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Sample records for acute nicotine administration

  1. Acute effects of nicotine administration during prospective memory, an event related fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Rusted, Jennifer; Ruest, Torsten; Gray, Marcus A

    2011-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that stimulating neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors modulates prospective memory (PM), the ability to remember and implement a prior intention. Here we used fMRI to explore the neuronal correlates of acute nicotinic (1mg) modulation during PM, employing a double blind, valence-matched placebo-controlled design, and a solely event-related analysis. Eight healthy adults completed on two occasions (1 week washout) a simple attentional task containing infrequent PM trials. PM activated bilateral parietal, prefrontal (BA10) and anterior cingulate, and deactivated genual cingulate and medial prefrontal regions. Further, acute nicotine administration decreased activity within a largely overlapping right parietal region. This data validates a purely event-related approach to exploring PM, and suggests procholinergic modulation of PM by parietal rather than BA10/frontal regions.

  2. Relations among acute and chronic nicotine administration, short-term memory, and tactics of data analysis.

    PubMed

    Kangas, Brian D; Branch, Marc N

    2012-09-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that nicotine may enhance short-term memory. Some of this evidence comes from nonhuman primate research using a procedure called delayed matching-to-sample, wherein the monkey is trained to select a comparison stimulus that matches some physical property of a previously presented sample stimulus. Delays between sample stimulus offset and comparison stimuli onset are manipulated and accuracy is measured. The present research attempted to systematically replicate these enhancement effects with pigeons. In addition, the effects of nicotine were assessed under another, more dynamic, memory task called titrating-delay matching-to-sample. In this procedure, the delay between sample offset and comparison onset adjusts as a function of the subject's performance. Correct matches increase the delay, mismatches decrease the delay, and titrated delay values serve as the primary dependent measure. Both studies examined nicotine's effects under acute and chronic administration. Neither provided clear or compelling evidence of memory enhancement following nicotine administration despite reliable and systematic dose-related changes in response latency measures. A modest dose-related effect on accuracy was found, but the magnitude of the effect appears to be directly related to tactics of data analysis involving best-dose analyses of a very circumscribed subset of trial types.

  3. Acute oral 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) decreases both alcohol intake and IV nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Amir H; Cauley, Marty C; Slade, Susan; Wells, Corinne; Glick, Stanley; Rose, Jed E; Levin, Edward D

    The ibogaine derivative 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) has been found to decrease self-administration of morphine, nicotine and alcohol in rats after systemic injection. However oral dosing is the preferred route clinically. The current study evaluated the effect of oral 18-MC dosing in rats on alcohol and nicotine self-administration. For the nicotine study, young adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were fitted with IV jugular infusion catheters and trained for nicotine self-administration in 45min. sessions. At weekly intervals they were administered by oral gavage doses of 18-MC (0, 10, 20 and 40mg/kg) following a repeated measures counterbalanced design twice. Acute oral 18-MC, at the 40mg/kg dosage, significantly reduced nicotine self-administration. There was a differential effect of 18-MC with rats above or below the median level of nicotine self-administration during the pretreatment baseline performance. Rats with lower baseline performance showed a significant reduction in nicotine self-administration with the 40mg/kg dosage, while those in the higher baseline group did not show a significant effect of 18-MC. In alcohol studies, the effects of the same doses of 18-MC were tested in both male and female alcohol preferring (P) rats that had free access to water and alcohol (10% v/v) 6h/day. The results show that 18-MC dose-dependently reduced alcohol intake in both male and female rats. All doses caused significant reductions in alcohol self-administration. These data reinforce previous findings that 18-MC is significantly effective in reducing alcohol intake and nicotine self-administration. The finding that 18-MC is also effective orally makes it advantageous for further development as a possible new therapy for treating alcoholism as well as smoking addiction.

  4. Effects of acute nicotine administration on behavioral and neural (EEG) correlates of working memory in non-smokers.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Derek J; Daniels, Richelle; Jaworska, Natalia; Knobelsdorf, Amy; Knott, Verner J

    2012-01-06

    Enhancements in working memory (WM) performance have been previously reported following acute smoking/nicotine. Neuroimaging and behavioral assessments of nicotine's effects on WM have yielded inconsistent findings. Few studies, however, have examined the effects of nicotine on WM-related neural activity in non-smokers. The present study examined the effect of acute nicotine gum administration (6 mg) on electroencephalographic (EEG) activity (alpha(1), alpha(2) and theta bands) and performance on the parametrically manipulated N-back task of WM in 20 non-smoking adults. EEG activity varied with WM load (e.g. alpha(1) decreasing and theta increasing). Performance on the N-back was also load-sensitive, with slower reaction times and decreased accuracy associated with increasing memory load. Neither response speed nor accuracy measures were affected by nicotine but EEG was, with the effects varying by load and brain region. Nicotine-induced increases in alpha(2) and theta were observed under lower (0-, 1-back) memory load conditions Additionally, nicotine significantly reduced signal detection sensitivity values and altered response bias toward being more conservative at all levels of the N-back. Taken together, these findings suggest that while nicotine may boost WM neural processes at lower levels of WM load in non-smokers, it also may activate concurrent behavioral inhibition networks that negate any effects on behavioral performance. Additionally, nicotine appears to have no impact, or perhaps a negative impact, on these processes under more demanding (2-back, 3-back) conditions in non-smokers.

  5. Chronic smoking, but not acute nicotine administration, modulates neural correlates of working memory

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Thomas J.; Shakleya, Diaá M.; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Stein, Elliot A.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Beyond the amelioration of deprivation-induced impairments, and in contrast to effects on attentional processes, the cognitive-enhancing properties of nicotine on working memory (WM) operations remain unclear. Objectives In an effort to elucidate potential enhancing effects, we explored the impact of transdermal nicotine on neural functioning in minimally deprived smokers and, in addition, assessed differences between smokers and non-smokers using a mixed block/event-related fMRI design that attempted to isolate specific central executive operations (attentional switch events) within general WM function (task blocks). Methods In task blocks, participants performed a continuous counting paradigm that required the simultaneous maintenance of, and frequent switching of attentional focus between, two running tallies in WM on some trials. Cigarette smokers (n=30) were scanned twice, once each with a nicotine and placebo patch, while non-smokers (n=27) were scanned twice with no patch. Results Across both groups, task blocks were associated with bilateral activation, notably in medial and lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), anterior insula, and parietal regions, whereas individual attentional switch trials were associated with activation in a similar, but predominantly left-lateralized network. Within the smoker group, although nicotine increased heart rate, altered performance and mood, and reduced tobacco cravings, no acute drug (state-like) effect on brain activity was detected for either the task or switch effects. However, relative to non-smokers, smokers showed greater tonic activation in medial superior frontal cortex, right anterior insula, and bilateral anterior PFC throughout task blocks (trait-like effect). Conclusions These data suggest smokers require recruitment of additional WM and supervisory control operations during task performance. PMID:20862456

  6. Nicotine vapor inhalation escalates nicotine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Nicholas W; Whitaker, Annie M; Baynes, Brittni; Abdel, Abdelrahim Y; Weil, Madelyn T; George, Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Humans escalate their cigarette smoking over time, and a major obstacle in the field of pre-clinical nicotine addiction research has been the inability to produce escalated nicotine self-administration in rats. In experiment 1, male Wistar rats were trained to respond for nicotine in 2-hour operant sessions, then exposed to chronic intermittent (12 hours/day) nicotine vapor and repeatedly tested for nicotine self-administration at 8-12 hours of withdrawal. Rats were tested intermittently on days 1, 3 and 5 of the vapor exposure procedure, then tested with nicotine vapor exposure on 6-15 consecutive days. Rats exhibited transient increases in operant nicotine responding during intermittent testing, regardless of vapor condition, and this responding returned to baseline levels upon resumption of consecutive-days testing (i.e. nicotine deprivation effect). Nicotine vapor-exposed rats then escalated nicotine self-administration relative to both their own baseline (∼200% increase) and non-dependent controls (∼3× higher). In experiment 2, rats were exposed or not exposed to chronic intermittent nicotine vapor, then tested for spontaneous and precipitated somatic signs of nicotine withdrawal. Eight hours following removal from nicotine vapor, rats exhibited robust mecamylamine-precipitated somatic signs of withdrawal. There was a strong correlation between nicotine flow rate and air-nicotine concentration, and the air-nicotine concentrations used in experiments 1 and 2 resemble concentrations experienced by human smokers. Collectively, these results suggest that chronic intermittent nicotine vapor inhalation produces somatic and motivational signs of nicotine dependence, the latter of which is evidenced by escalation of nicotine self-administration.

  7. Relations among Acute and Chronic Nicotine Administration, Short-Term Memory, and Tactics of Data Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kangas, Brian D.; Branch, Marc N.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that nicotine may enhance short-term memory. Some of this evidence comes from nonhuman primate research using a procedure called delayed matching-to-sample, wherein the monkey is trained to select a comparison stimulus that matches some physical property of a previously presented sample stimulus. Delays between sample…

  8. Neural mechanisms underlying nicotine addiction: acute positive reinforcement and withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Watkins, S S; Koob, G F; Markou, A

    2000-02-01

    The neurobiology of nicotine addiction is reviewed within the context of neurobiological and behavioral theories postulated for other drugs of abuse. The roles of various neurotransmitter systems, including acetylcholine, dopamine, serotonin, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and opioid peptides in acute nicotine reinforcement and withdrawal from chronic administration are examined followed by a discussion of potential neuroadaptations within these neurochemical systems that may lead to the development of nicotine dependence. The link between nicotine administration, depression and schizophrenia are also discussed. Finally, a theoretical model of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying acute nicotine withdrawal and protracted abstinence involves alterations within dopaminergic, serotonergic, and stress systems that are hypothesized to contribute to the negative affective state associated with nicotine abstinence.

  9. Effects of Chronic Buspirone Treatment on Nicotine and Concurrent Nicotine+Cocaine Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Nancy K; Fivel, Peter A; Kohut, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Nicotine dependence and cocaine abuse are major public health problems, and most cocaine abusers also smoke cigarettes. An ideal pharmacotherapy would reduce both cigarette smoking and cocaine abuse. Buspirone (Buspar) is a clinically available, non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic medication that acts on serotonin and dopamine systems. In preclinical studies, it reduced cocaine self-administration following both acute and chronic treatment in rhesus monkeys. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of chronic buspirone treatment on self-administration of intravenous (IV) nicotine and IV nicotine+cocaine combinations. Five cocaine-experienced adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained to self-administer nicotine or nicotine+cocaine combinations, and food pellets (1 g) during four 1-h daily sessions under a second-order schedule of reinforcement (FR 2 (VR16:S)). Each nicotine+cocaine combination maintained significantly higher levels of drug self-administration than nicotine or cocaine alone (P<0.05–0.001). Buspirone (0.032–0.56 mg/kg/h) was administered IV through one lumen of a double-lumen catheter every 20 min for 23 h each day, for 7–10 consecutive days. Each 7–10-day sequence of buspirone treatment was followed by saline-control treatment for at least 3 days until food- and drug-maintained responding returned to baseline. Buspirone dose-dependently reduced responding maintained by nicotine alone (0.001–0.1 mg/kg/inj; P<0.01) and by nicotine (0.001 or 0.0032 mg/kg/inj)+cocaine combinations (0.0032 mg/kg/inj; P<0.05–0.001) with no significant effects on food-maintained responding. We conclude that buspirone selectively attenuates the reinforcing effects of nicotine alone and nicotine+cocaine polydrug combinations in a nonhuman primate model of drug self-administration. PMID:23337868

  10. Effects of chronic buspirone treatment on nicotine and concurrent nicotine+cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K; Fivel, Peter A; Kohut, Stephen J

    2013-06-01

    Nicotine dependence and cocaine abuse are major public health problems, and most cocaine abusers also smoke cigarettes. An ideal pharmacotherapy would reduce both cigarette smoking and cocaine abuse. Buspirone (Buspar) is a clinically available, non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic medication that acts on serotonin and dopamine systems. In preclinical studies, it reduced cocaine self-administration following both acute and chronic treatment in rhesus monkeys. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of chronic buspirone treatment on self-administration of intravenous (IV) nicotine and IV nicotine+cocaine combinations. Five cocaine-experienced adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained to self-administer nicotine or nicotine+cocaine combinations, and food pellets (1 g) during four 1-h daily sessions under a second-order schedule of reinforcement (FR 2 (VR16:S)). Each nicotine+cocaine combination maintained significantly higher levels of drug self-administration than nicotine or cocaine alone (P<0.05-0.001). Buspirone (0.032-0.56 mg/kg/h) was administered IV through one lumen of a double-lumen catheter every 20 min for 23 h each day, for 7-10 consecutive days. Each 7-10-day sequence of buspirone treatment was followed by saline-control treatment for at least 3 days until food- and drug-maintained responding returned to baseline. Buspirone dose-dependently reduced responding maintained by nicotine alone (0.001-0.1 mg/kg/inj; P<0.01) and by nicotine (0.001 or 0.0032 mg/kg/inj)+cocaine combinations (0.0032 mg/kg/inj; P<0.05-0.001) with no significant effects on food-maintained responding. We conclude that buspirone selectively attenuates the reinforcing effects of nicotine alone and nicotine+cocaine polydrug combinations in a nonhuman primate model of drug self-administration.

  11. High-affinity α4β2 nicotinic receptors mediate the impairing effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Holliday, Erica; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Previously, studies from our lab have shown that while acute nicotine administered prior to training and testing enhances contextual fear conditioning, acute nicotine injections prior to extinction sessions impair extinction of contextual fear. Although there is also strong evidence showing that the acute nicotine's enhancing effects on contextual fear conditioning require high-affinity α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), it is unknown which nAChR subtypes are involved in the acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction. In this study, we investigated the effects of acute nicotine administration on contextual fear extinction in knock-out (KO) mice lacking α4, β2 or α7 subtypes of nAChRs and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Both KO and WT mice were first trained and tested for contextual fear conditioning and received a daily contextual extinction session for 4 days. Subjects received intraperitoneal injections of nicotine (0.18 mg/kg) or saline 2-4 min prior to each extinction session. Our results showed that the mice that lack α4 and β2 subtypes of nAChRs showed normal contextual fear extinction but not the acute nicotine-induced impairment while the mice that lack the α7 subtype showed both normal contextual extinction and nicotine-induced impairment of contextual extinction. In addition, control experiments showed that acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction persisted when nicotine administration was ceased and repeated acute nicotine administrations alone did not induce freezing behavior in the absence of context-shock learning. These results clearly demonstrate that high-affinity α4β2 nAChRs are necessary for the effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction.

  12. Mismatch negativity in tobacco-naïve cannabis users and its alteration with acute nicotine administration.

    PubMed

    Impey, Danielle; El-Marj, Nicole; Parks, Andrea; Choueiry, Joelle; Fisher, Derek; Knott, Verner J

    2015-09-01

    Chronic cannabis use may interact with factors, such as age of onset of cannabis use, family history, and genetic factors, to elicit schizophrenia (SZ)-like symptoms, including sensory and cognitive deficits. However, evidence of a relationship between cannabis use and cognitive impairment is confounded by concomitant use of tobacco. The objective of this study was to compare tobacco-naïve cannabis users with individuals without a history of tobacco/cannabis use on the auditory mismatch negativity (MMN) event-related potential (ERP), a neural measure of auditory deviance detection which is diminished in SZ. An exploratory arm of the study, conducted within a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled design, examined the acute effects of nicotine gum (6mg) on MMN in cannabis users. MMN was recorded in response to 5 deviant stimuli within an optimal MMN paradigm in 44 healthy, non-tobacco smoking volunteers aged 18-26. Cannabis users (n=21) started smoking cannabis prior to age 17, at least 1 joint per month. To examine the effects of chronicity, users were grouped into relatively heavy long-term (HLT; n=11) users and light short-term (LST; n=10) users. Impaired deviance detection was shown in cannabis users vs. nonusers as reflected by a smaller MMN to duration deviants. Chronicity of use was also associated with MMN alterations, as HLTs displayed a reduced duration and gap MMN vs. LSTs. Compared with placebo, nicotine treatment enhanced select MMN deviants in cannabis user subgroups. As deficits associated with early and persistent cannabis use are similar to those seen in SZ, these dose-dependant disturbances in early sensory processing with cannabis use may be one cognitive pathway which mediates an increased risk for SZ in vulnerable youth, and be influenced by concurrent cigarette smoking behavior.

  13. Acute administration of nicotine into the higher order auditory Te2 cortex specifically decreases the fear-related charge of remote emotional memories.

    PubMed

    Cambiaghi, Marco; Grosso, Anna; Renna, Annamaria; Concina, Giulia; Sacchetti, Benedetto

    2015-12-01

    Nicotine elicits several behavioural effects on mood as well as on stress and anxiety processes. Recently, it was found that the higher order components of the sensory cortex, such as the secondary auditory cortex Te2, are essential for the long-term storage of remote fear memories. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the effects of acute nicotine injection into the higher order auditory cortex Te2, on the remote emotional memories of either threat or incentive experiences in rats. We found that intra-Te2 nicotine injection decreased the fear-evoked responses to a tone previously paired with footshock. This effect was cue- and dose-specific and was not due to any interference with auditory stimuli processing, innate anxiety and fear processes, or with motor responses. Nicotine acts acutely in the presence of threat stimuli but it did not determine the permanent degradation of the fear-memory trace, since memories tested one week after nicotine injection were unaffected. Remarkably, nicotine did not affect the memory of a similar tone that was paired to incentive stimuli. We conclude from our results that nicotine, when acting acutely in the auditory cortex, relieves the fear charge embedded by learned stimuli.

  14. The effects of acute nicotine on contextual safety discrimination.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir G; Oliver, Chicora; Gould, Thomas J

    2014-11-01

    Anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), may be related to an inability to distinguish safe versus threatening environments and to extinguish fear memories. Given the high rate of cigarette smoking in patients with PTSD, as well as the recent finding that an acute dose of nicotine impairs extinction of contextual fear memory, we conducted a series of experiments to investigate the effect of acute nicotine in an animal model of contextual safety discrimination. Following saline or nicotine (at 0.0275, 0.045, 0.09 and 0.18 mg/kg) administration, C57BL/6J mice were trained in a contextual discrimination paradigm, in which the subjects received presentations of conditioned stimuli (CS) that co-terminated with a foot-shock in one context (context A (CXA)) and only CS presentations without foot-shock in a different context (context B (CXB)). Therefore, CXA was designated as the 'dangerous context', whereas CXB was designated as the 'safe context'. Our results suggested that saline-treated animals showed a strong discrimination between dangerous and safe contexts, while acute nicotine dose-dependently impaired contextual safety discrimination (Experiment 1). Furthermore, our results demonstrate that nicotine-induced impairment of contextual safety discrimination learning was not a result of increased generalized freezing (Experiment 2) or contingent on the common CS presentations in both contexts (Experiment 3). Finally, our results show that increasing the temporal gap between CXA and CXB during training abolished the impairing effects of nicotine (Experiment 4). The findings of this study may help link nicotine exposure to the safety learning deficits seen in anxiety disorder and PTSD patients.

  15. Effects of nicotinic and NMDA receptor channel blockers on intravenous cocaine and nicotine self-administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Blokhina, Elena A; Kashkin, Vladimir A; Zvartau, Edwin E; Danysz, Wojciech; Bespalov, Anton Y

    2005-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors prevents acquisition of instrumental behaviors reinforced by food and drugs such as morphine and cocaine. The present study aimed to extend this evidence by testing whether NMDA receptor channel blocker, memantine, would exert similar effects on acquisition of cocaine and nicotine self-administration in mice. Inasmuch as memantine also acts as nicotinic receptor channel blocker, this study assessed the effects of mecamylamine and MRZ 2/621 that are more selective nicotinic blockers. Adult male Swiss mice were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.8-2.4 microg/infusion) or nicotine (0.08-0.32 microg/infusion) during the 30-min test. Pretreatment with memantine (0.1-10 mg/kg) prevented acquisition of nicotine but not cocaine self-administration. Pretreatment with mecamylamine (0.3-3 mg/kg) and MRZ 2/621 (0.3-10 mg/kg) produced dose-dependent suppression of both cocaine and nicotine self-administration. Taken together with the previous reports, these results indicate that nicotinic receptor blockers antagonize acute reinforcing effects of cocaine while NMDA receptor blockade may have limited effectiveness.

  16. Exposure to nicotine enhances its subsequent self-administration: contribution of nicotine-associated contextual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Nichole M; Cortright, James J; Sampedro, Georgia R; Vezina, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Contextual stimuli present during nicotine exposure can come to act as conditioned stimuli and have been shown to play an important role in ongoing nicotine self-administration. In the present study, we characterized the effects of contextual stimuli previously paired with non-contingent nicotine exposure injections on subsequent nicotine self-administration. Rats were exposed to five injections of either saline or nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, i.p.) in either their home cage or a self-administration chamber with the levers retracted. Two weeks later, they were allowed to self-administer nicotine (30 μg/kg/infusion, IV) under fixed ratio (FR) schedules of reinforcement across 12 consecutive sessions. Lastly, responding under a progressive ratio (PR) schedule was assessed. Rats exposed to nicotine in the self-administration chamber subsequently increased their intake of nicotine across the FR test days, obtaining more infusions on average by days 7-12 compared to their saline exposed controls. This increase was not due to nicotine exposure alone as rats exposed to nicotine in the home cage did not show this effect. It was also not due to differences in the final ratio achieved between nicotine and saline exposed rats. Although rats exposed to nicotine in the self-administration chambers displayed reduced discrimination between the active and inactive levers during FR testing, they showed increased motivation to self-administer nicotine under the PR schedule. These results indicate that exposure to nicotine can enhance its subsequent self-administration and highlight the contribution of nicotine-associated contextual stimuli to the work output rats ultimately emit to obtain the drug.

  17. Ketanserin, a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, decreases nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Levin, Edward D; Slade, Susan; Johnson, Michael; Petro, Ann; Horton, Kofi; Williams, Paul; Rezvani, Amir H; Rose, Jed E

    2008-12-14

    Nicotine intake constitutes a principal mechanism for tobacco addiction. In addition to primary effects on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, nicotine has cascading effects, which may also underlie its neurobehavioral actions. Nicotine induces serotonin (5-HT) release, which has not classically been thought to be involved in tobacco addiction as dopamine has. However, addiction can be characterized more as a disorder of compulsion than a disorder of enjoyment. 5-HT mechanisms play key roles in compulsive disorders. Nicotine-induced 5-HT release may be a key to tobacco addiction. Ketanserin, a 5-HT2a and 5-HT2c receptor antagonist, significantly attenuates nicotine effects on attention and memory. These studies were conducted to determine if ketanserin would reduce nicotine self-administration in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (N=12) were given initial food pellet training and then 10 sessions of nicotine self-administration training (0.03 mg/kg/infusion, i.v.). Then the rats were administered ketanserin (1 or 2 mg/kg, s.c.) or the saline vehicle. Ketanserin (2 mg/kg) significantly decreased nicotine self-administration. This did not seem to be due to sedative or amnestic effects of ketanserin. In a second study, the effects of repeated administration of 2 mg/kg ketanserin (N=11) vs. saline injections (N=10) were examined. In the initial phase, the acute effectiveness of ketanserin in significantly reducing nicotine self-administration was replicated. The effect became attenuated during the following several sessions, but the significant effect became re-established during the final phases of this two-week study. 5-HT mechanisms play critical roles in the maintenance of nicotine self-administration. Better understanding of those roles may help lead to new 5-HT-based treatments for tobacco addiction.

  18. Nicotine Administration Attenuates Methamphetamine-Induced Novel Object Recognition Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Vieira-Brock, Paula L.; McFadden, Lisa M.; Nielsen, Shannon M.; Smith, Misty D.; Hanson, Glen R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have demonstrated that methamphetamine abuse leads to memory deficits and these are associated with relapse. Furthermore, extensive evidence indicates that nicotine prevents and/or improves memory deficits in different models of cognitive dysfunction and these nicotinic effects might be mediated by hippocampal or cortical nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The present study investigated whether nicotine attenuates methamphetamine-induced novel object recognition deficits in rats and explored potential underlying mechanisms. Methods: Adolescent or adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received either nicotine water (10–75 μg/mL) or tap water for several weeks. Methamphetamine (4×7.5mg/kg/injection) or saline was administered either before or after chronic nicotine exposure. Novel object recognition was evaluated 6 days after methamphetamine or saline. Serotonin transporter function and density and α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor density were assessed on the following day. Results: Chronic nicotine intake via drinking water beginning during either adolescence or adulthood attenuated the novel object recognition deficits caused by a high-dose methamphetamine administration. Similarly, nicotine attenuated methamphetamine-induced deficits in novel object recognition when administered after methamphetamine treatment. However, nicotine did not attenuate the serotonergic deficits caused by methamphetamine in adults. Conversely, nicotine attenuated methamphetamine-induced deficits in α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor density in the hippocampal CA1 region. Furthermore, nicotine increased α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor density in the hippocampal CA3, dentate gyrus and perirhinal cortex in both saline- and methamphetamine-treated rats. Conclusions: Overall, these findings suggest that nicotine-induced increases in α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex might be one mechanism by which

  19. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist varenicline increases the ataxic and sedative-hypnotic effects of acute ethanol administration in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamens, Helen M.; Andersen, Jimena; Picciotto, Marina R.

    2010-01-01

    Background The costs associated with alcohol abuse are staggering, therefore much effort has been put into developing new pharmacological strategies to decrease alcohol abuse. Recently, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) partial agonist varenicline has been shown to decrease ethanol consumption in both humans and animal models. Methods We examined the effects of varenicline on the ataxic and sedative-hypnotic effects of ethanol. First, varenicline was administered prior to placement in a locomotor activity chamber to determine if varenicline influenced baseline locomotor activity. To determine the effect of nicotinic modulation on ethanol-induced motor incoordination, varenicline was administered 30 min prior to an acute ethanol injection and then mice were tested on the balance beam, dowel test or fixed-speed rotarod. To examine ethanol's sedative-hypnotic effects, varenicline was administered 30 min prior to 4 g/kg ethanol and the duration of loss of righting reflex (LORR) was measured. Results Varenicline markedly reduced baseline locomotor activity in C57BL/6J mice. Varenicline increased ethanol-induced ataxia when measured on the balance beam and dowel test, but had no effect when measured on the fixed-speed rotarod. Pretreatment with varenicline increased the duration of LORR. Conclusions These data provide evidence that nAChRs may be involved in the ataxic and sedative effects of ethanol. It is possible that one mechanism which could contribute to the ability of varenicline to decrease ethanol consumption may be through increasing negative behavioral effects of alcohol. PMID:20946306

  20. A neurotensin analog, NT69L, attenuates intravenous nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Boules, Mona; Oliveros, Alfredo; Liang, Yanqi; Williams, Katrina; Shaw, Amanda; Robinson, Jessica; Fredrickson, Paul; Richelson, Elliott

    2011-02-01

    NT69L is a neurotensin analog that blocks nicotine-induced locomotor activity and has sustained efficacy in a rat model of nicotine-induced sensitization when administered peripherally. Additionally, NT69L attenuates food-reinforcement in rats. The present study tested the effect of acute administration of NT69L on nicotine self-infusion in Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were trained to self-infuse nicotine intravenously (0.03mg/kg per infusion) following operant training. Once the rats acquired stable responding to nicotine self-infusion they were pretreated with NT69L (1mg/kg, i.p.) or saline 30min before being assessed for nicotine self-infusion. Pretreatment with NT69L significantly attenuated nicotine self-infusion under FR1 (fixed ratio of 1) and FR5 schedule of reinforcement as compared to saline pretreatment. Control rats that were response-independent "yoked" as well as rats that self-infused saline or NT69L showed minimal responses, indicating that nicotine served as a reinforcer. Additionally, NT69L modulated serum corticosterone; brain norepinephrine serotonin; and dopamine receptors mRNA levels altered in the nicotine self-infused rats after a 24h withdrawal period. Pretreatment with NT69L significantly decreased the nicotine-induced increase in serum corticosterone levels and striatal norepinephrine and increased the nicotine-induced reduction in serotonin in both the striatum and the prefrontal cortex (PFC). NT69L might modulate dopamine neurotransmission implicated in the reinforcing effects of nicotine by modulating tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine receptor mRNA levels in the PFC and striatum. These data support further study of the effects of NT analogs on attenuating the reinforcing effects of psychostimulants.

  1. Baclofen and 2-hydroxysaclofen modify acute hypolocomotive and antinociceptive effects of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Varani, Andrés P; Aso, Ester; Maldonado, Rafael; Balerio, Graciela N

    2014-09-05

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible involvement of GABAB receptors in nicotine-induced hypolocomotion and antinociceptive effects in mice. Animals were exposed to nicotine only once. Acute nicotine hydrogen tartrate salt (3mg/kg; subcutaneous, s.c.) administration induced hypolocomotion and antinociceptive responses in the tail-immersion and the hot-plate tests. The effects of pretreatment with either the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen (1, 2 and 3mg/kg; intraperitoneal, i.p.) or GABAB receptor antagonist 2-hydroxysaclofen (0.25, 0.5 and 1mg/kg; i.p.) were evaluated on these behavioral nicotine responses. The GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen (3mg/kg, i.p.) abolished nicotine-induced antinociceptive effects in the tail-immersion and the hot-plate tests, but did not modify nicotine-induced hypolocomotion. In addition, the GABAB receptor antagonist, 2-hydroxysaclofen (1mg/kg, i.p.) increased nicotine-induced antinociceptive effects in the tail-immersion and the hot-plate tests, and abolished nicotine-induced hypolocomotion. The present results shed light that the GABAB receptor has an important role in mediating specific acute nicotine responses such as hypolocomotion and antinociception in mice.

  2. Acute reinforcing effects of low-dose nicotine nasal spray in humans.

    PubMed

    Perkins, K A; Grobe, J E; Caggiula, A; Wilson, A S; Stiller, R L

    1997-02-01

    Tobacco smoking behavior is reinforced by nicotine intake, but there has been little human research examining self-administration of nicotine per se, isolated from tobacco. In this study, 10 smokers (5 men, 5 women) who wanted to quit smoking sampled 0 (placebo), 0.75, and 1.5 ug/kg/spray nicotine via nasal spray during separate lab sessions before engaging in a free choice session, involving ad lib access to all three spray doses. Subjects also ad lib smoked during another session. For the group as a whole, neither nicotine spray dose was self-administered significantly more than placebo during the free choice session, suggesting low abuse potential. However, 4 of 10 subjects self-administered 1.5 ug/kg/spray on more than 50% of all sprays (vs. 33% chance) and were designated nicotine "choosers," while the others were "nonchoosers." Choosers responded to initial nicotine spray exposure during sampling sessions with greater positive subjective effects (similar to their responses to tobacco smoking), smoked more during the ad lib smoking session (i.e., self-administered more nicotine via tobacco smoking), and tended to be more heavily dependent smokers. They did not report greater withdrawal relief or less aversive effects from nicotine, suggesting their greater nicotine choice reflected greater positive reinforcement rather than negative reinforcement. These results are consistent with the few existing studies demonstrating that acute nicotine intake per se, in the absence of tobacco, may be reinforcing in some smokers.

  3. Influence of gender and sex hormones on nicotine acute pharmacological effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Damaj, M I

    2001-01-01

    The present study conducted a comprehensive examination of the putative sex differences in the potency of nicotine between male and female ICR mice using several pharmacological and behavioral tests. Among the responses to nicotine where significant sex differences were observed are the antinociceptive and the anxiolytic effects of nicotine. Female mice were found less sensitive to the acute effects of nicotine in these tests after s.c. administration. Similar gender differences were found after i.t. injection. Influence of gonadal hormones could underlie sex differences observed in our studies. Indeed, our data clearly indicate that sex hormones can modulate the effects of nicotine and nicotinic receptors in a differential manner. Progesterone and 17beta-estradiol were found to block nicotine's antinociception in mice. Testosterone failed to do so. In addition, progesterone and 17beta-estradiol blocked nicotine activation of alpha(4)beta(2) neuronal acetylcholine nicotinic receptors expressed in oocytes. Our findings contribute to our search for receptor mechanisms in drug dependence and in the discovery of better pharmacological agents for nicotine dependence.

  4. Nicotine administration enhances negative occasion setting in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Heidi C; Chodakewitz, Molly I; Bucci, David J

    2016-04-01

    Substantial research has established that exposure to nicotine during adolescence can lead to long-term changes in neural circuitry and behavior. However, relatively few studies have considered the effects of nicotine use on cognition during this critical stage of brain development. This is significant because the influence of nicotine on cognitive performance during adolescence may contribute to the development of regular nicotine use. For example, improvements in cognitive functioning may increase the perceived value of smoking and facilitate impulses to smoke. To address this, the present research tested the effects of nicotine on a form of inhibitory learning during adolescence. Specifically, adolescent rats were exposed to nicotine as they were trained in a negative occasion setting paradigm, in which successful performance depends on learning the conditions under which it is, or is not, appropriate to respond to a target stimulus. Here, we found that nicotine administration enhances negative occasion setting in adolescents. In addition, nicotine increased the amount of orienting behavior directed toward the inhibitory stimulus, suggesting that improvements in this form of behavioral inhibition may be attributed to nicotine-induced increases in attentional processing. These results may help elucidate the factors that contribute to the onset as well as continued use of products containing nicotine during adolescence and provide insight to increase the effectiveness of interventions targeted at reducing the prevalence of adolescent smoking.

  5. Noribogaine reduces nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Hanania, Taleen; Mash, Deborah C; Maillet, Emeline L

    2015-06-01

    Noribogaine, a polypharmacological drug with activities at opioid receptors, ionotropic nicotinic receptors, and serotonin reuptake transporters, has been investigated for treatment of substance abuse-related disorders. Smoking cessation has major benefits for both individuals and society, therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of noribogaine for use as a treatment for nicotine dependence. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to self-administer nicotine intravenous. After initial food pellet training, followed by 26 sessions of nicotine self-administration training, the rats were administered noribogaine (12.5, 25 or 50 mg/kg orally), noribogaine vehicle, varenicline or saline using a within-subject design with a Latin square test schedule. Noribogaine dose-dependently decreased nicotine self-administration by up to 64% of saline-treated rats' levels and was equi-effective to 1.7 mg/kg intraperitoneal varenicline. Noribogaine was less efficient at reducing food pellets self-administration than at nicotine self-administration, inhibiting the nondrug reinforcing effects of palatable pellets by 23% at the highest dose. These results suggest that noribogaine dose-dependently attenuates drug-taking behavior for nicotine, attenuates the reinforcing effects of nicotine and is comparable to varenicline power in that regard. The findings from the present study hold promise for a new therapy to aid smoking cessation.

  6. Dextromethorphan interactions with histaminergic and serotonergic treatments to reduce nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Scott A; Hall, Brandon J; Wells, Corinne; Slade, Susan; Jaskowski, Paul; Morrison, Margaret; Rezvani, Amir H; Rose, Jed E; Levin, Edward D

    2016-03-01

    Combining effective treatments with diverse mechanisms of action for smoking cessation may provide better therapy by targeting multiple points of control in the neural circuits underlying addiction. Previous research in a rat model has shown that dextromethorphan, which has α3β4 nicotinic and NMDA glutamatergic antagonist actions, significantly decreases nicotine self-administration. We have found in the rat model that the H1 histamine antagonist pyrilamine and the serotonin 5HT2C agonist lorcaserin also significantly reduce nicotine self-administration. The current studies were conducted to determine the interactive effects of dextromethorphan with pyrilamine and lorcaserin on nicotine self-administration in rats. Young adult female rats were fitted with jugular IV catheters and trained to self-administer a nicotine infusion dose of 0.03-mg/kg/infusion. In an initial dose-effect function study of dextromethorphan, we found a monotonic decrease in nicotine self-administration over a dose range of 1 to 30-mg/kg with the lowest effective dose of 3-mg/kg. Then, with two separate cohorts of rats, dextromethorphan (0, 3.3, and 10-mg/kg) interactions with pyrilamine (0, 4.43, and 13.3-mg/kg) were investigated as well as interactions with lorcaserin (0, 0.3125 and 0.625-mg/kg). In the pyrilamine-dextromethorphan interaction study, an acute dose of pyrilamine (13.3-mg/kg) as well as an acute dose of dextromethorphan caused a significant decrease in nicotine self-administration. There were mutually augmenting effects of these two drugs. The combination of dextromethorphan (10-mg/kg) and pyrilamine (13.3-mg/kg) significantly lowered nicotine self-administration relative to either 10-mg/kg of dextromethorphan alone (p<0.05) or 13.3-mg/kg of pyrilamine alone (p<0.0005). In the lorcaserin-dextromethorphan study, an acute dose of lorcaserin (0.312-mg/kg) as well as an acute dose of dextromethorphan (10-mg/kg) caused a significant decrease in nicotine self-administration

  7. Effects of Chronic Varenicline Treatment on Nicotine, Cocaine, and Concurrent Nicotine+Cocaine Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Nancy K; Fivel, Peter A; Kohut, Stephen J; Carroll, F Ivy

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine dependence and cocaine abuse are major public health problems, and most cocaine abusers also smoke cigarettes. An ideal treatment medication would reduce both cigarette smoking and cocaine abuse. Varenicline is a clinically available, partial agonist at α4β2* and α6β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and a full agonist at α7 nAChRs. Varenicline facilitates smoking cessation in clinical studies and reduced nicotine self-administration, and substituted for the nicotine-discriminative stimulus in preclinical studies. The present study examined the effects of chronic varenicline treatment on self-administration of IV nicotine, IV cocaine, IV nicotine+cocaine combinations, and concurrent food-maintained responding by five cocaine- and nicotine-experienced adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Varenicline (0.004–0.04 mg/kg/h) was administered intravenously every 20 min for 23 h each day for 7–10 consecutive days. Each varenicline treatment was followed by saline-control treatment until food- and drug-maintained responding returned to baseline. During control treatment, nicotine+cocaine combinations maintained significantly higher levels of drug self-administration than nicotine or cocaine alone (P<0.05–0.001). Varenicline dose-dependently reduced responding maintained by nicotine alone (0.0032 mg/kg/inj) (P<0.05), and in combination with cocaine (0.0032 mg/kg/inj) (P<0.05) with no significant effects on food-maintained responding. However, varenicline did not significantly decrease self-administration of a low dose of nicotine (0.001 mg/kg), cocaine alone (0.0032 and 0.01 mg/kg/inj), or 0.01 mg/kg cocaine combined with the same doses of nicotine. We conclude that varenicline selectively attenuates the reinforcing effects of nicotine alone but not cocaine alone, and its effects on nicotine+cocaine combinations are dependent on the dose of cocaine. PMID:24304823

  8. Effects of chronic varenicline treatment on nicotine, cocaine, and concurrent nicotine+cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K; Fivel, Peter A; Kohut, Stephen J; Carroll, F Ivy

    2014-04-01

    Nicotine dependence and cocaine abuse are major public health problems, and most cocaine abusers also smoke cigarettes. An ideal treatment medication would reduce both cigarette smoking and cocaine abuse. Varenicline is a clinically available, partial agonist at α4β2* and α6β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and a full agonist at α7 nAChRs. Varenicline facilitates smoking cessation in clinical studies and reduced nicotine self-administration, and substituted for the nicotine-discriminative stimulus in preclinical studies. The present study examined the effects of chronic varenicline treatment on self-administration of IV nicotine, IV cocaine, IV nicotine+cocaine combinations, and concurrent food-maintained responding by five cocaine- and nicotine-experienced adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Varenicline (0.004-0.04 mg/kg/h) was administered intravenously every 20 min for 23 h each day for 7-10 consecutive days. Each varenicline treatment was followed by saline-control treatment until food- and drug-maintained responding returned to baseline. During control treatment, nicotine+cocaine combinations maintained significantly higher levels of drug self-administration than nicotine or cocaine alone (P<0.05-0.001). Varenicline dose-dependently reduced responding maintained by nicotine alone (0.0032 mg/kg/inj) (P<0.05), and in combination with cocaine (0.0032 mg/kg/inj) (P<0.05) with no significant effects on food-maintained responding. However, varenicline did not significantly decrease self-administration of a low dose of nicotine (0.001 mg/kg), cocaine alone (0.0032 and 0.01 mg/kg/inj), or 0.01 mg/kg cocaine combined with the same doses of nicotine. We conclude that varenicline selectively attenuates the reinforcing effects of nicotine alone but not cocaine alone, and its effects on nicotine+cocaine combinations are dependent on the dose of cocaine.

  9. Acute nicotine poisoning associated with a traditional remedy for eczema

    PubMed Central

    Davies, P; Levy, S; Pahari, A; Martinez, D

    2001-01-01

    We present a case of severe acute nicotine poisoning in an 8 year old boy with moderate eczema after topical application of a traditional remedy from a book published in Bangladesh. Symptoms consistent with nicotine poisoning developed within 30 minutes of application of the remedy. The child subsequently improved with supportive care and was discharged after five days with no neurological sequelae. Diagnosis of nicotine poisoning was not initially made due to difficulty in obtaining an accurate history via an interpreter from the parents who did not speak English. Samples taken 12 hours after application of the remedy showed a serum nicotine of 89 µg/l, serum cotinine of 1430 µg/l, urine nicotine of 1120 µg/l, and a urine cotinine of 6960 µg/l confirming acute nicotine poisoning.

 PMID:11719343

  10. Extended access to nicotine self-administration leads to dependence: Circadian measures, withdrawal measures, and extinction behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, Laura E; Chen, Scott A; Smith, Ron T; Specio, Sheila E; Balster, Robert L; Paterson, Neil E; Markou, Athina; Zorrilla, Eric P; Koob, George F

    2007-01-01

    The present study characterized nicotine intake, circadian patterns of food and water intake, precipitated somatic signs of withdrawal, and extinction of nicotine-seeking behavior in rats with 23-h access to intravenous self-administration (IVSA). Separate groups of animals were allowed access to nicotine IVSA (0.015, n = 9; 0.03, n = 14; 0.06, n = 16; mg/kg/0.1 ml infusion/s; fixed ratio 1) and trained to nosepoke for food and water 23 h/day for 40 consecutive days. Somatic signs of nicotine withdrawal were examined following saline or mecamylamine administration (1.5 mg/kg i.p.), and extinction of nicotine-seeking behavior was assessed. A dose-dependent decrease in lever responding and an increase in nicotine intake were observed, with the highest nicotine dose producing the lowest amount of lever responding and the highest amount of nicotine intake. Nicotine acutely reduced diurnal and nocturnal food intake, producing smaller and fewer meals, and an increased rate of eating. Differences in rate of nicotine intake between the light and dark phase decreased significantly, especially in rats receiving higher unit nicotine doses (0.03 and 0.06 mg/kg), along with long-term decreases in the circadian profile and amplitude of feeding. Mecamylamine precipitated robust withdrawal signs, the magnitude of which was positively correlated with the total amount of self-administered nicotine. Extinction of nicotine-seeking behavior was observed and was facilitated by removal of nicotine-associated cues. The results demonstrate that rats will self-administer nicotine to the point of producing dependence, as measured by somatic signs, resistance to extinction, and measures of food intake.

  11. Nicotine and cocaine self-administration using a multiple schedule of intravenous drug and sucrose reinforcement in rats.

    PubMed

    Stairs, Dustin J; Neugebauer, Nichole M; Bardo, Michael T

    2010-05-01

    There appears to be a relatively narrow range of contingencies in which intravenous (i.v) infusions of nicotine will maintain responding in rats. The schedule of reinforcement typically used when investigating i.v. nicotine self-administration is a simple fixed-ratio (FR) schedule. This study determined if responding in rats could be established using a multiple schedule of either i.v. cocaine or nicotine and sucrose reinforcement. Following training of individual components with each reinforcer, rats were placed on an FR15 60-s timeout multiple schedule of cocaine (0.3 mg/kg/infusion) and sucrose (45 mg pellets) reinforcement or an FR5 60-s timeout multiple schedule of nicotine (0.03 mg/kg/infusion) and sucrose (45 mg pellets) reinforcement. Both cocaine and nicotine maintained significant levels of responding under the multiple schedule. Pretreatment with the dopamine D1 antagonist SCH 23390 increased cocaine-maintained responding, but not sucrose responding. Acute pretreatment with the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine or SCH 23390 specifically decreased nicotine self-administration. Extinction of the individual nicotine and sucrose components resulted in decreases in responding in each component under extinction. These results indicate that i.v. nicotine maintains responding under a multiple schedule. This procedure may be useful when studying the specificity of drug pretreatments on nicotine self-administration.

  12. Insula-specific H magnetic resonance spectroscopy reactions in heavy smokers under acute nicotine withdrawal and after oral nicotine substitution.

    PubMed

    Gutzeit, Andreas; Froehlich, Johannes M; Hergan, Klaus; Graf, Nicole; Binkert, Christoph A; Meier, Dieter; Brügger, Mike; Reischauer, Carolin; Sutter, Reto; Herdener, Marcus; Schubert, Tillmann; Kos, Sebastian; Grosshans, Martin; Straka, Matus; Mutschler, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify whether addiction-specific neurometabolic reaction patterns occur in the insular cortex during acute nicotine withdrawal in tobacco smokers in comparison to nonsmokers. Fourteen male smokers and 10 male nonsmokers were included. Neurometabolites of the right and the left insular cortices were quantified by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) on a 3-Tesla scanner. Three separate MRS measurements were performed in each subject: among the smokers, the first measurement was done during normal smoking behavior, the second measurement during acute withdrawal (after 24 h of smoking abstinence), and the third shortly after administration of an oral nicotine substitute. Simultaneously, craving, withdrawal symptoms, and CO levels in exhaled air were determined during the three phases. The participants in the control group underwent the same MR protocol. In the smokers, during withdrawal, the insular cortex showed a significant increase in glutamine (Gln; p = 0.023) as well as a slight increase not reaching significance for glutamine/glutamate (Glx; p = 0.085) and a nonsignificant drop in myoinositol (mI; p = 0.381). These values tended to normalize after oral nicotine substitution treatment, even though differences were not significant: Gln (p = 0.225), Glx (p = 0.107) and mI (p = 0.810). Overall, the nonsmokers (control group) did not show any metabolic changes over all three phases (p > 0.05). In smokers, acute nicotine withdrawal produces a neurometabolic reaction pattern that is partly reversed by the administration of an oral nicotine substitute. The results are consistent with the expression of an addiction-specific neurometabolic shift in the brain and confirm the fact that the insular cortex seems to play a possible role in nicotine dependence.

  13. Carbon Disulfide Mediates Socially-Acquired Nicotine Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tengfei; Chen, Hao

    2014-01-01

    The social environment plays a critical role in smoking initiation as well as relapse. We previously reported that rats acquired nicotine self-administration with an olfactogustatory cue only when another rat consuming the same cue was present during self-administration. Because carbon disulfide (CS2) mediates social learning of food preference in rodents, we hypothesized that socially acquired nicotine self-administration is also mediated by CS2. We tested this hypothesis by placing female adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats in operant chambers equipped with two lickometers. Licking on the active spout meeting a fixed-ratio 10 schedule triggered the concurrent delivery of an i.v. infusion (saline, or 30 µg/kg nicotine, free base) and an appetitive olfactogustatory cue containing CS2 (0–500 ppm). Rats that self-administered nicotine with the olfactogustatory cue alone licked less on the active spout than on the inactive spout. Adding CS2 to the olfactogustatory cue reversed the preference for the spouts. The group that received 500 ppm CS2 and the olfactogustatory cue obtained a significantly greater number of nicotine infusions than other groups. After extinction training, the original self-administration context reinstated nicotine-seeking behavior in all nicotine groups. In addition, in rats that received the olfactogustatory cue and 500 ppm CS2 during SA, a social environment where the nicotine-associated olfactory cue is present, induced much stronger drug-seeking behavior compared to a social environment lacking the olfactogustatory cue. These data established that CS2 is a critical signal that mediates social learning of nicotine self-administration with olfactogustatory cues in rodents. Additionally, these data showed that the social context can further enhance the drug-seeking behavior induced by the drug-taking environment. PMID:25532105

  14. Negative allosteric modulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors blocks nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ryan F; Hogenkamp, Derk J; Li, Wen Y; Tran, Minhtam B; Belluzzi, James D; Whittemore, Edward R; Leslie, Frances M; Gee, Kelvin W

    2007-12-01

    Drugs that antagonize nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) can be used to inhibit nicotine-induced behavior in both humans and animals. The aim of our experiments is to establish a proof-of-principle that antagonism of nAChRs by negative allosteric modulation can alter behavior in a relevant animal model of addiction, nicotine self-administration. We have identified a novel, negative allosteric modulator of nAChRs, UCI-30002 [N-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-naphthyl)-4-nitroaniline], with selectivity for the major neuronal nAChR subtypes over muscle-type nAChRs. After systemic administration, UCI-30002 significantly reduces nicotine self-administration in rats on both fixed ratio and progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement. The minimum effective dose that significantly alters nicotine self-administration corresponds to brain concentrations of UCI-30002 that produce at least 30% inhibition of the major neuronal nAChR subtypes measured in vitro. UCI-30002 has no effect on responding for food reinforcement in rats on either type of schedule, indicating that there is no effect on general responding or natural reward. UCI-30002 represents validation of the concept that negative allosteric modulators may have significant benefits as a strategy for treating nicotine addiction and encourages the development of subtype-selective modulators.

  15. Chronic caffeine exposure potentiates nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, M; Swanner, L S; Yasar, S; Goldberg, S R

    1999-03-01

    The prevalence of tobacco smoking and coffee drinking place nicotine and caffeine among the most used licit drugs in many societies and their consumption is often characterised by concurrent use. The pharmacological basis for any putative interaction between these drugs remains unclear. Epidemiological reports support anecdotal evidence, which suggests that smokers consume caffeine to enhance the euphoric effects of nicotine. The aim of the present experiment was to examine effects of chronic exposure to caffeine on responding maintained by nicotine. Sprague-Dawley rats consuming caffeine (approximately 150-180 mg/kg per day) in their drinking water for 7 days prior to the beginning and throughout behavioural testing acquired intravenous nicotine self-administration (0.03 mg/kg per infusion) more rapidly than did controls. In a cross-over design, exclusion of caffeine brought levels of nicotine self-administration back to baseline, while adding caffeine to the drinking water of control rats increased responding maintained by nicotine over 90%. These findings strongly suggest that caffeine can potentiate the reinforcing properties of nicotine, thus highlighting the importance of environmental factors in shaping and maintaining tobacco smoking.

  16. Amitifadine, a triple monoamine re-uptake inhibitor, reduces nicotine self-administration in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Edward D; Wells, Corinne; Johnson, Joshua E; Rezvani, Amir H.; Bymaster, Frank P.; Rose, Jed E.

    2016-01-01

    A wider diversity of drug treatments to aid smoking cessation is needed to help tailor the most efficacious treatment for different types of smokers. This study was conducted to determine whether amitifadine, which inhibits re-uptake of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin, would decrease nicotine self-administration at doses that do not cause adverse side effects. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to self-administer nicotine intravenous (IV) and were given acute doses of amitifadine in a repeated measures counterbalanced design. Effects of amitifadine on locomotor activity and food motivated responding were also evaluated. Chronic amitifadine effects were also examined. The 30 mg/kg amitifadine dose significantly reduced nicotine self-administration. The 5 and 10 mg/kg doses reduced nicotine self-administration during the first 15 min. of the session when the greatest amount of nicotine was self-administered. The 30 mg/kg amitifadine dose, but not the lower doses caused a significant reduction in locomotor activity averaged over the 1-hour session and reduced food motivated responding. The 10 mg/kg dose caused hypoactivity at the beginning of the session, but 5 mg/kg did not cause any hypoactivity. The effects of chronic amitifadine treatment (10 mg/kg) over the course of 15 sessions was also determined. Amitifadine caused a significant reduction in nicotine self-administration, which was not seen to diminish over two consecutive weeks of treatment and a week after enforced abstinence. Amitifadine significantly reduced nicotine self-administration. This prompts further research to determine if amitifadine might be an effective treatment for smoking cessation. PMID:26101069

  17. Amitifadine, a triple monoamine re-uptake inhibitor, reduces nicotine self-administration in female rats.

    PubMed

    Levin, Edward D; Wells, Corinne; Johnson, Joshua E; Rezvani, Amir H; Bymaster, Frank P; Rose, Jed E

    2015-10-05

    A wider diversity of drug treatments to aid smoking cessation is needed to help tailor the most efficacious treatment for different types of smokers. This study was conducted to determine whether amitifadine, which inhibits re-uptake of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin, would decrease nicotine self-administration at doses that do not cause adverse side effects. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to self-administer nicotine intravenous (IV) and were given acute doses of amitifadine in a repeated measures counterbalanced design. Effects of amitifadine on locomotor activity and food motivated responding were also evaluated. Chronic amitifadine effects were also examined. The 30 mg/kg amitifadine dose significantly reduced nicotine self-administration. The 5 and 10 mg/kg doses reduced nicotine self-administration during the first 15 min of the session when the greatest amount of nicotine was self-administered. The 30 mg/kg amitifadine dose, but not the lower doses caused a significant reduction in locomotor activity averaged over the one-hour session and reduced food motivated responding. The 10 mg/kg dose caused hypoactivity at the beginning of the session, but 5 mg/kg did not cause any hypoactivity. The effects of chronic amitifadine treatment (10 mg/kg) over the course of 15 sessions was also determined. Amitifadine caused a significant reduction in nicotine self-administration, which was not seen to diminish over two consecutive weeks of treatment and a week after enforced abstinence. Amitifadine significantly reduced nicotine self-administration. This prompts further research to determine if amitifadine might be an effective treatment for smoking cessation.

  18. CONTRASTING BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF ACUTE NICOTINE AND CHRONIC SMOKING IN DETOXIFIED ALCOHOLICS

    PubMed Central

    Boissoneault, Jeff; Gilbertson, Rebecca; Prather, Robert; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2011-01-01

    Background Current literature suggests that acute nicotine administration provides a compensatory mechanism by which alcoholics might alleviate attentional deficits. In contrast, chronic smoking is increasingly recognized as negatively affecting neurobehavioral integrity. These opposing effects have not been simultaneously examined. Thus, we sought to a) extend previous work by exploring the effects of acute nicotine effects on vigilance components of attention and replicate previous findings suggesting that treatment-seeking alcoholics experience benefit to a greater extent than do other groups; and b) to examine the impact of chronic smoking on these tasks and across subgroups. Methods Substance abusing participants (N=86) were recruited and subgrouped on the basis of dependency criteria as either alcoholics, alcoholics with co-morbid stimulant dependence, or stimulant dependent individuals. Groups of cigarette-smoking (N=17) and non-smoking (N=22) community controls were recruited as comparison groups. Smoking subjects were assigned a placebo, low, or high dose nicotine patch in a double-blind placebo controlled fashion. Non-smoking controls were administered either a placebo or low dose. Testing occurred after dose stabilization. Results General linear models indicated greater sensitivity to acute nicotine administration among alcoholics than other groups when controlling for the effect of intensity of smoking history, as reflected by pack-years. Pack-years correlated negatively with performance measures in alcoholics but not stimulant abusing subgroups or smoking controls. Finally, regression analyses demonstrated that pack-years predicted poorer performance only for the alcoholic subgroup. Conclusions These results support previous work finding a compensatory effect of acute nicotine administration on attentional performance in alcoholics and reinforce the consideration of recent nicotine use as a confound in neurocognitive studies of alcoholics. Of

  19. Effects of acute and chronic nicotine on elevated plus maze in mice: involvement of calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Biala, Grazyna; Budzynska, Barbara

    2006-05-30

    The current experiments examined the anxiety-related effects of acute and repeated nicotine administration using the elevated plus maze test in mice. Nicotine (0.1 mg/kg s.c., 5 and 30 min after injection; 0.5 mg/kg, s.c., 5 min after injection) had an anxiogenic effect, shown by specific decreases in the percentage of time spent on the open arms and in the percentage of open arm entries. Tolerance developed to this anxiogenic action after 6 days of daily nicotine administration (0.1 mg/kg, s.c.). Five minutes after the seventh injection, an anxiolytic effect was observed, i.e., specific increases in the percentage of time spent on the open arms and in the percentage of open arm entries. L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel antagonists nimodipine (5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.), flunarizine (5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.), verapamil (5, 10, 20 mg/kg) and diltiazem (5, 10, 20 mg/kg, i.p.) were also injected prior to an acute low dose of nicotine or to each injection of chronic nicotine. Our results revealed that calcium channel blockers dose-dependently attenuated both an anxiogenic effect of nicotine as well as the development of tolerance to this effect. Our results suggest that neural calcium-dependent mechanisms are involved in the anxiety-related responses to acute and chronic nicotine injection that may ultimately lead to addiction and smoking relapse in human smokers.

  20. Repeated administration of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor attenuates nicotine taking in rats and smoking behavior in human smokers.

    PubMed

    Ashare, R L; Kimmey, B A; Rupprecht, L E; Bowers, M E; Hayes, M R; Schmidt, H D

    2016-01-19

    Tobacco smoking remains the leading cause of preventable death worldwide and current smoking cessation medications have limited efficacy. Thus, there is a clear need for translational research focused on identifying novel pharmacotherapies for nicotine addiction. Our previous studies demonstrated that acute administration of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI) attenuates nicotine taking and seeking in rats and suggest that AChEIs could be repurposed for smoking cessation. Here, we expand upon these findings with experiments designed to determine the effects of repeated AChEI administration on voluntary nicotine taking in rats as well as smoking behavior in human smokers. Rats were trained to self-administer intravenous infusions of nicotine (0.03 mg kg(-1) per 0.59 ml) on a fixed-ratio-5 schedule of reinforcement. Once rats maintained stable nicotine taking, galantamine or donepezil was administered before 10 consecutive daily nicotine self-administration sessions. Repeated administration of 5.0 mg kg(-1) galantamine and 3.0 mg kg(-1) donepezil attenuated nicotine self-administration in rats. These effects were reinforcer-specific and not due to adverse malaise-like effects of drug treatment as repeated galantamine and donepezil administration had no effects on sucrose self-administration, ad libitum food intake and pica. The effects of repeated galantamine (versus placebo) on cigarette smoking were also tested in human treatment-seeking smokers. Two weeks of daily galantamine treatment (8.0 mg (week 1) and 16.0 mg (week 2)) significantly reduced smoking rate as well as smoking satisfaction and reward compared with placebo. This translational study indicates that repeated AChEI administration reduces nicotine reinforcement in rats and smoking behavior in humans at doses not associated with tolerance and/or adverse effects.

  1. Modulation of mood and cognitive performance following acute administration of single doses of Melissa officinalis (Lemon balm) with human CNS nicotinic and muscarinic receptor-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, D O; Wake, G; Savelev, S; Tildesley, N T J; Perry, E K; Wesnes, K A; Scholey, A B

    2003-10-01

    Melissa officinalis (Lemon balm) is a herbal medicine that has traditionally been attributed with memory-enhancing properties, but which is currently more widely used as a mild sedative and sleep aid. In a previous study it was demonstrated that a commercial Melissa extract led to dose-specific increases in calmness, and dose-dependent decrements in timed memory task performance. However, the extract utilized in that study did not exhibit in vitro cholinergic receptor-binding properties. The current study involved an initial screening of samples of M. officinalis for human acetylcholinesterase inhibition and cholinergic receptor-binding properties. The cognitive and mood effects of single doses of the most cholinergically active dried leaf were then assessed in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, balanced crossover study. Following the in vitro analysis, 20 healthy, young participants received single doses of 600, 1000, and 1600 mg of encapsulated dried leaf, or a matching placebo, at 7-day intervals. Cognitive performance and mood were assessed predose and at 1, 3, and 6 h postdose using the Cognitive Drug Research computerized assessment battery and Bond-Lader visual analog scales, respectively. In vitro analysis of the chosen extract established IC(50) concentrations of 0.18 and 3.47 mg ml(-1), respectively, for the displacement of [(3)H]-(N)-nicotine and [(3)H]-(N)-scopolamine from nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in the human cerebral cortex tissue. However, no cholinesterase inhibitory properties were detected. The most notable cognitive and mood effects were improved memory performance and increased 'calmness' at all postdose time points for the highest (1600 mg) dose. However, while the profile of results was overwhelmingly favorable for the highest dose, decrements in the speed of timed memory task performance and on a rapid visual information-processing task increased with decreasing dose. These results suggest that doses of Melissa

  2. Brain regions mediating α3β4 nicotinic antagonist effects of 18-MC on nicotine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Glick, Stanley D; Sell, Elizabeth M; McCallum, Sarah E; Maisonneuve, Isabelle M

    2011-11-01

    18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC), a putative anti-addictive agent, has been shown to decrease the self-administration of several drugs of abuse in rats. 18-MC is a potent antagonist at α3β4 nicotinic receptors. Consistent with high densities of α3β4 nicotinic receptors being located in the medial habenula and the interpeduncular nucleus, 18-MC has been shown to act in these regions to decrease both morphine and methamphetamine self-administration. The present study was conducted to determine if 18-MC's effect on nicotine self-administration is mediated by acting in these same brain regions. Because moderate densities of α3β4 receptors occur in the dorsolateral tegmentum, ventral tegmental area, and basolateral amygdala, these brain areas were also examined as potential sites of action of 18-MC. Local administration of 18-MC into either the medial habenula, the basolateral amygdala or the dorsolateral tegmentum decreased nicotine self-administration. Surprisingly, local administration of 18-MC into the interpeduncular nucleus increased nicotine self-administration while local administration of 18-MC into the ventral tegmental area had no effect on nicotine self-administration. Similar effects were produced by local administration of either mecamylamine or conotoxin AuIB. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that 18-MC decreases nicotine self-administration by indirectly modulating the dopaminergic mesolimbic pathway via blockade of α3β4 nicotinic receptors in the medial habenula, basolateral amygdala, and dorsolateral tegmentum. The data also suggest that an action of 18-MC in the interpeduncular nucleus may attenuate aversive and/or depressive effects of nicotine.

  3. Methylphenidate enhances the abuse-related behavioral effects of nicotine in rats: intravenous self-administration, drug discrimination, and locomotor cross-sensitization.

    PubMed

    Wooters, Thomas E; Neugebauer, Nichole M; Rush, Craig R; Bardo, Michael T

    2008-04-01

    Stimulant drugs, including D-amphetamine, cocaine, and methylphenidate, increase cigarette smoking in controlled human laboratory experiments. Although the mechanism(s) underlying this effect are unknown, it is possible that stimulants may enhance directly the abuse-related effects of nicotine. In the present study, we characterized the behavioral pharmacological interactions between methylphenidate and nicotine in the intravenous self-administration, drug discrimination, and locomotor cross-sensitization procedures. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to respond for intravenous nicotine (0.01 or 0.03 mg/kg/infusion) or sucrose, and the acute effects of methylphenidate (1.25-10 mg/kg) were determined; in addition, separate groups of rats were treated with methylphenidate (2.5 mg/kg) or saline before 12 consecutive nicotine (0.03 mg/kg/infusion) self-administration sessions. Next, the discriminative stimulus effects of nicotine (0.03-0.3 mg/kg) and methylphenidate (1.25-10 mg/kg), alone and in combination with a low nicotine dose (0.056 mg/kg), were tested in nicotine-trained rats. Finally, the locomotor effect of repeated methylphenidate (2.5 mg/kg) was tested in rats previously treated with nicotine (0.2-0.8 mg/kg). Results indicated that acute methylphenidate increased the rate of nicotine self-administration at doses that reduced sucrose-maintained responding; furthermore, tolerance to this effect was not apparent following repeated methylphenidate. Methylphenidate, while not substituting for nicotine alone, dose-dependently enhanced the discriminative stimulus effect of a low nicotine dose. In addition, repeated nicotine exposure promoted the development of locomotor sensitization to methylphenidate. Taken together with recent clinical findings, these results suggest that methylphenidate may enhance the abuse-related behavioral effects of nicotine, perhaps increasing vulnerability to tobacco dependence.

  4. Threshold of adulthood for the onset of nicotine self-administration in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Levin, Edward D; Slade, Susan; Wells, Corinne; Cauley, Marty; Petro, Ann; Vendittelli, Analise; Johnson, Michael; Williams, Paul; Horton, Kofi; Rezvani, Amir H

    2011-12-01

    The great majority of tobacco addiction begins during adolescence. More heavily addicted smokers begin smoking earlier, but differentiating the neurobehavioral impact of nicotine self-administration during adolescence from self-selection bias (whereby people more prone to heavy addiction also begin earlier) cannot be ethically unconfounded in humans. The goals of this research were to determine the age threshold for the adult-like nicotine self-administration and determine sex differences. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were tested for nicotine self-administration starting at 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 weeks of age in an operant FR1 schedule for IV nicotine (0.03 mg/kg/infusion) in 45-min sessions for 2 weeks, with 1 week of enforced abstinence and 1 week of resumed access. This study replicated our earlier work that nicotine self-administration was increased in adolescent vs. adult rats and that the effect was more pronounced in adolescent males, but the increased nicotine self-administration was more persistent in adolescent-onset females. The age threshold for adult-like behavior was 6-7 weeks of age. Adolescent-onset nicotine self-administration had persisting effects of eggaurated increases of nicotine self-administration when fixed-ratio requirements for self-administration were lowered. Female rats that had begun nicotine self-administration during adolescence showed exaggerated increases in nicotine self-administration after a switch back to FR1 from FR8, indicating a lessened control over their self-administration. Adolescent-onset nicotine self-administration was not found to potentiate cocaine self-administration. Adolescent-onset nicotine self-administration causes persistent increases in nicotine self-administration in female rats even after they reach adulthood and disrupts control over self-administration behavior.

  5. Involvement of the rostral agranular insular cortex in nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Pushparaj, Abhiram; Kim, Aaron S; Musiol, Martin; Trigo, Jose M; Le Foll, Bernard

    2015-09-01

    Our prior work demonstrated the involvement of the caudal granular subregion of the insular cortex in a rat model of nicotine self-administration. Recent studies in various animal models of addiction for nicotine and other drugs have identified a role for the rostral agranular subregion (RAIC). The current research was undertaken to examine the involvement of the RAIC in a rat model of nicotine self-administration. We investigated the inactivating effects of local infusions of a γ-aminobutyric acid agonist mixture (baclofen/muscimol) into the RAIC on nicotine self-administration under a fixed-ratio 5 (FR-5) schedule and on reinstatement of nicotine seeking induced by nicotine-associated cues in rats. We also evaluated the effects of RAIC inactivation on food self-administration under an FR5 schedule as a control. Inactivation of the RAIC decreased nicotine, but not food, self-administration. RAIC inactivation also prevented the reinstatement, after extinction, of nicotine seeking induced by nicotine-associated cues. Our study indicates that the RAIC is involved in nicotine-taking and nicotine-seeking in rats. Modulating insular cortex function appears to be a promising approach for nicotine dependence treatment.

  6. Beta 2 subunit-containing nicotinic receptors mediate acute nicotine-induced activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-dependent pathways in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jackson, K J; Walters, C L; Damaj, M I

    2009-08-01

    Nicotine is the addictive component of tobacco, and successful smoking cessation therapies must address the various processes that contribute to nicotine addiction. Thus, understanding the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes and subsequent molecular cascades activated after nicotine exposure is of the utmost importance in understanding the progression of nicotine dependence. One possible candidate is the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) pathway. Substrates of this kinase include the vesicle-associated protein synapsin I and the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). The goal of these studies was to examine these postreceptor mechanisms after acute nicotine treatment in vivo. We first show that administration of nicotine increases CaMKII activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and amygdala. In beta2 nAChR knockout (KO) mice, nicotine does not induce an increase in kinase activity, phosphorylated (p)Synapsin I, or pCREB. In contrast, alpha7 nAChR KO mice show nicotine-induced increases in CaMKII activity and pCREB, similar to their wild-type littermates. Moreover, we show that when animals are pretreated with the CaMKII inhibitors 4-[(2S)-2-[(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl) methylamino]-3-oxo-3-(4-phenyl-1-piperazinyl)propyl]phenyl isoquinolinesulfonic acid ester (KN-62) and N-[2-[[[3-(4-chlorophenyl)-2 propenyl]methylamino]methyl]phenyl]-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methoxybenzenesulphonamide (KN-93), nicotine-induced increase in the kinase activity and pCREB was attenuated in the VTA and NAc, whereas pretreatment with (2-[N-(4-methoxybenzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine, phosphate) (KN-92), the inactive analog, did not alter the nicotine-induced increase in pCREB. Taken together, these data suggest that the nicotine-induced increase in CaMKII activity may correlate with the nicotine-induced increase in pSynapsin I and pCREB in the VTA and NAc via beta2

  7. The 5-HT2C receptor agonist lorcaserin reduces nicotine self-administration, discrimination, and reinstatement: relationship to feeding behavior and impulse control.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Guy A; Silenieks, Leo B; Rossmann, Anne; Rizos, Zoe; Noble, Kevin; Soko, Ashlie D; Fletcher, Paul J

    2012-04-01

    Lorcaserin ((1R)-8-chloro-1-methyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine HCl) is a selective 5-HT(2C) receptor agonist with clinical efficacy in phase-III obesity trials. Based on evidence that this drug class also affects behaviors motivated by drug reinforcement, we compared the effect of lorcaserin on behavior maintained by food and nicotine reinforcement, as well as the stimulant and discriminative stimulus properties of nicotine in the rat. Acutely administered lorcaserin (0.3-3 mg/kg, subcutaneous (SC)) dose dependently reduced feeding induced by 22-h food deprivation or palatability. Effects up to 1 mg/kg were consistent with a specific effect on feeding motivation. Lorcaserin (0.6-1 mg/kg, SC) reduced operant responding for food on progressive and fixed ratio schedules of reinforcement. In this dose range lorcaserin also reversed the motor stimulant effect of nicotine, reduced intravenous self-administration of nicotine, and attenuated the nicotine cue in rats trained to discriminate nicotine from saline. Lorcaserin also reduced the reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior elicited by a compound cue comprising a nicotine prime and conditioned stimulus previously paired with nicotine reinforcement. Lorcaserin did not reinstate nicotine-seeking behavior or substitute for a nicotine cue. Finally, lorcaserin (0.3-1 mg/kg) reduced nicotine-induced increases in anticipatory responding, a measure of impulsive action, in rats performing the five-choice serial reaction time task. Importantly, these results indicate that lorcaserin, and likely other selective 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists, similarly affect both food- and nicotine-motivated behaviors, and nicotine-induced impulsivity. Collectively, these findings highlight a therapeutic potential for 5-HT(2C) agonists such as lorcaserin beyond obesity into addictive behaviors, such as nicotine dependence.

  8. The effects of nicotine administration on the pathophysiology of rat aortic wall.

    PubMed

    Kugo, H; Zaima, N; Tanaka, H; Urano, T; Unno, N; Moriyama, T

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is the progressive dilation of the abdominal aorta. Nicotine is reported to be associated with the development and rupture of AAA, but the pathological effects of nicotine on normal rat aorta have not been determined. We investigated pathological changes in the aortic wall of rats caused by the administration of nicotine. Nicotine administration weakened the vascular wall, increased gelatinolytic activity and promoted the destruction of elastin and collagen in the rat abdominal aorta. There were no differences in the areas positive for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 between the control and nicotine treated groups. The areas positive for MMP-12 in the nicotine group were significantly greater than for the control group. Gelatinolytic activity in the aortic wall was increased significantly in the nicotine group. Our findings suggest that MMP-12 is sensitive to nicotine exposure in rats.

  9. Prenatal nicotine exposure alters the responses to subsequent nicotine administration and withdrawal in adolescence: Serotonin receptors and cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Tate, Charlotte A; Cousins, Mandy M; Seidler, Frederic J

    2006-11-01

    Offspring of women who smoke during pregnancy are themselves more likely to take up smoking in adolescence, effects that are associated with a high rate of depression and increased sensitivity to withdrawal symptoms. To evaluate the biological basis for this relationship, we assessed effects on serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5HT) receptors and 5HT-mediated cellular responses in rats exposed to nicotine throughout prenatal development and then given nicotine in adolescence (postnatal days PN30-47.5), using regimens that reproduce plasma nicotine levels found in smokers. Evaluations were then made during the period of adolescent nicotine treatment and for up to one month after the end of treatment. Prenatal nicotine exposure, which elicits damage to 5HT projections in the cerebral cortex and striatum, produced sex-selective changes in the expression of 5HT(1A) and 5HT2 receptors, along with induction of adenylyl cyclase (AC), leading to sensitization of heterologous inputs operating through this signaling pathway. Superimposed on these effects, the AC response to 5HT was shifted toward inhibition. By itself, adolescent nicotine administration, which damages the same pathways, produced similar effects on receptors and the 5HT-mediated response, but a smaller overall induction of AC. Animals exposed to prenatal nicotine showed a reduced response to nicotine administered in adolescence, results in keeping with earlier findings of persistent desensitization. Our results indicate that prenatal nicotine exposure alters parameters of 5HT synaptic communication lasting into adolescence and changes the response to nicotine administration and withdrawal in adolescence, actions which may contribute to a subpopulation especially vulnerable to nicotine dependence.

  10. Sex differences in nicotine self-administration in rats during progressive unit dose reduction: Implications for nicotine regulation policy

    PubMed Central

    Grebenstein, Patricia; Burroughs, Danielle; Zhang, Yan; LeSage, Mark G.

    2013-01-01

    Reducing the nicotine content in tobacco products is being considered by the FDA as a policy to reduce the addictiveness of tobacco products. Understanding individual differences in response to nicotine reduction will be critical to developing safe and effective policy. Animal and human research demonstrating sex differences in the reinforcing effects of nicotine suggests that males and females may respond differently to nicotine-reduction policies. However, no studies have directly examined sex differences in the effects of nicotine unit-dose reduction on nicotine self-administration (NSA) in animals. The purpose of the present study was to examine this issue in a rodent self-administration model. Male and female rats were trained to self-administer nicotine (0.06 mg/kg) under an FR 3 schedule during daily 23 h sessions. Rats were then exposed to saline extinction and reacquisition of NSA, followed by weekly reductions in the unit dose (0.03 to 0.00025 mg/kg) until extinction levels of responding were achieved. Males and females were compared with respect to baseline levels of intake, resistance to extinction, degree of compensatory increases in responding during dose reduction, and the threshold reinforcing unit dose of nicotine. Exponential demand-curve analysis was also conducted to compare the sensitivity of males and females to increases in the unit price (FR/unit dose) of nicotine (i.e., elasticity of demand or reinforcing efficacy). Females exhibited significantly higher baseline intake and less compensation than males. However, there were no sex differences in the reinforcement threshold or elasticity of demand. Dose–response relationships were very well described by the exponential demand function (r2 values > 0.96 for individual subjects). These findings suggest that females may exhibit less compensatory smoking in response to nicotine reduction policies, even though their nicotine reinforcement threshold and elasticity of demand may not differ from

  11. Enriched environments for rodents and their interaction with nicotine administration.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Gresa, Patricia; Ramos-Campos, Marta; Redolat, Rosa

    2013-09-01

    An active lifestyle throughout the life cycle seems to delay cognitive aging and dementia and has also been evaluated as an intervention against addiction to cocaine and other drugs of abuse. In epidemiological studies with humans, it has proved difficult to separate the cognitive, social and physical components from other variables that influence lifestyle. Studies in animal models are useful for evaluating the impact of each of these factors and for uncovering the underlying mechanisms of the benefits of complex environments. Preclinical studies have employed the Environmental Enrichment paradigm (EE) which has been proposed as a preclinical model of positive life experiences in humans. EE has been associated with protective effects against addiction to some drugs, but few studies have been carried out in order to evaluate how its actions interact with nicotine addiction. In this context, the main aim of this review is to provide an analysis of the preclinical studies evaluating the interaction between exposure to enriched environments with the neurobiological and behavioral effects of nicotine administration. These studies will contribute to the development of future preventive and therapeutic applications of enriched environments and positive experiences for drug addiction in human beings, taking into account individual vulnerability. They also may shed light on new approaches to the treatment of nicotine addiction, as interventions based in physical exercise in interaction with other environmental variables.

  12. Chronic nicotine administration in the drinking water affects the striatal dopamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, K; Ahtee, L

    2000-05-01

    Although tobacco contains a large variety of substances, its addictive properties are most probably due to the reinforcing actions of nicotine that motivates continued tobacco use. Animals and humans self-administer nicotine, a response that appears to involve the mesolimbic dopamine system and to be common to other abused drugs. The present article reviews animal models to administer nicotine chronically. We also describe a new animal model in which nicotine is given to mice in drinking water as their sole source of fluid. This treatment produced nicotine plasma concentrations comparable to or above those found in smokers. We found that mice withdrawn from nicotine were tolerant to the effects of nicotine challenge on striatal dopamine metabolism as well as on body temperature and locomotor activity. Furthermore, 3H-nicotine binding in the cortex and midbrain was significantly increased in mice withdrawn from nicotine. The last part of the article will focus on the effects of this chronic nicotine treatment on striatal dopamine. Dopamine and its metabolites and locomotor activity were increased in the forenoon in mice still drinking nicotine solutions. We also report recent data in which chronic nicotine administration in the drinking water enhanced the effect of dopamine receptor agonist, quinpirole, on striatal metabolism. The animal model described appears to be a relevant method for studying the mechanisms that are thought to be involved in nicotine dependence.

  13. Increased Nicotine Self-Administration Following Prenatal Exposure in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Edward D.; Lawrence, Susan; Petro, Ann; Horton, Kofi; Seidler, Frederic J.; Slotkin, Theodore A.

    2007-01-01

    There is a significant association between maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy and greater subsequent risk of smoking in female offspring. In animal models, prenatal nicotine exposure causes persistent alterations in cholinergic and monoaminergic systems, both of which are important for nicotine actions underlying tobacco addiction. Accordingly, the current study was conducted to determine if there is a cause-and-effect relationship between prenatal nicotine exposure and nicotine self-administration starting in adolescence. Pregnant rats were administered nicotine (6 mg/kg/day) by osmotic minipump infusion throughout gestation and then, beginning in adolescence and continuing into adulthood, female offspring were given access to nicotine via a standard operant IV self-administration procedure (0.03 mg/kg/infusion). Gestational nicotine exposure did not alter the initial rate of nicotine self-administration. However, when animals underwent one week of forced abstinence and then had a second opportunity to self-administer nicotine, the prenatally-exposed animals showed a significantly greater rate of self-administration than did the controls. Prenatal nicotine exposure causes increased nicotine self-administration, which is revealed only when the animals are allowed to experience a period of nicotine abstinence. This supports a cause-and-effect relationship between the higher rates of smoking in the daughters of women who smoke cigarettes during pregnancy and implicates a role for nicotine in this effect. Our results further characterize the long-term liabilities of maternal smoking but also point to the potential liabilities of nicotine-based treatments for smoking cessation during pregnancy. PMID:17196243

  14. Thyroid receptor β involvement in the effects of acute nicotine on hippocampus-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Leach, Prescott T; Kenney, Justin W; Connor, David A; Gould, Thomas J

    2015-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is common despite adverse health effects. Nicotine's effects on learning may contribute to addiction by enhancing drug-context associations. Effects of nicotine on learning could be direct or could occur by altering systems that modulate cognition. Because thyroid signaling can alter cognition and nicotine/smoking may change thyroid function, nicotine could affect learning through changes in thyroid signaling. These studies investigate the functional contributions of thyroid receptor (TR) subtypes β and α1 to nicotine-enhanced learning and characterize the effects of acute nicotine and learning on thyroid hormone levels. We conducted a high throughput screen of transcription factor activity to identify novel targets that may contribute to the effects of nicotine on learning. Based on these results, which showed that combined nicotine and learning uniquely acted to increase TR activation, we identified TRs as potential targets of nicotine. Further analyses were conducted to determine the individual and combined effects of nicotine and learning on thyroid hormone levels, but no changes were seen. Next, to determine the role of TRβ and TRα1 in the effects of nicotine on learning, mice lacking the TRβ or TRα1 gene and wildtype littermates were administered acute nicotine prior to fear conditioning. Nicotine enhanced contextual fear conditioning in TRα1 knockout mice and wildtypes from both lines but TRβ knockout mice did not show nicotine-enhanced learning. This finding supports involvement of TRβ signaling in the effect of acute nicotine on hippocampus-dependent memory. Acute nicotine enhances learning and these effects may involve processes regulated by the transcription factor TRβ.

  15. Distinct Effects of Enriched Environment on Dopamine Clearance in Nucleus Accumbens Shell and Core Following Systemic Nicotine Administration

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, JUN; BARDO, MICHAEL T.; DWOSKIN, LINDA P.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental enrichment during development may reduce drug abuse liability by modulating dopamine transporter (DAT) function. Nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell and core respond differentially to regulate the rewarding properties and locomotor stimulant effects of psychostimulants. The current study evaluated dopamine (DA) clearance (CLDA) in the NAc shell and core using in vivo voltammetry in rats raised in an enriched condition (EC) or an impoverished condition (IC) and determined the effect of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg) on CLDA. Baseline CLDA in NAc shell and core was not different between EC and IC rats. In the saline control group, CLDA in NAc shell was greater across time in IC when compared with EC rats, whereas CLDA in NAc core was greater in EC rats when compared with IC rats. Consistent with these findings, opposite effects of enrichment on DA clearance in shell and core were obtained following acute nicotine administration. In NAc shell, nicotine increased CLDA in EC rats, but not in IC rats. Conversely, in NAc core, nicotine increased CLDA in IC rats, but not in EC rats. The current results demonstrate that environmental enrichment differentially regulates the response to nicotine in NAc shell and core via alterations in DAT function, which may explain how environmental enrichment reduces the behavioral response to nicotine. PMID:23065942

  16. Differential effects of nicotine treatment and ethanol self-administration on CYP2A6, CYP2B6 and nicotine pharmacokinetics in African green monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, C S; Miksys, S; Palmour, R M; Tyndale, R F

    2012-12-01

    In primates, nicotine is metabolically inactivated in the liver by CYP2A6 and possibly CYP2B6. Changes in the levels of these two enzymes may affect nicotine pharmacokinetics and influence smoking behaviors. This study investigated the independent and combined effects of ethanol self-administration and nicotine treatment (0.5 mg/kg b.i.d. s.c.) on hepatic CYP2A6 and CYP2B6 levels (mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activity), in vitro nicotine metabolism, and in vivo nicotine pharmacokinetics in monkeys. CYP2A6 mRNA and protein levels and in vitro coumarin (selective CYP2A6 substrate) and nicotine metabolism were decreased by nicotine treatment but unaffected by ethanol. CYP2B6 protein levels and in vitro bupropion (selective CYP2B6 substrate) metabolism were increased by ethanol but unaffected by nicotine treatment; CYP2B6 mRNA levels were unaltered by either treatment. Combined ethanol and nicotine exposure decreased CYP2A6 mRNA and protein levels, as well as in vitro coumarin and nicotine metabolism, and increased CYP2B6 protein levels and in vitro bupropion metabolism, with no change in CYP2B6 mRNA levels. Chronic nicotine resulted in higher nicotine plasma levels achieved after nicotine administration, consistent with decreased CYP2A6. Ethanol alone, or combined with nicotine, resulted in lower nicotine plasma levels by a mechanism independent of the change in these enzymes. Thus, nicotine can decrease hepatic CYP2A6, reducing the metabolism of its substrates, including nicotine, whereas ethanol can increase hepatic CYP2B6, increasing the metabolism of CYP2B6 substrates. In vivo nicotine pharmacokinetics are differentially affected by ethanol and nicotine, but when both drugs are used in combination the effect more closely resembles ethanol alone.

  17. Safety and effectiveness of transdermal nicotine patch in smokers admitted with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Meine, Trip J; Patel, Manesh R; Washam, Jeffrey B; Pappas, Paul A; Jollis, James G

    2005-04-15

    An analysis of smokers admitted with acute coronary syndrome who received transdermal nicotine therapy and those who did not was performed. Propensity analysis was used to match patients. Transdermal nicotine therapy appears safe and does not have an effect on the mortality of patients with acute coronary syndromes.

  18. Enhanced nicotine self-administration and suppressed dopaminergic systems in a rat model of diabetes.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, Laura E; Natividad, Luis A; Pipkin, Joseph A; Roman, Francisco; Torres, Ivan; Jurado, Jesus; Torres, Oscar V; Friedman, Theodore C; Tenayuca, John M; Nazarian, Arbi

    2014-11-01

    Patients with diabetes display a heightened propensity to use tobacco; however, it is unclear whether they experience enhanced rewarding effects of nicotine. Thus, this study examined the reinforcing effects of nicotine in a rodent model of diabetes involving administration of streptozotocin (STZ), a drug that is toxic to pancreatic insulin-producing cells. The first study compared STZ- and vehicle-treated rats that had 23-hour access to intravenous self-administration (IVSA) of nicotine or saline and concomitant access to food and water. In order to examine the contribution of dopamine to our behavioral effects, dopamine transporter (DAT), D1 and D2 receptor levels were compared in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) following 10 days of nicotine or saline IVSA. Dopamine levels in the NAc were also compared following nicotine administration. Lastly, nicotine metabolism and dose-dependent effects of nicotine IVSA were assessed. The results revealed that STZ-treated rats displayed enhanced nicotine intake and a robust increase in food and water intake relative to controls. Protein analysis revealed an increase in DAT and a decrease in D1 receptor levels in the NAc of STZ- versus vehicle-treated rats regardless of IVSA condition. STZ-treated rats also displayed suppressed NAc dopamine levels during baseline and in response to nicotine. STZ treatment did not alter our assessment of nicotine metabolism. Furthermore, STZ treatment increased nicotine IVSA in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that STZ-treatment increased the rewarding effects of nicotine. This suggests that strong reinforcing effects of nicotine may contribute to greater tobacco use in patients with diabetes.

  19. Enhanced nicotine self-administration and suppressed dopaminergic systems in a rat model of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, Laura E.; Natividad, Luis A.; Pipkin, Joseph A.; Roman, Francisco; Torres, Ivan; Jurado, Jesus; Torres, Oscar V.; Friedman, Theodore C.; Tenayuca, John M.; Nazarian, Arbi

    2013-01-01

    Patients with diabetes display a heightened propensity to use tobacco; however, it is unclear whether they experience enhanced rewarding effects of nicotine. Thus, this study examined the reinforcing effects of nicotine in a rodent model of diabetes involving administration of streptozotocin (STZ), a drug that is toxic to pancreatic insulin-producing cells. The first study compared STZ- and vehicle-treated rats that had 23-hour access to intravenous self-administration (IVSA) of nicotine or saline and concomitant access to food and water. In order to examine the contribution of dopamine to our behavioral effects, dopamine transporter (DAT), D1 and D2 receptor levels were compared in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) following 10 days of nicotine or saline IVSA. Dopamine levels in the NAc were also compared following nicotine administration. Lastly, nicotine metabolism and dose-dependent effects of nicotine IVSA were assessed. The results revealed that STZ-treated rats displayed enhanced nicotine intake and a robust increase in food and water intake relative to controls. Protein analysis revealed an increase in DAT and a decrease in D1 receptor levels in the NAc of STZ- versus vehicle-treated rats regardless of IVSA condition. STZ-treated rats also displayed suppressed NAc dopamine levels during baseline and in response to nicotine. STZ treatment did not alter our assessment of nicotine metabolism. Furthermore, STZ treatment increased nicotine IVSA in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that STZ-treatment increased the rewarding effects of nicotine. This suggests that strong reinforcing effects of nicotine may contribute to greater tobacco use in patients with diabetes. PMID:23834715

  20. Chronic administration of nicotine-free cigarette smoke extract impaired endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation in rats via increased vascular oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Shimosato, Takashi; Geddawy, Ayman; Tawa, Masashi; Imamura, Takeshi; Okamura, Tomio

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking has been implicated in the initiation and progression of cardiovascular disorders and atherosclerosis. Here, we examined the effects of nicotine-free cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on the regulation of cardiovascular function. Rats were subcutaneously administered PBS or nicotine-free CSE at 0.05 to 1.5 mL/day per rat for 4 weeks. Blood pressure, cardiac function, and vascular responsiveness were measured at 4 weeks after administration. Furthermore, acute effects of nicotine-free CSE were also studied in the aorta isolated from normal rats. Blood pressure and left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) were significantly increased in the nicotine-free CSE-administered rats, but heart rate, dP/dt(max), and dP/dt(min) were not affected. Endothelium-dependent relaxation by acetylcholine (ACh) in the nicotine-free CSE-treated rats was significantly attenuated compared to PBS-treated rats, but endothelium-independent relaxation by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) did not differ. Pretreatment with superoxide dismutase restored the attenuated ACh-induced relaxation. Contractions by phenylephrine, angiotensin II, and KCl did not differ between two groups. In vitro acute nicotine-free CSE treatment did not alter the response to ACh or SNP. These results suggest that chronic nicotine-free CSE administration impairs endothelial function by increased production of superoxide derived from the vascular wall components other than smooth muscles and induces slight hypertension accompanied with LVSP elevation.

  1. Effect of administration of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist BTMPS, during nicotine self-administration, on lever responding induced by context long after withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Hall, Brandon J; Pearson, Laura S; Buccafusco, Jerry J

    2010-02-01

    The use-dependent, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist bis-(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidinyl) sebacate (BTMPS) was studied for its potential to reduce the self-administration of nicotine in rats, as well as to reduce context-induced recidivistic-like behavior after a six-week period of cessation. Rats were allowed to self-administer nicotine (FR1 schedule) inside an operant chamber with a response lever active on a 24 h basis for 14 days. After the self-administration phase, the rats were returned to standard maintenance cages for a period of six weeks. At the end of six weeks the rats were returned to the operant chambers for 7 days and lever responses were recorded under conditions identical to the original self-administration phase, except that lever responses were not rewarded. Daily administration (s.c.) of BTMPS produced a dose-dependent decrease in the self-administration of nicotine 55-80% compared to control animals, and significantly decreased context-induced lever responding initiated six weeks after cessation (35-78% reduction vs. controls). Decreasing the BTMPS regimen to administration once every 3 days was not effective in reducing nicotine self-administration, but lever responding induced during the return to the operant chambers 6 weeks later was significantly decreased (40% reduction vs. controls). Therefore BTMPS can selectively reduce both self-administration of nicotine and long-term recidivistic-like behavior depending upon the dose regimen. Since BTMPS does not evoke anti-nicotinic effects under normal physiological conditions, these data support a proof of concept for the safe use of such compounds in the treatment of tobacco abuse.

  2. Effects of Maternal Intravenous Nicotine Administration on Locomotor Behavior in Pre-Weanling Rats

    PubMed Central

    LeSage, Mark G.; Gustaf, Erianne; Dufek, Matthew B.; Pentel, Paul R.

    2007-01-01

    Maternal tobacco use is associated with adverse developmental outcomes in offspring, including hyperactivity. Animal studies attempting to model this phenomenon have primarily used continuous s.c. nicotine infusion as the method of nicotine administration, which does not model the intermittent bolus delivery of nicotine associated with smoking in humans. The purpose of the present experiment was to examine the locomotor activity of pre-weanling offspring of pregnant rats exposed to an i.v. nicotine dosing protocol that approximates the pattern of nicotine exposure in moderate to heavy smokers. Pregnant rats were administered an i.v. bolus of 0.03 mg/kg nicotine (N=13) or saline (N=10) every 14 min for 16 hr/day, resulting in a total daily dose of 2 mg/kg (base), from gestational day 4 to delivery. Pups from each litter were tested for spontaneous locomotor activity on postnatal days (PND) 19–21 and nicotine-induced locomotor activity on PND 22. Mean birth weight was significantly lower in nicotine-exposed pups compared to controls, but body weights were equivalent between groups by the time of behavioral testing. Mean total distance traveled, vertical counts, and stereotypy counts were lower on PND 19 in nicotine-exposed pups compared to controls, but only the difference in mean stereotypy counts was statistically significant. Within session analysis revealed that both distance traveled and stereotypy were significantly decreased in nicotine-exposed pups in the first five minutes of the session on PND 19. Total time spent in the center of the field was also lower in nicotine exposed pups. Nicotine-induced increases in activity on PND 22 did not differ according to gestational exposure. These findings demonstrate that prenatal nicotine exposure in a model that mimics the pattern of nicotine exposure from cigarette smoking in humans results in offspring that exhibit low birth weight and hypoactivity in a novel environment. PMID:17141848

  3. Dopaminergic signaling mediates the motivational response underlying the opponent process to chronic but not acute nicotine.

    PubMed

    Grieder, Taryn E; Sellings, Laurie H; Vargas-Perez, Hector; Ting-A-Kee, Ryan; Siu, Eric C; Tyndale, Rachel F; van der Kooy, Derek

    2010-03-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system is implicated in the processing of the positive reinforcing effect of all drugs of abuse, including nicotine. It has been suggested that the dopaminergic system is also involved in the aversive motivational response to drug withdrawal, particularly for opiates, however, the role for dopaminergic signaling in the processing of the negative motivational properties of nicotine withdrawal is largely unknown. We hypothesized that signaling at dopaminergic receptors mediates chronic nicotine withdrawal aversions and that dopaminergic signaling would differentially mediate acute vs dependent nicotine motivation. We report that nicotine-dependent rats and mice showed conditioned place aversions to an environment paired with abstinence from chronic nicotine that were blocked by the DA receptor antagonist alpha-flupenthixol (alpha-flu) and in DA D(2) receptor knockout mice. Conversely, alpha-flu pretreatment had no effect on preferences for an environment paired with abstinence from acute nicotine. Taken together, these results suggest that dopaminergic signaling is necessary for the opponent motivational response to nicotine in dependent, but not non-dependent, rodents. Further, signaling at the DA D(2) receptor is critical in mediating withdrawal aversions in nicotine-dependent animals. We suggest that the alleviation of nicotine withdrawal primarily may be driving nicotine motivation in dependent animals.

  4. Scopolamine administration modulates muscarinic, nicotinic and NMDA receptor systems.

    PubMed

    Falsafi, Soheil Keihan; Deli, Alev; Höger, Harald; Pollak, Arnold; Lubec, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the effect of scopolamine on memory are abundant but so far only regulation of the muscarinic receptor (M1) has been reported. We hypothesized that levels of other cholinergic brain receptors as the nicotinic receptors and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, known to be involved in memory formation, would be modified by scopolamine administration.C57BL/6J mice were used for the experiments and divided into four groups. Two groups were given scopolamine 1 mg/kg i.p. (the first group was trained and the second group untrained) in the multiple T-maze (MTM), a paradigm for evaluation of spatial memory. Likewise, vehicle-treated mice were trained or untrained thus serving as controls. Hippocampal levels of M1, nicotinic receptor alpha 4 (Nic4) and 7 (Nic7) and subunit NR1containing complexes were determined by immunoblotting on blue native gel electrophoresis.Vehicle-treated trained mice learned the task and showed memory retrieval on day 8, while scopolamine-treatment led to significant impairment of performance in the MTM. At the day of retrieval, hippocampal levels for M1, Nic7 and NR1 were higher in the scopolamine treated groups than in vehicle-treated groups.The concerted action, i.e. the pattern of four brain receptor complexes regulated by the anticholinergic compound scopolamine, is shown. Insight into probable action mechanisms of scopolamine at the brain receptor complex level in the hippocampus is provided. Scopolamine treatment is a standard approach to test cognitive enhancers and other psychoactive compounds in pharmacological studies and therefore knowledge on mechanisms is of pivotal interest.

  5. NMDA receptors regulate nicotine-enhanced brain reward function and intravenous nicotine self-administration: Role of the ventral tegmental area and central nucleus of the amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Paul J.; Chartoff, Elena; Roberto, Marisa; Carlezon, William A.; Markou, Athina

    2009-01-01

    Nicotine is considered an important component of tobacco responsible for the smoking habit in humans. Nicotine increases glutamate-mediated transmission throughout brain reward circuitries. This action of nicotine could potentially contribute to its intrinsic rewarding and reward-enhancing properties, which motivate consumption of the drug. Here we show that the competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist LY235959 (0.5–2.5 mg/kg) abolished nicotine-enhanced brain reward function, reflected in blockade of the lowering of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) thresholds usually observed after experimenter-administered (0.25 mg/kg) or intravenously self-administered (0.03 mg/kg/infusion) nicotine injections. The highest LY235959 dose (5 mg/kg) tested reversed the hedonic valence of nicotine from positive to negative, reflected in nicotine-induced elevations of ICSS thresholds. LY235959 doses that reversed nicotine-induced lowering of ICSS thresholds also markedly decreased nicotine self-administration without altering responding for food reinforcement, whereas the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist NBQX had no effects on nicotine intake. In addition, nicotine self-administration upregulated NMDA receptor subunit expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), suggesting important interactions between nicotine and the NMDA receptor. Furthermore, nicotine (1 μM) increased NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in rat CeA slices, similar to its previously described effects in the VTA. Finally, infusion of LY235959 (0.1–10 ng/side) into the CeA or VTA decreased nicotine self-administration. Taken together, these data suggest that NMDA receptors, including those in the CeA and VTA, gate the magnitude and valence of the effects of nicotine on brain reward systems, thereby regulating motivation to consume the drug. PMID:18418357

  6. Nicotine suppresses acute colitis and colonic tumorigenesis associated with chronic colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shusaku; Hamada, Takayuki; Zaidi, Syed Faisal; Oshiro, Momoe; Lee, Jaemin; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Ishii, Yoko; Sasahara, Masakiyo; Kadowaki, Makoto

    2014-11-15

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that frequently progresses to colon cancer. The tumor-promoting effect of inflammation is now widely recognized and understood. Recent studies have revealed that treatment with nicotine ameliorates colitis in humans and experimental murine models, whereas the effect of nicotine on colitis-associated colonic tumorigenesis remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the effect of nicotine on the development of acute colitis and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). The acute colitis model was induced by treatment with 3% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) for 7 days, whereas the CAC model was induced by a combination of azoxymethane and repeated DSS treatment. Nicotine and a selective agonist of the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) reduced the severity of DSS-induced acute colonic inflammation. In addition, the suppressive effect of nicotine on acute colitis was attenuated by an antagonist of α7-nAChR. Furthermore, nicotine inhibited the IL-6 production of CD4 T cells in the DSS-induced inflamed colonic mucosa. We found that nicotine significantly reduced the number and size of colonic tumors in mice with CAC. Nicotine markedly inhibited the elevation of TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA as well as phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) 3 expression in the colons of the tumor model mice. These results demonstrate that nicotine suppresses acute colitis and colitis-associated tumorigenesis, and this effect may be associated with the activation of α7-nAChR. Furthermore, it is presumed that nicotine downregulates the expression of inflammatory mediators such as IL-6/Stat3 and TNF-α, thereby reducing the colonic tumorigenesis associated with chronic colitis.

  7. Nicotine administration in the wake-promoting basal forebrain attenuates sleep-promoting effects of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rishi; Lodhi, Shafi; Sahota, Pradeep; Thakkar, Mahesh M

    2015-10-01

    Nicotine and alcohol co-abuse is highly prevalent, although the underlying causes are unclear. It has been suggested that nicotine enhances pleasurable effects of alcohol while reducing aversive effects. Recently, we reported that nicotine acts via the basal forebrain (BF) to activate nucleus accumbens and increase alcohol consumption. Does nicotine suppress alcohol-induced aversive effects via the BF? We hypothesized that nicotine may act via the BF to suppress sleep-promoting effects of alcohol. To test this hypothesis, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with sleep-recording electrodes and bilateral guides targeted toward the BF. Nicotine (75 pmol/500 nL/side) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF; 500 nL/side) was microinjected into the BF followed by intragastric alcohol (ACSF + EtOH and NiC + EtOH groups; 3 g/kg) or water (NiC + W and ACSF + W groups; 10 mL/kg) administration. On completion, rats were killed and processed to localize injection sites in the BF. The statistical analysis revealed a significant effect of treatment on sleep-wakefulness. While rats exposed to alcohol (ACSF + EtOH) displayed strong sleep promotion, nicotine pre-treatment in the BF (NiC + EtOH) attenuated alcohol-induced sleep and normalized sleep-wakefulness. These results suggest that nicotine acts via the BF to suppress the aversive, sleep-promoting effects of alcohol, further supporting the role of BF in alcohol-nicotine co-use.

  8. Varenicline, a partial agonist at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, reduces nicotine-induced increases in 20% ethanol operant self-administration in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Bito-Onon, Jade J; Simms, Jeffrey A; Chatterjee, Susmita; Holgate, Joan; Bartlett, Selena E

    2011-07-01

    Alcohol and nicotine use disorders are often treated as separate diseases, despite evidence that approximately 80-90% of alcohol dependent individuals are also heavy smokers. Both nicotine and ethanol have been shown to interact with neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), suggesting these receptors are a common biological target for the effects of nicotine and ethanol in the brain. There are few studies that have examined the effects of co-administered nicotine and ethanol on the activity of nAChRs in rodents. In the present study, we show that Sprague-Dawley rats, a strain often used for nicotine studies but not as often for voluntary ethanol intake studies, will consume 20% ethanol using both the intermittent-access two-bottle-choice and operant self-administration models without the need for sucrose fading. We show that nicotine (0.2 mg/kg and 0.8 mg/kg, s.c.) significantly increases operant 20% ethanol self-administration and varenicline (2 mg/kg, s.c), a partial agonist at nAChRs, significantly decreases operant ethanol self-administration and nicotine-induced increases in ethanol self-administration. This suggests that nAChRs play an important role in increasing ethanol self-administration and that varenicline may be an efficacious treatment for alcohol and nicotine co-dependencies.

  9. Acute and chronic effects of nicotine on serotonin uptake in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Awtry, Tammy L; Werling, Linda L

    2003-12-01

    We sought to investigate the effect of nicotine exposure (chronic and acute) on serotonin transporter (SERT) activity in two regions of the brain important for behavioral effects of nicotine. We first looked at the effects of chronic nicotine exposure (0.7 mg/kg nicotine, twice a day for 10 days) on [(3)H]5-HT uptake in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus of rats. A significant increase in [(3)H]5-HT uptake was observed in synaptosomes prepared from both regions. To rule out the possibility that the increases were due to the last injection given, in a separate set of experiments a single injection of nicotine was administered the evening before sacrifice. No change in uptake occurred in either region, suggesting that the increases in uptake caused by nicotine was an effect of chronic exposure and not to an acute treatment. SERT binding studies, using prefrontocortical or hippocampal membrane preparations, revealed that chronic nicotine exposure significantly increased B(max) which correlated to an increase in SERT density. Lastly, we looked at the short-term effect of nicotine on [(3)H]5-HT uptake. Rats received a single nicotine injection 15-75 min before sacrifice. PFC synaptosomes displayed a time-dependent increase in uptake, whereas hippocampal synaptosomes showed an increase at only one time point.

  10. Full-gestational exposure to nicotine and ethanol augments nicotine self-administration by altering ventral tegmental dopaminergic function due to NMDA receptors in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Roguski, Emily E; Sharp, Burt M; Chen, Hao; Matta, Shannon G

    2014-03-01

    In adult rats, we have shown full-gestational exposure to nicotine and ethanol (Nic + EtOH) augmented nicotine self-administration (SA) (increased nicotine intake) compared to pair-fed (PF) offspring. Therefore, we hypothesized that full-gestational exposure to Nic + EtOH disrupts control of dopaminergic (DA) circuitry by ventral tegmental area (VTA) NMDA receptors, augmenting nicotine SA and DA release in nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of adolescents. Both NAcc DA and VTA glutamate release were hyper-responsive to intra-VTA NMDA in Nic + EtOH offspring versus PF (p = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). Similarly, DA release was more responsive to i.v. nicotine in Nic + EtOH offspring (p = 0.02). Local DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid sodium salt (AP5) (NMDA receptor antagonist) infusion into the VTA inhibited nicotine-stimulated DA release in Nic + EtOH and PF offspring. Nicotine SA was augmented in adolescent Nic + EtOH versus PF offspring (p = 0.000001). Daily VTA microinjections of AP5 reduced nicotine SA by Nic + EtOH offspring, without affecting PF (p = 0.000032). Indeed, nicotine SA in Nic + EtOH offspring receiving AP5 was not different from PF offspring. Both VTA mRNA transcripts and NMDA receptor subunit proteins were not altered in Nic + EtOH offspring. In summary, adolescent offspring exposed to gestational Nic + EtOH show markedly increased vulnerability to become dependent on nicotine. This reflects the enhanced function of a subpopulation of VTA NMDA receptors that confer greater nicotine-induced DA release in NAcc. We hypothesized that concurrent gestational exposure to nicotine and ethanol would disrupt the control of VTA dopaminergic circuitry by NMDA receptors. Resulting in the augmented nicotine self-administration (SA) in adolescent offspring.

  11. Acute effects of nicotine and mecamylamine on tobacco withdrawal symptoms, cigarette reward and ad lib smoking.

    PubMed

    Rose, J E; Behm, F M; Westman, E C

    2001-02-01

    Separate and combined effects of nicotine and the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine were studied in 32 healthy volunteer smokers after overnight abstinence from smoking. Subjects participated in three sessions (3 h each), during which they wore skin patches delivering either 0 mg/24 h, 21 mg/24 h or 42 mg/24 h nicotine. Thirty-two subjects were randomly assigned to two groups receiving oral mecamylamine hydrochloride (10 mg) vs. placebo capsules. Two and one-half hours after drug administration, subjects were allowed to smoke ad lib, rating the cigarettes for rewarding and aversive effects. Transdermal nicotine produced a dose-related reduction in the subjective rewarding qualities of smoking. Nicotine also reduced craving for cigarettes and this effect was attenuated, but not eliminated, by mecamylamine. Mecamylamine blocked the discriminability of high vs. low nicotine puffs of smoke, and increased nicotine intake substantially during the ad lib smoking period. Some of the psychophysiological effects of each drug (elevation in blood pressure from nicotine, sedation and decreased blood pressure from mecamylamine) were offset by the other drug. The results supported the hypothesis that nicotine replacement can alleviate tobacco withdrawal symptoms even in the presence of an antagonist such as mecamylamine. Mecamylamine did not precipitate withdrawal beyond the level associated with overnight cigarette deprivation, suggesting its effects were primarily due to offsetting the action of concurrently administered nicotine as opposed to blocking endogenous cholinergic transmission.

  12. Nicotine decreases ethanol-induced dopamine signaling and increases self-administration via stress hormones.

    PubMed

    Doyon, William M; Dong, Yu; Ostroumov, Alexey; Thomas, Alyse M; Zhang, Tao A; Dani, John A

    2013-08-07

    Tobacco smoking is a well-known risk factor for subsequent alcohol abuse, but the neural events underlying this risk remain largely unknown. Alcohol and nicotine reinforcement involve common neural circuitry, including the mesolimbic dopamine system. We demonstrate in rodents that pre-exposure to nicotine increases alcohol self-administration and decreases alcohol-induced dopamine responses. The blunted dopamine response was due to increased inhibitory synaptic transmission onto dopamine neurons. Blocking stress hormone receptors prior to nicotine exposure prevented all interactions with alcohol that we measured, including the increased inhibition onto dopamine neurons, the decreased dopamine responses, and the increased alcohol self-administration. These results indicate that nicotine recruits neuroendocrine systems to influence neurotransmission and behavior associated with alcohol reinforcement.

  13. Menthol facilitates the intravenous self-administration of nicotine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tengfei; Wang, Bin; Chen, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Menthol is preferred by ~25% of smokers and is the most common flavoring additive in tobacco and electronic cigarettes. Although some clinical studies have suggested that menthol facilitates the initiation of smoking and enhances the dependence on nicotine, many controversies remain. Using licking as the operant behavior, we found that adolescent rats self-administering nicotine (30μg/kg/infusion, free base, i.v.) with contingent oral menthol (60μl, 0.01% w/v) obtained significantly more infusions than rats receiving a vehicle cue or rats self-administering i.v. saline with a menthol cue. Rats yoked to their menthol-nicotine masters emitted significantly fewer licks on the active spouts, indicating that contingent pairing between nicotine and menthol is required for sustained nicotine intake. Rats that self-administered nicotine with a menthol cue also exhibited a long-lasting extinction burst and robust reinstatement behavior, neither of which were observed in rats that self-administered saline with a menthol cue. The cooling sensation of menthol is induced by activating the transient receptor potential M8 (TRPM8) channel. When WS-23, an odorless agonist of the TRPM8 channel, was used as a contingent cue for nicotine, the rats obtained a similar number of nicotine infusions as the rats that were provided a menthol cue and exhibited a strong preference for the active spout. In contrast, highly appetitive taste and odor cues failed to support nicotine self-administration. These data indicated that menthol, likely by inducing a cooling sensation, becomes a potent conditioned reinforcer when it is contingently delivered with nicotine. Together, these results provide a key behavioral mechanism by which menthol promotes the use of tobacco products or electronic cigarettes. PMID:25566005

  14. Inhibition of gustatory plasticity due to acute nicotine exposure in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Tetsuya; Miura, Hitoshi; Nishino, Asuka

    2013-11-01

    The present study investigated the effect of nicotine exposure on gustatory plasticity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The chemotactic response of wild-type N2 nematodes pre-exposed to 100mM NaCl with 3.0mM nicotine was almost the same as that of mock-conditioned nematodes unexposed to NaCl; however, the response of N2 nematodes pre-exposed to NaCl without nicotine was significantly lower than that of mock-conditioned nematodes. These results indicate that gustatory plasticity is inhibited by acute nicotine exposure. Inhibition of gustatory plasticity was observed when cat-2 mutants with a defect in dopamine biosynthesis were pre-exposed to NaCl with 3.0mM nicotine. Acute nicotine exposure did not cause inhibition of gustatory plasticity in bas-1 mutants, which had defects in both serotonin and dopamine secretion, and tph-1 mutants, which had a defect in serotonin secretion only. However, inhibition of gustatory plasticity was observed when bas-1 and tph-1 mutants were maintained on a growth plate that included serotonin. These results suggest that serotonin signaling plays an essential role in the modulation of the acute effects of nicotine.

  15. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV mediates acute nicotine-induced antinociception in acute thermal pain tests.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kia J; Damaj, Mohamad I

    2013-12-01

    Calcium-activated second messengers such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II have been implicated in drug-induced antinociception. The less abundant calcium-activated second messenger, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV), mediates emotional responses to pain and tolerance to morphine analgesia but its role in nicotine-mediated antinociception is currently unknown. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of CaMKIV in the acute effects of nicotine, primarily acute nicotine-induced antinociception. CaMKIV knockout (-/-), heterozygote (+/-), and wild-type (+/+) mice were injected with various doses of nicotine and evaluated in a battery of tests, including the tail-flick and hot-plate tests for antinociception, body temperature, and locomotor activity. Our results show a genotype-dependent reduction in tail-flick and hot-plate latency in CaMKIV (+/-) and (-/-) mice after acute nicotine treatment, whereas no difference was observed between genotypes in the body temperature and locomotor activity assessments. The results of this study support a role for CaMKIV in acute nicotine-induced spinal and supraspinal pain mechanisms, and further implicate involvement of calcium-dependent mechanisms in drug-induced antinociception.

  16. Sex Differences in the Acquisition and Maintenance of Cocaine and Nicotine Self-Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Swalve, Natashia; Smethells, John R.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Consistent sex differences are observed in human drug addiction, with females often exceeding males on drug intake. However, there is still a need for animal models for some aspects of addiction such as acquisition of drug self-administration and the subsequent development of drug-seeking. Objectives The present study examined sex differences in the acquisition of self-administration of two widely used stimulants, cocaine and nicotine. Methods Male and female rats self-administered cocaine (0.4 mg/kg/infusion) or nicotine (0.03 mg/kg/infusion) daily under a fixed-ratio 1 (FR 1) schedule until acquisition criteria were met (maximum of 30 sessions). The self-administration criterion for cocaine was ≥20 infusions in a 2 h session and ≥5 infusions in a 1 h session for nicotine. Sex differences were assessed by examining the percentage of rats that met acquisition criteria, the number of sessions to meet criteria and the number of infusions earned during the maintenance phase. Results A significantly higher percentage of male rats acquired both cocaine and nicotine self-administration than females, and males met acquisition criteria in fewer sessions. However, after criteria were met, females self-administered more cocaine than males during the first 5 days of maintenance. There were no sex differences in nicotine infusions post acquisition. Conclusions Differences in acquisition amongst sexes can reveal factors that are integral to initiation of drug use, an often overlooked phase of drug addiction. PMID:26685990

  17. Varenicline impairs extinction and enhances reinstatement across repeated cycles of nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Macnamara, Claire L; Holmes, Nathan M; Westbrook, R Fred; Clemens, Kelly J

    2016-06-01

    Varenicline is a partial nicotine receptor agonist widely prescribed as a smoking cessation medication. Repeated (or long-term) use of varenicline has been proposed as a treatment option for tobacco addiction. However the effect of repeated varenicline use on motivation for nicotine is unknown. Here the intravenous nicotine self-administration paradigm in rats was used to model the consequences of varenicline treatment across repeated cycles of administration, extinction and reinstatement. Rats acquired nicotine self-administration across 20 days before undergoing 6 days of extinction, where each extinction session was preceded by a single injection of varenicline or saline. This was followed by a single varenicline-free nicotine-primed reinstatement test. All rats then reacquired nicotine self-administration for 10 days followed by a second cycle of extinction. Across this period, rats either received a second cycle of varenicline (VAR-VAR) or saline (SAL-SAL), or the alternative treatment (SAL-VAR, VAR-SAL), followed by a final reinstatement test. Treatment with varenicline increased responding across the first cycle of extinction, but did not affect responding in the reinstatement test. Across the second cycle, varenicline again increased responding across extinction, and critically, rats treated with varenicline across cycle 1 and saline across cycle 2 (Group VAR-SAL) exhibited more reinstatement than rats in any other group. The effect of VAR on nicotine seeking was not due to its effects on locomotor activity. Instead, the results suggest that a history of VAR can increase vulnerability to reinstatement/relapse when its treatment is discontinued. The possible mechanisms of this increased vulnerability are discussed.

  18. Acute nicotine treatment prevents REM sleep deprivation-induced learning and memory impairment in rat.

    PubMed

    Aleisa, A M; Helal, G; Alhaider, I A; Alzoubi, K H; Srivareerat, M; Tran, T T; Al-Rejaie, S S; Alkadhi, K A

    2011-08-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation (SD) is implicated in impairment of spatial learning and memory and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). An increase in nicotine consumption among habitual smokers and initiation of tobacco use by nonsmokers was observed during SD. Although nicotine treatment was reported to attenuate the impairment of learning and memory and LTP associated with several mental disorders, the effect of nicotine on SD-induced learning and memory impairment has not been studied. Modified multiple platform paradigm was used to induce SD for 24 or 48 h during which rats were injected with saline or nicotine (1 mg kg(-1) s.c.) twice a day. In the radial arm water maze (RAWM) task, 24- or 48-h SD significantly impaired learning and short-term memory. In addition, extracellular recordings from CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the hippocampus in urethane anesthetized rats showed a significant impairment of LTP after 24- and 48-h SD. Treatment of normal rats with nicotine for 24 or 48 h did not enhance spatial learning and memory or affect magnitude of LTP in the CA1 and DG regions. However, concurrent, acute treatment of rats with nicotine significantly attenuated SD-induced impairment of learning and STM and prevented SD-induced impairment of LTP in the CA1 and DG regions. These results show that acute nicotine treatment prevented the deleterious effect of sleep loss on cognitive abilities and synaptic plasticity.

  19. Effects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists on cognition in rhesus monkeys with a chronic cocaine self-administration history.

    PubMed

    Gould, Robert W; Garg, Pradeep K; Garg, Sudha; Nader, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine use is associated with impaired cognitive function, which may negatively impact treatment outcomes. One pharmacological strategy to improve cognition involves nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) stimulation. However, the effects of chronic cocaine exposure on nAChR distribution and function have not been characterized. Thus, one goal of this study was to examine nAChR availability in rhesus monkeys with an extensive cocaine self-administration history (n = 4; ~6 years, mean intake, 1463 mg/kg) compared to age-matched cocaine-naive control monkeys (n = 5). Using [¹¹C]-nicotine and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, cocaine-experienced monkeys showed significantly higher receptor availability in the hippocampus compared to cocaine-naive monkeys. A second goal was to examine the effects of nAChR agonists on multiple domains of cognitive performance in these same monkeys. For these studies, working memory was assessed using a delayed match-to-sample (DMS) task, associative learning and behavioral flexibility using stimulus discrimination and reversal learning tasks. When administered acutely, the nonselective high-efficacy agonist nicotine, the low-efficacy α4β2* subtype-selective agonist varenicline and the high-efficacy α7 subtype-selective agonist, PNU-282987 significantly improved DMS performance in both cocaine-naive and cocaine-experienced monkeys. Individual doses of nicotine and varenicline that engendered maximum cognitive enhancing effects on working memory did not affect discrimination or reversal learning, while PNU-282987 disrupted reversal learning in the cocaine-naive monkeys. These findings indicate that a cocaine self-administration history influenced nAChR distribution and the effects of nAChR agonists on cognitive performance, including a reduced sensitivity to the disrupting effects on reversal learning. The cognitive enhancing effects of nAChR agonists may be beneficial in combination with behavioral treatments for

  20. The monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor tranylcypromine enhances nicotine self-administration in rats through a mechanism independent of MAO inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lotfipour, Shahrdad; Arnold, Monica M; Hogenkamp, Derk J; Gee, Kelvin W; Belluzzi, James D; Leslie, Frances M

    2011-01-01

    Our current study aims to evaluate the mechanisms of tranylcypromine (TCP)-mediated enhancement of nicotine self-administration. We replicated our previous findings which demonstrate that 1 h pretreatment with TCP (3 mg/kg, i.p.) enhances nicotine self-administration (7.5 μg/kg/inj, i.v.) when compared with vehicle-treated rodents. We tested whether TCP-mediated enhancement of nicotine self-administration was due to MAO inhibition or off-target effects by (i) extending the TCP pretreatment time from 1 to 20 h, and (ii) evaluating the role of the individual TCP stereoisomers in nicotine self-administration studies. While 20 h and (-)TCP pretreatment induced significant inhibition of MAO (60-90%), animals found nicotine only weakly reinforcing. Furthermore, while both (+) and (±)TCP treatment induced nearly 100% MAO inhibition, (+)TCP pretreated animals took longer to acquire nicotine self-administration compared to (±)TCP pretreated animals. Stable nicotine self-administration in (+)TCP pretreated animals was influenced by nicotinic receptor activation but not nicotine-paired cues. The opposite was found in (±)TCP pretreated animals. Treatment with (-) or (±)TCP increased dopamine and serotonin overflow, while the (+) and (±)TCP treatment enhanced monoamine overflow subsequent to nicotine. Together, our data suggests TCP enhancement of nicotine self-administration are mediated through mechanisms independent of MAO inhibition, including nicotine-paired cues and monoamine uptake inhibition.

  1. Transdermal Nicotine Administration and the Electroencephalographic Activity of Substance Abusers in Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, Natalie A.; Tivis, Rick; Prather, Robert; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2009-01-01

    Objectives It is widely recognized that individuals with alcohol or illicit substance abuse disorders often smoke cigarettes. However, few studies have examined the direct effects of nicotine among substance abuse subgroups. The current study examined patterns of electroencephalographic (EEG) activity in alcohol-dependent (AD), stimulant-dependent (StimD), alcohol- and stimulant-dependent (ASD) participants, as well as community controls (CC). All participants were regular smokers. Methods After overnight nicotine abstinence, subjects were administered either a high (14 or 21 mg) or low (7mg) dose transdermal nicotine patch. EEG data were collected during a 2 minute eyes open and 5 minute eyes closed baseline recording session, which occurred as part of a larger study of brain electrophysiology. Results The most interesting finding was a differential pattern of nicotine dose effects by group. EEGs of Controls and ASD participants did not distinguish between high and low nicotine doses; whereas, nicotine administration in the AD and StimD groups resulted in opposite findings across a range of spectral bands. Conclusions Although further research is warranted, these results may have implications for the study of smoking cessation and attentional functioning among substance abusers in treatment. These data suggest that nicotine–related changes in neurophysiology may be associated with specific brain areas and/or specific drug histories and reinforce the need for caution in generalizing among such groups. PMID:19347067

  2. Effects of Acute Vaporized Nicotine in Non-Tobacco Users at Rest and during Exercise

    PubMed Central

    FOGT, DONOVAN L.; LEVI, MICHAEL A.; RICKARDS, CAROLINE A.; STELLY, STEVEN P.; COOKE, WILLIAM H.

    2016-01-01

    Smokers, and even non-smokers, may utilize vaporized nicotine delivered by electronic cigarette (EC) due to the perception that EC are “healthier” than traditional tobacco cigarettes. The effects of vaporized nicotine delivered by EC on resting blood pressure (BP) and resting metabolic rate (RMR), or BP and aerobic power during exercise have not been studied. This investigation tested the effects of acute vaporized nicotine inhalation by EC on resting BP and RMR and cycle exercise BP, metabolic responses, and aerobic power in young, normotensive non-smokers. Using a double-blind design, 20 subjects (10 female) participated in two randomized trials: placebo (0 mg nicotine) or nicotine (18 mg nicotine). Participants inhaled from EC once every 30 s for 10 min (20 inhalations total). RMR was assessed 40 min later by indirect calorimetry followed by an incremental cycle test. RMR was not different between trials (p=0.79). Compared to the placebo, resting diastolic pressure (DBP) was 3 mmHg higher with nicotine (p=0.04). VO2peak was not different between the nicotine trial (2.3±0.8 L•min−1) and placebo (2.3±0.7 L•min−1) trials (p=0.77), and Wmax was also similar between nicotine (201.0±53.8 W) and the placebo (204.8±57.8 W) (p=0.29). During the cycle exercise test, average DBP was higher following nicotine use compared with placebo trial (p=0.05), and exercise DBPpeak after nicotine (79.4±7.6) was significantly higher than placebo (74.9±8.3 mmHg) (p=0.02). Resting systolic blood pressure (SBP) was 3.7 mmHg lower for nicotine trial (p=0.04) but no SBP treatment effect was observed during exercise (p=0.14). Our results show that acute vaporized nicotine inhalation via EC increases resting and exercise DBP but does not affect RMR or cycle aerobic power in young, normotensive non-smokers. PMID:27990223

  3. Effect of food training and training dose on nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Kristine L P; Lê, Anh Dzung; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2014-11-01

    Few studies investigate factors that influence acquisition in nicotine self-administration (NSA), such as food training and training dose. Most have utilized peak doses along nicotine's dose-response curve (15 and 30μg/kg) that establish NSA in the majority of animals. To investigate the specific and combined effects of training and dose on NSA acquisition, separate and head-to-head experiments using food training (FT) or spontaneous acquisition (SP) at multiple doses on the ascending limb of the dose-response curve were tested. First, rats underwent FT or SP under fixed ratio (FR1 and FR2) and progressive ratio (PR) schedules using 7.5-30μg/kg nicotine. More rats acquired NSA with FT vs. SP at 3.75μg/kg (56% vs. 38%) and 7.5μg/kg (88% vs. 40%, p<0.05) and FT rats responded higher under PR. Based on these findings, rats then underwent identical NSA acquisition and PR (with and without nicotine), extinction and reinstatement induced by cue exposure and nicotine in a head-to-head comparison of FT and SP using 7.5μg/kg. Acquisition differences were replicated: 100% FT and 60% SP rats met criteria (p<0.05). Without nicotine (cue only), no FT rats and 8% SP rats met criteria. FR and PR responding, extinction, and cue and nicotine-induced reinstatement did not differ between FT and SP. FT versus SP enhances acquisition at lower nicotine doses but does not alter subsequent behaviours. Lower doses can reinforce NSA and be used, in the absence of FT, to study influences on acquisition more closely modelling the initial phases of human smoking.

  4. Adolescent nicotine administration alters serotonin receptors and cell signaling mediated through adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Seidler, F J; Cousins, M M; Slikker, W; Slotkin, T A

    2002-10-04

    Nicotine is a neuroteratogen that targets synaptic function during critical developmental stages and recent studies indicate that CNS vulnerability extends into adolescence, the age at which smoking typically commences. We administered nicotine to adolescent rats via continuous minipump infusions from PN30 to PN47.5, using 6 mg/kg/day, a dose rate that replicates the plasma nicotine levels found in smokers, and examined 5HT receptors and related cell signaling during nicotine administration (PN45) and in the post-treatment period (PN50, 60, 75). Adolescent nicotine decreased 5HT(2) receptor binding in brain regions containing 5HT projections (hippocampus and cerebral cortex), with selectivity for females in the cerebral cortex; regions containing 5HT cell bodies showed either an increase (midbrain in males) or no change (brainstem). In contrast, there were no significant changes in 5HT(1A) receptors; however, the ability of the receptors to signal through adenylyl cyclase (AC) showed a switch from stimulatory to inhibitory effects in females during the post-treatment period. There were also transient alterations in AC responses to beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation, as well as pronounced induction of the AC response to the non-receptor-mediated stimulant, forskolin. Our results indicate that adolescent nicotine exposure alters the concentrations and functions of postsynaptic 5HT receptors in a manner commensurate with impaired 5HT synaptic function. The direction of change, emergence of defects after the cessation of nicotine administration, and sex-preference for effects in females, all support a relationship of impaired 5HT function to the higher incidence of depression seen in adolescent smokers.

  5. The effects of smoking deprivation and nicotine administration on emotional reactivity.

    PubMed

    Cinciripini, Paul M; Robinson, Jason D; Carter, Brian L; Lam, Cho; Wu, XiFeng; de Moor, Carl A; Baile, Walter F; Wetter, David W

    2006-06-01

    Although converging lines of evidence suggest that nicotine and mood are related at a fundamental biological level, this link has not been reliably demonstrated in laboratory studies. In this study, startle probe methodology was used to examine the effects of nicotine administration and deprivation on emotional processes associated with motivation. Smokers (N = 115) completed four laboratory sessions crossing deprivation (12-hr deprived vs. nondeprived) with nicotine spray (active vs. placebo). Participants viewed affective pictures (positive, negative, neutral) and pictures involving cigarette cues, while startle probes were administered. Deprivation decreased startle responding to cigarette cues, suggesting an activation of appetitive processes. Nicotine administration suppressed overall startle responding during deprivation. In addition, during deprivation, random exposure to negative stimuli over two blocks of trials resulted in decreased adaptation of the startle response, suggesting that some sensitization to negative emotional cues may take place during nicotine withdrawal. These effects are consistent with formulations of addiction, stressing that withdrawal may both increase the reinforcement salience of smoking stimuli and decrease habituation to negative emotional stimuli.

  6. Post-learning REM sleep deprivation impairs long-term memory: reversal by acute nicotine treatment.

    PubMed

    Aleisa, A M; Alzoubi, K H; Alkadhi, K A

    2011-07-15

    Rapid eye movement sleep deprivation (REM-SD) is associated with spatial learning and memory impairment. During REM-SD, an increase in nicotine consumption among habitual smokers and initiation of tobacco use by non-smokers have been reported. We have shown recently that nicotine treatment prevented learning and memory impairments associated with REM-SD. We now report the interactive effects of post-learning REM-SD and/or nicotine. The animals were first trained on the radial arm water maze (RAWM) task, then they were REM-sleep deprived using the modified multiple platform paradigm for 24h. During REM-SD period, the rats were injected with saline or nicotine (1mg/kg s.c. every 12h: a total of 3 injections). The animals were tested for long-term memory in the RAWM at the end of the REM-SD period. The 24h post-learning REM-SD significantly impaired long-term memory. However, nicotine treatment reversed the post-learning REM-SD-induced impairment of long-term memory. On the other hand, post-learning treatment of normal rats with nicotine for 24h enhanced long-term memory. These results indicate that post-learning acute nicotine treatment prevented the deleterious effect of REM-SD on cognitive abilities.

  7. The effects of nicotine self-administration and withdrawal on concurrently available chow and sucrose intake in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Bunney, Patricia E; Burroughs, Danielle; Hernandez, Christine; LeSage, Mark G

    2016-02-01

    Carbohydrate intake, preference, and taste thresholds may be altered in current and former cigarette smokers, which may mediate weight gain and risk for obesity in individuals who quit smoking. Attempts to model these effects in rodents have primarily used noncontingent nicotine administration. The purpose of this research was to characterize changes in chow and sucrose intake in rats during a 23-h access model of i.v. nicotine self-administration (NSA), in which rats lever-pressed for chow, sucrose, and nicotine under concurrent fixed-ratio (FR) 1 schedules. Male rats were assigned to one of three groups that differed in food and drug availability. The Nicotine C+S group had concurrent access to nicotine, chow, and sucrose. The Saline C+S group had access to saline, chow, and sucrose. The Nicotine C-Only group had access to nicotine and chow, but not sucrose. Changes in food intake and weight gain were assessed during baseline, NSA, and nicotine withdrawal (i.e., saline extinction). Weight gain was significantly slowed during NSA and increased during withdrawal, but did not differ between the nicotine groups. NSA produced a significant decrease in both chow and sucrose intake. Gradual tolerance to nicotine's effects on sucrose, but not chow intake, occurred. During withdrawal, chow and sucrose intake increased, with a larger percent increase in sucrose intake compared to chow. The proportion of total food intake from sucrose was greater at the end of withdrawal compared to baseline, indicating a history of nicotine intake changed dietary preference. Combined, these results indicate that sucrose intake is more resistant to nicotine's appetite suppressant effects and withdrawal from nicotine produces a greater increase in sweet food intake alongside general increases in chow intake. Changes in overall food intake in current and ex-smokers may lead to increased risk for obesity and other health problems, potentially limiting the benefit of quitting smoking.

  8. Mood influences on acute smoking responses are independent of nicotine intake and dose expectancy.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Kenneth A; Ciccocioppo, Melinda; Conklin, Cynthia A; Milanak, Melissa E; Grottenthaler, Amy; Sayette, Michael A

    2008-02-01

    Acute responses to smoking are influenced by nicotine and by nonpharmacological factors such as nicotine dose expectancy and sensory effects of smoke inhalation. Because negative mood increases smoking reinforcement, the authors examined whether these effects may be altered by mood context. Smokers (n=200) participated in 2 sessions, negative or positive mood induction, and were randomized to 1 of 5 groups. Four groups comprised the 2x2 balanced placebo design, varying actual (0.6 mg vs. 0.05 mg yield) and expected nicotine dose (expected nicotine vs. denicotinized [denic]) of cigarettes. A fifth group was a no-smoking control. Smoking, versus not smoking, attenuated negative affect, as well as withdrawal and craving. Negative mood increased smoking reinforcement. However, neither actual nor expected nicotine dose had much influence on these responses; even those smokers receiving and expecting a denic cigarette reported attenuated negative affect. A follow-up comparison suggested that the sensory effects of smoke inhalation, but not the simple motor effects of smoking behavior, were responsible. Thus, sensory effects of smoke inhalation had a greater influence on relieving negative affect than actual or expected nicotine intake.

  9. Reduction of Aggressive Episodes After Repeated Transdermal Nicotine Administration in a Hospitalized Adolescent with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Van Schalkwyk, Gerrit I; Lewis, Alan S; Qayyum, Zheala; Koslosky, Kourtney; Picciotto, Marina R; Volkmar, Fred R

    2015-09-01

    Aggression remains a major cause of morbidity in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Current pharmacotherapy for aggression is not always effective and is often associated with morbidity. Nicotinic acetylcholinergic neurotransmission may play a prominent role in ASD pathophysiology based on human and animal studies, and preclinical studies show nicotine administration can reduce aggression-related behaviors. Transdermal nicotine has been used to treat agitation in neuropsychiatric conditions with cholinergic dysfunction. Here we report the use of transdermal nicotine as an adjunctive medication to treat aggression in a hospitalized adolescent with ASD. Nicotine patch was recurrently well tolerated, and reduced the need for emergency medication and restraint. These findings suggest further study of transdermal nicotine for aggression comorbid with ASD is warranted.

  10. Reduction of Aggressive Episodes After Repeated Transdermal Nicotine Administration in a Hospitalized Adolescent with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Alan S.; Qayyum, Zheala; Koslosky, Kourtney; Picciotto, Marina R.; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2016-01-01

    Aggression remains a major cause of morbidity in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Current pharmacotherapy for aggression is not always effective and is often associated with morbidity. Nicotinic acetylcholinergic neurotransmission may play a prominent role in ASD pathophysiology based on human and animal studies, and preclinical studies show nicotine administration can reduce aggression-related behaviors. Transdermal nicotine has been used to treat agitation in neuropsychiatric conditions with cholinergic dysfunction. Here we report the use of transdermal nicotine as an adjunctive medication to treat aggression in a hospitalized adolescent with ASD. Nicotine patch was recurrently well tolerated, and reduced the need for emergency medication and restraint. These findings suggest further study of transdermal nicotine for aggression comorbid with ASD is warranted. PMID:25982311

  11. Effects of concurrent chronic administration of alcohol and nicotine on rat sperm parameters.

    PubMed

    Ezzatabadipour, M; Azizollahi, S; Sarvazad, A; Mirkahnooj, Z; Mahdinia, Z; Nematollahi-Mahani, S N

    2012-10-01

    The prevalence of cigarette and alcohol consumption is high among young adult males during the reproductive period. The current study aimed to evaluate the impact of concurrent chronic administration of nicotine and ethanol on the quality of sperm in the rat. Fifty healthy Wistar male rats were randomly divided into five groups (n = 10) and were given the following for a period of 50 days: ethanol (E), nicotine (N), ethanol and nicotine (E/N); the control group (C) and an intact (I) group. Body weight as well as the weight, volume and dimensions of the testes and the weight of the cauda epididymidis and vas deference were measured. The concentration, motility, viability and membrane integrity of sperm were also assessed. There were no significant differences between body weight and all testis parameters including weight, volume and dimensions. The concentration and motility of sperm in the E/N group was significantly reduced compared with the control group (P < 0.01). Nevertheless, only a marginally significant decrease in sperm viability was found in the E/N group compared with the control group. The study indicates that concurrent chronic administration of ethanol and nicotine may disturb male reproductive function.

  12. Effects of chronic nicotine administration on body weight, food intake and nitric oxide concentration in female and male rats.

    PubMed

    Ijomone, Omamuyovwi Meashack; Olaibi, Olayemi Kafilat; Nwoha, Polycarp Umunna

    2014-09-01

    Nicotine is readily consumed through cigarettes; however it is also easily consumed through the various forms of non-prescription nicotine replacement therapy. It has been shown to possess potential therapeutic value for the management of neurologic and neurodegenerative diseases in the last decade. Hence, this study examined the effects of chronic subcutaneous nicotine administration on food intake and body weight as well as on nitric oxide concentrations and total antioxidant capacity in female and male rats. Nicotine was administered to rats via subcutaneous injections at doses of 0.25, 2 and 4mg/kg body weight for 28 days. Control groups received normal saline; the vehicle for nicotine. Food intake by each group was monitored daily and body weight of the animals was measured twice weekly. At the end of drug administration, blood was obtained from each animal via cardiac puncture for biochemical determination of serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and nitric (NO) concentrations using standard assay kits. Results show significant loss (p<0.05) of body weight in all nicotine treated female rats. In contrast, male rats showed weight gain, though this was significantly lower (p<0.001) in nicotine treated groups compared to control. Nicotine significantly reduced (p<0.001) food consumed in both female and male rats; however dose related changes were observed in only male rats. No significant difference was observed in TAC following nicotine treatments for both female and male rats. Furthermore, only males exhibited changes in NO concentrations following nicotine treatment, as it significantly increased (p<0.01) NO concentrations in all male treated groups. In conclusion, this study has shown that modulation of body weight, food consumption and nitric oxide formation by nicotine is sexually dimorphic. Also, the study suggests that nicotine modulation of food intake and body weight and its modulation of NO may be independent of each other.

  13. Influence of acute or chronic calcium channel antagonists on the acquisition and consolidation of memory and nicotine-induced cognitive effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Biala, Grazyna; Kruk-Slomka, Marta; Jozwiak, Krzysztof

    2013-07-01

    Nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChRs) form a heterogeneous family of ligand-gated ion channels found in the nervous system. The main objective of our research was to investigate the interaction between cholinergic nicotinic system and calcium homeostasis in cognitive processes using the modified elevated plus maze memory model in mice. The time each mouse took to move from the open arm to either of the enclosed arms on the retention trial (transfer latency, TL2) was used as an index of memory. Our results showed that a single injection of nicotine (0.035 and 0.175 mg/kg) shortened TL2 values, improving memory-related processes. Similarly, L-type calcium channel antagonists (CCAs), i.e., flunarizine, verapamil, amlodipine, nimodipine, nifedipine, and nicardipine (at the range of dose 5-20 mg/kg) administered before or after training, decreased TL2 value improving memory acquisition and/or consolidation. Interestingly, at the subthresold doses, flunarizine, nicardipine, amlodipine, verapamil, and bupropion, a nAChR antagonist, significantly reversed the nicotine improvement of memory acquisition, while flunarizine, verapamil, and bupropion attenuated the improvement of memory consolidation provoked by an acute injection of nicotine (0.035 mg/kg, s.c.). After subchronic administration (14 days, i.p.) of verapamil and amlodipine, two CCAs with the highest affinity for nAChRs, only verapamil (5 mg/kg) impaired memory acquisition and consolidation while both verapamil and amlodipine, at the subthresold, ineffective dose (2.5 mg/kg), significantly reversed the improvement of memory provoked by an acute injection of nicotine (0.035 mg/kg, s.c.). Our findings can be useful to better understand the interaction between cholinergic nicotinic receptors and calcium-related mechanisms in memory-related processes.

  14. A unique role for striatal serotonergic systems in the withdrawal from adolescent nicotine administration.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Seidler, Frederic J

    2007-01-01

    Adolescent smokers experience more severe withdrawal symptoms upon smoking cessation than do adults, even when daily smoking has occurred for only a short period or with low levels of consumption. Animal models of nicotine withdrawal indicate involvement of striatal serotonin (5-HT) systems in nicotine reward, withdrawal and craving. We evaluated indices of striatal 5-HT and dopamine (DA) synaptic activity, neurotransmitter levels and turnover (metabolite/transmitter ratio), after continuous nicotine infusions to adolescent rats from postnatal days 30 to 47, using a dose rate (6 mg/kg/day) that produces plasma levels typical of smokers. Withdrawal was accompanied by a significant and persistent loss of striatal 5-HT synaptic activity, evidenced by an initial decline in turnover followed by a reduction in 5-HT content without a compensatory increase in turnover. Similar effects were seen for striatal DA activity. These effects were superimposed on a loss of stimulatory 5-HT cellular responses and promotion of inhibitory responses as identified in an earlier work with this model. None of these alterations was seen during withdrawal in adult rats given the same regimen. The unique adolescent withdrawal effects were not seen when the adolescent nicotine treatment period was shortened to early adolescence (days 30-37), even if the administration paradigm was changed to twice-daily injections to maximize withdrawal stress. Our results are consistent with unique effects of adolescent nicotine withdrawal on striatal 5-HT and DA systems, and point to a potential for serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors as alternatives to nicotine replacement therapy for smoking cessation in adolescents.

  15. Genome-Wide Expression Analysis Reveals Diverse Effects of Acute Nicotine Exposure on Neuronal Function-Related Genes and Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ju; Cui, Wenyan; Wei, Jinxue; Sun, Dongxiao; Gutala, Ramana; Gu, Jun; Li, Ming D.

    2011-01-01

    Previous human and animal studies demonstrate that acute nicotine exposure has complicated influences on the function of the nervous system, which may lead to long-lasting effects on the behavior and physiology of the subject. To determine the genes and pathways that might account for long-term changes after acute nicotine exposure, a pathway-focused oligoarray specifically designed for drug addiction research was used to assess acute nicotine effect on gene expression in the neuron-like SH-SY5Y cells. Our results showed that 295 genes involved in various biological functions were differentially regulated by 1 h of nicotine treatment. Among these genes, the expression changes of 221 were blocked by mecamylamine, indicating that the majority of nicotine-modulated genes were altered through the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs)-mediated signaling process. We further identified 14 biochemical pathways enriched among the nicotine-modulated genes, among which were those involved in neural development/synaptic plasticity, neuronal survival/death, immune response, or cellular metabolism. In the genes significantly regulated by nicotine but blocked by mecamylamine, 13 enriched pathways were detected. Nine of these pathways were shared with those enriched in the genes regulated by nicotine, including neuronal function-related pathways such as glucocorticoid receptor signaling, p38 MAPK signaling, PI3K/AKT signaling, and PTEN signaling, implying that nAChRs play important roles in the regulation of these biological processes. Together, our results not only provide insights into the mechanism underlying the acute response of neuronal cells to nicotine but also provide clues to how acute nicotine exposure exerts long-term effects on the nervous system. PMID:21556275

  16. IV nicotine self-administration in rats using a consummatory operant licking response: sensitivity to serotonergic, glutaminergic and histaminergic drugs.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Vanessa; Rose, Jed E; Levin, Edward D

    2014-10-03

    Tobacco smoking is characterized by repeated self-administration of nicotine by placing the cigarette in the mouth. The repeated hand-to-mouth self-administration is essentially a consummatory act. We recently developed a paradigm in which rats lick one of two spouts to trigger intravenous (IV) delivery of nicotine, which combines a consummatory act with rapid delivery of nicotine to model the act of tobacco smoking. We have found that rats will lick hundreds of times per nicotine infusion. In the current study, using the operant licking nicotine self-administration model with young adult Sprague-Dawley rats (0.03mg/kg/infusion of nicotine), we tested the effect of antagonists of H1 histamine receptors pyrilamine, serotonin (5HT) type 2 receptors ketanserin and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors with d-cycloserine as well as an agonist of 5HT2c receptors lorcaserin, in dose ranges that we have found in previous studies to significantly reduce IV nicotine self-administration with the operant lever press operand. The H1 antagonist pyrilamine significantly reduced operant licking for nicotine self-administration. Pyrilamine caused significant reductions in the operant licking paradigm at lower doses (10 and 20mg/kg) than those we previously observed to affect responding in the operant lever press paradigm. In contrast, the 5HT2A and C antagonist ketanserin did not show an effect of reducing nicotine self-administration in the same dose range we had found in a previous study to significantly reduce operant lever press nicotine self-administration. The 5HT2C agonist lorcaserin significantly decreased nicotine self-administration in the licking paradigm at the same dose threshold as with lever press responding. The NMDA glutamate partial agonist d-cycloserine did not produce any change in nicotine self-administration with the licking operand, in contrast to its effect on the classic lever-pressing task. The rat model incorporating consummatory aspects of

  17. Modeling of free fatty acid dynamics: insulin and nicotinic acid resistance under acute and chronic treatments.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Robert; Kroon, Tobias; Almquist, Joachim; Jirstrand, Mats; Oakes, Nicholas D; Evans, Neil D; Chappel, Michael J; Gabrielsson, Johan

    2017-02-21

    Nicotinic acid (NiAc) is a potent inhibitor of adipose tissue lipolysis. Acute administration results in a rapid reduction of plasma free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations. Sustained NiAc exposure is associated with tolerance development (drug resistance) and complete adaptation (FFA returning to pretreatment levels). We conducted a meta-analysis on a rich pre-clinical data set of the NiAc-FFA interaction to establish the acute and chronic exposure-response relations from a macro perspective. The data were analyzed using a nonlinear mixed-effects framework. We also developed a new turnover model that describes the adaptation seen in plasma FFA concentrations in lean Sprague-Dawley and obese Zucker rats following acute and chronic NiAc exposure. The adaptive mechanisms within the system were described using integral control systems and dynamic efficacies in the traditional [Formula: see text] model. Insulin was incorporated in parallel with NiAc as the main endogenous co-variate of FFA dynamics. The model captured profound insulin resistance and complete drug resistance in obese rats. The efficacy of NiAc as an inhibitor of FFA release went from 1 to approximately 0 during sustained exposure in obese rats. The potency of NiAc as an inhibitor of insulin and of FFA release was estimated to be 0.338 and 0.436 [Formula: see text], respectively, in obese rats. A range of dosing regimens was analyzed and predictions made for optimizing NiAc delivery to minimize FFA exposure. Given the exposure levels of the experiments, the importance of washout periods in-between NiAc infusions was illustrated. The washout periods should be [Formula: see text]2 h longer than the infusions in order to optimize 24 h lowering of FFA in rats. However, the predicted concentration-response relationships suggests that higher AUC reductions might be attained at lower NiAc exposures.

  18. Enhanced motor activity and brain dopamine turnover in mice during long-term nicotine administration in the drinking water.

    PubMed

    Gäddnäs, H; Pietilä, K; Piepponen, T P; Ahtee, L

    2001-12-01

    Nicotine was administered chronically to NMRI mice in their drinking water in gradually increasing concentrations to measure gross motor activity and brain nicotine concentrations over 24 h on the 50th day of nicotine administration. Also, the striatal postmortem tissue concentrations and accumbal extracellular concentrations of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were measured to study the role of dopaminergic systems in nicotine-induced hyperactivity in mice. The cerebral nicotine concentration was at its highest at the end of the dark period. The activity of nicotine-treated mice and their striatal DA metabolism were parallelly increased at 2 to 3 h after midnight and in the forenoon. Microdialysis experiments carried out in the forenoon showed that the extracellular levels of DA and DOPAC were elevated in the nucleus accumbens of these mice. Nicotine did not alter the circadian rhythmicity of activity in the mice. Rather, our findings suggest that the mice consume more nicotine when active and this might lead to enhanced release and metabolism of DA and further, to enhanced motor behavior. These findings support the suggestions that nicotine's effects on limbic and striatal DA are critical for its stimulating effects.

  19. The effects of nicotine self-administration and withdrawal on concurrently available chow and sucrose intake in adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    Bunney, Patricia E.; Burroughs, Danielle; Hernandez, Christine; LeSage, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate intake, preference, and taste thresholds may be altered in current and former cigarette smokers, which may mediate weight gain and risk for obesity in individuals who quit smoking. Attempts to model these effects in rodents have primarily used noncontingent nicotine administration. The purpose of this research was to characterize changes in chow and sucrose intake in rats during a 23-h access model of i.v. nicotine self-administration (NSA), in which rats lever-pressed for chow, sucrose, and nicotine under concurrent fixed-ratio (FR) 1 schedules. Male rats were assigned to one of three groups that differed in food and drug availability. The Nicotine C+S group had concurrent access to nicotine, chow, and sucrose. The Saline C+S group had access to saline, chow, and sucrose. The Nicotine C-Only group had access to nicotine and chow, but not sucrose. Changes in food intake and weight gain were assessed during baseline, NSA, and nicotine withdrawal (i.e., saline extinction). Weight gain was significantly slowed during NSA and increased during withdrawal, but did not differ between the nicotine groups. NSA produced a significant decrease in both chow and sucrose intake. Gradual tolerance to nicotine’s effects on sucrose, but not chow intake, occurred. During withdrawal, chow and sucrose intake increased, with a larger percent increase in sucrose intake compared to chow. The proportion of total food intake from sucrose was greater at the end of withdrawal compared to baseline, indicating a history of nicotine intake changed dietary preference. Combined, these results indicate that sucrose intake is more resistant to nicotine’s appetite suppressant effects and withdrawal from nicotine produces a greater increase in sweet food intake alongside general increases in chow intake. Changes in overall food intake in current and ex-smokers may lead to increased risk for obesity and other health problems, potentially limiting the benefit of quitting smoking. PMID

  20. Dual effect of chronic nicotine administration: augmentation of jejunitis and amelioration of colitis induced by iodoacetamide in rats.

    PubMed

    Eliakim, R; Karmeli, F; Cohen, P; Heyman, S N; Rachmilewitz, D

    2001-02-01

    Smoking has a dichotomous effect on inflammatory bowel disease, ameliorating disease activity in ulcerative colitis but having a deleterious effect on Crohn's disease. This effect is thought to be due to nicotine. We investigated the effect of chronic nicotine administration on the small and large bowel in iodoacetamide-induced jejunitis and colitis. Jejunitis was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by intrajejunal administration of 0.1 ml 2% iodoacetamide and colitis by intrarectal administration of 0.1 ml 3% iodoacetamide. Nicotine was dissolved in drinking water (12.5 or 250 micrograms/ml), rats drinking ad libitum. Nicotine administration started 10 days prior to damage induction and throughout the experiment and had no effect on weight gain or daily food intake of rats. Rats were killed 5 days after iodoacetamide-induced colitis and 7 days after induction of jejunitis. The jejunum and colon were resected, rinsed, weighed, damage assessed macroscopically and microscopically and tissue processed for myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activities and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) generation. Effects of nicotine on gut microcirculation were also assessed. Nicotine by itself caused no damage to the colon. Nicotine had a dichotomous effect on jejunitis and colitis. At a dose of 12.5 micrograms/ml nicotine improved the macroscopic damage of colitis from 252 +/- 66 to 70 +/- 31 mm2, and segmental weight also declined significantly in the colon (from 1.7 +/- 0.2 to 1.2 +/- 0.1 g/10 cm). In contrast, the same dose of nicotine had a deleterious effect on iodoacetamide-induced jejunitis, increasing the macroscopic damage from 368 +/- 38 to 460 +/- 97 mm2 in rats treated with injury escalating to 970 +/- 147 in rats treated with 250 micrograms/ml nicotine. Nicotine treatment also significantly increased jejunal segmental weight. By itself nicotine did not change NOS activity or PGE2 generation compared to control rats, but it enhanced microcirculation in the colon

  1. The acute effects of nicotine, tobacco smoke and carbon monoxide on myocardial oxygen tension in the anaesthetized cat

    PubMed Central

    Rink, Richard D.

    1978-01-01

    1 The acute effects of nicotine, tobacco smoke, and carbon monoxide on myocardial oxygen tension (MPo2) were estimated amperometrically in 33 anaesthetized open-chest cats with a glass-insulated 25 μm platinum cathode within a 22-gauge needle implanted in the left ventricular wall. 2 MPo2 was 1.6-60 mmHg (mean 23.5 mmHg) when arterial Po2 was >80 mmHg. Sequential intravenous infusions of nicotine (2-3 μg/kg every 45 s) or intracheal puffs (3-5 ml) of tobacco smoke commonly produced transitory increases (25-35 mmHg) of arterial pressure and 4-6 mmHg increments of MPo2. Intratracheal puffs (5 ml) of 5% carbon monoxide sufficient to increase carboxyhaemoglobin from 0.8 to 1.5% to 4-7% had no effect on arterial Po2 or blood pressure but typically decreased MPo2 by approximately 1-4 mmHg. Augmentation of MPo2 often succeeded carbon monoxide administration. 3 Arterial hypoxia (arterial Po2 < 60 mmHg) reduced mean MPo2 to 14.4 mmHg but anoxic levels were not observed. Pressor responses to nicotine and tobacco smoke were accompanied by small increases (usually 1-3 mmHg) of MPo2. Puffs of 5% carbon monoxide had less effect than during normoxia. Locations of low MPo2 (<10 mmHg) were unaffected as carboxyhaemoglobin was raised to 7-11% during hypoxaemia. 4 It is concluded that nicotine and tobacco smoke cause augmentation of myocardial oxygen supply, even during moderate hypoxaemia. By contrast, smoking dosages of carbon monoxide have the potential of producing a small reduction of MPo2 during normoxia, but the effect is negligible during moderate hypoxaemia. PMID:656704

  2. Adolescents and adults differ in the immediate and long-term impact of nicotine administration and withdrawal on cardiac norepinephrine.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Stadler, Ashley; Skavicus, Samantha; Seidler, Frederic J

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular responses to smoking cessation may differ in adolescents compared to adults. We administered nicotine by osmotic minipump infusion for 17 days to adolescent and adult rats (30 and 90 days of age, respectively) and examined cardiac norepinephrine levels during treatment, after withdrawal, and for months after cessation. In adults, nicotine evoked a significant elevation of cardiac norepinephrine and a distinct spike upon withdrawal, after which the levels returned to normal; the effect was specific to males. In contrast, adolescents did not show significant changes during nicotine treatment or in the immediate post-withdrawal period. However, beginning in young adulthood, males exposed to adolescent nicotine showed sustained elevations of cardiac norepinephrine, followed by later-emerging deficits that persisted through six months of age. We then conducted adolescent exposure using twice-daily injections, a regimen that augments stress associated with inter-dose withdrawal episodes. With the injection route, adolescents showed an enhanced cardiac norepinephrine response, reinforcing the relationship between withdrawal stress and a surge in cardiac norepinephrine levels. The relative resistance of adolescents to the acute nicotine withdrawal response is likely to make episodic nicotine exposure less stressful or aversive than in adults. Equally important, the long-term changes after adolescent nicotine exposure resemble those known to be associated with risk of hypertension in young adulthood (elevated norepinephrine) or subsequent congestive heart disease (norepinephrine deficits). Our findings reinforce the unique responses and consequences of nicotine exposure in adolescence, the period in which most smokers commence tobacco use.

  3. Adolescents and Adults Differ in the Immediate and Long-Term Impact of Nicotine Administration and Withdrawal on Cardiac Norepinephrine

    PubMed Central

    Slotkin, Theodore A.; Stadler, Ashley; Skavicus, Samantha; Seidler, Frederic J.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses to smoking cessation may differ in adolescents compared to adults. We administered nicotine by osmotic minipump infusion for 17 days to adolescent and adult rats (30 and 90 days of age, respectively) and examined cardiac norepinephrine levels during treatment, after withdrawal, and for months after cessation. In adults, nicotine evoked a significant elevation of cardiac norepinephrine and a distinct spike upon withdrawal, after which the levels returned to normal; the effect was specific to males. In contrast, adolescents did not show significant changes during nicotine treatment or in the immediate post-withdrawal period. However, beginning in young adulthood, males exposed to adolescent nicotine showed sustained elevations of cardiac norepinephrine, followed by later-emerging deficits that persisted through six months of age. We then conducted adolescent exposure using twice-daily injections, a regimen that augments stress associated with inter-dose withdrawal episodes. With the injection route, adolescents showed an enhanced cardiac norepinephrine response, reinforcing the relationship between withdrawal stress and a surge in cardiac norepinephrine levels. The relative resistance of adolescents to the acute nicotine withdrawal response is likely to make episodic nicotine exposure less stressful or aversive than in adults. Equally important, the long-term changes after adolescent nicotine exposure resemble those known to be associated with risk of hypertension in young adulthood (elevated norepinephrine) or subsequent congestive heart disease (norepinephrine deficits). Our findings reinforce the unique responses and consequences of nicotine exposure in adolescence, the period in which most smokers commence tobacco use. PMID:26993795

  4. The acute effects of nicotine on positive and negative affect in adolescent smokers.

    PubMed

    Kassel, Jon D; Evatt, Daniel P; Greenstein, Justin E; Wardle, Margaret C; Yates, Marisa C; Veilleux, Jennifer C

    2007-08-01

    Although adolescent cigarette smoking remains a critical public health concern, little is known about the reinforcing mechanisms governing smoking in this vulnerable population. To assess predictions derived from both positive and negative reinforcement models of drug use, the authors measured the acute effects of nicotine, as administered via tobacco cigarettes, on both positive and negative affect in a group of 15- to 18-year-old smokers. A matched group of nonsmokers served as a comparison group. Findings revealed that whereas adolescents who smoked a cigarette experienced reductions in both positive and negative affect, the observed reductions in negative affect were moderated by nicotine content of the cigarette (high yield vs. denicotinized), level of nicotine dependence, level of baseline craving, and smoking expectancies pertinent to negative affect regulation. Nonsmokers experienced no change in affect over the 10-min assessment period, and no interaction effects were observed for positive affect. Overall, the findings conform to a negative reinforcement model of nicotine effects and strongly suggest that, even among young light smokers, nicotine dependence and resultant withdrawal symptomatology may serve as motivating factors governing smoking behavior.

  5. Nicotine withdrawal among adolescents with acute psychopathology: an item response analysis.

    PubMed

    Strong, David R; Kahler, Christopher W; Ramsey, Susan E; Abrantes, Ana; Brown, Richard A

    2004-06-01

    The present study explored the relationship between psychopathology and the experience of nicotine withdrawal among 191 adolescent smokers deprived of nicotine during a psychiatric hospitalization. Using methods based in item response theory, we demonstrated the ability of symptoms of nicotine withdrawal to cohere in measuring the withdrawal syndrome. After controlling for nicotine dependence, we found that several disorders showed significant but modest univariate relationships with individual withdrawal symptoms. After controlling for comorbidity with other disorders, we found that depressive and conduct disorders maintained significant but modest relationships with increased withdrawal severity. Item analyses across groups suggested that girls, individuals with a depressive disorder, and individuals with a conduct disorder tended to report higher levels of nicotine withdrawal but did not appear to inflate their scores because of disorder- or gender-specific reporting bias. Although levels of acute distress were related to withdrawal severity, the six-item withdrawal index showed good discriminant validity in this sample by demonstrating stronger correlations with craving and level of dependence than could be accounted for by levels of distress alone.

  6. Inhibition of histone deacetylases facilitates extinction and attenuates reinstatement of nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Castino, Matthew R; Cornish, Jennifer L; Clemens, Kelly J

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin remodelling is integral to the formation of long-term memories. Recent evidence suggests that histone modification may play a role in the persistence of memories associated with drug use. The present series of experiments aimed to examine the effect of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition on the extinction and reinstatement of nicotine self-administration. Rats were trained to intravenously self-administer nicotine for 12 days on a fixed-ratio 1 schedule. In Experiment 1, responding was then extinguished through removal of nicotine and response-contingent cues. After each extinction session, the HDAC inhibitor, sodium butyrate (NaB), was administered immediately, or six hours after each session. In Experiment 2, response-contingent cues remained available across extinction to increase rates of responding during this phase, and NaB was administered immediately after the session. Finally, in Experiment 3, the effect of NaB treatment on extinction of responding for sucrose pellets was assessed. Across all experiments reinstatement to the cue and/or the reward itself was then tested. In the first experiment, treatment with NaB significantly attenuated nicotine and nicotine + cue reinstatement when administered immediately, but not six hours after each extinction session. When administered after cue-extinction (Expt. 2), NaB treatment specifically facilitated the rate of extinction across sessions, indicating that HDAC inhibition enhanced consolidation of the extinction memory. In contrast, there was no effect of NaB on the extinction and reinstatement of sucrose-seeking (Expt. 3), indicating that the observed effects are specific to a drug context. These results provide the first demonstration that HDAC inhibition facilitates the extinction of responding for an intravenously self-administered drug of abuse and further highlight the potential of HDAC inhibitors in the treatment of drug addiction.

  7. Adolescent nicotine exposure fails to impact cocaine reward, aversion and self-administration in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Pomfrey, Rebecca L; Bostwick, Tamaara A; Wetzell, B Bradley; Riley, Anthony L

    2015-10-01

    The present experiments examined the effects of adolescent nicotine pre-exposure on the rewarding and aversive effects of cocaine and on cocaine self-administration in adult male rats. In Experiment 1, adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats (postnatal days 28-43) were given once daily injections of nicotine (0.6mg/kg) or vehicle and then tested for the aversive and rewarding effects of cocaine in a combined conditioned taste avoidance (CTA)/conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure in adulthood. In Experiment 2, adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats were pre-exposed to nicotine then tested for cocaine self-administration (0.25 or 0.75mg/kg), progressive ratio (PR) responding, extinction and cue-induced reinstatement in adulthood. In Experiment 1, rats showed significant dose-dependent cocaine-induced taste avoidance with cocaine-injected subjects consuming less saccharin over trials, but no effect of nicotine pre-exposure. For place preferences, cocaine induced significant place preferences with cocaine injected subjects spending significantly more time on the cocaine-paired side, but again there was no effect of nicotine history. All rats in Experiment 2 showed clear, dose-dependent responding during cocaine acquisition, PR testing, extinction and reinstatement with no effect of nicotine pre-exposure. These studies demonstrate that adolescent nicotine pre-exposure does not have an impact on cocaine's affective properties or its self-administration at least with the specific parametric conditions under which these effects were tested.

  8. Impact of chronic nicotine administration on bone mineral content in young and adult rats: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Farag, Mahmoud M; Selima, Eman A; Salama, Mona A

    2013-11-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic nicotine administration on bone mineral homeostasis in rapidly growing young rats in comparison to effects in adult male rats. Two doses of nicotine (3 and 4.5mg/kg/day, as nicotine hydrogen tartrate) were used and rat treatment was continued for 6 months. In this study, all nicotine-treated rats weighed less than control rats and the effect was dose-dependent. Also, rats treated with nicotine had lower femoral wet weight and showed a significant reduction in femoral mid-shaft cortical width and femoral and lumbar vertebral ash weights. These effects were associated with a significant reduction of ash calcium and phosphorus contents of the femora and lumbar vertebrae. The bone mineral-lowering effects of nicotine were more severe in the lumbar vertebral spongy bone than in the femoral compact bone and these changes were more marked in adult rats than in young rats. An additional interesting observation was that the femora of young rats treated with nicotine were significantly shorter than those of control young rats. Also, the values of the femoral ash weight per unit length were significantly decreased in nicotine-treated adult rats but not in nicotine-treated young rats. Thus, these results show that nicotine-induced changes in bone vary with age. The clinical relevance of this study is that it may provide justification to insist that all people in general and the risky young group in particular should be warned against the hazards of the negative effects of nicotine on bone.

  9. Animal Models of Nicotine Exposure: Relevance to Second-Hand Smoking, Electronic Cigarette Use, and Compulsive Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ami; George, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Much evidence indicates that individuals use tobacco primarily to experience the psychopharmacological properties of nicotine and that a large proportion of smokers eventually become dependent on nicotine. In humans, nicotine acutely produces positive reinforcing effects, including mild euphoria, whereas a nicotine abstinence syndrome with both somatic and affective components is observed after chronic nicotine exposure. Animal models of nicotine self-administration and chronic exposure to nicotine have been critical in unveiling the neurobiological substrates that mediate the acute reinforcing effects of nicotine and emergence of a withdrawal syndrome during abstinence. However, important aspects of the transition from nicotine abuse to nicotine dependence, such as the emergence of increased motivation and compulsive nicotine intake following repeated exposure to the drug, have only recently begun to be modeled in animals. Thus, the neurobiological mechanisms that are involved in these important aspects of nicotine addiction remain largely unknown. In this review, we describe the different animal models available to date and discuss recent advances in animal models of nicotine exposure and nicotine dependence. This review demonstrates that novel animal models of nicotine vapor exposure and escalation of nicotine intake provide a unique opportunity to investigate the neurobiological effects of second-hand nicotine exposure, electronic cigarette use, and the mechanisms that underlie the transition from nicotine use to compulsive nicotine intake. PMID:23761766

  10. Metabolic Effects of Nicotine Gum and Cigarette Smoking: Potential Implications for Postcessation Weight Gain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klesges, Robert C.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Twenty smoking women participated in nicotine gum and smoking administration, after which resting energy expenditures (REEs) were measured. Results indicated acute increase in REE for both nicotine gum and cigarettes. Metabolic rates for nicotine gum slowly returned to baseline; rates for cigarettes quickly fell significantly below baseline.…

  11. Effects of acute caffeine administration on adolescents.

    PubMed

    Temple, Jennifer L; Dewey, Amber M; Briatico, Laura N

    2010-12-01

    Acute caffeine administration has physiological, behavioral, and subjective effects. Despite its widespread use, few studies have described the impact of caffeine consumption in children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acute caffeine administration in adolescents. We measured cardiovascular responses and snack food intake after acute administration of 0 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg, and 200 mg of caffeine. We also compared usual food intake and subjective effects of caffeine between high- and low-caffeine consumers. Finally, we conducted a detailed analysis of caffeine sources and consumption levels. We found main effects of caffeine dose on heart rate (HR) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), with HR decreasing and DBP increasing with increasing caffeine dose. There were significant interactions among gender, caffeine use, and time on DBP. High caffeine consumers (>50 mg/day) reported using caffeine to stay awake and drinking coffee, tea, soda, and energy drinks more than low consumers (<50 mg/day). Boys were more likely than girls to report using getting a rush, more energy, or improved athletic performance from caffeine. Finally, when we examined energy and macronutrient intake, we found that caffeine consumption was positively associated with laboratory energy intake, specifically from high-sugar, low-fat foods and also positively associated with protein and fat consumption outside of the laboratory. When taken together, these data suggest that acute caffeine administration has a broad range of effects in adolescents and that the magnitude of these effects is moderated by gender and chronic caffeine consumption.

  12. Detrimental effects of nicotine on the acute gastric mucosal injury induced by ethanol: role of asymmetric dimethylarginine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Zhou, Yuan; Zou, Yi-You; Wang, Li; Yang, Zhi-Chun; Guo, Ren; Li, Dai; Peng, Jun; Li, Yuan-Jian

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), is responsible for the detrimental effects of nicotine on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury and its underlying mechanisms. Gastric mucosal injury was induced by an injection of ethanol in the stomach in rats. Animals were pretreated with nicotine for 28 days before ethanol injection. The gastric mucosal ulcer index (UI) and the levels of ADMA and NO in gastric juice were determined. In vitro, the cultured mucosal epithelial cells were treated with nicotine in the presence or absence of ethanol. The concentration of ADMA in the culture medium and the ratio of cell apoptosis were measured, and the effect of nicotine or ADMA alone on cell apoptosis was also examined. In rats treated with ethanol, the UI and ADMA levels were increased and the NO level was decreased, and these effects of ethanol were augmented by pretreatment with nicotine. Administration of nicotine alone did not show significant impact on UI, ADMA level, or NO level. In vitro, incubation of human epithelial cells with ethanol induced cell injury accompanied by increased ADMA levels in the culture medium, an effect which was amplified in the presence of nicotine. Similarly, ethanol was able to induce epithelial cell apoptosis that was exacerbated by nicotine. Incubation of epithelial cells with nicotine alone did not induce cell apoptosis, but administration of ADMA alone did induce cell apoptosis. The results suggest that the gastric mucosal injury induced by ethanol is augmented by nicotine, which is related to the increased ADMA level.

  13. AT-1001: a high affinity and selective α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist blocks nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Toll, Lawrence; Zaveri, Nurulain T; Polgar, Willma E; Jiang, Faming; Khroyan, Taline V; Zhou, Wei; Xie, Xinmin Simon; Stauber, Gregory B; Costello, Matthew R; Leslie, Frances M

    2012-05-01

    Genomic and pharmacologic data have suggested the involvement of the α3β4 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in drug seeking to nicotine and other drugs of abuse. In order to better examine this receptor subtype, we have identified and characterized the first high affinity and selective α3β4 nAChR antagonist, AT-1001, both in vitro and in vivo. This is the first reported compound with a Ki below 10 nM at α3β4 nAChR and >90-fold selectivity over the other major subtypes, the α4β2 and α7 nAChR. AT-1001 competes with epibatidine, allowing for [³H]epibatidine binding to be used for structure-activity studies, however, both receptor binding and ligand-induced Ca²⁺ flux are not strictly competitive because increasing ligand concentration produces an apparent decrease in receptor number and maximal Ca²⁺ fluorescence. AT-1001 also potently and reversibly blocks epibatidine-induced inward currents in HEK cells transfected with α3β4 nAChR. Importantly, AT-1001 potently and dose-dependently blocks nicotine self-administration in rats, without affecting food responding. When tested in a nucleus accumbens (NAcs) synaptosomal preparation, AT-1001 inhibits nicotine-induced [³H]dopamine release poorly and at significantly higher concentrations compared with mecamylamine and conotoxin MII. These results suggest that its inhibition of nicotine self-administration in rats is not directly due to a decrease in dopamine release from the NAc, and most likely involves an indirect pathway requiring α3β4 nAChR. In conclusion, our studies provide further evidence for the involvement of α3β4 nAChR in nicotine self-administration. These findings suggest the utility of this receptor as a target for smoking cessation medications, and highlight the potential of AT-1001 and congeners as clinically useful compounds.

  14. Brain regions mediating alpha3beta4 nicotinic antagonist effects of 18-MC on methamphetamine and sucrose self-administration.

    PubMed

    Glick, Stanley D; Sell, Elizabeth M; Maisonneuve, Isabelle M

    2008-12-03

    The novel iboga alkaloid congener 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) is a putative anti-addictive agent that has been shown, in rats, to decrease the self-administration of several drugs of abuse. Previous work has established that 18-MC is a potent antagonist at alpha3beta4 nicotinic receptors. Because high densities of alpha3beta4 nicotinic receptors occur in the medial habenula and the interpeduncular nucleus and moderate densities occur in the dorsolateral tegmentum, ventral tegmental area, and basolateral amygdala, the present study was conducted to determine if 18-MC could act in these brain areas to modulate methamphetamine self-administration in rats. Local administration of 18-MC into either the medial habenula, the interpeduncular area or the basolateral amygdala decreased methamphetamine self-administration. Similar results were produced by local administration into the same brain areas of two other alpha3beta4 nicotinic antagonists, mecamylamine and alpha-conotoxin AuIB. Local administration of 18-MC, or the other antagonists, into the dorsolateral tegmentum or the ventral tegmental area had no effect on methamphetamine self-administration. In contrast, local administration of 18-MC and the other antagonists decreased sucrose self-administration when administered into the dorsolateral tegmentum or basolateral amygdala but had no effect when infused into the medial habenula, interpeduncular nucleus, or ventral tegmental area. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that 18-MC decreases methamphetamine self-administration by indirectly modulating the dopaminergic mesolimbic pathway via blockade of alpha3beta4 nicotinic receptors in the habenulo-interpeduncular pathway and the basolateral amygdala. The data also suggest that the basolateral amygdala along with a different pathway involving alpha3beta4 receptors in the dorsolateral tegmentum mediate the effect of 18-MC on sucrose self-administration.

  15. Adolescent mice are less sensitive to the effects of acute nicotine on context pre-exposure than adults.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Braak, David C; Tumolo, Jessica M; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-07-01

    Adolescence is a critical developmental period associated with both increased vulnerability to substance abuse and maturation of certain brain regions important for learning and memory such as the hippocampus. In this study, we employed a hippocampus-dependent learning context pre-exposure facilitation effect (CPFE) paradigm in order to test the effects of acute nicotine on contextual processing during adolescence (post-natal day (PND) 38) and adulthood (PND 53). In Experiment 1, adolescent or adult C57BL6/J mice received either saline or one of three nicotine doses (0.09, 0.18, and 0.36mg/kg) prior to contextual pre-exposure and testing. Our results demonstrated that both adolescent and adult mice showed CPFE in the saline groups. However, adolescent mice only showed acute nicotine enhancement of CPFE with the highest nicotine dose whereas adult mice showed the enhancing effects of acute nicotine with all three doses. In Experiment 2, to determine if the lack of nicotine's effects on CPFE shown by adolescent mice is specific to the age when they are tested, mice were either given contextual pre-exposure during adolescence or adulthood and received immediate shock and testing during adulthood after a 15day delay. We found that both adolescent and adult mice showed CPFE in the saline groups when tested during adulthood. However, like Experiment 1, mice that received contextual pre-exposure during adolescence did not show acute nicotine enhancement except at the highest dose (0.36mg/kg) whereas both low (0.09mg/kg) and high (0.36mg/kg) doses enhanced CPFE in adult mice. Finally, we showed that the enhanced freezing response found with 0.36mg/kg nicotine in the 15-day experiment may be a result of decreased locomotor activity as mice that received this dose of nicotine traveled shorter distances in an open field paradigm. Overall, our results indicate that while adolescent mice showed normal contextual processing when tested both during adolescence and adulthood, they

  16. N(N)-nicotinic blockade as an acute human model of autonomic failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Black, B. K.; Lance, R. H.; Squillante, M. D.; Costa, F.; Robertson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Pure autonomic failure has been conceptualized as deficient sympathetic and parasympathetic innervation. Several recent observations in chronic autonomic failure, however, cannot be explained simply by loss of autonomic innervation, at least according to our current understanding. To simulate acute autonomic failure, we blocked N(N)-nicotinic receptors with intravenous trimethaphan (6+/-0.4 mg/min) in 7 healthy subjects (4 men, 3 women, aged 32+/-3 years, 68+/-4 kg, 171+/-5 cm). N(N)-Nicotinic receptor blockade resulted in near-complete interruption of sympathetic and parasympathetic efferents as indicated by a battery of autonomic function tests. With trimethaphan, small postural changes from the horizontal were associated with significant blood pressure changes without compensatory changes in heart rate. Gastrointestinal motility, pupillary function, saliva production, and tearing were profoundly suppressed with trimethaphan. Plasma norepinephrine level decreased from 1.1+/-0.12 nmol/L (180+/-20 pg/mL) at baseline to 0.23+/-0.05 nmol/L (39+/-8 pg/mL) with trimethaphan (P<.001). There was a more than 16-fold increase in plasma vasopressin (P<.01) and no change in plasma renin activity. We conclude that blockade of N(N)-cholinergic receptors is useful to simulate the hemodynamic alterations of acute autonomic failure in humans. The loss of function with acute N(N)-cholinergic blockade is more complete than in most cases of chronic autonomic failure. This difference may be exploited to elucidate the contributions of acute denervation and chronic adaptation to the pathophysiology of autonomic failure. N(N)-Cholinergic blockade may also be applied to study human cardiovascular physiology and pharmacology in the absence of confounding baroreflexes.

  17. The acute effects of daily nicotine intake on heart rate--a toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic modelling study.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, M; Worth, A; Urani, C; Briesen, H; Schramm, K-W

    2014-10-01

    Joint physiologically-based toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic (PBTK/TD) modelling was applied to simulate concentration-time profiles of nicotine, a well-known stimulant, in the human body following single and repeated dosing. Both kinetic and dynamic models were first calibrated by using in vivo literature data for the Caucasian population. The models were then used to estimate the blood and liver concentrations of nicotine in terms of the Area Under Curve (AUC) and the peak concentration (Cmax) for selected exposure scenarios based on inhalation (cigarette smoking), oral intake (nicotine lozenges) and dermal absorption (nicotine patches). The model simulations indicated that whereas frequent cigarette smoking gives rise to high AUC and Cmax in blood, the use of nicotine-rich dermal patches leads to high AUC and Cmax in the liver. Venous blood concentrations were used to estimate one of the most common acute effects, mean heart rate, both at rest and during exercise. These estimations showed that cigarette smoking causes a high peak heart rate, whereas dermal absorption causes a high mean heart rate over 48h. This study illustrates the potential of using PBTK/TD modelling in the safety assessment of nicotine-containing products.

  18. COMT polymorphism modulates the resting-state EEG alpha oscillatory response to acute nicotine in male non-smokers

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, H.; Smith, D.; de la Salle, S.; Choueiry, J.; Impey, D.; Philippe, T.; Dort, H.; Millar, A.; Daigle, M.; Albert, P. R.; Beaudoin, A.; Knott, V.

    2015-01-01

    Performance improvements in cognitive tasks requiring executive functions are evident with nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists, and activation of the underlying neural circuitry supporting these cognitive effects is thought to involve dopamine neurotransmission. As individual difference in response to nicotine may be related to a functional polymorphism in the gene encoding catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), an enzyme that strongly influences cortical dopamine metabolism, this study examined the modulatory effects of the COMT Val158Met polymorphism on the neural response to acute nicotine as measured with resting-state electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations. In a sample of 62 healthy non-smoking adult males, a single dose (6 mg) of nicotine gum administered in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design was shown to affect α oscillatory activity, increasing power of upper α oscillations in frontocentral regions of Met/Met homozygotes and in parietal/occipital regions of Val/Met heterozygotes. Peak α frequency was also found to be faster with nicotine (vs. placebo) treatment in Val/Met heterozygotes, who exhibited a slower α frequency compared to Val/Val homozygotes. The data tentatively suggest that interindividual differences in brain α oscillations and their response to nicotinic agonist treatment are influenced by genetic mechanisms involving COMT. PMID:26096691

  19. Effects of varenicline on operant self-administration of alcohol and/or nicotine in a rat model of co-abuse.

    PubMed

    Funk, D; Lo, S; Coen, K; Lê, A D

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol and nicotine (in the form of tobacco) are often taken together, with increased negative health consequences. Co-use may modify intake of one or both of the drugs, or the effects of drugs used to treat nicotine or alcohol addiction. Varenicline is commonly prescribed as an aid to enhance quitting smoking. More recently it has been shown to reduce alcohol intake in humans and laboratory animals. There is little work investigating the role of co-exposure to alcohol and nicotine in the effects of varenicline. In pilot clinical studies, it has been reported that smoking enhances varenicline's effectiveness as a treatment for alcohol misuse, but this relationship has not been systematically investigated. To help resolve this, we examined if the effects of varenicline on alcohol and nicotine self-administration (SA) in rats are modified when the two drugs are taken together. Rats were trained on alcohol SA, and some were implanted with i.v. catheters for nicotine SA. Groups of animals then lever pressed for alcohol or nicotine alone, and another group lever pressed for alcohol and nicotine, using a two lever choice procedure. Varenicline did not affect alcohol SA. Varenicline reduced nicotine SA modestly. Access to both alcohol and nicotine reduced self-administration of either drug, but did not change the effects of varenicline. We found that in rats with a history of alcohol SA, varenicline reduced reinstatement of extinguished alcohol seeking induced by exposure to an alcohol prime combined with cues previously associated with alcohol.

  20. Iptakalim attenuates self-administration and acquired goal-tracking behavior controlled by nicotine.

    PubMed

    Charntikov, S; Swalve, N; Pittenger, S; Fink, K; Schepers, S; Hadlock, G C; Fleckenstein, A E; Hu, G; Li, M; Bevins, R A

    2013-12-01

    Iptakalim is an ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener, as well as an α4β2-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist. Pretreatment with iptakalim diminishes nicotine-induced dopamine (DA) and glutamate release in the nucleus accumbens. This neuropharmacological profile suggests that iptakalim may be useful for treatment of nicotine dependence. Thus, we examined the effects of iptakalim in two preclinical models. First, the impact of iptakalim on the interoceptive stimulus effect of nicotine was evaluated by training rats in a discriminated goal-tracking task that included intermixed nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, SC) and saline sessions. Sucrose was intermittently presented in a response-independent manner only on nicotine sessions. On intervening test days, rats were pretreated with iptakalim (10, 30, 60 mg/kg, IP). Results revealed that iptakalim attenuated nicotine-evoked responding controlled by the nicotine stimulus in a dose-dependent manner. In a separate study, the impact of iptakalim on the reinforcing effects of nicotine was investigated by training rats to lever-press to self-administer nicotine (0.01 mg/kg/infusion) [Dosage error corrected]. Results revealed that pretreatment with iptakalim (1, 3, 6 mg/kg, IV) decreased nicotine intake (i.e., less active lever responding). Neither behavioral effect was due to a non-specific motor effect of iptakalim, nor to an ability of iptakalim to inhibit DA transporter (DAT) or serotonin transporter (SERT) function. Together, these finding support the notion that iptakalim may be an effective pharmacotherapy for increasing smoking cessation and a better understanding of its action could contribute to medication development.

  1. Protection genes in nucleus accumbens shell affect vulnerability to nicotine self-administration across isogenic strains of adolescent rat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Luo, Rui; Gong, Suzhen; Matta, Shannon G; Sharp, Burt M

    2014-01-01

    Classical genetic studies show the heritability of cigarette smoking is 0.4-0.6, and that multiple genes confer susceptibility and resistance to smoking. Despite recent advances in identifying genes associated with smoking behaviors, the major source of this heritability and its impact on susceptibility and resistance are largely unknown. Operant self-administration (SA) of intravenous nicotine is an established model for smoking behavior. We recently confirmed that genetic factors exert strong control over nicotine intake in isogenic rat strains. Because the processing of afferent dopaminergic signals by nucleus accumbens shell (AcbS) is critical for acquisition and maintenance of motivated behaviors reinforced by nicotine, we hypothesized that differential basal gene expression in AcbS accounts for much of the strain-to-strain variation in nicotine SA. We therefore sequenced the transcriptome of AcbS samples obtained by laser capture microdissection from 10 isogenic adolescent rat strains and compared all RNA transcript levels with behavior. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis, a systems biology method, found 12 modules (i.e., unique sets of genes that covary across all samples) that correlated (p<0.05) with amount of self-administered nicotine; 9 of 12 correlated negatively, implying a protective role. PCR confirmed selected genes from these modules. Chilibot, a literature mining tool, identified 15 genes within 1 module that were nominally associated with cigarette smoking, thereby providing strong support for the analytical approach. This is the first report demonstrating that nicotine intake by adolescent rodents is associated with the expression of specific genes in AcbS of the mesolimbic system, which controls motivated behaviors. These findings provide new insights into genetic mechanisms that predispose or protect against tobacco addiction.

  2. EFFECT OF EPISODIC WEEKLY NICOTINE ADMINISTRATION ON REPEATED ACQUISITION IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our prior research showed both tolerance and sensitization to nicotine?s effects on motor activity with weekly dosing. This experiment determined the generality of this finding to conditioned behavior. After extended training on a repeated acquisition/performance schedule all ra...

  3. Effects of adolescent nicotine and SR 147778 (Surinabant) administration on food intake, somatic growth and metabolic parameters in rats.

    PubMed

    Lamota, Laura; Bermudez-Silva, Francisco Javier; Marco, Eva-María; Llorente, Ricardo; Gallego, Araceli; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Viveros, María-Paz

    2008-01-01

    Tobacco smoking and obesity are worldwide important health problems with a growing impact in adolescent and young adults. One of the consequences of nicotine withdrawal is an increase in body weight that can act as a risk factor to relapse. Experimental therapies with a cannabinoid receptor antagonist have been recently proposed for both cigarette smoking and complicated overweight. In the present study, we aimed to investigate metabolic and hormonal effects of chronic nicotine treatment (during treatment and in abstinence) in an animal model of adolescence as well as to address the pharmacological effects of the novel selective CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist, SR 147778 (Surinabant). Adolescence (postnatal days 37-44) and/or post-adolescence (postnatal days 45-59) administration of Surinabant reduced body weight gain, as well as plasma glucose levels and triglycerides. The drug also reduced insulin and leptin secretion, and increased adiponectin and corticosterone levels. The effects showed sexual dimorphisms and, in general, were more pronounced in females. Chronic exposure to nicotine (0.8 mg/kg), from postnatal days 30-44 did not result in overt effects on food intake or body weight gain. However, it altered certain responses to the administration of Surinabant, both when the two drugs were given simultaneously and when Surinabant was administered during the post-adolescence period, along nicotine withdrawal. The present results indicate that the endogenous cannabinoid system is active as a metabolic modulator during adolescence and that nicotine exposure can induce long-lasting effects on metabolic regulation, altering cannabinoid modulation of energy expenditure and metabolism.

  4. r-bPiDI, an α6β2* Nicotinic Receptor Antagonist, Decreases Nicotine-Evoked Dopamine Release and Nicotine Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Joshua S.; Meyer, Andrew C.; Pivavarchyk, M.; Horton, David B.; Zheng, Guangrong; Smith, Andrew M.; Wooters, Thomas E.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Crooks, Peter A.; Bardo, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    α6β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nACh Rs) expressed by dopaminergic neurons mediate nicotine-evoked dopamine (DA) release and nicotine reinforcement. α6β2* antagonists inhibit these effects of nicotine, such that α6β2* receptors serve as therapeutic targets for nicotine addiction. The present research assessed the neuropharmacology of 1,10-bis(3-methyl-5,6-dihydropyridin-1(2H)-yl)decane (r-bPiDI), a novel small-molecule, tertiary amino analog of its parent compound, N,N-decane-1,10-diyl-bis-3-picolinium diiodide (bPiDI). bPiDI was previously shown to inhibit both nicotine-evoked DA release and the reinforcing effects of nicotine. In the current study, r-bPiDI inhibition of [3H]nicotine and [3H]methyllyca-conitine binding sites was evaluated to assess interaction with the recognition binding sites on α4β2* and α7* nAChRs, respectively. Further, r-bPiDI inhibition of nicotine-evoked DA release in vitro in the absence and presence of α-conotoxin MII and following chronic in vivo nicotine administration were determined. The ability of r-bPiDI to decrease nicotine self-administration and food-maintained responding was also assessed. Results show that r-bPiDI did not inhibit [3H]nicotine or [3H]methylly-caconitine binding, but potently (IC50 = 37.5 nM) inhibited nicotine-evoked DA release from superfused striatal slices obtained from either drug naïve rats or from those repeatedly treated with nicotine. r-bPiDI inhibition of nicotine-evoked DA release was not different in the absence or presence of α-conotoxin MII, indicating that r-bPiDI acts as a potent, selective α6β2* nAChR antagonist. Acute systemic administration of r-bPiDI specifically decreased nicotine self-administration by 75 %, and did not alter food-maintained responding, demonstrating greater specificity relative to bPiDI and bPiDDB, as well as the tertiary amino analog r-bPiDDB. The current work describes the discovery of r-bPiDI, a tertiary amino, α-conotoxin MII-like small molecule

  5. Prospective evaluation of the effects of anxiety sensitivity and state anxiety in predicting acute nicotine withdrawal symptoms during smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kirsten A; Stewart, Sherry; Rosenfield, David; Steeves, Dan; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2012-06-01

    The current investigation explored the main and interactive effects of anxiety sensitivity (AS) and state anxiety in predicting acute nicotine withdrawal symptoms experienced during the initial 14 days of smoking cessation. Participants included 123 adult daily smokers (84 women; Mage = 45.93 years, SD = 10.34) undergoing psychosocial-pharmacological cessation treatment. Results indicated that after controlling for the effects of participant sex and nicotine dependence, state anxiety but not AS significantly predicted initial levels of nicotine withdrawal symptoms. Results also demonstrated that both state anxiety and AS were significantly related to the change in nicotine withdrawal symptoms over time. Finally, our results revealed a significant interaction between AS and state anxiety. Specifically, higher levels of AS were associated with a stronger relation between state anxiety and nicotine withdrawal symptoms experienced during the cessation attempt. Results suggest that among high AS persons, state anxiety may be more relevant, compared to those low in AS, in regard to experiencing withdrawal symptoms as more intense during the early phases of quitting.

  6. The physiology of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and its importance in the administration of anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rossman, Amanda C

    2011-10-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) can be found widely throughout the body. Although the activation of this receptor leads to multiple functions dependent on its location within the body and subunit composition, all nAChRs aid in the communication between the extracellular and intracellular compartments. The nAChR is composed of 3 domains: the extracellular, transmembrane, and intracellular. The receptor functions in response to ligands that act as an agonist or antagonist that binds to the extracellular domain causing activation or inactivation of the receptor. The activation of the nAChR causes a twisting motion of the receptor, which opens a gate allowing for the passage of sodium, potassium, and calcium cations through the cell membrane. The muscle-type nAChR and neuronal-type nAChR have important roles during the administration of anesthesia. The muscle-type nAChR, located in the neuromuscular junction, is the target of neuromuscular blockers and local anesthetics to prevent muscle contraction. General anesthetics affect the neuronal-type nAChR by inhibiting functions of the central nervous system, including memory formation. The importance of the nAChR cannot be underestimated, for it is through the manipulation of this receptor that many anesthetic goals are achieved.

  7. Tolerance to Ethanol or Nicotine Results in Increased Ethanol Self-Administration and Long-Term Depression in the Dorsolateral Striatum.

    PubMed

    Abburi, Chandrika; Wolfman, Shannon L; Metz, Ryan A E; Kamber, Rinya; McGehee, Daniel S; McDaid, John

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) and nicotine are the most widely coabused drugs. Tolerance to EtOH intoxication, including motor impairment, results in greater EtOH consumption and may result in a greater likelihood of addiction. Previous studies suggest that cross-tolerance between EtOH and nicotine may contribute to the abuse potential of these drugs. Here we demonstrate that repeated intermittent administration of either EtOH or nicotine in adult male Sprague Dawley rats results in tolerance to EtOH-induced motor impairment and increased EtOH self-administration. These findings suggest that nicotine and EtOH cross-tolerance results in decreased aversive and enhanced rewarding effects of EtOH. Endocannabinoid signaling in the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) has been implicated in both EtOH tolerance and reward, so we investigated whether nicotine or EtOH pretreatment might modulate endocannabinoid signaling in this region. Using similar EtOH and nicotine pretreatment methods resulted in increased paired-pulse ratios of evoked EPSCs in enkephalin-positive medium spiny neurons in DLS slices. Thus, EtOH and nicotine pretreatment may modulate glutamatergic synapses in the DLS presynaptically. Bath application of the CB1 receptor agonist Win 55,2-212 increased the paired-pulse ratio of evoked EPSCs in control slices, while Win 55,2-212 had no effect on paired-pulse ratio in slices from either EtOH- or nicotine-pretreated rats. Consistent with these effects, nicotine pretreatment occluded LTD induction by high-frequency stimulation of the corticostriatal inputs to the dorsolateral striatum. These results suggest that nicotine and EtOH pretreatment modulates striatal synapses to induce tolerance to the motor-impairing effects of EtOH, which may contribute to nicotine and EtOH coabuse.

  8. Tolerance to Ethanol or Nicotine Results in Increased Ethanol Self-Administration and Long-Term Depression in the Dorsolateral Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Abburi, Chandrika; Wolfman, Shannon L.; Metz, Ryan A. E.; Kamber, Rinya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ethanol (EtOH) and nicotine are the most widely coabused drugs. Tolerance to EtOH intoxication, including motor impairment, results in greater EtOH consumption and may result in a greater likelihood of addiction. Previous studies suggest that cross-tolerance between EtOH and nicotine may contribute to the abuse potential of these drugs. Here we demonstrate that repeated intermittent administration of either EtOH or nicotine in adult male Sprague Dawley rats results in tolerance to EtOH-induced motor impairment and increased EtOH self-administration. These findings suggest that nicotine and EtOH cross-tolerance results in decreased aversive and enhanced rewarding effects of EtOH. Endocannabinoid signaling in the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) has been implicated in both EtOH tolerance and reward, so we investigated whether nicotine or EtOH pretreatment might modulate endocannabinoid signaling in this region. Using similar EtOH and nicotine pretreatment methods resulted in increased paired-pulse ratios of evoked EPSCs in enkephalin-positive medium spiny neurons in DLS slices. Thus, EtOH and nicotine pretreatment may modulate glutamatergic synapses in the DLS presynaptically. Bath application of the CB1 receptor agonist Win 55,2-212 increased the paired-pulse ratio of evoked EPSCs in control slices, while Win 55,2-212 had no effect on paired-pulse ratio in slices from either EtOH- or nicotine-pretreated rats. Consistent with these effects, nicotine pretreatment occluded LTD induction by high-frequency stimulation of the corticostriatal inputs to the dorsolateral striatum. These results suggest that nicotine and EtOH pretreatment modulates striatal synapses to induce tolerance to the motor-impairing effects of EtOH, which may contribute to nicotine and EtOH coabuse. PMID:27517088

  9. The influence of caffeine on nicotine's discriminative stimulus, subjective, and reinforcing effects.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Kenneth A; Fonte, Carolyn; Stolinski, Amy; Blakesley-Ball, Richard; Wilson, Annette S

    2005-11-01

    Caffeine may acutely alter the discriminative stimulus and subjective effects of nicotine, perhaps explaining the association of coffee intake with smoking status. In this study, smokers were initially trained to discriminate 20 microg/kg nicotine by nasal spray from placebo (0). Then, generalization of nicotine discrimination was tested, using both 2- and 3-choice ("novel" option) procedures, across a range of doses (0-20 microg/kg) following pretreatment with 0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/kg caffeine p.o. Nicotine reinforcement was assessed after the end of generalization testing using a choice procedure. Caffeine pretreatment did not alter nicotine discrimination and self-administration. Caffeine and nicotine influenced some subjective and cardiovascular responses, but there were no interaction effects except for diastolic blood pressure. These results do not support the notion that caffeine acutely alters nicotine's discriminative stimulus, subjective, or reinforcing effects.

  10. Baclofen prevents drug-induced reinstatement of extinguished nicotine-seeking behaviour and nicotine place preference in rodents.

    PubMed

    Fattore, Liana; Spano, Maria Sabrina; Cossu, Gregorio; Scherma, Maria; Fratta, Walter; Fadda, Paola

    2009-07-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid(GABA)-B receptor agonist baclofen is known to reduce drug intake in both animals and humans and to prevent reinstatement of cocaine-, opioid-, and alcohol-seeking in rats after a period of extinction, but its effect on nicotine reinstatement is unknown. This study investigated the effect of baclofen on nicotine-seeking reinstatement both using the extinction/reinstatement model of nicotine self-administration and conditioned place preference (CPP). Results showed that in rats previously trained to intravenously self-administer nicotine (30 microg/kg/inf) under a FR-1 schedule of reinforcement, acute nicotine (0.15 mg/kg) priming effectively reinstates nicotine-seeking behaviour following extinction. At doses used in this study (up to 2.5 mg/kg) baclofen alone did not affect locomotor activity and did not reinstate responding. However, baclofen dose-dependently attenuated drug-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking in rats. Moreover, baclofen (1.25 mg/kg) completely blocked nicotine-induced reinstatement of extinguished nicotine (0.3 mg/kg) CPP in mice. Altogether, our results showed that baclofen is able to antagonise reinstatement of nicotine-seeking and CPP triggered by nicotine primings, suggesting its potential clinical utility as an anti-relapse agent.

  11. Effects of nicotine administration on elemental concentrations in mouse granulosa cells, maturing oocytes and oviduct epithelium studied by X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z; Jin, M; Nilsson, B O; Roomans, G M

    1998-10-01

    A normal maturation of the oocytes is dependent upon, among other things, normally functioning granulosa and corona radiata cells. Analyses performed during human in vitro fertilization programs have revealed that, in smokers, ovarian functions are affected and that smokers have a decreased fertilization rate. Further, animal studies have indicated that nicotine can reach the genital tractus, and that nicotine administration interferes with oocyte maturation, fertilization and early pregnancy. We applied X-ray microanalysis to monitor whether nicotine administration changed the ionic balance of cells in the reproductive tract (granulosa cells, oocytes and oviduct epithelial cells). The animals were given nicotine in the drinking water at a concentration of 108 mumol/l. After 15 days the animals were superovulated, ovaries and oviducts were frozen, and thick cryosections were prepared for energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. In the granulosa cells, the concentrations of Na and Cl increased after nicotine treatment, while the K concentrations decreased resulting in an increased Na/K ratio. The treated oocytes had a higher K concentration and a decreased Na/K ratio compared to the controls. In the epithelial cells of the oviduct, the concentrations of Na and K decreased after nicotine treatment without any changes in the Na/K ratio. Thus, heavy nicotine administration to mice causes significant changes in the ionic composition of the granulosa cells, the ovarian oocytes and the oviduct epithelium.

  12. Nicotine administration in adolescence reprograms the subsequent response to nicotine treatment and withdrawal in adulthood: sex-selective effects on cerebrocortical serotonergic function.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Card, Jennifer; Seidler, Frederic J

    2014-03-01

    Nicotine exposure in adolescence produces lasting changes in subsequent behavioral responses to addictive agents. We gave nicotine to adolescent rats (postnatal days PN30-47), simulating plasma levels in smokers, and then examined the subsequent effects of nicotine given again in adulthood (PN90-107), focusing on cerebrocortical serotonin levels and utilization (turnover) as an index of presynaptic activity of circuits involved in emotional state. Our evaluations encompassed responses during the period of adult nicotine treatment (PN105) and withdrawal (PN110, PN120, PN130), as well as long-term changes (PN180). In males, prior exposure to nicotine in adolescence greatly augmented the increase in serotonin turnover evoked by nicotine given in adulthood, an interaction that was further exacerbated during withdrawal. The effect was sufficiently large that it led to significant depletion of serotonin stores, an effect that was not seen with nicotine given alone in either adolescence or adulthood. In females, adolescent nicotine exposure blunted or delayed the spike in serotonin turnover evoked by withdrawal from adult nicotine treatment, a totally different effect from the interaction seen in males. Combined with earlier work showing persistent dysregulation of serotonin receptor expression and receptor coupling, the present results indicate that adolescent nicotine exposure reprograms future responses of 5HT systems to nicotine, changes that may contribute to life-long vulnerability to relapse and re-addiction.

  13. Antagonism at metabotropic glutamate 5 receptors inhibits nicotine- and cocaine-taking behaviours and prevents nicotine-triggered relapse to nicotine-seeking.

    PubMed

    Tessari, Michela; Pilla, Maria; Andreoli, Michela; Hutcheson, Daniel M; Heidbreder, Christian A

    2004-09-19

    Previous studies in metabotropic glutamate 5 receptor (mGlu5 receptor) deficient mice have indicated the importance of this receptor in the self-administration of cocaine and locomotor sensitisation to this stimulant. Both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors have been implicated in drug-seeking and drug-taking behaviours, but the specific role of each subtype of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu receptors) is still unknown. In the present series of experiments we further investigated the role of mGlu5 receptors on nicotine, cocaine- and food-taking behaviour. We also investigated the effects of the mGlu5 receptor antagonist MPEP (2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine) on the acute locomotor activating effects of nicotine, the expression of sensitisation to its repeated, intermittent administration, and nicotine-triggered relapse to nicotine-seeking behaviour. The results indicate that MPEP treatment reduced nicotine-induced drug-seeking behaviour in a model of nicotine-triggered relapse to nicotine seeking. Furthermore, MPEP decreased both nicotine and cocaine self-administration without affecting food self-administration under similar schedules of reinforcement. Finally, MPEP reduced both the acute locomotor stimulant effects of nicotine as well as the expression of behavioural sensitisation to its repeated administration. Although the intravenous administration of MPEP at 1 and 10 mg/kg transiently reduced spontaneous locomotor activity during the first 25 min post-administration, we also demonstrated that performance on the accelerating rotarod was not affected when MPEP was given 5 and 30 min prior to the test. Altogether, the present findings strengthen the hypothesis that selective antagonism at mGlu5 receptors may be a new potential pharmacotherapeutic approach for the treatment of drug dependence and addiction.

  14. Reinforcer devaluation as a consequence of acute nicotine exposure and withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Kirshenbaum, Ari; Green, John; Fay, Michael; Parks, Angelique; Phillips, Jesse; Stone, Jason; Roy, Tessa

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE Nicotine discontinuation produces behaviors in rats that are congruent with anhedonia, and these symptoms may be related to the devaluation of non-nicotine reinforcers. OBJECTIVE Four separate experiments were performed to explore the parameters surrounding nicotine-induced reinforcer devaluation. METHODS In Experiments 1 and 2, nicotine (0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg) or 0.3 mg/kg nicotine plus 1.0 mg/kg mecamylamine was delivered to rats prior to progressive ratio (PR) schedule sessions in which sucrose was used as a reinforcer. In order to (a) evaluate reinforcer enhancement by nicotine, and (b) reinforcer devaluation in the absence of nicotine, all rats experienced two PR schedule sessions per day for 10 days. Experiment 3 involved nicotine (0.3 mg/kg) and a visual stimulus in place of sucrose reinforcement. In Experiment 4, rats received nicotine (0.3 mg/kg) either before or after a single PR-schedule session for 10 days. RESULTS Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that reinforcer devaluation is related to the occupation of nicotinic-acetylcholine receptors. Results from Experiment 3 provide some evidence that devaluation occurs with either sucrose or visual-stimulus reinforcement. Experiment 4 demonstrates that a necessary condition for reinforcer devaluation to occur is the concurrent exposure to the reinforcer and nicotine. CONCLUSIONS Reinforcer devaluation in rats emerges rapidly in a progressive, orderly fashion that coincides with accumulated exposure to nicotine. These results suggest that reinforcer devaluation may be a feature of nicotine that contributes to the abuse liability of tobacco products. PMID:25401169

  15. Effects of oral caffeine pretreatment on response to intravenous nicotine and cocaine.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew W; Strain, Eric C; Griffiths, Roland R

    2010-08-01

    Previous research suggests that under conditions of chronic daily caffeine administration, caffeine increases the effects of nicotine. Little is known about the effects of caffeine pretreatment on response to nicotine under infrequent caffeine administration conditions. The present study examined whether infrequent (not on consecutive days) acute oral caffeine administration alters subject-rated, physiological, and monetary value effects of intravenous nicotine in regular users of caffeine, tobacco, and cocaine. To determine the specificity of effects of caffeine on response to nicotine, the effects of caffeine administration on response to intravenous cocaine (another short-acting stimulant) were also studied. Fourteen (1 woman) volunteers participated in this 3-4 week, double-blind, inpatient study. Volunteers participated in 10 experimental conditions in pseudo-randomized order, in which oral caffeine (250 mg/70 kg) or placebo was administered 1 hr before an intravenous injection, consisting of nicotine (1 or 2 mg/70 kg), cocaine (15 or 30 mg/70 kg), or saline. Infrequent acute caffeine pretreatment attenuated the increase resulting from 2 mg/70 kg nicotine administration on ratings of "rush," "good effects," "liking," "high," and "drowsy/sleepy." Caffeine had no significant effect on physiological response to nicotine. Caffeine had no significant effect on subject-rated and physiological response to cocaine, with the exception that caffeine significantly augmented blood pressure response to cocaine. In contrast to the previous research using chronic caffeine maintenance, these data suggest that infrequent acute caffeine administration may attenuate nicotine effects.

  16. Ethanol conditioned place preference and alterations in ΔFosB following adolescent nicotine administration differ in rats exhibiting high or low behavioral reactivity to a novel environment.

    PubMed

    Philpot, Rex M; Engberg, Melanie E; Wecker, Lynn

    2014-04-01

    This study determined the effects of adolescent nicotine administration on adult alcohol preference in rats exhibiting high or low behavioral reactivity to a novel environment, and ascertained whether nicotine altered ΔFosB in the ventral striatum (vStr) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) immediately after drug administration or after rats matured to adulthood. Animals were characterized as exhibiting high (HLA) or low (LLA) locomotor activity in the novel open field on postnatal day (PND) 31 and received injections of saline (0.9%) or nicotine (0.56 mg free base/kg) from PND 35 to 42. Ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) was assessed on PND 68 following 8 days conditioning in a biased paradigm; ΔFosB was measured on PND 43 or PND 68. Following adolescent nicotine exposure, HLA animals demonstrated a CPP when conditioned with ethanol; LLA animals were unaffected. Further, adolescent nicotine exposure for 8 days increased levels of ΔFosB in limbic regions in both HLA and LLA rats, but this increase persisted into adulthood only in LLA animals. Results indicate that adolescent nicotine exposure facilitates the establishment of an ethanol CPP in HLA rats, and that sustained elevations in ΔFosB are not necessary or sufficient for the establishment of an ethanol CPP in adulthood. These studies underscore the importance of assessing behavioral phenotype when determining the behavioral and cellular effects of adolescent nicotine exposure.

  17. Central estrogenic pathways protect against the depressant action of acute nicotine on reflex tachycardia in female rats

    SciTech Connect

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M. Fouda, Mohamed A.; El-gowilly, Sahar M.; Saad, Evan I.

    2012-02-01

    We have previously shown that acute exposure of male rats to nicotine preferentially attenuates baroreceptor-mediated control of reflex tachycardia in contrast to no effect on reflex bradycardia. Here, we investigated whether female rats are as sensitive as their male counterparts to the baroreflex depressant effect of nicotine and whether this interaction is modulated by estrogen. Baroreflex curves relating reflex chronotropic responses evoked by i.v. doses (1–16 μg/kg) of phenylephrine (PE) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP), were constructed in conscious freely moving proestrus, ovariectomized (OVX), and estrogen (50 μg/kg/day s.c., 5 days)-replaced OVX (OVXE{sub 2}) rats. Slopes of the curves were taken as a measure of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS{sub PE} and BRS{sub SNP}). Nicotine (100 μg/kg i.v.) reduced BRS{sub SNP} in OVX rats but not in proestrus or OVXE{sub 2} rats. The attenuation of reflex tachycardia by nicotine was also evident in diestrus rats, which exhibited plasma estrogen levels similar to those of OVX rats. BRS{sub PE} was not affected by nicotine in all rat preparations. Experiments were then extended to determine whether central estrogenic receptors modulate the nicotine–BRS{sub SNP} interaction. Intracisteral (i.c.) treatment of OVX rats with estrogen sulfate (0.2 μg/rat) abolished the BRS{sub SNP} attenuating effect of i.v. nicotine. This protective effect of estrogen disappeared when OVX rats were pretreated with i.c. ICI 182,780 (50 μg/rat, selective estrogen receptor antagonist). Together, these findings suggest that central neural pools of estrogen receptors underlie the protection offered by E{sub 2} against nicotine-induced baroreceptor dysfunction in female rats. -- Highlights: ► Estrogen protects against the depressant effect of nicotine on reflex tachycardia. ► The baroreflex response and estrogen status affect the nicotine–BRS interaction. ► The protection offered by estrogen is mediated via central estrogen receptors.

  18. Chronic administration of nicotine enhances NMDA-activated currents in the prefrontal cortex and core part of the nucleus accumbens of rats.

    PubMed

    Ávila-Ruiz, Tania; Carranza, Vladimir; Gustavo, López-López; Limón, Daniel I; Martínez, Isabel; Flores, Gonzalo; Flores-Hernández, Jorge

    2014-06-01

    Nicotine is an addictive substance of tobacco. It has been suggested that nicotine acts on glutamatergic (N-methyl-d-aspartate, NMDA) neurotransmission affecting dopamine release in the mesocorticolimbic system. This effect is reflected in neuroadaptative changes that can modulate neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) core (cNAcc) and shell (sNAcc) regions. We evaluated the effect of chronic administration of nicotine (4.23 mg/kg/day for 14 days) on NMDA activated currents in dissociated neurons from the PFC, and NAcc (from core and shell regions). We assessed nicotine blood levels by mass spectrophotometry and we confirmed that nicotine increases locomotor activity. An electrophysiological study showed an increase in NMDA currents in neurons from the PFC and core part of the NAcc in animals treated with nicotine compared to those of control rats. No change was observed in neurons from the shell part of the NAcc. The enhanced glutamatergic activity observed in the neurons of rats with chronic administration of nicotine may explain the increased locomotive activity also observed in such rats. To assess one of the possible causes of increased NMDA currents, we used magnesium, to block NMDA receptor that contains the NR2B subunit. If there is a change in percent block of NMDA currents, it means that there is a possible change in expression of NMDA receptor subunits. Our results showed that there is no difference in the blocking effect of magnesium on the NMDA currents. The magnesium lacks of effect after nicotinic treatment suggests that there is no change in expression of NR2B subunit of NMDA receptors, then, the effect of nicotine treatment on amplitude of NMDA currents may be due to an increase in the quantity of receptors or to a change in the unitary conductance, rather than a change in the expression of the subunits that constitute it.

  19. Acute effects of nicotine on processing of complex stimuli in smokers and nonsmokers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkrider, Ashley; Hedrick, Mark

    2004-05-01

    Effects of nicotine in the auditory system of normal-hearing smokers and nonsmokers were investigated both behaviorally and physiologically. Discrimination of consonant-vowel speech in quiet and noise was assessed in the presence and absence of a transdermal nicotine patch by measuring categorical boundaries and mismatch negativity (MMN). Data indicate that the effects of nicotine on both behavioral and physiological measures increased with an increase in severity of nicotine-induced symptoms. Smokers showed improved CV discrimination in quiet and noise with nicotine. Additionally, smokers exhibited more measurable and significantly sharper boundaries as well as larger MMN areas than nonsmokers in quiet and noise for both placebo and nicotine sessions. MMN data acquired for both quiet and noise, and behavioral data acquired in quiet, indicate that smokers show the greatest improvements in discrimination during nicotine exposure, followed by symptomatic nonsmokers. Asymptomatic nonsmokers show little improvement with nicotine and, on occasion, show decrements in performance. These data may contribute to our understanding of the role of nAChRs in the auditory system, the neural mechanisms that underlie the recognition of sound in quiet and noise, and mechanisms mediating improved information processing and enhanced cognitive performance that serve as reinforcement for continued tobacco use by smokers.

  20. Acute effects of nicotine on processing of complex stimuli in smokers and nonsmokers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkrider, Ashley; Hedrick, Mark

    2001-05-01

    Effects of nicotine in the auditory system of normal-hearing smokers and nonsmokers were investigated both behaviorally and physiologically. Discrimination of consonant-vowel speech in quiet and noise was assessed in the presence and absence of a transdermal nicotine patch by measuring categorical boundaries and mismatch negativity (MMN). Data indicate that the effects of nicotine on both behavioral and physiological measures increased with an increase in severity of nicotine-induced symptoms. Smokers showed improved CV discrimination in quiet and noise with nicotine. Additionally, smokers exhibited more measurable and significantly sharper boundaries as well as larger MMN areas than nonsmokers in quiet and noise for both placebo and nicotine sessions. MMN data acquired for both quiet and noise, and behavioral data acquired in quiet, indicate that smokers show the greatest improvements in discrimination during nicotine exposure, followed by symptomatic nonsmokers. Asymptomatic nonsmokers show little improvement with nicotine and, on occasion, show decrements in performance. These data may contribute to our understanding of the role of nAChRs in the auditory system, the neural mechanisms that underlie the recognition of sound in quiet and noise, and mechanisms mediating improved information processing and enhanced cognitive performance that serve as reinforcement for continued tobacco use by smokers.

  1. Modulation of mood and cognitive performance following acute administration of Melissa officinalis (lemon balm).

    PubMed

    Kennedy, D O; Scholey, Andrew B; Tildesley, N T J; Perry, E K; Wesnes, K A

    2002-07-01

    Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) is a traditional herbal medicine, which enjoys contemporary usage as a mild sedative, spasmolytic and antibacterial agent. It has been suggested, in light of in vitro cholinergic binding properties, that Melissa extracts may effectively ameliorate the cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease. To date, no study has investigated the effects on cognition and mood of administration of Melissa to healthy humans. The present randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, balanced-crossover study investigated the acute effects on cognition and mood of a standardised extract of M. officinalis. Twenty healthy, young participants received single doses of 300, 600 and 900 mg of M. officinalis (Pharmaton) or a matching placebo at 7-day intervals. Cognitive performance was assessed using the Cognitive Drug Research (CDR) computerised test battery and two serial subtraction tasks immediately prior to dosing and at 1, 2.5, 4 and 6 h thereafter. In vitro IC(50) concentrations for the displacement of [3H]-(N)-nicotine and [3H]-(N)-scopolamine from nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in human occipital cortex tissue were also calculated. Results, utilising the cognitive factors previously derived from the CDR battery, included a sustained improvement in Accuracy of Attention following 600 mg of Melissa and time- and dose-specific reductions in both Secondary Memory and Working Memory factors. Self-rated "calmness," as assessed by Bond-Lader mood scales, was elevated at the earliest time points by the lowest dose, whilst "alertness" was significantly reduced at all time points following the highest dose. Both nicotinic and muscarinic binding were found to be low in comparison to the levels found in previous studies.

  2. Time-dependent changes in nicotine behavioral responsivity during early withdrawal from chronic cocaine administration and attenuation of cocaine sensitization by mecamylamine.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Steven T; Fowler, J C; Froeliger, Brett; Lee, Tong H

    2014-04-01

    Cocaine abuse is associated with a high prevalence of nicotine dependence. In animals, nicotinic antagonists have been reported to block the development of cocaine behavioral sensitization and to attenuate cocaine place preference or self-administration. In the present study, we have determined: (1) changes in the locomotor responses to nicotine challenge during the first week of withdrawal from daily cocaine pretreatment; and (2) effects of the non-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist mecamylamine given during the first 5 days of cocaine withdrawal on the maintenance of cocaine behavioral sensitization. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with daily saline (SI) or cocaine (CI) injections for 14 days. In Experiment 1, separate animals in the SI and CI groups received a single nicotine challenge on day 1, 3, or 7 of withdrawal from their respective pretreatments. The CI group displayed enhanced locomotor responses to nicotine as compared to SI controls on days 3 and 7 of withdrawal, but not day 1. In Experiment 2, SI and CI animals were treated once a day with either saline or mecamylamine during the first 5 days of withdrawal, and were subsequently challenged with single cocaine injections on both withdrawal days 7 and 14. Mecamylamine treatment significantly attenuated expression of cocaine behavioral sensitization on both withdrawal days 7 and 14. Time-dependent changes in nicotinic responses occur during the first week of cocaine withdrawal, and intact nAChR neurotransmission during this period may be necessary for maintenance of cocaine behavioral sensitization.

  3. ACUTE NEGATIVE AFFECT RELIEF FROM SMOKING DEPENDS ON THE AFFECT SITUATION AND MEASURE, BUT NOT ON NICOTINE

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Kenneth A.; Karelitz, Joshua L.; Conklin, Cynthia A.; Sayette, Michael A.; Giedgowd, Grace E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Smoking acutely relieves negative affect (NA) due to smoking abstinence but may not relieve NA from other sources, such as stressors. Methods Dependent smokers (N=104) randomly assigned to one of three smoking conditions (nicotine or denic cigarettes, or no smoking) completed four negative mood induction procedures (one per session): 1) overnight smoking abstinence, 2) challenging computer task, 3) public speech preparation, and 4) watching negative mood slides. A fifth session involved a neutral mood control. The two smoking groups took 4 puffs on their assigned cigarette, and then smoked those same cigarettes ad libitum during continued mood induction. All subjects rated their level of NA and positive affect (PA) on several measures (Mood Form, PANAS, Stress-Arousal Checklist, and STAI-state). They also rated craving and withdrawal. Results NA relief from smoking depended on the NA source (i.e. mood induction procedure) and the affect measure. Smoking robustly relieved NA due to abstinence on all 4 measures, but only modestly relieved NA due to the other sources and typically on only some measures. Smoking’s effects on PA and withdrawal were similar to effects on NA, but relief of craving depended less on NA source. Smoking reinforcement only partly matched the pattern of NA relief. Few responses differed between the nicotine and denic smoking groups. Conclusions Acute NA relief from smoking depends on the situation and the affect measure used but may not depend on nicotine intake. These results challenge the common assumption that smoking, and nicotine in particular, broadly alleviates NA. PMID:20132927

  4. Anxiety sensitivity and panic reactivity to bodily sensations: relation to quit-day (acute) nicotine withdrawal symptom severity among daily smokers making a self-guided quit attempt.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Erin C; Johnson, Kirsten; Bergman, Jenna; Gibson, Laura E; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2009-10-01

    The current investigation explored the main and interactive effects of panic attacks in response to laboratory-induced bodily sensations and anxiety sensitivity in predicting acute nicotine withdrawal symptoms among daily smokers making a self-guided quit attempt. Participants were 99 daily smokers (58% women; M(age) = 28.4 years, SD = 11.7) who completed a battery of questionnaires, a voluntary hyperventilation challenge, and a measure of nicotine withdrawal symptoms 12 hr after making a self-guided quit attempt. Results indicated that the interaction of anxiety sensitivity and panic responsivity to the challenge predicted quit-day nicotine withdrawal symptom severity above and beyond the main effects (p < .05). The form of the interaction indicated that the relationship between postchallenge panic attack status and acute nicotine withdrawal was more robust among individuals who were low in anxiety sensitivity. Individuals who did not experience a panic attack posthyperventilation who were also low in anxiety sensitivity reported the lowest levels of nicotine withdrawal. Results suggest that anxiety sensitivity may be less relevant with regard to acute nicotine withdrawal severity among individuals with panic-related problems.

  5. Lack of CB1 cannabinoid receptors modifies nicotine behavioural responses, but not nicotine abstinence.

    PubMed

    Castañé, A; Valjent, E; Ledent, C; Parmentier, M; Maldonado, R; Valverde, O

    2002-10-01

    Cannabis is the most widely consumed illicit drug and its consumption is currently associated with tobacco, which contains another psychoactive compound, namely nicotine. Interactions between cannabinoids and other drugs of abuse, such as opioids, have been previously reported. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible role of CB1 cannabinoid receptor in responses induced by acute and repeated nicotine administration by using knockout mice lacking the CB1 cannabinoid receptor and their wild-type littermates. Acute nicotine (0.5, 1, 3 and 6 mg/kg, sc) administration decreased locomotor activity and induced antinociceptive responses in the tail-immersion and the hot-plate test, in wild-type animals. The antinociceptive effects in the tail-immersion test were significantly enhanced in CB1 knockout mice. In wild-type mice nicotine (0.5 mg/kg, sc) produced a significant rewarding effect, as measured by a conditioned place preference paradigm. This response was absent in CB1 knockout mice. Finally, a model of mecamylamine-induced abstinence in chronic nicotine-treated mice (10 mg/kg/day, sc) was developed. Mecamylamine (1 and 2 mg/kg, sc) precipitated several somatic signs of nicotine withdrawal in wild-type dependent mice. However, no difference in the severity of nicotine withdrawal was observed in CB1 knockout mice. These results demonstrate that some acute effects and motivational responses elicited by nicotine can be modulated by the endogenous cannabinoid system and support the existence of a physiological interaction between these two systems.

  6. Effects of Nicotine Administration and Stress on Sensory-Gating Depend on Rat Strain and Sex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    variable that may 2 interact with nicotine) in an animal model that included several different genotypes (Le., sex and strain). The present research...important to help explain smoking-stress interactions but this argument is based on limited data CAcri, 1994); and, 3) the available, relevant...groups, crowded (non-stressed) females self- administered more fentanyl (an opioid 100 times more potent that morphine ) than did individually-housed

  7. Self-administration of ethanol, cocaine, or nicotine does not decrease the soma size of ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Mazei-Robison, Michelle S; Appasani, Raghu; Edwards, Scott; Wee, Sunmee; Taylor, Seth R; Picciotto, Marina R; Koob, George F; Nestler, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Our previous observations show that chronic opiate administration, including self-administration, decrease the soma size of dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of rodents and humans, a morphological change correlated with increased firing rate and reward tolerance. Given that a general hallmark of drugs of abuse is to increase activity of the mesolimbic DA circuit, we sought to determine whether additional drug classes produced a similar morphological change. Sections containing VTA were obtained from rats that self-administered cocaine or ethanol and from mice that consumed nicotine. In contrast to opiates, we found no change in VTA DA soma size induced by any of these other drugs. These data suggest that VTA morphological changes are induced in a drug-specific manner and reinforce recent findings that some changes in mesolimbic signaling and neuroplasticity are drug-class dependent.

  8. The effects of co-administration of opium and morphine with nicotine during pregnancy on spatial learning and memory of adult male offspring rats

    PubMed Central

    Sepehri, Gholamreza; Parsania, Shahrnaz; Hajzadeh, Mousa-Al-Reza; Haghpanah, Tahereh; Sheibani, Vahid; Divsalar, Kouros; Shekarforoush, Shahnaz; Afarinesh, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Smoking opium/cigarette is a global health concern. The aim of this study was to examine learning and memory of rat male offsprings whose mothers had been exposed to either opium or morphine with nicotine during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Wistar rats were used for the experiments. In the female rats, opium, morphine and nicotine dependencies were induced by daily injections of drug solution for 10 days before mating. Spatial memory was tested by Morris water maze test in male pups at the postnatal day 60. The duration that took until the rats found the platform in the maze and also their swimming speed were recorded. Results: An increase in the platform finding duration was observed for the pups of dependent mothers in comparison with the control in the training trial (P<0.05). Prenatal exposure to opium/morphine and nicotine significantly decreased the time spent in the trigger zone to find the hidden platform (P<0.05) but had no significant effect on the swimming speed in the probe test. However, no significant difference was observed in the learning and memory behavior of offspring whose mothers received morphine, opium, nicotine or the co-administration of either morphine or opium with nicotine. Conclusion: The present study showed that the opium, morphine and nicotine abuse and co-administration of opium/morphine with nicotine during pregnancy may cause deficits in spatial learning of male rat offspring. Based on our data, no synergistic effects of co-drug administration were observed on learning and memory in male rat offspring. PMID:25691947

  9. Effect of a novel neurotensin analog, NT69L, on nicotine-induced alterations in monoamine levels in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yanqi; Boules, Mona; Shaw, Amanda M; Williams, Katrina; Fredrickson, Paul; Richelson, Elliott

    2008-09-22

    NT69L, is a novel neurotensin (8-13) analog that participates in the modulation of the dopaminergic pathways implicated in addiction to psychostimulants. NT69L blocks nicotine-induced hyperactivity as well as the initiation and expression of sensitization in rats. Recent evidence suggests that stimulation of mesocorticolimbic dopamine system, with influences from the other monoamine systems, e.g. norepinephrine and serotonin, is involved in nicotine's reinforcing properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of pretreatment with NT69L on nicotine-induced changes in monoamine levels in the rat brain using in vivo microdialysis. Acute or chronic (0.4 mg/kg, sc, once daily for 2 weeks) administration of nicotine elicited increases in extracellular levels of dopamine, dopamine metabolites, norepinephrine, or serotonin in medial prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens shell, and core of rats. Pretreatment with NT69L (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, ip) administered 40 min before nicotine injection significantly attenuated the acute nicotine-evoked increases in norepinephrine levels in medial prefrontal cortex, dopamine and serotonin in nucleus accumbens shell. After chronic nicotine administration, pretreatment of NT69L markedly reversed the increase in dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens core. NT69L's attenuation of some of the biochemical effects of acute and chronic nicotine is consistent with this peptide's attenuation of nicotine-induced behavioral effects. These data further support a role for NT69L or other neurotensin receptor agonists to treat nicotine addiction.

  10. Independent and combined effects of ethanol self-administration and nicotine treatment on hepatic CYP2E1 in African green monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, C S; Miksys, S; Palmour, R; Tyndale, R F

    2011-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 2E1 metabolizes ethanol and also bioactivates many toxins and procarcinogens. Elevated levels of hepatic CYP2E1 are associated with an increased susceptibility to chemical toxicity and carcinogenesis. This study investigated the induction of hepatic CYP2E1 by ethanol and nicotine, alone and in combination, in a nonhuman primate model. Monkeys that self-administered ethanol and that received subcutaneous injections of nicotine (0.5 mg/kg b.i.d.), alone and in combination, were compared with control animals (four groups, n = 10/group). Chlorzoxazone (CZN) was used as a probe drug to phenotype in vivo CYP2E1 activity before and after chronic ethanol and/or nicotine exposure. CYP2E1 protein levels and in vitro chlorzoxazone metabolism were assessed in liver microsomes. Average daily ethanol consumption was ≈3.0 g/kg (blood ethanol levels ≈24 mM) and was unaffected by nicotine treatment. Ethanol self-administration and nicotine treatment, alone and in combination, significantly increased in vivo CZN disposition compared with that in control animals. The effect of ethanol was only observed at higher levels of intake. Ethanol and nicotine increased CYP2E1 protein levels and in vitro CZN metabolism, with combined exposure to both drugs resulting in the greatest increase. The effect of ethanol was also dependent on level of intake. Chronic exposure to ethanol and nicotine induced hepatic CYP2E1 activity and protein levels, particularly when both drugs were used in combination and when ethanol intake was high. These results have important implications for public health, given the association between elevated CYP2E1 and disease, and the large proportion of individuals who are exposed to ethanol and nicotine, often in combination.

  11. Effects of adolescent nicotine exposure and withdrawal on intravenous cocaine self-administration during adulthood in male C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Price E; Miller, Mellessa M; Rogers, Tiffany D; Blaha, Charles D; Mittleman, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Studies of adolescent drug use show (1) a pattern in which the use of tobacco precedes the use of other drugs and (2) a positive relationship between adolescent tobacco use and later drug use. These observations have led to the hypothesis that a causal relationship exists between early exposure to nicotine and the later use of hard drugs such as cocaine. Using male C57BL/6J mice, we tested the hypothesis that nicotine exposure in adolescence leads to increased intravenous self-administration (IVSA) of cocaine in adulthood. Using miniature osmotic pumps, we exposed mice and their littermate controls to nicotine (24 mg/kg/day) or vehicle, respectively, over the entire course of adolescence [postnatal days (P) 28-56]. Nicotine exposure was terminated on P56 and mice were not exposed to nicotine again during the experiment. On P73, mice were allowed to acquire cocaine IVSA (1.0 mg/kg/infusion) and a dose-response curve was generated (0.18, 0.32, 0.56, 1.0, 1.8 mg/kg/infusion). Lever pressing during extinction conditions was also evaluated. All mice rapidly learned to lever press for the combination of cocaine infusions and non-drug stimuli. Analysis of the dose-response curve revealed that adolescent nicotine-exposed mice self-administered significantly more (P < 0.05) cocaine than controls at all but the highest dose. No significant differences were observed between adolescent nicotine-exposed and control mice during the acquisition or extinction stages. These results indicate that adolescent nicotine exposure can increase cocaine IVSA in mice, which suggests the possibility of a causal link between adolescent tobacco use and later cocaine use in humans.

  12. α6β2*-subtype nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are more sensitive than α4β2*-subtype receptors to regulation by chronic nicotine administration

    PubMed Central

    Marks, MJ; Grady, SR; Salminen, O; Paley, MA; Wageman, CR; McIntosh, JM; Whiteaker, P

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) of the α6β2* subtype (where * indicates the possible presence of additional subunits) are prominently expressed on dopaminergic neurons. Because of this, their role in tobacco use and nicotine dependence has received much attention. Previous studies have demonstrated that α6β2*-nAChR are downregulated following chronic nicotine exposure (unlike other subtypes that have been investigated – most prominently α4β2* nAChR). This study examines, for the first time, effects across a comprehensive chronic nicotine dose range. Chronic nicotine dose-responses and quantitative ligand-binding autoradiography were used to define nicotine sensitivity of changes in α4β2*-nAChR and α6β2*-nAChR expression. α6β2*-nAChR downregulation by chronic nicotine exposure in dopaminergic and optic-tract nuclei was ≈three-fold more sensitive than upregulation of α4β2*-nAChR. In contrast, nAChR-mediated [3H]-dopamine release from dopamine-terminal region synaptosomal preparations changed only in response to chronic treatment with high nicotine doses, while dopaminergic parameters (transporter expression and activity, dopamine receptor expression) were largely unchanged. Functional measures in olfactory tubercle preparations were made for the first time; both nAChR expression levels and nAChR-mediated functional measures changed differently between striatum and olfactory tubercles. These results show that functional changes measured using synaptosomal [3H]-DA release are primarily due to changes in nAChR, rather than in dopaminergic, function. PMID:24661093

  13. Cannabinoid receptor stimulation increases motivation for nicotine and nicotine seeking.

    PubMed

    Gamaleddin, Islam; Wertheim, Carrie; Zhu, Andy Z X; Coen, Kathleen M; Vemuri, Kiran; Makryannis, Alex; Goldberg, Steven R; Le Foll, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The cannabinoid system appears to play a critical facilitative role in mediating the reinforcing effects of nicotine and relapse to nicotine-seeking behaviour in abstinent subjects based on the actions of cannabinoid (CB) receptor antagonists. However, the effects of CB receptor stimulation on nicotine self-administration and reinstatement have not been systematically studied. Here, we studied the effects of WIN 55,212-2, a CB1/2 agonist, on intravenous nicotine self-administration under fixed-ratio (FR) and progressive-ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement in rats. The effects of WIN 55,212-2 on responding for food under similar schedules were also studied. In addition, the effects of WIN 55,212-2 on nicotine- and cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking were also studied, as well as the effects of WIN 55,212-2 on nicotine discrimination. WIN 55,212-2 decreased nicotine self-administration under the FR schedule. However, co-administration of WIN 55,212-2 with nicotine decreased responding for food, which suggests that this effect was non-selective. In contrast, WIN 55,212-2 increased both nicotine self-administration and responding for food under the PR schedule, produced dose-dependent reinstatement of nicotine seeking, and enhanced the reinstatement effects of nicotine-associated cues. Some of these effects were reversed by the CB1 antagonist rimonabant, but not by the CB2 antagonist AM630. In the drug discrimination tests between saline and 0.4 mg/kg nicotine, WIN 55,212-2 produced no nicotine-like discriminative effects but significantly potentiated discriminative stimulus effects of nicotine at the low dose through a CB1-receptor-dependent mechanism. These findings indicate that cannabinoid CB1-receptor stimulation increases the reinforcing effects of nicotine and precipitates relapse to nicotine-seeking behaviour in abstinent subjects. Thus, modulating CB1-receptor signalling might have therapeutic value for treating nicotine dependence.

  14. Effects of the 5-HT2C receptor agonist Ro60-0175 and the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist M100907 on nicotine self-administration and reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Paul J; Rizos, Zoë; Noble, Kevin; Soko, Ashlie D; Silenieks, Leo B; Lê, Anh Dzung; Higgins, Guy A

    2012-06-01

    The reinforcing effects of nicotine are mediated in part by brain dopamine systems. Serotonin, acting via 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors, modulates dopamine function. In these experiments we examined the effects of the 5-HT(2C) receptor agonist Ro60-0175 and the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist (M100907, volinanserin) on nicotine self-administration and reinstatement of nicotine-seeking. Male Long-Evans rats self-administered nicotine (0.03 mg/kg/infusion, IV) on either a FR5 or a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement. Ro60-0175 reduced responding for nicotine on both schedules. While Ro60-0175 also reduced responding for food reinforcement, response rates under drug treatment were several-fold higher than in animals responding for nicotine. M100907 did not alter responding for nicotine, or food, on either schedule. In tests of reinstatement of nicotine-seeking, rats were first trained to lever press for IV infusions of nicotine; each infusion was also accompanied by a compound cue consisting of a light and tone. This response was then extinguished over multiple sessions. Injecting rats with a nicotine prime (0.15 mg/kg) reinstated responding; reinstatement was also observed when responses were accompanied by the nicotine associated cue. Ro60-0175 attenuated reinstatement of responding induced by nicotine and by the cue. The effects of Ro60-0175 on both forms of reinstatement were blocked by the 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist SB242084. M100907 also reduced reinstatement induced by either the nicotine prime or by the nicotine associated cue. The results indicate that 5-HT(2C) and 5-HT(2A) receptors may be potential targets for therapies to treat some aspects of nicotine dependence.

  15. Differences between nicotine-abstinent smokers and non-smokers in terms of visuospatial attention and inhibition before and after single-blind nicotine administration.

    PubMed

    Logemann, H N A; Böcker, K B E; Deschamps, P K H; Kemner, C; Kenemans, J L

    2014-09-26

    The cholinergic system is implicated in visuospatial attention and inhibition, however the exact role is still unclear. Two key mechanisms in visuospatial attention are bias and disengagement. Bias refers to neuronal signals that enhance the sensitivity of the sensory cortex, disengagement is the decoupling of attention. Previous studies suggest that nicotine affects disengagement and (related) inhibition. However the exact relation is still unknown. Furthermore, nicotine-abstinence in 'healthy' smokers may resemble some anomalies of visuospatial attention and inhibition as seen in Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Smokers and non-smokers (32 male students) performed in a visuospatial cueing (VSC) task, to assess bias and disengagement, and in a stop-signal task (SST) to assess inhibition. It was expected that nicotine abstinent smokers compared to non-smokers, would show poor disengagement (indicated by an enhanced validity effect) and poor inhibitory control (indicated by an enhanced stop-signal reaction time (SSRT)). It was expected that nicotine would positively affect disengagement and inhibition: hypothesis 1 stated that this effect would be larger in smokers as opposed to non-smokers, in terms of smoking-related deficient inhibitory control. Hypothesis 2 stated the exact opposite, in terms of drug-tolerance. Results indicated no baseline differences. Nicotine enhanced inhibition more in non-smokers relative to smokers. Integrating the results, nicotine-abstinent smokers do not seem to resemble ADHD patients, and do not seem to smoke in order to self-medicate a pre-existing deficit pertaining to mechanisms of visuospatial attention and inhibition. Nicotine may affect inhibition more in non-smokers relative to smokers, consistent with a drug-tolerance account.

  16. Altered prefrontal connectivity after acute heroin administration during cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, André; Borgwardt, Stefan; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Smieskova, Renata; Lang, Undine E; Rubia, Katya; Walter, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Neuroimaging studies have reported reduced activity in a broad network of brain regions during response inhibition in heroin-dependent patients. However, how heroin in an acute dose modulates the neural correlates of response inhibition and the underlying brain connectivity has not yet been investigated. In this double-blind placebo-controlled study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine whether acute heroin administration changed whole brain activity during response inhibition in 26 heroin-dependent patients. We then applied dynamic causal modelling to investigate the effect of an acute dose of heroin on the functional interactions between the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the bilateral inferior frontal gyri (IFG). Heroin acutely reduced dACC activity, as well as the inhibition-induced modulation of connectivity from the dACC to the right IFG compared with placebo. Furthermore, dACC activity was positively related to false alarm rates after placebo but not heroin administration. These results suggest that acute heroin administration impairs cognitive control in dependent patients by reducing the activity in the dACC activity and the functional connectivity from the dACC to the right IFG.

  17. Nicotine inhibits memory CTL programming.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhifeng; Smyth, Kendra; Garcia, Karla; Mattson, Elliot; Li, Lei; Xiao, Zhengguo

    2013-01-01

    Nicotine is the main tobacco component responsible for tobacco addiction and is used extensively in smoking and smoking cessation therapies. However, little is known about its effects on the immune system. We confirmed that multiple nicotinic receptors are expressed on mouse and human cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and demonstrated that nicotinic receptors on mouse CTLs are regulated during activation. Acute nicotine presence during activation increases primary CTL expansion in vitro, but impairs in vivo expansion after transfer and subsequent memory CTL differentiation, which reduces protection against subsequent pathogen challenges. Furthermore, nicotine abolishes the regulatory effect of rapamycin on memory CTL programming, which can be attributed to the fact that rapamycin enhances expression of nicotinic receptors. Interestingly, naïve CTLs from chronic nicotine-treated mice have normal memory programming, which is impaired by nicotine during activation in vitro. In conclusion, simultaneous exposure to nicotine and antigen during CTL activation negatively affects memory development.

  18. Ethanol self-administration and nicotine treatment induce brain levels of CYP2B6 and CYP2E1 in African green monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Charmaine S; Miksys, Sharon; Palmour, Roberta M; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2013-09-01

    CYP2B6 and CYP2E1 are enzymes responsible for the metabolism of many centrally acting drugs, toxins and endogenous compounds. Human smokers and alcoholics have elevated levels of CYP2B6 and CYP2E1 in certain brain regions, which may contribute to altered drug efficacy, neurotoxicity and metabolic tolerance. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of ethanol self-administration and nicotine treatment, alone and in combination, on brain CYP2B6 and CYP2E1 levels in monkeys. Monkeys were randomized into four groups (N = 10/group): an ethanol-only group, a nicotine-only group, an ethanol + nicotine group and a control (no drug) group. Ethanol (10% alcohol in sucrose solution) was voluntarily self-administered by the monkeys and nicotine was given as subcutaneous injections (0.5 mg/kg bid). Immunocytochemistry revealed induction of both CYP2B6 and CYP2E1 protein in certain brain regions and cells within monkey brain as a result of ethanol self-administration, nicotine treatment and combined exposure to both drugs. Immunoblotting analyses demonstrated CYP2B6 induction by ethanol in the caudate, putamen and cerebellum (1.5-3.2 fold, P < 0.05), and CYP2E1 induction by nicotine in the frontal cortex and putamen (1.6-2.0 fold, P < 0.05). Combined ethanol and nicotine exposure induced CYP2B6 in the caudate, putamen, thalamus and cerebellum (1.4-2.4 fold, P < 0.05), and CYP2E1 in the frontal cortex and putamen (1.5-1.8, P < 0.05). CYP2B6 and CYP2E1 mRNA levels were unaffected by ethanol or nicotine exposure. In summary, ethanol and nicotine can induce CYP2B6 and CYP2E1 protein in the primate brain, which could potentially result in altered sensitivity to centrally acting drugs and toxins.

  19. Effects of caffeine and nicotine administration on growth and ossification of the ICR mouse fetus.

    PubMed

    Leblebicioglu-Bekcioglu, B; Paulson, R B; Paulson, J O; Sucheston, M E; Shanfeld, J; Bradway, S D

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how fetal effects are altered when nicotine (N) and caffeine (CA) are administered concurrently at dosages that individually produce minimal effects to the fetus. Female ICR mice were bred overnight and were assigned to four groups: CA (125 mg/kg), N (12mg/kg), CA plus N (125 mg/kg plus 12 mg/kg, respectively) treated, and control (distilled water) groups. Dams were intubated with these dosages three times daily during gestational days (GD) 6-18 and were euthanized on GD 18. Live fetuses were sexed, weighed, and examined for external malformations. One-half of the fetuses were fixed in 10% formalin and examined for internal malformations using Wilson's method. The remaining half was fixed in 95% ethanol (ETOH), stained, and cleared (Inouye's method) for skeletal examinations. Ossification was assessed by staging and measuring craniofacial bones, and counting ossification centra in sternbrae and in cervical and sacrococcygeal vertebrae. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Student-Newman-Keuls post-hoc tests set at p < .05 significance level. The litter was used as the unit of measure and the ANOVA main effects were CA, N, and an interaction term (CA+N). In comparison to controls, CA treatment resulted in reduced bone measurements or reduced ossification scores in 5 of the 19 parameters examined, whereas for N only five parameters were significant. The main effects for interaction of CA+N were significant for seven parameters measured. Although it is difficult to assign the specific type of drug interaction that occurred because results were not completely consistent for all parameters measured, it may be concluded that in most parameters measured both CA and CA+N were different from controls, but CA was not different from CA+N. Under the experimental conditions of this study, we found that of the two drugs, caffeine had a significantly greater effect on fetal growth and ossification than

  20. Effect of nicotine on feeding and body weight in rats: involvement of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide.

    PubMed

    Dandekar, Manoj P; Nakhate, Kartik T; Kokare, Dadasaheb M; Subhedar, Nishikant K

    2011-05-16

    While nicotine treatment to rodents causes a transient anorexia and persistent weight loss, withdrawal produces hyperphagia and weight gain. Herein, we test the hypothesis that endogenous anorectic peptide cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) may be involved in these nicotine triggered physiological disturbances. In acute study, an anorectic effect of intraperitoneal nicotine was significantly potentiated by intracerebroventricular pre-treatment with CART at 2 and 4 h post-injection time-points. In chronic study, following an initial reduction, food intake, but not body weight, was progressively restored to normal. On the other hand, termination of chronic nicotine treatment resulted in significant hyperphagia and weight gain. These effects of nicotine were abolished if the rats were concomitantly treated with CART. An immunohistochemical profile of hypothalamic CART was studied following different nicotine treatment conditions. Acute nicotine treatment caused a significant increase above control in the CART-immunoreactive cells and fibers in the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and fibers in the arcuate (ARC) nuclei. However, chronic nicotine administration had no effect on the CART-immunoreactivity in the PVN and ARC. While nicotine withdrawal reduced the population of CART-immunoreactive cells and fibers in the PVN, the immunoreactivity in the ARC fibers was increased. The results suggest that hypothalamic CART may process the acute, chronic and withdrawal effects of nicotine on feeding and body weight.

  1. Hormones, nicotine, and cocaine: clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K

    2010-06-01

    Nicotine and cocaine each stimulate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and -gonadal axis hormones, and there is increasing evidence that the hormonal milieu may modulate the abuse-related effects of these drugs. This review summarizes some clinical studies of the acute effects of cigarette smoking or IV cocaine on plasma drug and hormone levels and subjective effects ratings. The temporal covariance between these dependent measures was assessed with a rapid (2 min) sampling procedure in nicotine-dependent volunteers or current cocaine users. Cigarette smoking and IV cocaine each stimulated a rapid increase in LH and ACTH, followed by gradual increases in cortisol and DHEA. Positive subjective effects ratings increased immediately after initiation of cigarette smoking or IV cocaine administration. However, in contrast to cocaine's sustained positive effects (<20 min), ratings of "high" and "rush" began to decrease within one or two puffs of a high-nicotine cigarette while nicotine levels were increasing. Peak nicotine levels increased progressively after each of three successive cigarettes smoked at 60 min intervals, but the magnitude of the subjective effects ratings and peak ACTH and cortisol levels diminished. Only DHEA increased consistently after successive cigarettes. The possible influence of neuroactive hormones on nicotine dependence and cocaine abuse and the implications for treatment of these addictive disorders are discussed.

  2. Hormones, Nicotine and Cocaine: Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Nancy K.

    2009-01-01

    Nicotine and cocaine each stimulate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and -gonadal axis hormones, and there is increasing evidence that the hormonal milieu may modulate the abuse-related effects of these drugs. This review summarizes some clinical studies of the acute effects of cigarette smoking or IV cocaine on plasma drug and hormone levels, and subjective effects ratings. The temporal covariance between these dependent measures was assessed with a rapid (two min) sampling procedure in nicotine-dependent volunteers or current cocaine users. Cigarette smoking and IV cocaine each stimulated a rapid increase in LH and ACTH, followed by gradual increases in cortisol and DHEA. Positive subjective effects ratings increased immediately after initiation of cigarette smoking or IV cocaine administration. However, in contrast to cocaine’s sustained positive effects (< 20 min), ratings of “High” and “Rush” began to decrease within one or two puffs of a high nicotine cigarette while nicotine levels were increasing. Peak nicotine levels increased progressively after each of three successive cigarettes smoked at 60 min intervals, but the magnitude of the subjective effects ratings and peak ACTH and cortisol levels diminished. Only DHEA increased consistently after successive cigarettes. The possible influence of neuroactive hormones on nicotine dependence and cocaine abuse, and implications for treatment of these addictive disorders is discussed. PMID:19835877

  3. Reduced inhibitory action of a GABAB receptor agonist on [3H]-dopamine release from rat ventral tegmental area in vitro after chronic nicotine administration

    PubMed Central

    Amantea, Diana; Bowery, Norman G

    2004-01-01

    Background The activation of GABAB receptors in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) has been suggested to attenuate the rewarding properties of psychostimulants, including nicotine. However, the neurochemical mechanism that underlie this effect remains unknown. Since GABAB receptors modulate the release of several neurotransmitters in the mammalian brain, we have characterised the effect of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen on the release of [3H]-dopamine ([3H]-DA) from VTA slices of naïve rats and of rats pre-treated with nicotine. Results In naïve rats, baclofen concentration-dependently inhibited the electrically evoked release of [3H]-DA from the isolated VTA (EC50 = 0.103 μM, 95% CI = 0.043–0.249), without affecting the basal [3H]-monoamine overflow. This effect was mediated by activation of GABAB receptors as it was blocked by the selective receptor antagonist CGP55845A. Chronic administration of nicotine (0.4 mg kg-1, s.c., for 14 days) affected neither the basal nor the electrically evoked release of [3H]-DA from VTA slices. However, the inhibitory effect of baclofen (10 μM) on the stimulated [3H]-monoamine overflow was abolished in rats pre-treated with nicotine as compared to saline-injected controls. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that GABAB receptor activation reduces the release of DA from the rat VTA. In addition, a reduced sensitivity of VTA GABAB receptors appears to develop after chronic exposure to nicotine. The resulting disinhibition of VTA DA neurones might therefore contribute to the sensitised dopaminergic responses observed in the rat mesocorticolimbic system following repeated administration of nicotine. PMID:15494079

  4. Activation of the opioid μ1, but not δ or κ, receptors is required for nicotine reinforcement in a rat model of drug self-administration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiu; Jernigan, Courtney

    2010-01-01

    There has long been an interest in examining the involvement of opioid neurotransmission in nicotine rewarding process and addiction to nicotine. Over the past 3 decades, however, clinical effort to test the effectiveness of nonselective opioid antagonists (mainly naloxone and naltrexone) for smoking cessation has yielded equivocal results. In light of the fact that there are three distinctive types of receptors mediating actions of the endogenous opioid peptides, this study, using a rat model of nicotine self-administration, examined involvement of different opioid receptors in the reinforcement of nicotine by selective blockade of the μ1, the δ, and the κ opioid receptors. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained in daily 1 h sessions to intravenously self-administer nicotine (0.03 mg/kg/infusion) on a fixed-ratio 5 schedule. After establishment of stable nicotine self-administration behavior, the effects of the opioid antagonists were tested. Separate groups of rats were used to test the effects of naloxanazine (selective for μ1 receptors, 0, 5, 15 mg/kg), naltrindole (selective for δ receptors, 0, 0.5, 5 mg/kg), and 5′-guanidinonaltrindole (GNTI, selective for κ receptors, 0, 0.25, 1 mg/kg). In each individual drug group, the 3 drug doses were tested by using a within-subject and Latin-Square design. The effects of these antagonists on food self-administering behavior were also examined in the same rats in each respective drug group after retrained for food self-administration. Pretreatment with naloxonazine, but not naltrindole or GNTI, significantly reduced responses on the active lever and correspondingly the number of nicotine infusions. None of these antagonists changed lever-pressing behavior for food reinforcement. These results indicate that activation of the opioid μ1, but not the δ or the κ, receptors is required for the reinforcement of nicotine and suggest that opioid neurotransmission via the μ1 receptors would be a promising target for

  5. Activation of the opioid μ1, but not δ or κ, receptors is required for nicotine reinforcement in a rat model of drug self-administration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiu; Jernigan, Courtney

    2011-01-15

    There has long been an interest in examining the involvement of opioid neurotransmission in nicotine rewarding process and addiction to nicotine. Over the past 3 decades, however, clinical effort to test the effectiveness of nonselective opioid antagonists (mainly naloxone and naltrexone) for smoking cessation has yielded equivocal results. In light of the fact that there are three distinctive types of receptors mediating actions of the endogenous opioid peptides, this study, using a rat model of nicotine self-administration, examined involvement of different opioid receptors in the reinforcement of nicotine by selective blockade of the μ1, the δ, and the κ opioid receptors. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained in daily 1h sessions to intravenously self-administer nicotine (0.03 mg/kg/infusion) on a fixed-ratio 5 schedule. After establishment of stable nicotine self-administration behavior, the effects of the opioid antagonists were tested. Separate groups of rats were used to test the effects of naloxanazine (selective for μ1 receptors, 0, 5 and 15 mg/kg), naltrindole (selective for δ receptors, 0, 0.5 and 5mg/kg), and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole (GNTI, selective for κ receptors, 0, 0.25 and 1mg/kg). In each individual drug group, the 3 drug doses were tested by using a within-subject and Latin-Square design. The effects of these antagonists on food self-administering behavior were also examined in the same rats in each respective drug group after retrained for food self-administration. Pretreatment with naloxonazine, but not naltrindole or GNTI, significantly reduced responses on the active lever and correspondingly the number of nicotine infusions. None of these antagonists changed lever-pressing behavior for food reinforcement. These results indicate that activation of the opioid μ1, but not the δ or the κ, receptors is required for the reinforcement of nicotine and suggest that opioid neurotransmission via the μ1 receptors would be a promising target

  6. Methamphetamine Self-Administration Acutely Decreases Monoaminergic Transporter Function

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Lisa M.; Stout, Kristen A.; Vieira-Brock, Paula L.; Allen, Scott C.; Nielsen, Shannon M.; Wilkins, Diana G.; Hanson, Glen R.; Fleckenstein, Annette E.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that non-contingent methamphetamine (METH) administration rapidly decreases both dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine-2 transporter (VMAT-2) function. Because of the importance of transporter function to the abuse and neurotoxic liabilities of METH, and previous research indicating that the effects of non-contingent METH treatment do not necessarily predict effects of contingent exposure, the present study examined the acute impact of METH self-administration on these transporters. Results revealed that five days of METH self-administration (4 h/session; 0.06 mg/infusion) decreased DAT and VMAT-2 activity, as assessed in synaptosomes and vesicles, respectively, prepared from striatal tissue 1 h after the final self-administration session. METH self-administration increased core body temperatures as well. Brain METH and amphetamine (AMPH) levels, assessed 1 h after the final self-administration session, were approximately twice greater in high-pressing rats compared to low-pressing rats despite similar changes in DAT function. In conclusion, the present manuscript is the first to describe transporter function and METH/AMPH levels after self-administration in rodents. These data provide a foundation to investigate complex questions including how the response of dopaminergic systems to METH self-administration contributes to contingent-related processes such as dependence. PMID:22120988

  7. Methamphetamine self-administration acutely decreases monoaminergic transporter function.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Lisa M; Stout, Kristen A; Vieira-Brock, Paula L; Allen, Scott C; Nielsen, Shannon M; Wilkins, Diana G; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2012-03-01

    Numerous preclinical studies have demonstrated that noncontingent methamphetamine (METH) administration rapidly decreases both dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine-2 transporter (VMAT-2) function. Because of the importance of transporter function to the abuse and neurotoxic liabilities of METH, and previous research indicating that the effects of noncontingent METH treatment do not necessarily predict effects of contingent exposure, the present study examined the acute impact of METH self-administration on these transporters. Results revealed that five days of METH self-administration (4 h/session; 0.06 mg/infusion) decreased DAT and VMAT-2 activity, as assessed in synaptosomes and vesicles, respectively, prepared from striatal tissue 1 h after the final self-administration session. METH self-administration increased core body temperatures as well. Brain METH and amphetamine (AMPH) levels, assessed 1 h after the final self-administration session, were approximately twice greater in high-pressing rats compared to low-pressing rats despite similar changes in DAT function. In conclusion, the present manuscript is the first to describe transporter function and METH/AMPH levels after self-administration in rodents. These data provide a foundation to investigate complex questions including how the response of dopaminergic systems to METH self-administration contributes to contingent-related processes such as dependence.

  8. Exploration of the wound healing effect of topical administration of nicotine in combination with collagen scaffold in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Hiromu; Morimoto, Naoki; Sakamoto, Michiharu; Ogino, Shuichi; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2016-06-01

    Nicotine has been reported to prolong the wound healing; however, we showed that the topical application of 10(-4) M nicotine promoted murine wound healing. The objective of this study was to explore the wound healing effects of nicotine in combination with collagen scaffold using skin defects in rabbit. Three full-thickness skin defects 8 mm in diameter were made on the rabbit auricle. Artificial dermis was applied to the defects, and 10 μl of nicotine solution (10(-5), 10(-4), and10(-3) M), bFGF solution (0.5 μg/10 μl), and both bFGF and 10(-4) M nicotine solutions were injected into the artificial dermis once daily for 7 days. Rabbits were sacrificed on day 10, 15, or 20, and the wound healing process was evaluated. bFGF was superior in the formation of the dermis-like tissue and capillaries. In nicotine groups, the epithelial length and the dermis-like tissue formations in the 10(-4) M group were superior, in contrast, those were inhibited in the 10(-3) M group. The synergistic effect of bFGF and 10(-4) M nicotine was not confirmed. This study suggests that the topical application of 10(-4) M nicotine promoted wound healing in rabbit, but the effect was not apparent compared with murine models.

  9. Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Walley, Susan C; Jenssen, Brian P

    2015-11-01

    Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) are rapidly growing in popularity among youth. ENDS are handheld devices that produce an aerosolized mixture from a solution typically containing concentrated nicotine, flavoring chemicals, and propylene glycol to be inhaled by the user. ENDS are marketed under a variety of names, most commonly electronic cigarettes and e-cigarettes. In 2014, more youth reported using ENDS than any other tobacco product. ENDS pose health risks to both users and nonusers. Nicotine, the major psychoactive ingredient in ENDS solutions, is both highly addictive and toxic. In addition to nicotine, other toxicants, carcinogens, and metal particles have been detected in solutions and aerosols of ENDS. Nonusers are involuntarily exposed to the emissions of these devices with secondhand and thirdhand aerosol. The concentrated and often flavored nicotine in ENDS solutions poses a poisoning risk for young children. Reports of acute nicotine toxicity from US poison control centers have been increasing, with at least 1 child death reported from unintentional exposure to a nicotine-containing ENDS solution. With flavors, design, and marketing that appeal to youth, ENDS threaten to renormalize and glamorize nicotine and tobacco product use. There is a critical need for ENDS regulation, legislative action, and counter promotion to protect youth. ENDS have the potential to addict a new generation of youth to nicotine and reverse more than 50 years of progress in tobacco control.

  10. Effects of nicotine on response inhibition and interference control.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Ulrich; Faiola, Eliana; Kasparbauer, Anna-Maria; Petrovsky, Nadine; Chan, Raymond C K; Liepelt, Roman; Kumari, Veena

    2017-04-01

    Nicotine is a cholinergic agonist with known pro-cognitive effects in the domains of alerting and orienting attention. However, its effects on attentional top-down functions such as response inhibition and interference control are less well characterised. Here, we investigated the effects of 7 mg transdermal nicotine on performance on a battery of response inhibition and interference control tasks. A sample of N = 44 healthy adult non-smokers performed antisaccade, stop signal, Stroop, go/no-go, flanker, shape matching and Simon tasks, as well as the attentional network test (ANT) and a continuous performance task (CPT). Nicotine was administered in a within-subjects, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, with order of drug administration counterbalanced. Relative to placebo, nicotine led to significantly shorter reaction times on a prosaccade task and on CPT hits but did not significantly improve inhibitory or interference control performance on any task. Instead, nicotine had a negative influence in increasing the interference effect on the Simon task. Nicotine did not alter inter-individual associations between reaction times on congruent trials and error rates on incongruent trials on any task. Finally, there were effects involving order of drug administration, suggesting practice effects but also beneficial nicotine effects when the compound was administered first. Overall, our findings support previous studies showing positive effects of nicotine on basic attentional functions but do not provide direct evidence for an improvement of top-down cognitive control through acute administration of nicotine at this dose in healthy non-smokers.

  11. Alcohol and nicotine administration inhibits serotonin synthesis and tryptophan hydroxylase expression in dorsal and median raphe of young rats.

    PubMed

    Jang, Mi-Hyeon; Shin, Min-Chul; Lee, Taeck-Hyun; Kim, Young-Pyo; Jung, Sae-Bin; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Hong; Kim, Sung-Soo; Kim, Ee-Hwa; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2002-08-30

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of various neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present study, the effects of alcohol and nicotine on the synthesis of 5-HT and the expression of tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), the rate-limiting enzyme of 5-HT synthesis, in the dorsal and median raphe of young rats were investigated via immunohistochemistry. The numbers of the 5-HT-positive and TPH-positive cells were reduced by alcohol and nicotine treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Based on the results, it can be suggested that the pathogenesis of alcohol- and nicotine-induced neuropsychological disorders involves alcohol- and nicotine-induced suppression of 5-HT synthesis and TPH expression in raphe, and that this may be of particular relevance in the consumption of alcohol and nicotine during adolescence.

  12. Nicotine enhances the hypnotic and hypothermic effects of alcohol in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Cassandra A.; Jackson, Asti; Muldoon, Pretal P.; Dawson, Anton; O’Brien, Megan; Soll, Lindsey G.; Abdullah, Rehab; Carroll, F. Ivy; Tapper, Andrew R.; Miles, Michael F.; Banks, Matthew L.; Bettinger, Jill C.; Damaj, M. Imad

    2015-01-01

    Background Ethanol and nicotine abuse are two leading causes of preventable mortality in the world, but little is known about the pharmacological mechanisms mediating co-abuse. Few studies have examined the interaction of the acute effects of ethanol and nicotine. Here, we examine the effects of nicotine administration on the duration of ethanol-induced loss of righting reflex (LORR) and characterize the nature of their pharmacological interactions in C57BL/6J mice. Methods We assessed the effects of ethanol and nicotine and the nature of their interaction in the LORR test using isobolographic analysis after acute injection in C57BL/6J male mice. Next, we examined the importance of receptor efficacy using nicotinic partial agonists varenicline and sazetidine. We evaluated the involvement of major nAChR subtypes using nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine and nicotinic α4 and α7 knockout mice. The selectivity of nicotine’s actions on ethanol-induced LORR was examined by testing nicotine’s effects on the hypnotic properties of ketamine and pentobarbital. We also assessed the development of tolerance after repeated nicotine exposure. Lastly, we assessed if the effects of nicotine on ethanol-induced LORR extends to hypothermia and ethanol intake in the Drinking in the Dark (DID) paradigm. Results We found that acute nicotine injection enhances ethanol’s hypnotic effects in a synergistic manner and that receptor efficacy plays an important role in this interaction. Furthermore, tolerance developed to the enhancement of ethanol’s hypnotic effects by nicotine after repeated exposure of the drug. α4* and α7 nAChRs seem to play an important role in nicotine-ethanol interaction in the LORR test. In addition, the magnitude of ethanol-induced LORR enhancement by nicotine was more pronounced in C57BL/6J than DBA/2J mice. Furthermore, acute nicotine enhanced ketamine and pentobarbital hypnotic effects in the mouse. Finally, nicotine enhanced ethanol-induced hypothermia

  13. Combination of Comfrey Root Extract Plus Methyl Nicotinate in Patients with Conditions of Acute Upper or Low Back Pain: A Multicentre Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pabst, Helmut; Schaefer, Axel; Staiger, Christiane; Junker-Samek, Marc; Predel, Hans-Georg

    2013-01-01

    This randomised, multicentre, double-blind, three-arm, placebo-controlled trial compared a topical combination of 35% comfrey root extract plus 1.2% methyl nicotinate versus a single preparation of methyl nicotinate or placebo cream for relief of acute upper or low back pain. 379 patients were randomly assigned to three groups (combination, n = 163; methyl nicotinate, n = 164; placebo, n = 52). They applied a 12 cm layer of cream three times daily for 5 days. The primary efficacy variable was the area under the curve (AUC) of the visual analogue scale (VAS) on active standardised movement values at visits 1 to 4. Secondary measures included back pain at rest, pressure algometry, consumption of analgesic medication, functional impairment measured with Oswestry Disability Index, and global assessment of response. The AUC of the VAS on active standardised movement was markedly smaller in the combination treatment group than in the methyl nicotinate and in the placebo group (ANOVA: p < 0.0001). The combination demonstrated superiority to the two other treatment arms, while methyl nicotinate displayed a considerable effect as well. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:22887778

  14. Nicotine Lozenges

    MedlinePlus

    ... other nicotine smoking cessation aid, such as the nicotine patch, gum, inhaler, or nasal spray.tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, ... non-nicotine smoking cessation aids, such as bupropion (Wellbutrin) or ...

  15. 78 FR 277 - Food and Drug Administration Actions Related to Nicotine Replacement Therapies and Smoking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-03

    ... goals: (1) Total abstinence from tobacco use, (2) reductions in consumption of tobacco, and (3... Tobacco Dependence; Public Hearing; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... innovative products and treatments for tobacco dependence. The Agency is taking this action to...

  16. Immunogenicity of Individual Vaccine Components in a Bivalent Nicotine Vaccine Differ According to Vaccine Formulation and Administration Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cornish, Katherine E.; de Villiers, Sabina H. L.; Pravetoni, Marco; Pentel, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Structurally distinct nicotine immunogens can elicit independent antibody responses against nicotine when administered concurrently. Co-administering different nicotine immunogens together as a multivalent vaccine could be a useful way to generate higher antibody levels than with monovalent vaccines alone. The immunogenicity and additivity of monovalent and bivalent nicotine vaccines was studied across a range of immunogen doses, adjuvants, and routes to assess the generality of this approach. Rats were vaccinated with total immunogen doses of 12.5 - 100 μg of 3′-aminomethyl nicotine conjugated to recombinant Pseudomonas exoprotein A (3′-AmNic-rEPA), 6-carboxymethylureido nicotine conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (6-CMUNic-KLH), or both. Vaccines were administered s.c. in alum or i.p. in Freund’s adjuvant at matched total immunogen doses. When administered s.c. in alum, the contributions of the individual immunogens to total nicotine-specific antibody (NicAb) titers and concentrations were preserved across a range of doses. Antibody affinity for nicotine varied greatly among individuals but was similar for monovalent and bivalent vaccines. However when administered i.p. in Freund’s adjuvant the contributions of the individual immunogens to total NicAb titers and concentrations were compromised at some doses. These results support the possibility of co-administering structurally distinct nicotine immunogens to achieve a more robust immune response than can be obtained with monovalent immunogens alone. Choice of adjuvant was important for the preservation of immunogen component activity. PMID:24312662

  17. Acute caffeine administration affects zebrafish response to a robotic stimulus.

    PubMed

    Ladu, Fabrizio; Mwaffo, Violet; Li, Jasmine; Macrì, Simone; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Zebrafish has been recently proposed as a valid animal model to investigate the fundamental mechanisms regulating emotional behavior and evaluate the modulatory effects exerted by psychoactive compounds. In this study, we propose a novel methodological framework based on robotics and information theory to investigate the behavioral response of zebrafish exposed to acute caffeine treatment. In a binary preference test, we studied the response of caffeine-treated zebrafish to a replica of a shoal of conspecifics moving in the tank. A purely data-driven information theoretic approach was used to infer the influence of the replica on zebrafish behavior as a function of caffeine concentration. Our results demonstrate that acute caffeine administration modulates both the average speed and the interaction with the replica. Specifically, zebrafish exposed to elevated doses of caffeine show reduced locomotion and increased sensitivity to the motion of the replica. The methodology developed in this study may complement traditional experimental paradigms developed in the field of behavioral pharmacology.

  18. Effects of Oral Caffeine Pretreatment on Response to Intravenous Nicotine and Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew W.; Strain, Eric C.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Previous research suggests that under conditions of chronic daily caffeine administration, caffeine increases the effects of nicotine. Little is known about the effects of caffeine pretreatment on response to nicotine under infrequent caffeine administration conditions. Objectives The present study examined whether infrequent (not on consecutive days) acute oral caffeine administration alters subject-rated, physiological, and monetary value effects of i.v. nicotine in regular users of caffeine, tobacco, and cocaine. To determine the specificity of effects of caffeine on response to nicotine, the effects of caffeine administration on response to i.v. cocaine (another short-acting stimulant) were also studied. Methods Fourteen (1 female) volunteers participated in this 3-4 week, double-blind, inpatient study. Volunteers participated in 10 experimental conditions in pseudorandomized order, in which oral caffeine (250 mg/70kg) or placebo was administered 1 h before an i.v. injection, consisting of nicotine (1 or 2 mg/70 kg), cocaine (15 or 30 mg/70 kg), or saline. Results Infrequent acute caffeine pretreatment attenuated the increase resulting from 2 mg/70 kg nicotine administration on ratings of “rush,” “good effects,” “liking,” “high,” and “drowsy/sleepy.” Caffeine had no significant effect on physiological response to nicotine. Caffeine had no significant effect on subject-rated and physiological response to cocaine, with the exception that caffeine significantly augmented blood pressure response to cocaine. Conclusions In contrast to the previous research using chronic caffeine maintenance, these data suggest that infrequent acute caffeine administration may attenuate nicotine effects. PMID:20695686

  19. Stroke Code Improves Intravenous Thrombolysis Administration in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Huang, Kuang-Yu; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Timely intravenous (IV) thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke is associated with better clinical outcomes. Acute stroke care implemented with “Stroke Code” (SC) may increase IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of SC on thrombolysis. Methods The study period was divided into the “pre-SC era” (January 2006 to July 2010) and “SC era” (August 2010 to July 2013). Demographics, critical times (stroke symptom onset, presentation to the emergency department, neuroimaging, thrombolysis), stroke severity, and clinical outcomes were recorded and compared between the two eras. Results During the study period, 5957 patients with acute ischemic stroke were admitted; of these, 1301 (21.8%) arrived at the emergency department within 3 h of stroke onset and 307 (5.2%) received IV-tPA. The number and frequency of IV-tPA treatments for patients with an onset-to-door time of <3 h increased from the pre-SC era (n = 91, 13.9%) to the SC era (n = 216, 33.3%) (P<0.001). SC also improved the efficiency of IV-tPA administration; the median door-to-needle time decreased (88 to 51 min, P<0.001) and the percentage of door-to-needle times ≤60 min increased (14.3% to 71.3%, P<0.001). The SC era group tended to have more patients with good outcome (modified Rankin Scale ≤2) at discharge (49.5 vs. 39.6%, P = 0.11), with no difference in symptomatic hemorrhage events or in-hospital mortality. Conclusion The SC protocol increases the percentage of acute ischemic stroke patients receiving IV-tPA and decreases door-to-needle time. PMID:25111200

  20. Nurses' medication administration practices at two Singaporean acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Choo, Janet; Johnston, Linda; Manias, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall compliance with accepted medication administration procedures, and explored the distractions they faced during medication administration at two acute care hospitals in Singapore. A total of 140 registered nurses, 70 from each hospital, participated in the study. At both hospitals, nurses were distracted by personnel, such as physicians, radiographers, patients not under their care, and telephone calls, during medication rounds. Deviations from accepted medication procedures were observed. At one hospital, the use of a vest during medication administration alone was not effective in avoiding distractions during medication administration. Environmental factors and distractions can impact on the safe administration of medications, because they not only impair nurses' level of concentration, but also add to their work pressure. Attention should be placed on eliminating distractions through the use of appropriate strategies. Strategies that could be considered include the conduct of education sessions with health professionals and patients about the importance of not interrupting nurses while they are administering medications, and changes in work design.

  1. The Sensory Impact of Nicotine on Noradrenergic and Dopaminergic Neurons of the Nicotine Reward - Addiction Neurocircuitry.

    PubMed

    Rose, Jed E; Dehkordi, Ozra; Manaye, Kebreten F; Millis, Richard M; Cianaki, Salman Ameri; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni

    2016-04-01

    The sensory experience of smoking is a key component of nicotine addiction known to result, in part, from stimulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) at peripheral sensory nerve endings. Such stimulation of nAChRs is followed by activation of neurons at multiple sites in the mesocorticolimbic reward pathways. However, the neurochemical profiles of CNS cells that mediate the peripheral sensory impact of nicotine remain unknown. In the present study in mice, we first used c-Fos immunohistochemistry to identify CNS cells stimulated by nicotine (NIC, 40 μg/kg, IP) and by a peripherally-acting analog of nicotine, nicotine pyrrolidine methiodide (NIC-PM, 30 μg/kg, IP). Sequential double-labelling was then performed to determine whether noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurons of the nicotine reward-addiction circuitry were primary targets of NIC and NIC-PM. Double-labelling of NIC and/or NIC-PM activated c-Fos immunoreactive cells with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) showed no apparent c-Fos expression by the dopaminergic cells of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). With the exception of sparse numbers of TH immunoreactive D11 cells, dopamine-containing neurons in other areas of the reward-addiction circuitry, namely periaqueductal gray, and dorsal raphe, were also devoid of c-Fos immunoreactivity. Noradrenergic neurons of locus coeruleus (LC), known to innervate VTA, were activated by both NIC and NIC-PM. These results demonstrate that noradrenergic neurons of LC are among the first structures that are stimulated by single acute IP injection of NIC and NIC-PM. Dopaminergic neurons of VTA and other CNS sites, did not respond to acute IP administration of NIC or NIC-PM by induction of c-Fos.

  2. Histopathologycal findings in the ovaries and uterus of albino female rats promoted by co-administration of synthetic steroids and nicotine.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Isabel Cristina Cherici; Leite, Gabriel Adan Araújo; Pinto, Tiago; Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu

    2014-07-01

    The use of anabolic androgenic steroids is often associated with the use of other substances, licit or not, such as nicotine present in the tobacco. The present study investigated for the first time the effects of co-administration of synthetic steroids and nicotine on the ovarian and uterine tissue and fertility of adult female rats. Animals were submitted to treatment groups (n=16/group): nandrolone decanoate (ND; 7.5mg/kg BW/week); testosterone mixture (T; 7.5mg/kg BW/week); nicotine (N; 2.0mg/kg BW/day), and co-administration of ND/N, T/N and ND/T/N. The control group received saline solution daily. The injections were administered subcutaneously for 30 consecutive days. Results demonstrated that all androgenized rats exhibited estral acyclicity and there was suppression of reproductive capacity due to notable ovarian and uterine histological changes. Treatments promoted decrease (p<0.05) in the ovarian weight. Uterine weight increased (p<0.05) in the T and T/N groups, in comparison to control group. ND or T co-administered or not to nicotine promoted intense follicular degeneration, with formation of cysts in the ovaries. High levels of circulating androgens in the ND/T/N group induced the presence of ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors of Sertoli cell pattern. Androgenized females presented endometrial changes characterized by papilliferous or pleated luminal epithelium, oedematous and hemorrhagic stroma and presence of gland cysts. In conclusion, the co-administration of three drugs promoted atypical morphological pattern on the ovaries and uterus of female rats.

  3. Adaptations in cholinergic transmission in the ventral tegmental area associated with the affective signs of nicotine withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W; Markou, Athina

    2004-09-01

    Chronic administration of nicotine induces adaptations in the brain reward circuit to counteract the acute drug effects; when nicotine administration ceases, these adaptations remain unopposed and lead to drug withdrawal. The present studies were conducted to assess the effects of chronic nicotine administration on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the nucleus accumbens (Nacc) shell. A discrete-trial intracranial self-stimulation procedure that provides current-intensity thresholds as measures of brain reward function was used in rats. Previous studies have shown that withdrawal from nicotine-induced elevations in brain reward thresholds that are indicative of a decrease in brain reward function. We show here that injections of the nAChR antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DHbetaE; 0.6-20 microg total bilateral dose) into the VTA, but not outside the VTA, resulted in significant elevations in brain reward thresholds in nicotine dependent rats (9 mg/kg/day nicotine hydrogen tartrate) while having no effect in saline-treated controls. By contrast, DHbetaE (0.6-20 microg total bilateral dose) injected into the Nacc shell had no effect on brain reward thresholds of nicotine- or saline-treated rats. The adaptations in cholinergic transmission in the VTA are likely to mediate, at least partly, the affective signs of nicotine withdrawal in humans.

  4. MEMRI is a biomarker defining nicotine-specific neuronal responses in subregions of the rodent brain

    PubMed Central

    Bade, Aditya N; Gendelman, Howard E; Boska, Michael D; Liu, Yutong

    2017-01-01

    Nicotine dependence is defined by dopaminergic neuronal activation within the nucleus accumbens (ACB) and by affected neural projections from nicotine-stimulated neurons. Control of any subsequent neural activities would underpin any smoking cessation strategy. While extensive efforts have been made to study the pathophysiology of nicotine addiction, more limited works were developed to find imaging biomarkers. If such biomarkers are made available, addictive behaviors could be monitored noninvasively. To such ends, we employed manganese (Mn2+)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) to determine whether it could be used to monitor neuronal activities after acute and chronic nicotine exposure in rats. The following were observed. Mn2+ infusion identified ACB and hippocampal (HIP) neuronal activities following acute nicotine administration. Chronic exposure was achieved by week long subcutaneously implanted nicotine mini-pump. Here nicotine was shown to activate neurons in the ACB, HIP, and the prefrontal and insular cortex. These are all central nervous system reward regions linked to drug addiction. In conclusion, MEMRI is demonstrated to be a powerful imaging tool to study brain subregion specific neuronal activities affected by nicotine. Thus, we posit that MEMRI could be used to assess smoking-associated tolerance, withdrawal and as such serve as a pre-clinical screening tool for addiction cessation strategies in humans. PMID:28337287

  5. Long-term exposure to nicotine markedly reduces kynurenic acid in rat brain - In vitro and ex vivo evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinska, Elzbieta; Kuc, Damian; Zgrajka, Wojciech; Turski, Waldemar A.; Dekundy, Andrzej

    2009-10-15

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is a recognized broad-spectrum antagonist of excitatory amino acid receptors with a particularly high affinity for the glycine co-agonist site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex. KYNA is also a putative endogenous neuroprotectant. Recent studies show that KYNA strongly blocks {alpha}7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The present studies were aimed at assessing effects of acute and chronic nicotine exposure on KYNA production in rat brain slices in vitro and ex vivo. In brain slices, nicotine significantly increased KYNA formation at 10 mM but not at 1 or 5 mM. Different nAChR antagonists (dihydro-{beta}-erythroidine, methyllycaconitine and mecamylamine) failed to block the influence exerted by nicotine on KYNA synthesis in cortical slices in vitro. Effects of acute (1 mg/kg, i.p.), subchronic (10-day) and chronic (30-day) administration of nicotine in drinking water (100 {mu}g/ml) on KYNA brain content were evaluated ex vivo. Acute treatment with nicotine (1 mg/kg i.p.) did not affect KYNA level in rat brain. The subchronic exposure to nicotine in drinking water significantly increased KYNA by 43%, while chronic exposure to nicotine resulted in a reduction in KYNA by 47%. Co-administration of mecamylamine with nicotine in drinking water for 30 days reversed the effect exerted by nicotine on KYNA concentration in the cerebral cortex. The present results provide evidence for the hypothesis of reciprocal interaction between the nicotinic cholinergic system and the kynurenine pathway in the brain.

  6. Pharmacologic Antagonism of Ghrelin Receptors Attenuates Development of Nicotine Induced Locomotor Sensitization in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wellman, Paul J.; Clifford, P. Shane; Rodriguez, Juan; Hughes, Samuel; Eitan, Shoshana; Brunel, Luc; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Aims Ghrelin (GHR) is an orexigenic gut peptide that interacts with ghrelin receptors (GHR-Rs) to modulate brain reinforcement circuits. Systemic GHR infusions augment cocaine stimulated locomotion and conditioned place preference (CPP) in rats, whereas genetic or pharmacological ablation of GHR-Rs has been shown to attenuate the acute locomotor-enhancing effects of nicotine, cocaine, amphetamine and alcohol and to blunt the CPP induced by food, alcohol, amphetamine and cocaine in mice. The stimulant nicotine can induce CPP and like amphetamine and cocaine, repeated administration of nicotine induces locomotor sensitization in rats. A key issue is whether pharmacological antagonism of GHR-Rs would similarly attenuate nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization. Method To examine the role of GHR-Rs in the behavioral sensitizing effects of nicotine, adult male rats were injected with either 0, 3 or 6 mg/kg of the GHR-R receptor antagonist JMV 2959 (i.p.) and 20 minutes later with either vehicle or 0.4 mg/kg nicotine hydrogen tartrate (s.c.) on each of 7 consecutive days. Results Rats treated with nicotine alone showed robust locomotor sensitization, whereas rats pretreated with JMV 2959 showed significantly attenuated nicotine-induced hyperlocomotion. Conclusions These results suggest that GHR-R activity is required for the induction of locomotor sensitization to nicotine and complement an emerging literature implicating central GHR systems in drug reward/reinforcement. PMID:21903141

  7. Differential effects of serotonin (5-HT)2 receptor-targeting ligands on locomotor responses to nicotine-repeated treatment.

    PubMed

    Zaniewska, Magdalena; McCreary, Andrew C; Wydra, Karolina; Filip, Małgorzata

    2010-07-01

    We verified the hypothesis that serotonin (5-HT)(2) receptors control the locomotor effects of nicotine (0.4 mg kg(-1)) in rats by using the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist M100907, the preferential 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist DOI, the 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist SB 242084, and the 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists Ro 60-0175 and WAY 163909. Repeated pairings of a test environment with nicotine for 5 days, on Day 10 significantly augmented the locomotor activity following nicotine administration. Of the investigated 5-HT(2) receptor ligands, M100907 (2 mg kg(-1)) or DOI (1 mg kg(-1)) administered during the first 5 days in combination with nicotine attenuated or enhanced, respectively, the development of nicotine sensitization. Given acutely on Day 10, M100907 (2 mg kg(-1)), Ro 60-0175 (1 mg kg(-1)), and WAY 163909 (1.5 mg kg(-1)) decreased the expression of nicotine sensitization. In another set of experiments, where the nicotine challenge test was performed on Day 15 in animals treated repeatedly (Days: 1-5, 10) with nicotine, none of 5-HT(2) receptor ligands administered during the second withdrawal period (Days: 11-14) to nicotine-treated rats altered the sensitizing effect of nicotine given on Day 15. Our data indicate that 5-HT(2A) receptors (but not 5-HT(2C) receptors) play a permissive role in the sensitizing effects of nicotine, while stimulation of 5-HT(2A) receptors enhances the development of nicotine sensitization and activation of 5-HT(2C) receptors is essential for the expression of nicotine sensitization. Repeated treatment with the 5-HT(2) receptor ligands within the second nicotine withdrawal does not inhibit previously established sensitization.

  8. Cerebral blood flow effects of acute intravenous heroin administration.

    PubMed

    Kosel, Markus; Noss, Roger S; Hämmig, Robert; Wielepp, Peter; Bundeli, Petra; Heidbreder, Rebeca; Kinser, Jane A; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Fisch, Hans-Ulrich; Kayser, Sarah; Schlaepfer, Thomas E

    2008-04-01

    We examined acute effects of intravenous diacetylmorphine (heroin) administration - which induces a characteristic biphasic response: A short rush-sensation associated with intense pleasurable feelings followed by a subjectively different period of euphoria on cerebral blood flow. This was assessed in nine male heroin dependent patients participating in a heroin maintenance program in a setting resembling everyday pattern of heroin abuse. 99mTc-HMPAO was administered 45 s (rush) and 15 min (euphoria) after administration of i.v. heroin and 45 s after administration of saline (placebo). Plasma concentration of diacetylmorphine and its metabolites were measured with high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Compared to the euphoria condition, rush was associated with blood flow increase in the left posterior cerebellar lobe, left anterior cingulate gyrus and right precuneus. Our results are in line with recent reports indicating that the cerebellum is an important component in functional brain systems subserving sensory and motor integration, learning, modulation of affect, motivation and social behaviour, which all play important roles in reinforcing properties of opioids.

  9. Neuronal calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II mediates nicotine reward in the conditioned place preference test in mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kia J; Muldoon, Pretal P; Walters, Carrie; Damaj, Mohamad Imad

    2016-02-01

    Several recent studies have indicated the involvement of calcium-dependent mechanisms, in particular the abundant calcium-activated kinase, calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), in behaviors associated with nicotine dependence in mice. Behavioral and biochemical studies have shown that CaMKII is involved in acute and chronic nicotine behaviors and nicotine withdrawal; however, evidence of a role for CaMKII in nicotine reward is lacking. Thus, the goal of the current study was to examine the role of CaMKII in nicotine reward. Using pharmacological and genetic tools, we tested nicotine conditioned place preference (CPP) in C57Bl/6 mice after administration of CaMKII antagonists and in α-CaMKII wild-type (+/+) and heterozygote (±) mice. CaMKII antagonists blocked expression of nicotine CPP, and the preference score was significantly reduced in α-CaMKII ± mice compared with their +/+ counterparts. Further, we assessed CaMKII activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAc), prefrontal cortex, and hippocampus after nicotine CPP and found significant increases in CaMKII activity in the mouse VTA and NAc that were blocked by CaMKII antagonists. The findings from this study show that CaMKII mediates nicotine reward and suggest that increases in CaMKII activity in the VTA and NAc are relevant to nicotine reward behaviors.

  10. Nicotine-stimulated release of [3H]norepinephrine from fetal rat locus coeruleus cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, K A; Leslie, F M

    1998-02-01

    Acute nicotine administration stimulated [3H]norepinephrine ([3H]NE) release from cultured fetal locus coeruleus (LC) cells. The effect was concentration dependent, with an EC50 of 0.9 microM, and was abolished by removal of calcium from, or addition of tetrodotoxin (500 nM) to, the assay buffer. Other nicotinic receptor agonists stimulated [3H]NE release, with the rank order of potency being (+)-epibatidine > (-)-nicotine > 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP). Whereas (-)-nicotine and (+/-)-epibatidine exhibited equal maximal responses, DMPP was a partial agonist and (-)-cytisine had no agonist activity. Nicotine-stimulated release of [3H]NE was blocked by nicotinic receptor antagonists, with an order of potency of mecamylamine > lobeline > cytisine > methyllycaconitine > dihydro-beta-erythroidine. The pharmacological profile of this nicotinic receptor is largely consistent with that described previously for an alpha4beta2 subunit combination, although discrepancies in the efficacies of agonists were observed. No additivity in NMDA- and nicotine-stimulated [3H]NE release was observed, suggesting a common signal transduction mechanism. However, the pharmacological characteristics of MK-801 blockade of nicotine-induced responses were not consistent with those of an NMDA receptor. We therefore conclude that nicotine directly releases [3H]NE from LC cells and does not act indirectly via activation of glutamate release.

  11. Mice lacking the galanin gene show decreased sensitivity to nicotine conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Nichole M; Henehan, Robert M; Hales, Claire A; Picciotto, Marina R

    2011-03-01

    Previous work has indicated that the neuropeptide galanin decreases sensitivity to the rewarding effects of morphine and cocaine, but increases alcohol drinking. The aim of the current study was to examine the role of galanin signaling in nicotine reward by testing the effects of nicotine in mice lacking galanin peptide (GAL-/-) as compared to wild-type (GAL+/+) controls. Using an unbiased, three-chamber conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm the dose-response function for nicotine CPP was tested in GAL-/- and GAL+/+ mice. Since activation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK2) is involved in the rewarding effects of several classes of drugs of abuse, we then measured the level of ERK2 phosphorylation in the nucleus accumbens shell (NACsh) and core (NACco) of GAL-/- and GAL+/+ mice following re-exposure to the CPP chamber previously paired with nicotine as a marker of mesolimbic system activation. Finally, we examined whether acute nicotine administration affects ERK2 activity in GAL-/- and GAL+/+ mice. GAL-/- mice required a higher dose of nicotine to induce a significant CPP compared to GAL+/+ mice. In the conditioning groups showing significant expression of nicotine CPP, only GAL+/+ mice showed ERK2 activation in the NACsh. This suggests that the nicotine CPP observed in GAL+/+ mice resulted in differential recruitment of ERK signaling in the NACsh compared to GAL-/- mice. In addition, no activation of ERK2 was observed following acute nicotine administration in either genotype. These data, along with prior results, suggest that galanin alters sensitivity to drugs of abuse differentially, with morphine, cocaine and amphetamine place preference suppressed, and nicotine and alcohol preference increased, by galanin signaling.

  12. Nicotinic systems in central nervous systems disease: degenerative disorders and beyond.

    PubMed

    Newhouse, P A; Kelton, M

    2000-03-01

    in AD patients suggest that nicotinic stimulation can improve the acquisition and retention of verbal information and decrease errors. Preliminary results from a series of studies examining the acute and subchronic quantitative effects of nicotine on cognitive and motor functioning in Parkinson's disease suggest that acute nicotine administration and stimulation improves some aspects of cognitive and motor performance and may improve the processing speed of more complex tasks. The most likely near-term applications of novel nicotinic agonists in CNS disorders are likely to be in those disorders that are degenerative in nature, e.g. Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, or other movement disorders such as Tourette's syndrome. The most likely direct therapeutic role for nicotinic agonists is as augmentation therapy in combination with other agents rather than as monotherapy, except early in disease states or as a prophylactic or preventative treatment.

  13. Acute effects of ethanol on the transfer of nicotine and two dietary carcinogens in human placental perfusion.

    PubMed

    Veid, Jenni; Karttunen, Vesa; Myöhänen, Kirsi; Myllynen, Päivi; Auriola, Seppo; Halonen, Toivo; Vähäkangas, Kirsi

    2011-09-10

    Many mothers use, against instructions, alcohol during pregnancy. Simultaneously mothers are exposed to a wide range of other environmental chemicals. These chemicals may also harm the developing fetus, because almost all toxic compounds can go through human placenta. Toxicokinetic effects of ethanol on the transfer of other environmental compounds through human placenta have not been studied before. It is known that ethanol has lytic properties and increases the permeability and fluidity of cell membranes. We studied the effects of ethanol on the transfer of three different environmental toxins: nicotine, PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-b)pyridine) and NDMA (N-nitrosodimethylamine) in placental perfusion. We tested in human breast cancer adenocarcinoma cell line MCF-7 whether ethanol affects ABCG2/BCRP, which is also the major transporter in human placenta. We found that the transfer of ethanol is comparable to that of antipyrine, which points to passive diffusion as the transfer mechanism. Unexpectedly, ethanol had no statistically significant effect on the transfer of the other studied compounds. Neither did ethanol inhibit the function of ABCG2/BCRP. These experiments represent only the effects of acute exposure to ethanol and chronic exposure remains to be studied.

  14. Impact of administrative technology on acute care bed need.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J B; Dahlstrom, G A; Johnston, C M

    1985-01-01

    This article reports an evaluation of the impact of three administrative technologies--Admission Scheduling (AS) Systems, Outpatient Surgery (OPS) Programs, and Preadmission Testing (PAT) Programs--on the number of acute care beds required by a hospital. The evaluation mechanism reported here is called the ADTECH Computerized Planning Model. ADTECH uses parameters of each technology, identified from previous literature and discussions with health care professionals, to predict the changes in bed requirements resulting from implementation of these programs. Data from eight hospitals of various characteristics and sizes were run to test the ADTECH model. The results from these test runs indicate that the proper implementation of AS, OPS, and PAT can significantly influence a hospital's required bed complement. PMID:3988530

  15. Reduction of Aggressive Episodes after Repeated Transdermal Nicotine Administration in a Hospitalized Adolescent with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Schalkwyk, Gerrit I.; Lewis, Alan S.; Qayyum, Zheala; Koslosky, Kourtney; Picciotto, Marina R.; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2015-01-01

    Aggression remains a major cause of morbidity in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Current pharmacotherapy for aggression is not always effective and is often associated with morbidity. Nicotinic acetylcholinergic neurotransmission may play a prominent role in ASD pathophysiology based on human and animal studies, and preclinical…

  16. Nicotinic receptors, memory, and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Gould, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) modulate the neurobiological processes underlying hippocampal learning and memory. In addition, nicotine's ability to desensitize and upregulate certain nAChRs may alter hippocampus-dependent memory processes. Numerous studies have examined the effects of nicotine on hippocampus-dependent learning, as well as the roles of low- and high-affinity nAChRs in mediating nicotine's effects on hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. These studies suggested that while acute nicotine generally acts as a cognitive enhancer for hippocampus-dependent learning, withdrawal from chronic nicotine results in deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory. Furthermore, these studies demonstrated that low- and high-affinity nAChRs functionally differ in their involvement in nicotine's effects on hippocampus-dependent learning. In the present chapter, we reviewed studies using systemic or local injections of acute or chronic nicotine, nAChR subunit agonists or antagonists; genetically modified mice; and molecular biological techniques to characterize the effects of nicotine on hippocampus-dependent learning.

  17. Nicotine and tobacco

    MedlinePlus

    Withdrawal from nicotine; Smoking - nicotine addiction and withdrawal; Smokeless tobacco - nicotine addiction; Cigar smoking; Pipe smoking; Smokeless snuff; Tobacco use; Chewing tobacco; Nicotine addiction and tobacco

  18. Effect of dextrometorphan and dextrorphan on nicotine and neuronal nicotinic receptors: in vitro and in vivo selectivity.

    PubMed

    Damaj, M I; Flood, P; Ho, K K; May, E L; Martin, B R

    2005-02-01

    The effects of dextrometorphan and its metabolite dextrorphan on nicotine-induced antinociception in two acute thermal pain assays after systematic administration were evaluated in mice and compared with that of mecamylamine. Dextrometorphan and dextrorphan were found to block nicotine's antinociception in the tail-flick and hot-plate tests with different potencies (dextrometorphan is 10 times more potent than its metabolite). This blockade was not due to antagonism of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and/or interaction with opiate receptors, since selective drugs of these receptors failed to block nicotine's analgesic effects. Our results with the tail-flick and hot-plate tests showed an interesting in vivo functional selectivity for dextrometorphan over dextrorphan. In oocytes expressing various neuronal acetylcholine nicotinic receptors (nAChR), dextrometorphan and dextrorphan blocked nicotine activation of expressed alpha(3)beta(4), alpha(4)beta(2), and alpha(7) subtypes with a small degree of selectivity. However, the in vivo antagonistic potency of dextrometorphan and dextrorphan in the pain tests does not correlate well with their in vitro blockade potency at expressed nAChR subtypes. Furthermore, the apparent in vivo selectivity of dextrometorphan over dextrorphan is not related to its in vitro potency and does suggest the involvement of other mechanisms. In that respect, dextrometorphan seems to behave as another mecamylamine, a noncompetitive nicotinic receptor antagonist with a preferential activity to alpha(3)beta(4)(*) neuronal nAChR subtypes.

  19. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing the α4 subunit are critical for the nicotine-induced reduction of acute voluntary ethanol consumption.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Linzy M; Gardner, Paul; Tapper, Andrew R

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of the smoking cessation drug varenicline, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) partial agonist, in its ability to decrease voluntary ethanol intake in mice. Previous to our study, other labs had shown that this drug can decrease ethanol consumption and seeking in rat models of ethanol intake. Although varenicline was designed to be a high affinity partial agonist of nAChRs containing the α4 and β2 subunits (designated as α4β2*), at higher concentrations it can also act upon α3β2*, α6*, α3β4* and α7 nAChRs. Therefore, to further elucidate the nAChR subtype responsible for varenicline-induced reduction of ethanol consumption, we utilized a pharmacological approach in combination with two complimentary nAChR genetic mouse models, a knock-out line that does not express the α4 subunit (α4 KO) and another line that expresses α4* nAChRs hypersensitive to agonist (the Leu9'Ala line). We found that activation of α4* nAChRs was necessary and sufficient for varenicline-induced reduction of alcohol consumption. Consistent with this result, here we show that a more efficacious nAChR agonist, nicotine, also decreased voluntary ethanol intake, and that α4* nAChRs are critical for this reduction.

  20. Nicotine increases initial blood flow responses to local heating of human non-glabrous skin.

    PubMed

    Warner, David O; Joyner, Michael J; Charkoudian, Nisha

    2004-09-15

    Nicotine affects the regulation of skin blood flow (SkBF), but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that acute exposure to nicotine inhibits both the initial neurally mediated component and the later sustained component of SkBF responses to local heating of non-glabrous skin in humans. SkBF (measured by laser-Doppler) responses to local heating of forearm skin from 32 to 42 degrees C were measured in 11 chronic smokers. Heating occurred at one site over 15 min (RAMP) and over 90 s (STEP) at another site, and was maintained for an additional 30 min. STEP heating was also applied to a site pretreated with bretylium via iontophoresis to inhibit noradrenergic neurotransmission. Responses were measured before and after acute administration of nicotine via cigarettes or nasal spray in two experimental sessions. Nicotine decreased resting skin blood flow (P < 0.05); this response was inhibited by bretylium. During RAMP, nicotine increased the initial SkBF at 42 degrees C (by approximately 12%, P < 0.05). For STEP, nicotine increased the initial peak response (by approximately 25%, P < 0.05), and decreased the sustained plateau value (by approximately 10%, P < 0.05). In skin pretreated with bretylium, the increase caused by nicotine in the initial peak value persisted, but the plateau value was not different from pre-nicotine. These data suggest that in abstinent cigarette smokers, nicotine augments initial responses to both gradual and rapid non-painful heating of non-glabrous skin by sensitizing the sensory nerves that mediate the axon reflex associated with rapid vasodilatation. In contrast, nicotine decreases SkBF responses to prolonged heating by activating noradrenergic nerves.

  1. Chronic intermittent nicotine treatment dose-dependently alters serotonergic neurons response to citalopram in the rat.

    PubMed

    Touiki, Khalid; Rat, Pascal; Arib, Ouafa; Molimard, Robert; Chait, Abderrahman; de Beaurepaire, Renaud

    2008-05-01

    Acetylcholine nicotinic systems and serotonergic systems are known to interact. In rodents, acute and chronic nicotine treatments have consequences on several aspects of the activity of dorsal raphe serotonin (DRN 5-HT) neurons. One hypothesis is that states of functioning of DRN 5-HT neurons (firing rate and sensitivity) vary as a function of nicotine dose and mode of administration during chronic nicotine treatment. In the present study, the firing rate and sensitivity of DRN 5-HT neurons were investigated using single (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) or multiple (3 injections of 0.7 mg/kg) daily injections of nicotine over 10 days. The sensitivity of neurons was tested by the cumulative dose of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram necessary to inhibit their firing. The activity of neurons was tested during treatment, and then 24 and 48 h after nicotine withdrawal. The results show that, on day 10, DRN 5-HT neurons were desensitized (reduced response to citalopram) after chronic single daily injection treatments with the high dose of nicotine (1 mg/kg), while their sensitivity remained unaltered after single daily injections with the low dose (0.5 mg/kg), and after the multiple daily injection paradigm. None of the treatments altered the firing rate of DRN 5-HT neurons. The dose-dependent and time-dependent alterations of serotonergic neurons sensitivity after chronic nicotine treatments are likely the consequences of long-term adaptations of nicotinic receptors. The desensitization of DRN 5-HT neurons after chronic single daily injections of 1 mg/kg of nicotine suggests an antidepressant-like effect of chronic nicotine.

  2. Endocrinological Responses to the Administration of Nicotine: Interactions with Drug Initiation, Conditioned Effects, and Conditions of Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-27

    The skin surface was then cleansed wi-th Povidone -Iodine topical antiseptic solutican (Camall Co., Washington, MI 48094) and 70% alcohol solution...smokers of cigarettes is about 1.7 compared to non-smokers of similar age, the ratio increasing with the quantities smoked. The primary contributors... compared with saline control trials. Jarvik, Click and Nakamura (1970) using nicotine capsules, and Russell, Wilson, Feyerabend and Cole (1976

  3. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  4. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  5. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be safely used as a source of niacin...

  6. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  7. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum nicotinate. 172.310 Section 172.310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be...

  8. Discriminative and reinforcing stimulus effects of nicotine, cocaine, and cocaine + nicotine combinations in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K; Newman, Jennifer L

    2011-06-01

    Concurrent cigarette smoking and cocaine use is well documented. However, the behavioral pharmacology of cocaine and nicotine combinations is poorly understood, and there is a need for animal models to examine this form of polydrug abuse. The purpose of this study was twofold: first to assess the effects of nicotine on the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine, and second, to study self-administration of nicotine/cocaine combinations in a novel polydrug abuse model. In drug discrimination experiments, nicotine increased the discriminative stimulus effects of low cocaine doses in two of three monkeys, but nicotine did not substitute for cocaine in any monkey. Self-administration of cocaine and nicotine alone, and cocaine + nicotine combinations was studied under a second-order fixed ratio 2, variable ratio 16 (FR2[VR16:S]) schedule of reinforcement. Cocaine and nicotine alone were self-administered in a dose-dependent manner. The combination of marginally reinforcing doses of cocaine and nicotine increased drug self-administration behavior above levels observed with the same dose of either cocaine or nicotine alone. These findings indicate that nicotine may increase cocaine's discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects in rhesus monkeys, and illustrate the feasibility of combining cocaine and nicotine in a preclinical model of polydrug abuse. Further studies of the behavioral effects of nicotine + cocaine combinations will contribute to our understanding the pharmacology of dual nicotine and cocaine dependence, and will be useful for evaluation of new treatment medications.

  9. Nicotine effects on the impact of stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    administer it to Soldiers (e.g., transdermal patch ). Our research involves a model of nicotine use (voluntary intravenous self-administration of nicotine ...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0454 TITLE: Nicotine effects on the impact of stress...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 September 2012 - 31 August 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nicotine effects on the impact of stress 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  10. Glutamatergic Mechanisms of Comorbidity Between Acute Stress and Cocaine Self-administration

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Keller, Constanza; Kupchik, Yonatan; Gipson, Cassandra D; Brown, Robyn M; Spencer, Sade; Bollati, Flavia; Esparza, Maria A; Roberts-Wolfe, Doug; Heinsbroek, Jasper; Bobadilla, Ana-Clara; Cancela, Liliana M; Kalivas, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial comorbidity between stress disorders and substance use disorders (SUDs), and acute stress augments the locomotor stimulant effect of cocaine in animal models. Here we endeavor to understand the neural underpinnings of comorbid stress disorders and drug use by determining if the glutamatergic neuroadaptations that characterize cocaine self-administration are induced by acute stress. Rats were exposed to acute (2 h) immobilization stress and 3 weeks later the nucleus accumbens core was examined for changes in glutamate transport, glutamate mediated synaptic currents, and dendritic spine morphology. We also determined if acute stress potentiated the acquisition of cocaine self-administration. Acute stress produced an enduring reduction in glutamate transport, and potentiated excitatory synapses on medium spiny neurons. Acute stress also augmented the acquisition of cocaine self-administration. Importantly, by restoring glutamate transport in the accumbens core with ceftriaxone the capacity of acute stress to augment the acquisition of cocaine self-administration was abolished. Similarly, ceftriaxone treatment prevented stress-induced potentiation of cocaine-induced locomotor activity. However, ceftriaxone did not reverse stress-induced synaptic potentiation, indicating that this effect of stress exposure did not underpin the increased acquisition of cocaine self-administration. Reversing acute stress-induced vulnerability to self-administer cocaine by normalizing glutamate transport poses a novel treatment possibility for reducing comorbid SUDs in stress disorders. PMID:26821978

  11. Evaluation of the antidepressant-like effects of acute and sub-acute administration of crocin and crocetin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Bahareh; Nakhsaz, Alireza; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the putative antidepressant effects of crocin and crocetin, two major active ingredients of Crocus sativus L. (saffron) using mice in two different regimens of acute and sub-acute administration. Material and Methods: In acute treatment, antidepressant-like activities of crocin and crocetin (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) were evaluated using forced swim test (FST). In sub-acute study (21 times with 24-h intervals), antidepressant-like effects of oral administration of drugs were examined using FST and tail suspension test (TST). Locomotor activity and motor coordination were studied using open field and rotarod tests, respectively. Results: Acute treatment with crocin (40 mg/kg) and crocetin (20 and 40 mg/kg) produced antidepressant-like effect in FST without affecting the baseline locomotion in mice. Sub-acute oral administration of crocin significantly decreased immobility time only at the highest dose (100 mg/kg). Crocetin (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg) was able to decrease immobility time in FST and TST. Locomotor activity and coordination of mice were not affected by crocin or crocetin. Conclusion: Since higher doses of crocin was required to show antidepressant effects, more efficacy of crocetin may be concluded. This observation provides further support for metabolism of crocin to crocetin following oral administration. PMID:26468466

  12. Tachyphylaxis and sensitization to nicotine-induced tachycardiac and pressor effects after nicotine infusions.

    PubMed

    Cruz, S L; Vidrio, H

    1997-01-01

    This work examined the effects of nicotine on mean arterial pressure and heart rate in non-anesthetized spinal rats. Nicotine (200 mg/kg) was administered as a single bolus, as infusions lasting 7.5, 15 or 30 min, and as a post-infusion bolus. A nicotine bolus increased pressure and rate. These effects were less marked as the rate of infusion decreased. The infusions affected differentially the effects of a subsequent bolus. Thus, while tachycardia was decreased, the blood pressure rise was increased. An initial transient bradycardia was observed after bolus administration, but not during infusions; this effect was unchanged after post-infusion boluses. Pharmacological analysis indicated that tachycardia and bradycardia were predominantly due to ganglionic stimulation, while adrenal and sympathetic nerve catecholamine release played a major role in the pressor response. These results indicate that slow nicotine infusions do not induce tachyphylaxis for all of the cardiovascular effects of a subsequent bolus, and that development of acute tolerance appears to depend on the mechanism of action of the response.

  13. Predictors of the nicotine reinforcement threshold, compensation, and elasticity of demand in a rodent model of nicotine reduction policy*

    PubMed Central

    Grebenstein, Patricia E.; Burroughs, Danielle; Roiko, Samuel A.; Pentel, Paul R.; LeSage, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The FDA is considering reducing the nicotine content in tobacco products as a population-based strategy to reduce tobacco addiction. Research is needed to determine the threshold level of nicotine needed to maintain smoking and the extent of compensatory smoking that could occur during nicotine reduction. Sources of variability in these measures across sub-populations also need to be identified so that policies can take into account the risks and benefits of nicotine reduction in vulnerable populations. Methods The present study examined these issues in a rodent nicotine self- administration model of nicotine reduction policy to characterize individual differences in nicotine reinforcement thresholds, degree of compensation, and elasticity of demand during progressive reduction of the unit nicotine dose. The ability of individual differences in baseline nicotine intake and nicotine pharmacokinetics to predict responses to dose reduction was also examined. Results Considerable variability in the reinforcement threshold, compensation, and elasticity of demand was evident. High baseline nicotine intake was not correlated with the reinforcement threshold, but predicted less compensation and less elastic demand. Higher nicotine clearance predicted low reinforcement thresholds, greater compensation, and less elastic demand. Less elastic demand also predicted lower reinforcement thresholds. Conclusions These findings suggest that baseline nicotine intake, nicotine clearance, and the essential value of nicotine (i.e. elasticity of demand) moderate the effects of progressive nicotine reduction in rats and warrant further study in humans. They also suggest that smokers with fast nicotine metabolism may be more vulnerable to the risks of nicotine reduction. PMID:25891231

  14. Nicotine therapy for ulcerative colitis: a review of rationale, mechanisms, pharmacology, and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Sandborn, W J

    1999-05-01

    Smoking is protective against developing ulcerative colitis. Nicotine may be the cause of this protective effect. Controlled trials have demonstrated efficacy of transdermal nicotine for active ulcerative colitis. Side effects observed with transdermal nicotine include contact dermatitis, nausea, and lightheadedness. Topical administration of nicotine to the colon reduces nicotine blood concentrations and side effects, and may be of clinical benefit.

  15. EFFECTS OF ACUTE AND WEEKLY EPISODIC EXPOSURES TO ANATOXIN-A ON THE MOTOR ACTIVITY OF RATS: COMPARISON WITH NICOTINE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anatoxin-a is a potent nicotinic cholinergic agonist, that is produced by many genera of cyanobacteria, and has caused several poisoning episodes of wildlife, livestock, and domestic animals. Cyanobacterial blooms and toxin exposures are likely to occur episodically as environmen...

  16. The role of the a7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the acute toxicosis of methyllycaconitine in mice.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adverse physiological effects of methyllycaconitine (MLA) have been attributed to its competitive antagonism of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Recent research demonstrated a correlation between the LD50 of MLA and the amount of a7 nAChR in various mouse strains, suggesting that mice...

  17. Nicotine effects and the endogenous opioid system.

    PubMed

    Kishioka, Shiroh; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kobayashi, Yuka; Saika, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine (NIC) is an exogenous ligand of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), and it influences various functions in the central nervous system. Systemic administration of NIC elicits the release of endogenous opioids (endorphins, enkephalins, and dynorphins) in the supraspinal cord. Additionally, systemic NIC administration induces the release of methionine-enkephalin in the spinal dorsal horn. NIC has acute neurophysiological actions, including antinociceptive effects, and the ability to activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The endogenous opioid system participates in NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation. Moreover, NIC-induced antinociception is mediated by α4β2 and α7 nAChRs, while NIC-induced HPA axis activation is mediated by α4β2, not α7, suggesting that the effects of NIC on the endogenous opioid system are mediated by α7, not α4β2. NIC has substantial physical dependence liability. The opioid-receptor antagonist naloxone (NLX) elicits NIC withdrawal after repeated NIC administration, and NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is inhibited by concomitant administration of an opioid-receptor antagonist. NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is also inhibited by concomitant administration of an α7 antagonist, but not an α4β2 antagonist. Taken together, these findings suggest that NIC-induced antinociception and the development of physical dependence are mediated by the endogenous opioid system, via the α7 nAChR.

  18. Acute immune-mediated thrombocytopenia due to oxaliplatin administration: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pietrantonio, Filippo; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Buzzoni, Roberto; Bajetta, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    Drug-induced acute thrombocytopenia is an extremely rare side effect that may occur immediately after oxaliplatin infusion. This potentially fatal reaction is immune mediated and can be anticipated by mild hemorrhagic signs during previous administrations. This is the first report of acute thrombocytopenia occurring during adjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer with oxaliplatin. Clinicians should be aware of this adverse event in order to prevent possible serious consequences and stop further oxaliplatin administration.

  19. Chronic FAAH inhibition during nicotine abstinence alters habenular CB1 receptor activity and precipitates depressive-like behaviors.

    PubMed

    Simonnet, A; Zamberletti, E; Cador, M; Rubino, T; Caillé, S

    2017-02-01

    The role of the endocannabinoid system in nicotine addiction is being increasingly acknowledged. Acute inhibition of anandamide (AEA) degradation efficiently reduces nicotine withdrawal-induced affective symptoms in rats and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the degradation enzyme of AEA, has been proposed as a possible treatment against nicotine addiction. However, it is unclear whether chronic inhibition of AEA during nicotine abstinence will have beneficial or deleterious affective side-effects. Using a rat model of nicotine addiction, we found that, during abstinence, rats injected daily with a FAAH inhibitor (URB597) developed a depressive-like phenotype. Our results show that in the nicotine abstinent rats, URB597 induced low saccharin consumption, persistent immobility in the forced swim test and increased corticosterone levels in response to stress. In addition, URB597decreased CB1 receptor binding and activity in the habenula, a key structure in the control of nicotine-related emotional states. In contrast, non-treated abstinent rats showed increased CB1 receptor activity and behaviors comparable to controls. No FAAH inhibition-induced alterations were observed in animals that had a previous history of saline self-administration. Taken together, our results suggest that chronic FAAH inhibition prevents the homeostatic adaptations of habenular CB1 receptor function that are necessary for the recovery from nicotine dependence.

  20. Discriminative stimulus effects of nicotine in humans.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Kenneth A

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral discrimination procedures clearly demonstrate that nicotine elicits interoceptive stimulus effects in humans that are malleable by various pharmacological manipulations as well as by some behavioral manipulations. The parameters of nicotine discrimination and both chronic and acute factors that may alter discrimination behavior are addressed in this chapter, which emphasizes research by the author involving nicotine delivered by nasal spray. Human discrimination of nicotine is centrally mediated, as the central and peripheral nicotine antagonist mecamylamine blocks discrimination but the peripheral antagonist trimethaphan does not. The threshold dose for discrimination of nicotine via spray appears to be very low in smokers as well as nonsmokers. Because smoked tobacco delivers nicotine more rapidly than spray, the threshold dose of nicotine via smoking is probably even lower. In terms of individual differences, smokers may become tolerant to the discriminative stimulus effects of higher nicotine doses but not of low doses. Men may be more sensitive than women to nicotine's discriminative stimulus effects, consistent with other research suggesting that nicotine is more reinforcing in men than in women. Other potential individual differences in nicotine discrimination have not been clearly tested, but may include genetics, obesity, and dependence on other drugs. Acute environmental factors that alter nicotine discrimination include the specific training and testing conditions, pointing to the need for careful control over such conditions during research. Other factors, such as concurrent acute use of alcohol or caffeine, do not appear to alter nicotine discrimination, suggesting that changes in nicotine discrimination are not likely explanations for the association of smoking behavior with use of those drugs. Concurrent physical activity also does not appear to alter nicotine discrimination, indicating that results from studies of discrimination in

  1. Recognising nicotine: the neurobiological basis of nicotine discrimination.

    PubMed

    Smith, Janice W; Stolerman, Ian P

    2009-01-01

    Drug discrimination methodology makes possible the objective, quantitative study of the perception of psychoactive drug effects in either human or animal subjects. Investigations of the nicotine discriminative stimulus complex have contributed to our present understanding of nicotine psychopharmacology by defining the origin of its effects at specific subtypes of nicotinic receptor and the role of diverse neurotransmitter systems as mediating and modulating mechanisms. The evidence strongly supports central sites as the origins of the nicotine stimulus, and these are likely to be located in the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic neurons; the medial prefrontal cortex is primarily involved, with the Nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area of secondary importance, while another element of the complex stimulus may arise in the dorsal hippocampus. Additionally, it appears that interactions of nicotine with the dopamine, serotonin, cannabinoid and probably glutamate systems all contribute to the final perceived stimulus. The resemblance between the nicotine discriminative stimulus and those of the psychomotor stimulant drugs amphetamine and cocaine contributes to defining the nature of the addictive properties of nicotine. It is particularly interesting that acute and chronic exposure to caffeine produce quantitative and qualitative changes in the characteristics of the nicotine stimulus. Interactions of nicotine with caffeine and cannabinoids strengthen proposals that the use of one substance serves as a "gateway" in sequential shifts of the target substance for drug-seeking behaviour, with profound implications for the human use of the substances concerned. Drug discrimination is also an important standard technique used in assessments of the abuse liability of novel psychoactive compounds, with relevance to attempts to develop novel nicotinic agonists for use as cognitive enhancers.

  2. The effect of 900 and 1800 MHz GSM-like radiofrequency irradiation and nicotine sulfate administration on the embryonic development of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Boga, Ayper; Emre, Mustafa; Sertdemir, Yasar; Akillioglu, Kubra; Binokay, Secil; Demirhan, Osman

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GSM-like radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF EMR) and nicotine sulfate (NS) exposure on Xenopus embryonic development.The developmental effects of GSM-like RF-EMR (900-1800 MHz, at a SAR value of 1W/kg and NS on Xenopus laevis embryos were investigated). Following the application of radiofrequency radiation and/or NS administration, the embryos were closely examined in order to determine their possible teratogenic effects. Xenopus frogs obtained from the Department of Physiology of the Cukurova University, in accordance described by the Standard Guide of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Following the exposure of Xenopus embryos to RF-EMR at 900 and 1800 MHz (1.0W/kg) for 4, 6 and 8h; the whole body specific energy absorption rate (SAR) of the embryos was calculated. With the exception of irradiation at 1800 MHz no dramatic developmental anomalies were observed in the Xenopus embryos in association with RF-EMR applications. Combined RF-EMR and NS applications resulted in dramatic abnormalities and death among the Xenopus embryos. The study results indicated that GSM-like RF-EMR (e.g. radiation from cell phones) was not as harmful to Xenopus embryos as might have been expected. However, the combined effects of GSM-like RF-EMR and NS on Xenopus embryos were more severe than the effect of RF-EMR or NS alone. In conclusion, the study results appear to suggest that the combined use of nicotine and cell phones might result in more pronounced detrimental effects on the health of smokers.

  3. Joint feedback analysis modeling of nonesterified fatty acids in obese Zucker rats and normal Sprague-Dawley rats after different routes of administration of nicotinic acid.

    PubMed

    Tapani, Sofia; Almquist, Joachim; Leander, Jacob; Ahlström, Christine; Peletier, Lambertus A; Jirstrand, Mats; Gabrielsson, Johan

    2014-08-01

    Data were pooled from several studies on nicotinic acid (NiAc) intervention of fatty acid turnover in normal Sprague-Dawley and obese Zucker rats in order to perform a joint PKPD of data from more than 100 normal Sprague-Dawley and obese Zucker rats, exposed to several administration routes and rates. To describe the difference in pharmacodynamic parameters between obese and normal rats, we modified a previously published nonlinear mixed effects model describing tolerance and oscillatory rebound effects of NiAc on nonesterified fatty acids plasma concentrations. An important conclusion is that planning of experiments and dose scheduling cannot rely on pilot studies on normal animals alone. The obese rats have a less-pronounced concentration-response relationship and need higher doses to exhibit desired response. The relative level of fatty acid rebound after cessation of NiAc administration was also quantified in the two rat populations. Building joint normal-disease models with scaling parameter(s) to characterize the "degree of disease" can be a useful tool when designing informative experiments on diseased animals, particularly in the preclinical screen. Data were analyzed using nonlinear mixed effects modeling, for the optimization, we used an improved method for calculating the gradient than the usually adopted finite difference approximation.

  4. Nicotine and the adolescent brain.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Menglu; Cross, Sarah J; Loughlin, Sandra E; Leslie, Frances M

    2015-08-15

    Adolescence encompasses a sensitive developmental period of enhanced clinical vulnerability to nicotine, tobacco, and e-cigarettes. While there are sociocultural influences, data at preclinical and clinical levels indicate that this adolescent sensitivity has strong neurobiological underpinnings. Although definitions of adolescence vary, the hallmark of this period is a profound reorganization of brain regions necessary for mature cognitive and executive function, working memory, reward processing, emotional regulation, and motivated behavior. Regulating critical facets of brain maturation are nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). However, perturbations of cholinergic systems during this time with nicotine, via tobacco or e-cigarettes, have unique consequences on adolescent development. In this review, we highlight recent clinical and preclinical data examining the adolescent brain's distinct neurobiology and unique sensitivity to nicotine. First, we discuss what defines adolescence before reviewing normative structural and neurochemical alterations that persist until early adulthood, with an emphasis on dopaminergic systems. We review how acute exposure to nicotine impacts brain development and how drug responses differ from those seen in adults. Finally, we discuss the persistent alterations in neuronal signaling and cognitive function that result from chronic nicotine exposure, while highlighting a low dose, semi-chronic exposure paradigm that may better model adolescent tobacco use. We argue that nicotine exposure, increasingly occurring as a result of e-cigarette use, may induce epigenetic changes that sensitize the brain to other drugs and prime it for future substance abuse.

  5. Acute hepatopathy associated with mitotane administration in a dog.

    PubMed

    Webb, Craig B; Twedt, David C

    2006-01-01

    An adult dog with a persistent elevation in alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity was started on mitotane for suspected hyperadrenocorticism. One month later, the dog was presented for intermittent anorexia and acute icterus. The dog's liver enzyme activities and total bilirubin were markedly elevated, prothrombin time was prolonged, and blood urea nitrogen and glucose were low. Histopathology revealed marked, centrilobular, hepatocellular loss. After discontinuation of the mitotane, the dog recovered with supportive care and was normal 3 months later, which was consistent with mitotane-associated hepatic failure.

  6. Nicotine Gum

    MedlinePlus

    ... gum is used to help people stop smoking cigarettes. Nicotine chewing gum should be used together with ... by your doctor.If you smoke your first cigarette more than 30 minutes after waking up, use ...

  7. Subjective effects of transdermal nicotine among nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Ashare, Rebecca L; Baschnagel, Joseph S; Hawk, Larry W

    2010-04-01

    The subjective experience of nicotine, which may be influenced by personality traits as well as environmental factors, may be important for understanding the factors associated with the initiation and maintenance of nicotine dependence. The present study examined the effects of 7 mg transdermal nicotine among a relatively large sample (n = 91; 44 women) of college-aged nonsmokers. Using a placebo controlled, double-blind, within-subjects design, nicotine's effects were examined at rest and again after participants completed a sustained attention task. Sex and personality factors (Behavioral Inhibition and Behavioral Approach; BIS/BAS Scales; Carver & White, 1994) were examined as potential moderators. Overall, the effects of nicotine were generally modest and unpleasant. In the context of the cognitive task, nicotine increased nausea and negative affect but reduced fatigue, relative to placebo. In contrast, effects of nicotine during the initial 4 hr of patch administration, in which participants were in their natural environments, were moderated by individual differences in behavioral approach. Neither behavioral inhibition nor gender reliably moderated any subjective effects of nicotine. The present work suggests transdermal nicotine exerts only modest, mostly negative effects among nonsmokers. Future work should examine both contextual and personality moderators in large samples of participants who are exposed to nicotine through multiple routes of administration.

  8. Nicotinic involvement in memory function in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Levin, Edward D; Chen, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    Zebrafish are an emerging model for the study of the molecular mechanisms of brain function. To conduct studies of the neural bases of behavior in zebrafish, we must understand the behavioral function of zebrafish and how it is altered by perturbations of brain function. This study determined nicotine actions on memory function in zebrafish. With the methods that we have developed to assess memory in zebrafish using delayed spatial alternation (DSA), we determined the dose effect function of acute nicotine on memory function in zebrafish. As in rodents and primates, low nicotine doses improve memory in zebrafish, while high nicotine doses have diminished effect and can impair memory. This study shows that nicotine affects memory function in zebrafish much like in rats, mice, monkeys and humans. Now, zebrafish can be used to help understand the molecular mechanisms crucial to nicotine effects on memory.

  9. GABA(B) receptors involvement in the effects induced by nicotine on anxiety-related behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Varani, Andrés P; Balerio, Graciela N

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible involvement of GABA(B) receptors in the anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like responses induced by nicotine in mice. Animals were exposed to nicotine only once. The acute administration of low (0.05mg/kg, sc) or high (0.8mg/kg, sc) doses of nicotine produced opposite effects in the elevated plus maze test; respectively, anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like responses. The effect of pretreatment with either the GABA(B) receptor antagonist 2-OH-saclofen (0.25, 0.5 and 1mg/kg; ip) or the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen (0.5, 1 and 2mg/kg; ip), was evaluated on the anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like responses induced by nicotine. 2-OH-saclofen completely abolished both nicotine-induced effects (p<0.001) at the highest dose tested, suggesting an involvement of GABA(B) receptors in these behavioural responses. On the other hand, baclofen failed to modify the anxiety-related effects of nicotine. These results suggest that the GABA(B) receptors are involved in the regulation of nicotine-induced anxiety-related behavioural responses in mice, and provide new findings to support a potential pharmaco therapeutic use of GABAergic drugs in the treatment of tobacco addiction.

  10. Effect of acute thioacetamide administration on rat brain phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Osada, J.; Aylagas, H.; Miro-Obradors, M.J.; Arce, C.; Palacios-Alaiz, E.; Cascales, M. )

    1990-09-01

    Brain phospholipid composition and the ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate incorporation into brain phospholipids of control and rats treated for 3 days with thioacetamide were studied. Brain phospholipid content, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid did not show any significant change by the effect of thioacetamide. In contrast, thioacetamide induced a significant decrease in the levels of phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol and diphosphatidylglycerol. After 75 minutes of intraperitoneal label injection, specific radioactivity of all the above phospholipids with the exception of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine significantly increased. After 13 hours of isotope administration the specific radioactivity of almost all studied phospholipid classes was elevated, except for phosphatidic acid, the specific radioactivity of which did not change and for diphosphatidylglycerol which showed a decrease in specific radioactivity. These results suggest that under thioacetamide treatment brain phospholipids undergo metabolic transformations that may contribute to the hepatic encephalopathy induced by thioacetamide.

  11. Neurocognitive performance following acute mephedrone administration, with and without alcohol.

    PubMed

    de Sousa Fernandes Perna, E B; Papaseit, E; Pérez-Mañá, C; Mateus, J; Theunissen, E L; Kuypers, Kpc; de la Torre, R; Farré, M; Ramaekers, J G

    2016-12-01

    Recreational use of mephedrone, alone and in combination with alcohol, has increased over the past years. Pharmacological properties of mephedrone share similarities with methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), but its effect on neurocognitive function has not been well established in humans. The present study assessed the effect of mephedrone alone and after co-administration with alcohol on neurocognitive function. It was hypothesised that mephedrone would improve psychomotor performance but impair memory performance, when administered alone. Neurocognitive performance was expected to be impaired following mephedrone when combined with alcohol. Eleven participants received single doses of 200 mg mephedrone or placebo combined with 0.8 g/kg alcohol or placebo. Neurocognitive performance was assessed at baseline (T0), at one hour (T1) and four hours after (T2) mephedrone administration, by means of the Divided Attention Task (DAT), Critical Tracking Task (CTT), and the Spatial Memory Test (SMT). Mephedrone intoxication impaired short-term spatial memory at T1 and improved critical tracking performance at T2 Mephedrone alone did not affect divided attention, but did show an interaction with alcohol on reaction time at T2 Reaction time decreased when mephedrone was combined with alcohol as compared to alcohol alone. Alcohol intoxication impaired both short- and long-term spatial memory at T1 and divided attention at T1 and T2 Critical tracking performance was not affected by alcohol intoxication. The current findings support the hypothesis that mephedrone improves psychomotor performance, impairs spatial memory and does not affect divided attention performance. Stimulatory effects of mephedrone were not sufficient to compensate for the impairing effects of alcohol on most performance parameters.

  12. Behavioural antecedents to pro re nata psychotropic medication administration on acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Duncan; Robson, Deborah; Chaplin, Robert; Quirk, Alan; Bowers, Len

    2012-12-01

    This study examined the antecedents to administration of pro re nata (PRN) psychotropic medication on acute psychiatric wards, with a particular focus on its use in response to patient aggression and other conflict behaviours. A sample of 522 adult in-patients was recruited from 84 acute psychiatric wards in England. Data were collected from nursing and medical records for the first 2  weeks of admission. Two-thirds of patients received PRN medication during this period, but only 30% of administrations were preceded by patient conflict (usually aggression). Instead, it was typically administered to prevent escalation of patient behaviour and to help patients sleep. Overall, no conflict behaviours or further staff intervention occurred after 61% of PRN administrations. However, a successful outcome was less likely when medication was administered in response to patient aggression. The study concludes that improved monitoring, review procedures, training for nursing staff, and guidelines for the administration of PRN medications are needed.

  13. Brain and Muscle Redox Imbalance Elicited by Acute Ethylmalonic Acid Administration

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Milanez, Ana Paula; Felisberto, Francine; Galant, Leticia Selinger; Machado, Jéssica Luca; Furlanetto, Camila Brulezi; Petronilho, Fabricia; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2015-01-01

    Ethylmalonic acid (EMA) accumulates in tissues and biological fluids of patients affected by short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) and ethylmalonic encephalopathy, illnesses characterized by neurological and muscular symptoms. Considering that the mechanisms responsible for the brain and skeletal muscle damage in these diseases are poorly known, in the present work we investigated the effects of acute EMA administration on redox status parameters in cerebral cortex and skeletal muscle from 30-day-old rats. Animals received three subcutaneous injections of EMA (6 μmol/g; 90 min interval between injections) and were killed 1 h after the last administration. Control animals received saline in the same volumes. EMA administration significantly increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels in cerebral cortex and skeletal muscle, indicating increased lipid peroxidation. In addition, carbonyl content was increased in EMA-treated animal skeletal muscle when compared to the saline group. EMA administration also significantly increased 2’,7’-dihydrodichlorofluorescein oxidation and superoxide production (reactive species markers), and decreased glutathione peroxidase activity in cerebral cortex, while glutathione levels were decreased only in skeletal muscle. On the other hand, respiratory chain complex I-III activity was altered by acute EMA administration neither in cerebral cortex nor in skeletal muscle. The present results show that acute EMA administration elicits oxidative stress in rat brain and skeletal muscle, suggesting that oxidative damage may be involved in the pathophysiology of the brain and muscle symptoms found in patients affected by SCADD and ethylmalonic encephalopathy. PMID:26010931

  14. Brain and muscle redox imbalance elicited by acute ethylmalonic acid administration.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Milanez, Ana Paula; Felisberto, Francine; Galant, Leticia Selinger; Machado, Jéssica Luca; Furlanetto, Camila Brulezi; Petronilho, Fabricia; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa

    2015-01-01

    Ethylmalonic acid (EMA) accumulates in tissues and biological fluids of patients affected by short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) and ethylmalonic encephalopathy, illnesses characterized by neurological and muscular symptoms. Considering that the mechanisms responsible for the brain and skeletal muscle damage in these diseases are poorly known, in the present work we investigated the effects of acute EMA administration on redox status parameters in cerebral cortex and skeletal muscle from 30-day-old rats. Animals received three subcutaneous injections of EMA (6 μmol/g; 90 min interval between injections) and were killed 1 h after the last administration. Control animals received saline in the same volumes. EMA administration significantly increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels in cerebral cortex and skeletal muscle, indicating increased lipid peroxidation. In addition, carbonyl content was increased in EMA-treated animal skeletal muscle when compared to the saline group. EMA administration also significantly increased 2',7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein oxidation and superoxide production (reactive species markers), and decreased glutathione peroxidase activity in cerebral cortex, while glutathione levels were decreased only in skeletal muscle. On the other hand, respiratory chain complex I-III activity was altered by acute EMA administration neither in cerebral cortex nor in skeletal muscle. The present results show that acute EMA administration elicits oxidative stress in rat brain and skeletal muscle, suggesting that oxidative damage may be involved in the pathophysiology of the brain and muscle symptoms found in patients affected by SCADD and ethylmalonic encephalopathy.

  15. TISSUE DISPOSITION OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID IN THE MOUSE AFTER ACUTE ORAL ADMINISTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    TISSUE DISPOSITION OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID IN THE MOUSE
    AFTER ACUTE ORAL ADMINISTRATION

    Michael F. Hughes, Ph.D., Brenda C. Edwards, Carol T. Mitchell and Elaina M. Kenyon, Ph.D. United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Nation...

  16. The effects of acute alcohol administration on the human brain: insights from neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Bjork, James M; Gilman, Jodi M

    2014-09-01

    Over the last quarter century, researchers have peered into the living human brain to develop and refine mechanistic accounts of alcohol-induced behavior, as well as neurobiological mechanisms for development and maintenance of addiction. These in vivo neuroimaging studies generally show that acute alcohol administration affects brain structures implicated in motivation and behavior control, and that chronic intoxication is correlated with structural and functional abnormalities in these same structures, where some elements of these decrements normalize with extended sobriety. In this review, we will summarize recent findings about acute human brain responses to alcohol using neuroimaging techniques, and how they might explain behavioral effects of alcohol intoxication. We then briefly address how chronic alcohol intoxication (as inferred from cross-sectional differences between various drinking populations and controls) may yield individual brain differences between drinking subjects that may confound interpretation of acute alcohol administration effects. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Neuroimaging in Neuropharmacology'.

  17. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minmin; Lu, Chengwen; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Jianqiao; Du, Yuan; Duan, Sijin; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. PMID:26199634

  18. Age-dependent effects of initial exposure to nicotine on serotonin neurons.

    PubMed

    Bang, S J; Commons, K G

    2011-04-14

    Adolescence is a critical vulnerable period during which exposure to nicotine greatly enhances the possibility to develop drug addiction. Growing evidence suggests that serotonergic (5-HT) neurotransmission may contribute to the initiation and maintenance of addictive behavior. As the dorsal raphe (DR) and median raphe (MnR) nuclei are the primary 5-HT source to the forebrain, the current study tested the hypothesis that there are age-dependent effects of acute nicotine administration on activation of 5-HT neurons within these regions. Both adolescent (Postnatal day 30) and adult (Postnatal day 70) male Sprague-Dawley rats received subcutaneous injection of either saline or nicotine (0.2, 0.4, or 0.8 mg/kg). Subsequently, the number of 5-HT cells that were double-labeled for Fos and tryptophan hydroxylase was counted in seven subregions within the DR and the entire MnR. The results show that acute nicotine injection induces Fos expression in 5-HT neurons in a region-specific manner. In addition, adolescents show broader regional activations at either a lower (0.2 mg/kg) and a higher (0.8 mg/kg) dose of nicotine, displaying a unique U-shape response curve across doses. In contrast, 5-HT cells with activated Fos expression were restricted to fewer regions in adults, and the patterns of expression were more consistent across doses. The results reveal dose-dependent effects of nicotine during adolescence with apparent sensitization at different ends of the dosage spectrum examined compared to adults. These data indicate that initial exposure to nicotine may have unique effects in adolescence on the ascending 5-HT system, with the potential for consequences on the affective-motivational qualities of the drug and the subsequent propensity for repeated use.

  19. Nicotine effects on immediate and delayed verbal memory after substance use detoxification.

    PubMed

    Gilbertson, Rebecca; Boissoneault, Jeff; Prather, Robert; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2011-07-01

    Decrements in verbal memory are commonly reported by detoxified treatment-seeking individuals. Although acute nicotine has been shown to improve attentional performance, its effects on verbal memory in substance abusers have not been addressed. Treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent (ALCs, n = 29; 14 male), illicit-stimulant-dependent (predominantly cocaine; STIMs, n = 25; 15 male), and alcohol- and illicit-stimulant-dependent (ALC/STIMs, n = 50; 35 male) participants with comorbid nicotine dependence were studied. Subjects had been abstinent from their drugs of choice for 41 (±18) days and were in short-term abstinence from tobacco (∼8-10 hours). Subjects received double-blind administration of either transdermal nicotine (high dose: 21/14 mg for men and women, respectively, or low dose: 7 mg) or placebo. The Logical Memory (LM) subtest from the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) was used to assess immediate and delayed verbal memory recall. Results indicated that STIMs receiving the high dose of nicotine recalled more words at immediate recall than STIMs who received placebo. Trend level differences were also noted at delayed recall between STIM nicotine and placebo doses. Nicotine failed to impact either recall in alcoholic subgroups. Although not the primary focus, results also revealed differences in the forgetting rates between the groups with the ALC/STIMs demonstrating the steepest forgetting slope. In summary, this study suggests that nicotine effects may be differentially experienced by substance-using subgroups; that nicotine may have a direct effect on memory; and that in considering neurocognitive processes (e.g., encoding vs. retrieval), underlying endpoint indicators (e.g., correct recall) may be critical in predicting outcomes.

  20. Cellular, molecular, and genetic substrates underlying the impact of nicotine on learning.

    PubMed

    Gould, Thomas J; Leach, Prescott T

    2014-01-01

    Addiction is a chronic disorder marked by long-lasting maladaptive changes in behavior and in reward system function. However, the factors that contribute to the behavioral and biological changes that occur with addiction are complex and go beyond reward. Addiction involves changes in cognitive control and the development of disruptive drug-stimuli associations that can drive behavior. A reason for the strong influence drugs of abuse can exert on cognition may be the striking overlap between the neurobiological substrates of addiction and of learning and memory, especially areas involved in declarative memory. Declarative memories are critically involved in the formation of autobiographical memories, and the ability of drugs of abuse to alter these memories could be particularly detrimental. A key structure in this memory system is the hippocampus, which is critically involved in binding multimodal stimuli together to form complex long-term memories. While all drugs of abuse can alter hippocampal function, this review focuses on nicotine. Addiction to tobacco products is insidious, with the majority of smokers wanting to quit; yet the majority of those that attempt to quit fail. Nicotine addiction is associated with the presence of drug-context and drug-cue associations that trigger drug seeking behavior and altered cognition during periods of abstinence, which contributes to relapse. This suggests that understanding the effects of nicotine on learning and memory will advance understanding and potentially facilitate treating nicotine addiction. The following sections examine: (1) how the effects of nicotine on hippocampus-dependent learning change as nicotine administration transitions from acute to chronic and then to withdrawal from chronic treatment and the potential impact of these changes on addiction, (2) how nicotine usurps the cellular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, (3) the physiological changes in the hippocampus that may contribute to nicotine

  1. Nicotine Effects on Immediate and Delayed Verbal Memory After Substance Use Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Gilbertson, Rebecca; Boissoneault, Jeff; Prather, Robert; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2010-01-01

    Decrements in verbal memory are commonly reported by detoxified treatment-seeking individuals. Although acute nicotine has been shown to improve attentional performance, its effects on verbal memory in substance abusers have not been addressed. Treatment-seeking alcohol dependent (ALCS N=29; 14 male), illicit stimulant (predominantly cocaine) dependent (STIMS N = 25; 15 male) and alcohol and illicit stimulant dependent (ALC/STIMS N = 50; 35 male) participants with co-morbid nicotine dependence were studied. Subjects had been abstinent from their drugs of choice for 41(±18) days and were in short-term abstinence from tobacco (~8–10 hours). Subjects received double-blind administration of either transdermal nicotine (High dose: 21/14 mg for men and women, respectively or Low dose: 7 mg) or placebo. The Logical Memory (LM) subtest from the Wechsler Memory Scale -Revised (WMS-R) was used to assess immediate and delayed verbal memory recall. Results indicated that STIMS receiving the high dose of nicotine recalled more words at immediate recall than STIMS who received placebo. Trend level differences were also noted at delayed recall between STIM nicotine and placebo doses. Nicotine failed to impact either recall in alcoholic subgroups. Although not the primary focus, results also revealed differences in the forgetting rates between the groups with the ALC/STIMS demonstrating the steepest forgetting slope. In summary, this study suggests that nicotine effects may be differentially experienced by substance using subgroups; that nicotine may have a direct effect on memory and, that considering neurocognitive processes (e.g., encoding vs. retrieval) underlying endpoint indicators (e.g. correct recall) may be critical in predicting outcomes. PMID:21526444

  2. Cellular, Molecular, and Genetic Substrates Underlying the Impact of Nicotine on Learning

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Thomas J.; Leach, Prescott T.

    2013-01-01

    Addiction is a chronic disorder marked by long-lasting maladaptive changes in behavior and in reward system function. However, the factors that contribute to the behavioral and biological changes that occur with addiction are complex and go beyond reward. Addiction involves changes in cognitive control and the development of disruptive drug-stimuli associations that can drive behavior. A reason for the strong influence drugs of abuse can exert on cognition may be the striking overlap between the neurobiological substrates of addiction and of learning and memory, especially areas involved in declarative memory. Declarative memories are critically involved in the formation of autobiographical memories, and the ability of drugs of abuse to alter these memories could be particularly detrimental. A key structure in this memory system is the hippocampus, which is critically involved in binding multimodal stimuli together to form complex long-term memories. While all drugs of abuse can alter hippocampal function, this review focuses on nicotine. Addiction to tobacco products is insidious, with the majority of smokers wanting to quit; yet the majority of those that attempt to quit fail. Nicotine addiction is associated with the presence of drug-context and drug-cue associations that trigger drug seeking behavior and altered cognition during periods of abstinence, which contributes to relapse. This suggests that understanding the effects of nicotine on learning and memory will advance understanding and potentially facilitate treating nicotine addiction. The following sections examine: 1) how the effects of nicotine on hippocampus-dependent learning change as nicotine administration transitions from acute to chronic and then to withdrawal from chronic treatment and the potential impact of these changes on addiction, 2) how nicotine usurps the cellular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, 3) the physiological changes in the hippocampus that may contribute to nicotine withdrawal

  3. Association of Geographical Factors With Administration of Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kunisawa, Susumu; Morishima, Toshitaka; Ukawa, Naoto; Ikai, Hiroshi; Otsubo, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Koichi B.; Yokota, Chiaki; Minematsu, Kazuo; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Background Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is an effective treatment for acute ischemic stroke if administered within a few hours of stroke onset. Because of this time restriction, tPA administration remains infrequent. Ambulance use is an effective strategy for increasing tPA administration but may be influenced by geographical factors. The objectives of this study are to investigate the relationship between tPA administration and ambulance use and to examine how patient travel distance and population density affect tPA utilization. Methods and Results We analyzed administrative claims data from 114 194 acute ischemic stroke cases admitted to 603 hospitals between July 2010 and March 2012. Mixed‐effects logistic regression models of patients nested within hospitals with a random intercept were generated to analyze possible predictive factors (including patient characteristics, ambulance use, and driving time from home to hospital) of tPA administration for different population density categories to investigate differences in these factors in various regional backgrounds. Approximately 5.1% (5797/114 194) of patients received tPA. The composition of baseline characteristics varied among the population density categories, but adjustment for covariates resulted in all factors having similar associations with tPA administration in every category. The administration of tPA was associated with patient age and severity of stroke symptoms, but driving time showed no association. Ambulance use was significantly associated with tPA administration even after adjustment for covariates. Conclusion The association between ambulance use and tPA administration suggests the importance of calling an ambulance for suspected stroke. Promoting ambulance use for acute ischemic stroke patients may increase tPA use. PMID:24045119

  4. Nicotine Dependence Reveals Distinct Responses from Neurons and Their Resident Nicotinic Receptors in Medial Habenula

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Pei-Yu; McIntosh, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are the molecular target of nicotine. nAChRs in the medial habenula (MHb) have recently been shown to play a role in nicotine dependence, but it is not clear which nAChR subtypes or MHb neuron types are most important. To identify MHb nAChRs and/or cell types that play a role in nicotine dependence, we studied these receptors and cells with brain slice electrophysiology using both acute and chronic nicotine application. Cells in the ventroinferior (MHbVI) and ventrolateral MHb (MHbVL) subregions expressed functional nAChRs with different pharmacology. Further, application of nicotine to cells in these subregions led to different action potential firing patterns. The latter result was correlated with a differing ability of nicotine to induce nAChR desensitization. Chronic nicotine caused functional upregulation of nAChRs selectively in MHbVI cells, but did not change nAChR function in MHbVL. Importantly, firing responses were also differentially altered in these subregions following chronic nicotine. MHbVI neurons treated chronically with nicotine exhibited enhanced basal pacemaker firing but a blunted nicotine-induced firing response. MHbVL neurons did not change their firing properties in response to chronic nicotine. Together, these results suggest that acute and chronic nicotine differentially affect nAChR function and output of cells in MHb subregions. Because the MHb extensively innervates the interpeduncular nucleus, an area critical for both affective and somatic signs of withdrawal, these results could reflect some of the neurophysiological changes thought to occur in the MHb to the interpeduncular nucleus circuit in human smokers. PMID:26429939

  5. Metabolomics analysis reveals elevation of 3-indoxyl sulfate in plasma and brain during chemically-induced acute kidney injury in mice: Investigation of nicotinic acid receptor agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Zgoda-Pols, Joanna R.; Chowdhury, Swapan; Wirth, Mark; Milburn, Michael V.; Alexander, Danny C.; Alton, Kevin B.

    2011-08-15

    An investigative renal toxicity study using metabolomics was conducted with a potent nicotinic acid receptor (NAR) agonist, SCH 900424. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques were used to identify small molecule biomarkers of acute kidney injury (AKI) that could aid in a better mechanistic understanding of SCH 900424-induced AKI in mice. The metabolomics study revealed 3-indoxyl sulfate (3IS) as a more sensitive marker of SCH 900424-induced renal toxicity than creatinine or urea. An LC-MS assay for quantitative determination of 3IS in mouse matrices was also developed. Following treatment with SCH 900424, 3IS levels were markedly increased in murine plasma and brain, thereby potentially contributing to renal- and central nervous system (CNS)-related rapid onset of toxicities. Furthermore, significant decrease in urinary excretion of 3IS in those animals due to compromised renal function may be associated with the elevation of 3IS in plasma and brain. These data suggest that 3IS has a potential to be a marker of renal and CNS toxicities during chemically-induced AKI in mice. In addition, based on the metabolomic analysis other statistically significant plasma markers including p-cresol-sulfate and tryptophan catabolites (kynurenate, kynurenine, 3-indole-lactate) might be of toxicological importance but have not been studied in detail. This comprehensive approach that includes untargeted metabolomic and targeted bioanalytical sample analyses could be used to investigate toxicity of other compounds that pose preclinical or clinical development challenges in a pharmaceutical discovery and development. - Research Highlights: > Nicotinic acid receptor agonist, SCH 900424, caused acute kidney injury in mice. > MS-based metabolomics was conducted to identify potential small molecule markers of renal toxicity. > 3-indoxyl-sulfate was found to be as a more sensitive marker of renal toxicity than creatinine

  6. Chronic co-administration of nicotine and methamphetamine causes differential expression of immediate early genes in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens of rats.

    PubMed

    Saint-Preux, F; Bores, L R; Tulloch, I; Ladenheim, B; Kim, R; Thanos, P K; Volkow, N D; Cadet, J L

    2013-07-23

    Nicotine and methamphetamine (METH) cause addiction by triggering neuroplastic changes in brain reward pathways though they each engage distinct molecular targets (nicotine receptors and dopamine transporters respectively). Addiction to both drugs is very prevalent, with the vast majority of METH users also being smokers of cigarettes. This co-morbid occurrence thus raised questions about potential synergistic rewarding effects of the drugs. However, few studies have investigated the chronic neurobiological changes associated with co-morbid nicotine and METH addiction. Here we investigated the effects of these two drugs alone and in combination on the expression of several immediate early genes (IEGs) that are sensitive to drug exposures. Chronic exposure to either nicotine or METH caused significant decreases in the expression of fosb, fra1, and fra2 in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) but not in the dorsal striatum whereas the drug combination increased fra2 expression in both structures. Except for junB mRNA levels that were decreased by the three drug treatments in the NAc, there were no significant changes in the Jun family members. Of the Egr family members, NAc egr2 expression was decreased after nicotine and the drug combination whereas NAc egr3 was decreased after METH and the drug combination. The drug combination also increased striatal egr3 expression. The Nr4a family member, nr4a2/nurr1, showed increased striatal expression after all three drug treatments, while striatal nr4a3/nor-1 expression was increased by the drug combination whereas NAc nr4a1/nurr77 was decreased by nicotine and the drug combination. These observations suggest that, when given in combination, the two drugs exert distinct effects on the expression of IEGs in dopaminergic projection areas from those elicited by each drug alone. The significance of these changes in IEG expression and in other molecular markers in fostering co-morbid METH and nicotine abuse needs to be further evaluated.

  7. Effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress in rat lungs* **

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Ronaldo Lopes; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva; Laste, Gabriela; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz Cardoso; Cardoso, Paulo Francisco Guerreiro; Belló-Klein, Adriane

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress, as quantified by measuring lipid peroxidation (LPO) and total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP), in rat lungs. Methods: Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: acute treatment, comprising rats receiving a single injection of methylprednisolone (50 mg/kg i.p.); acute control, comprising rats i.p. injected with saline; chronic treatment, comprising rats receiving methylprednisolone in drinking water (6 mg/kg per day for 30 days); and chronic control, comprising rats receiving normal drinking water. Results: The levels of TRAP were significantly higher in the acute treatment group rats than in the acute control rats, suggesting an improvement in the pulmonary defenses of the former. The levels of lung LPO were significantly higher in the chronic treatment group rats than in the chronic control rats, indicating oxidative damage in the lung tissue of the former. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the acute use of corticosteroids is beneficial to lung tissue, whereas their chronic use is not. The chronic use of methylprednisolone appears to increase lung LPO levels. PMID:25029646

  8. Both acute and prolonged administration of EPO reduce cerebral and systemic vascular conductance in humans.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Peter; Kim, Yu-Sok; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Lundby, Carsten; Olsen, Niels V; Secher, Niels H; van Lieshout, Johannes J

    2012-03-01

    Administration of erythropoietin (EPO) has been linked to cerebrovascular events. EPO reduces vascular conductance, possibly because of the increase in hematocrit. Whether EPO in itself affects the vasculature remains unknown; here it was evaluated in healthy males by determining systemic and cerebrovascular variables following acute (30,000 IU/d for 3 d; n=8) and chronic (5000 IU/week for 13 wk; n=8) administration of EPO, while the responsiveness of the vasculature was challenged during cycling exercise, with and without hypoxia. Prolonged administration of EPO increased hematocrit from 42.5 ± 3.7 to 47.6 ± 4.1% (P<0.01), whereas hematocrit was unaffected following acute EPO administration. Yet, the two EPO regimes increased arterial pressure similarly (by 8±4 and 7±3 mmHg, respectively; P=0.01) through reduced vascular conductance (by 7±3 and 5±2%; P<0.05). Also, both EPO regimes widened the arterial-to-jugular O(2) differences at rest as well as during normoxic and hypoxic exercise (P<0.01), which indicated reduced cerebral blood flow despite preserved dynamic cerebral autoregulation, and an increase in middle cerebral artery mean blood flow velocity (P<0.05), therefore, reflected vasoconstriction. Thus, administration of EPO to healthy humans lowers systemic and cerebral conductance independent of its effect on hematocrit.

  9. Pre-exposure to ethanol, but not to caffeine and nicotine, induced place preference and self-administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist-benzodiazepine combination, Zoletil®.

    PubMed

    de la Peña, June Bryan I; dela Peña, Irene Joy I; Lee, Hye Lim; dela Peña, Ike; Shin, Chan Young; Sohn, Aee Ree; Cheong, Jae Hoon

    2013-09-01

    Zoletil® is an equal amount combination of the NMDA receptor antagonist, tiletamine, and the benzodiazepine, zolazepam, usually used as a veterinary anesthetic. Previous studies have shown that pre-exposure to Zoletil® and other psychoactive drugs (e.g. ketamine, diazepam) plays a significant role in the abuse liability of the compound. However, these studies were only focused on illicit psychoactive drugs and not on the more widely used licit psychoactive substances. Thus, the goal of the present work is to investigate whether pre-exposure to the three most commonly used licit psychoactive substances (caffeine, nicotine, and ethanol) affects the rewarding and reinforcing effects of Zoletil®. Rats were pretreated with caffeine (1.25 or 2.5 mg/kg), nicotine (125 or 250 μg/kg), ethanol (0.5, 2, or 4 g/kg), or saline (1 ml/kg) for 14 days, and evaluated for subsequent Zoletil® place preference (2.5 mg/kg) and self-administration (250 μg/kg). Zoletil® produced neither place preference nor self-administration in saline-pretreated rats. Pre-exposure to caffeine or nicotine does not have significant effects on Zoletil®'s abuse potential. However, pretreatment of ethanol significantly produced Zoletil® place preference and self-administration. These results suggest that individuals who are exposed to ethanol may have a high propensity to use/abuse Zoletil®. More importantly, the present result advocates the careful monitoring on the use and dispensation of Zoletil® or related substances.

  10. Impact of nicotine metabolism on nicotine's pharmacological effects and behavioral responses: insights from a Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Jia, Kunzhi; Zhou, Xin; McCallum, Sarah E; Hough, Lindsay B; Ding, Xinxin

    2013-12-01

    Nicotine metabolism is believed to affect not only nicotine's pharmacological effects but also nicotine addiction. As a key step toward testing this hypothesis, we have studied nicotine metabolism and nicotine's pharmacological and behavioral effects in a novel knockout mouse model [named Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null] lacking a number of cytochrome P450 genes known to be or possibly involved in nicotine metabolism, including two Cyp2a and all Cyp2b genes. We found that, compared with wild-type mice, the Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null mice showed >90% decreases in hepatic microsomal nicotine oxidase activity in vitro, and in rates of systemic nicotine clearance in vivo. Further comparisons of nicotine metabolism between Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null and Cyp2a5-null mice revealed significant roles of both CYP2A5 and CYP2B enzymes in nicotine clearance. Compared with the behavioral responses in wild-type mice, the decreases in nicotine metabolism in the Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null mice led to prolonged nicotine-induced acute pharmacological effects, in that null mice showed enhanced nicotine hypothermia and antinociception. Furthermore, we found that the Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null mice developed a preference for nicotine in a conditioned place preference test, a commonly used test of nicotine's rewarding effects, at a nicotine dose that was 4-fold lower than what was required by wild-type mice. Thus, CYP2A/2B-catalyzed nicotine clearance affects nicotine's behavioral response as well as its acute pharmacological effects in mice. This result provides direct experimental support of the findings of pharmacogenetic studies that suggest linkage between rates of nicotine metabolism and smoking behavior in humans.

  11. A C. elegans model of nicotine-dependent behavior: regulation by TRP family channels

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhaoyang; Li, Wei; Ward, Alex; Piggott, Beverly J.; Larkspur, Erin R.; Sternberg, Paul W.; Shawn Xu, X. Z.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Nicotine, the primary addictive substance in tobacco, induces profound behavioral responses in mammals, but the underlying genetic mechanisms are not well understood. Here we develop a C. elegans model of nicotine-dependent behavior. We show that worms exhibit behavioral responses to nicotine that parallel those observed in mammals, including acute response, tolerance, withdrawal and sensitization. These nicotine responses require nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) family genes that are known to mediate nicotine dependence in mammals, suggesting functional conservation of nAChRs in nicotine responses. Importantly, we find that mutant worms lacking TRPC (transient-receptor-potential canonical) channels are defective in response to nicotine and that such a defect can be rescued by a human TRPC channel, revealing an unexpected role for TRPC channels in regulating nicotine-dependent behavior. Thus, C. elegans can be used to characterize known genes as well as to identify new genes regulating nicotine responses. PMID:17081982

  12. Null mutation of the β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit attenuates nicotine withdrawal-induced anhedonia in mice.

    PubMed

    Stoker, Astrid K; Marks, Michael J; Markou, Athina

    2015-04-15

    The anhedonic signs of nicotine withdrawal are predictive of smoking relapse rates in humans. Identification of the neurobiological substrates that mediate anhedonia will provide insights into the genetic variations that underlie individual responses to smoking cessation and relapse. The present study assessed the role of β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nACh receptor) subunits in nicotine withdrawal-induced anhedonia using β2 nACh receptor subunit knockout (β2(-/-)) and wildtype (β2(+/+)) mice. Anhedonia was assessed with brain reward thresholds, defined as the current intensity that supports operant behavior in the discrete-trial current-intensity intracranial self-stimulation procedure. Nicotine was delivered chronically through osmotic minipumps for 28 days (40 mg/kg/day, base), and withdrawal was induced by either administering the broad-spectrum nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (i.e., antagonist-precipitated withdrawal) in mice chronically treated with nicotine or terminating chronic nicotine administration (i.e., spontaneous withdrawal). Mecamylamine (6 mg/kg, salt) significantly elevated brain reward thresholds in nicotine-treated β2(+/+) mice compared with saline-treated β2(+/+) mice and nicotine-treated β2(-/-) mice. Spontaneous nicotine withdrawal similarly resulted in significant elevations in thresholds in nicotine-withdrawing β2(+/+) mice compared with saline-treated β2(+/+) and nicotine-treated β2(-/-) mice, which remained at baseline levels. These results showed that precipitated and spontaneous nicotine withdrawal-induced anhedonia was attenuated in β2(-/-) mice. The reduced expression of anhedonic signs during nicotine withdrawal in β2(-/-) mice may have resulted from the lack of neuroadaptations in β2 nACh receptor subunit expression and function that may have occurred during either nicotine exposure or nicotine withdrawal in wildtype mice. In conclusion, individuals with genetic variations that result in diminished

  13. Nicotine, adolescence, and stress: A review of how stress can modulate the negative consequences of adolescent nicotine abuse.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Erica; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    In order to continue the decline of smoking prevalence, it is imperative to identify factors that contribute to the development of nicotine and tobacco addiction, such as adolescent initiation of nicotine use, adolescent stress, and their interaction. This review highlights the biological differences between adolescent and adults in nicotine use and resulting effects, and examines the enduring consequences of adolescent nicotine administration. A review of both clinical and preclinical literature indicates that adolescent, but not adult, nicotine administration leads to increased susceptibility for development of long-lasting impairments in learning and affect. Finally, the role stress plays in normal adolescent development, the deleterious effects stress has on learning and memory, and the negative consequences resulting from the interaction of stress and nicotine during adolescence is reviewed. The review concludes with ways in which future policies could benefit by addressing adolescent stress as a means of reducing adolescent nicotine abuse.

  14. Is albumin administration in the acutely ill associated with increased mortality? Results of the SOAP study

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Sakr, Yasser; Reinhart, Konrad; Sprung, Charles L; Gerlach, Herwig; Ranieri, V Marco

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Albumin administration in the critically ill has been the subject of some controversy. We investigated the use of albumin solutions in European intensive care units (ICUs) and its relationship to outcome. Methods In a cohort, multicenter, observational study, all patients admitted to one of the participating ICUs between 1 May and 15 May 2002 were followed up until death, hospital discharge, or for 60 days. Patients were classified according to whether or not they received albumin at any time during their ICU stay. Results Of 3,147 admitted patients, 354 (11.2%) received albumin and 2,793 (88.8%) did not. Patients who received albumin were more likely to have cancer or liver cirrhosis, to be surgical admissions, and to have sepsis. They had a longer length of ICU stay and a higher mortality rate, but were also more severely ill, as manifested by higher simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores than the other patients. A Cox proportional hazard model indicated that albumin administration was significantly associated with decreased 30-day survival. Moreover, in 339 pairs matched according to a propensity score, ICU and hospital mortality rates were higher in the patients who had received albumin than in those who had not (34.8 versus 20.9% and 41.3 versus 27.7%, respectively, both p < 0.001). Conclusion Albumin administration was associated with decreased survival in this population of acutely ill patients. Further prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to examine the effects of albumin administration in sub-groups of acutely ill patients. PMID:16356223

  15. Long-term effects of a single course of nicotine treatment in acute ulcerative colitis: remission maintenance in a 12-month follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Guslandi, M

    1999-11-01

    Patients with mild to moderate active colitis who are treated with mesalazine plus transdermal nicotine reportedly suffer fewer relapses than patients treated with mesalazine plus oral prednisone. A long-term follow-up period was carried out to confirm this. Thirty patients with remission of distal colitis after therapy with the above treatment schedules were monitored for 12 months (Rachmilewitz' activity index plus endoscopy). Relapsed patients were retreated in a cross-over fashion. After 12 months recurrences were observed in 14 of 15 patients initially treated with steroids and in 7 of 15 subjects who were had received transdermal nicotine (P = 0.007, Fisher's test). A higher proportion of relapsed patients from the prednisone group, after successful retreatment with nicotine patches, remained in remission after 6 months (20%) than relapsed patients who switched to steroid treatment (57%). Our present results confirm the concept that nicotine-induced remission of ulcerative colitis lasts longer than that obtained by oral corticosteroids.

  16. Alcohol's actions on neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Davis, Tiffany J; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2006-01-01

    Although it has been known for many years that alcoholism and tobacco addiction often co-occur, relatively little information is available on the biological factors that regulate the co-use and abuse of nicotine and alcohol. In the brain, nicotine acts at several different types of receptors collectively known as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Alcohol also acts on at least some of these receptors, enhancing the function of some nAChR subtypes and inhibiting the activity of others. Chronic alcohol and nicotine administration also lead to changes in the numbers of nAChRs. Natural variations (i.e., polymorphisms) in the genes encoding different nAChR subunits may be associated with individual differences in the sensitivity to some of alcohol's and nicotine's effects. Finally, at least one subtype of nAChR may help protect cells against alcohol-induced neurotoxicity.

  17. Acute d-Amphetamine Pretreatment Does Not Alter Stimulant Self-Administration in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Stoops, William W.; Vansickel, Andrea R.; Lile, Joshua A.; Rush, Craig R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent clinical research indicates that d-amphetamine is effective in treating cocaine and methamphetamine dependence. There is concern, however, with the use of d-amphetamine as a pharmacotherapy because acute administration of d-amphetamine decreases inhibition in cocaine-using individuals and may increase drug-taking behavior. The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether acute d-amphetamine pretreatment would alter the reinforcing, subject-rated, and cardiovascular effects of d-amphetamine. To this end, 7 human volunteers first sampled doses of oral d-amphetamine (0, 8, and 16 mg). These doses engender moderate drug taking and were selected to avoid a ceiling or floor effect. Volunteers were then allowed to self-administer these sampled doses using a modified-progressive ratio procedure in two sessions in which they received pretreatments with either 0 or 15 mg oral d-amphetamine 2 hours prior to completing the modified progressive-ratio procedure. d-Amphetamine produced prototypical stimulant-like effects (e.g., increased ratings of stimulated, elevated blood pressure) and maintained responding on the modified progressive-ratio schedule. Pretreatment with 15 mg oral d-amphetamine also produced prototypical stimulant-like effects, but failed to alter break points for d-amphetamine on the modified progressive-ratio procedure relative to placebo pretreatment. These results indicate that acute d-amphetamine pretreatment does not increase stimulant self-administration. PMID:17490738

  18. Neonatal nicotine exposure increases excitatory synaptic transmission and attenuates nicotine-stimulated GABA release in the adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Damborsky, Joanne C; Griffith, William H; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H

    2015-01-01

    Developmental exposure to nicotine has been linked to long-lasting changes in synaptic transmission which may contribute to behavioral abnormalities seen in offspring of women who smoke during pregnancy. Here, we examined the long-lasting effects of developmental nicotine exposure on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission, and on acute nicotine-induced glutamate and GABA release in the adult hippocampus, a structure important in cognitive and emotional behaviors. We utilized a chronic neonatal nicotine treatment model to administer nicotine (6 mg/kg/day) to rat pups from postnatal day (P) 1-7, a period that falls developmentally into the third human trimester. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings from CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices, we measured excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents in neonatally control- and nicotine-treated young adult males. Neonatal nicotine exposure significantly increased AMPA receptor-mediated spontaneous and evoked excitatory signaling, with no change in glutamate release probability in adults. Conversely, there was no increase in spontaneous GABAergic neurotransmission in nicotine-males. Chronic neonatal nicotine treatment had no effect on acute nicotine-stimulated glutamate release in adults, but acute nicotine-stimulated GABA release was significantly attenuated. Thus, neonatal nicotine exposure results in a persistent net increase in excitation and a concurrent loss of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated regulation of presynaptic GABA but not glutamate release, which would exacerbate excitation following endogenous or exogenous nAChR activation. Our data underscore an important role for nAChRs in hippocampal excitatory synapse development, and suggest selective long-term changes at specific presynaptic nAChRs which together could explain some of the behavioral abnormalities associated with maternal smoking.

  19. Anticataleptic activity of cathinone and MDMA (Ecstasy) upon acute and subchronic administration in rat.

    PubMed

    Banjaw, Mehret Yerdaw; Mayerhofer, Andreas; Schmidt, Werner J

    2003-09-15

    It was recently demonstrated that acute administration of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphet-amine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") is capable of counteracting haloperidol-induced catalepsy in rats. The present study was done with another psychostimulant, S-(-)-cathinone. In these experiments, 32 male Sprague-Dawley rats, 225 +/- 25 g, were used. They were divided into three groups. All groups received 0.5 mg/kg haloperidol in normal saline (s.c.) as a first injection. Then 30 min later each group received either isotonic phosphate-buffered saline, 1 mg/kg S-(-)-cathinone, or 2.5 mg/kg (RS)-MDMA (s.c.) as a second injection. The results of descent latency on both the horizontal bar and vertical grid showed that S-(-)-cathinone or (RS)-MDMA upon acute administration induces a strong anticataleptic activity (P < 0.0001) compared to rats treated with haloperidol plus vehicle. The effect of both drugs was later masked upon subchronic administration (days 2-7, 26-29). This is probably due to sensitization of cataleptic behavior. However, when the same groups of rats were tested on day 8 in a different task, i.e., open-field, they showed a significant difference (P < 0.05). The detailed mechanism of the observed strong anticataleptic activity of S-(-)-cathinone (which is considered a potent dopamine releaser) requires further investigation.

  20. Acute coronary vasospasm in a patient with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis following NSAID administration

    PubMed Central

    Benallegue, Naïl; Lozach, Pierre; Belizna, Cristina; Lavigne, Christian; Urbanski, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Eosinophilic with polyangiitis (EGPA, formerly known as Churg-Strauss syndrome) is a rare systemic disease characterized by a small-vessel necrotizing vasculitis. Cardiac manifestations are broad-ranging and are associated with a poor prognosis. Coronary vasospasm is uncommon. Here, we report a case of an acute coronary vasospasm in a patient with EGPA after corticosteroids withdrawal and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) introduction. This patient was initially misdiagnosed as bradykinin-mediated angioedema. A 30-year-old man presented with recurrence of abdominal pain and acute dyspnea. NSAID administration for pain during a flare was followed by coronary vasospasms leading to cardiac arrest. Corticosteroid treatment was recently interrupted by the patient. This case reports a rare cardiac complication of EGPA. NSAID might contribute to coronary vasospasm by eosinophilic degranulation in EGPA. Moreover, corticosteroid compliance must be emphasized among patients who display EGPA with high cardiac risk to prevent fatal issues. PMID:27893661

  1. [Albuminuria after acute oral administration of proteins in patients with renovascular hypertension].

    PubMed

    Stríbrná, J; Růzicka, M; Englis, M; Peregrín, J; Lánská, V

    1993-02-05

    In a group of 19 patients with renovascular hypertension the effect of a morning snack comprising meat (1 g protein per 1 kg body weight) on urinary albumin excretion was assessed. Concurrently the plasma creatinine concentration (Pcr) was examined which varied between normal and 260 mumol/l and the creatinine clearance (Ccr). After administration of an acute protein load the mean Ccr value increased by 23%. The albumin excretion, however, did not change substantially, as compared with the previous collection period (mean 17 and 18 micrograms/min). Microalbuminuria was recorded in 31% of the patients and its prevalence was directly related to the increasing Pcr value. The results revealed that an acute protein load did not increase albuminuria although the rise of Ccr was significant. The variability of albumin excretion in the course of the day is, however, influenced also by other factors and for assessment of microalbuminuria therefore examination of 24-hour urine samples should be preferred.

  2. Effect of acute ethanol administration on zebrafish tail-beat motion.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Tiziana; Mwaffo, Violet; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a species of choice in neurobiological and behavioral studies of alcohol-related disorders. In these efforts, the activity of adult zebrafish is typically quantified using indirect activity measures that are either scored manually or identified automatically from the fish trajectory. The analysis of such activity measures has produced important insight into the effect of acute ethanol exposure on individual and social behavior of this vertebrate species. Here, we leverage a recently developed tracking algorithm that reconstructs fish body shape to investigate the effect of acute ethanol administration on zebrafish tail-beat motion in terms of amplitude and frequency. Our results demonstrate a significant effect of ethanol on the tail-beat amplitude as well as the tail-beat frequency, both of which were found to robustly decrease for high ethanol concentrations. Such a direct measurement of zebrafish motor functions is in agreement with evidence based on indirect activity measures, offering a complementary perspective in behavioral screening.

  3. Corticosteroid Administration and Outcome of Adolescents and Adults With Acute Bacterial Meningitis: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Assiri, Abdullah M.; Alasmari, Faisal A.; Zimmerman, Valerie A.; Baddour, Larry M.; Erwin, Patricia J.; Tleyjeh, Imad M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically assess the effect of the adjunctive administration of corticosteroids in the treatment of acute bacterial meningitis. METHODS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis by searching several databases for reports (published from January 1966 through February 2008) of placebo-controlled randomized trials of corticosteroid use in the treatment of adolescents and adults with acute bacterial meningitis. We used random-effects models. Sources of heterogeneity were explored by preplanned subgroup analyses. RESULTS: The 4 eligible trials (published between 1999 and 2007) were of high methodological quality and included 1261 adult patients. Overall, the short-term mortality rate associated with corticosteroid administration was not significantly lower than that associated with placebo (relative risk [RR], 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-1.20; I2=54%). A significant interaction was found between the effect of corticosteroids and the income status of the country (P=.02) and the prevalence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among study populations (P=.03). The administration of corticosteroids resulted in a lower short-term mortality rate than did the administration of placebo in high-income countries (pooled RR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.27-0.92; I2=0%) and in the studies with a low prevalence of infection with HIV (RR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.44-0.99; I2=0%). In studies from high-income countries, the number needed to treat with corticosteriods to prevent 1 death and 1 neurologic sequela was 12.5 (95% CI, 7.1-100.0) and 11.0 (95% CI, 5.6-100.0), respectively. CONCLUSION: Our meta-analysis suggests that the adjunctive administration of corticosteroids is beneficial in the treatment of adolescents and adults with bacterial meningitis in patient populations similar to those seen in high-income countries and in areas with a low prevalence of HIV infection. PMID:19411436

  4. Nicotinic Mechanisms Modulate Ethanol Withdrawal and Modify Time Course and Symptoms Severity of Simultaneous Withdrawal from Alcohol and Nicotine.

    PubMed

    Perez, Erika; Quijano-Cardé, Natalia; De Biasi, Mariella

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol and nicotine are among the top causes of preventable death in the United States. Unfortunately, people who are dependent on alcohol are more likely to smoke than individuals in the general population. Similarly, smokers are more likely to abuse alcohol. Alcohol and nicotine codependence affects health in many ways and leads to poorer treatment outcomes in subjects who want to quit. This study examined the interaction of alcohol and nicotine during withdrawal and compared abstinence symptoms during withdrawal from one of the two drugs only vs both. Our results indicate that simultaneous withdrawal from alcohol and nicotine produces physical symptoms that are more severe and last longer than those experienced during withdrawal from one of the two drugs alone. In animals experiencing withdrawal after chronic ethanol treatment, acute nicotine exposure was sufficient to prevent abstinence symptoms. Similarly, symptoms were prevented when alcohol was injected acutely in mice undergoing nicotine withdrawal. These experiments provide evidence for the involvement of the nicotinic cholinergic system in alcohol withdrawal. Furthermore, the outcomes of intracranial microinfusions of mecamylamine, a nonselective nicotinic receptor antagonist, highlight a major role for the nicotinic receptors expressed in medial habenula and interpeduncular nucleus during withdrawal. Overall, the data support the notion that modulating the nicotinic cholinergic system might help to maintain long-term abstinence from alcohol.

  5. Shifting topographic activation and 5-HT1A receptor-mediated inhibition of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons produced by nicotine exposure and withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Robin; Commons, Kathryn G

    2011-05-01

    Nicotine activates serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] neurons innervating the forebrain, and this is thought to reduce anxiety. Nicotine withdrawal has also been associated with an activation of 5-HT neurotransmission, although withdrawal increases anxiety. In each case, 5-HT1A receptors have been implicated in the response. To determine whether there are different subgroups of 5-HT cells activated during nicotine administration and withdrawal, we mapped the appearance of Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, in 5-HT cells of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) and median raphe nucleus (MR). To understand the role of 5-HT1A receptor feedback inhibitory pathways in 5-HT cell activity during these conditions, we administered a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist and measured novel disinhibited Fos expression within 5-HT cells. Using these approaches, we found evidence that acute nicotine exposure activates 5-HT neurons rostrally and in the lateral wings of the DR, whereas there is 5-HT1A receptor-dependent inhibition of cells located ventrally at both the rostral level and mid-level. Previous chronic nicotine exposure did not modify the pattern of activation produced by acute nicotine exposure, but increased 5-HT1A receptor-dependent inhibition of 5-HT cells in the caudal DR. This pattern was nearly reversed during nicotine withdrawal, when there was evidence for caudal activation and mid-level and rostral 5-HT1A receptor-dependent inhibition. These results suggest that the distinct behavioral states produced by nicotine exposure and withdrawal correlate with reciprocal rostral-caudal patterns of activation and 5-HT1A receptor-mediated inhibition of DR 5-HT neurons. The complementary patterns of activation and inhibition suggest that 5-HT1A receptors may help to shape distinct topographic patterns of activation within the DR.

  6. Nicotine and Nicotinic Receptor Drugs: Potential for Parkinson's Disease and Drug-Induced Movement Disorders.

    PubMed

    Quik, Maryka; Bordia, Tanuja; Zhang, Danhui; Perez, Xiomara A

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia, as well as nonmotor symptoms including autonomic impairments, olfactory dysfunction, sleep disturbances, depression, and dementia. Although the major neurological deficit is a loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons, multiple neurotransmitters systems are compromised in Parkinson's disease. Consistent with this observation, dopamine replacement therapy dramatically improves Parkinson's disease motor symptoms. Additionally, drugs targeting the serotonergic, glutamatergic, adenosine, and other neurotransmitter systems may be beneficial. Recent evidence also indicates that nicotinic cholinergic drugs may be useful for the management of Parkinson's disease. This possibility initially arose from the results of epidemiological studies, which showed that smoking was associated with a decreased incidence of Parkinson's disease, an effect mediated in part by the nicotine in smoke. Further evidence for this idea stemmed from preclinical studies which showed that nicotine administration reduced nigrostriatal damage in parkinsonian rodents and monkeys. In addition to a potential neuroprotective role, emerging work indicates that nicotinic receptor drugs improve the abnormal involuntary movements or dyskinesias that arise as a side effect of l-dopa treatment, the gold standard therapy for Parkinson's disease. Both nicotine and nicotinic receptor drugs reduced l-dopa-induced dyskinesias by over 50% in parkinsonian rodent and monkey models. Notably, nicotine also attenuated the abnormal involuntary movements or tardive dyskinesias that arise with antipsychotic treatment. These observations, coupled with reports that nicotinic receptor drugs have procognitive and antidepressant effects, suggest that central nervous system (CNS) nicotinic receptors may represent useful targets for the treatment of movement disorders.

  7. Serotonin and suicidality: the impact of acute fluoxetine administration. I: Serotonin and suicide.

    PubMed

    King, R A; Segman, R H; Anderson, G M

    1994-01-01

    The general enhancement of central serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission following long-term administration of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) appears to play an important role in these drugs' anti-depressant efficacy. Because suicide and/or aggression appear linked to diminished levels of brain 5-HT and its metabolites, it has been suggested that SSRIs may be particularly effective in reducing suicidality. Case reports of increased or new suicidal ideation following administration of fluoxetine and other SSRIs, however, raise questions about how these potential side effects may relate to the SSRI's acute effects on 5-HT transmission. Part I of this review examines fluoxetine's effects on suicidality and related behaviors and reviews the relationship of suicidality to serotonergic dysregulation.

  8. Nicotine enhances alcohol intake and dopaminergic responses through β2* and β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tolu, Stefania; Marti, Fabio; Morel, Carole; Perrier, Carole; Torquet, Nicolas; Pons, Stephanie; de Beaurepaire, Renaud; Faure, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol and nicotine are the most widely co-abused drugs. Both modify the activity of dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA) and lead to an increase in DA release in the Nucleus Accumbens, thereby affecting the reward system. Evidences support the hypothesis that distinct nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), the molecular target of acetylcholine (ACh) and exogenous nicotine, are also in addition implicated in the response to alcohol. The precise molecular and neuronal substrates of this interaction are however not well understood. Here we used in vivo electrophysiology in the VTA to characterise acute and chronic interactions between nicotine and alcohol. Simultaneous injections of the two drugs enhanced their responses on VTA DA neuron firing and chronic exposure to nicotine increased alcohol-induced DA responses and alcohol intake. Then, we assessed the role of β4 * nAChRs, but not β2 * nAChRs, in mediating acute responses to alcohol using nAChR subtypes knockout mice (β2−/− and β4−/− mice). Finally, we showed that nicotine-induced modifications of alcohol responses were absent in β2−/− and β4−/− mice, suggesting that nicotine triggers β2* and β4 * nAChR-dependent neuroadaptations that subsequently modify the responses to alcohol and thus indicating these receptors as key mediators in the complex interactions between these two drugs. PMID:28332590

  9. The role of excessive versus acute administration of erythropoietin in attenuating hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Pappo, Orit; Ben-Ari, Ziv; Shevtsov, Evgeni; Avlas, Orna; Gassmann, Max; Ravid, Amiram; Cheporko, Yelena; Hochhauser, Edith

    2010-12-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (I/R) is the main cause of primary graft nonfunction. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of excessive versus acute administration of erythropoietin (EPO) in attenuating the hepatic injury induced by I/R in mice. The effect of segmental (70%) hepatic ischemia was evaluated in a transgenic mouse line with constitutive overexpression of human EPO cDNA and in wild-type (WT) mice. Mice were randomly allocated to 5 main experimental groups: (i) WT-sham, (ii) WT ischemia, (iii) WT ischemia + recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO), (iv) transgenic-sham, and (v) transgenic ischemia. The EPO-pretreated mice showed a significant reduction in liver enzyme levels and intrahepatic caspase-3 activity and fewer apoptotic hepatocytes (p < 0.05 for all) compared with the WT untreated I/R group. EPO decreased c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) expression during I/R. In transgenic I/R livers, baseline histology showed diffused hepatic injury, and no significant beneficial effect was noted between the WT untreated and the transgenic I/R mice. In conclusion, acute pretreatment with EPO in WT mice attenuated in vivo I/R liver injury. However, in excessive EPO overexpression, the initial liver injury abolished the beneficial effect of EPO. These findings have important implications for the potential use of acute EPO in I/R injury during liver transplantation.

  10. Acute Clinical Worsening after Steroid Administration in Cervical Myelitis May Reveal a Subdural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Rain, Silvia; Udding, Jan; Broere, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Subdural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is a rare condition characterized by clinical manifestations ranging from mild bilateral sensory deficits to quadriplegia. The diagnosis is often delayed due to unspecific neurological symptoms, initially diagnosed as polyneuropathy or myelopathy. The diagnosis can be delayed for as long as 1–15 years. The following report describes a cervical SDAVF case initially misdiagnosed as myelitis transversa and treated with intravenous steroids. A 56-year-old male presented with sensory deficits and mild leg and right arm weakness. Cervical MRI showed a central medullary hyperintense lesion with contrast enhancement. After metabolic, infectious, and malignant causes were excluded, myelitis transversa was presumed and the patient was treated intravenously with methylprednisolone. Shortly after that, he developed quadriplegia. Cervical MRI imaging showed engorged cervical perimedullary vessels, which were not visible on the initial MRI. The diagnosis was revised and a SDAVF identified. Prompt surgical treatment led to a complete recovery. The effect of intravenous steroids in SDAVF is controversial. Acute clinical worsening after steroid administration is previously reported in several publications; however, due to the paucity of clinical studies on SDAVF, this effect remains mostly overlooked or unknown. The findings in this patient support the causative relation between SDAVF clinical worsening and steroid administration. We propose that acute clinical worsening under steroids in patients initially diagnosed with myelitis should raise suspicion of an SDAVF. PMID:27920716

  11. Acute kidney function and morphology following topload administration of recombinant hemoglobin solution.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Alexandre Fabricio; Abreu Martucci, Ana Carolina Carvalho Ferreira; Cabrales, Pedro; Nascimento, Paulo do; Intaglietta, Marcos; Tsai, Amy G; Castiglia, Yara Marcondes Machado

    2017-02-01

    There is a 0.138% incidence of adverse reactions related to blood transfusion. Transfusion-related acute lung injury, immunosuppression, fever, pathogen transmission, and hemolytic transfusion reactions are the most common ones. Synthetic oxygen carriers have been developed to deal with blood shortages and for use in the field where stored blood was not available. They were also designed to be pathogen free, including unknown viruses. In this study, we used Male Golden Syrian Hamsters implemented with a dorsal window chamber to determine how infusion of three different, genetically crosslinked recombinant acellular hemoglobin (rHb) solutions with different oxygen affinities and nitric oxide kinetics affect mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), kidney function, and kidney structure. We found that the administration of all three rHb solutions caused mild hypertension and bradycardia 30 minutes after infusion. However, acute changes in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were not detected, even though histological analysis was performed 72 hours after treatment revealed some structural changes. All the rHb solutions resulted in hypertension 30 minutes after a 10% topload administration. Regardless of their properties, the presence of acellular Hb causes significant alterations to kidney tissue.

  12. Combined administration of hyperbaric oxygen and hydroxocobalamin improves cerebral metabolism after acute cyanide poisoning in rats.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M B; Olsen, N V; Hyldegaard, O

    2013-11-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) or intravenous hydroxocobalamin (OHCob) both abolish cyanide (CN)-induced surges in interstitial brain lactate and glucose concentrations. HBOT has been shown to induce a delayed increase in whole blood CN concentrations, whereas OHCob may act as an intravascular CN scavenger. Additionally, HBOT may prevent respiratory distress and restore blood pressure during CN intoxication, an effect not seen with OHCob administration. In this report, we evaluated the combined effects of HBOT and OHCob on interstitial lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations as well as lactate-to-pyruvate ratio in rat brain by means of microdialysis during acute CN poisoning. Anesthetized rats were allocated to three groups: 1) vehicle (1.2 ml isotonic NaCl intra-arterially); 2) potassium CN (5.4 mg/kg intra-arterially); 3) potassium CN, OHCob (100 mg/kg intra-arterially) and subsequent HBOT (284 kPa in 90 min). OHCob and HBOT significantly attenuated the acute surges in interstitial cerebral lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations compared with the intoxicated rats given no treatment. Furthermore, the combined treatment resulted in consistent low lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations, as well as in low lactate-to-pyruvate ratios compared with CN intoxicated controls. In rats receiving OHCob and HBOT, respiration improved and cyanosis disappeared, with subsequent stabilization of mean arterial blood pressure. The present findings indicate that a combined administration of OHCob and HBOT has a beneficial and persistent effect on the cerebral metabolism during CN intoxication.

  13. Effect of acute and chronic cobalt administration on carotid body chemoreceptors responses.

    PubMed

    Morelli, L; Di Giulio, C; Iezzi, M; Data, P G

    1994-06-30

    Chronic cobalt exposure leads to release and production of erythropoietin and consequently to polycythemia. Accordingly, cellular elements sensitive to oxygen in the carotid body, would manifest responses during acute and chronic cobalt administration. The carotid body, detects gas changes (PO2, PCO2/pH) in the arterial blood and regulates ventilation and circulation by the afferent nerve discharge. We hypothesized that cobalt interacts with an oxygen sensitive mechanism in the carotid chemoreception and in erythropoietin producing cells. Twelve cats were anesthetized, paralysed and artificially ventilated; few fiber preparation of carotid sinus nerve were recorded during close intraarterial injection of cobalt. In another protocol, 12 rats received an intraperitoneal dose of CoCl2 (10 mg/kg) daily for 6 weeks. At the end, the carotid body was fixed in situ by superfusion. Ultrastructural and morphometric studies were made. Acute administration (0.08-2.3 mumol) promptly stimulated the chemoreceptor afferents. Type I cells increased significantly along with erythropoiesis in the chronic cobalt treated rats. The stimulatory effects of cobalt on the carotid body chemoreceptor showed that sensitive mechanisms in the kidney and in the carotid body are similar, and cobalt interacts with the physiological responses of oxygen.

  14. Cyproheptadine resembles clozapine in vivo following both acute and chronic administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Goudie, Andrew J; Cooper, Gillian D; Cole, Jon C; Sumnall, Harry R

    2007-03-01

    Cyproheptadine is a cheap, widely available anti-allergy drug with a broad receptor binding profile which resembles that of clozapine. In rats discriminating clozapine from vehicle cyproheptadine mimicked clozapine very closely. Acutely it induced full generalization in the absence of response suppression, as observed with clozapine. Chronic administration of clozapine and cyproheptadine induced tolerance and cross-tolerance respectively to the clozapine stimulus. This was characterized by circa 3.5-fold parallel shifts to the right in the clozapine generalization curves. Such tolerance and cross-tolerance was spontaneously reversible, suggesting that it was pharmacodynamic, and that clozapine and cyproheptadine induce similar neuroadaptations when administered chronically. Administration of chlordiazepoxide at a very high dose induced no cross-tolerance to the clozapine stimulus showing the pharmacological specificity of tolerance. The clozapine stimulus is a compound cue involving actions at various receptors, and various clozapine-like antipsychotic (APD) drugs generalize fully to it. These data demonstrate that in vivo cyproheptadine resembles clozapine both acutely and chronically. Our findings, in conjunction with other actions of cyproheptadine -- induction of weight gain, alleviation of clozapine withdrawal, anxiolytic actions, alleviation of 'typical' APD-induced motoric side effects, and some preliminary clinical findings -- suggest that further study of cyproheptadine in conjunction with a 'typical' APD for the possible treatment of schizophrenia is merited at both pre-clinical and clinical levels.

  15. Differential peptidomics assessment of strain and age differences in mice in response to acute cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Romanova, Elena V; Rubakhin, Stanislav S; Ossyra, John R; Zombeck, Jonathan A; Nosek, Michael R; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Rhodes, Justin S

    2015-12-01

    Neurochemical differences in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis between individuals and between ages may contribute to differential susceptibility to cocaine abuse. This study measured peptide levels in the pituitary gland (Pit) and lateral hypothalamus (LH) in adolescent (age 30 days) and adult (age 65 days) mice from four standard inbred strains, FVB/NJ, DBA/2J, C57BL/6J, and BALB/cByJ, which have previously been characterized for acute locomotor responses to cocaine. Individual peptide profiles were analyzed using mass spectrometric profiling and principal component analysis. Sequences of assigned peptides were verified by tandem mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis classified all strains according to their distinct peptide profiles in Pit samples from adolescent mice, but not adults. Select pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides were significantly higher in adolescent BALB/cByJ and DBA/2J mice than in FVB/NJ or C57BL/6J mice. A subset of peptides in the LH, but not in the Pit, was altered by cocaine in adolescents. A 15 mg/kg dose of cocaine induced greater peptide alterations than a 30 mg/kg dose, particularly in FVB/NJ animals, with larger differences in adolescents than adults. Neuropeptides in the LH affected by acute cocaine administration included pro-opiomelanocortin-, myelin basic protein-, and glutamate transporter-derived peptides. The observed peptide differences could contribute to differential behavioral sensitivity to cocaine among strains and ages. Peptides were measured using mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) in individual lateral hypothalamus and pituitary samples from four strains and two ages of inbred mice in response to acute cocaine administration. Principal component analyses (PCA) classified the strains according to their peptide profiles from adolescent mice, and a subset of peptides in the lateral hypothalamus was altered by cocaine in adolescents.

  16. Evidence that nicotinic alpha(7) receptors are not involved in the hyperlocomotor and rewarding effects of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Grottick, A J; Trube, G; Corrigall, W A; Huwyler, J; Malherbe, P; Wyler, R; Higgins, G A

    2000-09-01

    Neuronal nicotinic receptors are comprised of combinations of alpha(2-9) and beta(2-4) subunits arranged to form a pentameric receptor. Currently, the principal central nervous system (CNS) subtypes are believed to be alpha(4)beta(2) and a homomeric alpha(7) receptor, although other combinations almost certainly exist. The identity of the nicotinic receptor subtype(s) involved in the rewarding effects of nicotine are unknown. In the present study, using some recently described subtype selective nicotinic agonists and antagonists, we investigated the role of the alpha(7) nicotinic receptor in the mediation of nicotine-induced hyperactivity and self-administration in rats. The alpha(7) receptor agonists AR-R 17779 and DMAC failed to stimulate locomotor activity in both nicotine-nontolerant and -sensitized rats. In contrast, nicotine and the putative alpha(4)beta(2) subtype selective agonist SIB1765F increased activity in both experimental conditions. In nicotine-sensitized rats, the high affinity (including the alpha(4)beta(2) subtype) nicotinic antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DHbetaE), but not the selective alpha(7) antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA), antagonized a nicotine-induced hyperactivity. Similarly, DHbetaE, but not MLA, pretreatment reduced nicotine self-administration. Electrophysiology experiments using Xenopus oocytes expressing the human alpha(7) receptor confirmed AR-R 17779 and DMAC to be potent agonists at this site, and further studies demonstrated the ability of systemically administered AR-R 17779 to penetrate into the CNS. Taken together, these results indicate a negligible role of alpha(7) receptors in nicotine-induced hyperlocomotion and reward in the rat, and support the view for an involvement of a member from the high-affinity nicotinic receptor subclass, possibly alpha(4)beta(2). Issues such as drug potency, CNS penetration, and desensitization of the alpha(7) receptor are discussed.

  17. Rapid Sensitization of Physiological, Neuronal, and Locomotor Effects of Nicotine: Critical Role of Peripheral Drug Actions

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Magalie; Tang, Jeremy S.; Woods, Amina S.

    2013-01-01

    Repeated exposure to nicotine and other psychostimulant drugs produces persistent increases in their psychomotor and physiological effects (sensitization), a phenomenon related to the drugs' reinforcing properties and abuse potential. Here we examined the role of peripheral actions of nicotine in nicotine-induced sensitization of centrally mediated physiological parameters (brain, muscle, and skin temperatures), cortical and VTA EEG, neck EMG activity, and locomotion in freely moving rats. Repeated injections of intravenous nicotine (30 μg/kg) induced sensitization of the drug's effects on all these measures. In contrast, repeated injections of the peripherally acting analog of nicotine, nicotine pyrrolidine methiodide (nicotinePM, 30 μg/kg, i.v.) resulted in habituation (tolerance) of the same physiological, neuronal, and behavioral measures. However, after repeated nicotine exposure, acute nicotinePM injections induced nicotine-like physiological responses: powerful cortical and VTA EEG desynchronization, EMG activation, a large brain temperature increase, but weaker hyperlocomotion. Additionally, both the acute locomotor response to nicotine and nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization were attenuated by blockade of peripheral nicotinic receptors by hexamethonium (3 mg/kg, i.v.). These data suggest that the peripheral actions of nicotine, which precede its direct central actions, serve as a conditioned interoceptive cue capable of eliciting nicotine-like physiological and neural responses after repeated nicotine exposure. Thus, by providing a neural signal to the CNS that is repeatedly paired with the direct central effects of nicotine, the drug's peripheral actions play a critical role in the development of nicotine-induced physiological, neural, and behavioral sensitization. PMID:23761889

  18. Topiramate does not alter nicotine or cocaine discrimination in rats.

    PubMed

    Le Foll, Bernard; Justinova, Zuzana; Wertheim, Carrie E; Barnes, Chanel; Goldberg, Steven R

    2008-02-01

    The effects of topiramate, a potential treatment for drug dependence, were evaluated in two groups of rats trained to discriminate the administration of either 0.4 mg/kg nicotine or 10 mg/kg cocaine from that of saline, under a fixed-ratio 10 schedule of food delivery. Topiramate (1-60 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) did not produce any nicotine-like or cocaine-like discriminative effects by itself and did not produce any shift in the dose-response curves for nicotine or cocaine discrimination. Thus, the ability to discriminate the effects of nicotine or cocaine does not appear to be altered by topiramate administration. Furthermore, topiramate, given either alone or in combination with nicotine or cocaine, did not depress rates of responding. These experiments indicate that topiramate does not enhance or reduce the ability of rats to discriminate the effects of nicotine or cocaine.

  19. Use of Bioimpedance to Assess Changes in Hemodynamics During Acute Administration of CPAP

    PubMed Central

    Digby, Genevieve C.; Driver, Helen S.; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Ropchan, Glorianne; Parker, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Attempts to investigate the mechanisms by which continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy improves heart function in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have been limited by the lack of non-invasive methods to assess cardiac performance. We used transthoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB) to assess acute hemodynamic changes including heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and cardiac index (CI) during PAP titration in (1) post-operative cardiac surgery patients, (2) patients with severe OSA, and (3) normal healthy volunteers. Methods Post-operative cardiac surgery patients were studied via TEB and pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) during acute titration of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) while mechanically ventilated. Patients with severe OSA were studied non-invasively by TEB during acute CPAP titration in supine stage 2 sleep, and normal subjects while awake and recumbent. Results In post-operative cardiac surgery patients (n = 3), increasing PEEP to 18 cmH2O significantly reduced SV and CI relative to baseline. There was no difference between TEB and PAC in terms of ability to assess variations in hemodynamic parameters. In patients with severe OSA (n = 3), CPAP titration to optimal pressure to alleviate obstructive apneas reduced HR, SV, CO and CI significantly compared to without CPAP. In three healthy subjects, maximal tolerated CPAP reduced SV and CO significantly compared to baseline. Conclusions Acute administration of CPAP causes a decrease in CO and CI, apparently a consequence of a reduction in SV. TEB appears to be an accurate and reproducible non-invasive method of detecting changes in hemodynamics.

  20. Curcumin improves liver damage in male mice exposed to nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Salahshoor, Mohammadreza; Mohamadian, Sabah; Kakabaraei, Seyran; Roshankhah, Shiva; Jalili, Cyrus

    2015-01-01

    The color of turmeric (薑黃 jiāng huáng) is because of a substance called curcumin. It has different pharmacological effects, such as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Nicotine is a major pharmacologically active substance in cigarette smoke. It is mainly metabolized in the liver and causes devastating effects. This study was designed to evaluate the protective role of curcumin against nicotine on the liver in mice. Forty-eight mice were equally divided into eight groups; control (normal saline), nicotine (2.5 mg/kg), curcumin (10, 30, and 60 mg/kg) and curcumin plus nicotine-treated groups. Curcumin, nicotine, and curcumin plus nicotine (once a day) were intraperitoneally injected for 4 weeks. The liver weight and histology, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and serum nitric oxide levels have been studied. The results indicated that nicotine administration significantly decreased liver weight and increased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein, liver enzymes level, and blood serum nitric oxide level compared with the saline group (p < 0.05). However, curcumin and curcumin plus nicotine administration substantially increased liver weight and decreased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein, liver enzymes, and nitric oxide levels in all groups compared with the nicotine group (p < 0.05). Curcumin demonstrated its protective effect against nicotine-induced liver toxicity. PMID:27114942

  1. Nicotine enhances contextual fear memory reconsolidation in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shaowen; Huang, Fulian; Li, Peng; Li, Zhenbang; Zhou, Shouhong; Deng, Haifeng; Yang, Yufeng

    2011-01-10

    There is increasing evidence that nicotine is involved in learning and memory. However, there remains no study that has explored the relationship between nicotine and memory reconsolidation. At present study, we tested the effects of nicotine on the reconsolidation of contextual fear memory in rats. Behavior procedure involved four training phases: habituation (Day 0), fear conditioning (Day 1), reactivation (Day 2) and test (Day 3). Rats were injected saline or nicotine (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0mg/kg) immediately after reactivation. Percent of time spent freezing was used to measure conditioned fear response. Results showed that compared with saline rats, rats with nicotine at 1.0mg/kg presented a significant increase of freezing response on Day 3. Nicotine at 1.0mg/kg was ineffective when injected 6h after reactivation. Further results showed that the enhancement of freezing response induced by nicotine at 1.0mg/kg was dependent on fear memory reconsolidation, and was not attributed to an enhancement of the nonspecific freezing response 24h after nicotine administration. The results suggest that nicotine administration immediately after reactivation enhances contextual fear memory reconsolidation. Our present finding extends previous research on the nicotinic effects on learning and memory.

  2. Acute caffeine administration effect on brain activation patterns in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Haller, Sven; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Rodriguez, Cristelle; Moser, Dominik; Toma, Simona; Hofmeister, Jeremy; Sinanaj, Indrit; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that acute caffeine administration enhances task-related brain activation in elderly individuals with preserved cognition. To explore the effects of this widely used agent on cognition and brain activation in early phases of cognitive decline, we performed a double-blinded, placebo-controlled functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study during an n-back working memory task in 17 individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) compared to 17 age-matched healthy controls (HC). All individuals were regular caffeine consumers with an overnight abstinence and given 200 mg caffeine versus placebo tablets 30 minutes before testing. Analyses included assessment of task-related activation (general linear model), functional connectivity (tensorial-independent component analysis, TICA), baseline perfusion (arterial spin labeling, ASL), grey matter density (voxel-based morphometry, VBM), and white matter microstructure (tract-based spatial statistics, TBSS). Acute caffeine administration induced a focal activation of the prefrontal areas in HC with a more diffuse and posteromedial activation pattern in MCI individuals. In MCI, TICA documented a significant caffeine-related enhancement in the prefrontal cortex, supplementary motor area, ventral premotor and parietal cortex as well as the basal ganglia and cerebellum. The absence of significant group differences in baseline ASL perfusion patterns supports a neuronal rather than a purely vascular origin of these differences. The VBM and TBSS analyses excluded potentially confounding differences in grey matter density and white matter microstructure between MCI and HC. The present findings suggest a posterior displacement of working memory-related brain activation patterns after caffeine administration in MCI that may represent a compensatory mechanism to counterbalance a frontal lobe dysfunction.

  3. Nicotine replacement therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... takes for the patch to work. The inhaler satisfies oral urges. Most of the nicotine vapor does ... spray provides a quick dose of nicotine to satisfy a craving you are unable to ignore. Levels ...

  4. Lethal acute lung injury and hypoglycemia after subcutaneous administration of monochloroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Kato, Junko; Dote, Tomotaro; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Shimbo, Yukari; Fujihara, Michiko; Kono, Koichi

    2006-06-01

    Hypoglycemia is suspected in the acute lethal toxicity induced by cutaneous exposure to monochloroacetic acid (MCA). Although it has been shown that hepato-renal dysfunction is involved, the mechanism and the target organs that directly affect mortality remain to be determined. We suspected respiratory failure as a main cause of death in some reported cases. We investigated dose-response effects, hypoglycemia, and lung injury in rats exposed to MCA. Serum glucose, blood gases, and parameters of alveolar injury in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were analysed 2 and 4 h after subcutaneous administration of MCA (108, 135 or 163 mg/kg). Apparent pulmonary injury and hypoglycemia were not identified 2 h after administration, but lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and total cells in BALF were dose-dependently increased; and severe hypoglycemia was identified 4 h after administration. Blood gas analysis showed remarkable alveolar gas dysfunction as exchange in the 163 mg/kg group. Thus, hypoglycemia and lung injury appear to cause death in response to MCA exposure.

  5. Improved memory for reward cues following acute buprenorphine administration in humans.

    PubMed

    Syal, Supriya; Ipser, Jonathan; Terburg, David; Solms, Mark; Panksepp, Jaak; Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Bos, Peter A; Montoya, Estrella R; Stein, Dan J; van Honk, Jack

    2015-03-01

    In rodents, there is abundant evidence for the involvement of the opioid system in the processing of reward cues, but this system has remained understudied in humans. In humans, the happy facial expression is a pivotal reward cue. Happy facial expressions activate the brain's reward system and are disregarded by subjects scoring high on depressive mood who are low in reward drive. We investigated whether a single 0.2mg administration of the mixed mu-opioid agonist/kappa-antagonist, buprenorphine, would influence short-term memory for happy, angry or fearful expressions relative to neutral faces. Healthy human subjects (n38) participated in a randomized placebo-controlled within-subject design, and performed an emotional face relocation task after administration of buprenorphine and placebo. We show that, compared to placebo, buprenorphine administration results in a significant improvement of memory for happy faces. Our data demonstrate that acute manipulation of the opioid system by buprenorphine increases short-term memory for social reward cues.

  6. Acute neuropsychological effects of MDMA and ethanol (co-)administration in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Wezenberg, E.; Valkenberg, M. M. G. J.; de Jong, C. A. J.; Buitelaar, J. K.; van Gerven, J. M. A.; Verkes, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale In Western societies, a considerable percentage of young people expose themselves to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or “ecstasy”). Commonly, ecstasy is used in combination with other substances, in particular alcohol (ethanol). MDMA induces both arousing as well as hallucinogenic effects, whereas ethanol is a general central nervous system depressant. Objective The aim of the present study is to assess the acute effects of single and co-administration of MDMA and ethanol on executive, memory, psychomotor, visuomotor, visuospatial and attention function, as well as on subjective experience. Materials and methods We performed a four-way, double-blind, randomised, crossover, placebo-controlled study in 16 healthy volunteers (nine male, seven female) between the ages of 18–29. MDMA was given orally (100 mg) and blood alcohol concentration was maintained at 0.6‰ by an ethanol infusion regime. Results Co-administration of MDMA and ethanol was well tolerated and did not show greater impairment of performance compared to the single-drug conditions. Impaired memory function was consistently observed after all drug conditions, whereas impairment of psychomotor function and attention was less consistent across drug conditions. Conclusions Co-administration of MDMA and ethanol did not exacerbate the effects of either drug alone. Although the impairment of performance by all drug conditions was relatively moderate, all induced significant impairment of cognitive function. PMID:18305926

  7. The Molecular Targets of Selected Organophosphorus Compounds at Nicotinic, Muscarinic, GABA, and Glutamate Synapses: Acute and Chronic Studies Including Prophylactic and Therapeutic Approaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-28

    bicyclo-octane analogs of amantadine with the ionic channels of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and electrically excitable membrane. J. Pharmacol...Warnick, J.E. Phencyclidine (PCP) - dopamine (DA) interaction in the isolated neonatal rat spinal cord. The Pharmacologist 1984. 12. Deshpande, S.S., Adler

  8. Adolescent nicotine exposure transiently increases high-affinity nicotinic receptors and modulates inhibitory synaptic transmission in rat medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Counotte, Danielle S.; Goriounova, Natalia A.; Moretti, Milena; Smoluch, Marek T.; Irth, Hubertus; Clementi, Francesco; Schoffelmeer, Anton N. M.; Mansvelder, Huibert D.; Smit, August B.; Gotti, Cecilia; Spijker, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is a critical developmental period during which most adult smokers initiate their habit. Adolescents are more vulnerable than adults to nicotine’s long-term effects on addictive and cognitive behavior. We investigated whether adolescent nicotine exposure in rats modifies expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in the short and/or long term, and whether this has functional consequences. Using receptor binding studies followed by immunoprecipitation of nAChR subunits, we showed that adolescent nicotine exposure, as compared with saline, caused an increase in mPFC nAChRs containing α4 or β2 subunits (24 and 18%, respectively) 24 h after the last injection. Nicotine exposure in adulthood had no such effect. This increase was transient and was not observed 5 wk following either adolescent or adult nicotine exposure. In line with increased nAChRs expression 1 d after adolescent nicotine exposure, we observed a 34% increase in amplitude of nicotine-induced spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in layer II/III mPFC pyramidal neurons. These effects were transient and specific, and observed only acutely after adolescent nicotine exposure, but not after 5 wk, and no changes were observed in adult-exposed animals. The acute nicotine-induced increase in α4β2-containing receptors in adolescents interferes with the normal developmental decrease (37%) of these receptors from early adolescence (postnatal day 34) to adulthood (postnatal day 104) in the mPFC. Together, this suggests that these receptors play a role in mediating the acute rewarding effects of nicotine and may underlie the increased sensitivity of adolescents to nicotine. PMID:22308197

  9. Effects of acute ethanol administration on nocturnal pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Creighton, J.A.; Rudeen, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acute ethanol administration on pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity, norepinephrine and indoleamine content was examined in male rats. When ethanol was administered in two equal doses (2 g/kg body weight) over a 4 hour period during the light phase, the nocturnal rise in NAT activity was delayed by seven hours. The nocturnal pineal norepinephrine content was not altered by ethanol except for a delay in the reduction of NE with the onset of the following light phase. Although ethanol treatment led to a significant reduction in nocturnal levels of pineal serotonin content, there was no significant effect upon pineal content of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). The data indicate that ethanol delays the onset of the rise of nocturnal pineal NAT activity.

  10. Effects of acute administration of brotizolam in subjects with disturbed sleep

    PubMed Central

    Roehrs, T.; Zorick, F.; Koshorek, G. L.; Wittig, R.; Roth, T.

    1983-01-01

    1 Effects of ingestion of brotizolam (0.25 and 0.50 mg) over 1-3 days on polysomnographic measures of sleep were assessed in patients complaining of insomnia. 2 Brotizolam reduced latency to sleep, number of awakenings and wake during sleep, and increased total sleep time. It also increased stage 2 sleep and decreased slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep. 3 Increasing the dose from 0.25 to 0.50 mg increased hypnotic efficacy, and there was a more consistent and reliable effect. 4 Discontinuation of brotizolam had minimal effects on sleep compared with placebo over the 3 nights after acute administration. 5 No side-effects or disruption of daytime function was found using questionnaires and objective tests of performance. PMID:6661383

  11. Behavioral consequences of chelator administration in acute cadmium toxicity (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Peele, D.B.; Farmer, J.D.; MacPhail, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    The conditioned flavor-aversion paradigm was used to assess the toxicity of acutely administered cadmium and the interaction of cadmium with the heavy-metal chelating agents dimercaprol (BAL) and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). Shortly after consuming saccharin, rats received cadmium either alone or in combination with BAL or DMSA. When compared to rats receiving either nothing or the vehicle, rats receiving cadmium displayed significant reductions in saccharin preference (i.e., conditioned flavor aversions). BAL and DMSA were also capable of producing conditioned flavor aversions when given alone. Rats receiving cadmium in combination with either BAL or DMSA displayed significant, but not complete, attenuations of conditioned flavor aversions when compared to rats receiving cadmium alone. Chelator-induced blockade of cadmium-induced flavor-aversion conditioning was not obtained when BAL or DMSA administration was delayed by 4 hrs.

  12. The dual orexin receptor antagonist TCS1102 does not affect reinstatement of nicotine-seeking

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Gavan P.; Clemens, Kelly J.

    2017-01-01

    The orexin/hypocretin system is important for appetitive motivation towards multiple drugs of abuse, including nicotine. Both OX1 and OX2 receptors individually have been shown to influence nicotine self-administration and reinstatement. Due to the increasing clinical use of dual orexin receptor antagonists in the treatment of disorders such as insomnia, we examined whether a dual orexin receptor antagonist may also be effective in reducing nicotine seeking. We tested the effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of the potent and selective dual orexin receptor antagonist TCS1102 on orexin-A-induced food self-administration, nicotine self-administration and reinstatement of nicotine-seeking in rats. Our results show that 30 μg of TCS1102 i.c.v. abolishes orexin-A-induced increases in food self-administration but does not reduce nicotine self-administration. Neither i.c.v. 10 μg nor 30 μg of TCS1102 reduced compound reinstatement after short-term (15 days) self-administration nicotine, but 30 μg transiently reduced cue/nicotine compound reinstatement after chronic self-administration (29 days). These results indicate that TCS1102 has no substantial effect on motivation for nicotine seeking following chronic self-administration and no effect after shorter periods of intake. Orexin receptor antagonists may therefore have little clinical utility against nicotine addiction. PMID:28296947

  13. Effects of acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on sympathetic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Tiradentes, R.V.; Pires, J.G.P.; Silva, N.F.; Ramage, A.G.; Santuzzi, C.H.; Futuro, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Serotonergic mechanisms have an important function in the central control of circulation. Here, the acute effects of three selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on autonomic and cardiorespiratory variables were measured in rats. Although SSRIs require 2-3 weeks to achieve their full antidepressant effects, it has been shown that they cause an immediate inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Seventy male Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and respiratory frequency. At lower doses, the acute cardiovascular effects of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline administered intravenously were insignificant and variable. At middle and higher doses, a general pattern was observed, with significant reductions in sympathetic nerve activity. At 10 min, fluoxetine (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced RSNA by -33±4.7 and -31±5.4%, respectively, without changes in blood pressure; 3 and 10 mg/kg paroxetine reduced RSNA by -35±5.4 and -31±5.5%, respectively, with an increase in blood pressure +26.3±2.5; 3 mg/kg sertraline reduced RSNA by -59.4±8.6%, without changes in blood pressure. Sympathoinhibition began 5 min after injection and lasted approximately 30 min. For fluoxetine and sertraline, but not paroxetine, there was a reduction in heart rate that was nearly parallel to the sympathoinhibition. The effect of these drugs on the other variables was insignificant. In conclusion, acute peripheral administration of SSRIs caused early autonomic cardiovascular effects, particularly sympathoinhibition, as measured by RSNA. Although a peripheral action cannot be ruled out, such effects are presumably mostly central. PMID:25003632

  14. Effects of acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Tiradentes, R V; Pires, J G P; Silva, N F; Ramage, A G; Santuzzi, C H; Futuro Neto, H A

    2014-07-01

    Serotonergic mechanisms have an important function in the central control of circulation. Here, the acute effects of three selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on autonomic and cardiorespiratory variables were measured in rats. Although SSRIs require 2-3 weeks to achieve their full antidepressant effects, it has been shown that they cause an immediate inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Seventy male Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and respiratory frequency. At lower doses, the acute cardiovascular effects of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline administered intravenously were insignificant and variable. At middle and higher doses, a general pattern was observed, with significant reductions in sympathetic nerve activity. At 10 min, fluoxetine (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced RSNA by -33 ± 4.7 and -31 ± 5.4%, respectively, without changes in blood pressure; 3 and 10 mg/kg paroxetine reduced RSNA by -35 ± 5.4 and -31 ± 5.5%, respectively, with an increase in blood pressure +26.3 ± 2.5; 3 mg/kg sertraline reduced RSNA by -59.4 ± 8.6%, without changes in blood pressure. Sympathoinhibition began 5 min after injection and lasted approximately 30 min. For fluoxetine and sertraline, but not paroxetine, there was a reduction in heart rate that was nearly parallel to the sympathoinhibition. The effect of these drugs on the other variables was insignificant. In conclusion, acute peripheral administration of SSRIs caused early autonomic cardiovascular effects, particularly sympathoinhibition, as measured by RSNA. Although a peripheral action cannot be ruled out, such effects are presumably mostly central.

  15. Liver necrosis induced by acute intraperitoneal ethanol administration in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Giavarotti, Leandro; D'Almeida, Vania; Giavarotti, Karin A S; Azzalis, Ligia A; Rodrigues, Luciano; Cravero, Amerys A M; Videla, Luis A; Koch, Osvaldo R; Junqueira, Virginia B C

    2002-03-01

    It is generally agreed that the deleterious pathophysiological effects of ethanol are caused, at least partially by an increase in free radical production. However, little attention has been directed to the effects of ethanol upon elderly organisms. Male Wistar rats at ages 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months were treated either with a single i.p. dose of 35% ethanol (v/v) at 3 g ethanol/kg body weight or an isovolumetric amount of 0.9% saline solution. We then assessed the plasma levels of transaminases and hepatic levels of oxidative stress-related parameters, followed by liver histological evaluation. The younger rats (3 months old) were not affected by the treatment with ethanol with respect to any of the studied parameters except for a lowering of total hepatic GSH and an increase in hepatic thiobarbituric acid reactants (TBARS) formation, while animals older than 3 months were increasingly more affected by the treatment. Acute ethanol treatment elicited the similar responses to those in the 3 months-old group, plus a decrease in the hepatic and plasma levels of beta-carotene and the plasma level of alpha-tocopherol, as well as an increase in the activity of plasma transaminases. In the 12,18 and 24 months old groups, there was increasing liver necrosis. These findings suggest that liver damage induced by acute ethanol administration in elderly rats may involve a lack of antioxidants.

  16. Central nervous insulin administration does not potentiate the acute glucoregulatory impact of concurrent mild hyperinsulinemia.

    PubMed

    Ott, Volker; Lehnert, Hendrik; Staub, Josefine; Wönne, Kathrin; Born, Jan; Hallschmid, Manfred

    2015-03-01

    Experiments in rodents suggest that hypothalamic insulin signaling essentially contributes to the acute control of peripheral glucose homeostasis. Against this background, we investigated in healthy humans whether intranasal (IN) insulin, which is known to effectively reach the brain compartment, impacts systemic glucose metabolism. Twenty overnight-fasted healthy, normal-weight men were IN administered 210 and 420 international units [IU] (10 and 20 IU every 15 min) of the insulin analog aspart (ins-asp) and placebo, respectively, during experimental sessions lasting 6 h. The use of ins-asp rather than human insulin enabled us to disentangle exogenous and endogenous insulin kinetics. IN insulin dose-dependently decreased plasma glucose concentrations while reducing C-peptide and attenuating endogenous insulin levels. However, we also observed a slight dose-dependent permeation of ins-asp into the circulation. In control experiments mimicking the systemic but not the central nervous uptake of the IN 210 IU dose via intravenous infusion of ins-asp at a dose of 0.12 IU/kg/24 h (n = 10), we obtained essentially identical effects on fasting plasma glucose concentrations. This pattern indicates that sustained IN insulin administration to the human brain to enhance central nervous insulin signaling does not acutely alter systemic glucose homeostasis beyond effects accounted for by concurrent mild hyperinsulinemia.

  17. GABAergic modulation of human social interaction in a prisoner's dilemma model by acute administration of alprazolam.

    PubMed

    Lane, Scott D; Gowin, Joshua L

    2009-10-01

    Recent work in neuroeconomics has used game theory paradigms to examine neural systems that subserve human social interaction and decision making. Attempts to modify social interaction through pharmacological manipulation have been less common. Here we show dose-dependent modification of human social behavior in a prisoner's dilemma model after acute administration of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-A modulating benzodiazepine alprazolam. Nine healthy adults received doses of placebo, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg alprazolam in a counterbalanced within-subject design, while completing multiple test blocks per day on an iterated prisoner's dilemma game. During test blocks in which peak subjective effects of alprazolam were reported, cooperative choices were significantly decreased as a function of dose. Consistent with previous reports showing that high acute doses of GABA-modulating drugs are associated with violence and other antisocial behavior, our data suggest that at sufficiently high doses, alprazolam can decrease cooperation. These behavioral changes may be facilitated by changes in inhibitory control facilitated by GABA. Game theory paradigms may prove useful in behavioral pharmacology studies seeking to measure social interaction, and may help inform the emerging field of neuroeconomics.

  18. Baclofen-induced antinociception and nicotinic receptor mechanism(s).

    PubMed

    Sabetkasai, M; Ahang, S; Shafaghi, B; Zarrindast, M R

    1999-11-01

    In this study, the influences of nicotinic receptor agents on baclofen-induced antinociception in the tail-flick test have been studied. Intraperitoneal administration of baclofen (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg) to mice induced a dose-dependent antinociception in the tail-flick test. Subcutaneous injection of nicotine (0.5-2.5 mg/kg) also caused a dose-dependent antinociceptive response. Intracerebral (10 and 20 microg/mouse) but not intraperitoneal administration of hexamethonium (5 and 10 mg/kg) to mice decreased the response of both nicotine and baclofen. However, administration of the GABA(B) antagonist CGP 35348 (100 and 200 mg/kg) decreased the response induced by baclofen but not by nicotine. It is concluded that at least part of the baclofen-induced antinociception may be mediated through a nicotinic mechanism.

  19. Activation of matrix metalloproteinase in dorsal hippocampus drives improvement in spatial working memory after intra-VTA nicotine infusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Shu, Hui; Zheng, Guo-qing; Wang, Xiaona; Sun, Yanyun; Liu, Yushan; Weaver, John Michael; Shen, Xianzhi; Liu, Wenlan; Jin, Xinchun

    2015-10-01

    The hippocampus receives dopaminergic projections from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra. These inputs appear to provide a modulatory signal that influences hippocampus-dependent behaviors. Enhancements in working memory performance have been previously reported following acute smoking/nicotine exposure. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the effects of nicotine on spatial working memory (SWM) and the mechanisms involved. Delayed alternation T-maze task was used to assess SWM. In situ and gel gelatin zymography were used to detect matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in SWM. Systemic or local (intra-VTA) administration of nicotine significantly improves SWM, which was accompanied by increased MMP-9 activity in dorsal hippocampus (dHPC). Intra-dHPC administration of MMP inhibitor FN-439 abolished the memory enhancement induced by intra-VTA nicotine infusion. FN-439 had no effect on locomotor behavior. Our data suggest that intra-VTA nicotine infusion activates MMP-9 in dHPC to improve SWM in rats.

  20. Effects of imperatorin on nicotine-induced anxiety- and memory-related responses and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Budzynska, Barbara; Boguszewska-Czubara, Anna; Kruk-Slomka, Marta; Skalicka-Wozniak, Krystyna; Michalak, Agnieszka; Musik, Irena; Biala, Grazyna; Glowniak, Kazimierz

    2013-10-02

    The purpose of the reported experiments was to examine the effects of imperatorin [9-[(3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl)oxy]-7H-furo[3,2-g]chromen-7-one] on anxiety and memory-related responses induced by nicotine in mice and their relation to the level of nicotine-induced oxidative stress in brain as well as in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. Male Swiss mice were tested for anxiety in the elevated plus maze test (EPM), and for cognition using passive avoidance (PA) procedures. Imperatorin, purified by high-speed counter-current chromatography from methanol extract of fruits of Angelica officinalis, acutely administered at the doses of 10 and 20mg/kg impaired the anxiogenic effect of nicotine (0.1mg/kg, s.c.). Furthermore, acute injections of subthreshold dose of imperatorin (1mg/kg, i.p.) improved processes of memory acquisition when co-administered with nicotine used at non-active dose of 0.05 mg/kg, s.c. Additionally, repeated administration of imperatorin (1mg/kg, i.p., twice daily, for 6 days) improved different stages of memory processes (both acquisition and consolidation) when injected in combination with non-active dose of nicotine (0.05 mg/kg, s.c.) in the PA task. Oxidative stress was assessed by determination of antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidases (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR)) activities as well as of malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration in the whole brain, the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex after repeated administration of imperatorin (1mg/kg, 6 days) and single nicotine injection (0.05 mg/kgs.c.) on the seventh day. The results of our research suggest strong behavioural interaction between imperatorin and nicotine at the level of anxiety- and cognitive-like processes. Furthermore, imperatorin inhibited nicotine-induced changes in examined indicators of oxidative stress, especially in the hippocampus and the cortex.

  1. Effects of systemic administration of sitafloxacin on subgingival microflora and antimicrobial susceptibility profile in acute periodontal lesions.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Sachiyo; Kasai, Shunsuke; Ihara, Yuichiro; Imamura, Kentaro; Kita, Daichi; Ota, Koki; Kinumatsu, Takashi; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Saito, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect(s) of systemic administration of sitafloxacin on subgingival microbial profiles of acute periodontal lesions. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates was also investigated. Patients with acute phases of chronic periodontitis were subjected to clinical examination and microbiological assessment of their subgingival plaque samples by culture technique. Sitafloxacin was then administered (100 mg/day for 5 days) systemically. The clinical and microbiological examinations were repeated 6-8 days after administration. Susceptibilities of clinical isolates to various antimicrobials were determined using the broth and agar dilution methods. From the sampled sites in 30 participants, a total of 355 clinical isolates (34 different bacterial species) were isolated and identified. Parvimonas micra, Prevotella intermedia and Streptococcus mitis were the most prevalent cultivable bacteria in acute sites. Systemic administration of sitafloxacin yielded a significant improvement in clinical and microbiological parameters. Among the antimicrobials tested, sitafloxacin was the most potent against the clinical isolates with an MIC90 of 0.12 μg/ml at baseline. After administration, most clinical isolates were still highly susceptible to sitafloxacin although some increase in MICs was observed. The results suggest that systemic administration of sitafloxacin is effective against subgingival bacteria isolated from acute periodontal lesions.

  2. Opioid Analgesics and Nicotine: More Than Blowing Smoke.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jin H; Lane, Scott D; Weaver, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    Practitioners are highly likely to encounter patients with concurrent use of nicotine products and opioid analgesics. Smokers present with more severe and extended chronic pain outcomes and have a higher frequency of prescription opioid use. Current tobacco smoking is a strong predictor of risk for nonmedical use of prescription opioids. Opioid and nicotinic-cholinergic neurotransmitter systems interact in important ways to modulate opioid and nicotine effects: dopamine release induced by nicotine is dependent on facilitation by the opioid system, and the nicotinic-acetylcholine system modulates self-administration of several classes of abused drugs-including opioids. Nicotine can serve as a prime for the use of other drugs, which in the case of the opioid system may be bidirectional. Opioids and compounds in tobacco, including nicotine, are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 enzyme system, but the metabolism of opioids and tobacco products can be complicated. Accordingly, drug interactions are possible but not always clear. Because of these issues, asking about nicotine use in patients taking opioids for pain is recommended. When assessing patient tobacco use, practitioners should also obtain information on products other than cigarettes, such as cigars, pipes, smokeless tobacco, and electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS, or e-cigarettes). There are multiple forms of behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy available to assist patients with smoking cessation, and opioid agonist maintenance and pain clinics represent underutilized opportunities for nicotine intervention programs.

  3. The role of nicotine in smoking: a dual-reinforcement model.

    PubMed

    Caggiula, Anthony R; Donny, Eric C; Palmatier, Matthew I; Liu, Xiu; Chaudhri, Nadia; Sved, Alan F

    2009-01-01

    Models of intravenous nicotine self-administration in laboratory animals are being used to investigate the behavioral and neurobiological consequences of nicotine reinforcement, and to aid in the development of novel pharmacotherapies for smoking cessation. Central to these models is the principle of primary reinforcement, which posits that response-contingent presentation of a primary reinforcer, nicotine, engenders robust operant behavior, whereas response-independent drug delivery does not. This dictum of nicotine as a primary reinforcer has been widely used to explain why people smoke tobacco-smoking results in the rapid delivery of nicotine to the brain, setting up a cascade of neurobiological processes that strengthen subsequent smoking behavior. However, there is mounting evidence that the primary reinforcement model of nicotine self-administration fails to fully explain existing data from both the animal self-administration and human smoking literatures. We have recently proposed a "dual reinforcement" model to more fully capture the relationship between nicotine and self-administration, including smoking. Briefly, the "dual reinforcement" model posits that nicotine acts as both a primary reinforcer and a reinforcement enhancer. The latter action of nicotine had originally been uncovered by showing that a reinforcing VS, which accompanies nicotine delivery, synergizes with nicotine in the acquisition and maintenance of self-administration, and that this synergism can be reproduced by combining operant responding for the reinforcing stimulus with non-contingent (response-independent) nicotine. Thus, self-administration (and smoking) is sustained by three actions: (1) nicotine, acting as a primary reinforcer, can sustain behavior that leads to its delivery; (2) nicotine, acting as a primary reinforcer, can establish neutral environmental stimuli as conditioned reinforcers through Pavlovian associations; and (3) nicotine, acting as a reinforcement enhancer

  4. Ethanol-nicotine interactions in long-sleep and short-sleep mice

    SciTech Connect

    de Fiebre, C.M.; Marks, M.J.; Collins, A.C. )

    1990-05-01

    The possibility that common genetic factors regulate initial sensitivities to ethanol and nicotine as well as the development of cross-tolerance between these agents was explored using the long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice. The LS mice proved to be more sensitive to an acute challenge with nicotine than were the SS mice. Segregation analysis (F1, F2, backcross) indicated that ethanol sensitivity and nicotine sensitivity segregate together. Acute pretreatment with nicotine did not significantly affect sensitivity to ethanol, but ethanol pretreatment altered nicotine responsiveness. The LS mice develop more tolerance to nicotine and ethanol than do the SS and they also develop more cross-tolerance. These genetically determined differences in initial sensitivities, and tolerance and cross-tolerance development are not readily explained by differences in brain nicotinic receptor numbers.

  5. The effect of acute stress and long-term corticosteroid administration on plasma metabolites in an urban and desert songbird.

    PubMed

    Davies, Scott; Rodriguez, Natalie S; Sweazea, Karen L; Deviche, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    In response to stressful stimuli, animals activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which can result in transition to the "emergency life history stage." A key adaptive characteristic of this life history stage is the mobilization of energy stores. However, few data are available on the metabolic response to acute stress in wild-caught, free-ranging birds. We quantified the effect of acute capture and restraint stress on plasma glucose, free fatty acid, and uric acid in free-ranging Abert's towhees Melozone aberti. Furthermore, birds were caught from urban and desert localities of Phoenix, Arizona, to investigate potential effects of urban versus desert habitats on the corticosterone (CORT) and metabolic response to acute stress. Complementing work on free-ranging birds, captive towhees received CORT-filled Silastic capsules to investigate the response of urban and desert conspecifics to long-term CORT administration. We quantified the effect of CORT administration on baseline plasma glucose and uric acid, liver and pectoralis muscle glycogen stores, kidney phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C, a key gluconeogenic enzyme), and body mass. Acute stress increased plasma CORT and glucose and decreased plasma uric acid but had no effect on plasma free fatty acid. There was no difference between urban and desert localities in body mass, fat scores, and the response to acute stress. CORT administration decreased body mass but had no effect on glucose and uric acid, pectoral muscle glycogen, or kidney PEPCK-C. However, liver glycogen of CORT-treated urban birds increased compared with corresponding controls, whereas glycogen decreased in CORT-treated desert birds. This study suggests that Abert's towhees principally mobilize glucose during acute stress but urban and desert towhees do not differ in their CORT and metabolic response to acute stress or long-term CORT administration.

  6. Early postnatal nicotine exposure causes hippocampus-dependent memory impairments in adolescent mice: Association with altered nicotinic cholinergic modulation of LTP, but not impaired LTP.

    PubMed

    Nakauchi, Sakura; Malvaez, Melissa; Su, Hailing; Kleeman, Elise; Dang, Richard; Wood, Marcelo A; Sumikawa, Katumi

    2015-02-01

    Fetal nicotine exposure from smoking during pregnancy causes long-lasting cognitive impairments in offspring, yet little is known about the mechanisms that underlie this effect. Here we demonstrate that early postnatal exposure of mouse pups to nicotine via maternal milk impairs long-term, but not short-term, hippocampus-dependent memory during adolescence. At the Schaffer collateral (SC) pathway, the most widely studied synapses for a cellular correlate of hippocampus-dependent memory, the induction of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-dependent transient long-term potentiation (LTP) and protein synthesis-dependent long-lasting LTP are not diminished by nicotine exposure, but rather unexpectedly the threshold for LTP induction becomes lower after nicotine treatment. Using voltage sensitive dye to visualize hippocampal activity, we found that early postnatal nicotine exposure also results in enhanced CA1 depolarization and hyperpolarization after SC stimulation. Furthermore, we show that postnatal nicotine exposure induces pervasive changes to the nicotinic modulation of CA1 activity: activation of nicotinic receptors no longer increases CA1 network depolarization, acute nicotine inhibits rather than facilitates the induction of LTP at the SC pathway by recruiting an additional nicotinic receptor subtype, and acute nicotine no longer blocks LTP induction at the temporoammonic pathway. These findings reflect the pervasive impact of nicotine exposure during hippocampal development, and demonstrate an association of hippocampal memory impairments with altered nicotinic cholinergic modulation of LTP, but not impaired LTP. The implication of our results is that nicotinic cholinergic-dependent plasticity is required for long-term memory formation and that postnatal nicotine exposure disrupts this form of plasticity.

  7. Delayed administration of darbepoetin or erythropoietin protects against ischemic acute renal injury and failure.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D W; Pat, B; Vesey, D A; Guan, Z; Endre, Z; Gobe, G C

    2006-05-01

    Administration of human recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) at time of acute ischemic renal injury (IRI) inhibits apoptosis, enhances tubular epithelial regeneration, and promotes renal functional recovery. The present study aimed to determine whether darbepoetin-alfa (DPO) exhibits comparable renoprotection to that afforded by EPO, whether pro or antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins are involved, and whether delayed administration of EPO or DPO 6 h following IRI ameliorates renal dysfunction. The model of IRI involved bilateral renal artery occlusion for 45 min in rats (N = 4 per group), followed by reperfusion for 1-7 days. Controls were sham-operated. Rats were treated at time of ischemia or sham operation (T0), or post-treated (6 h after the onset of reperfusion, T6) with EPO (5000 IU/kg), DPO (25 mug/kg), or appropriate vehicle by intraperitoneal injection. Renal function, structure, and immunohistochemistry for Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bax were analyzed. DPO or EPO at T0 significantly abrogated renal dysfunction in IRI animals (serum creatinine for IRI 0.17 +/- 0.05 mmol/l vs DPO-IRI 0.08 +/- 0.03 mmol/l vs EPO-IRI 0.04 +/- 0.01 mmol/l, P = 0.01). Delayed administration of DPO or EPO (T6) also significantly abrogated subsequent renal dysfunction (serum creatinine for IRI 0.17 +/- 0.05 mmol/l vs DPO-IRI 0.06 +/- 0.01 mmol/l vs EPO-IRI 0.03 +/- 0.03 mmol/l, P = 0.01). There was also significantly decreased tissue injury (apoptosis, P < 0.05), decreased proapoptotic Bax, and increased regenerative capacity, especially in the outer stripe of the outer medulla, with DPO or EPO at T0 or T6. These results reaffirm the potential clinical application of DPO and EPO as novel renoprotective agents for patients at risk of ischemic acute renal failure or after having sustained an ischemic renal insult.

  8. Effect of early administration of exogenous basic fibroblast growth factor on acute edematous pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qiang; Yao, Xing; Dai, Li-Cheng; Zhang, Guo-Lei; Ping, Jin-Liang; He, Jian-Fang; Han, Chun-Fan

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To observe the therapeutic effect of early administration of exogenous Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on acute edematous pancreatitis (AEP) in rats. METHODS: Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three (n = 10): normal control group (group I), AEP group (group II) and AEP with bFGF treatment group (group III). AEP was induced by subcutaneous injection of cerulein (5.5 μg/kg and 7.5 μg/kg) at 1 h interval into rats of groups II and III. Three hours after induction of AEP, 100 μg/kg bFGF was administrated intraperitoneally for 1h to group III rats. For test of DNA synthesis in acinar cells, 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling solution was intraperitoneally injected into the rats of groups II and III 24 h after bFGF treatment. The changes in serum amylase, lipase, pancreatic tissue wet/dry ratio were detected. RESULTS: In bFGF treatment group, there was a significant decrease in the volume of serum amylase, lipase and the pancreatic wet/dry weight ratio(1383.0 ± 94.6 U/L, 194.0 ± 43.6 U/L, 4.32 ± 0.32) compared to AEP group (3464 ± 223.7 U/L, 456 ±68.7 U/L, 6.89 ± 0.47) (P < 0.01), and no significant difference was found between bFGF treatment and control group (1289 ± 94.0 U/L, 171 ± 23.4 U/L, 4.12 ± 0.26, P > 0.05). The inflammatory changes such as interstitial edema, polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and vacuolization were significantly ameliorated compared to AEP group (P < 0.01). A small number of BrdU-labeled nuclei were observed in acinar cells of AEP rats (1.8 ± 0.3 nuclei/microscopic field, n = 10) while diffuse BrdU-labeled nuclei were found in bFGF-treated rats (18.9 ± 1.4 nuclei/microscopic field, n = 10) (P < 0.01). Immunohistochemical study showed increased DNA synthesis in pancreatic acinar cells. CONCLUSION: Early administration of exogenous bFGF has significant therapeutic effect on cerulein-induced acute edematous pancreatitis in rats. Its mechanism is related to the amelioration of inflammation

  9. [Administration of Palonosetron and Phenotropil for Prophylaxis of the N-V-D Stage of Acute Radiation Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Drachouv, I S; Bykov, V N; Seleznev, A B

    2016-01-01

    Experiments on small (rats) and large (dogs) animals have shown that a sequential administration of Palonosetron and Phenotropil decreases the intensity of the main manifestations of the N-V-D stage of acute radiation syndrome. These data show the appropriateness of a combined administration of Palonosetron and Phenotropil to prevent a reduced work capacity in the individuals participating in elimination of the consequences of accidents associated with overexposure to radiation.

  10. Acute and subacute IL-1β administrations differentially modulate neuroimmune and neurotrophic systems: possible implications for neuroprotection and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Alzheimer’s disease, stroke and brain injuries, activated microglia can release proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β. These cytokines may change astrocyte and neurotrophin functions, which influences neuronal survival and induces apoptosis. However, the interaction between neuroinflammation and neurotrophin functions in different brain conditions is unknown. The present study hypothesized that acute and subacute elevated IL-1β differentially modulates glial and neurotrophin functions, which are related to their role in neuroprotection and neurodegeneration. Method Rats were i.c.v. injected with saline or IL-1β for 1 or 8 days and tested in a radial maze. mRNA and protein expressions of glial cell markers, neurotrophins, neurotrophin receptors, β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were measured in the hippocampus. Results When compared to controls, memory deficits were found 4 days after IL-1 administrations, however the deficits were attenuated by IL-1 receptor antagonist (RA). Subacute IL-1 administrations increased expressions of APP, microglial active marker CD11b, and p75 neurotrophin receptor, and the concentration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1β, but decreased expressions of astrocyte active marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and TrK B. By contrast, up-regulations of NGF, BDNF and TrK B expressions were found after acute IL-1 administration, which are associated with the increase in both glial marker expressions and IL-10 concentrations. However, TrK A was down-regulated by acute and up-regulated by subacute IL-1 administrations. Subacute IL-1-induced changes in the glial activities, cytokine concentrations and expressions of BDNF and p75 were reversed by IL-1RA treatment. Conclusion These results indicate that acute and subacute IL-1 administrations induce different changes toward neuroprotection

  11. Modulation of Hippocampus-Dependent Learning and Synaptic Plasticity by Nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Justin W.; Gould, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    A long-standing relationship between nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and cognition exists. Drugs that act at nAChRs can have cognitive-enhancing effects and diseases that disrupt cognition such as Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia are associated with altered nAChR function. Specifically, hippocampus-dependent learning is particularly sensitive to the effects of nicotine. However, the effects of nicotine on hippocampus-dependent learning vary not only with the doses of nicotine used and whether nicotine is administered acutely, chronically, or withdrawn after chronic nicotine treatment but also vary across different hippocampus-dependent tasks such as the Morris water maze, the radial arm maze, and contextual fear conditioning. In addition, nicotine has variable effects across different types of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). Because different types of hippocampus-dependent learning and LTP involve different neural and molecular substrates, comparing the effects of nicotine across these paradigms can yield insights into the mechanisms that may underlie the effects of nicotine on learning and memory and aid in understanding the variable effects of nicotine on cognitive processes. This review compares and contrasts the effects of nicotine on hippocampus-dependent learning and LTP and briefly discusses how the effects of nicotine on learning could contribute to nicotine addiction. PMID:18690555

  12. The moderating influence of nicotine and smoking on resting-state mood and EEG changes in remitted depressed patients during tryptophan depletion.

    PubMed

    Knott, Verner; Bisserbe, Jean-Claude; Shah, Dhrasti; Thompson, Andrea; Bowers, Hayley; Blais, Crystal; Ilivitsky, Vadim

    2013-12-01

    Comorbidity between depression and tobacco use may reflect self-medication of serotonergically mediated mood dysregulation, which has been associated with aberrant cortical activation and hemispheric asymmetry in patients with major depressive disorders (MDD). This randomized, double-blind study in 28 remitted MDD patients examined the moderating effects of acute nicotine and smoker vs. nonsmoker status on mood and EEG changes accompanying transient reductions in serotonin induced by acute tryptophan depletion (ATD). In smokers, who exhibited greater posterior high alpha power and increased left frontal low alpha power (signs of deactivation) compared to nonsmokers, ATD increased self-ratings of depressed mood and elevated left frontal and right parietal high alpha power (i.e. further cortical deactivation). Smokers were not affected by nicotine administration. In nonsmokers, ATD did not influence depression ratings, but it reduced vigor ratings and increased frontal and posterior theta power; both of which were blocked by acute nicotine. These findings indicate a role for nicotinic receptors in disordered mood.

  13. Airborne Nicotine Concentrations in the Workplaces of Tobacco Farmers

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seok-Ju; Park, Sung-Jun; Kim, Byoung-Seok; Lim, Hyun-Sul; Kim, Jik-Su; Kim, In-Shik

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Nicotine is a natural alkaloid and insecticide in tobacco leaves. Green tobacco sickness (GTS) is known as a disease of acute nicotine intoxication among tobacco farmers. Until now, GTS has been recognized globally as a disease that results from nicotine absorption through the skin. However, we assumed that GTS might also result from nicotine inhalation as well as absorption. We aimed to measure the airborne nicotine concentrations in various work environments of Korean tobacco farmers. Methods We measured the nicotine concentrations in the tobacco fields, private curing barns, and joint curing barns of farmers from July to October 2010. All sampling and analyses of airborne nicotine were conducted according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health manual of analytic methods. Results The airborne nicotine concentrations (geometric mean [geometric standard deviation]) in the tobacco field were 83.4 mg/m3 (1.2) in the upper region and 93.3 mg/m3 (1.2) in the lower region. In addition, the nicotine concentration by personal sampling was 150.1 mg/m3. Similarly, the nicotine concentrations in the private curing barn, workers in curing barns, the front yard of the curing barn, and in the joint curing barn were 323.7 mg/m3 (2.0), 121.0 mg/m3 (1.5), 73.7 mg/m3 (1.7), and 610.3 mg/m3 (1.0), respectively. Conclusions The nicotine concentration in the workplaces of tobacco farmers was very high. Future studies should measure the environmental concentration of nicotine that is inhaled by tobacco farmers. PMID:24921017

  14. Effect of chronic estradiol administration on the acute pressor response to aortic coarctation in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Salgado, M C; Castania, J A; Ballejo, G; Salgado, H C

    1995-08-01

    We investigated the effect of chronic estradiol administration on the pressor response elicited by acute (45 min) partial aortic constriction in conscious Wistar rats and on vascular reactivity to angiotensin II and vasopressin in vitro. Estradiol (10 micrograms kg-1 day-1, sc) or vehicle was administered for 7 days to young castrated male and female rats and to female rats that had stopped cycling (14-16 months of age). In the acute experiment of aortic coarctation in conscious rats, carotid pressure was monitored continuously before and for 45 min after partial abdominal aortic coarctation. In ovariectomized females the mean carotid pressure and heart rate before aortic coarctation were significantly lower in estradiol-treated animals (107 +/- 3 vs 119 +/- 3 mmHg and 360 +/- 31 vs 494 +/- 12 bpm). Estradiol did not affect the pressor response (145-150 mmHg) to aortic coarctation of castrated male rats or ovariectomized female rats but blunted the reflex bradycardia of ovariectomized rats. The onset of the pressor response to aortic coarctation was delayed in aged female rats as compared to the other groups. While estradiol treatment significantly accelerated the onset of hypertension in aged rats, it did not affect the pressor response of castrated animals. Full dose-response curves to angiotensin II and vasopressin were constructed in vitro in the isolated mesenteric arterial bed obtained from similarly treated groups. Estradiol did not affect the vasopressin sensitivity or responsiveness of any group, but caused a significant increase in angiotensin II sensitivity in ovariectomized rats only.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Albumin Administration in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Safety Analysis of the ALIAS Part 2 Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Michael D.; Martin, Renee H.; Palesch, Yuko Y.; Moy, Claudia S.; Tamariz, Diego; Ryckborst, Karla J.; Jones, Elizabeth B.; Weisman, David; Pettigrew, Creed; Ginsberg, Myron D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Albumin treatment of ischemic stroke was associated with cardiopulmonary adverse events in previous studies and a low incidence of intracranial hemorrhage. We sought to describe the neurological and cardiopulmonary adverse events in the ALIAS Part 2 Multicenter Trial. Methods Ischemic stroke patients, aged 18–83 and a baseline NIHSS ≥ 6, were randomized to treatment with ALB or saline control within 5 hours of stroke onset. Neurological adverse events included symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, hemicraniectomy, neurological deterioration and neurological death. Cardiopulmonary adverse events included pulmonary edema/congestive heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, atrial fibrillation, pneumonia and pulmonary thromboembolism. Results Among 830 patients, neurological and cardiopulmonary adverse events were not differentially associated with poor outcome between ALB and saline control subjects. The rate of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in the first 24h was low overall (2.9%, 24/830) but more common in the ALB treated subjects (RR = 2.4, CI95 1.01–5.8). The rate of pulmonary edema/CHF in the first 48h was 7.9% (59/830) and was more common among ALB treated subjects (RR = 10.7, CI95 4.3–26.6); this complication was expected and was satisfactorily managed with mandated diuretic administration and intravenous fluid guidelines. Troponin elevations in the first 48h were common, occurring without ECG change or cardiac symptoms in 52 subjects (12.5%). Conclusions ALB therapy was associated with an increase in symptomatic ICH and pulmonary edema/congestive heart failure but this did not affect final outcomes. Troponin elevation occurs routinely in the first 48 hours after acute ischemic stroke. Trial Registration ClincalTrials.gov NCT00235495 PMID:26325387

  16. Effects of Gelam and Acacia honey acute administration on some biochemical parameters of Sprague Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since ancient times, honey has been used for medicinal purposes in many cultures; it is one of the oldest and most enduring substances used in wound management. Scientific evidence for its efficacy is widely studied, but systemic safety studies are still lacking. It is essential to study the impact of consumption of honey on the health and proper development of the consumer. Therefore, the present study was designed to observe the effects of acute administration (14 days) of Gelam honey (GH), a wild harvesting honey and Acacia honey (AH), a beekeeping honey, on male and female Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Methods An acute oral study was performed following OECD test guideline 423, with minor modifications. In the study, GH, AH and sucrose (S) were administered at 2000 mg/kg body weight. Animals were observed for the next 14 days. Gross pathology was performed at the end of the study. Animals were observed for mortality, morbidity, body weight changes, feed and water intake. Clinical biochemistry, gross pathology, relative organ weight and histopathological examination were performed. Results Rats fed with honey did not exhibit any abnormal signs or deaths. Results showed a decrease in weight gain and energy efficiency, but significantly increased in total food intake and total calories in female rats fed with GH, compared to control (p < 0.05). Nevertheless, a significant increase in body weight was observed in male rats in all honey-treated groups. Male rats fed with AH significantly decreased in total food intake, total calories and energy efficiency. Both male and female rats fed with GH displayed a significant decrease in triglycerides compared to control group. Hepatic and renal function levels were within acceptable range. The gross necropsy analysis did not reveal changes in any of the organs examined. Conclusions Our results suggest that acute consumption of GH and AH at 2000 mg/kg body weight of male and female SD rats has some discrepancy

  17. Acute and chronic administration of gold nanoparticles cause DNA damage in the cerebral cortex of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Eria; Rezin, Gislaine Tezza; Zanoni, Elton Torres; de Souza Notoya, Frederico; Leffa, Daniela Dimer; Damiani, Adriani Paganini; Daumann, Francine; Rodriguez, Juan Carlos Ortiz; Benavides, Roberto; da Silva, Luciano; Andrade, Vanessa M; da Silva Paula, Marcos Marques

    2014-01-01

    The use of gold nanoparticles is increasing in medicine; however, their toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Studies show that gold nanoparticles can cross the blood-brain barrier, as well as accumulate in the brain. Therefore, this study was undertaken to better understand the effects of gold nanoparticles on rat brains. DNA damage parameters were evaluated in the cerebral cortex of adult rats submitted to acute and chronic administration of gold nanoparticles of two different diameters: 10 and 30nm. During acute administration, adult rats received a single intraperitoneal injection of either gold nanoparticles or saline solution. During chronic administration, adult rats received a daily single injection for 28 days of the same gold nanoparticles or saline solution. Twenty-four hours after either single (acute) or last injection (chronic), the rats were euthanized by decapitation, their brains removed, and the cerebral cortices isolated for evaluation of DNA damage parameters. Our study showed that acute administration of gold nanoparticles in adult rats presented higher levels of damage frequency and damage index in their DNA compared to the control group. It was also observed that gold nanoparticles of 30nm presented higher levels of damage frequency and damage index in the DNA compared to the 10nm ones. When comparing the effects of chronic administration of gold nanoparticles of 10 and 30nm, we observed that occurred significant different index and frequency damage, comparing with control group. However, there is no difference between the 10 and 30nm groups in the levels of DNA damage for both parameters of the Comet assay. Results suggest that gold nanoparticles for both sizes cause DNA damage for chronic as well as acute treatments, although a higher damage was observed for the chronic one.

  18. Mode of inhibitory actions of acute and chronic chloroquine administration on the electrically stimulated mouse diaphragm in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Okwuasaba, F. K.; Otubu, J. A.; Udoh, F. V.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of bath applied chloroquine (Chlo) and of acute and chronic Chlo administration on skeletal muscle reactivity to electrical stimulation and to drugs have been studied on mouse hemidiaphragm preparations in vitro. 2. Chlo (0.15-150 micrograms) produced a concentration-dependent inhibition twitch and tetanic contractions due to direct muscle stimulation (MS). Acute and chronic administration of Chlo (45 mg kg-1, i.p. daily, for 3-28 days) progressively shifted the concentration-response curve to bath-applied Chlo to the right, with maximum effect occurring from day 14 of Chlo pretreatment. 3. Acute and chronic administration of Chlo decreased the twitch and tetanus tension, raised the minimal fusion frequency (MFR) for tetanic contraction to occur and did not alter the twitch/tetanus tension ratio. Tetanus tension unlike twitch tension was not significantly decreased on day 3. 4. Caffeine (5-500 microM)--and isoprenaline (0.001-0.8 microM)-induced potentiations of twitch contraction were attenuated in a concentration-dependent manner by bath-applied Chlo and by acute and chronic administration of Chlo. Higher concentrations of caffeine (0.1-5 microM) and KCl (10 mM-130 mM) produced contracture of the muscle which was sensitive to inhibition by Chlo (50-150 microM). Moreover, the spike contractions superimposed on caffeine contracture were more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of Chlo than the contracture. 5. The inhibitory effects of dantrolene sodium and (+)-tubocurarine on MS and on indirectly stimulated hemidiaphragm respectively were not significantly altered by acute and chronic administration of Chlo. In contrast, the inhibitory concentration-response curve to procaine was shifted to the right.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2282456

  19. Early nicotine withdrawal and transdermal nicotine effects on neurocognitive performance in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    AhnAllen, Christopher G; Nestor, Paul G; Shenton, Martha E; McCarley, Robert W; Niznikiewicz, Margaret A

    2008-03-01

    As cigarette smoking prevalence rates approach 90% in schizophrenia, an important emerging question is the role of nicotine in the disease-related disturbance in cognition. We therefore tested a total of 38 male cigarette smokers (22 schizophrenia, 16 normal control), matched on nicotine dependence, on the Attention Network Test (ANT) at three nicotine conditions (baseline, 8 h overnight withdrawal, 3 h 21 mg nicotine patch). The results indicated that the groups did not differ in performance on either of three ANT measures (alertness, orienting, and executive) across baseline, patch, and withdrawal conditions. However, in comparison to the controls, the participants with schizophrenia showed faster ANT reaction time (RT) for the nicotine patch in relation to the baseline condition. In comparison to controls, the participants with schizophrenia also showed reduced ANT accuracy at withdrawal but not at patch condition. These results suggest that overall processing speed and accuracy are affected differently by nicotine levels in participants with schizophrenia, with evidence supporting greater impairment from withdrawal and greater improvement from nicotine administration.

  20. Acute oral administration of low doses of methylphenidate targets calretinin neurons in the rat septal area

    PubMed Central

    García-Avilés, Álvaro; Albert-Gascó, Héctor; Arnal-Vicente, Isabel; Elhajj, Ebtisam; Sanjuan-Arias, Julio; Sanchez-Perez, Ana María; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is a commonly administered drug to treat children suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Alterations in septal driven hippocampal theta rhythm may underlie attention deficits observed in these patients. Amongst others, the septo-hippocampal connections have long been acknowledged to be important in preserving hippocampal function. Thus, we wanted to ascertain if MPD administration, which improves attention in patients, could affect septal areas connecting with hippocampus. We used low and orally administered MPD doses (1.3, 2.7 and 5 mg/Kg) to rats what mimics the dosage range in humans. In our model, we observed no effect when using 1.3 mg/Kg MPD; whereas 2.7 and 5 mg/Kg induced a significant increase in c-fos expression specifically in the medial septum (MS), an area intimately connected to the hippocampus. We analyzed dopaminergic areas such as nucleus accumbens and striatum, and found that only 5 mg/Kg induced c-fos levels increase. In these areas tyrosine hydroxylase correlated well with c-fos staining, whereas in the MS the sparse tyrosine hydroxylase fibers did not overlap with c-fos positive neurons. Double immunofluorescence of c-fos with neuronal markers in the septal area revealed that co-localization with choline acethyl transferase, parvalbumin, and calbindin with c-fos did not change with MPD treatment; whereas, calretinin and c-fos double labeled neurons increased after MPD administration. Altogether, these results suggest that low and acute doses of methylphenidate primary target specific populations of caltretinin medial septal neurons. PMID:25852493

  1. Neuroendocrine and neurochemical effects of acute ibogaine administration: a time course evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ali, S F; Newport, G D; Slikker, W; Rothman, R B; Baumann, M H

    1996-10-21

    Ibogaine (IBO) is an indole alkaloid that is reported to facilitate drug abstinence in substance abusers. Despite considerable investigation, the mechanism of IBO action in vivo and its suitability as a treatment for drug addiction remains unclear. The present study was designed to evaluate the time-course effects of acute IBO on neuroendocrine and neurochemical indices. Adult male rats were treated with i.p. saline or 50 mg/kg IBO and sacrificed 15, 30, 60, 120 min and 24 h later. Trunk blood was collected for hormone measures and brains were dissected for neurochemical analyses. IBO produced a rapid elevation in plasma prolactin that declined to control levels by 60 min. Corticosterone levels increased 15 min after drug administration, continued to increase for 120 min, but returned to control levels 24 h after dosing. IBO decreased dopamine (DA) concentrations in the striatum and frontal cortex at 30, 60 and 120 min after injection while DA metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), were elevated over the same time period. 24 h after IBO, DOPAC concentrations in striatum and HVA levels in the frontal cortex were below control values. Serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) were decreased at 60 min after IBO administration only in the striatum. These data indicate that a single injection of IBO produces a spectrum of effects that includes: (1) elevation of plasma prolactin and corticosterone, (2) short- and long-term effects on DA neurotransmission, and (3) modest, transient effects of 5-HT neurotransmission. The effects of IBO reported herein may have relevance to the anti-addictive properties of this drug, and this proposal warrants further investigation.

  2. Alpha and beta EEG power reflects L-dopa acute administration in parkinsonian patients

    PubMed Central

    Melgari, Jean-Marc; Curcio, Giuseppe; Mastrolilli, Francesca; Salomone, Gaetano; Trotta, Laura; Tombini, Mario; di Biase, Lazzaro; Scrascia, Federica; Fini, Rita; Fabrizio, Emma; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Vernieri, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of an acute L-dopa administration on eye-closed resting state electroencephalographic (EEG) activity of cognitively preserved Parkinsonian patients. Methods: We examined 24 right-handed patients diagnosed as uncomplicated probable Parkinson’s disease (PD). Each patient underwent Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS)-part-III evaluation before and 60 min after an oral load of L-dopa-methyl-ester/carbidopa 250/25 mg. Resting condition eyes-closed EEG data were recorded both pre- and post L-dopa load. Absolute EEG power values were calculated at each scalp derivation for Delta, Theta, Alpha and Beta frequency bands. UPDRS scores (both global and subscale scores) and EEG data (power values of different frequency bands for each scalp derivation) were submitted to a statistical analysis to compare Pre and Post L-Dopa conditions. Finally, a correlation analysis was carried out between EEG spectral content and UPDRS scores. Results: Considering EEG power spectral analysis, no statistically significant differences arose on Delta and Theta bands after L-dopa intake. Conversely, Alpha and Beta rhythms significantly increased on centro-parietal scalp derivations, as a function of L-dopa administration. Correlation analysis indicated a significant negative correlation between Beta power increase on centro-parietal areas and UPDRS subscores (Rigidity of arms and Bradykinesia). A minor significant negative correlation was also found between Alpha band increase and resting tremor. Conclusions: Assuming that a significant change in EEG power spectrum after L-dopa intake may be related to dopaminergic mechanisms, our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that dopaminergic defective networks are implicated in cortical oscillatory abnormalities at rest in non-demented PD patients. PMID:25452725

  3. Effects of acute cortisol administration on perceptual priming of trauma-related material.

    PubMed

    Holz, Elena; Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Streb, Markus; Pfaltz, Monique; Michael, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Intrusive memories are a hallmark symptom of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). They reflect excessive and uncontrolled retrieval of the traumatic memory. Acute elevations of cortisol are known to impair the retrieval of already stored memory information. Thus, continuous cortisol administration might help in reducing intrusive memories in PTSD. Strong perceptual priming for neutral stimuli associated with a "traumatic" context has been shown to be one important learning mechanism that leads to intrusive memories. However, the memory modulating effects of cortisol have only been shown for explicit declarative memory processes. Thus, in our double blind, placebo controlled study we aimed to investigate whether cortisol influences perceptual priming of neutral stimuli that appeared in a "traumatic" context. Two groups of healthy volunteers (N = 160) watched either neutral or "traumatic" picture stories on a computer screen. Neutral objects were presented in between the pictures. Memory for these neutral objects was tested after 24 hours with a perceptual priming task and an explicit memory task. Prior to memory testing half of the participants in each group received 25 mg of cortisol, the other half received placebo. In the placebo group participants in the "traumatic" stories condition showed more perceptual priming for the neutral objects than participants in the neutral stories condition, indicating a strong perceptual priming effect for neutral stimuli presented in a "traumatic" context. In the cortisol group this effect was not present: Participants in the neutral stories and participants in the "traumatic" stories condition in the cortisol group showed comparable priming effects for the neutral objects. Our findings show that cortisol inhibits perceptual priming for neutral stimuli that appeared in a "traumatic" context. These findings indicate that cortisol influences PTSD-relevant memory processes and thus further support the idea that administration

  4. Glutathione Depletion and Recovery After Acute Ethanol Administration in the Aging Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Barbara L.; Richie, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in the detoxification of ethanol (EtOH) and acute EtOH administration leads to GSH depletion in the liver and other tissues. Aging is also associated with a progressive decline in GSH levels and impairment in GSH biosynthesis in many tissues. Thus, the present study was designed to examine the effects of aging on EtOH-induced depletion and recovery of GSH in different tissues of the C57Bl/6NNIA mouse. EtOH (2-5 g/kg) or saline was administered i.p. to mice of ages 6 mo (young), 12 mo (mature), and 24 mo (old); and GSH and cyst(e)ine concentrations were measured 0-24 hours thereafter. EtOH administration (5g/kg) depleted hepatic GSH levels >50% by 6 hr in all animals. By 24 hr, levels remained low in both young and old mice, but recovered to baseline levels in mature mice. At 6 hr, the decrease in hepatic GSH was dose-dependent up to 3 g/kg EtOH, but not at higher doses. The extent of depletion at the 3 g/kg dose was dependent upon age, with old mice demonstrating significantly lower GSH levels than mature mice (P<0.001). Altogether these results indicate that aging was associated with a greater degree of EtOH and fasting-induced GSH depletion and subsequent impaired recovery in liver. An impaired ability to recover was also observed in young animals. Further studies are required to determine if an inability to recover from GSH depletion by EtOH is associated with enhanced toxicity. PMID:17343832

  5. Microglia activation and cell death in response to diethyl-dithiocarbamate acute administration.

    PubMed

    Zucconi, Gigliola Grassi; Laurenzi, Maria Assunta; Semprevivo, Massimo; Torni, Federica; Lindgren, Jan Ake; Marinucci, Eva

    2002-04-29

    An increasing body of evidence suggests a role for activated microglia in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Hence, it would be useful to have a better understanding of the significance of microglial activation for neuronal damage. Unfortunately, most models of microglial activation use invasive or long-lasting insults, which make it difficult to evaluate the role played by microglia. We have instead developed a model for microglial activation by using brief exposure to the widely available neurotoxin diethyl-dithiocarbamate (DDTC). Despite evidence for the neurotoxic nature of this substance, microglia involvement has not been hitherto investigated. After acute i.p. administration of DDTC at two different doses, microglia were already activated in selected areas of the rat brain (hippocampal dentate gyrus, entorhinal-pyriform cortex and hypothalamus) after 1 hour, reaching a peak at 3-6 hours and subsided within 6-48 hours, depending on the brain region. Microglia activation was associated with interleukin-1 beta immunopositivity between 3 and 6 hours and with up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex class II expression between 24 and 48 hours. No significant changes in astrocyte immunostaining were detected between 6 hours and 6 days. The TUNEL procedure revealed the death of a limited number of cells in the above-mentioned structures that peaked at 6h and then declined rapidly. Cell death was detected in sites with major, minor, or no microglial activation, indicating that these two events can occur concomitantly or independently. The study shows that the administration of DDTC provides a useful model for studying the implications of region-specific reactivity of microglia and its differential interaction with neuronal damage.

  6. Redox state and energy metabolism during liver regeneration: alterations produced by acute ethanol administration.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Salinas, J; Miranda-Garduño, L; Trejo-Izquierdo, E; Díaz-Muñoz, M; Vidrio, S; Morales-González, J A; Hernández-Muñoz, R

    1999-12-01

    Ethanol metabolism can induce modifications in liver metabolic pathways that are tightly regulated through the availability of cellular energy and through the redox state. Since partial hepatectomy (PH)-induced liver proliferation requires an oversupply of energy for enhanced syntheses of DNA and proteins, the present study was aimed at evaluating the effect of acute ethanol administration on the PH-induced changes in cellular redox and energy potentials. Ethanol (5 g/kg body weight) was administered to control rats and to two-thirds hepatectomized rats. Quantitation of the liver content of lactate, pyruvate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and adenine nucleotides led us to estimate the cytosolic and mitochondrial redox potentials and energy parameters. Specific activities in the liver of alcohol-metabolizing enzymes also were measured in these animals. Liver regeneration had no effect on cellular energy availability, but induced a more reduced cytosolic redox state accompanied by an oxidized mitochondrial redox state during the first 48 hr of treatment; the redox state normalized thereafter. Administration of ethanol did not modify energy parameters in PH rats, but this hepatotoxin readily blocked the PH-induced changes in the cellular redox state. In addition, proliferating liver promoted decreases in the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and of cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1); ethanol treatment prevented the PH-induced diminution of ADH activity. In summary, our data suggest that ethanol could minimize the PH-promoted metabolic adjustments mediated by redox reactions, probably leading to an ineffective preparatory event that culminates in compensatory liver growth after PH in the rat.

  7. Mechanisms of Nicotine Addiction

    SciTech Connect

    McGehee, Daniel

    2002-06-26

    Nicotine reinforces the use of tobacco products primarily through its interaction with specific receptor proteins within the brain's reward centers. A critical step in the process of addiction for many drugs, including nicotine, is the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine. A single nicotine exposure will enhance dopamine levels for hours, however, nicotinic receptors undergo both activation and then desensitization in minutes, which presents an important problem. How does the time course of receptor activity lead to the prolonged release of dopamine? We have found that persistent modulation of both inhibitory and excitatory synaptic connections by nicotine underlies the sustained increase in dopamine release. Because these inputs express different types of nicotinic receptors there is a coordinated shift in the balance of synaptic inputs toward excitation of the dopamine neurons. Excitatory inputs are turned on while inhibitory inputs are depressed, thereby boosting the brain's reward system.

  8. Mechanisms of Nicotine Addiction

    SciTech Connect

    McGehee, Daniel

    2009-06-26

    Nicotine reinforces the use of tobacco products primarily through its interaction with specific receptor proteins within the brain’s reward centers. A critical step in the process of addiction for many drugs, including nicotine, is the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine. A single nicotine exposure will enhance dopamine levels for hours, however, nicotinic receptors undergo both activation and then desensitization in minutes, which presents an important problem. How does the time course of receptor activity lead to the prolonged release of dopamine? We have found that persistent modulation of both inhibitory and excitatory synaptic connections by nicotine underlies the sustained increase in dopamine release. Because these inputs express different types of nicotinic receptors there is a coordinated shift in the balance of synaptic inputs toward excitation of the dopamine neurons. Excitatory inputs are turned on while inhibitory inputs are depressed, thereby boosting the brain’s reward system.

  9. Acute but not chronic administration of pioglitazone promoted behavioral and neurochemical protective effects in the MPTP model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Barbiero, Janaína K; Santiago, Ronise M; Lima, Marcelo M S; Ariza, Deborah; Morais, Lívia H; Andreatini, Roberto; Vital, Maria A B F

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the neurochemical, motor and cognitive effects of pioglitazone in a rat model of Parkinson's disease induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). In the first experiment, we administered MPTP, and 1h later administered a single oral dose of pioglitazone (5, 15 and 30 mg/kg). The following day, we performed the open-field test and neurochemical dose response curve. We demonstrated that 30 mg/kg of pioglitazone was capable of restoring striatal dopamine (DA) concentrations and motor behaviors. A second experiment was conducted to test the effects of two protocols (acute and chronic) of pioglitazone (30 mg/kg) administration in the open-field test, two-way active avoidance task and in the DA and metabolites levels. The acute protocol consisted of a single oral administration 1 h after MPTP, whereas the chronic protocol was performed with daily administrations starting 1 h after MPTP and ending 22 days after that. Results showed that neither protocol was able to reverse the cognitive impairment promoted by MPTP. We also demonstrated that acute treatment generated some level of neuroprotection, as confirmed by the absence of DA reduction in the group treated with pioglitazone in comparison to the sham group. By contrast, chronic treatment leaded to a reduction of striatal DA, close to MPTP administration alone. These findings suggest that acute administration of pioglitazone (30 mg/kg) was more efficient in generating beneficial effects on motor behaviors and in striatal DA levels. Nevertheless, we failed to demonstrate that pioglitazone administration improved performance on a dopamine-related cognitive task after MPTP.

  10. Effects of acute and 2-week administration of oral salbutamol on exercise performance and muscle strength in athletes.

    PubMed

    Hostrup, M; Kalsen, A; Auchenberg, M; Bangsbo, J; Backer, V

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate effects of acute and 2-week administration of oral salbutamol on repeated sprint ability, exercise performance, and muscle strength in elite endurance athletes. Twenty male elite athletes [VO2max: 69.4 ± 1.8 (Mean ± SE) mL/min/kg], aged 25.9 ± 1.4 years, were included in a randomized, double-blinded and placebo-controlled parallel study. At baseline, after acute administration, and again after 2-week administration of the study drugs (8 mg salbutamol or placebo), subjects' maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of m. quadriceps and isometric endurance of m. deltoideus were measured, followed by three repeated Wingate tests. Exercise performance at 110% of VO2max was determined on a bike ergometer. Acute administration of salbutamol increased peak power during first Wingate test by 4.1 ± 1.7% (P < 0.05). Two-week administration of salbutamol increased (P < 0.05) peak power during first and second Wingate test by 6.4 ± 2.0 and 4.2 ± 1.0%. Neither acute nor 2-week administration of salbutamol had any effect on MVC, exercise performance at 110% of VO2max or on isometric endurance. No differences were observed in the placebo group. In conclusion, salbutamol benefits athletes' sprint ability. Thus, the present study supports the restriction of oral salbutamol in competitive sports.

  11. Effects of acute and repeated administration of salvinorin A on dopamine function in the rat dorsal striatum

    PubMed Central

    Chefer, Vladimir I.; Shippenberg, Toni S.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Acute systemic administration of salvinorin A, a naturally occurring κ-opioid receptor (KOPr) agonist, decreases locomotion and striatal dopamine (DA) overflow. Objectives Conventional and quantitative microdialysis techniques were used to determine whether salvinorin A infusion into the dorsal striatum (DSTR) decreases DA overflow by altering DA uptake or release. The influence of repeated salvinorin A administration on basal DA dynamics and cocaine-evoked alterations in DA overflow and locomotion was also assessed. Materials and methods Salvinorin A was administered via the dialysis probe (0; 20–200 nM) or via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection (1.0 or 3.2 mg/kg per day×5 days). The effects of a challenge dose of cocaine were examined 48 h after repeated salvinorin treatment. Results Retrodialysis of salvinorin A produced a dose-related, KOPr antagonist reversible, decrease in DA levels. Extracellular DA levels were decreased whereas DA extraction fraction, which provides an estimate of DA uptake, was unaltered. In contrast to its acute administration, repeated salvinorin A administration did not modify dialysate DA levels. Similarly, neither basal extracellular DA levels nor DA uptake was altered. Unlike synthetic KOPr agonists, prior repeated administration of salvinorin A did not attenuate the locomotor activating effects of an acute cocaine (20 mg/kg, i.p.) challenge. However, cocaine-evoked DA overflow was enhanced. Conclusions These data demonstrate that acute, but not repeated, salvinorin A administration decreases mesostriatal neurotransmission and that activation of DSTR KOPr is sufficient for this effect. Differences in the interaction of salvinorin and synthetic KOPr agonists with cocaine suggest that the pharmacology of these agents may differ. PMID:18246329

  12. Antibiotic treatment for acute haematogenous osteomyelitis of childhood: moving towards shorter courses and oral administration.

    PubMed

    Pääkkönen, M; Peltola, H

    2011-10-01

    Acute haematogenous osteomyelitis (AHOM) of childhood usually affects the long bones of the lower limbs. Although almost any agent may cause AHOM, Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterium, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and, in some countries, Salmonella spp. and Kingella kingae. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has improved the diagnostic accuracy of traditional radiography and scintigraphy. Except for the pre-treatment diagnostic sample from bone before the institution of antibiotic therapy, no other surgery is usually required. Traditionally, non-neonatal AHOM has been treated with a 1-3-month course of antibiotics, including an intravenous (i.v.) phase for the first weeks, but recent prospective randomised studies challenge this approach. For most uncomplicated cases, a course of 20 days including an i.v. period of 2-4 days suffices, provided large enough doses of a well-absorbed agent (clindamycin or a first-generation cephalosporin, local resistance permitting) are used, administration is four times daily and most symptoms and signs subside within a few days. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) is a good guide in monitoring the course of illness, and the antimicrobial can usually be discontinued if CRP has decreased to <20 mg/L. Newer and costly agents, such as linezolid, should be reserved for cases due to resistant S. aureus strains. AHOM in neonates and immunocompromised patients probably requires a different approach. Because sequelae may develop slowly, follow-up for at least 1 year post hospitalisation is recommended.

  13. Effects of Acute Administration of Ketorolac on Mammalian Vestibular Sensory Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, G Christopher; Jones, Timothy A

    2013-01-01

    The nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) ketorolac is a candidate for use as a supplemental analgesic during major surgery in anesthetized rodents. The use of ketorolac during surgery is believed to reduce the anesthetic dose required to achieve and maintain an adequate surgical plane, thus improving the physiologic condition and survival of animals during long experimental procedures. Ketorolac has reported side effects that include dizziness, ear pain, hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo in humans, but ketorolac has not been reported to affect the vestibular system in animals. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated the acute effects of ketorolac on vestibular compound action potentials in C57BL/6 mice. Linear vestibular sensory-evoked potentials (VsEP) were recorded during the administration of ketorolac at doses 3 to 14 times the effective analgesic dose. VsEP results for ketorolac were compared with those from a control group maintained under anesthesia for the same period. Ketorolac did not significantly affect the temporal profiles of response latencies and amplitudes or the rate of change in response measures over time between controls and ketorolac-treated mice. These findings demonstrate that ketorolac can be used as an analgesic to supplement anesthesia in mice without concerns of modifying the amplitudes and latencies of the linear VsEP. PMID:23562034

  14. Prevention of reflex natriuresis after acute unilateral nephrectomy by neonatal administration of MSG

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.Y.; Wiedemann, E.; Deschepper, C.F.; Alper, R.H.; Humphreys, M.H.

    1987-02-01

    Acute unilateral nephrectomy (AUN) results in natriuresis from the remaining kidney through reflex pathways involving the central nervous system and requiring an intact pituitary gland. The natriuresis is accompanied by an increase in the plasma concentration of a peptide or peptides derived from the N-terminal fragment (NTF) of proopiomelanocortin. The authors measured plasma immunoreactive NTF-like material (IR-NTF) by radioimmunoassay, before and after AUN in control rats and rats treated neonatally with monosodium glutamate (MSG), a procedure that produces neuroendocrine dysfunction by destroying cell bodies in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, median eminence, and other brain regions. In control rats, IR-NTF increased from 85.8 +/- 54.9 (SD) to 207 +/- 98.1 fmol/ml after AUN as sodium excretion (U/sub Na/V) doubled. In MSG-treated rats, AUN produced no change in plasma IR-NTF concentration, nor did U/sub Na/V increase. Tissue content of IR-NTF was reduced in the arcuate nucleus and anterior lobe of pituitaries from MSG-treated rats compared with controls, but was no different in the neurointermediate lobe. These results indicate that the hypothalamic lesion produced by neonatal administration of MSG prevents both the increase in plasma IR-NTF concentration and the natruiuresis after AUN, and therefore lend further support to the concept of a casual relationship between these two consequences of AUN.

  15. Acute toxicity, histopathology, and coagulopathy in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) following administration of the rodenticide diphacinone.

    PubMed

    Rattner, Barnett A; Horak, Katherine E; Warner, Sarah E; Day, Daniel D; Meteyer, Carol U; Volker, Steven F; Eisemann, John D; Johnston, John J

    2011-05-01

    The acute oral toxicity of the anticoagulant rodenticide diphacinone was found to be over 20 times greater in American kestrels (Falco sparverius; median lethal dose 96.8 mg/kg body weight) compared with Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Modest evidence of internal bleeding was observed at necropsy, although histological examination of heart, liver, kidney, lung, intestine, and skeletal muscle revealed hemorrhage over a wide range of doses (35.1-675 mg/kg). Residue analysis suggests that the half-life of diphacinone in the liver of kestrels that survived was relatively short, with the majority of the dose cleared within 7 d of exposure. Several precise and sensitive clotting assays (prothrombin time, Russell's viper venom time, thrombin clotting time) were adapted for use in this species, and oral administration of diphacinone at 50 mg/kg increased prothrombin time and Russell's viper venom time at 48 and 96 h postdose compared with controls. Prolongation of in vitro clotting time reflects impaired coagulation complex activity, and generally corresponded with the onset of overt signs of toxicity and lethality. In view of the toxicity and risk evaluation data derived from American kestrels, the involvement of diphacinone in some raptor mortality events, and the paucity of threshold effects data following short-term dietary exposure for birds of prey, additional feeding trials with captive raptors are warranted to characterize more fully the risk of secondary poisoning.

  16. Acute toxicity, histopathology, and coagulopathy in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) following administration of the rodenticie diphacinone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Horak, Katherine E.; Warner, Sarah E.; Day, Daniel D.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Voler, Steven F.; Eisemann, John D.; Johnston, John J.

    2011-01-01

    The acute oral toxicity of the anticoagulant rodenticide diphacinone was found to be over 20 times greater in American kestrels (Falco sparverius; median lethal dose 96.8 mg/kg body weight) compared with Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Modest evidence of internal bleeding was observed at necropsy, although histological examination of heart, liver, kidney, lung, intestine, and skeletal muscle revealed hemorrhage over a wide range of doses (35.1-675 mg/kg). Residue analysis suggests that the half-life of diphacinone in the liver of kestrels that survived was relatively short, with the majority of the dose cleared within 7 d of exposure. Several precise and sensitive clotting assays (prothrombin time, Russell's viper venom time, thrombin clotting time) were adapted for use in this species, and oral administration of diphacinone at 50 mg/kg increased prothrombin time and Russell?s viper venom time at 48 and 96 h postdose compared with controls. Prolongation of in vitro clotting time reflects impaired coagulation complex activity, and generally corresponded with the onset of overt signs of toxicity and lethality. In view of the toxicity and risk evaluation data derived from American kestrels, the involvement of diphacinone in some raptor mortality events, and the paucity of threshold effects data following short-term dietary exposure for birds of prey, additional feeding trials with captive raptors are warranted to characterize more fully the risk of secondary poisoning.

  17. Effects of acute administration of ketorolac on mammalian vestibular sensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Gaines, G Christopher; Jones, Timothy A

    2013-01-01

    The nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) ketorolac is a candidate for use as a supplemental analgesic during major surgery in anesthetized rodents. The use of ketorolac during surgery is believed to reduce the anesthetic dose required to achieve and maintain an adequate surgical plane, thus improving the physiologic condition and survival of animals during long experimental procedures. Ketorolac has reported side effects that include dizziness, ear pain, hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo in humans, but ketorolac has not been reported to affect the vestibular system in animals. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated the acute effects of ketorolac on vestibular compound action potentials in C57BL/6 mice. Linear vestibular sensory-evoked potentials (VsEP) were recorded during the administration of ketorolac at doses 3 to 14 times the effective analgesic dose. VsEP results for ketorolac were compared with those from a control group maintained under anesthesia for the same period. Ketorolac did not significantly affect the temporal profiles of response latencies and amplitudes or the rate of change in response measures over time between controls and ketorolac-treated mice. These findings demonstrate that ketorolac can be used as an analgesic to supplement anesthesia in mice without concerns of modifying the amplitudes and latencies of the linear VsEP.

  18. Electrophysiology-Based Assays to Detect Subtype-Selective Modulation of Human Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Glenn E.; Fedorov, Nikolai B.; Kuryshev, Yuri A.; Liu, Zhiqi; Orr, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-31) gave the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the responsibility for regulating tobacco products. Nicotine is the primary addictive component of tobacco and its effects can be modulated by additional ingredients in manufactured products. Nicotine acts by mimicking the neurotransmitter acetylcholine on neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which function as ion channels in cholinergic modulation of neurotransmission. Subtypes within the family of neuronal nAChRs are defined by their α- and β-subunit composition. The subtype-selective profiles of tobacco constituents are largely unknown, but could be essential for understanding the physiological effects of tobacco products. In this report, we report the development and validation of electrophysiology-based high-throughput screens (e-HTS) for human nicotinic subtypes, α3β4, α3β4α5, α4β2, and α7 stably expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells. Assessment of agonist sensitivity and acute desensitization gave results comparable to those obtained by conventional manual patch clamp electrophysiology assays. The potency of reference antagonists for inhibition of the receptor channels and selectivity of positive allosteric modulators also were very similar between e-HTS and conventional manual patch voltage clamp data. Further validation was obtained in pilot screening of a library of FDA-approved drugs that identified α7 subtype-selective positive allosteric modulation by novel compounds. These assays provide new tools for profiling of nicotinic receptor selectivity. PMID:27505073

  19. Alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, and mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Crocq, Marc-Antoine

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol, nicotine, and caffeine are the most widely consumed psychotropic drugs worldwide. They are largely consumed by normal individuals, but their use is even more frequent in psychiatric patients, Thus, patients with schizophrenia tend to abuse all three substances. The interrelationships between depression and alcohol are complex. These drugs can all create dependence, as understood in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV). Alcohol abuse is clearly deleterious to the brain, provoking acute and chronic mental disorders, ranging from intoxication with impairment of cognition, to delirium tremens, halluosis, and dementia. In contrast, the main health consequences of nicotine, notably cancer and cardiovascular disases, lie outside the realm of psychiatry However, the mes of nicotine dependence and motivation to smoke or quit are of concern to psychiatrists. PMID:22033899

  20. Effects of acute and chronic administration of venlafaxine and desipramine on extracellular monoamine levels in the mouse prefrontal cortex and striatum.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Kosuke; Ago, Yukio; Umehara, Masato; Kita, Yuki; Fujita, Kazumi; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Toshio

    2014-04-15

    Prefrontal catecholamine neurotransmission plays a key role in the therapeutic actions of drugs for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have recently shown that serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors and the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor desipramine attenuated horizontal hyperactivity in spontaneously hypertensive rats, an animal model of ADHD, and that these drugs are potential pharmacotherapeutics for ADHD. In this study, we used in vivo microdialysis to study the effects of acute and chronic (once daily for 3 weeks) administration of the serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor venlafaxine and the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor desipramine on noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin levels, and the expression of the neuronal activity marker c-Fos in the mouse prefrontal cortex and striatum. Both acute and chronic venlafaxine administration increased prefrontal noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin levels and striatal noradrenaline and serotonin levels. Both acute and chronic desipramine administration increased prefrontal noradrenaline and dopamine levels and striatal noradrenaline levels, with chronic administration yielding stronger increase. Chronic desipramine did not affect striatal dopamine and serotonin levels. Both acute and chronic venlafaxine administration increased the expression of c-Fos in the prefrontal cortex, whereas chronic, but not acute, desipramine administration increased the expression of c-Fos in the prefrontal cortex. Both acute and chronic venlafaxine administration increased the striatal c-Fos expression to some degree, whereas desipramine administration did not. These results suggest that acute and chronic venlafaxine and chronic desipramine administration maximally activate the prefrontal adrenergic and dopaminergic systems without affecting striatal dopaminergic systems in mice.

  1. Unraveling the neurobiology of nicotine dependence using genetically engineered mice.

    PubMed

    Stoker, Astrid K; Markou, Athina

    2013-08-01

    This review article provides an overview of recent studies of nicotine dependence and withdrawal that used genetically engineered mice. Major progress has been made in recent years with mutant mice that have knockout and gain-of-function of specific neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit genes. Nicotine exerts its actions by binding to neuronal nAChRs that consist of five subunits. The different nAChR subunits that combine to compose a receptor determine the distinct pharmacological and kinetic properties of the specific nAChR. Recent findings in genetically engineered mice have indicated that while α4-containing and β2-containing nAChRs are involved in the acquisition of nicotine self-administration and initial stages of nicotine dependence, α7 homomeric nAChRs appear to be involved in the later stages of nicotine dependence. In the medial habenula, α5-containing, α3-containing, and β4-containing nAChRs were shown to be crucially important in the regulation of the aversive aspects of nicotine. Studies of the involvement of α6 nAChR subunits in nicotine dependence have only recently emerged. The use of genetically engineered mice continues to vastly improve our understanding of the neurobiology of nicotine dependence and withdrawal.

  2. Nicotine anxiogenic and rewarding effects are decreased in mice lacking β-endorphin

    PubMed Central

    Trigo, José M.; Zimmer, Andreas; Maldonado, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    The endogenous opioid system plays an important role in the behavioral effects of nicotine. Thus, μ-opioid receptor and the endogenous opioids derived from proenkephalin are involved in the central effects of nicotine. However, the role played by the different endogenous opioid peptides in the acute and chronic effects of nicotine remains to be fully established. Mice lacking β-endorphin were acutely injected with nicotine at different doses to evaluate locomotor, anxiogenic and antinociceptive responses. The rewarding properties of nicotine were evaluated by using the conditioned place-preference paradigm. Mice chronically treated with nicotine were acutely injected with mecamylamine to study the behavioral expression of nicotine withdrawal. Mice lacking β-endorphin exhibited a spontaneous hypoalgesia and hyperlocomotion and a reduction on the anxiogenic and rewarding effects induced by nicotine. Nicotine induced similar antinociception and hypolocomotion in both genotypes and no differences were found in the development of physical dependence. The dissociation between nicotine rewarding properties and physical dependence suggests a differential implication of β-endorphin in these addictive related responses. PMID:19376143

  3. Nicotine anxiogenic and rewarding effects are decreased in mice lacking beta-endorphin.

    PubMed

    Trigo, José M; Zimmer, Andreas; Maldonado, Rafael

    2009-06-01

    The endogenous opioid system plays an important role in the behavioral effects of nicotine. Thus, micro-opioid receptor and the endogenous opioids derived from proenkephalin are involved in the central effects of nicotine. However, the role played by the different endogenous opioid peptides in the acute and chronic effects of nicotine remains to be fully established. Mice lacking beta-endorphin were acutely injected with nicotine at different doses to evaluate locomotor, anxiogenic and antinociceptive responses. The rewarding properties of nicotine were evaluated by using the conditioned place-preference paradigm. Mice chronically treated with nicotine were acutely injected with mecamylamine to study the behavioral expression of nicotine withdrawal. Mice lacking beta-endorphin exhibited a spontaneous hypoalgesia and hyperlocomotion and a reduction on the anxiogenic and rewarding effects induced by nicotine. Nicotine induced similar antinociception and hypolocomotion in both genotypes and no differences were found in the development of physical dependence. The dissociation between nicotine rewarding properties and physical dependence suggests a differential implication of beta-endorphin in these addictive related responses.

  4. Nicotine recruits glutamate receptors to postsynaptic sites.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jing-Jing; Lozada, Adrian F; Gou, Chen-Yu; Xu, Jing; Chen, Yuan; Berg, Darwin K

    2015-09-01

    Cholinergic neurons project throughout the nervous system and activate nicotinic receptors to modulate synaptic function in ways that shape higher order brain function. The acute effects of nicotinic signaling on long-term synaptic plasticity have been well-characterized. Less well understood is how chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine, such as those encountered by habitual smokers, can alter neural connections to promote addiction and other lasting behavioral effects. We show here that chronic exposure of hippocampal neurons in culture to low levels of nicotine recruits AMPA and NMDA receptors to the cell surface and sequesters them at postsynaptic sites. The receptors include GluA2-containing AMPA receptors, which are responsible for most of the excitatory postsynaptic current mediated by AMPA receptors on the neurons, and include NMDA receptors containing GluN1 and GluN2B subunits. Moreover, we find that the nicotine treatment also increases expression of the presynaptic component synapsin 1 and arranges it in puncta juxtaposed to the additional AMPA and NMDA receptor puncta, suggestive of increases in synaptic contacts. Consistent with increased synaptic input, we find that the nicotine treatment leads to an increase in the excitatory postsynaptic currents mediated by AMPA and NMDA receptors. Further, the increases skew the ratio of excitatory-to-inhibitory input that the cell receives, and this holds both for pyramidal neurons and inhibitory neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region. The GluN2B-containing NMDA receptor redistribution at synapses is associated with a significant increase in GluN2B phosphorylation at Tyr1472, a site known to prevent GluN2B endocytosis. These results suggest that chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine not only alters functional connections but also is likely to change excitability levels across networks. Further, it may increase the propensity for synaptic plasticity, given the increase in synaptic NMDA receptors.

  5. Nicotine Recruits Glutamate Receptors to Postsynaptic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jing-jing; Lozada, Adrian F.; Gou, Chen-yu; Xu, Jing; Chen, Yuan; Berg, Darwin K.

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic neurons project throughout the nervous system and activate nicotinic receptors to modulate synaptic function in ways that shape higher order brain function. The acute effects of nicotinic signaling on long-term synaptic plasticity have been well-characterized. Less well understood is how chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine, such as those encountered by habitual smokers, can alter neural connections to promote addiction and other lasting behavioral effects. We show here that chronic exposure of hippocampal neurons in culture to low levels of nicotine recruits AMPA and NMDA receptors to the cell surface and sequesters them at postsynaptic sites. The receptors include GluA2-containing AMPA receptors, which are responsible for most of the excitatory postsynaptic current mediated by AMPA receptors on the neurons, and include NMDA receptors containing GluN1 and GluN2B subunits. Moreover, we find that the nicotine treatment also increases expression of the presynaptic component synapsin 1 and arranges it in puncta juxtaposed to the additional AMPA and NMDA receptor puncta, suggestive of increases in synaptic contacts. Consistent with increased synaptic input, we find that the nicotine treatment leads to an increase in the excitatory postsynaptic currents mediated by AMPA and NMDA receptors. Further, the increases skew the ratio of excitatory-to-inhibitory input the cell receives, and this holds both for pyramidal neurons and inhibitory neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region. The GluN2B-containing NMDA receptor redistribution at synapses is associated with a significant increase in GluN2B phosphorylation at Tyr1472, a site known to prevent GluN2B endocytosis. These results suggest that chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine not only alters functional connections but also is likely to change excitability levels across networks. Further, it may increase the propensity for synaptic plasticity, given the increase in synaptic NMDA receptors. PMID:26365992

  6. Activation of Peripheral κ-Opioid Receptors Normalizes Caffeine Effects Modified in Nicotine-Dependent Rats during Nicotine Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Sudakov, S K; Bogdanova, N G

    2016-10-01

    The study examined the effect of peripheral (intragastric) ICI-204,448, an agonist of gastric κ-opioid receptors, on the psychostimulating and anxiolytic effects of caffeine in nicotinedependent rats at the stage of nicotine withdrawal. In these rats, the effects of caffeine (10 mg/kg) were perverted. In nicotine-dependent rats, caffeine produced an anxiolytic effect accompanied by pronounced stimulation of motor activity, in contrast to anxiogenic effect induced by caffeine in intact rats without nicotine dependence. During nicotine withdrawal, nicotine-dependent rats demonstrated enhanced sensitivity to nicotine. Intragastric administration of κ-opioid receptor agonist ICI-204,448 normalized the effect of caffeine in nicotinedependent rats. We have previously demonstrated that activation of peripheral κ-opioid receptors inhibited central κ-opioid activity and eliminated manifestations of nicotine withdrawal syndrome in nicotine-dependent rats, e.g. metabolism activation, stimulation of motor activity, and enhancement of food consumption. In its turn, inhibition of central κ-opioid structures activates the brain adenosine system, which can attenuate the caffeine-induced effects in nicotine-dependent rats.

  7. Acute and chronic administration of ibogaine to the rat results in astrogliosis that is not confined to the cerebellar vermis.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, J P; Rogers, T S; Rodman, L E; Page, J G

    1996-10-31

    Acute administration of high doses of ibogaine (IBG) to the male rat results in degeneration of Purkinje cells and reactive gliosis in the cerebellar vermis. We examined whether acute and chronic administration of IBG to male and female rats results in gliosis as determined by quantification of the astroglial intermediate filament protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). After acute administration of IBG, rats of both sexes showed dose-related increases in GFAP that were not confined to the cerebellar vermis. After chronic administration of IBG, female, but not male rats, showed large (as much as 200% of control), dose-related increases in GFAP in hippocampus, olfactory bulbs, brain stem and striatum, but not cerebellum. In hippocampus, the cytoskeletal proteins, neurofilament 68 (NF-68) and beta-tubulin were increased in females treated chronically with IBG, findings consistent with a damage-induced sprouting response. Together, the data indicate that IBG damages areas of the brain outside the cerebellum and that the sites damaged are dependent on sex and dosage regimen.

  8. Atorvastatin improves Y-maze learning behaviour in nicotine treated male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Das S, Syam; Nair, Saritha S; Kavitha, S; Febi, John; Indira, M

    2015-11-01

    Nicotine is a parasympathomimetic alkaloid present in tobacco which can induce hyperlipidemia and has a direct effect on neural functions. Statins, competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxymethyl-3-glutaryl-coenzyme-A reductase, are cholesterol lowering drugs. It has some neuroprotective effects. Hence we analysed the combined effect of nicotine and statin on the learning behaviour of male albino rats. We employed Y-Maze conditional discrimination task. Rats were divided into 4 groups with six rats in each group. (1) Control, (2) Atorvastatin (10mg/kgb.wt), (3) Nicotine (0.6mg/kgb.wt) and (4) Atorvastatin (10mg/kgb.wt)+Nicotine (0.6mg/kgb.wt). After 30days of treatment rats from each group were selected for behavioural study and they were observed for 30days. At the end of the experimental period rats were sacrificed, and brain and liver were dissected out for further biochemical analysis. Nicotine treated group showed least performance in learning in comparison with control, atorvastatin and atorvastatin+nicotine treated groups. Co-administration of atorvastatin and nicotine improved learning behaviour compared to nicotine treated group. Reactive oxygen species level was significantly increased in nicotine group compared to control. The level of neurotransmitter serotonin which has a significant role in learning was found to be decreased in nicotine treated group compared to the control group. Activity of Na(+) K(+) ATPase, Ca(2+) ATPase and glutathione content was significantly reduced in nicotine treated group compared to control. The activity of acetylcholine esterase was significantly increased in the nicotine treated group. Expression studies showed significant decrease in N-methyl D-aspartate receptors and increase in mono amine oxidase-A and mono amine oxidase-B in nicotine treated group and was reversed in atorvastatin + nicotine treated group. It can be concluded that co-administration of nicotine with statin ameliorates the neural functional alterations caused

  9. AAV-directed persistent expression of a gene encoding anti-nicotine antibody for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Martin J; Rosenberg, Jonathan B; De, Bishnu P; Pagovich, Odelya E; Young, Colin N; Qiu, Jian-ping; Kaminsky, Stephen M; Hackett, Neil R; Worgall, Stefan; Janda, Kim D; Davisson, Robin L; Crystal, Ronald G

    2012-06-27

    Current strategies to help tobacco smokers quit have limited success as a result of the addictive properties of the nicotine in cigarette smoke. We hypothesized that a single administration of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer vector expressing high levels of an anti-nicotine antibody would persistently prevent nicotine from reaching its receptors in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we constructed an AAVrh.10 vector that expressed a full-length, high-affinity, anti-nicotine antibody derived from the Fab fragment of the anti-nicotine monoclonal antibody NIC9D9 (AAVantiNic). In mice treated with this vector, blood concentrations of the anti-nicotine antibody were dose-dependent, and the antibody showed high specificity and affinity for nicotine. The antibody shielded the brain from systemically administered nicotine, reducing brain nicotine concentrations to 15% of those in naïve mice. The amount of nicotine sequestered in the serum of vector-treated mice was more than seven times greater than that in untreated mice, with 83% of serum nicotine bound to immunoglobulin G. Treatment with the AAVantiNic vector blocked nicotine-mediated alterations in arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and locomotor activity. In summary, a single administration of a gene transfer vector expressing a high-affinity anti-nicotine monoclonal antibody elicited persistent (18 weeks), high titers of an anti-nicotine antibody that obviated the physiologic effects of nicotine. If this degree of efficacy translates to humans, AAVantiNic could be an effective preventative therapy for nicotine addiction.

  10. Melatonin protects uterus and oviduct exposed to nicotine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Saadat, Seyedeh Nazanin Seyed; Jahromi, Sina Khajeh; Homafar, Mohammad Amin; Haghiri, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Smoking is associated with higher infertility risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate protective effects of melatonin on the uterus and oviduct in mice exposed to nicotine. Adult female mice (n=32) were divided into four groups. Group A: control animals received normal saline, Group B: injected with nicotine 40µg/kg, Group C: injected with melatonin 10 µg, Group D: injected with nicotine 40µg/kg and melatonin 10 µg. All animals were treated over 15 days intraperitoneally. On the 16th day, animals in the estrus phase were dissected and their uterus and oviducts were removed. Immunohistochemistry was recruited for studying apoptosis and for detection of estrogen receptor (ER) alpha in luminal epithelium of the uterus and oviduct. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used for serum estradiol level determination. Nicotine in group B decreased estradiol level and ERalpha numbers both in the uterus and oviduct (p<0.05). Co-administration of melatonin-nicotine in Group D ameliorated the histology of the uterus and oviduct, increased ERalpha numbers and reduced apoptosis in the uterus and oviduct compared with the nicotine Group B (p<0.05). This study indicates that nicotine impairs the histology of the uterus and oviduct and co-administration of melatonin-nicotine ameliorates these findings, partly through alteration in ERalpha numbers and reduction of apoptosis. PMID:26038675

  11. Neurotensin agonist attenuates nicotine potentiation to cocaine sensitization.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Paul; Boules, Mona; Stennett, Bethany; Richelson, Elliott

    2014-03-01

    Tobacco usage typically precedes illicit drug use in adolescent and young adult populations. Several animal studies suggest nicotine increases the risk for subsequent cocaine abuse, and may be a negative prognostic factor for treatment of cocaine addiction; i.e., a "gateway drug". Neurotensin (NT) is a 13-amino acid neuropeptide that modulates dopamine, acetylcholine, glutamate, and GABA neurotransmission in brain reward pathways. NT69L, a NT(8-13) analog, blocks behavioral sensitization (an animal model for psychostimulant addiction) to nicotine, and nicotine self-administration in rats. The present study tested the effect of NT69L on the potentiating effects of nicotine on cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Male Wistar rats were injected daily for seven days with nicotine or saline (control) followed by four daily injections of cocaine. NT69L was administered 30 min prior to the last cocaine injection. Behavior was recorded with the use of activity chambers. Subchronic administration of nicotine enhanced cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization in Wistar rats, consistent with an hypothesized gateway effect. These behavioral effects of cocaine were attenuated by pretreatment with NT69L. The effect of the neurotensin agonist on cocaine sensitization in the nicotine treated group indicated a possible therapeutic effect for cocaine addiction, even in the presence of enhanced behavioral sensitization induced by nicotine.

  12. Treatment of nicotine dependence.

    PubMed

    Haxby, D G

    1995-02-01

    Drug and nondrug interventions used in treating nicotine dependence are reviewed. Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. Risks of smoking-related disease and death decline sharply when smokers quit, but 26% of Americans continue to smoke. Most smokers find it extremely difficult to quit smoking because of their nicotine addiction. Nonpharmacologic interventions used to promote smoking cessation include behavioral therapy, setting a specific date for quitting, receiving advice to quit from a health care professional, follow-up visits to review progress, self-help approaches, group counseling, filtration devices, hypnosis, and acupuncture. The efficacy of these approaches ranges from substantial to almost nil. The only pharmacologic agent with FDA-approved labeling for use in smoking-cessation therapy is nicotine. When used in conjunction with appropriate nonpharmacologic interventions, nicotine-replacement therapy roughly doubles the rate of quitting obtained with placebo. Nicotine-replacement therapies consist of nicotine transdermal (patch) systems and nicotine chewing gum. The nicotine patch is the first-line replacement therapy because it is effective when accompanied by only minimal (as opposed to more intensive) nonpharmacologic interventions and because it is easier to use and comply with than gum. Clonidine, antidepressants, and buspirone require further study to determine what role, if any, they should play in the treatment of nicotine dependence. The stages of smoking cessation are precontemplation, contemplation, action, and maintenance; interventions are selected on the basis of the stage the smoker is in. Nicotine dependence is difficult to treat, but there are aids that boost a smoker's chances of quitting. Nicotine patches and chewing gum offer the most effective pharmacologic options, especially when combined with behavioral interventions and counseling.

  13. The Volitional Nature of Nicotine Exposure Alters Anandamide and Oleoylethanolamide Levels in the Ventral Tegmental Area

    PubMed Central

    Buczynski, Matthew W; Polis, Ilham Y; Parsons, Loren H

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoid-1 receptors (CB1) have an important role in nicotine reward and their function is disrupted by chronic nicotine exposure, suggesting nicotine-induced alterations in endocannabinoid (eCB) signaling. However, the effects of nicotine on brain eCB levels have not been rigorously evaluated. Volitional intake of nicotine produces physiological and behavioral effects distinct from forced drug administration, although the mechanisms underlying these effects are not known. This study compared the effects of volitional nicotine self-administration (SA) and forced nicotine exposure (yoked administration (YA)) on levels of eCBs and related neuroactive lipids in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and other brain regions. Brain lipid levels were indexed both by in vivo microdialysis in the VTA and lipid extractions from brain tissues. Nicotine SA, but not YA, reduced baseline VTA dialysate oleoylethanolamide (OEA) levels relative to nicotine-naïve controls, and increased anandamide (AEA) release during nicotine intake. In contrast, all nicotine exposure paradigms increased VTA dialysate 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) levels. Thus, nicotine differentially modulates brain lipid (2-AG, AEA, and OEA) signaling, and these modulations are influenced by the volitional nature of the drug exposure. Corresponding bulk tissue analysis failed to identify these lipid changes. Nicotine exposure had no effect on fatty acid amide hydrolase activity in the VTA, suggesting that changes in AEA and OEA signaling result from alterations in their nicotine-induced biosynthesis. Both CB1 (by AEA and 2-AG) and non-CB1 (by OEA) targets can alter the excitability and activity of the dopaminergic neurons in the VTA. Collectively, these findings implicate disrupted lipid signaling in the motivational effects of nicotine. PMID:23169348

  14. The volitional nature of nicotine exposure alters anandamide and oleoylethanolamide levels in the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Buczynski, Matthew W; Polis, Ilham Y; Parsons, Loren H

    2013-03-01

    Cannabinoid-1 receptors (CB(1)) have an important role in nicotine reward and their function is disrupted by chronic nicotine exposure, suggesting nicotine-induced alterations in endocannabinoid (eCB) signaling. However, the effects of nicotine on brain eCB levels have not been rigorously evaluated. Volitional intake of nicotine produces physiological and behavioral effects distinct from forced drug administration, although the mechanisms underlying these effects are not known. This study compared the effects of volitional nicotine self-administration (SA) and forced nicotine exposure (yoked administration (YA)) on levels of eCBs and related neuroactive lipids in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and other brain regions. Brain lipid levels were indexed both by in vivo microdialysis in the VTA and lipid extractions from brain tissues. Nicotine SA, but not YA, reduced baseline VTA dialysate oleoylethanolamide (OEA) levels relative to nicotine-naïve controls, and increased anandamide (AEA) release during nicotine intake. In contrast, all nicotine exposure paradigms increased VTA dialysate 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) levels. Thus, nicotine differentially modulates brain lipid (2-AG, AEA, and OEA) signaling, and these modulations are influenced by the volitional nature of the drug exposure. Corresponding bulk tissue analysis failed to identify these lipid changes. Nicotine exposure had no effect on fatty acid amide hydrolase activity in the VTA, suggesting that changes in AEA and OEA signaling result from alterations in their nicotine-induced biosynthesis. Both CB(1) (by AEA and 2-AG) and non-CB(1) (by OEA) targets can alter the excitability and activity of the dopaminergic neurons in the VTA. Collectively, these findings implicate disrupted lipid signaling in the motivational effects of nicotine.

  15. Nicotine improves working memory span capacity in rats following sub-chronic ketamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Rushforth, Samantha L; Steckler, Thomas; Shoaib, Mohammed

    2011-12-01

    Ketamine, an NMDA-receptor antagonist, produces cognitive deficits in humans in a battery of tasks involving attention and memory. Nicotine can enhance various indices of cognitive performance, including working memory span capacity measured using the odor span task (OST). This study examined the effects of a sub-chronic ketamine treatment to model cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia, and to evaluate the effectiveness of nicotine, antipsychotic clozapine, and the novel mGlu2/3 agonist, LY404039, in restoring OST performance. Male hooded Lister rats were trained in the OST, a working memory task involving detection of a novel odor from an increasing number of presented odors until they exhibited asymptotic levels of stable performance. Sub-chronic ketamine exposure (10 and 30 mg/kg i.p. for 5 consecutive days) produced a dose-dependent impairment that was stable beyond 14 days following exposure. In one cohort, administration of graded doses of nicotine (0.025-0.1 mg/kg) acutely restored the performance in ketamine-treated animals, while significant improvements in odor span were observed in control subjects. In a second cohort of rats, acute tests with clozapine (1-10 mg/kg) and LY404039 (0.3-10 mg/kg) failed to reverse ketamine-induced deficits in doses that were observed to impair performance in the control groups. These data suggest that sub-chronic ketamine exposure in the OST presents a valuable method to examine novel treatments to restore cognitive impairments associated with neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Moreover, it highlights a central role for neuronal nicotinic receptors as viable targets for intervention that may be useful adjuncts to the currently prescribed anti-psychotics.

  16. Epigenetics of nicotine: another nail in the coughing.

    PubMed

    Volkow, Nora D

    2011-11-02

    In a mouse model, chronic nicotine exposure before cocaine use exacerbated the epigenetic, gene-expression, electrophysiological, and behavioral effects that occur during the transition from acute to chronic responses to cocaine that have been linked with the addictive process. Nicotine enhancement of the effects can be mimicked with an inhibitor of chromatin-modifying enzymes (class I and II histone deacetylases). These findings may spur the discovery of therapeutics for the treatment of addiction.

  17. An example of US Food and Drug Administration device regulation: medical devices indicated for use in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Peña, Carlos; Li, Khan; Felten, Richard; Ogden, Neil; Melkerson, Mark

    2007-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has established requirements for protecting the public health by assuring the safety and effectiveness of a variety of medical products including drugs, devices, and biological products, and for promoting public health by expediting the approval of treatments that are safe and effective. The Center for Devices and Radiological Health is the center within the agency that is responsible for pre- and postmarket regulation of medical devices. In this article, we review current regulation of medical devices, research and development programs, pre- and postmarket perspectives, and future considerations of medical devices, particularly as they relate to devices targeting acute ischemic stroke as an example of the process. We also review the Center for Devices and Radiological Health's historical perspective of acute ischemic stroke trials and clinical trial design considerations used in prior studies that have led to US market clearance as they are related to currently marketed devices indicated for acute ischemic stroke.

  18. An evaluation process for an electronic bar code medication administration information system in an acute care unit.

    PubMed

    Bargren, Michelle; Lu, Der-Fa

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to present an evaluation process and recommendations for addressing the gaps found with the implementation of a new bar code medication administration (BCMA) technology in a busy acute care hospital unit. The case study analyzes workflow procedures associated with administration of medications in an inpatient labor and delivery care unit before and one year after implementation of BCMA technology. The comparison reveals a twofold increase in workflow procedures for nursing staff because of the new technology. System gaps are identified from a nursing user's perspective, and recommendations are offered to close those gaps.

  19. Effect of an acute intraluminal administration of capsaicin on oesophageal motor pattern in GORD patients with ineffective oesophageal motility.

    PubMed

    Grossi, L; Cappello, G; Marzio, L

    2006-08-01

    Ineffective oesophageal motility (IOM) is a functional disorder affecting about 50% of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) patients. This disease in a severe form limits the clearing ability of the oesophagus and is considered one of the predictive factors for poorer GORD resolution. Capsaicin, the active compound of red pepper, exerts a prokinetic effect on oesophageal motility in healthy subjects by increasing the amplitude of body waves, even if no evidence exists on its possible role in situations of reduced motility. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of an acute administration of capsaicin on the oesophageal motor pattern in a group of GORD patients affected by severe IOM. Twelve GORD patients with severe IOM received an intra-oesophageal administration of 2 mL of a red pepper-olive oil mixture and 2 mL of olive oil alone serving as a control during a stationary manometry. The motor patterns of the oesophageal body and lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) were analysed at baseline and after the infusion of the two stimuli. The administration of capsaicin induced a significant improvement in oesophageal body contractility when compared with baseline. The velocity of propagation of waves and the LOS basal tone remained unchanged. The motor pattern was unaltered by the administration of olive oil alone. An acute administration of capsaicin seems to improve the motor performance of the oesophageal body in patients with ineffective motility. Whether this could represent the basis for further therapeutic approaches of GORD patients needs further study.

  20. Dose-response relationship of an environmental mixture of pyrethroids following an acute oral administration in the rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose-response relationship of an environmental mixture of pyrethroids following an acute oral administration in the rat M.F. Hughes1, D.G. Ross1, J.M. Starr1, E.J. Scollon1,2, M.J. Wolansky1,3, K.M. Crofton1, M.J. DeVito1,4 1U.S. EPA, ORD, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2U.S. EPA,...

  1. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors in rat brain. Annual report No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.J.

    1985-05-13

    We have conducted experiments to determine if 3H acetylcholine (3Hach) nicotinic recognition sites are located presynaptically on catecholamine and/or serotonin axons. Lesions of these axons by intraventricular injections of neurotoxins resulted in marked decreases in 3Hach binding sites in the striatum and hypothalamus, but not in the cortex or thalamus. These results indicate that 3Hach nicotinic binding sites are located on catecholamine and serotonin axons in specific areas of the brain. In other experiments, we determined that repeated administration of nicotine results in enhanced behavioral responses to a subsequent injection of nicotine, and that there appears to be a correlation between the enhanced response to nicotine and increased 3Hach binding sites in cerebral cortex.

  2. SSR591813, a novel selective and partial alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptor agonist with potential as an aid to smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, C; Bergis, O E; Galli, F; Lochead, A W; Jegham, S; Biton, B; Leonardon, J; Avenet, P; Sgard, F; Besnard, F; Graham, D; Coste, A; Oblin, A; Curet, O; Voltz, C; Gardes, A; Caille, D; Perrault, G; George, P; Soubrie, P; Scatton, B

    2003-07-01

    (5aS,8S,10aR)-5a,6,9,10-Tetrahydro,7H,11H-8,10a-methanopyrido[2',3':5,6]pyrano[2,3-d]azepine (SSR591813) is a novel compound that binds with high affinity to the rat and human alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes (Ki = 107 and 36 nM, respectively) and displays selectivity for the alpha4beta2 nAChR (Ki, human alpha3beta4 > 1000, alpha3beta2 = 116; alpha1beta1deltagamma > 6000 nM and rat alpha7 > 6000 nM). Electrophysiological experiments indicate that SSR591813 is a partial agonist at the human alpha4beta2 nAChR subtype (EC50 = 1.3 micro M, IA =19% compared with the full agonist 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenyl-piperazinium). In vivo findings from microdialysis and drug discrimination studies confirm the partial intrinsic activity of SSR591813. The drug increases dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens shell (30 mg/kg i.p.) and generalizes to nicotine or amphetamine (10-20 mg/kg i.p.) in rats, with an efficacy approximately 2-fold lower than that of nicotine. Pretreatment with SSR591813 (10 mg/kg i.p.) reduces the dopamine-releasing and discriminative effects of nicotine. SSR591813 shows activity in animal models of nicotine dependence at doses devoid of unwanted side effects typically observed with nicotine (hypothermia and cardiovascular effects). The compound (10 mg/kg i.p.) also prevents withdrawal signs precipitated by mecamylamine in nicotine-dependent rats and partially blocks the discriminative cue of an acute precipitated withdrawal. SSR591813 (20 mg/kg i.p.) reduces i.v. nicotine self-administration and antagonizes nicotine-induced behavioral sensitization in rats. The present results confirm important role for alpha4beta2 nAChRs in mediating nicotine dependence and suggest that SSR591813, a partial agonist at this particular nAChR subtype, may have therapeutic potential in the clinical management of smoking cessation.

  3. Attenuation of Compulsive-Like Behavior Through Positive Allosteric Modulation of α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Non-Induced Compulsive-Like Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Swarup; Mucha, Mckenzie; Khatri, Shailesh N.; Glenon, Richard; Schulte, Marvin K.; Bult-Ito, Abel

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinic α4β2 receptors are the most abundant subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressed in brain regions implicated in obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). These receptors are known to modify normal and addictive behaviors by modulating neuronal excitability. Desformylflustrabromine (dFBr) is a novel, positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of high acetylcholine sensitivity (HS) and low acetylcholine sensitivity (LS) α4β2 nAChRs. The present study tested the hypothesis that positive allosteric modulation of α4β2 receptors by dFBr will attenuate compulsive-like behavior in a non-induced compulsive-like mouse model. Male mice (Mus musculus) selected for compulsive-like nesting behavior (NB; 48 animals; 12 per group) received acute (once) and chronic (every day for 32 days) subcutaneous injection of dFBr at 2, 4 and 6 mg/kg doses. Saline was used as a control (0 mg/kg). Compulsive-like NB was assessed after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 24 h, while compulsive-like marble burying (MB) and anxiety-like open field (OF) behaviors were performed 2 h after dFBr administration. In the acute administration protocol, dFBr dose dependently attenuated NB and MB. Rapid effects (1–2 h after drug administration) of dFBr on MB and NB were observed for the chronic administration which was in congruence with the acute study. Chronic administration also revealed sustained suppression of NB by dFBr following 5 weeks of treatment. In both the acute and chronic regimen dFBr did not modulate OF behaviors. This research demonstrates the novel role of positive allosteric modulation of α4β2 nicotinic receptors by dFBr as a translational potential for OCD. PMID:28105008

  4. Variation in Nicotine Consumption in Inbred Mice Is Not Linked to Orosensory Ability

    PubMed Central

    Glatt, A. Rebecca; Denton, Kelley

    2009-01-01

    Genetic studies of nicotine addiction in mice have utilized the oral self-administration model. However, it is unclear if strain differences in nicotine consumption are influenced by variation in bitter taste sensitivity. We measured both nicotine consumption and nicotine brief-access licking behavior in several commonly used inbred strains of mice that were previously shown to differ in nicotine consumption. A/J (A), C57BL/6J (B6), and DBA/2J (D2) mice were given a 2-bottle choice test with a single concentration of nicotine (75 μg/ml; nicotine vs. water). Mice of these strains were also tested with a range of nicotine concentrations (5–400 μg/ml) using a brief-access test, which measures orosensory response and minimizes postingestive effects. Although B6 mice consumed more 75-μg/ml nicotine than A or D2 mice in the 2-bottle test, these strains did not differ in level of aversion to nicotine when tested with the brief-access procedure. Strain differences in orosensory response to nicotine were not found; yet, differences emerged during the 2-bottle tests. This study provides evidence that variation in intake level of nicotine is likely not due to differences in taste or trigeminal sensitivity but likely due to postingestive factors. PMID:18775876

  5. Voluntary co-consumption of alcohol and nicotine: Effects of abstinence, intermittency, and withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Kyu Y; Touchette, Jillienne C; Hartell, Elizabeth C; Bade, Elizabeth J; Lee, Anna M

    2016-10-01

    Alcohol and nicotine are often used together, and there is a high rate of co-occurrence between alcohol and nicotine addiction. Most animal models studying alcohol and nicotine interactions have utilized passive drug administration, which may not be relevant to human co-addiction. In addition, the interactions between alcohol and nicotine in female animals have been understudied, as most studies have used male animals. To address these issues, we developed models of alcohol and nicotine co-consumption in male and female mice that utilized voluntary, oral consumption of unsweetened alcohol, nicotine and water. We first examined drug consumption and preference in single-drug, sequential alcohol and nicotine consumption tests in male and female C57BL/6 and DBA/2J mice. We then tested chronic continuous and intermittent access alcohol and nicotine co-consumption procedures. We found that male and female C57BL/6 mice readily co-consumed unsweetened alcohol and nicotine. In our continuous co-consumption procedures, we found that varying the available nicotine concentration during an alcohol abstinence period affected compensatory nicotine consumption during alcohol abstinence, and affected rebound alcohol consumption when alcohol was re-introduced. Consumption of alcohol and nicotine in an intermittent co-consumption procedure produced higher alcohol consumption levels, but not nicotine consumption levels, compared with the continuous co-consumption procedures. Finally, we found that intermittent alcohol and nicotine co-consumption resulted in physical dependence. Our data show that these voluntary co-consumption procedures can be easily performed in mice and can be used to study behavioral interactions between alcohol and nicotine consumption, which may better model human alcohol and nicotine co-addiction.

  6. 18-Methoxycoronaridine acts in the medial habenula to attenuate behavioral and neurochemical sensitization to nicotine.

    PubMed

    Eggan, Branden L; McCallum, Sarah E

    2016-07-01

    Systemic 18-methoxycoronaridine, an alpha3beta4 nicotinic antagonist, slows the rate of induction of behavioral sensitization to nicotine (Glick et al., 1996; 2011). The primary mechanism of action of 18-MC is believed to be the inhibition of α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors which are densely expressed in the medial habenula and interpeduncular nucleus (Pace et al., 2004; Glick et al., 2012). Recently, these habenular nicotinic receptors and their multiple roles in nicotine aversion and withdrawal have been increasingly emphasized (Antolin-Fontes et al., 2015). Here, we investigated the effects of 18-MC on both behavioral and neurochemical sensitization to nicotine. Daily systemic administration of 18-MC slowed the rate of induction of behavioral sensitization to nicotine but failed to block the expression of a sensitized locomotor response when absent. In contrast, in nicotine sensitized animals, systemic 18-MC significantly reduced the expression of behavioral sensitization. Results from intra-habenular administration of 18-MC paralleled these findings in that the expression of behavioral sensitization was also reduced in sensitized animals. Consistent with its effects on behavioral sensitization, intra-MHb treatment with 18-MC completely abolished sensitized dopamine responses in the nucleus accumbens in nicotine sensitized animals. These results show that α3β4 nicotinic receptors in the MHb contribute to nicotine sensitization, a phenomenon associated with drug craving and relapse.

  7. Can nicotine be used medicinally in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Thiriez, Claire; Villafane, Gabriel; Grapin, Frédérique; Fenelon, Gilles; Remy, Philippe; Cesaro, Pierre

    2011-07-01

    The risk of Parkinson's disease is reduced by cigarette smoking, which raises some unanswered questions. Nicotine, a major component of tobacco smoke, could exert either nonreceptor-mediated biological effects or, more importantly, act on the different subtypes of nicotinic brain receptors, in particular those associated with the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. There is now robust experimental evidence for a neuroprotective effect of nicotine upon dopaminergic neurons. By contrast, in animal models of Parkinson's disease, nicotine alone has slight or no motor effects. However, nicotine may modulate dopamine transmission and has clear motor effects when associated with L-DOPA, reducing L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias. Clinical trials have yielded inconclusive results thus far and are hampered by different designs and small cohorts. Ongoing studies address either symptomatic motor or nonmotor symptoms, or neuroprotection. There is still no agreement on the daily dosage of nicotine or the method of administration. Together, these data suggest that nicotine or nicotinic receptor drugs have therapeutic potential for Parkinson's disease, although the specific treatment regimens remain to be determined.

  8. Effects of using electronic cigarettes on nicotine delivery and cardiovascular function in comparison with regular cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Yan, X Sherwin; D'Ruiz, Carl

    2015-02-01

    The development of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) has the potential to offer a less harmful alternative for tobacco users. This clinical study was designed to characterize e-cig users' exposure to nicotine, and to investigate the acute effects of e-cigs on the hemodynamic measurements (blood pressure and heart rate) in comparison with the effects of regular smoking. Five e-cigs and one Marlboro® cigarette were randomized for twenty-three participants under two exposure scenarios from Day 1 to Day 11: half-hour controlled administration and one hour ad lib use. The nicotine plasma concentrations after 1.5h of product use (C90) were significantly lower in the users of e-cigs than of Marlboro® cigarettes. The combination of glycerin and propylene glycol as the vehicle facilitated delivery of more nicotine than glycerin alone. The heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significantly elevated after use of Marlboro® cigarettes, but the elevation was less after use of most of the e-cigs. Use of e-cigs had no impact on the exhaled CO levels, whereas the Marlboro® cigarette significantly increased the exhaled CO more than 8 times above the baseline. In conclusion, e-cigs could be a less harmful alternative for tobacco users.

  9. Upregulation of surface alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptors is initiated by receptor desensitization after chronic exposure to nicotine.

    PubMed

    Fenster, C P; Whitworth, T L; Sheffield, E B; Quick, M W; Lester, R A

    1999-06-15

    It is hypothesized that desensitization of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) induced by chronic exposure to nicotine initiates upregulation of nAChR number. To test this hypothesis directly, oocytes expressing alpha4beta2 receptors were chronically incubated (24-48 hr) in nicotine, and the resulting changes in specific [3H]nicotine binding to surface receptors on intact oocytes were compared with functional receptor desensitization. Four lines of evidence strongly support the hypothesis. (1) The half-maximal nicotine concentration necessary to produce desensitization (9.7 nM) was the same as that needed to induce upregulation (9.9 nM). (2) The concentration of [3H]nicotine for half-maximal binding to surface nAChRs on intact oocytes was also similar (11.1 nM), as predicted from cyclical desensitization models. (3) Functional desensitization of alpha3beta4 receptors required 10-fold higher nicotine concentrations, and this was mirrored by a 10-fold shift in concentrations necessary for upregulation. (4) Mutant alpha4beta2 receptors that do not recover fully from desensitization, but not wild-type channels, were upregulated after acute (1 hr) applications of nicotine. Interestingly, the nicotine concentration required for half-maximal binding of alpha4beta2 receptors in total cell membrane homogenates was 20-fold lower than that measured for surface nAChRs in intact oocytes. These data suggest that cell homogenate binding assays may not accurately reflect the in vivo desensitization affinity of surface nAChRs and may account for some of the previously reported differences in the efficacy of nicotine for inducing nAChR desensitization and upregulation.

  10. Pilot study of the safety of starting administration of low-dose aspirin and cilostazol in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Keishi; Komatsu, Yoji; Sato, Naoaki; Higuchi, Osamu; Kujiraoka, Yuji; Kamezaki, Takao; Suzuki, Kensuke; Matsumura, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Progressive stroke is a serious problem due to the associated morbidity and mortality. Aspirin is recommended for acute ischemic stroke, but does not reduce the frequency of stroke progression. No standard treatment has been approved for the prevention of stroke progression. Cilostazol, which reduces platelet aggregation about 3 hours after single administration, does not increase the frequency of bleeding events when compared with aspirin or a placebo. Moreover, the combination of 100 mg aspirin and 200 mg cilostazol does not increase the frequency of bleeding events compared with only 100 mg aspirin, and thus is expected to prevent stroke progression with a high degree of safety. The present study investigated the safety of this combination of two drugs administered at the above concentrations in 54 patients with acute ischemic stroke within 48 hours of stroke onset. Modified National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) measurements were performed at baseline and again on day 4 to 7. Progressive stroke was defined as an increase greater than or equal to 1 point on NIHSS. Patient scores on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) were evaluated at baseline and 3 months after enrollment. Stroke progression occurred in 11.1% of the patients. The percentages of patients with mRS score from 0 to 2 were 42.6% and 75% at baseline and 3 months, respectively. No symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage or major extracranial hemorrhage occurred. These results suggest that administration of aspirin and cilostazol is safe for acute ischemic stroke.

  11. In vivo interactions between α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α: Implication for nicotine dependence.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Asti; Bagdas, Deniz; Muldoon, Pretal P; Lichtman, Aron H; Carroll, F Ivy; Greenwald, Mark; Miles, Michael F; Damaj, M Imad

    2017-03-07

    Chronic tobacco use dramatically increases health burdens and financial costs. Limitations of current smoking cessation therapies indicate the need for improved molecular targets. The main addictive component of tobacco, nicotine, exerts its dependency effects via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Activation of the homomeric α7 nAChR reduces nicotine's rewarding properties in conditioned place preference (CPP) test and i.v. self-administration models, but the mechanism underlying these effects is unknown. Recently, the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor type-α (PPARα) has been implicated as a downstream signaling target of the α7 nAChR in ventral tegmental area dopamine cells. The present study investigated PPARα as a possible mediator of the effect of α7 nAChR activation in nicotine dependence. Our results demonstrate the PPARα antagonist GW6471 blocks actions of the α7 nAChR agonist PNU282987 on nicotine reward in an unbiased CPP test in male ICR adult mice. These findings suggests that α7 nAChR activation attenuates nicotine CPP in a PPARα-dependent manner. To evaluate PPARα activation in nicotine dependence we used the selective and potent PPARα agonist, WY-14643 and the clinically used PPARα activator, fenofibrate, in nicotine CPP and we observed attenuation of nicotine preference, but fenofibrate was less potent. We also studied PPARα in nicotine dependence by evaluating its activation in nicotine withdrawal. WY-14643 reversed nicotine withdrawal signs whereas fenofibrate had modest efficacy. This suggests that PPARα plays a role in nicotine reward and withdrawal and that further studies are warranted to elucidate its function in mediating the effects of α7 nAChRs in nicotine dependence.

  12. Behavioral mechanisms underlying nicotine reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, Laura E; Smith, Tracy T; Schassburger, Rachel L; Buffalari, Deanne M; Sved, Alan F; Donny, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable deaths worldwide, and nicotine, the primary psychoactive constituent in tobacco, drives sustained use. The behavioral actions of nicotine are complex and extend well beyond the actions of the drug as a primary reinforcer. Stimuli that are consistently paired with nicotine can, through associative learning, take on reinforcing properties as conditioned stimuli. These conditioned stimuli can then impact the rate and probability of behavior and even function as conditioning reinforcers that maintain behavior in the absence of nicotine. Nicotine can also act as a conditioned stimulus (CS), predicting the delivery of other reinforcers, which may allow nicotine to acquire value as a conditioned reinforcer. These associative effects, establishing non-nicotine stimuli as conditioned stimuli with discriminative stimulus and conditioned reinforcing properties as well as establishing nicotine as a CS, are predicted by basic conditioning principles. However, nicotine can also act non-associatively. Nicotine directly enhances the reinforcing efficacy of other reinforcing stimuli in the environment, an effect that does not require a temporal or predictive relationship between nicotine and either the stimulus or the behavior. Hence, the reinforcing actions of nicotine stem both from the primary reinforcing actions of the drug (and the subsequent associative learning effects) as well as the reinforcement enhancement action of nicotine which is non-associative in nature. Gaining a better understanding of how nicotine impacts behavior will allow for maximally effective tobacco control efforts aimed at reducing the harm associated with tobacco use by reducing and/or treating its addictiveness.

  13. Nicotine and health.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    Nicotine, an alkaloid derived from the leaves of tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana rustica) is the primary addictive agent in tobacco products.(1,2) There are different ways of administering the various products including smoking cigarettes, chewing tobacco, holding moist snuff in the mouth, inhaling dry snuff through the nose, inhaling smoke from a waterpipe and inhaling vapour from an electronic cigarette.(3-6) It can be difficult differentiating the effects of nicotine from the many other toxic substances these products also contain. Here we review the pharmacological effects of nicotine but we will not review the well-known harmful effects of cigarettes, where it is primarily the toxins and carcinogens in tobacco smoke rather than the nicotine that cause illness and death.(7) A future article will consider the use of electronic cigarettes.

  14. Acute jugular vein thrombosis during rituximab administration: Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dada, Reyad; Zekri, Jamal; Ramal, Bilal; Ahmad, Kamel

    2016-02-01

    Rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody is licensed for the treatment of CD20 positive lymphomas. Previous studies have found rituximab, in combination with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy, is superior to cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone alone in the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and many other B-cell lymphomas. Acute hypersensitivity reactions have been reported in patients receiving rituximab infusion and usually manifesting as headache, fever, chills, sweats, skin rash, dyspnea, mild hypotension, and nausea. Acute major venous thrombosis and seizures have not been reported as manifestation of acute hypersensitivity reaction. We report on a 22-year-old woman, who was diagnosed with stage III B CD20 positive B-cell diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. During the first cycle of treatment, she developed grand-mal seizure while receiving rituximab infusion without any other features of acute hypersensitivity reaction. Imaging confirmed new onset jugular vein thrombosis with normal coagulation parameters. These events were managed by anticonvulsants and anticoagulation therapy. The patient completed eight cycles of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone without rituximab and achieved complete remission. No further complications were noted. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature describing grand-mal seizures and acute thrombosis while on rituximab treatment. Clinicians should be aware of this rare side effect, as stopping rituximab can prevent recurrence of these complications.

  15. Acute Severe Thrombocytopenia Occurring After Administration of Eptifibatide Postpones Emergent Coronary Artery Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Boettcher, Brent T.; Olund, Timothy J.; Pagel, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Eptifibatide is a platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GP IIb/IIIa) receptor antagonist that inhibits fibrinogen binding to the activated GP IIb/IIIa site and prevents platelet-platelet interaction and clot formation. GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors improve outcome in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndrome. Thrombocytopenia is a complication of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors, but severe thrombocytopenia is unusual. Most reported cases of severe thrombocytopenia after eptifibatide occurred in patients with acute coronary syndrome. The authors describe a patient who developed acute profound thrombocytopenia after receiving eptifibatide before emergent coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Case Presentation A 67-year-old man with a normal platelet count (220 K/uL) developed atrial fibrillation, left bundle branch block, and respiratory insufficiency consistent with acute coronary syndrome two days after colectomy. He received eptifibatide during cardiac catheterization, where three-vessel coronary artery disease was encountered. Emergent coronary artery surgery was planned, but the platelet count before surgery was 2 K/uL. Eptifibatide was discontinued, surgery was postponed, and acute coronary syndrome was treated with intraaortic balloon counterpulsation. Conclusions The authors describe the second reported case of eptifibatide-induced severe thrombocytopenia associated with cardiac surgery. In this case, discontinuation of eptifibatide and transfusion of apheresis platelets increased the platelet count (137 K/uL) the following day, and the patient subsequently underwent successful coronary artery surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:27843778

  16. Acute Carnosine Administration Increases Respiratory Chain Complexes and Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme Activities in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Levy W; Cararo, José H; Maravai, Soliany G; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Guerra Martinez, Camila; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Bogo, Maurício R; Hipkiss, Alan R; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C

    2016-10-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an imidazole dipeptide synthesized in excitable tissues of many animals, whose biochemical properties include carbonyl scavenger, anti-oxidant, bivalent metal ion chelator, proton buffer, and immunomodulating agent, although its precise physiological role(s) in skeletal muscle and brain tissues in vivo remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of acute carnosine administration on various aspects of brain bioenergetics of young Wistar rats. The activity of mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex was assessed using a spectrophotometer, and it was found that there was an increase in the activities of complexes I-III and II-III and succinate dehydrogenase in carnosine-treated rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. However, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) data on mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)) were not altered significantly and therefore suggest that short-term carnosine administration does not affect mitochondrial biogenesis. It was in agreement with the finding that immunocontent of respiratory chain complexes was not altered in animals receiving carnosine. These observations indicate that acute carnosine administration increases the respiratory chain and citric acid cycle enzyme activities in cerebral cortex of young rats, substantiating, at least in part, a neuroprotector effect assigned to carnosine against oxidative-driven disorders.

  17. The effects of the acute administration of low-dosage ethanol on the phasic neurochemical oscillations of the basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Noori, H R

    2012-09-01

    The effects of the acute ethanol consumption on the brain's neurochemistry are largely studied at the synaptic level. Here, the acute action of low dosages of ethanol, in terms of the inhibition of the glutamatergic system through antagonizing the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, on the neurochemical oscillations along the neurocircuitry of the basal ganglia is investigated by mathematical models. Substantial alterations in the dynamical behaviour of the neurochemical oscillations after single administration of low dosages of ethanol have been observed. Significant dynamical changes in the gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate systems along the subthalamic-pallidal feedback loop and the dopamine system of the striatal complex suggest new perspectives in the understanding of the ethanol-induced motor dysfunctions.

  18. Adult mice voluntarily progress to nicotine dependence in an oral self-selection assay.

    PubMed

    Locklear, Laura L; McDonald, Craig G; Smith, Robert F; Fryxell, Karl J

    2012-09-01

    Nicotine has both rewarding and aversive properties in rodents, as shown by intravenous self-administration, intracranial self-stimulation, and conditioned place preference experiments. However, high throughput models of nicotine reward have not been developed in mice. In previous two-bottle studies, mice often chose to drink less from the nicotine bottle than from the water bottle, which raises the question whether these paradigms provide a model of the reinforcing properties of oral nicotine. We hypothesized that previous two-bottle choice paradigms included factors (such as the brief duration of trials, the addition of flavorings to both bottles, water bottles located relatively close to each other, etc.) that may have obstructed the formation of a learned association between the taste of nicotine and its delayed pharmacological effects. Here we show that a paradigm designed to simplify the acquisition of a learned association resulted in nicotine consumption by various strains and sexes that diverged progressively over a period of seven weeks. The strain and sex with the highest nicotine consumption (C57BL/6J females) showed steady and statistically significant increases in nicotine consumption throughout this period. C57BL/6J females were clearly responding to the reinforcing properties of nicotine because they chose to drink over 70% of their fluids from the nicotine bottle. Moreover, they became nicotine dependent, as shown by highly significant nicotine withdrawal symptoms after the nicotine bottle was removed. The strain and sex with the lowest consumption (A/J males) showed a significant decrease in nicotine consumption, and by the end of the experiment were drinking only 24% of their fluids from the nicotine bottle.

  19. Behavioral and Molecular Analysis of Nicotine-Conditioned Place Preference in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kedikian, Ximena; Faillace, Maria Paula; Bernabeu, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    Studies using mice and rats have demonstrated that nicotine induces a conditioned place preference (CPP), with more effective results obtained by using biased procedures. Zebrafish have also been used as a model system to identify factors influencing nicotine-associated reward by using an unbiased design. Here, we report that zebrafish exhibited putative nicotine biased CPP to an initially aversive compartment (nicotine-paired group). A counterbalanced nicotine-exposed control group did not show a significant preference shift, providing evidence that the preference shift in the nicotine-paired group was not due to a reduction of aversion for this compartment. Zebrafish preference was corroborated by behavioral analysis of several indicators of drug preference, such as time spent in the drug-paired side, number of entries to the drug-paired side, and distance traveled. These results provided strong evidence that zebrafish may actually develop a preference for nicotine, although the drug was administrated in an aversive place for the fish, which was further supported by molecular studies. Reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR analysis depicted a significant increase in the expression of α7 and α6 but not α4 and β2 subunits of the nicotinic receptor in nicotine-paired zebrafish brains. In contrast, zebrafish brains from the counterbalanced nicotine group showed no significant changes. Moreover, CREB phosphorylation, an indicator of neural activity, accompanied the acquisition of nicotine-CPP. Our studies offered an incremental value to the drug addiction field, because they further describe behavioral features of CPP to nicotine in zebrafish. The results suggested that zebrafish exposed to nicotine in an unfriendly environment can develop a preference for that initially aversive place, which is likely due to the rewarding effect of nicotine. Therefore, this model can be used to screen exogenous and endogenous molecules involved in nicotine

  20. Acute Morphine Administration Reduces Cell-Mediated Immunity and Induces Reactivation of Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mojadadi, Shafi; Jamali, Abbas; Khansarinejad, Behzad; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Bamdad, Taravat

    2009-01-01

    Acute morphine administration is known to alter the course of herpes simplex virus infection. In this study, the effect of acute morphine administration on the reactivation of latent herpes was investigated in a mouse model. Because of the important role of cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity in the inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reactivation, the effect of acute morphine administration on CTL responses was also evaluated. Furthermore, lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ production were evaluated for their roles in the induction of the CTL response. The findings showed that acute morphine administration significantly reduced CTL responses, lymphocyte proliferation, and IFN-γ production. Furthermore, acute morphine administration has been shown to reactivate latent HSV-1. Previous studies have shown that cellular immune responses have important roles in the inhibition of HSV reactivation. These findings suggest that suppression of a portion of the cellular immune response after acute morphine administration may constitute one part of the mechanism that induces HSV reactivation. PMID:19403060

  1. Two-pore Channels (TPC2s) and Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP) at Lysosomal-Sarcoplasmic Reticular Junctions Contribute to Acute and Chronic β-Adrenoceptor Signaling in the Heart*

    PubMed Central

    Capel, Rebecca A.; Bolton, Emma L.; Lin, Wee K.; Aston, Daniel; Wang, Yanwen; Liu, Wei; Wang, Xin; Burton, Rebecca-Ann B.; Bloor-Young, Duncan; Shade, Kai-Ting; Ruas, Margarida; Parrington, John; Churchill, Grant C.; Lei, Ming; Galione, Antony; Terrar, Derek A.

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+-permeable type 2 two-pore channels (TPC2) are lysosomal proteins required for nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP)-evoked Ca2+ release in many diverse cell types. Here, we investigate the importance of TPC2 proteins for the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart. NAADP-AM failed to enhance Ca2+ responses in cardiac myocytes from Tpcn2−/− mice, unlike myocytes from wild-type (WT) mice. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitors suppressed actions of NAADP in myocytes. Ca2+ transients and contractions accompanying action potentials were increased by isoproterenol in myocytes from WT mice, but these effects of β-adrenoreceptor stimulation were reduced in myocytes from Tpcn2−/− mice. Increases in amplitude of L-type Ca2+ currents evoked by isoproterenol remained unchanged in myocytes from Tpcn2−/− mice showing no loss of β-adrenoceptors or coupling mechanisms. Whole hearts from Tpcn2−/− mice also showed reduced inotropic effects of isoproterenol and a reduced tendency for arrhythmias following acute β-adrenoreceptor stimulation. Hearts from Tpcn2−/− mice chronically exposed to isoproterenol showed less cardiac hypertrophy and increased threshold for arrhythmogenesis compared with WT controls. Electron microscopy showed that lysosomes form close contacts with the sarcoplasmic reticulum (separation ∼25 nm). We propose that Ca2+-signaling nanodomains between lysosomes and sarcoplasmic reticulum dependent on NAADP and TPC2 comprise an important element in β-adrenoreceptor signal transduction in cardiac myocytes. In summary, our observations define a role for NAADP and TPC2 at lysosomal/sarcoplasmic reticulum junctions as unexpected but major contributors in the acute actions of β-adrenergic signaling in the heart and also in stress pathways linking chronic stimulation of β-adrenoceptors to hypertrophy and associated arrhythmias. PMID:26438825

  2. Nicotine reduces antipsychotic-induced orofacial dyskinesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Bordia, Tanuja; McIntosh, J Michael; Quik, Maryka

    2012-03-01

    Antipsychotics are an important class of drugs for the management of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. They act by blocking dopamine receptors; however, because these receptors are present throughout the brain, prolonged antipsychotic use also leads to serious side effects. These include tardive dyskinesia, repetitive abnormal involuntary movements of the face and limbs for which there is little treatment. In this study, we investigated whether nicotine administration could reduce tardive dyskinesia because nicotine attenuates other drug-induced abnormal movements. We used a well established model of tardive dyskinesia in which rats injected with the commonly used antipsychotic haloperidol develop vacuous chewing movements (VCMs) that resemble human orofacial dyskinesias. Rats were first administered nicotine (minipump; 2 mg/kg per day). Two weeks later, they were given haloperidol (1 mg/kg s.c.) once daily. Nicotine treatment reduced haloperidol-induced VCMs by ∼20% after 5 weeks, with a significant ∼60% decline after 13 weeks. There was no worsening of haloperidol-induced catalepsy. To understand the molecular basis for this improvement, we measured the striatal dopamine transporter and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Both haloperidol and nicotine treatment decreased the transporter and α6β2* nAChRs (the asterisk indicates the possible presence of other nicotinic subunits in the receptor complex) when given alone, with no further decline with combined drug treatment. By contrast, nicotine alone increased, while haloperidol reduced α4β2* nAChRs in both vehicle and haloperidol-treated rats. These data suggest that molecular mechanisms other than those directly linked to the transporter and nAChRs underlie the nicotine-mediated improvement in haloperidol-induced VCMs in rats. The present results are the first to suggest that nicotine may be useful for improving the tardive dyskinesia associated with antipsychotic use.

  3. The effects of acute ethanol administration on ethanol withdrawal-induced anxiety-like syndrome in rats: A biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jaya; Hapidin, Hermizi; Get Bee, Yvonne-Tee; Ismail, Zalina

    2016-02-01

    Withdrawal from long-term ethanol consumption results in overexcitation of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the amygdala, which induces an anxiety-like syndrome. Most alcoholics that suffer from such symptoms frequently depend on habitual drinking as self-medication to alleviate their symptoms. Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) and protein kinase C (PKC) epsilon have been reported to mediate acute and chronic effects of ethanol. This study explores the changes in mGlu5 and PKC epsilon in the amygdala following acute administration of ethanol during ethanol withdrawal (EW) induced anxiety. Male Wistar rats were fed a modified liquid diet containing low-fat cow milk, sucrose, and maltodextrin, with a gradual introduction of 2.4%, 4.8% and 7.2% ethanol for 20 days. Six hours into EW, the rats were intraperitoneally injected with normal saline and ethanol (2.5 g/kg, 20% v/v), and exposed to open-field and elevated plus maze tests. Then, amygdala tissue was dissected from the rat brain for Western blot and gene expression studies. EW-induced anxiety was accompanied by a significant increase in mGlu5, total PKC epsilon, and phosphorylated PKC epsilon protein levels, and also of mRNA of mGlu5 (GRM5) in the amygdala. Acute administration of ethanol significantly attenuated EW-induced anxiety as well as an EW-induced increase in GRM5. The acute challenge of ethanol to EW rats had little effect on the phosphorylated and total protein levels of PKC epsilon in the amygdala. Our results demonstrate that amygdala PKC epsilon may not be directly involved in the development of anxiety following EW.

  4. The validity of ICD codes coupled with imaging procedure codes for identifying acute venous thromboembolism using administrative data.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Ghazi S; Wu, Cynthia; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan; McMurtry, M Sean

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of using a combination of International Classification of Diseases (ICD) diagnostic codes and imaging procedure codes for identifying deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) within administrative databases. Information from the Alberta Health (AH) inpatients and ambulatory care administrative databases in Alberta, Canada was obtained for subjects with a documented imaging study result performed at a large teaching hospital in Alberta to exclude venous thromboembolism (VTE) between 2000 and 2010. In 1361 randomly-selected patients, the proportion of patients correctly classified by AH administrative data, using both ICD diagnostic codes and procedure codes, was determined for DVT and PE using diagnoses documented in patient charts as the gold standard. Of the 1361 patients, 712 had suspected PE and 649 had suspected DVT. The sensitivities for identifying patients with PE or DVT using administrative data were 74.83% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 67.01-81.62) and 75.24% (95% CI: 65.86-83.14), respectively. The specificities for PE or DVT were 91.86% (95% CI: 89.29-93.98) and 95.77% (95% CI: 93.72-97.30), respectively. In conclusion, when coupled with relevant imaging codes, VTE diagnostic codes obtained from administrative data provide a relatively sensitive and very specific method to ascertain acute VTE.

  5. Novel insights on the effect of nicotine in a murine colitis model.

    PubMed

    AlSharari, Shakir D; Akbarali, Hamid I; Abdullah, Rehab A; Shahab, Omer; Auttachoat, Wimolnut; Ferreira, Gabriela A; White, Kimber L; Lichtman, Aron H; Cabral, Guy A; Damaj, M Imad

    2013-01-01

    Studies showed that nicotine has a positive influence on symptoms of ulcerative colitis. In the present study, we explored the effect of nicotine treatment using different routes of administration in the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis mouse model. We also investigated the effects of cotinine, a major metabolite of nicotine, in the model. C57BL6 adult male mice were given DSS solution freely in the drinking water for seven consecutive days, and tap water was given thereafter. Disease severity, length of the colon, colon tissue histology, and inflammatory markers, including colonic myeloperoxidase activity and colonic tumor necrosis factor-α levels, were evaluated. The effect of nicotine and cotinine treatments via various different routes of administration were examined the DSS model. In addition, we measured the plasma levels of nicotine and cotinine in our treatment protocols. Administration of low, but not high, doses of oral nicotine in DSS-treated mice resulted in a significant decrease in disease severity, histologic damage scores, as well as colonic level of tumor necrosis factor-α. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of nicotine was not seen after chronic s.c. or minipump infusion of the drug. Differences in plasma levels of nicotine and cotinine do not seem to account for this lack of effect. Finally, oral cotinine alone failed to show a significant effect in the DSS model of colitis. These results highlight that dose and route of administration play a critical role in the protective effect of nicotine in the DSS mouse colitis model.

  6. Nicotine is more addictive, not more cognitively therapeutic in a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia produced by neonatal ventral hippocampal lesions.

    PubMed

    Berg, Sarah A; Sentir, Alena M; Cooley, Benjamin S; Engleman, Eric A; Chambers, R Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Nicotine dependence is the leading cause of death in the United States. However, research on high rates of nicotine use in mental illness has primarily explained this co-morbidity as reflecting nicotine's therapeutic benefits, especially for cognitive symptoms, equating smoking with 'self-medication'. We used a leading neurodevelopmental model of mental illness in rats to prospectively test the alternative possibility that nicotine dependence pervades mental illness because nicotine is simply more addictive in mentally ill brains that involve developmental hippocampal dysfunction. Neonatal ventral hippocampal lesions (NVHL) have previously been demonstrated to produce post-adolescent-onset, pharmacological, neurobiological and cognitive-deficit features of schizophrenia. Here, we show that NVHLs increase adult nicotine self-administration, potentiating acquisition-intake, total nicotine consumed and drug seeking. Behavioral sensitization to nicotine in adolescence prior to self-administration is not accentuated by NVHLs in contrast to increased nicotine self-administration and behavioral sensitization documented in adult NVHL rats, suggesting periadolescent neurodevelopmental onset of nicotine addiction vulnerability in the NVHL model. Delivering a nicotine regimen approximating the exposure used in the sensitization and self-administration experiments (i.e. as a treatment) to adult rats did not specifically reverse NVHL-induced cortical-hippocampal-dependent cognitive deficits and actually worsened cognitive efficiency after nicotine treatment stopped, generating deficits that resemble those due to NVHLs. These findings represent the first prospective evidence demonstrating a causal link between disease processes in schizophrenia and nicotine addiction. Developmental cortical-temporal limbic dysfunction in mental illness may thus amplify nicotine's reinforcing effects and addiction risk and severity, even while producing cognitive deficits that are not

  7. Suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by acute heroin challenge in rats during acute and chronic withdrawal from chronic heroin administration

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Leri, Francesco; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    It is known that heroin dependence and withdrawal are associated with changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The objective of these studies in rats was to systematically investigate the level of HPA activity and response to a heroin challenge at two time points during heroin withdrawal, and to characterize the expression of associated stress-related genes 30 minutes after each heroin challenge. Rats received chronic (10-day) intermittent escalating-dose heroin administration (3×2.5 mg/kg/day on day 1; 3×20 mg/kg/day by day 10). Hormonal and neurochemical assessments were performed in acute (12 hours after last heroin injection) and chronic (10 days after the last injection) withdrawal. Both plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels were elevated during acute withdrawal, and heroin challenge at 20 mg/kg (the last dose of chronic escalation) at this time point attenuated this HPA hyperactivity. During chronic withdrawal, HPA hormonal levels returned to baseline, but heroin challenge at 5 mg/kg decreased ACTH levels. In contrast, this dose of heroin challenge stimulated the HPA axis in heroin naïve rats. In the anterior pituitary, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA levels were increased during acute withdrawal and retuned to control levels after chronic withdrawal. In the medial hypothalamus, however, the POMC mRNA levels were decreased during acute withdrawal, and increased after chronic withdrawal. Our results suggest a long-lasting change in HPA abnormal responsivity during chronic heroin withdrawal. PMID:23771528

  8. Acute intravenous administration of dietary constituent theanine suppresses noxious neuronal transmission of trigeminal spinal nucleus caudalis in rats.

    PubMed

    Takehana, Shiori; Kubota, Yoshiko; Uotsu, Nobuo; Yui, Kei; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Takeda, Mamoru

    2017-03-15

    Theanine is a non-dietary amino acid linked to the modulation of synaptic transmission in the central nervous system, although the acute effects of theanine in vivo, particularly on nociceptive transmission in the trigeminal system, remain to be determined. The present study investigated whether acute intravenous theanine administration to rats attenuates the excitability of wide dynamic range (WDR) spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis (SpVc) neurons in response to nociceptive and non-nociceptive mechanical stimulation in vivo. Extracellular single unit recordings were made from 15 SpVc neurons in response to orofacial mechanical stimulation of pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, and responses to non-noxious and noxious mechanical stimuli were analyzed. The mean firing frequency of SpVc WDR neurons in response to all mechanical stimuli was dose-dependently inhibited by theanine (10, 50, and 100mM, i.v.) with the maximum inhibition of discharge frequency reached within 5min. These inhibitory effects were reversed after approximately 10min. The relative magnitude of theanine's inhibition of SpVc WDR neuronal discharge frequency was significantly greater for noxious than non-noxious stimulation. Iontophoretic application of l-glutamate induced the mean firing frequency of SpVc WDR neuron responding to noxious mechanical stimulation was also inhibited by intravenous administration of 100mM theanine. These results suggest that acute intravenous theanine administration suppresses glutaminergic noxious synaptic transmission in the SpVc, implicating theanine as a potential complementary and alternative therapeutic agent for the treatment of trigeminal nociceptive pain.

  9. The role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the primary reinforcing and reinforcement-enhancing effects of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Palmatier, Matthew I; Liu, Xiu; Caggiula, Anthony R; Donny, Eric C; Sved, Alan F

    2007-05-01

    The primary reinforcing effects of nicotine are mediated by the drugs action at central nervous system nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Although previous studies have demonstrated that nicotine potently enhances responding for non-pharmacological stimuli, the role of nAChRs in this reinforcement-enhancing effect is not known. The two reinforcement-related effects of nicotine can be dissociated in a paradigm that provides concurrent access to drug infusions and a non-pharmacological visual stimulus (VS). The present study characterized the role of nAChRs in the primary reinforcing effect of nicotine and the reinforcement-enhancing effect of nicotine. For rats with access to VS (VS-Only), nicotine (NIC-Only), both reinforcers contingent upon one response (NIC+VS) or both reinforcers contingent upon separate responses (2-Lever), unit dose-response relationships (0, 30, 60, or 90 microg/kg/infusion, free base) were determined over a 22-day acquisition period. Expression of the two reinforcement-related effects of nicotine was manipulated by pharmacological antagonism of nAChRs (1 mg/kg mecamylamine, subcutaneous, 5-min before the session) or by substituting saline for nicotine infusions (ie extinction) over a series of seven test sessions. Unit dose manipulations yielded an inverse dose-response relationship for active lever responding in the NIC+VS group. The dose-response relationships for rats with independent access to each reinforcer (2-Lever group) were relatively flat. For the 2-Lever group, acute mecamylamine challenge blocked the reinforcement-enhancing effects of nicotine, VS-lever responding decreased to basal levels on the first day of mecamylamine treatment or saline substitution (to the level of the VS-Only group). In contrast, nicotine-lever responding decreased gradually over the 7-day testing period (similar to saline extinction). The two reinforcement-related effects of nicotine are mediated by nAChRs but can be dissociated by acute and

  10. Nicotine Inhibits Clostridium difficile Toxin A-Induced Colitis but Not Ileitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vigna, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine is protective in ulcerative colitis but not Crohn's disease of the small intestine, but little is known about the effects of nicotine on Clostridium difficile toxin A-induced enteritis. Isolated ileal or colonic segments in anesthetized rats were pretreated with nicotine bitartrate or other pharmacological agents before intraluminal injection of toxin A. After 3 hours, the treated segments were removed and inflammation was assessed. Nicotine biphasically inhibited toxin A colitis but not ileitis. Pretreatment with the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium, blocked the effects of nicotine. Pretreating the colonic segments with hexamethonium before toxin A administration resulted in more inflammation than seen with toxin A alone, suggesting that a tonic nicotinic anti-inflammatory condition exists in the colon. Nicotine also inhibited toxin A-induced increased colonic concentrations of the TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1) agonist, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), and release of the proinflammatory neuropeptide, substance P. Pretreatment with nicotine did not protect against direct TRPV1-mediated colitis caused by intraluminal capsaicin. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors tonically protect the colon against inflammation and nicotine inhibits toxin A colitis but not toxin A ileitis in rats in part by inhibition of toxin A-induced activation of TRPV1 by endogenous TRPV1 agonists such as LTB4. PMID:26881175

  11. Nicotine-seeking reinstatement is reduced by inhibition of instrumental memory reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Vincenzo; Mutti, Anna; Auber, Alessia; Chiamulera, Cristiano

    2014-12-01

    The reinforcing properties of nicotine play a major role in instrumental conditioning to nicotine taking in smokers. Retrieval of nicotine-related memories may promote relapse to nicotine seeking after prolonged abstinence. Once consolidated, memories are stable, but they return to a labile phase, called reconsolidation, after their retrieval. The aim of our study was to investigate whether it was possible to interfere with the reconsolidation of instrumental nicotine-related memories by acting at glutamatergic receptors [N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs)] to prevent relapse to nicotine-seeking behaviour in the rat. We assessed whether the NMDAR antagonist MK-801, administered before or after nicotine-related instrumental memory retrieval, can reduce reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behaviour in rats previously trained to nicotine self-administration. Following a period of forced abstinence, MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg intraperitoneally) was administered 30 min before or 1 h after the re-exposure to 20 lever presses without any contingency in the training context to retrieve instrumental memory. MK-801 administered after, but not before, retrieval inhibited reinstatement compared with vehicle controls and groups without retrieval of instrumental memory. Interestingly, a retrieval factor effect was observed as an increase of reinstatement in vehicle-treated groups, suggesting a behavioural outcome of the occurrence of instrumental memory reconsolidation. Our findings suggest that, by acting on NMDARs, it is possible to reduce the reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behaviour through inhibition of instrumental nicotine-related memory reconsolidation.

  12. Nicotine Inhibits Clostridium difficile Toxin A-Induced Colitis but Not Ileitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Vigna, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine is protective in ulcerative colitis but not Crohn's disease of the small intestine, but little is known about the effects of nicotine on Clostridium difficile toxin A-induced enteritis. Isolated ileal or colonic segments in anesthetized rats were pretreated with nicotine bitartrate or other pharmacological agents before intraluminal injection of toxin A. After 3 hours, the treated segments were removed and inflammation was assessed. Nicotine biphasically inhibited toxin A colitis but not ileitis. Pretreatment with the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium, blocked the effects of nicotine. Pretreating the colonic segments with hexamethonium before toxin A administration resulted in more inflammation than seen with toxin A alone, suggesting that a tonic nicotinic anti-inflammatory condition exists in the colon. Nicotine also inhibited toxin A-induced increased colonic concentrations of the TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1) agonist, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), and release of the proinflammatory neuropeptide, substance P. Pretreatment with nicotine did not protect against direct TRPV1-mediated colitis caused by intraluminal capsaicin. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors tonically protect the colon against inflammation and nicotine inhibits toxin A colitis but not toxin A ileitis in rats in part by inhibition of toxin A-induced activation of TRPV1 by endogenous TRPV1 agonists such as LTB4.

  13. Nicotine Blocks Brain Estrogen Synthase (Aromatase): In Vivo Positron Emission Tomography Studies in Female Baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Biegon, A.; Biegon, A.; Kim, S.-W.; Logan, J.; Hooker, J.M.; Muench, L.; Fowler, J.S.

    2010-01-12

    Cigarette smoking and nicotine have complex effects on human physiology and behavior, including some effects similar to those elicited by inhibition of aromatase, the last enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis. We report the first in vivo primate study to determine whether there is a direct effect of nicotine administration on brain aromatase. Brain aromatase availability was examined with positron emission tomography and the selective aromatase inhibitor [{sup 11}C]vorozole in six baboons before and after exposure to IV nicotine at .015 and .03 mg/kg. Nicotine administration produced significant, dose-dependent reductions in [{sup 11}C]vorozole binding. The amygdala and preoptic area showed the largest reductions. Plasma levels of nicotine and its major metabolite cotinine were similar to those found in cigarette smokers. Nicotine interacts in vivo with primate brain aromatase in regions involved in mood, aggression, and sexual behavior.

  14. N-Acetylcysteine Administration Prevents Nonthyroidal Illness Syndrome in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vidart, Josi; Wajner, Simone Magagnin; Leite, Rogério Sarmento; Manica, André; Schaan, Beatriz D.; Larsen, P. Reed

    2014-01-01

    Context: The acute phase of the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is characterized by low T3 and high rT3 levels, affecting up to 75% of critically ill patients. Oxidative stress has been implicated as a causative factor of the disturbed peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate whether N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a potent intracellular antioxidant, can prevent NTIS in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Design: This was a randomized, multicenter clinical trial. Settings: Consecutive patients admitted to the emergency and intensive care units of two tertiary hospitals in southern Brazil were recruited. Patients and intervention included 67 patients were randomized to receive NAC or placebo during 48 hours. Baseline characteristics and blood samples for thyroid hormones and oxidative parameters were collected. Main Outcome: Variation of serum T3 and rT3 levels was measured. Results: Baseline characteristics were similar between groups (all P > .05). T3 levels decreased in the placebo group at 12 hours of follow-up (P = .002) but not in NAC-treated patients (P = .10). Baseline rT3 levels were elevated in both groups and decreased over the initial 48 hours in the NAC-treated patients (P = .003) but not in the control group (P = .75). The free T4 and TSH levels were virtually identical between the groups throughout the study period (P > .05). Measurement of total antioxidant status and total carbonyl content demonstrated that oxidative balance was deranged in acute myocardial infarction patients, whereas NAC corrected these alterations (P < .001). Conclusions: NAC administration prevents the derangement in thyroid hormone concentrations commonly occurring in the acute phase of acute myocardial infarction, indicating that oxidative stress is involved in the NTIS pathophysiology. PMID:25148231

  15. Acute alcohol exposure, acidemia or glutamine administration impacts amino acid homeostasis in ovine maternal and fetal plasma.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Shannon E; Sawant, Onkar B; Lunde, Emilie R; Wu, Guoyao; Cudd, Timothy A

    2013-09-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a significant problem in human reproductive medicine. Maternal alcohol administration alters maternal amino acid homeostasis and results in acidemia in both mother and fetus, causing fetal growth restriction. We hypothesized that administration of glutamine, which increases renal ammoniagenesis to regulate acid-base balance, may provide an intervention strategy. This hypothesis was tested using sheep as an animal model. On day 115 of gestation, ewes were anesthetized and aseptic surgery was performed to insert catheters into the fetal abdominal aorta as well as the maternal abdominal aorta and vena cava. On day 128 of gestation, ewes received intravenous administration of saline, alcohol [1.75 g/kg body weight (BW)/h], a bolus of 30 mg glutamine/kg BW, alcohol + a bolus of 30 mg glutamine/kg BW, a bolus of 100 mg glutamine/kg BW, alcohol + a bolus of 100 mg glutamine/kg BW, or received CO2 administration to induce acidemia independent of alcohol. Blood samples were obtained simultaneously from the mother and the fetus at times 0 and 60 min (the time of peak blood alcohol concentration) of the study. Administration of alcohol to pregnant ewes led to a reduction in concentrations of glutamine and related amino acids in plasma by 21-30%. An acute administration of glutamine to ewes, concurrent with alcohol administration, improved the profile of most amino acids (including citrulline and arginine) in maternal and fetal plasma. We suggest that glutamine may have a protective effect against alcohol-induced metabolic disorders and FAS in the ovine model.

  16. Acute alcohol exposure, acidemia or glutamine administration impacts amino acid homeostasis in ovine maternal and fetal plasma

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, Shannon E.; Sawant, Onkar B.; Lunde, Emilie R.; Wu, Guoyao; Cudd, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a significant problem in human reproductive medicine. Maternal alcohol administration alters maternal amino acid homeostasis and results in acidemia in both mother and fetus, causing fetal growth restriction. We hypothesized that administration of glutamine, which increases renal ammoniagenesis to regulate acid-base balance, may provide an intervention strategy. This hypothesis was tested using sheep as an animal model. On day 115 of gestation, ewes were anesthetized and aseptic surgery was performed to insert catheters into the fetal abdominal aorta as well as the maternal abdominal aorta and vena cava. On day 128 of gestation, ewes received intravenous administration of saline, alcohol [1.75 g/kg body weight (BW)/h], a bolus of 30 mg glutamine/kg BW, alcohol + a bolus of 30 mg glutamine/kg BW, a bolus of 100 mg glutamine/kg BW, alcohol + a bolus of 100 mg glutamine/kg BW, or received CO2 administration to induce acidemia independent of alcohol. Blood samples were obtained simultaneously from the mother and the fetus at times 0 and 60 min (the time of peak blood alcohol concentration) of the study. Administration of alcohol to pregnant ewes led to a reduction in concentrations of glutamine and related amino acids in plasma by 21–30%. An acute administration of glutamine to ewes, concurrent with alcohol administration, improved the profile of most amino acids (including citrulline and arginine) in maternal and fetal plasma. We suggest that glutamine may have a protective effect against alcohol-induced metabolic disorders and FAS in the ovine model. PMID:23315157

  17. Neuronal effects of nicotine during auditory selective attention in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Smucny, Jason; Olincy, Ann; Rojas, Donald C; Tregellas, Jason R

    2016-01-01

    Although nicotine has been shown to improve attention deficits in schizophrenia, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying this effect are poorly understood. We hypothesized that nicotine would modulate attention-associated neuronal response in schizophrenia patients in the ventral parietal cortex (VPC), hippocampus, and anterior cingulate based on previous findings in control subjects. To test this hypothesis, the present study examined response in these regions in a cohort of nonsmoking patients and healthy control subjects using an auditory selective attention task with environmental noise distractors during placebo and nicotine administration. In agreement with our hypothesis, significant diagnosis (Control vs. Patient) X drug (Placebo vs. Nicotine) interactions were observed in the VPC and hippocampus. The interaction was driven by task-associated hyperactivity in patients (relative to healthy controls) during placebo administration, and decreased hyperactivity in patients after nicotine administration (relative to placebo). No significant interaction was observed in the anterior cingulate. Task-associated hyperactivity of the VPC predicted poor task performance in patients during placebo. Poor task performance also predicted symptoms in patients as measured by the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. These results are the first to suggest that nicotine may modulate brain activity in a selective attention-dependent manner in schizophrenia.

  18. HINDBRAIN AND CRANIAL NERVE DYSMORPHOGENESIS RESULT FROM ACUTE MATERNAL ETHANOL ADMINISTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute exposure of mouse embryos to ethanol during stages of hindbrain segmentation results in excessive cell death in specific cell populations. This study details the ethanol-induced cell loss and defines the subsequent effects of this early insult on rhombomere and cranial ner...

  19. Acute effects of intravenous administration of pamidronate in patients with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mie Jin; Kwon, Seong Ryul; Park, Shin-Goo; Park, Won

    2010-09-01

    We investigated acute effects of intermittent large dose bisphosphonate therapy in osteoporotic patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were incubated with alendronate (100 microM) for 18 hr, in vitro and cytokine expressions were measured by real-time RT-PCR. Pamidronate 30 mg was administered on 26 osteoporotic patients; and acute phase reactants, inflammatory cytokines and bone biomarkers were measured. The in vitro study showed significant increase in mRNA expression of IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. A notable rise in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) was observed over 3 days after pamidronate infusion (P=0.026). Serum levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IFN-gamma were also significantly increased (P=0.009, 0.014, 0.035, respectively) and the increase in IL-6 levels were strongly correlated with CRP levels (P=0.04). Serum calcium and c-telopeptide levels rapidly decreased after the treatment (P=0.02, <0.001, respectively). This study showed that mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines at peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) level were observed within 18 hr and marked elevation of inflammatory cytokines and acute phase reactants were demonstrated after pamidronate infusion at the dose for osteoporosis. Our studies confirmed that intermittent large dose aminobisphosphonate causes acute inflammation.

  20. [Ultrastructural changes in the pancreas of rats with acute pancreatitis after semax administration].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Iu V

    2000-01-01

    Semax favorably affects ultrastructural changes in the pancreas of rats with acute pancreatitis (AP): a single introduction of semax (0.1 mg/kg) into the pancreatic duct of rats with AP model prevents increased necrosis of the acinar tissues and inhibits purulent inflammation of the necrotised lobules by inducing their sclerosis and atrophy, thus retaining large areas of the pancreas intact.

  1. Chronic and acute alcohol administration induced neurochemical changes in the brain: comparison of distinct zebrafish populations.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Diptendu; Shams, Soaleha; Gerlai, Robert

    2014-04-01

    The zebrafish is increasingly utilized in the analysis of the effects of ethanol (alcohol) on brain function and behavior. We have shown significant population-dependent alcohol-induced changes in zebrafish behavior and have started to analyze alterations in dopaminergic and serotoninergic responses. Here, we analyze the effects of alcohol on levels of selected neurochemicals using a 2 × 3 (chronic × acute) between-subject alcohol exposure paradigm randomized for two zebrafish populations, AB and SF. Each fish first received the particular chronic treatment (0 or 0.5 vol/vol% alcohol) and subsequently the acute exposure (0, 0.5 or 1.0% alcohol). We report changes in levels of dopamine, DOPAC, serotonin, 5HIAA, glutamate, GABA, aspartate, glycine and taurine as quantified from whole brain extracts using HPLC. We also analyze monoamine oxidase and tyrosine hydroxylase enzymatic activity. The results demonstrate that compared to SF, AB is more responsive to both acute alcohol exposure and acute alcohol withdrawal at the level of neurochemistry, a finding that correlates well with prior behavioral observations and one which suggests the involvement of genes in the observed alcohol effects. We discuss correlations between the current results and prior behavioral findings, and stress the importance of characterization of zebrafish strains for future behavior genetic and psychopharmacology studies.

  2. Redistribution of adrenomedullary nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits and the effect on circulating epinephrine levels in a murine model of acute asthma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Feng, Juntao; Hu, Chengping; Qin, Qingwu; Li, Yuanyuan; Qin, Ling

    2017-01-01

    The lack of circulating epinephrine (EPI) in the pathogenesis of asthma has long been attributed to the lack of adrenergic nerves in human airways. However, in this study we considered that EPI levels are regulated by EPI release in addition to synthesis. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been shown to control EPI release, and we hypothesized that redistribution of nAChR subunits modulates EPI release and circulating EPI levels. Using a mouse model of asthma, circulating EPI levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Changes in the expression of nAChR subunits in the adrenal medulla were observed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis. Expression of phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, tyrosine hydroxylase and galanin was detected by RT-qPCR. Lung pathology, airway resistance (RL) and EPI levels were also assessed after treatment with an α7 nAChR agonist or antagonist. α7 nAChR mRNA expression in the adrenal medulla was increased by more than 2-fold (P<0.05), and circulating EPI levels increased rapidly after treatment with the α7 nAChR agonist. These results indicated that increased EPI release, which was caused by the overexpression of α7 nAChR, was responsible for elevated circulating EPI levels. After treatment with an agonist of α7 nAChR, RL was significantly decreased. Serum corticosterone levels in individual mice were measured to rule out glucocorticoid as the main mediator of changes in EPI levels. On the whole, redistribution of nAChR subunits, primarily α7 nAChR, occurs in the adrenal medulla in asthmatic mice. Increased α7 nAChR expression can rapidly increase serum EPI levels and decrease airway responsiveness. PMID:28035367

  3. Prophylactic Administration of Silybin Ameliorates L-Arginine-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Uçmak, Feyzullah; Ekin, Nazım; İbiloğlu, İbrahim; Arslan, Serkan; Kaplan, İbrahim; Şenateş, Ebubekir

    2016-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effect of silybin, a potent antioxidant, on L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in an experimental rat model. Material/Methods Forty female Wistar Albino rats were divided into 5 groups as follows: Group 1 (C): control group (n=8), Group 2 (SL): silybin group (n=8), Group 3 (LA): acute pancreatitis group (n=8), Group 4 (SLLA): prophylaxis group (n=8), and Group 5 (LASL): treatment group (n=8). Group C (control) received 2 intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of physiological saline at an interval of 1 h. Group SL received only a single i.p. injection of silybin. The SLLA group received a single i.p. injection of silybin before the induction of acute pancreatitis with L-arginine, whereas the LASL group received the same injection after the induction of acute pancreatitis with L-arginine. Pancreatic tissues were histopathologically examined. Levels of amylase and oxidative stress markers (total oxidant status and total anti-oxidant status) were determined in the blood samples. Oxidative stress index was calculated. Results In comparison to the LA, the prophylaxis and treatment groups showed significant improvements in serum oxidative stress parameters (p=0.001 and p=0.005, respectively). Histopathological analysis showed that the treatment group had significant improvements in edema scores only (p=0.006), whereas the prophylaxis group had the same improvements in inflammation and necrosis scores as well as in total scores (p=0.004, 0.006, and 0.004, respectively). Conclusions When used for prophylactic rather than therapeutic purposes, silybin ameliorates serum oxidative stress parameters and improves histopathological results via its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:27725627

  4. Influence of bupropion and calcium channel antagonists on the nicotine-induced memory-related response of mice in the elevated plus maze.

    PubMed

    Biała, Grazyna; Kruk, Marta

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of acute administration of nicotine on memory-related behavior in mice using the elevated plus maze test. In this test, the time necessary for mice to move from the open arm to the enclosed arm (i.e., transfer latency) was used as an index of memory. Our results revealed that nicotine (0.035 and 0.175 mg/kg, base, sc) shortened the transfer latency relative to the saline-treated group. Moreover, we investigated the effects of bupropion (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, ip) and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel antagonists (nimodipine, flunarizine, verapamil, diltiazem - 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg, ip) on memory-related behavior. At all tested doses, bupropion, did not significantly affect transfer latency. However, flunarizine and verapamil (both at 10 mg/kg) resulted in a slight decrease in transfer latency, whereas nimodipine (10 mg/kg) increased transfer latency. Interestingly, both bupropion (20 mg/kg) and calcium channel blockers (5 mg/kg) attenuated the improvement of memory induced by nicotine. Our findings indicate that the cholinergic nicotinic system may play an important role in memory consolidation, and that neural calcium-dependent mechanisms can be involved in the modulation of memory-related responses induced by nicotine. The results of these studies have revealed neuronal mechanisms that are important for nicotinic modulation of cognition and will be useful for the treatments of human disorders in which cholinergic pathways have been implicated, such as psychiatric disorders and addiction.

  5. Nicotine increases GABAergic input on rat dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons through alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vázquez, F; Chavarría, K; Garduño, J; Hernández-López, S; Mihailescu, S P

    2014-12-15

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) contains large populations of serotonergic (5-HT) neurons. This nucleus receives GABAergic inhibitory afferents from many brain areas and from DRN interneurons. Both GABAergic and 5-HT DRN neurons express functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Previous studies have demonstrated that nicotine increases 5-HT release and 5-HT DRN neuron discharge rate by stimulating postsynaptic nAChRs and by increasing glutamate and norepinephrine release inside DRN. However, the influence of nicotine on the GABAergic input to 5-HT DRN neurons was poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the effect of nicotine on GABAergic spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) of 5-HT DRN neurons and the subtype of nAChR(s) involved in this response. Experiments were performed in coronal slices obtained from young Wistar rats. GABAergic sIPSCs were recorded from post hoc-identified 5-HT DRN neurons with the whole cell voltage patch-clamp technique. Administration of nicotine (1 μM) increased sIPSC frequency in 72% of identified 5-HT DRN neurons. This effect was not reproduced by the α4β2 nAChR agonist RJR-2403 and was not influenced by TTX (1 μM). It was mimicked by the selective agonist for α7 nAChR, PNU-282987, and exacerbated by the positive allosteric modulator of the same receptor, PNU-120596. The nicotine-induced increase in sIPSC frequency was independent on voltage-gated calcium channels and dependent on Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR). These results demonstrate that nicotine increases the GABAergic input to most 5-HT DRN neurons, by activating α7 nAChRs and producing CICR in DRN GABAergic terminals.

  6. Subjective responses to nicotine in smokers may be associated with responses to caffeine and to alcohol.

    PubMed

    Perkins, K A; Fonte, C; Ashcom, J; Broge, M; Wilson, A

    2001-02-01

    Sensitivity in responses to one drug may relate to sensitivity to other drugs, suggesting broad individual differences in characteristic responsivity across drugs. Data from two separate studies of smokers were reanalyzed to examine associations between acute subjective and cardiovascular effects of nicotine vs. caffeine and between nicotine vs. alcohol. Typical intakes of cigarettes, alcohol, and caffeine were included as covariates when they were correlated with the responses of interest. Significant associations between nicotine and caffeine were seen for most of the subjective measures and for blood pressure responses. Fewer significant associations were observed between nicotine and alcohol. Responses associated between nicotine and both of the other drugs tended to reflect psychomotor stimulation. These results suggest that smokers who are more responsive to some of nicotine's subjective and blood pressure effects are also more sensitive to the same effects of caffeine and, to a lesser extent, of alcohol.

  7. Insulin signaling genes modulate nicotine-induced behavioral responses in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wescott, Seth A.; Ronan, Elizabeth A.; Xu, X.Z. Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Insulin signaling has been suggested to modulate nicotine dependence, but the underlying genetic evidence has been lacking. Here, we used the nematode, C. elegans, to investigate whether genetic alterations in the insulin signaling pathway affect behavioral responses to nicotine. To do so, we challenged drug-naïve C. elegans with an acute dose of nicotine [100 μM] while recording changes in their locomotion speed. While nicotine treatment stimulated locomotion speed in wild-type C. elegans, the same treatment reduced locomotion speed in mutants defective in insulin signaling. This phenotype could be suppressed by mutations in daf-16, a gene encoding a FOXO transcription factor that acts downstream of insulin signaling. Our data suggest that insulin signaling genes, daf-2, age-1, pdk-1, akt-1, and akt-2 modulate behavioral responses to nicotine in C. elegans, revealing a genetic link between nicotine behavior and insulin signaling. PMID:26317299

  8. Action-potential-independent GABAergic tone mediated by nicotinic stimulation of immature striatal miniature synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi; Otsu, Yo; Vasuta, Cristina; Nawa, Hiroyuki; Murphy, Timothy H

    2007-08-01

    Stimulation of presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) increases the frequency of miniature excitatory synaptic activity (mEPSCs) to a point where they can promote cell firing in hippocampal CA3 neurons. We have evaluated whether nicotine regulation of miniature synaptic activity can be extended to inhibitory transmission onto striatal medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs) in acute brain slices. Bath application of micromolar nicotine typically induced 12-fold increases in the frequency of miniature inhibitory synaptic currents (mIPSCs). Little effect was observed on the amplitude of mIPSCs or mEPSCs under these conditions. Nicotine stimulation of mIPSCs was dependent on entry of extracellular calcium because removal of calcium from perfusate was able to block its action. To assess the potential physiological significance of the nicotine-stimulated increase in mIPSC frequency, we also examined the nicotine effect on evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs). eIPSCs were markedly attenuated by nicotine. This effect could be attributed to two potential mechanisms: transmitter depletion due to extremely high mIPSC rates and/or a reduction in presynaptic excitability associated with nicotinic depolarization. Treatment with low concentrations of K(+) was able to in part mimic nicotine's stimulatory effect on mIPSCs and inhibitory effect on eIPSCs. Current-clamp recordings confirmed a direct depolarizing action of nicotine that could dampen eIPSC activity leading to a switch to striatal inhibitory synaptic transmission mediated by tonic mIPSCs.

  9. Examination of GABAergic and dopaminergic compounds in the acquisition of nicotine-conditioned hyperactivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Palmatier, Matthew I; Bevins, Rick A

    2002-01-01

    In rats, a distinct environment repeatedly paired with nicotine (0.421 mg/kg base, s.c.) comes to evoke an increase in activity in the absence of any drug. This hyperactivity indicates a Pavlovian-conditioned association between the environment and nicotine. We investigated whether a dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist (SCH-23390), a D(2)/D(3) antagonist (eticlopride) or a GABA(B) agonist (baclofen) would prevent the acquisition of nicotine-conditioned hyperactivity. In saline-pretreated rats, acute nicotine suppressed activity during the conditioning phase (i.e. environment-nicotine pairings); chronic nicotine stimulated activity. Pretreatment with SCH-23390 (0.01 mg/kg, i.p.) attenuated the activating effects of nicotine without affecting controls. Eticlopride (0.03-0.07 mg/kg, i.p.) and baclofen (0.625 and 1.25 mg/kg, i.p.) did not affect nicotine-induced activity in a selective manner. Regardless of the pretreatment drug, rats acquired the environment-nicotine association as indexed in a drug-free test. The inability of SCH-23390 to block the acquisition of nicotine-conditioned locomotor activity is notable because in past research SCH-23390 blocked expression of the learned association.

  10. Nicotine therapy for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, L D

    1996-09-01

    Smoking has been associated with a decreased frequency of UC. Currently, the role of nicotine for the treatment of UC is not established. Several studies have evaluated nicotine gum and transdermal patches as supplemental therapy for stable UC, but nicotine has not been compared with other treatment modalities. Nicotine dosages in the studies have varied from 5 to 30 mg/d without apparent dose-related therapeutic effects, and many patients have found relief from placebo treatment. Patients often do not tolerate nicotine therapy's adverse effects, which can include nausea, light-headedness, and headache. Due to the cyclic disease course of UC and the potential addictiveness of nicotine, further large studies are warranted to assess the benefits of nicotine therapy for UC. These studies should be conducted using a randomized, double-blind design with an extensive follow-up period. Until further trials are conducted, nicotine should generally not be recommended for UC treatment.

  11. Nicotine-Cadmium Interaction Alters Exploratory Motor Function and Increased Anxiety in Adult Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chris Ajonijebu, Duyilemi; Adeyemi Adeniyi, Philip; Oloruntoba Adekeye, Adeshina; Peter Olatunji, Babawale; Olakunle Ishola, Azeez; Michael Ogundele, Olalekan

    2014-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the time dependence in cadmium-nicotine interaction and its effect on motor function, anxiety linked behavioural changes, serum electrolytes, and weight after acute and chronic treatment in adult male mice. Animals were separated randomly into four groups of n = 6 animals each. Treatment was done with nicotine, cadmium, or nicotine-cadmium for 21 days. A fourth group received normal saline for the same duration (control). Average weight was determined at 7-day interval for the acute (D1-D7) and chronic (D7-D21) treatment phases. Similarly, the behavioural tests for exploratory motor function (open field test) and anxiety were evaluated. Serum electrolytes were measured after the chronic phase. Nicotine, cadmium, and nicotine-cadmium treatments caused no significant change in body weight after the acute phase while cadmium-nicotine and cadmium caused a decline in weight after the chronic phase. This suggests the role of cadmium in the weight loss observed in tobacco smoke users. Both nicotine and cadmium raised serum Ca2+ concentration and had no significant effect on K+ ion when compared with the control. In addition, nicotine-cadmium treatment increased bioaccumulation of Cd2+ in the serum which corresponded to a decrease in body weight, motor function, and an increase in anxiety. PMID:26317007

  12. Irreversible blockade of monoamine oxidases reveals the critical role of 5-HT transmission in locomotor response induced by nicotine in mice.

    PubMed

    Villégier, Anne-Sophie; Salomon, Lucas; Blanc, Gérard; Godeheu, Gérard; Glowinski, Jacques; Tassin, Jean-Pol

    2006-09-01

    Although nicotine is generally considered as the main compound responsible for addictive properties of tobacco, some experimental data indicate that nicotine does not exhibit all the characteristics of other substances of misuse such as psychostimulants and opiates. For example, nicotine generally fails to induce locomotor response in mice and self-administration of nicotine is difficult to obtain in rats. We have shown recently that a pretreatment with mixed irreversible monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as tranylcypromine, triggers a locomotor response to nicotine in mice and induces a robust self-administration of nicotine in rats. We show here that when mice were pretreated with enhancers of extracellular levels of noradrenaline, dopamine or serotonin (D-amphetamine, GBR12783 or para-chloro-amphetamine, respectively) and injected with nicotine (1 mg/kg), only those animals pretreated with para-chloro-amphetamine exhibited a specific locomotor response to nicotine. These data indicate a critical role of serotonin in nicotine-induced locomotor activity in mice. This was further confirmed in microdialysis experiments showing that nicotine induces an increase in extracellular serotonin levels in the ventral striatum in mice pretreated with tranylcypromine. This effect of nicotine on extracellular serotonin levels was absent in mice lacking the beta2-subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Our data suggest that mixed irreversible MAOIs conta