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Sample records for acute oxygen sensing

  1. Redox signaling in acute oxygen sensing.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia; López-Barneo, José

    2017-08-01

    Acute oxygen (O2) sensing is essential for individuals to survive under hypoxic conditions. The carotid body (CB) is the main peripheral chemoreceptor, which contains excitable and O2-sensitive glomus cells with O2-regulated ion channels. Upon exposure to acute hypoxia, inhibition of K(+) channels is the signal that triggers cell depolarization, transmitter release and activation of sensory fibers that stimulate the brainstem respiratory center to produce hyperventilation. The molecular mechanisms underlying O2 sensing by glomus cells have, however, remained elusive. Here we discuss recent data demonstrating that ablation of mitochondrial Ndufs2 gene selectively abolishes sensitivity of glomus cells to hypoxia, maintaining responsiveness to hypercapnia or hypoglycemia. These data suggest that reactive oxygen species and NADH generated in mitochondrial complex I during hypoxia are signaling molecules that modulate membrane K(+) channels. We propose that the structural substrates for acute O2 sensing in CB glomus cells are "O2-sensing microdomains" formed by mitochondria and neighboring K(+) channels in the plasma membrane. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Ceramide Mediates Acute Oxygen Sensing in Vascular Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Laura; Moral-Sanz, Javier; Morales-Cano, Daniel; Barreira, Bianca; Moreno, Enrique; Ferrarini, Alessia; Pandolfi, Rachele; Ruperez, Francisco J.; Cortijo, Julio; Sanchez-Luna, Manuel; Villamor, Eduardo; Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: A variety of vessels, such as resistance pulmonary arteries (PA) and fetoplacental arteries and the ductus arteriosus (DA) are specialized in sensing and responding to changes in oxygen tension. Despite opposite stimuli, normoxic DA contraction and hypoxic fetoplacental and PA vasoconstriction share some mechanistic features. Activation of neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) and subsequent ceramide production has been involved in hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). Herein we aimed to study the possible role of nSMase-derived ceramide as a common factor in the acute oxygen-sensing function of specialized vascular tissues. Results: The nSMase inhibitor GW4869 and an anticeramide antibody reduced the hypoxic vasoconstriction in chicken PA and chorioallantoic arteries (CA) and the normoxic contraction of chicken DA. Incubation with interference RNA targeted to SMPD3 also inhibited HPV. Moreover, ceramide and reactive oxygen species production were increased by hypoxia in PA and by normoxia in DA. Either bacterial sphingomyelinase or ceramide mimicked the contractile responses of hypoxia in PA and CA and those of normoxia in the DA. Furthermore, ceramide inhibited voltage-gated potassium currents present in smooth muscle cells from PA and DA. Finally, the role of nSMase in acute oxygen sensing was also observed in human PA and DA. Innovation: These data provide evidence for the proposal that nSMase-derived ceramide is a critical player in acute oxygen-sensing in specialized vascular tissues. Conclusion: Our results indicate that an increase in ceramide generation is involved in the vasoconstrictor responses induced by two opposite stimuli, such as hypoxia (in PA and CA) and normoxia (in DA). Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1–14. PMID:23725018

  3. Acute oxygen sensing by the carotid body: from mitochondria to plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Chang, Andy J

    2017-08-17

    Maintaining oxygen homeostasis is crucial to the survival of animals. Mammals respond acutely to changes in blood oxygen levels by modulating cardiopulmonary function. The major sensor of blood oxygen that regulates breathing is the carotid body (CB), a small chemosensory organ located at the carotid bifurcation. When arterial blood oxygen levels drop in hypoxia, neuroendocrine cells in the CB called glomus cells are activated to signal to afferent nerves that project to the brainstem. The mechanism by which hypoxia stimulates CB sensory activity has been the subject of many studies over the last 90 years. Two discrete models emerged that argue for the seat of oxygen sensing to lie either in the plasma membrane or mitochondria of CB cells. Recent studies are bridging the gap between these models by identifying hypoxic signals generated by changes in mitochondrial function in the CB that can be sensed by plasma membrane proteins on glomus cells. The CB is important for physiological adaptation to hypoxia, and its dysfunction contributes to sympathetic hyperactivity in common conditions such as sleep-disordering breathing, chronic heart failure, and insulin resistance. Understanding the basic mechanism of oxygen sensing in the CB could allow us to develop strategies to target this organ for therapy. In this short review, I will describe two historical models of CB oxygen sensing and new findings that are integrating these models. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  4. Mitochondrial Complex IV Subunit 4 Isoform 2 Is Essential for Acute Pulmonary Oxygen Sensing.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Natascha; Hüttemann, Maik; Pak, Oleg; Scheibe, Susan; Knoepp, Fenja; Sinkler, Christopher; Malczyk, Monika; Gierhardt, Mareike; Esfandiary, Azadeh; Kraut, Simone; Jonas, Felix; Veith, Christine; Aras, Siddhesh; Sydykov, Akylbek; Alebrahimdehkordi, Nasim; Giehl, Klaudia; Hecker, Matthias; Brandes, Ralf P; Seeger, Werner; Grimminger, Friedrich; Ghofrani, Hossein A; Schermuly, Ralph T; Grossman, Lawrence I; Weissmann, Norbert

    2017-08-04

    Acute pulmonary oxygen sensing is essential to avoid life-threatening hypoxemia via hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) which matches perfusion to ventilation. Hypoxia-induced mitochondrial superoxide release has been suggested as a critical step in the signaling pathway underlying HPV. However, the identity of the primary oxygen sensor and the mechanism of superoxide release in acute hypoxia, as well as its relevance for chronic pulmonary oxygen sensing, remain unresolved. To investigate the role of the pulmonary-specific isoform 2 of subunit 4 of the mitochondrial complex IV (Cox4i2) and the subsequent mediators superoxide and hydrogen peroxide for pulmonary oxygen sensing and signaling. Isolated ventilated and perfused lungs from Cox4i2(-/-) mice lacked acute HPV. In parallel, pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from Cox4i2(-/-) mice showed no hypoxia-induced increase of intracellular calcium. Hypoxia-induced superoxide release which was detected by electron spin resonance spectroscopy in wild-type PASMCs was absent in Cox4i2(-/-) PASMCs and was dependent on cysteine residues of Cox4i2. HPV could be inhibited by mitochondrial superoxide inhibitors proving the functional relevance of superoxide release for HPV. Mitochondrial hyperpolarization, which can promote mitochondrial superoxide release, was detected during acute hypoxia in wild-type but not Cox4i2(-/-) PASMCs. Downstream signaling determined by patch-clamp measurements showed decreased hypoxia-induced cellular membrane depolarization in Cox4i2(-/-) PASMCs compared with wild-type PASMCs, which could be normalized by the application of hydrogen peroxide. In contrast, chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular remodeling were not or only slightly affected by Cox4i2 deficiency, respectively. Cox4i2 is essential for acute but not chronic pulmonary oxygen sensing by triggering mitochondrial hyperpolarization and release of mitochondrial superoxide which, after

  5. Oxygen Sensing and Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Semenza, Gregg L.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of carotid bodies as sensory receptors for detecting arterial blood oxygen levels, and the identification and elucidation of the roles of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) in oxygen homeostasis have propelled the field of oxygen biology. This review highlights the gas-messenger signaling mechanisms associated with oxygen sensing, as well as transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms underlying the maintenance of oxygen homeostasis by HIFs and their relevance to physiology and pathology. PMID:26328879

  6. Oxygen sensing and signaling.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Joost T; Licausi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is an indispensable substrate for many biochemical reactions in plants, including energy metabolism (respiration). Despite its importance, plants lack an active transport mechanism to distribute oxygen to all cells. Therefore, steep oxygen gradients occur within most plant tissues, which can be exacerbated by environmental perturbations that further reduce oxygen availability. Plants possess various responses to cope with spatial and temporal variations in oxygen availability, many of which involve metabolic adaptations to deal with energy crises induced by low oxygen. Responses are induced gradually when oxygen concentrations decrease and are rapidly reversed upon reoxygenation. A direct effect of the oxygen level can be observed in the stability, and thus activity, of various transcription factors that control the expression of hypoxia-induced genes. Additional signaling pathways are activated by the impact of oxygen deficiency on mitochondrial and chloroplast functioning. Here, we describe the molecular components of the oxygen-sensing pathway.

  7. Mitochondrial cytochrome redox states and respiration in acute pulmonary oxygen sensing.

    PubMed

    Sommer, N; Pak, O; Schörner, S; Derfuss, T; Krug, A; Gnaiger, E; Ghofrani, H A; Schermuly, R T; Huckstorf, C; Seeger, W; Grimminger, F; Weissmann, N

    2010-11-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an essential mechanism to optimise lung gas exchange. We aimed to decipher the proposed oxygen sensing mechanism of mitochondria in HPV. Cytochrome redox state was assessed by remission spectrophotometry in intact lungs and isolated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC). Mitochondrial respiration was quantified by high-resolution respirometry. Alterations were compared with HPV and hypoxia-induced functional and molecular readouts on the cellular level. Aortic and renal arterial smooth muscle cells (ASMC and RASMC, respectively) served as controls. The hypoxia-induced decrease of mitochondrial respiration paralleled HPV in isolated lungs. In PASMC, reduction of respiration and mitochondrial cytochrome c and aa3 (complex IV), but not of cytochrome b (complex III) matched an increase in matrix superoxide levels as well as mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarisation with subsequent cytosolic calcium increase. In contrast to PASMC, RASMC displayed a lower decrease in respiration and no rise in superoxide, membrane potential or intracellular calcium. Pharmacological inhibition of mitochondria revealed analogous kinetics of cytochrome redox state and strength of HPV. Our data suggest inhibition of complex IV as an essential step in mitochondrial oxygen sensing of HPV. Concomitantly, increased superoxide release from complex III and mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarisation may initiate the cytosolic calcium increase underlying HPV.

  8. Oxygen sensing using microrobots.

    PubMed

    Ergeneman, Olgac; Chatzipirpiridis, George; Gelderblom, Femke B; Pokki, Juho; Pané, Salvador; Marín Suárez Del Toro, Marta; Fernández Sánchez, Jorge F; Sotiriou, Georgios A; Nelson, B J

    2010-01-01

    We present a luminescence oxygen sensor incorporated in a wireless intraocular microrobot for minimally-invasive diagnosis. This microrobot can be accurately controlled in the intraocular cavity by applying magnetic fields. The microrobot consists of a magnetic body susceptible to magnetic fields and a sensor coating. This coating embodies Pt(II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP) dyes as the luminescence material and polystyrene as a supporting matrix, and it can be wirelessly excited and read out by optical means. The sensor works based on quenching of luminescence in the presence of oxygen. The excitation and emission spectrum, response time, and oxygen sensitivity of the sensor were characterized using a spectrometer. A custom device was designed and built to use this sensor for intraocular measurements with the microrobot. Due to the intrinsic nature of luminescence lifetimes, a frequency-domain lifetime measurement approach was employed. An alternative sensor implementation using poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) (PS-MA) and PtOEP was successfully demonstrated with nanospheres to increase sensor performance.

  9. L-type calcium channel: Clarifying the "oxygen sensing hypothesis".

    PubMed

    Cserne Szappanos, Henrietta; Viola, Helena; Hool, Livia C

    2017-03-18

    The heart is able to respond acutely to changes in oxygen tension. Since ion channels can respond rapidly to stimuli, the "ion channel oxygen sensing hypothesis" has been proposed to explain acute adaptation of cells to changes in oxygen demand. However the exact mechanism for oxygen sensing continues to be debated. Mitochondria consume the lion's share of oxygen in the heart, fuelling the production of ATP that drives excitation and contraction. Mitochondria also produce reactive oxygen species that are capable of altering the redox state of proteins. The cardiac L-type calcium channel is responsible for maintaining excitation and contraction. Recently, the reactive cysteine on the cardiac L-type calcium channel was identified. These data clarified that the channel does not respond directly to changes in oxygen tension, but rather responds to cellular redox state. This leads to acute alterations in cell signalling responsible for the development of arrhythmias and pathology.

  10. Oxygen and carbon dioxide sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, Fan (Inventor); Pearton, Stephen John (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) capable of performing as a CO.sub.2 or O.sub.2 sensor is disclosed, hi one implementation, a polymer solar cell can be connected to the HEMT for use in an infrared detection system. In a second implementation, a selective recognition layer can be provided on a gate region of the HEMT. For carbon dioxide sensing, the selective recognition layer can be, in one example, PEI/starch. For oxygen sensing, the selective recognition layer can be, in one example, indium zinc oxide (IZO). In one application, the HEMTs can be used for the detection of carbon dioxide and oxygen in exhaled breath or blood.

  11. Nanoscale upconversion for oxygen sensing.

    PubMed

    Presley, Kayla; Hwang, Jinwoo; Cheong, Soshan; Tilley, Richard; Collins, Josh; Viapiano, Mariano; Lannutti, John

    2017-01-01

    Optical oxygen sensors have many promising qualities but rely on excitation by violet or blue wavelengths that suffer from high levels of scattering and absorption in biological tissues. Here we demonstrate an alternative method using 980nm near-infrared light to initially stimulate ceramic upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) contained within a novel form, electrospun core-shell fibers. The emission of the UCNPs excites a molecular optical oxygen sensor, the subsequent phosphorescent emission being dynamically quenched by the presence of molecular oxygen. The potential for use of such an energy transfer within electrospun fibers widely used in biological applications is promising. However, current knowledge of such 'handshake' interactions is limited. Fiber-based carriers enabling such optical conversions provide unique opportunities for biosensing as they recapitulate the topography of the extracellular matrix. This creates a wide array of potential theranostic, fiber-based applications in disease diagnosis/imaging, drug delivery and monitoring of therapeutic response. Using a fiber-based vehicle, we observed gaseous oxygen sensing capabilities and a linear Stern-Volmer response allowing highly accurate calibration. Configurational aspects were also studied to determine how to maximize the efficiency of this 'handshake' interaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A miniature inexpensive, oxygen sensing element

    SciTech Connect

    Arenz, R.W.

    1991-10-07

    An exhaustive study was conducted to determine the feasibility of Nernst-type oxygen sensors based on ceramics containing Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The basic sensor design consisted of a ceramic sensing module sealed into a metal tube. The module accommodated an internal heater and thermocouple. Thermal-expansion-matched metals, adhesives, and seals were researched and developed, consistent with sequential firings during sensor assembly. Significant effort was devoted to heater design/testing and to materials' compatibility with Pt electrodes. A systematic approach was taken to develop all sensor components which led to several design modifications. Prototype sensors were constructed and exhaustively tested. It is concluded that development of Nerst-type oxygen sensors based on Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} will require much further effort and application of specialized technologies. However, during the course of this 3-year program much progress was reported in the literature on amperometric-type oxygen sensors, and a minor effort was devoted here to this type of sensor based on Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}. These studies were made on Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based ceramic samples in a multilayer-capacitor-type geometry and amperometric-type oxygen sensing was demonstrated at very low temperatures ({approximately} 160{degree}C). A central advantage here is that these types of sensors can be mass-produced very inexpensively ({approximately} 20--50 cents per unit). Research is needed, however, to develop an optimum diffusion-limiting barrier coating. In summary, the original goals of this program were not achieved due to unforeseen problems with Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based Nernst sensors. However, a miniature amperometric sensor base on Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} was demonstrated in this program, and it is now seen that this latter sensor is far superior to the originally proposed Nernst sensor. 6 refs., 24 figs.

  13. Evolution and physiology of neural oxygen sensing

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Kauê M.; Accorsi-Mendonça, Daniela; Moraes, Davi J. A.; Machado, Benedito H.

    2014-01-01

    Major evolutionary trends in animal physiology have been heavily influenced by atmospheric O2 levels. Amongst other important factors, the increase in atmospheric O2 which occurred in the Pre-Cambrian and the development of aerobic respiration beckoned the evolution of animal organ systems that were dedicated to the absorption and transportation of O2, e.g., the respiratory and cardiovascular systems of vertebrates. Global variations of O2 levels in post-Cambrian periods have also been correlated with evolutionary changes in animal physiology, especially cardiorespiratory function. Oxygen transportation systems are, in our view, ultimately controlled by the brain related mechanisms, which senses changes in O2 availability and regulates autonomic and respiratory responses that ensure the survival of the organism in the face of hypoxic challenges. In vertebrates, the major sensorial system for oxygen sensing and responding to hypoxia is the peripheral chemoreflex neuronal pathways, which includes the oxygen chemosensitive glomus cells and several brainstem regions involved in the autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system and respiratory control. In this review we discuss the concept that regulating O2 homeostasis was one of the primordial roles of the nervous system. We also review the physiology of the peripheral chemoreflex, focusing on the integrative repercussions of chemoreflex activation and the evolutionary importance of this system, which is essential for the survival of complex organisms such as vertebrates. The contribution of hypoxia and peripheral chemoreflex for the development of diseases associated to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems is also discussed in an evolutionary context. PMID:25161625

  14. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for acute acoustic trauma.

    PubMed

    Pilgramm, M; Schumann, K

    1985-01-01

    We conducted a study on the effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on 122 soldiers following acute acoustic trauma. The patients included in this study, after the effect of spontaneous recovery had largely been excluded, were randomly allocated to four treatment groups. The results of our studies show that hyperbaric oxygen therapy shortens the course of healing with respect to high-pitch perception dysacusis. The results of treatment after an observation period of 6 weeks is also more favorable when patients are treated with oxygen when compared to patients given infusions or vasoactive substances. Similarly, the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy also reduces the frequency of relapse following discharge from hospital. In contrast, the vasoactive substance chosen in our studies (betahistine) failed to have a favorable effect on the course of healing. Our study has also shown that no method can compare with hyperbaric therapy in eliminating tinnitus following acoustic trauma.

  15. Photoluminescent determination of oxygen using metalloporphyrin-polymer sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Kyung; Okura, Ichiro

    1998-01-01

    Optical sensors for continuous monitoring of oxygen were presented. Oxygen sensing method was based on photoluminescence quenching of platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP) by oxygen. Oxygen sensing films were fabricated by incorporating PtOEP, a strong room-temperature photoluminescent dye, into polymer matrices and their sensing performances such as dynamic response characteristics and sensitivities were studied. The response time of the optical sensors strongly depends on the type of the polymer matrices and was between 10 and 100 s. The linearity of sensor response was largely improved using modified Stern-Volmer plots. The sensing films proved to be good operational stability, and no significant bleaching was observed in over 1 year in the absence of light. From the results of the preliminary test, these sensing systems were also anticipated as oxygen sensing materials applicable to aerodynamic environments.

  16. Oxygen Therapy in Suspected Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Robin; James, Stefan K; Jernberg, Tomas; Lindahl, Bertil; Erlinge, David; Witt, Nils; Arefalk, Gabriel; Frick, Mats; Alfredsson, Joakim; Nilsson, Lennart; Ravn-Fischer, Annica; Omerovic, Elmir; Kellerth, Thomas; Sparv, David; Ekelund, Ulf; Linder, Rickard; Ekström, Mattias; Lauermann, Jörg; Haaga, Urban; Pernow, John; Östlund, Ollie; Herlitz, Johan; Svensson, Leif

    2017-08-28

    Background The clinical effect of routine oxygen therapy in patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction who do not have hypoxemia at baseline is uncertain. Methods In this registry-based randomized clinical trial, we used nationwide Swedish registries for patient enrollment and data collection. Patients with suspected myocardial infarction and an oxygen saturation of 90% or higher were randomly assigned to receive either supplemental oxygen (6 liters per minute for 6 to 12 hours, delivered through an open face mask) or ambient air. Results A total of 6629 patients were enrolled. The median duration of oxygen therapy was 11.6 hours, and the median oxygen saturation at the end of the treatment period was 99% among patients assigned to oxygen and 97% among patients assigned to ambient air. Hypoxemia developed in 62 patients (1.9%) in the oxygen group, as compared with 254 patients (7.7%) in the ambient-air group. The median of the highest troponin level during hospitalization was 946.5 ng per liter in the oxygen group and 983.0 ng per liter in the ambient-air group. The primary end point of death from any cause within 1 year after randomization occurred in 5.0% of patients (166 of 3311) assigned to oxygen and in 5.1% of patients (168 of 3318) assigned to ambient air (hazard ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79 to 1.21; P=0.80). Rehospitalization with myocardial infarction within 1 year occurred in 126 patients (3.8%) assigned to oxygen and in 111 patients (3.3%) assigned to ambient air (hazard ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.88 to 1.46; P=0.33). The results were consistent across all predefined subgroups. Conclusions Routine use of supplemental oxygen in patients with suspected myocardial infarction who did not have hypoxemia was not found to reduce 1-year all-cause mortality. (Funded by the Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation and others; DETO2X-AMI ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01787110 .).

  17. Intracellular and in vivo oxygen sensing using phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Seiji; Yoshihara, Toshitada

    2016-08-01

    Molecular oxygen plays an indispensable role as a terminal electron acceptor in the electron transport chain in mitochondria. Acute or chronic oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) in organisms results in various diseases, and the elucidation of the pathogenic mechanism of hypoxia-related diseases and various cellular responses to hypoxia is an urgent issue. Optical oxygen imaging methods using phosphorescent probes have opened up techniques for noninvasive imaging of the intracellular and tissue oxygen status, and oxygen-sensitive probes play a key role in the development of this approach. We expect that phosphorescent Ir(III) complexes can serve as new oxygen-sensing probes for intracellular and intravascular oxygen imaging in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Oxygen therapy for acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Juan B; Burls, Amanda; Emparanza, José I; Bayliss, Susan E; Quinn, Tom

    2016-12-19

    Oxygen (O2) is widely used in people with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Previous systematic reviews concluded that there was insufficient evidence to know whether oxygen reduced, increased or had no effect on heart ischaemia or infarct size. Our first Cochrane review in 2010 also concluded there was insufficient evidence to know whether oxygen should be used. Since 2010, the lack of evidence to support this widely used intervention has attracted considerable attention, prompting further trials of oxygen therapy in myocardial infarction patients. It is thus important to update this Cochrane review. To assess the effects of routine use of inhaled oxygen for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We searched the following bibliographic databases on 6 June 2015: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (OVID), Embase (OVID), CINAHL (EBSCO) and Web of Science (Thomson Reuters). LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature) was last searched in September 2016. We also contacted experts to identify eligible studies. We applied no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials in people with suspected or proven AMI (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or non-STEMI) within 24 hours after onset, in which the intervention was inhaled oxygen (at normal pressure) compared to air, regardless of co-therapies provided to participants in both arms of the trial. Two authors independently reviewed the titles and abstracts of identified studies to see if they met the inclusion criteria and independently undertook the data extraction. We assessed the quality of studies and the risk of bias according to guidance in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. The primary outcome was death. The measure of effect used was the risk ratio (RR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI). We used the GRADE approach to evaluate the quality of the evidence and the GRADE profiler (GRADEpro) to

  19. Spatially monitoring oxygen level in 3D microfabricated cell culture systems using optical oxygen sensing beads.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Acosta, Miguel A; Leach, Jennie B; Carrier, Rebecca L

    2013-04-21

    Capability of measuring and monitoring local oxygen concentration at the single cell level (tens of microns scale) is often desirable but difficult to achieve in cell culture. In this study, biocompatible oxygen sensing beads were prepared and tested for their potential for real-time monitoring and mapping of local oxygen concentration in 3D micro-patterned cell culture systems. Each oxygen sensing bead is composed of a silica core loaded with both an oxygen sensitive Ru(Ph2phen3)Cl2 dye and oxygen insensitive Nile blue reference dye, and a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) shell rendering biocompatibility. Human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were cultivated on a series of PDMS and type I collagen based substrates patterned with micro-well arrays for 3 or 7 days, and then brought into contact with oxygen sensing beads. Using an image analysis algorithm to convert florescence intensity of beads to partial oxygen pressure in the culture system, tens of microns-size oxygen sensing beads enabled the spatial measurement of local oxygen concentration in the microfabricated system. Results generally indicated lower oxygen level inside wells than on top of wells, and local oxygen level dependence on structural features of cell culture surfaces. Interestingly, chemical composition of cell culture substrates also appeared to affect oxygen level, with type-I collagen based cell culture systems having lower oxygen concentration compared to PDMS based cell culture systems. In general, results suggest that oxygen sensing beads can be utilized to achieve real-time and local monitoring of micro-environment oxygen level in 3D microfabricated cell culture systems.

  20. Rapid response oxygen-sensing nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ruipeng; Behera, Prajna; Viapiano, Mariano S.; Lannutti, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular oxygen has profound effects on cell and tissue viability. Relevant sensor forms that can rapidly determine dissolved oxygen levels under biologically relevant conditions provide critical metabolic information. Using 0.5 μm diameter electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) fiber containing an oxygen-sensitive probe, tris (4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) dichloride, we observed a response time of 0.9±0.12 seconds – 4–10 times faster than previous reports – while the t95 for the corresponding film was more than two orders of magnitude greater. Interestingly, the response and recovery times of slightly larger diameter PCL fibers were 1.79±0.23 s and 2.29±0.13 s, respectively, while the recovery time was not statistically different likely due to the more limited interactions of nitrogen with the polymer matrix. A more than 10-fold increase in PCL fiber diameter reduces oxygen sensitivity while having minor effects on response time; conversely, decreases in fiber diameter to less than 0.5 μm would likely decrease response times even further. In addition, a 50°C heat treatment of the electrospun fiber resulted in both increased Stern-Volmer slope and linearity likely due to secondary recrystallization that further homogenized the probe microenvironment. At exposure times up to 3600 s in length, photobleaching was observed but was largely eliminated by the use of either polyethersulfone (PES) or a PES-PCL core-shell composition. However, this resulted in 2- and 3-fold slower response times. Finally, even the non-core shell compositions containing the Ru oxygen probe result in no apparent cytotoxicity in representative glioblastoma cell populations. PMID:23706233

  1. In vitro oxygen sensing using intraocular microrobots.

    PubMed

    Ergeneman, Olgaç; Chatzipirpiridis, George; Pokki, Juho; Marín-Suárez, Marta; Sotiriou, Georgios A; Medina-Rodríguez, Santiago; Sánchez, Jorge F Fernández; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J

    2012-11-01

    We present a luminescence oxygen sensor integrated with a wireless intraocular microrobot for minimally-invasive diagnosis. This microrobot can be accurately controlled in the intraocular cavity by applying magnetic fields. The microrobot consists of a magnetic body susceptible to magnetic fields and a sensor coating. This coating embodies Pt(II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP) dyes as the luminescence material and polystyrene as a supporting matrix, and it can be wirelessly excited and read out by optical means. The sensor works based on quenching of luminescence in the presence of oxygen. The excitation and emission spectrum, response time, and oxygen sensitivity of the sensor were characterized using a spectrometer. A custom device was designed and built to use this sensor for intraocular measurements with the microrobot. Due to the intrinsic nature of luminescence lifetimes, a frequency-domain lifetime measurement approach was used. An alternative sensor design with increased performance was demonstrated by using poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) (PS-MA) and PtOEP nanospheres.

  2. Nano-Enriched and Autonomous Sensing Framework for Dissolved Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Shehata, Nader; Azab, Mohammed; Kandas, Ishac; Meehan, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a nano-enhanced wireless sensing framework for dissolved oxygen (DO). The system integrates a nanosensor that employs cerium oxide (ceria) nanoparticles to monitor the concentration of DO in aqueous media via optical fluorescence quenching. We propose a comprehensive sensing framework with the nanosensor equipped with a digital interface where the sensor output is digitized and dispatched wirelessly to a trustworthy data collection and analysis framework for consolidation and information extraction. The proposed system collects and processes the sensor readings to provide clear indications about the current or the anticipated dissolved oxygen levels in the aqueous media. PMID:26287211

  3. Gold Corroles as Near-IR Phosphors for Oxygen Sensing.

    PubMed

    Lemon, Christopher M; Powers, David C; Brothers, Penelope J; Nocera, Daniel G

    2017-09-05

    The triplet state of gold(III) corroles is exploited for optical oxygen sensing. We report intense phosphorescence for gold(III) corroles in the near-IR, an optical window that is ideal for tissue transparency. Moreover, the triplet excited-state emission exhibits significant changes in intensity and lifetime over the 0-160 Torr O2 pressure range. This renders these compounds sensitive at biologically relevant pressures and overcomes the spectral limitations of palladium and platinum porphyrins for oxygen sensing in biology.

  4. Nano-Enriched and Autonomous Sensing Framework for Dissolved Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Nader; Azab, Mohammed; Kandas, Ishac; Meehan, Kathleen

    2015-08-14

    This paper investigates a nano-enhanced wireless sensing framework for dissolved oxygen (DO). The system integrates a nanosensor that employs cerium oxide (ceria) nanoparticles to monitor the concentration of DO in aqueous media via optical fluorescence quenching. We propose a comprehensive sensing framework with the nanosensor equipped with a digital interface where the sensor output is digitized and dispatched wirelessly to a trustworthy data collection and analysis framework for consolidation and information extraction. The proposed system collects and processes the sensor readings to provide clear indications about the current or the anticipated dissolved oxygen levels in the aqueous media.

  5. Oxygen sensing drives predictable migrations in a microbial community.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Bland J; Esteban, Genoveva F

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen sensing is widely practised by aerobic organisms ranging from bacteria to vertebrates, and a dominant oxygen-sensing mechanism may persist among all aerobes. We traced population migrations of 10 species of the larger aerobic ciliated protozoa living in lake sediment, and in the 15 m water column of Esthwaite Water in the English Lake District (UK). In so doing, we discovered that the character and dynamics of the lake sediment and water column were remarkably predictable in performance over a continuous period of almost 2 years. Increasing warming of the lake sediment, coupled with low oxygen tension, resulted in the emergence of aerobic ciliates out of the sediment and their migration into the water column. And with the annual collapse of thermal stratification in the water column, the whole annual cycle was repeated. In an unusual discovery, we found that particular ciliate species seemed to be 'linked' to other (functionally different) ciliate species partners via the ambient oxygen tension. The favoured hypothesis is that all ciliate species in a particular body-size range seek out a particular, preferred oxygen tension. If that is the case, the 'cement' providing the cohesion of the ciliate community might actually be the preferred oxygen tension. The principal aim of our study is to clarify the microbial migration itself, not the response of the different ciliate species to oxygen gradients once they have established themselves in the water column. The latter happens once the organisms have migrated out of the sediment together, driven by the ambient oxygen tension.

  6. Hydrogen sulfide and oxygen sensing in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Olson, Kenneth R; Whitfield, Nathan L

    2010-05-15

    Vertebrate cardiorespiratory homeostasis is inextricably dependent upon specialized cells that provide feedback on oxygen status in the tissues, blood, and on occasion, environment. These "oxygen sensing" cells include chemoreceptors and oxygen-sensitive chromaffin cells that initiate cardiorespiratory reflexes, vascular smooth muscle cells that adjust perfusion to metabolism or ventilation, and other cells that condition themselves in response to episodic hypoxia. Identification of how these cells sense oxygen and transduce this into the appropriate physiological response has enormous clinical applicability, but despite intense research there is no consensus regarding the initial hypoxia-effector coupling mechanism. This review examines an alternative mechanism of oxygen sensing using oxidation of endogenously produced hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) as the O(2)-sensitive couple. Support for this hypothesis includes the similarity of effects of hypoxia and H(2)S on a variety of tissues, augmentation of hypoxic responses by precursors of H(2)S production and their inhibition by inhibitors of H(2)S synthesis, and the rapid consumption of H(2)S by O(2) in the range of intracellular/mitochondrial Po(2). These studies also indicate that, under normoxic conditions, it is doubtful that free H(2)S has longer than a transient existence in tissue or extracellular fluid.

  7. Oxygen sensing characteristics of individual ZnO nanowire transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q.H.; Liang, Y.X.; Wan, Q.; Wang, T.H.

    2004-12-27

    Individual ZnO nanowire transistors are fabricated, and their sensing properties are investigated. The transistors show a carrier density of 2300 {mu}m{sup -1} and mobility up to 6.4 cm{sup 2}/V s, which are obtained from the I{sub SD}-V{sub G} curves. The threshold voltage shifts in the positive direction and the source-drain current decreases as ambient oxygen concentration increases. However, the opposite occurs when the transistors are under illumination. Surface adsorbates on the ZnO nanowires affect both the mobility and the carrier density. Our data are helpful in understanding the sensing mechanism of the gas sensors.

  8. Quality assessment of packaged foods by optical oxygen sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papkovsky, Dmitri B.; O'Mahony, Fiach C.; Kerry, Joe P.; Ogurtsov, Vladimir I.

    2005-11-01

    A phase-fluorometric oxygen sensor system has been developed, which allows non-destructive measurement of residual oxygen levels in sealed containers such as packaged foods. It operates with disposable solid-state sensors incorporated in each pack, and a portable detector which interrogates with the sensors through a (semi)transparent packaging material. The system has been optimized for packaging applications and validated in small and medium scale trials with different types of food, including MAP hams, cheese, convenience foods, smoked fish, bakery. It has demonstrated high efficiency in monitoring package integrity, oxygen profiles in packs, performance of packaging process and many other research and quality control tasks, allowing control of 100% of packs. The low-cost batch-calibrated sensors have demonstrated reliability, safety, stability including direct contact with food, high efficiency in the low oxygen range. Another system, which also employs the fluorescence-based oxygen sensing approach, provides rapid assessment of microbial contamination (total viable counts) in complex samples such as food homogenates, industrial waste, environmental samples, etc. It uses soluble oxygen-sensitive probes, standard microtitter plates and fluorescence measurements on conventional plate reader to monitor growth of aerobic bacteria in small test samples (e.g. food homogenates) via their oxygen respiration. The assay provides high sample through put, miniaturization, speed, and can serve as alternative to the established methods such as agar plate colony counts and turbidimetry.

  9. Vitamin C is dispensable for oxygen sensing in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nytko, Katarzyna J.; Maeda, Nobuyo; Schläfli, Philipp; Spielmann, Patrick; Wenger, Roland H.

    2011-01-01

    Prolyl-4-hydroxylation is necessary for proper structural assembly of collagens and oxygen-dependent protein stability of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). In vitro function of HIF prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD) enzymes requires oxygen and 2-oxoglutarate as cosubstrates with iron(II) and vitamin C serving as cofactors. Although vitamin C deficiency is known to cause the collagen-disassembly disease scurvy, it is unclear whether cellular oxygen sensing is similarly affected. Here, we report that vitamin C–deprived Gulo−/− knockout mice show normal HIF-dependent gene expression. The systemic response of Gulo−/− animals to inspiratory hypoxia, as measured by plasma erythropoietin levels, was similar to that of animals supplemented with vitamin C. Hypoxic HIF induction was also essentially normal under serum- and vitamin C–free cell-culture conditions, suggesting that vitamin C is not required for oxygen sensing in vivo. Glutathione was found to fully substitute for vitamin C requirement of all 3 PHD isoforms in vitro. Consistently, glutathione also reduced HIF-1α protein levels, transactivation activity, and endogenous target gene expression in cells exposed to CoCl2. A Cys201Ser mutation in PHD2 increased basal hydroxylation rates and conferred resistance to oxidative damage in vitro, suggesting that this surface-accessible PHD2 cysteine residue is a target of antioxidative protection by vitamin C and glutathione. PMID:21346252

  10. [Oxygen therapy in acute and chronic conditions: Indications, oxygen systems, assessement and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Luna Paredes, M C; Asensio de la Cruz, Oscar; Cortell Aznar, Isidoro; Martínez Carrasco, M C; Barrio Gómez de Agüero, M I; Pérez Ruiz, E; Pérez Frías, J

    2009-08-01

    Oxygen therapy has become a major tool for infants with acute and chronic respiratory failure. Appropriate goals when prescribing supplemental oxygen are reduction and prevention of hypoxemia, prevention and treatment of pulmonary hypertension and decrease in respiratory and cardiac overload. This is commonplace in the acute setting and is also becoming widespread in chronic pathologies. However, there is a lack of consensus on many fundamental issues, such as appropriate indications, desirable targets and outcome measures amongst centres, reflecting a variety of clinical practices. The Techniques Group of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Pneumology undertook to design recommendations for a rational approach to oxygen therapy, reviewing the existing literature in order to establish its indications, benefits and potential risks as well as its cost-effectivenes. General aspects of oxygen treatment are reviewed including physiological mechanisms, indications, delivery systems and assessment methods. Management of patients on home oxygen therapy is also addressed with discussion of benefits and potential risks of supplemental oxygen use.

  11. High flow nasal oxygen in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Ricard, J-D

    2012-07-01

    Use of high flow nasal cannula oxygen (HFNC) is increasingly popular in adult ICUs for patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. This is the result of the successful long-term use of HFNC in the neonatal field and recent clinical data in adults indicating beneficial effects of HFNC over conventional facemask oxygen therapy. HFNC rapidly alleviates symptoms of respiratory distress and improves oxygenation by several mechanisms, including deadspace washout, reduction in oxygen dilution and in inspiratory nasopharyngeal resistance, a moderate positive airway pressure effect that may generate alveolar recruitment and an overall greater tolerance and comfort with the interface and the heated and humidified inspired gases. Indications of HFNC are broad, encompassing most if not all causes of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. HFNC can also provide oxygen during invasive procedures, and be used to prevent or treat post-extubation respiratory failure. HFNC may also alleviate respiratory distress in patients at a palliative stage. Although observational studies suggest that HFNC might reduce the need for intubation in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure; such a reduction has not yet been demonstrated. Beyond this potential additional effect on outcome, the evidence already published argues in favor of the large use of HFNC as first line therapy for acute respiratory failure.

  12. Renal parenchymal oxygenation and hypoxia adaptation in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Christian; Rosen, Seymour; Heyman, Samuel N

    2006-10-01

    The pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI), formally termed acute tubular necrosis, is complex and, phenotypically, may range from functional dysregulation without overt morphological features to literal tubular destruction. Hypoxia results from imbalanced oxygen supply and consumption. Increasing evidence supports the view that regional renal hypoxia occurs in AKI irrespective of the underlying condition, even under circumstances basically believed to reflect 'direct' tubulotoxicity. However, at present, it is remains unclear whether hypoxia per se or, rather, re-oxygenation (possibly through reactive oxygen species) causes AKI. Data regarding renal hypoxia in the clinical situation of AKI are lacking and our current concepts regarding renal oxygenation during acute renal failure are presumptive and largely derived from experimental studies. There is robust experimental evidence that AKI is often associated with altered intrarenal microcirculation and oxygenation. Furthermore, renal parenchymal oxygen deprivation seems to participate in the pathogenesis of experimental AKI, induced by exogenous nephrotoxins (such as contrast media, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or amphotericin), sepsis, pigment and obstructive nephropathies. Sub-lethal cellular hypoxia engenders adaptational responses through hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF). Forthcoming technologies to modulate the HIF system form a novel potential therapeutic approach for AKI.

  13. Interaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Oxygen Sensing under Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bo; Teng, Huajian; Zhang, Li; Li, Hong; Li, Jing; Wang, Lina; Li, Hongzhu

    2015-01-01

    Based on the discovery of endogenous H2S production, many in depth studies show this gasotransmitter with a variety of physiological and pathological functions. Three enzymes, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MST), are involved in enzymatic production of H2S. Emerging evidence has elucidated an important protective role of H2S in hypoxic conditions in many mammalian systems. However, the mechanisms by which H2S senses and responses to hypoxia are largely elusive. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) function as key regulators of oxygen sensing, activating target genes expression under hypoxia. Recent studies have shown that exogenous H2S regulates HIF action in different patterns. The activation of carotid bodies is a sensitive and prompt response to hypoxia, rapidly enhancing general O2 supply. H2S has been identified as an excitatory mediator of hypoxic sensing in the carotid bodies. This paper presents a brief review of the roles of these two pathways which contribute to hypoxic sensing of H2S. PMID:26078818

  14. Oxygen Sensing by Arterial Chemoreceptors Depends on Mitochondrial Complex I Signaling.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Agüera, M Carmen; Gao, Lin; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; Pintado, C Oscar; Arias-Mayenco, Ignacio; García-Flores, Paula; García-Pergañeda, Antonio; Pascual, Alberto; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia; López-Barneo, José

    2015-11-03

    O2 sensing is essential for mammalian homeostasis. Peripheral chemoreceptors such as the carotid body (CB) contain cells with O2-sensitive K(+) channels, which are inhibited by hypoxia to trigger fast adaptive cardiorespiratory reflexes. How variations of O2 tension (PO2) are detected and the mechanisms whereby these changes are conveyed to membrane ion channels have remained elusive. We have studied acute O2 sensing in conditional knockout mice lacking mitochondrial complex I (MCI) genes. We inactivated Ndufs2, which encodes a protein that participates in ubiquinone binding. Ndufs2-null mice lose the hyperventilatory response to hypoxia, although they respond to hypercapnia. Ndufs2-deficient CB cells have normal functions and ATP content but are insensitive to changes in PO2. Our data suggest that chemoreceptor cells have a specialized succinate-dependent metabolism that induces an MCI state during hypoxia, characterized by the production of reactive oxygen species and accumulation of reduced pyridine nucleotides, which signal neighboring K(+) channels.

  15. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Dangers, Laurence; Bréchot, Nicholas; Schmidt, Matthieu; Lebreton, Guillaume; Hékimian, Guillaume; Nieszkowska, Ania; Besset, Sébastien; Trouillet, Jean-Louis; Chastre, Jean; Leprince, Pascal; Combes, Alain; Luyt, Charles-Edouard

    2017-08-01

    Long-term outcomes of patients treated with venoarterial-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for acute decompensated heart failure (i.e., cardiogenic shock complicating chronic cardiomyopathy) have not yet been reported. This study was undertaken to describe their outcomes and determine mortality-associated factors. Retrospective analysis of data prospectively collected. Twenty-six-bed tertiary hospital ICU. One hundred five patients implanted with venoarterial-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for acute decompensated heart failure. None. From March 2007 to January 2015, 105 patients were implanted with venoarterial-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for acute decompensated heart failure in our ICU (67% of them had an intraaortic balloon pump to unload the left ventricle). Their 1-year survival rate was 42%; most of the survivors were transplanted either directly or after switching to central bilateral centrifugal pump, ventricular-assist device, or total artificial heart. Most deaths occurred early after multiple organ failure. Multivariable analyses retained (odds ratio [95% CI]) pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score of more than 11 (3.3 [1.3-8.3]), idiopathic cardiomyopathy (0.4 [0.2-1]), cardiac disease duration greater than 2 years pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (2.8 [1.2-6.9]), and pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation blood lactate greater than 4 mmol/L (2.6 [1.03-6.4]) as independent predictors of 1-year mortality. Only 17% of patients with pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores of 14 or more survived, whereas 52% of those with scores less than 7 and 60% of those with scores 7 or more and less than 11 were alive 1 year later. Among this selected cohort of 105 patients implanted with venoarterial-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for acute decompensated heart failure, 1-year survival was 42%, but better for patients with pre-extracorporeal membrane

  16. Normobaric oxygen treatment in acute ischemic stroke: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shu-hai; Qi, Zhi-feng; Luo, Yu-min; Ji, Xun-ming; Liu, Ke Jian

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a common and serious neurological disease. Oxygen therapy has been shown to increase oxygen supply to ischemic tissues and improve outcomes after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. Normobaric hyperoxia (NBO), an easily applicable and non-invasive method, shows protective effects on acute ischemic stroke animals and patients in pilot studies. However, many critical scientific questions are still unclear, such as the therapeutic time window of NBO, the long-term effects and the benefits of NBO in large clinic trials. In this article, we review the current literatures on NBO treatment of acute ischemic stroke in preclinical and clinical studies and try to analyze and identify the key gaps or unknowns in our understanding about NBO. Based on these analyses, we provide suggestions for future studies. PMID:27867482

  17. Regulation of cellular gas exchange, oxygen sensing, and metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Clanton, T L; Hogan, M C; Gladden, L B

    2013-07-01

    Cells must continuously monitor and couple their metabolic requirements for ATP utilization with their ability to take up O2 for mitochondrial respiration. When O2 uptake and delivery move out of homeostasis, cells have elaborate and diverse sensing and response systems to compensate. In this review, we explore the biophysics of O2 and gas diffusion in the cell, how intracellular O2 is regulated, how intracellular O2 levels are sensed and how sensing systems impact mitochondrial respiration and shifts in metabolic pathways. Particular attention is paid to how O2 affects the redox state of the cell, as well as the NO, H2S, and CO concentrations. We also explore how these agents can affect various aspects of gas exchange and activate acute signaling pathways that promote survival. Two kinds of challenges to gas exchange are also discussed in detail: when insufficient O2 is available for respiration (hypoxia) and when metabolic requirements test the limits of gas exchange (exercising skeletal muscle). This review also focuses on responses to acute hypoxia in the context of the original "unifying theory of hypoxia tolerance" as expressed by Hochachka and colleagues. It includes discourse on the regulation of mitochondrial electron transport, metabolic suppression, shifts in metabolic pathways, and recruitment of cell survival pathways preventing collapse of membrane potential and nuclear apoptosis. Regarding exercise, the issues discussed relate to the O2 sensitivity of metabolic rate, O2 kinetics in exercise, and influences of available O2 on glycolysis and lactate production. © 2013 American Physiological Society.

  18. Oxygen sensing coordinates photomorphogenesis to facilitate seedling survival.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Mohamad; Berckhan, Sophie; Rooney, Daniel J; Gibbs, Daniel J; Vicente Conde, Jorge; Sousa Correia, Cristina; Bassel, George W; Marín-de la Rosa, Nora; León, José; Alabadí, David; Blázquez, Miguel A; Holdsworth, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Successful emergence from the soil is essential for plant establishment in natural and farmed systems. It has been assumed that the absence of light in the soil is the preeminent signal perceived during early seedling development, leading to a distinct morphogenic plan (skotomorphogenesis) [1], characterized by traits providing an adaptive advantage until emergence and photomorphogenesis. These traits include suppressed chlorophyll synthesis, promotion of hypocotyl elongation, and formation of a closed apical hook that protects the stem cell niche from damage [2, 3]. However, absence of light by itself is not a sufficient environmental signal for early seedling development [4, 5]. Reduced oxygen levels (hypoxia) can occur in water-logged soils [6-8]. We therefore hypothesized that below-ground hypoxia may be an important, but thus far undiscovered, ecological component regulating seedling development. Here, we show that survival and establishment of seedlings following darkness depend on their ability to sense hypoxia, through enhanced stability of group VII Ethylene Response Factor (ERFVII) transcription factors. Hypoxia is perceived as a positive environmental component in diverse taxa of flowering plants, promoting maintenance of skotomorphogenic traits. Hypoxia greatly enhances survival once light is perceived, while oxygen is necessary for the subsequent effective completion of photomorphogenesis. Together with light perception, oxygen sensing therefore allows an integrated response to the complex and changing physical microenvironment encountered during early seedling growth. We propose that plants monitor the soil's gaseous environment after germination, using hypoxia as a key external cue to protect the stem cell niche, thus ensuring successful rapid establishment upon emergence above ground. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Oxygen Sensing Coordinates Photomorphogenesis to Facilitate Seedling Survival

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Mohamad; Berckhan, Sophie; Rooney, Daniel J.; Gibbs, Daniel J.; Vicente Conde, Jorge; Sousa Correia, Cristina; Bassel, George W.; Marín-de la Rosa, Nora; León, José; Alabadí, David; Blázquez, Miguel A.; Holdsworth, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Successful emergence from the soil is essential for plant establishment in natural and farmed systems. It has been assumed that the absence of light in the soil is the preeminent signal perceived during early seedling development, leading to a distinct morphogenic plan (skotomorphogenesis) [1], characterized by traits providing an adaptive advantage until emergence and photomorphogenesis. These traits include suppressed chlorophyll synthesis, promotion of hypocotyl elongation, and formation of a closed apical hook that protects the stem cell niche from damage [2, 3]. However, absence of light by itself is not a sufficient environmental signal for early seedling development [4, 5]. Reduced oxygen levels (hypoxia) can occur in water-logged soils [6–8]. We therefore hypothesized that below-ground hypoxia may be an important, but thus far undiscovered, ecological component regulating seedling development. Here, we show that survival and establishment of seedlings following darkness depend on their ability to sense hypoxia, through enhanced stability of group VII Ethylene Response Factor (ERFVII) transcription factors. Hypoxia is perceived as a positive environmental component in diverse taxa of flowering plants, promoting maintenance of skotomorphogenic traits. Hypoxia greatly enhances survival once light is perceived, while oxygen is necessary for the subsequent effective completion of photomorphogenesis. Together with light perception, oxygen sensing therefore allows an integrated response to the complex and changing physical microenvironment encountered during early seedling growth. We propose that plants monitor the soil’s gaseous environment after germination, using hypoxia as a key external cue to protect the stem cell niche, thus ensuring successful rapid establishment upon emergence above ground. PMID:25981794

  20. Acute pulmonary edema secondary to hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    PubMed Central

    Obiagwu, Chukwudi; Paul, Vishesh; Chadha, Sameer; Hollander, Gerald; Shani, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of diabetic ulcers, air embolism, carbon monoxide poisoning and gas gangrene with minimal adverse effects. Very few cases of HBOT causing acute pulmonary edema (PE) has been described; with a study on dogs suggesting that a complication of this therapy could be PE. We describe the case of an 80-year-old man with a history of stable systolic heart failure and diabetes mellitus presenting with acute PE following treatment with HBOT for diabetic foot. PMID:25988073

  1. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in adults for severe acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Rozé, H; Repusseau, B; Ouattara, A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine the indications of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This technique of oxygenation has significantly increased worldwide with the H1N1 flu pandemic. The goal of ECMO is to maintain a safe level of oxygenation and controlled respiratory acidosis under protective ventilation. The enthusiasm for ECMO should not obscure the consideration for potential associated complications. Before widespread diffusion of ECMO, new trials should test the efficacy of early initiation or CO2 removal in addition to, or even as an alternative to mechanical ventilation for severe ARDS. Copyright © 2014 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxygen-Sensing Paint-On Bandage: Calibration of a Novel Approach in Tissue Perfusion Assessment.

    PubMed

    Koolen, Pieter G L; Li, Zongxi; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Paul, Marek A; Ibrahim, Ahmed M S; Matyal, Robina; Huang, Thomas; Evans, Conor L; Lin, Samuel J

    2017-07-01

    Knowledge of tissue oxygenation status is fundamental in the prevention of postoperative flap failure. Recently, the authors introduced a novel oxygen-sensing paint-on bandage that incorporated an oxygen-sensing porphyrin with a commercially available liquid bandage matrix. In this study, the authors extend validation of their oxygen-sensing bandage by comparing it to the use of near-infrared tissue oximetry in addition to Clark electrode measurements. The oxygen-sensing paint-on bandage was applied to the left hind limb in a rodent model. Simultaneously, a near-infrared imaging device and Clark electrode were attached to the right and left hind limbs, respectively. Tissue oxygenation was measured under normal, ischemic (aortic ligation), and reperfused conditions. On average, the oxygen-sensing paint-on bandage measured a decrease in transdermal oxygenation from 85.2 mmHg to 64.1 mmHg upon aortic ligation. The oxygen-sensing dye restored at 81.2 mmHg after unclamping. Responses in both control groups demonstrated a similar trend. Physiologic changes from normal to ischemic and reperfused conditions were statistically significantly different in all three techniques (p < 0.001). The authors' newly developed oxygen-sensing paint-on bandage exhibits a comparable trend in oxygenation recordings in a rat model similar to conventional oxygenation assessment techniques. This technique could potentially prove to be a valuable tool in the routine clinical management of flaps following free tissue transfer. Incorporating oxygen-sensing capabilities into a simple wound dressing material has the added benefit of providing both wound protection and constant wound oxygenation assessment.

  3. Gene expression analyses reveal metabolic specifications in acute O2 -sensing chemoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin; Bonilla-Henao, Victoria; García-Flores, Paula; Arias-Mayenco, Ignacio; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia; López-Barneo, José

    2017-09-15

    Glomus cells in the carotid body (CB) and chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla (AM) are essential for reflex cardiorespiratory adaptation to hypoxia. However, the mechanisms whereby these cells detect changes in O2 tension are poorly understood. The metabolic properties of acute O2 -sensing cells have been investigated by comparing the transcriptomes of CB and AM cells, which are O2 -sensitive, with superior cervical ganglion neurons, which are practically O2 -insensitive. In O2 -sensitive cells, we found a characteristic prolyl hydroxylase 3 down-regulation and hypoxia inducible factor 2α up-regulation, as well as overexpression of genes coding for three atypical mitochondrial electron transport subunits and pyruvate carboxylase, an enzyme that replenishes tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. In agreement with this observation, the inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase impairs CB acute O2 sensing. The responsiveness of peripheral chemoreceptor cells to acute hypoxia depends on a 'signature metabolic profile'. Acute O2 sensing is a fundamental property of cells in the peripheral chemoreceptors, e.g. glomus cells in the carotid body (CB) and chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla (AM), and is necessary for adaptation to hypoxia. These cells contain O2 -sensitive ion channels, which mediate membrane depolarization and transmitter release upon exposure to hypoxia. However, the mechanisms underlying the detection of changes in O2 tension by cells are still poorly understood. Recently, we suggested that CB glomus cells have specific metabolic features that favour the accumulation of reduced quinone and the production of mitochondrial NADH and reactive oxygen species during hypoxia. These signals alter membrane ion channel activity. To investigate the metabolic profile characteristic of acute O2 -sensing cells, we used adult mice to compare the transcriptomes of three cell types derived from common sympathoadrenal progenitors, but exhibiting variable

  4. Oxygen-sensing by arterial chemoreceptors: Mechanisms and medical translation.

    PubMed

    López-Barneo, José; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; Fernández-Agüera, M Carmen; Macías, David; Pardal, Ricardo; Gao, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Acute O2 sensing is necessary for the activation of cardiorespiratory reflexes (hyperventilation and sympathetic activation), which permit the survival of individuals under hypoxic environments (e.g. high altitude) or medical conditions presenting with reduced capacity for gas exchange between the lung alveoli and the blood. Changes in blood O2 tension are detected by the arterial chemoreceptors, in particular the carotid body (CB), which act in concert with the adrenal medulla (AM) to facilitate rapid adaptations to hypoxia. The field of arterial chemoreception has undergone a considerable expansion in recent years, with many of the fundamental observations made at the molecular and cellular levels serving to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of numerous medical disorders, and even to propose advances in the treatment strategies. In this review, after a short historical preface, we describe the current model of chemosensory transduction based on the modulation of membrane K(+) channels by O2 in specialized chemoreceptor cells. Recent progress in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the modulation of ion channels by O2 tension, which involves mitochondrial complex I, is also discussed. The discovery in the last few years of a specific population of neural crest-derived stem cells in the CB explains the reversible growth of this organ, an intriguing and unusual property of this type of neuronal tissue that contributes to acclimatization under chronic hypoxia. The essential homeostatic role of the CB-AM axis is clearly evident in newly generated mouse models that reach adulthood, albeit with CB and AM atrophy. These animals exhibit a marked intolerance to even mild hypoxia. CB inhibition or over-activation can have important medical consequences. Respiratory depression by general anesthetics or by opioid use is a common clinical condition that frequently causes death in susceptible individuals. An exaggerated sympathetic outflow due to over

  5. Acute oxygen therapy: a review of prescribing and delivery practices

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Joyce L; Wark, Peter AB; McDonald, Vanessa M

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is a commonly used drug in the clinical setting and like other drugs its use must be considered carefully. This is particularly true for those patients who are at risk of type II respiratory failure in whom the risk of hypercapnia is well established. In recent times, several international bodies have advocated for the prescription of oxygen therapy in an attempt to reduce this risk in vulnerable patient groups. Despite this guidance, published data have demonstrated that there has been poor uptake of these recommendations. Multiple interventions have been tested to improve concordance, and while some of these interventions show promise, the sustainability of these interventions are less convincing. In this review, we summarize data that have been published on the prevalence of oxygen prescription and the accurate and appropriate administration of this drug therapy. We also identify strategies that have shown promise in facilitating changes to oxygen prescription and delivery practice. There is a clear need to investigate the barriers, facilitators, and attitudes of clinicians in relation to the prescription of oxygen therapy in acute care. Interventions based on these findings then need to be designed and tested to facilitate the application of evidence-based guidelines to support sustained changes in practice, and ultimately improve patient care. PMID:27307722

  6. Acute oxygen therapy: a review of prescribing and delivery practices.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Joyce L; Wark, Peter A B; McDonald, Vanessa M

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is a commonly used drug in the clinical setting and like other drugs its use must be considered carefully. This is particularly true for those patients who are at risk of type II respiratory failure in whom the risk of hypercapnia is well established. In recent times, several international bodies have advocated for the prescription of oxygen therapy in an attempt to reduce this risk in vulnerable patient groups. Despite this guidance, published data have demonstrated that there has been poor uptake of these recommendations. Multiple interventions have been tested to improve concordance, and while some of these interventions show promise, the sustainability of these interventions are less convincing. In this review, we summarize data that have been published on the prevalence of oxygen prescription and the accurate and appropriate administration of this drug therapy. We also identify strategies that have shown promise in facilitating changes to oxygen prescription and delivery practice. There is a clear need to investigate the barriers, facilitators, and attitudes of clinicians in relation to the prescription of oxygen therapy in acute care. Interventions based on these findings then need to be designed and tested to facilitate the application of evidence-based guidelines to support sustained changes in practice, and ultimately improve patient care.

  7. Guinea Pig Oxygen-Sensing and Carotid Body Functional Properties.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Obeso, Elvira; Docio, Inmaculada; Olea, Elena; Cogolludo, Angel; Obeso, Ana; Rocher, Asuncion; Gomez-Niño, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Mammals have developed different mechanisms to maintain oxygen supply to cells in response to hypoxia. One of those mechanisms, the carotid body (CB) chemoreceptors, is able to detect physiological hypoxia and generate homeostatic reflex responses, mainly ventilatory and cardiovascular. It has been reported that guinea pigs, originally from the Andes, have a reduced ventilatory response to hypoxia compared to other mammals, implying that CB are not completely functional, which has been related to genetically/epigenetically determined poor hypoxia-driven CB reflex. This study was performed to check the guinea pig CB response to hypoxia compared to the well-known rat hypoxic response. These experiments have explored ventilatory parameters breathing different gases mixtures, cardiovascular responses to acute hypoxia, in vitro CB response to hypoxia and other stimuli and isolated guinea pig chemoreceptor cells properties. Our findings show that guinea pigs are hypotensive and have lower arterial pO2 than rats, probably related to a low sympathetic tone and high hemoglobin affinity. Those characteristics could represent a higher tolerance to hypoxic environment than other rodents. We also find that although CB are hypo-functional not showing chronic hypoxia sensitization, a small percentage of isolated carotid body chemoreceptor cells contain tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme and voltage-dependent K(+) currents and therefore can be depolarized. However hypoxia does not modify intracellular Ca(2+) levels or catecholamine secretion. Guinea pigs are able to hyperventilate only in response to intense acute hypoxic stimulus, but hypercapnic response is similar to rats. Whether other brain areas are also activated by hypoxia in guinea pigs remains to be studied.

  8. Guinea Pig Oxygen-Sensing and Carotid Body Functional Properties

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Obeso, Elvira; Docio, Inmaculada; Olea, Elena; Cogolludo, Angel; Obeso, Ana; Rocher, Asuncion; Gomez-Niño, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Mammals have developed different mechanisms to maintain oxygen supply to cells in response to hypoxia. One of those mechanisms, the carotid body (CB) chemoreceptors, is able to detect physiological hypoxia and generate homeostatic reflex responses, mainly ventilatory and cardiovascular. It has been reported that guinea pigs, originally from the Andes, have a reduced ventilatory response to hypoxia compared to other mammals, implying that CB are not completely functional, which has been related to genetically/epigenetically determined poor hypoxia-driven CB reflex. This study was performed to check the guinea pig CB response to hypoxia compared to the well-known rat hypoxic response. These experiments have explored ventilatory parameters breathing different gases mixtures, cardiovascular responses to acute hypoxia, in vitro CB response to hypoxia and other stimuli and isolated guinea pig chemoreceptor cells properties. Our findings show that guinea pigs are hypotensive and have lower arterial pO2 than rats, probably related to a low sympathetic tone and high hemoglobin affinity. Those characteristics could represent a higher tolerance to hypoxic environment than other rodents. We also find that although CB are hypo-functional not showing chronic hypoxia sensitization, a small percentage of isolated carotid body chemoreceptor cells contain tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme and voltage-dependent K+ currents and therefore can be depolarized. However hypoxia does not modify intracellular Ca2+ levels or catecholamine secretion. Guinea pigs are able to hyperventilate only in response to intense acute hypoxic stimulus, but hypercapnic response is similar to rats. Whether other brain areas are also activated by hypoxia in guinea pigs remains to be studied. PMID:28533756

  9. Effects of normobaric versus hyperbaric oxygen on cell injury induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation in acute brain slices

    PubMed Central

    Chazalviel, Laurent; Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Vallée, Nicolas; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Besnard, Stéphane; Abraini, Jacques H.

    2016-01-01

    Normobaric oxygen (NBO) and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) are emerging as a possible co-treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Both have been shown to reduce infarct volume, to improve neurologic outcome, to promote endogenous tissue plasminogen activator-induced thrombolysis and cerebral blood flow, and to improve tissue oxygenation through oxygen diffusion in the ischemic areas, thereby questioning the interest of HBO compared to NBO. In the present study, in order to investigate and compare the oxygen diffusion effects of NBO and HBO on acute ischemic stroke independently of their effects at the vascular level, we used acute brain slices exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation, an ex vivo model of brain ischemia that allows investigating the acute effects of NBO (partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) = 1 atmospheres absolute (ATA) = 0.1 MPa) and HBO (pO2 = 2.5 ATA = 0.25 MPa) through tissue oxygenation on ischemia-induced cell injury as measured by the release of lactate dehydrogenase. We found that HBO, but not NBO, reduced oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced cell injury, indicating that passive tissue oxygenation (i.e. without vascular support) of the brain parenchyma requires oxygen partial pressure higher than 1 ATA. PMID:27867486

  10. Effects of normobaric versus hyperbaric oxygen on cell injury induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation in acute brain slices.

    PubMed

    Chazalviel, Laurent; Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Vallée, Nicolas; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Besnard, Stéphane; Abraini, Jacques H

    2016-01-01

    Normobaric oxygen (NBO) and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) are emerging as a possible co-treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Both have been shown to reduce infarct volume, to improve neurologic outcome, to promote endogenous tissue plasminogen activator-induced thrombolysis and cerebral blood flow, and to improve tissue oxygenation through oxygen diffusion in the ischemic areas, thereby questioning the interest of HBO compared to NBO. In the present study, in order to investigate and compare the oxygen diffusion effects of NBO and HBO on acute ischemic stroke independently of their effects at the vascular level, we used acute brain slices exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation, an ex vivo model of brain ischemia that allows investigating the acute effects of NBO (partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) = 1 atmospheres absolute (ATA) = 0.1 MPa) and HBO (pO2 = 2.5 ATA = 0.25 MPa) through tissue oxygenation on ischemia-induced cell injury as measured by the release of lactate dehydrogenase. We found that HBO, but not NBO, reduced oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced cell injury, indicating that passive tissue oxygenation (i.e. without vascular support) of the brain parenchyma requires oxygen partial pressure higher than 1 ATA.

  11. Oxygen scrubbing and sensing in plant growth chambers using solid oxide electrolyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, K. R.; MacElroy, Robert D.

    1997-01-01

    The maintenance of optimal levels of oxygen in the gaseous environment of a plant growth chamber during light and dark periods is an essential criterion for the correct growth of plants. The use of solid oxide electrolyzers to control the oxygen levels by removing the excess gaseous oxygen during periods of illumination and full-scale photosynthesis is described. A part of the oxygen removed can be stored and supplied back to the plants during dark periods. The excess oxygen can be used by the crew. The electrolizer can be additionally used in its open circuit mode, to sense the oxygen concentrations in the plant chamber. The solid oxide electrolysis process is described.

  12. Oxygen sensing by the carotid body: mechanisms and role in adaptation to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    López-Barneo, José; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; Gao, Lin; Fernández-Agüera, M Carmen; Pardal, Ricardo; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia

    2016-04-15

    Oxygen (O2) is fundamental for cell and whole-body homeostasis. Our understanding of the adaptive processes that take place in response to a lack of O2(hypoxia) has progressed significantly in recent years. The carotid body (CB) is the main arterial chemoreceptor that mediates the acute cardiorespiratory reflexes (hyperventilation and sympathetic activation) triggered by hypoxia. The CB is composed of clusters of cells (glomeruli) in close contact with blood vessels and nerve fibers. Glomus cells, the O2-sensitive elements in the CB, are neuron-like cells that contain O2-sensitive K(+)channels, which are inhibited by hypoxia. This leads to cell depolarization, Ca(2+)entry, and the release of transmitters to activate sensory fibers terminating at the respiratory center. The mechanism whereby O2modulates K(+)channels has remained elusive, although several appealing hypotheses have been postulated. Recent data suggest that mitochondria complex I signaling to membrane K(+)channels plays a fundamental role in acute O2sensing. CB activation during exposure to low Po2is also necessary for acclimatization to chronic hypoxia. CB growth during sustained hypoxia depends on the activation of a resident population of stem cells, which are also activated by transmitters released from the O2-sensitive glomus cells. These advances should foster further studies on the role of CB dysfunction in the pathogenesis of highly prevalent human diseases. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Mechanisms of oxygen sensing: a key to therapy of pulmonary hypertension and patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Weir, E K; Obreztchikova, M; Vargese, A; Cabrera, J A; Peterson, D A; Hong, Z

    2008-01-01

    Specialized tissues that sense acute changes in the local oxygen tension include type 1 cells of the carotid body, neuroepithelial bodies in the lungs, and smooth muscle cells of the resistance pulmonary arteries and the ductus arteriosus (DA). Hypoxia inhibits outward potassium current in carotid body type 1 cells, leading to depolarization and calcium entry through L-type calcium channels. Increased intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca++]i) leads to exocytosis of neurotransmitters, thus stimulating the carotid sinus nerve and respiration. The same K+ channel inhibition occurs with hypoxia in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs), causing contraction and providing part of the mechanism of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). In the SMCs of the DA, the mechanism works in reverse. It is the shift from hypoxia to normoxia that inhibits K+ channels and causes normoxic ductal contraction. In both PA and DA, the contraction is augmented by release of Ca++ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, entry of Ca++ through store-operated channels (SOC) and by Ca++ sensitization. The same three ‘executive' mechanisms are partly responsible for idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). While vasoconstrictor mediators constrict both PA and DA and vasodilators dilate both vessels, only redox changes mimic oxygen by having directly opposite effects on the K+ channels, membrane potential, [Ca++]i and tone in the PA and DA. There are several different hypotheses as to how redox might alter tone, which remain to be resolved. However, understanding the mechanism will facilitate drug development for pulmonary hypertension and patent DA. PMID:18641675

  14. Lifetime-based photoacoustic oxygen sensing in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Lee, Yong-Eun Koo; Wang, Xueding; Kopelman, Raoul

    2012-05-01

    The determination of oxygen levels in blood and other tissues in vivo is critical for ensuring proper body functioning, for monitoring the status of many diseases, such as cancer, and for predicting the efficacy of therapy. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, a lifetime-based photoacoustic technique for the measurement of oxygen in vivo, using an oxygen sensitive dye, enabling real time quantification of blood oxygenation. The results from the main artery in the rat tail indicated that the lifetime of the dye, quantified by the photoacoustic technique, showed a linear relationship with the blood oxygenation levels in the targeted artery.

  15. Tin oxide nanoribbons with vacancy structures in luminescence-sensitive oxygen sensing.

    PubMed

    Chen, H T; Xiong, S J; Wu, X L; Zhu, J; Shen, J C; Chu, Paul K

    2009-05-01

    Vacancy structures in tin oxide nanoribbons fabricated via thermal evaporation and post-processing are probed by luminescence spectroscopy, and interesting properties that bode well for oxygen sensing are observed. Besides a broad 620-nm band, the fabricated tin oxide nanoribbons show a photoluminescence band at 480 nm when the measurement temperature is <100 K. The blue band appears from nanoribbons synthesized under high oxygen pressure or annealed under oxygen. The dependence suggests that the oxygen interstitial and vacancy densities determine the electronic states that produce the blue band. Calculation of the electron structures based on the density functional theory shows that decreased oxygen vacancies or increased oxygen interstitials enhance the 480-nm band but suppress the 620-nm band. The results reported here indicate that the tin oxide nanoribbons with vacancy structures have potential applications in luminescence-sensitive oxygen sensing.

  16. Myocardial and pulmonary effects of aqueous oxygen with acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Corno, Antonio F; Boone, Yves; Mallabiabarrena, Iker; Augstburger, Monique; Tozzi, Piergiorgio; Ferrari, Enrico; von Segesser, Ludwig K

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this paper was to evaluate myocardial and pulmonary effects of aqueous oxygen (AO) delivered directly into the pulmonary circulation in acute hypoxia. Six calves (2 months old, 68.0 +/- 2.2 kg) after general anesthesia, mechanical ventilation, and median sternotomy underwent total right heart bypass using fixed flow with continuous pressure and blood gas measurements in carotid and femoral arteries, left atrium, the coronary sinus and PA. Measurements of systemic and PA pressures and O2 saturations; myocardial O2 atrioventricular (AV) differences; and O2 extraction were made. After base line measurements, hypoxic ventilation reducing the mean arterial PO2 from 277 +/- 102 mm Hg to 47 +/- 4 mm Hg (p < 0.0005) was maintained for 30 minutes. Without changes in the hypoxic ventilation (mean arterial PO2 = 49 +/- 11 mm Hg) 3 ml/min of hyperbaric aqueous oxygen (AO = oxygen diluted in saline solution) was administered into the PA for 30 minutes. Pulmonary blood flow was maintained during the entire experiment (3.7 +/- 0.3 L/min). Hypoxic ventilation significantly raised (p < 0.05) the systolic (30 +/- 7 vs 21 +/- 4 mm Hg), diastolic (20 +/- 6 vs 12 +/- 3 mm Hg), and mean (23 +/- 7 vs 15 +/- 3 mm Hg) PA pressure; PA/systemic pressure ratio for systolic (0.37 +/- 0.08 vs 0.25 +/- 0.06) and mean (0.56 +/- 0.19 vs 0.29 +/- 0.11) pressures; and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) (5.63 +/- 1.06 vs 3.53 +/- 0.75 U). Aqueous oxygen (AO) infusion significantly reduced (p < 0.05) the values obtained with hypoxic ventilation; systolic (23 +/- 5 vs 30 +/- 7 mm Hg), diastolic (11 +/- 4 vs 20 +/- 6 mm Hg), and mean (14 +/- 3 vs 23 +/- 7 mm Hg) PA pressure; PA/systemic pressure ratio for systolic (0.25 +/- 0.05 vs 0.37 +/- 0.08) and mean pressures (0.29 +/- 0.12 vs 0.56 +/- 0.19); and PVR (3.41 +/- 1.01 vs 5.63 +/- 1.06 U). AO infusion in the pulmonary circulation did not influence the myocardial O2 atrioventricular (AV) difference or the O2 extraction. Infusion of

  17. Reactive oxygen species in eradicating acute myeloid leukemic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Fang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) have been proven to drive leukemia initiation, progression and relapse, and are increasingly being used as a critical target for therapeutic intervention. As an essential feature in LSCs, reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis has been extensively exploited in the past decade for targeting LSCs in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Most, if not all, agents that show therapeutic benefits are able to alter redox status by inducing ROS, which confers selectivity in eradicating AML stem cells but sparing normal counterparts. In this review, we provide the comprehensive update of ROS-generating agents in the context of their impacts on our understanding of the pathogenesis of AML and its therapy. We anticipate that further characterizing these ROS agents will help us combat against AML in the coming era of LSC-targeting strategy. PMID:27358859

  18. Renal oxygenation in acute renal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, Amany; Ho, Julie; Ow, Connie P C; Eppel, Gabriela A; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W; Schlaich, Markus P; Evans, Roger G

    2014-05-01

    Tissue hypoxia has been demonstrated, in both the renal cortex and medulla, during the acute phase of reperfusion after ischemia induced by occlusion of the aorta upstream from the kidney. However, there are also recent clinical observations indicating relatively well preserved oxygenation in the nonfunctional transplanted kidney. To test whether severe acute kidney injury can occur in the absence of widespread renal tissue hypoxia, we measured cortical and inner medullary tissue Po2 as well as total renal O2 delivery (Do2) and O2 consumption (Vo2) during the first 2 h of reperfusion after 60 min of occlusion of the renal artery in anesthetized rats. To perform this experiment, we used a new method for measuring kidney Do2 and Vo2 that relies on implantation of fluorescence optodes in the femoral artery and renal vein. We were unable to detect reductions in renal cortical or inner medullary tissue Po2 during reperfusion after ischemia localized to the kidney. This is likely explained by the observation that Vo2 (-57%) was reduced by at least as much as Do2 (-45%), due to a large reduction in glomerular filtration (-94%). However, localized tissue hypoxia, as evidence by pimonidazole adduct immunohistochemistry, was detected in kidneys subjected to ischemia and reperfusion, particularly in, but not exclusive to, the outer medulla. Thus, cellular hypoxia, particularly in the outer medulla, may still be present during reperfusion even when reductions in tissue Po2 are not detected in the cortex or inner medulla.

  19. Multifunctional mesoporous nanocomposites with magnetic, optical, and sensing features: synthesis, characterization, and their oxygen-sensing performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyan; Li, Bin; Zhang, Liming; Song, Hang

    2013-01-29

    In this paper, the fabrication, characterization, and application in oxygen sensing are reported for a novel multifunctional nanomaterial of [Ru(bpy)(2)phen-MMS] (bpy, 2,2'-bipyridyl; phen, phenathrolin) which was simply prepared by covalently grafting the ruthenium(II) polypyridyl compounds into the channels of magnetic mesoporous silica nanocomposites (MMS). Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, N(2) adsorption-desorption, a superconducting quantum interference device, UV-vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectra were used to characterize the samples. The well-designed multifunctional nanocomposites show superparamagnetic behavior and ordered mesoporous characteristics and exhibit a strong red-orange metal-to-ligand charge transfer emission. In addition, the obtained nanocomposites give high performance in oxygen sensing with high sensitivity (I(0)/I(100) = 5.2), good Stern-Volmer characteristics (R(2) = 0.9995), and short response/recovery times (t↓ = 6 s and t↑ = 12 s). The magnetic, mesoporous, luminescent, and oxygen-sensing properties of this multifunctional nanostructure make it hold great promise as a novel multifunctional oxygen-sensing system for chemical/biosensor.

  20. Distributed fiber optical sensing of oxygen with optical time domain reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Eich, Susanne; Schmälzlin, Elmar; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2013-05-31

    In many biological and environmental applications spatially resolved sensing of molecular oxygen is desirable. A powerful tool for distributed measurements is optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR) which is often used in the field of telecommunications. We combine this technique with a novel optical oxygen sensor dye, triangular-[4] phenylene (TP), immobilized in a polymer matrix. The TP luminescence decay time is 86 ns. The short decay time of the sensor dye is suitable to achieve a spatial resolution of some meters. In this paper we present the development and characterization of a reflectometer in the UV range of the electromagnetic spectrum as well as optical oxygen sensing with different fiber arrangements.

  1. Distributed Fiber Optical Sensing of Oxygen with Optical Time Domain Reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Eich, Susanne; Schmälzlin, Elmar; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2013-01-01

    In many biological and environmental applications spatially resolved sensing of molecular oxygen is desirable. A powerful tool for distributed measurements is optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR) which is often used in the field of telecommunications. We combine this technique with a novel optical oxygen sensor dye, triangular-[4] phenylene (TP), immobilized in a polymer matrix. The TP luminescence decay time is 86 ns. The short decay time of the sensor dye is suitable to achieve a spatial resolution of some meters. In this paper we present the development and characterization of a reflectometer in the UV range of the electromagnetic spectrum as well as optical oxygen sensing with different fiber arrangements. PMID:23727953

  2. Regulated oxygen sensing by protein hydroxylation in renal erythropoietin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Roland H; Hoogewijs, David

    2010-06-01

    The kidney is a major site of systemic oxygen sensing, regulating blood erythrocyte and hence oxygen content by hypoxia-inducible erythropoietin (Epo) expression. A constant ratio between blood perfusion and oxygen consumption, a stable corticomedullary oxygen gradient, and a relatively low tissue Po(2) are the prerequisites for the function of renal Epo-producing and oxygen-sensing (REPOS) cells, which are located in the juxtamedullary cortex. In kidney disease, renal oxygen consumption is decreased, leading to an increase in Po(2), dysfunction of REPOS cells, and anemia. The molecular principles of cellular oxygen sensing have been elucidated in the last few years, and genetically altered mouse models as well as hereditary diseases causing erythrocytosis have clarified the oxygen-signaling cascade leading to increased Epo expression in REPOS cells. However, the consequences of a number of recently discovered factors for the regulation of oxygen signaling in REPOS cells are unclear, asking for novel cell culture models which might be hampered by the putative neuron-like nature of this enigmatic cell type.

  3. A Pyrene@Micelle Sensor for Fluorescent Oxygen Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yan-xia; Peng, Hong-shang; Ping, Jian-tao; Wang, Xiao-hui; You, Fang-tian

    2015-01-01

    For most fluorescent oxygen sensors developed today, their fabrication process is either time-consuming or needs specialized knowledge. In this work, a robust fluorescent oxygen sensor is facilely constructed by dissolving pyrene molecules into CTAB aqueous solution. The as-prepared pyrene@micelle sensors have submicron-sized diameter, and the concentration of utilized pyrene can be reduced as low as 0.8 mM but still can exhibit dominant excimer emission. The excimer fluorescence is sensitive to dissolved oxygen in both intensity and lifetime, and the respective Stern-Volmer plot follows a nonlinear behavior justified by a two-site model. Because of the merits of large Stokes shift (~140 nm), easy fabrication, and robustness, the pyrene@micelle sensors are very attractive for practical determination of oxygen. PMID:26539471

  4. A rhenium complex doped in a silica molecular sieve for molecular oxygen sensing: Construction and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaozhou; Li, Yanxiao

    2016-01-01

    This paper reported a diamine ligand and its Re(I) complex for potential application in oxygen sensing. The novelty of this diamine ligand localized at its increased conjugation chain which had a typical electron-withdrawing group of 1,3,4-oxadiazole. Electronic distribution of excited electrons and their lifetime were supposed to be increased, favoring oxygen sensing collision. This hypothesis was confirmed by single crystal analysis, theoretical calculation and photophysical measurement. It was found that this Re(I) complex had a long-lived emission peaking at 545 nm, favoring sensing application. By doping this complex into a silica matrix MCM-41, oxygen sensing performance and mechanism of the resulting composites were discussed in detail. Non-linear Stern-Volmer working curves were observed with maximum sensitivity of 5.54 and short response time of 6 s.

  5. A rhenium complex doped in a silica molecular sieve for molecular oxygen sensing: Construction and characterization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaozhou; Li, Yanxiao

    2016-01-15

    This paper reported a diamine ligand and its Re(I) complex for potential application in oxygen sensing. The novelty of this diamine ligand localized at its increased conjugation chain which had a typical electron-withdrawing group of 1,3,4-oxadiazole. Electronic distribution of excited electrons and their lifetime were supposed to be increased, favoring oxygen sensing collision. This hypothesis was confirmed by single crystal analysis, theoretical calculation and photophysical measurement. It was found that this Re(I) complex had a long-lived emission peaking at 545 nm, favoring sensing application. By doping this complex into a silica matrix MCM-41, oxygen sensing performance and mechanism of the resulting composites were discussed in detail. Non-linear Stern-Volmer working curves were observed with maximum sensitivity of 5.54 and short response time of ~6 s. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Oxygen and life on earth: an anesthesiologist's views on oxygen evolution, discovery, sensing, and utilization.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Sten G E

    2008-07-01

    The advent of oxygenic photosynthesis and the accumulation of oxygen in our atmosphere opened up new possibilities for the development of life on Earth. The availability of oxygen, the most capable electron acceptor on our planet, allowed the development of highly efficient energy production from oxidative phosphorylation, which shaped the evolutionary development of aerobic life forms from the first multicellular organisms to the vertebrates.

  7. Luminescent sensing and imaging of oxygen: Fierce competition to the Clark electrode

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence‐based sensing schemes for oxygen have experienced a fast growth and are in the process of replacing the Clark electrode in many fields. Unlike electrodes, sensing is not limited to point measurements via fiber optic microsensors, but includes additional features such as planar sensing, imaging, and intracellular assays using nanosized sensor particles. In this essay, I review and discuss the essentials of (i) common solid‐state sensor approaches based on the use of luminescent indicator dyes and host polymers; (ii) fiber optic and planar sensing schemes; (iii) nanoparticle‐based intracellular sensing; and (iv) common spectroscopies. Optical sensors are also capable of multiple simultaneous sensing (such as O2 and temperature). Sensors for O2 are produced nowadays in large quantities in industry. Fields of application include sensing of O2 in plant and animal physiology, in clinical chemistry, in marine sciences, in the chemical industry and in process biotechnology. PMID:26113255

  8. Optical methods for sensing and imaging oxygen: materials, spectroscopies and applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-dong; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2014-05-21

    We review the current state of optical methods for sensing oxygen. These have become powerful alternatives to electrochemical detection and in the process of replacing the Clark electrode in many fields. The article (with 694 references) is divided into main sections on direct spectroscopic sensing of oxygen, on absorptiometric and luminescent probes, on polymeric matrices and supports, on additives and related materials, on spectroscopic schemes for read-out and imaging, and on sensing formats (such as waveguide sensing, sensor arrays, multiple sensors and nanosensors). We finally discuss future trends and applications and summarize the properties of the most often used indicator probes and polymers. The ESI† (with 385 references) gives a selection of specific applications of such sensors in medicine, biology, marine and geosciences, intracellular sensing, aerodynamics, industry and biotechnology, among others.

  9. Correlated oxygen-sensing PLIM, cell metabolism FLIM and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rück, A. C.; Kalinina, S.; Schäfer, P.; von Einem, B.; von Arnim, C.

    2017-02-01

    Correlated imaging of phosphorescence and fluorescence lifetime parameters of metabolic markers is a challenge for direct investigating mechanisms related to cell metabolism and oxygen tension. A large variety of clinical phenotypes is associated with mitochondrial defects accomplished with changes in cell metabolism. In many cases the hypoxic microenvironment of cancer cells shifts metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to anaerobic or aerobic glycolysis, a process known as "Warburg" effect. Also during stem cell differentiation a switch in cell metabolism is observed. Mitochondrial dysfunction associated with hypoxia has been invoked in many complex disorders such as type 2 diabetes, Alzheimeŕs disease, cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury, tissue inflammation and cancer. Cellular responses to oxygen tension have been studied extensively, optical imaging techniques based on time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) to detect oxygen concentration and distribution are therefore of prominent interest. Moreover, they offer the possibility by inspecting fluorescence decay characteristics of intrinsic coenzymes to directly image metabolic pathways, whereas oxygen tension can be determined by considering the phosphorescence lifetime of a phosphorescent probe. The combination of both fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of coenzymes like NAD(P)H and FAD and phosphorescence lifetime (PLIM) of phosphorescent dyes could provide valuable information about correlation of metabolic pathways and oxygen tension.

  10. Modulation of perfusion and oxygenation by red blood cell oxygen affinity during acute anemia.

    PubMed

    Cabrales, Pedro; Tsai, Amy G; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2008-03-01

    Responses to exchange transfusion using red blood cells (RBCs) with modified hemoglobin (Hb) oxygen (O(2)) affinity were studied in the hamster window chamber model during acute anemia to determine its role on microvascular perfusion and tissue oxygenation. Allosteric effectors were introduced in the RBCs by electroporation. Inositol hexaphosphate (IHP) and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5HMF) were used to decrease and increase Hb-O(2) affinity. In vitro P50s (partial pressure of O(2) at 50% Hb saturation) were modified to 10, 25, 45, and 50 mm Hg (normal P50 is 32 mm Hg). Allosteric effectors also decreased the Hill coefficient. Anemic condition was induced by isovolemic hemodilution exchanges using 6% dextran 70 kD to 18% hematocrit (Hct). Modified RBCs (at 18% Hct in 5% albumin solution) were infused by exchange transfusion of 35% of blood volume. Systemic parameters, microvascular perfusion, capillary perfusion (functional capillary density, FCD), and microvascular Po(2) levels were measured. RBcs with P50 of 45 mm Hg increased tissue Po(2) and decreased O(2) delivery (Do(2)) and extraction (Vo(2)) and RBCs with P50 of 60 mmHg reduced FCD, microvascular flow, tissue Po(2), Do(2) and Vo(2). Erythrocytes with increased Hb-O(2) affinity maintained hemodynamic conditions, Do(2) and decreased tissue Po(2). This study shows that in an anemic condition, maximal tissue Po(2) does not correspond to maximal Do(2) and Vo(2).

  11. Dissolved oxygen sensing using organometallic dyes deposited within a microfluidic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. L.; Ho, H. P.; Jin, L.; Chu, B. W.-K.; Li, M. J.; Yam, V. W.-W.

    2008-02-01

    This work primarily aims to integrate dissolved oxygen sensing capability with a microfluidic platform containing arrays of micro bio-reactors or bio-activity indicators. The measurement of oxygen concentration is of significance for a variety of bio-related applications such as cell culture and gene expression. Optical oxygen sensors based on luminescence quenching are gaining much interest in light of their low power consumption, quick response and high analyte sensitivity in comparison to similar oxygen sensing devices. In our microfluidic oxygen sensor device, a thin layer of oxygen-sensitive luminescent organometallic dye is covalently bonded to a glass slide. Micro flow channels are formed on the glass slide using patterned PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane). Dissolved oxygen sensing is then performed by directing an optical excitation probe beam to the area of interest within the microfluidic channel. The covalent bonding approach for sensor layer formation offers many distinct advantages over the physical entrapment method including minimizing dye leaching, ensuring good stability and fabrication simplicity. Experimental results confirm the feasibility of the device.

  12. Oxygen reverses deficits of cognitive function and memory and increased heart rate induced by acute severe isovolemic anemia.

    PubMed

    Weiskopf, Richard B; Feiner, John; Hopf, Harriet W; Viele, Maurene K; Watson, Jessica J; Kramer, Joel H; Ho, Rachel; Toy, Pearl

    2002-04-01

    Erythrocytes are transfused to improve oxygen delivery and prevent or treat inadequate oxygenation of tissues. Acute isovolemic anemia subtly slows human data processing and degrades memory, increases heart rate, and decreases self-assessed energy level. Erythrocyte transfusion is efficacious in reversing these effects of acute anemia. We tested the hypothesis that increasing arterial oxygen pressure (Pao2) to 350 mmHg or greater would supply sufficient oxygen to be equivalent to augmenting hemoglobin concentration by 2-3 g/dl and thus reverse the effects of acute anemia. Thirty-one healthy volunteers, aged 28 +/- 4 yr (mean +/- SD), were tested with verbal memory and standard, computerized neuropsychologic tests before and twice after acute isovolemic reduction of their hemoglobin concentration to 5.7 +/- 0.3 g/dl. Two sets of tests were performed in randomized order at the lower hemoglobin concentration: with the volunteer breathing room air or oxygen. The subject and those administering the tests and recording the results were unaware which gas was administered. As an additional control for duration of the experiment, 10 of these volunteers also completed the same tests on a separate day, without alteration of hemoglobin concentration, at times of the day similar to those on the experimental day. Heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, and self-assessed sense of energy were recorded at the time of each test. Reaction time for digit-symbol substitution test increased, delayed memory was degraded, mean arterial pressure and energy level decreased, and heart rate increased at a hemoglobin concentration of 5.7 g/dl (all P < 0.05). Increasing Pao2 to 406 +/- 47 mmHg reversed the digit-symbol substitution test result and the delayed memory changes to values not different from those at the baseline hemoglobin concentration of 12.7 +/- 1.0 g/dl, and decreased heart rate (P < 0.05). However, mean arterial pressure and energy level changes were not altered with

  13. Oxygen-sensing microdialysis probe for in vivo use.

    PubMed

    Osborne, P G; Li, X; Li, Y; Han, H

    2001-01-15

    Electrochemical conditions were optimized to allow the metal tube used for the shaft of commercial microdialysis (MD) probes to be coated with gold. In in vitro tests with phosphate-buffered Ringer's solution using double differential pulse amperometry (DDPA), the gold-coated shafts were capable of specifically measuring the reduction of oxygen and the oxidation of ascorbic acid in the presence of high concentrations of potentially interfering endogenous substances. By using fixed-potential amperometry (FPA), the gold-plated shaft also measured oxygen with minimal interference from high concentrations of potentially interfering endogenous substances. Concentric design MD probes were constructed that used a metal shaft (O.D = 0.4 mm), fused silica inlet and outlet tubes, and a 1.5 mm dialyzing membrane (O.D = 0.2 mm). A 0.5-0.7 mm gold collar was electroplated onto the metal shaft approximately 0.5 mm above the dialyzing membrane. The nongold outer surface of the MD probe was coated with an insulating polymer. In vivo tests demonstrated that DDPA was not suitable for use with this gold microdialyzing electrode (GMDE). However, brain oxygen levels were satisfactorily measured using FPA. In urethane-anesthetized rats, the reduction current to oxygen in the striatum was increased by brief (1 min) inhalation of O2 or CO2 and decreased by inhalation of N2. Transient application of noxious stimuli (foot pinch) increased cerebral O2, whereas bilateral carotid artery occlusion and death decreased striatal O2. The responses of the GMDE were indistinguishable from the reduction current simultaneously measured from a conventional carbon fiber electrode implanted adjacent to the gold-plated area of the MD shaft. Basal levels of striatal O(2) were 20 +/- 5 microM (n = 4) for the GMDE and 30 +/- 11 microM (n = 3) for the carbon fiber. The GMDE was robust and could be used for at least three animals. This technique can be used to provide information about the oxygen status of the

  14. Eliminating the Interference of Oxygen for Sensing Hydrogen Peroxide with the Polyaniline Modified Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yesong; Chen, Chien-Chung

    2008-01-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) has been shown to possess excellent catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction, however, this molecule may interfere with the electrochemical measurement of other targets when using a polyaniline modified platinum (PANI/Pt) electrode. In this study, we have demonstrated the considerable effects of dissolved oxygen on the sensing of hydrogen peroxide with the PANI/Pt electrode. Accordingly, we proposed a strategy to eliminate the influence of dissolved oxygen with oxygen scavengers. Our results indicated that as an oxygen scavenger sodium thiosulfate was very effective in the removal of dissolved oxygen from the sample solution, and had negligible effect on the quantification of hydrogen peroxide when its applied concentration was below 1 mM. PMID:27873985

  15. Spatiotemporal Oxygen Sensing Using Dual Emissive Boron Dye–Polylactide Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenation in tissue scaffolds continues to be a limiting factor in regenerative medicine despite efforts to induce neovascularization or to use oxygen-generating materials. Unfortunately, many established methods to measure oxygen concentration, such as using electrodes, require mechanical disturbance of the tissue structure. To address the need for scaffold-based oxygen concentration monitoring, a single-component, self-referenced oxygen sensor was made into nanofibers. Electrospinning process parameters were tuned to produce a biomaterial scaffold with specific morphological features. The ratio of an oxygen sensitive phosphorescence signal to an oxygen insensitive fluorescence signal was calculated at each image pixel to determine an oxygenation value. A single component boron dye–polymer conjugate was chosen for additional investigation due to improved resistance to degradation in aqueous media compared to a boron dye polymer blend. Standardization curves show that in fully supplemented media, the fibers are responsive to dissolved oxygen concentrations less than 15 ppm. Spatial (millimeters) and temporal (minutes) ratiometric gradients were observed in vitro radiating outward from the center of a dense adherent cell grouping on scaffolds. Sensor activation in ischemia and cell transplant models in vivo show oxygenation decreases on the scale of minutes. The nanofiber construct offers a robust approach to biomaterial scaffold oxygen sensing. PMID:25426706

  16. High performance oxygen sensing nanofibrous membranes of Eu(III) complex/polystyrene prepared by electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingkui, Li

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis, characterization, crystal structure, and photophysical properties of a Eu 3+ complex of Eu(TTA) 3Phen, where TTA = 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate, and Phen = 1,10-phenanthroline. Its elementary application for oxygen-sensing application is also investigated by doping it into a polymer matrix of polystyrene (PS). Experimental data suggest that the 3 wt% doped Eu(TTA) 3Phen nanofibrous membrane exhibits a high sensitivity of 3.4 towards oxygen with a good linear relationship of R2 = 0.996. In addition, the 3 wt% doped Eu(TTA) 3Phen nanofibrous membrane owns a quick response of 9 s towards molecular oxygen, along with its excellent atmosphere insensitivity and photobleaching resistance. All these results suggest that both Eu(TTA) 3Phen and Eu(TTA) 3Phen/PS system are promising candidates for oxygen-sensing optical sensors.

  17. Oxygen Sensing for Industrial Safety — Evolution and New Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The requirement for the detection of oxygen in industrial safety applications has historically been met by electrochemical technologies based on the consumption of metal anodes. Products using this approach have been technically and commercially successful for more than three decades. However, a combination of new requirements is driving the development of alternative approaches offering fresh opportunities and challenges. This paper reviews some key aspects in the evolution of consumable anode products and highlights recent developments in alternative technologies aimed at meeting current and anticipated future needs in this important application. PMID:24681673

  18. Role Of Hif2α Oxygen Sensing Pathway In Bronchial Epithelial Club Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Capelli, Mar; Marsboom, Glenn; Li, Qilong Oscar Yang; Tello, Daniel; Rodriguez, Florinda Melendez; Alonso, Tamara; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco; García-Rio, Francisco; Ancochea, Julio; Aragonés, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen-sensing pathways executed by the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) induce a cellular adaptive program when oxygen supply becomes limited. However, the role of the HIF oxygen-sensing pathway in the airway response to hypoxic stress in adulthood remains poorly understood. Here we found that in vivo exposure to hypoxia led to a profound increase in bronchial epithelial cell proliferation mainly confined to Club (Clara) cells. Interestingly, this response was executed by hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF2α), which controls the expression of FoxM1, a recognized proliferative factor of Club cells. Furthermore, HIF2α induced the expression of the resistin-like molecules α and β (RELMα and β), previously considered bronchial epithelial growth factors. Importantly, despite the central role of HIF2α, this proliferative response was not initiated by in vivo Vhl gene inactivation or pharmacological inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase oxygen sensors, indicating the molecular complexity of this response and the possible participation of other oxygen-sensing pathways. Club cells are principally involved in protection and maintenance of bronchial epithelium. Thus, our findings identify a novel molecular link between HIF2α and Club cell biology that can be regarded as a new HIF2α-dependent mechanism involved in bronchial epithelium adaptation to oxygen fluctuations. PMID:27150457

  19. Re(I) complex doped nanofibers for oxygen optical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, He; Zhu, Long; Wang, Aofang; Lu, Hongwei

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we design and synthesize a novel diamine ligand of PTO (2-(pyridin-2-yl)-5-p-tolyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole). The crystal structure, photophysical character and electronic nature of its corresponding Re(I) complex of Re(CO)3(PTO)Br have been investigated in detail. Experimental data and theoretical calculation suggest that Re(CO)3(PTO)Br owns a long-lived yellow phosphorescence which is sensitive towards molecular oxygen. By doping Re(CO)3(PTO)Br into a polymer matrix of polystyrene (PS), the emission response of the resulted composite nanofibers towards molecular oxygen is studied. The optimal sample with mean diameter of 600 nm shows a maximum sensitivity of 4.14 with short response time of 14 s (here sensitivity is defined as the ratio of emission intensity in pure N2 atmosphere to that in pure O2 atmosphere). The composite nanofibers are also found to be photostable enough to experience UV radiation.

  20. Re(I) complex doped nanofibers for oxygen optical sensing.

    PubMed

    Hong, He; Zhu, Long; Wang, Aofang; Lu, Hongwei

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we design and synthesize a novel diamine ligand of PTO (2-(pyridin-2-yl)-5-p-tolyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole). The crystal structure, photophysical character and electronic nature of its corresponding Re(I) complex of Re(CO)(3)(PTO)Br have been investigated in detail. Experimental data and theoretical calculation suggest that Re(CO)(3)(PTO)Br owns a long-lived yellow phosphorescence which is sensitive towards molecular oxygen. By doping Re(CO)(3)(PTO)Br into a polymer matrix of polystyrene (PS), the emission response of the resulted composite nanofibers towards molecular oxygen is studied. The optimal sample with mean diameter of 600 nm shows a maximum sensitivity of 4.14 with short response time of 14s (here sensitivity is defined as the ratio of emission intensity in pure N(2) atmosphere to that in pure O(2) atmosphere). The composite nanofibers are also found to be photostable enough to experience UV radiation.

  1. Arterial oxygen saturation for prediction of acute mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Roach, R C; Greene, E R; Schoene, R B; Hackett, P H

    1998-12-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a usually self-limiting syndrome encompassing headache, nausea and dizziness. AMS is seen in those that go from low to high altitudes too quickly, without allowing sufficient time to acclimatize. At present, susceptibility to AMS cannot be predicted. One feature of AMS noted in some studies is impaired gas exchange. If impaired gas exchange presages AMS then those individuals with exaggerated hypoxemia at high altitude may be more likely to develop AMS. If true, then monitoring of arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2%) may differentiate AMS-resistant individuals from those with impending AMS. To test this hypothesis, we measured SaO2% and AMS symptom scores in 102 healthy asymptomatic climbers at 4200 m on Denali (Mt. McKinley) prior to their further ascent toward the summit at 6194 m, and on their return from higher altitudes to 4200 m. The results show that exaggerated hypoxemia in asymptomatic climbers prior to further ascent correlates with subsequent AMS (r = -0.48, p < 0.001). Criteria are presented for identification of 80-100% of those climbers who later become ill with AMS. We conclude that resting arterial hypoxemia is related to later development of clinical AMS, and can exclude the occurrence and caution those at risk for development of subsequent AMS. Likely mechanisms are hypoventilation relative to normally acclimatizing individuals and/or abnormalities of gas exchange. Thus, non-invasive oximetry provides a simple, specific indicator of inadequate acclimatization to high altitudes and impending AMS.

  2. Remote sensing of atmospheric oxygen from a sounding rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Cotton, D. M.; Lampton, M.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Link, R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a rocket experiment to investigate mechanisms governing the interactions between two of the fundamental components of the solar-terrestrial system: the solar ionizing radiation and the earth's upper atmosphere. The aim is to characterize the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emissions resulting from these interactions in terms of physical parameters so that EUV remote sensing can be gainfully employed as a quantitative diagnostic of the terrestrial atmosphere and plasma environment. The payload consists of a high-resolution (about 0.5 A) spectrometer to measure the EUV emissions (980-1360 A) of the earth's dayglow, a moderate resolution (about 15 A) EUV spectrometer (250-1450 A) to measure the solar irradiation responsible for the photoelectron production, and a hydrogen Lyman Alpha photometer to monitor the solar irradiance and geocoronal emissions.

  3. Inhomogeneous Oxygen Vacancy Distribution in Semiconductor Gas Sensors: Formation, Migration and Determination on Gas Sensing Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianqiao; Gao, Yinglin; Wu, Xu; Jin, Guohua; Zhai, Zhaoxia; Liu, Huan

    2017-01-01

    The density of oxygen vacancies in semiconductor gas sensors was often assumed to be identical throughout the grain in the numerical discussion of the gas-sensing mechanism of the devices. In contrast, the actual devices had grains with inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen vacancy under non-ideal conditions. This conflict between reality and discussion drove us to study the formation and migration of the oxygen defects in semiconductor grains. A model of the gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy was proposed based on the effects of cooling rate and re-annealing on semiconductive thin films. The model established the diffusion equations of oxygen vacancy according to the defect kinetics of diffusion and exclusion. We described that the steady-state and transient-state oxygen vacancy distributions, which were used to calculate the gas-sensing characteristics of the sensor resistance and response to reducing gases under two different conditions. The gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy model had the applications in simulating the sensor performances, such as the power law, the grain size effect and the effect of depletion layer width. PMID:28796167

  4. Inhomogeneous Oxygen Vacancy Distribution in Semiconductor Gas Sensors: Formation, Migration and Determination on Gas Sensing Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianqiao; Gao, Yinglin; Wu, Xu; Jin, Guohua; Zhai, Zhaoxia; Liu, Huan

    2017-08-10

    The density of oxygen vacancies in semiconductor gas sensors was often assumed to be identical throughout the grain in the numerical discussion of the gas-sensing mechanism of the devices. In contrast, the actual devices had grains with inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen vacancy under non-ideal conditions. This conflict between reality and discussion drove us to study the formation and migration of the oxygen defects in semiconductor grains. A model of the gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy was proposed based on the effects of cooling rate and re-annealing on semiconductive thin films. The model established the diffusion equations of oxygen vacancy according to the defect kinetics of diffusion and exclusion. We described that the steady-state and transient-state oxygen vacancy distributions, which were used to calculate the gas-sensing characteristics of the sensor resistance and response to reducing gases under two different conditions. The gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy model had the applications in simulating the sensor performances, such as the power law, the grain size effect and the effect of depletion layer width.

  5. Synthesis of polystyrene beads loaded with dual luminophors for self-referenced oxygen sensing.

    PubMed

    Im, Sang Hyuk; Khalil, Gamal E; Callis, James; Ahn, Byung Hyun; Gouterman, Martin; Xia, Younan

    2005-09-15

    Dispersion polymerization has been successfully applied to synthesize monodisperse polystyrene beads loaded with SiOEP and PtOEP for self-referenced oxygen sensing. The polystyrene beads became larger in size as the concentration of initiator was increased due to the reduction of primary particles precipitated from the polymerization medium. The dual luminophors showed similar absorption spectra but two distinctive emission spectra with peaks at 580 and 650nm for SiOEP and PtOEP, respectively. While the emission of SiOEP exhibited no response to oxygen, the luminescence intensity of PtOEP was monotonically dependent on the concentration of oxygen. From the Stern-Volmer plot, we observed a linear correlation between the intensity ratio of SiOEP at 580nm to PtOEP at 650nm and the concentration of oxygen, which could be used to reliably monitor the partial pressure of oxygen in a system.

  6. Thickness Dependency of Thin Film Samaria Doped Ceria for Oxygen Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Sanghavi, Rahul P.; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Jiang, Weilin; Varga, Tamas; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Engelhard, Mark H.; Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Kayani, Asghar N.; Prasad, Shalini

    2011-01-01

    High temperature oxygen sensors are widely used for exhaust gas monitoring in automobiles. This particular study explores the use of thin film single crystalline samaria doped ceria as the oxygen sensing material. Desired signal to noise ratio can be achieved in a material system with high conductivity. From previous studies it is established that 6 atomic percent samarium doping is the optimum concentration for thin film samaria doped ceria to achieve high ionic conductivity. In this study, the conductivity of the 6 atomic percent samaria doped ceria thin film is measured as a function of the sensing film thickness. Hysteresis and dynamic response of this sensing platform is tested for a range of oxygen pressures from 0.001 Torr to 100 Torr for temperatures above 673 K. An attempt has been made to understand the physics behind the thickness dependent conductivity behavior of this sensing platform by developing a hypothetical operating model and through COMSOL simulations. This study can be used to identify the parameters required to construct a fast, reliable and compact high temperature oxygen sensor.

  7. A Microfluidic Device for Continuous Sensing of Systemic Acute Toxicants in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyan; Dong, Tao

    2013-01-01

    A bioluminescent-cell-based microfluidic device for sensing toxicants in drinking water was designed and fabricated. The system employed Vibrio fischeri cells as broad-spectrum sensors to monitor potential systemic cell toxicants in water, such as heavy metal ions and phenol. Specifically, the chip was designed for continuous detection. The chip design included two counter-flow micromixers, a T-junction droplet generator and six spiral microchannels. The cell suspension and water sample were introduced into the micromixers and dispersed into droplets in the air flow. This guaranteed sufficient oxygen supply for the cell sensors. Copper (Cu2+), zinc (Zn2+), potassium dichromate and 3,5-dichlorophenol were selected as typical toxicants to validate the sensing system. Preliminary tests verified that the system was an effective screening tool for acute toxicants although it could not recognize or quantify specific toxicants. A distinct non-linear relationship was observed between the zinc ion concentration and the Relative Luminescence Units (RLU) obtained during testing. Thus, the concentration of simple toxic chemicals in water can be roughly estimated by this system. The proposed device shows great promise for an early warning system for water safety. PMID:24300075

  8. A microfluidic device for continuous sensing of systemic acute toxicants in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyan; Dong, Tao

    2013-12-03

    A bioluminescent-cell-based microfluidic device for sensing toxicants in drinking water was designed and fabricated. The system employed Vibrio fischeri cells as broad-spectrum sensors to monitor potential systemic cell toxicants in water, such as heavy metal ions and phenol. Specifically, the chip was designed for continuous detection. The chip design included two counter-flow micromixers, a T-junction droplet generator and six spiral microchannels. The cell suspension and water sample were introduced into the micromixers and dispersed into droplets in the air flow. This guaranteed sufficient oxygen supply for the cell sensors. Copper (Cu2+), zinc (Zn2+), potassium dichromate and 3,5-dichlorophenol were selected as typical toxicants to validate the sensing system. Preliminary tests verified that the system was an effective screening tool for acute toxicants although it could not recognize or quantify specific toxicants. A distinct non-linear relationship was observed between the zinc ion concentration and the Relative Luminescence Units (RLU) obtained during testing. Thus, the concentration of simple toxic chemicals in water can be roughly estimated by this system. The proposed device shows great promise for an early warning system for water safety.

  9. Oxygen Sensing Difluoroboron β-Diketonate Polylactide Materials with Tunable Dynamic Ranges for Wound Imaging.

    PubMed

    DeRosa, Christopher A; Seaman, Scott A; Mathew, Alexander S; Gorick, Catherine M; Fan, Ziyi; Demas, James N; Peirce, Shayn M; Fraser, Cassandra L

    2016-11-23

    Difluoroboron β-diketonate poly(lactic acid) materials exhibit both fluorescence (F) and oxygen sensitive room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP). Introduction of halide heavy atoms (Br and I) is an effective strategy to control the oxygen sensitivity in these materials. A series of naphthyl-phenyl (nbm) dye derivatives with hydrogen, bromide and iodide substituents were prepared for comparison. As nanoparticles, the hydrogen derivative was hypersensitive to oxygen (0-0.3%), while the bromide analogue was suited for hypoxia detection (0-3% O2). The iodo derivative, BF2nbm(I)PLA, showed excellent F to RTP peak separation and an 0-100% oxygen sensitivity range unprecedented for metal-free RTP emitting materials. Due to the dual emission and unconventionally long RTP lifetimes of these O2 sensing materials, a portable, cost-effective camera was used to quantify oxygen levels via lifetime and red/green/blue (RGB) ratiometry. The hypersensitive H dye was well matched to lifetime detection, simultaneous lifetime and ratiometric imaging was possible for the bromide analogue, whereas the iodide material, with intense RTP emission and a shorter lifetime, was suited for RGB ratiometry. To demonstrate the prospects of this camera/material design combination for bioimaging, iodide boron dye-PLA nanoparticles were applied to a murine wound model to detect oxygen levels. Surprisingly, wound oxygen imaging was achieved without covering (i.e. without isolating from ambient conditions, air). Additionally, would healing was monitored via wound size reduction and associated oxygen recovery, from hypoxic to normoxic. These single-component materials provide a simple tunable platform for biological oxygen sensing that can be deployed to spatially resolve oxygen in a variety of environments.

  10. Cholesterol biosensors based on oxygen sensing alginate-silica microspheres.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Janak; Joshi, Abhijeet; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Srivastava, Rohit

    2011-09-01

    Cholesterol determination in body is important in diagnosis of diseases like coronary heart disease, arteriosclerosis, diabetes, and obstructive jaundice. This research aims at developing fluorimetric cholesterol biosensors based on self-assembled mesoporous alginate-silica (Algilica) microspheres. For preparing the biosensor, Pt-(II)-octaethylporphine (PtOEP; oxygen sensitive metalloporphyrin) dye has been loaded in the Algilica microspheres using the solvent-mediated precipitation method. Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) was then covalently conjugated to PtOEP/Algilica microspheres using EDC and NHS reagents. PtOEP dye and enzyme encapsulation, activity and stability were then analyzed. Layer-by-layer self-assembly was finally performed using PAH and PSS polyelectrolytes to minimize leaching of the biosensor components. The prepared biosensor exhibited linearity over a range of 0.77-2.5 mM O(2) (K(SV) : 0.097/mM of O(2) ) obtained using from Stern-Volmer plots. The biosensor response to standard cholesterol displayed a linear analytical range from 1.25 to 10 mM of cholesterol with regression coefficient of 0.996 (1.25-3.75 mM), 0.976 (1.25-6 mM), and 0.959 (1.25-10 mM) and response time of 10 min. Thus, the prepared cholesterol biosensor shows great potential in the diagnosis of hypercholesterolemia. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Optical sensor for dual sensing of oxygen and carbon dioxide based on sensing films coated on filter paper.

    PubMed

    Chu, Cheng-Shane; Syu, Jhih-Jheng

    2017-02-01

    An optical sensor for the dual sensing of oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) based on sensing films coated on filter paper is proposed. Ethyl cellulose (EC) doped with platinum(II) meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin (PtTFPP) and 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl coumarin serve as the oxygen sensing material and reference blue emission dye for the pH indicator, respectively. The CO2 sensing layer includes the pH-sensitive fluorescent indicator 1-hydroxy-3,6,8-pyrenetrisulfonic acid trisodium salt immobilized within the EC. The O2- and CO2-sensitive materials can both be excited with a 405 nm LED, and the two emission wavelengths can be detected separately. The experimental result reveals that the optical O2 and CO2 sensors have sensitivities of IN2 /I100%O2 =22.8 and IN2 /I100%CO2 =3.6, respectively. The response times of the optical O2 sensor were 15 s upon switching from nitrogen to O2 and 41 s when moving from O2 to nitrogen (N2). The response times of the optical CO2 sensor were 7 s upon switching from 100% N2 to 100% CO2 and 39 s when moving from 100% CO2 to 100% N2. The proposed optical dual sensor can be used for the simultaneous sensing of O2 and CO2 concentrations in environmental applications.

  12. Cellular Oxygen and Nutrient Sensing in Microgravity Using Time-Resolved Fluorescence Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szmacinski, Henryk

    2003-01-01

    Oxygen and nutrient sensing is fundamental to the understanding of cell growth and metabolism. This requires identification of optical probes and suitable detection technology without complex calibration procedures. Under this project Microcosm developed an experimental technique that allows for simultaneous imaging of intra- and inter-cellular events. The technique consists of frequency-domain Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM), a set of identified oxygen and pH probes, and methods for fabrication of microsensors. Specifications for electronic and optical components of FLIM instrumentation are provided. Hardware and software were developed for data acquisition and analysis. Principles, procedures, and representative images are demonstrated. Suitable lifetime sensitive oxygen, pH, and glucose probes for intra- and extra-cellular measurements of analyte concentrations have been identified and tested. Lifetime sensing and imaging have been performed using PBS buffer, culture media, and yeast cells as a model systems. Spectral specifications, calibration curves, and probes availability are also provided in the report.

  13. Percutaneous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for cardiogenic shock due to acute fulminant myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, Abdallah; Nardi, Olivier; Orlikowski, David; Combes, Alain; Chastre, Jean; Annane, Djillali

    2010-02-01

    Percutaneous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is an invasive technique that provides emergent circulatory support for patients with cardiogenic shock. We report a favorable outcome of an acute fulminant myocarditis in a 25-year-old myasthenia patient with cardiogenic shock supported by percutaneous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

  14. Oxygen regulation capacity in Discoglossus pictus tadpoles between moderate hyperoxia and acute hypoxia in water.

    PubMed

    Barja de Quiroga, G; Alonso-Bedate, M

    1988-09-01

    The oxygen dependence of aquatic oxygen consumption was measured in active and anesthetized stage XVIII Discoglossus pictus tadpoles (Amphibia, Anura). The active tadpoles are good oxygen regulators in moderate hyperoxia and moderate hypoxia, whereas they are oxygen conformers in acute hypoxia. Critical oxygen pressure was 52 mmHg O2. Anesthetizing the larvae changes them to perfect oxygen conformers between moderate hyperoxia and moderate hypoxia (249-63 mmHg O2). At stage XVIII the aquatic respiratory organs are still capable of producing oxygen regulation when free access to air is denied. The marked capacity for oxygen regulation in D. pictus tadpoles is concordant with the strong hypoxic environments in which these animals usually live in nature.

  15. Sensing performances of ZnO nanostructures grown under different oxygen pressures to hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Jin; Peng, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhenbo; Feng, Peter

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Surface morphology depends on the oxygen pressure. ► Structural degradation was observed for the ZnO samples when oxygen pressure was overhigh. ► The sensitivity of the ZnO-based sensors increase with grown oxygen pressure. -- Abstract: For extensive use in an industrialized process of individual ZnO nanostructures applied in gas sensors, a simple, inexpensive, and safe synthesis process is required. Here, nanostructured ZnO films were grown by a pulsed laser deposition technique under different oxygen pressures. Scanning electron microscopy images show nanopores, nanotips, and nanoparticles are obtained and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data indicate oxygen concentration of the synthesized samples increases monotonously with oxygen pressure. The sensor based on ZnO with high oxygen concentration has high sensitivity, rapid response (9 s) and recovery (80 s) behavior to 500 ppm hydrogen below 150 °C. Experimental data indicate that high oxygen concentration effectively improves the sensing properties of nanostructured ZnO.

  16. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy for acute respiratory failure during chemotherapy in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Youn Seup; Hong, Goohyeon

    2017-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by pneumonia in patients with hematologic malignancies can be life-threatening. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is the only temporary treatment for patients with ARDS who are refractory to conventional treatment. However, the immunosuppression and coagulopathies in hematological malignancies such as lymphoma and acute leukemia are relative contraindications for ECMO, due to high risks of infection and bleeding. Here, we report a 22-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who developed pneumonia and ARDS during induction chemotherapy; he was treated with ECMO.

  17. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy for acute respiratory failure during chemotherapy in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Youn Seup

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by pneumonia in patients with hematologic malignancies can be life-threatening. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is the only temporary treatment for patients with ARDS who are refractory to conventional treatment. However, the immunosuppression and coagulopathies in hematological malignancies such as lymphoma and acute leukemia are relative contraindications for ECMO, due to high risks of infection and bleeding. Here, we report a 22-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who developed pneumonia and ARDS during induction chemotherapy; he was treated with ECMO. PMID:28275497

  18. Intrarenal and urinary oxygenation during norepinephrine resuscitation in ovine septic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Lankadeva, Yugeesh R; Kosaka, Junko; Evans, Roger G; Bailey, Simon R; Bellomo, Rinaldo; May, Clive N

    2016-07-01

    Norepinephrine is the principal vasopressor used to restore blood pressure in sepsis, but its effects on intrarenal oxygenation are unknown. To clarify this, we examined renal cortical, medullary, and urinary oxygenation in ovine septic acute kidney injury and the response to resuscitation with norepinephrine. A renal artery flow probe and fiberoptic probes were placed in the cortex and medulla of sheep to measure tissue perfusion and oxygenation. A probe in the bladder catheter measured urinary oxygenation. Sepsis was induced in conscious sheep by infusion of Escherichia coli for 32 hours. At 24 to 30 hours of sepsis, either norepinephrine, to restore mean arterial pressure to preseptic levels or vehicle-saline was infused (8 sheep per group). Septic acute kidney injury was characterized by a reduction in blood pressure of ∼12 mm Hg, renal hyperperfusion, and oliguria. Sepsis reduced medullary perfusion (from an average of 1289 to 628 blood perfusion units), medullary oxygenation (from 32 to 16 mm Hg), and urinary oxygenation (from 36 to 24 mm Hg). Restoring blood pressure with norepinephrine further reduced medullary perfusion to an average of 331 blood perfusion units, medullary oxygenation to 8 mm Hg and urinary oxygenation to 18 mm Hg. Cortical perfusion and oxygenation were preserved. Thus, renal medullary hypoxia caused by intrarenal blood flow redistribution may contribute to the development of septic acute kidney injury, and resuscitation of blood pressure with norepinephrine exacerbates medullary hypoxia. The parallel changes in medullary and urinary oxygenation suggest that urinary oxygenation may be a useful real-time biomarker for risk of acute kidney injury.

  19. The role of high flow oxygen therapy in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Pérez-Terán, P; Roca, O

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory failure represents one of the most common causes of intensive care unit admission and oxygen therapy remains the first-line therapy in the management of these patients. In recent years, high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula has been described as a useful alternative to conventional oxygen therapy in patients with acute respiratory failure. High-flow oxygen via nasal cannula rapidly alleviates symptoms of acute respiratory failure and improves oxygenation by several mechanisms, including dead space washout, reduction in oxygen dilution and inspiratory nasopharyngeal resistance, a moderate positive airway pressure effect that may generate alveolar recruitment and an overall greater tolerance and comfort with the interface and the heated and humidified inspired gases. However, the experience in adults is still limited and there are no clinical guidelines to establish recommendations for their use. This article aims to review the existing evidence on the use of high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula in adults with acute respiratory failure and its possible applications, advantages and limitations.

  20. Two–Photon Oxygen Sensing with Quantum Dot–Porphyrin Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, Christopher M.; Karnas, Elizabeth; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Supramolecular assemblies of a quantum dot (QD) associated to palladium(II) porphyrins have been developed to detect oxygen (pO2) in organic solvents. Palladium porphyrins are sensitive in the 0–160 torr range, making them ideal phosphors for in vivo biological oxygen quantification. Porphyrins with meso pyridyl substituents bind to the surface of the QD to produce self–assembled nanosensors. Appreciable overlap between QD emission and porphyrin absorption features results in efficient Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) for signal transduction in these sensors. The QD serves as a photon antenna, enhancing porphyrin emission under both one– and two–photon excitation, demonstrating that QD–palladium porphyrin conjugates may be used for oxygen sensing over physiological oxygen ranges. PMID:23978247

  1. Acute leukaemia: making sense of a complex blood cancer.

    PubMed

    Meenaghan, Teresa; Dowling, Maura; Kelly, Mary

    Acute leukaemia represents a diverse group of blood cancers that affect both children and adults. Treatment schedules for these haematology cancers are often prolonged, with many associated side effects and complications. Nurses caring for patients with acute leukaemia require an anticipatory approach, where care is aimed at minimizing the side effects of treatment and being constantly vigilant for any impending adverse effects. Moreover, patients require support for the psychosocial issues that can arise for patients during their illness. This article provides an overview of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and acute myeloid leukaemia. Nursing considerations in the care of patients being treated for acute leukaemia are also explored.

  2. Uncondensed Graphitic Carbon Nitride on Reduced Graphene Oxide for Oxygen Sensing via a Photoredox Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ellis, James E; Sorescu, Dan C; Burkert, Seth C; White, David L; Star, Alexander

    2017-08-16

    Melon, a polymeric, uncondensed graphitic carbon nitride with a two-dimensional structure, has been coupled with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) to create an oxygen chemiresistor sensor that is active under UV photoactivation. Oxygen gas is an important sensor target in a variety of areas including industrial safety, combustion process monitoring, as well as environmental and biomedical fields. Because of the intimate electrical interface formed between melon and rGO, charge transfer of photoexcited electrons occurs between the two materials when under UV (λ = 365 nm) irradiation. A photoredox mechanism wherein oxygen is reduced on the rGO surface provides the basis for sensing oxygen gas in the concentration range 300-100 000 ppm. The sensor response was found to be logarithmically proportional to oxygen gas concentration. DFT calculations of a melon-oxidized graphene composite found that slight protonation of melon leads to charge accumulation on the rGO layer and a corresponding charge depletion on the melon layer. This work provides an example of a metal-free system for solid-gas interface sensing via a photoredox mechanism.

  3. Remote Sensing of Dissolved Oxygen and Nitrogen in Water using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Young, R.; Ganoe, R.

    2013-12-01

    The health of an estuarine ecosystem is largely driven by the abundance of dissolved oxygen and nitrogen available for maintenance of plant and animal life. An investigation was conducted to quantify the concentration of dissolved molecular oxygen and nitrogen in water by means of Raman spectroscopy. This technique is proposed for the remote sensing of dissolved oxygen in the Chesapeake Bay, which will be utilized by aircraft in order to survey large areas in real-time. A proof of principle experiment has demonstrated the ability to remotely detect dissolved oxygen and nitrogen in pure water (also Chesapeake Bay water) using a 355nm Nd:YAG laser and a simple monochromater to detect the shifted Raman oxygen and nitrogen backscattered signals at 376.2 and 387.5 nm respectively. The theoretical basis for the research, components of the experimental system, and key findings are presented. A 1.3-m water cell had an attached vertical column to house a Troll 9500 dissolved oxygen in-situ monitor (In-Situ Inc Troll 9500). The Raman oxygen signal could be calibrated with this devise. While Raman backscattered water signals are low a potential aircraft remote system was designed and will be presented.

  4. A revisit to O2 sensing and transduction in the carotid body chemoreceptors in the context of reactive oxygen species biology.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, C; Agapito, M T; Rocher, A; Gomez-Niño, A; Rigual, R; Castañeda, J; Conde, S V; Obeso, A

    2010-12-31

    Oxygen-sensing and transduction in purposeful responses in cells and organisms is of great physiological and medical interest. All animals, including humans, encounter in their lifespan many situations in which oxygen availability might be insufficient, whether acutely or chronically, physiologically or pathologically. Therefore to trace at the molecular level the sequence of events or steps connecting the oxygen deficit with the cell responses is of interest in itself as an achievement of science. In addition, it is also of great medical interest as such knowledge might facilitate the therapeutical approach to patients and to design strategies to minimize hypoxic damage. In our article we define the concepts of sensors and transducers, the steps of the hypoxic transduction cascade in the carotid body chemoreceptor cells and also discuss current models of oxygen- sensing (bioenergetic, biosynthetic and conformational) with their supportive and unsupportive data from updated literature. We envision oxygen-sensing in carotid body chemoreceptor cells as a process initiated at the level of plasma membrane and performed by a hemoprotein, which might be NOX4 or a hemoprotein not yet chemically identified. Upon oxygen-desaturation, the sensor would experience conformational changes allosterically transmitted to oxygen regulated K+ channels, the initial effectors in the transduction cascade. A decrease in their opening probability would produce cell depolarization, activation of voltage dependent calcium channels and release of neurotransmitters. Neurotransmitters would activate the nerve endings of the carotid body sensory nerve to convey the information of the hypoxic situation to the central nervous system that would command ventilation to fight hypoxia.

  5. Disassociating Lung Mechanics and Oxygenation in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yehya, Nadir; Thomas, Neal J

    2017-07-01

    Both oxygenation and peak inspiratory pressure are associated with mortality in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Since oxygenation and respiratory mechanics are linked, it is difficult to identify which variables, pressure or oxygenation, are independently associated with outcome. We aimed to determine whether respiratory mechanics (peak inspiratory pressure, positive end-expiratory pressure, ΔP [PIP minus PEEP], tidal volume, dynamic compliance [Cdyn]) or oxygenation (PaO2/FIO2) was associated with mortality. Prospective, observational, cohort study. University affiliated PICU. Mechanically ventilated children with acute respiratory distress syndrome (Berlin). None. Peak inspiratory pressure, positive end-expiratory pressure, ΔP, tidal volume, Cdyn, and PaO2/FIO2 were collected at acute respiratory distress syndrome onset and at 24 hours in 352 children between 2011 and 2016. At acute respiratory distress syndrome onset, neither mechanical variables nor PaO2/FIO2 were associated with mortality. At 24 hours, peak inspiratory pressure, positive end-expiratory pressure, ΔP were higher, and Cdyn and PaO2/FIO2 lower, in nonsurvivors. In multivariable logistic regression, PaO2/FIO2 at 24 hours and ΔPaO2/FIO2 (change in PaO2/FIO2 over the first 24 hr) were associated with mortality, whereas pressure variables were not. Both oxygenation and pressure variables were associated with duration of ventilation in multivariable competing risk regression. Improvements in oxygenation, but not in respiratory mechanics, were associated with lower mortality in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Future trials of mechanical ventilation in children should focus on oxygenation (higher PaO2/FIO2) rather than lower peak inspiratory pressure or ΔP, as oxygenation was more consistently associated with outcome.

  6. Role of renal oxygenation and mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Noureddin; Singh, Prabhleen

    2014-01-01

    There are unique features of renal oxygenation that render the kidney susceptible to oxygen demand-supply mismatch and hypoxia. Renal oxygen consumption by oxidative metabolism is closely coupled to and driven by tubular transport, which is linked to the filtered solute load and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). In turn, filtered solute load and GFR are dependent on the renal blood flow. Hence, changes in renal blood flow increase oxygen delivery but also increase oxygen demand (consumption) simultaneously by increasing the tubular workload of solute transport. The renal blood flow to different regions of kidney is also inhomogeneous, increasing the oxygen demand-supply mismatch in particular areas such as the outer medulla which become more susceptible to injury. Thus, tubular transport and oxidative metabolism by miochondria are closely coupled in the kidney and are the principal determinants of intrarenal oxygenation. Here we review the published literature characterizing renal oxygenation and mitochondrial function in ischemic and sepsis-associated acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the coupling of transport and metabolism in AKI has not been examined. This is a potentially fruitful area of research that should become increasingly active given the emerging data linking renal oxygenation and hypoxia to acute and chronic dysfunction in the kidney. 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2005-07-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor is being developed that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Two critical materials issues are the cluster's ability to withstand high temperatures when immobilized in a porous the sol-gel support, and whether after heating to high temperatures, the sol-gel matrix maintains a high and constant permeability to oxygen to support rapid quenching of luminescence. We used a composite materials approach to prepare stable sensing layers on optical fibers. We dispersed 60 w/w% of a pre-cured sol-gel composite containing the potassium salt of molybdenum clusters (K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}) into a sol-gel binder solution, and established the conditions necessary for deposition of sol-gel films on optical fibers and planar substrates. The fiber sensor has an output signal of 5 nW when pumped with an inexpensive commercial 365 nm ultraviolet light emitting diode (LED). Quenching of the sensor signal by oxygen was observed up to a gas temperature of 175 C with no degradation of the oxygen permeability of the composite after high temperature cycling. On planar substrates the cluster containing composite responds within <1 second to a gas exchange from nitrogen to oxygen, indicating the feasibility of real-time oxygen detection.

  8. Facet effects of palladium nanocrystals for oxygen reduction in ionic liquids and for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongan; Chi, Xiaowei; Zou, Shouzhong; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2016-03-01

    Palladium nanocrystals enclosed by {100} and {110} crystal facets, were successfully synthesized through an aqueous one-pot synthesis method. A new thermal annealing approach was developed for fabricating these palladium nanocrystals as a working electrode on a gas permeable membrane to study the facet effects of the oxygen reduction process in an ionic liquid, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Bmpy][NTf2]). Results were compared with the same processes at a conventional platinum electrode. Our study shows that the structural difference between the two facets of Pd nanocrystals has little effect on the oxygen reduction process but significantly affects the oxidation process of the superoxide. It is found that the Pd{110}/IL interface can better stabilize superoxide radicals revealed by a more positive oxidation potential compared to that of Pd{100}. In addition, the analytical characteristic of utilizing both palladium nanocrystals as electrodes for oxygen sensing is comparable with a polycrystal platinum oxygen sensor, in which Pd{110} presents the best sensitivity and lowest detection limit. Our results demonstrate the facet-dependence of oxygen reduction in an ionic liquid medium and provide the fundamental information needed to guide the applications of palladium nanocrystals in electrochemical gas sensor and fuel cell research.Palladium nanocrystals enclosed by {100} and {110} crystal facets, were successfully synthesized through an aqueous one-pot synthesis method. A new thermal annealing approach was developed for fabricating these palladium nanocrystals as a working electrode on a gas permeable membrane to study the facet effects of the oxygen reduction process in an ionic liquid, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Bmpy][NTf2]). Results were compared with the same processes at a conventional platinum electrode. Our study shows that the structural difference between the two facets of Pd

  9. Synthesis, characterization, photophysical and oxygen-sensing properties of a novel europium(III) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Nan; Xie, Jing; Zhang, Dawei

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis, characterization, crystal structure, and photophysical properties of a novel Eu 3+ complex of Eu(DBM) 3IPD, where DBM = 1,3-diphenyl-propane-1,3-dione and IPD = 4-(1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthrolin-2-yl)-N,N-diphenylaniline. Its elementary application for oxygen-sensing application is also investigated by doping it into a silica matrix of MCM-41. Experimental data suggest that the 20 mg/g doped Eu(DBM) 3IPD/MCM-41 system exhibits a high sensitivity of 3.6 towards molecular oxygen with a good linear relationship of R2 = 0.9987. In addition, the 20 mg/g doped Eu(DBM) 3IPD/MCM-41 system owns a quick response of 8 s towards oxygen, along with its excellent atmosphere insensitivity and photobleaching resistance. All these results suggest that both Eu(DBM) 3IPD and Eu(DBM) 3IPD/MCM-41 systems are promising candidates for oxygen-sensing optical sensors.

  10. Remote Sensing of Dissolved Oxygen and Nitrogen in Water Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganoe, Rene; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    The health of an estuarine ecosystem is largely driven by the abundance of dissolved oxygen and nitrogen available for maintenance of plant and animal life. An investigation was conducted to quantify the concentration of dissolved molecular oxygen and nitrogen in water by means of Raman spectroscopy. This technique is proposed for the remote sensing of dissolved oxygen in the Chesapeake Bay, which will be utilized by aircraft in order to survey large areas in real-time. A proof of principle system has been developed and the specifications are being honed to maximize efficiency for the final application. The theoretical criteria of the research, components of the experimental system, and key findings are presented in this report

  11. Exercise after acute hyperbaric oxygenation: is there an ergogenic effect?

    PubMed

    Webster, A L; Syrotuik, D G; Bell, G J; Jones, R L; Bhambhani, Y; Young, M

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 1-h exposure to 2.0 atm abs (202.6 kPa) and 100% oxygen on subsequent maximal O2 consumption (VO2max), ventilation threshold (VT), lactate threshold (LT), and muscle oxygenation (%Mox) during incremental exercise to maximum on a cycle ergometer. Two baseline exercise tests (T1 and T2) were performed on separate occasions without prior exposure to hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) and a third test (T3-HBO2) was performed after (22.5 +/- 5.6 min) HBO2 Near infared spectroscopy was used to monitor oxygenation of the left vastus lateralis muscle during T2 and T3-HBO2. No significant differences were observed between VO2max VT, or LT among any of the exercise tests. There was no significant difference in %Mox between T2 and T3-HBO2 except at 235 W where there was a significant elevation in %Mox during T3-HBO2 relative to T2. These results suggest that prior exposure to HBO2 (100% O2 at 2 atm abs for 1 h) has no ergogenic effect on subsequent incremental exercise performance.

  12. Neuroprotection of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in sub-acute traumatic brain injury: not by immediately improving cerebral oxygen saturation and oxygen partial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bao-chun; Liu, Li-jun; Liu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Although hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy can promote the recovery of neural function in patients who have suffered traumatic brain injury (TBI), the underlying mechanism is unclear. We hypothesized that hyperbaric oxygen treatment plays a neuroprotective role in TBI by increasing regional transcranial oxygen saturation (rSO2) and oxygen partial pressure (PaO2). To test this idea, we compared two groups: a control group with 20 healthy people and a treatment group with 40 TBI patients. The 40 patients were given 100% oxygen of HBO for 90 minutes. Changes in rSO2 were measured. The controls were also examined for rSO2 and PaO2, but received no treatment. rSO2 levels in the patients did not differ significantly after treatment, but levels before and after treatment were significantly lower than those in the control group. PaO2 levels were significantly decreased after the 30-minute HBO treatment. Our findings suggest that there is a disorder of oxygen metabolism in patients with sub-acute TBI. HBO does not immediately affect cerebral oxygen metabolism, and the underlying mechanism still needs to be studied in depth. PMID:27857747

  13. Optical oxygen sensing systems for drug discovery applications: Respirometric Screening Technology (RST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papkovsky, Dmitri B.; Hynes, James; Fernandes, Richard

    2005-11-01

    Quenched-fluorescence oxygen sensing allows non-chemical, reversible, real-time monitoring of molecular oxygen and rates of oxygen consumption in biological samples. Using this approach we have developed Respirometric Screening Technology (RST); a platform which facilitates the convenient analysis of cellular oxygen uptake. This in turn allows the investigation of compounds and processes which affect respiratory activity. The RST platform employs soluble phosphorescent oxygen-sensitive probes, which may be assessed in standard microtitter plates on a fluorescence plate reader. New formats of RST assays and time-resolved fluorescence detection instrumentation developed by Luxcel provide improvements in assay sensitivity, miniaturization and overall performance. RST has a diverse range of applications in drug discovery area including high throughput analysis of mitochondrial function; studies of mechanisms of toxicity and apoptosis; cell and animal based screening of compound libraries and environmental samples; and, sterility testing. RST has been successfully validated with a range of practical targets and adopted by several leading pharmaceutical companies.

  14. Oxygen sensing and hypoxia signalling pathways in animals: the implications of physiology for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Studies of regulation of the haematopoietic growth factor erythropoietin led to the unexpected discovery of a widespread system of direct oxygen sensing that regulates gene expression in animals. The oxygen-sensitive signal is generated by a series of non-haem Fe(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that catalyse the post-translational hydroxylation of specific residues in the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). These hydroxylations promote both oxygen-dependent degradation and oxygen-dependent inactivation of HIF, but are suppressed in hypoxia, leading to the accumulation of HIF and assembly of an active transcriptional complex in hypoxic cells. Hypoxia-inducible factor activates an extensive transcriptional cascade that interfaces with other cell signalling pathways, microRNA networks and RNA–protein translational control systems. The relationship of these cellular signalling pathways to the integrated physiology of oxygen homeostasis and the implication of dysregulating these massive physiological pathways in diseases such as cancer are discussed. PMID:23401619

  15. High-flow oxygen through nasal cannula in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Frat, Jean-Pierre; Thille, Arnaud W; Mercat, Alain; Girault, Christophe; Ragot, Stéphanie; Perbet, Sébastien; Prat, Gwénael; Boulain, Thierry; Morawiec, Elise; Cottereau, Alice; Devaquet, Jérôme; Nseir, Saad; Razazi, Keyvan; Mira, Jean-Paul; Argaud, Laurent; Chakarian, Jean-Charles; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Wittebole, Xavier; Chevalier, Stéphanie; Herbland, Alexandre; Fartoukh, Muriel; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Tonnelier, Jean-Marie; Pierrot, Marc; Mathonnet, Armelle; Béduneau, Gaëtan; Delétage-Métreau, Céline; Richard, Jean-Christophe M; Brochard, Laurent; Robert, René

    2015-06-04

    Whether noninvasive ventilation should be administered in patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure is debated. Therapy with high-flow oxygen through a nasal cannula may offer an alternative in patients with hypoxemia. We performed a multicenter, open-label trial in which we randomly assigned patients without hypercapnia who had acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and a ratio of the partial pressure of arterial oxygen to the fraction of inspired oxygen of 300 mm Hg or less to high-flow oxygen therapy, standard oxygen therapy delivered through a face mask, or noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients intubated at day 28; secondary outcomes included all-cause mortality in the intensive care unit and at 90 days and the number of ventilator-free days at day 28. A total of 310 patients were included in the analyses. The intubation rate (primary outcome) was 38% (40 of 106 patients) in the high-flow-oxygen group, 47% (44 of 94) in the standard group, and 50% (55 of 110) in the noninvasive-ventilation group (P=0.18 for all comparisons). The number of ventilator-free days at day 28 was significantly higher in the high-flow-oxygen group (24±8 days, vs. 22±10 in the standard-oxygen group and 19±12 in the noninvasive-ventilation group; P=0.02 for all comparisons). The hazard ratio for death at 90 days was 2.01 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01 to 3.99) with standard oxygen versus high-flow oxygen (P=0.046) and 2.50 (95% CI, 1.31 to 4.78) with noninvasive ventilation versus high-flow oxygen (P=0.006). In patients with nonhypercapnic acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, treatment with high-flow oxygen, standard oxygen, or noninvasive ventilation did not result in significantly different intubation rates. There was a significant difference in favor of high-flow oxygen in 90-day mortality. (Funded by the Programme Hospitalier de Recherche Clinique Interrégional 2010 of the French Ministry of Health; FLORALI

  16. Temperature-sensitive europium(III) probes and their use for simultaneous luminescent sensing of temperature and oxygen.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Sergey M; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2006-07-15

    Highly photostable and strongly luminescent europium(III) beta-diketonate complexes are presented that can act as new probes for optical sensing of temperature. They can be excited with the light of a 405-nm LED and possess strong brightnesses. The decay times of the probes contained in a poly(vinyl methyl ketone) film and in poly(tert-butyl styrene) microparticles are highly temperature-dependent between 0 and 70 degrees C. The temperature-sensitive microparticles were dispersed, along with oxygen-sensitive microbeads consisting of a palladium porphyrin oxygen indicator in poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile), in a thin layer of a hydrogel to give a dually sensing material which is excitable by a single light source. The two emissions can be separated by appropriate optical filters. The response to oxygen and temperature is described by 3D plots, and unbiased values can be obtained for temperature and oxygen, respectively, from the two luminescence signals if refined in an iteration step. The sensing scheme is intended for use in temperature-compensated sensing of oxygen, in contactless sensing of oxygen and temperature in (micro)biological and medical applications, in high-resolution oxygen profiling, and for simultaneous imaging of air pressure and temperature in wind tunnels.

  17. Reversed oxygen sensing using colloidal quantum wells towards highly emissive photoresponsive varnishes

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzon, Monica; Christodoulou, Sotirios; Vaccaro, Gianfranco; Pedrini, Jacopo; Meinardi, Francesco; Moreels, Iwan; Brovelli, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal quantum wells combine the advantages of size-tunable electronic properties with vast reactive surfaces that could allow one to realize highly emissive luminescent-sensing varnishes capable of detecting chemical agents through their reversible emission response, with great potential impact on life sciences, environmental monitoring, defence and aerospace engineering. Here we combine spectroelectrochemical measurements and spectroscopic studies in a controlled atmosphere to demonstrate the ‘reversed oxygen-sensing’ capability of CdSe colloidal quantum wells, that is, the exposure to oxygen reversibly increases their luminescence efficiency. Spectroelectrochemical experiments allow us to directly relate the sensing response to the occupancy of surface states. Magneto-optical measurements demonstrate that, under vacuum, heterostructured CdSe/CdS colloidal quantum wells stabilize in their negative trion state. The high starting emission efficiency provides a possible means to enhance the oxygen sensitivity by partially de-passivating the particle surfaces, thereby enhancing the density of unsaturated sites with a minimal cost in term of luminescence losses. PMID:25910499

  18. Temperature Compensation of Oxygen Sensing Films Utilizing a Dynamic Dual Lifetime Calculation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Bradley B.; McShane, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    With advances to chemical sensing, methods for compensation of errors introduced by interfering analytes are needed. In this work, a dual lifetime calculation technique was developed to enable simultaneous monitoring of two luminescence decays. Utilizing a windowed time-domain luminescence approach, the response of two luminophores is separated temporally. The ability of the dual dynamic rapid lifetime determination (DDRLD) approach to determine the response of two luminophores simultaneously was investigated through mathematical modeling and experimental testing. Modeling results indicated that lifetime predictions will be most accurate when the ratio of the lifetimes from each luminophore is at least three and the ratio of intensities is near unity. In vitro experiments were performed using a porphyrin that is sensitive to both oxygen and temperature, combined with a temperature-sensitive inorganic phosphor used for compensation of the porphyrin response. In static experiments, the dual measurements were found to be highly accurate when compared to single-luminophore measurements—statistically equivalent for the long lifetime emission and an average difference of 2% for the short lifetimes. Real-time testing with dynamic windowing was successful in demonstrating dual lifetime measurements and temperature compensation of the oxygen sensitive dye. When comparing the actual oxygen and temperature values with predictions made using a dual calibration approach, an overall difference of less than 1% was obtained. Thus, this method enables rapid, accurate extraction of multiple lifetimes without requiring computationally intense curve fitting, providing a significant advancement toward multi-analyte sensing and imaging techniques. PMID:26566384

  19. ACUTE SENSITIVITY OF JUVENILE SHORTNOSE STURGEON TO LOW DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Campbell, Jed G. and Larry R. Goodman. 2004. Acute Sensitivity of Juvenile Shortnose Sturgeon to Low Dissolved Oxygen Concentrations. EPA/600/J-04/175. Trans. Am. Fish. Soc. 133(3):772-776. (ERL,GB 1155).

    There is considerable concern that factors such as eutrophication, ...

  20. ACUTE SENSITIVITY OF JUVENILE SHORTNOSE STURGEON TO LOW DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Campbell, Jed G. and Larry R. Goodman. 2004. Acute Sensitivity of Juvenile Shortnose Sturgeon to Low Dissolved Oxygen Concentrations. EPA/600/J-04/175. Trans. Am. Fish. Soc. 133(3):772-776. (ERL,GB 1155).

    There is considerable concern that factors such as eutrophication, ...

  1. Molecular evolution of the metazoan PHD-HIF oxygen-sensing system.

    PubMed

    Rytkönen, Kalle T; Williams, Tom A; Renshaw, Gillian M; Primmer, Craig R; Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2011-06-01

    Metazoans rely on aerobic energy production, which requires an adequate oxygen supply. During reduced oxygen supply (hypoxia), the most profound changes in gene expression are mediated by transcription factors known as hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). HIF alpha proteins are commonly posttranslationally regulated by prolyl-4-hydroxylase (PHD) enzymes, which are direct "sensors" of cellular oxygen levels. We examined the molecular evolution of the metazoan PHD-HIF oxygen-sensing system by constructing complete phylogenies for PHD and HIF alpha genes and used computational tools to characterize the molecular changes underlying the functional divergence of PHD and HIF alpha duplicates. The presence of PHDs in metazoan genomes predates the emergence of HIF alphas. Our analysis revealed an unexpected diversity of PHD genes and HIF alpha sequence characteristics in invertebrates, suggesting that the simple oxygen-sensing systems of Caenorhabditis and Drosophila may not be typical of other invertebrate bilaterians. We studied the early vertebrate evolution of the system by sequencing these genes in early-diverging cartilaginous fishes, elasmobranchs. Cartilaginous fishes appear to have three paralogs of both PHD and HIF alpha. The novel sequences were used as outgroups for a detailed molecular analysis of PHD and HIF alpha duplicates in a major air-breathing vertebrate lineage, the mammals, and a major water-breathing vertebrate lineage, the teleosts. In PHDs, functionally divergent amino acid sites were detected near the HIF alpha-binding channel and beta2beta3 loop that defines its substrate specificity. In HIF alphas, more functional divergence was found in teleosts than in mammals, especially in the HIF-1 alpha PAS domain and HIF-2 alpha oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domains, which interact with PHDs. Overall, in the vertebrates, elevated substitution rates in the HIF-2 alpha N-terminal ODD domain, together with a functional divergence associated with the known

  2. Fiber-Based Laser Transmitter for Oxygen A-Band Spectroscopy and Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Abshire, James B.

    2010-01-01

    A fiber-based laser transmitter has been designed for active remote-sensing spectroscopy. The transmitter uses a master-oscillator-power-amplifier (MOPA) configuration with a distributed feedback diode-laser master oscillator and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier. The output from the MOPA is frequency-doubled with a periodically poled nonlinear crystal. The utility of this single-frequency, wavelength-tunable, power-scalable laser has been demonstrated in a spectroscopic measurement of the diatomic oxygen A-band.

  3. Diversity of magneto-aerotactic behaviors and oxygen sensing mechanisms in cultured magnetotactic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Bennet, Mathieu; Landau, Livnat; Vach, Peter; Pignol, David; Bazylinski, Dennis A; Frankel, Richard B; Klumpp, Stefan; Faivre, Damien

    2014-07-15

    Microorganisms living in gradient environments affect large-scale processes, including the cycling of elements such as carbon, nitrogen or sulfur, the rates and fate of primary production, and the generation of climatically active gases. Aerotaxis is a common adaptation in organisms living in the oxygen gradients of stratified environments. Magnetotactic bacteria are such gradient-inhabiting organisms that have a specific type of aerotaxis that allows them to compete at the oxic-anoxic interface. They biomineralize magnetosomes, intracellular membrane-coated magnetic nanoparticles, that comprise a permanent magnetic dipole that causes the cells to align along magnetic field lines. The magnetic alignment enables them to efficiently migrate toward an optimal oxygen concentration in microaerobic niches. This phenomenon is known as magneto-aerotaxis. Magneto-aerotaxis has only been characterized in a limited number of available cultured strains. In this work, we characterize the magneto-aerotactic behavior of 12 magnetotactic bacteria with various morphologies, phylogenies, physiologies, and flagellar apparatus. We report six different magneto-aerotactic behaviors that can be described as a combination of three distinct mechanisms, including the reported (di-)polar, axial, and a previously undescribed mechanism we named unipolar. We implement a model suggesting that the three magneto-aerotactic mechanisms are related to distinct oxygen sensing mechanisms that regulate the direction of cells' motility in an oxygen gradient.

  4. Diversity of Magneto-Aerotactic Behaviors and Oxygen Sensing Mechanisms in Cultured Magnetotactic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, Christopher T.; Bennet, Mathieu; Landau, Livnat; Vach, Peter; Pignol, David; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Frankel, Richard B.; Klumpp, Stefan; Faivre, Damien

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms living in gradient environments affect large-scale processes, including the cycling of elements such as carbon, nitrogen or sulfur, the rates and fate of primary production, and the generation of climatically active gases. Aerotaxis is a common adaptation in organisms living in the oxygen gradients of stratified environments. Magnetotactic bacteria are such gradient-inhabiting organisms that have a specific type of aerotaxis that allows them to compete at the oxic-anoxic interface. They biomineralize magnetosomes, intracellular membrane-coated magnetic nanoparticles, that comprise a permanent magnetic dipole that causes the cells to align along magnetic field lines. The magnetic alignment enables them to efficiently migrate toward an optimal oxygen concentration in microaerobic niches. This phenomenon is known as magneto-aerotaxis. Magneto-aerotaxis has only been characterized in a limited number of available cultured strains. In this work, we characterize the magneto-aerotactic behavior of 12 magnetotactic bacteria with various morphologies, phylogenies, physiologies, and flagellar apparatus. We report six different magneto-aerotactic behaviors that can be described as a combination of three distinct mechanisms, including the reported (di-)polar, axial, and a previously undescribed mechanism we named unipolar. We implement a model suggesting that the three magneto-aerotactic mechanisms are related to distinct oxygen sensing mechanisms that regulate the direction of cells’ motility in an oxygen gradient. PMID:25028894

  5. Microwave-assisted synthesis of SnO₂ nanorods for oxygen gas sensing at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Azam, Ameer; Habib, Sami S; Salah, Numan A; Ahmed, Faheem

    2013-01-01

    High-quality single-crystalline SnO₂ nanorods were synthesized using a microwave-assisted solution method. The nanorods were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible and Raman spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and electrical resistance measurements. The XRD pattern indicated the formation of single-phase SnO₂ nanorods with rutile structure. FE-SEM and TEM images revealed tetragonal nanorods of about 450-500 nm in length and 60-80 nm in diameter. The nanorods showed a higher BET surface area of 288 m²/g, much higher than that of previously reported work. The Raman scattering spectra indicated a typical rutile phase of the SnO₂. The absorption spectrum showed an absorption peak centered at 340 nm, and the band-gap value was found to be 3.64 eV. The gas-sensing properties of the SnO₂ nanorods for oxygen gas with different concentrations were measured at room temperature. It was found that the value of resistance increased with the increase in oxygen gas concentration in the test chamber. The SnO₂ nanorods exhibited high sensitivity and rapid response-recovery characteristics to oxygen gas, and could detect oxygen concentration as low as 1, 3, 5, and 10 ppm.

  6. Sedation Management in Children Supported on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Acute Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Schneider, James B; Sweberg, Todd; Asaro, Lisa A; Kirby, Aileen; Wypij, David; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; Curley, Martha A Q

    2017-10-01

    To describe sedation management in children supported on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for acute respiratory failure. Secondary analysis of prospectively collected data from a multicenter randomized trial of sedation (Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure). Twenty-one U.S. PICUs. One thousand two hundred fifty-five children, 2 weeks to 17 years old, with moderate/severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Sedation managed per usual care or Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure protocol. Sixty-one Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure patients (5%) with moderate/severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome were supported on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, including 29 managed per Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure protocol. Most extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patients received neuromuscular blockade (46%) or were heavily sedated with State Behavioral Scale scores -3/-2 (34%) by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation day 3. Median opioid and benzodiazepine doses on the day of cannulation, 0.15 mg/kg/hr (3.7 mg/kg/d) and 0.11 mg/kg/hr (2.8 mg/kg/d), increased by 36% and 58%, respectively, by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation day 3. In the 41 patients successfully decannulated prior to study discharge, patients were receiving 0.40 mg/kg/hr opioids (9.7 mg/kg/d) and 0.39 mg/kg/hr benzodiazepines (9.4 mg/kg/d) at decannulation, an increase from cannulation of 108% and 192%, respectively (both p < 0.001). Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patients experienced more clinically significant iatrogenic withdrawal than moderate/severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome patients managed without extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support (p < 0.001). Compared to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patients managed per Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure protocol

  7. Oxygen sensing in neuroendocrine cells and other cell types: pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells as an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Zachary; Millhorn, David E

    2003-01-01

    A steady supply of oxygen is an absolute requirement for mammalian cells to maintain normal cellular functions. To answer the challenge that oxygen deprivation represents, mammals have evolved specialized cell types that can sense changes in oxygen tension and alter gene expression to enhance oxygen delivery to hypoxic areas. These oxygensensing cells are rare and difficult to study in vivo. As a result, pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells have become a vital in vitro model system for deciphering the molecular events that confer the hypoxia-resistant and oxygen-sensing phenotypes. Research over the last few years has revealed that the hypoxia response in PC12 cells involves the interactions of several signal transduction pathways (Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinases, Akt, SAPKs, and MAPKs) and transcription factors (HIFs, CREB, and c-fos/junB). This review summarizes the current understanding of the role these signal transduction pathways and transcription factors play in determining the hypoxic response.

  8. Delayed low-dose supplemental oxygen improves survival following phosgene-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Grainge, C; Jugg, B J; Smith, A J; Brown, R F R; Jenner, J; Parkhouse, D A; Rice, P

    2010-06-01

    Phosgene is a chemical widely used in the plastics industry and has been used in warfare. It produces life-threatening pulmonary edema within hours of exposure; no antidote exists. This study examines pathophysiological changes seen following treatment with elevated inspired oxygen concentrations (Fi(O2)), in a model of phosgene-induced acute lung injury. Anesthetized pigs were exposed to phosgene (Ct 2500 mg min m(-3)) and ventilated (intermittent positive pressure ventilation, tidal volume 10 ml kg(-1), positive end-expiratory pressure 3 cm H(2)O, frequency 20 breaths min(-1)). The Fi(O2) was varied: group 1, Fi(O2) 0.30 (228 mm Hg) throughout; group 2, Fi(O2) 0.80 (608 mm Hg) immediately post exposure, to end; group 3, Fi(O2) 0.30 from 30 min post exposure, increased to 0.80 at 6 h post exposure; group 4, Fi(O2) 0.30 from 30 min post exposure, increased to 0.40 (304 mm Hg) at 6 h post exposure. Group 5, Fi(O2) 0.30 from 30 min post exposure, increased to 0.40 at 12 h post exposure. The current results demonstrate that oxygen is beneficial, with improved survival, arterial oxygen saturation, shunt fraction, and reduced lung wet weight to body weight ratio in all treatment groups, and improved arterial oxygen partial pressure in groups 2 and 3, compared to phosgene controls (group 1) animals. The authors recommend that treatment of phosgene-induced acute lung injury with inspired oxygen is delayed until signs or symptoms of hypoxia are present or arterial blood oxygenation falls. The lowest concentration of oxygen that maintains normal arterial oxygen saturation and absence of clinical signs of hypoxia is recommended.

  9. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D. J. Osborn; Po Zhang

    2006-09-30

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications has been developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. We report on a fiber optic technique for detection of gas phase oxygen up to 100 C based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the luminescence from molybdenum chloride clusters, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}. The inorganic sensing film is a composite of sol-gel particles embedded in a thin, oxygen permeable sol-gel binder. The particles are comprised of thermally stable, luminescent K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14} clusters dispersed in a fully equilibrated sol-gel matrix. From 40 to 100 C, the fiber sensor switches {approx}6x in intensity in response to alternating pulses of <0.001% O2 and 21% O{sub 2} between two well defined levels with a response time of 10 s. The sensor signal is a few nW for an input pump power of 250 {micro}W. The normalized sensor signal is linear with molar oxygen concentration and fits the theoretical Stern-Volmer relationship. Although the sensitivity decreases with temperature, sensitivity at 100 C is 160 [O{sub 2}]{sup -1}. These parameters are well suited for in-situ, real-time monitoring of oxygen for industrial process control applications.

  10. Cortical Cerebral Blood Flow, Oxygen Extraction Fraction, and Metabolic Rate in Patients with Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis or Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Li, Y

    2016-04-01

    With the advances of magnetic resonance technology, the CBF, oxygen extraction fraction, and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen can be measured in MRI. Our aim was to measure the CBF, oxygen extraction fraction, and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen use in patients with different severities of middle cerebral artery stenosis or acute stroke by using the arterial spin-labeling and susceptibility-weighted imaging techniques. Fifty-seven patients with MCA stenosis or acute stroke were recruited and classified into 4 groups: mild MCA stenosis (group 1), severe MCA stenosis (group 2), occluded MCA (group 3), and acute stroke (group 4). Arterial spin-labeling and SWI sequences were used to acquire CBF, oxygen extraction fraction, and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen. The oxygen extraction fraction in hemispheres with mild MCA stenosis (group 1) was remarkably higher than that in the contralateral hemisphere. In addition, hemispheres with severe MCA stenosis (group 2) had significantly lower CBF and a significantly higher oxygen extraction fraction than the contralateral hemisphere. Hemispheres with occluded MCA (group 3) or acute stroke (group 4) had a significantly lower CBF and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen and a significantly higher oxygen extraction fraction than the contralateral hemisphere. The oxygen extraction fraction gradually increased in groups 1-3. When this offset a decrease in CBF, the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen remained at a normal level. An occluded MCA led to reduction in both the CBF and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen. Moreover, the oxygen extraction fraction and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen significantly increased and decreased, respectively, in the occluded MCA region during acute stroke. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  11. Acute Variations in Retinal Vascular Oxygen Content in a Rabbit Model of Retinal Venous Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Saati, Saloomeh; Martin, Gabriel; Chader, Gerald; Humayun, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To study the variation in intravascular oxygen saturation (oximetry) during an acute retinal vein occlusion (RVO) using hyperspectral computed tomographic spectroscopy based oximetry measurements. Methods Thirty rabbits were dilated and anesthetized for experiments. Baseline oximetry measurements were made using a custom-made hyperspectral computed tomographic imaging spectrometer coupled to a fundus camera. RVO were induced using argon green laser following an intravenous injection of Rose Bengal. RVO induction was confirmed by fluorescein angiography. Retinal oximetry measurements were repeated in arterial and venous branches one hour after RVO induction and up to 4 weeks afterwards. Comparison of retinal oximetry before and after vein occlusion was made using the Student T-test. Results One hour after RVO induction, we observed statistically significant reductions in the intravascular oxygen saturation in temporal retinal arteries (85.1±6.1% vs. 80.6±6.6%; p<0.0001) and veins (71.4±5.5% vs. 64.0±4.7%; p<0.0001). This decrease was reversible in animals that spontaneously recannulated the vein occlusion. There were no statistically significant differences in oxygen saturation in the nasal control arteries and veins before and after temporal vein RVO induction. Conclusions We demonstrate, for the first time, acute changes in the intravascular oxygen content of retinal vessels 1 hour after RVO. These changes are reversible upon spontaneous recannulation of retinal vessels. This study demonstrates that hyperspectral computer tomographic spectroscopy based oximetry can detect physiological variations in intravascular retinal oxygen saturation. The study also provides the first qualitative and quantitative evidence of the variation in retinal vascular oxygen content directly attributable to an acute retinal vein occlusion. PMID:23185567

  12. Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand oxygen guidelines for acute oxygen use in adults: ‘Swimming between the flags’*

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Richard; Chien, Jimmy; Douglas, James; Eastlake, Leonie; Farah, Claude; King, Gregory; Moore, Rosemary; Pilcher, Janine; Richards, Michael; Smith, Sheree; Walters, Haydn

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand guidelines is to provide simple, practical evidence-based recommendations for the acute use of oxygen in adults in clinical practice. The intended users are all health professionals responsible for the administration and/or monitoring of oxygen therapy in the management of acute medical patients in the community and hospital settings (excluding perioperative and intensive care patients), those responsible for the training of such health professionals, and both public and private health care organizations that deliver oxygen therapy. PMID:26486092

  13. Growth and characterization of nanostructured CuO films via CBD approach for oxygen gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurfazliana, M. F.; Sahdan, M. Z.; Saim, H.

    2017-01-01

    Nanostructured copper oxide (CuO) films were grown on portable IDE circuit silicon-based by low-cost chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique at three different deposition times (3 h, 5 h and 7 h). The effect of deposition times on the morphological, structural, optical and sensing properties of the nanostructured films were investigated. From the morphological and structural properties, the nanostructured film deposited at 5 h was found to have homogenous surface of CuO nanowhiskers and high crystallinity with tenorite phase compared to 3 h and 7 h films. Besides, there is no heat treatment required in order to produce CuO nanostructures film with tenorite phase. The sensing response (resistance changes) of as-synthesized films to concentration of oxygen (O2) gas also was compared. Film resistance of CuO nanostructures was studied in an environment of dry air loaded (gas sensor chamber) with 30 % of O2 gas. The results revealed that the deposition time causes significant effect on the sensing performance of nanostructured CuO to O2 gas.

  14. Linear oxygen-sensing response from a rhenium complex induced by heavy atom: Synthesis, characterization, photophysical study and sensing performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Wan; Lun, Zhao; Lisha, Wang; Guangyang, Xu

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we synthesized a Br-containing ligand of 2-(4-bromophenyl)-5-(pyridin-2-yl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole and its corresponding Re(I) complex. Their synthesis, characterization, single crystal structure, electronic transitions and photophysical property were presented and discussed in detail. This Re(I) complex was found to be a yellow emitter with slim π → π* radiative decay contribution, and its emission was also found to be sensitive towards O2. By doping this Re(I) complex into a polymer matrix, the oxygen-sensing performance of the resulted composite nanofibers was also investigated. Owing to the porous structure of the supporting matrix, the optimal sample gave the highest sensitivity of 3.91 with short response time of only 9 s. In addition, the linearity of the Stern-Volmer plots was greatly improved due to the highly pure emissive center triggered by heavy-atom turbulence effect from Br atom, as indicted by theoretical calculation result.

  15. Linear oxygen-sensing response from a rhenium complex induced by heavy atom: synthesis, characterization, photophysical study and sensing performance.

    PubMed

    Wan, Pu; Zhao, Lun; Wang, Lisha; Xu, Guangyang

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we synthesized a Br-containing ligand of 2-(4-bromophenyl)-5-(pyridin-2-yl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole and its corresponding Re(I) complex. Their synthesis, characterization, single crystal structure, electronic transitions and photophysical property were presented and discussed in detail. This Re(I) complex was found to be a yellow emitter with slim π→π* radiative decay contribution, and its emission was also found to be sensitive towards O2. By doping this Re(I) complex into a polymer matrix, the oxygen-sensing performance of the resulted composite nanofibers was also investigated. Owing to the porous structure of the supporting matrix, the optimal sample gave the highest sensitivity of 3.91 with short response time of only 9 s. In addition, the linearity of the Stern-Volmer plots was greatly improved due to the highly pure emissive center triggered by heavy-atom turbulence effect from Br atom, as indicted by theoretical calculation result.

  16. Acute transient non-physiological over-sensing in the ventricle with a DF4 lead

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kevin Kit; Gould, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The DF-4 is a new defibrillator lead technology. We present two cases of non-physiological transient ventricular over-sensing in patients who underwent implantation of an ICD for secondary prevention. Case 1 had ventricular over-sensing during pacing threshold evaluation post defibrillation testing while Case 2 had the lead integrity alert triggered immediately post discharge with transient over-sensing. No lead-connector issues were found. Case 1 was likely due to improper venting of the header and trapped air. Case 2 was hypothesized to be due to intermittent header pin non-contact secondary to blood in the header. These cases reveal that DF-4 leads are subject to both reported and potentially novel causes of transient acute ventricular over-sensing. PMID:26937124

  17. Video monitoring of oxygen saturation during controlled episodes of acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Addison, Paul S; Foo, David M H; Jacquel, Dominique; Borg, Ulf

    2016-08-01

    A method for extracting video photoplethysmographic information from an RGB video stream is tested on data acquired during a porcine model of acute hypoxia. Cardiac pulsatile information was extracted from the acquired signals and processed to determine a continuously reported oxygen saturation (SvidO2). A high degree of correlation was found to exist between the video and a reference from a pulse oximeter. The calculated mean bias and accuracy across all eight desaturation episodes were -0.03% (range: -0.21% to 0.24%) and accuracy 4.90% (range: 3.80% to 6.19%) respectively. The results support the hypothesis that oxygen saturation trending can be evaluated accurately from a video system during acute hypoxia.

  18. Renal oxygenation and hemodynamics in acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prabhleen; Ricksten, Sven-Erik; Bragadottir, Gudrun; Redfors, Bengt; Nordquist, Lina

    2013-01-01

    Summary 1. Acute kidney injury (AKI) puts a major burden on health systems that may arise from multiple initiating insults, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, cardiovascular surgery, radio-contrast administration as well as sepsis. Similarly, the incidence and prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) continues to increase with significant morbidity and mortality. Moreover, an increasing number of AKI patients survive to develop CKD and end-stage kidney disease (ESRD). 2. Although the mechanisms for development of AKI and progression of CKD remain poorly understood, initial impairment of oxygen balance is likely to constitute a common pathway, causing renal tissue hypoxia and ATP starvation that will in turn induce extracellular matrix production, collagen deposition and fibrosis. Thus, possible future strategies for one or both conditions may involve dopamine, loop-diuretics, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors and atrial natriuretic peptide, substances that target kidney oxygen consumption and regulators of renal oxygenation such as nitric oxide and heme oxygenase-1. PMID:23360244

  19. Synthesis, photophysical and oxygen-sensing properties of a novel Eu{sup 3+} complex incorporated in mesoporous MCM-41

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo Qinghui; Li Bin; Zhang Liming; Wang Yinghui; Liu Yanhong; Zhang Jun; Chen Ying; Guo Lifan

    2010-07-15

    A novel Eu{sup 3+} complex of Eu(DPIQ)(TTA){sub 3} (DPIQ=10H-dipyrido [f,h] indolo [3,2-b] quinoxaline, TTA=2-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate) was synthesized and encapsulated in the mesoporous MCM-41, hoping to explore an oxygen-sensing system based on the long-lived Eu{sup 3+} emitter. The Eu(DPIQ)(TTA){sub 3}/MCM-41 composites were characterized by infrared spectra (IR), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectra, small-angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD), luminescence intensity quenching upon various oxygen concentrations, and fluorescence decay analysis. The results indicated that the composites exhibited the characteristic emission of the Eu{sup 3+} ion and the fluorescence intensity of {sup 5}D{sub 0}-{sup 7}F{sub 2} obviously decreased with increasing oxygen concentrations. The oxygen sensing properties of the composites with different loading levels of Eu(DPIQ)(TTA){sub 3} complex were investigated. A sensitivity of 3.04, a short response time of 7 s, and good linearity were obtained for the composites with a loading level of 20 mg/g. These results are the best reported values for optical oxygen-sensing materials based on Eu{sup 3+} complexes so far. - Graphical abstract: Novel optical oxygen-sensing composites are prepared by incorporating a novel Eu{sup 3+} complex Eu(DPIQ)(TTA){sub 3} into MCM-41. The emission intensity of Eu(DPIQ)(TTA){sub 3}/MCM-41 composites exhibits a strong oxygen dependent characteristic and the composite with a loading level of 20 mg/g possesses better fluorescence quenching with increasing oxygen concentrations.

  20. Acute inhibition of respiratory capacity of muscle reduces peak oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    McAllister, R M; Terjung, R L

    1990-12-01

    Electron transport capacity of skeletal muscle was inhibited in situ in an acute dose-dependent manner with myxothiazol, a tight-binding inhibitor of ubiquinone-cytochrome c reductase, complex III of the respiratory chain. Peak oxygen consumption of rat hindlimb muscle was determined via consecutive 10-min isometric contraction (100 ms at 100 Hz) periods of increasing energy demands (4, 8, 15, 30, 45, and 60 tetani/min), using an isolated hindlimb preparation perfused with a high oxygen delivery (approximately 6-8 mumol.min-1.g-1). Peak oxygen consumption decreased from 4.61 +/- 0.19 mumol.min-1.g-1 (control) in a dose-dependent manner to 0.73 +/- 0.07 mumol.min-1.g-1 at 0.50 microM myxothiazol in blood. Oxygen extraction decreased from 65 to 12% of delivered oxygen. Furthermore, the reduction in peak respiratory rate became evident at lower energy demands of the contraction sequence. Myxothiazol inhibition of respiration was not dependent on the presence of muscle contractions but was evident when mitochondria were uncoupled with carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. A 50% effective dosage (ED50) of 0.21 microM myxothiazol for inhibition of peak oxygen consumption closely resembled the inhibition of NADH-cytochrome c reductase activity (ED50 of 0.27 microM) determined from homogenates of the same muscles. This suggests that the peak oxygen consumption of skeletal muscle is tightly coupled to the capacity for electron transport evaluated by flux through NADH-cytochrome c reductase. If the enzyme activity measured in vitro correctly represents available enzymatic capacity within contracting muscle, approximately 75% of electron transport capacity for handling reducing equivalents generated from NADH is utilized during peak oxygen consumption of rat hindlimb muscle contracting in situ.

  1. Molybdenum chloride incorporated sol-gel materials for oxygen sensing above room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, D. J., III

    Maximizing the efficiency of the combustion process requires the ability to sense oxygen levels over a broad range of concentrations with fast response times under rapidly varying conditions of pressure and temperature to maintain the correct fuel/oxygen ratio in real-time. Quenching of the luminescence from organometallic compounds by oxygen has been used to develop a number of fiber-based sensors. A major drawback of these organometallic indicators for combustion applications is that the chromophores degrade with time, have a limited operational temperature range, typically room temperature +/-25°C, and lack long-term reliability. This work investigates luminescent molybdenum clusters based on Mo6Cl12 were as replacements for organometallic indicators. A study of the high temperature stability of Mo6Cl 12 in air revealed irreversible changes in the optical absorption spectrum at T >250°C and a loss of the red luminescence characteristic of the pristine clusters. Thermal aging experiments run in air and under nitrogen point to oxidation of the clusters as the cause of the change in optical properties. X-ray powder diffraction measurements on samples annealed at 300°C under controlled conditions are consistent with oxidation of Mo6Cl 12 to form MoO3. Optical and thermal aging experiments show that K2Mo6Cl14•1H2O, the alkali metal salt of Mo6Cl12, has higher thermal stability and remains luminescent after long-term aging in air at 280°C. Methods were developed for depositing K2Mo6Cl14•1H 2O-incorporated sol--gel films on planar and optical fiber substrates by dip coating and spray coating. The mechanical properties of the films depended on the film thickness; thin films were stable, but cracks often formed in the thicker films needed for sensors. This problem was addressed using two strategies: altering the components of the sol--gel solutions used to embed the clusters and by devising a composite approach to sensing layers where a slurry of fully cured sol

  2. A green-emitting Cu complex for oxygen-sensing purpose: Synthesis, characterization and photophysical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Han; Wei, Li; Zhentao, Liu; Xiangen, Han

    2015-05-01

    In the present work, a green-emitting Cu(I) complex [Cu(BT-Et)(POP)]BF4 was synthesized and fully characterized, where BT-Et = 4-(1-ethyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)thiazole, POP = bis(2-(diphenylphosphanyl)phenyl) ether, respectively. An ethyl group was connected onto the diamine ligand to breach π-π attraction within solid [Cu(BT-Et)(POP)]BF4, favoring O2 molecule attack and sensitivity improvement. Its molecular identity was confirmed by single crystal analysis and theoretical calculation. [Cu(BT-Et)(POP)]BF4 emitted long-lived green emission peaking at 521 nm upon photoexcitation which was vulnerable towards O2 molecule, making itself a potential oxygen sensing material. [Cu(BT-Et)(POP)]BF4 was then doped into a silica supporting matrix MCM-41. The resulting composite samples showed sensing behavior towards O2 molecule, with short response time of 10 s and sensitivity of 5.56.

  3. Detection of fluorescence lifetime based on solid state technology and its application to optical oxygen sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Wolfgang R.; O'Leary, Paul; Wolfbeis, Otto S.

    1995-05-01

    This paper presents the development of an instrument using solid state components for luminescence lifetime based sensing. For a number of applications luminescence lifetime based sensing is the preferred method because of its inherent referencing possibility. Further, lifetime based instrumentation promises a simplified optical construction, since the measurement is, within certain limits, independent of the signal intensity. Various measurement schemes have been reported, especially for optical oxygen sensors, using dynamic fluorescence quenching as the information carrier. However, most of them require bulky and expensive instrumentation because of the need for high-frequency modulated excitation sources and detection systems. In general photo-multipliers have been required. We report on the development of a measurement scheme using low-cost semiconductor devices (light emitting diodes, photo-diodes). The detection system is based on heterodyne demodulation techniques for reduction of the signal frequency range. The basic principles of the system is described and a comparison with existing measurement schemes is presented. The capabilities of the system are demonstrated with measurements on two sensor types having luminescence lifetimes in the range of 1 microsecond(s) and 50 microsecond(s) . Finally, a custom CMOS integrated circuit is presented which implements the front-end of the detection system.

  4. Early non-destructive biofouling detection and spatial distribution: Application of oxygen sensing optodes.

    PubMed

    Farhat, N M; Staal, M; Siddiqui, A; Borisov, S M; Bucs, Sz S; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2015-10-15

    Biofouling is a serious problem in reverse osmosis/nanofiltration (RO/NF) applications, reducing membrane performance. Early detection of biofouling plays an essential role in an adequate anti-biofouling strategy. Presently, fouling of membrane filtration systems is mainly determined by measuring changes in pressure drop, which is not exclusively linked to biofouling. Non-destructive imaging of oxygen concentrations (i) is specific for biological activity of biofilms and (ii) may enable earlier detection of biofilm accumulation than pressure drop. The objective of this study was to test whether transparent luminescent planar O2 optodes, in combination with a simple imaging system, can be used for early non-destructive biofouling detection. This biofouling detection is done by mapping the two-dimensional distribution of O2 concentrations and O2 decrease rates inside a membrane fouling simulator (MFS). Results show that at an early stage, biofouling development was detected by the oxygen sensing optodes while no significant increase in pressure drop was yet observed. Additionally, optodes could detect spatial heterogeneities in biofouling distribution at a micro scale. Biofilm development started mainly at the feed spacer crossings. The spatial and quantitative information on biological activity will lead to better understanding of the biofouling processes, contributing to the development of more effective biofouling control strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Composite Hydrogels with Engineered Microdomains for Optical Glucose Sensing at Low Oxygen Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bornhoeft, Lindsey R.; Biswas, Aniket; McShane, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing need for advanced tools that enable frequent monitoring of biomarkers for precision medicine. In this work, we present a composite hydrogel-based system providing real-time optical bioanalyte monitoring. The responsive material, alginate-in-alginate (AnA), is comprised of an alginate hydrogel with embedded bioactive, nanofilm-coated phosphorescent microdomains; palladium tetracarboxyphenylporphyrin serves as an optical indicator, glucose oxidase as a model enzyme, and layer-by-layer deposited polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) as the diffusion barrier. Glutaraldehyde crosslinking of the nanofilms resulted in a dramatic reduction in glucose diffusion (179%) while oxygen transport was not significantly affected. The responses of the AnA hydrogels to step changes of glucose at both ambient and physiological oxygen levels were evaluated, revealing controlled tuning of sensitivity and dynamic range. Stability, assessed by alternately exposing the responsive AnA hydrogels to extremely high and zero glucose concentrations, resulted in no significant difference in the response over 20 cycles. These AnA hydrogels represent an attractive approach to biosensing based on biocompatible materials that may be used as minimally-invasive, implantable devices capable of optical interrogation. The model glucose-responsive composite material studied in this work will serve as a template that can be translated for sensing additional analytes (e.g., lactate, urea, pyruvate, cholesterol) and can be used for monitoring other chronic conditions. PMID:28117762

  6. Oxygen Sensing Mesenchymal Progenitors Promote Neo-Vasculogenesis in a Humanized Mouse Model In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Nicole A.; Ortner, Anna; Jacamo, Rodrigo O.; Reinisch, Andreas; Schallmoser, Katharina; Rohban, Rokhsareh; Etchart, Nathalie; Fruehwirth, Margareta; Beham-Schmid, Christine; Andreeff, Michael; Strunk, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Despite insights into the molecular pathways regulating hypoxia-induced gene expression, it is not known which cell types accomplish oxygen sensing during neo-vasculogenesis. We have developed a humanized mouse model of endothelial and mesenchymal progenitor co-transplantation to delineate the cellular compartments responsible for hypoxia response during vasculogenesis. Mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSPCs) accumulated nuclear hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α earlier and more sensitively than endothelial colony forming progenitor cells (ECFCs) in vitro and in vivo. Hypoxic ECFCs showed reduced function in vitro and underwent apoptosis within 24h in vivo when used without MSPCs. Surprisingly, only in MSPCs did pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of HIF-1α abrogate neo-vasculogenesis. HIF deletion in ECFCs caused no effect. ECFCs could be rescued from hypoxia-induced apoptosis by HIF-competent MSPCs resulting in the formation of patent perfused human vessels. Several angiogenic factors need to act in concert to partially substitute mesenchymal HIF-deficiency. Results demonstrate that ECFCs require HIF-competent vessel wall progenitors to initiate vasculogenesis in vivo and to bypass hypoxia-induced apoptosis. We describe a novel mechanistic role of MSPCs as oxygen sensors promoting vasculogenesis thus underscoring their importance for the development of advanced cellular therapies. PMID:22970226

  7. Oxidant and Redox Signaling in Vascular Oxygen Sensing: Implications for Systemic and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract It has been well known for >100 years that systemic blood vessels dilate in response to decreases in oxygen tension (hypoxia; low Po2), and this response appears to be critical to supply blood to the stressed organ. Conversely, pulmonary vessels constrict to a decrease in alveolar Po2 to maintain a balance in the ventilation-to-perfusion ratio. Currently, although little question exists that the Po2 affects vascular reactivity and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) act as oxygen sensors, the molecular mechanisms involved in modulating the vascular reactivity are still not clearly understood. Many laboratories, including ours, have suggested that the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+ ]i), which regulates vasomotor function, is controlled by free radicals and redox signaling, including NAD(P)H and glutathione (GSH) redox. In this review article, therefore, we discuss the implications of redox and oxidant alterations seen in pulmonary and systemic hypertension, and how key targets that control [Ca2+ ]i, such as ion channels, Ca2+ release from internal stores and uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and the Ca2+ sensitivity to the myofilaments, are regulated by changes in intracellular redox and oxidants associated with vascular Po2 sensing in physiologic or pathophysiologic conditions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 10, 1137–1152. PMID:18315496

  8. Engineering the oxygen sensing regulation results in an enhanced recombinant human hemoglobin production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José L; Liu, Lifang; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Efficient production of appropriate oxygen carriers for transfusions (blood substitutes or artificial blood) has been pursued for many decades, and to date several strategies have been used, from synthetic polymers to cell-free hemoglobin carriers. The recent advances in the field of metabolic engineering also allowed the generation of different genetically modified organisms for the production of recombinant human hemoglobin. Several studies have showed very promising results using the bacterium Escherichia coli as a production platform, reporting hemoglobin titers above 5% of the total cell protein content. However, there are still certain limitations regarding the protein stability and functionality of the recombinant hemoglobin produced in bacterial systems. In order to overcome these limitations, yeast systems have been proposed as the eukaryal alternative. We recently reported the generation of a set of plasmids to produce functional human hemoglobin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with final titers of active hemoglobin exceeding 4% of the total cell protein. In this study, we propose a strategy for further engineering S. cerevisiae by altering the oxygen sensing pathway by deleting the transcription factor HAP1, which resulted in an increase of the final recombinant active hemoglobin titer exceeding 7% of the total cellular protein. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A phosphorescent copper(I) complex: Synthesis, characterization, photophysical property, and oxygen-sensing behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Caihong; Tao, Guoquan; Xu, Xinhua; Feng, Xiaoqing; Luo, Rongcheng

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis, crystal structure, photophysical properties, and electronic nature of a phosphorescent Cu(I) complex of [Cu(Phen-Np)(POP)]BF 4, where Phen-Np and POP stand for 2-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline and bis(2-(diphenylphosphanyl)phenyl) ether, respectively. [Cu(Phen-Np)(POP)]BF 4 renders a yellow phosphorescence peaking at 545 nm, with a long excited state lifetime of 4.69 μs. Density functional calculation reveals that the emission comes from a triplet metal-to-ligand-charge-transfer excited state. We electrospun composite nanofibers of [Cu(Phen-Np)(POP)]BF 4 and polystyrene (PS), hoping to explore the possibility of using the composite nanofibers as an oxygen sensing material. The finally obtained samples with average diameter of ˜300 nm exhibit a maximum sensitivity of 7.2 towards molecular oxygen with short response time of 7 s due to the large surface-area-to-volume ratio of nanofibrous membranes. No photobleaching is detected in these samples.

  10. Proteomic analysis reveals diverse proline hydroxylation-mediated oxygen-sensing cellular pathways in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bing; Gao, Yankun; Ruan, Hai-Bin; Chen, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Proline hydroxylation is a critical cellular mechanism regulating oxygen-response pathways in tumor initiation and progression. Yet, its substrate diversity and functions remain largely unknown. Here, we report a system-wide analysis to characterize proline hydroxylation substrates in cancer cells using an immunoaffinity-purification assisted proteomics strategy. We identified 562 sites from 272 proteins in HeLa cells. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that proline hydroxylation substrates are significantly enriched with mRNA processing and stress-response cellular pathways with canonical and diverse flanking sequence motifs. Structural analysis indicates a significant enrichment of proline hydroxylation participating in the secondary structure of substrate proteins. Our study identified and validated Brd4, a key transcription factor, as a novel proline hydroxylation substrate. Functional analysis showed that the inhibition of proline hydroxylation pathway significantly reduced the proline hydroxylation abundance on Brd4 and affected Brd4-mediated transcriptional activity as well as cell proliferation in AML leukemia cells. Taken together, our study identified a broad regulatory role of proline hydroxylation in cellular oxygen-sensing pathways and revealed potentially new targets that dynamically respond to hypoxia microenvironment in tumor cells. PMID:27764789

  11. Composite Hydrogels with Engineered Microdomains for Optical Glucose Sensing at Low Oxygen Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bornhoeft, Lindsey R; Biswas, Aniket; McShane, Michael J

    2017-01-22

    There is a growing need for advanced tools that enable frequent monitoring of biomarkers for precision medicine. In this work, we present a composite hydrogel-based system providing real-time optical bioanalyte monitoring. The responsive material, alginate-in-alginate (AnA), is comprised of an alginate hydrogel with embedded bioactive, nanofilm-coated phosphorescent microdomains; palladium tetracarboxyphenylporphyrin serves as an optical indicator, glucose oxidase as a model enzyme, and layer-by-layer deposited polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) as the diffusion barrier. Glutaraldehyde crosslinking of the nanofilms resulted in a dramatic reduction in glucose diffusion (179%) while oxygen transport was not significantly affected. The responses of the AnA hydrogels to step changes of glucose at both ambient and physiological oxygen levels were evaluated, revealing controlled tuning of sensitivity and dynamic range. Stability, assessed by alternately exposing the responsive AnA hydrogels to extremely high and zero glucose concentrations, resulted in no significant difference in the response over 20 cycles. These AnA hydrogels represent an attractive approach to biosensing based on biocompatible materials that may be used as minimally-invasive, implantable devices capable of optical interrogation. The model glucose-responsive composite material studied in this work will serve as a template that can be translated for sensing additional analytes (e.g., lactate, urea, pyruvate, cholesterol) and can be used for monitoring other chronic conditions.

  12. Effect of acute and delayed hyperbaric oxygen therapy on cyanide whole blood levels during acute cyanide intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lawson-Smith, P; Jansen, E C; Hilsted, L; Johnsen, A H; Hyldegaard, O

    2011-01-01

    Cyanide and carbon monoxide, which are often found in fire victims, are toxic gases emitted from fires. Cyanide and carbon monoxide have similar molecular structure. Cyanide binds to the enzyme cytochrome oxidase a, a3 similar to carbon monoxide, thus blocking the mitochondrial respiration chain causing depletion of adenosine triphosphate. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) is recommended for treating carbon monoxide poisoning. The therapeutic effect is due to a high oxygen pressure removing carbon monoxide from the cells. We hypothesise that HBO2 induces changes in whole-blood-cyanide by a competitive mechanism forcing cyanide out of cellular tissues. A rat model was developed to study this effect. Female Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized with a fentanyl + fluanizone combination and midazolam given subcutaneously (s.c.). Rats were poisoned with 5.4 mg/kg KCN injected intra-peritoneally in Group 1 and intra-arterially in Group 2. Blood samples were taken immediately after poisoning, and at one and a half, three and five hours. Blood was drawn from a jugular vein in Group 1 and from a femoral artery in Group 2. Group 1 rats were divided into a control group of 12 rats without HBO2, 10 rats had acute HBO2 immediately after poisoning and a group of 10 rats had HBO2 one and a half hours after poisoning. Group 2 rats were divided into a control group and an acute HBO2 group, with 10 rats in both groups. Whole-blood-cyanide concentrations were measured using the Conway method based on diffusion and the subsequent formation of cyanocobalamin measured by a spectrophotometer. Results showed that whole-blood-cyanide concentration in Group 1 controls and acute HBO2 initially rose and then fell towards zero. In rats treated with delayed HBO2, the reduction in whole-blood-cyanide concentration was significantly less as compared to controls and acute HBO2-treated rats. Group 2 controls whole-blood-cyanide concentration decreased towards zero throughout the observation period. However

  13. Acute cocoa flavanol improves cerebral oxygenation without enhancing executive function at rest or after exercise.

    PubMed

    Decroix, Lieselot; Tonoli, Cajsa; Soares, Danusa D; Tagougui, Semah; Heyman, Elsa; Meeusen, Romain

    2016-12-01

    Acute exercise-induced improvements in cognitive function are accompanied by increased (cerebral) blood flow and increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels. Acute cocoa flavanol (CF) intake may improve cognitive function, cerebral blood flow (in humans), and BNDF levels (in animals). This study investigated (i) the effect of CF intake in combination with exercise on cognitive function and (ii) cerebral hemodynamics and BDNF in response to CF intake and exercise. Twelve healthy men participated in this randomized, double-blind, crossover study. Participants performed a cognitive task (CT) at 100 min after acute 903-mg CF or placebo (PL) intake, followed by a 30-min time-trial. Immediately after this exercise, the same CT was performed. Prefrontal near-infrared spectroscopy was applied during CT and exercise to measure changes in oxygenated (ΔHbO2), deoxygenated (ΔHHb), and total haemoglobin (ΔHbtot) and blood samples were drawn and analyzed for BDNF. Reaction time was faster postexercise, but was not influenced by CF. ΔHbO2 during the resting CT was increased by CF, compared with PL. ΔHbO2, ΔHHb, and ΔHbtot increased in response to exercise without any effect of CF. During the postexercise cognitive task, there were no hemodynamic differences between CF or PL. Serum BDNF was increased by exercise, but was not influenced by CF. In conclusion, at rest, CF intake increased cerebral oxygenation, but not BDNF concentrations, and no impact on executive function was detected. This beneficial effect of CF on cerebral oxygenation at rest was overruled by the strong exercise-induced increases in cerebral perfusion and oxygenation.

  14. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Outcomes in Acute Respiratory Distress Treatment: Case Study in a Chinese Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Li, Tong; Xu, Lei; Hu, Xiao-min; Duan, Da-wei; Li, Zhi-bo; Gao, Xin-jing; Li, Jun; Wu, Peng; Liu, Ying-Wu

    2017-01-01

    Background No definitive conclusions have been drawn from the available data about the utilization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to treat severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The aim of this study was to review our center’s experience with ECMO and determine predictors of outcome from our Chinese center. Material/Methods We retrospectively analyzed a total of 23 consecutive candidates who fulfilled the study entry criteria between January 2009 and December 2015. Detailed clinical data, ECMO flow, and respiratory parameters before and after the introduction of ECMO were compared among in-hospital survivors and nonsurvivors; factors associated with mortality were investigated. Results Hemodynamics and oxygenation parameters were significantly improved after ECMO initiation. Thirteen patients survived to hospital discharge. Univariate correlation analysis demonstrated that APACHE II score (r=−0.463, p=0.03), acute kidney injury (r=−0.574, p=0.005), membrane oxygenator replacement (r=−0.516, p=0.014) and total length of hospital stay (r=0.526, p=0.012) were significantly correlated with survival to hospital discharge, and that the evolution of the levels of urea nitrogen, platelet, and fibrinogen may help to determine patient prognosis. Sixteen patients referred for ECMO from an outside hospital were successfully transported to our institution by ambulance, including seven transported under ECMO support. The survival rate of the ECMO-transport group was comparable to the conventional transport or the non-transport group (both p=1.000). Conclusions ECMO is an effective alternative option for severe ARDS. APACHE II score on admission, onset of acute kidney injury, and membrane oxygenator replacement, and the evolution of levels of urea nitrogen, platelet, and fibrinogen during hospitalization may help to determine the in-hospital patient prognosis. By establishing a well-trained mobile ECMO team, a long-distance, inter

  15. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Outcomes in Acute Respiratory Distress Treatment: Case Study in a Chinese Referral Center.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Li, Tong; Xu, Lei; Hu, Xiao-Min; Duan, Da-Wei; Li, Zhi-Bo; Gao, Xin-Jing; Li, Jun; Wu, Peng; Liu, Ying-Wu

    2017-02-10

    BACKGROUND No definitive conclusions have been drawn from the available data about the utilization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to treat severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The aim of this study was to review our center's experience with ECMO and determine predictors of outcome from our Chinese center. MATERIAL AND METHODS We retrospectively analyzed a total of 23 consecutive candidates who fulfilled the study entry criteria between January 2009 and December 2015. Detailed clinical data, ECMO flow, and respiratory parameters before and after the introduction of ECMO were compared among in-hospital survivors and nonsurvivors; factors associated with mortality were investigated. RESULTS Hemodynamics and oxygenation parameters were significantly improved after ECMO initiation. Thirteen patients survived to hospital discharge. Univariate correlation analysis demonstrated that APACHE II score (r=-0.463, p=0.03), acute kidney injury (r=-0.574, p=0.005), membrane oxygenator replacement (r=-0.516, p=0.014) and total length of hospital stay (r=0.526, p=0.012) were significantly correlated with survival to hospital discharge, and that the evolution of the levels of urea nitrogen, platelet, and fibrinogen may help to determine patient prognosis. Sixteen patients referred for ECMO from an outside hospital were successfully transported to our institution by ambulance, including seven transported under ECMO support. The survival rate of the ECMO-transport group was comparable to the conventional transport or the non-transport group (both p=1.000). CONCLUSIONS ECMO is an effective alternative option for severe ARDS. APACHE II score on admission, onset of acute kidney injury, and membrane oxygenator replacement, and the evolution of levels of urea nitrogen, platelet, and fibrinogen during hospitalization may help to determine the in-hospital patient prognosis. By establishing a well-trained mobile ECMO team, a long-distance, inter-hospital transport

  16. Oxygen sensing with an absolute optical sensor based on biluminescence (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas Redondo, Caterin; Reineke, Sebastian

    2017-06-01

    exciton dynamic range extended up to nine orders of magnitude between nanosecond-lifetime fluorescence and millisecond-lifetime phosphorescence. In this presentation, we will report on the oxygen sensing characteristics of this luminescent system compared to a benchmarked single state optical sensor. Such properties can be evaluated because of the sensitivity of the triplet state to oxygen and therefore, we investigate the dependence of the persistent phosphorescence on the oxygen content. Furthermore, we will address our efforts towards the potential integration of novel optical biluminescent sensing into organic electronics.

  17. High sensitivity and accuracy dissolved oxygen (DO) detection by using PtOEP/poly(MMA-co-TFEMA) sensing film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Honglin; Wang, Ying; Tian, Yanqing; Zhao, Jiupeng; Li, Yao

    2017-01-05

    Fluorinated acrylate polymer has received great interest in recent years due to its extraordinary characteristics such as high oxygen permeability, good stability, low surface energy and refractive index. In this work, platinum octaethylporphyrin/poly(methylmethacrylate-co-trifluoroethyl methacrylate) (PtOEP/poly(MMA-co-TFEMA)) oxygen sensing film was prepared by the immobilizing of PtOEP in a poly(MMA-co-TFEMA) matrix and the technological readiness of optical properties was established based on the principle of luminescence quenching. It was found that the oxygen-sensing performance could be improved by optimizing the monomer ratio (MMA/TFEMA=1:1), tributylphosphate(TBP, 0.05mL) and PtOEP (5μg) content. Under this condition, the maximum quenching ratio I0/I100 of the oxygen sensing film is obtained to be about 8.16, Stern-Volmer equation is I0/I=1.003+2.663[O2] (R(2)=0.999), exhibiting a linear relationship, good photo-stability, high sensitivity and accuracy. Finally, the synthesized PtOEP/poly(MMA-co-TFEMA) sensing film was used for DO detection in different water samples.

  18. High sensitivity and accuracy dissolved oxygen (DO) detection by using PtOEP/poly(MMA-co-TFEMA) sensing film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Honglin; Wang, Ying; Tian, Yanqing; Zhao, Jiupeng; Li, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Fluorinated acrylate polymer has received great interest in recent years due to its extraordinary characteristics such as high oxygen permeability, good stability, low surface energy and refractive index. In this work, platinum octaethylporphyrin/poly(methylmethacrylate-co-trifluoroethyl methacrylate) (PtOEP/poly(MMA-co-TFEMA)) oxygen sensing film was prepared by the immobilizing of PtOEP in a poly(MMA-co-TFEMA) matrix and the technological readiness of optical properties was established based on the principle of luminescence quenching. It was found that the oxygen-sensing performance could be improved by optimizing the monomer ratio (MMA/TFEMA = 1:1), tributylphosphate(TBP, 0.05 mL) and PtOEP (5 μg) content. Under this condition, the maximum quenching ratio I0/I100 of the oxygen sensing film is obtained to be about 8.16, Stern-Volmer equation is I0/I = 1.003 + 2.663[O2] (R2 = 0.999), exhibiting a linear relationship, good photo-stability, high sensitivity and accuracy. Finally, the synthesized PtOEP/poly(MMA-co-TFEMA) sensing film was used for DO detection in different water samples.

  19. Cardiac output and regional oxygen transport in the acutely hypoxic conscious sheep.

    PubMed

    Nesarajah, M S; Matalon, S; Krasney, J A; Farhi, L E

    1983-08-01

    We have studied the effects of severe acute hypoxemia (PaO2 = 25 torr) on cardiac output (Q), heart rate (HR), left ventricular contractility ((dP/dt)max/P), intravascular pressures and blood flow to the heart, brain, abdominal viscera, skin and respiratory and non-respiratory muscles in twelve conscious ewes that breathed a mixture of 8% O2 and 92% N2 for 20 min. Q, HR, (dP/dt)max/P) and systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures increased. Total peripheral resistance decreased while pulmonary vascular resistance remained unchanged. Coronary, cerebral, respiratory and nonrespiratory muscle and adrenal flows increased, in association with a decrease in regional vascular resistances, while the flows to the kidney and other abdominal viscera remained unchanged. The concentration of total plasma catecholamines doubled, indicating that the sympathetic nervous system plays a major role in the hemodynamic response to this level of hypoxia. Increased oxygen delivery to the heart (31%) and respiratory muscles (44%) were brought about by increases in both the magnitude and the redistribution of Q, the latter being the more important of the two mechanisms. In contrast, both mechanisms contributed equally to the amount of oxygen delivered to the brain and nonrespiratory muscles. We concluded that in acute hypoxemia, both the increase in Q and its regional redistribution contribute to the delivery of oxygen to the various tissues.

  20. Plant Oxygen Sensing Is Mediated by the N-End Rule Pathway: A Milestone in Plant Anaerobiosis

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, Rashmi; Mustroph, Angelika

    2011-01-01

    Like all aerobic organisms, plants require molecular oxygen for respiratory energy production. In plants, hypoxic conditions can occur during natural events (e.g., flooding), during developmental processes (e.g., seed germination), and in cells of compact tissues with high metabolic rates. Plant acclimation responses to hypoxia involve a modulation of gene expression leading to various biochemical, physiological, and morphological changes that stave off eventual anoxia. In contrast with the animal kingdom, a direct oxygen-sensing mechanism in plants has been elusive so far. However, two recent independent studies show that oxygen sensing in plants operates via posttranslational regulation of key hypoxia response transcription factors by the N-end rule pathway. The N-end rule is an evolutionarily conserved pathway for protein degradation that relates the fate of a protein with the identity of its N-terminal residues. Results from these studies demonstrate that oxygen-dependent modification and targeted proteolysis of members of the ethylene response factor group VII transcription factor family regulate hypoxia-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. The discovery of this plant hypoxia-sensing mechanism sets the stage for further research on plant homeostatic response to oxygen, which could be relevant to understanding plant distributions in flood-prone ecosystems and improving hypoxia tolerance of crops. PMID:22207573

  1. Acutely severe myocarditis successfully treated by percutaneous cardiopulmonary support applied by a newly developed heparin-binding oxygenator and circuits.

    PubMed

    Yasu, T; Murata, S; Katsuki, T; Fujii, M; Kubo, N; Ohmura, N; Ino, T; Saito, M

    1997-12-01

    The feasibility of using the heparin-bound percutaneous cardiopulmonary support system (PCPS) for prolonged extracorporeal circulation in patients with acute severe myocarditis is demonstrated. The case histories of 2 patients with cardiogenic shock caused by acute myocarditis are presented; both were successfully treated with long-term PCPS using a newly developed heparin-binding oxygenator and circuits without changing the oxygenator. The courses of both patients remain uneventful more than 12 months after discharge. We also discuss the clinical aspects of using heparin-bound PCPS in patients with acute severe myocarditis.

  2. Luminescent sensing of dissolved oxygen based on Ru(II) complex embedded in sol-gel matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Yubing; Tao, Wei; Hu, Yanli; Mao, Yimei; Zhao, Hui

    2015-11-01

    In biological cells and tissues environment, real-time monitoring and controlling dissolved oxygen (DO) provides critical information for studying cellular metabolism process, health status and pathological features. This paper developed an optical DO sensor based on fluorescence quenching principle, prepared tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10- phenanthroline)ruthenium(II) dichloride complex sol-gel sensing film, and studied its sensing performance. The principle of this sensor is that dissolved oxygen has quenching effect towards the fluorescence emitted by ruthenium complex. So the fluorescence intensity is reduced due to the existence of DO. The measurement limit of DO was 10- 100%, the response time was 20s, and the resolution was 0.02. Compared to traditional dissolved oxygen electrode probe, this luminescent fiber had many advantages, such as smaller size, shorter response time and higher stability.

  3. Outcome of Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease Treated with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Acute Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Trudzinski, Franziska C; Kaestner, Franziska; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim; Fähndrich, Sebastian; Seiler, Frederik; Böhmer, Philip; Linn, Oliver; Kaiser, Ralf; Haake, Hendrik; Langer, Frank; Bals, Robert; Wilkens, Heinrike; Lepper, Philipp M

    2016-03-01

    Patients with interstitial lung disease and acute respiratory failure have a poor prognosis especially if mechanical ventilation is required. To investigate the outcome of patients with acute respiratory failure in interstitial lung disease undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as a bridge to recovery or transplantation. This was a retrospective analysis of all patients with interstitial lung disease and acute respiratory failure treated with or without ECMO from March 2012 to August 2015. Forty patients with interstitial lung disease referred to our intensive care unit for acute respiratory failure were included in the analysis. Twenty-one were treated with ECMO. Eight patients were transferred by air from other hospitals within a range of 320 km (linear distance) for extended intensive care including the option of lung transplant. In total, 13 patients were evaluated, and eight were finally found to be suitable for lung transplantation from an ECMO bridge. Four patients from external hospitals were de novo listed during acute respiratory failure. Six patients underwent lung transplant, and two died on the waiting list after 9 and 63 days on ECMO, respectively. A total of 14 of 15 patients who did not undergo lung transplantation (93.3%) died after 40.3 ± 27.8 days on ECMO. Five out of six patients (83.3%) receiving a lung transplant could be discharged from hospital. ECMO is a lifesaving option for patients with interstitial lung disease and acute respiratory failure provided they are candidates for lung transplantation. ECMO is not able to reverse the poor prognosis in patients that do not qualify for lung transplantation.

  4. Caffeine protects human skin fibroblasts from acute reactive oxygen species-induced necrosis.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Jonathan I; Patel, Mital; Brody, Neil; Jagdeo, Jared

    2012-11-01

    Oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a major role in aging and carcinogenesis. Little is known about either the effects of acute ROS in necrosis and inflammation of skin or the therapeutic agents for prevention and treatment. Previously, our laboratory identified caffeine as an inhibitor of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-generated lipid peroxidation products in human skin fibroblasts. Here, we study effects of caffeine on acute ROS-mediated necrosis. Human skin fibroblasts were incubated with caffeine, followed by H2O2 challenge. Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell morphology, counts, apoptosis and necrosis, and ROS. We found that caffeine protects from H2O2 cell damage at lower (0.01 mM) and intermediate (0.1 mM) doses. The beneficial effects of caffeine appear to be mediated by a mechanism other than antioxidant function.

  5. Successfully treated severe obstetric sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Benetis, Rimantas; Nadisauskiene, Ruta; Sirvinskas, Edmundas; Lenkutis, Tadas; Siudikas, Adakrius; Kadusauskaitė, Vytaute; Railaitė, Dalia; Sukovas, Arturas; Abraitis, Vytautas

    2016-05-01

    We report a unique clinical case about an 18-year-old woman, immediately post-partum after an urgent C-section, who survived severe sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and was successfully treated with 11 different antibiotics, massive blood transfusions and repetitive surgeries and was on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support for 22 days. Although, ECMO is a time-limited procedure and most manufacturers do not advise more than 14 days of use, the situation for this patient was life-threatening and ECMO, despite the dangerous risks listed above, was the only way to win time for the lungs to recover and for treatment of the underlying disease, while maintaining adequate oxygenation and circulation. Fortunately, the condition of this woman was stabilized and she achieved complete physical recovery, despite minor neurological deficit in the fingers of her right hand. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Ataxia in acute mountain sickness does not improve with short-term oxygen inhalation.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Ralf W; Bärtsch, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Stability of stance declines at high altitude in subjects with and without acute mountain sickness (AMS), suggesting that postural ataxia might result from different hypoxia-related mechanisms than those causing the signs and symptoms of AMS. The aim of this study was to determine whether short-term oxygen inhalation improves stability of stance assessed by static posturography and/or the symptoms of AMS. Twenty male volunteers with cerebral AMS scores above 0.70 were investigated the first or second morning of their stay at an altitude of 4559 m. Posturographic parameters remained unchanged, whereas cerebral AMS scores decreased (p < 0.001) after inhalation of 3 L/min of oxygen for at least 10 min. We conclude that ataxia of stance assessed by posturography may result from different hypoxia-triggered mechanisms that need more time for recovery than those causing AMS.

  7. Should hyperbaric oxygen be used to treat the pregnant patient for acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoesen, K.B.; Camporesi, E.M.; Moon, R.E.; Hage, M.L.; Piantadosi, C.A. )

    1989-02-17

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is the leading cause of death due to poisoning. Although uncommon, CO poisoning does occur during pregnancy and can result in fetal mortality and neurological malformations in fetuses who survive to term. Uncertainty arises regarding the use of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) as a treatment for the pregnant patient because of possible adverse effects on the fetus that could be induced by oxygen at high partial pressures. While the dangers of hyperoxia to the fetus have been demonstrated in animal models, careful review of animal studies and human clinical experience indicates that the short duration of hyperoxic exposure attained during HBO therapy for CO poisoning can be tolerated by the fetus in all stages of pregnancy and reduces the risk of death or deformity to the mother and fetus. A case is presented of acute CO poisoning during pregnancy that was successfully treated with HBO. Recommendations are suggested for the use of HBO during pregnancy.

  8. Oxygen saturation changes in the optic nerve head during acute intraocular pressure elevation in monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoobehi, Bahram; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Ning, Jinfeng; Burgoyne, Claude F.; Rice, David A.; Khan, Fareeha; Thompson, Hilary W.; Beach, James M.

    2009-02-01

    Background and Objective: To evaluate the effect of an acute elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) on oxygen saturation of structures of the optic nerve head. Study Design/Materials and Methods: In the cynomolgus monkey eye, IOP was set to 10 mm Hg, and then raised to 30, 45, and 55 mm Hg. The ONH and overlying vessels were imaged using a fundus camera attached to a hyperspectral imaging system (HSI) at 10 and 30 minutes after IOP elevation. Results: Raising IOP from 10 to 30 mm Hg did not significantly (P < 0.0001) change saturation in vessels or ONH tissue structures but at 55 mm Hg, all structures showed significant reduction. Conclusions: Quantitative assay of the blood oxygen saturation in structures on the surface and overlying the optic nerve head is possible using hyperspectral imaging techniques.

  9. Acute Supramaximal Exercise Increases the Brain Oxygenation in Relation to Cognitive Workload

    PubMed Central

    Bediz, Cem Seref; Oniz, Adile; Guducu, Cagdas; Ural Demirci, Enise; Ogut, Hilmi; Gunay, Erkan; Cetinkaya, Caner; Ozgoren, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Single bout of exercise can improve the performance on cognitive tasks. However, cognitive responses may be controversial due to different type, intensity, and duration of exercise. In addition, the mechanism of the effect of acute exercise on brain is still unclear. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of supramaximal exercise on cognitive tasks by means of brain oxygenation monitoring. The brain oxygenation of Prefrontal cortex (PFC) was measured on 35 healthy male volunteers via functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) system. Subjects performed 2-Back test before and after the supramaximal exercise wingate anerobic test (WAnT) lasting 30-s on cycle ergometer. The PFC oxygenation change evaluation revealed that PFC oxygenation rise during post-exercise 2-Back task was considerably higher than those in pre-exercise 2-Back task. In order to describe the relationship between oxygenation change and exercise performance, subjects were divided into two groups as high performers (HP) and low performers (LP) according to their peak power values (PP) obtained from the supramaximal test. The oxy-hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) values were compared between pre- and post-exercise conditions within subjects and also between subjects according to peak power. When performers were compared, in the HP group, the oxy-Hb values in post-exercise 2-Back test were significantly higher than those in pre-exercise 2-Back test. HP had significantly higher post-exercise oxy-Hb change (Δ) than those of LP. In addition, PP of the total group were significantly correlated with Δoxy-Hb.The key findings of the present study revealed that acute supramaximal exercise has an impact on the brain oxygenation during a cognitive task. Also, the higher the anerobic PP describes the larger the oxy-Hb response in post-exercise cognitive task. The current study also demonstrated a significant correlation between peak power (exercise load) and post-exercise hemodynamic responses (oxy-, deoxy- and

  10. Room temperature alcohol sensing by oxygen vacancy controlled TiO{sub 2} nanotube array

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, A.; Dutta, K.; Bhowmik, B.; Bhattacharyya, P.; Chattopadhyay, P. P.

    2014-08-25

    Oxygen vacancy (OV) controlled TiO{sub 2} nanotubes, having diameters of 50–70 nm and lengths of 200–250 nm, were synthesized by electrochemical anodization in the mixed electrolyte comprising NH{sub 4}F and ethylene glycol with selective H{sub 2}O content. The structural evolution of TiO{sub 2} nanoforms has been studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Variation in the formation of OVs with the variation of the structure of TiO{sub 2} nanoforms has been evaluated by photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The sensor characteristics were correlated to the variation of the amount of induced OVs in the nanotubes. The efficient room temperature sensing achieved by the control of OVs of TiO{sub 2} nanotube array has paved the way for developing fast responding alcohol sensor with corresponding response magnitude of 60.2%, 45.3%, and 36.5% towards methanol, ethanol, and 2-propanol, respectively.

  11. Melatonin and the von Hippel-Lindau/HIF-1 oxygen sensing mechanism: A review.

    PubMed

    Vriend, Jerry; Reiter, Russel J

    2016-04-01

    There are numerous reports that melatonin inhibits the hypoxia-inducible factor, HIF-1α, and the HIF-1α-inducible gene, VEGF, both in vivo and in vitro. Through the inhibition of the HIF-1-VEGF pathway, melatonin reduces hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. Herein we discuss the interaction of melatonin with HIF-1α and HIF-1α-inducible genes in terms of what is currently known concerning the HIF-1α hypoxia response element (HIF-1α-HRE) pathway. The von Hippel-Lindau protein (VHL), also known as the VHL tumor suppressor, functions as part of a ubiquitin ligase complex which recognizes HIF-1α as a substrate. As such, VHL is part of the oxygen sensing mechanism of the cell. Under conditions of hypoxia, HIF-1α stimulates the transcription of numerous HIF-1α-induced genes, including EPO, VEGF, and PFKFB3; the latter is an enzyme which regulates glycolysis. Data from several studies show that ROS generated in mitochondria under conditions of hypoxia stimulate HIF-1α. Since melatonin acts as an antioxidant and reduces ROS, these data suggest that the antioxidant action of melatonin could account for reduced HIF-1, less VEGF, and reduced glycolysis in cancer cells (Warburg effect). A direct or indirect inhibitory action (via the reduction in ROS) of melatonin on proteasome activity would account for much of the published data.

  12. Cellular Oxygen Sensing: Crystal Structure of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl Hydroxylase (PHD2)

    SciTech Connect

    McDonough,M.; Li, V.; Flashman, E.; Chowdhury, R.; Mohr, C.; Lienard, B.; Zondlo, J.; Oldham, N.; Clifton, I.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Cellular and physiological responses to changes in dioxygen levels in metazoans are mediated via the posttranslational oxidation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF). Hydroxylation of conserved prolyl residues in the HIF-{alpha} subunit, catalyzed by HIF prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs), signals for its proteasomal degradation. The requirement of the PHDs for dioxygen links changes in dioxygen levels with the transcriptional regulation of the gene array that enables the cellular response to chronic hypoxia; the PHDs thus act as an oxygen-sensing component of the HIF system, and their inhibition mimics the hypoxic response. We describe crystal structures of the catalytic domain of human PHD2, an important prolyl-4-hydroxylase in the human hypoxic response in normal cells, in complex with Fe(II) and an inhibitor to 1.7 Angstroms resolution. PHD2 crystallizes as a homotrimer and contains a double-stranded {beta}-helix core fold common to the Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependant dioxygenase family, the residues of which are well conserved in the three human PHD enzymes (PHD 1-3). The structure provides insights into the hypoxic response, helps to rationalize a clinically observed mutation leading to familial erythrocytosis, and will aid in the design of PHD selective inhibitors for the treatment of anemia and ischemic disease.

  13. Oxygen-sensing mechanisms and the regulation of redox-responsive transcription factors in development and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, John J

    2002-01-01

    How do organisms sense the amount of oxygen in the environment and respond appropriately when the level of oxygen decreases? Oxygen sensing and the molecular stratagems underlying the process have been the focus of an endless number of investigations trying to find an answer to the question: "What is the identity of the oxygen sensor?" Dynamic changes in pO2 constitute a potential signaling mechanism for the regulation of the expression and activation of reduction-oxidation (redox)-sensitive and oxygen-responsive transcription factors, apoptosis-signaling molecules and inflammatory cytokines. The transition from placental to lung-based respiration causes a relatively hyperoxic shift or oxidative stress, which the perinatal, developing lung experiences during birth. This variation in ΔpO2, in particular, differentially regulates the compartmentalization and functioning of the transcription factors hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, oxygen-evoked regulation of HIF-1α and NF-κB is closely coupled with the intracellular redox state, such that modulating redox equilibrium affects their responsiveness at the molecular level (expression/transactivation). The differential regulation of HIF-1α and NF-κB in vitro is paralleled by oxygen-sensitive and redox-dependent pathways governing the regulation of these factors during the transition from placental to lung-based respiration ex utero. The birth transition period in vivo and ex utero also regulates apoptosis signaling pathways in a redox-dependent manner, consistent with NF-κB being transcriptionally regulated in order to play an anti-apoptotic function. An association is established between oxidative stress conditions and the augmentation of an inflammatory state in pathophysiology, regulated by the oxygen- and redox-sensitive pleiotropic cytokines. PMID:12537605

  14. Regional brain blood flow and cerebral hemispheric oxygen consumption during acute hypoxaemia in the llama fetus

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Aníbal J; Riquelme, Raquel A; Sanhueza, Emilia M; Herrera, Emilio; Cabello, Gertrudis; Giussani, Dino A; Parer, Julian T

    2002-01-01

    Unlike fetal animals of lowland species, the llama fetus does not increase its cerebral blood flow during an episode of acute hypoxaemia. This study tested the hypothesis that the fetal llama brain maintains cerebral hemispheric O2 consumption by increasing cerebral O2 extraction rather than decreasing cerebral oxygen utilisation during acute hypoxaemia. Six llama fetuses were surgically instrumented under general anaesthesia at 217 days of gestation (term ca 350 days) with vascular and amniotic catheters in order to carry out cardiorespiratory studies. Following a control period of 1 h, the llama fetuses underwent 3 × 20 min episodes of progressive hypoxaemia, induced by maternal inhalational hypoxia. During basal conditions and during each of the 20 min of hypoxaemia, fetal cerebral blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres, cerebral oxygen extraction was calculated, and fetal cerebral hemispheric O2 consumption was determined by the modified Fick principle. During hypoxaemia, fetal arterial O2 tension and fetal pH decreased progressively from 24 ± 1 to 20 ± 1 Torr and from 7.36 ± 0.01 to 7.33 ± 0.01, respectively, during the first 20 min episode, to 16 ± 1 Torr and 7.25 ± 0.05 during the second 20 min episode and to 14 ± 1 Torr and 7.21 ± 0.04 during the final 20 min episode. Fetal arterial partial pressure of CO2 (Pa,CO2, 42 ± 2 Torr) remained unaltered from baseline throughout the experiment. Fetal cerebral hemispheric blood flow and cerebral hemispheric oxygen extraction were unaltered from baseline during progressive hypoxaemia. In contrast, a progressive fall in fetal cerebral hemispheric oxygen consumption occurred during the hypoxaemic challenge. In conclusion, these data do not support the hypothesis that the fetal llama brain maintains cerebral hemispheric O2 consumption by increasing cerebral hemispheric O2 extraction. Rather, the data show that in the llama fetus, a reduction in cerebral hemispheric metabolism occurs during acute

  15. Identification of Anti-virulence Compounds That Disrupt Quorum-Sensing Regulated Acute and Persistent Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhaya, Arunava; Lesic, Biljana; He, Jianxin; Kitao, Tomoe; Righi, Valeria; Milot, Sylvain; Tzika, Aria; Rahme, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Etiological agents of acute, persistent, or relapsing clinical infections are often refractory to antibiotics due to multidrug resistance and/or antibiotic tolerance. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes recalcitrant and severe acute chronic and persistent human infections. Here, we target the MvfR-regulated P. aeruginosa quorum sensing (QS) virulence pathway to isolate robust molecules that specifically inhibit infection without affecting bacterial growth or viability to mitigate selective resistance. Using a whole-cell high-throughput screen (HTS) and structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis, we identify compounds that block the synthesis of both pro-persistence and pro-acute MvfR-dependent signaling molecules. These compounds, which share a benzamide-benzimidazole backbone and are unrelated to previous MvfR-regulon inhibitors, bind the global virulence QS transcriptional regulator, MvfR (PqsR); inhibit the MvfR regulon in multi-drug resistant isolates; are active against P. aeruginosa acute and persistent murine infections; and do not perturb bacterial growth. In addition, they are the first compounds identified to reduce the formation of antibiotic-tolerant persister cells. As such, these molecules provide for the development of next-generation clinical therapeutics to more effectively treat refractory and deleterious bacterial-human infections. PMID:25144274

  16. Human autonomic activity and its response to acute oxygen supplement after high altitude acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xuping; Kennedy, Brian P; Hopkins, Susan R; Bogaard, Harm J; Wagner, Peter D; Ziegler, Michael G

    2002-11-29

    It is well established that after acclimatization at high altitude, many sympathetic pathways are hyperactive yet heart rate (HR) remains unchanged. In this study, we attempted to determine if this unchanged heart rate is due to compensatory mechanisms such as changes in parasympathetic activity or levels of receptors for autonomic neurotransmitters. We also examined the role played by hypoxia in these autonomic adaptations to high altitude. Three experiments were carried out on five healthy lowlanders both at sea level (SL) and after 2 weeks of acclimatization at 3800 m (Post-Ac) with: (a) placebo (control); (b) acute beta-adrenergic receptor blockade by propranolol (PRO), or (c) acute parasympathetic receptor blockade by glycopyrrolate (GLY). Compared with SL control values, post-Ac venous norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine increased by 96% (p < 0.001) and 55% (p < 0.05), but epinephrine and HR did not change. PRO resulted in a smaller decrease in HR (bpm) Post-Ac than at SL (15 +/- 6 vs. 21 +/- 6, p < 0.05), while GLY caused a greater increase in HR Post-Ac than at SL (59 +/- 8 vs. 45 +/- 6, p < 0.05). Breathing oxygen at SL concentration while at altitude did not decrease NE, or alter the effect of PRO on HR, but reduced the chronotropic effect of GLY by 14% (p < 0.05). These results suggest that after acclimatization to altitude, increased parasympathetic neurotransmitter release and decreased beta-adenoreceptor activity account for the unchanged HR despite enhanced sympathetic activity. Acute oxygen replacement rapidly counteracted the parasympathetic, but not sympathetic hyperactivity that occurs at high altitude.

  17. Biological oxygen sensing via two-photon absorption by an Ir(III) complex using a femtosecond fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritomo, Hiroki; Fujii, Akinari; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Tobita, Seiji; Kawamata, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Near-infrared two-photon absorption of the phosphorescent Ir(III) complex (2,4-pentanedionato-κO 2,κO 4)bis[2-(6-phenanthridinyl-κN)benzo[b]thien-3-yl-κC]iridium (BTPHSA) was characterized. It exhibited a 800-1200 nm two-photon absorption band, and thus could be electronically excited by 1030-nm femtosecond Ti:sapphire and Yb-doped fiber lasers. By using BTPHSA, oxygen concentrations in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells were imaged. These results demonstrate two-photon oxygen sensing of live tissues via easily operable excitation sources.

  18. Effects of Repetitive Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment in Patients with Acute Cerebral Infarction: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-Hsin; Chen, Shao-Yuan; Wang, Vinchi; Chen, Chao-Ching; Wang, Kaw-Chen; Chen, Chih-Hao; Liu, Yi-Chien; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Yip, Ping-Keung; Ma, Wen-Ya; Liu, Chuan-Chieh

    2012-01-01

    The role of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke is controversial. This prospective study assessed the efficacy and safety of HBOT as adjuvant treatment on 46 acute ischemic stroke in patients who did not receive thrombolytic therapy. The HBOT group (n = 16) received conventional medical treatment with 10 sessions of adjunctive HBOT within 3–5 days after stroke onset, while the control group (n = 30) received the same treatment but without HBOT. Early (around two weeks after onset) and late (one month after onset) outcomes (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, NIHSS scores) and efficacy (changes of NIHSS scores) of HBOT were evaluated. The baseline clinical characteristics were similar in both groups. Both early and late outcomes of the HBOT group showed significant difference (P ≤ 0.001). In the control group, there was only significant difference in early outcome (P = 0.004). For early efficacy, there was no difference when comparing changes of NIHSS scores between the two groups (P = 0.140) but there was statistically significant difference when comparing changes of NIHSS scores at one month (P ≤ 0.001). The HBOT used in this study may be effective for patients with acute ischemic stroke and is a safe and harmless adjunctive treatment. PMID:22919348

  19. Awake extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in patients with severe postoperative acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Hye Ju; Cho, Woo Hyun; Kim, Dohyung

    2016-01-01

    A clinical trial of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as an alternative ventilator tool is being performed as a new indication for ECMO. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of awake ECMO to increase the success rate of weaning patients from ECMO and ventilator care during treatment of postoperative severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We retrospectively analyzed the clinical reports of 10 patients who underwent awake ECMO due to postoperative ARDS between August 2012 and May 2015. We analyzed patient history, the partial arterial pressure of oxygen (PaO2)/fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) ratio, and patient outcome. Seven patients (70%) were weaned from ECMO without difficulty; one patient failed to maintain awake ECMO, was re-intubated after 2 days of awake ECMO, and was re-tried on awake ECMO after 4 days of ventilator care. We weaned that patient from ECMO 2 days later. We weaned a total of eight patients (80%) from awake ECMO. The ECMO duration of surviving patients was 9.13±2.2 days (range, 6-12 days), and mean ventilator use duration was 6.8±4.7 days (range, 2-16 days). Two cases failed awake ECMO and died due to disease aggravation. Awake ECMO was a useful weaning strategy after severe postoperative ARDS, as it avoids long-duration use of mechanical ventilation. Additionally, it is possible for patients to breathe spontaneously, which might prevents respiratory muscle dystrophy.

  20. Evaluation of a novel topical essential oxygen oil for the treatment of pain in acute tendinopathy and sprains

    PubMed Central

    Pappagallo, Marco; Leslie, John B.; Raffa, Robert B.; Kash, Peter; Fleischer, Charles; Sinclair, Nicholas; Labhestwar, Sumedha; Di Lorenzo, Luigi; Tabor, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Summary Topical analgesics may play an increasingly important role in managing acute and chronic pain as acetaminophen, NSAIDs, and opioid drugs come under heightened scrutiny. This article reviews studies about essential oxygen oil, a topical over-the-counter (OTC) analgesic new to the American market but available for many years in Europe. Prospective studies evaluating the oil’s safety and efficacy in acute and chronic pain patients, a dermatological study in which healthy subjects served as their own controls, and a post-marketing surveillance study were considered. These studies found the novel essential oxygen oil to be safe and effective in a variety of acute and chronic pain syndromes as well as being well tolerated with few side effects. Its mechanism of action is not understood and further study is warranted. Essential oxygen oil is safe and effective for the treatment of pain associated with many common conditions, including tendinopathy, arthritis, sprains, and others. PMID:23738241

  1. Subcutaneous perfusion and oxygen during acute severe isovolemic hemodilution in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hopf, H W; Viele, M; Watson, J J; Feiner, J; Weiskopf, R; Hunt, T K; Noorani, M; Yeap, H; Ho, R; Toy, P

    2000-12-01

    Acute severe isovolemic anemia (to a hemoglobin [Hb] concentration of 50 g/L) does not decrease subcutaneous wound tissue oxygen tension (PsqO(2)). University hospital operating room and inpatient general clinical research center ward. Twenty-five healthy, paid volunteers. Subcutaneous oxygen tension and subcutaneous temperature (Tsq) were measured continuously during isovolemic hemodilution to an Hb level of 50 g/L. In 14 volunteers (initially well-perfused), "normal" perfusion (Tsq >34.4 degrees C) was achieved by hydration and systemic warming prior to starting isovolemic hemodilution, while in 11 volunteers (perfusion not controlled [PNC]), no attempt was made to control perfusion prior to hemodilution. Measurements of PsqO(2), Tsq, and relative subcutaneous blood flow (flow index). While PsqO(2), Tsq, and flow index were significantly lower in PNC vs well-perfused subjects at baseline, there was no significant difference between them at the Hb of 50 g/L (nadir). Subcutaneous PO(2) did not decrease significantly in either group. Arterial PO(2) was not different between the groups, and did not change significantly over time; Tsq and flow index increased significantly from baseline to nadir Hb in both groups. The level of PsqO(2) was maintained at baseline levels during hemodilution to Hb 50 g/L in healthy volunteers, whether they were initially well-perfused or mildly underperfused peripherally. Given the significant increase in Tsq and flow index, this resulted from a compensatory increase in subcutaneous blood flow sufficient to maintain oxygen delivery. Wound healing depends to a large extent on tissue oxygen delivery, and these data suggest that even severe anemia by itself would not be sufficient to impair wound healing. Thus, transfusion of autologous packed red blood cells solely to improve healing in surgical patients with no other indication for transfusion is not supported by these results.

  2. Roles of Proton-Sensing Receptors in the Transition from Acute to Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Sun, W H; Chen, C C

    2016-02-01

    Chronic pain, when not effectively treated, is a leading health and socioeconomic problem and has a harmful effect on all aspects of health-related quality of life. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanism of how pain transitions from the acute to chronic phase is essential for developing effective novel analgesics. Accumulated evidence has shown that the transition from acute to chronic pain is determined by a cellular signaling switch called hyperalgesic priming, which occurs in primary nociceptive afferents. The hyperalgesic priming is triggered by inflammatory mediators and is involved in a signal switch from protein kinase A (PKA) to protein kinase Cε (PKCε) located in both isolectin B4 (IB4)-positive (nonpeptidergic) and IB4-negative (peptidergic) nociceptors. Acidosis may be the decisive factor regulating the PKA-to-PKCε signal switch in a proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptor-dependent manner. Protons can also induce the hyperalgesic priming in IB4-negative muscle nociceptors in a PKCε-independent manner. Acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) and transient receptor potential/vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (TRPV1) are 2 major acid sensors involved in the proton-induced hyperalgesic priming. The proton-induced hyperalgesic priming in muscle afferents can be prevented by a substance P-mediated signaling pathway. In this review, we summarize the factors that modulate hyperalgesic priming in both IB4-positive and IB4-negative nociceptors and discuss the role of acid signaling in inflammatory and noninflammatory pain as well as orofacial muscle pain.

  3. Interdisciplinary Peripartum Management of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation – a Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, J.; Bogdanski, R.; Ortiz, J. U.; Kuschel, B.; Schneider, K. T. M.; Lobmaier, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly used for the management of acute severe cardiac and respiratory failure. One of the indications is acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for which, in some severe cases, ECMO represents the only possibility to save lives. We report on the successful long-term use of ECMO in a postpartum patient with recurrent pulmonary decompensation after peripartum uterine rupture with extensive blood loss. PMID:27065489

  4. Interdisciplinary Peripartum Management of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation - a Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Weyrich, J; Bogdanski, R; Ortiz, J U; Kuschel, B; Schneider, K T M; Lobmaier, S M

    2016-03-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly used for the management of acute severe cardiac and respiratory failure. One of the indications is acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for which, in some severe cases, ECMO represents the only possibility to save lives. We report on the successful long-term use of ECMO in a postpartum patient with recurrent pulmonary decompensation after peripartum uterine rupture with extensive blood loss.

  5. Acute and chronic effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on blood circulation of human muscle and tendon in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Ikebukuro, Toshihiro

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the acute and chronic effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on blood circulation of human muscle and tendon in vivo. Using near-infrared spectroscopy and red laser lights, we determined acute changes in blood volume (THb) and oxygen saturation (StO2) of the medial gastrocnemius muscle and Achilles tendon during 60 minutes of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (1.3 atm absolute and 50% O2, experiment 1). In addition, we determined the chronic effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (60 minutes, 2 times per week, 6 weeks) on THb and StO2 of muscle and tendon (experiment 2). In experiment 1, THb of the muscle increased gradually from resting level, but StO2 did not change. On the other hand, THb and StO2 of the tendon increased during hyperbaric oxygen therapy. In experiment 2, the pattern of changes in the measured variables during 60 minutes of therapy was similar for both the muscle and tendon between the first and last therapies. During resting, THb and StO2 of the tendon were significantly lower after 6 weeks of therapy, although those of the muscle were not. In conclusion, oxygen saturation of the tendon increased during hyperbaric oxygen therapy, whereas that of the muscle did not. This result would be related to the difference in the treated effects between muscle and tendon. However, oxygen saturation of the tendon, but not the muscle, during resting decreased after 6 weeks of therapy.

  6. Neurohistological Investigations on General Oxygen Deficiency of the Brain. 2. The Behavior of Astocytes After Acute and Subacute Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1951-03-01

    the cell bodies.the brain were examined histologically and stain’ At first sight this picture was suggestive of the formationed by methods common in...INVESTIGATIONS ON GENERAL OXYGEN DEFICIENCY OF THE BRAIN at 11 I. The Behavior of Astrocytes After Acute and Subacute Death A PROJECT NUMBER 21-23-004...c3, REPORT NUMBER 2 PROJECT IREPORT NEUROHISTOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS ON GENERAL OXYGEN DEFICIENCY OF THE BRAIN II. The Behavior of Astrocytes After

  7. Silicon-on-glass pore network micromodels with oxygen-sensing fluorophore films for chemical imaging and defined spatial structure.

    PubMed

    Grate, Jay W; Kelly, Ryan T; Suter, Jonathan; Anheier, Norm C

    2012-11-21

    Pore network microfluidic models were fabricated by a silicon-on-glass technique that provides the precision advantage of dry etched silicon while creating a structure that is transparent across all microfluidic channels and pores, and can be imaged from either side. A silicon layer is bonded to an underlying borosilicate glass substrate and thinned to the desired height of the microfluidic channels and pores. The silicon is then patterned and through-etched by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE), with the underlying glass serving as an etch stop. After bonding on a transparent glass cover plate, one obtains a micromodel in oxygen impermeable materials with water-wet surfaces where the microfluidic channels are transparent and structural elements such as the pillars creating the pore network are opaque. The advantageous features of this approach in a chemical imaging application are demonstrated by incorporating a Pt porphyrin fluorophore in a PDMS film serving as the oxygen-sensing layer and a bonding surface, or in a polystyrene film coated with a PDMS layer for bonding. The sensing of a dissolved oxygen gradient was demonstrated using fluorescence lifetime imaging, and it is shown that different matrix polymers lead to optimal use in different ranges of oxygen concentration. Imaging with the opaque pillars in between the observation direction and the continuous fluorophore film yields images that retain defined spatial structure in the sensor image.

  8. Exceptional Oxygen Sensing Properties of New Blue Light-Excitable Highly Luminescent Europium(III) and Gadolinium(III) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Borisov, Sergey M.; Fischer, Roland; Saf, Robert; Klimant, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    New europium(III) and gadolinium(III) complexes bearing 8-hydroxyphenalenone antenna combine efficient absorption in the blue part of the spectrum and strong emission in polymers at room temperature. The Eu(III) complexes show characteristic red luminescence whereas the Gd(III) dyes are strongly phosphorescent. The luminescence quantum yields are about 20% for the Eu(III) complexes and 50% for the Gd(III) dyes. In contrast to most state-of-the-art Eu(III) complexes the new dyes are quenched very efficiently by molecular oxygen. The luminescence decay times of the Gd(III) complexes exceed 1 ms which ensures exceptional sensitivity even in polymers of moderate oxygen permeability. These sensors are particularly suitable for trace oxygen sensing and may be good substitutes for Pd(II) porphyrins. The photophysical and sensing properties can be tuned by varying the nature of the fourth ligand. The narrow-band emission of the Eu(III) allows efficient elimination of the background light and autofluorescence and is also very attractive for use e.g. in multi-analyte sensors. The highly photostable indicators incorporated in nanoparticles are promising for imaging applications. Due to the straightforward preparation and low cost of starting materials the new dyes represent a promising alternative to the state-of-the-art oxygen indicators particularly for such applications as e.g. food packaging. PMID:27158252

  9. Silicon-on-glass pore network micromodels with oxygen-sensing fluorophore films for chemical imaging and defined spatial structure

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Anheier, Norman C.

    2012-11-21

    Pore network microfluidic models were fabricated by a silicon-on-glass technique that provides the precision advantage of dry etched silicon while creating a structure that is transparent across all microfluidic channels and pores, and can be imaged from either side. A silicon layer is bonded to an underlying borosilicate glass substrate and thinned to the desired height of the microfluidic channels and pores. The silicon is then patterned and through-etched by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE), with the underlying glass serving as an etch stop. After bonding on a transparent glass cover plate, one obtains a micromodel in oxygen impermeable materials with water wet surfaces where the microfluidic channels are transparent and structural elements such as the pillars creating the pore network are opaque. The micromodel can be imaged from either side. The advantageous features of this approach in a chemical imaging application are demonstrated by incorporating a Pt porphyrin fluorophore in a PDMS film serving as the oxygen sensing layer and a bonding surface, or in a polystyrene film coated with a PDMS layer for bonding. The sensing of a dissolved oxygen gradient was demonstrated using fluorescence lifetime imaging, and it is shown that different matrix polymers lead to optimal use in different ranges dissolved oxygen concentration. Imaging with the opaque pillars in between the observation direction and the continuous fluorophore film yields images that retain spatial information in the sensor image.

  10. DFT study of CO sensing mechanism on hexagonal WO3 (0 0 1) surface: The role of oxygen vacancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, FengHui; Zhao, Linghuan; Xue, Xu-Yan; Shen, Yaoyao; Jia, Xiangfeng; Chen, Shougang; Wang, Zonghua

    2014-08-01

    In this work, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been used to study the adsorption of CO on the oxygen deficient hexagonal WO3 (h-WO3) (0 0 1) surface. Two different situations including the O- and WO-terminated h-WO3 (0 0 1) surfaces are considered. The influence of surface defect density is also concerned. Calculations proposed that the oxygen vacancy exert negative effects on the sensing ability of the h-WO3 material. Under relatively higher defect density, the presence of the oxygen vacancy on both of the O and WO-terminated (0 0 1) surfaces all decreases their sensitivity to CO gas to some extent, while they are still sensitive enough to detect CO gas with the charge transfers of 0.498 and 0.129 e, respectively. Whereas, under lower defect density, calculations indicated that the sensitivity of the material can be lowered largely.

  11. Which type of repetitive muscle contractions induces a greater acute impairment of position sense?

    PubMed

    Fortier, Sylvie; Basset, Fabien A; Billaut, François; Behm, David; Teasdale, Normand

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine which type of repetitive muscle contractions induces a greater acute impairment of elbow position sense. Eleven male subjects participating in the study underwent (i) an exercise task (ET) consisting of 9 sets of 10 voluntary isometric, concentric, or eccentric contractions randomly performed on three separate sessions, and (ii) a pre- and post-exercise maximal voluntary isometric contraction (iMVC). Prior to and between sets of ET, a proprioception task (PT) consisting of matching the right arm to the left reference arm was performed at three different target angular positions (70 degrees , 110 degrees and 150 degrees). Each ET was immediately followed by 3 PT and 1 min rest. The statistical analysis revealed that post-exercise iMVCs were significantly decreased compared to pre-exercise iMVC in all conditions with a greater drop following the eccentric task. Despite this greater drop, position sense was significantly affected by the concentric exercise task. In addition, the spectral EMG signals significantly shifted towards lower frequencies from the initial values, regardless of exercise task. The results showed that concentric muscle contractions impaired position sense to a greater extent compared to isometric and eccentric contractions.

  12. Inhaled Sedation in Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Undergoing Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Meiser, Andreas; Bomberg, Hagen; Lepper, Philipp M; Trudzinski, Franziska C; Volk, Thomas; Groesdonk, Heinrich V

    2017-10-01

    Six patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome with the need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy in deep sedation were included. Isoflurane sedation with the AnaConDa system was initiated within 24 hours after initiation of ECMO therapy and resulted in a satisfactory sedation (Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale -4 to -5). Despite deep sedation, spontaneous breathing was possible in 6 of 6 patients. We observed a reduced need for vasopressor therapy and improved lung function (PaO2, PaCO2, delta P, and tidal volume) during isoflurane sedation. Opioid consumption could be reduced, and only very low doses of isoflurane were needed (1-3 mL/h). This small case series supports the feasibility of sedation using inhaled anesthetics concurrently with venovenous ECMO.

  13. Treatment of Adenoviral Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Using Cidofovir With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minhyeok; Kim, Seulgi; Kwon, Oh Jung; Kim, Ji Hye; Jeong, Inbeom; Son, Ji Woong; Na, Moon Jun; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Park, Hyun Woong; Kwon, Sun Jung

    2017-03-01

    Adenovirus infections are associated with respiratory (especially upper respiratory) infection and gastrointestinal disease and occur primarily in infants and children. Although rare in adults, severe lower respiratory adenovirus infections including pneumonia are reported in specific populations, such as military recruits and immunocompromised patients. Antiviral treatment is challenging due to limited clinical experience and lack of well-controlled randomized trials. Several previously reported cases of adenoviral pneumonia showed promising efficacy of cidofovir. However, few reports discussed the efficacy of cidofovir in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We experienced 3 cases of adenoviral pneumonia associated with ARDS and treated with cidofovir and respiratory support, including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). All 3 patients showed a positive clinical response to cidofovir and survival at 28 days. Cidofovir with early ECMO therapy may be a therapeutic option in adenoviral ARDS. A literature review identified 15 cases of adenovirus pneumonia associated with ARDS.

  14. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and dimethylated sulphur compounds in coral explants under acute thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Stephanie G; Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Ralph, Peter J; Petrou, Katherina

    2017-03-08

    Coral bleaching is intensifying with global climate change. While the causes for these catastrophic events are well understood, the cellular mechanism that triggers bleaching is not well established. Our understanding of coral bleaching processes is hindered by the lack of robust methods for studying interactions between host and symbiont at the single-cell level. Here we exposed coral explants to acute thermal stress and measured oxidative stress, more specifically, reactive oxygen species (ROS), in individual symbiont cells. Furthermore, we measured concentrations of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) to elucidate the role of these compounds in coral antioxidant function. This work demonstrates the application of coral explants for investigating coral physiology and biochemistry under thermal stress and delivers a new approach to study host-symbiont interactions at the microscale, allowing us to directly link intracellular ROS with DMSP and DMSO dynamics.

  15. Preservation of high glycolytic phenotype by establishing new acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines at physiologic oxygen concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Sheard, Michael A.; Ghent, Matthew V.; Cabral, Daniel J.; Lee, Joanne C.; Khankaldyyan, Vazgen; Ji, Lingyun; Wu, Samuel Q.; Kang, Min H.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Cancer cells typically exhibit increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and they continue to exhibit some elevation in glycolysis even under aerobic conditions. However, it is unclear whether cancer cell lines employ a high level of glycolysis comparable to that of the original cancers from which they were derived, even if their culture conditions are changed to physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations. From three childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients we established three new pairs of cell lines in both atmospheric (20%) and physiologic (bone marrow level, 5%) oxygen concentrations. Cell lines established in 20% oxygen exhibited lower proliferation, survival, expression of glycolysis genes, glucose consumption, and lactate production. Interestingly, the effects of oxygen concentration used during cell line initiation were only partially reversible when established cell cultures were switched from one oxygen concentration to another for eight weeks. These observations indicate that ALL cell lines established at atmospheric oxygen concentration can exhibit relatively low levels of glycolysis and these levels are semi-permanent, suggesting that physiologic oxygen concentrations may be needed from the time of cell line initiation to preserve the high level of glycolysis commonly exhibited by leukemias in vivo. - Highlights: • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher glycolytic expression and function. • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher proliferation and lower cell death. • The divergent metabolic phenotypes selected in 5% and 20% oxygen are semi-permanent.

  16. Multiple hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) expands the therapeutic window in acute spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Mehta, M P; Eichhorn, J H; Nanda, A; Zhang, J H

    2003-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) therapy has been reported to improve neurological recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI). In the present study, we examined whether multiple HBO expands the therapeutic window for acute SCI. Single HBO (2.8 ATA, 1 hour) treatment was used at 30 minutes, 3 hours, and 6 hours following SCI, and serial HBO treatment (once daily for 1 week) at 6 hours and 24 hours post-injury. Mild SCI was induced by adjusting the height for a weight drop insult (10 g) to 6.25 mm above the exposed spinal cord. The group of animals receiving a single HBO intervention beginning at 30 minutes and 3 hours, or serial HBO treatment starting at 6 hours following the injury had a significantly better neurological recovery than animals with SCI only. The results of this study demonstrate that multiple HBO expands the therapeutic window for acute SCI to 6 hours after injury, further that serial HBO administration is superior to single HBO therapy.

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated Prostaglandin E2 Contributes to Acute Response of Epithelial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Yi-Fan; Wang, Ying; Yu, Wei-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated after tissue injury play a crucial role during wound healing through initiating acute inflammation, clarifying infection and dead tissue, and mediating various intracellular signal transduction. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been identified as one of the major factors responsible for inflammation and tissue repair. In this study, we tested our hypothesis that ROS produced by damaged human keratinocytes induces the synthesis of PGE2. In vitro epithelial wounding model was used to observe the production of ROS and secretion of PGE2 as well as the involved signal pathway. The mechanical injury caused the rapid production of ROS in in vitro cultured keratinocytes, which was significantly blocked by an inhibitor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase. The increased intracellular ROS caused by mechanical injury stimulates PGE2 production in a time-dependent manner via the activation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), which was stimulated by phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK). These results indicate ROS-induced ERK activation leading to the activation of COX-2 and the synthesis of PGE2 in human keratinocytes responding to mechanical injury in the acute phase. PMID:28280524

  18. Combined administration of hyperbaric oxygen and hydroxocobalamin improves cerebral metabolism after acute cyanide poisoning in rats.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M B; Olsen, N V; Hyldegaard, O

    2013-11-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) or intravenous hydroxocobalamin (OHCob) both abolish cyanide (CN)-induced surges in interstitial brain lactate and glucose concentrations. HBOT has been shown to induce a delayed increase in whole blood CN concentrations, whereas OHCob may act as an intravascular CN scavenger. Additionally, HBOT may prevent respiratory distress and restore blood pressure during CN intoxication, an effect not seen with OHCob administration. In this report, we evaluated the combined effects of HBOT and OHCob on interstitial lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations as well as lactate-to-pyruvate ratio in rat brain by means of microdialysis during acute CN poisoning. Anesthetized rats were allocated to three groups: 1) vehicle (1.2 ml isotonic NaCl intra-arterially); 2) potassium CN (5.4 mg/kg intra-arterially); 3) potassium CN, OHCob (100 mg/kg intra-arterially) and subsequent HBOT (284 kPa in 90 min). OHCob and HBOT significantly attenuated the acute surges in interstitial cerebral lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations compared with the intoxicated rats given no treatment. Furthermore, the combined treatment resulted in consistent low lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations, as well as in low lactate-to-pyruvate ratios compared with CN intoxicated controls. In rats receiving OHCob and HBOT, respiration improved and cyanosis disappeared, with subsequent stabilization of mean arterial blood pressure. The present findings indicate that a combined administration of OHCob and HBOT has a beneficial and persistent effect on the cerebral metabolism during CN intoxication.

  19. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as salvage treatment for pulmonary Echinococcus granulosus infection with acute cyst rupture.

    PubMed

    Becker, Sören L; Fähndrich, Sebastian; Trudzinski, Franziska C; Gärtner, Barbara; Langer, Frank; Becker, Torben K; Bals, Robert; Lepper, Philipp M; Lensch, Christian

    2017-09-08

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been successfully used for the treatment of patients with respiratory failure due to severe infections. Though rare, parasites can also cause severe pulmonary disease. Tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus give rise to the development of cystic structures in the liver, lungs and other organs. Acute cyst rupture leads to potentially life-threatening infection, and affected patients may deteriorate rapidly. We describe the case of a young woman from Bulgaria who was admitted to hospital with severe dyspnoea, progressive chest pain and haemoptysis. Computed tomography of the chest was pathognomonic of cystic echinococcosis with acute cyst rupture. Following deterioration on mechanical ventilation, she was cannulated for veno-venous ECMO. The patient's condition improved considerably, and she could successfully be weaned from ECMO and mechanical ventilation. Following lobectomy of the affected left lower lobe, she was discharged home in good condition. This is the first report on the successful use of ECMO as salvage treatment for a severe manifestation of a helminthic disease. Due to recent migration to Western Europe, the number of patients presenting with respiratory failure due to pulmonary echinococcosis with cyst rupture is likely to increase. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Fluorescence-lifetime-based sensors: oxygen sensing and other biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randers-Eichhorn, Lisa; Bartlett, Roscoe A.; Sipior, Jeffrey; Frey, Douglas D.; Carter, Gary M.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Rao, Govind

    1996-05-01

    Murine hybridomas were cultivated in tissue culture flasks. Dissolved oxygen tensions in the gas and liquid phases during cell growth were measured non-invasively by an optical oxygen sensor. Readings were made with caps both cracked open and completely closed. During cell growth, gas phase oxygen concentrations remained near atmospheric levels, while the oxygen tension at the bottom of the flasks eventually reached zero. These results suggest that the widespread practice of cracking open tissue culture flask caps during cell growth with a view to supplying adequate oxygen to cells is ineffective and unnecessary. The mass transfer characteristics of the tissue culture flask indicate the dominant resistance to oxygen mass transfer to the cells was the liquid media. The mass transfer rates through the liquid layer under standard laboratory conditions were found to be greater than those predicted by diffusion alone, suggesting microscale mixing. Volumetric and specific oxygen consumption rates were calculated from the sensor data, and were comparable to published values. A recently developed single fiber optic oxygen sensor is described. This new sensor will provide oxygen concentrations at various levels in the tissue culture flasks, allowing more accurate modeling of oxygen diffusion.

  1. PET imaging of cerebral perfusion and oxygen consumption in acute ischemic stroke: Relation to outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Marchal, G.; Serrati, C.; Rioux, P.; Petit-Taboue, M.C.; Viader, F.; Sayette, V. de la; Doze, F. le; Lonchon, P; Derlon, J.M.; Orgogozo, J.M.; Baron, J.C.

    1993-04-10

    The authors used positron emission tomography (PET) to assess the relation between combined imaging of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption 5-18 h after first middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke and neurological outcome at 2 months. All 18 patients could be classified into three visually defined PET patterns of perfusion and oxygen consumption changes. Pattern 1 suggested extensive irreversible damage and was consistently associated with poor outcome. Pattern 2 suggested continuing ischemia and was associated with variable outcome. Pattern 3 with hyperperfusion and little or no metabolic alteration, was associated with excellent recovery, which suggests that early reperfusion is beneficial. This relation between PET and outcome was highly significant. The results suggest that within 5-18 h of stroke onset, PET is a good predictor of outcome in patterns 1 and 3, for which therapy seems limited. The absence of predictive value for pattern 2 suggests that it is due to a reversible ischemic state that is possibly amenable to therapy. These findings may have important implications for acute MCA stroke management and for patients' selection for therapeutic trials.

  2. Hyperbaric oxygen in skeletal muscle of rats submitted to total acute left hindlimb ischemia: A research report.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Luis Gustavo Campos; Dalio, Marcelo Bellini; Joviliano, Edwaldo Edner; Feres, Omar; Piccinato, Carlos Eli

    2015-01-01

    Determine the effect of hyperbaric oxygen treatment in skeletal muscle of rats submitted to total acute left hindlimb ischemia. An experimental study was designed using 48 Wistar rats divided into four groups (n = 12): Control; Ischemia (I)--total hindlimb ischemia for 270 minutes; Hyperbaric oxygen treatment during ischemia (HBO2)--total hindlimb ischemia for 270 minutes and hyperbaric oxygen during the first 90 minutes; Pre-treatment with hyperbaric oxygen (PHBO2)--90 minutes of hyperbaric oxygen treatment before total hindlimb ischemia for 270 minutes. Skeletal muscle injury was evaluated by measuring levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), total creatine phosphokinase (CPK); muscular malondialdehyde (MDA), muscular glycogen, and serum ischemia-modified albumin (IMA). AST was significantly higher in I, HBO2 and PHBO2 compared with control (P = .001). There was no difference in LDH. CPK was significantly higher in I, HBO2 and PHBO2, compared with control (p = .014). MDA was significantly higher in PHBO2, compared with other groups (p = .042). Glycogen was significantly decreased in I, HBO2 and PHBO2, compared with control (p < .001). Hyperbaric oxygen treatment in acute total hindlimb ischemia exerted no protective effect on muscle injury, regardless of time of application. When applied prior to installation of total ischemia, hyperbaric oxygen treatment aggravated muscle injury.

  3. Prone positioning improves oxygenation in adult burn patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hale, Diane F; Cannon, Jeremy W; Batchinsky, Andriy I; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Aden, James K; White, Christopher E; Renz, Evan M; Blackbourne, Lorne H; Chung, Kevin K

    2012-06-01

    Prone positioning (PP) improves oxygenation and may provide a benefit in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This approach adds significant challenges to patients in intensive care by limiting access to the endotracheal or tracheostomy tube and vascular access. PP also significantly complicates burn care by making skin protection and wound care more difficult. We hypothesize that PP improves oxygenation and can be performed safely in burn patients with ARDS. PP was implemented in a burn intensive care unit for 18 patients with severe refractory ARDS. The characteristics of these patients were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate the impact of PP on Pao2:FiO2 ratio (PFR) during the first 48 hours of therapy. Each patient was considered his or her own control before initiation of PP, and trends in PFR were evaluated with one-way analysis of variance. Secondary measures of complications and mortality were also evaluated. Mean PFR before PP was 87 (± 38) with a mean sequential organ failure assessment score of 11 (± 4). PFR improved during 48 hours in 12 of 14 survivors (p < 0.05). Mean PFR was 133 (± 77) immediately after PP, 165 (± 118) at 6 hours, 170 (± 115) at 12 hours, 214 (± 126) at 24 hours, 236 (± 137) at 36 hours, and 210 (± 97) at 48 hours. At each measured time interval except the last, PFR significantly improved. There were no unintended extubations. Facial pressure ulcers developed in four patients (22%). Overall, 14 survived 48 hours (78%), 12 survived 28 days (67%), and six survived to hospital discharge (33%). PP improves oxygenation in burn patients with severe ARDS and was safely implemented in a burn intensive care unit. Mortality in this population remains high, warranting investigation into additional complementary rescue therapies. Therapeutic study, level IV. Copyright © 2012 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  4. Low Doses of Oxygen Ion Irradiation Cause Acute Damage to Hematopoietic Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jianhui; Luo, Yi; Wang, Yingying; Pathak, Rupak; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Jones, Tamako; Mao, Xiao Wen; Nelson, Gregory; Boerma, Marjan; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    One of the major health risks to astronauts is radiation on long-duration space missions. Space radiation from sun and galactic cosmic rays consists primarily of 85% protons, 14% helium nuclei and 1% high-energy high-charge (HZE) particles, such as oxygen (16O), carbon, silicon, and iron ions. HZE particles exhibit dense linear tracks of ionization associated with clustered DNA damage and often high relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Therefore, new knowledge of risks from HZE particle exposures must be obtained. In the present study, we investigated the acute effects of low doses of 16O irradiation on the hematopoietic system. Specifically, we exposed C57BL/6J mice to 0.1, 0.25 and 1.0 Gy whole body 16O (600 MeV/n) irradiation and examined the effects on peripheral blood (PB) cells, and bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) at two weeks after the exposure. The results showed that the numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets were significantly decreased in PB after exposure to 1.0 Gy, but not to 0.1 or 0.25 Gy. However, both the frequency and number of HPCs and HSCs were reduced in a radiation dose-dependent manner in comparison to un-irradiated controls. Furthermore, HPCs and HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant reduction in clonogenic function determined by the colony-forming and cobblestone area-forming cell assays. These acute adverse effects of 16O irradiation on HSCs coincided with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), enhanced cell cycle entry of quiescent HSCs, and increased DNA damage. However, none of the 16O exposures induced apoptosis in HSCs. These data suggest that exposure to low doses of 16O irradiation induces acute BM injury in a dose-dependent manner primarily via increasing ROS production, cell cycling, and DNA damage in HSCs. This finding may aid in developing novel strategies in the protection of the hematopoietic

  5. Low Doses of Oxygen Ion Irradiation Cause Acute Damage to Hematopoietic Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Pathak, Rupak; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Jones, Tamako; Mao, Xiao Wen; Nelson, Gregory; Boerma, Marjan; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    One of the major health risks to astronauts is radiation on long-duration space missions. Space radiation from sun and galactic cosmic rays consists primarily of 85% protons, 14% helium nuclei and 1% high-energy high-charge (HZE) particles, such as oxygen (16O), carbon, silicon, and iron ions. HZE particles exhibit dense linear tracks of ionization associated with clustered DNA damage and often high relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Therefore, new knowledge of risks from HZE particle exposures must be obtained. In the present study, we investigated the acute effects of low doses of 16O irradiation on the hematopoietic system. Specifically, we exposed C57BL/6J mice to 0.1, 0.25 and 1.0 Gy whole body 16O (600 MeV/n) irradiation and examined the effects on peripheral blood (PB) cells, and bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) at two weeks after the exposure. The results showed that the numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets were significantly decreased in PB after exposure to 1.0 Gy, but not to 0.1 or 0.25 Gy. However, both the frequency and number of HPCs and HSCs were reduced in a radiation dose-dependent manner in comparison to un-irradiated controls. Furthermore, HPCs and HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant reduction in clonogenic function determined by the colony-forming and cobblestone area-forming cell assays. These acute adverse effects of 16O irradiation on HSCs coincided with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), enhanced cell cycle entry of quiescent HSCs, and increased DNA damage. However, none of the 16O exposures induced apoptosis in HSCs. These data suggest that exposure to low doses of 16O irradiation induces acute BM injury in a dose-dependent manner primarily via increasing ROS production, cell cycling, and DNA damage in HSCs. This finding may aid in developing novel strategies in the protection of the hematopoietic

  6. Effect of oxygen plasma modification on refractive index sensing with micro-cavity in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debowska, Anna K.; Dominik, Magdalena; Koba, Marcin; Janik, Monika; Bock, Wojtek; Śmietana, Mateusz

    2016-12-01

    A micro-cavity in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer (μIMZI) is an optical sensing structure fabricated in an optical fiber. Its design allows for refractive index sensing of liquid and gas in picoliter volumes, making it suitable for biochemical and medical sensing where measured material is often scarce. The fabricated structures show satisfactory levels of sensitivity, from about 400 nm/RIU in the near-water range of solutions (nD 1.336+/-0.003 RIU) to about 16 000 nm/RIU for solutions in approximate range from nD = 1.35 RIU to nD = 1.4 RIU. The structures were subjected to oxygen plasma, the process which was supposed to modify physical parameters of the structures, i.e., cavity surface wettability and roughness, and in consequence their sensitivity. As a result of the oxygen plasma modification we have observed a improved wettability of the structure surface, what makes it easier to introduce liquid into the cavity and simplifies the measurement process. In the case where the plasma processing is preceded by biological layer deposition, the bottom surface of the structure is smoothed and slightly deepened, causing a shift in the transmission spectrum and change in sensitivity.

  7. Sensing of oxygen in microtiter plates: a novel tool for screening drugs against pathogenic yeasts.

    PubMed

    Wesolowski, Janine; Hassan, Rabeay Y A; Hodde, Stephan; Bardroff, Christian; Bilitewski, Ursula

    2008-07-01

    Most antibiotics were discovered via their inhibition of growth of target organisms. However, yeasts in particular have the capability to adapt metabolic pathways to the availability of nutrients e.g. yeasts can easily switch between respiratory and fermentative pathways in response to oxygen concentration, or can even use both simultaneously. Thus, we cultivated S. cerevisiae BY4741 and C. albicans 1386 in microtiter plates with integrated oxygen sensors to characterize the availability of oxygen for the organisms and to detect influences of fungicides on the oxygen consumption rates. The relevance of the respiratory pathway was indicated by the almost total consumption of oxygen during the first 1-3 h of the cultivation in the microtiter plates, when an increase in turbidity could hardly be seen. Moreover, the sensitivity of S. cerevisiae to inhibitors of the respiratory chain, such as myxothiazol, could be detected via a reduced oxygen consumption rate, whereas no inhibition of growth was observed. Thus, not only was the sensitivity of the test organism for the test compound detectable, but the affected pathway was also highlighted. Other compounds, such as pyrrolnitrin and ambruticin VS-3, inhibited growth of C. albicans 1386 and of S. cerevisiae (only pyrrolnitrin), which was additionally observed as reduced oxygen consumption rates. Thus, the determination of oxygen in microtiter plates via fluorescent dyes is a versatile supplement to standard growth inhibition tests.

  8. Influence of oxygen content immediately after graft reperfusion on occurrence of postoperative acute kidney injury in living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chae, Min Suk; Lee, Nuri; Park, Da Hye; Lee, Jisoo; Jung, Hyun Sik; Park, Chul Soo; Lee, Jaemin; Choi, Jong Ho; Hong, Sang Hyun

    2017-08-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). In this study, we investigated perioperative factors, including oxygen content, related to the postoperative development of AKI after LDLT. The perioperative data of 334 patients were reviewed retrospectively. We identified the postoperative development of AKI based on the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria. Perioperative variables, including oxygen content, were compared between patients with and without AKI. Potentially significant variables in a univariate analysis were evaluated by multivariate analysis. Postoperative AKI developed in 76 patients (22.7%). Univariate analysis revealed that preoperative factors (body mass index [BMI], diabetes mellitus, C-reactive protein) and intraoperative factors (severe postreperfusion syndrome, packed red blood cell transfusion, furosemide, and oxygen content at the anhepatic phase, 5 minutes and 1 hour after graft reperfusion, and at peritoneal closure) of recipients were significant. The multivariate analysis showed that oxygen content 5 minutes after graft reperfusion, BMI, and furosemide administration were independently associated with postoperative AKI. In conclusion, postoperative AKI was independently associated with oxygen content 5 minutes after graft reperfusion, BMI, and furosemide administration. Meticulous ventilator care and transfusion should be required to maintain sufficient oxygen content immediately after graft reperfusion in patients who undergo LDLT.

  9. Economics of Inhaled Oxygen Use as an Acute Therapy for Cluster Headache in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Megan; Ford, Janet H; Aurora, Sheena K; Govindan, Sriram; Tepper, Deborah E; Tepper, Stewart J

    2017-10-01

    Cluster headache (CH) is a primary headache disorder associated with low levels of diagnosis and high unmet medical need. The pain attacks, associated anxiety, and fear in anticipation of the attacks are extremely debilitating to a patient with CH. For acute therapy, treatment guidelines recommend inhalation of high flow oxygen during the period of an attack. However, the use of oxygen for treatment of CH remains largely underutilized. The objectives of the study, which covered each of the US states, were to map the current market landscape of medical grade oxygen for use in CH and to develop a cost simulator based on a patient's needs and geography. Desk research was undertaken to obtain price lists and product catalogs from wholesale and retail suppliers of medical grade oxygen across all US states. Base case scenarios for chronic and episodic forms of CH were assumed. A cost simulator was used to calculate the cost of oxygen use using inputs including the state in USA, tank size and price, exacerbations per year, duration of exacerbation, attacks per day, flow rate and duration of flow. Information was also collected to determine if healthcare insurers covered the costs of home oxygen use for CH. Out of the 42 US states where pricing information of medical grade oxygen was available from suppliers, in 38 states the annual cost of high-flow oxygen for a patient with episodic CH was estimated to be <$1000. In 39 states, the annual cost of high-flow oxygen for a patient with chronic CH was estimated to be <$5000. Most of the home oxygen suppliers were familiar with CH and stocked the special non-rebreather masks and regulators necessary for this condition. It was found that many of the private commercial healthcare insurance providers reimbursed the cost of oxygen use for CH. However, the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) maintains there is insufficient evidence for coverage and continues to deny coverage for US Medicare and Medicaid patients

  10. Mutual antagonism between hypoxia-inducible factors 1α and 2α regulates oxygen sensing and cardio-respiratory homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Guoxiang; Peng, Ying-Jie; Reddy, Vaddi Damodara; Makarenko, Vladislav V; Nanduri, Jayasri; Khan, Shakil A; Garcia, Joseph A; Kumar, Ganesh K; Semenza, Gregg L; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2013-05-07

    Breathing and blood pressure are under constant homeostatic regulation to maintain optimal oxygen delivery to the tissues. Chemosensory reflexes initiated by the carotid body and catecholamine secretion from the adrenal medulla are the principal mechanisms for maintaining respiratory and cardiovascular homeostasis; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not known. Here, we report that balanced activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and HIF-2 is critical for oxygen sensing by the carotid body and adrenal medulla, and for their control of cardio-respiratory function. In Hif2α(+/-) mice, partial HIF-2α deficiency increased levels of HIF-1α and NADPH oxidase 2, leading to an oxidized intracellular redox state, exaggerated hypoxic sensitivity, and cardio-respiratory abnormalities, which were reversed by treatment with a HIF-1α inhibitor or a superoxide anion scavenger. Conversely, in Hif1α(+/-) mice, partial HIF-1α deficiency increased levels of HIF-2α and superoxide dismutase 2, leading to a reduced intracellular redox state, blunted oxygen sensing, and impaired carotid body and ventilatory responses to chronic hypoxia, which were corrected by treatment with a HIF-2α inhibitor. None of the abnormalities observed in Hif1α(+/-) mice or Hif2α(+/-) mice were observed in Hif1α(+/-);Hif2α(+/-) mice. These observations demonstrate that redox balance, which is determined by mutual antagonism between HIF-α isoforms, establishes the set point for hypoxic sensing by the carotid body and adrenal medulla, and is required for maintenance of cardio-respiratory homeostasis.

  11. Gas sensing in microplates with optodes: influence of oxygen exchange between sample, air, and plate material.

    PubMed

    Arain, Sarina; Weiss, Svenja; Heinzle, Elmar; John, Gernot T; Krause, Christian; Klimant, Ingo

    2005-05-05

    Microplates with integrated optical oxygen sensors are a new tool to study metabolic rates and enzyme activities. Precise measurements are possible only if oxygen exchange between the sample and the environment is known. In this study we quantify gas exchange in plastic microplates. Dissolved oxygen was detected using either an oxygen-sensitive film fixed at the bottom of each well or a needle-type sensor. The diffusion of oxygen into wells sealed with different foils, paraffin oil, and paraffin wax, respectively, was quantified. Although foil covers showed the lowest oxygen permeability, they include an inevitable gas phase between sample and sealing and are difficult to manage. The use of oil was found to be critical due to the extensive shaking caused by movement of the plates during measurements in microplate readers. Thus, paraffin wax was the choice material because it avoids convection of the sample and is easy to handle. Furthermore, without shaking, significant gradients in pO2 levels within a single well of a polystyrene microplate covered with paraffin oil were detected with the needle-type sensor. Higher pO2 levels were obtained near the surface of the sample as well as near the wall of the well. A significant diffusion of oxygen through the plastic plate material was found using plates based on polystyrene. Thus, the location of a sensor element within the well has an effect on the measured pO2 level. Using a sensor film fixed on the bottom of a well or using a dissolved pO2-sensitive indicator results in pO2 offset and in apparently lower respiration rates or enzyme activities. Oxygen diffusion through a polystyrene microplate was simulated for measurements without convection--that is, for samples without oxygen diffusion through the cover and for unshaken measurements using permeable sealings. This mathematical model allows for calculation of the correct kinetic parameters. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Determination of the Role of Oxygen in Suspected Acute Myocardial Infarction by Biomarkers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-02

    Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI); Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS); ST Elevation (STEMI) Myocardial Infarction; Ischemic Reperfusion Injury; Non-ST Elevation (NSTEMI) Myocardial Infarction; Angina, Unstable

  13. From critters to cancers: bridging comparative and clinical research on oxygen sensing, HIF signaling, and adaptations towards hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hoogewijs, D; Terwilliger, N B; Webster, K A; Powell-Coffman, J A; Tokishita, S; Yamagata, H; Hankeln, T; Burmester, T; Rytkönen, K T; Nikinmaa, M; Abele, D; Heise, K; Lucassen, M; Fandrey, J; Maxwell, P H; Påhlman, S; Gorr, T A

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this symposium at the First International Congress of Respiratory Biology (ICRB) was to enhance communication between comparative biologists and cancer researchers working on O(2) sensing via the HIF pathway. Representatives from both camps came together on August 13-16, 2006, in Bonn, Germany, to discuss molecular adaptations that occur after cells have been challenged by a reduced (hypoxia) or completely absent (anoxia) supply of oxygen. This brief "critters-to-cancer" survey discusses current projects and new directions aimed at improving understanding of hypoxic signaling and developing therapeutic interventions.

  14. HIF-1α in epidermis: oxygen sensing, cutaneous angiogenesis, cancer, and non-cancer disorders.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Hamid R; Ali, Nsrein; Nissen, Lars J; Harfouche, Ghida; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2011-09-01

    Besides lung, postnatal human epidermis is the only epithelium in direct contact with atmospheric oxygen. Skin epidermal oxygenation occurs mostly through atmospheric oxygen rather than tissue vasculature, resulting in a mildly hypoxic microenvironment that favors increased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). Considering the wide spectrum of biological processes, such as angiogenesis, inflammation, bioenergetics, proliferation, motility, and apoptosis, that are regulated by this transcription factor, its high expression level in the epidermis might be important to HIF-1α in skin physiology and pathophysiology. Here, we review the role of HIF-1α in cutaneous angiogenesis, skin tumorigenesis, and several skin disorders.

  15. Ventilation and oxygen consumption during acute hypoxia in newborn mammals: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Mortola, J P; Rezzonico, R; Lanthier, C

    1989-10-01

    We asked whether the lack of sustained hyperventilation during acute hypoxia, often reported to occur in the infant, is a common characteristic among newborn mammalian species, and to which extent inter-species differences may be accounted for by differences in metabolic responses. Ventilation (VE) and breathing pattern have been measured by flow-plethysmography or by the barometric method in normoxia and after 10 min of 10% O2 breathing in newborn mammals of 17 species over a 3 g to 20 kg range in body size. In 14 of these species oxygen consumption (VO2) has also been measured by a manometric technique or by calculation from the changes in chamber O2 pressure. VE and VO2 changed in proportion, among species, both in normoxia and hypoxia. In hypoxia, VE was higher, similar, or even lower than in normoxia, with some relation to the degree of maturity of the species at birth. In general, the small or absent VE responses to hypoxia resulted from small or no increase in tidal volume, while breathing frequency stayed elevated. The few departures from this pattern could be explained by interspecies differences in hypoxic sensitivity, since additional experiments in kittens and puppies indicated that, with more severe hypoxia, the pattern changed from rapid and shallow to deep and slow. In all cases, irrespective of the magnitude of the VE response, the VE/VO2 (and the mean inspiratory flow/VO2) increased during hypoxia, because the drop in VE, when present, was accompanied by an even larger drop in VO2. In fact, VO2 in hypoxia decreased in most species, although to variable degrees. Body temperature either did not change or decreased slightly, possibly indicating a trend toward a decrease of the set point of thermoregulation during hypoxia. In conclusion, the analysis gave further support to the concept that, during acute hypoxia, changes in metabolic rate play a paramount role in the ventilatory response of the newborn mammal.

  16. Pulmonary gas exchange response to oxygen breathing in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Santos, C; Ferrer, M; Roca, J; Torres, A; Hernández, C; Rodriguez-Roisin, R

    2000-01-01

    The mechanisms and time course of the pulmonary gas exchange response to 100% O(2) breathing in acute respiratory failure needing mechanical ventilation were studied in eight patients with acute lung injury (ALI) (48 +/- 18 yr [mean +/- SD]) and in four patients (66 +/- 2 yr) with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We postulated that, in patients with ALI while breathing 100% O(2), the primary mechanism of hypoxemia, i.e., increased intrapulmonary shunt, would further worsen (increase) as a result of reabsorption atelectasis. Respiratory and inert gases, and systemic and pulmonary hemodynamics were measured at maintenance fraction of inspired oxygen (FI(O(2))-m), at 30 and 60 min while breathing 100% O(2), and then at 30 min of resuming FI(O(2))-m. During 100% O(2) breathing, in patients with ALI, Pa(O(2)) (by 207 and 204 mm Hg; p < 0.01 each), Pa(CO(2)) (by 4 mm Hg each) (p < 0.05 each), and intrapulmonary shunt (from 16 +/- 10% to 22 +/- 11% and 23 +/- 11%) (p < 0.05 each) increased respectively. By contrast, in patients with COPD, Pa(O(2)) (by 387 and 393 mm Hg; p < 0.001 each), Pa(CO(2)) (by 4 and 5 mm Hg) and the dispersion of pulmonary blood flow (log SDQ) (from 1.33 +/- 0.10 to 1.60 +/- 0.20 and 1.80 +/- 0.30 [p < 0.05]) increased, respectively. In patients with ALI, the breathing of 100% O(2) deteriorates intrapulmonary shunt owing to collapse of unstable alveolar units with very low ventilation-perfusion (V A/Q) ratios, as opposed to patients with COPD, in whom only the dispersion of the blood flow distribution is disturbed, suggesting release of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

  17. Repetitive hyperbaric oxygen treatment increases insulin sensitivity in diabetes patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qian; Wei, Yi-ting; Fan, Shuang-bo; Wang, Liang; Zhou, Xiao-ping

    2017-01-01

    Aim The role of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke is controversial. This study aims to investigate whether the peripheral insulin sensitivity of type 2 diabetes patients suffering from intracerebral hemorrhage can be increased after HBOT. Methods Fifty-two type 2 diabetes participants were recruited after being diagnosed with intracerebral hemorrhage in our hospital. Insulin sensitivity was measured by the glucose infusion rate during a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (80 mU m−2 min−1) at baseline and 10 and 30 days after HBOT sessions. Serum insulin, fasting glucose, and hemoglobin A1C were measured in fasting serum at baseline and after HBOT sessions. In addition, early (∼10 days after onset) and late (1 month after onset) outcomes (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, NIHSS scores) and efficacy (changes of NIHSS scores) of HBOT were evaluated. Results In response to HBOT, the glucose infusion rate was increased by 37.8%±5.76% at 1 month after onset compared with baseline. Reduced serum insulin, fasting glucose, and hemoglobin A1C were observed after HBOT. Both early and late outcomes of the HBOT group were improved compared with baseline (P<0.001). In the control group, there was significant difference only in the late outcome (P<0.05). In the assessment of efficacy, there were statistically significant differences between the groups when comparing changes in NIHSS scores at 10 days and 1 month after onset (P<0.05). Conclusion Peripheral insulin sensitivity was increased following HBOT in type 2 diabetes patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. The HBOT used in this study may be effective for diabetes patients with acute stroke and is a safe and harmless adjunctive treatment. PMID:28228657

  18. Microwave-assisted synthesis of SnO2 nanorods for oxygen gas sensing at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Ameer; Habib, Sami S; Salah, Numan A; Ahmed, Faheem

    2013-01-01

    High-quality single-crystalline SnO2 nanorods were synthesized using a microwave-assisted solution method. The nanorods were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible and Raman spectroscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), and electrical resistance measurements. The XRD pattern indicated the formation of single-phase SnO2 nanorods with rutile structure. FE-SEM and TEM images revealed tetragonal nanorods of about 450–500 nm in length and 60–80 nm in diameter. The nanorods showed a higher BET surface area of 288 m2/g, much higher than that of previously reported work. The Raman scattering spectra indicated a typical rutile phase of the SnO2. The absorption spectrum showed an absorption peak centered at 340 nm, and the band-gap value was found to be 3.64 eV. The gas-sensing properties of the SnO2 nanorods for oxygen gas with different concentrations were measured at room temperature. It was found that the value of resistance increased with the increase in oxygen gas concentration in the test chamber. The SnO2 nanorods exhibited high sensitivity and rapid response-recovery characteristics to oxygen gas, and could detect oxygen concentration as low as 1, 3, 5, and 10 ppm. PMID:24143091

  19. Raman, EPR and ethanol sensing properties of oxygen-Vacancies SrTiO3-δ compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabelsi, H.; Bejar, M.; Dhahri, E.; Graça, M. P. F.; Valente, M. A.; Soares, M. J.; Sobolev, N. A.

    2017-12-01

    Polycrystalline SrTiO3-δ powders with cubic perovskite phase were prepared by solid-state reaction method followed by the creation of oxygen vacancies δ-thermal activated. The Raman spectroscopic investigation was carried out in a frequency range of 100-2000 cm-1, and the second-order Raman modes were observed at room temperature. The Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) results revealed that SrTiO3-δ samples had evident EPR signals that increased significantly with oxygen-vacancy concentrations. The incorporation of oxygen vacancies was found to decrease the thermal resistivity. Besides, the electrical sensing measurements showed that sensors based on SrTiO2.925 (STO1) and SrTiO2.875 (STO2) exhibited semiconductor behavior, while SrTiO2.75-based sensor (STO3) revealed the introduction of a metallic behavior at low temperature. Furthermore, these measurements confirmed that the resistivity increased after the introduction of the ethanol gas, which indicates that our samples can be considered as sensors for ethanol gas detection. The formation of oxygen vacancies under ethanol exposure at the surface of SrTiO3-δ sensors was evaluated by photoluminescence.

  20. Change in oxygen saturation does not predict acute mountain sickness on Jade Mountain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hang-Cheng; Lin, Wen-Ling; Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Wang, Shih-Hao; Chiu, Te-Fa; Weng, Yi-Ming; Hsu, Tai-Yi; Wu, Meng-Huan

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this trial was to establish whether changes in resting oxygen saturation (Spo(2)) during ascent of Jade Mountain is useful in predicting acute mountain sickness (AMS). AMS-risk factors were also assessed. A prospective trial was conducted on Jade Mountain, Taiwan from October 18 to October 27, 2008. Resting oxygen saturation (Spo(2)) and heart rate (HR) were measured in subjects at the trail entrance (2610 m), on arrival at Paiyun Lodge (3402 m) on day 1, and at Paiyun Lodge after reaching the summit (3952 m) the next day (day 2). AMS was diagnosed with Lake Louise criteria (AMS score ≥4). A total of 787 subjects were eligible for analysis; 286 (32.2%) met the criteria for AMS. Subjects who developed AMS had significantly lower Spo(2) than those who did not at the trail entrance (93.1% ± 2.1% vs 93.5% ± 2.3%; P = .023), on arrival at Paiyun Lodge on day 1 (86.2% ± 4.7% vs 87.6% ± 4.3%; P < .001), and on the return back to the Paiyun Lodge after a summit attempt on day 2 (85.5% ± 3.5% vs 89.6% ± 3.2%; P < .001), respectively. Trekkers with AMS were significantly younger (40.0 vs 43.2 years; P < .001), and had less high altitude (>3000 m) travel in the previous 3 months (29.9% vs 37.1%; P = .004). Subjects with AMS had a lower Spo(2) than those without AMS; however, the differences between the 2 groups were not clinically significant. The results of this study do not support the use of pulse oximetry in predicting AMS on Jade Mountain. Copyright © 2012 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prediction of acute mountain sickness by monitoring arterial oxygen saturation during ascent.

    PubMed

    Karinen, Heikki M; Peltonen, Juha E; Kähönen, Mika; Tikkanen, Heikki O

    2010-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common problem while ascending at high altitude. AMS may progress rapidly to fatal results if the acclimatization process fails or symptoms are neglected and the ascent continues. Extensively reduced arterial oxygen saturation at rest (R-Spo₂) has been proposed as an indicator of inadequate acclimatization and impending AMS. We hypothesized that climbers less likely to develop AMS on further ascent would have higher Spo₂ immediately after exercise (Ex-Spo₂) at high altitudes than their counterparts and that these postexercise measurements would provide additional value for resting measurements to plan safe ascent. The study was conducted during eight expeditions with 83 ascents. We measured R-Spo₂ and Ex-Spo₂ after moderate daily exercise [50 m walking, target heart rate (HR) 150 bpm] at altitudes of 2400 to 5300 m during ascent. The Lake Louise Questionnaire was used in the diagnosis of AMS. Ex-Spo₂ was lower at all altitudes among those climbers suffering from AMS during the expeditions than among those climbers who did not get AMS at any altitude during the expeditions. Reduced R-Spo₂ and Ex-Spo₂ measured at altitudes of 3500 and 4300 m seem to predict impending AMS at altitudes of 4300 m (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01) and 5300 m (both p < 0.01). Elevated resting HR did not predict impending AMS at these altitudes. Better aerobic capacity, younger age, and higher body mass index (BMI) were also associated with AMS (all p < 0.01). In conclusion, those climbers who successfully maintain their oxygen saturation at rest, especially during exercise, most likely do not develop AMS. The results suggest that daily evaluation of Spo₂ during ascent both at rest and during exercise can help to identify a population that does well at altitude.

  2. Intraoperative renal regional oxygen desaturation can be a predictor for acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dae-Kee; Kim, Wook-Jong; Chin, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Eun-Ho; Don Hahm, Kyung; Yeon Sim, Ji; Cheol Choi, In

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of renal regional oxygen saturation (renal rSO2) in predicting the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac surgery. A prospective observational study. Tertiary care university hospital. One hundred patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Renal rSO2 was monitored continuously by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) throughout the anesthetic period. Postoperative AKI was defined using the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, and End-stage (RIFLE) criteria. Of 95 patients who were included in the final analysis, 34 patients developed AKI after surgery. Recorded renal rSO2 data were used to calculate the total duration of the time when renal rSO2 was below the threshold values of 70%, 65%, 60%, 55%, and 50%. The total periods when the renal rSO2 level was below each of the threshold values were significantly longer in patients with AKI than in those without AKI (p = 0.001 or p<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to evaluate the predictive power of renal rSO2 for AKI. The ROC curve analysis showed that renal rSO2 could predict the risk of AKI with statistical significance and that a renal rSO2<55% had the best performance (area under the curve-ROC, 0.777; 95% CI, 0.669-0.885; p<0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that AKI significantly correlated with the duration of renal rSO2<55% (p = 0.002) and logistic EuroSCORE (p = 0.007). Intraoperative renal regional oxygen desaturation can be a good predictor of AKI in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2005-04-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. One of the critical materials issues is to demonstrate that the luminescent cluster immobilized in the sol-gel porous support can withstand high temperature. At the same time the sol-gel matrix must have a high permeability to oxygen. Using a potassium salt of the molybdenum clusters, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, we have established the conditions necessary for deposition of optical quality sol-gel films. From spectroscopic measurements of the film we have shown that the cluster luminescence is stable following heat cycling of 54 hours at 200 C. Quenching of a factor of 1.5X between pure nitrogen and 21% oxygen was observed from in-situ measurements of films heated directly at 200 C. An automated system for characterizing fiber optic oxygen sensors up to 220 C with a temporal resolution better than 10 s is under construction. We estimate a signal of 6 x 10{sup 8} photons/s after complete quenching in 21% oxygen. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  4. Dual sensing of oxygen and temperature using quantum dots and a ruthenium complex.

    PubMed

    Jorge, P A S; Maule, C; Silva, A J; Benrashid, R; Santos, J L; Farahi, F

    2008-01-14

    A scheme for the simultaneous determination of oxygen and temperature using quantum dots and a ruthenium complex is demonstrated. The luminescent complex [Ru(II)-tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)]2+ is immobilized in a non-hydrolytic sol-gel matrix and used as the oxygen sensor. The temperature information is provided by the luminescent emission of core-shell CdSe-ZnS semiconductor nanocrystals immobilized in the same material. Measurements of oxygen and temperature could be performed with associated errors of +/-2% of oxygen concentration and +/-1 degrees C, respectively. In addition, it is shown that while the dye luminescence intensity is quenched both by oxygen and temperature, the nanocrystals luminescent emission responds only to temperature. Results presented demonstrate that the combined luminescence response allows the simultaneous assessment of both parameters using a single optical fiber system. In particular, it was shown that a 10% error in the measured oxygen concentration, induced by a change in the sample temperature, could be compensated using the nanocrystals temperature information and a correction function.

  5. Determinants of maximal oxygen uptake in moderate acute hypoxia in endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Mollard, Pascal; Woorons, Xavier; Letournel, Muriel; Lamberto, Christine; Favret, Fabrice; Pichon, Aurélien; Beaudry, Michèle; Richalet, Jean-Paul

    2007-08-01

    The factors determining maximal oxygen consumption were explored in eight endurance trained subjects (TS) and eight untrained subjects (US) exposed to moderate acute normobaric hypoxia. Subjects performed maximal incremental tests at sea level and simulated altitudes (1,000, 2,500, 4,500 m). Heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (.Q), arterialized oxygen saturation (Sa'O2), oxygen uptake (.VO2max), ventilation (.VE, expressed in normobaric conditions) were measured. At maximal exercise, ventilatory equivalent (.VE/.VO2max), O2 transport (.QaO2max) and O2 extraction (O2ERmax) were calculated. In TS, .Qmax remained unchanged despite a significant reduction in HRmax at 4,500 m. SVmax remained unchanged. .VEmax decreased in TS at 4,500 m, .VE/.VO2max was lower in TS and greater at 4,500 m vs. sea level in both groups. Sa'O2max decreased at and above 1,000 m in TS and 2,500 m in US, O2ERmax increased at 4,500 m in both groups. .QaO2max decreased with altitude and was greater in TS than US up to 2,500 m but not at 4,500 m. .VO2max decreased with altitude but the decrement (Delta.VO2max) was larger in TS at 4,500 m. In both groups Delta.VO2max in moderate hypoxia was correlated with Delta.QaO2max. Several differences between the two groups are probably responsible for the greater Delta.VO2max in TS at 4,500 m : (1) the relative hypoventilation in TS as shown by the decrement in .VEmax at 4,500 m (2) the greater.QaO2max decrement in TS due to a lower Sa'O2max and unchanged .Qmax 3) the smaller increase in O2ERmax in TS, insufficient to compensate the decrease in .QaO2max.

  6. Enhancement of acute ethanol hepatotoxicity under conditions of low oxygen supply and ischemia/reperfusion. The role of oxygen radicals.

    PubMed

    Younes, M; Wagner, H; Strubelt, O

    1989-10-15

    Using isolated hemoglobin-free perfused rat livers we studied the effect of low oxygen supply on ethanol hepatotoxicity in two models. In the first model resembling low blood supply, perfusion rate was lowered from 60 to 10 ml/min after a 30 min-equilibration phase and kept low for 60 min. As a consequence, oxygen consumption fell from 1.76 +/- 0.15 mumol/min/g to 0.51 +/- 0.02 mumol/min/g. In the second model, total ischemia was accomplished by interruption of the perfusion for 30 min and was followed by reperfusion at a perfusion rate of 60 ml/min for a further 30 min. In this model, oxygen consumption returned immediately to normal values upon reperfusion. In both models, low oxygen supply had no toxic effects of its own on livers from fed rats. While ethanol (3 g/l) given under normoxic conditions led to a moderate hepatotoxicity, its application in both models of partial as well as total ischemia and reperfusion resulted in a marked liver damage as evidenced by a strong release of sorbitol dehydrogenase, glutamate-pyruvate-transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase and glutathione, as well as by an increase in hepatic calcium content. Inhibition of ethanol metabolism by 4-methylpyrazol prevented liver damage in both models indicating that metabolism of ethanol is a prerequisite for its toxicity to occur. Also, hepatotoxicity was inhibited partially by catalase and superoxide dismutase and nearly totally by deferrioxamine and allopurinol. Thus, reactive oxygen species which are produced during ethanol metabolism as well as under conditions of low oxygen supply are mediators of hepatic damage in both models employed.

  7. Mechanical Ventilation during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Patients with Acute Severe Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wan-Jie; Chen, Kun; Ni, Hongying

    2017-01-01

    Conventionally, a substantial number of patients with acute respiratory failure require mechanical ventilation (MV) to avert catastrophe of hypoxemia and hypercapnia. However, mechanical ventilation per se can cause lung injury, accelerating the disease progression. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides an alternative to rescue patients with severe respiratory failure that conventional mechanical ventilation fails to maintain adequate gas exchange. The physiology behind ECMO and its interaction with MV were reviewed. Next, we discussed the timing of ECMO initiation based on the risks and benefits of ECMO. During the running of ECMO, the protective ventilation strategy can be employed without worrying about catastrophic hypoxemia and carbon dioxide retention. There is a large body of evidence showing that protective ventilation with low tidal volume, high positive end-expiratory pressure, and prone positioning can provide benefits on mortality outcome. More recently, there is an increasing popularity on the use of awake and spontaneous breathing for patients undergoing ECMO, which is thought to be beneficial in terms of rehabilitation. PMID:28127231

  8. The Complex Relationship of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation and Acute Kidney Injury: Causation or Association?

    PubMed Central

    Kilburn, Daniel J.; Shekar, Kiran; Fraser, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a modified cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit capable of providing prolonged cardiorespiratory support. Recent advancement in ECMO technology has resulted in increased utilisation and clinical application. It can be used as a bridge-to-recovery, bridge-to-bridge, bridge-to-transplant, or bridge-to-decision. ECMO can restitute physiology in critically ill patients, which may minimise the risk of progressive multiorgan dysfunction. Alternatively, iatrogenic complications of ECMO clearly contribute to worse outcomes. These factors affect the risk : benefit ratio of ECMO which ultimately influence commencement/timing of ECMO. The complex interplay of pre-ECMO, ECMO, and post-ECMO pathophysiological processes are responsible for the substantial increased incidence of ECMO-associated acute kidney injury (EAKI). The development of EAKI significantly contributes to morbidity and mortality; however, there is a lack of evidence defining a potential benefit or causative link between ECMO and AKI. This area warrants investigation as further research will delineate the mechanisms involved and subsequent strategies to minimise the risk of EAKI. This review summarizes the current literature of ECMO and AKI, considers the possible benefits and risks of ECMO on renal function, outlines the related pathophysiology, highlights relevant investigative tools, and ultimately suggests an approach for future research into this under investigated area of critical care. PMID:27006941

  9. Eltrombopag modulates reactive oxygen species and decreases acute myeloid leukemia cell survival.

    PubMed

    Kalota, Anna; Selak, Mary A; Garcia-Cid, Laura A; Carroll, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the small molecule thrombopoietin (TPO) mimetic, eltrombopag (E), induces apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Here, we sought to define the mechanism of the anti-leukemic effect of eltrombopag. Our studies demonstrate that, at a concentration of 5 μM E in 2% serum, E induces apoptosis in leukemia cells by triggering PARP cleavage and activation of caspase cascades within 2-6 hours. The induction of apoptotic enzymes is critically dependent on drug concentration and the concentration of serum. This effect is not associated with an alteration in mitochondrial potential but is associated with a rapid decrease in a reactive oxygen species (ROS) in particular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Interestingly, E also decreases mitochondrial maximal and spare respiratory capacities suggesting an induced mitochondrial dysfunction that may not be readily apparent under basal conditions but becomes manifest only under stress. Co-treatment of MOLM14 AML cells with E plus Tempol or H2O2 provides a partial rescue of cell toxicity. Ferric ammonioum citrate (FAC) also antagonized the E induced toxicity, by inducing notable increase in ROS level. Overall, we propose that E dramatically decreases ROS levels leading to a disruption of AML intracellular metabolism and rapid cell death.

  10. Effect of resveratrol on pancreatic oxygen free radicals in rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen-Dong; Ma, Qing-Yong; Wang, Chang-An

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic effects of resveratrol (RESV) as a free radical scavenger on experimental severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: Seventy-two male Sprague–Dawley rats were divided randomly into sham operation group, SAP group, and resveratrol-treated group. Pancreatitis was induced by intraductal administration of 0.1 mL/kg 4% sodium taurocholate. RESV was given intravenously at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight. All animals were killed at 3, 6, 12 h after induction of the model. Serum amylase, pancreatic superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were determined. Pathologic changes of the pancreas were observed under optical microscope. RESULTS: The serum amylase, pancreatic MPO and the score of pathologic damage increased after the induction of pancreatitis, early (3, 6 h) SAP samples were characterized by decreased pancreatic SOD and increased pancreatic MDA. Resveratrol exhibited a protective effect against lipid peroxidation in cell membrane caused by oxygen free radicals in the early stage of SAP. This attenuation of the redox state impairment reduced cellular oxidative damage, as reflected by lower serum amylase, less severe pancreatic lesions, normal pancreatic MDA levels, as well as diminished neutrophil infiltration in pancreas. CONCLUSION: RESV may exert its therapeutic effect on SAP by lowering pancreatic oxidative free radicals and reducing pancreatic tissue infiltration of neutrophils. PMID:16440434

  11. Improved oxygen uptake efficiency slope in acute myocardial infarction patients after early phase I cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yun-Jeng; Li, Min-Hui; Chen, Chia-Hsin; Tuan, Sheng-Hui; Chen, Yi-Jen; Lin, Ko-Long

    2017-09-01

    A predischarge submaximal exercise test is often recommended after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) as part of phase I cardiac rehabilitation. In this study, a submaximal exercise parameter, oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES), was used to monitor the benefit of early mobilization within 48 h after AMI. An early mobilization protocol within 48 h after AMI has been initiated since 1 September 2012 in our center. Patients with onset time of AMI within 1 year before and 1 year after initiation of the early mobilization protocol were recruited for comparisons. Sixty patients were analyzed on the basis of this criterion, and were subjected to predischarge submaximal exercise tests. The OUES calculated with 100% exercise duration (OUES100) and calculated with the first 50% of exercise duration (OUES50) were obtained and analyzed. Both OUES100 and OUES50 of the AMI patients with early mobilization were significantly higher than those without early mobilization (P=0.025 and 0.007, respectively). The OUES100 and OUES50 were also highly correlated (r=0.891, P<0.001). The subgroup analysis using patients within 3 months before and 3 months after initiation of the protocol also showed a significant difference. OUES could be used to measure the exercise capacity and monitor the effect of phase I cardiac rehabilitation in patients soon after AMI. Early mobilization within 48 h following AMI significantly enhanced the patient's exercise capacity.

  12. Mechanical Ventilation during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Patients with Acute Severe Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongheng; Gu, Wan-Jie; Chen, Kun; Ni, Hongying

    2017-01-01

    Conventionally, a substantial number of patients with acute respiratory failure require mechanical ventilation (MV) to avert catastrophe of hypoxemia and hypercapnia. However, mechanical ventilation per se can cause lung injury, accelerating the disease progression. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides an alternative to rescue patients with severe respiratory failure that conventional mechanical ventilation fails to maintain adequate gas exchange. The physiology behind ECMO and its interaction with MV were reviewed. Next, we discussed the timing of ECMO initiation based on the risks and benefits of ECMO. During the running of ECMO, the protective ventilation strategy can be employed without worrying about catastrophic hypoxemia and carbon dioxide retention. There is a large body of evidence showing that protective ventilation with low tidal volume, high positive end-expiratory pressure, and prone positioning can provide benefits on mortality outcome. More recently, there is an increasing popularity on the use of awake and spontaneous breathing for patients undergoing ECMO, which is thought to be beneficial in terms of rehabilitation.

  13. Improved in vivo performance of amperometric oxygen (PO2) sensing catheters via electrochemical nitric oxide generation/release.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hang; Coughlin, Megan A; Major, Terry C; Aiello, Salvatore; Rojas Pena, Alvaro; Bartlett, Robert H; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2015-08-18

    A novel electrochemically controlled release method for nitric oxide (NO) (based on electrochemical reduction of nitrite ions) is combined with an amperometric oxygen sensor within a dual lumen catheter configuration for the continuous in vivo sensing of the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) in blood. The on-demand electrochemical NO generation/release method is shown to be fully compatible with amperometric PO2 sensing. The performance of the sensors is evaluated in rabbit veins and pig arteries for 7 and 21 h, respectively. Overall, the NO releasing sensors measure both venous and arterial PO2 values more accurately with an average deviation of -2 ± 11% and good correlation (R(2) = 0.97) with in vitro blood measurements, whereas the corresponding control sensors without NO release show an average deviation of -31 ± 28% and poor correlation (R(2) = 0.43) at time points >4 h after implantation in veins and >6 h in arteries. The NO releasing sensors induce less thrombus formation on the catheter surface in both veins and arteries (p < 0.05). This electrochemical NO generation/release method could offer a new and attractive means to improve the biocompatibility and performance of implantable chemical sensors.

  14. Improved in Vivo Performance of Amperometric Oxygen (PO2) Sensing Catheters via Electrochemical Nitric Oxide Generation/Release

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A novel electrochemically controlled release method for nitric oxide (NO) (based on electrochemical reduction of nitrite ions) is combined with an amperometric oxygen sensor within a dual lumen catheter configuration for the continuous in vivo sensing of the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) in blood. The on-demand electrochemical NO generation/release method is shown to be fully compatible with amperometric PO2 sensing. The performance of the sensors is evaluated in rabbit veins and pig arteries for 7 and 21 h, respectively. Overall, the NO releasing sensors measure both venous and arterial PO2 values more accurately with an average deviation of −2 ± 11% and good correlation (R2 = 0.97) with in vitro blood measurements, whereas the corresponding control sensors without NO release show an average deviation of −31 ± 28% and poor correlation (R2 = 0.43) at time points >4 h after implantation in veins and >6 h in arteries. The NO releasing sensors induce less thrombus formation on the catheter surface in both veins and arteries (p < 0.05). This electrochemical NO generation/release method could offer a new and attractive means to improve the biocompatibility and performance of implantable chemical sensors. PMID:26201351

  15. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2006-05-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Previously we described a particle-in-binder approach to immobilizing the potassium salt of the molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, at the tips of optical fibers. Compared to previous methods, the particle-in-binder approach affords fibers with greatly improved mechanical properties. The response of the sensor to oxygen at 40, 70 and 100 C was measured in 2-21% gas phase oxygen. The normalized sensor signal is linear with molar oxygen concentration and fits the theoretical Stern-Volmer relationship. Although the sensitivity decreases with temperature, at 100 C the sensitivity is 160 [O{sub 2}]{sup -1}. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  16. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn; Po Zhang

    2006-06-30

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Our approach towards immobilizing the potassium salt of the molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, at the far end of an optical fiber is to embed the cluster in a thermally cured sol-gel matrix particle. This particle-in-binder approach affords fibers with greatly improved mechanical properties, as compared to previous approaches. The sensor was characterized in 2-21% gas phase oxygen at 40, 70 and 100 C. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  17. Amphiphilic Fluorinated Polymer Nanoparticle Film Formation and Dissolved Oxygen Sensing Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yu; Zhu, Huie; Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Miyashita, Tokuji; Mitsuishi, Masaya

    2016-04-01

    Fluorinated polymer nanoparticle films were prepared by dissolving amphiphilic fluorinated polymer, poly (N-1H, 1H-pentadecafluorooctylmethacrylamide) (pC7F15MAA) in two miscible solvents (AK-225 and acetic acid). A superhydrophobic and porous film was obtained by dropcasting the solution on substrates. With higher ratios of AK-225 to acetic acid, pC7F15MAA was densified around acetic acid droplets, leading to the formation of pC7F15MAA nanoparticles. The condition of the nanoparticle film preparation was investigated by varying the mixing ratio or total concentration. A highly sensitive dissolved oxygen sensor system was successfully prepared utilizing a smart surface of superhydrophobic and porous pC7F15MAA nanoparticle film. The sensitivity showed I0/I40 = 126 in the range of dissolved oxygen concentration of 0 ~ 40 mg L-1. The oxygen sensitivity was compared with that of previous reports.

  18. An algorithm for sensing venous oxygenation using ultrasound-modulated light enhanced by microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeysett, Jack E.; Stride, Eleanor; Deng, Jing; Leung, Terence S.

    2012-02-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can provide an estimate of the mean oxygen saturation in tissue. This technique is limited by optical scattering, which reduces the spatial resolution of the measurement, and by absorption, which makes the measurement insensitive to oxygenation changes in larger deep blood vessels relative to that in the superficial tissue. Acousto-optic (AO) techniques which combine focused ultrasound (US) with diffuse light have been shown to improve the spatial resolution as a result of US-modulation of the light signal, however this technique still suffers from low signal-to-noise when detecting a signal from regions of high optical absorption. Combining an US contrast agent with this hybrid technique has been proposed to amplify an AO signal. Microbubbles are a clinical contrast agent used in diagnostic US for their ability to resonate in a sound field: in this work we also make use of their optical scattering properties (modelled using Mie theory). A perturbation Monte Carlo (pMC) model of light transport in a highly absorbing blood vessel containing microbubbles surrounded by tissue is used to calculate the AO signal detected on the top surface of the tissue. An algorithm based on the modified Beer-Lambert law is derived which expresses intravenous oxygen saturation in terms of an AO signal. This is used to determine the oxygen saturation in the blood vessel from a dual wavelength microbubble-contrast AO measurement. Applying this algorithm to the simulation data shows that the venous oxygen saturation is accurately recovered, and this measurement is robust to changes in the oxygenation of the superficial tissue layer.

  19. A 2.0 and 4.7 Heterodyne Spectrometer for Lower Thermospheric Wind, Temperature, and Atomic Oxygen Density Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, J.; Wu, D. L.; Mehdi, I.; Schlecht, E.; Demajistre, R.; Talaat, E. R.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we will present the concept of a high-sensitivity heterodyne spectrometer operating at Terahertz (THz) frequency for global lower thermospheric neutral wind, temperature and atomic oxygen density measurements from a low earth orbit. These critical measurements are needed to better understand underlying mechanisms of the upper atmospheric composition/dynamics/temperature variability and the role of neutral dynamics on the ionospheric variability. Currently, no reliable satellite remote sensing technique can provide these measurements globally in the critical 100-150 km altitude region with complete local time coverage and desired spatial resolution, precision and accuracy. The instrument, THz Limb Sounder (TLS), to be developed under NASA's Geospace Instrument Development and Enabling Science Program, is aimed to provide, for the first time, global neutral wind/temperature/density profile measurements during day and night, with focus at altitudes of 100-150 km where most of the ion-neutral energy/momentum couplings take place. The TLS concept extends the limb sounding technique employed by Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) for density/temperature/wind measurements by resolving the Doppler line shape of atomic oxygen fine structure emission at 2.0 and 4.7 THz (145 and 63 microns). These two atomic oxygen line emissions are very bright and distributed nearly uniformly globally (at all latitudes including high latitude particle precipitation regions) and temporally (at all local times during both day and night), thus ideal for thermospheric remote sensing. The TLS instrument concept, measurement methodology, and the expected performance will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  20. An electrochemically driven poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic actuator: oxygen sensing and programmable flows and pH gradients.

    PubMed

    Mitrovski, Svetlana M; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2005-06-01

    We describe the fabrication and performance of an integrated microelectrochemical reactor-a design possessing utility for multiple applications that include electrochemical sensing, the generation and manipulation of in-channel microfluidic pH gradients, and fluid actuation and flow. The device architecture is based on a three-electrode electrochemical cell design that incorporates a Pt interdigitated array (IDA) working (WE), a Pt counter (CE), and Ag pseudo-reference (RE) electrodes within a microfluidic network in which the WE is fully immersed in a liquid electrolyte confined in the channels. The microchannels are made from a conventional poly(dimethylsiloxane)(PDMS) elastomer, which serves also as a thin gas-permeable membrane through which gaseous reactants in the external ambient environment are supplied to the working electrode by diffusion. Due to the high permeability of oxygen through PDMS, the microfluidic cell supports significantly (>order of magnitude) higher current densities in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) than those measured in conventional (quiescent) electrochemical cells for the same electrode areas. We demonstrate in this work that, when operated at constant potential under mass transport control, the device can be utilized as a membrane-covered oxygen sensor, the response of which can be tuned by varying the thickness of the PDMS membrane. Depending on the experimental conditions under which the electrochemical ORR is performed, the data establish that the device can be operated as both a programmable pH gradient generator and a microfluidic pump.

  1. TDDFT study on recognition mechanism for the oxygen sensing of the cyclometalated platinum (II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Huan; Zhao, Zhengyan; Li, Guanglan; Gao, Liguo; Zhao, Ningjiu; Li, Peng; Jia, Yan; Zhou, Chenyang; Zhang, Mingzhen; Wang, Yong; Hao, Ce; Tang, Xiaoying

    2017-08-01

    The influence of oxygen molecule on the luminescent properties of a cyclometalated Pt(II) complex Lxp1, was investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) methods. Analysis of frontier molecular orbitals and electronic configuration indicated that the highest-occupied molecular orbital of the Lxp1 has a significant mixture of metal Pt (d) as well as 2-phenylpyridine and acetyl acetone(π). The lowest-unoccupied orbital of the Lxp1 primarily locates on π* of 2-phenylpyridineligands. The emission mechanism of the cyclometalated Pt(II) complex Lxp1 is assigned to the mixing of ligand-to-metal charge transfer and ligand-to-ligand charge transfer. The emission mechanism of the Lxp1-O2 complex can be attributed to the charge transfer from the oxygen molecule to the luminescent material Lxp1. Our study showed that intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the Lxp1 and oxygen molecule was strengthened by the calculation of electronic excitation, leading to a luminescence-decreasing phenomenon. The calculation of the radiative and non-radiative decay rate constants of the Lxp1 and the Lxp1-O2 complex demonstrates that the phosphorescence from T1-S0 of the Lxp1 would alter to the internal conversion from T1-T0 of the Lxp1-O2 complex. This alteration further explains the luminescence quenching phenomenon of the cyclometalated Pt(II) complex Lxp1 after interacting with oxygen molecule.

  2. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2005-01-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. One of the critical materials issues is to demonstrate that the luminescent cluster immobilized in the sol-gel porous support can withstand high temperature. At the same time the sol-gel matrix must have a high permeability to oxygen. Using a potassium salt of the molybdenum clusters, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, we have established the conditions necessary for deposition of optical quality sol-gel films. From spectroscopic measurements of the film we have shown that the cluster luminescence is stable following heat cycling of 1 hour at 250 C. Quenching of a factor of 4X between pure nitrogen and 21% oxygen was observed for films cured directly at 200 C. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  3. Video-Based Physiologic Monitoring During an Acute Hypoxic Challenge: Heart Rate, Respiratory Rate, and Oxygen Saturation.

    PubMed

    Addison, Paul S; Jacquel, Dominique; Foo, David M H; Antunes, André; Borg, Ulf R

    2017-09-01

    The physiologic information contained in the video photoplethysmogram is well documented. However, extracting this information during challenging conditions requires new analysis techniques to capture and process the video image streams to extract clinically useful physiologic parameters. We hypothesized that heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation trending can be evaluated accurately from video information during acute hypoxia. Video footage was acquired from multiple desaturation episodes during a porcine model of acute hypoxia using a standard visible light camera. A novel in-house algorithm was used to extract photoplethysmographic cardiac pulse and respiratory information from the video image streams and process it to extract a continuously reported video-based heart rate (HRvid), respiratory rate (RRvid), and oxygen saturation (SvidO2). This information was then compared with HR and oxygen saturation references from commercial pulse oximetry and the known rate of respiration from the ventilator. Eighty-eight minutes of data were acquired during 16 hypoxic episodes in 8 animals. A linear mixed-effects regression showed excellent responses relative to a nonhypoxic reference signal with slopes of 0.976 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.973-0.979) for HRvid; 1.135 (95% CI, 1.101-1.168) for RRvid, and 0.913 (95% CI, 0.905-0.920) for video-based oxygen saturation. These results were obtained while maintaining continuous uninterrupted vital sign monitoring for the entire study period. Video-based monitoring of HR, RR, and oxygen saturation may be performed with reasonable accuracy during acute hypoxic conditions in an anesthetized porcine hypoxia model using standard visible light camera equipment. However, the study was conducted during relatively low motion. A better understanding of the effect of motion and the effect of ambient light on the video photoplethysmogram may help refine this monitoring technology for use in the clinical environment.

  4. High performance optical sensing nanocomposites for low and ultra-low oxygen concentrations using phase-shift measurements.

    PubMed

    Medina-Rodríguez, Santiago; Marín-Suárez, Marta; Fernández-Sánchez, Jorge Fernando; de la Torre-Vega, Ángel; Baranoff, Etienne; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2013-08-21

    The accurate and real-time measurement of low and ultra-low concentrations of oxygen using non-invasive methods is a necessity for a multitude of applications, from brewing beer to developing encapsulating barriers for optoelectronic devices. Current optical methods and sensing materials often lack the necessary sensitivity, signal intensity, or stability for practical applications. In this report we present a new optical sensing nanocomposite resulting in an outstanding overall performance when combined with the phase-shift measurement method (determination of luminescence lifetime in the frequency domain). For the first time we have incorporated the standard PtTFPP dye (PtTFPP = platinum(II) 5,10,15,20-meso-tetrakis-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorophenyl)-porphyrin) into AP200/19, a nanostructured aluminium oxide-hydroxide solid support. This sensing film shows an excellent sensitivity between 0 and 1% O₂ (KSV = 3102 ± 132 bar⁻¹) and between 0 and 10% O₂ (KSV = 2568 ± 614 bar⁻¹) as well as Δτ0.05% (62.53 ± 3.66%), which makes it 62 times more sensitive than PtTFPP immobilized in polystyrene and also 8 times more sensitive than PtTFPP immobilized on silica beads. Furthermore the phase-shift measurement method results in a significant improvement (about 23 times) in stability compared to the use of intensity recording methods. The film also displays full reversibility, long shelf stability (no change observed after 12 months), and it is not affected by humidity. To establish this sensing methodology and develop sensors over the full range of the visible light, we also studied three other dye-AP200/19 nanocomposites based on phosphorescent cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes.

  5. Human oxygen sensing may have origins in prokaryotic elongation factor Tu prolyl-hydroxylation

    PubMed Central

    Scotti, John S.; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.; Ge, Wei; Bentley, Michael A.; Paps, Jordi; Kramer, Holger B.; Lee, Joongoo; Aik, WeiShen; Choi, Hwanho; Paulsen, Steinar M.; Bowman, Lesley A. H.; Loik, Nikita D.; Horita, Shoichiro; Ho, Chia-hua; Kershaw, Nadia J.; Tang, Christoph M.; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Preston, Gail M.; McDonough, Michael A.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The roles of 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases in eukaryotes include collagen stabilization, hypoxia sensing, and translational regulation. The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) sensing system is conserved in animals, but not in other organisms. However, bioinformatics imply that 2OG-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs) homologous to those acting as sensing components for the HIF system in animals occur in prokaryotes. We report cellular, biochemical, and crystallographic analyses revealing that Pseudomonas prolyl-hydroxylase domain containing protein (PPHD) contain a 2OG oxygenase related in structure and function to the animal PHDs. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa PPHD knockout mutant displays impaired growth in the presence of iron chelators and increased production of the virulence factor pyocyanin. We identify elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) as a PPHD substrate, which undergoes prolyl-4-hydroxylation on its switch I loop. A crystal structure of PPHD reveals striking similarity to human PHD2 and a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii prolyl-4-hydroxylase. A crystal structure of PPHD complexed with intact EF-Tu reveals that major conformational changes occur in both PPHD and EF-Tu, including a >20-Å movement of the EF-Tu switch I loop. Comparison of the PPHD structures with those of HIF and collagen PHDs reveals conservation in substrate recognition despite diverse biological roles and origins. The observed changes will be useful in designing new types of 2OG oxygenase inhibitors based on various conformational states, rather than active site iron chelators, which make up most reported 2OG oxygenase inhibitors. Structurally informed phylogenetic analyses suggest that the role of prolyl-hydroxylation in human hypoxia sensing has ancient origins. PMID:25197067

  6. Human oxygen sensing may have origins in prokaryotic elongation factor Tu prolyl-hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Scotti, John S; Leung, Ivanhoe K H; Ge, Wei; Bentley, Michael A; Paps, Jordi; Kramer, Holger B; Lee, Joongoo; Aik, WeiShen; Choi, Hwanho; Paulsen, Steinar M; Bowman, Lesley A H; Loik, Nikita D; Horita, Shoichiro; Ho, Chia-hua; Kershaw, Nadia J; Tang, Christoph M; Claridge, Timothy D W; Preston, Gail M; McDonough, Michael A; Schofield, Christopher J

    2014-09-16

    The roles of 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases in eukaryotes include collagen stabilization, hypoxia sensing, and translational regulation. The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) sensing system is conserved in animals, but not in other organisms. However, bioinformatics imply that 2OG-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs) homologous to those acting as sensing components for the HIF system in animals occur in prokaryotes. We report cellular, biochemical, and crystallographic analyses revealing that Pseudomonas prolyl-hydroxylase domain containing protein (PPHD) contain a 2OG oxygenase related in structure and function to the animal PHDs. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa PPHD knockout mutant displays impaired growth in the presence of iron chelators and increased production of the virulence factor pyocyanin. We identify elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) as a PPHD substrate, which undergoes prolyl-4-hydroxylation on its switch I loop. A crystal structure of PPHD reveals striking similarity to human PHD2 and a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii prolyl-4-hydroxylase. A crystal structure of PPHD complexed with intact EF-Tu reveals that major conformational changes occur in both PPHD and EF-Tu, including a >20-Å movement of the EF-Tu switch I loop. Comparison of the PPHD structures with those of HIF and collagen PHDs reveals conservation in substrate recognition despite diverse biological roles and origins. The observed changes will be useful in designing new types of 2OG oxygenase inhibitors based on various conformational states, rather than active site iron chelators, which make up most reported 2OG oxygenase inhibitors. Structurally informed phylogenetic analyses suggest that the role of prolyl-hydroxylation in human hypoxia sensing has ancient origins.

  7. Tubular cross talk in acute kidney injury: a story of sense and sensibility.

    PubMed

    El-Achkar, Tarek M; Dagher, Pierre C

    2015-06-15

    The mammalian kidney is an organ composed of numerous functional units or nephrons. Beyond the filtering glomerulus of each nephron, various tubular segments with distinct populations of epithelial cells sequentially span the kidney from cortex to medulla. The highly organized folding of the tubules results in a spatial distribution that allows intimate contact between various tubular subsegments. This unique arrangement can promote a newly recognized type of horizontal epithelial-to-epithelial cross talk. In this review, we discuss the importance of this tubular cross talk in shaping the response of the kidney to acute injury in a sense and sensibility model. We propose that injury-resistant tubules such as S1 proximal segments and thick ascending limbs (TAL) can act as "sensors" and thus modulate the responsiveness or "sensibility" of the S2-S3 proximal segments to injury. We also discuss new findings that highlight the importance of tubular cross talk in regulating homeostasis and inflammation not only in the kidney, but also systemically.

  8. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for blastomycosis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome: a case series.

    PubMed

    Bednarczyk, Joseph M; Kethireddy, Shravan; White, Christopher W; Freed, Darren H; Singal, Rohit K; Bell, Dean; Ahmed, Syed Zaki; Kumar, Anand; Light, Bruce

    2015-07-01

    Blastomyces dermatitidis is a dimorphic fungus endemic to North America capable of causing fatal respiratory failure. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) complicates up to 10% of pulmonary blastomycosis in hospitalized patients and carries a mortality of 50-90%. This report describes the clinical course of four consecutive patients with blastomycosis-related ARDS treated with venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) during 2009-2014. Four adults were referred from northwestern Ontario, Canada with progressive respiratory illnesses. All patients developed diffuse bilateral opacities on chest radiography and required mechanical ventilation within 6-72 hr. Patients satisfied Berlin criteria for severe ARDS with trough PaO2/F i O2 ratios of 44-61 on positive end-expiratory pressure of 12-24 cm H2O. Wet mount microscopy from respiratory samples showed broad-based yeast consistent with B.dermatitidis. Despite lung protective ventilation strategies with maximal F i O2 (patients A-D), neuromuscular blockade (patients A-D), inhaled nitric oxide (patients A and D), and prone positioning (patient D), progressive hypoxemia resulted in initiation of venovenous ECMO by hours 24-90 of mechanical ventilation with subsequent de-escalation of ventilatory support. In all four cases, ECMO decannulation was performed (7-23 days), mechanical ventilation was withdrawn (18-52 days), and the patients survived to hospital discharge (31-87 days). This report describes the successful application of ECMO as rescue therapy in aid of four patients with refractory blastomycosis-associated ARDS. In addition to early appropriate antimicrobial therapy, transfer to an institution experienced with ECMO should be considered when caring for patients from endemic areas with rapidly progressive respiratory failure.

  9. Restrictive transfusion practice during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Voelker, Maria T; Busch, Thilo; Bercker, Sven; Fichtner, Falk; Kaisers, Udo X; Laudi, Sven

    2015-04-01

    Recommendations concerning the management of hemoglobin levels and hematocrit in patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) still advise maintenance of a normal hematocrit. In contrast, current transfusion guidelines for critically ill patients support restrictive transfusion practice. We report on a series of patients receiving venovenous ECMO (vvECMO) for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) treated according to the restrictive transfusion regimen recommended for critically ill patients. We retrospectively analyzed 18 patients receiving vvECMO due to severe ARDS. Hemoglobin concentrations were kept between 7 and 9 g/dL with a transfusion trigger at 7 g/dL or when physiological transfusion triggers were apparent. We assessed baseline data, hospital mortality, time on ECMO, hemoglobin levels, hematocrit, quantities of packed red blood cells received, and lactate concentrations and compared survivors and nonsurvivors. The overall mortality of all patients on vvECMO was 38.9%. Mean hemoglobin concentration over all patients and ECMO days was 8.30 ± 0.51 g/dL, and hematocrit was 0.25 ± 0.01, with no difference between survivors and nonsurvivors. Mean numbers of given PRBCs showed a trend towards higher quantities in the group of nonsurvivors, but the difference was not significant (1.97 ± 1.47 vs. 0.96 ± 0.76 units; P = 0.07). Mean lactate clearance from the first to the third day was 45.4 ± 28.3%, with no significant difference between survivors and nonsurvivors (P = 0.19). In our cohort of patients treated with ECMO due to severe ARDS, the application of a restrictive transfusion protocol did not result in an increased mortality. Safety and feasibility of the application of a restrictive transfusion protocol in patients on ECMO must further be evaluated in randomized controlled trials.

  10. Predictors of Acute Renal Failure During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Pediatric Patients After Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lin; Long, Cun; Liu, Jinping; Hei, Feilong; Ji, Bingyang; Yu, Kun; Hu, Qiang; Hu, Jinxiao; Yuan, Yuan; Gao, Guodong

    2016-05-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is associated with increased mortality in pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The aim of this study was to identify predictors of ARF during ECMO in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery. A retrospective study analyzed 42 children (≤15 years) after cardiac surgery requiring venous-arterial ECMO between December 2008 and December 2014 at Fuwai Hospital. ARF was defined as ≥300% rise in serum creatinine (SCr) concentration from baseline or application of dialysis. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify the predictors of ARF during ECMO. A total of 42 children (age, interquartile range [IQR], 13.0 [7.2-29.8] months; weight, IQR, 8.5 [6.7-11.0] kg) after cardiac surgery requiring ECMO were included in this study. The total survival rate was 52.4%, and the incidence of ARF was 40.5%. As the result of univariate analysis, ECMO duration, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, maximum free hemoglobin (FHB) during ECMO, lactate level, and mean blood pressure before initiation of ECMO were entered in multiple logistic regression analysis. In multiple logistic regression analysis, FHB during ECMO (OR 1.136, 95% CI 1.023-1.261) and lactate level before initiation of ECMO (OR 1.602, 95% CI 1.025-2.502) were risk factors for ARF during ECMO after pediatric cardiac surgery. There was a linear correlation between maximum SCr and maximum FHB (Pearson's r = 0.535, P = 0.001). Maximum SCr during ECMO has also a linear correlation with lactate level before initiation of ECMO (Pearson's r = 0.342, P = 0.044). Increased FHB during ECMO and high lactate level before initiation of ECMO were risk factors for ARF during ECMO in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery.

  11. A New Combination Therapy in Severe Acute Pancreatitis—Hyperbaric Oxygen Plus 3-Aminobenzamide

    PubMed Central

    Inal, Volkan; Mas, Mehmet Refik; Isik, Ahmet Turan; Comert, Bilgin; Aydın, Sezai; Mas, Nukhet; Deveci, Mehmet Salih; Tasci, Ilker; Yamanel, Levent; Cinar, Esref; Unal, Mehmet Tahir

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to evaluate effects of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) plus 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB) cotreatment on tissue oxidative stress parameters (TOSp), tissue histopathology scores (THSc), and bacterial translocations (Bact-Trans) in an experimental model of severe acute pancreatitis (AP). Methods Seventy-five Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 5 groups. Group 1 received sham. Severe AP was induced by intraductal taurocholate infusion and then group 2 received saline, group 3 received 3-AB, group 4 received 3-AB plus HBO, and group 5 received HBO. 3-Aminobenzamide (10 mg/kg per day, once daily, intraperitoneal) and saline (1 mL/kg) were started right after the induction, whereas HBO (2,8 atm pressure, BID, 90 minutes each) was started at the sixth hour. The rats were euthanized at the 54th hour, and TOSp, THSc, and Bact-Trans were studied. Results In treatment groups 3 and 5, Bact-Trans (P < 0.05, P < 0.05), TOSp (P < 0.05, P < 0.05), and THSc (P < 0.001, P < 0.001) were significantly lower than controls. In addition to these findings, group 4 (cotreatment) showed the most significant effect on Bact-Trans and THSc (P < 0.001, P < 0.001) and also better in TOSp (P < 0.02). Conclusions Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition by 3-AB and HBO treatment alone was effective in the course of severe AP, and favorable with cotreatment because of the improved cascades of inflammatory process by different aspects. PMID:25347462

  12. Lack of reactive oxygen species deteriorates blood pressure regulation in acute stress.

    PubMed

    Bernátová, I; Bališ, P; Goga, R; Behuliak, M; Zicha, J; Sekaj, I

    2016-10-24

    This study investigated the contribution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to blood pressure regulation in conscious adult male Wistar rats exposed to acute stress. Role of ROS was investigated in rats with temporally impaired principal blood pressure regulation systems using ganglionic blocker pentolinium (P, 5 mg/kg), angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor captopril (C, 10 mg/kg), nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME (L, 30 mg/kg) and superoxide dismutase mimeticum tempol (T, 25 mg/kg). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured by the carotid artery catheter and inhibitors were administered intravenously. MAP was disturbed by a 3-s air jet, which increased MAP by 35.2+/-3.0 % vs. basal MAP after the first exposure. Air jet increased MAP in captopril- and tempol-treated rats similarly as observed in saline-treated rats. In pentolinium-treated rats stress significantly decreased MAP vs. pre-stress value. In L-NAME-treated rats stress failed to affect MAP significantly. Treatment of rats with P+L+C resulted in stress-induced MAP decrease by 17.3+/-1.3 % vs. pre-stress value and settling time (20.1+/-4.2 s). In P+L+C+T-treated rats stress led to maximal MAP decrease by 26.4+/-2.2 % (p<0.005 vs. P+L+C) and prolongation of settling time to 32.6+/-3.3 s (p<0.05 vs. P+L+C). Area under the MAP curve was significantly smaller in P+L+C-treated rats compared to P+L+C+T-treated ones (167+/-43 vs. 433+/-69 a.u., p<0.008). In conclusion, in rats with temporally impaired blood pressure regulation, the lack of ROS resulted in greater stress-induced MAP alterations and prolongation of time required to reach new post-stress steady state.

  13. Low-cost microarray thin-film electrodes with ionic liquid gel-polymer electrolytes for miniaturised oxygen sensing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junqiao; Silvester, Debbie S

    2016-06-21

    A robust, miniaturised electrochemical gas sensor for oxygen (O2) has been constructed using a commercially available Pt microarray thin-film electrode (MATFE) with a gellified electrolyte containing the room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([C2mim][NTf2]) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in a 50 : 50 mass ratio. Diffusion coefficients and solubilities for oxygen in mixtures of PMMA/RTIL at different PMMA doping concentrations (0-50% mass) were derived from potential step chronoamperometry (PSCA) on a Pt microdisk electrode. The MATFE was then used with both the neat RTIL and 50% (by mass) PMMA/RTIL gel, to study the analytical behavior over a wide concentration range (0.1 to 100 vol% O2). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and long-term chronoamperometry (LTCA) techniques were employed and it was determined that the gentler CV technique is better at higher O2 concentrations (above 60 vol%), but LTCA is more reliable and accurate at lower concentrations (especially below 0.5% O2). In particular, there was much less potential shifting (from the unstable Pt quasi-reference electrode) evident in the 50% PMMA/RTIL gel than in the neat RTIL, making this a much more suitable electrolyte for long-term continuous oxygen monitoring. The mass production and low-cost of the electrode array, along with the minimal amounts of RTIL/PMMA required, make this a viable sensing device for oxygen detection on a bulk scale in a wide range of environmental conditions.

  14. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D. J. Osborn; Po Zhang

    2006-09-30

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Our approach towards immobilizing the potassium salt of the molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, at the far end of an optical fiber is to embed the cluster in a thermally cured sol-gel matrix particle. Due to the improved mechanical properties of this approach high temperature sensor measurements were performed up to 100 C. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  15. EDTA-Decorated Nanostructured ZnO/CdS Thin Films for Oxygen Gas Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunraja, L.; Thirumoorthy, P.; Karthik, A.; Rajendran, V.; Edwinpaul, L.

    2016-08-01

    ZnO/CdS and ZnO/CdS-EDTA nanostructured thin films were prepared on a glass substrate using spin-coating and used for oxygen gas sensor applications. The structural properties of both ZnO/CdS and ZnO/CdS-EDTA nanostructured composites were comparatively characterized. The nanostructure thin film was found in a hexagonal structure with an average crystallite size reduced from 77 nm to 29 nm due to the influence of the EDTA. The optical absorption, photo luminescence, functional groups and surface morphology of the nanostructured thin films were comprehensively investigated. Oxygen was suitably tailored to verify the sensor response over a concentration range of 10-50 ppm at room temperature. Thus, the sensor studies reveal that the performance, response, and recovery time were enhanced in ZnO/CdS-EDTA nanostructured thin film compared with ZnO/CdS.

  16. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2006-01-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Previously we described a particle-in-binder approach to immobilizing the potassium salt of a molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, at the tips of optical fibers. Compared to previous methods, the particle-in-binder approach affords fibers with greatly improved mechanical properties. We have extensively characterized two fiber sensors at high temperature. We obtain quenching ratios between pure nitrogen and 21% oxygen as high as 3.9 x at 70 C. For the first sensor at 60 C we obtained a {+-} 1% variation in the quenching ratio over 6 cycles of measurement, and monitored the device performance over 23 days. We were able to operate the second sensor continuously for 14 hours at 70 C, and the sensor quenching ratio was stable to 5% over that time period. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  17. The disulfide relay of the intermembrane space of mitochondria: an oxygen-sensing system?

    PubMed

    Bihlmaier, Karl; Mesecke, Nikola; Kloeppel, Christine; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2008-12-01

    The intermembrane space of mitochondria contains many proteins that lack classical mitochondrial targeting sequences. Instead, these proteins often show characteristic patterns of cysteine residues that are critical for their accumulation in the organelle. Import of these proteins is catalyzed by two essential components, Mia40 and Erv1. Mia40 is a protein in the intermembrane space that directly binds newly imported proteins via disulfide bonds. By reorganization of these bonds, intramolecular disulfide bonds are formed in the imported proteins, which are thereby released from Mia40 into the intermembrane space. Because folded proteins are unable to traverse the import pore of the outer membrane, this leads to a permanent location of these proteins within the mitochondria. During this reaction, Mia40 becomes reduced and needs to be re-oxidized to regain its activity. Oxidation of Mia40 is carried out by Erv1, a conserved flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-binding sulfhydryl oxidase. Erv1 directly interacts with Mia40 and shuttles electrons from reduced Mia40 to oxidized cytochrome c, from whence they flow through cytochrome oxidase to molecular oxygen. The connection of the disulfide relay with the respiratory chain not only significantly increases the efficiency of the oxidase activity, but also prevents the formation of potentially deleterious hydrogen peroxide. The oxidative activity of Erv1 strongly depends on the oxygen concentration in mitochondria. Erv1, therefore, may function as a molecular switch that adapts mitochondrial activities to the oxygen levels in the cell.

  18. Evaluation of tissue oxygen saturation with near-infrared spectroscopy during experimental acute hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pavlisko, Noah D; Henao-Guerrero, Natalia; Killos, Maria B; Ricco, Carolina; Shih, Andre C; Bandt, Carsten; Werre, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate tissue oxygen saturation (Sto2) by use of near-infrared spectroscopy in experimental acute hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in dogs. 14 healthy adult purpose-bred Beagles. Dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane via facemask, anesthesia was maintained with propofol and rocuronium bromide, and dogs were mechanically ventilated to maintain normocapnia. Dogs were studied under normovolemia (baseline), hypovolemia with target mean arterial blood pressure < 40 mm Hg achieved and maintained steady for 10 minutes (hypovolemia T1), then 20 minutes later (hypovolemia T2), following resuscitation with shed blood (after transfusion), and after administration of 20 mL of hetastarch/kg (hypervolemia). Conditions were executed sequentially during a single anesthetic episode, allowing stabilization between states (10 minutes). Hemoglobin concentration, mean arterial blood pressure, arterial blood gas concentrations, cardiac index, oxygen delivery indexed to body surface area, and Sto2 were monitored. From baseline to hypovolemia T1, there was a significant reduction in mean ± SD oxygen delivery index (619 ± 257 mL/min/m(2) to 205 ± 76 mL/min/m(2)) and Sto2 (94 ± 4.4% to 78 ± 12.2%). Following resuscitation, Sto2 (80 ± 8.5% vs 92 ± 6.45%) and oxygen delivery index (211 ± 73 mL/min/m(2) vs 717 ± 221 mL/min/m(2)) significantly increased, returning to baseline values. Hypervolemia had no effect on Sto2 or oxygen delivery index. A strong correlation (r = 0.97) was detected between mean oxygen delivery index and Sto2 across all time points. Under the conditions of this study, there was a strong correlation between Sto2 and oxygen delivery, suggesting that Sto2 may be used to estimate oxygen delivery.

  19. The Stroke Oxygen Pilot Study: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Effects of Routine Oxygen Supplementation Early after Acute Stroke—Effect on Key Outcomes at Six Months

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khalid; Warusevitane, Anushka; Lally, Frank; Sim, Julius; Sills, Sheila; Pountain, Sarah; Nevatte, Tracy; Allen, Martin; Roffe, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Post-stroke hypoxia is common, and may adversely affect outcome. We have recently shown that oxygen supplementation may improve early neurological recovery. Here, we report the six-month outcomes of this pilot study. Methods Patients with a clinical diagnosis of acute stroke were randomized within 24 h of admission to oxygen supplementation at 2 or 3 L/min for 72 h or to control treatment (room air). Outcomes (see below) were assessed by postal questionnaire at 6 months. Analysis was by intention-to-treat, and statistical significance was set at p≤0.05. Results Out of 301 patients randomized two refused/withdrew consent and 289 (148 in the oxygen and 141 in the control group) were included in the analysis: males 44%, 51%; mean (SD) age 73 (12), 71 (12); median (IQR) National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score 6 (3, 10), 5 (3, 10) for the two groups respectively. At six months 22 (15%) patients in the oxygen group and 20 (14%) in the control group had died; mean survival in both groups was 162 days (p = 0.99). Median (IQR) scores for the primary outcome, the modified Rankin Scale, were 3 (1, 5) and 3 (1, 4) for the oxygen and control groups respectively. The covariate-adjusted odds ratio was 1.04 (95% CI 0.67, 1.60), indicating that the odds of a lower (i.e. better) score were non-significantly higher in the oxygen group (p = 0.86). The mean differences in the ability to perform basic (Barthel Index) and extended activities of daily living (NEADL), and quality of life (EuroQol) were also non-significant. Conclusions None of the key outcomes differed at 6 months between the groups. Although not statistically significant and generally of small magnitude, the effects were predominantly in favour of the oxygen group; a larger trial, powered to show differences in longer-term functional outcomes, is now on-going. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN12362720; Eudract.ema.europa.eu 2004-001866-41 PMID:23755093

  20. Effect of oxygen plasma treatment on horizontally aligned carbon nanotube thin film as pH-sensing membrane of extended-gate field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kuang-Yu; Tsai, Wan-Lin; Yang, Po-Yu; Chou, Chia-Hsin; Li, Yu-Ren; Liao, Chan-Yu; Cheng, Huang-Chung

    2015-04-01

    The high-performance pH-sensing membrane of extended-gate field-effect transistors (EGFET) composed of high-conductivity horizontally aligned carbon nanotube thin films (HACNTFs) after oxygen plasma treatment is successfully demonstrated. The 10-µm-wide catalytic metal lines with 60 µm interspace produced CNT vertical plates, and the plates were mechanically pulled down and densified to form HACNTFs. A large amount of oxygen-containing functional groups are decorated on the CNTs after the oxygen plasma treatment. These functional groups act as the sensing sites and respond to the H+ or OH- ions in solutions with different pH values. Therefore, these functionalized HACNTFs as pH-EGFET-sensing membranes can achieve a high voltage sensitivity of 40 mV/pH and high current sensitivity of 0.78 µA1/2/pH. Moreover, large linearity of 0.998 is measured in a wide sensing range from pH 1 to 13. These results reveal that the oxygen plasma treatment is an effective way to improve the CNT-sensing characteristics in pH-EGFET sensors.

  1. Space Shuttle Orbiter oxygen partial pressure sensing and control system improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frampton, Robert F.; Hoy, Dennis M.; Kelly, Kevin J.; Walleshauser, James J.

    1992-01-01

    A program aimed at developing a new PPO2 oxygen sensor and a replacement amplifier for the Space Shuttle Orbiter is described. Experimental design methodologies used in the test and modeling process made it possible to enhance the effectiveness of the program and to reduce its cost. Significant cost savings are due to the increased lifetime of the basic sensor cell, the maximization of useful sensor life through an increased amplifier gain adjustment capability, the use of streamlined production processes for the manufacture of the assemblies, and the refurbishment capability of the replacement sensor.

  2. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D. J. Osborn

    2003-09-30

    Spectroscopy of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} immobilized in a sol-gel matrix and heated to 200 C has been performed. Oxygen quenching of the luminescence was observed. Aging Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} to temperatures above 250 C converts the canary yellow Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} to a non-luminescent gray solid. Preliminary experiments point to oxidation of the clusters as the likely cause of thermally induced changes in the physical and optical properties of the clusters.

  3. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III

    2004-10-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. High temperature measurements of the emission of clusters in sol gel films show that the luminescence intensity from the films follow a 1/T relationship from room temperature to 150 C, and then declines at a slower rate at higher temperatures. The large number of photons available at 230 C is consistent with simple low cost optics for fiber optic probes based on the emission from clusters in sol gel films.

  4. The polycystins are modulated by cellular oxygen-sensing pathways and regulate mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Padovano, Valeria; Kuo, Ivana Y.; Stavola, Lindsey K.; Aerni, Hans R.; Flaherty, Benjamin J.; Chapin, Hannah C.; Ma, Ming; Somlo, Stefan; Boletta, Alessandra; Ehrlich, Barbara E.; Rinehart, Jesse; Caplan, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is caused by mutations in the genes encoding polycystin-1 (PC1) and polycystin-2 (PC2), which form an ion channel complex that may mediate ciliary sensory processes and regulate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ release. Loss of PC1 expression profoundly alters cellular energy metabolism. The mechanisms that control the trafficking of PC1 and PC2, as well as their broader physiological roles, are poorly understood. We found that O2 levels regulate the subcellular localization and channel activity of the polycystin complex through its interaction with the O2-sensing prolyl hydroxylase domain containing protein EGLN3 (or PHD3), which hydroxylates PC1. Moreover, cells lacking PC1 expression use less O2 and show less mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in response to bradykinin-induced ER Ca2+ release, indicating that PC1 can modulate mitochondrial function. These data suggest a novel role for the polycystins in sensing and responding to cellular O2 levels. PMID:27881662

  5. Time-dependency of improvements in arterial oxygenation during partial liquid ventilation in experimental acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Max, Martin; Kuhlen, Ralf; Dembinski, Rolf; Rossaint, Rolf

    2000-01-01

    Background: The mechanisms by which partial liquid ventilation (PLV) can improve gas exchange in acute lung injury are still unclear. Therefore, we examined the time- and dose-dependency of the improvements in arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) due to PLV in eight pigs with experimental lung injury, in order to discriminate increases due to oxygen dissolved in perfluorocarbon before its intrapulmonary instillation from a persistent diffusion of the respiratory gas through the liquid column. Results: Application of four sequential doses of perfluorocarbon resulted in a dose-dependent increase in PaO2. Comparison of measurements 5 and 30 min after instillation of each dose revealed a time-dependent decrease in PaO2 for doses that approximated the functional residual capacity of the animals. Conclusion: Although oxygen dissolved in perfluorocarbon at the onset of PLV can cause a short-term improvement in arterial oxygenation, diffusion of oxygen through the liquid may not be sufficient to maintain the initially observed increase in PaO2. PMID:11056747

  6. Acute toxicity of lead on tolerance, oxygen consumption, ammonia-N excretion, and metal accumulation in Penaeus indicus postlarvae.

    PubMed

    Chinni, Satyavathi; Khan, Ritindra N; Yallapragada, Prabhakara Rao

    2002-02-01

    The estuaries and backwaters that are the potential breeding grounds of penaeid shrimps are subject to heavy metal pollution through industrial effluents and domestic sewage. In the present investigation, laboratory experiments were conducted to study the acute toxicity of lead on tolerance, oxygen consumption, ammonia-N excretion, and metal accumulation in Penaeus indicus postlarvae. Static bioassay tests were employed to determine tolerance limits. Oxygen consumption, ammonia-N excretion, and metal accumulation were determined in postlarvae by exposing them to different concentrations of lead for a period of 48 h. Oxygen consumption measurements were made by using a respiratory chamber equipped with an oxygen electrode and ammonia-N was determined with trione (dichloro-S-triamine 2,4,6(1H,3H,5H-trione)). Accumulation of metal was estimated by wet-ash method. The LC50 value for 96 h was 7.223 ppm and the regression equation Y=4.1638+0.9738X with correlation coefficient of 0.9613 was obtained by probit method. A decrease in oxygen consumption and ammonia-N excretion was observed in postlarvae with increasing concentration of lead. A concentration-dependent accumulation of metal was noticed in these postlarvae. Modifications in O:N ratios of postlarvae suggest that lead accumulation might have altered utilization patterns.

  7. MEDEX2015: Greater Sea-Level Fitness Is Associated with Lower Sense of Effort During Himalayan Trekking Without Worse Acute Mountain Sickness.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Gabriella M K; Macdonald, Jamie H; Smith, Matthew; Jackson, Anna R; Callender, Nigel; Newcombe, Hannah K; Storey, Heather M; Willis, Sebastian; van den Beukel, Jojanneke; Woodward, Jonathan; Pollard, James; Wood, Benjamin; Newton, Victoria; Virian, Jana; Haswell, Owen; Oliver, Samuel J

    2017-06-01

    Rossetti, Gabriella M.K., Jamie H. Macdonald, Matthew Smith, Anna R. Jackson, Nigel Callender, Hannah K. Newcombe, Heather M. Storey, Sebastian Willis, Jojanneke van den Beukel, Jonathan Woodward, James Pollard, Benjamin Wood, Victoria Newton, Jana Virian, Owen Haswell, and Samuel J. Oliver. MEDEX2015: Greater sea-level fitness is associated with lower sense of effort during Himalayan trekking without worse acute mountain sickness. High Alt Med Biol. 18:152-162, 2017.-This study examined the complex relationships of fitness and hypoxic sensitivity with submaximal exercise responses and acute mountain sickness (AMS) at altitude. Determining these relationships is necessary before fitness or hypoxic sensitivity tests can be recommended to appraise individuals' readiness for altitude. Forty-four trekkers (26 men; 18 women; 20-67 years) completed a loaded walking test and a fitness questionnaire in normoxia to measure and estimate sea-level maximal aerobic capacity (maximum oxygen consumption [[Formula: see text]O2max]), respectively. Participants also completed a hypoxic exercise test to determine hypoxic sensitivity (cardiac, ventilatory, and arterial oxygen saturation responses to acute hypoxia, fraction of inspired oxygen [Fio2] = 0.112). One month later, all participants completed a 3-week trek to 5085 m with the same ascent profile. On ascent to 5085 m, ratings of perceived exertion (RPEascent), fatigue by Brunel Mood Scale, and AMS were recorded daily. At 5085 m, RPE during a fixed workload step test (RPEfixed) and step rate during perceptually regulated exercise (STEPRPE35) were recorded. Greater sea-level [Formula: see text]O2max was associated with, and predicted, lower sense of effort (RPEascent; r = -0.43; p < 0.001; RPEfixed; r = -0.69; p < 0.001) and higher step rate (STEPRPE35; r = 0.62; p < 0.01), but not worse AMS (r = 0.13; p = 0.4) or arterial oxygen desaturation (r = 0.07; p = 0.7). Lower RPEascent

  8. Baseline MELD-XI score and outcome from veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support for acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sern Lim, Hoong

    2016-11-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure is the most common acute heart failure phenotype. Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) can provide bridging support for patients with acute decompensated heart failure to transplantation. We studied the association between baseline (<6 months), pre-ECMO (<24 h) parameters and outcome of VA-ECMO support in patients with severe acute decompensated heart failure. We included 26 consecutive patients with acute decompensated heart failure (acute myocarditis, myocardial infarction or post-cardiotomy shock were excluded) who were bridged with peripheral VA-ECMO to transplantation. Data within six months (baseline) and immediately pre-ECMO were collected. Model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) with sodium (MELD-Na) and without international normalized ratio (MELD-XI) scores were calculated. Outcome was defined as death at 30 days following VA-ECMO support. Thirteen of the 26 patients died within 30 days of VA-ECMO support. Univariate associations with 30-day mortality were baseline MELD-XI, baseline sodium, creatinine, bilirubin, pre-ECMO alanine aminotransferase and lactate. However, only baseline MELD-XI score (hazard ratio 2.678 (95% CI 1.085-6.607), p=0.033) was associated 30-day survival on logistic regression analysis. Survivors demonstrated greater reduction in inotropic and vasoactive drug support and improvement in alanine aminotransferase and lactate levels. Using a threshold based on the median MELD-XI of 14.1, 30-day survival in patients with a baseline MELD-XI ⩽ 14.1 was 69% compared with 31% in patients with baseline MELD-XI > 14.1 ( p=0.046). Baseline MELD-XI score, but not pre-ECMO parameters, is independently associated with outcomes from VA-ECMO support in patients with acute decompensated heart failure.

  9. Primary endosymbiosis and the evolution of light and oxygen sensing in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Rockwell, Nathan C.; Lagarias, J. Clark; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2015-01-01

    The origin of the photosynthetic organelle in eukaryotes, the plastid, changed forever the evolutionary trajectory of life on our planet. Plastids are highly specialized compartments derived from a putative single cyanobacterial primary endosymbiosis that occurred in the common ancestor of the supergroup Archaeplastida that comprises the Viridiplantae (green algae and plants), red algae, and glaucophyte algae. These lineages include critical primary producers of freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems, progenitors of which provided plastids through secondary endosymbiosis to other algae such as diatoms and dinoflagellates that are critical to marine ecosystems. Despite its broad importance and the success of algal and plant lineages, the phagotrophic origin of the plastid imposed an interesting challenge on the predatory eukaryotic ancestor of the Archaeplastida. By engulfing an oxygenic photosynthetic cell, the host lineage imposed an oxidative stress upon itself in the presence of light. Adaptations to meet this challenge were thus likely to have occurred early on during the transition from a predatory phagotroph to an obligate phototroph (or mixotroph). Modern algae have recently been shown to employ linear tetrapyrroles (bilins) to respond to oxidative stress under high light. Here we explore the early events in plastid evolution and the possible ancient roles of bilins in responding to light and oxygen. PMID:25729749

  10. n-Propyl gallate activates hypoxia-inducible factor 1 by modulating intracellular oxygen-sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Motohide; Takabuchi, Satoshi; Tanaka, Tomoharu; Murata, Miyahiko; Nishi, Kenichiro; Oda, Seiko; Oda, Tomoyuki; Kanai, Michiyuki; Fukuda, Kazuhiko; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Adachi, Takehiko; Takabayashi, Arimichi; Semenza, Gregg L; Hirota, Kiichi

    2008-04-01

    HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor 1) is a master regulator of cellular adaptive responses to hypoxia. The expression and transcriptional activity of the HIF-1alpha subunit is stringently controlled by intracellular oxygen tension through the action of prolyl and asparaginyl hydroxylases. In the present study we demonstrate that PG (n-propyl gallate) activates HIF-1 and expression of its downstream target genes under normoxic conditions in cultured cells and in mice. The stability and transcriptional activity of HIF-1alpha are increased by PG. PG treatment inhibits the interaction between HIF-1alpha and VHL (von Hippel-Lindau protein) and promotes the interaction between HIF-1alpha and p300, indicating that PG inhibits the activity of both prolyl and asparaginyl HIF-1alpha hydroxylases. We conclude that PG activates HIF-1 and enhances the resultant gene expression by directly affecting the intracellular oxygen sensing system in vitro and in vivo and that PG represents a lead compound for the development of a non-toxic activator of HIF-1.

  11. Carbon nanotubes-ionic liquid nanocomposites sensing platform for NADH oxidation and oxygen, glucose detection in blood.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lu; Wen, Dan; Yin, Jianyuan; Deng, Liu; Zhu, Chengzhou; Dong, Shaojun

    2012-03-15

    An excellent electrochemical sensing platform has been designed by combining the huge specific surface area of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the remarkable conductivity of ionic liquid (IL). IL can easily untangle CNTs bundles and disperse CNTs by itself under grinding condition due to the π-π interaction between CNTs and IL. The resulting nanocomposites showed an augmentation on the voltammetric and amperometric behaviors of electrocatalytic activity toward O(2) and NADH. Therefore, such an efficient platform was developed to fabricate mediator-free oxygen sensor and glucose biosensor based on glucose dehydrogenase (GDH). O(2) could be determined in the range of zero to one hundred percent of O(2) content with the detection limit of 126 μg L(-1) (S/N=3). The glucose biosensor which was constructed by entrapping GDH into chitosan on the nanocomposites modified glassy carbon electrode surface, exhibited good electrocatalytic oxidation toward glucose with a detection limit of 9 μM in the linear range of 0.02-1mM. We also applied the as-prepared sensors to detect oxygen and glucose in real blood samples and acquired satisfied results.

  12. PHD1 links cell-cycle progression to oxygen sensing through hydroxylation of the centrosomal protein Cep192.

    PubMed

    Moser, Sandra C; Bensaddek, Dalila; Ortmann, Brian; Maure, Jean-Francois; Mudie, Sharon; Blow, J Julian; Lamond, Angus I; Swedlow, Jason R; Rocha, Sonia

    2013-08-26

    PHD1 belongs to the family of prolyl-4-hydroxylases (PHDs) that is responsible for posttranslational modification of prolines on specific target proteins. Because PHD activity is sensitive to oxygen levels and certain byproducts of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, PHDs act as sensors of the cell's metabolic state. Here, we identify PHD1 as a critical molecular link between oxygen sensing and cell-cycle control. We show that PHD1 function is required for centrosome duplication and maturation through modification of the critical centrosome component Cep192. Importantly, PHD1 is also required for primary cilia formation. Cep192 is hydroxylated by PHD1 on proline residue 1717. This hydroxylation is required for binding of the E3 ubiquitin ligase SCF(Skp2), which ubiquitinates Cep192, targeting it for proteasomal degradation. By modulating Cep192 levels, PHD1 thereby affects the processes of centriole duplication and centrosome maturation and contributes to the regulation of cell-cycle progression. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Study on a phosphorescent copper(I) complex and its oxygen-sensing performances upon polystyrene and MCM-41 matrixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao-yong; Xiao, Han-ning; Xu, Yi-ming; Zhang, Ming-jun

    In this paper, we synthesize a new ligand of 1-ethyl-2-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline (Phen-Np-Et) and its corresponding Cu(I) complex of [Cu(Phen-Np-Et)(POP)]BF4, where POP is bis(2-(diphenylphosphanyl)phenyl) ether. The single-crystal structure, electronic nature and photophysical property of [Cu(Phen-Np-Et)(POP)]BF4 are discussed in detail. It is found that the yellow emission from [Cu(Phen-Np-Et)(POP)]BF4 owns a long excited state lifetime of 287 μs under pure N2 atmosphere. Theoretical calculation on [Cu(Phen-Np-Et)(POP)]+ suggests that the emission comes from a triplet metal-to-ligand-charge-transfer excited state. Then, [Cu(Phen-Np-Et)(POP)]BF4 are doped into two matrixes of polystyrene and MCM-41 to investigate the oxygen-sensing performance. Finally, sensitivity maxima of 9.6 and 3.6 are achieved by the composite nanofibers of [Cu(Phen-Np-Et)(POP)]BF4/polystyrene and the [Cu(Phen-Np-Et)(POP)]BF4/MCM-41, respectively. Both samples are highly sensitive toward molecular oxygen, owing to the large surface-area-to-volume ratios of nanofibrous membranes and MCM-41 matrix.

  14. Singlet oxygen-induced photodegradation of the polymers and dyes in optical sensing materials and the effect of stabilizers on these processes.

    PubMed

    Enko, Barbara; Borisov, Sergey M; Regensburger, Johannes; Bäumler, Wolfgang; Gescheidt, Georg; Klimant, Ingo

    2013-09-12

    A comprehensive study of photodegradation processes in optical sensing materials caused by photosensitized singlet oxygen in different polymers is presented. The stabilities of the polymers are accessed in the oxygen consumption measurements performed with help of optical oxygen sensors. Polystyrene and poly(phenylsilesquioxane) are found to be the most stable among the polymers investigated, whereas poly(2,6-dimethyl-p-phenylene oxide) and particularly poly(methyl methacrylate) and their derivatives show the fastest oxygen consumption. The effect of the stabilizers (singlet oxygen quenchers) on the oxygen consumption rates, the photostability of the sensitizer, and the total photon emission (TPE) by singlet oxygen is studied. 1,4-Diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) was found to significantly reduce both the TPE and the oxygen consumption rates, indicating its role as a physical quencher of singlet oxygen. The addition of DABCO also significantly improved the photostability of the sensitizer. The N-alkylated derivative of DABCO and DABCO covalently grafted to the polystyrene backbone are prepared in an attempt to overcome the volatility and water solubility of the quencher. These derivatives as well as other tertiary amines investigated were found to be inefficient as stabilizing agents, and some of them even negatively affected the oxygen consumption rates.

  15. Phosphorescence lifetime based oxygen micro-sensing using a digital micromirror device.

    PubMed

    Chao, Shih-Hui; Holl, Mark R; McQuaide, Sarah C; Ren, Timothy T H; Gales, Steven A; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2007-08-20

    A digital light modulation microscope (DLMM) that utilizes a digital micromirror device (DMD) on an epifluorescence microscope has been developed to modulate excitation light in spatial and temporal domains for phosphorescence lifetime detection. Local O2 concentration can be inferred through the detected lifetime around an O2-quenching phosphorescent porphyrin microsensor. Combined with microsensor arrays, the DLMM can sequentially address light to each microsensor element to construct a discrete lifetime image or O2 distribution. In contrast to conventional phosphorescence lifetime imaging, the new method eliminates the need for a pulsed light source and a time-gated camera. To demonstrate O2 sensing with lab-on-a-chip devices, an array of 150-mum-diameter micro-wells coated with phosphorescent porphyrin were observed. The locations of the sensor elements were automatically identified though image analysis. The goal of this platform is to measure the O2 consumption of individual cells trapped in the microwells.

  16. Multi-modal in vivo imaging of brain blood oxygenation, blood flow and neural calcium dynamics during acute seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringuette, Dene; Jeffrey, Melanie A.; Carlen, Peter L.; Levi, Ofer

    2016-03-01

    Dysfunction of the vascular endothelium has been implicated in the development of epilepsy. To better understand the relation between vascular function and seizure and provide a foundation for interpreting results from functional imaging in chronic disease models, we investigate the relationship between intracellular calcium dynamics and local cerebral blood flow and blood oxygen saturation during acute seizure-like events and pharmacological seizure rescue. To probe the relation between the aforementioned physiological markers in an acute model of epilepsy in rats, we integrated three different optical modalities together with electrophysiological recordings: Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) was used to study changes in flow speeds, Intrinsic optical signal imaging (IOSI) was used to monitor changes in oxygenated, de-oxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentration, and Calcium-sensitive dye imaging was used to monitor intracellular calcium dynamics. We designed a dedicated cortical flow chamber to remove superficial blood and dye resulting from the injection procedure, which reduced spurious artifacts. The near infrared light used for IOSI and LSCI was delivered via a light pipe integrated with the flow chamber to minimize the effect of fluid surface movement on illumination stability. Calcium-sensitive dye was injected via a glass electrode used for recording the local field potential. Our system allowed us to observe and correlate increases in intracellular calcium, blood flow and blood volume during seizure-like events and provide a quantitative analysis of neurovascular coupling changes associated with seizure rescue via injection of an anti-convulsive agent.

  17. Oxygenated shunting from right to left: a feasibility study of minimized atrio-atrial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for mid-term lung assistance in an acute ovine model.

    PubMed

    Haushofer, Marcus; Abusabha, Yousef; Amerini, Andrea L A; Spillner, Jan; Nix, Christoph; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Goetzenich, Andreas; Hatam, Nima

    2013-07-01

    Right ventricular failure is often the final phase in acute and chronic respiratory failure. We combined right ventricular unloading with extracorporeal oxygenation in a new atrio-atrial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Eleven sheep (65 kg) were cannulated by a 28-Fr inflow cannula to the right atrium and a 25-Fr outflow cannula through the lateral left atrial wall. Both were connected by a serial combination of a microaxial pump (Impella Elect(®), Abiomed Europe, Aachen, Germany) and a membrane oxygenator (Novalung(®)-iLA membrane oxygenator; Novalung GmbH, Hechingen, Germany). In four animals, three subsequent states were evaluated: normal circulation, apneic hypoxia and increased right atrial after load by pulmonary banding. We focused on haemodynamic stability and gas exchange. All animals reached the end of the study protocol. In the apnoea phase, the decrease in PaO2 (21.4 ± 3.6 mmHg) immediately recovered (179.1 ± 134.8 mmHg) on-device in continuous apnoea. Right heart failure by excessive after load decreased mean arterial pressure (59 ± 29 mmHg) and increased central venous pressure and systolic right ventricular pressure; PaO2 and SvO2 decreased significantly. On assist, mean arterial pressure (103 ± 29 mmHg), central venous pressure and right ventricular pressure normalized. The SvO2 increased to 89 ± 3% and PaO2 stabilized (129 ± 21 mmHg). We demonstrated the efficacy of a miniaturized atrio-atrial ECMO. Right ventricular unloading was achieved, and gas exchange was well taken over by the Novalung. This allows an effective short- to mid-term treatment of cardiopulmonary failure, successfully combining right ventricular and respiratory bridging. The parallel bypass of the right ventricle and lung circulation permits full unloading of both systems as well as gradual weaning. Further pathologies (e.g. ischaemic right heart failure and acute lung injury) will have to be evaluated.

  18. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III

    2004-07-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Alkali salts of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} were synthesized and heated to 280 C for one hour in air. Optical measurements of the thermally treated material confirm the potential of the salts as lumophores in high temperature fiber optic sensors. In addition sol-gel films containing Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} were dip coated on quartz substrates and heated at 200 C for one hour. Conditions were developed for successfully immobilizing monomeric complexes that are compatible with sol-gel processing.

  19. Accurate modeling of the diagnostic 118-GHz oxygen line for remote sensing of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshelev, M. A.; Delahaye, T.; Serov, E. A.; Vilkov, I. N.; Boulet, C.; Tretyakov, M. Yu.

    2017-07-01

    We report the results of laboratory investigations of the shape of the diagnostic atmospheric N = 1- oxygen line performed over a very wide range of pressures from 0.4 to 1000 Torr using two principally different spectrometers having complementary abilities. A spectrometer with a radio-acoustic detector of absorption was used for recording low pressure spectra spanning the 0.4-2 Torr range, and high pressure data from 250 to 1000 Torr were registered by a resonator spectrometer. The sensitivity of both instruments was improved significantly which allowed us to obtain signal-to-noise ratio at spectra recordings of the order of a few thousands. The spectra analysis enabled the first manifestation of the speed-dependence of the collision cross section of the line, along with considerable refinement of other parameters, including pressure broadening, intensity and line-mixing. The results are of primary importance for atmospheric applications.

  20. A Potassium-Dependent Oxygen Sensing Pathway Regulates Plant Root Hydraulics.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Zaigham; Canut, Matthieu; Tournaire-Roux, Colette; Martinière, Alexandre; Boursiac, Yann; Loudet, Olivier; Maurel, Christophe

    2016-09-22

    Aerobic organisms survive low oxygen (O2) through activation of diverse molecular, metabolic, and physiological responses. In most plants, root water permeability (in other words, hydraulic conductivity, Lpr) is downregulated under O2 deficiency. Here, we used a quantitative genetics approach in Arabidopsis to clone Hydraulic Conductivity of Root 1 (HCR1), a Raf-like MAPKKK that negatively controls Lpr. HCR1 accumulates and is functional under combined O2 limitation and potassium (K(+)) sufficiency. HCR1 regulates Lpr and hypoxia responsive genes, through the control of RAP2.12, a key transcriptional regulator of the core anaerobic response. A substantial variation of HCR1 in regulating Lpr is observed at the Arabidopsis species level. Thus, by combinatorially integrating two soil signals, K(+) and O2 availability, HCR1 modulates the resilience of plants to multiple flooding scenarios.

  1. Using Yttra-Stabilized Zirconium Oxide Ceramics to Sense pH and Oxygen in Hydrothermal and Geothermal Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, M. F.; Grandstaff, D. E.; Ulmer, G. C.

    2002-05-01

    Zirconium-Oxide ceramics stabilized with ~8-wt% Yttrium-Oxide can be employed to sense pH in high temperature (>90oC) aqueous environments with an accuracy of 0.05 pH log units (Lvov et al., in press), and to sense the fugacity of oxygen (fO2) in low temperature (>230oC) gaseous environments with an accuracy of 0.2 (fO2) log units. The major components, in two commercially available yttria-stabilized ceramics are yttria ( ~8-wt%) and zirconia ( ~91-wt%) with minor amounts of Ti, Fe and U. The textural differences in the two ceramics produces significantly different emf vs. 10,000/T responses. Response error can be introduced by: the ionic contribution of the softening glass, the catalytic action of the Pt sensor components, and the presence of Ti and Fe in the ceramic, which has been shown to alter the oxygen diffusivity of the ceramic. (Merino et al., 1996) The first type of ceramic contains a 3-dimensionally-continuous Ca-Al-Si feldspathic glass that acts as a sintering aid during manufacturing. The glass, which has a higher ionic conductivity than the zirconia ceramic, reduces the bulk resistivity and induces an error over the temperature ranges representing the softening point of the glass. The glass also reduces durability of the ceramic. When the glass hydrates it produces zeolites, which grow primarily in the triple-grain-junctions of the ceramic. Thus mechanically weakening the ceramic generating electronic, ionic and mechanical stability problems. The second type of ceramic contains no grain boundary glass, but does contain discrete silicate phases (such as diopside, wollastonite, periclase, silica, etc.) in the triple-grain-junctions. Because there is no inter-granular glass, the type two ceramic does have a greater bulk resistivity compared with the type one ceramic. In a gas-sensing configuration, resistivity has been shown to affect the minimum temperature of sensor operation. A sensor with a higher bulk resistivity must reach a higher minimum

  2. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2005-10-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Previously we immobilized the potassium salt of a molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}M{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, in a sol-gel matrix and showed that the luminescence is stable after 54 hours at 200 C, but the quenching ratios were low and the films delaminated after thermal cycling due to densification of the matrix. Three new approaches to solve decreased quenching over time and delamination of films off fiber tips were investigated. In the first approach K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14} embedded in cured sol-gel particles were incorporated into a TEOS based sol-gel. These gave enhanced quenching (6x), but delaminated. Our second approach was to use a commercial cyanoacrylate glue to immobilize the particles onto the tip of an optical fiber. This gave better adhesion and good quenching initially, but eventually the glue degraded upon heating. Our third approach was to use a 55% OtMOS/ TEOS sol-gel binder. Films based on this new sol-gel binder show high quenching ({approx}6x) and superior mechanical stability even after thermal cycling. Sensor measurements on an optical fiber containing K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14} embedded in cured sol-gel particles were obtained from 100 to 25 C. The signal intensity in nitrogen was stable at 2.8 {+-} 0.2 nW, and the quenching ratio (ratio of signal in N{sub 2} vs. 21 % O{sub 2}) varied from 4.4 to 6.9X. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  3. Growth concentration effect on oxygen vacancy induced band gap narrowing and optical CO gas sensing properties of ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chun Hui; Tan, Sin Tee; Lee, Hock Beng; Yap, Chi Chin; Yahaya, Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    Band gap energy and surface defect on the nanostructure play an important role especially in determining the performance and properties of the optical based gas sensor. In this report, ZnO nanorods (ZNRs) with various growth concentrations were successfully synthesized using a facile wet chemical approach. The gas sensing performance of the ZNRs samples with different concentrations were tested toward the highly hazardous carbon monoxide (CO) gas at a concentration of 10 ppm operated at room temperature. It was found that the 40 mM ZNRs sample exhibited the highest response coupled with the shortest response time (123.3 ± 1.3 s) and recovery time (7.7 ± 0.3 s). The high response and accelerated sensing reaction were attributed to the band gap narrowing of the 40 mM ZNRs induced by the increase in oxygen vacancy related defect states, and it is directly proportional to the CO gas sensing activity. These defects acted as the oxygen trap sites which will promote the oxygen adsorption on the surface of ZNRs and enhanced its gas sensing capability. The ZNRs reported herein which exhibits a high sensitivity, fast and reversible response with rapid recovery have great potential to be used in toxic gas sensing applications at room temperature.

  4. Unconventional ratiometric-enhanced optical sensing of oxygen by mixed-phase TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettieri, S.; Pallotti, D. K.; Gesuele, F.; Maddalena, P.

    2016-07-01

    We show that mixed-phase titanium dioxide (TiO2) can be effectively employed as an unconventional, inorganic, dual-emitting, and ratiometric optical sensor of O2. Simultaneous availability of rutile and anatase TiO2 photoluminescence (PL) and their peculiar "anti-correlated" PL responses to O2 allow using their ratio as a measurement parameter associated with the O2 concentration, leading to an experimental responsivity being by construction larger than the one obtainable for single-phase PL detection. A proof of this concept is given, showing a two-fold enhancement of the optical responsivity provided by the ratiometric approach. Besides the peculiar ratiometric-enhanced responsivity, other characteristics of mixed phase TiO2 can be envisaged as favorable for O2 optical probing, namely (a) low production costs, (b) absence of heterogeneous components, and (c) self-supporting properties. These characteristics encourage experimenting with its use for applications requiring high indicator quantities at a competitive price, possibly also tackling the need to develop supporting matrixes that carry the luminescent probes and avoiding issues related to the use of different components for ratiometric sensing.

  5. Rational design of polymeric core shell ratiometric oxygen-sensing nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Aisling; Jacobs, Jaco; Burke, Christopher S; Martin, Aaron; Heise, Andreas; Keyes, Tia E

    2017-09-08

    A new approach for the fabrication of luminescent ratiometric sensing nanosensors is described using core-shell nanoparticles in which the probe and reference are spatially separated into the shell and core of the nanostructure respectively. The isolation of the reference in the core of the particle ensures a stable emission reference signal unaffected by the external environment. The core shell structure was prepared by engineering structurally well-defined Ru-conjugated block copolymers which acted as emulsifiers in the miniemulsion polymerisation of BODIPY loaded styrene nanoparticles. The resulting particles are highly stable and show excellent size monodispersity. The nanosensors exhibit dual emission under a single excitation wavelength with a reversible and quantitative ratiometric response to the O2 content in aqueous media. In the presence of a low concentration of CTAB, the particles cross the cell membrane and the particles show negligible cytotoxicity. Such an approach to sensor nanoparticles should be of value across a range of applications where a stable ratiometric signal in diverse environments is required.

  6. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) treated successfully by veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in a nearly drowned patient.

    PubMed

    Sonoo, Tomohiro; Ohshima, Kazuma; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Asada, Toshifumi; Hiruma, Takahiro; Doi, Kento; Gunshin, Masataka; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Anraku, Masaki; Nakajima, Susumu; Nakajima, Jun; Yahagi, Naoki

    2014-09-01

    This report highlights about one acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) case after near-drowning resuscitated using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Few cases have been reported about ECMO use for near-drowning and in most of these cases, ECMO was initiated within the first week. However, in our report, we would like to emphasize that seemingly irreversible secondary worsening of ARDS after nearly drowned patient was successfully treated by ECMO use more than 1 week after near-drowning followed by discharge without home oxygen therapy, social support, or any complication. This is probably due to sufficient lung rest for ventilator-associated lung injury during ECMO use. Based on our case's clinical course, intensive care unit physicians must consider ECMO even in the late phase of worsened ARDS after near-drowning.

  7. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) for Lung Injury in Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Paolone, Summer

    2016-11-10

    Despite advances in mechanical ventilation, severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates ranging from 26% to 58%. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a modified cardiopulmonary bypass circuit that serves as an artificial membrane lung and blood pump to provide gas exchange and systemic perfusion for patients when their own heart and lungs are unable to function adequately. ECMO is a complex network that provides oxygenation and ventilation and allows the lungs to rest and recover from respiratory failure while minimizing iatrogenic ventilator-induced lung injury. In critical care settings, ECMO is proven to improve survival rates and outcomes in patients with severe ARDS. This review defines severe ARDS; describes the ECMO circuit; and discusses recent research, optimal use of the ECMO circuit, limitations of therapy including potential complications, economic impact, and logistical factors; and discusses future research considerations.

  8. Role of distal arginine in early sensing intermediates in the heme domain of the oxygen sensor FixL.

    PubMed

    Jasaitis, Audrius; Hola, Klara; Bouzhir-Sima, Latifa; Lambry, Jean-Christophe; Balland, Veronique; Vos, Marten H; Liebl, Ursula

    2006-05-16

    FixL is a bacterial heme-based oxygen sensor, in which release of oxygen from the sensing PAS domain leads to activation of an associated kinase domain. Static structural studies have suggested an important role of the conserved residue arginine 220 in signal transmission at the level of the heme domain. To assess the role of this residue in the dynamics and properties of the initial intermediates in ligand release, we have investigated the effects of R220X (X = I, Q, E, H, or A) mutations in the FixLH heme domain on the dynamics and spectral properties of the heme upon photolysis of O(2), NO, and CO using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Comparison of transient spectra for CO and NO dissociation with steady-state spectra indicated less strain on the heme in the ligand dissociation species for all mutants compared to the wild type (WT). For CO and NO, the kinetics were similar to those of the wild type, with the exception of (1) a relatively low yield of picosecond NO rebinding to R220A, presumably related to the increase in the free volume of the heme pocket, and (2) substantial pH-dependent picosecond to nanosecond rebinding of CO to R220H, related to formation of a hydrogen bond between CO and histidine 220. Upon excitation of the complex bound with the physiological sensor ligand O(2), a 5-8 ps decay phase and a nondecaying (>4 ns) phase were observed for WT and all mutants. The strong distortion of the spectrum associated with the decay phase in WT is substantially diminished in all mutant proteins, indicating an R220-induced role of the heme in the primary intermediate in signal transmission. Furthermore, the yield of dissociated oxygen after this phase ( approximately 10% in WT) is increased in all mutants, up to almost unity in R220A, indicating a key role of R220 in caging the oxygen near the heme through hydrogen bonding. Molecular dynamics simulations corroborate these findings and suggest motions of O(2) and arginine 220 away from the heme

  9. The acute antinociceptive effect of hyperbaric oxygen is not accompanied by an increase in markers of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shulin; Shirachi, Donald Y.; Quock, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Exposure to hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) causes an antinociceptive response in mice. However, breathing oxygen (O2) at an elevated pressure can potentially cause oxygen toxicity. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of HBO2 antinociception and the toxicity profile of HBO2. Main methods Male NIH Swiss mice were assessed for acute antinociceptive responsiveness under room air or 100% O2 at 1.0 or 3.5 atmospheres absolute (ATA), using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test. For the oxygen toxicity test, mice were exposed to 3.5 ATA oxygen for 11 min, 60 min, 60 min daily for 2 days (120 min) or 60 min daily for 4 days (240 min), then assessed by analyzing the levels of two oxidative stress markers, MDA (malondialdehyde) and protein carbonyl in brain, spinal cord and lung. Key Findings Only the combination of 100% O2 and 3.5 ATA caused significant antinociception. The antinociceptive effect of 100% O2 was pressure-dependent up to 3.5 ATA. In the oxygen toxicity test, mice exposed to HBO2 for different time intervals had levels of brain, spinal cord and lung MDA and protein carbonyl that were comparable to that of control animals exposed to room air. Significance Treatment with 100% O2 evokes a pressure-dependent antinociceptive effect. Since there was no significant increase in levels of the oxidative stress markers in the tested tissues, it is concluded HBO2 at 3.5 ATA produces antinociception in the absence of oxidative stress in mice. PMID:24418003

  10. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Treatment of Acute Inverted Takotsubo-Like Cardiomyopathy From Hemorrhagic Pheochromocytoma in Late Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    van Zwet, Cornelis Johannes; Rist, Andreas; Haeussler, Achim; Graves, Kirk; Zollinger, Andreas; Blumenthal, Stephan

    2016-11-01

    We describe the first case of a pregnant woman presenting with an acute inverted takotsubo-like cardiomyopathy caused by a postpartum diagnosed hemorrhagic pheochromocytoma, successfully treated with percutaneous venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (va-ECMO). During admission, an emergency cesarean delivery had to be performed. The fetus needed resuscitation for 5 minutes. The mother was successfully resuscitated and treated with percutaneous va-ECMO for 7 days. Despite advances in diagnostic techniques during the past decade, in many cases, pheochromocytoma in pregnancy is still missed. This results in a maternal and fetal mortality rate of up to 30% in both.

  11. Severe Tumor Lysis Syndrome and Acute Pulmonary Edema Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Following Initiation of Chemotherapy for Metastatic Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Ethan; Wolbrink, Traci; Mack, Jennifer; Rowe, R Grant

    2016-05-01

    We present an 8-year-old male with metastatic alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) who developed precipitous cardiopulmonary collapse with severe tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) 48 hr after initiation of chemotherapy. Despite no detectable pulmonary metastases, acute hypoxemic respiratory failure developed, requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Although TLS has been reported in disseminated ARMS, this singular case of life-threatening respiratory deterioration developing after initiation of chemotherapy presented unique therapeutic dilemmas. We review the clinical aspects of this case, including possible mechanisms of respiratory failure, and discuss the role of ECMO utilization in pediatric oncology.

  12. Oxygen sensing glucose biosensors based on alginate nano-micro systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Rashmi; Joshi, Abhijeet; Srivastava, Rohit

    2014-04-01

    Clinically glucose monitoring in diabetes management is done by point-measurement. However, an accurate, continuous glucose monitoring, and minimally invasive method is desirable. The research aims at developing fluorescence-mediated glucose detecting biosensors based on near-infrared radiation (NIR) oxygen sensitive dyes. Biosensors based on Glucose oxidase (GOx)-Rudpp loaded alginate microspheres (GRAM) and GOx-Platinum-octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP)-PLAalginate microsphere system (GPAM) were developed using air-driven atomization and characterized using optical microscopy, CLSM, fluorescence spectro-photometry etc. Biosensing studies were performed by exposing standard solutions of glucose. Uniform sized GRAM and GPAM with size 50+/-10μm were formed using atomization. CLSM imaging of biosensors suggests that Rudpp and PtOEP nanoparticles are uniformly distributed in alginate microspheres. The GRAM and GPAM showed a good regression constant of 0.974 and of 0.9648 over a range of 0-10 mM of glucose with a high sensitivity of 3.349%/mM (625 nm) and 2.38%/mM (645 nm) at 10 mM of glucose for GRAM and GPAM biosensor. GRAM and GPAM biosensors show great potential in development of an accurate and minimally invasive glucose biosensor. NIR dye based assays can aid sensitive, minimally-invasive and interference-free detection of glucose in diabetic patients.

  13. Defective Tibetan PHD2 binding to p23 links high altitude adaption to altered oxygen sensing.

    PubMed

    Song, Daisheng; Li, Lin-sheng; Arsenault, Patrick R; Tan, Qiulin; Bigham, Abigail W; Heaton-Johnson, Katherine J; Master, Stephen R; Lee, Frank S

    2014-05-23

    The Tibetan population has adapted to the chronic hypoxia of high altitude. Tibetans bear a genetic signature in the prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2/EGLN1) gene, which encodes for the central oxygen sensor of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. Recent studies have focused attention on two nonsynonymous coding region substitutions, D4E and C127S, both of which are markedly enriched in the Tibetan population. These amino acids reside in a region of PHD2 that harbors a zinc finger, which we have previously discovered binds to a Pro-Xaa-Leu-Glu (PXLE) motif in the HSP90 cochaperone p23, thereby recruiting PHD2 to the HSP90 pathway to facilitate HIF-α hydroxylation. We herein report that the Tibetan PHD2 haplotype (D4E/C127S) strikingly diminishes the interaction of PHD2 with p23, resulting in impaired PHD2 down-regulation of the HIF pathway. The defective binding to p23 depends on both the D4E and C127S substitutions. We also identify a PXLE motif in HSP90 itself that can mediate binding to PHD2 but find that this interaction is maintained with the D4E/C127S PHD2 haplotype. We propose that the Tibetan PHD2 variant is a loss of function (hypomorphic) allele, leading to augmented HIF activation to facilitate adaptation to high altitude. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III

    2004-04-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. The luminescence of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} immobilized in a sol-gel matrix was measured as a function of heater temperature up to 200 C, in an inert environment. While the luminescence decreased with temperature, the integrated intensity at 200 C should be sufficient to enable detection of the luminescence in a fiber geometry. Previously we found that aging Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} at temperatures above 250 C converts the canary yellow Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} to a non-luminescent gray solid. Optical and thermal aging experiments show that the alkali metal salts of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} have higher thermal stabilities and remain luminescent after aging at 280 C.

  15. Enhanced oxygen sensing properties of Pt(II) complex and dye entrapped core-shell silica nanoparticles embedded in sol-gel matrix.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chen-Shane; Lo, Yu-Lung; Sung, Ti-Wen

    2010-08-15

    This paper presents a highly sensitive oxygen sensor that comprises an optical fiber coated at one end with platinum(II) meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin (PtTFPP) and PtTFPP entrapped core-shell silica nanoparticles embedded in an n-octyltriethoxysilane (Octyl-triEOS)/tetraethylorthosilane (TEOS) composite xerogel. The sensitivity of the optical oxygen sensor is quantified in terms of the ratio I(0)/I(100), where I(0) and I(100) represent the detected fluorescence intensities in pure nitrogen and pure oxygen environments, respectively. The experimental results show that the oxygen sensor has a sensitivity (I(0)/I(100)) of 166. The response time was 1.3s when switching from pure nitrogen to pure oxygen, and 18.6s when switching in the reverse direction. The experimental results show that compared to oxygen sensors based on PtTFPP, PtOEP, or Ru(dpp)(3)(2+) dyes, the proposed optical fiber oxygen sensor has the highest sensitivity. In addition to the increased surface area per unit mass of the sensing surface, the dye entrapped in the core of silica nanoparticles also increases the sensitivity because a substantial number of aerial oxygen molecules penetrate the porous silica shell. The dye entrapped core-shell nanoparticles is more prone to oxygen quenching. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pyruvate modifies metabolic flux and nutrient sensing during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an immature swine model

    SciTech Connect

    Ledee, Dolena R.; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Olson, Aaron; Isern, Nancy G.; Robillard Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-07-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support for infants and children with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. Nutritional support is mandatory during ECMO, although specific actions for substrates on the heart have not been delineated. Prior work shows that enhancing pyruvate oxidation promotes successful weaning from ECMO. Accordingly, we closely examined the role of prolonged systemic pyruvate supplementation in modifying metabolic parameters during the unique conditions of ventricular unloading provided by ECMO. Twelve male mixed breed Yorkshire piglets (age 30-49 days) received systemic infusion of either normal saline (Group C) or pyruvate (Group P) during ECMO for 8 hours. Over the final hour piglets received [2-13C] pyruvate, and [13C6]-L-leucine, as an indicator for oxidation and protein synthesis. A significant increase in lactate and pyruvate concentrations occurred, along with an increase in the absolute concentration of all measured CAC intermediates. Group P showed greater anaplerotic flux through pyruvate carboxylation although pyruvate oxidation relative to citrate synthase flux was similar to Group C. The groups demonstrated similar leucine fractional contributions to acetyl-CoA and fractional protein synthesis rates. Pyruvate also promoted an increase in the phosphorylation state of several nutrient sensitive enzymes, such as AMPK and ACC, and promoted O-GlcNAcylation through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP). In conclusion, prolonged pyruvate supplementation during ECMO modified anaplerotic pyruvate flux and elicited changes in important nutrient and energy sensitive pathways, while preserving protein synthesis. Therefore, the observed results support the further study of nutritional supplementation and its downstream effects on cardiac adaptation during ventricular unloading.

  17. Pyruvate modifies metabolic flux and nutrient sensing during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an immature swine model

    PubMed Central

    Ledee, Dolena R.; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen M.; Olson, Aaron K.; Isern, Nancy; Robillard-Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support for infants and children with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. Nutritional support is mandatory during ECMO although specific actions for substrates on the heart have not been delineated. Prior work shows that enhancing pyruvate oxidation promotes successful weaning from ECMO. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that prolonged systemic pyruvate supplementation activates pyruvate oxidation in an immature swine model in vivo. Twelve male mixed-breed Yorkshire piglets (age 30–49 days) received systemic infusion of either normal saline (group C) or pyruvate (group P) during the final 6 h of 8 h of ECMO. Over the final hour, piglets received [2-13C] pyruvate, as a reference substrate for oxidation, and [13C6]-l-leucine, as an indicator for amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis. A significant increase in lactate and pyruvate concentrations occurred, along with an increase in the absolute concentration of the citric acid cycle intermediates. An increase in anaplerotic flux through pyruvate carboxylation in group P occurred compared with no change in pyruvate oxidation. Additionally, pyruvate promoted an increase in the phosphorylation state of several nutrient-sensitive enzymes, like AMP-activated protein kinase and acetyl CoA carboxylase, suggesting activation for fatty acid oxidation. Pyruvate also promoted O-GlcNAcylation through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway. In conclusion, although prolonged pyruvate supplementation did not alter pyruvate oxidation, it did elicit changes in nutrient- and energy-sensitive pathways. Therefore, the observed results support the further study of pyruvate and its downstream effect on cardiac function. PMID:25910802

  18. Real-time monitoring of luminescent lifetime changes of PtOEP oxygen sensing film with LED/photodiode-based time-domain lifetime device.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shaomin; Wu, Wanhua; Wu, Yubo; Zhao, Taiyang; Zhou, Fuke; Yang, Yubin; Zhang, Xin; Liang, Xiaofen; Wu, Wenting; Chi, Lina; Wang, Zhonggang; Zhao, Jianzhang

    2009-05-01

    A cost-effective LED/photodiode(PD)-based time-domain luminescent lifetime measuring device with rugged electronics and simplified algorithms was assembled and successfully used to characterize oxygen sensing films, by continuously monitoring phosphorescence lifetime changes of phosphorescent platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP) in cardo poly(aryl ether ketone) polymer (IMPEK-C) vs. variation of the oxygen partial pressure in a gas mixture (O(2)/N(2)). The results determined by both phosphorescence lifetime and intensity monitoring were compared and the lifetime mode gave results which are in good agreement with the intensity mode. The lifetime-based linear Stern-Volmer plot indicates that the PtOEP molecules are nearly homogeneously distributed in the sensing film. The phosphorescent lifetime of the PtOEP film changes from 75 micros in neat N(2) to less than 2 micros in neat O(2). The sensing system (by combination of the PtOEP sensing film with the home-assembled lifetime device) gives a high lifetime-based O(2) sensing resolution, e.g. about 2 micros Torr(-1) for low O(2) concentration (below 3.5% O(2), V/V). This feasible lifetime device configuration is affordable to most sensor laboratories and the device may facilitate the study of O(2) sensing material with the continuous lifetime monitoring method.

  19. Significance of KATP channels, L-type Ca2+ channels and CYP450-4A enzymes in oxygen sensing in mouse cremaster muscle arterioles In vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ATP-sensitive K+ channels (KATP channels), NO, prostaglandins, 20-HETE and L-type Ca2+ channels have all been suggested to be involved in oxygen sensing in skeletal muscle arterioles, but the role of the individual mechanisms remain controversial. We aimed to establish the importance of these mechanisms for oxygen sensing in arterioles in an in vivo model of metabolically active skeletal muscle. For this purpose we utilized the exteriorized cremaster muscle of anesthetized mice, in which the cremaster muscle was exposed to controlled perturbation of tissue PO2. Results Change from “high” oxygen tension (PO2 = 153.4 ± 3.4 mmHg) to “low” oxygen tension (PO2 = 13.8 ± 1.3 mmHg) dilated cremaster muscle arterioles from 11.0 ± 0.4 μm to 32.9 ± 0.9 μm (n = 28, P < 0.05). Glibenclamide (KATP channel blocker) caused maximal vasoconstriction, and abolished the dilation to low oxygen, whereas the KATP channel opener cromakalim caused maximal dilation and prevented the constriction to high oxygen. When adding cromakalim on top of glibenclamide or vice versa, the reactivity to oxygen was gradually restored. Inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channels using 3 μM nifedipine did not fully block basal tone in the arterioles, but rendered them unresponsive to changes in PO2. Inhibition of the CYP450-4A enzyme using DDMS blocked vasoconstriction to an increase in PO2, but had no effect on dilation to low PO2. Conclusions We conclude that: 1) L-type Ca2+ channels are central to oxygen sensing, 2) KATP channels are permissive for the arteriolar response to oxygen, but are not directly involved in the oxygen sensing mechanism and 3) CYP450-4A mediated 20-HETE production is involved in vasoconstriction to high PO2. PMID:23663730

  20. Reduced to oxidized glutathione ratios and oxygen sensing in calf and rabbit carotid body chemoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Alfayate, G; Obeso, A; Agapito, M T; González, C

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work was to test the redox hypotheses of O2 chemoreception in the carotid body (CB). They postulate that hypoxia alters the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG), causing modifications to the sulfhydryl groups/disulfide bonds of K+ channel proteins, which leads to the activation of chemoreceptor cells. We found that the GSH/GSSG ratio in normoxic calf CB (30.14 ± 4.67; n = 12) and hypoxic organs (33.03 ± 6.88; n = 10), and the absolute levels of total glutathione (0.71 ± 0.07 nmol (mg tissue)−1, normoxia vs. 0.76 ± 0.07 nmol (mg tissue)−1, hypoxia) were not statistically different. N-Acetylcysteine (2 mm; NAC), a precursor of glutathione and ROS scavenger, increased normoxic glutathione levels to 1.03 ± 0.06 nmol (mg tissue)−1 (P < 0.02) and GSH/GSSG ratios to 59.05 ± 5.05 (P < 0.001). NAC (20 μm–10 mm) did not activate or inhibit chemoreceptor cells as it did not alter the normoxic or the hypoxic release of 3H-catecholamines (3H-CAs) from rabbit and calf CBs whose CA deposits had been labelled by prior incubation with the natural CA precursor 3H-tyrosine. NAC (2 mm) was equally ineffective in altering the release of 3H-CAs induced by stimuli (high external K+ and ionomycin) that bypass the initial steps of the hypoxic cascade of activation of chemoreceptor cells, thereby excluding the possibility that the lack of effect of NAC on normoxic and hypoxic release of 3H-CAs results from a concomitant alteration of Ca2+ channels or of the exocytotic machinery. The present findings do not support the contention that O2 chemoreception in the CB is linked to variations in the GSH/GSSG quotient as the redox models propose. PMID:11711574

  1. Pulsed Dose Delivery of Oxygen in Mechanically Ventilated Pigs with Acute Lung Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    atropine (0.54 mg/kg). They were then intubated with 7.5 French endotracheal tubes. A surgical plane of anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane...patients often require intubation and mechanical ventilation with supplemental oxygen and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). To date, the...circuit, directly at the endotracheal tube. We used the SeQual Eclipse II, which was selected for its oxygen generating capabilities, as it is capable

  2. Sense of coherence and experiences of social support and mastery in the early discharge period after an acute cardiac event.

    PubMed

    Hildingh, Cathrine; Fridlund, Bengt; Baigi, Amir

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine sense of coherence and experiences of change in social support and mastery from a short-term perspective in patients who had been admitted to hospital with a suspected myocardial infarction. The early discharge period after an acute cardiac event can be a stressful and vulnerable time when psychosocial resources are of the utmost importance. A positive outcome in an encounter with a stressor is thought to be linked to a strong sense of coherence, social support and mastery. A multi-centre survey was conducted in three hospitals in southern Sweden. The sample was 300, 241 of whom completed the questionnaires; while in hospital and two weeks postdischarge. In the early discharge period a low sense of coherence was found in over 60% of the sample. There was an association between social support and mastery and between sense of coherence and mastery. Differences in social support ratings, with lower ratings two weeks postdischarge, were found among women and persons over 65 years of age. This study adds knowledge about experiences in the early discharge period. Changes in ratings of social support but not in ratings of mastery were found between baseline and two weeks postdischarge. Healthcare professionals need to be sensitive to patients' sense of coherence, mastery and need for social support during the early discharge period. They can help patients to identify adequate support strategies and prevent future potential complications. However, to routinely assess sense of coherence, social support and mastery, there is a need for a simple and useful instrument in clinical practice.

  3. High-flow oxygen therapy in immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory failure: A review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Bin; Peng, Jin-Min; Weng, Li; Liu, Guang-Yun; Du, Bin

    2017-09-22

    Acute respiratory failure remains a common hazardous complication in immunocompromised patients and is associated with increased mortality rates when endotracheal intubation is need. We aimed to evaluate the effect of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC) compared with other oxygen technique for this patient population. We searched Cochrane library, Embase, PubMed databases before Aug. 15, 2017 for eligible articles. A meta-analysis was performed for measuring short-term mortality (defined as ICU, hospital or 28-days mortality) and intubation rate as the primary outcomes, and length of stay in ICU as the secondary outcome. We included seven studies involving 667 patients. Use of HFNC was significantly association with a reduction in short-term mortality (RR 0.66; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.84, p=0.0007) and intubation rate (RR 0.76, 95% CI 0.64 to 0.90; p=0.002). In addition, HFNC did not significant increase length of stay in ICU (MD 0.15days; 95% CI, -2.08 to 2.39; p=0.89). The results of current meta-analysis suggest that use of HFNC significantly improve outcomes of acute respiratory failure in immunocompromised patients. Owing to the quality of the included studies, further adequately powered randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm our results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. No additive effects of inhaled iloprost and prone positioning on pulmonary hypertension and oxygenation in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Senturk, E; Cakar, N; Ozcan, P E; Basel, A; Sengul, T; Telci, L; Esen, F; Nahum, A; Strang, C M; Winterhalter, M

    2012-09-01

    In acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pulmonary hypertension is associated with a poor prognosis. Prone position is effective to improve oxygenation whereas inhaled iloprost can treat pulmonary hypertension. However, combination of these interventions has not been examined before. The hypothesis was that this combination had additive effects on oxygenation and pulmonary hemodynamics as compared with each intervention alone. In a prospective, randomized cross-over study, ten pigs were anesthetized, intubated and ventilated with volume controlled ventilation. Carotid, jugular venous and pulmonary artery catheters were inserted. ARDS was induced with oleic acid (0.20 mL/kg). Measurements were repeated in randomized different sequences of prone or supine positions with or without iloprost inhalation (220 ng/kg/min) (four combinations). Systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures; arterial and mixed venous blood gases; and Qs/Qt and the resistances were recorded. Iloprost decreased pulmonary artery pressures (for MPAP: P=0.034) in both supine (37±10 vs. 31±8 mmHg; P<0.05) and prone positions (38±9 vs. 29±8 mmHg; P<0.05); but did not obtain a significant improvement in oxygenation in both positions. Prone position improved the oxygenation (p<0.0001) compared to supine position in both with (361±140 vs. 183±158 mmHg, P<0.05) or without iloprost application (331±112 vs. 167±117 mmHg, P<0.05); but did not achieve a significant decrease in MPAP. Although iloprost reduced pulmonary arterial pressures, and prone positioning improved oxygenation; there are no additive effects of the combination of both interventions on both parameters. To treat both pulmonary hypertension and hypoxemia, application of iloprost in prone position is suggested.

  5. Effect of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy in adults with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Xiaofeng; Hua, Yusi; Liu, Jin; Gong, Cansheng; Zhao, Wenling

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conflicting recommendations exist on whether high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy should be administered to adult patients in critical care with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate its effect on intubation rates. METHODS: We searched electronic databases from inception to April 2016. We included RCTs that compared HFNC oxygen therapy with usual care (conventional oxygen therapy or noninvasive ventilation) in adults with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Because of the different methodologies and variation in clinical outcomes, we conducted 2 subgroup analyses according to oxygen therapy used and disease severity. We pooled data using random-effects models. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who required endotracheal intubation. RESULTS: We included 6 RCTs (n = 1892). Compared with conventional oxygen therapy, HFNC oxygen therapy was associated with a lower intubation rate (risk ratio [RR] 0.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38 to 0.94; I2 = 49%). We found no significant difference in the rate between HFNC oxygen therapy and noninvasive ventilation (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.09; I2 = 2%). In the subgroup analysis by disease severity, no significant differences were found in the intubation rate between HFNC oxygen therapy and either conventional oxygen therapy or noninvasive ventilation (interaction p = 0.3 and 0.4, respectively). INTERPRETATION: The intubation rate with HFNC oxygen therapy was lower than the rate with conventional oxygen therapy and similar to the rate with noninvasive ventilation among patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Larger, high-quality RCTs are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:28246239

  6. Acute effects of ferumoxytol on regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Cantow, Kathleen; Pohlmann, Andreas; Flemming, Bert; Ferrara, Fabienne; Waiczies, Sonia; Grosenick, Dirk; Niendorf, Thoralf; Seeliger, Erdmann

    2016-01-01

    The superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle ferumoxytol is increasingly used as intravascular contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study details the impact of ferumoxytol on regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation. In 10 anesthetized rats, a single intravenous injection of isotonic saline (used as volume control) was followed by three consecutive injections of ferumoxytol to achieve cumulative doses of 6, 10, and 41 mg Fe/kg body mass. Arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, renal cortical and medullary perfusion and oxygen tension were continuously measured. Regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation was characterized by dedicated interventions: brief periods of suprarenal aortic occlusion, hypoxia, and hyperoxia. None of the three doses of ferumoxytol resulted in significant changes in any of the measured parameters as compared to saline. Ferumoxytol did not significantly alter regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation as studied by aortic occlusion and hypoxia. The only significant effect of ferumoxytol at the highest dose was a blunting of the hyperoxia-induced increase in arterial pressure. Taken together, ferumoxytol has only marginal effects on the regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation. This makes ferumoxytol a prime candidate as contrast agent for renal MRI including the assessment of renal blood volume fraction. PMID:27436132

  7. Potentiation of butylated hydroxytoluene-induced acute lung damage by oxygen. Cell kinetics and collagen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Haschek, W M; Reiser, K M; Klein-Szanto, A J; Kehrer, J P; Smith, L H; Last, J A; Witschi, H P

    1983-01-01

    Changes in cell proliferation and in collagen synthesis were studied in young adult male BALB/c mice injected intraperitoneally with 400 mg/kg of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in corn oil or corn oil alone and immediately exposed to 70% oxygen or air for 6 days. Mice received [3H]thymidine either as a single injection 90 min before being killed or as a continual infusion via an osmotic minipump. Autoradiography was done 2 to 14 days after BHT injection, and cell kinetic studies were performed. In a similar experiment, mice were injected intraperitoneally with [3H]proline 3 h before being killed, and type l/type III collagen ratio in newly synthesized lung collagen was determined. We found that exposure to 70% oxygen immediately after the administration of BHT initially delayed the epithelial cell proliferation and the decrease in the percentage of newly synthesized type III collagen that occurred after BHT alone. Once the animals were removed from oxygen there was a compensatory burst of cell proliferation and a precipitous drop in the percentage of newly synthesized type III collagen. The proliferating cell population after removal from oxygen was primarily interstitial and not epithelial. When exposure to oxygen was delayed, cell proliferation was similar to that seen after BHT injection alone.

  8. Modulation of Type I Interferon-Associated Viral Sensing during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in African Green Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Jochems, Simon P.; Petitjean, Gaël; Kunkel, Désirée; Liovat, Anne-Sophie; Ploquin, Mickaël J.; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Lebon, Pierre; Jacquelin, Béatrice

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), such as African green monkeys (AGMs), do not progress to AIDS when infected with SIV. This is associated with an absence of a chronic type I interferon (IFN-I) signature. It is unclear how the IFN-I response is downmodulated in AGMs. We longitudinally assessed the capacity of AGM blood cells to produce IFN-I in response to SIV and herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. Phenotypes and functions of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and other mononuclear blood cells were assessed by flow cytometry, and expression of viral sensors was measured by reverse transcription-PCR. pDCs displayed low BDCA-2, CD40, and HLA-DR expression levels during AGM acute SIV (SIVagm) infection. BDCA-2 was required for sensing of SIV, but not of HSV, by pDCs. In acute infection, AGM peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) produced less IFN-I upon SIV stimulation. In the chronic phase, the production was normal, confirming that the lack of chronic inflammation is not due to a sensing defect of pDCs. In contrast to stimulation by SIV, more IFN-I was produced upon HSV stimulation of PBMCs isolated during acute infection, while the frequency of AGM pDCs producing IFN-I upon in vitro stimulation with HSV was diminished. Indeed, other cells started producing IFN-I. This increased viral sensing by non-pDCs was associated with an upregulation of Toll-like receptor 3 and IFN-γ-inducible protein 16 caused by IFN-I in acute SIVagm infection. Our results suggest that, as in pathogenic SIVmac infection, SIVagm infection mobilizes bone marrow precursor pDCs. Moreover, we show that SIV infection modifies the capacity of viral sensing in cells other than pDCs, which could drive IFN-I production in specific settings. IMPORTANCE The effects of HIV/SIV infections on the capacity of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) to produce IFN-I in vivo are still incompletely defined. As IFN-I can restrict viral replication, contribute to inflammation

  9. High-flow nasal oxygen therapy and noninvasive ventilation in the management of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Frat, Jean-Pierre; Coudroy, Rémi; Marjanovic, Nicolas; Thille, Arnaud W

    2017-07-01

    High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy is a recent technique delivering a high flow of heated and humidified gas. HFNC is simpler to use and apply than noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and appears to be a good alternative treatment for hypoxemic acute respiratory failure (ARF). HFNC is better tolerated than NIV, delivers high fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2), generates a low level of positive pressure and provides washout of dead space in the upper airways, thereby improving mechanical pulmonary properties and unloading inspiratory muscles during ARF. A recent multicenter randomized controlled trial showed benefits of HFNC concerning mortality and intubation in severe patients with hypoxemic ARF. In management of patients with hypoxemic ARF, NIV results have been conflicting. Despite improved oxygenation, NIV delivered with face mask may generate high tidal volumes and subsequent ventilator-induced lung injury. An approach applying NIV with a helmet, high levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and low pressure support (PS) levels seems to open new opportunities in patients with hypoxemic ARF. However, a large-scale randomized controlled study is needed to assess and compare this approach with HFNC.

  10. The effects of dexamethasone and oxygen in ventilated adult sheep with early phase acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Engel, Monique; Nowacki, Relana M E; Boden, Pim; Reiss, Lucy K; Uhlig, Stefan; Reynaert, Niki L; Gopal, Poornima; Wouters, Emiel F M; Willems, Coen H M P; Kloosterboer, Nico; Wolfs, Tim G A M; Zimmermann, Luc J I; Vos, Gijs D; Kramer, Boris W

    2015-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threating condition with high morbidity and mortality. Inflammation is the main factor in the pathogenesis of ARDS. Therefore systemic corticosteroids are a rational therapeutic approach, but the effect of corticosteroids is still unclear. In this study, we looked at the effects of corticosteroids in ventilated sheep with ARDS, induced by lung lavage. We performed a prospective, randomised study in 64 ventilated sheep with ARDS, to evaluate the effect of corticosteroids and oxygen concentration on gas exchange and lung injury. Oxygenation index (OI) and ventilation efficacy index (VEI) were calculated to evaluate gas exchange. Lung injury was assessed by inflammatory response in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma and histology of the lung. OI, VEI, lung inflammation, surfactant production, or lung histology was not influenced by corticosteroids. In the 100 % oxygen groups, OI was higher and total number of cells and disaturated phospholipids were lower in BALF. Our study showed that corticosteroids did not influence inflammation in early phase ARDS and that hyperoxia aggravated lung injury which could not be modulated by dexamethasone in early phase ARDS.

  11. Effect of nebulized budesonide on respiratory mechanics and oxygenation in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome: Randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Hatem Saber; Meguid, Mona Mohamed Abdel

    2017-01-01

    Background: We tested the hypothesis that nebulized budesonide would improve lung mechanics and oxygenation in patients with early acute lung injury (ALI) and/or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) during protective mechanical ventilation strategy without adversely affecting systemic hemodynamics. Methods: Patients with ALI/ARDS were included and assigned into two groups; budesonide group (30 cases) in whom 1 mg–2 ml budesonide suspension was nebulized through the endotracheal tube and control group (30 cases) in whom 2 ml saline (placebo) were nebulized instead of budesonide. This regimen was repeated every 12 h for three successive days alongside with constant ventilator settings in both groups. Hemodynamics, airway pressures, and PaO2/FiO2 were measured throughout the study period (72 h) with either nebulized budesonide or saline. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were analyzed serologically as markers of inflammation at pre- and post-nebulization sessions. Results: We found a significant difference between the two groups regarding PaO2/FiO2 (P = 0.023), peak (P = 0.021), and plateau (P = 0.032) airway pressures. Furthermore, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were significantly reduced after budesonide nebulizations. No significant difference was found between the two groups regarding hemodynamic variables. Conclusion: Nebulized budesonide improved oxygenation, peak, and plateau airway pressures and significantly reduced inflammatory markers (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) without affecting hemodynamics. Trial Registry: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ANZCTR) at the number: ACTRN12615000373572. PMID:28217046

  12. The effects of breathing a helium-oxygen gas mixture on maximal pulmonary ventilation and maximal oxygen consumption during exercise in acute moderate hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takeshi; Calbet, Jose A L; Honda, Yasushi; Fujii, Naoto; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2010-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that maximal exercise pulmonary ventilation (VE max) is a limiting factor affecting maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) in moderate hypobaric hypoxia (H), we examined the effect of breathing a helium-oxygen gas mixture (He-O(2); 20.9% O(2)), which would reduce air density and would be expected to increase VE max. Fourteen healthy young male subjects performed incremental treadmill running tests to exhaustion in normobaric normoxia (N; sea level) and in H (atmospheric pressure equivalent to 2,500 m above sea level). These exercise tests were carried out under three conditions [H with He-O(2), H with normal air and N] in random order. VO2 max and arterial oxy-hemoglobin saturation (SaO(2)) were, respectively, 15.2, 7.5 and 4.0% higher (all p < 0.05) with He-O(2) than with normal air (VE max, 171.9 ± 16.1 vs. 150.1 ± 16.9 L/min; VO2 max, 52.50 ± 9.13 vs. 48.72 ± 5.35 mL/kg/min; arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO(2)), 79 ± 3 vs. 76 ± 3%). There was a linear relationship between the increment in VE max and the increment in VO2 max in H (r = 0.77; p < 0.05). When subjects were divided into two groups based on their VO2 max, both groups showed increased VE max and SaO(2) in H with He-O(2), but VO2 max was increased only in the high VO2 max group. These findings suggest that in acute moderate hypobaric hypoxia, air-flow resistance can be a limiting factor affecting VE max; consequently, VO2 max is limited in part by VE max especially in subjects with high VO2 max.

  13. Phosphorescent Platinum(II) and Palladium(II) Complexes with Azatetrabenzoporphyrins—New Red Laser Diode-Compatible Indicators for Optical Oxygen Sensing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A new class of oxygen indicators is described. Platinum(II) and palladium(II) complexes of azatetrabenzoporphyrins occupy an intermediate position between tetrabenzoporphyrins and phthalocyanines and combine features of both. The new dyes are excitable in the red part of the spectrum and possess strong room-temperature NIR phosphorescence. Other features include excellent spectral compatibility with the red laser diodes and 632.8 nm line of He−Ne laser, excellent photostability, and significantly shorter decay times than for the respective meso-tetraphenyltetrabenzoporphyrins. Applicability of the complexes for optical oxygen sensing is demonstrated. PMID:20186289

  14. Sense and nonsense of high-dose cytarabine for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Löwenberg, Bob

    2013-01-03

    High-dose cytarabine applied during remission induction or as consolidation after attainment of a complete remission has become an established element in the treatment of adults with acute myeloid leukemia. Recent evidence has challenged the need for these exceptionally high-dose levels of cytarabine. In this review, we present a reappraisal of the usefulness of high-dose cytarabine for acute myeloid leukemia treatment.

  15. Comparison of high-flow nasal oxygen therapy with conventional oxygen therapy and noninvasive ventilation in adult patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Souvik; Som, Anirban; Bhattacharjee, Sulagna; Arora, Mahesh K; Baidya, Dalim K

    2016-10-01

    The role of high-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) therapy in adult patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure is controversial. This meta-analysis of prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has been designed to compare HFNO with noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and conventional oxygen therapy in such patients. Initial database searching revealed 336 RCTs, of which 7 were included in this meta-analysis. Five RCTs compared HFNO with standard oxygen therapy, one compared HFNO with NIV, and one compared all three. HFNO did not decrease the requirement of higher respiratory support compared with control group. HFNO was associated with improved respiratory rate and dyspnea score, and better comfort in 3 RCTs, whereas other studies did not find any difference. High-flow nasal oxygen does not offer any benefit over NIV or conventional oxygen therapy in terms of requirement of higher respiratory support. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nanocrystalline CePO(4):Tb as a novel oxygen sensing material on the basis of its redox responsive reversible luminescence.

    PubMed

    Di, Weihua; Wang, Xiaojun; Ren, Xinguang

    2010-02-19

    This work reports for the first time on a new finding of luminescent CePO(4):Tb nanocrystals providing a novel oxygen sensing material on the basis of the redox responsive reversible luminescence in an oxidizing/reducing atmosphere. The origin of the luminescence quenching/recovery of nanocrystalline CePO(4):Tb was clearly demonstrated, from the surface chemistry of nanocrystals and the fluorescence decay dynamics of Tb(III). Our present work represents a preliminary demonstration of the feasibility of using nanocrystalline CePO(4):Tb as a novel oxygen sensing material since it yields several advantages including surfactant-free synthesis, dual detection functioning, rapid response, high sensitivity and good reproducibility.

  17. The Effects of Oxygen Therapy on Myocardial Salvage in ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction Treated with Acute Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: The Supplemental Oxygen in Catheterized Coronary Emergency Reperfusion (SOCCER) Study.

    PubMed

    Khoshnood, Ardavan; Carlsson, Marcus; Akbarzadeh, Mahin; Bhiladvala, Pallonji; Roijer, Anders; Bodetoft, Stefan; Höglund, Peter; Zughaft, David; Todorova, Lizbet; Erlinge, David; Ekelund, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Despite a lack of scientific evidence, oxygen has long been a part of standard treatment for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, several studies suggest that oxygen therapy may have negative cardiovascular effects. We here describe a randomized controlled trial, i.e. Supplemental Oxygen in Catheterized Coronary Emergency Reperfusion (SOCCER), aiming to evaluate the effect of oxygen therapy on myocardial salvage and infarct size in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with a primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). One hundred normoxic STEMI patients accepted for a primary PCI are randomized in the ambulance to either standard oxygen therapy or no supplemental oxygen. All patients undergo cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) 2-6 days after the primary PCI, and a subgroup of 50 patients undergo an extended echocardiography during admission and at 6 months. All patients are followed for 6 months for hospital admission for heart failure and subjective perception of health. The primary endpoint is the myocardial salvage index on CMR. Even though oxygen therapy is a part of standard care, oxygen may not be beneficial for patients with AMI and is possibly even harmful. The results of the present and concurrent oxygen trials may change international treatment guidelines for patients with AMI or ischemia.

  18. The effect of acute exposure to hyperbaric oxygen on respiratory system mechanics in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rubini, Alessandro; Porzionato, Andrea; Zara, Susi; Cataldi, Amelia; Garetto, Giacomo; Bosco, Gerardo

    2013-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate the possible effects of acute hyperbaric hyperoxia on respiratory mechanics of anaesthetised, positive-pressure ventilated rats. We measured respiratory mechanics by the end-inflation occlusion method in nine rats previously acutely exposed to hyperbaric hyperoxia in a standard fashion. The method allows the measurements of respiratory system elastance and of both the "ohmic" and of the viscoelastic components of airway resistance, which respectively depend on the newtonian pressure dissipation due to the ohmic airway resistance to air flow, and on the viscoelastic pressure dissipation caused by respiratory system tissues stress-relaxation. The activities of inducible and endothelial NO-synthase in the lung's tissues (iNOS and eNOS respectively) also were investigated. Data were compared with those obtained in control animals. We found that the exposure to hyperbaric hyperoxia increased respiratory system elastance and both the "ohmic" and viscoelastic components of inspiratory resistances. These changes were accompanied by increased iNOS but not eNOS activities. Hyperbaric hyperoxia was shown to acutely induce detrimental effects on respiratory mechanics. A possible causative role was suggested for increased nitrogen reactive species production because of increased iNOS activity.

  19. Acute EPOC response in women to circuit training and treadmill exercise of matched oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Braun, W A; Hawthorne, W E; Markofski, M M

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of circuit training (CT) and treadmill exercise performed at matched rates of oxygen consumption and exercise duration on elevated post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) in untrained women, while controlling for the menstrual cycle. Eight, untrained females (31.3 +/- 9.1 years; 2.04 +/- 0.26 l min(-1) estimated VO2max; BMI=24.6+/-3.9 kg/m2) volunteered to participate in the study. Testing was performed during the early follicular phase for each subject to minimize hormonal variability between tests. Subjects performed two exercise sessions approximately 28 days apart. Resting, supine energy expenditure was measured for 30 min preceding exercise and for 1 h after completion of exercise. Respiratory gas exchange data were collected continuously during rest and exercise periods via indirect calorimetry. CT consisted of three sets of eight common resistance exercises. Pre-exercise and exercise oxygen consumption was not different between testing days (P>0.05). Thus, exercise conditions were appropriately matched. Analysis of EPOC data revealed that CT resulted in a significantly higher (p<0.05) oxygen uptake during the first 30 min of recovery (0.27 +/- 0.01 l min(-1) vs 0.23+/-0.01 l min(-1)); though, at 60 min, treatment differences were not present. Mean VO2 remained significantly higher (0.231 +/- 0.01 l min(-1)) than pre-exercise measures (0.193 +/- 0.01 l min(-1)) throughout the 60-min EPOC period (p<0.05). Heart rate, RPE, V(E) and RER were all significantly greater during CT (p<0.05). When exercise VO2 and exercise duration were matched, CT was associated with a greater metabolic disturbance and cost during the early phases of EPOC.

  20. Health-related quality of life, sense of coherence and leisure-time physical activity in women after an acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Løvlien, Mona; Mundal, Liv; Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise

    2017-04-01

    To examine the relationship between leisure-time physical activity, health-related quality of life and sense of coherence in women after an acute myocardial infarction, and further to investigate whether these aspects were associated with age. Physical activity and health-related quality of life are vital aspects for patients after an acute myocardial infarction. Cross-sectional. All eligible women diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction received a postal questionnaire two to three months after hospital discharge, and 142 women were included. To measure health-related quality of life and sense of coherence, The MacNew Heart disease questionnaire and the Sense of coherence-13 scale was used. Respondents reporting at least one type of physical activity had significantly higher health-related quality of life as compared to respondents reporting no kind of physical activity. Respondents reporting physical activity for at least 30 minutes twice a week had significantly higher health-related quality of life scores than respondents being active less than twice a week. A weak association was found between physical activity level and sense of coherence. Reduction in physical activity after the acute myocardial infarction was associated with reduced health-related quality of life and sense of coherence. Sense of coherence was significantly associated with age, as respondents 75 years and older had significantly higher scores than respondents younger than 75 years. Physical activity, even at a low level, is significantly associated with increased health-related quality of life and to some extent to sense of coherence. Tailoring women after an acute myocardial infarction about lifestyle changes must include knowledge about the benefits of leisure-time physical activity, and that even a small amount of activity is associated with a better health-related quality of life. The utmost important assignment is to motivate the women for regular physical activity in their leisure

  1. The Aer protein and the serine chemoreceptor Tsr independently sense intracellular energy levels and transduce oxygen, redox, and energy signals for Escherichia coli behavior

    PubMed Central

    Rebbapragada, Anuradha; Johnson, Mark S.; Harding, Gordon P.; Zuccarelli, Anthony J.; Fletcher, Hansel M.; Zhulin, Igor B.; Taylor, Barry L.

    1997-01-01

    We identified a protein, Aer, as a signal transducer that senses intracellular energy levels rather than the external environment and that transduces signals for aerotaxis (taxis to oxygen) and other energy-dependent behavioral responses in Escherichia coli. Domains in Aer are similar to the signaling domain in chemotaxis receptors and the putative oxygen-sensing domain of some transcriptional activators. A putative FAD-binding site in the N-terminal domain of Aer shares a consensus sequence with the NifL, Bat, and Wc-1 signal-transducing proteins that regulate gene expression in response to redox changes, oxygen, and blue light, respectively. A double mutant deficient in aer and tsr, which codes for the serine chemoreceptor, was negative for aerotaxis, redox taxis, and glycerol taxis, each of which requires the proton motive force and/or electron transport system for signaling. We propose that Aer and Tsr sense the proton motive force or cellular redox state and thereby integrate diverse signals that guide E. coli to environments where maximal energy is available for growth. PMID:9380671

  2. Effects of purified oxygenated water on exercise performance during acute hypoxic exposure.

    PubMed

    Wing-Gaia, Stacie L; Subudhi, Andrew W; Askew, Eldon W

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of purified oxygenated water on exercise performance under hypoxic conditions. Nine recreational male cyclists (age = 26.6 +/- 5.2 y, weight = 87.6 +/- 19.5 kg, VO2peak = 46.5 +/- 5.9 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)) completed two 600 kJ cycling time trials under hypoxic conditions (FIO2 = 13.6% O2, Pbar = 641 mmHg) separated by 2 wk. Trials were completed following 3 d ingestion of 35 mL x kg(-1) x d(-1) of control (CON) or experimental (EXP) water. Time to completion, heart rate (HR), rate of perceived exertion (RPE), pulse oximetry (SaO2), blood gases (PcO2 and PcCO2), and lactate were measured during the trials. Hydration was assessed with pre- and post-exercise body weight and 24-h urine specific gravity. Performance, hydration, and blood oxygenation were unaffected by EXP water. Results of this study suggest that purified oxygenated water does not improve exercise performance in moderately active males.

  3. Acute exposure of mercury chloride stimulates the tissue regeneration program and reactive oxygen species production in the Drosophila midgut.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Wu, Xiaochun; Luo, Hongjie; Zhao, Lingling; Ji, Xin; Qiao, Xianfeng; Jin, Yaping; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We used Drosophila as an animal model to study the digestive tract in response to the exposure of inorganic mercury (HgCl2). We found that after oral administration, mercury was mainly sequestered within the midgut. This resulted in increased cell death, which in turn stimulated the tissue regeneration program, including accelerated proliferation and differentiation of the intestinal stem cells (ISCs). We further demonstrated that these injuries correlate closely with the excessive production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), as vitamin E, an antioxidant reagent, efficiently suppressed the HgCl2-induced phenotypes of midgut and improved the viability. We propose that the Drosophila midgut could serve as a suitable model to study the treatment of acute hydrargyrism on the digestive systems.

  4. Acute effects of combined burn and smoke inhalation injury on carboxyhemoglobin formation, tissue oxygenation, and cardiac performance.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Martin; Morita, Naoki; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Murakami, Kazunori; Traber, Lillian; Traber, Daniel Lee

    2004-05-07

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) formation, global oxygen transport, and cardiac performance in the acute phase of combined burn and smoke inhalation injury. Following a third degree burn of 20% of the total body surface area, adult sheep were subjected to cotton smoke (4x12 breaths) according to an established protocol. Compared with baseline (BL), the burn injury led to an immediate and sustained COHb-independent depression in myocardial contractility. Despite a progressive increase in COHb formation, up to a maximum of 78+/-3% (P < 0.001 vs BL), smoke inhalation did not further impair these hemodynamic changes. This study demonstrated that in the early stage of combined burn and smoke inhalation injury, the depression in cardiac function is basically triggered by the burn injury, whereas COHb generation secondary to cotton smoke exposure primarily contributes to pulmonary shunting.

  5. [Recommendations for pediatric oxygen therapy in acute and chronic settings: needs assessment, implementation criteria, prescription practices and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Aubertin, G; Marguet, C; Delacourt, C; Houdouin, V; Leclainche, L; Lubrano, M; Marteletti, O; Pin, I; Pouessel, G; Rittié, J-L; Saulnier, J-P; Schweitzer, C; Stremler, N; Thumerelle, C; Toutain-Rigolet, A; Beydon, N

    2012-05-01

    Recommendations for acute and long-term oxygen therapy (needs assessment, implementation criteria, prescription practices, and follow-up) in children were produced by the Groupe de Recherche sur les Avancées en Pneumo-Pédiatrie (GRAPP) under the auspices of the French Paediatric Pulmonology and Allergology Society (SP2A). The Haute Autorité de Santé (HAS) methodology, based on the Formalized Consensus, was used. A first panel of experts analyzed the English and French literature to provide a second panel of experts with recommendations to validate. Only the recommendations are presented here, but the full text (arguments+recommendations) is available at the website of the French Paediatric Society: www.sfpediatrie.com.

  6. [Recommendations for pediatric oxygen therapy in acute and chronic settings: Needs assessment, implementation criteria, prescription practices and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Aubertin, G; Marguet, C; Delacourt, C; Houdouin, V; Leclainche, L; Lubrano, M; Marteletti, O; Pin, I; Pouessel, G; Rittié, J-L; Saulnier, J-P; Schweitzer, C; Stremler, N; Thumerelle, C; Toutain-Rigolet, A; Beydon, N

    2013-12-01

    Recommendations for acute and long-term oxygen therapy (needs assessment, implementation criteria, prescription practices, and follow-up) in children were produced by the Groupe de Recherche sur les Avancées en Pneumo-Pédiatrie (GRAPP) under the auspices of the French Paediatric Pulmonology and Allergology Society (SP2A). The Haute Autorité de Santé (HAS) methodology, based on the Formalized Consensus, was used. A first panel of experts analyzed the English and French literature to provide a second panel of experts with recommendations to validate. Only the recommendations are presented here, but the full text (arguments+recommendations) is available at the website of the French Paediatric Society: www.sfpediatrie.com.

  7. Catastrophic Catecholamine-Induced Cardiomyopathy Mimicking Acute Myocardial Infarction, Rescued by Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) in Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Il-Woo; Lee, Cheol Whan; Kim, Young-Hak; Hong, Myeong-Ki; Lee, Jae-Won; Kim, Jae-Joong; Park, Seong-Wook

    2008-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare disorder and functioning tumor composed of chromaffin cells that secrete catecholamines. Patients with a pheochromocytoma 'crisis' have a high mortality in spite of aggressive therapy. We present a case with a severe acute catecholamine cardiomyopathy presenting ST segment elevation with cardiogenic shock after hemorrhage into a left suprarenal tumor. Intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) support, combined with inotropic therapy, was performed. However, the patient deteriorated rapidly and was unresponsive to a full dose of inotropics and IABP. We decided to apply extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) device for the patient. His clinical state began to improve 3 days after ECMO. After achieving hemodynamic stabilization, he underwent successful laparoscopic left adrenalectomy. He needed no further cardiac medication after discharge. PMID:18437026

  8. Monochloramine-sensitive amperometric microelectrode: optimization of gold, platinum, and carbon fiber sensing materials for removal of dissolved oxygen interference

    EPA Science Inventory

    Amperometric monochloramine detection using newly fabricated gold, platinum, and carbon-fiber microsensors was investigated to optimize sensor operation and eliminate oxygen interference. Gold and platinum microsensors exhibited no oxygen interference during monochloramine measu...

  9. Monochloramine-sensitive amperometric microelectrode: optimization of gold, platinum, and carbon fiber sensing materials for removal of dissolved oxygen interference

    EPA Science Inventory

    Amperometric monochloramine detection using newly fabricated gold, platinum, and carbon-fiber microsensors was investigated to optimize sensor operation and eliminate oxygen interference. Gold and platinum microsensors exhibited no oxygen interference during monochloramine measu...

  10. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation improves survival in a novel 24-hour pig model of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Araos, Joaquín; Alegría, Leyla; García, Patricio; Damiani, Felipe; Tapia, Pablo; Soto, Dagoberto; Salomon, Tatiana; Rodriguez, Felipe; Amthauer, Macarena; Erranz, Benjamín; Castro, Gabriel; Carreño, Pamela; Medina, Tania; Retamal, Jaime; Cruces, Pablo; Bugedo, Guillermo; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly being used to treat severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, there is limited clinical evidence about how to optimize the technique. Experimental research can provide an alternative to fill the actual knowledge gap. The purpose of the present study was to develop and validate an animal model of acute lung injury (ALI) which resembled severe ARDS, and which could be successfully supported with ECMO. Eighteen pigs were randomly allocated into three groups: sham, ALI, and ALI + ECMO. ALI was induced by a double-hit consisting in repeated saline lavage followed by a 2-hour period of injurious ventilation. All animals were followed up to 24 hours while being ventilated with conventional ventilation (tidal volume 10 ml/kg). The lung injury model resulted in severe hypoxemia, increased airway pressures, pulmonary hypertension, and altered alveolar membrane barrier function, as indicated by an increased protein concentration in bronchoalveolar fluid, and increased wet/dry lung weight ratio. Histologic examination revealed severe diffuse alveolar damage, characteristic of ARDS. Veno-venous ECMO was started at the end of lung injury induction with a flow > 60 ml/kg/min resulting in rapid reversal of hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension. Mortality was 0, 66.6 and 16.6% in the SHAM, ALI and ALI + ECMO groups, respectively (p < 0.05). This is a novel clinically relevant animal model that can be used to optimize the approach to ECMO and foster translational research in extracorporeal lung support.

  11. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation improves survival in a novel 24-hour pig model of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Araos, Joaquín; Alegría, Leyla; García, Patricio; Damiani, Felipe; Tapia, Pablo; Soto, Dagoberto; Salomon, Tatiana; Rodriguez, Felipe; Amthauer, Macarena; Erranz, Benjamín; Castro, Gabriel; Carreño, Pamela; Medina, Tania; Retamal, Jaime; Cruces, Pablo; Bugedo, Guillermo; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly being used to treat severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, there is limited clinical evidence about how to optimize the technique. Experimental research can provide an alternative to fill the actual knowledge gap. The purpose of the present study was to develop and validate an animal model of acute lung injury (ALI) which resembled severe ARDS, and which could be successfully supported with ECMO. Eighteen pigs were randomly allocated into three groups: sham, ALI, and ALI + ECMO. ALI was induced by a double-hit consisting in repeated saline lavage followed by a 2-hour period of injurious ventilation. All animals were followed up to 24 hours while being ventilated with conventional ventilation (tidal volume 10 ml/kg). The lung injury model resulted in severe hypoxemia, increased airway pressures, pulmonary hypertension, and altered alveolar membrane barrier function, as indicated by an increased protein concentration in bronchoalveolar fluid, and increased wet/dry lung weight ratio. Histologic examination revealed severe diffuse alveolar damage, characteristic of ARDS. Veno-venous ECMO was started at the end of lung injury induction with a flow > 60 ml/kg/min resulting in rapid reversal of hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension. Mortality was 0, 66.6 and 16.6% in the SHAM, ALI and ALI + ECMO groups, respectively (p < 0.05). This is a novel clinically relevant animal model that can be used to optimize the approach to ECMO and foster translational research in extracorporeal lung support. PMID:27398166

  12. Oxygen uptake response to cycle ergometry in post-acute stroke patients with different severity of hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Kai; Weng, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Tien-Wen; Huang, Mao-Hsiung

    2013-11-01

    This study evaluated the impact of severity of hemiparesis on oxygen uptake (VO2) response in post-acute stroke patients. Sixty-four patients with a mean poststroke interval of 8.6 ± 3.8 days underwent a ramp cardiopulmonary exercise test on a cycling ergometer to volitional termination. Mean peak VO2 (VO2peak) and work efficiency (ΔVO2/ΔWR) were measured by open-circuit spirometry during standard upright ergometer cycling. Severity of the hemiparetic lower limb was assessed by Brunnstrom's motor recovery stages lower extremity (BMRSL). VO2peak was 10% lower in hemiparetic leg with BMRSL V than in that with BMRSL VI, 20% lower in BMRSL IV, and 50% lower in BMRSL III. ΔVO2/ΔWR was higher for the group with increased BMRSL. The relations were consistent after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, stroke type, hemiparetic side, modified Ashworth Scale, time poststroke, comorbidities, and medications. Our findings revealed that O2peak is dependent on the severity of hemiparesis in leg, and along with ΔO2/ΔWR closely related to the severity of hemiparesis in post-acute stroke patients, regardless of the types and locations of lesion after stroke, as well as the differences in comorbidities and medications. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Is acute static stretching able to reduce the time to exhaustion at power output corresponding to maximal oxygen uptake?

    PubMed

    Samogin Lopes, Felipe A; Menegon, Elton M; Franchini, Emerson; Tricoli, Valmor; de M Bertuzzi, Rômulo C

    2010-06-01

    This study analyzed the effect of an acute static stretching bout on the time to exhaustion (Tlim) at power output corresponding to VO2max. Eleven physically active male subjects (age 22.3+/-2.8 years, VO2max 2.7+/-0.5 L.min) completed an incremental cycle ergometer test, 2 muscle strength tests, and 2 maximal tests to exhaustion at power output corresponding to VO2max with and without a previous static stretching bout. The Tlim was not significantly affected by the static stretching (164+/-28 vs. 150+/-26 seconds with and without stretching, respectively, p=0.09), but the time to reach VO2max (118+/-22 vs. 102+/-25 seconds), blood-lactate accumulation immediately after exercise (10.7+/-2.9 vs. 8.0+/-1.7 mmol.L), and oxygen deficit (2.4+/-0.9 vs. 2.1+/-0.7 L) were significantly reduced (pacute static stretching bout did not reduce Tlim at power output corresponding to VO2max possibly by accelerating aerobic metabolism activation at the beginning of exercise. These results suggest that coaches and practitioners involved with aerobic dependent activities may use static stretching as part of their warm-up routines without fear of diminishing high-intensity aerobic exercise performance.

  14. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment of dogs has no effect on red cell deformability but causes an acute fluid shift.

    PubMed

    Martindale, V E; McKay, K

    1995-01-01

    Red blood cells respond to a number of perturbations, including hypoxia, with a reduction in deformability. Local hypoxia may become self-reinforcing, as hypoxic cells block capillaries preventing perfusion by oxygenated cells. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is frequently used to treat conditions involving some degree of local hypoxia, but does it have a direct effect on deformability? To investigate this, 12 normal dogs received a 10 week "clinical" course of HBO: one 90 min treatment per weekday at 2.4 ATA (243 kPa), 100% O2. On Mondays and Fridays, a blood sample was drawn into EDTA, centrifuged, and the packed red blood cells resuspended in medium to a dilution of 2 x 10(6) to 5 x 10(6) cells/ml, and filtered under constant of 1.08 kPa through a precalibrated Nucleopore Hemafil Polycarbonate membrane. Filtrate was collected for one minute and weighed, and the red blood cell "incremental volume" calculated according to Engstrom (Engstrom and Ohlsson, Pediatric Res. 27:220-226, 1990). No significant change was seen in filtration rates, indicating that HBO itself neither improves nor impairs dog red blood cell deformability. Changes in other commonly measured blood parameters remained within clinical norms. An acute fluid shift out of red blood cells and into plasma was indicated.

  15. Acute Myocardial Infarction Complicated by Cardiogenic Shock: An Algorithm-Based Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Program Can Improve Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Unai, Shinya; Tanaka, Daizo; Ruggiero, Nicholas; Hirose, Hitoshi; Cavarocchi, Nicholas C

    2016-03-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in our institution resulted in near total mortality prior to the establishment of an algorithm-based program in July 2010. We hypothesized that an algorithm-based ECMO program improves the outcome of patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated with cardiogenic shock. Between March 2003 and July 2013, 29 patients underwent emergent catheterization for acute myocardial infarction due to left main or proximal left anterior descending artery occlusion complicated with cardiogenic shock (defined as systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg despite multiple inotropes, with or without intra-aortic balloon pump, lactic acidosis). Of 29 patients, 15 patients were treated before July 2010 (Group 1, old program), and 14 patients were treated after July 2010 (Group 2, new program). There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics, including age, sex, coronary risk factors, and left ventricular ejection fraction between the two groups. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation prior to ECMO was performed in two cases (13%) in Group 1 and four cases (29%) in Group 2. ECMO support was performed in one case (6.7%) in Group 1 and six cases (43%) in Group 2. The 30-day survival of Group 1 versus Group 2 was 40 versus 79% (P = 0.03), and 1-year survival rate was 20 versus 56% (P = 0.01). The survival rate for patients who underwent ECMO was 0% in Group 1 versus 83% in Group 2 (P = 0.09). In Group 2, the mean duration on ECMO was 9.8 ± 5.9 days. Of the six patients who required ECMO in Group 2, 100% were successfully weaned off ECMO or were bridged to ventricular assist device implantation. Initiation of an algorithm-based ECMO program improved the outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock.

  16. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production by fish muscle mitochondria: Potential role in acute heat-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Banh, Sheena; Wiens, Lilian; Sotiri, Emianka; Treberg, Jason R

    2016-01-01

    Acute heat challenge is known to induce cell-level oxidative stress in fishes. Mitochondria are well known for the capacity to make reactive oxygen species (ROS) and as such are often implicated as a source of the oxidants associated with this thermally-induced oxidative stress. This implication is often asserted, despite little direct data for mitochondrial ROS metabolism in fishes. Here we characterize mitochondrial ROS metabolism in three Actinopterygian fish species at two levels, the capacity for superoxide/H2O2 production and the antioxidant thiol-reductase enzyme activities. We find that red muscle mitochondria from all three species have measurable ROS production and respond to different assay conditions consistent with what might be anticipated; assuming similar relative contributions from difference ROS producing sites as found in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria. Although there are species and assay specific exceptions, fish mitochondria may have a greater capacity to produce ROS than that found in the rat when either normalized to respiratory capacity or determined at a common assay temperature. The interspecific differences in ROS production are not correlated with thiol-based antioxidant reductase activities. Moreover, mimicking an acute in vivo heat stress by comparing the impact of increasing assay temperature on these processes in vitro, we find evidence supporting a preferential activation of mitochondrial H2O2 production relative to the increase in the capacity of reductase enzymes to supply electrons to the mitochondrial matrix peroxidases. This supports the contention that mitochondria may be, at least in part, responsible for the ROS that lead to oxidative stress in fish tissues exposed to acute heat challenge.

  17. Oxygen Sensing via the Ethylene Response Transcription Factor RAP2.12 Affects Plant Metabolism and Performance under Both Normoxia and Hypoxia1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Melanie Verena; Iyer, Srignanakshi; Lehmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Subgroup-VII-ethylene-response-factor (ERF-VII) transcription factors are involved in the regulation of hypoxic gene expression and regulated by proteasome-mediated proteolysis via the oxygen-dependent branch of the N-end-rule pathway. While research into ERF-VII mainly focused on their role to regulate anoxic gene expression, little is known on the impact of this oxygen-sensing system in regulating plant metabolism and growth. By comparing Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants overexpressing N-end-rule-sensitive and insensitive forms of the ERF-VII-factor RAP2.12, we provide evidence that oxygen-dependent RAP2.12 stability regulates central metabolic processes to sustain growth, development, and anoxic resistance of plants. (1) Under normoxia, overexpression of N-end-rule-insensitive Δ13RAP2.12 led to increased activities of fermentative enzymes and increased accumulation of fermentation products, which were accompanied by decreased adenylate energy states and starch levels, and impaired plant growth and development, indicating a role of oxygen-regulated RAP2.12 degradation to prevent aerobic fermentation. (2) In Δ13RAP2.12-overexpressing plants, decreased carbohydrate reserves also led to a decrease in anoxic resistance, which was prevented by external Suc supply. (3) Overexpression of Δ13RAP2.12 led to decreased respiration rates, changes in the levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, and accumulation of a large number of amino acids, including Ala and γ-amino butyric acid, indicating a role of oxygen-regulated RAP2.12 abundance in controlling the flux-modus of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. (4) The increase in amino acids was accompanied by increased levels of immune-regulatory metabolites. These results show that oxygen-sensing, mediating RAP2.12 degradation is indispensable to optimize metabolic performance, plant growth, and development under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. PMID:27372243

  18. Differences in prefrontal blood oxygenation during an acute multitasking stressor in ecstasy polydrug users.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C A; Wetherell, M A; Fisk, J E; Montgomery, C

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive deficits are well documented in ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine; MDMA) users, with such deficits being taken as evidence of dysregulation of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) system. More recently neuroimaging has been used to corroborate these deficits. The present study aimed to assess multitasking performance in ecstasy polydrug users, polydrug users and drug-naive individuals. It was predicted that ecstasy polydrug users would perform worse than non-users on the behavioural measure and this would be supported by differences in cortical blood oxygenation. In the study, 20 ecstasy-polydrug users, 17 polydrug users and 19 drug-naive individuals took part. On day 1, drug use history was taken and questionnaire measures were completed. On day 2, participants completed a 20-min multitasking stressor while brain blood oxygenation was measured using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). There were no significant differences between the three groups on the subscales of the multitasking stressor. In addition, there were no significant differences on self-report measures of perceived workload (NASA Task Load Index). In terms of mood, ecstasy users were significantly less calm and less relaxed compared with drug-naive controls. There were also significant differences at three voxels on the fNIRS, indicating decreased blood oxygenation in ecstasy users compared with drug-naive controls at voxel 2 (left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex), voxel 14 and voxel 16 (right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex), and compared with polydrug controls at V14. The results of the present study provide support for changes in brain activation during performance of demanding tasks in ecstasy polydrug users, which could be related to cerebral vasoconstriction.

  19. Whole body oxygen utilization during acute carbon monoxide poisoning and isocapneic nitrogen hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Halebian, P; Robinson, N; Barie, P; Goodwin, C; Shires, G T

    1986-02-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning occurs frequently in victims of enclosed space fires, resulting in the formation of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb). Based on in vitro studies it has been suggested that CO poisoning causes a left shift of the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve, decreasing peripheral oxygen extraction and exacerbating hypoxic injury. Formation of carboxycytochrome oxidase has also been postulated to act as a toxin by blocking cellular oxygen utilization. The effects of in vitro CO poisoning were evaluated in studies of 12 anesthetized, paralyzed dogs ventilated at 150 cc/kg/min. Six were subjected to CO poisoning by ventilation with a 0.5% CO in air inspirate. Six were ventilated with a mixture of air and nitrogen (N2) to produce a similar decrement of arterial oxyhemoglobin (aO2Hb) saturation. Arterial and mixed venous blood gases, thermal dilution cardiac output, and spectrophotometric arterial and mixed venous O2Hb and COHb saturation were measured. Oxygen consumption (VO2) and extraction (EXT) were calculated from these measurements and the CO and N2 groups were compared by ANOVA and Wilcoxon sign rank test as oxyhemoglobin was progressively decreased. There were no significant differences in VO2 or O2 EXT in these two sets of animals subjected to equivalent reductions of arterial oxyhemoglobin despite the fact that CO poisoning was the mode of desaturation in one group. These findings suggest that CO poisoning is primarily a hypoxic lesion caused by replacement of O2Hb by COHb. Effects predicted from in vitro studies may not be manifest in vivo due to physiologic responses active in the whole organism. This may have implications for the resuscitation of CO-injured patients.

  20. Acute effects of varying doses of propranolol upon oxygen haemoglobin affinity in man

    PubMed Central

    Brain, M. C.; Card, R. T.; Kane, J.; Lyonnais, J.; Dollery, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    1 The effect of propranolol 2 h following doses of 10, 30, or 100 mg upon the blood oxygen-haemoglobin dissociation curves has been studied in four normal subjects. 2 The pO2 at 50% saturation (p50) was not changed significantly under control conditions or after 10 and 100 mg doses. There was a just significant increase of 2 mmHg in the p50 value after the 30 mg dose. 3 There was no significant change in red cell adenosine triphosphate or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate nor in plasma phosphate. 4 There was no correlation between plasma propranolol concentration and changes in blood p50. PMID:22454871

  1. Oxygen-inducible glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase as protective switch transforming neurotoxic glutamate to metabolic fuel during acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Rink, Cameron; Gnyawali, Surya; Peterson, Laura; Khanna, Savita

    2011-05-15

    This work rests on our previous report (J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 30: 1275-1287, 2010) recognizing that glutamate (Glu) oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) is induced when brain tissue hypoxia is corrected during acute ischemic stroke (AIS). GOT can metabolize Glu into tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and may therefore be useful to harness excess neurotoxic extracellular Glu during AIS as a metabolic substrate. We report that in cultured neural cells challenged with hypoglycemia, extracellular Glu can support cell survival as long as there is sufficient oxygenation. This effect is abrogated by GOT knockdown. In a rodent model of AIS, supplemental oxygen (100% O(2) inhaled) during ischemia significantly increased GOT expression and activity in the stroke-affected brain tissue and prevented loss of ATP. Biochemical analyses and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy during stroke demonstrated that such elevated GOT decreased Glu levels at the stroke-affected site. In vivo lentiviral gene delivery of GOT minimized lesion volume, whereas GOT knockdown worsened stroke outcomes. Thus, brain tissue GOT emerges as a novel target in managing stroke outcomes. This work demonstrates that correction of hypoxia during AIS can help clear extracellular neurotoxic Glu by enabling utilization of this amino acid as a metabolic fuel to support survival of the hypoglycemic brain tissue. Strategies to mitigate extracellular Glu-mediated neurodegeneration via blocking receptor-mediated excitotoxicity have failed in clinical trials. We introduce the concept that under hypoglycemic conditions extracellular Glu can be transformed from a neurotoxin to a survival factor by GOT, provided there is sufficient oxygen to sustain cellular respiration.

  2. Use of two parallel oxygenators in a very large patient (2.76 m2) for an acute "A" dissecting aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Lonský, Vladimir; Mand'ák, Jiri; Kubícek, Jaroslav; Volt, Martin; Procházka, Egon; Dominik, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The very large patient (weight 142 kg, height 197 cm, body surface 2.76 m2) was referred to acute operation with dissecting type A ascending aortic aneurysm. The calculated blood flow was 6.63 l/min. To anticipate potential difficulties with perfusion and oxygenation two oxygenators connected in parallel were incorporated into the circuit. Bentall procedure with ACB to the RCA was performed. The perfusion was uneventful. Bypass time was 259 minutes, cross clamp time 141 minutes, circulatory arrest 7 minutes. The highest oxygenators gas flow was 2.6 l/min with maximum FiO2 0.42. The use of two in parallel connected oxygenators is a very effective, easy and safe method in such extreme perfusions, offering to the perfusionist a great reserve of oxygenator output.

  3. On the mechanisms that limit oxygen uptake during exercise in acute and chronic hypoxia: role of muscle mass

    PubMed Central

    Calbet, José A L; Rådegran, Göran; Boushel, Robert; Saltin, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    Peak aerobic power in humans () is markedly affected by inspired O2 tension (). The question to be answered in this study is what factor plays a major role in the limitation of muscle peak in hypoxia: arterial O2 partial pressure () or O2 content ()? Thus, cardiac output (dye dilution with Cardio-green), leg blood flow (thermodilution), intra-arterial blood pressure and femoral arterial-to-venous differences in blood gases were determined in nine lowlanders studied during incremental exercise using a large (two-legged cycle ergometer exercise: Bike) and a small (one-legged knee extension exercise: Knee) muscle mass in normoxia, acute hypoxia (AH) () and after 9 weeks of residence at 5260 m (CH). Reducing the size of the active muscle mass blunted by 62% the effect of hypoxia on in AH and abolished completely the effect of hypoxia on after altitude acclimatization. Acclimatization improved Bike peak exercise from 34 ± 1 in AH to 45 ± 1 mmHg in CH (P < 0.05) and Knee from 38 ± 1 to 55 ± 2 mmHg (P < 0.05). Peak cardiac output and leg blood flow were reduced in hypoxia only during Bike. Acute hypoxia resulted in reduction of systemic O2 delivery (46 and 21%) and leg O2 delivery (47 and 26%) during Bike and Knee, respectively, almost matching the corresponding reduction in . Altitude acclimatization restored fully peak systemic and leg O2 delivery in CH (2.69 ± 0.27 and 1.28 ± 0.11 l min−1, respectively) to sea level values (2.65 ± 0.15 and 1.16 ± 0.11 l min−1, respectively) during Knee, but not during Bike. During Knee in CH, leg oxygen delivery was similar to normoxia and, therefore, also in spite of a of 55 mmHg. Reducing the size of the active muscle mass improves pulmonary gas exchange during hypoxic exercise, attenuates the Bohr effect on oxygen uploading at the lungs and preserves sea level convective O2 transport to the active muscles. Thus, the altitude-acclimatized human has potentially a similar exercising capacity as at sea level when the

  4. Combined venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and transcatheter aortic valve implantation for the treatment of acute aortic prosthesis dysfunction in a high-risk patient.

    PubMed

    Pergolini, Amedeo; Zampi, Giordano; Tinti, Maria Denitza; Polizzi, Vincenzo; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Pontillo, Daniele; Musumeci, Francesco; Luzi, Giampaolo

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient with acute bioprosthesis dysfunction in cardiogenic shock, in whom hemodynamic support was provided by venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and successfully treated by transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Oxygen uptake and cardiovascular responses in control adults and acute myocardial infarction patients during bathing.

    PubMed

    Winslow, E H; Lane, L D; Gaffney, F A

    1985-01-01

    Physiological responses before, during, and after three types of baths were determined in 18 patients who were 5 to 17 days postinfarction and 22 control adults. In the patients, oxygen consumption (VO2) averaged 6, 7, and 7 ml/kg/min, peak heart rate 105, 108, and 112 beats per minute, and rate pressure product 115, 120, and 111 for basin, tub, and shower bathing, respectively. Oxygen consumption during bathing was less than 3 times resting levels. The patients had a significantly lower VO2 during bathing than the control subjects. The patients' peak heart rates were higher than anticipated for the level of exertion, and sometimes exceeded the target heart rates used in predischarge testing. Peak heart rate and occurrence of dysrhythmia did not differ significantly between the three types of baths. In the women patients, rate pressure product was significantly higher after tub bath than after basin bath or shower. The subjects had no cardiovascular symptoms during bathing, rated all three baths as light exertion, and disliked the basin bath. The data show that the physiologic costs of the three types of baths are similar, differences in responses to bathing seem more a function of subject variability than bath type, and many cardiac patients can take a tub bath or shower earlier in their hospitalization. However, more research is needed to predict patients likely to have an exaggerated response to bathing and to develop clear guidelines for bath method selection and progression.

  6. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Influence of Oxygen Pressure on Structural and Sensing Properties of β-Ga2O3 Nanomaterial by Thermal Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hai-Lin; Fan, Duo-Wang

    2009-11-01

    We prepare the gallium oxide (β-Ga2O3) nanomaterials from gallium and oxygen by thermal evaporation in the argon atmosphere and research their oxygen sensing under UV illumination with different oxygen pressures. X-ray diffraction reveals that the synthesized product is monoclinic gallium oxide, it is further confirmed by electron diffraction of transmission electron microscope, and its morphology through the observation using scanning electron microscope reveals that β-Ga2O3 nanobelts with a breadth less than 100 nm and length of several micrometers are synthesized under low oxygen pressure, while the nano/microbelts are synthesized under high oxygen pressure. Room-temperature oxygen sensing is tested under at 254 nm illumination and it is found that the current decreases quickly first and then slowly with oxygen pressure from low to high.

  7. [High flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy in the treatment of acute bronchiolitis in neonates].

    PubMed

    Bermúdez Barrezueta, Lorena; García Carbonell, Nuria; López Montes, Jorge; Gómez Zafra, Rafael; Marín Reina, Purificación; Herrmannova, Jana; Casero Soriano, Javier

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether the availability of heated humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy was associated with a decrease in need for mechanical ventilation in neonates hospitalised with acute bronchiolitis. A combined retrospective and prospective (ambispective) cohort study was performed in a type II-B Neonatal Unit, including hospitalised neonates with acute bronchiolitis after the introduction of HFNC (HFNC-period; October 2011-April 2015). They were compared with a historical cohort prior to the availability of this technique (pre-HFNC; January 2008-May 2011). The need for mechanical ventilation between the two study groups was analysed. Clinical parameters and technique-related complications were evaluated in neonates treated with HFNC. A total of 112 neonates were included, 56 after the introduction of HFNC and 56 from the period before the introduction of HFNC. None of patients in the HFNC-period required intubation, compared with 3.6% of the patients in the pre-HFNC group. The availability of HFNC resulted in a significant decrease in the need for non-invasive mechanical ventilation (30.4% vs 10.7%; P=.01), with a relative risk (RR) of .353 (95% CI; .150-.829), an absolute risk reduction (ARR) of 19.6% (95% CI; 5.13 - 34.2), yielding a NNT of 5. In the HFNC-period, 22 patients received high flow therapy, and 22.7% (95% CI; 7.8 to 45.4) required non-invasive ventilation. Treatment with HFNC was associated with a significant decrease in heart rate (P=.03), respiratory rate (P=.01), and an improvement in the Wood-Downes Férres score (P=.00). No adverse effects were observed. The availability of HFNC reduces the need for non-invasive mechanical ventilation, allowing a safe and effective medical management of neonates with acute bronchiolitis. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. [Dynamic oxygen tension in the brain of rats under acute hypobaric hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Kisliakov, Iu Ia; Popova, N I

    1990-10-01

    In unanesthetized rats at the "altitudes" of 4000 m (1st group) and 8000 m (2nd group), within 1.5 hrs the 1st group developed a 17-30% drop in the PO2 in 43% of cases, no changes occurred in 14% of cases, and in 43% the PO2 increased by 145-205%. In the 2nd group, the PO2 was decreased by 44-87%, on the average. The PO2 changes in the brain cortex under hypoxic conditions seems to have a phasic character as expressed by alternation of increased and decreased levels of the PO2 depending on the degree of hypoxia and induced, apparently, by systemic and local responses compensating for the lack of oxygen in the air.

  9. An immunohistochemical analysis of the neuroprotective effects of memantine, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and brimonidine after acute ischemia reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Erdenöz, Serkan; Uslu, Ünal; Oba, Ersin; Cumbul, Alev; Çağatay, Halil; Aktaş, Şamil; Eskicoğlu, Emiray

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study applies treatment methods to rat retinas subjected to acute ischemia reperfusion injury and compares the efficacy of memantine, hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy, and brimonidine by histopathological examination. Methods Thirty adult Wistar albino rats were divided into five groups after retinal ischemia was induced by elevating the intraocular pressure to 120 mmHg. The groups were as follows: group 1: control; group 2: acute retinal ischemia (ARI) model but without treatment group; group 3: memantine (MEM) treatment group; group 4: HBO therapy group; and group 5: brimonidine treatment (BRI) group. In the control group, right eyes were cannulated with a 30-gauge needle and removed without causing any intraocular pressure change. The ARI group was an acute retinal ischemia model, but without treatment. In the MEM group, animals were given a unique dose of intravenous 25 mg/kg memantine by the tail vein route after inducing ARI. In the HBO group, at 2 h following ARI, HBO treatment was applied for nine days. In the BRI group, a 0.15% brimonidine tartrate eye drop treatment was applied twice a day (BID) for seven days before ARI. Twenty-one days after establishing ischemia reperfusion, the right eyes were enucleated after the cardiac gluteraldehyde perfusion method, and then submitted to histological evaluation. Results On average, the total retinal ganglion cell number was 239.93±8.60 in the control group, 125.14±7.18 in the ARI group, 215.89±8.36 in the MEM group, 208.69±2.05 in the HBO group, and 172.27±8.16 in the BRI group. Mean apoptotic indexes in the groups were 1.1±0.35%, 57.71±0.58%, 23.57±1.73%, 15.63±0.58%, and 29.37±2.55%, respectively. Conclusions The present study shows that memantine, HBO, and brimonidine therapies were effective in reducing the damage induced by acute ischemia reperfusion in the rat retina. Our study suggests that these treatments had beneficial effects due to neuroprotection, and therefore may be applied

  10. Sol-gel synthesized Sr4Al14O25:Eu2+/Dy3+ blue-green phosphorous as oxygen sensing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Ilkyaz; Ertekin, Kadriye; Demirci, Selim; Gultekin, Serdar; Celik, Erdal

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we utilized newly synthesized Sr4Al14O25:Eu2+/Dy3+ blue-green phosphors along with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for fabrication of oxygen sensitive materials. To the best of our knowledge oxygen sensing mechanism of the offered design is totally different from the previously published works. One-component silicone: poly (1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne), two component phenyl bearing silicone, plasticized polymethylmethacrylate, and ethylcellulose (EC) were tested as matrix materials. Electrospun fibers, porous and smooth thin films were produced by electrospinning or knife coating technique. Oxygen induced luminescence of the phosphors at 544 nm was followed as the analytical signal. Utilization of silver nanoparticles in silicone along with phosphors resulted with a 7.14 fold enhancement in the signal intensity and significant spectral response towards oxygen competing with the signals of the oxygen sensors utilizing metalloporphyrins or ruthenium complexes. We observed high sensitivity and stability, increased surface area and an enhancement in all sensor dynamics. Linearity of the calibration plots was superior for the pO2 range of 0.0-20.0% with respect to the previously reported ones. When stored at the ambient air of the laboratory there was no significant drift in signal intensity after 12 months. Our sensitivity and stability tests are still in progress.

  11. Analysis of the hypoxia-induced ADH2 promoter of the respiratory yeast Pichia stipitis reveals a new mechanism for sensing of oxygen limitation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Passoth, Volkmar; Cohn, Marita; Schäfer, Bernd; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Klinner, Ulrich

    2003-01-15

    We introduced a reporter gene system into Pichia stipitis using the gene for the artificial green fluorescent protein (GFP), variant yEGFP. This system was used to analyse hypoxia-dependent PsADH2 regulation. Reporter gene activity was only found under oxygen limitation on a fermentable carbon source. The promoter was not induced by oxygen limitation in the Crabtree-positive yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Promoter deletions revealed that a region of 15 bp contained the essential site for hypoxic induction. This motif was different from the known hypoxia response elements of S. cerevisiae but showed some similarity to the mammalian HIF-1 binding site. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated specific protein binding to this region under oxygen limitation. Similar to the S. cerevisiae heme sensor system, the promoter was induced by Co(2+). Cyanide was not able to mimic the effect of oxygen limitation. The activation mechanism of PsADH2 also, in this respect, has similarities to the mammalian HIF-1 system, which is inducible by Co(2+) but not by cyanide. Thus, the very first promoter analysis in P. stipitis revealed a hitherto unknown mechanism of oxygen sensing in yeast.

  12. Highly distributed multi-point, temperature and pressure compensated, fiber optic oxygen sensors (FOxSense) for aircraft fuel tank environment and safety monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Kempen, Cornelia; Sun, Sunjian; Esterkin, Yan

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes recent progress towards the development and qualification of a highly distributed, multi-point, all optical pressure and temperature compensated, fiber optic oxygen sensor (FOxSense™) system for closed-loop monitoring and safety of the oxygen ullage environment inside fuel tanks of military and commercial aircraft. The alloptical FOxSense™ system uses a passive, multi-parameter (O2/T&P) fiber optic sensor probe with no electrical connections leading to the sensors install within the fuel tanks of an aircraft. The all optical sensor consists of an integrated multi-parameter fiber optic sensor probe that integrates a fuel insensitive fluorescence based optical oxygen optrode with built-in temperature and pressure optical optrodes for compensation of temperature and pressure variants induced in the fluorescence response of the oxygen optrode. The distributed (O2/T&P) fiber optic sensors installed in the fuel tanks of the aircraft are connected to the FOxSense optoelectronic system via a fiber optic cable conduit reaching to each fuel tank in the aircraft. A multichannel frequency-domain fiber optic sensor read-out (FOxSense™) system is used to interrogate the optical signal of all three sensors in real-time and to display the fuel tank oxygen environment suitable for aircraft status and alarm applications. Preliminary testing of the all optical fiber optic oxygen sensor have demonstrated the ability to monitor the oxygen environment inside a simulated fuel tank in the range of 0% O2 to 40% O2 concentrations, temperatures from (-) 40°C to (+) 60°C, and altitudes from 0-ft to 40,000-ft.

  13. Acute post-exercise oxygen uptake, hormone and plasma metabolite response in obese men.

    PubMed

    Lanzi, S; Codecasa, F; Cornacchia, M; Maestrini, S; Salvadori, A; Fanari, P; Brunani, A; Malatesta, D

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to compare oxygen uptake (  VO2), hormone and plasma metabolite responses during the 30 min after submaximal incremental exercise (Incr) performed at the same relative/absolute exercise intensity and duration in lean (L) and obese (O) men. Eight L and 8 O men (BMI: 22.9 ± 0.4; 37.2 ± 1.8 kg · m(-2)) completed Incr and were then seated for 30 min.   VO2 was monitored during the first 10 min and from the 25-30(th) minutes of recovery. Blood samples were drawn for the determination of hormone (catecholamines, insulin) and plasma metabolite (NEFA, glycerol) concentrations. Excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) magnitude during the first 10 min was similar in O and in L (3.5 ± 0.4; 3.4 ± 0.3 liters, respectively, p=0.86). When normalized to percent change (  VO2END=100%), %   VO2END during recovery was significantly higher from 90-120 s in O than in L (p ≤ 0.04). There were no significant differences in catecholamines (p ≥ 0.24), whereas insulin was significantly higher in O than in L during recovery (p=0.01). The time-course of glycerol was similar from 10-30 min of recovery (-42% for L; -41% for O, p=0.85), whereas significantly different patterns of NEFA were found from 10-30 min of recovery between groups (-18% for L; +8% for O, p=0.03). Despite similar EPOC, a difference in   VO2 modulation between groups was observed, likely due to faster initial rates of   VO2 decline in L than in O. The different patterns of NEFA between groups may suggest a lower NEFA reesterification during recovery in O, which was not involved in the rapid EPOC component. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Identifying an Oxygenation Index Threshold for Increased Mortality in Acute Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Brandon G; Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Kang, Paul; Rao, Mounica Y; Willis, Brigham C; Dalton, Heidi J

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this work was to examine current oxygenation index (OI) data and outcomes using electronic medical record data to identify a specific OI value associated with mortality. This study was a retrospective electronic medical record data review from the pediatric ICU of Phoenix Children's Hospital, with data mining for variables to calculate OIs on subjects age 1 month to 20 y mechanically ventilated > 24 h, excluding those with known intracardiac shunts or cyanotic heart disease. Age, length of hospital stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, and outcomes were also assessed. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare continuous variables, receiver operating characteristic analysis was used in determining discriminant ability, and logistic regression was conducted to determine the odds ratio (OR) for risk of death with increasing OI. OI was calculated on 65 subjects, of whom 6 died (9%). The median maximum OI was 10 for all subjects, 17 for non-survivors, and 8 for survivors (P = .14 via Wilcoxon rank-sum test). ORs indicated a 2.4-fold increase in the odds of death (P = .09, 95% CI 0.9-6.6) for each increasing point in maximum OI. Mean OI OR revealed a 1.9-fold increase in the odds of death (P = .25, 95% CI 0.6-5.9). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated a higher discriminate ability for maximum OI (area under the curve = 0.68) than mean OI (area under the curve = 0.58). OI cut-points for mortality were established. Mortality was unchanged until maximum OI > 17, for which mortality nearly tripled at a value of 18% versus 6-7% for range 0-17. Limitations exist in obtaining serial OI values from current electronic medical records. Serial assessment of OI values may allow creation of alert values for increased mortality risk. Consideration of escalation of therapies for respiratory failure, such as high-frequency ventilation, inhaled nitric oxide, or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation may be warranted at lower OIs than historically

  15. Oxygen or cooling, to make a decision after acute ischemia stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-cao; Jin, Xin-chun

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a salvageable penumbra, a region of ischemic brain tissue with sufficient energy for short-term survival, has been widely agreed as the premise for thrombolytic therapy with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), which remains the only United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved treatment for acute ischemia stroke. However, the use of tPA has been profoundly constrained due to its narrow therapeutic time window and the increased risk of potentially deadly hemorrhagic transformation (HT). Blood brain barrier (BBB) damage within the thrombolytic time window is an indicator for tPA-induced HT and both normobaric hyperoxia (NBO) and hypothermia have been shown to protect the BBB from ischemia/reperfusion injury. Therefore, providing the O2 as soon as possible (NBO treatment), freezing the brain (hypothermia treatment) to slow down ischemia-induced BBB damage or their combined use may extend the time window for the treatment of tPA. In this review, we summarize the protective effects of NBO, hypothermia or their use combined with tPA on ischemia stroke, based on which, the combination of NBO and hypothermia may be an ideal early stroke treatment to preserve the ischemic penumbra. Given this, there is an urge for large randomized controlled trials to address the effect. PMID:28217292

  16. Reactive oxygen species, Ca(2+) stores and acute pancreatitis; a step closer to therapy?

    PubMed

    Criddle, David N

    2016-09-01

    Disruption of Ca(2+) homeostasis can lead to severe damage of the pancreas, resulting in premature activation of digestive enzymes, vacuolisation and necrotic cell death, features typical of acute pancreatitis (AP). Therefore a fine balance between Ca(2+) release from internal stores, Ca(2+) entry and extrusion mechanisms is necessary to avoid injury. Precipitants of AP induce Ca(2+) overload of the pancreatic acinar cell that causes mitochondrial dysfunction, via formation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), loss of ATP production and consequent necrosis. Oxidative stress has been shown to occur in the development of AP and may modify Ca(2+) signalling events in the acinar cell. However, the precise pathophysiological involvement is currently unclear and antioxidant therapy in the clinic has largely proved ineffective. Possible reasons for this are discussed, including evidence that ROS generation may determine cell death patterns. In contrast, recent evidence has indicated the potential for AP therapy via the prevention of Ca(2+)-dependent mitochondrial damage. Multiple approaches are indicated from preclinical findings; 1) inhibition of Ca(2+) release by IP3R blockade, 2) inhibition of Ca(2+) entry through Orai1 blockade and 3) prevention of MPTP formation. Clinical trials of drugs which prevent mitochondrial dysfunction induced by Ca(2+) overload of pancreatic acinar cells are imminent and may provide patient benefit for a disease that currently lacks specific therapy. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Fractal dimension of EEG activity senses neuronal impairment in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Zappasodi, Filippo; Olejarczyk, Elzbieta; Marzetti, Laura; Assenza, Giovanni; Pizzella, Vittorio; Tecchio, Franca

    2014-01-01

    The brain is a self-organizing system which displays self-similarities at different spatial and temporal scales. Thus, the complexity of its dynamics, associated to efficient processing and functional advantages, is expected to be captured by a measure of its scale-free (fractal) properties. Under the hypothesis that the fractal dimension (FD) of the electroencephalographic signal (EEG) is optimally sensitive to the neuronal dysfunction secondary to a brain lesion, we tested the FD's ability in assessing two key processes in acute stroke: the clinical impairment and the recovery prognosis. Resting EEG was collected in 36 patients 4-10 days after a unilateral ischemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory and 19 healthy controls. National Health Institute Stroke Scale (NIHss) was collected at T0 and 6 months later. Highuchi FD, its inter-hemispheric asymmetry (FDasy) and spectral band powers were calculated for EEG signals. FD was smaller in patients than in controls (1.447±0.092 vs 1.525±0.105) and its reduction was paired to a worse acute clinical status. FD decrease was associated to alpha increase and beta decrease of oscillatory activity power. Larger FDasy in acute phase was paired to a worse clinical recovery at six months. FD in our patients captured the loss of complexity reflecting the global system dysfunction resulting from the structural damage. This decrease seems to reveal the intimate nature of structure-function unity, where the regional neural multi-scale self-similar activity is impaired by the anatomical lesion. This picture is coherent with neuronal activity complexity decrease paired to a reduced repertoire of functional abilities. FDasy result highlights the functional relevance of the balance between homologous brain structures' activities in stroke recovery.

  18. Fractal Dimension of EEG Activity Senses Neuronal Impairment in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zappasodi, Filippo; Olejarczyk, Elzbieta; Marzetti, Laura; Assenza, Giovanni; Pizzella, Vittorio; Tecchio, Franca

    2014-01-01

    The brain is a self-organizing system which displays self-similarities at different spatial and temporal scales. Thus, the complexity of its dynamics, associated to efficient processing and functional advantages, is expected to be captured by a measure of its scale-free (fractal) properties. Under the hypothesis that the fractal dimension (FD) of the electroencephalographic signal (EEG) is optimally sensitive to the neuronal dysfunction secondary to a brain lesion, we tested the FD’s ability in assessing two key processes in acute stroke: the clinical impairment and the recovery prognosis. Resting EEG was collected in 36 patients 4–10 days after a unilateral ischemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory and 19 healthy controls. National Health Institute Stroke Scale (NIHss) was collected at T0 and 6 months later. Highuchi FD, its inter-hemispheric asymmetry (FDasy) and spectral band powers were calculated for EEG signals. FD was smaller in patients than in controls (1.447±0.092 vs 1.525±0.105) and its reduction was paired to a worse acute clinical status. FD decrease was associated to alpha increase and beta decrease of oscillatory activity power. Larger FDasy in acute phase was paired to a worse clinical recovery at six months. FD in our patients captured the loss of complexity reflecting the global system dysfunction resulting from the structural damage. This decrease seems to reveal the intimate nature of structure-function unity, where the regional neural multi-scale self-similar activity is impaired by the anatomical lesion. This picture is coherent with neuronal activity complexity decrease paired to a reduced repertoire of functional abilities. FDasy result highlights the functional relevance of the balance between homologous brain structures’ activities in stroke recovery. PMID:24967904

  19. The acute effects of nicotine, tobacco smoke and carbon monoxide on myocardial oxygen tension in the anaesthetized cat

    PubMed Central

    Rink, Richard D.

    1978-01-01

    1 The acute effects of nicotine, tobacco smoke, and carbon monoxide on myocardial oxygen tension (MPo2) were estimated amperometrically in 33 anaesthetized open-chest cats with a glass-insulated 25 μm platinum cathode within a 22-gauge needle implanted in the left ventricular wall. 2 MPo2 was 1.6-60 mmHg (mean 23.5 mmHg) when arterial Po2 was >80 mmHg. Sequential intravenous infusions of nicotine (2-3 μg/kg every 45 s) or intracheal puffs (3-5 ml) of tobacco smoke commonly produced transitory increases (25-35 mmHg) of arterial pressure and 4-6 mmHg increments of MPo2. Intratracheal puffs (5 ml) of 5% carbon monoxide sufficient to increase carboxyhaemoglobin from 0.8 to 1.5% to 4-7% had no effect on arterial Po2 or blood pressure but typically decreased MPo2 by approximately 1-4 mmHg. Augmentation of MPo2 often succeeded carbon monoxide administration. 3 Arterial hypoxia (arterial Po2 < 60 mmHg) reduced mean MPo2 to 14.4 mmHg but anoxic levels were not observed. Pressor responses to nicotine and tobacco smoke were accompanied by small increases (usually 1-3 mmHg) of MPo2. Puffs of 5% carbon monoxide had less effect than during normoxia. Locations of low MPo2 (<10 mmHg) were unaffected as carboxyhaemoglobin was raised to 7-11% during hypoxaemia. 4 It is concluded that nicotine and tobacco smoke cause augmentation of myocardial oxygen supply, even during moderate hypoxaemia. By contrast, smoking dosages of carbon monoxide have the potential of producing a small reduction of MPo2 during normoxia, but the effect is negligible during moderate hypoxaemia. PMID:656704

  20. Resveratrol attenuates early pyramidal neuron excitability impairment and death in acute rat hippocampal slices caused by oxygen-glucose deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huaqiu; Schools, Gary P.; Lei, Ting; Wang, Wei; Kimelberg, Harold; Zhou, Min

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the polyphenol resveratrol (trans-3, 5, 4′-trihydroxystibene, RVT) potently protects against cerebral ischemia neuronal damage due to its oxygen free radicals scavenging and antioxidant properties. However, it is unknown whether RVT can attenuate ischemia-induced early impairment of neuronal excitability. To address this question, we simulated ischemic conditions by applying oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) to acute rat hippocampal slices and examined the effect of RVT on OGD-induced pyramidal neuron excitability impairment using whole-cell patch clamp recording. 100 μM RVT largely inhibited the 15 min OGD-induced progressive membrane potential (Vm) depolarization and the reduction in evoked action potential frequency and amplitude in pyramidal neurons. In the parallel neuronal viability study using TO-PRO-3 iodide staining, 20 min OGD induced irreversible CA1 pyramidal neuronal death which was significantly reduced by 100 μM RVT. No similar effects were found with PQQ treatment, an antioxidant also showing potent neuroprotection in the rat rMCAO ischemia model. This suggests that antioxidant action per se, is unlikely accounting for the observed early effects of RVT. RVT also markedly reduced the frequency and amplitude of AMPA mediated spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in pyramidal neurons, which is also an early consequence of OGD. RVT effects on neuronal excitability were inhibited by the large conductance potassium channel (BK channel) inhibitor paxilline. Together, these studies demonstrate that RVT attenuates OGD induced neuronal impairment occurring early in the simulated ischemia slice model by enhancing the activation of BK channel and reducing the OGD-enhanced AMPA/NMDA receptor mediated neuronal EPSCs. PMID:18495119

  1. Outcome of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use in acute respiratory distress syndrome after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Song, Joo Han; Woo, Won Ki; Song, Seung Hwan; Kim, Hyo Hyun; Kim, Bong Joon; Kim, Ha Eun; Kim, Do Jung; Suh, Jee Won; Shin, Yu Rim; Park, Han Ki; Lee, Seung Hyun; Joo, Hyun Chel; Lee, Sak; Chang, Byung Chul; Yoo, Kyung Jong; Kim, Young Sam

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is a known risk factor for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We aimed to analyze the treatment outcome in patients who required veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) for postcardiotomy ARDS despite other rescue modalities. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 13 patients (mean age, 54.7±5.9 years) who received VV-ECMO support for refractory ARDS after cardiac surgery between March 2013 and February 2016 at Severance Hospital, Yonsei University (Seoul, Korea). Results At the start of VV-ECMO, the average lung injury score was 3.0±0.2, and the Respiratory Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Survival Prediction (RESP) score was −4±1.1. Although 7 patients initiated VV-ECMO support within 24 h from operation, the remaining 6 started at a median of 8.5 days (range, 5−16 days). Nine (69.3%) patients were successfully weaned from VV-ECMO. After a median follow-up duration of 14.5 months (range, 1.0−33.0 months) for survivors, the 1-year overall survival was 58.6%±14.4%. The differences in the overall survival from VV-ECMO according to the RESP score risk classes were borderline significant (100% in class III, 50%±25% in class IV, and 20%±17.9% in class V; P=0.088). Conclusions VV-ECMO support can be a feasible rescue strategy for adult patients who develop refractory ARDS after a cardiac surgery. Additionally, the RESP score seems a valuable prognostic tool for post-ECMO survival outcome in this patient population as well. PMID:27499972

  2. Sensing properties of an oxygen sensor using BaCe{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3{minus}{alpha}} ceramics as electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Noboru; Yasumoto, Eiichi; Nakagiri, Yasushi; Gamo, Takaharu

    1998-05-01

    Limiting-current-type oxygen sensors using BaCe{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3{minus}{alpha}} (BCG) ceramics as electrolytes were constructed on a trial basis and their sensing properties investigated in order to develop a new oxygen sensor to replace the zirconia type. BCG ceramics exhibited high conductivity in the temperature range 200--1,000 C, and it was verified that the oxide ion could be a conductive carrier in BCG in oxygen at low temperatures (300 C). The oxygen sensors using BCGs worked at 300 C, and their output currents linearly increased with an increase in oxygen concentration in the range 1--22%. They could respond within 30 s between 1 and 21%, and humidity only slightly affected sensing performance. BCG seems to be a promising electrolyte material for an oxygen sensor operating at low temperatures (300 C).

  3. Cognitive functions and cerebral oxygenation changes during acute and prolonged hypoxic exposure.

    PubMed

    Davranche, Karen; Casini, Laurence; Arnal, Pierrick J; Rupp, Thomas; Perrey, Stéphane; Verges, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to assess specific cognitive processes (cognitive control and time perception) and hemodynamic correlates using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) during acute and prolonged high-altitude exposure. Eleven male subjects were transported via helicopter and dropped at 14 272 ft (4 350 meters) of altitude where they stayed for 4 days. Cognitive tasks, involving a conflict task and temporal bisection task, were performed at sea level the week before ascending to high altitude, the day of arrival (D0), the second (D2) and fourth (D4) day at high altitude. Cortical hemodynamic changes in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) area were monitored with fNIRS at rest and during the conflict task. Results showed that high altitude impacts information processing in terms of speed and accuracy. In the early hours of exposure (D0), participants displayed slower reaction times (RT) and decision errors were twice as high. While error rate for simple spontaneous responses remained twice that at sea level, the slow-down of RT was not detectable after 2 days at high-altitude. The larger fNIRS responses from D0 to D2 suggest that higher prefrontal activity partially counteracted cognitive performance decrements. Cognitive control, assessed through the build-up of a top-down response suppression mechanism, the early automatic response activation and the post-error adjustment were not impacted by hypoxia. However, during prolonged hypoxic exposure the temporal judgments were underestimated suggesting a slowdown of the internal clock. A decrease in cortical arousal level induced by hypoxia could consistently explain both the slowdown of the internal clock and the persistence of a higher number of errors after several days of exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhanced sensitivity with fast three-dimensional blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional MRI: comparison of SENSE-PRESTO and 2D-EPI at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Neggers, Sebastiaan F W; Hermans, Erno J; Ramsey, Nick F

    2008-08-01

    A major impetus in functional MRI development is to enhance sensitivity to changes in neural activity. One way to improve sensitivity is to enhance contrast to noise ratio, for instance by increasing field strength or the number of receiving coils. If these parameters are fixed, there is still the possibility to optimize scans by altering speed or signal strength [signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)]. We here demonstrate a very fast whole-brain scan, by combining a three-dimensional (3D)-PRESTO (principle of echo shifting with a train of observations) pulse sequence with a commercial eight-channel head coil and sensitivity encoding (SENSE). 3D-PRESTO uses time optimally by means of echo shifting. Moreover, 3D scans can accommodate SENSE in two directions, reducing scan time proportionally. The present PRESTO-SENSE sequence achieves full brain coverage within 500 ms. We compared this with a two-dimensional (2D) echo planar imaging (EPI) scan with identical brain coverage on 10 volunteers. Resting-state temporal SNR in the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) frequency range and T-statistics for thumb movement and visual checkerboard activations were compared. Results show improved temporal SNR across the brain for PRESTO-SENSE compared with EPI. The percentage signal change and relative standard deviation of the noise were smaller for PRESTO-SENSE. Sensitivity for brain activation, as reflected by T-values, was consistently higher for PRESTO, and this seemed to be mainly due to the increased number of observations within a fixed time period. We conclude that PRESTO accelerated with SENSE in two directions can be more sensitive to BOLD signal changes than the widely used 2D-EPI, when a fixed amount of time is available for functional MRI scanning. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Efficacy of high-flow oxygen by nasal cannula with active humidification in a patient with acute respiratory failure of neuromuscular origin.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Lobato, Salvador; Folgado, Miguel Angel; Chapa, Angel; Mayoralas Alises, Sagrario

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of choice for patients with respiratory failure of neuromuscular origin, especially in patients with hypercapnic respiratory acidosis, is noninvasive ventilation (NIV). Endotracheal intubation and invasive ventilation are indicated for patients with severe respiratory compromise or failure of NIV. In recent years, high-flow oxygen therapy and active humidification devices have been introduced, and emerging evidence suggests that high-flow oxygen may be effective in various clinical settings, such as acute respiratory failure, after cardiac surgery, during sedation and analgesia, in acute heart failure, in hypoxemic respiratory distress, in do-not-intubate patients, in patients with chronic cough and copious secretions, pulmonary fibrosis, or cancer, in critical areas and the emergency department. We report on a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who arrived at the emergency department with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. She did not tolerate NIV and refused intubation, but was treated successfully with heated, humidified oxygen via high-flow nasal cannula. Arterial blood analysis after an hour on high-flow nasal cannula showed improved pH, P(aCO2), and awareness. The respiratory acidosis was corrected, and she was discharged after 5 days of hospitalization. Her response to high-flow nasal cannula was similar to that expected with NIV. We discuss the mechanisms of action of heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy.

  6. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy after Acute Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury: Improvement of Locomotor Recovery in Rats.

    PubMed

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Figueiró, Manuela Peletti; da Silva, Pedro Guarise; Conzatti, Lucas Piccoli; Rizkalla, Elisa Braun; Santos, Scheila Cardoso Dos; de Quadros, Francine Würzius; Radaelli, Lucas

    2017-08-23

    controlled laboratory study. analyse the effectiveness of HT using mild and moderate models of SCI. Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) can cause permanent impairment with socioeconomic consequences. The motor deficit occurs by two mechanisms: destruction of neuronal cells and local inflammatory response, resulting in hypoxia. Hyperbaric Therapy (HT) acts by increasing oxygen in the injured area. thoracic laminectomy was performed in 72 female Wistar rats. The MASCIS impactor was used at 12.5 mm (n = 35) and 25 mm (n = 35) of height to perform, respectively, mild and moderate SCI. Muscle strength was assessed through the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scale (BBB) on days 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after SCI. The animals were randomized into 5 subgroups with seven animals each: (1) control group had SCI without HT; (2) HT 30 minutes after SCI; (3) HT 30 minutes after SCI and daily for 7 days; (4) HT 12 hours after SCI; and (5) HT 12 hours after SCI and daily for 7 days. HT was performed at 2.5 atm for one hour. there was a linear relationship between injury severity and motor deficit until day 21, with similar BBB scores on day 28. A pattern of uniform lesions was observed in the mild SCI, with lower variation of BBB when compared to moderate SCI. All animals that underwent HT had significant improvement in motor function and histology when compared to control group. Regardless of the injury model, animals submitted to 7-day protocols had an early improvement in motor function and a smaller area of histological injury. the present study reported that the sooner HT is begun after mild and moderate SCI and the larger the number of sessions, the greater and earlier is the motor recovery and smaller is the tissue injury. N/A.

  7. [A simple and controllable method for reproduction of a model of high oxygen tension induced acute lung injury].

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoyue; Mou, Shengxu; Chen, Miao; Hui, Yue; Mei, Hong; Qin, Song; Chen, Tao

    2016-01-01

    To explore a simpler, more economic and reproducible method to reproduce a model of high oxygen induced acute lung injury (HALI) in rats. An animal feeding box equipped with a controllable high oxygen was designed. 100 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into normal control group and HALI group by random number table method, with 50 rats in each group. Each group was randomly subdivided into five subgroups according to the duration of exposure to high oxygen, namely 0, 24, 48, 72 and 96-hour subgroups, with 10 rats in each subgroup. The rats in normal control group were kept in cages with ambient air, and the rats in HALI group were kept in an oxygen tank in which the oxygen concentration was higher than 90% volume ratio, with the temperature maintained at 25-27?centigrade, humidity of 50%-70%, and CO2 concentration < 0.5% for 23.5 hours every day. The arterial blood of rats was collected for analysis of blood gas at all time points, and the oxygenation index (OI) and respiratory index (RI) were calculated. Then the rats were sacrificed and the right lung was harvested, which was sectioned and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE). The changes in histopathology were observed with light microscopy, and pathological score was recorded. The left lung was harvested for the measurement of the wet/dry weight ratio (W/D). With the prolongation of high oxygen exposure time, the degree of lung injury in HALI group was gradually increased, and the degree of derangement of alveolar structure appeared in an increasing degree, with destruction of the alveolar wall, widening of alveolar space, and appearance of edema, and inflammatory cell infiltration. A small quantity of red blood cells exudation could be found in some rats. The pathologic changes were most obvious at 48-72 hours after exposure. With the prolongation of high oxygen exposure time (0, 24, 48, 72, 96 hours), the OI (mmHg, 1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa) in HALI group was gradually decreased (446.67±29.93, 306.19±37

  8. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as Bridge-to-Decision in Acute Heart Failure due to Systemic Light-Chain Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jennifer Mancio; Fontes-Carvalho, Ricardo; Valente, Dília; Almeida, Cristiana; Cruz, António José; Tente, David; Coelho, Henrique; Oliveira, Marco; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Ribeiro, Vasco Gama

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 58 Final Diagnosis: Acute hear failure Symptoms: Dispnoea • edema • fatigue Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Bone marrow biopsy • endomyocardial biopsy • abdominal subcutaneous fat biopsy under ECMO support Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Cardiac amyloidosis results from the amyloid deposition in heart tissue, either in the context of a systemic disease or as a localized form. Several pro-amyloid proteins can produce amyloid deposits in the heart. Each of these amyloidoses has characteristic clinical (cardiac and extracardiac) features, and a specific diagnosis and treatment. Case Report: A 58-year-old woman who presented with acute heart failure and echocardiographic findings strongly suggestive of infiltrative cardiomyopathy needed percutaneous veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as bridge-to-decision. Amyloid deposition was found on endomyocardial and bone marrow biopsies. Bone marrow plasma cell infiltrate with acute renal lesion and hypercalcemia confirmed the diagnosis of multiple myeloma-associated systemic light-chain amyloidosis (AL). Refractory shock with multi-organic failure syndrome persisted and no improvements in left ventricular function and structure were seen. After extensive discussion by a multidisciplinary team, and with the patients’ family, she was not considered eligible for high-dose chemotherapy and/or autologous stem cell transplantation, heart transplantation, or sequential heart with autologous stem cell transplantation. The patient died a few hours after ECMO withdrawal. During the 14 days of ECMO support no major bleeding or thrombotic complications occurred. Conclusions: The clinician must consider a diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis in patients with heart failure, a restrictive type of cardiomyopathy with ventricular hypertrophy in the absence of valve abnormalities, or uncontrolled arterial hypertension. Although developments in chemotherapy have greatly

  9. Acute supplementation of N-acetylcysteine does not affect muscle blood flow and oxygenation characteristics during handgrip exercise.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua R; Broxterman, Ryan M; Ade, Carl J; Evans, Kara K; Kurti, Stephanie P; Hammer, Shane M; Barstow, Thomas J; Harms, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC; antioxidant and thiol donor) supplementation has improved exercise performance and delayed fatigue, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. One possibility isNACsupplementation increases limb blood flow during severe-intensity exercise. The purpose was to determine ifNACsupplementation affected exercising arm blood flow and muscle oxygenation characteristics. We hypothesized thatNACwould lead to higher limb blood flow and lower muscle deoxygenation characteristics during severe-intensity exercise. Eight healthy nonendurance trained men (21.8 ± 1.2 years) were recruited and completed two constant power handgrip exercise tests at 80% peak power until exhaustion. Subjects orally consumed either placebo (PLA) orNAC(70 mg/kg) 60 min prior to handgrip exercise. Immediately prior to exercise, venous blood samples were collected for determination of plasma redox balance. Brachial artery blood flow (BABF) was measured via Doppler ultrasound and flexor digitorum superficialis oxygenation characteristics were measured via near-infrared spectroscopy. FollowingNACsupplementaiton, plasma cysteine (NAC: 47.2 ± 20.3 μmol/L vs.PLA: 9.6 ± 1.2 μmol/L;P = 0.001) and total cysteine (NAC: 156.2 ± 33.9 μmol/L vs.PLA: 132.2 ± 16.3 μmol/L;P = 0.048) increased. Time to exhaustion was not significantly different (P = 0.55) betweenNAC(473.0 ± 62.1 sec) andPLA(438.7 ± 58.1 sec). RestingBABFwas not different (P = 0.79) withNAC(99.3 ± 31.1 mL/min) andPLA(108.3 ± 46.0 mL/min).BABFwas not different (P = 0.42) during exercise or at end-exercise (NAC: 413 ± 109 mL/min;PLA: 445 ± 147 mL/min). Deoxy-[hemoglobin+myoglobin] and total-[hemoglobin+myoglobin] were not significantly different (P = 0.73 andP = 0.54, respectively) at rest or during exercise between conditions. We conclude that acuteNACsupplementation does not alter oxygen delivery during exercise in men.

  10. Aspartate 141 Is the Fourth Ligand of the Oxygen-sensing [4Fe-4S]2+ Cluster of Bacillus subtilis Transcriptional Regulator Fnr*

    PubMed Central

    Gruner, Ines; Frädrich, Claudia; Böttger, Lars H.; Trautwein, Alfred X.; Jahn, Dieter; Härtig, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis redox regulator Fnr controls genes of the anaerobic metabolism in response to low oxygen tension. An unusual structure for the oxygen-sensing [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster was detected by a combination of genetic experiments with UV-visible and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Asp-141 was identified as the fourth iron-sulfur cluster ligand besides three Cys residues. Exchange of Asp-141 with Ala abolished functional in vivo complementation of an fnr knock-out strain by the mutagenized fnr gene and in vitro DNA binding of the recombinant regulator FnrD141A. In contrast, substitution of Asp-141 with Cys preserved [4Fe-4S]2+ structure and regulator function. PMID:21068385

  11. The FixL protein of Rhizobium meliloti can be separated into a heme-binding oxygen-sensing domain and a functional C-terminal kinase domain.

    PubMed Central

    Monson, E K; Weinstein, M; Ditta, G S; Helinski, D R

    1992-01-01

    Transcription of nitrogen fixation (nif and fix) genes in Rhizobium meliloti is induced by a decrease in oxygen concentration. The products of two genes, fixL and fixJ, are responsible for sensing and transmitting the low-oxygen signal. The proteins encoded by fixL and fixJ (FixL and FixJ, respectively) are homologous to a family of bacterial proteins that transduce environmental signals through a common phosphotransfer mechanism [David, M., Daveran, M., Batut, J., Dedieu, A., Domergue, O., Ghai, J., Hertig, C., Boistard, P. & Khan, D. (1988) Cell 54, 671-683]. FixL, the oxygen sensor, is a membrane protein. It has previously been shown that a soluble derivative of FixL, FixL*, is an oxygen-binding hemoprotein and a kinase that autophosphorylates and also phosphorylates FixJ [Gilles-Gonzalez, M. A., Ditta, G. S. & Helinski, D. R. (1991) Nature (London) 350, 170-172]. In this work, deletion derivatives of fixL* were constructed and overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the truncated proteins were purified. We show that a fragment of FixL from amino acid residue 127 to residue 260 binds heme, retains the ability to bind oxygen, and has no detectable kinase activity. A C-terminal fragment of FixL, beginning at residue 260, fails to bind heme but is active as a kinase. We also demonstrate that anaerobiosis results in an enhancement of FixL* autophosphorylation and FixJ phosphorylation activities in vitro. Finally, we show that the heme-binding region of FixL is required in vitro for oxygen regulation of its kinase activities. Images PMID:1584762

  12. Myocardial protection of early extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support for acute myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock in pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gang-jie; Sun, Li-na; Li, Xing-hai; Wang, Ning-fu; Wu, Hong-hai; Yuan, Chen-xing; Li, Qiao-qiao; Xu, Peng; Ren, Ya-qi; Mao, Bao-gen

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore myocardial protection of early extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support for acute myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock in pigs. 24 male pigs (34.6 ± 1.3 kg) were randomly divided into three groups-control group, drug therapy group, and ECMO group. Myocardial infarction model was created in drug therapy group and ECMO group by ligating coronary artery. When cardiogenic shock occurred, drugs were given in drug therapy group and ECMO began to work in ECMO group. The pigs were killed 24 h after cardiogenic shock. Compared with in drug therapy group, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure in ECMO group decreased significantly 6 h after ligation (P < 0.05). At the end of the experiments, LV - dp/dt among three groups was significantly different, drug therapy group < ECMO group < control group. There was no difference in LV + dp/dt between drug therapy group and ECMO group. Compared with drug group, myocardial infarct size of ECMO group did not reduce significantly, but myocardial enzyme and troponin-I decreased significantly. Compared with drug therapy, ECMO improves left ventricular diastolic function, and may improve systolic function. ECMO cannot reduce myocardial infarct size without revascularization, but may have positive effects on ischemic areas by avoiding further injuring.

  13. Position paper for the organization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation programs for acute respiratory failure in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain; Brodie, Daniel; Bartlett, Robert; Brochard, Laurent; Brower, Roy; Conrad, Steve; De Backer, Daniel; Fan, Eddy; Ferguson, Niall; Fortenberry, James; Fraser, John; Gattinoni, Luciano; Lynch, William; MacLaren, Graeme; Mercat, Alain; Mueller, Thomas; Ogino, Mark; Peek, Giles; Pellegrino, Vince; Pesenti, Antonio; Ranieri, Marco; Slutsky, Arthur; Vuylsteke, Alain

    2014-09-01

    The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for severe acute respiratory failure (ARF) in adults is growing rapidly given recent advances in technology, even though there is controversy regarding the evidence justifying its use. Because ECMO is a complex, high-risk, and costly modality, at present it should be conducted in centers with sufficient experience, volume, and expertise to ensure it is used safely. This position paper represents the consensus opinion of an international group of physicians and associated health-care workers who have expertise in therapeutic modalities used in the treatment of patients with severe ARF, with a focus on ECMO. The aim of this paper is to provide physicians, ECMO center directors and coordinators, hospital directors, health-care organizations, and regional, national, and international policy makers a description of the optimal approach to organizing ECMO programs for ARF in adult patients. Importantly, this will help ensure that ECMO is delivered safely and proficiently, such that future observational and randomized clinical trials assessing this technique may be performed by experienced centers under homogeneous and optimal conditions. Given the need for further evidence, we encourage restraint in the widespread use of ECMO until we have a better appreciation for both the potential clinical applications and the optimal techniques for performing ECMO.

  14. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F.; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M.; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S.; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N.; Thorneloe, Kevin S.; Bradshaw, Heather B.; Matalon, Sadis

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  15. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N; Thorneloe, Kevin S; Bradshaw, Heather B; Matalon, Sadis; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2014-07-15

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  16. [Altitude, the ratio of PaO2 to fraction of inspired oxygen, and shunt: impact on the assessment of acute lung injury].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Padilla, J R

    2004-10-01

    The ratio of PaO2 to the fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FIO2) is commonly used to determine the severity of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The research presented here used computational models of the lung to analyze the effect of altitude on the PaO2/FIO2 ratio and pulmonary shunt. At a given shunt, the PaO2/FIO2 ratio is lower at higher altitudes. Therefore, when evaluating for ARDS based on a PaO2/FIO2 ratio of <200 mm Hg, patients residing at high altitudes will have less shunt and, presumably, less severe lung injury than patients at sea level. This should be taken into consideration when comparing patients from different altitudes. Shunt should more often be measured directly or be estimated assuming a constant arteriovenous oxygen content difference.

  17. Protective Role of Proton-Sensing TDAG8 in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Mogi, Chihiro; Aoki-Saito, Haruka; Tobo, Masayuki; Kamide, Yosuke; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Sato, Koichi; Dobashi, Kunio; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Hisada, Takeshi; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury is characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils into lungs and the subsequent impairment of lung function. Here we explored the role of TDAG8 in lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administrated intratracheally. In this model, cytokines and chemokines released from resident macrophages are shown to cause neutrophilic inflammation in the lungs. We found that LPS treatment increased TDAG8 expression in the lungs and confirmed its expression in resident macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. LPS administration remarkably increased neutrophil accumulation without appreciable change in the resident macrophages, which was associated with increased penetration of blood proteins into BAL fluids, interstitial accumulation of inflammatory cells, and damage of the alveolar architecture. The LPS-induced neutrophil accumulation and the associated lung damage were enhanced in TDAG8-deficient mice as compared with those in wild-type mice. LPS also increased several mRNA and protein expressions of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the lungs or BAL fluids. Among these inflammatory mediators, mRNA and protein expression of KC (also known as CXCL1), a chemokine of neutrophils, were significantly enhanced by TDAG8 deficiency. We conclude that TDAG8 is a negative regulator for lung neutrophilic inflammation and injury, in part, through the inhibition of chemokine production. PMID:26690120

  18. Protective Role of Proton-Sensing TDAG8 in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Mogi, Chihiro; Aoki-Saito, Haruka; Tobo, Masayuki; Kamide, Yosuke; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Sato, Koichi; Dobashi, Kunio; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Hisada, Takeshi; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-12-04

    Acute lung injury is characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils into lungs and the subsequent impairment of lung function. Here we explored the role of TDAG8 in lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administrated intratracheally. In this model, cytokines and chemokines released from resident macrophages are shown to cause neutrophilic inflammation in the lungs. We found that LPS treatment increased TDAG8 expression in the lungs and confirmed its expression in resident macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. LPS administration remarkably increased neutrophil accumulation without appreciable change in the resident macrophages, which was associated with increased penetration of blood proteins into BAL fluids, interstitial accumulation of inflammatory cells, and damage of the alveolar architecture. The LPS-induced neutrophil accumulation and the associated lung damage were enhanced in TDAG8-deficient mice as compared with those in wild-type mice. LPS also increased several mRNA and protein expressions of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the lungs or BAL fluids. Among these inflammatory mediators, mRNA and protein expression of KC (also known as CXCL1), a chemokine of neutrophils, were significantly enhanced by TDAG8 deficiency. We conclude that TDAG8 is a negative regulator for lung neutrophilic inflammation and injury, in part, through the inhibition of chemokine production.

  19. Dose-dependent effects of dietary nitrate on the oxygen cost of moderate-intensity exercise: Acute vs. chronic supplementation.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Lee J; Ortiz de Zevallos, Joaquin; Isidore, Taro; Nyman, Lara; Vanhatalo, Anni; Bailey, Stephen J; Jones, Andrew M

    2016-07-01

    To investigate whether chronic supplementation with a low or moderate dose of dietary nitrate (NO3(-)) reduces submaximal exercise oxygen uptake (V˙O2) and to assess whether or not this is dependent on acute NO3(-) administration prior to exercise. Following baseline tests, 34 healthy subjects were allocated to receive 3 mmol NO3(-), 6 mmol NO3(-) or placebo. Two hours following the first ingestion, and after 7, 28 and 30 days of supplementation, subjects completed two moderate-intensity step exercise tests. On days 28 and 30, subjects in the NO3(-) groups completed the test 2 h post consumption of a NO3(-) dose (CHR + ACU) and a placebo dose (CHR). Plasma nitrite concentration ([NO2(-)]) was elevated in a dose-dependent manner at 2 h, 7 days and 28-30 days on the CHR + ACU visit. Compared to pre-treatment baseline, 6 mmol NO3(-) reduced the steady-state V˙O2 during moderate-intensity exercise by 3% at 2 h (P = 0.06), 7 days and at 28-30 days (both P < 0.05) on the CHR + ACU visit, but was unaffected by 3 mmol NO3(-) at all measurement points. On the CHR visit in the 6 mmol group, plasma [NO2(-)] had returned to pre-treatment baseline, but the steady-state V˙O2 remained reduced. Up to ∼4 weeks supplementation with 6 but not 3 mmol NO3(-) can reduce submaximal exercise V˙O2. A comparable reduction in submaximal exercise V˙O2 following chronic supplementation with 6 mmol NO3(-) can be achieved both with and without the acute ingestion of NO3(-) and associated elevation of plasma [NO2(-)]. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Resveratrol induces acute endothelium-dependent renal vasodilation mediated through nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species scavenging

    PubMed Central

    Gordish, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol is suggested to have beneficial cardiovascular and renoprotective effects. Resveratrol increases endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. We hypothesized resveratrol acts as an acute renal vasodilator, mediated through increased NO production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In anesthetized rats, we found 5.0 mg/kg body weight (bw) of resveratrol increased renal blood flow (RBF) by 8% [from 6.98 ± 0.42 to 7.54 ± 0.17 ml·min−1·gram of kidney weight−1 (gkw); n = 8; P < 0.002] and decreased renal vascular resistance (RVR) by 18% from 15.00 ± 1.65 to 12.32 ± 1.20 arbitrary resistance units (ARU; P < 0.002). To test the participation of NO, we administered 5.0 mg/kg bw resveratrol before and after 10 mg/kg bw of the NOS inhibitor N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). l-NAME reduced the increase in RBF to resveratrol by 54% (from 0.59 ± 0.05 to 0.27 ± 0.06 ml·min−1·gkw−1; n = 10; P < 0.001). To test the participation of ROS, we gave 5.0 mg/kg bw resveratrol before and after 1 mg/kg bw tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic. Resveratrol increased RBF 7.6% (from 5.91 ± 0.32 to 6.36 ± 0.12 ml·min−1·gkw−1; n = 7; P < 0.001) and decreased RVR 19% (from 18.83 ± 1.37 to 15.27 ± 1.37 ARU). Tempol blocked resveratrol-induced increase in RBF (from 0.45 ± 0.12 to 0.10 ± 0.05 ml·min−1·gkw−1; n = 7; P < 0.03) and the decrease in RVR posttempol was 44% of the control response (3.56 ± 0.34 vs. 1.57 ± 0.21 ARU; n = 7; P < 0.006). We also tested the role of endothelium-derived prostanoids. Two days of 10 mg/kg bw indomethacin pretreatment did not alter basal blood pressure or RBF. Resveratrol-induced vasodilation remained unaffected. We conclude intravenous resveratrol acts as an acute renal vasodilator, partially mediated by increased NO production/NO bioavailability and superoxide scavenging but not by inducing vasodilatory cyclooxygenase products. PMID:24431202

  1. Acute on-chip HIV detection through label-free electrical sensing of viral nano-lysate.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Hadi; Jahangir, Muntasir; Inci, Fatih; Wang, Shuqi; Willenbrecht, Remington B M; Giguel, Francoise F; Tsibris, Athe M N; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-08-12

    Development of portable biosensors has broad applications in environmental monitoring, clinical diagnosis, public health, and homeland security. There is an unmet need for pathogen detection at the point-of-care (POC) using a fast, sensitive, inexpensive, and easy-to-use method that does not require complex infrastructure and well-trained technicians. For instance, detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) at acute infection stage has been challenging, since current antibody-based POC technologies are not effective due to low concentration of antibodies. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time a label-free electrical sensing method that can detect lysed viruses, i.e. viral nano-lysate, through impedance analysis, offering an alternative technology to the antibody-based methods such as dipsticks and Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The presented method is a broadly applicable platform technology that can potentially be adapted to detect multiple pathogens utilizing impedance spectroscopy for other infectious diseases including herpes, influenza, hepatitis, pox, malaria, and tuberculosis. The presented method offers a rapid and portable tool that can be used as a detection technology at the POC in resource-constrained settings, as well as hospital and primary care settings.

  2. Spontaneous Respiration Using Intravenous Anesthesia and High-Flow Nasal Oxygen (STRIVE Hi) Management of Acute Adult Epiglottitis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Phillip Kwan-Giet; Booth, Anton Willis Gerard; Vidhani, Kim

    2017-09-26

    High-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) is a potentially life-saving adjunct in the emergency management of the obstructed airway. HFNO has multiple beneficial applications in critical care and respiratory support, but its use in emergency-obstructed airway management has not been defined. This case report describes spontaneous respiration using intravenous anesthesia and high-flow nasal oxygen to successfully manage acute adult epiglottitis with rapidly progressing airway obstruction. Oxygenation, carbon dioxide levels, and airway patency were maintained, which facilitated endotracheal intubation while the patient was spontaneously breathing during general anesthesia. The application of HFNO can be extended to emergency airway obstruction.This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  3. Acute resistance exercise with blood flow restriction effects on heart rate, double product, oxygen saturation and perceived exertion.

    PubMed

    Neto, Gabriel R; Sousa, Maria S C; Costa e Silva, Gabriel V; Gil, Ana L S; Salles, Belmiro F; Novaes, Jefferson S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the acute effect of resistance exercise (RE) with and without blood flow restriction (BFR) on heart rate (HR), double product (DP), oxygen saturation (SpO2 ) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Twenty-four men (21·79 ± 3·21 years) performed three experimental protocols in a random order (crossover): (i) high-intensity RE at 80% of 1RM (HI), (ii) low-intensity RE at 20% of 1RM (LI) and (iii) low-intensity RE at 20% of 1RM combined with partial blood flow restriction (LI+BFR). HR, blood pressure, SpO2 and RPE were assessed. The data were analysed using repeated measures analysis of variance and the Wilcoxon test for RPE. The results indicated that all protocols significantly increased HR, both immediately postexercise and during the subsequent 60 min (P<0·05), and postexercise DP (P<0·05), but there were no differences between protocols. The protocols of LI and LI+BFR reduced postexercise SpO2 (P = 0·033, P = 0·007), and the LI+BFR protocol presented a perception of greater exertion in the lower limbs compared with HI (P = 0·022). We conclude that RE performed at low intensity combined with BFR seems to reduce the SpO2 after exercise and increase HR and DP while maintaining a perception of greater exertion on the lower limbs.

  4. Diagnosis and prediction of the occurrence of acute mountain sickness measuring oxygen saturation--independent of absolute altitude?

    PubMed

    Leichtfried, Veronika; Basic, Daniel; Burtscher, Martin; Gothe, Raffaella Matteucci; Siebert, Uwe; Schobersberger, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Commercialization of trekking tourism enables untrained persons to participate in trekking tours. Because hypoxia is one of the main purported triggers for acute mountain sickness (AMS), pulse oximetry, which measures arterial oxygen saturation (SPO2), is discussed to be a possible and useful tool for the diagnosis of AMS. The purpose of this study was to evaluate possible associations between SPO2 values and the occurrence of AMS. In 204 trekkers, SPO2 values (pulse oximetry) were measured and the Lake Louise Self-assessment Score (LLS) was administered over the first 7 days of their trekking tours. During treks at altitudes of 2500-5500 m in Nepal, India, Africa, and South America, 100 participants suffered from mild AMS, 3 participants suffered from severe AMS, and 9 participants reported both mild and severe AMS. The lowest mean SPO2 was 85.5 (95 % confidence interval (CI), 83.9-86.1 %) on day 5. SPO2 and LLS exhibited a weak to moderate negative correlation for all days of the study (ρ ranging from -0.142 to -0.370). Calculation of time-shifted associations of 24 and 48 h resulted in the disappearance of most associations. Susceptibility to headaches (odds ratio (OR) 2.9-7.2) and a history of AMS (OR 2.2-3.1) were determined to be potential risk factors for the development of AMS. Since there is no strong altitude-independent association between AMS and SPO2 during the first week of high-altitude adaptation, the implementation of pulse oximetry during trekking in order to detect and predict AMS remains questionable.

  5. Necrostatin-1 protects against reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced hepatotoxicity in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Kenji; Hatano, Etsuro; Iwaisako, Keiko; Takeiri, Masatoshi; Noma, Naruto; Ohmae, Saori; Toriguchi, Kan; Tanabe, Kazutaka; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Seo, Satoru; Taura, Kojiro; Machida, Keigo; Takeda, Norihiko; Saji, Shigehira; Uemoto, Shinji; Asagiri, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Excessive acetaminophen (APAP) use is one of the most common causes of acute liver failure. Various types of cell death in the damaged liver are linked to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, and, of these, necrotic cell death of hepatocytes has been shown to be involved in disease pathogenesis. Until recently, necrosis was commonly considered to be a random and unregulated form of cell death; however, recent studies have identified a previously unknown form of programmed necrosis called receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIPK)-dependent necrosis (or necroptosis), which is controlled by the kinases RIPK1 and RIPK3. Although RIPK-dependent necrosis has been implicated in a variety of disease states, including atherosclerosis, myocardial organ damage, stroke, ischemia–reperfusion injury, pancreatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. However its involvement in APAP-induced hepatocyte necrosis remains elusive. Here, we showed that RIPK1 phosphorylation, which is a hallmark of RIPK-dependent necrosis, was induced by APAP, and the expression pattern of RIPK1 and RIPK3 in the liver overlapped with that of CYP2E1, whose activity around the central vein area has been demonstrated to be critical for the development of APAP-induced hepatic injury. Moreover, a RIPK1 inhibitor ameliorated APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in an animal model, which was underscored by significant suppression of the release of hepatic enzymes and cytokine expression levels. RIPK1 inhibition decreased reactive oxygen species levels produced in APAP-injured hepatocytes, whereas CYP2E1 expression and the depletion rate of total glutathione were unaffected. Of note, RIPK1 inhibition also conferred resistance to oxidative stress in hepatocytes. These data collectively demonstrated a RIPK-dependent necrotic mechanism operates in the APAP-injured liver and inhibition of this pathway may be beneficial for APAP-induced fulminant hepatic failure. PMID:25349782

  6. Ratiometric Molecular Probes Based on Dual Emission of a Blue Fluorescent Coumarin and a Red Phosphorescent Cationic Iridium(III) Complex for Intracellular Oxygen Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Toshitada; Murayama, Saori; Tobita, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Ratiometric molecular probes RP1 and RP2 consisting of a blue fluorescent coumarin and a red phosphorescent cationic iridium complex connected by a tetra- or octaproline linker, respectively, were designed and synthesized for sensing oxygen levels in living cells. These probes exhibited dual emission with good spectral separation in acetonitrile. The photorelaxation processes, including intramolecular energy transfer, were revealed by emission quantum yield and lifetime measurements. The ratios (RI=(Ip/If)) between the phosphorescence (Ip) and fluorescence (If) intensities showed excellent oxygen responses; the ratio of RI under degassed and aerated conditions (RI0/RI) was 20.3 and 19.6 for RP1 and RP2. The introduction of the cationic Ir (III) complex improved the cellular uptake efficiency compared to that of a neutral analogue with a tetraproline linker. The emission spectra of the ratiometric probes internalized into living HeLa or MCF-7 cells could be obtained using a conventional microplate reader. The complex RP2 with an octaproline linker provided ratios comparable to the ratiometric measurements obtained using a microplate reader: the ratio of the RI value of RP2 under hypoxia (2.5% O2) to that under normoxia (21% O2) was 1.5 and 1.7 for HeLa and MCF-7 cells, respectively. Thus, the intracellular oxygen levels of MCF-7 cells could be imaged by ratiometric emission measurements using the complex RP2. PMID:26066988

  7. Ratiometric Molecular Probes Based on Dual Emission of a Blue Fluorescent Coumarin and a Red Phosphorescent Cationic Iridium(III) Complex for Intracellular Oxygen Sensing.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Toshitada; Murayama, Saori; Tobita, Seiji

    2015-06-09

    Ratiometric molecular probes RP1 and RP2 consisting of a blue fluorescent coumarin and a red phosphorescent cationic iridium complex connected by a tetra- or octaproline linker, respectively, were designed and synthesized for sensing oxygen levels in living cells. These probes exhibited dual emission with good spectral separation in acetonitrile. The photorelaxation processes, including intramolecular energy transfer, were revealed by emission quantum yield and lifetime measurements. The ratios (R(I) = (I(p)/I(f))) between the phosphorescence (I(p)) and fluorescence (I(f)) intensities showed excellent oxygen responses; the ratio of R(I) under degassed and aerated conditions ( R(I)(0) was 20.3 and 19.6 for RP1 and RP2. The introduction of the cationic Ir (III) complex improved the cellular uptake efficiency compared to that of a neutral analogue with a tetraproline linker. The emission spectra of the ratiometric probes internalized into living HeLa or MCF-7 cells could be obtained using a conventional microplate reader. The complex RP2 with an octaproline linker provided ratios comparable to the ratiometric measurements obtained using a microplate reader: the ratio of the R(I)) value of RP2 under hypoxia (2.5% O2) to that under normoxia (21% O2) was 1.5 and 1.7 for HeLa and MCF-7 cells, respectively. Thus, the intracellular oxygen levels of MCF-7 cells could be imaged by ratiometric emission measurements using the complex RP2.

  8. Enhancing dissolved oxygen control using an on-line hybrid fuzzy-neural soft-sensing model-based control system in an anaerobic/anoxic/oxic process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingzhi; Wan, Jinquan; Hu, Kang; Ma, Yongwen; Wang, Yan

    2013-12-01

    An on-line hybrid fuzzy-neural soft-sensing model-based control system was developed to optimize dissolved oxygen concentration in a bench-scale anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A(2)/O) process. In order to improve the performance of the control system, a self-adapted fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm and adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) models were employed. The proposed control system permits the on-line implementation of every operating strategy of the experimental system. A set of experiments involving variable hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent pH (pH), dissolved oxygen in the aerobic reactor (DO), and mixed-liquid return ratio (r) was carried out. Using the proposed system, the amount of COD in the effluent stabilized at the set-point and below. The improvement was achieved with optimum dissolved oxygen concentration because the performance of the treatment process was optimized using operating rules implemented in real time. The system allows various expert operational approaches to be deployed with the goal of minimizing organic substances in the outlet while using the minimum amount of energy.

  9. Influence of samaria doping on the resistance of ceria thin films and its implications to the planar oxygen sensing devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shilpi; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Engelhard, Mark H.; Shutthanandan, V.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Jiang, Weilin; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Prasad, Shalini

    2009-05-27

    In order to evaluate and analyze the effect of samarium (Sm) doping on the resistance of cerium oxide, we have grown highly oriented samaria doped ceria (SDC) thin films on sapphire, Al2O3 (0001) substrates by using oxygen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (OPA-MBE). The film growth was monitored using reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) which shows two-dimensional growth throughout the deposition. Following growth, the thin films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). XPS depth-profile shows Sm atoms are uniformly distributed in ceria lattice throughout the bulk of the film. The valence states of Ce and Sm in doped thin films are found to be Ce4+ and Sm3+, respectively. HRXRD shows the samaria doped ceria films on Al2O3(0001) exhibit (111) preferred orientation. Ion-channeling in RBS measurements confirms high quality of the thin films. The resistance of the samaria doped ceria films, obtained by two probe measurement capability under various oxygen pressure (1mTorr-100Torr) and temperatures (623K to 973K), is significantly lower than that of pure ceria under same conditions. The 6Sm% doped ceria film is the optimum composition for highest conductivity. This is attributed to the increased oxygen vacant sites in fluorite crystal structure of the epitaxial thin films which facilitate faster oxygen diffusion through hopping process.

  10. New method of preoxygenation for orotracheal intubation in patients with hypoxaemic acute respiratory failure in the intensive care unit, non-invasive ventilation combined with apnoeic oxygenation by high flow nasal oxygen: the randomised OPTINIV study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Samir; Molinari, Nicolas; De Jong, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tracheal intubation in the intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with severe life-threatening complications including severe hypoxaemia. Preoxygenation before intubation has been recommended in order to decrease such complications. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV)-assisted preoxygenation allows increased oxygen saturation during the intubation procedure, by applying a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to prevent alveolar derecruitment. However, the NIV mask has to be taken off after preoxygenation to allow the passage of the tube through the mouth. The patient with hypoxaemia does not receive oxygen during this period, at risk of major hypoxaemia. High-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC) has a potential for apnoeic oxygenation during the apnoea period following the preoxygenation with NIV. Whether application of HFNC combined with NIV is more effective at reducing oxygen desaturation during the intubation procedure compared with NIV alone for preoxygenation in patients with hypoxaemia in the ICU with acute respiratory failure remains to be established. Methods and analysis The HFNC combined to NIV for decreasing oxygen desaturation during the intubation procedure in patients with hypoxaemia in the ICU (OPTINIV) trial is an investigator-initiated monocentre randomised controlled two-arm trial with assessor-blinded outcome assessment. The OPTINIV trial randomises 50 patients with hypoxaemia requiring orotracheal intubation for acute respiratory failure to receive NIV (pressure support=10, PEEP=5, fractional inspired oxygen (FiO2)=100%) combined with HFNC (flow=60 L/min, FiO2=100%, interventional group) or NIV alone (reference group) for preoxygenation. The primary outcome is lowest oxygen saturation during the intubation procedure. Secondary outcomes are intubation-related complications, quality of preoxygenation and ICU mortality. Ethics and dissemination The study project has been approved by the appropriate ethics committee (CPP Sud

  11. Identification of HIF-1 signaling pathway in Pelteobagrus vachelli using RNA-Seq: effects of acute hypoxia and reoxygenation on oxygen sensors, respiratory metabolism, and hematology indices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guosong; Zhao, Cheng; Wang, Qintao; Gu, Yichun; Li, Zecheng; Tao, Panfeng; Chen, Jiawei; Yin, Shaowu

    2017-03-28

    Oxygen is a vital element in aquatic environments. The concentration of oxygen to which aquatic organisms are exposed is influenced by salinity, water temperature, weather, and surface water runoff. Hypoxia has a serious effect on fish populations, and can lead to the loss of habitat and die-offs. Therefore, in the present study we used next-generation sequencing technology to characterize the transcriptomes of Pelteobagrus vachelli and identified 70 candidate genes in the HIF-1 signaling pathway that are important for the hypoxic response in all metazoan species. For the first time, the present study reported the effects of acute hypoxia and reoxygenation on oxygen sensors, respiratory metabolism, and hematology indices in P. vachelli. The predicted physiological adjustments show that P. vachelli's blood oxygen-carrying capacity was increased through increased RBC, HB, and SI after hypoxia exposure. Glycolysis-related enzyme activities (PFK, HK, and PK) and LDH in the brain and liver also increased, indicating a rise in anaerobic metabolism. The observed reduction in oxidative enzyme level (CS) in the liver during hypoxia suggests a concomitant depression in aerobic metabolism. There were significant increases in oxygen sensor mRNA expression and HIF-1α protein expression during hypoxia and reoxygenation exposure, suggesting that the HIF-1 signaling pathway was activated in the liver and brain of P. vachelli in response to acute hypoxia and reoxygenation. Our findings suggest that oxygen sensors (e.g., HIF-1α) of P. vachelli are potentially useful biomarkers of environmental hypoxic exposure. These data contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the hypoxia signaling pathway in fish under hypoxia and reoxygenation.

  12. Production of reactive oxygen species, gene expression, and enzymatic activity in quail subjected to acute heat stress.

    PubMed

    Del Vesco, A P; Gasparino, E

    2013-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of acute heat stress on the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), the gene expression of the avian uncoupling protein (avUCP) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX 7), and the activity of the enzyme GPX in the liver of meat quail. Two groups of 15 meat quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) that were 23 d of age were initially housed individually in metallic cages. A period of 7 d was provided for the 2 bird groups to adapt to the cages and to a thermoneutral environment at 25°C with 60% relative humidity. At 30 d of age, 15 quail were exposed to a heat stress (HS) treatment of 34°C for 24 h, humidity 60%, whereas control quail (n = 15) were kept at 25°C. To analyze the production of ROS, 4 quail from each treatment group were slaughtered, and their livers were collected for mitochondrial isolation and to measure the subsequent production of ROS by the mitochondria. Additionally, the livers of 6 animals from each treatment group were collected for total RNA extraction. The cDNA was amplified using primers specific for the target genes, and expression was analyzed using the real-time PCR reaction (qRT-PCR). Five animals from each treatment group were slaughtered to analyze glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, which was determined by using of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and based on measuring the amount nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidized. A greater amount of mitochondrial ROS was found in HS animals (0.34 vs. 0.22 nm of ROS produced min(-1) · mg(-1) of protein, P < 0.05) for the reactions that contained only rotenone and in the reactions that were performed with rotenone and antimycin (0.31 vs. 0.23 nm of ROS produced min(-1) · mg(-1) of protein, P < 0.05). Concomitantly, the birds that were subjected to acute heat stress and had a greater amount of ROS production expressed less avUCP mRNA [0.75 arbitrary units (AU) vs. 0.87 AU, P < 0.05] and more GPX 7 mRNA (2.37 AU vs. 1.17 AU

  13. Remote sensing of cloud-top pressure using reflected solar radiation in the oxygen A-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, M.-L. C.

    1985-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for using the reflection of solar radiation in the oxygen A-band to determine cloud-top altitude. Because of multiple scattering and molecular absorption inside the cloud, the reflection of clouds is substantially modified in comparison with a mirror cloud, which is assumed to have a 100 percent reflection. To infer true cloud-top altitude, therefore, it is necessary to accurately estimate the amount of 'photon penetration'. Theoretical calculations indicate that the amount of photon penetration depends on the altitude, the scaled volume scattering coefficient, and the scaled optical thickness of the cloud. Algorithms using the reflection in the oxygen A-band to determine the cloud-top pressure have been applied to an aircraft field experiment in conjunction with CCOPE, 1981. Results of this study are very encouraging, especially for extended clouds.

  14. Digital phosphorimeter with frequency domain signal processing: Application to real-time fiber-optic oxygen sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcala, J. Ricardo; Yu, Clement; Yeh, Gong Jong

    1993-06-01

    An instrument to measure the excited-state lifetimes of phosphorescent materials in real time is described. This apparatus uses pulsed and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG solid-state laser for excitation, sampler for data acquisition, and frequency domain methods for data fitting. The instrument amplifies the ac components of the detector output and band limits the signal to 25 kHz. The fundamental frequency of the excitation is then set to obtain a desired number of harmonics. This band limited signal is sampled and averaged over few thousand cycles in the time domain. The frequency domain representation of the data is obtained by employing fast Fourier transform algorithms. The phase delay and the modulation ratio of each sampled harmonic is then computed. Ten to a hundred values of the phase and modulations are averaged before computing the sensor lifetime. The instrument is capable of measuring precise and accurate excited-state lifetimes from subpicowatt luminescent signals in 100 μm optical fibers. To monitor oxygen for biomedical applications the response time of the system is decreased by collecting only 8 or 16 harmonics. A least-squares fit yields the lifetimes of single exponentials. A component of zero lifetime is introduced to account for the backscatter excitation. The phosphorescence lifetimes measured reproducibly to three parts in a thousand are used to monitor oxygen. Oxygen concentrations are computed employing empirical polynomials. The system drift is less than 1% over 100 h of continuous operation. This instrument is used to measure oxygen concentrations in vitro and in vivo with 2 s update times and 90 s full response times. Examples of measurements in saline solutions and in dogs are presented.

  15. Oxygen Sensing in Drosophila: Multiple Isoforms of the Prolyl Hydroxylase Fatiga Have Different Capacity to Regulate HIFα/Sima

    PubMed Central

    Dekanty, Andrés; Wappner, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Background The Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF) mediates cellular adaptations to low oxygen. Prolyl-4-hydroxylases are oxygen sensors that hydroxylate the HIF alpha-subunit, promoting its proteasomal degradation in normoxia. Three HIF-prolyl hydroxylases, encoded by independent genes, PHD1, PHD2, and PHD3, occur in mammals. PHD2, the longest PHD isoform includes a MYND domain, whose biochemical function is unclear. PHD2 and PHD3 genes are induced in hypoxia to shut down HIF dependent transcription upon reoxygenation, while expression of PHD1 is oxygen-independent. The physiologic significance of the diversity of the PHD oxygen sensors is intriguing. Methodology and Principal Findings We have analyzed the Drosophila PHD locus, fatiga, which encodes 3 isoforms, FgaA, FgaB and FgaC that are originated through a combination of alternative initiation of transcription and alternative splicing. FgaA includes a MYND domain and is homologous to PHD2, while FgaB and FgaC are shorter isoforms most similar to PHD3. Through a combination of genetic experiments in vivo and molecular analyses in cell culture, we show that fgaB but not fgaA is induced in hypoxia, in a Sima-dependent manner, through a HIF-Responsive Element localized in the first intron of fgaA. The regulatory capacity of FgaB is stronger than that of FgaA, as complete reversion of fga loss-of-function phenotypes is observed upon transgenic expression of the former, and only partial rescue occurs after expression of the latter. Conclusions and Significance Diversity of PHD isoforms is a conserved feature in evolution. As in mammals, there are hypoxia-inducible and non-inducible Drosophila PHDs, and a fly isoform including a MYND domain co-exists with isoforms lacking this domain. Our results suggest that the isoform devoid of a MYND domain has stronger regulatory capacity than that including this domain. PMID:20811646

  16. Oxygen Mapping within Healthy and Acutely Infarcted Brain Tissue in Humans Using the NMR Relaxation of Lipids: A Proof-Of-Concept Translational Study.

    PubMed

    Colliez, Florence; Safronova, Marta M; Magat, Julie; Joudiou, Nicolas; Peeters, André P; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Gallez, Bernard; Duprez, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The clinical applicability of brain oxygenation mapping using the MOBILE (Mapping of Oxygen By Imaging Lipids relaxation Enhancement) magnetic resonance (MR) technique was assessed in the clinical setting of normal brain and of acute cerebral ischemia as a founding proof-of-concept translational study. Changes in the oxygenation level within healthy brain tissue can be detected by analyzing the spin-lattice proton relaxation ('Global T1' combining water and lipid protons) because of the paramagnetic properties of molecular oxygen. It was hypothesized that selective measurement of the relaxation of the lipid protons ('Lipids T1') would result in enhanced sensitivity of pO2 mapping because of higher solubility of oxygen in lipids than in water, and this was demonstrated in pre-clinical models using the MOBILE technique. In the present study, 12 healthy volunteers and eight patients with acute (48-72 hours) brain infarction were examined with the same clinical 3T MR system. Both Lipids R1 (R1 = 1/T1) and Global R1 were significantly different in the infarcted area and the contralateral unaffected brain tissue, with a higher statistical significance for Lipids R1 (median difference: 0.408 s-1; p<0.0001) than for Global R1 (median difference: 0.154 s-1; p = 0.027). Both Lipids R1 and Global R1 values in the unaffected contralateral brain tissue of stroke patients were not significantly different from the R1 values calculated in the brain tissue of healthy volunteers. The main limitations of the present prototypic version of the MOBILE sequence are the long acquisition time (4 min), hampering robustness of data in uncooperative patients, and a 2 mm slice thickness precluding accurate measurements in small infarcts because of partial volume averaging effects.

  17. Acute administration of high doses of taurine does not substantially improve high-intensity running performance and the effect on maximal accumulated oxygen deficit is unclear.

    PubMed

    Milioni, Fabio; Malta, Elvis de Souza; Rocha, Leandro George Spinola do Amaral; Mesquita, Camila Angélica Asahi; de Freitas, Ellen Cristini; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute administration of taurine overload on time to exhaustion (TTE) of high-intensity running performance and alternative maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAODALT). The study design was a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover design. Seventeen healthy male volunteers (age: 25 ± 6 years; maximal oxygen uptake: 50.5 ± 7.6 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) performed an incremental treadmill-running test until voluntary exhaustion to determine maximal oxygen uptake and exercise intensity at maximal oxygen uptake. Subsequently, participants completed randomly 2 bouts of supramaximal treadmill-running at 110% exercise intensity at maximal oxygen uptake until exhaustion (placebo (6 g dextrose) or taurine (6 g) supplementation), separated by 1 week. MAODALT was determined using a single supramaximal effort by summating the contribution of the phosphagen and glycolytic pathways. When comparing the results of the supramaximal trials (i.e., placebo and taurine conditions) no differences were observed for high-intensity running TTE (237.70 ± 66.00 and 277.30 ± 40.64 s; p = 0.44) and MAODALT (55.77 ± 8.22 and 55.06 ± 7.89 mL·kg(-1); p = 0.61), which seem to indicate trivial and unclear differences using the magnitude-based inferences approach, respectively. In conclusion, acute 6 g taurine supplementation before exercise did not substantially improve high-intensity running performance and showed an unclear effect on MAODALT.

  18. A method for measuring brain partial pressure of oxygen in unanesthetized unrestrained subjects: the effect of acute and chronic hypoxia on brain tissue PO2

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Prado, E.; Natah, Siraj; Srinivasan, Sathyanarayanan; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2011-01-01

    The level of tissue oxygenation provides information related to the balance between oxygen delivery, oxygen utilization, tissue reactivity and morphology during physiological conditions. Tissue partial pressure of oxygen (PtO2) is influenced by the use of anesthesia or restraint. These factors may impact the absolute level of PtO2. In this study we present a novel fibre optic method to measure brain PtO2. This method can be used in unanesthetized, unrestrained animals, provides absolute values for PO2, has a stable calibration, does not consume oxygen and is MRI compatible. Brain PtO2 was studied during acute hypoxia, as well as before and after 28 days of high altitude acclimatization. A sensor was chronically implanted in the frontal cortex of 8 Wistar rats. It is comprised of a fiber optic probe with a tip containing material that fluoresces with an oxygen dependent lifetime. Brain PtO2 declines by 80% and 76% pre- and post-acclimatization respectively, when the fraction of inspired oxygen declines from 0.21 to 0.08. In addition, a linear relationship between brain PtO2 and inspired O2 levels was demonstrated r2=0.98 and r2=0.99 (pre- and post-acclimatization). Hypoxia acclimatization resulted in an increase in the overall brain PtO2 by approximately 35%. This paper demonstrates the use of a novel chronically implanted fibre optic based sensor for measuring absolute PtO2. It shows a very strong linear relationship in awake animals between inspired O2 and tissue O2, and shows that there is a proportional increase in PtO2 over a range of inspired values after exposure to chronic hypoxia. PMID:20817029

  19. Control of Respiratory Drive and Effort in Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Patients Recovering from Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Tommaso; Grasselli, Giacomo; Suriano, Grazia; Eronia, Nilde; Spadaro, Savino; Turrini, Cecilia; Patroniti, Nicolo'; Bellani, Giacomo; Pesenti, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    The amount of extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal may influence respiratory drive in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The authors evaluated the effects of different levels of extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal in patients recovering from severe ARDS undergoing pressure support ventilation (PSV) and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA). The authors conducted a prospective, randomized, crossover study on eight spontaneously breathing ARDS patients undergoing venovenous ECMO since 28 ± 20 days. To modulate carbon dioxide extraction, ECMO gas flow (GF) was decreased from baseline resting protective conditions (i.e., GF100%, set to obtain pressure generated in the first 100 ms of inspiration against an occluded airway less than 2 cm H2O, respiratory rate less than or equal to 25 bpm, tidal volume less than 6 ml/kg, and peak airway pressure less than 25 cm H2O) to GF50%-GF25%-GF0% during both PSV and NAVA (random order for ventilation mode). Continuous recordings of airway pressure and flow and esophageal pressure were obtained and analyzed during all study phases. At higher levels of extracorporeal carbon dioxide extraction, pressure generated in the first 100 ms of inspiration against an occluded airway decreased from 2.8 ± 2.7 cm H2O (PSV, GF0%) and 3.0 ± 2.1 cm H2O (NAVA, GF0%) to 0.9 ± 0.5 cm H2O (PSV, GF100%) and 1.0 ± 0.8 cm H2O (NAVA, GF100%; P < 0.001) and patients' inspiratory muscle pressure passed from 8.5 ± 6.3 and 6.5 ± 5.5 cm H2O to 4.5 ± 3.1 and 4.2 ± 3.7 cm H2O (P < 0.001). In time, decreased inspiratory drive and effort determined by higher carbon dioxide extraction led to reduction of tidal volume from 6.6 ± 0.9 and 7.5 ± 1.2 ml/kg to 4.9 ± 0.8 and 5.3 ± 1.3 ml/kg (P < 0.001) and of peak airway pressure from 21 ± 3 and 25 ± 4 cm H2O to 21 ± 3 and 21 ± 5

  20. Acute kidney injury is a frequent complication in critically ill neonates receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: a 14-year cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Newborns in need of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support are at high risk of developing acute kidney injury (AKI). AKI may occur as part of multiple organ failure and can be aggravated by exposure to components of the extracorporeal circuit. AKI necessitates adjustment of dosage of renally eliminated drugs and avoidance of nephrotoxic drugs. We aimed to define systematically the incidence and clinical course of AKI in critically ill neonates receiving ECMO support. Methods This study reviewed prospectively collected clinical data (including age, diagnosis, ECMO course, and serum creatinine (SCr)) of all ECMO-treated neonates within our institution spanning a 14-year period. AKI was defined by using the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of renal function, and End-stage renal disease (RIFLE) classification. SCr data were reviewed per ECMO day and compared with age-specific SCr reference values. Accordingly, patients were assigned to RIFLE categories (Risk, Injury, or Failure as 150%, 200%, or 300% of median SCr reference values). Data are presented as median and interquartile range (IQR) or number and percentage. Results Of 242 patients included, 179 (74%) survived. Median age at the start of ECMO was 39 hours (IQR, 26 to 63); median ECMO duration was 5.8 days (IQR, 3.9 to 9.4). In total, 153 (64%) patients had evidence of AKI, with 72 (30%) qualifying as Risk, 55 (23%) as Injury, and 26 (11%) as Failure. At the end of the study period, only 71 (46%) patients of all 153 AKI patients improved by at least one RIFLE category. With regression analysis, it was found that nitric oxide ventilation (P = 0.04) and younger age at the start of ECMO (P = 0.004) were significant predictors of AKI. Survival until intensive care unit discharge was significantly lower for patients in the Failure category (35%) as compared with the Non-AKI (78%), Risk (82%), and Injury category (76%), with all P < 0.001, whereas no significant differences were found between the

  1. Temperature, Oxygen, and Salt-Sensing Neurons in C. elegans Are Carbon Dioxide Sensors that Control Avoidance Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bretscher, Andrew Jonathan; Kodama-Namba, Eiji; Busch, Karl Emanuel; Murphy, Robin Joseph; Soltesz, Zoltan; Laurent, Patrick; de Bono, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Summary Homeostatic control of body fluid CO2 is essential in animals but is poorly understood. C. elegans relies on diffusion for gas exchange and avoids environments with elevated CO2. We show that C. elegans temperature, O2, and salt-sensing neurons are also CO2 sensors mediating CO2 avoidance. AFD thermosensors respond to increasing CO2 by a fall and then rise in Ca2+ and show a Ca2+ spike when CO2 decreases. BAG O2 sensors and ASE salt sensors are both activated by CO2 and remain tonically active while high CO2 persists. CO2-evoked Ca2+ responses in AFD and BAG neurons require cGMP-gated ion channels. Atypical soluble guanylate cyclases mediating O2 responses also contribute to BAG CO2 responses. AFD and BAG neurons together stimulate turning when CO2 rises and inhibit turning when CO2 falls. Our results show that C. elegans senses CO2 using functionally diverse sensory neurons acting homeostatically to minimize exposure to elevated CO2. PMID:21435556

  2. Cellular oxygen sensing: Importins and exportins are mediators of intracellular localisation of prolyl-4-hydroxylases PHD1 and PHD2

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, Amrei; Pientka, Friederike Katharina; Moeckel, Sylvia; Kettelhake, Antje; Hartmann, Enno; Koehler, Matthias; Depping, Reinhard

    2009-10-02

    Hypoxia-inducible factors are crucial in the regulatory process of oxygen homeostasis of vertebrate cells. Inhibition of prolyl hydroxylation of HIF-{alpha} subunits by prolyl-hydroxylases (PHD1, PHD2 and PHD3) leads to transcription of a greater number of hypoxia responsive genes. We have investigated the subcellular distribution and the molecular mechanisms regulating the intracellular allocation of PHD1 and PHD2. As reported earlier we find PHD1 located exclusively in the nucleus. We demonstrate that nuclear import of PHD1 occurs importin {alpha}/{beta} dependently and relies on a nuclear localisation signal (NLS). By contrast PHD2 is cycling between nucleus and cytoplasm, and nuclear import seems to be independent of 'classical' importin {alpha}/{beta} receptors. Furthermore, we reveal that the exit of PHD2 from the nucleus requires CRM1 and the N-terminal 100 amino acids of the protein. Our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of the regulation of the oxygen sensor cascade of PHDs in different cellular compartments.

  3. Novel perspectives on the PHD-HIF oxygen sensing pathway in cardioprotection mediated by IPC and RIPC.

    PubMed

    Martin-Puig, Silvia; Tello, Daniel; Aragonés, Julián

    2015-01-01

    Reperfusion of ischemic cardiac tissue is the standard treatment for improving clinical outcome following myocardial infarction but is inevitably associated with ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Ischemic myocardial injury can be alleviated by exposing the heart to brief episodes of sublethal ischemia-reperfusion prior to the ischemic insult, a phenomenon that has been termed ischemic preconditioning (IPC). Similarly, remote IPC (RIPC) is defined as transient episodes of ischemia at a distant site before a subsequent prolonged injury of the target organ. In this setting, adaptive responses to hypoxia/ischemia in peripheral tissues include the release of soluble factors that have the potential to protect cardiomyocytes remotely. Oxygen fluctuations is a hallmark of insufficient tissue perfusion and ischemic episodes. Emerging evidence indicates that prolyl hydroxylase oxygen sensors (PHDs) and hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) are critical regulators of IPC and RIPC. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the role of the PHD-HIF axis in IPC and RIPC-mediated cardioprotection and examine molecular pathways and cell types that might be involved. We also appraise the therapeutic value of targeting the PHD-HIF axis to enhance cardiac tolerance against IRI.

  4. Usefulness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy to inhibit restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Mohsen; Fares, Wassim; Abdel-Karim, Isam; Koch, J Michael; Sopko, Joseph; Adler, Dale

    2004-06-15

    The purpose of this trial was to assess whether the addition of hyperbaric oxygen to percutaneous coronary intervention can reduce clinical restenosis. Major adverse cardiac events at 8 months were found in only 1 of 24 patients (4%) who received hyperbaric oxygen compared with 13 of 37 patients (35%) who did not.

  5. A magnetic mesoporous nanocomposite modified with a ruthenium complex for site-specific molecular oxygen sensing: Construction and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu-qing, Zhao; Xi, Chen; De-jun, Wan

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we constructed a core-shell structured organic-inorganic hybrid composite, where superparamagnetic ferroferric oxide and silica molecular sieve MCM-41 were used as the inner core and the outer shell, respectively. A Ru(II) complex was covalently grafted into these MCM-41 tunnels. Electron microscopy images, XRD analysis, IR spectra, thermogravimetry and N2 adsorption/desorption analysis were applied to confirm this Ru(II)-functionalized hybrid composite. Emission of this composite decreased with increasing O2 concentrations, which made itself an O2 sensing system. High selectivity (12.2), linear working curve (linearity = 0.99) and short response time (12 s) were obtained from this composite.

  6. Repeated lung lavage with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation treating severe acute respiratory distress syndrome due to nasogastric tube malposition for enternal nutrition: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kao, Xiaoming; Yu, Wenkui; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2012-01-01

    Enternal nutritional support, a frequently applied technique for providing nutrition and energy, played a pivotal role in the treatment of high risk patients. However, severe complications induced by malposition of nasogastric tube caused great danger and even death to the patients. In this case report, we present a patient with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) induced by bronchopleural fistula (BPF) due to malposition of nasogastric tube. Repeated lung lavage combined with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was performed after transferring to the ICU of our hospital. Finally, the patient recovered and discharged 7 days after admission.

  7. Treatment of sepsis and ARDS with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and interventional lung assist membrane ventilator in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gorjup, Vojka; Fister, Misa; Noc, Marko; Rajic, Vladan; Ribaric, Suada Filekovic

    2012-07-01

    We report an 18-year-old ice skater with acute lymphoblast leukemia. She developed Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteremia, severe sepsis, septic shock, and ARDS following chemotherapy-induced severe bone marrow failure. She was successfully treated with extraordinary life support measures, which included extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, double lumen lung ventilation for management of hemoptysis, and lung assist membrane ventilation. After 57 days of ICU treatment and a year of rehabilitation, the patient has fully regained her functional status, is now finishing high school, and is ice skating again.

  8. In vivo imaging of hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in acute focal cerebral ischemic rats with laser speckle imaging and functional photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zilin; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Xiaoquan; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2012-08-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease. The changes in cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism associated with stroke play an important role in pathophysiology study. But the changes were difficult to describe with a single imaging modality. Here the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and oxygen saturation (SO2) were yielded with laser speckle imaging (LSI) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) during and after 3-h acute focal ischemic rats. These hemodynamic measures were further synthesized to deduce the changes in oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). The results indicate that all the hemodynamics except CBV had rapid declines within 40-min occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCAO). CBV in arteries and veins first increased to the maximum value of 112.42±36.69% and 130.58±31.01% by 15 min MCAO; then all the hemodynamics had a persistent reduction with small fluctuations during the ischemic. When ischemia lasted for 3 h, CBF in arteries, veins decreased to 17±14.65%, 24.52±20.66%, respectively, CBV dropped to 62±18.56% and 59±18.48%. And the absolute SO2 decreased by 40.52±22.42% and 54.24±11.77%. After 180-min MCAO, the changes in hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism were also quantified. The study suggested that combining LSI and PAM provides an attractive approach for stroke detection in small animal studies.

  9. In vivo imaging of hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in acute focal cerebral ischemic rats with laser speckle imaging and functional photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zilin; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Xiaoquan; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2012-08-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease. The changes in cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism associated with stroke play an important role in pathophysiology study. But the changes were difficult to describe with a single imaging modality. Here the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and oxygen saturation (SO2) were yielded with laser speckle imaging (LSI) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) during and after 3-h acute focal ischemic rats. These hemodynamic measures were further synthesized to deduce the changes in oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). The results indicate that all the hemodynamics except CBV had rapid declines within 40-min occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCAO). CBV in arteries and veins first increased to the maximum value of 112.42 ± 36.69% and 130.58 ± 31.01% by 15 min MCAO; then all the hemodynamics had a persistent reduction with small fluctuations during the ischemic. When ischemia lasted for 3 h, CBF in arteries, veins decreased to 17 ± 14.65%, 24.52 ± 20.66%, respectively, CBV dropped to 62 ± 18.56% and 59 ± 18.48%. And the absolute SO2 decreased by 40.52 ± 22.42% and 54.24 ± 11.77%. After 180-min MCAO, the changes in hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism were also quantified. The study suggested that combining LSI and PAM provides an attractive approach for stroke detection in small animal studies.

  10. In-airway molecular flow sensing: A new technology for continuous, noninvasive monitoring of oxygen consumption in critical care

    PubMed Central

    Ciaffoni, Luca; O’Neill, David P.; Couper, John H.; Ritchie, Grant A. D.; Hancock, Gus; Robbins, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    There are no satisfactory methods for monitoring oxygen consumption in critical care. To address this, we adapted laser absorption spectroscopy to provide measurements of O2, CO2, and water vapor within the airway every 10 ms. The analyzer is integrated within a novel respiratory flow meter that is an order of magnitude more precise than other flow meters. Such precision, coupled with the accurate alignment of gas concentrations with respiratory flow, makes possible the determination of O2 consumption by direct integration over time of the product of O2 concentration and flow. The precision is illustrated by integrating the balance gas (N2 plus Ar) flow and showing that this exchange was near zero. Measured O2 consumption changed by <5% between air and O2 breathing. Clinical capability was illustrated by recording O2 consumption during an aortic aneurysm repair. This device now makes easy, accurate, and noninvasive measurement of O2 consumption for intubated patients in critical care possible. PMID:27532048

  11. Automated oxygen titration and weaning with FreeO2 in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD: a pilot randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Lellouche, François; Bouchard, Pierre-Alexandre; Roberge, Maude; Simard, Serge; L’Her, Erwan; Maltais, François; Lacasse, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We developed a device (FreeO2) that automatically adjusts the oxygen flow rates based on patients’ needs, in order to limit hyperoxia and hypoxemia and to automatically wean them from oxygen. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using FreeO2 in patients hospitalized in the respiratory ward for an acute exacerbation of COPD. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial comparing FreeO2 vs manual oxygen titration in the respiratory ward of a university hospital. We measured the perception of appropriateness of oxygen titration and monitoring in both groups by nurses and attending physicians using a Likert scale. We evaluated the time in the target range of oxygen saturation (SpO2) as defined for each patient by the attending physician, the time with severe desaturation (SpO2 <85%), and the time with hyperoxia (SpO2 >5% above the target). We also recorded length of stay, intensive care unit admissions, and readmission rate. Fifty patients were randomized (25 patients in both groups; mean age: 72±8 years; mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second: 1.00±0.49 L; and mean initial O2 flow 2.0±1.0 L/min). Results Nurses and attending physicians felt that oxygen titration and monitoring were equally appropriate with both O2 administration systems. The percentage of time within the SpO2 target was significantly higher with FreeO2, and the time with severe desaturation and hyperoxia was significantly reduced with FreeO2. Time from study inclusion to hospital discharge was 5.8±4.4 days with FreeO2 and 8.4±6.0 days with usual oxygen administration (P=0.051). Conclusion FreeO2 was deemed as an appropriate oxygen administration system by nurses and physicians of a respiratory unit. This system maintained SpO2 at the target level better than did manual titration and reduced periods of desaturation and hyperoxia. Our results also suggest that FreeO2 has the potential to reduce the hospital length of stay. PMID:27601891

  12. Automated oxygen titration and weaning with FreeO2 in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD: a pilot randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Lellouche, François; Bouchard, Pierre-Alexandre; Roberge, Maude; Simard, Serge; L'Her, Erwan; Maltais, François; Lacasse, Yves

    2016-01-01

    We developed a device (FreeO2) that automatically adjusts the oxygen flow rates based on patients' needs, in order to limit hyperoxia and hypoxemia and to automatically wean them from oxygen. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using FreeO2 in patients hospitalized in the respiratory ward for an acute exacerbation of COPD. We conducted a randomized controlled trial comparing FreeO2 vs manual oxygen titration in the respiratory ward of a university hospital. We measured the perception of appropriateness of oxygen titration and monitoring in both groups by nurses and attending physicians using a Likert scale. We evaluated the time in the target range of oxygen saturation (SpO2) as defined for each patient by the attending physician, the time with severe desaturation (SpO2 <85%), and the time with hyperoxia (SpO2 >5% above the target). We also recorded length of stay, intensive care unit admissions, and readmission rate. Fifty patients were randomized (25 patients in both groups; mean age: 72±8 years; mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second: 1.00±0.49 L; and mean initial O2 flow 2.0±1.0 L/min). Nurses and attending physicians felt that oxygen titration and monitoring were equally appropriate with both O2 administration systems. The percentage of time within the SpO2 target was significantly higher with FreeO2, and the time with severe desaturation and hyperoxia was significantly reduced with FreeO2. Time from study inclusion to hospital discharge was 5.8±4.4 days with FreeO2 and 8.4±6.0 days with usual oxygen administration (P=0.051). FreeO2 was deemed as an appropriate oxygen administration system by nurses and physicians of a respiratory unit. This system maintained SpO2 at the target level better than did manual titration and reduced periods of desaturation and hyperoxia. Our results also suggest that FreeO2 has the potential to reduce the hospital length of stay.

  13. A pilot study: a combined therapy using polymyxin-B hemoperfusion and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Itai, Junji; Ohshimo, Shinichiro; Kida, Yoshiko; Ota, Kohei; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Hirohashi, Nobuyuki; Bonella, Francesco; Guzman, Josune; Costabel, Ulrich; Kohno, Nobuoki; Tanigawa, Koichi

    2015-01-05

    Direct hemoperfusion with polymyxin B-immobilized fiber (PMX-DHP) might be beneficial for treating acute exacerbation (AE) of interstitial pneumonia (IP). Venovenous extracorporeal membranous oxygenation (VV-ECMO) is an emerging tool to avoid ventilator-induced lung injury. This is a report presenting the first three patients with AE of IP treated with a combined therapy of PMX-DHP and VV-ECMO. Patient 1 was a 68-year-old male with acute interstitial pneumonia, patient 2 a 67-year-old male with AE of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and patient 3 a 61-year-old female with AE of collagen vascular disease-associated interstitial pneumonia. All patients were severely hypoxemic and required mechanical ventilation. A combined therapy using PMX-DHP and VV-ECMO was initiated with support of intravenous corticosteroids and antibiotics. Radiological findings, oxygenation and laboratory findings markedly improved and all patients survived without severe complications. A combined therapy of PMX-DHP and VV-ECMO might be a therapeutic option for AE of IP.

  14. Oxygen sensing by primary cardiac fibroblasts: a key role of p21(Waf1/Cip1/Sdi1).

    PubMed

    Roy, Sashwati; Khanna, Savita; Bickerstaff, Alice A; Subramanian, Sukanya V; Atalay, Mustafa; Bierl, Michael; Pendyala, Srikanth; Levy, Dana; Sharma, Nidhi; Venojarvi, Mika; Strauch, Arthur; Orosz, Charles G; Sen, Chandan K

    2003-02-21

    In mammalian organs under normoxic conditions, O2 concentration ranges from 12% to <0.5%, with O2 approximately 14% in arterial blood and <10% in the myocardium. During mild hypoxia, myocardial O2 drops to approximately 1% to 3% or lower. In response to chronic moderate hypoxia, cells adjust their normoxia set point such that reoxygenation-dependent relative elevation of PO2 results in perceived hyperoxia. We hypothesized that O2, even in marginal relative excess of the PO2 to which cardiac cells are adjusted, results in activation of specific signal transduction pathways that alter the phenotype and function of these cells. To test this hypothesis, cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) isolated from adult murine ventricle were cultured in 10% or 21% O2 (hyperoxia relative to the PO2 to which cells are adjusted in vivo) and were compared with those cultured in 3% O2 (mild hypoxia). Compared with cells cultured in 3% O2, cells that were cultured in 10% or 21% O2 demonstrated remarkable reversible G2/M arrest and a phenotype indicative of differentiation to myofibroblasts. These effects were independent of NADPH oxidase function. CFs exposed to high O2 exhibited higher levels of reactive oxygen species production. The molecular signature response to perceived hyperoxia included (1) induction of p21, cyclin D1, cyclin D2, cyclin G1, Fos-related antigen-2, and transforming growth factor-beta1, (2) lowered telomerase activity, and (3) activation of transforming growth factor-beta1 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. CFs deficient in p21 were resistant to such O2 sensitivity. This study raises the vital broad-based issue of controlling ambient O2 during the culture of primary cells isolated from organs.

  15. Oxygen-sensing histidine-protein kinases: assays of ligand binding and turnover of response-regulator substrates.

    PubMed

    Gilles-Gonzalez, Marie-Alda; Gonzalez, Gonzalo; Sousa, Eduardo Henrique Silva; Tuckerman, Jason

    2008-01-01

    Heme-based sensors are a recently discovered functional class of heme proteins that serve to detect physiological fluctuations in oxygen (O(2)), carbon monoxide (CO), or nitric oxide (NO). Many of these modular sensors detect heme ligands by coupling a histidine-protein kinase to a heme-binding domain. They typically bind O2, CO, and NO but respond only to one of these ligands. Usually, they are active in the ferrous unliganded state but are switched off by saturation with O2. The heme-binding domains of these kinases are quite varied. They may feature a PAS fold, as in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Sinorhizobium melitoti FixL proteins, or a GAF fold, as in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis DevS and DosT proteins. Alternative folds, such as HNOB (also H-NOX), have also been noted for such signal-transducing kinases, although these classes are less well studied. Histidine-protein kinases function in partnership with cognate response-regulator substrate(s): usually transcription factors that they activate by phosphorylation. For example, FixL proteins specifically phosphorylate their FixJ partners, and DevS and DosT proteins phosphorylate DevR in response to hypoxia. We present methods for purifying these sensors and their protein substrates, verifying the quality of the preparations, determining the K(d) values for binding of ligand and preparing sensors of known saturation, and measuring the rates of turnover (k(cat)) of the protein substrate by sensors of known heme status.

  16. A critical role of acute bronchoconstriction in the mortality associated with high-dose sarin inhalation: Effects of epinephrine and oxygen therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Zhuang, Jianguo; Barrett, Edward G.; Xu, Fadi; Russell, Robert G.; Sopori, Mohan L.

    2014-01-15

    Sarin is an organophosphate nerve agent that is among the most lethal chemical toxins known to mankind. Because of its vaporization properties and ease and low cost of production, sarin is the nerve agent with a strong potential for use by terrorists and rouge nations. The primary route of sarin exposure is through inhalation and, depending on the dose, sarin leads to acute respiratory failure and death. The mechanism(s) of sarin-induced respiratory failure is poorly understood. Sarin irreversibly inhibits acetylcholine esterase, leading to excessive synaptic levels of acetylcholine and, we have previously shown that sarin causes marked ventilatory changes including weakened response to hypoxia. We now show that LD{sub 50} sarin inhalation causes severe bronchoconstriction in rats, leading to airway resistance, increased hypoxia-induced factor-1α, and severe lung epithelium injury. Transferring animals into 60% oxygen chambers after sarin exposure improved the survival from about 50% to 75% at 24 h; however, many animals died within hours after removal from the oxygen chambers. On the other hand, if LD{sub 50} sarin-exposed animals were administered the bronchodilator epinephrine, > 90% of the animals survived. Moreover, while both epinephrine and oxygen treatments moderated cardiorespiratory parameters, the proinflammatory cytokine surge, and elevated expression of hypoxia-induced factor-1α, only epinephrine consistently reduced the sarin-induced bronchoconstriction. These data suggest that severe bronchoconstriction is a critical factor in the mortality induced by LD{sub 50} sarin inhalation, and epinephrine may limit the ventilatory, inflammatory, and lethal effects of sarin. - Highlights: • Inhalation exposure of rats to LD{sub 50} sarin causes death through respiratory failure. • Severe bronchoconstriction is the major cause of sarin-induced respiratory failure. • Transfer of sarin exposed rats to 60% oxygen improves the mortality temporarily.

  17. Polarimetric remote sensing in oxygen A and B bands: sensitivity study and information content analysis for vertical profile of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shouguo; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical analysis is conducted to reveal the information content of aerosol vertical profile in space-borne measurements of the backscattered radiance and degree of linear polarization (DOLP) in oxygen (O2) A and B bands. Assuming a quasi-Gaussian shape for aerosol vertical profile characterized by peak height H and half width γ (at half maximum), the Unified Linearized Vector Radiative Transfer Model (UNL-VRTM) is used to simulate the Stokes four-vector elements of upwelling radiation at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and their Jacobians with respect to H and γ. Calculations for different aerosol types and different combinations of H and γ values show that the wide range of gas absorption optical depth in O2 A and B band enables the sensitivity of backscattered DOLP and radiance at TOA to the aerosol layer at different altitudes. Quantitatively, DOLP in O2 A and B bands is found to be more sensitive to H and γ than radiance, especially over the bright surfaces (with large visible reflectance). In many O2 absorption wavelengths, the degree of freedom of signal (DFS) for retrieving H (or γ) generally increases with H (and γ) and can be close to unity in many cases, assuming that the composite uncertainty from surface and aerosol scattering properties as well as measurements is less than 5 %. Further analysis demonstrates that DFS needed for simultaneous retrieval of H and γ can be obtained from a combined use of DOLP measurements at ˜ 10-100 O2 A and B absorption wavelengths (or channels), depending on the specific values of H. The higher the aerosol layer, the fewer number of channels for DOLP measurements in O2 A and B bands are needed for characterizing H and γ. Future hyperspectral measurements of DOLP in O2 A and B bands are needed to continue studying their potential and their combination with radiance and DOLP in atmospheric window channels for retrieving the vertical profiles of aerosols, especially highly scattering aerosols, over land.

  18. An Oxygen-Sensing Two-Component System in the Burkholderia cepacia Complex Regulates Biofilm, Intracellular Invasion, and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Tiffany L.; Boisvert, Nicole M.; Priebe, Gregory P.

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia dolosa is a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), which is a group of bacteria that cause chronic lung infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and can be associated with outbreaks carrying high morbidity and mortality. While investigating the genomic diversity of B. dolosa strains collected from an outbreak among CF patients, we previously identified fixL as a gene showing signs of strong positive selection. This gene has homology to fixL of the rhizobial FixL/FixJ two-component system. The goals of this study were to determine the functions of FixLJ and their role in virulence in B. dolosa. We generated a fixLJ deletion mutant and complemented controls in B. dolosa strain AU0158. Using a fixK-lacZ reporter we found that FixLJ was activated in low oxygen in multiple BCC species. In a murine pneumonia model, the B. dolosa fixLJ deletion mutant was cleared faster from the lungs and spleen than wild-type B. dolosa strain AU0158 at 7 days post infection. Interestingly, the fixLJ deletion mutant made more biofilm, albeit with altered structure, but was less motile than strain AU0158. Using RNA-seq with in vitro grown bacteria, we found ~11% of the genome was differentially expressed in the fixLJ deletion mutant relative to strain AU0158. Multiple flagella-associated genes were down-regulated in the fixLJ deletion mutant, so we also evaluated virulence of a fliC deletion mutant, which lacks a flagellum. We saw no difference in the ability of the fliC deletion mutant to persist in the murine model relative to strain AU0158, suggesting factors other than flagella caused the phenotype of decreased persistence. We found the fixLJ deletion mutant to be less invasive in human lung epithelial and macrophage-like cells. In conclusion, B. dolosa fixLJ is a global regulator that controls biofilm formation, motility, intracellular invasion/persistence, and virulence. PMID:28046077

  19. An Oxygen-Sensing Two-Component System in the Burkholderia cepacia Complex Regulates Biofilm, Intracellular Invasion, and Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Schaefers, Matthew M; Liao, Tiffany L; Boisvert, Nicole M; Roux, Damien; Yoder-Himes, Deborah; Priebe, Gregory P

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia dolosa is a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), which is a group of bacteria that cause chronic lung infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and can be associated with outbreaks carrying high morbidity and mortality. While investigating the genomic diversity of B. dolosa strains collected from an outbreak among CF patients, we previously identified fixL as a gene showing signs of strong positive selection. This gene has homology to fixL of the rhizobial FixL/FixJ two-component system. The goals of this study were to determine the functions of FixLJ and their role in virulence in B. dolosa. We generated a fixLJ deletion mutant and complemented controls in B. dolosa strain AU0158. Using a fixK-lacZ reporter we found that FixLJ was activated in low oxygen in multiple BCC species. In a murine pneumonia model, the B. dolosa fixLJ deletion mutant was cleared faster from the lungs and spleen than wild-type B. dolosa strain AU0158 at 7 days post infection. Interestingly, the fixLJ deletion mutant made more biofilm, albeit with altered structure, but was less motile than strain AU0158. Using RNA-seq with in vitro grown bacteria, we found ~11% of the genome was differentially expressed in the fixLJ deletion mutant relative to strain AU0158. Multiple flagella-associated genes were down-regulated in the fixLJ deletion mutant, so we also evaluated virulence of a fliC deletion mutant, which lacks a flagellum. We saw no difference in the ability of the fliC deletion mutant to persist in the murine model relative to strain AU0158, suggesting factors other than flagella caused the phenotype of decreased persistence. We found the fixLJ deletion mutant to be less invasive in human lung epithelial and macrophage-like cells. In conclusion, B. dolosa fixLJ is a global regulator that controls biofilm formation, motility, intracellular invasion/persistence, and virulence.

  20. Oxygenated shunting from right to left: a feasibility study of minimized atrio-atrial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for mid-term lung assistance in an acute ovine model†‡

    PubMed Central

    Haushofer, Marcus; Abusabha, Yousef; Amerini, Andrea L.A.; Spillner, Jan; Nix, Christoph; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Goetzenich, Andreas; Hatam, Nima

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Right ventricular failure is often the final phase in acute and chronic respiratory failure. We combined right ventricular unloading with extracorporeal oxygenation in a new atrio-atrial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). METHODS Eleven sheep (65 kg) were cannulated by a 28-Fr inflow cannula to the right atrium and a 25-Fr outflow cannula through the lateral left atrial wall. Both were connected by a serial combination of a microaxial pump (Impella Elect®, Abiomed Europe, Aachen, Germany) and a membrane oxygenator (Novalung®—iLA membrane oxygenator; Novalung GmbH, Hechingen, Germany). In four animals, three subsequent states were evaluated: normal circulation, apneic hypoxia and increased right atrial after load by pulmonary banding. We focused on haemodynamic stability and gas exchange. RESULTS All animals reached the end of the study protocol. In the apnoea phase, the decrease in PaO2 (21.4 ± 3.6 mmHg) immediately recovered (179.1 ± 134.8 mmHg) on-device in continuous apnoea. Right heart failure by excessive after load decreased mean arterial pressure (59 ± 29 mmHg) and increased central venous pressure and systolic right ventricular pressure; PaO2 and SvO2 decreased significantly. On assist, mean arterial pressure (103 ± 29 mmHg), central venous pressure and right ventricular pressure normalized. The SvO2 increased to 89 ± 3% and PaO2 stabilized (129 ± 21 mmHg). CONCLUSIONS We demonstrated the efficacy of a miniaturized atrio-atrial ECMO. Right ventricular unloading was achieved, and gas exchange was well taken over by the Novalung. This allows an effective short- to mid-term treatment of cardiopulmonary failure, successfully combining right ventricular and respiratory bridging. The parallel bypass of the right ventricle and lung circulation permits full unloading of both systems as well as gradual weaning. Further pathologies (e.g. ischaemic right heart failure and acute lung injury) will have to be evaluated. PMID:23543405

  1. Anaemia only causes a small reduction in the upper critical temperature of sea bass: is oxygen delivery the limiting factor for tolerance of acute warming in fishes?

    PubMed

    Wang, Tobias; Lefevre, Sjannie; Iversen, Nina K; Findorf, Inge; Buchanan, Rasmus; McKenzie, David J

    2014-12-15

    To address how the capacity for oxygen transport influences tolerance of acute warming in fishes, we investigated whether a reduction in haematocrit, by means of intra-peritoneal injection of the haemolytic agent phenylhydrazine, lowered the upper critical temperature of sea bass. A reduction in haematocrit from 42±2% to 20±3% (mean ± s.e.m.) caused a significant but minor reduction in upper critical temperature, from 35.8±0.1 to 35.1±0.2°C, with no correlation between individual values for haematocrit and upper thermal limit. Anaemia did not influence the rise in oxygen uptake between 25 and 33°C, because the anaemic fish were able to compensate for reduced blood oxygen carrying capacity with a significant increase in cardiac output. Therefore, in sea bass the upper critical temperature, at which they lost equilibrium, was not determined by an inability of the cardio-respiratory system to meet the thermal acceleration of metabolic demands. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Duration of effects of acute environmental changes on food anticipatory behaviour, feed intake, oxygen consumption, and cortisol release in Atlantic salmon parr.

    PubMed

    Folkedal, Ole; Torgersen, Thomas; Olsen, Rolf Erik; Fernö, Anders; Nilsson, Jonatan; Oppedal, Frode; Stien, Lars H; Kristiansen, Tore S

    2012-01-18

    We compared behavioural and physiological responses and recovery time after different acute environmental challenges in groups of salmon parr. The fish were prior to the study conditioned to a flashing light signalling arrival of food 30 s later to study if the strength of Pavlovian conditioned food anticipatory behaviour can be used to assess how salmon parr cope with various challenges. The effect on anticipatory behaviour was compared to the effect on feed intake and physiological responses of oxygen hyper-consumption and cortisol excretion. The challenges were temperature fluctuation (6.5C° over 4 h), hyperoxia (up to 380% O(2) saturation over 4 h), and intense chasing for 10 min. Cortisol excretion was only elevated after hyperoxia and chasing, and returned to baseline levels after around 3 h or less. Oxygen hyper-consumption persisted for even shorter periods. Feed intake was reduced the first feeding after all challenges and recovered within 3 h after temperature and hyperoxia, but was reduced for days after chasing. Food anticipatory behaviour was reduced for a longer period than feed intake after hyperoxia and was low at least 6 h after chasing. Our findings suggest that a recovery of challenged Atlantic salmon parr to baseline levels of cortisol excretion and oxygen consumption does not mean full recovery of all psychological and physiological effects of environmental challenges, and emphasise the need for measuring several factors including behavioural parameters when assessing fish welfare. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Oxygenation-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke Using T2'/R2' Mapping: Influence of Relative Cerebral Blood Volume.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Alexander; Deichmann, Ralf; Nöth, Ulrike; Pfeilschifter, Waltraud; Berkefeld, Joachim; Singer, Oliver C; Klein, Johannes C; Wagner, Marlies

    2017-06-01

    Quantitative T2'/R2' mapping detect locally increased concentrations of deoxygenated hemoglobin-causing a decrease of T2' and increase of R2'-and might reflect increased cerebral oxygen extraction fraction. Because increases of (relative) cerebral blood volume (rCBV) may influence T2' and R2' through accumulation of deoxygenated hemoglobin, we aimed to investigate the impact of rCBV on T2'/R2' in patients with ischemic stroke. Data from patients with acute internal carotid artery and middle cerebral artery occlusion were analyzed. T2', R2', and rCBV were measured within the ischemic core, slightly and severely hypoperfused areas, and their relationship was examined. A strong negative correlation with rCBV was found for R2' (r=-0.544; P=0.002), and T2' correlated positively with rCBV (r=0.546; P=0.001) in time-to-peak-delayed areas. T2'/R2' within hypoperfused tissue remained unchanged at normal or elevated rCBV levels. T2' decrease/R2' increase within hypoperfused areas in ischemic stroke is not caused by local elevations of rCBV but most probably only by increased cerebral oxygen extraction fraction. However, considering rCBV is crucial to assess extent of oxygen extraction fraction changes by means of T2'/R2'. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. A critical role of acute bronchoconstriction in the mortality associated with high-dose sarin inhalation: effects of epinephrine and oxygen therapies.

    PubMed

    Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Zhuang, Jianguo; Barrett, Edward G; Xu, Fadi; Russell, Robert G; Sopori, Mohan L

    2014-01-15

    Sarin is an organophosphate nerve agent that is among the most lethal chemical toxins known to mankind. Because of its vaporization properties and ease and low cost of production, sarin is the nerve agent with a strong potential for use by terrorists and rouge nations. The primary route of sarin exposure is through inhalation and, depending on the dose, sarin leads to acute respiratory failure and death. The mechanism(s) of sarin-induced respiratory failure is poorly understood. Sarin irreversibly inhibits acetylcholine esterase, leading to excessive synaptic levels of acetylcholine and, we have previously shown that sarin causes marked ventilatory changes including weakened response to hypoxia. We now show that LD50 sarin inhalation causes severe bronchoconstriction in rats, leading to airway resistance, increased hypoxia-induced factor-1α, and severe lung epithelium injury. Transferring animals into 60% oxygen chambers after sarin exposure improved the survival from about 50% to 75% at 24h; however, many animals died within hours after removal from the oxygen chambers. On the other hand, if LD50 sarin-exposed animals were administered the bronchodilator epinephrine, >90% of the animals survived. Moreover, while both epinephrine and oxygen treatments moderated cardiorespiratory parameters, the proinflammatory cytokine surge, and elevated expression of hypoxia-induced factor-1α, only epinephrine consistently reduced the sarin-induced bronchoconstriction. These data suggest that severe bronchoconstriction is a critical factor in the mortality induced by LD50 sarin inhalation, and epinephrine may limit the ventilatory, inflammatory, and lethal effects of sarin.

  5. The role of k+ channels in determining pulmonary vascular tone, oxygen sensing, cell proliferation, and apoptosis: implications in hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moudgil, Rohit; Michelakis, Evangelos D; Archer, Stephen L

    2006-12-01

    Potassium channels are tetrameric, membrane-spanning proteins that selectively conduct K+ at near diffusion-limited rates. Their remarkable ionic selectivity results from a highly-conserved K+ recognition sequence in the pore. The classical function of K+ channels is regulation of membrane potential (EM) and thence vascular tone. In pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC), tonic K+ egress, driven by a 145/5 mM intracellular/extracellular concentration gradient, contributes to a EM of about -60 mV. It has been recently discovered that K+ channels also participate in vascular remodeling by regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis. PASMC express voltage-gated (Kv), inward rectifier (Kir), calcium-sensitive (KCa), and two-pore (K2P) channels. Certain K+ channels are subject to rapid redox regulation by reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from the PASMC's oxygen-sensor (mitochondria and/or NADPH oxidase). Acute hypoxic inhibition of ROS production inhibits Kv1.5, which depolarizes EM, opens voltage-sensitive, L-type calcium channels, elevates cytosolic calcium, and initiates hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). Hypoxia-inhibited K+ currents are not seen in systemic arterial SMCs. Kv expression is also transcriptionally regulated by HIF-1alpha and NFAT. Loss of PASMC Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 contributes to the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by causing a sustained depolarization, which increases intracellular calcium and K+, thereby stimulating cell proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis, respectively. Restoring Kv expression (via Kv1.5 gene therapy, dichloroacetate, or anti-survivin therapy) reduces experimental PAH. Electrophysiological diversity exists within the pulmonary circulation. Resistance PASMC have a homogeneous Kv current (including an oxygen-sensitive component), whereas conduit PASMC current is a Kv/KCa mosaic. This reflects regional differences in expression of channel isoforms, heterotetramers, splice variants, and regulatory

  6. Therapeutic targeting of oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylases abrogates ATF4-dependent neuronal death and improves outcomes after brain hemorrhage in several rodent models

    DOE PAGES

    Karuppagounder, Saravanan S.; Alim, Ishraq; Khim, Soah J.; ...

    2016-03-02

    Disability or death due to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is attributed to blood lysis, liberation of iron and consequent oxidative stress. Iron chelators bind to free iron and prevent neuronal death induced by oxidative stress and disability due to ICH, but the mechanisms for this effect remain unclear. Here we show that the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl-hydroxylase (HIF- PHD) family of iron-dependent oxygen sensing enzymes are effectors of iron chelation. Molecular reduction of the three HIF-PHD enzyme isoforms in mouse striatum improved functional recovery following ICH. A low molecular weight hydroxyquinoline inhibitor of the HIF-PHDs, adaptaquin, reduced neuronal death and behavioral deficitsmore » following ICH in several rodent models without affecting total iron or zinc distribution in the brain. Unexpectedly, protection from oxidative death in vitro or from ICH in vivo by adaptaquin was associated with suppression of expression of the prodeath factor ATF4 rather than activation of a HIF-dependent prosurvival pathway. In conclusion, together these findings demonstrate that brain-specific inactivation of the HIF-PHD metalloenzymes with the blood-brain barrier permeable inhibitor adaptaquin can improve functional outcomes following ICH in multiple rodent species.« less

  7. Therapeutic targeting of oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylases abrogates ATF4-dependent neuronal death and improves outcomes after brain hemorrhage in several rodent models

    SciTech Connect

    Karuppagounder, Saravanan S.; Alim, Ishraq; Khim, Soah J.; Bourassa, Megan W.; Sleiman, Sama F.; John, Roseleen; Thinnes, Cyrille C.; Yeh, Tzu-Lan; Demetriades, Marina; Neitemeier, Sandra; Cruz, Dana; Gazaryan, Irina; Killilea, David W.; Morgenstern, Lewis; Xi, Guohu; Keep, Richard F.; Schallert, Timothy; Tappero, Ryan V.; Zhong, Jian; Cho, Sunghee; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Holman, T. R.; Culmsee, Carsten; Fong, Guo-Hua -H.; Su, Yijing; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun; Cave, John W.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Colbourne, Frederick; Coppola, Giovanni; Ratan, Rajiv R.

    2016-03-02

    Disability or death due to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is attributed to blood lysis, liberation of iron and consequent oxidative stress. Iron chelators bind to free iron and prevent neuronal death induced by oxidative stress and disability due to ICH, but the mechanisms for this effect remain unclear. Here we show that the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl-hydroxylase (HIF- PHD) family of iron-dependent oxygen sensing enzymes are effectors of iron chelation. Molecular reduction of the three HIF-PHD enzyme isoforms in mouse striatum improved functional recovery following ICH. A low molecular weight hydroxyquinoline inhibitor of the HIF-PHDs, adaptaquin, reduced neuronal death and behavioral deficits following ICH in several rodent models without affecting total iron or zinc distribution in the brain. Unexpectedly, protection from oxidative death in vitro or from ICH in vivo by adaptaquin was associated with suppression of expression of the prodeath factor ATF4 rather than activation of a HIF-dependent prosurvival pathway. In conclusion, together these findings demonstrate that brain-specific inactivation of the HIF-PHD metalloenzymes with the blood-brain barrier permeable inhibitor adaptaquin can improve functional outcomes following ICH in multiple rodent species.

  8. Development of a Remote Sensing Small Satellite for Temperature Sounding in the Mesosphere/Lower Thermosphere by Measurement of the Oxygen Atmospheric Band Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiml, Michael; Kaufmann, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Coupling processes initiated by gravity waves in the middle atmosphere have increasing importance for the modeling of the climate system and represent one of the larger uncertainties in this field. To support new modeling efforts spatially resolved measurements of wave fields are very beneficial. This contribution proposes a new small satellite mission based on a three unit CubeSat form factor to observe the Oxygen Atmospheric Band emission around 762 nm for temperature derivation in a limb sounding configuration to characterize gravity waves. The satellite instrument resolves individual rotational lines whose intensities follow a Boltzmann law allowing for the derivation of temperature from the relative structure of these lines. The employed Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer is characterized by its high throughput at a small form factor, allowing to perform scientific remote sensing measurements within a small satellite during day and night. The spectrometer consists of a thermally stabilized solid block and has no moving parts, which increases its reliability in orbit while allowing high precision measurements within a small volume. The instrument is verified in its precursor mission, the Atmospheric Heterodyne Interferometer Test (AtmoHIT), within the REXUS/BEXUS ballistic rocket flight campaign. The description of the flight campaign and the results thereof conclude this contribution.

  9. Therapeutic targeting of oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylases abrogates ATF4-dependent neuronal death and improves outcomes after brain hemorrhage in several rodent models.

    PubMed

    Karuppagounder, Saravanan S; Alim, Ishraq; Khim, Soah J; Bourassa, Megan W; Sleiman, Sama F; John, Roseleen; Thinnes, Cyrille C; Yeh, Tzu-Lan; Demetriades, Marina; Neitemeier, Sandra; Cruz, Dana; Gazaryan, Irina; Killilea, David W; Morgenstern, Lewis; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F; Schallert, Timothy; Tappero, Ryan V; Zhong, Jian; Cho, Sunghee; Maxfield, Frederick R; Holman, Theodore R; Culmsee, Carsten; Fong, Guo-Hua; Su, Yijing; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun; Cave, John W; Schofield, Christopher J; Colbourne, Frederick; Coppola, Giovanni; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2016-03-02

    Disability or death due to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is attributed to blood lysis, liberation of iron, and consequent oxidative stress. Iron chelators bind to free iron and prevent neuronal death induced by oxidative stress and disability due to ICH, but the mechanisms for this effect remain unclear. We show that the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase domain (HIF-PHD) family of iron-dependent, oxygen-sensing enzymes are effectors of iron chelation. Molecular reduction of the three HIF-PHD enzyme isoforms in the mouse striatum improved functional recovery after ICH. A low-molecular-weight hydroxyquinoline inhibitor of the HIF-PHD enzymes, adaptaquin, reduced neuronal death and behavioral deficits after ICH in several rodent models without affecting total iron or zinc distribution in the brain. Unexpectedly, protection from oxidative death in vitro or from ICH in vivo by adaptaquin was associated with suppression of activity of the prodeath factor ATF4 rather than activation of an HIF-dependent prosurvival pathway. Together, these findings demonstrate that brain-specific inactivation of the HIF-PHD metalloenzymes with the blood-brain barrier-permeable inhibitor adaptaquin can improve functional outcomes after ICH in several rodent models.

  10. Therapeutic targeting of oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylases abrogates ATF4-dependent neuronal death and improves outcomes after brain hemorrhage in several rodent models

    PubMed Central

    Karuppagounder, Saravanan S.; Alim, Ishraq; Khim, Soah J.; Bourassa, Megan W.; Sleiman, Sama F.; John, Roseleen; Thinnes, Cyrille C.; Yeh, Tzu-Lan; Demetriades, Marina; Neitemeier, Sandra; Cruz, Dana; Gazaryan, Irina; Killilea, David W.; Morgenstern, Lewis; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F.; Schallert, Timothy; Tappero, Ryan V.; Zhong, Jian; Cho, Sunghee; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Holman, Theodore R.; Culmsee, Carsten; Fong, Guo-Hua; Su, Yijing; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun; Cave, John W.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Colbourne, Frederick; Coppola, Giovanni; Ratan, Rajiv R.

    2017-01-01

    Disability or death due to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is attributed to blood lysis, liberation of iron, and consequent oxidative stress. Iron chelators bind to free iron and prevent neuronal death induced by oxidative stress and disability due to ICH, but the mechanisms for this effect remain unclear. We show that the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase domain (HIF-PHD) family of iron-dependent, oxygen-sensing enzymes are effectors of iron chelation. Molecular reduction of the three HIF-PHD enzyme isoforms in the mouse striatum improved functional recovery after ICH. A low-molecular-weight hydroxyquinoline inhibitor of the HIF-PHD enzymes, adaptaquin, reduced neuronal death and behavioral deficits after ICH in several rodent models without affecting total iron or zinc distribution in the brain. Unexpectedly, protection from oxidative death in vitro or from ICH in vivo by adaptaquin was associated with suppression of activity of the prodeath factor ATF4 rather than activation of an HIF-dependent prosurvival pathway. Together, these findings demonstrate that brain-specific inactivation of the HIF-PHD metalloenzymes with the blood-brain barrier-permeable inhibitor adaptaquin can improve functional outcomes after ICH in several rodent models. PMID:26936506

  11. Phytoglobin: a novel nomenclature for plant globins accepted by the globin community at the 2014 XVIII conference on Oxygen-Binding and Sensing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robert; Hargrove, Mark; Arredondo-Peter, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) is a heme-containing protein found in the red blood cells of vertebrates. For many years, the only known Hb-like molecule in plants was leghemoglobin (Lb). The discovery that other Hb-like proteins existed in plants led to the term “nonsymbiotic Hbs (nsHbs)” to differentiate them from the Lbs. While this terminology was adequate in the early stages of research on the protein, the complexity of the research in this area necessitates a change in the definition of these proteins to delineate them from red blood cell Hb. At the 2014 XVIII Conference on Oxygen-Binding and Sensing Proteins, the group devoted to the study of heme-containing proteins, this issue was discussed and a consensus was reached on a proposed name change. We propose Phytoglobin (Phytogb) as a logical, descriptive name to describe a heme-containing (Hb-like) protein found in plants. It will be readily recognized by the research community without a prolonged explanation of the origin of the term. The classification system that has been established can essentially remain unchanged substituting Phytogb in place of nsHb. Here, we present a guide to the new nomenclature, with reference to the existing terminology and a phylogenetic scheme, placing the known Phytogbs in the new nomenclature. PMID:26998237

  12. Relationship Between Changes in the Temporal Dynamics of the Blood-Oxygen-Level-Dependent Signal and Hypoperfusion in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Ahmed A; Ostwaldt, Ann-Christin; Nierhaus, Till; Ganeshan, Ramanan; Audebert, Heinrich J; Villringer, Kersten; Villringer, Arno; Fiebach, Jochen B

    2017-04-01

    Changes in the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal provide a noninvasive measure of blood flow, but a detailed comparison with established perfusion parameters in acute stroke is lacking. We investigated the relationship between BOLD signal temporal delay and dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) in stroke patients. In 30 patients with acute (<24 hours) ischemic stroke, we performed Pearson correlation and multiple linear regression between DSC-MRI parameters (time to maximum [Tmax], mean transit time, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral blood volume) and BOLD-based parameters (BOLD delay and coefficient of BOLD variation). Prediction of severe hypoperfusion (Tmax >6 seconds) was assessed using receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. Correlation was highest between Tmax and BOLD delay (venous sinus reference; time shift range 7; median r=0.60; interquartile range=0.49-0.71). Coefficient of BOLD variation correlated with cerebral blood volume (median r= 0.37; interquartile range=0.24-0.51). Mean R(2) for predicting BOLD delay by DSC-MRI was 0.54 (SD=0.2) and for predicting coefficient of BOLD variation was 0.37 (SD=0.17). BOLD delay (whole-brain reference, time shift range 3) had an area under the curve of 0.76 for predicting severe hypoperfusion (sensitivity=69.2%; specificity=80%), whereas BOLD delay (venous sinus reference, time shift range 3) had an area under the curve of 0.76 (sensitivity=67.3%; specificity=83.5%). BOLD delay is related to macrovascular delay and microvascular hypoperfusion, can identify severely hypoperfused tissue in acute stroke, and is a promising alternative to gadolinium contrast agent-based perfusion assessment in acute stroke. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00715533 and NCT02077582. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Greater endurance capacity and improved dyspnoea with acute oxygen supplementation in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients without resting hypoxaemia.

    PubMed

    Dowman, Leona M; McDonald, Christine F; Bozinovski, Steven; Vlahos, Ross; Gillies, Rebecca; Pouniotis, Dodie; Hill, Catherine J; Goh, Nicole S L; Holland, Anne E

    2017-07-01

    Supplemental oxygen is commonly prescribed in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), although its benefits have not been proven. The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of oxygen on oxidative stress, cytokine production, skeletal muscle metabolism and physiological response to exercise in IPF. Eleven participants with IPF received either oxygen, at an FiO2 of 0.50, or compressed air for 1 h at rest and during a cycle endurance test at 85% of peak work rate. Blood samples collected at rest and during exercise were analysed for markers of oxidative stress, skeletal muscle metabolism and cytokines. The protocol was repeated a week later with the alternate intervention. Compared with air, oxygen did not adversely affect biomarker concentrations at rest and significantly improved endurance time (mean difference = 99 ± 81s, P = 0.002), dyspnoea (-1 ± 1 U, P = 0.02), systolic blood pressure (BP; -11 ± 11 mm Hg, P = 0.006), nadir oxyhaemoglobin saturation (SpO2 ; 8 ± 6%, P = 0.001), SpO2 at 2-min (7 ± 6%, P = 0.003) and 5-min isotimes (5 ± 3, P < 0.001) and peak exercise xanthine concentrations (-42 ± 73 µmol/L, P = 0.03). Air significantly increased IL-10 (5 ± 5 pg/mL, P = 0.04) at 2-min isotime. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARs), IL-6, TNF-α, creatine kinase, lactate, heart rate and fatigue did not differ between the two interventions at any time point. In patients with IPF, breathing oxygen at FiO2 of 0.50 at rest seems safe. During exercise, oxygen improves exercise tolerance, alleviates exercise-induced hypoxaemia and reduces dyspnoea. A potential relationship between oxygen administration and improved skeletal muscle metabolism should be explored in future studies. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  14. Effects of different inspired oxygen fractions on sildenafil-induced pulmonary anti-hypertensive effects in a sheep model of acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Diana Rocío Becerra; Teixeira-Neto, Francisco José; Paola Lagos-Carvajal, Angie; Steim-Diniz, Miriely; Rodríguez, Nathalia Celeita; Dias-Junior, Carlos Alan

    2015-04-15

    Sildenafil is a pulmonary anti-hypertensive agent whose action could be modified by different fractions of inspired oxygen (FiO2). We compared the effects of pure oxygen (FiO2 > 90%) or room air (21% FiO2) on the cardiopulmonary actions of sildenafil in sheep with acute pulmonary embolism (APE). Thirty-two anesthetized, mechanically ventilated sheep (34.9 ± 5.4 kg), were randomly distributed into four groups (n = 8 per group): FiO2 > 90% without intervention; APE induced by microspheres with FiO2 > 90%, followed 30 min later by placebo (Emb90); or APE followed 30 min later by intravenous sildenafil (0.7 mg/kg over 30 min) with FiO2 > 90% (Emb + Sild90) or 21% FiO2 (Emb + Sild21) [Corrected]. Variables were recorded until 30 min after the end of treatment administration. Microsphere injection increased (P < 0.05) mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP) in all embolized groups (111-140% higher than that of baseline). Compared with values recorded 30 min after induction of APE (E30), sildenafil induced greater decreases in MPAP in the Emb + Sil90 group than in the Emb + Sil21 group (23% and 14% lower than E30, respectively). Hypotension (mean arterial pressure < 60 mm Hg) was precipitated by sildenafil due to systemic vasodilation in the Emb + Sil21 group. Embolization lowered the PaO2/FiO2 ratio and increased venous admixture, but sildenafil did not alter the oxygenation impairment induced by APE. Sildenafil induces a more consistent pulmonary anti-hypertensive effect and causes less interference with the systemic circulation with the concomitant use of pure oxygen than that with room air in the APE setting.

  15. Use of a dual lumen cannula for venovenous extra corporeal membrane oxygenation in a patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome and a previously inserted inferior vena cava filter: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Palizas Jr., Fernando; García, Christian Casabella; Norese, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is used in refractory hypoxemia in many clinical settings. Thoracic trauma patients usually develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. Due to high risk of bleeding, thrombotic complications present in this context are particularly difficult to manage and usually require insertion of an inferior vena cava filter to prevent embolism from the distal veins to the pulmonary circulation. Here, we present a case of a thoracic trauma patient with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome requiring venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation via a right internal jugular double lumen cannula due to a previously inserted inferior vena cava filter caused by distal bilateral calf muscle vein deep vein thrombosis. PMID:27096680

  16. Bloodless reperfusion with the oxygen carrier HBOC-201 in acute myocardial infarction: a novel platform for cardioprotective probes delivery.

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, Jose M; Galán-Arriola, Carlos; Fernández-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Aguero, Jaume; Sánchez-González, Javier; García-Alvarez, Ana; Nuno-Ayala, Mario; Dubé, Gregory P; Zafirelis, Zafiris; López-Martín, Gonzalo J; Bernal, Juan A; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique; Fuster, Valentín; Ibáñez, Borja

    2017-03-01

    Reperfusion, despite being required for myocardial salvage, is associated with additional injury. We hypothesize that infarct size (IS) will be reduced by a period of bloodless reperfusion with hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOC) before blood-flow restoration. In the pig model, we first characterized the impact of intracoronary perfusion with a fixed volume (600 ml) of a pre-oxygenated acellular HBOC, HBOC-201, on the healthy myocardium. HBOC-201 was administered through the lumen of the angioplasty balloon (i.e., distal to the occlusion site) immediately after onset of coronary occlusion at 1, 0.7, 0.4, or 0.2 ml/kg/min for 12, 17, 30, and 60 min, respectively, followed by blood-flow restoration. Outcome measures were systemic hemodynamics and LV performance assessed by the state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. The best performing HBOC-201 perfusion strategies were then tested for their impact on LV performance during myocardial infarction, in pigs subjected to 45 min mid-left anterior descending (LAD) coronary occlusion. At the end of the ischemia duration, pigs were randomized to regular reperfusion (blood-only reperfusion) vs. bloodless reperfusion (perfusion with pre-oxygenated HBOC-201 distal to the occlusion site), followed by blood-flow restoration. Hemodynamics and CMR-measured LV performance were assessed at 7- and 45-day follow-up. In modifications of the HBOC-201 procedure, glucose and insulin were included to support cardiac metabolism. A total of 66 pigs were included in this study. Twenty healthy pigs (5 per infusion protocol) were used in the study of healthy myocardium. Intracoronary administration of HBOC-201 (600 ml) at varying rates, including a flow of 0.4 ml/kg/min (corresponding to a maximum perfusion time of 30 min), did not damage the healthy myocardium. Slower perfusion (longer infusion time) was associated with permanent LV dysfunction and myocardial necrosis. A total of 46 pigs underwent MI induction

  17. Sense of coherence--a determinant of quality of life over time in older female acute myocardial infarction survivors.

    PubMed

    Norekvål, Tone M; Fridlund, Bengt; Moons, Philip; Nordrehaug, Jan E; Saevareid, Hans I; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Hanestad, Berit R

    2010-03-01

    To determine the relationships between different sense of coherence levels and quality of life, and in older female myocardial infarction survivors; to investigate how socio-demographic, clinical characteristics, sense of coherence self-reported symptoms and function affect quality of life; and to determine whether sense of coherence and quality of life are stable during a six-month follow-up. Myocardial infraction confers new physical and mental challenges. However, research on sense of coherence and other factors involved in maintaining physical, psychosocial and environmental aspects of quality of life in older female myocardial infraction survivors is scant. Survey. A postal survey was conducted of 145 women, aged 62-80 years, three months to five years after myocardial infarction (T1), with a follow-up after six months (T2). Self-reported socio-demographic and clinical data and hospital medical records data were collected. The sense of coherence scale (SOC-29) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument Abbreviated (WHOQOL-BREF) were used. We found a significant difference in quality of life between weak, moderate, and strong sense of coherence groups (p<0.001). Sense of coherence contributed to the level of all quality of life domains (p<0.001). Several clinical characteristics contributed to quality of life: (1) physical domain: comorbidities (p<0.001), previous myocardial infarction (p = 0.013), ejection fraction (p<0.011), length of hospital stay (p = 0.005) symptoms and function (p<0.001); (2) psychological domain: previous myocardial infarction (p = 0.031) and symptoms and function (p<0.001); and (3) environmental domain: education (p = 0.033) and symptoms and function (p = 0.003). On group level, both sense of coherence and quality of life were stable. Experiencing specific health changes (p<0.001), not major life events, influenced quality of life during the six-month follow-up. Sense of coherence was an important stable determinant of

  18. Does one's sense of coherence change after an acute myocardial infarction? A two-year longitudinal study in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Eva; Malm, Dan; Berterö, Carina; Karlsson, Jan-Erik

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess changes in the sense of coherence of patients who had suffered their first myocardial infarction. Out of 100 patients at the start of the study, these changes were evaluated in 66 men and 18 women aged 36-70 years. Generally, the sense of coherence was found to be stable among the whole group, but there were significant individual variations in its development in some of the participants over the following years. Even the individuals with an initally high sense of coherence could experience a decrease in its level. The changes that were found in the men can be explained by their marital status, level of treatment satisfaction, disease perception/quality of life, physical limitation, and alcohol intake and/or tobacco use at the baseline. An unexpected finding was that the single men with an initially high sense of coherence experienced a decreased level over time. In order to maintain or increase patients' sense of coherence, it is important for nurses to help them identify their risk factors and to provide conditions for individualized cardiac rehabilitation in order to avoid another myocardial infarction. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Severe Acute Cardiopulmonary Failure Related to Gadobutrol Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Reaction: Successful Resuscitation With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Guru, Pramod K; Bohman, J Kyle; Fleming, Chad J; Tan, Hon L; Sanghavi, Devang K; De Moraes, Alice Gallo; Barsness, Gregory W; Wittwer, Erica D; King, Bernard F; Arteaga, Grace M; Flick, Randall; Schears, Gregory J

    2016-03-01

    Nonanaphylactic noncardiogenic pulmonary edema leading to cardiorespiratory arrest related to the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadobutrol has rarely been reported in the literature. Rarer is the association of hypokalemia with acidosis. We report 2 patients who had severe pulmonary edema associated with the use of gadobutrol contrast in the absence of other inciting agents or events. These cases were unique not only for their rare and severe presentations but also because they exemplified the increasing role of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in resuscitation. Emergency extracorporeal membrane oxygenation resuscitation can be rapidly initiated and successful in the setting of a well-organized workflow, and it is a viable alternative and helps improve patient outcome in cases refractory to conventional resuscitative measures.

  20. Bi-caval dual lumen venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and high-frequency percussive ventilatory support for postintubation tracheal injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Julie C; Topjian, Alexis A; McInnes, Andrew D; Mattei, Peter; McCloskey, John J; Friess, Stuart H; Kilbaugh, Todd J

    2011-12-01

    Bi-caval dual lumen venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) as a nonoperative approach to postintubation tracheal injury has not been described. We report the case of a 7-year-old boy who sustained a postintubation tracheal injury, developed acute respiratory distress syndrome from aspiration and viral pneumonitis, and was supported on bi-caval dual lumen VV-ECMO for 16 days until the trachea healed without surgical repair. Before ECMO decannulation, high-frequency percussive ventilation using a volumetric diffusive respiration ventilator was used for lung recruitment and airway clearance without disruption of the healed trachea. The use of ECMO to allow for lower mean airway pressure during initial healing and high-frequency percussive ventilation for lung recruitment and secretion clearance is a promising strategy to allow nonoperative tracheal injury repair in critically ill patients with multiple comorbidities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of the Pulsatile Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation on Hemodynamic Energy and Systemic Microcirculation in a Piglet Model of Acute Cardiac Failure.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Hideshi; Ichiba, Shingo; Ujike, Yoshihito; Douguchi, Takuma; Obata, Hideaki; Inamori, Syuji; Iwasaki, Tatsuo; Kasahara, Shingo; Sano, Shunji; Ündar, Akif

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of pulsatile and nonpulsatile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) on hemodynamic energy and systemic microcirculation in an acute cardiac failure model in piglets. Fourteen piglets with a mean body weight of 6.08 ± 0.86 kg were divided into pulsatile (N = 7) and nonpulsatile (N = 7) ECMO groups. The experimental ECMO circuit consisted of a centrifugal pump, a membrane oxygenator, and a pneumatic pulsatile flow generator system developed in-house. Nonpulsatile ECMO was initiated at a flow rate of 140 mL/kg/min for the first 30 min with normal heart beating, with rectal temperature maintained at 36°C. Ventricular fibrillation was then induced with a 3.5-V alternating current to generate a cardiac dysfunction model. Using this model, we collected the data on pulsatile and nonpulsatile groups. The piglets were weaned off ECMO at the end of the experiment (180 min after ECMO was initiated). The animals did not receive blood transfusions, inotropic drugs, or vasoactive drugs. Blood samples were collected to measure hemoglobin, methemoglobin, blood gases, electrolytes, and lactic acid levels. Hemodynamic energy was calculated using the Shepard's energy equivalent pressure. Near-infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor brain and kidney perfusion. The pulsatile ECMO group had a higher atrial pressure (systolic and mean), and significantly higher regional saturation at the brain level, than the nonpulsatile group (for both, P < 0.05). Additionally, the pulsatile ECMO group had higher methemoglobin levels within the normal range than the nonpulsatile group. Our study demonstrated that pulsatile ECMO produces significantly higher hemodynamic energy and improves systemic microcirculation, compared with nonpulsatile ECMO in acute cardiac failure.

  2. Effects of pulmonary static inflation with 50% xenon on oxygen impairment during cardiopulmonary bypass for stanford type A acute aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Mu; Yang, Yanwei; Pan, Xudong; Lu, Jiakai; Zhang, Zhiquan; Cheng, Weiping

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of pulmonary static inflation with 50% xenon on postoperative oxygen impairment during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for Stanford type A acute aortic dissection (AAD). Methods: This prospective single-center nonrandomized controlled clinical trial included 100 adult patients undergoing surgery for Stanford type A AAD at an academic hospital in China. Fifty subjects underwent pulmonary static inflation with 50% oxygen from January 2013 to January 2014, and 50 underwent inflation with 50% xenon from January 2014 to December 2014. During CPB, the lungs were inflated with either 50% xenon (xenon group) or 50% oxygen (control group) to maintain an airway pressure of 5 cm H2O. The primary outcome was oxygenation index (OI) value after intubation, and 10 minutes and 6 hours after the operation. The second outcome was cytokine and reactive oxygen species levels after intubation and 10 minutes, 6 hours, and 24 hours after the operation. Results: Patients treated with xenon had lower OI levels compared to the control group before surgery (P = 0.002); however, there was no difference in postoperative values between the 2 groups. Following surgery, mean maximal OI values decreased by 18.8% and 33.8%, respectively, in the xenon and control groups. After surgery, the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha, and thromboxane B2 decreased by 23.5%, 9.1%, and 30.2%, respectively, in the xenon group, but increased by 10.8%, 26.2%, and 26.4%, respectively, in the control group. Moreover, IL-10 levels increased by 28% in the xenon group and decreased by 7.5% in the control group. There were significant time and treatment-time interaction effects on methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (P = 0.000 and P = 0.050, respectively) and myeloperoxidase (P = 0.000 and P = 0.001 in xenon and control groups, respectively). There was no difference in hospital mortality and 1-year

  3. Detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the oxidant-sensing probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, Rajesh P.; Singh, Shailendra P.; Haeder, Donat-P.; Sinha, Rajeshwar P.

    2010-07-02

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under simulated solar radiation (UV-B: 0.30 Wm{sup -2}, UV-A: 25.70 Wm{sup -2} and PAR: 118.06 Wm{sup -2}) was studied in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937 using the oxidant-sensing fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). DCFH-DA is a nonpolar dye, converted into the polar derivative DCFH by cellular esterases that are nonfluorescent but switched to highly fluorescent DCF when oxidized by intracellular ROS and other peroxides. The images obtained from the fluorescence microscope after 12 h of irradiation showed green fluorescence from cells covered with 295, 320 or 395 nm cut-off filters, indicating the generation of ROS in all treatments. However, the green/red fluorescence ratio obtained from fluorescence microscopic analysis showed the highest generation of ROS after UV-B radiation in comparison to PAR or UV-A radiation. Production of ROS was also measured by a spectrofluorophotometer and results obtained supported the results of fluorescence microscopy. Low levels of ROS were detected at the start (0 h) of the experiment showing that they are generated even during normal metabolism. This study also showed that UV-B radiation causes the fragmentation of the cyanobacterial filaments which could be due to the observed oxidative stress. This is the first report for the detection of intracellular ROS in a cyanobacterium by fluorescence microscopy using DCFH-DA and thereby suggesting the applicability of this method in the study of in vivo generation of ROS.

  4. Heme-independent Redox Sensing by the Heme-Nitric Oxide/Oxygen-binding Protein (H-NOX) from Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadyay, Roma; Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Schaub, Tanner; Yukl, Erik T

    2016-08-19

    Heme nitric oxide/oxygen (H-NOX)-binding proteins act as nitric oxide (NO) sensors among various bacterial species. In several cases, they act to mediate communal behavior such as biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and motility by influencing the activity of downstream signaling proteins such as histidine kinases (HisKa) in a NO-dependent manner. An H-NOX/HisKa regulatory circuit was recently identified in Vibrio cholerae, and the H-NOX protein has been spectroscopically characterized. However, the influence of the H-NOX protein on HisKa autophosphorylation has not been evaluated. This process may be important for persistence and pathogenicity in this organism. Here, we have expressed and purified the V. cholerae HisKa (HnoK) and H-NOX in its heme-bound (holo) and heme-free (apo) forms. Autophosphorylation assays of HnoK in the presence of H-NOX show that the holoprotein in the Fe(II)-NO and Fe(III) forms is a potent inhibitor of HnoK. Activity of the Fe(III) form and aerobic instability of the Fe(II) form suggested that Vibrio cholerae H-NOX may act as a sensor of the redox state as well as NO. Remarkably, the apoprotein also showed robust HnoK inhibition that was dependent on the oxidation of cysteine residues to form disulfide bonds at a highly conserved zinc site. The importance of cysteine in this process was confirmed by mutagenesis, which also showed that holo Fe(III), but not Fe(II)-NO, H-NOX relied heavily upon cysteine for activation. These results highlight a heme-independent mechanism for activation of V. cholerae H-NOX that implicates this protein as a dual redox/NO sensor. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. AirSR, a [2Fe-2S] cluster-containing two-component system, mediates global oxygen sensing and redox signaling in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Ji, Quanjiang; Jones, Marcus B; Deng, Xin; Liang, Haihua; Frank, Bryan; Telser, Joshua; Peterson, Scott N; Bae, Taeok; He, Chuan

    2012-01-11

    Oxygen sensing and redox signaling significantly affect bacterial physiology and host-pathogen interaction. Here we show that a Staphylococcus aureus two-component system, AirSR (anaerobic iron-sulfur cluster-containing redox sensor regulator, formerly YhcSR), responds to oxidation signals (O(2), H(2)O(2), NO, etc) by using a redox-active [2Fe-2S] cluster in the sensor kinase AirS. Mutagenesis studies demonstrate that the [2Fe-2S] cluster is essential for the kinase activity of AirS. We have also discovered that a homologue of IscS (SA1450) in S. aureus is active as a cysteine desulfurase, which enables the in vitro reconstitution of the [2Fe-2S] cluster in AirS. Phosphorylation assays show that the oxidized AirS with a [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster is the fully active form of the kinase but not the apo-AirS nor the reduced AirS possessing a [2Fe-2S](+) cluster. Overoxidation by prolonged exposure to O(2) or contact with H(2)O(2) or NO led to inactivation of AirS. Transcriptome analysis revealed that mutation of airR impacts the expression of ~355 genes under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, the mutant strain displayed increased resistance toward H(2)O(2), vancomycin, norfloxacin, and ciprofloxacin under anaerobic conditions. Together, our results show that S. aureus AirSR is a redox-dependent global regulatory system that plays important roles in gene regulation using a redox active Fe-S cluster under O(2)-limited conditions. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. Effects of calcium-sensing receptors on apoptosis in rat hippocampus during hypoxia/re-oxygenation through the ERK1/2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Li; Wang, Shilei; Li, Shuhong; Li, Yu; Zhang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the effects of calcium-sensing receptors (CaSR) on apoptosis in rat hippocampus during hypoxia/re-oxygenation (H/R). Methods: After post-culturing of isolated rat hippocampus, the cultures were subjected to H/R, meanwhile gadolinium chloride (GdCl3, agonist of CaSR) and NPS 2390 (antagonists of CaSR) was added to reperfusion solution. The number of hippocampal neuron, cell proliferation assay and apoptosis rate was determined by inverted microscope, 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and flow cytometer (FCM). Besides, caspase-3, Bax, cytochrome C (Cyt-c), extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2, pERK1/2, P38 and pP38 were analyzed by western blotting. Results: The hippocampal neuron number and cell viability were significantly decreased after H/R treatment, and were further significantly reduced when co-treatment with CaSR agonist GdCl3. But the effects of GdCl3 were attenuated by NPS-2390. Whereas, apoptosis rate, the expression level of caspase-3, Bax and Cyt-c were all significantly increased under H/R condition, and was further significantly increased by GdCl3, but were reversed by NPS-2390 (P < 0.05). Moreover, there were no significant differences in expression of ERK1/2, P38 and pP38 among different groups. However, the expression of pERK1/2 was significantly increased after H/R treatment, but was significantly reduced by NPS 2390 (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results suggest that CaSR might play significant roles in the induction of hippocampus apoptosis in rat during H/R through phosphorylation of ERK1/2. PMID:26550201

  7. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Prevents Murine Antibody-Mediated Acute Lung Injury at the Level of Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Production

    PubMed Central

    Semple, John W.; Kim, Michael; Hou, Jing; McVey, Mark; Lee, Young Jin; Tabuchi, Arata; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Chai, Zhong-Wei; Lazarus, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a leading cause of transfusion-associated mortality that can occur with any type of transfusion and is thought to be primarily due to donor antibodies activating pulmonary neutrophils in recipients. Recently, a large prospective case controlled clinical study of cardiac surgery patients demonstrated that despite implementation of male donors, a high incidence of TRALI still occurred and suggested a need for additional interventions in susceptible patient populations. To examine if intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) may be effective, a murine model of antibody-mediated acute lung injury that approximates human TRALI was examined. When BALB/c mice were injected with the anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibody 34-1-2s, mild shock (reduced rectal temperature) and respiratory distress (dyspnea) were observed and pre-treatment of the mice with 2 g/kg IVIg completely prevented these symptoms. To determine IVIg's usefulness to affect severe lung damage, SCID mice, previously shown to be hypersensitive to 34-1-2s were used. SCID mice treated with 34-1-2s underwent severe shock, lung damage (increased wet/dry ratios) and 40% mortality within 2 hours. Treatment with 2 g/kg IVIg 18 hours before 34-1-2s administration completely protected the mice from all adverse events. Treatment with IVIg after symptoms began also reduced lung damage and mortality. While the prophylactic IVIg administration did not affect 34-1-2s-induced pulmonary neutrophil accumulation, bone marrow-derived neutrophils from the IVIg-treated mice displayed no spontaneous ROS production nor could they be stimulated in vitro with fMLP or 34-1-2s. These results suggest that IVIg prevents murine antibody-mediated acute lung injury at the level of neutrophil ROS production and thus, alleviating tissue damage. PMID:22363629

  8. A nutritional strategy to improve oxygenation and decrease morbidity in patients who have acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    DeMichele, Stephen J; Wood, Steven M; Wennberg, Ann K

    2006-12-01

    Enteral nutrition is increasingly becoming the standard of care for critically ill patients with the goal of providing nutritional support that prevents nutritional deficiencies and reduces morbidity. Furthermore, the development of nutritional strategies that dampen inflammation is an encouraging advance in the management of patients who have acute respiratory distress syndrome. This article discusses evidence from randomized, controlled studies that the use of a specialized nutritional formula containing eicosapentaenoic acid plus gamma-linolenic acid and elevated antioxidants offer physiologic and anti-inflammatory benefits over standard formulas.

  9. Does high-flow nasal cannula oxygen improve outcome in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Si-Ming; Liu, Kai-Xiong; Lin, Zhi-Hong; Lin, Pei-Hong

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) in the rate of intubation and mortality for patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. We searched Pubmed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for relevant studies. Two reviewers extracted data and reviewed the quality of the studies independently. The primary outcome was the rate of intubation; secondary outcome was mortality in the hospital. Study-level data were pooled using a random-effects model when I2 was >50% or a fixed-effects model when I2 was <50%. Eight randomized controlled studies with a total of 1,818patients were considered. Pooled analysis showed that no statistically significant difference was found between groups regarding the rate of intubation (odds ratio [OR] = 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.60-1.04; P = 0.09; I2 = 36%) and no statistically significant difference was found between groups regarding hospital mortality (OR = 0.89; 95% CI: 0.62-127; P = 0.51; I2 = 47%). The use of HFNC showed a trend toward reduction in the intubation rate, which did not meet statistical significance, in patients with acute respiratory failure compared with conventional oxygen therapy (COT) and noninvasive ventilation (NIV). Moreover no difference in mortality. So, Large, well-designed, randomized, multi-center trials are needed to confirm the effects of HFNC in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute ascorbic acid ingestion increases skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen consumption via local vasodilation during graded handgrip exercise in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jennifer C.; Crecelius, Anne R.; Larson, Dennis G.

    2015-01-01

    Human aging is associated with reduced skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise, which may be a result of impaired endothelium-dependent dilation and/or attenuated ability to blunt sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction. Intra-arterial infusion of ascorbic acid (AA) increases nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation and forearm blood flow (FBF) during handgrip exercise in older adults, yet it remains unknown whether an acute oral dose can similarly improve FBF or enhance the ability to blunt sympathetic vasoconstriction during exercise. We hypothesized that 1) acute oral AA would improve FBF (Doppler ultrasound) and oxygen consumption (V̇o2) via local vasodilation during graded rhythmic handgrip exercise in older adults (protocol 1), and 2) AA ingestion would not enhance sympatholysis in older adults during handgrip exercise (protocol 2). In protocol 1 (n = 8; 65 ± 3 yr), AA did not influence FBF or V̇o2 during rest or 5% maximal v