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Sample records for acute pain syndromes

  1. Acute Abdominal Pain Secondary to Chilaiditi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Andrew S.; Lopez, Michael A.; Buicko, Jessica L.; Lopez-Viego, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Chilaiditi syndrome is a rare condition occurring in 0.025% to 0.28% of the population. In these patients, the colon is displaced and caught between the liver and the right hemidiaphragm. Patients' symptoms can range from asymptomatic to acute intermittent bowel obstruction. Diagnosis is best achieved with CT imaging. Identification of Chilaiditi syndrome is clinically significant as it can lead to many significant complications such as volvulus, perforation, and bowel obstruction. If the patient is symptomatic, treatment is usually conservative. Surgery is rarely indicated with indications including ischemia and failure of resolution with conservative management. PMID:23936720

  2. Chest Pain in Adolescent Japanese Male Mimicking Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin K.; Naheed, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Acute chest pain with very elevated troponin level and abnormal EKG in adult population is considered sine qua non to acute coronary syndrome (ACS) unless proved otherwise. Similar presentation in adolescent population is seen less often but raises suspicion for ACS. Most common etiology for chest pain with cardiac enzyme elevation in adolescent population is usually viral myopericarditis. The adolescent population presenting with chest pain and elevated cardiac enzymes should be carefully evaluated for ACS and other etiologies including myocarditis, myopericarditis, pulmonary embolism, acute rheumatic fever, and trauma. We report one Japanese adolescent male with mycoplasma pneumoniae myocarditis who presented to the ER with chest pain, elevated cardiac enzymes, and abnormal EKG. PMID:25202456

  3. Rethinking Cocaine-Associated Chest Pain and Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, Jonathan B.; Marhefka, Gregary D.

    2011-01-01

    Every year more than 500,000 patients present to the emergency department with cocaine-associated complications, most commonly chest pain. Many of these patients undergo extensive work-up and treatment. Much of the evidence regarding cocaine’s cardiovascular effects, as well as the current management of cocaine-associated chest pain and acute coronary syndromes, is anecdotally derived and based on studies written more than 2 decades ago that involved only a few patients. Newer studies have brought into question many of the commonly held theories and practices regarding the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of this common clinical scenario. However, there continues to be a paucity of prospective, randomized trials addressing this topic as it relates to clinical outcomes. We searched PubMed for English-language articles from 1960 to 2011 using the keywords cocaine, chest pain, coronary arteries, myocardial infarction, emergency department, cardiac biomarkers, electrocardiogram, coronary computed tomography, observation unit, β-blockers, benzodiazepines, nitroglycerin, calcium channel blockers, phentolamine, and cardiomyopathy; including various combinations of these terms. We reviewed the abstracts to confirm relevance, and then full articles were extracted. References from extracted articles were also reviewed for relevant articles. In this review, we critically evaluate the limited historical evidence underlying the current teachings on cocaine’s cardiovascular effects and management of cocaine-associated chest pain. We aim to update the reader on more recent, albeit small, studies on the emergency department evaluation and clinical and pharmacologic management of cocaine-associated chest pain. Finally, we summarize recent guidelines and review an algorithm based on the current best evidence. PMID:22134939

  4. A rare cause of acute abdominal pain: Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Ramazan; Ozdemir, Ayse Zehra; Ozturk, Bahadir; Bilgici, Meltem Ceyhan; Tosun, Migraci

    2014-01-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is a rare müllerian duct anomaly with uterus didelphys, unilateral obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. Patients with this syndrome generally present after menarche with pelvic pain and mass and, rarely, primary infertility in later years. Strong suspicion and knowledge of this syndrome are mandatory for an accurate diagnosis. A 14-year-old female patient presented with acute retention of urine and abdominopelvic pain. Her condition was diagnosed with the use ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging as a case of HWW syndrome. She was treated with vaginal hemiseptal resection. The HWW syndrome should be considered among the differential diagnoses in girls with renal anomalies presenting with pelvic mass, symptoms of acute abdominal pain, and acute urinary retention. PMID:24378860

  5. Abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion as clinical presentation of acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Valle Feijóo, M L; Bermúdez Sanjurjo, J R; González Vázquez, L; Rey Martínez, M; de la Fuente Aguado, J

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare condition characterized by abdominal pain and a wide range of nonspecific symptoms. We report the case of a woman with abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) as clinical presentation of AIP. The diagnosis was achieved through the etiologic study of the SIADH. PMID:25796467

  6. Acute pain.

    PubMed

    Good, M

    1999-01-01

    The review of acute pain describes the problem of unresolved pain and its effects on the neural, autonomic, and immune systems. Conceptualizations and mechanisms of pain are reviewed as well as theories of pain management. Descriptive studies of patient and nurse factors that inhibit effective pain management are discussed, followed by studies of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. Critical analysis reveals that most studies were atheoretical, and therefore, this proliferation of information lacked conceptual coherence and organization. Furthermore, the nature and extent of barriers to pain management were described, but few intervention studies have been devised, as yet, to modify the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of nurses and patients that are barriers to pain management. Although some of the complementary therapies have sufficient research support to be used in clinical pain management, the physiological mechanisms and outcomes need to be studied. It is critical at this time to design studies of interventions to improve assessment, decision making, attentive care, and patient teaching. PMID:10418655

  7. Acute abdominal pain in a man with Cushing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rahmanian, M; Nedooshan, J J; Rafat, S; Rafie, R; Rafiei, M; Moghadam, R N

    2015-10-01

    Arterial thrombosis or emboli have rarely been reported in Cushing syndrome (CS). Here we describe the first case of mesenteric ischaemia secondary to ventricular emboli in a patient with CS. Laboratory evaluation showed increased fibrinogen and factor VIII. Previous studies showed that venous thromboembolism (VTE) increases in CS. This case for the first time described arterial system thrombosis and emboli in a patient with adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-dependent CS. PMID:25943108

  8. Intradermal Therapy (Mesotherapy) for the Treatment of Acute Pain in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Conforti, Giorgio; Capone, Loredana

    2014-01-01

    Background The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common cause of severe hand pain. In this study we treated acute pain in CTS patients by means of local intradermal injections of anti-inflammatory drugs (mesotherapy). Methods In twenty-five patients (forty-five hands), CTS diagnosis was confirmed by clinical and neurophysiological examination prior to mesotherapy. A mixture containing lidocaine 10 mg, ketoprophen lysine-acetylsalycilate 80 mg, xantinol nicotinate 100 mg, cyanocobalamine 1,000 mcg plus injectable water was used. Sites of injection were three parallel lines above the transverse carpal ligament and two v-shaped lines, one at the base of the thenar eminence, and the other at the base of the hypothenar eminence. Results The day after the treatment, all but four patients reported a significant reduction in pain and paresthesias. After 12 months, 17 patients had a complete pain relief, eight patients reported recurrence of pain and sensory symptoms and four out of them underwent surgical treatment. Conclusions With the obvious limits of a small-size open-label study, our results suggest that mesotherapy can temporary relieve pain and paresthesias in most CTS patients and in some cases its effect seems to be long-lasting. Further controlled studies are needed to confirm our preliminary findings and to compare mesotherapy to conventional approaches for the treatment of CTS. PMID:24478901

  9. Complex regional pain syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition that can affect any area of the ... Bailey A, Audette JF. Complex regional pain syndrome. In: Frontera ... of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  10. Complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome is a chronic pain condition characterized by autonomic and inflammatory features. It occurs acutely in about 7% of patients who have limb fractures, limb surgery, or other injuries. Many cases resolve within the first year, with a smaller subset progressing to the chronic form. This transition is often paralleled by a change from "warm complex regional pain syndrome," with inflammatory characteristics dominant, to "cold complex regional pain syndrome" in which autonomic features dominate. Multiple peripheral and central mechanisms seem to be involved, the relative contributions of which may differ between individuals and over time. Possible contributors include peripheral and central sensitization, autonomic changes and sympatho-afferent coupling, inflammatory and immune alterations, brain changes, and genetic and psychological factors. The syndrome is diagnosed purely on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms. Effective management of the chronic form of the syndrome is often challenging. Few high quality randomized controlled trials are available to support the efficacy of the most commonly used interventions. Reviews of available randomized trials suggest that physical and occupational therapy (including graded motor imagery and mirror therapy), bisphosphonates, calcitonin, subanesthetic intravenous ketamine, free radical scavengers, oral corticosteroids, and spinal cord stimulation may be effective treatments. Multidisciplinary clinical care, which centers around functionally focused therapies is recommended. Other interventions are used to facilitate engagement in functional therapies and to improve quality of life. PMID:26224572

  11. Diagnostic importance of admission platelet volume indices in patients with acute chest pain suggesting acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Mohammad Reza; Taghipour-Sani, Leila; Rezaei, Yousef; Rostami, Rahim

    2014-01-01

    Objective Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a challenging issue in cardiovascular medicine. Given platelet role in atherothrombosis, we sought to determine whether platelet indices can be used as diagnostic tests for patients who suffered from an acute chest discomfort. Methods We prospectively enrolled 862 patients with an acute chest pain and 184 healthy matched controls. They were divided into four groups: 184 controls, 249 of non-ACS, 421 of unstable angina (UA), and 192 of myocardial infarction (MI) cases. Blood samples were collected at admission to the emergency department for routine hematologic tests. Results The mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), and platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR) were significantly greater in patients with MI compared with those of non-ACS or control subjects. Negative and significant correlations existed between MPV, PDW, and P-LCR values and platelet count (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves showed that the MPV, PDW, and P-LCR with cut-off values of 9.15 fL, 11.35 fL, and 20.25% and with area under the curves of 0.563, 0.557, and 0.560, respectively, detected MI patients among those who had chest discomfort. The sensitivities and specificities were found to be 72% and 40%, 73% and 37%, and 68% and 44% for MPV, PDW, and P-LCR, respectively. Conclusion An elevated admission MPV, PDW, and P-LCR may be of benefit to detect chest pain resulting in MI from that of non-cardiac one, and also for risk stratification of patients who suffered from an acute chest discomfort. PMID:25634396

  12. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  13. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  14. Acute intermittent porphyria leading to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES): a rare cause of abdominal pain and seizures.

    PubMed

    Dagens, Andrew; Gilhooley, Michael James

    2016-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an inherited deficiency in the haem biosynthesis pathway. AIP is rare, affecting around 1 in 75 000 people. Acute attacks are characterised by abdominal pain associated with autonomic, neurological and psychiatric symptoms. AIP is rarely associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). PRES is a clinicoradiological condition caused by the failure of the posterior circulation to autoregulate, resulting in cerebral oedema, headaches, nausea and seizures. This association is important because drugs used in the management of seizures may worsen an attack of AIP. This article describes a case of AIP and PRES in a young woman. PMID:27277587

  15. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed. PMID:26944242

  16. Complex regional pain syndrome and acute carpal tunnel syndrome following radial artery cannulation: a neurological perspective and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lazaro, Reynaldo P

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) associated with acute carpal tunnel syndrome (aCTS) developed in a 38-year-old right-handed man following radial artery cannulation (RAC) during the course of lumbar spine surgery. Inciting events and risk factors that might have led to these complications included: multiple arterial punctures and subsequent hematoma formation, radial artery spasm compounded by aggressive hemostasis, anatomical changes in the wrists related to repetitive manual activities in the workplace, and possible protracted hyperextension of the wrists during perioperative and operative procedure. Although CRPS is considered a rare complication of RAC, the condition is disabling and debilitating, especially when associated with aCTS. PMID:25621693

  17. [COMPLEX REGIONAL PAIN SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Blažeković, Ivan; Bilić, Ervina; Žagar, Marija; Anić, Branimir

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) represents a state of constant and often disabling pain, affecting one region (usually hand) and often occurs after a trauma whose severity does not correlate with the level of pain. The older term for this condition of chronic pain associated with motor and autonomic symptoms is reflex sympathetic dystrophy or causalgia. The aim of this review, based on contemporary literature, is to show the epidemiology and etiology, proposed pathophysiological mechanisms, method of diagnosis and treatment options, prevention and mitigation of this under-recognized disease. CRPS I occurs without known neurological damage, unlike CRPS II, where the history of trauma is present and in some cases damage to the peripheral nervous system can be objectively assessed using electromyoneurography. New diagnostic methods, such as quantitative sensory testing (CST), challenge this division because the CST findings in patients with CRPS I can suggest damage to Adelta peripheral nerve fibers. Except for distinguishing type I and type II disease, it is important to bear in mind the diversity of clinical presentation of CRPS in acute and chronic phase of the disease. This regional pain syndrome typically includes the autonomic and motor signs and thus differs from other peripheral neuropathic pain syndromes. The complexity of the clinical presentation indicates the likely presence of different pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this disease. Previous studies have demonstrated the autonomic dysfunction, neurogenic inflammation and neuroplastic changes. The diagnosis of CRPS is based on anamnesis and clinical examination on the basis of which the disease can be graded according to the Budapest Criteria. A valuable aid in differentiating subtypes of the disease is electromyoneurography. The treatment of CRPS is as complex as the clinical picture and the pathophysiology of the disease and requires interdisciplinary cooperation and individual approach

  18. Chest pain syndromes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Gagan

    2012-08-01

    Chest pain syndromes in pregnancy include numerous catastrophic cardiovascular events. Acute myocardial infarction, aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and amniotic fluid embolism are the most important causes of nonobstetric mortality and morbidity in pregnancy. Each of these could result in poor maternal and fetal outcomes if not diagnosed and treated in a timely fashion. However, their diagnosis and management is limited by fetal risks of diagnostic procedures, dangers of pharmacotherapy and interventions that have neither been widely studied nor validated. This article reviews the current literature on epidemiology, risk factors, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of 4 potentially lethal chest pain syndromes in pregnancy. PMID:22813362

  19. An unusual cause of chest pain: Acute coronary syndrome following administration of ergotamine tartrate.

    PubMed

    Okutucu, Sercan; Karakulak, Ugur Nadir; Kabakcı, Giray; Aytemir, Kudret

    2012-01-01

    For many years, ergotamine has been used for the acute treatment of migraine. Ergotamine may produce coronary vasospasm, which is often associated with ischemic electrocardiography changes and angina pectoris. A 62-year-old woman who was admitted to the emergency department because of chest pain is described. She had a history of severe migraine attacks and started to use ergotamine tartrate 0.75 mg daily the day before. Electrocardiography revealed sinus tachycardia with left anterior hemiblock and T wave inversion in the precordial leads. Cardiac biomarker levels were elevated. After discontinuation of the drug and initiation of vasodilator treatment, her chest pain resolved. Patients with migraine may have an underlying vasospastic disorder predisposing them to coronary artery spasm. Physicians should be alerted to potential cardiac vasospastic effects of low-dose ergotamine in the treatment of migraine. PMID:23204901

  20. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician January 15, 2007, http://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0115/p194.html) Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A ... Physician November 01, 1999, http://www.aafp.org/afp/991101ap/2012.html) Written by familydoctor.org editorial ...

  1. The Manchester Acute Coronary Syndromes (MACS) decision rule for suspected cardiac chest pain: derivation and external validation

    PubMed Central

    Body, Richard; Carley, Simon; McDowell, Garry; Pemberton, Philip; Burrows, Gillian; Cook, Gary; Lewis, Philip S; Smith, Alexander; Mackway-Jones, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to derive and validate a clinical decision rule (CDR) for suspected cardiac chest pain in the emergency department (ED). Incorporating information available at the time of first presentation, this CDR would effectively risk-stratify patients and immediately identify: (A) patients for whom hospitalisation may be safely avoided; and (B) high-risk patients, facilitating judicious use of resources. Methods In two sequential prospective observational cohort studies at heterogeneous centres, we included ED patients with suspected cardiac chest pain. We recorded clinical features and drew blood on arrival. The primary outcome was major adverse cardiac events (MACE) (death, prevalent or incident acute myocardial infarction, coronary revascularisation or new coronary stenosis >50%) within 30 days. The CDR was derived by logistic regression, considering reliable (κ>0.6) univariate predictors (p<0.05) for inclusion. Results In the derivation study (n=698) we derived a CDR including eight variables (high sensitivity troponin T; heart-type fatty acid binding protein; ECG ischaemia; diaphoresis observed; vomiting; pain radiation to right arm/shoulder; worsening angina; hypotension), which had a C-statistic of 0.95 (95% CI 0.93 to 0.97) implying near perfect diagnostic performance. On external validation (n=463) the CDR identified 27.0% of patients as ‘very low risk’ and potentially suitable for discharge from the ED. 0.0% of these patients had prevalent acute myocardial infarction and 1.6% developed MACE (n=2; both coronary stenoses without revascularisation). 9.9% of patients were classified as ‘high-risk’, 95.7% of whom developed MACE. Conclusions The Manchester Acute Coronary Syndromes (MACS) rule has the potential to safely reduce unnecessary hospital admissions and facilitate judicious use of high dependency resources. PMID:24780911

  2. Reversal of Acute Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Using the Practical Application of Neurodiagnostic Evaluation Process: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen E

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, a patient in my practice developed complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS 1) after bunion surgery. The condition was properly diagnosed within 4 weeks with a diagnostic technique that I routinely use to diagnose chronic musculoskeletal pain, and it was successfully treated. The tests, which are based on primitive and postural reflexes in infants, were adapted to reflect normal and abnormal motor behaviors in adults after provocation of reflexes of the autonomic nervous system (afferent C fibers in peripheral nerves). Approximately 60 days after my patient’s operation, the tests indicated a positive reflex at the posterior tibial nerve in the operated foot. Surgery to remove an accessory ossicle from the talus adjacent to this nerve resolved the CRPS 1 within 2 weeks. Since CRPS 1 is a dysfunctional state of the autonomic regulatory control of pain, it was postulated that a test based on autonomic nerve function could isolate the source of CRPS 1. The Practical Application of Neurodiagnostic Evaluation process was shown to be diagnostic for the cause of acute CRPS 1 and to allow its reversal. Further evaluation of the test for diagnosis and treatment of CRPS is needed. PMID:24355904

  3. Loin pain hematuria syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Adeel S.; Salameh, Hassan; Erickson, Stephen B.; Prieto, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Loin pain hematuria syndrome (LPHS), first described in 1967, is a rare pain syndrome, which is not well understood. The syndrome is characterized by severe intermittent or persistent flank pain, either unilateral or bilateral, associated with gross or microscopic hematuria. LPHS is a diagnosis of exclusion as there still is not a consensus of validated diagnostic criteria, though several criteria have been proposed. The wide differential diagnosis would suggest a meticulous yet specific diagnostic work-up depending on the individual clinical features and natural history. Several mechanisms regarding the pathophysiology of LPHS have been proposed but without pinpointing the actual causative etiology, the treatment remains symptomatic. Treatment modalities for LPHS are diverse including simple analgesia, opioid analgesic and kidney autotransplantation. This review article summarizes the current understanding regarding the pathophysiology of LPHS along with the steps required for proper diagnosis and a discussion of the different therapeutic approaches for LPHS. PMID:26798473

  4. Loin pain hematuria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Adeel S; Salameh, Hassan; Erickson, Stephen B; Prieto, Mikel

    2016-02-01

    Loin pain hematuria syndrome (LPHS), first described in 1967, is a rare pain syndrome, which is not well understood. The syndrome is characterized by severe intermittent or persistent flank pain, either unilateral or bilateral, associated with gross or microscopic hematuria. LPHS is a diagnosis of exclusion as there still is not a consensus of validated diagnostic criteria, though several criteria have been proposed. The wide differential diagnosis would suggest a meticulous yet specific diagnostic work-up depending on the individual clinical features and natural history. Several mechanisms regarding the pathophysiology of LPHS have been proposed but without pinpointing the actual causative etiology, the treatment remains symptomatic. Treatment modalities for LPHS are diverse including simple analgesia, opioid analgesic and kidney autotransplantation. This review article summarizes the current understanding regarding the pathophysiology of LPHS along with the steps required for proper diagnosis and a discussion of the different therapeutic approaches for LPHS. PMID:26798473

  5. Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Redmond, John M; Chen, Austin W; Domb, Benjamin G

    2016-04-01

    Patients who have lateral hip pain historically have been diagnosed with trochanteric bursitis and treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, corticosteroid injections, and physical therapy. Although this strategy is effective for most patients, a substantial number of patients continue to have pain and functional limitations. Over the past decade, our understanding of disorders occurring in the peritrochanteric space has increased dramatically. Greater trochanteric pain syndrome encompasses trochanteric bursitis, external coxa saltans (ie, snapping hip), and abductor tendinopathy. A thorough understanding of the anatomy, examination findings, and imaging characteristics aids the clinician in treating these patients. Open and endoscopic treatment options are available for use when nonsurgical treatment is unsuccessful. PMID:26990713

  6. [Acute Chest Pain].

    PubMed

    Gmür, Christian

    2016-02-17

    Acute chest pain is a frequent consultation reason in general practice as well as in emergency departments. With the help of history, physical examination, ECG, laboratory and newly developed risk scores, potentially life-threatening diseases and high-risk patients may be detected and treated early, quickly and cost-effectively. New biomarkers and their combination with risk scores can increase the negative predictive value to exclude certain diseases. PMID:26886697

  7. Acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  8. Acute aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corvera, Joel S

    2016-05-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  9. Acute Effect of Topical Menthol on Chronic Pain in Slaughterhouse Workers with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Triple-Blind, Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Markus D.; Jay, Kenneth; Colado, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Topical menthol gels are classified “topical analgesics” and are claimed to relieve minor aches and pains of the musculoskeletal system. In this study we investigate the acute effect of topical menthol on carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). We screened 645 slaughterhouse workers and recruited 10 participants with CTS and chronic pain of the arm/hand who were randomly distributed into two groups to receive topical menthol (Biofreeze) or placebo (gel with a menthol scent) during the working day and 48 hours later the other treatment (crossover design). Participants rated arm/hand pain intensity during the last hour of work (scale 0–10) immediately before 1, 2, and 3 hours after application. Furthermore, global rating of change (GROC) in arm/hand pain was assessed 3 hours after application. Compared with placebo, pain intensity and GROC improved more following application of topical menthol (P = 0.026 and P = 0.044, resp.). Pain intensity of the arm/hand decreased by −1.2 (CI 95%: −1.7 to −0.6) following topical menthol compared with placebo, corresponding to a moderate effect size of 0.63. In conclusion, topical menthol acutely reduces pain intensity during the working day in slaughterhouse workers with CTS and should be considered as an effective nonsystemic alternative to regular analgesics in the workplace management of chronic and neuropathic pain. PMID:25298894

  10. Myofascial pain syndrome treatments.

    PubMed

    Borg-Stein, Joanne; Iaccarino, Mary Alexis

    2014-05-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a regional pain disorder caused by taut bands of muscle fibers in skeletal muscles called myofascial trigger points. MPS is a common disorder, often diagnosed and treated by physiatrists. Treatment strategies for MPS include exercises, patient education, and trigger point injection. Pharmacologic interventions are also common, and a variety of analgesics, antiinflammatories, antidepressants, and other medications are used in clinical practice. This review explores the various treatment options for MPS, including those therapies that target myofascial trigger points and common secondary symptoms. PMID:24787338

  11. Complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sebastin, Sandeep J

    2011-05-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) previously known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic neurological disorder involving the limbs characterized by disabling pain, swelling, vasomotor instability, sudomotor abnormality, and impairment of motor function. CRPS is not uncommon after hand surgery and may complicate post-operative care. There is no specific diagnostic test for CRPS and the diagnosis is based on history, clinical examination, and supportive laboratory findings. Recent modifications to diagnostic criteria have enabled clinicians to diagnose this disease more consistently. This review gives a synopsis of CRPS and discusses the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment options based on the limited evidence in the literature. PMID:22022040

  12. Complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sebastin, Sandeep J

    2011-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) previously known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic neurological disorder involving the limbs characterized by disabling pain, swelling, vasomotor instability, sudomotor abnormality, and impairment of motor function. CRPS is not uncommon after hand surgery and may complicate post-operative care. There is no specific diagnostic test for CRPS and the diagnosis is based on history, clinical examination, and supportive laboratory findings. Recent modifications to diagnostic criteria have enabled clinicians to diagnose this disease more consistently. This review gives a synopsis of CRPS and discusses the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment options based on the limited evidence in the literature. PMID:22022040

  13. [Ultrasonography in acute pelvic pain].

    PubMed

    Kupesić, Sanja; Aksamija, Alenka; Vucić, Niksa; Tripalo, Ana; Kurjak, Asim

    2002-01-01

    accurate diagnosis of this entity since it enables differentiation between acute and chronic stages based on analysis of the vascular resistance. Hemorrhagic ovarian cysts may be presented by variety of ultrasound findings since intracystic echoes depend upon the quality and quantity of the blood clots. Color Doppler investigation demonstrates moderate to low vascular resistance typical of luteal flow. Leiomyomas undergoing degenerative changes are another cause of acute pelvic pain commonly present in patients of reproductive age. Color flow detects regularly separated vessels at the periphery of the leiomyoma, which exhibit moderate vascular resistance. Although the classic symptom of endometriosis is chronic pelvic pain, in some patients acute pelvic pain does occur. Most of these patients demonstrate an endometrioma or "chocolate" cyst containing diffuse carpet-like echoes. Sometimes, solid components may indicate even ovarian malignancy, but if color Doppler ultrasound is applied it is less likely to obtain false positive results. One should be aware that pericystic and/or hillar type of ovarian endometrioma vascularization facilitate correct recognition of this entity. Pelvic congestion syndrome is another condition that can cause an attack of acute pelvic pain. It is usually consequence of dilatation of venous plexuses, arteries or both systems. By switching color Doppler gynecologist can differentiate pelvic congestion syndrome from multilocular cysts, pelvic inflammatory disease or adenomyosis. Ovarian vein thrombosis is a potentially fatal disorder occurring most often in the early postpartal period. Hypercoagulability, infection and stasis are main etiologic factors, and transvaginal color Doppler ultrasound is an excellent diagnostic tool to diagnose it. Acute pelvic pain may occur even in normal intrauterine pregnancy. This may be explained by hormonal changes, rapid growth of the uterus and increased blood flow. Ultrasound is mandatory for distinguishing

  14. Joint hypermobility syndrome pain.

    PubMed

    Grahame, Rodney

    2009-12-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) was initially defined as the occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the presence of joint laxity and hypermobility in otherwise healthy individuals. It is now perceived as a commonly overlooked, underdiagnosed, multifaceted, and multisystemic heritable disorder of connective tissue (HDCT), which shares many of the phenotypic features of other HDCTs such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Whereas the additional flexibility can confer benefits in terms of mobility and agility, adverse effects of tissue laxity and fragility can give rise to clinical consequences that resonate far beyond the confines of the musculoskeletal system. There is hardly a clinical specialty to be found that is not touched in one way or another by JHS. Over the past decade, it has become evident that of all the complications that may arise in JHS, chronic pain is arguably the most menacing and difficult to treat. PMID:19889283

  15. Complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Emily S.; De La Cerda, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a neurologic disorder that often results in debilitating chronic pain, but the diagnosis may elude providers as it is one of exclusion. A history of trauma may be elucidated. We report a case of CRPS and review the clinical findings, appropriate workup, and treatment options for the patient. The patient we describe went through an extensive workup before receiving the correct diagnosis. Delay in diagnosis leads to prolonged suffering for the patient and, at times, unnecessary invasive debridement procedures. Raising awareness of this entity may help physicians make the correct diagnosis early, as well as initiate a collaborative effort between neurology, anesthesiology, and dermatology to provide the patient the most favorable outcome. PMID:27365892

  16. Early Treatment of Acute Complex Regional Pain Syndrome after Fracture or Injury with Prednisone: Why Is There a Failure to Treat? A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) after fracture is a cause of pain, dysfunction, and potentially permanent disability. The evidence for treatment with oral corticosteroids is growing and supported by several international guidelines; however, treatment is not widely offered. Objective. Rapid recognition and treatment of complex regional pain in the upper extremity after acute injury as a disease modifying and potentially curative treatment. Methods. The present study was a case series involving three patients who developed CRPS after a trauma to the neck and/or upper limb. Patients were screened by clinical examination and bone scan and met the Budapest criteria. Results. Resolution of pain, swelling, and disability in all three patients. Discussion. There is increasing support, based on the existing evidence and clinical outcomes, for the use of prednisone to treat the acute phase of CRPS and as a promising treatment to halt the progression of the phenomenon and potentially cure the condition; however, widespread use of prednisone likely remains low, potentially resulting in long-term pain, joint contracture, and disability. A large-scale randomized control trial has not been performed. Conclusion. Corticosteroids can be an effective treatment option for CRPS after fracture. PMID:27445622

  17. Low back pain - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... as ice, mild painkillers, physical therapy, and proper exercises. Most of the time, back pain will get ... prevent getting back pain again. Stretching and strengthening exercises are important. But, starting these exercises too soon ...

  18. Acute Radiation Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary Radiation Emergencies & Your Health Possible Health Effects Contamination and Exposure Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) Cutaneous Radiation ... Decision Making in Radiation Emergencies Protective Actions Internal Contamination Clinical Reference (ICCR) Application Psychological First Aid in ...

  19. [Bilateral acute depigmentation of the iris syndrome].

    PubMed

    Portmann, A; Gueudry, J; Siahmed, K; Muraine, M

    2011-05-01

    Bilateral acute depigmentation of the iris syndrome (BADI syndrome) is a new clinical entity. Young females from 20 to 45 years of age are most commonly affected. It is characterized by bilateral nontransilluminating depigmentation of the iris stroma. During the acute phase, this clinical entity also combines with red painful eye, pigmentation of the trabecular meshwork, anterior chamber flare, circulating pigment, and pigmented deposit on the endothelium cornea. At the acute stage, the symptoms are controlled with topical corticosteroid treatment. The prognosis is good. We report a 41-year-old woman presenting with BADI syndrome. PMID:21531477

  20. Central Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... intolerable bursts of sharp pain similar to the pain caused by a dental probe on an exposed nerve. Individuals may have numbness in the areas affected by the pain. The burning and loss of touch sensations are ...

  1. Acute pain management in children

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Susan T; Hannallah, Raafat S

    2010-01-01

    The greatest advance in pediatric pain medicine is the recognition that untreated pain is a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality after surgical trauma. Accurate assessment of pain in different age groups and the effective treatment of postoperative pain is constantly being refined; with newer drugs being used alone or in combination with other drugs continues to be explored. Several advances in developmental neurobiology and pharmacology, knowledge of new analgesics and newer applications of old analgesics in the last two decades have helped the pediatric anesthesiologist in managing pain in children more efficiently. The latter include administering opioids via the skin and nasal mucosa and their addition into the neuraxial local anesthetics. Systemic opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and regional analgesics alone or combined with additives are currently used to provide effective postoperative analgesia. These modalities are best utilized when combined as a multimodal approach to treat acute pain in the perioperative setting. The development of receptor specific drugs that can produce pain relief without the untoward side effects of respiratory depression will hasten the recovery and discharge of children after surgery. This review focuses on the overview of acute pain management in children, with an emphasis on pharmacological and regional anesthesia in achieving this goal. PMID:21197314

  2. The refractory painful arc syndrome.

    PubMed

    Watson, M

    1978-11-01

    Twenty-three patients with a severe refractory painful arc syndrome have been treated by excision of the outer end of the clavicle and division of the coracoacromial ligament through a deltoid-splitting approach. After a follow-up of more than six months all patients have been relieved of night pain. Six still have slight pain on movement, but the rest are symptom-free. PMID:711806

  3. Slowly progressive Lemierre's syndrome with orbital pain and exophthalmos.

    PubMed

    Hama, Yuka; Koga, Masatoshi; Fujinami, Jun; Asayama, Shinya; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an oropharyngeal bacterial infection characterized by rapidly progressive septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein. A lack of appropriate antibiotic therapy can be life-threatening. We describe the case of a 39-year-old man with Lemierre's syndrome who presented with long-lasting orbital pain and acute exophthalmos 6 weeks after initial infection. This report is to help clinicians consider the diagnosis of Lemierre's syndrome when encountering a patient with long-lasting orbital pain and acute exophthalmos. Neck ultrasonography is useful for detecting thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein in Lemierre's syndrome patients. PMID:26419364

  4. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... block. This is an injection of an anesthetic (pain reliever) into certain nerves to block the pain signals. If the injection works, it may be repeated. Physical therapy and psychological counseling are also helpful. However, a ...

  5. [A case of Hamman's syndrome associated with acute-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus presenting with abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Hiromi; Sakaguchi, Kosaku; Muro, Shinichiro; Sasaki, Kyo; Kobayashi, Sayo; Fujisawa, Tomoo; Nawa, Toru; Ueki, Toru; Yabushita, Kazuhisa; Shimoe, Toshinari

    2015-05-01

    A 21-year-old female presented at an emergency department with abdominal pain and nausea. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest and abdomen revealed a small amount of mediastinal emphysema in the precardiac area, but the underlying cause could not be identified. On admission, her plasma glucose was 371 mg/dl, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was 14.0%, and blood pH was 6.91. These findings supported a diagnosis of Hamman's syndrome associated with diabetic ketoacidosis. Her diabetic ketoacidosis was managed with insulin and fluid therapy, and the mediastinal emphysema disappeared spontaneously by the time of discharge. Presence of free air of the chest and abdominal cavity must warrant a differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal perforation; however, when the free air is accompanied by diabetic ketoacidosis, it is not necessary to perform urgent endoscopy. PMID:25947021

  6. The 'chest pain kit' study: A 'pill in the pocket' concept to improve the pre-hospital therapy of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kralev, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The 'pill in the pocket' concept is an established therapy for atrial fibrillation. The current guidelines for the management of patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction endorse the concept that faster time to reperfusion is associated with important reductions in morbidity and mortality. The mechanical reperfusion and outcome of these patients is significantly supported by dual antiplatelet therapy. There is no data comparing the effect of early self-application by the patient ('pill in the pocket') versus application by the emergency doctor of dual antiplatelet therapy and a factor Xa inhibitor in case of severe chest pain. In patients with a high risk of developing an acute coronary syndrome and previously selected by a cardiologist, early self-application of dual antiplatelet therapy and a factor Xa inhibitor (e.g. fondaparinux) immediately after calling the emergency doctor might be of significance in cases of acute coronary syndrome or pulmonary embolism. In particular, in less developed areas where it might take a long time for the emergency doctor to arrive, this 'pill in the pocket' concept may be significant. PMID:20865688

  7. Melatonin in Chronic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Danilov, Andrei; Kurganova, Julia

    2016-06-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by epiphysis and extrapineal structures. It performs several functions including chronobiotic, antioxidant, oncostatic, immune modulating, normothermal, and anxiolytic functions. Melatonin affects the cardiovascular system and gastrointestinal tract, participates in reproduction and metabolism, and body mass regulation. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated melatonin efficacy in relation to pain syndromes. The present paper reviews the studies on melatonin use in fibromyalgia, headaches, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic back pain, and rheumatoid arthritis. The paper discusses the possible mechanisms of melatonin analgesic properties. On one hand, circadian rhythms normalization results in sleep improvement, which is inevitably disordered in chronic pain syndromes, and activation of melatonin adaptive capabilities. On the other hand, there is evidence of melatonin-independent analgesic effect involving melatonin receptors and several neurotransmitter systems. PMID:26984272

  8. Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Ernest; Clauw, Daniel J.; Goldenberg, Don L.; Harris, Richard E.; Helfenstein, Milton; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Noguchi, Koichi; Silverman, Stuart L.; Ushida, Takahiro; Wang, Guochun

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript, developed by a group of chronic pain researchers and clinicians from around the world, aims to address the state of knowledge about fibromyalgia (FM) and identify ongoing challenges in the field of FM and other chronic pain syndromes that may be characterized by pain centralization/amplification/hypersensitivity. There have been many exciting developments in research studies of the pathophysiology and treatment of FM and related syndromes that have the potential to improve the recognition and management of patients with FM and other conditions with FM-like pain. However, much of the new information has not reached all clinicians, especially primary care clinicians, who have the greatest potential to use this new knowledge to positively impact their patients’ lives. Furthermore, there are persistent misconceptions about FM and a lack of consensus regarding the diagnosis and treatment of FM. This paper presents a framework for future global efforts to improve the understanding and treatment of FM and other associated chronic pain syndromes, disseminate research findings, identify ways to enhance advocacy for these patients, and improve global efforts to collaborate and reach consensus about key issues related to FM and chronic pain in general. PMID:27022674

  9. Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in the assessment of patients presenting with chest pain suspected for acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Filippo, Massimo; Capasso, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Acute chest pain is an important clinical challenge and a major reason for presentation to the emergency department. Although multiple imaging techniques are available to assess patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS), considerable interest has been focused on the use of non-invasive imaging options as coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). According to several recent evidences, CCTA has been shown to represent a useful tool to rapidly and accurately diagnose coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with low to intermediate cardiovascular risk. CCTA examination has the unique ability to non-invasively depict the coronary anatomy, not only allowing visualization of the lumen of the arteries in order to detect severe stenosis or occlusion responsible of myocardial ischemia, but also allows the assessment of coronary artery wall by demonstrating the presence or absence of CAD. However, routine CCTA is not able to differentiate ischemic from non-ischemic chest pain in patients with known CAD and it does not provide any functional assessment of the heart. Conversely, CMR is considered the gold standard in the evaluation of morphology, function, viability and tissue characterization of the heart. CMR offers a wide range of tools for diagnosing myocardial infarction (MI) at least at the same time of the elevation of cardiac troponin values, differentiating infarct tissue and ischemic myocardium from normal myocardium or mimicking conditions, and distinguishing between new and old ischemic events. In high-risk patients, with acute and chronic manifestations of CAD, CMR may be preferable to CCTA, since it would allow detection, differential diagnosis, prognostic evaluation and management of MI. PMID:27500156

  10. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... an important role in sustaining the pain. Another theory is that CRPS is caused by a triggering ... All NINDS-prepared information is in the public domain and may be freely copied. Credit to the ...

  11. Complex regional pain syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... plays an important role in the pain. Another theory is that CRPS is caused by a triggering ... the nervous system. This includes the nerves that control the blood vessels and sweat glands. The damaged ...

  12. Greater trochanteric pain syndrome diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mallow, Michael; Nazarian, Levon N

    2014-05-01

    Lateral hip pain, or greater trochanteric pain syndrome, is a commonly seen condition; in this article, the relevant anatomy, epidemiology, and evaluation strategies of greater trochanteric pain syndrome are reviewed. Specific attention is focused on imaging of this syndrome and treatment techniques, including ultrasound-guided interventions. PMID:24787333

  13. Acute pain transfusion reaction.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Jody; Osswald, Michael; Walker, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    A 34-year-old woman with a diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH) received a double umbilical cord blood transplantation following a myeloablative chemotherapy preparative regimen with busulfan and cyclophosphamide. HLH is a rare, potentially fatal hematologic disorder characterized by the overactivation of histocytes and T lymphocytes, leading to organ infiltration and acute illness. On day 25 post-transplantation, the patient required a platelet transfusion for a platelet count of 6,000 per ml (normal range = 150,000-450,000 per ml). The patient's blood type prior to the cord blood transplantation was B positive and, although both umbilical cord blood donors were O positive, the patient was still B positive per blood bank testing on that day. Although the recipient of an allogenic stem cell transplantation will eventually become the blood type of the donor, the time for this process to occur varies for each person. That process must be monitored by the blood bank for the purpose of cross-matching blood products to decrease hemolysis as much as possible. The patient was premedicated with the facility's standard for platelet transfusions: acetaminophen 650 mg and diphenhydramine 25 mg about 30 minutes prior to the platelet transfusion. PMID:24161631

  14. Acute Abdominal Pain in Children.

    PubMed

    Reust, Carin E; Williams, Amy

    2016-05-15

    Acute abdominal pain accounts for approximately 9% of childhood primary care office visits. Symptoms and signs that increase the likelihood of a surgical cause for pain include fever, bilious vomiting, bloody diarrhea, absent bowel sounds, voluntary guarding, rigidity, and rebound tenderness. The age of the child can help focus the differential diagnosis. In infants and toddlers, clinicians should consider congenital anomalies and other causes, including malrotation, hernias, Meckel diverticulum, or intussusception. In school-aged children, constipation and infectious causes of pain, such as gastroenteritis, colitis, respiratory infections, and urinary tract infections, are more common. In female adolescents, clinicians should consider pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy, ruptured ovarian cysts, or ovarian torsion. Initial laboratory tests include complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein, urinalysis, and a pregnancy test. Abdominal radiography can be used to diagnose constipation or obstruction. Ultrasonography is the initial choice in children for the diagnosis of cholecystitis, pancreatitis, ovarian cyst, ovarian or testicular torsion, pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy-related pathology, and appendicitis. Appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain requiring surgery, with a peak incidence during adolescence. When the appendix is not clearly visible on ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27175718

  15. Central pain and dysesthesia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Berić, A

    1998-11-01

    This article presents recent observations about different recognized central pain syndromes (CPS) and discusses them in light of contemporary microelectrode and imaging findings. Different theories regarding the generation of CPS are reviewed, with an emphasis on difficulties in diagnosis and treatment. The author discourages destructive procedures for treatment of CPS, favoring, instead, reversible procedures such as stimulation techniques and drug delivery systems. PMID:9767069

  16. [Acute coronary syndromes: epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Alev Arat

    2013-04-01

    Coronary heart disease is the main cause of death in the world as well as in Turkey. It's not only a health issue but also a social problem with a high economic burden and negative impact on quality of life. The majority of deaths are attributable to acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and their complications.This review summarizes some important facts regarding ACS epidemiology in the world and in Turkey. PMID:27323430

  17. Modified Graded Motor Imagery for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1 of the Upper Extremity in the Acute Phase: A Patient Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagueux, Emilie; Charest, Joelle; Lefrancois-Caron, Eve; Mauger, Marie-Eve; Mercier, Emilie; Savard, Kim; Tousignant-Laflamme, Yannick

    2012-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a pathologic condition in which the painful experience is disproportionate in time and intensity in comparison with the inciting event. At present, the pathophysiology of CRPS is not well understood. Several studies have indicated that cortical reorganization plays a role in the persistence of the symptoms.…

  18. [Mechanisms by which acute orofacial pain becomes chronic].

    PubMed

    Cahana, A; Forster, A

    2006-06-01

    Pain is a complex, multidimensional experience encompassing sensory-discriminative, cognitive, emotional and motivational dimensions. These dimensions in the orofacial region have particular expression since the face and mouth have special biological, emotional and psychological meaning to each individual. Orofacial pain is frequent. Epidemiological studies reveal a high prevalence of severe pain in syndromes such as temporomandibular disorders (TMD), burning mouth syndrome and toothaches, as well as an important role of psychosocial influences, contributing to the persistence of these syndromes. Many of the difficulties experienced by clinicians with the diagnosis and management of acute and chronic orofacial pain stem from a lack of recognition and understanding of these complex conditions, the various intricate bio-psycho-social interactions and the neurobiology behind the chronicisation of acute pain. This text strives to review the important advances and insights into the peripheral processes by which noxious stimuli activates or modulates nociceptive afferent input into the brainstem, the neural pathways in the brainstem and higher levels of the trigeminal (V) somatosensory system and the mechanisms involved in the plasticity of nociceptive transmission. We shall link this knowledge to clinical correlates and suggest a therapeutic approach in acute orofacial pain, in the attempt to avoid the development of chronic pain. PMID:16804482

  19. Pain perception in people with Down syndrome: a synthesis of clinical and experimental research

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Brian E.; Defrin, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    People with an intellectual disability experience both acute and chronic pain with at least the same frequency as the general population. However, considerably less is known about the pain perception of people with Down syndrome. In this review paper, we evaluated the available clinical and experimental evidence. Some experimental studies of acute pain have indicated that pain threshold was higher than normal but only when using a reaction time method to measure pain sensitivity. However, when reaction time is not part of the calculation of the pain threshold, pain sensitivity in people with Down syndrome is in fact lower than normal (more sensitive to pain). Clinical studies of chronic pain have shown that people with an intellectual disability experience chronic pain and within that population, people with Down syndrome also experience chronic pain, but the precise prevalence of chronic pain in Down syndrome has yet to be established. Taken together, the literature suggests that people with Down syndrome experience pain, both acute and chronic, with at least the same frequency as the rest of the population. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that although acute pain expression appears to be delayed, once pain is registered, there appears to be a magnified pain response. We conclude by proposing an agenda for future research in this area. PMID:26283936

  20. [Acute aortic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Christoph A

    2016-06-01

    Acute aortic syndrome is the common denominator for acute events to the aortic wall and encompasses dissection of the aorta, intramural hematoma, formation of aortic ulcers and trauma to the aorta with an annual incidence of up to 35 cases/100.000 between 65 and 75 years of age. Both, inflammation and/or microtrauma at the level of the aortic media layer, and a genetic disposition are promoting elements of AAS, while the extent and anatomic involvement of the ascending aorta call for either surgical resection/repair in the proximal part of the aorta, or an endovascular solution for pathologies in the distal aorta; in all cases of dissection (regardless of location) reconstruction/realignment has been proven to portend better long-term outcomes (in addition to medical management of blood pressure). PMID:27254622

  1. Acute Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Andrew H

    2016-07-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) is a well-known pathophysiologic complication of trauma or tissue ischemia. ACS affects the appearance, function, and even the viability of the involved limb, and demands immediate diagnosis and treatment. However, ACS is difficult to diagnose and the only effective treatment is decompressive surgical fasciotomy. The clinical signs and symptoms may easily be attributed to other aspects of the injury, which further complicates the diagnosis. This article highlights the latest information regarding the diagnosis of ACS, how to perform fasciotomies, how to manage fasciotomy wounds, and also reviews complications and outcomes of ACS. PMID:27241376

  2. Pain Management: Part 1: Managing Acute and Postoperative Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Safe and effective management of acute dental pain can be accomplished with nonopioid and opioid analgesics. To formulate regimens properly, it is essential to appreciate basic pharmacological principles and appropriate dosage strategies for each of the available analgesic classes. This article will review the basic pharmacology of analgesic drug classes, including their relative efficacy for dental pain, and will suggest appropriate regimens based on pain intensity. Management of chronic pain will be addressed in the second part of this series. PMID:20553137

  3. Challenging pain syndromes: Parsonage-Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clark C; Bevelaqua, Anna-Christina

    2014-05-01

    Parsonage-Turner syndrome (PTS) is a rare disorder typically characterized by an abrupt onset of upper extremity pain followed by progressive neurologic deficits, including weakness, atrophy, and occasionally sensory abnormalities. The exact cause and pathophysiology of PTS are complex and incompletely understood. Autoimmune, genetic, infectious, and mechanical processes have all been implicated. No specific treatments have been proven to reduce neurologic impairment or improve the prognosis of PTS. Most patients with PTS are treated with a multidisciplinary approach that includes both physical therapy and pharmacologic treatment, often with multiple agents. Further research is needed. PMID:24787332

  4. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Lemierre's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Paul N.; Soghikian, Maida V.; Bhangoo, Munveer S.

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an infectious disease defined by the presence of septic thrombophlebitis with associated embolic phenomenon, most commonly to the lungs. Here we present two cases from a single institution of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) developing as a result of Lemierre's syndrome in previously healthy young adult men. ARDS can occur as a consequence of pulmonary septic emboli and sepsis, both of which are well-described consequences of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe important diagnostic and management considerations in the care of patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and Lemierre's syndrome. Essential components of management include prompt antibiotic therapy, lung-protective ventilation strategies, and supportive care. PMID:25143837

  5. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Lemierre's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hein, Paul N; Soghikian, Maida V; Bhangoo, Munveer S

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an infectious disease defined by the presence of septic thrombophlebitis with associated embolic phenomenon, most commonly to the lungs. Here we present two cases from a single institution of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) developing as a result of Lemierre's syndrome in previously healthy young adult men. ARDS can occur as a consequence of pulmonary septic emboli and sepsis, both of which are well-described consequences of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe important diagnostic and management considerations in the care of patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and Lemierre's syndrome. Essential components of management include prompt antibiotic therapy, lung-protective ventilation strategies, and supportive care. PMID:25143837

  6. Does acute intraoral pain alter cutaneous sensibility?

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, P; Ekblom, A; Lindblom, U; Marchettini, P

    1988-01-01

    Cutaneous sensibility was tested in eight patients suffering from acute postoperative intraoral pain. Tactile-, cold-, warm-, and heat-pain thresholds as well as reaction time to cold pulses were unaffected by the presence of pain. However, reaction time to warm pulses was increased in the painful area on the day of pain compared to a non-painful state. The findings are discussed in relation to (1) functional convergence of different sensory fibres on central neurons (2) the phenomenon of diffuse noxious inhibitory controls and (3) secondary hyperalgesia. The observed effect of clinical pain on the warm pathway could be explained as an intrasegmental noxious inhibitory effect. PMID:3216205

  7. The complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oaklander, Anne Louise; Horowitz, Steven H

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is the current consensus-derived name for a syndrome usually triggered by limb trauma. Required elements include prolonged, disproportionate distal-limb pain and microvascular dysregulation (e.g., edema or color changes) or altered sweating. CRPS-II (formerly "causalgia") describes patients with identified nerve injuries. CRPS-I (formerly "reflex sympathetic dystrophy") describes most patients who lack evidence of specific nerve injuries. Diagnosis is clinical and the pathophysiology involves combinations of small-fiber axonopathy, microvasculopathy, inflammation, and brain plasticity/sensitization. Females have much higher risk and workplace accidents are a well-recognized cause. Inflammation and dysimmunity, perhaps facilitated by injury to the blood-nerve barrier, may contribute. Most patients, particularly the young, recover gradually, but treatment can speed healing. Evidence of efficacy is strongest for rehabilitation therapies (e.g., graded-motor imagery), neuropathic pain medications, and electric stimulation of the spinal cord, injured nerve, or motor cortex. Investigational treatments include ketamine, botulinum toxin, immunoglobulins, and transcranial neuromodulation. Nonrecovering patients should be re-evaluated for neurosurgically treatable causal lesions (nerve entrapment, impingement, infections, or tumors) and treatable potentiating medical conditions, including polyneuropathy and circulatory insufficiency. Earlier impressions that CRPS represents malingering or psychosomatic illness have been replaced by evidence that CRPS is a rare complication of limb injury in biologically susceptible individuals. PMID:26563805

  8. The Biochemical Origin of Pain: The origin of all Pain is Inflammation and the Inflammatory Response. PART 2 of 3 –Inflammatory Profile of Pain Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Every pain syndrome has an inflammatory profile consisting of the inflammatory mediators that are present in the pain syndrome. The inflammatory profile may have variations from one person to another and may have variations in the same person at different times. The key to treatment of Pain Syndromes is an understanding of their inflammatory profile. Pain syndromes may be treated medically or surgically. The goal should be inhibition or suppression of production of the inflammatory mediators and inhibition, suppression or modulation of neuronal afferent and efferent (motor) transmission. A successful outcome is one that results in less inflammation and thus less pain. We hereby describe the inflammatory profile for several pain syndromes including arthritis, back pain, neck pain, fibromyalgia, interstitial cystitis, migraine, neuropathic pain, complex regional pain syndrome / reflex sympathetic dystrophy (CRPS/RSD), bursitis, shoulder pain and vulvodynia. These profiles are derived from basic science and clinical research performed in the past by numerous investigators and will be updated in the future by new technologies such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Our unifying theory or law of pain states: The origin of all pain is inflammation and the inflammatory response. The biochemical mediators of inflammation include cytokines, neuropeptides, growth factors and neurotransmitters. Irrespective of the type of pain whether it is acute or chronic pain, peripheral or central pain, nociceptive or neuropathic pain, the underlying origin is inflammation and the inflammatory response. Activation of pain receptors, transmission and modulation of pain signals, neuro plasticity and central sensitization are all one continuum of inflammation and the inflammatory response. Irrespective of the characteristic of the pain, whether it is sharp, dull, aching, burning, stabbing, numbing or tingling, all pain arise from inflammation and the inflammatory response. We are proposing

  9. [Intranasal opioids for acute pain].

    PubMed

    Añez Simón, C; Rull Bartomeu, M; Rodríguez Pérez, A; Fuentes Baena, A

    2006-12-01

    Intranasal drug administration is an easy, well-tolerated, noninvasive transmucosal route that avoids first-pass metabolism in the liver. The nasal mucosa provides an extensive, highly vascularized surface of pseudostratified ciliated epithelium. It secretes mucus that is subjected to mucociliary movement that can affect the time of contact between the drug and the surface. Absorption is influenced by anatomical and physiological factors as well as by properties of the drug and the delivery system. We review the literature on intranasal administration of fentanyl, meperidine, diamorphine, and butorphanol to treat acute pain. The adverse systemic effects are similar to those described for intravenous administration, the most common being drowsiness, nausea, and vomiting. Local effects reported are a burning sensation with meperidine and a bad taste. PMID:17302079

  10. Point-of-care echocardiography for aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism and acute coronary syndrome in patients with killer chest pain: EASY screening focused on the assessment of effusion, aorta, ventricular size and shape and ventricular asynergy.

    PubMed

    Nishigami, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Focus assessed transthoracic echocardiography and focused cardiac ultrasound are point-of-care echo protocols for the evaluation of cardiac disease in the emergency room; however, these protocols may not adequately assess aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and acute coronary syndrome in patients with killer chest pain. Here, I present an echocardiography protocol focused on screening for these critical cardiovascular diseases. This protocol (termed EASY screening) consists of the assessment of effusion in the pericardial space, aortic abnormalities, the size and shape of the ventricles and asynergy of the left ventricle. Aortic dissection is suggested by positive findings for effusion and/or abnormal aortic findings. Pulmonary embolism is suggested by a dilated right ventricle and a D-shaped left ventricle in the short-axis view. Acute coronary syndrome is suggested by asynergy of left ventricular wall motion. EASY screening may facilitate the assessment of aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism and acute coronary syndrome in patients presenting to the emergency room with killer chest pain. PMID:26497152

  11. ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Is ARDS? ARDS, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, is a lung condition that leads to low oxygen levels in the blood. ARDS can be life threatening because your body's organs need oxygen-rich ...

  12. Craniofacial Pain as the Sole Sign of Prodromal Angina and Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Review and Report of a Rare Case.

    PubMed

    Fazlyab, Mahta; Esnaashari, Ehsan; Saleh, Mojgan; Shakerian, Farshad; Akhlagh Moayed, Davood; Asgary, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Orofacial pain can arise from different regions and etiologies. Some of the most debilitating pain conditions arise from the structures innervated by the trigeminal system (head, face, masticatory musculature, temporomandibular joint and associated structures). The problem with referred pain is the misdiagnosis and unnecessary therapy directed to the pain location instead of its origin. When craniofacial pain is the sole sign of myocardial ischemia, failure to recognize its cardiac source can endanger the patient. In particular, apart from unnecessary dental treatments, patients with acute myocardial infarction who do not experience chest pain run a very high risk of misdiagnosis and death. As endodontists, each of us may face many patients complaining of pain sensation in the teeth with the main source being other craniofacial/visceral organs. This review plots a diagnostically challenging case paving the way for further literature presentation in this regard. The aim of this compendious review was to gain knowledge about the prevalence, clinical characteristics and possible mechanisms of craniofacial pain of cardiac origin, in order to improve the clinician's ability to make a correct diagnosis. PMID:26523144

  13. Craniofacial Pain as the Sole Sign of Prodromal Angina and Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Review and Report of a Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Fazlyab, Mahta; Esnaashari, Ehsan; Saleh, Mojgan; Shakerian, Farshad; Akhlagh Moayed, Davood; Asgary, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Orofacial pain can arise from different regions and etiologies. Some of the most debilitating pain conditions arise from the structures innervated by the trigeminal system (head, face, masticatory musculature, temporomandibular joint and associated structures). The problem with referred pain is the misdiagnosis and unnecessary therapy directed to the pain location instead of its origin. When craniofacial pain is the sole sign of myocardial ischemia, failure to recognize its cardiac source can endanger the patient. In particular, apart from unnecessary dental treatments, patients with acute myocardial infarction who do not experience chest pain run a very high risk of misdiagnosis and death. As endodontists, each of us may face many patients complaining of pain sensation in the teeth with the main source being other craniofacial/visceral organs. This review plots a diagnostically challenging case paving the way for further literature presentation in this regard. The aim of this compendious review was to gain knowledge about the prevalence, clinical characteristics and possible mechanisms of craniofacial pain of cardiac origin, in order to improve the clinician’s ability to make a correct diagnosis. PMID:26523144

  14. Delayed Presentation of Acute Gluteal Compartment Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tasch, James J.; Misodi, Emmanuel O.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 23 Final Diagnosis: Acute gluteal compartment syndrome Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Gluteal fasciotomy Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Acute gluteal compartment syndrome is a rare condition that usually results from prolonged immobilization following a traumatic event, conventionally involving the presence of compounding factors such as alcohol or opioid intoxication. If delay in medical treatment is prolonged, severe rhabdomyolysis may ensue, leading to acute renal failure and potentially death. Case Report: We report the case of a 23-year-old male with a recent history of incarceration and recreational drug use, who presented with reports of severe right-sided buttock pain and profound right-sided neurological loss following a questionable history involving prolonged immobilization after a fall from a standing position. The patient required an emergent gluteal fasciotomy immediately upon admission and required temporary hemodialysis. After an extended hospital stay, he ultimately recovered with only mild deficits in muscular strength in the right lower extremity. Conclusions: This report demonstrates the importance of early recognition of gluteal compartment syndrome to prevent morbidity and mortality. Compartment syndrome presents in many unique ways, and healthcare practitioners must have a keen diagnostic sense to allow for early surgical intervention. Proper wick catheter measurements should be utilized more frequently, instead of relying on clinical symptomatology such as loss of peripheral pulses for diagnosis of compartment syndrome. PMID:27432320

  15. Surgical Options for Atypical Facial Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Rahimpour, Shervin; Lad, Shivanand P

    2016-07-01

    Atypical neuropathic facial pain is a syndrome of intractable and unremitting facial pain that is secondary to nociceptive signaling in the trigeminal system. These syndromes are often recalcitrant to pharmacotherapy and other common interventions, including microvascular decompression and percutaneous procedures. Herein, the authors present two other viable approaches (nucleus caudalis dorsal root entry zone lesioning and motor cortex stimulation), their indications, and finally a possible treatment algorithm to consider when assessing patients with atypical facial pain. PMID:27325003

  16. Lamotrigine for acute and chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Wiffen, Philip J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an update of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2007. Some antiepileptic medicines have a place in the treatment of neuropathic pain (pain due to nerve damage). This updated review adds five new additional studies looking at evidence for Lamotrigine as an effective treatment for acute and chronic pain. Objectives To assess analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of the antiepileptic drug lamotrigine in acute and chronic pain. Search methods Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of lamotrigine in acute, and chronic pain (including cancer pain) were identified from MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL up to January 2011. Additional studies were sought from the reference list of the retrieved papers. Selection criteria RCTs investigating the use of lamotrigine (any dose, by any route, and for any study duration) for the treatment of acute or chronic pain. Assessment of pain intensity or pain relief, or both, using validated scales. Participants were adults aged 18 and over. Only full journal publication articles were included. Data collection and analysis Dichotomous data (ideally for the outcome of at least 50% pain relief) were used to calculate relative risk with 95% confidence intervals. Meta-analysis was undertaken using a fixed-effect model. Numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNTs) were calculated as the reciprocal of the absolute risk reduction. For unwanted effects, the NNT becomes the number needed to harm (NNH) and was calculated. Main results Twelve included studies in 11 publications (1511 participants), all with chronic neuropathic pain: central post stroke pain (1), chemotherapy induced neuropathic pain (1), diabetic neuropathy (4), HIV related neuropathy (2), mixed neuropathic pain (2), spinal cord injury related pain (1), and trigeminal neuralgia (1); none investigated lamotrigine in acute pain. The update had five additional studies (1111 additional participants). Participants were aged between 26 and 77 years. Study duration

  17. Central pain: "new" syndromes and their evaluation.

    PubMed

    Berić, A

    1993-10-01

    Central pain syndrome is defined as pain associated with a lesion of the central nervous system. It has a low incidence but is frequently intractable and does not have effective treatment. The cause of central pain is speculative; however, the single common sensory abnormality in patients with central pain is interruption of spinothalamocortical nociceptive pathways. It appears that severe central nervous system lesions, with total destruction of ascending sensory systems, do not lead to a central pain syndrome; and that setting of mild, moderate, or severe disruption of the anterolateral ascending system with partial or complete preservation of the dorsal column/medial lemniscus functions is most frequently associated with central pain syndrome. Furthermore, even during remission, dysesthesias and pain could be triggered by additional afferent input to the large fiber/dorsal column/medial lemniscus system and, once established, they may not be abolished by additional deafferentation. PMID:8413354

  18. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Estenssoro, Elisa; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute respiratory failure produced by an inflammatory edema secondary to increased lung capillary permeability. This causes alveolar flooding and subsequently deep hypoxemia, with intrapulmonary shunt as its most important underlying mechanism. Characteristically, this alteration is unresponsive to high FIO2 and only reverses with end-expiratory positive pressure (PEEP). Pulmonary infiltrates on CXR and CT are the hallmark, together with decreased lung compliance. ARDS always occurs within a week of exposition to a precipitating factor; most frequently pneumonia, shock, aspiration of gastric contents, sepsis, and trauma. In CT scan, the disease is frequently inhomogeneous, with gravitational infiltrates coexisting with normal-density areas and also with hyperaerated parenchyma. Mortality is high (30-60%) especially in ARDS associated with septic shock and neurocritical diseases. The cornerstone of therapy lies in the treatment of the underlying cause and in the use mechanical ventilation which, if inappropriately administered, can lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. Tidal volume = 6 ml/kg of ideal body weight to maintain an end-inspiratory (plateau) pressure = 30 cm H2O ("protective ventilation") is the only variable consistently associated with decreased mortality. Moderate-to-high PEEP levels are frequently required to treat hypoxemia, yet no specific level or titration strategy has improved outcomes. Recently, the use of early prone positioning in patients with PaO2/FIO2 = 150 was associated with increased survival. In severely hypoxemic patients, it may be necessary to use adjuvants of mechanical ventilation as recruitment maneuvers, pressure-controlled modes, neuromuscular blocking agents, and extracorporeal-membrane oxygenation. Fluid restriction appears beneficial. PMID:27576283

  19. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yadam, Suman; Bihler, Eric; Balaan, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious inflammatory disorder with high mortality. Its main pathologic mechanism seems to result from increased alveolar permeability. Its definition has also changed since first being described according to the Berlin definition, which now classifies ARDS on a severity scale based on PaO2 (partial pressure of oxygen, arterial)/FIO2 (fraction of inspired oxygen) ratio. The cornerstone of therapy was found to be a low tidal volume strategy featuring volumes of 6 to 8 mL per kg of ideal body weight that has been shown to have decreased mortality as proven by the ARDSnet trials. There are other areas of treatment right now that include extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, as well for severe refractory hypoxemia. Other methods that include prone positioning for ventilation have also shown improvements in oxygenation. Positive end-expiratory pressure with lung recruitment maneuvers has also been found to be helpful. Other therapies that include vasodilators and neuromuscular agents are still being explored and need further studies to define their role in ARDS. PMID:26919679

  20. Acute and Chronic Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Nathan; Emanski, Eric; Knaub, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is an extremely common presenting complaint that occurs in upward of 80% of persons. Treatment of an acute episode of back pain includes relative rest, activity modification, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, and physical therapy. Patient education is also imperative, as these patients are at risk for further future episodes of back pain. Chronic back pain (>6 months' duration) develops in a small percentage of patients. Clinicians' ability to diagnose the exact pathologic source of these symptoms is severely limited, making a cure unlikely. Treatment of these patients should be supportive, the goal being to improve pain and function. PMID:26614726

  1. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Lanny

    2012-06-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The topics addressed in this issue are Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and associated chronic pain; the information is meant to help readers understand the mechanisms for pain in this connective tissue disorder as well as general treatment principles for chronic pain management. PMID:22616833

  2. Imaging for acute pelvic pain in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Masselli, Gabriele; Brunelli, Roberto; Monti, Riccardo; Guida, Marianna; Laghi, Francesca; Casciani, Emanuele; Polettini, Elisabetta; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    2014-04-01

    Acute pelvic pain in pregnancy presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Standard imaging techniques need to be adapted to reduce harm to the foetus from X-rays because of their teratogenic and carcinogenic potential. Ultrasound remains the primary imaging investigation of the pregnant abdomen. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be useful in the diagnosis of gynaecological and obstetric problems during pregnancy and in the setting of acute abdomen during pregnancy. MRI overcomes some of the limitations of ultrasound, mainly the size of the gravid uterus. MRI poses theoretical risks to the foetus and care must be taken to minimise these with the avoidance of contrast agents. Teaching Points • Ultrasound and MRI are the preferred investigations for acute pelvic pain during pregnancy. • Ultrasound remains the primary imaging investigation because of availability and portability. • MRI helps differentiate causes of acute pelvic pain when ultrasound is inconclusive. PMID:24535757

  3. The acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Its development leads to high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this devastating entity. In this review article, we describe updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss the new definition of ARDS, its risk factors and pathophysiology, and current evidence regarding ventilation management, adjunctive therapies, and intervention required in refractory hypoxemia. PMID:25829644

  4. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... and adolescents include: Hemolytic uremic syndrome Henoch-Schönlein purpura IgA nephropathy Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis Common causes in ... Heart failure - overview Hemolytic-uremic syndrome Henoch-Schönlein purpura Hepatitis High blood pressure Hypersensitivity vasculitis IgA nephropathy ...

  5. Acute Painful Stress and Inflammatory Mediator Production

    PubMed Central

    Griffis, Charles A.; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Compton, Peggy; Goldberg, Alyssa; Witarama, Tuff; Kotlerman, Jenny; Irwin, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory pathways may be activated under conditions of painful stress, which is hypothesized to worsen the pain experience and place medically-vulnerable populations at risk for increased morbidity. Objectives To evaluate the effects of pain and subjective pain-related stress on pro-inflammatory activity. Methods A total of 19 healthy control subjects underwent a single standard cold-pressor pain test (CPT) and a no-pain control condition. Indicators of pain and stress were measured and related to inflammatory immune responses (CD811a, IL-1RA, and IL-6) immediately following the painful stimulus, and compared to responses under non-pain conditions. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure were measured as indicators of sympathetic stimulation. Results CPT was clearly painful and generated an activation of the sympathetic nervous system. CD811a increased in both conditions, but with no statistically significant greater increase following CPT (p < .06). IL-1RA demonstrated a non-statistically significant increase following CPT (p < .07). The change in IL-6 following CPT differed significantly from the response seen in the control condition (p < .02). Conclusions These findings suggest that CP acute pain may affect proinflammatory pathways, possibly through mechanisms related to adrenergic activation. PMID:23407214

  6. Acute spontaneous tumor lysis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jasek, A M; Day, H J

    1994-10-01

    An 83-year-old woman with no previous history of malignancy was admitted to our institution with weakness and anemia and subsequently developed acute tumor lysis syndrome secondary to newly diagnosed Burkitt's leukemia/lymphoma. This syndrome has been previously described in patients with hematologic malignancies; however, its development has been related to the administration of chemotherapy, steroids, or radiotherapy. The spontaneous occurrence of tumor lysis syndrome has not been previously reported; however, Cohen et al. [Am J Med 58:486-491, 1980] report 8 of 37 patients with "clinically insignificant pretreatment derangements" of serum potassium, phosphate, and calcium. PMID:8092128

  7. Delayed Presentation of Acute Gluteal Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tasch, James J; Misodi, Emmanuel O

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acute gluteal compartment syndrome is a rare condition that usually results from prolonged immobilization following a traumatic event, conventionally involving the presence of compounding factors such as alcohol or opioid intoxication. If delay in medical treatment is prolonged, severe rhabdomyolysis may ensue, leading to acute renal failure and potentially death. CASE REPORT We report the case of a 23-year-old male with a recent history of incarceration and recreational drug use, who presented with reports of severe right-sided buttock pain and profound right-sided neurological loss following a questionable history involving prolonged immobilization after a fall from a standing position. The patient required an emergent gluteal fasciotomy immediately upon admission and required temporary hemodialysis. After an extended hospital stay, he ultimately recovered with only mild deficits in muscular strength in the right lower extremity. CONCLUSIONS This report demonstrates the importance of early recognition of gluteal compartment syndrome to prevent morbidity and mortality. Compartment syndrome presents in many unique ways, and healthcare practitioners must have a keen diagnostic sense to allow for early surgical intervention. Proper wick catheter measurements should be utilized more frequently, instead of relying on clinical symptomatology such as loss of peripheral pulses for diagnosis of compartment syndrome. PMID:27432320

  8. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  9. Acute coronary syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Heart attack-ACS; Myocardial infarction-ACS; MI-ACS; Acute MI-ACS; ST-elevation myocardial infarction-ACS; Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction-ACS; Unstable angina-ACS; Accelerating angina-ACS; New- ...

  10. Interstitial Cystitis / Painful Bladder Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Events Upcoming and past meetings Follow Us Social media, RSS feeds, and more Follow Us Health Information > ... Chronic Pain Association American Pain Society American Urogynecologic ... Claimants' Representatives Social Security Administration United Ostomy ...

  11. [Behavioral aspects of chronic pain syndromes].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, J T

    2000-06-01

    The knowledge of biological pain mechanisms are not sufficient for the understanding of patients with chronic pain syndromes such as low back, cervicobrachial and muscle pain. Psychological and psychosocial aspects play important roles in the setting and perpetuation of symptoms. Mood and anxiety disorders, secondary gains such as early retirement and financial compensations, must all be acknowledged by the physician as possible contributors to the symptoms. Abnormal illness behavior may better characterize patients with chronic pain syndromes. Behavior observation, which is akin to medical practice, is therefore a powerful tool in the diagnosis and management of these syndromes. Physicians ought be very careful in not reinforcing the patients already strong organic convictions regarding their symptoms, avoiding making decisions based on patients complaints and alleged disabilities, and assigning poorly defined and disputable diagnosis labels. Society needs also to refrain from policies that encourage abnormal illness behaviors. PMID:10849642

  12. The clinics of acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rastelli, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Risk stratification and management of patients with chest pain continues to be challenging despite considerable efforts made in the last decades by many clinicians and researchers. The throutful evaluation necessitates that the physicians have a high index of suspicion for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and always keep in mind the myriad of often subtle and atypical presentations of ischemic heart disease, especially in certain patient populations such as the elderly ones. In this article we aim to review and discuss the available evidence on the value of clinical presentation in patients with a suspected ACS, with special emphasis on history, characteristics of chest pain, associated symptoms, atypical presentations, precipitating and relieving factors, drugs, clinical rules and significance of clinical Gestalt. PMID:27294087

  13. The clinics of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Rastelli, Gianni

    2016-05-01

    Risk stratification and management of patients with chest pain continues to be challenging despite considerable efforts made in the last decades by many clinicians and researchers. The throutful evaluation necessitates that the physicians have a high index of suspicion for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and always keep in mind the myriad of often subtle and atypical presentations of ischemic heart disease, especially in certain patient populations such as the elderly ones. In this article we aim to review and discuss the available evidence on the value of clinical presentation in patients with a suspected ACS, with special emphasis on history, characteristics of chest pain, associated symptoms, atypical presentations, precipitating and relieving factors, drugs, clinical rules and significance of clinical Gestalt. PMID:27294087

  14. [Imaging of acute pelvic pain in women].

    PubMed

    Genevois, A; Marouteau, N; Lemercier, E; Dacher, J N; Thiebot, J

    2008-01-01

    Acute pelvic pain in women is a routine situation in any emergency unit. The radiologist should know how to explore the patient with regards to the history and clinical findings. Ultrasonography is the primary and sometimes the only necessary imaging tool in the assessment of acute pelvic pain in women. MRI is the preferred technique in pregnant or young women. CT is more valuable for assessing nongynecologic disorders or post-partum and post-operative infections. This article reviews the contribution of each imaging technique in this clinical situation. Emphasis is put on the importance of age and clinical findings in the diagnostic strategy. PMID:18288036

  15. Inflammation in complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Parkitny, Luke; McAuley, James H.; Di Pietro, Flavia; Stanton, Tasha R.; O’Connell, Neil E.; Marinus, Johan; van Hilten, Jacobus J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: We conducted a systematic review of the literature with meta-analysis to determine whether complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is associated with a specific inflammatory profile and whether this is dependent on the duration of the condition. Methods: Comprehensive searches of the literature using MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, and reference lists from published reviews identified articles that measured inflammatory factors in CRPS. Two independent investigators screened titles and abstracts, and performed data extraction and risk of bias assessments. Studies were subgrouped by medium (blood, blister fluid, and CSF) and duration (acute and chronic CRPS). Where possible, meta-analyses of inflammatory factor concentrations were performed and pooled effect sizes were calculated using random-effects models. Results: Twenty-two studies were included in the systematic review and 15 in the meta-analysis. In acute CRPS, the concentrations of interleukin (IL)-8 and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors I (sTNF-RI) and II (sTNF-RII) were significantly increased in blood. In chronic CRPS, significant increases were found in 1) TNFα, bradykinin, sIL-1RI, IL-1Ra, IL-2, sIL-2Ra, IL-4, IL-7, interferon-γ, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and sRAGE (soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products) in blood; 2) IL-1Ra, MCP-1, MIP-1β, and IL-6 in blister fluid; and 3) IL-1β and IL-6 in CSF. Chronic CRPS was also associated with significantly decreased 1) substance P, sE-selectin, sL-selectin, sP-selectin, and sGP130 in blood; and 2) soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) in CSF. Most studies failed to meet 3 or more of our quality criteria. Conclusion: CRPS is associated with the presence of a proinflammatory state in the blood, blister fluid, and CSF. Different inflammatory profiles were found for acute and chronic cases. PMID:23267031

  16. Analyzing acute procedural pain in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lang, Elvira V; Tan, Gabriel; Amihai, Ido; Jensen, Mark P

    2014-07-01

    Because acute procedural pain tends to increase with procedure time, assessments of pain management strategies must take that time relationship into account. Statistical time-course analyses are, however, complex and require large patient numbers to detect differences. The current study evaluated the abilities of various single and simple composite measures such as averaged pain or individual patient pain slopes to detect treatment effects. Secondary analyses were performed with the data from 3 prospective randomized clinical trials that assessed the effect of a self-hypnotic relaxation intervention on procedural pain, measured every 10-15 minutes during vascular/renal interventions, breast biopsies, and tumor embolizations. Single point-in-time and maximal pain comparisons were poor in detecting treatment effects. Linear data sets of individual patient slopes yielded the same qualitative results as the more complex repeated measures analyses, allowing the use of standard statistical approaches (eg, Kruskal-Wallis), and promising analyses of smaller subgroups, which otherwise would be underpowered. With nonlinear data, a simple averaged score was highly sensitive in detecting differences. Use of these 2 workable and relatively simple approaches may be a first step towards facilitating the development of data sets that could enable meta-analyses of data from acute pain trials. PMID:24731852

  17. [Complex regional pain syndrome versus chronic regional pain syndrome (Hand-Finger Syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Wulle, C

    2010-02-01

    Dystrophy is a main factor of CRPS. A large number of patients do not develop dystrophy but, instead, they suffer from pain with limitation in movement, possible paraesthesia and/or swelling. This is then a chronic regional pain syndrome or (shoulder-arm-) hand-finger syndrome. These patients should never be confronted with the diagnosis Morbus Sudeck or algodystrophy, which are today also well known among non-professionals, to avoid pushing them into a status of constant severe invalidity. Histories, clinical examination, as well as a good personal understanding of the patient are indispensable. Knowing that pain, or the extent of pain, remains subjective until today, the clinical diagnosis depends on the absence of side differences in: a) the circumference of soft tissues of both upper extremities; b) the callosity of the palm; c) the bone-density. These three parameters allow verification of the consequences of the pain complaints (indirect pain verification). It is essential to find the cause for their suffering and to treat it as far as possible: 1) Too long and inappropriate immobilisation (patient's suffering not considered sufficiently). These patients can recover quickly when the right diagnosis is made in good time. 2) Limitation of movement due to scar, neuroma, or elongation pain: a) bizarre functional disabilities can develop; b) due to the patient's complaints, one or several operations would finally be performed, which will not lead to an improvement but rather to an aggravation of the pain; c) socially-induced purposeful pain increase, the typical statement of the patient will be: "I can't stand it any longer". Patients who are socially over-burdened, or have psycho-social problems, may experience a decline of performance or a post-traumatic stress disorder. Several patients will be introduced as illustrations for each of the relevant groups. PMID:20205065

  18. Fear of pain in children and adolescents with neuropathic pain and complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Simons, Laura E

    2016-02-01

    A significant proportion of children and adolescents with chronic pain endorse elevated pain-related fear. Pain-related fear is associated with high levels of disability, depressive symptoms, and school impairment. Because of faulty nerve signaling, individuals with neuropathic pain and complex regional pain syndrome may be more prone to develop pain-related fear as they avoid use of and neglect the affected body area(s), resulting in exacerbated symptoms, muscle atrophy, maintenance of pain signaling, and ongoing pain-related disability. Not surprisingly, effective treatments for elevated pain-related fears involve exposure to previously avoided activities to downregulate incorrect pain signaling. In the context of intensive interdisciplinary pain treatment of youth with neuropathic pain, decreasing pain-related fear is associated with improved physical and psychological functioning, whereas high initial pain-related fear is a risk factor for less treatment responsiveness. An innovative approach to targeting pain-related fear and evidence of a neural response to treatment involving decoupling of the amygdala with key fear circuits in youth with complex regional pain syndrome suggest breakthroughs in our ability to ameliorate these issues. PMID:26785161

  19. Complex regional pain syndrome: observations on diagnosis, treatment and definition of a new subgroup.

    PubMed

    Żyluk, A; Puchalski, P

    2013-07-01

    Several definitions and sets of diagnostic criteria of complex regional pain syndrome have been proposed, but to date none has been accepted completely. This article presents a specific subtype of the disease, called 'chronic, refractory complex regional pain syndrome' which is extremely severe, disabling and resistant to treatment. It also emphasizes difficulties with diagnosing complex regional pain syndrome because of its variable clinical presentation and diagnostic criteria being insufficiently precise. The necessity to distinguish between criteria for clinical use and for scientific purposes is suggested with a proposal of practical guideline for diagnosing acute complex regional pain syndrome. A review of treatments for complex regional pain syndrome is presented, with opinion on their effectiveness: good in an early stage, less well in chronic and generally poor in the chronic, refractory subtype. PMID:23221182

  20. Advances in the diagnosis of acute aortic syndromes: Role of imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Dentamaro, Ilaria; Masi, Filippo; Carbonara, Santa; Ricci, Gabriella

    2016-06-01

    Aortic diseases include a wide range of pathological conditions: aortic aneurysms, pseudoaneurysms, acute aortic syndromes, atherosclerotic and inflammatory conditions, genetic diseases and congenital anomalies. Acute aortic syndromes have acute onset and may be life-threatening. They include aortic dissection, intramural haematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer and traumatic aortic injury. Pain is the common denominator to all acute aortic syndromes. Pain occurs regardless of age, gender and other associated clinical conditions. In this review, we deal with the main findings in the clinical setting and the most recent indications for diagnostic imaging, which are aimed to start an appropriate treatment and improve the short- and long-term prognosis of these patients. PMID:26957573

  1. Acute bilateral spontaneous forearm compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dalton, David M; Munigangaiah, Sudarshan; Subramaniam, Tava; McCabe, John P

    2014-01-01

    Acute spontaneous compartment syndrome of the forearm is rarely reported in the literature. It is typically associated with trauma or thromboembolism in the acute setting and repetitive exertional stress in the chronic setting. However it is rare for it to present bilaterally with no apparent underlying cause. We report the case of a young 31-year-old lady who presented to our Emergency Department with bilateral compartment syndrome of the forearm. Her presenting complaints included acute severe pain and swelling of the forearms bilaterally, with a decreased range of movement of the wrist and fingers. She also complained of numbness in all fingers. She had no history of recent trauma and ultrasound scans showed no evidence of vascular compromise. Past medical history was notable only for idiopathic hypertension and coeliac disease. The patient was taken to theatre urgently where flexor and extensor compartments and carpal tunnel were decompressed. Pronator Teres was found to be dusky initially but turned pink after decompression. All other muscles were normal. An interesting fact of this case was that combination of the high compartment pressures and anaesthetic related hypotension caused the forearm pulses to become impalpable at induction, these returned intra-operatively. The patient has been seen in the outpatient department following discharge. She is well apart from some mildly reduced grip strength in her right hand likely due to carpal tunnel decompression. No cause was found for the scenario after extensive medical investigation. PMID:24641749

  2. Acute radiation syndrome and chronic radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grammaticos, Philip; Giannoula, Evanthia; Fountos, George P

    2013-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) or sickness or poisoning or toxicity is induced after a whole body exposure of men to high doses of radiation between 1-12Gy. First symptoms are from the gastrointestinal system, which together with bone marrow are the most sensitive parts of our body. Chronic radiation syndrome (CRS) may be induced by smaller than 1Gy radiation doses or after a mild form of ARS. Prophylaxis and treatment suggestions are described. In cases of ARS, a large part of the exposed population after proper medical care may survive, while without medical care this part of the population will be lost. Prophylaxis may also save another part of the population. PMID:23570025

  3. Patellofemoral pain syndrome in Iranian female athletes.

    PubMed

    Nejati, Parisa; Forogh, Bijan; Moeineddin, Reza; Baradaran, Hamid Reza; Nejati, Mina

    2011-01-01

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is the most common overuse syndrome in athletes. It is one of the causes of anterior knee pain in athletic population who come to the sports medicine clinic. Patellofemoral pain is more common among female athletes especially adolescents and young adults. Symptoms include: persistent pain behind the patella or peripatella. Pain increases on ascending and descending stairs and squatting and prolonged sitting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PFPS in Iranian female athletes. 418 female athletes aged 15-35 years were examined in five sports: Soccer (190), volleyball (103), running (42), fencing (45) and rock climbing (38). The athletes who had non- traumatic onset anterior knee pain of at least 3 months that increased in descending and ascending stairs and squatting, had no other causes of anterior knee pain such as ligament instability, bursitis, meniscal injury, tendonitis and arthritis and no history of knee surgery during the one past year were diagnosed as PFPS. 26/190 (13.68 %) soccer players, 21/103(20.38 %) volleyball players, 7/42 (16.66 %) runners, 6/45(13.33 %) fencers and 10/38 (26.31%) rock climbers had patellofemoral pain. Among the 418 female athletes who were evaluated 70 had PFPS. Rock climbers were the most common athletes with PFPS followed by volleyball players and runners. PMID:21681705

  4. Approach to chest pain and acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Pandie, S; Hellenberg, D; Hellig, F; Ntsekhe, M

    2016-03-01

    Patient history, physical examination, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac biomarkers are key components of an effective chest pain assessment. The first priority is excluding serious chest pain syndromes, namely acute coronary syndromes (ACSs), aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, cardiac tamponade and tension pneumothorax. On history, the mnemonic SOCRATES (Site Onset Character Radiation Association Time Exacerbating/relieving factor and Severity) helps differentiate cardiac from non-cardiac pain. On examination, evaluation of vital signs, evidence of murmurs, rubs, heart failure, tension pneumothoraces and chest infections are important. A 12-lead ECG should be interpreted within 10 minutes of first medical contact, specifically to identify ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). High-sensitivity troponins improve the rapid rule-out of myocardial infarction (MI) and confirmation of non-ST elevation MI (NSTEMI). ACS (STEMI and NSTEMI/unstable anginapectoris (UAP)) result from acute destabilisation of coronary atheroma with resultant complete (STEMI) or subtotal (NSTEMI/UAP) thrombotic coronary occlusion. The management of STEMI patients includes providing urgent reperfusion: primary percutaneous coronary intervention(PPCI) if available, deliverable within 60 - 120 minutes, and fibrinolysis if PPCI is not available. Essential adjunctive therapies include antiplatelet therapy (aspirin, P2Y12 inhibitors), anticoagulation (heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin) and cardiac monitoring. PMID:27303759

  5. Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome.

    PubMed

    Panzera, Alis Kolter

    2007-02-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic, painful bladder syndrome primarily found in women. Although the direct cause(s) of IC are unknown, several theories exist. Common symptoms include urinary urgency, frequency, and pain. Treatment options include behavioral therapies, use of pharmacologic agents, and surgery. Patients benefit from prompt diagnosis and initiation of treatments. Important clinical features of IC in women including the pathology, common symptoms, and recommended evaluation and management strategies are reviewed. PMID:17390922

  6. Imaging study of the painful heel syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.L.; Smibert, J.G.; Cox, R.; Mitchell, R.; Klenerman, L.

    1987-06-01

    A total of 45 patients with the painful heel syndrome without evidence of an associated inflammatory arthritis, seven of whom had pain in both heels, were studied using technetium-99 isotope bone scans and lateral and 45 degrees medial oblique radiographs of both feet. Of the 52 painful heels 31 (59.6%) showed increased uptake of tracer at the calcaneum. Patients with scans showing increased uptake tended to have more severe heel pain and responded more frequently to a local hydrocortisone injection. On plain x-ray, 39 of 52 painful heels (75%) and 24 of the 38 opposite nonpainful heels (63%) showed plantar spurs, compared with five of 63 (7.9%) heels in 59 age- and sex-matched controls. No evidence of stress fractures was seen.

  7. Acute Type A Aortic Dissection Missed as Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ansari-Ramandi, Mohammad Mostafa; Firoozi, Ata

    2016-01-01

    Although the aortic dissection is not common, its outcome is frequently fatal, and many patients with aortic dissection die before referral to the hospital or any diagnostic testing. The symptoms of aortic dissection can be similar to myocardial ischemia. A 66-year-old male was referred to our hospital with suspicion of aortic dissection after echocardiography done for evaluating his high blood pressure. He had symptoms of acute coronary syndrome two years before and had done coronary angiography. On presentation to our hospital he had a high blood pressure. On reviewing his past medical history and examining, in the film of coronary angiography, the dissection flap in ascending aorta was identified. Although type A aortic dissection is a catastrophic condition with high mortality and requires prompt surgical treatment but in some cases it may be misdiagnosed as acute coronary syndrome. Sometimes against its high mortality when left untreated, patients survive and are diagnosed later in life incidentally. So it is of great importance to have great clinical suspicion for aortic dissection in patients referring to the hospital with chest pain and the predisposing factors. PMID:27437290

  8. Pharmacology of opioids in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Ricardo; Barkin, Robert L; Wang, Victor C

    2011-01-01

    The perpetual pursuit of pain elimination has been constant throughout human history and pervades human cultures. In some ways it is as old as medicine itself. Cultures throughout history have practiced the art of pain management through remedies such as oral ingestion of herbs or techniques believed to have special properties. In fact, even Hippocrates wrote about the practice of trepanation, the cutting of holes in the body to release pain. Current therapies for management of pain include the pervasive utilization of opioids, which have an extensive history, spanning centuries. There is general agreement about the appropriateness of opioids for the treatment of acute and cancer pain, but the long-term use of these drugs for treatment of chronic non-malignant pain remains controversial. The pros and cons regarding these issues are beyond the scope of this review. Instead, the purpose of this review will be directed towards the pharmacology of commonly prescribed opioids in the treatment of various chronic pain syndromes. Opium, derived from the Greek word for "juice," is extracted from the latex sap of the opium poppy (Papaverum somniferum). The juice of the poppy is the source of some 20 different alkaloids of opium. These alkaloids of opioids can be divided into 2 chemical classes: phenanthrenes (morphine, codeine, and thebaine) and benzylisoquinolines (agents that do not interact with opioid receptors). PMID:21785485

  9. Acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jawaid, Saad; Chaudary, Adeel

    2014-01-01

    The paramedics brought a 60-year-old man to the emergency department after a sudden onset of shortness of breath with a subsequent drop in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). On arrival the patient looked peri-arrest. His O2 saturations were 84% on 15 L of oxygen. He had gasping breathing with a completely silent chest and the GCS was 6/15 (E=1, V=1, M=4). The blood gas revealed type-2 respiratory failure. The chest X-ray was unremarkable and ECG was not indicative for cardiac catheterisation lab activation. Bedside shock scan was done which showed global hypokinesia of the left ventricle. In spite of unconvincing ECG and chest X-ray, an acute cardiac event was diagnosed in view of an abnormal bedside echo. The patient was transferred to the cardiac catheterisation lab for urgent percutaneous coronary intervention which revealed critical stenosis of the left main stem coronary artery, which was successfully stented. The patient had a good recovery from the life-threatening event. PMID:24913081

  10. [Back pain and acne conglobata: SAPHO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kühn, F; Fehr, S; Stoll, T

    2007-04-11

    We report on a young woman suffering from SAPHO syndrome with back pain and arthritis of the sternoclavicular joints. This inflammatory disorder of the osteoarticular system (synovitis, osteitis, and hyperostosis) is associated with severe acne or palmoplantar pustulosis. The patient was treated with pamidronate, NSAID and physiotherapy which improved the musculoskeletal symptoms completely. The acne was treated with isotretinoin. PMID:17506389

  11. Pain Part 8: Burning Mouth Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beneng, Kiran; Renton, Tara

    2016-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a rare but impactful condition affecting mainly post-menopausal women resulting in constant pain and significant difficulty with eating, drinking and daily function. The aetiology of BMS remains an enigma. Recent evidence suggests it likely to be neuropathic in origin, the cause of which remains unknown. There is no cure for this condition and the unfortunate patients remain managed on a variety of neuropathic pain medication, salivary substitutes and other non-medical interventions that help the patient 'get through the day'. Some simple strategies can assist both clinician and patient to manage this debilitating condition. CPD/Clinical Relevance: The dental team will recognize patients presenting with burning mouth syndrome. They are difficult patients to manage and are often referred to secondary care and, ultimately, depend on their general medical practitioners for pain management. PMID:27439272

  12. Sensitization of the Nociceptive System in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Diedrichs, Carolina; Baron, Ralf; Gierthmühlen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    Background Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is characterized by sensory, motor and autonomic abnormalities without electrophysiological evidence of a nerve lesion. Objective Aims were to investigate how sensory, autonomic and motor function change in the course of the disease. Methods 19 CRPS-I patients (17 with acute, 2 with chronic CRPS, mean duration of disease 5.7±8.3, range 1–33 months) were examined with questionnaires (LANSS, NPS, MPI, Quick DASH, multiple choice list of descriptors for sensory, motor, autonomic symptoms), motor and autonomic tests as well as quantitative sensory testing according to the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain at two visits (baseline and 36±10.6, range 16–53 months later). Results CRPS-I patients had an improvement of sudomotor and vasomotor function, but still a great impairment of sensory and motor function upon follow-up. Although pain and mechanical detection improved upon follow-up, thermal and mechanical pain sensitivity increased, including the contralateral side. Increase in mechanical pain sensitivity and loss of mechanical detection were associated with presence of ongoing pain. Conclusions The results demonstrate that patients with CRPS-I show a sensitization of the nociceptive system in the course of the disease, for which ongoing pain seems to be the most important trigger. They further suggest that measured loss of function in CRPS-I is due to pain-induced hypoesthesia rather than a minimal nerve lesion. In conclusion, this article gives evidence for a pronociceptive pain modulation profile developing in the course of CRPS and thus helps to assess underlying mechanisms of CRPS that contribute to the maintenance of patients’ pain and disability. PMID:27149519

  13. Emergency pulpotomy in relieving acute dental pain among Tanzanian patients

    PubMed Central

    Nyerere, Joachim W; Matee, Mecky I; Simon, Elison NM

    2006-01-01

    Background In Tanzania, oral health services are mostly in the form of dental extractions aimed at alleviating acute dental pain. Conservative methods of alleviating acute dental pain are virtually non-existent. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to determine treatment success of emergency pulpotomy in relieving acute dental pain. Methods Setting: School of Dentistry, Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Study design: Longitudinal study. Participants: 180 patients who presented with dental pain due to acute irreversible pulpitis during the study period between July and August 2001. Treatment and evaluation: Patients were treated by emergency pulpotomy on permanent posterior teeth and were evaluated for pain after one, three and six week's post-treatment. Pain, if present, was categorised as either mild or acute. Results Of the patients with treated premolars, 25 (13.9%) patients did not experience pain at all while 19 (10.6%) experienced mild pain. None of the patients with treated premolars experienced acute pain. Among 136 patients with treated molars 56 (31%) did not experience any pain, 76 (42.2%) experienced mild pain and the other 4 (2.2%) suffered acute pain. Conclusion The short term treatment success of emergency pulpotomy was high being 100% for premolars and 97.1% for molars, suggesting that it can be recommended as a measure to alleviate acute dental pain while other conservative treatment options are being considered. PMID:16426455

  14. What's new in acute compartment syndrome?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Edward J; Sanders, David W; Shuler, Michael S; Lawendy, Abdel-Rahman; Cole, Ashley L; Alqahtani, Saad M; Schmidt, Andrew H

    2012-12-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) after trauma is often the result of increased size of the damaged tissues after acute crush injury or from reperfusion of ischemic areas. It usually is not solely caused by accumulation of free blood or fluid in the compartment, although that can contribute in some cases. There is no reliable and reproducible test that confirms the diagnosis of ACS. A missed diagnosis or failure to cut the fascia to release pressure within a few hours can result in severe intractable pain, paralysis, and sensory deficits. Reduced blood circulation leads to oxygen and nutrient deprivation, muscle necrosis, and permanent disability. Currently, the diagnosis of ACS is made on the basis of physical examination and repeated needle sticks over a short time frame to measure intracompartmental pressures. Missed compartment syndromes continue to be one of most common causes of malpractice lawsuits. Existing technology for continuous pressure measurements are insensitive, particularly in the deep tissues and compartments, and their use is restricted to highly trained personnel. Newer concepts of the pathophysiology accompanied by new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities have recently been advanced. Among these are the concept of inflammatory mediators as markers and anti-inflammatories as medical adjunct therapy. New diagnostic modalities include near-infrared spectroscopy, ultrafiltration catheters, and radio-frequency identification implants. These all address current shortcomings in the diagnostic armamentarium that trauma surgeons can use. The strengths and weaknesses of these new concepts are discussed to allow the trauma surgeon to follow current evolution of the field. PMID:22913965

  15. Pain insensitivity syndrome misinterpreted as inflicted burns.

    PubMed

    van den Bosch, Gerbrich E; Baartmans, Martin G A; Vos, Paul; Dokter, Jan; White, Tonya; Tibboel, Dick

    2014-05-01

    We present a case study of a 10-year-old child with severe burns that were misinterpreted as inflicted burns. Because of multiple injuries since early life, the family was under suspicion of child abuse and therefore under supervision of the Child Care Board for 2 years before the boy was burned. Because the boy incurred the burns without feeling pain, we conducted a thorough medical examination and laboratory testing, evaluated detection and pain thresholds, and used MRI to study brain morphology and brain activation patterns during pain between this patient and 3 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. We found elevated detection and pain thresholds and lower brain activation during pain in the patient compared with the healthy controls and reference values. The patient received the diagnosis of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV on the basis of clinical findings and the laboratory testing, complemented with the altered pain and detection thresholds and MRI findings. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV is a very rare congenital pain insensitivity syndrome characterized by the absence of pain and temperature sensation combined with oral mutilation due to unawareness, fractures, and anhidrosis caused by abnormalities in the peripheral nerves. Health care workers should be aware of the potential presence of this disease to prevent false accusations of child abuse. PMID:24733875

  16. Cardiac MRI of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akerem Khan, Shamruz; Khan, Shamruz Akarem; Williamson, Eric E; Foley, Thomas A; Cullen, Ethany L; Young, Phillip M; Araoz, Philip A

    2013-05-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. New serological biomarkers, such as troponins, have improved the diagnosis of ACS; however, the diagnosis of ACS can still be difficult as there is marked heterogeneity in its presentation and significant overlap with other disorders presenting with chest pain. Evidence is accumulating that cardiac MRI provides information that can aid the detection and differential diagnosis of ACS, guide clinical decision-making and improve risk-stratification after an event. In this review, we present the relevant cardiac MRI techniques that can be used to detect ACS accurately, provide differential diagnosis, identify the sequelae of ACS, and determine prognostication after ACS. PMID:23668741

  17. Acute chest pain emergencies - spouses' prehospital experiences.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Kerstin; Quell, Robin; Sørlie, Venke

    2008-10-01

    The call to the Emergency Medical Dispatch Centre is often a person's first contact with the health-care system in cases of acute illness or injury and acute chest pain is a common reason for calling. The aim was to illuminate how spouses to persons with acute chest pain experienced the alarm situation, the emergency call and the prehospital emergency care. Interviews were conducted with nineteen spouses. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used for the analyses. The themes responsibility and uneasiness emerged as well as an overall theme of aloneness. Being a spouse to a person in need of acute medical and nursing assistance was interpreted as "Being responsible and trying to preserve life" and "Being able to manage the uneasiness and having trust in an uncertain situation." When their partners' life was at risk the spouses were in an escalating spiral of worry, uncertainty, stress, fear of loss, feeling of loneliness and desperation. They had to manage emotional distress and felt compelled to act to preserve life, a challenging situation. PMID:18929341

  18. Single dose dipyrone for acute postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Sheena; Faura, Clara; Edwards, Jayne; McQuay, Henry J; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Dipyrone (metamizole) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug used in some countries to treat pain (postoperative, colic, cancer, and migraine); it is banned in others because of an association with life-threatening blood agranulocytosis. This review updates a 2001 Cochrane review, and no relevant new studies were identified, but additional outcomes were sought. Objectives To assess the efficacy and adverse events of single dose dipyrone in acute postoperative pain. Search methods The earlier review searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and the Oxford Pain Relief Database to December 1999. For the update we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE,EMBASE and LILACS to February 2010. Selection criteria Single dose, randomised, double-blind, placebo or active controlled trials of dipyrone for relief of established moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults. We included oral, rectal, intramuscular or intravenous administration of study drugs. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed for methodological quality and data extracted by two review authors independently. Summed total pain relief over six hours (TOTPAR) was used to calculate the number of participants achieving at least 50% pain relief. Derived results were used to calculate, with 95% confidence intervals, relative benefit compared to placebo, and the number needed to treat (NNT) for one participant to experience at least 50% pain relief over six hours. Use and time to use of rescue medication were additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was collected. Main results Fifteen studies tested mainly 500 mg oral dipyrone (173 participants), 2.5 g intravenous dipyrone (101), 2.5 g intramuscular dipyrone (99); fewer than 60 participants received any other dose. All studies used active controls (ibuprofen, paracetamol, aspirin, flurbiprofen, ketoprofen, dexketoprofen, ketorolac, pethidine, tramadol, suprofen); eight used placebo controls. Over 70% of participants

  19. Pediatric complex regional pain syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, Rotem; Uziel, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic, intensified localized pain condition that can affect children and adolescents as well as adults, but is more common among adolescent girls. Symptoms include limb pain; allodynia; hyperalgesia; swelling and/or changes in skin color of the affected limb; dry, mottled skin; hyperhidrosis and trophic changes of the nails and hair. The exact mechanism of CRPS is unknown, although several different mechanisms have been suggested. The diagnosis is clinical, with the aid of the adult criteria for CRPS. Standard care consists of a multidisciplinary approach with the implementation of intensive physical therapy in conjunction with psychological counseling. Pharmacological treatments may aid in reducing pain in order to allow the patient to participate fully in intensive physiotherapy. The prognosis in pediatric CRPS is favorable. PMID:27130211

  20. The intersection between asthma and acute chest syndrome in children with sickle-cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    DeBaun, Michael R; Strunk, Robert C

    2016-06-18

    Acute chest syndrome is a frequent cause of acute lung disease in children with sickle-cell disease. Asthma is common in children with sickle-cell disease and is associated with increased incidence of vaso-occlusive pain events, acute chest syndrome episodes, and earlier death. Risk factors for asthma exacerbation and an acute chest syndrome episode are similar, and both can present with shortness of breath, chest pain, cough, and wheezing. Despite overlapping risk factors and symptoms, an acute exacerbation of asthma or an episode of acute chest syndrome are two distinct entities that need disease-specific management strategies. Although understanding has increased about asthma as a comorbidity in sickle-cell disease and its effects on morbidity, substantial gaps remain in knowledge about best management. PMID:27353685

  1. Acute pediatric leg compartment syndrome in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Eric; Truntzer, Jeremy; Trunzter, Jeremy; Klinge, Steve; Schwartz, Kevin; Schiller, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is an orthopedic surgical emergency and may result in devastating complications in the setting of delayed or missed diagnosis. Compartment syndrome has a variety of causes, including posttraumatic or postoperative swelling, external compression, burns, bleeding disorders, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Rare cases of pediatric acute compartment syndrome in the setting of acute myeloid leukemia and, even less commonly, chronic myeloid leukemia have been reported. The authors report the first known case of pediatric acute compartment syndrome in a patient without a previously known diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. On initial examination, an 11-year-old boy presented with a 2-week history of progressive left calf pain and swelling after playing soccer. Magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a hematoma in the left superficial posterior compartment. The patient had unrelenting pain, intermittent lateral foot parethesias, and inability to bear weight. Subsequently, he was diagnosed with acute compartment syndrome and underwent fasciotomy and evacuation of a hematoma. Laboratory results showed an abnormal white blood cell count of 440×10(9)/L (normal, 4.4-11×10(9)) and international normalized ratio of 1.3 (normal, 0.8-1.2). Further testing included the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene located on the Philadelphia chromosome, leading to a diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. Monotherapy with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) was initiated. This report adds another unique case to the growing literature on compartment syndrome in the pediatric population and reinforces the need to consider compartment syndrome, even in unlikely clinical scenarios. PMID:25361367

  2. Behavioral Concepts in the Analysis of Chronic Pain Syndromes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; Gil, Karen M.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews behavioral and psychological concepts currently applied to the assessment and treatment of chronic pain syndromes, including operant conditioning and psychophysiologic concepts such as the stress-pain hypothesis, the pain-muscle spasm-pain cycle, and the neuromuscular pain model. Discusses relaxation and biofeedback training and concepts…

  3. [Acute pain in children and its treatment].

    PubMed

    Dalens, B

    1991-01-01

    Pain in paediatrics has long been underestimated. The numerous scientific studies carried out during the last decade show that its existence can no longer be doubted: in fact, pain already exists during the neonatal period, and probably throughout the last trimester of gestation as well. Pain pathways mature during the embryonic period and peripheral receptors develop between the 7th and 20th week. A-delta and C fibers, as well as spinal roots and nerves, are completely differentiated before the end of the second month. The development of specific neurotransmitters and thalamic and cortical dendritic branching occurs later on; it is well enough developed to allow perception of painful stimuli (slow or protopathic component) from the beginning of the foetal period onwards. The discriminative rapid component develops in parallel to myelinisation, and the psycho-affective component, which requires a long and complex learning process, will not be fully operative until the end of puberty. Assessing pain, already a difficult task in the adult, is all the more so in children because of lesser verbal communicative capabilities, difficulty in handling abstract concepts, lack of experience of painful stimuli to make comparisons, and ignorance of their body image. In the very young child, diagnosing pain relies on suggestive circumstances, and an altered behaviour, knowing that no one symptom in pathognomonic. As the child grows up, methods for self-assessment of pain become usable, such as coloured scales and simplified verbal scales. However, behavioural tests remain the mainstay until the prepubertal period. The treatment of acute pain requires a reasoned approach which takes into account the state of the child, that of the aetiological investigations, the likely course of the lesions, as well as the patient's analgesic requirements. Therapeutic means do not differ from those for adult patients; however, the differences of distribution of body water, the small

  4. Acute psychosocial stress reduces pain modulation capabilities in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Geva, Nirit; Pruessner, Jens; Defrin, Ruth

    2014-11-01

    Anecdotes on the ability of individuals to continue to function under stressful conditions despite injuries causing excruciating pain suggest that acute stress may induce analgesia. However, studies exploring the effect of acute experimental stress on pain perception show inconsistent results, possibly due to methodological differences. Our aim was to systematically study the effect of acute stress on pain perception using static and dynamic, state-of-the-art pain measurements. Participants were 29 healthy men who underwent the measurement of heat-pain threshold, heat-pain intolerance, temporal summation of pain, and conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Testing was conducted before and during exposure to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST), inducing acute psychosocial stress. Stress levels were evaluated using perceived ratings of stress and anxiety, autonomic variables, and salivary cortisol. The MIST induced a significant stress reaction. Although pain threshold and pain intolerance were unaffected by stress, an increase in temporal summation of pain and a decrease in CPM were observed. These changes were significantly more robust among individuals with stronger reaction to stress ("high responders"), with a significant correlation between the perception of stress and the performance in the pain measurements. We conclude that acute psychosocial stress seems not to affect the sensitivity to pain, however, it significantly reduces the ability to modulate pain in a dose-response manner. Considering the diverse effects of stress in this and other studies, it appears that the type of stress and the magnitude of its appraisal determine its interactions with the pain system. PMID:25250721

  5. Topical NSAIDs for acute pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Thomas; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Use of topical NSAIDs to treat acute musculoskeletal conditions is widely accepted in some parts of the world, but not in others. Their main attraction is their potential to provide pain relief without associated systemic adverse events. Objectives To review the evidence from randomised, double-blind, controlled trials on the efficacy and safety of topically applied NSAIDs in acute pain. Search methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, and our own in-house database to December 2009. We sought unpublished studies by asking personal contacts and searching on-line clinical trial registers and manufacturers web sites. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, active or placebo (inert carrier)-controlled trials in which treatments were administered to adult patients with acute pain resulting from strains, sprains or sports or overuse-type injuries (twisted ankle, for instance). There had to be at least 10 participants in each treatment arm, with application of treatment at least once daily. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and validity, and extracted data. Numbers of participants achieving each outcome were used to calculate relative risk and numbers needed to treat (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or other active treatment. Main results Forty-seven studies were included; most compared topical NSAIDs in the form of a gel, spray, or cream with a similar placebo, with 3455 participants in the overall analysis of efficacy. For all topical NSAIDs combined, compared with placebo, the number needed to treat to benefit (NNT) for clinical success, equivalent to 50% pain relief, was 4.5 (3.9 to 5.3) for treatment periods of 6 to 14 days. Topical diclofenac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and piroxicam were of similar efficacy, but indomethacin and benzydamine were not significantly better than placebo. Local skin reactions were generally mild and transient, and did not differ from

  6. [Excruciating flank pain: "acute renal colic"].

    PubMed

    Thomas, A; Andrianne, R

    2004-04-01

    The classic presentation of acute renal colic is the sudden onset of very severe pain in the flank primarily caused by the acute ureteral obstruction. The diagnosis is often made on clinical symptoms only, although confirmatory exams are generally performed because many others significant disorders may present with symptom of flank pain that mimics renal colic. Life threatening emergency such as abdominal aortic aneurysm must be ruled out. While non contrast CT has become the standard imaging modality, in some situations, a plain abdominal radiograph associated with a renal ultrasound or a contrast study such as intravenous pyelogram may be preferred. Hematuria is frequently present on urine analysis. The usual therapy represented by analgesic and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should be started as soon as possible. Size and location of the stone are the most important predictors of spontaneous passage. Uncontrolled pain by medical therapy, fever, oligo-anuria suggest complicated stone disease. Such conditions require emergency treatment by drainage or stone extraction. Although recurrent stone rate is important, extensive metabolic explorations are not recommended after an uncomplicated first episode. Nevertheless fluid intake is encouraged and a stone chemical analysis should be performed whenever possible. PMID:15182032

  7. Towards Prevention of Acute Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A.; Thongprayoon, C.; Pickering, B.W.; Akhoundi, A.; Wilson, G.; Pieczkiewicz, D.; Herasevich, V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Identifying patients at risk for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) before their admission to intensive care is crucial to prevention and treatment. The objective of this study is to determine the performance of an automated algorithm for identifying selected ARDS predisposing conditions at the time of hospital admission. Methods This secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study included 3,005 patients admitted to hospital between January 1 and December 31, 2010. The automated algorithm for five ARDS predisposing conditions (sepsis, pneumonia, aspiration, acute pancreatitis, and shock) was developed through a series of queries applied to institutional electronic medical record databases. The automated algorithm was derived and refined in a derivation cohort of 1,562 patients and subsequently validated in an independent cohort of 1,443 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of an automated algorithm to identify ARDS risk factors were compared with another two independent data extraction strategies, including manual data extraction and ICD-9 code search. The reference standard was defined as the agreement between the ICD-9 code, automated and manual data extraction. Results Compared to the reference standard, the automated algorithm had higher sensitivity than manual data extraction for identifying a case of sepsis (95% vs. 56%), aspiration (63% vs. 42%), acute pancreatitis (100% vs. 70%), pneumonia (93% vs. 62%) and shock (77% vs. 41%) with similar specificity except for sepsis and pneumonia (90% vs. 98% for sepsis and 95% vs. 99% for pneumonia). The PPV for identifying these five acute conditions using the automated algorithm ranged from 65% for pneumonia to 91 % for acute pancreatitis, whereas the NPV for the automated algorithm ranged from 99% to 100%. Conclusion A rule-based electronic data extraction can reliably and accurately identify patients at risk of ARDS at the time of hospital

  8. Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy presenting as acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdin, Amr; Eitel, Ingo; de Waha, Suzanne; Thiele, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a rare variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. It is characterized by a local hypertrophy of the apical segments and displays typical electrocardiographic and imaging patterns. The clinical manifestations are variable and range from an asymptomatic course to sudden cardiac death. The most frequent symptom is chest pain and thus apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can mimic the symptoms and repolarization disturbances indicative of acute coronary syndrome. PMID:26628684

  9. Neuropathic pain syndrome displayed by malingerers

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, José L.; Verdugo, Renato J.

    2009-01-01

    Among 237 patients communicating chronic pain, associated with sensory-motor and “autonomic” displays, qualifying taxonomically for Neuropathic Pain, there were 16 shown through surveillance to be malingerers. When analyzed through neurological methods, their profile was characteristically atypical. There were no objective equivalents of peripheral or central processes impairing nerve impulse transmission. In absence of medical explanation all 16 had been adjudicated, by default, the label Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). We emphasize that CRPS patients may not only harbor unrecognized pathology (“lesion”) of the nervous system (CRPS II); or hypothetical central neuronal “dysfunction” (CRPS I); or conversion disorder; but may display a recognizable simulated illness without neuropsychiatric pathology. PMID:20686134

  10. Comparison of Rates of Coronary Angiography and Combined Testing Procedures in Patients Seen in the Emergency Room With Chest Pain (But No Objective Acute Coronary Syndrome Findings) Having Coronary Computed Tomography Versus Exercise Stress Testing.

    PubMed

    Grunau, Brian; Leipsic, Jonathon; Purssell, Elizabeth; Kasteel, Naomi; Nguyen, Kimchi; Kazem, Mikameh; Naoum, Christopher; Raju, Rekha; Blanke, Philipp; Heilbron, Brett; Taylor, Carolyn; Scheuermeyer, Frank X

    2016-07-15

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) appears comparable to standard care, including exercise stress testing (EST), in diagnosing acute coronary syndrome in emergency department (ED) patients with chest pain but may increase downstream testing. The objective of this study was to investigate rates of post-CCTA versus post-EST testing for (1) invasive angiography and (2) all combined cardiac testing. This was a retrospective cohort study performed at 2 urban Canadian EDs involving patients aged up to 65 years with chest pain but no objective ACS findings that were evaluated with CCTA or EST at the physician's discretion. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who had 30-day invasive angiography in each group; secondary outcomes included all subsequent 30-day cardiac testing, including nuclear medicine scanning. From July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2014, we collected 1,700 patients: 521 CCTA and 1,179 EST. Demographics and risk factors were similar in both cohorts. In the following 30 days, 30 CCTA (5.8%) and 297 EST (25.2%) patients underwent any type of additional cardiac testing (difference 19.4%, 95% CI 16.0 to 22.6), whereas 12 CCTA (2.3%) and 20 EST patients (1.7%) underwent angiography (difference 0.6%, 95% CI -0.8% to 2.6%). No patients in either group died or had a myocardial infarction within 30 days. For ED patients with chest pain who underwent brief observation, CCTA and EST had similar 30-day angiography rates, but CCTA patients underwent significantly less overall cardiac investigations. PMID:27236251

  11. Coronary Intramural Hematoma Presenting as Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Takenobu; Kadota, Kazushige; Kubo, Shunsuke; Habara, Seiji; Mitsudo, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of intramural hematoma without ongoing myocardial ischemia that healed spontaneously with conservative treatment. A 37-year-old woman was admitted due to chest pain. Acute coronary syndrome was diagnosed by electrocardiography and echocardiography. Coronary angiography showed 90% stenosis in the distal portion of the left anterior descending coronary artery, where intravascular ultrasound showed a hematoma, but optical coherence tomography could not detect the entry point. Therefore, we identified the intramural hematoma as the etiology. Because the coronary flow was maintained and chest pain disappeared, we chose conservative treatment. Fifteen days after admission, coronary computed tomography showed an improvement in the intramural hematoma. PMID:27477409

  12. Acute pain management curriculum for emergency medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Motov, Sergey M; Marshall, John P

    2011-10-01

    Pain is the most common reason people visit emergency departments (EDs); this implies that emergency physicians (EPs) should be experts in managing acute painful conditions. The current trend in the literature, however, demonstrates that EPs possess inadequate knowledge and lack formal training in acute pain management. The purpose of this article is to create a formal educational curriculum that would assist emergency medicine (EM) residents in proper assessment and treatment of acute pain, as well as in providing a solid theoretical and practical knowledge base for managing acute pain in the ED. The authors propose a series of lectures, case-oriented study groups, practical small group sessions, and class-specific didactics with the goal of enhancing the theoretical and practical knowledge of acute pain management in the ED. PMID:21692900

  13. Immune mediators of chronic pelvic pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Stephen F.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    The cause of chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) has yet to be established. Since the late 1980s, cytokine, chemokine, and immunological classification studies using human samples have focused on identifying biomarkers for CPPS, but no diagnostically beneficial biomarkers have been identified, and these studies have done little to deepen our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chronic prostatic pain. Given the large number of men thought to be affected by this condition and the ineffective nature of current treatments, there is a pressing need to elucidate these mechanisms. Prostatitis types IIIa and IIIb are classified according to the presence of pain without concurrent presence of bacteria; however, it is becoming more evident that, although levels of bacteria are not directly associated with levels of pain, the presence of bacteria might act as the initiating factor that drives primary activation of mast-cell-mediated inflammation in the prostate. Mast cell activation is also known to suppress regulatory T cell (Treg) control of self-tolerance and also activate neural sensitization. This combination of established autoimmunity coupled with peripheral and central neural sensitization can result in the development of multiple symptoms, including pelvic pain and bladder irritation. Identifying these mechanisms as central mediators in CPPS offers new insight into the prospective treatment of the disease. PMID:24686526

  14. Immune mediators of chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Stephen F; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2014-05-01

    The cause of chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) has yet to be established. Since the late 1980s, cytokine, chemokine, and immunological classification studies using human samples have focused on identifying biomarkers for CPPS, but no diagnostically beneficial biomarkers have been identified, and these studies have done little to deepen our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chronic prostatic pain. Given the large number of men thought to be affected by this condition and the ineffective nature of current treatments, there is a pressing need to elucidate these mechanisms. Prostatitis types IIIa and IIIb are classified according to the presence of pain without concurrent presence of bacteria; however, it is becoming more evident that, although levels of bacteria are not directly associated with levels of pain, the presence of bacteria might act as the initiating factor that drives primary activation of mast-cell-mediated inflammation in the prostate. Mast cell activation is also known to suppress regulatory T cell (Treg) control of self-tolerance and also activate neural sensitization. This combination of established autoimmunity coupled with peripheral and central neural sensitization can result in the development of multiple symptoms, including pelvic pain and bladder irritation. Identifying these mechanisms as central mediators in CPPS offers new insight into the prospective treatment of the disease. PMID:24686526

  15. [Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)].

    PubMed

    Gillissen, Adrian; Ruf, Bernhard R

    2003-06-15

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a viral disease, observed primarily in Southern China in November 2002, with variable flu-like symptoms and pneumonia, in approx. 5% leading to death from respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). The disease was spread over more than 30 states all over the globe by SARS-virus-infected travelers. WHO and CDC received first information about a new syndrome by the end of February 2003, after the first cases outside the Republic of China had been observed. A case in Hanoi, Vietnam, led to the first precise information about the new disease entity to WHO, by Dr. Carlo Urbani, a co-worker of WHO/Doctors without Borders, who had been called by local colleagues to assist in the management of a patient with an unknown severe disease by the end of February 2003. Dr. Urbani died from SARS, as did many other health care workers. In the meantime, more than 7,000 cases have been observed worldwide, predominantly in China and Hong Kong, but also in Taiwan, Canada, Singapore, and the USA, and many other countries, and more than 600 of these patients died from RDS. Since the beginning of March 2003, when WHO and CDC started their activities, in close collaboration with a group of international experts, including the Bernhard-Nocht-Institute in Hamburg and the Department of Virology in Frankfurt/Main, a previously impossible success in the disclosure of the disease was achieved. Within only 8 weeks of research it was possible to describe the infectious agent, a genetically modified coronavirus, including the genetic sequence, to establish specific diagnostic PCR methods and to find possible mechanisms for promising therapeutic approaches. In addition, intensifying classical quarantine and hospital hygiene measures, it was possible to limit SARS in many countries to sporadic cases, and to reduce the disease in countries such as Canada and Vietnam. This review article summarizes important information about many issues of SARS (May 15th, 2003

  16. Bladder afferent hyperexcitability in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Naoki; Oguchi, Tomohiko; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yasuhito; Yoshikawa, Satoru; Sugino, Yoshio; Kawamorita, Naoki; Kashyap, Mahendra P; Chancellor, Michael B; Tyagi, Pradeep; Ogawa, Teruyuki

    2014-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a disease with lower urinary tract symptoms, such as bladder pain and urinary frequency, which results in seriously impaired quality of life of patients. The extreme pain and urinary frequency are often difficult to treat. Although the etiology of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is still not known, there is increasing evidence showing that afferent hyperexcitability as a result of neurogenic bladder inflammation and urothelial dysfunction is important to the pathophysiological basis of symptom development. Further investigation of the pathophysiology will lead to the effective treatment of patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. PMID:24807488

  17. ACUTE PELVIC PAIN IN THE ADOLESCENT: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Samuels-Kalow, M.; Mollen, C.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of acute pelvic pain in the adolescent female requires differentiating among a broad differential diagnosis that includes potentially serious illness across several organ systems. The case presented provides an illustration of the assessment and management of acute pelvic pain, and key teaching points about important potential causes. PMID:26273230

  18. Acute idiopathic blue fingers: a young man with Achenbach's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hidemi; Uchida, Haruhito Adam; Okuyama, Yuka; Wada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 20-year-old man presenting with acute painful blue fingers. All physical findings, including an Allen test, were normal, and systematic symptoms frequently seen in collagen diseases were absent. Although we performed a wide variety of investigations including medical imaging, no specific abnormal findings were observed. Skin biopsy pathology was an important reference. The patient's symptoms gradually improved and were completely resolved without specific treatment. Based on the clinical presentation and course, we gave a diagnosis of Achenbach's syndrome, developed in a young male. Achenbach's syndrome is rare, but still may be encountered in clinical practice. The symptoms can be startling to the patient, eliciting fear of something terrible when, in fact, the syndrome is relatively benign and has a good prognosis. Recognising this disease quickly after presentation helps to eliminate the anxiety of the patient, as well as reducing excessively invasive investigations. We present a case report to enlighten Achenbach's syndrome. PMID:27090544

  19. [Sweet syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) and erythema nodosum in Crohn disease].

    PubMed

    Schlegel Gómez, R; Kiesewetter, F; von den Driesch, P; Hornstein, O P

    1990-07-01

    We report on 2 patients who developed an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (Sweet's syndrome) and erythema nodosum in association with Crohn's disease. The first patient showed symmetrical painful erythemas on her cheeks after hemicolectomy. Additionally, red painful nodules appeared on her lower legs. The second patient disclosed typical Sweet's syndrome-like lesions with pustules and plaques on her face, scalp and extremities after activation of Crohn's disease. Simultaneously, erythema nodosum-like lesions appeared on her lower legs. PMID:2144848

  20. Acute myelogenous leukaemia in Hurler's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, K T; McKenna, R W; Desnick, R J

    1978-06-01

    The occurrence of the Hurler syndrome and acute myelogenous leukaemia in a 2 1/2-year-old girl is described. This represents the first published report of the concurrence of these two diseases. PMID:97385

  1. Flank pain and acute renal failure after binge drinking: a growing concern?

    PubMed

    Calviño, Jesús; Bravo, Juan; Millán, Beatriz; Gonzalez-Tabares, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    We describe two cases of acute renal failure (ARF) after heavy alcohol intake. Remarkable features included a few days latency period after binge drinking, acute flank pain resembling pyelonephritis, lack of rhabdomyolysis or liver injury, and concomitant intake of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Renal function improved with conservative treatment, and despite NSAIDs use, hyperkalemia was not clinically significant. Since binge drinking is common in the Western population, early recognition of this syndrome may be helpful when examining a patient with flank pain and ARF of unclear etiology. PMID:23477481

  2. Respiratory symptoms and acute painful episodes in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Eufemia; Sockrider, Marianna M; Dinu, Marlen; Acosta, Monica; Mueller, Brigitta U

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and determined whether respiratory symptoms were associated with prevalence of chest pain and number of acute painful episodes in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease. Participants (N = 93; 44 females, 49 males; mean age 9.8 +/- 4.3 years) reported coughing in the morning (21.5%), at night (31.2%), and during exercise (30.1%). Wheezing occurred both when they had a cold or infection (29.0%) and when they did not have (23.7%) a cold or infection. Sleep was disturbed by wheezing in 20.4%. Among the 76 patients who were school-age (>5 years), 19.7% of patients missed more than 4 days of school because of respiratory symptoms. The majority of patients reported having acute painful episodes (82.8%), and most (66.7%) reported having chest pain during acute painful episodes in the previous 12 months. Participants with acute pain episodes greater than 3 during the previous 12 months had significantly higher reports of breathing difficulties (P = .01) and chest pain (P = .002). The high number of respiratory symptoms (cough and wheeze) among patients with sickle cell disease may trigger acute painful episodes. Early screening and recognition, ongoing monitoring, and proactive management of respiratory symptoms may minimize the number of acute painful episodes. PMID:20038672

  3. Patterns of hyperalgesia in complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sieweke, N; Birklein, F; Riedl, B; Neundörfer, B; Handwerker, H O

    1999-03-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is characterized by a triad of sensory, motor and autonomic dysfunctions, with long-standing pain and temperature differences of the affected and contralateral limb as predominant symptoms. The pathogenesis of the disorder still remains unclear. Among the main hypotheses of an underlying pathophysiology we find inflammatory processes and dysfunction of the sympathetic nervous system. Whether the main site of dysfunction is found centrally or peripherally is not known. With psychophysical methods we studied patterns of hyperalgesia to obtain a better understanding of the neuropathic pain component in CRPS. Forty patients in an acute phase of CRPS and a median duration of the disease of 10 weeks, were included in the study. Hyperalgesia to heat was tested with a thermode providing feedback-controlled temperature increases. Two forms of mechanical hyperalgesia were examined: phasic mechanical stimuli by using a custom-made impact stimulator for the determination of individual pain thresholds, tonic mechanical stimuli were applied using a pinch-device. Additionally a 'wind-up' paradigm was used to study a pain phenomenon of presumed central origin: a defined impact stimulus was given once and five times in repetition. A subpopulation of patients was reevaluated for mechanical hyperalgesia after i.v. injection of 500 mg acetyl-salicylic acid. Hyperalgesia to heat was insignificant. We found, however, a marked mechanical hyperalgesia to phasic impact stimuli (P < 0.005), whereas, static stimulation (squeezing skin folds) results were insignificant again. Wind-up related pain was also significantly enhanced in the affected limb (P < 0.02). The anti-inflammatory agent had no effect. These results indicate a non-inflammatory pathogenesis in CRPS presumably central in origin. PMID:10204729

  4. Substance P and Acute Pain in Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lisowska, Barbara; Siewruk, Katarzyna; Lisowski, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is a limited information about the role of Substance P (SP) in acute pain nociception following surgical stimulation in patients with a chronic inflammatory state not to mention the link between this neuropeptide level changes and intensity of pain. The goal of the research was to find the correlation between SP level changes and acute pain intensity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis undergoing elective orthopedic surgery. Material and Methods Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were enrolled in the study. The correlation between acute pain intensity and concentration of SP in serum as well as in drainage fluid from postoperative wound was assessed in patients with RA who underwent Total Knee Replacement (TKA) under spinal anesthesia. Results In patients with RA a correlation between intensity of acute pain and serum SP was found postoperatively, whereas there was no correlation between intensity of acute pain and concentration of SP in drainage fluid. Conclusions 1. The correlation between acute pain intensity and SP serum concentration was found postoperatively in patients with RA. 2. The correlation between acute pain intensity and SP concentration in drainage fluid was not found postoperatively in patients with RA. PMID:26731421

  5. Haemophagocytic syndrome complicating acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Stark, R.; Manoharan, A.

    1989-01-01

    A 41 year old female developed reactive haemophagocytic histiocytosis secondary to herpes simplex infection, during remission induction for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. She recovered fully with acyclovir and supportive treatment. Previous publications on the association between acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and haemophagocytic syndrome are reviewed, and the nature of the haemophagocytic disorder is discussed. Images Figure 1 PMID:2687829

  6. Responses to acute pain and the nursing implications.

    PubMed

    Wells, N

    1984-01-01

    Management of acute pain offers many techniques--peripherally, to reduce the sensory input from the nociceptors and ascending fibres, and centrally by altering cognition, evaluation and emotional arousal to the sensory input. Scientifically-based nursing intervention is imperative. Therefore, nurses needed a better understanding of recent research regarding pain. As well, recognition that all individuals express and cope with pain in different ways, and therefore exhibit different pain behaviours, is necessary if effective nursing care is to be given. Finally, with all the interacting variables and methods of intervention available, pain medication should never be the only intervention used for the patient with pain. PMID:6142910

  7. Acute Coronary Syndrome: Posthospital Outpatient Management.

    PubMed

    Veauthier, Brian; Sievers, Karlynn; Hornecker, Jaime

    2015-10-01

    When providing care for patients who are discharged from the hospital after experiencing acute coronary syndrome (ACS), several issues should be addressed. Drug regimens should be reviewed to ensure that patients are taking appropriate drugs, including antiplatelet agents, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor blockers, aldosterone antagonists, beta blockers/calcium channel blockers, cholesterol-lowering drugs, and nitroglycerin. The review also should confirm that patients understand when and how to take their drugs, and that there are no obstacles (eg, cost) that might result in nonadherence to drug regimens. Lifestyle modifications, including improvements in diet and exercise regimens, along with participation in a cardiac rehabilitation program, should be encouraged. Risk factor reduction measures include smoking cessation for smokers, weight management for patients who are overweight, and optimal control of blood pressure and blood glucose levels. Appropriate vaccinations should be administered; influenza and pneumococcal vaccines are indicated for all patients with ACS in the absence of contraindications. Patients requiring pain control should avoid use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs because they increase the risk of cardiovascular events; acetaminophen or other drugs should be used. Finally, depression is common among patients with ACS. Screening for and management of depression are significant components of care. PMID:26439396

  8. [Pain syndrome of the musculoskeletal system in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Höfel, L; Draheim, N; Häfner, R; Haas, J P

    2016-04-01

    Chronic pain syndromes in children and adolescents are defined as continuous or recurrent pain without an underlying causative diagnosis and lasting for more than 3 months. It is estimated that every fourth child in Germany suffers from chronic pain with every twentieth suffering from extreme recurrent pain. The incidence of chronic pain in children and adolescents is increasing with headache, abdominal pain and musculoskeletal pain being the most frequent. The quality of life declines not only due to the pain but to relieving postural and psychological factors, such as fear and sadness. School attendance, social activities and hobbies are mostly affected. This review summarizes the background of chronic pain syndromes and introduces a multimodal therapeutic approach. PMID:26892925

  9. National Heart Attack Alert Program position paper: chest pain centers and programs for the evaluation of acute cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zalenski, R J; Selker, H P; Cannon, C P; Farin, H M; Gibler, W B; Goldberg, R J; Lambrew, C T; Ornato, J P; Rydman, R J; Steele, P

    2000-05-01

    The National Heart Attack Alert Program (NHAAP), which is coordinated by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), promotes the early detection and optimal treatment of patients with acute myocardial infarction and other acute coronary ischemic syndromes. The NHAAP, having observed the development and growth of chest pain centers in emergency departments with special interest, created a task force to evaluate such centers and make recommendations pertaining to the management of patients with acute cardiac ischemia. This position paper offers recommendations to assist emergency physicians in EDs, including those with chest pain centers, in providing comprehensive care for patients with acute cardiac ischemia. PMID:10783408

  10. Novel Treatment of Chronic Bladder Pain Syndrome and Other Pelvic Pain Disorders by OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection

    PubMed Central

    Jhang, Jia-Fong; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is defined as pain in the pelvic organs and related structures of at least 6 months’ duration. The pathophysiology of CPP is uncertain, and its treatment presents challenges. Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A), known for its antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and muscle relaxant activity, has been used recently to treat refractory CPP with promising results. In patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, most studies suggest intravesical BoNT-A injection reduces bladder pain and increases bladder capacity. Repeated BoNT-A injection is also effective and reduces inflammation in the bladder. Intraprostatic BoNT-A injection could significantly improve prostate pain and urinary frequency in the patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Animal studies also suggest BoNT-A injection in the prostate decreases inflammation in the prostate. Patients with CPP due to pelvic muscle pain and spasm also benefit from localized BoNT-A injections. BoNT-A injection in the pelvic floor muscle improves dyspareunia and decreases pelvic floor pressure. Preliminary studies show intravesical BoNT-A injection is useful in inflammatory bladder diseases such as chemical cystitis, radiation cystitis, and ketamine related cystitis. Dysuria is the most common adverse effect after BoNT-A injection. Very few patients develop acute urinary retention after treatment. PMID:26094697

  11. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sarraf, Mohammad; Schrier, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Impaired cardiac function leads to activation of the neurohumoral axis, sodium and water retention, congestion and ultimately impaired kidney function. This sequence of events has been termed the Cardiorenal Syndrome. This is different from the increase in cardiovascular complications which occur with primary kidney disease, that is, the so-called Renocardiac Syndrome. The present review discusses the pathogenesis of the Cardiorenal Syndrome followed by the benefits and potential deleterious effects of pharmacological agents that have been used in this setting. The agents discussed are diuretics, aquaretics, natriuretic peptides, vasodilators, inotropes and adenosine α1 receptor antagonists. The potential role of ultrafiltration is also briefly discussed. PMID:21423563

  12. Chest radiography in acute aortic syndrome: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Ashish; Rajendran, Surendran; Yung, Wai Heng; Babu, Suresh Balasubramanian; Peh, Wilfred C

    2016-08-01

    Acute aortic syndrome is a group of life-threatening diseases of the thoracic aorta that usually present to the emergency department. It includes aortic dissection, aortic intramural hematoma, and penetrating aortic ulcer. Rare aortic pathologies of aorto-esophageal fistula and mycotic aneurysm may also be included in this list. All these conditions require urgent treatment with complex clinical care and management. Most patients who present with chest pain are evaluated with a chest radiograph in the emergency department. It is important that maximum diagnostic information is extracted from the chest radiograph as certain signs on the chest radiograph are extremely useful in pointing towards the diagnosis of acute aortic syndrome. PMID:27282377

  13. Pathobiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sapru, Anil; Flori, Heidi; Quasney, Michael W; Dahmer, Mary K

    2015-06-01

    The unique characteristics of pulmonary circulation and alveolar-epithelial capillary-endothelial barrier allow for maintenance of the air-filled, fluid-free status of the alveoli essential for facilitating gas exchange, maintaining alveolar stability, and defending the lung against inhaled pathogens. The hallmark of pathophysiology in acute respiratory distress syndrome is the loss of the alveolar capillary permeability barrier and the presence of protein-rich edema fluid in the alveoli. This alteration in permeability and accumulation of fluid in the alveoli accompanies damage to the lung epithelium and vascular endothelium along with dysregulated inflammation and inappropriate activity of leukocytes and platelets. In addition, there is uncontrolled activation of coagulation along with suppression of fibrinolysis and loss of surfactant. These pathophysiological changes result in the clinical manifestations of acute respiratory distress syndrome, which include hypoxemia, radiographic opacities, decreased functional residual capacity, increased physiologic deadspace, and decreased lung compliance. Resolution of acute respiratory distress syndrome involves the migration of cells to the site of injury and re-establishment of the epithelium and endothelium with or without the development of fibrosis. Most of the data related to acute respiratory distress syndrome, however, originate from studies in adults or in mature animals with very few studies performed in children or juvenile animals. The lack of studies in children is particularly problematic because the lungs and immune system are still developing during childhood and consequently the pathophysiology of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome may differ in significant ways from that seen in acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults. This article describes what is known of the pathophysiologic processes of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome as we know it today while also presenting the much

  14. Chronic Pain Syndromes in Gynaecological Practice: Endometriosis and Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Siedentopf, F.

    2012-01-01

    As gynaecologists frequently function as “general practitioners” for women, gynaecologists are frequently confronted with questions which initially appear to have only a tenuous connection to their field. Chronic pain syndromes represent a particular challenge, especially as pain syndromes are often associated with severe psychosocial stress for the affected woman. This article discusses some of the psychometric aspects of chronic pain in endometriosis and fibromyalgia together with practical therapeutic approaches. PMID:26640283

  15. Conditioned pain modulation in women with irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence suggests that patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are more vigilant to pain-associated stimuli. The aims of this study were to compare women with IBS (n = 20) to healthy control (HC, n = 20) women on pain sensitivity, conditioned pain modulation (CPM) efficiency, and salivary corti...

  16. Rethinking the Psychogenic Model of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Somatoform Disorders and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Renee J.; Chopra, Pradeep; Richardi, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Explaining the etiology of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) from the psychogenic model is exceedingly unsophisticated, because neurocognitive deficits, neuroanatomical abnormalities, and distortions in cognitive mapping are features of CRPS pathology. More importantly, many people who have developed CRPS have no history of mental illness. The psychogenic model offers comfort to physicians and mental health practitioners (MHPs) who have difficulty understanding pain maintained by newly uncovered neuro inflammatory processes. With increased education about CRPS through a biopsychosocial perspective, both physicians and MHPs can better diagnose, treat, and manage CRPS symptomatology. PMID:24223338

  17. Complex regional pain syndrome-significant progress in understanding.

    PubMed

    Birklein, Frank; Schlereth, Tanja

    2015-04-01

    Research into complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) has made significant progress. First, there was the implementation of the official IASP "Budapest" diagnostic criteria. It would be desirable to also define exclusion and outcome criteria that should be reported in studies. The next step was to recognize the complex pathophysiology. After trauma, some inflammation is physiological; in acute CRPS, this inflammation persists for months. There is an abundance of inflammatory and a lack of anti-inflammatory mediators. This proinflammatory network (cytokines and probably also other mediators) sensitizes the peripheral and spinal nociceptive system, it facilitates the release of neuropeptides from nociceptors inducing the visible signs of inflammation, and it stimulates bone cell or fibroblast proliferation, and endothelial dysfunction leading to vascular changes. Trauma may also expose nervous system structures to the immune system and triggers autoantibodies binding to adreno- and acetylcholine receptors. In an individual time frame, the pain in this inflammatory phase pushes the transition into "centralized" CRPS, which is dominated by neuronal plasticity and reorganization. Sensory-motor integration becomes disturbed, leading to a loss of motor function; the body representation is distorted leading to numbness and autonomic disturbances. In an attempt to avoid pain, patients neglect their limb and learn maladaptive nonuse. The final step will be to assess large cohorts and to analyze these data together with data from public resources using a bioinformatics approach. We could then develop diagnostic toolboxes for individual pathophysiology and select focused treatments or develop new ones. PMID:25789441

  18. Clinical outcome of Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome mimicking acute biliary disease

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seong Yong; Kim, Jin Il; Cheung, Dae Young; Cho, Se Hyun; Park, Soo-Heon; Han, Joon-Yeol; Kim, Jae Kwang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome. METHODS: The clinical courses of patients that visited St. Mary’s Hospital with abdominal pain from January 2005 to December 2006 and were diagnosed with Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome were examined. RESULTS: Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome was identified in 22 female patients of childbearing age; their mean age was 31.0 ± 8.1 years. Fourteen of these cases presented with pain in the upper right abdomen alone or together with pain in the lower abdomen, and six patients presented with pain only in the lower abdomen. The first impression at the time of visit was acute cholecystitis or cholangitis in 10 patients and acute appendicitis or pelvic inflammatory disease in eight patients. Twenty-one patients were diagnosed by abdominal computer tomography (CT), and the results of abdominal sonography were normal for 10 of these patients. Chlamydia trichomatis was isolated from 18 patients. Two patients underwent laparoscopic adhesiotomy and 20 patients were completely cured by antibiotic treatment. CONCLUSION: For women of childbearing age with acute pain in the upper right abdomen alone or together with pain in the lower abdomen, Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome should be considered during differential diagnosis. Moreover, in cases suspected to be Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome, abdominal CT, rather than abdominal sonography, assists in the diagnosis. PMID:19058334

  19. Graduated compression stockings to treat acute leg pain associated with proximal DVT. A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kahn, S R; Shapiro, S; Ducruet, T; Wells, P S; Rodger, M A; Kovacs, M J; Anderson, D; Tagalakis, V; Morrison, D R; Solymoss, S; Miron, M-J; Yeo, E; Smith, R; Schulman, S; Kassis, J; Kearon, C; Chagnon, I; Wong, T; Demers, C; Hanmiah, R; Kaatz, S; Selby, R; Rathbun, S; Desmarais, S; Opatrny, L; Ortel, T L; Galanaud, J-P; Ginsberg, J S

    2014-12-01

    Acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) causes leg pain. Elastic compression stockings (ECS) have potential to relieve DVT-related leg pain by diminishing the diameter of distended veins and increasing venous blood flow. It was our objective to determine whether ECS reduce leg pain in patients with acute DVT. We performed a secondary analysis of the SOX Trial, a multicentre randomised placebo controlled trial of active ECS versus placebo ECS to prevent the post-thrombotic syndrome.The study was performed in 24 hospital centres in Canada and the U.S. and included 803 patients with a first episode of acute proximal DVT. Patients were randomised to receive active ECS (knee length, 30-40 mm Hg graduated pressure) or placebo ECS (manufactured to look identical to active ECS, but lacking therapeutic compression). Study outcome was leg pain severity assessed on an 11-point numerical pain rating scale (0, no pain; 10, worst possible pain) at baseline, 14, 30 and 60 days after randomisation. Mean age was 55 years and 60% were male. In active ECS patients (n=409), mean (SD) pain severity at baseline and at 60 days were 5.18 (3.29) and 1.39 (2.19), respectively, and in placebo ECS patients (n=394) were 5.38 (3.29) and 1.13 (1.86), respectively. There were no significant differences in pain scores between groups at any assessment point, and no evidence for subgroup interaction by age, sex or anatomical extent of DVT. Results were similar in an analysis restricted to patients who reported wearing stockings every day. In conclusion, ECS do not reduce leg pain in patients with acute proximal DVT. PMID:25183442

  20. Slipping Rib Syndrome as Persistent Abdominal and Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Bolaños-Vergaray, Juan Javier; de la Gala García, Francisco; Obaya Rebollar, Juan Carlos; Bové Alvarez, Maria

    2015-11-01

    Slipping rib syndrome is an overlooked cause of persistent abdominal or chest pain. The etiology of this syndrome is not well understood, but the characteristic pain is from hypermobility of the false ribs. Although it is a diagnosis of exclusion, misdiagnosis may lead to an excessive workup. A simple clinical examination via the hooking maneuver is the most significant feature of its diagnosis. We describe the case of a 41-year-old woman with slipping rib syndrome. PMID:26528703

  1. Practical management of complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Eric S

    2009-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) describes a diversity of painful conditions following trauma, coupled with abnormal regulation of blood flow and sweating, trophic changes, and edema of skin. The excruciating pain and diverse autonomic dysfunctions in CRPS are disproportionate to any inciting and recovering event. CRPS type I is formerly identified as "reflex sympathetic dystrophy." CRPS type II is the new term for "causalgia" that always coexists with documented nerve injury. The present diagnostic criteria of CRPS I and II depend solely on meticulous history and physical examination without any confirmation by specific test procedure (or gold standard). There are only few clinical studies with large-scale randomized trials of pharmacologic agents on the treatment of CRPS. Bisphosphonates have been studied in multiple controlled trials, based on theoretical benefit of bone resorption, to offer pain relief and functional improvement in patients with CRPS. Many current rationales in treatment of CRPS (such as topical agents, antiepileptic drugs, tricyclic antidepressants, and opioids) are mainly dependent on efficacy originate in other common conditions of neuropathic pain. There are additional innovative therapies on CRPS that are still in infancy. No wonder all the treatment of individual CRPS case nowadays is pragmatic at best. Although the interventional therapies in CRPS (such as nerve blockade, sympathetic block, spinal cord and peripheral nerve stimulation, implantable spinal medication pumps, and chemical and surgical sympathectomy) may offer more rapid response, yet it is still controversial with unpredictable outcome. Nevertheless, we need to start pain management immediately with the ambition to restore function in every probable case of CRPS. An interdisciplinary setting with comprehensive approach (pharmacologic, interventional, and psychological in conjunction with rehabilitation pathway) has been proposed as protocol in the practical management

  2. Yoga intervention and functional pain syndromes: a selective review.

    PubMed

    Sutar, Roshan; Yadav, Suresh; Desai, Geetha

    2016-06-01

    The definition of functional pain syndromes is varied across literature. No effort has been made to see all functional pain disorder groups under broad nomenclature which would exclude conditions for which pathophysiology is strongly known. Since these disorders are commonly treated with alternative treatment modalities and impose significant burden on health utilization, an effort to look into studies on yoga-based interventions on 'functional pain syndromes' (FPS) was made. This study defined FPS as 'Chronic relapsing remitting pain conditions, the origin of which is difficult to trace with no definite physical pathology on clinical suspicion or available laboratory measures and are valid based on subjective pain reporting, associated distress and socio-occupational dysfunction'. Chronic headache, neck pain, back pain, fibromyalgia, pelvic pain, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and somatoform pain disorders were included for this review. The review found four meta-analyses on the selected topic both indicating modest efficacy and benefit of yoga in these disorders. Future efforts should be directed to do a large meta-analysis of functional pain syndromes. PMID:27291934

  3. New aetiology of patellofemoral pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chas, Julie; Mariot, Philippe; Tassart, Marc; Pialoux, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 30-year-old man with more than 100 different male sexual partners per year. He reported using cocaine, ecstasy, γ-hydroxybutyric acid and crystal mephedrone and presented with bilateral gonalgia resistant to standard analgesia. He had no noteworthy medical history, and physical examination and laboratory tests were uninformative. MRI showed marked intra-articular effusion but no meniscus or ligament damage. The aetiological diagnosis in this case was made by excluding other potential causes. Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is one of the most common and challenging injuries. In this first case reported, the aetiology was found to be mechanical, due to the position adopted during fellatio with multiple male partners. PMID:24859542

  4. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  5. Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Resmini, Giuseppina; Ratti, Chiara; Canton, Gianluca; Murena, Luigi; Moretti, Antimo; Iolascon, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Summary Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a multifactorial and disabling disorder with complex etiology and pathogenesis. Goals of therapy in CRPS should be pain relief, functional restoration, and psychological stabilization, but early interventions are needed in order to achieve these objectives. Several drugs have been used to reduce pain and to improve functional status in CRPS, despite the lack of scientific evidence supporting their use in this scenario. They include anti-inflammatory drugs, analgesics, anesthetics, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, oral muscle relaxants, corticosteroids, calcitonin, bisphosphonates, calcium channel blockers and topical agents. NSAIDs showed no value in treating CRPS. Glucocorticoids are the only anti-inflammatory drugs for which there is direct clinical trial evidence in early stage of CRPS. Opioids are a reasonable second or third-line treatment option, but tolerance and long term toxicity are unresolved issues. The use of anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants has not been well investigated for pain management in CRPS. During the last years, bisphosphonates have been the mostly studied pharmacologic agents in CRPS treatment and there are good evidence to support their use in this condition. Recently, the efficacy of intravenous (IV) administration of neridronate has been reported in a randomized controlled trial. Significant improvements in VAS score and other indices of pain and quality of life in patients who received four 100 mg IV doses of neridronate versus placebo were reported. These findings were confirmed in the open-extension phase of the study, when patients formerly enrolled in the placebo group received neridronate at the same dosage, and these results were maintained at 1 year follow-up. The current literature concerning sympathetic blocks and sympathectomy techniques lacks evidence of efficacy. Low evidence was recorded for a free radical scavenger, dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) cream (50%). The

  6. Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Resmini, Giuseppina; Ratti, Chiara; Canton, Gianluca; Murena, Luigi; Moretti, Antimo; Iolascon, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a multifactorial and disabling disorder with complex etiology and pathogenesis. Goals of therapy in CRPS should be pain relief, functional restoration, and psychological stabilization, but early interventions are needed in order to achieve these objectives. Several drugs have been used to reduce pain and to improve functional status in CRPS, despite the lack of scientific evidence supporting their use in this scenario. They include anti-inflammatory drugs, analgesics, anesthetics, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, oral muscle relaxants, corticosteroids, calcitonin, bisphosphonates, calcium channel blockers and topical agents. NSAIDs showed no value in treating CRPS. Glucocorticoids are the only anti-inflammatory drugs for which there is direct clinical trial evidence in early stage of CRPS. Opioids are a reasonable second or third-line treatment option, but tolerance and long term toxicity are unresolved issues. The use of anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants has not been well investigated for pain management in CRPS. During the last years, bisphosphonates have been the mostly studied pharmacologic agents in CRPS treatment and there are good evidence to support their use in this condition. Recently, the efficacy of intravenous (IV) administration of neridronate has been reported in a randomized controlled trial. Significant improvements in VAS score and other indices of pain and quality of life in patients who received four 100 mg IV doses of neridronate versus placebo were reported. These findings were confirmed in the open-extension phase of the study, when patients formerly enrolled in the placebo group received neridronate at the same dosage, and these results were maintained at 1 year follow-up. The current literature concerning sympathetic blocks and sympathectomy techniques lacks evidence of efficacy. Low evidence was recorded for a free radical scavenger, dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) cream (50%). The same level

  7. Acute myelofibrosis in children with Down's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D I

    1975-01-01

    Two boys with Down's syndrome, recognized at birth, developed acute myelogibrosis at the ages of 19 and 21 months. The disorder presented with anaemia and splenomegaly, and clinically resembled acute leukaemia, but bone marrow histology showed a bizarre pattern with generalized fibrosis, markedly increased reticulin, large reticulum cells, and giant cells resembling megakaryocytes. The children survived 6 and 11 months from diagnosis. A third case is quoted (Hillman and Forrester, 1968) which was also studied at this hospital; the features of all 3 cases are similar. There appears to be an increased incidence of acute myelofibrosis in children with Down's syndrome, which may be a further example of the instability of the haemopoietic system in the disease. In children with Down's syndrome and unusual leukaemia-like illness, histological examination of the bone marrow may be diagnostic. Images FIG. 1. FIG. 2. FIG.3. PMID:125073

  8. A retrospective study of acute pancreatitis in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Etiological diagnosis is an important part of the diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis. Hantavirus infection is a rare cause of acute pancreatitis, which is easy to ignore. There is a need to analyze clinical features of acute pancreatitis caused by Hantavirus. Methods This is a retrospective study conducted from May 1, 2006 to May 31, 2012 on patients diagnosed with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome at our hospital. We reviewed these patients medical records, laboratory results and radiologic examinations to determine the prevalence and summarize clinical features of acute pancreatitis in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Results A total of 218 patients were diagnosed with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome during the 6-year study period. Only 2.8% (6/218) of the total hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome patients were diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. The first symptom for all six of the patients with acute pancreatitis was fever. All six patients experienced hemorrhage and thrombocytopenia during the disease course, which was different from general acute pancreatitis. In addition, we presented two misdiagnosed clinical cases. Conclusions Acute pancreatitis is not a frequent complication in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Clinicians should be alerted to the possibility of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome when acute pancreatitis patients with epidemiological data have high fever before abdominal pain. PMID:24345089

  9. Acute Myocardial Infarction in Nephrotic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Kavita; Hiremath, Shirish; Lakade, Sachin; Davakhar, Sudarshan

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old male, known case of nephrotic syndrome since 12 years, hypertensive presented with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and accelerated hypertension. Coronary angiography revealed 100% thrombotic occlusion of mid left anterior descending artery, treated with thrombus aspiration and intracoronary tirofiban and nitroglycerine. He was stabilized within 24 hours. The pathogenesis of AMI in nephrotic syndrome has been discussed with this case report. PMID:27608787

  10. Inflammation: a trigger for acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sager, Hendrik B; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the vessel wall and a major cause of death worldwide. One of atherosclerosis' most dreadful complications are acute coronary syndromes that comprise ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, and unstable angina. We now understand that inflammation substantially contributes to the initiation, progression, and destabilization of atherosclerosis. In this review, we will focus on the role of inflammatory leukocytes, which are the cellular protagonists of vascular inflammation, in triggering disease progression and, ultimately, the destabilization that causes acute coronary syndromes. PMID:27273431

  11. Guideline for diagnosis and treatment of subacromial pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Diercks, Ron; Bron, Carel; Dorrestijn, Oscar; Meskers, Carel; Naber, René; de Ruiter, Tjerk; Willems, Jaap; Winters, Jan; van der Woude, Henk Jan

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of “subacromial impingement syndrome” of the shoulder has changed drastically in the past decade. The anatomical explanation as “impingement” of the rotator cuff is not sufficient to cover the pathology. “Subacromial pain syndrome”, SAPS, describes the condition better. A working group formed from a number of Dutch specialist societies, joined by the Dutch Orthopedic Association, has produced a guideline based on the available scientific evidence. This resulted in a new outlook for the treatment of subacromial pain syndrome. The important conclusions and advice from this work are as follows: (1) The diagnosis SAPS can only be made using a combination of clinical tests. (2) SAPS should preferably be treated non-operatively. (3) Acute pain should be treated with analgetics if necessary. (4) Subacromial injection with corticosteroids is indicated for persistent or recurrent symptoms. (5) Diagnostic imaging is useful after 6 weeks of symptoms. Ultrasound examination is the recommended imaging, to exclude a rotator cuff rupture. (6) Occupational interventions are useful when complaints persist for longer than 6 weeks. (7) Exercise therapy should be specific and should be of low intensity and high frequency, combining eccentric training, attention to relaxation and posture, and treatment of myofascial trigger points (including stretching of the muscles) may be considered. (8) Strict immobilization and mobilization techniques are not recommended. (9) Tendinosis calcarea can be treated by shockwave (ESWT) or needling under ultrasound guidance (barbotage). (10) Rehabilitation in a specialized unit can be considered in chronic, treatment resistant SAPS, with pain perpetuating behavior. (11) There is no convincing evidence that surgical treatment for SAPS is more effective than conservature management. (12) There is no indication for the surgical treatment of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears. PMID:24847788

  12. Topical analgesics in the management of acute and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Argoff, Charles E

    2013-02-01

    Oral analgesics are commonly prescribed for the treatment of acute and chronic pain, but these agents often produce adverse systemic effects, which sometimes are severe. Topical analgesics offer the potential to provide the same analgesic relief provided by oral analgesics but with minimal adverse systemic effects. This article describes the results of a systematic review of the efficacy of topical analgesics in the management of acute and chronic pain conditions. A literature search of MEDLINE/PubMed was conducted using the keywords topical analgesic AND chronic pain OR acute pain OR neuropathic pain and focused only on individual clinical trials published in English-language journals. The search identified 92 articles, of which 65 were eligible for inclusion in the review. The most commonly studied topical analgesics were nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (n=27), followed by lidocaine (n=9), capsaicin (n=6), amitriptyline (n=5), glyceryl trinitrate (n=3), opioids (n=2), menthol (n=2), pimecrolimus (n=2), and phenytoin (n=2). The most common indications were acute soft tissue injuries (n=18), followed by neuropathic pain (n=17), experimental pain (n=6), osteoarthritis and other chronic joint-related conditions (n=5), skin or leg ulcers (n=5), and chronic knee pain (n=2). Strong evidence was identified for the use of topical diclofenac and topical ibuprofen in the treatment of acute soft tissue injuries or chronic joint-related conditions, such as osteoarthritis. Evidence also supports the use of topical lidocaine in the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia and diabetic neuropathy. Currently, limited evidence is available to support the use of other topical analgesics in acute and chronic pain. PMID:23374622

  13. Acute Pain Medicine in the United States: A Status Report

    PubMed Central

    Tighe, Patrick; Buckenmaier, Chester C.; Boezaart, Andre P.; Carr, Daniel B.; Clark, Laura L.; Herring, Andrew A.; Kent, Michael; Mackey, Sean; Mariano, Edward R.; Polomano, Rosemary C.; Reisfield, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Consensus indicates that a comprehensive, multimodal, holistic approach is foundational to the practice of acute pain medicine (APM), but lack of uniform, evidence-based clinical pathways leads to undesirable variability throughout U. S. healthcare systems. Acute pain studies are inconsistently synthesized to guide educational programs. Advanced practice techniques involving regional anesthesia assume the presence of a physician-led, multidisciplinary acute pain service, which is often unavailable or inconsistently applied. This heterogeneity of educational and organizational standards may result in unnecessary patient pain and escalation of healthcare costs. Methods A multidisciplinary panel was nominated through the Acute Pain Medicine Shared Interest Group (APMSIG) of the American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM). The panel met in Chicago, Illinois, in July 2014, to identify gaps and set priorities in APM research and education. Results The panel identified 3 areas of critical need: 1) an open-source acute pain data registry and clinical support tool to inform clinical decision making and resource allocation and to enhance research efforts; 2) a strong professional APM identity as an accredited subspecialty; and 3) educational goals targeted toward third-party payers, hospital administrators, and other key stakeholders to convey the importance of APM. Conclusion This report is the first step in a 3-year initiative aimed at creating conditions and incentives for the optimal provision of APM services to facilitate and enhance the quality of patient recovery after surgery, illness, or trauma. The ultimate goal is to reduce the conversion of acute pain to the debilitating disease of chronic pain. PMID:26535424

  14. [Effect of stress on the development of deafferentation pain syndrome in rats after sciatic nerve transection].

    PubMed

    Osipov, A V; Kukushkin, M L

    1993-05-01

    Effect of immobilization and painful stress on the development of deafferentation pain syndrome, appeared after sciatic nerve section, has been studied in Wistar rats. It has been determined that both immobilization and painful stress favour the appearance of pain syndrome in rats without clinical signs of pain syndrome up to the moment of stress influence. There has been made a conclusion that both immobilization and painful stress favour the appearance of pathologic algic system, which is the basis of pain syndrome. The fact that stress can cause analgesia in normal animals in contrast to those with potential pain syndrome is explained to different mechanisms of physiological and pathological pain. PMID:8043822

  15. Coronary computed tomography angiography for the evaluation of patients with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Rajani, R; Brum, R L; Preston, R; Carr-White, G; Berman, D S

    2011-12-01

    Acute chest pain is a common presenting complaint of patients attending emergency room departments. Despite this, it can often be challenging to completely exclude a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome following an initial standard clinical and biochemical evaluation. As a result of this, patients are often admitted to hospital until the treating clinician is satisfied that this diagnosis can be excluded. This process imparts a significant health economic burden by not only increasing hospital bed occupancy rates but also by the unnecessary layering of diagnostic investigations. With the rapid advances in coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA), there has been considerable interest in whether coronary CTA may be a viable alternative to this current standard care. We review the current literature and supporting evidence for utilising coronary CTA in the evaluation of patients presenting with acute chest pain in terms of its diagnostic accuracy, safety, cost-effectiveness and prognostic implications. PMID:22093533

  16. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Associated with Tumor Lysis Syndrome in a Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Alessandra; Genova, Selene; Maringhini, Silvio; Coffaro, Giancarlo; Ziino, Ottavio; D’Angelo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and dangerous complication usually associated with antiblastic treatment in some malignancies characterized by high cell turn-over. Mild or severe electrolyte abnormalities including high serum levels of uric acid, potassium, phosphorus, creatinine, bun and reduction of calcium can be responsible for multi-organ failure, involving mostly kidneys, heart and central nervous system. Renal damage can be followed by acute renal failure, weight gain, progressive liver impairment, overproduction of cytokines, and subsequent maintenance of multi-organ damage. Life-threatening acute respiratory failure associated with tumor lysis syndrome is rare. We describe a child with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed an unusually dramatic tumor lysis syndrome, after administration of the first low doses of steroid, that was rapidly associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subsequent clinical course and treatment modalities that resulted in the gradual and full recovery of the child are also described. PMID:25918625

  17. Activation of cutaneous immune responses in complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Birklein, Frank; Drummond, Peter D.; Li, Wenwu; Schlereth, Tanja; Albrecht, Nahid; Finch, Philip M.; Dawson, Linda F.; Clark, J. David; Kingery, Wade S.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is unresolved, but TNF-α and IL-6 are elevated in experimental skin blister fluid from CRPS affected limbs, as is tryptase, a marker for mast cells. In the rat fracture model of CRPS exaggerated sensory and sympathetic neural signaling stimulate keratinocyte and mast cell proliferation, causing the local production of high levels of inflammatory cytokines leading to pain behavior. The current investigation used CRPS patient skin biopsies to determine whether keratinocyte and mast cell proliferation occur in CRPS skin and to identify the cellular source of the up-regulated TNF-α, IL-6, and tryptase observed in CRPS experimental skin blister fluid. Skin biopsies were collected from the affected skin and the contralateral mirror site in 55 CRPS patients and the biopsy sections were immunostained for keratinocyte, cell proliferation, mast cell markers, TNF-α, and IL-6. In early CRPS keratinocytes were activated in the affected skin, resulting in proliferation, epidermal thickening, and up-regulated TNF-α and IL-6 expression. In chronic CRPS there was reduced keratinocyte proliferation with epidermal thinning in the affected skin. Acute CRPS patients also had increased mast cell accumulation in the affected skin, but there was no increase in mast cell numbers in chronic CRPS. PMID:24462502

  18. Terminology, criteria, and definitions in complex regional pain syndrome: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, Katherine; Littlejohn, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome has long been recognized as a severe and high impact chronic pain disorder. However, the condition has historically been difficult to define and classify and little attention has been given to where complex regional pain syndrome sits within other apparently similar chronic pain disorders, such as fibromyalgia and regional pain syndrome. In this review challenges in regard to nomenclature, definitions, and classification of complex regional pain syndrome are reviewed and suggestions are provided about future directions. PMID:26715858

  19. Acupuncture Anesthesia and Analgesia for Clinical Acute Pain in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Acupuncture anesthesia has been practiced in China since about 1960. In Japan, Hyodo reported 30 cases of acupuncture anesthesia in 1972. However, from around 1980, the direction of acupuncture investigations turned from anesthesia to analgesia. Acupuncture analgesia is presently considered a way to activate the body's endogenous analgesic system. Recently, with the rise of acupuncture as one of the most well known CAM therapies, acupuncture or moxibustion treatment has been reported for both acute and chronic pain. Even so, few clinical reports and original articles have been reported in Japan. This review illustrates how acupuncture is being used in Japan for acute pain such as surgical operations, post- operative pain (POP), neuropathic pain, pain associated with teeth extractions and after the extraction of impacted wisdom teeth. PMID:18604250

  20. Effect of ω-conotoxin MVIIA and Phα1β on paclitaxel-induced acute and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Flávia K; Dalmolin, Gerusa D; Trevisan, Gabriela; Tonello, Raquel; Silva, Mariane A; Rossato, Mateus F; Klafke, Jonatas Z; Cordeiro, Marta do N; Castro Junior, Célio J; Montijo, Danuza; Gomez, Marcus V; Ferreira, Juliano

    2013-12-01

    The treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel produces a painful peripheral neuropathy, and is associated with an acute pain syndrome in a clinically significant number of patients. However, no standard therapy has been established to manage the acute pain or the chronic neuropathic pain related to paclitaxel. In the present study, we evaluated the analgesic potential of two N-type voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) blockers, ω-conotoxin MVIIA and Phα1β, on acute and chronic pain induced by paclitaxel. Adult male rats were treated with four intraperitoneal injections of paclitaxel (1+1+1+1mg/kg, in alternate days) and the development of mechanical hyperalgesia was evaluated 24h (acute painful stage) or 15days (chronic painful stage) after the first paclitaxel injection. Not all animals showed mechanical hyperalgesia 24h after the first paclitaxel injection, but those that showed developed a more intense mechanical hyperalgesia at the chronic painful stage. Intrathecal administration (i.t.) of ω-conotoxin MVIIA (3-300pmol/site) or Phα1β (10-300pmol/site) reduced the mechanical hyperalgesia either at the acute or at the chronic painful stage induced by paclitaxel. When administered at the acute painful stage, ω-conotoxin MVIIA (300pmol/site, i.t.) and Phα1β (300pmol/site, i.t.) prevented the worsening of chronic mechanical hyperalgesia. Furthermore, Phα1β (30-300pmol/site, i.t.) elicited less adverse effects than ω-conotoxin MVIIA (10-300 pmol/site, i.t.). Taken together, our data evidence the involvement of N-type VGCC in pain sensitization induced by paclitaxel and point out the potential of Phα1β as a safer alternative than ω-conotoxin MVIIA to treat the pain related to paclitaxel. PMID:24148893

  1. Preventing Chronic Pain following Acute Pain: Risk Factors, Preventive Strategies, and their Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    McGreevy, Kai; Bottros, Michael M.; Raja, Srinivasa N.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is the leading cause of disability in the United States. The transition from acute to persistent pain is thought to arise from maladaptive neuroplastic mechanisms involving three intertwined processes, peripheral sensitization, central sensitization, and descending modulation. Strategies aimed at preventing persistent pain may target such processes. Models for studying preventive strategies include persistent post-surgical pain (PPP), persistent post-trauma pain (PTP) and post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN). Such entities allow a more defined acute onset of tissue injury after which study of the long-term effects is more easily examined. In this review, we examine the pathophysiology, epidemiology, risk factors, and treatment strategies for the prevention of chronic pain using these models. Both pharmacological and interventional approaches are described, as well as a discussion of preventive strategies on the horizon. PMID:22102847

  2. Are Pain-Related Fears Mediators for Reducing Disability and Pain in Patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1? An Explorative Analysis on Pain Exposure Physical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barnhoorn, Karlijn J.; Staal, J. Bart; van Dongen, Robert T. M.; Frölke, Jan Paul M.; Klomp, Frank P.; van de Meent, Henk; Samwel, Han; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether pain-related fears are mediators for reducing disability and pain in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 when treating with Pain Exposure Physical Therapy. Design An explorative secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial. Participants Fifty-six patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1. Interventions The experimental group received Pain Exposure Physical Therapy in a maximum of five treatment sessions; the control group received conventional treatment following the Dutch multidisciplinary guideline. Outcome measures Levels of disability, pain, and pain-related fears (fear-avoidance beliefs, pain catastrophizing, and kinesiophobia) were measured at baseline and after 3, 6, and 9 months follow-up. Results The experimental group had a significantly larger decrease in disability of 7.77 points (95% CI 1.09 to 14.45) and in pain of 1.83 points (95% CI 0.44 to 3.23) over nine months than the control group. The potential mediators pain-related fears decreased significantly in both groups, but there were no significant differences between groups, which indicated that there was no mediation. Conclusion The reduction of pain-related fears was comparable in both groups. We found no indication that pain-related fears mediate the larger reduction of disability and pain in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 treated with Pain Exposure Physical Therapy compared to conventional treatment. Trial registration International Clinical Trials Registry NCT00817128 PMID:25919011

  3. Pain-related psychological correlates of pediatric acute post-surgical pain

    PubMed Central

    Pagé, M Gabrielle; Stinson, Jennifer; Campbell, Fiona; Isaac, Lisa; Katz, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Background Post-surgical pain is prevalent in children, yet is significantly understudied. The goals of this study were to examine gender differences in pain outcomes and pain-related psychological constructs postoperatively and to identify pain-related psychological correlates of acute post-surgical pain (APSP) and predictors of functional disability 2 weeks after hospital discharge. Methods Eighty-three children aged 8–18 (mean 13.8 ± 2.4) years who underwent major orthopedic or general surgery completed pain and pain-related psychological measures 48–72 hours and 2 weeks after surgery. Results Girls reported higher levels of acute postoperative anxiety and pain unpleasantness compared with boys. In addition, pain anxiety was significantly associated with APSP intensity and functional disability 2 weeks after discharge, whereas pain catastrophizing was associated with APSP unpleasantness. Conclusion These results highlight the important role played by pain-related psychological factors in the experience of pediatric APSP by children and adolescents. PMID:23204864

  4. Chronic pain associated with the Chikungunya Fever: long lasting burden of an acute illness

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is responsible for major epidemics worldwide. Autochthonous cases were recently reported in several European countries. Acute infection is thought to be monophasic. However reports on chronic pain related to CHIKV infection have been made. In particular, the fact that many of these patients do not respond well to usual analgesics suggests that the nature of chronic pain may be not only nociceptive but also neuropathic. Neuropathic pain syndromes require specific treatment and the identification of neuropathic characteristics (NC) in a pain syndrome is a major step towards pain control. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional study at the end of the major two-wave outbreak lasting 17 months in Réunion Island. We assessed pain in 106 patients seeking general practitioners with confirmed infection with the CHIK virus, and evaluated its impact on quality of life (QoL). Results The mean intensity of pain on the visual-analogical scale (VAS) was 5.8 ± 2.1, and its mean duration was 89 ± 2 days. Fifty-six patients fulfilled the definition of chronic pain. Pain had NC in 18.9% according to the DN4 questionnaire. Conversely, about two thirds (65%) of patients with NC had chronic pain. The average pain intensity was similar between patients with or without NC (6.0 ± 1.7 vs 6.1 ± 2.0). However, the total score of the Short Form-McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ)(15.5 ± 5.2 vs 11.6 ± 5.2; p < 0.01) and both the affective (18.8 ± 6.2 vs 13.4 ± 6.7; p < 0.01) and sensory subscores (34.3 ± 10.7 vs 25.0 ± 9.9; p < 0.01) were significantly higher in patients with NC. The mean pain interference in life activities calculated from the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) was significantly higher in patients with chronic pain than in patients without it (6.8 ± 1.9 vs 5.9 ± 1.9, p < 0.05). This score was also significantly higher in patients with NC than in those without such a feature (7.2 ± 1.5 vs 6.1 ± 1.9, p < 0.05). Conclusions There

  5. Algodystrophy: complex regional pain syndrome and incomplete forms

    PubMed Central

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Dell’Osso, Giacomo; Bugelli, Giulia; Celli, Fabio; Cazzella, Niki; Guido, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Summary The algodystrophy, also known as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), is a painful disease characterized by erythema, edema, functional impairment, sensory and vasomotor disturbance. The diagnosis of CRPS is based solely on clinical signs and symptoms, and for exclusion compared to other forms of chronic pain. There is not a specific diagnostic procedure; careful clinical evaluation and additional test should lead to an accurate diagnosis. There are similar forms of chronic pain known as bone marrow edema syndrome, in which is absent the history of trauma or triggering events and the skin dystrophic changes and vasomotor alterations. These incomplete forms are self-limited, and surgical treatment is generally not needed. It is still controversial, if these forms represent a distinct self-limiting entity or an incomplete variant of CRPS. In painful unexplained conditions such as frozen shoulder, post-operative stiff shoulder or painful knee prosthesis, the algodystrophy, especially in its incomplete forms, could represent the cause. PMID:27252736

  6. Algodystrophy: complex regional pain syndrome and incomplete forms.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Dell'Osso, Giacomo; Bugelli, Giulia; Celli, Fabio; Cazzella, Niki; Guido, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    The algodystrophy, also known as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), is a painful disease characterized by erythema, edema, functional impairment, sensory and vasomotor disturbance. The diagnosis of CRPS is based solely on clinical signs and symptoms, and for exclusion compared to other forms of chronic pain. There is not a specific diagnostic procedure; careful clinical evaluation and additional test should lead to an accurate diagnosis. There are similar forms of chronic pain known as bone marrow edema syndrome, in which is absent the history of trauma or triggering events and the skin dystrophic changes and vasomotor alterations. These incomplete forms are self-limited, and surgical treatment is generally not needed. It is still controversial, if these forms represent a distinct self-limiting entity or an incomplete variant of CRPS. In painful unexplained conditions such as frozen shoulder, post-operative stiff shoulder or painful knee prosthesis, the algodystrophy, especially in its incomplete forms, could represent the cause. PMID:27252736

  7. Free flap transfer for complex regional pain syndrome type II

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Ken; Kikuchi, Mamoru; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Hosokawa, Ko; Shibata, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A patient with complex regional pain syndrome type II was successfully treated using free anterolateral thigh flap transfer with digital nerve coaptation to the cutaneous nerve of the flap. Release of the scarred tissue and soft tissue coverage with targeted sensory nerve coaptation were useful in relieving severe pain.

  8. [Pathogenetic mechanisms of phantom-pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Reshetnyak, V K; Kukushkin, M L; Gurko, N C

    2015-01-01

    This review considers the literature data on the epidemiology of phantom-pain syndrome (PPS) presents the results of numerous clinical studies demonstrating the lack of effectiveness of the vast majority of modem non-pharmacological and pharmacological methods of treatment of PPS. Detail presents data on the patho genetic mechanisms underlying the PPS. According to most researchers, the major role in the patho genesis of the PPS has the reorganization of the somatosensory area of the cerebral cortex of the brain. At the same time discusses the views of researchers who believe that the main reason PPS is to strengthen nociceptive and nonnociceptive afferentation in the peripheral newous system. The comparison of these conflicting data it is concluded that in the genesis of the PPS plays the role of both primary and secondary sensitization. Leading important dysfunction of the central nervous system. Details the modern understanding of the mechanisms underlying the high efficiency of suppression of PPS during stimulation of motor cortex. PMID:27116887

  9. Central poststroke pain: somatosensory abnormalities and the presence of associated myofascial pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Central post-stroke pain (CPSP) is a neuropathic pain syndrome associated with somatosensory abnormalities due to central nervous system lesion following a cerebrovascular insult. Post-stroke pain (PSP) refers to a broader range of clinical conditions leading to pain after stroke, but not restricted to CPSP, including other types of pain such as myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), painful shoulder, lumbar and dorsal pain, complex regional pain syndrome, and spasticity-related pain. Despite its recognition as part of the general PSP diagnostic possibilities, the prevalence of MPS has never been characterized in patients with CPSP patients. We performed a cross-sectional standardized clinical and radiological evaluation of patients with definite CPSP in order to assess the presence of other non-neuropathic pain syndromes, and in particular, the role of myofascial pain syndrome in these patients. Methods CPSP patients underwent a standardized sensory and motor neurological evaluation, and were classified according to stroke mechanism, neurological deficits, presence and profile of MPS. The Visual Analogic Scale (VAS), McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), and Beck Depression Scale (BDS) were filled out by all participants. Results Forty CPSP patients were included. Thirty-six (90.0%) had one single ischemic stroke. Pain presented during the first three months after stroke in 75.0%. Median pain intensity was 10 (5 to 10). There was no difference in pain intensity among the different lesion site groups. Neuropathic pain was continuous-ongoing in 34 (85.0%) patients and intermittent in the remainder. Burning was the most common descriptor (70%). Main aggravating factors were contact to cold (62.5%). Thermo-sensory abnormalities were universal. MPS was diagnosed in 27 (67.5%) patients and was more common in the supratentorial extra-thalamic group (P <0.001). No significant differences were observed among the different stroke location groups and pain questionnaires and

  10. Quick identification of acute chest pain patients study (QICS)

    PubMed Central

    Willemsen, Hendrik M; de Jong, Gonda; Tio, René A; Nieuwland, Wybe; Kema, Ido P; van der Horst, Iwan CC; Oudkerk, Mattijs; Zijlstra, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Background Patients with acute chest pain are often referred to the emergency ward and extensively investigated. Investigations are costly and could induce unnecessary complications, especially with invasive diagnostics. Nevertheless, chest pain patients have high mortalities. Fast identification of high-risk patients is crucial. Therefore several strategies have been developed including specific symptoms, signs, laboratory measurements, and imaging. Methods/Design The Quick Identification of acute Chest pain Study (QICS) will investigate whether a combined use of specific symptoms and signs, electrocardiography, routine and new laboratory measures, adjunctive imaging including electron beam (EBT) computed tomography (CT) and contrast multislice CT (MSCT) will have a high diagnostic yield for patients with acute chest pain. All patients will be investigated according a standardized protocol in the Emergency Department. Serum and plasma will be frozen for future analysis for a wide range of biomarkers at a later time point. The primary endpoint is the safe recognition of low-risk chest pain patients directly at presentation. Secondary endpoint is the identification of a wide range of sensitive predictive clinical markers, chemical biomarkers and radiological markers in acute chest pain patients. Chemical biomarkers will be compared to quantitative CT measurements of coronary atherosclerosis as a surrogate endpoint. Chemical biomarkers will also be compared in head to head comparison and for their additional value. Discussion This will be a very extensive investigation of a wide range of risk predictors in acute chest pain patients. New reliable fast and cheap diagnostic algorithm resulting from the test results might improve chest pain patients' prognosis, and reduce unnecessary costs and diagnostic complications. PMID:19527487

  11. Fibromyalgia syndrome and myofascial pain syndrome. Do they exist?

    PubMed

    Bohr, T W

    1995-05-01

    "It is in the healing business that the temptations of junk science are the strongest and the controls against it the weakest." Despite their subjective nature, these syndromes (particularly MPS) have little reliability and validity, and advocates paint them as "objective." Despite a legacy of poor-quality science, enthusiasts continue to cite small, methodologically flawed studies purporting to show biologic variables for these syndromes. Despite a wealth of traditional pain research, disciples continue to ignore the placebo effect, demonstrating a therapeutic hubris despite studies showing a dismal natural history for FS. In reviewing the literature on MPS and FS, F.M.R. Walshe's sage words come to mind that the advocates of these syndromes are "better armed with technique than with judgment." A sympathic observer might claim that labeling patients with monikers of nondiseases such as FS and MPS may not be such a bad thing. After all, there is still a stigma for psychiatric disease in our society, and even telling a sufferer that this plays only a partial role may put that patient on the defensive. Labeling may have iatrogenic consequences, however, particularly in the setting of the work place. Furthermore, review of a typical support group newsletter gives ipso facto proof of this noxious potential. The author of a flyer stuffed inside the newsletter complains that getting social security and disability benefits for "the invisible disability" can be "an uphill battle. But don't loose (sic) hope." Apparently the "seriousness of the condition" is not appreciated by the medical community at large, and "clinician bias may well be the largest threat," according to Boston epidemiologist Dr. John Mason. Sufferers are urged to trek to their local medical library and pull four particular articles claiming FS patients have more "stress," "daily hassles," and difficulty working compared with arthritis patients. If articles can't be located, patients are told to ask their

  12. The Painful Shoulder: Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Yousaf; Nagy, Mathias Thomas; Malal, Joby; Waseem, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff disorders are considered to be among the most common causes of shoulder pain and disability encountered in both primary and secondary care. The general pathology of subacromial impingment generally relates to a chronic repetitive process in which the conjoint tendon of the rotator cuff undergoes repetitive compression and micro trauma as it passes under the coracoacromial arch. However acute traumatic injuries may also lead to this condition. Diagnosis remains a clinical one, however advances in imaging modalities have enabled clinicians to have an increased understanding of the pathological process. Ultrasound scanning appears to be a justifiable and cost effective assessment tool following plain radiographs in the assessment of shoulder impingment, with MRI scans being reserved for more complex cases. A period of observed conservative management including the use of NSAIDs, physiotherapy with or without the use of subacromial steroid injections is a well-established and accepted practice. However, in young patients or following any traumatic injury to the rotator cuff, surgery should be considered early. If surgery is to be performed this should be done arthroscopically and in the case of complete rotator cuff rupture the tendon should be repaired where possible. PMID:24082973

  13. Sexual dysfunction in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tran, Christine N; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2013-08-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), or NIH category III prostatitis, is a common clinical syndrome characterized by genital/pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms in the absence of urinary tract infection. There is also growing recognition of the association of sexual dysfunction with CP/CPPS including erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory pain, and premature ejaculation. In this review, we discuss the association between CP/CPPS and sexual dysfunction, potential mechanisms for sexual dysfunction, and treatment strategies for erectile dysfunction in CP/CPPS. PMID:23579441

  14. Markov chain evaluation of acute postoperative pain transition states.

    PubMed

    Tighe, Patrick J; Bzdega, Matthew; Fillingim, Roger B; Rashidi, Parisa; Aytug, Haldun

    2016-03-01

    Previous investigations on acute postoperative pain dynamicity have focused on daily pain assessments, and so were unable to examine intraday variations in acute pain intensity. We analyzed 476,108 postoperative acute pain intensity ratings, which were clinically documented on postoperative days 1 to 7 from 8346 surgical patients using Markov chain modeling to describe how patients are likely to transition from one pain state to another in a probabilistic fashion. The Markov chain was found to be irreducible and positive recurrent, with no absorbing states. Transition probabilities ranged from 0.0031, for the transition from state 10 to state 1, to 0.69 for the transition from state 0 to state 0. The greatest density of transitions was noted in the diagonal region of the transition matrix, suggesting that patients were generally most likely to transition to the same pain state as their current state. There were also slightly increased probability densities in transitioning to a state of asleep or 0 from the current state. An examination of the number of steps required to traverse from a particular first pain score to a target state suggested that overall, fewer steps were required to reach a state of 0 (range 6.1-8.8 steps) or asleep (range 9.1-11) than were required to reach a mild pain intensity state. Our results suggest that using Markov chains is a feasible method for describing probabilistic postoperative pain trajectories, pointing toward the possibility of using Markov decision processes to model sequential interactions between pain intensity ratings, and postoperative analgesic interventions. PMID:26588689

  15. [Botulinum toxin for the treatment of pain syndromes].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Joaquim J; Couto, Marina; Costa, João; Coelho, Miguel; Rosa, Mário M; Sampaio, Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Although botulinum toxin (BoNT) is being used for therapeutic purposes for more than 20 years, the list of potential new indications continues to increase and includes various pain syndromes. The pain relief experienced by patients with dystonia and spasticity from intramuscular BoNT injections suggested that other chronic skeletal-muscles pain conditions may also benefit. BoNT inhibits the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction thereby reducing striatal muscle contractions and the proposed analgesic property was initially attributed to muscular relaxation. A specific analgesic BoNT effect is difficult to conclude from studies where pain is conditioned by other associated symptoms like dystonia, muscle contraction or spasticity. One alternative is to critically appraise clinical trials where BoNT was studied as the active intervention and pain evaluated as an outcome. From this analysis there is convincing evidence for the effectiveness of BoNT in the treatment of pain associated with cervical dystonia. For all other pain syndromes there have been relatively few, small sized, placebo-controlled studies (myofascial pain syndrome, chronic neck and low back pain, piriformis syndrome and fibromyalgia) and the results of these studies have been contradictory or non conclusive. To establish the analgesic properties of BoNT there is a need for appropriately designed, exploratory randomized controlled studies in well accepted human models of nociceptive or neuropathic pain. This does not exclude the subsequent need to conduct pragmatic trials to evaluate the effectiveness of BoNT in conditions where the improvement of pain or any associated clinical sign or symptom may be of clinical relevance. PMID:17058384

  16. Shaping attitudes to postoperative pain relief: the role of the acute pain team.

    PubMed

    McLeod, G A; Davies, H T; Colvin, J R

    1995-01-01

    Postoperative pain relief is often inadequate. Ignorance and misconceptions about opioids by ward staff contribute to this poor management. The introduction of acute pain teams has done much to improve pain relief for patients. It may also have contributed to changes in attitudes and knowledge of medical and nursing staff. We questioned 48 doctors and nurses on their knowledge and beliefs about postoperative pain relief. Staff members were questioned on two units, one with access to an acute pain team and one without. Over half those on the unit using traditional postoperative care thought patients did not receive adequate pain relief (58%). In comparison, only one respondent from the unit with the pain team thought this was the case (P < 0.001). More staff members that had experience of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) were optimistic about its benefits than those in the unit with no experience; they were also less concerned about possible side effects. Only one respondent on the unit using PCA thought it carried a risk of drug dependence, compared to over half (55%) of those on the unit with no experience in this technique (P < 0.001). Over two-thirds of staff familiar with PCA thought nursing workload had decreased. Acute pain teams have an important role in educating ward staff. The impact of establishing such teams on staff knowledge and attitudes needs further study to ensure that they can carry out this role most effectively. PMID:7536228

  17. Painful legs and moving toes syndrome responsive to pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, FH; Liu, W; Geigel, E; Castaneda, S; Rossi, EM; Schnacky, K

    2015-01-01

    Report three cases of painful legs and moving toes (PLMT) syndrome responsive to pregabalin along with a review of its literature. Three patients with PLMT syndrome improved with pregabalin. The first and third patient reported improvement in pain scores, quality of life, and quality of sleep sustained over time. The second and third patient had near complete remission of toe movements, but pregabalin was discontinued in the second patient due to aggravation of leg edema. PLMT is a rare and debilitating disorder characterized by lower limb pain and involuntary toes or feet movements. Its pathophysiology remains unknown and its therapy refractory to most drugs, except for pregabalin, as shown in this case series. PLMT is a rare and incapacitating syndrome due to the lack of an effective pain therapy. We report three patients with PLMT who favorable responded to pregabalin. We propose pregabalin be considered in the management of PLMT. PMID:25766346

  18. Carpal tunnel syndrome, diabetic neuropathy, fibromyalgia, glucosamine and chondroitin, hypnosis in pain management, marijuana for pain.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Scott M

    2007-01-01

    This feature presents information for patients in a question and answer format. It is written to simulate actual questions that many pain patients ask and to provide answers in a context and language that most pain patients will comprehend. Issues addressed in this issue are carpel tunnel syndrome, fibromyalgia, glucosamine and chondroitin, hypnosis, marijuana. PMID:17844729

  19. Stretch-induced cervicobrachial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quintner, J

    1990-01-01

    The case records of 22 patients who presented with severe and persistent cervicobrachial pain were reviewed. The onset of their pain followed the performance of a forceful activity (lifting, pulling or pushing) using one or both arms in the outstretched position. Their symptoms and the findings on physical examination were both consistent with stretch-induced damage to neural tissues related to the painful upper limb. The predominant site of painful neural pathology appeared to be within the cervical spine. PMID:25025877

  20. Support Vector Machine Diagnosis of Acute Abdominal Pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björnsdotter, Malin; Nalin, Kajsa; Hansson, Lars-Erik; Malmgren, Helge

    This study explores the feasibility of a decision-support system for patients seeking care for acute abdominal pain, and, specifically the diagnosis of acute diverticulitis. We used a linear support vector machine (SVM) to separate diverticulitis from all other reported cases of abdominal pain and from the important differential diagnosis non-specific abdominal pain (NSAP). On a database containing 3337 patients, the SVM obtained results comparable to those of the doctors in separating diverticulitis or NSAP from the remaining diseases. The distinction between diverticulitis and NSAP was, however, substantially improved by the SVM. For this patient group, the doctors achieved a sensitivity of 0.714 and a specificity of 0.963. When adjusted to the physicians' results, the SVM sensitivity/specificity was higher at 0.714/0.985 and 0.786/0.963 respectively. Age was found as the most important discriminative variable, closely followed by C-reactive protein level and lower left side pain.

  1. Does a view of nature promote relief from acute pain?

    PubMed

    Kline, Grace A

    2009-09-01

    Inadequate control of acute pain is a well-recognized and serious problem. Distraction is one of the methods used in adjunct with medications to relieve pain. Nature-related sensory stimuli are frequently used for both distraction and relaxation. The human response model that focuses on individual adaptation to health conditions is used in this article to guide an analysis of relevant studies. Four studies in clinical settings evaluated the effect of nature (as a visual stimulus) to determine whether it promoted relief of acute pain. All these studies also used audio stimuli (nature sounds or music). Distracting visual and auditory stimuli used together provided stronger evidence of pain reduction than when either type of stimulus was used alone. PMID:19755566

  2. Role of Alternative Therapies for Chronic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Donna-Ann; Maslin, Benjamin; Legler, Aron; Springer, Erin; Asgerally, Abbas; Vadivelu, Nalini

    2016-05-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) for the treatment of chronic pain. This review examines alternative and complimentary therapies, which can be incorporated as part of a biopsychosocial approach in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes. In the present investigation, literature from articles indexed on PubMed was evaluated including topics of alternative therapies, complimentary therapies, pain psychology, biofeedback therapy, physical exercise therapies, acupuncture, natural and herbal supplements, whole-body cryotherapy, and smartphone technologies in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes. This review highlights the key role of psychology in the treatment of chronic pain. Cognitive behavior therapy appears to be the most impactful while biofeedback therapy has also been shown to be effective for chronic pain. Exercise therapy has been shown to be effective in short-, intermediate-, and long-term pain states. When compared to that in sham controls, acupuncture has shown some benefit for neck pain immediately after the procedure and in the short term and improvement has also been demonstrated in the treatment of headaches. The role of smartphones and whole-body cryotherapy are new modalities and further studies are needed. Recent literature suggests that several alternate therapies could play a role in the treatment of chronic pain, supporting the biopsychosocial model in the treatment of pain states. PMID:27038968

  3. Loin Pain Haematuria Syndrome - A Narrative Review of Pain Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Loin pain haematuria syndrome (LPHS) is an uncommon clinical entity that has divided renal physicians, pain practitioners, and even psychiatrists since its initial description. A relative paucity of data exists regarding the condition, with best practice guidelines lacking amid the existing threads of anecdotal experiences and variable follow-up observations. The aim of this article was to review the cumulative published experience of pain relief strategies for LPHS. PMID:27103962

  4. Hemolysis in Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis: Zieve's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sitrin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A 45-year-old man presented with acute alcoholic hepatitis, jaundice, and anemia on admission. There was no history of bleeding or any evidence of gastrointestinal blood loss. Lab studies revealed hemolysis as the cause of anemia. The patient was diagnosed with Zieve's syndrome and managed with supportive measures. He recovered well and was discharged to a detoxification unit in a stable condition. Zieve's syndrome has been described in literature, mostly in non-English language case studies, but is largely under-recognized and under-reported. Diagnosis should be made quickly to avoid unnecessary invasive diagnostic interventions. PMID:26203455

  5. Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain Syndrome-A Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Chandola, H C; Chakraborty, Arunangshu

    2009-01-01

    Summary Pain and fatigue associated to the musculoskeletal system are among the leading causes of patients to visit their physicians and nearly one-third of such patients suffer from fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic debilitating disorder characterized by widespread pain with tenderness in specific areas, leading to fatigue, headache and sleep disorder. Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS), is also a localized musculoskeletal pain producing condition whose diagnostic and management criteria differ from FMS but still considered by many only a subtype of FMS. Till date no exact cause has been held responsible for these painful conditions, therefore treatment of these disorders is always a challenge. The therapies are not precise but multimodal including pharmacological and alternative approaches. This article describes the existing knowledge pertaining to these conditions in regard of causative factors diagnosis and management. PMID:20640108

  6. Acute leukemias in children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seewald, Laura; Taub, Jeffrey W; Maloney, Kelly W; McCabe, Edward R B

    2012-09-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) often present with hematopoietic abnormalities, and are at increased risk of developing leukemia. Specifically, 3-10% of newborns with DS are diagnosed with transient myeloproliferative disease, and children with DS are 500 times more likely to develop acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) and 20 times more likely to develop acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) than typical children. This review examines the characteristics of these leukemias and their development in the unique genetic background of trisomy 21. A discussion is also provided for areas of future research and potential therapeutic development. PMID:22867885

  7. Misdiagnosis of Abdominal Pain in Pregnancy: Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Sunita; Gupta, Shweta; Begum, Jasmina; Ghose, Seetesh

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of acute pancreatitis in a pregnant woman who presented to our emergency department with complaints of severe abdominal pain, was misdiagnosed as scar dehiscence and underwent emergency repeat caesarean section at 33 wks for fetal distress. The preterm baby developed severe respiratory distress and succumbed on the second postnatal day. Persistent severe pain in the postoperative period in the mother prompted further evaluation which led to a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Conservative and supportive management was instituted leading to an eventual favourable maternal outcome. PMID:25738042

  8. Differential diagnostic dilemma between pulmonary embolism and acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Enes Elvin; Nikus, Kjell C.; Erdogan, Halil I.; Ozdemir, Kurtulus

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a frequent life-threatening condition in emergency departments. Careful diagnosis is important, and different diagnostic tests such as electrocardiogram (ECG), biochemical markers, echocardiogram, and computed tomography are required. Although ECG is a cheap and rapid diagnostic test for pulmonary embolism, it has some limitations in the differential diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome and acute PE. Herein, we report ECG results of a patient diagnosed with acute PE mimicking acute coronary syndrome. PMID:27092202

  9. Interactions between Pain and the Motor Cortex: Insights from Research on Phantom Limb Pain and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Léonard, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Pain is a significantly disabling problem that often interacts with other deficits during the rehabilitation process. The aim of this paper is to review evidence of interactions between pain and the motor cortex in order to attempt to answer the following questions: (1) Does acute pain interfere with motor-cortex activity? (2) Does chronic pain interfere with motor-cortex activity, and, conversely, does motor-cortex plasticity contribute to chronic pain? (3) Can the induction of motor plasticity by means of motor-cortex stimulation decrease pain? (4) Can motor training result in both motor-cortex reorganization and pain relief? Summary of Key Points: Acute experimental pain has been clearly shown to exert an inhibitory influence over the motor cortex, which can interfere with motor learning capacities. Current evidence also suggests a relationship between chronic pain and motor-cortex reorganization, but it is still unclear whether one causes the other. However, there is growing evidence that interventions aimed at normalizing motor-cortex organization can lead to pain relief. Conclusions: Interactions between pain and the motor cortex are complex, and more studies are needed to understand these interactions in our patients, as well as to develop optimal rehabilitative strategies. PMID:22654236

  10. Psychometric properties of the Brazilian version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale for acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Renata Antunes; Dias, Rosângela Corrêa; Queiroz, Bárbara Zille de; Rosa, Nayza Maciel de Britto; Pereira, Leani de Souza Máximo; Dias, João Marcos Domingues; Magalhães, Lívia de Castro

    2015-05-01

    Measurement instruments of pain catastrophizing for middle-aged and elderly individuals are needed to understand its impact on low back pain. The goals were to cross-culturally adapt the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, assess the construct validity through Rasch analysis, and verify reliability and convergent validity of pain catastrophizing with psychosocial factors. 131 individuals aged 55 years and older with acute low back pain were interviewed . The intra-rater reliability was Kp = 0.80 and interrater Kp = 0.75. The Rasch analysis found adequate reliability coefficients (0.95 for items and 0.90 for individuals ). The separation index for the elderly was 2.95 and 4.59 items. Of the 13 items, one did not fit the model, which was justified in the sample evaluated. The pain catastrophizing correlated with most psychosocial factors. The instrument proved to be clinically useful. Subsequent studies should carry out the same analysis in different populations. PMID:26017211

  11. Direct intrawound administration of dimethylsulphoxide relieves acute pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mayank; Prasoon, Pranav; Kumar, Rahul; Singh, Anurag; Shrimal, Prawal; Ray, Subrata B

    2016-04-01

    Wounds associated with injuries such as burns can produce moderate to severe pain. Besides causing distress to the patient, unrelieved pain could delay healing owing to stress-related problems. Thus, pain needs to be treated as early as possible after injury. It was hypothesised that local treatment of wounds with appropriate analgesic drugs could attenuate pain. HOE 140, a bradykinin receptor antagonist, reduced acute inflammatory pain in rats after intrawound administration. In this study, the analgesic effect of dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) was investigated in a similar hind-paw incision model in rats. An extremely small quantity (10 µl) of 100% DMSO was administered into the incision site just before closure of the wound. It persistently attenuated guarding behaviour in rats over a period of 3 days without affecting thermal hyperalgesia or allodynia. Accumulated evidence indicates that guarding is equivalent to pain at rest in humans. The possible mechanisms of the analgesic effect could be inhibition of C group of peripheral nerve fibres or even free radical scavenging. Healing of the wound was found to be normal at the end of the study period. In conclusion, DMSO could be useful in the treatment of acute pain resulting from tissue injuries such as burns. PMID:24750992

  12. Intrathecal drug administration in chronic pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ver Donck, Ann; Vranken, Jan H; Puylaert, Martine; Hayek, Salim; Mekhail, Nagy; Van Zundert, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Chronic pain may recur after initial response to strong opioids in both patients with cancer and patients without cancer or therapy may be complicated by intolerable side effects. When minimally invasive interventional pain management techniques also fail to provide satisfactory pain relief, continuous intrathecal analgesic administration may be considered. Only 3 products have been officially approved for long-term intrathecal administration: morphine, baclofen, and ziconotide. The efficacy of intrathecal ziconotide for the management of patients with severe chronic refractory noncancer pain was illustrated in 3 placebo-controlled trials. A randomized study showed this treatment option to be effective over a short follow-up period for patients with pain due to cancer or AIDS. The efficacy of intrathecal opioid administration for the management of chronic noncancer pain is mainly derived from prospective and retrospective noncontrolled trials. The effect of intrathecal morphine administration in patients with pain due to cancer was compared with oral or transdermal treatment in a randomized controlled trial, which found better pain control and fewer side effects with intrathecal opioids. Other evidence is derived from cohort studies. Side effects of chronic intrathecal therapy may either be technical (catheter or pump malfunction) or biological (infection). The most troublesome complication is, however, the possibility of granuloma formation at the catheter tip that may induce neurological damage. Given limited studies, the evidence for intrathecal drug administration in patients suffering from cancer-related pain is more compelling than that of chronic noncancer pain. PMID:24118774

  13. [Pain therapy in acute renal colic.].

    PubMed

    Tschuschke, C; Müller, S C; Hertle, L

    1993-09-01

    The severe pain of a renal colic is an emergency and requires a fast and sufficient analgesic therapy with few side-effects. The release of the ureteral obstruction is secondary to this initial treatment. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis directly interferes with the mechanism of renal colic pain. Dipyrone, indomethacin and diclofenac are the drugs of choice. They should be administered intravenously if possible. Narcotic agents and their derivatives are the second choice. Spasmolytic agents are unnecessary in the treatment of renal colic. PMID:18415401

  14. Outcome After Pituitary Radiosurgery for Thalamic Pain Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Motohiro Chernov, Mikhail F.; Taira, Takaomi; Ochiai, Taku; Nakaya, Kotaro; Tamura, Noriko; Goto, Shinichi; Yomo, Shoji; Kouyama, Nobuo; Katayama, Yoko; Kawakami, Yoriko; Izawa, Masahiro; Muragaki, Yoshihiro

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcomes after pituitary radiosurgery in patients with post-stroke thalamic pain syndrome. Methods and Materials: From 2002 to 2006, 24 patients with thalamic pain syndrome underwent pituitary radiosurgery at Tokyo Women's Medical University and were followed at least 12 months thereafter. The radiosurgical target was defined as the pituitary gland and its connection with the pituitary stalk. The maximum dose varied from 140 to 180 Gy. Mean follow-up after treatment was 35 months (range, 12-48 months). Results: Initial pain reduction, usually within 48 h after radiosurgery, was marked in 17 patients (71%). However, in the majority of cases the pain recurred within 6 months after treatment, and at the time of the last follow-up examination durable pain control was marked in only 5 patients (21%). Ten patients (42%) had treatment-associated side effects. Anterior pituitary abnormalities were marked in 8 cases and required hormonal replacement therapy in 3; transient diabetes insipidus was observed in 2 cases, transient hyponatremia in 1, and clinical deterioration due to increase of the numbness severity despite significant reduction of pain was seen once. Conclusions: Pituitary radiosurgery for thalamic pain results in a high rate of initial efficacy and is accompanied by acceptable morbidity. It can be used as a primary minimally invasive management option for patients with post-stroke thalamic pain resistant to medical therapy. However, in the majority of cases pain recurrence occurs within 1 year after treatment.

  15. Evaluation of acute pelvic pain in women.

    PubMed

    Kruszka, Paul S; Kruszka, Stephen J

    2010-07-15

    Diagnosis of pelvic pain in women can be challenging because many symptoms and signs are insensitive and nonspecific. As the first priority, urgent life-threatening conditions (e.g., ectopic pregnancy, appendicitis, ruptured ovarian cyst) and fertility-threatening conditions (e.g., pelvic inflammatory disease, ovarian torsion) must be considered. A careful history focusing on pain characteristics, review of systems, and gynecologic, sexual, and social history, in addition to physical examination helps narrow the differential diagnosis. The most common urgent causes of pelvic pain are pelvic inflammatory disease, ruptured ovarian cyst, and appendicitis; however, many other diagnoses in the differential may mimic these conditions, and imaging is often needed. Transvaginal ultrasonography should be the initial imaging test because of its sensitivities across most etiologies and its lack of radiation exposure. A high index of suspicion should be maintained for pelvic inflammatory disease when other etiologies are ruled out, because the presentation is variable and the prevalence is high. Multiple studies have shown that 20 to 50 percent of women presenting with pelvic pain have pelvic inflammatory disease. Adolescents and pregnant and postpartum women require unique considerations. PMID:20642266

  16. Bertolotti Syndrome: A Diagnostic and Management Dilemma for Pain Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anil; Jain, Suruchi; Shamshery, Chetna

    2013-01-01

    Background Bertolotti's syndrome (BS), a form of lumbago in lumbosacral transitional vertebrae, is an important cause of low back pain in young patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the etiology of low back pain and the efficacy of treatment offered to patients with BS. Methods All patients of BS Castellvi type1a during a period of 6 months were enrolled in the study. The patients underwent interventional pain procedures for diagnosis and pain relief. Response to the therapy was assessed based on VAS and ODI scores. A 50% decrease in VAS score or a VAS score less than 3 would be considered adequate pain relief. Results All 20 patients diagnosed with BS during the 6-month observation period had scoliosis. Common causes of back pain were the ipsilateral L5-S1 facet joint, neoarticulation, the SI joint, and disc degeneration. Responses to various interventions for pain relief were different and inconsistent from patient to patient. In particular, responses to interventions for neoarticular pain were generally poor. Conclusions Pain in patients with BS does not usually respond to interventional pain treatment. A very dynamic treatment approach must be pursued while managing BS patients, and the treatment plan must be individualized at various stages in order to obtain satisfactory pain relief. PMID:24156003

  17. Usefulness of the Pain Tracking Technique in Acute Mechanical Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bravo Acosta, Tania; Martín Cordero, Jorge E.; Hernández Tápanes, Solangel; Pedroso Morales, Isis; Fernández Cuesta, José Ignacio; Leyva Serrano, Maritza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the usefulness of the pain tracking technique in acute mechanical low back pain. Method. We performed an experimental prospective (longitudinal) explanatory study between January 2011 and September 2012. The sample was randomly divided into two groups. Patients were assessed at the start and end of the treatment using the visual analogue scale and the Waddell test. Treatment consisted in applying the pain tracking technique to the study group and interferential current therapy to the control group. At the end of treatment, cryotherapy was applied for 10 minutes. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and the Mann Whitney test were used. They were performed with a predetermined significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Results. Pain was triggered by prolonged static posture and intense physical labor and intensified through trunk movements and when sitting and standing. The greatest relief was reported in lateral decubitus position and in William's position. The majority of the patients had contracture. Pain and disability were modified with the rehabilitation treatment in both groups. Conclusions. Both the pain tracking and interferential current techniques combined with cryotherapy are useful treatments for acute mechanical low back pain. The onset of analgesia is faster when using the pain tracking technique. PMID:26240758

  18. [Acute compartment syndrome after a bowling game].

    PubMed

    Meyer, C Y; Braun, K F; Huber-Wagner, S; Neu, J

    2015-11-01

    A 28-year-old male patient was initially conservatively treated by a general physician for muscle strain of the right calf after a bowling game. Due to increasing pain and swelling of the lower leg 5 days later, the differential diagnosis of a deep vein thrombosis was considered. Furthermore, the onset of neurological deficits and problems with raising the foot prompted inclusion of compartment syndrome in the differential diagnosis for the first time. Admission to hospital for surgical intervention was scheduled for the following day. At this point in time the laboratory results showed a negative d-dimer value and greatly increased C-reactive protein level. On day 6 a dermatofasciotomy was performed which revealed extensive muscular necrosis with complete palsy of the peroneal nerve. In the following lawsuit the patient accused the surgeon of having misdiagnosed the slow-onset compartment syndrome and thus delaying correct and mandatory treatment. The arbitration board ruled that the surgeon should have performed fasciotomy immediately on day 5 at the patient's consultation. The clinical presentation of progressive pain, swelling of the lower leg in combination with peroneal palsy must lead to the differential diagnosis of compartment syndrome resulting in adequate therapy. The delay of immediate surgery, therefore, was assessed to be faulty as this knowledge is to be expected of a surgeon. PMID:26440405

  19. [Small fiber neuropathy in a patient with complete Heerfordt syndrome manifesting as refractory facial pain].

    PubMed

    Hirai, Toshiaki; Miyagawa, Shinji; Matsui, Kazutaka; Kurita, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of complete Heerfordt syndrome accompanied by the involvement of small fiber neuropathy (SFN) manifesting as refracory facial pain. A 30-year-old man presented with pyrexia, a 2-week history of facial burning pain, and difficulty of mastication. After admission to our hospital, neurological examinations showed bilateral facial pain, trigeminal motor palsy, left facial nerve palsy, bilateral sensory neural deafness, uveitis and swelling of the parotid gland. Other examinations revealed bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, high serum titer of angiotensin coenzyme, and no response in a tuberculin-tested, non-caseating epithelioid granuloma from lip biopsy, leading to the diagnosis of complete Heerfordt syndrome. Mandibular skin biopsy with immunostaining for PGP 9.5 showed SFN. High-dose corticosteroids proved somewhat effective against SFN as facial pain, but reducing the corticosteroid dose proved difficult, as symptoms were refractory to other immunosuppressants and pain-control drugs such as anti-epileptics and anti-depressants. The patient died of acute pancreatitis 3 years after disease onset. Autopsy showed no granuloma in hilar lymph node, trigeminal nerve, cranial base, nerve root, and muscle. SFN in this case probably represent a cause of refractory facial pain. PMID:25087562

  20. Pain, Catastrophizing, and Depression in Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jong Kyou

    2013-01-01

    Persistent and disabling pain is the hallmark of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). However, disease severity (as measured by objective indexes such as those that use radiography or serology) is only marginally related to patients' reports of pain severity, and pain-related presentation can differ widely among individuals with CP/CPPS. Increasing evidence in support of the biopsychosocial model of pain suggests that cognitive and emotional processes are crucial contributors to inter-individual differences in the perception and impact of pain. This review describes the growing body of literature relating depression and catastrophizing to the experience of pain and pain-related sequelae in CP/CPPS. Depression and catastrophizing are consistently associated with the reported severity of pain, sensitivity to pain, physical disability, poor treatment outcomes, and inflammatory disease activity and potentially with early mortality. A variety of pathways, from cognitive to behavioral to neurophysiological, seem to mediate these deleterious effects. Collectively, depression and catastrophizing are critically important variables in understanding the experience of pain in patients with CP/CPPS. Pain, depression, and catastrophizing might all be uniquely important therapeutic targets in the multimodal management of a range of such conditions. PMID:23869268

  1. Treatment of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome as a neuropathic pain condition

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Lakshmi; Pattanik, Manorama; Titarmore, Vaishali

    2014-01-01

    A lady of 52 years with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC) presented with chronic pelvic pain, irritative voiding with sphincter dominance on urodynamics. 3 yrs of oral analgesics, antispasmodics and intravesical therapy was ineffective. We surmised her pain, and irritative voiding to be secondary to constant straining against a dysfunctional pelvic floor. We treated PBS/IC as a neuropathic phenomenon with a combination of neuromodulator medications and continuous caudal epidural analgesia to reduce the pain induced peripheral and central sensitisation. Botulinum toxin type A injection into pelvic floor muscles appeared to address their dysfuction. Clinical and urodynamics response was encouraging. PMID:25097327

  2. OHVIRA syndrome presenting with acute abdomen: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gungor Ugurlucan, Funda; Bastu, Ercan; Gulsen, Gokce; Kurek Eken, Meryem; Akhan, Suleyman Engin

    2014-01-01

    Uterus didelphys with obstructed hemivagina and ipsilateral renal agenesis (OHVIRA) or Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is a rare congenital urogenital anomaly. A 13-year-old female presented with acute abdominal pain and dysmenorrhea. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging showed uterus didelphys, hematometrocolpos, obstructed hemivagina, and right renal agenesis. Hemivaginal septal resection and anastomosis between the obstructed hemivagina and the normal vagina was tried, but it was not possible. Unilateral hysterectomy was performed. HWW syndrome may present with acute abdomen and is usually treated with vaginal septum resection and drainage of the hematometrocolpos. PMID:24461469

  3. New formulations of fentanyl for acute pain management.

    PubMed

    Paech, M J; Bloor, M; Schug, S A

    2012-02-01

    Intravenous fentanyl citrate has stood the test of time as a valuable formulation for pain management. The desirable physicochemical properties of fentanyl have allowed the development of several alternative formulations for delivery using less invasive routes, for example, transmucosal (intranasal, oral buccal and oral sublingual) and transdermal. These new formulations have been applied to clinical settings in which rapid onset of analgesia is desired, using convenient but noninvasive methods. Recent commercialization of various formulations has been driven largely by the needs of cancer patients, for whom severe but self-limiting "breakthrough" pain is less suitably treated by parenteral or oral routes of opioid administration. However, these formulations are also used for acute analgesia in prehospital and in-hospital emergency department care, and for pediatric acute pain management. Finally, they are increasingly used by patients with chronic pain of nonmalignant origin, although there is considerable debate about their merit in this group. We searched the databases MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL and Cochrane up to October 2011, using search terms "fentanyl AND nasal; intranasal; transmucosal; buccal; sublingual; oral; inhaled; inhalation; transdermal". The characteristics of several formulations of fentanyl are reviewed, detailing their pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and clinical experience with their use for acute pain management. PMID:22384452

  4. Common Questions About the Evaluation of Acute Pelvic Pain.

    PubMed

    Bhavsar, Amit K; Gelner, Elizabeth J; Shorma, Toni

    2016-01-01

    Acute pelvic pain is defined as lower abdominal or pelvic pain of less than three months' duration. It is a common presentation in primary care. Evaluation can be challenging because of a broad differential diagnosis and because many associated signs and symptoms are nonspecific. The most common diagnoses in reproductive-aged women with acute pelvic pain are idiopathic pelvic pain, pelvic inflammatory disease, acute appendicitis, ovarian cysts, ectopic pregnancy, and endometriosis. Among postmenopausal women, cancer must be considered. Findings from the history and physical examination can point to likely diagnoses, and laboratory testing and imaging can help confirm. Women of reproductive age should take a pregnancy test. In early pregnancy, transvaginal ultrasonography and beta human chorionic gonadotropin levels can help identify ectopic pregnancy and spontaneous abortion. For nonpregnant women, ultrasonography or computed tomography is indicated, depending on the possible diagnosis (e.g., ultrasonography is preferred when ovarian pathology is suspected). If ultrasonography results are nondiagnostic, magnetic resonance imaging can be helpful in pregnant women when acute appendicitis is suspected. If magnetic resonance imaging is unavailable, computed tomography may be indicated. PMID:26760839

  5. A Brain Signature to Differentiate Acute and Chronic Pain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yifei; Wang, Yuzheng; Sun, Yabin; Wang, Jin-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The transition from acute pain to chronic pain entails considerable changes of patients at multiple levels of the nervous system and in psychological states. An accurate differentiation between acute and chronic pain is essential in pain management as it may help optimize analgesic treatments according to the pain state of patients. Given that acute and chronic pain could modulate brain states in different ways and that brain states could greatly shape the neural processing of external inputs, we hypothesized that acute and chronic pain would show differential effects on cortical responses to non-nociceptive sensory information. Here by analyzing auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs) to pure tones in rats with acute or chronic pain, we found opposite influences of acute and chronic pain on cortical responses to auditory inputs. In particular, compared to no-pain controls, the N100 wave of rat AEPs was significantly enhanced in rats with acute pain but significantly reduced in rats with chronic pain, indicating that acute pain facilitated cortical processing of auditory information while chronic pain exerted an inhibitory effect. These findings could be justified by the fact that individuals suffering from acute or chronic pain would have different vigilance states, i.e., the vigilance level to external sensory stimuli would be increased with acute pain, but decreased with chronic pain. Therefore, this auditory response holds promise of being a brain signature to differentiate acute and chronic pain. Instead of investigating the pain system per se, the study of pain-induced influences on cortical processing of non-nocicpetive sensory information might represent a potential strategy to monitor the progress of pain chronification in clinical applications. PMID:27199727

  6. Actinomyces infection causing acute right iliac fossa pain

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajah, Narendranath; Hameed, Waseem; Middleton, Simon; Booth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This is a case of a 75-year-old man being admitted to the on-call surgical department with acute abdominal pain. On arrival he was clinically dehydrated and shocked with localised pain over McBurney's point and examination findings were suggestive of appendiceal or other colonic pathology. Full blood testing revealed a white cell count of 38×109/L and a C reactive protein (CRP) of 278 mg/L. A CT scan revealed a gallbladder empyema that extended into the right iliac fossa. This case highlights the potential for a hyperdistended gallbladder empyema to present as acute right iliac fossa pain with blood tests suggestive of complicated disease. Further analysis confirmed Actinomyces infection as the underlying aetiology prior to a laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy. This case serves to remind clinicians of this as a rare potential cause of atypical gallbladder pathology. PMID:24872493

  7. Children and adolescents with complex regional pain syndrome: More psychologically distressed than other children in pain?

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Deirdre E; Williams, Sara E; Carullo, Veronica P; Claar, Robyn Lewis; Bruehl, Stephen; Berde, Charles B

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Historically, in both adult and pediatric populations, a lack of knowledge regarding complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and absence of clear diagnostic criteria have contributed to the view that this is a primarily psychiatric condition. OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that children with CRPS are more functionally disabled, have more pain and are more psychologically distressed than children with other pain conditions. METHODS: A total of 101 children evaluated in a tertiary care pediatric pain clinic who met the International Association for the Study of Pain consensus diagnostic criteria for CRPS participated in the present retrospective study. Comparison groups included 103 children with abdominal pain, 291 with headache and 119 with back pain. Children and parents completed self-report questionnaires assessing disability, somatization, pain coping, depression, anxiety and school attendance. RESULTS: Children with CRPS reported higher pain intensity and more recent onset of pain at the initial tertiary pain clinic evaluation compared with children with other chronic pain conditions. They reported greater functional disability and more somatic symptoms than children with headaches or back pain. Scores on measures of depression and anxiety were within normal limits and similar to those of children in other pain diagnostic groups. CONCLUSIONS: As a group, clinic-referred children with CRPS may be more functionally impaired and experience more somatic symptoms compared with children with other pain conditions. However, overall psychological functioning as assessed by self-report appears to be similar to that of children with other chronic pain diagnoses. Comprehensive assessment using a biopsychosocial framework is essential to understanding and appropriately treating children with symptoms of CRPS. PMID:23662291

  8. [The multivector nature of relief of acute and chronic pain and necessity of using pain coping strategies].

    PubMed

    Yakupov, E Z; Yakupova, S P; Muslimova, E A

    2015-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the urgent problem of pain syndromes of multimodal character developed in different pathologies. The diagnosis and treatment of pain is frequently complicated by nociceptive, neuropathic and dysfunctional components. Special attention is drawn to the dysfunctional component and its relation to depression. In this context, the authors consider psychological aspects of pain syndrome formation and methods of treatment using pharmacological medications and pain-coping strategies as well. Different coping strategies of active and passive pain-coping styles depending on sex, personality features, nosologic forms are presented. The necessity of using the active coping-strategies to relieve pain of different genesis is highlighted. PMID:26978501

  9. TRPV1 sensitization mediates postinflammatory visceral pain following acute colitis.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Tamia K; Basso, Lilian; Iftinca, Mircea C; Flynn, Robyn; Chapman, Kevin; Dietrich, Gilles; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Altier, Christophe

    2015-07-15

    Quiescent phases of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are often accompanied by chronic abdominal pain. Although the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel has been postulated as an important mediator of visceral hypersensitivity, its functional role in postinflammatory pain remains elusive. This study aimed at establishing the role of TRPV1 in the peripheral sensitization underlying chronic visceral pain in the context of colitis. Wild-type and TRPV1-deficient mice were separated into three groups (control, acute colitis, and recovery), and experimental colitis was induced by oral administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Recovery mice showed increased chemically and mechanically evoked visceral hypersensitivity 5 wk post-DSS discontinuation, at which point inflammation had completely resolved. Significant changes in nonevoked pain-related behaviors could also be observed in these animals, indicative of persistent discomfort. These behavioral changes correlated with elevated colonic levels of substance P (SP) and TRPV1 in recovery mice, thus leading to the hypothesis that SP could sensitize TRPV1 function. In vitro experiments revealed that prolonged exposure to SP could indeed sensitize capsaicin-evoked currents in both cultured neurons and TRPV1-transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells, a mechanism that involved TRPV1 ubiquitination and subsequent accumulation at the plasma membrane. Importantly, although TRPV1-deficient animals experienced similar disease severity and pain as wild-type mice in the acute phase of colitis, TRPV1 deletion prevented the development of postinflammatory visceral hypersensitivity and pain-associated behaviors. Collectively, our results suggest that chronic exposure of colon-innervating primary afferents to SP could sensitize TRPV1 and thus participate in the establishment of persistent abdominal pain following acute inflammation. PMID:26021808

  10. Similarities between interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and vulvodynia: implications for patient management

    PubMed Central

    Moldwin, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) and vulvodynia are chronic pain syndromes that appear to be intertwined from the perspectives of embryology, pathology and epidemiology. These associations may account for similar responses to various therapies. PMID:26816866

  11. Acute kidney injury in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Marenzi, Giancarlo; Cosentino, Nicola; Bartorelli, Antonio L

    2015-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly being seen in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs). This condition has a complex pathogenesis, an incidence that can reach 30% and it is associated with higher short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, AKI is still characterised by lack of a single accepted definition, unclear pathophysiology understanding and insensitive diagnostic tools that make its detection difficult, particularly in the setting of ACS. Recent data suggested that patients with AKI during ACS, even those in whom renal function seems to fully recover, face an increased, persisting risk of future AKI and may develop chronic kidney disease. Thus, in these patients, nephrology follow-up, after hospital discharge, and secondary preventive measures should possibly be implemented. In this review, we aim at providing a framework of knowledge to increase cardiologists' awareness of AKI, with the goal of improving the outcome of patients with ACS. PMID:26243789

  12. Diagnosis of Acute Coronary Syndrome with a Support Vector Machine.

    PubMed

    Berikol, Göksu Bozdereli; Yildiz, Oktay; Özcan, I Türkay

    2016-04-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a serious condition arising from an imbalance of supply and demand to meet myocardium's metabolic needs. Patients typically present with retrosternal chest pain radiating to neck and left arm. Electrocardiography (ECG) and laboratory tests are used indiagnosis. However in emergency departments, there are some difficulties for physicians to decide whether hospitalizing, following up or discharging the patient. The aim of the study is to diagnose ACS and helping the physician with his decisionto discharge or to hospitalizevia machine learning techniques such as support vector machine (SVM) by using patient data including age, sex, risk factors, and cardiac enzymes (CK-MB, Troponin I) of patients presenting to emergency department with chest pain. Clinical, laboratory, and imaging data of 228 patients presenting to emergency department with chest pain were reviewedand the performance of support vector machine. Four different methods (Support vector machine (SVM), Artificial neural network (ANN), Naïve Bayes and Logistic Regression) were tested and the results of SVM which has the highest accuracy is reported. Among 228 patients aged 19 to 91 years who were included in the study, 99 (43.4 %) were qualified as ACS, while 129 (56.5 %) had no ACS. The classification model using SVM attained a 99.13 % classification success. The present study showed a 99.13 % classification success for ACS diagnosis attained by Support Vector Machine. This study showed that machine learning techniques may help emergency department staff make decisions by rapidly producing relevant data. PMID:26815338

  13. MDCT evaluation of acute aortic syndrome (AAS).

    PubMed

    Valente, Tullio; Rossi, Giovanni; Lassandro, Francesco; Rea, Gaetano; Marino, Maurizio; Muto, Maurizio; Molino, Antonio; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    Non-traumatic acute thoracic aortic syndromes (AAS) describe a spectrum of life-threatening aortic pathologies with significant implications on diagnosis, therapy and management. There is a common pathway for the various manifestations of AAS that eventually leads to a breakdown of the aortic intima and media. Improvements in biology and health policy and diffusion of technology into the community resulted in an associated decrease in mortality and morbidity related to aortic therapeutic interventions. Hybrid procedures, branched and fenestrated endografts, and percutaneous aortic valves have emerged as potent and viable alternatives to traditional surgeries. In this context, current state-of-the art multidetector CT (MDCT) is actually the gold standard in the emergency setting because of its intrinsic diagnostic value. Management of acute aortic disease has changed with the increasing realization that endovascular therapies may offer distinct advantages in these situations. This article provides a summary of AAS, focusing especially on the MDCT technique, typical and atypical findings and common pitfalls of AAS, as well as recent concepts regarding the subtypes of AAS, consisting of aortic dissection, intramural haematoma, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer and unstable aortic aneurysm or contained aortic rupture. MDCT findings will be related to pathophysiology, timing and management options to achieve a definite and timely diagnostic and therapeutic definition. In the present article, we review the aetiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, outcomes and therapeutic approaches to acute aortic syndromes. PMID:27033344

  14. Acute coronary syndrome in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    El-Deeb, Mohammed; El-Menyar, Ayman; Gehani, Abdulrazzak; Sulaiman, Kadhim

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the available information on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of acute coronary syndromes (ST-elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI] and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction [NSTEMI]) during all stages of pregnancy. We searched the English-language literature indexed in MEDLINE, Scopus and EBSCO host research databases from 1980 through to August 2010 using the indexing terms 'pregnancy', 'ante-,peri-, and postpartum', 'acute coronary syndrome', 'myocardial infarction', 'STEMI' and 'NSTEMI'. Symptomatic coronary artery disease is still infrequent in women of childbearing age, but the recent increase in its prevalence in pregnancy has been attributed to the modern trend of childbearing in older years because many young working women are postponing having children. Although rare, acute pregnancy-related MI is a devastating event that may claim the life of a mother and her fetus. The incidence of MI is estimated at 0.6-1 per 10,000 pregnancies. The case fatality rate has been reported to be 5-37%. Owing to the rarity of the event, information related to MI in pregnancy is derived from case reports and, therefore, is subject to considerable reporting bias. Treatment needs to be prompt and urgent because of the very high mortality rate. Current guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of MI should be expanded to include pregnancy-related MI. Screening and management of cardiovascular risk factors should be achieved before pregnancy. PMID:21517733

  15. Enlargement of choroid plexus in complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangyu; Hotta, Jaakko; Lehtinen, Maria K.; Forss, Nina; Hari, Riitta

    2015-01-01

    The choroid plexus, located in brain ventricles, has received surprisingly little attention in clinical neuroscience. In morphometric brain analysis, we serendipitously found a 21% increase in choroid plexus volume in 12 patients suffering from complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) compared with age- and gender-matched healthy subjects. No enlargement was observed in a group of 8 patients suffering from chronic pain of other etiologies. Our findings suggest involvement of the choroid plexus in the pathogenesis of CRPS. Since the choroid plexus can mediate interaction between peripheral and brain inflammation, our findings pinpoint the choroid plexus as an important target for future research of central pain mechanisms. PMID:26388497

  16. Orofacial pain syndromes: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Klasser, Gary D

    2014-11-01

    Patients will often visit their primary medical practitioner with orofacial pain complaints. Hence, it is important to recognize and have an understanding of these conditions to properly evaluate and potentially manage these disorders. If the practitioner is uncertain or uncomfortable with these conditions, then patient referral to a knowledgeable health care practitioner should be considered for further evaluation and management. In this article, the evaluation and management of various neuropathic, neurovascular, and vascular pains are discussed. PMID:25443681

  17. Single dose oral ibuprofen for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Christopher J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background This review updates a 1999 Cochrane review showing that ibuprofen at various doses was effective in postoperative pain in single dose studies designed to demonstrate analgesic efficacy. New studies have since been published. Ibuprofen is one of the most widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) analgesics both by prescription and as an over-the-counter medicine. Ibuprofen is used for acute and chronic painful conditions. Objectives To assess analgesic efficacy of ibuprofen in single oral doses for moderate and severe postoperative pain in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to May 2009. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trials of single dose orally administered ibuprofen (any formulation) in adults with moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Pain relief or pain intensity data were extracted and converted into the dichotomous outcome of number of participants with at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, from which relative risk and number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) were calculated. Numbers of participants using rescue medication over specified time periods, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals were collected. Main results Seventy-two studies compared ibuprofen and placebo (9186 participants). Studies were predominantly of high reporting quality, and the bulk of the information concerned ibuprofen 200 mg and 400 mg. For at least 50% pain relief compared with placebo the NNT for ibuprofen 200 mg (2690 participants) was 2.7 (2.5 to 3.0) and for ibuprofen 400 mg (6475 participants) it was 2.5 (2.4 to 2.6). The proportion with at least 50% pain relief was 46% with 200 mg and 54% with 400 mg. Remedication within 6 hours was less

  18. Interaction of Hyperalgesia and Sensory Loss in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I (CRPS I)

    PubMed Central

    Huge, Volker; Lauchart, Meike; Förderreuther, Stefanie; Kaufhold, Wibke; Valet, Michael; Azad, Shahnaz Christina; Beyer, Antje; Magerl, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Background Sensory abnormalities are a key feature of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). In order to characterise these changes in patients suffering from acute or chronic CRPS I, we used Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) in comparison to an age and gender matched control group. Methods 61 patients presenting with CRPS I of the upper extremity and 56 healthy subjects were prospectively assessed using QST. The patients' warm and cold detection thresholds (WDT; CDT), the heat and cold pain thresholds (HPT; CPT) and the occurrence of paradoxical heat sensation (PHS) were observed. Results In acute CRPS I, patients showed warm and cold hyperalgesia, indicated by significant changes in HPT and CPT. WDT and CDT were significantly increased as well, indicating warm and cold hypoaesthesia. In chronic CRPS, thermal hyperalgesia declined, but CDT as well as WDT further deteriorated. Solely patients with acute CRPS displayed PHS. To a minor degree, all QST changes were also present on the contralateral limb. Conclusions We propose three pathomechanisms of CRPS I, which follow a distinct time course: Thermal hyperalgesia, observed in acute CRPS, indicates an ongoing aseptic peripheral inflammation. Thermal hypoaesthesia, as detected in acute and chronic CRPS, signals a degeneration of A-delta and C-fibres, which further deteriorates in chronic CRPS. PHS in acute CRPS I indicates that both inflammation and degeneration are present, whilst in chronic CRPS I, the pathomechanism of degeneration dominates, signalled by the absence of PHS. The contralateral changes observed strongly suggest the involvement of the central nervous system. PMID:18648647

  19. Pregabalin for acute and chronic pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R Andrew; Straube, Sebastian; Wiffen, Philip J; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiepileptic drugs have been used in pain management since the 1960s. Pregabalin is a recently developed antiepileptic drug also used in management of chronic neuropathic pain conditions. Objectives To assess analgesic efficacy and associated adverse events of pregabalin in acute and chronic pain. Search methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL to May 2009 for randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Additional studies were identified from the reference lists of retrieved papers and on-line clinical trial databases. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind trials reporting on the analgesic effect of pregabalin, with subjective pain assessment by the patient as either the primary or a secondary outcome. Data collection and analysis Two independent review authors extracted data and assessed trial quality. Numbers-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNTs) were calculated, where possible, from dichotomous data for effectiveness, adverse events and study withdrawals. Main results There was no clear evidence of beneficial effects of pregabalin in established acute postoperative pain. No studies evaluated pregabalin in chronic nociceptive pain, like arthritis. Pregabalin at doses of 300 mg, 450 mg, and 600 mg daily was effective in patients with postherpetic neuralgia, painful diabetic neuropathy, central neuropathic pain, and fibromyalgia (19 studies, 7003 participants). Pregabalin at 150 mg daily was generally ineffective. Efficacy was demonstrated for dichotomous outcomes equating to moderate or substantial pain relief, alongside lower rates for lack of efficacy discontinuations with increasing dose. The best (lowest) NNT for each condition for at least 50% pain relief over baseline (substantial benefit) for 600 mg pregabalin daily compared with placebo were 3.9 (95% confidence interval 3.1 to 5.1) for postherpetic neuralgia, 5.0 (4.0 to 6.6) for painful diabetic neuropathy, 5.6 (3.5 to 14) for central neuropathic pain, and 11 (7.1 to 21) for fibromyalgia

  20. Intramuscular hemangioma mimicking myofascial pain syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hwee; Hwang, Miriam; Kang, Yoon Kyoo; Kim, In Jong; Park, Yoon Kun

    2007-06-01

    Intramuscular hemangioma, an infrequent but important cause of musculoskeletal pain, is often difficult to establish the diagnosis clinically. This report describes a case of a 32-yr-old woman who presented with severe left calf pain for 10 yr. Initial conservative treatments consisting of intramuscular electrical stimulation, herb medication, acupuncture, and intramuscular lidocaine injection under the diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome in other facilities, failed to alleviate the symptoms. On physical examination, there was no motor weakness or sensory change. Conventional radiography of the leg revealed a soft tissue phlebolith. Conventional angiography study showed hemangioma. Intramuscular hemangioma within the soleus muscle was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Following surgical excision of the hemangioma, the patient's symptom resolved completely. Intramuscular hemangioma is a rare cause of calf pain and should be considered in the differential diagnosis if a patient with muscle pain, particularly if associated with a soft tissue mass, fails to respond to conservative treatment. PMID:17596677

  1. Intramuscular Hemangioma Mimicking Myofascial Pain Syndrome : A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Miriam; Kang, Yoon Kyoo; Kim, In Jong; Park, Yoon Kun

    2007-01-01

    Intramuscular hemangioma, an infrequent but important cause of musculoskeletal pain, is often difficult to establish the diagnosis clinically. This report describes a case of a 32-yr-old woman who presented with severe left calf pain for 10 yr. Initial conservative treatments consisting of intramuscular electrical stimulation, herb medication, acupuncture, and intramuscular lidocaine injection under the diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome in other facilities, failed to alleviate the symptoms. On physical examination, there was no motor weakness or sensory change. Conventional radiography of the leg revealed a soft tissue phlebolith. Conventional angiography study showed hemangioma. Intramuscular hemangioma within the soleus muscle was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Following surgical excision of the hemangioma, the patient's symptom resolved completely. Intramuscular hemangioma is a rare cause of calf pain and should be considered in the differential diagnosis if a patient with muscle pain, particularly if associated with a soft tissue mass, fails to respond to conservative treatment. PMID:17596677

  2. Acute coronary syndrome after levamisole-adultered cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Katarzyna; Grabherr, Silke; Shiferaw, Kebede; Doenz, Franceso; Augsburger, Marc; Mangin, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine is a well known trigger of acute coronary syndromes. Over the last 10 years levamisole, a veterinary anthelminthic drug has been increasingly used as an adulterant of cocaine. Levamisole was used to treat pediatric nephritic syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis before being withdrawn from the market due to its significant toxicity, i.e. hematological complications and vasculitis. The major complications of levamisole-adultered cocaine reported up to now are hematological and dermatological. The case reported here is of a 25 year old man with a history of cocaine abuse who died at home after complaining of retrosternal pain. Postmortem CT-angiography, autopsy, and chemical and toxicological analyses were performed. An eroded coronary artery plaque was found at the proximal segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Two myocardial infarct scars were present in the left ventricle. Microscopic examination of the coronary artery revealed infiltration of eosinophils into the adventitia and intima. Toxicological examination confirmed the presence of cocaine and its metabolites in the peripheral blood, and of levamisole in the urine and pericardial fluid. Eosinophilic inflammatory coronary artery pathologies have been clinically linked to coronary dissection, hypersensitivity coronary syndrome and vasospastic allergic angina. The coronary pathology in the presented case could be a complication of levamisole-adultered cocaine use, in which an allergic or immune-mediated mechanism might play a role. The rise in cocaine addiction worldwide and the increase of levamisole adulterated cocaine highlights the importance of updating our knowledge of the effects of adultered cocaine abuse. PMID:24365689

  3. Contemporary management of acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Large, G

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on the modern management of the non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (unstable angina and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction). Patients with these syndromes are at varying degrees of risk of (re)infarction and death. This risk can be reliably predicted by clinical, electrocardiographic, and biochemical markers. Aspirin, clopidogrel, heparin (unfractionated or low molecular weight), and anti-ischaemic drugs should be offered to all patients, irrespective of the predicted level of risk. Patients at high risk should also receive a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor inhibitor and should undergo early coronary arteriography with a view to percutaneous or surgical revascularisation. Lower risk patients should undergo non-invasive testing. When inducible myocardial ischaemia is exhibited coronary arteriography should follow. When non-invasive testing is negative, a conservative management strategy is safe. PMID:15811883

  4. Dual pathway therapy in acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stachon, Peter; Ahrens, Ingo; Bode, Christoph; Zirlik, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    In 10 % of patients, who suffer an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a major cardiovascular event occurs despite optimal therapy. The occlusion of the vessel is driven by atherothrombosis, which arises from platelet activation and activation of the coagulation cascade. In the last decade the secondary prevention continuously improved by development of dual anti-platelet therapy with new P2Y12-inhibitors such as clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor. Until recently, the coagulation cascade was not targeted in secondary prevention. The coagulation factor Xa plays a crucial role in thrombosis and is elevated in patients after acute coronary syndrome, therefore representing an attractive target for novel therapies in ACS. Former studies with vitamin K antagonists showed reduction of cardiovascular events but increased major bleedings. Two phase-3 trials investigated the role of novel oral anticoagulant agents on top of aspirin and clopidogrel in patients with ACS. The APPRAISE-2 study, which tested the oral factor Xa inhibitor apixaban was prematurely terminated because of an increase of major bleedings in the absence of an effect on cardiovascular events. In contrast, the ATLAS ACS2 TIMI-51 trial interrogating the oral factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban in a low dose regimen showed significant reduction of cardiovascular events as well as total mortality. Thus, add-on treatment with low dose rivaroxaban emerged as a new option for patients with ACS. This review illustrates recent advances in the development of antithrombotic therapy in acute coronary syndromes, provides guidance on which patients should receive which therapy for secondary prevention of events, and points out potentially fruitful new strategies for the future of antithrombotic treatment in ACS. PMID:26660521

  5. Acute abdominal pain in patients with lassa fever: Radiological assessment and diagnostic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Eze, Kenneth C.; Salami, Taofeek A.; Kpolugbo, James U.

    2014-01-01

    Background: To highlight the problems of diagnosis and management of acute abdomen in patients with lassa fever. And to also highlight the need for high index of suspicion of lassa fever in patients presenting with acute abdominal pain in order to avoid surgical intervention with unfavourable prognosis and nosocomial transmission of infections, especially in Lassa fever-endemic regions. Materials and Methods: A review of experiences of the authors in the management of lassa fever over a 4-year period (2004-2008). Literature on lassa fever, available in the internet and other local sources, was studied in November 2010 and reviewed. Results: Normal plain chest radiographic picture can change rapidly due to pulmonary oedema, pulmonary haemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Plain abdominal radiograph may show dilated bowels with signs of paralytic ileus or dynamic intestinal obstruction due to bowel wall haemorrhage or inflamed and enlarged Peyer's patches. Ultrasound may show free intra-peritoneal fluid due to peritonitis and intra-peritoneal haemorrhage. Bleeding into the gall bladder wall may erroneously suggest infective cholecystitis. Pericardial effusion with or without pericarditis causing abdominal pain may be seen using echocardiography. High index of suspicion, antibody testing for lassa fever and viral isolation in a reference laboratory are critical for accurate diagnosis. Conclusion: Patients from lassa fever-endemic regions may present with features that suggest acute abdomen. Radiological studies may show findings that suggest acute abdomen but these should be interpreted in the light of the general clinical condition of the patient. It is necessary to know that acute abdominal pain and vomiting in lassa fever-endemic areas could be caused by lassa fever, which is a medical condition. Surgical option should be undertaken with restraint as it increases the morbidity, may worsen the prognosis and increase the risk of nosocomial transmission

  6. Genetics of the acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute coronary artery syndrome in the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western countries, and its epidemiological burden is also constantly increasing worldwide, including Asia. Due to social and economic consequences, a number of experimental and epidemiological studies have analyzed its etiology so far, in order to develop effective preventive and treatment measures. Thanks to these studies, it is now clear that coronary artery disease (CAD) is a complex multifactorial disorder, resulting from close interaction between acquired and inherited risk factors. In particular, considerable advances were made in the last decade about our understanding of the genetic causes of CAD, mainly propelled by the progresses in whole genome scanning and the development of genome wide association studies. This narrative review is hence dedicated to explore the role of genetic factors in the risk of developing acute CAD. PMID:27294088

  7. Acute Coronary Syndrome and ST Segment Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Carey, Mary G

    2016-09-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is caused by a critical obstruction of a coronary artery because of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Three specific conditions are included: ST elevation myocardial infarction, non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, and unstable angina. The ST segment on the electrocardiogram is a sensitive and specific marker of myocardial ischemia and infarction; however, ST segment deviation is regional not global, thus the ECG lead must be placed over the affected region of the myocardium. This article describes ACS and infarction and the use of ST segment monitoring to detect these conditions. PMID:27484662

  8. Acute low back pain: diagnostics and treatment.

    PubMed

    Becker, F C

    2001-03-01

    How many times have you heard from a patient or groaned yourself "Oh, my aching back?" Innocuous movements such as reaching, stooping, or leaning are halted mid-performance as you sense "something" give, catch, snap, grab, or slide in your lower back. Such subjective complaints may also include sensations of discomfort described as stabbing, sharp, dull, hot/burning, tingling, or numbing. In practice, you will be required to assess these subjective symptoms, effectively document objective data, formulate a diagnosis, and plan appropriate treatment for your patients. Careful attention to history, associated symptoms, and following a systematic approach to back pain can make the rule-in/out differentials less taxing on both the practitioner and the patient. PMID:11329554

  9. Topical rubefacients for acute and chronic pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Paul; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Rubefacients (containing salicylates or nicotinamides) cause irritation of the skin, and are believed to relieve various musculoskeletal pains. They are available on prescription, and are common components in over-the-counter remedies. A non-Cochrane review in 2004 found limited evidence for efficacy. Objectives To review current evidence for efficacy and safety of topically applied rubefacients in acute and chronic painful musculoskeletal conditions in adults. Search methods Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Oxford Pain Relief Database, and reference lists of articles were searched; last search December 2008. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind, placebo or active controlled clinical trials of topical rubefacient for musculoskeletal pain in adults, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm, and reporting outcomes at close to 7 (minimum 3, maximum 10) days for acute conditions and 14 (minimum 7) days or longer for chronic conditions. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and quality, and extracted data. Relative benefit or risk and number needed to treat to benefit or harm (NNT or NNH) were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Acute and chronic conditions were analysed separately. Main results Six placebo and one active controlled studies (560 and 137 participants) in acute pain, and seven placebo and two active controlled studies (489 and 90 participants) in chronic pain were included. All used topical salicylates. The evidence in acute conditions was not robust; using only better quality, valid studies, there was no difference between topical rubefacient and topical control, though overall, including lower quality studies, the NNT for clinical success compared with placebo was 3.2 (95% CI: 2.4 to 4.9). In chronic conditions the NNT was 6.2 (95% CI: 4.0 to 13) compared with topical placebo. Adverse events and withdrawals occurred more often with rubefacients than placebo

  10. A Case with Repeated Recurrent Acute Coronary Syndrome due to Pseudoephedrine Use: Kounis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Çeliker, Metin; Tuncer, Mustafa; Şekeralmaz, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Allergic reaction-associated acute coronary syndrome picture is defined as Kounis syndrome. Although drug use is the most common cause of allergic reaction, foods and environmental factors may also play a role in the etiology. Herein, a case with acute coronary syndrome that developed two times at 8-month interval due to pseudoephedrine use for upper respiratory tract infection is presented. PMID:25435880

  11. Current studies on myofascial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Ta-Shen

    2009-10-01

    Recent studies have clarified the nature of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). In an MTrP region, multiple hyperirritable loci can be found. The sensory components of the MTrP locus are sensitized nociceptors that are responsible for pain, referred pain, and local twitch responses. The motor components are dysfunctional endplates that are responsible for taut band formation as a result of excessive acetylcholine (ACh) leakage. The concentrations of pain- and inflammation-related substances are increased in the MTrP region. It has been hypothesized that excessive ACh release, sarcomere shortening, and release of sensitizing substances are three essential features that relate to one another in a positive feedback cycle. This MTrP circuit is the connection among spinal sensory (dorsal horn) neurons responsible for the MTrP phenomena. Recent studies suggest that measurement of biochemicals associated with pain and inflammation in the MTrP region, the sonographic study of MTrPs, and the magnetic resonance elastography for taut band image are potential tools for the diagnosis of MTrPs. Many methods have been used to treat myofascial pain, including laser therapy, shockwave therapy, and botulinum toxin type A injection. PMID:19728962

  12. The Brain-Gut Axis in Abdominal Pain Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Emeran A.; Tillisch, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    The importance of bidirectional brain-gut interactions in gastrointestinal (GI) illness is increasingly recognized, most prominently in the area of functional GI syndromes such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia, and functional chest pain. The brain receives a constant stream of interoceptive input from the GI tract, integrates this information with other interoceptive information from the body and with contextual information from the environment, and sends an integrated response back to various target cells within the GI tract. This system is optimized to assure homeostasis of the GI tract during physiological perturbations and to adapt GI function to the overall state of the organism. In health, the great majority of interoceptive information reaching the brain is not consciously perceived but serves primarily as input to autonomic reflex pathways. In patients with functional abdominal pain syndromes, conscious perception of interoceptive information from the GI tract, or recall of interoceptive memories of such input, can occur in the form of constant or recurrent discomfort or pain. This is often associated with alterations in autonomic nervous system output and with emotional changes. A model is proposed that incorporates reported peripheral and central abnormalities in patients with IBS, extrapolates similar alterations in brain-gut interactions to patients with other chronic abdominal pain syndromes, and provides novel treatment targets. PMID:21090962

  13. [Cervical myofascial pain syndrome. Narrative review of physiotherapeutic treatment].

    PubMed

    Capó-Juan, M A

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a complex and multifactorial phenomenon that depends on the interaction of biopsychosocial factors. Between 15-25% of adults suffer from chronic pain at some point in their lives. Cervical chronic pain is considered a public health problem affecting 9.6% men and 21.9% women, according to the latest National Health Survey 2011-12. A high percentage of medical consultations due to muscle pain turn out to be myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). Its existence implies the presence of myofascial trigger points which can be latent or active throughout the whole population. The aim of this review is to update knowledge in the various therapies applied by the physiotherapist in the treatment of this syndrome at cervical level. From the review it appears that some of the most used techniques that may be useful in the short or medium term are: ischemic compression and/or trigger point pressure release and dry needling. Furthermore, various combinations of treatment modalities are used to treat this syndrome, taking other aspects into account, such as education. PMID:25963463

  14. Painful Os Peroneum Syndrome: Underdiagnosed Condition in the Lateral Midfoot Pain.

    PubMed

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete; de Souza, Barbara Nogueira Caracas; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Os peroneum is an accessory ossicle located within the peroneus longus tendon. The painful os peroneum syndrome (POPS) results from a wide spectrum of conditions, including fractures, diastases, and other causes. POPS can result in tenosynovitis or discontinuity of the peroneus longus tendon with a clinical presentation of pain in the lateral aspect of the midfoot. Authors report a typical case of POPS, illustrating this entity through different imaging methods (radiographs, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging). We emphasize the prevalence of this ossicle and discuss painful complications. PMID:27478674

  15. Painful Os Peroneum Syndrome: Underdiagnosed Condition in the Lateral Midfoot Pain

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Barbara Nogueira Caracas

    2016-01-01

    Os peroneum is an accessory ossicle located within the peroneus longus tendon. The painful os peroneum syndrome (POPS) results from a wide spectrum of conditions, including fractures, diastases, and other causes. POPS can result in tenosynovitis or discontinuity of the peroneus longus tendon with a clinical presentation of pain in the lateral aspect of the midfoot. Authors report a typical case of POPS, illustrating this entity through different imaging methods (radiographs, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging). We emphasize the prevalence of this ossicle and discuss painful complications. PMID:27478674

  16. [Evaluation and correction of the pain syndrome in premature newborns with CNS infringement].

    PubMed

    Gadzhieva, N N

    2009-04-01

    Premature newborn may feel different kinds of pain, thus incomplete diagnostics and unjustified therapy may lead to unfavourable physiological effects. All the pain feelings that a child experiences are acute and recurrent or persistent leading to a pain syndrome if there is no intervention. Currently a huge arsenal of pharmacological drugs is available to control pain. There are a lot of researches described in the literature on the effectiveness of the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokynetics and complications related to administration of different analgetics in newborns. However the unfavorable complications identified prevent their use in newborns. Analgesic effect can be made not only by proper analgetics, but combined homeopathic medications as well. One of such medications, which has no side effects is traumel S. The current paper reflects outcomes of the clinical research took place over the 79 pre-term newborns with infringement of the CNS who are subject of a big number of the prescribed treatment manipulation and procedures whereas most of them are quite painful. There is necessity of applying anesthesia treatment for avoiding clinical and biochemical consequences of the pain syndrome. Application of the traumel C intramuscularly or traumel C ointment per os just before and during painful manipulation affect drop pain level of a newborn. Appreciation of pain is subject to the level of CNS lesions because during severe disorders behavioral reaction to pain is certainly reduced. Premature newborns from control group, in the dynamics of neonatal period, manifested reliable reduction (R<0,05) of neurokinin A from 17.52 to 2.08 ng/ml, substance P from 2.5 to 0.3 n/ml compare to seek newborns. During comparison of the results it was revealed that premature newborns, with hypoxemic-ischemic lesion of CNS, treated based on traditional allopathic therapy from the first day of life, manifest significantly high level of neurokinin A and substance P, maintained until the

  17. Ecstasy-induced acute coronary syndrome: something to rave about.

    PubMed

    Hoggett, Kerry; McCoubrie, David; Fatovich, Daniel M

    2012-06-01

    Ecstasy or 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine is a commonly used illicit recreational drug, enjoying popularity for its stimulant effects. Although acute coronary syndrome is recognized after cocaine and methamphetamine use, association with Ecstasy use has rarely been reported. We report three cases of significantly delayed acute coronary syndrome and ST elevation myocardial infarction related to ingestion of Ecstasy. PMID:22672176

  18. Unrecognized acute exertional compartment syndrome of the leg and treatment.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Nebojsa; Bottoni, Craig; Cassidy, Charles

    2011-04-01

    Acute-on-chronic exertional compartment syndrome is rare and may be easily missed without a high degree of awareness and clinical suspicion. We report a case of unrecognized acute-on-chronic exertional compartment syndrome in a recreational soccer player. The late sequela of this condition, foot drop, was successfully treated with transfer of the peroneus longus tendon. PMID:21667742

  19. Systematic review of chronic pain in persons with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Velvin, G; Bathen, T; Rand-Hendriksen, S; Geirdal, A Ø

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the literature on chronic pain in adults with Marfan syndrome (MFS), critically appraising and synthesizing relevant literature. A systematic review was conducted by searching the published literature databases using available medical, physical, psychological, social databases and other sources. All studies that addressed pain in MFS, published in peer-reviewed journals were assessed. Of 351 search results, 18 articles satisfied the eligibility criteria. All studies were cross-sectional and quantitative; no randomized controlled trials or intervention studies were found. Most studies had small sample sizes, low response rates and mainly dealt with other aspects of the diagnosis than pain. Only one article dealt mainly with pain. The research on chronic pain in MFS is limited in size and quality. Despite these limitations, studies describe that the prevalence of pain in patients with MFS is high, varying from 47 to 92% and affecting several anatomic sites. In addition, chronic pain limits daily function and few studies describe treatment options for pain in patients with MFS. Research is needed to obtain more evidence-based knowledge for developing more appropriate rehabilitation programs for people with MFS. PMID:26607862

  20. Botulinum Toxin A for Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Bin; Tai, Huai-Ching; Chung, Shiu-Dong; Birder, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A), derived from Clostridium botulinum, has been used clinically for several diseases or syndrome including chronic migraine, spasticity, focal dystonia and other neuropathic pain. Chronic pelvic or bladder pain is the one of the core symptoms of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC). However, in the field of urology, chronic bladder or pelvic pain is often difficult to eradicate by oral medications or bladder instillation therapy. We are looking for new treatment modality to improve bladder pain or associated urinary symptoms such as frequency and urgency for patients with BPS/IC. Recent studies investigating the mechanism of the antinociceptive effects of BoNT A suggest that it can inhibit the release of peripheral neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators from sensory nerves. In this review, we will examine the evidence supporting the use of BoNTs in bladder pain from basic science models and review the clinical studies on therapeutic applications of BoNT for BPS/IC. PMID:27376330

  1. Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-30

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. [Acute and subacute leg and foot paralysis of radicular origin: clinical aspects, examination technique and differential diagnosis of root syndromes].

    PubMed

    Steinsiepe, K F; Magun, J G

    1990-11-01

    We describe symptoms and physical findings consistent with acute or subacute radicular lesions in the lower limb: radicular pain syndromes in the leg and the motor as well as sensory deficits of lumbar and sacral roots L2 to S1. We emphasize the importance of anterior thigh pain which is not sufficiently known, and we point out our neurological findings which do not correspond to descriptions in standard textbooks. Aids to the examination of these radicular syndromes are given, stressing the technique of examining motor signs. We also discuss the differential diagnosis to other, nonradicular syndromes and we present practical guidelines. Finally, surgical emergencies of practical importance are pointed out. PMID:2080391

  3. Pain management in the acute care setting: Update and debates.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Greta M

    2016-02-01

    Pain management in the paediatric acute care setting is underutilised and can be improved. An awareness of the analgesic options available and their limitations is an important starting point. This article describes the evolving understanding of relevant pharmacogenomics and safety data of the various analgesic agents with a focus on agents available in Australia and New Zealand. It highlights the concerns with the use of codeine in children and discusses alternative oral opioids. Key features of oral, parenteral, inhaled and intranasal analgesic agents are discussed, as well as evidence supported use of sweet tasting solutions and non-pharmacological interventions. One of the biggest changes in acute care pain management has been the advent of intranasal fentanyl providing reliable potent analgesia without the need for intravenous access. The article will also address the issue of multimodal analgesia where a single agent is insufficient. PMID:27062626

  4. Musculoskeletal pain syndromes that affect adolescents.

    PubMed

    Szer, I S

    1996-07-01

    Musculoskeletal pain is one of the most common pains of adolescence, along with headache and abdominal pain, and arthralgia is the single most common reason for referral to the pediatric rheumatologist. Not surprisingly, the pediatric rheumatologist is frequently called to distinguish organic from functional symptoms. During the past decade, the pediatric rheumatology community has been evaluating increasing numbers of adolescents and preadolescents who experience musculoskeletal symptoms presumably as a defense against emotional stress from achievement either in academic work or in sports. To complicate the challenge further, coexistent organic and psychologic disturbance is not rare. Clearly, organic illness does not protect a patient from emotional plan, and it may be most difficult to differentiate nonorganic pain in a patient with a known organic illness. Conversely, adolescents with organic illness may use their disease for secondary gain. Fear of misdiagnosis of physical illness as psychiatric and the notion that all of the patient's complaints should be explained by a unifying diagnosis cause diagnostic error in both psychogenic illness with physical manifestations and physical illness with psychogenic symptoms. PMID:8673201

  5. [PECULIARITIES OF TREATMENT VERTEBROGENIC PAIN SYNDROMES].

    PubMed

    Klymenko, O; Belska, I

    2015-01-01

    The results of studying the pathogenetic features of back pain at vertebrogenic of Spine, and disorders of life of patients in relation to it. Application of therapy with the standard treatment and the complex medicine of the vitamins B. PMID:27089720

  6. Carbamazepine for acute and chronic pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Wiffen, Philip J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Carbamazepine is used to treat chronic neuropathic pain. Objectives Evaluation of analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of carbamazepine for acute and chronic pain management (except headaches). Search methods Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of carbamazepine in acute, chronic or cancer pain were identified, searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, SIGLE and Cochrane CENTRAL to June 2010, reference lists of retrieved papers, and reviews. Selection criteria RCTs reporting the analgesic effects of carbamazepine. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted results and scored for quality. Numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNT) or harm (NNH) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated from dichotomous data for effectiveness, adverse effects and adverse event withdrawal. Issues of study quality, size, duration, and outcomes were examined. Main results Fifteen included studies (12 cross-over design; three parallel-group) with 629 participants. Carbamazepine was less effective than prednisolone in preventing postherpetic neuralgia following acute herpes zoster (1 study, 40 participants). No studies examined acute postoperative pain. Fourteen studies investigated chronic neuropathic pain: two lasted eight weeks, others were four weeks or less (mean 3 weeks, median 2 weeks). Five had low reporting quality. Ten involved fewer than 50 participants; mean and median maximum treatment group sizes were 34 and 29. Outcome reporting was inconsistent. Most placebo controlled studies indicated that carbamazepine was better than placebo. Five studies with 298 participants provided dichotomous results; 70% improved with carbamazepine and 12% with placebo. Carbamazepine at any dose, using any definition of improvement was significantly better than placebo (70% versus 12% improved; 5 studies, 298 participants); relative benefit 6.1 (3.9 to 9.7), NNT 1.7 (1.5 to 2.0). Four studies (188 participants) reporting outcomes equivalent to 50% pain reduction or more

  7. Topical NSAIDs for acute pain: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Lorna; Moore, R Andrew; Edwards, Jayne E; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J

    2004-01-01

    Background A previous systematic review reported that topical NSAIDs were effective in relieving pain in acute conditions like sprains and strains, with differences between individual drugs for efficacy. More trials, a better understanding of trial quality and bias, and a reclassification of certain drugs necessitate a new review. Methods Studies were identified by searching electronic databases and writing to manufacturers. We selected randomised double blind trials comparing topical NSAID with either placebo or another active treatment in adults with acute pain, and extracted dichotomous information approximating to a 50% reduction in pain at one week, together with details of adverse events and withdrawals. Relative benefit and number-needed-to-treat (NNT), and relative risk and number-needed-to-harm (NNH) were calculated, with sensitivity analyses where appropriate to investigate differences between individual drugs and aspects of trial design. Results Twenty-six double blind placebo controlled trials had information from 2,853 patients for evaluation of efficacy. Topical NSAID was significantly better than placebo in 19 of the 26 trials, with a pooled relative benefit of 1.6 (95% confidence interval 1.4 to 1.7), and NNT of 3.8 (95% confidence interval 3.4 to 4.4) compared with placebo for the outcome of half pain relief at seven days. Results were not affected by outcome reported, or condition treated, but smaller trials yielded a larger estimate of efficacy. Indirect comparisons of individual topical NSAIDs showed that ketoprofen was significantly better than all other topical NSAIDs, while indomethacin was barely distinguished from placebo. Three trials, with 433 patients, compared topical with oral NSAID (two trials compared the same drug, one compared different drugs) and found no difference in efficacy. Local adverse events, systemic adverse events, or withdrawals due to an adverse event were rare, and no different between topical NSAID and placebo

  8. Acute Abdominal Pain in the Bariatric Surgery Patient.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kyle D; Takenaka, Katrin Y; Luber, Samuel D

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is present in epidemic proportions in the United States, and bariatric surgery has become more common. Thus, emergency physicians will undoubtedly encounter many patients who have undergone one of these procedures. Knowledge of the anatomic changes specific to these procedures aids the clinician in understanding potential complications and devising an organized differential diagnosis. This article reviews common bariatric surgery procedures, their complications, and the approach to acute abdominal pain in these patients. PMID:27133251

  9. Use of Scrambler Therapy in Acute Paediatric Pain: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Spadini, Silvia; De Tommasi, Valentina; Benini, Franca

    2016-01-01

    We report our clinical experience on the effect of Scrambler Therapy (ST) for a child with acute mixed pain refractory to pharmacological treatment. ST, recently proposed as an alternative treatment for chronic neuropathic pain in adults, is a noninvasive approach to relieve pain, by changing pain perception at brain level. It is safe and has no side effects. Further research is needed to assess its efficacy for acute pain and for paediatric population. PMID:26977329

  10. Cardiac computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Nieman, Koen; Hoffmann, Udo

    2015-04-14

    The efficient and reliable evaluation of patients with acute chest pain is one of the most challenging tasks in the emergency department. Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography may play a major role, since it permits ruling out coronary artery disease with high accuracy if performed with expertise in properly selected and prepared patients. Several randomized trials have established early cardiac CT as a viable safe and potentially more efficient alternative to functional testing in the evaluation of acute chest pain. Ongoing investigations explore whether advanced anatomic and functional assessments such as high-risk coronary plaque, resting myocardial perfusion, and left ventricular function, or the simulation of the fractional coronary flow reserve will add information to the anatomic assessment for stenosis, which would allow expanding the benefits of cardiac CT from triage to treatment decisions. Especially, the combination of high-sensitive troponins and coronary computed tomography angiography may play a valuable role in future strategies for the management of patients presenting with acute chest pain. PMID:25687351

  11. Diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in older patients.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Corey; Clark, Dwayne C

    2006-11-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common presenting complaint in older patients. Presentation may differ from that of the younger patient and is often complicated by coexistent disease, delays in presentation, and physical and social barriers. The physical examination can be misleadingly benign, even with catastrophic conditions such as abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture and mesenteric ischemia. Changes that occur in the biliary system because of aging make older patients vulnerable to acute cholecystitis, the most common indication for surgery in this population. In older patients with appendicitis, the initial diagnosis is correct only one half of the time, and there are increased rates of perforation and mortality when compared with younger patients. Medication use, gallstones, and alcohol use increase the risk of pancreatitis, and advanced age is an indicator of poor prognosis for this disease. Diverticulitis is a common cause of abdominal pain in the older patient; in appropriately selected patients, it may be treated on an outpatient basis with oral antibiotics. Small and large bowel obstructions, usually caused by adhesive disease or malignancy, are more common in the aged and often require surgery. Morbidity and mortality among older patients presenting with acute abdominal pain are high, and these patients often require hospitalization with prompt surgical consultation. PMID:17111893

  12. Acute lower motor neuron syndrome and spinal cord gray matter hyperintensities in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael R.; Chad, David A.; Venna, Nagagopal

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe a novel manifestation of lower motor neuron disease in patients with well-controlled HIV infection. Methods: A retrospective study was performed to identify HIV-positive individuals with acute, painful lower motor neuron diseases. Results: Six patients were identified with HIV and lower motor neuron disease. Two patients met the inclusion criteria of well-controlled, chronic HIV infection and an acute, painful, unilateral lower motor neuron paralytic syndrome affecting the distal portion of the upper limb. These patients had segmental T2-hyperintense lesions in the central gray matter of the cervical spinal cord on MRI. One patient stabilized and the second patient improved with immunomodulatory therapy. Conclusions: This newly described syndrome expands the clinical spectrum of lower motor neuron diseases in HIV. PMID:26015990

  13. Impact of d-Dimers on the Differential Diagnosis of Acute Chest Pain: Current Aspects Besides the Widely Known.

    PubMed

    Hahne, Kathrin; Lebiedz, Pia; Breuckmann, Frank

    2014-01-01

    d-dimers are cleavage products of fibrin that occur during plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis of blood clots. In the emergency department, d-dimer measurement represents a valuable and cost-effective tool in the differential diagnosis of acute chest pain including the main life-threatening entities: acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolism, and acute aortic syndrome. Whereas the diagnostic and prognostic values of d-dimer testing in acute coronary syndrome is of less priority, increases of d-dimers are frequently found in venous thromboembolism and acute aortic syndromes, especially acute aortic dissection. As to the high negative predictive value of d-dimer in those disorders, patients with low to intermediate pretest probability may profit in terms of less necessity of further non-invasive or even invasive imaging, simultaneously reducing potential complications and healthcare-related costs. However, because of the low specificity of the different d-dimer tests in contrast to its frequent usage, adequate interpretation is required. Age-related adjustment of d-dimer levels may be used to increase its diagnostic power. PMID:25392700

  14. Impact of d-Dimers on the Differential Diagnosis of Acute Chest Pain: Current Aspects Besides the Widely Known

    PubMed Central

    Hahne, Kathrin; Lebiedz, Pia; Breuckmann, Frank

    2014-01-01

    d-dimers are cleavage products of fibrin that occur during plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis of blood clots. In the emergency department, d-dimer measurement represents a valuable and cost-effective tool in the differential diagnosis of acute chest pain including the main life-threatening entities: acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolism, and acute aortic syndrome. Whereas the diagnostic and prognostic values of d-dimer testing in acute coronary syndrome is of less priority, increases of d-dimers are frequently found in venous thromboembolism and acute aortic syndromes, especially acute aortic dissection. As to the high negative predictive value of d-dimer in those disorders, patients with low to intermediate pretest probability may profit in terms of less necessity of further non-invasive or even invasive imaging, simultaneously reducing potential complications and healthcare-related costs. However, because of the low specificity of the different d-dimer tests in contrast to its frequent usage, adequate interpretation is required. Age-related adjustment of d-dimer levels may be used to increase its diagnostic power. PMID:25392700

  15. Chronic Pain Syndrome Caused by a Bird's Nest Filter: First Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Basheer, Mamoun Ahmad; Hamilton, Mark; Holdaway, Chris

    2008-07-15

    AimTo report the first case of a Bird's Nest IVC filter causing a chronic pain syndrome lasting 13 years through IVC wall penetration and subsequent break off of one of the filter struts.Materials and ResultsA 43-year-old female presented with a 13-year history of abdominal pain following uneventful insertion of a Bird's Nest vena cava filter through a right internal jugular percutanous approach. A year following the procedure, CT scan revealed one arm of the filter to be outside IVC borders. Nine years from the date of insertion the nature of the pain changed acutely following a five feet jump to more localized RUQ pain worse with twisting movements. A CT scan showed the strut to have pierced the IVC wall and penetrated the Unicate process of pancreas. Plain x-rays taken at different times in February 2006 showed one of the struts to be free floating in the peritoneal cavity. The floating strut was removed surgically from the wall of the Ileum. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and the patient was discharged pain free three days later.ConclusionChronic pain is an added complication of BNF devices. Although rare, it further emphasizes the need for long-term follow up of patients with IVC filters.

  16. The Acute to Chronic Pain Transition: Can Chronic Pain Be Prevented?

    PubMed

    Pozek, John-Paul J; Beausang, David; Baratta, Jaime L; Viscusi, Eugene R

    2016-01-01

    Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) is a distressing disease process that can lead to long-term disability, reduced quality of life, and increased health care spending. Although the exact mechanism of development of CPSP is unknown, nerve injury and inflammation may lead to peripheral and central sensitization. Given the complexity of the disease process, no novel treatment has been identified. The preoperative use of multimodal analgesia has been shown to decrease acute postoperative pain, but it has no proven efficacy in preventing development of CPSP. PMID:26614716

  17. Efficacy of dry needling for treatment of myofascial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fogelman, Yacov; Kent, John

    2015-01-01

    Myofascial pain is a major cause of musculoskeletal regional pain. Myofascial pain, which is a high-prevalence but eminently treatable condition, is almost universally underdiagnosed by physicians and undertreated by physical therapy modalities. Large numbers of patients can be left suffering in chronic pain for years. Dry needling, also referred to as Intramuscular Stimulation, is a method in the arsenal of pain management which has been known for almost 200 years in Western medicine, yet has been almost completely ignored. With the increase in research in this field over the past two decades, there are many high-quality studies that demonstrate dry needling to be an effective and safe method for the treatment of myofascial pain when diagnosed and treated by adequately-trained physicians or physical therapists. This article provides an overview of recent literature regarding the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome, evidence for the efficacy of dry needling as a central component of its management, and a glimpse at developments in recent imaging methods to aid in the treatment of these problems. PMID:25322743

  18. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    López, Mario; Martín, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    The acute radiation syndrome (ARS) occurs after whole-body or significant partial-body irradiation (typically at a dose of >1 Gy). ARS can involve the hematopoietic, cutaneous, gastrointestinal and the neurovascular organ systems either individually or in combination. There is a correlation between the severity of clinical signs and symptoms of ARS and radiation dose. Radiation induced multi-organ failure (MOF) describes the progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems over time. Radiation combined injury (RCI) is defined as radiation injury combined with blunt or penetrating trauma, burns, blast, or infection. The classic syndromes are: hematopoietic (doses >2–3 Gy), gastrointestinal (doses 5–12 Gy) and cerebrovascular syndrome (doses 10–20 Gy). There is no possibility to survive after doses >10–12 Gy. The Phases of ARS are—prodromal: 0–2 days from exposure, latent: 2–20 days, and manifest illness: 21–60 days from exposure. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) at a dose of 5 μg/kg body weight per day subcutaneously has been recommended as treatment of neutropenia, and antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal agents for prevention or treatment of infections. If taken within the first hours of contamination, stable iodine in the form of nonradioactive potassium iodide (KI) saturates iodine binding sites within the thyroid and inhibits incorporation of radioiodines into the gland. Finally, if severe aplasia persists under cytokines for more than 14 days, the possibility of a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation should be evaluated. This review will focus on the clinical aspects of the ARS, using the European triage system (METREPOL) to evaluate the severity of radiation injury, and scoring groups of patients for the general and specific management of the syndrome. PMID:24376971

  19. Medical Management of Tumor Lysis Syndrome, Postprocedural Pain, and Venous Thromboembolism Following Interventional Radiology Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzalian, Ali; Armitage, Keith B.; Kapoor, Baljendra; Kalva, Sanjeeva P.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid expansion of minimally invasive image-guided procedures has led to their extensive use in the interdisciplinary management of patients with vascular, hepatobiliary, genitourinary, and oncologic diseases. Given the increased availability and breadth of these procedures, it is important for physicians to be aware of common complications and their management. In this article, the authors describe management of select common complications from interventional radiology procedures including tumor lysis syndrome, acute on chronic postprocedural pain, and venous thromboembolism. These complications are discussed in detail and their medical management is outlined according to generally accepted practice and evidence from the literature. PMID:26038627

  20. Management of pain and fatigue in the joint hypermobility syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type): principles and proposal for a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Celletti, Claudia; Celli, Mauro; Morrone, Aldo; Colombi, Marina; Camerota, Filippo; Grammatico, Paola

    2012-08-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) hypermobility type (EDS-HT), is a underdiagnosed heritable connective tissue disorder characterized by generalized joint hypermobility and a wide range of visceral, pelvic, neurologic, and cognitive dysfunctions. Deterioration of quality of life is mainly associated with pain and fatigue. Except for the recognized effectiveness of physiotherapy for some musculoskeletal features, there are no standardized guidelines for the assessment and treatment of pain and fatigue. In this work, a practical classification of pain presentations and factors contributing in generating painful sensations in JHS/EDS-HT is proposed. Pain can be topographically classified in articular limb (acute/subacute and chronic), muscular limb (myofascial and fibromyalgia), neuropathic limb, back/neck, abdominal and pelvic pain, and headache. For selected forms of pain, specific predisposing characteristics are outlined. Fatigue appears as the result of multiple factors, including muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency, unrefreshing sleep, dysautonomia, intestinal malabsorption, reactive depression/anxiety, and excessive use of analgesics. A set of lifestyle recommendations to instruct patients as well as specific investigations aimed at characterizing pain and fatigue are identified. Available treatment options are discussed in the set of a structured multidisciplinary approach based on reliable outcome tools. PMID:22786715

  1. Computerized tomography of the acute left upper quadrant pain.

    PubMed

    Tirkes, Temel; Ballenger, Zachary; Steenburg, Scott D; Altman, Daniel J; Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen in the emergent setting of left upper quadrant pain. One hundred patients (average age: 45, range: 19-93 years, female: 57 %, male: 43 %) who presented to the emergency department (ED) and underwent CT scanning of abdomen with the given indication of left upper quadrant pain were included in this study. The results from CT examinations were compared to final diagnoses determined by either ED physician or clinician on a follow-up visit. Sensitivity of CT was 69 % (95 %CI: 52-83 %) for 39 patients who eventually were diagnosed with an acute abdominal abnormality. Twenty-seven patients had an acute abnormal finding on abdominal CT that represented the cause of the patient's pain (positive predictive value of 100 %, 95 %CI: 87-100 %). Of the remaining 73 patients with negative CT report, 12 were diagnosed clinically (either in the ED or on follow-up visit to specialist) with a pathology that was undetectable on the CT imaging (negative predictive value of 83 %, 95 %CI: 73-91 %). None of the remaining 61 patients with negative CT were found to have pathology by clinical evaluation (specificity of 100 %, 95 %CI: 94-100 %). CT is a useful examination for patients with acute left upper quadrant pain in the emergency department setting with moderate sensitivity and excellent specificity. PMID:27230731

  2. Endogenous pain inhibition is unrelated to autonomic responses in acute whiplash-associated disorders.

    PubMed

    De Kooning, Margot; Daenen, Liesbeth; Roussel, Nathalie; Cras, Patrick; Buyl, Ronald; Ickmans, Kelly; Struyf, Filip; Nijs, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acute whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) demonstrate an inefficient endogenous pain inhibition and may experience a dysfunction in autonomic nervous system reactivity to pain. This study compared the autonomic response to painful stimuli between patients with acute and chronic WAD and healthy controls. In addition, the role of the autonomic nervous system for explaining inefficient endogenous pain inhibition was examined in acute WAD. Seventeen patients with acute WAD, 30 patients with chronic WAD, and 31 healthy controls participated in an experiment evaluating the autonomic nervous system at rest and during painful stimuli. Skin conductance and heart rate variability (HRV) parameters were monitored continuously during conditioned pain modulation. A significant autonomic response to pain was present for skin conductance and two HRV parameters in all experimental groups. There was an interaction effect in the skin conductance response to pain but not in HRV responses in any of the groups. In patients with acute WAD, no significant correlations were present between pain, pressure pain thresholds, pain inhibition, and any of the autonomic parameters. This study refutes autonomic dysfunction at rest and in response to pain in acute WAD. The dysfunctional conditioned pain modulation appears unrelated to autonomic responses to pain. PMID:26348457

  3. Single dose oral diclofenac for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Philip; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Diclofenac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), available as a potassium salt (immediate-release) or sodium salt (delayed-release). This review updates an earlier review published in The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (Issue 2, 2004) on ‘Single dose oral diclofenac for postoperative pain’. Objectives To assess single dose oral diclofenac for the treatment of acute postoperative pain. Search methods Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Biological Abstracts, the Oxford Pain Relief Database, and reference lists of articles were searched; last search December 2008. Selection criteria Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of single dose, oral diclofenac (sodium or potassium) for acute postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion and quality, and extracted data. The area under the pain relief versus time curve was used to derive the proportion of participants with at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, using validated equations. Relative benefit (risk) and number needed to treat to benefit (NNT) were calculated. Information on adverse events, time to remedication, and participants needing additional analgesia was also collected. Main results Fifteen studies (eight additional studies) with 1512 participants more than doubled the information available at each dose. Overall 50% to 60% of participants experienced at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours at any dose with diclofenac, compared to 10 to 20% with placebo, giving NNTs of about 2.5 for doses of 25 mg to 100 mg (similar to earlier review); no dose response was demonstrated. At 50 mg and 100 mg, NNTs for diclofenac potassium (2.1 (1.8 to 2.4) and 1.9 (1.7 to 2.2)) were significantly lower (better) than for diclofenac sodium (6.7 (4.2 to 17) and 4.5 (3.2 to 7.7)). The median time to use of rescue medication was 2 hours for placebo, 4.3 hours for diclofenac 50 mg and 4.9 hours

  4. Copeptin in acute coronary syndromes and heart failure management: State of the art and future directions.

    PubMed

    Schurtz, Guillaume; Lamblin, Nicolas; Bauters, Christophe; Goldstein, Patrick; Lemesle, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the use of multiple biomarkers has changed cardiovascular disease management. Recently, several trials have assessed the diagnostic and prognostic performances of copeptin, especially in patients with heart failure or acute coronary syndromes. Primary results are interesting, with copeptin looking promising for: the management of patients who present at emergency departments early after chest pain onset and the risk stratification of patients with heart failure. The purpose of this article is to review the data on the place of copeptin in the management of patients with chest pain or heart failure. PMID:26071835

  5. Exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome in a young man, occurring after a short race.

    PubMed

    Basnet, Bibhusan; Matar, Mousa; Vaitilingham, Siddharthan; Chalise, Shyam; Irooegbu, Nkem; Bang, Jane

    2016-04-01

    We describe a case of exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome (ACS) in a 23-year-old man who presented to his primary care physician 48 hours after he attempted to run a 5K race. He noticed searing pain in his left leg after the first half mile but had no other symptoms. He was referred to the emergency department and diagnosed with ACS, and a fasciotomy was done. A presentation of limb pain that is out of proportion to a known or suspected injury should prompt consideration of ACS. Early recognition and surgical management are essential to achieving the best possible outcome. PMID:27034546

  6. Exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome in a young man, occurring after a short race

    PubMed Central

    Matar, Mousa; Vaitilingham, Siddharthan; Chalise, Shyam; Irooegbu, Nkem; Bang, Jane

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome (ACS) in a 23-year-old man who presented to his primary care physician 48 hours after he attempted to run a 5K race. He noticed searing pain in his left leg after the first half mile but had no other symptoms. He was referred to the emergency department and diagnosed with ACS, and a fasciotomy was done. A presentation of limb pain that is out of proportion to a known or suspected injury should prompt consideration of ACS. Early recognition and surgical management are essential to achieving the best possible outcome. PMID:27034546

  7. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  8. Acute Coronary Syndromes in Women: Recent Treatment Trends and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Garth

    2016-01-01

    In the USA and internationally, women experience farranging differences with respect to acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and myocardial infarction (MI). Women suffer from more comorbidities than men, such as smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and poor mental health. They some-times exhibit atypical MI presentation symptoms and are overall less likely to present with chest pain. Women are more likely than men to encounter delays between the onset of symptoms and arrival at the hospital or to guideline treatment. The use of various surgical and pharmacological treatments, including revascularization approaches, also differs. Women, on average, have worse outcomes than men following MI, with more complications, higher mortality rates, and poorer recovery. Internationally, outcomes are similar despite various differences in health care and culture in non-US countries. In this review, we detail differences regarding ACS and MI in women, describing their complex correlations and discussing their possible causes. Educational approaches that are tailored to women might help to reduce the incidence of ACS and MI, as well as outcomes following hospitalization. Although outcomes following acute MI have been improving over the years, women may require special consideration in order to see continued improvement. PMID:26884685

  9. Progress and perspectives in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rotta, Alexandre Tellechea; Piva, Jefferson Pedro; Andreolio, Cinara; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a disease of acute onset characterized by hypoxemia and infiltrates on chest radiographs that affects both adults and children of all ages. It is an important cause of respiratory failure in pediatric intensive care units and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, until recently, the definitions and diagnostic criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome have focused on the adult population. In this article, we review the evolution of the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome over nearly five decades, with a special focus on the new pediatric definition. We also discuss recommendations for the implementation of mechanical ventilation strategies in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and the use of adjuvant therapies. PMID:26331971

  10. Progress and perspectives in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rotta, Alexandre Tellechea; Piva, Jefferson Pedro; Andreolio, Cinara; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a disease of acute onset characterized by hypoxemia and infiltrates on chest radiographs that affects both adults and children of all ages. It is an important cause of respiratory failure in pediatric intensive care units and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, until recently, the definitions and diagnostic criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome have focused on the adult population. In this article, we review the evolution of the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome over nearly five decades, with a special focus on the new pediatric definition. We also discuss recommendations for the implementation of mechanical ventilation strategies in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and the use of adjuvant therapies. PMID:26331971

  11. Novel oral anticoagulants in acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costopoulos, Charis; Niespialowska-Steuden, Maria; Kukreja, Neville; Gorog, Diana A

    2013-09-10

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with a prevalence that has now reached pandemic levels as a consequence of the rapid modernization of the developing world. Its presentation as an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a frequent reason for hospital admission and of profound implications for personal, societal and global health. Despite improvements in the management of ACS with anti-platelet and anticoagulant therapy and revascularization techniques, many patients continue to suffer recurrent ischemic events. The need to reduce future cardiovascular events has led to the development of novel therapies to prevent coronary thrombosis, targeting thrombin-mediated pathways. These include direct Xa inhibitors (apixaban, rivaroxaban and darexaban), direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran) and PAR 1 antagonists (vorapaxar and atopaxar). This article critically reviews the comparative mechanisms of action, the risks and benefits, together with the clinical evidence base for the use of these novel oral agents in the management of ACS patients. PMID:22989603

  12. Increased bladder permeability in interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Wisniewski, Amy B.; VanGordon, Samuel; Lin, HsuehKung; Kropp, Bradley P.; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    The definition of interstitial cystitis (IC) has evolved over the years from being a well-defined entity characterized by diagnostic lesion (Hunner’s ulcer) in the urothelium to a clinical diagnosis by exclusion [painful bladder syndrome (PBS)]. Although the etiology is unknown, a central theme has been an association with increased permeability of the bladder. This article reviews the evidence for increased permeability being important to the symptoms of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) and in treating the disorder. Recent work showing cross-communication among visceral organs is also reviewed to provide a basis for understanding IC/PBS as a systemic disorder of a complex, interconnected system consisting of the bladder, bowel and other organs, nerves, cytokine-responding cells and the nervous system. PMID:26751576

  13. Compassionate Care for Patients With Complex Regional Pain Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Melissa A; Smith, Carolyn E; Pomidor, Michelle A

    2015-08-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a debilitating condition characterized by specific symptoms such as intense pain and loss of function. This syndrome can be so devastating that it affects quality of life. Often, CRPS is misdiagnosed and misunderstood, which can be extremely frustrating for patients. The purpose of the survey in this study was to query actual patients living with CRPS to gain additional knowledge and suggestions to help improve their care. Respondents expressed a variety of emotions when asked about their healthcare experiences, which suggests that healthcare providers need to be better educated about CRPS so they can provide more compassionate care for patients trying to cope with this condition. PMID:26153786

  14. McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome: a rare case report of acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    MOIS, EMIL IOAN; GRAUR, FLORIN; SECHEL, ROXANA; AL-HAJJAR, NADIM

    2016-01-01

    Giant tubular-villous adenoma of the rectum can determine secretory diarrhea, associated with a depleting syndrome of prerenal acute renal failure, hyponatremia, hypokalemia and hypoproteinemia. These symptoms are known as the McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome, and there are about 50 cases reported in literature. We present the case of a 59-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with abdominal pain, prerenal azotemia, and electrolyte disturbances with a background of chronic diarrhea, caused by a giant rectal tumor. Conservative therapy initially improved and normalized renal function, and made surgical resection of the tumor possible. PMID:27152085

  15. Restless legs syndrome and pain disorders: what's in common?

    PubMed

    Goulart, Leonardo Ierardi; Delgado Rodrigues, Raimundo Nonato; Prieto Peres, Mario Fernando

    2014-11-01

    Between 10 % and 30 % of the population report chronic pain. More than half of these also have sleep complaints. From considering these data, it can be inferred there is a significant overlapping between these conditions. Restless Legs Syndrome/Willis-Ekbom Disease (RLS/WED) is characterized by complaints of an "urge to move" frequently associated with dysesthesias. From that perspective, these sensations can also have painful characteristics. By the same token, the presence of comorbid diseases as predicted by a higher prevalence RLS/WED, have many of them with pain as an important complaint. Pain is a multidimensional response involving several levels of expression ranging from somatosensory to emotional. The potential shared mechanisms between RLS/WED and pain may involve sleep deprivation/fragmentation effect, inducing an increase in markers of inflammation and reduction in pain thresholds. These are modulated by several different settings of neurotransmitters with a huge participation of monoaminergic dysfunctional circuits. A thorough comprehension of these mechanisms is of utmost importance for the correct approach and treatment choices. PMID:25249423

  16. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Risaku

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome affects military personnel and civilians following the uncontrolled dispersal of radiation, such as that caused by detonation of nuclear devices and inappropriate medical treatments. Therefore, there is a growing need for medical interventions that facilitate the improved recovery of victims and patients. One promising approach may be cell therapy, which, when appropriately implemented, may facilitate recovery from whole body injuries. This editorial highlights the current knowledge regarding the use of mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the benefits and limitations of which are under investigation. Establishing successful therapies for acute radiation syndrome may require using such a therapeutic approach in addition to conventional approaches. PMID:27182446

  17. Autoimmune etiology of complex regional pain syndrome (M. Sudeck).

    PubMed

    Blaes, F; Schmitz, K; Tschernatsch, M; Kaps, M; Krasenbrink, I; Hempelmann, G; Bräu, M E

    2004-11-01

    Sera of 12 patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) were tested for the occurrence of autoantibodies against nervous system structures. Immunohistochemistry revealed autoantibodies against autonomic nervous system structures in 5 of 12 (41.6%) of the patients. Western blot analysis showed neuronal reactivity in 11 of 12 (91.6%) patients. The authors hypothesize that CRPS can result from an autoimmune process against the sympathetic nervous system. PMID:15534271

  18. Eagle's syndrome - Masquerading as ear pain: Review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Yasmeenahamed, Sahuthullah; Laliytha, Bijay Kumar; Sivaraman, Shivakumar; Ambiga, Pazhani; Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Sudhaa, Mani

    2015-01-01

    The name styloid process (SP) was derived from the Greek word “stylos” meaning a pillar. It is a bony, cylindrical, needle-shaped projection, which originates from the posterior-inferior side of the petrous bone, immediately in front of the stylomastoid foramen, and goes obliquely down and forward. When elongated leads to pain and discomfort called Eagle's syndrome. Elongated SP accounts approximately to 4–7% of the population, 4% only are symptomatic. PMID:26538879

  19. Complex regional pain syndrome after thromboendarterectomy: which type is it?

    PubMed

    Baillet, Georges; Planchon, Claude Alain; Tamgac, Feyzi; Thomassin, Martine; Foult, Jean-Marc

    2002-09-01

    The authors describe a complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and discuss its type according to the presence or absence of nerve injury. A patient underwent thromboendarterectomy of the right popliteal artery. Subsequently, right lower limb reflex sympathetic dystrophy developed, which was confirmed by scintigraphy and responded well to calcitonin treatment. Typing according to the new classification of CRPS type I or II with possible nerve injury is discussed, and a short review of the literature is included. PMID:12192276

  20. Acute abdominal and pelvic pain in pregnancy: ESUR recommendations.

    PubMed

    Masselli, Gabriele; Derchi, Lorenzo; McHugo, Josephine; Rockall, Andrea; Vock, Peter; Weston, Michael; Spencer, John

    2013-12-01

    Acute abdominal pain in pregnancy presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Standard imaging techniques need to be adapted to reduce harm to the fetus from X-rays due to their teratogenic and carcinogenic potential. Ultrasound remains the primary imaging investigation of the pregnant abdomen. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be useful in the diagnosis of gynaecological and obstetric problems during pregnancy and in the setting of acute abdomen during pregnancy. MRI overcomes some of the limitations of ultrasound, mainly the size of the gravid uterus. MRI poses theoretical risks to the fetus and care must be taken to minimise these with the avoidance of contrast agents. This article reviews the evolving imaging and clinical literature on appropriate investigation of acute abdominal and pelvic pain during established intrauterine pregnancy, addressing its common causes. Guidelines based on the current literature and on the accumulated clinico-radiological experience of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) working group are proposed for imaging these suspected conditions. PMID:23990045

  1. A Rare Case of Parkinson's Disease with Severe Neck Pain Owing to Crowned Dens Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Teruyuki; Tamura, Masato; Osabe, Keiichi; Tamiya, Takashi; Miki, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Mai; Akira, Kanno; Kamei, Satoshi; Takasu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is regarded as one of the most common nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). In particular, musculoskeletal pain has been reported as the most common type of PD-associated pain. Crowned dens syndrome (CDS), related to microcrystalline deposition in the periodontoid process, is the main cause of acute or chronic cervical pain. Case Presentation This report describes the case of an 87-year-old woman who had severe bradykinesia, muscle rigidity, gait disturbance and neck pain. Laboratory examination revealed marked elevations of white blood cells (10,100/µl) and C-reactive protein (CRP; 8.63 mg/dl). She was primarily diagnosed with severe and untreated PD, corresponding to Hoehn and Yahr scale score IV, with musculoskeletal pain and urinary tract infection. The patient was treated with antiparkinsonism drugs, antibiotic agents and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but they had only limited effects. Cervical plain computed tomography (CT) scanning detected remarkable crown-like calcification surrounding the odontoid process. Based on CT findings, the patient was diagnosed as having CDS with PD, and was immediately treated with corticosteroid. The severe neck rigidity with pain and the serum CRP level (0.83 mg/dl) of the patient were drastically improved within a week by the additional corticosteroid therapy. Conclusion Severe neck rigidity and bradykinesia in this patient might have strengthened the chondrocalcinosis around the odontoid process. Cervical plain CT scan is necessary and useful for the definitive diagnosis of CDS. CDS should be considered as a differential diagnosis of a possible etiology for musculoskeletal pain related to rigidity and bradykinesia in PD. PMID:24926265

  2. Heart rate analysis by sparse representation for acute pain detection.

    PubMed

    Tejman-Yarden, Shai; Levi, Ofer; Beizerov, Alex; Parmet, Yisrael; Nguyen, Tu; Saunders, Michael; Rudich, Zvia; Perry, James C; Baker, Dewleen G; Moeller-Bertram, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Objective pain assessment methods pose an advantage over the currently used subjective pain rating tools. Advanced signal processing methodologies, including the wavelet transform (WT) and the orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm (OMP), were developed in the past two decades. The aim of this study was to apply and compare these time-specific methods to heart rate samples of healthy subjects for acute pain detection. Fifteen adult volunteers participated in a study conducted in the pain clinic at a single center. Each subject's heart rate was sampled for 5-min baseline, followed by a cold pressor test (CPT). Analysis was done by the WT and the OMP algorithm with a Fourier/Wavelet dictionary separately. Data from 11 subjects were analyzed. Compared to baseline, The WT analysis showed a significant coefficients' density increase during the pain incline period (p < 0.01) and the entire CPT (p < 0.01), with significantly higher coefficient amplitudes. The OMP analysis showed a significant wavelet coefficients' density increase during pain incline and decline periods (p < 0.01, p < 0.05) and the entire CPT (p < 0.001), with suggestive higher amplitudes. Comparison of both methods showed that during the baseline there was a significant reduction in wavelet coefficient density using the OMP algorithm (p < 0.001). Analysis by the two-way ANOVA with repeated measures showed a significant proportional increase in wavelet coefficients during the incline period and the entire CPT using the OMP algorithm (p < 0.01). Both methods provided accurate and non-delayed detection of pain events. Statistical analysis proved the OMP to be by far more specific allowing the Fourier coefficients to represent the signal's basic harmonics and the wavelet coefficients to focus on the time-specific painful event. This is an initial study using OMP for pain detection; further studies need to prove the efficiency of this system in different settings. PMID:26264057

  3. Efficacy of disintegrating aspirin in two different models for acute mild-to-moderate pain: sore throat pain and dental pain.

    PubMed

    Voelker, M; Schachtel, B P; Cooper, S A; Gatoulis, S C

    2016-02-01

    A recently developed fast-release aspirin tablet formulation has been evaluated in two different pain models. The dental impaction pain model and the sore throat pain model are widely used for assessing analgesia, including acute mild-to-moderate pain. Both studies were double-blind, randomized, parallel group and compared a single dose of 1000 mg aspirin with 1000 mg paracetamol and with placebo and investigated the onset and overall time course of pain relief. Speed of onset was measured by the double-stopwatch method for time to meaningful pain relief and time to first perceptible pain relief. Pain intensity and pain relief were rated subjectively over a 6-h (dental pain) and 2-h (sore throat pain) time period. In both models fast-release aspirin and commercial paracetamol were statistically significantly different from placebo for onset of action, summed pain intensity differences and total pain relief. Meaningful pain relief was achieved within a median of 42.3 and 42.9 min for aspirin and paracetamol, respectively, in the dental pain model. The corresponding numbers in sore throat pain were 48.0 and 40.4 min. All treatments in both studies were safe and well tolerated. No serious adverse events were reported and no subject was discontinued due to an adverse event. Overall the two studies clearly demonstrated efficacy over placebo in the two pain models and a comparable efficacy and safety profile between aspirin and an equivalent dose of paracetamol under the conditions of acute dental pain and acute sore throat pain. Trial registration These trials were registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, registration number: NCT01420094, registration date: July 27, 2011 and registration number: NCT01453400, registration date: October 13, 2011. PMID:26603742

  4. Does temporomandibular disorder pain dysfunction syndrome affect dietary intake?

    PubMed

    Irving, J; Wood, G D; Hackett, A F

    1999-11-01

    Temporomandibular disorder pain dysfunction syndrome (TDPDS) is the most common cause of facial pain after toothache. The symptoms are varied but are likely to affect the choice, intake and enjoyment of food. This has not been previously investigated. In this paper a preliminary study of 35 patients attending a department of oral and maxillofacial surgery at a general hospital is presented. Thirty-one subjects reported that eating was a problem; 15 prepared food differently and 24 considered that their choice of food was limited. Four of the five foods most often reported to be difficult to eat are valuable in the diet: meat (22), apples (20), bread (13), toast (7) and toffees (6). Twenty-three subjects reported eating a softer diet. Most (25) reported pain when eating. Such circumstances make it harder for TDPDS sufferers to meet current nutritional guidelines, especially, perhaps, for some to achieve an adequate intake of iron. PMID:10765783

  5. Innovative Program Targets Five Common Pain Syndromes With Non-opioid Alternatives.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    To combat the prescription opioid problem, St. Joseph's Healthcare System in Paterson, NJ, has developed a new program that gives providers options they can use to effectively alleviate pain without resorting to highly addictive medication. Launched in January 2016 in the ED at St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center (SJRMC), the Alternatives to Opioids (ALTO) program utilizes protocols that primarily target five common conditions: renal colic, sciatica, headaches, musculoskeletal pain, and extremity fractures. Administrators say they have successfully treated more than 300 patients under the new program, and they see ALTO as a model other hospitals can duplicate. Among the alternative therapies called for in the ALTO program are trigger point injections, nitrous oxide, and ultrasound-guided nerve blocks. ALTO medications are specifically chosen because of how they affect the pain receptor sites for each different pain syndrome. While the primary goal of the program is to use alternatives to opioids when-ever possible, another important underlying goal is to stop acute pain from becoming chronic. While ALTO therapies typically take a bit longer to deliver than prescribing opioids, administrators note that this has not adversely affected patient flow in the ED. PMID:27295817

  6. Gender inequality in acute coronary syndrome patients at Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Mirghani, Hyder O.; Elnour, Mohammed A.; Taha, Akasha M.; Elbadawi, Abdulateef S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gender differences among patients with the acute coronary syndrome is still being debated, no research has been done on gender inequality among coronary syndrome patients in Sudan. Objectives: To study gender differences in presentation, management, and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome in Sudan. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive longitudinal study was conducted in Omdurman Teaching Hospital between July 2014 and August 2015. Patients were invited to sign a written informed consent form, were interviewed and examined by a physician, and then followed during their hospital stay. Information collected includes coronary risk factors, vital signs, echocardiography findings, arrhythmias, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, and death. The Ethical Committee of Omdurman Teaching Hospital approved the research. Results: A total of 197 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients were included, 43.1% were females. A significant statistical difference was evident between males and females regarding the type of acute coronary syndrome, its presentation, and time of presentation to the hospital, smoking, and receipt of thrombolysis (P < 0.05). No differences were found with regard to age, hypertension, diabetes, family history of myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, and in-hospital acute coronary complications (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Women were less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy, present with chest pain, and diagnosed with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. No gender differences were found in acute coronary syndrome risk factors apart from smoking, which was more common in males, and there were no differences between males and females as regards in-hospital complications. PMID:27186156

  7. Varicella Zoster Infection: A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain Mimicking Acute Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Olmez, Deniz; Boz, Alper; Erkan, Nazif

    2009-01-01

    Varicella zoster is an acute viral infection that results from reactivation of a latent varicella zoster virus. It usually occurs in adult population and immune compromised patients. It rarely occurs in healthy children. Here we present a 14 years old male with varicella zoster that had abdominal pain mimicking acute abdomen to alert others who are consulted for the differentiation of acute abdomen and others who may be consulted for pain management. Keywords Varicella zoster; Abdominal pain PMID:22461879

  8. An 86-year-old man with acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Paul M E L; Posthouwer, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    An 86-year-old man presented with severe pain in the upper abdomen along with fever. On physical examination, we found an arterial blood pressure of 84/43 mm Hg, a heart rate of 80 bpm and a temperature of 38.3°C. The abdomen was painful and peristalsis was absent. Empiric antibiotic therapy for sepsis was started with amoxicillin/clavulanate and gentamicin. CT scan of the abdomen revealed an emphysematous cholecystitis. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystostomy was applied. Bile cultures revealed Clostridium perfringens. Emphysematous cholecystitis is a life-threatening form of acute cholecystitis that occurs as a consequence of ischaemic injury to the gallbladder, followed by translocation of gas-forming bacteria (ie, C. perfringens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella and Streptococci). The mortality associated with emphysematous cholecystitis is higher than in non-emphysematous cholecystitis (15% vs 4%). Therefore, early diagnosis with radiological imaging is of vital importance. PMID:26869625

  9. Hypnosis for Acute Procedural Pain: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, Cassie; Sliwinski, Jim; Yu, Yimin; Johnson, Aimee; Fisher, William; Kekecs, Zoltán; Elkins, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Clinical evidence for the effectiveness of hypnosis in the treatment of acute procedural pain was critically evaluated based on reports from randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs). Results from the 29 RCTs meeting inclusion criteria suggest that hypnosis decreases pain compared to standard care and attention control groups and that it is at least as effective as comparable adjunct psychological or behavioral therapies. In addition, applying hypnosis in multiple sessions prior to the day of the procedure produced the highest percentage of significant results. Hypnosis was most effective in minor surgical procedures. However, interpretations are limited by considerable risk of bias. Further studies using minimally effective control conditions and systematic control of intervention dose and timing are required to strengthen conclusions. PMID:26599994

  10. A surprising cause of acute right upper quadrant pain

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, Rodger Scott; Greenwood, Robert; Laczek, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    A 42 year-old African-American woman was admitted for severe acute right upper quadrant pain. Her liver function tests showed a cholestatic pattern of hepatitis. She had no known history of liver disease or sarcoidosis. Imaging of her liver and biliary tree did not reveal any apparent cause for her right upper quadrant pain. A liver biopsy was performed which showed granulomatous disease. This prompted a CT chest that showed mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of the mediastinal lymphnode revealed non-caseating granulomas. Despite having no pulmonary symptoms or history of pulmonary sarcoidosis, she was diagnosed with systemic pulmonary sarcoidosis. She was treated with corticosteroids and had complete resolution of symptoms over the next several weeks. PMID:25103316

  11. Diagnostic peritoneal lavage in evaluating acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Barbee, C L; Gilsdorf, R B

    1975-06-01

    A study was performed to determine the value of peritoneal lavage in the acute abdomen not related to trauma. Lavage was performed in 33 patients in the evaluation of abdominal pain of sufficient degree to warrant consideration for surgical intervention. Peritoneal lavage was truly positive or truly negative in 64% of the cases. It showed false negative results in 28% and false positive results in 8%. The lavage was most accurate in the evaluation of appendicitis, colonic disease, and intra abdominal bleeding. It was highly inaccurate in the evaluation of cholecystitis and peptic ulcer disease. It was concluded that the peritoneal lavage can be a useful adjunct in the evaluation of patients with abdominal pain and should be considered in difficult diagnostic problems but not routinely employed. PMID:1138636

  12. An Audit of Changes in Outcomes of Acute Pain Service

    PubMed Central

    Low, Sheng Jia; Wong, Stanley Sau Ching; Qiu, Qiu; Lee, Yvonne; Chan, Timmy Chi Wing; Irwin, Michael G.; Cheung, Chi Wai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute pain services (APS) have evolved over time. Strategies nowadays emphasize multimodal analgesic regimes using a combination of nonopioid adjuvant analgesic drugs, peripheral nerve blocks, and local anaesthetic wound infiltration where appropriate. APS should be assessed over time to evaluate changes in outcomes which form the basis for future development. In this audit, data of patients under APS care in Queen Mary hospital, Hong Kong, between 2009 and 2012 were analyzed and compared with data from a previous audit between 1992 and 1995. The use of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) was increased (from 69.3% to 86.5%, P < 0.001), while the use of epidural analgesia reduced (from 25.3% to 8.3%, P < 0.001) significantly. Although postoperative pain scores did not improve, PCA opioid consumption and the incidence of analgesia-related side effects were significantly less (all P < 0.001). More patients graded their postoperative analgesic techniques used as good when the results from these 2 audit periods were compared (P < 0.001 and P = 0.001 for PCA and epidural analgesia, respectively). In conclusion, there has been a change in analgesic management techniques, but there has been no improvement in overall pain relief. While changes over time have led to improvement in important parameters such as the incidence of side effects and patient satisfaction, further and continuous efforts and improvements are warrant to reduce acute pain relief and suffering of the patients after the surgery. PMID:26448012

  13. Efficacy of hepatobiliary imaging in acute abdominal pain: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, J.E.; Fink-Bennett, D.M.; Thrall, J.H.; Resinger, W.W.; Calderon, H.C.; Mirkes, S.H.; Shah, P.K.

    1980-10-01

    To assess prospectively the usefulness of hepatobiliary imaging in acute abdominal pain (72 hr or less), 36 patients were scintigraphed. Before the procedure, the referring physician completed Part I of a questionnaire indicating his differential diagnosis, diagnostic confidence (expressed as a percentage), and therapeutic plan. Immediately after the test, the same physician with knowledge of the results, completed Part II of the questionnaire indicating again his differential diagnosis, diagnostic confidence, and therapeutic plan. The impact of the imaging on the physician's diagnostic confidence was expressed as a log-likelihood-ratio (LLR).

  14. Acute Painful Ptosis Secondary to IgG4 Dacryoadenitis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rumana; El-Khyat, Abdul; Berry-Brincat, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old lorry driver presented with 3 weeks of blurred vision, pain and diplopia. There was a right upper lid ptosis with some restriction of eye movements. A CT revealed an enlarged lacrimal gland and lacrimal gland biopsy showed IgG4-positive plasma cells. The patient responded to oral prednisolone and fully recovered. As a condition which mimics a number of diseases, an IgG4-related disease presents a diagnostic challenge and ought to be considered in both acute and chronic presentations. PMID:27293410

  15. [Caffeine as adjuvant analgeticum for treating acute pain].

    PubMed

    Nikolajsen, Lone; Haroutiunian, Simon

    2013-10-14

    Based on 19 studies (7,238 participants) a Cochrane review concludes that the addition of caffeine to an analgesic drug provides superior analgesia compared with the analgesic drug alone. The benefit is small, with a number needed to treat of approx. 16. The use of analgesics containing caffeine is associated with an increased risk of the development of physical dependence, overuse headache, and withdrawal symptoms upon abrupt discontinuation. Combination analgesics with caffeine should only be used temporarily and exclusively for the treatment of acute pain conditions. PMID:24629115

  16. Uncommon Causes of Acute Abdominal Pain – A Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, Mahesh; Balasubramaniam, Rajan; Shetty, Sharath Kumar; Yadavalli, Shanthala; Ahetasham, Mohammed; Devarapalli, Sravya

    2016-01-01

    Acute abdomen is one of the most common clinical conditions requiring a radiological investigation. Ultrasound is the primary modality of choice which can diagnose some of the common causes of acute abdomen. However, sometimes the underlying cause for the pain is far more complicated than expected mandating a high degree of suspicion to suggest further investigation with contrast enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Here, we have compiled a comprehensive series of selected cases to highlight the conditions which can be easily overlooked unless carefully sought for. This article also emphasizes the importance of multimodality approach to arrive at the final diagnosis with an increased overall diagnostic accuracy which in turn improves patient management and prognosis. PMID:27014500

  17. [Meloxicam-induced colitis revealed by acute abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Seddik, H; Rabhi, M

    2013-03-01

    Whether intestinal toxicity of preferential or selective COX-2 inhibitors is reduced compared with that of standard NSAIDs is controversial. A 26-year-old woman presented with acute abdominal pain and bloody diarrhoea a few days after beginning meloxicam treatment. Endoscopic examination of the colon showed erythematous and ulcerative lesions involving 15 cm of the left colon. No aetiology has been found for colitis. Diarrhea disappeared 1 week after meloxicam was stopped. Total colonoscopy 3 months and 2 years later was normal. The role of meloxicam in the etiology of colitis was considered plausible. This report and a few other cases in the literature suggest that cyclooxygenase-2 selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug inhibitor toxicity should be investigated in case of unexplained acute colitis. PMID:23537413

  18. Brain Functional and Anatomical Changes in Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Melissa A.; Chanda, Mona L.; Parks, Elle L.; Baliki, Marwan N.; Apkarian, A. Vania; Schaeffer, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Research into the pathophysiology of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome has primarily focused on markers of peripheral dysfunction. We present the first neuroimaging investigation to our knowledge to characterize brain function and anatomy in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Materials and Methods We collected data from 19 male patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and 16 healthy age and gender matched controls. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were obtained from 14 patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome as they rated spontaneous pain inside the scanner. Group differences (16 patients per group) in gray matter total volume and regional density were evaluated using voxel-based morphometry, and white matter integrity was studied with diffusion tensor imaging to measure fractional anisotropy. Functional and anatomical imaging outcomes were correlated with the clinical characteristics of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Results Spontaneous pelvic pain was uniquely characterized by functional activation within the right anterior insula, which correlated with clinical pain intensity. No group differences were found in regional gray matter volume, yet density of gray matter in pain relevant regions (anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortices) positively correlated with pain intensity and extent of pain chronicity. Moreover the correlation between white matter anisotropy and neo-cortical gray matter volume was disrupted in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Conclusions We provide novel evidence that the pain of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is associated with a chronic pelvic pain syndrome specific pattern of functional brain activation and brain anatomical reorganization. These findings necessitate further investigations into the role of central mechanisms in the initiation and maintenance of chronic prostatitis

  19. [The nutrition of acute phase in patients with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Rie; Sebe, Mayu

    2016-03-01

    In this session, we describe the acute phase in patients with metabolic syndrome from two sides; acute disease that occurs higher in patients with metabolic syndrome such as colonary heart disease and stroke, and acute aggravation of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome. The electrolyte imbalance is frequently detected in critical ill patients. It is reported that the extreme abnormalities of ionized calcium concentrations are independent predictors of mortality. In addition, from clinical database MIMIC-Ⅱ,calcium supplementation improves clinical outcome in intensive care unit patients. Although metabolic syndrome; lifestyle-related disease, is a chronic disease, the possibility of falling into acute disease by having it becomes very high and improvement of electrolyte imbalance, especially hypocalcaemia is expected to effective on clinical outcome. PMID:26923986

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of acute extremity compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    von Keudell, Arvind G; Weaver, Michael J; Appleton, Paul T; Appelton, Paul T; Bae, Donald S; Dyer, George S M; Heng, Marilyn; Jupiter, Jesse B; Vrahas, Mark S

    2015-09-26

    Acute compartment syndrome of the extremities is well known, but diagnosis can be challenging. Ineffective treatment can have devastating consequences, such as permanent dysaesthesia, ischaemic contractures, muscle dysfunction, loss of limb, and even loss of life. Despite many studies, there is no consensus about the way in which acute extremity compartment syndromes should be diagnosed. Many surgeons suggest continuous monitoring of intracompartmental pressure for all patients who have high-risk extremity injuries, whereas others suggest aggressive surgical intervention if acute compartment syndrome is even suspected. Although surgical fasciotomy might reduce intracompartmental pressure, this procedure also carries the risk of long-term complications. In this paper in The Lancet Series about emergency surgery we summarise the available data on acute extremity compartment syndrome of the upper and lower extremities in adults and children, discuss the underlying pathophysiology, and propose a clinical guideline based on the available data. PMID:26460664

  1. Associates of Physical Function and Pain in Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Piva, Sara R.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Irrgang, James J.; Fritz, Julie M.; Wisniewski, Stephen; McGinty, Gerald T.; Childs, John D.; Domenech, Manuel A.; Jones, Scott; Delitto, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore whether impairment of muscle strength, soft tissue length, movement control, postural and biomechanic alterations, and psychologic factors are associated with physical function and pain in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Rehabilitation outpatient. Participants Seventy-four patients diagnosed with PFPS. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Measurements were self-reported function and pain; strength of quadriceps, hip abduction, and hip external rotation; length of hamstrings, quadriceps, plantar flexors, iliotibial band/tensor fasciae latae complex, and lateral retinaculum; foot pronation; Q-angle; tibial torsion; visual observation of quality of movement during a lateral step-down task; anxiety; and fear-avoidance beliefs. Results After controlling for age and sex, anxiety and fear-avoidance beliefs about work and physical activity were associated with function, while only fear-avoidance beliefs about work and physical activity were associated with pain. Conclusions Psychologic factors were the only associates of function and pain in patients with PFPS. Factors related to physical impairments did not associate to function or pain. Our results should be validated in other samples of patients with PFPS. Further studies should determine the role of other psychologic factors, and how they relate to anxiety and fear-avoidance beliefs in these patients. PMID:19236982

  2. Four treatment strategies for complex regional pain syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ki; Yang, Dae Suk; Lee, Jae Won; Choy, Won Sik

    2012-06-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) poses a dilemma for many clinicians due to its unknown etiology and largely unsuccessful treatment modalities. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical results of 4 treatment modalities for CRPS type 1. A total of 59 patients were divided into 4 groups based on treatment modality: group A, an oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) (n=10); group B, oral gabapentin (n=12); group C, intravenous (IV) 10% mannitol and steroid (n=11); group D, a combination of IV 20% mannitol and steroid with oral gabapentin (n=26). The patients remained under medical supervision after discharge and were evaluated either once a month or once every 2 months until final follow-up at a mean of 8 months. Patients in group A showed improvement in pain level, finger range of motion, swelling, and grip strength, without statistical significance (P=.076, P=.062, P=.312, and P=.804, respectively). Patients in group B showed significant improvement in pain level (P<.001), and patients in group C showed improvement in pain, finger range of motion, and swelling (P=.127), which rendered functional impairment unchanged. In comparison, patients in group D showed recovery of grip strength and improvement in pain level, finger range of motion, and (P<.001, P=.016, P=.031, and P=.047, respectively). Based on these results, a protocol including a combination of IV 20% mannitol and steroid with oral gabapentin is an acceptable and effective treatment for CRPS type 1. PMID:22691654

  3. Pain and pressure pain thresholds in adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome and healthy controls: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Winger, Anette; Kvarstein, Gunnvald; Wyller, Vegard Bruun; Sulheim, Dag; Fagermoen, Even; Småstuen, Milada Cvancarova; Helseth, Sølvi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Although pain is a significant symptom in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), pain is poorly understood in adolescents with CFS. The aim of this study was to explore pain distribution and prevalence, pain intensity and its functional interference in everyday life, as well as pressure pain thresholds (PPT) in adolescents with CFS and compare this with a control group of healthy adolescents (HC). Methods This is a case–control, cross-sectional study on pain including 120 adolescents with CFS and 39 HCs, aged 12–18 years. We measured pain frequency, pain severity and pain interference using self-reporting questionnaires. PPT was measured using pressure algometry. Data were collected from March 2010 until October 2012 as part of the Norwegian Study of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Adolescents: Pathophysiology and Intervention Trial. Results Adolescents with CFS had significantly lower PPTs compared with HCs (p<0.001). The Pain Severity Score and the Pain Interference Score were significantly higher in adolescents with CFS compared with HCs (p<0.001). Almost all adolescents with CFS experienced headache, abdominal pain and/or pain in muscles and joints. Moreover, in all sites, the pain intensity levels were significantly higher than in HCs (p<0.001). Conclusions We found a higher prevalence of severe pain among adolescents with CFS and lowered pain thresholds compared with HCs. The mechanisms, however, are still obscure. Large longitudinal population surveys are warranted measuring pain thresholds prior to the onset of CFS. Trial registration number Clinical Trials, NCT01040429; The Norwegian Study of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Adolescents: Pathophysiology and Intervention Trial (NorCAPITAL) http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. PMID:25287104

  4. [Septic shock Fusobacterium necrophorum from origin gynecological at complicated an acute respiratory distress syndrome: a variant of Lemierre's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Huynh-Moynot, Sophie; Commandeur, Diane; Danguy des Déserts, Marc; Drouillard, Isabelle; Leguen, Patrick; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a female patient of 47 years old who presents in a state of septic shock with acute insufficient respiratory complicated with syndrome of acute respiratory distress, together with a list of abdominal pain and polyarthralgia too. In her case of medical history, it is retained that she has had a intra-uterine device since 6 years without medical follow up. The initial thoraco-abdomino-pelvic scan shows a left ovarian vein thrombosis, as well as the opaqueness alveolus diffused interstitiel bilaterally and an aspect of ileitis. The IUD is taken off because of sudden occuring of purulent leucorrhoea. This results in a clinical and paraclinical improvement, whereas aminopenicillin was administered to the patient since 1 week. The microbiological blood test allows to put in evidence Fusobacterium necrophorum found in a blood culture and is sensitive to the amoxicilline-acide clavulanique and metronidazole. Isolation of this bacteria, classically found in Lemierre's syndrome, allowed to explain the multilfocalization of the symtoms and the list of pain. The whole concerns about a variant of Lemierre's syndrom: a state of septic shock secondary then caused by the anaerobic Gram negative bacilli, which is a commensal bacteria of the female genital tractus, complicated of septic emboli typical. PMID:21464014

  5. Lumbopelvic manipulation in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Michael S; Wofford, Nancy H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: A recent clinical prediction rule (CPR) identified characteristics that may predict an immediate reduction in pain following lumbopelvic manipulation in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. The purpose of this single-arm cohort study was to replicate the proposed CPR in a different population and investigate changes in self-reported pain, hip range of motion, strength, and function immediately following lumbopelvic manipulation. Methods: Forty-four subjects (63·6% female; mean age 27·4 years) met inclusion criteria. Hip internal rotation range of motion, lower extremity strength using a handheld dynamometer, and single/triple hop tests were assessed prior to and immediately following a spinal manipulation. A global rating of change questionnaire was administered after testing and telephonically at 1 week. Paired t-tests compared pre- and post-manipulation range of motion, strength, and hop test limb symmetry indices (α = 0·05). Results: Fifty-seven percent of subjects had a successful outcome measured by the numerical pain rating scale immediately following manipulation. Twenty-five of subjects experienced a successful outcome as measured by the global rating of change questionnaire at 1 week. No single individual or combination of predictor variables predicted a positive outcome immediately following the lumbopelvic manipulation (+likelihood ratio 0·7 with three of five predictor variables present). Statistically significant differences (P<0·05) were found in hip extension and abduction strength and hip internal rotation symmetry post-manipulation, but do not appear to be clinically meaningful. Discussion: The previously identified CPR was not able to be replicated and no clinically meaningful changes in range of motion, strength, or function were apparent. Future research should focus on a comprehensive impairment-based treatment approach in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:23904749

  6. [Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS)].

    PubMed

    Scheiner, David A; Perucchini, Daniele; Fink, Daniel; Betschart, Cornelia

    2015-08-19

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (BPS) is still an etiologically poorly understood chronic pain syndrome. BPS is a clinical diagnosis. The current treatment modalities are aimed at symptom relief because no cure is possible. Analgesics may be used at any point in treatment but preferably for short-term relief for flares or bladder pain. AUA has issued clinical practice guidelines with a stepwise approach. The first-line therapy begins with self-care and behavior modification. Physical therapy and oral medications such as amitriptyline, PPS, or antihistamines belong to the second-line therapy. Third-line therapy requires cystoscopy and hydrodistension, treatment of Hunner lesions, or intravesical use of e.g. DMSO. Neuromodulation is considered a fourth-line therapy in patients who have failed third-line treatments. Fifth-line therapies consist of intravesical injection of BoNT or oral cyclosporin A. Cystectomy is the sixth-line therapy and the treatment of last resort. PMID:26286495

  7. Sublingual Sufentanil: A Review in Acute Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E

    2016-04-01

    The sufentanil sublingual tablet system (SSTS; Zalviso(®)) is a novel patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) device intended to overcome some of the drawbacks of opioid-based intravenous PCA (IV-PCA). Based on the results of three phase III studies, the SSTS has been approved in the EU for the management of acute moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults in a hospital setting. In a head-to-head comparison with morphine, the gold standard for opioid-based IV-PCA, the SSTS was associated with a more rapid onset of analgesia and higher rates of success, based on patient and healthcare professional global assessments of the method of pain control. Patients and healthcare professionals also rated the SSTS as being easier to use and expressed a greater level of overall satisfaction with this device. The SSTS was generally well tolerated, with an adverse event profile typical of that of other opioids and generally similar to that of placebo. By virtue of its preprogrammed, noninvasive design, the SSTS avoids the risk of pump programming errors and other complications (e.g. infections and analgesic gaps) that can occur with IV-PCA technology; it also imposes less restriction on postoperative mobility. As such, the SSTS provides an effective alternative to opioid-based IV-PCA for the management of acute moderate to severe postoperative pain. Future studies should ideally focus on evaluating the relative cost effectiveness of the SSTS and comparing it with other available needle-free PCA modalities. PMID:27067596

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Casazza, Brian A

    2012-02-15

    Acute low back pain is one of the most common reasons for adults to see a family physician. Although most patients recover quickly with minimal treatment, proper evaluation is imperative to identify rare cases of serious underlying pathology. Certain red flags should prompt aggressive treatment or referral to a spine specialist, whereas others are less concerning. Serious red flags include significant trauma related to age (i.e., injury related to a fall from a height or motor vehicle crash in a young patient, or from a minor fall or heavy lifting in a patient with osteoporosis or possible osteoporosis), major or progressive motor or sensory deficit, new-onset bowel or bladder incontinence or urinary retention, loss of anal sphincter tone, saddle anesthesia, history of cancer metastatic to bone, and suspected spinal infection. Without clinical signs of serious pathology, diagnostic imaging and laboratory testing often are not required. Although there are numerous treatments for nonspecific acute low back pain, most have little evidence of benefit. Patient education and medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and muscle relaxants are beneficial. Bed rest should be avoided if possible. Exercises directed by a physical therapist, such as the McKenzie method and spine stabilization exercises, may decrease recurrent pain and need for health care services. Spinal manipulation and chiropractic techniques are no more effective than established medical treatments, and adding them to established treatments does not improve outcomes. No substantial benefit has been shown with oral steroids, acupuncture, massage, traction, lumbar supports, or regular exercise programs. PMID:22335313

  9. Does weather affect daily pain intensity levels in patients with acute low back pain? A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Duong, Vicky; Maher, Chris G; Steffens, Daniel; Li, Qiang; Hancock, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of various weather parameters on pain intensity levels in patients with acute low back pain (LBP). We performed a secondary analysis using data from the PACE trial that evaluated paracetamol (acetaminophen) in the treatment of acute LBP. Data on 1604 patients with LBP were included in the analysis. Weather parameters (precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, and air pressure) were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Pain intensity was assessed daily on a 0-10 numerical pain rating scale over a 2-week period. A generalised estimating equation analysis was used to examine the relationship between daily pain intensity levels and weather in three different time epochs (current day, previous day, and change between previous and current days). A second model was adjusted for important back pain prognostic factors. The analysis did not show any association between weather and pain intensity levels in patients with acute LBP in each of the time epochs. There was no change in strength of association after the model was adjusted for prognostic factors. Contrary to common belief, the results demonstrated that the weather parameters of precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, and air pressure did not influence the intensity of pain reported by patients during an episode of acute LBP. PMID:26759130

  10. Unusual case of acute neck pain: acute calcific longus colli tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Gunjan S; Fomin, Daren A; Joshi, Gargi S; Serano, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Acute calcific longus colli tendinitis (ACLCT), a very rare cause of severe neck pain, dysphagia and odynophagia, is often mistaken for other common causes of neck pain. However, prompt recognition of this uncommon presentation is important to prevent unnecessary medical and surgical intervention. A 46-year-old Caucasian man presented with a 1-day history of severe neck pain, headache and odynophagia. The patient was afebrile with stable vital signs, however, the laboratory data showed mildly elevated C reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The physical examination was remarkable for markedly reduced cervical range of motion. MRI revealed the pathognomonic findings of paravertebral oedema and calcification. The definitive diagnosis of ACLCT was made and the patient was successfully managed with a short course of oral steroid, benzodiazepine and aural acupuncture, with complete resolution of the condition within a week. PMID:27257001

  11. Painful Bladder Filling and Painful Urgency Are Distinct Characteristics in Men and Women with Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndromes – A MAPP Research Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Lai, H. Henry; Krieger, John N.; Pontari, Michel A.; Buchwald, Dedra; Hou, Xiaoling; Landis, J. Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe bladder-associated symptoms in patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain syndromes (UCPPS) and to correlate these symptoms with urologic, non-urologic, psychosocial, and quality of life measures. Methods Participants were 233 women and 191 men with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome or chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome in a multi-center study. They completed a battery of measures, including items asking if their pain worsened with bladder filling (“painful filling”) or if their urge to urinate was due to pain, pressure, or discomfort (“painful urgency”). Participants were categorized into 3 groups: 1) “both” painful filling and painful urgency, 2) “either” painful filling or painful urgency, or 3) “neither.” Results Seventy-five percent of men and 88% of women were categorized as “both” or “either.” These bladder characteristics were associated with more severe urologic symptoms (increased pain, frequency, urgency), higher somatic symptom burden, depression, and worse quality of life (all p<0.01, 3-group trend test). A gradient effect was observed across groups (both > either > neither). Compared to those in the “neither” group, men categorized as “both” or “either” reported more frequent UCPPS symptom flares, catastrophizing, and irritable bowel syndrome, and women categorized as “both” or “either” were more likely to have negative affect and chronic fatigue syndrome. Conclusions Men and women with bladder symptoms characterized as painful filling or painful urgency had more severe urologic symptoms, more generalized symptoms, and worse quality of life than participants who reported neither characteristic, suggesting that these symptom characteristics might represent important subsets of UCPPS patients. PMID:26192257

  12. Single dose oral analgesics for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J; Wiffen, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Background Thirty-five Cochrane Reviews of randomised trials testing the analgesic efficacy of individual drug interventions in acute postoperative pain have been published. This overview brings together the results of all those reviews and assesses the reliability of available data. Objectives To summarise data from all Cochrane Reviews that have assessed the effects of pharmaceutical interventions for acute pain in adults with at least moderate pain following surgery, who have been given a single dose of oral analgesic taken alone. Methods We identified systematic reviews in The Cochrane Library through a simple search strategy. All reviews were overseen by a single Review Group, had a standard title, and had as their primary outcome numbers of participants with at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours compared with placebo. For individual reviews we extracted the number needed to treat (NNT) for this outcome for each drug/dose combination, and also the percentage of participants achieving at least 50% maximum pain relief, the mean of mean or median time to remedication, the percentage of participants remedicating by 6, 8, 12, or 24 hours, and results for participants experiencing at least one adverse event. Main results The overview included 35 separate Cochrane Reviews with 38 analyses of single dose oral analgesics tested in acute postoperative pain models, with results from about 45,000 participants studied in approximately 350 individual studies. The individual reviews included only high-quality trials of standardised design and outcome reporting. The reviews used standardised methods and reporting for both efficacy and harm. Event rates with placebo were consistent in larger data sets. No statistical comparison was undertaken. There were reviews but no trial data were available for acemetacin, meloxicam, nabumetone, nefopam, sulindac, tenoxicam, and tiaprofenic acid. Inadequate amounts of data were available for dexibuprofen, dextropropoxyphene 130

  13. Prognostic biomarkers in acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Salvagno, Gian Luca; Pavan, Chiara

    2016-07-01

    The acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a leading cause of death around the globe. Beside a still high mortality rate, additional complications of ACS include arrhythmias, left ventricular mural thrombus, cardiac fibrosis, heart failure (HF), cardiogenic shock, mitral valve dysfunction, aneurysms, up to cardiac rupture. Despite many prognostic tools have been developed over the past decades, efforts are still ongoing to identify reliable and predictive biomarkers, which may help predict the prognosis of these patients and especially the risk of HF. Recent evidence suggests that the value of a discrete number of biomarkers of myocardial fibrosis, namely the soluble form of suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (sST2) and galectin-3 (GAL-3), may be predictive of HF and death in patients with ACS. Interestingly, the already promising predictive value of these biomarkers when measured alone was shown to be consistently magnified when combined with other and well-established cardiac biomarkers such natriuretic peptides and cardiac troponins. This article is hence aimed to review the current knowledge about cardiac biomarkers of fibrosis and adverse remodeling. PMID:27500159

  14. Prognostic biomarkers in acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pavan, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a leading cause of death around the globe. Beside a still high mortality rate, additional complications of ACS include arrhythmias, left ventricular mural thrombus, cardiac fibrosis, heart failure (HF), cardiogenic shock, mitral valve dysfunction, aneurysms, up to cardiac rupture. Despite many prognostic tools have been developed over the past decades, efforts are still ongoing to identify reliable and predictive biomarkers, which may help predict the prognosis of these patients and especially the risk of HF. Recent evidence suggests that the value of a discrete number of biomarkers of myocardial fibrosis, namely the soluble form of suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (sST2) and galectin-3 (GAL-3), may be predictive of HF and death in patients with ACS. Interestingly, the already promising predictive value of these biomarkers when measured alone was shown to be consistently magnified when combined with other and well-established cardiac biomarkers such natriuretic peptides and cardiac troponins. This article is hence aimed to review the current knowledge about cardiac biomarkers of fibrosis and adverse remodeling. PMID:27500159

  15. Acute Charles Bonnet Syndrome following Hughes procedure.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michelle E; Pointdujour-Lim, Renelle; Lally, Sara; Shields, Carol L; Rabinowitz, Michael P

    2016-10-01

    A 69-year-old male experienced monocular formed visual hallucinations after occlusion of the right eye following resection of eyelid basal cell carcinoma and reconstruction with a Hughes procedure (tarsoconjunctival flap). His symptoms included recurrent, well-defined, organized, complex, formed images of small children playing in the snow. These visual phenomena occurred only in the occluded eye, began several hours after surgery, and recurred intermittently several times daily for 4 days, lasting several minutes with each occurrence. The patient retained insight into the false nature of the images throughout the duration of his symptoms, and the hallucinations resolved spontaneously while the flap was still in place. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Charles Bonnet Syndrome (CBS) following a Hughes procedure in a patient with normal visual acuity in the non-occluded fellow eye. Unlike other reported cases of acute onset CBS following transient monocular occlusion, hallucinations in the occluded eye remitted prior to restoration of vision in the occluded eye. Ophthalmologists should be aware of the potential for CBS following even transient monocular occlusion and should consider warning patients about its potential to occur. PMID:27467709

  16. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: A clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Donahoe, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a complex disorder of heterogeneous etiologies characterized by a consistent, recognizable pattern of lung injury. Extensive epidemiologic studies and clinical intervention trials have been conducted to address the high mortality of this disorder and have provided significant insight into the complexity of studying new therapies for this condition. The existing clinical investigations in ARDS will be highlighted in this review. The limitations to current definitions, patient selection, and outcome assessment will be considered. While significant attention has been focused on the parenchymal injury that characterizes this disorder and the clinical support of gas exchange function, relatively limited focus has been directed to hemodynamic and pulmonary vascular dysfunction equally prominent in the disease. The limited available clinical information in this area will also be reviewed. The current standards for cardiopulmonary management of the condition will be outlined. Current gaps in our understanding of the clinical condition will be highlighted with the expectation that continued progress will contribute to a decline in disease mortality. PMID:22034606

  17. Potential Risk Factors for the Onset of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Shipton, Edward A.; Mulder, Roger T.

    2015-01-01

    Anaesthetists in the acute and chronic pain teams are often involved in treating Complex Regional Pain Syndromes. Current literature about the risk factors for the onset of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1 (CRPS 1) remains sparse. This syndrome has a low prevalence, a highly variable presentation, and no gold standard for diagnosis. In the research setting, the pathogenesis of the syndrome continues to be elusive. There is a growing body of literature that addresses efficacy of a wide range of interventions as well as the likely mechanisms that contribute to the onset of CRPS 1. The objective for this systematic search of the literature focuses on determining the potential risk factors for the onset of CRPS 1. Eligible articles were analysed, dated 1996 to April 2014, and potential risk factors for the onset of CRPS 1 were identified from 10 prospective and 6 retrospective studies. Potential risk factors for the onset of CRPS 1 were found to include being female, particularly postmenopausal female, ankle dislocation or intra-articular fracture, immobilisation, and a report of higher than usual levels of pain in the early phases of trauma. It is not possible to draw definite conclusions as this evidence is heterogeneous and of mixed quality, relevance, and weighting strength against bias and has not been confirmed across multiple trials or in homogenous studies. PMID:25688265

  18. Patients With Chronic Pelvic Pain: Endometriosis or Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis and interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome share similar symptoms. Interstitial cystitis was once considered rare, but it is now recognized as more common than previously thought. This review examines evidence that patients presenting with symptoms typically attributed to endometriosis or with unresolved pelvic pain after treatment for endometriosis may, in fact, have interstitial cystitis, and suggests approaches for appropriate diagnosis. Methods: A MedLine search using “chronic pelvic pain,” “endometriosis,” “interstitial cystitis,” and “bladder origin pain” as key words was performed for the most recent English-language articles. Additional references were obtained through cross-referencing the bibliography cited in each publication. Discussion: The symptoms of endometriosis and inter-stitial cystitis frequently overlap, and these 2 conditions may even coexist in the same patient. In cases of unresolved endometriosis and persistent pelvic pain, patients may have interstitial cystitis. A variety of tools are available to aid in identifying interstitial cystitis. Conclusion: Gynecologists should be alert to the possible presence of interstitial cystitis in patients who present with chronic pelvic pain typical of endometriosis. PMID:17761077

  19. Chinese scalp acupuncture relieves pain and restores function in complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hommer, Dean H

    2012-10-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) can result from trauma or after surgery. It is often difficult to manage effectively. If not recognized early, it can result in significant debilitation. Symptoms attributed to CRPS include neuropathic pain, allodynia, sudomotor changes, and decreased range of motion. It can occur with (Type II) or without (Type I) nerve injury. A number of soldiers sustaining extremity injuries during combat have manifested these symptoms. Two subjects were diagnosed with CRPS after sustaining upper extremity injuries during military operations. After failing conservative treatment, Chinese Scalp Acupuncture (CSA) was used once to twice a week for 1 to 4 weeks. CSA resulted in improvement in the pain visual analog scale or numeric rating scale by over 80% in two soldiers with upper extremity CRPS. Additionally, decreased sensory changes and improved function were noted on exam and therapy assessments. Notably, the pain reduction, functional improvement, and normalization of sensation have been fully maintained between treatments. The treatment response had been sustained at 20-month follow-up with no recurrence. CSA provided lasting pain reduction, and improved function and sensation in this group of combatants with upper extremity CRPS. PMID:23113454

  20. Coracoid syndrome: a neglected cause of anterior shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    GIGANTE, ANTONIO; BOTTEGONI, CARLO; BARBADORO, PAMELA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the present prospective open-label study was designed to gain further insights into a condition thought to constitute a neglected but not uncommon syndrome characterized by anterior shoulder pain and tenderness to palpation over the apex of the coracoid process, not related to rotator cuff or pectoralis minor tendinopathy, long head of the biceps tendon disorders, or instability. The aim was to clarify its prevalence, clinical characteristics, differential diagnosis and response to corticosteroid injections. Methods patients with primary anterior shoulder pain precisely reproduced by deep pressure on the apex of the coracoid process were recruited. Patients with clinical or instrumental signs of other shoulder disorders were excluded. Patients were given an injection of triamcinolone acetonide 40 mg/ml 1 ml at the coracoid trigger point. They were evaluated after 15, 30 and 60 days and at 2 years using Equal Visual Analog Scale (EQ-VAS) and the Italian version of the Simple Shoulder Test (SST). Results between January 1 and December 31 2010, we treated 15 patients aged 26–66 years. The majority were women (86.67%). At 15 days, 6 (40%) patients reported complete resolution of their symptoms, while 9 (60%) complained of residual symptoms and received another injection. At 30 days, 14 (93.33%) patients were pain-free and very satisfied. At 2 years, the 14 patients who had been asymptomatic at 30 days reported that they had experienced no further pain or impaired shoulder function. The analysis of variance for repeated measures showed a significant effect of time on EQ-VAS and SST scores. Conclusions the present study documents the existence, and characteristics, of a “coracoid syndrome” characterized by anterior shoulder pain and tenderness to palpation over the apex of the coracoid process and showed that the pain is usually amenable to steroid treatment. This syndrome should be clearly distinguished from anterior shoulder pain due to other causes, in

  1. Treatment of abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vanuytsel, Tim; Tack, Jan F; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2014-08-01

    Functional abdominal pain in the context of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a challenging problem for primary care physicians, gastroenterologists and pain specialists. We review the evidence for the current and future non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment options targeting the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract. Cognitive interventions such as cognitive behavioral therapy and hypnotherapy have demonstrated excellent results in IBS patients, but the limited availability and labor-intensive nature limit their routine use in daily practice. In patients who are refractory to first-line therapy, tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are both effective to obtain symptomatic relief, but only TCAs have been shown to improve abdominal pain in meta-analyses. A diet low in fermentable carbohydrates and polyols (FODMAP) seems effective in subgroups of patients to reduce abdominal pain, bloating, and to improve the stool pattern. The evidence for fiber is limited and only isphagula may be somewhat beneficial. The efficacy of probiotics is difficult to interpret since several strains in different quantities have been used across studies. Antispasmodics, including peppermint oil, are still considered the first-line treatment for abdominal pain in IBS. Second-line therapies for diarrhea-predominant IBS include the non-absorbable antibiotic rifaximin and the 5HT3 antagonists alosetron and ramosetron, although the use of the former is restricted because of the rare risk of ischemic colitis. In laxative-resistant, constipation-predominant IBS, the chloride-secretion stimulating drugs lubiprostone and linaclotide, a guanylate cyclase C agonist that also has direct analgesic effects, reduce abdominal pain and improve the stool pattern. PMID:24845149

  2. Effect of Therapeutic Modalities on Patients With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lake, David A.; Wofford, Nancy H.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a common orthopaedic condition for which operative and nonoperative treatments have been used. Therapeutic modalities have been recommended for the treatment of patients with PFPS—including cold, ultrasound, phonophoresis, iontophoresis, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, electrical stimulation for pain control, electromyographic biofeedback, and laser. Objective: To determine the effectiveness of therapeutic modalities for the treatment of patients with PFPS. Data Sources: In May and August 2010, Medline was searched using the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science Citation Index, Science Direct, ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health, and Your Journals@OVID. Study Selection: Selected studies were randomized controlled trials that used a therapeutic modality to treat patients with PFPS. The review included articles with all outcome measures relevant for the PFPS patient: knee extension and flexion strength (isokinetic and isometric), patellofemoral pain assessment during activities of daily life, functional tests (eg, squats), Kujala patellofemoral score, and electromyographic recording from knee flexors and extensors and quadriceps femoris cross-sectional areas. Data Extraction: Authors conducted independent quality appraisals of studies using the PEDro Scale and a system designed for analysis of studies on interventions for patellofemoral pain. Results: Twelve studies met criteria: 1 on the effects of cold and ultrasound together, ice alone, iontophoresis, and phonophoresis; 3, neuromuscular electrical stimulation; 4, electromyographic biofeedback; 3, electrical stimulation for control of pain; and 1, laser. Discussion: Most studies were of low to moderate quality. Some reported that therapeutic modalities, when combined with other treatments, may be of some benefit for pain management or other symptoms. There was no consistent evidence of any beneficial effect when a therapeutic modality was used alone

  3. Development and Validation of the Youth Acute Pain Functional Ability Questionnaire (YAPFAQ)

    PubMed Central

    Zempsky, William T; O’Hara, Emily A; Santanelli, James P; New, Tamara; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Casella, James; Palermo, Tonya M.

    2014-01-01

    Physical function and functional recovery are important aspects of the acute pain experience in children and adolescents in hospitalized settings. Measures of function related to pediatric acute pain do not exist currently, limiting understanding of recovery in youth undergoing acute and procedural pain. To address this gap, we developed and assessed the clinical utility and preliminary validity of the Youth Acute Pain Functional Ability Questionnaire (YAPFAQ). We evaluated psychometric properties of this measure in 159 patients with sickle cell disease, ages 7–21 years who were hospitalized for vasoocclusive episodes at four urban children’s hospitals. The YAPFAQ demonstrated strong internal reliability and test-retest reliability. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted to examine the preliminary factor structure, and to help reduce the number of items for the final scale. Evidence for moderate construct validity was demonstrated among validated measures of pain burden, motor function, functional ability and quality of life. The YAPFAQ is a new measure of youth functional ability in the acute pain setting. Further evaluation of this measure in additional pediatric populations is needed to understand applicability across a spectrum of youth experiencing acute pain related to illness, trauma, and medical/surgical procedures. PERSPECTIVE Measures of function in response to acute pain are needed in order to more comprehensively evaluate acute pain interventions in pediatrics; however, no specific measures are available. Our preliminary psychometric evaluation of an acute pain functional ability measure for youth indicates that it may be a promising tool for further refinement in additional pediatric acute pain populations. PMID:25277425

  4. Systemic corticosteroids in acute chest syndrome: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Ogunlesi, Folasade; Heeney, Matthew M; Koumbourlis, Anastassios C

    2014-03-01

    Acute chest syndrome(ACS) is the most common pulmonary complication of sickle cell disease (SCD), the second most common cause of hospitalization and the primary cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease. Its highest prevalence is in early childhood. The pathogenesis of ACS is unknown but many predisposing conditions and mechanisms have been implicated including infections, pulmonary fat embolism, asthma and ischemic reperfusion injury. These conditions are associated with inflammation and therefore, the use of corticosteroids has been advocated because of their anti-inflammatory properties. Although, significant benefits from their use have been shown, there is great reluctance in using them because of reports of serious adverse effects, such as readmission to the hospital due rebound pain crisis, stroke, renal infarction, coma and even death. The current article reviews the evidence in favor and against the use of corticosteroids in ACS. Emphasis is given on the potential benefits vs. risks among the different types of corticosteroids, the importance of the dosing regimen and the role of underlying co-morbidities. PMID:24268617

  5. Cervico-thoracic or lumbar sympathectomy for neuropathic pain and complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Straube, Sebastian; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background This review is an update on ‘Sympathectomy for neuropathic pain’ originally published in Issue 2, 2003. The concept that many neuropathic pain syndromes (traditionally this definition would include complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS)) are “sympathetically maintained pains” has historically led to treatments that interrupt the sympathetic nervous system. Chemical sympathectomies use alcohol or phenol injections to destroy ganglia of the sympathetic chain, while surgical ablation is performed by open removal or electrocoagulation of the sympathetic chain, or minimally invasive procedures using thermal or laser interruption. Objectives To review the evidence from randomised, double blind, controlled trials on the efficacy and safety of chemical and surgical sympathectomy for neuropathic pain. Sympathectomy could be compared with placebo (sham) or other active treatment. Search methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library to May 2010. We screened references in the retrieved articles and literature reviews, and contacted experts in the field of neuropathic pain. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind, placebo or active controlled studies assessing the effects of sympathectomy for neuropathic pain and CRPS. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and validity, and extracted data. No pooled analysis of data was possible. Main results Only one study satisfied our inclusion criteria, comparing percutaneous radiofrequency thermal lumbar sympathectomy with lumbar sympathetic neurolysis using phenol in 20 participants with CRPS. There was no comparison of sympathectomy versus sham or placebo. No dichotomous pain outcomes were reported. Average baseline scores of 8-9/10 on several pain scales fell to about 4/10 initially (1 day) and remained at 3-5/10 over four months. There were no significant differences between groups, except for “unpleasant sensation”, which was higher with

  6. Pain Assessment with Cognitively Impaired Older People in the Acute Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Research reveals that older people continue to experience much suffering from acute and chronic pain conditions. People with cognitive impairment receive less analgesia than their cognitively intact peers. Postoperative pain assessment with older people in the acute hospital setting remains a challenge. Context and culture have a significant impact of pain assessment practices. Due to a paucity of research exploring how pain assessment and management practices with cognitively impaired older people may be realised in the acute hospital setting, there is a need for further research to be conducted. PMID:26524985

  7. Acute compartment syndrome of the foot in a soccer player: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Laframboise, Michelle A.; Muir, Brad

    2011-01-01

    Objective To present the diagnostic and clinical features including management of acute compartment syndrome (ACS) of the foot and to create a sense of emergency amongst clinicians of this rare and dangerous condition. Clinical Features A 28-year old male soccer player on acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and verapamil presented with severe swelling, paresthesia, and pain in the left ankle after an acute grade three-inversion ankle sprain. A diagnosis of foot compartment syndrome was made. Intervention and Outcome A fasciotomy was not performed and subsequent neurological sequelae occurred. We hypothesize that the edema caused by the ankle sprain was excessive due to the use of ASA and verapamil, resulting in increased compartmental pressure and neurological signs in the foot. Summary Although rare, it is extremely important to be aware of the clinical features of ACS of the foot to obtain an appropriate diagnosis and manage this medical emergency promptly. PMID:22131567

  8. Acute postoperative pain predicts chronic pain and long-term analgesic requirements after breast surgery for cancer.

    PubMed

    Fassoulaki, A; Melemeni, A; Staikou, C; Triga, A; Sarantopoulos, C

    2008-01-01

    Postoperative pain and analgesic requirements may be associated with chronic pain. The aim of the study was to investigate this association. We studied 98 patients who had cancer breast surgery and served as controls in four previous studies, receiving placebo. We compared the pain and analgesic requirements 0-9 h and 1-6 days postoperatively: a) between patients with chronic pain 3 months postoperatively versus patients without and b) between those patients who consumed analgesics at home versus those who did not. Patients with chronic pain had experienced higher intensity pain at rest the first 9 postoperative hours (VAS-rest p = 0.033). Patients requiring analgesics at home had consumed postoperatively more opioids (p = 0.005) and more paracetamol (p = 0.037). These patients had experienced pain of higher intensity the first 9 postoperative hours (VAS-rest p = 0.022, VAS-movement p = 0.009) as well as during the six postoperative days (VAS-rest p = 0.013, VAS-movement p = 0.001). Higher intensities of acute postoperative pain are associated with chronic pain development. Higher analgesic needs and higher acute postoperatively pain intensity are associated with long-term analgesic consumption. PMID:19235522

  9. 'Pseudofailure' of spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain following a new severe noxious stimulus: learning points from a case series of failed spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome and failed back surgery syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muquit, Samiul; Moussa, Ahmad Abdelhai; Basu, Surajit

    2016-05-01

    Failure of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may be due to hardware problems, migration of electrodes and, in the long-term, plasticity in the spinal cord with habituation to the stimulation current. We describe a series of seven patients who experienced acute therapeutic loss of SCS effects following an acute nociceptive event unrelated to primary pathology. There were no hardware problems. We called this 'Pseudofailure', as the effective stimulation returned in all patients following a period off stimulation or reprogramming. This phenomenon has not been reported previously in the literature. Over a 4-year period, we managed seven patients with this feature: four had received SCS for complex regional pain syndrome and three for failed back surgery syndrome. In all seven cases, there was cessation of the pain relief afforded by SCS following an acute painful event: four patients had trauma, two patients had domestic electric shock and one patient suffered shingles (varicella zoster infection). We excluded hardware-related problems in all cases. In two patients, SCS effects could be regained by an initial attempt at reprogramming. In the remaining five cases reprogramming was unsuccessful, and stimulation was switched off for several months before recommencing, when we discovered a return of good therapeutic effect. We conclude that SCS may seem to fail following a separate strong nociceptive stimulus. Stimulation may be regained with reprogramming or following a period with stimulation switched off. We would, therefore, advise against removal of SCS hardware in the first instance. PMID:27551417

  10. ‘Pseudofailure’ of spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain following a new severe noxious stimulus: learning points from a case series of failed spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome and failed back surgery syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muquit, Samiul; Moussa, Ahmad Abdelhai; Basu, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Failure of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may be due to hardware problems, migration of electrodes and, in the long-term, plasticity in the spinal cord with habituation to the stimulation current. We describe a series of seven patients who experienced acute therapeutic loss of SCS effects following an acute nociceptive event unrelated to primary pathology. There were no hardware problems. We called this ‘Pseudofailure’, as the effective stimulation returned in all patients following a period off stimulation or reprogramming. This phenomenon has not been reported previously in the literature. Over a 4-year period, we managed seven patients with this feature: four had received SCS for complex regional pain syndrome and three for failed back surgery syndrome. In all seven cases, there was cessation of the pain relief afforded by SCS following an acute painful event: four patients had trauma, two patients had domestic electric shock and one patient suffered shingles (varicella zoster infection). We excluded hardware-related problems in all cases. In two patients, SCS effects could be regained by an initial attempt at reprogramming. In the remaining five cases reprogramming was unsuccessful, and stimulation was switched off for several months before recommencing, when we discovered a return of good therapeutic effect. We conclude that SCS may seem to fail following a separate strong nociceptive stimulus. Stimulation may be regained with reprogramming or following a period with stimulation switched off. We would, therefore, advise against removal of SCS hardware in the first instance. PMID:27551417

  11. Serum myeloperoxidase: a novel biomarker for evaluation of patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gururajan, P; Gurumurthy, P; Nayar, P; Babu, S; Sarasabharati, A; Victor, D; Cherian, K M

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Myeloperoxidase, an abundant leucocyte enzyme, is elevated in culprit lesions that have ruptured in patients with sudden cardiac injury. Multiple lines of evidence suggest an association between myeloperoxidase and inflammation and acute coronary syndrome. Myeloperoxidase has been proposed as a potent risk marker and diagnostic tool in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Recent studies have reported the potential use of myeloperoxidase in acute coronary syndrome, but limited reports are available on its utility in different groups of ACS in the emergency department. Therefore the circulating levels of serum myeloperoxidase in patients with acute coronary syndrome and control subjects were studied. Design and setting The levels of serum myeloperoxidase were measured by ELISA in 485 patients admitted to emergency care unit, of which 89 patients were diagnosed as non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). The levels of myeloperoxidase were significantly increased in patients with ACS when compared with controls and NCCP. From the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, the optimum value above which myeloperoxidase can be considered positive was found to be 48.02 U/ml. The area under the curve was found to be 0.956 with 95% CI (0.934 to 0.973) (p<0.0001). A combination analysis of ROC curves of troponin, creatine kinase MB (CK-MB) and myeloperoxidase showed myeloperoxidase to be highly significant. Multivariate analysis revealed myeloperoxidase to be an independent diagnostic marker for early diagnosis of ACS. Conclusion Myeloperoxidase, in contrast to troponin and CK-MB, identified patients at risk of ischaemic events, even in the absence of myocardial necrosis, thus highlighting its potent usefulness for risk stratification among patients presenting with chest pain.

  12. Effectiveness of core muscle strengthening for improving pain and dynamic balance among female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chevidikunnan, Mohamed Faisal; Al Saif, Amer; Gaowgzeh, Riziq Allah; Mamdouh, Khaled A

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a frequent musculoskeletal disorder, which can result from core muscles instability that can lead to pain and altered dynamic balance. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of core muscle strengthening on pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty female patients with age ranging from 16 to 40 years with patellofemoral pain syndrome were divided into study (N=10) and control (N=10) groups. Both groups were given 4 weeks of conventional physical therapy program and an additional core muscle strengthening for the study group. The tools used to assess the outcome were Visual Analogue Scale and Star Excursion Balance Test. [Results] The results of the study show that participants in the study group revealed a significantly greater improvement in the intensity of pain and dynamic balance as compared to the control group. [Conclusion] Adding a core muscle-strengthening program to the conventional physical therapy management improves pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:27313363

  13. [Postoperative pain management. Aims and organization of a strategy for postoperative acute pain therapy].

    PubMed

    Nolli, M; Nicosia, F

    2000-09-01

    The Health Services, not only the Italian one, is under pressure because of request for improving treatment quality and the financial need for reorganization and cost-saving. It's required a rationalization of intervention, together with a careful choice of the best and cheapest techniques and the demonstration of their efficacy. The anaesthesia service activity, in a period of cost rationalization and funds restriction should be aimed to appropriate outcome measures corrected by both patient's risk factors and surgical-anaesthesiological case-mix. The development of a complete strategy for surgical pain management might run into two phases. The first phase, internal and mono-specialistic, should develop like the creation of an Acute Pain Team. The main processes are: focusing the problem (charge of the care), training, information, teaching methodology (timing, methods, drugs, techniques, etc.) and the audit (before and after changes). The main aims are the evaluation of the level of analgesia and pain relief or patient's satisfaction which are partial endpoints useful to demonstrate the improvement and the efficacy of the new pain management strategies. The second phase, multidisciplinary, is directed toward the creation of a Postoperative Evaluation Team. The main objective is to set up a collaborative clinical group able to identify the criteria for quality, efficacy and safety. The major purpose is the evaluation of major outcome measures: surgical outcome, morbidity, mortality and length of hospitalization. The improvement in the quality of postoperative pain treatment goes through a better organization and a progressive increase of the already available therapy. The achievement of the result and the quality projects depend on the interaction among staff members with different behaviours and settings. Internal teaching and training, continuous education for doctors and nurses, and external information, marketing and improvement of attractive capability of

  14. [A case of acute renal failure following compartment syndrome after the surgery for femoral neck fracture].

    PubMed

    Koda, Kenichiro; Uzawa, Masashi; Ide, Yasuo; Harada, Masaki; Sanbe, Norie; Sugano, Takayuki; Satoh, Yasuo; Tagami, Megumi

    2013-02-01

    Compartment syndrome is known to develop after a prolonged surgery in the lithotomy position. We experienced acute renal failure following compartment syndrome after the surgery in hemilithotomy position. A 62-year-old man underwent a left hip fixation for femoral neck fracture. The surgical leg was placed into traction in a foot piece and the intact leg was placed in the hemilithotomy position. Because of the difficulty in repositioning and the trouble with fluoroscope, the surgery took over 5 hours. He suffered acute pain, swelling and spasm in his intact leg placed into hemilithotomy after the surgery. Creatine kinase, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine markedly increased and myoglobinuria was recognized. We diagnosed an acute renal failure following compartment syndrome and treated him in the ICU on close monitoring. In spite of the treatment with massive transfusion and diuretics, he needed hemodialysis twice and then his renal function improved. Prevention is most essential for compartment syndrome after a prolonged surgery in the lithotomy position. Risk factors should be recognized before surgery and appropriate action should be taken such as using Allen stirrups and avoiding hypotension, hypovolemia and the prolonged lithotomy position with exaggerated elevation of legs. PMID:23479927

  15. Unintentional overdose of analgesia secondary to acute dental pain.

    PubMed

    Dodd, M D; Graham, C A

    2002-08-24

    Three cases of unintentional overdose with simple analgesics are presented. Over a two month period, these patients presented to the accident and emergency (A&E) department with acute dental pain, outside normal working hours, having been unable to access emergency dental care. In one case the patient's reason for attendance was to obtain further supplies of analgesics. The patients required admission for assessment of the severity of the overdose in addition to advice about appropriate use of analgesics and advice on access to dental care. None of the patients required treatment for the overdose. These cases serve as a timely reminder of the importance of taking an accurate drug history in emergency situations. They also raise issues of patient education for self medication and access to emergency dental services outside normal working hours. PMID:12222908

  16. A Patient with Acute Kidney Pain and High Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Soulen, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    This case presented challenging diagnostic and management issues in a young healthy man who presented with abdominal pain and new-onset hypertension. The differential diagnosis evolved over the course of the clinical presentation. The patient had severe vascular involvement of his renal and basal cerebral arteries that initially was assumed to be due to a vasculitic process or hypercoagulable state. Finally it became apparent that the patient did not have a systemic illness but rather a localized vascular disease most likely due to segmental arterial mediolysis, a rare, under-recognized condition that can potentially be fatal. This condition is often difficult to distinguish from fibromuscular dysplasia. It is important to recognize and correctly diagnose the condition, particularly in the acute phase of the disease, because delay in diagnosis can contribute to morbidity and mortality. PMID:25583291

  17. Plasma homocysteine levels in acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Turgan, N; Boydak, B; Habif, S; Apakkan, S; Ozmen, D; Mutaf, I; Bayindir, O

    1999-11-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is currently regarded as an independent and modifiable risk factor for ischemic vascular diseases and thrombosis. We measured fasting plasma total homocysteine levels by HPLC with fluorescence detection in 30 patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes and 30 age and sex-matched control subjects. Demographic data, classical risk factors (systolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, smoking, ethanol intake, family history of ischaemic heart disease) and life-style habits were recorded. Lipid fractions including total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratio, serum creatinine, LDL-cholesterol and vitamins involved in the metabolism of homocysteine, folic acid and vitamin B12 were also assessed. Total fasting homocysteine concentrations were significantly higher in the patient group (12.2 +/- 1.01 micromol/l) than in the control subjects (7.05 +/- 0.36 micromol/l; p < 0.0001). Homocysteine correlated positively with age (r = 0.617; p < 0.01) and serum creatinine (r = 0.457; p < 0.01) in the patient group. Hyperhomocysteinemia was not associated with vitamin B12 or folate deficiency states. Vitamin B12 concentration was 273 +/- 16.4 ng/l in the control group and 284.3 +/- 32.2 ng/l in the patient group (p = NS). Serum folate concentration also was not significantly different between controls and patients; 7.57 +/- 0.58 microg/l and 8.05 +/- 0.72 microg/l, respectively. Since no significant difference was observed in the lipid parameters between patients and controls, the hyperhomocysteinemia in the patient group supports the view that homocysteine is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Our results strongly suggest that elevated homocysteine levels are among the interacting factors in the complex, multifactorial pathophysiology of ischemic heart disease. PMID:10737556

  18. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Transient and persistent pain induced connectivity alterations in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Linnman, Clas; Becerra, Lino; Lebel, Alyssa; Berde, Charles; Grant, P Ellen; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of pain-induced changes in functional connectivity was performed in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) patients. High field functional magnetic resonance imaging was done in the symptomatic painful state and at follow up in the asymptomatic pain free/recovered state. Two types of connectivity alterations were defined: (1) Transient increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb vs. unaffected limb in the CRPS state, but with normalized connectivity patterns in the recovered state; and (2) Persistent increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb as compared to the unaffected limb that persisted also in the recovered state (recovered affected limb versus recovered unaffected limb). The data support the notion that even after symptomatic recovery, alterations in brain systems persist, particularly in amygdala and basal ganglia systems. Connectivity analysis may provide a measure of temporal normalization of different circuits/regions when evaluating therapeutic interventions for this condition. The results add emphasis to the importance of early recognition and management in improving outcome of pediatric CRPS. PMID:23526938

  20. Transient and Persistent Pain Induced Connectivity Alterations in Pediatric Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Becerra, Lino; Lebel, Alyssa; Berde, Charles; Grant, P. Ellen; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of pain-induced changes in functional connectivity was performed in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) patients. High field functional magnetic resonance imaging was done in the symptomatic painful state and at follow up in the asymptomatic pain free/recovered state. Two types of connectivity alterations were defined: (1) Transient increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb vs. unaffected limb in the CRPS state, but with normalized connectivity patterns in the recovered state; and (2) Persistent increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb as compared to the unaffected limb that persisted also in the recovered state (recovered affected limb versus recovered unaffected limb). The data support the notion that even after symptomatic recovery, alterations in brain systems persist, particularly in amygdala and basal ganglia systems. Connectivity analysis may provide a measure of temporal normalization of different circuits/regions when evaluating therapeutic interventions for this condition. The results add emphasis to the importance of early recognition and management in improving outcome of pediatric CRPS. PMID:23526938

  1. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  2. Rehabilitation outcomes after combined acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and Guillain-Barré syndrome in a child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Korupolu, Radha; Ngo, Thien; Hack, Nawaz; Escott, Edward; Salles, Sara

    2014-01-01

    A 5-year old female presented with acute tetraparesis and areflexia. Initial imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis were suggestive of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). Minimal clinical response with intravenous steroids prompted further work up. Limited nerve conduction studies suggested possible acute motor-sensory axonal neuropathy, a rare variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Repeat imaging was compatible with polyradiculopathy indicating concomitance of ADEM and GBS. The patient suffered severe motor deficits and neuropathic pain. Slow but significant functional recovery was noted after intensive inpatient rehabilitation followed by continued rehabilitation via home health services. PMID:25260509

  3. Think twice - Diagnostic delay in a patient with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Bang, Cæcilie Larsen; Porsbjerg, Celeste Michala

    2016-01-01

    Heart involvement is the most critical and potentially lethal systemic manifestation in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA). We present a case of acute chest pain in a 58-year-old male with severe asthma, which regressed after sublingual administration of nitroglycerine. At the time of hospital admission, there were non-specific ST-changes on the ecg, coronary enzymes were increased, and the patient was concluded to have a non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction, and treated as such. A subacute cardiac catheterization showed no signs of significant coronary stenosis. During the next days, there was increasing pain and reduced strength in both feet. Paraclinical imaging and neurological examinations could not explain the symptoms, and physiotherapy was initiated. At the time, no connection to patient's diagnosis of severe asthma was made. The patient was seen in the respiratory outpatient clinic for a routine check-up, three weeks after the initial hospital admission. At this point, there was increasing pain in both legs and the patient had difficulty walking and experienced increasing dyspnea. Blood eosinophils were elevated (12.7 × 10(9)/L), and an acute HRCT scan showed bilateral peribronchial infiltrates with ground glass opacification and small noduli. A diagnosis of EGPA was established, and administration of systemic glucocorticoids was initiated. A year and a half later, there is still reduced strength and sensory loss. This case illustrates that it is important to consider alternative diagnoses in patients with atypical symptoms and a low risk profile. Heart involvement is the most critical and potentially lethal systemic manifestation in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA, formerly known as Churg-Strauss syndrome), which makes a quick diagnosis and prompt initiation of correct treatment imperative. PMID:27625985

  4. [From Morbus Sudeck to complex regional pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Agarwal-Kozlowski, K; Schumacher, T; Goerig, M; Beck, H

    2011-04-01

    Burning pain and autonomic disorders, such as change of skin color, hyperhidrosis, edema and stiffness in joints of extremities were first described in 1864 by Silas W. Mitchell. The German expression "Morbus Sudeck" takes its name from the surgeon Paul Sudeck from Hamburg who described spotty decalcification in x-rays in 1900. In the Anglo-Saxon world, the theory that the sympathetic nervous system was involved in the generation and sustention of these alterations was based on the observations of the French surgeon René Leriche and in 1846 James A. Evans introduced the expression sympathetic reflex dystrophy. As doubts arose that the sympathetic nervous system could not be the sole culprit, the descriptive phrase of complex regional pain syndrome was introduced to substitute for more than 60 synonyms focusing on the fact that the disease develops after minor trauma or nerve lesions and does not correlate with the severity of the trauma. Diagnosing this syndrome is still hampered by the fact that no specific laboratory or radiological marker has yet been identified. Multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to therapy seem to be inevitable. Since Sudeck first described the disease, 110 years have passed. The underlying hypothesis and theories as well as the development during this time period are summarized. PMID:21350971

  5. Patellofemoral pain syndrome: electromyography in a frequency domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelli, D. S.; Kuriki, H. U.; Polito, L. F.; Azevedo, F. M.; Negrão Filho, R. F.; Alves, N.

    2011-09-01

    The Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS), has a multifactorial etiology and affects approximately 7 to 15% of the population, mostly women, youth, adults and active persons. PFPS causes anterior or retropatelar pain that is exacerbated during functional motor gestures, such as up and down stairs or spending long periods of time sitting, squatting or kneeling. As the diagnostic evaluation of this syndrome is still indirect, different mechanisms and methodologies try to make a classification that distinguishes patients with PFPS in relation to asymptomatic. Thereby, the purpose of this investigation was to determine the characteristics of the electromyographic (EMG) signal in the frequency domain of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) and vastus lateralis (VL) in patients with PFPS, during the ascent of stairs. 33 young women (22 control group and 11 PFPS group), were evaluated by EMG during ascent of stairs. The VMO mean power frequency (MPF) and the VL frequency 95% (F95) were lower in symptomatic individuals. This may be related to the difference in muscle recruitment strategy exerted by each muscle in the PFPS group compared to the control group.

  6. Movement, Function, Pain, and Postoperative Edema in Axillary Web Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Blaes, Anne H.; Haddad, Tuffia C.; Hunter, David W.; Hirsch, Alan T.; Ludewig, Paula M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Axillary web syndrome (AWS) is a condition that may develop following breast cancer surgery and that presents as a palpable axillary cord of tissue. Objective The purposes of this study were: (1) to determine the clinical characteristics of AWS related to movement, function, pain, and postoperative edema and (2) to define the incidence of and risk factors for AWS within the first 3 months following breast cancer surgery. Design This was a prospective cohort study with a repeated-measures design. Methods Women who underwent breast cancer surgery with sentinel node biopsy or axillary lymph node dissection (N=36) were assessed for AWS, shoulder range of motion, function, pain, and postoperative edema (using girth measurements, bioimpedance, and tissue dielectric constant) at 2, 4, and 12 weeks. Demographic characteristics were used for risk analysis. Results Seventeen women (47.2%) developed AWS, and AWS persisted in 10 participants (27.8%) at 12 weeks. Abduction range of motion was significantly lower in the AWS group compared with the non-AWS group at 2 and 4 weeks. There were no differences between groups in measurements of function, pain, or edema at any time point. Trunk edema measured by dielectric constant was present in both groups, with an incidence of 55%. Multivariate analysis determined lower body mass index as being significantly associated with AWS (odds ratio=0.86; 95% confidence interval=0.74, 1.00). Limitations Limitations included a short follow-up time and a small sample size. Conclusion Axillary web syndrome is prevalent following breast/axilla surgery for early-stage breast cancer and may persist beyond 12 weeks. The early consequences include movement restriction, but the long-term effects of persistent AWS cords are yet unknown. Low body mass index is considered a risk factor for AWS. PMID:25977305

  7. Evidence based guidelines for complex regional pain syndrome type 1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is subject to discussion. The purpose of this study was to develop multidisciplinary guidelines for treatment of CRPS-I. Method A multidisciplinary task force graded literature evaluating treatment effects for CRPS-I according to their strength of evidence, published between 1980 to June 2005. Treatment recommendations based on the literature findings were formulated and formally approved by all Dutch professional associations involved in CRPS-I treatment. Results For pain treatment, the WHO analgesic ladder is advised with the exception of strong opioids. For neuropathic pain, anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants may be considered. For inflammatory symptoms, free-radical scavengers (dimethylsulphoxide or acetylcysteine) are advised. To promote peripheral blood flow, vasodilatory medication may be considered. Percutaneous sympathetic blockades may be used to increase blood flow in case vasodilatory medication has insufficient effect. To decrease functional limitations, standardised physiotherapy and occupational therapy are advised. To prevent the occurrence of CRPS-I after wrist fractures, vitamin C is recommended. Adequate perioperative analgesia, limitation of operating time, limited use of tourniquet, and use of regional anaesthetic techniques are recommended for secondary prevention of CRPS-I. Conclusions Based on the literature identified and the extent of evidence found for therapeutic interventions for CRPS-I, we conclude that further research is needed into each of the therapeutic modalities discussed in the guidelines. PMID:20356382

  8. Static Balance in Patients With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Citaker, Seyit; Kaya, Defne; Yuksel, Inci; Yosmaoglu, Baran; Nyland, John; Atay, Ozgur Ahmet; Doral, Mahmut Nedim

    2011-01-01

    Background: The relationship between one-leg static standing balance (OLSSB) and patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is unknown. Hypothesis: OLSSB decreases in patients with PFPS. Design: Prospective case series. Methods: Fifty-two women with unilateral PFPS were enrolled in this study. OLSSB was evaluated with a stabilometer. Q angle was measured with a lengthened-arm universal goniometer. Lower extremity alignment was analyzed with full-length standing anteroposterior teleroentgenograms. Quadriceps and hamstring strength was measured on an isokinetic dynamometer. Results: There were significant differences in OLSSB, Q angle, and strength of quadriceps and hamstring between the symptomatic and asymptomatic sides. There was a correlation between the strength of the quadriceps and hamstring and OLSSB, while there was no correlation between OLSSB and the severity of pain, lower extremity alignment, and Q angle on the symptomatic side. Conclusions: OLSSB and quadriceps and hamstring strength decreased and Q angle increased on the symptomatic side in PFPS patients. A relationship between OLSSB and pain, Q angle, and lower extremity alignment was not detected, while there was a correlation between the strength of the quadriceps and hamstring and OLSSB. Clinical Relevance: A quadriceps and hamstring strengthening may be beneficial to improve OLSSB in patients with PFPS. PMID:23016053

  9. Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 in a pediatric patient: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Demirdal, Ümit Seçil; Bükülmez, Ayşegül; Solak, Özlem

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 is one of the causes of morbidity of childhood which is also named reflex symphathetic dystrophia. The syndrome is characterized with regional pain and vasomotor, sudomotor and sensory changes in the distal parts of the extremities involved. Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 shows difference in children in terms of clinical picture and imaging methods compared to adults. The most important point is that the prognosis is generally better in children if early diagnosis and treatment is provided. On the other hand, causes including presence of psychological factors or less contribution of imaging methods in children lead to delayed diagnosis or erroneous diagnosis. In this article, a 10 year-old male patient who was diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 was described. Thus, we aimed to remind clinicians that this syndrome should also be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of pain in children. PMID:26078637

  10. Effectiveness of therapeutic physical exercise in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Alba-Martín, Pablo; Gallego-Izquierdo, T; Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Romero-Franco, Natalia; Núñez-Nagy, Susana; Pecos-Martín, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of conservative treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome with physical exercise. [Subjects and Methods] A computer-based review conducted of four databases (PubMed, the Cochrane Library, PEDro, and the University Library) was completed based on the inclusion criteria of patellofemoral pain syndrome patients treated with physical exercise methods and examination with self-reported pain and/or functional questionnaires. [Results] The findings of ten clinical trials of moderate to high quality were evaluated to determine the effectiveness of physical exercise as conservative management for patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Conclusion] The intervention programs that were most effective in relieving pain and improving function in patellofemoral pain syndrome included proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching and strengthening exercises for the hip external rotator and abductor muscles and knee extensor muscles. PMID:26311988

  11. Chronic pain in hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type): it is a challenge

    PubMed Central

    Scheper, Mark C; de Vries, Janneke E; Verbunt, Jeanine; Engelbert, Raoul HH

    2015-01-01

    Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) is highly prevalent among patients diagnosed with chronic pain. When GJH is accompanied by pain in ≥4 joints over a period ≥3 months in the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) may be diagnosed. In addition, GJH is also a clinical sign that is frequently present in hereditary diseases of the connective tissue, such as the Marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, and the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome. However, within the Ehlers–Danlos spectrum, a similar subcategory of patients having similar clinical features as HMS but lacking a specific genetic profile was identified: Ehlers–Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT). Researchers and clinicians have struggled for decades with the highly diverse clinical presentation within the HMS and EDS-HT phenotypes (Challenge 1) and the lack of understanding of the pathological mechanisms that underlie the development of pain and its persistence (Challenge 2). In addition, within the HMS/EDS-HT phenotype, there is a high prevalence of psychosocial factors, which again presents a difficult issue that needs to be addressed (Challenge 3). Despite recent scientific advances, many obstacles for clinical care and research still remain. To gain further insight into the phenotype of HMS/EDS-HT and its mechanisms, clearer descriptions of these populations should be made available. Future research and clinical care should revise and create consensus on the diagnostic criteria for HMS/EDS-HT (Solution 1), account for clinical heterogeneity by the classification of subtypes within the HMS/EDS-HT spectrum (Solution 2), and create a clinical core set (Solution 3). PMID:26316810

  12. Chronic pain in hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type): it is a challenge.

    PubMed

    Scheper, Mark C; de Vries, Janneke E; Verbunt, Jeanine; Engelbert, Raoul Hh

    2015-01-01

    Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) is highly prevalent among patients diagnosed with chronic pain. When GJH is accompanied by pain in ≥4 joints over a period ≥3 months in the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) may be diagnosed. In addition, GJH is also a clinical sign that is frequently present in hereditary diseases of the connective tissue, such as the Marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, and the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, within the Ehlers-Danlos spectrum, a similar subcategory of patients having similar clinical features as HMS but lacking a specific genetic profile was identified: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT). Researchers and clinicians have struggled for decades with the highly diverse clinical presentation within the HMS and EDS-HT phenotypes (Challenge 1) and the lack of understanding of the pathological mechanisms that underlie the development of pain and its persistence (Challenge 2). In addition, within the HMS/EDS-HT phenotype, there is a high prevalence of psychosocial factors, which again presents a difficult issue that needs to be addressed (Challenge 3). Despite recent scientific advances, many obstacles for clinical care and research still remain. To gain further insight into the phenotype of HMS/EDS-HT and its mechanisms, clearer descriptions of these populations should be made available. Future research and clinical care should revise and create consensus on the diagnostic criteria for HMS/EDS-HT (Solution 1), account for clinical heterogeneity by the classification of subtypes within the HMS/EDS-HT spectrum (Solution 2), and create a clinical core set (Solution 3). PMID:26316810

  13. [Management of acute pain therapy: guidelines, recommendations and current practice in german hospitals].

    PubMed

    Erlenwein, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Organisational requirements and the education and training of stuff provide the basis for an adequate supply of quality in acute pain and should be the focus of efforts. Although organizational recommendations of the German guideline on "treatment of acute perioperative and post-traumatic pain" have been increasingly established in practice within the last few years, in many German hospitals there is still lagging far behind in the implementation of general supply conditions, such as regular pain measurement or the introduction of appropriate standardized treatment protocols for all areas of the hospital.As specialized care structures acute pain services have been implemented in 80% of the German hospitals, but only 45% of them meet quality criteria. Due to the heterogeneous realization of acute pain management in different hospitals, it comes apparent, that general guideline recommendations and binding definitions are required to achieve adequate supply conditions. PMID:26863643

  14. WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775 With or Without Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-25

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Exercise-related transient abdominal pain secondary to median arcuate ligament syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Haskins, Ivy N; Harr, Jeffrey N; Brody, Fred

    2016-07-01

    Exercise-related transient abdominal pain is a common entity in young athletes. An uncommon aetiology of this type of pain is median arcuate ligament syndrome. This article details an 18-year-old field hockey player who presented with a 1-year history of exercise-related transient abdominal pain. Despite a trial of preventative strategies, the patient's pain persisted, prompting surgical intervention. Following a laparoscopic median arcuate ligament release, the patient's symptoms resolved. Therefore, when exercise-related transient abdominal pain persists despite precautionary measures, median arcuate ligament syndrome should be considered. PMID:26542078

  16. Maxillary sinusitis as a differential diagnosis in temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rihani, A

    1985-01-01

    Maxillary sinusitis may be diagnosed incorrectly as TMJ pain-dysfunction syndrome because of a similarity of signs and symptoms. Both conditions can manifest with headache, facial pain radiating to the ear and the maxillary teeth, preauricular pain, and pain in the buccal vestibule posterior and superior to the maxillary tuberosity. It can be concluded that (1) more consideration should be given to sinus disturbances as a differential diagnosis in TMJ pain-dysfunction syndrome, (2) it may be preferable to refer some patients with TMJ pain to a medical center where specialists in dentistry, otolaryngology, neurology, rheumatology, and psychiatry can evaluate the patient, and (3) TMJ pain-dysfunction syndrome should be evaluated and treated by a dentist experienced in management of this disorder. PMID:3856028

  17. DoD–NCCAM/NIH Workshop on Acupuncture for Treatment of Acute Pain

    PubMed Central

    Belard, Jean Louis; Glowa, John; Khalsa, Partap; Weber, Wendy; Huntley, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Department of Defense (DoD) and the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) cosponsored a workshop that explored the possible benefits of acupuncture treatment for acute pain. One goal of the workshop was to establish a roadmap to building an evidence base on that would indicate whether acupuncture is helpful for treating active-duty military personnel experiencing acute pain. The workshop highlighted brief presentations on the most current research on acupuncture and acute pain mechanisms. The impact of various modifiers (stress, genetics, population, phenotypes, etc.) on acute pain pathways and response to acupuncture treatment was discussed. Additional presentations focused on common neural mechanisms, an overview of real-world experience with using acupuncture to treat traumatic acute pain, and best tools and methods specific for acupuncture studies. Three breakout groups addressed the gaps, opportunities, and barriers to acupuncture use for acute pain in military and trauma settings. Different models of effectiveness research and optimal research designs for conducting trials in acute traumatic pain were also discussed. PMID:23020611

  18. Coping with new challenges in acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Théroux, Pierre; Labarthe, Benoît

    2006-01-01

    The acute coronary syndromes have become well-established clinical entities and are used as working diagnoses tied in with elaborate investigation and treatment practice guidelines. However, these syndromes remain challenging because their prevalence, morbidity and mortality remain high. Furthermore, these syndromes are demanding on the health care system because an early invasive management strategy is recommended for most patients with these conditions. Coping with these challenges requires the following initiatives: stepping beyond current diagnostic and management algorithms to a better performing risk stratification scheme that considers specific patient risk factors in addition to the disease risk, and a reintegration of acute coronary syndromes into the more global perspective of coronary artery disease; more effective antithrombotic therapy that does not further compromise bleeding risk, or drugs that control thrombogenic stimuli; and medical and revascularization therapies targeted to more specific individual pathophysiologies identified by novel blood markers and imaging techniques. PMID:16929386

  19. Acute compartment syndrome occurring in forearm with relatively small amount of hematoma following transradial coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Atsuhiko; Iwamoto, Jotaro; Tsumuraya, Naoko; Nagaoka, Masakazu; Ikari, Yuji

    2016-04-01

    A 59-year-old female with angina pectoris successfully underwent percutaneous coronary intervention via the right radial artery. She complained of right forearm pain and numbness 4.5 h after the procedure. Though the swelling in her right arm seemed relatively mild, pressure measurement showed significant increase of internal forearm pressure. She developed acute compartment syndrome in the right forearm, and fasciotomy was performed immediately. The weight of subcutaneous hematoma in her right arm was approximately 100 g. Symptoms of paralysis and the impairment of perception remained for some time, but had completely recovered 4 months post-surgery. PMID:25855327

  20. Acute pancreatitis in a young girl with the Netherton syndrome.

    PubMed

    Söreide, Kjetil; Söiland, Håvard; Körner, Hartwig; Haga, Harald; Söreide, Jon Arne

    2005-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is uncommon in children younger than 15 years. We present the first report on the association of acute pancreatitis with the Netherton syndrome. The Netherton syndrome is an inherited skin disease characterized by ichthyosiform erythroderma, a pathognomonic hair shaft defect ("bamboo hair"), and atopic features. A 14-year-old girl with symptoms and signs of severe acute pancreatitis was admitted to our department. A diagnostic workup could not reveal any common known cause of pancreatitis, and the cause of pancreatitis would most likely be considered idiopathic. However, based on recent reports regarding various pathophysiological mechanisms for both acute pancreatitis and the Netherton syndrome (eg, shearing the 5q locus for the respective gene-associated defects in SPINK1 and SPINK5), we speculate if a possible association may exist. Investigations on pancreatitis and the Netherton syndrome may disclose factors closely involved in the pathomechanisms of both. This notion may be of clinical importance as it adds to the number of potential life-threatening events to patients with the Netherton syndrome. PMID:16291148

  1. Effects of intracutaneous injections of sterile water in patients with acute low back pain: a randomized, controlled, clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Cui, J.Z.; Geng, Z.S.; Zhang, Y.H.; Feng, J.Y.; Zhu, P.; Zhang, X.B.

    2016-01-01

    Intracutaneous sterile water injection (ISWI) is used for relief of low back pain during labor, acute attacks of urolithiasis, chronic neck and shoulder pain following whiplash injuries, and chronic myofascial pain syndrome. We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effect of ISWI for relief of acute low back pain (aLBP). A total of 68 patients (41 females and 27 males) between 18 and 55 years old experiencing aLBP with moderate to severe pain (scores ≥5 on an 11-point visual analogue scale [VAS]) were recruited and randomly assigned to receive either ISWIs (n=34) or intracutaneous isotonic saline injections (placebo treatment; n=34). The primary outcome was improvement in pain intensity using the VAS at 10, 45, and 90 min and 1 day after treatment. The secondary outcome was functional improvement, which was assessed using the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS) 1 day after treatment. The mean VAS score was significantly lower in the ISWI group than in the control group at 10, 45, and 90 min, and 1 day after injection (P<0.05, t-test). The mean increment in PSFS score of the ISWI group was 2.9±2.2 1 day after treatment, while that in the control group was 0.9±2.2. Our study showed that ISWI was effective for relieving pain and improving function in aLBP patients at short-term follow-up. ISWI might be an alternative treatment for aLBP patients, especially in areas where medications are not available, as well as in specific patients (e.g., those who are pregnant or have asthma), who are unable to receive medications or other forms of analgesia because of side effects. PMID:26840703

  2. Effects of intracutaneous injections of sterile water in patients with acute low back pain: a randomized, controlled, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cui, J Z; Geng, Z S; Zhang, Y H; Feng, J Y; Zhu, P; Zhang, X B

    2016-03-01

    Intracutaneous sterile water injection (ISWI) is used for relief of low back pain during labor, acute attacks of urolithiasis, chronic neck and shoulder pain following whiplash injuries, and chronic myofascial pain syndrome. We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effect of ISWI for relief of acute low back pain (aLBP). A total of 68 patients (41 females and 27 males) between 18 and 55 years old experiencing aLBP with moderate to severe pain (scores ≥5 on an 11-point visual analogue scale [VAS]) were recruited and randomly assigned to receive either ISWIs (n=34) or intracutaneous isotonic saline injections (placebo treatment; n=34). The primary outcome was improvement in pain intensity using the VAS at 10, 45, and 90 min and 1 day after treatment. The secondary outcome was functional improvement, which was assessed using the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS) 1 day after treatment. The mean VAS score was significantly lower in the ISWI group than in the control group at 10, 45, and 90 min, and 1 day after injection (P<0.05, t-test). The mean increment in PSFS score of the ISWI group was 2.9±2.2 1 day after treatment, while that in the control group was 0.9±2.2. Our study showed that ISWI was effective for relieving pain and improving function in aLBP patients at short-term follow-up. ISWI might be an alternative treatment for aLBP patients, especially in areas where medications are not available, as well as in specific patients (e.g., those who are pregnant or have asthma), who are unable to receive medications or other forms of analgesia because of side effects. PMID:26840703

  3. The acute cardiorenal syndrome: burden and mechanisms of disease.

    PubMed

    Nijst, Petra; Mullens, Wilfried

    2014-12-01

    Worsening renal function during the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure, so-called acute cardio-renal syndrome, is very common and complicates the treatment course. The underlying pathophysiology of worsening renal function (WRF) involves variable contributions of renal hemodynamics, neurohormonal activity, and oxidative stress. Historically, WRF has been associated with adverse outcomes. However, emerging data support therapeutic strategies that permit WRF while effectively treating congestion as they are associated with improved outcomes. PMID:25135470

  4. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: Pulmonary and extrapulmonary not so similar

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Dhooria, Sahajal; Behera, Digambar; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by acute onset respiratory failure with bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and hypoxemia. Current evidence suggests different respiratory mechanics in pulmonary ARDS (ARDSp) and extrapulmonary ARDS (ARDSexp) with disproportionate decrease in lung compliance in the former and chest wall compliance in the latter. Herein, we report two patients of ARDS, one each with ARDSp and ARDSexp that were managed using real-time esophageal pressure monitoring using the AVEA ventilator to tailor the ventilatory strategy. PMID:27076736

  5. Implementation of a portable electronic system for providing pain relief to patellofemoral pain syndrome patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang Chien, Jia-Ren; Lin, Guo-Hong; Hsu, Ar-Tyan

    2011-10-01

    In this study, a portable electromyogram (EMG) system and a stimulator are developed for patellofemoral pain syndrome patients, with the objective of reducing the pain experienced by these patients; the patellar pain is caused by an imbalance between the vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) and the vastus lateralis (VL). The EMG measurement circuit and the electrical stimulation device proposed in this study are specifically designed for the VMO and the VL; they are capable of real-time waveform recording, possess analyzing functions, and can upload their measurement data to a computer for storage and analysis. The system can calculate and record the time difference between the EMGs of the VMO and the VL, as well as the signal strengths of both the EMGs. As soon as the system detects the generation of the EMG of the VL, it quickly calculates and processes the event and stimulates the VMO as feedback through electrical stimulation units, in order to induce its contraction. The system can adjust the signal strength, time length, and the sequence of the electrical stimulation, both manually and automatically. The output waveform of the electrical stimulation circuit is a dual-phase asymmetrical pulse waveform. The primary function of the electrical simulation circuit is to ensure that the muscles contract effectively. The performance of the device can be seen that the width of each pulse is 20-1000 μs, the frequency of each pulse is 10-100 Hz, and current strength is 10-60 mA.

  6. Implementation of a portable electronic system for providing pain relief to patellofemoral pain syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Chien, Jia-Ren Chang; Lin, Guo-Hong; Hsu, Ar-Tyan

    2011-10-01

    In this study, a portable electromyogram (EMG) system and a stimulator are developed for patellofemoral pain syndrome patients, with the objective of reducing the pain experienced by these patients; the patellar pain is caused by an imbalance between the vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) and the vastus lateralis (VL). The EMG measurement circuit and the electrical stimulation device proposed in this study are specifically designed for the VMO and the VL; they are capable of real-time waveform recording, possess analyzing functions, and can upload their measurement data to a computer for storage and analysis. The system can calculate and record the time difference between the EMGs of the VMO and the VL, as well as the signal strengths of both the EMGs. As soon as the system detects the generation of the EMG of the VL, it quickly calculates and processes the event and stimulates the VMO as feedback through electrical stimulation units, in order to induce its contraction. The system can adjust the signal strength, time length, and the sequence of the electrical stimulation, both manually and automatically. The output waveform of the electrical stimulation circuit is a dual-phase asymmetrical pulse waveform. The primary function of the electrical simulation circuit is to ensure that the muscles contract effectively. The performance of the device can be seen that the width of each pulse is 20-1000 μs, the frequency of each pulse is 10-100 Hz, and current strength is 10-60 mA. PMID:22047323

  7. Cardiac MR enables diagnosis in 90% of patients with acute chest pain, elevated biomarkers and unobstructed coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Emrich, K; Abegunewardene, N; Oberholzer, K; Dueber, C; Muenzel, T; Kreitner, K-F

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic value of cardiac MRI (CMR) in patients with acute chest pain, elevated cardiac enzymes and a negative coronary angiogram. Methods: This study included a total of 125 patients treated in the chest pain unit during a 39-month period. Each included patient underwent MRI within a median of 3 days after cardiac catheterization. The MRI protocol comprised cine, oedema-sensitive and late gadolinium-enhancement imaging. The standard of reference was a consensus diagnosis based on clinical follow-up and the synopsis of all clinical, laboratory and imaging data. Results: MRI revealed a multitude of diagnoses, including ischaemic cardiomyopathy (CM), dilated CM, myocarditis, Takotsubo CM, hypertensive heart disease, hypertrophic CM, cardiac amyloidosis and non-compaction CM. MRI-based diagnoses were the same as the final reference diagnoses in 113/125 patients (90%), with the two diagnoses differing in only 12/125 patients. In two patients, no final diagnosis could be established. Conclusion: CMR performed early after the onset of symptoms revealed a broad spectrum of diseases. CMR delivered a correct final diagnosis in 90% of patients with acute chest pain, elevated cardiac enzymes and a negative coronary angiogram. Advances in knowledge: Diagnosing patients with acute coronary syndrome but unobstructed coronary arteries remains a challenge for cardiologists. CMR performed early after catheterization reveals a broad spectrum of diseases with only a simple and quick examination protocol, and there is a high concordance between MRI-based diagnoses and final reference diagnoses. PMID:25782462

  8. Juvenile Fibromyalgia: Different from the Adult Chronic Pain Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; King, Christopher; Ting, Tracy V; Arnold, Lesley M

    2016-04-01

    While a majority of research has focused on adult fibromyalgia (FM), recent evidence has provided insights into the presence and impact of FM in children and adolescents. Commonly referred as juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM), youths, particularly adolescent girls, present with persistent widespread pain and cardinal symptoms observed in adult FM. A majority of youth with JFM continue to experience symptoms into adulthood, which highlights the importance of early recognition and intervention. Some differences are observed between adult and juvenile-onset FM syndrome with regard to comorbidities (e.g., joint hypermobility is common in JFM). Psychological comorbidities are common but less severe in JFM. Compared to adult FM, approved pharmacological treatments for JFM are lacking, but non-pharmacologic approaches (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy and exercise) show promise. A number of conceptual issues still remain including (1) directly comparing similarities and differences in symptoms and (2) identifying shared and unique mechanisms underlying FM in adults and youths. PMID:26984803

  9. Acute coronary syndrome in the Asia-Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mark Y; Du, Xin; Eccleston, David; Ma, Changsheng; Mohanan, Padinhare P; Ogita, Manabu; Shyu, Kou-Gi; Yan, Bryan P; Jeong, Young-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    More than 4.2 billion inhabitants populate the Asia-Pacific region. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is now a major cause of death and disability in this region with in-hospital mortality typically exceeding 5%. Yet, the region still lacks consensus on the best approach to overcoming its specific challenges in reducing mortality from ACS. The Asia-Pacific Real world evIdenCe on Outcome and Treatment of ACS (APRICOT) project reviewed current published and unpublished registry data, unmet needs in ACS management and possible approaches towards improving ACS-related mortality in the region. There was striking heterogeneity in the use of invasive procedures, pharmacologic practice (hospitalization/post-discharge), and in short- and long-term clinical outcomes across healthcare systems; this heterogeneity was perceived to be far greater than in Western Europe or the United States. 'Benchmark' short-term clinical outcomes are preferred over long-term outcomes due to difficulties in follow-up, recording and maintenance of medication adherence in a geographically large and culturally diverse region. Key 'barriers' towards improving outcomes include patient education (pain awareness, consequences of missing medication and secondary prevention), geographical landscape (urban vs. metropolitan), limited long-term adherence to guideline-based management and widespread adoption of cost-based rather than value-based healthcare systems. Initiatives to overcome these barriers should include implementation of pre-hospital management strategies, toolkits to aid in-hospital treatment, greater community outreach with online patient/physician education and telemedicine, sustainable economic models to improve accessibility to effective pharmacotherapies and the acquisition of high-quality 'real-world' regional data to tailor secondary prevention initiatives that meet the unique needs of countries in this region. PMID:26476044

  10. Side effects of using nitrates to treat heart failure and the acute coronary syndromes, unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Thadani, Udho; Ripley, Toni L

    2007-07-01

    Nitrates are potent venous dilators and anti-ischemic agents. They are widely used for the relief of chest pain and pulmonary congestion in patients with acute coronary syndromes and heart failure. Nitrates, however, do not reduce mortality in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Combination of nitrates and hydralazine when given in addition to beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce mortality and heart failure hospitalizations in patients with heart failure due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction who are of African-American origin. Side effects during nitrate therapy are common but are less well described in the literature compared with the reported side effects in patients with stable angina pectoris. The reported incidence of side effects varies highly among different studies and among various disease states. Headache is the most commonly reported side effect with an incidence of 12% in acute heart failure, 41-73% in chronic heart failure, 3-19% in unstable angina and 2-26% in acute myocardial infarction. The reported incidence of hypotension also differs: 5-10% in acute heart failure, 20% in chronic heart failure, 9% in unstable angina and < 1-48% in acute myocardial infarction, with the incidence being much higher with concomitant nitrate therapy plus angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Reported incidence of dizziness is as low as 1% in patients with acute myocardial infarction to as high as 29% in patients with heart failure. Severe headaches and/or symptomatic hypotension may necessitate discontinuation of nitrate therapy. Severe life threatening hypotension or even death may occur when nitrates are used in patients with acute inferior myocardial infarction associated with right ventricular dysfunction or infarction, or with concomitant use of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors or N-acetylcysteine. Despite the disturbing observational reports in the literature that continuous and prolonged use of nitrates may lead to

  11. An overview of the management of post-vasectomy pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei Phin; Levine, Laurence A

    2016-01-01

    Post-vasectomy pain syndrome remains one of the more challenging urological problems to manage. This can be a frustrating process for both the patient and clinician as there is no well-recognized diagnostic regimen or reliable effective treatment. Many of these patients will end up seeing physicians across many disciplines, further frustrating them. The etiology of post-vasectomy pain syndrome is not clearly delineated. Postulations include damage to the scrotal and spermatic cord nerve structures via inflammatory effects of the immune system, back pressure effects in the obstructed vas and epididymis, vascular stasis, nerve impingement, or perineural fibrosis. Post-vasectomy pain syndrome is defined as at least 3 months of chronic or intermittent scrotal content pain. This article reviews the current understanding of post-vasectomy pain syndrome, theories behind its pathophysiology, evaluation pathways, and treatment options. PMID:26952956

  12. How can we strengthen the quadriceps femoris in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Defne; Doral, Mahmut Nedim; Callaghan, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Summary Purpose: the aim of this article was to review the clinical approach of quadriceps strengthening programmes. Methods: a literature search was carried out from 1980 up to September 2011. Eligible studies were those that: (1) evaluated the patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (not healthy or asymptomatic subjects) (2) examined the effect of kinetic chain exercises (3) examined the effect of weight-bearing exercises (4) compared the effect of the combined exercises programme in the treatment of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Results and conclusion: patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome may tolerate a closed kinetic chain exercises programme better than open kinetic chain. Weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing quadriceps exercises can significantly improve subjective and clinical outcomes in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Combining treatments as an initial approach to treating patellofemoral pain but developing individualized more functional, global treatments are essential. PMID:23738270

  13. An overview of the management of post-vasectomy pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wei Phin; Levine, Laurence A

    2016-01-01

    Post-vasectomy pain syndrome remains one of the more challenging urological problems to manage. This can be a frustrating process for both the patient and clinician as there is no well-recognized diagnostic regimen or reliable effective treatment. Many of these patients will end up seeing physicians across many disciplines, further frustrating them. The etiology of post-vasectomy pain syndrome is not clearly delineated. Postulations include damage to the scrotal and spermatic cord nerve structures via inflammatory effects of the immune system, back pressure effects in the obstructed vas and epididymis, vascular stasis, nerve impingement, or perineural fibrosis. Post-vasectomy pain syndrome is defined as at least 3 months of chronic or intermittent scrotal content pain. This article reviews the current understanding of post-vasectomy pain syndrome, theories behind its pathophysiology, evaluation pathways, and treatment options. PMID:26952956

  14. Meperidine (pethidine) versus morphine in acute pain management of opioid-dependent patients

    PubMed Central

    Solhi, Hassan; Sanaei-Zadeh, Hossein; Solhi, Sadra; Azizi Nadian, Mohammad Ali; Gharibi, Morteza; Sadeghi Sedeh, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of morphine and meperidine (pethidine) as pain relief in opioid-dependent patients with acute pain. A total of 122 opioid-dependent patients with acute pain were included in the study. Their pain severity was assessed, using visual analog scale (VAS) scores ranging from 0 to 10. The patients randomly received intravenous morphine (up to 0.15 mg/kg) or meperidine (up to 1.5 mg/kg) for pain control by patient control analgesia (PCA) pump. The clinical opioid withdrawal scale (COWS) was employed for the assessment of withdrawal symptoms. The pain relief and the emergence of withdrawal symptoms were measured at 15, 30, and 60 minutes after drug administration. The patients who received morphine reported a better pain control compared to those who received meperidine (mean ± standard deviation [SD] VAS scores 4.11±1.90 vs 5.85±2.08 at the end of the study; P<0.001). On the other hand, the patients who received meperidine indicated prominent withdrawal symptoms (mean ± SD COWS scores 4.80±2.18 vs. 1.98±0.82 at the end of the study; P<0.001). Our findings revealed that morphine can be recommended in acute pain management of opioid-dependent patients. In addition, emergency physicians should ask their patients about any drug dependence before selecting the appropriate drug for their acute pain management.

  15. Meperidine (pethidine) versus morphine in acute pain management of opioid-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Solhi, Hassan; Sanaei-Zadeh, Hossein; Solhi, Sadra; Azizi Nadian, Mohammad Ali; Gharibi, Morteza; Sadeghi Sedeh, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of morphine and meperidine (pethidine) as pain relief in opioid-dependent patients with acute pain. A total of 122 opioid-dependent patients with acute pain were included in the study. Their pain severity was assessed, using visual analog scale (VAS) scores ranging from 0 to 10. The patients randomly received intravenous morphine (up to 0.15 mg/kg) or meperidine (up to 1.5 mg/kg) for pain control by patient control analgesia (PCA) pump. The clinical opioid withdrawal scale (COWS) was employed for the assessment of withdrawal symptoms. The pain relief and the emergence of withdrawal symptoms were measured at 15, 30, and 60 minutes after drug administration. The patients who received morphine reported a better pain control compared to those who received meperidine (mean ± standard deviation [SD] VAS scores 4.11±1.90 vs 5.85±2.08 at the end of the study; P<0.001). On the other hand, the patients who received meperidine indicated prominent withdrawal symptoms (mean ± SD COWS scores 4.80±2.18 vs. 1.98±0.82 at the end of the study; P<0.001). Our findings revealed that morphine can be recommended in acute pain management of opioid-dependent patients. In addition, emergency physicians should ask their patients about any drug dependence before selecting the appropriate drug for their acute pain management. PMID:27621675

  16. Large twisted ovarian fibroma associated with Meigs’ syndrome, abdominal pain and severe anemia treated by laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Meigs' syndrome is a rare but well-known syndrome defined as the triad of benign solid ovarian tumor, ascites, and pleural effusion. Meigs' syndrome always requires surgical treatment. However, the optimal approach for its management has not been sufficiently investigated. Case presentation We report a patient with a large twisted ovarian fibroma associated with Meigs’ syndrome, abdominal pain and severe hemolytic anemia that was treated by laparoscopic surgery. This case highlights the difficulties that may be encountered in the management of patients with Meigs’ syndrome, including potential misdiagnosis of the tumor as a malignant ovarian neoplasm that may influence the medical and surgical approach and the adverse impact that Meigs’ syndrome can have on the patient’s condition, especially if it is associated with acute pain and severe anemia. Considering the patient’s serious clinical condition and assuming that she had Meigs' syndrome with a twisted large ovarian mass and possible hemolytic anemia, we first concentrated on effective medical management of our patient and chose the most appropriate surgical treatment after laparoscopic examination. The main aim of our initial approach was preoperative management of the anemia. Blood transfusions and glucocorticoid therapy resulted in stabilization of the hemoglobin level and normalization of the bilirubin levels, which confirmed the appropriateness of this approach. Laparoscopic surgery 4 days after admission enabled definitive diagnosis of the tumor, confirmed torsion and removed the bulky ovarian fibroma, resulting in timely resolution of symptoms, short hospitalization, relatively low morbidity and a rapid return to her social and professional life. Conclusions This case highlights the difficulties that may be encountered in the management of patients with Meigs' syndrome, including potential misdiagnosis of the tumor as a malignant ovarian neoplasm that may influence the medical and

  17. Physical Activity and Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ran; Chomistek, Andrea K.; Dimitrakoff, Jordan D.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Willett, Walter C.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Wu, Kana

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a prevalent urologic disorder among men, but its etiology is still poorly understood. Our objective was to examine the relationship between physical activity and incidence of CP/CPPS in a large cohort of male health professionals. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study among men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study followed from 1986 to 2008. The study population included 20,918 men who completed all CP/CPPS questions on the 2008 questionnaire. Leisure-time physical activity, including type and intensity of activity, was measured by questionnaire in 1986. A National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index pain score was calculated based on the responses on the 2008 questionnaire. Participants with pain scores ≥ 8 were considered CP/CPPS cases (n=689). Results Higher leisure-time physical activity was associated with lower risk of CP/CPPS. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) comparing >35.0 to ≤3.5 MET-h/wk of physical activity was 0.72 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56, 0.92, p for trend <0.001). Observed inverse associations between physical activity and CP/CPPS were similar for both moderate- and vigorous-intensity activities. Sedentary behavior, measured as time spent watching television, was not associated with risk of CP/CPPS (p for trend 0.64). Conclusions Findings from this study, the first large scale and most comprehensive study to date on this association, suggest that higher levels of leisure-time physical activity may lower risk of CP/CPPS in middle-aged and older men. PMID:25116086

  18. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts

  19. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Relationship between coronary artery ectasia, cocaine abuse and acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Dendramis, Gregory; Paleologo, Claudia; Piraino, Davide; Assennato, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery ectasia (CAE) often represents a coronary angiography finding casually detected or following the occurrence of an acute coronary syndrome. The pathogenetic role of cocaine abuse in the genesis of CAE is still little known and very few data are available in literature. We describe a case of a 31-year-old male cocaine user admitted to our department for typical acute chest pain. Coronary angiography showed diffuse coronary ectasia with slow flows and without hemodynamically significant stenosis. An increasing of matrix metalloproteinases values and a reduction of their tissue inhibitors was showed both during hospitalization and at one month after discharge. This case report emphasizes the close relationship between cocaine abuse, CAE and acute coronary syndromes in patients without hemodynamically significant coronary stenosis. As reported by Satran et al, cocaine abuse should be considered an important risk factor for CAE and these patients appear to be at increased risk of angina and acute myocardial infarct. Further studies that can strengthen this hypothesis would be useful to deepen and better analyze this interesting association. PMID:27231522

  1. Research design considerations for single-dose analgesic clinical trials in acute pain: IMMPACT recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Stephen A; Desjardins, Paul J; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H; Katz, Nathaniel P; Kehlet, Henrik; Ballantyne, Jane C; Burke, Laurie B; Carragee, Eugene; Cowan, Penney; Croll, Scott; Dionne, Raymond A; Farrar, John T; Gilron, Ian; Gordon, Debra B; Iyengar, Smriti; Jay, Gary W; Kalso, Eija A; Kerns, Robert D; McDermott, Michael P; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rappaport, Bob A; Rauschkolb, Christine; Royal, Mike A; Segerdahl, Märta; Stauffer, Joseph W; Todd, Knox H; Vanhove, Geertrui F; Wallace, Mark S; West, Christine; White, Richard E; Wu, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    This article summarizes the results of a meeting convened by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) on key considerations and best practices governing the design of acute pain clinical trials. We discuss the role of early phase clinical trials, including pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) trials, and the value of including both placebo and active standards of comparison in acute pain trials. This article focuses on single-dose and short-duration trials with emphasis on the perioperative and study design factors that influence assay sensitivity. Recommendations are presented on assessment measures, study designs, and operational factors. Although most of the methodological advances have come from studies of postoperative pain after dental impaction, bunionectomy, and other surgeries, the design considerations discussed are applicable to many other acute pain studies conducted in different settings. PMID:26683233

  2. Development of Cardiovascular Indices of Acute Pain Responding in Infants: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Waxman, Jordana A.; Pillai Riddell, Rebecca R.; Tablon, Paula; Schmidt, Louis A.; Pinhasov, Angelina

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cardiovascular indices of pain are pervasive in the hospital setting. However, no prospective research has examined the development of cardiac responses to acutely painful procedures in the first year of life. Objectives. Our main goal was to synthesize existing evidence regarding the development of cardiovascular responses to acutely painful medical procedures over the first year of life in preterm and term born infants. Methods. A systematic search retrieved 6994 articles to review against inclusion criteria. A total of 41 studies were included in the review. Results. In response to acutely painful procedures, most infants had an increase in mean heart rate (HR) that varied in magnitude both across and within gestational and postnatal ages. Research in the area of HR variability has been inconsistent, limiting conclusions. Conclusions. Longitudinal research is needed to further understand the inherent variability of cardiovascular pain responses across and within gestational and postnatal ages and the causes for the variability. PMID:27445630

  3. Outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome--worldwide, 2003.

    PubMed

    2003-03-21

    Since late February 2003, CDC has been supporting the World Health Organization (WHO) in the investigation of a multicountry outbreak of atypical pneumonia of unknown etiology. The illness is being referred to as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). This report describes the scope of the outbreak, preliminary case definition, and interim infection control guidance for the United States. PMID:12665115

  4. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Prevention in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsueh-Erh

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is a newly identified respiratory disease that threatened Taiwan between April 14 and July 5, 2003. Chang Gung University experienced various SARS-related episodes, such as the postponement of classes for 7 days, the reporting of probable SARS cases, and the isolation of students under Level A and B…

  5. Tarsal tunnel syndrome masked by painful diabetic polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ormeci, Tugrul; Mahirogulları, Mahir; Aysal, Fikret

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Various causes influence the etiology of tarsal tunnel syndrome including systemic diseases with progressive neuropathy, such as diabetes. Presentation of case We describe a 52-year-old male patient with complaints of numbness, burning sensation and pain in both feet. The laboratory results showed that the patient had uncontrolled diabetes, and the EMG showed distal symmetrical sensory-motor neuropathy and nerve entrapment at the right. Ultrasonography and MRI showed the cyst in relation to medial plantar nerve, and edema- moderate atrophy were observed at the distal muscles of the foot. Discussion Foot neuropathy in diabetic patients is a complex process. So, in planning the initial treatment, medical or surgical therapy is selected based on the location and type of the pathology. Foot deformities can be corrected with resting, anti-inflammatory treatment, appropriate shoes, orthesis and socks, and if required, ankle stabilization can be attempted. If the patient is still unresponsive, surgical treatment may be applied. Conclusion It is essential to investigate more localized reasons like tarsal tunnel syndrome that may mimic diabetic neuropathy, should be treated primarily. PMID:26333036

  6. CPX-351 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  7. Abdominal Lymphatic Malformation Presenting as Acute Abdominal Pain: A Common Pediatric Complaint, but an Unusual Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Christopher I; Farrell, Caitlin A; Nelson, Kyle A; Levy, Jason A

    2016-05-01

    We present the clinical and radiological findings involving a mesenteric lymphatic malformation causing volvulus in a toddler presenting with acute abdominal pain, as well as its treatment options. PMID:27139293

  8. Connective tissue, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome(s), and head and cervical pain.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Ghibellini, Giulia; Celletti, Claudia; Camerota, Filippo; Grammatico, Paola

    2015-03-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an umbrella term for a growing group of hereditary disorders of the connective tissue mainly manifesting with generalized joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and vascular and internal organ fragility. In contrast with other well known heritable connective tissue disorders with severe cardiovascular involvement (e.g., Marfan syndrome), most EDS patients share a nearly normal life span, but are severely limited by disabling features, such as pain, fatigue and headache. In this work, pertinent literature is reviewed with focus on prevalence, features and possible pathogenic mechanisms of headache in EDSs. Gathered data are fragmented and generally have a low level of evidence. Headache is reported in no less than 1/3 of the patients. Migraine results the most common type in the hypermobility type of EDS. Other possibly related headache disorders include tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache, headache attributed to spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leakage, headache secondary to Chiari malformation, cervicogenic headache and neck-tongue syndrome, whose association still lacks of reliable prevalence studies. The underlying pathogenesis seems complex and variably associated with cardiovascular dysautonomia, cervical spine and temporomandibular joint instability/dysfunction, meningeal fragility, poor sleep quality, pain-killer drugs overuse and central sensitization. Particular attention is posed on a presumed subclinical cervical spine dysfunction. Standard treatment is always symptomatic and usually unsuccessful. Assessment and management procedures are discussed in order to put some basis for ameliorating the actual patients' needs and nurturing future research. PMID:25655119

  9. [The use of nimesulide in the treatment of acute low back pain].

    PubMed

    Shikhkerimov, R K

    2016-01-01

    The objective is to study the efficacy and safety of nimesulide (nemulex) in the treatment of acute low back pain (LBP). The medical documentation of 54 patients with primary syndrome of LBP, which were treated in a polyclinic with nemulex at a dose of 200 mg per day had been studied. The assessment of patients' condition and efficacy and safety of the treatment was conducted based on the information after three visits (1-st, 5-th and 10-th day). The analysis took into account the data of clinical-neurological examination and the assessment of pain intensity at rest and at movement according to the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the severity of Lasegue symptom and limitation of movements in the lumbar spine. Safety of the therapy was evaluated on the basis of accounting of undesirable side reactions and data analysis and physical examination and laboratory testing. Cardiovascular safety was assessed by blood pressure and blood lipid profile on day 10. The use of nemulex at a dose of 200 mg per day resulted in relief of pain and increase of mobility in the lumbar spine on the 5th day of treatment that indicates the effectiveness of anti-inflammatory therapy to restore the previous functional status of patients with LBP. The use of nemulex was accompanied not only by statistically significant analgesic effect (0,78±0,14 points alone; 1,12±0,18 points when moving by VAS on the 10th day of the treatment) and high security (only 1 of the 54 patients was recorded to have elevation of hepatic transaminases; and 2 patients with dyspepsia without endoscopic changes of gastrointestinal tract). PMID:27240177

  10. Postoperative sleep disruptions: a potential catalyst of acute pain?

    PubMed

    Chouchou, Florian; Khoury, Samar; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Denis, Ronald; Lavigne, Gilles J

    2014-06-01

    Despite the substantial advances in the understanding of pain mechanisms and management, postoperative pain relief remains an important health care issue. Surgical patients also frequently report postoperative sleep complaints. Major sleep alterations in the postoperative period include sleep fragmentation, reduced total sleep time, and loss of time spent in slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep. Clinical and experimental studies show that sleep disturbances may exacerbate pain, whereas pain and opioid treatments disturb sleep. Surgical stress appears to be a major contributor to both sleep disruptions and altered pain perception. However, pain and the use of opioid analgesics could worsen sleep alterations, whereas sleep disruptions may contribute to intensify pain. Nevertheless, little is known about the relationship between postoperative sleep and pain. Although the sleep-pain interaction has been addressed from both ends, this review focuses on the impact of sleep disruptions on pain perception. A better understanding of the effect of postoperative sleep disruptions on pain perception would help in selecting patients at risk for more severe pain and may facilitate the development of more effective and safer pain management programs. PMID:24074687

  11. Identification Bracelet Precipitated Acute Compartment Syndrome during Intravenous Infusion in an Obtunded Patient

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Wahib; Chaucer, Benjamin; Felek, Suleyman; Arsura, Edward L.; Nfonoyim, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is a serious condition requiring immediate medical care. A lack of urgent medical treatment can result in serious complications such as loss of function and even amputation. While the pathophysiology of acute compartment syndrome is well understood, numerous potential causes are still being discovered. A rare cause of acute compartment syndrome is IV infiltration. We present a case of acute compartment syndrome resulting from intravenous infusion due to proximal placement of a patient identification bracelet. We conclude that both routine evaluation for IV infiltration and proximal placement of IV lines are essential for prevention of acute compartment syndrome. PMID:26904308

  12. Isolated Acute Exertional Compartment Syndrome (AECS) of the Extensor Carpi Ulnaris

    PubMed Central

    J, Mika; O, Brinkmann; TO, Clanton; G, Szalay; Rw, Kinne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Only two cases of an isolated compartment syndrome of the extensor carpi ulnaris have been described previously [1,2]. In both cases, the onset was acute. In the first case, histological examination revealed no necrosis. The second case was regarded to be due to a previously unknown anatomic variation and no necrotic tissue was recognized upon gross examination. This case report describes a third case of an isolated acute exertional compartment syndrome (AECS) of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle with focal areas of necrotic tissue. Case Report: We report the third case of an isolated AECS of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle. A 35 year-old left-handed man, a motor mechanic by profession, presented to the emergency department with excruciating pain at the ulnar side of the left dorsal forearm. The previous day, he had repetitively used a sliding hammer with his left arm. Since then he had experienced severe pain despite the use of over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Here, in contrast to the previously reported cases, the histological examination revealed focal areas of necrotic tissue. No anatomic variations were found during surgical decompression. Postoperatively, the patient had complete pain relief and return of function. Conclusion: This report again indicates that the extensor carpi ulnaris is especially prone to develop the AECS syndrome and raises the question whether involvement of the other extensor muscles may rather be secondary to the excessive swelling of the extensor carpi ulnaris and not to strenuous exercise. This should be taken into consideration when humans load their forearm repeatedly during heavy labor or sports. In addition, we are showing that even with histologically confirmed areas of partial muscle necrosis the patient can return to normal muscle function. PMID:27299113

  13. Endogenous inhibition of somatic pain is impaired in girls with irritable bowel syndrome compared with healthy girls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous pain inhibition is often deficient in adults with chronic pain conditions including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is unclear whether deficiencies in pain inhibition are present in young children with IBS. The present study compared endogenous pain inhibition, somatic pain threshold, ...

  14. Urinary hypoxanthine and xanthine levels in acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Turgan, N; Boydak, B; Habif, S; Gülter, C; Senol, B; Mutaf, I; Ozmen, D; Bayindir, O

    1999-01-01

    Ischemia leads to impaired ATP metabolism, with increased production of purine degradation products, such as hypoxanthine and xanthine, which are useful markers of tissue hypoxia. These extracellular markers of ischemia have been studied extensively in many clinical conditions of oxidative stress, including perinatal asphyxia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, cerebral ischemia, and preeclampsia. The aim of this study was to explore the usefulness of urinary hypoxanthine and xanthine as ischemia markers in acute coronary syndromes. Urinary excretion of hypoxanthine and xanthine was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography in 30 patients with acute coronary syndromes and in 30 age- and sex-matched controls. Serum and urine uric acid, creatinine, and urea concentrations were also determined. Hypoxanthine excretion was significantly elevated in patients compared with healthy controls (84.37+/-8.63 and 42.70+/-3.97 nmol/mg creatinine, mean+/-SEM, P<0.0001). Urinary xanthine levels were also increased in patients with acute coronary syndromes (100.13+/-12.14 and 34.74+/-4.07 nmol/mg creatinine patients and controls, respectively; P<0.0001). Hypoxanthine and xanthine excretion showed a strong positive correlation in both groups. Significant negative correlations between urinary hypoxanthine and uric acid and xanthine and uric acid were observed in the patients, but not in controls. In conclusion, increased levels of ATP degradation products hypoxanthine and xanthine are observed in various hypoxic clinical conditions. This study suggests that these parameters may be useful markers of ischemia in patients with acute coronary syndromes. PMID:10784378

  15. Evaluation of acute right upper quadrant pain: sonography and /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA cholescintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, W.P.; Mack, L.A.; Rudd, T.G.; Rogers, J.V.; Gibbs, P.

    1982-07-01

    A group of 75 patients with acute right upper quadrant pain was evaluated with both sonography and cholescintigraphy. Accuracy in screening for gallbladder disease was significantly greater with sonography (96%) than with cholescintigraphy (74%). For selecting patients with acute cholecystitis from this population that included acute and chronic cholecystitis as well as nonbiliary pathology, PIPIDA was less accurate (77%) than might be expected based on previous reports primarily due to false positive nonvisualization caused by chronic cholecystitis. Of patients with nonbiliary pathology, sonography was able to detect the cause of the right upper quadrant pain in 21%. Patients with acute right upper quadrant pain should first be screened with sonography. If cholescintigraphy is subsequently used for suspected acute cholecystitis, positive results should be interpreted with caution before surgery is planned.

  16. Multidetector CT in emergency radiology: acute and generalized non-traumatic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Paolantonio, Pasquale; Rengo, Marco; Ferrari, Riccardo; Laghi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) is an imaging technique that provides otherwise unobtainable information in the diagnostic work-up of patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A correct working diagnosis depends essentially on understanding the individual patient's clinical data and laboratory findings. In haemodynamically stable patients with acute severe and generalized abdominal pain, MDCT is now the preferred imaging test and gives invaluable diagnostic information, also in unstable patients after stabilization. In this descriptive review, we focus our attention on acute, severe and generalized or undifferentiated non-traumatic abdominal pain. The main differential diagnoses are acute pancreatitis, gastrointestinal perforation, ruptured abdominal aneurysm and acute mesenteric ischaemia. We will provide radiologist readers with a technical guide to optimize MDCT imaging protocols and list the major CT signs essential to reach a correct diagnosis and guide the best treatment. PMID:26689097

  17. Study on different surgical approaches for acute Lumber disk protrusion combined with Cauda Equina Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lianbing; Fang, Liangqin; Qiu, Yihua; Xing, Shunming; Chen, Dechun; He, Xiang; Wang, Jinxin; Lai, Jing; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Jiefeng; Liao, Teng; Tan, Junming

    2014-01-01

    To compare the long and short term effectiveness and complications of different surgical approaches for Lumber disk protrusion combined with Cauda Equina Syndrome and find a better surgical method for the disease. In this study, follow up records of 144 patients received conventional laminectomy and minimally invasive decompression and fenestration 48 hours within acute injury of lumber disk protrusion combined with Cauda Equina Syndrome were analyzed. Surgical outcome immediately and 3, 6, 12, 36 months after the surgery were compared to evaluate the effectiveness two different approaches. The results indicated that there are no significant differences regarding age, sexual proportion, body mass index (BMI), visual analogue scale of pain (VAS) score as well as Frankel scores before the surgery, and significant differences VAS score as well as Frankel scores immediately after the surgery. In conclusion, minimally invasive decompression and fenestration can be of the same effectiveness and less complications comparing with the conventional laminectomy. PMID:25674258

  18. Extended-release morphine sulfate in treatment of severe acute and chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Balch, Robert J; Trescot, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Morphine is the archetypal opioid analgesic. Because it is a short-acting opioid, its use has been limited to the management of acute pain. The development of extended-release formulations have resulted in the increased utilization of morphine in chronic pain conditions. This review documents the history of morphine use in pain treatment, and describes the metabolism, pharmacodynamics, formulations, and efficacy of the currently available extended-release morphine medications. PMID:21197323

  19. Effects of Parasternal Block on Acute and Chronic Pain in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Surgery.

    PubMed

    Doğan Bakı, Elif; Kavrut Ozturk, Nilgün; Ayoğlu, Rauf Umut; Emmiler, Mustafa; Karslı, Bilge; Uzel, Hanife

    2016-09-01

    Background Sternotomy causes considerable postoperative pain and postoperative pain management encompasses different analgesic regimens. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of peroperative parasternal block with levobupivacaine on acute and chronic pain after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Materials and Methods A total of 81 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery were included in this study. Patients were randomly allocated by opening an envelope to receive either parasternal block with pharmacologic analgesia (group P; before sternal wire placement: sternotomy and mediastinal tube sites were infiltrated with local anesthetics) or pharmacologic analgesia alone (group C) for postoperative pain relief. All patients received intravenous tramadol with patient-controlled analgesia at the end of the surgery. Demographic characteristics, vital signs, tramadol consumption, analgesic intake, and intensity of pain with a visual analogue scale were recorded for each patient. Six months after surgery, the patients' type of chronic pain was evaluated using the Leeds Assessment Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale questionnaire. Results Patients who received parasternal block experienced less pain and needed less opioid analgesic (125.75 ± 28.9 mg in group P vs 213.17 ± 61.25 mg in group C) for 24 hours postoperatively (P < .001). There was no significant difference in nociceptive and neuropathic pain between the groups. Conclusion Parasternal block had a benefical effect on the management of postoperative acute pain and decreased opioid consumption after surgery but had no significant effect in chronic post surgical pain. PMID:25900900

  20. Gender Differences in Acute and Chronic Pain in the Emergency Department: Results of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference Pain Section

    PubMed Central

    Musey, Paul I.; Linnstaedt, Sarah D.; Platts-Mills, Timothy F.; Miner, James R.; Bortsov, Andrey V.; Safdar, Basmah; Bijur, Polly; Rosenau, Alex; Tsze, Daniel S.; Chang, Andrew K.; Dorai, Suprina; Engel, Kirsten; Feldman, James A.; Fusaro, Angela M.; Lee, David C.; Rosenberg, Mark; Keefe, Francis J.; Peak, David A.; Nam, Catherine S.; Patel, Roma G.; Fillingim, Roger B.; McLean, Samuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a leading public health problem in the United States, with an annual economic burden of more than $630 billion, and is one of the most common reasons that individuals seek emergency department (ED) care. There is a paucity of data regarding sex differences in the assessment and treatment of acute and chronic pain conditions in the ED. The Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference convened in Dallas, Texas in May of 2014 to develop a research agenda to address this issue among others related to sex differences in the ED. Prior to the conference, experts and stakeholders from emergency medicine and the pain research field reviewed the current literature and identified eight candidate priority areas. At the conference, these eight areas were reviewed and all eight were ratified using a nominal group technique to build consensus. These priority areas were: 1) gender differences in the pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions for pain, including differences in opioid tolerance, side effects, or misuse; 2) gender differences in pain severity perceptions, clinically meaningful differences in acute pain, and pain treatment preferences; 3) gender differences in pain outcomes of ED patients across the lifespan; 4) gender differences in the relationship between acute pain and acute psychological responses; 5) the influence of physician-patient gender differences and characteristics on the assessment and treatment of pain; 6) gender differences in the influence of acute stress and chronic stress on acute pain responses; 7) gender differences in biologic mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating acute pain in ED populations; and 8) gender differences in biologic mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating chronic pain development after trauma, stress, or acute illness exposure. These areas represent priority areas for future scientific inquiry, and gaining understanding in these will be essential to improving our understanding of sex and gender

  1. Gender differences in acute and chronic pain in the emergency department: results of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference pain section.

    PubMed

    Musey, Paul I; Linnstaedt, Sarah D; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Miner, James R; Bortsov, Andrey V; Safdar, Basmah; Bijur, Polly; Rosenau, Alex; Tsze, Daniel S; Chang, Andrew K; Dorai, Suprina; Engel, Kirsten G; Feldman, James A; Fusaro, Angela M; Lee, David C; Rosenberg, Mark; Keefe, Francis J; Peak, David A; Nam, Catherine S; Patel, Roma G; Fillingim, Roger B; McLean, Samuel A

    2014-12-01

    Pain is a leading public health problem in the United States, with an annual economic burden of more than $630 billion, and is one of the most common reasons that individuals seek emergency department (ED) care. There is a paucity of data regarding sex differences in the assessment and treatment of acute and chronic pain conditions in the ED. The Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference convened in Dallas, Texas, in May 2014 to develop a research agenda to address this issue among others related to sex differences in the ED. Prior to the conference, experts and stakeholders from emergency medicine and the pain research field reviewed the current literature and identified eight candidate priority areas. At the conference, these eight areas were reviewed and all eight were ratified using a nominal group technique to build consensus. These priority areas were: 1) gender differences in the pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for pain, including differences in opioid tolerance, side effects, or misuse; 2) gender differences in pain severity perceptions, clinically meaningful differences in acute pain, and pain treatment preferences; 3) gender differences in pain outcomes of ED patients across the life span; 4) gender differences in the relationship between acute pain and acute psychological responses; 5) the influence of physician-patient gender differences and characteristics on the assessment and treatment of pain; 6) gender differences in the influence of acute stress and chronic stress on acute pain responses; 7) gender differences in biological mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating acute pain in ED populations; and 8) gender differences in biological mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating chronic pain development after trauma, stress, or acute illness exposure. These areas represent priority areas for future scientific inquiry, and gaining understanding in these will be essential to improving our understanding of sex and gender

  2. 'Spousal Revenge Syndrome'- description of a new chronic pelvic pain syndrome patient cohort.

    PubMed

    Makovey, Iryna; Dolinga, Robert; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2016-02-01

    Psychological factors may play a role in the pathophysiology of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). This case series describes a cohort of 10 men presenting with CP/CPPS whose symptoms began after an extramarital sexual encounter, who strongly believed they had a sexually transmitted infection (STI) despite negative testing, and who have had no improvement with empiric antibiotic treatment. Patients' clinical presentation and physical exam findings are reviewed. All men were clinically phenotyped with the UPOINT system. Pelvic floor spasm and not infection was prominent in these men. Treatment recommendations are proposed and compliance assessed. PMID:26892062

  3. Reduced acute nociception and chronic pain in Shank2-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyoung-Gon; Oh, Seog-Bae; Zhuo, Min; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a debilitating mental illness and social issue. Autism spectrum disorder patients suffer from social isolation, cognitive deficits, compulsive behavior, and sensory deficits, including hyposensitivity to pain. However, recent studies argued that autism spectrum disorder patients show physiological pain response and, in some cases, even extremely intense pain response to harmless stimulation. Recently, Shank gene family was reported as one of the genetic risk factors of autism spectrum disorder. Thus, in this study, we used Shank2(-) (/) (-) (Shank2 knock-out, KO) mice to investigate the controversial pain sensitivity issue and found that Shank2 KO mice showed reduced tactile perception and analgesia to chronic pain. PMID:27145803

  4. Acetazolamide attenuates chemical-stimulated but not thermal-stimulated acute pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ya-jie; Chen, Ying; Pang, Chong; Wu, Ning; Li, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Acetazolamide (AZA), a carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, has been found to alleviate inflammatory and neuropathic pain in rats. In the present study, we investigated the effects of AZA on thermal- and chemical-stimulated acute pain in mice and the possible mechanisms underlying the effects. Methods: Five acute pain models based on thermal and chemical stimuli were established to investigate the effects of AZA on different types of nociception in mice. The antinociceptive effects of methazolamide (another CA inhibitor) and diazepam (a positive allosteric modulator of GABAA receptor) were also examined. The drugs were administered either intraperitoneally (ip) or intrathecally. Results: AZA (50–200 mg/kg, ip) did not produce analgesia in two thermal-stimulated acute pain models, ie, mouse tail-flick and hot-plate tests. In contrast, AZA (50–200 mg/kg, ip) dose-dependently reduced paw licking time in both capsaicin and formalin tests in mice. A similar result was observed in a mouse acetic acid-induced writhing test. However, AZA (10 nmol/mouse, intrathecally) did not produce significant analgesia in the 3 chemical-stimulated acute pain models. In addition, methazolamide (50–200 mg/kg, ip) and diazepam (0.25–1.0 mg/kg, ip) did not produce significant analgesia in either thermal- or chemical-stimulated acute pain. Conclusion: AZA produces analgesia in chemical-stimulated, but not thermal-stimulated acute pain in mice. The attenuation of chemical-stimulated acute pain by AZA may not be due to enhancement of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition via inhibiting CA activity but rather a peripheral ion channel-related mechanism. PMID:24335844

  5. Metabolic syndrome in the survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ouf, Noran M; Jan, Mohammed M

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a common complication encountered in children surviving acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Affected patients develop obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Metabolic syndrome is a consequence of multiple factors, particularly hormonal imbalance induced by various ALL treatments. This review aims to evaluate the risk factors and mechanisms leading to the development of metabolic syndrome. Further research is needed to improve our understanding of the mechanisms leading to insulin resistance and the associated endothelial and adipose tissue dysfunction. Future studies should also examine other possible contributing factors, such as environmental and genetic factors. Understanding these factors will help in guiding modifications of the current ALL treatment protocols in order to prevent the development of this syndrome and hence improve the quality of life of ALL survivors. Until this is achieved, clinicians should continue to identify patients at risk early and use a therapeutic approach that combines dietary restrictions and enhanced physical activity. PMID:25081809

  6. [Organ damage and cardiorenal syndrome in acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Casado Cerrada, Jesús; Pérez Calvo, Juan Ignacio

    2014-03-01

    Heart failure is a complex syndrome that affects almost all organs and systems of the body. Signs and symptoms of organ dysfunction, in particular kidney dysfunction, may be accentuated or become evident for the first time during acute decompensation of heart failure. Cardiorenal syndrome has been defined as the simultaneous dysfunction of both the heart and the kidney, regardless of which of the two organs may have suffered the initial damage and regardless also of their previous functional status. Research into the mechanisms regulating the complex relationship between the two organs is prompting the search for new biomarkers to help physicians detect renal damage in subclinical stages. Hence, a preventive approach to renal dysfunction may be adopted in the clinical setting in the near future. This article provides a general overview of cardiorenal syndrome and an update of the physiopathological mechanisms involved. Special emphasis is placed on the role of visceral congestion as an emergent mechanism in this syndrome. PMID:24930080

  7. Pain experience and expression in Rett syndrome: Subjective and objective measurement approaches

    PubMed Central

    Barney, Chantel C.; Feyma, Timothy; Beisang, Arthur; Symons, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is associated with myriad debilitating health issues and significant motor and communicative impairments. Because of the former there is concern about the possibility of recurrent and chronic pain but because of the latter it remains difficult to determine what pain ‘looks like’ in RTT. This study investigated pain experience and expression using multiple complementary subjective and objective approaches among a clinical RTT sample. Following informed consent, 18 participants (all female) with RTT (mean age= 12.8 years, SD= 6.32) were characterized in terms of pain experience and interference, typical pain expression, and elicited pain behavior during a passive range of motion-like examination procedure. Parents completed the Dalhousie Pain Interview (DPI; pain type, frequency, duration, intensity), the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI; pain interference), and the Non-Communicating Children’s Pain Checklist – Revised (NCCPC-R; typical pain expression). A Pain Examination Procedure (PEP) was conducted and scored using the Pain and Discomfort Scale (PADS). The majority of the sample (89%) were reported to experience pain in the previous week which presented as gastrointestinal (n=8), musculoskeletal (n=5), and seizure related pain (n=5) that was intense (scored 0–10; M= 5.67, SD= 3.09) and long in duration (M= 25.22 hours, SD= 53.52). Numerous pain-expressive behaviors were inventoried (e.g., vocal, facial, mood/interaction changes) when parents reported their child’s typical pain behaviors and based on independent direct observation during a reliably coded pain exam. This study provides subjective and objective evidence that individuals with RTT experience recurring and chronic pain for which pain expression appears intact. PMID:26425056

  8. Acute Pain Speeds Skin Barrier Recovery in Healthy Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Jennifer E.; Song, Sunmi; Engeland, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Psychological stress is known to impair skin barrier recovery, but little is known about the impact of pain on skin healing processes. Our primary goals were to examine the degree to which acute pain affects recovery from skin barrier disruption, and the potential mediating impact of cortisol and catecholamines. Methods Healthy non-smokers aged 18-43 (N=53, 65% women) underwent a 3-minute cold pressor pain stimulus to their foot. Tape-stripping of forearm skin occurred at two separate locations: before (site 1) and after (site 2) the pain stimulus. Transepidural water loss (TEWL) was assessed at baseline (pre-stripping), immediately post-stripping, and at 75 minutes to determine skin barrier recovery. Cortisol and catecholamine responses were obtained from multiple saliva and plasma samples, respectively. Results Contrary to expectations, greater pain was associated with faster skin barrier recovery, even after controlling for demographics, mood, anxiety, and other factors. Those who reported higher pain showed faster recovery at site 2 compared to a) individuals who experienced lower pain; and b) their own recovery at site 1. Greater increase in norepinephrine (but not in cortisol) was also associated with faster recovery at site 2, and mediated the impact of pain on recovery. Discussion Results bolster evidence that acute pain can affect immune-related processes. It is possible that acute pain may speed recovery from dermal abrasions, although pain is likely to impair recovery from more severe wounds. As pain is an important potential target for clinical intervention, further investigation of pain, stress, and healing processes is warranted. PMID:23148814

  9. Prevalence and Characteristics of Anergia (Lack of Energy) in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Jonathan A.; Davidson, Karina W.; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Shimbo, Daichi; Newman, Jonathan D.; Gurland, Barry J.; Maurer, Mathew S.

    2012-01-01

    Anergia, a commonly occurring syndrome in older adults and patients with cardiovascular diseases, is associated with functional and clinical limitations. To date, the prevalence and clinical-demographic characteristics of anergia in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) have not been elucidated. We examined the prevalence and clinical-demographic characteristics of anergia in a multiethnic sample of patients with ACS. Hospitalized patients with ACS (n = 472), enrolled in the Prescription Usage Lifestyle and Stress (PULSE) prospective cohort study, completed assessments of demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics within 7 days of hospitalization for an ACS event. Current depressive disorder was ascertained using a structured psychiatric interview 3 to 7 days post-discharge. Anergia was assessed at baseline and defined using patients’ binary responses (yes/no) to seven items related to energy level. At least 1 complaint of anergia was reported by 79.9% (n = 377) of patients, and 32% (n = 153) of patients met criteria for anergia. In a multivariable logistic regression model, anergia was independently associated with being female, white (compared to black), having bodily pain, participating in exercise, having current depressive disorder, and having higher values on the Charlson comorbidity index. In conclusion, anergia is a highly prevalent syndrome among patients with ACS. It is distinct from depression and is associated with modifiable clinical factors such as participation in exercise and bodily pain that may be appropriate targets for intervention. PMID:22835409

  10. The role of experiential avoidance in acute pain tolerance: a laboratory test.

    PubMed

    Feldner, Matthew T; Hekmat, Hamid; Zvolensky, Michael J; Vowles, Kevin E; Secrist, Zachary; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W

    2006-06-01

    The present investigation examined the role of experiential avoidance in terms of acute pain tolerance and subsequent recovery. Seventy nonclinical participants completed the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire and underwent a well-established cold pressor task. Results indicated that individuals reporting higher levels of experiential avoidance had lower pain endurance and tolerance and recovered more slowly from this particular type of aversive event. Consistent with theoretical prediction, these findings suggest that experiential avoidance may play a role in tolerance of acute pain. PMID:15882839

  11. Circulating endothelin in acute ischaemic syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Ray, S G; McMurray, J J; Morton, J J; Dargie, H J

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Endothelin is an extremely potent vasoconstrictor that may have a role in the pathogenesis of acute myocardial ischaemia. Atrial natriuretic factor is an endogenous antagonist of endothelin. To find the pattern and possible importance of circulating endothelin in ischaemic heart disease, concentrations in normal controls and those in patients with stable and unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction, and chronic cardiac failure were compared. The relation between circulating concentrations of endothelin and atrial natriuretic factor in the aftermath of myocardial infarction was also examined. METHODS--Eighteen patients with acute myocardial infarction, 10 with unstable angina, 10 with stable angina, 12 with chronic cardiac failure, and 10 normal controls were studied. Endothelin concentration was measured in venous plasma by radioimmunoassay. In patients with acute myocardial infarction simultaneous concentrations of endothelin and atrial natriuretic factor were measured on admission and at one, four, and 24 hours. RESULTS--Mean concentrations (SEM) of endothelin were 5.72 (0.19) fmol/ml in controls, 6.56 (0.48) fmol/ml in stable angina, 6.41 (0.48) fmol/ml in unstable angina, and 13.83 (0.95) fmol/ml in chronic cardiac failure. In acute myocardial infarction concentrations were 8.81 (0.69) fmol/ml on admission, 11.85 (1.02) fmol/ml at one hour, 11.88 (1.10) fmol/ml at four hours, and 7.30 (0.49) fmol/ml at 24 hours. Concentrations of atrial natriuretic factor at the same times were 68.1 (13.1) pg/ml, 8.4 (1.5) pg/ml, 24.4 (4.1) pg/ml, and 42.0 (6.9) pg/ml. CONCLUSIONS--Plasma endothelin is raised in chronic heart failure and in the aftermath of acute myocardial infarction but not in stable or unstable angina. After myocardial infarction endothelin concentrations are raised whereas concentrations of atrial natriuretic factor are relatively low. The role of endothelin in the pathogenesis of acute myocardial infarction and its interactions with other

  12. Management of patients with complex regional pain syndrome type I.

    PubMed

    Gatti, D; Rossini, M; Adami, S

    2016-08-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) includes different conditions characterized by regional pain and sensory, motor, sudomotor, vasomotor, and/or trophic findings, affecting a peripheral limb usually after a noxious event, such as a trauma or surgery. The pathophysiology is still poorly understood. Limited data are available on the incidence of CRPS-I, and the disease is underestimated and under-diagnosed. The disease shows a female preponderance approximately 3:1 with a peak age of incidence around the 5th and 6th decade. The available diagnostic criteria for CRPS-I rely on clinical criteria that are unfortunately focused on the signs and symptoms of the chronic and late disease, while little emphasis is given to the typical imaging (X-rays, bone scintigraphy, MRI) findings of the early phase. Over the last decades, several therapies have been proposed but the few studies available are often too small to be conclusive and rarely evolved to randomized controlled trials (RCTs). On the basis of the results of a few RCTs, only short courses of high bisphosphonate doses appear to provide substantial benefits. The best results are seen in patients in the early phase of the disease, often with the persistent remission or complete healing of the conditions. Since the only accredited mechanism of action of bisphosphonates is the suppression of osteoclastic bone resorption, it is likely the initial dramatic bone loss plays a role in the maintenance and evolution of CRPS-I. Short courses of high doses of bisphosphonates should be considered the treatment of choice for patients with CRPS-I. PMID:26928187

  13. Successful management of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 using single injection interscalene brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Fallatah, Summayah M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type 1 of the upper limb is a painful and debilitating condition. Interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) in conjugation with other modalities was shown to be a feasible therapy with variable success. We reported a case of CRPS type 1 as diagnosed by International Association for the Study of Pain criteria in which pharmacological approaches failed to achieve adequate pain relief and even were associated with progressive dysfunction of the upper extremity. Single injection ISB, in combination with physical therapy and botulinum toxin injection, was successful to alleviate pain with functional restoration. PMID:25422619

  14. Translating Research into Practice Intervention Improves Management of Acute Pain in Older Hip Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Titler, Marita G; Herr, Keela; Brooks, John M; Xie, Xian-Jin; Ardery, Gail; Schilling, Margo L; Marsh, J Lawrence; Everett, Linda Q; Clarke, William R

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test an interdisciplinary, multifaceted, translating research into practice (TRIP) intervention to (a) promote adoption, by physicians and nurses, of evidence-based (EB) acute pain management practices in hospitalized older adults, (b) decrease barriers to use of EB acute pain management practices, and (c) decrease pain intensity of older hospitalized adults. Study Design Experimental design with the hospital as the unit of randomization. Study Setting Twelve acute care hospitals in the Midwest. Data Sources (a) Medical records (MRs) of patients ≥65 years or older with a hip fracture admitted before and following implementation of the TRIP intervention and (b) physicians and nurses who care for those patients. Data Collection Data were abstracted from MRs and questions distributed to nurses and physicians. Principal Findings The Summative Index for Quality of Acute Pain Care (0–18 scale) was significantly higher for the experimental (10.1) than comparison group (8.4) at the end of the TRIP implementation phase. At the end of the TRIP implementation phase, patients in the experimental group had a lower mean pain intensity rating than those in the comparison group (p<.0001). Conclusion The TRIP intervention improved quality of acute pain management of older adults hospitalized with a hip fracture. PMID:19146568

  15. Laparoscopic Management of Acute Pancreatitis Secondary to Rapunzel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Koushk Jalali, Bijan; Bingöl, Alperen; Reyad, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    A 17-year-old girl presented with bilious vomiting and abdominal pain to the surgery department. The history was positive for trichotillomania and trichophagia. A CT scan showed a mass in the stomach, which was highly suspicious for a gastric bezoar. Drooping parts of the bezoar caused a duodenal obstruction with secondary acute pancreatitis. The bezoar was removed via a laparoscopically performed gastrotomy. PMID:27144047

  16. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  18. A possible role of the locus coeruleus in complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    Heightened sensitivity to painful stimulation commonly spreads from the affected limb to the ipsilateral forehead in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In addition, acoustic startle evokes greater auditory discomfort and increases in limb pain when presented on the affected than unaffected side. In contrast, limb pain ordinarily evokes analgesia in the ipsilateral forehead of healthy participants, and acoustic startle suppresses limb pain. Together, these findings suggest that hemilateral and generalized pain control mechanisms are disrupted in CRPS, and that multisensory integrative processes are compromised. Failure to inhibit nociceptive input from the CRPS-affected limb could sensitize spinal and supraspinal neurons that receive convergent nociceptive and auditory information from hemilateral body sites. Somatosensory, auditory, and emotional inputs may then aggravate pain by feeding into this sensitized nociceptive network. In particular, a disturbance in hemilateral pain processing that involves the locus coeruleus could exacerbate the symptoms of CRPS in some patients. PMID:23162445

  19. Salivary cortisol and psychological factors in women with chronic and acute oro-facial pain.

    PubMed

    Jasim, H; Louca, S; Christidis, N; Ernberg, M

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the salivary cortisol level, pain intensity and psychological factors between patients with chronic and acute oro-facial pain (OP) and pain-free subjects. Twenty-seven females with chronic OP (a diagnosis of myofascial pain according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders with at least 6 months duration), 24 females with acute OP (<10 days duration) and 27 pain-free females participated. Morning saliva was collected from all participants for analyses of the cortisol level. The pain intensity was assessed on a 0-10 numeric rating scale. The participants were evaluated by the Symptom Checklist 90-revised for levels of depression and somatisation, and the Perceived Stress Scale. The cortisol levels among the three patient groups were similar with no significant group differences. The median (interquartile range) current pain level did not differ between chronic and acute OP and was, respectively, 5 (4) and 5 (3). Patients with chronic OP showed significantly higher scores for depression, somatisation and perceived stress compared with patients with acute OP (Ps < 0.001), but there were no significant differences between acute OP and controls. To conclude, there were no differences in cortisol level between groups, despite significant higher levels of depression, somatisation and perceived stress in patients with chronic OP. This shows that psychological distress has a more important role in chronic than in acute OP. However, the relation between pain, adreno-cortical activity and psychological distress is complex and warrants further investigation. PMID:24313837

  20. Acute psychosocial stress and emotion regulation skills modulate empathic reactions to pain in others.

    PubMed

    Buruck, Gabriele; Wendsche, Johannes; Melzer, Marlen; Strobel, Alexander; Dörfel, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial stress affects resources for adequate coping with environmental demands. A crucial question in this context is the extent to which acute psychosocial stressors impact empathy and emotion regulation. In the present study, 120 participants were randomly assigned to a control group vs. a group confronted with the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), an established paradigm for the induction of acute psychosocial stress. Empathy for pain as a specific subgroup of empathy was assessed via pain intensity ratings during a pain-picture task. Self-reported emotion regulation skills were measured as predictors using an established questionnaire. Stressed individuals scored significantly lower on the appraisal of pain pictures. A regression model was chosen to find variables that further predict the pain ratings. These findings implicate that acute psychosocial stress might impair empathic processes to observed pain in another person and the ability to accept one's emotion additionally predicts the empathic reaction. Furthermore, the ability to tolerate negative emotions modulated the relation between stress and pain judgments, and thus influenced core cognitive-affective functions relevant for coping with environmental challenges. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the necessity of reducing negative emotions in terms of empathic distress when confronted with pain of another person under psychosocial stress, in order to be able to retain pro-social behavior. PMID:24910626

  1. Acute psychosocial stress and emotion regulation skills modulate empathic reactions to pain in others

    PubMed Central

    Buruck, Gabriele; Wendsche, Johannes; Melzer, Marlen; Strobel, Alexander; Dörfel, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial stress affects resources for adequate coping with environmental demands. A crucial question in this context is the extent to which acute psychosocial stressors impact empathy and emotion regulation. In the present study, 120 participants were randomly assigned to a control group vs. a group confronted with the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), an established paradigm for the induction of acute psychosocial stress. Empathy for pain as a specific subgroup of empathy was assessed via pain intensity ratings during a pain-picture task. Self-reported emotion regulation skills were measured as predictors using an established questionnaire. Stressed individuals scored significantly lower on the appraisal of pain pictures. A regression model was chosen to find variables that further predict the pain ratings. These findings implicate that acute psychosocial stress might impair empathic processes to observed pain in another person and the ability to accept one's emotion additionally predicts the empathic reaction. Furthermore, the ability to tolerate negative emotions modulated the relation between stress and pain judgments, and thus influenced core cognitive-affective functions relevant for coping with environmental challenges. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the necessity of reducing negative emotions in terms of empathic distress when confronted with pain of another person under psychosocial stress, in order to be able to retain pro-social behavior. PMID:24910626

  2. Quality Assessment of Acute Inpatient Pain Management in an Academic Health Center.

    PubMed

    Lin, Richard J; Reid, M Carrington; Chused, Amy E; Evans, Arthur T

    2016-02-01

    The quality of acute inpatient pain management remains suboptimal and poorly understood. In this retrospective study, we analyze acute pain management practice in a large academic health center using several quality indicators. Not surprisingly, despite high rate of pain assessment, many patients still have frequent, prolonged, and unrelieved severe pain episodes. Upon examination of naloxone administration, we identify potential inappropriate opioid prescription practices such as the use of wrong opioids in hepatic and renal failure and simultaneous use of multiple short-acting opioids. Most importantly, we find that chronic opioid users appear to suffer the most in terms of undertreatment of pain as well as opioid overdose, highlighting the urgent need to target this underserved population of patients. PMID:25106418

  3. Effects of ozone applied by spinal endoscopy in patients with chronic pain related to failed back surgery syndrome: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    de Nêuton, Francisco; Magalhães, Oliveira; Soares, Sandra Correia; Torres, Jaqueline Melo; Ungaretti, Arthur; Cacciacarro, Mariana Fillipi; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In the last two decades, ozone has emerged as a treatment for low back pain, applied by means of minimally invasive techniques. Objective The aim of this study is to assess the effect and safety of ozone therapy applied in the epidural space for chronic pain related to failed back surgery syndrome. Methods The investigators studied 13 sequential patients of both sexes, between 18 and 70 years old, with persistent chronic pain (more than six months) in the lumbar region and in the lower limbs related to failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). Pain was classified as neuropathic and non-neuropathic regarding the topography (lumbar and lower limb), based on the DN4 (Douleur Neuropathique 4) questionnaire. The patients received the ozone gas in the lumbar epidural space via spinal-sacral endoscopy. Clinical evaluation was performed before, immediately after (24 hours), and 1, 3, and 6 months after intervention with visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Results Overall, the patients had 43.7% reduction of lumbar pain, 60.9% reduction in leg pain in six months followed by 44.0% of improvement in ODI. The reduction of pain and in the disability index was markedly greater in patients with non-neuropathic predominant pain, 95.2%, 80.6%, and 75.3% improvement in lumbar, leg pain, and ODI respectively, while neuropathic predominant pain patients experienced only 12.5%, 42.4%, and 20.9% improvement, also respectively. No neurological or infectious complications were observed acutely or during the follow-up. The present data suggests that epidural ozone might be a therapeutic option for persistent low back pain, especially in non-neuropathic predominant pain patients, but double-blind controlled studies are still required to prove its efficacy. PMID:24259984

  4. Subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome based on abdominal pain/discomfort severity and bowel pattern

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has traditionally been classified by stooling pattern (e.g., diarrhea-predominant). However, other patterns of symptoms have long been recognized, e.g., pain severity. Our objective was to examine the utility of subtyping women with IBS based on pain/discomfort severit...

  5. Increased gastrointestinal permeability and gut inflammation in children with functional abdominal pain and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine gastrointestinal (GI) permeability and fecal calprotectin concentration in children 7 to 10 years of age with functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome (FAP/IBS) versus control subjects and ascertain potential relationships with pain symptoms and stooling, GI permeability a...

  6. Emotional predictors and behavioral triggers of acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Karina W.

    2008-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that depression, anxiety, and hostility/anger may each be an independent risk factor for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) occurrence. Data specific to the role of these negative emotional states in predisposing to imminent ACS risk are limited, however. Additionally, a number of studies have indicated that certain situational triggers (such as intense physical exertion) and behavioral triggers (such as acute anxiety or anger) are predictive of imminent occurrence of an ACS. Despite these findings, the use of emotional or behavioral information to identify persons at high risk for imminent ACS onset is not yet practical. Further research is needed to facilitate such patient identification. PMID:18540140

  7. Early Treatment of Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Przybysz, Thomas M; Heffner, Alan C

    2016-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is defined by acute diffuse inflammatory lung injury invoked by a variety of systemic or pulmonary insults. Despite medical progress in management, mortality remains 27% to 45%. Patients with ARDS should be managed with low tidal volume ventilation. Permissive hypercapnea is well tolerated. Conservative fluid strategy can reduce ventilator and hospital days in patients without shock. Prone positioning and neuromuscular blockers reduce mortality in some patients. Early management of ARDS is relevant to emergency medicine. Identifying ARDS patients who should be transferred to an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation center is an important task for emergency providers. PMID:26614238

  8. Ruptured intracardiac hydatid cyst presenting as acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pranav; Lakhia, Ketav; Malhotra, Amber; Garg, Pankaj

    2016-07-01

    Hydatid disease is a parasitic infection caused by the larvae of Echinococcus granulosus, which is still endemic in many developing countries. Cardiac involvement is rare but potentially very serious on account of various clinical presentations and nonspecific symptoms that occasionally mimic acute coronary syndrome. We describe a case of ruptured left ventricular hydatid cyst presenting as acute inferolateral myocardial infarction with electrocardiographic changes. Because coronary angiography revealed normal coronary arteries, the final diagnosis was made on the basis of echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging. On-pump surgical resection followed by albendazole therapy yielded an excellent outcome. PMID:26045489

  9. Acute respiratory distress syndrome due to systemic lupus erythematosus with hemophagocytic syndrome: an autopsy report.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kazuma; Matsuda, Masayuki; Sekijima, Yoshiki; Hosoda, Waki; Gono, Takahisa; Hoshi, Kenichi; Shimojo, Hisashi; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2005-04-01

    This report concerns a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who died of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) 1 day after the onset of pulmonary symptoms. Autopsy demonstrated severe hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow and histopathology indicating a marked increase in vascular permeability in both lungs and kidneys. In this patient, active SLE and associated hemophagocytic syndrome may have induced an increase in the production of inflammatory cytokines, which immediately induced ARDS. Since fatal ARDS can occur as a life-threatening complication of SLE, careful observation is necessary, particularly when there are clinical findings suggestive of associated hemophagocytic syndrome. PMID:15338452

  10. Nociceptive transmission and modulation via P2X receptors in central pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yung-Hui; Shyu, Bai-Chuang

    2016-01-01

    Painful sensations are some of the most frequent complaints of patients who are admitted to local medical clinics. Persistent pain varies according to its causes, often resulting from local tissue damage or inflammation. Central somatosensory pathway lesions that are not adequately relieved can consequently cause central pain syndrome or central neuropathic pain. Research on the molecular mechanisms that underlie this pathogenesis is important for treating such pain. To date, evidence suggests the involvement of ion channels, including adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-gated cation channel P2X receptors, in central nervous system pain transmission and persistent modulation upon and following the occurrence of neuropathic pain. Several P2X receptor subtypes, including P2X2, P2X3, P2X4, and P2X7, have been shown to play diverse roles in the pathogenesis of central pain including the mediation of fast transmission in the peripheral nervous system and modulation of neuronal activity in the central nervous system. This review article highlights the role of the P2X family of ATP receptors in the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain and pain transmission. We discuss basic research that may be translated to clinical application, suggesting that P2X receptors may be treatment targets for central pain syndrome. PMID:27230068

  11. Complex regional pain syndrome: evidence for warm and cold subtypes in a large prospective clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen; Maihöfner, Christian; Stanton-Hicks, Michael; Perez, Roberto S G M; Vatine, Jean-Jacques; Brunner, Florian; Birklein, Frank; Schlereth, Tanja; Mackey, Sean; Mailis-Gagnon, Angela; Livshitz, Anatoly; Harden, R Norman

    2016-08-01

    Limited research suggests that there may be Warm complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and Cold CRPS subtypes, with inflammatory mechanisms contributing most strongly to the former. This study for the first time used an unbiased statistical pattern recognition technique to evaluate whether distinct Warm vs Cold CRPS subtypes can be discerned in the clinical population. An international, multisite study was conducted using standardized procedures to evaluate signs and symptoms in 152 patients with clinical CRPS at baseline, with 3-month follow-up evaluations in 112 of these patients. Two-step cluster analysis using automated cluster selection identified a 2-cluster solution as optimal. Results revealed a Warm CRPS patient cluster characterized by a warm, red, edematous, and sweaty extremity and a Cold CRPS patient cluster characterized by a cold, blue, and less edematous extremity. Median pain duration was significantly (P < 0.001) shorter in the Warm CRPS (4.7 months) than in the Cold CRPS subtype (20 months), with pain intensity comparable. A derived total inflammatory score was significantly (P < 0.001) elevated in the Warm CRPS group (compared with Cold CRPS) at baseline but diminished significantly (P < 0.001) over the follow-up period, whereas this score did not diminish in the Cold CRPS group (time × subtype interaction: P < 0.001). Results support the existence of a Warm CRPS subtype common in patients with acute (<6 months) CRPS and a relatively distinct Cold CRPS subtype most common in chronic CRPS. The pattern of clinical features suggests that inflammatory mechanisms contribute most prominently to the Warm CRPS subtype but that these mechanisms diminish substantially during the first year postinjury. PMID:27023422

  12. [Chronic lower back pain].

    PubMed

    Werber, A; Schiltenwolf, M

    2012-02-01

    Poor efficiency in terms of treatment of unspecific back pain and related chronic pain syndromes has led to the necessity of general care guidelines addressing evidence-based strategies for treatment of lower back pain (LBP). Systematically validated and reviewed algorithms have been established for all kinds of unspecific back pain, covering both acute and chronic syndromes. Concerning the impact of psychosocial risk factors in the development of chronic LBP, multimodal treatment is preferred to monomodal strategies. Self-responsible acting on the part of the patient should be supported while invasive methods in particular, i.e. operative treatment, should be avoided due to lacking evidence in outcome efficiency. PMID:22349772

  13. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome: definitions, mechanisms and treatment].

    PubMed

    Urso, Domenico Lorenzo

    2006-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a secondary acute respiratory insufficiency caused by an inflammatory syndrome which is characterized by an increased of permeability pulmonary edema, associated with many other clinic anomalies, radiological and pathophysiological not directly caused by, but with which it could coexist, a left atrial hypertension. The illness, characterized by refractory hypoxemia, recognizes several causes, which have direct or indirect harm on the cells of the membrane alveolus-capillary. In spite of the improvements in the therapeutic approach, during these last 40 years, represented by the aid of the mechanical ventilation and the use of selective pulmonary vasodilators, this condition is life threatening and often lethal: 90% of mortality rate amongst those older than 65 years. PMID:16913178

  14. [Invasive diagnosis, transcatheter and surgical treatment of acute coronary syndromes].

    PubMed

    Fabián, J; Hricák, V; Fridrich, V; Fischer, V

    1998-01-01

    On the basis of long-term personal experiences and critical evaluation of the present literatury sources authors described the role of invasive diagnostic methods and transcathetral and cardiosurgical possibilities in the recognition and therapy of acute coronary syndromes. These techniques are, and in the forthcoming year shall be available only in specialized institutions. The paper describes the indication for these aggressive techniques as well as their limitations and complications. The goal of the presented article is to inform both the cardiological and frequently broad physicians' societies about the possibilities of diaventional cardiology and cardiosurgery which will be gradually more applied in the care of the patients with acute coronary syndromes. (Ref. 39, Tab. 2, Fig. 3.) PMID:9919748

  15. Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Limbs: Current Concepts and Management

    PubMed Central

    Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Malahias, Marco; Hindocha, Sandip; Khan, Wasim; Juma, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) of the limb refers to a constellation of symptoms, which occur following a rise in the pressure inside a limb muscle compartment. A failure or delay in recognising ACS almost invariably results in adverse outcomes for patients. Unrecognised ACS can leave patients with nonviable limbs requiring amputation and can also be life–threatening. Several clinical features indicate ACS. Where diagnosis is unclear there are several techniques for measuring intracompartmental pressure described in this review. As early diagnosis and fasciotomy are known to be the best determinants of good outcomes, it is important that surgeons are aware of the features that make this diagnosis likely. This clinical review discusses current knowledge on the relevant clinical anatomy, aetiology, pathophysiology, risk factors, clinical features, diagnostic procedures and management of an acute presentation of compartment syndrome. PMID:23248724

  16. Hypersensitivity and pain induced by operative procedures and the "cracked tooth" syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, S; Boston, D

    1997-01-01

    Various dental conditions are responsible for tooth hypersensitivity and pain. They include hypersensitive dentin; the "cracked tooth" syndrome; pulp and periapical irritation, inflammation and/or degeneration; barodontalgia (aerodontalgia); and periodontal pathoses, particularly the pulpal-periodontal syndrome. Each operative condition is reviewed with respect to its etiology, symptomatology, and diagnosis. Some treatment recommendations are made to prevent or reduce symptoms. PMID:9515403

  17. Betaine and Secondary Events in an Acute Coronary Syndrome Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Michael; George, Peter M.; Elmslie, Jane L.; Atkinson, Wendy; Slow, Sandy; Molyneux, Sarah L.; Troughton, Richard W.; Richards, A. Mark; Frampton, Christopher M.; Chambers, Stephen T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Betaine insufficiency is associated with unfavourable vascular risk profiles in metabolic syndrome patients. We investigated associations between betaine insufficiency and secondary events in acute coronary syndrome patients. Methods Plasma (531) and urine (415) samples were collected four months after discharge following an acute coronary event. Death (34), secondary acute myocardial infarction (MI) (70) and hospital admission for heart failure (45) events were recorded over a median follow-up of 832 days. Principal Findings The highest and lowest quintiles of urinary betaine excretion associated with risk of heart failure (p = 0.0046, p = 0.013 compared with middle 60%) but not with subsequent acute MI. The lowest quintile of plasma betaine was associated with subsequent acute MI (p = 0.014), and the top quintile plasma betaine with heart failure (p = 0.043), especially in patients with diabetes (p<0.001). Top quintile plasma concentrations of dimethylglycine (betaine metabolite) and top quintile plasma homocysteine both associated with all three outcomes, acute MI (p = 0.004, <0.001), heart failure (p = 0.027, p<0.001) and survival (p<0.001, p<0.001). High homocysteine was associated with high or low betaine excretion in >60% of these subjects (p = 0.017). Median NT-proBNP concentrations were lowest in the middle quintile of plasma betaine concentration (p = 0.002). Conclusions Betaine insufficiency indicates increased risk of secondary heart failure and acute MI. Its association with elevated homocysteine may partly explain the disappointing results of folate supplementation. In some patients, especially with diabetes, elevated plasma betaine also indicates increased risk. PMID:22649561

  18. Sex-related differences in access to care among patients with premature acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Roxanne; Humphries, Karin H.; Shimony, Avi; Bacon, Simon L.; Lavoie, Kim L.; Rabi, Doreen; Karp, Igor; Tsadok, Meytal Avgil; Pilote, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Background: Access to care may be implicated in disparities between men and women in death after acute coronary syndrome, especially among younger adults. We aimed to assess sex-related differences in access to care among patients with premature acute coronary syndrome and to identify clinical and gender-related determinants of access to care. Methods: We studied 1123 patients (18–55 yr) admitted to hospital for acute coronary syndrome and enrolled in the GENESIS-PRAXY cohort study. Outcome measures were door-to-electrocardiography, door-to-needle and door-to-balloon times, as well as proportions of patients undergoing cardiac catheterization, reperfusion or nonprimary percutaneous coronary intervention. We performed univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses to identify clinical and gender-related determinants of timely procedures and use of invasive procedures. Results: Women were less likely than men to receive care within benchmark times for electrocardiography (≤ 10 min: 29% v. 38%, p = 0.02) or fibrinolysis (≤ 30 min: 32% v. 57%, p = 0.01). Women with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI) were less likely than men to undergo reperfusion therapy (primary percutaneous coronary intervention or fibrinolysis) (83% v. 91%, p = 0.01), and women with non–ST-segment elevation MI or unstable angina were less likely to undergo nonprimary percutaneous coronary intervention (48% v. 66%, p < 0.001). Clinical determinants of poorer access to care included anxiety, increased number of risk factors and absence of chest pain. Gender-related determinants included feminine traits of personality and responsibility for housework. Interpretation: Among younger adults with acute coronary syndrome, women and men had different access to care. Moreover, fewer than half of men and women with ST-segment elevation MI received timely primary coronary intervention. Our results also highlight that men and women with no chest pain and those with anxiety

  19. An Unusual Aneurysm of the Main Pulmonary Artery Presenting as Acute Coronary Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kholeif, Mona A.; El Tahir, Mohamed Kholeif, Yasser A.; El Watidy, Ahmed

    2006-10-15

    A 70-year old man presented with retrosternal chest pain. His electrocardiogram showed nonspecific T wave changes. Cardiac-specific troponin I (cTnI) was elevated. His condition was managed as acute coronary syndrome, following which he had two minor episodes of hemoptysis. A CT pulmonary angiogram showed no evidence of pulmonary embolism, but a large mass lesion was seen in the mediastinum. Echocardiography and cardiac MRI demonstrated a large solid mass, arising from the right ventricular outflow tract and causing compression of the main pulmonary artery (MPA). The differential diagnosis included pericardial and myocardial tumors and clotted aneurysm of the MPA. At surgery, a clotted aneurysmal sac was identified originating from the MPA and the defect was healed. Aneurysms of the MPA are rare. They most commonly present with dyspnea and chest pain. Compression of surrounding structures produces protean manifestations. A high index of suspicion coupled with imaging modalities establishes the diagnosis. Blunt trauma to the chest, at the time of an accident 4 years previously, may explain this aneurysm. The patient's presentation with chest pain was probably due to compression and/or stretching of surrounding structures. Coronary artery compression simulating acute coronary syndrome has been documented in the literature. The rise in cTnI may have been due to right ventricular strain, as a result of right ventricular outflow obstruction by the aneurysm. This has not been reported previously in the literature. The saccular morphology and narrow neck of the aneurysm predisposed to stagnation leading to clotting of the lumen and healing of the tear, which caused the diagnostic difficulty.

  20. Chronic pain in Noonan Syndrome: A previously unreported but common symptom.

    PubMed

    Vegunta, Sravanthi; Cotugno, Richard; Williamson, Amber; Grebe, Theresa A

    2015-12-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a multiple malformation syndrome characterized by pulmonic stenosis, cardiomyopathy, short stature, lymphatic dysplasia, craniofacial anomalies, cryptorchidism, clotting disorders, and learning disabilities. Eight genes in the RAS/MAPK signaling pathway are implicated in NS. Chronic pain is an uncommon feature. To investigate the prevalence of pain in NS, we distributed a two-part questionnaire about pain among NS individuals at the Third International Meeting on Genetic Syndromes of the Ras/MAPK Pathway. The first part of the questionnaire queried demographic information among all NS participants. The second part was completed by individuals with chronic pain. Questions included musculoskeletal problems and clinical features of pain. Forty-five questionnaires were analyzed; 53% of subjects were female. Mean age was 17 (2-48) years; 47% had a PTPN11 mutation. Sixty-two percent (28/45) of individuals with NS experienced chronic pain. There was a significant relationship between prevalence of pain and residing in a cold climate (P = 0.004). Pain occurred commonly in extremities/joints and head/trunk, but more commonly in extremities/joints (P = 0.066). Subjects with hypermobile joints were more likely to have pain (P = 0.052). Human growth hormone treatment was not statistically significant among subjects without chronic pain (P = 0.607). We conclude that pain is a frequent and under-recognized clinical feature of NS. Chronic pain may be associated with joint hypermobility and aggravated by colder climate. Our study is a preliminary investigation that should raise awareness about pain as a common symptom in children and adults with NS. PMID:26297936

  1. Nursing Care of Women With Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome.

    PubMed

    MacMullen, Nancy J; Dulski, Laura A; Martin, Patricia B; Blobaum, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome is a chronic condition affecting approximately 3.3 million women in the United States. It is defined by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases as "urinary pain that can't be attributed to other causes such as infection or urinary stones." Because of the intimate nature of the symptoms, women are often reluctant to seek treatment. When they do, they require a care provider with specialized nursing skills. Nursing practice based on carefully reviewed literature will result in the provision of comprehensive and compassionate nursing care for women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. PMID:27067933

  2. Useful laboratory tests for studying thrombogenesis in acute cardiac syndromes.

    PubMed

    Fareed, J; Hoppensteadt, D A; Leya, F; Iqbal, O; Wolf, H; Bick, R

    1998-08-01

    We review laboratory tests that evaluate thrombogenesis during acute coronary syndromes. These tests have been found to be valuable research tools in more clearly understanding the pathophysiology of acute coronary syndromes. In particular, we describe tissue factor, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, prothrombin fragment 1.2, thrombin-antithrombin complex, fibrinopeptide A, tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), t-PA-PAI complex, Bbeta 15-42-related peptides, fibrinogen degradation products, fibrin degradation products, D-dimer, platelet factor 4, beta-thromboglobulin, 5-hydroxytryptamine, thromboxane B2, prostacyclin, endothelin, angiotensin-converting enzyme, soluble thrombomodulin, C1-esterase inhibitor, anaphylotoxins C3a, C4a, and C5a, bradykinin, tumor necrosis factor, leukotriene C4, platelet activating factor, anti-phospholipid antibody, and von Willebrand factor. Some of these tests may prove to be useful in clinical diagnosis and management of acute coronary syndromes. Clinical outcome studies are needed to determine which tests may be cost effective and medically useful. PMID:9702994

  3. The oral administration of trans-caryophyllene attenuates acute and chronic pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Paula-Freire, L I G; Andersen, M L; Gama, V S; Molska, G R; Carlini, E L A

    2014-02-15

    Trans-caryophyllene is a sesquiterpene present in many medicinal plants' essential oils, such as Ocimum gratissimum and Cannabis sativa. In this study, we evaluated the antinociceptive activity of trans-caryophyllene in murine models of acute and chronic pain and the involvement of trans-caryophyllene in the opioid and endocannabinoid systems. Acute pain was determined using the hot plate test (thermal nociception) and the formalin test (inflammatory pain). The chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve induced hypernociception was measured by the hot plate and von Frey tests. To elucidate the mechanism of action, mice were pre-treated with naloxone or AM630 30 min before the trans-caryophyllene treatment. Afterwards, thermal nociception was evaluated. The levels of IL-1β were measured in CCI-mice by ELISA. Trans-caryophyllene administration significantly minimized the pain in both the acute and chronic pain models. The antinociceptive effect observed during the hot plate test was reversed by naloxone and AM630, indicating the participation of both the opioid and endocannabinoid system. Trans-caryophyllene treatment also decreased the IL-1β levels. These results demonstrate that trans-caryophyllene reduced both acute and chronic pain in mice, which may be mediated through the opioid and endocannabinoid systems. PMID:24055516

  4. Treatment of mild to moderate pain of acute soft tissue injury: diflunisal vs acetaminophen with codeine.

    PubMed

    Muncie, H L; King, D E; DeForge, B

    1986-08-01

    Acute soft tissue injuries create pain and limitation of function. Treatment requires analgesia and time for full recovery. Acetaminophen with codeine (650 mg plus 60 mg, respectively, every 4 to 6 hours) is used frequently as the analgesic of choice. Diflunisal (1,000 mg initially then 500 mg twice a day) vs acetaminophen with codeine was prospectively studied in the treatment of acute mild to moderate pain from soft tissue injuries. Thirty-five patients with acute strains, sprains, or low back pain were randomized to treatment (17 acetaminophen with codeine vs 18 diflunisal). Both groups were similar in the amount of pain and type of injury at initiation of therapy. Patient pain rating went from 3.3 +/- 0.6 to 1.6 +/- 1.5 for acetaminophen with codeine and from 3.3 +/- 0.6 to 1.3 +/- 1.1 for diflunisal. However, 65 percent of acetaminophen with codeine patients experienced side effects, with 35 percent of these patients stopping the medication because of intolerable side effects. In the diflunisal group, 28 percent of the patients experienced side effects and 5 percent had to stop the medication early. Diflunisal was found to be an effective analgesic in mild to moderate pain of acute soft tissue injuries, and caused fewer and more tolerable side effects than did acetaminophen with codeine. PMID:2942630

  5. Desmoid tumor in Gardner's Syndrome presented as acute abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Hatzimarkou, Andreas; Filippou, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, Vasilios; Filippou, Georgios; Rizos, Spiros; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2006-01-01

    Background Gardner's syndrome can occasionally be complicated with intra-abdominal desmoid tumor. These tumors usually remain asymptomatic but can exhibit symptoms due to intestinal, vascular and ureteral compression and obstruction. Case presentation A rare case of a 41-year-old male patient with Gardner's syndrome complicated with intra-abdominal desmoid tumor, which first presented as acute abdomen, is presented. Conclusion Extra-abdominal manifestations of Gardner's syndrome along with a palpable abdominal mass would raise suspicion for the presence of a desmoid tumor in the majority of cases. In life-threatening cases, surgical treatment should be considered as a palliative approach, though the extent of excision remains debatable PMID:16569244

  6. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following acute pancreatitis during chemotherapy for acute monocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Koh, Hideo; Bingo, Masato; Yoshida, Masahiro; Nanno, Satoru; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Nakane, Takahiko; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Shimono, Taro; Hino, Masayuki

    2014-05-01

    We describe an 18-year-old man with acute leukemia who presented with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) shortly after developing acute pancreatitis. On day 15 after the third consolidation course with high-dose cytarabine, treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics was initiated for febrile neutropenia. On day 16, he developed septic shock, and subsequently, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). After adding vancomycin, micafungin and high-dose methylprednisolone (mPSL) to his treatment regimen, these manifestations subsided. On day 22, he received hemodialysis for drug-induced acute renal failure. On day 24, he developed acute pancreatitis possibly due to mPSL; the following day he had generalized seizures, and was intubated. Cerebrospinal fluid findings were normal. Brain MRI revealed hyperintense signals on FLAIR images and increased apparent diffusion coefficient values in the sub-cortical and deep white matter areas of the bilateral temporal and occipital lobes, indicative of vasogenic edema. Thus, we diagnosed PRES. Blood pressure, seizures and volume status were controlled, with MRI findings showing improvement by day 42. He was extubated on day 32 and discharged on day 49 without complications. Although little is known about PRES following acute pancreatitis, clinicians should be aware that this condition may develop. PMID:24881921

  7. Regulation of peripheral blood flow in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: clinical implication for symptomatic relief and pain management

    PubMed Central

    Groeneweg, George; Huygen, Frank JPM; Coderre, Terence J; Zijlstra, Freek J

    2009-01-01

    Background During the chronic stage of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), impaired microcirculation is related to increased vasoconstriction, tissue hypoxia, and metabolic tissue acidosis in the affected limb. Several mechanisms may be responsible for the ischemia and pain in chronic cold CPRS. Discussion The diminished blood flow may be caused by either sympathetic dysfunction, hypersensitivity to circulating catecholamines, or endothelial dysfunction. The pain may be of neuropathic, inflammatory, nociceptive, or functional nature, or of mixed origin. Summary The origin of the pain should be the basis of the symptomatic therapy. Since the difference in temperature between both hands fluctuates over time in cold CRPS, when in doubt, the clinician should prioritize the patient's report of a persistent cold extremity over clinical tests that show no difference. Future research should focus on developing easily applied methods for clinical use to differentiate between central and peripheral blood flow regulation disorders in individual patients. PMID:19775468

  8. CLINICAL ASPECTS OF ACUTE POST-OPERATIVE PAIN MANAGEMENT & ITS ASSESSMENT

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anuj; Kaur, Kirtipal; Sharma, Sheeshpal; Goyal, Shubham; Arora, Saahil; Murthy, R.S.R

    2010-01-01

    Management of postoperative pain relieve suffering and leads to earlier mobilization, shortened hospital stay, reduced hospital costs, and increased patient satisfaction. An effective postoperative management is not a standardized regime rather is tailored to the needs of the individual patient, taking into account medical, psychological, and physical condition; age; level of fear or anxiety; surgical procedure; personal preference; and response to therapeutic agents given. The major goal in the management of postoperative pain is to minimize the dose of medications to lessen side effects & provide adequate analgesia. Postoperative pain is still under managed due to obstacles in implementation of Acute Pain Services due to insufficient education, fear of complications associated with available analgesic drugs, poor pain assessment and inadequate staff. This review reflects the clinical aspects of postoperative pain & its assessment & management with an emphasis on research for new analgesic molecules & delivery system. PMID:22247838

  9. Systematic reviews of bed rest and advice to stay active for acute low back pain.

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, G; Feder, G; Lewis, M

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the United Kingdom (UK), 9% of adults consult their doctor annually with back pain. The treatment recommendations are based on orthopaedic teaching, but the current management is causing increasing dissatisfaction. Many general practitioners (GPs) are confused about what constitutes effective advice. AIM: To review all randomized controlled trials of bed rest and of medical advice to stay active for acute back pain. METHOD: A systematic review based on a search of MEDLINE and EMBASE from 1966 to April 1996 with complete citation tracking for randomized controlled trials of bed rest or medical advice to stay active and continue ordinary daily activities. The inclusion criteria were: primary care setting, patients with low back pain of up to 3 months duration, and patient-centred outcomes (rate of recovery from the acute attack, relief of pain, restoration of function, satisfaction with treatment, days off work and return to work, development of chronic pain and disability, recurrent attacks, and further health care use). RESULTS: Ten trials of bed rest and eight trials of advice to stay active were identified. Consistent findings showed that bed rest is not an effective treatment for acute low back pain but may delay recovery. Advice to stay active and to continue ordinary activities results in a faster return to work, less chronic disability, and fewer recurrent problems. CONCLUSION: A simple but fundamental change from the traditional prescription of bed rest to positive advice about staying active could improve clinical outcomes and reduce the personal and social impact of back pain. PMID:9474831

  10. Painful Bladder Syndrome: An Unusual Presentation in a Case of Upper Tract Fungus Balls.

    PubMed

    Bajic, Petar; Wetterlin, Jessica; Bresler, Larissa

    2016-05-01

    Urinary tract fungus balls are a rare pathologic entity which may be asymptomatic or have variable presentations. To date, there have been no documented cases of fungus balls presenting as painful bladder syndrome. Painful bladder syndrome is a constellation of symptoms which may include pelvic pain, urgency and frequency not explained by other causes. Here, we present the first case of these two entities concurrently. Our patient had a longstanding history of diabetes, nephrolithiasis and recurrent urinary tract infections. He presented with symptoms of painful bladder syndrome and work-up revealed filling defects within the renal collecting system concerning for malignancy. Subsequent ureteroscopy revealed dense white debris consistent with candida fungus balls. Following clearance of the debris and antifungal therapy, our patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:27390583

  11. Painful Bladder Syndrome: An Unusual Presentation in a Case of Upper Tract Fungus Balls

    PubMed Central

    Bajic, Petar; Wetterlin, Jessica; Bresler, Larissa

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract fungus balls are a rare pathologic entity which may be asymptomatic or have variable presentations. To date, there have been no documented cases of fungus balls presenting as painful bladder syndrome. Painful bladder syndrome is a constellation of symptoms which may include pelvic pain, urgency and frequency not explained by other causes. Here, we present the first case of these two entities concurrently. Our patient had a longstanding history of diabetes, nephrolithiasis and recurrent urinary tract infections. He presented with symptoms of painful bladder syndrome and work-up revealed filling defects within the renal collecting system concerning for malignancy. Subsequent ureteroscopy revealed dense white debris consistent with candida fungus balls. Following clearance of the debris and antifungal therapy, our patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:27390583

  12. Guideline for diagnosis and treatment of subacromial pain syndrome: a multidisciplinary review by the Dutch Orthopaedic Association.

    PubMed

    Diercks, Ron; Bron, Carel; Dorrestijn, Oscar; Meskers, Carel; Naber, René; de Ruiter, Tjerk; Willems, Jaap; Winters, Jan; van der Woude, Henk Jan

    2014-06-01

    Treatment of "subacromial impingement syndrome" of the shoulder has changed drastically in the past decade. The anatomical explanation as "impingement" of the rotator cuff is not sufficient to cover the pathology. "Subacromial pain syndrome", SAPS, describes the condition better. A working group formed from a number of Dutch specialist societies, joined by the Dutch Orthopedic Association, has produced a guideline based on the available scientific evidence. This resulted in a new outlook for the treatment of subacromial pain syndrome. The important conclusions and advice from this work are as follows: (1) The diagnosis SAPS can only be made using a combination of clinical tests. (2) SAPS should preferably be treated non-operatively. (3) Acute pain should be treated with analgetics if necessary. (4) Subacromial injection with corticosteroids is indicated for persistent or recurrent symptoms. (5) Diagnostic imaging is useful after 6 weeks of symptoms. Ultrasound examination is the recommended imaging, to exclude a rotator cuff rupture. (6) Occupational interventions are useful when complaints persist for longer than 6 weeks. (7) Exercise therapy should be specific and should be of low intensity and high frequency, combining eccentric training, attention to relaxation and posture, and treatment of myofascial trigger points (including stretching of the muscles) may be considered. (8) Strict immobilization and mobilization techniques are not recommended. (9) Tendinosis calcarea can be treated by shockwave (ESWT) or needling under ultrasound guidance (barbotage). (10) Rehabilitation in a specialized unit can be considered in chronic, treatment resistant SAPS, with pain perpetuating behavior. (11) There is no convincing evidence that surgical treatment for SAPS is more effective than conservature management. (12) There is no indication for the surgical treatment of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears. PMID:24847788

  13. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Bone Necrosis; Central Nervous System Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Testicular Leukemia; Therapy-Related Toxicity; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  14. Post poliomyelitis syndrome: A rare sequel of acute poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Abrar, Anam; Ahmad, Arsalan

    2015-03-01

    Post poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS) is a rare sequel of acute poliomyelitis, usually seen 30-40 years after an acute episode. It is characterized by new muscle weakness seen in survivors of acute poliomyelitis. We describe a rare case of a 50 year old man; with a previous history of poliomyelitis in right lower limb who now presented with complaints of progressive left lower limb weakness for past two years. The diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical suspicion and EMG findings. PPS is not a well recognized disease in Pakistan and due to the lack of documentation; its true prevalence is not known. Though, over the years, cases of Poliomyelitis have decreased worldwide, however, PPS still remains a constant challenge for the physicians. This report highlights the impact of the disease on the quality of life of patients suffering from PPS and emphasis on the need for new therapeutic approach. PMID:25933575

  15. Acute cholinergic syndrome following ingestion of contaminated herbal extract.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, M-J; Yen, Z-S; Chen, S-C; Fang, C-C

    2008-11-01

    Herbal preparations are becoming more and more popular and increasingly used in the USA. Herbs are from natural plants and therefore often considered to be harmless compared with western medicines. Nevertheless, as the use of herbal remedies has risen, so has the incidence of acute and chronic herbal intoxication. The case history is presented of a 68-year-old man who presented with an acute cholinergic syndrome soon after ingesting a herbal preparation containing Flemingia macrophylla and ginseng. His red blood cell acetylcholinesterase activity dropped to 50% of the normal reference range. He was treated successfully with atropine and supportive care. It was thought that contamination with pesticides, such as organophosphate residue, was the probable cause. This case highlights the need to be more aware of the possibility of acute pesticide intoxication in herbal users, even when only small amounts are consumed. PMID:18955628

  16. Management of Acute Aortic Syndrome and Chronic Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Nordon, Ian M. Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M.; Morgan, Robert A.; Thompson, Matt M.

    2011-10-15

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) describes several life-threatening aortic pathologies. These include intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer, and acute aortic dissection (AAD). Advances in both imaging and endovascular treatment have led to an increase in diagnosis and improved management of these often catastrophic pathologies. Patients, who were previously consigned to medical management or high-risk open surgical repair, can now be offered minimally invasive solutions with reduced morbidity and mortality. Information from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) database demonstrates how in selected patients with complicated AAD the 30-day mortality from open surgery is 17% and endovascular stenting is 6%. Despite these improvements in perioperative deaths, the risks of stroke and paraplegia remain with endovascular treatment (combined outcome risk 4%). The pathophysiology of each aspect of AAS is described. The best imaging techniques and the evolving role of endovascular techniques in the definitive management of AAS are discussed incorporating strategies to reduce perioperative morbidity.

  17. Pulmonary sarcoidosis presenting with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Arondi, Sabrina; Valsecchi, Alberto; Borghesi, Andrea; Monti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a common disease that involve almost constantly the lung. Usually the onset is insidious, and symptoms are slowly ingravescent. Very rarely, as in the case here reported, sarcoidosis can cause an acute respiratory failure with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A 20-year-old girl from Pakistan presented for acute fatigue, fever, and cough with a chest X-ray displayed the micronodular interstitial disease. Despite of anti-tuberculosis therapy, ARDS developed in a few days requiring continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Examinations on transbronchial specimens obtained by bronchoscopy permitted to reach the diagnosis of sarcoidosis and steroid therapy improved rapidly clinical conditions. This is the first case report reported in Europe that confirms the rare onset of sarcoidosis as ARDS. Steroid therapy allows to cure rapidly this severe complication. PMID:26933462

  18. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) After Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Tara; Al-Sharief, Khalid; Sethi, Vineeta; Ranger, Gurpreet S.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an unusual condition typified by acute visual impairment caused by sudden, marked parieto-occipital vasogenic edema. Thought to be inflammatory in origin, it has been described in patients undergoing chemotherapy, with autoimmune disease, and in some infections. We report a case of PRES that occurred one week after an episode of acute pancreatitis in an otherwise healthy 40-year-old female. There was progressive visual impairment over a 24-hour period with almost complete visual loss, with characteristic findings on magnetic resonance imaging. After treatment with steroids, the visual loss recovered. Clinicians should retain an index of suspicion of this rare condition in patients with visual impairment after acute pancreatitis. PMID:26759673

  19. Complex regional pain syndrome – type I: What’s in a name?

    PubMed Central

    Coderre, Terence J.

    2015-01-01

    Within a two year period in the 1940’s, two Boston physicians published dramatically opposing views on the underlying nature of a syndrome now known as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Evans suggested, in several papers in 1946–1947, that sympathetic reflexes maintain pain and dystrophy in affected limbs. Foisie, in 1947, suggested arterial vasospasms were key in the etiology of this pain syndrome. Evans’ hypothesis established the nomenclature for this syndrome for 60 years, and his term “reflex sympathetic dystrophy” guided clinical treatment and research activities over the same period. Foisie’s proposed nomenclature was unrecognized, and had virtually no impact on the field. Recent evidence suggests that Evans’ contribution to the field may have in fact lead clinicians and researchers astray all those years. This focus article on CRPS compares recent observations with these 2 earlier theories and asks the question -- what if we had adopted Foisie’s nomenclature from the beginning? PMID:20634146

  20. A systematic review of early prognostic factors for persistent pain following acute orthopedic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Fiona J; Watson, Wendy L; Newstead, Stuart V; McClure, Roderick J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute orthopedic trauma contributes substantially to the global burden of disease. OBJECTIVES: The present systematic review aimed to summarize the current knowledge concerning prognostic factors for the presence of persistent pain, pain severity and pain-related disability following acute orthopedic trauma involving a spectrum of pathologies to working-age adults. METHODS: The Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for level II prognostic studies published between January 1996 and October 2010. Studies that were longitudinal and reported results with multivariate analyses appropriate for prognostic studies were included. Studies that addressed two specific injury types that have been the subject of previous reviews, namely, injuries to the spinal column and amputations, were excluded. RESULTS: The searches yielded 992 studies; 10 studies met the inclusion criteria and were rated for methodological quality. Seventeen factors were considered in more than one cohort. There was strong evidence supporting the association of female sex, older age, high pain intensity, preinjury anxiety or depression, and fewer years of education with persistent pain outcomes. There was moderate evidence supporting the association between postinjury depression or anxiety with persistent pain, and that injury severity was not a risk factor for ongoing pain. CONCLUSION: Many individuals experience persistent pain following acute trauma. Due to the lack of studies, the use of different constructs to measure the same factor and the methodological limitations associated with many of the studies, the present review was only able to reliably identify a limited set of factors that predicted persistent pain. Recommendations for the conduct of future methodologically rigorous studies of persistent pain are provided. PMID:22518366

  1. Successful Treatment of Lower Limb Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Three Weeks of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.

    PubMed

    Katznelson, Rita; Segal, Shira C; Clarke, Hance

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a treatment that delivers 100% oxygen at increased atmospheric pressures. The efficacy of HBOT for treating pain has been described in various animal pain models and may have clinical efficacy in the treatment of human chronic pain syndromes. We present our experience with posttraumatic Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type 2 in a patient who underwent 15 sessions of HBOT. A 41-year-old male with one-year history of CRPS of left foot followed by left ankle fracture demonstrated less pain, decreased swelling, less allodynia, and improvement in skin color and range of motion of the lower limb after 3 weeks of HBOT. Patient was back to work for the first time in over a year. HBOT may be considered as a valuable therapeutic tool in the treatment of long-standing CRPS. PMID:27445607

  2. Successful Treatment of Lower Limb Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Three Weeks of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Katznelson, Rita; Segal, Shira C.; Clarke, Hance

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a treatment that delivers 100% oxygen at increased atmospheric pressures. The efficacy of HBOT for treating pain has been described in various animal pain models and may have clinical efficacy in the treatment of human chronic pain syndromes. We present our experience with posttraumatic Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type 2 in a patient who underwent 15 sessions of HBOT. A 41-year-old male with one-year history of CRPS of left foot followed by left ankle fracture demonstrated less pain, decreased swelling, less allodynia, and improvement in skin color and range of motion of the lower limb after 3 weeks of HBOT. Patient was back to work for the first time in over a year. HBOT may be considered as a valuable therapeutic tool in the treatment of long-standing CRPS. PMID:27445607

  3. Groin pain syndrome: an association of different pathologies and a case presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bisciotti, Gian Nicola; Auci, Alessio; Di Marzo, Francesco; Galli, Roberto; Pulici, Luca; Carimati, Giulia; Quaglia, Alessandro; Volpi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background groin pain affects all types of athletes, especially soccer players. Many diseases with different etiologies may cause groin pain. Purpose offer a mini review of groin pain in soccer accompanied by the presentation of a case report highlighting the possible association of more clinical frameworks into the onset of groin pain syndrome, in order to recommend that clinical evaluations take into account possible associations between bone, muscle and tendon such as inguinal canal disease. Conclusion the multifactorial etiology of groin pain syndrome needs to be examined with a comprehensive approach, with standardized clinical evaluation based on an imaging protocol in order to evaluate all possible diseases. Study design Mini review- Case report (Level V). PMID:26605198

  4. The effect of an acute pain service on nurses' knowledge and beliefs about post-operative pain.

    PubMed

    Mackintosh, C; Bowles, S

    2000-01-01

    The management of post-operative pain has been an area of concern for many years, with many studies focusing on the knowledge and beliefs of nurses working in this area. Following the report of the Royal College of Surgeons & College of Anaesthetists (1990) in the UK, there has been a rapid expansion in the development of Acute Pain Services (APS) in an attempt to counter these concerns. This descriptive study considers the possible impact the introduction of an APS had on the knowledge and beliefs of nurses working in the surgical area. A closed-answer questionnaire was used to replicate an earlier study (Mackintosh, 1994) which took place before the introduction of the APS. Findings demonstrate a consistent but mainly statistically non-significant trend in all areas towards an improved knowledge base and more appropriate beliefs about pain. PMID:11022500

  5. Reduced Maximal Force during Acute Anterior Knee Pain Is Associated with Deficits in Voluntary Muscle Activation

    PubMed Central

    Salomoni, Sauro; Tucker, Kylie; Hug, François; McPhee, Megan; Hodges, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Although maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force is reduced during pain, studies using interpolated twitch show no consistent reduction of voluntary muscle drive. The present study aimed to test if the reduction in MVC force during acute experimental pain could be explained by increased activation of antagonist muscles, weak voluntary activation at baseline, or changes in force direction. Twenty-two healthy volunteers performed maximal voluntary isometric knee extensions before, during, and after the effects of hypertonic (pain) and isotonic (control) saline injections into the infrapatellar fat pad. The MVC force, voluntary activation, electromyographic (EMG) activity of agonist, antagonist, and auxiliary (hip) muscles, and pain cognition and anxiety scores were recorded. MVC force was 9.3% lower during pain than baseline (p < 0.001), but there was no systematic change in voluntary activation. Reduced MVC force during pain was variable between participants (SD: 14%), and was correlated with reduced voluntary activation (r = 0.90), baseline voluntary activation (r = − 0.62), and reduced EMG amplitude of agonist and antagonist muscles (all r > 0.52), but not with changes in force direction, pain or anxiety scores. Hence, reduced MVC force during acute pain was mainly explained by deficits in maximal voluntary drive. PMID:27559737

  6. Complex regional pain syndrome-like symptoms during herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Berry, James D; Rowbotham, Michael C; Petersen, Karin Lottrup

    2004-07-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) associated with herpes zoster (HZ) was first reported by Sudeck in 1901 (Sudeck, 1901) and is recognized clinically. However, only 13 cases have been published in the literature, and nothing is known about the incidence, prevalence, or natural history (Chester, 1992; Foster et al., 1989; Grosslight et al., 1986; Ketz and Schliack,1968; Kishimoto et al., 1995; Querol and Cisneros, 2001; Sudeck, 1901; Visitsunthorn and Prete, 1981). The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of CRPS-like symptoms in a prospectively gathered cohort of subjects with HZ and to follow the natural history of their pain and sensory disturbance during the first 6 months after onset of HZ. Subjects were evaluated at four time points after HZ: 2-6 weeks, 6-8 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Only subjects aged 50 or older with pain VAS ratings of >/=20/100 at 2-6 weeks were eligible. The first (screening) visit included a neurological and physical examination that was updated at each subsequent visit. Assessments included ratings of pain intensity, allodynia severity, and rash severity. The neurological exam included determination of presence or absence of the following CRPS-like symptoms: (1) increased sweating, (2) color changes, (3) skin temperature changes, (4) weakness of the affected area based on physical exam, (5) edema, and (6) extension of CRPS-like symptoms outside the affected dermatome. For subjects with HZ in dermatomes that can include the limbs (C4-T2 and L1-S2), extremity involvement was considered present if allodynia or rash extended beyond the neck of the humerus (upper extremity), the inguinal ligament (anterior lower extremity), or gluteal sulcus (posterior lower extremity). Involvement of the extremity was considered proximal if neither HZ rash nor allodynia extended past the elbow (upper extremity) or knee (lower extremity). Of the first 75 subjects recruited, 25 had HZ outbreaks in dermatomes that extended into the

  7. Painful Chest Wall Swellings: Tietze Syndrome or Chest Wall Tumor?

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Tevfik; Gunal, Nesimi; Gulbahar, Gultekin; Kocer, Bulent; Han, Serdar; Eryazgan, Mehmet Ali; Ozsoy, Arzu; Naldoken, Seniha; Alhan, Aslıhan; Sakinci, Unal

    2016-04-01

    Background Tietze syndrome (TS) is an inflammatory condition characterized by chest pain and swelling of costochondral junction. Primary chest wall tumors may mimic TS. In this article, we report our experience of approximately 121 patients initially diagnosed as TS and determined chest wall tumor in some cases at the follow-up. Methods This is a retrospective review of patients diagnosed as TS by clinical examination, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, routine laboratory tests, and computed tomography (CT) of chest: all treated and followed up between March 2001 and July 2012. There were 121 cases (41 males and 80 females; mean age, 39.6 ± 3.2 years) of TS. Results In 27 patients with initial normal radiological findings, the size of swellings had doubled during the follow-up period (mean, 8.51 ± 2.15 months). These patients were reevaluated with chest CT and bone scintigraphy and then early diagnostic biopsy was performed. Pathologic examination revealed primary chest wall tumor in 13 patients (5 malignant, 8 benign). CT had a sensitivity of 92.3% and a specificity of 64.2% in detection of tumors (kappa: 0.56, p = 0.002), whereas the sensitivity and the specificity of bone scan were 84.6 and 35.7%, respectively (kappa: 0.199, p = 0.385). Conclusion Primary chest wall tumors could mimic TS. Bone scintigraphy or CT is not specific enough to determine malignant and other benign disorders of costochondral junction. Therefore, clinicians should follow TS patients more closely, and in case of increasing size of swelling, early diagnostic biopsy should be considered. PMID:25742551

  8. Streptococcus viridans osteomyelitis with endocarditis presenting as acute onset lower back pain.

    PubMed

    Buchman, A L

    1990-01-01

    An elderly male with a history of diabetes mellitus and a recent dental procedure presented to the emergency department with acute lumbosacral pain and low grade fever. Computerized tomography (CT scan) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yielded a presumptive diagnosis of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis. A diagnosis of viridans Streptococcus vertebral osteomyelitis was confirmed by gallium scanning and blood culture. The literature has emphasized the occurrence of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis as a chronic process. A review suggests that viridans Streptococci, although an uncommon cause of this disorder, is usually associated with back pain of more acute onset. It is therefore recommended that pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis be considered in any patient presenting to the emergency department with the acute onset of lower back pain, fever, leukocytosis and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. PMID:2142706

  9. Role of the Cannabinoid System in Pain Control and Therapeutic Implications for the Management of Acute and Chronic Pain Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Manzanares, J; Julian, MD; Carrascosa, A

    2006-01-01

    Cannabis extracts and synthetic cannabinoids are still widely considered illegal substances. Preclinical and clinical studies have suggested that they may result useful to treat diverse diseases, including those related with acute or chronic pain. The discovery of cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous ligands, and the machinery for the synthesis, transport, and degradation of these retrograde messengers, has equipped us with neurochemical tools for novel drug design. Agonist-activated cannabinoid receptors, modulate nociceptive thresholds, inhibit release of pro-inflammatory molecules, and display synergistic effects with other systems that influence analgesia, especially the endogenous opioid system. Cannabinoid receptor agonists have shown therapeutic value against inflammatory and neuropathic pains, conditions that are often refractory to therapy. Although the psychoactive effects of these substances have limited clinical progress to study cannabinoid actions in pain mechanisms, preclinical research is progressing rapidly. For example, CB1mediated suppression of mast cell activation responses, CB2-mediated indirect stimulation of opioid receptors located in primary afferent pathways, and the discovery of inhibitors for either the transporters or the enzymes degrading endocannabinoids, are recent findings that suggest new therapeutic approaches to avoid central nervous system side effects. In this review, we will examine promising indications of cannabinoid receptor agonists to alleviate acute and chronic pain episodes. Recently, Cannabis sativa extracts, containing known doses of tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, have granted approval in Canada for the relief of neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis. Further double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trials are needed to evaluate the potential therapeutic effectiveness of various cannabinoid agonists-based medications for controlling different types of pain. PMID:18615144

  10. Clinical characteristics and long-term progression of young patients with acute coronary syndrome in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Soeiro, Alexandre de Matos; Fernandes, Felipe Lourenço; Soeiro, Maria Carolina Feres de Almeida; Serrano, Carlos Vicente; de Oliveira, Múcio Tavares

    2015-01-01

    Objective In Brazil, there are few descriptions in the literature on the angiographic pattern and clinical characteristics of young patients with acute coronary syndrome, despite the evident number of cases in the population. The objective of this study was to evaluate which clinical characteristics are most closely related to the acute coronary syndrome in young patients, and what long-term outcomes are in this population. Methods This is a prospective observational study with 268 patients aged under 55 years with acute coronary syndrome, carried out between May 2010 and May 2013. Data were obtained on demographics, laboratory test and angiography results, and the coronary treatment adopted. Statistical analysis was presented as percentages and absolute values. Results Approximately 57% were men and the median age was 50 years (30 to 55). The main risk factors were arterial hypertension (68%), smoking (67%), and dyslipidemia (43%). Typical pain was present in 90% of patients. In young individuals, 25.7% showed ST segment elevation. Approximately 56.5% of patients presented with a single-vessel angiographic pattern. About 7.1% were submitted to coronary bypass surgery, and 42.1% to percutaneous coronary angioplasty. Intrahospital mortality was 1.5%, and the combined event rate (cerebrovascular accident/stroke, cardiogenic shock, reinfarction, and arrhythmias) was 13.8%. After a mean follow-up of 10 months, mortality was 9.8%, while 25.4% of the patients had new ischemic events, and 37.3% required readmission to hospital. Conclusion In the short-term, young patients presented with mortality rates below what was expected when compared to the rates noted in other studies. However, there was a significant increase in the number of events in the 10-month follow-up. PMID:26466059

  11. Acute promyelocytic leukemia-associated Sweet's syndrome mimicking an axillary abscess: A case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Gaopande, Vandana L; Joshi, Sourabh S; Joshi, Avinash R

    2015-12-01

    A subcutaneous painful left axillary nodule was clinically diagnosed as abscess. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) revealed smears full of mature neutrophils. Background was free of fibrinous necrotic material and degenerating and necrotic neutrophils, which is characteristic of abscess. No organisms were detectable on special staining, and culture was sterile. A cytological differential diagnosis of abscess or Sweet's syndrome (SS) was offered, and the latter was confirmed. SS, also known as acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, shows diffuse dermal neutrophilic infiltrate without vasculitis on biopsy. Our case is probably the first where SS was diagnosed on FNAB. SS is a differential diagnosis for painful skin nodules. FNAB smears of painful skin nodules that yield abundant neutrophils should be carefully evaluated for necrosis, fibrin and degenerated neutrophils. The absence of these in an appropriate clinical setting points towards a neutrophilic dermatosis like SS. PMID:26390119

  12. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  13. Single dose oral piroxicam for acute postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R Andrew; Edwards, Jayne; Loke, Yoon; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2000. Piroxicam is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with analgesic properties, and is used mainly for treating rheumatic disorders. Some drugs have been directly compared against each other within a trial setting to determine their relative efficacies, whereas other have not. It is possible, however, to compare analgesics indirectly by examining the effectiveness of each drug against placebo when used in similar clinical situations. Objectives To determine the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of single-dose piroxicam compared with placebo in moderate to severe postoperative pain. To compare the effects of piroxicam with other analgesics. Search methods Published studies were identified from systematic searching of MEDLINE, Biological Abstracts, EMBASE, CENTRAL and the Oxford Pain Relief Database in December 2007. Additional studies were identified from the reference lists of retrieved reports. Selection criteria The following inclusion criteria were used: full journal publication, randomised placebo controlled trial, double-blind design, adult participants, postoperative pain of moderate to severe intensity at the baseline assessment, postoperative administration of oral or intramuscular piroxicam. Data collection and analysis Summed pain intensity and pain relief data were extracted and converted into dichotomous information to yield the number of participants obtaining at least 50% pain relief. This was used to calculate estimates of relative benefit and number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) for one participant to obtain at least 50% pain relief. Information was collected on adverse effects and estimates of relative risk and number-needed-to-treat-to-harm (NNH) were calculated. Main results In this update no further studies were found. The original search identified three studies (141 participants) which compared oral piroxicam 20 mg with placebo and

  14. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the treatment of acute pain in remote environments: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Russell, Katie W; Scaife, Courtney L; Weber, David C; Windsor, Jeremy S; Wheeler, Albert R; Smith, William R; Wedmore, Ian; McIntosh, Scott E; Lieberman, James R

    2014-12-01

    The Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the management of pain in austere environments. Recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence as defined by criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Acute Pain in Remote Environments published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2014;25(1):41-49. PMID:25498266

  15. Human Rabies with Initial Manifestations that Mimic Acute Brachial Neuritis and Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Edward C.; Maury, Joaquin S.; Santana-Gould, Lenay; Craver, Randall D.; El-Abassi, Rima; Segura-Palacios, Enrique; Sumner, Austin J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Human rabies can be overlooked in places where this disease is now rare. Its diagnosis is further confused by a negative history of exposure (cryptogenic rabies), by a Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) type of presentation, or by symptoms indicating another diagnosis, eg, acute brachial neuritis (ABN). Case presentation A 19-year-old Mexican, with no past health problems, presented with a two-day history of left shoulder, arm, and chest pain. He arrived in Louisiana from Mexico five days prior to admission. Of particular importance is the absence of a history of rabies exposure and immunization. On admission, the patient had quadriparesis, areflexia, and elevated protein in the cerebrospinal fluid, prompting a diagnosis of GBS. However, emerging neurological deficits pointed towards acute encephalitis. Rabies was suspected on hospital day 11 after common causes of encephalitis (eg, arboviruses) have been excluded. The patient tested positive for rabies IgM and IgG. He died 17 days after admission. Negri bodies were detected in the patient’s brain and rabies virus antigen typing identified the vampire bat as the source of infection. Conclusion Rabies should be suspected in every patient with a rapidly evolving GBS-like illness—even if there is no history of exposure and no evidence of encephalitis on presentation. The patient’s ABN-like symptoms may be equivalent to the pain experienced by rabies victims near the inoculation site. PMID:22577299

  16. [Current approaches to the treatment of severe hypoxic respiratory insufficiency (acute lung injury; acute respiratory distress syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Kluge, S; Müller, T; Pfeifer, M

    2011-02-01

    Lung-protective ventilation with a low tidal volume, plateau pressure < 30 cm H(2)O. oxygen saturation > 90% and permissive hypercapnia results in reduction of the mortality rate in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The level of the positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) must be chosen in relation to oxygen requirement. High frequency oscillatory ventilation and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist are promising methods. However, further studies with firm end-points have to be awaited before a final judgment is possible. Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can ensure life-sustaining gas exchange in patients with severe vitally compromised pulmonary failure, to provide time for lung tissue to heal and reduce ventilatory stress. The latest guidelines for analgesia and sedation in intensive care medicine demand consistent monitoring of the level of sedation and the intensity of pain. The sedation should be interrupted daily, with phases of awakenings and, if possible, spontaneous breathing. Methods of supportive treatment: Positional treatment (prone position) and inhalation of vasodilators can improve ventilation/perfusion mismatch and thus oxygenation. However, administration of surfactant is currently not advised in adult respiratory failure. PMID:21271478

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute abdominal and pelvic pain in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Furey, Elizabeth A; Bailey, April A; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2014-08-01

    Evaluation of acute abdominal and pelvic pain in pregnancy presents a diagnostic challenge for clinicians and radiologists alike. The differential diagnosis includes obstetric and nonobstetric conditions unique to pregnancy, in addition to causes of acute abdominal and pelvic pain unrelated to the pregnancy. The clinical presentation and course of disease may be altered in pregnancy, and several pathologies are exacerbated by pregnancy. Discriminating clinical features in the diagnosis of abdominal and pelvic pain are often confounded by expected anatomic and physiologic changes in pregnancy. Moreover, while diagnostic pathways may be altered in pregnancy, the necessity for a timely and accurate diagnosis must be underscored, as delay in treatment may result in an undesirable increase in morbidity and/or mortality for both the patient and fetus. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) through faster acquisition and motion-insensitive techniques, coupled with increased awareness and education regarding the value of MRI in diagnosing a wide range of pathology, have established MRI as a valuable strategy in the investigation of acute abdominal and pelvic pain in the pregnant patient. This review presents a practical approach to common obstetric and nonobstetric causes of acute abdominal and pelvic pain during pregnancy, as well as safety considerations for performing MRI in this patient population. PMID:25099561

  18. When flexibility is not necessarily a virtue: a review of hypermobility syndromes and chronic or recurrent musculoskeletal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Cattalini, Marco; Khubchandani, Raju; Cimaz, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Chronic or recurrent musculoskeletal pain is a common complaint in children. Among the most common causes for this problem are different conditions associated with hypermobility. Pediatricians and allied professionals should be well aware of the characteristics of the different syndromes associated with hypermobility and facilitate early recognition and appropriate management. In this review we provide information on Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Marfan Syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Stickler syndrome, and discuss their characteristics and clinical management. PMID:26444669

  19. Acute myeloid leukaemia after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in girl with Bloom syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Madeleine; Jenney, Meriel; Lazarou, Laz; White, Rhian; Birdsall, Sanda; Staab, Timo; Schindler, Detlev; Meyer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is an inherited genomic instability disorder caused by disruption of the BLM helicase and confers an extreme cancer predisposition. Here we report on a girl with BS who developed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) at age nine, and treatment-related acute myeloid leukaemia (t-AML) aged 12. She was compound heterozygous for the novel BLM frameshift deletion c.1624delG and the previously described c.3415C>T nonsense mutation. Two haematological malignancies in a child with BS imply a fundamental role for BLM for normal haematopoiesis, in particular in the presence of genotoxic stress. PMID:24932421

  20. Acute myeloid leukaemia after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in girl with Bloom syndrome.

    PubMed

    Adams, Madeleine; Jenney, Meriel; Lazarou, Laz; White, Rhian; Birdsall, Sanda; Staab, Timo; Schindler, Detlev; Meyer, Stefan

    2013-09-18

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is an inherited genomic instability disorder caused by disruption of the BLM helicase and confers an extreme cancer predisposition. Here we report on a girl with BS who developed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) at age nine, and treatment-related acute myeloid leukaemia (t-AML) aged 12. She was compound heterozygous for the novel BLM frameshift deletion c.1624delG and the previously described c.3415C>T nonsense mutation. Two haematological malignancies in a child with BS imply a fundamental role for BLM for normal haematopoiesis, in particular in the presence of genotoxic stress. PMID:24932421