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Sample records for acute nitric oxide

  1. Nitric oxide and hyperoxic acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-wu; Han, Cui-hong; Zhang, Pei-xi; Zheng, Juan; Liu, Kan; Sun, Xue-jun

    2016-01-01

    Hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) refers to the damage to the lungs secondary to exposure to elevated oxygen partial pressure. HALI has been a concern in clinical practice with the development of deep diving and the use of normobaric as well as hyperbaric oxygen in clinical practice. Although the pathogenesis of HALI has been extensively studied, the findings are still controversial. Nitric oxide (NO) is an intercellular messenger and has been considered as a signaling molecule involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Although the role of NO in the occurrence and development of pulmonary diseases including HALI has been extensively studied, the findings on the role of NO in HALI are conflicting. Moreover, inhalation of NO has been approved as a therapeutic strategy for several diseases. In this paper, we briefly summarize the role of NO in the pathogenesis of HALI and the therapeutic potential of inhaled NO in HALI. PMID:27867474

  2. [Nitric oxide].

    PubMed

    Rovira, I

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide was identified as the relaxing factor derived from the endothelium in 1987. Nitric oxide synthesis allows the vascular system to maintain a state of vasodilation, thereby regulating arterial pressure. Nitric oxide is also found in platelets, where it inhibits adhesion and aggregation; in the immune system, where it is responsible for the cytotoxic action of macrophages; and in the nervous system, where it acts as neurotransmitter. A deficit in endogenous synthesis of nitric oxide contributes to such conditions as essential arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension and heart disease. An excess of nitrous oxide induced by endotoxins and cytokinins, meanwhile, is believed to be responsible for hypotension in septic shock and for hyperdynamic circulatory state in cirrhosis of the liver. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the rejection of transplanted organs and in cell damage after reperfusion. Inhaled nitrous oxide gas reduces pulmonary hypertension without triggering systemic hypotension in both experimental and clinical conditions. It also produces selective vasodilation when used to ventilate specific pulmonary areas, thereby improving the ventilation/perfusion ratio and, hence, oxygenation. Nitric oxide inhalation is effective in pulmonary hypertension-coincident with chronic obstructive lung disease, in persistent neonatal pulmonary hypertension and in pulmonary hypertension with congenital or acquired heart disease. Likewise, it reduces intrapulmonary shunt in acute respiratory failure and improves gas exchange. Under experimental conditions nitric oxide acts as a bronchodilator, although it seems to be less effective for this purpose in clinical use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Nitric oxide synthase in acute alteration of nitric oxide levels after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sehba, Fatima A; Chereshnev, Igor; Maayani, Saul; Friedrich, Victor; Bederson, Joshua B

    2004-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with acute decreases and subsequent recovery of cerebral nitric oxide (NO) levels, but the mechanisms of these alterations are not known. In this study, we measured NO synthase (NOS) protein and kinetics to determine its involvement in the alterations of cerebral NO levels after SAH. The endovascular rat model of SAH was used. The number of NOS-1 (neuronal) and NOS-2 (inducible)-positive cells (0-96 h) was determined by counting immunoreactive cells in 8-microm cryostat sections. The tissue content of active NOS and its kinetic parameters were studied with an enzymatic l-citrulline assay. The number of NOS-1-positive cells increased between 1 and 3 hours after SAH, decreased to and below control values at 6 and 72 hours after SAH, and increased to control values 96 hours after SAH. The number of NOS-2-positive cells increased 1 hour after SAH, decreased to control values at 24 hours, and increased above control values 96 hours after SAH. The Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters (V(max), K(m), slope) of NOS remained unchanged at 10 and 90 minutes after SAH. NOS-1 and -2 proteins undergo a triphasic alteration after SAH, whereas the amount of active NOS and its kinetic parameters remain unchanged during the first 90 minutes after SAH. Depletion of NOS is not involved in the acute alterations of cerebral NO levels after SAH.

  4. Inhaled nitric oxide aggravates phosgene model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Li; Hai, Chun-Xu; Pauluhn, Jürgen

    2011-11-01

    The principal acute mode of action of inhaled phosgene gas is related to an increase alveolar fluid exudation under pathologic conditions. This paper considers some aspects in modeling phosgene-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in an acute rat bioassay and whether edema formation can be modulated by inhaled nitric oxide (iNO). Protein analysis in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid is amongst the most sensitive method to quantify the phosgene-induced non-cardiogenic, pulmonary high-permeability edema following acute inhalation exposure. Maximum concentrations in BAL-protein occur within one day postexposure, typically within a latency period up to about 15 h as a consequence of an increasingly exhausted lymphatic drainage. An almost similar sensitivity was given by the functional endpoint 'enhanced pause (Penh)' when measured by non-invasive whole-body barometric plethysmography over a time period of 20 h. The magnitude of edema formation follows a concentration x time (C¹xt) relationship, although animal model-specific deviations may occur at very short exposure durations (1-20 min) due to a rodent-specific, reflexively induced transient decreased ventilation. This has to be accounted for when simulating accidental exposure scenarios to study the mechanisms involved in pharmacological modulation of fluid transport in this type of ALI. Therefore, a special focus has to be given to the dosimetry of inhaled phosgene, otherwise any change in effect magnitude, as a result of under-dosing of phosgene, may be misconceived as promising therapy. This study demonstrates that accidental exposures can be modeled best in rats by exposure durations of at least 20-30 min. Lung function measurements (Penh) show that pathophysiological effects appear to occur concomitant with the exposure to phosgene; however, its full clinical manifestation requires a gross imbalance of pulmonary fluid clearance. When applying this concept, post-phosgene exposure iNO at 1.5 ppm × 6 h or

  5. Nitric oxide is negatively correlated to pain during acute inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The role that nitric oxide (NO) plays in modulating pain in the periphery is unclear. We show here, the results of two independent clinical studies (microdialysis and gene expression studies) and a pilot dose finding study (glyceryl trinitrate study), to study the role of NO in the early phase of acute inflammatory pain following oral surgery. The effect of ketorolac on NO production and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) gene expression was also studied. Results Microdialysis samples showed significantly higher levels of NO at the first 100 min compared to the last 80 minutes in the placebo treated group. In the ketorolac group, on the other hand, NO levels gradually decreased over the first 60 min but were similar to placebo over the later 100-180 min, with no significant change in NO level over time. The levels of NO were negatively correlated to pain intensity scores. Local infusion of the NO donor glyceryl trinitrate at the site of surgery, showed a small analgesic effect that did not reach statistical significance in the sample size used. While the gene expression of iNOS and eNOS were not up-regulated, 3 hours after surgery, nNOS was downregulated in both treatment groups and eNOS gene expression was significantly lower in the ketorolac group compared to the placebo group. Further, there was a positive correlation between the change in gene expression of nNOS and eNOS in the placebo goup but not in the ketorolac group. Conclusion We suggest that at this early stage of inflammatory pain in man, NO is analgesic in the periphery. Further, ketorolac down-regulates eNOS gene expression. PMID:20843331

  6. Exhaled nitric oxide in acute respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Gadish, Tal; Soferman, Ruth; Merimovitch, Tamar; Fireman, Elizabeth; Sivan, Yakov

    2010-08-01

    To investigate fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) levels in infants during acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis and during convalescence. Prospective cohort study. Comparison of FeNO levels between infants with laboratory-confirmed acute RSV bronchiolitis and 2 control groups: healthy infants and infants with recurrent wheezing. The Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine and the Pediatric Pulmonary Clinic of the Tel Aviv Medical Center from November 2008 to July 2009. The FeNO levels were measured at referral and at 2 visits over 4 months after convalescence. The FeNO level was measured using the multiple-breath exhalation technique. Forty-four infants with acute RSV bronchiolitis (mean [SD] age, 6.8 [7.3] months), 21 infants with recurrent wheezing (mean [SD] age, 10.8 [7.59] months), and 32 age-matched healthy controls (mean [SD] age, 6.8 [9.1] months). Follow-up data were available for 22 children (55%) for the first follow-up visit and for 11 children (25%) for the second follow-up visit. Acute RSV bronchiolitis. The FeNO levels during acute RSV bronchiolitis vs controls and FeNO levels during follow-up vs acute-stage disease. Mean FeNO levels for RSV-positive infants were significantly lower compared with healthy controls and infants with recurrent wheezing: mean (SD), 1.89 (1.76) parts per billion (ppb), 7.28 (4.96) ppb, and 4.86 (7.49) ppb, respectively (P<.001). The FeNO levels at the 2- and 4-month follow-up visits increased to 7.74 (5.13) ppb and 11.37 (6.29) ppb, respectively (P=.001). The FeNO levels are temporarily reduced during acute RSV bronchiolitis and increase during convalescence to normal levels and higher. The mechanisms for this suppression and its relation to future wheezing and asthma need to be studied.

  7. Exhaled nitric oxide concentration upon acute exposure to moderate altitude.

    PubMed

    Caspersen, C; Stang, J; Thorsen, E; Stensrud, T

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess immediate changes in the partial pressure of nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled gas (PE NO ) in healthy trained subjects who were acutely exposed to moderate altitude. One group of nine and another group of 20 healthy subjects were exposed to an ambient pressure of 728 hPa (546 mmHg) corresponding to an altitude of 2800 m for 5 and 90 min, respectively, in an altitude chamber. PE NO was measured offline by sampling exhaled gas in tight metal foil bags at 5, 30, 60, and 90 min. A correction for increased expiratory flow rate due to gas density effects at altitude was performed (PE NO corr). PE NO was significantly decreased by 13-16%, while the fraction of NO in exhaled gas (FE NO) was increased by 16-19% compared to sea level. There was no significant change in PE NO corr after exposure to altitude for 5, 30, 60, and 90 min. We conclude that there was no change in PENO upon arrival at altitude after correcting for gas density effects on expiratory flow rate. Corrections for altitude effects must be done before comparing measurements performed at different altitudes when using measurements of FENO to monitor athletes who have asthma during training at altitude.

  8. Increased serum nitric oxide and malondialdehyde levels in patients with acute intestinal amebiasis.

    PubMed

    Namıduru, E S; Tarakçıoğlu, M; Namıduru, M; Kocabaş, R; Erbağcı, B; Meram, I; Karaoğlan, I; Yılmaz, N; Cekmen, M

    2011-12-01

    To determine the level of oxygen-nitrogen stress parameters in the pathogenesis of amebiasis. Twenty-four acute intestinal amebiasis patients and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in the present study. Serum malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels were determined spectrophotometrically. Serum malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels were significantly higher in acute intestinal amebiasis patients than healthy controls (P<0.001). These results suggest that oxidative and nitrosative stress may play a major role in tissue damage in acute intestinal amebiasis patients. Also these parameters can be used to supplement the conventional microscopic method for reliable diagnosis of intestinal amebiasis.

  9. Nitric oxide synthase and NADPH-diaphorase after acute hypobaric hypoxia in the rat caudate putamen.

    PubMed

    Encinas, Juan Manuel; Fernández, Ana Patricia; Salas, Eduardo; Castro-Blanco, Susana; Muñoz, Priscila; Rodrigo, José; Serrano, Julia

    2004-03-01

    Changes in the production system of nitric oxide (NO), a multifunctional biological messenger known to participate in blood-flow regulation, neuromodulation, and neuroprotection or neurotoxicity, were investigated in the caudate putamen of adult rats submitted to hypobaric hypoxia. Employing immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, enzymatic assay, and NADPH-diaphorase staining, we demonstrate that neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) expression and constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) activity were transiently activated by 7 h of exposure to a simulated altitude of 8325 m (27,000 ft). In addition, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) immunoreactivity and blood vessel NADPH-diaphorase staining peaked immediately after the hypoxic stimulus, whereas inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and activity remained unaltered. Nitrotyrosine formation, a marker of protein nitration, was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, and was found to increase parallel to nitric oxide synthesis. We conclude that the nitric oxide system undergoes significant transient alterations in the caudate putamen of adult rats submitted to acute hypobaric hypoxia.

  10. [Effect of acute phosgene inhalation on antioxidant enzymes, nitric oxide and nitric-oxide synthase in rats].

    PubMed

    Qin, Xu-jun; Hai, Chun-xu; Liang, Xin; Wang, Peng; Chen, Hong-li; Liu, Rui

    2004-06-01

    To study the effect of acute phosgene inhalation on the antioxidant enzymes, nitric oxide (NO) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in rats. Phosgene was produced by decomposing bis (trichdomethyl) carbonate in the presence of N,N-dimethyl formamide. SD rats were randomly divided into two groups: control and phosgene exposure groups. In a special experimental device with equipment modulating the gas flow, phosgene exposed rats inhaled phosgene quantitatively for five minutes. Two hours later, all the rats were sacrificed and the ratio of wet weight to dried weight of lung (WW/DW) was calculated. Peripheral blood, serum and liver were collected to examine the activities of antioxidant enzymes including glutathione S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), NOS, and NO level. The total content of proteins were also determined. The WW/DW ratio of lung in phosgene exposure group was much higher than that in control group (P < 0.01). The activities of GST in serum and liver of phosgene exposure group increased significantly (P < 0.05). The activities of SOD, CAT, GSHPx and NOS in serum or blood and liver of phosgene exposure group were also increased significantly (P < 0.05). But the content of NO was significantly decreased (P < 0.01). Acute phosgene inhalation may cause a dramatically changes of several antioxidant enzyme activities, and acute injury of liver to some extent in rats. The latter is related to reactive oxygen species. But the elevation of antioxidant enzyme activities suggests that antioxidative treatment for acute phosgene poisoning should not be considered first.

  11. Nitric oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitric oxide ; CASRN 10102 - 43 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  12. Nitric oxide protects against ischemic acute renal failure through the suppression of renal endothelin-1 overproduction.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Hayato; Takaoka, Masanori; Kubo, Yasuhiro; Katayama, Tomoaki; Tsutsui, Hidenobu; Takayama, Junji; Matsumura, Yasuo

    2004-11-01

    To elucidate the role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of ischemic acute renal failure, we investigated the effects of FK409, a spontaneous nitric oxide donor, and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, on ischemia/reperfusion-induced renal injury and endothelin-1 overproduction in post-ischemic kidneys. Ischemic acute renal failure was induced by occlusion of the left renal artery and vein for 45 minutes followed by reperfusion, 2 weeks after contralateral nephrectomy. At 24 hours after reperfusion, renal function in untreated acute renal failure rats markedly decreased and histological examination revealed severe renal damage of the kidney. Increases in renal endothelin-1 contents were evident in the acute renal failure rats at 2 and 24 hours after reperfusion, respectively. Pretreatment with FK409 (1 or 3 mg/kg, intravenously) dose-dependently ameliorated renal injuries and suppressed the elevation of endothelin-1 content induced by ischemia/reperfusion. In contrast, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (1 or 10 mg/kg, intravenously) pretreatment dose-dependently aggravated renal injuries of acute renal failure rats, and the effect is accompanied by further increase in the renal endothelin-1 contents. These results suggest that both exogenous and endogenous nitric oxide have protective effects against ischemia/reperfusion-induced renal dysfunction and tissue damage, probably through the suppression of endothelin-1 overproduction in post-ischemic kidneys.

  13. Identification of gene variants related to the nitric oxide pathway in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Umman, B; Cakmakoglu, B; Cincin, Z B; Kocaaga, M; Emet, S; Tamer, S; Gokkusu, C

    2015-12-10

    Dysfunction of vascular endothelium is known to have an essential role in the atherosclerotic process by releasing mediators including nitric oxide (NO). Nitric oxide maintains endothelial balance by controlling cellular processes of vascular smooth muscle cells. Evidence suggests that variations in the NO pathway could include atherosclerotic events. The objective of this study was to determine the possible effects of genes on the nitric oxide pathway in the development of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The blood samples of 100 patients with ACS and 100 controls were collected at Istanbul University, Department of Cardiology. DNA samples were genotyped by using Illumina Cyto-SNP-12 BeadChip. The additive model and Correlation/Trend Test were selected for association analysis. Afterwards, a Q-Q graphic was drawn to compare expected and obtained values. A Manhattan plot was produced to display p-values that were generated by -log10(P) function for each SNP. The p-values under 1×10(-4) were selected as statistically significant SNPs while p-values under 5×10(-2) were considered as suspicious biomarker candidates. Nitric oxide pathway analysis was then used to find the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to ACS. As a result, death-associated protein kinase 3 (DAPK) (rs10426955) was found to be most statistically significant SNP. The most suspicious biomarker candidates associated with the nitric oxide pathway analysis were vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MSRA), nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1), and GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH-1). Further studies with large sample groups are necessary to clarify the exact role of nitric oxide in the development of disease.

  14. A crucial role of nitric oxide in acute lung injury secondary to the acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Yan, Wen-Mao; Yang, Bin; Shi, Jing-dong; Song, Mao-min; Zhao, Yuqian

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in acute lung inflammation and injury secondary to acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP), 5% sodium taurocholate was retrogradely injected into the biliopancreatic duct of rats to ANP model. These ANP rats were given L-Arginine (L-Arg, 100 mg/kg), L-NAME (10 mg/kg), or their combination by intraperitoneal injection 30 min prior to ANP induction. At 1, 3, 6, and 12 hours after ANP induction, lung NO production, and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression were measured. Lung histopathological changes, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein concentration, proinflammatory mediators tumor necrotic factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and lung tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were examined. Results showed that NO production and iNOS mRNA expression in alveolar macrophages (AMs) were significantly increased along with significant increases in lung histological abnormalities and BAL proteins in the ANP group, all of which were further enhanced by pretreatment with L-Arg and attenuated by pretreatment with L-NAME, respectively. These markers were slightly attenuated by pretreatment with combination of L-Arg + L-NAME, suggesting that NO is required for initiating the acute lung damage in ANP rats, and also that L-Arg-enhanced lung injury is mediated by its NO generation rather than its direct effect. MPO activity and TNF-alpha expression in lung were upregulated in the ANP rats and further enhanced by pretreatment with L-Arg and attenuated by pretreatment with L-NAME, respectively. These results suggest that overproduction of NO mediated by iNOS in the lung is required for the acute lung inflammation and damage secondary to ANP.

  15. The contradictory effects of nitric oxide in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Feral; Gul, Mehmet; Esrefoglu, Mukaddes; Ates, Burhan

    2008-04-01

    This study was planned to observe the effects of nitric oxide synthesis on the antioxidative defense enzymes and pancreatic tissue histology in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal injections of 50 microg/kg caerulein, L-arginine used for NO induction and N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) used for NO inhibition. In the caerulein group acinar cell degeneration, interstitial inflammation, oedema and haemorrhage were detected. Pancreatic damage scores were decreased with both NO induction and inhibition (p<0.05). MDA, GSH-Px, CAT, GSH and SOD activities were significantly changed in the caerulein group and indicated increased oxidative stress. Both NO induction and inhibition decreased this oxidative stress. It is concluded that both nitric oxide induction and inhibition ameliorated caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. The findings indicate that a certain amount of NO production has beneficial effects in experimental acute pancreatitis, but uncontrolled over-production of NO may be detrimental.

  16. Oxidative stress and nitric oxide in rats with alcohol-induced acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Andican, Gülnur; Gelisgen, Remisa; Unal, Ethem; Tortum, Osman Baran; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Karahasanoglu, Tayfun; Burçak, Gülden

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Oxygen free radical mediated tissue damage is well established in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP). Whether nitric oxide (NO) plays a deleterious or a protective role is unknown. In alcohol-induced AP, we studied NO, lipooxidative damage and glutathione in pancreas, lung and circulation. METHODS: AP was induced in rats (n = 25) by injection of ethyl alcohol into the common biliary duct. A sham laparatomy was performed in controls (n = 15). After 24 h the animals were killed, blood and tissue sampling were done. RESULTS: Histopathologic evidence confirmed the development of AP. Marked changes were observed in the pulmonary tissue. Compared with controls, the AP group displayed higher values for NO metabolites in pancreas and lungs, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in circulation. Glutathione was lower in pancreas and in circulation. Glutathione and NO were positively correlated in pancreas and lungs of controls but negatively correlated in circulation of experimental group. In the experimental group, plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were negatively correlated with pancreas thiobarbituric acid reactive substances but positively correlated with pancreas NO. CONCLUSION: NO increases in both pancreas and lungs in AP and NO contributes to the pathogenesis of AP under oxidative stress. PMID:15818750

  17. Imbalance between nitric oxide and dopamine may underly aggression in acute neurological patients.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Bermudez, J; Perez-Neri, I; Montes, S; Ramirez-Abascal, M; Nente, F; Abundes-Corona, A; Soto-Hernandez, J L; Rios, C

    2010-10-01

    The neurochemical basis of aggressive behavior in humans is not fully understood. In this study we explored the relationship between aggressiveness (as measured by the Overt Aggression Scale), cognitive performance (as measured by the Mini Mental State Examination), and biochemical markers of dopamine neurotransmission (homovanillic acid, HVA) and nitric oxide synthesis (nitrite plus nitrate, NO(x)) in cerebrospinal fluid from 70 patients with acute brain disorders, mainly brain infections. Aggressive behavior and cognitive performance showed an inverse correlation. NO(x)/HVA ratio was inversely correlated to aggressive behavior, and positively correlated to cognitive performance. A subanalysis with antipsychotic-naïve patients confirmed those results. The balance between nitric oxide and dopamine could be related to the cognitive control of aggressive impulse.

  18. Pathophysiological assessment of nitric oxide (given as sodium nitroprusside) in acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, R J; Cluckie, A; Jackson, S H; Buxton-Thomas, M; Bath, P M

    1998-01-01

    Acute ischaemic stroke is characterised by reductions in local cerebral blood flow (CBF) and activation of circulating platelets and leucocytes. Nitric oxide is a vasodilator and can inhibit these circulating cells. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of nitric oxide on platelet function and regional CBF in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a spontaneous nitric oxide donor, was administered at a dose which caused a 10 mm Hg fall in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) in a pathophysiological study to 22 patients with acute ischaemic stroke and 12 matched control subjects. Platelet function (whole blood aggregation and flow cytometry) was assessed before and during SNP administration. Changes in regional CBF were measured using single photon emission computerised tomography (SPECT) scanning. SNP significantly reduced platelet aggregation in both the patient and control subject groups. Equally, the expression of platelet adhesion molecules P-selectin (CD62) and glycoprotein (GP) GP IIIa (CD61) were significantly reduced in both groups. GP Ia (CDw49b) expression was significantly attenuated in the patient but not in the control group. Four patients underwent SPECT scanning and improvements in local CBF corresponding to the penumbral area of the clinical stroke site were seen in 3 of these patients. A total of 24 regions of asymmetrical perfusion were examined, pre-SNP (median (SQR)), 0.68 (0.14) vs. peri-SNP 0.78 (0.17), 2p = 0.065. SNP, given at a dose which reduced MABP by 10 mm Hg, significantly inhibited platelet aggregation and adhesion molecule expression. Improved regional CBF was seen in some patients. SNP is a candidate therapeutic agent for patients with acute ischaemic stroke and warrants further study.

  19. Dietary Nitrate Acutely and Markedly Increased Exhaled Nitric Oxide in a Cystic Fibrosis Case

    PubMed Central

    Kerley, Conor P.; Kilbride, Emma; Greally, Peter; Elnazir, Basil

    2016-01-01

    Airway nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule with bronchoprotective, anti-inflammatory and anti-infective roles. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic lung condition associated with deceased exhaled NO. Strategies to increase exhaled NO in CF have yielded inconsistent results. A potential new method of increasing systemic NO involves ingestion of dietary, inorganic nitrate which is reduced to nitrite and NO. We present the case of a 12-year-old, athletic boy with CF who demonstrated acute but marked increases in exhaled NO following dietary nitrate consumption compared to placebo PMID:27630187

  20. The antioxidant tempol decreases acute pulmonary thromboembolism-induced hemolysis and nitric oxide consumption.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Santos, Ozelia; Neto-Neves, Evandro M; Ferraz, Karina C; Sertório, Jonas T; Portella, Rafael L; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2013-11-01

    Acute pulmonary thromboembolism (APT) is a critical condition associated with acute pulmonary hypertension. Recent studies suggest that oxidative stress and hemolysis contribute to APT-induced pulmonary hypertension, possibly as a result of increased nitric oxide (NO) consumption. We hypothesized that the antioxidant tempol could attenuate APT-induced hemolysis, and therefore attenuate APT-induced increases in plasma NO consumption. APT was induced in anesthetized sheep with autologous blood clots. The hemodynamic effects of tempol infused at 1.0mg/kg/min 30 min after APT were determined. Hemodynamic measurements were carried out every 15 min. To assess oxidative stress, serum 8-isoprostanes levels were measured by ELISA. Plasma cell-free hemoglobin concentrations and NO consumption by plasma samples were determined. An in vitro oxidative AAPH-induced hemolysis assay was used to further validate the in vivo effects of tempol. APT caused pulmonary hypertension, and increased pulmonary vascular resistance in proportion with the increases in 8-isoprostanes, plasma cell-free hemoglobin concentrations, and NO consumption by plasma (all P<0.05). Tempol attenuated the hemodynamic alterations by approximately 15-20% and blunted APT-induced increases in 8-isoprostanes, in cell-free hemoglobin concentrations, and the increases in NO consumption by plasma (P<0.05). Tempol dose-dependently attenuated AAPH-induced in vitro hemolysis (P<0.05). Our findings are consistent with the idea that antioxidant properties of tempol decrease APT-induced hemolysis and nitric oxide consumption, thus attenuating APT-induced pulmonary hypertension. © 2013.

  1. Improved tolerance of acute severe hypoxic stress in chronic hypoxic diaphragm is nitric oxide-dependent.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Philip; McMorrow, Clodagh; Bradford, Aidan; O'Halloran, Ken D

    2015-09-01

    The effects of chronic hypoxia (CH) on respiratory muscle performance have hardly been investigated, despite clinical relevance. Results from recent studies are indicative of unique adaptive strategies in hypoxic diaphragm. Respiratory muscle tolerance of acute severe hypoxic stress was examined in normoxic and CH diaphragm in the presence and absence of a nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor. We tested the hypothesis that improved tolerance of severe hypoxic stress in CH diaphragm is NO-dependent. Wistar rats were exposed to normoxia (sea-level, n = 6) or CH (ambient pressure = 380 mmHg, n = 6) for 6 weeks. Diaphragm muscle functional properties were determined ex vivo under severe hypoxic conditions (gassed with 95%N2/5% CO2) with and without 1 mM L-N(G)-nitroarginine (L-NNA, nNOS inhibitor). Fatigue tolerance, but not force, was significantly improved in CH diaphragm (p = 0.008). CH exposure did not affect diaphragm muscle fibre oxidative capacity determined from cluster analysis of area-density plots of muscle fibre succinate dehydrogenase activity. Acute NOS inhibition reduced diaphragm peak tetanic force (p = 0.018), irrespective of gas treatment, and completely reversed improved fatigue tolerance of the CH diaphragm. We conclude that CH exposure improves fatigue tolerance during acute severe hypoxic stress in an NO-dependent manner, independent of muscle fibre oxidative capacity.

  2. Inhaled nitric oxide exacerbated phorbol-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hen I; Chu, Shi Jye; Hsu, Kang; Wang, David

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we determined the effect of inhaled nitric oxide (NO) on the acute lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in isolated rat lung. Typical acute lung injury was induced successfully by PMA during 60 min of observation. PMA (2 microg/kg) elicited a significant increase in microvascular permeability, (measured using the capillary filtration coefficient Kfc), lung weight gain, lung weight/body weight ratio, pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and protein concentration of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Pretreatment with inhaled NO (30 ppm) significantly exacerbated acute lung injury. All of the parameters reflective of lung injury increased significantly except PAP (P<0.05). Coadministration of Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (5 mM) attenuated the detrimental effect of inhaled NO in PMA-induced lung injury, except for PAP. In addition, L-NAME (5 mM) significantly attenuated PMA-induced acute lung injury except for PAP. These experimental data suggest that inhaled NO significantly exacerbated acute lung injury induced by PMA in rats. L-NAME attenuated the detrimental effect of inhaled NO.

  3. Neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase upregulation in the rat medial prefrontal cortex following acute restraint stress: A dataset.

    PubMed

    Spiers, Jereme G; Chen, Hsiao-Jou Cortina; Lee, Johnny K; Sernia, Conrad; Lavidis, Nickolas A

    2016-03-01

    This data article provides additional evidence on gene expression changes in the neuronal and inducible isoforms of nitric oxide synthase in the medial prefrontal cortex following acute stress. Male Wistar rats aged 6-8 weeks were exposed to control or restraint stress conditions for up to four hours in the dark cycle after which the brain was removed and the medial prefrontal cortex isolated by cryodissection. Following RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis, gene expression data were measured using quantitative real-time PCR. The mRNA levels of the neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase isoforms, and the inhibitory subunit of NF-κB, I kappa B alpha were determined using the ΔΔCT method relative to control animals. This data article presents complementary results related to the research article entitled 'Acute restraint stress induces specific changes in nitric oxide production and inflammatory markers in the rat hippocampus and striatum' [1].

  4. Effect of acute lithium administration on penile erection: involvement of nitric oxide system.

    PubMed

    Sandoughdaran, Saleh; Sadeghipour, Hamed; Sadeghipour, Hamid Reza

    2016-02-01

    Lithium has been the treatment of choice for bipolar disorder (BD) for many years. Although erectile dysfunction is a known adverse effect of this drug, the mechanism of action by which lithium affects erectile function is still unknown. The aim was to investigate the possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in modulatory effect of lithium on penile erection (PE). We further evaluated the possible role of Sildenafil in treatment of lithium-induced erectile dysfunction. Erectile function was determined using rat model of apomorphine-induced erections. For evaluating the effect of lithium on penile erection, rats received intraperitoneal injection of graded doses of lithium chloride 30 mins before subcutaneous injection of apomorphine. To determine the possible role of NO pathway, sub-effective dose of N (G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, was administered 15 min before administration of sub-effective dose of lithium chloride. In other separate experimental groups, sub- effective dose of the nitric oxide precursor, L-arginine, or Sildenafil was injected into the animals 15 min before administration of a potent dose of lithium. 30 min after administration of lithium chloride, animals were assessed in apomorphine test. Serum lithium levels were measured 30 min after administration of effective dose of lithium. Lithium at 50 and 100 mg/kg significantly decreased number of PE (p<0.001), whereas at lower doses (5, 10 and 30 mg/kg) had no effect on apomorphine induced PE. The serum Li+ level of rats receiving 50 mg/kg lithium was 1±0.15 mmol/L which is in therapeutic range of lithium. The inhibitory effect of Lithium was blocked by administration of sub-effective dose of nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (100 mg/kg) (p<0.001) and sildenafil (3.5 mg/kg) (p<0.001) whereas pretreatment with a low and sub-effective dose of L-NAME (10mg/kg) potentiated sub-effective dose of lithium, (p<0.001). These results suggest acute

  5. Effect of acute lithium administration on penile erection: involvement of nitric oxide system

    PubMed Central

    Sandoughdaran, Saleh; Sadeghipour, Hamed; Sadeghipour, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lithium has been the treatment of choice for bipolar disorder (BD) for many years. Although erectile dysfunction is a known adverse effect of this drug, the mechanism of action by which lithium affects erectile function is still unknown. Objective: The aim was to investigate the possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in modulatory effect of lithium on penile erection (PE). We further evaluated the possible role of Sildenafil in treatment of lithium-induced erectile dysfunction. Materials and Methods: Erectile function was determined using rat model of apomorphine-induced erections. For evaluating the effect of lithium on penile erection, rats received intraperitoneal injection of graded doses of lithium chloride 30 mins before subcutaneous injection of apomorphine. To determine the possible role of NO pathway, sub-effective dose of N (G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, was administered 15 min before administration of sub-effective dose of lithium chloride. In other separate experimental groups, sub- effective dose of the nitric oxide precursor, L-arginine, or Sildenafil was injected into the animals 15 min before administration of a potent dose of lithium. 30 min after administration of lithium chloride, animals were assessed in apomorphine test. Serum lithium levels were measured 30 min after administration of effective dose of lithium. Results: Lithium at 50 and 100 mg/kg significantly decreased number of PE (p<0.001), whereas at lower doses (5, 10 and 30 mg/kg) had no effect on apomorphine induced PE. The serum Li+ level of rats receiving 50 mg/kg lithium was 1±0.15 mmol/L which is in therapeutic range of lithium. The inhibitory effect of Lithium was blocked by administration of sub-effective dose of nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (100 mg/kg) (p<0.001) and sildenafil (3.5 mg/kg) (p<0.001) whereas pretreatment with a low and sub-effective dose of L-NAME (10mg/kg) potentiated sub-effective dose of

  6. [The modification of nitric oxide production by exogenous substrates of Krebs cycle during acute hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Kurhaliuk, N M; Kotsiuruba, A V; Sahach, V F

    2005-01-01

    Hypoxia causes the disruption of mitochondria electron respiratory chain, production of active oxygen forms and the unoxidative protection. In experiments on Wistar rats the influence of sodium succinate (50 mg/kg) and 6-ketoglutarate (200 mg/kg) on NO2-, NO3-, urea and polyamines contents in blood and liver under acute hypoxia (7% O2 in N2, 30 min) was investigated. Nitrite and nitrate content decreased in erythrocytes and liver but not in plasma under acute hypoxia. The exogenous succinate (SK) stimulated production of nitric oxide in erythrocytes and liver while 6-ketoglutarate (KG) only in liver. The switch from more intensive SK oxidation that reveals adrenomimetic influence and causes the synthesis and release of NO from erythrocyte, to less intensive KG correlates with well-known decrease of tissue respiration under the activation of the cholinergic system due to urea cycle activation particularly in liver. The activation of the SK oxidation takes place mainly under the different stress conditions and causes NO production in the blood cells. These conditions of the intensive and fast action under acute hypoxia are accompanied on the one hand by the increase of oxygen input ratio and on the other hand by activation of the free radical oxidation. The protective effect of the natural Krebs cycle intermediates--SK and KG in particular, is related to the regulation of NO synthesis and its metabolism in the main organs. These results proved the existence not only metabolite control of NO system by Krebs cycle intermediates, but the existence of the systemic mechanism for the support of the functional state of mitochondria under hypoxia.

  7. Exhaled nitric oxide decreases upon acute exposure to high-altitude hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daniel E; Beall, Cynthia M; Strohl, Kingman P; Mills, Phoebe S

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a vasodilator that plays a role in blood flow and oxygen delivery. Acute hypoxia down regulates NO synthesis, a response that may exacerbate hypoxic stress by decreasing blood flow. This study was designed to test the hypotheses that pulmonary NO decreases upon acute exposure to high-altitude hypoxia and that relatively low levels of NO at altitude are associated with greater stress as reflected in more symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS). A sample of 47 healthy, adult, nonsmoking, sea-level residents provided measurements at sea level, at 2,800 m, and at 0-, 2-, and 3-h exposure times at 4,200 m altitude on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Measurements were made of exhaled NO, oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, heart rate, and reported symptoms of AMS. The partial pressure of NO concentration in exhaled breath decreased significantly from a sea level mean of 4.2 nmHg to 3.8 nmHg at 2,800 m and 3.4 nmHg at 4,200 m. NO concentration in exhaled breath did not change significantly over a 3-h exposure at 4,200 m and recovered to pre-exposure baseline upon return to sea level. There was no significant association between the level of NO exhaled and the number of self-reported symptoms of AMS during this brief exposure. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 18:196-202, 2006. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. A Meta-Analysis of Exhaled Nitric Oxide in Acute Normobaric Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    MacInnis, Martin J; Carter, Eric A; Donnelly, Joseph; Koehle, Michael S

    2015-08-01

    The effect of hypoxia on the exhaled nitric oxide (NO) of humans is unresolved. Many studies have measured the fraction of exhaled NO (FENO) or the partial pressure of exhaled NO (PENO) in normobaric and hypobaric hypoxia, with differing results. To better understand NO physiology and altitude acclimatization, we employed a random effects meta-analysis to determine the effect of acute normobaric hypoxia on the PENO of humans. A total of 93 subjects from 7 published studies (with 9 groups) were included. The median duration of exposure was 30 min and the mean hypoxic PIo2 was 95 (SD=10) mmHg. The weighted standardized mean difference (SMD) in PENO measured at baseline and during an acute exposure to normobaric hypoxia was not significantly different from zero (SMD=0.09; 95% CI=-0.17, 0.34; z=0.65). Based on this meta-analysis, acute normobaric hypoxia does not affect the PENO measured from the mouths of humans. This result should be considered for interpretations of high-altitude (and hypobaric) measurements of exhaled NO. As the PENO is a potential biomarker for altitude-illness susceptibility, recognizing that normobaric hypoxia does not affect the PENO will be important for understanding previous associations between low exhaled NO and poor acclimatization to hypoxia.

  9. Single gavage with Porphyromonas gingivalis reduces acute systemic nitric oxide response in mice.

    PubMed

    Nemec, A; Pavlica, Z; Sentjurc, M; Crossley, D A; Jerin, A; Erzen, D; Zdovc, I; Petelin, M; Skaleric, U

    2008-10-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important periodontal pathogen, can also induce host responses in distant tissues. P. gingivalis induces nitric oxide (NO) production in immune system cells and non-immune system cells, therefore NO might be involved in an acute systemic host response. Eighteen female BALB/c mice were perorally inoculated with 10(8) colony-forming units live P. gingivalis ATCC 33277. Plasma nitrite and nitrate (NOx) and NO production in lungs, aorta, heart, liver, spleen, kidneys, and brain were measured at intervals after inoculation and compared with levels in 11 control animals. NOx levels were significantly (P = 0.017) lower at 7, 13, and 25 h after P. gingivalis inoculation. A similar trend in NO production occurred in most tested organs, but never reached statistical significance. The correlation between NOx in plasma and NO in liver was positive (Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.81, P = 0.0025) and marginal for kidney (0.58, P = 0.059). Single peroral inoculation of mice with P. gingivalis reduces the acute systemic NO response. As NO is important for host defense, the reduction of NO levels after exposure is likely to delay the host response, increasing the chances that infection with P. gingivalis will become established.

  10. Effect of nitric oxide inhalation on gas exchange in acute severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Federico P; Amado, Veronica M; Roca, Josep; Torres, Antoni; Nicolas, Josep M; Rodriguez-Roisin, Robert; Barberà, Joan A

    2013-06-15

    Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) causes selective pulmonary vasodilatation and may improve gas exchange. The study was aimed to evaluate the acute effects of inhaled NO on pulmonary gas exchange in severe unilateral pneumonia, where hypoxemia results from increased intrapulmonary shunt. We studied 8 patients without preexisting lung disease (59±18 yr; 4M/4F) with early unilateral severe pneumonia and respiratory failure. Pulmonary and systemic hemodynamics and gas exchange, including ventilation-perfusion (V;A/Q;) distributions, were measured at baseline and while breathing 5 and 40 parts per million (ppm) of NO. Inhaled NO caused a dose-dependent fall in pulmonary vascular resistance (by 12% and 21%, with 5 and 40ppm, respectively; p<0.01, each) and improvement of PaO2 (by 25% and 23%; p<0.05, each), owing to the reduction of intrapulmonary shunt (by 23% and 27%; p<0.05, each), without changes in the amount of perfusion to low V;A/Q; ratio alveolar units. Patients with greater baseline intrapulmonary shunt exhibited greater improvement in arterial oxygenation (r(2)=0.55, p<0.05). We conclude that low doses of inhaled NO improve pulmonary gas exchange in acute severe pneumonia.

  11. Acute and chronic effects of dinner with alcoholic beverages on nitric oxide metabolites in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Sierksma, Aafje; van der Gaag, Martijn S; Grobbee, Diederick E; Hendriks, Henk F J

    2003-07-01

    1. The present study investigated the acute and chronic effect of dinner with alcoholic beverages on serum nitric oxide (NO) metabolites, namely nitrate and nitrite (NOx), in 11 healthy, non-smoking middle-aged men. 2. In a randomized, diet-controlled, cross-over trial, subjects consumed dinner with four glasses of red wine, beer, spirits (Dutch gin) or sparkling mineral water (control) for 3 weeks. At the end of each 3 week period, serum NOx concentrations were measured just before and 1, 5 and 13 h after dinner. 3. Serum NOx concentrations were approximately 50% higher 1 and 5 h after dinner with any beverage compared with just before dinner (P = 0.0001). At 1 h after dinner, the serum NOx concentration was approximately 11% lower after dinner with alcoholic beverages compared with concentrations observed after dinner with water (P = 0.01). The fasted serum NOx concentration (13 h after dinner) was similar to the preprandial concentration and there were no differences in serum NOx concentrations between the alcoholic beverages. 4. Food intake acutely and transiently increased serum NOx concentrations, an effect that was slightly attenuated if combined with alcoholic beverages. Chronic moderate alcohol consumption had no effect on serum NOx concentration.

  12. Inhaled nitric oxide in adult patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monsalve-Naharro, José Ángel; Domingo-Chiva, Esther; García Castillo, Sergio; Cuesta-Montero, Pablo; Jiménez-Vizuete, José María

    2017-03-01

    In some patients, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leads to life-threatening refractory hypoxemia developing. Physicians may consider hypoxemic rescue therapies in an attempt to improve oxygenation in these patients while on conventional mechanical ventilation support. Use of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in ARDS is one of the most widely-studied pharmacological interventions over the past two decades. Its efficacy was examined in several randomized clinical trials and has undergone meta-analyses. Although iNO treatment was associated with improved oxygenation, researchers unfortunately never demonstrated a concomitant decrease in mortality or any improved outcome. Hence the current evidence suggests that iNO should not be routinely used in patients with ARDS however may be considered as adjunct therapy to tentatively improve oxygenation while other therapies are being considered in patients with severely hypoxemic ARDS.This review focuses on the therapeutic use of iNO in adult ARDS patients. We set out some recommendations for its use as rescue therapy against refractory hypoxemia.

  13. Disrupted Nitric Oxide Metabolism from Type II Diabetes and Acute Exposure to Particulate Air Pollution.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Ashley P; Kipen, Howard; Laumbach, Robert; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Kelly-McNeill, Kathleen; Cepeda, Clarimel; Fan, Zhi-Hua; Amorosa, Louis; Lubitz, Sara; Schneider, Stephen; Gow, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Type II diabetes is an established cause of vascular impairment. Particulate air pollution is known to exacerbate cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, particularly in susceptible populations. This study set out to determine the impact of exposure to traffic pollution, with and without particle filtration, on vascular endothelial function in Type II diabetes. Endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO) has previously been linked to vascular health. Reactive hyperemia induces a significant increase in plasma nitrite, the proximal metabolite of NO, in healthy subjects, while diabetics have a lower and more variable level of response. Twenty type II diabetics and 20 controls (ages 46-70 years) were taken on a 1.5 hr roadway traffic air pollution exposure as passengers. We analyzed plasma nitrite, as a measure of vascular function, using forearm ischemia to elicit a reactive hyperemic response before and after exposure to one ride with and one without filtration of the particle components of pollution. Control subjects displayed a significant increase in plasma nitrite levels during reactive hyperemia. This response was no longer present following exposure to traffic air pollution, but did not vary with whether or not the particle phase was filtered out. Diabetics did not display an increase in nitrite levels following reactive hyperemia. This response was not altered following pollution exposure. These data suggest that components of acute traffic pollution exposure diminish vascular reactivity in non-diabetic individuals. It also confirms that type II diabetics have a preexisting diminished ability to appropriately respond to a vascular challenge, and that traffic pollution exposure does not cause a further measureable acute change in plasma nitrite levels in Type II diabetics.

  14. Acute dairy milk ingestion does not improve nitric oxide-dependent vasodilation in the cutaneous microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Alba, Billie K; Stanhewicz, Anna E; Kenney, W Larry; Alexander, Lacy M

    2016-07-01

    In epidemiological studies, chronic dairy milk consumption is associated with improved vascular health and reduced age-related increases in blood pressure. Although milk protein supplementation augments conduit artery flow-mediated dilation, whether or not acute dairy milk intake may improve microvascular function remains unclear. We hypothesised that dairy milk would increase direct measurement of endothelial nitric oxide (NO)-dependent cutaneous vasodilation in response to local skin heating. Eleven men and women (61 (sem 2) years) ingested two or four servings (473 and 946 ml) of 1 % dairy milk or a rice beverage on each of 4 separate study days. In a subset of five subjects, an additional protocol was completed after 473 ml of water ingestion. Once a stable blood flow occurred, 15 mm-N G -nitro-l-arginine methyl ester was perfused (intradermal microdialysis) to quantify NO-dependent vasodilation. Red-blood-cell flux (RBF) was measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry, and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC=RBF/mean arterial pressure) was calculated and normalised to maximum (%CVCmax; 28 mm-sodium nitroprusside). Full expression of cutaneous vasodilation was not different among dairy milk, rice beverage and water, and there was no effect of serving size on the total vasodilatory response. Contrary to our hypothesis, NO-dependent vasodilation was lower for dairy milk than rice beverage (D: 49 (sem 5), R: 55 (sem 5) %CVCmax; P<0·01). Acute dairy milk ingestion does not augment NO-dependent vasodilation in the cutaneous microcirculation compared with a rice beverage control.

  15. Disrupted Nitric Oxide Metabolism from Type II Diabetes and Acute Exposure to Particulate Air Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, Ashley P.; Kipen, Howard; Laumbach, Robert; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Kelly-McNeill, Kathleen; Cepeda, Clarimel; Fan, Zhi-Hua; Amorosa, Louis; Lubitz, Sara; Schneider, Stephen; Gow, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Type II diabetes is an established cause of vascular impairment. Particulate air pollution is known to exacerbate cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, particularly in susceptible populations. This study set out to determine the impact of exposure to traffic pollution, with and without particle filtration, on vascular endothelial function in Type II diabetes. Endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO) has previously been linked to vascular health. Reactive hyperemia induces a significant increase in plasma nitrite, the proximal metabolite of NO, in healthy subjects, while diabetics have a lower and more variable level of response. Twenty type II diabetics and 20 controls (ages 46–70 years) were taken on a 1.5hr roadway traffic air pollution exposure as passengers. We analyzed plasma nitrite, as a measure of vascular function, using forearm ischemia to elicit a reactive hyperemic response before and after exposure to one ride with and one without filtration of the particle components of pollution. Control subjects displayed a significant increase in plasma nitrite levels during reactive hyperemia. This response was no longer present following exposure to traffic air pollution, but did not vary with whether or not the particle phase was filtered out. Diabetics did not display an increase in nitrite levels following reactive hyperemia. This response was not altered following pollution exposure. These data suggest that components of acute traffic pollution exposure diminish vascular reactivity in non-diabetic individuals. It also confirms that type II diabetics have a preexisting diminished ability to appropriately respond to a vascular challenge, and that traffic pollution exposure does not cause a further measureable acute change in plasma nitrite levels in Type II diabetics. PMID:26656561

  16. Comparison of inhaled milrinone, nitric oxide and prostacyclin in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Martin; Corsilli, Daniel; Williamson, David R; Brosseau, Marc; Bellemare, Patrick; Delisle, Stéphane; Nguyen, Anne QN; Varin, France

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the safety and efficacy of inhaled milrinone in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). METHODS Open-label prospective cross-over pilot study where fifteen adult patients with hypoxemic failure meeting standard ARDS criteria and monitored with a pulmonary artery catheter were recruited in an academic 24-bed medico-surgical intensive care unit. Random sequential administration of iNO (20 ppm) or nebulized epoprostenol (10 μg/mL) was done in all patients. Thereafter, inhaled milrinone (1 mg/mL) alone followed by inhaled milrinone in association with inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) was administered. A jet nebulization device synchronized with the mechanical ventilation was use to administrate the epoprostenol and the milrinone. Hemodynamic measurements and partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) were recorded before and after each inhaled therapy administration. RESULTS The majority of ARDS were of pulmonary cause (n = 13) and pneumonia (n = 7) was the leading underlying initial disease. Other pulmonary causes of ARDS were: Post cardiopulmonary bypass (n = 2), smoke inhalation injury (n = 1), thoracic trauma and pulmonary contusions (n = 2) and aspiration (n = 1). Two patients had an extra pulmonary cause of ARDS: A polytrauma patient and an intra-abdominal abscess Inhaled nitric oxide, epoprostenol, inhaled milrinone and the combination of inhaled milrinone and iNO had no impact on systemic hemodynamics. No significant adverse events related to study medications were observed. The median increase of PaO2 from baseline was 8.8 mmHg [interquartile range (IQR) = 16.3], 6.0 mmHg (IQR = 18.4), 6 mmHg (IQR = 15.8) and 9.2 mmHg (IQR = 20.2) respectively with iNO, epoprostenol, inhaled milrinone, and iNO added to milrinone. Only iNO and the combination of inhaled milrinone and iNO had a statistically significant effect on PaO2. CONCLUSION When comparing the effects of inhaled NO, milrinone and epoprostenol, only NO significantly improved oxygenation

  17. The human coronary vasodilatory response to acute mental stress is mediated by neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sitara G; Melikian, Narbeh; Shabeeh, Husain; Cabaco, Ana R; Martin, Katherine; Khan, Faisal; O'Gallagher, Kevin; Chowienczyk, Philip J; Shah, Ajay M

    2017-09-01

    Mental stress-induced ischemia approximately doubles the risk of cardiac events in patients with coronary artery disease, yet the mechanisms underlying changes in coronary blood flow in response to mental stress are poorly characterized. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) regulates basal coronary blood flow in healthy humans and mediates mental stress-induced vasodilation in the forearm. However, its possible role in mental stress-induced increases in coronary blood flow is unknown. We studied 11 patients (6 men and 5 women, mean age: 58 ± 14 yr) undergoing elective diagnostic cardiac catheterization and assessed the vasodilator response to mental stress elicited by the Stroop color-word test. Intracoronary substance P (20 pmol/min) and isosorbide dinitrate (1 mg) were used to assess endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation, respectively. Coronary blood flow was estimated using intracoronary Doppler recordings and quantitative coronary angiography to measure coronary artery diameter. Mental stress increased coronary flow by 34 ± 7.0% over the preceding baseline during saline infusion (P < 0.01), and this was reduced to 26 ± 7.0% in the presence of the selective nNOS inhibitor S-methyl-l-thiocitrulline (0.625 µmol/min, P < 0.001). Mental stress increased coronary artery diameter by 6.9 ± 3.7% (P = 0.02) and 0.5 ± 2.8% (P = 0.51) in the presence of S-methyl-l-thiocitrulline. The response to substance P did not predict the response to mental stress (r(2) = -0.22, P = 0.83). nNOS mediates the human coronary vasodilator response to mental stress, predominantly through actions at the level of coronary resistance vessels.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Acute mental stress induces vasodilation of the coronary microvasculature. Here, we show that this response involves neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the human coronary circulation.Listen to this article's corresponding podcast at http://ajpheart.podbean.com/e/nnos-and-coronary-flow-during-mental-stress/. Copyright

  18. Effects of Acute Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Lower Leg Vascular Function in Chronic Tetraplegia

    PubMed Central

    La Fountaine, Michael F; Radulovic, Miroslav; Cardozo, Christopher P; Spungen, Ann M; DeMeersman, Ronald E; Bauman, William A

    2009-01-01

    Background/Objective: To improve our understanding of the lower-leg vascular responses of nitric oxide synthase inhibition in persons with tetraplegia. Participants: Six people with chronic tetraplegia and 6 age-matched controls. Methods: Lower-leg relative vascular resistance and venous volume variation were obtained by venous occlusion plethysmography and blood pressure by auscultation at baseline. Postintravenous infusion of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine-methyl-ester (1 mg·kg−1) or placebo on separate days. Results: At baseline in the group with tetraplegia compared with controls, mean arterial pressure and relative vascular resistance of the leg were significantly lower. After nitric oxide synthase inhibition, mean arterial pressure and lower leg vascular resistance were significantly elevated in both groups. There were no group or intervention differences in venous volume variation. Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that nitric oxide synthase inhibition with 1 mg·kg−1 NG-nitro-l-arginine-methyl-ester normalizes seated blood pressure and lower leg vascular resistance to control group baseline levels. PMID:20025149

  19. Enhanced nitric oxide generation from nitric oxide synthases as the cause of increased peroxynitrite formation during acute restraint stress: Effects on carotid responsiveness to angiotensinergic stimuli in type-1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Josimar D; Pernomian, Larissa; Gomes, Mayara S; Moreira, Rafael P; do Prado, Alejandro F; da Silva, Carlos H T P; de Oliveira, Ana M

    2016-07-15

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species accumulation. Behavioral stress increases nitric oxide production, which may trigger a massive impact on vascular cells and accelerate cardiovascular complications under oxidative stress conditions such as Diabetes. For this study, type-1 Diabetes mellitus was induced in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. After 28 days, cumulative concentration-response curves for angiotensin II were obtained in endothelium-intact carotid rings from diabetic rats that underwent to acute restraint stress for 3h. The contractile response evoked by angiotensin II was increased in carotid arteries from diabetic rats. Acute restraint stress did not alter angiotensin II-induced contraction in carotid arteries from normoglycaemic rats. However acute stress combined with Diabetes increased angiotensin II-induced contraction in carotid rings. Western blot experiments and the inhibition of nitric oxide synthases in functional assays showed that neuronal, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase isoforms contribute to the increased formation of peroxynitrite and contractile hyperreactivity to angiotensin II in carotid rings from stressed diabetic rats. In summary, these findings suggest that the increased superoxide anion generation in carotid arteries from diabetic rats associated to the increased local nitric oxide synthases expression and activity induced by acute restrain stress were responsible for exacerbating the local formation of peroxynitrite and the contraction induced by angiotensin II. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of inhaled nitric oxide on pulmonary hemodynamics after acute lung injury in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Romand, J.A.; Pinsky, M.R.; Firestone, L.; Zar, H.A.; Lancaster, J.R. Jr. )

    1994-03-01

    Increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and mismatch in ventilation-to-perfusion ratio characterize acute lung injury (ALI). Pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa) decreases when nitric oxide (NO) is inhaled during hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV); thus NO inhalation may reduce PVR and improve gas exchange in ALI. The authors studied the hemodynamic and gas exchange effects of NO inhalation during HPV and then ALI in eight anesthetized open-chest mechanically ventilated dogs. Right atrial pressure, Ppa, and left ventricular and arterial pressures were measured, and cardiac output was estimated by an aortic flow probe. Shunt and dead space were also estimated. The effect of 5-min exposures to 0, 17, 28, 47, and 0 ppm inhaled NO was recorded during hyperoxia, hypoxia, and oleic acid-induced ALI. During ALI, partial [beta]-adrenergic blockage (propanolol, 0.15 mg/kg iv) was induced and 74 ppm NO was inhaled. Nitrosylhemoglobin (NO-Hb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) levels were measured. During hyperoxia, NO inhalation had no measurable effects. Hypoxia increased Ppa and calculated PVR, both of which decreased with 17 ppm NO. ALI decreased arterial Po[sub 2] and increased airway pressure, shunt, and dead space ventilation. Ppa and PVR were greater during ALI than during hyperoxia. NO inhalation had no measurable effect during ALI before or after [beta]-adrenergic blockage. MetHb remained low, and NO-Hb was unmeasurable. Bolus infusion of nitroglycerin (15 [mu]g) induced an immediate decrease in Ppa and PVR during ALI. Short-term NO inhalation does not affect PVR or gas exchange in dogs with oleic acid-induced ALI, nor does it increase NO-Hb or MetHb. In contrast, NO can diminish hypoxia-induced elevations in pulmonary vascular tone. These data suggest that NO inhalation selectively dilates the pulmonary circulation and specifically reduces HPV but not oleic acid-induced increases in pulmonary vasomotor tone. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. The Effect of Viral Infection on Exhaled Nitric Oxide in Children with Acute Asthma Exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Malka, Jonathan; Covar, Ronina; Faino, Anna; Fish, Jennifer; Pickering, Paige; Ramamoorthy, Preveen; Gleason, Melanie; Spahn, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (Feno) level is used as an aid in the diagnosis and management of chronic asthma. Its role in acute asthma remains to be studied. To determine whether Feno levels are elevated in children with asthma exacerbations compared with baseline, and whether there is a difference in Feno levels based on PCR positive (+) (respiratory virus isolated by PCR analysis) versus PCR negative (-) (respiratory virus not isolated by PCR analysis) status. Children with a previous Feno level measurement while stable and who presented to an urgent care facility with an asthma exacerbation were enrolled. Feno levels, spirometry, and nasal swabs for viral PCR were obtained at the time of the exacerbation and following a course of prednisone. Data were available on 66 children. Linear mixed models were used to regress the outcomes of interest (FEV1, FEV1/forced vital capacity, forced expiratory flow at 25% to 75% of forced vital capacity, and natural log Feno) on detected virus (yes/no), visit (baseline, exacerbation, follow-up), and the interaction between the detected virus and visit. Compared with baseline, higher Feno values and lower lung function were found at the time of an exacerbation. A respiratory virus was detected in 59% of the exacerbations. The interaction between PCR (+) and PCR (-) groups and visit on log Feno was marginally significant (P = .07). There was no difference in log Feno between the PCR (+) and PCR (-) groups at baseline, while higher log Feno was found in the PCR (-) group at the time of exacerbation and following prednisone (P = .05 and .001, respectively). Higher Feno concentration in PCR (-) exacerbations suggests an eosinophilic predominance in nonviral compared with viral exacerbations. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Deficient Mice Are Protected from Lipopolysaccharide Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christine M.; Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Ham III, P. Benson; Meadows, Mary Louise; Cherian-Shaw, Mary; Kangath, Archana; Sridhar, Supriya; Lucas, Rudolf; Black, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria induces acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. This injury is associated with lung edema, inflammation, diffuse alveolar damage, and severe respiratory insufficiency. We have previously reported that LPS-mediated nitric oxide synthase (NOS) uncoupling, through increases in asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), plays an important role in the development of ALI through the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Therefore, the focus of this study was to determine whether mice deficient in endothelial NOS (eNOS-/-) are protected against ALI. In both wild-type and eNOS-/- mice, ALI was induced by the intratracheal instillation of LPS (2 mg/kg). After 24 hours, we found that eNOS-/-mice were protected against the LPS mediated increase in inflammatory cell infiltration, inflammatory cytokine production, and lung injury. In addition, LPS exposed eNOS-/- mice had increased oxygen saturation and improved lung mechanics. The protection in eNOS-/- mice was associated with an attenuated production of NO, NOS derived superoxide, and peroxynitrite. Furthermore, we found that eNOS-/- mice had less RhoA activation that correlated with a reduction in RhoA nitration at Tyr34. Finally, we found that the reduction in NOS uncoupling in eNOS-/- mice was due to a preservation of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) activity that prevented the LPS-mediated increase in ADMA. Together our data suggest that eNOS derived reactive species play an important role in the development of LPS-mediated lung injury. PMID:25786132

  3. Role of Inhaled Nitric Oxide in the Management of Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Juliette Lucinda; Bronicki, Ronald A.; Anas, Nick

    2016-01-01

    To date, there have been several systematic reviews with meta-analysis that have shown no reduction in mortality with the use of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Importantly, these reports fail to make a distinction between the pediatric and adult patient. The number of adult patients in these reviews are far greater than the number of pediatric patients, which makes it difficult to interpret the data regarding the role of iNO on the pediatric population. Extrapolating data from the adult population to the pediatric population is complicated as we know that physiology and the body’s response to disease can be different between adult and pediatric patients. iNO has been demonstrated to improve outcomes in term and near-term infants with hypoxic respiratory failure associated with pulmonary hypertension. Recently, Bronicki et al. published a prospective randomized control trial investigating the impact of iNO on the pediatric patient population with acute respiratory failure. In this study, a benefit of decreased duration of mechanical ventilation and an increased rate of ECMO-free survival was demonstrated in patients who were randomized to receiving iNO, suggesting that there may be benefit to the use of iNO in pediatric ARDS (PARDS) that has not been demonstrated in adults. iNO has repeatedly been shown to transiently improve oxygenation in all age groups, and yet neonates and pediatric patients have shown improvement in other outcomes that have not been seen in adults. The mechanism that explains improvement with the use of iNO in these patient populations are not well understood but does not appear to be solely a result of sustained improvement in oxygenation. There are physiologic studies that suggest alternative mechanisms for explaining the positive effects of iNO, such as platelet aggregation inhibition and reduction in systemic inflammation. Hence, the role of iNO by various mechanisms and in various

  4. Effect of acute administration of sildenafil to rats with detrusor overactivity induced by chronic deficiency of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Reges, Ricardo; D'Ancona, Carlos; Mônica, Fabíola; Antunes, Edson

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the effect of phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE5i) in the lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated to benign prostatic hyperplasia have been studied thoroughly. However, it remains unclear how the PDE5i improve LUTS. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential of acute administration of the PDE5i sildenafil to improve detrusor overactivity (DO) induced by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME), an nitric oxide sinthase (NOS) inhibitor, in rats. Twenty-seven MALE adult Wistar Rats were divided into the following groups: (1) control, (2) L-NAME, (3) sildenafil alone, and (4) L-NAME + sildenafil. The NOS blocker L-NAME (20 mg/rat/day) was given in the drinking water. Sildenafil (100 µg/kg) was administrated intravenously (i.v.) acutely, diluted in cremophor, propylene glycol and water. All animals underwent to anesthetized cystometograms. The chronic and systemic administration of L-NAME markedly increased the number of non voiding contractions (2.62 (± 0.89)), and frequency of micturition (1.97 (± 0.78)), as well increased volume threshold (2.83 mL (± 1.64)) compared with control group, the number of non voiding contractions (1.17 (± 0.75)), frequency of micturition (1.08 (± 0.65)) and volume threshold (1.16 mL (± 0.38)), p < 0.001, p = 0.01, and p = 0.04, respectively. Sildenafil infusion decreased the number of micturition cycles significantly from the baseline to end point (-0.93 (± 0.34)) in nitric oxide (NO) deficient animals compared with sildenafil infusion alone (control) in animals with normal NO level (0.13 (± 0.25)), p = 0.03. Systemic reduction of nitric oxide causes detrusor overactivity and acute infusion of sildenafil reduces the number of micturition cycles in chronic NO-deficient rats.

  5. Nitric oxide in the airways.

    PubMed

    Scadding, Glenis

    2007-08-01

    This review briefly explains the basic facts about nitric oxide, which is entering clinical practice as a measure of lower airways inflammation and is likely also to be employed in otorhinolaryngological practice. These include the validity of nasal nitric oxide in diagnosing primary ciliary dyskinesia and in monitoring the response to chronic rhinosinusitis therapy. The nasal nitric oxide value combined with a humming manoeuvre, which increases the passage of nitric oxide from the sinuses to the nose if the ostiomeatal complex is patent, could reduce the need for computed tomography scans. The link between nitric oxide production and ciliary beating requires further exploration. Therapeutic adjustments to nitric oxide production are under investigation. Nitric oxide is likely to prove highly relevant to airways defence, as well as being an inflammatory mediator. Nasal nitric oxide probably explains some of the benefit of nasal rather than mouth breathing.

  6. Effects of chronic nitric oxide synthase inhibition on responses to acute exercise in swine.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Richard M; Newcomer, Sean C; Pope, Eric R; Turk, James R; Laughlin, M Harold

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is potentially involved in several responses to acute exercise. We tested the hypotheses that inhibition of NO formation reduces maximal O(2) delivery to muscle, but does not affect O(2) utilization by muscle, therefore lowering maximal O(2) consumption. To test these hypotheses, swine (approximately 30 kg) drank either tap water (Con, n = 25) or water with N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (8.0 +/- 0.4 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1) for >or=4 wk; LN, n = 24). Treatment efficacy was reflected by higher mean arterial pressure and lower plasma NO metabolite concentration in LN than Con (both P < 0.05). Swine completed two graded treadmill running tests to maximum. In the first test, O(2) consumption was determined at rest through maximal exercise intensity. O(2) consumption did not differ between groups at rest or at most exercise intensities, including maximum (Con, 40.8 +/- 1.8 ml x min(-1) x kg(-1); LN, 40.4 +/- 2.9; not significant). In the second test, tissue-specific blood flows were determined using the radiolabeled-microsphere technique. At rest, blood flows were lower (P < 0.05) in LN compared with Con for a number of tissues, including kidney, adrenal, lung, and several skeletal muscles. During both submaximal and maximal exercise, however, blood flows were similar between Con and LN for all 16 muscles examined; only blood flows to kidney (Con, 99 +/- 16 ml x min(-1) x 100 g; LN, 55 +/- 15; P < 0.05) and pancreas (Con, 25 +/- 7; LN, 6 +/- 2; P < 0.05) were lower in LN at maximum. Endothelium-dependent, but not -independent, relaxation of renal arterial segments was reduced (P < 0.05) in vitro. These data indicate that exercise-induced increases in muscle blood flows are maintained with chronic inhibition of NO formation and that maximal O(2) consumption is therefore preserved. Redundant vasodilatory pathways and/or upregulation of these pathways may underlie these findings.

  7. Effects of chronic nitric oxide synthase inhibition on responses to acute exercise in swine

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Richard M.; Newcomer, Sean C.; Pope, Eric R.; Turk, James R.; Laughlin, M. Harold

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is potentially involved in several responses to acute exercise. We tested the hypotheses that inhibition of NO formation reduces maximal O2 delivery to muscle, but does not affect O2 utilization by muscle, therefore lowering maximal O2 consumption. To test these hypotheses, swine (~30 kg) drank either tap water (Con, n = 25) or water with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (8.0 ± 0.4 mg · kg−1 · day−1 for ≥4 wk; LN, n = 24). Treatment efficacy was reflected by higher mean arterial pressure and lower plasma NO metabolite concentration in LN than Con (both P < 0.05). Swine completed two graded treadmill running tests to maximum. In the first test, O2 consumption was determined at rest through maximal exercise intensity. O2 consumption did not differ between groups at rest or at most exercise intensities, including maximum (Con, 40.8 ± 1.8 ml · min−1 · kg−1; LN, 40.4 ± 2.9; not significant). In the second test, tissue-specific blood flows were determined using the radiolabeled-microsphere technique. At rest, blood flows were lower (P < 0.05) in LN compared with Con for a number of tissues, including kidney, adrenal, lung, and several skeletal muscles. During both submaximal and maximal exercise, however, blood flows were similar between Con and LN for all 16 muscles examined; only blood flows to kidney (Con, 99 ± 16 ml · min−1 · 100 g; LN, 55 ± 15; P < 0.05) and pancreas (Con, 25 ± 7; LN, 6 ± 2; P < 0.05) were lower in LN at maximum. Endothelium-dependent, but not -independent, relaxation of renal arterial segments was reduced (P < 0.05) in vitro. These data indicate that exercise-induced increases in muscle blood flows are maintained with chronic inhibition of NO formation and that maximal O2 consumption is therefore preserved. Redundant vasodilatory pathways and/or upregulation of these pathways may underlie these findings. PMID:17975123

  8. Oral sapropterin acutely augments reflex vasodilation in aged human skin through nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Alexander, Lacy M; Kenney, W Larry

    2013-10-01

    Functional constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and its cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) are required for full reflex cutaneous vasodilation and are attenuated in primary aging. Acute, locally administered BH4 increases reflex vasodilation through NO-dependent mechanisms in aged skin. We hypothesized that oral sapropterin (Kuvan, shelf-stable pharmaceutical formulation of BH4) would augment reflex vasodilation in aged human skin during hyperthermia. Nine healthy human subjects (76 ± 1 yr) ingested sapropterin (10 mg/kg) or placebo in a randomized double-blind crossover design. Venous blood samples were collected prior to, and 3 h following, ingestion of sapropterin for measurement of plasma BH4. Three intradermal microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for local delivery of 1) lactated Ringer's solution, 2) 10 mM BH4, and 3) 20 mM N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to inhibit NOS. Red cell flux was measured at each site by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) as reflex vasodilation was induced using a water-perfused suit. At 1°C rise in oral temperature, mean body temperature was clamped and 20 mM l-NAME was perfused at each site. Cutaneous vascular conductance was calculated (CVC = LDF/MAP) and expressed as a percentage of maximum (%CVCmax 28 mM sodium nitroprusside and local heat 43°C). Plasma concentrations of BH4 were significantly elevated 3 h after ingestion of sapropterin (0 h: 19.1 ± 2 pmol/ml vs. 3 h: 43.8 ± 3 pmol/ml; P < 0.001). Sapropterin increased NO-dependent vasodilation at control site (placebo: 14 ± 1 %CVCmax vs. sapropterin: 25 ± 4 %CVCmax; P = 0.004). Local BH4 administration increased NO-dependent vasodilation compared with control in placebo trials only (control: 14 ± 1 %CVCmax vs. BH4-treated: 24 ± 3 %CVCmax; P = 0.02). These data suggest oral sapropterin increases bioavailable BH4 in aged skin microvasculature sufficiently to increase NO synthesis through NOS and that sapropterin may be a viable intervention to

  9. Oral sapropterin acutely augments reflex vasodilation in aged human skin through nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Stanhewicz, Anna E.; Kenney, W. Larry

    2013-01-01

    Functional constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and its cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) are required for full reflex cutaneous vasodilation and are attenuated in primary aging. Acute, locally administered BH4 increases reflex vasodilation through NO-dependent mechanisms in aged skin. We hypothesized that oral sapropterin (Kuvan, shelf-stable pharmaceutical formulation of BH4) would augment reflex vasodilation in aged human skin during hyperthermia. Nine healthy human subjects (76 ± 1 yr) ingested sapropterin (10 mg/kg) or placebo in a randomized double-blind crossover design. Venous blood samples were collected prior to, and 3 h following, ingestion of sapropterin for measurement of plasma BH4. Three intradermal microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for local delivery of 1) lactated Ringer's solution, 2) 10 mM BH4, and 3) 20 mM NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to inhibit NOS. Red cell flux was measured at each site by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) as reflex vasodilation was induced using a water-perfused suit. At 1°C rise in oral temperature, mean body temperature was clamped and 20 mM l-NAME was perfused at each site. Cutaneous vascular conductance was calculated (CVC = LDF/MAP) and expressed as a percentage of maximum (%CVCmax 28 mM sodium nitroprusside and local heat 43°C). Plasma concentrations of BH4 were significantly elevated 3 h after ingestion of sapropterin (0 h: 19.1 ± 2 pmol/ml vs. 3 h: 43.8 ± 3 pmol/ml; P < 0.001). Sapropterin increased NO-dependent vasodilation at control site (placebo: 14 ± 1 %CVCmax vs. sapropterin: 25 ± 4 %CVCmax; P = 0.004). Local BH4 administration increased NO-dependent vasodilation compared with control in placebo trials only (control: 14 ± 1 %CVCmax vs. BH4-treated: 24 ± 3 %CVCmax; P = 0.02). These data suggest oral sapropterin increases bioavailable BH4 in aged skin microvasculature sufficiently to increase NO synthesis through NOS and that sapropterin may be a viable intervention to

  10. Attenuation of acute nitrogen mustard-induced lung injury, inflammation and fibrogenesis by a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Venosa, Alessandro; Hall, LeRoy; Gow, Andrew J.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-12-15

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a toxic vesicant known to cause damage to the respiratory tract. Injury is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In these studies we analyzed the effects of transient inhibition of iNOS using aminoguanidine (AG) on NM-induced pulmonary toxicity. Rats were treated intratracheally with 0.125 mg/kg NM or control. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and lung tissue were collected 1 d–28 d later and lung injury, oxidative stress and fibrosis assessed. NM exposure resulted in progressive histopathological changes in the lung including multifocal lesions, perivascular and peribronchial edema, inflammatory cell accumulation, alveolar fibrin deposition, bronchiolization of alveolar septal walls, and fibrosis. This was correlated with trichrome staining and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) was also increased in the lung following NM exposure, along with levels of protein and inflammatory cells in BAL, consistent with oxidative stress and alveolar-epithelial injury. Both classically activated proinflammatory (iNOS{sup +} and cyclooxygenase-2{sup +}) and alternatively activated profibrotic (YM-1{sup +} and galectin-3{sup +}) macrophages appeared in the lung following NM administration; this was evident within 1 d, and persisted for 28 d. AG administration (50 mg/kg, 2 ×/day, 1 d–3 d) abrogated NM-induced injury, oxidative stress and inflammation at 1 d and 3 d post exposure, with no effects at 7 d or 28 d. These findings indicate that nitric oxide generated via iNOS contributes to acute NM-induced lung toxicity, however, transient inhibition of iNOS is not sufficient to protect against pulmonary fibrosis. -- Highlights: ► Nitrogen mustard (NM) induces acute lung injury and fibrosis. ► Pulmonary toxicity is associated with increased expression of iNOS. ► Transient inhibition of iNOS attenuates acute

  11. Nitric oxide mediates effects of acute, not chronic, naltrexone on LPS-induced hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic rats.

    PubMed

    Ghiassy, Bentolhoda; Rahimi, Nastaran; Javadi-Paydar, Mehrak; Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest endogenous opioids and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In this study, the interaction between the opioid receptor antagonist and NO was investigated on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced HE in cirrhotic rats. Male rats were divided in the sham- and bile duct ligation (BDL)-operated groups. Animals were treated with saline; naltrexone (10 mg/kg, i.p.); or L-NAME (3 mg/kg, i.p.), alone or in combination with naltrexone. To induce HE, LPS (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected 1 h after the final drug treatment. HE scoring, hepatic histology, and plasma NO metabolites levels and mortality rate were recorded. Deteriorated level of consciousness and mortality after LPS administration significantly ameliorated following both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone in cirrhotic rats. However, acute and chronic administration of L-NAME did not change HE scores in cirrhotic rats. The effects of acute but not chronic treatment of naltrexone on HE parameters were reversed by L-NAME. Plasma NOx concentrations elevated in BDL rats, which were decreased after acute and chronic treatment by naltrexone or L-NAME, significantly. We suggest both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone improved LPS-induced HE. But, only acute treatment with naltrexone may affect through NO pathway.

  12. Successful treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome after hysterectomy for life-threatening atonic bleeding by inhaled nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Ayaka; Hashiba, Eiji; Otomo, Noriaki; Muraoka, Masatoshi; Kimura, Futoshi; Hirota, Kazuyoshi

    2011-10-01

    We report a case of a 33-year-old female who developed severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) after emergency hysterectomy for life-threatening atonic bleeding. A marked decline in pulmonary oxygenation was observed during the surgery, which led to a diagnosis of ARDS. Following admission to the intensive care unit, hypoxia became critical, with a PaO(2)/F(I)O(2) value of 52 even after recruitment maneuvers. Inhaled nitric oxide (NO 10 ppm) was administered to the patient as a rescue treatment, resulting in a gradual but dramatic improvement in pulmonary oxygenation. Although several randomized trials have failed to confirm the beneficial effects of NO on morbidity in patients with ARDS, NO administration is worth consideration as treatment prior to invasive treatments, such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, for patients with acute lung injury/ARDS.

  13. Nitric oxide availability in deeply hypoxic crucian carp: acute and chronic changes and utilization of ambient nitrite reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Marie N; Gerber, Lucie; Jensen, Frank B

    2016-03-15

    Recent research suggest that anoxia-tolerant fish transfer extracellular nitrite into the tissues, where it is used for nitric oxide (NO) generation, iron-nitrosylation, and S-nitrosation of proteins, as part of the cytoprotective response toward prolonged hypoxia and subsequent reoxygenation. We hypothesized that crucian carp take up ambient nitrite and use it as a source of cellular NO availability during hypoxia. Fish were exposed for 1 day to normoxia (Po2 > 140 mmHg) and deep hypoxia (1 < Po2 < 3 mmHg) at both low (< 0.2 μM) and moderately elevated (10 μM) ambient [nitrite] to decipher NO metabolites in plasma and several tissues. We also compared NO metabolite changes during acute (10 min) and chronic (1 day) exposures to three different O2 levels. Plasma [nitrite] decreased with decreasing [O2], while the cellular concentrations of nitrite and nitros(yl)ated compounds either increased or stayed constant, depending on O2 level and tissue type. Nitrite was notably increased in the heart during deep hypoxia, and the increase was amplified by elevated ambient [nitrite]. Raised nitrite also increased gill [nitrite] and decreased mRNA expression of an inducible nitric oxide synthase-2 gene variant. The data support that ambient nitrite is taken up across the gills to be distributed via the blood to the tissues, particularly the heart, where it assists in cytoprotection and other functions. Cardiac nitrite was not elevated in acutely exposed fish, revealing that the response requires time. NO metabolite levels were higher during acute than chronic exposures, possibly caused by increased swimming activity and stress in acutely exposed fish.

  14. Role of nitric oxide synthase inhibition in the acute hypertensive response to intracerebroventricular cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Demontis, Maria Piera; Varoni, Maria Vittoria; Volpe, Anna Rita; Emanueli, Costanza; Madeddu, Paolo

    1998-01-01

    In the rat, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of cadmium, a pollutant with long biological half-life, causes a sustained increase in blood pressure at doses that are ineffective by peripheral route. Since cadmium inhibits calcium-calmodulin constitutive nitric oxide (NO) synthase in cytosolic preparations of rat brain, this mechanism may be responsible for the acute pressor action of this heavy metal.To test this possibility, we evaluated the effect of i.c.v. injection of 88 nmol cadmium in normotensive unanaesthetized Wistar rats, which were i.c.v. pre-treated with: (1) saline (control), (2) L-arginine (L-Arg), to increase the availability of substrate for NO biosynthesis, (3) D-arginine (D-Arg), (4) 3-[4-morpholinyl]-sydnonimine-hydrochloride (SIN-1), an NO donor, or (5) CaCl2, a cofactor of brain calcium-calmodulin-dependent cNOSI. In additional experiments, the levels of L-citrulline (the stable equimolar product derived from enzymatic cleavage of L-Arg by NO synthase) were determined in the brain of vehicle- or cadmium-treated rats.The pressor response to cadmium reached its nadir at 5 min (43±4 mmHg) and lasted over 20 min in controls. L-Citrulline/protein content was reduced from 35 up to 50% in the cerebral cortex, pons, hippocampus, striatus, hypothalamus (P<0.01) of cadmium-treated rats compared with controls. Central injection of NG nitro-L-arginine-methylester (L-NAME) also reduced the levels of L-citrulline in the brain.Both the magnitude and duration of the response were attenuated by 1.21 and 2.42 μmol SIN-1 (32±3 and 15±4 mmHg, P<0.05), or 1 μmol CaCl2 (6±4 mmHg, P<0.05). Selectivity of action exerted by SIN-1 was confirmed by the use of another NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP). Both L-Arg and D-Arg caused a mild but significant attenuation in the main phase of the pressor response evoked by cadmium. However, only L-Arg reduced the magnitude of the delayed, pressor response. Despite their similarity in

  15. Bacterial nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Crane, Brian R; Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Patel, Bhumit A

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) are multidomain metalloproteins first identified in mammals as being responsible for the synthesis of the wide-spread signaling and protective agent nitric oxide (NO). Over the past 10 years, prokaryotic proteins that are homologous to animal NOSs have been identified and characterized, both in terms of enzymology and biological function. Despite some interesting differences in cofactor utilization and redox partners, the bacterial enzymes are in many ways similar to their mammalian NOS (mNOS) counterparts and, as such, have provided insight into the structural and catalytic properties of the NOS family. In particular, spectroscopic studies of thermostable bacterial NOSs have revealed key oxyheme intermediates involved in the oxidation of substrate L-arginine (Arg) to product NO. The biological functions of some bacterial NOSs have only more recently come to light. These studies disclose new roles for NO in biology, such as taking part in toxin biosynthesis, protection against oxidative stress, and regulation of recovery from radiation damage.

  16. Nitric oxide neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Dawson, V L; Dawson, T M

    1996-06-01

    Derangements in glutamate neurotransmission have been implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders including, stroke, epilepsy, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subtype of glutamate receptors results in the influx of calcium which binds calmodulin and activates neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), to convent L-arginine to citrulline and nitric oxide (NO). NO has many roles in the central nervous system as a messenger molecule, however, when generated in excess NO can be neurotoxic. Excess NO is in part responsible for glutamate neurotoxicity in primary neuronal cell culture and in animal models of stroke. It is likely that most of the neurotoxic actions of NO are mediated by peroxynitrite (ONOO-), the reaction product from NO and superoxide anion. In pathologic conditions, peroxynitrite and oxygen free radicals can be generated in excess of a cell antioxidant capacity resulting in severe damage to cellular constituents including proteins, DNA and lipids. The inherent biochemical and physiological characteristics of the brain, including high lipid concentrations and energy requirements, make it particularly susceptible to free radical and oxidant mediated insult. Increasing evidence indicates that many neurologic disorders may have components of free radical and oxidative stress induced injury.

  17. Acute hemolytic vascular inflammatory processes are prevented by nitric oxide replacement or a single dose of hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Camila Bononi; Souza, Lucas Eduardo Botelho; Leonardo, Flavia Costa; Costa, Fabio Trindade Maranhão; Werneck, Claudio C; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Conran, Nicola

    2015-08-06

    Hemolysis and consequent release of cell-free hemoglobin (CFHb) impair vascular nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and cause oxidative and inflammatory processes. Hydroxyurea (HU), a common therapy for sickle cell disease (SCD), induces fetal Hb production and can act as an NO donor. We evaluated the acute inflammatory effects of intravenous water-induced hemolysis in C57BL/6 mice and determined the abilities of an NO donor, diethylamine NONOate (DEANO), and a single dose of HU to modulate this inflammation. Intravenous water induced acute hemolysis in C57BL/6 mice, attaining plasma Hb levels comparable to those observed in chimeric SCD mice. This hemolysis resulted in significant and rapid systemic inflammation and vascular leukocyte recruitment within 15 minutes, accompanied by NO metabolite generation. Administration of another potent NO scavenger (2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) to C57BL/6 mice induced similar alterations in leukocyte recruitment, whereas hemin-induced inflammation occurred over a longer time frame. Importantly, the acute inflammatory effects of water-induced hemolysis were abolished by the simultaneous administration of DEANO or HU, without altering CFHb, in an NO pathway-mediated manner. In vitro, HU partially reversed the Hb-mediated induction of endothelial proinflammatory cytokine secretion and adhesion molecule expression. In summary, pathophysiological levels of hemolysis trigger an immediate inflammatory response, possibly mediated by vascular NO consumption. HU presents beneficial anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting rapid-onset hemolytic inflammation via an NO-dependent mechanism, independently of fetal Hb elevation. Data provide novel insights into mechanisms of hemolytic inflammation and further support perspectives for the use of HU as an acute treatment for SCD and other hemolytic disorders.

  18. Acute restraint stress induces specific changes in nitric oxide production and inflammatory markers in the rat hippocampus and striatum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Jou Cortina; Spiers, Jereme G; Sernia, Conrad; Lavidis, Nickolas A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic mild stress has been shown to cause hippocampal neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) overexpression and the resultant nitric oxide (NO) production has been implicated in the etiology of depression. However, the extent of nitrosative changes including NOS enzymatic activity and the overall output of NO production in regions of the brain like the hippocampus and striatum following acute stress has not been characterized. In this study, outbred male Wistar rats aged 6-7 weeks were randomly allocated into 0 (control), 60, 120, or 240 min stress groups and neural regions were cryodissected for measurement of constitutive and inducible NOS enzymatic activity, nitrosative status, and relative gene expression of neuronal and inducible NOS. Hippocampal constitutive NOS activity increased initially but was superseded by the inducible isoform as stress duration was prolonged. Interestingly, hippocampal neuronal NOS and interleukin-1β mRNA expression was downregulated, while the inducible NOS isoform was upregulated in conjunction with other inflammatory markers. This pro-inflammatory phenotype within the hippocampus was further confirmed with an increase in the glucocorticoid-antagonizing macrophage migration inhibitory factor, Mif, and the glial surveillance marker, Ciita. This indicates that despite high levels of glucocorticoids, acute stress sensitizes a neuroinflammatory response within the hippocampus involving both pro-inflammatory cytokines and inducible NOS while concurrently modulating the immunophenotype of glia. Furthermore, there was a delayed increase in striatal inducible NOS expression while no change was found in other pro-inflammatory mediators. This suggests that short term stress induces a generalized increase in inducible NOS signaling that coincides with regionally specific increased markers of adaptive immunity and inflammation within the brain.

  19. Changes in activity of stress-realizing body systems as a result of terahertz irradiation at nitric oxide frequencies in albino rats under conditions of acute stress.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N

    2013-01-01

    We studied the effects of irradiation with teraherz electromagnetic waves at frequencies corresponding to nitric oxide emission and absorption molecular spectrum (150,176-150,664 GHz) on activity of the sympathoadrenal and pituitary-adrenal axes of the stress response in albino male rats under conditions of acute immobilization stress. It was shown that terahertz waves exert stress-limiting effect and are capable of reducing the levels of catecholamines, corticotropin, and corticosterone in male rats exposed to acute stress.

  20. Neovestitol, an isoflavonoid isolated from Brazilian red propolis, reduces acute and chronic inflammation: involvement of nitric oxide and IL-6

    PubMed Central

    Franchin, Marcelo; Colón, David F.; da Cunha, Marcos G.; Castanheira, Fernanda V. S.; Saraiva, André L. L.; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Alencar, Severino M.; Cunha, Thiago M.; Rosalen, Pedro L.

    2016-01-01

    Isoflavonoids have been largely studied due to their distinct biological activities identified thus far. Herein, we evaluated the activity of neovestitol, an isoflavonoid isolated from Brazilian red propolis, in acute and chronic inflammation. As for acute inflammation, we found that neovestitol reduced neutrophil migration, leukocyte rolling and adhesion, as well as expression of ICAM-1 in the mesenteric microcirculation during lipopolysaccharide-induced acute peritonitis. No changes were observed in the levels of TNF-α, CXCL1/KC and CXCL2/MIP-2 upon pretreatment with neovestitol. The administration of an inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor abolished the inhibitory effects of neovestitol in neutrophil migration and ICAM-1 expression. Nitrite levels increased upon treatment with neovestitol. No effects of neovestitol were observed on the chemotaxis of neutrophils in vitro. As for chronic inflammation, neovestitol also reduced the clinical score and joint damage in a collagen-induced arthritis model. There was no change in the frequency of IL-17-producing TCD4+ cells. In addition, pretreatment with neovestitol reduced the levels of IL-6. These results demonstrate a potential anti-inflammatory activity of neovestitol, which may be useful for therapeutic purposes and/or as a nutraceutical. PMID:27819273

  1. Neovestitol, an isoflavonoid isolated from Brazilian red propolis, reduces acute and chronic inflammation: involvement of nitric oxide and IL-6.

    PubMed

    Franchin, Marcelo; Colón, David F; da Cunha, Marcos G; Castanheira, Fernanda V S; Saraiva, André L L; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Alencar, Severino M; Cunha, Thiago M; Rosalen, Pedro L

    2016-11-07

    Isoflavonoids have been largely studied due to their distinct biological activities identified thus far. Herein, we evaluated the activity of neovestitol, an isoflavonoid isolated from Brazilian red propolis, in acute and chronic inflammation. As for acute inflammation, we found that neovestitol reduced neutrophil migration, leukocyte rolling and adhesion, as well as expression of ICAM-1 in the mesenteric microcirculation during lipopolysaccharide-induced acute peritonitis. No changes were observed in the levels of TNF-α, CXCL1/KC and CXCL2/MIP-2 upon pretreatment with neovestitol. The administration of an inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor abolished the inhibitory effects of neovestitol in neutrophil migration and ICAM-1 expression. Nitrite levels increased upon treatment with neovestitol. No effects of neovestitol were observed on the chemotaxis of neutrophils in vitro. As for chronic inflammation, neovestitol also reduced the clinical score and joint damage in a collagen-induced arthritis model. There was no change in the frequency of IL-17-producing TCD4+ cells. In addition, pretreatment with neovestitol reduced the levels of IL-6. These results demonstrate a potential anti-inflammatory activity of neovestitol, which may be useful for therapeutic purposes and/or as a nutraceutical.

  2. Demystified … Nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Stuart-Smith, K

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of nitric oxide (NO) demonstrated that cells could communicate via the manufacture and local diffusion of an unstable lipid soluble molecule. Since the original demonstration of the vascular relaxant properties of endothelium derived NO, this fascinating molecule has been shown to have multiple, complex roles within many biological systems. This review cannot hope to cover all of the recent advances in NO biology, but seeks to place the discovery of NO in its historical context, and show how far our understanding has come in the past 20 years. The role of NO in mitochondrial respiration, and consequently in oxidative stress, is described in detail because these processes probably underline the importance of NO in the development of disease. PMID:12456772

  3. Effect of nitric oxide pathway regulation on water/sodium balance and renal function in a rodent model of acute liver and renal failure.

    PubMed

    Saracyn, Marek; Ząbkowski, Tomasz; Zdanowski, Robert; Brytan, Marek; Patera, Janusz; Nowak, Zbigniew; Kade, Grzegorz; Wańkowicz, Zofia

    2014-09-27

    The pathomechanism of acute hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), a particular form of acute renal failure that occurs in the course of acute liver injury, is still poorly understood. The aim of our study was to estimate the influence of the activation and inhibition of the nitric oxide pathway on the water/sodium balance and development of acute renal failure in the course of HRS. We used male Sprague-Dawley rats in the acute galactosamine (Ga1N) model of HRS. The nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors L-NAME and L-arginine were administered intraperitoneally before and after liver damage. HRS developed in all tested groups. L-NAME increased osmotic clearance and urine volume more effectively before liver injury. Furthermore, administration of L-NAME increased creatinine clearance both before and after Ga1N injection. A double dose of L-NAME did not yield further improvement before Ga1N injection, but improved creatinine clearance after Ga1N intoxication. Injection of L-arginine increased sodium excretion and urine volume, but only after liver injury. Moreover, L-arginine injected after Ga1N caused significant improvement of the creatinine clearance in a dose-dependent manner. Our study shows that inhibition of the nitric oxide pathway improves parameters of water and sodium balance and prevents development of acute renal failure in the course of acute liver injury and liver failure. Activation of the nitric oxide system also has a favorable influence on water/sodium balance and renal failure, but only after liver injury.

  4. Detection of nitric oxide pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, C., Jr.; Weisbach, M. F.

    1973-01-01

    Studies of absorption spectra enhancement of certain atomic and molecular species inserter in dye-laser cavities have indicated that nitric oxide can be determined at low concentrations. Absorption coefficient of small amounts of nitric oxide in intra-laser-cavity absorption cell containing helium is enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude.

  5. Medullary ventrolateral nitric oxide mediates the cardiac effect of electroacupuncture at "Neiguan" acupoint on acute myocardial ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Juan-Xiu; Zhou, Pei-Hua; Wang, Jin; Li, Xia; Cao, Yin-Xiang; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Da-Nian

    2004-08-25

    Experiments were performed on male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats anesthetized with a mixture of urethane and chloralose. A rat model of acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) was made by ligation of the left anterior descending branch of the coronary artery (LAD). After the LAD ligation, the ischemia area of the left ventricular wall became somewhat pale immediately. Under a light microscope, the pathological examination revealed that all the cells were swollen and in red color when the cardiac section was stained with hematoxylin basic fuchsin picric acid (HBFP), which indicated a typical change in the myocardial ischemia. In the AMI model, it was found that cardiac functions were markedly attenuated, such as decreases in the heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP), maximal rate for left ventricular pressure rising and declining (+/-dp/dt(max)), velocity of contractile element (V(CE)) and total area of cardiac force loop (L(0)), and an increase in the left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP). In such AMI rats, application of electroacupuncture (EA) at "Neiguan" acupoints (Pe 6) for 20 min could obviously improve the above-mentioned cardiac functions. After microinjection of nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), was made into the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the curative effect of EA on myocardial ischemia was reduced significantly or abolished, while after microinjection of normal saline of the same volume was made into the RVLM, the improving effect of EA remained. These results suggest that the effect of EA on myocardial ischemia is possibly mediated by the nitric oxide (NO) in the RVLM.

  6. Post-translational modification of manganese superoxide dismutase in acutely rejecting cardiac transplants: role of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Nilakantan, Vani; Halligan, Nadine L N; Nguyen, Thanh K; Hilton, Gail; Khanna, Ashwani K; Roza, Allan M; Johnson, Christopher P; Adams, Mark B; Griffith, Owen W; Pieper, Galen M

    2005-10-01

    Nitration of a critical tyrosine residue in the active site of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) can lead to enzyme inactivation. In this study, we examined the effect of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) on MnSOD expression, activity and nitration in acutely rejecting cardiac transplants. Lewis (isograft) or Wistar-Furth (allograft) donor hearts were transplanted into Lewis recipient rats. Some rats received L-N6-(1-iminoethyl) lysine (l-NIL), a specific iNOS inhibitor. Protein nitration was determined by immunohistochemical, Western blot and slot-blot analyses. MnSOD enzyme activity and gene expression were determined using Western, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoprecipitation techniques. MnSOD protein levels were decreased 50% by post-operative day 6 (POD 6), which was prevented by L-NIL. RT-PCR analysis indicated that this decrease could not be explained by any changes in MnSOD mRNA. MnSOD enzyme activity but not protein was decreased at POD 5 in untreated allografts. The loss of MnSOD activity at POD 5 was also prevented by L-NIL. Immunoreactive nitrotyrosine was apparent in untreated allografts at POD 6. Slot-blot analysis indicated that nitrotyrosine formation in allografts could be blocked by L-NIL. Nitration of MnSOD was evident upon immunoprecipitation of MnSOD followed by Western blotting for nitrotyrosine. These results suggest that the decreased MnSOD enzyme activity in acutely rejecting cardiac allografts can be attributed to a post-translational modification related to nitration arising via an iNOS-dependent pathway. This could be a potential major source of amplified oxidative stress in acute graft rejection.

  7. The role of nitric oxide in the cardiovascular response to chronic and acute hypoxia in White Leghorn chicken (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Iversen, N K; Wang, T; Baatrup, E; Crossley, D A

    2014-06-01

    Prenatal hypoxia due to placental insufficiency results in deleterious phenotypes and compensatory mechanisms including increased sympathetic tone. Utilizing the embryonic chicken model, we investigated (i) changes in nitric oxide (NO)-mediated tone in response to chronic hypoxic development and (ii) the in vivo role of NO-mediated tone during acute hypoxic exposure, which has not been previously studied. We hypothesized that NO tone on the cardiovascular system would be unaffected by chronic hypoxic incubation in White Leghorn chicken (Gallus domesticus) embryos. We measured arterial pressure, heart rate and femoral blood flow (via a Doppler flow probe) in response to acute hypoxia (10% O2 ) and pharmacological manipulations in normoxic- and hypoxic (15% O2 )-incubated embryos. This was performed at 70 and 90% of total incubation time (21 days). At 70% of incubation (day 15), blood volume and chorioallantoic membrane development are maximal; 90% of incubation (day 19) is 1 day prior to lung ventilation. Acute hypoxic exposure decreased femoral flow in both 90% groups, but increased femoral artery resistance in the hypoxic group. NO tone increased during development, but was not affected by hypoxic incubation. Inhibition of NO production by L-NAME (100 mg kg(-1) ) revealed that NO plays a significant role in the flow response to hypoxia. Chronic hypoxic incubation has no effect on cardiovascular NO tone during White Leghorn chicken development. In the intact animal, NO function during acute hypoxic stress is suppressed by hypoxic incubation, indicating that chronic hypoxic stress dampens the NO contribution. © 2014 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Sleep active cortical neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase are active after both acute sleep deprivation and chronic sleep restriction.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, M R; Kim, Y; Karpova, S A; Winston, S; McCarley, R W; Strecker, R E; Gerashchenko, D

    2013-09-05

    Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) delta power (~0.5-4 Hz), also known as slow wave activity (SWA), is typically enhanced after acute sleep deprivation (SD) but not after chronic sleep restriction (CSR). Recently, sleep-active cortical neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) were identified and associated with enhanced SWA after short acute bouts of SD (i.e., 6h). However, the relationship between cortical nNOS neuronal activity and SWA during CSR is unknown. We compared the activity of cortical neurons expressing nNOS (via c-Fos and nNOS immuno-reactivity, respectively) and sleep in rats in three conditions: (1) after 18-h of acute SD; (2) after five consecutive days of sleep restriction (SR) (18-h SD per day with 6h ad libitum sleep opportunity per day); (3) and time-of-day matched ad libitum sleep controls. Cortical nNOS neuronal activity was enhanced during sleep after both 18-h SD and 5 days of SR treatments compared to control treatments. SWA and NREM sleep delta energy (the product of NREM sleep duration and SWA) were positively correlated with enhanced cortical nNOS neuronal activity after 18-h SD but not 5days of SR. That neurons expressing nNOS were active after longer amounts of acute SD (18h vs. 6h reported in the literature) and were correlated with SWA further suggest that these cells might regulate SWA. However, since these neurons were active after CSR when SWA was not enhanced, these findings suggest that mechanisms downstream of their activation are altered during CSR.

  9. Nitric oxide enhancement strategies.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Nathan S

    2015-08-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that many diseases are characterized or associated with perturbations in nitric oxide (NO) production/signaling. Therapeutics or strategies designed to restore normal NO homeostasis will likely have broad application and utility. This highly complex and multistep pathway for NO production and subsequent target activation provides many steps in the endogenous pathway that may be useful targets for drug development for cardiovascular disease, antimicrobial, cancer, wound healing, etc. This article will summarize known strategies that are currently available or in development for enhancing NO production or availability in the human body. Each strategy will be discussed including exogenous sources of NO, use of precursors to promote NO production and downstream pathways affected by NO production with advantages and disadvantages highlighted for each. Development of NO-based therapeutics is and will continue to be a major focus of biotech, academia as well as pharmaceutical companies. Application of safe and effective strategies will certainly transform health and disease.

  10. Nitric oxide signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Allan D

    2005-01-01

    Plants have four nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymes. NOS1 appears mitochondrial, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) chloroplastic. Distinct peroxisomal and apoplastic NOS enzymes are predicted. Nitrite-dependent NO synthesis is catalyzed by cytoplasmic nitrate reductase or a root plasma membrane enzyme, or occurs nonenzymatically. Nitric oxide undergoes both catalyzed and uncatalyzed oxidation. However, there is no evidence of reaction with superoxide, and S-nitrosylation reactions are unlikely except during hypoxia. The only proven direct targets of NO in plants are metalloenzymes and one metal complex. Nitric oxide inhibits apoplastic catalases/ascorbate peroxidases in some species but may stimulate these enzymes in others. Plants also have the NO response pathway involving cGMP, cADPR, and release of calcium from internal stores. Other known targets include chloroplast and mitochondrial electron transport. Nitric oxide suppresses Fenton chemistry by interacting with ferryl ion, preventing generation of hydroxyl radicals. Functions of NO in plant development, response to biotic and abiotic stressors, iron homeostasis, and regulation of respiration and photosynthesis may all be ascribed to interaction with one of these targets. Nitric oxide function in drought/abscisic acid (ABA)-induction of stomatal closure requires nitrate reductase and NOS1. Nitric oxide synthasel likely functions to produce sufficient NO to inhibit photosynthetic electron transport, allowing nitrite accumulation. Nitric oxide is produced during the hypersensitive response outside cells undergoing programmed cell death immediately prior to loss of plasma membrane integrity. A plasma membrane lipid-derived signal likely activates apoplastic NOS. Nitric oxide diffuses within the apoplast and signals neighboring cells via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent induction of salicylic acid biosynthesis. Response to wounding appears to involve the same NOS and direct targets.

  11. Resveratrol induces acute endothelium-dependent renal vasodilation mediated through nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species scavenging

    PubMed Central

    Gordish, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol is suggested to have beneficial cardiovascular and renoprotective effects. Resveratrol increases endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. We hypothesized resveratrol acts as an acute renal vasodilator, mediated through increased NO production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In anesthetized rats, we found 5.0 mg/kg body weight (bw) of resveratrol increased renal blood flow (RBF) by 8% [from 6.98 ± 0.42 to 7.54 ± 0.17 ml·min−1·gram of kidney weight−1 (gkw); n = 8; P < 0.002] and decreased renal vascular resistance (RVR) by 18% from 15.00 ± 1.65 to 12.32 ± 1.20 arbitrary resistance units (ARU; P < 0.002). To test the participation of NO, we administered 5.0 mg/kg bw resveratrol before and after 10 mg/kg bw of the NOS inhibitor N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). l-NAME reduced the increase in RBF to resveratrol by 54% (from 0.59 ± 0.05 to 0.27 ± 0.06 ml·min−1·gkw−1; n = 10; P < 0.001). To test the participation of ROS, we gave 5.0 mg/kg bw resveratrol before and after 1 mg/kg bw tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic. Resveratrol increased RBF 7.6% (from 5.91 ± 0.32 to 6.36 ± 0.12 ml·min−1·gkw−1; n = 7; P < 0.001) and decreased RVR 19% (from 18.83 ± 1.37 to 15.27 ± 1.37 ARU). Tempol blocked resveratrol-induced increase in RBF (from 0.45 ± 0.12 to 0.10 ± 0.05 ml·min−1·gkw−1; n = 7; P < 0.03) and the decrease in RVR posttempol was 44% of the control response (3.56 ± 0.34 vs. 1.57 ± 0.21 ARU; n = 7; P < 0.006). We also tested the role of endothelium-derived prostanoids. Two days of 10 mg/kg bw indomethacin pretreatment did not alter basal blood pressure or RBF. Resveratrol-induced vasodilation remained unaffected. We conclude intravenous resveratrol acts as an acute renal vasodilator, partially mediated by increased NO production/NO bioavailability and superoxide scavenging but not by inducing vasodilatory cyclooxygenase products. PMID:24431202

  12. Nitric oxide is the key mediator of death induced by fisetin in human acute monocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ash, Dipankar; Subramanian, Manikandan; Surolia, Avadhesha; Shaha, Chandrima

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to be effective in cancer chemoprevention and therefore drugs that help generate NO would be preferable for combination chemotherapy or solo use. This study shows a new evidence of NO as a mediator of acute leukemia cell death induced by fisetin, a promising chemotherapeutic agent. Fisetin was able to kill THP-1 cells in vivo resulting in tumor shrinkage in the mouse xenograft model. Death induction in vitro was mediated by an increase in NO resulting in double strand DNA breaks and the activation of both the extrinsic and the intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Double strand DNA breaks could be reduced if NO inhibitor was present during fisetin treatment. Fisetin also inhibited the downstream components of the mTORC1 pathway through downregulation of levels of p70 S6 kinase and inducing hypo-phosphorylation of S6 Ri P kinase, eIF4B and eEF2K. NO inhibition restored phosphorylation of downstream effectors of mTORC1 and rescued cells from death. Fisetin induced Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) channels and abrogation of Ca(2+) influx reduced caspase activation and cell death. NO increase and increased Ca(2+) were independent phenomenon. It was inferred that apoptotic death of acute monocytic leukemia cells was induced by fisetin through increased generation of NO and elevated Ca(2+) entry activating the caspase dependent apoptotic pathways. Therefore, manipulation of NO production could be viewed as a potential strategy to increase efficacy of chemotherapy in acute monocytic leukemia.

  13. Nitric oxide is the key mediator of death induced by fisetin in human acute monocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Dipankar; Subramanian, Manikandan; Surolia, Avadhesha; Shaha, Chandrima

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to be effective in cancer chemoprevention and therefore drugs that help generate NO would be preferable for combination chemotherapy or solo use. This study shows a new evidence of NO as a mediator of acute leukemia cell death induced by fisetin, a promising chemotherapeutic agent. Fisetin was able to kill THP-1 cells in vivo resulting in tumor shrinkage in the mouse xenograft model. Death induction in vitro was mediated by an increase in NO resulting in double strand DNA breaks and the activation of both the extrinsic and the intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Double strand DNA breaks could be reduced if NO inhibitor was present during fisetin treatment. Fisetin also inhibited the downstream components of the mTORC1 pathway through downregulation of levels of p70 S6 kinase and inducing hypo-phosphorylation of S6 Ri P kinase, eIF4B and eEF2K. NO inhibition restored phosphorylation of downstream effectors of mTORC1 and rescued cells from death. Fisetin induced Ca2+ entry through L-type Ca2+ channels and abrogation of Ca2+ influx reduced caspase activation and cell death. NO increase and increased Ca2+ were independent phenomenon. It was inferred that apoptotic death of acute monocytic leukemia cells was induced by fisetin through increased generation of NO and elevated Ca2+ entry activating the caspase dependent apoptotic pathways. Therefore, manipulation of NO production could be viewed as a potential strategy to increase efficacy of chemotherapy in acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:25973292

  14. Nitric oxide and cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Cengel, Atiye; Sahinarslan, Asife

    2006-12-01

    Endothelium has many important functions including the control of blood-tissue permeability and vascular tonus, regulation of vascular surface properties for homeostasis and inflammation. Nitric oxide is the chief molecule in regulation of endothelial functions. Nitric oxide deficiency, which is also known as endothelial dysfunction, is the first step for the occurrence of many disease states in cardiovascular system including heart failure, hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, hyperhomocysteinemia and smoking. This review deals with the importance of nitric oxide for cardiovascular system. It also includes the latest improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of endothelial dysfunction.

  15. Nitric oxide and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muntané, Jordi; la Mata, Manuel De

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a lipophilic, highly diffusible and short-lived physiological messenger which regulates a variety of important physiological responses including vasodilation, respiration, cell migration, immune response and apoptosis. NO is synthesized by three differentially gene-encoded NO synthase (NOS) in mammals: neuronal NOS (nNOS or NOS-1), inducible NOS (iNOS or NOS-2) and endothelial NOS (eNOS or NOS-3). All isoforms of NOS catalyze the reaction of L-arginine, NADPH and oxygen to NO, L-citrulline and NADP. NO may exert its cellular action by cGMP-dependent as well as by cGMP-independent pathways including postranslational modifications in cysteine (S-nitrosylation or S-nitrosation) and tyrosine (nitration) residues, mixed disulfide formation (S-nitrosoglutathione or GSNO) or promoting further oxidation protein stages which have been related to altered protein function and gene transcription, genotoxic lesions, alteration of cell-cycle check points, apoptosis and DNA repair. NO sensitizes tumor cells to chemotherapeutic compounds. The expression of NOS-2 and NOS-3 has been found to be increased in a variety of human cancers. The multiple actions of NO in the tumor environment is related to heterogeneous cell responses with particular attention in the regulation of the stress response mediated by the hypoxia inducible factor-1 and p53 generally leading to growth arrest, apoptosis or adaptation. PMID:21161018

  16. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nitric oxide. 173.337 Section 173.337... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.337 Nitric oxide. (a) Nitric oxide must be... valve and valve seat that will not deteriorate in contact with nitric oxide. Cylinders or valves may...

  17. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nitric oxide. 173.337 Section 173.337... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.337 Nitric oxide. (a) Nitric oxide must be... valve and valve seat that will not deteriorate in contact with nitric oxide. Cylinders or valves may...

  18. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nitric oxide. 173.337 Section 173.337... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.337 Nitric oxide. (a) Nitric oxide must be... valve and valve seat that will not deteriorate in contact with nitric oxide. Cylinders or valves may...

  19. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nitric oxide. 173.337 Section 173.337... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.337 Nitric oxide. (a) Nitric oxide must be... valve and valve seat that will not deteriorate in contact with nitric oxide. Cylinders or valves may...

  20. The relation between apoptosis of acinar cells and nitric oxide during acute rejection of pancreas transplantation in rats.

    PubMed

    Xiaoguang, Ni; Zhong, Liu; Hailong, Chen; Ping, Zhao; Xiaofeng, Bai; Fenglin, Guan

    2003-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important mechanism of immune-mediated graft damage. Nitric oxide (NO) generated by inducible NO synthase (iNOS) has been demonstrated to induce apoptosis. This study investigated whether apoptosis occurs during pancreas allograft rejection and examined the relationship of apoptosis of acinar cells and NO. The rats were divided into three groups: untreated isograft group, untreated allograft group and aminoguanidine (AG)-treated group. The pancreatic grafts were harvested on the post-transplantation day 3, 5 and 7 and were used to detect the histopathological rejection grade, the expression of iNOS and the apoptotic index (AI) of the graft. iNOS presented faint positive in the acinar cells of untreated isografts and did not change greatly after transplantation (P>0.05), the level of iNOS in the untreated allografts increased progressively (P<0.01) and at the same time point was significantly higher than that of untreated isograft group and AG-treated group (P<0.01). The transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling showed that the apoptotic cells were mainly acinar cells. A significant correlation between AI and iNOS was noted (P<0.01, r=0.611). Therefore, NO-mediated apoptosis of acinar cells plays an important role in acute rejection of pancreas transplantation, AG can mitigate the damage of pancreas allografts.

  1. Effects of an endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor on phorbol myristate acetate-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hen I; Chu, Shi Jye; Wang, David; Chen, Hsing I; Hsu, Kang

    2003-01-01

    1. In the present study, we determined whether the endogenous nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) inhibitor Nomega-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) could ameliorate the acute lung injury (ALI) induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in rat isolated lung. 2. Typical ALI was induced successfully by PMA during 60 min of observation. At 2 micro g/kg, PMA elicited a significant increase in microvascular permeability (measured using the capillary filtration coefficient Kfc), lung weight gain, lung weight/bodyweight ratio, pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and protein concentration of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. 3. Pretreatment with the NOS inhibitor l-NAME (5 mmol/L) significantly attenuated ALI. None of the parameters reflective of lung injury showed significant increase, except for PAP (P < 0.001). The addition of l-arginine (4 mmol/L) blocked the protective effective of l-NAME. Pretreatment with l-arginine exacerbated PMA-induced lung injury. 4. These data suggest that l-NAME significantly ameliorates ALI induced by PMA in rats, indicating that endogenous NO plays a key role in the development of lung oedema in PMA-induced lung injury.

  2. Nitric oxide in shock.

    PubMed

    Cauwels, A

    2007-09-01

    Refractory hypotension with end-organ hypoperfusion and failure is an ominous feature of shock. Distributive shock is caused by severe infections (septic shock) or severe systemic allergic reactions (anaphylactic shock). In 1986, it was concluded that nitric oxide (NO) is the endothelium-derived relaxing factor that had been discovered 6 years earlier. Since then, NO has been shown to be important for the physiological and pathological control of vascular tone. Nevertheless, although inhibition of NO synthesis restores blood pressure, NO synthase (NOS) inhibition cannot improve outcome, on the contrary. This implies that NO acts as a double-edged sword during septic shock. Consequently, the focus has shifted towards selective inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibitors. The contribution of NO to anaphylactic shock seems to be more straightforward, as NOS inhibition abrogates shock in conscious mice. Surprisingly, however, this shock-inducing NO is not produced by the inducible iNOS, but by the so-called constitutive enzyme endothelial NOS. This review summarizes the contribution of NO to septic and anaphylactic shock. Although NOS inhibition may be promising for the treatment of anaphylactic shock, the failure of a phase III trial indicates that other approaches are required for the successful treatment of septic shock. Amongst these, high hopes are set for selective iNOS inhibitors. But it might also be necessary to shift gears and focus on downstream cardiovascular targets of NO or on other vasodilating phenomena.

  3. Chemiluminescence of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, W. E.; Rusch, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the intensities of the delta and gamma bands of nitric oxide in the nighttime terrestrial thermosphere are presented and used to infer the rate coefficient for the transition from the C 2 Pi to the A 2 Sigma + states. The nightglow spectrum was observed between 1900 and 2300 A at a resolution of 15 A by a rocket-borne scanning 1/4-m spectrometer pointing north at an apogee of 150 km. Progressions of the delta, gamma and epsilon bands are identified on the spectra by the construction of synthetic spectra, and the contributions of resonance fluorescence to the total band intensities are calculated. Finally, the ratio of the sum of the gamma bands for v-prime = 0 to the sum of the delta bands for v-prime = 0 is used to derive a branching ratio of 0.21 + or - 0.04 to the A 2 Sigma + state, which yields a probability for the C-A transition of 5.6 + or - 1.5 x to the 6th/sec.

  4. Nitric oxide enhancement strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Nathan S

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that many diseases are characterized or associated with perturbations in nitric oxide (NO) production/signaling. Therapeutics or strategies designed to restore normal NO homeostasis will likely have broad application and utility. This highly complex and multistep pathway for NO production and subsequent target activation provides many steps in the endogenous pathway that may be useful targets for drug development for cardiovascular disease, antimicrobial, cancer, wound healing, etc. This article will summarize known strategies that are currently available or in development for enhancing NO production or availability in the human body. Each strategy will be discussed including exogenous sources of NO, use of precursors to promote NO production and downstream pathways affected by NO production with advantages and disadvantages highlighted for each. Development of NO-based therapeutics is and will continue to be a major focus of biotech, academia as well as pharmaceutical companies. Application of safe and effective strategies will certainly transform health and disease. PMID:28031863

  5. Coronary action of endothelin-1 and vasopressin during acute hypertension in anesthetized goats. Role of nitric oxide and prostanoids.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Nuria; Martínez, María Angeles; García-Villalón, Angel Luis; Monge, Luis; Diéguez, Godofredo

    2004-01-01

    Coronary reactivity to endothelin-1 and vasopressin during acute, moderate hypertension, and the role of nitric oxide (NO) and prostanoids in this reactivity was examined in anesthetized goats. Left circumflex coronary flow was electromagnetically measured, and hypertension was induced by constriction of the thoracic aorta in animals nontreated (7 goats) or treated with the inhibitor of NO synthesis Nw-nitro-L-arginine methyl esther (L-NAME, 6 goats) or the cyclooxygenase inhibitor meclofenamate (6 goats). Under normotension (19 animals), basal mean values for mean arterial pressure and coronary vascular conductance (CVC) were 89+/-3 mm Hg and 0.36+/-0.038 ml/min/mm Hg, respectively. Endothelin-1 (0.01-0.3 nmol) and vasopressin (0.03-1 microg) dose-dependently decreased CVC, which, for endothelin-1 ranged from 5+/-1% (0.01 nmol; P<0.01) to 66+/-4% (0.3 nmol; P<0.001) and for vasopressin ranged from 9+/-1% (0.03 microg P<0.01) to 41+/-3% (1 microg; P<0.001). During nontreated and treated hypertension, mean arterial pressure increased to approximately 130 mmHg (P<0.01), and CVC decreased (17%) only during L-NAME-treated hypertension. The effects of endothelin-1 and vasopressin on CVC were decreased by approximately 50% during nontreated hypertension, and this was abolished by L-NAME and was not affected by meclofenamate. Therefore, during acute, moderate hypertension, the coronary vasoconstriction to endothelin-1 and vasopressin is attenuated, which may be related with increased NO release but not with prostanoids.

  6. Reduction of death rate due to acute myocardial infarction in subjects with cancers through systemic restoration of impaired nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Ray, Udayan; Jana, Pradipta; Bhattacharya, Rabindra; Banerjee, Debipriya; Sinha, Asru

    2014-01-01

    Excessive aggregation of platelets at the site of plaque rupture on the coronary artery led to the formation of thrombus which is reported to precipitate acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to inhibit platelet aggregation and induce thrombolysis through the in situ formation of plasmin. As the plasma NO level in AMI patients from two different ethnic groups was reduced to 0 µM (median) compared to 4.0 µM (median) in normal controls, the effect of restoration of the NO level to normal ranges on the rate of death due to AMI was determined. The restoration of plasma NO level was achieved by a sticking small cotton pad (10×25 mm) containing 0.28 mmol sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in 0.9% NaCl to the abdominal skin of the participants using non-toxic adhesive tape which was reported to normalize the plasma NO level. The participants (8,283) were volunteers in an independent study who had different kinds of cancers and did not wish to use any conventional therapy for their condition but opted to receive SNP "pad" for their condition for 3 years. The use of SNP "pad" which normalized (≈4.0 µM) the plasma NO level that in consequence reduced the death rate due to AMI, among the participants, was found to be significantly reduced compared to the death due to AMI in normal population. Our data suggested that the use of SNP "pad" significantly reduced the death due to AMI. www.ctri.nic.in CTRI/2013/12/004236.

  7. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase is protective in the initiation of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    DiMagno, Matthew J; Williams, John A; Hao, Yibai; Ernst, Stephen A; Owyang, Chung

    2004-07-01

    The effect of inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) or enhancing NO on the course of acute pancreatitis (AP) is controversial, in part because three NOS isoforms exist: neuronal (nNOS), endothelial (eNOS), and inducible (iNOS). We investigated whether inhibition or selective gene deletion of NOS isoforms modified the initiation phase of caerulein-induced AP in mice and explored whether this affected pancreatic microvascular blood flow (PMBF). We investigated the effects of nonspecific NOS inhibition with N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA; 10 mg/kg ip) or targeted deletion of eNOS, nNOS, or iNOS genes on the initiation phase of caerulein-induced AP in mice using in vivo and in vitro models. Western blot analysis was performed to assess eNOS phosphorylation status, an indicator of enzyme activity, and microsphere studies were used to measure PMBF. l-NNA and eNOS deletion, but not nNOS or iNOS deletion, increased pancreatic trypsin activity and serum lipase during the initiation phase of in vivo caerulein-induced AP. l-NNA and eNOS did not affect trypsin activity in caerulein-hyperstimulated isolated acini, suggesting that nonacinar events mediate the effect of NOS blockade in vivo. The initiation phase of AP in wild-type mice was associated with eNOS Thr(495) residue dephosphorylation, which accompanies eNOS activation, and a 178% increase in PMBF; these effects were absent in eNOS-deleted mice. Thus eNOS is the main isoform influencing the initiation of caerulein-induced AP. eNOS-derived NO exerts a protective effect through actions on nonacinar cell types, most likely endothelial cells, to produce greater PMBF.

  8. The role of the hypothalamic nitric oxide in the pressor responses elicited by acute environmental stress in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Kawa, T; Takeda, K; Harada, S; Hatta, T; Moriguchi, J; Miki, S; Morimoto, S; Itoh, H; Nakata, T; Sasaki, S; Nakagawa, M

    2002-08-09

    We quantitatively investigated the change in nitric oxide (NO) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and its effect on cardiovascular regulation during shaker stress (SS) using brain microdialysis in awake rats. Male Wistar rats were fed either N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 0.7 g/L) or tap water for 2 weeks. Two days after implantation of an arterial catheter and guide shaft, a microdialysis probe was placed to perfuse the PVN with degassed Ringer solution at 2 microl/min in awake normotensive Wistar (CONTROL) and chronic L-NAME-treated hypertensive rats. After the rat was placed in a plastic cage set on a shaker, the blood pressure and heart rate was monitored and 10-min SS was loaded at a frequency of 200 cycles/min. Dialysate samples were analyzed by NO analyzer (based on the Griess reaction) every 10 min, and NOx (NO(2)(-) + NO(3)(-)) was measured. Plasma NOx was also measured before and after SS. Pressor responses elicited by SS were significantly greater in L-NAME-treated rats than in the CONTROL. Although NOx in the PVN dialysate were increased by SS in the CONTROL, these responses were attenuated in chronic L-NAME-treated rats. Resting plasma NOx were higher in the CONTROL than in L-NAME-treated rats. SS elicited no difference between two groups in plasma NOx. These results indicated that NO within the PVN, but not in systemic circulation, may play a role on the attenuation of the pressor responses elicited by SS. The dysfunction of NO release within the PVN may, in part, play a role in the exaggerated pressor responses in acute environmental stress.

  9. Preconditioning induced by gentamicin protects against acute kidney injury: The role of prostaglandins but not nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Pessoa, Edson A.; Convento, Marcia B.; Ribas, Otoniel S.; Tristao, Vivian R.; Reis, Luciana Aparecida; Borges, Fernanda T.; Schor, Nestor

    2011-05-15

    Nephrotoxicity is the main side effect of gentamicin (GENTA). Preconditioning (PC) refers to a situation in which an organ subjected to an injury responds less intensely when exposed to another injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of PC with GENTA on nephrotoxic acute kidney injury (AKI). GENTA group rats were injected daily with GENTA (40 mg/kg/BW) for 10 days. PC animals were injected with GENTA for 3 days (40 mg/kg/BW/daily) and, after one rest week, were injected daily with GENTA for 10 days. Animals of the L-NAME and DICLO groups were preconditioned for 3 days and then received daily injections of GENTA for 10 days; they were concomitantly treated with L-NAME (10 mg/kg/BW) and diclofenac (DICLO, 5 mg/kg/BW) for 13 days. Blood and urine were collected for measurement of serum creatinine, urea, urine sodium, protein, hydroperoxides, lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide (NO). The animals were killed; kidneys were removed for histology and immunohistochemistry for apoptosis and cell proliferation. GENTA group rats showed an increase in plasma creatinine, urea, urine sodium, hydroperoxides, lipid peroxidation, proteinuria, necrosis and apoptosis, characterizing nephrotoxic AKI. PC animals showed a decrease in these parameters and increased proliferation. The blockade of NO synthesis by L-NAME potentiated the protective effect, suggesting that NO contributed to the injury caused by GENTA. The blockade of prostaglandin synthesis with DICLO increased serum and urinary parameters, blunting the protective effect of PC. Our data suggest that PC could be a useful tool to protect against nephrotoxic AKI.

  10. The effect of acute aripiprazole treatment on chemically and electrically induced seizures in mice: The role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Shafaroodi, Hamed; Oveisi, Simin; Hosseini, Mahsa; Niknahad, Hossein; Moezi, Leila

    2015-07-01

    Aripiprazole is an antipsychotic drug which acts through dopamine and serotonin receptors. Aripiprazole was noted to have antiseizure effects in a study on mice, while it induced seizures in a few human case reports. Dopaminergic and serotonergic systems relate to nitric oxide, and aripiprazole also has effects on dopamine and serotonin receptors. This study investigated the effects of aripiprazole on seizures and the potential role of nitric oxide in the process. The following three models were examined to explore the role of aripiprazole on seizures in mice: 1 - pentylenetetrazole administered intravenously, 2 - pentylenetetrazole administered intraperitoneally, and 3 - electroshock. Aripiprazole administration delayed clonic seizure in intravenous and intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole models. In the electroshock-induced seizure model, tonic seizure and mortality protection percent were increased after aripiprazole administration. In intraperitoneal administration of pentylenetetrazole, aripiprazole effects on clonic seizure latency were significantly decreased when l-NAME - a nonselective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole - a selective neuronal NOS (nNOS) inhibitor, or aminoguanidine - a selective inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibitor was injected before aripiprazole administration. In the intravenous pentylenetetrazole method, administration of l-NAME or aminoguanidine inhibited aripiprazole effects on clonic seizure threshold. Aminoguanidine or l-NAME administration decreased aripiprazole-induced protection against tonic seizures and death in the electroshock model. In both intravenous and intraperitoneal seizure models, aripiprazole and l-arginine coadministration delayed the onset of clonic seizures. Moreover, it increased protection against tonic seizures and death in intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole and electroshock models. In conclusion, the release of nitric oxide via iNOS or nNOS may be involved in anticonvulsant properties of

  11. Hierarchical change in antioxidant enzyme gene expression and activity in acute cardiac rejection: role of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Nilakantan, Vani; Zhou, Xianghua; Hilton, Gail; Roza, Allan M; Adams, Mark B; Johnson, Christopher P; Pieper, Galen M

    2005-02-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen may mediate inflammation injury, but the status of the antioxidant defense system that might influence this process is unknown. In the present study, we examined the expression profile of the antioxidant enzymes, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in acutely rejecting cardiac allografts and the potential role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in modulating antioxidant gene expression and activity. Donor hearts from Lewis (isograft) or Wistar-Furth (allograft) rats were transplanted into Lewis recipient rats. A subset of the allografts received L-N6-(1-imino-ethyl) lysine (L-NIL), a specific iNOS inhibitor, beginning the day of surgery until the day of harvesting. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) protein levels were significantly decreased by postoperative day 4 (POD4) and postoperative day 5 (POD5), respectively, in allografts compared to isografts. While CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZn SOD) levels were unchanged, there was a 50% decrease in MnSOD protein in allografts at postoperative day 6 (POD6). The sequential loss in antioxidant protein levels was not due to transcriptional regulation since there was no change in RNA levels for any of the genes tested. L-NIL did not alter catalase protein; however, the loss of MnSOD protein at POD6 was prevented by L-NIL. Consistent with a decrease in antioxidant protein levels, there was a sequential loss in enzyme activity for MnSOD, catalase and GPX. L-NIL however, restored MnSOD and GPX activities but not catalase activity. Treatment with CsA restored both protein and enzyme activities of GPX and MnSOD but not catalase. These results indicate that the loss in MnSOD and GPX protein and activity in allografts occurs via an iNOS-dependent mechanism whereas the decrease in catalase appears to be iNOS-independent. This suggests a differential role for iNOS in regulating post-translational modification of individual antioxidant enzymes

  12. Participation of nitric oxide and cyclic GMP in the supersensitivity of acute diabetic rat myocardium by cholinergic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wald, M R; Borda, E S; Sterin-Borda, L

    1998-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to explore the pharmacological and biochemical mechanisms involved in diabetic cardiomyopathy, with particular interest in the abnormal function of cholinergic neurotransmission at the onset of the pathology. The muscarinic acethylcholine agonist carbachol showed a negative inotropic response on both normal and diabetic isolated atria, but the latter showed a supersensitive response. No changes were found in muscarinic acethylcholine receptor (mAChR) expression. Measurements of mAChR-associated second messengers indicated no significant differences between normal and diabetic rat atria in the stimulatory effect of carbachol on protein kinase C activity and the production of inositol phosphates, or in the inhibitory effect induced by carbachol on cyclic AMP (cAMP) production. On the contrary, nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity and cyclic GMP production were higher in diabetic cardiac preparations than in normal ones. Moreover, in diabetic atria, nitric oxide synthase and guanylate cyclase inhibitors shifted the carbachol concentration-response curve on contractility to the right, reaching values similar to those of normal atria. These results suggest an early alteration in the mACh system during the diabetic state, associated with increased production of nitric oxide and cyclic GMP (cGMP). This, in turn, could increase the biological mechanical activity of the mAChR agonist, inducing in this way a higher pharmacological response, without changes in mAChR expression.

  13. Temporal profiles of blood pressure, circulating nitric oxide, and adrenomedullin as predictors of clinical outcome in acute ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    SERRANO-PONZ, MARTA; RODRIGO-GASQUÉ, CARMEN; SILES, EVA; MARTÍNEZ-LARA, ESTHER; OCHOA-CALLEJERO, LAURA; MARTÍNEZ, ALFREDO

    2016-01-01

    Stroke remains an important health and social challenge. The present study investigated whether blood pressure (BP) parameters and circulating levels of nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) and adrenomedullin (AM) may predict clinical outcomes of stroke. Patients (n=76) diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke were admitted to the stroke unit and clinical history data and monitored parameters were recorded. Blood plasma was collected at days 1, 2, and 7 to measure NOx and AM levels. Infarct volume, neurological severity [on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS)], and functional prognosis (on the Rankin scale) were measured as clinical outcomes. Patients with higher BP had more severe symptoms (NIHSS >3; P<0.01) and BP variability predicted neurological severity and growth of infarct volume. NOx values were significantly lower in stroke patients than in healthy controls (P<0.01). An increase in NOx levels from day 1 to day 2 was beneficial for the patients as measured by NIHSS at 7 days and 3 months, and by Rankin at 3 months [odds ratio (OR), 0.91] whereas a steep increase from day 2 to day 7 was detrimental and associated with an increase in infarct volume (OR, 35.3). AM levels were significantly higher in patients at day 1 and 2 than in healthy individuals (P<0.01) and these levels returned to normal at day 7. Patients with high AM levels at day 2 had significantly higher NIHSS scores measured at day 1 (P<0.05) and 7 (P<0.01). A receiving operating characteristic curve analysis identified that AM levels at day 2 of >522.13 pg/ml predicted increased neurological severity at day 7 (area under the curve=0.721). Multivariate logistic regression indicated that AM levels at day 2 predicted increased neurological severity at 7 days and at 3 months. BP parameters and changing levels for NOx and AM predicted long-term clinical outcomes as measured by infarct volume, neurological severity scale, and functional prognosis. PMID:27035412

  14. TNF-α dependent production of inducible nitric oxide is involved in PGE1 protection against acute liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Muntane, J; Rodriguez, F; Segado, O; Quintero, A; Lozano, J; Siendones, E; Pedraza, C; Delgado, M; O'Valle, F; Garcia, R; Montero, J; De la Mata, M; Mino, G

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and nitric oxide modulate damage in several experimental models of liver injury. We have previously shown that protection against D-galactosamine (D-GalN) induced liver injury by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) was accompanied by an increase in TNF-α and nitrite/nitrate in serum.
AIMS—The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of TNF-α and nitric oxide during protection by PGE1 of liver damage induced by D-GalN.
METHODS—Liver injury was induced in male Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of 1 g/kg of D-GalN. PGE1 was administered 30 minutes before D-GalN. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was inhibited by methylisothiourea (MT), and TNF-α concentration in serum was lowered by administration of anti-TNF-α antibodies. Liver injury was evaluated by alanine aminotransferase activity in serum, and histological examination and DNA fragmentation in liver. TNF-α and nitrite/nitrate concentrations were determined in serum. Expression of TNF-α and iNOS was also assessed in liver sections.
RESULTS—PGE1 decreased liver injury and increased TNF-α and nitrite/nitrate concentrations in serum of rats treated with D-GalN. PGE1 protection was related to enhanced expression of TNF-α and iNOS in hepatocytes. Administration of anti-TNF-α antibodies or MT blocked the protection by PGE1 of liver injury induced by D-GalN.
CONCLUSIONS—This study suggests that prior administration of PGE1 to D-GalN treated animals enhanced expression of TNF-α and iNOS in hepatocytes, and that this was causally related to protection by PGE1 against D-GalN induced liver injury.


Keywords: tumour necrosis factor α; nitric oxide; prostaglandin E1; methylisothiourea; D-galactosamine; liver injury PMID:10986217

  15. The dimethylarginine (ADMA)/nitric oxide pathway in the brain and periphery of rats with thioacetamide-induced acute liver failure: Modulation by histidine.

    PubMed

    Milewski, Krzysztof; Hilgier, Wojciech; Albrecht, Jan; Zielińska, Magdalena

    2015-09-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is related to variations in the nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and oxidative/nitrosative stress (ONS), and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthases (NOSs). In the present study we compared the effects of acute liver failure (ALF) in the rat TAA model on ADMA concentration in plasma and cerebral cortex, and on the activity and expression of the ADMA degrading enzyme, dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH), in brain and liver. ALF increased blood and brain ADMA, and the increase was correlated with decreased DDAH activity in both brain and liver. An i.p. administration of histidine (His), an amino acid reported to alleviate oxidative stress associated with HE (100 mg/kg b.w.), reversed the increase of brain ADMA, which was accompanied by the recovery of brain DDAH activity (determined ex vivo), and with an increase of the total NOS activity. His also activated DDAH ex vivo in brain homogenates derived from control and TAA rats. ALF in this model was also accompanied by increases of blood cyclooxygenase activity and blood and brain TNF-α content, markers of the inflammatory response in the periphery, but these changes were not affected by His, except for the reduction of TNF-α mRNA transcript in the brain. His increased the total antioxidant capacity of the brain cortex, but not of the blood, further documenting its direct neuroprotective power.

  16. Acute cocoa Flavanols intake has minimal effects on exercise-induced oxidative stress and nitric oxide production in healthy cyclists: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Decroix, Lieselot; Tonoli, Cajsa; Soares, Danusa Dias; Descat, Amandine; Drittij-Reijnders, Marie-José; Weseler, Antje R; Bast, Aalt; Stahl, Wilhelm; Heyman, Elsa; Meeusen, Romain

    2017-01-01

    Cocoa flavanols (CF) can stimulate vasodilation by improved nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacities. This study aimed to examine whether acute CF intake can affect exercise-induced changes in antioxidant capacity, oxidative stress, inflammation and NO production, as well as exercise performance and recovery in well-trained cyclists. Twelve well-trained male cyclists (mean ± SD age, VO2max: 30 ± 3 years, 63.0 ± 3.5 ml/kg/min) participated in this randomized, double-blind, cross over study. On 2 separate occasions, subjects performed two 30-min time trials 1.5 (TT1) and 3 (TT2) hours after CF (900 mg CF) or placebo (PL, 13 mg CF) intake, interposed by passive rest. Lactate, glucose, heartrate, rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and power output were measured during the TTs. Blood was drawn at baseline, before and after each TT and analyzed for epicatechin serum concentrations, trolox equivalent antioxidative capacity (TEAC), uric acid (UA), malonaldehyde (MDA), L-arginine/ADMA, citrulline, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α plasma concentrations. Relative changes in blood markers and pacing strategy during TT were analysed by repeated measured ANOVA. TT performance was compared between PL and CF by paired t-test. Epicatechin concentrations were increased by CF intake. Exercise-induced increase in TEAC/UA was improved by CF intake (F(1) = 5.57; p = .038) (post-TT1: PL: 113.34 ± 3.9%, CF: 117.64 ± 3.96%, post-TT2: PL: 108.59 ± 3.95%, CF: 123.72 ± 7.4% to baseline), while exercise-induced increases in MDA, IL-1 and IL-6 were not affected by CF intake. TNF-α was unaltered by exercise and by CF. Exercise-induced decreases in L-arginine/ADMA and increases in citrulline were not affected by CF intake. TT1 and TT2 performance and exercise-induced physiological changes were unaffected by CF intake. Acute CF intake increased total antioxidant capacity in rest and during exercise

  17. [Nitric oxide production in plants].

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Urszula

    2007-01-01

    There are still many controversial observations and opinions on the cellular/subcellular localization and sources of endogenous nitric oxide synthesis in plant cells. NO can be produced in plants by non-enzymatic and enzymatic systems depending on plant species, organ or tissue as well as on physiological state of the plant and changing environmental conditions. The best documented reactions in plant that contribute to NO production are NO production from nitrite as a substrate by cytosolic (cNR) and membrane bound (PM-NR) nitrate reductases (NR), and NO production by several arginine-dependent nitric oxide synthase-like activities (NOS). The latest papers indicate that mitochondria are an important source of arginine- and nitrite-dependent NO production in plants. There are other potential enzymatic sources of NO in plants including xanthine oxidoreductase, peroxidase, cytochrome P450.

  18. Nitric oxide reburning with methane

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpaty, S.K.; Subramanian, K.

    1996-12-31

    This paper deals with initial findings from the ongoing, three-year DOE program that began on 02/01/1995. The program involves computer simulation studies to aid in planning and conducting a series of experiments that will extend the knowledge of reburning process. The objective of this work is to find nitric oxide reduction effectiveness for various reburning fuels and identify both homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction mechanisms characterizing NO reduction.

  19. Nitric oxide and airway reactivity.

    PubMed

    Strapkova, A; Nosalova, G

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a neurotransmitter of the inhibitory nonadrenergic noncholinergic mediation in the respiratory system. Its participation in the regulation of airways functions is determined by its level in the organism. We examined participation of nitric oxide in the changes of the airway reactivity evoked by toluene exposure as the source of the free radicals. The changes of nitric oxide level in the organism were evoked by administration of its indirect donor isosorbide dinitrate. Thiol groups were provided by administration of antioxidative mucolytic N-acetylcysteine. Used drugs--isosorbide dinitrate (5 mg/kg b.w.) and N-acetylcysteine (300 mg/kg b.w.) were administered intraperitoneally or by inhalation 30 minutes before each exposure to the toluene vapours. The control group was not treated with drugs. After toluene exposure (2 hours in each of 3 consecutive days) tracheal and lung strips smooth muscle reactivity to histamine was observed under in "in vitro" conditions. The administration of isosorbide dinitrate decreased especially the lung strip smooth muscle reactivity to histamine. We revealed more expressive effect of the pretreatment with intraperitoneally administered isosorbide dinitrate in the comparison with inhalation. Simultaneous pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine intensified beneficial effect of isosorbide dinitrate probably by increasing of the intracellullary level of thiols. In our experimental conditions possible participation of nitric oxide in changes of airways smooth muscle reactivity after exposure to the toluene follows from results, as well as the importance of thiol groups for the activity of its indirect donors. (Fig. 6, Tab. 3, Ref. 35.)

  20. Nitric Oxide Production in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Planchet, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    There is now general agreement that nitric oxide (NO) is an important and almost universal signal in plants. Nevertheless, there are still many controversial observations and opinions on the importance and function of NO in plants. Partly, this may be due to the difficulties in detecting and even more in quantifying NO. Here, we summarize major pathways of NO production in plants, and briefly discuss some methodical problems. PMID:19521475

  1. Nitric oxide and the common cold.

    PubMed

    Proud, David

    2005-02-01

    The common cold is a clinical syndrome triggered by a variety of viral pathogens, but rhinoviruses are the most frequent cause. Complications of such infections include sinusitis, otitis media, and exacerbations of asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease. There is growing interest in host innate defence responses that may regulate the severity of viral responses. We will review recent evidence that nitric oxide is an important contributor to the host response during colds. Infection of human airway epithelial cells with human rhinovirus has been shown to lead to the increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase both in vitro and in vivo. This increase in epithelial inducible nitric oxide synthase correlates with increased levels of nitric oxide in exhaled air. Importantly, nitric oxide can inhibit human rhinovirus-induced epithelial expression of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and can inhibit viral replication in epithelial cells in vitro. Moreover, nitric oxide can modulate several signal transduction pathways that are associated with cytokine generation. Nitric oxide can also nitrosylate viral proteases and can interact with the immune system. Consistent with these observations, pilot studies have indicated that the increased generation of nitric oxide during rhinovirus infections is associated with fewer symptoms and more rapid viral clearance. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the role of nitric oxide in colds and to determine whether the administration of nitric oxide donor compounds could be a viable therapeutic approach for viral exacerbations of airway diseases.

  2. Nitric oxide: a challenge to chiropractic

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Lon

    2000-01-01

    The 1998 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine recognized the biological significance of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide is derived from the amino acid arginine. It is intimately involved with circulatory vessel dilation where, for example, it protects against heart attacks, and is the basis for new medications such as Sildenafil (Viagra). Nitric oxide acts as a neurotransmitter and can modulate many neurological reactions. The immune system uses nitric oxide to destroy pathogens by interfering with key enzymes. Nitric oxide is responsible for both osteoclastic and osteoblastic responses in bone and is a key player in the degenerative aspects of arthritis. The process of apoptosis employs nitric oxide in the orderly removal of unneeded cells. There is clear evidence that major signaling and control mechanisms exist in the body apart from the nervous system. Chiropractic is thus faced with the challenge of how to incorporate this new knowledge which conflicts with traditional chiropractic concepts.

  3. Exhaled nitric oxide in children after accidental exposure to chlorine gas.

    PubMed

    Grasemann, Hartmut; Tschiedel, Eva; Groch, Manuela; Klepper, Jörg; Ratjen, Felix

    2007-08-01

    Chronic exposure to chlorine gas has been shown to cause occupational asthma. Acute inhalation of chlorine is known to cause airway inflammation and induce airway nitric oxide formation. Exhaled nitric oxide may therefore be a marker of airway damage after chlorine gas exposure. After accidental chlorine gas exposure in a swimming pool, exhaled nitric oxide and pulmonary function were repeatedly measured in 18 children over a 1-mo period. Symptomatic children with impaired pulmonary function had higher nitric oxide levels on the day after the exposure compared to day 8 and day 28. Differences in exhaled nitric oxide were more pronounced at a higher exhalation flow compared to lower flow, suggesting peripheral rather than central airway damage. This was in accordance with the observed changes in pulmonary function. No changes in exhaled nitric oxide were seen in asymptomatic children. These data suggest that acute chlorine gas exposure results in a mild increase of exhaled nitric oxide in symptomatic children.

  4. Different effects of dexamethasone and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME on caerulein-induced rat acute pancreatitis, depending on the severity.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yusuke; Kato, Shinichi; Abe, Mitsumasa; Mitsufuji, Shoji; Takeuchi, Koji

    2005-01-01

    Effects of dexamethasone and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, on caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis were examined in rats. Acute pancreatitis was induced by caerulein (20 mug/kg, s.c.) given repeatedly 2 or 4 times every hour, and serum amylase levels, pancreas weight and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were measured 6 h after the first injection of caerulein. Dexamethasone (3 mg/kg) and L-NAME (30 mg/kg) were administered p.o. 30 min before the first injection of caerulein. Caerulein caused moderate or severe pancreatitis, depending on the times of injections, resulting in different degrees of increase in serum amylase levels and pancreas weight, and the marked elevation of MPO activity was observed only after injections of caerulein given 4 times per hour. Both dexamethasone and L-NAME suppressed the severity of pancreatits, yet the effect of L-NAME as compared with dexamethasone was more potent against mild pancreatitis but less potent against severe pancreatitis. These results suggest that caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis shows different responsiveness to L-NAME and dexamethasone, depending on the severity; the former is more effective against pancreatitis with less inflammation, while the latter is more effective against pancreatitis with severe inflammation. It is assumed that endogenous NO may be involved in oedema formation as the early event in the development of acute pancreatitis.

  5. Nitric oxide in marine photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Castellano, Immacolata; Patti, Francesco Paolo; Palumbo, Anna; Buia, Maria Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Nitric oxide is a versatile and powerful signaling molecule in plants. However, most of our understanding stems from studies on terrestrial plants and very little is known about marine autotrophs. This review summarizes current knowledge about the source of nitric oxide synthesis in marine photosynthetic organisms and its role in various physiological processes under normal and stress conditions. The interactions of nitric oxide with other stress signals and cross talk among secondary messengers are also highlighted.

  6. The nitric oxide producing reactions of hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    King, S Bruce

    2003-03-01

    Hydroxyurea is used to treat a variety of cancers and sickle cell disease. Despite this widespread use, a complete mechanistic understanding of the beneficial actions of this compound remains to be understood. Hydroxyurea inhibits ribonucleotide reductase and increases the levels of fetal hemoglobin, which explains a portion of the effects of this drug. Administration of hydroxyurea to patients results in a significant increase in levels of iron nitrosyl hemoglobin, nitrite and nitrate suggesting the in vivo metabolism of hydroxyurea to nitric oxide. Formation of nitric oxide from hydroxyurea may explain a portion of the observed effects of hydroxyurea treatment. At the present, the mechanism or mechanisms of nitric oxide release, the identity of the in vivo oxidant and the site of metabolism remain to be identified. Chemical oxidation of hydroxyurea produces nitric oxide and nitroxyl, the one-electron reduced form of nitric oxide. These oxidative pathways generally proceed through the nitroxide radical (2) or C-nitrosoformamide (3). Biological oxidants, including both iron and copper containing enzymes and proteins, also convert hydroxyurea to nitric oxide or its decomposition products in vitro and these reactions also occur through these intermediates. A number of other reactions of hydroxyurea including the reaction with ribonucleotide reductase and irradiation demonstrate the potential to release nitric oxide and should be further investigated. Gaining an understanding of the metabolism of hydroxyurea to nitric oxide will provide valuable information towards the treatment of these disorders and may lead to the development of better therapeutic agents.

  7. New concepts in vascular nitric oxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Oeckler, R A; Wolin, M S

    2000-09-01

    Low levels of nitric oxide (NO) control the activities of guanylate cyclase and mitochondrial respiration. Increasing NO levels interact with multiple signaling systems through the formation of peroxynitrite and other oxidation products. Signaling mechanisms linked to NO participate in the prevention of acute responses such as vasoconstriction, thrombosis and the recruitment of inflammatory cells. In contrast, processes related to vascular remodeling, and responses to injury that are associated with the progression and adaptation to disease processes, are not as well understood. Many of the opposing processes involved in these adaptations may originate from the diverse signaling mechanisms that NO and its oxidized products can regulate in a cell-specific manner in the vessel wall.

  8. Study of Atmospheric Nitric Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalgarno, A.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the contribution of energetic nitrogen atoms to the production of nitric oxide in the thermosphere and their influence on the infrared emission spectrum. The nitric oxide molecules are important contributors to the cooling of the atmosphere. We first pointed out that in determining the energy distribution of the nitrogen atoms, it is important to take into account the thermal motion of the atmospheric gases. It had been ignored in all earlier studies. The source spectra are broadened considerably by the center of mass motion of the reactants. We worked out the consequences for the production of nitric oxide at night, using as sources of energetic N atoms, NO(+) + e yield N + O, N(D-2) + O yield N + O. The high energy tail is enhanced by orders of magnitude. We had earlier suggested (Sharma et al. 1993) that the reaction of energetic nitrogen atoms with O2 was responsible for the rotationally enhanced NO identified in the infrared spectrum. Our calculations provided quantitative confirmation of the suggestion. We proceeded to explore the validity of another approximation used in earlier analyses, the hard sphere approximation for the energy loss in elastic collisions. We carried out precise quantum mechanical calculations of the elastic 2 differential scattering of nitrogen atoms in collisions with oxygen atoms and showed that although the hard sphere approximation was nowhere of high precision, reasonable results could be obtained with an effective cross section of 6 x 10(exp 15)sq cm. We also initiated a program to include inelastic energy loss processes in the determination of the energy distribution function. We began a calculation of the rotation and vibrational excitation cross sections of molecular nitrogen and nitrogen atoms and developed a method for including inelastic energy loss as a function of scattering angle in the Boltzmann equation. A procedure for obtaining the solution of the Boltzman equation was worked out.

  9. Development and characterization of glutamyl-protected N-hydroxyguanidines as reno-active nitric oxide donor drugs with therapeutic potential in acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingzhi; Milliken, Philip; Kulczynska, Agnieszka; Slawin, Alex M Z; Gordon, Adele; Kirkby, Nicholas S; Webb, David J; Botting, Nigel P; Megson, Ian L

    2013-07-11

    Acute renal failure (ARF) has high mortality and no effective treatment. Nitric oxide (NO) delivery represents a credible means of preventing the damaging effects of vasoconstriction, central to ARF, but design of drugs with the necessary renoselectivity is challenging. Here, we developed N-hydroxyguanidine NO donor drugs that were protected against spontaneous NO release by linkage to glutamyl adducts that could be cleaved by γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT), found predominantly in renal tissue. Parent NO donor drug activity was optimized in advance of glutamyl adduct prodrug design. A lead compound that was a suitable substrate for γ-GT-mediated deprotection was identified. Metabolism of this prodrug to the active parent compound was confirmed in rat kidney homogenates, and the prodrug was shown to be an active vasodilator in rat isolated perfused kidneys (EC50 ~50 μM). The data confirm that glutamate protection of N-hydroxyguanidines is an approach that might hold promise in ARF.

  10. Investigation of the role of nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase pathway in ascorbic acid-mediated protection against acute kidney injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Koul, Vaishali; Kaur, Anudeep; Singh, Amrit Pal

    2015-08-01

    The present study investigated the possible involvement of nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase (NO/sGC) pathway in ascorbic acid (AA)-mediated protection against acute kidney injury (AKI) in rats. The rats were subjected to bilateral renal ischemia by occluding renal pedicles for 40 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h. The AKI was assessed in terms of measuring creatinine clearance (CrCl), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), plasma uric acid, potassium level, fractional excretion of sodium (FeNa), and microproteinuria. The NO level and oxidative stress in renal tissues were assessed by measuring myeloperoxidase activity, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, superoxide anion generation, and reduced glutathione level. AA (50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered for 3 days before subjecting rats to AKI. In separate groups, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, L-NAME (20 mg/kg, i.p.) and sGC inhibitor, methylene blue (50 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered prior to AA treatment in rats. The significant decrease in CrCl and increase in BUN, plasma uric acid, potassium, FeNa, microproteinuria, and oxidative stress in renal tissues demonstrated ischemia-reperfusion-induced AKI in rats. The AA treatment ameliorated ischemia-reperfusion-induced AKI along with the increase in renal NO level. The pretreatment with L-NAME and methylene blue abolished protective effect of AA. It is concluded that AA protects against ischemia-reperfusion-induced AKI. Moreover, the NO/sGC pathway finds its definite involvement in AA-mediated reno-protective effect.

  11. Novel effects of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, K. L.; Martin, E.; Turko, I. V.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a simple free radical gas, elicits a surprisingly wide range of physiological and pathophysiological effects. NO interacts with soluble guanylate cyclase to evoke many of these effects. However, NO can also interact with molecular oxygen and superoxide radicals to produce reactive nitrogen species that can modify a number of macromolecules including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. NO can also interact directly with transition metals. Here, we have reviewed the non--3',5'-cyclic-guanosine-monophosphate-mediated effects of NO including modifications of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids.

  12. [Nitric oxide in dengue pathology].

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ortega, M

    1998-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a multifunctional molecule that is involved in citotoxic as well as citoprotective processes, it's synthesis is highly regulated by the cell because an alteration in NO production is associated with a variety of pathologies, such as Septic, Anaphylactic and Hemorrhagic Shock. The clinical feature of dengue virus infection has a spectrum that goes from mild, dengue fever, to a severe disease, dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock. Here, some evidences are discussed that links NO with the pathology of the severe disease cause by dengue virus.

  13. Prevention by NCX 4016, a nitric oxide-donating aspirin, but not by aspirin, of the acute endothelial dysfunction induced by exercise in patients with intermittent claudication.

    PubMed

    Gresele, Paolo; Migliacci, Rino; Procacci, Alessandra; De Monte, Paola; Bonizzoni, Erminio

    2007-03-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion damage evokes systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in patients with intermittent claudication. We compared the effects of aspirin with those of a nitric oxide-donating aspirin in preventing the acute, systemic endothelial dysfunction provoked by exercise-induced ischemia of the lower limbs in patients with intermittent claudication. In a prospective, randomized, single-blind, parallel-groups trial among 44 patients with intermittent claudication we compared four weeks of aspirin (100 mg o.d.) with NCX 4016 (800 mg b.i.d.). Primary end point was the exercise-induced changes in brachial flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) at day 28; secondary end points were effort-induced changes of markers of neutrophil (plasma elastase) and endothelial (soluble VCAM-1) activation. Baseline FMD was comparable in the two groups, both on day 1 (pre-treatment: aspirin = 3.1 +/- 0.5%, nitroaspirin = 3.9 +/- 0.7%, p = NS), and on day 28 (aspirin = 3.4 +/- 0.7%, NCX 4016 = 3.2 +/- 0.6%, p = NS). Maximal treadmill exercise induced an acute worsening of FMD in both groups at baseline (aspirin = -1.15%, nitroaspirin = -1.76%); after four weeks treatment, the impairment of FMD induced by exercise was still present in the aspirintreated group (-1.46%) while it was abolished in the NCX 4016-treated group (+0.79%, p = 0.038 vs. aspirin). Similarly, exercise induced an increase of plasma elastase and of sVCAM-1 which were not affected by aspirin while they were suppressed by NCX 4016. Maximal treadmill exercise induces a systemic arterial endothelial dysfunction in patients with intermittent claudication. A nitric oxide-donating aspirin, but not aspirin, prevents effort-induced endothelial dysfunction.

  14. Aged red garlic extract reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 macrophages and acute pulmonary inflammation through haeme oxygenase-1 induction.

    PubMed

    Park, H-J; Jeon, B T; Kim, H C; Roh, G S; Shin, J-H; Sung, N-J; Han, J; Kang, D

    2012-05-01

    It is known that garlic has antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. Aged red garlic (ARG), a novel aged garlic formulation, has higher antioxidant effects than fresh raw garlic. This study was performed to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of ARG extract (ARGE). The anti-inflammatory effects of ARGE were evaluated in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated Raw 264.7 macrophages and acute lung inflammatory mice. NO production was determined by the Griess method, and iNOS, HO-1 and COX-2 expressions were measured using Western blot analysis. Histology and inflammation extent of lung were analysed using haematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. ARGE treatment markedly reduced LPS-induced nitrite production in RAW 264.7 macrophages and reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. Treatment of cells with ARGE led to a significant increase in haeme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression, which was mediated by stimulating the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Treatment with zinc protoporphyrin, a selective inhibitor of HO-1, significantly reversed the ARGE-mediated inhibition of nitrite production (P < 0.05). In LPS-induced inflammatory mice, ARGE treatment down-regulated iNOS and COX-2 expressions, while it up-regulated HO-1 expression. These results show that ARGE reduces LPS-induced nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 macrophages through HO-1 induction and suggest that ARGE may have potential effects on prevention and treatment of acute inflammatory lung injury. © 2012 The Authors Acta Physiologica © 2012 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  15. Exhaled Nitric Oxide in Acute Phase of Bronchiolitis and Its Relation with Episodes of Subsequent Wheezing in Children of Preschool Age.

    PubMed

    Peña Zarza, Jose Antonio; Osona, Borja; Gil-Sanchez, Jose Antonio; Figuerola, Joan

    2012-06-01

    BACKGROUND: Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) levels are increased in children with asthma and in infants with recurrent wheezing, but the role of FENO in the acute phase of bronchiolitis is still not defined. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to evaluate FENO values in the acute phase of bronchiolitis, compare them with healthy infants, and relate those values with the appearance of other wheezing episodes. METHODS: FENO values were determined in infants between 2 months and 2 years affected with RVS bronchiolitis by offline method. The FENO values collected in the acute phase were related with the respiratory clinical symptoms presented in the 2 years following the episode. RESULTS: A total of 30 patients were recruited: 15 in the bronchiolitis group and 15 in the control group. The average of the FENO values in the acute phase was 18.74 ppb (range 2-88) in the bronchiolitis group, and 8.75 ppb (range 2-24) in the control group. However, these results showed no significant statistical differences (p=0.176). Nevertheless, we found a positive correlation between the FENO values and the clinical score (Downes) of the bronchiolitis episode (p=0.023). In infants that presented other wheezing episodes in the 2 years after, the average of FENO in the acute phase of the first episode was 23.1 ppb (average of 10.25 ppb) versus 8.4 ppb (average 5.4 ppb) in the group of patients with no other episodes. The comparison of averages has no statistical significance. CONCLUSION: We found no differences in FENO between infants with bronchiolitis and healthy ones. The FENO values in the acute phase seems to be related to the severity of the disease but do not predict the appearance of wheezing episodes in the following 2 years.

  16. Intracoronary Des-Acyl Ghrelin Acutely Increases Cardiac Perfusion Through a Nitric Oxide-Related Mechanism in Female Anesthetized Pigs.

    PubMed

    Grossini, Elena; Raina, Giulia; Farruggio, Serena; Camillo, Lara; Molinari, Claudio; Mary, David; Walker, Gillian Elisabeth; Bona, Gianni; Vacca, Giovanni; Moia, Stefania; Prodam, Flavia; Surico, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    Des-acyl ghrelin (DAG), the most abundant form of ghrelin in humans, has been found to reduce arterial blood pressure and prevent cardiac and endothelial cell apoptosis. Despite this, data regarding its direct effect on cardiac function and coronary blood flow, as well as the related involvement of autonomic nervous system and nitric oxide (NO), are scarce. We therefore examined these issues using both in vivo and in vitro studies. In 20 anesthetized pigs, intracoronary 100 pmol/mL DAG infusion with a constant heart rate and aortic blood pressure, increased coronary blood flow and NO release, whereas reducing coronary vascular resistances (P < .05). Dose responses to DAG were evaluated in five pigs. No effects on cardiac contractility/relaxation or myocardial oxygen consumption were observed. Moreover, whereas the blockade of muscarinic cholinoceptors (n = 5) or α- and β-adrenoceptors (n = 5 each) did not abolish the observed responses, NO synthase inhibition (n = 5) prevented the effects of DAG on coronary blood flow and NO release. In coronary artery endothelial cells, DAG dose dependently increased NO release through cAMP signaling and ERK1/2, Akt, and p38 MAPK involvement as well as the phosphorylation of endothelial NO synthase. In conclusion, in anesthetized pigs, DAG primarily increased cardiac perfusion through the involvement of NO release. Moreover, the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt appears to play roles in eliciting the observed NO production in coronary artery endothelial cells.

  17. Protective effect of resveratrol on acute endotoxemia-induced nephrotoxicity in rat through nitric oxide independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sebai, Hichem; Ben-Attia, Mossadok; Sani, Mamane; Aouani, Ezzedine; Ghanem-Boughanmi, Néziha

    2008-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a glycolipid component of the cell wall of gram negative bacteria inducing deleterious effects on the kidney. Endotoxemia-induced nephrotoxicity is characterized by disturbed intracellular redox balance and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation leading to DNA, proteins and membrane lipid damages. Resveratrol (trans-3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene) is a polyphenol displaying antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This study investigated its effects on LPS-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Resveratrol counteracted all LPS-induced changes in renal haemodynamic parameters. In the kidney resveratrol abrogated LPS-induced lipoperoxidation and antioxidant enzyme activities depletion as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) but not peroxidase (POD) activity. LPS increased plasma and urine nitric oxide (NO) level and resveratrol reversed them. More importantly, LPS-induced iron mobilization from plasma to kidney, which was also abolished by resveratrol treatment. All these results suggest that resveratrol exerted strong antioxidant properties against LPS-induced nephrotoxicity and that its mode of action seemed to involve iron shuttling proteins.

  18. U-Bang-Haequi Tang: A Herbal Prescription that Prevents Acute Inflammation through Inhibition of NF-κB-Mediated Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Hwangbo, Min; Jung, Ji Yun; Ki, Sung Hwan; Park, Sang Mi; Jegal, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Ju-Hee; Kang, Seung Ho; Park, Sun-Dong; Ku, Sae Kwang; Zhao, Rong Jie; Jee, Seon Young

    2014-01-01

    Since antiquity, medical herbs have been prescribed for both treatment and preventative purposes. Herbal formulas are used to reduce toxicity as well as increase efficacy in traditional Korean medicine. U-bang-haequi tang (UBT) is a herbal prescription containing Arctii fructus and Forsythia suspensa as its main components and has treated many human diseases in traditional Korean medicine. This research investigated the effects of UBT against an acute phase of inflammation. For this, we measured induction of nitric oxide (NO) and related proteins in macrophage cell line stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Further, paw swelling was measured in carrageenan-treated rats. Carrageenan significantly induced activation of inflammatory cells and increases in paw volume, whereas oral administration of 0.3 or 1 g/kg/day of UBT inhibited the acute inflammatory response. In RAW264.7 cells, UBT inhibited mRNA and protein expression levels of iNOS. UBT treatment also blocked elevation of NO production, nuclear translocation of NF-κB, phosphorylation of Iκ-Bα induced by LPS. Moreover, UBT treatment significantly blocked the phosphorylation of p38 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases by LPS. In conclusion, UBT prevented both acute inflammation in rats as well as LPS-induced NO and iNOS gene expression through inhibition of NF-κB in RAW264.7 cells. PMID:24959187

  19. CCN1 acutely increases nitric oxide production via integrin αvβ3-Akt-S6K-phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at the serine 1177 signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Soojin; Lee, Hyeon-Ju; Kim, Gyungah; Won, Kyung-Jong; Park, Yoon Shin; Jo, Inho

    2015-12-01

    Although CCN1 (also known as cysteine-rich, angiogenic inducer 61, CYR61) has been reported to promote angiogenesis and neovascularization in endothelial cells (ECs), its effects on endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production have never been studied. Using human umbilical vein ECs, we investigated whether and how CCN1 regulates NO production. CCN1 acutely increased NO production in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) at serine 1177 (eNOS-Ser(1177)), but not that of eNOS-Thr(495) or eNOS-Ser(114). The level of total eNOS expression was unaltered. Treatment with either LY294002, a selective inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase known as an upstream kinase of Akt, or H-89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A, mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1, Rho-associated protein kinase 2, and ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K), inhibited CCN1-stimulated eNOS-Ser(1177) phosphorylation and subsequent NO production. Ectopic expression of small interfering RNA against Akt and S6K significantly inhibited the effects of CCN1. Consistently, CCN1 increased the phosphorylation of Akt-Ser(473) and S6K-Thr(389). However, CCN1 did not alter the expression or secretion of VEGF, a known downstream factor of CCN1 and a potential upstream factor of Akt-mediated eNOS-Ser(1177) phosphorylation. Furthermore, neutralization of integrin αvβ3 with corresponding antibody completely reversed all of the observed effects of CCN1. Moreover, CCN1 increased acetylcholine-induced relaxation in the rat aortas. Finally, we also found that CCN1-stimulated eNOS-Ser(1177) phosphorylation and NO production are true for other types of EC tested. In conclusion, CCN1 acutely increases NO production via activation of a signaling axis in integrin αvβ3-Akt-S6K-eNOS-Ser(1177) phosphorylation, suggesting an important role for CCN1 in vasodilation.

  20. The basics about nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Bruckdorfer, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a gas and a free radical which is now recognised to have very important physiological roles. It is synthesised enzymatically from the amino acid L-arginine in a number of tissues using the three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase, one of which is inducible and can form much large amounts of NO. NO is important in the endothelium-dependent regulation of blood flow and pressure as well as inhibiting the activation of blood platelets. NO is recognised as a neurotransmitter at least in certain types of nerves. Along with other free radicals, NO is also important in the primary defence mechanisms against attack by micro-organisms. NO has a close interaction with iron-containing proteins and binds to haem. By this process NO activates a haem-containing enzyme called soluble guanylyl cyclase which is activated a thousand fold to produce the signalling molecule cyclic GMP. This has many effects at the molecular level to set in train the pathways which propagate the diverse physiological actions of NO. Although this pathway through cyclic GMP is important, this is by no means the only mechanism by which NO influences the activities of the cell. These alternative pathways depend on modification of the structure of enzymes and structural proteins in several different ways. Most of these modifications result from the actions of NO with other free radicals such as oxygen and superoxide anions to produce reactive oxidants. The oxidants modify the proteins by, among others, nitrosation and nitration of proteins of thiol groups and aromatic amino acids respectively. These changes introduce potential new subtleties to the effects on NO on cellular function which are only now being explored. Protein modifications by NO are even more evident in many inflammatory disorders and may account, at least to some extent, to the pathology seen in these conditions.

  1. Nitric oxide fumigation for postharvest pest control

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitric oxide fumigation is effective against all arthropod pests at various life stages tested. Nine insect pests at various life stages and bulb mites were subjected to nitric oxide fumigation treatments under ultralow oxygen conditions of =50 ppm O2 in 1.9L glass jars as fumigation chambers. The ...

  2. Two Dimensional Polymer That Generates Nitric Oxide.

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Koren, Amy B.

    2005-10-04

    A polymeric composition that generates nitric oxide and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate nonthrombogenic by applying a coating of the polymeric composition to the substrate are disclosed. The composition comprises: (1) a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, and (ii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups; and (2) a plurality of nitric oxide generating functional groups associated with the crosslinked chemical combination. Once exposed to a physiological environment, the coating generates nitric oxide thereby inhibiting platelet aggregation. In one embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups are provided by a nitrated compound (e.g., nitrocellulose) imbedded in the polymeric composition. In another embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups comprise N2O2- groups covalently bonded to amino groups on the polymer.

  3. Bilirubin prevents acute DSS-induced colitis by inhibiting leukocyte infiltration and suppressing upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Stephen D; Vogel, Megan E; Kindel, Tammy L; Smith, Darcey L H; Idelman, Gila; Avissar, Uri; Kakarlapudi, Ganesh; Masnovi, Michelle E

    2015-11-15

    Bilirubin is thought to exert anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1)-dependent leukocyte migration and by suppressing the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). As VCAM-1 and iNOS are important mediators of tissue injury in the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) murine model of inflammatory colitis, we examined whether bilirubin prevents colonic injury in DSS-treated mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were administered 2.5% DSS in the drinking water for 7 days, while simultaneously receiving intraperitoneal injections of bilirubin (30 mg/kg) or potassium phosphate vehicle. Disease activity was monitored, peripheral blood counts and serum nitrate levels were determined, and intestinal specimens were analyzed for histological injury, leukocyte infiltration, and iNOS expression. The effect of bilirubin on IL-5 production by HSB-2 cells and on Jurkat cell transendothelial migration also was determined. DSS-treated mice that simultaneously received bilirubin lost less body weight, had lower serum nitrate levels, and exhibited reduced disease severity than vehicle-treated animals. Concordantly, histopathological analyses revealed that bilirubin-treated mice manifested significantly less colonic injury, including reduced infiltration of eosinophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes, and diminished iNOS expression. Bilirubin administration also was associated with decreased eosinophil and monocyte infiltration into the small intestine, with a corresponding increase in peripheral blood eosinophilia. Bilirubin prevented Jurkat migration but did not alter IL-5 production. In conclusion, bilirubin prevents DSS-induced colitis by inhibiting the migration of leukocytes across the vascular endothelium and by suppressing iNOS expression.

  4. UV Induced Oxidation of Nitric Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde, F. (Inventor); Luecke, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated at least in part using in situ UV radiation sources. The sources of the oxidizing species include oxygen and/or hydrogen peroxide. The oxygen may be a component of the gaseous stream or added to the gaseous stream, preferably near a UV radiation source, and is converted to ozone by the UV irradiation. The hydrogen peroxide is decomposed through a combination of vaporization and UV irradiation. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50% by volume and increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding vaporization within the flow channel of the gaseous stream and in the presence of the UV radiation sources.

  5. Analytical Chemistry of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Evan M.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is the focus of intense research, owing primarily to its wide-ranging biological and physiological actions. A requirement for understanding its origin, activity, and regulation is the need for accurate and precise measurement techniques. Unfortunately, analytical assays for monitoring NO are challenged by NO’s unique chemical and physical properties, including its reactivity, rapid diffusion, and short half-life. Moreover, NO concentrations may span pM to µM in physiological milieu, requiring techniques with wide dynamic response ranges. Despite such challenges, many analytical techniques have emerged for the detection of NO. Herein, we review the most common spectroscopic and electrochemical methods, with special focus on the fundamentals behind each technique and approaches that have been coupled with modern analytical measurement tools or exploited to create novel NO sensors. PMID:20636069

  6. Nanocarriers for Nitric Oxide Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Juliana; Marotta-Oliveira, Samantha S.; Cicillini, Simone Aparecida; Eloy, Josimar de Oliveira; Marchetti, Juliana Maldonado

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a promising pharmaceutical agent that has vasodilative, antibacterial, and tumoricidal effects. To study the complex and wide-ranging roles of NO and to facilitate its therapeutic use, a great number of synthetic compounds (e.g., nitrosothiols, nitrosohydroxyamines, N-diazeniumdiolates, and nitrosyl metal complexes) have been developed to chemically stabilize and release NO in a controlled manner. Although NO is currently being exploited in many biomedical applications, its use is limited by several factors, including a short half-life, instability during storage, and potential toxicity. Additionally, efficient methods of both localized and systemic in vivo delivery and dose control are needed. One strategy for addressing these limitations and thus increasing the utility of NO donors is based on nanotechnology. PMID:21869934

  7. Analytical chemistry of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Hetrick, Evan M; Schoenfisch, Mark H

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is the focus of intense research primarily because of its wide-ranging biological and physiological actions. To understand its origin, activity, and regulation, accurate and precise measurement techniques are needed. Unfortunately, analytical assays for monitoring NO are challenged by NO's unique chemical and physical properties, including its reactivity, rapid diffusion, and short half-life. Moreover, NO concentrations may span the picomolar-to-micromolar range in physiological milieus, requiring techniques with wide dynamic response ranges. Despite such challenges, many analytical techniques have emerged for the detection of NO. Herein, we review the most common spectroscopic and electrochemical methods, with a focus on the underlying mechanism of each technique and on approaches that have been coupled with modern analytical measurement tools to create novel NO sensors.

  8. Effects of selective and non-selective inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase on morphine- and endomorphin-1-induced analgesia in acute and neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Makuch, Wioletta; Mika, Joanna; Rojewska, Ewelina; Zychowska, Magdalena; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to be involved in the mechanisms of pain generation throughout the nervous system. We examined the effects of intrathecally (i.t.) administered nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors on the antinociceptive effects of morphine and endomorphin-1 during acute pain and in chronic constriction injury (CCI)-exposed rats. We used N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), a non-selective NOS inhibitor; 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) or 1-(2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-imidazole (TRIM), selective inhibitors of neuronal NOS (NOS1); and 1400W dihydrochloride, a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS (NOS2). Morphine (0.5-2.5 μg) and endomorphin-1 (2.5-20 μg) in acute pain and morphine (10-40 μg) and endomorphin-1 (5-20 μg) after CCI-injury were combined with NOS inhibitors. For acute pain, the ED50 for endomorphin-1 (7.1 μg) was higher than that of morphine (1.3 μg) in the tail-flick test. For neuropathic pain, the ED50 value for morphine was much higher (43.2 μg) than that of endomorphin-1 (9.2 μg) in von Frey test. NOS inhibitors slightly influenced pain thresholds in both pain models. Moreover, in neuropathic pain, the effects of morphine were more potentiated by L-NAME, TRIM, 7-NI and 1400W (12×, 8.6×, 4.1× and 5.3×, respectively) than were the effects of endomorphin-1 (2.7×, 4.3×, 3.4× and 2.1×, respectively) in the von Frey test. Minocycline which is known to enhance the efficiency of morphine in neuropathic pain, decreased the mRNA expression of NOS1 in the DRG and NOS2 and C1q in the spinal cord after CCI. Both NOS2 and IBA-1 protein levels in the spinal cord and NOS1, NOS2 and IBA1 protein levels in DRG decreased after minocycline administration. In conclusion, our results provide evidence that both neuronal and non-neuronal NOS/NO pathways contribute to the behavioural pain responses evoked by nerve injury. The NOS inhibitors regardless of the type of pain enhanced morphine antinociception and, to a lesser extent, altered the

  9. Curcumin, an atoxic antioxidant and natural NFkappaB, cyclooxygenase-2, lipooxygenase, and inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor: a shield against acute and chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Bengmark, Stig

    2006-01-01

    The world suffers a tsunami of chronic diseases, and a typhoon of acute illnesses, many of which are associated with the inappropriate or exaggerated activation of genes involved in inflammation. Finding therapeutic agents which can modulate the inflammatory reaction is the highest priority in medical research today. Drugs developed by the pharmaceutical industry have thus far been associated with toxicity and side effects, which is why natural substances are of increasing interest. A literature search (PubMed) showed almost 1500 papers dealing with curcumin, most from recent years. All available abstracts were read. Approximately 300 full papers were reviewed. Curcumin, a component of turmeric, has been shown to be non-toxic, to have antioxidant activity, and to inhibit such mediators of inflammation as NFkappaB, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), lipooxygenase (LOX), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Significant preventive and/or curative effects have been observed in experimental animal models of a number of diseases, including arteriosclerosis, cancer, diabetes, respiratory, hepatic, pancreatic, intestinal and gastric diseases, neurodegenerative and eye diseases. Turmeric, an approved food additive, or its component curcumin, has shown surprisingly beneficial effects in experimental studies of acute and chronic diseases characterized by an exaggerated inflammatory reaction. There is ample evidence to support its clinical use, both as a prevention and a treatment. Several natural substances have greater antioxidant effects than conventional vitamins, including various polyphenols, flavonoids and curcumenoids. Natural substances are worth further exploration both experimentally and clinically.

  10. Expression and Activity of Nitric Oxide Synthase Isoforms in Methamphetamine-Induced Striatal Dopamine Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Danielle M.; Son, Jong H.; Keefe, Kristen A.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide is implicated in methamphetamine (METH)-induced neurotoxicity; however, the source of the nitric oxide has not been identified. Previous work has also revealed that animals with partial dopamine loss induced by a neurotoxic regimen of methamphetamine fail to exhibit further decreases in striatal dopamine when re-exposed to methamphetamine 7–30 days later. The current study examined nitric oxide synthase expression and activity and protein nitration in striata of animals administered saline or neurotoxic regimens of methamphetamine at postnatal days 60 and/or 90, resulting in four treatment groups: Saline:Saline, METH:Saline, Saline:METH, and METH:METH. Acute administration of methamphetamine on postnatal day 90 (Saline:METH and METH:METH) increased nitric oxide production, as evidenced by increased protein nitration. Methamphetamine did not, however, change the expression of endothelial or inducible isoforms of nitric oxide synthase, nor did it change the number of cells positive for neuronal nitric oxide synthase mRNA expression or the amount of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mRNA per cell. However, nitric oxide synthase activity in striatal interneurons was increased in the Saline:METH and METH:METH animals. These data suggest that increased nitric oxide production after a neurotoxic regimen of methamphetamine results from increased nitric oxide synthase activity, rather than an induction of mRNA, and that constitutively expressed neuronal nitric oxide synthase is the most likely source of nitric oxide after methamphetamine administration. Of interest, animals rendered resistant to further methamphetamine-induced dopamine depletions still show equivalent degrees of methamphetamine-induced nitric oxide production, suggesting that nitric oxide production alone in response to methamphetamine is not sufficient to induce acute neurotoxic injury. PMID:23230214

  11. Nitric oxide and virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Akaike, T; Maeda, H

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has complex and diverse functions in physiological and pathophysiological phenomena. The mechanisms of many events induced by NO are now well defined, so that a fundamental understanding of NO biology is almost established. Accumulated evidence suggests that NO and oxygen radicals such as superoxide are key molecules in the pathogenesis of various infectious diseases. NO biosynthesis, particularly through expression of an inducible NO synthase (iNOS), occurs in a variety of microbial infections. Although antimicrobial activity of NO is appreciated for bacteria and protozoa, NO has opposing effects in virus infections such as influenza virus pneumonia and certain other neurotropic virus infections. iNOS produces an excessive amount of NO for long periods, which allows generation of a highly reactive nitrogen oxide species, peroxynitrite, via a radical coupling reaction of NO with superoxide. Thus, peroxynitrite causes oxidative tissue injury through potent oxidation and nitration reactions of various biomolecules. NO also appears to affect a host's immune response, with immunopathological consequences. For example, overproduction of NO in virus infections in mice is reported to suppress type 1 helper T-cell-dependent immune responses, leading to type 2 helper T-cell-biased immunological host responses. Thus, NO may be a host response modulator rather than a simple antiviral agent. The unique biological properties of NO are further illustrated by our recent data suggesting that viral mutation and evolution may be accelerated by NO-induced oxidative stress. Here, we discuss these multiple roles of NO in pathogenesis of virus infections as related to both non-specific inflammatory responses and immunological host reactions modulated by NO during infections in vivo. PMID:11106932

  12. Sampling nitric oxide from combustion gases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Houseman, J.; Teixeira, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental study of several sampling tube and probe material compositions and designs aimed at preventing nitric oxide reduction when sampling nitric oxide from combustion gases. A 250,000 Btu/h furnace fired with technical grade methane was used for testing the sampling probes over a wide range of air-fuel mixtures. The results obtained include the finding that the use of stainless steel in probes creates inaccuracies in near-stoichiometric and fuel-rich sampling in hydrocarbon flames. For very fuel-rich flames, water cooling is needed even in quartz probes to prevent significant reduction of nitric oxide.-

  13. Distribution of nitric oxide in cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Mesáros, S; Grunfeld, S

    1997-01-01

    We report here the in vitro measurements of nitric oxide in the cardiovascular system using a porphyrinic sensor specific for NO. Nitric oxide concentrations were measured directly in different parts of the heart and also in different arteries and veins, ranging from 100 microm to 5 mm in diameter. Highest NO. concentrations were found in the heart and particularly in the areas of aortic and pulmonary valves. The NO. concentration in the arteries was higher than in the veins. A clearcut positive correlation was obtained by plotting the vessel diameter and production of nitric oxide.

  14. Nitric oxide signaling in yeast.

    PubMed

    Astuti, Rika Indri; Nasuno, Ryo; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    As a cellular signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO) is widely conserved from microorganisms, such as bacteria, yeasts, and fungi, to higher eukaryotes including plants and mammals. NO is mainly produced by NO synthase (NOS) or nitrite reductase (NIR) activity. There are several NO detoxification systems, including NO dioxygenase (NOD) and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR). NO homeostasis based on the balance between NO synthesis and degradation is important for the regulation of its physiological functions because an excess level of NO causes nitrosative stress due to the high reactivity of NO and NO-derived compounds. In yeast, NO may be involved in stress responses, but NO and its signaling have been poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian NOS orthologs in the genome. Even though the activities of NOS and NIR have been observed in yeast cells, the gene encoding NOS and the NO production mechanism catalyzed by NIR remain unclear. On the other hand, yeast cells employ NOD and GSNOR to maintain an intracellular redox balance following endogenous NO production, exogenous NO treatment, or environmental stresses. This article reviews NO metabolism (synthesis, degradation) and its regulation in yeast. The physiological roles of NO in yeast, including the oxidative stress response, are also discussed here. Such investigations into NO signaling are essential for understanding the NO-dependent genetic and physiological modulations. In addition to being responsible for the pathology and pharmacology of various degenerative diseases, NO signaling may be a potential target for the construction and engineering of industrial yeast strains.

  15. Novel insights into phosgene-induced acute lung injury in rats: role of dysregulated cardiopulmonary reflexes and nitric oxide in lung edema pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenli; Liu, Fangfang; Wang, Chen; Truebel, Hubert; Pauluhn, Juergen

    2013-02-01

    Phosgene gas is a lower respiratory tract irritant. As such, it stimulates nociceptive vagal C-fiber-related reflexes in a dose-rate and concentration × exposure duration (C × t)-dependent manner. In rats, this reflex is characterized by extended apnea time periods, bradycardia, and hypothermia. Although inhalation exposures at nonlethal C × t products show rapid reversibility of reflexively induced changes in respiratory patterns, lethal C × t products seem to cause prolonged stimulation after discontinued exposure to phosgene. This observation has been taken as indirect evidence that phosgene-induced lethal lung edema is likely to be associated with a dysfunctional neurogenic control of cardiopulmonary and microvascular physiology. In order to verify this hypothesis, data from respiratory function measurements during and after the inhalation exposure to phosgene gas were compared with time-course measurements of cardiac function over 20 h post-phosgene exposure. These data were complemented by time-course analyses of nitric oxide (NO(e)) and carbon dioxide in exhaled breath, including time-dependent changes of extravasated protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and hemoglobin in blood. The nitric oxidase synthetase inhibitors L-NAME and L-NIL were used to further elucidate the role of NO(e) in this type of acute lung injury and whether its analysis can serve as an early biomarker of pulmonary injury. Collectively, the sequence and time course of pathological events in phosgene-induced lung edema appear to suggest that overstimulated, continued sensorimotor vagal reflexes affect cardiopulmonary hemodynamics. A continued parasympathetic tone appears to be involved in this etiopathology.

  16. Continuing versus Stopping Prestroke Antihypertensive Therapy in Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Subgroup Analysis of the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke Trial.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Kailash; Scutt, Polly; Woodhouse, Lisa; Adami, Alessandro; Becker, Jennifer L; Cala, Lesley A; Casado, Ana M; Chen, Christopher; Dineen, Robert A; Gommans, John; Koumellis, Panos; Christensen, Hanna; Collins, Ronan; Czlonkowska, Anna; Lees, Kennedy R; Ntaios, George; Ozturk, Serefnur; Phillips, Stephen J; Sprigg, Nikola; Szatmari, Szabolcs; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Bath, Philip M

    2016-05-01

    More than 50% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) are taking antihypertensive drugs before ictus. Although antihypertensive therapy should be given long term for secondary prevention, whether to continue or stop such treatment during the acute phase of ICH remains unclear, a question that was addressed in the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke (ENOS) trial. ENOS was an international multicenter, prospective, randomized, blinded endpoint trial. Among 629 patients with ICH and systolic blood pressure between 140 and 220 mmHg, 246 patients who were taking antihypertensive drugs were assigned to continue (n = 119) or to stop (n = 127) taking drugs temporarily for 7 days. The primary outcome was the modified Rankin Score at 90 days. Secondary outcomes included death, length of stay in hospital, discharge destination, activities of daily living, mood, cognition, and quality of life. Blood pressure level (baseline 171/92 mmHg) fell in both groups but was significantly lower at 7 days in those patients assigned to continue antihypertensive drugs (difference 9.4/3.5 mmHg, P < .01). At 90 days, the primary outcome did not differ between the groups; the adjusted common odds ratio (OR) for worse outcome with continue versus stop drugs was .92 (95% confidence interval, .45-1.89; P = .83). There was no difference between the treatment groups for any secondary outcome measure, or rates of death or serious adverse events. Among patients with acute ICH, immediate continuation of antihypertensive drugs during the first week did not reduce death or major disability in comparison to stopping treatment temporarily. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Continuing versus Stopping Prestroke Antihypertensive Therapy in Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Subgroup Analysis of the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke Trial

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Kailash; Scutt, Polly; Woodhouse, Lisa; Adami, Alessandro; Becker, Jennifer L.; Cala, Lesley A.; Casado, Ana M.; Chen, Christopher; Dineen, Robert A.; Gommans, John; Koumellis, Panos; Christensen, Hanna; Collins, Ronan; Czlonkowska, Anna; Lees, Kennedy R.; Ntaios, George; Ozturk, Serefnur; Phillips, Stephen J.; Sprigg, Nikola; Szatmari, Szabolcs; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Bath, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose More than 50% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) are taking antihypertensive drugs before ictus. Although antihypertensive therapy should be given long term for secondary prevention, whether to continue or stop such treatment during the acute phase of ICH remains unclear, a question that was addressed in the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke (ENOS) trial. Methods ENOS was an international multicenter, prospective, randomized, blinded endpoint trial. Among 629 patients with ICH and systolic blood pressure between 140 and 220 mmHg, 246 patients who were taking antihypertensive drugs were assigned to continue (n = 119) or to stop (n = 127) taking drugs temporarily for 7 days. The primary outcome was the modified Rankin Score at 90 days. Secondary outcomes included death, length of stay in hospital, discharge destination, activities of daily living, mood, cognition, and quality of life. Results Blood pressure level (baseline 171/92 mmHg) fell in both groups but was significantly lower at 7 days in those patients assigned to continue antihypertensive drugs (difference 9.4/3.5 mmHg, P < .01). At 90 days, the primary outcome did not differ between the groups; the adjusted common odds ratio (OR) for worse outcome with continue versus stop drugs was .92 (95% confidence interval, .45-1.89; P = .83). There was no difference between the treatment groups for any secondary outcome measure, or rates of death or serious adverse events. Conclusions Among patients with acute ICH, immediate continuation of antihypertensive drugs during the first week did not reduce death or major disability in comparison to stopping treatment temporarily. PMID:26853137

  18. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitric oxide...

  19. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitric oxide...

  20. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitric oxide...

  1. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitric oxide...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add nitric oxide to gases that are to be breathed by a patient. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is to...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add nitric oxide to gases that are to be breathed by a patient. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is to...

  4. Anticonvulsant drugs, oxidative stress and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Vega Rasgado, L A; Ceballos Reyes, G M; Vega-Diaz, M F

    2011-01-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO) is thought to play a fundamental role in the genesis and the spreading of epileptiform hyperactivity, although its function is unclear and controversial. As a free radical, NO may cause oxidative stress, which is emerging as an important mechanism in the etiology of seizure-induced neuronal death. Here we investigated the role of NO in seizure mechanisms through oxidative stress generation by studying the effect of anticonvulsant drugs such as amino oxyacetic acid (AAOA), valproate (VALP), diazepam (DIAZ) and gabapentin (GBPTNA) on oxidative stress in the brain, estimated as free carbonyls by the method of Dalle and Rossi, and by measuring NO by the indirect method based on the Griess reaction. Results show that, except for AAOA and VALP, anticonvulsants did not significantly affect or decreased free carbonyls, but reversed the oxidative stress produced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced convulsions. Anticonvulsants except AAOA diminished NO levels and with the exception of VALP, counteracted the increase in NO generated by PTZ. Anticonvulsants decreased oxidative stress and NO especially in hippocampus (HI) and cortex (CX), and reversed PTZ effects on both parameters. PTZ diminished NO in HI, which could be explained since PTZ caused an increase on endothelial NO synthase but a decrease in neuronal NOS expression in this brain area. Since the drugs studied are modulating GABA levels, our results suggest that seizures generated by alterations in GABAergic transmission produce oxidative stress caused by NO, which can be reversed by anticonvulsants. The effects described differ among the brain regions studied and the NO synthase isoform affected.

  5. Nitric Oxide Synthases and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Ingrid M.; Sridhar, Arun; Györke, Sandor; Cardounel, Arturo J.; Carnes, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. There are multiple systems in the myocardium which contribute to redox homeostasis, and loss of homeostasis can result in oxidative stress. Potential sources of oxidants include nitric oxide synthases (NOS), which normally produce nitric oxide in the heart. Two NOS isoforms (1 and 3) are normally expressed in the heart. During pathologies such as heart failure, there is induction of NOS 2 in multiple cell types in the myocardium. In certain conditions, the NOS enzymes may become uncoupled, shifting from production of nitric oxide to superoxide anion, a potent free radical and oxidant. Multiple lines of evidence suggest a role for NOS in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. Therapeutic approaches to reduce atrial fibrillation by modulation of NOS activity may be beneficial, although further investigation of this strategy is needed. PMID:22536189

  6. Nitric oxide production by Tunguska meteor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1978-01-01

    The nonequilibrium chemical processes of nitric oxide formation are computed for the wake of the Tunguska meteor of 1908. The wake characteristics are derived by carrying out an optically-thick radiation field analysis for ablation of the meteoroid. The wake flow field is approximated by a one-dimensional, well-stirred reactor model. Known characteristics of the Tunguska event are imposed as constraints, and three controlling parameters - chemical composition, density, and velocity - are varied over a range around the values derived by Korobeinikov et al. (1976) and Petrov and Stulov (1975). The calculation shows that at least 19 million tons of nitric oxide is produced between the altitudes of 10 and 50 km. The anomalous atmospheric phenomena following the event are attributed to the reactions involving nitric oxide thus produced and atmospheric ozone. It is speculated that the nitric oxide produced by the event fertilized the area near the fall, causing the observed rapid plant growth.

  7. Variation of plasma levels of endothelin, calcitonin gene-related peptide, nitric oxide, and malondialdehyde in acute myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y B; Wang, Y Z; Yue, Y H; Zhao, W C; Feng, G X

    2015-05-25

    We examined the variation in plasma levels of endothelin (ET), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), nitric oxide (NO), and malondialdehyde (MDA), as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, in acute myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury in a rabbit model. Seventy rabbits were randomly assigned into 3 groups. Open-chest surgery (OCS) was performed for all rabbits. Group A (N = 20) received sham-surgery, group B (N = 25) was the reperfusion group, and group C (N = 25) was the infarction group. At 12 h after chest clo-sure, plasma ET levels in groups B and C were clearly increased, while CGRP levels were clearly decreased, particularly in group B. At 24 h after chest closure, ET levels were higher than before OCS, while there was no significant difference between groups B and C. ET in group B was decreased, while that in group C was increased at 12 h. No significant difference in CGRP was observed between 12 and 24 h after chest closure. NO levels in groups B and C at 12 h after chest closure were significantly decreased compared to those before OCS. NO levels in group B at 24, 48, and 72 h were significantly lower than those at 12 h, while those of group C were not significantly changed after 12 h. Dynamic monitoring and comparison of plasma levels of ET, CGRP, NO, and MDA as well as SOD activity revealed that appropriate intervention of these factors may reduce reperfusion injury.

  8. Combined effect of low-dose nitric oxide gas inhalation with partial liquid ventilation on hemodynamics, pulmonary function, and gas exchange in acute lung injury of newborn piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Won; Hwang, Jong Hee; Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Won Soon

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a randomized animal study to determine whether there is a cumulative effect on hemodynamics, pulmonary function, and gas exchange when low-dose nitric oxide (NO) is added to partial liquid ventilation (PLV) in acute lung injury. Eighteen newborn piglets were saline-lavaged repeatedly, and randomly divided into two groups: PLV with perfluorocarbon group (n=8) and lavage only (control) group (n=10). Perfluorodecalin (30 mL/kg) was instilled into the endotracheal tube for 30 min, followed by 5-10 mL/kg/hr. Fifteen minutes after the completion of perfluorodecalin dosing, NO (10 ppm) was added to the inspiratory gas in an "on/off" manner. Perfluorodecalin instillation produced a significant improvement in gas exchange, pulmonary mechanics, shunt, and pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). The addition of NO produced a further significant improvement in PaO2 and PAP. The "on/off" response to NO was seen apparently in PAP, PaO2, dynamic compliance, and shunt. All the variables in control group were remained at near the after-lavage levels without significant improvements until the end of the experiment. We concluded that NO might have a cumulative effect on gas exchange when combined with PLV, and this might be attributable to deceased PAP and V/Q mismatching. PMID:14676437

  9. Nitric oxide synthase in tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Kurenni, D E; Thurlow, G A; Turner, R W; Moroz, L L; Sharkey, K A; Barnes, S

    1995-10-23

    Previous studies have indicated that nitric oxide, a labile freely diffusible biological messenger synthesized by nitric oxide synthase, may modulate light transduction and signal transmission in the retina. In the present work, the large size of retinal cells in tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) allowed the utilization of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase histochemistry and nitric oxide synthase immunocytochemistry to delineate the cell-specific intracellular localization of nitric oxide synthase. NADPH-diaphorase activity was highly concentrated in the outer retina, in rod and cone inner segment ellipsoids, and between and adjacent to the photoreceptor cell bodies in the outer nuclear layer. Examination of enzymatically isolated retinal cells indicated that outer nuclear layer NADPH-diaphorase activity was localized to the distal processes of the retinal glial (Müller) cells and to putative bipolar cell Landolt clubs. Less intense NADPH-diaphorase activity was seen in the photoreceptor inner segment myoid region, in a small number of inner nuclear layer cells, in cap-like configurations at the distal poles of cells in the ganglion cell layer and surrounding ganglion cell layer somata, and in punctate form within both plexiform layers, the pigment epithelium, and the optic nerve. Nitric oxide synthase-like immunoreactivity was similarly localized, but was also concentrated along a thin sublamina centered within the inner plexiform layer. The potential for nitric oxide generation at multiple retinal sites suggests that this molecule may play a number of roles in the processing of visual information in the retina.

  10. [Nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation].

    PubMed

    Cristol, J P; Maggi, M F; Guérin, M C; Torreilles, J; Descomps, B

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical produced enzymatically in biological systems from the guanidino group of L-arginine. Its large spectrum of biological effects is achieved through chemical interactions with different targets including oxygen (O2), superoxide (O2o-) and other oxygen reactive species (ROS), transition metals and thiols. Superoxide anions and other ROS have been reported to react with NO to produce peroxynitrite anions that can decompose to form nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and hydroxyl radial (OHo). Thus, NO has been reported to have a dual effect on lipid peroxidation (prooxidant via the peroxynitrite or antioxydant via the chelation of ROS). In the present study we have investigated in different models the in vitro and in vivo action of NO on lipid peroxidation. Copper-induced LDL oxidation were used as an in vitro model. Human LDL (100 micrograms ApoB/ml) were incubated in oxygene-saturated PBS buffer in presence or absence of Cu2+ (2.5 microM) with increasing concentrations of NO donnors (sodium nitroprussiate or nitroso-glutathione). LDL oxidation was monitored continuously for conjugated diene formation (234 nm) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) accumulation. Exogenous NO prevents in a dose dependent manner the progress of copper-induced oxidation. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury (I/R), characterized by an overproduction of ROS, is used as an in vivo model. Anaesthetized rats were submitted to 1 hour renal ischaemia following by 2 hours of reperfusion. Sham-operated rats (SOP) were used as control. Lipid peroxidation was evaluated by measuring the HNE accumulated in rats kidneys in presence or absence of L-arginine or D-arginine infusion. L-arginine, but not D-arginine, enhances HNE accumulation in I/R but not in SOP (< 0.050 pmol/g tissue in SOP versus 0.6 nmol/g tissue in I/R), showing that, in this experimental conditions, NO produced from L-arginine, enhances the toxicity of ROS. This study shows that the pro- or antioxydant effects of NO are different

  11. Acute right heart failure after hemorrhagic shock and trauma pneumonectomy-a management approach: A blinded randomized controlled animal trial using inhaled nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, Andrea L; Sjoholm, Lars O; Goldberg, Amy; Pathak, Abhijit; Santora, Thomas; Sharp, Thomas E; Wallner, Markus; Berretta, Remus M; Poole, Lauren A; Wu, Jichuan; Wolfson, Marla R

    2017-02-01

    Hemorrhagic shock and pneumonectomy causes an acute increase in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). The increase in PVR and right ventricular (RV) afterload leads to acute RV failure, thus reducing left ventricular (LV) preload and output. Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) lowers PVR by relaxing pulmonary arterial smooth muscle without remarkable systemic vascular effects. We hypothesized that with hemorrhagic shock and pneumonectomy, iNO can be used to decrease PVR and mitigate right heart failure. A hemorrhagic shock and pneumonectomy model was developed using sheep. Sheep received lung protective ventilatory support and were instrumented to serially obtain measurements of hemodynamics, gas exchange, and blood chemistry. Heart function was assessed with echocardiography. After randomization to study gas of iNO 20 ppm (n = 9) or nitrogen as placebo (n = 9), baseline measurements were obtained. Hemorrhagic shock was initiated by exsanguination to a target of 50% of the baseline mean arterial pressure. The resuscitation phase was initiated, consisting of simultaneous left pulmonary hilum ligation, via median sternotomy, infusion of autologous blood and initiation of study gas. Animals were monitored for 4 hours. All animals had an initial increase in PVR. PVR remained elevated with placebo; with iNO, PVR decreased to baseline. Echo showed improved RV function in the iNO group while it remained impaired in the placebo group. After an initial increase in shunt and lactate and decrease in SvO2, all returned toward baseline in the iNO group but remained abnormal in the placebo group. These data indicate that by decreasing PVR, iNO decreased RV afterload, preserved RV and LV function, and tissue oxygenation in this hemorrhagic shock and pneumonectomy model. This suggests that iNO may be a useful clinical adjunct to mitigate right heart failure and improve survival when trauma pneumonectomy is required.

  12. Overexpression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in rat aortic endothelial cells attenuates palmitic acid-induced inflammation and reduction in nitric oxide bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Endothelial dysfunction is a well documented evidence for the onset of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. Lipids disorder is among the main risk factors for endothelial dysfunction in these diseases. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), one of the cholesterol transporters, plays an important role in the maintenance of intracellular lipid homeostasis. However, the effect of StAR on endothelial dysfunction is not well understood. Palmitic acid (PA) has been shown to decrease eNOS activity and induce inflammation, both are the causes of endothelial dysfunction, in an endothelial cell culture model. Methods StAR gene was introduced into primary rat aortic endothelial cells by adenovirus infection. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine the relative genes and proteins expression level to elucidate the underlying mechanism. The free fatty acid and cholesterol quantification kits were used to detect total cellular free fatty acid and cholesterol. The levels of inflammatory factors and nitric oxide were determined by ELISA and classic Griess reagent methods respectively. Results We successfully overexpressed StAR in primary rat aortic endothelial cells. Following StAR overexpression, mRNA levels of IL-1β, TNFα, IL6 and VCAM-1 and protein levels of IL-1β, , TNFα and IL-6 in culture supernatant were significantly decreased, which duing to blocke NFκB nuclear translocation and activation. Moreover, StAR overexpression attenuated the PA-induced reduction of nitric oxide bioavailability by protecting the bioactivity of pAkt/peNOS/NO pathway. Furthermore, the key genes involved in lipid metabolism were greatly reduced following StAR overexpression. In order to investigate the underlying mechanism, cerulenin and lovastatin, the inhibitor of fatty acid and cholesterol synthase, were added prior to PA treatment. The results showed that both cerulenin and lovastatin had a similar effect as StAR overexpression. On the

  13. Comparison of acute hemodynamic effects of aerosolized iloprost and inhaled nitric oxide in adult congenital heart disease with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Caojin, Zhang; Yigao, Huang; Tao, Huang; Wenhui, Huang; Chunli, Xia; Xinsheng, Huang

    2012-01-01

    To compare the acute hemodynamic effects of aerosolized iloprost and inhaled nitric oxide (NO) in adult congenital heart disease (CHD) patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). One hundred and eighty five adult CHDs with severe PAH were nonrandomized into two groups (iloprost, n=127; NO, n=58). Various hemodynamic parameters were measured before and after iloprost or NO inhalation. Iloprost and NO inhalation resulted in significant reductions in pulmonary arterial pressure (from 110.6±21.8 mmHg to 105.5±22.3 mmHg, p<0.05; from 113.1±18.7 mmHg to 107.2±19.9 mmHg, p<0.05, respectively) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) (from 13.4±8.3 Wood units to 9.6±6.4 Wood units, p<0.01; from 13.7±7.1 Wood units to 9.3±4.9 Wood units, p<0.01, respectively) and increases in pulmonary blood flow (from 6.7±3.3 L/min to 9.4±5.8 L/min, p<0.05; from 6.6±3.1 L/min to 9.6±5.9 L/min, p<0.01, respectively) and the Qp/Qs ratio (from 1.5±0.8 to 2.1±1.4, p<0.01; from 1.5±0.8 to 2.0±1.3, p<0.01, respectively). When the effects of inhaled iloprost and NO were compared, similar reductions in pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance were observed. Aerosolized iloprost and inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) were generally well tolerated and no patient experienced any side effects during inhalation. Aerosolized iloprost can be effectively and safely used and might be an alternative to NO for testing pulmonary vascular reactivity and treating severe PAH in adult CHD patients.

  14. [Retinal ischemia and nitric oxide].

    PubMed

    Neroev, V V; Arkhipova, M M

    2003-01-01

    Retinal ischemia is the main chain in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases of the eye. It was established that nitric oxide (NO) plays the key role in the development of ischemia. Recent understanding of the NO role, as a universal regulator of the cellular and tissue metabolism, is presented. The authors' and published data were used to design a scheme of pathogenesis of retinal ischemia with regard for the NO role. NO can produce both positive and negative effects depending on a stage of the process, NO concentration and on a number of other factors if they are present. Initial stages of hypoxia/ischemia are accompanied by an activation of all forms of NO-synthases (NOS) caused by the influence of biologically active substances (cytokines, prostaglandins, serotonin, bradykinin, glycolisis suboxide products etc.). The activation of inducible NOS, which synthesize a bigger quantity of NO possessing a direct cytotoxic action and contributing to the production of highly toxic radical of peroxinitrit, is in the focus of attention. The damage of cellular structures due to free-radical processes leads to the development of endothelial, macrophage and thrombocyte malfunctions, which manifest itself through a reduced activity of endothelial NOS and through disruption of NO-dependent processes (vasospasm, an increased aggregation of platelets and a reduced fibrinolytic activity). A sharp reduction of NO synthesis substrate (L-arginine) is observed in patients with retinal ischemia. The aggravation of ischemia causes a decrease of NO synthesis due to an exhaustion of L-arginine and its intensified consumption in the course of free-radical processes. The use of NO-inhibitors and of NO-donors at different stages of retinal ischemia prevents the development of neovascularization and proliferation.

  15. Nitric oxide, inducible nitric oxide synthase and inflammation in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Robert P

    2002-12-01

    Inflammation is a process consisting of a complex of cytological and chemical reactions which occur in and around affected blood vessels and adjacent tissues in response to an injury caused by a physical, chemical or biological insult. Much work has been performed in the past several years investigating inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS, EC 1.14.13.39) and nitric oxide in inflammation. This has resulted in a rapid increase in knowledge about iNOS and nitric oxide. Nitric oxide formation from inducible NOS is regulated by numerous inflammatory mediators, often with contradictory effects, depending upon the type and duration of the inflammatory insult. Equine medicine appears to have benefited the most from the increased interest in this small, inflammatory mediator. Most of the information on nitric oxide in traditional veterinary species has been produced using models or naturally occurring inflammatory diseases of this species.

  16. Nitric Oxide as a Mediator of Oxidant Lung Injury Due to Paraquat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berisha, Hasan I.; Pakbaz, Hedayatollah; Absood, Afaf; Said, Sami I.

    1994-08-01

    At low concentrations, nitric oxide is a physiological transmitter, but in excessive concentrations it may cause cell and tissue injury. We report that in acute oxidant injury induced by the herbicide paraquat in isolated guinea pig lungs, nitric oxide synthesis was markedly stimulated, as evidenced by increased levels of cyclic GMP in lung perfusate and of nitrite and L-citrulline production in lung tissue. All signs of injury, including increased airway and perfusion pressures, pulmonary edema, and protein leakage into the airspaces, were dose-dependently attenuated or totally prevented by either N^G-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or N^ω-nitro-L-arginine, selective and competitive inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase. Protection was reversed by excess L-arginine but not by its enantiomer D-arginine. When blood was added to the lung perfusate, the paraquat injury was moderated or delayed as it was when paraquat was given to anesthetized guinea pigs. The rapid onset of injury and its failure to occur in the absence of Ca2+ suggest that constitutive rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase was responsible for the stimulated nitric oxide synthesis. The findings indicate that nitric oxide plays a critical role in the production of lung tissue injury due to paraquat, and it may be a pathogenetic factor in other forms of oxidant tissue injury.

  17. Neural mechanisms in nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, M.; Victor, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide is hypothesized to be an inhibitory modulator of central sympathetic nervous outflow, and deficient neuronal nitric oxide production to cause sympathetic overactivity, which then contributes to nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension. The biochemical and neuroanatomical basis for this concept revolves around nitric oxide modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission within brainstem vasomotor centers. The functional consequence of neuronal nitric oxide in blood pressure regulation is, however, marked by an apparent conflict in the literature. On one hand, conscious animal studies using sympathetic blockade suggest a significant role for neuronal nitric oxide deficiency in the development of nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension, and on the other hand, there is evidence against such a role derived from 'knock-out' mice lacking nitric-oxide synthase 1, the major source of neuronal nitric oxide.

  18. Neural mechanisms in nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, M.; Victor, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide is hypothesized to be an inhibitory modulator of central sympathetic nervous outflow, and deficient neuronal nitric oxide production to cause sympathetic overactivity, which then contributes to nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension. The biochemical and neuroanatomical basis for this concept revolves around nitric oxide modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission within brainstem vasomotor centers. The functional consequence of neuronal nitric oxide in blood pressure regulation is, however, marked by an apparent conflict in the literature. On one hand, conscious animal studies using sympathetic blockade suggest a significant role for neuronal nitric oxide deficiency in the development of nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension, and on the other hand, there is evidence against such a role derived from 'knock-out' mice lacking nitric-oxide synthase 1, the major source of neuronal nitric oxide.

  19. Selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibition attenuates remote acute lung injury in a model of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Harkin, Denis W; Rubin, Barry B; Romaschin, Alex; Lindsay, Thomas F

    2004-08-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture is associated with a systemic inflammatory response syndrome and acute lung injury. Using a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, N(6)-(iminoethyl)-lysine (L-NIL), we explored the role of iNOS in the early pro-inflammatory signaling and acute lung injury in experimental abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture. Anesthetized rats were randomized to sham control or shock and clamp (s + c) groups, which underwent one hour of hemorrhagic shock, followed by 45 minutes of supramesenteric aortic clamping, and then two hours resuscitated reperfusion. Animals in s + c were randomized to receive intravenous L-NIL at 50 microg/kg/h or saline at the start of reperfusion. Pulmonary permeability to (125)I-labeled albumin, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, cytokine levels, and semi-quantitative RT-PCR for mRNA were indicators of microvascular permeability, leuco-sequestration, and pro-inflammatory signaling, respectively. Lung permeability index were significantly increased in s + c compared to sham (4.43 +/- 0.96 versus 1.30 +/- 0.17, P < 0.01), and attenuated by L-NIL treatment (2.14 +/- 0.70, P < 0.05). Lung tissue MPO activity was significantly increased in s + c compared to sham (2.80 +/- 0.32 versus 1.03 +/- 0.29, P < 0.002), and attenuated by L-NIL treatment (1.50 +/- 0.20, P < 0.007). Lung tissue iNOS activity was significantly increased in s + c compared to sham animals (P < 0.05), and attenuated by L-NIL treatment (P < 0.05). Lung tissue iNOS mRNA was upregulated 8-fold in s + c compared to sham (P < 0.05). Data represents mean +/- standard error mean, comparisons with ANOVA. These data suggest that in our model of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm iNOS plays a crucial role in reperfusion lung injury. Selective inhibition of iNOS during early reperfusion prevents neutrophil mediated acute lung injury.

  20. Nitric oxide inhibition of human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, J B; Doty, E; Bonaventura, J; Haney, A F

    1995-08-01

    To determine the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on sperm motility in vitro. Normal human sperm separated by centrifugation through a discontinuous Percoll gradient and subsequent swim-up were incubated for up to 24 hours with NO donors, with and without the known NO quencher hemoglobin, as well as with agents that raise intracellular cyclic 3',5'-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Sperm respiration was determined by a tetrazolium-formazan spectrophotometric assay. Andrology laboratory. Absolute sperm motility and respiration. Sperm incubated with the NO donors 1 mM nitroprusside, 100 to 125 microM 3-morpholinosydnonimine, and 25 to 125 microM pure nitric oxide gas dissolved in buffer were inhibited in motility in a dose-dependent fashion. The inhibition could be reversed by the NO quencher hemoglobin. Agents that raise cellular cGMP (dibutyryl cGMP or 8-bromo-cGMP) did not inhibit motility. Nitric oxide inhibited sperm respiration, as measured by the tetrazolium-formazan assay. Nitric oxide reduces sperm motility, possibly by a mechanism involving inhibition of cellular respiration independent of an elevation of intracellular cGMP. Nitric oxide elaborated in the female or male genital tract in vivo could adversely influence sperm function and fertility.

  1. Association of nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) 894 G>T polymorphism with prognostic outcomes of anthracycline in Chinese patients with acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    He, Hui; Xu, Ya-Jing; Yin, Ji-Ye; Li, Xi; Qu, Jian; Xu, Xiao-Jing; Liu, Zhuo-Gang; Zhou, Fan; Zhai, Ming; Li, Yan; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) 894 G>T polymorphism on prognostic outcomes of anthracycline in Chinese patients with de novo intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and to examine the gene expression level in relation to genetic variation. In all, 225 Chinese patients with intermediate-risk AML (at the complete remission stage) treated with anthracycline were enrolled in the study. The 894 G>T polymorphism of the NOS3 gene was analysed by allele-specific matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight. Expression of NOS3 mRNA was tested in 72 patients of known genotype for NOS3 894 G>T. The clinical characteristics of these patients were obtained from medical records. Survival analysis showed that patients with AML (GG genotype) had a longer overall survival (OS; P = 0.006). After adjusting for age, gender, leucocyte count, haemoglobin level, platelet level, French, American and Britain (FAB) classification, lactate dehydrogenase levels, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status, nucleophosmin gene and fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 gene, multivariate survival analysis showed that the NOS3 894 G>T polymorphism appeared to be a predicting factor for OS (P = 0.014; hazard ratio = 1.856). However, no significant associations between the NOS3 894 G>T polymorphism and relapse-free survival and relapse in patients with AML were observed. Gene expression levels were significantly higher in patients with the GG genotype than in patients with the GT and TT genotypes (P = 0.033). The findings suggest that the NOS3 894 G>T variant may be a biomarker for the prediction of OS in Chinese patients with AML. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Nitric oxide production and nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Rodríguez-Monroy, Marco A; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia; Jarillo-Luna, Adriana; Carrasco-Yepez, Marisela; Miliar-García, Angel; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael

    2007-07-01

    Free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri produces an acute and fatal infectious disease called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), whose pathophysiological mechanism is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in PAM. Although NO has a cytotoxic effect on various parasites, it is produced by others as part of the pathology, as is the case with Entamoeba histolytica. To test for the production of NO, we analyzed whether antibodies against mammalian NO synthase isoforms (neuronal, inducible, and endothelial) presented immunoreactivity to N. fowleri proteins. We found that the trophozoites produced NO in vitro. The Western blot results, which showed N. fowleri trophozoites, contained proteins that share epitopes with the three described mammalian NOS, but have relative molecular weights different than those described in the literature, suggesting that N. fowleri may contain undescribed NOS isoforms. Moreover, we found that trophozoites reacted to the NOS2 antibody, in amebic cultures as well as in the mouse brain infected with N. fowleri, suggesting that nitric oxide may participate in the pathogenesis of PAM. Further research aimed at determining whether N. fowleri contains active novel NOS isoforms could lead to the design of new therapies against this parasite.

  3. Nitric Oxide's Involvement in the Spectrum of Psychotic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Maia-de-Oliveira, João Paulo; Kandratavicius, Ludmyla; Nunes, Emerson Arcoverde; Machado-de-Sousa, João Paulo; Hallak, Jaime E; Dursun, Serdar Murat

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that dopaminergic abnormalities found in psychotic disorders may be secondary to nitric oxide dysfunctions. Nitric oxide seems to influence glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission, both of which have been associated with psychosis. To search and review published works which examined the influence of nitric oxide in psychotic disorders subjects. The research was executed in the on-line collections of Pubmed and ISI Web of Science. The key aspects utilized were "Psychotic Disorders AND Nitric Oxide", "Psychosis AND Nitric Oxide","Schizotypal Personality Disorder AND Nitric Oxide", "Delusional Disorder AND Nitric Oxide", "Brief Psychotic Disorder AND Nitric Oxide", "Schizophreniform Disorder AND Nitric Oxide", "Schizoaffective Disorder AND Nitric Oxide", and "Schizophrenia AND Nitric Oxide". Empirical works utilizing human subjects, published in the last 10 years, in English language were included. Initially, the search yielded a total of 95 studies. Then, 39 were elected according to the inclusion requirements. The selected articles were divided into five groups: biochemical studies (n=15; 38.5%), genetic studies (n=11; 28.2%), postmortem studies (n=6; 15.4%), clinical trials (n=6; 15.4%), and case reports (n=1; 2.5%). The studies evaluated only schizophrenic or schizoaffective disorder subjects. The great majority of them found evidence of nitric oxide dysfunctions in psychosis. The results of the review strengthen the idea that nitric oxide has a key participation in psychotic disorders and deserves deeper investigation as a target for future pharmacological intervention.

  4. The role of Bradyrhizobium japonicum nitric oxide reductase in nitric oxide detoxification in soya bean root nodules.

    PubMed

    Meakin, G E; Jepson, B J N; Richardson, D J; Bedmar, E J; Delgado, M J

    2006-02-01

    The identification of nitric oxide-bound leghaemoglobin within soya bean nodules has led to the question of how Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids overcome the toxicity of this nitric oxide. It has previously been shown that one candidate for nitric oxide detoxification, the respiratory nitric oxide reductase, is expressed in soya bean nodules from plants supplied with nitrate. In this paper, the role of this enzyme in nitric oxide detoxification is assessed and discussion is provided on other possible B. japonicum nitric oxide detoxification systems.

  5. Effect of acute hyperglycaemia on sodium handling and excretion of nitric oxide metabolites, bradykinin, and cGMP in Type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Simková, R; Kazdová, L; Karasová, L; Simek, S; Pelikánová, T

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acutely induced hyperglycaemia on renal sodium handling and to explore the role of the bradykinin-nitric oxide-cGMP signalling pathway. We compared 20 Type 1 diabetic (DM1) patients without microalbuminuria with 15 weight-, age-, and sex-matched healthy controls (C). Clearances of para-aminohippuric acid (CPAH), inulin (Cin), lithium, sodium, and urinary nitrite/nitrate (NOx), cGMP and bradykinin excretion rates were measured in two 90-min periods: a glycaemic clamp-induced euglycaemia (5 mmol/l-period I) and hyperglycaemia (12 mmol/l-period II) (Study 1) and during time-controlled euglycaemia (5 mmol/l-period I and 5 mmol/l-period II) to avoid the effects of time and volume load (Study 2). Cin and CPAH were not significantly different during euglycaemia (period I of Study 1) in DM1 and controls, whereas fractional excretion of sodium was decreased in DM1 (1.84 +/- 0.75 vs. 2.36 +/- 0.67%; P < 0.05) due to an increase in fractional distal tubular reabsorption of sodium (94.01 +/- 1.94 vs. 92.24 +/- 2.47%; P < 0.05). A comparison of changes during Study 1 and Study 2 revealed acute hyperglycaemia did not change renal haemodynamics significantly, while fractional distal tubular reabsorption of sodium increased (DM1: P < 0.05; C: P < 0.01) and fractional excretion of sodium decreased (P < 0.01) in both groups. The urinary excretion rates of NOx were comparable during euglycaemia in DM1 and C. While in C, they significantly increased during Study 1 (period I: 382 +/- 217 vs. period II: 515 +/- 254 nmol/min; P < 0.01) and Study 2 (period I: 202.9 +/- 176.8 vs. period II: 297.2 +/- 267.5 nmol/min; P < 0.05) as a consequence of the water load, no changes were found in DM1. The urinary excretion of bradykinin was lower in DM1 compared with C (0.84 +/- 0.68 vs. 1.20 +/- 0.85 micro g/min; P < 0.01) during euglycaemia; it was not affected by hyperglycaemia. There were no significant differences between DM1 and C and in c

  6. Comparison of the effects of nebulized terbutaline with or without intravenous betamethasone on exhaled nitric oxide in children with acute asthma attack.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming Yung; Tsai, Yi Giien; Yang, Kuender D; Hung, Chih Hsing

    2006-02-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), a non-invasive marker that reflects the degree of airway inflammation, may be useful for assessing the response to anti-inflammatory treatment of asthma. The purpose of this randomized prospective study was to compare the effect of a nebulized terbutaline plus a single intravenous dose of betamethasone at baseline followed by a second of terbutaline at 6 h with the effect of the same protocol of nebulized terbutaline alone on airway inflammation of acute asthmatic children as demonstrated by eNO levels. Children visiting the emergency department due to acute asthma attack were recruited. All enrolled patients had fluorescent assay-proven hypersensitivity to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. Patients were randomized to receive either nebulized terbutaline plus intravenous betamethasone (experimental group, n = 11) or nebulized terbutaline alone (control group, n = 11) at baseline followed by a second dose of nebulized terbutaline alone 6 h later. Exhaled NO concentrations were significantly reduced in the experimental group at 7 h (40.25 +/- 12.43 vs 28.88 +/- 18.02 ppb; p = 0.005) and 12 h (40.25 +/- 12.43 vs 30.11 +/- 18.16 ppb; p = 0.007) after treatment. The eNO level in the experimental group was also reduced at 7 h (28.88 +/- 18.02 vs 38.12 +/- 16.50 ppb; p = 0.034) and 12 h (30.11 +/- 18.16 vs 39.36 +/- 17.63 ppb; p = 0.035) compared to the control group. The change of eNO concentration was correlated to the change of peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) [r = -0.678; p = 0.022] and pulmonary index scores (r = 0.606; p = 0.048) at 7 h after treatment in the betamethasone group. Nebulized terbutaline given at baseline and 6 h later was significantly more effective in improving PEFR and asthmatic symptoms (pulmonary index scores) for at least 12 h when the initial dose was administered in combination with intravenous betamethasone.

  7. Enhanced colonic nitric oxide generation and nitric oxide synthase activity in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Rachmilewitz, D; Stamler, J S; Bachwich, D; Karmeli, F; Ackerman, Z; Podolsky, D K

    1995-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that nitric oxide (NO.), the product of nitric oxide synthase in inflammatory cells, may play a part in tissue injury and inflammation through its oxidative metabolism. In this study the colonic generation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and nitric oxide synthase activity was determined in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Colonic biopsy specimens were obtained from inflammatory bowel disease patients and from normal controls. Mucosal explants were cultured in vitro for 24 hours and NOx generation was determined. Nitric oxide synthase activity was monitored by the conversion of [3H]-L-arginine to citrulline. Median NOx generation by inflamed colonic mucosa of patients with active ulcerative colitis and Crohn's colitis was 4.2- and 8.1-fold respectively higher than that by normal human colonic mucosa. In ulcerative colitis and Crohn's colitis nitric oxide synthase activity was 10.0- and 3.8-fold respectively higher than in normal subjects. Colonic NOx generation is significantly decreased by methylprednisolone and ketotifen. The decrease in NOx generation by cultured colonic mucosa induced by methylprednisolone suggests that NO synthase activity is induced during the culture and the steroid effect may contribute to its therapeutic effect. Enhanced colonic NOx generation by stimulated nitric oxide synthase activity in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease may contribute to tissue injury. PMID:7541008

  8. Astragaloside-IV prevents acute kidney injury and inflammation by normalizing muscular mitochondrial function associated with a nitric oxide protective mechanism in crush syndrome rats.

    PubMed

    Murata, Isamu; Abe, Yuji; Yaginuma, Yuka; Yodo, Kayako; Kamakari, Yuka; Miyazaki, Yurika; Baba, Daichi; Shinoda, Yuko; Iwasaki, Toru; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Kobayashi, Jun; Inoue, Yutaka; Kanamoto, Ikuo

    2017-09-04

    Crush syndrome (CS) is a serious medical condition characterized by muscle cell damage resulting from decompression after compression (i.e., ischemia/reperfusion injury). A large number of CS patients develop cardiac failure, kidney dysfunction, and systemic inflammation, even when fluid therapy is administered. We evaluated whether the administration of astragaloside-IV (AS)-containing fluid improved survival by preventing kidney and muscular mitochondrial dysfunction in a rat model of CS. The CS model was generated by subjecting anesthetized rats to bilateral hind limb compression with a rubber tourniquet for 5 h. Rats were then randomly divided into four groups: (1) sham; (2) CS with no treatment; (3) CS with normal saline treatment; and (4) CS with normal saline + 10 mg/kg AS. AS-containing fluid improved kidney function by improving shock and metabolic acidosis in CS rats. In addition, there was a reduction in oxidative damage. The attenuation of hyperkalemia was significantly related to improving muscle injury via preventing mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, this mitochondria protection mechanism was related to the nitric oxide (NO) generated by activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, which provided an anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effect. Treatment with AS-containing fluid led to a dramatic improvement in survival following CS because of direct and indirect anti-oxidative effects in the kidney, and improvements in mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation owing to AS acting as an NO donor in injured muscle.

  9. Role of exhaled nitric oxide in asthma.

    PubMed

    Yates, D H

    2001-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), an evanescent atmospheric gas, has recently been discovered to be an important biological mediator in animals and humans. Nitric oxide plays a key role within the lung in the modulation of a wide variety of functions including pulmonary vascular tone, nonadrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) transmission and modification of the inflammatory response. Asthma is characterized by chronic airway inflammation and increased synthesis of NO and other highly reactive and toxic substances (reactive oxygen species). Pro- inflammatory cytokines such as TNFalpha and IL-1beta are secreted in asthma and result in inflammatory cell recruitment, but also induce calcium- and calmodulin-independent nitric oxide synthases (iNOS) and perpetuate the inflammatory response within the airways. Nitric oxide is released by several pulmonary cells including epithelial cells, eosinophils and macrophages, and NO has been shown to be increased in conditions associated with airway inflammation, such as asthma and viral infections. Nitric oxide can be measured in the expired air of several species, and exhaled NO can now be rapidly and easily measured by the use of chemiluminescence analysers in humans. Exhaled NO is increased in steroid-naive asthmatic subjects and during an asthma exacerbation, although it returns to baseline levels with appropriate anti-inflammatory treatment, and such measurements have been proposed as a simple non-invasive method of measuring airway inflammation in asthma. Here the chemical and biological properties of NO are briefly discussed, followed by a summary of the methodological considerations relevant to the measurement of exhaled NO and its role in lung diseases including asthma. The origin of exhaled NO is considered, and brief mention made of other potential markers of airway inflammation or oxidant stress in exhaled breath.

  10. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca(2+) mobilization and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi; Cho, Du-Hyong; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Duk-Hee; Jo, Inho

    2013-07-12

    Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser(1179)) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation. This study suggests that FIR radiation increases NO production via increasing CaMKII-mediated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation but TRPV channels may not be involved in this pathway. Our results may provide the molecular mechanism by which FIR radiation improves endothelial function.

  11. BIOGENIC NITRIC OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM CROPLAND SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of nitric oxide (NO) were determined during late spring and summer 1995 and the spring of 1996 from four agricultural soils on which four different crops were grown. These agricultural soils were located at four different sites throughout North Carolina. Emission rates ...

  12. Arginine metabolism: nitric oxide and beyond.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, G; Morris, S M

    1998-01-01

    Arginine is one of the most versatile amino acids in animal cells, serving as a precursor for the synthesis not only of proteins but also of nitric oxide, urea, polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine and agmatine. Of the enzymes that catalyse rate-controlling steps in arginine synthesis and catabolism, argininosuccinate synthase, the two arginase isoenzymes, the three nitric oxide synthase isoenzymes and arginine decarboxylase have been recognized in recent years as key factors in regulating newly identified aspects of arginine metabolism. In particular, changes in the activities of argininosuccinate synthase, the arginases, the inducible isoenzyme of nitric oxide synthase and also cationic amino acid transporters play major roles in determining the metabolic fates of arginine in health and disease, and recent studies have identified complex patterns of interaction among these enzymes. There is growing interest in the potential roles of the arginase isoenzymes as regulators of the synthesis of nitric oxide, polyamines, proline and glutamate. Physiological roles and relationships between the pathways of arginine synthesis and catabolism in vivo are complex and difficult to analyse, owing to compartmentalized expression of various enzymes at both organ (e.g. liver, small intestine and kidney) and subcellular (cytosol and mitochondria) levels, as well as to changes in expression during development and in response to diet, hormones and cytokines. The ongoing development of new cell lines and animal models using cDNA clones and genes for key arginine metabolic enzymes will provide new approaches more clearly elucidating the physiological roles of these enzymes. PMID:9806879

  13. BIOGENIC NITRIC OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM CROPLAND SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of nitric oxide (NO) were determined during late spring and summer 1995 and the spring of 1996 from four agricultural soils on which four different crops were grown. These agricultural soils were located at four different sites throughout North Carolina. Emission rates ...

  14. Nitric oxide. Novel biology with clinical relevance.

    PubMed Central

    Billiar, T R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The author provides the reader with a view of the regulation and function of nitric oxide (NO), based on the three distinct enzyme isoforms that synthesize NO. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Nitric oxide is a short-lived molecule exhibiting functions as diverse as neurotransmission and microbial killing. Recent advances in the characterization of the enzymes responsible for NO synthesis and in the understanding of how NO interacts with targets have led to new insights into the many facets of this diverse molecule. METHODS: Nitric oxide is produced by one of three enzyme isoforms of NO synthesis. These enzymes vary considerably in their distribution, regulation, and function. Accordingly, the NO synthesis or lack of NO production will have consequences unique to that isoform. Therefore, this review summarizes the regulation and function of NO generated by each of the three isoforms. RESULTS: Nitric oxide exhibits many unique characteristics that allow this molecule to perform so many functions. The amount, duration, and location of the NO synthesis will depend on the isoform of NO synthase expressed. For each isoform, there probably are disease processes in which deficiency states exist. For induced NO synthesis, states of overexpression exist. CONCLUSIONS: Understanding the regulation and function of the enzymes that produce NO and the unique characteristics of each enzyme isoform is likely to lead to therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat a number of diseases. PMID:7537035

  15. Nitric oxide-releasing ruthenium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chi-Ming; Liao, Kai-Jun; Lok, Chun-Nam; Che, Chi-Ming

    2011-10-14

    Nitric oxide-releasing ruthenium nanoparticles were synthesized by the reaction of alkanethiolate-protected ruthenium nanoparticles with tert-butyl nitrite ((t)BuONO), and their water-soluble derivatives are able to deliver NO to proteins such as reduced myoglobin upon light irradiation in aqueous media.

  16. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5165 Nitric oxide administration apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5165 Nitric oxide administration apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5165 Nitric oxide administration apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add...

  19. Nitric oxide in adaptation to altitude.

    PubMed

    Beall, Cynthia M; Laskowski, Daniel; Erzurum, Serpil C

    2012-04-01

    This review summarizes published information on the levels of nitric oxide gas (NO) in the lungs and NO-derived liquid-phase molecules in the acclimatization of visitors newly arrived at altitudes of 2500 m or more and adaptation of populations whose ancestors arrived thousands of years ago. Studies of acutely exposed visitors to high altitude focus on the first 24-48 h with just a few extending to days or weeks. Among healthy visitors, NO levels in the lung, plasma, and/or red blood cells fell within 2h, but then returned toward baseline or slightly higher by 48 h and increased above baseline by 5 days. Among visitors ill with high-altitude pulmonary edema at the time of the study or in the past, NO levels were lower than those of their healthy counterparts. As for highland populations, Tibetans had NO levels in the lung, plasma, and red blood cells that were at least double and in some cases orders of magnitude greater than other populations regardless of altitude. Red blood cell-associated nitrogen oxides were more than 200 times higher. Other highland populations had generally higher levels although not to the degree shown by Tibetans. Overall, responses of those acclimatized and those presumed to be adapted are in the same direction, although the Tibetans have much larger responses. Missing are long-term data on lowlanders at altitude showing how similar they become to the Tibetan phenotype. Also missing are data on Tibetans at low altitude to see the extent to which their phenotype is a response to the immediate environment or expressed constitutively. The mechanisms causing the visitors' and the Tibetans' high levels of NO and NO-derived molecules at altitude remain unknown. Limited data suggest processes including hypoxic upregulation of NO synthase gene expression, hemoglobin-NO reactions, and genetic variation. Gains in understanding will require integrating appropriate methods and measurement techniques with indicators of adaptive function under hypoxic

  20. Nitric oxide in adaptation to altitude

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, Daniel; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes published information on levels of nitric oxide gas (NO) in the lungs and NO-derived liquid phase molecules in the acclimatization of visitors newly arrived at altitudes of 2500m or more and adaptation of populations whose ancestors arrived thousands of years ago. Studies of acutely exposed visitors to high altitude focus on the first 24–48 hours with just a few extending to days or weeks. Among healthy visitors, NO levels in the lung, plasma and/or red blood cells fell within three hours, but then returned toward baseline or slightly higher by 48 hours, and increased above baseline by 5 days. Among visitors ill with high-altitude pulmonary edema at the time of the study or in the past, NO levels were lower than their healthy counterparts. As for highland populations, Tibetans had NO levels in the lung, plasma and red blood cells that were at least double and in some cases orders of magnitude greater than other populations regardless of altitude. Red blood cell associated nitrogen oxides were more than two hundred times higher. Other highland populations had generally higher levels although not to the degree showed by Tibetans. Overall, responses of those acclimatized and those presumed to be adapted are in the same direction although the Tibetans have much larger responses. Missing are long-term data on lowlanders at altitude showing how similar they become to the Tibetan phenotype. Also missing are data on Tibetans at low altitude to see the extent to which their phenotype is a response to the immediate environment or expressed constitutively. The mechanisms causing the visitors’ and the Tibetans’ high levels of NO and NO-derived molecules at altitude remain unknown. Limited data suggest processes including hypoxic upregulation of NO synthase gene expression, hemoglobin-NO reactions and genetic variation. Gains in understanding will require integrating appropriate methods and measurement techniques with indicators of adaptive function

  1. The importance of nitric oxide and arginase in the pathogenesis of acute neuroinflammation: are those contra players with the same direction?

    PubMed

    Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan; Stojanovic, Ivana; Pavlovic, Radmila; Pavlovic, Dusica

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) products (NOx) and arginase activity in acute neuroinflammation, we analyzed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma of clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients, who were divided into groups on the basis of clinical and radiological disease activity. The NOx levels, in both, CSF and plasma, were increased in CIS (p = 0.0015, p = 0.0014, respectively) and RRMS group (p = 0.002, p = 0.0019, respectively), while arginase activity approached low levels, in CIS (p = 0.009, p = 0.02, respectively) and RRMS group (p = 0.018, p = 0.034, respectively) compared to controls. The NOx levels were higher in CSF and plasma of CIS than in RRMS group (p = 0.065, p = 0.037, respectively), inverse to arginase activity which was higher, in CSF and plasma, in RRMS than in CIS group (p = 0.031, p = 0.02, respectively). The CSF and plasma NOx values positively correlated with the clinical disease activity in CIS (r = 0.09, p = 0.81; r = 0.45, p = 0.023, respectively) and RRMS group (r = 0.311, p = 0.04; r = 0.512, p = 0.01, respectively). Also, CSF and plasma arginase activity showed negative correlation with clinical disease activity in CIS (r = 0.39, p = 0.03; r = 0.1, p = 0.65, respectively) and RRMS group (r = 0.43, p = 0.03; r = 0.62, p = 0.015, respectively). The CSF NOx levels showed positive correlation with volume of acute radiological lesions of CNS in CIS (r = 0.25, p = 0.045) and RRMS group (r = 0.31, p = 0.04), while arginase activity showed the negative correlations in CIS (r = 0.41; p = 0.035) and RRMS group (r = 0.52, p = 0.022). The results support NO and arginase involvement in the pathogenesis of acute neuroinflammation, which determination may be useful as surrogate markers for clinical and radiological disease activity.

  2. Nitric oxide in the prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex is involved in the anxiogenic-like effect induced by acute restraint stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Vila-Verde, C; Marinho, A L Z; Lisboa, S F; Guimarães, F S

    2016-04-21

    Neurons containing the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) enzyme are located in brain areas related to defensive behavior, such as the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vMPFC). Rats exposed to a live predator (a cat) present anxiety-like behavior and an increased number of nNOS-positive neurons in this brain area one-week later. Moreover, stress-related behavioral changes in rodents can be prevented by systemic or local vMPFC nNOS inhibition. In the present study we investigated if acute restraint stress (RS)-induced delayed (one-week) anxiogenic-like effect was associated with increased nNOS expression or activity in the vMPFC. Furthermore, we also tested if local pharmacological nNOS inhibition would prevent stress-induced behavioral changes. Male Wistar rats were submitted to RS for 3h and tested in the elevated plus maze (EPM) 24h or 7 days later. Two hours after the EPM test, their brains were removed, processed and nNOS expression in the vMPFC was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Another group of animals was used for measuring NO metabolites (NOx; an indirect measure of NOS activity) immediately after the EPM test, 24h after RS. Independent groups had guide cannula implanted bilaterally into the prelimbic (PL) portion of vMPFC. Five to six days after surgery, the animals were submitted to RS and 24h later received local administration of the nNOS inhibitor, N-propyl-l-arginine (NPLA; 0.04 nmol). They were tested in the EPM 10 min later. RS-induced anxiogenic-like effect was accompanied by increased nNOS expression in the PL (p<0.05), but not in the infralimbic (IL) vMPFC, both 24h and 7 days after RS. Moreover, open-arm exploration of the EPM was negatively correlated with nNOS expression (p<0.05) and NOx levels (p<0.05) in the PL. The anxiogenic-like effect observed 24h after RS was prevented by NPLA (p<0.05). Our results suggest that RS-induced anxiogenic-like effect might depend on increased nNOS-mediated signaling in the PL MPFC. Copyright © 2016 IBRO

  3. Efficacy of inhaled nitric oxide in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Love, Lauren E; Bradshaw, Wanda T

    2012-02-01

    Over the past 20 years, the recognition of nitric oxide (NO) as an endothelial-derived vasodilator has led to remarkable advances in vascular biology awareness. The signaling molecule NO, produced by NO synthase, is a molecule that is widespread in the body and important in multiple organ systems. Soon after its discovery, investigators found NO to be a potent pulmonary vasodilator in term neonates. Nitric oxide has come to perform a key function in neonatal therapy and management since its identification, especially in those with respiratory failure. It is conventionally used in the neonatal population for the treatment of persistent pulmonary hypertension, resulting in hypoxic respiratory failure of the term or near-term newborn. Inhaled NO has been successful in acutely improving oxygenation and in reducing the need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation treatment. In recent years, the efficacy of inhaled NO for the prevention of pulmonary disability as well as its neuroprotective capabilities in preterm infants has been explored.

  4. Intracoronary genistein acutely increases coronary blood flow in anesthetized pigs through beta-adrenergic mediated nitric oxide release and estrogenic receptors.

    PubMed

    Grossini, Elena; Molinari, Claudio; Mary, David A S G; Uberti, Francesca; Caimmi, Philippe Primo; Surico, Nicola; Vacca, Giovanni

    2008-05-01

    Various studies have suggested that the phytoestrogen genistein has beneficial cardioprotective and vascular effects. However, there has been scarce information regarding the primary effect of genistein on coronary blood flow and its mechanisms including estrogen receptors, autonomic nervous system, and nitric oxide (NO). The present study was planned to determine the primary effect of genistein on coronary blood flow and the mechanisms involved. In anesthetized pigs, changes in left anterior descending coronary artery caused by intracoronary infusion of genistein at constant heart rate and arterial pressure were assessed using ultrasound flowmeters. In 25 pigs, genistein infused at 0.075 mg/min increased coronary blood flow by about 16.3%. This response was graded in a further five pigs by increasing the infused dose of the genistein between 0.007 and 0.147 mg/min. In the 25 pigs, blockade of cholinergic receptors (iv atropine; five pigs) and alpha-adrenergic receptors (iv phentolamine; five pigs) did not abolish the coronary response to genistein, whose effects were prevented by blockade of beta(2)-adrenergic receptors (iv butoxamine; five pigs), nitric oxide synthase (intracoronary N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester; five pigs) and estrogenic receptors (ERs; ERalpha/ERbeta; intracoronary fulvestrant; five pigs). In porcine aortic endothelial cells, genistein induced the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and NO production through ERK 1/2, Akt, and p38 MAPK pathways, which was prevented by the concomitant treatment by butoxamine and fulvestrant. In conclusion, genistein primarily caused coronary vasodilation the mechanism of which involved ERalpha/ERbeta and the release of NO through vasodilatory beta(2)-adrenoreceptor effects.

  5. Involvement of nitric oxide in the pathophysiology of acute heat stress in the rat. Influence of a new antioxidant compound H-290/51.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H S; Westman, J; Alm, P; Sjöquist, P O; Cervós-Navarro, J; Nyberg, F

    1997-03-15

    The possibility that nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the pathophysiology of brain injury caused by heat stress (HS) was examined using immunohistochemistry of a constitutive isoform of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (c-NOS) in a rat model. In addition, to discover the role of oxidative stress in inducing c-NOS activity in HS, the effect of a new antioxidant H-290/51 on HS-induced expression of c-NOS immunoreactivity was examined. Subjection of conscious young animals to a 4-h HS in a biological oxygen demand (BOD) incubator at 38 degrees C resulted in marked upregulation of c-NOS in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of stressed rats compared to normal rats kept at room temperature (21 +/- 1 degrees C). The c-NOS immunoreactivity was found in distorted neurons located in the edematous regions not normally showing c-NOS activity. Pretreatment with H-290/51 significantly attenuated the upregulation of c-NOS in animals subjected to HS, and the signs of neuronal distortion and edema were less pronounced. These results suggest that HS has the capacity to induce upregulation of c-NOS, and these effects can be reduced by prior treatment with H-290/51, indicating a possible neuroprotective effect of antioxidants in thermal brain injury.

  6. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca{sup 2+} mobilization and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi; Cho, Du-Hyong; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Duk-Hee; Jo, Inho

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Far-infrared (FIR) radiation increases eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation and NO production in BAEC. •CaMKII and PKA mediate FIR-stimulated increases in eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. •FIR increases intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. •Thermo-sensitive TRPV Ca{sup 2+} channels are unlikely to be involved in the FIR-mediated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation pathway. -- Abstract: Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser{sup 1179}) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40 min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. This

  7. Nitric oxide methods in seed biology.

    PubMed

    Bethke, Paul C; Libourel, Igor G L; Vitecek, Jan; Jones, Russell L

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitous signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in seed biology. Experiments with this biologically important gas require special provisions because NO in aerobic environments is readily converted into other oxides of nitrogen. In this chapter, we describe methods for the application of NO as a gas, and through the use of NO-donor compounds. We included information on the removal or reduction of NO with NO scavengers. Methods for detecting NO using NO-reactive fluorescent probes, and an apparatus incorporating an oxidizer column are also described.

  8. A selective nanosensing probe for nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouma, P. I.; Kalyanasundaram, K.

    2008-12-01

    Measurement of NO gas in exhaled human breath may be used to monitor oxidative stress and pulmonary diseases. Until now, only bulk, expensive, chemiluminescence-based NO monitors have been available to medicine. A nanosensing probe based on WO3 selectively detecting minute nitric oxide gas concentrations in the presence of interfering volatile compounds is presented. This is possible due to the chemical affinity of rhenium trioxide based phases to oxidizing gases. The NO nanoprobe is expected to lead to portable and affordable, noninvasive, single breath sampling, NO diagnostics.

  9. Uncoupled Cardiac Nitric Oxide Synthase Mediates Diastolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Gad A.; Fan, Tai-Hwang M.; Liu, Hong; Jiao, Zhe; Xiao, Hong D.; Lovelock, Joshua D.; Boulden, Beth M.; Widder, Julian; Fredd, Scott; Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Wolska, Beata M.; Dikalov, Sergey; Harrison, David G.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is one consequence of hypertension and caused by impaired cardiac diastolic relaxation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a known modulator of cardiac relaxation. Hypertension can lead to a reduction in vascular NO, in part because nitric oxide synthase (NOS) becomes uncoupled when oxidative depletion of its co-factor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) occurs.Similar events may occur in the heart leading to uncoupled NOS and diastolic dysfunction. Methods and Results In a hypertensive mouse model, diastolic dysfunction was accompanied by cardiac oxidation, a reduction in cardiac BH4, and uncoupled NOS. Compared to sham-operated animals, male mice with unilateral nephrectomy, with subcutaneous implantation of a controlled release deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) pellet, and given 1% saline to drink were mildly hypertensive and had diastolic dysfunction in the absence of systolic dysfunction or cardiac hypertrophy. The hypertensive mouse hearts showed increased oxidized biopterins, NOS-dependent superoxide production, reduced NO production, and phosphorylated phospholamban. Feeding hypertensive mice BH4 (5 mg/day), but not treating with hydralazine or tetrahydroneopterin, improved cardiac BH4 stores, phosphorylated phospholamban levels, and diastolic dysfunction. Isolated cardiomyocyte experiments revealed impaired relaxation that was normalized with acute BH4 treatment. Targeted cardiac overexpression of angiotensin converting enzyme also resulted in cardiac oxidation, NOS uncoupling, and diastolic dysfunction in the absence of hypertension. Conclusions Cardiac oxidation, independent of vascular changes, can lead to uncoupled cardiac NOS and diastolic dysfunction. BH4 may represent a possible treatment for diastolic dysfunction. PMID:20083682

  10. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T.C. Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T.; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S.; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO) - a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells. PMID:26390975

  11. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T C Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO)--a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells.

  12. Nitric oxide and obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Weiss, J Woodrow; Liu, Yuzhen; Li, Xianghong; Ji, En-sheng

    2012-11-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common disease, affecting 16% of the working age population. Although sleep apnea has a well-established connection to daytime sleepiness presumably mediated through repetitive sleep disruption, some other consequences are less well understood. Clinical, epidemiological, and physiological investigations have demonstrated a connection between sleep apnea and daytime hypertension. The elevation of arterial pressure is evident during waking, when patients are not hypoxic, and is mediated by sustained sympathoexcitation and by altered peripheral vascular reactivity. This review summarizes data suggesting that both the sympathoexcitation and the altered vascular reactivity are, at least in part, a consequence of reduced expression of nitric oxide synthase, in neural tissue and in endothelium. Reduced nitric oxide generation in central and peripheral sites of sympathoregulation and in endothelium together may, in part, explain the elevations in waking pressures observed in sleep apnea patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nitric oxide in the pulmonary vasculature.

    PubMed

    Coggins, Matthew P; Bloch, Kenneth D

    2007-09-01

    Homeostasis in the pulmonary vasculature is maintained by the actions of vasoactive compounds, including nitric oxide (NO). NO is critical for normal development of the pulmonary vasculature and continues to mediate normal vasoregulation in adulthood. Loss of NO bioavailability is one component of the endothelial dysfunction and vascular pathology found in pulmonary hypertension (PH). A broad research effort continues to expand our understanding of the control of NO production and NO signaling and has generated novel theories on the importance of pulmonary NO production in the control of the systemic vasculature. This understanding has led to exciting developments in our ability to treat PH, including inhaled NO and phosphodiesterase inhibitors, and to several promising directions for future therapies using nitric oxide-donor compounds, stimulators of soluble guanylate cyclase, progenitor cells expressing NO synthase (NOS), and NOS gene manipulation.

  14. Inducible nitric oxide synthase: Good or bad?

    PubMed

    Lind, Maggie; Hayes, Alan; Caprnda, Martin; Petrovic, Daniel; Rodrigo, Luis; Kruzliak, Peter; Zulli, Anthony

    2017-09-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOS) are a family of isoforms responsible for the synthesis of the potent dilator nitric oxide (NO). Expression of inducible NOS (iNOS) occurs in conditions of inflammation, and produces large amounts of NO. In pathological conditions iNOS is regarded as a harmful enzyme and is proposed to be a major contributor to diseases of the cardiovascular system such as atherosclerosis. In this review, we address the notion that iNOS is a detrimental enzyme in disease and discuss its potentially beneficial roles. Additionally, we describe other molecules associated with iNOS in diseases such as atherosclerosis, and current research on therapeutic inhibitors tested to reduced pathology associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Nitric oxide, malnutrition and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Brunini, Tatiana M C; Moss, Monique B; Siqueira, Mariana A S; Santos, Sérgio F F; Lugon, Jocemir R; Mendes-Ribeiro, Antônio C

    2007-04-01

    The conditionally essential amino acid L-arginine is the substrate for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, a key second messenger involved in physiological functions including endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation and inhibition of platelet adhesion and aggregation. Extracellular L-arginine transport seems to be essential for the production of NO by the action of NO synthases (NOS), even when the intracellular levels of L-arginine are available in excess (L-arginine paradox). Chronic renal failure (CRF) is a complex clinical condition associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and thrombosis leading to cardiovascular events. Various studies document that markers of malnutrition and inflammation, such as low body mass index (BMI), C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), are strong independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). There is considerable literature demonstrating that a disturbance in the nitric oxide control mechanism plays a role in mediating the haemodynamic and haemostatic disorders present in CRF. Endogenous analogues of L-arginine, ADMA and L-NMMA, which can inhibit NO synthesis and L-arginine transport, are increased whilst L-arginine is reduced in plasma from all stages of CRF patients. In this context, the uptake of L-arginine in blood cells is increased in undialysed CRF patients and in patients treated by CAPD and haemodialysis. In platelets obtained from haemodialysis patients, the activation of L-arginine transport and NO production was limited to well-nourished patients. Impairment in nitric oxide bioactivity, coupled with malnutrition and inflammation, may contribute to increased incidence of atherothrombotic events in CRF. This article summarizes the current knowledge of L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway and malnutrition in CRF and briefly describes possible therapeutic interventions.

  16. Endogenous nitric oxide generation in protoplast chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Rajesh Kumar; Prommer, Judith; Watanabe, Masami

    2013-01-01

    KEY MESSAGE : NO generation is studied in the protoplast chloroplasts. NO, ONOO ( - ) and ROS (O ( 2 ) ( - ) and H ( 2 ) O ( 2 ) ) are generated in chloroplasts. Nitric oxide synthase-like protein appears to be involved in NO generation. Nitric oxide stimulates chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast differentiation. The present study was conducted to better understand the process of NO generation in the leaf chloroplasts and protoplasts. NO, peroxynitrite and superoxide anion were investigated in the protoplasts and isolated chloroplasts using specific dyes, confocal laser scanning and light microscopy. The level of NO was highest after protoplast isolation and subsequently decreased during culture. Suppression of NO signal in the presence of PTIO, suggests that diaminofluorescein-2 diacetate (DAF-2DA) detected NO. Detection of peroxynitrite, a reaction product of NO and superoxide anion, further suggests NO generation. Moreover, generation of NO and peroxynitrite in the chloroplasts of wild-type Arabidopsis and their absence or weak signals in the leaf-derived protoplasts of Atnoa1 mutants confirmed the reactivity of DAF-2DA and aminophenyl fluorescein to NO and peroxynitrite, respectively. Isolated chloroplasts also showed signal of NO. Suppression of NO signal in the presence of 100 μM nitric oxide synthase inhibitors [L-NNA, Nω-nitro-L-arginine and PBIT, S,S'-1,3-phenylene-bis(1,2-ethanediyl)-bis-isothiourea] revealed that nitric oxide synthase-like system is involved in NO synthesis. Suppression of NO signal in the protoplasts isolated in the presence of cycloheximide suggests de novo synthesis of NO generating protein during the process of protoplast isolation. Furthermore, the lack of inhibition of NO production by sodium tungstate (250 μM) and inhibition by L-NNA, and PBIT suggest involvement NOS-like protein, but not nitrate reductase, in NO generation in the leaf chloroplasts and protoplasts.

  17. Nitric Oxide in Mammary Tumor Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    smaller level TIMP-3. This indicated that invasion stimulating effects of endogenous NO are, at least in part , mediated by downregulation TIMP-2 and...vasculature: Inhibition retards tumor growth in vivo. In: Moncada S, Feelisch M, Busse R, Higgs EA (eds) Biology of Nitric Oxide. Part 4: Enzymology...useful in treating certain human cancers either as single agents or as a part of combination therapies. I. Introduction duction of proliferation

  18. Killing of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro by nitric oxide derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Rockett, K A; Awburn, M M; Cowden, W B; Clark, I A

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the in vitro susceptibility of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum to killing by nitric oxide and related molecules. A saturated solution of nitric oxide did not inhibit parasite growth, but two oxidation products of nitric oxide (nitrite and nitrate ions) were toxic to the parasite in millimolar concentrations. Nitrosothiol derivatives of cysteine and glutathione were found to be about a thousand times more active (50% growth inhibitory concentration, approximately 40 microM) than nitrite. PMID:1879941

  19. Nitric oxide and thiol groups.

    PubMed

    Gaston, B

    1999-05-05

    S-Nitroso(sy)lation reactions have recently been appreciated to regulate protein function and mediate 'nitrosative' stress. S-Nitrosothiols (SNOs) have been identified in a variety of tissues, and represent a novel class of signaling molecules which may act independently of homolytic cleavage to NO - and, indeed, in a stereoselective fashion - or be metabolized to other bioactive nitrogen oxides. It is now appreciated that sulfur-NO interactions have critical physiological relevance to mammalian neurotransmission, ion channel function, intracellular signaling and antimicrobial defense. These reactions are promising targets for the development of new medical therapies.

  20. The role of nitric oxide in experimental cerulein induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Um, Soon Ho; Kwon, Yong Dae; Kim, Chang Duck; Lee, Hong Sik; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Chun, Hoon Jai; Lee, Sang Woo; Choi, Jae Hyun; Ryu, Ho Sang; Hyun, Jin Hai

    2003-08-01

    An enhanced formation of nitric oxide (NO), due to the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of shock and inflammation, but its role in acute pancreatitis still remains controversial. To clarify the role of NO in acute pancreatitis, the present experiment investigated the expression of iNOS and the effect of NOS inhibition on cerulein-induced pancreatitis in rats. Group I received intraperitoneal (ip) injection of normal saline. Group II received two ip injections of cerulein (20 microgram/kg). Group III received injections of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (30 mg/kg) with cerulein. Group IV received L-arginine (250 mg/kg) with cerulein and L-NAME. The expression of iNOS in the pancreas was examined by western blot analysis. The plasma concentration of NO metabolites was measured. The severity of pancreatitis was assessed by measuring serum amylase, pancreas water content and histopathological examination. Compared with controls, the cerulein group displayed significantly increased expression of iNOS and raised plasma NO metabolites. Treatment with L-NAME significantly decreased hyperamylasemia, plasma NO level, and the extent of pancreatic injury. Treatment with L-arginine reversed the effects of L-NAME. These findings suggest that an enhanced formation of NO by iNOS plays an important role in the development of acute pancreatitis, and inhibition of NO production has the beneficial effects in reducing pancreas injury.

  1. Oxidative stress, nitric oxide, and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pitocco, Dario; Zaccardi, Francesco; Di Stasio, Enrico; Romitelli, Federica; Santini, Stefano A; Zuppi, Cecilia; Ghirlanda, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    In the recent decades, oxidative stress has become focus of interest in most biomedical disciplines and many types of clinical research. Increasing evidence from research on several diseases show that oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetes, obesity, cancer, ageing, inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders, hypertension, apoptosis, cardiovascular diseases, and heart failure. Based on this research, the emerging concept is that oxidative stress is the "final common pathway", through which risk factors of several diseases exert their deleterious effects. Oxidative stress causes a complex dysregulation of cell metabolism and cell-cell homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction. These are the two most relevant mechanisms in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes, and in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, the leading cause of death in diabetic patients.

  2. Oxidative Stress, Nitric Oxide, and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pitocco, Dario; Zaccardi, Francesco; Di Stasio, Enrico; Romitelli, Federica; Santini, Stefano A.; Zuppi, Cecilia; Ghirlanda, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    In the recent decades, oxidative stress has become focus of interest in most biomedical disciplines and many types of clinical research. Increasing evidence from research on several diseases show that oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetes, obesity, cancer, ageing, inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders, hypertension, apoptosis, cardiovascular diseases, and heart failure. Based on this research, the emerging concept is that oxidative stress is the “final common pathway”, through which risk factors of several diseases exert their deleterious effects. Oxidative stress causes a complex dysregulation of cell metabolism and cell-cell homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction. These are the two most relevant mechanisms in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes, and in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, the leading cause of death in diabetic patients. PMID:20703435

  3. [Nitric oxide and the kidneys].

    PubMed

    Dzúrik, R; Spustová, V

    2001-02-01

    Nitrogen oxide (NO) is one of the crucial modulators of the vascular tonus. Apart from its effect on the cardiovascular system it exerts an effect also on other types of cells and ensures their functions.Specially comprehensive is its synthesis and action in the kidneys: NO is formed in the endothelial cells due to the activity of constitutional endothelial synthase (eNOS), in mesangial cells of inductive synthase (iNOS), in smooth muscle cells (vsmNOS), in tubular cells neuronal NOS (nNOS) and iNOS and in the macula densa nNOS. By modulation of the v.afferens it influences the blood flow through the glomeruli and filtration pressure in the glomeruli. It participates in the tubuloglomerular feedback: the cells of the macula densa produce NO via nNOS, the genetic transcription and translation of which as well as the kationic translation system ensure the transport of the L-arginine precursor and regulate very sensitively NO formation. The latter diffuses via the extraglomerular mesangium into the iuxtaglomerular apparatus where renin is forned.NO reduces proteinuria and renal proliferation. During renal insufficiency NO production is inhibited and in diabetes NO production is increased. Diabetic hyperfiltration and hypertrophy are ascribed to produced NO. Experimental studies contributed substantially to the knowledge of renal effects of NO. At present intensive clinical research has been started which, no doubt, will influence medical practice.

  4. Development of sensors for nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Glazier, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    The importance of nitric oxide (NO) in mammalian systems has recently been recognized. Interest in NO stems from the discovery of its role in several processes. Firstly, NO is found to be an endothelium-derived relaxing factor. Release of NO by endothelial cells lining blood vessels causes the surrounding smooth muscle of the vessel walls to relax. Secondly, it is known to inhibit the aggregation and adhesion of platelets in blood vessels. Thirdly, NO is believed to be formed by activated macrophage cells to assist in killing foreign cells. Lastly, NO acts in the brain both as a feedback messenger from post- to presynaptic nerve cells and as a conventional neurotransmitter affecting cells other than presynaptic nerve cells. In addition to these roles, it is likely that NO is involved in other processes given its reactivity and potential presence in all mammalian cells. Measurement of NO flux within biological systems is a challenging problem as NO is generated in the nanomolar to micromolar range and is subject to rapid oxidation. The three most common assay techniques for NO in biological systems include: (a) electron paramagnetic resonance detection, (b) hemoglobin oxidation, and (c) chemiluminescence detection with ozone. The authors have initiated research on the construction of a hemoglobin-based, fiber-optic sensor for the detection of nitric oxide in biological systems and progress toward this goal will be presented.

  5. Reduction of nitric oxide emissions from a combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, R.A.; Pritchard, H.O.

    1980-05-27

    A turbojet combustor and method for controlling nitric oxide emissions is provided by employing successive combustion zones wherein after combustion of an initial portion of the fuel in a primary combustion zone, the combustion products of the primary zone are combined with the remaining portion of fuel and additional plenum air and burned in a secondary combustion zone under conditions that result in low nitric oxide emissions. Low nitric oxide emissions are achieved by a novel turbojet combustor arrangement which provides flame stability by allowing stable combustion, which usually result in large emissions of nitric oxide in a primary combustion zone, to be accompanied by low nitric oxide emissions resulting from controlled fuel-lean combustion, ignited by the emission products from the primary zone, in a secondary combustion zone at a lower combustion temperature resulting in low emissions of nitric oxide.

  6. Nitric oxide control of lower genitourinary tract functions: a review.

    PubMed

    Burnett, A L

    1995-06-01

    It is apparent that evolving concepts of the regulatory basis for functions in the pelvis must take into account the role exerted by nitric oxide. A recently characterized messenger molecule, nitric oxide has been associated with numerous physiologic processes. Intense investigations of this molecule have extended its importance to several genitourinary functions. Penile erection, micturition, peristalsis of the male excurrent duct system, contractile properties of the prostate, and lumbosacral spinal cord neurotransmission are all functions that may transpire under some degree of control by nitric oxide. Impotence, urinary obstruction, or ejaculatory problems, in turn, may represent alterations of nitric oxide production or action. The strategic manipulation of nitric oxide or its mechanism of action, possibly by pharmacologic means, may restore or produce desired functional effects. These possibilities, therefore, suggest that the advancing knowledge of nitric oxide in the genitourinary tract may be of enormous clinical value in the future.

  7. Updated role of nitric oxide in disorders of erythrocyte function.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Marc J; Maley, Jason H; Lasker, George F; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2013-03-01

    Nitric oxide is a potent vasodilator that plays a critical role in disorders of erythrocyte function. Sickle cell disease, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and banked blood preservation are three conditions where nitric oxide is intimately related to dysfunctional erythrocytes. These conditions are accompanied by hemolysis, thrombosis and vasoocclusion. Our understanding of the interaction between nitric oxide, hemoglobin, and the vasculature is constantly evolving, and by defining this role we can better direct trials aimed at improving the treatments of disorders of erythrocyte function. Here we briefly discuss nitric oxide's interaction with hemoglobin through the hypothesis regarding Snitrosohemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and myoglobin as nitrite reductases. We then review the current understanding of the role of nitric oxide in sickle cell disease, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and banked blood, and discuss therapeutics in development to target nitric oxide in the treatment of some of these disorders.

  8. Use of inhaled nitric oxide in the new born period: results from the European Inhaled Nitric Oxide Registry.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Chris; Ibrahim, Hafis; Göthberg, Sylvia; Jónsson, Baldvin; Subhedar, Nimish

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to present data relating to the use of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in newborn infants included in the European Inhaled Nitric Oxide Registry. Demographic, clinical and therapeutic data from seven European centres are reported. Univariate analyses were performed to identify factors associated with acute response to iNO and survival without extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). A total of 112 newborn infants received iNO, with 40% being less than 34 weeks gestational age. The commonest indication for iNO was secondary pulmonary hypertension. Acute response to iNO was more common in infants with a higher oxygenation index (median OI 32.7 vs 22.6, p = 0.040), although acute response did not predict survival without ECMO. Infants who survived without ECMO had a lower OI prior to therapy (median OI 24 vs 43, p = 0.009), were commenced on a higher starting dose (median dose 20 ppm vs 10 ppm p = 0.013) and received a lower maintenance dose (median dose 10 vs 17 ppm, p = 0.027) than those who died or received ECMO. Collating and reporting data about iNO therapy in neonates across a number of European centres using a web-based system is feasible. These data may be used to monitor the clinical use of iNO, identify adverse effects, generate research hypotheses and promote high standards in the clinical use of iNO.

  9. Enhanced gastric nitric oxide synthase activity in duodenal ulcer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Rachmilewitz, D; Karmeli, F; Eliakim, R; Stalnikowicz, R; Ackerman, Z; Amir, G; Stamler, J S

    1994-01-01

    Nitric oxide, the product of nitric oxide synthase in inflammatory cells, may have a role in tissue injury through its oxidative metabolism. Nitric oxide may have a role in the pathogenesis of duodenal ulcer and may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the association between gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori and peptic disease. In this study, calcium independent nitric oxide synthase activity was detected in human gastric mucosa suggesting expression of the inducible isoform. In 17 duodenal ulcer patients gastric antral and fundic nitric oxide synthase activity was found to be two and 1.5-fold respectively higher than its activity in the antrum and fundus of 14 normal subjects (p < 0.05). H pylori was detected in the antrum of 15 of 17 duodenal ulcer patients and only in 7 of 14 of the control subjects. Antral nitric oxide synthase activity in H pylori positive duodenal ulcer patients was twofold higher than in H pylori positive normal subjects (p < 0.05). In duodenal ulcer patients antral and fundic nitric oxide synthase activity resumed normal values after induction of ulcer healing with ranitidine. Eradication of H pylori did not further affect gastric nitric oxide synthase activity. These findings suggest that in duodenal ulcer patients stimulated gastric mucosal nitric oxide synthase activity, though independent of the H pylori state, may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:7525417

  10. Depression of extra-cellular GABA and increase of NMDA-induced nitric oxide following acute intra-nuclear administration of alcohol in the cerebellar nuclei of the rat.

    PubMed

    Manto, Mario; Laute, Marie-Aline; Pandolfo, Massimo

    2005-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and nitric oxide are two key-transmitters in cerebellar nuclei, the major output of cerebellar circuitry. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of acute intra-cerebellar administration of ethanol (20 mM) on extra-cellular levels of GABA and on the NMDA-induced nitric oxide (NO) production using microdialysis in the rat. We also studied: (i) the effects of a pre-administration of DNQX, a specific antagonist of AMPA receptors, on NO production, (ii) the effects of a pre-administration of 7-NI (7-nitroindazole, an inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase NOS) and APV (D-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid, a specific blocker of the NMDA type glutamate receptors) on the actions of alcohol/NMDA on glutamate receptors, and (iii) the in vivo interaction between DNQX, ethanol and NMDA receptor activation. We found that ethanol decreased the amount of extra-cellular GABA, and that this effect was counterbalanced by administration of tiagabine 1 mg/kg, a potent inhibitor of GAT-1 GABA transporter, given by the i.p. route. In loco administration of NMDA increased the levels of NO, as previously reported. A pre-administration of DNQX (500 microM) increased significantly the production of NO up to toxic levels, as well as ethanol administration. A pre-administration of 7-NI or APV reduced significantly the amounts of NO when NMDA and alcohol were infused simultaneously. The combination of ethanol with DNQX was associated with a marked enhancement of the concentrations of NO. The activity of GAT-1 in cerebellar nuclei and around this target, including in glial cells expressing GAT-1 activated by ambient GABA, seems to be spared by ethanol. Tiagabine could be considered as a candidate for future investigational treatments of acute ethanol-induced dysfunction of cerebellar nuclei. We found a potentiation of the production of NO when AMPA antagonists are given simultaneously to ethanol. The hypothesis of AMPA neurotoxicity, which has

  11. Measuring nasal nitric oxide in allergic rhinitis patients.

    PubMed

    Nesic, V S; Djordjevic, V Z; Tomic-Spiric, V; Dudvarski, Z R; Soldatovic, I A; Arsovic, N A

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to compare two sampling methods for nasal nitric oxide in healthy individuals and allergic rhinitis patients, and to examine the within-subject reliability of nasal nitric oxide measurement. The study included 23 allergic rhinitis patients without concomitant asthma and 10 healthy individuals. For all participants, nitric oxide levels were measured non-invasively from the lungs through the mouth (i.e. the oral fractional exhaled nitric oxide) and the nose. Nasal nitric oxide was measured by two different methods: (1) nasal aspiration via one nostril during breath holding and (2) single-breath quiet exhalation against resistance through a tight facemask (i.e. the nasal fractional exhaled nitric oxide). Compared with healthy participants, allergic rhinitis patients had significantly higher average oral and nasal nitric oxide levels. All methods of nitric oxide measurement had excellent reliability. Nasal nitric oxide measurement is a useful and reliable clinical tool for diagnosing allergic rhinitis in patients without asthma in an out-patient setting.

  12. Inhaled nitric oxide in chronic obstructive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tiihonen, J.; Hakola, P.; Paanila, J.; Turtiainen . Dept. of Forensic Psychiatry)

    1993-01-30

    During an investigation of the effect of nitric oxide on the pulmonary circulation the authors had the opportunity to give nitric oxide to a patient with longstanding obstructive airway disease, with successful results. A 72-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was referred to the institution for assessment of pulmonary vascular reactivity to acetylcholine and nitric oxide. Acetylcholine was infused into the main pulmonary artery followed 15 min later by an inhalation of 80 parts per million (ppm) nitric oxide. Heart rate and systemic arterial and pulmonary arterial pressures were continuously monitored. Throughout the study the inspired oxygen concentration was kept constant at 98%. Nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide concentrations were monitored while nitric oxide was delivered. The infusion of acetylcholine resulted in a small increase in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Nitric oxide produced a substantial fall in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance with a concomitant increase in systemic arterial oxygen tension. These results suggest that endothelium-dependent relaxation of the pulmonary vasculature was impaired in the patient and that exogenous nitric oxide was an effective pulmonary vasodilator. In-vitro investigation of explanted airways disease suggests not only that endothelium-dependent pulmonary artery relaxation is impaired but also that the dysfunction is related to pre-existing hypoxemia and hypercapnia. Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells and might alter the pulmonary vascular remodeling characteristic of patients with chronic obstructive airways disease.

  13. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils.

    PubMed

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-07-05

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources of NO in the atmosphere are anthropogenic emissions (from combustion of fossil fuels) and biogenic emission from soils. NO is both produced and consumed in soils as a result of biotic and abiotic processes. The main processes involved are microbial nitrification and denitrification, and chemodenitrification. Thus, the net result is complex and dependent on several factors such as nitrogen availability, organic matter content, oxygen status, soil moisture, pH and temperature. This paper reviews recent knowledge on processes forming NO in soils and the factors controlling its emission to the atmosphere. Schemes for simulating these processes are described, and the results are discussed with the purpose of scaling up to global emission.

  14. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils

    PubMed Central

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources of NO in the atmosphere are anthropogenic emissions (from combustion of fossil fuels) and biogenic emission from soils. NO is both produced and consumed in soils as a result of biotic and abiotic processes. The main processes involved are microbial nitrification and denitrification, and chemodenitrification. Thus, the net result is complex and dependent on several factors such as nitrogen availability, organic matter content, oxygen status, soil moisture, pH and temperature. This paper reviews recent knowledge on processes forming NO in soils and the factors controlling its emission to the atmosphere. Schemes for simulating these processes are described, and the results are discussed with the purpose of scaling up to global emission. PMID:23713124

  15. Regulatory effects of anesthetics on nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenguo; Liu, Qin; Zhu, Xiao; Wu, Zhi; Li, Dongpei; Huang, Fang; He, Hongwen

    2016-04-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical gas in the biological system, which is produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) family. NO acts as a biological mediator and plays important roles in different systems in humans. The NO/NOS system exerts a broad spectrum of signaling functions involved in vasodilation, inflammation, oxidative stress, cardioprotection and neuroprotection. It has been demonstrated that intravenous and volatile anesthetics (such as propofol, ketamine, midazolam, isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane, etc.) modulate NO production through multiple mechanisms that may influence physiological and pathophysiological processes. This review focuses on the effects of different anesthetics on NO/NOS regulation in different disease conditions. Possible cellular mechanisms and intermediate role of NO/NOS in anesthetic-mediated organ protection are also discussed. It would be interesting to clarify the impact of anesthetics on NO/NOS regulation. This review gives an overview of the effects of different anesthetics on NO/NOS regulation and function in different physiologic and pathophysiologic states.

  16. Nitric oxide and plant iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Buet, Agustina; Simontacchi, Marcela

    2015-03-01

    Like all living organisms, plants demand iron (Fe) for important biochemical and metabolic processes. Internal imbalances, as a consequence of insufficient or excess Fe in the environment, lead to growth restriction and affect crop yield. Knowledge of signals and factors affecting each step in Fe uptake from the soil and distribution (long-distance transport, remobilization from old to young leaves, and storage in seeds) is necessary to improve our understanding of plant mineral nutrition. In this context, the role of nitric oxide (NO) is discussed as a key player in maintaining Fe homeostasis through its cross talk with hormones, ferritin, and frataxin and the ability to form nitrosyl-iron complexes.

  17. Nitric oxide in liver inflammation and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Martin-Sanz, Paloma; Hortelano, Sonsoles; Callejas, Nuria A; Goren, Nora; Casado, Marta; Zeini, Miriam; Boscá, Lisardo

    2002-12-01

    Hepatocytes express and release inflammatory mediators after challenge with bacterial cell wall molecules and proinflammatory cytokines. Nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2) is expressed under these conditions and the high-output NO synthesis that follows contributes to the inflammatory response in this tissue and participates in the onset of several hepatopathies. However, in the course of liver regeneration, for example, after partial hepatectomy, NOS-2 is expressed at moderate levels and contributes to inhibit apoptosis and to favor progression in the cell cycle until the organ size and function are restored. The mechanisms involved in the regulation of NOS-2 expression under these conditions are revised.

  18. Nitric oxide as a surgical adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Aimee; Friedman, Adam J

    2015-08-01

    Advances in surgical technology have allowed for previously unconsidered therapeutic interventions. However, the complexity and invasiveness of surgical procedures are not without adverse consequences. Nitric oxide's fundamental role in a host of physiological processes, including angiogenesis, wound and bone healing, thromboresistance, smooth muscle relaxation and inflammation makes it a significant player in accelerating wound healing and mitigating the inflammation of ischemia reperfusion injury common to surgical procedures. In addition, the therapeutic properties of NO have been harnessed for the prophylactic treatment of implant infection and graft failure. In this article, we will discuss the mechanism by which NO mediates these processes, and its perioperative translational applications.

  19. Effect of premixing on nitric oxide formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Emissions from a simple 10-cm (4-in.) diameter tube combustor burning a premixed, gaseous propane/air mixture were measured. Inlet conditions included a temperature of 590 K (600 F), pressure of 5.5 atm, and reference velocity of 23 m/s (75 ft/s) for a range of equivalence ratios from the lean limit to slightly richer than stoichiometric. A nitric oxide emission index of 1 g NO2/kg fuel was measured for an equivalence ratio of 0.57.

  20. Nitric oxide and oxidative stress in placental explant cultures.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Juvic M; Casart, Ysabel C; Camejo, María I

    2016-01-01

    Placental explant culture, and cellular cytolysis and cellular differentiation have been previously studied. However, oxidative stress and nitric oxide profiles have not been evaluated in these systems. The aim of this study was to determine the release of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide from placental explants cultured over a seven day period. Placental explants were maintained for seven days in culture and the medium was changed every 24 hours. The response was assessed in terms of syncytiotrophoblast differentiation (human chorionic gonadotropin, hCG), cellular cytolysis (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH), oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS), and nitric oxide (NO). Levels of hCG increased progressively from day two to attain its highest level on days four and five after which it decreased gradually. In contrast, the levels of LDH, TBARS, and NO were elevated in the early days of placental culture when new syncytiotrophoblast from cytotrophoblast were forming and also in the last days of culture when tissue was declining. In conclusion, the levels of NO and lipid peroxidation follow a pattern similar to LDH and contrary to hCG. Future placental explant studies to evaluate oxidative stress and NO should consider the physiological changes inherent during the time of culture.

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction associated with nitric oxide pathways in glutamate neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Manucha, Walter

    Multiple mechanisms underlying glutamate-induced neurotoxicity have recently been discussed. Likewise, a clear deregulation of the mitochondrial respiratory mechanism has been described in patients with neurodegeneration, oxidative stress, and inflammation. This article highlights nitric oxide, an atypical neurotransmitter synthesized and released on demand by the post-synaptic neurons, and has many important implications for nerve cell survival and differentiation. Consequently, synaptogenesis, synapse elimination, and neurotransmitter release, are nitric oxide-modulated. Interesting, an emergent role of nitric oxide pathways has been discussed as regards neurotoxicity from glutamate-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that nitric oxide pathways modulation could prevent oxidative damage to neurons through apoptosis inhibition. This review aims to highlight the emergent aspects of nitric oxide-mediated signaling in the brain, and how they can be related to neurotoxicity, as well as the development of neurodegenerative diseases development.

  2. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage.

    PubMed

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Komur, Baran; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders.

  3. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders. PMID:27382570

  4. Development of Antisense Therapeutic and Imaging Agents to Detect and Suppress Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) Expression in Acute Lung Injury (ALI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuefei

    This dissertation focuses on the development and investigation of antisense imaging and therapeutic agents, combined with nanotechnology, to detect and suppress inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression for the diagnosis and treatment of acute lung injury (ALI). To achieve this goal, several efforts were made. The first effort was the identification and characterization of high binding affinity antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and shell-crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticle (SCK)-PNA conjugates to the iNOS mRNA. Antisense binding sites on the iNOS mRNA were first mapped by a procedure for rapidly generating a library of antisense accessible sites on native mRNAs (MASL) which involves reverse transcription of whole cell mRNA extracts with a random oligodeoxynucleotide primer followed by mRNA-specific PCR. Antisense PNAs against the antisense accessible sites were accordingly synthesized and characterized. The second effort was the investigation of cationic shell crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticle (cSCK)-mediated siRNA delivery to suppress iNOS expression for the treatment of ALI. siRNA with its unique gene-specific properties could serve as a promising therapeutic agent, however success in this area has been challenged by a lack of efficient biocompatible transfection agents. cSCK with its nanometer size and positive charge previously showed efficient cellular delivery of phosphorothioate ODNs (oligodeoxynucleotides), plasmid DNA and PNA. Herein, cSCK showed good siRNA binding and facilitated efficient siRNA transfection in HeLa, a mouse macrophage cell line and other human cell lines. cSCK led to greater silencing efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000 in HeLa cells as determined by the viability following transfection with cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic siRNAs, as well in 293T and HEK cells, and was comparable in BEAS-2B and MCF10a cells. The third effort was the preparation of an iNOS imaging probe through electrostatic complexation between a radiolabeled

  5. Vascular nitric oxide: Beyond eNOS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingzi; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan W S

    2015-10-01

    As the first discovered gaseous signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO) affects a number of cellular processes, including those involving vascular cells. This brief review summarizes the contribution of NO to the regulation of vascular tone and its sources in the blood vessel wall. NO regulates the degree of contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells mainly by stimulating soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) to produce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), although cGMP-independent signaling [S-nitrosylation of target proteins, activation of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) or production of cyclic inosine monophosphate (cIMP)] also can be involved. In the blood vessel wall, NO is produced mainly from l-arginine by the enzyme endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) but it can also be released non-enzymatically from S-nitrosothiols or from nitrate/nitrite. Dysfunction in the production and/or the bioavailability of NO characterizes endothelial dysfunction, which is associated with cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis.

  6. Nitric oxide may mediate nipple erection.

    PubMed

    Tezer, Murat; Ozluk, Yasemin; Sanli, Oner; Asoglu, Oktar; Kadioglu, Ates

    2012-01-01

    The nipple is a specialized structure that can become erect by cold, sexual arousal, breast-feeding, or other tactile stimulations, which can induce the milk ejection reflex and sexual arousal because of intense sensory innervation. The studies that have been conducted thus far to identify the mechanism of nipple erection (NE) are not sufficient. It has been stated that NE occurs via activation of the sympathetic nervous system and smooth muscle contraction. The purposes of this study were to investigate the existence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the nipple-areola complex (NAC) to explain the NE mechanism. Considering that smooth muscle relaxation might be effective in NE, endothelial and neuronal NOS expression and localization were investigated via immunohistochemical methods on sagittal sections from 17 human NACs. The results of this study indicate that eNOS is expressed in the vascular endothelium, ductal epithelium, and smooth muscles, whereas nNOS is expressed in the neural fibers, smooth muscles, ductal epithelium, and vascular endothelium in the NAC. Sinusoidal spaces with endothelial layers similar to those found in penile cavernosal tissue are not found in the NAC. Various mediators are known to affect the function of the NAC smooth muscles; however, this study demonstrates that enzymes (eNOS and nNOS) that synthesize nitric oxide are expressed in the NAC.

  7. Nitric oxide synthase in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    López-Figueroa, M O; Møller, M

    1996-10-01

    The recent discovery of nitric oxide (NO) as a biological messenger molecule with unique characteristics has opened a new field in pineal research. This free radical gas is synthesized by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) from L-arginine. The activation of adrenoreceptors in the membrane of the pinealocytes mediates the increase in NO through a mechanism that involves G proteins. In the pinealocyte, NO stimulates guanylyl cyclase resulting in an increased intracellular content of cGMP. The role of cGMP in pineal metabolism, however, is still enigmatic. Using enzyme histochemistry and immunohistochemistry, the presence of NOS has been confirmed in the pineal gland of some species. In the rat and especially in the sheep, NOS is located in nerve fibres innervating the gland. These nerve fibres also contain the neuropeptides vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI), and are probably of parasympathetic origin. In cell cultures and tissue sections NOS immunoreactivity has been shown to be present in pinealocytes of the rat and bovine but not in the sheep. Finally, NOS is also present in the endothelial cells of the blood vessels of the pineal gland. Accordingly, in the mammalian pineal gland, NO is synthesized in both presynaptic nerve fibers and pinealocytes, as well as in blood vessels. However, the anatomical location of NO synthesis varies considerably among species. NO released in the pineal gland, might influence both the pineal metabolism and the blood flow of the gland.

  8. Nitric oxide from a "green" perspective.

    PubMed

    Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2015-02-15

    The molecule nitric oxide (NO) which is involved in practically all biochemical and physiological plant processes has become a subject for plant research. However, there remain many unanswered questions concerning how, where and when this molecule is enzymatically generated in higher plants. This mini-review aims to provide an overview of NO in plants for those readers unfamiliar with this field of research. The review will therefore discuss the importance of NO in higher plants at the physiological and biochemical levels, its involvement in designated nitro-oxidative stresses in response to adverse abiotic and biotic environmental conditions, NO emission/uptake from plants, beneficial plant-microbial interactions, and its potential application in the biotechnological fields of agriculture and food nutrition.

  9. Melatonin and its precursors scavenge nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Y.; Mori, A.; Liburdy, R.; Packer, L.

    1998-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of melatonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin, 5-hydroxytryptophan and L-tryptophan was examined by the Griess reaction using flow injection analysis. 1-Hydroxy-2-oxo-3-(N-methyl-3-aminopropyl)-3-methyl-1-triazene(NOC-7) was used as NO generator. The Griess reagent stoichiometrically reacts with NO2-, which was converted by a cadmium-copper reduction column from the stable end products of NO oxidation. Except for tryptophan, all the compounds examined scavenged NO in a dose-dependent manner. Melatonin, which has a methoxy group in the 5-position and an acetyl side chain, exhibited the most potent scavenging activity among the compounds tested. Serotonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively, showed moderate scavenging activity compared to melatonin. Tryptophan, which has neither a methoxy nor a hydroxyl group in the 5-position, exhibited the least NO scavenging activity.

  10. Nitric oxide rescues thalidomide mediated teratogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Siamwala, Jamila H.; Veeriah, Vimal; Priya, M. Krishna; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Sinha, Swaraj; Nagarajan, Shunmugam; T, Pradeep; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2012-01-01

    Thalidomide, a sedative drug given to pregnant women, unfortunately caused limb deformities in thousands of babies. Recently the drug was revived because of its therapeutic potential; however the search is still ongoing for an antidote against thalidomide induced limb deformities. In the current study we found that nitric oxide (NO) rescues thalidomide affected chick (Gallus gallus) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. This study confirms that NO reduced the number of thalidomide mediated limb deformities by 94% and 80% in chick and zebrafish embryos respectively. NO prevents limb deformities by promoting angiogenesis, reducing oxidative stress and inactivating caspase-3 dependent apoptosis. We conclude that NO secures angiogenesis in the thalidomide treated embryos to protect them from deformities. PMID:22997553

  11. Beneficial effects of low-dose benidipine in acute autoimmune myocarditis: suppressive effects on inflammatory cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zuyi; Kishimoto, Chiharu; Shioji, Keisuke

    2003-06-01

    Excessive production of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible NO synthase (iNOS) contributes to the progression of myocardial damage in myocarditis. Some dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers reportedly inhibit NO production and proinflammatory cytokines and the present study sought to clarify if a low dose of benidipine, a novel dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, would ameliorate experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM). Rats with or without myocarditis were administered oral benidipine at a dose of 3 mg. kg(-1). day(-1) for 3 weeks. Low-dose benidipine did not decrease blood pressure significantly compared with the untreated group, but markedly reduced the severity of myocarditis. Myocardial interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) expression and IL-1beta-positive cells were significantly less in rats with EAM that were treated with low-dose benidipine compared with untreated rats. Also, myocardial iNOS expression and iNOS-positive cells were markedly reduced in in the treated rats compared with the untreated group. Furthermore, myocardial NO production and nitrotyrosine expression were suppressed by the treatment in rats with EAM. The cardioprotection of low-dose benidipine may be caused by suppression of inflammatory cytokines and inhibition of NO production.

  12. Nitric Oxide--Some Old and New Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainscough, Eric W.; Brodie, Andrew M.

    1995-01-01

    Because of the role it plays in physiology and neurobiology, there is a rebirth of interest in nitric oxide. It can affect enzyme and immune system regulation and cytotoxicity. Nitric oxide may represent a new class of signaling molecules--gases that pass through cells and vanish. Overactive neurons produce large amounts of NO which may be linked…

  13. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer....

  14. Nitric Oxide--Some Old and New Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainscough, Eric W.; Brodie, Andrew M.

    1995-01-01

    Because of the role it plays in physiology and neurobiology, there is a rebirth of interest in nitric oxide. It can affect enzyme and immune system regulation and cytotoxicity. Nitric oxide may represent a new class of signaling molecules--gases that pass through cells and vanish. Overactive neurons produce large amounts of NO which may be linked…

  15. The Iron-Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-17

    To assess the importance of iron to hydrazine stability, the study of hydrazine oxidation by nitric acid has been extended to investigate the iron-catalyzed oxidation. This report describes those results.

  16. Nitric Oxide Modulators: An Emerging Class of Medicinal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, S. R.; Satyanarayana, K.; Rao, M. N. A.; Pai, K. V.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide, a unique messenger in biological system, is ubiquitously present virtually in all tissues revealing its versatile nature of being involved in diverse physiological functions such as vascular tone, inhibition of platelet aggregation, cell adhesion, neurotransmission and enzyme and immune regulation. The tremendous advancements made in the past few decades in this area suggests that the nitric oxide modulation either by its exogenous release through nitric oxide donors or inhibition of its synthesis by nitric oxide synthase inhibitors in physiological milieu may provide newer clinical strategies for the treatment of some diseases. In this review, an attempt is made to document and understand the biological chemistry of different classes of nitric oxide modulators that would prove to be a fruitful area in the years to come. PMID:23798773

  17. Nitric oxide protects endothelium from cadmium mediated leakiness.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Shunmugam; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Priya, M Krishna; Swaminathan, Akila; Siamwala, Jamila H; Sinha, Swaraj; Veeriah, Vimal; Sonar, Punam; Jadhav, Vivek; Jaffar Ali, B M; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium targets the vascular endothelium causing endothelial dysfunction and leakiness of endothelial barrier. Nitric oxide plays a major role in mediating endothelial functions including angiogenesis, migration and permeability. The present study investigates the nitric oxide effects on cadmium induced endothelial leakiness. Results of ex vivo and in vitro permeability assays showed that even a sub-lethal dose of cadmium chloride (1 µM) was sufficient to induce leakiness of endothelial cells. Cadmium drastically altered the actin polymerisation pattern and membrane tension of these cells compared to controls. Addition of nitric oxide donor Spermine NONOate (SP) significantly blunted cadmium-mediated effects and recover endothelial cells integrity. Cadmium-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements and membrane leakiness are associated with the low nitric oxide availability and high reactive oxygen species generation. In brief, we show the protective role of nitric oxide against cadmium-mediated endothelial leakiness. © 2013 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  18. Reduction of nitric oxide emissions from a combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. A.; Pritchard, H. O. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A turbojet combustor and method for controlling nitric oxide emissions by employing successive combustion zones is described. After combustion of an initial portion of the fuel in a primary combustion zone, the combustion products of the primary zone are combined with the remaining portion of fuel and additional plenum air and burned in a secondary combustion zone under conditions that result in low nitric oxide emissions. Low nitric oxide emissions are achieved by a novel turbojet combustor arrangement which provides flame stability by allowing stable combustion to be accompanied by low nitric oxide emissions resulting from controlled fuel-lean combustion (ignited by the emission products from the primary zone) in a secondary combustion zone at a lower combustion temperature resulting in low emission of nitric oxide.

  19. Sickle cell disease and nitric oxide: A paradigm shift?

    PubMed Central

    Mack, A. Kyle; Kato, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease is thought to result from the polymerization of hemoglobin S in red cells, under hypoxic conditions, resulting in the occlusion of blood vessels. Adhesion of cells to the venular endothelium also appears to play a role. Recent studies have also suggested that in addition to the polymerization of hemoglobin S in the red blood cell, a deficiency of the endogenous vasodilator, nitric oxide may be involved. Hemoglobin released as a result of hemolysis rapidly consumes nitric oxide resulting in a whole program of events that inhibit blood flow. Therapies directed at decreasing the destruction of nitric oxide, increasing the production of nitric oxide, or amplifying the nitric oxide response may prove beneficial. PMID:16517208

  20. Nasal nitric oxide in children with adenoidal hypertrophy: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Torretta, S; Bossi, A; Capaccio, P; Marchisio, P; Esposito, S; Brevi, A; Pignataro, L

    2010-06-01

    Nasal nitric oxide, a mediator involved in upper airway inflammation, is impaired in children with allergic rhinitis and rhinosinusitis. Normal values are 200-450 parts per billion, but no data are available concerning its levels in children with adenoidal obstruction, predisposing to chronic nasosinusal inflammation. This study aimed to: (1) measure nasal nitric oxide levels in non-allergic children with adenoidal hypertrophy and (2) assess its possible relationship with the degree of adenoidal hypertrophy and other variable (gender, age, body max index, passive smoking exposure, recurrent acute otitis media, recurrent respiratory infections, and hypertrophy of nasal turbinates). Eighty-one children with suspected adenoidal hypertrophy underwent nasal fibroendoscopy to assess the degree of adenoidal hypertrophy, and nasal nitric oxide on-line measurements by means of a dedicated chemiluminescence analyser. Nasal nitric oxide was successfully measured in 35 patients, most of whom had levels >450 parts per billion; the values were significantly higher (p=0.031) in children with non-obstructive adenoids. There was no significant correlation with any other variable. Preliminary data show above-normal nasal nitric oxide levels in children with adenoidal hypertrophy, especially those with non-obstructive adenoids. This suggests nitric oxide involvement in recurrent nasopharyngeal inflammation due to adenoidal hypertrophy. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Plant pathogenic Streptomyces species produce nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide in response to host signals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent intercellular signal for defense, development and metabolism in animals and plants. In mammals, highly regulated nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) generate NO. NOS homologs exist in some prokaryotes, but direct evidence for NO production by these proteins has been lacking...

  2. Production of nitric oxide and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in ovarian cystic tumors.

    PubMed

    Nomelini, Rosekeila Simões; de Abreu Ribeiro, Lívia Carolina; Tavares-Murta, Beatriz Martins; Adad, Sheila Jorge; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido

    2008-01-01

    Tumor sections from nonneoplastic (n = 15), benign (n = 28), and malignant ovarian tumors (n = 20) were obtained from 63 women. Immunohistochemistry of the tumor sections demonstrated that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was increased in ovarian cancer samples compared to nonneoplastic or benign tumor samples. Using the Griess method, nitric oxide (NO) metabolite levels were also found to be elevated in malignant tumor samples compared to benign tumor samples (P < .05). For stage I ovarian cancer, intracystic NO levels >80 microM were more frequent than NO levels <80 microM, and iNOS expression in well-differentiated carcinomas was greater than in moderately/poorly differentiated carcinomas (P < .05). These data suggest an important role for NO in ovarian carcinogenesis.

  3. Production of Nitric Oxide and Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Ovarian Cystic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nomelini, Rosekeila Simões; Ribeiro, Lívia Carolina de Abreu; Tavares-Murta, Beatriz Martins; Adad, Sheila Jorge; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido

    2008-01-01

    Tumor sections from nonneoplastic (n = 15), benign (n = 28), and malignant ovarian tumors (n = 20) were obtained from 63 women. Immunohistochemistry of the tumor sections demonstrated that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was increased in ovarian cancer samples compared to nonneoplastic or benign tumor samples. Using the Griess method, nitric oxide (NO) metabolite levels were also found to be elevated in malignant tumor samples compared to benign tumor samples (P < .05). For stage I ovarian cancer, intracystic NO levels >80 μM were more frequent than NO levels <80 μM, and iNOS expression in well-differentiated carcinomas was greater than in moderately/poorly differentiated carcinomas (P < .05). These data suggest an important role for NO in ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:19132106

  4. Acute administration of single oral dose of grape seed polyphenols restores blood pressure in a rat model of metabolic syndrome: role of nitric oxide and prostacyclin.

    PubMed

    Pons, Zara; Margalef, Maria; Bravo, Francisca I; Arola-Arnal, Anna; Muguerza, Begoña

    2016-03-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the antihypertensive effectiveness of different doses of grape seed polyphenols in cafeteria diet-fed hypertensive rats (CHRs) and to establish the mechanism involved in the blood pressure (BP) lowering effect of these compounds in this experimental model of metabolic syndrome (MS). Male 8-week-old Wistar rats were fed cafeteria or standard (ST) diet for 10 weeks. After this, the antihypertensive effect of a single oral administration of a polyphenol grape seed extract (GSPE) was tested at different doses (250, 375 and 500 mg/kg) in CHRs. BP was recorded before and 2, 4, 6, 8, 24 and 48 h post-administration. The hypotensive effect of GSPE was also proved in ST diet-fed rats. Additionally, in other experiment, CHRs were orally administered 375 mg/kg GSPE. Four hours post-administration, the rats were intraperitoneally administrated 30 mg/kg NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or 5 mg/kg indomethacin [inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin synthesis, respectively]. BP was recorded initially and 6 h post-administration. GSPE produced a decrease in SBP and DBP, the most effective dose (375 mg/kg) showing an antihypertensive effect in CHRs similar to the drug captopril, and did not affect BP of ST diet-fed rats. The antihypertensive effect was completely abolished by L-NAME and partially inhibited by indomethacin. GSPE acts as an antihypertensive agent in a rat model of hypertension associated with MS. The change in endothelium-derived NO availability is one of the mechanisms involved in the antihypertensive effect of GSPE in CHRs. Additionally, endothelial prostacyclin contributes to the effect of GSPE on arterial BP.

  5. No evidence of a role for neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the nucleus tractus solitarius in ventilatory responses to acute or chronic hypoxia in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Pamenter, Matthew E; Go, Ariel; Fu, Zhenxing; Powell, Frank L

    2015-03-15

    When exposed to a hypoxic environment, the body's first response is a reflex increase in ventilation, termed the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR). With chronic sustained hypoxia (CSH), such as during acclimatization to high altitude, an additional time-dependent increase in ventilation occurs, which increases the HVR and is termed ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH). This secondary increase persists after exposure to CSH and involves plasticity within the circuits in the central nervous system that control breathing. The mechanisms of HVR plasticity are currently poorly understood. We hypothesized that changes in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity or expression in the nucleus tractus solitarius contribute to this plasticity and underlie VAH in rats. To test this, we treated rats held in normoxia or 10% O2 (CSH, PIO2 = 70 Torr) for 7-9 days and measured ventilation in conscious, unrestrained animals before and after microinjecting the general NOS antagonist L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester into the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) or systemically injecting the nNOS-specific antagonist S-methyl-l-thiocitrulline. Localization of injection sites in the NTS was confirmed by histology following the experiment. We found that 1) neither NTS-specific nor systemic nNOS antagonism had any effect on hypoxia-mediated changes in breathing or metabolism (P > 0.05), but 2) nNOS protein expression was increased in the middle and caudal NTS by CSH. A persistent HVR after nNOS blockade in the NTS contrasts with results in awake mice, and our findings do not support the hypotheses that nNOS in the NTS contribute to the HVR or VAH in awake rats. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. No evidence of a role for neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the nucleus tractus solitarius in ventilatory responses to acute or chronic hypoxia in awake rats

    PubMed Central

    Pamenter, Matthew E.; Go, Ariel; Fu, Zhenxing

    2015-01-01

    When exposed to a hypoxic environment, the body's first response is a reflex increase in ventilation, termed the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR). With chronic sustained hypoxia (CSH), such as during acclimatization to high altitude, an additional time-dependent increase in ventilation occurs, which increases the HVR and is termed ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH). This secondary increase persists after exposure to CSH and involves plasticity within the circuits in the central nervous system that control breathing. The mechanisms of HVR plasticity are currently poorly understood. We hypothesized that changes in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity or expression in the nucleus tractus solitarius contribute to this plasticity and underlie VAH in rats. To test this, we treated rats held in normoxia or 10% O2 (CSH, PiO2 = 70 Torr) for 7–9 days and measured ventilation in conscious, unrestrained animals before and after microinjecting the general NOS antagonist L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester into the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) or systemically injecting the nNOS-specific antagonist S-methyl-l-thiocitrulline. Localization of injection sites in the NTS was confirmed by histology following the experiment. We found that 1) neither NTS-specific nor systemic nNOS antagonism had any effect on hypoxia-mediated changes in breathing or metabolism (P > 0.05), but 2) nNOS protein expression was increased in the middle and caudal NTS by CSH. A persistent HVR after nNOS blockade in the NTS contrasts with results in awake mice, and our findings do not support the hypotheses that nNOS in the NTS contribute to the HVR or VAH in awake rats. PMID:25571988

  7. Nitric oxide-releasing porous silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafshgari, Morteza Hasanzadeh; Cavallaro, Alex; Delalat, Bahman; Harding, Frances J.; McInnes, Steven JP; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno; Vasilev, Krasimir; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the ability of porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) to entrap and deliver nitric oxide (NO) as an effective antibacterial agent is tested against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. NO was entrapped inside PSi NPs functionalized by means of the thermal hydrocarbonization (THC) process. Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells. The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties. These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment.

  8. Nitric oxide signalling via cytoskeleton in plants.

    PubMed

    Yemets, Alla I; Krasylenko, Yuliya A; Lytvyn, Dmytro I; Sheremet, Yarina A; Blume, Yaroslav B

    2011-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) in plant cell mediates processes of growth and development starting from seed germination to pollination, as well as biotic and abiotic stress tolerance. However, proper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of NO signalling in plants has just begun to emerge. Accumulated evidence suggests that in eukaryotic cells NO regulates functions of proteins by their post-translational modifications, namely tyrosine nitration and S-nitrosylation. Among the candidates for NO-downstream effectors are cytoskeletal proteins because of their involvement in many processes regulated by NO. This review discusses new insights in plant NO signalling focused mainly on the involvement of cytoskeleton components into NO-cascades. Herein, examples of NO-related post-translational modifications of cytoskeletal proteins, and also indirect NO impact, are discussed. Special attention is paid to plant α-tubulin tyrosine nitration as an emerging topic in plant NO research.

  9. The emerging multifaceted roles of nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, P C; Schroeder, R A

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly reactive free radical with a multitude of organ specific regulatory functions. Since 1985, NO has been the subject of numerous research efforts and as a result, has been found to play a major role in the cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, immune, and central nervous systems. In addition, deranged NO synthesis is the basis for a number of pathophysiologic states, such as atherosclerosis, pulmonary hypertension, pyloric stenosis, and the hypertension associated with renal failure. Traditional NO donors such as sodium nitroprusside and new pharmacologic NO adducts such as S-nitrosothiols may serve as exogenous sources of NO for the treatment of NO-deficient pathologic states. This review is an attempt to acquaint the surgical community with the fundamentals of NO biochemistry and physiology. Increased knowledge of its functions in normal homeostasis and pathologic states will enable physicians to better understand these disease processes and utilize new pharmacologic therapies. PMID:7717775

  10. Nitric oxide-releasing porous silicon nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the ability of porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) to entrap and deliver nitric oxide (NO) as an effective antibacterial agent is tested against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. NO was entrapped inside PSi NPs functionalized by means of the thermal hydrocarbonization (THC) process. Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells. The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties. These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment. PMID:25114633

  11. Humming greatly increases nasal nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Weitzberg, Eddie; Lundberg, Jon O N

    2002-07-15

    The paranasal sinuses are major producers of nitric oxide (NO). We hypothesized that oscillating airflow produced by humming would enhance sinus ventilation and thereby increase nasal NO levels. Ten healthy subjects took part in the study. Nasal NO was measured with a chemiluminescence technique during humming and quiet single-breath exhalations at a fixed flow rate. NO increased 15-fold during humming compared with quiet exhalation. In a two-compartment model of the nose and sinus, oscillating airflow caused a dramatic increase in gas exchange between the cavities. Obstruction of the sinus ostium is a central event in the pathogenesis of sinusitis. Nasal NO measurements during humming may be a useful noninvasive test of sinus NO production and ostial patency. In addition, any therapeutic effects of the improved sinus ventilation caused by humming should be investigated.

  12. Nitric Oxide Release Part I. Macromolecular Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, Daniel A.; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The roles of nitric oxide (NO) in physiology and pathophysiology merit the use of NO as a therapeutic for certain biomedical applications. Unfortunately, limited NO payloads, too rapid NO release, and the lack of targeted NO delivery have hindered the clinical utility of NO gas and low molecular weight NO donor compounds. A wide-variety of NO-releasing macromolecular scaffolds has thus been developed to improve NO’s pharmacological potential. In this tutorial review, we provide an overview of the most promising NO release scaffolds including protein, organic, inorganic, and hybrid organic-inorganic systems. The NO release vehicles selected for discussion were chosen based on their enhanced NO storage, tunable NO release characteristics, and potential as therapeutics. PMID:22362355

  13. Nitric oxide and mitochondria in metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Litvinova, Larisa; Atochin, Dmitriy N.; Fattakhov, Nikolai; Vasilenko, Mariia; Zatolokin, Pavel; Kirienkova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic disorders that collectively increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a crucial role in the pathogeneses of MS components and is involved in different mitochondrial signaling pathways that control respiration and apoptosis. The present review summarizes the recent information regarding the interrelations of mitochondria and NO in MS. Changes in the activities of different NO synthase isoforms lead to the formation of metabolic disorders and therefore are highlighted here. Reduced endothelial NOS activity and NO bioavailability, as the main factors underlying the endothelial dysfunction that occurs in MS, are discussed in this review in relation to mitochondrial dysfunction. We also focus on potential therapeutic strategies involving NO signaling pathways that can be used to treat patients with metabolic disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The article may help researchers develop new approaches for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of MS. PMID:25741283

  14. Recent developments in nitric oxide donor drugs

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M R; Megson, I L

    2007-01-01

    During the 1980s, the free radical, nitric oxide (NO), was discovered to be a crucial signalling molecule, with wide-ranging functions in the cardiovascular, nervous and immune systems. Aside from providing a credible explanation for the actions of organic nitrates and sodium nitroprusside that have long been used in the treatment of angina and hypertensive crises respectively, the discovery generated great hopes for new NO-based treatments for a wide variety of ailments. Decades later, however, we are still awaiting novel licensed agents in this arena, despite an enormous research effort to this end. This review explores some of the most promising recent advances in NO donor drug development and addresses the challenges associated with NO as a therapeutic agent. PMID:17401442

  15. Superhydrophobic nitric oxide-releasing xerogels.

    PubMed

    Storm, Wesley L; Youn, Jonghae; Reighard, Katelyn P; Worley, Brittany V; Lodaya, Hetali M; Shin, Jae Ho; Schoenfisch, Mark H

    2014-08-01

    Superhydrophobic nitric oxide (NO)-releasing xerogels were prepared by spray-coating a fluorinated silane/silica composite onto N-diazeniumdiolate NO donor-modified xerogels. The thickness of the superhydrophobic layer was used to extend NO release durations from 59 to 105h. The resulting xerogels were stable, maintaining superhydrophobicity for up to 1month (the longest duration tested) when immersed in solution, with no leaching of silica or undesirable fragmentation detected. The combination of superhydrophobicity and NO release reduced viable Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion by >2-logs. The killing effect of NO was demonstrated at longer bacterial contact times, with superhydrophobic NO-releasing xerogels resulting in 3.8-log reductions in adhered viable bacteria vs. controls. With no observed toxicity to L929 murine fibroblasts, NO-releasing superhydrophobic membranes may be valuable antibacterial coatings for implants as they both reduce adhesion and kill bacteria that do adhere.

  16. Nitric Oxide Signaling in the Microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Buerk, Donald G.; Barbee, Kenneth A.; Jaron, Dov

    2013-01-01

    Several apparent paradoxes are evident when one compares mathematical predictions from models of nitric oxide (NO) diffusion and convection in vasculature structures with experimental measurements of NO (or related metabolites) in animal and human studies. Values for NO predicted from mathematical models are generally much lower than in vivo NO values reported in the literature for experiments, specifically with NO microelectrodes positioned at perivascular locations next to different sizes of blood vessels in the microcirculation and NO electrodes inserted into a wide range of tissues supplied by the microcirculation of each specific organ system under investigation. There continues to be uncertainty about the roles of NO scavenging by hemoglobin versus a storage function that may conserve NO, and other signaling targets for NO need to be considered. This review describes model predictions and relevant experimental data with respect to several signaling pathways in the microcirculation that involve NO. PMID:22196161

  17. Role of nitric oxide in thermotolerance

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Yi; Zhou, Shuo; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Haijun

    2010-01-01

    A tCaM3 is a key factor in heat shock (HS) signal transduction. Nitric oxide (NO) is believed to mediate a variety of resistant reactions against environmental factors. Our experiments indicate that under heat stress NO induces thermotolerance. In order to do so, NO is signal molecule acting upstream of AtCaM3, stimulating the DNA-binding activity of HS transcription factors as well as the accumulation of heat shock proteins. As a novel HS signaling molecule, NO signal pathway is little known and several unexpected results are emerging. Herein we are discussing them and conclude that in order to obtain a more profound understanding of this new role of NO, detailed research will be needed in the future. PMID:21057186

  18. An intercomparison of nitric oxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, J. M., Jr.; Gregory, G. L.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Carroll, M. A.; Mcfarland, M.; Ridley, B. A.; Davis, D. D.; Bradshaw, J.; Rodgers, M. O.; Torres, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Results from an intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted at Wallops Island, VA, in July 1983. Instruments intercompared included a laser-induced fluorescence system and two chemiluminescence instruments. The intercomparisons were performed with ambient air at NO mixing ratios ranging from 10 to 60 pptv and NO-enriched ambient air at mixing ratios from 20 to 170 pptv. All instruments sampled from a common manifold. The techniques exhibited a high degree of correlation among themselves and with changes in the NO mixing ratio. Agreement among the three techniques was placed at approximately + or - 30 percent. Within this level of agreement, no artifacts or species interferences were identified.

  19. Nitric oxide generating/releasing materials

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hongying; Nacharaju, Parimala; Friedman, Adam; Friedman, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing the impressive therapeutic potential of Nitric oxide (NO) remains an ongoing challenge. This paper describes several of the current strategies both with respect to the underlying chemistry and physics and to the applications where they have shown promise. Included in this overview are molecular systems such as NONOates that release NO through chemical reactions and delivery vehicles such as nanoparticles that can generate, store, transport and deliver NO and related bioactive forms of NO such as nitrosothiols. Although there has been much positive movement, it is clear that we are only at the early stages of knowing how to precisely produce, transport and deliver to targeted sites therapeutic levels of NO and related molecules. PMID:26855790

  20. Nitric oxide, human diseases and the herbal products that affect the nitric oxide signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Achike, Francis I; Kwan, Chiu-Yin

    2003-09-01

    1. Nitric oxide (NO) is formed enzymatically from l-arginine in the presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Nitric oxide is generated constitutively in endothelial cells via sheer stress and blood-borne substances. Nitric oxide is also generated constitutively in neuronal cells and serves as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic nerve endings. Furthermore, NO can also be formed via enzyme induction in many tissues in the presence of cytokines. 2. The ubiquitous presence of NO in the living body suggests that NO plays an important role in the maintenance of health. Being a free radical with vasodilatory properties, NO exerts dual effects on tissues and cells in various biological systems. At low concentrations, NO can dilate the blood vessels and improve the circulation, but at high concentrations it can cause circulatory shock and induce cell death. Thus, diseases can arise in the presence of the extreme ends of the physiological concentrations of NO. 3. The NO signalling pathway has, in recent years, become a target for new drug development. The high level of flavonoids, catechins, tannins and other polyphenolic compounds present in vegetables, fruits, soy, tea and even red wine (from grapes) is believed to contribute to their beneficial health effects. Some of these compounds induce NO formation from the endothelial cells to improve circulation and some suppress the induction of inducible NOS in inflammation and infection. 4. Many botanical medicinal herbs and drugs derived from these herbs have been shown to have effects on the NO signalling pathway. For example, the saponins from ginseng, ginsenosides, have been shown to relax blood vessels (probably contributing to the antifatigue and blood pressure-lowering effects of ginseng) and corpus cavernosum (thus, for the treatment of men suffering from erectile dysfunction; however, the legendary aphrodisiac effect of ginseng may be an overstatement). Many plant extracts or

  1. Nitric oxide synthesis and signalling in plants.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ian D; Neill, Steven J; Hancock, John T

    2008-05-01

    As with all organisms, plants must respond to a plethora of external environmental cues. Individual plant cells must also perceive and respond to a wide range of internal signals. It is now well-accepted that nitric oxide (NO) is a component of the repertoire of signals that a plant uses to both thrive and survive. Recent experimental data have shown, or at least implicated, the involvement of NO in reproductive processes, control of development and in the regulation of physiological responses such as stomatal closure. However, although studies concerning NO synthesis and signalling in animals are well-advanced, in plants there are still fundamental questions concerning how NO is produced and used that need to be answered. For example, there is a range of potential NO-generating enzymes in plants, but no obvious plant nitric oxide synthase (NOS) homolog has yet been identified. Some studies have shown the importance of NOS-like enzymes in mediating NO responses in plants, while other studies suggest that the enzyme nitrate reductase (NR) is more important. Still, more published work suggests the involvement of completely different enzymes in plant NO synthesis. Similarly, it is not always clear how NO mediates its responses. Although it appears that in plants, as in animals, NO can lead to an increase in the signal cGMP which leads to altered ion channel activity and gene expression, it is not understood how this actually occurs. NO is a relatively reactive compound, and it is not always easy to study. Furthermore, its biological activity needs to be considered in conjunction with that of other compounds such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can have a profound effect on both its accumulation and function. In this paper, we will review the present understanding of how NO is produced in plants, how it is removed when its signal is no longer required and how it may be both perceived and acted upon.

  2. Nitric oxide-induced calcium release: activation of type 1 ryanodine receptor by endogenous nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Kakizawa, Sho; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Iino, Masamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs), located in the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) membrane, are required for intracellular Ca2+ release that is involved in a wide range of cellular functions. In addition to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in cardiac cells and voltage-induced Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle cells, we recently identified another mode of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization mediated by RyR, i.e., nitric oxide-induced Ca2+ release (NICR), in cerebellar Purkinje cells. NICR is evoked by neuronal activity, is dependent on S-nitrosylation of type 1 RyR (RyR1) and is involved in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) of cerebellar synapses. In this addendum, we examined whether peroxynitrite, which is produced by the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide, may also have an effect on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 and the cerebellar LTP. We found that scavengers of peroxynitrite have no significant effect either on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 or on the cerebellar LTP. We also found that an application of a high concentration of peroxynitrite does not reproduce neuronal activity-dependent Ca2+ release in Purkinje cells. These results support that NICR is induced by endogenous nitric oxide produced by neuronal activity through S-nitrosylation of RyR1.

  3. Induction of proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide by Trypanosoma cruzi in renal cells.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gabriel M; Yoshida, Nobuko; Higa, Elisa M S; Shenkman, Sérgio; Alves, Monique; Staquicini, Daniela; Cascabulho, Cynthia; Schor, Nestor

    2011-08-01

    Chagas disease is typically associated with cardiac involvement. During the acute phase of murine infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, severe acute myocarditis can develop. Prior to cardiac alteration, however, infected mice present with renal inflammatory infiltration causing acute kidney injury due to an ischemia/reperfusion lesion. Thus, the present study was undertaken in order to evaluate whether the parasites or some of their components would directly affect renal cells. As such, this study employed kidney cell lines (mesangial, epithelial, and proximal tubular) that mimic different regions of the renal system. Mesangial cells are more resistant to infection, showing reduced parasite internalization relative to epithelial and proximal tubular cells. Upon infection, mesangial cells produced more nitric oxide, tumor factor necrosis-α, and interferon-γ and showed decreased viability when compared to the other cell lines. These results indicate that the resistance of mesangial cells to infection may be related to the increased expression of nitric oxide and proinflammatory cytokines. Conversely, the high levels of nitric oxide produced by these cells caused impairment of cell integrity and viability. Higher nitric oxide concentrations promote cellular injury and can be involved in the genesis of ischemia/reperfusion lesions in acute kidney injury.

  4. Erythrocyte nitric oxide availability and oxidative stress following exercise.

    PubMed

    Medeiros-Lima, Daniel Jose Matos; Mendes-Ribeiro, Antonio Claudio; Brunini, Tatiana Marlowe Cunha; Martins, Marcela Anjos; Mury, Wanda Vianna; Freire, Raul Almeira; Monteiro, Walace David; Farinatti, Paulo Tarso Veras; Matsuura, Cristiane

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence has shown that acute exercise impairs erythrocyte membrane structure and function as a consequence of increased physical and chemical stress. Erythrocyte-synthesized nitric oxide (NO) is known to modulate membrane fluidity, and its bioavailability depends on the balance between its production and scavenging by reactive oxygen species. Here, we investigated whether a maximal exercise test could affect erythrocyte NO bioavailability and oxidative stress. Twelve men (26±4 years old, V̇O2peak 44.1±4.3 mL·kg-1·min-1) performed a treadmill maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test. Blood was collected at rest and immediately after exercise for erythrocytes isolation. Maximal exercise caused an increase in erythrocytes count, haemoglobin and haematocrit levels. There was no change in L-arginine influx into erythrocytes after exercise. Yet, nitric oxide synthase activity, and thus, NO production, was increased after maximal test, as well cyclic GMP levels. In relation to biomarkers of oxidative stress, maximal test resulted in increased levels of lipid peroxidation, and diminished superoxide dismutase activity. Neither glutathione peroxidase nor catalase activity was affected by maximal test. Our findings demonstrate that the increased erythrocyte membrane rigidity caused by an acute bout of exercise may be caused, in part, by an increased lipid oxidative damage caused by ROS produced exogenously.

  5. Effect of Treatment Delay, Stroke Type, and Thrombolysis on the Effect of Glyceryl Trinitrate, a Nitric Oxide Donor, on Outcome after Acute Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Individual Patient from Randomised Trials

    PubMed Central

    Bath, Philip M.; Woodhouse, Lisa; Krishnan, Kailash; Anderson, Craig; Berge, Eivind; Ford, Gary A.; Robinson, Thompson G.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Sprigg, Nikola; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; in Acute Stroke Collaboration (BASC), Blood pressure

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nitric oxide (NO) donors are a candidate treatment for acute stroke and two trials have suggested that they might improve outcome if administered within 4–6 hours of stroke onset. We assessed the safety and efficacy of NO donors using individual patient data (IPD) from completed trials. Methods. Randomised controlled trials of NO donors in patients with acute or subacute stroke were identified and IPD sought from the trialists. The effect of NO donor versus control on functional outcome was assessed using the modified Rankin scale (mRS) and death, by time to randomisation. Secondary outcomes included measures of disability, mood, and quality of life. Results. Five trials (4,197 participants) were identified, all involving glyceryl trinitrate (GTN). Compared with control, GTN lowered blood pressure by 7.4/3.3 mmHg. At day 90, GTN did not alter any clinical measures. However, in 312 patients randomised within 6 hours of stroke onset, GTN was associated with beneficial shifts in the mRS (odds ratio (OR) 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.34–0.78) and reduced death (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.14–0.78). Conclusions. NO donors do not alter outcome in patients with recent stroke. However, when administered within 6 hours, NO donors might improve outcomes in both ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. PMID:27190674

  6. Analytical techniques for assaying nitric oxide bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Parthasarathy, Deepa; Torregrossa, Ashley C; Mian, Asad; Bryan, Nathan S

    2012-06-18

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a diatomic free radical that is extremely short lived in biological systems (less than 1 second in circulating blood). NO may be considered one of the most important signaling molecules produced in our body, regulating essential functions including but not limited to regulation of blood pressure, immune response and neural communication. Therefore its accurate detection and quantification in biological matrices is critical to understanding the role of NO in health and disease. With such a short physiological half life of NO, alternative strategies for the detection of reaction products of NO biochemistry have been developed. The quantification of relevant NO metabolites in multiple biological compartments provides valuable information with regards to in vivo NO production, bioavailability and metabolism. Simply sampling a single compartment such as blood or plasma may not always provide an accurate assessment of whole body NO status, particularly in tissues. The ability to compare blood with select tissues in experimental animals will help bridge the gap between basic science and clinical medicine as far as diagnostic and prognostic utility of NO biomarkers in health and disease. Therefore, extrapolation of plasma or blood NO status to specific tissues of interest is no longer a valid approach. As a result, methods continue to be developed and validated which allow the detection and quantification of NO and NO-related products/metabolites in multiple compartments of experimental animals in vivo. The established paradigm of NO biochemistry from production by NO synthases to activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) to eventual oxidation to nitrite (NO(2)(-)) and nitrate (NO(3)(-)) may only represent part of NO's effects in vivo. The interaction of NO and NO-derived metabolites with protein thiols, secondary amines, and metals to form S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs), N-nitrosamines (RNNOs), and nitrosyl-heme respectively represent c

  7. Nitric oxide scavengers differentially inhibit ammonia oxidation in ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sauder, Laura A; Ross, Ashley A; Neufeld, Josh D

    2016-04-01

    Differential inhibitors are important for measuring the relative contributions of microbial groups, such as ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), to biogeochemical processes in environmental samples. In particular, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO) represents a nitric oxide scavenger used for the specific inhibition of AOA, implicating nitric oxide as an intermediate of thaumarchaeotal ammonia oxidation. This study investigated four alternative nitric oxide scavengers for their ability to differentially inhibit AOA and AOB in comparison to PTIO. Caffeic acid, curcumin, methylene blue hydrate and trolox were tested onNitrosopumilus maritimus, two unpublished AOA representatives (AOA-6f and AOA-G6) as well as the AOB representative Nitrosomonas europaea All four scavengers inhibited ammonia oxidation by AOA at lower concentrations than for AOB. In particular, differential inhibition of AOA and AOB by caffeic acid (100 μM) and methylene blue hydrate (3 μM) was comparable to carboxy-PTIO (100 μM) in pure and enrichment culture incubations. However, when added to aquarium sponge biofilm microcosms, both scavengers were unable to inhibit ammonia oxidation consistently, likely due to degradation of the inhibitors themselves. This study provides evidence that a variety of nitric oxide scavengers result in differential inhibition of ammonia oxidation in AOA and AOB, and provides support to the proposed role of nitric oxide as a key intermediate in the thaumarchaeotal ammonia oxidation pathway.

  8. Pharmacologic strategies in neonatal pulmonary hypertension other than nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Lakshminrusimha, Satyan; Mathew, Bobby; Leach, Corinne L

    2016-04-01

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is approved for use in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) but does not lead to sustained improvement in oxygenation in one-third of patients with PPHN. Inhaled NO is less effective in the management of PPHN secondary to congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), extreme prematurity, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Intravenous pulmonary vasodilators such as prostacyclin, alprostadil, sildenafil, and milrinone have been successfully used in PPHN resistant to iNO. Oral pulmonary vasodilators such as endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors such as sildenafil and tadalafil are used both during acute and chronic phases of PPHN. In the absence of infection, glucocorticoids may also be effective in PPHN. Many of these pharmacologic agents are not approved for use in PPHN and our knowledge is based on case reports and small trials. Large multicenter randomized controlled trials with long-term follow-up are required to evaluate alternate pharmacologic strategies in PPHN.

  9. Acute ingestion of citrulline stimulates nitric oxide synthesis but does not increase blood flow in healthy young and older adults with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Schutzler, Scott E.; Schrader, Amy; Spencer, Horace J.; Azhar, Gohar; Deutz, Nicolaas E. P.; Wolfe, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    To determine if age-associated vascular dysfunction in older adults with heart failure (HF) is due to insufficient synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), we performed two separate studies: 1) a kinetic study with a stable isotope tracer method to determine in vivo kinetics of NO metabolism, and 2) a vascular function study using a plethysmography method to determine reactive hyperemic forearm blood flow (RH-FBF) in older and young adults in the fasted state and in response to citrulline ingestion. In the fasted state, NO synthesis (per kg body wt) was ∼50% lower in older vs. young adults and was related to a decreased rate of appearance of the NO precursor arginine. Citrulline ingestion (3 g) stimulated de novo arginine synthesis in both older [6.88 ± 0.83 to 35.40 ± 4.90 μmol·kg body wt−1·h−1] and to a greater extent in young adults (12.02 ± 1.01 to 66.26 ± 4.79 μmol·kg body wt−1·h−1). NO synthesis rate increased correspondingly in older (0.17 ± 0.01 to 2.12 ± 0.36 μmol·kg body wt−1·h−1) and to a greater extent in young adults (0.36 ± 0.04 to 3.57 ± 0.47 μmol·kg body wt−1·h−1). Consistent with the kinetic data, RH-FBF in the fasted state was ∼40% reduced in older vs. young adults. However, citrulline ingestion (10 g) failed to increase RH-FBF in either older or young adults. In conclusion, citrulline ingestion improved impaired NO synthesis in older HF adults but not RH-FBF, suggesting that factors other than NO synthesis play a role in the impaired RH-FBF in older HF adults, and/or it may require a longer duration of supplementation to be effective in improving RH-FBF. PMID:26442881

  10. Inhaled nitric oxide in acute respiratory distress syndrome with and without septic shock requiring norepinephrine administration: a dose–response study

    PubMed Central

    Mourgeon, Eric; Puybasset, Louis; Law-Koune, Jean-Dominique; Lu, Qin; Abdennour, Lamine; Gallart, Lluis; Malassine, Patrick; Rao, GS Umamaheswara; Cluzel, Philippe; Bennani, Abdelhai; Coriat, Pierre; Rouby, Jean-Jacques

    1997-01-01

    Background: The aim of this prospective study was to assess whether the presence of septic shock could influence the dose response to inhaled nitric oxide (NO) in NO-responding patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Results: Eight patients with ARDS and without septic shock (PaO2 = 95 ± 16 mmHg, PEEP = 0, FiO2 = 1.0), and eight patients with ARDS and septic shock (PaO2 = 88 ± 11 mmHg, PEEP = 0, FiO2 = 1.0) receiving exclusively norepinephrine were studied. All responded to 15 ppm inhaled NO with an increase in PaO2 of at least 40 mmHg, at FiO2 1.0 and PEEP 10 cmH2O. Inspiratory intratracheal NO concentrations were recorded continuously using a fast response time chemiluminescence apparatus. Seven inspiratory NO concentrations were randomly administered: 0.15, 0.45, 1.5, 4.5, 15, 45 and 150 ppm. In both groups, NO induced a dose-dependent decrease in mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP), pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI), and venous admixture (QVA/QT), and a dose-dependent increase in PaO2/FiO2 (P ≤ 0.012). Dose-response of MPAP and PVRI were similar in both groups with a plateau effect at 4.5 ppm. Dose-response of PaO2/FiO2 was influenced by the presence of septic shock. No plateau effect was observed in patients with septic shock and PaO2/FiO2 increased by 173 ± 37% at 150 ppm. In patients without septic shock, an 82 ± 26% increase in PaO2/FiO2 was observed with a plateau effect obtained at 15 ppm. In both groups, dose-response curves demonstrated a marked interindividual variability and in five patients pulmonary vascular effect and improvement in arterial oxygenation were dissociated. Conclusion: For similar NOinduced decreases in MPAP and PVRI in both groups, the increase in arterial oxygenation was more marked in patients with septic shock. PMID:11056694

  11. Acute ingestion of citrulline stimulates nitric oxide synthesis but does not increase blood flow in healthy young and older adults with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Young; Schutzler, Scott E; Schrader, Amy; Spencer, Horace J; Azhar, Gohar; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; Wolfe, Robert R

    2015-12-01

    To determine if age-associated vascular dysfunction in older adults with heart failure (HF) is due to insufficient synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), we performed two separate studies: 1) a kinetic study with a stable isotope tracer method to determine in vivo kinetics of NO metabolism, and 2) a vascular function study using a plethysmography method to determine reactive hyperemic forearm blood flow (RH-FBF) in older and young adults in the fasted state and in response to citrulline ingestion. In the fasted state, NO synthesis (per kg body wt) was ∼ 50% lower in older vs. young adults and was related to a decreased rate of appearance of the NO precursor arginine. Citrulline ingestion (3 g) stimulated de novo arginine synthesis in both older [6.88 ± 0.83 to 35.40 ± 4.90 μmol · kg body wt(-1) · h(-1)] and to a greater extent in young adults (12.02 ± 1.01 to 66.26 ± 4.79 μmol · kg body wt(-1) · h(-1)). NO synthesis rate increased correspondingly in older (0.17 ± 0.01 to 2.12 ± 0.36 μmol · kg body wt(-1) · h(-1)) and to a greater extent in young adults (0.36 ± 0.04 to 3.57 ± 0.47 μmol · kg body wt(-1) · h(-1)). Consistent with the kinetic data, RH-FBF in the fasted state was ∼ 40% reduced in older vs. young adults. However, citrulline ingestion (10 g) failed to increase RH-FBF in either older or young adults. In conclusion, citrulline ingestion improved impaired NO synthesis in older HF adults but not RH-FBF, suggesting that factors other than NO synthesis play a role in the impaired RH-FBF in older HF adults, and/or it may require a longer duration of supplementation to be effective in improving RH-FBF.

  12. The oral microbiome and nitric oxide homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hezel, M P; Weitzberg, E

    2015-01-01

    The tiny radical nitric oxide (NO) participates in a vast number of physiological functions including vasodilation, nerve transmission, host defence and cellular energetics. Classically produced by a family of specific enzymes, NO synthases (NOSs), NO signals via reactions with other radicals or transition metals. An alternative pathway for the generation of NO is the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway in which the inorganic anions nitrate (NO(3)(-)) and nitrite (NO(2)(-)) are reduced to NO and other reactive nitrogen intermediates. Nitrate and nitrite are oxidation products from NOS-dependent NO generation but also constituents in our diet, mainly in leafy green vegetables. Irrespective of origin, active uptake of circulating nitrate in the salivary glands, excretion in saliva and subsequent reduction to nitrite by oral commensal bacteria are all necessary steps for further NO generation. This central role of the oral cavity in regulating NO generation from nitrate presents a new and intriguing aspect of the human microbiome in health and disease. In this review, we present recent advances in our understanding of the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway and specifically highlight the importance of the oral cavity as a hub for its function. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Biomimetic and microbial reduction of nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, W.T.; Le, U.; Ronda, S.

    1995-12-31

    The biomimetic reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) by dithiothreitol in the presence of cyanocobalamin and cobalt-centered porphyrins has been investigated. Reactions were monitored directly using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy vapor-phase spectra. Reaction rates were twofold faster for the corrin than for the cobalt-centered porphyrins. The stoichiometry showed the loss of two molecules of NO per molecule of N{sub 2}O produced. We have also demonstrated that the facultative anaerobe and chemoautotroph, Thiobacillus denitrificans, can be cultured anoxically in batch reactors using NO as a terminal electron acceptor with reduction to elemental nitrogen (N{sub 2}). We have proposed that the concentrated stream of NO{sub x}, as obtained from certain regenerable processes for the gas desulfurization and NO{sub x} removal, could be converted to N{sub 2} for disposal by contact with a culture of T. denitrificans. Four heterotrophic bacteria have also been identified that may be grown in batch cultures with succinate, yeast extract, or heat and alkali pretreated sewage sludge as carbon and energy sources and NO as a terminal electron acceptor. These are Paracoccus dentrificans, Pseudomonas denitrificans, Alcaligens denitrificans, and Thiophaera pantotropha.

  14. Nitric Oxide Synthases in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Carnicer, Ricardo; Crabtree, Mark J.; Sivakumaran, Vidhya

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The regulation of myocardial function by constitutive nitric oxide synthases (NOS) is important for the maintenance of myocardial Ca2+ homeostasis, relaxation and distensibility, and protection from arrhythmia and abnormal stress stimuli. However, sustained insults such as diabetes, hypertension, hemodynamic overload, and atrial fibrillation lead to dysfunctional NOS activity with superoxide produced instead of NO and worse pathophysiology. Recent Advances: Major strides in understanding the role of normal and abnormal constitutive NOS in the heart have revealed molecular targets by which NO modulates myocyte function and morphology, the role and nature of post-translational modifications of NOS, and factors controlling nitroso-redox balance. Localized and differential signaling from NOS1 (neuronal) versus NOS3 (endothelial) isoforms are being identified, as are methods to restore NOS function in heart disease. Critical Issues: Abnormal NOS signaling plays a key role in many cardiac disorders, while targeted modulation may potentially reverse this pathogenic source of oxidative stress. Future Directions: Improvements in the clinical translation of potent modulators of NOS function/dysfunction may ultimately provide a powerful new treatment for many hearts diseases that are fueled by nitroso-redox imbalance. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1078–1099. PMID:22871241

  15. Nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide alterations in chronically stressed rats: a model for nitric oxide in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shang-Feng; Lu, Yun-Rong; Shi, Li-Gen; Wu, Xue-Yan; Sun, Bo; Fu, Xin-Yan; Luo, Jian-Hong; Bao, Ai-Min

    2014-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and NO synthase-1 (NOS1) are involved in the stress response and in depression. We compared NOS-NO alterations in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) with alterations in major depressive disorder (MDD) in humans. In the hypothalamus of male CUS rats we determined NOS activity, and in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) we determined NOS1-immunoreactive (ir) cell densities and co-localization of NOS1 with stress-related neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), vasopressin (AVP) or oxytocin (OXT). We measured plasma NO levels and cortisol in male medicine-naïve MDD patients and plasma NO and corticosterone (CORT) in CUS rats. In the CUS rat total NOS activity in the hypothalamus (P=0.018) and NOS1-ir cell density in the PVN were both significantly decreased (P=0.018), while NOS1 staining was mainly expressed in OXT-ir neurons in this nucleus. Interestingly, plasma NO levels were significantly increased both in male CUS rats (P=0.001) and in male MDD patients (P<0.001). Plasma CORT levels were increased in male CUS rats (P=0.001), while male MDD patients did not show a significant change in cortisol levels. In conclusion, the changes in plasma and hypothalamic NOS-NO of CUS rats and MDD were similar. The male CUS rat model may thus help us with our investigation of the mechanism underlying NOS-NO alterations in depression.

  16. Nitric oxide signalling: insect brains and photocytes.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, Barry A; Aprille, June; Modica-Napolitano, Josephine

    2004-01-01

    The success of insects arises partly from extraordinary biochemical and physiological specializations. For example, most species lack glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and respiratory-gas transport proteins and thus allow oxygen to diffuse directly into cells. To counter the increased potential for oxidative damage, insect tissues rely on the indirect protection of the thioredoxin reductase pathway to maintain redox homoeostasis. Such specializations must impact on the control of reactive oxygen species and free radicals such as the signalling molecule NO. This chapter focuses on NO signalling in the insect central nervous system and in the light-producing lantern of the firefly. It is shown that neural NO production is coupled to both muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The NO-mediated increase in cGMP evokes changes in spike activity of neurons controlling the gut and body wall musculature. In addition, maps of NO-producing and -responsive neurons make insects useful models for establishing the range and specificity of NO's actions in the central nervous system. The firefly lantern also provides insight into the interplay of tissue anatomy and cellular biochemistry in NO signalling. In the lantern, nitric oxide synthase is expressed in tracheal end cells that are interposed between neuron terminals and photocytes. Exogenous NO can activate light production and NO scavengers block evoked flashes. NO inhibits respiration in isolated lantern mitochondria and this can be reversed by bright light. It is proposed that NO controls flashes by transiently inhibiting oxygen consumption and permitting direct oxidation of activated luciferin. It is possible that light production itself contributes to the restoration of mitochondrial activity and consequent cessation of the flash.

  17. The Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-02

    Hydrazine nitrate-nitric acid solutions are used in the ion exchange process for separating Pu-238 and Np-237 and have been found to dissolve plutonium metal in a manner advantageous to SRP metal recovery operations. Laboratory tests on the stability of hydrazine in nitric acid solutions were performed to obtain accurate data, and the results of these tests are reported here. These tests provide sufficient information to specify temperature control for hydrazine-nitric acid solutions in plant processes.

  18. Nitrate causes a dose-dependent augmentation of nitric oxide status in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Croft, Kevin D; Puddey, Ian B; Considine, Michael J; Yang, Xingbin; Ward, Natalie C; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2012-05-01

    Green leafy vegetables, high in dietary nitrate, may contribute to cardiovascular health by augmenting nitric oxide status. The exogenous enterosalivary pathway of nitrate reduction to nitrite appears to be a critical determinant of the effects of nitrate. Our primary objective was to investigate the dose-response of nitrate intake on nitric oxide status and nitrate reduction in the mouth. We also assessed whether antibacterial toothpaste can inhibit nitrate reduction and blunt subsequent increases in circulating nitric oxide. A randomised, controlled, crossover trial with healthy women (n = 16) was conducted. The acute effects of four doses of nitrate (0 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 400 mg, as well as 400 mg plus antibacterial toothpaste), administered in random order, were compared. Measurements included biomarkers of plasma nitric oxide status, assessed by measuring S-nitrosothiols + other nitroso species (RXNO) and nitrite, and a biomarker of nitrate reduction in the mouth, assessed by measuring salivary nitrite. Compared to 0 mg, all doses of nitrate resulted in higher plasma RXNO and nitrite, and salivary nitrite (P < 0.05). A linear dose-response to nitrate intake was observed with plasma RXNO and nitrite, and salivary nitrite (P < 0.001). Antibacterial toothpaste did not alter nitrate reduction in the mouth (P > 0.9) or blunt the increase in nitric oxide status (P > 0.9). Thus, our study has demonstrated that increasing nitrate intake results in a dose-related increase in nitrate reduction in the mouth and nitric oxide status, and that use of antibacterial toothpaste does not inhibit nitrate reduction or blunt increases in circulating nitric oxide.

  19. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  20. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  1. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  2. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  3. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to anti-inflammatory therapy, as an adjunct to established clinical and laboratory assessments of...

  4. Calculated Effects of Nitric Oxide Flow Contamination on Scramjet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Karen E.; Rock, Kenneth E.

    1995-01-01

    The level of nitric oxide contamination in the test gas of the NASA Langley Research Center Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility and the effect of the contamination on scramjet test engine performance were investigated analytically. The study was conducted for standard facility conditions corresponding to Mach 6, 7, and 8 flight simulations. The analytically determined levels of nitric oxide produced in the facility are compared with experimentally measured levels. Results of the analysis indicate that nitric oxide levels range from one to three mole percent, which corroborates the measured levels. A three-stream combustor code with finite rate chemistry was used to investigate how nitric oxide affects scramjet performance in terms of combustor pressure rise, heat release, and thrust performance. Results indicate minimal effects on engine performance for the test conditions of this investigation.

  5. Detection of nitric oxide by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Neil

    2010-07-15

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been used in a number of ways to study nitric oxide chemistry and biology. As an intrinsically stable and relatively unreactive diatomic free radical, the challenges of detecting this species by EPR are somewhat different from those of transient radical species. This review gives a basic introduction to EPR spectroscopy and discusses its uses to assess and quantify nitric oxide formation in biological systems.

  6. Nitric Oxide Inhibits Coxiella burnetii Replication and Parasitophorous Vacuole Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Dale; Barrows, Lorraine F.; Lindstrom, Nicole M.; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a recognized cytotoxic effector against facultative and obligate intracellular bacteria. This study examined the effect of nitric oxide produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) up-regulated in response to cytokine stimulation, or by a synthetic nitric oxide donor, on replication of obligately intracellular Coxiella burnetii in murine L-929 cells. Immunoblotting and nitrite assays revealed that C. burnetii infection of L-929 cells augments expression of iNOS up-regulated in response to gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Infection in the absence of cytokine stimulation did not result in demonstrable up-regulation of iNOS expression or in increased nitrite production. Nitrite production by cytokine-treated cells was significantly inhibited by the iNOS inhibitor S-methylisothiourea (SMT). Treatment of infected cells with IFN-γ and TNF-α or the synthetic nitric oxide donor 2,2′-(hydroxynitrosohydrazino)bis-ethanamine (DETA/NONOate) had a bacteriostatic effect on C. burnetii replication. Inhibition of replication was reversed upon addition of SMT to the culture medium of cytokine-treated cells. Microscopic analysis of infected cells revealed that nitric oxide (either cytokine induced or donor derived) inhibited formation of the mature (large) parasitophorous vacuole that is characteristic of C. burnetii infection of host cells. Instead, exposure of infected cells to nitric oxide resulted in the formation of multiple small, acidic vacuoles usually containing one C. burnetii cell. Removal of nitrosative stress resulted in the coalescence of small vacuoles to form a large vacuole harboring multiple C. burnetii cells. These experiments demonstrate that nitric oxide reversibly inhibits replication of C. burnetii and formation of the parasitophorous vacuole. PMID:12183564

  7. Measurements of nitric oxide after a nuclear burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcghan, M.; Shaw, A.; Megill, L. R.; Sedlacek, W.; Guthals, P. R.; Fowler, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of ozone and nitric oxide in a nuclear cloud 7 days after the explosion are reported. No measurable increase above ambient density of either ozone or nitric oxide was found. Results from a chemistry model of the cloud do not agree with the measurement unless 'nonstandard' assumptions are made with regard to the operating chemical processes. A number of possible explanations of the results are discussed.

  8. Nitric oxide is required for tactile learning in Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J D; Bonaventura, J; Kohm, A P

    1994-06-22

    Nitric oxide, produced by nitric oxide synthase in brain tissue, is essential for several different kinds of learning in vertebrates. We present the first evidence that it is also essential for learning in an invertebrate. Intramuscular injections of an inhibitor of the enzyme completely block touch learning in Octopus vulgaris. Eight control animals learned a touch paradigm, but none of eight synthase-inhibited ones learned it.

  9. Nitric oxide donors for cardiovascular implant applications.

    PubMed

    Naghavi, Noora; de Mel, Achala; Alavijeh, Omid Sadeghi; Cousins, Brian G; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2013-01-14

    In an era of increased cardiovascular disease burden in the ageing population, there is great demand for devices that come in to contact with the blood such as heart valves, stents, and bypass grafts that offer life saving treatments. Nitric oxide (NO) elution from healthy endothelial tissue that lines the vessels maintains haemostasis throughout the vasculature. Surgical devices that release NO are desirable treatment options and N-diazeniumdiolates and S-nitrosothiols are recognized as preferred donor molecules. There is a keen interest to investigate newer methods by which NO donors can be retained within biomaterials so that their release and kinetic profiles can be optimized. A range of polymeric scaffolds incorporating microparticles and nanomaterials are presenting solutions to current challenges, and have been investigated in a range of clinical applications. This review outlines the application of NO donors for cardiovascular therapy using biomaterials that release NO locally to prevent thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia (IH) and enhance endothelialization in the fabrication of next generation cardiovascular device technology.

  10. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  11. Nitric oxide transport in an axisymmetric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Fan, Yubo; Xu, X Yun; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2012-10-07

    To test the hypothesis that disturbed flow can impede the transport of nitric oxide (NO) in the artery and hence induce atherogenesis, we used a lumen-wall model of an idealized arterial stenosis with NO produced at the blood vessel-wall interface to study the transport of NO in the stenosis. Blood flows in the lumen and through the arterial wall were simulated by Navier-Stokes equations and Darcy's Law, respectively. Meanwhile, the transport of NO in the lumen and the transport of NO within the arterial wall were modelled by advection-diffusion reaction equations. Coupling of fluid dynamics at the endothelium was achieved by the Kedem-Katchalsky equations. The results showed that both the hydraulic conductivity of the endothelium and the non-Newtonian viscous behaviour of blood had little effect on the distribution of NO. However, the blood flow rate, stenosis severity, red blood cells (RBCs), RBC-free layer and NO production rate at the blood vessel-wall interface could significantly affect the transport of NO. The theoretical study revealed that the transport of NO was significantly hindered in the disturbed flow region distal to the stenosis. The reduced NO concentration in the disturbed flow region might play an important role in the localized genesis and development of atherosclerosis.

  12. Nasal nitric oxide in unilateral sinus disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chia-Hsiang; Tseng, Hsiao-Jung; Huang, Chi-Che; Chang, Po-Hung; Chen, Yi-Wei; Lee, Ta-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Unilateral sinus disease (USD) can sometimes be difficult to accurately diagnose before surgery. The application of nasal nitric oxide (nNO) for USD diagnosis and its surgical outcome in USD has not been reported in the literature. We prospectively enrolled sixty-six USD patients who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery for fungal rhinosinusitis (n = 19), chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) without nasal polyps (n = 13), CRS with nasal polyps (n = 12) and sinonasal mass lesions (n = 22). nNO levels were measured preoperatively and at three and six months postoperatively. Correlations between nNO levels and potential clinical parameters, type of disease, disease severity, and disease-related quality of life (QOL) were assessed. Unlike bilateral CRS, in USD, nNO levels did not correlate with disease severity or postoperative QOL improvements. Except for fungus group, there were no differences in nNO levels between lesion and non-lesion sides in all the other groups. nNO levels on both sides were significantly elevated six months postoperatively in all groups. Fungal rhinosinusitis patients had the lowest preoperative nNO levels, and a cutoff of 239.3 ppb had the best sensitivity (79.0%) and specificity (87.2%) for preoperative diagnosis. While preoperative nNO levels cannot serve as an alternative marker for disease severity of USD, they were lower in fungal rhinosinusitis patients than in other USD patients and may be useful for more accurate diagnosis prior to surgery. PMID:28199369

  13. Dietary Nitrate, Nitric Oxide, and Cardiovascular Health.

    PubMed

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Croft, Kevin D; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2016-09-09

    Emerging evidence strongly suggests that dietary nitrate, derived in the diet primarily from vegetables, could contribute to cardiovascular health via effects on nitric oxide (NO) status. NO plays an essential role in cardiovascular health. It is produced via the classical L-arginine-NO-synthase pathway and the recently discovered enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. The discovery of this alternate pathway has highlighted dietary nitrate as a candidate for the cardioprotective effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables. Clinical trials with dietary nitrate have observed improvements in blood pressure, endothelial function, ischemia-reperfusion injury, arterial stiffness, platelet function, and exercise performance with a concomitant augmentation of markers of NO status. While these results are indicative of cardiovascular benefits with dietary nitrate intake, there is still a lingering concern about nitrate in relation to methemoglobinemia, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. It is the purpose of this review to present an overview of NO and its critical role in cardiovascular health; to detail the observed vascular benefits of dietary nitrate intake through effects on NO status as well as to discuss the controversy surrounding the possible toxic effects of nitrate.

  14. Effects of nitric oxide in mucociliary transport.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Eleonora Elisia Abra; Pinge, Marli Cardoso Martins; Andrade Neto, Otavio André; Pessoa, Nathália Gardin

    2009-01-01

    The airways are made up of ciliated epithelium which secretes mucous, protecting the respiratory tract from particles inhaled during breathing. Its is paramount to understand the physiology and the mechanisms involved in mucociliary activity. Literature suggests that Nitric oxide (NO), especially the one produced by iNOS expression, maintains the mucociliary function and the immune defense of the nasal cavity. to assess NO participation and the enzymatic pathways in the production of NO and mucociliary transport, using constructive and inductive NO synthetase inhibitors, L-NAME and aminoguanidine, respectively. frog palates were prepared and immersed in ringer (control), L-NAME or aminoguanidine solutions. The palates were immersed in these solutions for four periods of 15 minutes. Mucociliary transport measures were carried out before and after each exposure. control palates maintained stable their transportation speed. L-NAME increased, while aminoguanidine reduced mucous transportation velocity. unspecific cNOS block with L-NAME and relatively specific iNOS block with aminoguanidine results leads us to propose that depending on the pathway, the NO can increase or reduce mucociliary transport in frog palates.

  15. Nitric oxide and teratogenesis: an update.

    PubMed

    Tiboni, Gian Mario; Ponzano, Adalisa

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), generated by NO synthase (NOS) enzymes, is an important bioactive molecule involved in the regulation of several biological phenomena that are crucial for organogenesis, including gene expression, cell growth, matrix remolding, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The expression of NOS isoforms in embryonic tissues is temporally and spatially regulated, and disruption of endogenous NO can lead to developmental defects. Maternal treatment with pan NOS inhibitors during early organogenesis caused severe malformations of the axial skeleton. In utero exposure during the fetal period induced limb reduction defects of vascular origin. Knock-out mice have been used to define the role of the various NOS isoforms on the origin of the abnormal development. Cardiovascular malformations, limb reduction defects, reduced growth and reduced survival have been observed in knock-out mice with targeted disruption of endothelial NOS (eNOS). Limited morphological changes were observed in mice lacking inducible NOS (iNOS) or neuronal NOS n(NOS). Results obtained with in vitro studies suggest that optimal levels of NO are required for neural tube closure. Disregulation of NO production was also recently proposed as a contributing mechanism in the origin of malformations associated with exposure to known environmental teratogens, such as valproic acid, thalidomide, copper deficiency, and diabetes.

  16. Modulation of nitric oxide bioavailability by erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuang-Tse; Han, Tae H.; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Vaughn, Mark W.; van Herle, Helga; Hein, Travis W.; Zhang, Cuihua; Kuo, Lih; Liao, James C.

    2001-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) activates soluble guanylyl cyclase in smooth muscle cells to induce vasodilation in the vasculature. However, as hemoglobin (Hb) is an effective scavenger of NO and is present in high concentrations inside the red blood cell (RBC), the bioavailability of NO would be too low to elicit soluble guanylyl cyclase activation in the presence of blood. Therefore, NO bioactivity must be preserved. Here we present evidence suggesting that the RBC participates in the preservation of NO bioactivity by reducing NO influx. The NO uptake by RBCs was increased and decreased by altering the degree of band 3 binding to the cytoskeleton. Methemoglobin and denatured hemoglobin binding to the RBC membrane or cytoskeleton also were shown to contribute to reducing the NO uptake rate of the RBC. These alterations in NO uptake by the RBC, hence the NO bioavailability, were determined to correlate with the vasodilation of isolated blood vessels. Our observations suggest that RBC membrane and cytoskeleton associated NO-inert proteins provide a barrier for NO diffusion and thus account for the reduction in the NO uptake rate of RBCs.

  17. Inducible nitric oxide synthase in the myocard.

    PubMed

    Buchwalow, I B; Schulze, W; Karczewski, P; Kostic, M M; Wallukat, G; Morwinski, R; Krause, E G; Müller, J; Paul, M; Slezak, J; Luft, F C; Haller, H

    2001-01-01

    Recognition of significance of nitric oxide synthases (NOS) in cardiovascular regulations has led to intensive research and development of therapies focused on NOS as potential therapeutic targets. However, the NOS isoform profile of cardiac tissue and subcellular localization of NOS isoforms remain a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to investigate the localization of an inducible NOS isoform (NOS2) in cardiomyocytes. Employing a novel immunocytochemical technique of a catalyzed reporter deposition system with tyramide and electron microscopical immunocytochemistry complemented with Western blotting and RT-PCR, we detected NOS2 both in rat neonatal and adult cultured cardiomyocytes and in the normal myocard of adult rats as well as in the human myocard of patients with dilative cardiomyopathy. NOS2 was targeted predominantly to a particulate component of the cardiomyocyte--along contractile fibers, in the plasma membrane including T-tubules, as well as in the nuclear envelope, mitochondria and Golgi complex. Our results point to an involvement of NOS2 in maintaining cardiac homeostasis and contradict to the notion that NOS2 is expressed in cardiac tissue only in response to various physiological and pathogenic factors. NOS2 targeting to mitochondria and contractile fibers suggests a relationship of NO with contractile function and energy production in the cardiac muscle.

  18. Structures of human constitutive nitric oxide synthases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiying; Jamal, Joumana; Plaza, Carla; Pineda, Stephanie Hai; Chreifi, Georges; Jing, Qing; Cinelli, Maris A.; Silverman, Richard B.; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Mammals produce three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS): neuronal NOS (nNOS), inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS). The overproduction of NO by nNOS is associated with a number of neurodegenerative disorders; therefore, a desirable therapeutic goal is the design of drugs that target nNOS but not the other isoforms. Crystallography, coupled with computational approaches and medicinal chemistry, has played a critical role in developing highly selective nNOS inhibitors that exhibit exceptional neuroprotective properties. For historic reasons, crystallography has focused on rat nNOS and bovine eNOS because these were available in high quality; thus, their structures have been used in structure–activity–relationship studies. Although these constitutive NOSs share more than 90% sequence identity across mammalian species for each NOS isoform, inhibitor-binding studies revealed that subtle differences near the heme active site in the same NOS isoform across species still impact enzyme–inhibitor interactions. Therefore, structures of the human constitutive NOSs are indispensible. Here, the first structure of human neuronal NOS at 2.03 Å resolution is reported and a different crystal form of human endothelial NOS is reported at 1.73 Å resolution. PMID:25286850

  19. Hemoglobin: A Nitric-Oxide Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the hemoglobin superfamily efficiently catalyze nitric-oxide dioxygenation, and when paired with native electron donors, function as NO dioxygenases (NODs). Indeed, the NOD function has emerged as a more common and ancient function than the well-known role in O2 transport-storage. Novel hemoglobins possessing a NOD function continue to be discovered in diverse life forms. Unique hemoglobin structures evolved, in part, for catalysis with different electron donors. The mechanism of NOD catalysis by representative single domain hemoglobins and multidomain flavohemoglobin occurs through a multistep mechanism involving O2 migration to the heme pocket, O2 binding-reduction, NO migration, radical-radical coupling, O-atom rearrangement, nitrate release, and heme iron re-reduction. Unraveling the physiological functions of multiple NODs with varying expression in organisms and the complexity of NO as both a poison and signaling molecule remain grand challenges for the NO field. NOD knockout organisms and cells expressing recombinant NODs are helping to advance our understanding of NO actions in microbial infection, plant senescence, cancer, mitochondrial function, iron metabolism, and tissue O2 homeostasis. NOD inhibitors are being pursued for therapeutic applications as antibiotics and antitumor agents. Transgenic NOD-expressing plants, fish, algae, and microbes are being developed for agriculture, aquaculture, and industry. PMID:24278729

  20. Nitric oxide reduces seed dormancy in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bethke, Paul C; Libourel, Igor G L; Jones, Russell L

    2006-01-01

    Dormancy is a property of many mature seeds, and experimentation over the past century has identified numerous chemical treatments that will reduce seed dormancy. Nitrogen-containing compounds including nitrate, nitrite, and cyanide break seed dormancy in a range of species. Experiments are described here that were carried out to further our understanding of the mechanism whereby these and other compounds, such as the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP), bring about a reduction in seed dormancy of Arabidopsis thaliana. A simple method was devised for applying the products of SNP photolysis through the gas phase. Using this approach it was shown that SNP, as well as potassium ferricyanide (Fe(III)CN) and potassium ferrocyanide (Fe(II)CN), reduced dormancy of Arabidopsis seeds by generating cyanide (CN). The effects of potassium cyanide (KCN) on dormant seeds were tested and it was confirmed that cyanide vapours were sufficient to break Arabidopsis seed dormancy. Nitrate and nitrite also reduced Arabidopsis seed dormancy and resulted in substantial rates of germination. The effects of CN, nitrite, and nitrate on dormancy were prevented by the NO scavenger c-PTIO. It was confirmed that NO plays a role in reducing seed dormancy by using purified NO gas, and a model to explain how nitrogen-containing compounds may break dormancy in Arabidopsis is presented.

  1. Airborne intercomparison of nitric oxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, James M., Jr.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Mcdougal, David S.; Torres, Arnold L.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1987-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted during missions flown in the fall of 1983 and spring of 1984. Instruments intercompared included a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system and two chemiluminescence instruments (CL). NO mixing ratios from below 5 pptv (parts per trillion by volume) to greater than 100 pptv were reported, with the majority less than 20 pptv. Good correlation was observed between the measurements reported by the CL and LIF techniques. The general level of agreement observed for the ensemble of measurements obtained during the two missions provides the basis from which one can conclude that equally 'valid' measurements of background levels of NO can be expected from either CL or LIF instruments. At the same time the periods of disagreement that were observed between the CL and LIF instruments as well as between the two CL instruments highlight the difficulty of obtaining reliable measurements with NO mixing ratios in the 5-20 pptv range and emphasize the vigilance that should be maintained in future NO measurements.

  2. Nitric oxide modulates sensitivity to ABA

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Juste, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gas with crucial signaling functions in plant defense and development. As demonstrated by generating a triple nia1nia2noa1-2 mutant with extremely low levels of NO (February 2010 issue of Plant Physiology), NO is synthesized in plants through mainly two different pathways involving nitrate reductase (NR/NIA) and NO Associated 1 (AtNOA1) proteins. Depletion of basal NO levels leads to a priming of ABA-triggered responses that causes hypersensitivity to this hormone and results in enhanced seed dormancy and decreased seed germination and seedling establishment in the triple mutant. NO produced under non-stressed conditions represses inhibition of seed developmental transitions by ABA. Moreover, NO plays a positive role in post-germinative vegetative development and also exerts a critical control of ABA-related functions on stomata closure. The triple nia1nia2noa1-2 mutant is hypersensitive to ABA in stomatal closure thus resulting in a extreme phenotype of resistance to drought. In the light of the recent discovery of PYR/PYL/RCAR as a family of potential ABA receptors, regulation of ABA sensitivity by NO may be exerted either directly on ABA receptors or on downstream signalling components; both two aspects that deserve our present and future attention. PMID:20168082

  3. Nitric oxide transport in an axisymmetric stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Fan, Yubo; Xu, X. Yun; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that disturbed flow can impede the transport of nitric oxide (NO) in the artery and hence induce atherogenesis, we used a lumen–wall model of an idealized arterial stenosis with NO produced at the blood vessel–wall interface to study the transport of NO in the stenosis. Blood flows in the lumen and through the arterial wall were simulated by Navier–Stokes equations and Darcy's Law, respectively. Meanwhile, the transport of NO in the lumen and the transport of NO within the arterial wall were modelled by advection–diffusion reaction equations. Coupling of fluid dynamics at the endothelium was achieved by the Kedem–Katchalsky equations. The results showed that both the hydraulic conductivity of the endothelium and the non-Newtonian viscous behaviour of blood had little effect on the distribution of NO. However, the blood flow rate, stenosis severity, red blood cells (RBCs), RBC-free layer and NO production rate at the blood vessel–wall interface could significantly affect the transport of NO. The theoretical study revealed that the transport of NO was significantly hindered in the disturbed flow region distal to the stenosis. The reduced NO concentration in the disturbed flow region might play an important role in the localized genesis and development of atherosclerosis. PMID:22593099

  4. Caffeinated nitric oxide-releasing lozenge improves cycling time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Kim, H T; Solares, G J; Kim, K; Ding, Z; Ivy, J L

    2015-02-01

    Boosting nitric oxide production during exercise by various means has been found to improve exercise performance. We investigated the effects of a nitric oxide releasing lozenge with added caffeine (70 mg) on oxygen consumption during steady-state exercise and cycling time trial performance using a double-blinded randomized, crossover experimental design. 15 moderately trained cyclists (7 females and 8 males) were randomly assigned to ingest the caffeinated nitric oxide lozenge or placebo 5 min before exercise. Oxygen consumption and blood lactate were assessed at rest and at 50%, 65% and 75% maximal oxygen consumption. Exercise performance was assessed by time to complete a simulated 20.15 km cycling time-trial course. No significant treatment effects for oxygen consumption or blood lactate at rest or during steady-state exercise were observed. However, time-trial performance was improved by 2.1% (p<0.01) when participants consumed the nitric oxide lozenge (2,424±69 s) compared to placebo (2,476±78 s) and without a significant difference in rating of perceived exertion. These results suggest that acute supplementation with a caffeinated nitric oxide releasing lozenge may be a practical and effective means of improving aerobic exercise performance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Nitric oxide-dependent penile erection in mice lacking neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, A. L.; Nelson, R. J.; Calvin, D. C.; Liu, J. X.; Demas, G. E.; Klein, S. L.; Kriegsfeld, L. J.; Dawson, V. L.; Dawson, T. M.; Snyder, S. H.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated as a mediator of penile erection, because the neuronal isoform of NO synthase (NOS) is localized to the penile innervation and NOS inhibitors selectively block erections. NO can also be formed by two other NOS isoforms derived from distinct genes, inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS). To clarify the source of NO in penile function, we have examined mice with targeted deletion of the nNOS gene (nNOS- mice). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mating behavior, electrophysiologically induced penile erection, isolated erectile tissue isometric tension, and eNOS localization by immunohistochemistry and Western blot were performed on nNOS- mice and wild-type controls. RESULTS: Both intact animal penile erections and isolated erectile tissue function are maintained in nNOS mice, in agreement with demonstrated normal sexual behaviors, but is stereospecifically blocked by the NOS inhibitor, L-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME). eNOS is abundantly present in endothelium of penile vasculature and sinusoidal endothelium within the corpora cavemosa, with levels that are significantly higher in nNOS- mice than in wild-type controls. CONCLUSIONS: eNOS mediates NO-dependent penile erection in nNOS- animals and normal penile erection. These data clarify the role of nitric oxide in penile erection and may have implications for therapeutic agents with selective effects on NOS isoforms. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 5 PMID:8784782

  6. Nitric oxide-dependent penile erection in mice lacking neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Burnett, A L; Nelson, R J; Calvin, D C; Liu, J X; Demas, G E; Klein, S L; Kriegsfeld, L J; Dawson, V L; Dawson, T M; Snyder, S H

    1996-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated as a mediator of penile erection, because the neuronal isoform of NO synthase (NOS) is localized to the penile innervation and NOS inhibitors selectively block erections. NO can also be formed by two other NOS isoforms derived from distinct genes, inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS). To clarify the source of NO in penile function, we have examined mice with targeted deletion of the nNOS gene (nNOS- mice). Mating behavior, electrophysiologically induced penile erection, isolated erectile tissue isometric tension, and eNOS localization by immunohistochemistry and Western blot were performed on nNOS- mice and wild-type controls. Both intact animal penile erections and isolated erectile tissue function are maintained in nNOS mice, in agreement with demonstrated normal sexual behaviors, but is stereospecifically blocked by the NOS inhibitor, L-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME). eNOS is abundantly present in endothelium of penile vasculature and sinusoidal endothelium within the corpora cavemosa, with levels that are significantly higher in nNOS- mice than in wild-type controls. eNOS mediates NO-dependent penile erection in nNOS- animals and normal penile erection. These data clarify the role of nitric oxide in penile erection and may have implications for therapeutic agents with selective effects on NOS isoforms.

  7. Direct chemiluminescence detection of nitric oxide in aqueous solutions using the natural nitric oxide target soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Woldman, Yakov Y; Sun, Jian; Zweier, Jay L; Khramtsov, Valery V

    2009-11-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical involved in many physiological processes including regulation of blood pressure, immune response, and neurotransmission. However, the measurement of extremely low, in some cases subnanomolar, physiological concentrations of nitric oxide presents an analytical challenge. The purpose of this methods article is to introduce a new highly sensitive chemiluminescence approach to direct NO detection in aqueous solutions using a natural nitric oxide target, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), which catalyzes the conversion of guanosine triphosphate to guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and inorganic pyrophosphate. The suggested enzymatic assay uses the fact that the rate of the reaction increases by about 200 times when NO binds with sGC and, in so doing, provides a sensor for nitric oxide. Luminescence detection of the above reaction is accomplished by converting inorganic pyrophosphate into ATP with the help of ATP sulfurylase followed by light emission from the ATP-dependent luciferin-luciferase reaction. Detailed protocols for NO quantification in aqueous samples are provided. The examples of applications include measurement of NO generated by a nitric oxide donor (PAPA-NONOate), nitric oxide synthase, and NO gas dissolved in buffer. The method allows for the measurement of NO concentrations in the nanomolar range and NO generation rates as low as 100 pM/min.

  8. SOIL NITROUS OXIDE, NITRIC OXIDE, AND AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM A RECOVERING RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEM IN SOUTHERN APPALACHIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents two years of seasonal nitric oxide, ammonia, and nitrous oxide trace gas fluxes measured in a recovering riparian zone with cattle excluded and in an adjacent riparian zone grazed by cattle. In the recovering riparian zone, average nitric oxide, ammonia, and ni...

  9. The effects of coenzyme Q10 on seizures in mice: the involvement of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Sattarinezhad, Elahe; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Sheikhnouri, Kiandokht; Mousavi, Zahra; Moezi, Leila

    2014-08-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is a potent antioxidant in both mitochondria and lipid membranes. It has also been recognized to have an effect on gene expression. This study was designed to investigate whether acute or subchronic treatment with coenzyme Q10 altered the seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole or electroshock in mice. We also evaluated the involvement of nitric oxide in the effects of coenzyme Q10 in pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure models. Acute oral treatment with different doses of coenzyme Q10 did not affect the seizure in intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole, intravenous pentylenetetrazole, and electroshock models in mice. Subchronic oral administration of coenzyme Q10 (100 mg/kg or more) increased time latencies to the onset of myoclonic jerks and clonic seizures induced by intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole and at the doses of 25 mg/kg or more increased the seizure threshold induced by intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazole. Subchronic doses of coenzyme Q10 (50 mg/kg or more) also decreased the incidence of tonic seizures in the electroshock-induced seizure model. Moreover, acute treatment with the precursor of nitric oxide synthesis, L-arginine (60 mg/kg), led to a significant potentiation of the antiseizure effects of subchronic administration of coenzyme Q10 (400 mg/kg in intraperitoneal and 6.25 mg/kg in intravenous pentylenetetrazole tests). Acute treatment with l-NAME (5 mg/kg), a nonspecific nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, significantly attenuated the antiseizure effects of subchronic doses of coenzyme Q10 in both seizure models induced by pentylenetetrazole. On the other hand, acute administration of aminoguanidine (100 mg/kg), a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, did not affect the seizures in mice treated with subchronic doses of coenzyme Q10 in both intraperitoneal and intravenous pentylenetetrazole tests. In conclusion, only subchronic and not acute administration of coenzyme Q10 attenuated seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole

  10. Nitric oxide synthases: structure, function and inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Alderton, W K; Cooper, C E; Knowles, R G

    2001-01-01

    This review concentrates on advances in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) structure, function and inhibition made in the last seven years, during which time substantial advances have been made in our understanding of this enzyme family. There is now information on the enzyme structure at all levels from primary (amino acid sequence) to quaternary (dimerization, association with other proteins) structure. The crystal structures of the oxygenase domains of inducible NOS (iNOS) and vascular endothelial NOS (eNOS) allow us to interpret other information in the context of this important part of the enzyme, with its binding sites for iron protoporphyrin IX (haem), biopterin, L-arginine, and the many inhibitors which interact with them. The exact nature of the NOS reaction, its mechanism and its products continue to be sources of controversy. The role of the biopterin cofactor is now becoming clearer, with emerging data implicating one-electron redox cycling as well as the multiple allosteric effects on enzyme activity. Regulation of the NOSs has been described at all levels from gene transcription to covalent modification and allosteric regulation of the enzyme itself. A wide range of NOS inhibitors have been discussed, interacting with the enzyme in diverse ways in terms of site and mechanism of inhibition, time-dependence and selectivity for individual isoforms, although there are many pitfalls and misunderstandings of these aspects. Highly selective inhibitors of iNOS versus eNOS and neuronal NOS have been identified and some of these have potential in the treatment of a range of inflammatory and other conditions in which iNOS has been implicated. PMID:11463332

  11. Nitric oxide and the paranasal sinuses.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Jon O

    2008-11-01

    The discovery within the paranasal sinuses for the production of nitric oxide (NO) has altered the traditional explanations of sinus physiology. This review article reports the ongoing investigation of sinus physiology beginning with the discovery of NO gas production in the paranasal sinuses that occurred in 1995, and the impact that finding has had both in the basic science and clinical arenas. It was shown that healthy paranasal sinus epithelium expresses an inducible NO synthase that continuously generates large amounts of NO, a pluripotent gaseous messenger with potent vasodilating, and antimicrobial activity. This NO can be measured noninvasively in nasally exhaled breath. The role of NO in the sinuses is likely to enhance local host defense mechanisms via direct inhibition of pathogen growth and stimulation of mucociliary activity. The NO concentration in a healthy sinus exceeds those that are needed for antibacterial effects in vitro. In patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and in cystic fibrosis, nasal NO is extremely low. This defect NO generation likely contributes to the great susceptibility to chronic sinusitis in these patients. In addition, the low-nasal NO is of diagnostic value especially in PCD, where nasal NO is very low or absent. Intriguingly, NO gas from the nose and sinuses is inhaled with every breath and reaches the lungs in a more diluted form to enhance pulmonary oxygen uptake via local vasodilation. In this sense NO may be regarded as an "aerocrine" hormone that is produced in the nose and sinuses and transported to a distal site of action with every inhalation. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Nitric oxide scavenging by red cell microparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Zhao, Weixin; Christ, George J; Gladwin, Mark T; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B

    2013-12-01

    Red cell microparticles form during the storage of red blood cells and in diseases associated with red cell breakdown and asplenia, including hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease. These small phospholipid vesicles that are derived from red blood cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of transfusion of aged stored blood and hemolytic diseases, via activation of the hemostatic system and effects on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Red cell microparticles react with the important signaling molecule NO almost as fast as cell-free hemoglobin, about 1000 times faster than red-cell-encapsulated hemoglobin. The degree to which this fast reaction with NO by red cell microparticles influences NO bioavailability depends on several factors that are explored here. In the context of stored blood preserved in ADSOL, we find that both cell-free hemoglobin and red cell microparticles increase as a function of duration of storage, and the proportion of extra erythrocytic hemoglobin in the red cell microparticle fraction is about 20% throughout storage. Normalized by hemoglobin concentration, the NO-scavenging ability of cell-free hemoglobin is slightly higher than that of red cell microparticles as determined by a chemiluminescence NO-scavenging assay. Computational simulations show that the degree to which red cell microparticles scavenge NO will depend substantially on whether they enter the cell-free zone next to the endothelial cells. Single-microvessel myography experiments performed under laminar flow conditions demonstrate that microparticles significantly enter the cell-free zone and inhibit acetylcholine, endothelial-dependent, and NO-dependent vasodilation. Taken together, these data suggest that as little as 5 μM hemoglobin in red cell microparticles, an amount formed after the infusion of one unit of aged stored packed red blood cells, has the potential to reduce NO bioavailability and impair endothelial-dependent vasodilation.

  13. Acute lung injury after inhalation of nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shih Ling; Yap, Eng Soo; Khoo, See Meng; Lim, Tow Keang; Mukhopadhyay, Amartya; Teo, Sylvia Tzu Li

    2008-12-01

    We report two cases of acute lung injury after the inhalation of nitric acid fumes in an industrial accident. The first patient, who was not using a respirator and standing in close proximity to the site of spillage of concentrated nitric acid, presented within 12 h with worsening dyspnea and required noninvasive ventilation for type 1 respiratory failure. The second case presented 1 day later with similar symptoms, but only required supportive treatment with high-flow oxygen. Both patients' chest radiographs showed widespread bilateral airspace shadows consistent with acute lung injury. Both received treatment with systemic steroids. They were discharged from hospital 5 days postexposure. Initial lung function test showed a restrictive pattern that normalized by 3 weeks postexposure. This case series describes the natural history after acute inhalation of nitric acid fumes, and demonstrates that the severity of lung injury is directly dependent on the exposure level. It also highlights the use of noninvasive ventilatory support in the management of such patients.

  14. Nitric oxide functions as a signal in plant disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Delledonne, M; Xia, Y; Dixon, R A; Lamb, C

    1998-08-06

    Recognition of an avirulent pathogen triggers the rapid production of the reactive oxygen intermediates superoxide (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). This oxidative burst drives crosslinking of the cell wall, induces several plant genes involved in cellular protection and defence, and is necessary for the initiation of host cell death in the hypersensitive disease-resistance response. However, this burst is not enough to support a strong disease-resistance response. Here we show that nitric oxide, which acts as a signal in the immune, nervous and vascular systems, potentiates the induction of hypersensitive cell death in soybean cells by reactive oxygen intermediates and functions independently of such intermediates to induce genes for the synthesis of protective natural products. Moreover, inhibitors of nitric oxide synthesis compromise the hypersensitive disease-resistance response of Arabidopsis leaves to Pseudomonas syringae, promoting disease and bacterial growth. We conclude that nitric oxide plays a key role in disease resistance in plants.

  15. Nitric Oxide Generating Polymeric Coatings for Subcutaneous Glucose Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-14

    required to fabricate implantable amperometric glucose sensors with outer polymeric coatings that slowly generate low levels of nitric oxide (NO...is aimed at exploring and optimizing the chemistries required to fabricate implantable amperometric glucose sensors with outer polymeric films that...34 Oral Presentation, The Tenth World Congress on Biosensors , May 16, 2008, Shanghai, China. -J. Yang, J. L. Welby, M. E. Meyerhoff, “Generic Nitric

  16. The Nitric Acid Oxidation of Selected Alcohols and Ketones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Kurt W.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Shows that nitric acid can be used as a rapid, versatile, and economical oxidant for selected organic substances. The experiments (with background information, procedures, and results provided) require one three-hour laboratory period but could serve as open-ended projects since substrates not described could be oxidized. (JN)

  17. Nitric oxide is overproduced by peritoneal macrophages in rat taurocholate pancreatitis: the mechanism of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression.

    PubMed

    Satoh, A; Shimosegawa, T; Kimura, K; Moriizumi, S; Masamune, A; Koizumi, M; Toyota, T

    1998-11-01

    To investigate the pathobiology of severe acute pancreatitis, we studied the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in peritoneal macrophages of experimental pancreatitis. Taurocholate (TCA) pancreatitis and cerulein (CE) pancreatitis were used as models of lethal and self-limited pancreatitis, respectively, and the mechanism of iNOS expression in peritoneal macrophages was studied. Serum nitrate and nitrite (NOx) concentrations increased during the course of TCA pancreatitis, and iNOS-immunoreactivity was detected in the peritoneal macrophages 12 h after the induction of TCA pancreatitis, but these phenomena were not observed in CE pancreatitis. Despite the difference in the iNOS expression, the iNOS messenger RNA (mRNA) and the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) were detected in the peritoneal macrophages of both pancreatitis models. The supernatant of TCA pancreatitis ascites could induce iNOS in the peritoneal macrophages of normal rats in vitro, but the peritoneal lavage fluid of CE pancreatitis rats could not. The results indicated that there may be qualitative or quantitative differences in the macrophage activation between the two types of experimental pancreatitis and suggested that the ascites of rats with lethal acute pancreatitis contains some soluble factors that activate the macrophage/monocyte system and cause an overproduction of NO by the iNOS expression.

  18. Nitric Oxide Formation by Meteoroids in the Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menees, Gene P.; Park, Chul

    1976-01-01

    The process of nitric oxide formation during atmospheric entry of meteoroids is analyzed theoretically. An ablating meteoroid is assumed to be a point source in a uniform flow with a continuum regime evolving in its wake. The amount of nitric oxide produced by high-temperature reactions of air in the continuum regime is calculated by numerical integration of chemical-rate equations. This is accomplished by assuming that flow properties are constant across the reacting region, the radius of the region being determined from considerations of shock-wave formation and molecular diffusion. The results, when summed over the observed mass, velocity, and entry-angle distributions of meteoroids, provide annual global production rates of nitric oxide as a function of altitude. The peak production of nitric oxide is found to occur at altitudes between 9 x 10(exp 4) and 10(exp 5) m, the total annual rate being about 4 x 10(exp 7) kg. The present results suggest that the large concentration of nitric oxide observed below 9.5 x 10(exp 4) m could be attributed to meteoroids instead of photodissociation of nitrogen into metastable, 2D-state atoms, as has been previously hypothesized.

  19. Nitric Oxide in Astrocyte-Neuron Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Nianzhen

    2002-01-01

    Astrocytes, a subtype of glial cell, have recently been shown to exhibit Ca2+ elevations in response to neurotransmitters. A Ca2+ elevation can propagate to adjacent astrocytes as a Ca2+ wave, which allows an astrocyte to communicate with its neighbors. Additionally, glutamate can be released from astrocytes via a Ca2+-dependent mechanism, thus modulating neuronal activity and synaptic transmission. In this dissertation, the author investigated the roles of another endogenous signal, nitric oxide (NO), in astrocyte-neuron signaling. First the author tested if NO is generated during astrocytic Ca2+ signaling by imaging NO in purified murine cortical astrocyte cultures. Physiological concentrations of a natural messenger, ATP, caused a Ca2+-dependent NO production. To test the roles of NO in astrocytic Ca2+ signaling, the author applied NO to astrocyte cultures via addition of a NO donor, S-nitrosol-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). NO induced an influx of external Ca2+, possibly through store-operated Ca2+ channels. The NO-induced Ca2+ signaling is cGMP-independent since 8-Br-cGMP, an agonistic analog of cGMP, did not induce a detectable Ca2+ change. The consequence of this NO-induced Ca2+ influx was assessed by simultaneously monitoring of cytosolic and internal store Ca2+ using fluorescent Ca2+ indicators x-rhod-1 and mag-fluo-4. Blockage of NO signaling with the NO scavenger PTIO significantly reduced the refilling percentage of internal stores following ATP-induced Ca2+ release, suggesting that NO modulates internal store refilling. Furthermore, locally photo-release of NO to a single astrocyte led to a Ca2+ elevation in the stimulated astrocyte and a subsequent Ca2+ wave to neighbors. Finally, the author tested the role of NO inglutamate-mediated astrocyte-neuron signaling by

  20. Light activated nitric oxide releasing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muizzi Casanas, Dayana Andreina

    The ability to control the location and dosage of biologically active molecules inside the human body can be critical to maximizing effective treatment of cardiovascular diseases like angina. The current standard of treatment relies on the metabolism of organonitrate drugs into nitric oxide (NO), which are not specific, and also show problems with densitization with long-term use. There is a need then to create a treatment method that gives targeted release of NO. Metal-nitrosyl (M-NO) complexes can be used for delivery of NO since the release of NO can be controlled with light. However, the NO-releasing drug must be activated with red light to ensure maximum penetration of light through tissue. However, the release of NO from M-NO complexes with red-light activation is a significant challenge since the energy required to break the metal-NO bond is usually larger than the energy provided by red light. The goal of this project was to create red- sensitive, NO-releasing materials based on Ru-salen-nitrosyl compounds. Our approach was to first modify Ru salen complexes to sensitize the photochemistry for release of NO after red light irradiation. Next, we pursued polymerization of the Ru-salen complexes. We report the synthesis and quantitative photochemical characterization of a series of ruthenium salen nitrosyl complexes. These complexes were modified by incorporating electron donating groups in the salen ligand structure at key locations to increase electron density on the Ru. Complexes with either an --OH or --OCH3 substituent showed an improvement in the quantum yield of release of NO upon blue light irradiation compared to the unmodified salen. These --OH and --OCH3 complexes were also sensitized for NO release after red light activation, however the red-sensitive complexes were unstable and showed ligand substitution on the order of minutes. The substituted complexes remained sensitive for NO release, but only after blue light irradiation. The Ru

  1. Nitric oxide inhibits isoproterenol-stimulated adipocyte lipolysis through oxidative inactivation of the beta-agonist.

    PubMed Central

    Klatt, P; Cacho, J; Crespo, M D; Herrera, E; Ramos, P

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been implicated in the inhibition of catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis in adipose tissue by as yet unknown mechanisms. In the present study, it is shown that the nitric oxide donor, 2,2-diethyl-1-nitroso-oxyhydrazine, antagonized isoproterenol (isoprenaline)-induced lipolysis in rat adipocytes, freshly isolated from white adipose tissue, by decreasing the potency of the beta-agonist without affecting its efficacy. These data suggest that nitric oxide did not act downstream of the beta-adrenoceptor but reduced the effective concentration of isoproterenol. In support of the latter hypothesis, we found that pre-treatment of isoproterenol with nitric oxide abolished the lipolytic activity of the catecholamine. Spectroscopic data and HPLC analysis confirmed that the nitric oxide-mediated inactivation of isoproterenol was in fact because of the modification of the catecholamine through a sequence of oxidation reactions, which apparently involved the generation of an aminochrome. Similarly, aminochrome was found to be the primary product of isoproterenol oxidation by 3-morpholinosydnonimine and peroxynitrite. Finally, it was shown that nitric oxide released from cytokine-stimulated adipocytes attenuated the lipolytic effect of isoproterenol by inactivating the catecholamine. In contrast with very recent findings, which suggest that nitric oxide impairs the beta-adrenergic action of isoproterenol through intracellular mechanisms and not through a chemical reaction between NO and the catecholamine, we showed that nitric oxide was able to attenuate the pharmacological activity of isoproterenol in vitro as well as in a nitric oxide-generating cellular system through oxidation of the beta-agonist. These findings should be taken into account in both the design and interpretation of studies used to investigate the role of nitric oxide as a modulator of isoproterenol-stimulated signal transduction pathways. PMID:11023835

  2. Nitric oxide inhibits isoproterenol-stimulated adipocyte lipolysis through oxidative inactivation of the beta-agonist.

    PubMed

    Klatt, P; Cacho, J; Crespo, M D; Herrera, E; Ramos, P

    2000-10-15

    Nitric oxide has been implicated in the inhibition of catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis in adipose tissue by as yet unknown mechanisms. In the present study, it is shown that the nitric oxide donor, 2,2-diethyl-1-nitroso-oxyhydrazine, antagonized isoproterenol (isoprenaline)-induced lipolysis in rat adipocytes, freshly isolated from white adipose tissue, by decreasing the potency of the beta-agonist without affecting its efficacy. These data suggest that nitric oxide did not act downstream of the beta-adrenoceptor but reduced the effective concentration of isoproterenol. In support of the latter hypothesis, we found that pre-treatment of isoproterenol with nitric oxide abolished the lipolytic activity of the catecholamine. Spectroscopic data and HPLC analysis confirmed that the nitric oxide-mediated inactivation of isoproterenol was in fact because of the modification of the catecholamine through a sequence of oxidation reactions, which apparently involved the generation of an aminochrome. Similarly, aminochrome was found to be the primary product of isoproterenol oxidation by 3-morpholinosydnonimine and peroxynitrite. Finally, it was shown that nitric oxide released from cytokine-stimulated adipocytes attenuated the lipolytic effect of isoproterenol by inactivating the catecholamine. In contrast with very recent findings, which suggest that nitric oxide impairs the beta-adrenergic action of isoproterenol through intracellular mechanisms and not through a chemical reaction between NO and the catecholamine, we showed that nitric oxide was able to attenuate the pharmacological activity of isoproterenol in vitro as well as in a nitric oxide-generating cellular system through oxidation of the beta-agonist. These findings should be taken into account in both the design and interpretation of studies used to investigate the role of nitric oxide as a modulator of isoproterenol-stimulated signal transduction pathways.

  3. Hemorrhagic shock and nitric oxide release from erythrocytic nitric oxide synthase: A quantitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kejing; Pittman, Roland N.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2009-01-01

    A large loss of blood during hemorrhage can result in profound shock, a state of hypotension associated with hemodynamic abnormalities. One of the hypotheses to account for this collapse of homeostasis is that the production of nitric oxide (NO), a gas molecule that dilates blood vessels, is significantly impaired during hemorrhage, resulting in a mismatch between O2 delivery and the metabolic activity in the tissues. NO can be released from multiple sources in the vasculature. Recent studies have shown that erythrocytes express functional endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3), which potentially serves as an intraluminal NO source. NO delivery from this source is complex: Erythrocytes are not only NO producers but also act as potent sinks because of the high affinity of NO for hemoglobin. To test our hypothesis that the loss of erythrocytic NOS3 during hemorrhage contributes to NO deficiency-related shock, we have constructed a multicellular computational model that simulates NO production and transport to allow us to quantify the loss of NO under different hemorrhagic conditions. Our model shows that: (1) during mild hemorrhage and subsequent hemodilution (hematocrit >30%), NO from this intraluminal source is only slightly decreased in the vascular smooth muscle, but the NO level is significantly reduced under severe hemorrhagic conditions (hematocrit <30%); (2) whether a significant amount of NO from this source can be delivered to vascular smooth muscle is strongly dependent on the existence of a protective mechanism for NO delivery; (3) if the expression level of NOS3 on erythrocytes is similar to that on endothelial cells, we estimate ~13 pM NO at the vascular smooth muscle from this source when such a protective mechanism is involved. This study provides a basis for detailed studies to characterize the impairment of NO release pathways during hemorrhage and yield important insights for the development of resuscitation methods. PMID:19285090

  4. Hemorrhagic shock and nitric oxide release from erythrocytic nitric oxide synthase: a quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kejing; Pittman, Roland N; Popel, Aleksander S

    2009-06-01

    A large loss of blood during hemorrhage can result in profound shock, a state of hypotension associated with hemodynamic abnormalities. One of the hypotheses to account for this collapse of homeostasis is that the production of nitric oxide (NO), a gas molecule that dilates blood vessels, is significantly impaired during hemorrhage, resulting in a mismatch between O(2) delivery and the metabolic activity in the tissues. NO can be released from multiple sources in the vasculature. Recent studies have shown that erythrocytes express functional endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3), which potentially serves as an intraluminal NO source. NO delivery from this source is complex: erythrocytes are not only NO producers but also act as potent sinks because of the high affinity of NO for hemoglobin. To test our hypothesis that the loss of erythrocytic NOS3 during hemorrhage contributes to NO deficiency-related shock, we have constructed a multicellular computational model that simulates NO production and transport to allow us to quantify the loss of NO under different hemorrhagic conditions. Our model shows that: (1) during mild hemorrhage and subsequent hemodilution (hematocrit >30%), NO from this intraluminal source is only slightly decreased in the vascular smooth muscle, but the NO level is significantly reduced under severe hemorrhagic conditions (hematocrit <30%); (2) whether a significant amount of NO from this source can be delivered to vascular smooth muscle is strongly dependent on the existence of a protective mechanism for NO delivery; (3) if the expression level of NOS3 on erythrocytes is similar to that on endothelial cells, we estimate approximately 13 pM NO at the vascular smooth muscle from this source when such a protective mechanism is involved. This study provides a basis for detailed studies to characterize the impairment of NO release pathways during hemorrhage and yield important insights for the development of resuscitation methods.

  5. Sleep-disordered breathing children: Measurement of nasal nitric oxide and fractional exhaled nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Zou, Y; Mai, F; Zhang, X; Liu, Y; Lin, X

    2016-03-01

    To assess the clinical significance of nasal nitric oxide (nNO) and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) concentrations in children with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). Enrolled in this study were 30 children with SDB and 15 healthy children. The nNO and FeNO concentrations were measured noninvasively using a NIOX MINO system (Aerocrine AB, Solna, Sweden). SPSS statistics 20.0 software (IBM SPSS statistics 20.0, Armonk, NY, USA) was used to analyze the data. The median (25th and 75th percentiles) nNO concentration of SDB children measured in parts per billion (ppb) was 111.0 (44.0; 349.0) ppb; FeNO concentration of SDB children was 12.0 (9.8; 14.0) ppb. The nNO concentration of healthy children was 52.0 (22.0; 139.0) ppb; FeNO concentration of healthy children was 12.0 (10.0; 16.0) ppb. Compared to healthy children, nNO concentration was significantly higher in children with SDB (Z = -2.215, P = 0.027). Correlation analysis showed that SDB children's nNO concentration directly correlated with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI; r = 0.429, P = 0.018), and inversely correlated with nadir oxygen saturation (SaO2; r = -0.482, P = 0.007). No other polysomnographic parameters significantly correlated with nNO concentration. Our data suggest that nNO concentration might be useful for diagnosis and evaluation of disease severity in SDB children. Furthermore, these results suggest that nNO concentration has a greater prognostic value than FeNO concentration.

  6. Estimation of the nitric oxide formed from hydroxylamine by Nitrosomonas

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J. H.

    1965-01-01

    1. Nitric oxide that was produced by reducing nitrite with an excess of acidified potassium iodide under nitrogen in Warburg respirometer flasks was rapidly absorbed by a solution of permanganate in sodium hydroxide held in the side arm. A small amount of nitrous oxide (or nitrogen) that was also produced was not absorbed. 2. By using a quantitative method for the recovery of nitrite from samples of the alkaline permanganate, it was found that the sum of the nitrite N formed and the residual nitrous oxide N was equivalent to the nitrite N used to generate the gases. These results showed that alkaline permanganate completely oxidized nitric oxide to nitrite. The method was suitable for determining 0·4–20 μmoles of nitric oxide. 3. The technique was used to determine the nitric oxide content of the nitrogenous gas that was produced anaerobically from hydroxylamine by an extract of the autotrophic nitrifying micro-organism Nitrosomonas in the presence of methylene blue as electron acceptor. PMID:14342235

  7. Nitric oxide and changes of iron metabolism in exercise.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhong Ming

    2002-11-01

    Accumulated data imply that exercise itself might not lead to a true iron deficiency or 'sport anaemia' in a healthy athlete who has adequate iron intake. The higher prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia in younger female athletes might be not due to exercise itself, but probably results from dietary choices, inadequate iron intake and menstruation. These factors can also induce iron deficiency or anaemia in the general population. However, exercise does affect iron metabolism, leading to low or sub-optimal iron status. The underlying mechanism is unknown. In this review, recent advances in the study of the effect of exercise on iron metabolism and nitric oxide, and the relationship between nitric oxide and iron status in exercise are discussed. A hypothesis that increased production of nitric oxide might contribute to sub-optimal iron status in exercise is proposed.

  8. Parameters controlling nitric oxide emissions from gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heywood, J. B.; Mikus, T.

    1973-01-01

    Nitric oxide forms in the primary zone of gas turbine combustors where the burnt gas composition is close to stoichiometric and gas temperatures are highest. It has been found that combustor air inlet conditions, mean primary zone fuel-air ratio, residence time, and the uniformity of the primary zone are the most important variables affecting nitric oxide emissions. Relatively simple model of the flow in a gas turbine combustor, coupled with a rate equation for nitric oxide formation via the Zeldovich mechanism are shown to correlate the variation in measured NOx emissions. Data from a number of different combustor concepts are analyzed and shown to be in reasonable agreement with predictions. The NOx formulation model is used to assess the extent to which an advanced combustor concept, the NASA swirl can, has produced a lean well-mixed primary zone generally believed to be the best low NOx emissions burner type.

  9. Nitric oxide formation by meteoroids in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menees, G. P.; Park, C.

    1974-01-01

    The process of nitric oxide formation during atmospheric entry of meteoroids is analyzed theoretically. An ablating meteoroid is assumed to be a point source in a uniform flow with a continuum regime evolving in its wake. The amount of nitric oxide produced by high-temperature reactions of air in the continuum regime is calculated by numerical integration of chemical-rate equations. This is accomplished by assuming that flow properties are constant across the reacting region, its radius being determined from considerations of shock-wave formation and molecular diffusion. The results, when summed over the observed mass, velocity, and entry-angle distributions of meteoroids, provide annual global production rates of nitric oxide as a function of altitude. The peak production is found to occur between 90- and 100-km altitude, the total annual rate being around 40 million kg.

  10. Enhanced biogenic emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide following surface biomass burning

    Treesearch

    Iris C. Anderson; Joel S. Levine; Mark A. Poth; Philip J. Riggan

    1988-01-01

    Recent measurements indicate significantly enhanced biogenic soil emissions of both nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) following surface burning. These enhanced fluxes persisted for at least 6 months following the burn. Simultaneous measurements indicate enhanced levels of...

  11. Relationship between exhaled nitric oxide and childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Frank, T L; Adisesh, A; Pickering, A C; Morrison, J F; Wright, T; Francis, H; Fletcher, A; Frank, P I; Hannaford, P

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if exhaled nitric oxide levels in children varied according to their asthmatic and atopic status. Exhaled nitric oxide was measured in a sample of 93 children attending the North West Lung Centre, Manchester, United Kingdom, for the clinical evaluation of a respiratory questionnaire being developed as a screening tool in general practice. The clinical assessment included full lung function, skin prick testing, and exercise challenge. Children were said to be asthmatic either by consensus decision of three independent consultant pediatricians, who reviewed all the clinical results except the nitric oxide measurements, or by positive exercise test. Atopic asthmatic children had higher geometric mean exhaled nitric oxide levels (consensus decision, 12.5 ppb [parts per billion] 95% CI, 8.3 to 18. 8; positive exercise test, 12.2 ppb 95% CI, 7.6 to 19.7) than did nonatopic asthmatic children (3.2 ppb 95% CI, 2.3 to 4.6; 3.2 ppb 95% CI, 2.0 to 5.0), atopic nonasthmatic children (3.8 ppb 95% CI, 2. 7 to 5.5; 5.7 ppb 95% CI, 4.1 to 8.0), or nonatopic nonasthmatic children (3.4 ppb 95% CI, 2.8 to 4.1; 3.5 ppb 95% CI, 3.0 to 4.1). Thus, exhaled nitric oxide was raised in atopic asthmatics but not in nonatopic asthmatics, and these nonatopic asthmatics had levels of exhaled nitric oxide similar to those of the nonasthmatics whether atopic or not.

  12. Structural and biological studies on bacterial nitric oxide synthase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Jeffrey K.; Li, Huiying; Jing, Qing; Kang, Soosung; Richo, Jerry; Silverman, Richard B.; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by bacterial NOS functions as a cytoprotective agent against oxidative stress in Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus anthracis, and Bacillus subtilis. The screening of several NOS-selective inhibitors uncovered two inhibitors with potential antimicrobial properties. These two compounds impede the growth of B. subtilis under oxidative stress, and crystal structures show that each compound exhibits a unique binding mode. Both compounds serve as excellent leads for the future development of antimicrobials against bacterial NOS-containing bacteria. PMID:24145412

  13. Recent Advances on Nitric Oxide in the Upper Airways.

    PubMed

    Maniscalco, Mauro; Bianco, Andrea; Mazzarella, Gennaro; Motta, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide (NO) originates from the upper airways, and takes action, to varying extents, in regulation, protection and defense, as well as in noxious processes. Nitric oxide retains important functions in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes of the human body, including vaso-regulation, antimicrobial activity, neurotransmission and respiration. This review article reports the ongoing investigations regarding the source, biology and relevance of NO within upper respiratory tract. In addition, we discuss the role of NO, originating from nasal and paranasal sinuses, in inflammatory disorders such as allergic rhinitis, sinusitis, primary ciliary dyskinesia, and cystic fibrosis.

  14. Nitric oxide emission from pulverized coal blend flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kopparthi, V.; Gollahalli, S.R.

    1995-09-01

    An experimental study of the nitric oxide emission from pulverized blended coal flames as a function of blending mass ratio is presented. Coals of three ranks (anthracite, bituminous, and lignite), and of the same rank (bituminous), but of different origin (Oklahoma and Wyoming mines), were used as fuels. Also, their blends (anthracite-bituminous, anthracite-lignite, lignite-bituminous, and Oklahoma-Wyoming coals) at mass ratios of 20:80, 40:60, 60:40, and 80:20 were studied. Correlations of nitric oxide emission index (mass/unit energy release) with blend mass ratio are presented.

  15. Use of inhaled nitric oxide in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide, an important signaling molecule with multiple regulatory effects throughout the body, is an important tool for the treatment of full-term and late-preterm infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn and hypoxemic respiratory failure. Several randomized controlled trials have evaluated its role in the management of preterm infants ≤ 34 weeks' gestational age with varying results. The purpose of this clinical report is to summarize the existing evidence for the use of inhaled nitric oxide in preterm infants and provide guidance regarding its use in this population.

  16. Efficacy of nitric oxide, with or without continuing antihypertensive treatment, for management of high blood pressure in acute stroke (ENOS): a partial-factorial randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background High blood pressure is associated with poor outcome after stroke. Whether blood pressure should be lowered early after stroke, and whether to continue or temporarily withdraw existing antihypertensive drugs, is not known. We assessed outcomes after stroke in patients given drugs to lower their blood pressure. Methods In our multicentre, partial-factorial trial, we randomly assigned patients admitted to hospital with an acute ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke and raised systolic blood pressure (systolic 140–220 mm Hg) to 7 days of transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (5 mg per day), started within 48 h of stroke onset, or to no glyceryl trinitrate (control group). A subset of patients who were taking antihypertensive drugs before their stroke were also randomly assigned to continue or stop taking these drugs. The primary outcome was function, assessed with the modified Rankin Scale at 90 days by observers masked to treatment assignment. This study is registered, number ISRCTN99414122. Findings Between July 20, 2001, and Oct 14, 2013, we enrolled 4011 patients. Mean blood pressure was 167 (SD 19) mm Hg/90 (13) mm Hg at baseline (median 26 h [16–37] after stroke onset), and was significantly reduced on day 1 in 2000 patients allocated to glyceryl trinitrate compared with 2011 controls (difference −7·0 [95% CI −8·5 to −5·6] mm Hg/–3·5 [–4·4 to −2·6] mm Hg; both p<0·0001), and on day 7 in 1053 patients allocated to continue antihypertensive drugs compared with 1044 patients randomised to stop them (difference −9·5 [95% CI −11·8 to −7·2] mm Hg/–5·0 [–6·4 to −3·7] mm Hg; both p<0·0001). Functional outcome at day 90 did not differ in either treatment comparison—the adjusted common odds ratio (OR) for worse outcome with glyceryl trinitrate versus no glyceryl trinitrate was 1·01 (95% CI 0·91–1·13; p=0·83), and with continue versus stop antihypertensive drugs OR was 1·05 (0·90–1·22; p=0·55). Interpretation

  17. [Nitric oxide and anti-protozoan chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gradoni, L; Ascenzi, P

    2004-06-01

    Constitutive nitric oxide (NO) is generated by constitutively expressed types of NO-synthase enzymes (NOS-I and -III), being involved in physiological processes such as nervous transmission and vasodilatation. Inducible NO, synthesized by the NO-synthase isoform NOS-II, is an anti-pathogen and tumoricidal agent. However, inducible NO production requires a tight control because of cytotoxic and immune-modulation activity. NO produced by human and canine macrophages has long been demonstrated to be involved in the intracellular killing of Leishmania. Mechanisms of parasite survival and persistence in the host have been throughly investigated, and include suppression of NOS-II and the parasite entry into NOS-II negative cells. Both intracellular and extracellular morphotypes of Trypanosoma cruzi are killed by NO in vitro and in vivo, although a role of NO in the pathogenesis of heart disease has been reported. Killing of extracellular protozoa such as Trichomonas vaginalis and Naegleria fowleri by activated macrophages is also mediated by NO. The main control of Plasmodium spp infection in human and murine hepatocytes, and in human monocytes is achieved by NO-mediated mechanisms. Protection from severe malaria in African children has been found associated with polymorphisms of the NOS-II promoter; however, a pathogenic role of endogenous NO has been documented in cerebral malaria. Although several macromolecules are putative NO targets, recent experimental work has shown that NO-releasing compounds inhibit cysteine proteases (CP) of P. falciparum, T. cruzi and L. infantum in a dose-dependent manner. CPs are present in a wide range of parasitic protozoa and appear to be relevant in several aspects of the life cycle and of the parasite-host relationships. Comparative analysis of 3-D amino acid sequence models of CPs from a broad range of living organisms, from viruses to mammals, suggests that the Sy atom of the Cys catalytic residue undergoes NO-dependent chemical

  18. Origin and Impact of Nitric Oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the organized bacterial community called biofilm is a crucial event in bacterial physiology. Given that biofilms are often refractory to antibiotics and disinfectants to which planktonic bacteria are susceptible, their formation is also an industrially and medically relevant issue. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a well-known human pathogen causing acute and chronic infections, is considered a model organism to study biofilms. A large number of environmental cues control biofilm dynamics in bacterial cells. In particular, the dispersal of individual cells from the biofilm requires metabolic and morphological reprogramming in which the second messenger bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) plays a central role. The diatomic gas nitric oxide (NO), a well-known signaling molecule in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, is able to induce the dispersal of P. aeruginosa and other bacterial biofilms by lowering c-di-GMP levels. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms connecting NO sensing to the activation of c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases in P. aeruginosa, ultimately leading to c-di-GMP decrease and biofilm dispersal. PMID:26260455

  19. [Nitric oxide and reflectory regulation of blood circulation in rats].

    PubMed

    Shapoval, L M; Moĭbenko, O O; Sahach, V F; Pobihaĭlo, L S; Dmytrenko, O V

    2003-01-01

    In acute experiments on anaesthetized with urethane normotensive rats we studied the ways of participation of nitric oxide (NO) in reflector control of the cardiovascular system by the medullary neurons within n.tractus solitarii (NTS), dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve (DNV), n. ambiguus (AMB), and the lateral reticular nucleus (LRN). Modulations of the activities of neuronal NO-synthase (nNOS) in the populations of the cardiovascular neurons within the medullary nuclei which are involved in the reflector cardiovascular control were induced by intramedullary injections of sodium nitroprusside as NO donor, L-arginine as NO precursor, L-NNA as an inhibitor of NOS, as well as by intraperetoneal injections of 7-nitroindazol (nNOS inhibitor). We have determined that stimulation of nNOS activity in the populations of the medullary neurons resulted in both remarkable shifts in the SAP level and in inhibiting the chemoreceptor reflector responses. After preliminary inhibiting nNOS chemoreceptor reflexes induced by epinephrine were found to be enhanced in most experiments.

  20. Nitric oxide metabolites (nitrite and nitrate) in several clinical condition.

    PubMed

    Caimi, G; Hopps, E; Montana, M; Carollo, C; Calandrino, V; Incalcaterra, E; Canino, B; Lo Presti, R

    2014-01-01

    We determined the concentration of nitric oxide metabolites (NO2-+NO3-), expressed as NOx, in several clinical conditions. Regarding this, we have examined 25 subjects with arterial hypertension, 41 subjects with chronic kidney disease in conservative treatment, 106 subjects with metabolic syndrome subdivided according to the presence (n = 43) or not (n = 63) of diabetes mellitus, 48 subjects with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), 14 women with systemic sclerosis complicated with Raynaud's phenomenon, 42 dialyzed subjects and 105 young subjects with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). In subjects with arterial hypertension, chronic kidney disease, metabolic syndrome, systemic sclerosis, as well as, in dialyzed and AMI subjects, we found at baseline a NOx increase. In dyalized subjects after a standard dialysis session, we observed a decrease in NOx. The increase in NOx in juvenile AMI was significantly influenced by cigarette smoking and less by cardiovascular risk factors and the extent of coronary lesions; at 3 and 12 months later than the initial event, we observed a decrease of NOx that remains significantly higher than the control group. In subjects with OSAS no difference in NOx was noted in comparison with normal controls, although their subdivision according to the apnea/hypopnea index operates a clear distinction regarding NOx concentration.

  1. Hypertension, nitric oxide, oxidants, and dietary plant polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Galleano, Monica; Pechanova, Olga; Fraga, Cesar G

    2010-12-01

    Fruits and vegetables are key foods whose high ingestion is associated with the improvement of numerous pathological conditions, including hypertension. Such health promoting actions have been increasingly ascribed to the antioxidant characteristics of different polyphenols in fruits and vegetables. Consequently, based on this assumption, many beverages and foods rich in polyphenols, grape, tea, cocoa, and soy products and many of their chemical constituents purified, are being studied both, as antioxidants and antihypertensive agents. This paper reviews the current evidence linking high polyphenol consumption with reductions in blood pressure. Basic chemical aspects of flavanols, flavonols, isoflavones and stilbenes, as possible responsible for the observed effects of those foods on blood pressure are included. Human interventions studies by using grapes and wine, cocoa and chocolate, black and green tea, soy products, and purified compounds ((+)-catequin, quercetin, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate) are summarized. The discussed hypothesis, strongly supported by experimental data in animals, is that by regulating nitric oxide bioavailability, polyphenols present in fruits and vegetables affect endothelial function and as a consequence, blood pressure. Even when data are not definitive and many questions remain open, the whole evidence is encouraging to start considering diets that can provide a benefit to hypertensive subjects, and those benefits will be more significant in people that do not have controlled his/her elevated blood pressure.

  2. Estimates of nitric oxide production for lifting spacecraft reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1971-01-01

    The amount of nitric oxide which may be produced by heating of air during an atmospheric reentry of a lifting spacecraft is estimated by three different methods. Two assume nitrogen fixation by the process of sudden freezing, and the third is a computer calculation using chemical rate equations.

  3. Nitric oxide as a potent fumigant for postharvest pest control

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is a great demand for safe and effective alternative fumigants to replace methyl bromide and other toxic fumigants for pest control. Nitric oxide, a common signal molecule in biological systems, was found to be effective and safe to control insects under ultralow oxygen conditions. Fumigatio...

  4. Nitric oxide emissions from a central California dairy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) were monitored downwind from a central California dairy facility during 2011 and 2012. NO concentrations at the dairy were significantly higher than the background levels during August 2011, but were indistinguishable from upwind concentrations during January, Apr...

  5. Arginine, citrulline and nitric oxide metabolism in sepsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Arginine has vasodilatory effects, via its conversion by nitric oxide (NO) synthase into NO, and immunomodulatory actions that play important roles in sepsis. Protein breakdown affects arginine availability, and the release of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, may therefore a...

  6. Substituted 2-aminopyridines as inhibitors of nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, W K; Caldwell, C G; Chen, P; Durette, P L; Esser, C K; Lanza, T J; Kopka, I E; Guthikonda, R; Shah, S K; MacCoss, M; Chabin, R M; Fletcher, D; Grant, S K; Green, B G; Humes, J L; Kelly, T M; Luell, S; Meurer, R; Moore, V; Pacholok, S G; Pavia, T; Williams, H R; Wong, K K

    2000-09-04

    A series of substituted 2-aminopyridines was prepared and evaluated as inhibitors of human nitric oxide synthases (NOS). 4,6-Disubstitution enhanced both potency and specificity for the inducible NOS with the most potent compound having an IC50 of 28 nM.

  7. The levels of nitric oxide in megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Aydoğdu, İsmet; Bayraktar, Nihayet; Kuku, İrfan; Kuku, İrfan; Kaya, Emin

    2009-12-05

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between nitric oxide degradation products (nitrate and nitrite) levels and megaloblastic anemia which is treated with cyalocobalamin. A total of 30 patients with megaloblastic anemia (16 Male, 14 Female) were included in the study. Cyanocobalamin was administered (1.000 µg/day intramuscularly) until the reticulocyte crisis occurred to the normal range. The control group consisted of 30 healthy subjects (15 Male, 15 Female). Nitric oxide levels were measured before treatment and compared with the values obtained during peak reticulocyte count. Plasma direct nitrite, total nitrite and nitrate levels were 24,86±3,87, 60.56±7,01 and 36,02±5,24 in before treatment versus 15,48±3,05, 38,92±6,44 and 22,77±6,04 μmol/dl in after treatment, respectively. Plasma direct nitrite, total nitrite and nitrate levels were significantly lower in after treatment compared with the before treatment (p<0.001). Nitric oxide levels are seen to increase in megaloblastic anemia. This study suggested that abnormalities in the nitric oxide levels in megaloblastic anemia are restored by vitamin B12 replacement therapy.

  8. Apple fruit responses following exposure to nitric oxide

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Exogenous nitric oxide (.NO) applied as gas or generated from .NO releasing compounds has physiological activity in cut apple fruit tissues. Studies were conducted to characterize .NO production by whole fruit as well as to assess responses of whole fruit to exogenous .NO. .NO and ethylene product...

  9. Nitric oxide inhibition sustains vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction.

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, M. J.; Carnochan, P.; Allen-Mersh, T. G.

    1995-01-01

    Hepatic parenchymal vasoconstriction increases cytotoxic drug uptake into hepatic metastases by increasing the tumour to liver blood flow ratio. Prolonged infusion of the vasoconstrictor vasopressin does not result in sustained vasoconstriction, and this may limit the benefit of vasopressin in infusional chemotherapy. We have assessed whether loss of vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction is mediated by nitric oxide. Hepatic and tumour blood flow were continuously monitored, in an animal hepatic tumour model, by laser Doppler flowmetry. The response to regionally infused vasopressin and the nitric oxide inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) were assessed over a 30 min infusion period. The vasopressin-induced vasoconstrictor effect diminished after 15 min despite continued infusion. Vasoconstriction was significantly prolonged when L-NAME was infused in addition to vasopressin. The increase in tumour to normal blood flow ratio was greater over the infusion period when L-NAME was co-administered with vasopressin. Our results suggest that the loss of vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction seen in liver parenchyma after regional infusion is prevented by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-name and may be mediated by nitric oxide. PMID:7734317

  10. Modulation of nitric-oxide synthase by nicotine.

    PubMed

    Tonnessen, B H; Severson, S R; Hurt, R D; Miller, V M

    2000-11-01

    Effects of nicotine on arterial endothelium-dependent relaxations mediated by nitric oxide are controversial. Experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that nicotine can directly alter activity of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS). NOS from aortic endothelial cells of untreated dogs and recombinant eNOS, neuronal NOS, and inducible NOS were used for these experiments. NOS activity was determined as conversion of L-[(3)H]arginine to L-[(3)H]citrulline in the absence or presence of nicotine (10(-7)-10(-3) M) in vitro. In separate assays, concentrations of cofactors NADPH, FAD, and tetrahydrobioprotein were reduced by half to assess for possible interaction with nicotine. With enzyme from aortic endothelial cells, total and calcium-dependent accumulation of citrulline increased by 30% in the presence of 10(-5) M nicotine. Nicotine dose dependently also increased citrulline accumulation by recombinant eNOS and neuronal NOS but not inducible NOS. Effects of nicotine on accumulation of citrulline by isolated eNOS and recombinant eNOS were further modulated by changes in the concentration of NADPH in the incubation solution. Our data demonstrate a significant effect of nicotine on eNOS-mediated citrulline accumulation. These results suggest that effects of nicotine on production of nitric oxide may depend on NADPH or oxygen radical interactions with NOS and thus may explain, in part, inconsistent findings of changes in production of endothelium-derived nitric oxide with nicotine administration.

  11. Cross sections for electron collisions with nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2016-09-15

    Cross section data are reviewed for electron collisions with nitric oxide. Collision processes considered are total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational, vibrational, and electronic states, ionization, and dissociative electron attachment. After a survey of the literature (up to the end of 2015), recommended values of the cross section are determined, as far as possible.

  12. Nitric oxide determination by amperometric carbon fiber microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Katrlík, Jaroslav; Zálesáková, Pavlína

    2002-05-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) amperometric microsensor was prepared by the modification of bare carbon fiber electrode by Nafion and cellulose acetate (CA). Detection limit, response time, reproducibility and influence of some possible interferences (nitrite, nitrate, arginine) were tested and evaluated. This sensor was used for in vitro determination of NO release from fresh porcine aorta induced by calcium ionophore A23187 (CI).

  13. Oscillations of nitric oxide concentration in the perturbed denitrification pathway of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Kucera, I

    1992-01-01

    The metabolism of nitric oxide in Paracoccus denitrificans has been studied using a Clark-type electrode. The uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and the SH reagent N-ethylmaleimide, both of which released nitric oxide from cells respiring nitrite, were found to be efficient inhibitors of nitric oxide reductase activity. Control experiments with another uncoupler, pentachlorophenol, showed that the inhibitory effect of CCCP was not the result of a decrease in membrane potential. The denitrification pathway in cells with partly inhibited nitric oxide reductase, or in a reconstituted system containing purified nitric reductase and membrane vesicles, exhibited marked sustained oscillations of nitric oxide concentration. The occurrence of the oscillations was strictly dependent on the initial concentration of nitrite. The observed oscillatory kinetics is considered to reflect two regulatory signals destabilizing the denitrification pathway, namely the inhibition of nitric oxide reductase by nitric oxide and/or by nitrite. PMID:1325776

  14. Production of nitric oxide using a microwave plasma torch and its application to fungal cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Young Ho; Kumar, Naresh; Kang, Min-Ho; Cho, Guang Sup; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Gyungsoon; Uhm, Han Sup

    2015-03-01

    The generation of nitric oxide by a microwave plasma torch is proposed for its application to cell differentiation. A microwave plasma torch was developed based on basic kinetic theory. The analytical theory indicates that nitric oxide density is nearly proportional to oxygen molecular density and that the high-temperature flame is an effective means of generating nitric oxide. Experimental data pertaining to nitric oxide production are presented in terms of the oxygen input in units of cubic centimeters per minute. The apparent length of the torch flame increases as the oxygen input increases. The various levels of nitric oxide are observed depending on the flow rate of nitrogen gas, the mole fraction of oxygen gas, and the microwave power. In order to evaluate the potential of nitric oxide as an activator of cell differentiation, we applied nitric oxide generated from the microwave plasma torch to a model microbial cell (Neurospora crassa: non-pathogenic fungus). Germination and hyphal differentiation of fungal cells were not dramatically changed but there was a significant increase in spore formation after treatment with nitric oxide. In addition, the expression level of a sporulation related gene acon-3 was significantly elevated after 24 h upon nitric oxide treatment. Increase in the level of nitric oxide, nitrite and nitrate in water after nitric oxide treatment seems to be responsible for activation of fungal sporulation. Our results suggest that nitric oxide generated by plasma can be used as a possible activator of cell differentiation and development.

  15. Nitric oxide control of cardiac function: is neuronal nitric oxide synthase a key component?

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Claire E; Ashley, Euan A; Casadei, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to regulate cardiac function, both in physiological conditions and in disease states. However, several aspects of NO signalling in the myocardium remain poorly understood. It is becoming increasingly apparent that the disparate functions ascribed to NO result from its generation by different isoforms of the NO synthase (NOS) enzyme, the varying subcellular localization and regulation of NOS isoforms and their effector proteins. Some apparently contrasting findings may have arisen from the use of non-isoform-specific inhibitors of NOS, and from the assumption that NO donors may be able to mimic the actions of endogenously produced NO. In recent years an at least partial explanation for some of the disagreements, although by no means all, may be found from studies that have focused on the role of the neuronal NOS (nNOS) isoform. These data have shown a key role for nNOS in the control of basal and adrenergically stimulated cardiac contractility and in the autonomic control of heart rate. Whether or not the role of nNOS carries implications for cardiovascular disease remains an intriguing possibility requiring future study. PMID:15306414

  16. Air contamination with nitric oxide: effect on exhaled nitric oxide response.

    PubMed

    Therminarias, A; Flore, P; Favre-Juvin, A; Oddou, M F; Delaire, M; Grimbert, F

    1998-03-01

    This study examines the response of exhaled nitric oxide (NO) concentration (ECNO) and quantity of exhaled NO over time (EVNO) in 10 healthy subjects breathing into five polyethylene bags, one in which synthetic air was free of NO and four in which NO was diluted to concentrations of 20 +/- 0.6, 49 +/- 0.8, 98 +/- 2, and 148 +/- 2 ppb, respectively. Each subject was connected to each bag for 10 min at random. Minute ventilation and ECNO were measured continuously, and EVNO was calculated continuously. ECNO and EVNO values were significantly higher for an inhaled NO concentration of 20 ppb than for NO-free air. Above 20 ppb, ECNO and EVNO increased linearly with inhaled NO concentration. It is reasonable to assume that a share of the quantity of inspired NO over time (InspVNO) because of air contamination by pollution is rejected by the ventilatory pathway. Insofar as InspVNO does not affect endogenous production or the metabolic fate of NO in the airway, this share may be estimated as being approximately one third of InspVNO, the remainder being taken by the endogenous pathway. Thus, air contamination by the NO resulting from pollution greatly increases the NO response in exhaled air.

  17. Inhaled nitric oxide augments nitric oxide transport on sickle cell hemoglobin without affecting oxygen affinity

    PubMed Central

    Gladwin, Mark T.; Schechter, Alan N.; Shelhamer, James H.; Pannell, Lewis K.; Conway, Deirdre A.; Hrinczenko, Borys W.; Nichols, James S.; Pease-Fye, Margaret E.; Noguchi, Constance T.; Rodgers, Griffin P.; Ognibene, Frederick P.

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) inhalation has been reported to increase the oxygen affinity of sickle cell erythrocytes. Also, proposed allosteric mechanisms for hemoglobin, based on S-nitrosation of β-chain cysteine 93, raise the possibilty of altering the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease by inhibiting polymerization or by increasing NO delivery to the tissue. We studied the effects of a 2-hour treatment, using varying concentrations of inhaled NO. Oxygen affinity, as measured by P50, did not respond to inhaled NO, either in controls or in individuals with sickle cell disease. At baseline, the arterial and venous levels of nitrosylated hemoglobin were not significantly different, but NO inhalation led to a dose-dependent increase in mean nitrosylated hemoglobin, and at the highest dosage, a significant arterial-venous difference emerged. The levels of nitrosylated hemoglobin are too low to affect overall hemoglobin oxygen affinity, but augmented NO transport to the microvasculature seems a promising strategy for improving microvascular perfusion. PMID:10510334

  18. Practical nitric oxide measurement employing a nitric oxide-selective electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimori, K.; Ishida, H.; Fukahori, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Murakami, E.

    1994-08-01

    An NO-selective electrode was developed as an easily applicable tool for a real-time nitric oxide (NO) measurement. The working electrode (0.2 mm diam) was made from Pt/Ir alloy coated with a three-layered membrane. The counterelectrode was made from a carbon fiber. When a stable NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine, was applied, the electrode current increased in a dose-dependent fashion. The current and calculated NO concentration showed a linear relationship in the range from 0.2 nM (S/N=1) to 1 μM of NO. The response of the electrode was 1.14±0.09 s. The effects of temperature, pH, and chemicals other than NO on the electrode current were also evaluated. Electrodes which were placed in the luminal side of rat aortic rings exhibited 30 pA of current due to NO generation induced by the addition of 10-6 M of acetylcholine. The current was eliminated in the presence of 50 μM NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase. Thus, this NO-selective electrode is applicable to real-time NO assay in biological systems.

  19. Inhaled nitric oxide in premature infants: effect on tracheal aspirate and plasma nitric oxide metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Posencheg, M A; Gow, A J; Truog, W E; Ballard, R A; Cnaan, A; Golombek, S G; Ballard, P L

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is a potential new therapy for prevention of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and brain injury in premature infants. This study examined dose-related effects of iNO on NO metabolites as evidence of NO delivery. Study Design: A subset of 102 premature infants in the NO CLD trial, receiving 24 days of iNO (20 p.p.m. decreasing to 2 p.p.m.) or placebo, were analyzed. Tracheal aspirate (TA) and plasma samples collected at enrollment and at intervals during study gas were analyzed for NO metabolites. Result: iNO treatment increased NO metabolites in TA at 20 and 10 p.p.m. (1.7- to 2.3-fold vs control) and in plasma at 20, 10, and 5 p.p.m. (1.6- to 2.3-fold). In post hoc analysis, treated infants with lower metabolite levels at entry had an improved clinical outcome. Conclusion: iNO causes dose-related increases in NO metabolites in the circulation as well as lung fluid, as evidenced by TA analysis, showing NO delivery to these compartments. PMID:19812581

  20. Nitric oxide and pH modulation in gynaecological cancer.

    PubMed

    Sanhueza, Carlos; Araos, Joaquín; Naranjo, Luciano; Barros, Eric; Subiabre, Mario; Toledo, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Chiarello, Delia I; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sobrevia, Luis

    2016-12-01

    Nitric oxide plays several roles in cellular physiology, including control of the vascular tone and defence against pathogen infection. Neuronal, inducible and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms synthesize nitric oxide. Cells generate acid and base equivalents, whose physiological intracellular concentrations are kept due to membrane transport systems, including Na(+) /H(+) exchangers and Na(+) /HCO3(-) transporters, thus maintaining a physiological pH at the intracellular (~7.0) and extracellular (~7.4) medium. In several pathologies, including cancer, cells are exposed to an extracellular acidic microenvironment, and the role for these membrane transport mechanisms in this phenomenon is likely. As altered NOS expression and activity is seen in cancer cells and because this gas promotes a glycolytic phenotype leading to extracellular acidosis in gynaecological cancer cells, a pro-inflammatory microenvironment increasing inducible NOS expression in this cell type is feasible. However, whether abnormal control of intracellular and extracellular pH by cancer cells regards with their ability to synthesize or respond to nitric oxide is unknown. We, here, discuss a potential link between pH alterations, pH controlling membrane transport systems and NOS function. We propose a potential association between inducible NOS induction and Na(+) /H(+) exchanger expression and activity in human ovary cancer. A potentiation between nitric oxide generation and the maintenance of a low extracellular pH (i.e. acidic) is proposed to establish a sequence of events in ovarian cancer cells, thus preserving a pro-proliferative acidic tumour extracellular microenvironment. We suggest that pharmacological therapeutic targeting of Na(+) /H(+) exchangers and inducible NOS may have benefits in human epithelial ovarian cancer.

  1. Nitric oxide influences blood flow distribution in renovascular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sigmon, D H; Beierwaltes, W H

    1994-01-01

    Endothelium-derived nitric oxide contributes to the regulation of regional blood flow. Inhibition of endothelium-derived nitric oxide synthesis increases blood pressure and vascular resistance. Using the substrate antagonist N omega-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester to block endothelium-derived nitric oxide synthesis, we tested the hypothesis that, in two-kidney, one clip renovascular hypertension, endothelium-derived nitric oxide plays an increased role in maintaining blood flow to the nonclipped kidney and other visceral organs compared with normotensive controls. This could be due to increased vascular shear stress, a primary stimulus for endothelium-derived nitric oxide synthesis, after the onset of hypertension. In hypertensive rats with mild renal artery stenosis, basal renal blood flow normalized by kidney weight was similar in the nonclipped and clipped kidneys. Basal blood pressure of controls was 98 +/- 2 mm Hg compared with 145 +/- 3 mm Hg in the two-kidney, one clip hypertensive rats. N omega-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester increased blood pressure by 20 +/- 2 and 43 +/- 3 mm Hg in control and hypertensive rats, respectively. Compared with normotensive controls, basal resistance was higher in all organ beds in the hypertensive rats including brain, heart, intestine, and kidney. With the exception of the renal circulation, the increase in vascular resistance after N omega-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester was greater in hypertensive rats compared with normotensive controls. In the hypertensive rats, N omega-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester caused a similar increase in vascular resistance in both the nonclipped and clipped kidneys, and this was not different from normotensive controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Rate of Nitric Oxide Scavenging by hemoglobin bound to haptoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Azarov, Ivan; He, Xiaojun; Jeffers, Anne; Basu, Swati; Ucer, Burak; Hantgan, Roy R.; Levy, Andrew; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2008-01-01

    Cell-free hemoglobin, released from the red cell, may play a major role in regulating the bioavailability of nitric oxide. The abundant serum protein haptoglobin, rapidly binds to free hemoglobin forming a stable complex accelerating its clearance. The haptoglobin gene is polymorphic with two classes of alleles denoted 1 and 2. We have previously demonstrated that the haptoglobin 1 protein-hemoglobin complex is cleared twice as fast as the haptoglobin 2 protein-hemoglobin complex. In this report we explored whether haptoglobin binding to hemoglobin reduces the rate of nitric oxide scavenging using time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. We found that both the haptoglobin 1 and haptoglobin 2 protein complexes react with nitric oxide at the same rate as unbound cell-free hemoglobin. To confirm these results we developed a novel assay where free hemoglobin and hemoglobin bound to haptoglobin competed in the reaction with NO. The relative rate of the NO reaction was then determined by examining the amount of reacted species using analytical ultracentrifugation. Since complexation of hemoglobin with haptoglobin does not reduce NO scavenging, we propose that the haptoglobin genotype may influence nitric oxide bioavailability by determining the clearance rate of the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex. We provide computer simulations showing that a two-fold difference in the rate of uptake of the haptoglobin hemoglobin complex by macrophages significantly affects nitric oxide bioavailability thereby providing a plausible explanation for why there is more vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage in individuals and transgenic mice homozygous for the Hp 2 allele. PMID:18364244

  3. Process for combined control of mercury and nitric oxide.

    SciTech Connect

    Livengood, C. D.; Mendelsohn, M. H.

    1999-11-03

    Continuing concern about the effects of mercury in the environment may lead to requirements for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. If such controls are mandated, the use of existing flue-gas cleanup systems, such as wet scrubbers currently employed for flue-gas desulfurization, would be desirable, Such scrubbers have been shown to be effective for capturing oxidized forms of mercury, but cannot capture the very insoluble elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) that can form a significant fraction of the total emissions. At Argonne National Laboratory, we have proposed and tested a concept for enhancing removal of Hg{sup 0}, as well as nitric oxide, through introduction of an oxidizing agent into the flue gas upstream of a scrubber, which readily absorbs the soluble reaction products. Recently, we developed a new method for introducing the oxidizing agent into the flue-gas stream that dramatically improved reactant utilization. The oxidizing agent employed was NOXSORB{trademark}, which is a commercial product containing chloric acid and sodium chlorate. When a dilute solution of this agent was introduced into a gas stream containing Hg{sup 0} and other typical flue-gas species at 300 F, we found that about 100% of the mercury was removed from the gas phase and recovered in process liquids. At the same time, approximately 80% of the nitric oxide was removed. The effect of sulfur dioxide on this process was also investigated and the results showed that it slightly decreased the amount of Hg{sup 0} oxidized while appearing to increase the removal of nitric oxide from the gas phase. We are currently testing the effects of variations in NOXSORB{trademark} concentration, sulfur dioxide concentration, nitric oxide concentration, and reaction time (residence time). Preliminary economic projections based on the results to date indicate that the chemical cost for nitric oxide oxidation could be less than $5,000/ton removed, while for Hg{sup 0} oxidation it

  4. Transient hypoxia stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in brain subcortex by a neuronal nitric oxide synthase-dependent mechanism

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adaptive mechanisms that protect brain metabolism during and after hypoxia, for instance, during hypoxic preconditioning, are coordinated in part by nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that acute transient hypoxia stimulates NO synthase (NOS)-activated mechanisms of m...

  5. Transient hypoxia stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in brain subcortex by a neuronal nitric oxide synthase-dependent mechanism

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adaptive mechanisms that protect brain metabolism during and after hypoxia, for instance, during hypoxic preconditioning, are coordinated in part by nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that acute transient hypoxia stimulates NO synthase (NOS)-activated mechanisms of m...

  6. Arginase regulates red blood cell nitric oxide synthase and export of cardioprotective nitric oxide bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiangning; Gonon, Adrian T; Sjöquist, Per-Ove; Lundberg, Jon O; Pernow, John

    2013-09-10

    The theory that red blood cells (RBCs) generate and release nitric oxide (NO)-like bioactivity has gained considerable interest. However, it remains unclear whether it can be produced by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), which is present in RBCs, and whether NO can escape scavenging by hemoglobin. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that arginase reciprocally controls NO formation in RBCs by competition with eNOS for their common substrate arginine and that RBC-derived NO is functionally active following arginase blockade. We show that rodent and human RBCs contain functional arginase 1 and that pharmacological inhibition of arginase increases export of eNOS-derived nitrogen oxides from RBCs under basal conditions. The functional importance was tested in an ex vivo model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Inhibitors of arginase significantly improved postischemic functional recovery in rat hearts if administered in whole blood or with RBCs in plasma. By contrast, arginase inhibition did not improve postischemic recovery when administered with buffer solution or plasma alone. The protective effect of arginase inhibition was lost in the presence of a NOS inhibitor. Moreover, hearts from eNOS(-/-) mice were protected when the arginase inhibitor was given with blood from wild-type donors. In contrast, when hearts from wild-type mice were given blood from eNOS(-/-) mice, the arginase inhibitor failed to protect against ischemia-reperfusion. These results strongly support the notion that RBCs contain functional eNOS and release NO-like bioactivity. This process is under tight control by arginase 1 and is of functional importance during ischemia-reperfusion.

  7. Nitric oxide synthase-dependent nitric oxide production is associated with salt tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min-Gui; Tian, Qiu-Ying; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2007-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a key molecule involved in many physiological processes in plants. To characterize roles of NO in tolerance of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to salt stress, effect of NaCl on Arabidopsis wild-type and mutant (Atnoa1) plants with an impaired in vivo NO synthase (NOS) activity and a reduced endogenous NO level was investigated. Atnoa1 mutant plants displayed a greater Na+ to K+ ratio in shoots than wild-type plants due to enhanced accumulation of Na+ and reduced accumulation of K+ when exposed to NaCl. Germination of Atnoa1 seeds was more sensitive to NaCl than that of wild-type seeds, and wild-type plants exhibited higher survival rates than Atnoa1 plants when grown under salt stress. Atnoa1 plants had higher levels of hydrogen peroxide than wild-type plants under both control and salt stress, suggesting that Atnoa1 is more vulnerable to salt and oxidative stress than wild-type plants. Treatments of wild-type plants with NOS inhibitor and NO scavenger reduced endogenous NO levels and enhanced NaCl-induced increase in Na+ to K+ ratio. Exposure of wild-type plants to NaCl inhibited NOS activity and reduced quantity of NOA1 protein, leading to a decrease in endogenous NO levels measured by NO-specific fluorescent probe. Treatment of Atnoa1 plants with NO donor sodium nitroprusside attenuated the NaCl-induced increase in Na+ to K+ ratio. Therefore, these findings provide direct evidence to support that disruption of NOS-dependent NO production is associated with salt tolerance in Arabidopsis.

  8. ttCH, a selective inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression with antiarthritic properties.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Javier; Payá, Miguel; Domínguez, José N; Ferrándiz, Ma Luisa

    2003-03-28

    In a previous work, we investigated the effects of a series of dimethoxy- and trimethoxychalcone derivatives, with various patterns of fluorination, on nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine RAW 264.7 cells. The present study was designed to determine if 2,4,6-trimethoxy-2'-trifluoromethylchalcone (ttCH) could modulate the production of nitric oxide (NO) and/or prostaglandins in vitro and in vivo. On the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7, ttCH inhibited dose-dependently NO and prostaglandin E(2) production, with IC(50) in the micromolar range. This compound had no direct inhibitory effect on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 activities. NO reduction was the consequence of inhibition of the expression of iNOS. This compound also exhibited in vivo an inhibitory behaviour on nitrite and prostaglandin E(2) levels. We have assessed the effect of ttCH in the treatment of acute and chronic inflammatory processes such as the mouse carrageenan paw oedema and the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis. The present study demonstrated that ttCH exerts acute and chronic anti-inflammatory effects that may be related with the inhibition of iNOS expression.

  9. Increased Salivary Nitric Oxide and G6PD Activity in Refugees with Anxiety and Stress.

    PubMed

    Gammoh, Omar S; Al-Smadi, Ahmed; Al-Awaida, Wajdy; Badr, Mujtaba M; Qinna, Nidal A

    2016-10-01

    Anxiety and stress are related to physiological changes in humans. Accumulating evidence suggests a cross-talk between psychiatric disorders and oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to compare oxidative stress and defensive antioxidant biomarkers in a group of refugees with acute anxiety and stress with a group of local Jordanians. The Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) Arabic version were used to assess anxiety and stress respectively. Salivary nitric oxide concentration, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity and total salivary protein were compared. As expected, refugees showed higher anxiety and stress scores compared with Jordanians. Also, we report a significant increase in salivary nitric oxide and G6PD activity in the refugee group while total protein concentration did not vary between the two groups. This is the first study that demonstrates an increase in nitric oxide and G6PD activity in the saliva of refugees, thus highlighting their potential role as possible biomarkers in anxiety and stress disorders. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Heat stress stimulates nitric oxide production in Symbiodinium microadriaticum: a possible linkage between nitric oxide and the coral bleaching phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Josée Nina; Yamasaki, Hideo

    2008-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gas displaying multiple physiological functions in plants, animals and bacteria. The enzymes nitrate reductase and NO synthase have been suggested to be involved in the production of NO in plants and algae, but the implication of those enzymes in NO production under physiological conditions remains obscure. Symbiodinium microadriaticum, commonly referred to as zooxanthellae, is a marine microalga commonly found in symbiotic association with a cnidarian host including reef-building corals. Here we demonstrate NO production in zooxanthellae upon supplementation of either sodium nitrite or L-arginine as a substrate. The nitrite-dependent NO production was detected electrochemically and confirmed by the application of 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO), a specific NO scavenger. Cells stained with the diaminofluorescein, DAF-2 DA, an NO fluorescent probe, showed an increase in fluorescence intensity upon supplementation of both sodium nitrite and L-arginine. Microscopic observations of DAF-stained cells verified that NO was produced inside the cells. NO production in S. microadriaticum was found to increase upon exposure of cells to an acute heat stress which also caused a decline in the photosynthetic efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m)). This study provides substantial evidence to confirm that zooxanthellae can synthesize NO even when they are not in a symbiotic association with a coral host. The increase in NO production at high temperatures suggests that heat stress stimulates the microalgal NO production in a temperature-dependent manner. The implications of these findings are discussed in the light of the coral bleaching phenomenon which is associated with elevated sea surface temperature due to global warming.

  11. Post-translational regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in vascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jin; Fulton, David

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a short-lived gaseous signaling molecule. In blood vessels, it is synthesized in a dynamic fashion by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and influences vascular function via two distinct mechanisms, the activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent signaling and the S-nitrosylation of proteins with reactive thiols (S-nitrosylation). The regulation of eNOS activity and NO bioavailability is critical to maintain blood vessel function. The activity of eNOS and ability to generate NO is regulated at the transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational levels. Post-translational modifications acutely impact eNOS activity and dysregulation of these mechanisms compromise eNOS activity and foster the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). This review will intergrate past and current literature on the post-translational modifications of eNOS in both health and disease. PMID:24379783

  12. Nitric oxide as a mediator of inflammation?—You had better believe it

    PubMed Central

    Grisham, Matthew B.

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide has enigmatic qualities in inflammation. In order to appreciate the precise contributions of nitric oxide to a pathophysiological process, one must account for enzyme source, coproduction of oxidants and antioxidant defences, time, rate of nitric oxide production, cellular source, peroxynitrite formation and effects on DNA (mutagenesis/apoptosis). We contend that there is ample evidence to consider nitric oxide as a molecular aggressor in inflammation, particularly chronic inflammation. Therapeutic benefit can be achieved by inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase and not the donation of additional nitric oxide. Furthermore, there is growing appreciation that nitric oxide and products derived thereof, are critical components linking the increased incidence of cancer in states of chronic inflammation. PMID:18475670

  13. Alterations in Nitric Oxide Synthase in the Aged CNS

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Junyang; Na, Changhyun; Huh, Youngbuhm

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with neuronal loss, gross weight reduction of the brain, and glial proliferation in the cortex, all of which lead to functional changes in the brain. It is known that oxidative stress is a critical factor in the pathogenesis of aging; additionally, growing evidence suggests that excessive nitric oxide (NO) production contributes to the aging process. However, it is still unclear how NO plays a role in the aging process. This paper describes age-related changes in the activity of NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d), a marker for neurons containing nitric oxide synthase (NOS), in many CNS regions. Understanding these changes may provide a novel perspective in identifying the aging mechanism. PMID:22829960

  14. Phenolic compounds from plants as nitric oxide production inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Conforti, F; Menichini, F

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a diatomic free radical produced from L-arginine by constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthase (cNOS and iNOS) in numerous mammalian cells and tissues. Nitric oxide (NO), superoxide (O2-) and their reaction product peroxynitrite (ONOO-) may be generated in excess during the host response against viral and antibacterial infections and contribute to some pathogenesis by promoting oxidative stress, tissue injury and, even, cancer. Oxidative damage, caused by action of free radicals, may initiate and promote the progression of a number of chronic diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes and inflammation. The mechanism of inflammation injury is attributed, in part, to release of reactive oxygen species from activated neutrophils and macrophages. ROS propagate inflammation by stimulating release of mediators such as NO and cytokines. The interest of the research is motivated by the current need to find new substances of natural origin which have demonstrated effectiveness in the described fields of application and low degree of toxicity for humans. Natural products provide a vast pool of NO inhibitors that can possibly be developed into clinical products. This article reviews some plenolic secondary metabolites from plants with NO inhibitory properties and their structure-activity relationship studies that can be focused for drug development programs.

  15. Nitric oxide in prepubertal rat ovary contribution of the ganglionic nitric oxide synthase system via superior ovarian nerve.

    PubMed

    Casais, Marilina; Delgado, Silvia Marcela; Vallcaneras, Sandra; Sosa, Zulema; Rastrilla, Ana María

    2007-02-01

    Both peripheral innervation and nitric oxide (NO) participate in ovarian steroidogenesis. Considering the existence of the nitric oxide/ nitric oxide synthase system in the peripheral neural system and in the ovary, the aim of this work was to analyze if the liberation of NO in the ovarian compartment of prepubertal rats is of ovarian and/or ganglionic origin. The analysis is carried out from a physiological point of view using the experimental coeliac ganglion--Superior Ovarian Nerve--ovary model with and without ganglionic cholinergic stimulus Acetylcholine (Ach) 10(-6) M. Non selective and selective inhibitors of the synthase nitric oxide enzyme were added to the ovarian and ganglionic compartment, and the liberation of nitrites (soluble metabolite of the nitric oxide) in the ovarian incubation liquid was measured. We found that the non-selective inhibitor L-nitro-arginina methyl ester (L-NAME) in the ovarian compartment decreased the liberation of nitrites, and that Aminoguanidine (AG) in two concentrations in a non-dose dependent form provoked the same effect. The addition of Ach in ganglion magnified the effect of the inhibitors of the NOS enzyme. The most relevant results after the addition of inhibitors in ganglion were obtained with AG 400 and 800 microM. The inhibition was made evident with and without the joint action of Ach in ganglion. These data suggest that the greatest production of NO in the ovarian compartment comes from the ovary, mainly the iNOS isoform, though the coeliac ganglion also contributes through the superior ovarian nerve but with less quantity.

  16. Combined atmospheric oxidant capacity and increased levels of exhaled nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changyuan; Li, Huichu; Chen, Renjie; Xu, Wenxi; Wang, Cuicui; Tse, Lap Ah; Zhao, Zhuohui; Kan, Haidong

    2016-07-01

    Nitrogen dioxide and ozone are two interrelated oxidative pollutants in the atmosphere. Few studies have evaluated the health effects of combined oxidant capacity (O x ). We investigated the short-term effects of O x on fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), a well-established biomarker for airway inflammation, in a group of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Real-time concentrations of O x were obtained by calculating directly the sum of nitrogen dioxide and ozone. Linear mixed-effect models were applied to explore the acute effects of O x on FeNO levels. Short-term exposure to Ox was significantly associated with elevated FeNO. This effect was strongest in the first 24 h after exposure, and was robust to the adjustment of PM2.5. A 10 μg m-3 increase in 24 h average concentrations of O x was associated with 4.28% (95% confidence interval: 1.19%, 7.37%) increase in FeNO. The effect estimates were statistically significant only among males, elders, and those with body mass index ≥24 kg m-2, a comorbidity, higher educational attainment, or moderate airflow limitation. This analysis demonstrated an independent effect of O x on respiratory inflammation, and suggested that a single metric O x might serve as a preferable indicator of atmospheric oxidative capacity in further air pollution epidemiological studies.

  17. Inhaled Nitric Oxide in Acute Lung Disease.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    seems likely ECMO extracorporeal membrane oxygenation EDRF endothelial-derived relaxing factor that the potent dose-related selective pulmonary GBS... ECMO ). To evaluate the dose response and time inhaled NO. (Fig. 7). The significant decrease in oxy- course of the pulmonary effects of NO., inspiratory...effects (39, 40). In many of these chil- dren, ECMO has been avoided. Similar improvement _0 has been noted in adult patients undergoing cardio- LPS NO

  18. Hypergravity upregulates renal inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide production

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Gun; Oh, Choong Sik; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to hypergravity severely decreases renal blood flow, potentially causing renal dysfunction. Nitric oxide (NO), which is endogenously synthesized by inducible NO synthase (iNOS), plays an important role in the regulation of renal function. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of hypergravity exposure on the production of NO in kidneys. To determine whether hypergravity induces renal hypoxia and alters renal iNOS expression and NO production, mice were exposed to short-term hypergravity at +3Gz for 1 h. The time course of iNOS mRNA expression, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α expression, and NO production was examined. Renal HIF-1α levels were significantly elevated immediately after centrifugation, and this increase was sustained for 3 h post-exposure. iNOS mRNA levels were also significantly increased immediately after exposure and were maintained during the reoxygenation period. Immunohistochemical staining for iNOS revealed that the cortical tubular epithelium exhibited moderate to strong cytoplasmic iNOS immunoreactivity immediately after hypergravity exposure and during the reoxygenation period. The time course of NO production was similar to that of iNOS expression. Our results suggest that both hypoxia and reoxygenation might be involved in the upregulation of HIF-1α in the kidneys of mice exposed to hypergravity. Significant increases in renocortical iNOS expression immediately after centrifugation and during the reoxygenation period suggest that iNOS expression induced by hypergravity exposure might play a protective role against hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in the renal cortex. Further investigations are necessary to clarify the role of iNOS and NO in kidneys exposed to hypergravity. PMID:27174912

  19. Characterization of exhaled nitric oxide: introducing a new reproducible method for nasal nitric oxide measurements.

    PubMed

    Palm, J P; Graf, P; Lundberg, J O; Alving, K

    2000-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is present in the human nasal airways and has been suggested to originate primarily from the paranasal sinuses. The aim of this study was to establish a new and reproducible method for measurement of nasal NO. Through repeated single-breath measurements the intra- and inter-individual variations of NO levels in nasally (into a tightly fitting mask covering the nose) and orally exhaled air were determined in healthy humans. Variations due to the methods used were investigated. The contribution of oral NO to the nasal exhalations by introducing a mouthwash procedure was also studied. This study shows distinct individual values of NO in nasally and orally exhaled air of healthy humans. Some diurnal variability was also found with a rise in NO in nasally and orally exhaled air over the day, but no, or little, day-to-day variability when comparing the results from separate mornings. There was no correlation between NO levels in nasally and orally exhaled air, whereas there was a strong correlation between NO levels in air exhaled through the left and right nostril. The levels of NO in air exhaled at 0.17 L x s(-1) through either nostril separately were higher than in air exhaled at the same flow rate through both nostrils simultaneously. After the introduction of a mouthwash procedure the level of NO in orally, but not nasally exhaled air was reduced. To conclude the method using nasal exhalation into a nose mask is highly reproducible. It is also suggested that subtracting the level of NO in orally exhaled air, after mouthwash, from that in nasally exhaled air, would adequately reflect nasal NO levels.

  20. Antenatal Insults Modify Newborn Olfactory Function By Nitric Oxide Produced From Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Drobyshevsky, Alexander; Yu, Lei; Yang, Yirong; Khalid, Syed; Luo, Kehuan; Jiang, Rugang; Ji, Haitao; Derrick, Matthew; Kay, Leslie; Silverman, Richard B.; Tan, Sidhartha

    2012-01-01

    Newborn feeding, maternal, bonding, growth and wellbeing depend upon intact odor recognition in the early postnatal period. Antenatal stress may affect postnatal odor recognition. We investigated the exact role of a neurotransmitter, nitric oxide (NO), in newborn olfactory function. We hypothesized that olfactory neuron activity depended on NO generated by neuronal NO synthase (NOS). Utilizing in vivo functional manganese enhanced MRI (MEMRI) in a rabbit model of cerebral palsy we had shown previously that in utero hypoxia ischemia (H-I) at E22 (70% gestation) resulted in impaired postnatal response to odorants and poor feeding. With the same antenatal insult, we manipulated NO levels in the olfactory neuron in postnatal day 1 (P1) kits by administration of intranasal NO donors or a highly selective nNOS inhibitor. Olfactory function was quantitatively measured by the response to amyl acetate stimulation by MEMRI. The relevance of nNOS to normal olfactory development was confirmed by the increase of nNOS gene expression from fetal ages to P1 in olfactory epithelium and bulbs. In control kits, nNOS inhibition decreased NO production in the olfactory system and increased MEMRI slope enhancement. In H-I kits the MEMRI slope did not increase, implicating modification of endogenous NO-mediated olfactory function by the antenatal insult. NO donors as a source of exogenous NO did not significantly change function in either group. In conclusion, olfactory epithelium nNOS in newborn rabbits probably modulates olfactory signal transduction. Antenatal H-I injury remote from delivery may affect early functional development of the olfactory system by decreasing NO-dependent signal transduction. PMID:22836143

  1. Influence of atmospheric nitric oxide concentration on the measurement of nitric oxide in exhaled air

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, M.; Pelizzoni, A.; Majori, M.; Cuomo, A.; Munari, E. d.; Pesci, A.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled air shows promise as a non-invasive method of detecting lung inflammation. However, variable concentrations of NO are measured in environmental air. The aim of this study was to verify a possible relationship between exhaled NO and atmospheric NO values during high atmospheric NO days.
METHOD—Exhaled air from 78 healthy non-smokers of mean age 35.3 years was examined for the presence of NO using a chemiluminescence NO analyser and NO levels were expressed as part per billion (ppb). The exhaled air from all the subjects was collected into a single bag and into two sequential bags. Before each test atmospheric NO was measured.
RESULTS—The mean (SE) concentration of exhaled NO collected into the single bag was 17.1 (0.6) ppb while the mean values of exhaled NO in bags 1 and 2 were 16.7 (1.3) ppb and 13.8 (1.2) ppb, respectively. The atmospheric NO concentrations registered before each test varied from 0.4 to 71 ppb. There was a significant correlation between exhaled NO in the single bag and atmospheric NO (r = 0.38,p = 0.001). The atmospheric NO concentration also correlated with exhaled NO both in bag 1 (r = 0.44, p = 0.0001) and in bag 2 (r= 0.42, p = 0.0001). These correlations disappeared with atmospheric NO concentrations lower than 35ppb.
CONCLUSIONS—These results indicate a relationship between atmospheric NO and NO levels measured in exhaled air, therefore exhaled NO should not be measured on very high atmospheric NO days.

 PMID:9828854

  2. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation and nitric oxide function: new light through old windows.

    PubMed

    Bird, Ian M

    2011-09-01

    The principle mechanisms operating at the level of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) itself to control its activity are phosphorylation, the auto-regulatory properties of the protein itself, and Ca(2)(+)/calmodulin binding. It is now clear that activation of eNOS is greatest when phosphorylation of certain serine and threonine residues is accompanied by elevation of cytosolic [Ca2+](i). While eNOS also contains an autoinhibitory loop, Rafikov et al. (2011) present the evidence for a newly identified 'flexible arm' that operates in response to redox state. Boeldt et al. (2011) also review the evidence that changes in the nature of endothelial Ca(2)(+) signaling itself in different physiologic states can extend both the amplitude and duration of NO output, and a failure to change these responses in pregnancy is associated with preeclampsia. The change in Ca(2)(+) signaling is mediated through altering capacitative entry mechanisms inherent in the cell, and so many agonist responses using this mechanism are altered. The term 'adaptive cell signaling' is also introduced for the first time to describe this phenomenon. Finally NO is classically regarded as a regulator of vascular function, but NO has other actions. One proposed role is regulation of steroid biosynthesis but the physiologic relevance was unclear. Ducsay & Myers (2011) now present new evidence that NO may provide the adrenal with a mechanism to regulate cortisol output according to exposure to hypoxia. One thing all three of these reviews show is that even after several decades of study into NO biosynthesis and function, there are clearly still many things left to discover.

  3. Was nitric oxide the first deep electron sink?

    PubMed

    Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; van Lis, Robert; Duval, Simon; Schoepp-Cothenet, Barbara; Russell, Michael J; Nitschke, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary histories of enzymes involved in chemiosmotic energy conversion indicate that a strongly oxidizing substrate was available to the last universal common ancestor before the divergence of Bacteria and Archaea. According to palaeogeochemical evidence, O(2) was not present beyond trace amounts on the early Earth. Based on recent phylogenetic, enzymatic and geochemical results, we propose that, in the earliest Archaean, nitric oxide (NO) and its derivatives nitrate and nitrite served as strongly oxidizing substrates driving the evolution of a bioenergetic pathway related to modern dissimilatory denitrification. Aerobic respiration emerged later from within this ancestral pathway via adaptation of the enzyme NO reductase to its new substrate, dioxygen.

  4. Nitric oxide ameliorates the damaging effects of oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Manish Singh; Srivastava, Meenakshi; Srivastava, Alka; Singh, Anumeha; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2016-11-01

    In cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120, iron deficiency leads to oxidative stress with unavoidable consequences. Nitric oxide reduces pigment damage and supported the growth of Anabaena 7120 in iron-deficient conditions. Elevation in nitric oxide accumulation and reduced superoxide radical production justified the role of nitric oxide in alleviating oxidative stress in iron deficiency. Increased activities of antioxidative enzymes and higher levels of ROS scavengers (ascorbate, glutathione and thiol) in iron deficiency were also observed in the presence of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide also supported the membrane integrity of Anabaena cells and reduces protein and DNA damage caused by oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency. Results suggested that nitric oxide alleviates the damaging effects of oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

  5. The effect of high altitude on nasal nitric oxide levels.

    PubMed

    Altundag, Aytug; Salihoglu, Murat; Cayonu, Melih; Cingi, Cemal; Tekeli, Hakan; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether nasal nitric oxide (nNO) levels change in relation to high altitude in a natural setting where the weather conditions were favorable. The present study included 41 healthy volunteers without a history of acute rhinosinusitis within 3 weeks and nasal polyposis. The study group consisted of 31 males (76 %) and 10 females (24 %) and the mean age of the study population was 38 ± 10 years. The volunteers encamped for 2 days in a mountain village at an altitude of 1,500 m above sea level (masl) and proceeded to highlands at an altitude of 2,200 masl throughout the day. The measurements of nNO were done randomly, either first at the mountain village or at sea level. Each participant had nNO values both at sea level and at high altitude at the end of the study. The nNO values of sea level and high altitude were compared to investigate the effect of high altitude on nNO levels. The mean of average nNO measurements at the high altitude was 74.2 ± 41 parts-per-billion (ppb) and the mean of the measurements at sea level was 93.4 ± 45 ppb. The change in nNO depending on the altitude level was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The current investigation showed that nNO levels were decreased at high altitude even if the weather conditions were favorable, such as temperature, humidity, and wind.

  6. Lipopolysaccharide impairs endothelial nitric oxide synthesis in rat renal arteries.

    PubMed

    Piepot, H A; Boer, C; Groeneveld, A B; Van Lambalgen, A A; Sipkema, P

    2000-06-01

    Impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation may contribute to hypoperfusion and failure of abdominal organs, including the kidneys during endotoxin or septic shock. In this study, the short-term (2 h) effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rat renal and superior mesenteric arteries were documented. Rat renal and mesenteric arteries were dissected and exposed in vitro to LPS for two hours. The effects of LPS on vascular reactivity were determined and compared with time-matched controls. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) release was determined using an NO microsensor in adjacent vessel segments. LPS impaired maximal acetylcholine (ACh)-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in renal arteries (62.5 +/- 8.8% vs. 34.4 +/- 7.5% in controls and LPS-exposed arteries), but not in mesenteric arteries. LPS did not alter the sensitivity of renal arteries to exogenous NO. ACh-dependent vasodilation was abolished after blocking NO synthesis with 10-4 mol/L L-NA in control and LPS-incubated renal arteries. When compared with controls, NO release induced by ACh and the receptor-independent calcium ionophore A23187 was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in LPS-exposed renal segments and was fully abolished in endothelium-denuded segments, indicating that LPS attenuated receptor-dependent as well as receptor-independent endothelial NO release. In contrast, ACh- and A23187-induced NO release was normal in LPS-exposed mesenteric arteries. These results indicate that LPS-induced selective impairment of ACh-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in rat renal arteries is caused by decreased endothelial NO release. This may contribute to the propensity for acute renal failure during septic shock.

  7. Exogenous nitric oxide prevents cardiovascular collapse during hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Nachuraju, Parimala; Friedman, Adam J; Friedman, Joel M; Cabrales, Pedro

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the systemic and microvascular hemodynamic changes related to increased nitric oxide (NO) availability following significant hemorrhage, made available by administration of NO releasing nanoparticles (NO-nps). Hemodynamic responses to hemorrhagic shock were studied in the hamster window chamber. Acute hemorrhage was induced by arterial controlled bleeding of 50% of blood volume, and the resulting hemodynamic parameters were followed over 90 min. Exogenous NO was administered in the form of NO-nps (5mg/kg suspended in 50 μl saline) 10 min following induced hemorrhage. Control groups received equal dose of NO free nanoparticles (Control-nps) and Vehicle solution. Animals treated with NO-nps partially maintained systemic and microvascular function during hypovolemic shock compared to animals treated with Control-nps or the Vehicle (50 μl saline). The continuous NO released by the NO-nps reverted arteriolar vasoconstriction, partially recovered both functional capillary density and microvascular blood flows. Additionally, NO supplementation post hemorrhage prevented cardiac decompensation, and thereby maintained and stabilized the heart rate. Paradoxically, the peripheral vasodilation induced by the NO-nps did not decrease blood pressure, and combined with NO's effects on vascular resistance, NO-nps promoted intravascular pressure redistribution and blood flow, avoiding tissue ischemia. Therefore, by increasing NO availability with NO-nps during hypovolemic shock, it is possible that cardiac stability and microvascular perfusion can be preserved, ultimately increasing survivability and local tissue viability, and reducing hemorrhagic shock sequelae. The relevance, stability, and efficacy of exogenous NO therapy in the form of NO-nps will potentially facilitate the intended use in battlefield and trauma situations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Refractory Oxide Coatings on Titanium for Nitric Acid Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Shankar, A.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2014-07-01

    Tantalum and Niobium have good corrosion resistance in nitric acid as well as in molten chloride salt medium encountered in spent fuel nuclear reprocessing plants. Commercially, pure Ti (Cp-Ti) exhibits good corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium; however, in vapor condensates of nitric acid, significant corrosion was observed. In the present study, a thermochemical diffusion method was pursued to coat Ta2O5, Nb2O5, and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5 on Ti to improve the corrosion resistance and enhance the life of critical components in reprocessing plants. The coated samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, profilometry, micro-scratch test, and ASTM A262 Practice-C test in 65 pct boiling nitric acid. The SEM micrograph of the coated samples showed that uniform dense coating containing Ta2O5 and/or Nb2O5 was formed. XRD patterns indicated the formation of TiO2, Ta2O5/Nb2O5, and mixed oxide/solid solution phase on coated Ti samples. ASTM A262 Practice-C test revealed reproducible outstanding corrosion resistance of Ta2O5-coated sample in comparison to Nb2O5- and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5-coated sample. The hardness of the Ta2O5-coated Cp-Ti sample was found to be twice that of uncoated Cp-Ti. The SEM and XRD results confirmed the presence of protective oxide layer (Ta2O5, rutile TiO2, and mixed phase) on coated sample which improved the corrosion resistance remarkably in boiling liquid phase of nitric acid compared to uncoated Cp-Ti and Ti-5Ta-1.8Nb alloy. Three phase corrosion test conducted on Ta2O5-coated samples in boiling 11.5 M nitric acid showed poor corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid due to poor adhesion of the coating. The adhesive strength of the coated samples needs to be optimized in order to improve the corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid.

  9. Opposite cellular accumulation and nitric oxide production in vivo after pleural immunization with M. leprae or M. bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Moura, A C; Werneck-Barroso, E; Rosas, E C; Henriques, M G; Cordeiro, R S

    1999-01-01

    Mycobacteria as intracellular pathogens have evolved mechanisms to survive within macrophages. Our previous data showed that M. leprae (ML), unlike M. bovis BCG, did not induce an inflammatory response in the mice subcutaneous tissue. Further, ML inhibited BCG-induced foot pad oedema and seemed to transform macrophages in epithelioid cells. Since these mycobacteria share common antigens, here we seeked to compare the acute and chronic cellular response evoked by ML and BCG in pleurisy of a mycobacteria-susceptible mice (BALB/c). The total leukocytes, the cell type that migrated to the pleural cavity and macrophage activation assayed by nitric oxide release were determined. Live or dead BCG Moreau recruited the same extent of cells, essentially monocytes and neutrophils, dose-dependently, in both acute and chronic pleurisy. BCG-induced eosinophilia was observed only in the acute response (after 24 h of injection). A significant nitric oxide release by pleural macrophages was triggered by BCG Moreau without previous activation. Nevertheless, ML failed to recruit leukocytes to the pleural space or to lead to nitric oxide production despite the number of bacilli used and the time studied (1, 7 or 14 days after injection). Although these mycobacteria have common antigens that cross-react, these data show a distinct ability of ML or BCG to recruit cells to the pleural space and to activate pleural macrophage for nitric oxide production in vivo.

  10. Polyphosphoester-based cationic nanoparticles serendipitously release integral biologically-active components to serve as novel degradable inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuefei; Zhang, Shiyi; Zhang, Fuwu; Loftis, Alexander; Pavía-Sanders, Adriana; Zou, Jiong; Fan, Jingwei; Taylor, John-Stephen A; Wooley, Karen L

    2013-10-18

    A degradable polyphosphoester (PPE)-based cationic nanoparticle (cSCK), which is integrated constructed as a novel degradable drug device, demonstrates surprisingly efficient inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) transcription, and eventually inhibits nitric oxide (NO) over-production, without loading of any specific therapeutic drugs. This system may serve as a promising anti-inflammatory agent toward the treatment of acute lung injury.

  11. Nitric oxide synthase in plants: Where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Santolini, Jérôme; André, François; Jeandroz, Sylvain; Wendehenne, David

    2017-02-28

    Over the past twenty years, nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as an important player in various plant physiological processes. Although many advances in the understanding of NO functions have been made, the question of how NO is produced in plants is still challenging. It is now generally accepted that the endogenous production of NO is mainly accomplished through the reduction of nitrite via both enzymatic and non-enzymatic mechanisms which remain to be fully characterized. Furthermore, experimental arguments in favour of the existence of plant nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-like enzymes have been reported. However, recent investigations revealed that land plants do not possess animal NOS-like enzymes while few algal species do. Phylogenetic and structural analyses reveals interesting features specific to algal NOS-like proteins.

  12. Nitric oxide-donor SNAP induces Xenopus eggs activation.

    PubMed

    Jeseta, Michal; Marin, Matthieu; Tichovska, Hana; Melicharova, Petra; Cailliau-Maggio, Katia; Martoriati, Alain; Lescuyer-Rousseau, Arlette; Beaujois, Rémy; Petr, Jaroslav; Sedmikova, Marketa; Bodart, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is identified as a signaling molecule involved in many cellular or physiological functions including meiotic maturation and parthenogenetic activation of mammalian oocytes. We observed that nitric oxide donor SNAP was potent to induce parthenogenetic activation in Xenopus eggs. NO-scavenger CPTIO impaired the effects of SNAP, providing evidence for the effects of the latter to be specific upon NO release. In Xenopus eggs, SNAP treatment induced pigment rearrangement, pronucleus formation and exocytosis of cortical granules. At a biochemical level, SNAP exposure lead to MAPK and Rsk inactivation within 30 minutes whereas MPF remained active, in contrast to calcium ionophore control where MPF activity dropped rapidly. MAPK inactivation could be correlated to pronuclear envelope reformation observed. In SNAP-treated eggs, a strong increase in intracellular calcium level was observed. NO effects were impaired in calcium-free or calcium limited medium, suggesting that that parthenogenetic activation of Xenopus oocytes with a NO donor was mainly calcium-dependent.

  13. Exogenous nitric oxide activates the endothelial glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Ji, Julie Y; Diamond, Scott L

    2004-05-21

    This study investigated the effect of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) on endothelial glucocorticoid receptor (GR) function. The NO donor diethylenetriamine NONOate (DETA, 50-500microM) caused concentration dependent nuclear localization of transfected chimeric green fluorescent protein GFP-GR and elevated expression of secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) from a glucocorticoid response element (GRE) promoter construct in bovine aortic endothelial cells. Other weaker NO donors (S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine and spermine NONOate) failed to induce GFP-GR nuclear localization, but all the NO donors activated GRE-SEAP expression, a response unaffected by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Overall, exogenous NO from high concentration donors can directly activate GR, suggesting a potential feedback mechanism for NO to regulate endothelial inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression.

  14. Nitric oxide dioxygenase: An enzymic function for flavohemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Paul R.; Gardner, Anne M.; Martin, Lori A.; Salzman, Andrew L.

    1998-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO•) is a toxin, and various life forms appear to have evolved strategies for its detoxification. NO•-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli were isolated that rapidly consumed NO•. An NO•-converting activity was reconstituted in extracts that required NADPH, FAD, and O2, was cyanide-sensitive, and produced NO3−. This nitric oxide dioxygenase (NOD) contained 19 of 20 N-terminal amino acids identical to those of the E. coli flavohemoglobin. Furthermore, NOD activity was produced by the flavohemoglobin gene and was inducible by NO•. Flavohemoglobin/NOD-deficient mutants were also sensitive to growth inhibition by gaseous NO•. The results identify a function for the evolutionarily conserved flavohemoglobins and, moreover, suggest that NO• detoxification may be a more ancient function for the widely distributed hemoglobins, and associated methemoglobin reductases, than dioxygen transport and storage. PMID:9724711

  15. Bactericidal efficacy of nitric oxide-releasing silica nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Evan M.; Shin, Jae Ho; Stasko, Nathan A.; Johnson, C. Bryce; Wespe, Daniel A.; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    The utility of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing silica nanoparticles as a novel antibacterial is demonstrated against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles were prepared via co-condensation of tetraalkoxysilane with aminoalkoxysilane modified with diazeniumdiolate NO donors, allowing for the storage of large NO payloads. Comparison of the bactericidal efficacy of the NO-releasing nanoparticles to 1-[2-(carboxylato)pyrrolidin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (PROLI/NO), a small molecule NO donor, demonstrated enhanced bactericidal efficacy of nanoparticle-derived NO and reduced cytotoxicity to healthy cells (mammalian fibroblasts). Confocal microscopy revealed that fluorescently-labeled NO-releasing nanoparticles associated with the bacteria, providing rationale for the enhanced bactericidal efficacy of the nanoparticles. Intracellular NO concentrations were measurable when the NO was delivered from nanoparticles as opposed to PROLI/NO. Collectively, these results demonstrate the advantage of delivering NO via nanoparticles for antimicrobial applications. PMID:19206623

  16. Nitric oxide: considerations for the treatment of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Terpolilli, Nicole A; Moskowitz, Michael A; Plesnila, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Some 40 years ago it was recognized by Furchgott and colleagues that the endothelium releases a vasodilator, endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). Later on, several groups identified EDRF to be a gas, nitric oxide (NO). Since then, NO was identified as one of the most versatile and unique molecules in animal and human biology. Nitric oxide mediates a plethora of physiological functions, for example, maintenance of vascular tone and inflammation. Apart from these physiological functions, NO is also involved in the pathophysiology of various disorders, specifically those in which regulation of blood flow and inflammation has a key role. The aim of the current review is to summarize the role of NO in cerebral ischemia, the most common cause of stroke. PMID:22333622

  17. Nitric oxide in the upper stratosphere - Measurements and geophysical interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvath, J. J.; Frederick, J. E.; Orsini, N.; Douglass, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    A rocket-borne parachute-deployed chemiluminescence instrument has obtained seven new measurements of atmospheric nitric oxide for altitudes between 30 and 50 km at mid-latitudes. These results, when combined with profiles measured by an earlier version of the instrument, cover all four seasons and provide a more comprehensive picture of upper stratospheric nitric oxide than has been available previously. At the highest altitudes studied, the vertical gradient in mixing ratio displays positive and negative values during different observations, with the largest values tending to appear at the greatest heights in summer. Examination of the differences among the profiles, which exceed a factor of 3 near the stratopause, suggests that they arise from the action of transport processes which carry air into the mid-latitude upper stratosphere from regions of the atmosphere that contain widely different odd-nitrogen abundances.

  18. Existence of nitric oxide synthase in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wendland, B; Schweizer, F E; Ryan, T A; Nakane, M; Murad, F; Scheller, R H; Tsien, R W

    1994-01-01

    It has been proposed that nitric oxide (NO) serves as a key retrograde messenger during long-term potentiation at hippocampal synapses, linking induction of long-term potentiation in postsynaptic CA1 pyramidal cells to expression of long-term potentiation in presynaptic nerve terminals. However, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), the proposed NO-generating enzyme, has not yet been detected in the appropriate postsynaptic cells. We here demonstrate specific NOS immunoreactivity in the CA1 region of hippocampal sections by using an antibody specific for NOS type I and relatively gentle methods of fixation. NOS immunoreactivity was found in dendrites and cell bodies of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Cultured hippocampal pyramidal cells also displayed specific immunostaining. Control experiments showed no staining with preimmune serum or immune serum that was blocked with purified NOS. These results demonstrate that CA1 pyramidal cells contain NOS, as required were NO involved in retrograde signaling during hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Images PMID:7510887

  19. Diazeniumdiolated carbamates: A novel class of nitric oxide donors

    PubMed Central

    Nandurdikar, Rahul S.; Maciag, Anna E.; Cao, Zhao; Keefer, Larry K.; Saavedra, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    We report an indirect method for synthesis of previously inaccessible diazeniumdiolated carbamates. Synthesis involves use of previously reported triisopropylsilyloxymethylated isopropylamine diazeniumdiolate (TOM-ylated IPA/NO). These novel diazeniumdiolated carbamate prodrugs upon activation release nitric oxide (NO) similar to their secondary amine counterparts. They are also efficient sources of intracellular NO. These prodrugs may have potential applications as therapeutic NO-donors. PMID:22356735

  20. Regulation of nitric oxide synthesis by dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase.

    PubMed Central

    MacAllister, R. J.; Parry, H.; Kimoto, M.; Ogawa, T.; Russell, R. J.; Hodson, H.; Whitley, G. S.; Vallance, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH), an enzyme that metabolizes the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitors NG-monomethyl-arginine and NG,NG-dimethy-L-arginine to citrulline, was identified by Western blotting in rat and human tissue homogenates. 2. S-2-amino-4(3-methylguanidino)butanoic acid (4124W) inhibited the metabolism of [14C]-NG-monomethyl-L-arginine to [14C]-citrulline by rat liver homogenates (IC50 416 +/- 66 microM; n = 9), human cultured endothelial cells (IC50 250 +/- 34 microM; n = 9) and isolated purified dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase. 3. Addition of 4124W to culture medium increased the accumulation of endogenously-generated NG,NG-dimethy-L-arginine in the supernatant of human cultured endothelial cells from 3.1 +/- 0.3 to 5 +/- 0.7 microM (n = 15; P < 0.005). 4. 4124W (1 microM - 1 mM) had no direct effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity but caused endothelium-dependent contraction of rat aortic rings (1 mM 4124W increased tone by 81.5 +/- 9.6% of that caused by phenylephrine 100 nM). This effect was reversed by L-arginine (100 microM). 4124W reversed endothelium-dependent relaxation of human saphenous vein (19.2 +/- 6.7% reversal of bradykinin-induced relaxation at 1 mM 4124W). 5. These data suggest that inhibition of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase increases the intracellular contraction of NG,NG-dimethyl-L-arginine sufficiently to inhibit nitric oxide synthesis. Inhibiting the activity of DDAH may provide an alternative mechanism for inhibition of nitric oxide synthases and changes in the activity of DDAH could contribute to pathophysiological alterations in NO generation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8982498

  1. Application of a Nitric Oxide Sensor in Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Saldanha, Carlota; Lopes de Almeida, José Pedro; Silva-Herdade, Ana Santos

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we describe the biochemical properties and effects of nitric oxide (NO) in intact and dysfunctional arterial and venous endothelium. Application of the NO electrochemical sensor in vivo and in vitro in erythrocytes of healthy subjects and patients with vascular disease are reviewed. The electrochemical NO sensor device applied to human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the description of others NO types of sensors are also mentioned. PMID:25587407

  2. Nitric oxide: a physiologic mediator of penile erection.

    PubMed

    Burnett, A L; Lowenstein, C J; Bredt, D S; Chang, T S; Snyder, S H

    1992-07-17

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a cytotoxic agent of macrophages, a messenger molecule of neurons, and a vasodilator produced by endothelial cells. NO synthase, the synthetic enzyme for NO, was localized to rat penile neurons innervating the corpora cavernosa and to neuronal plexuses in the adventitial layer of penile arteries. Small doses of NO synthase inhibitors abolished electrophysiologically induced penile erections. These results establish NO as a physiologic mediator of erectile function.

  3. Nitric oxide production in plants: facts and fictions.

    PubMed

    Planchet, Elisabeth; Kaiser, Werner M

    2006-03-01

    There is now general agreement that nitric oxide (NO) is an important and almost universal signal in plants. Nevertheless, there are still many controversial observations and opinions on the importance and function of NO in plants. Partly, this may be due to the difficulties in detecting and even more in quantifying NO. Here, we summarize major pathways of NO production in plants, and briefly discuss some methodical problems.

  4. Tuning the nitric oxide release from CPO-27 MOFs.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Damiano; Warrender, Stewart J; Duncan, Morven J; Kelsall, Christopher J; Doherty, Mary K; Whitfield, Phillip D; Megson, Ian L; Morris, Russell E

    2016-02-13

    Nitric oxide (NO) storage and release measurements have been recorded for Ni-doped CPO-27 (Mg) and CPO-27 (Zn), and the biological effect of the released NO was assessed in porcine coronary artery relaxation tests. The results indicate that the doping strategy leads to increased levels of NO storage and delivery compared to the parent materials and that the NO dosage and biological response can be tuned via this approach to suit the requirements of particular applications.

  5. [Recommendations for inhaled nitric oxide treatment in the newborn diseases].

    PubMed

    2001-09-01

    The recommendations in this document highlight current indications for inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) treatment in the newborn by clearly differentiating between those that are supported by scientific evidence and those for which evidence is still lacking. However, the use of this treatment in preterm infants and in those with congenital heart disease has not yet been scientifically approved. We discuss the methodology, dosage and adverse effects of iNO administration, as well as the reasons for its ineffectiveness.

  6. [Recommendations for inhaled nitric oxide treatment in the newborn].

    PubMed

    Figueras Aloy, J; Castillo Salinas, F; Elorza Fernández, D; Sánchez-Luna, M; Pérez Rodríguez, J

    2006-03-01

    The recommendations in this document describe the current indications for inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) treatment in the newborn and clearly distinguish between those supported by scientific evidence and those for which evidence is still lacking, such as its use in preterm infants. The methodology for iNO administration, its dosage and the main secondary effects are discussed, and the reasons for lack of response to this treatment are analyzed.

  7. Platelet aggregation responses are critically regulated in vivo by endogenous nitric oxide but not by endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Tymvios, C; Moore, C; Jones, S; Solomon, A; Sanz-Rosa, D; Emerson, M

    2009-12-01

    Although exogenous nitric oxide (NO) clearly modifies platelet function, the role and the source of endogenous NO in vivo remain undefined. In addition, endothelial NO synthase (NOS-3) critically regulates vessel tone but its role in modulating platelet function is unclear. In this paper we have investigated the roles of endogenous NO and NOS-3 in regulating platelet function in vivo and determined the functional contribution made by platelet-derived NO. We used a mouse model for directly assessing platelet functional responses in situ in the presence of an intact vascular endothelium with supporting in vitro and molecular studies. Acute NOS inhibition by N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) enhanced platelet aggregatory responses to thrombin and platelets were shown to be regulated primarily by NO sources external to the platelet. Elevation of endogenous NOS inhibitors to mimic effects reported in patients with cardiovascular diseases did not enhance platelet responses. Platelet responsiveness following agonist stimulation was not modified in male or female NOS-3(-/-) mice but responses in NOS-3(-/-) mice were enhanced by L-NAME. Platelets are regulated by endogenous NO in vivo, primarily by NO originating from the environment external to the platelet with a negligible or undetectable role of platelet-derived NO. Raised levels of endogenous NOS inhibitors, as reported in a range of diseases were not, in isolation, sufficient to enhance platelet activity and NOS-3 is not essential for normal platelet function in vivo due to the presence of bioactive NO following deletion of NOS-3.

  8. Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor Improves De Novo and Long-Term l-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia in Hemiparkinsonian Rats

    PubMed Central

    Padovan-Neto, Fernando Eduardo; Echeverry, Marcela Bermúdez; Chiavegatto, Silvana; Del-Bel, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitors of neuronal and endothelial nitric oxide synthase decrease l-3,4-dihidroxifenilalanine (l-DOPA)-induced dyskinesias in rodents. The mechanism of nitric oxide inhibitor action is unknown. The aims of the present study were to investigate the decrease of l-DOPA-induced abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats by nitric oxide inhibitors following either acute or chronic treatment. The primary findings of this study were that NG-nitro-l-Arginine, an inhibitor of endothelial and neuronal nitric oxide synthase, attenuated AIMs induced by chronic and acute l-DOPA. In contrast, rotational behavior was attenuated only after chronic l-DOPA. The 6-OHDA lesion and the l-DOPA treatment induced a bilateral increase (1.5 times) in the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) protein and nNOS mRNA in the striatum and in the frontal cortex. There was a parallel increase, bilaterally, of the FosB/ΔFosB, primarily in the ipsilateral striatum. The exception was in the contralateral striatum and the ipsilateral frontal cortex, where chronic l-DOPA treatment induced an increase of approximately 10 times the nNOS mRNA. Our results provided further evidence of an anti-dyskinetic effect of NOS inhibitor. The effect appeared under l-DOPA acute and chronic treatment. The l-DOPA treatment also revealed an over-expression of the neuronal NOS in the frontal cortex and striatum. Our results corroborated findings that l-DOPA-induced rotation differs between acute and chronic treatment. The effect of the NOS inhibitor conceivably relied on the l-DOPA structural modifications in the Parkinsonian brain. Taken together, these data provided a rationale for further evaluation of NOS inhibitors in the treatment of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. PMID:21713068

  9. Tyrosol attenuates ischemia-reperfusion-induced kidney injury via inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengqi; Zhu, Qingjun; Wu, Nan; Siow, Yaw L; Aukema, Harold; O, Karmin

    2013-04-17

    Tyrosol is a natural phenolic antioxidant compound. Oxidative stress represents one of the important mechanisms underlying ischemia-reperfusion-induced kidney injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of tyrosol against ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury. The left kidney of Sprague-Dawley rats was subjected to 45 min of ischemia followed by reperfusion for 6 h. Ischemia-reperfusion caused an increase in peroxynitrite formation and lipid peroxidation. The level of nitric oxide (NO) metabolites and the mRNA of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were elevated in ischemia-reperfused kidneys. Administration of tyrosol (100 mg/kg body weight) to rats prior to the induction of ischemia significantly reduced peroxynitrite formation, lipid peroxidation, and the level of NO metabolites. Tyrosol administration also attenuated ischemia-reperfusion-induced NF-κB activation and iNOS expression. Such a treatment improved kidney function. Results suggest that tyrosol may have a protective effect against acute kidney injury through inhibition of iNOS-mediated oxidative stress.

  10. The response of thermospheric nitric oxide to an auroral storm

    SciTech Connect

    Siskind, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The response of thermospheric nitric oxide (NO) to the auroral storm of September 19, 1984 is analyzed. Measurements of nitric oxide from the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) ultraviolet spectrometer are compared with the calculations of a one-dimensional photochemical model of the lower thermosphere. The NCAR Thermospheric General Circulation Model (TGCM) is used to calculate the response of the background neutral atmosphere to auroral forcings such as Joule and particle heating. The output of the TGCM is used as input to the photochemical model. The time history of the auroral energy input is assessed using particle data from the NOAA 6 and 7 satellites. The SME NO measurements were made from 100 km to 140 km along two orbital tracks: one over the United States and one over Europe. The observations show a factor of 3 increase in NO at auroral latitudes for both orbits as a result of the storm. Nitric oxide at mid-latitudes also increased by a factor of 3 but only over the United States. Calculations of the mid-latitude NO response show that temperature increases which result from Joule heating lead to NO enhancements. A larger response is initially seen for altitudes greater than 120 km.

  11. Defective nitric oxide production by alveolar macrophages during Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lasbury, Mark E; Liao, Chung-Ping; Hage, Chadi A; Durant, Pamela J; Tschang, Dennis; Wang, Shao-Hung; Zhang, Chen; Lee, Chao-Hung

    2011-04-01

    The effect of nitric oxide (NO) on Pneumocystis (Pc) organisms, the role of NO in the defense against infection with Pc, and the production of NO by alveolar macrophages (AMs) during Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) were investigated. The results indicate that NO was toxic to Pc organisms and inhibited their proliferation in culture. When the production of NO was inhibited by intraperitoneal injection of rats with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-N(5)-(1-iminoethyl) ornithine, progression of Pc infection in immunocompetent rats was enhanced. Concentrations of NO in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from immunosuppressed, Pc-infected rats and mice were greatly reduced, compared with those from uninfected animals, and AMs from these animals were defective in NO production. However, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein concentrations were high in AMs from Pc-infected rats and mice. Immunoblot analysis showed that iNOS in AMs from Pc-infected rats existed primarily as a monomer, but the homo-dimerization of iNOS monomers was required for the production of NO. When iNOS dimerization cofactors, including calmodulin, were added to macrophage lysates, iNOS dimerization increased, whereas incubation of the same lysates with all cofactors except calmodulin did not rescue iNOS dimer formation. These data suggest that NO is important in the defense against Pc infection, but that the production of NO in AMs during PCP is defective because of the reduced dimerization of iNOS.

  12. [Measurement of exhaled nitric oxide in healthy Chinese].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luo; Luo, Xue-rui; Liu, Cheng-yao; Zhao, Yan; Han, De-min

    2009-04-01

    To obtain the normal values of nitric oxide (NO) exhaled through nose and mouth in healthy Chinese adults by measuring exhaled NO and analyzing the influencing factors. Eighty healthy Chinese adults were recruited, including 20 males and 60 females. The age ranged from 18 to 44 years old. Chemiluminescence analyzer (NIOX) was used to obtain the values of exhaled NO through nose and mouth. The relativity between NO and gender, age, height, body mass index, time, ambient NO were analyzed with Multiple linear regression and correlation. Exhaled NO values were (17+/-8)x10(-9) and correlated significantly with height. Regression equation: Y (exhaled nitric oxide)=-58.524+0.457X (height, cm), t=-2.985, P<0.01. Transnasal NO values were (819+/-211)x10(-9) and correlated significantly with age and gender. Regression equation: Y (nasal nitric oxide)=760.245+9.417X1(age)-111.222X2(gender), t=5.188, P<0.01. Exhaled NO normal values were 17x10(-9) and Transnasal NO normal values were 819x10(-9). Exhaled NO correlated positively with height. Transnasal NO correlated positively with age and negatively with gender.

  13. The Role of Nitric Oxide Synthase Uncoupling in Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Rabender, Christopher S.; Alam, Asim; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Cardnell, Robert J.; Yakovlev, Vasily A.; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D.; Graves, Paul; Zweit, Jamal; Mikkelsen, Ross B.

    2015-01-01

    Here evidence suggests that nitric oxide synthases (NOS) of tumor cells, in contrast to normal tissues, synthesize predominantly superoxide and peroxynitrite. Based on HPLC analysis, the underlying mechanism for this uncoupling is a reduced tetrahydrobiopterin: dihydrobiopterin ratio (BH4:BH2) found in breast, colorectal, epidermoid and head and neck tumors compared to normal tissues. Increasing BH4:BH2 and reconstitution of coupled NOS activity in breast cancer cells with the BH4 salvage pathway precursor, sepiapterin, causes significant shifts in downstream signaling including increased cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) activity, decreased β-catenin expression and TCF4 promoter activity, and reduced NF-κB promoter activity. Sepiapterin inhibited breast tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo as measured by clonogenic assay, Ki67 staining and 18F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). In summary, using diverse tumor types, it is demonstrated that the BH4:BH2 ratio is lower in tumor tissues and as a consequence nitric oxide synthase activity generates more peroxynitrite and superoxide anion than nitric oxide resulting in important tumor growth promoting and anti-apoptotic signaling properties. Implications The synthetic BH4, Kuvan®, is used to elevate BH4:BH2 in some phenylketonuria patients and to treat diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction suggesting a novel, testable approach for correcting an abnormality of tumor metabolism to control tumor growth. PMID:25724429

  14. Cytokine and nitric oxide production following severe envenomation.

    PubMed

    Petricevich, Vera L

    2004-09-01

    Venom is a complex mixture of many substances such as toxins, enzymes, growth factor activators, and inhibitors are particularly responsible for the deleterious effects of cells. These constituents interact in the body with a large number of proteins and receptors, and this interaction determines the eventual inflammatory effect of the compounds. Envenomation by bees, scorpions, snakes, spiders and wasps involves the activation of the inflammatory response with the release and activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and other mediators, such as nitric oxide. Recently, a battery of cytokines produced by activated T cells or macrophages have been added to in envenomations. Cytokines are important for the interactions between cells in the immune and inflammatory responses. Although the pathophysiology of envenomation is not fully understood, venom and immune responses are known to trigger the release of cytokines and nitric oxide. The cytokines initiate a cascade of events that lead to illness behaviors such as fever, anorexia, and, as well as a host of physiologic events such as activation of vasodilation, hypotension and increased nitric oxide production. Accumulating evidence indicates that these cytokines play important roles in mediating cell recruitment and activation necessary for inflammation and the repair of tissue damage. A better understanding of the involvement of the inflammatory system in different envenoming syndromes may have future therapeutic benefits.

  15. Evaluation of oxidative stress and nitric oxide levels in patients with oral cavity cancer.

    PubMed

    Beevi, S Syed Sultan; Rasheed, A Muzib Hassanal; Geetha, A

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of oxidative stress and levels of nitric oxide in patients with oral cavity cancer by analyzing the levels of lipid peroxidation products, antioxidants and nitric oxide products. This prospective study was conducted on 15 patients with biopsy proven squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity with clinical stage III/IV and an equal number of age and sex matched healthy subjects. The levels of lipid peroxidation products, antioxidants and nitric oxide products were determined by colorimetric methods. Lipid peroxidation products like lipid hydroperoxide (LHP) and malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide products like nitrite (NO(2)(-)), nitrate (NO(3)(-)) and total nitrite (TNO(2)(-)) were significantly elevated, whereas enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants were significantly lowered in oral cavity cancer patients when compared to normal healthy subjects. Enhanced lipid peroxidation with concomitant decrease in antioxidants is indicative of oxidative stress that provides evidence of the relationship between lipid peroxidation and oral cavity cancer. Increased nitric oxide production represents a general mechanism in its pathogenesis.

  16. Basal nitric oxide production is enhanced by hydraulic pressure in cultured human trabecular cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, T.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Nitric oxide donors reduce intraocular pressure. Human trabecular cells in culture were examined for their nitric oxide production in response to hydraulic pressure.
METHODS—Human trabecular cells were cultured from trabeculum tissue fragments excised during trabeculectomy and exposed to hydraulic pressure change in a culture flask connected to a glass syringe. The pressure was exerted by automatic infusion of the piston of the syringe and monitored by a pressure gauge. The intracellular nitric oxide level was measured in real time with a nitric oxide binding fluorescent dye, diaminofluorescein-2.
RESULTS—Intracellular nitric oxide levels in cultured trabecular cells showed spontaneous fluctuation during 400 seconds of observation. Peak levels of intracellular nitric oxide were significantly higher at hydraulic pressure of 30, 40, and 50 mm Hg, compared with 0 and 25 mm Hg (p<0.0001, one way ANOVA, and p<0.05, Tukey-Kramer test). The fluctuation was completely abolished by the presence of N-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. The cultured trabecular cells were shown by immunohistochemistry to express brain nitric oxide synthase (bNOS).
CONCLUSION—Higher levels of hydraulic pressure enhanced basal production of nitric oxide in human trabecular cells. Nitric oxide would be a physiological mediator in the regulation of intraocular pressure.

 PMID:10837391

  17. Nitric oxide regulation of calcitonin gene-related peptide gene expression in rat trigeminal ganglia neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bellamy, Jamie; Bowen, Elizabeth J.; Russo, Andrew F.; Durham, Paul L.

    2006-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and nitric oxide are involved in the underlying pathophysiology of migraine and other diseases involving neurogenic inflammation. We have tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide might trigger signaling mechanisms within the trigeminal ganglia neurons that would coordinately stimulate CGRP synthesis and release. Treatment of primary trigeminal ganglia cultures with nitric oxide donors caused a greater than four-fold increase in CGRP release compared with unstimulated cultures. Similarly, CGRP promoter activity was also stimulated by nitric oxide donors and overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Cotreatment with the antimigraine drug sumatriptan greatly repressed nitric oxide stimulation of CGRP promoter activity and secretion. Somewhat surprisingly, the mechanisms of nitric oxide stimulation of CGRP secretion did not require cGMP or PI3-kinase signaling pathways, but rather, nitric oxide action required extracellular calcium and likely involves T-type calcium channels. Furthermore, nitric oxide was shown to increase expression of the active forms of the mitogen-activated protein kinases Jun amino-terminal kinase and p38 but not extracellular signal-related kinase in trigeminal neurons. In summary, our results provide new insight into the cellular mechanisms by which nitric oxide induces CGRP synthesis and secretion from trigeminal neurons. PMID:16630053

  18. Plant mitochondria: source and target for nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Igamberdiev, Abir U; Ratcliffe, R George; Gupta, Kapuganti J

    2014-11-01

    Plant mitochondria generate nitric oxide (NO) under anoxia through the action of cytochrome c oxidase and other electron transport chain components on nitrite. This reductive mechanism operates under aerobic conditions at high electron transport rates. Indirect evidence also indicates that the oxidative pathway of NO production may be associated with mitochondria. We review the consequences of mitochondrial NO production, including the inhibition of oxygen uptake by cytochrome c oxidase, the inhibition of aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase, the induction of alternative oxidase, and the nitrosylation of several proteins, including glycine decarboxylase. The importance of these events in adaptation to abiotic and biotic stresses is discussed.

  19. Extracellular nitric oxide signaling in the hamster biological clock.

    PubMed

    Plano, Santiago A; Agostino, Patricia V; Golombek, Diego A

    2007-11-27

    Nocturnal light pulses induce phase shifts in circadian rhythms and activate cFos expression in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). We have studied the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the intercellular communication within the dorsal and ventral portions of the SCN in Syrian hamsters. Administration of the NO scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide blocked photic phase advances in a dose-dependent manner and inhibited light-induced cFos-ir, without affecting light-induced circadian phase delays. These results suggest that NO may act as an intercellular messenger in the SCN, mediating light-induced phase advances.

  20. L-citrulline immunostaining identifies nitric oxide production sites within neurons.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, G P T; Friedrich, V L; Holstein, G R

    2002-01-01

    The cellular and subcellular localization of L-citrulline was analyzed in the adult rat brain and compared with that of traditional markers for the presence of nitric oxide synthase. Light, transmission electron, and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study tissue sections processed for immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody against L-citrulline or polyclonal anti-neuronal nitric oxide synthase sera, and double immunofluorescence to detect neuronal nitric oxide synthase and L-citrulline co-localization. The results demonstrate that the same CNS regions and cell types are labeled by neuronal nitric oxide synthase polyclonal antisera and L-citrulline monoclonal antibodies, using both immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence. Short-term pretreatment with a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor reduces L-citrulline immunostaining, but does not affect neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity. In the vestibular brainstem, double immunofluorescence studies show that many, but not all, neuronal nitric oxide synthase-positive cells co-express L-citrulline, and that local intracellular patches of intense L-citrulline accumulation are present in some neurons. Conversely, all L-citrulline-labeled neurons co-express neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Cells expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase alone are interpreted as neurons with the potential to produce nitric oxide under other stimulus conditions, and the subcellular foci of enhanced L-citrulline staining are viewed as intracellular sites of nitric oxide production. This interpretation is supported by ultrastructural observations of subcellular foci with enhanced L-citrulline and/or neuronal nitric oxide synthase staining that are located primarily at postsynaptic densities and portions of the endoplasmic reticulum. We conclude that nitric oxide is produced and released at focal sites within neurons that are identifiable using L-citrulline as a marker. Copyright 2002 IBRO

  1. L-citrulline immunostaining identifies nitric oxide production sites within neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinelli, G. P. T.; Friedrich, V. L. Jr; Holstein, G. R.

    2002-01-01

    The cellular and subcellular localization of L-citrulline was analyzed in the adult rat brain and compared with that of traditional markers for the presence of nitric oxide synthase. Light, transmission electron, and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study tissue sections processed for immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody against L-citrulline or polyclonal anti-neuronal nitric oxide synthase sera, and double immunofluorescence to detect neuronal nitric oxide synthase and L-citrulline co-localization. The results demonstrate that the same CNS regions and cell types are labeled by neuronal nitric oxide synthase polyclonal antisera and L-citrulline monoclonal antibodies, using both immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence. Short-term pretreatment with a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor reduces L-citrulline immunostaining, but does not affect neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity. In the vestibular brainstem, double immunofluorescence studies show that many, but not all, neuronal nitric oxide synthase-positive cells co-express L-citrulline, and that local intracellular patches of intense L-citrulline accumulation are present in some neurons. Conversely, all L-citrulline-labeled neurons co-express neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Cells expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase alone are interpreted as neurons with the potential to produce nitric oxide under other stimulus conditions, and the subcellular foci of enhanced L-citrulline staining are viewed as intracellular sites of nitric oxide production. This interpretation is supported by ultrastructural observations of subcellular foci with enhanced L-citrulline and/or neuronal nitric oxide synthase staining that are located primarily at postsynaptic densities and portions of the endoplasmic reticulum. We conclude that nitric oxide is produced and released at focal sites within neurons that are identifiable using L-citrulline as a marker. Copyright 2002 IBRO.

  2. Inhibition of in vivo leishmanicidal mechanisms by tempol: nitric oxide down-regulation and oxidant scavenging.

    PubMed

    Linares, Edlaine; Giorgio, Selma; Augusto, Ohara

    2008-04-15

    Tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy) has long been known to protect experimental animals from the injury associated with oxidative and inflammatory conditions. In the latter case, a parallel decrease in tissue protein nitration levels has been observed. Protein nitration represents a shift in nitric oxide actions from physiological to pathophysiological and potentially damaging pathways involving its derived oxidants such as nitrogen dioxide and peroxynitrite. In infectious diseases, protein tyrosine nitration of tissues and cells has been taken as evidence for the involvement of nitric oxide-derived oxidants in microbicidal mechanisms. To examine whether tempol inhibits the microbicidal action of macrophages, we investigated its effects on Leishmania amazonensis infection in vitro (RAW 264.7 murine macrophages) and in vivo (C57Bl/6 mice). Tempol was administered in the drinking water at 2 mM throughout the experiments and shown to reach infected footpads as the nitroxide plus the hydroxylamine derivative by EPR analysis. At the time of maximum infection (6 weeks), tempol increased footpad lesion size (120%) and parasite burden (150%). In lesion extracts, tempol decreased overall nitric oxide products and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase to about 80% of the levels in control animals. Nitric oxide-derived products produced by radical mechanisms, such as 3-nitrotyrosine and nitrosothiol, decreased to about 40% of the levels in control mice. The results indicate that tempol worsened L. amazonensis infection by a dual mechanism involving down-regulation of iNOS expression and scavenging of nitric oxide-derived oxidants. Thus, the development of therapeutic strategies based on nitroxides should take into account the potential risk of altering host resistance to parasite infection.

  3. Osteopontin protects against hyperoxia-induced lung injury by inhibiting nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang-Feng; Liu, Shuang; Zhou, Yu-Jie; Zhu, Guang-Fa; Foda, Hussein D

    2010-04-05

    Exposure of adult mice to more than 95% O(2) produces a lethal injury by 72 hours. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of murine hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphorylated glycoprotein produced principally by macrophages. OPN inhibits inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which generates large amounts of nitric oxide production. However, the relationship between nitric oxide and endogenous OPN in lung tissue during hyperoxia-induced ALI has not yet been elucidated, thus we examined the role that OPN plays in the hyperoxia-induced lung injury and its relationships with NOS. One hundred and forty-four osteopontin knock-out (KO) mice and their matched wild type background control (WT) were exposed in sealed cages > 95% oxygen or room air for 24- 72 hours, and the severity of lung injury was assessed; expression of OPN, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and iNOS mRNA in lung tissues at 24, 48 and 72 hours of hyperoxia were studied by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR); immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed for the detection of iNOS, eNOS, and OPN protein in lung tissues. OPN KO mice developed more severe acute lung injury at 72 hours of hyperoxia. The wet/dry weight ratio increased to 6.85 +/- 0.66 in the KO mice at 72 hours of hyperoxia as compared to 5.31 +/- 0.92 in the WT group (P < 0.05). iNOS mRNA (48 hours: 1.04 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.63 +/- 0.09, P < 0.01; 72 hours: 0.89 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.72 +/- 0.09, P < 0.05) and eNOS mRNA (48 hours: 0.62 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.43 +/- 0.09, P < 0.05; 72 hours: 0.67 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.45 +/- 0.09, P < 0.05) expression was more significantly increased in OPN KO mice than their matched WT mice when exposed to hyperoxia. IHC study showed higher expression of iNOS (20.54 +/- 3.18 vs. 12.52 +/- 2.46, P < 0.05) and eNOS (19.83 +/- 5.64 vs. 9.45 +/- 3.82, P < 0.05) in lung tissues of OPN KO mice at 72 hours of hyperoxia. OPN can protect against

  4. Flavone inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, nitric oxide production and protein S-nitrosylation in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wenzhen; Yang, Bingwu; Fu, Huiling; Ma, Long; Liu, Tingting; Chai, Rongfei; Zheng, Zhaodi; Zhang, Qunye; Li, Guorong

    2015-03-13

    As the core structure of flavonoids, flavone has been proved to possess anticancer effects. Flavone's growth inhibitory functions are related to NO. NO is synthesized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and generally increased in a variety of cancer cells. NO regulates multiple cellular responses by S-nitrosylation. In this study, we explored flavone-induced regulations on nitric oxide (NO)-related cellular processes in breast cancer cells. Our results showed that, flavone suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Flavone restrains NO synthesis by does-dependent inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity. The decrease of NO generation was detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Flavone-induced inhibitory effect on NOS activity is dependent on intact cell structure. For the NO-induced protein modification, flavone treatment significantly down-regulated protein S-nitrosylation, which was detected by “Biotin-switch” method. The present study provides a novel, NO-related mechanism for the anticancer function of flavone. - Highlights: • Flavone inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. • Flavone decreases nitric oxide production by inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity in breast cancer cells. • Flavone down-regulates protein S-nitrosylation.

  5. Recombinant SSP4 protein from Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes regulates nitric oxide production by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Ligonio, A; López-Monteon, A; Talamás-Rohana, P; Rosales-Encina, J L

    2004-10-01

    Acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is characterized by immunosuppression mediated by T cells and macrophages (Mphis). Nitric oxide (NO) production during the initial phase of acute infection might participate in the clearance of parasites by Mphis, whereas its overproduction during the late phase of acute infection would account for the immunosuppression observed. Trypanosoma cruzi molecules that might regulate the host responses have not been fully identified. Here, we demonstrate that active immunization with MBP::SSP4, a recombinant protein derived from a surface antigen specific of T. cruzi amastigotes (TcSSP4), was able to stimulate Ab production (IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b). On the other hand, MBP::SSP4 was able to stimulate NO production by peritoneal Mphis from BALB/c mice and Mphis from the J774 cell line. This effect was also observed at the level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) detected by Western Blot. Furthermore, MBP::SSP4 was also shown to induce the expression of IL-1alpha, IL-6, IL-12, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha in normal animals, and IL-10 in immunized animals. In addition the protein MBP::SSP4 was able to bind to the surface of PMphis and J774 Mphis. These results suggest that TcSSP4 could modulate Mphi NO production and this may represent a mechanism participating in the immunoregulatory processes during Chagas' disease.

  6. [A preliminary observation on the effects of inhaled nitric oxide on bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Yang, Y; Weng, X

    1995-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a vasodilator as well as a bronchodilator. In order to estimate the therapeutic effects of NO on bronchial asthma, 10 patients in acute exacerbation stage were selected for this study. 40 ppm NO was inhaled for 20 minutes. The clinical stage and pulmonary function were evaluated instantly. The results showed that subjective symptoms were relieved and wheezing rales decreased to a different extent, FEV1 and PEF improved significantly (P < 0.05). It is suggested that low concentration NO inhalation can be used as a therapeutic measure for bronchial asthma.

  7. How the location of superoxide generation influences the β-cell response to nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Oleson, Bryndon J; McGraw, Jennifer; Naatz, Aaron; Mathews, Clayton E; Corbett, John A

    2015-03-20

    Cytokines impair the function and decrease the viability of insulin-producing β-cells by a pathway that requires the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and generation of high levels of nitric oxide. In addition to nitric oxide, excessive formation of reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, has been shown to cause β-cell damage. Although the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide results in the formation of peroxynitrite, we have shown that β-cells do not have the capacity to produce this powerful oxidant in response to cytokines. When β-cells are forced to generate peroxynitrite using nitric oxide donors and superoxide-generating redox cycling agents, superoxide scavenges nitric oxide and prevents the inhibitory and destructive actions of nitric oxide on mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and β-cell viability. In this study, we show that the β-cell response to nitric oxide is regulated by the location of superoxide generation. Nitric oxide freely diffuses through cell membranes, and it reacts with superoxide produced within cells and in the extracellular space, generating peroxynitrite. However, only when it is produced within cells does superoxide attenuate nitric oxide-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, gene expression, and toxicity. These findings suggest that the location of radical generation and the site of radical reactions are key determinants in the functional response of β-cells to reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. Although nitric oxide is freely diffusible, its biological function can be controlled by the local generation of superoxide, such that when this reaction occurs within β-cells, superoxide protects β-cells by scavenging nitric oxide.

  8. Beneficial Effects of Concomitant Neuronal and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition in Ovine Burn and Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Matthias; Hamahata, Atsumori; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Cox, Robert A.; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Westphal, Martin; Traber, Lillian D.; Herndon, David N.; Traber, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Different isoforms of nitric oxide synthase are critically involved in the development of pulmonary failure secondary to acute lung injury. Here we tested the hypothesis that simultaneous blockade of inducible and neuronal nitric oxide synthase effectively prevents the pulmonary lesions in an ovine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) induced by combined burn and smoke inhalation injury. Chronically instrumented sheep were allocated to a sham-injured group (n = 6), an injured and untreated group (n = 6), or an injured group treated with simultaneous infusion of selective inducible and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (n = 5). The injury was induced by 48 breath of cotton smoke and a 3rd degree burn of 40% total body surface area. All sheep were mechanically ventilated and fluid resuscitated. The injury induced severe pulmonary dysfunction as indicated by decreases in PaO2/FiO2 ratio and increases in pulmonary shunt fraction, ventilatory pressures, lung lymph flow, and lung wet/dry weight ratio. The treatment fully prevented the elevations in lymph and plasma nitrate/nitrite levels, pulmonary shunting, ventilatory pressures, lung lymph flow, and wet/dry weight ratio and significantly attenuated the decline in PaO2/FiO2 ratio. In conclusion, simultaneous blockade of inducible and neuronal nitric oxide synthase exerts beneficial pulmonary effects in an ovine model of ARDS secondary to combined burn and smoke inhalation injury. This novel treatment strategy may represent a useful therapeutic adjunct for patients with these injuries. PMID:21263377

  9. Modulation of nitric oxide synthase activity in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jorens, P. G.; Matthys, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    L-Arginine is converted to the highly reactive and unstable nitric oxide (NO) and L-citrulline by an enzyme named nitric oxide synthase (NOS). NO decomposes into other nitrogen oxides such as nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO2-), and in the presence of superoxide anion to the potent oxidizing agent peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Activated rodent macrophages are capable of expressing an inducible form of this enzyme (iNOS) in response to appropriate stimuli, i.e., lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-γ (IFNγ). Other cytokines can modulate the induction of NO biosynthesis in macrophages. NO is a major effector molecule of the anti-microbial and cytotoxic activity of rodent macrophages against certain micro-organisms and tumour cells, respectively. The NO synthesizing pathway has been demonstrated in human monocytes and other cells, but its role in host defence seems to be accessory. A delicate functional balance between microbial stimuli, host-derived cytokines and hormones in the microenvironment regulates iNOS expression. This review will focus mainly on the known and proposed mechanisms of the regulation of iNOS induction, and on agents that can modulate NO release once the active enzyme has been expressed in the macrophage. PMID:18475620

  10. The nitric oxide response in plant-associated endosymbiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Juan J; Sánchez, Cristina; Gates, Andrew J; Bedmar, Eulogio J; Mesa, Socorro; Richardson, David J; Delgado, María J

    2011-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous signalling molecule which becomes very toxic due to its ability to react with multiple cellular targets in biological systems. Bacterial cells protect against NO through the expression of enzymes that detoxify this molecule by oxidizing it to nitrate or reducing it to nitrous oxide or ammonia. These enzymes are haemoglobins, c-type nitric oxide reductase, flavorubredoxins and the cytochrome c respiratory nitrite reductase. Expression of the genes encoding these enzymes is controlled by NO-sensitive regulatory proteins. The production of NO in rhizobia-legume symbiosis has been demonstrated recently. In functioning nodules, NO acts as a potent inhibitor of nitrogenase enzymes. These observations have led to the question of how rhizobia overcome the toxicity of NO. Several studies on the NO response have been undertaken in two non-dentrifying rhizobial species, Sinorhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium etli, and in a denitrifying species, Bradyrhizobium japonicum. In the present mini-review, current knowledge of the NO response in those legume-associated endosymbiotic bacteria is summarized.

  11. Solar-terrestrial coupling: Solar soft X-rays and thermospheric nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Charles A.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    Simultaneous measurements were made of the solar soft x-ray irradiances and the thermospheric nitric oxide density in the tropics from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) satellite. The analysis of these observations for 44 days of low geomagnetic activity in the spring of 1998 show that there is a correlation between the solar soft x-ray irradiances and thermospheric nitric oxide densities in the tropics. Photochemical model calculations that used the measured solar soft x-ray irradiances as input parameters adequately reproduce the magnitude of the time-varying component of the thermospheric nitric oxide in the tropics. An additional amount of nitric oxide is present in the tropics that does not vary with the time period of the solar rotation. The conclusion of this analysis is that solar soft x-rays are the primary cause of the variation in the thermospheric nitric oxide densities in the tropics during times of low geomagnetic activity.

  12. A Finite Rate Chemical Analysis of Nitric Oxide Flow Contamination Effects on Scramjet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Karen F.; Rock, Kenneth E.

    2003-01-01

    The level of nitric oxide contamination in the test gas of the Langley Research Center Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility and the effect of the contamination on scramjet test engine performance were investigated analytically. A finite rate chemical analysis was performed to determine the levels of nitric oxide produced in the facility at conditions corresponding to Mach 6 to 8 flight simulations. Results indicate that nitric oxide levels range from one to three mole percent, corroborating previously obtained measurements. A three-stream combustor code with finite rate chemistry was used to investigate the effects of nitric oxide on scramjet performance. Results indicate that nitric oxide in the test gas causes a small increase in heat release and thrust performance for the test conditions investigated. However, a rate constant uncertainty analysis suggests that the effect of nitric oxide ranges from no net effect, to an increase of about 10 percent in thrust performance.

  13. Nitric oxide-releasing polymer incorporated ointment for cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Kang, Youngnam; Kim, Jihoon; Lee, Yeong Mi; Im, Sooseok; Park, Hansoo; Kim, Won Jong

    2015-12-28

    This work demonstrates the development of nitric oxide-releasing ointment and its potential on efficient wound healing. Nitric oxide-releasing polymer was successfully synthesized, which is composed of biocompatible Pluronic F127, branched polyethylenimine and 1-substituted diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolates. The synthesized nitric oxide-releasing polymer was incorporated into the PEG-based ointment which not only facilitated nitric oxide release in a slow manner, but also served as a moisturizer to enhance the wound healing. As compared to control groups, the nitric oxide-releasing ointment showed the accelerated wound closure with enhanced re-epithelialization, collagen deposition, and blood vessel formation in vivo. Therefore, this nitric oxide-based ointment presents the promising potential for the efficient strategy to heal the cutaneous wound.

  14. Increased brain nitric oxide levels following ethanol administration.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, Niall; O'Riordan, Saidhbhe L; Klamer, Daniel; Lowry, John; Pålsson, Erik

    2015-05-01

    Nitric oxide is a ubiquitous messenger molecule, which at elevated concentrations has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders. Its role in oxidative stress, attributed in particular to the formation of peroxynitrite, proceeds through its high affinity for the superoxide radical. Alcoholism has recently been associated with the induction of oxidative stress, which is generally defined as a shift in equilibrium between pro-oxidant and anti-oxidant species in the direction of the former. Furthermore, its primary metabolite acetaldehyde, has been extensively associated with oxidative damage related toxic effects following alcohol ingestion. The principal objective of this study was the application of long term in vivo electrochemistry (LIVE) to investigate the effect of ethanol (0.125, 0.5 and 2.0 g kg(-1)) and acetaldehyde (12.5, 50 and 200 mg kg(-1)) on NO levels in the nucleus accumbens of freely moving rats. Systemic administrations of ethanol and acetaldehyde resulted in a dose-dependent increases in NO levels, albeit with very differing time courses. Subsequent to this the effect on accumbal NO levels, of subjecting the animal to different drug combinations, was also elucidated. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME (20 mg kg(-1)) and acetaldehyde sequestering agent D-penicillamine (50 mg kg(-1)) both attenuated the increase in NO levels following ethanol (1 g kg(-1)) administration. Conversely, the alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (25 mg kg(-1)) and catalase inhibitor sodium azide (10 mg kg(-1)) potentiated the increase in NO levels following ethanol administration. Finally, dual inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase and catalase by cyanamide (25 mg kg(-1)) caused an attenuation of ethanol effects on NO levels. Taken together these data highlight a robust increase in brain NO levels following systemic alcohol administration which is dependent on NO synthase activity and may involve both alcohol- and acetaldehyde

  15. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen on nitric oxide generation in humans.

    PubMed

    Uusijärvi, Johan; Eriksson, Karin; Larsson, Agneta C; Nihlén, Carina; Schiffer, Tomas; Lindholm, Peter; Weitzberg, Eddie

    2015-01-30

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) has been suggested to affect nitric oxide (NO) generation in humans. Specific NO synthases (NOSs) use L-arginine and molecular oxygen to produce NO but this signaling radical may also be formed by serial reduction of the inorganic anions nitrate and nitrite. Interestingly, commensal facultative anaerobic bacteria in the oral cavity are necessary for the first step to reduce nitrate to nitrite. The nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway is greatly potentiated by hypoxia and low pH in contrast to classical NOS-dependent NO generation. We investigated the effects of HBO2 on NO generation in healthy subjects including orally and nasally exhaled NO, plasma and salivary nitrate and nitrite as well as plasma cGMP and plasma citrulline/arginine ratio. In addition, we also conducted in-vitro experiments in order to investigate the effects of hyperoxia on nitrate/nitrite metabolism and NO generation by oral bacteria. Two separate HBO2 experiments were performed. In a cross-over experiment (EXP1) subjects breathed air at 130 kPa (control) or oxygen at 250 kPa for 100 minutes and parameters were measured before and after exposure. In experiment 2 (EXP 2) measurements were performed also during HBO2 at 250 kPa for 110 minutes. HBO2 acutely reduced orally and nasally exhaled NO by 30% and 16%, respectively. There was a marked decrease in salivary nitrite/nitrate ratio during and after HBO2, indicating a reduced bacterial conversion of nitrate to nitrite and NO. This was supported by in vitro experiments with oral bacteria showing that hyperoxia inhibited bacterial nitrate and nitrite reduction leading to reduced NO generation. Plasma nitrate was unaffected by HBO2 while plasma nitrite was reduced during HBO2 treatment. In contrast, plasma cGMP increased during HBO2 as did citrulline/arginine ratio after treatment and control. HBO2-exposure in humans affects NO generation in the airways and systemically differently. These data suggest that the individual NOSs

  16. Hemolysis-Associated Nitric Oxide Dysregulation during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Sulkowski, Jason P.; Cooper, Jennifer N.; Pearson, Erik G.; Connelly, James T.; Rintoul, Natalie; Kilbaugh, Todd J.; Deans, Katherine J.; Minneci, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Acute intravascular hemolysis during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) leads to increased levels of cell-free hemoglobin (FHb). Our aim was to investigate whether FHb levels are associated with nitric oxide (NO) consumption and clinical outcomes. A prospective observational study was performed involving pediatric patients on ECMO. Blood samples were collected before, during, and after the ECMO run, and plasma was evaluated for FHb, oxyhemoglobin, and NO consumption. Clinical data were collected including baseline patient characteristics, indications for ECMO, circuit changes, and mortality. Correlations between laboratory measures and associations between laboratory measures and clinical observations were evaluated. Twenty-three patients (11 male, 17 neonates) were enrolled with a median weight of 3.1 kg (interquartile range, 2.8–14.0 kg) and median ECMO run of 12 days (interquartile range, 5–19 day). There was a significant increase in FHb over time on ECMO (p = .007), and significant correlations were present between NO consumption and both FHb (r = .41, p = .01) and oxyhemoglobin levels (r = .98, p < .0001). Patients on ECMO for sepsis (n = 6) had lower average levels of oxyhemoglobin (mean [standard deviation {SD}] 14.5 [4.4] versus 19.0 [5.0] μM, p = .07) and NO consumption (mean [SD] 15.8 [4.1] versus 19.8 [3.7] μM, p = .04) during ECMO than patients with other indications. In the 3 days leading up to a circuit change, there were increases in mean total cell-free hemoglobin levels (24%/day, p = .08), oxyhemoglobin (37%/day, p = .005), and NO consumption (40%/day, p = .006) (n = 5). There were no significant associations identified between peak or average plasma measures of hemolysis and type of ECMO (venovenous versus venoarterial) or mortality. For children on ECMO, we observed a strong correlation between increased levels of plasma FHb and elevations in oxyhemoglobin and NO consumption; however, these changes were not associated

  17. Assessing the physiological concentration and targets of nitric oxide in brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Catherine N; Attwell, David

    2008-01-01

    Low nanomolar concentrations of nitric oxide activate guanylyl cyclase to produce cGMP, which has diverse physiological effects. Higher concentrations inhibit mitochondrial respiration at cytochrome c oxidase and this has been proposed to be important physiologically, increasing oxygen permeation into tissue (by reducing the oxygen use of cells near blood vessels), activating AMP kinase, and regulating the relationship between cerebral blood flow and oxygen use. It is unclear, however, whether nitric oxide can accumulate physiologically to concentrations at which inhibition of respiration occurs. In rat cerebellar slices, we activated nitric oxide production from each isoform of nitric oxide synthase. Only activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, which is expressed pathologically, caused any significant inhibition of respiration. Modelling oxygen and nitric oxide concentrations predicted that, in vivo, physiological nitric oxide levels are too low to affect respiration. Even pathologically, the nitric oxide concentration may only rise to 2.5 nm, producing a 1.5% inhibition of respiration. Thus, under physiological conditions, nitric oxide signals do not inhibit respiration but are well-tuned to the dynamic range of guanylyl cyclase activation. PMID:18535091

  18. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, Travis Shane; Mincher, Bruce Jay; Schmitt, Nicholas C

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  19. Modulation of Lung Function by Increased Nitric Oxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ram Lochan; Yadav, Prakash Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Cigarette smoking reduces endogenous Nitric Oxide (NO) production by reducing Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) activity, which is one of the probable reason for increased rate of pulmonary diseases in smokers. Nitric oxide/oxygen blends are used in critical care to promote capillary and pulmonary dilation to treat several pulmonary vascular diseases. Among several supplements, the highest NOS activation has been proved for garlic with its unique mechanism of action. Aim To investigate the effect of dietary supplementation of NO producing garlic on pulmonary function of smokers. Materials and Methods The study was conducted on 40 healthy non-smoker (Group A) and 40 chronic smoker (Group B) males with matched age, height and weight. The pulmonary function tests- Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC ratio and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) were performed in non-smokers (Group A), smokers (Group B) and smokers after supplementation of approximately 4 gm of raw garlic (2 garlic cloves) per day for three months (Group C). Endogenous NO production was studied in smokers before and after garlic supplementation and in non-smokers without supplementation. The data obtained were compared between the groups using unpaired student’s t-test. The p-value considered significant at <0.05. Results Our results showed that FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC ratio and PEFR were reduced significantly along with a significant decreased NOS activity among smokers (Group B) when compared with non-smokers (Group A). Garlic supplementation significantly improved the pulmonary function tests in Group C in comparison to Group B by increasing NOS activity. Conclusion Dietary supplementation of garlic, which might be by increasing NOS activity, has significantly improved pulmonary functions in smokers. PMID:28764150

  20. Dysfunctional nitric oxide signalling increases risk of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Jeanette; Stark, Klaus; Esslinger, Ulrike B; Rumpf, Philipp Moritz; Koesling, Doris; de Wit, Cor; Kaiser, Frank J; Braunholz, Diana; Medack, Anja; Fischer, Marcus; Zimmermann, Martina E; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Graf, Elisabeth; Eck, Sebastian; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Nahrstaedt, Janja; Willenborg, Christina; Bruse, Petra; Brænne, Ingrid; Nöthen, Markus M; Hofmann, Per; Braund, Peter S; Mergia, Evanthia; Reinhard, Wibke; Burgdorf, Christof; Schreiber, Stefan; Balmforth, Anthony J; Hall, Alistair S; Bertram, Lars; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Li, Shu-Chen; März, Winfried; Reilly, Muredach; Kathiresan, Sekar; McPherson, Ruth; Walter, Ulrich; Ott, Jurg; Samani, Nilesh J; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; Hengstenberg, Christian; Schunkert, Heribert

    2013-12-19

    Myocardial infarction, a leading cause of death in the Western world, usually occurs when the fibrous cap overlying an atherosclerotic plaque in a coronary artery ruptures. The resulting exposure of blood to the atherosclerotic material then triggers thrombus formation, which occludes the artery. The importance of genetic predisposition to coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction is best documented by the predictive value of a positive family history. Next-generation sequencing in families with several affected individuals has revolutionized mutation identification. Here we report the segregation of two private, heterozygous mutations in two functionally related genes, GUCY1A3 (p.Leu163Phefs*24) and CCT7 (p.Ser525Leu), in an extended myocardial infarction family. GUCY1A3 encodes the α1 subunit of soluble guanylyl cyclase (α1-sGC), and CCT7 encodes CCTη, a member of the tailless complex polypeptide 1 ring complex, which, among other functions, stabilizes soluble guanylyl cyclase. After stimulation with nitric oxide, soluble guanylyl cyclase generates cGMP, which induces vasodilation and inhibits platelet activation. We demonstrate in vitro that mutations in both GUCY1A3 and CCT7 severely reduce α1-sGC as well as β1-sGC protein content, and impair soluble guanylyl cyclase activity. Moreover, platelets from digenic mutation carriers contained less soluble guanylyl cyclase protein and consequently displayed reduced nitric-oxide-induced cGMP formation. Mice deficient in α1-sGC protein displayed accelerated thrombus formation in the microcirculation after local trauma. Starting with a severely affected family, we have identified a link between impaired soluble-guanylyl-cyclase-dependent nitric oxide signalling and myocardial infarction risk, possibly through accelerated thrombus formation. Reversing this defect may provide a new therapeutic target for reducing the risk of myocardial infarction.

  1. Daily exhaled nitric oxide measurements and asthma exacerbations in children.

    PubMed

    van der Valk, R J P; Baraldi, E; Stern, G; Frey, U; de Jongste, J C

    2012-02-01

    Fractional exhaled Nitric Oxide (FeNO) is a biomarker for eosinophilic airway inflammation and can be measured at home on a daily basis. A short-term increase in FeNO may indicate a higher risk of future asthma exacerbations. To assess changes in FeNO before and after asthma exacerbations compared to a stable control period. A post hoc analysis was performed on daily FeNO measurements over 30 weeks in children with asthma (n = 77). Moderate exacerbations were defined by an increase in symptom scores and severe exacerbations by prescription of prednisone. Individual mean and maximum FeNO, the variability of FeNO assessed by the coefficient of variation (CV), and slopes of FeNO in time were all quantified in 3-week blocks. Cross-correlation of FeNO with symptoms and autocorrelation of FeNO were assessed in relation to exacerbations and examined as predictors for exacerbations compared to reference periods using logistic regression. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide could be assessed in relation to 25 moderate and 12 severe exacerbations. The CV, slope, cross-correlation, and autocorrelation of daily FeNO increased before moderate exacerbations. Increases in slope were also randomly seen in 19% of 2-week blocks of children without exacerbations. At least 3-5 FeNO measurements in the 3 weeks before an exacerbation were needed to calculate a slope that could predict moderate exacerbations. No specific pattern of FeNO was seen before severe exacerbations. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide monitoring revealed changes in FeNO prior to moderate exacerbations. Whether this can be used to prevent loss of asthma control should be further explored. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. The role of nitric oxide in low level light therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.

    2008-02-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing tissue damage by reducing cellular apoptosis has been known for almost forty years since the invention of lasers. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial. Firstly the biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and secondly the complexity of choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. This review will focus on the role of nitric oxide in the cellular and tissue effects of LLLT. Red and near-IR light is primarily absorbed by cytochrome c oxidase (unit four in the mitochondrial respiratory chain). Nitric oxide produced in the mitochondria can inhibit respiration by binding to cytochrome c oxidase and competitively displacing oxygen, especially in stressed or hypoxic cells. If light absorption displaced the nitric oxide and thus allowed the cytochrome c oxidase to recover and cellular respiration to resume, this would explain many of the observations made in LLLT. Why the effect is only seen in hypoxic, stressed or damaged cells or tissues? How the effects can keep working for some time (hours or days) postillumination? Why increased NO concentrations are sometimes measured in cell culture or in animals? How blood flow can be increased? Why angiogenesis is sometimes increased after LLLT in vivo?

  3. Role of nitric oxide in coronary vasomotion during handgrip exercise.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Y; Kanki, H; Ogawa, S

    1997-11-01

    Endothelium-dependent modulation of coronary vasomotion during increased sympathetic tone remains unclear in normal and atherosclerotic human coronory arteries. We evaluated the role of endothelium-derived nitric oxide in vasomotion during isometric exercise in normal subjects (n = 7) and in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) (n = 10). Coronary blood flow and epicardial coronary artery diameter to the handgrip test were measured before and after intracoronary administration of 100 micromol/min of N(G)-monomethyl L-arginine (L-NMMA). Heart rate and aortic blood pressure increased during handgrip test. Handgrip test caused a significant dilation in the diameter of the epicardial coronary artery in normal subjects (9.9% +/- 3.9%, mean +/- SD) and in the diameter of smooth segments of patients with CAD (5% +/- 3.7%, p < 0.05 vs normal subjects). In contrast, the diameter of irregular segments in patients with CAD decreased during handgrip test (-9.8 +/- 3.9%). After L-NMMA, the epicardial coronary artery significantly increased during handgrip test compared with before L-NMMA in normal subjects. L-NMMA did not have any effect on handgrip test induced vasodilation in the smooth segments and vasoconstriction in the irregular segments in the patients with CAD. Handgrip test-induced increases in coronary blood flow did not change after L-NMMA in both groups. Nitric oxide does not play a major role in HNG-induced vasodilation in epicardial and microcirculatory vessels in normal human coronary circulation. Although the decreased release in nitric oxide may modulate the abnormal response of the epicardial coronary artery to handgrip test, this does not explain the paradoxic constrictive response from the depressed but still dilatory response in the patients with CAD.

  4. Methods of nitric oxide detection in plants: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Mur, Luis A J; Mandon, Julien; Cristescu, Simona M; Harren, Frans J M; Prats, Elena

    2011-11-01

    Over the last decade nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to influence a range of processes in plants. However, when, where and even if NO production occurs is controversial in several physiological scenarios in plants. This arises from a series of causes: (a) doubts have arisen over the specificity of widely used 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA)/4-amino-5-methylamino-2,7-difluorofluorescein (DAF-FM) dyes for NO, (b) no plant nitric oxide synthase (NOS) has been cloned, so that the validity of using mammalian NOS inhibitors to demonstrate that NO is being measured is debatable, (c) the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-l-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) needs to be used with caution, and (d) some discrepancies between assays for in planta measurements and another based on sampling NO from the gas phase have been reported. This review will outline some commonly used methods to determine NO, attempt to reconcile differing results obtained by different laboratories and suggest appropriate approaches to unequivocally demonstrate the production of NO.

  5. Cancer Cell Metabolism and the Modulating Effects of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Fang; Diers, Anne R.; Hogg, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Altered metabolic phenotype has been recognized as a hallmark of tumor cells for many years, but this aspect of the cancer phenotype has come into greater focus in recent years. NOS2 (inducible nitric oxide synthase of iNOS) has been implicated as a component in many aggressive tumor phenotypes, including melanoma, glioblastoma and breast cancer. Nitric oxide has been well established as a modulator of cellular bioenergetics pathways, in many ways similar to the alteration of cellular metabolism observed in aggressive tumors. In this review we attempt to bring these concepts together with the general hypothesis that one function of NOS2 and NO in cancer is to modulate metabolic processes to facilitate increased tumor aggression. There are many mechanisms by which NO can modulate tumor metabolism, including direct inhibition of respiration, alterations in mitochondrial mass, oxidative inhibition of bioenergetic enzymes, and the stimulation of secondary signaling pathways. Here we review metabolic alterations in the context of cancer cells and discuss the role of NO as a potential mediator of these changes. PMID:25464273

  6. Elucidating nitric oxide synthase domain interactions by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Scott A; Holden, Jeffrey K; Li, Huiying; Poulos, Thomas L

    2016-02-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is a multidomain enzyme that catalyzes the production of nitric oxide (NO) by oxidizing L-Arg to NO and L-citrulline. NO production requires multiple interdomain electron transfer steps between the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and heme domain. Specifically, NADPH-derived electrons are transferred to the heme-containing oxygenase domain via the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and FMN containing reductase domains. While crystal structures are available for both the reductase and oxygenase domains of NOS, to date there is no atomic level structural information on domain interactions required for the final FMN-to-heme electron transfer step. Here, we evaluate a model of this final electron transfer step for the heme-FMN-calmodulin NOS complex based on the recent biophysical studies using a 105-ns molecular dynamics trajectory. The resulting equilibrated complex structure is very stable and provides a detailed prediction of interdomain contacts required for stabilizing the NOS output state. The resulting equilibrated complex model agrees well with previous experimental work and provides a detailed working model of the final NOS electron transfer step required for NO biosynthesis.

  7. Mitochondrial nitric oxide metabolism in rat muscle during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Silvia; Boveris, Alberto

    2004-11-01

    In this study, heart and diaphragm mitochondria produced 0.69 and 0.77 nmol nitric oxide (NO)/min mg protein, rates that account for 67 and 24% of maximal cellular NO production, respectively. Endotoxemia and septic shock occur with an exacerbated inflammatory response that damages tissue mitochondria. Skeletal muscle seems to be one of the main target organs in septic shock, showing an increased NO production and early oxidative stress. The kinetic properties of mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mtNOS) of heart and diaphragm were determined. For diaphragm, the KM values for O2 and L-Arg were 4.6 and 37 microM and for heart were 3.3 and 36 microM. The optimal pH for mtNOS activity was 6.5 for diaphragm and 7.0 for heart. A marked increase in mtNOS activity was observed in endotoxemic rats, 90% in diaphragm and 30% in heart. Diaphragm and heart mitochondrial O2*- and H2O2 production were 2- to 3-fold increased during endotoxemia and Mn-SOD activity showed a 2-fold increase in treated animals, whereas catalase activity was unchanged. One of the current hypotheses for the molecular mechanisms underlying the complex condition of septic shock is that the enhanced NO production by mtNOS leads to excessive peroxynitrite production and protein nitration in the mitochondrial matrix, causing mitochondrial dysfunction and contractile failure.

  8. Characteristics of the nitric oxide synthase-catalyzed conversion of arginine to N-hydroxyarginine, the first oxygenation step in the enzymic synthesis of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Campos, K L; Giovanelli, J; Kaufman, S

    1995-01-27

    The nitric oxide synthase-catalyzed conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline and nitric oxide is known to be the sum of two partial reactions: oxygenation of arginine to N-hydroxyarginine, followed by oxygenation of N-hydroxyarginine to citrulline and nitric oxide. Whereas the conversion of N-hydroxyarginine to citrulline and nitric oxide has been the subject of a number of studies, the oxygenation of arginine to N-hydroxyarginine has received little attention. Here we show that substrate amounts of rat cerebellar nitric oxide synthase, in the absence of added NADPH, catalyze the conversion of arginine to N-hydroxyarginine as the dominant product. The product appears not to be tightly bound to the enzyme. A maximum of 0.16 mol of N-hydroxyarginine/mol of nitric oxide synthase subunit was formed. The reaction requires oxygen and the addition of Ca2+/calmodulin and is stimulated 3-fold by tetrahydrobiopterin. Upon addition of NADPH, citrulline is formed exclusively. Conversion of N-hydroxyarginine to citrulline, like the first partial reaction, requires Ca2+/calmodulin and is stimulated by tetrahydrobiopterin but differs from the first partial reaction in being completely dependent upon addition of NADPH. These results indicate that brain nitric oxide synthase contains an endogenous reductant that can support oxygenation of arginine but not of N-hydroxyarginine. The reductant is not NADPH, since the amount of nitric oxide synthase-bound NADPH is appreciably less than the amount required for N-hydroxyarginine synthesis. Possible candidates for this role are discussed in relation to proposed mechanisms of action of nitric oxide synthase.

  9. Application of nitric oxide measurements in clinical conditions beyond asthma

    PubMed Central

    Malinovschi, Andrei; Ludviksdottir, Dora; Tufvesson, Ellen; Rolla, Giovanni; Bjermer, Leif; Alving, Kjell; Diamant, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is a convenient, non-invasive method for the assessment of active, mainly Th2-driven, airway inflammation, which is sensitive to treatment with standard anti-inflammatory therapy. Consequently, FeNO serves as a valued tool to aid diagnosis and monitoring in several asthma phenotypes. More recently, FeNO has been evaluated in several other respiratory, infectious, and/or immunological conditions. In this short review, we provide an overview of several clinical studies and discuss the status of potential applications of NO measurements in clinical conditions beyond asthma. PMID:26672962

  10. [Nitric oxide is a major player in plant immune system].

    PubMed

    Koen, Emmanuel; Lamotte, Olivier; Besson-Bard, Angélique; Bourque, Stéphane; Nicolas-Francès, Valérie; Jeandroz, Sylvain; Wendehenne, David

    2013-03-01

    In animals, nitric oxide (NO) functions as a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in diverse physiological processes such as immunity. Recent studies provided evidence that plants challenged by pathogenic microorganisms also produce NO. The emerging picture is that NO functions as a signal in plant immunity and executes part of its effects through posttranslational protein modifications. Notably, the characterization of S-nitrosylated proteins provided insights into the molecular mechanisms by which NO exerts its activities. Based on these findings, it appears that NO is involved in both the activation and the negative control of the signaling pathways related to plant immunity.

  11. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in plant biotic interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheler, Claudia; Durner, Jörg; Astier, Jeremy

    2013-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules in plants. Recent progress has been made in defining their role during plant biotic interactions. Over the last decade, their function in disease resistance has been highlighted and focused a lot of investigations. Moreover, NO and ROS have recently emerged as important players of defense responses after herbivore attacks. Besides their role in plant adaptive response development, NO and ROS have been demonstrated to be involved in symbiotic interactions between plants and microorganisms. Here we review recent data concerning these three sides of NO and ROS functions in plant biotic interactions.

  12. Electrochemical Detection of Nitric Oxide in Plant Cell Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Griveau, Sophie; Besson-Bard, Angélique; Bedioui, Fethi; Wendehenne, David

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a hydrophobic radical acting as a physiological mediator in plants. Because of its unique properties, the detection of NO in plant tissues and cell suspensions remains a challenge. For this purpose, several techniques are used, each having certain advantages and limitations such as interferences with other species, questionable sensitivity, and/or selectivity or ex situ measurement. Here we describe a very attractive approach for tracking NO in plant cell suspensions using a NO-sensitive homemade platinum/iridium-based electrochemical microsensor. This method constitutes the absolute real-time proof of the production of free NO in physiological conditions.

  13. Nitric oxide signaling in plant responses to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Weihua; Fan, Liu-Min

    2008-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays important roles in diverse physiological processes in plants. NO can provoke both beneficial and harmful effects, which depend on the concentration and location of NO in plant cells. This review is focused on NO synthesis and the functions of NO in plant responses to abiotic environmental stresses. Abiotic stresses mostly induce NO production in plants. NO alleviates the harmfulness of reactive oxygen species, and reacts with other target molecules, and regulates the expression of stress responsive genes under various stress conditions.

  14. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide-measuring devices: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Maniscalco, Mauro; Vitale, Carolina; Vatrella, Alessandro; Molino, Antonio; Bianco, Andrea; Mazzarella, Gennaro

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (NO) has been employed in the diagnosis of specific types of airway inflammation, guiding treatment monitoring by predicting and assessing response to anti-inflammatory therapy and monitoring for compliance and detecting relapse. Various techniques are currently used to analyze exhaled NO concentrations under a range of conditions for both health and disease. These include chemiluminescence and electrochemical sensor devices. The cost effectiveness and ability to achieve adequate flexibility in sensitivity and selectivity of NO measurement for these methods are evaluated alongside the potential for use of laser-based technology. This review explores the technologies involved in the measurement of exhaled NO. PMID:27382340

  15. Multi-reference calculations of nitric oxide dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Naoki; Mochizuki, Yuji; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    The nitric oxide dimer, (NO) 2, has been known as an archetype with severe near-degeneracy because of the weak N-N bonding. We thus performed a series of multi-reference calculations of fourth-order coupled pair approximation (MRCPA4) and configuration interaction (MRCI). For the ground state, the molecular structure of cis form was optimized by these calculations. The MRCPA4 geometry was favorably compared with the recent experimental data, indicating the importance of higher excitations. Low-lying singlet excited states were also addressed. Through these calculations, the intrinsic MR character of this system was illustrated.

  16. Nitric oxide-sensitive pulmonary hypertension in congenital rubella syndrome.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Francesco; Migliaro, Fiorella; Di Pietro, Elisa; Borgia, Francesco; Rapacciuolo, Antonio; Capasso, Letizia

    2015-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension is a very rare presentation of congenital virus infection. We discuss the case of complete congenital rubella syndrome presenting at echocardiography with pulmonary hypertension that worsened after ductus ligation. Cardiac catheterization showed a normal pulmonary valve and vascular tree but a PAP = 40 mmHg. The infant promptly responded to inhaled nitric oxide while on mechanical ventilation and was later shifted to oral sildenafil. It is not clear whether our observation may be due to direct viral damage to the endothelium or to the rubella virus increasing the vascular tone via a metabolic derangement.

  17. Nitric oxide donor-mediated killing of bioluminescent Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Virta, M; Karp, M; Vuorinen, P

    1994-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of two nitric oxide-releasing compounds against Escherichia coli were investigated by using recombinant E. coli cloned with a luciferase gene from Pyrophorus plagiophthalamus. Since luciferase uses intracellular ATP to generate visible light which can be measured from living cells in real time, we wanted to compare the extent to which cell viability parallels light emission. Results from luminescence measurements and CFU counts were in good agreement, and the decrease in light emission was shown to provide a rapid and more sensitive indication of cytotoxicity. PMID:7695261

  18. An appraisal of techniques for administration of gaseous nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Tibballs, J; Hochmann, M; Carter, B; Osborne, A

    1993-12-01

    Gaseous nitric oxide (NO) is a potent selective pulmonary vasodilator. When mixed with O2 for more than 10-15 minutes it forms toxic amounts of nitrogen dioxide (NO2). We describe two techniques to administer 20 parts per million (ppm) during mechanical ventilation. A technique using flows of NO and O2 at low pressure to drive a Siemens Servo 900C ventilator provided a constant inspired concentration of NO. Another technique in which NO was added to the inspiratory limb of a Siemens Servo 900C ventilator driven by high pressure oxygen provided a highly variable concentration (9-53 ppm) of inspired NO.

  19. New regulatory, signaling pathways, and sources of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Pluta, Ryszard M

    2011-01-01

    Discovered in 1980 by the late Robert F. Furchgott, endothelium-derived relaxing factor, nitric oxide (NO), has been in the forefront of vascular research for several decades. What was originally a narrow approach, has been significantly widened due to major advances in understanding the chemical and biological properties of NO as well as its signaling pathways and discovering new sources of this notorious free radical gas. In this review, recent discoveries regarding NO and their implications on therapy for delayed cerebral vasospasm are presented.

  20. Nitric oxide affects plant mitochondrial functionality in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zottini, Michela; Formentin, Elide; Scattolin, Michela; Carimi, Francesco; Lo Schiavo, Fiorella; Terzi, Mario

    2002-03-27

    In this report, we show that nitric oxide affects mitochondrial functionality in plant cells and reduces total cell respiration due to strong inhibition of the cytochrome pathway. The residual respiration depends on the alternative pathway and novel synthesis of alternative oxidase occurs. These modifications are associated with depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, suggesting a conserved signalling pathway in plants and animals. This signal cascade is triggered at the mitochondrial level and induces about 20% of cell death. In order to achieve a higher level of cell death, the addition of H(2)O(2) is necessary.

  1. H2S regulation of nitric oxide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kolluru, Gopi K.; Yuan, Shuai; Shen, Xinggui; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are two major gaseous signaling molecules that regulate diverse physiological functions. Recent publications indicate the regulatory role of H2S on NO metabolism. In this chapter, we discuss the latest findings on H2S-NO interactions through formation of novel chemical derivatives, and experimental approaches to study these adducts. This chapter also addresses potential H2S interference on various NO detection techniques, along with precautions for analyzing biological samples from various sources. This information will facilitate critical evaluation and clearer insight into H2S regulation of NO signaling and its influence on various physiological functions. PMID:25725527

  2. Susceptibility to cerulein-induced pancreatitis in inducible nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Qui, B; Mei, Q B; Ma, J J; Korsten, M A

    2001-07-01

    Production of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) has been proposed as a pathogenic factor in acute pancreatitis, but its role has still not been fully examined. The present study explored the role of iNOS in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis using iNOS-deficient mice. Twelve- to 14-week-old male mice (C57B1/6 and iNOS-deficient) were administered cerulein by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection at hourly intervals for 7 hours and killed 24 hours later after the first dose. Pancreatic wet weight, pancreatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and levels of plasma nitrite and serum amylase were measured. In another experiment isosorbide dinitrate (an NO donor) was given by oral gavage every 6 hours for 24 hours beginning simultaneously with cerulein injections in iNOS-deficient mice. Cerulein administration dose-dependently increased pancreatic wet weight, myeloperoxidase activity, and levels of nitrite and amylase in C57B1/6 mice. These parameters (except nitrite levels) were significantly intensified in iNOS-deficient mice. At the dose employed, cerulein failed to increase nitrite levels in iNOS-deficient mice. The susceptibility to cerulein toxicity in iNOS-deficient mice was abolished by NO donor treatment. NO release from an iNOS source appears to play a protective role in cerulein-induced pancreatitis. At least in part, NO may prevent neutrophil accumulation after cerulein administration.

  3. Experimental inhibition of nitric oxide increases Plasmodium relictum (lineage SGS1) parasitaemia.

    PubMed

    Bichet, Coraline; Cornet, Stéphane; Larcombe, Stephen; Sorci, Gabriele

    2012-12-01

    Malaria is a widespread vector-borne disease infecting a wide range of terrestrial vertebrates including reptiles, birds and mammals. In addition to being one of the most deadly infectious diseases for humans, malaria is a threat to wildlife. The host immune system represents the main defence against malaria parasites. Identifying the immune effectors involved in malaria resistance has therefore become a major focus of research. However, this has mostly involved humans and animal models (rodents) and how the immune system regulates malaria progression in non-model organisms has been largely ignored. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) as an immune effector contributing to the control of the acute phase of infection with the avian malaria agent Plasmodium relictum. We used experimental infections of domestic canaries in conjunction with the inhibition of the enzyme inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) to assess the protective function of NO during the infection, and the physiological costs paid by the host in the absence of an effective NO response. Our results show that birds treated with the iNOS inhibitor suffered from a higher parasitaemia, but did not pay a higher cost of infection (anaemia). While these findings confirm that NO contributes to the resistance to avian malaria during the acute phase of the infection, they also suggest that parasitaemia and costs of infection can be decoupled.

  4. Effects of Ginkgo biloba on exhaled nasal nitric oxide during normobaric hypoxia in humans.

    PubMed

    Jowers, Casey; Shih, Richard; James, Jim; Deloughery, Thomas G; Holden, William E

    2004-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba, an extract of the ginkgo tree, may prevent or lessen symptoms of acute mountain sickness in humans. The mechanism of this effect is poorly understood. One hypothesis is that ginkgo alters nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, possibly by scavenging NO or altering nitric oxide synthase expression and thereby lessening the vasodilatory effects of NO. To date, an effect of Ginkgo biloba on NO metabolism has not been demonstrated in humans. We measured exhaled nasal NO output in humans (n = 9) during normoxia and then during acute normobaric hypoxia (goal oxyhemoglobin saturation 75% to 85%) before and after administration of a standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba (120 mg twice daily for 5 days). Oxygen saturation, heart rate, and minute ventilation were similar before and after Ginkgo biloba administration. Exhaled nasal NO output was increased during normoxia following ginkgo (p < 0.02) and reduced during normobaric hypoxia both before (p < 0.02) and following (p < 0.003) ginkgo. Exhaled nasal NO output during normobaric hypoxia was lowest following ginkgo (p < 0.003). We conclude that Ginkgo biloba increases exhaled nasal NO output during normoxia and enhances reduced exhaled nasal NO output during normobaric hypoxia. Our results suggest that Ginkgo biloba may act to reduce AMS through an effect on NO metabolism.

  5. Real-time visualization of distinct nitric oxide generation of nitric oxide synthase isoforms in single cells.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Emrah; Hallström, Seth; Bischof, Helmut; Opelt, Marissa; Schmidt, Kurt; Mayer, Bernd; Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Graier, Wolfgang F; Malli, Roland

    2017-09-04

    The members of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) family, eNOS, nNOS and iNOS, are well-characterized enzymes. However, due to the lack of suitable direct NO sensors, little is known about the kinetic properties of cellular NO generation by the different nitric oxide synthase isoenzymes. Very recently, we developed a novel class of fluorescent protein-based NO-probes, the geNOps, which allow real-time measurement of cellular NO generation and fluctuation. By applying these genetic NO biosensors to nNOS-, eNOS- and iNOS-expressing HEK293 cells we were able to characterize the respective NO dynamics in single cells that exhibited identical Ca(2+) signaling as comparable activator of nNOS and eNOS. Our data demonstrate that upon Ca(2+) mobilization nNOS-derived NO signals occur instantly and strictly follow the Ca(2+) elevation while NO release by eNOS occurs gradually and sustained. To detect high NO levels in cells expressing iNOS, a new ratiometric probe based on two fluorescent proteins was developed. This novel geNOp variant allows the measurement of the high NO levels in cells expressing iNOS. Moreover, we used this probe to study the L-arginine-dependency of NO generation by iNOS on the level of single cells. Our experiments highlight that the geNOps technology is suitable to detect obvious differences in the kinetics, amplitude and substrate-dependence of cellular NO signals-derived from all three nitric oxide synthase isoforms. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reactions of nitric oxide with tree and fungal laccase.

    PubMed

    Martin, C T; Morse, R H; Kanne, R M; Gray, H B; Malmström, B G; Chan, S I

    1981-09-01

    The reactions of nitric oxide (NO) with the oxidized and reduced forms of fungal and tree laccase, as well as with tree laccase depleted in type 2 copper, are reported. The products of the reactions were determined by NMR and mass spectroscopy, whereas the oxidation states of the enzymes were monitored by EPR and optical spectroscopy. All three copper sites in fungal laccase are reduced by NO. In addition, NO forms a specific complex with the reduced type 2 copper. NO similarly reduces all of the copper sites in tree laccase, but it also oxidizes the reduced sites produced by ascorbate or NO reduction. A catalytic cycle is set up in which N2O, NO2-, and various forms of the enzyme are produced. On freezing of fully reduced tree laccase in the presence of NO, the type 1 copper becomes reoxidized. This reaction does not occur with the enzyme depleted in type 2 copper, suggesting that it involves intramolecular electron transfer from the type 1 copper to NO bound to the type 2 copper. When the half-oxidized tree laccase is formed in the presence of NO, a population of molecules exists which exhibits a type 3 EPR signal. A triplet EPR signal is also seen in the same preparation and is attributed to a population of the enzyme molecules in which NO is bound to the reduced copper of a half-oxidized type 3 copper site.

  7. Uncoupled cardiac nitric oxide synthase mediates diastolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Gad A; Fan, Tai-Hwang M; Liu, Hong; Jiao, Zhe; Xiao, Hong D; Lovelock, Joshua D; Boulden, Beth M; Widder, Julian; Fredd, Scott; Bernstein, Kenneth E; Wolska, Beata M; Dikalov, Sergey; Harrison, David G; Dudley, Samuel C

    2010-02-02

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is 1 consequence of hypertension and is caused by impaired cardiac diastolic relaxation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a known modulator of cardiac relaxation. Hypertension can lead to a reduction in vascular NO, in part because NO synthase (NOS) becomes uncoupled when oxidative depletion of its cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) occurs. Similar events may occur in the heart that lead to uncoupled NOS and diastolic dysfunction. In a hypertensive mouse model, diastolic dysfunction was accompanied by cardiac oxidation, a reduction in cardiac BH(4), and uncoupled NOS. Compared with sham-operated animals, male mice with unilateral nephrectomy, with subcutaneous implantation of a controlled-release deoxycorticosterone acetate pellet, and given 1% saline to drink were mildly hypertensive and had diastolic dysfunction in the absence of systolic dysfunction or cardiac hypertrophy. The hypertensive mouse hearts showed increased oxidized biopterins, NOS-dependent superoxide production, reduced NO production, and dephosphorylated phospholamban. Feeding hypertensive mice BH(4) (5 mg/d), but not treating with hydralazine or tetrahydroneopterin, improved cardiac BH(4) stores, phosphorylated phospholamban levels, and diastolic dysfunction. Isolated cardiomyocyte experiments revealed impaired relaxation that was normalized with short-term BH(4) treatment. Targeted cardiac overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme also resulted in cardiac oxidation, NOS uncoupling, and diastolic dysfunction in the absence of hypertension. Cardiac oxidation, independently of vascular changes, can lead to uncoupled cardiac NOS and diastolic dysfunction. BH(4) may represent a possible treatment for diastolic dysfunction.

  8. Role of Nitric Oxide in the Regulation of Renin and Vasopressin Secretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Ian A.

    1994-01-01

    Research during recent years has established nitric oxide as a unique signaling molecule that plays important roles in the regulation of the cardiovascular, nervous, immune, and other systems. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the control of the secretion of hormones by the pancreas, hypothalamus, and anterior pituitary gland, and evidence is accumulating that it contributes to the regulation of the secretion of renin and vasopressin, hormones that play key roles in the control of sodium and water balance. Several lines of evidence have implicated nitric oxide in the control of renin secretion. The enzyme nitric oxide synthase is present in vascular and tubular elements of the kidney, particularly in cells of the macula densa, a structure that plays an important role in the control of renin secretion. Guanylyl cyclase, a major target for nitric oxide, is also present in the kidney. Drugs that inhibit nitric oxide synthesis generally suppress renin release in vivo and in vitro, suggesting a stimulatory role for the L-arginine/nitric oxide pathway in the control of renin secretion. Under some conditions, however, blockade of nitric oxide synthesis increases renin secretion. Recent studies indicate that nitric oxide not only contributes to the regulation of basal renin secretion, but also participates in the renin secretory responses to activation of the renal baroreceptor, macula densa, and beta adrenoceptor mechanisms that regulate renin secretion. Histochemical and immunocytochemical studies have revealed the presence of nitric oxide synthase in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus and in the posterior pituitary gland. Colocalization of nitric oxide synthase and vasopressin has been demonstrated in some hypothalamic neurons. Nitric oxide synthase activity in the hypothalamus and pituitary is increased by maneuvers known to stimulate vasopressin secretion, including salt loading and dehydration, Administration of L-arginine and nitric

  9. Nasal nitric oxide is dependent on sinus obstruction in allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Suojalehto, Hille; Vehmas, Tapio; Lindström, Irmeli; Kennedy, David W; Kilpeläinen, Maritta; Plosila, Tuomas; Savukoski, Sauli; Sipilä, Jukka; Varpula, Matti; Wolff, Henrik; Alenius, Harri; Toskala, Elina

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between nasal nitric oxide and nasal symptoms, sinus opacification, and markers of allergic inflammation in allergic and in nonallergic rhinitis while taking into account the effect of sinus obstruction. We studied 175 young adult subjects divided into three groups: 1) allergic rhinitis, 2) nonallergic rhinitis, and 3) controls. We measured nasal nitric oxide using the breath-holding method and exhaled nitric oxide and scored semiquantitatively nasal computed tomography scans for opacification and obstruction. We also assessed the visual analogue scores of nasal symptoms, eosinophil count, and interleukin-13 mRNA levels in nasal biopsies. The level of nasal nitric oxide correlated with exhaled nitric oxide (r = 0.377, P < .001). In allergic rhinitis, nasal nitric oxide was elevated when compared to the controls, and an inverse correlation existed between the nasal nitric oxide level and sinus ostial obstruction (r = -0.272, P = .013). In nonallergic rhinitis, the level of nasal nitric oxide was similar to that of the controls. In allergic rhinitis, nasal nitric oxide correlated positively with the opacification score (r = 0.250, P = .033) and the nasal eosinophil count (r = 0.293, P = .030) of patients without a marked sinus ostial obstruction. Sinus ostial obstruction lowers the level of nasal nitric oxide and reduces its value as an indicator of allergic mucosal inflammation. A high nasal nitric oxide level may be a useful marker of eosinophilic inflammation in the nasal cavity and indicate the absence of marked sinus ostial obstruction. 3b. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Nitric oxide is necessary for visual learning in Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J D; Bonaventura, J; Kohm, A; Hiscat, M

    1996-12-22

    We recently reported that inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in Octopus vulgaris by intramuscular injections of an analog of L-arginine, N-omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), blocked touch learning in Octopus vulgaris. The inactive enantiomorph (D-NAME), which had no effect on learning, was used for control. We now report that essentially the same procedures block visual learning in this animal. We used a visual paradigm in which the octopus was trained to respond positively to a smooth black plastic ball 2.5 cm diameter and negatively to a similar white ball, or vice versa. One set of eight animals was trained to the black ball positive, and another set of six to the white ball positive. Each set was trained at different times by two different trainers. We found that a 1 h pretreatment with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME blocks visual learning in Octopus vulgaris in both sets of animals.

  11. Antioxidant and nitric oxide inhibition activities of Thai medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Makchuchit, Sunita; Itharat, Arunporn; Tewtrakul, Supinya

    2010-12-01

    Nineteen Thai medicinal plants used in Thai traditional medicine preparation to treat colds, asthma and fever were studied for their antioxidant and NO inhibitory activities. Three extracts were obtained from each plant. First extract obtained by macerating the plant part in 95% ethanol (Et) residue was boiled in water, where water extract (EW) was obtained. The third extract (HW) was obtained by boiling each plant in water similar to that of Thai traditional medicine practice. These extracts were tested for their antioxidant activity using DPPH assay, and anti-inflammatory activity by determination of inhibitory activity on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW 264.7 cell lines using Griess reagent. Results indicated that Et, EW and HW of Syzygium aromaticum showed the highest antioxidant activity (EC50 = 6.56, 4.73 and 5.30 microg/ml, respectively). Et of Atractylodes lancea exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW 264.7 cells, with IC50 value of 9.70 microg/ml, followed by Et of Angelica sinensis and Cuminum cyminum (IC50 = 12.52 and 13.56 microg/ml, respectively) but water extract (EW, HW) of all plants were apparently inactive. These results of anti-inflammatory activity of these plants correspond with the traditional use for fever; cold, allergic-related diseases and inflammatory-related diseases.

  12. Effects of nitric oxide on stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuchen; Lee, Yugyung; Lee, Chi H

    2015-12-01

    The use of stem cells as a research tool and a therapeutic vehicle has demonstrated their great potential in the treatment of various diseases. With unveiling of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) universally present at various levels in nearly all types of body tissues, the potential therapeutic implication of nitric oxide (NO) has been magnified, and thus scientists have explored new treatment strategies involved with stem cells and NO against various diseases. As the functionality of NO encompasses cardiovascular, neuronal and immune systems, NO is involved in stem cell differentiation, epigenetic regulation and immune suppression. Stem cells trigger cellular responses to external signals on the basis of both NO specific pathways and concerted action with endogenous compounds including stem cell regulators. As potency and interaction of NO with stem cells generally depend on the concentrations of NO and the presence of the cofactors at the active site, the suitable carriers for NO delivery is integral for exerting maximal efficacy of stem cells. The innovative utilization of NO functionality and involved mechani