by Mg²⁺-free treatment, accompanied by elevated ratio of neuronal death, which could be rescued by NAD repletion. These data demonstrated that cellular NAD depletion and decline of SIRT1 activity play critical roles in PARP-1-mediated epileptic neuronal death in the HNC model of acute AE.

  3. Spatiotemporal pattern of neuronal injury induced by DFP in rats: A model for delayed neuronal cell death following acute OP intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yonggang; Lein, Pamela J.; Liu Cuimei; Bruun, Donald A.; Tewolde, Teclemichael; Ford, Gregory; Ford, Byron D.

    2011-06-15

    Organophosphate (OP) neurotoxins cause acute cholinergic toxicity and seizures resulting in delayed brain damage and persistent neurological symptoms. Testing novel strategies for protecting against delayed effects of acute OP intoxication has been hampered by the lack of appropriate animal models. In this study, we characterize the spatiotemporal pattern of cellular injury after acute intoxication with the OP diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP). Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received pyridostigmine (0.1 mg/kg, im) and atropine methylnitrate (20 mg/kg, im) prior to DFP (9 mg/kg, ip) administration. All DFP-treated animals exhibited moderate to severe seizures within minutes after DFP injection but survived up to 72 h. AChE activity was significantly depressed in the cortex, hippocampus, subcortical brain tissue and cerebellum at 1 h post-DFP injection and this inhibition persisted for up to 72 h. Analysis of neuronal injury by Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) labeling revealed delayed neuronal cell death in the hippocampus, cortex, amygdala and thalamus, but not the cerebellum, starting at 4 h and persisting until 72 h after DFP treatment, although temporal profiles varied between brain regions. At 24 h post-DFP injection, the pattern of FJB labeling corresponded to TUNEL staining in most brain regions, and FJB-positive cells displayed reduced NeuN immunoreactivity but were not immunopositive for astrocytic (GFAP), oligodendroglial (O4) or macrophage/microglial (ED1) markers, demonstrating that DFP causes a region-specific delayed neuronal injury mediated in part by apoptosis. These findings indicate the feasibility of this model for testing neuroprotective strategies, and provide insight regarding therapeutic windows for effective pharmacological intervention following acute OP intoxication. - Research Highlights: > DFP induced neuronal FJB labeling starting at 4-8 h after treatment > The pattern of DFP-induced FJB labeling closely corresponded to TUNEL staining > FJB

  4. DNA Damage Induced Neuronal Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    Experiments are proposed to examine the molecular mechanism by which mustard chemical warfare agents induce neuronal cell death . DNA damage is the...proposed underlying mechanism of mustard-induced neuronal cell death . We propose a novel research strategy to test this hypothesis by using mice with...perturbed DNA repair to explore the relationship between mustard-induced DNA damage and neuronal cell death . Initial in vitro studies (Years 1, 2 & 3

  5. Acute estradiol protects CA1 neurons from ischemia-induced apoptotic cell death via the PI3K/Akt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jover-Mengual, Teresa; Miyawaki, Takahiro; Latuszek, Adrianna; Alborch, Enrique; Zukin, R. Suzanne; Etgen, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    Global ischemia arising during cardiac arrest or cardiac surgery causes highly selective, delayed death of hippocampal CA1 neurons. Exogenous estradiol ameliorates global ischemia-induced neuronal death and cognitive impairment in male and female rodents. However, the molecular mechanisms by which a single acute injection of estradiol administered after the ischemic event intervenes in global ischemia-induced apoptotic cell death are unclear. Here we show that acute estradiol acts via the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling cascade to protect CA1 neurons in ovariectomized female rats. We demonstrate that global ischemia promotes early activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) and forkhead transcription factor of the O class (FOXO)3A, known Akt targets that are related to cell survival, and activation of caspase-3. Estradiol prevents ischemia-induced dephosphorylation and activation of GSK3β and FOXO3A, and the caspase death cascade. These findings support a model whereby estradiol acts by activation of PI3K/Akt signaling to promote neuronal survival in the face of global ischemia. PMID:20114038

  6. Calcium imaging in neuron cell death.

    PubMed

    Calvo, María; Villalobos, Carlos; Núñez, Lucía

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ is involved in control of a large variety of cell functions including apoptosis and neuron cell death. For example, intracellular Ca2+ overload is critical in neuron cell death induced by excitotoxicity. Thus, single cell monitoring of intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt ) in neurons concurrently with apoptosis and neuron cell death is widely required. Procedures for culture and preparation of primary cultures of hippocampal rat neurons and fluorescence imaging of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in Fura2/AM -loaded neurons are described. We also describe a method for apoptosis detection by immunofluorescence imaging. Finally, a simple method for concurrent measurements of [Ca2+]cyt and apoptosis in the same neurons is described.

  7. TRPM7, the cytoskeleton and neuronal death

    PubMed Central

    Asrar, Suhail; Aarts, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the world. Elucidation of the underlying mechanisms associated with neuronal death during this detrimental process has been of significant interest in the field of research. One principle component vital to the maintenance of cellular integrity is the cytoskeleton. Studies suggest that abnormalities at the level of this fundamental structure are directly linked to adverse effects on cellular well-being, including cell death. In recent years, evidence has also emerged regarding an imperative role for the transient receptor potential (TRP) family member TRPM7 in the mediation of excitotoxic-independent neuronal demise. In this review, we will elaborate on the current knowledge and unique properties associated with the functioning of this structure. In addition, we will deliberate the involvement of distinct mechanistic pathways during TRPM7-dependent cell death, including modifications at the level of the cytoskeleton. PMID:23247582

  8. Neuronal cell death in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Roger F

    2007-12-01

    It is generally assumed that neuronal cell death is minimal in liver failure and is insufficient to account for the neuropsychiatric symptoms characteristic of hepatic encephalopathy. However, contrary to this assumption, neuronal cell damage and death are well documented in liver failure patients, taking the form of several distinct clinical entities namely acquired (non-Wilsonian) hepatocerebral degeneration, cirrhosis-related Parkinsonism, post-shunt myelopathy and cerebellar degeneration. In addition, there is evidence to suggest that liver failure contributes to the severity of neuronal loss in Wernicke's encephalopathy. The long-standing nature of the thalamic and cerebellar lesions, over 80% of which are missed by routine clinical evaluation, together with the probability that they are nutritional in origin, underscores the need for careful nutritional management (adequate dietary protein, Vitamin B(1)) in liver failure patients. Mechanisms identified with the potential to cause neuronal cell death in liver failure include NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity, lactic acidosis, oxidative/nitrosative stress and the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The extent of neuronal damage in liver failure may be attenuated by compensatory mechanisms that include down-regulation of NMDA receptors, hypothermia and the presence of neuroprotective steroids such as allopregnanolone. These findings suggest that some of the purported "sequelae" of liver transplantation (gait ataxia, memory loss, confusion) could reflect preexisting neuropathology.

  9. Antioxidant gene therapy against neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Yepes, Juliana; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Annadurai, Anandhan; Wang, Fang; Skotak, Maciej; Chandra, Namas; Li, Ming; Pappa, Aglaia; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Razo, Luz Maria Del; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet; Franco, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a common hallmark of neuronal cell death associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, as well as brain stroke/ischemia and traumatic brain injury. Increased accumulation of reactive species of both oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) has been implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction, energy impairment, alterations in metal homeostasis and accumulation of aggregated proteins observed in neurodegenerative disorders, which lead to the activation/modulation of cell death mechanisms that include apoptotic, necrotic and autophagic pathways. Thus, the design of novel antioxidant strategies to selectively target oxidative stress and redox imbalance might represent important therapeutic approaches against neurological disorders. This work reviews the evidence demonstrating the ability of genetically encoded antioxidant systems to selectively counteract neuronal cell loss in neurodegenerative diseases and ischemic brain damage. Because gene therapy approaches to treat inherited and acquired disorders offer many unique advantages over conventional therapeutic approaches, we discussed basic research/clinical evidence and the potential of virus-mediated gene delivery techniques for antioxidant gene therapy. PMID:24333264

  10. Do Single Seizures Cause Neuronal Death in the Human Hippocampus?

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Luisa L; Lopez-Meraz, Maria-Leonor; Niquet, Jerome; Wasterlain, Claude G

    2007-01-01

    The question of whether repeated single seizures cause neuronal death in the adult human brain is of great clinical importance and might have broad therapeutic implications. Reviewed here are recent studies on the effects of repeated single seizures (in the absence of status epilepticus) on hippocampal volume and on neuronal death markers in blood and in surgically ablated hippocampi. PMID:17520081

  11. Life and death of neurons in the aging brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, J. H.; Hof, P. R.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by extensive neuron death that leads to functional decline, but the neurobiological correlates of functional decline in normal aging are less well defined. For decades, it has been a commonly held notion that widespread neuron death in the neocortex and hippocampus is an inevitable concomitant of brain aging, but recent quantitative studies suggest that neuron death is restricted in normal aging and unlikely to account for age-related impairment of neocortical and hippocampal functions. In this article, the qualitative and quantitative differences between aging and Alzheimer's disease with respect to neuron loss are discussed, and age-related changes in functional and biochemical attributes of hippocampal circuits that might mediate functional decline in the absence of neuron death are explored. When these data are viewed comprehensively, it appears that the primary neurobiological substrates for functional impairment in aging differ in important ways from those in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Death of Neurons following Injury Requires Conductive Neuronal Gap Junction Channels but Not a Specific Connexin

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Joseph D.; Ramsey, Jon; Polk, Jeremy M; Koop, Andre; Denisova, Janna V.; Belousov, Andrei B.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological blockade or genetic knockout of neuronal connexin 36 (Cx36)-containing gap junctions reduces neuronal death caused by ischemia, traumatic brain injury and NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated excitotoxicity. However, whether Cx36 gap junctions contribute to neuronal death via channel-dependent or channel-independent mechanism remains an open question. To address this, we manipulated connexin protein expression via lentiviral transduction of mouse neuronal cortical cultures and analyzed neuronal death twenty-four hours following administration of NMDA (a model of NMDAR excitotoxicity) or oxygen-glucose deprivation (a model of ischemic injury). In cultures prepared from wild-type mice, over-expression and knockdown of Cx36-containing gap junctions augmented and prevented, respectively, neuronal death from NMDAR-mediated excitotoxicity and ischemia. In cultures obtained form from Cx36 knockout mice, re-expression of functional gap junction channels, containing either neuronal Cx36 or non-neuronal Cx43 or Cx31, resulted in increased neuronal death following insult. In contrast, the expression of communication-deficient gap junctions (containing mutated connexins) did not have this effect. Finally, the absence of ethidium bromide uptake in non-transduced wild-type neurons two hours following NMDAR excitotoxicity or ischemia suggested the absence of active endogenous hemichannels in those neurons. Taken together, these results suggest a role for neuronal gap junctions in cell death via a connexin type-independent mechanism that likely relies on channel activities of gap junctional complexes among neurons. A possible contribution of gap junction channel-permeable death signals in neuronal death is discussed. PMID:26017008

  13. [Transient brain ischemia: NMDA receptor modulation and delayed neuronal death].

    PubMed

    Benquet, Pascal; Gee, Christine E; Gerber, Urs

    2008-02-01

    Transient global ischemia induces delayed neuronal death in certain cell types and brain regions while sparing cells in other areas. A key process through which oxygen-glucose deprivation triggers cell death is the excessive accumulation of the neurotransmitter glutamate leading to over excitation of neurons. In certain neurons this increase in glutamate will potentiate the NMDA type of glutamate receptor, which can then initiate cell death. This review provides an update of the neurophysiological, cellular and molecular mechanisms inducing post-ischemic plasticity of NMDA receptors, focusing on the sensitive CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus as compared to the relatively resistant neighboring CA3 neurons. Both a change in the equilibrium between protein tyrosine kinases/phosphatases and an increased density of surface NMDA receptors in response to ischemia may explain the selective vulnerability of specific cell types. Implications for the treatment of stroke and reasons for the failures of human clinical trials utilizing NMDA receptor antagonists are also discussed.

  14. Life and Death of a Neuron

    MedlinePlus

    ... results from the release of excess glutamate. Macrophages (green) eat dying neurons in order to clear debris. ... Page NINDS Pseudotumor Cerebri Information Page NINDS Psychogenic Movement Information Page NINDS Rasmussen's Encephalitis Information Page NINDS ...

  15. Endogenous recovery after brain damage: molecular mechanisms that balance neuronal life/death fate.

    PubMed

    Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B; Penagos-Puig, Andrés; Ramírez-Jarquín, Josué O

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal survival depends on multiple factors that comprise a well-fueled energy metabolism, trophic input, clearance of toxic substances, appropriate redox environment, integrity of blood-brain barrier, suppression of programmed cell death pathways and cell cycle arrest. Disturbances of brain homeostasis lead to acute or chronic alterations that might ultimately cause neuronal death with consequent impairment of neurological function. Although we understand most of these processes well when they occur independently from one another, we still lack a clear grasp of the concerted cellular and molecular mechanisms activated upon neuronal damage that intervene in protecting damaged neurons from death. In this review, we summarize a handful of endogenously activated mechanisms that balance molecular cues so as to determine whether neurons recover from injury or die. We center our discussion on mechanisms that have been identified to participate in stroke, although we consider different scenarios of chronic neurodegeneration as well. We discuss two central processes that are involved in endogenous repair and that, when not regulated, could lead to tissue damage, namely, trophic support and neuroinflammation. We emphasize the need to construct integrated models of neuronal degeneration and survival that, in the end, converge in neuronal fate after injury. Under neurodegenerative conditions, endogenously activated mechanisms balance out molecular cues that determine whether neurons contend toxicity or die. Many processes involved in endogenous repair may as well lead to tissue damage depending on the strength of stimuli. Signaling mediated by trophic factors and neuroinflammation are examples of these processes as they regulate different mechanisms that mediate neuronal demise including necrosis, apoptosis, necroptosis, pyroptosis and autophagy. In this review, we discuss recent findings on balanced regulation and their involvement in neuronal death.

  16. Independent controls for neocortical neuron production and histogenetic cell death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verney, C.; Takahashi, T.; Bhide, P. G.; Nowakowski, R. S.; Caviness, V. S. Jr

    2000-01-01

    We estimated the proportion of cells eliminated by histogenetic cell death during the first 2 postnatal weeks in areas 1, 3 and 40 of the mouse parietal neocortex. For each layer and for the subcortical white matter in each neocortical area, the number of dying cells per mm(2) was calculated and the proportionate cell death for each day of the 2-week interval was estimated. The data show that cell death proceeds essentially uniformly across the neocortical areas and layers and that it does not follow either the spatiotemporal gradient of cell cycle progression in the pseudostratified ventricular epithelium of the cerebral wall, the source of neocortical neurons, or the 'inside-out' neocortical neuronogenetic sequence. Therefore, we infer that the control mechanisms of neocortical histogenetic cell death are independent of mechanisms controlling neuronogenesis or neuronal migration but may be associated with the ingrowth, expansion and a system-wide matching of neuronal connectivity. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Mitochondrial Mechanisms of Neuronal Cell Death: Potential Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2017-01-06

    Mitochondria lie at the crossroads of neuronal survival and cell death. They play important roles in cellular bioenergetics, control intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, and participate in key metabolic pathways. Mutations in genes involved in mitochondrial quality control cause a myriad of neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondria have evolved strategies to kill cells when they are not able to continue their vital functions. This review provides an overview of the role of mitochondria in neurologic disease and the cell death pathways that are mediated through mitochondria, including their role in accidental cell death, the regulated cell death pathways of apoptosis and parthanatos, and programmed cell death. It details the current state of parthanatic cell death and discusses potential therapeutic strategies targeting initiators and effectors of mitochondrial-mediated cell death in neurologic disorders.

  18. Decrease in doublecortin expression without neuronal cell death in rat retrosplenial cortex after stress exposure.

    PubMed

    Kutsuna, Nobuo; Suma, Takeshi; Takada, Yoshiyuki; Yamashita, Akiko; Oshima, Hideki; Sakatani, Kaoru; Yamamoto, Takamitsu; Katayama, Yoichi

    2012-03-07

    Exposure to acute stress by forced swim impairs spatial learning and memory in rats. The retrosplenial cortex plays an important role in spatial learning and memory. A cell population that expresses immature neuronal markers, including doublecortin (DCX), plays a key role in plasticity of the adult brain through formation of new neurons. Here, we aimed to determine whether rats exposed to acute stress showed changes in DCX expression in retrosplenial cortex cells. Twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Six were subjected to acute stress by forced swim (group S), and the remaining six served as controls (group C). Immunohistochemical staining was performed for DCX, neuron-specific nuclear protein, parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, and somatostatin. Newly generated cells were immunohistochemically detected by daily administration of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine for 1 week. Fluoro-Jade B staining was performed to detect cell death. Group S showed lower number of DCX-expressing cells than group C (P<0.001). The proportion of DCX-expressing cells showing neuron-specific nuclear protein co-localization (24% in group S; 27% in group C) or parvalbumin co-localization (65% in group S; 61% in group C) remained unchanged after acute stress exposure. Neither 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive nor Fluoro-Jade B-positive cells were found in the retrosplenial cortex of groups S and C. DCX-expressing cells in the retrosplenial cortex decreases markedly without cell death after acute stress exposure. Neuronal differentiation of these cells toward gamma aminobutyric acidergic interneurons appears to be unaltered. The decrease in DCX expression may reduce plasticity potential within the retrosplenial cortex and attenuate spatial learning and memory function.

  19. Induction of neuronal cell death by paraneoplastic Ma1 antigen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huai-Lu; D'Mello, Santosh R

    2010-12-01

    Paraneoplastic Ma1 (PNMA1) is a member of a family of proteins involved in an autoimmune disorder called paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. Although it is widely expressed in brain, nothing is known about the function of PNMA1 in neurons. We find that PNMA1 expression is highest in the perinatal brain, a period during which developmentally regulated neuronal death occurs. PNMA1 expression increases in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) induced to die by low potassium (LK) and in cortical neurons following homocysteic acid (HCA) treament. Elevated PNMA1 expression is also observed in the degenerating striatum in two separate mouse models of Huntington's disease, the R6/2 transgenic model and the 3-nitropropionic acid-induced chemical model. Suppression of endogenous PNMA1 expression inhibits LK-induced neuronal apoptosis. Ectopic expression of PNMA1 promotes apoptosis even in medium containing high potassium, a condition that normally ensures survival of CGNs. Deletion of the N-terminal half of the PNMA1 protein abrogates its apoptotic activity, whereas deletion of the C-terminal half renders the protein more toxic. Within the N-terminal half, the ability to induce neuronal death depends on the presence of a BH3-like domain. In addition to being necessary for apoptosis, the BH3-like domain is necessary for self-association of PNMA1. Apoptosis by PNMA1 expression is inhibited by overexpression of Bcl2, suggesting that PNMA1-induced neuronal death may depend on the binding of a proapoptotic member of the Bcl2 family to the BH3 domain. Taken together, our results suggest that PNMA1 is a proapoptotic protein in neurons, elevated expression of which may contribute to neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. FGF-2 induces neuronal death through upregulation of system xc-.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqian; Albano, Rebecca; Lobner, Doug

    2014-02-14

    The cystine/glutamate antiporter (system xc-) transports cystine into cell in exchange for glutamate. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) upregulates system xc- selectively on astrocytes, which leads to increased cystine uptake, the substrate for glutathione production, and increased glutamate release. While increased intracellular glutathione can limit oxidative stress, the increased glutamate release can potentially lead to excitotoxicity to neurons. To test this hypothesis, mixed neuronal and glial cortical cultures were treated with FGF-2. Treatment with FGF-2 for 48 h caused a significant neuronal death in these cultures. Cell death was not observed in neuronal-enriched cultures, or astrocyte-enriched cultures, suggesting the toxicity was the result of neuron-glia interaction. Blocking system xc- eliminated the neuronal death as did the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo[f]quinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX), but not the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine. When cultures were exposed directly to glutamate, both NBQX and memantine blocked the neuronal toxicity. The mechanism of this altered profile of glutamate receptor mediated toxicity by FGF-2 is unclear. The selective calcium permeable AMPA receptor antagonist 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine (NASPM) failed to offer protection. The most likely explanation for the results is that 48 h FGF-2 treatment induces AMPA/kainate receptor toxicity through increased system xc- function resulting in increased release of glutamate. At the same time, FGF-2 alters the sensitivity of the neurons to glutamate toxicity in a manner that promotes selective AMPA/kainate receptor mediated toxicity.

  1. Sex Stratified Neuronal Cultures to Study Ischemic Cell Death Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Saurabh; Traystman, Richard J.; Herson, Paco S.

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences in neuronal susceptibility to ischemic injury and neurodegenerative disease have long been observed, but the signaling mechanisms responsible for those differences remain unclear. Primary disassociated embryonic neuronal culture provides a simplified experimental model with which to investigate the neuronal cell signaling involved in cell death as a result of ischemia or disease; however, most neuronal cultures used in research today are mixed sex. Researchers can and do test the effects of sex steroid treatment in mixed sex neuronal cultures in models of neuronal injury and disease, but accumulating evidence suggests that the female brain responds to androgens, estrogens, and progesterone differently than the male brain. Furthermore, neonate male and female rodents respond differently to ischemic injury, with males experiencing greater injury following cerebral ischemia than females. Thus, mixed sex neuronal cultures might obscure and confound the experimental results; important information might be missed. For this reason, the Herson Lab at the University of Colorado School of Medicine routinely prepares sex-stratified primary disassociated embryonic neuronal cultures from both hippocampus and cortex. Embryos are sexed before harvesting of brain tissue and male and female tissue are disassociated separately, plated separately, and maintained separately. Using this method, the Herson Lab has demonstrated a male-specific role for the ion channel TRPM2 in ischemic cell death. In this manuscript, we share and discuss our protocol for sexing embryonic mice and preparing sex-stratified hippocampal primary disassociated neuron cultures. This method can be adapted to prepare sex-stratified cortical cultures and the method for embryo sexing can be used in conjunction with other protocols for any study in which sex is thought to be an important determinant of outcome. PMID:24378980

  2. Angiotensin II protects cultured midbrain dopaminergic neurons against rotenone-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Grammatopoulos, Tom N; Ahmadi, Ferogh; Jones, Susan M; Fariss, Marc W; Weyhenmeyer, James A; Zawada, W Michael

    2005-05-31

    In this study, we demonstrate that angiotensin II (Ang II) protects dopamine (DA) neurons from rotenone toxicity in vitro. Primary ventral mesencephalic (VM) cultures from E15 rats were grown for 5 days and then cultured in the presence of the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, rotenone. Acute exposure (20 h) to 20 nM rotenone reduced the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive (TH+) neurons by 50 +/- 6% when compared to untreated cultures. Pre-treatment of VM cultures with 100 nM Ang II decreased TH+ neuronal loss to 25 +/- 10% at the 20-nM rotenone concentration. Ang II in the presence of the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) antagonist, losartan, was even more effective in protecting DA neurons showing a loss of only 13 +/- 4% at 20 nM rotenone. Conversely, the AT2R antagonist, PD123319, abolished the protective effects of Ang II. Furthermore, both the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK801, and the antioxidant, alpha-tocopheryl succinate (vitamin E analogue), prevented rotenone-induced toxicity. Here, we show that acute exposure of VM cultures to the pesticide rotenone leads to dopaminergic neuronal cell death and that angiotensin acting through the AT2 receptor protects dopamine neurons from rotenone toxicity.

  3. Neuronal cell death: an overview of its different forms in central and peripheral neurons.

    PubMed

    Lossi, Laura; Castagna, Claudia; Merighi, Adalberto

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of neuronal cell death dates back to the nineteenth century. Nowadays, after a very long period of conceptual difficulties, the notion that cell death is a phenomenon occurring during the entire life course of the nervous system, from neurogenesis to adulthood and senescence, is fully established. The dichotomy between apoptosis, as the prototype of programmed cell death (PCD ), and necrosis, as the prototype of death caused by an external insult, must be carefully reconsidered, as different types of PCD: apoptosis, autophagy, pyroptosis, and oncosis have all been demonstrated in neurons (and glia ). These modes of PCD may be triggered by different stimuli, but share some intracellular pathways such that different types of cell death may affect the same population of neurons according to several intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Therefore, a mixed morphology is often observed also depending on degrees of differentiation, activity, and injury. The main histological and ultrastructural features of the different types of cell death in neurons are described and related to the cellular pathways that are specifically activated in any of these types of PCD.

  4. Statins induce differentiation and cell death in neurons and astroglia.

    PubMed

    März, Pia; Otten, Uwe; Miserez, André R

    2007-01-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of the hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, the rate limiting enzyme for cholesterol biosynthesis. Experimental and clinical studies with statins suggest that they have beneficial effects on neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, it was of interest to characterize the direct effects of statins on CNS neurons and glial cells. We have treated defined cultures of neurons and astrocytes of newborn rats with two lipophilic statins, atorvastatin and simvastatin, and analyzed their effects on morphology and survival. Treatment of astrocytes with statins induced a time- and dose-dependent stellation, followed by apoptosis. Similarly, statins elicited programmed cell death of cerebellar granule neurons but with a higher sensitivity. Analysis of different signaling cascades revealed that statins fail to influence classical pathways such as Akt or MAP kinases, known to be activated in CNS cells. In addition, astrocyte stellation triggered by statins resembled dibutryl-cyclic AMP (db-cAMP) induced morphological differentiation. However, in contrast to db-cAMP, statins induced upregulation of low-density lipoprotein receptors, without affecting GFAP expression, indicating separate underlying mechanisms. Analysis of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway revealed that lack of mevalonate and of its downstream metabolites, mainly geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate (GGPP), is responsible for the statin-induced apoptosis of neurons and astrocytes. Moreover, astrocytic stellation triggered by statins was inhibited by mevalonate and GGPP. Interestingly, neuronal cell death was significantly reduced in astrocyte/neuron co-cultures treated with statins. We postulate that under these conditions signals provided by astrocytes, e.g., isoprenoids play a key role in neuronal survival.

  5. Microglial activation induces neuronal death in Chandipura virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Abhishek Kumar; Ghosh, Sourish; Pradhan, Sreeparna; Basu, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Neurotropic viruses induce neurodegeneration either directly by activating host death domains or indirectly through host immune response pathways. Chandipura Virus (CHPV) belonging to family Rhabdoviridae is ranked among the emerging pathogens of the Indian subcontinent. Previously we have reported that CHPV induces neurodegeneration albeit the root cause of this degeneration is still an open question. In this study we explored the role of microglia following CHPV infection. Phenotypic analysis of microglia through lectin and Iba-1 staining indicated cells were in an activated state post CHPV infection in cortical region of the infected mouse brain. Cytokine Bead Array (CBA) analysis revealed comparatively higher cytokine and chemokine levels in the same region. Increased level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), Nitric Oxide (NO) and Reactive Oxygen species (ROS) in CHPV infected mouse brain indicated a strong inflammatory response to CHPV infection. Hence it was hypothesized through our analyses that this inflammatory response may stimulate the neuronal death following CHPV infection. In order to validate our hypothesis supernatant from CHPV infected microglial culture was used to infect neuronal cell line and primary neurons. This study confirmed the bystander killing of neurons due to activation of microglia post CHPV infection. PMID:26931456

  6. Epigenetic regulation of motor neuron cell death through DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Chestnut, Barry A; Chang, Qing; Price, Ann; Lesuisse, Catherine; Wong, Margaret; Martin, Lee J

    2011-11-16

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism for gene silencing engaged by DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt)-catalyzed methyl group transfer to cytosine residues in gene-regulatory regions. It is unknown whether aberrant DNA methylation can cause neurodegeneration. We tested the hypothesis that Dnmts can mediate neuronal cell death. Enforced expression of Dnmt3a induced degeneration of cultured NSC34 cells. During apoptosis of NSC34 cells induced by camptothecin, levels of Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a increased fivefold and twofold, respectively, and 5-methylcytosine accumulated in nuclei. Truncation mutation of the Dnmt3a catalytic domain and Dnmt3a RNAi blocked apoptosis of cultured neurons. Inhibition of Dnmt catalytic activity with RG108 and procainamide protected cultured neurons from excessive DNA methylation and apoptosis. In vivo, Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a are expressed differentially during mouse brain and spinal cord maturation and in adulthood when Dnmt3a is abundant in synapses and mitochondria. Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a are expressed in motor neurons of adult mouse spinal cord, and, during their apoptosis induced by sciatic nerve avulsion, nuclear and cytoplasmic 5-methylcytosine immunoreactivity, Dnmt3a protein levels and Dnmt enzyme activity increased preapoptotically. Inhibition of Dnmts with RG108 blocked completely the increase in 5-methycytosine and the apoptosis of motor neurons in mice. In human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), motor neurons showed changes in Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and 5-methylcytosine similar to experimental models. Thus, motor neurons can engage epigenetic mechanisms to drive apoptosis, involving Dnmt upregulation and increased DNA methylation. These cellular mechanisms could be relevant to human ALS pathobiology and disease treatment.

  7. Stem cells decreased neuronal cell death after hypoxic stress in primary fetal rat neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Tetsuro; Xu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    To explore stem cell-mediated neuronal protection through extracellular signaling pathways by transplanted stem cells, we sought to identify potential candidate molecules responsible for neuronal protection using an in vitro coculture system. Primary fetal rat hippocampal neurons underwent hypoxia (≤1% oxygen) for 96 h nad then were returned to a normoxic condition. The study group then received rat umbilical cord matrix-derived stem cells, while the control group received fresh media only. The experimental group showed decreased neuronal apoptosis compared to the control group [44.5 ± 1.6% vs. 71.0 ± 4.2% (mean ± SD, p = 0.0005) on day 5] and higher neuronal survival (4.9 ± 1.2 cells/100× field vs. 2.2 ± 0.3, p = 0.02 on day 5). Among 90 proteins evaluated using a protein array, stem cell coculture media showed increased protein secretion of TIMP-1 (5.61-fold), TIMP-2 (4.88), CNTF-Rα (3.42), activin A (2.20), fractalkine (2.04), CCR4 (2.02), and decreased secretion in MIP-2 (0.30-fold), AMPK α1 (0.43), TROY (0.48), and TIMP-3 (0.50). This study demonstrated that coculturing stem cells with primary neurons in vitro decreased neuronal cell death after hypoxia with significantly altered protein secretion. The results suggest that stem cells may offer neuronal protection through extracellular signaling.

  8. DNA damage, neuronal and glial cell death and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Barzilai, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a key factor in the maintenance of genome stability. As such, it is a central axis in sustaining cellular homeostasis in a variety of contexts: development, growth, differentiation, and maintenance of the normal life cycle of the cell. It is now clear that diverse mechanisms encompassing cell cycle regulation, repair pathways, many aspects of cellular metabolism, and cell death are inter-linked and act in concert in response to DNA damage. Defects in the DDR in proliferating cells can lead to cancer, while DDR defects in neurons may result in neurodegeneration. Mature neurons are highly differentiated, post-mitotic cells that cannot be replenished after disease or trauma. Their high metabolic activity generates large amounts of reactive oxygen species with DNA damaging capacity. Moreover, their intense transcriptional activity increases the potential for genomic DNA damage. Respectively, neurons have elaborate mechanisms to defend the integrity of their genome, thus ensuring their longevity and functionality in the face of these threats. Over the course of the past two decades, there has been a substantial increase in our understanding of the role of glial cells in supporting the neuronal cell DDR and longevity. This review article focuses on the potential role of the DDR in the etiology and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, and in addition, it describes various aspects of glial cell functionality in two genomic instability disorders: ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) and Nijmegen breakage syndrome.

  9. HIP/PAP prevents excitotoxic neuronal death and promotes plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Haldipur, Parthiv; Dupuis, Nina; Degos, Vincent; Moniaux, Nicolas; Chhor, Vibol; Rasika, Sowmyalakshmi; Schwendimann, Leslie; le Charpentier, Tifenn; Rougier, Elodie; Amouyal, Paul; Amouyal, Gilles; Dournaud, Pascal; Bréchot, Christian; El Ghouzzi, Vincent; Faivre, Jamila; Fleiss, Bobbi; Mani, Shyamala; Gressens, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Excitotoxicity plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of perinatal brain injuries. Among the consequences of excessive activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate are oxidative stress caused by free radical release from damaged mitochondria, neuronal death and subsequent loss of connectivity. Drugs that could protect nervous tissue and support regeneration are attractive therapeutic options. The hepatocarcinoma intestine pancreas protein/pancreatitis-associated protein I (HIP/PAP) or Reg3α, which is approved for clinical testing for the protection and regeneration of the liver, is upregulated in the central nervous system following injury or disease. Here, we examined the neuroprotective/neuroregenerative potential of HIP/PAP following excitotoxic brain injury. Methods We studied the expression of HIP/PAP and two of its putative effectors, cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 19 (ARPP19) and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43), in the neonatal brain, and the protective/regenerative properties of HIP/PAP in three paradigms of perinatal excitotoxicity: intracerebral injection of the NMDA agonist ibotenate in newborn pups, a pediatric model of traumatic brain injury, and cultured primary cortical neurons. Results HIP/PAP, ARPP19, and GAP-43 were expressed in the neonatal mouse brain. HIP/PAP prevented the formation of cortical and white matter lesions and reduced neuronal death and glial activation following excitotoxic insults in vivo. In vitro, HIP/PAP promoted neuronal survival, preserved neurite complexity and fasciculation, and protected cell contents from reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced damage. Interpretation HIP/PAP has strong neuroprotective/neuroregenerative potential following excitotoxic injury to the developing brain, and could represent an interesting therapeutic strategy in perinatal brain injury. PMID:25493266

  10. Cell death and proliferation in acute slices and organotypic cultures of mammalian CNS.

    PubMed

    Lossi, Laura; Alasia, Silvia; Salio, Chiara; Merighi, Adalberto

    2009-08-01

    Analysis of the interplay between cell proliferation and death has been greatly advantaged by the development of CNS slice preparations. In slices, interactions between neurons and neurons and the glial cells are fundamentally preserved in a fashion close to the in vivo situation. In parallel, these preparations offer the possibility of an easy experimental manipulation. Two main types of slices are currently in use: the acute slices, which are short living preparations where the major functions of the intact brain (including neurogenesis) are maintained, and the organotypic cultures, where the maturation and plasticity of neuronal circuitries in relation to naturally occurring neuronal death and/or experimental insults can be followed over several weeks in vitro. We will discuss here the main advantages/disadvantages linked to the use of CNS slices for histological analysis of neuronal proliferation and death, as well as the main findings obtained in the most popular types of preparations, i.e. the cortical, hippocampal, cerebellar and retinal slices.

  11. Neuronal death enhanced by N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Stefovska, Vanya; Turski, Lechoslaw

    2000-01-01

    Glutamate promotes neuronal survival during brain development and destroys neurons after injuries in the mature brain. Glutamate antagonists are in human clinical trials aiming to demonstrate limitation of neuronal injury after head trauma, which consists of both rapid and slowly progressing neurodegeneration. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists are considered for neuroprotection in chronic neurodegenerative disorders with slowly progressing cell death only. Therefore, humans suffering from Huntington's disease, characterized by slowly progressing neurodegeneration of the basal ganglia, are subjected to trials with glutamate antagonists. Here we demonstrate that progressive neurodegeneration in the basal ganglia induced by the mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionate or in the hippocampus by traumatic brain injury is enhanced by N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists but ameliorated by α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonists. These observations reveal that N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists may increase neurodestruction in mature brain undergoing slowly progressing neurodegeneration, whereas blockade of the action of glutamate at α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors may be neuroprotective. PMID:11058158

  12. Humanin Derivatives Inhibit Necrotic Cell Death in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Aviv; Lerner-Yardeni, Jenny; Meridor, David; Kasher, Roni; Nathan, Ilana; Parola, Abraham H

    2015-01-01

    Humanin and its derivatives are peptides known for their protective antiapoptotic effects against Alzheimer’s disease. Herein, we identify a novel function of the humanin-derivative AGA(C8R)-HNG17 (namely, protection against cellular necrosis). Necrosis is one of the main modes of cell death, which was until recently considered an unmoderated process. However, recent findings suggest the opposite. We have found that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 confers protection against necrosis in the neuronal cell lines PC-12 and NSC-34, where necrosis is induced in a glucose-free medium by either chemohypoxia or by a shift from apoptosis to necrosis. Our studies in traumatic brain injury models in mice, where necrosis is the main mode of neuronal cell death, have shown that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 has a protective effect. This result is demonstrated by a decrease in a neuronal severity score and by a reduction in brain edema, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An insight into the peptide’s antinecrotic mechanism was attained through measurements of cellular ATP levels in PC-12 cells under necrotic conditions, showing that the peptide mitigates a necrosis-associated decrease in ATP levels. Further, we demonstrate the peptide’s direct enhancement of the activity of ATP synthase activity, isolated from rat-liver mitochondria, suggesting that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 targets the mitochondria and regulates cellular ATP levels. Thus, AGA(C8R)-HNG17 has potential use for the development of drug therapies for necrosis-related diseases, for example, traumatic brain injury, stroke, myocardial infarction, and other conditions for which no efficient drug-based treatment is currently available. Finally, this study provides new insight into the mechanisms underlying the antinecrotic mode of action of AGA(C8R)-HNG17. PMID:26062019

  13. Nerve growth factor withdrawal-induced cell death in neuronal PC12 cells resembles that in sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that in neuronal cells the developmental phenomenon of programmed cell death is an active process, requiring synthesis of both RNA and protein. This presumably reflects a requirement for novel gene products to effect cell death. It is shown here that the death of nerve growth factor-deprived neuronal PC12 cells occurs at the same rate as that of rat sympathetic neurons and, like rat sympathetic neurons, involves new transcription and translation. In nerve growth factor-deprived neuronal PC12 cells, a decline in metabolic activity, assessed by uptake of [3H]2-deoxyglucose, precedes the decline in cell number, assessed by counts of trypan blue-excluding cells. Both declines are prevented by actinomycin D and anisomycin. In contrast, the death of nonneuronal (chromaffin-like) PC12 cells is not inhibited by transcription or translation inhibitors and thus does not require new protein synthesis. DNA fragmentation by internucleosomal cleavage does not appear to be a consistent or significant aspect of cell death in sympathetic neurons, neuronal PC12 cells, or nonneuronal PC12 cells, notwithstanding that the putative nuclease inhibitor aurintricarboxylic acid protects sympathetic neurons, as well as neuronal and nonneuronal PC12 cells, from death induced by trophic factor removal. Both phenotypic classes of PC12 cells respond to aurintricarboxylic acid with similar dose-response characteristics. Our results indicate that programmed cell death in neuronal PC12 cells, but not in nonneuronal PC12 cells, resembles programmed cell death in sympathetic neurons in significant mechanistic aspects: time course, role of new protein synthesis, and lack of a significant degree of DNA fragmentation. PMID:1469055

  14. Therapeutic Effects of PPARα on Neuronal Death and Microvascular Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Elizabeth P.; Ma, Jian-xing

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) is a broadly expressed nuclear hormone receptor and is a transcription factor for diverse target genes possessing a PPAR response element (PPRE) in the promoter region. The PPRE is highly conserved, and PPARs thus regulate transcription of an extensive array of target genes involved in energy metabolism, vascular function, oxidative stress, inflammation, and many other biological processes. PPARα has potent protective effects against neuronal cell death and microvascular impairment, which have been attributed in part to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Here we discuss PPARα's effects in neurodegenerative and microvascular diseases and also recent clinical findings that identified therapeutic effects of a PPARα agonist in diabetic microvascular complications. PMID:25705219

  15. Dopamine Promotes Striatal Neuronal Apoptotic Death via ERK Signaling Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Rusnak, Milan; Lombroso, Paul J.; Sidhu, Anita

    2009-01-01

    Although the mechanisms underlying striatal neurodegeneration are poorly understood, we have shown that striatal pathogenesis may be initiated by high synaptic levels of extracellular dopamine (DA). Here we investigated in rat striatal primary neurons the mobilization of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways after treatment with DA. Instead of observing an elevation of the archetypical pro-cytotoxic MAPKs, p-JNK and p-p38 MAPK, we found that DA, acting through D1 DA receptors, induced a sustained stimulation of the phosphorylated form of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) via a cAMP/PKA/Rap1/B-Raf/MEK pathway. Blockade of D2 DA receptors, β-adrenergic receptors or NMDA receptors with receptor-specific antagonists had no significant effect on this process. Activation of D1 DA receptors and PKA by DA caused phosphorylation and inactivation of the striatal–enriched tyrosine phosphatase (STEP), an important phosphatase for the dephosphorylation and subsequent inactivation of p-ERK in striatum. Interestingly p-ERK was primarily retained in the cytoplasm, with only low amounts translocated to the nucleus. The scaffold protein β-arrestin2 interacted with both p-ERK and D1 DA receptor, triggering the cytosolic retention of p-ERK and inducing striatal neuronal apoptotic death. These data provide unique insight into a novel role of p-ERK in striatal neurodegeneration. PMID:19200235

  16. Thrombo-hemorrhagic deaths in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Lo Coco, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has become the most curable form of acute myeloid leukemia after the advent of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). However, early deaths (ED) mostly due to the disease-associated coagulopathy remain the major cause of treatment failure. In particular, hemorrhagic events account for 40-65% of ED and several prognostic factors have been identified for such hemorrhagic deaths, including poor performance status, high white blood cell (WBC) count and coagulopathy. Occurrence of thrombosis during treatment with ATRA may be associated with differentiation syndrome (DS) or represent an isolated event. Some prognostic factors have been reported to be associated with thrombosis, including increased WBC or aberrant immunophenotype of leukemic promyelocytes. Aim of this review is to report the incidence, severity, possible pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of thrombo-haemorrhagic deaths in APL.

  17. Neuron-specific knock-down of SMN1 causes neuron degeneration and death through an apoptotic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Gallotta, Ivan; Mazzarella, Nadia; Donato, Alessandra; Esposito, Alessandro; Chaplin, Justin C.; Castro, Silvana; Zampi, Giuseppina; Battaglia, Giorgio S.; Hilliard, Massimo A.; Bazzicalupo, Paolo; Di Schiavi, Elia

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a devastating disease that is characterized by degeneration and death of a specific subclass of motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord. Although the gene responsible, survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1), was identified 20 years ago, it has proven difficult to investigate its effects in vivo. Consequently, a number of key questions regarding the molecular and cellular functions of this molecule have remained unanswered. We developed a Caenorhabditis elegans model of smn-1 loss-of-function using a neuron-specific RNA interference strategy to knock-down smn-1 selectively in a subclass of motor neurons. The transgenic animals presented a cell-autonomous, age-dependent degeneration of motor neurons detected as locomotory defects and the disappearance of presynaptic and cytoplasmic fluorescent markers in targeted neurons. This degeneration led to neuronal death as revealed by positive reactivity to genetic and chemical cell-death markers. We show that genes of the classical apoptosis pathway are involved in the smn-1-mediated neuronal death, and that this phenotype can be rescued by the expression of human SMN1, indicating a functional conservation between the two orthologs. Finally, we determined that Plastin3/plst-1 genetically interacts with smn-1 to prevent degeneration, and that treatment with valproic acid is able to rescue the degenerative phenotype. These results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to the loss of motor neurons when SMN1 function is reduced. PMID:27260405

  18. Neuronal cell death in the arcuate nucleus of the medulla oblongata in stillbirth.

    PubMed

    Folkerth, Rebecca D; Zanoni, Sallie; Andiman, Sarah E; Billiards, Saraid S

    2008-02-01

    The hypothesis that unexplained stillbirth arises in a similar manner as the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is based in part on shared neuropathologic features between the two entities, including hypoxic-ischemic lesions such as white matter and brainstem gliosis, as well as aplasia or hypoplasia of the arcuate nucleus on the ventral surface of the medulla. The arcuate nucleus is the putative homologue of the respiratory chemosensory region at the ventral medullary surface in animals that is involved in central chemosensitivity. To determine arcuate nucleus pathology in stillbirth, and its co-occurrence with evidence of hypoxia-ischemia, we reviewed brain specimens from the archives of our hospitals from 22 consecutive stillbirths from 22 to 41 gestational weeks. Explained causes of death (n=17) included nuchal cord, acute chorioamnionitis, placental abruption, and fetal glomerulosclerosis; 5 cases were unexplained. In 12 brains, we observed nuclear karyorrhexis and/or pyknosis with cytoplasmic hypereosinophilia in neurons in the arcuate nucleus in both explained (n=8) and unexplained (n=4) cases (54.5% of total cases). Three additional cases had arcuate aplasia (n=1) or hypoplasia (n=2) (13.6% of total cases); one of the latter cases also had neuronal necrosis in the hypoplastic arcuate. The degree of gliosis in the region of the arcuate nucleus was variable across all cases, without statistically significant differences between groups with and without arcuate nucleus necrosis. Other lesions in association with (n=14) and without (n=8) arcuate nucleus abnormalities were diffuse cerebral white matter gliosis, periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), and neuronal necrosis in the hippocampus, basal ganglia, thalamus, basis pontis, and brainstem tegmentum. In 16/20 (80.0%) cases (with or without histologic necrosis of the arcuate), immunostaining with caspase-3 demonstrated positive neurons. Our findings suggest that neuronal pathology in the arcuate nucleus may be

  19. Acute stimulation of transplanted neurons improves motoneuron survival, axon growth, and muscle reinnervation.

    PubMed

    Grumbles, Robert M; Liu, Yang; Thomas, Christie M; Wood, Patrick M; Thomas, Christine K

    2013-06-15

    Few options exist for treatment of pervasive motoneuron death after spinal cord injury or in neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Local transplantation of embryonic motoneurons into an axotomized peripheral nerve is a promising approach to arrest the atrophy of denervated muscles; however, muscle reinnervation is limited by poor motoneuron survival. The aim of the present study was to test whether acute electrical stimulation of transplanted embryonic neurons promotes motoneuron survival, axon growth, and muscle reinnervation. The sciatic nerve of adult Fischer rats was transected to mimic the widespread denervation seen after disease or injury. Acutely dissociated rat embryonic ventral spinal cord cells were transplanted into the distal tibial nerve stump as a neuron source for muscle reinnervation. Immediately post-transplantation, the cells were stimulated at 20 Hz for 1 h. Other groups were used to control for the cell transplantation and stimulation. When neurons were stimulated acutely, there were significantly more neurons, including cholinergic neurons, 10 weeks after transplantation. This led to enhanced numbers of myelinated axons, reinnervation of more muscle fibers, and more medial and lateral gastrocnemius muscles were functionally connected to the transplant. Reinnervation reduced muscle atrophy significantly. These data support the concept that electrical stimulation rescues transplanted motoneurons and facilitates muscle reinnervation.

  20. Sudden unexpected death under acute influence of cannabis.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Benno; Kauferstein, Silke; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie; Daldrup, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The acute toxicity of cannabinoids is said to be low and there is little public awareness of the potentially hazardous cardiovascular effects of cannabis, e.g. marked increase in heart rate or supine blood pressure. We describe the cases of two young, putative healthy men who died unexpectedly under the acute influence of cannabinoids. To our knowledge, these are the first cases of suspected fatal cannabis intoxications where full postmortem investigations, including autopsy, toxicological, histological, immunohistochemical and genetical examinations, were carried out. The results of these examinations are presented. After exclusion of other causes of death we assume that the young men experienced fatal cardiovascular complications evoked by smoking cannabis.

  1. Common Mechanisms of Neuronal Cell Death After Exposure to Diverse Environmental Insults: Implications for Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    Neuronal cell death after exposure to neurotoxins or after central nervous system (CNS) injury is the major cause of devastating neurological...neuronal cell death is critical to development of appropriate treatment strategies. Although the environmental causes of CNS injury are diverse (e.g...of cellular and molecular events is responsible for the vast majority of cell death . The research results contained in this annual report summarize the

  2. [Acute liver failure after ingestion of death cap mushrooms].

    PubMed

    Zuliani, Anna-Maria; Kabar, Iyad; Mitchell, Todd; Heinzow, Hauke Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    Amatoxins, which are mainly found in Amanita phalloides, Amanita virosa, and Galerina autumnalis, are responsible for the majority of fatal intoxication with green death cap. The intoxication is associated with acute liver failure, which explains the poor prognosis. Acute liver injury is generally preceeded by a gastrointestinal phase with nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. In the course, pre-renal kidney failure due to the associated fluid deficit and fulminant liver failure may occur. General guidelines for the treatment of amatoxin poisoning are yet not available. We report on three patients who suffered from amatoxin mushroom poisoning after ingestion of green death cap mushrooms. Based on the pathophysiology of amatoxin poisoning, we discuss a potential therapeutic approach.

  3. RARβ regulates neuronal cell death and differentiation in the avian ciliary ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Boerries, Melanie; Busch, Hauke

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Programmed cell death during chicken ciliary ganglion (CG) development is mostly discussed as an extrinsically regulated process, guided either by the establishment of a functional balance between preganglionic and postganglionic activity or the availability of target‐derived neurotrophic factors. We found that the expression of the gene coding for the nuclear retinoic acid receptor β (RARB) is transiently upregulated prior to and during the execution phase of cell death in the CG. Using retroviral vectors, the expression of RARB was knocked down during embryonic development in ovo. The knockdown led to a significant increase in CG neuron number after the cell death phase. BrdU injections and active caspase‐3 staining revealed that this increase in neuron number was due to an inhibition of apoptosis during the normal cell death phase. Furthermore, apoptotic neuron numbers were significantly increased at a stage when cell death is normally completed. While the cholinergic phenotype of the neurons remained unchanged after RARB knockdown, the expression of the proneural gene Cash1 was increased, but somatostatin‐like immunoreactivity, a hallmark of the mature choroid neuron population, was decreased. Taken together, these results point toward a delay in neuronal differentiation as well as cell death. The availability of nuclear retinoic acid receptor β (RARβ) and RARβ‐induced transcription of genes could therefore be a new intrinsic cue for the maturation of CG neurons and their predisposition to undergo cell death. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 75: 1204–1218, 2015 PMID:25663354

  4. Motor neuron death in ALS – programmed by astrocytes?

    PubMed Central

    Pirooznia, Sheila K.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2014-01-01

    Motor neurons in ALS die via cell-autonomous and non-cell autonomous mechanisms. Using adult human astrocytes and motor neurons, Re et al (2014) discover that familial and sporadic ALS derived human adult astrocytes secrete neurotoxic factors that selectively kill motor neurons through necroptosis, suggesting a new therapeutic avenue. PMID:24607221

  5. Neuronal Cell Death Induced by Mechanical Percussion Trauma in Cultured Neurons is not Preceded by Alterations in Glucose, Lactate and Glutamine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, A. R.; Bak, L. K.; Rama Rao, K. V.; Waagepetersen, H.S.; Schousboe, A.; Norenberg, M.D.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a devastating neurological disorder that usually presents in acute and chronic forms. Brain edema and associated increased intracranial pressure in the early phase following TBI are major consequences of acute trauma. On the other hand, neuronal injury, leading to neurobehavioral and cognitive impairments, that usually develop months to years after single or repetitive episodes of head trauma, are major consequences of chronic TBI. The molecular mechanisms responsible for TBI-induced injury, however, are unclear. Recent studies have suggested that early mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent energy failure play a role in the pathogenesis of TBI. We therefore examined whether oxidative metabolism of 13C-labeled glucose, lactate or glutamine is altered early following in vitro mechanical percussion-induced trauma (5 atm) to neurons (4–24 h), and whether such events contribute to the development of neuronal injury. Cell viability was assayed using the release of the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), together with fluorescence-based cell staining (calcein and ethidium homodimer-1 for live and dead cells, respectively). Trauma had no effect on the LDH release in neurons from 1 h to 18 h. However, a significant increase in LDH release was detected at 24 h after trauma. Similar findings were identified when traumatized neurons were stained with fluorescent markers. Additionally 13C-labeling of glutamate showed a small, but statistically significant decrease at 14 h after trauma. However, trauma had no effect on the cycling ratio of the TCA cycle at any time-period examined. These findings indicate that trauma does not cause a disturbance in oxidative metabolism of any of the substrates used for neurons. Accordingly, such metabolic disturbance does not appear to contribute to the neuronal death in the early stages following trauma. PMID:26729365

  6. bcl-2 transgene expression can protect neurons against developmental and induced cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Farlie, P G; Dringen, R; Rees, S M; Kannourakis, G; Bernard, O

    1995-01-01

    The bcl-2 protooncogene, which protects various cell types from apoptotic cell death, is expressed in the developing and adult nervous system. To explore its role in regulation of neuronal cell death, we generated transgenic mice expressing Bcl-2 under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter, which forced expression uniquely in neurons. Sensory neurons isolated from dorsal root ganglia of newborn mice normally require nerve growth factor for their survival in culture, but those from the bcl-2 transgenic mice showed enhanced survival in its absence. Furthermore, apoptotic death of motor neurons after axotomy of the sciatic nerve was inhibited in these mice. The number of neurons in two neuronal populations from the central and peripheral nervous system was increased by 30%, indicating that Bcl-2 expression can protect neurons from cell death during development. The generation of these transgenic mice suggests that Bcl-2 may play an important role in survival of neurons both during development and throughout adult life. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7753817

  7. Prolonged elevation of serum neuron-specific enolase in children after clinical diagnosis of brain death.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Mogami, Yukiko; Toribe, Yausihisa; Yamada, Keitaro; Yanagihara, Keiko; Hirata, Ikuko; Mano, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    To elucidate the time course of neuronal cell death after the clinical criteria for brain death are met, the authors reviewed serial changes of serum neuron-specific enolase levels in 3 children (age range, 3-15 years) clinically diagnosed as brain dead due to cardiopulmonary arrest. All patients survived for more than 2 months after brain death. Children with brain death had higher peak neuron-specific enolase values (1069-2849 ng/mL) than did 3 control children (256-1800 ng/mL) who did not become brain dead but had poor neurological outcome (1 death, 2 vegetative state) after cardiopulmonary arrest. A major finding is that children with brain death showed persistent elevation of neuron-specific enolase at 4 weeks (>400 ng/mL) and 8 weeks (>50 ng/mL) after cardiopulmonary arrest, in comparison with 2 surviving patients without brain death (<50 ng/mL at 4 weeks). This prolonged elevation of neuron-specific enolase suggests that total brain necrosis might not be present at the time of clinical diagnosis of brain death.

  8. Protein carbonylation, protein aggregation and neuronal cell death in a murine model of multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Anushka

    Many studies have suggested that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of both multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Yet, the mechanism by which oxidative stress leads to tissue damage in these disorders is unclear. Recent work from our laboratory has revealed that protein carbonylation, a major oxidative modification caused by severe and/or chronic oxidative stress conditions, is elevated in MS and EAE. Furthermore, protein carbonylation has been shown to alter protein structure leading to misfolding/aggregation. These findings prompted me to hypothesize that carbonylated proteins, formed as a consequence of oxidative stress and/or decreased proteasomal activity, promote protein aggregation to mediate neuronal apoptosis in vitro and in EAE. To test this novel hypothesis, I first characterized protein carbonylation, protein aggregation and apoptosis along the spinal cord during the course of myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 peptide-induced EAE in C57BL/6 mice [Chapter 2]. The results show that carbonylated proteins accumulate throughout the course of the disease, albeit by different mechanisms: increased oxidative stress in acute EAE and decreased proteasomal activity in chronic EAE. I discovered not only that there is a temporal correlation between protein carbonylation and apoptosis but also that carbonyl levels are significantly higher in apoptotic cells. A high number of juxta-nuclear and cytoplasmic protein aggregates containing the majority of the oxidized proteins are also present during the course of EAE, which seems to be due to reduced autophagy. In chapter 3, I show that when gluthathione levels are reduced to those in EAE spinal cord, both neuron-like PC12 (nPC12) cells and primary neuronal cultures accumulate carbonylated proteins and undergo cell death (both by necrosis and apoptosis). Immunocytochemical and biochemical studies also revealed a temporal

  9. p53 controls neuronal death in the CA3 region of the newborn mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Murase, Sachiko; Poser, Steve W; Joseph, Joby; McKay, Ronald D

    2011-08-01

    It is important to determine the mechanisms controlling the number of neurons in the nervous system. Previously, we reported that neuronal activity plays a central role in controlling neuron number in the neonatal hippocampus of rodents. Neuronal survival requires sustained activation of the serine-threonine kinase Akt, which is initiated by neurotrophins and continued for several hours by neuronal activity and integrin signaling. Here, we focus on the CA3 region to show that neuronal apoptosis requires p53. As in wild-type animals, neuronal death occurs in the first postnatal week and ends by postnatal day (P)10 in p53(-/-) mice. During this period, the CA3 region of p53(-/-) mice contains significantly lower numbers of apoptotic cells, and at the end of the death period, it contains more neurons than the wild type. At P10, the p53(-/-) CA3 region contains a novel subpopulation of neurons with small soma size. These neurons show normal levels of tropomyosin receptor kinase receptor activation, but lower levels of activated Akt than the neurons with somata of normal size. These results suggest that p53 is the key downstream regulator of the novel survival-signaling pathway that regulates the number of CA3 neurons in the first 10 days of postnatal life.

  10. Cathepsin B-dependent motor neuron death after nerve injury in the adult mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li; Wu, Zhou; Baba, Masashi; Peters, Christoph; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Cathepsin B (CB), a lysosomal cysteine protease, is expressed in neuron and glia. {yields} CB increased in hypogrossal nucleus neurons after nerve injury in adult mice. {yields} CB-deficiency significantly increased the mean survival ratio of injured neurons. {yields} Thus, CB plays a critical role in axotomy-induced neuronal death in adult mice. -- Abstract: There are significant differences in the rate of neuronal death after peripheral nerve injury between species. The rate of neuronal death of motor neurons after nerve injury in the adult rats is very low, whereas that in adult mice is relatively high. However, the understanding of the mechanism underlying axotomy-induced motor neuron death in adult mice is limited. Cathepsin B (CB), a typical cysteine lysosomal protease, has been implicated in three major morphologically distinct pathways of cell death; apoptosis, necrosis and autophagic cell death. The possible involvement of CB in the neuronal death of hypogrossal nucleus (HGN) neurons after nerve injury in adult mice was thus examined. Quantitative analyses showed the mean survival ratio of HGN neurons in CB-deficient (CB-/-) adult mice after nerve injury was significantly greater than that in the wild-type mice. At the same time, proliferation of microglia in the injured side of the HGN of CB-/- adult mice was markedly reduced compared with that in the wild-type mice. On the injured side of the HGN in the wild-type adult mice, both pro- and mature forms of CB markedly increased in accordance with the increase in the membrane-bound form of LC3 (LC3-II), a marker protein of autophagy. Furthermore, the increase in CB preceded an increase in the expression of Noxa, a major executor for axotomy-induced motor neuron death in the adult mouse. Conversely, expression of neither Noxa or LC3-II was observed in the HGN of adult CB-/- mice after nerve injury. These observations strongly suggest that CB plays a critical role in axotomy

  11. Blockade of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors protects hippocampal neurons against global ischemia-induced death

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Kyung-Min; Yokota, Hidenori; Mashiko, Toshihiro; Castillo, Pablo E.; Zukin, R. Suzanne; Bennett, Michael V. L.

    2005-01-01

    Transient global or forebrain ischemia induced experimentally in animals can cause selective, delayed neuronal death of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. A striking feature is a delayed rise in intracellular free Zn2+ in CA1 neurons just before the onset of histologically detectable cell death. Here we show that α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) at Schaffer collateral to CA1 synapses in postischemic hippocampus exhibit properties of Ca2+/Zn2+-permeable, Glu receptor 2 (GluR2)-lacking AMPARs before the rise in Zn2+ and cell death. At 42 h after ischemia, AMPA excitatory postsynaptic currents exhibited pronounced inward rectification and marked sensitivity to 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine (Naspm), a selective channel blocker of GluR2-lacking AMPARs. In control hippocampus, AMPA excitatory postsynaptic currents were electrically linear and relatively insensitive to Naspm. Naspm injected intrahippocampally at 9-40 h after insult greatly reduced the late rise in intracellular free Zn2+ in postischemic CA1 neurons and afforded partial protection against ischemia-induced cell death. These results implicate GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors in the ischemia-induced rise in free Zn2+ and death of CA1 neurons, although a direct action at the time of the rise in Zn2+ is unproven. This receptor subtype appears to be an important therapeutic target for intervention in ischemia-induced neuronal death in humans. PMID:16093311

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress as a Mediator of Neurotoxin-Induced Dopamine Neuron Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    that there is determine the number of neurons lost by simply counting an earlier independent natural cell death event affecting Nissl -stained neuronal...neurons increased their viability (Hoffmann et Members of the Bcl-2 family take an important part in al. 1983). Tomozawa and Appel ( 1986 ) demonstrated that...expression, because it Akerud P, Alberch J, Eketjall S, Wagner J, Arenas E (1999) has also been observed for counts of Nissl -stained profiles

  13. Nuclear trafficking of Pten after brain injury leads to neuron survival not death.

    PubMed

    Goh, Choo-Peng; Putz, Ulrich; Howitt, Jason; Low, Ley-Hian; Gunnersen, Jenny; Bye, Nicole; Morganti-Kossmann, Cristina; Tan, Seong-Seng

    2014-02-01

    There is controversy whether accumulation of the tumor suppressor PTEN protein in the cell nucleus under stress conditions such as trauma and stroke causes cell death. A number of in vitro studies have reported enhanced apoptosis in neurons possessing nuclear PTEN, with the interpretation that its nuclear phosphatase activity leads to reduction of the survival protein phospho-Akt. However, there have been no in vivo studies to show that nuclear PTEN in neurons under stress is detrimental. Using a mouse model of injury, we demonstrate here that brain trauma altered the nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution of Pten, resulting in increased nuclear Pten but only in surviving neurons near the lesion. This event was driven by Ndfip1, an adaptor and activator of protein ubiquitination by Nedd4 E3 ligases. Neurons next to the lesion with nuclear PTEN were invariably negative for TUNEL, a marker for cell death. These neurons also showed increased Ndfip1 which we previously showed to be associated with neuron survival. Biochemical assays revealed that overall levels of Pten in the affected cortex were unchanged after trauma, suggesting that Pten abundance globally had not increased but rather Pten subcellular location in affected neurons had changed. Following experimental injury, the number of neurons with nuclear Pten was reduced in heterozygous mice (Ndfip1(+/-)) although lesion volumes were increased. We conclude that nuclear trafficking of Pten following injury leads to neuron survival not death.

  14. DJ-1 protects against cell death following acute cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Dongworth, R K; Mukherjee, U A; Hall, A R; Astin, R; Ong, S-B; Yao, Z; Dyson, A; Szabadkai, G; Davidson, S M; Yellon, D M; Hausenloy, D J

    2014-02-27

    Novel therapeutic targets are required to protect the heart against cell death from acute ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Mutations in the DJ-1 (PARK7) gene in dopaminergic neurons induce mitochondrial dysfunction and a genetic form of Parkinson's disease. Genetic ablation of DJ-1 renders the brain more susceptible to cell death following ischemia-reperfusion in a model of stroke. Although DJ-1 is present in the heart, its role there is currently unclear. We sought to investigate whether mitochondrial DJ-1 may protect the heart against cell death from acute IRI by preventing mitochondrial dysfunction. Overexpression of DJ-1 in HL-1 cardiac cells conferred the following beneficial effects: reduced cell death following simulated IRI (30.4±4.7% with DJ-1 versus 52.9±4.7% in control; n=5, P<0.05); delayed mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening (a critical mediator of cell death) (260±33 s with DJ-1 versus 121±12 s in control; n=6, P<0.05); and induction of mitochondrial elongation (81.3±2.5% with DJ-1 versus 62.0±2.8% in control; n=6 cells, P<0.05). These beneficial effects of DJ-1 were absent in cells expressing the non-functional DJ-1(L166P) and DJ-1(Cys106A) mutants. Adult mice devoid of DJ-1 (KO) were found to be more susceptible to cell death from in vivo IRI with larger myocardial infarct sizes (50.9±3.5% DJ-1 KO versus 41.1±2.5% in DJ-1 WT; n≥7, P<0.05) and resistant to cardioprotection by ischemic preconditioning. DJ-1 KO hearts showed increased mitochondrial fragmentation on electron microscopy, although there were no differences in calcium-induced MPTP opening, mitochondrial respiratory function or myocardial ATP levels. We demonstrate that loss of DJ-1 protects the heart from acute IRI cell death by preventing mitochondrial dysfunction. We propose that DJ-1 may represent a novel therapeutic target for cardioprotection.

  15. Effects of acute spinalization on neurons of postural networks

    PubMed Central

    Zelenin, Pavel V.; Lyalka, Vladimir F.; Hsu, Li-Ju; Orlovsky, Grigori N.; Deliagina, Tatiana G.

    2016-01-01

    Postural limb reflexes (PLRs) represent a substantial component of postural corrections. Spinalization results in loss of postural functions, including disappearance of PLRs. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of acute spinalization on two populations of spinal neurons (F and E) mediating PLRs, which we characterized previously. For this purpose, in decerebrate rabbits spinalized at T12, responses of interneurons from L5 to stimulation causing PLRs before spinalization, were recorded. The results were compared to control data obtained in our previous study. We found that spinalization affected the distribution of F- and E-neurons across the spinal grey matter, caused a significant decrease in their activity, as well as disturbances in processing of posture-related sensory inputs. A two-fold decrease in the proportion of F-neurons in the intermediate grey matter was observed. Location of populations of F- and E-neurons exhibiting significant decrease in their activity was determined. A dramatic decrease of the efficacy of sensory input from the ipsilateral limb to F-neurons, and from the contralateral limb to E-neurons was found. These changes in operation of postural networks underlie the loss of postural control after spinalization, and represent a starting point for the development of spasticity. PMID:27302149

  16. Acute Hypoglycemia Induces Retinal Cell Death in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Martine; Schorderet, Daniel F.; Roduit, Raphaël

    2011-01-01

    Background Glucose is the most important metabolic substrate of the retina and maintenance of normoglycemia is an essential challenge for diabetic patients. Glycemic excursions could lead to cardiovascular disease, nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy. A vast body of literature exists on hyperglycemia namely in the field of diabetic retinopathy, but very little is known about the deleterious effect of hypoglycemia. Therefore, we decided to study the role of acute hypoglycemia in mouse retina. Methodology/Principal Findings To test effects of hypoglycemia, we performed a 5-hour hyperinsulinemic/hypoglycemic clamp; to exclude an effect of insulin, we made a hyperinsulinemic/euglycemic clamp as control. We then isolated retinas from each group at different time-points after the clamp to analyze cells apoptosis and genes regulation. In parallel, we used 661W photoreceptor cells to confirm in vivo results. We showed herein that hypoglycemia induced retinal cell death in mouse via caspase 3 activation. We then tested the mRNA expression of glutathione transferase omega 1 (Gsto1) and glutathione peroxidase 3 (Gpx3), two genes involved in glutathione (GSH) homeostasis. The expression of both genes was up-regulated by low glucose, leading to a decrease of reduced glutathione (GSH). In vitro experiments confirmed the low-glucose induction of 661W cell death via superoxide production and activation of caspase 3, which was concomitant with a decrease of GSH content. Moreover, decrease of GSH content by inhibition with buthionine sulphoximine (BSO) at high glucose induced apoptosis, while complementation with extracellular glutathione ethyl ester (GSHee) at low glucose restored GSH level and reduced apoptosis. Conclusions/Significance We showed, for the first time, that acute insulin-induced hypoglycemia leads to caspase 3-dependant retinal cell death with a predominant role of GSH content. PMID:21738719

  17. Neuronal mechanism for acute mechanosensitivity in tactile-foraging waterfowl

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Eve R.; Mastrotto, Marco; Laursen, Willem J.; Schulz, Vincent P.; Goodman, Jena B.; Funk, Owen H.; Gallagher, Patrick G.; Gracheva, Elena O.; Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N.

    2014-01-01

    Relying almost exclusively on their acute sense of touch, tactile-foraging birds can feed in murky water, but the cellular mechanism is unknown. Mechanical stimuli activate specialized cutaneous end organs in the bill, innervated by trigeminal afferents. We report that trigeminal ganglia (TG) of domestic and wild tactile-foraging ducks exhibit numerical expansion of large-diameter mechanoreceptive neurons expressing the mechano-gated ion channel Piezo2. These features are not found in visually foraging birds. Moreover, in the duck, the expansion of mechanoreceptors occurs at the expense of thermosensors. Direct mechanical stimulation of duck TG neurons evokes high-amplitude depolarizing current with a low threshold of activation, high signal amplification gain, and slow kinetics of inactivation. Together, these factors contribute to efficient conversion of light mechanical stimuli into neuronal excitation. Our results reveal an evolutionary strategy to hone tactile perception in vertebrates at the level of primary afferents. PMID:25246547

  18. Death due to acute tetrachloroethylene intoxication in a chronic abuser.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Mastroluca, Lavinia; Marasciuolo, Laura; Caligara, Marina; Sironi, Luca; Gentile, Guendalina; Zoja, Riccardo

    2015-05-01

    Volatile substances are used widespread, especially among young people, as a cheap and easily accessible drug. Tetrachloroethylene is one of the solvents exerting effects on the central nervous system with experiences of disinhibition and euphoria. The case presented is that of a 27-year-old female, found dead by her father at home with cotton swabs dipped in the nostrils. She was already known for this type of abuse and previously admitted twice to the hospital for nonfatal acute poisonings. The swabs were still soaked in tetrachloroethylene. Toxicological and histological investigations demonstrated the presence of an overlap between chronic intake of the substance (with high concentrations in sites of accumulation, e.g., the adipose tissue, and contemporary tissue damage, as histologically highlighted) and acute intoxication as final cause of death, with a concentration of 158 mg/L in cardiac blood and 4915 mg/kg in the adipose tissue. No other drugs or medicines were detected in body fluids or tissues, and to our knowledge, this is the highest concentration ever detected in forensic cases. This peculiar case confirms the toxicity of this substance and focuses on the importance of complete histological and toxicological investigations in the distinction between chronic abuse and acute intoxication.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Cell Death in Spinal Networks in Relation to Locomotor Activity After Acute Injury in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kuzhandaivel, Anujaianthi; Nistri, Andrea; Mazzone, Graciela L.; Mladinic, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the pathophysiological changes triggered by an acute spinal cord injury is a primary goal to prevent and treat chronic disability with a mechanism-based approach. After the primary phase of rapid cell death at the injury site, secondary damage occurs via autodestruction of unscathed tissue through complex cell-death mechanisms that comprise caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways. To devise novel neuroprotective strategies to restore locomotion, it is, therefore, necessary to focus on the death mechanisms of neurons and glia within spinal locomotor networks. To this end, the availability of in vitro preparations of the rodent spinal cord capable of expressing locomotor-like oscillatory patterns recorded electrophysiologically from motoneuron pools offers the novel opportunity to correlate locomotor network function with molecular and histological changes long after an acute experimental lesion. Distinct forms of damage to the in vitro spinal cord, namely excitotoxic stimulation or severe metabolic perturbation (with oxidative stress, hypoxia/aglycemia), can be applied with differential outcome in terms of cell types and functional loss. In either case, cell death is a delayed phenomenon developing over several hours. Neurons are more vulnerable to excitotoxicity and more resistant to metabolic perturbation, while the opposite holds true for glia. Neurons mainly die because of hyperactivation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) with subsequent DNA damage and mitochondrial energy collapse. Conversely, glial cells die predominantly by apoptosis. It is likely that early neuroprotection against acute spinal injury may require tailor-made drugs targeted to specific cell-death processes of certain cell types within the locomotor circuitry. Furthermore, comparison of network size and function before and after graded injury provides an estimate of the minimal network membership to express the locomotor program. PMID:21734866

  20. Cyclin D1 is an essential mediator of apoptotic neuronal cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Kranenburg, O; van der Eb, A J; Zantema, A

    1996-01-01

    Many neurons in the developing nervous system undergo programmed cell death, or apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is largely unknown. In the present report, we present evidence that the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 is involved in the regulation of neuronal cell death. During neuronal apoptosis, cyclin D1-dependent kinase activity is stimulated, due to an increase in cyclin D1 levels. Moreover, artificial elevation of cyclin D1 levels is sufficient to induce apoptosis, even in non-neural cell types. Cyclin D1-induced apoptosis, like neuronal apoptosis, can be inhibited by 21 kDa E1B, Bcl2 and pRb, but not by 55 kDa E1B. Most importantly, however, overexpression of the cyclin D-dependent kinase inhibitor p16INK4 protects neurons from apoptotic cell death, demonstrating that activation of endogenous cyclin D1-dependent kinases is essential during neuronal apoptosis. These data support a model in which neuronal apoptosis results from an aborted attempt to activate the cell cycle in terminally differentiated neurons. Images PMID:8598205

  1. Human group IIA secretory phospholipase A2 induces neuronal cell death via apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yagami, Tatsurou; Ueda, Keiichi; Asakura, Kenji; Hata, Satoshi; Kuroda, Takayuki; Sakaeda, Toshiyuki; Takasu, Nobuo; Tanaka, Kazushige; Gemba, Takefumi; Hori, Yozo

    2002-01-01

    Expression of group IIA secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IIA) is documented in the cerebral cortex (CTX) after ischemia, suggesting that sPLA2-IIA is associated with neurodegeneration. However, how sPLA2-IIA is involved in the neurodegeneration remains obscure. To clarify the pathologic role of sPLA2-IIA, we examined its neurotoxicity in rats that had the middle cerebral artery occluded and in primary cultures of cortical neurons. After occlusion, sPLA2 activity was increased in the CTX. An sPLA2 inhibitor, indoxam, significantly ameliorated not only the elevated activity of the sPLA2 but also the neurodegeneration in the CTX. The neuroprotective effect of indoxam was observed even when it was administered after occlusion. In primary cultures, sPLA2-IIA caused marked neuronal cell death. Morphologic and ultrastructural characteristics of neuronal cell death by sPLA2-IIA were apoptotic, as evidenced by condensed chromatin and fragmented DNA. Before apoptosis, sPLA2-IIA liberated arachidonic acid (AA) and generated prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), an AA metabolite, from neurons. Indoxam significantly suppressed not only AA release, but also PGD2 generation. Indoxam prevented neurons from sPLA2-IIA-induced neuronal cell death. The neuroprotective effect of indoxam was observed even when it was administered after sPLA2-IIA treatment. Furthermore, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor significantly prevented neurons from sPLA2-IIA-induced PGD2 generation and neuronal cell death. In conclusion, sPLA2-IIA induces neuronal cell death via apoptosis, which might be associated with AA metabolites, especially PGD2. Furthermore, sPLA2 contributes to neurodegeneration in the ischemic brain, highlighting the therapeutic potential of sPLA2-IIA inhibitors for stroke.

  2. [The causes of death after acute myocardial infarction (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Puletti, M; Zingales, L D; Borgia, C; La Rosa, A; Curione, M; Pozzar, F; Righetti, G; Jacobellis, G F

    1979-01-01

    Following a brief outline on problems concerning methodology, the cause of death is analysed in 110 patients dying from acute myocardial infarction during hospitalization. Autopsy studied were carried out in 78 cases. Of the various causes, the most frequent were forms of contractile insufficiency (EPA, shock, shock + EPA, biventricular congestive heart failure) which were responsible for 50.90% of cases; followed by cardiac rupture (considered in a single group with electromechanic dissociations of the patients not submitted to autopsy studies since in the experience of the Authors cardiac rupture almost always presents with this pattern) with a frequency of 29%. The frequency of arrhythmias, on the other hand, is very low, particularly in the coronary care unit where it is practically a negligible causa mortis 2.72%): even if sudden death, in patients who were not monitored, is included amongst the arrhythmias, the percentage is still only about 10%. Embolism (usually pulmonary, but systemic in one case) was the cause of death in 5 patients (4.54%). Three patients over 80 years of age died from ischemic cerebral episodes. Age, sex, and site of infarction, do not appear, in the present series, to have a determinant effect in the cause of death; a higher frequency of rupture in the female sex was not, for example, confirmed. On the basis of the observations in the present series, any relationship between cardiac rupture and anticoagulating therapy, steroid treatment, application of endocavitary stimulators, or early ambulation is excluded. It is also excluded that reanimation, as hypothesized by some Authors, may be responsible for rupture.

  3. Toxic Neuronal Death by Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrongenase and Mitochondria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and after a number of forms of toxic exposure. If unique elements in the signaling pathways for the PD or toxic apoptosis can be identified and their apoptosis signaling impeded, neuronal loss may be slowed or reduced in the conditions. The research proposed in this grant was designed to examine the role of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in apoptotic neuronal signaling. Recent studies in postmortem brain have implicated GAPDH apoptosis signaling in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Propargylamines, with

  4. Casein Kinase 1 Suppresses Activation of REST in Insulted Hippocampal Neurons and Halts Ischemia-Induced Neuronal Death

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Naoki; Hwang, Jee-Yeon; Gertner, Michael; Pontarelli, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Repressor Element-1 (RE1) Silencing Transcription Factor/Neuron-Restrictive Silencer Factor (REST/NRSF) is a gene-silencing factor that is widely expressed during embryogenesis and plays a strategic role in neuronal differentiation. Recent studies indicate that REST can be activated in differentiated neurons during a critical window of time in postnatal development and in adult neurons in response to neuronal insults such as seizures and ischemia. However, the mechanism by which REST is regulated in neurons is as yet unknown. Here, we show that REST is controlled at the level of protein stability via β-TrCP-dependent, ubiquitin-based proteasomal degradation in differentiated neurons under physiological conditions and identify Casein Kinase 1 (CK1) as an upstream effector that bidirectionally regulates REST cellular abundance. CK1 associates with and phosphorylates REST at two neighboring, but distinct, motifs within the C terminus of REST critical for binding of β-TrCP and targeting of REST for proteasomal degradation. We further show that global ischemia in rats in vivo triggers a decrease in CK1 and an increase in REST in selectively vulnerable hippocampal CA1 neurons. Administration of the CK1 activator pyrvinium pamoate by in vivo injection immediately after ischemia restores CK1 activity, suppresses REST expression, and rescues neurons destined to die. Our results identify a novel and previously unappreciated role for CK1 as a brake on REST stability and abundance in adult neurons and reveal that loss of CK1 is causally related to ischemia-induced neuronal death. These findings point to CK1 as a potential therapeutic target for the amelioration of hippocampal injury and cognitive deficits associated with global ischemia. PMID:24760862

  5. Inhibition of telomerase causes vulnerability to endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Toru; Nakatsu, Kanako; Shimamoto, Akira; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2016-08-26

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in several diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we investigated the possible involvement of telomerase in ER stress-induced cell death. ER stress-induced cell death was ameliorated in telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) over-expressing MCF7 cells (MCF7-TERT cell). Telomerase specific inhibitor, BIBR1532, reversed the inhibitory effect of TERT on ER stress-induced cell death in MCF7-TERT cells. These findings suggest that BIBR1532 may specifically inhibit telomerase activity, thereby inducing cell death in ER stress-exposed cells. TERT was expressed in the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. To analyze the possible involvement of telomerase in ER stress-induced neuronal cell death, we treated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with BIBR1532 and analyzed ER stress-induced cell death. We found that BIBR1532 significantly enhanced the ER stress-induced neuronal cell death. These findings suggest that inhibition of telomerase activity may enhance vulnerability to neuronal cell death caused by ER stress.

  6. Early immature neuronal death initiates cerebral ischemia-induced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Kim, D H; Lee, H E; Kwon, K J; Park, S J; Heo, H; Lee, Y; Choi, J W; Shin, C Y; Ryu, J H

    2015-01-22

    Throughout adulthood, neurons are continuously replaced by new cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, and this neurogenesis is increased by various neuronal injuries including ischemic stroke and seizure. While several mechanisms of this injury-induced neurogenesis have been elucidated, the initiation factor remains unclear. Here, we investigated which signal(s) trigger(s) ischemia-induced cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG region. We found that early apoptotic cell death of the immature neurons occurred in the DG region following transient forebrain ischemia/reperfusion in mice. Moreover, early immature neuronal death in the DG initiated transient forebrain ischemia/reperfusion-induced neurogenesis through glycogen synthase kinase-3β/β-catenin signaling, which was mediated by microglia-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Additionally, we observed that the blockade of immature neuronal cell death, early microglial activation, or IGF-1 signaling attenuated ischemia-induced neurogenesis. These results suggest that early immature neuronal cell death initiates ischemia-induced neurogenesis through microglial IGF-1 in mice.

  7. Is neuronal death required for seizure-induced epileptogenesis in the immature brain?

    PubMed Central

    Baram, Tallie Z.; Eghbal-Ahmadi, Mariam; Bender, Roland A.

    2011-01-01

    Do seizures cause neuronal death? At least in the immature hippocampus, this may not be the critical question for determining the mechanisms of epileptogenesis. Neuronal injury and death have clearly been shown to occur in most epilepsy models in the mature brain, and are widely considered a prerequisite to seizure-induced epilepsy. In contrast, little neuronal death occurs after even a severe and prolonged seizure prior to the third postnatal week. However, seizures early in life, for example prolonged experimental febrile seizures, can profoundly and permanently change the hippocampal circuit in a pro-epileptogenic direction. These seizure-induced alterations of limbic excitability may require transient structural injury, but are mainly due to functional changes in expression of gene coding for specific receptors and channels, leading to altered functional properties of hippocampal neurons. Thus, in some pro-epileptogenic models in the developing brain, neither the death of neurons nor death-induced abnormalities of surviving neurons may underlie the formation of an epileptic circuit. Rather, findings in the experimental prolonged febrile seizure model suggest that persistent functional alterations of gene expression (‘neuroplasticity’) in diverse hippocampal neuronal populations may promote pro-epileptogenic processes induced by these seizures. These findings also suggest that during development, relatively short, intense bursts of neuronal activity may disrupt ‘normal’ programmed maturational processes to result in permanent, selective alterations of gene expression, with profound functional consequences. Therefore, determining the cascade of changes in the programmed expression of pertinent genes, including their temporal and cell-specific spatial profiles, may provide important information for understanding the process of transformation of an evolving, maturing hippocampal network into one which is hyperexcitable. PMID:12143355

  8. Fibrinogen nitrotyrosination after ischemic stroke impairs thrombolysis and promotes neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Ill-Raga, Gerard; Palomer, Ernest; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Guix, Francesc X; Bosch-Morató, Mònica; Guivernau, Biuse; Tajes, Marta; Valls-Comamala, Victòria; Jiménez-Conde, Jordi; Ois, Angel; Pérez-Asensio, Fernando; Reyes-Navarro, Mario; Caballo, Carolina; Gil-Gómez, Gabriel; Lopez-Vilchez, Irene; Galan, Ana M; Alameda, Francesc; Escolar, Gines; Opazo, Carlos; Planas, Anna M; Roquer, Jaume; Valverde, Miguel A; Muñoz, Francisco J

    2015-03-01

    Ischemic stroke is an acute vascular event that compromises neuronal viability, and identification of the pathophysiological mechanisms is critical for its correct management. Ischemia produces increased nitric oxide synthesis to recover blood flow but also induces a free radical burst. Nitric oxide and superoxide anion react to generate peroxynitrite that nitrates tyrosines. We found that fibrinogen nitrotyrosination was detected in plasma after the initiation of ischemic stroke in human patients. Electron microscopy and protein intrinsic fluorescence showed that in vitro nitrotyrosination of fibrinogen affected its structure. Thromboelastography showed that initially fibrinogen nitrotyrosination retarded clot formation but later made the clot more resistant to fibrinolysis. This result was independent of any effect on thrombin production. Immunofluorescence analysis of affected human brain areas also showed that both fibrinogen and nitrotyrosinated fibrinogen spread into the brain parenchyma after ischemic stroke. Therefore, we assayed the toxicity of fibrinogen and nitrotyrosinated fibrinogen in a human neuroblastoma cell line. For that purpose we measured the activity of caspase-3, a key enzyme in the apoptotic pathway, and cell survival. We found that nitrotyrosinated fibrinogen induced higher activation of caspase 3. Accordingly, cell survival assays showed a more neurotoxic effect of nitrotyrosinated fibrinogen at all concentrations tested. In summary, nitrotyrosinated fibrinogen would be of pathophysiological interest in ischemic stroke due to both its impact on hemostasis - it impairs thrombolysis, the main target in stroke treatments - and its neurotoxicity that would contribute to the death of the brain tissue surrounding the infarcted area.

  9. Nonapoptotic cell death in acute kidney injury and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute tubular necrosis causes a loss of renal function, which clinically presents as acute kidney failure (AKI). The biochemical signaling pathways that trigger necrosis have been investigated in detail over the past 5 years. It is now clear that necrosis (regulated necrosis, RN) represents a genetically driven process that contributes to the pathophysiology of AKI. RN pathways such as necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-induced regulated necrosis (MPT-RN) may be mechanistically distinct, and the relative contributions to overall organ damage during AKI in living organisms largely remain elusive. In a synchronized manner, some necrotic programs induce the breakdown of tubular segments and multicellular functional units, whereas others are limited to killing single cells in the tubular compartment. Importantly, the means by which a renal cell dies may have implications for the subsequent inflammatory response. In this review, the recent advances in the field of renal cell death in AKI and key enzymes that might serve as novel therapeutic targets will be discussed. As a consequence of the interference with RN, the immunogenicity of dying cells in AKI in renal transplants will be diminished, rendering inhibitors of RN indirect immunosuppressive agents.

  10. Neuronal death or dismemberment mediated by Sox14

    PubMed Central

    Osterloh, Jeannette M; Freeman, Marc R

    2016-01-01

    The pruning of unneeded axons and dendrites is crucial for circuitry maturation, but poorly understood on the molecular level. During Drosophila metamorphosis, the transcription factor Sox14 acts as a context-dependent mediator of death, axonal or dendritic pruning. Its transcriptional target Mical acts specifically in dendrite pruning. PMID:19935724

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-regulated CXCR3 pathway mediates inflammation and neuronal injury in acute glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Ha, Y; Liu, H; Xu, Z; Yokota, H; Narayanan, S P; Lemtalsi, T; Smith, S B; Caldwell, R W; Caldwell, R B; Zhang, W

    2015-10-08

    Acute glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in East Asia. The mechanisms underlying retinal neuronal injury induced by a sudden rise in intraocular pressure (IOP) remain obscure. Here we demonstrate that the activation of CXCL10/CXCR3 axis, which mediates the recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells, has a critical role in a mouse model of acute glaucoma. The mRNA and protein expression levels of CXCL10 and CXCR3 were significantly increased after IOP-induced retinal ischemia. Blockade of the CXCR3 pathway by deleting CXCR3 gene significantly attenuated ischemic injury-induced upregulation of inflammatory molecules (interleukin-1β and E-selectin), inhibited the recruitment of microglia/monocyte to the superficial retina, reduced peroxynitrite formation, and prevented the loss of neurons within the ganglion cell layer. In contrast, intravitreal delivery of CXCL10 increased leukocyte recruitment and retinal cell apoptosis. Inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with chemical chaperones partially blocked ischemic injury-induced CXCL10 upregulation, whereas induction of ER stress with tunicamycin enhanced CXCL10 expression in retina and primary retinal ganglion cells. Interestingly, deleting CXCR3 attenuated ER stress-induced retinal cell death. In conclusion, these results indicate that ER stress-medicated activation of CXCL10/CXCR3 pathway has an important role in retinal inflammation and neuronal injury after high IOP-induced ischemia.

  12. Protein Kinase Pathways That Regulate Neuronal Survival and Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK) in- hnMF sfrs E2 n E2,aemrel ncreased in parallel with enhanced expression of the GABAA hibitor KN93 to...purified by cesium chloride gra- neurons were placed in conditioned medium and the medium was dient ultracentrifugation. The viral titer was determined...membrane de- rifled by cesium chloride gradient ultracentrifugation. The viral titer polarization) and serum for their survival in vitro (20, 21, 24

  13. Redox Regulation of Intracellular Zinc: Molecular Signaling in the Life and Death of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aizenman, Elias

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Zn2+ has emerged as a major regulator of neuronal physiology, as well as an important signaling agent in neural injury. The intracellular concentration of this metal is tightly regulated through the actions of Zn2+ transporters and the thiol-rich metal binding protein metallothionein, closely linking the redox status of the cell to cellular availability of Zn2+. Accordingly, oxidative and nitrosative stress during ischemic injury leads to an accumulation of neuronal free Zn2+ and the activation of several downstream cell death processes. While this Zn2+ rise is an established signaling event in neuronal cell death, recent evidence suggests that a transient, sublethal accumulation of free Zn2+ can also play a critical role in neuroprotective pathways activated during ischemic preconditioning. Thus, redox-sensitive proteins, like metallothioneins, may play a critical role in determining neuronal cell fate by regulating the localization and concentration of intracellular free Zn2+. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 2249–2263. PMID:20849376

  14. New aspects of 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol in modulating neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Noriko; Urano, Yasuomi; Takabe, Wakako; Saito, Yoshiro

    2015-10-01

    24(S)-Hydroxycholesterol (24S-OHC), which is enzymatically produced in the brain, has been known to play an important role in maintaining cholesterol homeostasis in the brain and has been proposed as a possible biomarker of neurodegenerative disease. Recent studies have revealed diverse functions of 24S-OHC and gained increased attention. For example, 24S-OHC at sublethal concentrations has been found to induce an adaptive response via activation of the liver X receptor signaling pathway, thereby protecting neuronal cells against subsequent oxidative stress. It has also been found that physiological concentrations of 24S-OHC suppress amyloid-β production via downregulation of amyloid precursor protein trafficking in neuronal cells. On the other hand, high concentrations of 24S-OHC have been found to induce a type of nonapoptotic programmed cell death in neuronal cells expressing little caspase-8. Because neuronal cell death induced by 24S-OHC has been found to proceed by a unique mechanism, which is different from but in some ways similar to necroptosis-necroptosis being a type of programmed necrosis induced by tumor necrosis factor α-neuronal cell death induced by 24S-OHC has been called "necroptosis-like" cell death. 24S-OHC-induced cell death is dependent on the formation of 24S-OHC esters but not on oxidative stress. This review article discusses newly reported aspects of 24S-OHC in neuronal cell death and sheds light on the possible importance of controlling 24S-OHC levels in the brain for preventing neurodegenerative disease.

  15. Acute ethanol suppresses glutamatergic neurotransmission through endocannabinoids in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Basavarajappa, Balapal S; Ninan, Ipe; Arancio, Ottavio

    2008-11-01

    Ethanol exposure during fetal development is a leading cause of long-term cognitive impairments. Studies suggest that ethanol exposure have deleterious effects on the hippocampus, a brain region that is important for learning and memory. Ethanol exerts its effects, in part, via alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission, which is critical for the maturation of neuronal circuits during development. The current literature strongly supports the growing evidence that ethanol inhibits glutamate release in the neonatal CA1 hippocampal region. However, the exact molecular mechanism responsible for this effect is not well understood. In this study, we show that ethanol enhances endocannabinoid (EC) levels in cultured hippocampal neurons, possibly through calcium pathways. Acute ethanol depresses miniature post-synaptic current (mEPSC) frequencies without affecting their amplitude. This suggests that ethanol inhibits glutamate release. The CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) present on pre-synaptic neurons are not altered by acute ethanol. The CB1R antagonist SR 141716A reverses ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. Drugs that are known to enhance the in vivo function of ECs occlude ethanol effects on mEPSC frequency. Chelation of post-synaptic calcium by EGTA antagonizes ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. The activation of CB1R with the selective agonist WIN55,212-2 also suppresses the mEPSC frequency. This WIN55,212-2 effect is similar to the ethanol effects and is reversed by SR141716A. In addition, tetani-induced excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) are depressed by acute ethanol. SR141716A significantly reverses ethanol effects on evoked EPSC amplitude in a dual recording preparation. These observations, taken together, suggest the participation of ECs as retrograde messengers in the ethanol-induced depression of synaptic activities.

  16. The effects of NAD+ on apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial biogenesis and function after glutamate excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowan; Li, Hailong; Ding, Shinghua

    2014-11-07

    NAD+ is an essential co-enzyme for cellular energy metabolism and is also involved as a substrate for many cellular enzymatic reactions. It has been shown that NAD+ has a beneficial effect on neuronal survival and brain injury in in vitro and in vivo ischemic models. However, the effect of NAD+ on mitochondrial biogenesis and function in ischemia has not been well investigated. In the present study, we used an in vitro glutamate excitotoxicity model of primary cultured cortical neurons to study the effect of NAD+ on apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Our results show that supplementation of NAD+ could effectively reduce apoptotic neuronal death, and apoptotic inducing factor translocation after neurons were challenged with excitotoxic glutamate stimulation. Using different approaches including confocal imaging, mitochondrial DNA measurement and Western blot analysis of PGC-1 and NRF-1, we also found that NAD+ could significantly attenuate glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and the impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, NAD+ treatment effectively inhibited mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and NADH redistribution after excitotoxic glutamate stimulation. Taken together, our results demonstrated that NAD+ is capable of inhibiting apoptotic neuronal death after glutamate excitotoxicity via preserving mitochondrial biogenesis and integrity. Our findings provide insights into potential neuroprotective strategies in ischemic stroke.

  17. Simultaneous activation of mitophagy and autophagy by staurosporine protects against dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ji-Young; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Seo-Eun; Son, Jin H

    2014-02-21

    Abnormal autophagy is frequently observed during dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, it is not yet firmly established whether active autophagy is beneficial or pathogenic with respect to dopaminergic cell loss. Staurosporine, a common inducer of apoptosis, is often used in mechanistic studies of dopaminergic cell death. Here we report that staurosporine activates both autophagy and mitophagy simultaneously during dopaminergic neuronal cell death, and evaluate the physiological significance of these processes during cell death. First, staurosporine treatment resulted in induction of autophagy in more than 75% of apoptotic cells. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin A1 decreased significantly cell viability. In addition, staurosporine treatment resulted in activation of the PINK1-Parkin mitophagy pathway, of which deficit underlies some familial cases of PD, in the dopaminergic neuronal cell line, SN4741. The genetic blockade of this pathway by PINK1 null mutation also dramatically increased staurosporine-induced cell death. Taken together, our data suggest that staurosporine induces both mitophagy and autophagy, and that these pathways exert a significant neuroprotective effect, rather than a contribution to autophagic cell death. This model system may therefore be useful for elucidating the mechanisms underlying crosstalk between autophagy, mitophagy, and cell death in dopaminergic neurons.

  18. Cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) adversely effects on pilocarpine seizure-induced hippocampal neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Dong Won; Choi, Bo Young; Sohn, Min; Lee, Song Hee; Choi, Hui Chul; Song, Hong Ki; Suh, Sang Won

    2015-01-21

    Citicoline (CDP-choline; cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine) is an important intermediate in the biosynthesis of cell membrane phospholipids. Citicoline serves as a choline donor in the biosynthetic pathways of acetylcholine and neuronal membrane phospholipids, mainly phosphatidylcholine. The ability of citicoline to reverse neuronal injury has been tested in animal models of cerebral ischemia and clinical trials have been performed in stroke patients. However, no studies have examined the effect of citicoline on seizure-induced neuronal death. To clarify the potential therapeutic effects of citicoline on seizure-induced neuronal death, we used an animal model of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) was induced by intraperitoneal injection of pilocarpine (25mg/kg) in adult male rats. Citicoline (100 or 300 mg/kg) was injected into the intraperitoneal space two hours after seizure onset and a second injection was performed 24h after the seizure. Citicoline was injected once per day for one week after pilocarpine- or kainate-induced seizure. Neuronal injury and microglial activation were evaluated at 1 week post-seizure. Surprisingly, rather than offering protection, citicoline treatment actually enhanced seizure-induced neuronal death and microglial activation in the hippocampus compared to vehicle treated controls. Citicoline administration after seizure-induction increased immunoglobulin leakage via BBB disruption in the hippocampus compared with the vehicle-only group. To clarify if this adverse effect of citicoline is generalizable across alternative seizure models, we induced seizure by kainate injection (10mg/kg, i.p.) and then injected citicoline as in pilocarpine-induced seizure. We found that citicoline did not modulate kainate seizure-induced neuronal death, BBB disruption or microglial activation. These results suggest that citicoline may not have neuroprotective effects after seizure and that clinical application of citicoline after

  19. Ectopic cell cycle proteins predict the sites of neuronal cell death in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Busser, J; Geldmacher, D S; Herrup, K

    1998-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a major dementing illness characterized by regional concentrations of senile plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and extensive neuronal cell death. Although cell and synaptic loss is most directly linked to the severity of symptoms, the mechanisms leading to the neuronal death remain unclear. Based on evidence linking neuronal death during development to unexpected reappearance of cell cycle events, we investigated the brains of 12 neuropathologically verified cases of Alzheimer's disease and eight age-matched, disease-free controls for the presence of cell cycle proteins. Aberrant expression of cyclin D, cdk4, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and cyclin B1 were identified in the hippocampus, subiculum, locus coeruleus, and dorsal raphe nuclei, but not inferotemporal cortex or cerebellum of AD cases. With only one exception, control subjects showed no significant expression of cell cycle markers in any of the six regions. We propose that disregulation of various components of the cell cycle is a significant contributor to regionally specific neuronal death in AD.

  20. Prevention of delayed neuronal death in gerbil hippocampus by a novel vinca alkaloid derivative (vinconate).

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Kogure, K

    1989-08-01

    We investigated the effect of vinconate, a novel vinca alkaloid derivative, on delayed neuronal death using Mongolian gerbils. The animals were allowed to survive for 7 d after 3 or 5 min of forebrain ischemia induced by bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries. Morphological changes and calcium (45Ca) accumulation were evaluated in the CA1 sector of the hippocampus after ischemia. Vinconate (50, 100, and 300 mg/kg) showed protective effects against neuronal death in a dose-dependent manner when administered intraperitoneally (ip) 10 min before 5 min of ischemia. However, the administration of vinconate (100 and 300 mg/kg, ip) immediately after 5 min of ischemia showed no therapeutic effect, whereas a marked therapeutic effect of vinconate (50 and 100 mg/kg, ip) was observed when administered immediately after 3 min of ischemia. An anesthetic dose of pentobarbital (40 mg/kg, ip) also produced significant protection against neuronal death. Furthermore, a 45Ca autoradiographic study indicated that a marked calcium accumulation was found in the Ca1 sector at 7 d after 5 min of ischemia, which was consistent with the extent of histological neuronal damage. When vinconate (100 and 300 mg/kg, ip) was administered 10 min before 5 min of ischemia, the abnormal calcium accumulation was not detected in the CA1 sector. These data indicate that suppression of abnormal neuronal activity may be owing to the antagonistic action of vinconate on calcium accumulation.

  1. Expression level of P2X7 receptor is a determinant of ATP-induced death of mouse cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, A; Keno, Y; Marumiya, A; Sudo, Y; Uda, Y; Matsuda, K; Morita, Y; Furuta, T; Nishida, K; Nagasawa, K

    2016-04-05

    Activation of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), a purinergic receptor, expressed by neurons is well-known to induce their death, but whether or not their sensitivity to ATP depends on its expression levels remains unclear. Here, we examined the effect of the expression level of P2X7Rs on cell viability using pure neuron cultures, co-cultures with astrocytes derived from SJL- and ddY-strain mice, and mouse P2X7R-expressing HEK293T cell systems. Treatment of pure neuron cultures with 5mM ATP for 2h, followed by 3-h incubation in fresh medium, resulted in death of both types of neurons, and their death was prevented by administration of P2X7R-specific antagonists. In both SJL- and ddY-neurons, ATP-induced neuronal death was inhibited by a mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitor cyclosporine A, mitochondrial dysfunction being involved in their death. The ATP-induced neuronal death was greater for SJL-neurons than for ddY-ones, this being correlated with the expression level of P2X7R in them, and the same results were obtained for the HEK293T cell systems. Co-culture of neurons with astrocytes increased the ATP-induced neuronal death compared to the case of pure neuron cultures. Overall, we reveal that neuronal vulnerability to ATP depends on the expression level of P2X7R, and co-existence of astrocytes exacerbates ATP-induced neuronal death.

  2. Methamphetamine-induced neuronal apoptosis involves the activation of multiple death pathways. Review.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean Lud; Jayanthi, Subramaniam; Deng, Xiaolin

    2005-11-01

    The abuse of the illicit drug methamphetamine (METH) is a major concern because it can cause terminal degeneration and neuronal cell death in the brain. METH-induced cell death occurs via processes that resemble apoptosis. In the present review, we discuss the role of various apoptotic events in the causation of METH-induced neuronal apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Studies using comprehensive approaches to gene expression profiling have allowed for the identification of several genes that are up-regulated or down-regulated after an apoptosis-inducing dose of the drug. Further experiments have also documented the fact that the drug can cause demise of striatal enkephalinergic neurons by cross-talks between mitochondria-, endoplasmic reticulum- and receptor-mediated apoptotic events. These neuropathological observations have also been reported in models of drug-induced neuroplastic alterations used to mimic drug addiction (Nestler, 2001).

  3. DJ-1 mediates paraquat-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyun Joo; Heo, Jun Young; Shim, Jung Hee; Park, Ji Hoon; Seo, Kang Sik; Ryu, Min Jeong; Han, Jeong Su; Shong, Minho; Son, Jin H; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2011-04-25

    There are two causes of Parkinson's disease (PD): environmental insults and genetic mutations of PD-associated genes. Environmental insults and genetic mutations lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, and a combination of mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress in dopaminergic neurons is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of PD. Among the PD-associated genes, DJ-1 acts as a redox sensor for oxidative stress and has been also proposed to maintain mitochondrial complex I activity. To understand molecular functions of DJ-1 in the cell, we have generated DJ-1 null cells from the DJ-1(-/-) mouse embryos. Using these null cells, we investigated the susceptibility to an environmental toxin, paraquat, which is known to inhibit mitochondrial complex I. Interestingly, we found that DJ-1 null cells showed a resistance to paraquat-induced apoptosis, including reduced poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and procaspase-3. Also DJ-1 null cells generated less superoxide than SN4741 cells by paraquat treatment. Consistent with the reduced paraquat sensitivity, DJ-1 null cells showed reduced complex I activity, which was partially rescued by ectopic DJ-I expression. In summary, our results suggest that DJ-1 is critical to maintain mitochondrial complex I and complex I could be a key target in interaction of paraquat toxicity and DJ-1 for giving rise to PD.

  4. Delayed neuronal death in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons after forebrain ischemia in hyperglycemic gerbils: amelioration by indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Kondo, F; Kondo, Y; Makino, H; Ogawa, N

    2000-01-17

    Hyperglycemia worsens ischemic-induced neuronal damage. Many reports argue the delayed neuronal cell death (DND) after forebrain ischemia in gerbils is due to apoptosis. We examined the effects of hyperglycemia and indomethacin on DND after forebrain ischemia in gerbils. Complete occlusion of both common carotid arteries was performed for 3.5 min followed by declamping and reperfusion. Blood glucose levels were maintained at 25-30 mmol/1 for 24 h after reperfusion in the hyperglycemic groups. We examined morphological changes consistent with DND using Nissel-stained sections and DNA fragmentation using TUNEL staining, at 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, 108, 120 h, and 7 days after reperfusion. DND was noted 96-120 h after ischemia in normoglycemic group. Hyperglycemia enhanced the development of DND at an earlier stage (48-84 h after ischemia). TUNEL positive neurons were detected 72-108 h after reperfusion in normoglycemic group, but very few TUNEL positive neurons were detected in hyperglycemic group at 36-48 h. Indomethacin reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells in normoglycemia and completely inhibited the appearance of TUNEL-positive cells under hyperglycemia. The number of viable neurons at 7 days after ischemia was markedly higher in indomethacin-treated groups than vehicle-treated group. Our results indicate that hyperglycemia worsens DND after forebrain ischemia in gerbils but such process is not associated with DNA fragmentation. Our results also showed that indomethacin provides a neuroprotective effect in normo- and hyperglycemic conditions.

  5. NMDAR-Mediated Hippocampal Neuronal Death is Exacerbated by Activities of ASIC1a

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Su; Yu, Yang; Ma, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Hui; Zhang, Yong-Li; Wang, Xing-Tao; Wang, Chaoyun; Fan, Wei-Ming; Zheng, Qing-Yin

    2015-01-01

    NMDARs and ASIC1a both exist in central synapses and mediate important physiological and pathological conditions, but the functional relationship between them is unclear. Here we report several novel findings that may shed light on the functional relationship between these two ion channels in the excitatory postsynaptic membrane of mouse hippocampus. Firstly, NMDAR activation induced by either NMDA or OGD led to increased [Ca2+]i and greater apoptotic and necrotic cell deaths in cultured hippocampal neurons; these cell deaths were prevented by application of NMDAR antagonists. Secondly, ASIC1a activation induced by pH 6.0 extracellular solution (ECS) showed similar increases in apoptotic and necrotic cell deaths; these cell deaths were prevented by ASIC1a antagonists, and also by NMDAR antagonists. Since increased [Ca2+]i leads to increased cell deaths and since NMDAR exhibits much greater calcium permeability than ASIC1a, these data suggest that ASIC1a-induced neuronal death is mediated through activation of NMDARs. Thirdly, treatment of hippocampal cultures with both NMDA and acidic ECS induced greater degrees of cell deaths than either NMDA or acidic ECS treatment alone. These results suggest that ASIC1a activation up-regulates NMDAR function. Additional data supporting the functional relationship between ASIC1a and NMDAR are found in our electrophysiology experiments in hippocampal slices, where stimulation of ASIC1a induced a marked increase in NMDAR EPSC amplitude, and inhibition of ASIC1a resulted in a decrease in NMDAR EPSC amplitude. In summary, we present evidence that ASIC1a activity facilitates NMDAR function and exacerbates NMDAR-mediated neuronal death in pathological conditions. These findings are invaluable to the search for novel therapeutic targets in the treatment of brain ischemia. PMID:25947342

  6. Leptomeningeal neurons are a common finding in infants and are increased in sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Christian H; Gros, Oliver; Nolte, Kay W; Vennemann, Mechtild; Bajanowski, Thomas; Brinkmann, Bernd

    2009-03-01

    Developmental abnormalities of the brain, in particular, the brainstem potentially affecting centers for breathing, circulation and sleep regulation, are thought to be involved in the etiology of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). In order to investigate whether leptomeningeal neurons could serve as morphological indicators for a developmental failure or retardation in cerebral maturation, we evaluated the density of isolated leptomeningeal neurons (without associated glia) in 15 brain regions of 24 SIDS and 8 control cases, representing part of the German Study on sudden infant death. Leptomeningeal neurons were encountered in 79% of SIDS and 68% of control cases. More leptomeningeal neurons in SIDS versus control cases were found in lower pons (p = 0.002), upper pons (p = 0.016), cerebellar hemispheres (p = 0.012), lower medulla oblongata (p = 0.039), and temporal lobe (p = 0.041). Summarizing the data according to gross anatomical region of origin (i.e., brainstem, cerebellum or cerebrum), higher numbers of leptomeningeal neurons in SIDS cases were only found in the brainstem (p = 0.006 vs. 0.13 and 0.19, respectively). Our data show that single leptomeningeal neurons are present in most normal infantile brains. The age-dependent increase of leptomeningeal neurons among SIDS cases may either (a) represent a delayed maturation or retardation, i.e., a later or slower reduction of neurons or a delayed peak in occurrence (shift toward an older age), or (b) may be interpreted as a generally increased occurrence of leptomeningeal neurons among SIDS cases as a result of a diffuse developmental abnormality during central nervous system maturation.

  7. End-of-life and brain death in acute coma and disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Greer, David M; Curiale, Gioacchino G

    2013-04-01

    Consulting neurologists are often asked to evaluate patients in acute nontraumatic coma. The authors review prognostication of functional outcomes, determining brain death, and managing end-of-life care. Prognostication of outcome after cardiac arrest in comatose patients is a frequently encountered scenario with high-stakes implications. However, current guidelines are limited by a failure to address the use of therapeutic hypothermia and thus may lead to overly pessimistic outcome prediction. Pupillary light responses and corneal reflexes remain highly predictive clinical signs of a poor prognosis. Motor responses have a high false-positive rate for predicting a poor outcome, especially in patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Ancillary testing with electroencephalography, somatosensory evoked potentials, serum neuron-specific enolase, and neuroimaging is often useful in predicting outcomes. Brain death is a clinical condition of irreversible coma of known cause with absent brainstem reflexes and apnea. An understanding of the value of confirmatory testing and the potential for confounding factors is essential in making a correct diagnosis. As coma carries a high mortality rate, neurologists must be capable of guiding goals of care, discussing end-of-life issues, and understanding organ-procurement procedures.

  8. Mechanism for the Protective Effect of Resveratrol against Oxidative Stress-Induced Neuronal Death

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Masayuki; Choi, Hye Joung; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress can induce cytotoxicity in neurons, which plays an important role in the etiology of neuronal damage and degeneration. The present study seeks to determine the cellular and biochemical mechanisms underlying resveratrol’s protective effect against oxidative neuronal death. The cultured HT22 cells, an immortalized mouse hippocampal neuronal cell line, were used as an in vitro model, and the oxidative stress and neurotoxicity in these neuronal cells were induced by exposure to high concentrations of glutamate. Resveratrol strongly protected HT22 cells from glutamate-induced oxidative cell death. Resveratrol’s neuroprotective effect was independent of its direct radical-scavenging property, but instead was dependent on its ability to selectively induce the expression of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2), and subsequently, reduce mitochondrial oxidative stress and damage. The induction of the mitochondrial SOD2 by resveratrol was mediated through the activation of the PI3K/Akt and GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling pathways. Taken together, the results of this study show that up-regulation of the mitochondrial SOD2 by resveratrol represents an important mechanism for its protection of neuronal cells against oxidative cytotoxicity resulting form mitochondrial oxidative stress. PMID:20542495

  9. The N-terminal Set-β Protein Isoform Induces Neuronal Death.

    PubMed

    Trakhtenberg, Ephraim F; Morkin, Melina I; Patel, Karan H; Fernandez, Stephanie G; Sang, Alan; Shaw, Peter; Liu, Xiongfei; Wang, Yan; Mlacker, Gregory M; Gao, Han; Velmeshev, Dmitry; Dombrowski, Susan M; Vitek, Michael P; Goldberg, Jeffrey L

    2015-05-22

    Set-β protein plays different roles in neurons, but the diversity of Set-β neuronal isoforms and their functions have not been characterized. The expression and subcellular localization of Set-β are altered in Alzheimer disease, cleavage of Set-β leads to neuronal death after stroke, and the full-length Set-β regulates retinal ganglion cell (RGC) and hippocampal neuron axon growth and regeneration in a subcellular localization-dependent manner. Here we used various biochemical approaches to investigate Set-β isoforms and their role in the CNS, using the same type of neurons, RGCs, across studies. We found multiple alternatively spliced isoforms expressed from the Set locus in purified RGCs. Set transcripts containing the Set-β-specific exon were the most highly expressed isoforms. We also identified a novel, alternatively spliced Set-β transcript lacking the nuclear localization signal and demonstrated that the full-length (∼39-kDa) Set-β is localized predominantly in the nucleus, whereas a shorter (∼25-kDa) Set-β isoform is localized predominantly in the cytoplasm. Finally, we show that an N-terminal Set-β cleavage product can induce neuronal death.

  10. Intracerebroventricular administration of Shiga toxin type 2 induces striatal neuronal death and glial alterations: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Jorge; Loidl, César Fabián; Creydt, Virginia Pistone; Boccoli, Javier; Ibarra, Cristina

    2007-08-03

    Shiga toxin (Stx) from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (STEC) is the main cause of hemorrhagic colitis which may derive to hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). HUS is characterized by acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia. Mortality in the acute stage has been lower than 5% of total affected argentine children with endemic HUS. Common signs of severe CNS involvement leading to death included seizures, alteration of consciousness, hemiparesis, visual disturbances, and brainstem symptoms. The main purpose of the present work was to study the direct involvement of Stx2 in brain cells by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of Stx2. Immunodetection of Stx2 was confirmed by immunoelectron cytochemistry in different subsets and compartments of affected caudate putamen cells of corpus striatum. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies revealed apoptotic neurons, glial ultrastructural alterations and demyelinated fibers. The i.c.v. microinfusion was applied for the first time in rats to demonstrate the direct action of Stx2 in neurons and glial cells. The toxin may affect brain neuroglial cells without the involvement of proinflammatory or systemic neurotoxic elements.

  11. Pathways to ischemic neuronal cell death: are sex differences relevant?

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Jesse T; McCullough, Louise D

    2008-01-01

    We have known for some time that the epidemiology of human stroke is sexually dimorphic until late in life, well beyond the years of reproductive senescence and menopause. Now, a new concept is emerging: the mechanisms and outcome of cerebral ischemic injury are influenced strongly by biological sex as well as the availability of sex steroids to the brain. The principal mammalian estrogen (17 β estradiol or E2) is neuroprotective in many types of brain injury and has been the major focus of investigation over the past several decades. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that although hormones are a major contributor to sex-specific outcomes, they do not fully account for sex-specific responses to cerebral ischemia. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent studies in cell culture and animal models that suggest that genetic sex determines experimental stroke outcome and that divergent cell death pathways are activated after an ischemic insult. These sex differences need to be identified if we are to develop efficacious neuroprotective agents for use in stroke patients. PMID:18573200

  12. Microglia activation and cell death in response to diethyl-dithiocarbamate acute administration.

    PubMed

    Zucconi, Gigliola Grassi; Laurenzi, Maria Assunta; Semprevivo, Massimo; Torni, Federica; Lindgren, Jan Ake; Marinucci, Eva

    2002-04-29

    An increasing body of evidence suggests a role for activated microglia in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Hence, it would be useful to have a better understanding of the significance of microglial activation for neuronal damage. Unfortunately, most models of microglial activation use invasive or long-lasting insults, which make it difficult to evaluate the role played by microglia. We have instead developed a model for microglial activation by using brief exposure to the widely available neurotoxin diethyl-dithiocarbamate (DDTC). Despite evidence for the neurotoxic nature of this substance, microglia involvement has not been hitherto investigated. After acute i.p. administration of DDTC at two different doses, microglia were already activated in selected areas of the rat brain (hippocampal dentate gyrus, entorhinal-pyriform cortex and hypothalamus) after 1 hour, reaching a peak at 3-6 hours and subsided within 6-48 hours, depending on the brain region. Microglia activation was associated with interleukin-1 beta immunopositivity between 3 and 6 hours and with up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex class II expression between 24 and 48 hours. No significant changes in astrocyte immunostaining were detected between 6 hours and 6 days. The TUNEL procedure revealed the death of a limited number of cells in the above-mentioned structures that peaked at 6h and then declined rapidly. Cell death was detected in sites with major, minor, or no microglial activation, indicating that these two events can occur concomitantly or independently. The study shows that the administration of DDTC provides a useful model for studying the implications of region-specific reactivity of microglia and its differential interaction with neuronal damage.

  13. Efficacy and kinetics of opioid action on acutely dissociated neurons.

    PubMed

    Ingram, S; Wilding, T J; McCleskey, E W; Williams, J T

    1997-07-01

    Opioids have been shown to cause a potent inhibition of neurons in the locus ceruleus (LC) in vivo in brain slices and isolated neurons; however, the kinetics of opioid action have not been described. In this study, we used acutely isolated LC neurons to examine opioid and alpha2-adrenoceptor action on potassium and calcium currents. [Met]Enkephalin (ME), [D-Ser2,Leu5,Thr6]-enkephalin, etorphine, and [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]enkephalin increased potassium conductance, whereas morphine and naloxone were antagonists. The time constant of potassium channel activation was approximately 0.7 sec and was the same for each agonist. The amplitude of the current and the time constant of decay were dependent on the agonist, suggesting that agonist efficacy and affinity, respectively, determined these parameters. The amplitude of potassium current induced by the alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist UK14304 was not significantly different from that induced by ME, but the time constant of current activation was half that of ME, and the decline was more rapid. When potassium conductances were blocked with the combination of internal cesium and external barium, opioid and alpha2 agonists had no effect at potentials more negative than -50 mV and decreased barium currents at potentials between -40 and +20 mV. Both morphine and clonidine caused a small inhibition of barium current. In dorsal root ganglion cells, morphine alone had small and inconsistent effects on the calcium current, but it always competitively antagonized the inhibition caused by [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]enkephalin. The results in isolated LC neurons suggest 1) the amplitude and time course of the opioid-induced potassium current depend on agonist efficacy and affinity and 2) the coupling of both mu-opioid and alpha2-adrenoceptors to calcium channels seems to be more efficient than that to potassium channels.

  14. Sudden Death Following Selective Neuronal Lesions in the Rat Nucleus Tractus Solitarii

    PubMed Central

    Talman, William T.; Lin, Li-Hsien

    2013-01-01

    In efforts to assess baroreflex and cardiovascular responses in rats in which substance P (SP) or catecholamine transmission had been eliminated we studied animals after bilateral injections into the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) of SP or stabilized SP (SSP) conjugated to saporin (SP-SAP or SSP-SAP respectively) or SAP conjugated to an antibody to dopamine-β-hydroxylase (anti-DBH-SAP). We found that SP- and SSP-SAP eliminated NTS neurons that expressed the SP neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) while anti-DBH-SAP eliminated NTS neurons expressing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and DBH. The toxins were selective. Thus SP-or SSP-SAP did not eliminate TH/DBH neurons and anti-DBH-SAP did not eliminate NK1R neurons in the NTS. Each toxin, however, led to chronic lability of arterial blood pressure, diminished baroreflex function, cardiac ventricular irritability, coagulation necrosis of cardiac myocytes and, in some animals, sudden death associated with asystole. However, when TH/DBH neurons were targeted and eliminated by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), none of the cardiovascular or cardiac changes occurred. The studies reviewed here reveal that selective lesions of the NTS lead to altered baroreflex control and to cardiac changes that may lead to sudden death. Though the findings could support a role for SP or catecholamines in baroreflex transmission neither is proven in that NK1R colocalizes with glutamate receptors. Thus neurons with both are lost when treated with SP- or SSP-SAP. In addition, loss of catecholamine neurons after treatment with 6-OHDA does not affect cardiovascular control. Thus, the effect of the toxins may depend on an action of SAP independent of the effects of the SAP conjugates on targeted neuronal types. PMID:23245583

  15. Cofilin inhibition restores neuronal cell death in oxygen glucose deprivation model of ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Madineni, Anusha; Alhadidi, Qasim; Shah, Zahoor A.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia is a condition associated with decreased blood supply to the brain, eventually leading to death of neurons. It is associated with a diverse cascade of responses involving both degenerative and regenerative mechanisms. At the cellular level, the changes are initiated prominently in the neuronal cytoskeleton. Cofilin, a cytoskeletal actin severing protein, is known to be involved in the early stages of apoptotic cell death. Evidence supports its intervention in the progression of disease states like Alzheimer's and ischemic kidney disease. In the present study, we have hypothesized the possible involvement of cofilin in ischemia. Using PC12 cells and mouse primary cultures of cortical neurons, we investigated the potential role of cofilin in ischemia in two different in vitro ischemic models: chemical induced oxidative stress and oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R). The expression profile studies demonstrated a decrease in phosphocofilin levels in all models of ischemia, implying stress-induced cofilin activation. Furthermore, calcineurin and slingshot 1L (SSH) phosphatases were found to be the signaling mediators of the cofilin activation. In primary cultures of cortical neurons, cofilin was found to be significantly activated after 1 h of OGD. To delineate the role of activated cofilin in ischemia, we knocked down cofilin by siRNA technique and tested the impact of cofilin silencing on neuronal viability. Cofilin siRNA-treated neurons showed a significant reduction of cofilin levels in all treatment groups (control, OGD and OGD/R). Additionally, cofilin siRNA reduced cofilin mitochondrial translocation and caspase 3 cleavage, with a concomitant increase in neuronal viability. These results strongly support the active role of cofilin in ischemia-induced neuronal degeneration and apoptosis. We believe that targeting this protein mediator has a potential for therapeutic intervention in ischemic brain injury and stroke. PMID:25526862

  16. Cofilin Inhibition Restores Neuronal Cell Death in Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation Model of Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Madineni, Anusha; Alhadidi, Qasim; Shah, Zahoor A

    2016-03-01

    Ischemia is a condition associated with decreased blood supply to the brain, eventually leading to death of neurons. It is associated with a diverse cascade of responses involving both degenerative and regenerative mechanisms. At the cellular level, the changes are initiated prominently in the neuronal cytoskeleton. Cofilin, a cytoskeletal actin severing protein, is known to be involved in the early stages of apoptotic cell death. Evidence supports its intervention in the progression of disease states like Alzheimer's and ischemic kidney disease. In the present study, we have hypothesized the possible involvement of cofilin in ischemia. Using PC12 cells and mouse primary cultures of cortical neurons, we investigated the potential role of cofilin in ischemia in two different in vitro ischemic models: chemical induced oxidative stress and oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R). The expression profile studies demonstrated a decrease in phosphocofilin levels in all models of ischemia, implying stress-induced cofilin activation. Furthermore, calcineurin and slingshot 1L (SSH) phosphatases were found to be the signaling mediators of the cofilin activation. In primary cultures of cortical neurons, cofilin was found to be significantly activated after 1 h of OGD. To delineate the role of activated cofilin in ischemia, we knocked down cofilin by small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique and tested the impact of cofilin silencing on neuronal viability. Cofilin siRNA-treated neurons showed a significant reduction of cofilin levels in all treatment groups (control, OGD, and OGD/R). Additionally, cofilin siRNA-reduced cofilin mitochondrial translocation and caspase 3 cleavage, with a concomitant increase in neuronal viability. These results strongly support the active role of cofilin in ischemia-induced neuronal degeneration and apoptosis. We believe that targeting this protein mediator has a potential for therapeutic intervention in ischemic brain injury and stroke.

  17. Contributions of Bcl-xL to acute and long term changes in bioenergetics during neuronal plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Elizabeth A

    2014-08-01

    Mitochondria manufacture and release metabolites and manage calcium during neuronal activity and synaptic transmission, but whether long term alterations in mitochondrial function contribute to the neuronal plasticity underlying changes in organism behavior patterns is still poorly understood. Although normal neuronal plasticity may determine learning, in contrast a persistent decline in synaptic strength or neuronal excitability may portend neurite retraction and eventual somatic death. Anti-death proteins such as Bcl-xL not only provide neuroprotection at the neuronal soma during cell death stimuli, but also appear to enhance neurotransmitter release and synaptic growth and development. It is proposed that Bcl-xL performs these functions through its ability to regulate mitochondrial release of bioenergetic metabolites and calcium, and through its ability to rapidly alter mitochondrial positioning and morphology. Bcl-xL also interacts with proteins that directly alter synaptic vesicle recycling. Bcl-xL translocates acutely to sub-cellular membranes during neuronal activity to achieve changes in synaptic efficacy. After stressful stimuli, pro-apoptotic cleaved delta N Bcl-xL (ΔN Bcl-xL) induces mitochondrial ion channel activity leading to synaptic depression and this is regulated by caspase activation. During physiological states of decreased synaptic stimulation, loss of mitochondrial Bcl-xL and low level caspase activation occur prior to the onset of long term decline in synaptic efficacy. The degree to which Bcl-xL changes mitochondrial membrane permeability may control the direction of change in synaptic strength. The small molecule Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737 has been useful in defining the role of Bcl-xL in synaptic processes. Bcl-xL is crucial to the normal health of neurons and synapses and its malfunction may contribute to neurodegenerative disease.

  18. Transcriptional repression induces a slowly progressive atypical neuronal death associated with changes of YAP isoforms and p73

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Masataka; Qi, Mei-ling; Yoshimura, Natsue; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Wada, Yo-ichi; Enokido, Yasushi; Marubuchi, Shigeki; Harjes, Phoebe; Arai, Nobutaka; Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu; Blandino, Giovanni; Sudol, Marius; Rich, Tina; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Wanker, Erich E.; Saitoe, Minoru; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    Transcriptional disturbance is implicated in the pathology of polyglutamine diseases, including Huntington's disease (HD). However, it is unknown whether transcriptional repression leads to neuronal death or what forms that death might take. We found transcriptional repression-induced atypical death (TRIAD) of neurons to be distinct from apoptosis, necrosis, or autophagy. The progression of TRIAD was extremely slow in comparison with other types of cell death. Gene expression profiling revealed the reduction of full-length yes-associated protein (YAP), a p73 cofactor to promote apoptosis, as specific to TRIAD. Furthermore, novel neuron-specific YAP isoforms (YAPΔCs) were sustained during TRIAD to suppress neuronal death in a dominant-negative fashion. YAPΔCs and activated p73 were colocalized in the striatal neurons of HD patients and mutant huntingtin (htt) transgenic mice. YAPΔCs also markedly attenuated Htt-induced neuronal death in primary neuron and Drosophila melanogaster models. Collectively, transcriptional repression induces a novel prototype of neuronal death associated with the changes of YAP isoforms and p73, which might be relevant to the HD pathology. PMID:16461361

  19. P2X7 receptor-induced death of motor neurons by a peroxynitrite/FAS-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gandelman, Mandi; Levy, Mark; Cassina, Patricia; Barbeito, Luis; Beckman, Joseph S

    2013-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor/channel responds to extracellular ATP and is associated with neuronal death and neuroinflammation in spinal cord injury and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Whether activation of P2X7 directly causes motor neuron death is unknown. We found that cultured motor neurons isolated from embryonic rat spinal cord express P2X7 and underwent caspase-dependent apoptosis when exposed to exceptionally low concentrations of the P2X7 agonist 3′-O-(4-benzoyl)-ATP (BzATP). The P2X7 inhibitors BBG, oATP and KN-62 prevented BzATP-induced motor neuron death. The endogenous P2X7 agonist ATP induced motor neuron death at low concentrations (1-100 μM). High concentrations of ATP (1 mM) paradoxically became protective due to degradation in the culture media to produce adenosine and activate adenosine receptors. P2X7-induced motor neuron death was dependent on neuronal nitric oxide synthase-mediated production of peroxynitrite, p38 activation and autocrine FAS signaling. Taken together, our results indicate that motor neurons are highly sensitive to P2X7 activation, which triggers apoptosis by activation of the well-established peroxynitrite/FAS death pathway in motor neurons. PMID:23646980

  20. Procaspase-activating compound 1 induces a caspase-3-dependent cell death in cerebellar granule neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Gulzeb; Akselsen, Oyvind W.; Hansen, Trond V.; Paulsen, Ragnhild E.

    2010-09-15

    Procaspase-activating compound 1, PAC-1, has been introduced as a direct activator of procaspase-3 and has been suggested as a therapeutic agent against cancer. Its activation of procaspase-3 is dependent on the chelation of zinc. We have tested PAC-1 and an analogue of PAC-1 as zinc chelators in vitro as well as their ability to activate caspase-3 and induce cell death in chicken cerebellar granule neuron cultures. These neurons are non-dividing, primary cells with normal caspase-3. The results reported herein show that PAC-1 chelates zinc, activates procaspase-3, and leads to caspase-3-dependent cell death in neurons, as the specific caspase-3-inhibitor Ac-DEVD-cmk inhibited both the caspase-3 activity and cell death. Thus, chicken cerebellar granule neurons is a suitable model to study mechanisms of interference with apoptosis of PAC-1 and similar compounds. Furthermore, the present study also raises concern about potential neurotoxicity of PAC-1 if used in cancer therapy.

  1. Extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-induced tau overexpression mediates neuronal death through suppressing survival signaling ERK phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xu-Ying; Tuo, Qing-Zhang; Liuyang, Zhen-Yu; Xie, Ao-Ji; Feng, Xiao-Long; Yan, Xiong; Qiu, Mei; Li, Shen; Wang, Xiu-Lian; Cao, Fu-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Chuan; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of the hyperphosphorylated tau is a pathological hallmark in the brain of Alzheimer disease. Activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors (E-NMDARs) induces excitatory toxicity that is involved in Alzheimer's neurodegeneration. However, the intrinsic link between E-NMDARs and the tau-induced neuronal damage remains elusive. In the present study, we showed in cultured primary cortical neurons that activation of E-NMDA receptors but not synaptic NMDA receptors dramatically increased tau mRNA and protein levels, with a simultaneous neuronal degeneration and decreased neuronal survival. Memantine, a selective antagonist of E-NMDARs, reversed E-NMDARs-induced tau overexpression. Activation of E-NMDARs in wild-type mouse brains resulted in neuron loss in hippocampus, whereas tau deletion in neuronal cultures and in the mouse brains rescued the E-NMDARs-induced neuronal death and degeneration. The E-NMDARs-induced tau overexpression was correlated with a reduced ERK phosphorylation, whereas the increased MEK activity, decreased binding and activity of ERK phosphatase to ERK, and increased ERK phosphorylation were observed in tau knockout mice. On the contrary, addition of tau proteins promoted ERK dephosphorylation in vitro. Taking together, these results indicate that tau overexpression mediates the excitatory toxicity induced by E-NMDAR activation through inhibiting ERK phosphorylation. PMID:27809304

  2. Carbon monoxide-induced delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and change in acetylcholine concentration in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nabeshima, T.; Katoh, A.; Ishimaru, H.; Yoneda, Y.; Ogita, K.; Murase, K.; Ohtsuka, H.; Inari, K.; Fukuta, T.; Kameyama, T. )

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the interrelationship of delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and changes in acetylcholine concentration induced by carbon monoxide (CO)-exposure in mice. In the test for retention of the passive avoidance task, amnesia was observed 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure when the mice were exposed to CO 1 day after training; in the case when the mice were exposed to CO 5 and 7 days before training, amnesia was also observed in a retention test given 1 day after training. The number of pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 subfield was lower than that of the control 3, 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure. But the neurodegeneration in the parietal cortex, area 1, was not observed until 7 days after CO-exposure. The findings indicated that the amnesia and the neuronal death were produced after a delay when the mice were exposed to CO. In addition, the delayed amnesia was closely related to the delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield. Moreover, (3H)glutamate and (3H)glycine binding sites did not change after CO-exposure but, 7 days after CO-exposure, the concentration of acetylcholine and the binding of (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate in the frontal cortex and the striatum were found to have significantly changed, but those in the hippocampus did not show significant change. Therefore, we suggest that delayed amnesia induced by CO-exposure may result from delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield and dysfunction in the acetylcholinergic neurons, in the frontal cortex, the striatum and/or the hippocampus.

  3. Ethanol-induced oxidative stress precedes mitochondrially mediated apoptotic death of cultured fetal cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Vinitha; Watts, Lora Talley; Maffi, Shivani Kaushal; Chen, Juanjuan; Schenker, Steven; Henderson, George

    2003-11-15

    In utero ethanol exposure elicits apoptotic cell death in the fetal brain, and this may be mediated by oxidative stress. Our studies utilize cultured fetal rat cortical neurons and illustrate that ethanol elicits a rapid onset of oxidative stress, which culminates in mitochondrially mediated apoptotic cell death. Cells exposed to ethanol (2.5 mg/ml) remained attached to their polylysine matrix during a 24-hr exposure, but they exhibited distinct signs of oxidative stress, decreased viability, and apoptosis. Confocal microscopy of live cortical neurons pretreated with dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate demonstrated an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) within 5 min of ethanol exposure. The levels of ROS further increased by 58% within 1 hr (P <.05) and by 82% within 2 hr (P <.05), accompanied by increases of mitochondrial 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). These early events were followed by decreased trypan blue exclusion of 10% to 32% (P <.05) at the 6- to 24-hr time points, respectively. This culminates in apoptotic death, with increases of Annexin V binding of 43%, 89%, 123%, and 238%, at 2, 6, 12, and 24 hr of ethanol treatment, respectively, as well as DNA fragmentation increases of 50% and 65% by 12 and 24 hr, respectively. Release of cytochrome c by mitochondria increased by 53% at 6 hr of exposure (P <.05), concomitant with activation of caspase 3 (52% at 12 hr, P <.05). Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine increased cellular glutathione and prevented apoptosis. These studies provide a time line illustrating that oxidative stress and formation of a proapoptotic lipid peroxidation product, HNE, precede a cascade of mitochondrially mediated events in cultured fetal cortical neurons, culminating in apoptotic death. The prevention of apoptosis by augmentation of glutathione stores also strongly supports a role for oxidative stress in ethanol-mediated apoptotic death of fetal cortical neurons.

  4. Cardiac arrest triggers hippocampal neuronal death through autophagic and apoptotic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Derong; Shang, Hanbing; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jiang, Wei; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of neuronal death induced by ischemic injury remains unknown. We investigated whether autophagy and p53 signaling played a role in the apoptosis of hippocampal neurons following global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, in a rat model of 8-min asphyxial cardiac arrest (CA) and resuscitation. Increased autophagosome numbers, expression of lysosomal cathepsin B, cathepsin D, Beclin-1, and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) suggested autophagy in hippocampal cells. The expression of tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53) and its target genes: Bax, p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), and damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM) were upregulated following CA. The p53-specific inhibitor pifithrin-α (PFT-α) significantly reduced the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax and PUMA) and autophagic proteins (LC3-II and DRAM) that generally increase following CA. PFT-α also reduced hippocampal neuronal damage following CA. Similarly, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), which inhibits autophagy and bafilomycin A1 (BFA), which inhibits lysosomes, significantly inhibited hippocampal neuronal damage after CA. These results indicate that CA affects both autophagy and apoptosis, partially mediated by p53. Autophagy plays a significant role in hippocampal neuronal death induced by cerebral I/R following asphyxial-CA. PMID:27273382

  5. Cell Death, Neuronal Plasticity and Functional Loading in the Development of the Central Nervous System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefe, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Research on the precise timing and regulation of neuron production and maturation in the vestibular and visual systems of Wistar rats and several inbred strains of mice (C57B16 and Pallid mutant) concentrated upon establishing a timing baseline for mitotic development of the neurons of the vestibular nuclei and the peripheral vestibular sensory structures (maculae, cristae). This involved studies of the timing and site of neuronal cell birth and preliminary studies of neuronal cell death in both central and peripheral elements of the mammalian vestibular system. Studies on neuronal generation and maturation in the retina were recently added to provide a mechanism for more properly defining the in utero' developmental age of the individual fetal subject and to closely monitor potential transplacental effects of environmentally stressed maternal systems. Information is given on current efforts concentrating upon the (1) perinatal period of development (E18 thru P14) and (2) the role of cell death in response to variation in the functional loading of the vestibular and proprioreceptive systems in developing mammalian organisms.

  6. Cabergoline, dopamine D2 receptor agonist, prevents neuronal cell death under oxidative stress via reducing excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Odaka, Haruki; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Adachi, Naoki; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Nakajima, Shingo; Katanuma, Yusuke; Inoue, Takafumi; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence demonstrate that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. Potent antioxidants may therefore be effective in the treatment of such diseases. Cabergoline, a dopamine D2 receptor agonist and antiparkinson drug, has been studied using several cell types including mesencephalic neurons, and is recognized as a potent radical scavenger. Here, we examined whether cabergoline exerts neuroprotective effects against oxidative stress through a receptor-mediated mechanism in cultured cortical neurons. We found that neuronal death induced by H₂O₂ exposure was inhibited by pretreatment with cabergoline, while this protective effect was eliminated in the presence of a dopamine D2 receptor inhibitor, spiperone. Activation of ERK1/2 by H₂O₂ was suppressed by cabergoline, and an ERK signaling pathway inhibitor, U0126, similarly protected cortical neurons from cell death. This suggested the ERK signaling pathway has a critical role in cabergoline-mediated neuroprotection. Furthermore, increased extracellular levels of glutamate induced by H₂O₂, which might contribute to ERK activation, were reduced by cabergoline, while inhibitors for NMDA receptor or L-type Ca²⁺ channel demonstrated a survival effect against H₂O₂. Interestingly, we found that cabergoline increased expression levels of glutamate transporters such as EAAC1. Taken together, these results suggest that cabergoline has a protective effect on cortical neurons via a receptor-mediated mechanism including repression of ERK1/2 activation and extracellular glutamate accumulation induced by H₂O₂.

  7. Bifunctional apoptosis inhibitor (BAR) protects neurons from diverse cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Roth, W; Kermer, P; Krajewska, M; Welsh, K; Davis, S; Krajewski, S; Reed, J C

    2003-10-01

    The bifunctional apoptosis regulator (BAR) is a multidomain protein that was originally identified as an inhibitor of Bax-induced apoptosis. Immunoblot analysis of normal human tissues demonstrated high BAR expression in the brain, compared to low or absent expression in other organs. Immunohistochemical staining of human adult tissues revealed that the BAR protein is predominantly expressed by neurons in the central nervous system. Immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that BAR localizes mainly to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of cells. Overexpression of BAR in CSM 14.1 neuronal cells resulted in significant protection from a broad range of cell death stimuli, including agents that activate apoptotic pathways involving mitochondria, TNF-family death receptors, and ER stress. Downregulation of BAR by antisense oligonucleotides sensitized neuronal cells to induction of apoptosis. Moreover, the search for novel interaction partners of BAR identified several candidate proteins that might contribute to the regulation of neuronal apoptosis (HIP1, Hippi, and Bap31). Taken together, the expression pattern and functional data suggest that the BAR protein is involved in the regulation of neuronal survival.

  8. A histopathological study of premature and mature infants with pontosubicular neuron necrosis: neuronal cell death in perinatal brain damage.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Yuji; Takashima, Sachio; Itoh, Masayuki

    2006-06-20

    Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage is a major cause of neuronal and behavior deficits, in which the onset of injury can be before, at or after birth, and the effects may be delayed. Pontosubicular neuron necrosis (PSN) is one of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and its pathological peculiarity is neuronal apoptosis. In this study, we investigated whether apoptotic cascade of PSN used a caspase-pathway or not, and whether hypoglycemia activated apoptosis or not. Sections of the pons of PSN with and without hypoglycemia were stained using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling (TUNEL) and immunohistochemistry for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), Bcl-2, Bcl-x and activated caspase 3. Additionally, we performed immunoblot analysis of Bcl-2, Bcl-x and activated caspase 3. TUNEL-positive cell was closely associated with the presence of karyorrhexis. Under combination of karyorrhectic and TUNEL-positive cells, number of apoptotic cells in premature brains was significantly more than in mature brains. Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury was considered to easily lead to apoptosis in premature infants. Moreover, as this pathophysiology, caspase-pathway activation contributed to neuronal death from caspase-immunoexpression analyses. PSN with hypoglycemia showed large number of apoptotic cells and higher expression of activated caspase 3. The result may be more severe with the background of hypoglycemia and prematurity complicated by hypoxia and/or ischemia.

  9. High-Content Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Reveals CCR3 as a Key Mediator of Neuronal Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaishan; Sherbini, Omar; Ling-lin Pai, Emily; Kwon, Ji-Sun; He, Wei; Wang, Hong; Chi, Zhikai; Xu, Jinchong; Jiang, Haisong; Andrabi, Shaida A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal loss caused by ischemic injury, trauma, or disease can lead to devastating consequences for the individual. With the goal of limiting neuronal loss, a number of cell death pathways have been studied, but there may be additional contributors to neuronal death that are yet unknown. To identify previously unknown cell death mediators, we performed a high-content genome-wide screening of short, interfering RNA (siRNA) with an siRNA library in murine neural stem cells after exposure to N-methyl-N-nitroso-N′-nitroguanidine (MNNG), which leads to DNA damage and cell death. Eighty genes were identified as key mediators for cell death. Among them, 14 are known cell death mediators and 66 have not previously been linked to cell death pathways. Using an integrated approach with functional and bioinformatics analysis, we provide possible molecular networks, interconnected pathways, and/or protein complexes that may participate in cell death. Of the 66 genes, we selected CCR3 for further evaluation and found that CCR3 is a mediator of neuronal injury. CCR3 inhibition or deletion protects murine cortical cultures from oxygen-glucose deprivation–induced cell death, and CCR3 deletion in mice provides protection from ischemia in vivo. Taken together, our findings suggest that CCR3 is a previously unknown mediator of cell death. Future identification of the neural cell death network in which CCR3 participates will enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of neural cell death. PMID:27822494

  10. High-Content Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Reveals CCR3 as a Key Mediator of Neuronal Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianmin; Wang, Huaishan; Sherbini, Omar; Ling-Lin Pai, Emily; Kang, Sung-Ung; Kwon, Ji-Sun; Yang, Jia; He, Wei; Wang, Hong; Eacker, Stephen M; Chi, Zhikai; Mao, Xiaobo; Xu, Jinchong; Jiang, Haisong; Andrabi, Shaida A; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal loss caused by ischemic injury, trauma, or disease can lead to devastating consequences for the individual. With the goal of limiting neuronal loss, a number of cell death pathways have been studied, but there may be additional contributors to neuronal death that are yet unknown. To identify previously unknown cell death mediators, we performed a high-content genome-wide screening of short, interfering RNA (siRNA) with an siRNA library in murine neural stem cells after exposure to N-methyl-N-nitroso-N'-nitroguanidine (MNNG), which leads to DNA damage and cell death. Eighty genes were identified as key mediators for cell death. Among them, 14 are known cell death mediators and 66 have not previously been linked to cell death pathways. Using an integrated approach with functional and bioinformatics analysis, we provide possible molecular networks, interconnected pathways, and/or protein complexes that may participate in cell death. Of the 66 genes, we selected CCR3 for further evaluation and found that CCR3 is a mediator of neuronal injury. CCR3 inhibition or deletion protects murine cortical cultures from oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced cell death, and CCR3 deletion in mice provides protection from ischemia in vivo. Taken together, our findings suggest that CCR3 is a previously unknown mediator of cell death. Future identification of the neural cell death network in which CCR3 participates will enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of neural cell death.

  11. YCl3 Promotes Neuronal Cell Death by Inducing Apoptotic Pathways in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yechun; Tian, Yuantong; Zeng, Zhaoyi; Shuai, Ping; Lan, Haiying; Zhu, Xianshen; Zhong, Yi

    2017-01-01

    The pollutants rare earth elements (REEs) have posed great threats to human health. To investigate the cytotoxicity of yttrium (Y), a model that rats have free access to water containing YCl3 for 6 months is utilized. The results showed that YCl3 treatment promoted neuronal cell apoptosis by upregulating the proapoptotic factors Bax, caspase-3, Cyto c, and DAPK and by downregulating the antiapoptotic factors Bcl-2 and XIAP at both mRNA and protein levels. Conclusively, YCl3 exhibited cytotoxicity and promoted neuronal cell death by the induction of apoptotic pathways. PMID:28326317

  12. APP as a Protective Factor in Acute Neuronal Insults

    PubMed Central

    Hefter, Dimitri; Draguhn, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Despite its key role in the molecular pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the physiological function of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is unknown. Increasing evidence, however, points towards a neuroprotective role of this membrane protein in situations of metabolic stress. A key observation is the up-regulation of APP following acute (stroke, cardiac arrest) or chronic (cerebrovascular disease) hypoxic-ischemic conditions. While this mechanism may increase the risk or severity of AD, APP by itself or its soluble extracellular fragment APPsα can promote neuronal survival. Indeed, different animal models of acute hypoxia-ischemia, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and excitotoxicity have revealed protective effects of APP or APPsα. The underlying mechanisms involve APP-mediated regulation of calcium homeostasis via NMDA receptors (NMDAR), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) or internal calcium stores. In addition, APP affects the expression of survival- or apoptosis-related genes as well as neurotrophic factors. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the neuroprotective role of APP and APPsα and possible implications for future research and new therapeutic strategies. PMID:28210211

  13. Depletion of medullary serotonergic neurons in patients with multiple system atrophy who succumbed to sudden death.

    PubMed

    Tada, Mari; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Onodera, Osamu; Ozawa, Tetsutaro; Morita, Takashi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2009-07-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by prominent autonomic failure with ataxia and/or parkinsonism. The leading cause of death in MSA is sudden death. We have shown that the early development of autonomic failure is an independent risk factor for sudden death. The depletion of sympathetic preganglionic neurons in the spinal intermediolateral cell column (IML) and its afferent medullary catecholaminergic and serotonergic neurons has been proposed to be partly responsible for autonomic failure in MSA. In this study, we investigated whether the depletion of neurons in any of these autonomic neuron groups contributes to sudden death in MSA. Out of 52 autopsy-proven patients with MSA, we selected 12 individuals who had died within 3.5 years after disease onset to define the accurate levels of slices and identify early neuropathological changes of autonomic nuclei in MSA. Four patients succumbed to sudden death and eight patients died through established causes. Serial 10 mum sections were obtained from the 8th segment of the thoracic cord and the rostral medulla oblongata. Sections from the medulla oblongata were immunostained for thyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase. The total cell number in the five sections was computed for comparison. Compared with the control, the MSA group showed a marked depletion of neurons in the IML (38.0 +/- 7.1 versus 75.2 +/- 7.6 cells, P < 0.001), thyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in the ventrolateral medulla (VLM) (17.4 +/- 5.1 versus 72.8 +/- 13.6 cells, P < 0.01) and tryptophan hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in the VLM (15.6 +/- 9.2 versus 60.8 +/- 17.0 cells, P < 0.01), nucleus raphe obscurus (19.3 +/- 4.4 versus 75.3 +/- 8.6 cells, P < 0.001), nucleus raphe pallidus (2.1 +/- 2.7 versus 9.0 +/- 3.4 cells, P < 0.03), and arcuate nucleus (0.4 +/- 0.8 versus 2.3 +/- 1.5 cells, P < 0.05). Moreover, in patients who succumbed to sudden death, when compared with patients who

  14. [Responses of neurons of the associative parietal cortex during acute extinction restoration of a conditioned reflex].

    PubMed

    Prikhodchenko, N N

    1977-01-01

    The dynamics of spike neuronal activity in the parietal associative cortex was studied in the course of acute extinction and restoration of a conditioned reflex. Certain similarities have been found in neuronal firing during the reorganization of behavioral acts (transient processes in neuronal activity, general types of neuronal responses, etc.) The data obtained suggest the involvement of neurones of the parietal associative cortex in the processes related to the reorganization of behavioral acts, and the existence of common mechanisms of search for an optimal regime of neuronal assemblies functioning in different types of conditioned activity.

  15. miR-455 inhibits neuronal cell death by targeting TRAF3 in cerebral ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Shengtao; Tang, Bo; Li, Gang; Fan, Ruiming; Cao, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of brain disease, with high morbidity, disability, and mortality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as vital gene regulators in various types of human diseases. Accumulating evidence has suggested that aberrant expression of miRNAs play critical roles in the pathologies of ischemic stroke. Yet, the precise mechanism by which miRNAs control cerebral ischemic stroke remains unclear. In the present study, we explored whether miR-455 suppresses neuronal death by targeting TRAF3 in cerebral ischemic stroke. The expression levels of miR-455 and TRAF3 were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The role of miR-455 in cell death caused by oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD) was assessed using Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. The influence of miR-455 on infarct volume was evaluated in mouse brain after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Bioinformatics softwares and luciferase analysis were used to find and confirm the targets of miR-455. The results showed that the expression levels of miR-455 significantly decreased in primary neuronal cells subjected to OGD and mouse brain subjected to MCAO. In addition, forced expression of miR-455 inhibited neuronal death and weakened ischemic brain infarction in focal ischemia-stroked mice. Furthermore, TRAF3 was proved to be a direct target of miR-455, and miR-455 could negatively suppress TRAF3 expression. Biological function analysis showed that TRAF3 silencing displayed the neuroprotective effect in ischemic stroke and could enhance miR-455-induced positive impact on ischemic injury both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, miR-455 played a vital role in protecting neuronal cells from death by downregulating TRAF3 protein expression. These findings may represent a novel latent therapeutic target for cerebral ischemic stroke. PMID:27980410

  16. [Neuronal death in the neocortex of drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy patients].

    PubMed

    Lorigados Pedre, L; Orozco Suárez, S; Morales Chacón, L; García Maeso, I; Estupiñán Diaz, B; Bender del Busto, J E; Pavón Fuentes, N; Paula Piñero, B; Rocha Arrieta, L

    2008-11-01

    Introduction. Participation of apoptotic death mechanisms in drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (DRTLE) is currently under great debate. We have investigated if there is neuronal loss and the immunodetection to different markers in neocortical tissue death in eigth patients with DRTLE. The neocortexes of five patients deceased due to non-neurological causes, paired in age and gender were evaluated as control tissue. Methods. The evaluation of neuronal loss was made by means of a stereological study and with immunohistochemical techniques with the synaptophysin marker. Immunopositivity to different apoptotic markers (annexin V, caspase 3 and 8, bcl-2 and p53) and detection of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation (TUNEL) were analyzed and double labeling with synaptophysin was performed in every case. The results were evaluated with confocal microscope and analyzed with the Zeiss LSM 5 Image Browser Program, 2.80.1113 (Germany). Results. A statistically significant decrease in the total number of cells (p < 0.05) and the synaptophysin cells+ (p<0.01) in the neocortex (layer IV) of the patients with DRTLE when compared with the control tissue was found. No significant differences were found in the apoptotic markers bcl-2, p53, caspase 3 and 8 for any of the neocortex layers while there was a statistically significant increase in the number of TUNEL cells+ (p<0.05) and annexin V+ (p<0.05) in the neocortical layer IV of the patients. Conclusions. This group of evidence speaks in favor of the existence of an effect on the neuronal number in the neocortex layer IV that may be associated with noncaspase dependent apoptotic death process, without being able to rule out death by necrosis. Key words: Drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Apoptosis. Necrosis. Neuronal loss. Neurología 2008;23(9):555-565.

  17. Impaired autophagy flux is associated with neuronal cell death after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Chinmoy; Zhao, Zaorui; Aungst, Stephanie; Sabirzhanov, Boris; Faden, Alan I; Lipinski, Marta M

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of autophagy contributes to neuronal cell death in several neurodegenerative and lysosomal storage diseases. Markers of autophagy are also increased after traumatic brain injury (TBI), but its mechanisms and function are not known. Following controlled cortical impact (CCI) brain injury in GFP-Lc3 (green fluorescent protein-LC3) transgenic mice, we observed accumulation of autophagosomes in ipsilateral cortex and hippocampus between 1 and 7 d. This accumulation was not due to increased initiation of autophagy but rather to a decrease in clearance of autophagosomes, as reflected by accumulation of the autophagic substrate SQSTM1/p62 (sequestosome 1). This was confirmed by ex vivo studies, which demonstrated impaired autophagic flux in brain slices from injured as compared to control animals. Increased SQSTM1 peaked at d 1-3 but resolved by d 7, suggesting that the defect in autophagy flux is temporary. The early impairment of autophagy is at least in part caused by lysosomal dysfunction, as evidenced by lower protein levels and enzymatic activity of CTSD (cathepsin D). Furthermore, immediately after injury both autophagosomes and SQSTM1 accumulated predominantly in neurons. This was accompanied by appearance of SQSTM1 and ubiquitin-positive puncta in the affected cells, suggesting that, similar to the situation observed in neurodegenerative diseases, impaired autophagy may contribute to neuronal injury. Consistently, GFP-LC3 and SQSTM1 colocalized with markers of both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent cell death in neuronal cells proximal to the injury site. Taken together, our data indicated for the first time that autophagic clearance is impaired early after TBI due to lysosomal dysfunction, and correlates with neuronal cell death.

  18. Genome-Wide Expression Analysis Reveals Diverse Effects of Acute Nicotine Exposure on Neuronal Function-Related Genes and Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ju; Cui, Wenyan; Wei, Jinxue; Sun, Dongxiao; Gutala, Ramana; Gu, Jun; Li, Ming D.

    2011-01-01

    Previous human and animal studies demonstrate that acute nicotine exposure has complicated influences on the function of the nervous system, which may lead to long-lasting effects on the behavior and physiology of the subject. To determine the genes and pathways that might account for long-term changes after acute nicotine exposure, a pathway-focused oligoarray specifically designed for drug addiction research was used to assess acute nicotine effect on gene expression in the neuron-like SH-SY5Y cells. Our results showed that 295 genes involved in various biological functions were differentially regulated by 1 h of nicotine treatment. Among these genes, the expression changes of 221 were blocked by mecamylamine, indicating that the majority of nicotine-modulated genes were altered through the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs)-mediated signaling process. We further identified 14 biochemical pathways enriched among the nicotine-modulated genes, among which were those involved in neural development/synaptic plasticity, neuronal survival/death, immune response, or cellular metabolism. In the genes significantly regulated by nicotine but blocked by mecamylamine, 13 enriched pathways were detected. Nine of these pathways were shared with those enriched in the genes regulated by nicotine, including neuronal function-related pathways such as glucocorticoid receptor signaling, p38 MAPK signaling, PI3K/AKT signaling, and PTEN signaling, implying that nAChRs play important roles in the regulation of these biological processes. Together, our results not only provide insights into the mechanism underlying the acute response of neuronal cells to nicotine but also provide clues to how acute nicotine exposure exerts long-term effects on the nervous system. PMID:21556275

  19. Effect of acupuncture on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced nigrostratal dopaminergic neuronal cell death in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeung-Kee; Lim, Hyung-Ho; Song, Yun-Kyung; Lee, Hee-Hyuk; Lim, Sabina; Han, Seung-Moo; Kim, Chang-Ju

    In this study, we investigated the effect of acupuncture at the Zusanli acupoint (ST36) on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal cell death in the rats with Parkinson's disease. Two weeks after unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the striatum, an apomorphine-induced rotational behavior test showed significant rotational asymmetry in the rats with Parkinson's disease. Immunostaining for tyrosine hydroxylase demonstrated a dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra and dopaminergic fiber loss in the striatum. Acupuncture at the ST36 for 14 days significantly inhibited rotational asymmetry in the rats with Parkinson's disease, and also protected against 6-OHDA-induced nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal loss. These effects of acupuncture were not observed for the non-acupoint (hip) acupuncture. The present study shows that acupuncture at the ST36 acupoint can be used as a useful strategy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  20. Protective effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonism on VX-induced neuronal cell death in cultured rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yushan; Weiss, M Tracy; Yin, Junfei; Tenn, Catherine C; Nelson, Peggy D; Mikler, John R

    2008-01-01

    Exposure of the central nervous system to organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents induces seizures and neuronal cell death. Here we report that the OP nerve agent, VX, induces apoptotic-like cell death in cultured rat cortical neurons. The VX effects on neurons were concentration-dependent, with an IC(50) of approximately 30 microM. Blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) with 50 microM. D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV) diminished 30 microM VX-induced total cell death, as assessed by alamarBlue assay and Hoechst staining. In contrast, neither antagonists of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) nor metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) had any effect on VX-induced neurotoxicity. VX-induced neuronal cell death could not be solely attributed to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, since neither the reversible pharmacological cholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine, nor the muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine, affected VX-induced cell death. Importantly, APV was found to be therapeutically effective against VX-induced cell death up to 2 h post VX exposure. These results suggest that NMDARs, but not AMPARs or mGluRs, play important roles in VX-induced cell death in cultured rat cortical neurons. Based on their therapeutic effects, NMDAR antagonists may be beneficial in the treatment of VX-induced neurotoxicities.

  1. Neuroprotective effect of Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis against kainic acid-neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Juárez, Angélica; Chamorro, Germán; Alva-Sánchez, Claudia; Paniagua-Castro, Norma; Pacheco-Rosado, Jorge

    2016-08-01

    Context Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis (SP) is a cyanobacterium which has attracted attention because of its nutritional value and pharmacological properties. It was previously reported that SP reduces oxidative stress in the hippocampus and protects against damaging neurobehavioural effects of systemic kainic acid (KA). It is widely known that the systemic administration of KA induces neuronal damage, specifically in the CA3 hippocampal region. Objective The present study determines if the SP sub-chronic treatment has neuroprotective properties against KA. Materials and methods Male SW mice were treated with SP during 24 d, at doses of 0, 200, and 800 mg/kg, once daily, and with KA (35 mg/kg, ip) as a single dose on day 14. After the treatment, a histological analysis was performed and the number of atrophic neuronal cells in CA3 hippocampal region was quantified. Results Pretreatment with SP does not protect against seizures induced by KA. However, mortality in the SP 200 and the SP 800 groups was of 20%, while for the KA group, it was of 60%. A single KA ip administration produced a considerable neuronal damage, whereas both doses of SP sub-chronic treatment reduced the number of atrophic neurons in CA3 hippocampal region with respect to the KA group. Discussion The SP neurobehaviour improvement after KA systemic administration correlates with the capacity of SP to reduce KA-neuronal death in CA3 hippocampal cells. This neuroprotection may be related to the antioxidant properties of SP. Conclusion SP reduces KA-neuronal death in CA3 hippocampal cells.

  2. Increased neuronal death and disturbed axonal growth in the Polμ-deficient mouse embryonic retina

    PubMed Central

    Baleriola, Jimena; Álvarez-Lindo, Noemí; de la Villa, Pedro; Bernad, Antonio; Blanco, Luis; Suárez, Teresa; de la Rosa, Enrique J.

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death occurs naturally at different stages of neural development, including neurogenesis. The functional role of this early phase of neural cell death, which affects recently differentiated neurons among other cell types, remains undefined. Some mouse models defective in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair present massive cell death during neural development, occasionally provoking embryonic lethality, while other organs and tissues remain unaffected. This suggests that DSBs occur frequently and selectively in the developing nervous system. We analyzed the embryonic retina of a mouse model deficient in the error-prone DNA polymerase μ (Polμ), a key component of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair system. DNA DSBs were increased in the mutant mouse at embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5), as well as the incidence of cell death that affected young neurons, including retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Polμ−/− mice also showed disturbed RGC axonal growth and navigation, and altered distribution of the axonal guidance molecules L1-CAM and Bravo (also known as Nr-CAM). These findings demonstrate that Polμ is necessary for proper retinal development, and support that the generation of DSBs and their repair via the NHEJ pathway are genuine processes involved in neural development. PMID:27172884

  3. Ginkgolic acids induce neuronal death and activate protein phosphatase type-2C.

    PubMed

    Ahlemeyer, B; Selke, D; Schaper, C; Klumpp, S; Krieglstein, J

    2001-10-26

    The standardized extract from Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761) is used for the treatment of dementia. Because of allergenic and genotoxic effects, ginkgolic acids are restricted in EGb 761 to 5 ppm. The question arises whether ginkgolic acids also have neurotoxic effects. In the present study, ginkgolic acids caused death of cultured chick embryonic neurons in a concentration-dependent manner, in the presence and in the absence of serum. Ginkgolic acids-induced death showed features of apoptosis as we observed chromatin condensation, shrinkage of the nucleus and reduction of the damage by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, demonstrating an active type of cell death. However, DNA fragmentation detected by the terminal-transferase-mediated ddUTP-digoxigenin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay and caspase-3 activation, which are also considered as hallmarks of apoptosis, were not seen after treatment with 150 microM ginkgolic acids in serum-free medium, a dose which increased the percentage of neurons with chromatin condensation and shrunken nuclei to 88% compared with 25% in serum-deprived, vehicle-treated controls. This suggests that ginkgolic acid-induced death showed signs of apoptosis as well as of necrosis. Ginkgolic acids specifically increased the activity of protein phosphatase type-2C, whereas other protein phosphatases such as protein phosphatases 1A, 2A and 2B, tyrosine phosphatase, and unspecific acid- and alkaline phosphatases were inhibited or remained unchanged, suggesting protein phosphatase 2C to play a role in the neurotoxic effect mediated by ginkgolic acids.

  4. Sleep active cortical neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase are active after both acute sleep deprivation and chronic sleep restriction.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, M R; Kim, Y; Karpova, S A; Winston, S; McCarley, R W; Strecker, R E; Gerashchenko, D

    2013-09-05

    Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) delta power (~0.5-4 Hz), also known as slow wave activity (SWA), is typically enhanced after acute sleep deprivation (SD) but not after chronic sleep restriction (CSR). Recently, sleep-active cortical neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) were identified and associated with enhanced SWA after short acute bouts of SD (i.e., 6h). However, the relationship between cortical nNOS neuronal activity and SWA during CSR is unknown. We compared the activity of cortical neurons expressing nNOS (via c-Fos and nNOS immuno-reactivity, respectively) and sleep in rats in three conditions: (1) after 18-h of acute SD; (2) after five consecutive days of sleep restriction (SR) (18-h SD per day with 6h ad libitum sleep opportunity per day); (3) and time-of-day matched ad libitum sleep controls. Cortical nNOS neuronal activity was enhanced during sleep after both 18-h SD and 5 days of SR treatments compared to control treatments. SWA and NREM sleep delta energy (the product of NREM sleep duration and SWA) were positively correlated with enhanced cortical nNOS neuronal activity after 18-h SD but not 5days of SR. That neurons expressing nNOS were active after longer amounts of acute SD (18h vs. 6h reported in the literature) and were correlated with SWA further suggest that these cells might regulate SWA. However, since these neurons were active after CSR when SWA was not enhanced, these findings suggest that mechanisms downstream of their activation are altered during CSR.

  5. Early repolarization, acute emotional stress and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Palmiere, Cristian; Lesta, Maria del Mar; Vanhaebost, Jessica; Mangin, Patrice; Augsburger, Marc; Vogt, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    We herein report the case of a 36-year-old man who died suddenly after a fight with another man. Forensic investigations included unenhanced computed tomography, postmortem angiography, autopsy, histology, neuropathology, toxicology, and biochemistry and allowed a traumatic cause of death to be excluded. An electrocardiogram recorded some years prior to death revealed the presence of an early repolarization pattern. Based on the results of all investigations, the cause of death was determined to be cardiac arrhythmia and cardiac arrest during an emotionally stressful event associated with physical assault. Direct third party involvement, however, was excluded, and the manner of death was listed as natural. The case was not pursued any further by the public prosecutor.

  6. Retrograde labeling of regenerated electromotor neurons with HRP in a teleost fish, Sternarchus albifrons: relation to cell death.

    PubMed

    Anderson, M J; Fong, H L; Waxman, S G

    1985-01-01

    Back-labeling of regenerated electromotor neurons in the teleost Sternarchus albifrons was performed to test the hypothesis that, in regenerated spinal cord, incorrectly located electromotor neurons are eliminated because their axons do not reach the correct target area (electric organ). In each cross section examined, all of the regenerated electromotor neurons ipsilateral to the implantation site were labeled with horseradish peroxidase, including those ectopic cells located at the edge of the cord, which are later eliminated by selective cell death. Retrograde labeling of these ectopic neurons demonstrates that their axons do extend into the correct target area (the regenerated electric organ). Thus total misdirection of the axons cannot be the cause of their subsequent cell death. We conclude that selective neuronal death in this system does not reflect the absence of axonal projection to the correct target area.

  7. Antihelminthic Benzimidazoles Are Novel HIF Activators That Prevent Oxidative Neuronal Death via Binding to Tubulin

    PubMed Central

    Aleyasin, Hossein; Karuppagounder, Saravanan S.; Kumar, Amit; Sleiman, Sama; Basso, Manuela; Ma, Thong; Siddiq, Ambreena; Chinta, Shankar J.; Brochier, Camille; Langley, Brett; Haskew-Layton, Renee; Bane, Susan L.; Riggins, Gregory J.; Gazaryan, Irina; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Andersen, Julie K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Pharmacological activation of the adaptive response to hypoxia is a therapeutic strategy of growing interest for neurological conditions, including stroke, Huntington's disease, and Parkinson's disease. We screened a drug library with known safety in humans using a hippocampal neuroblast line expressing a reporter of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-dependent transcription. Results: Our screen identified more than 40 compounds with the ability to induce hypoxia response element-driven luciferase activity as well or better than deferoxamine, a canonical activator of hypoxic adaptation. Among the chemical entities identified, the antihelminthic benzimidazoles represented one pharmacophore that appeared multiple times in our screen. Secondary assays confirmed that antihelminthics stabilized the transcriptional activator HIF-1α and induced expression of a known HIF target gene, p21cip1/waf1, in post-mitotic cortical neurons. The on-target effect of these agents in stimulating hypoxic signaling was binding to free tubulin. Moreover, antihelminthic benzimidazoles also abrogated oxidative stress-induced death in vitro, and this on-target effect also involves binding to free tubulin. Innovation and Conclusions: These studies demonstrate that tubulin-binding drugs can activate a component of the hypoxic adaptive response, specifically the stabilization of HIF-1α and its downstream targets. Tubulin-binding drugs, including antihelminthic benzimidazoles, also abrogate oxidative neuronal death in primary neurons. Given their safety in humans and known ability to penetrate into the central nervous system, antihelminthic benzimidazoles may be considered viable candidates for treating diseases associated with oxidative neuronal death, including stroke. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 121–134. PMID:24766300

  8. Normoxic resuscitation after cardiac arrest protects against hippocampal oxidative stress, metabolic dysfunction, and neuronal death

    PubMed Central

    Vereczki, Viktoria; Martin, Erica; Rosenthal, Robert E; Hof, Patrick R; Hoffman, Gloria E; Fiskum, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Resuscitation and prolonged ventilation using 100% oxygen after cardiac arrest is standard clinical practice despite evidence from animal models indicating that neurologic outcome is improved using normoxic compared with hyperoxic resuscitation. This study tested the hypothesis that normoxic ventilation during the first hour after cardiac arrest in dogs protects against prelethal oxidative stress to proteins, loss of the critical metabolic enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC), and minimizes subsequent neuronal death in the hippocampus. Anesthetized beagles underwent 10 mins ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest, followed by defibrillation and ventilation with either 21% or 100% O2. At 1 h after resuscitation, the ventilator was adjusted to maintain normal blood gas levels in both groups. Brains were perfusion-fixed at 2 h reperfusion and used for immunohistochemical measurements of hippocampal nitrotyrosine, a product of protein oxidation, and the E1α subunit of PDHC. In hyperoxic dogs, PDHC immunostaining diminished by approximately 90% compared with sham-operated dogs, while staining in normoxic animals was not significantly different from nonischemic dogs. Protein nitration in the hippocampal neurons of hyperoxic animals was 2–3 times greater than either sham-operated or normoxic resuscitated animals at 2 h reperfusion. Stereologic quantification of neuronal death at 24 h reperfusion showed a 40% reduction using normoxic compared with hyperoxic resuscitation. These results indicate that postischemic hyperoxic ventilation promotes oxidative stress that exacerbates prelethal loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase and delayed hippocampal neuronal cell death. Moreover, these findings indicate the need for clinical trials comparing the effects of different ventilatory oxygen levels on neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest. PMID:16251887

  9. Oxidation of Survival Factor MEF2D in Neuronal Death and Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li; She, Hua; Li, Wenming; Zeng, Jin; Zhu, Jinqiu; Jones, Dean P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Dysfunction of myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D), a key survival protein and transcription factor, underlies the pathogenic loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). Both genetic factors and neurotoxins associated with PD impair MEF2D function in vitro and in animal models of PD. We investigated whether distinct stress conditions target MEF2D via converging mechanisms. Results: We showed that exposure of a DA neuronal cell line to 6-hyroxydopamine (6-OHDA), which causes PD in animals models, led to direct oxidative modifications of MEF2D. Oxidized MEF2D bound to heat-shock cognate protein 70 kDa, the key regulator for chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), at a higher affinity. Oxidative stress also increased the level of lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2A (LAMP2A), the rate-limiting receptor for CMA substrate flux, and stimulated CMA activity. These changes resulted in accelerated degradation of MEF2D. Importantly, 6-OHDA induced MEF2D oxidation and increased LAMP2A in the substantia nigra pars compacta region of the mouse brain. Consistently, the levels of oxidized MEF2D were much higher in postmortem PD brains compared with the controls. Functionally, reducing the levels of either MEF2D or LAMP2A exacerbated 6-OHDA-induced death of the DA neuronal cell line. Expression of an MEF2D mutant that is resistant to oxidative modification protected cells from 6-OHDA-induced death. Innovation: This study showed that oxidization of survival protein MEF2D is one of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in oxidative stress-induced DA neuronal death. Conclusion: Oxidation of survival factor MEF2D inhibits its function, underlies oxidative stress-induced neurotoxicity, and may be a part of the PD pathogenic process. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2936–2948. PMID:24219011

  10. Histone Hyperacetylation Up-regulates Protein Kinase Cδ in Dopaminergic Neurons to Induce Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Huajun; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Harischandra, Dilshan S.; Kondru, Naveen; Ghosh, Anamitra; Panicker, Nikhil; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Rana, Ajay; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative stress-sensitive protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) has been implicated in dopaminergic neuronal cell death. However, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms regulating PKCδ expression in neurons. Here, we report a novel mechanism by which the PKCδ gene can be regulated by histone acetylation. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor sodium butyrate (NaBu) induced PKCδ expression in cultured neurons, brain slices, and animal models. Several other HDAC inhibitors also mimicked NaBu. The chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that hyperacetylation of histone H4 by NaBu is associated with the PKCδ promoter. Deletion analysis of the PKCδ promoter mapped the NaBu-responsive element to an 81-bp minimal promoter region. Detailed mutagenesis studies within this region revealed that four GC boxes conferred hyperacetylation-induced PKCδ promoter activation. Cotransfection experiments and Sp inhibitor studies demonstrated that Sp1, Sp3, and Sp4 regulated NaBu-induced PKCδ up-regulation. However, NaBu did not alter the DNA binding activities of Sp proteins or their expression. Interestingly, a one-hybrid analysis revealed that NaBu enhanced transcriptional activity of Sp1/Sp3. Overexpression of the p300/cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP) potentiated the NaBu-mediated transactivation potential of Sp1/Sp3, but expressing several HDACs attenuated this effect, suggesting that p300/CBP and HDACs act as coactivators or corepressors in histone acetylation-induced PKCδ up-regulation. Finally, using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we showed that NaBu up-regulation of PKCδ sensitizes neurons to cell death in a human dopaminergic cell model and brain slice cultures. Together, these results indicate that histone acetylation regulates PKCδ expression to augment nigrostriatal dopaminergic cell death, which could contribute to the progressive neuropathogenesis of Parkinson disease. PMID:25342743

  11. Time-Dependent Increases in Protease Activities for Neuronal Apoptosis in Spinal Cords of Lewis Rats During Development of Acute Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Arabinda; Guyton, M. Kelly; Matzelle, Denise D.; Ray, Swapan K.; Banik, Naren L.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by axonal demyelination and neurodegeneration, the latter having been inadequately explored in the MS animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The purpose of this study was to examine the time-dependent correlation between increased calpain and caspase activities and neurodegeneration in spinal cord tissues from Lewis rats with acute EAE. An increase in TUNEL-positive neurons and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in EAE spinal cords suggested that neuronal death was a result of apoptosis on days 8–10 following induction of EAE. Increases in calpain expression in EAE correlated with activation of pro-apoptotic proteases, leading to apoptotic cell death beginning on day 8 of EAE, which occurred before the appearance of visible clinical symptoms. Increases in calcineurin expression and decreases in phospho-Bad (p-Bad) suggested Bad activation in apoptosis during acute EAE. Increases in the Bax:Bcl-2 ratio and activation of caspase-9 showed the involvement of mitochondria in apoptosis. Further, caspase-8 activation suggested induction of the death receptor–mediated pathway for apoptosis. Endoplasmic reticulum stress leading to caspase-3 activation was also observed, indicating that multiple apoptotic pathways were activated following EAE induction. In contrast, cell death was mostly a result of necrosis on the later day (day 11), when EAE entered a severe stage. From these findings, we conclude that increases in calpain and caspase activities play crucial roles in neuronal apoptosis during the development of acute EAE. PMID:18521931

  12. Cabergoline, Dopamine D2 Receptor Agonist, Prevents Neuronal Cell Death under Oxidative Stress via Reducing Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Odaka, Haruki; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Adachi, Naoki; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Nakajima, Shingo; Katanuma, Yusuke; Inoue, Takafumi; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence demonstrate that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. Potent antioxidants may therefore be effective in the treatment of such diseases. Cabergoline, a dopamine D2 receptor agonist and antiparkinson drug, has been studied using several cell types including mesencephalic neurons, and is recognized as a potent radical scavenger. Here, we examined whether cabergoline exerts neuroprotective effects against oxidative stress through a receptor-mediated mechanism in cultured cortical neurons. We found that neuronal death induced by H2O2 exposure was inhibited by pretreatment with cabergoline, while this protective effect was eliminated in the presence of a dopamine D2 receptor inhibitor, spiperone. Activation of ERK1/2 by H2O2 was suppressed by cabergoline, and an ERK signaling pathway inhibitor, U0126, similarly protected cortical neurons from cell death. This suggested the ERK signaling pathway has a critical role in cabergoline-mediated neuroprotection. Furthermore, increased extracellular levels of glutamate induced by H2O2, which might contribute to ERK activation, were reduced by cabergoline, while inhibitors for NMDA receptor or L-type Ca2+ channel demonstrated a survival effect against H2O2. Interestingly, we found that cabergoline increased expression levels of glutamate transporters such as EAAC1. Taken together, these results suggest that cabergoline has a protective effect on cortical neurons via a receptor-mediated mechanism including repression of ERK1/2 activation and extracellular glutamate accumulation induced by H2O2. PMID:24914776

  13. Leukotriene receptor antagonists, LY293111 and ONO-1078, protect neurons from the sPLA2-IB-induced neuronal cell death independently of blocking their receptors.

    PubMed

    Yagami, Tatsurou; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Kohma, Hiromi

    2013-09-01

    In the ischemic brain, leukotrienes (LTs) are increased and their receptor antagonists protect neurons. However, it has not yet been sufficiently clarified how antagonists for LT receptors exhibit neuroprotective effects. In the present study, we evaluated protective effects of receptor antagonists for LTB4 (LY293111) and cysteinyl LTs (ONO-1078) in the primary culture of rat cortical neurons. The group IB secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IB)-induced neuronal cell death had been established as the in vitro model for cerebral ischemia. sPLA2-IB triggered the influx of Ca(2+) into neurons via L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (L-VDCC). Subsequently, the enzyme produced eicosanoids including LTB4 before neuronal cell death. Neither administration of LTB4 nor cysteinyl LTs such as LTC4, LTD4 and LTE4 killed neurons. However, both LY293111 and ONO-1078 significantly prevented neurons from the neurotoxicity of sPLA2-IB, suggesting that the two LT receptor blockers protected neurons through alternative pathways beside LT receptors. An L-VDCC blocker does not only inhibit the influx of Ca(2+) into neurons but also rescues neurons from the sPLA2-IB-induced neuronal cell death. The two LT receptor antagonists also blocked the sPLA2-IB-induced Ca(2+) influx significantly. Thus, LTs exhibited no neurotoxicity, but their receptor antagonists protected neurons directly in the in vitro ischemic model. Furthermore, the suppression of L-VDCC appeared to be involved in the neuroprotective effects of LY293111 and ONO-1078 independent of blocking their receptors.

  14. Cyclooxygenase-2 contributes to VX-induced cell death in cultured cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Tenn, Catherine C; Weiss, M Tracy; Beaup, Claire; Peinnequin, Andre; Wang, Yushan; Dorandeu, Frederic

    2012-04-05

    The link between cell death and increased cyclooxygenases-2 (COX-2) activity has not been clearly established. In this study, we examined whether COX-2 activation contributed to the mechanism of neurotoxicity produced by an organophosphorous nerve agent in cultured rat cortical neurons. Exposure of neuronal cells to the nerve agent, VX resulted in an increase in COX enzyme activity in the culture media. A concentration dependent increase in the activity levels of COX-2 enzyme was observed while there was little to no effect on COX-1. In addition, COX-2 mRNA and protein levels increased several hours post-VX exposure. Pre-treatment of the cortical cells with the COX-2 selective inhibitor, NS 398 resulted in a decrease in both the enzyme activity and prostaglandin (PGE(2) and PGF(2α)) release, as well as in a reduction in cell death. These findings indicate that the increase in COX-2 activity may contribute to the mechanism of VX-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cortical neuron.

  15. Acupuncture suppresses kainic acid-induced neuronal death and inflammatory events in mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Tae; Doo, Ah-Reum; Kim, Seung-Nam; Kim, Song-Yi; Kim, Yoon Young; Kim, Jang-Hyun; Lee, Hyejung; Yin, Chang Shik; Park, Hi-Joon

    2012-09-01

    The administration of kainic acid (KA) causes seizures and produces neurodegeneration in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells. The present study investigated a possible role of acupuncture in reducing hippocampal cell death and inflammatory events, using a mouse model of kainic acid-induced epilepsy. Male C57BL/6 mice received acupuncture treatments at acupoint HT8 or in the tail area bilaterally once a day for 2 days and again immediately after an intraperitoneal injection of KA (30 mg/kg). HT8 is located on the palmar surface of the forelimbs, between the fourth and fifth metacarpal bones. Twenty-four hours after the KA injection, neuronal cell survival, the activations of microglia and astrocytes, and mRNA expression of two proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), were measured in the hippocampus. Acupuncture stimulation at HT8, but not in the tail area, significantly reduced the KA-induced seizure, neuron death, microglial and astrocyte activations, and IL-1β mRNA expression in the hippocampus. The acupuncture stimulation also decreased the mRNA expression of TNF-α, but it was not significant. These results indicate that acupuncture at HT8 can inhibit hippocampal cell death and suppress KA-induced inflammatory events, suggesting a possible role for acupuncture in the treatment of epilepsy.

  16. Ceramide and neurodegeneration: Susceptibility of neurons and oligodendrocytes to cell damage and death

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Arundhati; Hogan, Edward L.; Pahan, Kalipada

    2009-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are marked by extensive neuronal apoptosis and gliosis. Although several apoptosis-inducing agents have been described, understanding of the regulatory mechanisms underlying modes of cell death is incomplete. A major breakthrough in delineation of the mechanism of cell death came from elucidation of the sphingomyelin (SM)-ceramide pathway that has received worldwide attention in recent years. The SM pathway induces apoptosis, differentiation, proliferation, and growth arrest depending upon cell and receptor types, and on downstream targets. Sphingomyelin, a plasma membrane constituent, is abundant in mammalian nervous system, and ceramide, its primary catabolic product released by activation of either neutral or acidic sphingomyelinase, serves as a potential lipid second messenger or mediator molecule modulating diverse cellular signaling pathways. Neutral sphingomyelinase (NSMase) is a key enzyme in the regulated activation of the SM cycle and is particularly sensitive to oxidative stress. In a context of increasing clarification of the mechanisms of neurodegeneration, we thought that it would be useful to review details of recent findings that we and others have made concerning different pro-apoptotic neurotoxins including proinflammatory cytokines, hypoxia-induced SM hydrolysis and ceramide production that induce cell death in human primary neurons and primary oligodendrocytes: redox sensitive events. What has and is emerging is a vista of therapeutically important ceramide regulation affecting a variety of different neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory disorders. PMID:19147160

  17. Environmental enrichment increases doublecortin-associated new neurons and decreases neuronal death without modifying anxiety-like behavior in mice chronically exposed to toluene.

    PubMed

    Paez-Martinez, Nayeli; Flores-Serrano, Zoraida; Ortiz-Lopez, Leonardo; Ramirez-Rodriguez, Gerardo

    2013-11-01

    Toluene misuse is a health problem worldwide with broad effects at the level of the central nervous system; however, therapeutic alternatives for inhalant abusers are limited. Chronic use of volatile substances is associated with different neurological and cognitive alterations, being anxiety a psychiatric condition with high prevalence. At cellular level toluene reduces neurogenesis and induces neuronal death. On the other hand, environmental enrichment has demonstrated to produce positive effects at behavioral and neuronal levels. Thus, the aim of the present work was to model alterations occasioned after repeated exposure to toluene (anxiety, reduction in neurogenesis - measured as doublecortin-labeled cells - and neuronal death). Subsequently, the influence of environmental enrichment on these effects was evaluated. Adolescent mice were exposed to toluene vapors from 1 to 4 weeks. Effects on anxiety were evaluated with the burying behavior test, whereas neurogenesis and hippocampal cell death were analyzed with immunohistochemistry, using anti-doublecortin or anti-active-Caspase-3 antibodies, respectively. Results showed that chronic toluene exposure increased anxiety in the burying behavior test; additionally, toluene decreased neurogenesis and enhanced neuronal death. Environmental enrichment (EE) enhanced the anxiety like response in air-exposed mice but did not modify the toluene anxiety response. Additionally, EE enhanced neurogenesis in toluene-pretreated animals at the same level to that found in animals unexposed to toluene and decreased neuronal death. Overall, the present study showed that environmental enrichment positively impacts some effects produced by repeated exposure to toluene.

  18. Oleuropein Prevents Neuronal Death, Mitigates Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Modulates Autophagy in a Dopaminergic Cellular Model

    PubMed Central

    Achour, Imène; Arel-Dubeau, Anne-Marie; Renaud, Justine; Legrand, Manon; Attard, Everaldo; Germain, Marc; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. There is currently no cure for PD and present medications aim to alleviate clinical symptoms, thus prevention remains the ideal strategy to reduce the prevalence of this disease. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oleuropein (OLE), the major phenolic compound in olive derivatives, may prevent neuronal degeneration in a cellular dopaminergic model of PD, differentiated PC12 cells exposed to the potent parkinsonian toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). We also investigated OLE’s ability to mitigate mitochondrial oxidative stress and modulate the autophagic flux. Our results obtained by measuring cytotoxicity and apoptotic events demonstrate that OLE significantly decreases neuronal death. OLE could also reduce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species resulting from blocking superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, quantification of autophagic and acidic vesicles in the cytoplasm alongside expression of specific autophagic markers uncovered a regulatory role for OLE against autophagic flux impairment induced by bafilomycin A1. Altogether, our results define OLE as a neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and autophagy-regulating molecule, in a neuronal dopaminergic cellular model. PMID:27517912

  19. Oleuropein Prevents Neuronal Death, Mitigates Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Modulates Autophagy in a Dopaminergic Cellular Model.

    PubMed

    Achour, Imène; Arel-Dubeau, Anne-Marie; Renaud, Justine; Legrand, Manon; Attard, Everaldo; Germain, Marc; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2016-08-09

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. There is currently no cure for PD and present medications aim to alleviate clinical symptoms, thus prevention remains the ideal strategy to reduce the prevalence of this disease. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oleuropein (OLE), the major phenolic compound in olive derivatives, may prevent neuronal degeneration in a cellular dopaminergic model of PD, differentiated PC12 cells exposed to the potent parkinsonian toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). We also investigated OLE's ability to mitigate mitochondrial oxidative stress and modulate the autophagic flux. Our results obtained by measuring cytotoxicity and apoptotic events demonstrate that OLE significantly decreases neuronal death. OLE could also reduce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species resulting from blocking superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, quantification of autophagic and acidic vesicles in the cytoplasm alongside expression of specific autophagic markers uncovered a regulatory role for OLE against autophagic flux impairment induced by bafilomycin A1. Altogether, our results define OLE as a neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and autophagy-regulating molecule, in a neuronal dopaminergic cellular model.

  20. Exogenous α-Synuclein Fibrils Induce Lewy Body Pathology Leading to Synaptic Dysfunction and Neuron Death

    PubMed Central

    Volpicelli-Daley, Laura A.; Luk, Kelvin C.; Patel, Tapan P.; Tanik, Selcuk A.; Riddle, Dawn M.; Stieber, Anna; Meany, David F.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Inclusions comprised of α-synuclein (α-syn), i.e. Lewy bodies (LBs) and Lewy neurites (LNs), define synucleinopathies including Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). Here, we demonstrate that pre-formed fibrils generated from full length and truncated recombinant α-syn enter primary neurons, likely by adsorptive-mediated endocytosis and promote recruitment of soluble endogenous α-syn into insoluble PD-like LBs and LNs. Remarkably, endogenous α-syn was sufficient for formation of these aggregates, and overexpression of wild type or mutant α-syn was not required. LN-like pathology first developed in axons and propagated to form LB-like inclusions in perikarya. Accumulation of pathologic α-syn led to selective decreases in synaptic proteins, progressive impairments in neuronal excitability and connectivity, and eventually, neuron death. Thus, our data contribute important insights into the etiology and pathogenesis of PD-like α-syn inclusions, their impact on neuronal functions, and provide a model for discovering therapeutics targeting pathologic α-syn- mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:21982369

  1. Bowel movement frequency in late-life and substantia nigra neuron density at death.

    PubMed

    Petrovitch, Helen; Abbott, Robert D; Ross, G Webster; Nelson, James; Masaki, Kamal H; Tanner, Caroline M; Launer, Lenore J; White, Lon R

    2009-02-15

    Constipation is associated with future risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) and with incidental Lewy bodies (LB) in the locus ceruleus or substantia nigra (SN). Our purpose is to examine the independent association between bowel movement frequency in late-life and postmortem SN neuron density. Bowel movement frequency was assessed in the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study from 1991 to 1993 in 414 men aged 71 to 93 years with later postmortem evaluations. Brains were examined for LB in the SN and locus ceruleus and neurons were counted in four quadrants from a transverse section of SN. In nonsmokers, neuron densities (counts/mm(2)) for men with >1, 1, and <1 bowel movement daily were 18.5, 18.8, 10.1 (P < 0.001) for dorsomedial; 15.3, 16.4, 10.2 (P < 0.03) for ventromedial; and 18.6, 18.3, 10.9 (P = 0.011) for ventrolateral quadrants. Relationships were not significant in the dorsolateral quadrant or in any quadrant among smokers. After adjustment for age, time to death, coffee drinking, tricep skinfold thickness, excessive daytime sleepiness, cognitive function, PD, and incidental LB, density ratios in nonsmokers with 1 or more bowel movement(s) daily were significantly higher compared to those with <1 daily. Constipation is associated with low SN neuron density independent of the presence of LB.

  2. Differential roles of phospholipases A2 in neuronal death and neurogenesis: implications for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Evelin L; da Silva, Emanuelle R; Novaes, Barbara de A; Skaf, Heni D; Gattaz, Wagner F

    2010-12-01

    The involvement of phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) in Alzheimer disease (AD) was first investigated nearly 15 years ago. Over the years, several PLA(2) isoforms have been detected in brain tissue: calcium-dependent secreted PLA(2) or sPLA(2) (IIA, IIC, IIE, V, X, and XII), calcium-dependent cytosolic PLA(2) or cPLA(2) (IVA, IVB, and IVC), and calcium-independent PLA(2) or iPLA(2) (VIA and VIB). Additionally, numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have suggested the role of different brain PLA(2) in both physiological and pathological events. This review aimed to summarize the findings in the literature relating the different brain PLA(2) isoforms with alterations found in AD, such as neuronal cell death and impaired neurogenesis process. The review showed that sPLA(2)-IIA, sPLA(2)-V and cPLA(2)-IVA are involved in neuronal death, whereas sPLA(2)-III and sPLA(2)-X are related to the process of neurogenesis, and that the cPLA(2) and iPLA(2) groups can be involved in both neuronal death and neurogenesis. In AD, there are reports of reduced activity of the cPLA(2) and iPLA(2) groups and increased expression of sPLA(2)-IIA and cPLA(2)-IVA. The findings suggest that the inhibition of cPLA(2) and iPLA(2) isoforms (yet to be determined) might contribute to impaired neurogenesis, whereas stimulation of sPLA(2)-IIA and cPLA(2)-IVA might contribute to neurodegeneration in AD.

  3. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress as a Mediator of Neurotoxin-Induced Dopamine Neuron Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by...Stress as a Mediator of Neurotoxin-Induced Dopamine Neuron Death 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1-0492 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d...PROJECT NUMBER Robert E. Burke, M.D 5e. TASK NUMBER E-Mail: rb43@columbia.edu 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND

  4. Massive cell death of immature hematopoietic cells and neurons in Bcl-x-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, N; Wang, F; Roth, K A; Sawa, H; Nakayama, K; Nakayama, K; Negishi, I; Senju, S; Zhang, Q; Fujii, S

    1995-03-10

    bcl-x is a member of the bcl-2 gene family, which may regulate programmed cell death. Mice were generated that lacked Bcl-x. The Bcl-x-deficient mice died around embryonic day 13. Extensive apoptotic cell death was evident in postmitotic immature neurons of the developing brain, spinal cord, and dorsal root ganglia. Hematopoietic cells in the liver were also apoptotic. Analyses of bcl-x double-knockout chimeric mice showed that the maturation of Bcl-x-deficient lymphocytes was diminished. The life-span of immature lymphocytes, but not mature lymphocytes, was shortened. Thus, Bcl-x functions to support the viability of immature cells during the development of the nervous and hematopoietic systems.

  5. Interleukin-1β secreted from betanodavirus-infected microglia caused the death of neurons in giant grouper brains.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yu-Hui; Wu, Yu-Chi; Chi, Shau-Chi

    2017-05-01

    High interleukin (IL)-1β gene expression was observed in dead giant grouper brains after nervous necrosis virus (NNV) infection. To investigate the neuronal death caused by NNV infection, primary tissue culture of giant grouper brains (pGB) was performed. In NNV-infected pGB cells, the viral capsid protein was detected in both neurons and microglia; furthermore, microglial proliferation and neuronal death were observed. The culture supernatant (CS) of NNV-infected pGB cells contained IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, which were mainly released from the microglia. A new batch of pGB cells was treated with CS, resulting in neuronal death, which could be prevented by blocking the IL-1β in the CS by using anti-IL-1β polyclonal antibodies. Moreover, pGB cells treated with recombinant IL-1β showed microglial proliferation and neuronal death. Thus, NNV infection may activate microglial proliferation and stimulate microglial secretion of IL-1β, which is a critical cytokine responsible for neuronal death in NNV-infected grouper brains.

  6. Valproic acid induces neuronal cell death through a novel calpain-dependent necroptosis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bollino, Dominique; Balan, Irina; Aurelian, Laure

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor used to treat epilepsy and mood disorders, has HDAC-related and -unrelated neurotoxic activity, the mechanism of which is still poorly understood. We report that VPA induces neuronal cell death through an atypical calpain-dependent necroptosis pathway that initiates with downstream activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and increased expression of receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP-1) and is accompanied by cleavage and mitochondrial release/nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing-factor (AIF), mitochondrial release of Smac/DIABLO, and inhibition of the anti-apoptotic protein X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP). Coinciding with AIF nuclear translocation, VPA induces phosphorylation of the necroptosis-associated histone H2A family member H2AX, which is known to contribute to lethal DNA degradation. These signals are inhibited in neuronal cells that express constitutively activated MEK/ERK and/or PI3-K/Akt survival pathways, allowing them to resist VPA-induced cell death. The data indicate that VPA has neurotoxic activity and identify a novel calpain-dependent necroptosis pathway that includes JNK1 activation and RIP-1 expression. PMID:25581256

  7. TRPV1 stimulation triggers apoptotic cell death of rat cortical neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Shirakawa, Hisashi; Yamaoka, Tomoko; Sanpei, Kazuaki; Sasaoka, Hirotoshi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2008-12-26

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) functions as a polymodal nociceptor and is activated by several vanilloids, including capsaicin, protons and heat. Although TRPV1 channels are widely distributed in the brain, their roles remain unclear. Here, we investigated the roles of TRPV1 in cytotoxic processes using TRPV1-expressing cultured rat cortical neurons. Capsaicin induced severe neuronal death with apoptotic features, which was completely inhibited by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine and was dependent on extracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx. Interestingly, nifedipine, a specific L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel blocker, attenuated capsaicin cytotoxicity, even when applied 2-4 h after the capsaicin. ERK inhibitor PD98059 and several antioxidants, but not the JNK and p38 inhibitors, attenuated capsaicin cytotoxicity. Together, these data indicate that TRPV1 activation triggers apoptotic cell death of rat cortical cultures via L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel opening, Ca{sup 2+} influx, ERK phosphorylation, and reactive oxygen species production.

  8. Mfn2 downregulation in excitotoxicity causes mitochondrial dysfunction and delayed neuronal death

    PubMed Central

    Martorell-Riera, Alejandro; Segarra-Mondejar, Marc; Muñoz, Juan P; Ginet, Vanessa; Olloquequi, Jordi; Pérez-Clausell, Jeús; Palacín, Manuel; Reina, Manuel; Puyal, Julien; Zorzano, Antonio; Soriano, Francesc X

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial fusion and fission is a dynamic process critical for the maintenance of mitochondrial function and cell viability. During excitotoxicity neuronal mitochondria are fragmented, but the mechanism underlying this process is poorly understood. Here, we show that Mfn2 is the only member of the mitochondrial fusion/fission machinery whose expression is reduced in in vitro and in vivo models of excitotoxicity. Whereas in cortical primary cultures, Drp1 recruitment to mitochondria plays a primordial role in mitochondrial fragmentation in an early phase that can be reversed once the insult has ceased, Mfn2 downregulation intervenes in a delayed mitochondrial fragmentation phase that progresses even when the insult has ceased. Downregulation of Mfn2 causes mitochondrial dysfunction, altered calcium homeostasis, and enhanced Bax translocation to mitochondria, resulting in delayed neuronal death. We found that transcription factor MEF2 regulates basal Mfn2 expression in neurons and that excitotoxicity-dependent degradation of MEF2 causes Mfn2 downregulation. Thus, Mfn2 reduction is a late event in excitotoxicity and its targeting may help to reduce excitotoxic damage and increase the currently short therapeutic window in stroke. PMID:25147362

  9. ASIC channel inhibition enhances excitotoxic neuronal death in an in vitro model of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Graciela L; Veeraraghavan, Priyadharishini; Gonzalez-Inchauspe, Carlota; Nistri, Andrea; Uchitel, Osvaldo D

    2017-02-20

    In the spinal cord high extracellular glutamate evokes excitotoxic damage with neuronal loss and severe locomotor impairment. During the cell dysfunction process, extracellular pH becomes acid and may activate acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) which could be important contributors to neurodegenerative pathologies. Our previous studies have shown that transient application of the glutamate analog kainate (KA) evokes delayed excitotoxic death of spinal neurons, while white matter is mainly spared. The present goal was to enquire if ASIC channels modulated KA damage in relation to locomotor network function and cell death. Mouse spinal cord slices were treated with KA (0.01 or 0.1mM) for 1h, and then washed out for 24h prior to analysis. RT-PCR results showed that KA (at 0.01mM concentration that is near-threshold for damage) increased mRNA expression of ASIC1a, ASIC1b, ASIC2 and ASIC3, an effect reversed by the ASIC inhibitor 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). A KA neurotoxic dose (0.1mM) reduced ASIC1a and ASIC2 expression. Cell viability assays demonstrated KA-induced large damage in spinal slices from mice with ASIC1a gene ablation. Likewise, immunohistochemistry indicated significant neuronal loss when KA was followed by the ASIC inhibitors DAPI or amiloride. Electrophysiological recording from ventral roots of isolated spinal cords showed that alternating oscillatory cycles were slowed down by 0.01mMKA, and intensely inhibited by subsequently applied DAPI or amiloride. Our data suggest that early rise in ASIC expression and function counteracted deleterious effects on spinal networks by raising the excitotoxicity threshold, a result with potential implications for improving neuroprotection.

  10. Treatment with harmine ameliorates functional impairment and neuronal death following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    ZHONG, ZEQI; TAO, YUAN; YANG, HUI

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of mortality in young individuals, and results in motor and cognitive deficiency. Excitotoxicity is an important process during neuronal cell death, which is caused by excessive release of glutamate following TBI. Astrocytic glutamate transporters have a predominant role in maintaining extracellular glutamate concentrations below excitotoxic levels, and glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) may account for >90% of glutamate uptake in the brain. The β-carboline alkaloid harmine has been demonstrated to exert neuroprotective actions in vivo, and the beneficial effects were specifically due to elevation of GLT-1. However, whether harmine provides neuroprotection following TBI remains to be elucidated. The present study performed intraperitoneal harmine injections in rats (30 mg/kg per day for up to 5 days), in order to investigate whether harmine treatment attenuates brain edema and improves functional recovery in a rat model of TBI. The neuronal survival ratio and the protein expression of apoptosis-associated caspase 3 were also assessed in the hippocampus of the rat brain. Furthermore, the expression levels of GLT-1 and inflammatory cytokines were detected, in order to determine the underlying mechanisms. The results of the present study demonstrated that administration of harmine significantly attenuated cerebral edema, and improved learning and memory ability. In addition, harmine significantly increased the protein expression of GLT-1, and markedly attenuated the expression levels of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, thereby attenuating apoptotic neuronal death in the hippocampus. These results provided in vivo evidence that harmine may exert neuroprotective effects by synergistically reducing excitotoxicity and inflammation following TBI. PMID:26496827

  11. The role of mitochondria-mediated intrinsic death pathway in gingerdione derivative I6-induced neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Ho; Chen, Po-See; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Huang, Li-Jiau; Gean, Po-Wu; Chiu, Ted-H

    2012-03-01

    Neuronal death induced by I6 displayed apoptotic characteristics but the precise mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In the present studies, I6 at 24 h after intraperitoneal administration significantly decreased the density of surviving neurons and increased caspase-3 activity in frontal cortex, suggesting that peripherally administered I6 may cross BBB to induce CNS toxicity. In rat embryonic primary cortical cells, I6-induced reduction of mitochondrial viability and neuronal apoptosis was inhibited by vitamin E. In addition, I6-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused the disruption of mitochondria membrane potential (MMP), the release of cytochrome c, the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), resulting in activation of mitochondrial-mediated intrinsic death pathway. Pre-treatment with antioxidant vitamin E or N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely abolished the I6-induced generation of ROS, loss of MMP, release of cytochrome c, activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and cleavage of PARP. Carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP), a mitochondrial uncoupler, significantly reduced I6-induced neuronal death as well as caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. These results suggest that I6 induces neuronal death by promoting intracellular ROS production to cause a loss of MMP that result in release of cytochrome c and activation of mitochondria-mediated intrinsic death pathway.

  12. Effect of Polyphenols on Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Neuronal Death and Brain Edema in Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Panickar, Kiran S.; Anderson, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Polyphenols are natural substances with variable phenolic structures and are elevated in vegetables, fruits, grains, bark, roots, tea, and wine. There are over 8000 polyphenolic structures identified in plants, but edible plants contain only several hundred polyphenolic structures. In addition to their well-known antioxidant effects, select polyphenols also have insulin-potentiating, anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, anti-viral, anti-ulcer, and anti-apoptotic properties. One important consequence of ischemia is neuronal death and oxidative stress plays a key role in neuronal viability. In addition, neuronal death may be initiated by the activation of mitochondria-associated cell death pathways. Another consequence of ischemia that is possibly mediated by oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction is glial swelling, a component of cytotoxic brain edema. The purpose of this article is to review the current literature on the contribution of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction to neuronal death, cell swelling, and brain edema in ischemia. A review of currently known mechanisms underlying neuronal death and edema/cell swelling will be undertaken and the potential of dietary polyphenols to reduce such neural damage will be critically reviewed. PMID:22174658

  13. MPP+ induces necrostatin-1- and ferrostatin-1-sensitive necrotic death of neuronal SH-SY5Y cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Keisuke; Eguchi, Yutaka; Imagawa, Yusuke; Akai, Shuji; Mochizuki, Hideki; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide

    2017-01-01

    Regulation of cell death is potentially a powerful treatment modality for intractable diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases. Although there have been many reports about the possible involvement of various types of cell death in neurodegenerative diseases, it is still unclear exactly how neurons die in patients with these diseases, thus treatment strategies based on cell death regulation have not been established yet. To obtain some insight into the mechanisms of cell death involved in neurodegenerative diseases, we studied the effect of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) on the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y (a widely used model of Parkinson’s disease). We found that MPP+ predominantly induced non-apoptotic death of neuronally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. This cell death was strongly inhibited by necrostatin-1 (Nec-1), a necroptosis inhibitor, and by an indole-containing compound (3,3′-diindolylmethane: DIM). However, it occurred independently of receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1/3 (RIP1/RIP3), indicating that this form of cell death was not necroptosis. MPP+-induced cell death was also inhibited by several inhibitors of ferroptosis, including ferrostatin-1 (Fer-1). Although MPP+-induced death and ferroptosis shared some features, such as occurrence of lipid peroxidation and inhibition by Fer-1, MPP+-induced death seemed to be distinct from ferroptosis because MPP+-induced death (but not ferroptosis) was inhibited by Nec-1, was independent of p53, and was accompanied by ATP depletion and mitochondrial swelling. Further investigation of MPP+-induced non-apoptotic cell death may be useful for understanding the mechanisms of neuronal loss and for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease. PMID:28250973

  14. MPP+ induces necrostatin-1- and ferrostatin-1-sensitive necrotic death of neuronal SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Keisuke; Eguchi, Yutaka; Imagawa, Yusuke; Akai, Shuji; Mochizuki, Hideki; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide

    2017-01-01

    Regulation of cell death is potentially a powerful treatment modality for intractable diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases. Although there have been many reports about the possible involvement of various types of cell death in neurodegenerative diseases, it is still unclear exactly how neurons die in patients with these diseases, thus treatment strategies based on cell death regulation have not been established yet. To obtain some insight into the mechanisms of cell death involved in neurodegenerative diseases, we studied the effect of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) on the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y (a widely used model of Parkinson's disease). We found that MPP+ predominantly induced non-apoptotic death of neuronally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. This cell death was strongly inhibited by necrostatin-1 (Nec-1), a necroptosis inhibitor, and by an indole-containing compound (3,3'-diindolylmethane: DIM). However, it occurred independently of receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1/3 (RIP1/RIP3), indicating that this form of cell death was not necroptosis. MPP+-induced cell death was also inhibited by several inhibitors of ferroptosis, including ferrostatin-1 (Fer-1). Although MPP+-induced death and ferroptosis shared some features, such as occurrence of lipid peroxidation and inhibition by Fer-1, MPP+-induced death seemed to be distinct from ferroptosis because MPP+-induced death (but not ferroptosis) was inhibited by Nec-1, was independent of p53, and was accompanied by ATP depletion and mitochondrial swelling. Further investigation of MPP+-induced non-apoptotic cell death may be useful for understanding the mechanisms of neuronal loss and for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease.

  15. The Small-Molecule TrkB Agonist 7, 8-Dihydroxyflavone Decreases Hippocampal Newborn Neuron Death After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Gao, Xiang; Zhao, Shu; Hu, Weipeng; Chen, Jinhui

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies in rodents have shown that after a moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) with a controlled cortical impact (CCI) device, the adult-born immature granular neurons in the dentate gyrus are the most vulnerable cell type in the hippocampus. There is no effective approach for preventing immature neuron death after TBI. We found that tyrosine-related kinase B (TrkB), a receptor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is highly expressed in adult-born immature neurons. We determined that the small molecule imitating BDNF, 7, 8-dihydroxyflavone (DHF), increased phosphorylation of TrkB in immature neurons both in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment with DHF protected immature neurons from excitotoxicity-mediated death in vitro, and systemic administration of DHF before moderate CCI injury reduced the death of adult-born immature neurons in the hippocampus 24 hours after injury. By contrast, inhibiting BDNF signaling using the TrkB antagonist ANA12 attenuated the neuroprotective effects of DHF. These data indicate that DHF may be a promising chemical compound that promotes immature neuron survival after TBI through activation of the BDNF signaling pathway.

  16. Expanded polyglutamines in Caenorhabditis elegans cause axonal abnormalities and severe dysfunction of PLM mechanosensory neurons without cell death.

    PubMed

    Parker, J A; Connolly, J B; Wellington, C; Hayden, M; Dausset, J; Neri, C

    2001-11-06

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the protein huntingtin (htt). HD pathogenesis appears to involve the production of mutated N-terminal htt, cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregation of htt, and abnormal activity of htt interactor proteins essential to neuronal survival. Before cell death, neuronal dysfunction may be an important step of HD pathogenesis. To explore polyQ-mediated neuronal toxicity, we expressed the first 57 amino acids of human htt containing normal [19 Gln residues (Glns)] and expanded (88 or 128 Glns) polyQ fused to fluorescent marker proteins in the six touch receptor neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans. Expanded polyQ produced touch insensitivity in young adults. Noticeably, only 28 +/- 6% of animals with 128 Glns were touch sensitive in the tail, as mediated by the PLM neurons. Similar perinuclear deposits and faint nuclear accumulation of fusion proteins with 19, 88, and 128 Glns were observed. In contrast, significant deposits and morphological abnormalities in PLM cell axons were observed with expanded polyQ (128 Glns) and partially correlated with touch insensitivity. PLM cell death was not detected in young or old adults. These animals indicate that significant neuronal dysfunction without cell death may be induced by expanded polyQ and may correlate with axonal insults, and not cell body aggregates. These animals also provide a suitable model to perform in vivo suppression of polyQ-mediated neuronal dysfunction.

  17. Intravenous immunoglobulin protects neurons against amyloid beta-peptide toxicity and ischemic stroke by attenuating multiple cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Widiapradja, Alexander; Vegh, Viktor; Lok, Ker Zhing; Manzanero, Silvia; Thundyil, John; Gelderblom, Mathias; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Pavlovski, Dale; Tang, Sung-Chun; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Magnus, Tim; Chan, Sic L; Sobey, Christopher G; Reutens, David; Basta, Milan; Mattson, Mark P; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2012-07-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) preparations obtained by fractionating blood plasma, are increasingly being used increasingly as an effective therapeutic agent in treatment of several inflammatory diseases. Its use as a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of stroke and Alzheimer's disease has been proposed, but little is known about the neuroprotective mechanisms of IVIg. In this study, we investigated the effect of IVIg on downstream signaling pathways that are involved in neuronal cell death in experimental models of stroke and Alzheimer's disease. Treatment of cultured neurons with IVIg reduced simulated ischemia- and amyloid βpeptide (Aβ)-induced caspase 3 cleavage, and phosphorylation of the cell death-associated kinases p38MAPK, c-Jun NH2 -terminal kinase and p65, in vitro. Additionally, Aβ-induced accumulation of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal was attenuated in neurons treated with IVIg. IVIg treatment also up-regulated the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl2 in cortical neurons under ischemia-like conditions and exposure to Aβ. Treatment of mice with IVIg reduced neuronal cell loss, apoptosis and infarct size, and improved functional outcome in a model of focal ischemic stroke. Together, these results indicate that IVIg acts directly on neurons to protect them against ischemic stroke and Aβ-induced neuronal apoptosis by inhibiting cell death pathways and by elevating levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2.

  18. The factors affecting early death after the initial therapy of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Gunes, Gursel; Eliacik, Eylem; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Etgul, Sezgin; Aslan, Tuncay; Yayar, Okan; Aydin, Seda; Demiroglu, Haluk; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Sayinalp, Nilgun; Goker, Hakan; Aksu, Salih; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    There are some improvements in management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, induction-induced deaths still remain as a major problem. The aim of this study is to assess clinical parameters affecting early death in patients with AML. 199 AML patients, who were treated with intensive, non-intensive or supportive treatment between 2002 and 2014 in Hacettepe Hematology Department, were analyzed retrospectively. In our study early death rate for elderly was found to be lower than previous reports whereas it was similar for those who were under age of 60. Better ECOG performance (ECOG performance score 0 and 1) and non-intensive treatment associated with lower early death rates, however APL-type disease associated with higher early death rates. ECOG performance score at diagnosis was found to be the most related independent factor with higher rate of early death in 15 days after treatment (P<0.001). Therefore we decided to understand the factors which were related with ECOG. WBC count at diagnosis was found to be the only related parameter with ECOG performance score. Leucocyte count at diagnosis appears like to have an indirect effect on early death in AML patients. It maybe suggested that in recent years there is an improvement in early death rates of elderly AML patients. The currently reported findings require prospective validation and would encourage the incorporation of other next generation genomics for the prediction of early death and overall risk status of AML. PMID:26885243

  19. [The significance of ethanolemia for the diagnosis of death from acute ethanol poisoning].

    PubMed

    Kapustin, A V; Panfilenko, O A; Serebriakova, V G

    2002-01-01

    Foci of myolysis of cardiac muscle fibers are suggested to be used for evaluation of thanatogenetic significance of ethanol concentration in cadaveric blood. This sign of acute ethanol poisoning is absent in case of other cause of death in a state of ethanol intoxication, even in the presence of high ethanolemia. Therefore, foci of myolysis are a sign of ethanol tolerance.

  20. The Anion Gap is a Predictive Clinical Marker for Death in Patients with Acute Pesticide Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Hyo; Park, Samel; Lee, Jung-Won; Hwang, Il-Woong; Moon, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Park, Su-Yeon; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2016-07-01

    Pesticide formulation includes solvents (methanol and xylene) and antifreeze (ethylene glycol) whose metabolites are anions such as formic acid, hippuric acid, and oxalate. However, the effect of the anion gap on clinical outcome in acute pesticide intoxication requires clarification. In this prospective study, we compared the anion gap and other parameters between surviving versus deceased patients with acute pesticide intoxication. The following parameters were assessed in 1,058 patients with acute pesticide intoxication: blood chemistry (blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, glucose, lactic acid, liver enzymes, albumin, globulin, and urate), urinalysis (ketone bodies), arterial blood gas analysis, electrolytes (Na(+), K(+), Cl(-) HCO3 (-), Ca(++)), pesticide field of use, class, and ingestion amount, clinical outcome (death rate, length of hospital stay, length of intensive care unit stay, and seriousness of toxic symptoms), and the calculated anion gap. Among the 481 patients with a high anion gap, 52.2% had a blood pH in the physiologic range, 35.8% had metabolic acidosis, and 12.1% had acidemia. Age, anion gap, pesticide field of use, pesticide class, seriousness of symptoms (all P < 0.001), and time lag after ingestion (P = 0.048) were significant risk factors for death in univariate analyses. Among these, age, anion gap, and pesticide class were significant risk factors for death in a multiple logistic regression analysis (P < 0.001). In conclusions, high anion gap is a significant risk factor for death, regardless of the accompanying acid-base balance status in patients with acute pesticide intoxication.

  1. Torpedo electromotor system development: neuronal cell death and electric organ development in the fourth branchial arch.

    PubMed

    Fox, G Q; Richardson, G P; Kirk, C

    1985-06-08

    The fourth branchial arch of Torpedo marmorata has been examined at the light and electron microscopic level during development. Of interest was the determination of the extent of electric organ tissue reported to be present in this arch and its possible relationship to electromotoneuron cell death in the electric lobes. The main electric organ of the torpedo is derived from the hyoid and first three branchial arches and is innervated by four major electromotor nerves. Extensive electromotoneuron cell death occurs in the electric lobes and most notably in the posterior poles. This feature could be due to a tendency for these neurons to innervate the fourth branchial arch where little or no electric tissue is formed. Our findings support this conclusion but are not entirely consistent with the idea that a population mismatch has occurred. This is because cell death precedes the genesis of the target cells. The presence of innervated differentiated electric tissue in this arch is also reported, leading to the conclusion that Torpedo marmorata possesses an accessory electric organ.

  2. Evaluation of the importance of astrocytes when screening for acute toxicity in neuronal cell systems.

    PubMed

    Woehrling, E K; Hill, E J; Coleman, M D

    2010-02-01

    Reliable, high throughput, in vitro preliminary screening batteries have the potential to greatly accelerate the rate at which regulatory neurotoxicity data is generated. This study evaluated the importance of astrocytes when predicting acute toxic potential using a neuronal screening battery of pure neuronal (NT2.N) and astrocytic (NT2.A) and integrated neuronal/astrocytic (NT2.N/A) cell systems derived from the human NT2.D1 cell line, using biochemical endpoints (mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) depolarisation and ATP and GSH depletion). Following exposure for 72 h, the known acute human neurotoxicants trimethyltin-chloride, chloroquine and 6-hydroxydopamine were frequently capable of disrupting biochemical processes in all of the cell systems at non-cytotoxic concentrations. Astrocytes provide key metabolic and protective support to neurons during toxic challenge in vivo and generally the astrocyte containing cell systems showed increased tolerance to toxicant insult compared with the NT2.N mono-culture in vitro. Whilst there was no consistent relationship between MMP, ATP and GSH log IC(50) values for the NT2.N/A and NT2.A cell systems, these data did provide preliminary evidence of modulation of the acute neuronal toxic response by astrocytes. In conclusion, the suitability of NT2 neurons and astrocytes as cell systems for acute toxicity screening deserves further investigation.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid high mobility group box 1 is associated with neuronal death in subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuo-Chuan; Tang, Sung-Chun; Lee, Jing-Er; Li, Yu-I; Huang, Yi-Shuian; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Arumugam, Thiruma V; Tu, Yong-Kwang

    2017-02-01

    We aim to determine the cerebrospinal fluid levels of high mobility group box 1 in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients and to investigate the involvement of the receptor for advanced glycation end products and high mobility group box 1 in the pathogenesis of post-subarachnoid hemorrhage neuronal death. The study included 40 patients (mean age, 59 ± 19 years) with Fisher's grade ≥ III aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Cerebrospinal fluid was collected on the seventh day post-hemorrhage. Receptor for advanced glycation end products expression was examined in rat brain tissue following subarachnoid hemorrhage and in cultured neurons exposed to post-subarachnoid hemorrhage cerebrospinal fluid. Therapeutic effects of the recombinant soluble form of RAGE on subarachnoid hemorrhage models were also investigated. The results indicated that a higher level of cerebrospinal fluid high mobility group box 1 was independently associated with unfavorable outcome at three months post-subarachnoid hemorrhage (OR = 1.061, 95% CI: 1.005-1.121). Expression of RAGE increased in post-subarachnoid hemorrhage rat brain cells and in cultured neuron with stimulation of post-subarachnoid hemorrhage cerebrospinal fluid. Administration of recombinant soluble form of RAGE significantly reduced the number of positive TUNEL staining cells in subarachnoid hemorrhage rat and improved cell viability in post-subarachnoid hemorrhage cerebrospinal fluid-treated cultured neurons. Thus, the level of cerebrospinal fluid high mobility group box 1 can be a prognostic indicator for patients with Fisher's grade ≥ III aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and that treatment with soluble form of RAGE is a novel approach for subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  4. Hydroxysafflor Yellow A Protects Neurons From Excitotoxic Death through Inhibition of NMDARs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingtao; Ma, Zhiyuan; Fu, Zhongxiao; Gao, Su; Yang, Liu; Jin, Yan; Sun, Hui; Wang, Chaoyun; Fan, Weiming; Chen, Lin; Zheng, Qing-Yin; Bi, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Excessive glutamate release causes overactivation of N-methyl d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), leading to excitatory neuronal damage in cerebral ischemia. Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA), a compound extracted from Carthamus tinctorius L., has been reported to exert a neuroprotective effect in many pathological conditions, including brain ischemia. However, the underlying mechanism of HSYA's effect on neurons remains elusive. In the present study, we conducted experiments using patch-clamp recording of mouse hippocampal slices. In addition, we performed Ca2+ imaging, Western blots, as well as mitochondrial-targeted circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein transfection into cultured hippocampal neurons in order to decipher the physiological mechanism underlying HSYA's neuroprotective effect. Through the electrophysiology experiments, we found that HSYA inhibited NMDAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor and γ-aminobutyric acid A-type receptor-mediated currents. This inhibitory effect of HSYA on NMDARs was concentration dependent. HSYA did not show any preferential inhibition of either N-methyl d-aspartate receptor subtype 2A- or N-methyl d-aspartate receptor subtype 2B- subunit-containing NMDARs. Additionally, HSYA exhibits a facilitatory effect on paired NMDAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents. Furthermore, HSYA reduced the magnitude of NMDAR-mediated membrane depolarization currents evoked by oxygen-glucose deprivation, and suppressed oxygen-glucose deprivation–induced and NMDAR-dependent ischemic long-term potentiation, which is believed to cause severe reperfusion damage after ischemia. Through the molecular biology experiments, we found that HSYA inhibited the NMDA-induced and NMDAR-mediated intracellular Ca2+ concentration increase in hippocampal cultures, reduced apoptotic and necrotic cell deaths, and prevented mitochondrial damage. Together, our data

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction and death in motor neurons exposed to the glutathione-depleting agent ethacrynic acid.

    PubMed

    Rizzardini, M; Lupi, M; Bernasconi, S; Mangolini, A; Cantoni, L

    2003-03-15

    This study investigated the mechanisms of toxicity of glutathione (GSH) depletion in one cell type, the motor neuron. Ethacrynic acid (EA) (100 microM) was added to immortalized mouse motor neurons (NSC-34) to deplete both cytosolic and mitochondrial glutathione rapidly. This caused a drop in GSH to 25% of the initial level in 1 h and complete loss in 4 h. This effect was accompanied by enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a peak after 2 h of exposure, and by signs of mitochondrial dysfunction such as a decrease in 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) (30% less after 4 h). The increase in ROS and the MTT reduction were both EA concentration-dependent. Expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a marker of oxidative stress, also increased. The mitochondrial damage was monitored by measuring the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) from the uptake of rhodamine 123 into mitochondria. MMP dropped (20%) after only 1 h exposure to EA, and slowly continued to decline until 3 h, with a steep drop at 5 h (50% decrease), i.e. after the complete GSH loss. Quantification of DNA fragmentation by the TUNEL technique showed that the proportion of cells with fragmented nuclei rose from 10% after 5 h EA exposure to about 65% at 18 h. These results indicate that EA-induced GSH depletion rapidly impairs the mitochondrial function of motor neurons, and this precedes cell death. This experimental model of oxidative toxicity could be useful to study mechanisms of diseases like spinal cord injury (SCI) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), where motor neurons are the vulnerable population and oxidative stress has a pathogenic role.

  6. Prefrontal cortex gates acute morphine action on dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changliang; Fang, Xing; Wu, Qianqian; Jin, Guozhang; Zhen, Xuechu

    2015-08-01

    Morphine excites dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), an effect mediated by both local and systemic mechanisms. While the importance of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) - VTA circuit in opiate addiction is well established, little is known about how the PFC regulates the activity of VTA DA neurons upon morphine stimulation. One major challenge is that VTA DA neurons are highly heterogeneous in terms of projection and regulation, making their responses to PFC manipulations variable. Our previous work has identified a subgroup of VTA DA neurons exhibiting significant slow oscillation in their firing sequence, and demonstrated that most of these neurons are functionally connected with the PFC. In the present study, we focus our efforts only on VTA DA neurons expressing strong slow oscillation, and report that blocking the neuronal activity in the PFC remarkably attenuates the morphine-induced excitation of these neurons. Using in vivo microdialysis, we find that inactivation of the PFC also reduces the morphine-induced elevation of DA levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Furthermore, 24 h after only single morphine exposure, PFC-inactivation failed to prevent subsequent morphine challenge from exciting VTA DA neurons, which is paralleled by altered response of PFC pyramidal neurons to morphine stimulation. Our results indicate that the PFC gates acute morphine action on a subset of VTA DA neurons, which is highly plastic and can be functionally remodeled by morphine exposure.

  7. Effect of acute lateral hemisection of the spinal cord on spinal neurons of postural networks.

    PubMed

    Zelenin, P V; Lyalka, V F; Orlovsky, G N; Deliagina, T G

    2016-12-17

    In quadrupeds, acute lateral hemisection of the spinal cord (LHS) severely impairs postural functions, which recover over time. Postural limb reflexes (PLRs) represent a substantial component of postural corrections in intact animals. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of acute LHS on two populations of spinal neurons (F and E) mediating PLRs. For this purpose, in decerebrate rabbits, responses of individual neurons from L5 to stimulation causing PLRs were recorded before and during reversible LHS (caused by temporal cold block of signal transmission in lateral spinal pathways at L1), as well as after acute surgical LHS at L1. Results obtained after Sur-LHS were compared to control data obtained in our previous study. We found that acute LHS caused disappearance of PLRs on the affected side. It also changed a proportion of different types of neurons on that side. A significant decrease and increase in the proportion of F- and non-modulated neurons, respectively, was found. LHS caused a significant decrease in most parameters of activity in F-neurons located in the ventral horn on the lesioned side and in E-neurons of the dorsal horn on both sides. These changes were caused by a significant decrease in the efficacy of posture-related sensory input from the ipsilateral limb to F-neurons, and from the contralateral limb to both F- and E-neurons. These distortions in operation of postural networks underlie the impairment of postural control after acute LHS, and represent a starting point for the subsequent recovery of postural functions.

  8. Tat-HSP22 inhibits oxidative stress-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death by regulation of the mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hyo Sang; Kim, Dae Won; Shin, Min Jea; Cho, Su Bin; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chi Hern; Yeo, Eun Ji; Choi, Yeon Joo; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Sohn, Eun Jeong; Son, Ora; Cho, Sung-Woo; Kim, Duk-Soo; Yu, Yeon Hee; Lee, Keun Wook; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2017-01-04

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the progression of various neuronal diseases including ischemia. Heat shock protein 22 (HSP22) is known to protect cells against oxidative stress. However, the protective effects and mechanisms of HSP22 in hippocampal neuronal cells under oxidative stress remain unknown. In this study, we determined whether HSP22 protects against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress in HT-22 using Tat-HSP22 fusion protein. We found that Tat-HSP22 transduced into HT-22 cells and that H2O2-induced cell death, oxidative stress, and DNA damage were significantly reduced by Tat-HSP22. In addition, Tat-HSP22 markedly inhibited H2O2-induced mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, cleaved caspase-3, and Bax expression levels, while Bcl-2 expression levels were increased in HT-22 cells. Further, we showed that Tat-HSP22 transduced into animal brain and inhibited cleaved-caspase-3 expression levels as well as significantly inhibited hippocampal neuronal cell death in the CA1 region of animals in the ischemic animal model. In the present study, we demonstrated that transduced Tat-HSP22 attenuates oxidative stress-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death through the mitochondrial signaling pathway and plays a crucial role in inhibiting neuronal cell death, suggesting that Tat-HSP22 protein may be used to prevent oxidative stress-related brain diseases including ischemia.

  9. Brain neuronal chromatin responses in acute soman intoxicated rats.

    PubMed

    Martin, L J; Doebler, J A; Wall, T J; Shih, T M; Anthony, A

    1986-08-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats (200 g) were injected subcutaneously with soman, a potent neuronal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor, at doses of 0.5, 0.8 and 1.0 LD50 (1 LD50 = 135 micrograms/kg) before decapitation at 1 and 24 h post-exposure. Correlative data were obtained on the severity of brain AChE inactivation and physicochemical changes in nuclear chromatin of cerebrocortical (layer V) and striatal neurons using Feulgen-DNA (F-DNA) cytophotometry and ocular filar micrometry. Decreased lability of neurons to F-DNA acid hydrolysis (reduced F-DNA yield), nuclear shrinkage and chromatin aggregation (decreased chromophore area) were used as indices of suppression of genomic template activity; conversely, increases in F-DNA yield and chromophore area signify enhanced neuroexcitation. At 1 hr post-soman there was a dose-dependent inactivation of AChE with a moderate increase in chromatin activation, i.e., nuclear hypertrophy and chromatin dispersion. At 24 hr post-soman there was a partial restoration of AChE activity, notably in striatal neurons, with a suppression in chromatin template activity. These data indicate that actions of soman on neuronal functioning are time-dependent. The absence of any dose-related neuronal chromatin changes may signify existence of non-cholinergic mediated events.

  10. In vitro research of the alteration of neurons in vagal core in medulla oblongata at asphyxic deaths.

    PubMed

    Haliti, Naim; Islami, Hilmi; Elezi, Nevzat; Shabani, Ragip; Abdullahu, Bedri; Dragusha, Gani

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to research the morphological changes of neurons in the vagus nerve nuclei in medulla oblongata in asphyxia related death cases. Morphological changes that were investigated were mainly in the dorsal motor respiratory center (DMRC), nucleus tractus solitarius (nTS) and nucleus ambigus (nA) in the medulla oblongata. In our research, the autopsy material from asphyxia related death cases was used from various etiologies: monoxide carbon (CO), liquid drowning, strangulation, electricity, clinical-pathological death, firing weapon, explosive weapon, sharp and blunt objects and death cases due to accident. The material selected for research was taken from medulla oblongata and lungs from all lobes. The material from the medulla oblongata and lungs was fixed in a 10% solution of buffered formalin. Special histochemical methods for central nervous system (CNS) were employed like: Cresyl echt violet, toluidin blue, Sevier-Munger modification and Grimelius. For stereometrical analysis of the quantitative density of the neurons the universal testing system Weibel M42 was used. The acquired results show that in sudden asphyxia related death cases, there are alterations in the nuclei of vagal nerve in form of: central chromatolysis, axonal retraction, axonal fragmentation, intranuclear vacuolization, cytoplasmic vacuolization, edema, condensation and dispersion of substance of Nissl, proliferation of oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and microglia. The altered population of vagus nerve neurons does not show an important statistical significance compared to the overall quantity of the neurons in the nuclei of the vagus nerve (p<0.05).

  11. A Case of Acute Motor Axonal Neuropathy Mimicking Brain Death and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Sandhya; Poysophon, Poysophon; Poblete, Roy; Kim-Tenser, May

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case report of fulminant Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) mimicking brain death. A previously healthy 60-year-old male was admitted to the neurointensive care unit after developing rapidly progressive weakness and respiratory failure. On presentation, the patient was found to have absent brainstem and spinal cord reflexes resembling that of brain death. Acute motor axonal neuropathy, a subtype of GBS, was diagnosed by cerebrospinal fluid and nerve conduction velocity testing. An electroencephalogram showed that the patient had normal, appropriately reactive brain function. Transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound showed appropriate blood flow to the brain. GBS rarely presents with weakness so severe as to mimic brain death. This article provides a review of similar literature. This case demonstrates the importance of performing a proper brain death examination, which includes evaluation for irreversible cerebral injury, exclusion of any confounding conditions, and performance of tests such as electroencephalography and TCDs when uncertainty exists about the reliability of the clinical exam.

  12. Quercetin attenuates neuronal death against aluminum-induced neurodegeneration in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D R; Wani, W Y; Sunkaria, A; Kandimalla, R J; Sharma, R K; Verma, D; Bal, A; Gill, K D

    2016-06-02

    Aluminum is a light weight and toxic metal present ubiquitously on earth, which has gained considerable attention due to its neurotoxic effects. It also has been linked ecologically and epidemiologically to several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Guamanian-Parkinsonian complex and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The mechanism of aluminum neurotoxicity is poorly understood, but it is well documented that aluminum generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). Enhanced ROS production leads to disruption of cellular antioxidant defense systems and release of cytochrome c (cyt-c) from mitochondria to cytosol resulting in apoptotic cell death. Quercetin (a natural flavonoid) protects it from oxidative damage and has been shown to decrease mitochondrial damage in various animal models of oxidative stress. We hypothesized that if oxidative damage to mitochondria does play a significant role in aluminum-induced neurodegeneration, and then quercetin should ameliorate neuronal apoptosis. Administration of quercetin (10 mg/kg body wt/day) reduced aluminum (10 mg/kg body wt/day)-induced oxidative stress (decreased ROS production, increased mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity). In addition, quercetin also prevents aluminum-induced translocation of cyt-c, and up-regulates Bcl-2, down-regulates Bax, p53, caspase-3 activation and reduces DNA fragmentation. Quercetin also obstructs aluminum-induced neurodegenerative changes in aluminum-treated rats as seen by Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) staining. Further electron microscopic studies revealed that quercetin attenuates aluminum-induced mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae and chromatin condensation. These results indicate that treatment with quercetin may represent a therapeutic strategy to attenuate the neuronal death against aluminum-induced neurodegeneration.

  13. Methylglyoxal causes strong weakening of detoxifying capacity and apoptotic cell death in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Di Loreto, Silvia; Zimmitti, Vincenzo; Sebastiani, Pierluigi; Cervelli, Carla; Falone, Stefano; Amicarelli, Fernanda

    2008-01-01

    The hippocampus is known to play a crucial role in learning and memory. Recent data from literature show that cognitive problems, common to aged or diabetic patients, may be related to accumulation of toxic alpha-oxoaldehydes such as methylglyoxal. Thus, it is possible that methylglyoxal could be, at least in part, responsible for the impairment of cognitive functions, and the knowledge of the mechanisms through which this compound elicits neuronal toxicity could be useful for the development of possible therapeutic strategies. We previously reported a high susceptibility of hippocampal neurons to methylglyoxal, through an oxidation-dependent mechanism. In the present study, we extend our investigation on the molecular mechanisms which underlie methylglyoxal toxicity, focusing on possible effects on expression and activity of glyoxalases, its main detoxifying enzymes, and glutathione peroxidase, as well as on the levels of reduced glutathione. We also investigate methylglyoxal-induced modulation of brain derived neurotrophic factor and proinflammatory cytokines. Our results show that methylglyoxal causes a dramatic depletion of reduced glutathione and a significant inhibition of both glyoxalase and glutathione peroxidase activities. Furthermore, methylglyoxal treatment seems to affect the expression of inflammatory cytokines and survival factors. In conclusion, our findings suggest that methylglyoxal-induced neurotoxicity occurs through the impairment of detoxification pathway and depletion of reduced glutathione. This, in turn, triggers widespread apoptotic cell death, occurring through the convergence of both mitochondrial and Fas-receptor pathways.

  14. Galectin-3 expression in delayed neuronal death of hippocampal CA1 following transient forebrain ischemia, and its inhibition by hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kunio; Niwa, Masayuki; Goda, Wael; Binh, Nguyen Huy; Nakashima, Masaya; Takamatsu, Manabu; Hara, Akira

    2011-03-25

    The ischemic damage in the hippocampal CA1 sector following transient ischemia, delayed neuronal death, is a typical apoptosis, but the mechanism underlying the delayed neuronal death is still far from fully understood. Galectin-3 is a β-galactosidase-binding lectin which is important in cell proliferation and apoptotic regulation. Galectin-3 is expressed by microglial cells in experimental models of adult stroke. It has been reported that activated microglial cells are widely observed in the brain, including in the hippocampal CA1 region after transient ischemic insult. In the present study, time course expression of galectin-3 following transient forebrain ischemia in gerbils was examined by immunohistochemistry, combined with Iba-1 immunostaining (a specific microglial cell marker), hematoxylin and eosin staining (for morphological observation), and in situ terminal dUTP-biotin nick end labeling of DNA fragments method (for determination of cell death). Following transient ischemia, we observed a transient increase of galectin-3 expression in CA1 region, which was maximal 96h after reperfusion. Galectin-3 expression was predominately localized within CA1 region and observed only in cells which expressed Iba-1. The galectin-3-positive microglial cells emerge after the onset of neuronal cell damage. Expressions of galectin-3 and Iba-1 were strongly reduced by hypothermia during ischemic insult. Prevention of galectin-3 and Iba-1 expression in microglia by hypothermia has led us to propose that hypothermia either inhibits microglial activation or prevents delayed neuronal death itself. Our results indicate that galectin-3 might exert its effect by modulating the neuronal damage in delayed neuronal death.

  15. Necroptosis drives motor neuron death in models of both sporadic and familial ALS

    PubMed Central

    Re, Diane B.; Verche, Virginia Le; Yu, Changhao; Amoroso, Mackenzie W.; Politi, Kristin A.; Phani, Sudarshan; Ikiz, Burcin; Hoffmann, Lucas; Koolen, Martijn; Nagata, Tetsuya; Papadimitriou, Dimitra; Nagy, Peter; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi; Kariya, Shingo; Wichterle, Hynek; Henderson, Christopher E.; Przedborski, Serge

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Most cases of neurodegenerative disease are sporadic, hindering the use of genetic mouse models to analyze disease mechanisms. Focusing on the motor neuron (MN) disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) we therefore devised a fully humanized co-culture model composed of human adult primary sporadic ALS (sALS) astrocytes and human embryonic stem cell-derived MNs. The model reproduces the cardinal features of human ALS: sALS astrocytes, but not those from control patients, trigger selective death of MNs. The mechanisms underlying this non-cell-autonomous toxicity were investigated in both astrocytes and MNs. Although causal in familial ALS (fALS), SOD1 does not contribute to the toxicity of sALS astrocytes. Death of MNs triggered by either sALS or fALS astrocytes occurs through necroptosis, a form of programmed necrosis involving receptor-interacting protein 1 and the mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein. The necroptotic pathway therefore constitutes a novel potential therapeutic target for this incurable disease. PMID:24508385

  16. Pathophysiological role of different tubular epithelial cell death modes in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Sancho-Martínez, Sandra M.; López-Novoa, José M.; López-Hernández, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    The histological substrate of many forms of intrinsic acute kidney injury (AKI) has been classically attributed to tubular necrosis. However, more recent studies indicate that necrosis is not the main form of cell death in AKI and that other forms such as apoptosis, regulated necrosis (i.e. necroptosis and parthanatos), autophagic cell death and mitotic catastrophe, also participate in AKI and that their contribution depends on the cause and stage of AKI. Herein, we briefly summarize the main characteristics of the major types of cell death and we also critically review the existing evidence on the occurrence of different types of cell death reported in the most common experimental models of AKI and human specimens. We also discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms linking tubule epithelial cell death with reduced glomerular filtration, azotaemia and hydroelectrolytic imbalance. For instance, special relevance is given to the analysis of the inflammatory component of some forms of cell death over that of others, as an important and differential pathophysiological determinant. Finally, known molecular mechanisms and signalling pathways involved in each cell death type pose appropriate targets to specifically prevent or reverse AKI, provided that further knowledge of their participation and repercussion in each AKI syndrome is progressively increased in the near future. PMID:26413280

  17. Sensitization of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells for LCL161-induced cell death by targeting redox homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Haß, Christina; Belz, Katharina; Schoeneberger, Hannah; Fulda, Simone

    2016-04-01

    Disturbed redox homeostasis with both elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and antioxidant defense mechanisms has been reported in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We therefore hypothesized that inhibition of pathways responsible for ROS detoxification renders ALL cells more susceptible for cell death. Here, we report that pharmacological inhibitors of key pathways for the elimination of ROS, i.e. Erastin, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and Auranofin, sensitize ALL cells for cell death upon treatment with the Smac mimetic LCL161 that antagonizes Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Erastin, BSO or Auranofin significantly increase LCL161-induced cell death and also act in concert with LCL161 to profoundly suppress long-term clonogenic survival in several ALL cell lines. Erastin or BSO cooperates with LCL161 to stimulate ROS production and lipid peroxidation prior to cell death. ROS production and lipid peroxidation are required for this cotreatment-induced cell death, since ROS scavengers or pharmacological inhibition of lipid peroxidation provides significant protection against cell death. These results emphasize that inhibition of antioxidant defense mechanisms can serve as a potent approach to prime ALL cells for LCL161-induced cell death.

  18. Medical neglect death due to acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: an autopsy case report.

    PubMed

    Usumoto, Yosuke; Sameshima, Naomi; Tsuji, Akiko; Kudo, Keiko; Nishida, Naoki; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of 2-year-old girl who died of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), the most common cancer in children. She had no remarkable medical history. She was transferred to a hospital because of respiratory distress and died 4 hours after arrival. Two weeks before death, she had a fever of 39 degrees C, which subsided after the administration of a naturopathic herbal remedy. She developed jaundice 1 week before death, and her condition worsened on the day of death. Laboratory test results on admission showed a markedly elevated white blood cell count. Accordingly, the cause of death was suspected to be acute leukaemia. Forensic autopsy revealed the cause of death to be precursor B-cell ALL. With advancements in medical technology, the 5-year survival rate of children with ALL is nearly 90%. However, in this case, the deceased's parents preferred complementary and alternative medicine (i.e., naturopathy) to evidence-based medicine and had not taken her to a hospital for a medical check-up or immunisation since she was an infant. Thus, if she had received routine medical care, she would have a more than 60% chance of being alive 5 years after diagnosis. Therefore, we conclude that the parents should be accused of medical neglect regardless of their motives.

  19. Arctic ground squirrel neuronal progenitor cells resist oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced death

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Kelly L; Wells, Matthew; McGee, Rebecca; Ross, Austin P; Kelleher-Andersson, Judith

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the influence of ischemia/reperfusion on arctic ground squirrel (AGS) neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs), we subjected these cultured cells to oxygen and glucose deprivation. METHODS: AGS NPCs were expanded and differentiated into NPCs and as an ischemia vulnerable control, commercially available human NPCs (hNPCs) were seeded from thawed NPCs. NPCs, identified by expression of TUJ1 were seen at 14-21 d in vitro (DIV). Cultures were exposed to control conditions, hypoxia, oxygen and glucose deprivation or glucose deprivation alone or following return to normal conditions to model reperfusion. Cell viability and death were assessed from loss of ATP as well as from measures of alamarBlue® and lactate dehydrogenase in the media and from counts of TUJ1 positive cells using immunocytochemistry. Dividing cells were identified by expression of Ki67 and phenotyped by double labeling with GFAP, MAP2ab or TUJ1. RESULTS: We report that when cultured in NeuraLife™, AGS cells remain viable out to 21 DIV, continue to express TUJ1 and begin to express MAP2ab. Viability of hNPCs assessed by fluorescence alamarBlue (arbitrary units) depends on both glucose and oxygen availability [viability of hNPCs after 24 h oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) with return of oxygen and glucose decreased from 48151 ± 4551 in control cultures to 43481 ± 2413 after OGD, P < 0.05]. By contrast, when AGS NPCs are exposed to the same OGD with reperfusion at 14 DIV, cell viability assessed by alamarBlue increased from 165305 ± 11719 in control cultures to 196054 ± 13977 after OGD. Likewise AGS NPCs recovered ATP (92766 ± 6089 in control and 92907 ± 4290 after modeled reperfusion; arbitrary luminescence units), and doubled in the ratio of TUJ1 expressing neurons to total dividing cells (0.11 ± 0.04 in control cultures vs 0.22 ± 0.2 after modeled reperfusion, P < 0.05). Maintaining AGS NPCs for a longer time in culture lowered resistance to injury, however, did not impair

  20. Acute effect of exposure of mollusk single neuron to 900-MHz mobile phone radiation.

    PubMed

    Partsvania, B; Sulaberidze, T; Shoshiashvili, L; Modebadze, Z

    2011-09-01

    The goal of the present work was to explore the influence of commercially available cell phone irradiation on the single neuron excitability and memory processes. A Transverse Electromagnetic Cell (TEM Cell) was used to expose single neurons of mollusk to the electromagnetic field. Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method was used for modeling the TEM Cell and the electromagnetic field interactions with living nerve ganglion and neurons. Neuron electrophysiology was investigated using standard microelectrode technique. The specific absorption rate (SAR) deposited into the single neuron was calculated to be 0.63 W/kg with a temperature increment of 0.1°C. After acute exposure, average firing threshold of the action potentials was not changed. However, the average latent period was significantly decreased. This indicates that together with latent period the threshold and the time of habituation might be altered during exposure. However, these alterations are transient and only latent period remains on the changed level.

  1. FoxO3a is activated and executes neuron death via Bim in response to β-amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Sanphui, P; Biswas, S C

    2013-01-01

    The molecules that mediate death of selective neurons in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are mostly unknown. The Forkhead transcription factor FoxO3a has emerged as an important mediator of cell fate including apoptosis. When phosphorylated by Akt, it is localized in the cytosol as an inactive complex bound with 14-3-3 protein. For activation and localization of FoxO3a in the nucleus, further modifications are required, such as phosphorylation by mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) and arginine methylation by protein arginine methyltransferase1. We report here that Akt-mediated phosphorylation of FoxO3a is diminished in neurons exposed to oligomeric β-amyloid (Aβ), in vitro and in vivo. We also find that oligomeric Aβ activates FoxO3a by MST1 phosphorylation and arginine methylation in primary cultures of hippocampal and cortical neurons. Moreover, FoxO3a translocates from the cytosol to nucleus in cultured neurons in response to Aβ. Most importantly, the nuclear redistribution of FoxO3a is significantly increased in Aβ-overexpressing AβPPswe-PS1dE9 mice and Aβ-infused rat brains. We further find that FoxO3a is essential for loss of neurons and neural networks in response to Aβ. Recent reports implicate Bim, a pro-apoptotic member of Bcl-2 family, in neuron death in AD, as a key target of this transcription factor. We show that Bim is a direct target of FoxO3a in Aβ-treated neurons. Our findings thus indicate that FoxO3a is activated, translocated to the nucleus and mediates neuron death via Bim in response to Aβ toxicity. PMID:23661003

  2. Homocysteine-NMDA receptor mediated activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase leads to neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ranjana; Paul, Surojit

    2009-01-01

    Hyper-homocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for stroke and neurological abnormalities. However the underlying cellular mechanisms by which elevated homocysteine can promote neuronal death is not clear. In the present study we have examined the role of NMDA receptor mediated activation of the extracellular-signal regulated mitogen activated protein (ERK MAP) kinase pathway in homocysteine-dependent neurotoxicity. The study demonstrates that in neurons L-homocysteine-induced cell death is mediated through activation of NMDA receptors. The study also shows that homocysteine-dependent NMDA receptor stimulation and resultant Ca2+ influx leads to rapid and sustained phosphorylation of ERK MAP kinase. Inhibition of ERK phosphorylation attenuates homocysteine mediated neuronal cell death thereby demonstrating that activation of ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway is an intermediate step that couples homocysteine mediated NMDA receptor stimulation to neuronal death. The findings also show that cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB), a pro-survival transcription factor and a downstream target of ERK, is only transiently activated following homocysteine exposure. The sustained activation of ERK but a transient activation of CREB together suggest that exposure to homocysteine initiates a feedback loop that shuts off CREB signaling without affecting ERK phosphorylation and thereby facilitates homocysteine mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:19508427

  3. Activity-dependent modulation of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone neurone activity by acute oestradiol.

    PubMed

    Romanò, Nicola; Herbison, Allan E

    2012-10-01

    Oestradiol (E₂) exerts potent feedback actions upon gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones and part of this feedback action may occur through the rapid action of E₂. Using a transgenic GnRH-Pericam mouse line that allows real-time intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca²⁺](i)) to be monitored in adult GnRH neurones in a brain slice preparation, we examined the acute effects of 100 pM-100 nM E₂ on [Ca²⁺](i) transients in spontaneously active GnRH neurones. Approximately 30% of GnRH neurones exhibit spontaneous [Ca²⁺](i) transients at a frequency greater than two transients/15 min in adult female mice. In these cells, treatment with an incremental 1, 10, 100 nM E₂ protocol or 100 pM E₂ alone resulted in the suppression or complete cessation of [Ca²⁺](i) transients in 15 of 18 (83%) GnRH neurones. This effect was mimicked by E₂ bound to albumin, suggesting a membrane site of action, and was maintained in oestrogen receptor β knockout mice, indicating that this receptor is not essential for the rapid suppression of [Ca²⁺](i) transients. These findings contrast with those GnRH neurones exhibiting very few or no [Ca²⁺](i) transients (< 2 transients/15 min) that exhibit the opposite response of being activated by acute E₂. A series of dual calcium-cell-attached electrical recordings showed that [Ca²⁺](i) transients were associated with GnRH neurone burst firing and that E₂ suppression or activation of [Ca²⁺](i) transients was mirrored by a depression or initiation of burst firing. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that the acute actions of E₂ on GnRH neurones are critically dependent upon their pattern of burst firing.

  4. [Death of neurons and glial cells, induced by a photodynamic injury: signaling processes and neurone-glial interactions].

    PubMed

    Uzdenskiĭ, A B; Kolosov, M S; Lobanov, A V

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms of photodynamic (PD) injury of neurons and glial cells are reviewed. Neuron responses: firing stimulation at high photosensitizer concentrations and inhibition at low concentrations (< 10(-7) M) that were followed by necrosis, are described. Glial cells died from both necrosis and apoptosis. Local laser inactivation of a neuron enhanced PD-induced apoptosis of glial cells, thus indicating that neuron maintained the survival of glia. Inter- and intracellular signaling mediated photodamage of these cells. Using inhibitors or activators of signaling proteins, the involvement of Ca(2+)-, adenylate cyclase- and tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling pathways in responses of neurons and glial cells to photosensitization was shown. Their pharmacological modulation can change selectivity of PD injury of neuronal and glial cells and efficiency of PD therapy.

  5. [Variants of the signs of death from acute alcohol poisoning stipulated by different features of thanatogenesis].

    PubMed

    Kapustin, A V; Zombkovskaia, L S; Panfilenko, O A; Serebriakova, V G

    2003-01-01

    Two variants of thanatogenesis were formulated in cases of death of acute alcohol intoxication; according to the above variants, different combinations of macro- and micro signs as well as of biochemical indices of carbohydrates content in the hepatic tissues and blood are revealed during cadaver examinations. The diagnostic value of the mentioned signs demands that the thanatogenesis specific features must be taken into account in each separate case.

  6. The Anion Gap is a Predictive Clinical Marker for Death in Patients with Acute Pesticide Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide formulation includes solvents (methanol and xylene) and antifreeze (ethylene glycol) whose metabolites are anions such as formic acid, hippuric acid, and oxalate. However, the effect of the anion gap on clinical outcome in acute pesticide intoxication requires clarification. In this prospective study, we compared the anion gap and other parameters between surviving versus deceased patients with acute pesticide intoxication. The following parameters were assessed in 1,058 patients with acute pesticide intoxication: blood chemistry (blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, glucose, lactic acid, liver enzymes, albumin, globulin, and urate), urinalysis (ketone bodies), arterial blood gas analysis, electrolytes (Na+, K+, Cl- HCO3-, Ca++), pesticide field of use, class, and ingestion amount, clinical outcome (death rate, length of hospital stay, length of intensive care unit stay, and seriousness of toxic symptoms), and the calculated anion gap. Among the 481 patients with a high anion gap, 52.2% had a blood pH in the physiologic range, 35.8% had metabolic acidosis, and 12.1% had acidemia. Age, anion gap, pesticide field of use, pesticide class, seriousness of symptoms (all P < 0.001), and time lag after ingestion (P = 0.048) were significant risk factors for death in univariate analyses. Among these, age, anion gap, and pesticide class were significant risk factors for death in a multiple logistic regression analysis (P < 0.001). In conclusions, high anion gap is a significant risk factor for death, regardless of the accompanying acid-base balance status in patients with acute pesticide intoxication. PMID:27366016

  7. Arginine vasopressin neuronal loss results from autophagy-associated cell death in a mouse model for familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, D; Arima, H; Morishita, Y; Wenjun, L; Azuma, Y; Ito, Y; Suga, H; Goto, M; Banno, R; Sugimura, Y; Shiota, A; Asai, N; Takahashi, M; Oiso, Y

    2014-03-27

    Familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus (FNDI) characterized by progressive polyuria is mostly caused by mutations in the gene encoding neurophysin II (NPII), which is the carrier protein of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Although accumulation of mutant NPII in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) could be toxic for AVP neurons, the precise mechanisms of cell death of AVP neurons, reported in autopsy studies, remain unclear. Here, we subjected FNDI model mice to intermittent water deprivation (WD) in order to promote the phenotypes. Electron microscopic analyses demonstrated that, while aggregates are confined to a certain compartment of the ER in the AVP neurons of FNDI mice with water access ad libitum, they were scattered throughout the dilated ER lumen in the FNDI mice subjected to WD for 4 weeks. It is also demonstrated that phagophores, the autophagosome precursors, emerged in the vicinity of aggregates and engulfed the ER containing scattered aggregates. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that expression of p62, an adapter protein between ubiquitin and autophagosome, was elicited on autophagosomal membranes in the AVP neurons, suggesting selective autophagy induction at this time point. Treatment of hypothalamic explants of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) transgenic mice with an ER stressor thapsigargin increased the number of GFP-LC3 puncta, suggesting that ER stress could induce autophagosome formation in the hypothalamus of wild-type mice as well. The cytoplasm of AVP neurons in FNDI mice was occupied with vacuoles in the mice subjected to WD for 12 weeks, when 30-40% of AVP neurons are lost. Our data thus demonstrated that autophagy was induced in the AVP neurons subjected to ER stress in FNDI mice. Although autophagy should primarily be protective for neurons, it is suggested that the organelles including ER were lost over time through autophagy, leading to autophagy

  8. Role and regulation of Cdc25A phosphatase in neuron death induced by NGF deprivation or β-amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nandini; Sanphui, Priyankar; Kemeny, Stav; Greene, Lloyd A; Biswas, Subhas C

    2016-01-01

    Neuron death during development and in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is associated with aberrant regulation/induction of cell cycle proteins. However, the proximal events in this process are unknown. Cell cycle initiation requires dephosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinases by cell division cycle 25A (Cdc25A). Here, we show that Cdc25A is essential for neuronal death in response to NGF deprivation or β-amyloid (Aβ) treatment and describe the mechanisms by which it is regulated in these paradigms. Cdc25A mRNA, protein and Cdc25A phosphatase activity were induced by NGF deprivation and Aβ treatment. Enhanced Cdc25A expression was also observed in rat brains infused with Aβ and in Aβ-overexpressing AβPPswe-PS1dE9 mice. In cultured neurons Cdc25A inhibition by chemical inhibitors or shRNA prevented cell death and neurite degeneration caused by NGF deprivation or Aβ. Additionally, Cdc25A inhibition diminished distal signaling events including Cdk-dependent elevation of phospho-pRb and subsequent caspase-3 activation. Mechanism studies revealed that Cdc25A induction by NGF deprivation and Aβ is mediated by activation of Forkhead transcription factors that in turn suppress miR-21, a negative regulator of Cdc25A. Our studies thus identify Cdc25A as a required upstream element of the apoptotic cell cycle pathway that is required for neuron death in response to trophic factor deprivation and to Aβ exposure and therefore as a potential target to suppress pathologic neuron death. PMID:28028440

  9. Phenylpropenoic Acid Glucoside from Rooibos Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Cell Death Induced by Acute Injury

    PubMed Central

    Himpe, Eddy; Cunha, Daniel A.; Song, Imane; Bugliani, Marco; Marchetti, Piero; Cnop, Miriam; Bouwens, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous studies demonstrated that a phenylpropenoic acid glucoside (PPAG) from rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) extract had anti-hyperglycemic activity and significant protective effects on the pancreatic beta cell mass in a chronic diet-induced diabetes model. The present study evaluated the cytoprotective effect of the phytochemical on beta cells exposed to acute cell stress. Methods Synthetically prepared PPAG was administered orally in mice treated with a single dose of streptozotocin to acutely induce beta cell death and hyperglycemia. Its effect was assessed on beta cell mass, proliferation and apoptotic cell death. Its cytoprotective effect was also studied in vitro on INS-1E beta cells and on human pancreatic islet cells. Results Treatment with the phytochemical PPAG protected beta cells during the first days after the insult against apoptotic cell death, as evidenced by TUNEL staining, and prevented loss of expression of anti-apoptotic protein BCL2 in vivo. In vitro, PPAG protected INS-1E beta cells from streptozotocin-induced apoptosis and necrosis in a BCL2-dependent and independent way, respectively, depending on glucose concentration. PPAG also protected human pancreatic islet cells against the cytotoxic action of the fatty acid palmitate. Conclusions These findings show the potential use of PPAG as phytomedicine which protects the beta cell mass exposed to acute diabetogenic stress. PMID:27299564

  10. Nerve growth factor neuroprotection of ethanol-induced neuronal death in rat cerebral cortex is age dependent.

    PubMed

    Mooney, S M; Miller, M W

    2007-10-26

    Organotypic cultures of rat cortex were used to test the hypotheses that nerve growth factor (NGF) is neuroprotective for immature cortical neurons and that ethanol abolishes this neuroprotection in a developmental stage-dependent manner. Samples were obtained on gestational day (G) 16 or postnatal day (P) 3 and cultured with ethanol (0 or 400 mg/dl) and NGF (0 or 30 ng/ml) for 72 h. Dying neurons were identified as exhibiting terminal nick-end labeling, immunoreactivity for activated caspase 3, or condensed nuclear chromatin. Two cortical compartments were examined in fetal tissue: a superficial, cell-sparse marginal zone (MZ) and a cell-dense cortical plate (CP). At P3, the CP was subdivided into a cell-dense upper cortical plate (UCP) and a less densely packed lower cortical plate (LCP). Neuronal death in the MZ was affected by neither NGF nor ethanol at both ages. In the fetal CP, NGF did not affect the incidence of cell death, but ethanol increased it. Treatment with NGF caused an upregulation of the expression of Neg, a gene known to be affected by NGF and ethanol. NGF did not ameliorate the ethanol-induced death. In pups, ethanol increased the amount of death in the LCP. NGF did protect against this death. Neither ethanol nor NGF altered the incidence of cell death in the UCP. The laminar-dependent neuroprotection did not correlate with expression of NGF receptors or Neg. Thus, NGF can be protective against the neurotoxic effect of ethanol in the neonatal brain. This effect is site selective and time dependent and it targets postmigratory, differentiating neurons.

  11. Abnormal intra-aural pressure waves associated with death in African children with acute nontraumatic coma

    PubMed Central

    Gwer, Samson; Kazungu, Michael; Chengo, Eddie; Ohuma, Eric O.; Idro, Richard; Birch, Tony; Marchbanks, Robert; Kirkham, Fenella J.; Newton, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: We explored the relationship between tympanic membrane displacement (TMD) measurements, a tool to monitor intracranial pressure noninvasively, and clinical features and death in children with acute coma in Kilifi, Kenya. Methods: Between November 2007 and September 2009, we made serial TMD measurements and clinical observations on children with acute coma (Blantyre coma score (BCS) ≤ 2) on the pediatric high dependency unit of Kilifi District Hospital, and on well children presenting to the hospital's outpatient department for routine follow-up. We examined middle ear function using tympanometry and measured cardiac pulse (CPA) and respiratory pulse pressure amplitudes (RPA) using the TMD analyzer. Results: We recruited 75 children (32 (43%) females; median age 3.3 (IQR: 2.0, 4.3) years). Twenty-one (28%) children died. Higher TMD measurements predicted death. Adjusting for diagnosis, every 50 nl rise in both semirecumbent and recumbent CPA was associated with increased odds of death associated with intracranial herniation (OR: 1.61, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07, 2.41; P = 0.02 and OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.10, 1.66; P ≤ 0.01 respectively). Conclusion: Raised TMD pulse pressure measurements are associated with death and may be useful in detecting and monitoring risk of intracranial herniation and intracranial pressure in childhood coma. PMID:25790276

  12. Multidendritic sensory neurons in the adult Drosophila abdomen: origins, dendritic morphology, and segment- and age-dependent programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Shimono, Kohei; Fujimoto, Azusa; Tsuyama, Taiichi; Yamamoto-Kochi, Misato; Sato, Motohiko; Hattori, Yukako; Sugimura, Kaoru; Usui, Tadao; Kimura, Ken-ichi; Uemura, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    Background For the establishment of functional neural circuits that support a wide range of animal behaviors, initial circuits formed in early development have to be reorganized. One way to achieve this is local remodeling of the circuitry hardwiring. To genetically investigate the underlying mechanisms of this remodeling, one model system employs a major group of Drosophila multidendritic sensory neurons - the dendritic arborization (da) neurons - which exhibit dramatic dendritic pruning and subsequent growth during metamorphosis. The 15 da neurons are identified in each larval abdominal hemisegment and are classified into four categories - classes I to IV - in order of increasing size of their receptive fields and/or arbor complexity at the mature larval stage. Our knowledge regarding the anatomy and developmental basis of adult da neurons is still fragmentary. Results We identified multidendritic neurons in the adult Drosophila abdomen, visualized the dendritic arbors of the individual neurons, and traced the origins of those cells back to the larval stage. There were six da neurons in abdominal hemisegment 3 or 4 (A3/4) of the pharate adult and the adult just after eclosion, five of which were persistent larval da neurons. We quantitatively analyzed dendritic arbors of three of the six adult neurons and examined expression in the pharate adult of key transcription factors that result in the larval class-selective dendritic morphologies. The 'baseline design' of A3/4 in the adult was further modified in a segment-dependent and age-dependent manner. One of our notable findings is that a larval class I neuron, ddaE, completed dendritic remodeling in A2 to A4 and then underwent caspase-dependent cell death within 1 week after eclosion, while homologous neurons in A5 and in more posterior segments degenerated at pupal stages. Another finding is that the dendritic arbor of a class IV neuron, v'ada, was immediately reshaped during post-eclosion growth. It exhibited

  13. A Common Carcinogen Benzo[a]pyrene Causes Neuronal Death in Mouse via Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nazmi, Arshed; Kumawat, Kanhaiya Lal; Basu, Anirban

    2010-01-01

    Background Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) belongs to a class of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that serve as micropollutants in the environment. B[a]P has been reported as a probable carcinogen in humans. Exposure to B[a]P can take place by ingestion of contaminated (especially grilled, roasted or smoked) food or water, or inhalation of polluted air. There are reports available that also suggests neurotoxicity as a result of B[a]P exposure, but the exact mechanism of action is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Using neuroblastoma cell line and primary cortical neuron culture, we demonstrated that B[a]P has no direct neurotoxic effect. We utilized both in vivo and in vitro systems to demonstrate that B[a]P causes microglial activation. Using microglial cell line and primary microglial culture, we showed for the first time that B[a]P administration results in elevation of reactive oxygen species within the microglia thereby causing depression of antioxidant protein levels; enhanced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, that results in increased production of NO from the cells. Synthesis and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines were also elevated within the microglia, possibly via the p38MAP kinase pathway. All these factors contributed to bystander death of neurons, in vitro. When administered to animals, B[a]P was found to cause microglial activation and astrogliosis in the brain with subsequent increase in proinflammatory cytokine levels. Conclusions/Significance Contrary to earlier published reports we found that B[a]P has no direct neurotoxic activity. However, it kills neurons in a bystander mechanism by activating the immune cells of the brain viz the microglia. For the first time, we have provided conclusive evidence regarding the mechanism by which the micropollutant B[a]P may actually cause damage to the central nervous system. In today's perspective, where rising pollution levels globally are a matter of grave concern, our study throws light on

  14. Th17 Cells Induce Dopaminergic Neuronal Death via LFA-1/ICAM-1 Interaction in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhan; Huang, Yan; Cao, Bei-Bei; Qiu, Yi-Hua; Peng, Yu-Ping

    2016-11-14

    T helper (Th)17 cells, a subset of CD4(+) T lymphocytes, have strong pro-inflammatory property and appear to be essential in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases. However, the involvement of Th17 cells in Parkinson's disease (PD) that is characterized by a progressive degeneration of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in the nigrostriatal system is unclear. Here, we aimed to demonstrate that Th17 cells infiltrate into the brain parenchyma and induce neuroinflammation and DAergic neuronal death in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)- or 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced PD models. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in the substantia nigra (SN) was assessed by the signal of FITC-labeled albumin that was injected into blood circulation via the ascending aorta. Live cell imaging system was used to observe a direct contact of Th17 cells with neurons by staining these cells using the two adhesion molecules, leukocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, respectively. Th17 cells invaded into the SN where BBB was disrupted in MPTP-induced PD mice. Th17 cells exacerbated DAergic neuronal loss and pro-inflammatory/neurotrophic factor disorders in MPP(+)-treated ventral mesencephalic (VM) cell cultures. A direct contact of LFA-1-stained Th17 cells with ICAM-1-stained VM neurons was dynamically captured. Either blocking LFA-1 in Th17 cells or blocking ICAM-1 in VM neurons with neutralizing antibodies abolished Th17-induced DAergic neuronal death. These results establish that Th17 cells infiltrate into the brain parenchyma of PD mice through lesioned BBB and exert neurotoxic property by promoting glial activation and importantly by a direct damage to neurons depending on LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction.

  15. Bid mediates fission, membrane permeabilization and peri-nuclear accumulation of mitochondria as a prerequisite for oxidative neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Grohm, Julia; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Culmsee, Carsten

    2010-07-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that undergo permanent fusion and fission, a process that is important for mitochondrial function and cellular survival. Emerging evidence suggests that oxidative stress disturbs mitochondrial morphology dynamics, resulting in detrimental mitochondrial fragmentation. In particular, such fatal mitochondrial fission has been detected in neurons exposed to oxidative stress, suggesting mitochondrial dynamics as a key feature in intrinsic death pathways. However, the regulation of mitochondrial fission in neurons exposed to lethal stress is largely unknown. Here, we used a model of glutamate toxicity in HT-22 cells for investigating mitochondrial fission and fusion in neurons exposed to oxidative stress. In these immortalized hippocampal neurons, glutamate induces glutathione depletion and increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Glutamate toxicity resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation and peri-nuclear accumulation of the organelles. Further, mitochondrial fission was associated with loss of mitochondrial outer membrane potential (MOMP). The Bid-inhibitor BI-6c9 prevented MOMP and mitochondrial fission, and protected the cells from cell death. In conclusion, oxidative stress induced by glutamate causes mitochondrial translocation of Bid thereby inducing mitochondrial fission and associated mitochondrial cell death pathways. Inhibiting regulators of pathological mitochondrial fragmentation is proposed as an efficient strategy of neuroprotection.

  16. Block of Na+,K+-ATPase and induction of hybrid death by 4-aminopyridine in cultured cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue Qing; Xiao, Ai Ying; Yang, Aizhen; LaRose, Lori; Wei, Ling; Yu, Shan Ping

    2003-05-01

    K(+) channel blockers such as 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) can be toxic to neurons; the cellular mechanism underlying the toxicity, however, is obscure. In cultured mouse cortical neurons, we tested the hypothesis that the toxic effect of 4-AP might result from inhibiting the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (Na(+),K(+)-pump) and thereafter induction of a hybrid death of concomitant apoptosis and necrosis. The Na(+),K(+)-pump activity, monitored as whole-cell membrane currents, was markedly blocked by 4-AP in concentration- and voltage-dependent manners in low millimolar ranges. At similar concentrations, 4-AP induced a neuronal death sensitive to attenuation by the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK (Z-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethyl ketone) or Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM (1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester). Electron microscopy confirmed hybrid ultrastructural features of coexisting apoptotic and necrotic components in same cells. We suggest that 4-AP is a potent antagonist of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and an inducer of the hybrid death of central neurons.

  17. NR2B-NMDA receptor mediated modulation of the tyrosine phosphatase STEP regulates glutamate induced neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ranjana; Deb, Ishani; Mukherjee, Saibal; Paul, Surojit

    2011-01-01

    The present study examines the role of a neuron-specific tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) in excitotoxic cell death. Our findings demonstrate that p38 MAPK, a stress-activated kinase that is known to play a role in the etiology of excitotoxic cell death is a substrate of STEP. Glutamate-mediated NMDA receptor stimulation leads to rapid but transient activation of p38 MAPK, which is primarily dependent on NR2A-NMDA receptor activation. Conversely, activation of NR2B-NMDA receptors leads to dephosphorylation and subsequent activation of STEP, which in turn leads to inactivation of p38 MAPK. Thus during transient NMDA receptor stimulation, increases in STEP activity appears to limit the duration of activation of p38 MAPK and improves neuronal survival. However, if NR2B-NMDA receptor stimulation is sustained, protective effects of STEP activation are lost, as these stimuli cause significant degradation of active STEP, leading to secondary activation of p38 MAP kinase. Consistent with this observation, a cell transducible TAT-STEP peptide that constitutively binds to p38 MAPK attenuated neuronal cell death caused by sustained NMDA receptor stimulation. The findings imply that the activation and levels of STEP are dependent on the duration and magnitude of NR2B-NMDA receptor stimulation and STEP serves as a modulator of NMDA receptor dependent neuronal injury, through its regulation of p38 MAPK. PMID:21029094

  18. Type A and B monoamine oxidase in age-related neurodegenerative disorders: their distinct roles in neuronal death and survival.

    PubMed

    Naoi, Makoto; Maruyama, Wakako; Inaba-Hasegawa, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    In neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, type B monoamine oxidase (MAO-B) has been proposed to play a primary role though generating reactive oxygen species in oxidation of monoamine substrates. MAO-B oxidizes MPTP into MPP+, and an MAO-B inhibitor, deprenyl, prevents the MPTP oxidation and also MPP+neutotoxicity. These results suggest the association of MAO-B with neuronal death in neurodegenerative disorders. On the other hand, deprenyl and rasagiline, selective MAO-B inhibitors, have been proved to protect neuronal cells in cellular and animal models of neurodegeneration. These inhibitors decrease oxidation of the substrates, scavenge oxygen radicals, intervene apoptosis signal pathway in mitochondria and induce pro-survival genes coding anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and neurotrophic factors. However, the association of MAO-B itself with the neuroprotective function of MAO-B inhibitors remains enigmatic. Recently, the involvement of type A MAO (MAO-A) in neuronal death has been shown by upregulation MAO-A expression in cellular models. MAO-A is a target of an endogenous neurotoxin, Nmethyl( R)salsolinol, and MAO-A knockdown (KO) with short interfering (si)RNA protects neuronal death from apoptosis. In addition, MAO-A mediates the increased expression of genes for anti-apoptotic, pro-survival Bcl-2 and neurotrophic factors by MAO-B inhibitors, whereas MAO-B doe not. In this review, we present our recent results on the novel role of MAO-A and MAO-B in neuronal death and also in the neuroprotective gene induction by MAO inhibitors. The future development of new series of neuroprotective drugs is discussed among compounds, which have high affinity to MAO-A and can induce pro-survival genes. MAO-A is expected to play a role in disease-modifying therapy for neurodegenerative disorders.

  19. Discovery of a novel neuroprotectant, BHDPC, that protects against MPP+/MPTP-induced neuronal death in multiple experimental models.

    PubMed

    Chong, Cheong-Meng; Ma, Dan; Zhao, Chao; Franklin, Robin J M; Zhou, Zhong-Yan; Ai, Nana; Li, Chuwen; Yu, Huidong; Hou, Tingjun; Sa, Fei; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen

    2015-12-01

    Progressive degeneration and death of neurons are main causes of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Although some current medicines may temporarily improve their symptoms, no treatments can slow or halt the progression of neuronal death. In this study, a pyrimidine derivative, benzyl 7-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (BHDPC), was found to attenuate dramatically the MPTP-induced death of dopaminergic neurons and improve behavior movement deficiency in zebrafish, supporting its potential neuroprotective activity in vivo. Further study in rat organotypic cerebellar cultures indicated that BHDPC was able to suppress MPP(+)-induced cell death of brain tissue slices ex vivo. The protective effect of BHDPC against MPP(+) toxicity was also effective in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells through restoring abnormal changes in mitochondrial membrane potential and numerous apoptotic regulators. Western blotting analysis indicated that BHDPC was able to activate PKA/CREB survival signaling and further up-regulate Bcl2 expression. However, BHDPC failed to suppress MPP(+)-induced cytotoxicity and the increase of caspase 3 activity in the presence of the PKA inhibitor H89. Taken together, these results suggest that BHDPC is a potential neuroprotectant with prosurvival effects in multiple models of neurodegenerative disease in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo.

  20. Cyclosporin A inhibits caspase-independent death of NGF-deprived sympathetic neurons: a potential role for mitochondrial permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Louis K; Johnson, Eugene M

    2002-05-27

    Opening of the permeability transition pore (PTP) has been implicated as an important mitochondrial event that occurs during apoptosis. We examined the role of the PTP in the well-characterized cell death of rat sympathetic neurons deprived of nerve growth factor (NGF) in vitro. Removal of NGF causes these neurons to undergo either a classic apoptotic cell death or, when treated with a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor such as boc-aspartyl(OMe)-fluoromethylketone (BAF), a delayed, nonapoptotic cell death. The PTP inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA), blocked commitment-to-die in the presence of BAF, as defined by the ability of NGF readdition to rescue cells, but had little effect on commitment-to-die in the absence of BAF. CsA did not have trophic effects on BAF-saved cells, but did block the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. These data suggest that PTP opening is a critical event in caspase-independent, nonapoptotic (but not caspase-dependent, apoptotic) death of NGF-deprived rat sympathetic neurons.

  1. Oxidative modification of neurofilament-L and neuronal cell death induced by the catechol neurotoxin, tetrahydropapaveroline.

    PubMed

    Kyeong, Inn Goo; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young; Kang, Jung Hoon

    2013-02-13

    Tetrahydropapaveroline (THP), which is an endogenous neurotoxin, has been suspected to be associated with dopaminergic neurotoxicity of l-DOPA. In this study, we examined oxidative modification of neurofilament-L (NF-L) and neuronal cell death induced by THP. When disassembled NF-L was incubated with THP, protein aggregation was increased in a time- and THP dose-dependent manner. The formation of carbonyl compounds and dityrosine were observed in the THP-mediated NF-L aggregates. Radical scavengers reduced THP-mediated NF-L modification. These results suggest that the modification of NF-L by THP may be due to oxidative damage resulting from the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). When THP exposed NF-L was subjected to amino acid analysis, glutamate, proline and lysine residues were found to be particularly sensitive. We also investigated the effects of copper ions on THP-mediated NF-L modification. At a low concentration of THP, copper ions enhanced the modification of NF-L. Treatment of C6 astrocyte cells with THP led to a concentration-dependent reduction in cell viability. When these cells were treated with 100μM THP, the levels of ROS increased 3.5-fold compared with control cells. Furthermore, treatment of cells with THP increased NF-L aggregate formation, suggesting the involvement of NF-L modification in THP-induced cell damage.

  2. XBP1 mitigates aminoglycoside-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, N; Duscha, S; Boukari, H; Meyer, M; Xie, J; Wei, G; Schrepfer, T; Roschitzki, B; Boettger, E C; Schacht, J

    2015-01-01

    Here we study links between aminoglycoside-induced mistranslation, protein misfolding and neuropathy. We demonstrate that aminoglycosides induce misreading in mammalian cells and assess endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways. Genome-wide transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed upregulation of genes related to protein folding and degradation. Quantitative PCR confirmed induction of UPR markers including C/EBP homologous protein, glucose-regulated protein 94, binding immunoglobulin protein and X-box binding protein-1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing, which is crucial for UPR activation. We studied the effect of a compromised UPR on aminoglycoside ototoxicity in haploinsufficient XBP1 (XBP1+/−) mice. Intra-tympanic aminoglycoside treatment caused high-frequency hearing loss in XBP1+/− mice but not in wild-type littermates. Densities of spiral ganglion cells and synaptic ribbons were decreased in gentamicin-treated XBP1+/− mice, while sensory cells were preserved. Co-injection of the chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated hearing loss. These results suggest that aminoglycoside-induced ER stress and cell death in spiral ganglion neurons is mitigated by XBP1, masking aminoglycoside neurotoxicity at the organismal level. PMID:25973683

  3. Acute treatment with 17beta-estradiol attenuates astrocyte-astrocyte and astrocyte-neuron communication.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shilpa P; Sikdar, Sujit Kumar

    2007-12-01

    Astrocytes are now recognized as dynamic signaling elements in the brain. Bidirectional communication between neurons and astrocytes involves integration of neuronal inputs by astrocytes and release of gliotransmitters that modulate neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission. The ovarian steroid hormone, 17beta-estradiol, in addition to its rapid actions on neuronal electrical activity can rapidly alter astrocyte intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) through a membrane-associated estrogen receptor. Using calcium imaging and electrophysiological techniques, we investigated the functional consequences of acute treatment with estradiol on astrocyte-astrocyte and astrocyte-neuron communication in mixed hippocampal cultures. Mechanical stimulation of an astrocyte evoked a [Ca2+]i rise in the stimulated astrocyte, which propagated to the surrounding astrocytes as a [Ca2+]i wave. Following acute treatment with estradiol, the amplitude of the [Ca2+]i elevation in astrocytes around the stimulated astrocyte was attenuated. Further, estradiol inhibited the [Ca2+]i rise in individual astrocytes in response to the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, trans-(+/-)-1-amino-1,3-cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid. Mechanical stimulation of astrocytes induced [Ca2+]i elevations and electrophysiological responses in adjacent neurons. Estradiol rapidly attenuated the astrocyte-evoked glutamate-mediated [Ca2+]i rise and slow inward current in neurons. Also, the incidence of astrocyte-induced increase in spontaneous postsynaptic current frequency was reduced in the presence of estradiol. The effects of estradiol were stereo-specific and reversible following washout. These findings may indicate that the regulation of neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission by astrocytes is sensitive to rapid estradiol-mediated hormonal control.

  4. Hijacking microglial glutathione by inorganic arsenic impels bystander death of immature neurons through extracellular cystine/glutamate imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vikas; Gera, Ruchi; Kushwaha, Rajesh; Sharma, Anuj Kumar; Patnaik, Satyakam; Ghosh, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic-induced altered microglial activity leads to neuronal death, but the causative mechanism remains unclear. The present study showed, arsenic-exposed (10 μM) microglial (N9) culture supernatant induced bystander death of neuro-2a (N2a), which was further validated with primary microglia and immature neuronal cultures. Results indicated that arsenic-induced GSH synthesis by N9 unfavorably modified the extracellular milieu for N2a by lowering cystine and increasing glutamate concentration. Similar result was observed in N9-N2a co-culture. Co-exposure of arsenic and 250 μM glutamate, less than the level (265 μM) detected in arsenic-exposed N9 culture supernatant, compromised N2a viability which was rescued by cystine supplementation. Therefore, microglia executes bystander N2a death by competitive inhibition of system Xc- (xCT) through extracellular cystine/glutamate imbalance. We confirmed the role of xCT in mediating bystander N2a death by siRNA inhibition studies. Ex-vivo primary microglia culture supernatant from gestationally exposed mice measured to contain lower cystine and higher glutamate compared to control and N-acetyl cysteine co-treated group. Immunofluorescence staining of brain cryosections from treated group showed more dead immature neurons with no such effect on microglia. Collectively, we showed, in presence of arsenic microglia alters cystine/glutamate balance through xCT in extracellular milieu leading to bystander death of immature neurons. PMID:27477106

  5. Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor protects against apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial damage in ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaowan; Li, Hailong; Ding, Shinghua

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF), also known as nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), the rate-limiting enzyme in mammalian NAD+ biosynthesis pathway, plays a brain and neuronal protective role in ischemic stroke. In this study, we further investigated the mechanism of its neuroprotective effect after ischemia in the primary cultured mouse cortical neurons. Using apoptotic cell death assay, fluorescent imaging, molecular biology, mitochondrial biogenesis measurements and Western blotting analysis, our results show that the overexpression of PBEF in neurons can significantly promote neuronal survival, reduce the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria to nuclei and inhibit the activation of capase-3 after glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. We further found that the overexpression of PBEF can suppress glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, the loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and the reduction of PGC-1 and NRF-1 expressions. Furthermore, these beneficial effects by PBEF are dependent on its enzymatic activity of NAD+ synthesis. In summary, our study demonstrated that PBEF ameliorates ischemia-induced neuronal death through inhibiting caspase-dependent and independent apoptotic signaling pathways and suppressing mitochondrial damage and dysfunction. Our study provides novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of PBEF, and helps to identify potential targets for ischemic stroke therapy. PMID:27576732

  6. Time-course of neuronal death in the mouse pilocarpine model of chronic epilepsy using Fluoro-Jade C staining.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian; Liu, Yong-Hong; Huang, Yuan-Gui; Chen, Liang-Wei

    2008-11-19

    Epilepsy is a serious neurological disorder in human beings and the long-term pathological events remain largely obscure. We are interested in elucidating long-term brain injury that may occur in the temporal lobe epilepsy, and time-course of neuronal death was examined in a mouse pilocarpine model of chronic epilepsy by Fluoro-Jade C (FJC) dye that can specifically stain the degenerative neurons in the central nervous system. The FJC stain combined with immunohistochemistry to neuronal nuclear specific protein revealed that pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) resulted in massive degenerative death of neuronal cells in brains with their dense distribution in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. The FJC-positive degenerating neurons, most of them also expressed apoptosis signaling molecules such as caspase-9 and activated caspase-3, occurred at 4h, increased into peak levels at 12h-3d, and then gradually went down at 7d-14d after onset of SE. More interestingly, a large percentage (about 88%) of FJC-positive degenerative neurons were GABAergic as indicated with their immunoreactivity to glutamic acid decarboxylase-67, implying that inhibitory function of GABAergic neural system might by seriously damaged in brains subject to SE attack in this mouse pilocarpine model. Taken together with previous studies, time-course of degenerative neurons in the mouse pilocarpine model by Fluoro-Jade C staining further benefits understanding of long-term brain pathological changes and recurrent seizure mechanism, and may also result in finding the most suitable time-window in therapeutic manipulation of the chronic epilepsy in human beings.

  7. [Incidence of sudden death cases in acute coronary insufficiency and acute myocardial infarction at the pre-hospital stage in Krasnoyarsk].

    PubMed

    Opaleva-Stegantseva, V A; Ivanov, A G; Gavrilina, I A; Khar'kov, E I; Ratovskaia, V I

    1986-05-01

    The impact of improvements in prehospital cardiologic service on total and prehospital mortality associated with acute coronary insufficiency (ACI) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and the causes of fatal outcomes is illustrated by a study based on the acute myocardial infarction register involving populations from two city districts between 20 and 69 years of age. Prehospital mortality caused by ACI and AMI is shown to decline with the progress of cardiologic care. The decline is attributed to reduced incidence of some causes of death, such as heart failure and cardiogenic shock. Sudden coronary death (85.1%) remains the principal cause of prehospital mortality.

  8. Fragile X mental retardation protein is required for programmed cell death and clearance of developmentally-transient peptidergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Cheryl L; Broadie, Kendal

    2011-08-15

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), caused by loss of fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene function, is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. The FMR1 product (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein best established to function in activity-dependent modulation of synaptic connections. In the Drosophila FXS disease model, loss of functionally-conserved dFMRP causes synaptic overgrowth and overelaboration in pigment dispersing factor (PDF) peptidergic neurons in the adult brain. Here, we identify a very different component of PDF neuron misregulation in dfmr1 mutants: the aberrant retention of normally developmentally-transient PDF tritocerebral (PDF-TRI) neurons. In wild-type animals, PDF-TRI neurons in the central brain undergo programmed cell death and complete, processive clearance within days of eclosion. In the absence of dFMRP, a defective apoptotic program leads to constitutive maintenance of these peptidergic neurons. We tested whether this apoptotic defect is circuit-specific by examining crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) and bursicon circuits, which are similarly developmentally-transient and normally eliminated immediately post-eclosion. In dfmr1 null mutants, CCAP/bursicon neurons also exhibit significantly delayed clearance dynamics, but are subsequently eliminated from the nervous system, in contrast to the fully persistent PDF-TRI neurons. Thus, the requirement of dFMRP for the retention of transitory peptidergic neurons shows evident circuit specificity. The novel defect of impaired apoptosis and aberrant neuron persistence in the Drosophila FXS model suggests an entirely new level of "pruning" dysfunction may contribute to the FXS disease state.

  9. GSK-3β-induced Tau pathology drives hippocampal neuronal cell death in Huntington's disease: involvement of astrocyte–neuron interactions

    PubMed Central

    L'Episcopo, F; Drouin-Ouellet, J; Tirolo, C; Pulvirenti, A; Giugno, R; Testa, N; Caniglia, S; Serapide, M F; Cisbani, G; Barker, R A; Cicchetti, F; Marchetti, B

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) has emerged as a critical factor in several pathways involved in hippocampal neuronal maintenance and function. In Huntington's disease (HD), there are early hippocampal deficits both in patients and transgenic mouse models, which prompted us to investigate whether disease-specific changes in GSK-3β expression may underlie these abnormalities. Thirty-three postmortem hippocampal samples from HD patients (neuropathological grades 2–4) and age- and sex-matched normal control cases were analyzed using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCRs (qPCRs) and immunohistochemistry. In vitro and in vivo studies looking at hippocampal pathology and GSK-3β were also undertaken in transgenic R6/2 and wild-type mice. We identified a disease and stage-dependent upregulation of GSK-3β mRNA and protein levels in the HD hippocampus, with the active isoform pGSK-3β-Tyr216 being strongly expressed in dentate gyrus (DG) neurons and astrocytes at a time when phosphorylation of Tau at the AT8 epitope was also present in these same neurons. This upregulation of pGSK-3β-Tyr216 was also found in the R6/2 hippocampus in vivo and linked to the increased vulnerability of primary hippocampal neurons in vitro. In addition, the increased expression of GSK-3β in the astrocytes of R6/2 mice appeared to be the main driver of Tau phosphorylation and caspase3 activation-induced neuronal death, at least in part via an exacerbated production of major proinflammatory mediators. This stage-dependent overactivation of GSK-3β in HD-affected hippocampal neurons and astrocytes therefore points to GSK-3β as being a critical factor in the pathological development of this condition. As such, therapeutic targeting of this pathway may help ameliorate neuronal dysfunction in HD. PMID:27124580

  10. Nucleus accumbens neuronal activity correlates to the animal's behavioral response to acute and chronic methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Claussen, Catherine M; Chong, Samuel L; Dafny, Nachum

    2014-04-22

    Acute and chronic methylphenidate (MPD) exposure was recorded simultaneously for the rat's locomotor activity and the nucleus accumbens (NAc) neuronal activity. The evaluation of the neuronal events was based on the animal's behavior response to chronic MPD administration: 1) Animals exhibiting behavioral sensitization, 2) Animals exhibiting behavioral tolerance. The experiment lasted for 10days with four groups of animals; saline, 0.6, 2.5, and 10.0mg/kg MPD. For the main behavioral findings, about half of the animals exhibited behavioral sensitization or behavioral tolerance to 0.6, 2.5, and/or 10mg/kg MPD respectively. Three hundred and forty one NAc neuronal units were evaluated. Approximately 80% of NAc units responded to 0.6, 2.5, and 10.0mg/kg MPD. When the neuronal activity was analyzed based on the animals' behavioral response to chronic MPD exposure, significant differences were seen between the neuronal population responses recorded from animals that expressed behavioral sensitization when compared to the NAc neuronal responses recorded from animals exhibiting behavioral tolerance. Three types of neurophysiological sensitization and neurophysiological tolerance can be recognized following chronic MPD administration to the neuronal populations. Collectively, these findings show that the same dose of chronic MPD can elicit either behavioral tolerance or behavioral sensitization. Differential statistical analyses were used to verify our hypothesis that the neuronal activity recorded from animals exhibiting behavioral sensitization will respond differently to MPD compared to those animals exhibiting behavioral tolerance, thus, suggesting that it is essential to record the animal's behavior concomitantly with neuronal recordings.

  11. Repetitive acute intermittent hypoxia increases growth/neurotrophic factor expression in non-respiratory motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Satriotomo, I; Nichols, N L; Dale, E A; Emery, A T; Dahlberg, J M; Mitchell, G S

    2016-05-13

    Repetitive acute intermittent hypoxia (rAIH) increases growth/trophic factor expression in respiratory motor neurons, thereby eliciting spinal respiratory motor plasticity and/or neuroprotection. Here we demonstrate that rAIH effects are not unique to respiratory motor neurons, but are also expressed in non-respiratory, spinal alpha motor neurons and upper motor neurons of the motor cortex. In specific, we used immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence to assess growth/trophic factor protein expression in spinal sections from rats exposed to AIH three times per week for 10weeks (3×wAIH). 3×wAIH increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its high-affinity receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), and phosphorylated TrkB (pTrkB) immunoreactivity in putative alpha motor neurons of spinal cervical 7 (C7) and lumbar 3 (L3) segments, as well as in upper motor neurons of the primary motor cortex (M1). 3×wAIH also increased immunoreactivity of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), the high-affinity VEGFA receptor (VEGFR-2) and an important VEGF gene regulator, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). Thus, rAIH effects on growth/trophic factors are characteristic of non-respiratory as well as respiratory motor neurons. rAIH may be a useful tool in the treatment of disorders causing paralysis, such as spinal injury and motor neuron disease, as a pretreatment to enhance motor neuron survival during disease, or as preconditioning for cell-transplant therapies.

  12. Exacerbation of excitotoxic neuronal death induced during mitochondrial inhibition in vivo: relation to energy imbalance or ATP depletion?

    PubMed

    Del Río, P; Montiel, T; Chagoya, V; Massieu, L

    2007-06-08

    During the past two decades a close relationship between the energy state of the cell and glutamate neurotoxicity has been suggested. We have previously shown that increasing the extracellular concentration of glutamate does not cause neuronal death unless a deficit in energy metabolism occurs. The mechanisms of glutamate-induced neuronal death have been extensively studied in vitro and it has been associated with a rapid and severe decrease in ATP levels, accompanied with mitochondrial dysfunction. In this study we aimed to investigate the time course of the changes in energy metabolites during glutamate-induced neuronal death, in the presence of a moderate inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism in the rat striatum in vivo. We also aimed to study whether or not, as reported in vitro, changes in ATP levels are related to the extension of neuronal death. Results show that glutamate-induced lesions are exacerbated when rats are previously treated with a subtoxic dose of the mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP). However, changes in nucleotide levels were similar in rats injected with glutamate alone and in rats injected with glutamate and previously treated with 3-NP. In spite of the presence of an extensive striatal lesion, nucleotide levels were recovered in 3-NP-treated rats 24 h after glutamate injection. Results show that 3-NP pre-treatment induced an imbalance in nucleotide levels that predisposed cells to glutamate toxicity; however it did not influence the bioenergetic changes induced by glutamate alone. Enhancement of glutamate neurotoxicity in 3-NP pre-treated rats is more related to a sustained nucleotide imbalance than just to a rapid decrease in ATP levels.

  13. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics Contributes to Propofol-Induced Cell Death in Human Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Twaroski, Danielle M.; Yan, Yasheng; Zaja, Ivan; Clark, Eric; Bosnjak, Zeljko J.; Bai, Xiaowen

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies in developing animals have shown that when anesthetic agents are administered early in life, it can lead to neuronal cell death and learning disabilities. Development of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neurons has provided a valuable tool for understanding the effects of anesthetics on developing human neurons. Unbalanced mitochondrial fusion/fission leads to various pathological conditions including neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to dissect the role of mitochondrial dynamics in propofol-induced neurotoxicity. Methods TUNEL staining was used to assess cell death in hESC-derived neurons. Mitochondrial fission was assessed using TOM20 staining and electron microscopy. Expression of mitochondrial fission-related proteins was assessed by Western blot and confocal microscopy was used to assess opening time of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Results Exposure to 6 hours of 20 μg/mL propofol increased cell death from 3.18±0.17% in the control-treated group to 9.6±0.95% and led to detrimental increases in mitochondrial fission (n=5 coverslips/group) accompanied by increased expression of activated dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), key proteins responsible for mitochondrial fission. Propofol exposure also induced earlier opening of the mPTP from 118.9±3.1 seconds in the control-treated group to 73.3±1.6 seconds. Pretreatment of the cells with mdivi-1, a mitochondrial fission blocker rescued the propofol-induced toxicity, mitochondrial fission and mPTP opening time (n=75 cells/group). Inhibiting CDK1 attenuated the increase in cell death and fission and the increase in expression of activated Drp1. Conclusions These data demonstrate for the first time that propofol-induced neurotoxicity occurs through a mitochondrial fission/mPTP-mediated pathway. PMID:26352374

  14. Acute death of astrocytes in blast-exposed rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anna P; Shah, Alok S; Aperi, Brandy V; Kurpad, Shekar N; Stemper, Brian D; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Blast traumatic brain injury (bTBI) affects civilians, soldiers, and veterans worldwide and presents significant health concerns. The mechanisms of neurodegeneration following bTBI remain elusive and current therapies are largely ineffective. It is important to better characterize blast-evoked cellular changes and underlying mechanisms in order to develop more effective therapies. In the present study, our group utilized rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs) as an in vitro system to model bTBI. OHCs were exposed to either 138 ± 22 kPa (low) or 273 ± 23 kPa (high) overpressures using an open-ended helium-driven shock tube, or were assigned to sham control group. At 2 hours (h) following injury, we have characterized the astrocytic response to a blast overpressure. Immunostaining against the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) revealed acute shearing and morphological changes in astrocytes, including clasmatodendrosis. Moreover, overlap of GFAP immunostaining and propidium iodide (PI) indicated astrocytic death. Quantification of the number of dead astrocytes per counting area in the hippocampal cornu Ammonis 1 region (CA1), demonstrated a significant increase in dead astrocytes in the low- and high-blast, compared to sham control OHCs. However only a small number of GFAP-expressing astrocytes were co-labeled with the apoptotic marker Annexin V, suggesting necrosis as the primary type of cell death in the acute phase following blast exposure. Moreover, western blot analyses revealed calpain mediated breakdown of GFAP. The dextran exclusion additionally indicated membrane disruption as a potential mechanism of acute astrocytic death. Furthermore, although blast exposure did not evoke significant changes in glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) expression, loss of GLT-1-expressing astrocytes suggests dysregulation of glutamate uptake following injury. Our data illustrate the profound effect of blast overpressure on astrocytes in OHCs at 2 h

  15. Acute death of astrocytes in blast-exposed rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Anna P.; Shah, Alok S.; Aperi, Brandy V.; Kurpad, Shekar N.; Stemper, Brian D.; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Blast traumatic brain injury (bTBI) affects civilians, soldiers, and veterans worldwide and presents significant health concerns. The mechanisms of neurodegeneration following bTBI remain elusive and current therapies are largely ineffective. It is important to better characterize blast-evoked cellular changes and underlying mechanisms in order to develop more effective therapies. In the present study, our group utilized rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs) as an in vitro system to model bTBI. OHCs were exposed to either 138 ± 22 kPa (low) or 273 ± 23 kPa (high) overpressures using an open-ended helium-driven shock tube, or were assigned to sham control group. At 2 hours (h) following injury, we have characterized the astrocytic response to a blast overpressure. Immunostaining against the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) revealed acute shearing and morphological changes in astrocytes, including clasmatodendrosis. Moreover, overlap of GFAP immunostaining and propidium iodide (PI) indicated astrocytic death. Quantification of the number of dead astrocytes per counting area in the hippocampal cornu Ammonis 1 region (CA1), demonstrated a significant increase in dead astrocytes in the low- and high-blast, compared to sham control OHCs. However only a small number of GFAP-expressing astrocytes were co-labeled with the apoptotic marker Annexin V, suggesting necrosis as the primary type of cell death in the acute phase following blast exposure. Moreover, western blot analyses revealed calpain mediated breakdown of GFAP. The dextran exclusion additionally indicated membrane disruption as a potential mechanism of acute astrocytic death. Furthermore, although blast exposure did not evoke significant changes in glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) expression, loss of GLT-1-expressing astrocytes suggests dysregulation of glutamate uptake following injury. Our data illustrate the profound effect of blast overpressure on astrocytes in OHCs at 2 h

  16. Calcium and magnesium in drinking water and risk of death from acute myocardial infarction in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-Yuh; Chang, Chih-Ching; Tsai, Shang-Shyue; Chiu, Hui-Fen

    2006-07-01

    Many studies have examined the association between cardiovascular disease mortality and water hardness. However, the results have not been consistent. This report examines whether calcium and magnesium in drinking water are protective against acute myocardial infarction (AMI). All eligible AMI deaths (10,094 cases) of Taiwan residents from 1994 to 2003 were compared with deaths from other causes (10,094 controls), and the levels of calcium and magnesium in drinking water of these residents were determined. Data on calcium and magnesium levels in drinking water throughout Taiwan have been obtained from the Taiwan Water Supply Corporation. The control group consisted of people who died from other causes and the controls were pair matched to the cases by sex, year of birth, and year of death. The adjusted odd ratios (95% confidence interval) were 0.79 (0.73-0.86) for the group with water calcium levels between 25.1 and 42.4 mg/L and 0.71 (0.65-0.77) for the group with calcium levels of 42.6 mg/L or more. After adjustment for calcium levels in drinking water, there was no difference between the groups with different levels of magnesium. The results of the present study show that there is a significant protective effect of calcium intake from drinking water on the risk of death from AMI.

  17. TRPM2 channel deficiency prevents delayed cytosolic Zn2+ accumulation and CA1 pyramidal neuronal death after transient global ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ye, M; Yang, W; Ainscough, J F; Hu, X-P; Li, X; Sedo, A; Zhang, X-H; Zhang, X; Chen, Z; Li, X-M; Beech, D J; Sivaprasadarao, A; Luo, J-H; Jiang, L-H

    2014-01-01

    Transient ischemia is a leading cause of cognitive dysfunction. Postischemic ROS generation and an increase in the cytosolic Zn2+ level ([Zn2+]c) are critical in delayed CA1 pyramidal neuronal death, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we investigated the role of ROS-sensitive TRPM2 (transient receptor potential melastatin-related 2) channel. Using in vivo and in vitro models of ischemia–reperfusion, we showed that genetic knockout of TRPM2 strongly prohibited the delayed increase in the [Zn2+]c, ROS generation, CA1 pyramidal neuronal death and postischemic memory impairment. Time-lapse imaging revealed that TRPM2 deficiency had no effect on the ischemia-induced increase in the [Zn2+]c but abolished the cytosolic Zn2+ accumulation during reperfusion as well as ROS-elicited increases in the [Zn2+]c. These results provide the first evidence to show a critical role for TRPM2 channel activation during reperfusion in the delayed increase in the [Zn2+]c and CA1 pyramidal neuronal death and identify TRPM2 as a key molecule signaling ROS generation to postischemic brain injury. PMID:25429618

  18. NMDA-Receptors Are Involved in Cu2+/Paraquat-Induced Death of Cultured Cerebellar Granule Neurons.

    PubMed

    Stelmashook, E V; Genrikhs, E E; Aleksandrova, O P; Amelkina, G A; Zelenova, E A; Isaev, N K

    2016-08-01

    Rat cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) were not sensitive to CuCl2 (1-10 µM, 24 h), whereas paraquat (150 µM) decreased neuronal survival to 79 ± 3% of control level. Simultaneous treatment of CGNs with paraquat and CuCl2 (2, 5, or 10 µM Cu2+/paraquat) caused significant copper dose-dependent death, lowering their survival to 56 ± 4, 37 ± 3, or 16 ± 2%, respectively, and stimulating elevated production of free radicals in CGNs. Introduction of vitamin E, a non-competitive antagonist of NMDA subtype of glutamate receptors (MK-801), and also removal of glutamine from the incubation medium decreased toxicity of Cu2+/paraquat mixture. However, addition of Cu2+ into the incubation medium did not affect CGNs death caused by glutamate. These data emphasize that excessive copper in the brain may trigger oxidative stress, which in turn results in release of glutamate, overstimulation of glutamate receptors, and neuronal death.

  19. A Cytotoxic, Co-operative Interaction Between Energy Deprivation and Glutamate Release From System xc− Mediates Aglycemic Neuronal Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, Trista L.; He, Yan; Jackman, Nicole A.; Lobner, Doug; Hewett, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The astrocyte cystine/glutamate antiporter (system xc−) contributes substantially to the excitotoxic neuronal cell death facilitated by glucose deprivation. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which this occurred. Using pure astrocyte cultures, as well as, mixed cortical cell cultures containing both neurons and astrocytes, we found that neither an enhancement in system xc− expression nor activity underlies the excitotoxic effects of aglycemia. In addition, using three separate bioassays, we demonstrate no change in the ability of glucose-deprived astrocytes—either cultured alone or with neurons—to remove glutamate from the extracellular space. Instead, we demonstrate that glucose-deprived cultures are 2 to 3 times more sensitive to the killing effects of glutamate or N-methyl-D-aspartate when compared with their glucose-containing controls. Hence, our results are consistent with the weak excitotoxic hypothesis such that a bioenergetic deficiency, which is measureable in our mixed but not astrocyte cultures, allows normally innocuous concentrations of glutamate to become excitotoxic. Adding to the burgeoning literature detailing the contribution of astrocytes to neuronal injury, we conclude that under our experimental paradigm, a cytotoxic, co-operative interaction between energy deprivation and glutamate release from astrocyte system xc− mediates aglycemic neuronal cell death. PMID:26553727

  20. Microglial AGE-albumin is critical for neuronal death in Parkinson’s disease: a possible implication for theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Bayarsaikhan, Enkhjargal; Bayarsaikhan, Delger; Lee, Jaesuk; Son, Myeongjoo; Oh, Seyeon; Moon, Jeongsik; Park, Hye-Jeong; Roshini, Arivazhagan; Kim, Seung U; Song, Byoung-Joon; Jo, Seung-Mook; Byun, Kyunghee; Lee, Bonghee

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease (PD), by inducing protein aggregation and cross-link, formation of Lewy body, and neuronal death. In this study, we observed that AGE-albumin, the most abundant AGE product in the human PD brain, is synthesized in activated microglial cells and accumulates in the extracellular space. AGE-albumin synthesis in human-activated microglial cells is distinctly inhibited by ascorbic acid and cytochalasin treatment. Accumulated AGE-albumin upregulates the receptor to AGE, leading to apoptosis of human primary dopamine (DA) neurons. In animal experiments, we observed reduced DA neuronal cell death by treatment with soluble receptor to AGE. Our study provides evidence that activated microglial cells are one of the main contributors in AGE-albumin accumulation, deleterious to DA neurons in human and animal PD brains. Finally, activated microglial AGE-albumin could be used as a diagnostic and therapeutic biomarker with high sensitivity for neurodegenerative disorders, including PD. PMID:27601894

  1. Stress-induced nuclear translocation of CDK5 suppresses neuronal death by downregulating ERK activation via VRK3 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haengjin; Kim, Wanil; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Dohyun; Park, Choon-Ho; Kim, Sangjune; Kim, Do-Yeon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Although extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) activity is generally associated with cell survival, prolonged ERK activation induced by oxidative stress also mediates neuronal cell death. Here we report that oxidative stress-induced cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) activation stimulates neuroprotective signaling via phosphorylation of vaccinia-related kinase 3 (VRK3) at Ser 108. The binding of vaccinia H1-related (VHR) phosphatase to phosphorylated VRK3 increased its affinity for phospho-ERK and subsequently downregulated ERK activation. Overexpression of VRK3 protected human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced apoptosis. However the CDK5 was unable to phosphorylate mutant VRK3, and thus the mutant forms of VRK3 could not attenuate apoptotic process. Suppression of CDK5 activity results in increase of ERK activation and elevation of proapoptotic protein Bak expression in mouse cortical neurons. Results from VRK3-deficient neurons were further confirmed the role of VRK3 phosphorylation in H2O2-evoked ERK regulation. Importantly, we showed an association between phospho-VRK3 levels and the progression of human Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Together our work reveals endogenous protective mechanism against oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death and suggest VRK3 as a potential therapeutic target in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27346674

  2. The Alteration of Neonatal Raphe Neurons by Prenatal-Perinatal Nicotine. Meaning for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cerpa, Verónica J; Aylwin, María de la Luz O; Beltrán-Castillo, Sebastián; Bravo, Eduardo U; Llona, Isabel R; Richerson, George B; Eugenín, Jaime L

    2015-10-01

    Nicotine may link maternal cigarette smoking with respiratory dysfunctions in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Prenatal-perinatal nicotine exposure blunts ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and reduces central respiratory chemoreception in mouse neonates at Postnatal Days 0 (P0) to P3. This suggests that raphe neurons, which are altered in SIDS and contribute to central respiratory chemoreception, may be affected by nicotine. We therefore investigated whether prenatal-perinatal nicotine exposure affects the activity, electrical properties, and chemosensitivity of raphe obscurus (ROb) neurons in mouse neonates. Osmotic minipumps, implanted subcutaneously in 5- to 7-day-pregnant CF1 mice, delivered nicotine bitartrate (60 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) or saline (control) for up to 28 days. In neonates, ventilation was recorded by head-out plethysmography, c-Fos (neuronal activity marker), or serotonin autoreceptors (5HT1AR) were immunodetected using light microscopy, and patch-clamp recordings were made from raphe neurons in brainstem slices under normocarbia and hypercarbia. Prenatal-perinatal nicotine exposure decreased the hypercarbia-induced ventilatory responses at P1-P5, reduced both the number of c-Fos-positive ROb neurons during eucapnic normoxia at P1-P3 and their hypercapnia-induced recruitment at P3, increased 5HT1AR immunolabeling of ROb neurons at P3-P5, and reduced the spontaneous firing frequency of ROb neurons at P3 without affecting their CO2 sensitivity or their passive and active electrical properties. These findings reveal that prenatal-perinatal nicotine reduces the activity of neonatal ROb neurons, likely as a consequence of increased expression of 5HT1ARs. This hypoactivity may change the functional state of the respiratory neural network leading to breathing vulnerability and chemosensory failure as seen in SIDS.

  3. Caudate neuronal recording in freely behaving animals following acute and chronic dose response methylphenidate exposure.

    PubMed

    Claussen, Catherine M; Dafny, Nachum

    2015-09-01

    The misuse and abuse of the psychostimulant, methylphenidate (MPD) the drug of choice in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has seen a sharp uprising in recent years among both youth and adults for its cognitive enhancing effects and for recreational purposes. This uprise in illicit use has lead to many questions concerning the long-term consequences of MPD exposure. The objective of this study was to record animal behavior concomitantly with the caudate nucleus (CN) neuronal activity following acute and repetitive (chronic) dose response exposure to methylphenidate (MPD). A saline control and three MPD dose (0.6, 2.5, and 10.0mg/kg) groups were used. Behaviorally, the same MPD dose in some animals following chronic MPD exposure elicited behavioral sensitization and other animals elicited behavioral tolerance. Based on this finding, the CN neuronal population recorded from animals expressing behavioral sensitization was also evaluated separately from CN neurons recorded from animals expressing behavioral tolerance to chronic MPD exposure, respectively. Significant differences in CN neuronal population responses between the behaviorally sensitized and the behaviorally tolerant animals were observed for the 2.5 and 10.0mg/kg MPD exposed groups. For 2.5mg/kg MPD, behaviorally sensitized animals responded by decreasing their firing rates while behaviorally tolerant animals showed mainly an increase in their firing rates. The CN neuronal responses recorded from the behaviorally sensitized animals following 10.0mg/kg MPD responded by increasing their firing rates whereas the CN neuronal recordings from the behaviorally tolerant animals showed that approximately half decreased their firing rates in response to 10.0mg/kg MPD exposure. The comparison of percentage change in neuronal firing rates showed that the behaviorally tolerant animals trended to exhibit increases in their neuronal firing rates at ED1 following initial MPD exposure and

  4. Alpha-Synuclein Oligomers Interact with Metal Ions to Induce Oxidative Stress and Neuronal Death in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deas, Emma; Cremades, Nunilo; Angelova, Plamena R.; Ludtmann, Marthe H.R.; Yao, Zhi; Chen, Serene; Horrocks, Mathew H.; Banushi, Blerida; Little, Daniel; Devine, Michael J.; Gissen, Paul; Klenerman, David; Dobson, Christopher M.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Protein aggregation and oxidative stress are both key pathogenic processes in Parkinson's disease, although the mechanism by which misfolded proteins induce oxidative stress and neuronal death remains unknown. In this study, we describe how aggregation of alpha-synuclein (α-S) from its monomeric form to its soluble oligomeric state results in aberrant free radical production and neuronal toxicity. Results: We first demonstrate excessive free radical production in a human induced pluripotent stem-derived α-S triplication model at basal levels and on application of picomolar doses of β-sheet-rich α-S oligomers. We probed the effects of different structural species of α-S in wild-type rat neuronal cultures and show that both oligomeric and fibrillar forms of α-S are capable of generating free radical production, but that only the oligomeric form results in reduction of endogenous glutathione and subsequent neuronal toxicity. We dissected the mechanism of oligomer-induced free radical production and found that it was interestingly independent of several known cellular enzymatic sources. Innovation: The oligomer-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was entirely dependent on the presence of free metal ions as addition of metal chelators was able to block oligomer-induced ROS production and prevent oligomer-induced neuronal death. Conclusion: Our findings further support the causative role of soluble amyloid oligomers in triggering neurodegeneration and shed light into the mechanisms by which these species cause neuronal damage, which, we show here, can be amenable to modulation through the use of metal chelation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 376–391. PMID:26564470

  5. Distribution of corticospinal motor neurons in the postnatal rat: quantitative evidence for massive collateral elimination and modest cell death.

    PubMed

    Oudega, M; Varon, S; Hagg, T

    1994-09-01

    The postnatal development of rat corticospinal motor neurons (CSMN) was studied by retrograde tracing with cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) injected into the upper cervical dorsal spinal cord on the first postnatal day (P0), P3, P10, P20, and at adulthood. CTB-labeled neurons were visualized by immunocytochemistry and extensively quantified throughout the cortex. At P0, CSMN were found to an extent similar to that reported in P3 animals with other neuronal tracers, now permitting in vitro studies of neonatal CSMN. Between P0 and P3, the number of labeled neurons increased by 30% to a total maximum of approximately 185,000 in both cortices. The increase occurred throughout the cortex. At P10, the number of labeled CSMN had decreased to 60% of the number at P3. Fewer CSMN were evident particularly in the perirhinal cortex. Between P10 and P20, the number of CSMN decreased further to 52% of the maximal number at P3. This decrease occurred predominantly in the cingulate and parietal cortex. The number of labeled CSMN in rats injected at P0 and analyzed at P20 was 10% lower than the number in P0-injected littermates that were analyzed at P3, which suggests that only a small portion of the "disappearing" CSMN undergoes developmental neuronal death. Thus, the spinal projection of the remaining 38% is apparently eliminated between P3 and P20. Detailed quantitative analysis of the CSMN distribution demonstrated that neuronal death occurs predominantly in the perirhinal cortex. In contrast, axonal elimination of corticospinal projections occurred throughout the CSMN field, i.e., primarily in the frontal, occipital, and perirhinal cortex between P3-P10 and in the cingulate and parietal cortex between P10-P20.

  6. Calcium Imaging of AM Dyes Following Prolonged Incubation in Acute Neuronal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Morley, John W.; Tapson, Jonathan; Breen, Paul P.; van Schaik, André

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-imaging is a sensitive method for monitoring calcium dynamics during neuronal activity. As intracellular calcium concentration is correlated to physiological and pathophysiological activity of neurons, calcium imaging with fluorescent indicators is one of the most commonly used techniques in neuroscience today. Current methodologies for loading calcium dyes into the tissue require prolonged incubation time (45–150 min), in addition to dissection and recovery time after the slicing procedure. This prolonged incubation curtails experimental time, as tissue is typically maintained for 6–8 hours after slicing. Using a recently introduced recovery chamber that extends the viability of acute brain slices to more than 24 hours, we tested the effectiveness of calcium AM staining following long incubation periods post cell loading and its impact on the functional properties of calcium signals in acute brain slices and wholemount retinae. We show that calcium dyes remain within cells and are fully functional >24 hours after loading. Moreover, the calcium dynamics recorded >24 hrs were similar to the calcium signals recorded in fresh tissue that was incubated for <4 hrs. These results indicate that long exposure of calcium AM dyes to the intracellular cytoplasm did not alter the intracellular calcium concentration, the functional range of the dye or viability of the neurons. This data extends our previous work showing that a custom recovery chamber can extend the viability of neuronal tissue, and reliable data for both electrophysiology and imaging can be obtained >24hrs after dissection. These methods will not only extend experimental time for those using acute neuronal tissue, but also may reduce the number of animals required to complete experimental goals. PMID:27183102

  7. Reduced calcium binding protein immunoreactivity induced by electroconvulsive shock indicates neuronal hyperactivity, not neuronal death or deactivation.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-E; Kwak, S-E; Kim, D-S; Won, M H; Kwon, O-S; Choi, S-Y; Kang, T-C

    2006-01-01

    Calcium-binding proteins (CBPs), such as parvalbumin and calbindin D-28k, are useful markers of specific neuronal types in the CNS. In recent studies, expression of CBPs may be indicative of a deactivated neuronal state, particularly epilepsy. However, it is controversial whether altered expression of CBPs in the hippocampus practically indicate neuronal activity. Therefore, the present study was performed to investigate the extent of profiles of expression of CBPs in the rat hippocampus affected by several episodes induced by electroconvulsive shock. In the present study, following electroconvulsive shock expression of CBPs were reduced in the hippocampus in a stimulus-dependent manner, and recovered to the control level at 6 h after electroconvulsive shock. However, paired-pulse responses of the dentate gyrus were transiently impaired by electroconvulsive shock, and immediately normalized to baseline value. In addition, effects of electroconvulsive shock on expression of CBPs and paired-pulse responses were prevented by pretreatment of vigabatrin. These findings suggest that reduced expression of CBPs induced by seizure activity may be indicative of hyperactivity of CBP positive neurons, which is a practical consequence of the abnormal discharge, and that they may play an important role in regulating seizure activity.

  8. Adaptations in responsiveness of brainstem pain-modulating neurons in acute compared with chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Daniel R; Heinricher, Mary M

    2013-06-01

    Despite similar behavioral hypersensitivity, acute and chronic pain have distinct neural bases. We used intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant to directly compare activity of pain-modulating neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) in acute vs chronic inflammation. Heat-evoked and von Frey-evoked withdrawal reflexes and corresponding RVM neuronal activity were recorded in lightly anesthetized animals either during the first hour after complete Freund's adjuvant injection (acute) or 3 to 10 days later (chronic). Thermal and modest mechanical hyperalgesia during acute inflammation were associated with increases in the spontaneous activity of pain-facilitating ON-cells and suppression of pain-inhibiting OFF-cells. Acute hyperalgesia was reversed by RVM block, showing that the increased activity of RVM ON-cells is necessary for acute behavioral hypersensitivity. In chronic inflammation, thermal hyperalgesia had resolved but mechanical hyperalgesia had become pronounced. The spontaneous discharges of ON- and OFF-cells were not different from those in control subjects, but the mechanical response thresholds for both cell classes were reduced into the innocuous range. RVM block in the chronic condition worsened mechanical hyperalgesia. These studies identify distinct contributions of RVM ON- and OFF-cells to acute and chronic inflammatory hyperalgesia. During early immune-mediated inflammation, ON-cell spontaneous activity promotes hyperalgesia. After inflammation is established, the antinociceptive influence of OFF-cells is dominant, yet the lowered threshold for the OFF-cell pause allows behavioral responses to stimuli that would normally be considered innocuous. The efficacy of OFF-cells in counteracting sensitization of ascending transmission pathways could therefore be an important determining factor in development of chronic inflammatory pain.

  9. Combined Exposure to Simulated Microgravity and Acute or Chronic Radiation Reduces Neuronal Network Integrity and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Quintens, Roel; Samari, Nada; de Saint-Georges, Louis; van Oostveldt, Patrick; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed Abderrafi

    2016-01-01

    During orbital or interplanetary space flights, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiations and microgravity. However, most earth-based studies on the potential health risks of space conditions have investigated the effects of these two conditions separately. This study aimed at assessing the combined effect of radiation exposure and microgravity on neuronal morphology and survival in vitro. In particular, we investigated the effects of simulated microgravity after acute (X-rays) or during chronic (Californium-252) exposure to ionizing radiation using mouse mature neuron cultures. Acute exposure to low (0.1 Gy) doses of X-rays caused a delay in neurite outgrowth and a reduction in soma size, while only the high dose impaired neuronal survival. Of interest, the strongest effect on neuronal morphology and survival was evident in cells exposed to microgravity and in particular in cells exposed to both microgravity and radiation. Removal of neurons from simulated microgravity for a period of 24 h was not sufficient to recover neurite length, whereas the soma size showed a clear re-adaptation to normal ground conditions. Genome-wide gene expression analysis confirmed a modulation of genes involved in neurite extension, cell survival and synaptic communication, suggesting that these changes might be responsible for the observed morphological effects. In general, the observed synergistic changes in neuronal network integrity and cell survival induced by simulated space conditions might help to better evaluate the astronaut's health risks and underline the importance of investigating the central nervous system and long-term cognition during and after a space flight. PMID:27203085

  10. [Rupture of the free wall of the heart as cause of death in acute myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Hurtado Buen Abad, L; De la Ree, R; Contreras, M; González-Hermosillo, J A; Salinas, L; Cárdenas, M

    1978-01-01

    Twenty four cases with myocardial rupture among 259 patients with autopsy after death due to myocardial infarction, were compared with patients with acute myocardial infarction and death secondary to other causes. Myocardial rupture occured during the first 72 hours in 58% of the patients and all cases within the first five days. Two thirds of the patients were males and 46% were 70 years of age. There were 24 myocardial ruptures (9.5%). Previous history of arterial hypertension and un-remittent anginal pain were predisposing factors for rupture (p=0.05). Other previously reported bad prognostic factors such as persistent hipertension after acute infarction, severe exercise before infarction and history of Diabetes Mellitus were not statistically significant in this study. Ruptured myocardium was not influenced by a previous history of myocardial infarction, hospitalization delay in the C.C.U., administration of anticoagulants, digitalis or pressor amines. There was no significant difference among the groups compared in enzyme curves or magnitude of leucocytosis. Electromechanic dissociation, sinus bradycardia, nodal rhythm followed by idioventricular rhythm and asystole, were observed following myocardial rupture.

  11. Underediting of GluR2 mRNA, a neuronal death inducing molecular change in sporadic ALS, does not occur in motor neurons in ALS1 or SBMA.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Yukio; Sun, Hui; Ito, Kyoko; Hideyama, Takuto; Aoki, Masashi; Sobue, Gen; Tsuji, Shoji; Kwak, Shin

    2006-01-01

    Deficient RNA editing of the AMPA receptor subunit GluR2 at the Q/R site is a primary cause of neuronal death and recently has been reported to be a tightly linked etiological cause of motor neuron death in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We quantified the RNA editing efficiency of the GluR2 Q/R site in single motor neurons of rats transgenic for mutant human Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) as well as patients with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), and found that GluR2 mRNA was completely edited in all the motor neurons examined. It seems likely that the death cascade is different among the dying motor neurons in sporadic ALS, familial ALS with mutant SOD1 and SBMA.

  12. Lapatinib induces autophagic cell death and differentiation in acute myeloblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Fang, Li-Wen; Su, Wen-Chi; Hsu, Wen-Yi; Yang, Kai-Chien; Huang, Huey-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Lapatinib is an oral-form dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or ErbB/Her) superfamily members with anticancer activity. In this study, we examined the effects and mechanism of action of lapatinib on several human leukemia cells lines, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. We found that lapatinib inhibited the growth of human AML U937, HL-60, NB4, CML KU812, MEG-01, and ALL Jurkat T cells. Among these leukemia cell lines, lapatinib induced apoptosis in HL-60, NB4, and Jurkat cells, but induced nonapoptotic cell death in U937, K562, and MEG-01 cells. Moreover, lapatinib treatment caused autophagic cell death as shown by positive acridine orange staining, the massive formation of vacuoles as seen by electronic microscopy, and the upregulation of LC3-II, ATG5, and ATG7 in AML U937 cells. Furthermore, autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine and knockdown of ATG5, ATG7, and Beclin-1 using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) partially rescued lapatinib-induced cell death. In addition, the induction of phagocytosis and ROS production as well as the upregulation of surface markers CD14 and CD68 was detected in lapatinib-treated U937 cells, suggesting the induction of macrophagic differentiation in AML U937 cells by lapatinib. We also noted the synergistic effects of the use of lapatinib and cytotoxic drugs in U937 leukemia cells. These results indicate that lapatinib may have potential for development as a novel antileukemia agent. PMID:27499639

  13. Ascorbate prevents cell death from prolonged exposure to glutamate in an in vitro model of human dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Ballaz, Santiago; Morales, Ingrid; Rodríguez, Manuel; Obeso, José A

    2013-12-01

    Ascorbate (vitamin C) is a nonenzymatic antioxidant highly concentrated in the brain. In addition to mediating redox balance, ascorbate is linked to glutamate neurotransmission in the striatum, where it renders neuroprotection against excessive glutamate stimulation. Oxidative stress and glutamatergic overactivity are key biochemical features accompanying the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra that characterizes Parkinson's disease (PD). At present, it is not clear whether antiglutamate agents and ascorbate might be neuroprotective agents for PD. Thus, we tested whether ascorbate can prevent cell death from prolonged exposure to glutamate using dopaminergic neurons of human origin. To this purpose, dopamine-like neurons were obtained by differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells and then cultured for 4 days without antioxidant (antiaging) protection to evaluate glutamate toxicity and ascorbate protection as a model system of potential factors contributing to dopaminergic neuron death in PD. Glutamate dose dependently induced toxicity in dopaminergic cells largely by the stimulation of AMPA and metabotropic receptors and to a lesser extent by N-methyl-D-aspartate and kainate receptors. At relatively physiological levels of extracellular concentration, ascorbate protected cells against glutamate excitotoxicity. This neuroprotection apparently relies on the inhibition of oxidative stress, because ascorbate prevented the pro-oxidant action of the scavenging molecule quercetin, which occurred over the course of prolonged exposure, as is also seen with glutamate. Our findings show the relevance of ascorbate as a neuroprotective agent and emphasize an often underappreciated role of oxidative stress in glutamate excitotoxicity. Occurrence of a glutamate-ascorbate link in dopaminergic neurons may explain previous contradictions regarding their putative role in PD.

  14. NRA-2, a nicalin homolog, regulates neuronal death by controlling surface localization of toxic Caenorhabditis elegans DEG/ENaC channels.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Shaunak; Yeola, Shrutika; Zhang, Wenying; Bianchi, Laura; Driscoll, Monica

    2014-04-25

    Hyperactivated DEG/ENaCs induce neuronal death through excessive cation influx and disruption of intracellular calcium homeostasis. Caenorhabditis elegans DEG/ENaC MEC-4 is hyperactivated by the (d) mutation and induces death of touch neurons. The analogous substitution in MEC-10 (MEC-10(d)) co-expressed in the same neurons is only mildly neurotoxic. We exploited the lower toxicity of MEC-10(d) to identify RNAi knockdowns that enhance neuronal death. We report here that knock-out of the C. elegans nicalin homolog NRA-2 enhances MEC-10(d)-induced neuronal death. Cell biological assays in C. elegans neurons show that NRA-2 controls the distribution of MEC-10(d) between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cell surface. Electrophysiological experiments in Xenopus oocytes support this notion and suggest that control of channel distribution by NRA-2 is dependent on the subunit composition. We propose that nicalin/NRA-2 functions in a quality control mechanism to retain mutant channels in the endoplasmic reticulum, influencing the extent of neuronal death. Mammalian nicalin may have a similar role in DEG/ENaC biology, therefore influencing pathological conditions like ischemia.

  15. NRA-2, a Nicalin Homolog, Regulates Neuronal Death by Controlling Surface Localization of Toxic Caenorhabditis elegans DEG/ENaC Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Shaunak; Yeola, Shrutika; Zhang, Wenying; Bianchi, Laura; Driscoll, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Hyperactivated DEG/ENaCs induce neuronal death through excessive cation influx and disruption of intracellular calcium homeostasis. Caenorhabditis elegans DEG/ENaC MEC-4 is hyperactivated by the (d) mutation and induces death of touch neurons. The analogous substitution in MEC-10 (MEC-10(d)) co-expressed in the same neurons is only mildly neurotoxic. We exploited the lower toxicity of MEC-10(d) to identify RNAi knockdowns that enhance neuronal death. We report here that knock-out of the C. elegans nicalin homolog NRA-2 enhances MEC-10(d)-induced neuronal death. Cell biological assays in C. elegans neurons show that NRA-2 controls the distribution of MEC-10(d) between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cell surface. Electrophysiological experiments in Xenopus oocytes support this notion and suggest that control of channel distribution by NRA-2 is dependent on the subunit composition. We propose that nicalin/NRA-2 functions in a quality control mechanism to retain mutant channels in the endoplasmic reticulum, influencing the extent of neuronal death. Mammalian nicalin may have a similar role in DEG/ENaC biology, therefore influencing pathological conditions like ischemia. PMID:24567339

  16. Inhibition of autophagy via activation of PI3K/Akt pathway contributes to the protection of ginsenoside Rb1 against neuronal death caused by ischemic insults.

    PubMed

    Luo, Tianfei; Liu, Guiying; Ma, Hongxi; Lu, Bin; Xu, Haiyang; Wang, Yujing; Wu, Jiang; Ge, Pengfei; Liang, Jianmin

    2014-09-01

    Lethal autophagy is a pathway leading to neuronal death caused by transient global ischemia. In this study, we examined the effect of Ginsenoside Rb1 (GRb1) on ischemia/reperfusion-induced autophagic neuronal death and investigated the role of PI3K/Akt. Ischemic neuronal death in vitro was induced by using oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) in SH-SY5Y cells, and transient global ischemia was produced by using two vessels occlusion in rats. Cellular viability of SH-SY5Y cells was assessed by MTT assay, and CA1 neuronal death was evaluated by Hematoxylin-eosin staining. Autophagic vacuoles were detected by using both fluorescent microscopy in combination with acridine orange (AO) and Monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining and transmission electronic microscopy. Protein levels of LC3II, Beclin1, total Akt and phosphor-Akt at Ser473 were examined by western blotting analysis. GRb1 inhibited both OGD and transient ischemia-induced neuronal death and mitigated OGD-induced autophagic vacuoles in SH-SY5Y cells. By contrast, PI3K inhibitor LY294002 counteracted the protection of GRb1 against neuronal death caused by either OGD or transient ischemia. LY294002 not only mitigated the up-regulated protein level of phosphor Akt at Ser473 caused by GRb1, but also reversed the inhibitory effect of GRb1 on OGD and transient ischemia-induced elevation in protein levels of LC3II and Beclin1.

  17. Naphthazarin protects against glutamate-induced neuronal death via activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Tae Gen; Kawamoto, Elisa M.; Yu, Qian-Sheng; Greig, Nigel H.; Mattson, Mark P.; Camandola, Simonetta

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Naphthazarin activates the Nrf2/ARE pathway. •Naphthazarin induces Nrf2-driven genes in neurons and astrocytes. •Naphthazarin protects neurons against excitotoxicity. -- Abstract: Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway is an important cellular stress response pathway involved in neuroprotection. We previously screened several natural phytochemicals and identified plumbagin as a novel activator of the Nrf2/ARE pathway that can protect neurons against ischemic injury. Here we extended our studies to natural and synthetic derivatives of plumbagin. We found that 5,8-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (naphthazarin) is a potent activator of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, up-regulates the expression of Nrf2-driven genes in primary neuronal and glial cultures, and protects neurons against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity.

  18. Involvement of cyclin D1/CDK4 and pRb mediated by PI3K/AKT pathway activation in Pb{sup 2+}-induced neuronal death in cultured hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chenchen Xing Tairan Tang Mingliang Yong Wu Yan Dan Deng Hongmin Wang Huili Wang Ming Chen Jutao Ruan Diyun

    2008-06-15

    Lead (Pb) is widely recognized as a neurotoxicant. One of the suggested mechanisms of lead neurotoxicity is apoptotic cell death. And the mechanism by which Pb{sup 2+} causes neuronal death is not well understood. The present study sought to examine the obligate nature of cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), phosphorylation of its substrate retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and its select upstream signal phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway in the death of primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons evoked by Pb{sup 2+}. Our data showed that lead treatment of primary hippocampal cultures results in dose-dependent cell death. Inhibition of CDK4 prevented Pb{sup 2+}-induced neuronal death significantly but was incomplete. In addition, we demonstrated that the levels of cyclin D1 and pRb/p107 were increased during Pb{sup 2+} treatment. These elevated expression persisted up to 48 h, returning to control levels after 72 h. We also presented pharmacological and morphological evidences that cyclin D1/CDK4 and pRb/p107 were required for such kind of neuronal death. Addition of the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (30 {mu}M) or wortmannin (100 nM) significantly rescued the cultured hippocampal neurons from death caused by Pb{sup 2+}. And that Pb{sup 2+}-elicited phospho-AKT (Ser473) participated in the induction of cyclin D1 and partial pRb/p107 expression. These results provide evidences that cell cycle elements play a required role in the death of neurons evoked by Pb{sup 2+} and suggest that certain signaling elements upstream of cyclin D1/CDK4 are modified and/or required for this form of neuronal death.

  19. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) protects neurons from acute toxicity using a ganglioside-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Niraj R; Nguyen, Thien; Bullen, John W; Griffin, John W; Schnaar, Ronald L

    2010-03-17

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a protein expressed on the innermost wrap of myelin, contributes to long-term axon stability as evidenced by progressive axon degeneration in Mag-null mice. Recently, MAG was also found to protect axons from acute toxic insults. In the current study, rat dorsal root ganglion neurons were cultured on control substrata and substrata adsorbed with myelin proteins. Neurons on myelin-adsorbed surfaces were resistant to acute degeneration of neurites induced by vincristine, a cancer chemotherapeutic agent with neuropathic side effects. Myelin-mediated protection was reversed by anti-MAG antibody and was absent when cells were cultured on extracts from Mag-null mouse myelin, confirming the protective role of MAG. Gangliosides (sialylated glycosphingolipids) are one functional class of axonal receptors for MAG. In the current studies, a direct role for gangliosides in mediating the acute protective effects of MAG was established. Treatment of neurons with sialidase, an enzyme that cleaves the terminal sialic acids required for MAG binding, reversed MAG's protective effect, as did treatment with (1R,2R)-1-phenyl-2-hexadecanoylamino-3-pyrrolidino-1-propanol, an inhibitor of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis. In contrast, treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, an enzyme that cleaves Nogo receptors (NgR, another class of MAG receptor), or with a peptide inhibitor of an NgR-associated signaling molecule p75(NTR), failed to diminish MAG-mediated protection. Inhibiting the Rho-associated protein kinase ROCK reversed protection. We conclude that MAG protects neurites from acute toxic insult via a ganglioside-mediated signaling pathway that involves activation of RhoA. Understanding MAG-mediated protection may provide opportunities to reduce axonal damage and loss.

  20. HDAC2 selectively regulates FOXO3a-mediated gene transcription during oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shengyi; Zhao, Siqi; Yan, Feng; Cheng, Jinbo; Huang, Li; Chen, Hong; Liu, Qingsong; Ji, Xunming; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2015-01-21

    All neurodegenerative diseases are associated with oxidative stress-induced neuronal death. Forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a) is a key transcription factor involved in neuronal apoptosis. However, how FOXO3a forms complexes and functions in oxidative stress processing remains largely unknown. In the present study, we show that histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) forms a physical complex with FOXO3a, which plays an important role in FOXO3a-dependent gene transcription and oxidative stress-induced mouse cerebellar granule neuron (CGN) apoptosis. Interestingly, we also found that HDAC2 became selectively enriched in the promoter region of the p21 gene, but not those of other target genes, and inhibited FOXO3a-mediated p21 transcription. Furthermore, we found that oxidative stress reduced the interaction between FOXO3a and HDAC2, leading to an increased histone H4K16 acetylation level in the p21 promoter region and upregulated p21 expression in a manner independent of p53 or E2F1. Phosphorylation of HDAC2 at Ser 394 is important for the HDAC2-FOXO3a interaction, and we found that cerebral ischemia/reperfusion reduced phosphorylation of HDAC2 at Ser 394 and mitigated the HDAC2-FOXO3a interaction in mouse brain tissue. Our study reveals the novel regulation of FOXO3a-mediated selective gene transcription via epigenetic modification in the process of oxidative stress-induced cell death, which could be exploited therapeutically.

  1. Evidence for the involvement of apoptosis-inducing factor-mediated caspase-independent neuronal death in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenfeng; Mechawar, Naguib; Krantic, Slavica; Quirion, Rémi

    2010-05-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests the involvement of caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms in neuronal cell death in Alzheimer disease (AD). The apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) is a mitochondrial oxido-reductase originally characterized as a mediator of caspase-independent programmed cell death (PCD). In this postmortem study, we investigated the distribution of AIF and its possible morphological association with pathological features in the hippocampus, as well as entorhinal and medial gyrus of temporal cortices of late stage AD, dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and control subjects. In comparison with controls, a significant increase in neuronal AIF immunoreactivity (AIF-ir) was observed in the hippocampus and the superficial layers of entorhinal and medial gyrus of temporal cortices in AD--but not DLB--samples. AIF-ir in neuronal nuclei was also significantly more widespread in AD compared with control and DLB samples. Furthermore, AIF-ir was found to be colocalized with neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in AD brains. Interestingly, a significant positive correlation was seen between nuclear AIF-ir and Braak stage in CA1 of the hippocampus as well as in entorhinal and temporal cortices in AD samples. These data show for the first time: (1) the nuclear localization of AIF in the AD brain and (2) its colocalization with NFTs, suggesting a possible involvement of AIF-mediated caspase-independent PCD, at least in the late stage of this neuropathology.

  2. 1–42 β-Amyloid peptide requires PDK1/nPKC/Rac 1 pathway to induce neuronal death

    PubMed Central

    Manterola, L; Hernando-Rodríguez, M; Ruiz, A; Apraiz, A; Arrizabalaga, O; Vellón, L; Alberdi, E; Cavaliere, F; Lacerda, H M; Jimenez, S; Parada, L A; Matute, C; Zugaza, J L

    2013-01-01

    1–42 β-Amyloid (Aβ1–42) peptide is a key molecule involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Some of its effects are manifested at the neuronal morphological level. These morphological changes involve loss of neurites due to cytoskeleton alterations. However, the mechanism of Aβ1–42 peptide activation of the neurodegenerative program is still poorly understood. Here, Aβ1–42 peptide-induced transduction of cellular death signals through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/phosphoinositol-dependent kinase (PDK)/novel protein kinase C (nPKC)/Rac 1 axis is described. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of PDK1 and nPKC activities blocks Rac 1 activation and neuronal cell death. Our results provide insights into an unsuspected connection between PDK1, nPKCs and Rac 1 in the same signal-transduction pathway and points out nPKCs and Rac 1 as potential therapeutic targets to block the toxic effects of Aβ1–42 peptide in neurons. PMID:23340502

  3. A rare mutation in UNC5C predisposes to Alzheimer’s disease and increases neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel-Smith, MK; Hunkapiller, J; Bhangale, TR; Srinivasan, K; Maloney, JA; Atwal, JK; Sa, SM; Yaylaoglu, MB; Foreman, O; Ortmann, W; Rathore, N; Hansen, DV; Tessier-Lavigne, M; Mayeux, R; Pericak-Vance, M; Haines, J; Farrer, LA; Schellenberg, GD; Goate, A; Behrens, TW

    2015-01-01

    We have identified a rare coding mutation, T835M (rs137875858), in the Netrin receptor UNC5C that segregated with disease in an autosomal dominant pattern in two families enriched for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD), and was associated with disease across four large case/control cohorts (OR = 2.15, Pmeta= 0.0095). T835M alters a conserved residue in the hinge region of UNC5C, and in vitro studies demonstrate that this mutation leads to increased cell death in several cell types, including neurons. Furthermore, neurons expressing T835M UNC5C are more susceptible to multiple neurodegenerative stimuli, including β-Amyloid (Aβ). Based on these data and the enriched hippocampal expression of UNC5C in the adult nervous system, we propose one possible mechanism in which T835M UNC5C contributes to the risk of Alzheimer’s disease is by increasing susceptibility to neuronal cell death, particularly in vulnerable regions of the Alzheimer’s brain. PMID:25419706

  4. Selective 14-3-3γ induction quenches p-β-catenin Ser37/Bax-enhanced cell death in cerebral cortical neurons during ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Lai, X J; Ye, S Q; Zheng, L; Li, L; Liu, Q R; Yu, S B; Pang, Y; Jin, S; Li, Q; Yu, A C H; Chen, X Q

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia-induced cell death is a major cause of disability or death after stroke. Identifying the key intrinsic protective mechanisms induced by ischemia is critical for the development of effective stroke treatment. Here, we reported that 14-3-3γ was a selective ischemia-inducible survival factor in cerebral cortical neurons reducing cell death by downregulating Bax depend direct 14-3-3γ/p-β-catenin Ser37 interactions in the nucleus. 14-3-3γ, but not other 14-3-3 isoforms, was upregulated in primary cerebral cortical neurons upon oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD) as measured by quantitative PCR, western blot and fluorescent immunostaining. The selective induction of 14-3-3γ in cortical neurons by OGD was verified by the in vivo ischemic stroke model. Knocking down 14-3-3γ alone or inhibiting 14-3-3/client interactions was sufficient to induce cell death in normal cultured neurons and exacerbate OGD-induced neuronal death. Ectopic overexpression of 14-3-3γ significantly reduced OGD-induced cell death in cultured neurons. Co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer demonstrated that endogenous 14-3-3γ bound directly to more p-β-catenin Ser37 but not p-Bad, p-Ask-1, p-p53 and Bax. During OGD, p-β-catenin Ser37 but not p-β-catenin Ser45 was increased prominently, which correlated with Bax elevation in cortical neurons. OGD promoted the entry of 14-3-3γ into the nuclei, in correlation with the increase of nuclear p-β-catenin Ser37 in neurons. Overexpression of 14-3-3γ significantly reduced Bax expression, whereas knockdown of 14-3-3γ increased Bax in cortical neurons. Abolishing β-catenin phosphorylation at Ser37 (S37A) significantly reduced Bax and cell death in neurons upon OGD. Finally, 14-3-3γ overexpression completely suppressed β-catenin-enhanced Bax and cell death in neurons upon OGD. Based on these data, we propose that the 14-3-3γ/p-β-catenin Ser37/Bax axis determines cell survival or death of neurons during ischemia

  5. Melatonin Mediates Protective Effects against Kainic Acid-Induced Neuronal Death through Safeguarding ER Stress and Mitochondrial Disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Feixiao; Shi, Cai; Chen, Qingjie; Hang, Weijian; Xia, Liangtao; Wu, Yue; Tao, Sophia Z.; Zhou, Jie; Shi, Anbing; Chen, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal death is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress. Melatonin is known to protect hippocampal neurons from KA-induced apoptosis, but the exact mechanisms underlying melatonin protective effects against neuronal mitochondria disorder and ER stress remain uncertain. In this study, we investigated the sheltering roles of melatonin during KA-induced apoptosis by focusing on mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress mediated signal pathways. KA causes mitochondrial dynamic disorder and dysfunction through calpain activation, leading to neuronal apoptosis. Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM and calpain inhibitor calpeptin can significantly restore mitochondrial morphology and function. ER stress can also be induced by KA treatment. ER stress inhibitor 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuates ER stress-mediated apoptosis and mitochondrial disorder. It is worth noting that calpain activation was also inhibited under PBA administration. Thus, we concluded that melatonin effectively inhibits KA-induced calpain upregulation/activation and mitochondrial deterioration by alleviating Ca2+ overload and ER stress. PMID:28293167

  6. Amelioration of oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced neuronal death by chloroform fraction of bay leaves (Laurus nobilis).

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun-Young; Lee, Sung-Jin; Nam, Kung-Woo; Shin, Jongheon; Oh, Ki-bong; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Mar, Woongchon

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the Laurus nobilis chloroform fraction (LNCF) protects against cerebral ischemia neuronal damage. Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and brain slices from rats were subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD), followed by reoxgenation with and without LNCF. The viabilities of SH-SY5Y cells and brain slices from the rats were 58.5±4.9% and 79.7±5.9% in the group subjected to OGD, and 80.4±0.4% and 97.2±1.9% at 4 µg/ml of LNCF, respectively. LNCF also significantly inhibited death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) dephosphorylation. Pretreatment with LNCF at 4 mg/kg significantly decreased infarct size by 79% of vehicle control in the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in vivo model. LNCF is a neuroprotective drug candidate against cerebral ischemia neuronal damage.

  7. miR-134 regulates ischemia/reperfusion injury-induced neuronal cell death by regulating CREB signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weidong; Liu, Xiaobin; Cao, Jie; Meng, Facai; Li, Min; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Jie

    2015-04-01

    microRNA-134 (miR-134) has been reported to be a brain-specific miRNA and is differently expressed in brain tissues subjected to ischemic injury. However, the underlying mechanism of miR-134 in regulating cerebral ischemic injury remains poorly understood. The current study was designed to delineate the molecular basis of miR-134 in regulating cerebral ischemic injury. Using the oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model of hippocampal neuron ischemia in vitro, we found that the overexpression of miR-134 mediated by recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector infection significantly promoted neuron death induced by OGD/reoxygenation, whereas the inhibition of miR-134 provided protective effects against OGD/reoxygenation-induced cell death. Moreover, cyclic AMP (cAMP) response element-binding protein (CREB) as a putative target of miR-134 was downregulated and upregulated by miR-134 overexpression or inhibition, respectively. The direct interaction between miR-134 and the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of CREB mRNA was further confirmed by dual-luciferase reporter assay. Overexpression of miR-134 also inhibited the expression of the downstream gene of CREB, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2, whereas the inhibition of miR-134 upregulated the expression of BDNF and Bcl-2 in neurons after OGD/reoxygenation. Notably, the knockdown of CREB by CREB siRNA apparently abrogated the protective effect of anti-miR-134 on OGD/reoxygenation-induced cell death. Taken together, our study suggests that downregulation of miR-134 alleviates ischemic injury through enhancing CREB expression and downstream genes, providing a promising and potential therapeutic target for cerebral ischemic injury.

  8. Serotonergic neuronal death and concomitant serotonin deficiency curb copulation ability of Drosophila platonic mutants

    PubMed Central

    Yilmazer, Yasemin B.; Koganezawa, Masayuki; Sato, Kosei; Xu, Jinhua; Yamamoto, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila platonic (plt) males court females, but fail to copulate. Here we show that plt is an allele of scribbler (sbb), a BMP signalling component. sbb knockdown in larvae leads to the loss of approximately eight serotonergic neurons, which express the sex-determinant protein Doublesex (Dsx). Genetic deprivation of serotonin (5-HT) from dsx-expressing neurons results in copulation defects. Thus, sbb+ is developmentally required for the survival of a specific subset of dsx-expressing neurons, which support the normal execution of copulation in adults by providing 5-HT. Our study highlights the conserved involvement of serotonergic neurons in the control of copulatory mechanisms and the key role of BMP signalling in the formation of a sex-specific circuitry. PMID:27958269

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α mediates acute effects of palmitoylethanolamide on sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Khasabova, Iryna A; Xiong, Yee; Coicou, Lia G; Piomelli, Daniele; Seybold, Virginia

    2012-09-12

    The amplitude of the depolarization-evoked Ca2+ transient is larger in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from tumor-bearing mice compared with that of neurons from naive mice, and the change is mimicked by coculturing DRG neurons with the fibrosarcoma cells used to generate the tumors (Khasabova et al., 2007). The effect of palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), a ligand for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), was determined on the evoked-Ca2+ transient in the coculture condition. The level of PEA was reduced in DRG cells from tumor-bearing mice as well as those cocultured with fibrosarcoma cells. Pretreatment with PEA, a synthetic PPARα agonist (GW7647), or ARN077, an inhibitor of the enzyme that hydrolyzes PEA, acutely decreased the amplitude of the evoked Ca2+ transient in small DRG neurons cocultured with fibrosarcoma cells. The PPARα antagonist GW6471 blocked the effect of each. In contrast, the PPARα agonist was without effect in the control condition, but the antagonist increased the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient, suggesting that PPARα receptors are saturated by endogenous ligand under basal conditions. Effects of drugs on mechanical sensitivity in vivo paralleled their effects on DRG neurons in vitro. Local injection of ARN077 decreased mechanical hyperalgesia in tumor-bearing mice, and the effect was blocked by GW6471. These data support the conclusion that the activity of DRG neurons is rapidly modulated by PEA through a PPARα-dependent mechanism. Moreover, agents that increase the activity of PPARα may provide a therapeutic strategy to reduce tumor-evoked pain.

  10. Cellular and molecular characterization of Ca2+ currents in acutely isolated, adult rat neostriatal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bargas, J; Howe, A; Eberwine, J; Cao, Y; Surmeier, D J

    1994-11-01

    Ca2+ currents in acutely isolated, adult rat neostriatal neurons were studied with whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques. In the vast majority of neurons (approximately 90%, n > 250), currents were exclusively of the high-voltage-activated (HVA) type. HVA currents activated near -40 mV and reached their maximum amplitude near 0 mV. Quasi-steady-state inactivation curves in many neurons were well fitted only with a sum of Boltzmann functions, suggesting that the HVA currents were heterogeneous. Although the block of whole-cell current by Cd2+ was well fitted with a single isotherm having an IC50 of near 1 microM, experiments with organic channel antagonists suggested that at least four types of HVA channels were expressed by most cells. On average, the L-channel antagonist nifedipine (5-10 microM) blocked 31 +/- 10% of the whole-cell current (n = 20), the N-channel antagonist omega-conotoxin GVIA (omega-CgTx) (2-5 microM) blocked 27 +/- 11% (n = 20), and the P-channel antagonist omega-agatoxin IVA (100-500 nM) blocked 21 +/- 10% (n = 18). In many neurons, the block by omega-CgTx was partially or completely reversible. In cells tested with a combination of these antagonists, 34 +/- 17% of the peak Ca2+ current remained unblocked (n = 13). Single-cell expression profiling of medium-sized neurons revealed the presence of rbA and rbB Ca2+ channel alpha 1 subunit mRNAs but low or undetectable levels of rbC mRNA (n = 12). These findings suggest that although adult neostriatal projection neurons do not express significant levels of LVA Ca2+ current, they do express a pharmacologically and structurally heterogeneous population of HVA currents.

  11. Protection of dichlorvos induced oxidative stress and nigrostriatal neuronal death by chronic Coenzyme Q{sub 10} pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Binukumar, BK; Gupta, Nidhi; Bal, Amanjit; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2011-10-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have shown an association between pesticide exposure and increased risk of developing Parkinson's diseases. Oxidative stress generated as a result of mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated as an important factor in the etiology of Parkinson's disease. Previously, we reported that chronic dichlorvos exposure causes mitochondrial impairments and nigrostriatal neuronal death in rats. The present study was designed to test whether Coenzyme Q{sub 10} (CoQ{sub 10}) administration has any neuroprotective effect against dichlorvos mediated nigrostriatal neuronal death, {alpha}-synuclein aggregation, and motor dysfunction. Male albino rats were administered dichlorvos by subcutaneous injection at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg body weight over a period of 12 weeks. Results obtained there after showed that dichlorvos exposure leads to enhanced mitochondrial ROS production, {alpha}-synuclein aggregation, decreased dopamine and its metabolite levels resulting in nigrostriatal neurodegeneration. Pretreatment by Coenzyme Q{sub 10} (4.5 mg/kg ip for 12 weeks) to dichlorvos treated animals significantly attenuated the extent of nigrostriatal neuronal damage, in terms of decreased ROS production, increased dopamine and its metabolite levels, and restoration of motor dysfunction when compared to dichlorvos treated animals. Thus, the present study shows that Coenzyme Q{sub 10} administration may attenuate dichlorvos induced nigrostriatal neurodegeneration, {alpha}-synuclein aggregation and motor dysfunction by virtue of its antioxidant action. - Highlights: > CoQ{sub 10} administration attenuates dichlorvos induced nigrostriatal neurodegenaration. > CoQ{sub 10} pre treatment leads to preservation of TH-IR neurons. > CoQ{sub 10} may decrease oxidative damage and {alpha}-synuclin aggregation. > CoQ{sub 10} treatment enhances motor function and protects rats from catalepsy.

  12. Thiopental Inhibits Global Protein Synthesis by Repression of Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 2 and Protects from Hypoxic Neuronal Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Schwer, Christian I.; Lehane, Cornelius; Guelzow, Timo; Zenker, Simone; Strosing, Karl M.; Spassov, Sashko; Erxleben, Anika; Heimrich, Bernd; Buerkle, Hartmut; Humar, Matjaz

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic and traumatic brain injury is associated with increased risk for death and disability. The inhibition of penumbral tissue damage has been recognized as a target for therapeutic intervention, because cellular injury evolves progressively upon ATP-depletion and loss of ion homeostasis. In patients, thiopental is used to treat refractory intracranial hypertension by reducing intracranial pressure and cerebral metabolic demands; however, therapeutic benefits of thiopental-treatment are controversially discussed. In the present study we identified fundamental neuroprotective molecular mechanisms mediated by thiopental. Here we show that thiopental inhibits global protein synthesis, which preserves the intracellular energy metabolite content in oxygen-deprived human neuronal SK-N-SH cells or primary mouse cortical neurons and thus ameliorates hypoxic cell damage. Sensitivity to hypoxic damage was restored by pharmacologic repression of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase. Translational inhibition was mediated by calcium influx, activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase, and inhibitory phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2. Our results explain the reduction of cerebral metabolic demands during thiopental treatment. Cycloheximide also protected neurons from hypoxic cell death, indicating that translational inhibitors may generally reduce secondary brain injury. In conclusion our study demonstrates that therapeutic inhibition of global protein synthesis protects neurons from hypoxic damage by preserving energy balance in oxygen-deprived cells. Molecular evidence for thiopental-mediated neuroprotection favours a positive clinical evaluation of barbiturate treatment. The chemical structure of thiopental could represent a pharmacologically relevant scaffold for the development of new organ-protective compounds to ameliorate tissue damage when oxygen availability is limited. PMID:24167567

  13. Signaling Pathways that Mediate Neurotoxin-Induced Death of Dopamine Neurons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information...from E15 embryonic rats to investigate our hypothesis. The data obtained should lead to the identification of promising therapeutic strategies to slow...dopamine neurons in culture. This allowed us to study dopamine neurons (GFP-positive cells) using live-cell imaging techniques. Most of the data

  14. Fingolimod Limits Acute Aβ Neurotoxicity and Promotes Synaptic Versus Extrasynaptic NMDA Receptor Functionality in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pooja; Gabrielli, Martina; Ponzoni, Luisa; Pelucchi, Silvia; Stravalaci, Matteo; Beeg, Marten; Mazzitelli, Sonia; Braida, Daniela; Sala, Mariaelvina; Boda, Enrica; Buffo, Annalisa; Gobbi, Marco; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Matteoli, Michela; Marcello, Elena; Verderio, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Fingolimod, also known as FTY720, is an analogue of the sphingolipid sphingosine, which has been proved to be neuroprotective in rodent models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Several cellular and molecular targets underlying the neuroprotective effects of FTY720 have been recently identified. However, whether the drug directly protects neurons from toxicity of amyloid-beta (Aβ) still remains poorly defined. Using a combination of biochemical assays, live imaging and electrophysiology we demonstrate that FTY720 induces a rapid increase in GLUN2A-containing neuroprotective NMDARs on the surface of dendritic spines in cultured hippocampal neurons. In addition, the drug mobilizes extrasynaptic GLUN2B-containing NMDARs, which are coupled to cell death, to the synapses. Altered ratio of synaptic/extrasynaptic NMDARs decreases calcium responsiveness of neurons to neurotoxic soluble Aβ 1–42 and renders neurons resistant to early alteration of calcium homeostasis. The fast defensive response of FTY720 occurs through a Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1P-R) -dependent mechanism, as it is lost in the presence of S1P-R1 and S1P-R3 antagonists. We propose that rapid synaptic relocation of NMDARs might have direct impact on amelioration of cognitive performance in transgenic APPswe/PS1dE9 AD mice upon sub-chronic treatment with FTY720. PMID:28134307

  15. Peripherin-mediated death of motor neurons rescued by overexpression of neurofilament NF-H proteins.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Julien, Jean-Pierre

    2003-04-01

    In previous studies, we showed that overexpression of peripherin, a neuronal intermediate filament (IF) protein, in mice deficient for neurofilament light (NF-L) subunits induced a progressive adult-onset degeneration of spinal motor neurons characterized by the presence of IF inclusion bodies reminiscent of axonal spheroids found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In contrast, the overexpression of human neurofilament heavy (NF-H) proteins provoked the formation of massive perikaryal IF protein accumulations with no loss of motor neurons. To further investigate the toxic properties of IF protein inclusions, we generated NF-L null mice that co-express both peripherin and NF-H transgenes. The axonal count in L5 ventral roots from 6 and 8-month-old transgenic mice showed that NF-H overexpression rescued the peripherin-mediated degeneration of motor neurons. Our analysis suggests that the protective effect of extra NF-H proteins is related to the sequestration of peripherin into the perikaryon of motor neurons, thereby abolishing the development of axonal IF inclusions that might block transport. These findings illustrate the importance of IF protein stoichiometry in formation, localization and toxicity of neuronal inclusion bodies.

  16. Cabergoline protects dopaminergic neurons against rotenone-induced cell death in primary mesencephalic cell culture.

    PubMed

    Meinel, J; Radad, K; Rausch, W-D; Reichmann, H; Gille, G

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, primary mesencephalic cell cultures prepared from embryonic mouse mesencephala were used to investigate the neuroprotective effect of cabergoline, an ergoline D2 receptor agonist, against the pesticide and neurotoxin rotenone relevant to Parkinson disease (PD). Treatment of cultures with cabergoline alone significantly increased the number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (THir) neurons and reduced the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) into the culture medium compared to untreated controls. Against rotenone toxicity, cabergoline significantly rescued degenerating THir neurons, reduced the release of LDH into the culture medium and improved the morphology of surviving THir neurons. The neuroprotective effects afforded by cabergoline were independent of dopaminergic stimulation as blocking of dopamine receptors by the dopamine receptor antagonist sulpiride did not prevent them. Furthermore, rotenone-induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was significantly reduced by cabergoline. Although cabergoline increased the glutathione (GSH) content in the culture, the protective effect for dopaminergic neurons seemed not to be predominantly mediated by increasing GSH, as depletion of GSH by L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), a GSH biosynthesis inhibitor, did not prevent cabergoline-mediated neuroprotection of THir neurons in rotenone-treated cultures. Moreover, cabergoline significantly increased the ATP/protein ratio in primary mesencephalic cell cultures when added alone or prior to rotenone treatment. These results indicate a neuroprotective effect of cabergoline for dopaminergic neurons against rotenone toxicity. This effect was independent of dopamine receptor stimulation and was at least partially mediated by reducing ROS production and increasing the ATP/protein ratio.

  17. Investigating the Mechanisms Underlying Neuronal Death in Ischemia Using In Vitro Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation: Potential Involvement of Protein SUMOylation

    PubMed Central

    CIMAROSTI, HELENA; HENLEY, JEREMY M.

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that brain ischemia can cause neuronal death via different signaling cascades. The relative importance and interrelationships between these pathways, however, remain poorly understood. Here is presented an overview of studies using oxygen-glucose deprivation of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in ischemia. The culturing techniques, setup of the oxygen-glucose deprivation model, and analytical tools are reviewed. The authors focus on SUMOylation, a posttranslational protein modification that has recently been implicated in ischemia from whole animal studies as an example of how these powerful tools can be applied and could be of interest to investigate the molecular pathways underlying ischemic cell death. PMID:19029060

  18. Status epilepticus decreases glutamate receptor 2 mRNA and protein expression in hippocampal pyramidal cells before neuronal death

    PubMed Central

    Grooms, Sonja Y.; Opitz, Thoralf; Bennett, Michael V. L.; Zukin, R. Suzanne

    2000-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus in adult rats leads to delayed, selective death of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3. Death is preceded by down-regulation of glutamate receptor 2 (GluR2) mRNA and protein [the subunit that limits Ca2+ permeability of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors] in CA1 and CA3, as indicated by in situ hybridization, immunolabeling, and quantitative Western blotting. GluR1 mRNA and protein are unchanged or slightly increased before cell death. These changes could lead to formation of GluR2-lacking, Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors and increased toxicity of endogenous glutamate. GluR2 immunolabeling is unchanged in granule cells of the dentate gyrus, which are resistant to seizure-induced death. Thus, formation of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors may be a critical mediator of delayed neurodegeneration after status epilepticus. PMID:10725374

  19. Acute canine distemper encephalitis is associated with rapid neuronal loss and local immune activation.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Penny A; Bastien-Hamel, Louis-Etienne; von Messling, Veronika

    2010-04-01

    For most virus infections of the central nervous system (CNS), immune-mediated damage, the route of inoculation and death of infected cells all contribute to the pathology observed. To investigate the role of these factors in early canine distemper neuropathogenesis, we infected ferrets either intranasally or intraperitoneally with the neurovirulent canine distemper virus strain Snyder Hill. Regardless of the route of inoculation, the virus primarily targeted the olfactory bulb, brainstem, hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas only occasional foci were detected in the cortex. The infection led to widespread neuronal loss, which correlated with the clinical signs observed. Increased numbers of activated microglia, reactive gliosis and different pro-inflammatory cytokines were detected in the infected areas, suggesting that the presence and ultimate death of infected cells at early times after infection trigger strong local immune activation, despite the observed systemic immunosuppression.

  20. A neuronal population in hypothalamus that dramatically resists acute ischemic injury compared to neocortex.

    PubMed

    Brisson, C Devin; Andrew, R David

    2012-07-01

    Pyramidal neurons (PyNs) of the cortex are highly susceptible to acute stroke damage, yet "lower" brain regions like hypothalamus and brain stem better survive global ischemia. Here we show for the first time that a "lower" neuron population intrinsically resists acute strokelike injury. In rat brain slices deprived of oxygen and glucose (OGD), we imaged anoxic depolarization (AD) as it propagated through neocortex or hypothalamus. AD, the initial electrophysiological event of stroke, is a front of depolarization that drains residual energy in compromised gray matter. The extent of AD reliably determines ensuing cortical damage, but do all CNS neurons generate a robust AD? During 10 min of OGD, PyNs depolarize without functional recovery. In contrast, magnocellular neuroendocrine cells (MNCs) in hypothalamus under identical stress generate a weak and delayed AD, resist complete depolarization, and rapidly repolarize when oxygen and glucose are restored. They recover their membrane potential, input resistance, and spike amplitude and can survive multiple OGD exposures. Two-photon microscopy in slices derived from a fluorescent mouse line confirms this protection, revealing PyN swelling and dendritic beading after OGD, whereas MNCs are not injured. Exposure to the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase inhibitor ouabain (100 μM) induces AD similar to OGD in both cell types. Moreover, elevated extracellular K(+) concentration ([K(+)](o)) evokes spreading depression (SD), a milder version of AD, in PyNs but not MNCs. Therefore overriding the pump by OGD, ouabain, or elevated [K(+)](o) evokes a propagating depolarization in higher gray matter but not in MNCs. We suggest that variation in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase pump efficiency during ischemia injury determines whether a neuronal type succumbs to or resists stroke.

  1. Kidney and lung injury in irradiated rats protected from acute death by partial-body shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.; Michieli, B.M. )

    1990-04-01

    Ninety-six CD-1 male rats were exposed to gamma-ray doses (0-25 Gy) in increments of 5 Gy. One femur, the surgically exteriorized GI tract, and the oral cavity were shielded during irradiation to protect against acute mortality from injury to the hematopoietic system, small intestine, and oral cavity. In addition, the thoraxes of half of the animals from each dose group were shielded. At approximately monthly intervals from 2 to 10 months after irradiation the hematocrit, plasma urea nitrogen (PUN), and {sup 51}Cr-EDTA clearance were measured. During the study 20 thorax-shielded and 19 thorax-irradiated animals died. All rats whose thoraxes received 25 Gy irradiation and three out of seven rats whose thoraxes received 20 Gy died 1 to 3 months postirradiation with massive pleural fluid accumulation. Shielding the thoraxes prevented this mode of death at these doses. Kidney injury was judged to be the primary cause of death of all thorax-shielded animals and 15- and 20-Gy thorax-irradiated animals. Animals with kidney damage had elevated PUN and reduced {sup 51}Cr-EDTA clearance and hematocrits. The relative merits of each of these end points in assessing radiation-induced kidney injury after total-body exposure are discussed.

  2. Pedicularioside A from Buddleia lindleyana inhibits cell death induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ions (MPP+) in primary cultures of rat mesencephalic neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Yun; Lu, Jiang-Hai; Li, Quan; Zhao, Yu-Ying; Pu, Xiao-Ping

    2008-01-28

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by the progressive degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Buddleia lindleyana is a traditional Chinese herb, commonly called Zui Yu Cao. The purification and identification of pedicularioside A and other phenylethanoid glycosides from this plant have been reported. However, their neuroprotective effects on the 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+))-induced death of rat mesencephalic neuron primary cultures and the precise mechanism of this protection remains unclear. We used the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiozol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay for cellular growth to examine the effects of five phenylethanoid glycosides isolated from B. lindleyana, including pedicularioside A, leucosceptoside A, isoacteoside, acteoside, and arenariside, on the viability of mesencephalic neurons treated with MPP(+). Of the compounds tested, pedicularioside A exhibited the greatest degree of protection from MPP(+)-induced cell death. We also observed a marked increase in the number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons. Pedicularioside A inhibited expression of the caspase-3 gene and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in cultures exposed to MPP(+). Our results suggest that pedicularioside A has a neuroprotective effect to improve the survival of mesencephalic neurons (dopaminergic neurons and non-dopaminergic neurons). The mode of action appears to be the inhibition of caspase-3 gene expression, thereby protecting mesencephalic neurons from MPP(+)-induced cell death.

  3. Carbon Monoxide Releasing Molecule-A1 (CORM-A1) Improves Neurogenesis: Increase of Neuronal Differentiation Yield by Preventing Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Ana S; Soares, Nuno L; Vieira, Melissa; Gramsbergen, Jan Bert; Vieira, Helena L A

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia and neurodegenerative diseases lead to impairment or death of neurons in the central nervous system. Stem cell based therapies are promising strategies currently under investigation. Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenous product of heme degradation by heme oxygenase (HO) activity. Administration of CO at low concentrations produces several beneficial effects in distinct tissues, namely anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory. Herein the CO role on modulation of neuronal differentiation was assessed. Three different models with increasing complexity were used: human neuroblastoma SH-S5Y5 cell line, human teratocarcinoma NT2 cell line and organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC). Cell lines were differentiated into post-mitotic neurons by treatment with retinoic acid (RA) supplemented with CO-releasing molecule A1 (CORM-A1). CORM-A1 positively modulated neuronal differentiation, since it increased final neuronal production and enhanced the expression of specific neuronal genes: Nestin, Tuj1 and MAP2. Furthermore, during neuronal differentiation process, there was an increase in proliferative cell number (ki67 mRNA expressing cells) and a decrease in cell death (lower propidium iodide (PI) uptake, limitation of caspase-3 activation and higher Bcl-2 expressing cells). CO supplementation did not increase the expression of RA receptors. In the case of SH-S5Y5 model, small amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation emerges as important signaling molecules during CO-promoted neuronal differentiation. CO's improvement of neuronal differentiation yield was validated using OHSC as ex vivo model. CORM-A1 treatment of OHSC promoted higher levels of cells expressing the neuronal marker Tuj1. Still, CORM-A1 increased cell proliferation assessed by ki67 expression and also prevented cell death, which was followed by increased Bcl-2 expression, decreased levels of active caspase-3 and PI uptake. Likewise, ROS signaling emerged as key factors in CO

  4. Contribution of downregulation of L-type calcium currents to delayed neuronal death in rat hippocampus after global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Jian-Ming; Hu, De-Hui; Hou, Feng-Qing; Zhao, Miao; Zhu, Xin-Hong; Wang, Ying; Li, Jian-Guo; Hu, Ping; Chen, Liang; Qin, Lu-Ning; Gao, Tian-Ming

    2007-05-09

    Transient forebrain ischemia induces delayed, selective neuronal death in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. The underlying molecular mechanisms are as yet unclear, but it is known that activation of L-type Ca2+ channels specifically increases the expression of a group of genes required for neuronal survival. Accordingly, we examined temporal changes in L-type calcium-channel activity in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia by patch-clamp techniques. In vulnerable CA1 neurons, L-type Ca2+-channel activity was persistently downregulated after ischemic insult, whereas in invulnerable CA3 neurons, no change occurred. Downregulation of L-type calcium channels was partially caused by oxidation modulation in postischemic channels. Furthermore, L-type but neither N-type nor P/Q-type Ca2+-channel antagonists alone significantly inhibited the survival of cultured hippocampal neurons. In contrast, specific L-type calcium-channel agonist remarkably reduced neuronal cell death and restored the inhibited channels induced by nitric oxide donor. More importantly, L-type calcium-channel agonist applied after reoxygenation or reperfusion significantly decreased neuronal injury in in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation ischemic model and in animals subjected to forebrain ischemia-reperfusion. Together, the present results suggest that ischemia-induced inhibition of L-type calcium currents may give rise to delayed death of neurons in the CA1 region, possibly via oxidation mechanisms. Our findings may lead to a new perspective on neuronal death after ischemic insult and suggest that a novel therapeutic approach, activation of L-type calcium channels, could be tested at late stages of reperfusion for stroke treatment.

  5. Tyrosol exerts a protective effect against dopaminergic neuronal cell death in in vitro model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dewapriya, Pradeep; Himaya, S W A; Li, Yong-Xin; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-11-15

    Experimental evidence suggests that tyrosol [2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethanol] exhibits potent protective activities against several pathogeneses. In this study, we evaluated the protective effect of tyrosol against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced CATH.a neuron cell death. Tyrosol dose-dependently protected CATH.a cells from MPP(+)-induced cell death and the protection was more apparent after prolong incubation (48h). The data showed that tyrosol treatment suppressed the reduction of phospho-tyrosine hydroxylase level in CATH.a cells. Further, the compound repressed MPP(+)-induced depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and thereby maintained intracellular ATP production in the cell. The cellular signalling pathway studies revealed that tyrosol protected CATH.a cells from MPP(+)-induced apoptotic signalling, most likely via activation of PI3K/Akt signalling pathway along with up-regulation of anti-oxidative enzymes (SOD-1 and SOD-2) and DJ-1 protein in the cell. Collectively, present study demonstrates that tyrosol significantly protects dopaminergic neurons from MPP(+)-induced degradation, and reveals potential neuroprotective mechanism of tyrosol.

  6. Pronase acutely modifies high voltage-activated calcium currents and cell properties of Lymnaea neurons.

    PubMed

    Hermann, P M; Lukowiak, K; Wildering, W C; Bulloch, A G

    1997-12-01

    Pronase E ('pronase') is one of the proteolytic enzymes that are used in preparative procedures such as cell isolation and to soften the sheath of invertebrate ganglia. Although several effects of proteolytic enzymes on the physiology of non-neuronal tissues have been described, the effects of these enzymes on central neurons have received little attention. We examined the effects of bath-applied pronase on neurons in the Lymnaea central nervous system and in vitro. Pronase caused action potential broadening in neurons that exhibit a shoulder on the repolarization phase of their action potentials. This effect of pronase was accompanied by, although unrelated to, a depolarization and decrease in action potential interval. Some, but not all, effects of pronase in the central nervous system were reversible. For example, the decreases in membrane potential and action potential interval were both reversed after approximately 1 h of washing with saline. However, the effect of pronase on the action potential duration was not reversed after a period of 90 min. The modulation of action potential width prompted us to examine Ca2+ currents. Exposure to pronase resulted in an increase in both peak and late high voltage-activated Ca2+ currents in isolated neurons. Pronase neither changed the inactivation rate nor caused a shift in the current-voltage relationship of the current. The changes in action potential duration could be prevented by application of 0.1 mM Cd2+, indicating that the action potential broadening caused by pronase depends on Ca2+ influx. This is the first systematic study of the acute and direct actions of pronase on Ca2+ currents and cell properties both in the CNS and in vitro.

  7. Quasimodo mediates daily and acute light effects on Drosophila clock neuron excitability.

    PubMed

    Buhl, Edgar; Bradlaugh, Adam; Ogueta, Maite; Chen, Ko-Fan; Stanewsky, Ralf; Hodge, James J L

    2016-11-22

    We have characterized a light-input pathway regulating Drosophila clock neuron excitability. The molecular clock drives rhythmic electrical excitability of clock neurons, and we show that the recently discovered light-input factor Quasimodo (Qsm) regulates this variation, presumably via an Na(+), K(+), Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC) and the Shaw K(+) channel (dKV3.1). Because of light-dependent degradation of the clock protein Timeless (Tim), constant illumination (LL) leads to a breakdown of molecular and behavioral rhythms. Both overexpression ((OX)) and knockdown ((RNAi)) of qsm, NKCC, or Shaw led to robust LL rhythmicity. Whole-cell recordings of the large ventral lateral neurons (l-LNv) showed that altering Qsm levels reduced the daily variation in neuronal activity: qsm(OX) led to a constitutive less active, night-like state, and qsm(RNAi) led to a more active, day-like state. Qsm also affected daily changes in K(+) currents and the GABA reversal potential, suggesting a role in modifying membrane currents and GABA responses in a daily fashion, potentially modulating light arousal and input to the clock. When directly challenged with blue light, wild-type l-LNvs responded with increased firing at night and no net response during the day, whereas altering Qsm, NKKC, or Shaw levels abolished these day/night differences. Finally, coexpression of Shaw(OX) and NKCC(RNAi) in a qsm mutant background restored LL-induced behavioral arrhythmicity and wild-type neuronal activity patterns, suggesting that the three genes operate in the same pathway. We propose that Qsm affects both daily and acute light effects in l-LNvs probably acting on Shaw and NKCC.

  8. Cause and Consequence: Mitochondrial Dysfunction Initiates and Propagates Neuronal Dysfunction, Neuronal Death and Behavioral Abnormalities in Age Associated Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Gary E.; Starkov, Anatoly; Blass, John P.; Ratan, Rajiv R.; Beal, M. Flint

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Age-related neurodegenerative diseases are associated with mild impairment of oxidative metabolism and accumulation of abnormal proteins. Within the cell, the mitochondria appears to be a dominant site for initiation and propagation of disease processes. Shifts in metabolism in response to mild metabolic perturbations may decrease the threshold for irreversible injury in response to ordinarily sub lethal metabolic insults. Mild impairment of metabolism accrue from and lead to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increased ROS change cell signaling via post transcriptional and transcriptional changes. The cause and consequences of mild impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is one focus of this review. Many experiments in tissues from humans support the notion that oxidative modification of the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) compromises neuronal energy metabolism and enhance ROS production in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). These data suggest that cognitive decline in AD derives from the selective tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle abnormalities. By contrast in Huntington’s Disease (HD), a movement disorder with cognitive features distinct form AD, complex II + III abnormalities may dominate. These distinct mitochondrial abnormalities culminate in oxidative stress, energy dysfunction, and aberrant homeostasis of cytosolic calcium. Cytosolic calcium, elevations even only transiently, leads to hyperactivity of a number of enzymes. One calcium activated enzyme with demonstrated pathophysiological import in HD and AD is transglutaminase (TGase). TGase is a cross linking enzymes that can modulate transcrption, inactivate metabolic enzymes, and cause aggregation of critical proteins. Recent data indicate that TGase can silence expression of genes involved in compensating for metabolic stress. Altogether, our results suggest that increasing KGDHC via inhibition of TGase or via a host of other strategies to be described would be effective therapeutic

  9. Neuronal Cell Death and Degeneration through Increased Nitroxidative Stress and Tau Phosphorylation in HIV-1 Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Eun; Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2017-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms for increased neurodegeneration and neurocognitive deficits in HIV-infected people are unclear. Therefore, this study was aimed to investigate the mechanisms of increased neurodegeneration in 5-month old male HIV-1 Transgenic (Tg) rats compared to the age- and gender-matched wild-type (WT) by evaluating histological changes and biochemical parameters of the key proteins involved in the cell death signaling and apoptosis. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed decreased neuronal cells with elevated astrogliosis in HIV-1 Tg rats compared to WT. Mechanistic studies revealed that increased levels of nitroxidative stress marker proteins such as NADPH-oxidase, cytochrome P450-2E1 (CYP2E1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinases such as JNK and p38K, activated cell-cycle dependent CDK5, hypoxia-inducible protein-1α, nitrated proteins, hyperphosphorylated tau, and amyloid plaques in HIV-Tg rats were consistently observed in HIV-1 Tg rats. Confocal microscopy and cell viability analyses showed that treatment with an antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or a specific inhibitor of iNOS 1400W significantly prevented the increased apoptosis of neuro-2A cells by HIV-1 Tat or gp120 protein, demonstrating the causal role of HIV-1 mediated nitroxidative stress and protein nitration in promoting neuronal cell death. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblot analysis confirmed nitration of Hsp90, evaluated as an example of nitrated proteins, suggesting possible involvement of nitrated proteins in neuronal damage. Further, activated p-JNK directly binds tau and phosphorylates multiple amino acids, suggesting an important role of p-JNK in tau hyperphosphorylation and tauopathy. These changes were accompanied with elevated levels of many apoptosis-related proteins Bax and cleaved (activated) caspase-3 as well as proinflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6 and MCP-1. Collectively, these results

  10. Trasmembrane chemokines CX3CL1 and CXCL16 drive interplay between neurons, microglia and astrocytes to counteract pMCAO and excitotoxic neuronal death

    PubMed Central

    Rosito, Maria; Lauro, Clotilde; Chece, Giuseppina; Porzia, Alessandra; Monaco, Lucia; Mainiero, Fabrizio; Catalano, Myriam; Limatola, Cristina; Trettel, Flavia

    2014-01-01

    Upon noxious insults, cells of the brain parenchyma activate endogenous self-protective mechanisms to counteract brain damage. Interplay between microglia and astrocytes can be determinant to build a physiological response to noxious stimuli arisen from injury or stress, thus understanding the cross talk between microglia and astrocytes would be helpful to elucidate the role of glial cells in endogenous protective mechanisms and might contribute to the development of new strategy to mobilize such program and reduce brain cell death. Here we demonstrate that chemokines CX3CL1 and CXCL16 are molecular players that synergistically drive cross-talk between neurons, microglia and astrocytes to promote physiological neuroprotective mechanisms that counteract neuronal cell death due to ischemic and excitotoxic insults. In an in vivo model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) we found that exogenous administration of soluble CXCL16 reduces ischemic volume and that, upon pMCAO, endogenous CXCL16 signaling restrains brain damage, being ischemic volume reduced in mice that lack CXCL16 receptor. We demonstrated that CX3CL1, acting on microglia, elicits CXCL16 release from glia and this is important to induce neroprotection since lack of CXCL16 signaling impairs CX3CL1 neuroprotection against both in vitro Glu-excitotoxic insult and pMCAO. Moreover the activity of adenosine receptor A3R and the astrocytic release of CCL2 play also a role in trasmembrane chemokine neuroprotective effect, since their inactivation reduces CX3CL1- and CXCL16 induced neuroprotection. PMID:25071451

  11. TRAF6 and p62 inhibit amyloid β-induced neuronal death through p75 neurotrophin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Geetha, Thangiah; Zheng, Chen; McGregor, Wade C.; White, B. Douglas; Diaz-Meco, Maria T.; Moscat, Jorge; Babu, Jeganathan Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates are the primary component of senile plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD) patient’s brain. Aβ is known to bind p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) and mediates Aβ-induced neuronal death. Recently, we showed that NGF leads to p75NTR polyubiquitination, which promotes neuronal cell survival. Here, we demonstrate that Aβ stimulation impaired the p75NTR polyubiquitination. TRAF6 and p62 are required for polyubiquitination of p75NTR on NGF stimulation. Interestingly, we found that overexpression of TRAF6/p62 restored p75NTR polyubiquitination upon Aβ/NGF treatment. Aβ significantly reduced NF-κB activity by attenuating the interaction of p75NTR with IKKβ. p75NTR increased NF-κB activity by recruiting TRAF6/p62, which thereby mediated cell survival. These findings indicate that TRAF6/p62 abrogated the Aβ-mediated inhibition of p75NTR polyubiquitination and restored neuronal cell survival. PMID:23017601

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress as a Mediator of Neurotoxin-Induced Dopamine Neuron Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    nigra. J. Neurosci. 17, 2030–2039. Martin D. P., Schmidt R. E., DiStefano P., Lowry O., Carter J. and Johnson E. (1988) Inhibitors of protein synthesis...1994;124:537–546. 49. Martin DP, Schmidt RE, DiStefano P, Lowry O, Carter J, Johnson E. Inhibitors of protein synthesis and RNA synthesis prevent neuronal

  13. Modifications of excitatory and inhibitory transmission in rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons by acute lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Masahito; Nagami, Hideaki; Takase, Yuko; Nakanishi, Ryoji; Kotani, Naoki; Akaike, Norio

    2015-08-01

    The acute effects of high-dose Li(+) treatment on glutamatergic and GABAergic transmissions were studied in the "synaptic bouton" preparation of isolated rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons by using focal electrical stimulation. Both action potential-dependent glutamatergic excitatory and GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eEPSC and eIPSC, respectively) were dose-dependently inhibited in the external media containing 30-150 mM Li(+), but the sensitivity for Li(+) was greater tendency for eEPSCs than for eIPSCs. When the effects of Li(+) on glutamate or GABAA receptor-mediated whole-cell responses (IGlu and IGABA) elicited by an exogenous application of glutamate or GABA were examined in the postsynaptic soma membrane of CA3 neurons, Li(+) slightly inhibited both IGlu and IGABA at the 150 mM Li(+) concentration. Present results suggest that acute treatment with high concentrations of Li(+) acts preferentially on presynaptic terminals, and that the Li(+)-induced inhibition may be greater for excitatory than for inhibitory transmission.

  14. Tissue-type plasminogen activator controls neuronal death by raising surface dynamics of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lesept, Flavie; Chevilley, Arnaud; Jezequel, Julie; Ladépêche, Laurent; Macrez, Richard; Aimable, Margaux; Lenoir, Sophie; Bertrand, Thomas; Rubrecht, Laëtitia; Galea, Pascale; Lebouvier, Laurent; Petersen, Karl-Uwe; Hommet, Yannick; Maubert, Eric; Ali, Carine; Groc, Laurent; Vivien, Denis

    2016-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are ion channels whose synaptic versus extrasynaptic localization critically influences their functions. This distribution of NMDARs is highly dependent on their lateral diffusion at the cell membrane. Each obligatory subunit of NMDARs (GluN1 and GluN2) contains two extracellular clamshell-like domains with an agonist-binding domain and a distal N-terminal domain (NTD). To date, the roles and dynamics of the NTD of the GluN1 subunit in NMDAR allosteric signaling remain poorly understood. Using single nanoparticle tracking in mouse neurons, we demonstrate that the extracellular neuronal protease tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), well known to have a role in the synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival, leads to a selective increase of the surface dynamics and subsequent diffusion of extrasynaptic NMDARs. This process explains the previously reported ability of tPA to promote NMDAR-mediated calcium influx. In parallel, we developed a monoclonal antibody capable of specifically blocking the interaction of tPA with the NTD of the GluN1 subunit of NMDAR. Using this original approach, we demonstrate that the tPA binds the NTD of the GluN1 subunit at a lysine in position 178. Accordingly, when applied to mouse neurons, our selected antibody (named Glunomab) leads to a selective reduction of the tPA-mediated surface dynamics of extrasynaptic NMDARs, subsequent signaling and neurotoxicity, both in vitro and in vivo. Altogether, we demonstrate that the tPA is a ligand of the NTD of the obligatory GluN1 subunit of NMDAR acting as a modulator of their dynamic distribution at the neuronal surface and subsequent signaling. PMID:27831563

  15. Methyl Vitamin B12 but not methylfolate rescues a motor neuron-like cell line from homocysteine-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Hemendinger, Richelle A; Armstrong, Edward J; Brooks, Benjamin Rix

    2011-03-15

    Homocysteine is an excitatory amino acid implicated in multiple diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Information on the toxicity of homocysteine in motor neurons is limited and few studies have examined how this toxicity can be modulated. In NSC-34D cells (a hybrid cell line derived from motor neuron-neuroblastoma), homocysteine induces apoptotic cell death in the millimolar range with a TC₅₀ (toxic concentration at which 50% of maximal cell death is achieved) of 2.2 mM, confirmed by activation of caspase 3/7. Induction of apoptosis was independent of short-term reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Methyl Vitamin B12 (MeCbl) and methyl tetrahydrofolate (MTHF), used clinically to treat elevated homocysteine levels, were tested for their ability to reverse homocysteine-mediated motor neuron cell death. MeCbl in the micromolar range was able to provide neuroprotection (2 h pretreatment prior to homocysteine) and neurorescue (simultaneous exposure with homocysteine) against millimolar homocysteine with an IC₅₀ (concentration at which 50% of maximal cell death is inhibited) of 0.6 μM and 0.4 μM, respectively. In contrast, MTHF (up to 10 μM) had no effect on homocysteine-mediated cell death. MeCbl inhibited caspase 3/7 activation by homocysteine in a time- and dose-dependent manner, whereas MTHF had no effect. We conclude that MeCbl is effective against homocysteine-induced cell death in motor neurons in a ROS-independent manner, via a reduction in caspase activation and apoptosis. MeCbl decreases Hcy induced motor neuron death in vitro in a hybrid cell line derived from motor neuron-neuroblastoma and may play a role in the treatment of late stage ALS where HCy levels are increased in animal models of ALS.

  16. Methyl Vitamin B12 but not methylfolate rescues a motor neuron-like cell line from homocysteine-mediated cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Hemendinger, Richelle A. Armstrong, Edward J.; Brooks, Benjamin Rix

    2011-03-15

    Homocysteine is an excitatory amino acid implicated in multiple diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Information on the toxicity of homocysteine in motor neurons is limited and few studies have examined how this toxicity can be modulated. In NSC-34D cells (a hybrid cell line derived from motor neuron-neuroblastoma), homocysteine induces apoptotic cell death in the millimolar range with a TC{sub 50} (toxic concentration at which 50% of maximal cell death is achieved) of 2.2 mM, confirmed by activation of caspase 3/7. Induction of apoptosis was independent of short-term reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Methyl Vitamin B12 (MeCbl) and methyl tetrahydrofolate (MTHF), used clinically to treat elevated homocysteine levels, were tested for their ability to reverse homocysteine-mediated motor neuron cell death. MeCbl in the micromolar range was able to provide neuroprotection (2 h pretreatment prior to homocysteine) and neurorescue (simultaneous exposure with homocysteine) against millimolar homocysteine with an IC{sub 50} (concentration at which 50% of maximal cell death is inhibited) of 0.6 {mu}M and 0.4 {mu}M, respectively. In contrast, MTHF (up to 10 {mu}M) had no effect on homocysteine-mediated cell death. MeCbl inhibited caspase 3/7 activation by homocysteine in a time- and dose-dependent manner, whereas MTHF had no effect. We conclude that MeCbl is effective against homocysteine-induced cell death in motor neurons in a ROS-independent manner, via a reduction in caspase activation and apoptosis. MeCbl decreases Hcy induced motor neuron death in vitro in a hybrid cell line derived from motor neuron-neuroblastoma and may play a role in the treatment of late stage ALS where HCy levels are increased in animal models of ALS.

  17. The role of parkin in the differential susceptibility of tuberoinfundibular and nigrostriatal dopamine neurons to acute toxicant exposure.

    PubMed

    Benskey, Matthew J; Manfredsson, Fredric P; Lookingland, Keith J; Goudreau, John L

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson disease causes degeneration of nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) neurons, while tuberoinfundibular DA neurons remain unaffected. A similar pattern is observed following exposure to 1-methy-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyradine (MPTP). The mechanism of tuberoinfundibular neuronal recovery from MPTP is associated with up-regulation of parkin protein. Here we tested if parkin mediates tuberoinfundibular neuronal recovery from MPTP by knocking-down parkin in tuberoinfundibular neurons using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV), expressing a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) directed toward parkin. Following knockdown, axon terminal DA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) concentrations were analyzed 24h post-MPTP administration. rAAV-shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous parkin rendered tuberoinfundibular neurons susceptible to MPTP induced terminal DA loss, but not TH loss, within 24h post-MPTP. To determine if the neuroprotective benefits of parkin up-regulation could be translated to nigrostriatal neurons, rAAV expressing human parkin was injected into the substantia nigra of mice and axon terminal DA and TH concentrations were analyzed 24h post-MPTP. Nigral parkin over-expression prevented loss of TH in the axon terminals and soma of nigrostriatal neurons, but had no effect on terminal DA loss within 24h post-MPTP. These data show that parkin is necessary for the recovery of terminal DA concentrations within tuberoinfundibular neurons following acute MPTP administration, and parkin can rescue MPTP-induced decreases in TH within nigrostriatal neurons.

  18. alpha2-Adrenoceptor-mediated potassium currents in acutely dissociated rat locus coeruleus neurones.

    PubMed

    Arima, J; Kubo, C; Ishibashi, H; Akaike, N

    1998-04-01

    1. The noradrenaline (NA)-activated response was investigated in neurones acutely dissociated from the rat locus coeruleus (LC) using nystatin-perforated, conventional whole-cell and inside-out patch recording modes under current- and voltage-clamp conditions. 2. Under current-clamp conditions, NA hyperpolarized the LC neurones, abolishing the spontaneous action potentials. In voltage-clamp studies, NA induced an inwardly rectifying K+ current (INA) in a concentration-dependent manner with a half-maximum effective concentration of 2.2 x 10(-7) M. 3. INA was mimicked by the alpha2-agonist UK14304 but was inhibited by either the alpha2B/alpha2C antagonist ARC239 or the alpha1- and alpha2B/alpha2C antagonist prazosin, suggesting the contribution of alpha2B/alpha2C adrenoceptors. 4. INA was inhibited by the intracellular application of GDPbetaS but fully activated by intracellular perfusion of GTPgammaS. 5. In the inside-out recording mode, the application of GTP to the cytoplasmic side of the patch membrane markedly enhanced the open probability of the NA-activated single channels which represented the inwardly rectifying properties. 6. These results indicate that the activation of alpha2B/alpha2C adrenoceptors coupled with GTP-binding protein directly activates the inwardly rectifying K+ currents in rat LC neurones, thus resulting in a decrease in the spontaneous firing activities.

  19. Visually guided whole cell patch clamp of mouse supraoptic nucleus neurons in cultured and acute conditions.

    PubMed

    Stachniak, Tevye J E; Bourque, Charles W

    2006-07-01

    Recent advances in neuronal culturing techniques have supplied a new set of tools for studying neural tissue, providing effective means to study molecular aspects of regulatory elements in the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus (SON). To combine molecular biology techniques with electrophysiological recording, we modified an organotypic culture protocol to permit transfection and whole cell patch-clamp recordings from SON cells. Neonatal mouse brain coronal sections containing the SON were dissected out, placed on a filter insert in culture medium, and incubated for at least 4 days to allow attachment to the insert. The SON was identifiable using gross anatomical landmarks, which remained intact throughout the culturing period. Immunohistochemical staining identified both vasopressinergic and oxytocinergic cells present in the cultures, typically appearing in well-defined clusters. Whole cell recordings from these cultures demonstrated that certain properties of the neonatal mouse SON were comparable to adult mouse magnocellular neurons. SON neurons in both neonatal cultures and acute adult slices showed similar sustained outward rectification above -60 mV and action potential broadening during evoked activity. Membrane potential, input resistance, and rapidly inactivating potassium current density (IA) were reduced in the cultures, whereas whole cell capacitance and spontaneous synaptic excitation were increased, perhaps reflecting developmental changes in cell physiology that warrant further study. The use of the outlined organotypic culturing procedures will allow the study of such electrophysiological properties of mouse SON using whole cell patch-clamp, in addition to various molecular, techniques that require longer incubation times.

  20. Resveratrol attenuates acute kidney injury by inhibiting death receptor-mediated apoptotic pathways in a cisplatin-induced rat model

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qiufa; Xiao, Xiaoyan; Zhen, Junhui; Feng, Jinbo; Song, Chun; Jiang, Bei; Hu, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a clinical syndrome characterized by a loss of renal function and acute tubular necrosis. Resveratrol exerts a wide range of pharmacological effects based on its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and cytoprotective properties. The present study aimed to evaluate whether resveratrol attenuates acute kidney injury in a cisplatin-induced rat model and to investigate the potential mechanisms involved. Rats were randomly divided into four treatment groups: Control, cisplatin, resveratrol, and cisplatin plus resveratrol. Rats exposed to cisplatin displayed acute kidney injury, identified by analysis of renal function and histopathological observation. Resveratrol significantly ameliorated the increased serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, renal index and histopathological damage induced by cisplatin. Furthermore, compared with untreated control animals, cisplatin lead to significantly increased expression of Fas ligand, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), caspase-8 and Bcl-2 associated protein X apoptosis regulator (Bax), and decreased expression of anti-apoptosis regulators, BH3 interacting domain death agonist (BID) and B cell lymphoma 2 apoptosis regulator (Bcl-2). Administration of resveratrol significantly reversed the cisplatin-induced alteration in these apoptosis-associated proteins. In conclusion, these findings suggest that resveratrol attenuates cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury through inactivation of the death receptor-mediated apoptotic pathway, and may provide a new therapeutic strategy to ameliorate the process of acute kidney injury. PMID:27600998

  1. Fractal Dimension of EEG Activity Senses Neuronal Impairment in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zappasodi, Filippo; Olejarczyk, Elzbieta; Marzetti, Laura; Assenza, Giovanni; Pizzella, Vittorio; Tecchio, Franca

    2014-01-01

    The brain is a self-organizing system which displays self-similarities at different spatial and temporal scales. Thus, the complexity of its dynamics, associated to efficient processing and functional advantages, is expected to be captured by a measure of its scale-free (fractal) properties. Under the hypothesis that the fractal dimension (FD) of the electroencephalographic signal (EEG) is optimally sensitive to the neuronal dysfunction secondary to a brain lesion, we tested the FD’s ability in assessing two key processes in acute stroke: the clinical impairment and the recovery prognosis. Resting EEG was collected in 36 patients 4–10 days after a unilateral ischemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory and 19 healthy controls. National Health Institute Stroke Scale (NIHss) was collected at T0 and 6 months later. Highuchi FD, its inter-hemispheric asymmetry (FDasy) and spectral band powers were calculated for EEG signals. FD was smaller in patients than in controls (1.447±0.092 vs 1.525±0.105) and its reduction was paired to a worse acute clinical status. FD decrease was associated to alpha increase and beta decrease of oscillatory activity power. Larger FDasy in acute phase was paired to a worse clinical recovery at six months. FD in our patients captured the loss of complexity reflecting the global system dysfunction resulting from the structural damage. This decrease seems to reveal the intimate nature of structure-function unity, where the regional neural multi-scale self-similar activity is impaired by the anatomical lesion. This picture is coherent with neuronal activity complexity decrease paired to a reduced repertoire of functional abilities. FDasy result highlights the functional relevance of the balance between homologous brain structures’ activities in stroke recovery. PMID:24967904

  2. Fractal dimension of EEG activity senses neuronal impairment in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Zappasodi, Filippo; Olejarczyk, Elzbieta; Marzetti, Laura; Assenza, Giovanni; Pizzella, Vittorio; Tecchio, Franca

    2014-01-01

    The brain is a self-organizing system which displays self-similarities at different spatial and temporal scales. Thus, the complexity of its dynamics, associated to efficient processing and functional advantages, is expected to be captured by a measure of its scale-free (fractal) properties. Under the hypothesis that the fractal dimension (FD) of the electroencephalographic signal (EEG) is optimally sensitive to the neuronal dysfunction secondary to a brain lesion, we tested the FD's ability in assessing two key processes in acute stroke: the clinical impairment and the recovery prognosis. Resting EEG was collected in 36 patients 4-10 days after a unilateral ischemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory and 19 healthy controls. National Health Institute Stroke Scale (NIHss) was collected at T0 and 6 months later. Highuchi FD, its inter-hemispheric asymmetry (FDasy) and spectral band powers were calculated for EEG signals. FD was smaller in patients than in controls (1.447±0.092 vs 1.525±0.105) and its reduction was paired to a worse acute clinical status. FD decrease was associated to alpha increase and beta decrease of oscillatory activity power. Larger FDasy in acute phase was paired to a worse clinical recovery at six months. FD in our patients captured the loss of complexity reflecting the global system dysfunction resulting from the structural damage. This decrease seems to reveal the intimate nature of structure-function unity, where the regional neural multi-scale self-similar activity is impaired by the anatomical lesion. This picture is coherent with neuronal activity complexity decrease paired to a reduced repertoire of functional abilities. FDasy result highlights the functional relevance of the balance between homologous brain structures' activities in stroke recovery.

  3. MDM2 prevents spontaneous tubular epithelial cell death and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Thomasova, Dana; Ebrahim, Martrez; Fleckinger, Kristina; Li, Moying; Molnar, Jakob; Popper, Bastian; Liapis, Helen; Kotb, Ahmed M; Siegerist, Florian; Endlich, Nicole; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Murine double minute-2 (MDM2) is an E3-ubiquitin ligase and the main negative regulator of tumor suppressor gene p53. MDM2 has also a non-redundant function as a modulator of NF-kB signaling. As such it promotes proliferation and inflammation. MDM2 is highly expressed in the unchallenged tubular epithelial cells and we hypothesized that MDM2 is necessary for their survival and homeostasis. MDM2 knockdown by siRNA or by genetic depletion resulted in demise of tubular cells in vitro. This phenotype was completely rescued by concomitant knockdown of p53, thus suggesting p53 dependency. In vivo experiments in the zebrafish model demonstrated that the tubulus cells of the larvae undergo cell death after the knockdown of mdm2. Doxycycline-induced deletion of MDM2 in tubular cell-specific MDM2-knockout mice Pax8rtTa-cre; MDM2f/f caused acute kidney injury with increased plasma creatinine and blood urea nitrogen and sharp decline of glomerular filtration rate. Histological analysis showed massive swelling of renal tubular cells and later their loss and extensive tubular dilation, markedly in proximal tubules. Ultrastructural changes of tubular epithelial cells included swelling of the cytoplasm and mitochondria with the loss of cristae and their transformation in the vacuoles. The pathological phenotype of the tubular cell-specific MDM2-knockout mouse model was completely rescued by co-deletion of p53. Tubular epithelium compensates only partially for the cell loss caused by MDM2 depletion by proliferation of surviving tubular cells, with incomplete MDM2 deletion, but rather mesenchymal healing occurs. We conclude that MDM2 is a non-redundant survival factor for proximal tubular cells by protecting them from spontaneous p53 overexpression-related cell death. PMID:27882940

  4. SUMO-specific protease 1 protects neurons from apoptotic death during transient brain ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huijun; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Aoxue; Huang, Dehua; Deng, Shining; Cheng, Jinke; Zhu, Michael X; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    SUMO-specific protease 1 (SENP1) deconjugates SUMO from modified proteins. Although post-ischemic activation of SUMO conjugation was suggested to be neuroprotective against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, the function of SENP1 in this process remained unclear. Here we show that transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice followed by 6, 12 and 24 h reperfusion significantly enhanced SENP1 levels in the affected brain area, independent of transcription. Consistent with the increase in SENP1, the levels of SUMO1-conjugated proteins were decreased by I/R in cortical neurons of control littermate mice, but unchanged in that of animals with conditional ablation of SENP1 gene from adult principal neurons, the SENP1flox/flox:CamKIIα-Cre (SENP1 cKO) mice. The SENP1 cKO mice exhibited a significant increase in infarct volume in the cerebral cortex and more severe motor impairment in response to I/R as compared with the control littermates. Cortical neurons from I/R-injured SENP1 cKO mice became more apoptotic than that from control littermates, as indicated by both TUNEL staining and caspase-3 activation. Overexpression of SENP1 in somatosensory cortices of adult wild-type (WT) mice suppressed I/R-induced neuronal apoptosis. We conclude that SENP1 plays a neuroprotective role in I/R injury by inhibiting apoptosis through decreasing SUMO1 conjugation. These findings reveal a novel mechanism of neuroprotection by protein desumoylation, which may help develop new therapies for mitigating brain injury associated with ischemic stroke. PMID:27882949

  5. Cytokine-mediated survival from lethal herpes simplex virus infection: role of programmed neuronal death.

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, K D; Gurushanthaiah, D; Howes, E L; Lewandowski, G A; Reed, J C; Bloom, F E; Sarvetnick, N E

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for cytokine-mediated antiviral effects are not fully understood. We approached this problem by studying the outcome of intraocular herpes simplex (HSV) infection in transgenic mice that express interferon gamma in the photoreceptor cells of the retina. These transgenic mice showed selective survival from lethal HSV-2 infection manifested in both eyes, the optic nerve, and the brain. Although transgenic mice developed greater inflammatory responses to the virus in the eyes, inflammation and viral titers in their brains were equivalent to nontransgenic mice. However, survival of transgenic mice correlated with markedly lower numbers of central neurons undergoing apoptosis. The protooncogene Bcl2 was found to be induced in the HSV-2-infected brains of transgenic mice, allowing us to speculate on its role in fostering neuronal survival in this model. These observations imply a complex interaction between cytokine, virus, and host cellular factors. Our results suggest a cytokine-regulated salvage pathway that allows for survival of infected neurons. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7724576

  6. Acute oral administration of low doses of methylphenidate targets calretinin neurons in the rat septal area

    PubMed Central

    García-Avilés, Álvaro; Albert-Gascó, Héctor; Arnal-Vicente, Isabel; Elhajj, Ebtisam; Sanjuan-Arias, Julio; Sanchez-Perez, Ana María; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is a commonly administered drug to treat children suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Alterations in septal driven hippocampal theta rhythm may underlie attention deficits observed in these patients. Amongst others, the septo-hippocampal connections have long been acknowledged to be important in preserving hippocampal function. Thus, we wanted to ascertain if MPD administration, which improves attention in patients, could affect septal areas connecting with hippocampus. We used low and orally administered MPD doses (1.3, 2.7 and 5 mg/Kg) to rats what mimics the dosage range in humans. In our model, we observed no effect when using 1.3 mg/Kg MPD; whereas 2.7 and 5 mg/Kg induced a significant increase in c-fos expression specifically in the medial septum (MS), an area intimately connected to the hippocampus. We analyzed dopaminergic areas such as nucleus accumbens and striatum, and found that only 5 mg/Kg induced c-fos levels increase. In these areas tyrosine hydroxylase correlated well with c-fos staining, whereas in the MS the sparse tyrosine hydroxylase fibers did not overlap with c-fos positive neurons. Double immunofluorescence of c-fos with neuronal markers in the septal area revealed that co-localization with choline acethyl transferase, parvalbumin, and calbindin with c-fos did not change with MPD treatment; whereas, calretinin and c-fos double labeled neurons increased after MPD administration. Altogether, these results suggest that low and acute doses of methylphenidate primary target specific populations of caltretinin medial septal neurons. PMID:25852493

  7. Effect of Octreotide on Enteric Motor Neurons in Experimental Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Duowu; Wu, Wenbin; Li, Zhaoshen

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Amelioration of intestinal dysmotility and stasis during the early period of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) appears to be important to reduce the risks of secondary pancreatic infection. We aimed to characterize the association between the neuropathy of the enteric nervous system and gut dysfunction and to examine the effect of octreotide on motor innervation in the early stage of ANP. Methodology/Principal Findings The rats were randomly divided into eight groups: control+saline; control+octreotide; ANP+saline and ANP+octreotide (24 h, 48 h, 72 h). The spontaneous activity of ileal segments and the response to ACh, l-NNA were recorded. The alterations of myenteric neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), choline acetyltransferase (CHAT), PGP9.5 and somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2) immunoreactive cells were evaluated by immunofluorescence and the protein expression of nNOS and CHAT were evaluated by western blot. We found the amplitude of spontaneous contractions at 48 h and the response to ACh at 24 h declined in the ANP+saline rats. A higher contractile response to both ACh and to l-NNA was observed in the ANP+octreotide group, compared with the ANP+saline rats at 24 h. A significant reduction in the nNOS and cholinergic neurons was observed in ANP+saline rats at the three time points. However, this reduction was greatly ameliorated in the presence of octreotide at 24 h and 48 h. The protein expression of CHAT neurons at 24 h and the nNOS neurons at 48 h in the ANP+octreotide rats was much higher than the ANP+saline rats. Conclusion The pathogenesis of ileus in the early stage of ANP may be related to the neuropathy of the enteric nervous system. Octreotide may reduce the severity of ileus by lessening the damage to enteric motor innervation. PMID:23300603

  8. GnRH neuron firing and response to GABA in vitro depend on acute brain slice thickness and orientation.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Stephanie; Piet, Richard; Iremonger, Karl; Hwa Yeo, Shel; Clarkson, Jenny; Porteous, Robert; Herbison, Allan E

    2012-08-01

    The GnRH neurons exhibit long dendrites and project to the median eminence. The aim of the present study was to generate an acute brain slice preparation that enabled recordings to be undertaken from GnRH neurons maintaining the full extent of their dendrites or axons. A thick, horizontal brain slice was developed, in which it was possible to record from the horizontally oriented GnRH neurons located in the anterior hypothalamic area (AHA). In vivo studies showed that the majority of AHA GnRH neurons projected outside the blood-brain barrier and expressed c-Fos at the time of the GnRH surge. On-cell recordings compared AHA GnRH neurons in the horizontal slice (AHAh) with AHA and preoptic area (POA) GnRH neurons in coronal slices [POA coronal (POAc) and AHA coronal (AHAc), respectively]. AHAh GnRH neurons exhibited tighter burst firing compared with other slice orientations. Although α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) excited GnRH neurons in all preparations, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was excitatory in AHAc and POAc but inhibitory in AHAh slices. GABA(A) receptor postsynaptic currents were the same in AHAh and AHAc slices. Intriguingly, direct activation of GABA(A) or GABA(B) receptors respectively stimulated and inhibited GnRH neurons regardless of slice orientation. Subsequent experiments indicated that net GABA effects were determined by differences in the ratio of GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor-mediated effects in "long" and "short" dendrites of GnRH neurons in the different slice orientations. These studies document a new brain slice preparation for recording from GnRH neurons with their extensive dendrites/axons and highlight the importance of GnRH neuron orientation relative to the angle of brain slicing in studying these neurons in vitro.

  9. The PtdIns(3,4)P(2) phosphatase INPP4A is a suppressor of excitotoxic neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Junko; Kofuji, Satoshi; Itoh, Reietsu; Momiyama, Toshihiko; Takayama, Kiyohiko; Murakami, Haruka; Chida, Shinsuke; Tsuya, Yuko; Takasuga, Shunsuke; Eguchi, Satoshi; Asanuma, Ken; Horie, Yasuo; Miura, Kouichi; Davies, Elizabeth Michele; Mitchell, Christina; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Hirai, Hirokazu; Takenawa, Tadaomi; Suzuki, Akira; Sasaki, Takehiko

    2010-05-27

    Phosphorylated derivatives of phosphatidylinositol, collectively referred to as phosphoinositides, occur in the cytoplasmic leaflet of cellular membranes and regulate activities such as vesicle transport, cytoskeletal reorganization and signal transduction. Recent studies have indicated an important role for phosphoinositide metabolism in the aetiology of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, myopathy and inflammation. Although the biological functions of the phosphatases that regulate phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3)) have been well characterized, little is known about the functions of the phosphatases regulating the closely related molecule phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4)P(2)). Here we show that inositol polyphosphate phosphatase 4A (INPP4A), a PtdIns(3,4)P(2) phosphatase, is a suppressor of glutamate excitotoxicity in the central nervous system. Targeted disruption of the Inpp4a gene in mice leads to neurodegeneration in the striatum, the input nucleus of the basal ganglia that has a central role in motor and cognitive behaviours. Notably, Inpp4a(-/-) mice show severe involuntary movement disorders. In vitro, Inpp4a gene silencing via short hairpin RNA renders cultured primary striatal neurons vulnerable to cell death mediated by N-methyl-d-aspartate-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs). Mechanistically, INPP4A is found at the postsynaptic density and regulates synaptic NMDAR localization and NMDAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic current. Thus, INPP4A protects neurons from excitotoxic cell death and thereby maintains the functional integrity of the brain. Our study demonstrates that PtdIns(3,4)P(2), PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) and the phosphatases acting on them can have distinct regulatory roles, and provides insight into the unique aspects and physiological significance of PtdIns(3,4)P(2) metabolism. INPP4A represents, to our knowledge, the first signalling protein with a function in neurons to suppress excitotoxic cell death

  10. BDNF up-regulates TrkB protein and prevents the death of CA1 neurons following transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, I; Ballabriga, J; Martí, E; Pérez, E; Alberch, J; Arenas, E

    1998-04-01

    The neurotrophin family of growth factors, which includes Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), Neurotrophin-3 (NT3) and Neurotrophin-4/5 (NT4/5) bind and activate specific tyrosine kinase (Trk) receptors to promote cell survival and growth of different cell populations. For these reasons, growing attention has been paid to the use of neurotrophins as therapeutic agents in neurodegeneration, and to the regulation of the expression of their specific receptors by the ligands. BDNF expression, as revealed by immunohistochemistry, is found in the pre-subiculum, CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Strong TrkB immunoreactivity is present in most CA3 neurons but only in scattered neurons of the CA1 area. Weak TrkB immunoreactivity is found in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. Unilateral grafting of BDNF-transfected fibroblasts into the hippocampus resulted in a marked increase in the intensity of the immunoreaction and in the number of TrkB-immunoreactive neurons in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus, pre-subiculum and CA1 area in the vicinity of the graft. No similar effects were produced after the injection of control mock-transfected fibroblasts. Delayed cell death in the CA1 area was produced following 5 min of forebrain ischemia in the gerbil. The majority of living cells in the CA1 area at the fourth day were BDNF/TrkB immunoreactive. Unilateral grafting of control mock-transfected or BDNF fibroblasts two days before ischemia resulted in a moderate non-specific protection of TrkB-negative, but not TrkB-positive cells, in the CA1 area of the grafted side. This finding is in line with a vascular and glial reaction, as revealed, by immunohistochemistry using astroglial and microglial cell markers. This astroglial response was higher in the grafted side than in the contralateral side in ischemic gerbils, but no differences were seen between BDNF-producing and non-BDNF-producing grafts. However, grafting of

  11. X-ray-induced cell death in the developing hippocampal complex involved neurons and requires protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, I.; Serrano, T.; Alcantara, S.; Tortosa, A.; Graus, F.

    1993-07-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats aged 1 or 15 days were irradiated with a single dose of 200 cGy X-rays and killed at different intervals from 3 to 48 hours (h). Dying cells were recognized by their shrunken and often fragmented nuclei and less damaged cytoplasm in the early stages. On the basis of immunocytochemical markers, dying cells probably represented a heterogeneous population which included neurons and immature cells. In rats aged 1 day the number of dying cells rapidly increased in the hippocampal complex with peak values 6 h after irradiation. This was following by a gentle decrease to reach normal values 48 h after irradiation. The most severely affected regions were the subplate and the cellular layer of the subiculum, gyrus dentatus and hilus, and the stratum oriens and pyramidale of the hippocampus (CA1 more affected than CA2, and this more affected than CA3). X-ray-induced cell death was abolished with an injection of cycloheximide (2 [mu]g/g i.p.) given at the time of irradiation. X-ray-induced cell death was not changed after the intraventicular administration of nerve growth factor (NGF; 10 [mu]g in saline) at the time of irradiation. Cell death was not induced by X-irradiation in rats aged 15 days. These results indicate that X-ray-induced cell death in the hippocampal complex of the developing rat is subjected to determinate temporal and regional patterns of vulnerability; it is an active process mediated by protein synthesis but probably not dependent on NGF. 60 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Rapid generation of mitochondrial superoxide induces mitochondrion-dependent but caspase-independent cell death in hippocampal neuronal cells that morphologically resembles necroptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Masayuki; Choi, Hye Joung; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2012-07-15

    Studies in recent years have revealed that excess mitochondrial superoxide production is an important etiological factor in neurodegenerative diseases, resulting from oxidative modifications of cellular lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Hence, it is important to understand the mechanism by which mitochondrial oxidative stress causes neuronal death. In this study, the immortalized mouse hippocampal neuronal cells (HT22) in culture were used as a model and they were exposed to menadione (also known as vitamin K{sub 3}) to increase intracellular superoxide production. We found that menadione causes preferential accumulation of superoxide in the mitochondria of these cells, along with the rapid development of mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular ATP depletion. Neuronal death induced by menadione is independent of the activation of the MAPK signaling pathways and caspases. The lack of caspase activation is due to the rapid depletion of cellular ATP. It was observed that two ATP-independent mitochondrial nucleases, namely, AIF and Endo G, are released following menadione exposure. Silencing of their expression using specific siRNAs results in transient suppression (for ∼ 12 h) of mitochondrial superoxide-induced neuronal death. While suppression of the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase expression markedly sensitizes neuronal cells to mitochondrial superoxide-induced cytotoxicity, its over-expression confers strong protection. Collectively, these findings showed that many of the observed features associated with mitochondrial superoxide-induced cell death, including caspase independency, rapid depletion of ATP level, mitochondrial release of AIF and Endo G, and mitochondrial swelling, are distinctly different from those of apoptosis; instead they resemble some of the known features of necroptosis. -- Highlights: ► Menadione causes mitochondrial superoxide accumulation and injury. ► Menadione-induced cell death is caspase-independent, due to rapid depletion of

  13. Motor neuron cell death in wobbler mutant mice follows overexpression of the G-protein-coupled, protease-activated receptor for thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Festoff, B. W.; D'Andrea, M. R.; Citron, B. A.; Salcedo, R. M.; Smirnova, I. V.; Andrade-Gordon, P.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration are actively sought for new therapeutic strategies. Transgenic, knockout and genetic mouse models greatly aid our understanding of the mechanisms for neuronal cell death. A naturally occurring, autosomal recessive mutant, known as wobbler, and mice transgenic for familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) superoxide dismutase (SOD)1 mutations are available, but the molecular mechanisms remain equally unknown. Both phenotypes are detectable after birth. Wobbler is detectable in the third week of life, when homozygotes (wr/wr) exhibit prominent gliosis and significant motor neuron loss in the cervical, but not in lumbar, spinal cord segments. To address molecular mechanisms, we evaluated "death signals" associated with the multifunctional serine protease, thrombin, which leads to apoptotic motor neuronal cell death in culture by cleavage of a G-protein coupled, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thrombin activities were determined with chromogenic substrate assays, Western immunoblots and immunohistochemistry were performed with anti-PAR-1 to observe localizations of the receptor and anti-GFAP staining was used to monitor astrocytosis. PAR-1 mRNA levels and locations were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in situ hybridizations. Cell death was monitored with in situ DNA fragmentation assays. RESULTS: In preliminary studies we found a 5-fold increase in PAR-1 mRNA in cervical spinal cords from wr/wr, compared with wild-type (wt) littermates. Our current studies suggested that reactive astrocytosis and motor neuron cell death were causally linked with alterations in thrombin signaling. PAR-1 protein expression was increased, as demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and confirmed with in situ hybridization, in phenotypic wr/wr motor neurons, compared with wt, but not in astrocytes. This increase was much greater in cervical, compared with lumbar

  14. Signaling Pathways that Mediate Neurotoxin-Induced Death of Dopamine Neurons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    undergoing apoptosis. Cell Death and Differentiation, 12: 255-265, 2005. 5. Zimmermann, AK, FA Loucks , SS Le, BD Butts, M McClure, RJ Bouchard, KA...279-289, 2005. 7. Le, SS, FA Loucks , H Udo, S Richardson-Burns, RA Phelps, RJ Bouchard, H Barth, K Aktories, KL Tyler, ER Kandel, KA Heidenreich...Apoptosis in Biochemistry and Structural Biology. 2004 2. Loucks FA, Zimmermann AK, Le SS, Bouchard RJ, Laessig TA, Heidenreich KA, and Linseman DA

  15. Common Mechanisms of Neuronal Cell Death after Exposure to Diverse Environmental Insults: Implications for Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    corres\\DODcommonmechfinalreportJuly2006.doc 27 Ronald L. Hayes. Comparison of biomarkers alpha-II spectrin breakdown products, S100B , and tau after...death, we and others have made rapid advances in the development of biomarkers allowing non-invasive study of proteolytic pathology in in vivo models...In addition, proteomics-based platforms can provide powerful technologies to detect biomarkers ultimately providing capabilities for non-invasive

  16. Repair of oxidative DNA damage, cell-cycle regulation and neuronal death may influence the clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Silva, Aderbal R T; Santos, Ana Cecília Feio; Farfel, Jose M; Grinberg, Lea T; Ferretti, Renata E L; Campos, Antonio Hugo Jose Froes Marques; Cunha, Isabela Werneck; Begnami, Maria Dirlei; Rocha, Rafael M; Carraro, Dirce M; de Bragança Pereira, Carlos Alberto; Jacob-Filho, Wilson; Brentani, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline associated with a featured neuropathology (neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles). Several studies have implicated oxidative damage to DNA, DNA repair, and altered cell-cycle regulation in addition to cell death in AD post-mitotic neurons. However, there is a lack of studies that systematically assess those biological processes in patients with AD neuropathology but with no evidence of cognitive impairment. We evaluated markers of oxidative DNA damage (8-OHdG, H2AX), DNA repair (p53, BRCA1, PTEN), and cell-cycle (Cdk1, Cdk4, Cdk5, Cyclin B1, Cyclin D1, p27Kip1, phospho-Rb and E2F1) through immunohistochemistry and cell death through TUNEL in autopsy hippocampal tissue samples arrayed in a tissue microarray (TMA) composed of three groups: I) "clinical-pathological AD" (CP-AD)--subjects with neuropathological AD (Braak ≥ IV and CERAD = B or C) and clinical dementia (CDR ≥ 2, IQCODE>3.8); II) "pathological AD" (P-AD)--subjects with neuropathological AD (Braak ≥ IV and CERAD = B or C) and without cognitive impairment (CDR 0, IQCODE<3.2); and III) "normal aging" (N)--subjects without neuropathological AD (Braak ≤ II and CERAD 0 or A) and with normal cognitive function (CDR 0, IQCODE<3.2). Our results show that high levels of oxidative DNA damage are present in all groups. However, significant reductions in DNA repair and cell-cycle inhibition markers and increases in cell-cycle progression and cell death markers in subjects with CP-AD were detected when compared to both P-AD and N groups, whereas there were no significant differences in the studied markers between P-AD individuals and N subjects. This study indicates that, even in the setting of pathological AD, healthy cognition may be associated with a preserved repair to DNA damage, cell-cycle regulation, and cell death in post-mitotic neurons.

  17. Beatquency domain and machine learning improve prediction of cardiovascular death after acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun; Scirica, Benjamin M.; Stultz, Collin M.; Guttag, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Frequency domain measures of heart rate variability (HRV) are associated with adverse events after a myocardial infarction. However, patterns in the traditional frequency domain (measured in Hz, or cycles per second) may capture different cardiac phenomena at different heart rates. An alternative is to consider frequency with respect to heartbeats, or beatquency. We compared the use of frequency and beatquency domains to predict patient risk after an acute coronary syndrome. We then determined whether machine learning could further improve the predictive performance. We first evaluated the use of pre-defined frequency and beatquency bands in a clinical trial dataset (N = 2302) for the HRV risk measure LF/HF (the ratio of low frequency to high frequency power). Relative to frequency, beatquency improved the ability of LF/HF to predict cardiovascular death within one year (Area Under the Curve, or AUC, of 0.730 vs. 0.704, p < 0.001). Next, we used machine learning to learn frequency and beatquency bands with optimal predictive power, which further improved the AUC for beatquency to 0.753 (p < 0.001), but not for frequency. Results in additional validation datasets (N = 2255 and N = 765) were similar. Our results suggest that beatquency and machine learning provide valuable tools in physiological studies of HRV. PMID:27708350

  18. Acute death associated with Citrobacter freundii infection in an African elephant (Loxodonta africana).

    PubMed

    Ortega, Joaquín; Corpa, Juan M; Orden, José A; Blanco, Jorge; Carbonell, María D; Gerique, Amalia C; Latimer, Erin; Hayward, Gary S; Roemmelt, Andreas; Kraemer, Thomas; Romey, Aurore; Kassimi, Labib B; Casares, Miguel

    2015-09-01

    A 21-year-old male African elephant (Loxodonta africana) died suddenly with no previous medical history. Grossly, there were severe multifocal epicardial and endocardial hemorrhages of the atria and ventricles, hydropericardium, multifocal pleural hemorrhages, and severe pulmonary congestion and edema. Histologically, there was fibrinoid vasculitis and thrombosis in the heart and lung and myocardial necrosis. Citrobacter freundii was isolated in abundance in pure culture from liver and heart samples. Low levels of multiples types of elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV-6, EEHV-2B, and EEHV-3A) were detected in spleen samples, but not in heart samples. The levels of EEHV DNA found were much lower than those usually associated with acute EEHV hemorrhagic disease, and many other genomic loci that would normally be found in such cases were evidently below the level of detection. Therefore, these findings are unlikely to indicate lethal EEHV disease. Polymerase chain reaction for encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) and toxicology for oleander (Nerium oleander) were negative. Stress, resulting from recent transport, and antimicrobial therapy may have contributed to the death of this animal.

  19. Beatquency domain and machine learning improve prediction of cardiovascular death after acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Scirica, Benjamin M; Stultz, Collin M; Guttag, John V

    2016-10-06

    Frequency domain measures of heart rate variability (HRV) are associated with adverse events after a myocardial infarction. However, patterns in the traditional frequency domain (measured in Hz, or cycles per second) may capture different cardiac phenomena at different heart rates. An alternative is to consider frequency with respect to heartbeats, or beatquency. We compared the use of frequency and beatquency domains to predict patient risk after an acute coronary syndrome. We then determined whether machine learning could further improve the predictive performance. We first evaluated the use of pre-defined frequency and beatquency bands in a clinical trial dataset (N = 2302) for the HRV risk measure LF/HF (the ratio of low frequency to high frequency power). Relative to frequency, beatquency improved the ability of LF/HF to predict cardiovascular death within one year (Area Under the Curve, or AUC, of 0.730 vs. 0.704, p < 0.001). Next, we used machine learning to learn frequency and beatquency bands with optimal predictive power, which further improved the AUC for beatquency to 0.753 (p < 0.001), but not for frequency. Results in additional validation datasets (N = 2255 and N = 765) were similar. Our results suggest that beatquency and machine learning provide valuable tools in physiological studies of HRV.

  20. Cell death induction by the acute promyelocytic leukemia-specific PML/RARα fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Ferrucci, Pier Francesco; Grignani, Francesco; Pearson, Mark; Fagioli, Marta; Nicoletti, Ildo; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    1997-01-01

    PML/RARα is the abnormal protein product generated by the acute promyelocytic leukemia-specific t(15;17). Expression of PML/RARα in hematopoietic precursor cell lines induces block of differentiation and promotes survival. We report here that PML/RARα has a potent growth inhibitory effect on all nonhematopoietic cell lines and on the majority of the hematopoietic cell lines tested. Inducible expression of PML/RARα in fibroblasts demonstrated that the basis for the growth suppression is induction of cell death. Deletion of relevant promyelocytic leukemia (PML) and retinoic acid receptor (RARα) domains within the fusion protein revealed that its growth inhibitory effect depends on the integrity of the PML aminoterminal region (RING, B1, B2, and coiled coil regions) and the RARα DNA binding region. Analysis of the nuclear localization of the same PML/RARα deletion mutants by immunofluorescence and cell fractionation revealed that the biological activity of the fusion protein correlates with its microspeckled localization and its association to the nuclear matrix. The PML aminoterminal region, but not the RARα zinc fingers, is required for the proper nuclear localization of PML/RARα. We propose that the matrix-associated microspeckles are the active sites of PML/RARα and that targeting of RARα sequences to this specific nuclear subdomain through PML sequences is crucial to the activity of the fusion protein on survival regulation. PMID:9380732

  1. Combined exposure to simulated microgravity and acute or chronic radiation reduces neuronal network integrity and cell survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benotmane, Rafi

    During orbital or interplanetary space flights, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiations and microgravity. This study aimed at assessing the effect of these combined conditions on neuronal network density, cell morphology and survival, using well-connected mouse cortical neuron cultures. To this end, neurons were exposed to acute low and high doses of low LET (X-rays) radiation or to chronic low dose-rate of high LET neutron irradiation (Californium-252), under the simulated microgravity generated by the Random Positioning Machine (RPM, Dutch space). High content image analysis of cortical neurons positive for the neuronal marker βIII-tubulin unveiled a reduced neuronal network integrity and connectivity, and an altered cell morphology after exposure to acute/chronic radiation or to simulated microgravity. Additionally, in both conditions, a defect in DNA-repair efficiency was revealed by an increased number of γH2AX-positive foci, as well as an increased number of Annexin V-positive apoptotic neurons. Of interest, when combining both simulated space conditions, we noted a synergistic effect on neuronal network density, neuronal morphology, cell survival and DNA repair. Furthermore, these observations are in agreement with preliminary gene expression data, revealing modulations in cytoskeletal and apoptosis-related genes after exposure to simulated microgravity. In conclusion, the observed in vitro changes in neuronal network integrity and cell survival induced by space simulated conditions provide us with mechanistic understanding to evaluate health risks and the development of countermeasures to prevent neurological disorders in astronauts over long-term space travels. Acknowledgements: This work is supported partly by the EU-FP7 projects CEREBRAD (n° 295552)

  2. Quantitative relationships between huntingtin levels, polyglutamine length, inclusion body formation, and neuronal death provide novel insight into Huntington’s disease molecular pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jason; Arrasate, Montserrat; Shaby, Benjamin A.; Mitra, Siddhartha; Masliah, Eliezer; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2010-01-01

    An expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) stretch in the protein huntingtin (htt) induces self-aggregation into inclusion bodies (IBs) and causes Huntington’s disease (HD). Defining precise relationships between early observable variables and neuronal death at the molecular and cellular levels should improve our understanding of HD pathogenesis. Here, we utilized an automated microscope that can track thousands of neurons individually over their entire lifetime to quantify interconnected relationships between early variables, such as htt levels, polyQ length, and IB formation, and neuronal death in a primary striatal model of HD. The resulting model revealed that: mutant htt increases the risk of death by tonically interfering with homeostatic coping mechanisms rather than producing accumulated damage to the neuron; htt toxicity is saturable; the rate limiting steps for inclusion body formation and death can be traced to different conformational changes in monomeric htt; and IB formation reduces the impact of a neuron’s starting levels of htt on its risk of death. Finally, the model that emerges from our quantitative measurements places critical limits on the potential mechanisms by which mutant htt might induce neurodegeneration, which should help direct future research. PMID:20685997

  3. Compatibility of SYTO 13 and Hoechst 33342 for Longitudinal Imaging of Neuron Viability and Cell Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-14

    neuronal differentiation ESNs were generated, plated and cultured as previously described [10,11]. ESNs were maintained in NeurobasalW- A medium ( NBA ...washed and incubated for 6 h in complete NBA medium without (control) or with 1 μM staurosporine. After 6 h, the media was replaced with complete NBA ...supplemented with 5 μg/mL PI for 10 min at 37°C and 5% CO2 followed by complete NBA with 5 μg/mL Hoechst or 500 nM SYTO 13 for 5 min. Cover- slips were

  4. Rapamycin protects against neuronal death and improves neurological function with modulation of microglia after experimental intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, D; Liu, F; Yang, T; Jin, T; Zhang, H; Luo, X; Wang, M

    2016-09-30

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) results in a devastating brain disorder with high mortality and poor prognosis and effective therapeutic intervention for the disease remains a challenge at present. The present study investigated the neuroprotective effects of rapamycin on ICH-induced brain damage and the possible involvement of activated microglia. ICH was induced in rats by injection of type IV collagenase into striatum. Different dose of rapamycin was systemically administrated by intraperitoneal injection beginning at 1 h after ICH induction. Western blot analysis showed that ICH led to a long-lasting increase of phosphorylated mTOR and this hyperactivation of mTOR was reduced by systemic administration of rapamycin. Rapamycin treatment significantly improved the sensorimotor deficits induced by ICH, and attenuated ICH-induced brain edema formation as well as lesion volume. Nissl and Fluoro-Jade C staining demonstrated that administration with rapamycin remarkably decreased neuronal death surrounding the hematoma at 7 d after ICH insult. ELISA and real-time quantitative PCR demonstrated that rapamycin inhibited ICH-induced excessive expression of TNF-α and IL-1β in ipsilateral hemisphere. Furthermore, activation of microglia induced by ICH was significantly suppressed by rapamycin administration. These data indicated that treatment of rapamycin following ICH decreased the brain injuries and neuronal death at the peri-hematoma striatum, and increased neurological function, which associated with reduced the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and activated microglia. The results provide novel insight into the neuroprotective therapeutic strategy of rapamycin for ICH insult, which possibly involving the regulation of microglial activation.

  5. Oxidative stress-induced CREB upregulation promotes DNA damage repair prior to neuronal cell death protection.

    PubMed

    Pregi, Nicolás; Belluscio, Laura María; Berardino, Bruno Gabriel; Castillo, Daniela Susana; Cánepa, Eduardo Tomás

    2017-01-01

    cAMP response element-binding (CREB) protein is a cellular transcription factor that mediates responses to different physiological and pathological signals. Using a model of human neuronal cells we demonstrate herein, that CREB is phosphorylated after oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide. This phosphorylation is largely independent of PKA and of the canonical phosphoacceptor site at ser-133, and is accompanied by an upregulation of CREB expression at both mRNA and protein levels. In accordance with previous data, we show that CREB upregulation promotes cell survival and that its silencing results in an increment of apoptosis after oxidative stress. Interestingly, we also found that CREB promotes DNA repair after treatment with hydrogen peroxide. Using a cDNA microarray we found that CREB is responsible for the regulation of many genes involved in DNA repair and cell survival after oxidative injury. In summary, the neuroprotective effect mediated by CREB appears to follow three essential steps following oxidative injury. First, the upregulation of CREB expression that allows sufficient level of activated and phosphorylated protein is the primordial event that promotes the induction of genes of the DNA Damage Response. Then and when the DNA repair is effective, CREB induces detoxification and survival genes. This kinetics seems to be important to completely resolve oxidative-induced neuronal damages.

  6. Bone marrow transplantation in hindlimb muscles of motoneuron degenerative mice reduces neuronal death and improves motor function.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Diego; Viso-León, Mari Carmen; Botella-López, Arancha; Jaramillo-Merchan, Jesus; Moraleda, Jose M; Jones, Jonathan; Martínez, Salvador

    2013-06-01

    Bone marrow has proved to be an adequate source of stem cells for the treatment of numerous disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Bone marrow can be easily and relatively painlessly extracted from a patient or allogenic donor and then transplanted into the degenerative area. Here, the grafted cells will activate a number of mechanisms in order to protect, repair, and/or regenerate the damaged tissue. These properties make the bone marrow a feasible source for cell therapy. In this work, we transplanted bone marrow cells into a mouse model of motoneuron degeneration, with the particularity of placing the cells in the hindlimb muscles rather than in the spinal cord where neuronal degeneration occurs. To this end, we analyze the possibility for the transplanted cells to increase the survival rate of the spinal cord motoneurons by axonal-guided retrograde neurotrophism. As a result, the mice significantly improved their motor functions. This coincided with an increased number of motoneurons innervating the treated muscle compared with the neurons innervating the non-treated contralateral symmetric muscle. In addition, we detected an increase in glial-derived neurotrophic factor in the spinal cord, a neurotrophic factor known to be involved in the rescue of degenerating motoneurons, exerting a neuroprotective effect. Thus, we have proved that bone marrow injected into the muscles is capable of rescuing these motoneurons from death, which may be a possible therapeutic approach for spinal cord motoneuron degenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  7. Blockade of the Interaction of Calcineurin with FOXO in Astrocytes Protects Against Amyloid-β-Induced Neuronal Death.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ana M; Hervas, Ruben; Dominguez-Fraile, Manuel; Garrido, Victoria Navarro; Gomez-Gutierrez, Patricia; Vega, Miguel; Vitorica, Javier; Perez, Juan J; Torres Aleman, Ignacio

    2016-04-12

    Astrocytes actively participate in neuro-inflammatory processes associated to Alzheimer's disease (AD), and other brain pathologies. We recently showed that an astrocyte-specific intracellular signaling pathway involving an interaction of the phosphatase calcineurin with the transcription factor FOXO3 is a major driver in AD-associated pathological inflammation, suggesting a potential new druggable target for this devastating disease. We have now developed decoy molecules to interfere with calcineurin/FOXO3 interactions, and tested them in astrocytes and neuronal co-cultures exposed to amyloid-β (Aβ) toxicity. We observed that interference of calcineurin/FOXO3 interactions exerts a protective action against Aβ-induced neuronal death and favors the production of a set of growth factors that we hypothesize form part of a cytoprotective pathway to resolve inflammation. Furthermore, interference of the Aβ-induced interaction of calcineurin with FOXO3 by decoy compounds significantly decreased amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) synthesis, reduced the AβPP amyloidogenic pathway, resulting in lower Aβ levels, and blocked the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-6 in astrocytes. Collectively, these data indicate that interrupting pro-inflammatory calcineurin/FOXO3 interactions in astrocytes triggered by Aβ accumulation in brain may constitute an effective new therapeutic approach in AD. Future studies with intranasal delivery, or brain barrier permeable decoy compounds, are warranted.

  8. Ginkgo biloba Prevents Transient Global Ischemia-Induced Delayed Hippocampal Neuronal Death Through Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Tulsulkar, Jatin; Shah, Zahoor A.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported neuroprotective properties of Ginkgo biloba/EGb 761® (EGb 761) in transient and permanent mouse models of brain ischemia. In a quest to extend our studies on EGB 761 and its constituents further, we used a model of transient global ischemia induced delayed hippocampal neuronal death and inflammation. Mice pretreated with different test drugs for 7 days were subjected to eight-minute bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (tBCCAO) at day 8. After 7 days of reperfusion, mice brains were dissected out for TUNEL assay and immunohistochemistry. In-situ detection of fragmented DNA (TUNEL staining) showed that out of all test drugs, only EGb 761 (13.6% ± 3.2) pretreatment protected neurons in the hippocampus against global ischemia (vs. vehicle, 85.1% ± 9.9; p < 0.05). Immunofluorescence-based studies demonstrated that pretreatment with EGb 761 upregulated the expression levels of heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as compared to the vehicle group. In addition, increased number of activated astrocytes and microglia in the vehicle group was observed to be significantly lower in the EGb 761 pretreated group. Together, these results suggest that EGb 761 is a multifunctional neuroprotective agent, and the protection is in part associated with activation of the HO1/Nrf2 pathway, upregulation of VEGF and downregulation of inflammatory mediators such as astrocytes and microglia. PMID:23228346

  9. Bone Marrow Transplantation in Hindlimb Muscles of Motoneuron Degenerative Mice Reduces Neuronal Death and Improves Motor Function

    PubMed Central

    Viso-León, Mari Carmen; Botella-López, Arancha; Jaramillo-Merchan, Jesus; Moraleda, Jose M.; Jones, Jonathan; Martínez, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow has proved to be an adequate source of stem cells for the treatment of numerous disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Bone marrow can be easily and relatively painlessly extracted from a patient or allogenic donor and then transplanted into the degenerative area. Here, the grafted cells will activate a number of mechanisms in order to protect, repair, and/or regenerate the damaged tissue. These properties make the bone marrow a feasible source for cell therapy. In this work, we transplanted bone marrow cells into a mouse model of motoneuron degeneration, with the particularity of placing the cells in the hindlimb muscles rather than in the spinal cord where neuronal degeneration occurs. To this end, we analyze the possibility for the transplanted cells to increase the survival rate of the spinal cord motoneurons by axonal-guided retrograde neurotrophism. As a result, the mice significantly improved their motor functions. This coincided with an increased number of motoneurons innervating the treated muscle compared with the neurons innervating the non-treated contralateral symmetric muscle. In addition, we detected an increase in glial-derived neurotrophic factor in the spinal cord, a neurotrophic factor known to be involved in the rescue of degenerating motoneurons, exerting a neuroprotective effect. Thus, we have proved that bone marrow injected into the muscles is capable of rescuing these motoneurons from death, which may be a possible therapeutic approach for spinal cord motoneuron degenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:23282201

  10. Acupuncture prevents 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neuronal death in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in the rat Parkinson's disease model.

    PubMed

    Park, Hi-Joon; Lim, Sabina; Joo, Wan-Seok; Yin, Chang-Shik; Lee, Hyang-Sook; Lee, Hye-Jung; Seo, Jung Chul; Leem, Kanghyun; Son, Yang-Sun; Kim, Youn-Jung; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Yong-Sik; Chung, Joo-Ho

    2003-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder, and it has been suggested that treatments promoting survival and functional recovery of affected dopaminergic neurons could have a significant and long-term therapeutic value. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of acupuncture on the nigrostriatal system in rat unilaterally lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 4 microg/microl, intrastriatal injection) using tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor, trkB, immunohistochemistries. Two weeks after the lesions were made, rats presented with asymmetry in rotational behavior (118.3 +/- 17.5 turns/h) following injection with apomorphine, a dopamine receptor agonist (0.5 mg/kg, sc). In contrast, acupunctural treatment at acupoints GB34 and LI3 was shown to significantly reduce this motor deficit (14.6 +/- 13.4 turns/h). Analysis via TH immunohistochemistry revealed a substantial loss of cell bodies in the substantia nigra (SN) (45.7% loss) and their terminals in the dorsolateral striatum ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA-induced lesion. However, acupunctural treatment resulted in the enhanced survival of dopaminergic neurons in the SN (21.4% loss) and their terminals in the dorsolateral striatum. Acupuncture also increased the expression of trkB significantly (35.6% increase) in the ipsilateral SN. In conclusion, we observed that only acupuncturing without the use of any drug has the neuroprotective effects against neuronal death in the rat PD model and these protective properties of acupuncture could be mediated by trkB.

  11. TLR4-activated microglia require IFN-γ to induce severe neuronal dysfunction and death in situ

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, Ismini E.; Lewen, Andrea; Galow, Lukas V.; Cesetti, Tiziana; Scheffel, Jörg; Regen, Tommy; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Kann, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Microglia (tissue-resident macrophages) represent the main cell type of the innate immune system in the CNS; however, the mechanisms that control the activation of microglia are widely unknown. We systematically explored microglial activation and functional microglia–neuron interactions in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures, i.e., postnatal cortical tissue that lacks adaptive immunity. We applied electrophysiological recordings of local field potential and extracellular K+ concentration, immunohistochemistry, design-based stereology, morphometry, Sholl analysis, and biochemical analyses. We show that chronic activation with either bacterial lipopolysaccharide through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) or leukocyte cytokine IFN-γ induces reactive phenotypes in microglia associated with morphological changes, population expansion, CD11b and CD68 up-regulation, and proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6) and nitric oxide (NO) release. Notably, these reactive phenotypes only moderately alter intrinsic neuronal excitability and gamma oscillations (30–100 Hz), which emerge from precise synaptic communication of glutamatergic pyramidal cells and fast-spiking, parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons, in local hippocampal networks. Short-term synaptic plasticity and extracellular potassium homeostasis during neural excitation, also reflecting astrocyte function, are unaffected. In contrast, the coactivation of TLR4 and IFN-γ receptors results in neuronal dysfunction and death, caused mainly by enhanced microglial inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and NO release, because iNOS inhibition is neuroprotective. Thus, activation of TLR4 in microglia in situ requires concomitant IFN-γ receptor signaling from peripheral immune cells, such as T helper type 1 and natural killer cells, to unleash neurotoxicity and inflammation-induced neurodegeneration. Our findings provide crucial mechanistic insight into the complex process of microglia activation

  12. 3',4',7-Trihydroxyflavone prevents apoptotic cell death in neuronal cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seung-Hwan; Hong, Sa-Ik; Ma, Shi-Xun; Lee, Seok-Yong; Jang, Choon-Gon

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of 3',4',7-trihydroxyflavone (THF) protection of neuronal cells from neuronal cell death induced by the oxidative stress-related neurotoxin hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Pretreatment with THF significantly elevated cell viability, reduced H2O2-induced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione (GSH) content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, catalase (CAT) activity, and mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) loss. Western blot data demonstrated that THF inhibited the H2O2-induced up- or down-regulation of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), Bax, Bcl-2, and Bcl-xL, and attenuated the H2O2-induced release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol. In addition, pretreatment with THF attenuated H2O2-induced rapid and significant phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K)/Akt. THF also inhibited nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) translocation to the nucleus induced by H2O2, down-stream of H2O2-induced phosphorylation of MAPKs and PI3K/Akt. These data provide the first evidence that THF protects neuronal cells against H2O2-induced oxidative stress, possibly through ROS reduction, mitochondria protection, and NF-κB modulation via MAPKs and PI3K/Akt pathways. The neuroprotective effects of THF make it a promising candidate as a therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Acute upregulation of neuronal mitochondrial type-1 cannabinoid receptor and it's role in metabolic defects and neuronal apoptosis after TBI.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Lv, Xiao-Ai; Dai, Qun; Ge, Yu-Qing; Xu, Jie

    2016-08-02

    Metabolic defects and neuronal apoptosis initiated by traumatic brain injury (TBI) contribute to subsequent neurodegeneration. They are all regulated by mechanisms centered around mitochondrion. Type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) enriched on neuronal plasma membrane. Recent evidences point to the substantial presence of CB1 receptors on neuronal mitochondrial outer membranes (mtCB1) and the activation of mtCB1 influences aerobic respiration via inhibiting mitochondrial cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)/complex I pathway. The expression and role of neuronal mtCB1 under TBI are unknown. Using TBI models of cultured neurons, wild type and CB1 knockout mice, we found mtCB1 quickly upregulated after TBI. Activation of mtCB1 promoted metabolic defects accompanied with ATP shortage but protected neurons from apoptosis. Selective activation of plasma membrane CB1 showed no effects on neuronal metabolism and apoptosis. Activation of mtCB1 receptors inhibited mitochondrial cAMP/PKA/complex I and resulted in exacerbated metabolic defects accompanied with a higher ratio of ATP reduction to oxygen consumption decrease as well as neuronal apoptosis. Further research found the remarkable accumulation of protein kinase B (AKT) on neuronal mitochondria following TBI and the activation of mtCB1 upregulated mitochondrial AKT/complex V activity. Upregulation of mitochondrial AKT/complex V activity showed anti-apoptosis effects and alleviated ATP shortage in metabolic defects. Taken together, we have identified mtCB1 quickly upregulate after TBI and a dual role the mtCB1 might play in metabolic defects and neuronal apoptosis initiated by TBI: the inhibition of mitochondrial cAMP/PKA/complex I aggravates metabolic defects, energy insufficiency as well as neuronal apoptosis, but the coactivation of mitochondrial AKT/complex V mitigates energy insufficiency and neuronal apoptosis.

  14. Neuroprotective effect of acute melatonin treatment on hippocampal neurons against irradiation by inhibition of caspase-3

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIANGUO; ZHANG, GUOWEI; MENG, ZHUANGZHI; WANG, LINGZHAN; LIU, HAIYING; LIU, QIANG; BUREN, BATU

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal cell apoptosis is associated with various factors that induce neurological damage, including radiation exposure. When administered prior to exposure to radiation, a protective agent may prevent cellular and molecular injury. The present study aimed to investigate whether melatonin exerts a neuroprotective effect by inhibiting the caspase cell death pathway. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered melatonin (100 mg/kg body weight) 30 min prior to radiation exposure in red light during the evening. In order to elucidate whether melatonin has a neuroprotective role, immunohistochemistry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling, Nissl staining, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, reactive oxygen species analysis and western blotting were performed. At 24 h post-melatonin treatment, caspase-3 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly decreased. These results demonstrated that melatonin may protect hippocampal neurons via the inhibition of caspase-3 when exposed to irradiation. Therefore, caspase-3 inhibition serves a neuroprotective and antioxidant role in the interventional treatment of melatonin. The results of the present study suggested that melatonin may have a potential therapeutic effect against irradiation; however, further studies are required in order to elucidate the underlying antioxidant mechanisms. PMID:27313671

  15. Electrophysiological profile of the new atypical neuroleptic, sertindole, on midbrain dopamine neurones in rats: acute and repeated treatment.

    PubMed

    Skarsfeldt, T

    1992-01-01

    Sertindole (Lundbeck code No. Lu 23-174) (1-[2-[4-[5-chloro-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]-1-piperidinyl] ethyl]-2-imidazolidinone) is a new potential neuroleptic compound. After 3 weeks of treatment sertindole shows an extreme selectivity to inhibit the number of spontaneously active dopaminergic (DA) neurones in ventral tegmental area (VTA) while leaving the number of active DA neurones in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC) unaffected. Acute injection of apomorphine or baclofen reverse the inhibition of activity seen after repeated treatment with sertindole. This suggests that sertindole induces a depolarization inactivation of the DA neurones. The depolarization inactivation is reversible since normal activity of DA neurones is found in both SNC and VTA after two weeks withdrawal from repeated treatment with a low dose with sertindole. One or two weeks administration of a high dose of sertindole induced only minor effects on the DA neurones in VTA; i.e., in order to obtain the depolarization inactivation sertindole requires 3 weeks of treatment as has also been reported for other neuroleptics. Three weeks of treatment with clozapine induces a selective inhibition of the active DA neurones in VTA but at much higher doses than seen with sertindole, while haloperidol induces a non-selective decrease of spontaneously active DA neurones in both areas. In acute electrophysiological experiments intravenous (i.v.) administration of sertindole--in contrast to both clozapine and haloperidol--neither reverse d-amphetamine- nor apomorphine-induced inhibition of the firing frequencies of DA neurones in SNC or in VTA. In addition, sertindole does not--even in high doses--increase the firing frequency of DA neurones in SNC or VTA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Characterization of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in acutely isolated adult rat basolateral amygdala neurons.

    PubMed

    McCool, B A; Botting, S K

    2000-03-24

    Large concentrations of the beta-amino acid, taurine, can be found in many forebrain areas such as the basolateral amygdala, a portion of the limbic forebrain intimately associated with the regulation of fear/anxiety-like behaviors. In addition to its cytoprotective and osmoregulatory roles, taurine may also serve as an agonist at GABA(A)- and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. In this latter context, the present study demonstrates that application of taurine to acutely isolated neurons from the basolateral amygdala of adult rats causes significant alterations in resting membrane current, as measured by whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology. Using standard pharmacological approaches, we find that currents gated by concentrations of taurine neurons, these two chloride channels are functionally expressed at comparable levels. Given that a number of clinically relevant compounds are associated with the regulation of GABA(A) receptors in this brain region, the presence of both strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and their agonist, taurine, in the basolateral amygdala may suggest an important role for these receptors in the limbic forebrain of adult rats.

  17. Japanese encephalitis virus infection decrease endogenous IL-10 production: correlation with microglial activation and neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Swarup, Vivek; Ghosh, Joydeep; Duseja, Rachna; Ghosh, Soumya; Basu, Anirban

    2007-06-13

    The anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 is synthesized in the central nervous system (CNS) and acts to limit clinical symptoms of stroke, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, meningitis, and the behavioral changes that occur during bacterial infections. Expression of IL-10 is critical during the course of most major diseases in the CNS and promotes survival of neurons and all glial cells in the brain by blocking the effects of proinflammatory cytokines and by promoting expression of cell survival signals. In order to assess functional importance of this cytokine in viral encephalitis we have exploited an experimental model of Japanese encephalitis (JE). We report for the first time that in Japanese encephalitis, there is a progressive decline in level of IL-10. The extent of progressive decrease in IL-10 level following viral infection is inversely proportional to the increase in the level of proinflammatory cytokines as well as negative consequences that follows viral infection.

  18. Beneficial effects of carnosic acid on dieldrin-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Ae; Kim, Seung; Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Chun-Sung; Kim, Do Kyung; Kim, Sung-Jun; Chun, Hong Sung

    2008-08-27

    Carnosic acid (CA) is one of the bioactive polyphenols present in extracts of the herb rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis). In this study, we examined possible protective effects of CA on neurotoxicity induced by dieldrin, an organochlorine pesticide implicated in sporadic Parkinson's disease, in cultured dopaminergic cells (SN4741). CA (5-10 muM) pretreatment showed potent protective effects in a concentration-related manner and prevented dieldrin (10 muM)-induced caspase-3 activation, Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation, and caspase-12 activation. Furthermore, dieldrin-induced downregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor production was significantly attenuated by CA. These results suggest that CA may safeguard dopaminergic neuronal cells from environmental neurotoxins by enhancing brain-derived neurotrophic factor and repressing apoptotic molecules.

  19. Nitric oxide is the key mediator of death induced by fisetin in human acute monocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ash, Dipankar; Subramanian, Manikandan; Surolia, Avadhesha; Shaha, Chandrima

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to be effective in cancer chemoprevention and therefore drugs that help generate NO would be preferable for combination chemotherapy or solo use. This study shows a new evidence of NO as a mediator of acute leukemia cell death induced by fisetin, a promising chemotherapeutic agent. Fisetin was able to kill THP-1 cells in vivo resulting in tumor shrinkage in the mouse xenograft model. Death induction in vitro was mediated by an increase in NO resulting in double strand DNA breaks and the activation of both the extrinsic and the intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Double strand DNA breaks could be reduced if NO inhibitor was present during fisetin treatment. Fisetin also inhibited the downstream components of the mTORC1 pathway through downregulation of levels of p70 S6 kinase and inducing hypo-phosphorylation of S6 Ri P kinase, eIF4B and eEF2K. NO inhibition restored phosphorylation of downstream effectors of mTORC1 and rescued cells from death. Fisetin induced Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) channels and abrogation of Ca(2+) influx reduced caspase activation and cell death. NO increase and increased Ca(2+) were independent phenomenon. It was inferred that apoptotic death of acute monocytic leukemia cells was induced by fisetin through increased generation of NO and elevated Ca(2+) entry activating the caspase dependent apoptotic pathways. Therefore, manipulation of NO production could be viewed as a potential strategy to increase efficacy of chemotherapy in acute monocytic leukemia.

  20. Nitric oxide is the key mediator of death induced by fisetin in human acute monocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Dipankar; Subramanian, Manikandan; Surolia, Avadhesha; Shaha, Chandrima

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to be effective in cancer chemoprevention and therefore drugs that help generate NO would be preferable for combination chemotherapy or solo use. This study shows a new evidence of NO as a mediator of acute leukemia cell death induced by fisetin, a promising chemotherapeutic agent. Fisetin was able to kill THP-1 cells in vivo resulting in tumor shrinkage in the mouse xenograft model. Death induction in vitro was mediated by an increase in NO resulting in double strand DNA breaks and the activation of both the extrinsic and the intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Double strand DNA breaks could be reduced if NO inhibitor was present during fisetin treatment. Fisetin also inhibited the downstream components of the mTORC1 pathway through downregulation of levels of p70 S6 kinase and inducing hypo-phosphorylation of S6 Ri P kinase, eIF4B and eEF2K. NO inhibition restored phosphorylation of downstream effectors of mTORC1 and rescued cells from death. Fisetin induced Ca2+ entry through L-type Ca2+ channels and abrogation of Ca2+ influx reduced caspase activation and cell death. NO increase and increased Ca2+ were independent phenomenon. It was inferred that apoptotic death of acute monocytic leukemia cells was induced by fisetin through increased generation of NO and elevated Ca2+ entry activating the caspase dependent apoptotic pathways. Therefore, manipulation of NO production could be viewed as a potential strategy to increase efficacy of chemotherapy in acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:25973292

  1. Evaluation of Acute Alcohol Intoxication as the Primary Cause of Death: A Diagnostic Challenge for Forensic Pathologists.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Hu, Li; Hu, Lingli; Zhang, Xiang; Phipps, Rebecca; Fowler, David R; Chen, Feng; Li, Ling

    2017-01-25

    Deaths caused by acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) remain a major public health issue. This study is retrospective and descriptive: an 8-year case analysis of deaths due to AAI in Maryland. Study showed that of 150 AAI deaths, the death rate among Hispanics (10.41/100,000 population) was significantly higher than all the non-Hispanics combined (1.88/100,000 population). The majority of individuals were young adults, overweight, and binge drinkers. The obese group showed significantly lower mean heart and peripheral blood alcohol concentration (BAC) (0.36%, 0.37%) than the normal weight group (0.45%, 0.42%). Based on the PBAC and urine AC ratio, 49.6% deaths likely occurred close to peak phase, followed by postabsorptive phase (31.6%) and absorptive phase (18.8%). Our results indicate that forensic pathologists should evaluate postmortem BAC in the light of individual's age, drinking history, body weight, possible phase of alcohol intoxication, and other autopsy findings when certifying AAI as primary cause of death.

  2. Epigenetic intervention with a BET inhibitor ameliorates acute retinal ganglion cell death in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Lei; Urabe, Go; Fu, Yingmei

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The bromo and extraterminal (BET) epigenetic “reader” family is becoming an appealing new therapeutic target for several common diseases, yet little is known of its role in retinal neurodegeneration. We explored the potential of BET inhibition in the protection of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Methods To test the therapeutic effect of JQ1, an inhibitor highly selective for the BET family of proteins, we used an acute RGC damage model induced by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) excitotoxicity. Adult C57BL/6 mice received an intravitreal injection of NMDA with (or without) JQ1 in one eye and vehicle control in the contralateral eye; RGC loss was assessed on retinal sections and whole mounts. Gene expression and apoptosis were analyzed by quantitative real time (RT)-PCR and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), respectively. For counting RGCs, immunostaining of the marker protein BRN3A was performed on whole mounts. Results NMDA treatment eliminated RGCs (day 7 and day 14 post injection) and diminished the expression (mRNAs) of RGC-selective genes, including Thy1, Nrn1, Sncg, and Nfl (day 3 and day 7). In contrast, co-injection with JQ1 maintained the number and gene expression of RGCs at ~2 fold of the control (NMDA only, no JQ1), and it decreased NMDA-induced TUNEL-positive cells in the RGC layer by 35%. While NMDA treatment dramatically upregulated mRNAs of inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-1β, MCP-1, RANTES) in retinal homogenates, co-injection with JQ1 suppressed their upregulation by ~50%. Conclusions Intravitreal injection of a BET inhibitor (JQ1) ameliorates NMDA-induced RGC death, revealing the RGC-protective potential of pharmacological blockage of the BET family. This new strategy of epigenetic intervention may be extended to other retinal degenerative conditions. PMID:28356707

  3. The clinical challenge of preventing sudden cardiac death immediately after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Manolis, Antonis S

    2014-12-01

    Unfortunately, of all patients experiencing acute myocardial infarction (MI), usually in the form of ST-elevation MI, 25-35% will die of sudden cardiac death (SCD) before receiving medical attention, most often from ventricular fibrillation. For patients who reach the hospital, prognosis is considerably better and has improved over the years. Reperfusion therapy, best attained with primary percutaneous coronary intervention compared to thrombolysis, has made a big difference in reducing the risk of SCD early and late after ST-elevation MI. In-hospital SCD due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias is manageable, with either preventive measures or drugs or electrical cardioversion. There is general agreement for secondary prevention of SCD post-MI with implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) when malignant ventricular arrhythmias occur late (>48 h) after an MI, and are not due to reversible or correctable causes. The major challenge remains that of primary prevention, that is, how to prevent SCD during the first 1-3 months after ST-elevation MI for patients who have low left ventricular ejection fraction and are not candidates for an ICD according to current guidelines, due to the results of two studies, which did not show any benefits of early (<40 days after an MI) ICD implantation. Two recent documents may provide direction as to how to bridge the gap for this early post-MI period. Both recommend an electrophysiology study to guide implantation of an ICD, at least for those developing syncope or non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, who have an inducible sustained ventricular tachycardia at the electrophysiology study. An ICD is also recommended for patients with indication for a permanent pacemaker due to bradyarrhythmias, who also meet primary prevention criteria for SCD.

  4. Complex II inhibition by 3-NP causes mitochondrial fragmentation and neuronal cell death via an NMDA- and ROS-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liot, G; Bossy, B; Lubitz, S; Kushnareva, Y; Sejbuk, N; Bossy-Wetzel, E

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory complex II inhibition plays a central role in Huntington’s disease (HD). Remarkably, 3-NP, a complex II inhibitor, recapitulates HD-like symptoms. Furthermore, decreases in mitochondrial fusion or increases in mitochondrial fission have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. However, the relationship between mitochondrial energy defects and mitochondrial dynamics has never been explored in detail. In addition, the mechanism of neuronal cell death by complex II inhibition remains unclear. Here, we tested the temporal and spatial relationship between energy decline, impairment of mitochondrial dynamics, and neuronal cell death in response to 3-NP using quantitative fluorescence time-lapse microscopy and cortical neurons. 3-NP caused an immediate drop in ATP. This event corresponded with a mild rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS), but mitochondrial morphology remained unaltered. Unexpectedly, several hours after this initial phase, a second dramatic rise in ROS occurred, associated with profound mitochondrial fission characterized by the conversion of filamentous to punctate mitochondria and neuronal cell death. Glutamate receptor antagonist AP5 abolishes the second peak in ROS, mitochondrial fission, and cell death. Thus, secondary excitotoxicity, mediated by glutamate receptor activation of the NMDA subtype, and consequent oxidative and nitrosative stress cause mitochondrial fission, rather than energy deficits per se. These results improve our understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying HD pathogenesis. PMID:19300456

  5. Neuronal cells but not muscle cells are resistant to oxidative stress mediated protein misfolding and cell death: role of molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Wei, Rochelle; Hamilton, Ryan T; Chaudhuri, Asish R

    2014-04-18

    Our recent study in a mouse model of familial-Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (f-ALS) revealed that muscle proteins are equally sensitive to misfolding as spinal cord proteins despite the presence of low mutant CuZn-superoxide dismutase, which is considered to be the key toxic element for initiation and progression of f-ALS. More importantly, we observed differential level of heat shock proteins (Hsp's) between skeletal muscle and spinal cord tissues prior to the onset and during disease progression; spinal cord maintains significantly higher level of Hsp's compared to skeletal muscle. In this study, we report two important observations; (i) muscle cells (but not neuronal cells) are extremely vulnerable to protein misfolding and cell death during challenge with oxidative stress and (ii) muscle cells fail to mount Hsp's during challenge unlike neuronal cells. These two findings can possibly explain why muscle atrophy precedes the death of motor neurons in f-ALS mice.

  6. Death-associated protein kinase-mediated cell death modulated by interaction with DANGER.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bingnan N; Ahmad, Abdullah S; Saleem, Sofiyan; Patterson, Randen L; Hester, Lynda; Doré, Sylvain; Snyder, Solomon H

    2010-01-06

    Death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) is a key player in multiple cell death signaling pathways. We report that DAPK is regulated by DANGER, a partial MAB-21 domain-containing protein. DANGER binds directly to DAPK and inhibits DAPK catalytic activity. DANGER-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts and neurons exhibit greater DAPK activity and increased sensitivity to cell death stimuli than do wild-type control cells. In addition, DANGER-deficient mice manifest more severe brain damage after acute excitotoxicity and transient cerebral ischemia than do control mice. Accordingly, DANGER may physiologically regulate the viability of neurons and represent a potential therapeutic target for stroke and neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Suppression of autophagy precipitates neuronal cell death following low doses of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Castino, Roberta; Lazzeri, Gloria; Lenzi, Paola; Bellio, Natascia; Follo, Carlo; Ferrucci, Michela; Fornai, Francesco; Isidoro, Ciro

    2008-08-01

    Methamphetamine abuse is toxic to dopaminergic neurons, causing nigrostriatal denervation and striatal dopamine loss. Following methamphetamine exposure, the number of nigral cell bodies is generally preserved, but their cytoplasm features autophagic-like vacuolization and cytoplasmic accumulation of alpha-synuclein-, ubiquitin- and parkin-positive inclusion-like bodies. Whether autophagy is epiphenomenal or it plays a role in the mechanism of methamphetamine toxicity and, in the latter case, whether its role consists of counteracting or promoting the neurotoxic effect remains obscure. We investigated the signaling pathway and the significance (protective vs. toxic) of autophagy activation and the convergence of the autophagic and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathways at the level of the same intracellular bodies in a simple cell model of methamphetamine toxicity. We show that autophagy is rapidly up-regulated in response to methamphetamine. Confocal fluorescence microscopy and immuno-electron microscopy studies demonstrated the presence of alpha-synuclein aggregates in autophagy-lysosomal structures in cells exposed to methamphetamine, a condition compatible with cell survival. Inhibition of autophagy either by pharmacologic or genetic manipulation of the class III Phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-mediated signaling prevented the removal of alpha-synuclein aggregates and precipitated a bax-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis pathway.

  8. DJ-1-dependent protective activity of DJ-1-binding compound no. 23 against neuronal cell death in MPTP-treated mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Inafune, Ayako; Michitani, Naruyuki; Hatakeyama, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Kotaro; Sasaki, Mai; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Niki, Takeshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by dopaminergic cell death in the substantia nigra, leading to a reduced level of dopamine in the striatum. Oxidative stress is one of the causes of PD. Since symptomatic PD therapies are used, identification of compounds or proteins that inhibit oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death is necessary. DJ-1 is a causative gene product of familial PD and plays a role in anti-oxidative stress reaction. We have identified various DJ-1-binding compounds, including compound-23, that restored neuronal cell death and locomotion defects observed in neurotoxin-induced PD models. In this study, wild-type and DJ-1-knockout mice were injected intraperitoneally with 1 mg/kg of compound-23 and then with 30 mg/kg of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) at 1 h after injection. Five days after administration, the effects of compound-23 on MPTP-induced locomotion deficits, on dopaminergic cell death and on brain dopamine levels were analyzed by rotor rod tests, by staining cells with an anti-TH antibody and by an HPLC, respectively. The results showed that compound-23 inhibited MPTP-induced reduction of retention time on the rotor rod bar, neuronal cell death in the substantia nigra and striatum and dopamine content in wild-type mice but not in DJ-1-knockout mice, indicating a DJ-1-dependent effect of compound-23.

  9. Vitamin B-6 nutrition, 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK), and neuronal cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, C.L.; Guilarte, T.R. )

    1990-02-26

    Neonatal vitamin B-6 restriction results in CNS neurochemical and neuropathological impairment including ataxia, tremor, and seizures. Coincident with the onset of neurological signs, there is a dramatic increase in the CNS levels of 3HK, an endogenous tryptophan metabolite which has been reported to possess convulsant and cytotoxic properties. Previous studies have shown that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} plays a critical role in 3HK toxicity. In 3HK exposed cell cultures, toxic levels of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} may be produced intracellularly by the action of cellular oxidases or on either side of the cell membrane by iron-catalyzed autooxidation of 3HK. Alternatively, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} may be required as a cosubstrate for the peroxidative oxidation of 3HK to a toxic quinoneimine. In order to address the issue of the site and mode of action of 3HK toxicity, the authors have examined the effects of treatments administered before and after exposure to 3HK such that their effects must reflect actions confined within the intracellular compartment. The results show that the toxicity of 3HK was attenuated by post-treatment with catalase and by pre-treatment with desferrioxamine or horseradish peroxidase. These results support a direct role for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in 3HK toxicity and suggest that cell death results from toxic levels of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the intracellular compartment.

  10. Electrophysiological and Morphological Characterization of Neuronal Microcircuits in Acute Brain Slices Using Paired Patch-Clamp Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Guanxiao; Radnikow, Gabriele; Feldmeyer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The combination of patch clamp recordings from two (or more) synaptically coupled neurons (paired recordings) in acute brain slice preparations with simultaneous intracellular biocytin filling allows a correlated analysis of their structural and functional properties. With this method it is possible to identify and characterize both pre- and postsynaptic neurons by their morphology and electrophysiological response pattern. Paired recordings allow studying the connectivity patterns between these neurons as well as the properties of both chemical and electrical synaptic transmission. Here, we give a step-by-step description of the procedures required to obtain reliable paired recordings together with an optimal recovery of the neuron morphology. We will describe how pairs of neurons connected via chemical synapses or gap junctions are identified in brain slice preparations. We will outline how neurons are reconstructed to obtain their 3D morphology of the dendritic and axonal domain and how synaptic contacts are identified and localized. We will also discuss the caveats and limitations of the paired recording technique, in particular those associated with dendritic and axonal truncations during the preparation of brain slices because these strongly affect connectivity estimates. However, because of the versatility of the paired recording approach it will remain a valuable tool in characterizing different aspects of synaptic transmission at identified neuronal microcircuits in the brain. PMID:25650985

  11. Topiramate attenuates early brain injury following subarachnoid haemorrhage in rats via duplex protection against inflammation and neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yong; Guo, Song-Xue; Li, Jian-Ru; Du, Hang-Gen; Wang, Chao-Hui; Zhang, Jian-Min; Wu, Qun

    2015-10-05

    Early brain injury (EBI) following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) insults contributes to the poor prognosis and high mortality observed in SAH patients. Topiramate (TPM) is a novel, broad-spectrum, antiepileptic drug with a reported protective effect against several brain injuries. The current study aimed to investigate the potential of TPM for neuroprotection against EBI after SAH and the possible dose-dependency of this effect. An endovascular perforation SAH model was established in rats, and TPM was administered by intraperitoneal injection after surgery at three different doses (20mg/kg, 40mg/kg, and 80mg/kg). The animals' neurological scores and brain water content were evaluated, and ELISA, Western blotting and immunostaining assays were conducted to assess the effect of TPM. The results revealed that TPM lowers the elevated levels of myeloperoxidase and proinflammatory mediators observed after SAH in a dose-related fashion, and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathway is the target of neuroinflammation regulation. In addition, TPM ameliorated SAH-induced cortical neuronal apoptosis by influencing Bax, Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 protein expression, and the effect of TPM was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. Various dosages of TPM also upregulated the protein expression of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic signalling molecules, GABAA receptor (GABAAR) α1, GABAAR γ2, and K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 2 (KCC2) together and downregulated Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 1 (NKCC1) expression. Thus, TPM may be an effective neuroprotectant in EBI after SAH by regulating neuroinflammation and neuronal cell death.

  12. Ovarian hormone deficiency reduces intrinsic excitability and abolishes acute estrogen sensitivity in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wendy W.; Adelman, John P.; Maylie, James

    2011-01-01

    Premature and uncompensated loss of ovarian hormones following ovariectomy (OVX) elevates the risks of cognitive impairment and dementia. These risks are prevented with estrogen (E2)-containing hormone replacement therapy initiated shortly following OVX but not after substantial delay. Currently the cellular bases underlying these clinical findings are unknown. At the cellular level, intrinsic membrane properties regulate the efficiency of synaptic inputs to initiate output action potentials (APs), thereby affecting neuronal communication hence cognitive processing. This study tested the hypothesis that in CA1 pyramidal neurons, intrinsic membrane properties and their acute regulation by E2 require ovarian hormones for maintenance. Whole-cell current clamp recordings were performed on neurons from ~7 months old OVX rats that experienced either short-term (10 days, control OVX) or long-term (5 months, OVXLT) ovarian hormone deficiency. The results reveal that long-term hormone deficiency reduced intrinsic membrane excitability (IE) as measured by the number of evoked action potentials (APs) and firing duration for a given current injection. This was accompanied by AP broadening, an increased slow afterhyperpolarization (sAHP), and faster accumulation of NaV channel inactivation during repetitive firing. In the control OVX neurons, E2 acutely increased IE and reduced the sAHP. In contrast, acute regulation of IE by E2 was absent in the OVXLT neurons. Since the degree of IE of hippocampal pyramidal neurons is positively related with hippocampus-dependent learning ability, and modulation of IE is observed following successful learning, these findings provide a framework for understanding hormone deficiency-related cognitive impairment and the critical window for therapy initiation. PMID:21325532

  13. Acute neurotoxic effects of mancozeb and maneb in mesencephalic neuronal cultures are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Domico, Lisa M; Zeevalk, Gail D; Bernard, Laura P; Cooper, Keith R

    2006-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that exposure to agrochemicals may contribute to the development of idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Maneb (MB), a widely used Mn-containing ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate (EBDC) fungicide, has been implicated in selective dopaminergic neurotoxicity. In this study, we examine the potential neurotoxicity of mancozeb (MZ), a widely used EBDC fungicide that is structurally similar to MB, but contains both Zn and Mn. Primary mesencephalic cells isolated from Sprague-Dawley embryonic day 15 rat embryos were exposed in vitro to either MZ or MB to compare their cytotoxic potential. Exposure to 10-120 microM MZ or MB for 24h resulted in a dose-dependent toxicity in both the dopamine (DA) and GABA mesencephalic populations as assessed by a functional assay for high affinity transporter activity. Consistent with this, cell viability as well as tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons decreased with increasing doses of MZ or MB. Toxic potencies for MZ and MB were similar and no difference in sensitivity between the DA and GABA populations was observed with the fungicides. Exposure to ethylene thiourea, the major metabolite of either MZ or MB, was not toxic, implicating the parent compound in toxicity. Both the organic and Mn metal components of the fungicides were found to contribute to toxicity. Non-toxic exposures to the fungicides decreased ATP levels in a dose-dependent manner suggesting impairment of energy metabolism. In whole mitochondrial preparations isolated from adult rat brains, MZ and MB inhibited NADH-linked state 3 respiration. Mild to moderate mitochondrial uncoupling was also observed in response to the fungicides. In conclusion, our findings indicate that acute exposure to high doses of MZ and MB produce equipotent toxic effects in both DA and GABA neurons that may be associated with perturbations in mitochondrial respiration.

  14. Examination of the influence of leptin and acute metabolic challenge on RFRP-3 neurons of mice in development and adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Poling, Matthew C.; Shieh, Morris P.; Munaganuru, Nagambika; Luo, Elena; Kauffman, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The neuropeptide RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP-3; mammalian ortholog to GnIH) can inhibit LH release and increases feeding, but the regulation and development of RFRP-3 neurons remains poorly characterized, especially in mice. Methods and Results We first confirmed that peripheral injections of murine RFRP-3 peptide could markedly suppress luteinizing hormone secretion in adult mice, as in other species. Second, given RFRP-3′s reported orexigenic properties, we performed double-label in situ hybridization for metabolic genes in Rfrp neurons of mice. While Rfrp neurons did not readily co-express NPY, TRH, or MC4R, a small subset of Rfrp neurons did express leptin receptor in both sexes. Surprisingly, we identified no changes in Rfrp expression or neuronal activation in adult mice after acute fasting. However, we determined that Rfrp mRNA levels in the DMN were significantly reduced in adult Obese (Ob) mice of both sexes. Given the lower Rfrp levels observed in adult Ob mice, we asked whether leptin might also regulate RFRP-3 neuron development. Rfrp gene expression changed markedly over juvenile development, correlating with the timing of the juvenile “leptin surge” known to govern hypothalamic feeding circuit development. However, the dramatic developmental changes in juvenile Rfrp expression did not appear to be leptin-driven, as the pattern and timing of Rfrp neuron development were unaltered in Ob juveniles. Conclusion Leptin status modulates RFRP-3 expression in adulthood, but is not required for normal development of the RFRP-3 system. Leptin's regulation of adult RFRP-3 neurons likely occurs via primarily indirect signaling, and may be secondary to obesity, as only a small subset of RFRP-3 neurons express LepRb. PMID:25378037

  15. INTERDISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Instability and Death of Spiral Wave in a Two-Dimensional Array of Hindmarsh-Rose Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Ni; Ma, Jun; Tang, Jun; Li, Yan-Long

    2010-02-01

    Spiral wave could be observed in the excitable media, the neurons are often excitable within appropriate parameters. The appearance and formation of spiral wave in the cardiac tissue is linked to monomorphic ventricular tachycardia that can denervate into polymorphic tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. The neuronal system often consists of a large number of neurons with complex connections. In this paper, we theoretically study the transition from spiral wave to spiral turbulence and homogeneous state (death of spiral wave) in two-dimensional array of the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron with completely nearest-neighbor connections. In our numerical studies, a stable rotating spiral wave is developed and selected as the initial state, then the bifurcation parameters are changed to different values to observe the transition from spiral wave to homogeneous state, breakup of spiral wave and weak change of spiral wave, respectively. A statistical factor of synchronization is defined with the mean field theory to analyze the transition from spiral wave to other spatial states, and the snapshots of the membrane potentials of all neurons and time series of mean membrane potentials of all neurons are also plotted to discuss the change of spiral wave. It is found that the sharp changing points in the curve for factor of synchronization vs. bifurcation parameter indicate sudden transition from spiral wave to other states. And the results are independent of the number of neurons we used.

  16. The novel marker LTBP2 predicts all-cause and pulmonary death in patients with acute dyspnoea.

    PubMed

    Breidthardt, Tobias; Vanpoucke, Griet; Potocki, Mihael; Mosimann, Tamina; Ziller, Ronny; Thomas, Gregoire; Laroy, Wouter; Moerman, Piet; Socrates, Thenral; Drexler, Beatrice; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Kas, Koen; Mueller, Christian

    2012-11-01

    The risk stratification in patients presenting with acute dyspnoea remains a challenge. We therefore conducted a prospective, observational cohort study enrolling 292 patients presenting to the emergency department with acute dyspnoea. A proteomic approach for antibody-free targeted protein quantification based on high-end MS was used to measure LTBP2 [latent TGF (transforming growth factor)-binding protein 2] levels. Final diagnosis and death during follow-up were adjudicated blinded to LTBP2 levels. AHF (acute heart failure) was the final diagnosis in 54% of patients. In both AHF (P<0.001) and non-AHF (P=0.015) patients, LTBP2 levels at presentation were significantly higher in non-survivors compared with survivors with differences on median levels being 2.2- and 1.5-fold respectively. When assessing the cause of death, LTBP2 levels were significantly higher in patients dying from pulmonary causes (P=0.0005). Overall, LTBP2 powerfully predicted early pulmonary death {AUC (area under the curve), 0.95 [95% CI (confidence interval), 0.91-0.98]}. In ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve analyses for the prediction of 1-year mortality LTBP2 achieved an AUC of 0.77 (95% CI, 0.71-0.84); comparable with the predictive potential of NT-proBNP [N-terminal pro-B-type natriuruetic peptide; 0.77 (95% CI, 0.72-0.82)]. Importantly, the predictive potential of LTBP2 persisted in patients with AHF as the cause of dypnea (AUC 0.78) and was independent of renal dysfunction (AUC 0.77). In a multivariate Cox regression analysis, LTBP2 was the strongest independent predictor of death [HR (hazard ratio), 3.76 (95% CI, 2.13-6.64); P<0.0001]. In conclusion, plasma levels of LTBP2 present a novel and powerful predictor of all-cause mortality, and particularly pulmonary death. Cause-specific prediction of death would enable targeted prevention, e.g. with pre-emptive antibiotic therapy.

  17. Causes of death in patients ≥75 years of age with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morici, Nuccia; Savonitto, Stefano; Murena, Ernesto; Antonicelli, Roberto; Piovaccari, Giancarlo; Tucci, Daniele; Tamburino, Corrado; Fontanelli, Alessandro; Bolognese, Leonardo; Menozzi, Mila; Cavallini, Claudio; Petronio, Anna Sonia; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Piscione, Federico; Steffenino, Giuseppe; De Servi, Stefano

    2013-07-01

    The causes of death within 1 year of hospital admission in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes are ill defined, particularly in patients aged ≥75 years. From January 2008 through May 2010, we enrolled 645 patients aged ≥75 years with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes: 313 in a randomized trial comparing an early aggressive versus an initially conservative approach, and 332, excluded from the trial for specific reasons, in a parallel registry. Each death occurring during 1 year of follow-up was adjudicated by an independent committee. The mean age was 82 years in both study cohorts, and 53% were men. By the end of the follow-up period (median 369 days, interquartile range 345 to 391), 120 patients (18.6%) had died. The mortality was significantly greater in the registry (23.8% vs 13.1%, p = 0.001). The deaths were classified as cardiac in 94% of the cases during the index admission and 68% of the cases during the follow-up period. Eighty-six percent of the cardiac deaths were of ischemic origin. In a multivariate logistic regression model that included the variables present on admission in the whole study population, the ejection fraction (hazard ratio 0.95, 95% confidence interval 0.94 to 0.97; p <0.001), hemoglobin level (hazard ratio 0.85, 95% confidence interval 0.76 to 0.94; p = 0.001), older age (hazard ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.10, p = 0.010), and creatinine clearance (hazard ratio 0.99, 95% confidence interval 0.97 to 0.99; p = 0.030) were the independent predictors of all-cause death at 1 year. In conclusion, within 1 year after admission for non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes, most deaths in patients aged ≥75 years have a cardiac origin, mostly owing to myocardial ischemia.

  18. Clinical trial (GUSTO-1 and INJECT) evidence of earlier death for men than women after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Rieves, D; Wright, G; Gupta, G; Shacter, E

    2000-01-15

    Epidemiologic studies of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have described gender differences in the time of death after infarction, with greater numbers of men dying before hospitalization than women. However, in controlled, hospital-based clinical trials, women die at higher rates than men. We hypothesized that evidence of a gender difference in the time of death following AMI may be found in controlled studies of hospitalized AMI patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of the Global Utilization of Streptokinase and Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Occluded Coronary Arteries (GUSTO-1) and International Joint Efficacy Comparison of Thrombolytics (INJECT) trial databases using logistic regression modeling and time-to-death analyses. The age-adjusted female-to-male odds ratio for mortality was 1.4 (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 1.5) in GUSTO-1 and 1.5 (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 1.8) in INJECT. GUSTO-1 showed that among patients dying during the first 24 hours after symptom onset, men died an average of 1.7 hours earlier than women (p<0.001). This difference was due to earlier deaths among men < or =65 years of age. Furthermore, in GUSTO-1, the analysis of time to death in hour increments demonstrated that greater proportions of men died at earlier time points than women and a disproportionate number of early deaths occurred among younger men than among women of any age or older men. In INJECT, where time to death could only be analyzed in 1-day increments, no gender differences were evident. These results raise the possibility that the pattern of earlier death for men in thrombolytic clinical trials represents the continuation of a gender-specific mortality pattern that began before hospitalization. The death of a disproportionate number of men before hospitalization may represent an inherent gender bias for clinical studies enrolling only hospitalized patients. More high-risk men would be excluded from these studies than women because of death before

  19. Influences of nanoparticle zinc oxide on acutely isolated rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingxia; Xu, Lanju; Zhang, Tao; Ren, Guogang; Yang, Zhuo

    2009-03-01

    The effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles (nano-ZnO) on the properties of voltage-dependent sodium, potassium currents and evoked action potentials were studied in acutely isolated rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons at postnatal ages of 10-14 days rats using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The results indicated that: (1) in the present of final concentration of 10(-4)g/ml nano-ZnO, the current-voltage curve of sodium current (I(Na)) was decreased, and the peak amplitudes of I(Na) were increased considerably from -50 to +20mV (p<0.05). Meanwhile, the inactivation and the recovery from inactivation of I(Na) were also promoted by the nano-ZnO solution (10(-4)g/ml) (p<0.01). However, the steady-state activation curve of I(Na) was not shifted by the nano-ZnO. (2) The amplitudes of transient outward potassium current (I(A)) were increased by the nano-ZnO solution (10(-4)g/ml), while the current-voltage curve of delayed rectifier potassium current (I(K)) was significantly increased from +20 to +90mV (p<0.05). However, it is apparent that the nano-ZnO solution did not shift the steady-state activation curve of I(A) and I(K), and neither had significant effects on the inactivation and the recovery from inactivation of I(A). (3) Peak amplitude and overshoot of the evoked single action potential were increased and half-width was diminished in the presence of the 10(-4)g/ml nano-ZnO solution (p<0.05). Simultaneously, a prolonged depolarizing current injection enhanced (p<0.05) repetitive firing evoked firing rate. These results suggested that 10(-4)g/ml nano-ZnO solution can lead to an enhancement in the current amplitudes of I(Na) and I(K) by increasing the opening number of sodium channels, delaying rectifier potassium channels, and enhancing the excitability of neurons, which lead to Na(+) influx and the accumulation of intracellular Na(+), as well as K(+) efflux plus the loss of cytoplasmic K(+). These may disturb the ionic homeostasis and the physiological

  20. Proteolytic activation of proapoptotic kinase protein kinase Cδ by tumor necrosis factor α death receptor signaling in dopaminergic neurons during neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The mechanisms of progressive dopaminergic neuronal loss in Parkinson’s disease (PD) remain poorly understood, largely due to the complex etiology and multifactorial nature of disease pathogenesis. Several lines of evidence from human studies and experimental models over the last decade have identified neuroinflammation as a potential pathophysiological mechanism contributing to disease progression. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) has recently emerged as the primary neuroinflammatory mediator that can elicit dopaminergic cell death in PD. However, the signaling pathways by which TNF mediates dopaminergic cell death have not been completely elucidated. Methods In this study we used a dopaminergic neuronal cell model and recombinant TNF to characterize intracellular signaling pathways activated during TNF-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Etanercept and neutralizing antibodies to tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) were used to block TNF signaling. We confirmed the results from our mechanistic studies in primary embryonic mesencephalic cultures and in vivo using the stereotaxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) model of nigral dopaminergic degeneration. Results TNF signaling in dopaminergic neuronal cells triggered the activation of protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), an isoform of the novel PKC family, by caspase-3 and caspase-8 dependent proteolytic cleavage. Both TNFR1 neutralizing antibodies and the soluble TNF receptor Etanercept blocked TNF-induced PKCδ proteolytic activation. Proteolytic activation of PKCδ was accompanied by translocation of the kinase to the nucleus. Notably, inhibition of PKCδ signaling by small interfering (si)RNA or overexpression of a PKCδ cleavage-resistant mutant protected against TNF-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death. Further, primary dopaminergic neurons obtained from PKCδ knockout (−/−) mice were resistant to TNF toxicity. The proteolytic activation of PKCδ in the mouse substantia nigra in the neuroinflammatory LPS

  1. Protective effect of the green tea component, L-theanine on environmental toxins-induced neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hong-Suk; Kim, Seung; Lee, Sook-Young; Park, Jeong Ae; Kim, Sung-Jun; Chun, Hong Sung

    2008-07-01

    Several environmental neurotoxins and oxidative stress inducers are known to damage the nervous system and are considered major factors associated with the selective vulnerability of nigral dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). Gamma-glutamylethylamide (L-theanine), a natural glutamate analog in green tea, has been shown to exert strong anti-ischemic effect. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of L-theanine on neurotoxicity induced by PD-related neurotoxicants, rotenone and dieldrin in cultured human dopaminergic cell line, SH-SY5Y. Our initial experiments revealed that L-theanine (500 microM) attenuated both rotenone- and dieldrin-induced DNA fragmentation and apoptotic death in SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, L-theanine partially prevented both rotenone- and dieldrin-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) up-regulation. Both rotenone- and dieldrin-induced down-regulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation was significantly blocked by pretreatment with L-theanine. Furthermore, pretreatment with L-theanine significantly attenuated the down-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) production in SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that L-theanine directly provide neuroprotection against PD-related neurotoxicants and may be clinically useful for preventing PD symptoms.

  2. Protective effects of bupivacaine against kainic acid-induced seizure and neuronal cell death in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Kuan Ming; Wu, Chia Chan; Wang, Ming Jiuh; Lee, Ming Yi; Wang, Su Jane

    2015-01-01

    The excessive release of glutamate is a critical element in the neuropathology of epilepsy, and bupivacaine, a local anesthetic agent, has been shown to inhibit the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals. This study investigated whether bupivacaine produces antiseizure and antiexcitotoxic effects using a kainic acid (KA) rat model, an animal model used for temporal lobe epilepsy, and excitotoxic neurodegeneration experiments. The results showed that administering bupivacaine (0.4 mg/kg or 2 mg/kg) intraperitoneally to rats 30 min before intraperitoneal injection of KA (15 mg/kg) increased seizure latency and reduced the seizure score. In addition, bupivacaine attenuated KA-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death, and this protective effect was accompanied by the inhibition of microglial activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus. Moreover, bupivacaine shortened the latency of escaping onto the platform in the Morris water maze learning performance test. Collectively, these data suggest that bupivacaine has therapeutic potential for treating epilepsy.

  3. Crosstalk between 2 organelles: Lysosomal storage of heparan sulfate causes mitochondrial defects and neuronal death in mucopolysaccharidosis III type C

    PubMed Central

    Pshezhetsky, Alexey V

    2015-01-01

    More than 30% of all lysosomal diseases are mucopolysaccharidoses, disorders affecting the enzymes needed for the stepwise degradation of glycosaminoglycans (mucopolysaccharides). Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIC (MPS IIIC) is a severe neurologic disease caused by genetic deficiency of heparan sulfate acetyl-CoA: α-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase (HGSNAT). Through our studies, we have cloned the gene, identified molecular defects in MPS IIIC patients and most recently completed phenotypic characterization of the first animal model of the disease, a mouse with a germline inactivation of the Hgsnat gene.1 The obtained data have led us to propose that Hgsnat deficiency and lysosomal accumulation of heparan sulfate in microglial cells followed by their activation and cytokine release result in mitochondrial dysfunction in the neurons causing their death which explains why MPS IIIC manifests primarily as a neurodegenerative disease. The goal of this addendum is to summarize data yielding new insights into the mechanism of MPS IIIC and promising novel therapeutic solutions for this and similar disorders. PMID:26459666

  4. The regulation of p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis by JNK/c-Jun pathway in β-amyloid-induced neuron death.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Rumana; Sanphui, Priyankar; Das, Hrishita; Saha, Pampa; Biswas, Subhas Chandra

    2015-09-01

    Neuronal loss in selective areas of brain underlies the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent evidences place oligomeric β-amyloid (Aβ) central to the disease. However, mechanism of neuron death in response to Aβ remains elusive. Activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway and induction of the AP-1 transcription factor c-Jun are reported in AD. However, targets of JNK/c-Jun in Aβ-induced neuron death are mostly unknown. Our study shows that pro-apoptotic proteins, Bim (Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death) and Puma (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis) are targets of c-Jun in Aβ-treated neurons. We demonstrate that the JNK/c-Jun pathway is activated, in cultures of cortical neurons following treatment with oligomeric Aβ and in AD transgenic mice, and that inhibition of this pathway by selective inhibitor blocks induction of Puma by Aβ. We also find that both JNK and p53 pathways co-operatively regulate Puma expression in Aβ-treated neurons. Moreover, we identified a novel AP1-binding site on rat puma gene which is necessary for direct binding of c-Jun with Puma promoter. Finally, we find that knocking down of c-Jun by siRNA provides significant protection from Aβ toxicity and that induction of Bim and Puma by Aβ in neurons requires c-Jun. Taken together, our results suggest that both Bim and Puma are target of c-Jun and elucidate the intricate regulation of Puma expression by JNK/c-Jun and p53 pathways in neurons upon Aβ toxicity. JNK/c-Jun pathway is shown to be activated in neurons of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain and plays a vital role in neuron death in AD models. However, downstream targets of c-Jun in this disease have not been thoroughly elucidated. Our study shows that two important pro-apoptotic proteins, Bim (Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death) and Puma (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis) are targets of c-Jun in Aβ-treated neurons. We demonstrate that the JNK/c-jun pathway is activated, in cultures

  5. Hsp27 binding to the 3'UTR of bim mRNA prevents neuronal death during oxidative stress-induced injury: a novel cytoprotective mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dávila, David; Jiménez-Mateos, Eva M; Mooney, Claire M; Velasco, Guillermo; Henshall, David C; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2014-11-01

    Neurons face a changeable microenvironment and therefore need mechanisms that allow rapid switch on/off of their cytoprotective and apoptosis-inducing signaling pathways. Cellular mechanisms that control apoptosis activation include the regulation of pro/antiapoptotic mRNAs through their 3'-untranslated region (UTR). This region holds binding elements for RNA-binding proteins, which can control mRNA translation. Here we demonstrate that heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) prevents oxidative stress-induced cell death in cerebellar granule neurons by specific regulation of the mRNA for the proapoptotic BH3-only protein, Bim. Hsp27 depletion induced by oxidative stress using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) correlated with bim gene activation and subsequent neuronal death, whereas enhanced Hsp27 expression prevented these. This effect could not be explained by proteasomal degradation of Bim or bim promoter inhibition; however, it was associated with a specific increase in the levels of bim mRNA and with its binding to Hsp27. Finally, we determined that enhanced Hsp27 expression in neurons exposed to H2O2 or glutamate prevented the translation of a reporter plasmid where bim-3'UTR mRNA sequence was cloned downstream of a luciferase gene. These results suggest that repression of bim mRNA translation through binding to the 3'UTR constitutes a novel cytoprotective mechanism of Hsp27 during stress in neurons.

  6. Increase of galectin-3 expression in microglia by hyperthermia in delayed neuronal death of hippocampal CA1 following transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kunio; Niwa, Masayuki; Binh, Nguyen Huy; Nakashima, Masaya; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Takamatsu, Manabu; Hara, Akira

    2011-10-31

    The ischemic damage in the hippocampal CA1 region following transient forebrain ischemia, delayed neuronal death, is a typical apoptotic response, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We have reported that mild hyperthermia (38 °C) accelerates DNA fragmentation of the gerbil CA1 pyramidal neurons following transient forebrain ischemia. Recently, we reported that galectin-3, a β-galactosidase-binding lectin, is spatio-temporally expressed only by activated microglial cells located within CA1 region following transient forebrain ischemia in gerbils. Furthermore, expression of galectin-3 and Iba-1 (a specific microglial cell marker) are strongly reduced by hypothermia during ischemic insult. To further elucidate the effect of hyperthermia on the expression of galectin-3 by micloglia in delayed neuronal death, we examined immunohistochemical expression of galectin-3 and Iba-1, in situ terminal dUTP-biotin nick end labeling of DNA fragmentation (for determination of cell death) and hematoxylin and eosin staining (for morphological observation). We observed that between 37 °C and 39 °C, there was a temperature-dependent enhancement of galectin-3 expression in microglial cells in the CA1 region following transient ischemia. Apoptotic DNA fragmentation, detected by TUNEL staining, was observed in CA1 region in normothermia. This TUNEL staining was enhanced by hyperthermia at 37.5 °C and 38 °C, but not at 39 °C. Ischemia-induced neuronal degeneration in CA1 region in gerbil hippocampus subjected to hyperthermia (37.5 °C, 38 °C and 39 °C) observed by HE staining is similar to that in normothermic gerbils. These findings imply that galectin-3 expression in microglia may influence the survival of CA1 pyramidal neurons in cases such as hyperthermia-related neuronal injury.

  7. Exploring psychotic symptoms: a comparison of motor related neuronal activation during and after acute psychosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Delusions and hallucinations are classic positive symptoms of schizophrenia. A contemporary cognitive theory called the ‘forward output model’ suggests that the misattribution of self-generated actions may underlie some of these types of symptoms, such as delusions of control – the experience of self-generated action being controlled by an external agency. In order to examine the validity of this suggestion, we performed a longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study examining neuronal activation associated with motor movement during acute psychosis. Methods We studied brain activation using fMRI during a motor task in 11 patients with schizophrenia and 9 healthy controls. The patient group was tested at two time points separated by 6–8 weeks. Results At initial testing, the patient group had a mean Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale score of 56.3, and showed significantly increased activation within the left inferior parietal lobe (IPL) compared to controls. Patients reported significantly decreased positive symptoms at 6–8 week followup and IPL activation had returned to normal. Our results demonstrate that first-rank positive symptoms are associated with hyperactivation in the secondary somatosensory cortex (IPL). Conclusions These findings lend further credence to the theory that a dysfunction in the sensory feedback system located in the IPL, and which is thought to underlie our sense of agency, may contribute to the aetiology of delusions of control. PMID:22871335

  8. Acute intravenous administration of dietary constituent theanine suppresses noxious neuronal transmission of trigeminal spinal nucleus caudalis in rats.

    PubMed

    Takehana, Shiori; Kubota, Yoshiko; Uotsu, Nobuo; Yui, Kei; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Takeda, Mamoru

    2017-03-15

    Theanine is a non-dietary amino acid linked to the modulation of synaptic transmission in the central nervous system, although the acute effects of theanine in vivo, particularly on nociceptive transmission in the trigeminal system, remain to be determined. The present study investigated whether acute intravenous theanine administration to rats attenuates the excitability of wide dynamic range (WDR) spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis (SpVc) neurons in response to nociceptive and non-nociceptive mechanical stimulation in vivo. Extracellular single unit recordings were made from 15 SpVc neurons in response to orofacial mechanical stimulation of pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, and responses to non-noxious and noxious mechanical stimuli were analyzed. The mean firing frequency of SpVc WDR neurons in response to all mechanical stimuli was dose-dependently inhibited by theanine (10, 50, and 100mM, i.v.) with the maximum inhibition of discharge frequency reached within 5min. These inhibitory effects were reversed after approximately 10min. The relative magnitude of theanine's inhibition of SpVc WDR neuronal discharge frequency was significantly greater for noxious than non-noxious stimulation. Iontophoretic application of l-glutamate induced the mean firing frequency of SpVc WDR neuron responding to noxious mechanical stimulation was also inhibited by intravenous administration of 100mM theanine. These results suggest that acute intravenous theanine administration suppresses glutaminergic noxious synaptic transmission in the SpVc, implicating theanine as a potential complementary and alternative therapeutic agent for the treatment of trigeminal nociceptive pain.

  9. A Case of Mushroom Poisoning with Russula subnigricans: Development of Rhabdomyolysis, Acute Kidney Injury, Cardiogenic Shock, and Death

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mushroom exposures are increasing worldwide. The incidence and fatality of mushroom poisoning are reported to be increasing. Several new syndromes in mushroom poisoning have been described. Rhabdomyolytic mushroom poisoning is one of new syndromes. Russula subnigricans mushroom can cause delayed-onset rhabdomyolysis with acute kidney injury in the severely poisoned patient. There are few reports on the toxicity of R. subnigricans. This report represents the first record of R. subnigricans poisoning with rhabdomyolysis in Korea, describing a 51-year-old man who suffered from rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, severe hypocalcemia, respiratory failure, ventricular tachycardia, cardiogenic shock, and death. Mushroom poisoning should be considered in the evaluation of rhabdomyolysis of unknown cause. Furthermore, R. subnigricans should be considered in the mushroom poisoning with rhabdomyolysis. PMID:27366018

  10. NQDI 1, an inhibitor of ASK1 attenuates acute ischemic renal injury by modulating oxidative stress and cell death.

    PubMed

    El Eter, Eman

    2013-09-01

    Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is among the signaling events that lead to postischemic cell death. Inhibition of ASK1 pathway protected hearts from ischemic damage. The present study evaluated the renal protective effects of NQDI 1, an inhibitor of ASK1, in an animal model of acute ischemic renal failure. Male Wistar rats were subjected to right nephrectomy and clamping of left renal pedicle for 45 min, or sham operation. The administration of NQDI 1 attenuated renal dysfunction and histological changes characteristic for renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). Apoptosis of renal tissues, as detected by TUNEL staining, was also reduced together with p53 protein expression, and renal levels of MDA and SOD with NQDI 1 administration and BCL2 was up regulated. In conclusion, inhibition of ASK1 is of therapeutic potential against acute ischemic renal injury. Its protective effects are mediated via inhibition of apoptosis and oxidative stress.

  11. Radiation injury and acute death in Armadillidium vulgare (terrestrial isopod, Crustacea) subjected to ionizing radiation. [/sup 137/Cs

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsuchi, Y.; Egami, N.

    1981-01-01

    From whole- and partial-body irradiation experiments with adult Armadillidium vulgare, the following conclusions were drawn: the LD/sub 50/-30 days for this animal when subjected to ..gamma.. radiation at 25 +- 2/sup 0/C was about 30 kR. Radiosensitivity of the animal changed during the molt cycle. Ionizing radiation increased mortality at ecdysis and during intermolt stages. Anatomical and histological observations indicated that (1) gastrointestinal injury as the major cause of acute death does not apply to this animal because the intestine is not a cell-proliferative organ: (2) the epidermis may be the critical target organ.

  12. Sensory defects in Necdin deficient mice result from a loss of sensory neurons correlated within an increase of developmental programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Andrieu, David; Meziane, Hamid; Marly, Fabienne; Angelats, Corinne; Fernandez, Pierre-Alain; Muscatelli, Françoise

    2006-01-01

    Background The human NECDIN gene is involved in a neurodevelopmental disorder, Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Previously we reported a mouse Necdin knock-out model with similar defects to PWS patients. Despite the putative roles attributed to Necdin, mainly from in vitro studies, its in vivo function remains unclear. In this study, we investigate sensory-motor behaviour in Necdin deficient mice. We reveal cellular defects and analyse their cause. Results We report sensory differences in Necdin deficient mice compared to wild type animals. These differences led us to investigate sensory neuron development in Necdin deficient mouse embryos. First, we describe the expression pattern of Necdin in developing DRGs and report a reduction of one-third in specified sensory neurons in dorsal roots ganglia and show that this neuronal loss is achieved by E13.5, when DRGs sensory neurons are specified. In parallel, we observed an increase of 41% in neuronal apoptosis during the wave of naturally occurring cell death at E12.5. Since it is assumed that Necdin is a P75NTR interactor, we looked at the P75NTR-expressing cell population in Necdin knock-out embryos. Unexpectedly, Necdin loss of function has no effect on p75NTR expressing neurons suggesting no direct genetic interaction between Necdin and P75NTR in this context. Although we exclude a role of Necdin in axonal outgrowth from spinal sensory neurons in early developmental stages; such a role could occur later in neuronal differentiation. Finally we also exclude an anti-proliferative role of Necdin in developing sensory neurons. Conclusion Overall, our data show clearly that, in early development of the nervous system, Necdin is an anti-apoptotic or survival factor. PMID:17116257

  13. Protective effect of keishi-bukuryo-gan and its constituent medicinal plants against nitric oxide donor-induced neuronal death in cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Y; Yokoyama, K; Goto, H; Sekiya, N; Mantani, N; Tahara, E; Hikiami, H; Terasawa, K

    2004-07-01

    Keishi-bukuryo-gan (Gui-Zhi-Fu-Ling-Wan) (KBG) is a traditional Chinese/Japanese medical (Kampo) formulation that has been administered to patients with "Oketsu" (blood stagnation) syndrome. In the process of neuronal cell death induced by brain ischemia, excessive generation of nitric oxide (NO) free radicals is implicated in the neurotoxicity. In the present study, we examined the protective effects of KBG and its constituent medicinal plants against NO donors, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and 2,2'-(hydroxynitrosohydrazino)bis-ethanamine (NOC18)-induced neuronal death in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs). MTT assay showed cell viability to be significantly increased by the addition of KBG extract (KBGE) (100 microg/ml), Cinnamomi Cortex extract (CCE) (3, 10 and 30 microg/ml), Paeoniae Radix extract (PRE) (100 microg/ml) and Moutan Cortex extract (MCE) (10 and 30 microg/ml) compared with exposure to SNP (30 microM, 24 h) only. Also, cell viability was significantly increased by the addition of KBGE (100 and 300 microg/ml), CCE (30 and 100 microg/ml), PRE (100 and 300 microg/ml) and MCE (30 and 100 microg/ml) compared with exposure to NOC 18 (100 microM, 48 h) only. Persicae Semen extract and Hoelen extract did not protect against NO donor-induced neuronal death. These results suggest that KBG has protective effect against NO-mediated neuronal death in cultured CGCs and that it is derived from Cinnamomi Cortex, Paeoniae Radix and Moutan Cortex.

  14. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, but not neurotrophin-3, prevents ischaemia-induced neuronal cell death in organotypic rat hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Pringle, A K; Sundstrom, L E; Wilde, G J; Williams, L R; Iannotti, F

    1996-06-28

    We have investigated the neuroprotective actions of neurotrophins in a model of ischaemia using slice cultures. Ischaemia was induced in organotypic hippocampal cultures by simultaneous oxygen and glucose deprivation. Cell death was assessed 24 h later by propidium iodide fluorescence. Pre- but not post-ischaemic addition of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) produced a concentration-dependent reduction in neuronal damage. Neurotrophin-3 was not neuroprotective. These data suggest that BDNF may form part of an endogenous neuroprotective mechanism.

  15. Influence of pesticide regulation on acute poisoning deaths in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Darren M.; Karunarathna, Ayanthi; Buckley, Nick A.; Manuweera, Gamini; Sheriff, M. H. Rezvi; Eddleston, Michael

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess in a developing Asian country the impact of pesticide regulation on the number of deaths from poisoning. These regulations, which were implemented in Sri Lanka from the 1970s, aimed to reduce the number of deaths - the majority from self-poisoning - by limiting the availability and use of highly toxic pesticides. METHODS: Information on legislative changes was obtained from the Ministry of Agriculture, national and district hospital admission data were obtained from the Sri Lanka Health Statistics Unit, and individual details of deaths by pesticide poisoning were obtained from a manual review of patients' notes and intensive care unit records in Anuradhapura. FINDINGS: Between 1986 and 2000, the total national number of admissions due to poisoning doubled, and admissions due to pesticide poisoning increased by more than 50%. At the same time, the case fatality proportion (CFP) fell for total poisonings and for poisonings due to pesticides. In 1991_92, 72% of pesticide-induced deaths in Anuradhapura were caused by organophosphorus (OP) and carbamate pesticides - in particular, the WHO class I OPs monocrotophos and methamidophos. From 1991, the import of these pesticides was reduced gradually until they were banned for routine use in January 1995, with a corresponding fall in deaths. Unfortunately, their place in agricultural practice was taken by the WHO class II organochlorine endosulfan, which led to a rise in deaths from status epilepticus - from one in 1994 to 50 in 1998. Endosulfan was banned in 1998, and over the following three years the number of endosulfan deaths fell to three. However, at the end of the decade, the number of deaths from pesticides was at a similar level to that of 1991, with WHO class II OPs causing the most deaths. Although these drugs are less toxic than class I OPs, the management of class II OPs remains difficult because they are, nevertheless, still highly toxic, and their toxicity is exacerbated by the paucity

  16. Contrasting alterations to synaptic and intrinsic properties in upper-cervical superficial dorsal horn neurons following acute neck muscle inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute and chronic pain in axial structures, like the back and neck, are difficult to treat, and have incidence as high as 15%. Surprisingly, most preclinical work on pain mechanisms focuses on cutaneous structures in the limbs and animal models of axial pain are not widely available. Accordingly, we developed a mouse model of acute cervical muscle inflammation and assessed the functional properties of superficial dorsal horn (SDH) neurons. Results Male C57/Bl6 mice (P24-P40) were deeply anaesthetised (urethane 2.2 g/kg i.p) and the rectus capitis major muscle (RCM) injected with 40 μl of 2% carrageenan. Sham animals received vehicle injection and controls remained anaesthetised for 2 hrs. Mice in each group were sacrificed at 2 hrs for analysis. c-Fos staining was used to determine the location of activated neurons. c-Fos labelling in carrageenan-injected mice was concentrated within ipsilateral (87% and 63% of labelled neurons in C1 and C2 segments, respectively) and contralateral laminae I - II with some expression in lateral lamina V. c-Fos expression remained below detectable levels in control and sham animals. In additional experiments, whole cell recordings were obtained from visualised SDH neurons in transverse slices in the ipsilateral C1 and C2 spinal segments. Resting membrane potential and input resistance were not altered. Mean spontaneous EPSC amplitude was reduced by ~20% in neurons from carrageenan-injected mice versus control and sham animals (20.63 ± 1.05 vs. 24.64 ± 0.91 and 25.87 ± 1.32 pA, respectively). The amplitude (238 ± 33 vs. 494 ± 96 and 593 ± 167 pA) and inactivation time constant (12.9 ± 1.5 vs. 22.1 ± 3.6 and 15.3 ± 1.4 ms) of the rapid A type potassium current (IAr), the dominant subthreshold current in SDH neurons, were reduced in carrageenan-injected mice. Conclusions Excitatory synaptic drive onto, and important intrinsic properties (i.e., IAr) within SDH neurons are

  17. A Comparative Study of Five Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease: Cell Cycle Events Reveal New Insights into Neurons at Risk for Death

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luming; Cheung, Timmy; Chen, Jianmin; Herrup, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Ectopic cell cycle events (CCEs) in postmitotic neurons link the neurodegenerative process in human Alzheimer's disease (AD) with the brain phenotype of transgenic mouse models with known familial AD genes. Most reports on the mouse models use the appearance of brain amyloid pathology as a key outcome measure. In the current paper, we focus on the induction of neurodegeneration using CCEs as markers for impending neuronal loss. We compare 5 mouse models of familial AD for the appearance of CCEs in subcortical regions—deep cerebellar nuclei, amygdala, locus coeruleus, hippocampus, and dorsal raphe. We find that the models differ in their CCE involvement as well as in the appearance of phosphorylated tau and amyloid deposition, suggesting that each model represents a different disease phenotype. Comparison with the pattern of neuron death in human AD suggests that each may represent a distinctly different disease model when used in preclinical trials. PMID:21912750

  18. Interference with Protease-activated Receptor 1 Alleviates Neuronal Cell Death Induced by Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Microglial Cells through the PI3K/Akt Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuxin; Yang, Wuyang; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Wang, Baocheng; Xu, Shujun; Zhu, Weijie; Yu, Feng; Yuan, Shaoji; Lu, Peigang

    2016-01-01

    Excessive microglial cells activation in response to inflammatory stimuli leads to synaptic loss, dysfunction, and neuronal cell death. Activated microglia are involved in the pathogenesis of neurological conditions and frequently contribute to several complications. Accumulating evidence suggests that signaling through PAR-1 is involved in inflammation, however, its function has yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we have demonstrated that the suppression of PAR-1 leads to down-regulation of inflammatory factors including IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, NO, as well as the prevention of activation of NF-κB in BV2 cells. In addition, we found that a PAR-1 antagonist, SCH, prevented LPS-induced excessive microglial activation in a dose-dependent manner. As a result of SCH treatment, neuronal cell death via up-regulation of Akt-mediated pathways was reduced. Our results demonstrate that the beneficial effects of SCH are linked to its ability to block an inflammatory response. Further, we found that SCH inhibited the death of PC12 neurons from the cytotoxicity of activated BV2 cells via activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. These neuro-protective effects appear to be related to inhibition of PAR-1, and represents a novel neuroprotective strategy that could has potential for use in therapeutic interventions of neuroinflammatory disease. PMID:27910893

  19. Protection of hypoglycemia-induced neuronal death by β-hydroxybutyrate involves the preservation of energy levels and decreased production of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Julio-Amilpas, Alberto; Montiel, Teresa; Soto-Tinoco, Eva; Gerónimo-Olvera, Cristian; Massieu, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the main energy substrate in brain but in certain circumstances such as prolonged fasting and the suckling period alternative substrates can be used such as the ketone bodies (KB), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and acetoacetate. It has been shown that KB prevent neuronal death induced during energy limiting conditions and excitotoxicity. The protective effect of KB has been mainly attributed to the improvement of mitochondrial function. In the present study, we have investigated the protective effect of D-BHB against neuronal death induced by severe noncoma hypoglycemia in the rat in vivo and by glucose deprivation (GD) in cortical cultures. Results show that systemic administration of D-BHB reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in distinct cortical areas and subregions of the hippocampus and efficiently prevents neuronal death in the cortex of hypoglycemic animals. In vitro results show that D-BHB stimulates ATP production and reduces ROS levels, while the nonphysiologic isomer of BHB, L-BHB, has no effect on energy production but reduces ROS levels. Data suggest that protection by BHB, not only results from its metabolic action but is also related to its capability to reduce ROS, rendering this KB as a suitable candidate for the treatment of ischemic and traumatic injury. PMID:25649993

  20. Loss of miR-29b following acute ischemic stroke contributes to neural cell death and infarct size

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Savita; Rink, Cameron; Ghoorkhanian, Reza; Gnyawali, Surya; Heigel, Mallory; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan S; Chalfant, Charles E; Chan, Yuk Cheung; Banerjee, Jaideep; Huang, Yue; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione depletion and 12-lipoxygenase-dependent metabolism of arachidonic acid are known to be implicated in neurodegeneration associated with acute ischemic stroke. The objective of this study was to investigate the significance of miR-29 in neurodegeneration associated with acute ischemic stroke. Neural cell death caused by arachidonic acid insult of glutathione-deficient cells was preceded by a 12-lipoxygenase-dependent loss of miR-29b. Delivery of miR-29b mimic to blunt such loss was neuroprotective. miR-29b inhibition potentiated such neural cell death. 12-Lipoxygenase knockdown and inhibitors attenuated the loss of miR-29b in challenged cells. In vivo, stroke caused by middle-cerebral artery occlusion was followed by higher 12-lipoxygenase activity and loss of miR-29b as detected in laser-captured infarct site tissue. 12-Lipoxygenase knockout mice demonstrated protection against such miR loss. miR-29b gene delivery markedly attenuated stroke-induced brain lesion. Oral supplementation of α-tocotrienol, a vitamin E 12-lipoxygenase inhibitor, rescued stroke-induced loss of miR-29b and minimized lesion size. This work provides the first evidence demonstrating that loss of miR-29b at the infarct site is a key contributor to stroke lesion. Such loss is contributed by activity of the 12-lipoxygenase pathway providing maiden evidence linking arachidonic acid metabolism to miR-dependent mechanisms in stroke. PMID:23632968

  1. Quinazoline-based tricyclic compounds that regulate programmed cell death, induce neuronal differentiation, and are curative in animal models for excitotoxicity and hereditary brain disease

    PubMed Central

    Vainshtein, A; Veenman, L; Shterenberg, A; Singh, S; Masarwa, A; Dutta, B; Island, B; Tsoglin, E; Levin, E; Leschiner, S; Maniv, I; Pe’er, L; Otradnov, I; Zubedat, S; Aga-Mizrachi, S; Weizman, A; Avital, A; Marek, I; Gavish, M

    2015-01-01

    Expanding on a quinazoline scaffold, we developed tricyclic compounds with biological activity. These compounds bind to the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) and protect U118MG (glioblastoma cell line of glial origin) cells from glutamate-induced cell death. Fascinating, they can induce neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells (cell line of pheochromocytoma origin with neuronal characteristics) known to display neuronal characteristics, including outgrowth of neurites, tubulin expression, and NeuN (antigen known as ‘neuronal nuclei’, also known as Rbfox3) expression. As part of the neurodifferentiation process, they can amplify cell death induced by glutamate. Interestingly, the compound 2-phenylquinazolin-4-yl dimethylcarbamate (MGV-1) can induce expansive neurite sprouting on its own and also in synergy with nerve growth factor and with glutamate. Glycine is not required, indicating that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors are not involved in this activity. These diverse effects on cells of glial origin and on cells with neuronal characteristics induced in culture by this one compound, MGV-1, as reported in this article, mimic the diverse events that take place during embryonic development of the brain (maintenance of glial integrity, differentiation of progenitor cells to mature neurons, and weeding out of non-differentiating progenitor cells). Such mechanisms are also important for protective, curative, and restorative processes that occur during and after brain injury and brain disease. Indeed, we found in a rat model of systemic kainic acid injection that MGV-1 can prevent seizures, counteract the process of ongoing brain damage, including edema, and restore behavior defects to normal patterns. Furthermore, in the R6-2 (transgenic mouse model for Huntington disease; Strain name: B6CBA-Tg(HDexon1)62Gpb/3J) transgenic mouse model for Huntington disease, derivatives of MGV-1 can increase lifespan by >20% and reduce incidence of abnormal movements. Also in vitro

  2. Cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on primary neuronal cells of the forebrain: the involvement of cannabinoid CB1 receptors and apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Ken-ichi; Funada, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    The abuse of herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids has become an issue of public concern. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the acute cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on mouse brain neuronal cells. Cytotoxicity induced by synthetic cannabinoid (CP-55,940, CP-47,497, CP-47,497-C8, HU-210, JWH-018, JWH-210, AM-2201, and MAM-2201) was examined using forebrain neuronal cultures. These synthetic cannabinoids induced cytotoxicity in the forebrain cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity was suppressed by preincubation with the selective CB1 receptor antagonist AM251, but not with the selective CB2 receptor antagonist AM630. Furthermore, annexin-V-positive cells were found among the treated forebrain cells. Synthetic cannabinoid treatment induced the activation of caspase-3, and preincubation with a caspase-3 inhibitor significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity. These synthetic cannabinoids induced apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent mechanism in the forebrain cultures. Our results indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards primary neuronal cells is mediated by the CB1 receptor, but not by the CB2 receptor, and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the apoptosis induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, excessive synthetic cannabinoid abuse may present a serious acute health concern due to neuronal damage or deficits in the brain.

  3. Therapeutic targeting of oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylases abrogates ATF4-dependent neuronal death and improves outcomes after brain hemorrhage in several rodent models

    PubMed Central

    Karuppagounder, Saravanan S.; Alim, Ishraq; Khim, Soah J.; Bourassa, Megan W.; Sleiman, Sama F.; John, Roseleen; Thinnes, Cyrille C.; Yeh, Tzu-Lan; Demetriades, Marina; Neitemeier, Sandra; Cruz, Dana; Gazaryan, Irina; Killilea, David W.; Morgenstern, Lewis; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F.; Schallert, Timothy; Tappero, Ryan V.; Zhong, Jian; Cho, Sunghee; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Holman, Theodore R.; Culmsee, Carsten; Fong, Guo-Hua; Su, Yijing; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun; Cave, John W.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Colbourne, Frederick; Coppola, Giovanni; Ratan, Rajiv R.

    2017-01-01

    Disability or death due to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is attributed to blood lysis, liberation of iron, and consequent oxidative stress. Iron chelators bind to free iron and prevent neuronal death induced by oxidative stress and disability due to ICH, but the mechanisms for this effect remain unclear. We show that the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase domain (HIF-PHD) family of iron-dependent, oxygen-sensing enzymes are effectors of iron chelation. Molecular reduction of the three HIF-PHD enzyme isoforms in the mouse striatum improved functional recovery after ICH. A low-molecular-weight hydroxyquinoline inhibitor of the HIF-PHD enzymes, adaptaquin, reduced neuronal death and behavioral deficits after ICH in several rodent models without affecting total iron or zinc distribution in the brain. Unexpectedly, protection from oxidative death in vitro or from ICH in vivo by adaptaquin was associated with suppression of activity of the prodeath factor ATF4 rather than activation of an HIF-dependent prosurvival pathway. Together, these findings demonstrate that brain-specific inactivation of the HIF-PHD metalloenzymes with the blood-brain barrier-permeable inhibitor adaptaquin can improve functional outcomes after ICH in several rodent models. PMID:26936506

  4. Therapeutic targeting of oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylases abrogates ATF4-dependent neuronal death and improves outcomes after brain hemorrhage in several rodent models

    DOE PAGES

    Karuppagounder, Saravanan S.; Alim, Ishraq; Khim, Soah J.; ...

    2016-03-02

    Disability or death due to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is attributed to blood lysis, liberation of iron and consequent oxidative stress. Iron chelators bind to free iron and prevent neuronal death induced by oxidative stress and disability due to ICH, but the mechanisms for this effect remain unclear. Here we show that the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl-hydroxylase (HIF- PHD) family of iron-dependent oxygen sensing enzymes are effectors of iron chelation. Molecular reduction of the three HIF-PHD enzyme isoforms in mouse striatum improved functional recovery following ICH. A low molecular weight hydroxyquinoline inhibitor of the HIF-PHDs, adaptaquin, reduced neuronal death and behavioral deficitsmore » following ICH in several rodent models without affecting total iron or zinc distribution in the brain. Unexpectedly, protection from oxidative death in vitro or from ICH in vivo by adaptaquin was associated with suppression of expression of the prodeath factor ATF4 rather than activation of a HIF-dependent prosurvival pathway. In conclusion, together these findings demonstrate that brain-specific inactivation of the HIF-PHD metalloenzymes with the blood-brain barrier permeable inhibitor adaptaquin can improve functional outcomes following ICH in multiple rodent species.« less

  5. Therapeutic targeting of oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylases abrogates ATF4-dependent neuronal death and improves outcomes after brain hemorrhage in several rodent models

    SciTech Connect

    Karuppagounder, Saravanan S.; Alim, Ishraq; Khim, Soah J.; Bourassa, Megan W.; Sleiman, Sama F.; John, Roseleen; Thinnes, Cyrille C.; Yeh, Tzu-Lan; Demetriades, Marina; Neitemeier, Sandra; Cruz, Dana; Gazaryan, Irina; Killilea, David W.; Morgenstern, Lewis; Xi, Guohu; Keep, Richard F.; Schallert, Timothy; Tappero, Ryan V.; Zhong, Jian; Cho, Sunghee; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Holman, T. R.; Culmsee, Carsten; Fong, Guo-Hua -H.; Su, Yijing; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun; Cave, John W.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Colbourne, Frederick; Coppola, Giovanni; Ratan, Rajiv R.

    2016-03-02

    Disability or death due to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is attributed to blood lysis, liberation of iron and consequent oxidative stress. Iron chelators bind to free iron and prevent neuronal death induced by oxidative stress and disability due to ICH, but the mechanisms for this effect remain unclear. Here we show that the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl-hydroxylase (HIF- PHD) family of iron-dependent oxygen sensing enzymes are effectors of iron chelation. Molecular reduction of the three HIF-PHD enzyme isoforms in mouse striatum improved functional recovery following ICH. A low molecular weight hydroxyquinoline inhibitor of the HIF-PHDs, adaptaquin, reduced neuronal death and behavioral deficits following ICH in several rodent models without affecting total iron or zinc distribution in the brain. Unexpectedly, protection from oxidative death in vitro or from ICH in vivo by adaptaquin was associated with suppression of expression of the prodeath factor ATF4 rather than activation of a HIF-dependent prosurvival pathway. In conclusion, together these findings demonstrate that brain-specific inactivation of the HIF-PHD metalloenzymes with the blood-brain barrier permeable inhibitor adaptaquin can improve functional outcomes following ICH in multiple rodent species.

  6. Therapeutic targeting of oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylases abrogates ATF4-dependent neuronal death and improves outcomes after brain hemorrhage in several rodent models.

    PubMed

    Karuppagounder, Saravanan S; Alim, Ishraq; Khim, Soah J; Bourassa, Megan W; Sleiman, Sama F; John, Roseleen; Thinnes, Cyrille C; Yeh, Tzu-Lan; Demetriades, Marina; Neitemeier, Sandra; Cruz, Dana; Gazaryan, Irina; Killilea, David W; Morgenstern, Lewis; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F; Schallert, Timothy; Tappero, Ryan V; Zhong, Jian; Cho, Sunghee; Maxfield, Frederick R; Holman, Theodore R; Culmsee, Carsten; Fong, Guo-Hua; Su, Yijing; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun; Cave, John W; Schofield, Christopher J; Colbourne, Frederick; Coppola, Giovanni; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2016-03-02

    Disability or death due to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is attributed to blood lysis, liberation of iron, and consequent oxidative stress. Iron chelators bind to free iron and prevent neuronal death induced by oxidative stress and disability due to ICH, but the mechanisms for this effect remain unclear. We show that the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase domain (HIF-PHD) family of iron-dependent, oxygen-sensing enzymes are effectors of iron chelation. Molecular reduction of the three HIF-PHD enzyme isoforms in the mouse striatum improved functional recovery after ICH. A low-molecular-weight hydroxyquinoline inhibitor of the HIF-PHD enzymes, adaptaquin, reduced neuronal death and behavioral deficits after ICH in several rodent models without affecting total iron or zinc distribution in the brain. Unexpectedly, protection from oxidative death in vitro or from ICH in vivo by adaptaquin was associated with suppression of activity of the prodeath factor ATF4 rather than activation of an HIF-dependent prosurvival pathway. Together, these findings demonstrate that brain-specific inactivation of the HIF-PHD metalloenzymes with the blood-brain barrier-permeable inhibitor adaptaquin can improve functional outcomes after ICH in several rodent models.

  7. Death from undetected acute myocardial infarction secondary to coronary artery dissection after blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Puanglumyai, Supot; Thamtakerngkit, Somboon; Lekawanvijit, Suree

    2016-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma is a common occurrence in automobile accidents. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) caused by coronary dissection following blunt thoracic trauma is rare. We report a case of healthy 24-year-old man with a history of blunt thoracic injury with subsequent undetected AMI who died of acute decompensated heart failure 4 days after the insult. The autopsy findings showed a 90% luminal narrowing of the left anterior descending coronary artery by dissecting hematoma, 3 cm in length. The myocardium revealed transmural myocardial infarction affecting apex, most part of left ventricular free wall, and interventricular septum. Both lungs were heavy, wet, and noncrepitant. Histological findings of the infarcted myocardium were consistent with 3-5 days post-AMI. Sections from both lungs revealed massive pulmonary edema, reflecting acute decompensated heart failure following a large AMI secondary to coronary dissection. Blunt thoracic trauma may obscure typical chest pain associated with cardiac ischemia especially in cases with a high tolerance for pain.

  8. Molecular basis of vitamin E action. Tocotrienol potently inhibits glutamate-induced pp60(c-Src) kinase activation and death of HT4 neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Sen, C K; Khanna, S; Roy, S; Packer, L

    2000-04-28

    HT4 hippocampal neuronal cells were studied to compare the efficacy of tocopherols and tocotrienol to protect against glutamate-induced death. Tocotrienols were more effective than alpha-tocopherol in preventing glutamate-induced death. Uptake of tocotrienols from the culture medium was more efficient compared with that of alpha-tocopherol. Vitamin E molecules have potent antioxidant properties. Results show that at low concentrations, tocotrienols may have protected cells by an antioxidant-independent mechanism. Examination of signal transduction pathways revealed that protein tyrosine phosphorylation processes played a central role in the execution of death. Activation of pp60(c-Src) kinase and phosphorylation of ERK were observed in response to glutamate treatment. Nanomolar amounts of alpha-tocotrienol, but not alpha-tocopherol, blocked glutamate-induced death by suppressing glutamate-induced early activation of c-Src kinase. Overexpression of kinase-active c-Src sensitized cells to glutamate-induced death. Tocotrienol treatment prevented death of Src-overexpressing cells treated with glutamate. alpha-Tocotrienol did not influence activity of recombinant c-Src kinase suggesting that its mechanism of action may include regulation of SH domains. This study provides first evidence describing the molecular basis of tocotrienol action. At a concentration 4-10-fold lower than levels detected in plasma of supplemented humans, tocotrienol regulated unique signal transduction processes that were not sensitive to comparable concentrations of tocopherol.

  9. Progranulin protects against endotoxin-induced acute kidney injury by downregulating renal cell death and inflammatory responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoying; Gou, Linfeng; Zhou, Meng; Yang, Fusheng; Zhao, Yihan; Feng, Tingting; Shi, Peikun; Ghavamian, Armin; Zhao, Weiming; Yu, Yuan; Lu, Yi; Yi, Fan; Liu, Guangyi; Tang, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Progranulin (PGRN), a pluripotent secreted growth factor, is involved in various physiologic and disease processes. However, the role of PGRN in endotoxin-induced septic acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unknown. The objective of this study is to investigate the protective effects of PGRN on an endotoxin-induced AKI mouse model by using PGRN-deficient mice and recombinant PGRN (rPGRN) pretreatment. PGRN levels were increased in kidneys of wild-type (WT) mice at 6 and 24h after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. Renal function detection, hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemical staining, ELISA and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated uridine triphosphate nick-end labeling were used to reveal tissue injury, inflammatory cell infiltration, production of inflammatory mediators and cell death in mouse kidneys after LPS injection. PGRN deficiency resulted in severe kidney injury and increased apoptotic death, inflammatory cell infiltration, production of pro-inflammatory mediators and the expression and nucleus-to-cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB1 in the kidney. In addition, rPGRN administration before LPS treatment ameliorated the endotoxin-induced AKI in WT mice. PGRN may be a novel biologic agent with therapeutic potential for endotoxin-induced septic AKI possibly by inhibiting LPS-induced renal cell death and inflammatory responses in mice.

  10. T315 Decreases Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Viability through a Combination of Apoptosis Induction and Autophagic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chang-Fang; Weng, Jing-Ru; Jadhav, Appaso; Wu, Chia-Yung; Sargeant, Aaron M.; Bai, Li-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    T315, an integrin-linked kinase (ILK) inhibitor, has been shown to suppress the proliferation of breast cancer, stomach cancer and chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Here we demonstrate that T315 decreases cell viability of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines (HL-60 and THP-1) and primary leukemia cells from AML patients in a dose-responsive manner. Normal human bone marrow cells are less sensitive than leukemia cells to T315. T315 down regulates protein kinase B (Akt) and p-Akt and induces caspase activation, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage, apoptosis and autophagy through an ILK-independent manner. Interestingly, pretreatment with autophagy inhibitors rescues cells from apoptosis and concomitant PARP cleavage, which implicates a key role of autophagic cell death in T315-mediated cytotoxicity. T315 also demonstrates efficacy in vivo, suppressing the growth of THP-1 xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice when administered intraperitoneally. This study shows that autophagic cell death and apoptosis cooperatively contribute to the anticancer activity of T315 in AML cells. In conclusion, the complementary roles of apoptotic and autophagic cell death should be considered in the future assessment of the translational value of T315 in AML therapy. PMID:27537872

  11. Acute Kidney Injury in Poor Countries Should No Longer Be a Death Sentence: The ISN '0 by 25' Project.

    PubMed

    Perico, Norberto; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common disorder throughout the world that is associated with severe morbidity, mortality and cost. Although deaths due to AKI occur in both high- and low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), the majority of avoidable deaths occur in LMIC nations. If managed adequately and in a timely fashion, the majority of these cases of AKI are preventable, treatable and often reversible with simple measures. AKI also has a major economic impact on healthcare expenditure. This is particularly true in poor countries where AKI especially impacts young productive people, imposing severe penury on their families. The International Society of Nephrology (ISN) has launched a long-term program, the '0 by 25' project, which advocates that zero people should die of untreated AKI in the poorest part of Africa, Asia and Latin America by 2025. The mission is to eventually lessen the high burden in terms of deaths consequent to this disorder in resource-poor regions worldwide. This is a challenging but potentially feasible and productive initiative that requires a broad vision about how the public and private sectors can work in partnership with the governments of the LMIC countries and leading nongovernmental organizations operating locally, to ensure sustainability of the 0 by 25 program and save many lives.

  12. ACUTE PHASE DEATHS FROM MURINE POLYMICROBIAL SEPSIS ARE CHARACTERIZED BY INNATE IMMUNE SUPPRESSION RATHER THAN EXHAUSTION1

    PubMed Central

    Chiswick, Evan L.; Mella, Juan R.; Bernardo, John; Remick, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, a leading cause of death in the U.S., has poorly understood mechanisms of mortality. To address this, our model of Cecal Ligation and Puncture (CLP) induced sepsis stratifies mice as predicted to Live (Live-P) or Die (Die-P) based on plasma IL-6. Six hours post-CLP, both Live-P and Die-P groups have equivalent peritoneal bacterial colony forming units and recruitment of phagocytes. By 24hr, however, Die-P mice have increased bacterial burden, despite increased neutrophil recruitment, suggesting Die-P phagocytes have impaired bacterial killing. Peritoneal cells were used to study multiple bactericidal processes: bacterial killing, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation, and phagocytosis. Total phagocytosis and intra-phagosomal processes were determined with triple-labeled E.coli, covalently labeled with ROS and pH sensitive probes, and an ROS/pH insensitive probe for normalization. While similar proportions of Live-P and Die-P phagocytes responded to exogenous stimuli, Die-P phagocytes showed marked deficits in all parameters measured, thus suggesting immunosuppression rather than exhaustion. This contradicts the prevailing sepsis paradigm that acute phase sepsis deaths (<5 days) result from excessive inflammation, whereas chronic phase deaths (>5 days) are characterized by insufficient inflammation and immunosuppression. These data suggest that suppression of cellular innate immunity in sepsis occurs within the first six hours. PMID:26371253

  13. IL-1β increases necrotic neuronal cell death in the developing rat hippocampus after status epilepticus by activating type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1RI).

    PubMed

    Medel-Matus, Jesús-Servando; Álvarez-Croda, Dulce-Mariely; Martínez-Quiroz, Joel; Beltrán-Parrazal, Luis; Morgado-Valle, Consuelo; López-Meraz, María-Leonor

    2014-11-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is associated with seizure-induced neuronal cell death in the adult brain. The contribution of IL-1β to neuronal injury induced by status epilepticus (SE) in the immature brain remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of IL-1β administration on hippocampal neuronal cell death associated with SE in the immature brain, and the role of the type I receptor of IL-1β (IL-1RI). SE was induced with lithium-pilocarpine in 14-days-old (P14) rat pups. Six hours after SE onset, pups were i.c.v. injected in the right ventricle with IL-1β (0, 0.3, 3, 30, or 300 ng), 30 ng of IL-1RI antagonist (IL-1Ra) alone, or 30 ng of IL-1Ra plus 3ng of IL-1β. As control groups, pups without seizures were injected with 3 ng of IL-1β or vehicle. Twenty-four hours after SE onset, neuronal cell death in the CA1 field of dorsal hippocampus was assessed by hematoxylin-eosin, Fluoro-Jade B and in vivo propidium iodide (PI) staining; expression of active caspase-3 (aCas-3) was also determined, using immunohistochemistry. The concentration-response curve of IL-1β showed a bell-shape. Only pups injected with 3 ng of IL-1β after SE showed a significant increase in the number of cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm and pyknotic nuclei, as well as F-JB positive cells with respect to the vehicle group. This effect was prevented when IL-1β was injected with IL-1Ra. Injection of 3 ng of IL-1β increased the number of PI-positive cells in CA1 area after SE. Injection of 3 ng of IL-1β did not produce hippocampal cell death in rats without seizures. Active caspase-3 expression was not observed after treatments in hippocampus. The activation of the IL-1β/IL-1RI system increases necrotic neuronal cell death caused by SE in rat pups.

  14. Is the link between alcohol and cardiovascular death among young Russian men attributable to misclassification of acute alcohol intoxication? Evidence from the city of Izhevsk

    PubMed Central

    Shkolnikov, V; McKee, M; Chervyakov, V; Kyrianov, N

    2002-01-01

    Background: Research on the aetiology of sudden cardiac death among young men in Russia strongly suggests an association with binge drinking. However, the possibility remains that such deaths are misclassified as being attributable to cardiovascular disease when they are really caused by acute alcohol poisoning. Objective: To describe postmortem levels of blood alcohol in Russian men dying from various causes and so determine whether deaths from alcohol poisoning are being misclassified as cardiovascular deaths. Setting: Ishevsk, capital of the Udmurt Republic, situated in the Ural region of the Russian Federation. Methods: The study was part of a larger one on adult mortality. The study sample was 309 deaths among men aged 20–55 dying between August 1998 and March 1999 from other than neoplasms, infectious diseases or unspecified causes and on whom necropsy records could be obtained. Information on cause of death was extracted from death certificates and data on postmortem blood alcohol concentration (BAC) from forensic records. Blood alcohol concentrations were adjusted where necessary to allow for delay in necropsy. Results: Medium or greater levels of intoxication occurred in a quarter of those recorded as dying from cardiovascular disease but in over half of those dying from external causes. BAC levels consistent with at least strong intoxication were seen in 13.5% of deaths from cardiovascular disease and 27.1% from external causes. No cardiovascular deaths had BAC at levels usually thought to be fatal while this level was seen in 26% of deaths from accidental poisoning. Conclusion: Evidence of recent consumption of alcohol is common among Russian men dying under the age of 55, with severe intoxication common where death is from external causes. However, the high death rates from cardiovascular disease in Russia cannot be explained by misclassification of deaths attributable to acute alcohol poisoning. This study thus resolves one of the outstanding

  15. Morphofunctional alterations in ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons in acute and prolonged opiates withdrawal. A computational perspective.

    PubMed

    Enrico, P; Migliore, M; Spiga, S; Mulas, G; Caboni, F; Diana, M

    2016-05-13

    Dopamine (DA) neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) play a key role in the neurobiological basis of goal-directed behaviors and addiction. Morphine (MOR) withdrawal induces acute and long-term changes in the morphology and physiology of VTA DA cells, but the mechanisms underlying these modifications are poorly understood. Because of their predictive value, computational models are a powerful tool in neurobiological research, and are often used to gain further insights and deeper understanding on the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying the development of various psychiatric disorders. Here we present a biophysical model of a DA VTA neuron based on 3D morphological reconstruction and electrophysiological data, showing how opiates withdrawal-driven morphological and electrophysiological changes could affect the firing rate and discharge pattern. The model findings suggest how and to what extent a change in the balance of GABA/GLU inputs can take into account the experimentally observed hypofunction of VTA DA neurons during acute and prolonged withdrawal, whereas morphological changes may play a role in the increased excitability of VTA DA cell to opiate administration observed during opiate withdrawal.

  16. Multifaceted role of nitric oxide in an in vitro mouse neuronal injury model: transcriptomic profiling defines the temporal recruitment of death signalling cascades

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhao Feng; Chen, Minghui Jessica; Manikandan, Jayapal; Melendez, Alirio J; Shui, Guanghou; Russo-Marie, Françoise; Whiteman, Matthew; Beart, Philip M; Moore, Philip K; Cheung, Nam Sang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Nitric oxide is implicated in the pathogenesis of various neuropathologies characterized by oxidative stress. Although nitric oxide has been reported to be involved in the exacerbation of oxidative stress observed in several neuropathologies, existent data fail to provide a holistic description of how nitrergic pathobiology elicits neuronal injury. Here we provide a comprehensive description of mechanisms contributing to nitric oxide induced neuronal injury by global transcriptomic profiling. Microarray analyses were undertaken on RNA from murine primary cortical neurons treated with the nitric oxide generator DETA-NONOate (NOC-18, 0.5 mM) for 8–24 hrs. Biological pathway analysis focused upon 3672 gene probes which demonstrated at least a ±1.5-fold expression in a minimum of one out of three time-points and passed statistical analysis (one-way anova, P < 0.05). Numerous enriched processes potentially determining nitric oxide mediated neuronal injury were identified from the transcriptomic profile: cell death, developmental growth and survival, cell cycle, calcium ion homeostasis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, mitochondrial homeostasis, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and GSH and nitric oxide metabolism. Our detailed time-course study of nitric oxide induced neuronal injury allowed us to provide the first time a holistic description of the temporal sequence of cellular events contributing to nitrergic injury. These data form a foundation for the development of screening platforms and define targets for intervention in nitric oxide neuropathologies where nitric oxide mediated injury is causative. PMID:21352476

  17. Neuronal death induced by misfolded prion protein is due to NAD+ depletion and can be relieved in vitro and in vivo by NAD+ replenishment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Minghai; Ottenberg, Gregory; Sferrazza, Gian Franco; Hubbs, Christopher; Fallahi, Mohammad; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Brantley, Alicia F.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of neuronal death in protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and prion diseases are poorly understood. We used a highly toxic misfolded prion protein (TPrP) model to understand neurotoxicity induced by prion protein misfolding. We show that abnormal autophagy activation and neuronal demise is due to severe, neuron-specific, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) depletion. Toxic prion protein-exposed neuronal cells exhibit dramatic reductions of intracellular NAD+ followed by decreased ATP production, and are completely rescued by treatment with NAD+ or its precursor nicotinamide because of restoration of physiological NAD+ levels. Toxic prion protein-induced NAD+ depletion results from PARP1-independent excessive protein ADP-ribosylations. In vivo, toxic prion protein-induced degeneration of hippocampal neurons is prevented dose-dependently by intracerebral injection of NAD+. Intranasal NAD+ treatment of prion-infected sick mice significantly improves activity and delays motor impairment. Our study reveals NAD+ starvation as a novel mechanism of autophagy activation and neurodegeneration induced by a misfolded amyloidogenic protein. We propose the development of NAD+ replenishment strategies for neuroprotection in prion diseases and possibly other protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25678560

  18. Neuronal death induced by misfolded prion protein is due to NAD+ depletion and can be relieved in vitro and in vivo by NAD+ replenishment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Minghai; Ottenberg, Gregory; Sferrazza, Gian Franco; Hubbs, Christopher; Fallahi, Mohammad; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Brantley, Alicia F; Lasmézas, Corinne I

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms of neuronal death in protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and prion diseases are poorly understood. We used a highly toxic misfolded prion protein (TPrP) model to understand neurotoxicity induced by prion protein misfolding. We show that abnormal autophagy activation and neuronal demise is due to severe, neuron-specific, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) depletion. Toxic prion protein-exposed neuronal cells exhibit dramatic reductions of intracellular NAD(+) followed by decreased ATP production, and are completely rescued by treatment with NAD(+) or its precursor nicotinamide because of restoration of physiological NAD(+) levels. Toxic prion protein-induced NAD(+) depletion results from PARP1-independent excessive protein ADP-ribosylations. In vivo, toxic prion protein-induced degeneration of hippocampal neurons is prevented dose-dependently by intracerebral injection of NAD(+). Intranasal NAD(+) treatment of prion-infected sick mice significantly improves activity and delays motor impairment. Our study reveals NAD(+) starvation as a novel mechanism of autophagy activation and neurodegeneration induced by a misfolded amyloidogenic protein. We propose the development of NAD(+) replenishment strategies for neuroprotection in prion diseases and possibly other protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Disruption of IP₃R2-mediated Ca²⁺ signaling pathway in astrocytes ameliorates neuronal death and brain damage while reducing behavioral deficits after focal ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Li, Hailong; Xie, Yicheng; Zhang, Nannan; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Qiao; Ding, Shinghua

    2015-12-01

    Inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R)-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) increase is the major Ca(2+) signaling pathway in astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). Ca(2+) increases in astrocytes have been found to modulate neuronal function through gliotransmitter release. We previously demonstrated that astrocytes exhibit enhanced Ca(2+) signaling in vivo after photothrombosis (PT)-induced ischemia, which is largely due to the activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). The aim of this study is to investigate the role of astrocytic IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) signaling in neuronal death, brain damage and behavior outcomes after PT. For this purpose, we conducted experiments using homozygous type 2 IP3R (IP3R2) knockout (KO) mice. Histological and immunostaining studies showed that IP3R2 KO mice were indeed deficient in IP3R2 in astrocytes and exhibited normal brain cytoarchitecture. IP3R2 KO mice also had the same densities of S100β+ astrocytes and NeuN+ neurons in the cortices, and exhibited the same glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and glial glutamate transporter (GLT-1) levels in the cortices and hippocampi as compared with wild type (WT) mice. Two-photon (2-P) imaging showed that IP3R2 KO mice did not exhibit ATP-induced Ca(2+) waves in vivo in the astrocytic network, which verified the disruption of IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) signaling in astrocytes of these mice. When subject to PT, IP3R2 KO mice had smaller infarction than WT mice in acute and chronic phases of ischemia. IP3R2 KO mice also exhibited less neuronal apoptosis, reactive astrogliosis, and tissue loss than WT mice. Behavioral tests, including cylinder, hanging wire, pole and adhesive tests, showed that IP3R2 KO mice exhibited reduced functional deficits after PT. Collectively, our study demonstrates that disruption of astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling by deleting IP3R2s has beneficial effects on neuronal and brain protection and functional deficits after stroke. These findings reveal a novel non

  20. MC1568 Inhibits Thimerosal-Induced Apoptotic Cell Death by Preventing HDAC4 Up-Regulation in Neuronal Cells and in Rat Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Guida, Natascia; Laudati, Giusy; Mascolo, Luigi; Cuomo, Ornella; Anzilotti, Serenella; Sirabella, Rossana; Santopaolo, Marianna; Galgani, Mario; Montuori, Paolo; Di Renzo, Gianfranco; Canzoniero, Lorella M T; Formisano, Luigi

    2016-12-01

    Ethylmercury thiosalicylate (thimerosal) is an organic mercury-based compound commonly used as an antimicrobial preservative that has been found to be neurotoxic. In contrast, histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibition has been found to be neuroprotective against several environmental contaminants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls, di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate, and methylmercury. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of HDAC inhibition on thimerosal-induced neurotoxicity in neuroblastoma cells and cortical neurons. Interestingly, we found that thimerosal, at 0.5 μM in SH-SY5Y cells and at 1 μM in neurons, caused cell death by activation of apoptosis, which was prevented by the HDAC class IIA inhibitor MC1568 but not the class I inhibitor MS275. Furthermore, thimerosal specifically increased HDAC4 protein expression but not that of HDACs 5, 6, 7, and 9. Western blot analysis revealed that MC1568 prevented thimerosal-induced HDAC4 increase. In addition, both HDAC4 knocking-down and MC1568 inhibited thimerosal-induced cell death in SH-SY5Y cells and cortical neurons. Importantly, intramuscular injection of 12 μg/kg thimerosal on postnatal days 7, 9, 11, and 15 increased HDAC4 levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which decreased histone H4 acetylation in infant male rats, in parallel increased motor activity changes. In addition, coadministration of 40 mg/kg MC1568 (intraperitoneal injection) moderated the HDAC4 increase which reduced histone H4 deacetylation and caspase-3 cleavage in the PFC. Finally, open-field testing showed that thimerosal-induced motor activity changes are reduced by MC1568. These findings indicate that HDAC4 regulates thimerosal-induced cell death in neurons and that treatment with MC1568 prevents thimerosal-induced activation of caspase-3 in the rat PFC.

  1. Histone hyperacetylation up-regulates protein kinase Cδ in dopaminergic neurons to induce cell death: relevance to epigenetic mechanisms of neurodegeneration in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huajun; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Harischandra, Dilshan S; Kondru, Naveen; Ghosh, Anamitra; Panicker, Nikhil; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Rana, Ajay; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G

    2014-12-12

    The oxidative stress-sensitive protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) has been implicated in dopaminergic neuronal cell death. However, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms regulating PKCδ expression in neurons. Here, we report a novel mechanism by which the PKCδ gene can be regulated by histone acetylation. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor sodium butyrate (NaBu) induced PKCδ expression in cultured neurons, brain slices, and animal models. Several other HDAC inhibitors also mimicked NaBu. The chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that hyperacetylation of histone H4 by NaBu is associated with the PKCδ promoter. Deletion analysis of the PKCδ promoter mapped the NaBu-responsive element to an 81-bp minimal promoter region. Detailed mutagenesis studies within this region revealed that four GC boxes conferred hyperacetylation-induced PKCδ promoter activation. Cotransfection experiments and Sp inhibitor studies demonstrated that Sp1, Sp3, and Sp4 regulated NaBu-induced PKCδ up-regulation. However, NaBu did not alter the DNA binding activities of Sp proteins or their expression. Interestingly, a one-hybrid analysis revealed that NaBu enhanced transcriptional activity of Sp1/Sp3. Overexpression of the p300/cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP) potentiated the NaBu-mediated transactivation potential of Sp1/Sp3, but expressing several HDACs attenuated this effect, suggesting that p300/CBP and HDACs act as coactivators or corepressors in histone acetylation-induced PKCδ up-regulation. Finally, using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we showed that NaBu up-regulation of PKCδ sensitizes neurons to cell death in a human dopaminergic cell model and brain slice cultures. Together, these results indicate that histone acetylation regulates PKCδ expression to augment nigrostriatal dopaminergic cell death, which could contribute to the progressive neuropathogenesis of Parkinson disease.

  2. Kainic acid-induced neurodegeneration and activation of inflammatory processes in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures: treatment with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor does not prevent neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, Juha T; Ruohonen, Saku; Kukko-Lukjanov, Tiina-Kaisa; Plysjuk, Anna; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R; Holopainen, Irma E

    2011-06-01

    In the postnatal rodent hippocampus status epilepticus (SE) leads to age- and region-specific excitotoxic neuronal damage, the precise mechanisms of which are still incompletely known. Recent studies suggest that the activation of inflammatory responses together with glial cell reactivity highly contribute to excitotoxic neuronal damage. However, pharmacological tools to attenuate their activation in the postnatal brain are still poorly elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of inflammatory mediators in kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal damage in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs). A specific cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor N-[2-(cyclohexyloxy)-4-nitrophenyl]-methanesulfonamide (NS-398) was used to study whether or not it could ameliorate neuronal death. Our results show that KA treatment (24 h) resulted in a dose-dependent degeneration of CA3a/b pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, COX-2 immunoreactivity was pronouncedly enhanced particularly in CA3c pyramidal neurons, microglial and astrocyte morphology changed from a resting to active appearance, the expression of the microglial specific protein, Iba1, increased, and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production increased. These indicated the activation of inflammatory processes. However, the expression of neither proinflammatory cytokines, i.e. tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), nor the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 mRNA was significantly altered by KA treatment as studied by real-time PCR. Despite activation of an array of inflammatory processes, neuronal damage could not be rescued either with the combined pre- and co-treatment with a specific COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398. Our results suggest that KA induces activation of a repertoire of inflammatory processes in immature OHCs, and that the timing of anti-inflammatory treatment to achieve neuroprotection is a challenge due to developmental properties and the complexity of inflammatory processes activated by

  3. The effects of acute alcohol exposure on the response properties of neurons in visual cortex area 17 of cats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bo; Xia Jing; Li Guangxing; Zhou Yifeng

    2010-03-15

    Physiological and behavioral studies have demonstrated that a number of visual functions such as visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and motion perception can be impaired by acute alcohol exposure. The orientation- and direction-selective responses of cells in primary visual cortex are thought to participate in the perception of form and motion. To investigate how orientation selectivity and direction selectivity of neurons are influenced by acute alcohol exposure in vivo, we used the extracellular single-unit recording technique to examine the response properties of neurons in primary visual cortex (A17) of adult cats. We found that alcohol reduces spontaneous activity, visual evoked unit responses, the signal-to-noise ratio, and orientation selectivity of A17 cells. In addition, small but detectable changes in both the preferred orientation/direction and the bandwidth of the orientation tuning curve of strongly orientation-biased A17 cells were observed after acute alcohol administration. Our findings may provide physiological evidence for some alcohol-related deficits in visual function observed in behavioral studies.

  4. CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS, OUTCOMES AND RISK FACTORS FOR DEATH AMONG CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS WITH HIV-RELATED ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY

    PubMed Central

    LUNA, Leonardo Duarte Sobreira; SOARES, Douglas de Sousa; JUNIOR, Geraldo Bezerra da SILVA; CAVALCANTE, Malena Gadelha; MALVEIRA, Lara Raissa Cavalcante; MENESES, Gdayllon Cavalcante; PEREIRA, Eanes Delgado Barros; DAHER, Elizabeth De Francesco

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Background: The aim of this study is to describe clinical characteristics, outcomes and risk factors for death among patients with HIV-related acute kidney injury (AKI) admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: A retrospective study was conducted with HIV-infected AKI patients admitted to the ICU of an infectious diseases hospital in Fortaleza, Brazil. All the patients with confirmed diagnosis of HIV and AKI admitted from January 2004 to December 2011 were included. A comparison between survivors and non-survivors was performed. Risk factors for death were investigated. Results: Among 256 AKI patients admitted to the ICU in the study period, 73 were identified as HIV-infected, with a predominance of male patients (83.6%), and the mean age was 41.2 ± 10.4 years. Non-survivor patients presented higher APACHE II scores (61.4 ± 19 vs. 38.6 ± 18, p = 0.004), used more vasoconstrictors (70.9 vs. 37.5%, p = 0.02) and needed more mechanical ventilation - MV (81.1 vs. 35.3%, p = 0.001). There were 55 deaths (75.3%), most of them (53.4%) due to septic shock. Independent risk factors for mortality were septic shock (OR = 14.2, 95% CI = 2.0-96.9, p = 0.007) and respiratory insufficiency with need of MV (OR = 27.6, 95% CI = 5.0-153.0, p < 0.001). Conclusion: Non-survivor HIV-infected patients with AKI admitted to the ICU presented higher severity APACHE II scores, more respiratory damage and hemodynamic impairment than survivors. Septic shock and respiratory insufficiency were independently associated to death. PMID:27410912

  5. Cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on primary neuronal cells of the forebrain: the involvement of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors and apoptotic cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Tomiyama, Ken-ichi; Funada, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    The abuse of herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids has become an issue of public concern. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the acute cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on mouse brain neuronal cells. Cytotoxicity induced by synthetic cannabinoid (CP-55,940, CP-47,497, CP-47,497-C8, HU-210, JWH-018, JWH-210, AM-2201, and MAM-2201) was examined using forebrain neuronal cultures. These synthetic cannabinoids induced cytotoxicity in the forebrain cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity was suppressed by preincubation with the selective CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist AM251, but not with the selective CB{sub 2} receptor antagonist AM630. Furthermore, annexin-V-positive cells were found among the treated forebrain cells. Synthetic cannabinoid treatment induced the activation of caspase-3, and preincubation with a caspase-3 inhibitor significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity. These synthetic cannabinoids induced apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent mechanism in the forebrain cultures. Our results indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards primary neuronal cells is mediated by the CB{sub 1} receptor, but not by the CB{sub 2} receptor, and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the apoptosis induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, excessive synthetic cannabinoid abuse may present a serious acute health concern due to neuronal damage or deficits in the brain. - Highlights: • Synthetic cannabinoids (classical cannabinoids, non-classical cannabinoids, and aminoalkylindole derivatives) induce cytotoxicity in mouse forebrain cultures. • Synthetic cannabinoid-induced cytotoxicity towards forebrain cultures is mediated by the CB{sub 1} receptor, but not by the CB{sub 2} receptor, and involves caspase-dependent apoptosis. • A high concentration of synthetic cannabinoids may be toxic to neuronal cells that express CB{sub 1} receptors.

  6. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in neurons of trigeminal ganglion contributes to nociception induced by acute pulpitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jia-Ji; Du, Yi; Cai, Wen-Ke; Kuang, Rong; Chang, Ting; Zhang, Zhuo; Yang, Yong-Xiang; Sun, Chao; Li, Zhu-Yi; Kuang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Pain caused by acute pulpitis (AP) is a common symptom in clinical settings. However, its underlying mechanisms have largely remained unknown. Using AP model, we demonstrated that dental injury caused severe pulp inflammation with up-regulated serum IL-1β. Assessment from head-withdrawal reflex thresholds (HWTs) and open-field test demonstrated nociceptive response at 1 day post injury. A consistent up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) ipsilateral to the injured pulp was found; and downstream signaling components of TLR4, including MyD88, TRIF and NF-κB, and cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β, were also increased. Retrograde labeling indicated that most TLR4 positve neuron in the TG innnervated the pulp and TLR4 immunoreactivity was mainly in the medium and small neurons. Double labeling showed that the TLR4 expressing neurons in the ipsilateral TG were TRPV1 and CGRP positive, but IB4 negative. Furthermore, blocking TLR4 by eritoran (TLR4 antagonist) in TGs of the AP model significantly down-regulated MyD88, TRIF, NF-κB, TNF-α and IL-1β production and behavior of nociceptive response. Our findings suggest that TLR4 signaling in TG cells, particularly the peptidergic TRPV1 neurons, plays a key role in AP-induced nociception, and indicate that TLR4 signaling could be a potential therapeutic target for orofacial pain. PMID:26224622

  7. The acute hospital setting as a place of death and final care: a qualitative study on perspectives of family physicians, nurses and family carers.

    PubMed

    Reyniers, Thijs; Houttekier, Dirk; Cohen, Joachim; Pasman, H Roeline; Deliens, Luc

    2014-05-01

    While the focus of end-of-life care research and policy has predominantly been on 'death in a homelike environment', little is known about perceptions of the acute hospital setting as a place of final care or death. Using a qualitative design and constant comparative analysis, the perspectives of family physicians, nurses and family carers were explored. Participants generally perceived the acute hospital setting to be inadequate for terminally ill patients, although they indicated that in some circumstances it might be a 'safe haven'. This implies that a higher quality of end-of-life care provision in the acute hospital setting needs to be ensured, preferably by improving communication skills. At the same time alternatives to the acute hospital setting need to be developed or expanded.

  8. Drinking to near death--acute water intoxication leading to neurogenic stunned myocardium.

    PubMed

    Losonczy, Lia I; Lovallo, Emily; Schnorr, C Daniel; Mantuani, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic stunned myocardium is a rare disease entity that has been typically described as a consequence of subarachnoid hemorrhage and, less commonly, seizures. Here we describe a case of a healthy young woman who drank excessive free water causing acute hyponatremia complicated by cerebral edema and seizure, leading to cardiogenic shock from neurogenic stunned myocardium. Two days later, she had complete return of her normal cardiac function.

  9. Auraptene and Other Prenyloxyphenylpropanoids Suppress Microglial Activation and Dopaminergic Neuronal Cell Death in a Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama, Satoshi; Semba, Tomoki; Toyoda, Nobuki; Epifano, Francesco; Genovese, Salvatore; Fiorito, Serena; Taddeo, Vito Alessandro; Sawamoto, Atsushi; Nakajima, Mitsunari; Furukawa, Yoshiko

    2016-01-01

    In patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), hyperactivated inflammation in the brain, particularly microglial hyperactivation in the substantia nigra (SN), is reported to be one of the triggers for the delayed loss of dopaminergic neurons and sequential motor functional impairments. We previously reported that (1) auraptene (AUR), a natural prenyloxycoumain, suppressed inflammatory responses including the hyperactivation of microglia in the ischemic brain and inflamed brain, thereby inhibiting neuronal cell death; (2) 7-isopentenyloxycoumarin (7-IP), another natural prenyloxycoumain, exerted anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects against excitotoxicity; and (3) 4′-geranyloxyferulic acid (GOFA), a natural prenyloxycinnamic acid, also exerted anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, using an intranigral lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PD-like mouse model, we investigated whether AUR, 7-IP, and GOFA suppress microglial activation and protect against dopaminergic neuronal cell death in the SN. We successfully showed that these prenyloxyphenylpropanoids exhibited these prospective abilities, suggesting the potential of these compounds as neuroprotective agents for patients with PD. PMID:27763495

  10. Akt attenuates apoptotic death through phosphorylation of H2A under hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in PC12 cells and hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Hye; Kim, Chung Kwon; Lee, Sang Bae; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Cho, Sung-Woo; Ahn, Jee-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Although the essential role of protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt in cell survival signaling has been clearly established, the mechanism by which Akt mediates the cellular response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress remains unclear. We demonstrated that Akt attenuated neuronal apoptosis through direct association with histone 2A (H2A) and phosphorylation of H2A at threonine 17. At early time points during H2O2 exposure of PC12 cells and primary hippocampal neurons, when the cells can tolerate the level of DNA damage, Akt was activated and phosphorylated H2A, leading to inhibition of apoptotic death. At later time points, Akt delivered the NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase Sirtuin 2 (Sirt 2) to the vicinity of phosphorylated H2A in response to irreversible DNA damage, thereby inducing H2A deacetylation and subsequently leading to apoptotic death. Ectopically expressed T17A-substituted H2A minimally interacted with Akt and failed to prevent apoptosis under oxidative stress. Thus Akt-mediated H2A phosphorylation has an anti-apoptotic function in conditions of H2O2-induced oxidative stress in neurons and PC12 cells. PMID:26899247

  11. S-Nitrosylation of parkin as a novel regulator of p53-mediated neuronal cell death in sporadic Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutations in the gene encoding parkin, a neuroprotective protein with dual functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase and transcriptional repressor of p53, are linked to familial forms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). We hypothesized that oxidative posttranslational modification of parkin by environmental toxins may contribute to sporadic PD. Results We first demonstrated that S-nitrosylation of parkin decreased its activity as a repressor of p53 gene expression, leading to upregulation of p53. Chromatin immunoprecipitation as well as gel-shift assays showed that parkin bound to the p53 promoter, and this binding was inhibited by S-nitrosylation of parkin. Additionally, nitrosative stress induced apoptosis in cells expressing parkin, and this death was, at least in part, dependent upon p53. In primary mesencephalic cultures, pesticide-induced apoptosis was prevented by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). In a mouse model of pesticide-induced PD, both S-nitrosylated (SNO-)parkin and p53 protein levels were increased, while administration of a NOS inhibitor mitigated neuronal death in these mice. Moreover, the levels of SNO-parkin and p53 were simultaneously elevated in postmortem human PD brain compared to controls. Conclusions Taken together, our data indicate that S-nitrosylation of parkin, leading to p53-mediated neuronal cell death, contributes to the pathophysiology of sporadic PD. PMID:23985028

  12. Minocycline attenuates both OGD-induced HMGB1 release and HMGB1-induced cell death in ischemic neuronal injury in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Biswas, Kamal Krishna; Ito, Takashi; Tancharoen, Salunya; Morimoto, Yoko; Matsuda, Fumiyo; Oyama, Yoko; Takenouchi, Kazunori; Miura, Naoki; Arimura, Noboru; Nawa, Yuko; Meng, Xiaojie; Shrestha, Binita; Arimura, Shinichiro; and others

    2009-07-24

    High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a non-histone DNA-binding protein, is massively released into the extracellular space from neuronal cells after ischemic insult and exacerbates brain tissue damage in rats. Minocycline is a semisynthetic second-generation tetracycline antibiotic which has recently been shown to be a promising neuroprotective agent. In this study, we found that minocycline inhibited HMGB1 release in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-treated PC12 cells and triggered the activation of p38mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2). The ERK kinase (MEK)1/2 inhibitor U-0126 and p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580 blocked HMGB1 release in response to OGD. Furthermore, HMGB1 triggered cell death in a dose-dependent fashion. Minocycline significantly rescued HMGB1-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. In light of recent observations as well as the good safety profile of minocycline in humans, we propose that minocycline might play a potent neuroprotective role through the inhibition of HMGB1-induced neuronal cell death in cerebral infarction.

  13. Infection-related mortality in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: an analysis of infectious deaths on UKALL2003.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, David; Bate, Jessica; Wade, Rachel; Clack, Rachel; Dhir, Sunita; Hough, Rachael; Vora, Ajay; Goulden, Nick; Samarasinghe, Sujith

    2014-08-14

    Although infection is the major cause of treatment-related mortality (TRM) in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, factors associated with infection-related mortality (IRM) are poorly understood. To address this, we report an analysis of all 75 cases of IRM in the United Kingdom Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Randomised Trial 2003 (UKALL 2003). The 5-year cumulative incidence of IRM was 2.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9%-3.0%), accounting for 75 (30%) of 249 trial deaths and 75 (64%) of 117 TRM deaths. Risk for IRM as a proportion of TRM was greater in induction than other phases (77% vs 56%; P = .02). Sixty-eight percent of cases were associated with bacterial infection (64% Gram-negative) and 20% with fungal infection. Down syndrome was the most significant risk factor for IRM (odds ratio [OR], 12.08; 95% CI, 6.54-22.32; P < .0001). In addition, there was a trend toward increased IRM in girls (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.02-2.61; P = .04), as well as increasing treatment intensity (regimen B vs A: OR, 2.11 [95% CI, 1.24-3.60]; regimen C vs A: OR, 1.41 [95% CI, 0.76-2.62]; P = .02). Importantly, patients with Down syndrome were at significantly higher risk for IRM during maintenance (P = .048). Our results confirm Down syndrome as a major risk factor for IRM. Enhanced supportive care and prophylactic antibiotics should be considered in high-risk patient groups and during periods of increased risk. This study was registered at http://www.controlled-trials.com/ as #ISRCTN07355119.

  14. Genetic Dissection of γ-secretase-dependent and - independent Functions of Presenilin in Regulating Neuronal Cell Cycle and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Kallhoff-Munoz, Verena; Hu, Lingyun; Chen, Xiaoli; Pautler, Robia G.; Zheng, Hui

    2008-01-01

    Cell cycle markers have been shown to be upregulated and proposed to lead to apoptosis of post-mitotic neurons in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Presenilin (PS) plays a critical role in AD pathogenesis, and loss of function studies in mice established a potent effect of PS in cell proliferation in peripheral tissues. Whether PS has a similar activity in the neuronal cell cycle has not been investigated. PS exhibits γ-secretase-dependent and -independent functions; the former requires aspartate 257 (D257) as part of the active site, and the latter involves the hydrophilic loop domain encoded by exon 10. We used two novel mouse models, one expressing the PS1 D257A mutation on a postnatal PS conditional knockout background and the other deleting exon 10 of PS1, to dissect the γ-secretase-dependent and -independent activities of PS in the adult CNS. Whereas γ-secretase plays a dominant role in neuronal survival, our studies reveal potent neuronal cell cycle regulation mediated by the PS1 hydrophilic loop. Although neurons expressing cell cycle markers do not directly succumb to apoptosis, they are more vulnerable under stress conditions. Importantly, our data identify a novel pool of cytoplasmic p53 as a downstream mediator of this cellular vulnerability. These results support a model whereby the PS γ-secretase activity is essential in maintaining neuronal viability, and the PS1 loop domain modulates neuronal homeostasis through cell cycle and cytoplasmic p53 control. PMID:18971484

  15. Amyloid beta-peptide impairs ion-motive ATPase activities: evidence for a role in loss of neuronal Ca2+ homeostasis and cell death.

    PubMed

    Mark, R J; Hensley, K; Butterfield, D A; Mattson, M P

    1995-09-01

    The amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) that accumulates as insoluble plaques in the brain in Alzheimer's disease can be directly neurotoxic and can increase neuronal vulnerability to excitotoxic insults. The mechanism of A beta toxicity is unclear but is believed to involve generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and loss of calcium homeostasis. We now report that exposure of cultured rat hippocampal neurons to A beta 1-40 or A beta 25-35 causes a selective reduction in Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity which precedes loss of calcium homeostasis and cell degeneration. Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity was reduced within 30 min of exposure to A beta 25-35 and declined to less than 40% of basal level by 3 hr. A beta did not impair other Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase activities or Na+/Ca2+ exchange. Experiments with ouabain, a specific inhibitor of the Na+/K(+)-ATPase, demonstrated that impairment of this enzyme was sufficient to induce an elevation of [Ca2+]i and neuronal injury. Impairment of Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity appeared to be causally involved in the elevation of [Ca2+]i and neurotoxicity since suppression of Na+ influx significantly reduced A beta- and ouabain-induced [Ca2+]i elevation and neuronal death. Neuronal degeneration induced by ouabain appeared to be of an apoptotic form as indicated by nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation. The antioxidant free radical scavengers vitamin E and propylgallate significantly attenuated A beta-induced impairment of Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity, elevation of [Ca2+]i and neurotoxicity, suggesting a role for ROS. Finally, exposure of synaptosomes from postmortem human hippocampus to A beta resulted in a significant and specific reduction in Na+/K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase activities, without affecting other Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase activities or Na+/Ca2+ exchange. These data suggest that impairment of ion-motive ATPases may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuronal injury in Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Mechanisms of cell death in acute myocardial infarction: pathophysiological implications for treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Zwaan, C.; Daemen, M.J.A.P.; Hermens, W.Th.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to draw attention to the growing list of pathophysiological phenomena occurring in blood, the vessel wall and cardiac tissue during myocardial infarction. A further aim is to point to the complexity of factors, contributing to cardiac dysfunction and the implications for therapy, aimed at limiting myocardial cell death. Not all pathophysiological mechanisms have been elucidated yet, indicating the necessity for further research in this area. In addition we describe interventions which have shown promise in animal studies, those which may show promise in humans, and those which are accepted as therapies of choice. PMID:25696691

  17. Effects of neuron-specific estrogen receptor (ER) α and ERβ deletion on the acute estrogen negative feedback mechanism in adult female mice.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Rachel Y; Porteous, Robert; Chambon, Pierre; Abrahám, István; Herbison, Allan E

    2014-04-01

    The negative feedback mechanism through which 17β-estradiol (E2) acts to suppress the activity of the GnRH neurons remains unclear. Using inducible and cell-specific genetic mouse models, we examined the estrogen receptor (ER) isoforms expressed by neurons that mediate acute estrogen negative feedback. Adult female mutant mice in which ERα was deleted from all neurons in the neonatal period failed to exhibit estrous cycles or negative feedback. Adult mutant female mice with neonatal neuronal ERβ deletion exhibited normal estrous cycles, but a failure of E2 to suppress LH secretion was seen in ovariectomized mice. Mutant mice with a GnRH neuron-selective deletion of ERβ exhibited normal cycles and negative feedback, suggesting no critical role for ERβ in GnRH neurons in acute negative feedback. To examine the adult roles of neurons expressing ERα, an inducible tamoxifen-based Cre-LoxP approach was used to ablate ERα from neurons that express calmodulin kinase IIα in adults. This resulted in mice with no estrous cycles, a normal increase in LH after ovariectomy, but an inability of E2 to suppress LH secretion. Finally, acute administration of ERα- and ERβ-selective agonists to adult ovariectomized wild-type mice revealed that activation of ERα suppressed LH secretion, whereas ERβ agonists had no effect. This study highlights the differences in adult reproductive phenotypes that result from neonatal vs adult ablation of ERα in the brain. Together, these experiments expand previous global knockout studies by demonstrating that neurons expressing ERα are essential and probably sufficient for the acute estrogen negative feedback mechanism in female mice.

  18. Evidence for metal poisoning in acute deaths of large red drum (Scianeops ocellata)

    SciTech Connect

    Cardeihac, P.T.; Simpson, C.F.; White, F.H.; Thompson, N.P.; Carr, W.E.

    1981-12-01

    Two of the approximately 100 large, mature, red drum found dead or dying in Florida's Indian River and Mosquito Lagoon were examined. Determinations were made of serum electrolyte concentrations, total proteins, albumins, globulins, creatinine values, and enzyme activity. Concentrations of copper, zinc, arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, lead, and selenium were determined by atomic aborption. The outstanding histological lesions were found in the gills of a moribund specimen. Results indicate that the acute episode was triggered by ingestion of copper, zinc, and arsenic. However, cadmium, mercury and chromium may have been contributory by binding with metallothionein and thus lowering tolerance to metal poisoning. (JMT)

  19. Genistein inhibition of OGD-induced brain neuron death correlates with its modulation of apoptosis, voltage-gated potassium and sodium currents and glutamate signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xue-Ling; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Yu-Xiang; He, Cong-Cong; Tian, Kun; Wang, Hong-Gang; An, Di; Heng, Bin; Liu, Yan-Qiang

    2016-07-25

    In the present study, we established an in vitro model of hypoxic-ischemia via exposing primary neurons of newborn rats to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and observing the effects of genistein, a soybean isoflavone, on hypoxic-ischemic neuron viability, apoptosis, voltage-activated potassium (Kv) and sodium (Nav) currents, and glutamate receptor subunits. The results indicated that OGD exposure reduced the viability and increased the apoptosis of brain neurons. Meanwhile, OGD exposure caused changes in the current-voltage curves and current amplitude values of voltage-activated potassium and sodium currents; OGD exposure also decreased GluR2 expression and increased NR2 expression. However, genistein at least partially reversed the effects caused by OGD. The results suggest that hypoxic-ischemia-caused neuronal apoptosis/death is related to an increase in K(+) efflux, a decrease in Na(+) influx, a down-regulation of GluR2, and an up-regulation of NR2. Genistein may exert some neuroprotective effects via the modulation of Kv and Nav currents and the glutamate signal pathway, mediated by GluR2 and NR2.

  20. Deletion Of XIAP reduces the severity of acute pancreatitis via regulation of cell death and nuclear factor-κB activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Yu, Jiang; Chi, Jun-Lin; Long, Fei-Wu; Yang, Hong-Wei; Chen, Ke-Ling; Lv, Zhao-Ying; Zhou, Bin; Peng, Zhi-Hai; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Zong-Guang

    2017-03-16

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) still remains a clinical challenge, not only for its high mortality but the uncontrolled inflammatory progression from acute pancreatitis (AP) to SAP. Cell death, including apoptosis and necrosis are critical pathology of AP, since the severity of pancreatitis correlates directly with necrosis and inversely with apoptosis Therefore, regulation of cell death from necrosis to apoptosis may have practicably therapeutic value. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is the best characterized member of the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAP) family, but its function in AP remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the potential role of XIAP in regulation of cell death and inflammation during acute pancreatitis. The in vivo pancreatitis model was induced by the administration of cerulein with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or by the administration of l-arginine in wild-type or XIAP-deficient mice, and ex vivo model was induced by the administration of cerulein+LPS in AR42J cell line following XIAP inhibition. The severity of acute pancreatitis was determined by serum amylase activity and histological grading. XIAP deletion on cell apoptosis, necrosis and inflammatory response were examined. Caspases activities, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and receptor-interacting protein kinase1 (RIP1) degradation were assessed by western blot. Deletion of XIAP resulted in the reduction of amylase activity, decrease of NF-κB activation and less release of TNF-α and IL-6, together with increased caspases activities and RIP1 degradation, leading to enhanced apoptosis and reduced necrosis in pancreatic acinar cells and ameliorated the severity of acute pancreatitis. Our results indicate that deletion of XIAP switches cell death away from necrosis to apoptosis and decreases the inflammatory response, effectively attenuating the severity of AP/SAP. The critical role of XIAP in cell death and inflammation suggests that

  1. Amyloid-β reduces the expression of neuronal FAIM-L, thereby shifting the inflammatory response mediated by TNFα from neuronal protection to death

    PubMed Central

    Carriba, P; Jimenez, S; Navarro, V; Moreno-Gonzalez, I; Barneda-Zahonero, B; Moubarak, R S; Lopez-Soriano, J; Gutierrez, A; Vitorica, J; Comella, J X

    2015-01-01

    The brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) present elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), a cytokine that has a dual function in neuronal cells. On one hand, TNFα can activate neuronal apoptosis, and on the other hand, it can protect these cells against amyloid-β (Aβ) toxicity. Given the dual behavior of this molecule, there is some controversy regarding its contribution to the pathogenesis of AD. Here we examined the relevance of the long form of Fas apoptotic inhibitory molecule (FAIM) protein, FAIM-L, in regulating the dual function of TNFα. We detected that FAIM-L was reduced in the hippocampi of patients with AD. We also observed that the entorhinal and hippocampal cortex of a mouse model of AD (PS1M146LxAPP751sl) showed a reduction in this protein before the onset of neurodegeneration. Notably, cultured neurons treated with the cortical soluble fractions of these animals showed a decrease in endogenous FAIM-L, an effect that is mimicked by the treatment with Aβ-derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs). The reduction in the expression of FAIM-L is associated with the progression of the neurodegeneration by changing the inflammatory response mediated by TNFα in neurons. In this sense, we also demonstrate that the protection afforded by TNFα against Aβ toxicity ceases when endogenous FAIM-L is reduced by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or by treatment with ADDLs. All together, these results support the notion that levels of FAIM-L contribute to determine the protective or deleterious effect of TNFα in neuronal cells. PMID:25675299

  2. The acute phase of mild traumatic brain injury is characterized by a distance-dependent neuronal hypoactivity.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Victoria P A; Shultz, Sandy R; Yan, Edwin B; O'Brien, Terence J; Rajan, Ramesh

    2014-11-15

    The consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) on neuronal functionality are only now being elucidated. We have now examined the changes in sensory encoding in the whisker-recipient barrel cortex and the brain tissue damage in the acute phase (24 h) after induction of TBI (n=9), with sham controls receiving surgery only (n=5). Injury was induced using the lateral fluid percussion injury method, which causes a mixture of focal and diffuse brain injury. Both population and single cell neuronal responses evoked by both simple and complex whisker stimuli revealed a suppression of activity that decreased with distance from the locus of injury both within a hemisphere and across hemispheres, with a greater extent of hypoactivity in ipsilateral barrel cortex compared with contralateral cortex. This was coupled with an increase in spontaneous output in Layer 5a, but only ipsilateral to the injury site. There was also disruption of axonal integrity in various regions in the ipsilateral but not contralateral hemisphere. These results complement our previous findings after mild diffuse-only TBI induced by the weight-drop impact acceleration method where, in the same acute post-injury phase, we found a similar depth-dependent hypoactivity in sensory cortex. This suggests a common sequelae of events in both diffuse TBI and mixed focal/diffuse TBI in the immediate post-injury period that then evolve over time to produce different long-term functional outcomes.

  3. The Acute Phase of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Is Characterized by a Distance-Dependent Neuronal Hypoactivity

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Victoria P.A.; Shultz, Sandy R.; Yan, Edwin B.; O'Brien, Terence J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) on neuronal functionality are only now being elucidated. We have now examined the changes in sensory encoding in the whisker-recipient barrel cortex and the brain tissue damage in the acute phase (24 h) after induction of TBI (n=9), with sham controls receiving surgery only (n=5). Injury was induced using the lateral fluid percussion injury method, which causes a mixture of focal and diffuse brain injury. Both population and single cell neuronal responses evoked by both simple and complex whisker stimuli revealed a suppression of activity that decreased with distance from the locus of injury both within a hemisphere and across hemispheres, with a greater extent of hypoactivity in ipsilateral barrel cortex compared with contralateral cortex. This was coupled with an increase in spontaneous output in Layer 5a, but only ipsilateral to the injury site. There was also disruption of axonal integrity in various regions in the ipsilateral but not contralateral hemisphere. These results complement our previous findings after mild diffuse-only TBI induced by the weight-drop impact acceleration method where, in the same acute post-injury phase, we found a similar depth-dependent hypoactivity in sensory cortex. This suggests a common sequelae of events in both diffuse TBI and mixed focal/diffuse TBI in the immediate post-injury period that then evolve over time to produce different long-term functional outcomes. PMID:24927383

  4. Diverse impact of acute and long-term extracellular proteolytic activity on plasticity of neuronal excitability

    PubMed Central

    Wójtowicz, Tomasz; Brzdąk, Patrycja; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2015-01-01

    Learning and memory require alteration in number and strength of existing synaptic connections. Extracellular proteolysis within the synapses has been shown to play a pivotal role in synaptic plasticity by determining synapse structure, function, and number. Although synaptic plasticity of excitatory synapses is generally acknowledged to play a crucial role in formation of memory traces, some components of neural plasticity are reflected by nonsynaptic changes. Since information in neural networks is ultimately conveyed with action potentials, scaling of neuronal excitability could significantly enhance or dampen the outcome of dendritic integration, boost neuronal information storage capacity and ultimately learning. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. With this regard, several lines of evidence and our most recent study support a view that activity of extracellular proteases might affect information processing in neuronal networks by affecting targets beyond synapses. Here, we review the most recent studies addressing the impact of extracellular proteolysis on plasticity of neuronal excitability and discuss how enzymatic activity may alter input-output/transfer function of neurons, supporting cognitive processes. Interestingly, extracellular proteolysis may alter intrinsic neuronal excitability and excitation/inhibition balance both rapidly (time of minutes to hours) and in long-term window. Moreover, it appears that by cleavage of extracellular matrix (ECM) constituents, proteases may modulate function of ion channels or alter inhibitory drive and hence facilitate active participation of dendrites and axon initial segments (AISs) in adjusting neuronal input/output function. Altogether, a picture emerges whereby both rapid and long-term extracellular proteolysis may influence some aspects of information processing in neurons, such as initiation of action potential, spike frequency adaptation, properties of action potential and dendritic

  5. Prognostic indicators of adverse renal outcome and death in acute kidney injury hospital survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hamzić-Mehmedbašić, Aida; Rašić, Senija; Balavac, Merima; Rebić, Damir; Delić-Šarac, Marina; Durak-Nalbantić, Azra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Data regarding prognostic factors of post-discharge mortality and adverse renal function outcome in acute kidney injury (AKI) hospital survivors are scarce and controversial. Objectives: We aimed to identify predictors of post-discharge mortality and adverse renal function outcome in AKI hospital survivors. Patients and Methods: The study group consisted of 84 AKI hospital survivors admitted to the tertiary medical center during 2-year period. Baseline clinical parameters, with renal outcome 3 months after discharge and 6-month mortality were evaluated. According survival and renal function outcome, patients were divided into two groups. Results: Patients who did not recover renal function were statistically significantly older (P < 0.007) with higher Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score (P < 0.000) and more likely to have anuria and oliguria (P = 0.008) compared to those with recovery. Deceased AKI patients were statistically significantly older (P < 0.000), with higher CCI score (P < 0.000), greater prevalence of sepsis (P =0.004), higher levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) (P < 0.017) and ferritin (P < 0.051) and lower concentrations of albumin (P<0.01) compared to survivors. By multivariate analysis, independent predictors of adverse renal outcome were female gender (P =0.033), increasing CCI (P =0.000), presence of pre-existing chronic kidney disease (P =0.000) and diabetes mellitus (P =0.019) as well as acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) (P =0.032), while protective factor for renal function outcome was higher urine output (P =0.009). Independent predictors of post-discharge mortality were female gender (P =0.04), higher CCI score (P =0.001) and sepsis (P =0.034). Conclusion: Female AKI hospital survivors with increasing burden of comorbidities, diagnosis of sepsis and ADHF seem to be at high-risk for poor post-discharge outcome. PMID:27471736

  6. Resveratrol suppresses calcium-mediated microglial activation and rescues hippocampal neurons of adult rats following acute bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Ji-Nan; Liao, Wen-Chieh; Wu, Un-In; Shyu, Ling-Yuh; Mai, Fu-Der; Chen, Li-You; Chen, Mei-Jung; Youn, Su-Chung; Chang, Hung-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is a serious disease with severe neurological sequelae. The intense calcium-mediated microglial activation and subsequently pro-inflammatory cytokine release plays an important role in eliciting ABM-related oxidative damage. Considering resveratrol possesses significant anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties, the present study aims to determine whether resveratrol would exert beneficial effects on hippocampal neurons following ABM. ABM was induced by inoculating Klebsiella pneumoniae into adult rats intraventricularly. The time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin-B4 (GSA-IB4) and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) immunohistochemistry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as well as malondialdehyde (MDA) measurement were used to examine the calcium expression, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine level, and extent of oxidative stress, respectively. In ABM rats, strong calcium signaling associated with enhanced microglial activation was observed in hippocampus. Increased microglial expression was coincided with intense production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative damage. However, in rats receiving resveratrol after ABM, the calcium intensity, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine and MDA levels were all significantly decreased. Quantitative data showed that much more hippocampal neurons were survived in resveratrol-treated rats following ABM. As resveratrol successfully rescues hippocampal neurons from ABM by suppressing the calcium-mediated microglial activation, therapeutic use of resveratrol may act as a promising strategy to counteract the ABM-induced neurological damage.

  7. 5-HT1A receptor activation counteracted the effect of acute immobilization of noradrenergic neurons in the rat locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Rioja, José; Santín, Luis J; López-Barroso, Diana; Doña, Alicia; Ulzurrun, Eugenia; Aguirre, José A

    2007-01-22

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of acute stress and the 5-HT(1A) receptor involvement in both, the hippocampus noradrenaline (NA) tissue levels and the c-Fos immunoreactivity (c-Fos-IR) in the catecholaminergic neurons of the locus coeruleus (LC). Double immunocytochemical staining of tyrosine hydroxilase (TH) and c-Fos protein combined with stereological techniques were used to study the specific cell activation in the LC neurons in five experimental groups (control group, immobilization (1h) group, 8-OH-DPAT group (8-OH-DPAT 0.3mg/kg, s.c.), DPAT+IMMO group (8-OH-DPAT 0.3mg/kg, s.c., 30' prior acute immobilization) and WAY+DPAT+IMMO group (WAY-100635 0.3mg/kg, s.c. and 8-OH-DPAT 0.3mg/kg, s.c., 45'and 30', respectively, before immobilization). The results showed that hippocampal NA tissue levels and c-Fos-IR in the TH positive neurons of the LC were significantly increased immediately and after 90', respectively, after the immobilization period. Pre-treatment with 8-OH-DPAT counteracted the effects induced by immobilization, but pre-treatment with WAY-100635 did not block the effects induced by 8-OH-DPAT. These results suggest that noradrenaline system is associated in a significant way with immobilization stress. The role of 5-HT(1A) receptor activation in this stress response is also discussed.

  8. Plasma ceramides predict cardiovascular death in patients with stable coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndromes beyond LDL-cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Laaksonen, Reijo; Ekroos, Kim; Sysi-Aho, Marko; Hilvo, Mika; Vihervaara, Terhi; Kauhanen, Dimple; Suoniemi, Matti; Hurme, Reini; März, Winfried; Scharnagl, Hubert; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Nieminen, Markku S.; Klingenberg, Roland; Matter, Christian M.; Hornemann, Thorsten; Jüni, Peter; Rodondi, Nicolas; Räber, Lorenz; Windecker, Stephan; Gencer, Baris; Pedersen, Eva Ringdal; Tell, Grethe S.; Nygård, Ottar; Mach, Francois; Sinisalo, Juha; Lüscher, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim was to study the prognostic value of plasma ceramides (Cer) as cardiovascular death (CV death) markers in three independent coronary artery disease (CAD) cohorts. Methods and results Corogene study is a prospective Finnish cohort including stable CAD patients (n = 160). Multiple lipid biomarkers and C-reactive protein were measured in addition to plasma Cer(d18:1/16:0), Cer(d18:1/18:0), Cer(d18:1/24:0), and Cer(d18:1/24:1). Subsequently, the association between high-risk ceramides and CV mortality was investigated in the prospective Special Program University Medicine—Inflammation in Acute Coronary Syndromes (SPUM-ACS) cohort (n = 1637), conducted in four Swiss university hospitals. Finally, the results were validated in Bergen Coronary Angiography Cohort (BECAC), a prospective Norwegian cohort study of stable CAD patients. Ceramides, especially when used in ratios, were significantly associated with CV death in all studies, independent of other lipid markers and C-reactive protein. Adjusted odds ratios per standard deviation for the Cer(d18:1/16:0)/Cer(d18:1/24:0) ratio were 4.49 (95% CI, 2.24–8.98), 1.64 (1.29–2.08), and 1.77 (1.41–2.23) in the Corogene, SPUM-ACS, and BECAC studies, respectively. The Cer(d18:1/16:0)/Cer(d18:1/24:0) ratio improved the predictive value of the GRACE score (net reclassification improvement, NRI = 0.17 and ΔAUC = 0.09) in ACS and the predictive value of the Marschner score in stable CAD (NRI = 0.15 and ΔAUC = 0.02). Conclusions Distinct plasma ceramide ratios are significant predictors of CV death both in patients with stable CAD and ACS, over and above currently used lipid markers. This may improve the identification of high-risk patients in need of more aggressive therapeutic interventions. PMID:27125947

  9. Characteristics of multiple Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels in acutely dissociated chick ciliary-ganglion neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Dryer, S E; Dourado, M M; Wisgirda, M E

    1991-01-01

    1. Whole-cell and single-channel recordings were used to characterize Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels (IK(Ca)) in acutely dissociated chick-ganglion neurones. 2. Application of depolarizing voltage steps resulted in outward currents that could be separated according to their dependence on external Ca2+ and/or holding potential. IK(Ca) was the only outward current that could be evoked from holding potentials of -50 mV or less. IK(Ca) was eliminated by bath application of Ca(2+)-free salines. A voltage-dependent outward current (IK(V)) could be evoked from more negative holding potentials in Ca(2+)-free salines. IK(V) was only partially blocked by as much as 30 mM-tetraethylammonium (TEA). 3. Tail currents associated with IK(Ca) reversed close to the K+ equilibrium potential (EK). IK(Ca) tail currents appeared sigmoidal, but the falling phase of the tail currents could be fitted with exponential curves that decayed faster at more negative membrane potentials. 4. IK(Ca) was blocked completely and reversibly by 10 mM-TEA. IK(Ca) was substantially reduced (80-90%) by as little as 1 mM-TEA. 5. Total IK(Ca) was reduced but not eliminated by saturating concentrations of apamin (200 nM). This blockade was not reversible with up to 30 min of washing. Application of 100 microM-d-tubocurare (dTC) also produced a partial blockade of total IK(Ca). 6. Whole-cell current-clamp recordings showed that IK(Ca) contributed to the late phases of spike repolarization and was the dominant current flowing during the spike after-hyperpolarization (AHP). Application of 200 nM-apamin caused a reduction in the duration of the AHP. This reduction was best seen when multiple spikes were evoked by prolonged (20-50 ms) injections of depolarizing current. 7. Three distinct types of IK(Ca) channels could be observed in inside-out patches in the presence of free Ca2+ concentrations of 2 x 10(-7) M, but not in the presence of free Ca2+ at concentrations of less than 10(-9) M. These had unitary chord

  10. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced neuronal cell death in a large animal model of retinal degeneration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Linnéa; Arnér, Karin; Ghosh, Fredrik

    2016-07-01

    N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) has been reported to induce photoreceptor-specific degeneration with minimal inner retinal impact in small animals in vivo. Pending its use within a retinal transplantation paradigm, we here explore the effects of MNU on outer and inner retinal neurons and glia in an in vitro large animal model of retinal degeneration. The previously described degenerative culture explant model of adult porcine retina was used and compared with explants receiving 10 or 100 μg/ml MNU (MNU10 and MNU100) supplementation. All explants were kept for 5 days in vitro, and examined for morphology as well as for glial and neuronal immunohistochemical markers. Rhodopsin-labeled photoreceptors were present in all explants. The number of cone photoreceptors (transducin), rod bipolar cells (PKC) and horizontal cells (calbindin) was significantly lower in MNU treated explants (p < 0.001). Gliosis was attenuated in MNU10 treated explants, with expression of vimentin, glial fibrillary protein (GFAP), glutamine synthetase (GS), and bFGF comparable to in vivo controls. In corresponding MNU100 counterparts, the expression of Müller cell proteins was almost extinguished. We here show that MNU causes degeneration of outer and inner retinal neurons and glia in the adult porcine retina in vitro. MNU10 explants display attenuation of gliosis, despite decreased neuronal survival compared with untreated controls. Our results have impact on the use of MNU as a large animal photoreceptor degeneration model, on tissue engineering related to retinal transplantation, and on our understanding of gliosis related neuronal degenerative cell death.

  11. A Multicenter Experience from Lebanon in Childhood and Adolescent Acute Myeloid Leukemia: High rate of Early Death in Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Roula A.; Horkos, Jessy G.; Bustros, Youssef D.; Farhat, Hussein Z.; Abla, Oussama

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a disease with marked heterogeneity. Despite major improvement in outcome, it remains a life-threatening malignancy. Demographic and clinical data on pediatric AML is lacking among the Lebanese population. Purpose We aimed to identify clinical, molecular and outcome data in children with AML in Lebanon. Methods A retrospective chart review of children with AML diagnosed in three Lebanese hospitals during the past 8 years was conducted. Results From May 2002 through March 2010, we identified 24 children with AML in Saint George Hospital University Medical Center, University Medical Center Rizk Hospital, and Abou-Jaoude Hospital. Males and females were equally represented; median age at diagnosis was 9 years (range 1–24) and median WBC at diagnosis was 31 × 109/L (range: 2.1–376 × 109/L). Twenty five percent of patients (6 out of 24) had acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Karyotype was normal in 33% of patients; t(8;21), inv (16), t(8;9), t(7;11), t(9;11), complex chromosomal abnormality, monosomy 7 and trisomy 8 were the most common cytogenetic abnormalities encountered. Patients were treated on different European and North American protocols. Twelve patients (50%) achieved morphologic CR after cycle 1, 6 of them (50%) had bone marrow relapse within 11 months from diagnosis. Nine patients underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant, and 3 of them are alive at 5 years post-transplant. Early death rate was 16.6% of patients, mainly those with APL and a presenting WBC > 10 × 109/L. Fifty per cent of APL patients had an early death due to DIC despite starting ATRA therapy. Overall, median survival for AML patients who died from disease progression was 25.8 months (range: 1–60 months). Overall disease-free survival was 30.4%. Patients < 10 years of age had a 50% survival rate compared to 0% in patients > 10 years. Conclusions Our report highlights the needs in Lebanon for better supportive care of children with APL

  12. Effects of acute treadmill running at different intensities on activities of serotonin and corticotropin-releasing factor neurons, and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Tomomi; Nishii, Ayu; Amemiya, Seiichiro; Kubota, Natsuko; Nishijima, Takeshi; Kita, Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that physical exercise can reduce and prevent the incidence of stress-related psychiatric disorders, including depression and anxiety. Activation of serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is implicated in antidepressant/anxiolytic properties. In addition, the incidence and symptoms of these disorders may involve dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that is initiated by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Thus, it is possible that physical exercise produces its antidepressant/anxiolytic effects by affecting these neuronal activities. However, the effects of acute physical exercise at different intensities on these neuronal activation and behavioral changes are still unclear. Here, we examined the activities of 5-HT neurons in the DRN and CRF neurons in the PVN during 30 min of treadmill running at different speeds (high speed, 25 m/min; low speed, 15m/min; control, only sitting on the treadmill) in male Wistar rats, using c-Fos/5-HT or CRF immunohistochemistry. We also performed the elevated plus maze test and the forced swim test to assess anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, respectively. Acute treadmill running at low speed, but not high speed, significantly increased c-Fos expression in 5-HT neurons in the DRN compared to the control, whereas high-speed running significantly enhanced c-Fos expression in CRF neurons in the PVN compared with the control and low-speed running. Furthermore, low-speed running resulted in decreased anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors compared with high-speed running. These results suggest that acute physical exercise with mild and low stress can efficiently induce optimal neuronal activation that is involved in the antidepressant/anxiolytic effects.

  13. NOX1 is responsible for cell death through STAT3 activation in hyperoxia and is associated with the pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carnesecchi, Stephanie; Dunand-Sauthier, Isabelle; Zanetti, Filippo; Singovski, Grigory; Deffert, Christine; Donati, Yves; Cagarelli, Thomas; Pache, Jean-Claude; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Reith, Walter; Barazzone-Argiroffo, Constance

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to alveolar cell death in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and we previously demonstrated that NOX1-derived ROS contributed to hyperoxia-induced alveolar cell death in mice. The study investigates whether NOX1 expression is modulated in epithelial cells concomitantly to cell death and associated to STAT3 signaling in the exudative phase of ARDS. In addition, the role of STAT3 activation in NOX1-dependent epithelial cell death was confirmed by using a lung epithelial cell line and in mice exposed to hyperoxia. NOX1 expression, cell death and STAT3 staining were evaluated in the lungs of control and ARDS patients by immunohistochemistry. In parallel, a stable NOX1-silenced murine epithelial cell line (MLE12) and NOX1-deficient mice were used to characterize signalling pathways. In the present study, we show that NOX1 is detected in alveolar epithelial cells of ARDS patients in the exudative stage. In addition, increased alveolar epithelial cell death and phosphorylated STAT3 are observed in ARDS patients and associated with NOX1 expression. Phosphorylated STAT3 is also correlated with TUNEL staining. We also confirmed that NOX1-dependent STAT3 activation participates to alveolar epithelial cell death. Silencing and acute inhibition of NOX1 in MLE12 led to decreased cell death and cleaved-caspase 3 induced by hyperoxia. Additionally, hyperoxia-induced STAT3 phosphorylation is dependent on NOX1 expression and associated with cell death in MLE12 and mice. This study demonstrates that NOX1 is involved in human ARDS pathophysiology and is responsible for the damage occurring in alveolar epithelial cells at least in part via STAT3 signalling pathways. PMID:24551274

  14. Acute Cadmium Fume Poisoning: Five Cases with one Death from Renal Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Beton, D. C.; Andrews, G. S.; Davies, H. J.; Howells, Leonard; Smith, G. F.

    1966-01-01

    This paper describes the accidental poisoning of five workers by cadmium fume. The men were dismantling a frame of girders in a confined space by cutting bolts with an oxyacetylene burner. They were unaware at the time that the bolts were cadmium-plated or that this presented a serious industrial hazard. The paper sets out to give an appreciation of acute cadmium poisoning, the characteristics and uses of cadmium, and a review of the literature. The clinical picture of these cases is described, with the pathology of the fatal case which showed severe pulmonary oedema, alveolar metaplasia of the lung, and bilateral cortical necrosis of the kidneys. The lungs contained 0·25 g. cadmium oxide (CdO) per 100 g. wet specimen. An attempted estimation of the fatal dose of CdO fume is made. From the post-mortem findings, using an assumption that 11% of inhaled CdO will be retained in the lungs, approximately 51·7 mg. CdO fume must have been inhaled by the fatal case. As he worked for five hours with a probable ventilatory rate of 20 l./min. the concentration of CdO in the air breathed would be of the order of 8·6 mg./m.3. An estimation of the dose from a study of the working conditions proved unsatisfactory due to certain variables listed in the text. Images PMID:5928153

  15. Sudden death due to ventricular double rupture as a complication of inferior acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shi-Jian; Zhang, Chen; Meng, Qing-Tao; Peng, Yong; Chen, Mao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Ventricular double rupture (VDR) is a rare but lethal mechanical complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The early identification and timely treatment of VDR remain challenging problems. We present a case of AMI with VDR and briefly review the characteristics and prognosis of this life-threatening disease. Patient concerns and Diagnoses: A 77-year-old male presented to our hospital with a 4-day history of severe dizziness, mild chest tightness, and dyspnea. An inferior AMI was diagnosed. Interventions and Outcomes: On the second hospital day, hypotension and a new cardiac murmur was found. The emergency echocardiographic study disclosed a ventricular septal defect. Soon after that the patient suddenly died of ventricular free-wall rupture. Lessons: In patients with AMI complicated by a septal perforation in the apical region, close to the septum-free wall junction, special attention should be paid to the great risk of VDR. Other high risk factors included advanced age, delayed reperfusion, and inferior infarction. Sufficient evaluation of the risk factors, close monitoring of vital signs, early identification of the specific symptoms, and timely treatment are the key points for the effective prediction and prevention of VDR. PMID:28033290

  16. NADPH oxidase 4 deficiency increases tubular cell death during acute ischemic reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Nlandu-Khodo, Stellor; Dissard, Romain; Hasler, Udo; Schäfer, Matthias; Pircher, Haymo; Jansen-Durr, Pidder; Krause, Karl Heinz; Martin, Pierre-Yves; de Seigneux, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) is highly expressed in kidney proximal tubular cells. NOX4 constitutively produces hydrogen peroxide, which may regulate important pro-survival pathways. Renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is a classical model mimicking human ischemic acute tubular necrosis. We hypothesized that NOX4 plays a protective role in kidney IRI. In wild type (WT) animals subjected to IRI, NOX4 protein expression increased after 24 hours. NOX4 KO (knock-out) and WT littermates mice were subjected to IRI. NOX4 KO mice displayed decreased renal function and more severe tubular apoptosis, decreased Bcl-2 expression and higher histologic damage scores compared to WT. Activation of NRF2 was decreased in NOX4 KO mice in response to IRI. This was related to decreased KEAP1 oxidation leading to decreased NRF2 stabilization. This resulted in decreased glutathione levels. In vitro silencing of NOX4 in cells showed an enhanced propensity to apoptosis, with reduced expression of NRF2, glutathione content and Bcl-2 expression, similar to cells derived from NOX4 KO mice. Overexpression of a constitutively active form of NRF2 (caNRF2) in NOX4 depleted cells rescued most of this phenotype in cultured cells, implying that NRF2 regulation by ROS issued from NOX4 may play an important role in its anti-apoptotic property. PMID:27924932

  17. Thromboxane synthetase inhibitor ameliorates delayed neuronal death in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus after transient global ischemia in gerbils.

    PubMed

    Iijima, T; Sawa, H; Shiokawa, Y; Saito, I; Ishii, H; Nakamura, Z; Sankawa, H

    1996-07-01

    Thromboxane A2 accumulates in the hippocampus after global ischemia and may play a key role in postischemic hypoperfusion. Thromboxane synthetase inhibitor (OKY-046) inhibits the accumulation of thromboxane A2 and promotes prostacycline production. Therefore, we set out to determine whether the inhibition of thromboxane synthesis would ameriolate postischemic neuronal death. Three groups of six Mongolian gerbils were subjected to different treatments: untreated control, untreated ischemia, and treated ischemia. Immediately after forebrain ischemia, OKY-046 (10 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally into the treated group. After 7 days of survival, the histopathology of the brain was examined. Pyramidal cell density in the CA1 sector in the treated group was 147 +/- 70 nuclei/mm (mean +/- SD), which was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than than in the untreated group (33 +/- 10 (nuclei/mm). The findings were 231 +/- 7 nuclei/mm for the control group. No significant difference was seen in the profile of temporal muscle temperature before and after ischemia between the groups. Ultrastructurally, the vessels in the CAI sector showed lumen patency in the treated group, whereas occluded vessels with an extended perivascular space were observed in the untreated group. Thromboxane synthetase inhibitor thus partly ameliorates the selective vulnerability of the hippocampus after forebrain ischemia, suggesting that thromboxane A2 is involved in the development of delayed neuronal death, independently of any thermal effect.

  18. Activity-dependent regulation of [Ca2+]i in avian cochlear nucleus neurons: roles of protein kinases A and C and relation to cell death.

    PubMed

    Zirpel, L; Lippe, W R; Rubel, E W

    1998-05-01

    Neurons of the cochlear nucleus, nucleus magnocellularis (NM), of young chicks require excitatory afferent input from the eighth nerve for maintenance and survival. One of the earliest changes seen in NM neurons after deafferentation is an increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). This increase in [Ca2+]i is due to loss of activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) that activate second-messenger cascades involved in [Ca2+]i regulation. Because mGluRs are known to act via the phospholipase C and adenylate cyclase signal transduction pathways, the goal of this study was to determine the roles of protein kinases A (PKA) and C (PKC) activities in the regulation of NM neuron [Ca2+]i by eighth nerve stimulation. Additionally, we sought to determine the relationship between increased [Ca2+]i and cell death as measured by propidium iodide incorporation. [Ca2+]i of individual NM neurons in brain stem slices was monitored using fura-2 ratiometric fluorescence imaging. NM field potentials were monitored in experiments in which the eighth nerve was stimulated. Five hertz orthodromic stimulation maintained NM neuron [Ca2+]i at approximately 110 nM for 180 min. In the absence of stimulation, NM neuron [Ca2+]i increased steadily to a mean of 265 nM by 120 min. This increase was attenuated by superfusion of PKC activators phorbol-12,13-myristate acetate (100 nM) or dioctanoylglycerol (50 microM) and by activators of PKA: 1 mM 8-bromoadenosine-3',5'-cyclophosphate sodium (8-Br-cAMP), 50 microM forskolin or 100 microM Sp-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate triethylamine. Inhibition of PKA (100 microM Rp-cAMPS) or PKC (50 nM bisindolymaleimide or 10 microM U73122) during continuous orthodromic stimulation resulted in an increase in NM neuron [Ca2+]i that exceeded 170 and 180 nM, respectively, by 120 min. Nonspecific kinase inhibition with 1 microM staurosporine during stimulation resulted in an [Ca2+]i increase that was greater in magnitude than

  19. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cell