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Sample records for acute pancreatic inflammation

  1. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  2. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as the sudden inflammation ... the incidence of recurrent attacks minimized. Timothy Gardner, MD is Director of Pancreatic Disorders at Dartmouth-Hitchcock ...

  3. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  4. Lipolysis of Visceral Adipocyte Triglyceride by Pancreatic Lipases Converts Mild Acute Pancreatitis to Severe Pancreatitis Independent of Necrosis and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Krutika; Trivedi, Ram N.; Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Cline, Rachel A.; DeLany, James P.; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P.

    2016-01-01

    Visceral fat necrosis has been associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) for over 100 years; however, its pathogenesis and role in SAP outcomes are poorly understood. Based on recent work suggesting that pancreatic fat lipolysis plays an important role in SAP, we evaluated the role of pancreatic lipases in SAP-associated visceral fat necrosis, the inflammatory response, local injury, and outcomes of acute pancreatitis (AP). For this, cerulein pancreatitis was induced in lean and obese mice, alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat and parameters of AP induction (serum amylase and lipase), fat necrosis, pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure, and inflammatory response were assessed. Pancreatic lipases were measured in fat necrosis and were overexpressed in 3T3-L1 cells. We noted obesity to convert mild cerulein AP to SAP with greater cytokines, unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), and multisystem organ failure, and 100% mortality without affecting AP induction or pancreatic necrosis. Increased pancreatic lipase amounts and activity were noted in the extensive visceral fat necrosis of dying obese mice. Lipase inhibition reduced fat necrosis, UFAs, organ failure, and mortality but not the parameters of AP induction. Pancreatic lipase expression increased lipolysis in 3T3-L1 cells. We conclude that UFAs generated via lipolysis of visceral fat by pancreatic lipases convert mild AP to SAP independent of pancreatic necrosis and the inflammatory response. PMID:25579844

  5. [Chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, T; Katada, N; Nishimura, D; Hoshino, H; Shimizu, F; Suzuki, R; Sano, H; Kato, K

    1998-11-01

    MRCP has been recognized as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic method. In the present study we evaluated the usefulness of MRCP in diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis. Two-dimensional fast asymmetric spin-echo (FASE) MRCP was performed in 40 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 13 with acute pancreatitis. In 29 patients (72.5%) with chronic pancreatitis and 9 (66.7%) with acute pancreatitis, main pancreatic duct (MPD) was visualized entirely. MRCP could demonstrate the characteristic findings of chronic pancreatitis such as dilatation and irregularity of MPD in most cases. In acute pancreatitis, MRCP indicated that MPD was normal in diameter, but irregular in configuration compared with that of the control group. MRCP may facilitate the diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis.

  6. Protective Effects of Proanthocyanidin on Cerulein-induced Acute Pancreatic Inflammation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Akyuz, Cebrail; Sehirli, Ahmet Ozer; Topaloglu, Umit; Ogunc, Ayliz Velioglu; Cetinel, Sule; Sener, Goksel

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the possible protective effect of proanthocyanidin against cerulein-induced acute pancreatic inflammation (AP) and oxidative injury. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with proanthocyanidine (100 mg/kg, orally) or saline 15 min before cerulein was given by 20 µg/kg subcutaneously at 1-h intervals within 4 hours. Six hours after cerulein or saline injections, the animals were killed by decapitation. Blood samples were collected to analyze amylase, lipase, and proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1b). Pancreas tissues were taken for the determination of tissue glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, Na+, K+-ATPase and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities. Formation of reactive oxygen species in pancreatic tissue samples was monitored by using chemiluminescence (CL) technique with luminol and lucigenin probes, while the extent of tissue injury was analyzed microscopically. Results Acute pancreatitis caused a significant decrease in tissue GSH level and Na+, K+-ATPase activity, which was accompanied with significant increases in the pancreatic MDA, luminol and lucigenin chemiluminescences (CL) levels and MPO activity. Similarly TNF-α and IL-1β levels were elevated in the pancreatic group as compared to control group. On the other hand, proanthocyanidin treatment reversed all these biochemical indices, as well as histopathological alterations that were induced by cerulein. Conclusions Proanthocyanidine can ameliorate pancreatic injury induced by cerulein in rats, this result suggests that proanthocyanidin may have utility in treating acute pancreatititis. PMID:27956946

  7. Caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis results in mild lung inflammation and altered respiratory mechanics.

    PubMed

    Elder, Alison S F; Saccone, Gino T P; Bersten, Andrew D; Dixon, Dani-Louise

    2011-03-01

    Acute lung injury is a common complication of acute pancreatitis (AP) and contributes to the majority of AP-associated deaths. Although some aspects of AP-induced lung inflammation have been demonstrated, investigation of resultant changes in lung function is limited. The aim of this study was to characterize lung injury in caerulein-induced AP. Male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 7-8/group) received 7 injections of caerulein (50 μg/kg) at 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, or 120 hours before measurement of lung impedance mechanics. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), plasma, pancreatic, and lung tissue were collected to determine pancreatic and lung measures of acute inflammation. AP developed between 12 and 24 hours, as indicated by increased plasma amylase activity and pancreatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, edema, and abnormal acinar cells, before beginning to resolve by 48 hours. In the lung, MPO activity peaked at 12 and 96 hours, with BAL cytokine concentrations peaking at 12 hours, followed by lung edema at 24 hours, and BAL cell count at 48 hours. Importantly, no significant changes in BAL protein concentration or arterial blood gas-pH levels were evident over the same period, and only modest changes were observed in respiratory mechanics. Caerulein-induced AP results in minor lung injury, which is not sufficient to allow protein permeability and substantially alter respiratory mechanics.

  8. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  9. [Acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Hecker, M; Mayer, K; Askevold, I; Collet, P; Weigand, M A; Krombach, G A; Padberg, W; Hecker, A

    2014-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially fatal disease with individually differing expression of systemic involvement. For this reason early diagnosis with subsequent risk stratification is essential in the clinical management of this frequent gastroenterological disorder. Severe forms of acute pancreatitis occur in approximately 20 % of cases often requiring intensive care monitoring and interdisciplinary therapeutic approaches. In the acute phase adequate fluid replacement and sufficient analgesic therapy is of major therapeutic importance. Concerning the administration of antibiotics and the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis a change in paradigms could be observed in recent years. Furthermore, endoscopic, radiological or surgical interventions can be necessary depending on the severity of the disease and potential complications.

  10. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  11. Resolvin D1 protects against inflammation in experimental acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Dan; Long, Fei-Wu; Chen, Ke-Ling; Yang, Hong-Wei; Lv, Zhao-Yin; Zhou, Bin; Peng, Zhi-Hai; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Zong-Guang

    2016-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition that may lead to multisystemic organ failure with considerable mortality. Recently, resolvin D1 (RvD1) as an endogenous anti-inflammatory lipid mediator has been confirmed to protect against many inflammatory diseases. This study was designed to investigate the effects of RvD1 in acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury. Acute pancreatitis varying from mild to severe was induced by cerulein or cerulein combined with LPS, respectively. Mice were pretreated with RvD1 at a dose of 300 ng/mouse 30 min before the first injection of cerulein. Severity of AP was assessed by biochemical markers and histology. Serum cytokines and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in pancreas and lung were determined for assessing the extent of inflammatory response. NF-κB activation was determined by Western blotting. The injection of cerulein or cerulein combined with LPS resulted in local injury in the pancreas and corresponding systemic inflammatory changes with pronounced severity in the cerulein and LPS group. Pretreated RvD1 significantly reduced the degree of amylase, lipase, TNF-α, and IL-6 serum levels; the MPO activities in the pancreas and the lungs; the pancreatic NF-κB activation; and the severity of pancreatic injury and associated lung injury, especially in the severe acute pancreatitis model. These results suggest that RvD1 is capable of improving injury of pancreas and lung and exerting anti-inflammatory effects through the inhibition of NF-κB activation in experimental acute pancreatitis, with more notable protective effect in severe acute pancreatitis. These findings indicate that RvD1 may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy in the management of severe acute pancreatitis.

  12. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid reduces endoplasmic reticulum stress, acinar cell damage, and systemic inflammation in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Seyhun, Ersin; Malo, Antje; Schäfer, Claus; Moskaluk, Christopher A; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Göke, Burkhard; Kubisch, Constanze H

    2011-11-01

    In acute pancreatitis, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress prompts an accumulation of malfolded proteins inside the ER, initiating the unfolded protein response (UPR). Because the ER chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) is known to inhibit the UPR in vitro, this study examined the in vivo effects of TUDCA in an acute experimental pancreatitis model. Acute pancreatitis was induced in Wistar rats using caerulein, with or without prior TUDCA treatment. UPR components were analyzed, including chaperone binding protein (BiP), phosphorylated protein kinase-like ER kinase (pPERK), X-box binding protein (XBP)-1, phosphorylated c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (pJNK), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologues protein, and caspase 12 and 3 activation. In addition, pancreatitis biomarkers were measured, such as serum amylase, trypsin activation, edema formation, histology, and the inflammatory reaction in pancreatic and lung tissue. TUDCA treatment reduced intracellular trypsin activation, edema formation, and cell damage, while leaving amylase levels unaltered. The activation of myeloperoxidase was clearly reduced in pancreas and lung. Furthermore, TUDCA prevented caerulein-induced BiP upregulation, reduced XBP-1 splicing, and caspase 12 and 3 activation. It accelerated the downregulation of pJNK. In controls without pancreatitis, TUDCA showed cytoprotective effects including pPERK signaling and activation of downstream targets. We concluded that ER stress responses activated in acute pancreatitis are grossly attenuated by TUDCA. The chaperone reduced the UPR and inhibited ER stress-associated proapoptotic pathways. TUDCA has a cytoprotective potential in the exocrine pancreas. These data hint at new perspectives for an employment of chemical chaperones, such as TUDCA, in prevention of acute pancreatitis.

  13. Involvement of exosomes in lung inflammation associated with experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bonjoch, Laia; Casas, Vanessa; Carrascal, Montserrat; Closa, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    A frequent complication of acute pancreatitis is the lung damage associated with the systemic inflammatory response. Although various pro-inflammatory mediators generated at both local and systemic levels have been identified, the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease are still poorly understood. In recent years, exosomes have emerged as a new intercellular communication system able to transfer encapsulated proteins and small RNAs and protect them from degradation. Using an experimental model of taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis in rats, we aimed to evaluate the role of exosomes in the extent of the systemic inflammatory response. Induction of pancreatitis increased the concentration of circulating exosomes, which showed a different proteomic profile to those obtained from control animals. A series of tracking experiments using PKH26-stained exosomes revealed that circulating exosomes effectively reached the alveolar compartment and were internalized by macrophages. In vitro experiments revealed that exosomes obtained under inflammatory conditions activate and polarize these alveolar macrophages towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Interestingly, the proteomic analysis of circulating exosomes during acute pancreatitis suggested a multi-organ origin with a relevant role for the liver as a source of these vesicles. Tracking experiments also revealed that the liver retains the majority of exosomes from the peritoneal cavity. We conclude that exosomes are involved in the lung damage associated with experimental acute pancreatitis and could be relevant mediators in the systemic effects of pancreatitis. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. HMGB1 and Histones Play a Significant Role in Inducing Systemic Inflammation and Multiple Organ Dysfunctions in Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tenhunen, Jyrki; Tonnessen, Tor Inge

    2017-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) starts as a local inflammation of pancreatic tissue that induces the development of multiple extrapancreatic organs dysfunction; however, the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. Ischemia-reperfusion, circulating inflammatory cytokines, and possible bile cytokines significantly contribute to gut mucosal injury and intestinal bacterial translocation (BT) during SAP. Circulating HMGB1 level is significantly increased in SAP patients and HMGB1 is an important factor that mediates (at least partly) gut BT during SAP. Gut BT plays a critical role in triggering/inducing systemic inflammation/sepsis in critical illness, and profound systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) can lead to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) during SAP, and systemic inflammation with multiorgan dysfunction is the cause of death in experimental SAP. Therefore, HMGB1 is an important factor that links gut BT and systemic inflammation. Furthermore, HMGB1 significantly contributes to multiple organ injuries. The SAP patients also have significantly increased circulating histones and cell-free DNAs levels, which can reflect the disease severity and contribute to multiple organ injuries in SAP. Hepatic Kupffer cells (KCs) are the predominant source of circulating inflammatory cytokines in SAP, and new evidence indicates that hepatocyte is another important source of circulating HMGB1 in SAP; therefore, treating the liver injury is important in SAP. PMID:28316860

  15. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... mg/dL Injury to the pancreas from an accident Other causes include: After certain procedures used to ... pressure Rapid heart rate Rapid breathing (respiratory) rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes ...

  16. The Interplay between Inflammation, Coagulation and Endothelial Injury in the Early Phase of Acute Pancreatitis: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Dumnicka, Paulina; Maduzia, Dawid; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Olszanecki, Rafał; Drożdż, Ryszard; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata

    2017-02-08

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease with varied severity, ranging from mild local inflammation to severe systemic involvement resulting in substantial mortality. Early pathologic events in AP, both local and systemic, are associated with vascular derangements, including endothelial activation and injury, dysregulation of vasomotor tone, increased vascular permeability, increased leukocyte migration to tissues, and activation of coagulation. The purpose of the review was to summarize current evidence regarding the interplay between inflammation, coagulation and endothelial dysfunction in the early phase of AP. Practical aspects were emphasized: (1) we summarized available data on diagnostic usefulness of the markers of endothelial dysfunction and activated coagulation in early prediction of severe AP; (2) we reviewed in detail the results of experimental studies and clinical trials targeting coagulation-inflammation interactions in severe AP. Among laboratory tests, d-dimer and angiopoietin-2 measurements seem the most useful in early prediction of severe AP. Although most clinical trials evaluating anticoagulants in treatment of severe AP did not show benefits, they also did not show significantly increased bleeding risk. Promising results of human trials were published for low molecular weight heparin treatment. Several anticoagulants that proved beneficial in animal experiments are thus worth testing in patients.

  17. The Interplay between Inflammation, Coagulation and Endothelial Injury in the Early Phase of Acute Pancreatitis: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Dumnicka, Paulina; Maduzia, Dawid; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Olszanecki, Rafał; Drożdż, Ryszard; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata

    2017-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease with varied severity, ranging from mild local inflammation to severe systemic involvement resulting in substantial mortality. Early pathologic events in AP, both local and systemic, are associated with vascular derangements, including endothelial activation and injury, dysregulation of vasomotor tone, increased vascular permeability, increased leukocyte migration to tissues, and activation of coagulation. The purpose of the review was to summarize current evidence regarding the interplay between inflammation, coagulation and endothelial dysfunction in the early phase of AP. Practical aspects were emphasized: (1) we summarized available data on diagnostic usefulness of the markers of endothelial dysfunction and activated coagulation in early prediction of severe AP; (2) we reviewed in detail the results of experimental studies and clinical trials targeting coagulation-inflammation interactions in severe AP. Among laboratory tests, d-dimer and angiopoietin-2 measurements seem the most useful in early prediction of severe AP. Although most clinical trials evaluating anticoagulants in treatment of severe AP did not show benefits, they also did not show significantly increased bleeding risk. Promising results of human trials were published for low molecular weight heparin treatment. Several anticoagulants that proved beneficial in animal experiments are thus worth testing in patients. PMID:28208708

  18. Pancreatic cancer, inflammation, and microbiome.

    PubMed

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Pushalkar, Smruti; Saxena, Deepak; Miller, George

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. No effective screening methods exist, and available treatment modalities do not effectively treat the disease. Inflammatory conditions such as pancreatitis represent a well-known risk factor for pancreatic cancer development. Yet only in the past 2 decades has pancreatic cancer been recognized as an inflammation-driven cancer, and the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenic role of inflammation are beginning to be explored in detail. A substantial amount of preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that bacteria are likely to influence this process by activating immune receptors and perpetuating cancer-associated inflammation. The recent explosion of investigations of the human microbiome have highlighted how perturbations of commensal bacterial populations can promote inflammation and promote disease processes, including carcinogenesis. The elucidation of the interplay between inflammation and microbiome in the context of pancreatic carcinogenesis will provide novel targets for intervention to prevent and treat pancreatic cancer more efficiently. Further studies toward this direction are urgently needed.

  19. TRPV1 and TRPA1 antagonists prevent the transition of acute to chronic inflammation and pain in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Erica S; La, Jun-Ho; Scheff, Nicole N; Davis, Brian M; Albers, Kathryn M; Gebhart, G F

    2013-03-27

    Visceral afferents expressing transient receptor potential (TRP) channels TRPV1 and TRPA1 are thought to be required for neurogenic inflammation and development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. Using a mouse model of chronic pancreatitis (CP) produced by repeated episodes (twice weekly) of caerulein-induced AP (AP), we studied the involvement of these TRP channels in pancreatic inflammation and pain-related behaviors. Antagonists of the two TRP channels were administered at different times to block the neurogenic component of AP. Six bouts of AP (over 3 wks) increased pancreatic inflammation and pain-related behaviors, produced fibrosis and sprouting of pancreatic nerve fibers, and increased TRPV1 and TRPA1 gene transcripts and a nociceptive marker, pERK, in pancreas afferent somata. Treatment with TRP antagonists, when initiated before week 3, decreased pancreatic inflammation and pain-related behaviors and also blocked the development of histopathological changes in the pancreas and upregulation of TRPV1, TRPA1, and pERK in pancreatic afferents. Continued treatment with TRP antagonists blocked the development of CP and pain behaviors even when mice were challenged with seven more weeks of twice weekly caerulein. When started after week 3, however, treatment with TRP antagonists was ineffective in blocking the transition from AP to CP and the emergence of pain behaviors. These results suggest: (1) an important role for neurogenic inflammation in pancreatitis and pain-related behaviors, (2) that there is a transition from AP to CP, after which TRP channel antagonism is ineffective, and thus (3) that early intervention with TRP channel antagonists may attenuate the transition to and development of CP effectively.

  20. Pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Madhav; Wong, Fei Ling; Cao, Yang; Lau, Hon Yen; Huang, Jiali; Puneet, Padmam; Chevali, Lakshmi

    2005-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common clinical condition. It is a disease of variable severity in which some patients experience mild, self-limited attacks while others manifest a severe, highly morbid, and frequently lethal attack. The exact mechanisms by which diverse etiological factors induce an attack are still unclear. It is generally believed that the earliest events in acute pancreatitis occur within acinar cells. Acinar cell injury early in acute pancreatitis leads to a local inflammatory reaction. If this inflammatory reaction is marked, it leads to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). An excessive SIRS leads to distant organ damage and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). MODS associated with acute pancreatitis is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in this condition. Recent studies have established the role played by inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and the resultant MODS. At the same time, recent research has demonstrated the importance of acinar cell death in the form of apoptosis and necrosis as a determinant of pancreatitis severity. In this review, we will discuss about our current understanding of the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis.

  1. Recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Vishal; Ganguly, Ishita

    2014-09-28

    Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) is commonly encountered, but less commonly understood clinical entity, especially idiopathic RAP, with propensity to lead to repeated attacks and may be chronic pancreatitis if attacks continue to recur. A great number of studies have been published on acute pancreatitis, but few have focused on RAP. Analysing the results of clinical studies focusing specifically on RAP is problematic in view due to lack of standard definitions, randomised clinical trials, standard evaluation protocol used and less post intervention follow-up duration. With the availability of newer investigation modalities less number of etiologies will remains undiagnosed. This review particularly is focused on the present knowledge in understanding of RAP.

  2. [Experimental models of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ceranowicz, Piotr; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembiński, Artur

    2015-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is a severe disease with high mortality. Clinical studies can bring some data about etiology, pathogenesis and the course of acute pancreatitis. However, studies concerning early events of this disease and the new concepts of treatment cannot be performed on humans, due to ethical reasons. Animal models of acute pancreatitis have been developed to solve this problem. This review presents currently used experimental models of acute pancreatitis, their properties and clinical relevance. Experimental models of acute pancreatitis can be divided into in vivo (non-invasive and invasive) and ex vivo models. The onset, development, severity and extent of acute pancreatitis, as well as the mortality, vary considerably between these different models. Animal models reproducibly produce mild, moderate or severe acute pancreatitis. One of the most commonly used models of acute pancreatitis is created by administration of supramaximal doses of cerulein, an analog of cholecystokinin. This model produces acute mild edematous pancreatitis in rats, whereas administration of cerulein in mice leads to the development of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis evoked by retrograde administration of sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct is the most often used model of acute severe necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. Ex vivo models allow to eliminate the influence of hormonal and nervous factors on the development of acute pancreatitis.

  3. [Acute pancreatitis due to lupus].

    PubMed

    Hani, Mohamed Aziz; Guesmi, Fethi; Ben Achour, Jamel; Zribi, Riadh; Bouasker, Ibtissem; Zoghlami, Ayoub; Najah, Nabil

    2004-02-01

    Among digestive clinical presentations of systemic lupus erythematosus, acute pancreatitis remains a serious affection with very poor prognosis. To date, pathogenesis is still unclear. We report two cases of fatal acute pancreatitis related to systemic lupus erythematosus.

  4. Comparison of the prognostic values of inflammation markers in patients with acute pancreatitis: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Ying; Feng, Limin; Guo, Renyong

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Inflammation-based prognostic markers (neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio (NLR), prognostic nutritional index (PNI), red cell distribution width (RDW) and lymphocyte–monocyte ratio (LMR)) are associated with overall survival in some diseases. This study assessed their prognostic value in mortality and severity in acute pancreatitis (AP). Design A retrospective cohort study. Setting Patients with AP were recruited from the emergency department at our hospital. Participants A total of 359 patients with AP (31 non-survivors) were enrolled. Primary and secondary outcome measures Mortality and severity of AP were the primary and secondary outcome measures, respectively. Biochemistry and haematology results of the first test after admission were collected. Independent relationships between severe AP (SAP) and markers were assessed using multivariate logistic regression models. Mortality prediction ability was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Overall survival was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method, with differences compared using the log-rank test. Independent relationships between mortality and each predictor were estimated using the Cox proportional hazard models. Results Compared with survivors of AP, non-survivors had higher RDW (p<0.001), higher NLR (p<0.001), lower LMR (p<0.001) and lower PNI (p<0.001) at baseline. C reactive protein (CRP; OR=8.251, p<0.001), RDW (OR=2.533, p=0.003) and PNI (OR=7.753, p<0.001) were independently associated with the occurrence of SAP. For predicting mortality, NLR had the largest area under the ROC curve (0.804, p<0.001), with a 16.64 cut-off value, 82.4% sensitivity and 75.6% specificity. RDW was a reliable marker for excluding death owing to its lowest negative likelihood ratio (0.11). NLR (HR=4.726, p=0.004), CRP (HR=3.503, p=0.003), RDW (HR=3.139, p=0.013) and PNI (HR=2.641, p=0.011) were independently associated with mortality of AP. Conclusions NLR was the most powerful marker of

  5. Managing acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Skipworth, James R A; Shankar, Arjun; Pereira, Stephen P

    2010-10-01

    Pancreatitis may be acute or chronic. Although both can be caused by similar aetiologies, they tend to follow distinct natural histories. Around 80% of acute pancreatitis (AP) diagnoses occur secondary to gallstone disease and alcohol misuse. AP is commonly associated with sudden onset of upper abdominal pain radiating to the back that is usually severe enough to warrant the patient seeking urgent medical attention. Onset of pain may be related to a recent alcohol binge or rich, fatty meal. The patient may appear unwell, be tachycardic and have exquisite tenderness in the upper abdomen. Overall, 10-25% of AP episodes are classified as severe, leading to an associated mortality rate of 7.5%. Disease severity is best predicted from a number of clinical scoring systems which can be applied at diagnosis in association with repeated clinical assessment, measurement of acute inflammatory markers, and CT. All patients with suspected AP should be referred urgently. Chronic pancreatitis (CP) follows continued, repetitive or sustained injury to the pancreas and 70% of diagnoses occur secondary to alcohol abuse. The characteristic presenting feature of CP is insidious progression of chronic, severe, upper abdominal pain, radiating to the back, caused by a combination of progressive pancreatic destruction, inflammation and duct obstruction. Signs and symptoms include weight loss and steatorrhoea and later on diabetes. CP patients may also present with recurrent episodes mimicking AP, both symptomatically and metabolically. Diagnosis of CP should be based on symptom profile, imaging and assessment of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function. CT should be the first-line imaging investigation.

  6. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Staging of Pancreatic Cancer Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Whipple Procedure Complementary Therapies Pancreatic Cancer Support ...

  7. Models of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Markus M; Gorelick, Fred S

    2013-06-01

    Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis have been created to examine mechanisms of pathogenesis, test therapeutic interventions, and study the influence of inflammation on the development of pancreatic cancer. In vitro models can be used to study early stage, short-term processes that involve acinar cell responses. Rodent models reproducibly develop mild or severe disease. One of the most commonly used pancreatitis models is created by administration of supraphysiologic concentrations of caerulein, an ortholog of cholecystokinin. Induction of chronic pancreatitis with factors thought to have a role in human disease, such as combinations of lipopolysaccharide and chronic ethanol feeding, might be relevant to human disease. Models of autoimmune chronic pancreatitis have also been developed. Most models, particularly of chronic pancreatitis, require further characterization to determine which features of human disease they include.

  8. Pancreatitis-induced Inflammation Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer by Inhibiting Oncogene-Induced Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Carmen; Collado, Manuel; Navas, Carolina; Schuhmacher, Alberto J; Hernández-Porras, Isabel; Cañamero, Marta; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Serrano, Manuel; Barbacid, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells of adult mice (≥P60) are resistant to transformation by some of the most robust oncogenic insults including expression of K-Ras oncogenes and loss of p16Ink4a/p19Arf or Trp53 tumor suppressors. Yet, these acinar cells yield pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (mPanIN) and ductal adenocarcinomas (mPDAC) if exposed to limited bouts of non-acute pancreatitis, providing they harbor K-Ras oncogenes. Pancreatitis contributes to tumor progression by abrogating the senescence barrier characteristic of low-grade mPanINs. Attenuation of pancreatitis-induced inflammation also accelerates tissue repair and thwarts mPanIN expansion. Patients with chronic pancreatitis display senescent PanINs, if they have received anti-inflammatory drugs. These results put forward the concept that anti-inflammatory treatment of people diagnosed with pancreatitis may reduce their risk of developing PDAC. PMID:21665147

  9. Cerulein Pancreatitis: Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Cerulein pancreatitis is similar to human edematous pancreatitis, manifesting with dysregulation of digestive enzyme production and cytoplasmic vacuolization, the death of acinar cells, edema formation, and infiltration of inflammatory cells into the pancreas. Reactive oxygen species are involved in nuclear factor-κB activation, cytokine expression, apoptosis and pathogenesis of pancreatitis. There is recent evidence that cerulein activates NADPH oxidase, which is a major source of reactive oxygen species during inflammation and apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cells. In addition, the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway has been suggested as being involved in inflammatory signaling in the pancreas. This review discusses the involvement of oxidative stress in inflammation and apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cells stimulated with cerulein as an in vitro model of pancreatitis. PMID:20485614

  10. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition.

  11. Acute Pancreatitis after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tabakovic, Mithat; Salkic, Nermin N.; Bosnjic, Jasmina; Alibegovic, Ervin

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare but life-threatening complication in patients with transplanted kidney. The incidence of acute pancreatitis after kidney transplantation ranges from 2% to 7%, with mortality rate between 50 and 100%. We report a case of a female patient aged 46 years, developing an interstitial acute pancreatitis 8 years following a renal transplantation. The specific aethiological factor was not clearly established, although possibility of biliary pancreatitis with spontaneous stone elimination and/or medication-induced pancreatitis remains the strongest. Every patient after renal transplantation with an acute onset of abdominal pain should be promptly evaluated for presence of pancreatitis with a careful application of the most appropriate diagnostic procedure for each individual patient. PMID:23259142

  12. Canagliflozin-Associated Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajanshu

    2016-01-01

    Canagliflozin is a new drug in class of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors used for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We describe a patient who developed moderately severe acute pancreatitis as an untoward consequence after being initiated on this drug. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of canagliflozin-associated acute pancreatitis in clinical literature.

  13. Acute pancreatitis: The stress factor

    PubMed Central

    Binker, Marcelo G; Cosen-Binker, Laura I

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disorder of the pancreas that may cause life-threatening complications. Etiologies of pancreatitis vary, with gallstones accounting for the majority of all cases, followed by alcohol. Other causes of pancreatitis include trauma, ischemia, mechanical obstruction, infections, autoimmune, hereditary, and drugs. The main events occurring in the pancreatic acinar cell that initiate and propagate acute pancreatitis include inhibition of secretion, intracellular activation of proteases, and generation of inflammatory mediators. Small cytokines known as chemokines are released from damaged pancreatic cells and attract inflammatory cells, whose systemic action ultimately determined the severity of the disease. Indeed, severe forms of pancreatitis may result in systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiorgan dysfunction syndrome, characterized by a progressive physiologic failure of several interdependent organ systems. Stress occurs when homeostasis is threatened, and stressors can include physical or mental forces, or combinations of both. Depending on the timing and duration, stress can result in beneficial or harmful consequences. While it is well established that a previous acute-short-term stress decreases the severity of experimentally-induced pancreatitis, the worsening effects of chronic stress on the exocrine pancreas have received relatively little attention. This review will focus on the influence of both prior acute-short-term and chronic stress in acute pancreatitis. PMID:24914340

  14. [Diabetes mellitus in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Rubio, José Luis; Torre-Delgadillo, Aldo; Robles-Díaz, Guillermo

    2002-01-01

    Exocrine and endocrine components of pancreas are interrelated anatomically and functionally. Exocrine pancreatic dysfunction often accompanies endocrine pancreatic impairment and vice versa. Diabetes mellitus resulting from alterations of exocrine pancreas, such as acute or chronic pancreatitis, is known as pancreatic diabetes. Hyperglycemia during acute pancreatitis (AP) can be due to abnormalities in insulin secretion, increase in counterregulatory hormones release, or decrease in glucose utilization by peripheral tissues. Causal association is suggested between diabetic ketoacidosis and AP and is attributed to alternation in metabolism of triglycerides. High blood glucose levels are associated with severe AP and constitute factor of worst prognosis. Some patients are discharged with diabetes after AP episode, while others develop diabetes during first year of follow-up. Origin and frequency of glycemic abnormalities associated with AP have not been settled yet accurately. Also, predictive factors for diabetes development and persistence after AP have not been recognized to date.

  15. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  16. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF-VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  17. Pinealectomy aggravates acute pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jaworek, Jolanta; Zwirska-Korczala, Krystyna; Szklarczyk, Joanna; Nawrot-Porąbka, Katarzyna; Leja-Szpak, Anna; Jaworek, Andrzej K; Tomaszewska, Romana

    2010-01-01

    Melatonin, a pineal indoleamine, protects the pancreas against acute damage; however, the involvement of the pineal gland in the pancreatoprotective action of melatonin is unknown. The primary aim of this study was to determine the effects of pinealectomy on the course of acute caerulein-induced pancreatitis (AP) in rats. AP was induced by a subcutaneous infusion of caerulein (25 μg/kg) into pinealectomized or sham-operated animals. Melatonin (5 or 25 mg/kg) was given via intraperitoneal (ip) injection 30 min prior to the induction of AP. The pancreatic content of the lipid peroxidation products malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal (MDA + 4HNE) and the activity of an antioxidative enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), were measured in each group of rats. Melatonin blood levels were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). In the sham-operated rats, AP was confirmed with histological examination and manifested as pancreatic edema and an increase in the blood lipase level (by 1,500%). In addition, the pancreatic content of MDA+ 4HNE was increased by 200%, and pancreatic glutathione peroxydase (GSH-Px) activity was reduced by 40%. Pinealectomy significantly aggravated the histological manifestations of AP, reduced the GSH-Px activity and markedly augmented the levels of MDA+ 4HNE in the pancreas of rats with or without AP as compared to sham-operated animals. Melatonin was undetectable in the blood of the pinealectomized rats with or without AP. Treatment with melatonin (25 mg/kg, ip) prevented the development of AP in the sham-operated rats and significantly reduced pancreatic inflammation in the animals previously subjected to pinealectomy. In conclusion, pineal melatonin contributes to the pancreatic protection through the activation of the antioxidative defense mechanism in pancreatic tissue as well as its direct antioxidant effects.

  18. Chronic pancreatitis: relation to acute pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Uomo, G; Rabitti, P G

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between chronic pancreatitis (CP) and other pancreatic diseases, such as acute pancreatitis (AP) and pancreatic cancer (PK), remains a fairly debated question. The progression from alcoholic AP to CP is controversial, and some long-term epidemiological studies suggest that alcoholic CP might be the result of recurrent alcoholic AP (necrosis-fibrosis sequence) and a subgroup of alcoholics may present recurrent AP without progression to CP. Other predisposing factors (genetic, nutritional, environmental) seems to be important in inducing different outcomes of pancreatic damage due to alcohol. However, recurrent episodes of AP are clearly involved in pathophysiology of CP in patients with hereditary pancreatitis. A relationship between CP and subsequent PK development has long been suspected, but we actually don't know whether this association is direct or is the result of confounding factors, such as alcohol intake or cigarette smoking. Many issues should be considered as indicators of a causal association, and several of them are not fulfilled. Nonetheless, epidemiological studies (case-control or cohort studies) showed that the risk of PK is increased in patients with CP; the risk is significantly higher in tropical calcifying CP and hereditary pancreatitis. Studies on growth factors, oncogenes, tumor-suppressor genes, and angiogenesis suggest that the sequence PC-KP is plausible from the biological standpoint.

  19. Somatostatin therapy of acute experimental pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Lankisch, P G; Koop, H; Winckler, K; Fölsch, U R; Creutzfeldt, W

    1977-01-01

    Because somatostatin (SRIF) reduces exocrine pancreatic secretion, its effect on acute pancreatitis was investigated in rats. Linear SRIF reduced serum amylase and lipase but had no effect on pancreatic necrosis, oedema, leucocyte infiltration, and enzyme content. The mortality rate was not reduced. These results do not recommend the use of SRIF in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. PMID:604191

  20. [Therapeutic attitude in acute necrotizing pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Leşe, Mihaela; Pop, C; Naghi, Ildiko; Mureşan, Lavinia

    2002-01-01

    The necrosectomy, celiostomy and pancreatic drainage represent the surgical treatment of choice in necrotizing pancreatitis. We present the clinical observation of a patient 59 years old operated in surgical service of Baia Mare for acute necrotizing pancreatitis, discussing the moment of operation, tips of operations, postoperative complications as well as our experience in acute grave pancreatitis treatment.

  1. Blood tests for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Basnayake, Chamara; Ratnam, Dilip

    2015-01-01

    Summary The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis requires the presence of at least two of the three diagnostic criteria – characteristic abdominal pain, elevated serum amylase or lipase, and radiological evidence of pancreatitis. Serum concentrations of amylase and lipase rise within hours of the pancreatic injury. A threshold concentration 2–4 times the upper limit of normal is recommended for diagnosis. Serum lipase is now the preferred test due to its improved sensitivity, particularly in alcohol-induced pancreatitis. Its prolonged elevation creates a wider diagnostic window than amylase. Neither enzyme is useful in monitoring or predicting the severity of an episode of pancreatitis in adults. New biomarkers including trypsinogen and elastase have no significant advantage over amylase or lipase. PMID:26648641

  2. Experimental Models in Syrian Golden Hamster Replicate Human Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunan; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Lu, Guotao; Xu, Pengfei; Qiu, Xu; Chen, Liye; Qi, Rong; Huang, Shouxiong; Li, Weiqin; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George

    2016-01-01

    The hamster has been shown to share a variety of metabolic similarities with humans. To replicate human acute pancreatitis with hamsters, we comparatively studied the efficacy of common methods, such as the peritoneal injections of caerulein, L-arginine, the retrograde infusion of sodium taurocholate, and another novel model with concomitant administration of ethanol and fatty acid. The severity of pancreatitis was evaluated by serum amylase activity, pathological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and the expression of inflammation factors in pancreas. The results support that the severity of pathological injury is consistent with the pancreatitis induced in mice and rat using the same methods. Specifically, caerulein induced mild edematous pancreatitis accompanied by minimal lung injury, while L-arginine induced extremely severe pancreatic injury including necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. Infusion of Na-taurocholate into the pancreatic duct induced necrotizing pancreatitis in the head of pancreas and lighter inflammation in the distal region. The severity of acute pancreatitis induced by combination of ethanol and fatty acids was between the extent of caerulein and L-arginine induction, with obvious inflammatory cells infiltration. In view of the advantages in lipid metabolism features, hamster models are ideally suited for the studies of pancreatitis associated with altered metabolism in humans. PMID:27302647

  3. Danaparoid sodium prevents cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Satoshi; Iwasaka, Hideo; Uchida, Tomohisa; Hasegawa, Akira; Asai, Nobuhiko; Noguchi, Takayuki

    2009-07-01

    Systemic inflammatory mediators, including the protein high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), play an important role in the development of acute pancreatitis. Anticoagulants such as danaparoid sodium (DA) may be able to inhibit sepsis-induced inflammation, but the mechanism of action is not well understood. We hypothesized that DA would act as an inhibitor of inflammation and prevent cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Male Wistar rats were used as subjects in this study. Each received a bolus of 50 U/kg of DA or saline-injected into the tail vein, followed by 4 injections of 50 mg/kg cerulean (i.p.) at 1-h intervals. Cytokine (IL-6), NO, and HMGB1 levels in serum and pancreatic tissue were measured after the cerulein injection. Pancreas histopathology and wet-dry ratio significantly improved in the DA-injected (50 U/kg) animals compared with saline-injected rats. Serum and pancreatic HMGB1 levels decreased over time in DA-treated animals. Danaparoid sodium also decreased cytokine, NO, and HMGB1 levels during cerulein-induced inflammation. As a result, DA ameliorated pancreas pathology in the rat model of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. This study demonstrates that DA treatment prevents cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in a rat model. This effect may be mediated through inhibition of cytokines, NO, and HMGB1.

  4. Fluid resuscitation in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Aakash; Manrai, Manish; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis remains a clinical challenge, despite an exponential increase in our knowledge of its complex pathophysiological changes. Early fluid therapy is the cornerstone of treatment and is universally recommended; however, there is a lack of consensus regarding the type, rate, amount and end points of fluid replacement. Further confusion is added with the newer studies reporting better results with controlled fluid therapy. This review focuses on the pathophysiology of fluid depletion in acute pancreatitis, as well as the rationale for fluid replacement, the type, optimal amount, rate of infusion and monitoring of such patients. The basic goal of fluid epletion should be to prevent or minimize the systemic response to inflammatory markers. For this review, various studies and reviews were critically evaluated, along with authors’ recommendations, for predicted severe or severe pancreatitis based on the available evidence. PMID:25561779

  5. Immune-modulating therapy in acute pancreatitis: fact or fiction.

    PubMed

    Akinosoglou, Karolina; Gogos, Charalambos

    2014-11-07

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is one of the most common diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, bearing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current treatment of AP remains unspecific and supportive and is mainly targeted to aggressively prevent systemic complications and organ failure by intensive care. As acute pancreatitis shares an indistinguishable profile of inflammation with sepsis, therapeutic approaches have turned towards modulating the systemic inflammatory response. Targets, among others, have included pro- and anti-inflammatory modulators, cytokines, chemokines, immune cells, adhesive molecules and platelets. Even though, initial results in experimental models have been encouraging, clinical implementation of immune-regulating therapies in acute pancreatitis has had a slow progress. Main reasons include difficulty in clinical translation of experimental data, poor understanding of inflammatory response time-course, flaws in experimental designs, need for multimodal approaches and commercial drawbacks. Whether immune-modulation in acute pancreatitis remains a fact or just fiction remains to be seen in the future.

  6. Pancreatic pseudocyst after acute organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Ken; Ito, Tetsuhide; Arita, Yoshiyuki; Sadamoto, Yojiro; Harada, Naohiko; Yamaguchi, Koji; Tanaka, Masao; Nakano, Itsuro; Nawata, Hajime; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2006-04-01

    Acute organophosphate poisoning (OP) shows several severe clinical symptoms due to its strong blocking effect on cholinesterase. Acute pancreatitis is one of the complications associated with acute OP, but this association still may not be widely recognized. We report here the case of a 73-year-old man who had repeated abdominal pain during and after the treatment of acute OP. Hyperamylasemia and a 7-cm pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail were noted on investigations. We diagnosed pancreatic pseudocyst that likely was secondary to an episode of acute pancreatitis following acute OP. He was initially treated with a long-term intravenous hyperalimentation, protease inhibitors and octerotide, but eventually required surgical intervention, a cystgastrostomy. Acute pancreatitis and hyperamylasemia are known to be possible complications of acute OP. It is necessary to examine and assess pancreatic damage in patients with acute OP.

  7. Resveratrol: A medical drug for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhen-Hua; Ma, Qing-Yong

    2005-01-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates that resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic compound extracted from plants, inhibit inflammation when administered. It has direct effects on suppression of platelet coagulation and cytokines production in many experimental models. Because microcirculation occlusion and cytokines over-production is involved in many diseases such as acute pancreatitis (AP), the discovery of resveratrol as platelet and cytokines inhibitors has shed light on the treatment of AP, which still has significant mortality and morbidity. It is anticipated that this natural polyphenol could serve as a therapeutic compound in managing AP through different pathways. PMID:15929163

  8. Study on acute recent stage pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ye-Chen; Wang, Min; Zhu, Feng; Qin, Ren-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas which involves the pancreas and surrounding tissue, and systemic inflammation with a characteristic systemic increase of vascular permeability and increased risk of multiple organ dysfunction. Currently, the pathogenesis of AP is fuzzy, and the diagnosis and treatment need to be standardized. Nevertheless, increased knowledge of AP may achieve more thorough understanding of the pathogenesis. The use of further advanced diagnostic tools and superior treatment, potentially will help clinicians to manage AP at an appropriate stage. However, in view of the multi factorial disease and the complex clinical manifestations, the management of patients with AP is also remaining areas for improvement. PMID:25473166

  9. Acute pancreatitis: Manifestation of acute HIV infection in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Anas; Altaf, Muhammad; Sferra, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Pancreatitis in the pediatric age group is not as common as in adults. Etiologies are various and differ from those in adults. Although infectious etiology accounts for a significant number of cases of pancreatitis, acute infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was rarely reported as a possible etiology for acute pancreatitis in adults. Acute pancreatitis has never been reported as a presenting manifestation of acute HIV infection in children. Case Report: We describe a pediatric patient who presented with acute pancreatitis that revealed acute HIV infection. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis as a primary manifestation of HIV infection is very rare. It may represent an uncommon aspect of primary HIV infection. We suggest that acute HIV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute pancreatitis at all ages. PMID:23569476

  10. Peripancreatic fat necrosis worsens acute pancreatitis independent of pancreatic necrosis via unsaturated fatty acids increased in human pancreatic necrosis collections

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Pawan; Patel, Krutika; Durgampudi, Chandra; Trivedi, Ram N; de Oliveira, Cristiane; Crowell, Michael D; Pannala, Rahul; Lee, Kenneth; Brand, Randall; Chennat, Jennifer; Slivka, Adam; Papachristou, Georgios I; Khalid, Asif; Whitcomb, David C; DeLany, James P; Cline, Rachel A; Acharya, Chathur; Jaligama, Deepthi; Murad, Faris M; Yadav, Dhiraj; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Peripancreatic fat necrosis occurs frequently in necrotising pancreatitis. Distinguishing markers from mediators of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is important since targeting mediators may improve outcomes. We evaluated potential agents in human pancreatic necrotic collections (NCs), pseudocysts (PCs) and pancreatic cystic neoplasms and used pancreatic acini, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and an acute pancreatitis (AP) model to determine SAP mediators. Methods We measured acinar and PBMC injury induced by agents increased in NCs and PCs. Outcomes of caerulein pancreatitis were studied in lean rats coadministered interleukin (IL)-1β and keratinocyte chemoattractant/growth-regulated oncogene, triolein alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat. Results NCs had higher fatty acids, IL-8 and IL-1β versus other fluids. Lipolysis of unsaturated triglyceride and resulting unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) oleic and linoleic acids induced necro-apoptosis at less than half the concentration in NCs but other agents did not do so at more than two times these concentrations. Cytokine coadministration resulted in higher pancreatic and lung inflammation than caerulein alone, but only triolein coadministration caused peripancreatic fat stranding, higher cytokines, UFAs, multisystem organ failure (MSOF) and mortality in 97% animals, which were prevented by orlistat. Conclusions UFAs, IL-1β and IL-8 are elevated in NCs. However, UFAs generated via peripancreatic fat lipolysis causes worse inflammation and MSOF, converting mild AP to SAP. PMID:25500204

  11. Platelet-activating factor: a mediator of pancreatic inflammation during cerulein hyperstimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, W; Levine, B A; Olson, M S

    1993-05-01

    Hyperstimulation of the exocrine pancreas with cerulein causes acute pancreatitis, characterized by intensive interstitial edema, acinar vacuolization, leukocytic infiltration, and hyperamylasemia. Whereas the pathogenesis of cerulein-induced pancreatitis is not well-defined, a local inflammatory response may contribute to the full expression of acute pancreatitis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) seems to be an important mediator of the inflammatory response. The present evidence includes: 1) pancreatic PAF levels increased in rats in which cerulein-induced pancreatitis was initiated, concomitant with an increase in calcium concentrations in the pancreatic tissue; 2) treatment of rats exposed to cerulein with WEB2170, a PAF receptor antagonist, was shown to reduce inflammatory injury, as demonstrated by decreases in pancreatic weight, Evan's blue extravasation, and myeloperoxidase activity and an improvement in pancreatic histology. In an idealized in vitro experiment mimicking cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, in which pancreatic acini were employed, cerulein induced amylase release, an increase in [Ca2+]i, and an increase in PAF synthesis. Whereas amylase release was induced by low concentrations of cerulein (10(-11) mol/L), relatively high concentrations of cerulein (10(-9) mol/L) were required for the observed increases in PAF synthesis and the [Ca2+]i, indicating that these two responses may not occur under physiological conditions. The present study suggests that the pancreatic accumulation of PAF coupled with Ca2+ overload are important biochemical components of the pathophysiology of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. In fact, PAF production may serve as a primary mediator of inflammation observed during pancreatic hyperstimulation. This is an important observation that will allow a more detailed characterization of the molecular basis of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

  12. Platelet-activating factor: a mediator of pancreatic inflammation during cerulein hyperstimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, W.; Levine, B. A.; Olson, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    Hyperstimulation of the exocrine pancreas with cerulein causes acute pancreatitis, characterized by intensive interstitial edema, acinar vacuolization, leukocytic infiltration, and hyperamylasemia. Whereas the pathogenesis of cerulein-induced pancreatitis is not well-defined, a local inflammatory response may contribute to the full expression of acute pancreatitis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) seems to be an important mediator of the inflammatory response. The present evidence includes: 1) pancreatic PAF levels increased in rats in which cerulein-induced pancreatitis was initiated, concomitant with an increase in calcium concentrations in the pancreatic tissue; 2) treatment of rats exposed to cerulein with WEB2170, a PAF receptor antagonist, was shown to reduce inflammatory injury, as demonstrated by decreases in pancreatic weight, Evan's blue extravasation, and myeloperoxidase activity and an improvement in pancreatic histology. In an idealized in vitro experiment mimicking cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, in which pancreatic acini were employed, cerulein induced amylase release, an increase in [Ca2+]i, and an increase in PAF synthesis. Whereas amylase release was induced by low concentrations of cerulein (10(-11) mol/L), relatively high concentrations of cerulein (10(-9) mol/L) were required for the observed increases in PAF synthesis and the [Ca2+]i, indicating that these two responses may not occur under physiological conditions. The present study suggests that the pancreatic accumulation of PAF coupled with Ca2+ overload are important biochemical components of the pathophysiology of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. In fact, PAF production may serve as a primary mediator of inflammation observed during pancreatic hyperstimulation. This is an important observation that will allow a more detailed characterization of the molecular basis of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Images Figure 1 PMID:8494049

  13. A Novel Model of Severe Gallstone Pancreatitis: Murine Pancreatic Duct Ligation Results in Systemic Inflammation and Substantial Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Isaac; Yuan, Zuobiao; Meyerholz, David K.; Twait, Erik; Williard, Deborah E.; Kempuraj, Duraisamy

    2010-01-01

    Background Suitable experimental models of gallstone pancreatitis with systemic inflammation and mortality are limited. We developed a novel murine model of duct-ligation-induced acute pancreatitis associated with multiorgan dysfunction and severe mortality. Methods Laparotomy was done on C57/BL6 mice followed by pancreatic duct (PD) ligation, bile duct (BD) ligation without PD ligation, or sham operation. Results Only mice with PD ligation developed acute pancreatitis and had 100% mortality. Pulmonary compliance was significantly reduced after PD ligation but not BD ligation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid neutrophil count and interleukin-1β concentration, and the plasma creatinine level, were significantly elevated with PD ligation but not BD ligation. Pancreatic nuclear factor κB (p65) and activator protein 1 (c-Jun) were activated within 1 h of PD ligation. Conclusion PD-ligation-induced acute pancreatitis in mice is associated with systemic inflammation, acute lung injury, multiorgan dysfunction and death. The development of this novel model is an exciting and notable advance in the field. PMID:20975317

  14. Acute pancreatitis as a model of SIRS.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Madhav

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common clinical condition. Excessive systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in acute pancreatitis leads to distant organ damage and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), which is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in this condition. Development of in vivo experimental models of acute pancreatitis and associated systemic organ damage has enabled us to study the role played by inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and associated systemic organ damage. Using these models, recent studies by us and other investigators have established the critical role played by inflammatory mediators such as TNF-a, IL-1b, IL-6, PAF, IL-10, CD40L, C5a, ICAM-1, chemokines, substance P and hydrogen sulfide in acute pancreatitis and the resultant MODS. This chapter intends to present an overview of different experimental animal models of acute pancreatitis and associated MODS and the role of inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of this condition.

  15. Acute and chronic pancreatitis: surgical management.

    PubMed

    Dzakovic, Alexander; Superina, Riccardo

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatitis is becoming increasingly prevalent in children, posing new challenges to pediatric health care providers. Although some general adult treatment paradigms are applicable in the pediatric population, diagnostic workup and surgical management of acute and chronic pancreatitis have to be tailored to anatomic and pathophysiological entities peculiar to children. Nonbiliary causes of acute pancreatitis in children are generally managed nonoperatively with hydration, close biochemical and clinical observation, and early initiation of enteral feeds. Surgical intervention including cholecystectomy or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is often required in acute biliary pancreatitis, whereas infected pancreatic necrosis remains a rare absolute indication for pancreatic debridement and drainage via open, laparoscopic, or interventional radiologic procedure. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by painful irreversible changes of the parenchyma and ducts, which may result in or be caused by inadequate ductal drainage. A variety of surgical procedures providing drainage, denervation, resection, or a combination thereof are well established to relieve pain and preserve pancreatic function.

  16. Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The etiology of acute pancreatitis in children is often drugs, infections, trauma, or anatomic abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms (such as abdominal pain and vomiting), serum pancreatic enzyme levels, and imaging studies. Several scoring systems have been proposed for the assessment of severity, which is useful for selecting treatments and predicting prognosis. The basic pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis does not greatly differ between adults and children, and the treatments for adults and children are similar. In large part, our understanding of the pathology, optimal treatment, assessment of severity, and outcome of acute pancreatitis in children is taken from the adult literature. However, we often find that the common management of adult pancreatitis is difficult to apply to children. With advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment methods, severe acute pancreatitis in children is becoming better understood and more controllable. PMID:25400985

  17. Finasteride use and acute pancreatitis in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lai, Hsueh-Chou; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether there is an association between finasteride use and the risk of acute pancreatitis. This population-based case-control study used the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 2,530 male subjects aged 40-84 years with a first-attack of acute pancreatitis during the period of 1998-2011 as the case group and 10,119 randomly selected subjects without acute pancreatitis as the control group. Both groups were matched by age and index year of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Subjects who never had finasteride prescription were defined as "never use." Subjects who at least received 1 prescription for finasteride before the date of diagnosing acute pancreatitis were defined as "ever use." The association of acute pancreatitis with finasteride use was examined by the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) using the multivariable unconditional logistic regression model. The crude OR of acute pancreatitis was 1.78 (95%CI 1.33, 2.39) for subjects with ever use of finasteride, when compared with subjects with never use of finasteride. After adjusting for potential confounders, the adjusted OR of acute pancreatitis decreased to 1.25 (95%CI 0.90, 1.73) for subjects with ever use of finasteride, but no statistical significance was seen. No association can be detected between finasteride use and the risk of acute pancreatitis.

  18. [Correlation between hyperamylasemia and acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Monaco, R; Durante, E; Pampolini, M; Tioli, P

    1981-05-31

    It is often difficult to differentiate acute pancreatitis (A.P.) from some other acute abdominal diseases, when there is an elevated serum amylase. In contrast, the renal clearance of amylase, expressed as a percentage of creatinine clearance, can separate patients with A.P. from patients with acute colecistitis, common duct stone without pancreatitis, hyperamylasemia after biliary surgery, acute peptic ulcer and acute salivary diseases.

  19. Contraceptive pills and acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, T N; Mital, H S; Gupta, S K

    1981-06-01

    This article reports a case of acute pancreatitis in a patient taking the oral contraceptive pill. A 32 year old mother had been on combined contraceptive pills since 1975. In 1978 she started having upper abdominal and retrosternal pain. She became critically ill with peripheral circulatory collapse, dyspnoea and cyanosis. A superficial thrombophlebitis was noted on the medial aspect of the right thigh. The diagnosis of pancreatitis was considered with history of recurrent abdominal pain. After several tests and supportive therapy (intravenous fluids, antibiotics, steriods), the woman started showing improvements in 48 hours and recovered in 10 days. This case differs from previously described cases in that the cholesterol and triglyceride levels were normal. The hypoglycemia has not been described previously.

  20. Acute pancreatitis in patients with pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaojun; Tian, Bole

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a rare manifestation of pancreatic cancer (PC). The relationship between AP and PC remains less distinct. From January 2009 to November 2015, 47consecutive patients with PC who presented with AP were reviewed for this study. Clinical features, clinicopathologic variables, postoperative complications, and follow-up evaluations of patients were documented in detail from our database. In order to identify cutoff threshold time for surgery, receiver operating curve (ROC) was built according to patients with or without postoperative complications. Cumulative rate of survival was calculated by using the Kaplan–Meier method. The study was conducted in accordance with the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki and the guidelines of West China Hospital. This study included 35 men (74.5%) and 12 women (25.5%) (mean age: 52 years), with a median follow-up of 40 months. AP was clinically mild in 45 (95.7%) and severe in 2 (4.3%). The diagnosis of PC was delayed by 2 to 660 days (median 101 days). Thirty-nine (83.0%) cases underwent surgery. Eight (17.0%) cases performed biopsies only. Of 39 patients, radical surgery was performed in 32 (82.1%) cases and palliative in 7 (19.9%) cases. Two (8.0%) patients were needed for vascular resection and reconstruction. Postoperative complications occurred in 12 (30.8%) patients. About 24.5 days was the best cutoff point, with an area under curve (AUC) of 0.727 (P = 0.025, 95% confidence interval: 0.555–0.8999). The survival rate of patients at 1 year was 23.4%. The median survival in patients with vascular resection and reconstruction was 18 months, compared with 10 months in patients without vascular resection (P = 0.042). For the primary stage (T), Tix was identified in 3 patients, the survival of whom were 5, 28, 50 months, respectively. And 2 of them were still alive at the follow-up period. The severity of AP was mainly mild. Surgical intervention after 24.5 days may benefit for

  1. PPAR-gamma knockout in pancreatic epithelial cells abolishes the inhibitory effect of rosiglitazone on caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ivashchenko, C Y; Duan, S Z; Usher, M G; Mortensen, R M

    2007-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) agonists, such as the thiazolidinediones (TZDs), decrease acute inflammation in both pancreatic cell lines and mouse models of acute pancreatitis. Since PPAR-gamma agonists have been shown to exert some of their actions independent of PPAR-gamma, the role of PPAR-gamma in pancreatic inflammation has not been directly tested. Furthermore, the differential role of PPAR-gamma in endodermal derivatives (acini, ductal cells, and islets) as opposed to the endothelial or inflammatory cells is unknown. To determine whether the effects of a TZD, rosiglitazone, on caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis are dependent on PPAR-gamma in the endodermal derivatives, we created a cell-type specific knock out of PPAR-gamma in pancreatic acini, ducts, and islets. PPAR-gamma knockout animals show a greater response in some inflammatory genes after caerulein challenge. The anti-inflammatory effect of rosiglitazone on edema, macrophage infiltration, and expression of the proinflammatory cytokines is significantly decreased in pancreata of the knockout animals compared with control animals. However, rosiglitazone retains its effect in the lungs of the pancreatic-specific PPAR-gamma knockout animals, likely due to direct anti-inflammatory effect on lung parenchyma. These data show that the PPAR-gamma in the pancreatic epithelia and islets is important in suppressing inflammation and is required for the anti-inflammatory effects of TZDs in acute pancreatitis.

  2. Spautin-1 Ameliorates Acute Pancreatitis via Inhibiting Impaired Autophagy and Alleviating Calcium Overload

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Juan; Feng, Xueping; Huang, Xiao-Ying; Huang, Zhongshi; Huang, Yanqiang; Li, Chaogan; Li, Genliang; Nong, Song; Wu, Ruoshi; Huang, Yongzhi; Long, Xi-Dai

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is characterized by zymogen preactivation. Severe inflammation caused by zymogen activation can eventually lead to multiple organ dysfunctions which contribute to the high mortality rate of severe acute pancreatitis. However, there is no specific treatment available for acute pancreatitis therapy. Here, we show that spautin-1, which effectively inhibits autophagy flux, ameliorated the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis induced by cerulein or L-arginine. CaMKII phosphorylation due to cytosolic calcium overload was revealed in this paper. It was also demonstrated that autophagic protein aggregates degradation blockade accompanied by impaired autophagy correlated positively with intra-acinar cell digestive aymogen activation stimulated by cerulein or L-arginine. The role of spautin-1 in ameliorating acute pancreatitis was shown here to be associated with impaired autophagy inhibition and Ca2+ overload alleviation. We provide a promising therapy for acute pancreatitis through targeting both impaired autophagy and increased cytosolic calcium. PMID:27579473

  3. Approach to acute, recurrent, and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Timothy P; Freeman, Martin L

    2008-06-01

    Pancreatitis can manifest as a one-time episode, recurring attacks, or chronic pain. It is caused by numerous factors ranging from alcohol consumption to gallstones to subtle obstructive causes and occult autoimmune disorders. As a result, determining the etiology and effectively treating the causes and consequences of pancreatitis can be challenging. This article reviews the diagnosis and management of acute, acute recurrent, and chronic pancreatitis, focusing on more challenging scenarios.

  4. NSAIDs and Acute Pancreatitis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The resulting pain is the main symptom of acute pancreatitis and it should be alleviated as soon as possible. NSAIDs are the first line therapy for pain and they are generally administered to acute pancreatitis patients upon admission to the hospital. In addition, these drugs have also been used to prevent post-endoscopic cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, there are several reports indicating that NSAIDs may be the actual cause of acute pancreatitis. We carried out a literature search on PubMed/MEDLINE; all full text papers published in from January 1966 to November 2009 on the use of NSAIDs in acute pancreatitis were collected; the literature search was also supplemented by a review of the bibliographies of the papers evaluated. Thus, in this article, we will systematically review the current literature in order to better illustrate the role of NSAIDs in acute pancreatitis, in particular: i) NSAIDs as a cause of acute pancreatitis; ii) their use to prevent post-retrograde ERCP pancreatitis and iii) their efficacy for pain relief in the acute illness of the pancreas. PMID:27713268

  5. Acute Pancreatitis Secondary to Gestational Hypertriglyceridaemia

    PubMed Central

    Cahalane, Alexis M.; Smith, Myles J.; Ryan, James; Maguire, Donal

    2012-01-01

    Gestational hypertriglyceridaemia is a rare cause of acute pancreatitis. Its pathophysiology is incompletely understood. Severity scoring and effective management remain challenging. We report a case of acute pancreatitis secondary to gestational hypertriglyceridaemia. We describe the use of computed tomography to provide an alternative determination of severity, as well as plasmapheresis as a means of treating the condition. PMID:22844296

  6. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: incidence and severity.

    PubMed Central

    Lankisch, P G; Dröge, M; Gottesleben, F

    1995-01-01

    To determine the incidence and severity of drug induced acute pancreatitis, data from 45 German centres of gastroenterology were evaluated. Among 1613 patients treated for acute pancreatitis in 1993, drug induced acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 22 patients (incidence 1.4%). Drugs held responsible were azathioprine, mesalazine/sulfasalazine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI), oestrogens, frusemide, hydrochlorothiazide, and rifampicin. Pancreatic necrosis not exceeding 33% of the organ was found on ultrasonography or computed tomography, or both, in three patients (14%). Pancreatic pseudocysts did not occur. A decrease of arterial PO2 reflecting respiratory insufficiency, and an increase of serum creatinine, reflecting renal insufficiency as complications of acute pancreatitis were seen in two (9%) and four (18%) patients, respectively. Artificial ventilation was not needed, and dialysis was necessary in only one (5%) case. Two patients (9%) died of AIDS and tuberculosis, respectively; pancreatitis did not seem to have contributed materially to their death. In conclusion, drugs rarely cause acute pancreatitis, and drug induced acute pancreatitis usually runs a benign course. PMID:7489946

  7. Prognostic markers in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gomatos, Ilias P; Xiaodong, Xu; Ghaneh, Paula; Halloran, Christopher; Raraty, Michael; Lane, Brian; Sutton, Robert; Neoptolemos, John P

    2014-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis has a mortality rate of 5-10%. Early deaths are mainly due to multiorgan failure and late deaths are due to septic complications from pancreatic necrosis. The recently described 2012 Revised Atlanta Classification and the Determinant Classification both provide a more accurate description of edematous and necrotizing pancreatitis and local complications. The 2012 Revised Atlanta Classification uses the modified Marshall scoring system for assessing organ dysfunction. The Determinant Classification uses the sepsis-related organ failure assessment scoring system for organ dysfunction and, unlike the 2012 Revised Atlanta Classification, includes infected necrosis as a criterion of severity. These scoring systems are used to assess systemic complications requiring intensive therapy unit support and intra-abdominal complications requiring minimally invasive interventions. Numerous prognostic systems and markers have been evaluated but only the Glasgow system and serum CRP levels provide pragmatic prognostic accuracy early on. Novel concepts using genetic, transcriptomic and proteomic profiling and also functional imaging for the identification of specific disease patterns are now required.

  8. [Surgical and therapeutic treatment of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Sandakov, P Ia; Samartsev, V A; Mineev, D A

    2014-01-01

    It was analyzed the features of different forms of acute pancreatitis in 1001 patients including 324 cases with pancreatonecrosis and 245 patients with middle severity of disease. It was shown that monitoring of patients' condition and destructive process in pancreas by using of modified SOFA-scale and evaluation of sonographic signs of inflammation are advisable. Flow indicators including resistance index and the maximum flow velocity in celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery represented severity of gland's destruction. Sonographic investigation revealed small-focal pancreonecrosis. It allows to differentiate medical tactics. Surgical treatment was performed in 582 patients. Efficiency of surgical treatment is determined by diagnostic methods, timely sanation of destructive focuses of pancreas, abdominal cavity, retroperitoneal fiber, adequate drainage and mini-invasive techniques using in case of purulent complications. The main prognostic factors of development of complications and adverse outcomes are determined.

  9. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2013-10-01

    The present article analyzes the main presentations on acute pancreatitis (AP) in Digestive Disease Week 2013. Perfusion computed tomography allows early diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin predicts the development of acute renal failure, severe AP and death. Factors associated with greater fluid sequestration in AP are alcoholic etiology, an elevated hematocrit, and the presence of criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome; fluid sequestration is associated with a worse outcome. True pseudocysts (fluid collections without necrosis for more than 4 weeks) are a highly infrequent complication in AP. Patients with necrotic collections have a poor prognosis, especially if associated with infection. A meta-analysis on fluid therapy suggests that early aggressive fluid administration is associated with higher mortality and more frequent respiratory complications. According to a meta-analysis, enteral nutrition initiated within 24 hours of admission improves the outcome of AP compared with later initiation of enteral nutrition. Pentoxifylline could be a promising alternative in AP; a double-blind randomized study showed that this drug reduced the length of hospital and intensive care unit stay, as well as the need for intensive care unit admission. The association of octreotide and celecoxib seems to reduce the frequency of organ damage compared with octreotide alone. Mild AP can be managed in the ambulatory setting through hospital-at-home units after a short, 24-hour admission.

  10. Effects of Montelukast in an Experimental Model of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Angı, Serkan; Eken, Hüseyin; Kılıç, Erol; Karaköse, Oktay; Balci, Gürhan; Somuncu, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    Background We evaluated the hematological, biochemical, and histopathological effects of Montelukast on pancreatic damage in an experimental acute pancreatitis model created by cerulein in rats before and after the induction of pancreatitis. Materials/Methods Forty rats were divided into 4 groups with 10 rats each. The study groups were: the Cerulein (C) group, the Cerulein + early Montelukast (CMe) group, the Cerulein + late Montelukast (CMl) group, and the Control group. The pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, leukocyte, hematocrit, pancreatic amylase, and lipase values were measured in the arterial blood samples taken immediately before rats were killed. Results There were statistically significant differences between the C group and the Control group in the values of pancreatic amylase, lipase, blood leukocyte, hematocrit, pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, and pancreatic water content, and also in each of the values of edema, inflammation, vacuolization, necrosis, and total histopathological score (P<0.05). When the CMl group and C group were compared, no statistically significant differences were found in any parameter analyzed. When the CMe group was compared with the C group, pancreatic amylase, lipase, pH, PO2, pCO2, HCO3, pancreatic water content, histopathological edema, inflammation, and total histopathological score values were significantly different between the groups (P<0.05). Finally, when the CMe group and the Control group were compared, significant differences were found in all except 2 (leukocyte and pO2) parameters (P<0.05). Conclusions Leukotriene receptor antagonists used in the late phases of pancreatitis might not result in any benefit; however, when they are given in the early phases or prophylactically, they may decrease pancreatic damage. PMID:27479458

  11. [Clinico-tomographic correlations in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Lese, M; Pop, C; Brânduşe, M; Achim, V; Grigorescu, D; Nemeş, S

    1998-01-01

    In the surgery ward from Baia Mare, in the period 1989-1997 have been operated yearly, on an average, 16-17 acute pancreatitis, out of which 8-9 were necrotic-haemorrhagic acute pancreatitis. The possibility of carrying out the computerized tomography allowed a more precise pre-surgery diagnosis and after surgery was improved observation of evolution of the inflammatory phenomena from the pancreatic zone so that the volume, the structure and the outline of the pancreas, the abdominal or pleural liquid collections and the aspect of the neighboring tissues have been correlated in dynamics, with the clinic aspect of the acute pancreatitis and the prognostic indexes. Even if the computerized tomography allowed a more correct evaluation of the patients suffering of acute pancreatitis, there have been 4-6 decreases due to this affection and its complications, the post-surgery death rate remaining at 17-21%.

  12. Protective effects of rhubarb on experimental severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu-Qing; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Ito, Tetsuhide; Qian, Jia-Ming

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of rhubarb on severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in rats. METHODS: Severe acute pancreatitis was induced by two intraperitoneal injections of cerulein (40 μg/kg body weight) plus 5-h restraint water-immersion stress. Rhubarb (75-150 mg/kg) was orally fed before the first cerulein injection. The degree of pancreatic edema, serum amylase level, local pancreatic blood flow (PBF), and histological alterations were investigated. The effects of rhubarb on pancreatic exocrine secretion in this model were evaluated by comparing with those of somatostatin. RESULTS: In the Cerulein + Stress group, severe edema and diffuse hemorrhage in the pancreas were observed, the pancreatic wet weight (11.60 ± 0.61 g/Kg) and serum amylase (458 490 ± 43 100 U/L) were markedly increased (P < 0.01 vs control). In the rhubarb (150 mg/kg) treated rats, necrosis and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) infiltration in the pancreas were significantly reduced (P < 0.01), and a marked decrease (50%) in serum amylase levels was also observed (P < 0.01). PBF dropped to 38% (93 ± 5 mL/min per 100 g) of the control in the Cerulein + Stress group and partly recovered in the Cerulein + Stress + Rhubarb 150 mg group (135 ± 12 mL/min per 100 g) (P < 0.01). The pancreatic exocrine function was impaired in the SAP rats. The amylase levels of pancreatic juice were reduced in the rats treated with rhubarb or somatostatin, comparing with that of untreated SAP group. The bicarbonate concentration of pancreatic juice was markedly elevated only in the rhubarb-treated group (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Rhubarb can exert protective effects on SAP, probably by inhibiting the inflammation of pancreas, improving pancreatic microcirculation, and altering exocrine secretion. PMID:15052683

  13. Effects of diazoxide in experimental acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Andrade, Roberta; Kunitake, Tiago; Koike, Marcia Kiyomi; Machado, Marcel C C; Souza, Heraldo Possolo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to assess the effects of diazoxide on the mortality, pancreatic injury, and inflammatory response in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Male Wistar rats (200–400 g) were divided randomly into two groups. Fifteen minutes before surgery, animals received physiological (0.9%) saline (3 mL/kg) (control group) or 45 mg/kg diazoxide (treatment group) via the intravenous route. Acute pancreatitis was induced by injection of 2.5% sodium taurocholate via the biliopancreatic duct. Mortality (n=38) was observed for 72 h and analyzed by the Mantel–Cox Log-rank test. To study pancreatic lesions and systemic inflammation, rats (10 from each group) were killed 3 h after acute pancreatitis induction; ascites volume was measured and blood as well as pancreases were collected. Pancreatic injury was assessed according to Schmidt’s scale. Cytokine expression in plasma was evaluated by the multiplex method. RESULTS: Mortality at 72 h was 33% in the control group and 60% in the treatment group (p=0.07). Ascites volumes and plasma levels of cytokines between groups were similar. No difference was observed in edema or infiltration of inflammatory cells in pancreatic tissues from either group. However, necrosis of acinar cells was lower in the treatment group compared to the control group (3.5 vs. 3.75, p=0.015). CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with diazoxide can reduce necrosis of acinar cells in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis, but does not affect the inflammatory response or mortality after 72 h. PMID:28273237

  14. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: An autoimmune disease?

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele

    2008-01-01

    In this review article, we will briefly describe the main characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis and then we will concentrate on our aim, namely, evaluating the clinical characteristics of patients having recurrence of pain from the disease. In fact, the open question is to evaluate the possible presence of autoimmune pancreatitis in patients with an undefined etiology of acute pancreatitis and for this reason we carried out a search in the literature in order to explore this issue. In cases of recurrent attacks of pain in patients with “diopathic”pancreatitis, we need to keep in mind the possibility that our patients may have autoimmune pancreatitis. Even though the frequency of this disease seems to be quite low, we believe that in the future, by increasing our knowledge on the subject, we will be able to diagnose an ever-increasing number of patients having acute recurrence of pain from autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:18286678

  15. Small Bowel Obstruction Secondary to Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sunkara, Tagore; Etienne, Denzil; Caughey, Megan E.; Gaduputi, Vinaya

    2017-01-01

    While an uncommon occurrence, it is possible for patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis to develop colonic ileus, obstruction, or perforation. By extension, it is also possible to develop a small bowel obstruction following an episode of acute pancreatitis. Here, we present the case of a 44-year-old male, who after repeated attacks of acute pancreatitis, came to the emergency department with continuous, non-bloody vomiting. This patient also complained of both left upper quadrant and epigastric pain, and was subsequently diagnosed with a small bowel obstruction involving the proximal jejunum. PMID:28270876

  16. Small Bowel Obstruction Secondary to Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Tagore; Etienne, Denzil; Caughey, Megan E; Gaduputi, Vinaya

    2017-02-01

    While an uncommon occurrence, it is possible for patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis to develop colonic ileus, obstruction, or perforation. By extension, it is also possible to develop a small bowel obstruction following an episode of acute pancreatitis. Here, we present the case of a 44-year-old male, who after repeated attacks of acute pancreatitis, came to the emergency department with continuous, non-bloody vomiting. This patient also complained of both left upper quadrant and epigastric pain, and was subsequently diagnosed with a small bowel obstruction involving the proximal jejunum.

  17. [On PACAP-aggravated experimental acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Chen, Youdai; Zhou, Zongguang; Chen, Youqin; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Hongkai; Zheng, Xuelian

    2004-12-01

    The role of PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide), a peptidergic transmitter, in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis is not yet clear. This experiment was conducted to examine the action of exogenous PACAP on rat pancreas and on the course of experimental acute pancreatitis. The results showed that 5-30 microg/kg of PACAP slightly raised the serum amylase level, induced pancreatic edema (23.88% +/- 2.532%-25.86% +/- 1.974% of experiment groups versus 29.21% +/- 5.657% of control group), inflammatory cell infiltration, vacuolization of acinar cells, and occasionally fatty and parenchymal necroses. 15-30 microg/kg of PACAP aggravated cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis; the pancreatic edema became more marked (13.45% +/- 2.045%-17.66% +/- 4.652% of expreiment groups versus 21.83% +/- 3.013% of cerulein group, P<0.05), the serum amylase level became higher; and ascites, pancreatic bleeding, fatty and parenchymal necroses, and extensive vacuolization of acinar cells appeared. For sodium taurocholate-induced pancreatitis, 5-10 microg/kg of PACAP mildly attenuated the pancreatic edema, reduced the serum amylase level (1986.91 +/- 710.97-2944.33 +/- 1182.47 IU/L vs 3690.87 +/- 2277.99 IU/L, P<0.05), whereas it caused multifocal hemorrhage and prominent necrosis in pancreas. Except the cerulein-induced pancreatitis groups, other groups were found to have reduced pancreatic functional capillary density (FCD); when pancreatic edema was taken into consideration and calibrated FCD was introduced (FCD weighted against pancreatic wet/dry ratio), all groups revealed increases in pancreatic functional capillaries when compared with normal control. In conclusion, PACAP is proinflammatory in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis, PACAP plus cerulein can induce acute hemorrhagic/necrotizing pancreatitis, and the action of PACAP on cerulein-induced panceatitis may differ from that on sodium taurocholate-induced one. In this experiment, pancreatic FCD was

  18. [Ultrastructural changes in the pancreas of rats with acute pancreatitis after semax administration].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Iu V

    2000-01-01

    Semax favorably affects ultrastructural changes in the pancreas of rats with acute pancreatitis (AP): a single introduction of semax (0.1 mg/kg) into the pancreatic duct of rats with AP model prevents increased necrosis of the acinar tissues and inhibits purulent inflammation of the necrotised lobules by inducing their sclerosis and atrophy, thus retaining large areas of the pancreas intact.

  19. [Fluid therapy in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2013-12-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (AP) is associated with an increased need for fluids due to fluid sequestration and, in the most severe cases, with decreased peripheral vascular tone. For several decades, clinical practice guidelines have recommended aggressive fluid therapy to improve the prognosis of AP. This recommendation is based on theoretical models, animal studies, and retrospective studies in humans. Recent studies suggest that aggressive fluid administration in all patients with AP could have a neutral or harmful effect. Fluid therapy based on Ringer's lactate could improve the course of the disease, although further studies are needed to confirm this possibility. Most patients with AP do not require invasive monitoring of hemodynamic parameters to guide fluid therapy administration. Moreover, the ability of these parameters to improve prognosis has not been demonstrated.

  20. Pancreatic ascites hemoglobin contributes to the systemic response in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Upon hemolysis extracellular hemoglobin causes oxidative stress and cytotoxicity due to its peroxidase activity. Extracellular hemoglobin may release free hemin, which increases vascular permeability, leukocyte recruitment, and adhesion molecule expression. Pancreatitis-associated ascitic fluid is reddish and may contain extracellular hemoglobin. Our aim has been to determine the role of extracellular hemoglobin in the local and systemic inflammatory response during severe acute pancreatitis in rats. To this end we studied taurocholate-induced necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. First, extracellular hemoglobin in ascites and plasma was quantified and the hemolytic action of ascitic fluid was tested. Second, we assessed whether peritoneal lavage prevented the increase in extracellular hemoglobin in plasma during pancreatitis. Third, hemoglobin was purified from rat erythrocytes and administered intraperitoneally to assess the local and systemic effects of ascitic-associated extracellular hemoglobin during acute pancreatitis. Extracellular hemoglobin and hemin levels markedly increased in ascitic fluid and plasma during necrotizing pancreatitis. Peroxidase activity was very high in ascites. The peritoneal lavage abrogated the increase in extracellular hemoglobin in plasma. The administration of extracellular hemoglobin enhanced ascites; dramatically increased abdominal fat necrosis; upregulated tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 gene expression; and decreased expression of interleukin-10 in abdominal adipose tissue during pancreatitis. Extracellular hemoglobin enhanced the gene expression and protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and other hypoxia-inducible factor-related genes in the lung. Extracellular hemoglobin also increased myeloperoxidase activity in the lung. In conclusion, extracellular hemoglobin contributes to the inflammatory response in severe acute pancreatitis through abdominal fat necrosis and inflammation

  1. Pancreaticoatmospheric fistula following severe acute necrotising pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Simoneau, Eve; Chughtai, Talat; Razek, Tarek; Deckelbaum, Dan L

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute necrotising pancreatitis is associated with numerous local and systemic complications. Abdominal compartment syndrome requiring urgent decompressive laparotomy is a potential complication of this disease process and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We describe the case of a pancreaticoatmospheric fistula following decompressive laparotomy in a patient with severe acute necrotising pancreatitis. While this fistula was managed successfully using the current standard of care for pancreatic fistulas, the wound care for in this patient with drainage of the fistula through an open abdomen, is a significant challenge. PMID:25519860

  2. Alcohol consumption in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sand, J; Lankisch, P G; Nordback, I

    2007-01-01

    Understanding of the relation between the alcoholic consumption and the development of pancreatitis should help in defining the alcoholic etiology of pancreatitis. Although the association between alcohol consumption and pancreatitis has been recognized for over 100 years, it remains still unclear why some alcoholics develop pancreatitis and some do not. Surprisingly little data are available about alcohol amounts, drinking patterns, type of alcohol consumed and other habits such as dietary habits or smoking in respect to pancreatitis preceding the attack of acute pancreatitis or the time of the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. This review summarizes the current knowledge. Epidemiological studies clearly show connection between the alcohol consumption in population and the development of acute and chronic pancreatitis. In the individual level the risk to develop either acute or chronic pancreatitis increases along with the alcohol consumption. Moreover, the risk for recurrent acute pancreatitis after the first acute pancreatitis episode seems also to be highly dependent on the level of alcohol consumption. Abstaining from alcohol may prohibit recurrent acute pancreatitis and reduce pain in chronic pancreatitis. Therefore, all the attempts to decrease alcohol consumption after acute pancreatitis and even after the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis should be encouraged. Smoking seems to be a remarkable co-factor together with alcohol in the development of chronic pancreatitis, whereas no hard data are available for this association in acute pancreatitis. Setting the limits for accepting the alcohol as the etiology cannot currently be based on published data, but rather on the 'political' agreement.

  3. Management of acute pancreatitis (AP) – Polish Pancreatic Club recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Rosołowski, Mariusz; Lipiński, Michał; Dobosz, Marek; Durlik, Marek; Głuszek, Stanisław; Kuśnierz, Katarzyna; Lampe, Paweł; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Nowakowska-Duława, Ewa; Nowak-Niezgoda, Magdalena; Radomańska, Barbara; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Wereszczyńska-Siemiątkowska, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    The presented recommendations concern the current management of acute pancreatitis. The recommendations relate to the diagnostics and treatment of early and late phases of acute pancreatitis and complications of the disease taking into consideration surgical and endoscopic methods. All the recommendations were subjected to voting by the members of the Working Group of the Polish Pancreatic Club, who evaluated them every single time on a five-point scale, where A means full acceptance, B means acceptance with a certain reservation, C means acceptance with a serious reservation, D means rejection with a certain reservation and E means full rejection. The results of the vote, together with commentary, are provided for each recommendation. PMID:27350832

  4. Genetics of acute and chronic pancreatitis: An update

    PubMed Central

    Ravi Kanth, VV; Nageshwar Reddy, D

    2014-01-01

    Progress made in identifying the genetic susceptibility underlying acute and chronic pancreatitis has benefitted the clinicians in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease in a better way. The identification of mutations in cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene; functional gain mutations) and serine protease inhibitor kazal type 1 (SPINK1 gene; functional loss mutations) and other potential susceptibility factors in genes that play an important role in the pancreatic secretory functions or response to inflammation during pancreatic injury has changed the current concepts and understanding of a complex multifactorial disease like pancreatitis. An individual’s susceptibility to the disease is governed by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Candidate gene and genetic linkage studies have identified polymorphisms in cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1), SPINK1, cystic fibrosis trans-membrane conductance regulator (CFTR), Chymotrypsinogen C (CTRC), Cathepsin B (CTSB) and calcium sensing receptor (CASR). Individuals with polymorphisms in the mentioned genes and other as yet identified genes are at an enhanced risk for the disease. Recently, polymorphisms in genes other than those involved in “intra-pancreatic trypsin regulatory mechanism” namely Claudin-2 (CLDN2) and Carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1) gene have also been identified for their association with pancreatitis. With ever growing number of studies trying to identify the genetic susceptibility in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms, this review is an attempt to compile the available information on the topic. PMID:25400986

  5. Genetics of acute and chronic pancreatitis: An update.

    PubMed

    Ravi Kanth, Vv; Nageshwar Reddy, D

    2014-11-15

    Progress made in identifying the genetic susceptibility underlying acute and chronic pancreatitis has benefitted the clinicians in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease in a better way. The identification of mutations in cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene; functional gain mutations) and serine protease inhibitor kazal type 1 (SPINK1 gene; functional loss mutations) and other potential susceptibility factors in genes that play an important role in the pancreatic secretory functions or response to inflammation during pancreatic injury has changed the current concepts and understanding of a complex multifactorial disease like pancreatitis. An individual's susceptibility to the disease is governed by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Candidate gene and genetic linkage studies have identified polymorphisms in cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1), SPINK1, cystic fibrosis trans-membrane conductance regulator (CFTR), Chymotrypsinogen C (CTRC), Cathepsin B (CTSB) and calcium sensing receptor (CASR). Individuals with polymorphisms in the mentioned genes and other as yet identified genes are at an enhanced risk for the disease. Recently, polymorphisms in genes other than those involved in "intra-pancreatic trypsin regulatory mechanism" namely Claudin-2 (CLDN2) and Carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1) gene have also been identified for their association with pancreatitis. With ever growing number of studies trying to identify the genetic susceptibility in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms, this review is an attempt to compile the available information on the topic.

  6. Pathophysiology of pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Browne, George W; Pitchumoni, CS

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in its severe form is complicated by multiple organ system dysfunction, most importantly by pulmonary complications which include hypoxia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, atelectasis, and pleural effusion. The pathogenesis of some of the above complications is attributed to the production of noxious cytokines. Clinically significant is the early onset of pleural effusion, which heralds a poor outcome of acute pancreatitis. The role of circulating trypsin, phospholipase A2, platelet activating factor, release of free fatty acids, chemoattractants such as tumor necrsosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-8, fMet-leu-phe (a bacterial wall product), nitric oxide, substance P, and macrophage inhibitor factor is currently studied. The hope is that future management of acute pancreatitis with a better understanding of the pathogenesis of lung injury will be directed against the production of noxious cytokines. PMID:17131469

  7. Mediastinal Pseudocyst in Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sushil Kumar; Jain, Pawan Kumar; Gupta, Sukhdev

    2016-03-01

    Pseudocyst is a common complication of Acute and chronic pancreatitis. However, its extension into the mediastinum is a rare entity. We present a case of 52 years male with acute on chronic pancreatitis (alcohol related) who presented with dysphagia and dyspnoea and was found to have a pancreatic pseudocyst extending upto the neck. Ultrasound fails to pick up mediastinal pseudocysts and requires additional imaging modalities - CT and MRI. Management of Mediastinal pseudocyst depends upon underlying etiology, ductal anatomy, size of the pseudocyst, and availability of expertise. Small pseudocysts in asymptomatic patients may resolve spontaneously, but requires prolonged conservative therapy with somatostatin or its analogue and Total Parenteral Nutrition. Ruptured pseudocyst in a symptomatic unstable patient requires surgical resection. Endoscopic ultrasound guided drainage (transmural or transpapillary) and Main Pancreatic Duct stenting are safe and effective treatment modality.

  8. Severe hypertriglyceridemia-related acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Stefanutti, Claudia; Labbadia, Giancarlo; Morozzi, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially life-threatening complication of severe hypertriglyceridemia. In some cases, inborn errors of metabolism such as lipoprotein lipase deficiency, apoprotein C-II deficiency, and familial hypertriglyceridemia have been reported as causes of severe hypertriglyceridemia. More often, severe hypertriglyceridemia describes various clinical conditions characterized by high plasma levels of triglycerides (>1000 mg/dL), chylomicron remnants, or intermediate density lipoprotein like particles, and/or chylomicrons. International guidelines on the management of acute pancreatitis are currently available. Standard therapeutic measures are based on the use of lipid-lowering agents (fenofibrate, gemfibrozil, niacin, Ω-3 fatty acids), low molecular weight heparin, and insulin in diabetic patients. However, when standard medical therapies have failed, non-pharmacological approaches based upon the removal of triglycerides with therapeutic plasma exchange can also provide benefit to patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis. Plasma exchange could be very helpful in reducing triglycerides levels during the acute phase of hyperlipidemic pancreatitis, and in the prevention of recurrence. The current evidence on management of acute pancreatitis and severe hypertriglyceridemia, focusing on symptoms, treatment and potential complications is reviewed herein.

  9. Effects of Local Pancreatic Renin-Angiotensin System on the Microcirculation of Rat with Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ling; Long, Haocheng; Wang, Hui; Feng, Jiarui; Chen, Feixiang

    2015-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is normally related to multiorgan dysfunction and local complications. Studies have found that local pancreatic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was significantly upregulated in drug-induced SAP. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of angiotensin II receptors inhibitor valsartan on dual role of RAS in SAP in a rat model and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. 3.8% sodium taurocholate (1 ml/kg) was injected to the pancreatic capsule in order for pancreatitis induction. Rats in the sham group were injected with normal saline in identical locations. We also investigated the regulation of experimentally induced SAP on local RAS expression in the pancreas through determination of the activities of serum amylase, lipase and myeloperoxidase, histological and biochemical analysis, radioimmunoassay, fluorescence quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis. The results indicated that valsartan could effectively suppress the local RAS to protect against experimental acute pancreatitis through inhibition of microcirculation disturbances and inflammation. The results suggest that pancreatic RAS plays a critical role in the regulation of pancreatic functions and demonstrates application potential as AT1 receptor antagonists. Moreover, other RAS inhibitors could be a new therapeutic target in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26170733

  10. Nutritional support in acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Grant, John P

    2011-08-01

    Nutritional support can have a significant beneficial impact on the course of moderate to severe acute pancreatitis. Enteral nutrition is preferred, with emphasis on establishment of jejunal access; however, parenteral nutrition can also be of value if intestinal failure is present. Early initiation of nutritional support is critical, with benefits decreasing rapidly if begun after 48 hours from admission. Severe malnutrition in chronic pancreatitis can be avoided or treated with dietary modifications or enteral nutrition.

  11. Acute pancreatitis in infants and children.

    PubMed Central

    Hillemeier, C.; Gryboski, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is being encountered more often in children due to antimetabolite therapy, accidental injury, and traumatic battering. Pancreatitis may occur in the absence of traditionally elevated serum amylase and lipase, and initial diagnosis may depend upon ultrasonography. Traditional therapy of enteric rest with nasogastric suction has been supported by the use of parenteral nutrition. Newer pharmaceutical agents have been ineffective in altering the course of the illness or in preventing complications of pseudocyst or abscess. PMID:6382834

  12. A better model of acute pancreatitis for evaluating therapy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J; Rattner, D W; Lewandrowski, K; Compton, C C; Mandavilli, U; Knoefel, W T; Warshaw, A L

    1992-01-01

    Existing models of acute pancreatitis have limitations to studying novel therapy. Whereas some produce mild self-limited pancreatitis, others result in sudden necrotizing injury. The authors developed an improved model providing homogeneous moderately severe injury by superimposing secretory hyperstimulation on minimal intraductal bile acid exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 231) received low-pressure intraductal glycodeoxycholic acid (GDOC) at very low (5 or 10 mmol/L) concentrations followed by intravenous cerulein. Cerulein or GDOC alone caused only very mild inflammation. However, GDOC combined with cerulein was uniformly associated with more edema (p less than 0.0005), acinar necrosis (p less than 0.01), inflammation (p less than 0.006), and hemorrhage (p less than 0.01). Pancreatic injury was further increased and death was potentiated by increasing volume and duration of intraductal low-dose GDOC infusion. There was significant morphologic progression between 6 and 24 hours. The authors conclude that (1) combining minimal intraductal bile acid exposure with intravenous hyperstimulation produces homogeneous pancreatitis of intermediate severity that can be modulated at will; (2) the injury is progressive over at least 24 hours with finite mortality rate; (3) the model provides superior opportunity to study innovative therapy.

  13. A better model of acute pancreatitis for evaluating therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, J; Rattner, D W; Lewandrowski, K; Compton, C C; Mandavilli, U; Knoefel, W T; Warshaw, A L

    1992-01-01

    Existing models of acute pancreatitis have limitations to studying novel therapy. Whereas some produce mild self-limited pancreatitis, others result in sudden necrotizing injury. The authors developed an improved model providing homogeneous moderately severe injury by superimposing secretory hyperstimulation on minimal intraductal bile acid exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 231) received low-pressure intraductal glycodeoxycholic acid (GDOC) at very low (5 or 10 mmol/L) concentrations followed by intravenous cerulein. Cerulein or GDOC alone caused only very mild inflammation. However, GDOC combined with cerulein was uniformly associated with more edema (p less than 0.0005), acinar necrosis (p less than 0.01), inflammation (p less than 0.006), and hemorrhage (p less than 0.01). Pancreatic injury was further increased and death was potentiated by increasing volume and duration of intraductal low-dose GDOC infusion. There was significant morphologic progression between 6 and 24 hours. The authors conclude that (1) combining minimal intraductal bile acid exposure with intravenous hyperstimulation produces homogeneous pancreatitis of intermediate severity that can be modulated at will; (2) the injury is progressive over at least 24 hours with finite mortality rate; (3) the model provides superior opportunity to study innovative therapy. Images FIG. 3. FIG. 4. FIG. 5. FIG. 6. FIG. 7. PMID:1731649

  14. Disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome: complete pancreas transection secondary to acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gámez-del-Castillo, Juan Manuel; Garcés-Albir, Marina; Fernández-Moreno, María Carmen; Morera-Ocón, Francisco Javier; Villagrasa, Rosana; Sabater-Ortí, Luis

    2016-03-01

    Disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome is a serious complication of acute pancreatitis which is defined by a complete discontinuity of the pancreatic duct, such that a viable side of the pancreas remains isolated from the gastrointestinal tract. This pancreatic disruption is infrequently observed in the clinical practice and its diagnostic and therapeutic management are controversial. We present an extreme case of disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome with complete duct disruption and pancreatic transection following acute pancreatitis, as well as the diagnostic and therapeutic processes carried out.

  15. Acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure complicating doxylamine succinate intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Deok; Lee, Soo Teik

    2002-06-01

    Doxylamine succinate is an antihistaminic drugwith additional hypnotic, anticholinergic and local anesthetic effects first described in 1948. In Korea and many other countries, it is a common-over-the counter medication frequently involved in overdoses. Clinical symtomatology of doxylamine succinate overdose includes somnolence, coma, seizures, mydriasis, tachycardia, psychosis, and rhabdomyolysis. A serious complication may be rhabdomyolysis with subsequent impairment of renal function and acute renal failure. We report a case of acute renal failure and acute pancreatitis complicating a doxylamine succinate intoxication.

  16. The dynamics of acute inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rukmini

    The acute inflammatory response is the non-specific and immediate reaction of the body to pathogenic organisms, tissue trauma and unregulated cell growth. An imbalance in this response could lead to a condition commonly known as "shock" or "sepsis". This thesis is an attempt to elucidate the dynamics of acute inflammatory response to infection and contribute to its systemic understanding through mathematical modeling and analysis. The models of immunity discussed use Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) to model the variation of concentration in time of the various interacting species. Chapter 2 discusses three such models of increasing complexity. Sections 2.1 and 2.2 discuss smaller models that capture the core features of inflammation and offer general predictions concerning the design of the system. Phase-space and bifurcation analyses have been used to examine the behavior at various parameter regimes. Section 2.3 discusses a global physiological model that includes several equations modeling the concentration (or numbers) of cells, cytokines and other mediators. The conclusions drawn from the reduced and detailed models about the qualitative effects of the parameters are very similar and these similarities have also been discussed. In Chapter 3, the specific applications of the biologically detailed model are discussed in greater detail. These include a simulation of anthrax infection and an in silico simulation of a clinical trial. Such simulations are very useful to biologists and could prove to be invaluable tools in drug design. Finally, Chapter 4 discusses the general problem of extinction of populations modeled as continuous variables in ODES is discussed. The average time to extinction and threshold are estimated based on analyzing the equivalent stochastic processes.

  17. Crohn's disease and acute pancreatitis. A review of literature.

    PubMed

    Jasdanwala, Sarfaraz; Babyatsky, Mark

    2015-03-20

    Crohn's disease, a transmural inflammatory bowel disease, has many well-known extra-intestinal manifestations and complications. Although acute pancreatitis has a higher incidence in patients with Crohn's disease as compared to the general population, acute pancreatitis is still relatively uncommon in patients with Crohn's disease. Patients with Crohn's disease are at an approximately fourfold higher risk than the general population to develop acute pancreatitis. The risk of developing acute pancreatitis is higher in females as compared to males. Acute pancreatitis can occur at any age with higher incidence reported in patients in their 20s and between 40-50 years of age. The severity and prognosis of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease is the same as in general population. Acute pancreatitis can occur before onset of intestinal Crohn's disease, this presentation being more common in children than adults. It can also occur as the presenting symptom. However, most commonly it occurs after intestinal symptoms have manifest with a mean time interval between the initial presentation and development of acute pancreatitis being 2 years. There are several etiological factors contributing to acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease. It is not clear whether acute pancreatitis is a direct extra-intestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease; however, majority of the cases of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease are due to GS and medications. Drugs used for the treatment of Crohn's disease that have been reported to cause acute pancreatitis include 5-ASA agents, azathioprine and 6 mercaptopurine, metornidazole and corticosteroids. Recent evidence has emerged correlating both type 1 and 2 autoimmune pancreatitis with Crohn's disease. Understanding the association between the two disease entities is key to effectively manage patients with Crohn's disease and acute pancreatitis.

  18. Clinical practice guideline: management of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Joshua A.; Hsu, Jonathan; Bawazeer, Mohammad; Marshall, John; Friedrich, Jan O.; Nathens, Avery; Coburn, Natalie; May, Gary R.; Pearsall, Emily; McLeod, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in the incidence of acute pancreatitis reported worldwide. Despite improvements in access to care, imaging and interventional techniques, acute pancreatitis continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis, recent studies auditing the clinical management of the condition have shown important areas of noncompliance with evidence-based recommendations. This underscores the importance of creating understandable and implementable recommendations for the diagnosis and management of acute pancreatitis. The purpose of the present guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for the management of both mild and severe acute pancreatitis as well as the management of complications of acute pancreatitis and of gall stone–induced pancreatitis. Une hausse de l’incidence de pancréatite aiguë a été constatée à l’échelle mondiale. Malgré l’amélioration de l’accès aux soins et aux techniques d’imagerie et d’intervention, la pancréatite aiguë est toujours associée à une morbidité et une mortalité importantes. Bien qu’il existe des guides de pratique clinique pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, des études récentes sur la vérification de la prise en charge clinique de cette affection révèlent des lacunes importantes dans la conformité aux recommandations fondées sur des données probantes. Ces résultats mettent en relief l’importance de formuler des recommandations compréhensibles et applicables pour le diagnostic et la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë. La présente ligne directrice vise à fournir des recommandations fondées sur des données probantes pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, qu’elle soit bénigne ou grave, ainsi que de ses complications et de celles de la pancréatite causée par un calcul biliaire. PMID:27007094

  19. Effects of urtica dioica extract on experimental acute pancreatitis model in rats.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Baris; Basar, Omer; Aktas, Bora; Altinbas, Akif; Ekiz, Fuat; Büyükcam, Fatih; Albayrak, Aynur; Ginis, Zeynep; Oztürk, Gülfer; Coban, Sahin; Ucar, Engin; Kaya, Oskay; Yüksel, Osman; Caner, Sedat; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the acute inflammation of pancreas and peripancreatic tissues, and distant organs are also affected. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Urtica dioica extract (UDE) treatment on cerulein induced acute pancreatitis in rats. Twenty-one Wistar Albino rats were divided into three groups: Control, Pancreatitis, and UDE treatment group. In the control group no procedures were performed. In the pancreatitis and treatment groups, pancreatitis was induced with intraperitoneal injection of cerulein, followed by intraperitoneal injection of 1 ml saline (pancreatitis group) and 1 ml 5.2% UDE (treatment group). Pancreatic tissues were examined histopathologically. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α), amylase and markers of apoptosis (M30, M65) were also measured in blood samples. Immunohistochemical staining was performed with Caspase-3 antibody. Histopathological findings in the UDE treatment group were less severe than in the pancreatitis group (5.7 vs 11.7, p = 0.010). TNF-α levels were not statistically different between treated and control groups (63.3 vs. 57.2, p = 0.141). UDE treatment was associated with less apoptosis [determined by M30, caspase-3 index (%)], (1.769 vs. 0.288, p = 0.056; 3% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.224; respectively). UDE treatment of pancreatitis merits further study.

  20. Resolution of acute inflammation in the lung.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruce D; Serhan, Charles N

    2014-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is essential to health. So too is its resolution. In response to invading microbes, noxious stimuli, or tissue injury, an acute inflammatory response is mounted to protect the host. To limit inflammation and prevent collateral injury of healthy, uninvolved tissue, the lung orchestrates the formation of specialized proresolving mediators, specifically lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, and maresins. These immunoresolvents are agonists for resolution that interact with specific receptors on leukocytes and structural cells to blunt further inflammation and promote catabasis. This process appears to be defective in several common lung diseases that are characterized by excess or chronic inflammation. Here, we review the molecular and cellular effectors of resolution of acute inflammation in the lung.

  1. Resolution of Acute Inflammation In The Lung

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Bruce D.; Serhan, Charles N.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is essential to health. So too is its resolution. In response to invading microbes, noxious stimuli or tissue injury, an acute inflammatory response is mounted to protect the host. To limit inflammation and prevent collateral injury of healthy, uninvolved tissue, the lung orchestrates the formation of specialized pro-resolving mediators, specifically lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins. These immunoresolvents are agonists for resolution that interact with specific receptors on leukocytes and structural cells to blunt further inflammation and promote catabasis. This process appears to be defective in several common lung diseases that are characterized by excess or chronic inflammation. Here, we review the molecular and cellular effectors of resolution of acute inflammation in the lung. PMID:24313723

  2. Tamoxifen-induced hypertriglyceridemia causing acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hemant Kumar; Prasad, Mahendranath S.; Kandasamy, Arun K.; Dharanipragada, Kadambari

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen has both antagonistic and agonistic tissue-specific actions. It can have a paradoxical estrogenic effect on lipid metabolism resulting in elevated triglyceride and chylomicron levels. This can cause life-threatening complications like acute pancreatitis. To our knowledge, very few cases of tamoxifen-induced pancreatitis have been reported in the literature. We report a case of severe hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis following tamoxifen use. A 50-year-old diabetic lady was on tamoxifen (20mg/day) hormonal therapy for breast cancer. Within 3 months of starting therapy, she developed hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis. Laboratory values include: Serum amylase 778 IU/L, total cholesterol 785 mg/dL, triglycerides 4568 mg/dL and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) 12 mg/dL. Tamoxifen was substituted with letrozole and atorvastatin started. There was a prompt reversal of the adverse effects. Effects on lipid profile must be considered while initiating tamoxifen in predisposed individuals as the consequences are life threatening. PMID:27127396

  3. Acute pancreatitis : complication of chicken pox in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Roy, Pinaki; Maity, Pranab; Basu, Arindam; Dey, Somitra; Das, Biman; Ghosh, U S

    2012-12-01

    Chicken pox is a benign self limited disease. But it may rarely be complicated with acute pancreatitis in otherwise healthy patient. We present a case of varicella pancreatitis and its marked recovery with acyclovir.

  4. THE PANC 3 SCORE PREDICTING SEVERITY OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    BEDUSCHI, Murilo Gamba; MELLO, André Luiz Parizi; VON-MÜHLEN, Bruno; FRANZON, Orli

    2016-01-01

    Background : About 20% of cases of acute pancreatitis progress to a severe form, leading to high mortality rates. Several studies suggested methods to identify patients that will progress more severely. However, most studies present problems when used on daily practice. Objective : To assess the efficacy of the PANC 3 score to predict acute pancreatitis severity and its relation to clinical outcome. Methods : Acute pancreatitis patients were assessed as to sex, age, body mass index (BMI), etiology of pancreatitis, intensive care need, length of stay, length of stay in intensive care unit and mortality. The PANC 3 score was determined within the first 24 hours after diagnosis and compared to acute pancreatitis grade of the Revised Atlanta classification. Results : Out of 64 patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis, 58 met the inclusion criteria. The PANC 3 score was positive in five cases (8.6%), pancreatitis progressed to a severe form in 10 cases (17.2%) and five patients (8.6%) died. Patients with a positive score and severe pancreatitis required intensive care more often, and stayed for a longer period in intensive care units. The PANC 3 score showed sensitivity of 50%, specificity of 100%, accuracy of 91.4%, positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 90.6% in prediction of severe acute pancreatitis. Conclusion : The PANC 3 score is useful to assess acute pancreatitis because it is easy and quick to use, has high specificity, high accuracy and high predictive value in prediction of severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:27120730

  5. Immune checkpoint and inflammation as therapeutic targets in pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kimbara, Shiro; Kondo, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is one of the most deadly malignant neoplasms, and the efficacy of conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy is far from satisfactory. Recent research studies have revealed that immunosuppression and inflammation are associated with oncogenesis, as well as tumor development, invasion, and metastasis in PAC. Thus, immunosuppression-related signaling, especially that involving immune checkpoint and inflammation, has emerged as novel treatment targets for PAC. However, PAC is an immune-resistant tumor, and it is still unclear whether immune checkpoint or anti-inflammation therapies would be an ideal strategy. In this article, we will review immune checkpoint and inflammation as potential targets, as well as clinical trials and the prospects for immunotherapy in PAC. PMID:27672267

  6. [Significance of prognostic parameters in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Guastella, T; Scuderi, M; Di Stefano, A; Scala, R; Rapisarda, D; Succi, L; Russello, D

    1993-07-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic approach to Acute Pancreatitis (A.P.) is directly related to the clinical presentation. The Authors reviewed the data of 66 patients, hospitalized between October 1989 and December 1991, to verify the effectiveness of the prognostic criteria suggested by Ranson (1974), Mercadier (1977) and Imrie (1978). A.P. was of biliary origin in the majority of the patients (63.5%); five patients (7.5%) had an acute alcoholic pancreatitis, while the aetiology was traumatic or unknown in the remaining cases. A complicated clinical course was defined by the development of pseudocyst, pancreatic abscess, digestive haemorrhage, death or prolonged hospitalization (more than 20 days). The 28.8% of the patients developed complications during hospitalization. There were seven pancreatic pseudocysts, six pulmonary complications, three renal insufficiencies, two vascular complications, two sepsies and a gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The mean hospitalization period was 15.1 days (range 1-112). The Authors conclude that the three different prognostic criteria are equally useful to test the severity of A.P. attacks allowing to identify patients with the higher risk to develop complications during hospitalization.

  7. Genetic predispositions to acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, D C

    2000-05-01

    Advances in molecular genetics have provided the powerful tools necessary to identify the key molecules and mechanisms that underly the disease process. Continued work in this area promises to reveal new insights as new disease genes are discovered. This article focuses on the insights into the cause of acute and chronic pancreatitis gained by investigation of the HP genes, the diagnosis of the known mutations, the fascinating observation of nonpenetrance, and a look at future directions.

  8. Prognostic markers in acute pancreatitis: can pancreatic necrosis be predicted?

    PubMed Central

    Leese, T.; Shaw, D.; Holliday, M.

    1988-01-01

    The value of six prognostic markers was assessed prospectively in 198 attacks of acute pancreatitis with specific attention to their ability to predict pancreatic necrosis. The Imrie Prognostic Score (IPS) was recorded within 48 h of diagnosis. The serum C-reactive protein (CRP) alpha 1 antiprotease (A1AP), alpha 2 macroglobulin (A2M), amylase and white cell count (WCC) were measured on days 1, 3 and 7. When comparing all severe clinical outcomes to mile outcomes, serum CRP concentrations were higher on all three days (P less than 0.02, less than 0.001, less than 0.001), A1AP concentrations were higher on day 3 (P less than 0.05), A2M concentrations were lower on day 7 (P less than 0.01) and WCC was higher on all three days (P less than 0.001, less than 0.001, less than 0.001). Serum amylase concentrations showed no significant differences. None of the measured parameters were helpful in distinguishing patients who subsequently developed pancreatic necrosis from patients who had other severe outcomes. Multivariate analysis revealed that the initial IPS showed greatest independent significance in predicting severe outcome followed by the WCC (days 1 and 7) and CRP (day 3). CRP and WCC may be clinically useful predictors of severe outcome to supplement the initial IPS. These methods are unlikely to distinguish pancreatic necrosis from other severe outcomes, but they may supplement clinical judgment in selecting a high risk group of patients for contrast enhanced computed tomography. PMID:2458063

  9. A rare disease in the differential diagnosis of acute pancreatitis: acute brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Berber, Ilhami; Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Yetkin, Funda; Unlu, Serkan; Yilmaz, Sami; Bentli, Recep; Bazna, Sezai

    2014-01-01

    Some infectious organisms may give rise to acute pancreatitis; brucellosis, however, extremely rarely leads to acute pancreatitis. A 40-year-old man was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis, the etiology of which was determined to be acute brucellosis. The patient was discharged without complications approximately 15 days after the initiation of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and doxycycline treatment. Brucella infections may rarely be complicated by acute pancreatitis. Thus, brucellosis should be remembered in the etiology of acute pancreatitis in regions such as Turkey, where Brucella infections are endemic.

  10. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Gas on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao-xin; Han, Bing; Hou, Li-Min; An, Ting-Ting; Jia, Guang; Cheng, Zhuo-Xin; Ma, Yong; Zhou, Yi-Nan; Kong, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Jia; Wang, Yong-Wei; Sun, Xue-Jun; Pan, Shang-Ha; Sun, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease mediated by damage to acinar cells and pancreatic inflammation. In patients with AP, subsequent systemic inflammatory responses and multiple organs dysfunction commonly occur. Interactions between cytokines and oxidative stress greatly contribute to the amplification of uncontrolled inflammatory responses. Molecular hydrogen (H2) is a potent free radical scavenger that not only ameliorates oxidative stress but also lowers cytokine levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of H2 gas on AP both in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro assessment, AR42J cells were treated with cerulein and then incubated in H2-rich or normal medium for 24 h, and for the in vivo experiment, AP was induced through a retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatobiliary duct (0.1 mL/100 g body weight). Wistar rats were treated with inhaled air or 2% H2 gas and sacrificed 12 h following the induction of pancreatitis. Specimens were collected and processed to measure the amylase and lipase activity levels; the myeloperoxidase activity and production levels; the cytokine mRNA expression levels; the 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and glutathione levels; and the cell survival rate. Histological examinations and immunohistochemical analyses were then conducted. The results revealed significant reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of H2 gas were associated with reductions in AR42J cell and pancreatic tissue damage. In conclusion, our results suggest that H2 gas is capable of ameliorating damage to the pancreas and AR42J cells and that H2 exerts protective effects both in vitro and in vivo on subjects with AP. Thus, the results obtained indicate that this gas may represent a novel therapy agent in the management of AP. PMID:27115738

  11. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Gas on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao-Xin; Han, Bing; Hou, Li-Min; An, Ting-Ting; Jia, Guang; Cheng, Zhuo-Xin; Ma, Yong; Zhou, Yi-Nan; Kong, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Jia; Wang, Yong-Wei; Sun, Xue-Jun; Pan, Shang-Ha; Sun, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease mediated by damage to acinar cells and pancreatic inflammation. In patients with AP, subsequent systemic inflammatory responses and multiple organs dysfunction commonly occur. Interactions between cytokines and oxidative stress greatly contribute to the amplification of uncontrolled inflammatory responses. Molecular hydrogen (H2) is a potent free radical scavenger that not only ameliorates oxidative stress but also lowers cytokine levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of H2 gas on AP both in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro assessment, AR42J cells were treated with cerulein and then incubated in H2-rich or normal medium for 24 h, and for the in vivo experiment, AP was induced through a retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatobiliary duct (0.1 mL/100 g body weight). Wistar rats were treated with inhaled air or 2% H2 gas and sacrificed 12 h following the induction of pancreatitis. Specimens were collected and processed to measure the amylase and lipase activity levels; the myeloperoxidase activity and production levels; the cytokine mRNA expression levels; the 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and glutathione levels; and the cell survival rate. Histological examinations and immunohistochemical analyses were then conducted. The results revealed significant reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of H2 gas were associated with reductions in AR42J cell and pancreatic tissue damage. In conclusion, our results suggest that H2 gas is capable of ameliorating damage to the pancreas and AR42J cells and that H2 exerts protective effects both in vitro and in vivo on subjects with AP. Thus, the results obtained indicate that this gas may represent a novel therapy agent in the management of AP.

  12. The new revised classification of acute pancreatitis 2012.

    PubMed

    Sarr, Michael G; Banks, Peter A; Bollen, Thomas L; Dervenis, Christos; Gooszen, Hein G; Johnson, Colin D; Tsiotos, Gregory G; Vege, Santhi Swaroop

    2013-06-01

    This study aims to update the 1991 Atlanta Classification of acute pancreatitis, to standardize the reporting of and terminology of the disease and its complications. Important features of this classification have incorporated new insights into the disease learned over the last 20 years, including the recognition that acute pancreatitis and its complications involve a dynamic process involving two phases, early and late. The accurate and consistent description of acute pancreatitis will help to improve the stratification and reporting of new methods of care of acute pancreatitis across different practices, geographic areas, and countries.

  13. Probiotics enhance pancreatic glutathione biosynthesis and reduce oxidative stress in experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lutgendorff, Femke; Trulsson, Lena M; van Minnen, L Paul; Rijkers, Ger T; Timmerman, Harro M; Franzén, Lennart E; Gooszen, Hein G; Akkermans, Louis M A; Söderholm, Johan D; Sandström, Per A

    2008-11-01

    Factors determining severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) are poorly understood. Oxidative stress causes acinar cell injury and contributes to the severity, whereas prophylactic probiotics ameliorate experimental pancreatitis. Our objective was to study how probiotics affect oxidative stress, inflammation, and acinar cell injury during the early phase of AP. Fifty-three male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into groups: 1) control, 2) sham procedure, 3) AP with no treatment, 4) AP with probiotics, and 5) AP with placebo. AP was induced under general anesthesia by intraductal glycodeoxycholate infusion (15 mM) and intravenous cerulein (5 microg.kg(-1).h(-1), for 6 h). Daily probiotics or placebo were administered intragastrically, starting 5 days prior to AP. After cerulein infusion, pancreas samples were collected for analysis including lipid peroxidation, glutathione, glutamate-cysteine-ligase activity, histological grading of pancreatic injury, and NF-kappaB activation. The severity of pancreatic injury correlated to oxidative damage (r = 0.9) and was ameliorated by probiotics (1.5 vs. placebo 5.5; P = 0.014). AP-induced NF-kappaB activation was reduced by probiotics (0.20 vs. placebo 0.53 OD(450nm)/mg nuclear protein; P < 0.001). Probiotics attenuated AP-induced lipid peroxidation (0.25 vs. placebo 0.51 pmol malondialdehyde/mg protein; P < 0.001). Not only was AP-induced glutathione depletion prevented (8.81 vs. placebo 4.1 micromol/mg protein, P < 0.001), probiotic pretreatment even increased glutathione compared with sham rats (8.81 vs. sham 6.18 miccromol/mg protein, P < 0.001). Biosynthesis of glutathione (glutamate-cysteine-ligase activity) was enhanced in probiotic-pretreated animals. Probiotics enhanced the biosynthesis of glutathione, which may have reduced activation of inflammation and acinar cell injury and ameliorated experimental AP, via a reduction in oxidative stress.

  14. Role of ischemia in acute pancreatitis. Hemorrhagic shock converts edematous pancreatitis to hemorrhagic pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kyogoku, T; Manabe, T; Tobe, T

    1992-09-01

    Ischemia has been considered to play a role in the development of acute pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ischemia, caused by hemorrhagic shock, on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats. Acute pancreatitis was induced by the intravenous infusion of a supramaximally stimulating dose of cerulein (10 micrograms/kg/hr) for 6 hr. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by the removal of blood until the mean arterial blood pressure reached 35 mm Hg. This level was maintained for 30 min, after which time all the blood was reinfused. Hemorrhagic shock alone induced no morphological change in the pancreas. However, after the induction of hemorrhagic shock in animals treated with cerulein, hemorrhage and parenchymal necrosis were frequently observed in the pancreas. Seven of 20 rats (35%) receiving cerulein plus hemorrhagic shock had died by 48 hr after the start of cerulein infusion, whereas none of the rats in the cerulein or shock group died during this experiment. Cathepsin B activity in the pancreas of the cerulein plus shock group was significantly higher than in the other groups at 48 hr. These results suggest that ischemia may be a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

  15. Inhibition of Ras signalling reduces neutrophil infiltration and tissue damage in severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changhui; Merza, Mohammed; Luo, Lingtao; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2015-01-05

    Neutrophil recruitment is known to be a rate-limiting step in mediating tissue injury in severe acute pancreatitis (AP). However, the signalling mechanisms controlling inflammation and organ damage in AP remain elusive. Herein, we examined the role of Ras signalling in AP. Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with a Ras inhibitor (farnesylthiosalicylic acid, FTS) before infusion of taurocholate into the pancreatic duct. Pancreatic and lung tissues as well as blood were collected 24 h after pancreatitis induction. Pretreatment with FTS decreased serum amylase levels by 82% and significantly attenuated acinar cell necrosis, tissue haemorrhage and oedema formation in taurocholate-induced pancreatitis. Inhibition of Ras signalling reduced myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in the inflamed pancreas by 42%. In addition, administration of FTS decreased pancreatic levels of CXC chemokines as well as circulating levels of interleukin-6 and high-mobility group box 1 in animals exposed to taurocholate. Moreover, treatment with FTS reduced taurocholate-induced MPO levels in the lung. Inhibition of Ras signalling had no effect on neutrophil expression of Mac-1 in mice with pancreatitis. Moreover, FTS had no direct impact on trypsin activation in isolated pancreatic acinar cells. These results indicate that Ras signalling controls CXC chemokine formation, neutrophil recruitment and tissue injury in severe AP. Thus, our findings highlight a new signalling mechanism regulating neutrophil recruitment in the pancreas and suggest that inhibition of Ras signalling might be a useful strategy to attenuate local and systemic inflammation in severe AP.

  16. Monocyte trafficking in acute and chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Molly A; Platt, Andrew M; Potteaux, Stephane; Randolph, Gwendalyn J

    2011-10-01

    Environmental signals at the site of inflammation mediate rapid monocyte mobilization and dictate differentiation programs whereby these cells give rise to macrophages or dendritic cells. Monocytes participate in tissue healing, clearance of pathogens and dead cells, and initiation of adaptive immunity. However, recruited monocytes can also contribute to the pathogenesis of infection and chronic inflammatory disease, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we explore monocyte trafficking in the context of acute inflammation, relying predominantly on data from microbial infection models. These mechanisms will be compared to monocyte trafficking during chronic inflammation in experimental models of atherosclerosis. Recent developments suggest that monocyte trafficking shares common themes in diverse inflammatory diseases; however, important differences exist between monocyte migratory pathways in acute and chronic inflammation.

  17. Pro-inflammatory effects of hydrogen sulphide on substance P in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Madhav; Sidhapuriwala, Jenab N; Ng, Siaw Wei; Tamizhselvi, Ramasamy; Moochhala, Shabbir M

    2008-04-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S), a novel gasotransmitter, has been recognized to play an important role in inflammation. Cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE) is a major H(2)S synthesizing enzyme in the cardiovascular system and DL-propargylglycine (PAG) is an irreversible inhibitor of CSE. Substance P (SP), a product of preprotachykinin-A (PPT-A) gene, is a well-known pro-inflammatory mediator which acts principally through the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). We have shown an association between H(2)S and SP in pulmonary inflammation as well as a pro-inflammatory role of H(2)S and SP in acute pancreatitis. The present study was aimed to investigate the interplay between pro-inflammatory effects of H(2)S and SP in a murine model of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced in mice by 10 hourly intraperitoneal injections of caerulein (50 (g/kg). PAG (100 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered either 1 hr before (prophylactic) or 1 hr after (therapeutic) the first caerulein injection. PAG, given prophylactically as well as therapeutically, significantly reduced plasma H(2)S levels and pancreatic H(2)S synthesizing activities as well as SP concentrations in plasma, pancreas and lung compared with caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Furthermore, prophylactic as well as therapeutic administration of PAG significantly reduced PPT-A mRNA expression and NK-1R mRNA expression in both pancreas and lung when compared with caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. These results suggest that the pro-inflammatory effects of H(2)S may be mediated by SP-NK-1R pathway in acute pancreatitis.

  18. The role of pancreatic ducts in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Peter; Rakonczay, Zoltan

    2015-07-01

    Pancreatic ducts secrete 2.5 l of alkaline, HCO3(-)-rich fluid daily which greatly contributes to the homeostasis of the pancreas. Ducts are also important in the pathophysiology of the pancreas; alteration of ductal function can lead to severe diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis. The role of pancreatic ducts in the development of acute pancreatitis has only been uncovered recently. Pancreatitis inducing agents like bile acids and ethanol dose-dependently affect pancreatic ductal secretion; low concentrations stimulate, whereas high concentrations inhibit secretion. The majority of the review will focus on the central role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a critical protein in the regulation of ductal secretion, in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis which is highlighted by numerous investigations. Downregulation of CFTR expression results in increased severity of acute pancreatitis in mice. Furthermore, human genetic studies have demonstrated statistically significant association of CFTR mutations with acute recurrent pancreatitis. Overall, the data support the involvement of pancreatic ducts in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

  19. Timing of cholecystectomy after acute severe pancreatitis in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    TALEBI-BAKHSHAYESH, Mousa; MOHAMMADZADEH, Alireza; ZARGAR, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and is usually caused by gallstones; its occurrence in pregnancy is rare. Cholecystectomy for biliary pancreatitis during pregnancy is unavoidable, but its timing is controversial. We herein present the case of a patient who underwent termination of pregnancy due to deteriorated acute severe pancreatitis during the 27th week of gestation. Cholecystectomy was performed because of the relapse of acute biliary pancreatitis 10 days after being discharged. The interval from pancreatitis to cholecystectomy varies with its severity; in mild pancreatitis the interval may be one week, but in severe cases it maybe up to three weeks. Because pancreatitis may relapse during this interval, as occurred in the present case, a better solution for the timing of cholecystectomy must be sought. PMID:26715899

  20. Biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis: a clinical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chenggang; Li, Xin; Sun, Jintang; Zou, Peng; Gao, Shubo; Zhang, Peixun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical treatment features of biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 21 cases of biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis in the Department of General Surgery in our hospital during May 2005 to July 2011 was performed; the clinical treatment features were analyzed in terms of surgical option, onset interval of acute pancreatitis after last surgery, length of stay in hospital and Ranson score. Results: There was no statistic difference between the two groups (A: The onset interval of acute pancreatitis after last surgery < 0.5 year. B: The onset interval of acute pancreatitis after last surgery > 0.5 year) in pathogenetic condition and length of stay in hospital. All patients were discharged after treatment, a follow-up of 6-18 months found no recurrence of pancreatitis. Conclusion: There is no relevance between the treatment feature and onset interval of biliary and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis. The disease is still treated meanly with symptomatic and supportive treatment, while the etiological treatment is also particularly important. PMID:26131243

  1. Enteral Nutrition and Acute Pancreatitis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Spanier, B. W. M.; Bruno, M. J.; Mathus-Vliegen, E. M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with acute pancreatitis (AP), nutritional support is required if normal food cannot be tolerated within several days. Enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition. We reviewed the literature about enteral nutrition in AP. Methods. A MEDLINE search of the English language literature between 1999–2009. Results. Nasogastric tube feeding appears to be safe and well tolerated in the majority of patients with severe AP, rendering the concept of pancreatic rest less probable. Enteral nutrition has a beneficial influence on the outcome of AP and should probably be initiated as early as possible (within 48 hours). Supplementation of enteral formulas with glutamine or prebiotics and probiotics cannot routinely be recommended. Conclusions. Nutrition therapy in patients with AP emerged from supportive adjunctive therapy to a proactive primary intervention. Large multicentre studies are needed to confirm the safety and effectiveness of nasogastric feeding and to investigate the role of early nutrition support. PMID:20811543

  2. Acute Pancreatitis: The Role of Imaging and Interventional Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, Michael M.; Lucey, Brian C.; Gervais, Debra A.; Mueller, Peter R.

    2004-09-15

    Acute pancreatitis can manifest as a benign condition with minimal abdominal pain and hyperamylasemia or can have a fulminant course, which can be life-threatening usually due to the development of infected pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure. Fortunately, 70-80% of patients with acute pancreatitis have a benign self-limiting course. The initial 24-48 hours after the initial diagnosis is usually the period that determines the subsequent course, and for many of the 20-30% of patients who subsequently have a fulminant course, this becomes apparent within this time frame. With reference to long-term outcome following acute pancreatitis, most cases recover without long-term sequelae with only a minority of cases progressing to chronic pancreatitis. In the initial management of acute pancreatitis, assessment of metabolic disturbances and systemic organ dysfunction is critical. However, the advent and continued refinement of cross-sectional imaging modalities over the past two decades has led to a prominent role for diagnostic imaging in assessing acute pancreatitis. Furthermore, these cross-sectional imaging modalities have enabled the development of diagnostic and therapeutic interventional techniques in the hands of radiologists. In this article we review the diagnostic features of acute pancreatitis, the clinical staging systems, complications and the role of imaging. The role of interventional radiology techniques in the management of acute pancreatitis will be discussed as well as potential complications associated with these treatments.

  3. Acute Lipotoxicity Regulates Severity of Biliary Acute Pancreatitis without Affecting Its Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Patel, Krutika; Cline, Rachel; Trivedi, Ram N.; DeLany, James P.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Papachristou, Georgios I.; Lee, Kenneth; Acharya, Chathur; Jaligama, Deepthi; Navina, Sarah; Murad, Faris; Singh, Vijay P.

    2015-01-01

    Obese patients have worse outcomes during acute pancreatitis (AP). Previous animal models of AP have found worse outcomes in obese rodents who may have a baseline proinflammatory state. Our aim was to study the role of acute lipolytic generation of fatty acids on local severity and systemic complications of AP. Human postpancreatitis necrotic collections were analyzed for unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) and saturated fatty acids. A model of biliary AP was designed to replicate the human variables by intraductal injection of the triglyceride glyceryl trilinoleate alone or with the chemically distinct lipase inhibitors orlistat or cetilistat. Parameters of AP etiology and outcomes of local and systemic severity were measured. Patients with postpancreatitis necrotic collections were obese, and 13 of 15 had biliary AP. Postpancreatitis necrotic collections were enriched in UFAs. Intraductal glyceryl trilinoleate with or without the lipase inhibitors resulted in oil red O–positive areas, resembling intrapancreatic fat. Both lipase inhibitors reduced the glyceryl trilinoleate–induced increase in serum lipase, UFAs, pancreatic necrosis, serum inflammatory markers, systemic injury, and mortality but not serum alanine aminotransferase, bilirubin, or amylase. We conclude that UFAs are enriched in human necrotic collections and acute UFA generation via lipolysis worsens pancreatic necrosis, systemic inflammation, and injury associated with severe AP. Inhibition of lipolysis reduces UFA generation and improves these outcomes of AP without interfering with its induction. PMID:24854864

  4. Impact of Global Fxr Deficiency on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis and Genetic Variation in the FXR Locus in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nijmeijer, Rian M.; Schaap, Frank G.; Smits, Alexander J. J.; Kremer, Andreas E.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Kroese, Alfons B. A.; Rijkers, Ger. T.; Schipper, Marguerite E. I.; Verheem, André; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Erpecum, Karel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs including the pancreas, exhibits anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting NF-κB activation and is implicated in maintaining intestinal barrier integrity and preventing bacterial overgrowth and translocation. Here we explore, with the aid of complementary animal and human experiments, the potential role of FXR in acute pancreatitis. Methods Experimental acute pancreatitis was induced using the CCK-analogue cerulein in wild-type and Fxr-/- mice. Severity of acute pancreatitis was assessed using histology and a semi-quantitative scoring system. Ileal permeability was analyzed in vitro by Ussing chambers and an in vivo permeability assay. Gene expression of Fxr and Fxr target genes was studied by quantitative RT-PCR. Serum FGF19 levels were determined by ELISA in acute pancreatitis patients and healthy volunteers. A genetic association study in 387 acute pancreatitis patients and 853 controls was performed using 9 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering the complete FXR gene and two additional functional SNPs. Results In wild-type mice with acute pancreatitis, ileal transepithelial resistance was reduced and ileal mRNA expression of Fxr target genes Fgf15, SHP, and IBABP was decreased. Nevertheless, Fxr-/- mice did not exhibit a more severe acute pancreatitis than wild-type mice. In patients with acute pancreatitis, FGF19 levels were lower than in controls. However, there were no associations of FXR SNPs or haplotypes with susceptibility to acute pancreatitis, or its course, outcome or etiology. Conclusion We found no evidence for a major role of FXR in acute human or murine pancreatitis. The observed altered Fxr activity during the course of disease may be a

  5. Acute pancreatitis following granulosa cell tumor removal in a mare

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Diego E.; Radtke, Catherine L.; Russell, Lauren A.; Lopez, Alfonso; Wichtel, Maureen W.

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare disease in horses and is often associated with gastrointestinal disorders. Accurate diagnosis is challenging due to the presence of nonspecific clinical signs. This case represents the first documentation of acute pancreatitis in a horse following surgery of the reproductive tract. PMID:26483579

  6. A serial histologic study of the development and progression of acute pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, S. S.; Watt, I. A.; Donaldson, L. A.; Crocket, A.; Joffe, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    This study was undertaken for the purpose of a serial investigation of the development and progression of the light-microscopic changes of acute pancreatitis and histologic criteria for evaluating pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis, similar to that found in man, was induced in rats with the use of a closed duodenal loop technique (n = 36). Control rats underwent a laparotomy with mobilization of the duodenum (n = 12). Animals were killed every 2 hours for 24 hours, and a detailed and independent histologic evaluation was made of each. Focal acinar necrosis proceeding to a vasculitis appeared within 2--4 hours before the infiltration of inflammatory cells. Thereafter, the extent of acinar necrosis closely reflected the vasculitis with the later development of the acute inflammation. By the sixteenth hour, these changes were graded as moderate pancreatitis, and by 24 hours the process represented severe hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Vascular changes and acinar necrosis preceded the inflammatory cell infiltrate. The pancreatitis has been quantitated into minimal, moderate, or severe by assessing the severity of edema, acute inflammatory infiltrate, and changes in the vessels, ducts, and acini. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7223862

  7. The contradictory effects of nitric oxide in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Feral; Gul, Mehmet; Esrefoglu, Mukaddes; Ates, Burhan

    2008-04-01

    This study was planned to observe the effects of nitric oxide synthesis on the antioxidative defense enzymes and pancreatic tissue histology in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal injections of 50 microg/kg caerulein, L-arginine used for NO induction and N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) used for NO inhibition. In the caerulein group acinar cell degeneration, interstitial inflammation, oedema and haemorrhage were detected. Pancreatic damage scores were decreased with both NO induction and inhibition (p<0.05). MDA, GSH-Px, CAT, GSH and SOD activities were significantly changed in the caerulein group and indicated increased oxidative stress. Both NO induction and inhibition decreased this oxidative stress. It is concluded that both nitric oxide induction and inhibition ameliorated caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. The findings indicate that a certain amount of NO production has beneficial effects in experimental acute pancreatitis, but uncontrolled over-production of NO may be detrimental.

  8. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Baker, Mark E; Nelson, Rendon C; Rosen, Max P; Blake, Michael A; Cash, Brooks D; Hindman, Nicole M; Kamel, Ihab R; Kaur, Harmeet; Piorkowski, Robert J; Qayyum, Aliya; Yarmish, Gail M

    2014-12-01

    The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every two years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. The Atlanta Classification by the Acute Pancreatitis Classification Working Group recently modified the terminology for the clinical course and the morphologic changes identified on imaging, primarily contrast- enhanced multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The two distinct clinical courses of the disease are classified as (1) early phase, which lasts approximately 1 week, and (2) late phase, which starts after the first week and can last for months after the initial episode. The two, primary, morphologic changes are acute, interstitial edematous and necrotizing pancreatitis. Timing of imaging, primarily MDCT, is based on the clinical phases and is, therefore, important for these imaging guidelines. Ultrasound's role is to detect gallstones after the first episode. MDCT plays a primary role in the management of acutely ill patients, only after a minimum of 48-72 hours and generally after one week. MR plays a supplementary role to MDCT. Follow-up MDCT guides management and therapy: percutaneous aspiration of fluid collections and/or placement of large caliber catheters in infected necrosis.

  9. Prostanoid receptors and acute inflammation in skin.

    PubMed

    Hohjoh, Hirofumi; Inazumi, Tomoaki; Tsuchiya, Soken; Sugimoto, Yukihiko

    2014-12-01

    Prostanoids such as prostaglandins (PGs) and thromboxanes exert a wide variety of actions via nine types of G protein-coupled receptors, including four PGE2 receptors (EPs) and two PGD2 receptors (DPs). Recent studies have revealed that prostanoids trigger or modulate acute inflammation in the skin via multiple mechanisms involving distinct receptors and molecules; PGE2 elicits vascular permeability and edema formation via EP3 receptor on mast cells, and PGE2 increases blood flow by eliciting vasodilatation via EP2/EP4 receptors on smooth muscle cells. PGD2-DP1 signaling plays a role in mast cell maturation and mast cell-mediated inflammation. Therefore, the local inhibition of specific prostanoid receptor signaling is expected to be an effective strategy for the prevention and treatment of acute inflammation.

  10. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cruz, L; Navarro, S; Valderrama, R; Sáenz, A; Guarner, L; Aparisi, L; Espi, A; Jaurietta, E; Marruecos, L; Gener, J

    1994-04-01

    A multicenter study of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) classified in accordance with the Balthazar criteria (grades D and E), has been performed in 12 teaching hospitals. A total of 233 patients were reviewed, and the mortality rate was 26.6%. The most common etiology was biliary pancreatitis (45.5%). Among the complications, shock, renal insufficiency, pulmonary insufficiency and hemorrhagic gastritis were associated with a mortality rate of 51-66%. Diffuse fluid collections were associated with a higher mortality rate (26.8%) than localized fluid collections (14.5%). In 106 patients with gallstone pancreatitis, early surgery was performed in 17, and 5 patients (29.4%) died. No mortality was observed in 32 patients with delayed surgery. Sphincterotomy was performed in 13 patients, and 4 (30.7%) died. Early surgery (necrosectomy and closed peritoneal lavage) was undertaken in 75 patients, with a mortality rate of 39%. In conclusion, the morbidity and mortality rates of ANP can be improved with proper monitoring, adequate supportive care and the judicious use of surgery based on clinical and morphological findings.

  11. Ansa pancreatica as a predisposing factor for recurrent acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Takana Yamakawa; Gonoi, Wataru; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Hayashi, Naoto; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the non-biased prevalence and clinical significance of ansa pancreatica in patients with acute pancreatitis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS Our institutional review board approved this cross-sectional study, which consisted of a community-based cohort of 587 consecutive participants in a whole-body health-check program, and 73 subjects with episode of acute pancreatitis (55 patients with a single episode of acute pancreatitis, and 18 patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis). All of the subjects underwent abdominal MRI including magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, medical examinations, and blood tests. Two board-certified, diagnostic, abdominal radiologists evaluated the images, and ansa pancreatica was diagnosed based on its characteristic anatomy on MRI. RESULTS Compared with the community group [5/587 (0.85%)], patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis had a significantly higher frequency of ansa pancreatica [2/18 (11.1%)] (P = 0.016; OR = 14.3; 95%CI: 1.27-96.1), but not compared with patients with single-episode acute pancreatitis [1/55 (1.8%)] (P = 0.42; OR = 2.1; 95%CI: 0.44-19.7). Multiple logistic regression analysis using age, alcohol intake, presence of ansa pancreatica, and presence of autoimmune disease as independent covariates, revealed a significant relationship between the presence of ansa pancreatica and recurrent acute pancreatitis. The presence of autoimmune disease was also significantly associated with the onset of recurrent acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, neither age nor alcohol intake were significantly related to the onset of recurrent acute pancreatitis. CONCLUSION The present study is the first to provide robust evidence that the presence of ansa pancreatica is significantly associated with recurrent acute pancreatitis. PMID:27833385

  12. Energetic etiologies of acute pancreatitis: A report of five cases

    PubMed Central

    Shmelev, Artem; Abdo, Alain; Sachdev, Sarina; Shah, Urvi; Kowdley, Gopal C; Cunningham, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    There are several common causes of acute pancreatitis, principally excessive alcohol intake and gallstones, and there are many rare causes. However, cases of pancreatitis still occur in the absence of any recognizable factors, and these cases of idiopathic pancreatitis suggest the presence of unrecognized etiologies. Five cases of acute pancreatitis in four patients came to attention due to a strong temporal association with exposure to nerve stimulators and energy drinks. Given that these cases of pancreatitis were otherwise unexplained, and given that these exposures were not clearly known to be associated with pancreatitis, we performed a search for precedent cases and for mechanistic bases. No clear precedent cases were found in PubMed and only scant, weak precedent cases were found in public-health databases. However, there was a coherent body of intriguing literature in support of a mechanistic basis for these exposures playing a role in the etiology of pancreatitis. PMID:26600983

  13. A data-driven acute inflammation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Acute inflammation is a severe medical condition defined as an inflammatory response of the body to an infection. Its rapid progression requires quick and accurate decisions from clinicians. Inadequate and delayed decisions makes acute inflammation the 10th leading cause of death overall in United States with the estimated cost of treatment about $17 billion annually. However, despite the need, there are limited number of methods that could assist clinicians to determine optimal therapies for acute inflammation. We developed a data-driven method for suggesting optimal therapy by using machine learning model that is learned on historical patients' behaviors. To reduce both the risk of failure and the expense for clinical trials, our method is evaluated on a virtual patients generated by a mathematical model that emulates inflammatory response. In conducted experiments, acute inflammation was handled with two complimentary pro- and anti-inflammatory medications which adequate timing and doses are crucial for the successful outcome. Our experiments show that the dosage regimen assigned with our data-driven method significantly improves the percentage of healthy patients when compared to results by other methods used in clinical practice and found in literature. Our method saved 88% of patients that would otherwise die within a week, while the best method found in literature saved only 73% of patients. At the same time, our method used lower doses of medications than alternatives. In addition, our method achieved better results than alternatives when only incomplete or noisy measurements were available over time as well as it was less affected by therapy delay. The presented results provide strong evidence that models from the artificial intelligence community have a potential for development of personalized treatment strategies for acute inflammation. PMID:24565439

  14. Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Complicated Falciparum Malaria.

    PubMed

    Barman, Bhupen; Bhattacharya, Prasanta Kumar; Lynrah, Kryshan G; Ete, Tony; Issar, Neel Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common protozoan diseases, especially in tropical countries. The clinical manifestation of malaria, especially falciparum malaria varies from mild acute febrile illness to life threatening severe systemic complications involving one or more organ systems. We would like to report a case of complicated falciparum malaria involving cerebral, renal, hepatic system along with acute pancreatitis. The patient was successfully treated with anti malarial and other supportive treatment. To the best of our knowledge there are very few reports of acute pancreatitis due to malaria. Falciparum malaria therefore should be added to the list of infectious agents causing acute pancreatitis especially in areas where malaria is endemic.

  15. Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Complicated Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Prasanta Kumar; Lynrah, Kryshan G; Ete, Tony; Issar, Neel Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common protozoan diseases, especially in tropical countries. The clinical manifestation of malaria, especially falciparum malaria varies from mild acute febrile illness to life threatening severe systemic complications involving one or more organ systems. We would like to report a case of complicated falciparum malaria involving cerebral, renal, hepatic system along with acute pancreatitis. The patient was successfully treated with anti malarial and other supportive treatment. To the best of our knowledge there are very few reports of acute pancreatitis due to malaria. Falciparum malaria therefore should be added to the list of infectious agents causing acute pancreatitis especially in areas where malaria is endemic. PMID:26894117

  16. Postischemic Inflammation in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Consoli, Arturo; Arnaboldi, Marco; Consoli, Domenico

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia is caused by arterial occlusion due to a thrombus or an embolus. Such occlusion induces multiple and concomitant pathophysiological processes that involve bioenergetic failure, acidosis, loss of cell homeostasis, excitotoxicity, and disruption of the blood-brain barrier. All of these mechanisms contribute to neuronal death, mainly via apoptosis or necrosis. The immune system is involved in this process in the early phases after brain injury, which contributes to potential enlargement of the infarct size and involves the penumbra area. Whereas inflammation and the immune system both exert deleterious effects, they also contribute to brain protection by stimulating a preconditioning status and to the concomitant repair of the injured parenchyma. This review describes the main phases of the inflammatory process occurring after arterial cerebral occlusion, with an emphasis on the role of single mediators. PMID:28079313

  17. Protective effects of daphnetin on sodium taurocholate‑induced severe acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Jiao; Zhao, Kai-Liang; Wang, Li-Kun; Shi, Qiao; Zuo, Teng; Liu, Tian-Yi; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Wei-Xing

    2014-05-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is the sudden onset of pancreatic inflammation, which is characterized by edema, acinar cell necrosis, hemorrhage and severe inflammation of the pancreas and is associated with a high mortality rate. Daphnetin has been shown to alleviate organ injury in a variety of preclinical animal models of coagulation disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of daphnetin on severe acute pancreatitis in a rat model. Severe acute pancreatitis in the rat model was induced by retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate (1 ml/kg) into the bile-pancreatic duct. Daphnetin (4 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally at 30 min prior to the infusion of sodium taurocholate. The severity of pancreatitis was evaluated by various analyses of serum amylase and lipase, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content, as well as by histological grading. The levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in the serum were measured by ELISA. The results revealed that the daphnetin-treated SAP rat group (SAP-D) exhibited a lower pathological score of the pancreas compared with the SAP group (SAP). Further analyses demonstrated that the SAP-D group had lower levels of serum amylase, lipase and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α and IL-1β, and a decreased MPO activity and MDA content 3, 6 and 12 h subsequent to the infusion of sodium taurocholate compared with the SAP group (SAP). These findings indicated that daphnetin exerted a protective function in the SAP rat model. Therefore, daphnetin may be considered as a potential compound for the therapy and prevention of acute pancreatitis.

  18. Protective effect of central thyrotropin-releasing hormone analog on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Masashi; Goto, Manabu; Nakamura, Kimihide; Shimada, Tadahito; Hiraishi, Hideyuki; Terano, Akira; Haneda, Masakazu

    2005-02-15

    Central neuropeptides play a role in many physiological functions through the autonomic nervous system. We have recently demonstrated that central injection of a thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) analog increases pancreatic blood flow through vagal and nitric oxide-dependent pathways. In this study, the central effect of a TRH analog on experimental acute pancreatitis was investigated in rats. Acute pancreatitis was induced by two intraperitoneal injections of cerulein (40 microg/kg) at 1-h interval. Either stable TRH analog, RX 77368 (5-100 ng), or saline was injected intracisternally 15 min before the first cerulein injection under ether anesthesia. Serum amylase level was measured before and 5 h after the first cerulein injection. Pancreatic wet/dry weight ratio and histological changes were also evaluated. Intracisternal TRH analog inhibited cerulean-induced elevation of serum amylase level, increase in pancreatic wet/dry weight ratio and pancreatic histological changes, such as interstitial edema, inflammation and vacuolization. The pancreatic cytoprotection induced by central TRH analog was abolished by subdiaphragmatic vagotomy and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME), but not by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Intravenous administration of the TRH analog did not influence cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. These results indicate that the TRH analog acts in the central nervous system to protect against acute pancreatitis through vagal and nitric oxide-dependent pathways.

  19. Mortality prognostic factors in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Popa, CC; Badiu, DC; Rusu, OC; Grigorean, VT; Neagu, SI; Strugaru, CR

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to present the biological prognostic factors of mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis. Methods: Several usual laboratory values were monitored: glucose, urea, partial pressure of oxygen, WBC count, hemoglobin, total bilirubin, and cholesterol. A statistical analysis was performed by using ROC curves and AUC interpretation. Results: The overall mortality rate was 21.1% and was different depending on the severity of the disease. Only 2.22% of the patients with a mild disease died, as opposed to 45.63% of the patients with a severe form. All the analyses studied were significantly elevated in the deceased patients. A close correlation between blood glucose, urea, partial pressure of oxygen, WBC, hemoglobin, total bilirubin, and cholesterol and mortality was objectified by measuring the AUC, which was of 97.1%, 95.5%, 93.4%, 92.7%, 87.4%, 82.2%, and 79.0%. Conclusions: The usual, easy to use, fast, and cheap tests were useful in predicting mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis. Our study confirmed that the combination of several factors led to an accurate mortality prediction. PMID:27928447

  20. Acute Pancreatitis Caused By Mushroom Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Karahan, Samet; Erden, Abdulsamet; Cetinkaya, Ali; Avci, Deniz; Ortakoyluoglu, Adile Irfan; Karagoz, Hatice; Bulut, Kadir; Basak, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Of the more than 5000 species of mushrooms known, 100 types are toxic and approximately 10% of these toxic types can cause fatal toxicity. A type of mushroom called Amanita phalloides is responsible for 95% of toxic mushroom poisonings. In this article, we report 2 cases of mushroom poisonings caused by Lactarius volemus, known as Tirmit by the local people. The patient and his wife were admitted to the emergency room with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting 20 hours after consuming Lactarius volemus, an edible type of mushroom. The patients reported that they had been collecting this mushroom from the mountains and eating them for several years but had never developed any clinicopathology to date. Further examination of the patients revealed a very rare case of acute pancreatitis due to mushroom intoxication. The male patient was admitted to the intensive care unit while his wife was followed in the internal medicine service, because of her relative mild clinical symptoms. Both patients recovered without sequelae and were discharged. In this article, we aimed to emphasize that gastrointestinal symptoms are often observed in mushroom intoxications and can be confused with acute pancreatitis, thus leading to misdiagnosis of patients. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can improve patients’ prognosis and prevent the development of complications. PMID:26835473

  1. Quetiapine-induced hypertriglyceridaemia causing acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Franco, John Mark; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Griffin, Timothy John

    2015-05-14

    Second-generation antipsychotics have well-known metabolic side effects such as hyperlipidaemia and hyperglycaemia. A middle-aged man presented with epigastric and flank pain associated with nausea, and was noted to have elevated triglycerides (3590 mg/dL or 40.53 mmol/L), lipase and glucose. Haematological parameters revealed neutropenia with pancytopaenia. The patient was started on conservative management for acute pancreatitis, and on intravenous insulin and oral gemfibrozil for lowering of his triglycerides. He gradually improved and was transitioned to oral atorvastatin and fenofibrate. His triglycerides, glucose and leucocyte counts normalised at discharge and he was transitioned to ziprasidone. The combination of hypertriglyceridaemia, worsening hyperglycaemia and neutropenia made us suspect quetiapine as the causative agent. Medications cause only 0.1-7% of acute pancreatitis cases, with quetiapine implicated in only five-reported cases. Hypertriglyceridaemia (>600 mg/dL or 6.77 mmol/L) is frequently reported with quetiapine use, but severe hypertriglyceridaemia (>1000 mg/dL or 11.29 mmol/L) has been reported in <10 patients.

  2. Fluid collections in and around the pancreas in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Brun, Alexander; Agarwal, Nanakram; Pitchumoni, C S

    2011-08-01

    The advent of computed tomographic scan with its wide use in the evaluation of acute pancreatitis has opened up a new topic in pancreatology i.e. fluid collections. Fluid collections in and around the pancreas occur often in acute pancreatitis and were defined by the Atlanta Symposium on Acute Pancreatitis in 1992. Two decades since the Atlanta Conference additional experience has brought to light the inadequacy and poor understanding of the terms used by different specialists involved in the care of patients with acute pancreatitis when interpreting imaging modalities and the need for a uniformly used classification system. The deficiencies of the Atlanta definitions and advances in medicine have led to a proposed revision of the Atlanta classification promulgated by the Acute Pancreatitis Classification Working Group. The newly used terms "acute peripancreatic fluid collections," "pancreatic pseudocyst," "postnecrotic pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collections," and "walled-off pancreatic necrosis" are to be clearly understood in the interpretation of imaging studies. The current treatment methods for fluid collections are diverse and depend on accurate interpretations of radiologic tests. Management options include conservative treatment, percutaneous catheter drainage, open and laparoscopic surgery, and endoscopic drainage. The choice of treatment depends on a correct diagnosis of the type of fluid collection. In this study we have attempted to clarify the management and clinical features of different types of fluid collections as they have been initially defined under the 1992 Atlanta Classification and revised by the Working Group's proposed categorization.

  3. Prognostic signs and nonoperative peritoneal lavage in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ranson, J H; Rifkind, K M; Turner, J W

    1976-08-01

    Three hundred patients with acute pancreatitis have been studied. Pancreatitis was associated with alcoholism in 207, biliary tract disease in 51 and other conditions in 42. Twenty-two patients died, and an additional 34 patients required more than one week of treatment in the intensive care unit. Retrospective analysis of the first 100 patients identified 11 objective findings which correlated with the occurrence of serious illness or death. They were, on admission, age over 55 years, blood glucose level over 200 milligrams per cent, white blood count over 16,000 per cubic millimeter, serum lactic dehydrogenase level over 350 International units per liter and serum glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase level over 250 Sigma Frankel units per cent. During the initial 48 hours of therapy, the findings were hematocrit value decrease over 10 percentage points, serum calcium level below 8 milligrams per cent, base deficit over 4 milli-equivalents per liter, a blood urea nitrogen level increase over 5 milligrams per cent, estimated fluid sequestration over 6 liters and arterial oxygen tension less than 60 millimeters of mercury. Prospective application of these signs in the latter 200 patients permitted the accurate early identification of those with severe pancreatitis. Only one of 162 patients with fewer than three of these early features was seriously ill or died, while 24 of 38 patients with three or more early positive findings were seriously ill or died. The objective early identification of patients with severe pancreatitis permits more vigorous management of this group and also provides a basis for the selection of patients for the evaluation of proposed improved therapies. Percutaneous peritoneal dialysis in severe pancreatitis was evaluated in ten patients, with three or more positive early signs, who were randomly assigned to dialysis or continued conventional care. Morbidity was strikingly reduced in patients who underwent dialysis, and while death or more than

  4. Aspirin Protects against Acinar Cells Necrosis in Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guotao; Tong, Zhihui; Ding, Yanbing; Liu, Jinjiao; Pan, Yiyuan; Gao, Lin; Tu, Jianfeng; Liu, George

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin has a clear anti-inflammatory effect and is used as an anti-inflammatory agent for both acute and long-term inflammation. Previous study has indicated that aspirin alleviated acute pancreatitis induced by caerulein in rat. However, the role of aspirin on severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and the necrosis of pancreatic acinar cell are not yet clear. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of aspirin treatment on a SAP model induced by caerulein combined with Lipopolysaccharide. We found that aspirin reduced serum amylase and lipase levels, decreased the MPO activity, and alleviated the histopathological manifestations of pancreas and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. Proinflammatory cytokines were decreased and the expression of NF-κB p65 in acinar cell nuclei was suppressed after aspirin treatment. Furthermore, aspirin induced the apoptosis of acinar cells by TUNEL assay, and the expression of Bax and caspase 3 was increased and the expression of Bcl-2 was decreased. Intriguingly, the downregulation of critical necrosis associated proteins RIP1, RIP3, and p-MLKL was observed; what is more, we additionally found that aspirin reduced the COX level of pancreatic tissue. In conclusion, our data showed that aspirin could protect pancreatic acinar cell against necrosis and reduce the severity of SAP. Clinically, aspirin may potentially be a therapeutic intervention for SAP. PMID:28119929

  5. CD40L is not involved in acute experimental pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Aree; Awla, Darbaz; Jeppsson, Bengt; Regnér, Sara; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2011-05-20

    Recent data suggest that platelets not only control thrombosis and hemostasis but may also regulate inflammatory processes such as acute pancreatitis. However, the specific role of platelet-derived mediators in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis is not known. Herein, we examined the role of CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154) in different models of acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced by repetitive caerulein administration (50μg/kg, i.p.) or infusion of sodium taurocholate (5%-10μl) into the pancreatic duct in wild-type C57BL/6 and CD40L-deficient mice. Neutrophil infiltration, myeloperoxidase (MPO), macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) levels, acinar cell necrosis, edema and hemorrhage in the pancreas as well as serum amylase activity and lung levels of MPO were quantified 24h after induction of acute pancreatitis. Caerulein and taurocholate challenge caused a clear-cut pancreatic damage characterized by increased acinar cell necrosis, neutrophil infiltration, focal hemorrhage, edema formation as well as increased levels of serum amylase and MIP-2 in the pancreas and lung MPO and histological damage. Notably, CD40L gene-deficient animals exhibited a similar phenotype as wild-type mice after challenge with caerulein and taurocholate. Similarly, administration of an antibody directed against CD40L had no effect against acute pancreatitis. Our data suggest that CD40L does not play a functional role in experimental acute pancreatitis. Thus, other candidates than CD40L needs to be explored in order to identify platelet-derived mediators in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis.

  6. [The systemic inflammatory response syndrome correction in acute destructive pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Agapov, M A; Khoreva, M V; Gorskiĭ, V A

    2011-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a disease of variable severity. In which some patients experience mild, self-limited attacks while others manifest a severe, highly morbid, and frequently lethal attack. The exact mechanisms by which diverse etiological factors induce an attack are still unclear. Recent studies have established the role played by inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. In our research we have estimated influence of not steroid anti-inflammatory preparation on synthesis pro-and anti-inflammatory Cytokines at healthy donors and at patients with Acute pancreatitis.

  7. Central role of neutrophil in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi-wen; Meng, Xiao-xiao; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is an acute abdominal disease with the strong systemic inflammatory response, and rapidly progresses from a local pancreatic damage into multiple organ dysfunction. For many decades, the contributions of neutrophils to the pathology of SAP were traditionally thought to be the chemokine and cytokine cascades that accompany inflammation. In this review, we focus mainly on those recently recognized aspects of neutrophils in SAP processes. First, emerging evidence suggests that therapeutic interventions targeting neutrophils significantly lower tissue damage and protect against the occurrence of pancreatitis. Second, trypsin activation promotes the initial neutrophils recruitment into local pancreas, and subsequently neutrophils infiltration in turn triggers trypsin production. Finally, neutrophils have the unique ability to release neutrophil extracellular traps even in the absence of pathogens. PMID:26249268

  8. Prediction of Severe Acute Pancreatitis Using a Decision Tree Model Based on the Revised Atlanta Classification of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yushun; Yang, Chong; Gou, Shanmiao; Li, Yongfeng; Xiong, Jiongxin; Wu, Heshui; Wang, Chunyou

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a model for the early prediction of severe acute pancreatitis based on the revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis. Methods Clinical data of 1308 patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) were included in the retrospective study. A total of 603 patients who were admitted to the hospital within 36 hours of the onset of the disease were included at last according to the inclusion criteria. The clinical data were collected within 12 hours after admission. All the patients were classified as having mild acute pancreatitis (MAP), moderately severe acute pancreatitis (MSAP) and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) based on the revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis. All the 603 patients were randomly divided into training group (402 cases) and test group (201 cases). Univariate and multiple regression analyses were used to identify the independent risk factors for the development of SAP in the training group. Then the prediction model was constructed using the decision tree method, and this model was applied to the test group to evaluate its validity. Results The decision tree model was developed using creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase, and oxygenation index to predict SAP. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of SAP in the training group were 80.9% and 90.0%, respectively, and the sensitivity and specificity in the test group were 88.6% and 90.4%, respectively. Conclusions The decision tree model based on creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase, and oxygenation index is more likely to predict the occurrence of SAP. PMID:26580397

  9. What Have We Learned About Acute Pancreatitis in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Harrison X.; Lowe, Mark E.; Husain, Sohail Z.

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric pancreatitis has received much attention during the past few years. Numerous reports have identified an increasing trend in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in children and key differences in disease presentation and management between infants and older children. The present review provides a brief, evidence-based focus on the latest progress in the clinical field. It also poses important questions for emerging multicenter registries to answer about the natural history and management of affected children with pancreatitis. PMID:21336157

  10. [Lung surfactant changes in acute destructive pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Uchikov, A; Khristov, Zh; Murdzhev, K; Tar'lov, Z

    2000-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), with mortality rate ranging from 15 to 40 per cent, continues to be a serious challenge to emergency surgeons. Not infrequently, in such cases lesions to the respiratory system develop, with the changes in pulmonary surfactant (PS) occurring during SAP considered as one of the major factors implicated. Alterations in structural phospholipids of PS (lecithin and sphyngomyelin) are assessed under experimental conditions in 26 dogs with modulated SAP at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours, and the obtained results compared to the ones prior to pancreatitis triggering. The animals are divided up into two groups--untreated and given Sandostatin treatment. In either group a reduction of PS fractions is documented, with a statistically significant lesser reduction of the indicators under study being established in the Sandostatin-treated group by comparison with the untreated one. Modulated SAP in dogs accounts for a significant reduction of the surfactant phospholipid values--lecithin and sphyngomyelin--in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL).

  11. Optimizing the Treatment of Acute Duct-Destructive Pancreatitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhakiev, Bazylbek S.; Karsakbayev, Uteugali G.; Kelimberdiev, Mersaid S.; ?uhamedgalieva, Bodagoz M.; K?nonenko, Aleksander F.

    2016-01-01

    The search for new methods for treating duct-destructive pancreatitis is a relevant problem. Endogenous intoxication and oxidative stress that accompany acute pancreatitis often progress even after surgery, which forces one to search for additional possibilities of preventing these severe consequences. This research studied the effect of small…

  12. Lymphatic Vascular Response to Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Pier-Anne; Hazen, Amy; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    During acute inflammation, functioning lymphatics are believed to reduce edema and to provide a transiting route for immune cells, but the extent at which the dermal lymphatic remodeling impacts lymphatic transport or the factors regulating these changes remains unclear. Herein we quantify the increase in lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and examine the expression of pro-angiogenenic and lymphangiogenic factors during acute cutaneous hypersensitivity (CHS). We found that LECs actively proliferate during CHS but that this proliferation does not affect the lymphatic vessel density. Instead, lymphatic remodeling is accompanied by lymphatic vessel leakiness and lower ejection of lymph fluid, which is observed only in the proximal lymphatic vessel draining the inflamed area. LECs and the immune cells release growth factors and cytokines during inflammation, which impact the lymphatic microenvironment and function. We identified that FGF-2, PLGF-2, HGF, EGF, and KC/CXCL17 are differentially expressed within tissues during acute CHS, but both VEGF-C and VEGF-D levels do not significantly change. Our results indicate that VEGF-C and VEGF-D are not the only players and other factors may be responsible for the LECs proliferation and altered lymphatic function in acute CHS. PMID:24086691

  13. [Acute pancreatitis. Evidence-based practice guidelines, prepared by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group].

    PubMed

    Hritz, István; Czakó, László; Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Farkas, Gyula; Kelemen, Dezső; Lásztity, Natália; Morvay, Zita; Oláh, Attila; Pap, Ákos; Párniczky, Andrea; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Szentkereszti, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Szücs, Ákos; Takács, Tamás; Tiszlavicz, László; Hegyi, Péter

    2015-02-15

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common diseases of the gastrointestinal tract associated with significant morbidity and mortality that requires up-to-date and evidence based treatment guidelines. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group proposed to prepare evidence based guideline for the medical and surgical management of acute pancreatitis based on the available international guidelines and evidence. The preparatory and consultation task force appointed by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group translated and, if it was necessary, complemented and/or modified the international guidelines. All together 42 relevant clinical questions were defined in 11 topics (Diagnosis and etiology, Prognosis, Imaging, Fluid therapy, Intensive care management, Prevention of infectious complications, Nutrition, Biliary interventions, Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography pancreatitis, Indication, timing and strategy for intervention in necrotizing pancreatitis, Timing of cholecystectomy [or endoscopic sphincterotomy]). Evidence was classified according to the UpToDate® grading system. The draft of the guideline was presented and discussed at the consensus meeting on September 12, 2014. 25 clinical questions with almost total (more than 95%) and 17 clinical questions with strong (more than 70%) agreement were accepted. The present guideline is the first evidence based acute pancreatitis guideline in Hungary. The guideline may provide important help for tuition, everyday practice and for establishment of proper finance of acute pancreatitis. Therefore, the authors believe that these guidelines will widely become as basic reference in Hungary.

  14. Procalcitonin Strip Test as an Independent Predictor in Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Dias, Brendan Hermenigildo; Rozario, Anthony Prakash; Olakkengil, Santosh Antony; V, Anirudh

    2015-12-01

    Plasma procalcitonin (PCT) is a highly specific marker for the diagnosis of bacterial infection and sepsis. Studies have demonstrated its role in the setting of sepsis and acute pancreatitis. This study aims to analyze and compare the prognostic efficacy of plasma procalcitonin strip test in acute pancreatitis. A prospective study was conducted in the department of general surgery from June 2012 to June 2013. Plasma procalcitonin was estimated by the semiquantitative strip test. The study included a total of 50 patients diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis. Data was collected and statistically analyzed using SPSS version 17. Thirty-nine out of the 50 patients (78 %) were males with a mean age of 46.8 years (range, 25-78 years) and 25 patients (50 %) had ethanol-induced pancreatitis, while 13 patients (26 %) had gall stone pancreatitis. Plasma PCT values were found to correlate better than CRP levels and total leukocyte count with the total duration of hospitalization, ITU, and ICU stay, as well as with the progression to severe acute pancreatitis. A cut off for plasma PCT of >2 ng/mL was found to be 100 % sensitive and 100 % specific and a cut off for CRP of >19 mg/dL was 70 % sensitive and 65 % specific for predicting the progression to severe acute pancreatitis. Plasma PCT also correlated well with antibiotic requirement. A cut off value of >0.5 ng/mL for plasma PCT was 100 % sensitive and 80 % specific and a cut off value of >18 mg/dL for CRP was 86 % sensitive and 63 % specific for predicting antibiotic requirement. Plasma procalcitonin is an early and reliable prognostic indicator in acute pancreatitis. The procalcitonin strip test is a rapid test which is useful in analyzing prognosis in patients with acute pancreatitis.

  15. 5-lipoxygenase knockout mice exhibit a resistance to acute pancreatitis induced by cerulein

    PubMed Central

    Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Rossi, Antonietta; Serraino, Ivana; Di Paola, Rosanna; Dugo, Laura; Genovese, Tiziana; Britti, Domenico; Sciarra, Giuseppe; De Sarro, Angelina; Caputi, Achille P; Sautebin, Lidia

    2003-01-01

    Here we compare the degree of pancreatitis caused by cerulein in mice lacking 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) and in the corresponding wild-type mice. Intraperitoneal injection of cerulein in mice resulted in severe, acute pancreatitis characterized by oedema, neutrophil infiltration and necrosis and elevated serum levels of amylase and lipase. Infiltration of pancreatic and lung tissue with neutrophils (measured as increase in myeloperoxidase activity) was associated with enhanced lipid peroxidation (increased tissue levels of malondialdehyde). Immunohistochemical examination demonstrated a marked increase in immunoreactivity for intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), P-selectin and E-selectin in the pancreas and lung of cerulein-treated mice. In contrast, the degree of (1) pancreatic inflammation and tissue injury (histological score), (2) up-regulation/expression of P-selectin, E-selectin and ICAM-1, and (3) neutrophil infiltration was markedly reduced in pancreatic and lung tissue obtained from cerulein-treated 5-LO-deficient mice. These findings support the view that 5-LO plays an important, pro-inflammatory role in the acute pancreatitis caused by cerulein in mice. PMID:12941149

  16. A prospective study of radionuclide biliary scanning in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Neoptolemos, J. P.; Fossard, D. P.; Berry, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Early surgery for biliary pancreatitis has resulted in a need for an accurate method of gallstone detection in acute pancreatitis. Fifty patients with acute pancreatitis were studied prospectively to assess the diagnostic value of Radionuclide Biliary Scanning (RBS) performed within 72 hours of an attack. To assess the general accuracy of RBS a further 154 patients with suspected acute cholecystitis or biliary colic were similarly studied. There were 34 patients with biliary pancreatitis and 18 (53%) had a positive scan (no gallbladder seen). There were 16 patients with non-biliary pancreatitis and 5 (31%) had a positive scan. All 51 patients with acute cholecystitis had a positive scan, as did 82% of the 51 patients with biliary colic. There were 52 patients with no biliary or pancreatic disease and none of these had a positive scan. RBS is highly accurate in confirming a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis or biliary colic. However, it cannot be relied on to differentiate between biliary and non-biliary pancreatitis and should certainly not be used as the basis for biliary surgery in these patients. PMID:6859781

  17. BPC 157 therapy to detriment sphincters failure-esophagitis-pancreatitis in rat and acute pancreatitis patients low sphincters pressure.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, I; Dobric, I; Drmic, D; Sever, M; Klicek, R; Radic, B; Brcic, L; Kolenc, D; Zlatar, M; Kunjko, K; Jurcic, D; Martinac, M; Rasic, Z; Boban Blagaic, A; Romic, Z; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2011-10-01

    Possibly, acute esophagitis and pancreatitis cause each other, and we focused on sphincteric failure as the common causative key able to induce either esophagitis and acute pancreatitis or both of them, and thereby investigate the presence of a common therapy nominator. This may be an anti-ulcer pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (tested for inflammatory bowel disease, wound treatment) affecting esophagitis, lower esophageal and pyloric sphincters failure and acute pancreatitis (10 μg/kg, 10 ng/kg intraperitoneally or in drinking water). The esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure (i.e., insertion of the tubes into the sphincters, lower esophageal and pyloric) and acute pancreatitis procedure (i.e., bile duct ligation) were combined in rats. Esophageal manometry was done in acute pancreatitis patients. In rats acute pancreatitis procedure produced also esophagitis and both sphincter failure, decreased pressure 24 h post-surgery. Furthermore, bile duct ligation alone immediately declines the pressure in both sphincters. Vice versa, the esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure alone produced acute pancreatitis. What's more, these lesions (esophagitis, sphincter failure, acute pancreatitis when combined) aggravate each other (tubes into sphincters and ligated bile duct). Counteraction occurred by BPC 157 therapies. In acute pancreatitis patients lower pressure at rest was in both esophageal sphincters in acute pancreatitis patients. We conclude that BPC 157 could cure esophagitis/sphincter/acute pancreatitis healing failure.

  18. Amylase, lipase, pancreatic isoamylase, and phospholipase A in diagnosis of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Clavé, P; Guillaumes, S; Blanco, I; Nabau, N; Mercé, J; Farré, A; Marruecos, L; Lluís, F

    1995-08-01

    To determine the utility of serum amylase (AMY), lipase (Lp), pancreatic isoamylase (isoA), phospholipase A (PLA), and urine AMY in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, samples of serum and urine were obtained on admission and every day thereafter for 5 days from 384 patients with acute abdominal pain. Diagnostic accuracy, determined as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, was > 0.975 for serum AMY, Lp, isoA, and urine AMY. For each of these enzymes, a threshold value (twice to sixfold the upper limit of the reference values) offering diagnostic efficiency > 95% could be determined. In contrast, accuracy and efficiency of serum PLA were low. The profiles of these enzymes in acute pancreatitis decreased in a parallel fashion over 5 days except for PLA. We conclude that diagnostic utilities are similar for serum AMY, Lp, isoA, and urine AMY for acute pancreatitis, provided that an appropriate threshold is established.

  19. [The management of acute pancreatitis according to the modern guidelines].

    PubMed

    Botoi, G; Andercou, O; Andercou, A; Marian, D; Tamasan, A; Span, M

    2011-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis is a critical illness as the organism that produces a significant mortality despite diagnostic and therapeutic acquisitions. While new mechanisms have been identified for production and were crystallized management principles, a number of controversies remain awaiting resolution in the near future. Aim is to establish, based on their experience and literature data, place the current means of diagnosis and treatment in close correlation with the pathophysiological events of acute pancreatitis.

  20. Prophylactic Administration of Silybin Ameliorates L-Arginine-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Uçmak, Feyzullah; Ekin, Nazım; İbiloğlu, İbrahim; Arslan, Serkan; Kaplan, İbrahim; Şenateş, Ebubekir

    2016-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effect of silybin, a potent antioxidant, on L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in an experimental rat model. Material/Methods Forty female Wistar Albino rats were divided into 5 groups as follows: Group 1 (C): control group (n=8), Group 2 (SL): silybin group (n=8), Group 3 (LA): acute pancreatitis group (n=8), Group 4 (SLLA): prophylaxis group (n=8), and Group 5 (LASL): treatment group (n=8). Group C (control) received 2 intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of physiological saline at an interval of 1 h. Group SL received only a single i.p. injection of silybin. The SLLA group received a single i.p. injection of silybin before the induction of acute pancreatitis with L-arginine, whereas the LASL group received the same injection after the induction of acute pancreatitis with L-arginine. Pancreatic tissues were histopathologically examined. Levels of amylase and oxidative stress markers (total oxidant status and total anti-oxidant status) were determined in the blood samples. Oxidative stress index was calculated. Results In comparison to the LA, the prophylaxis and treatment groups showed significant improvements in serum oxidative stress parameters (p=0.001 and p=0.005, respectively). Histopathological analysis showed that the treatment group had significant improvements in edema scores only (p=0.006), whereas the prophylaxis group had the same improvements in inflammation and necrosis scores as well as in total scores (p=0.004, 0.006, and 0.004, respectively). Conclusions When used for prophylactic rather than therapeutic purposes, silybin ameliorates serum oxidative stress parameters and improves histopathological results via its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:27725627

  1. Lupeol Protects Against Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Jun; Bae, Gi-Sang; Choi, Sun Bok; Jo, Il-Joo; Kim, Dong-Goo; Shin, Joon-Yeon; Lee, Sung-Kon; Kim, Myoung-Jin; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2015-10-01

    Lupeol is a triterpenoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables and is known to exhibit a wide range of biological activities, including antiinflammatory and anti-cancer effects. However, the effects of lupeol on acute pancreatitis specifically have not been well characterized. Here, we investigated the effects of lupeol on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Acute pancreatitis was induced via an intraperitoneal injection of cerulein (50 µg/kg). In the lupeol treatment group, lupeol was administered intraperitoneally (10, 25, or 50 mg/kg) 1 h before the first cerulein injection. Blood samples were taken to determine serum cytokine and amylase levels. The pancreas was rapidly removed for morphological examination and used in the myeloperoxidase assay, trypsin activity assay, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In addition, we isolated pancreatic acinar cells using a collagenase method to examine the acinar cell viability. Lupeol administration significantly attenuated the severity of pancreatitis, as was shown by reduced pancreatic edema, and neutrophil infiltration. In addition, lupeol inhibited elevation of digestive enzymes and cytokine levels, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1, and interleukin (IL)-6. Furthermore, lupeol inhibited the cerulein-induced acinar cell death. In conclusion, these results suggest that lupeol exhibits protective effects on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

  2. Fasting prevents acute pancreatitis induced by cerulein in rats.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, M; Tani, S; Okabayashi, Y; Fujii, M; Nakamura, T; Fujisawa, T; Koide, M; Itoh, H

    1990-07-01

    We examined the effect of fasting on the course of experimental acute pancreatitis induced in rats by four subcutaneous injections of 20 micrograms/kg body weight of cerulein at hourly intervals. Rats were either fasted from 24 hr before to 9 hr after the first cerulein injection or fed ad libitum throughout the experiment. Twenty-four hours of fasting reduced cerulein-induced increases in serum levels of amylase and anionic trypsin(ogen) to 50 and 70% of those in fed rats, respectively. Increases in pancreatic wet weight after cerulein injections were also less in fasted rats than in fed rats. Pancreatic content of trypsin was significantly decreased after a 24-hr fast, and no further changes were induced by cerulein injections. The histological signs of acute pancreatitis were greatly alleviated by fasting. However, 24 hr of fasting did not alter the sensitivity and responsiveness of the exocrine pancreas to cerulein in both in vivo and in vitro. Plasma CCK bioactivity and immunoreactive secretin concentration in 24-hr-fasted rats were significantly lower than those in fed rats. Administration of CCK receptor antagonist, loxiglumide, 12 hr prior to the induction of acute pancreatitis reduced the increase in serum amylase activity in fed rats to nearly the same levels as that in fasted rats and alleviated histological signs of pancreatitis to some extent. These present observations suggest that fasting lessens the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis by reducing endogenous CCK release.

  3. Management of patients after recovering from acute severe biliary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dedemadi, Georgia; Nikolopoulos, Manolis; Kalaitzopoulos, Ioannis; Sgourakis, George

    2016-01-01

    Cholelithiasis is the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, accounting 35%-60% of cases. Around 15%-20% of patients suffer a severe attack with high morbidity and mortality rates. As far as treatment is concerned, the optimum method of late management of patients with severe acute biliary pancreatitis is still contentious and the main question is over the correct timing of every intervention. Patients after recovering from an acute episode of severe biliary pancreatitis can be offered alternative options in their management, including cholecystectomy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy, or no definitive treatment. Delaying cholecystectomy until after resolution of the inflammatory process, usually not earlier than 6 wk after onset of acute pancreatitis, seems to be a safe policy. ERCP and sphincterotomy on index admission prevent recurrent episodes of pancreatitis until cholecystectomy is performed, but if used for definitive treatment, they can be a valuable tool for patients unfit for surgery. Some patients who survive severe biliary pancreatitis may develop pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis. Management of pseudocysts with minimally invasive techniques, if not therapeutic, can be used as a bridge to definitive operative treatment, which includes delayed cholecystectomy and concurrent pseudocyst drainage in some patients. A management algorithm has been developed for patients surviving severe biliary pancreatitis according to the currently published data in the literature. PMID:27678352

  4. The tripeptide analog feG ameliorates severity of acute pancreatitis in a caerulein mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rifai, Yusnita; Elder, Alison S F; Carati, Colin J; Hussey, Damian J; Li, Xin; Woods, Charmaine M; Schloithe, Ann C; Thomas, Anthony C; Mathison, Ronald D; Davison, Joseph S; Toouli, James; Saccone, Gino T P

    2008-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality; however, there is no specific treatment for this disease. A novel salivary tripeptide analog, feG, reduces inflammation in several different animal models of inflammation. The aims of this study were to determine whether feG reduced the severity of AP and modifies the expression of pancreatic ICAM-1 mRNA during AP in a mouse model. AP was induced in mice by hourly (x12) intraperitoneal injections of caerulein. A single dose of feG (100 microg/kg) was coadministered with caerulein either at time 0 h (prophylactic) or 3 h after AP induction (therapeutic). Plasma amylase and pancreatic MPO activities and pancreatic ICAM-1 mRNA expression (by RT-PCR) were measured. Pancreatic sections were histologically assessed for abnormal acinar cells and interstitial space. AP induction produced a sevenfold increase in plasma amylase, a tenfold increase in pancreatic MPO activity, and a threefold increase in interstitial space, and 90% of the acinar cells were abnormal. Prophylactic treatment with feG reduced the AP-induced plasma amylase activity by 45%, pancreatic MPO by 80%, the proportion of abnormal acinar cells by 30%, and interstitial space by 40%. Therapeutic treatment with feG significantly reduced the AP-induced abnormal acinar cells by 10% and the interstitial space by 20%. Pancreatic ICAM-1 mRNA expression was upregulated in AP and was reduced by 50% with prophylactic and therapeutic treatment with feG. We conclude that feG ameliorates experimental AP acting at least in part by modulating ICAM-1 expression in the pancreas.

  5. Paeoniflorin ameliorates acute necrotizing pancreatitis and pancreatitis‑induced acute renal injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Weixing; Shi, Qiao; Zhao, Liang; Mei, Fangchao; Li, Chen; Zuo, Teng; He, Xiaobo

    2016-08-01

    Acute renal injury caused by acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) is a common complication that is associated with a high rate of mortality. Paeoniflorin is the active ingredient of paeonia radix and exhibits a number of pharmacological effects, such as anti‑inflammatory, anticancer, analgesic and immunomodulatory effects. The present study detected the potential treatment effects of paeoniflorin on acute renal injury induced by ANP in a rat model. The optimal dose of paeoniflorin for preventing acute renal injury induced by ANP was determined. Then, the possible protective mechanism of paeoniflorin was investigated. The serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α, interleukin (IL)‑1β and IL‑6 were measured with enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay kits. Renal inflammation and apoptosis were measured by immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The expression of nitric oxide in kidney tissues was also evaluated. The p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were measured by western blotting. The results shown that paeoniflorin may ameliorate acute renal injury following ANP in rats by inhibiting inflammatory responses and renal cell apoptosis. These effects may be associated with the p38MAPK and nuclear factor‑κB signal pathway.

  6. The Timing of Biliary Surgery in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ranson, John H. C.

    1979-01-01

    The timing of biliary surgery remains controversial in patients with acute pancreatitis associated with cholelithiasis. Eighty hospital admissions for acute pancreatitis, occurring in 74 patients with cholelithiasis, have therefore been reviewed. Among 22 patients who underwent abdominal surgery during the first week of treatment, there were five deaths (23%) and four patients (18%) who required more than seven days of intensive care. Fifty-eight episodes of pancreatitis were managed nonoperatively during the first week of treatment, with no deaths, although six (10%) required more than seven days of intensive care. Biliary surgery was undertaken later during the same admission in 37 patients, with no deaths. Twenty-one patients were discharged without biliary operation, but seven (33%) developed further pancreatitis. Previously reported prognostic signs were used to divide pancreatitis into 57 “mild” episodes (1.8% mortality) and 23 “severe” episodes (17% mortality). Early (day 0-7) definitive biliary surgery was undertaken in 11 patients with “mild” pancreatitis, with one death (9%), and in six patients with “severe” pancreatitis, with four deaths (67%). In three recent patients with “severe” pancreatitis, early biliary surgery was limited to cholecystostomy, with no deaths. These findings suggest that although early correction of associated biliary disease may be undertaken safely in many patients with “mild” acute pancreatitis, early definitive surgery is hazardous in “severe” pancreatitis and should, if possible, be deferred until pancreatitis has subsided. In most patients biliary surgery should precede hospital discharge. PMID:443917

  7. Endotoxemia in newborn rats attenuates acute pancreatitis at adult age.

    PubMed

    Jaworek, J; Konturek, S J; Macko, M; Kot, M; Szklarczyk, J; Leja-Szpak, A; Nawrot-Porabka, K; Stachura, J; Tomaszewska, R; Siwicki, A; Pawlik, W W

    2007-03-01

    Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS), at high concentration is responsible for sepsis, and neonatal mortality, however low concentration of LPS protected the pancreas against acute damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exposition of suckling rats to LPS on the course of acute pancreatitis at adult age. Suckling rat (30-40g) received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of saline (control) or LPS from Escherichia coli or Salmonella typhi (5, 10 or 15 mg/kg-day) during 5 consecutive days. Two months later these rats have been subjected to i.p. cearulein infusion (25 microg/kg) to produce caerulein-induced pancreatitis (CIP). The following parameters were tested: pancreatic weight and morphology, plasma amylase and lipase activities, interleukin 1beta (IL-1 beta), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and interleukin 10 (IL-10) plasma concentrations. Pancreatic concentration of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lipid peroxidation products; malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) have been also measured. Caerulein infusion produced CIP in all animals tested, that was confirmed by histological examination. In the rats, which have been subjected in the neonatal period of life to LPS at doses 10 or 15 mg/kg-day x 5 days, all manifestations of CIP have been reduced. In these animals acute inflammatory infiltration of pancreatic tissue and pancreatic cell vacuolization have been significantly diminished. Also pancreatic weight, plasma lipase and alpha-amylase activities, as well as plasma concentrations of IL-1beta and IL-6 have been markedly decreased, whereas plasma anti-inflammatory IL-10 concentration was significantly increased in these animals as compared to the control rats, subjected in the infancy to saline injection instead of LPS. Caerulein-induced fall in pancreatic SOD concentration was reversed and accompanied by significant reduction of MDA + 4 HNE in the pancreatic tissue. The effects of LPS derived from E. coli or S. typhi were similar

  8. The Antioxidant Profiles, Lysosomal and Membrane Enzymes Activity in Patients with Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Milnerowicz, Halina; Bukowski, Radosław; Jabłonowska, Monika; Ściskalska, Milena; Milnerowicz, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators, such as IL-6, play an important role in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis. The study was aimed to assess the degree of the pro/antioxidative imbalance and estimate which antioxidant plays a role in the maintenance of pro/antioxidative balance during acute pancreatitis. The study was investigated in the blood of 32 patients with acute pancreatitis and 37 healthy subjects. IL-6 concentration as early marker of inflammation was determinated. The intensity of oxidative stress was assessed by TBARS concentration. To investigate antioxidative status, the GPx and Cu/Zn SOD activities and the levels of GSH, MT, SH groups, and TRAP were measured. The concentrations of Cu and Zn as ions participating in the maintenance of antioxidant enzymes stability and playing a role in the course of disease were determinated. The activities of GGT, AAP, NAG, and β-GD as markers of tissue damage were also measured. An increase in IL-6 concentration, which correlated with Ranson criteria, and an increase in GPx activity, levels of MT, TBARS, or GGT, and NAG activities in patients group compared to healthy subjects were demonstrated. A decrease in GSH level in patients group compared to control group was noted. The studies suggest that GPx/GSH and MT play the role of the first line of defence against oxidative stress and pro/antioxidant imbalance in the course of acute pancreatitis. PMID:25298618

  9. Different effects of dexamethasone and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME on caerulein-induced rat acute pancreatitis, depending on the severity.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yusuke; Kato, Shinichi; Abe, Mitsumasa; Mitsufuji, Shoji; Takeuchi, Koji

    2005-01-01

    Effects of dexamethasone and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, on caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis were examined in rats. Acute pancreatitis was induced by caerulein (20 mug/kg, s.c.) given repeatedly 2 or 4 times every hour, and serum amylase levels, pancreas weight and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were measured 6 h after the first injection of caerulein. Dexamethasone (3 mg/kg) and L-NAME (30 mg/kg) were administered p.o. 30 min before the first injection of caerulein. Caerulein caused moderate or severe pancreatitis, depending on the times of injections, resulting in different degrees of increase in serum amylase levels and pancreas weight, and the marked elevation of MPO activity was observed only after injections of caerulein given 4 times per hour. Both dexamethasone and L-NAME suppressed the severity of pancreatits, yet the effect of L-NAME as compared with dexamethasone was more potent against mild pancreatitis but less potent against severe pancreatitis. These results suggest that caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis shows different responsiveness to L-NAME and dexamethasone, depending on the severity; the former is more effective against pancreatitis with less inflammation, while the latter is more effective against pancreatitis with severe inflammation. It is assumed that endogenous NO may be involved in oedema formation as the early event in the development of acute pancreatitis.

  10. Walled-off pancreatic necrosis and other current concepts in the radiological assessment of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Elen Freitas de Cerqueira; Rocha, Manoel de Souza; Pereira, Fábio Payão; Blasbalg, Roberto; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition caused by intracellular activation and extravasation of inappropriate proteolytic enzymes determining destruction of pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissues. This is a fairly common clinical condition with two main presentations, namely, endematous pancreatitis - a less severe presentation -, and necrotizing pancreatitis - the most severe presentation that affects a significant part of patients. The radiological evaluation, particularly by computed tomography, plays a fundamental role in the definition of the management of severe cases, especially regarding the characterization of local complications with implications in the prognosis and in the definition of the therapeutic approach. New concepts include the subdivision of necrotizing pancreatitis into the following presentations: pancreatic parenchymal necrosis with concomitant peripancreatic tissue necrosis, and necrosis restricted to peripancreatic tissues. Moreover, there was a systematization of the terms acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pseudocyst, post-necrotic pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collections and walled-off pancreatic necrosis. The knowledge about such terms is extremely relevant to standardize the terminology utilized by specialists involved in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients.

  11. Altered Gene Expression in Cerulein-Stimulated Pancreatic Acinar Cells: Pathologic Mechanism of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ji Hoon; Lim, Joo Weon

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a multifactorial disease associated with the premature activation of digestive enzymes. The genes expressed in pancreatic acinar cells determine the severity of the disease. The present study determined the differentially expressed genes in pancreatic acinar cells treated with cerulein as an in vitro model of acute pancreatitis. Pancreatic acinar AR42J cells were stimulated with 10-8 M cerulein for 4 h, and genes with altered expression were identified using a cDNA microarray for 4,000 rat genes and validated by real-time PCR. These genes showed a 2.5-fold or higher increase with cerulein: lithostatin, guanylate cyclase, myosin light chain kinase 2, cathepsin C, progestin-induced protein, and pancreatic trypsin 2. Stathin 1 and ribosomal protein S13 showed a 2.5-fold or higher decreases in expression. Real-time PCR analysis showed time-dependent alterations of these genes. Using commercially available antibodies specific for guanylate cyclase, myosin light chain kinase 2, and cathepsin C, a time-dependent increase in these proteins were observed by Western blotting. Thus, disturbances in proliferation, differentiation, cytoskeleton arrangement, enzyme activity, and secretion may be underlying mechanisms of acute pancreatitis. PMID:20054485

  12. Analysis of the pancreatic low molecular weight proteome in an animal model of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lassout, Olivier; Pastor, Catherine M; Fétaud-Lapierre, Vanessa; Hochstrasser, Denis F; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Lescuyer, Pierre

    2010-09-03

    We used a peptidomic approach for the analysis of the low molecular weight proteome in rat pancreatic tissue extracts. The goal was to develop a method that allows identifying endogenous peptides produced in the pancreas in the course of acute pancreatitis. The workflow combines peptides enrichment by centrifugal ultrafiltration, fractionation by isoelectric focusing, and LC-MS/MS analysis without prior enzymatic digestion. The method was assessed on pancreatic extracts from 3 rats with caerulein-induced pancreatitis and 3 healthy controls. A qualitative analysis of the peptide patterns obtained from the different samples was performed to determine the main biological processes associated to the identified peptides. Comparison of peptidomic and immunoblot data for alpha-tubulin, beta-tubulin and coatomer gamma showed that the correlation between the number of identified peptides and the protein abundance was variable. Nevertheless, peptidomic analysis highlighted inflammatory and stress proteins, which peptide pattern was related to acute pancreatitis pathobiology. For these proteins, the higher number of peptides in pancreatitis samples reflected an increase in protein abundance. Moreover, for murinoglobulin-1 or carboxypeptidase B, peptide pattern could be related to protein function. These data suggest that peptidomic analysis is a complementary approach to proteomics for investigating pathobiological processes involved in acute pancreatitis.

  13. Effect of inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production on pancreatic infection in experimental acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Ana Maria M.; Sampietre, Sandra; Patzina, Rosely; Jukemura, Jose; Cunha, Jose Eduardo M.; Machado, Marcel C.C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Acute pancreatitis is one the important causes of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). SIRS results in gut barrier dysfunction that allows bacterial translocation and pancreatic infection to occur. Indomethacin has been used to reduce inflammatory process and bacterial translocation in experimental models. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production on pancreatic infection. Materials and methods. An experimental model of severe acute pancreatitis (AP) was utilized. The animals were divided into three groups: sham (surgical procedure without AP induction); pancreatitis (AP induction); and indomethacin (AP induction plus administration of 3 mg/kg of indomethacin). Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10, PGE2, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured 2 h after the induction of AP. We analyzed the occurrence of pancreatic infection with bacterial cultures performed 24 h after the induction of AP. The occurrence of pancreatic infection (considered positive when the CFU/g was >105), pancreatic histologic analysis, and mortality rate were studied. Results. In spite of the reduction of IL-6, IL-10, and PGE2 levels in the indomethacin group, TNF-α level, bacterial translocation, and pancreatic infection were not influenced by administration of indomethacin. The inhibition of PGE2 production did not reduce pancreatic infection, histologic score, or mortality rate. Conclusion. The inhibition of PGE2 production was not able to reduce the occurrence of pancreatic infection and does not have any beneficial effect in this experimental model. Further investigations will be necessary to discover a specific inhibitor that would make it possible to develop an anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:18345325

  14. Protective Effect of Pretreatment with Acenocoumarol in Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Warzecha, Zygmunt; Sendur, Paweł; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Dembiński, Marcin; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Olszanecki, Rafał; Tomaszewska, Romana; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Coagulation is recognized as a key player in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The aim of the current research was to examine the effect of pretreatment with acenocoumarol on the development of acute pancreatitis (AP) evoked by cerulein. Methods: AP was induced in rats by cerulein administered intraperitoneally. Acenocoumarol (50, 100 or 150 µg/kg/dose/day) or saline were given once daily for seven days before AP induction. Results: In rats with AP, pretreatment with acenocoumarol administered at the dose of 50 or 100 µg/kg/dose/day improved pancreatic histology, reducing the degree of edema and inflammatory infiltration, and vacuolization of acinar cells. Moreover, pretreatment with acenocoumarol given at the dose of 50 or 100 µg/kg/dose/day reduced the AP-evoked increase in pancreatic weight, serum activity of amylase and lipase, and serum concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β, as well as ameliorated pancreatic DNA synthesis and pancreatic blood flow. In contrast, acenocoumarol given at the dose of 150 μg/kg/dose did not exhibit any protective effect against cerulein-induced pancreatitis. Conclusion: Low doses of acenocoumarol, given before induction of AP by cerulein, inhibit the development of that inflammation. PMID:27754317

  15. Bilateral renal artery thrombosis secondary to acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Thajudeen, Bijin; Budhiraja, Pooja; Bracamonte, Erika R.

    2013-01-01

    Renal artery thrombosis is a rare, but serious and often under-diagnosed condition. We report a case of bilateral renal artery thrombosis secondary to acute necrotizing pancreatitis. A 66-year-old female presented with abdominal pain and acute kidney injury (AKI). A renal biopsy showed organized intraluminal thrombi and a computer tomography scan of the abdomen showed bilateral renal artery thrombosis. Emergent laprotomy showed necrosed pancreas. Doppler studies showed deep vein thrombosis of the lower extremities and internal jugular vein thrombosis. Workup for hypercoagulability was unremarkable. The final diagnosis was AKI secondary to bilateral renal artery thrombosis probably due to hypercoagulability of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. PMID:26064514

  16. Role of endoscopic ultrasonography in the diagnosis of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Tyler

    2013-10-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) can be a useful tool for detecting underlying causes of acute pancreatitis and establishing the severity of fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis. Ancillary techniques include fine needle aspiration and core biopsy, bile collection for crystal analysis, pancreatic function testing, and celiac plexus block. This review focuses on the role of EUS in the diagnosis of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

  17. Risk Factors for Worsening of Acute Pancreatitis in Patients Admitted with Mild Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhouxiang; Xu, Lubai; Wang, Xiangyu; Yang, Dinghua

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to investigate risk factors for developing more severe pancreatitis, including moderately severe (MSAP) and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), in patients admitted with mild acute pancreatitis (MAP). Material/Methods Patients admitted with MAP to our hospital from March 2013 to May 2016 were included and prospectively evaluated. Possible risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP were age, blood glucose level on admission, etiology, sex, Ranson score, amylase level, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE-II) scores, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, serum calcium level, visceral fat area (VFA), body mass index (BMI), whether this was the first episode of AP, and method of administration of octreotide. The effects of variables for developing MSAP or SAP were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Mortality, hospital duration, and rate of ICU transfer of patients were compared between patients who developed MSAP or SAP and patients who did not. Results A total of 602 patients admitted with MAP were recruited into this study (256 men and 346 women). Seventy-four patients (12.3%) developed MSAP or SAP. According to univariate logistic regression analyses, the results indicated that there were 5 significant differences between patients who developed MSAP or SAP and those who did not: VFA (>100 cm2) (p=0.003), BMI (≥25 kg/m2) (p=0.001), Ranson score(p=0.004), APACHE-II (≥5) (p=0.001), and blood glucose level on admission (>11.1 mmol/L) (p=0.040). Further multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that BMI (≥25 kg/m2) (p=0.005), APACHE-II (≥5) (p=0.001), and blood glucose level on admission (>11.1 mmol/L) (p=0.004) were independent risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP in patients admitted with MAP. Moreover, patients who developed MSAP or SAP had a mortality rate of 5.4%. Conclusions Significant risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP in patients admitted with MAP

  18. Risk Factors for Worsening of Acute Pancreatitis in Patients Admitted with Mild Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhouxiang; Xu, Lubai; Wang, Xiangyu; Yang, Dinghua

    2017-02-26

    BACKGROUND The aim of the present study was to investigate risk factors for developing more severe pancreatitis, including moderately severe (MSAP) and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), in patients admitted with mild acute pancreatitis (MAP). MATERIAL AND METHODS Patients admitted with MAP to our hospital from March 2013 to May 2016 were included and prospectively evaluated. Possible risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP were age, blood glucose level on admission, etiology, sex, Ranson score, amylase level, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE-II) scores, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, serum calcium level, visceral fat area (VFA), body mass index (BMI), whether this was the first episode of AP, and method of administration of octreotide. The effects of variables for developing MSAP or SAP were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Mortality, hospital duration, and rate of ICU transfer of patients were compared between patients who developed MSAP or SAP and patients who did not. RESULTS A total of 602 patients admitted with MAP were recruited into this study (256 men and 346 women). Seventy-four patients (12.3%) developed MSAP or SAP. According to univariate logistic regression analyses, the results indicated that there were 5 significant differences between patients who developed MSAP or SAP and those who did not: VFA (>100 cm²) (p=0.003), BMI (≥25 kg/m²) (p=0.001), Ranson score(p=0.004), APACHE-II (≥5) (p=0.001), and blood glucose level on admission (>11.1 mmol/L) (p=0.040). Further multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that BMI (≥25 kg/m²) (p=0.005), APACHE-II (≥5) (p=0.001), and blood glucose level on admission (>11.1 mmol/L) (p=0.004) were independent risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP in patients admitted with MAP. Moreover, patients who developed MSAP or SAP had a mortality rate of 5.4%. CONCLUSIONS Significant risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP in patients admitted

  19. Role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lupia, Enrico; Pigozzi, Luca; Goffi, Alberto; Hirsch, Emilio; Montrucchio, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    A large body of experimental and clinical data supports the notion that inflammation in acute pancreatitis has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of local and systemic damage and is a major determinant of clinical severity. Thus, research has recently focused on molecules that can regulate the inflammatory processes, such as phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks), a family of lipid and protein kinases involved in intracellular signal transduction. Studies using genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibitors of different PI3K isoforms, in particular the class I PI3Kδ and PI3Kγ, have contributed to a greater understanding of the roles of these kinases in the modulation of inflammatory and immune responses. Recent data suggest that PI3Ks are also involved in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Activation of the PI3K signaling pathway, and in particular of the class IB PI3Kγ isoform, has a significant role in those events which are necessary for the initiation of acute pancreatic injury, namely calcium signaling alteration, trypsinogen activation, and nuclear factor-κB transcription. Moreover, PI3Kγ is instrumental in modulating acinar cell apoptosis, and regulating local neutrophil infiltration and systemic inflammatory responses during the course of experimental acute pancreatitis. The availability of PI3K inhibitors selective for specific isoforms may provide new valuable therapeutic strategies to improve the clinical course of this disease. This article presents a brief summary of PI3K structure and function, and highlights recent advances that implicate PI3Ks in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. PMID:25386068

  20. An impacted pancreatic stone in the papilla induced acute obstructive cholangitis in a patient with chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Kwang-Ho; Kwon, Chang-Il; Yoon, Sang-Wook; Kim, Won Hee; Lee, Jung Min; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Hong, Sung Pyo; Park, Pil Won

    2012-03-01

    Obstructive jaundice is very rarely caused by impaction of a pancreatic stone in the papilla. We report here on a case of obstructive jaundice with acute cholangitis that was caused by an impacted pancreatic stone in the papilla in a patient with chronic pancreatitis. A 48-year-old man presented with acute obstructive cholangitis. Abdominal computed tomography with the reconstructed image revealed distal biliary obstruction that was caused by a pancreatic stone in the pancreatic head, and there was also pancreatic ductal dilatation and parenchymal atrophy of the pancreatic body and tail with multiple calcifications. Emergency duodenoscopy revealed an impacted pancreatic stone in the papilla. Precut papillotomy using a needle knife was performed, followed by removal of the pancreatic stone using grasping forceps. After additional sphincterotomy, a large amount of dark-greenish bile juice gushed out. The patient rapidly improved and he has remained well.

  1. Acute pancreatitis in the paediatric age group: a personal experience.

    PubMed

    Cosentini, A; Stranieri, G; Capillo, S; Notarangelo, L; Madonna, L; Iannini, S; Ferro, V; Defilippo, V; Defilippo, R G; Rubino, R

    2005-01-01

    Although relatively rare, acute pancreatitis is the most common disease complex involving the pancreas in the paediatric age group. The etiology of the disease is often unknown, and Italian epidemiological data on the paediatric population and, in particular, on the etiology of the disease are not available (except for studies of prevalence). Within the field of the most frequently encountered pancreatitis in the age range of our interest (i.e. 0-18 years), not only the commonly observed forms whose etiopathogenesis is ascribable to cholelithiasis must be mentioned but also those forms due to proteic-caloric malnutrition that are becoming increasingly common. The presenting clinical symptoms and signs may not be typical and the laboratory tests may not always be sensitive enough. In such age range chronic recurrent pancreatitis plays a very important epidemiologic role. Approximately 40% of children and teenagers admitted to the hospital with a diagnosis of pancreatitis report a previous episode of the disease. Irreversible changes in pancreatic parenchyma develop in those patients in whom the disease progresses, leading to pancreatic insufficiency. Such a morbid condition (chronic pancreatitis) is more often observed in adolescents, in whom the disease manifests itself with a vague repetitive dyspeptic symptomatology, after alternating remissions and recrudescences, not always clinically evident. In children, the clinical picture most commonly encountered is represented by recurrent abdominal pains, in view of the fact that the patients are frequently affected by thalassaemia. The pseudocystic evolution of the disease is the most common organic damage resulting from the chronic progression of the pancreatic impairment. A few differences have been found with respect to severity, etiology, and mortality of pancreatitis in the paediatric age group as compared with older age groups. Both the general practitioner with a paediatric practice and the paediatrician

  2. Involvement of endogenous cholecystokinin in pancreatic regeneration after cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jurkowska, G; Grondin, G; Morisset, J

    1992-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the involvement of endogenous cholecystokinin (CCK) in the regeneration of pancreatic tissue after cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis treated by the CCK receptor antagonist L364,718. Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats by s.c. injections of cerulein in gelatin (12 micrograms/kg) three times a day for 2 days with controls receiving saline in gelatin. Rats were then divided into four treatment groups: saline-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (SD), saline-L364,718 (SA), cerulein-pancreatitis-DMSO (CD), and cerulein-pancreatitis-L364,718 (CA). In the first experiment, rats were treated for 3 or 10 days with DMSO or L364,718 (0.1 mg/kg, twice a day). In the second experiment, rats were treated for 13 days with DMSO or L364,718 (1.0 mg/kg, twice a day). After the rats were killed, pancreata were weighed and evaluated for their total protein, amylase, chymotrypsin, RNA, and DNA. We found that destruction of the pancreatic tissue occurred after cerulein-induced pancreatitis and that regeneration of the tissue was in progress but incomplete after 10 days; the low dose of L364,718 did not prevent regeneration. After 13 days, regeneration was still incomplete but the 1-mg dose of L364,718 strongly inhibited spontaneous regeneration. These data suggest that endogenous CCK is an important and potent trophic factor in the regeneration process of pancreatic tissue following an episode of acute pancreatitis.

  3. Protective effects of endothelin-1 on acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kogire, M; Inoue, K; Higashide, S; Takaori, K; Echigo, Y; Gu, Y J; Sumi, S; Uchida, K; Imamura, M

    1995-06-01

    Endothelin-1, a 21-residue peptide isolated from vascular endothelial cells, has a broad spectrum of actions. To clarify the involvement of endothelin-1 in acute pancreatitis, we examined the effects of endothelin-1 and its receptor antagonist BQ-123 on cerulein-induced pancreatitis in rats. Rats were infused intravenously with heparin-saline (control), endothelin-1 (100 pmol/kg/hr), cerulein (5 micrograms/kg/hr), or cerulein plus endothelin-1 for 3.5 hr. In another experiment, cerulein or cerulein plus BQ-123 (3 mg/kg/hr) was infused. Infusion of cerulein caused hyperamylasemia and pancreatic edema. Endothelin-1, when infused with cerulein, decreased the extent of pancreatic edema with a significant increase in the pancreatic dry- to wet-weight ratio. Histological changes induced by cerulein were markedly attenuated when endothelin-1 was given with cerulein. In contrast, endothelin-receptor blockade with BQ-123 further augmented pancreatic edema caused by cerulein. The extent of inflammatory cell infiltration was greater than BQ-123 was given with cerulein. Endothelin-1 or BQ-123 had no influence on hyperamylasemia. This study suggests that endothelin-1 has protective effects on experimental acute pancreatitis.

  4. Loss of Ifnar1 in Pancreatic Acinar Cells Ameliorates the Disease Course of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Katharina J.; Raulefs, Susanne; Kong, Bo; Steiger, Katja; Regel, Ivonne; Gewies, Andreas; Kleeff, Jörg; Michalski, Christoph W.

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferon constitutes an essential component of the combinational therapy against viral disease. Acute pancreatitis is one side effect of type I interferon-based therapy, implying that activation of type I interferon signaling affects the homeostasis and integrity of pancreatic acinar cells. Here, we investigated the role of type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells using a caerulein-induced murine model of acute pancreatitis. Pancreas-specific ablation of interferon (alpha and beta) receptor 1 (Ifnar1) partially protected animals from caerulein-induced pancreatitis, as demonstrated by reduced tissue damage. Profiling of infiltrating immune cells revealed that this dampened tissue damage response correlated with the number of macrophages in the pancreas. Pharmacologic depletion of macrophages reversed the protective effect of Ifnar1 deficiency. Furthermore, expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2), a potent factor for macrophage recruitment, was significantly increased in the Ifnar1-deficient pancreas. Thus, type I interferon signaling in pancreatic acinar cells controls pancreatic homeostasis by affecting the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response in the pancreas. PMID:26618925

  5. The Association of Viral Hepatitis and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.; Olsen, Harvey; Swanson, Virginia; Rinderknecht, Heinrich

    1972-01-01

    The histological features of 24 pancreases obtained from patients who died of causes other than hepatitis, pancreatitis or pancreatic tumors, included a variable degree of autolysis, rare foci of inflammatory reaction but no hemorrhagic fat necrosis or destruction of elastic tissue in vessel walls (elastolysis). Assays of elastase in extracts of these pancreases showed no free enzyme, but varying amounts of proelastase. A review of autopsy findings in 33 patients with fatal liver necrosis attributed to halothane anesthesia, demonstrated changes of acute pancreatitis only in two. On the other hand, a review of 16 cases of fulminant viral hepatitis revealed changes characteristic of acute pancreatitis in seven – interstitial edema, hemorrhagic fat necrosis, inflammatory reaction and frequently elastolysis in vessel walls. Determination of elastase in extracts of one pancreas showed the bulk of the enzyme in free form. Furthermore, assays of urinary amylase in 44 patients with viral hepatitis showed increased levels of this enzyme (2583 ± 398 mean value ± standard error, Somogyi units per 100 ml in 13, or 29.5 percent). The evidence suggests that acute pancreatitis may at times complicate viral hepatitis. Although direct proof of viral pancreatic involvement is not feasible at present, a rational hypothesis is advanced which underlines similar mechanisms of tissue involvement in both liver and pancreas that may be brought about by the hepatitis viruses. PMID:5070694

  6. Surgical and interventional management of complications caused by acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Karakayali, Feza Y

    2014-10-07

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders worldwide. It requires acute hospitalization, with a reported annual incidence of 13 to 45 cases per 100,000 persons. In severe cases there is persistent organ failure and a mortality rate of 15% to 30%, whereas mortality of mild pancreatitis is only 0% to 1%. Treatment principles of necrotizing pancreatitis and the role of surgery are still controversial. Despite surgery being effective for infected pancreatic necrosis, it carries the risk of long-term endocrine and exocrine deficiency and a morbidity and mortality rate of between 10% to 40%. Considering high morbidity and mortality rates of operative necrosectomy, minimally invasive strategies are being explored by gastrointestinal surgeons, radiologists, and gastroenterologists. Since 1999, several other minimally invasive surgical, endoscopic, and radiologic approaches to drain and debride pancreatic necrosis have been described. In patients who do not improve after technically adequate drainage, necrosectomy should be performed. When minimal invasive management is unsuccessful or necrosis has spread to locations not accessible by endoscopy, open abdominal surgery is recommended. Additionally, surgery is recognized as a major determinant of outcomes for acute pancreatitis, and there is general agreement that patients should undergo surgery in the late phase of the disease. It is important to consider multidisciplinary management, considering the clinical situation and the comorbidity of the patient, as well as the surgeons experience.

  7. A crucial role of nitric oxide in acute lung injury secondary to the acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Yan, Wen-Mao; Yang, Bin; Shi, Jing-dong; Song, Mao-min; Zhao, Yuqian

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in acute lung inflammation and injury secondary to acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP), 5% sodium taurocholate was retrogradely injected into the biliopancreatic duct of rats to ANP model. These ANP rats were given L-Arginine (L-Arg, 100 mg/kg), L-NAME (10 mg/kg), or their combination by intraperitoneal injection 30 min prior to ANP induction. At 1, 3, 6, and 12 hours after ANP induction, lung NO production, and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression were measured. Lung histopathological changes, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein concentration, proinflammatory mediators tumor necrotic factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and lung tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were examined. Results showed that NO production and iNOS mRNA expression in alveolar macrophages (AMs) were significantly increased along with significant increases in lung histological abnormalities and BAL proteins in the ANP group, all of which were further enhanced by pretreatment with L-Arg and attenuated by pretreatment with L-NAME, respectively. These markers were slightly attenuated by pretreatment with combination of L-Arg + L-NAME, suggesting that NO is required for initiating the acute lung damage in ANP rats, and also that L-Arg-enhanced lung injury is mediated by its NO generation rather than its direct effect. MPO activity and TNF-alpha expression in lung were upregulated in the ANP rats and further enhanced by pretreatment with L-Arg and attenuated by pretreatment with L-NAME, respectively. These results suggest that overproduction of NO mediated by iNOS in the lung is required for the acute lung inflammation and damage secondary to ANP.

  8. Bidirectional Relationship Between Diabetes and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Kung; Huang, Ming-Yuan; Hsu, Chen-Yang; Su, Yung-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The proposed bidirectional relationship between acute pancreatitis (AP) and diabetes has never been examined with the same source of data. Furthermore, the effects of disease severity on this relationship have not been fully evaluated. The present study employed the findings from a single database to measure the strength of the association between AP and diabetes. Findings from 1 million National Health Insurance beneficiaries were utilized. Two cohort studies with this database were selected to evaluate the linkage between diabetes and AP. The first cohort analysis addressed the risk of AP among diabetic patients and was comprised of 42,080 diabetic patients and 672,146 unexposed subjects. The second cohort analysis considered the risk of diabetes among patients with AP and enrolled 3187 patients with AP and 709259 unexposed subjects. All adult beneficiaries were followed from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2012 to identify outcomes of interest. Cox regression models were applied to compare hazards adjusted for potential confounders. For the first cohort, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of AP was significantly increased by the presence of diabetes (1.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.52–1.96). In diabetic patients with a history of hyperglycemic crisis episodes (HCEs), the HR was even higher (6.32; 95% CI, 4.54–8.81). For the second cohort, the adjusted HR of diabetes in patients with AP was increased compared to the general population (2.15; 95% CI, 1.92–2.41). For patients with severe AP, the HR was also higher (2.22; 95% CI, 1.50–3.29) but did not differ significantly from that for patients with nonsevere AP. The 2 cohort studies provided evidence for the bidirectional relationship between diabetes and AP. Moreover, diabetic patients with history of HCEs may be associated with higher risk of AP. PMID:26765434

  9. A rare entity in ED: Normal lipase level in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Limon, Onder; Sahin, Erkan; Kantar, Funda Ugur; Oray, Deniz; Ugurhan, Asli Aydinoglu

    2016-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis can have a variable presentation and diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, serum amylase and lipase levels and computed tomography. Negative predictive value of serum lipase in diagnosing acute pancreatitis is approximately to 100 percent and a normal blood lipase level in acute pancreatitis is an extremely rare condition. Here we reported two cases with normal serum amylase and lipase levels.

  10. The glucose intolerance of acute pancreatitis: hormonal response to arginine.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S S; Duckworth, W C; Jallepalli, P; Bobal, M A; Iyer, R

    1980-01-01

    Patients with acute pancreatitis were studied by arginine infusion at 48--72 h. 7--10 days, and 18--21 days after onset of their illness. Plasma glucose, insulin, and glucagon values were determined. Acute pancreatitis was characterized by fasting hyperglycemia and hyperglucagonemia, associated with relative hyoinsulinemia. Arginine stimulation early in the disease (48--72 h) demonstrated hyperglycemia and hyperglucagonemia, which normalized by 18--21 days. Both phases of the normal biphasic insulin response to arginine were decreased during the initial arginine infusion. By 18--21 days, although the first phase was completely normal, the second phase of insulin secretion remained depressed. Acute pancreatitis is associated with damage to both the endocrine and exocrine pancreas. Glucose intolerance seen with this disease appears to be the result of hyperglucagonemia and relative hypoinsulinemia. Although the healing process at 3 wk is associated with return of plasma glucose and glucagon concentrations to normal, the impaired second phase insulin secretion persists.

  11. Splenic hematoma in acute pancreatitis. Role of coagulation disorders.

    PubMed

    Clavé, P; Guillaumes, S; Blanco, I; Martínez de Hurtado, J; Esquius, J; Marruecos, L; Fontcuberta, J; Pérez, C; Farré, A; Lluís, F

    1992-08-01

    Splenic hematomas are infrequent complications of acute pancreatitis. In some cases, local factors that may play a role in the pathogenesis of the hematoma (thrombosis of the splenic artery or veins, intrasplenic pseudocysts, perisplenic adhesions, enzymatic digestion) are found. In the absence of local factors, the etiology of splenic hemorrhage remains unknown. We report two cases of splenic hematoma occurring during an acute necro-hemorrhagic pancreatitis associated with renal failure that required renal replacement therapy (hemodialysis and continuous arteriovenous hemodialysis). In both cases, more than half of splenic parenchyma was affected by multiple infarctions. No local factors responsible for the splenic abnormalities were detected in either case. Thrombosis of the splenic arterial microcirculation and a coagulation disorder consistent with disseminated intravascular coagulation was detected in one patient. In the second patient, coagulation disorders secondary to either liver disease, pancreatitis and its septic complications, or extracorporeal circuit heparinization for renal replacement therapy were present. Coagulation disorders should be considered whenever a splenic hematoma is found in a patient with acute pancreatitis. Disseminated intravascular coagulation may be the etiology of a splenic hematoma in acute pancreatitis.

  12. [Incidence of acute pancreatitis in children with inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Stawarski, Andrzej; Iwańczak, Franciszek

    2004-07-01

    The aim of our study was to estimate the frequency of acute pancreatitis and the frequency of increased activity of pancreatic enzymes in serum of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Analysis comprises 101 children aged from 3 to 18-years treated because of IBD in the period of 1998-2002: 79 children with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 22 children Crohn's disease (CD). The authors analyzed together 191 admissions because of UC and 51 because of CD. Acute pancreatitis was observed in 4.5% of children with CD and in 5.1% of children with UC. Significantly more often acute pancreatitis was recognized in children with moderate and severe stage of UC. Hyperamylasemia was observed in 27.3% of children with CD and in 12.7% of children with UC. Hyperlipasemia was observed only in children with UC (3.8%), elevated urinary amylase was observed in 4.5% of children with CD and in 8.86% children with UC. No correlations between the frequency of acute pancreatitis and medication were observed.

  13. The MET Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Confers Repair of Murine Pancreatic Acinar Cells following Acute and Chronic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gaziova, Ivana; Jackson, Daniel; Boor, Paul J.; Carter, Dwayne; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Elferink, Cornelis J.; Joshi, Aditya D.; Kaphalia, Bhupendra; Logsdon, Craig D.; Pereira de Castro, Karen; Soong, Lynn; Tao, Xinrong; Qiu, Suimin; Elferink, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Acinar cells represent the primary target in necroinflammatory diseases of the pancreas, including pancreatitis. The signaling pathways guiding acinar cell repair and regeneration following injury remain poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Receptor/MET signaling as an intrinsic repair mechanism for acinar cells following acute damage and chronic alcohol-associated injury. Here, we generated mice with targeted deletion of MET in adult acinar cells (MET-/-). Acute and repetitive pancreatic injury was induced in MET-/- and control mice with cerulein, and chronic injury by feeding mice Lieber-DeCarli diets containing alcohol with or without enhancement of repetitive pancreatic injury. We examined the exocrine pancreas of these mice histologically for acinar death, edema, inflammation and collagen deposition and changes in the transcriptional program. We show that MET expression is relatively low in normal adult pancreas. However, MET levels were elevated in ductal and acinar cells in human pancreatitis specimens, consistent with a role for MET in an adaptive repair mechanism. We report that genetic deletion of MET in adult murine acinar cells was linked to increased acinar cell death, chronic inflammation and delayed recovery (regeneration) of pancreatic exocrine tissue. Notably, increased pancreatic collagen deposition was detected in MET knockout mice following repetitive injury as well alcohol-associated injury. Finally, we identified specific alterations of the pancreatic transcriptome associated with MET signaling during injury, involved in tissue repair, inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Together, these data demonstrate the importance of MET signaling for acinar repair and regeneration, a novel finding that could attenuate the symptomology of pancreatic injury. PMID:27798657

  14. Meandering Main Pancreatic Duct as a Relevant Factor to the Onset of Idiopathic Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gonoi, Wataru; Akai, Hiroyuki; Hagiwara, Kazuchika; Akahane, Masaaki; Hayashi, Naoto; Maeda, Eriko; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Kiryu, Shigeru; Tada, Minoru; Uno, Kansei; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Okura, Naoki; Koike, Kazuhiko; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2012-01-01

    Background Meandering main pancreatic duct (MMPD), which comprises loop type and reverse-Z type main pancreatic duct (MPD), has long been discussed its relation to pancreatitis. However, no previous study has investigated its clinical significance. We aimed to determine the non-biased prevalence and the effect of MMPD on idiopathic pancreatitis using non-invasive magnetic resonance (MR) technique. Methods and Findings A cross-sectional study performed in a tertiary referral center. The study enrolled 504 subjects from the community and 30 patients with idiopathic pancreatitis (7 acute, 13 chronic, and 10 recurrent acute). All subjects underwent MR scanning and medical examination. MMPD was diagnosed when the MPD in the head of pancreas formed two or more extrema in the horizontal direction on coronal images of MR cholangiopancreatography, making a loop or a reverse-Z shaped hairpin curves and not accompanied by other pancreatic ductal anomaly. Statistical comparison was made among groups on the rate of MMPD including loop and reverse-Z subtypes, MR findings, and clinical features. The rate of MMPD was significantly higher for all idiopathic pancreatitis/idiopathic recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) (20%/40%; P<0.001/0.0001; odds ratio (OR), 11.1/29.0) than in the community (2.2%) but was not higher for acute/chronic pancreatitis (14%/8%; P = 0.154/0.266). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed MMPD to be a significant factor that induces pancreatitis/RAP (P<0.0001/0.0001; OR, 4.01/26.2). Loop/reverse-Z subtypes were found more frequently in idiopathic RAP subgroup (20%/20%; P = 0.009/0.007; OR, 20.2/24.2) than in the community (1.2%/1.0%). The other clinical and radiographic features were shown not associated with the onset of pancreatitis. Conclusions MMPD is a common anatomical variant and might be a relevant factor to the onset of idiopathic RAP. PMID:22655061

  15. Pretreatment with low doses of acenocoumarol inhibits the development of acute ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Warzecha, Z; Sendur, P; Ceranowicz, P; Dembinski, M; Cieszkowski, J; Kusnierz-Cabala, B; Tomaszewska, R; Dembinski, A

    2015-10-01

    Coagulative disorders are known to occur in acute pancreatitis and are related to the severity of this disease. Various experimental and clinical studies have shown protective and therapeutic effect of heparin in acute pancreatitis. Aim of the present study was to determine the influence of acenocoumarol, a vitamin K antagonist, on the development of acute pancreatitis. Studies were performed on male Wistar rats weighing 250 - 270 g. Acenocoumarol at the dose of 50, 100 or 150 μg/kg/dose or vehicle were administered once a day for 7 days before induction of acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion. The severity of acute pancreatitis was assessed after 5-h reperfusion. Pretreatment with acenocoumarol given at the dose of 50 or 100 μg/kg/dose reduced morphological signs of acute pancreatitis. These effects were accompanied with a decrease in the pancreatitis-evoked increase in serum activity of lipase and serum concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β. Moreover, the pancreatitis-evoked reductions in pancreatic DNA synthesis and pancreatic blood flow were partially reversed by pretreatment with acenocoumarol given at the dose of 50 and 100 μg/kg/dose. Administration of acenocoumarol at the dose of 150 μg/kg/dose did not exhibit any protective effect against ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis. We concluded that pretreatment with low doses of acenocoumarol reduces the severity of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis.

  16. Acute pancreatitis, acute hepatitis and acute renal failure favourably resolved in two renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, Mihai; Ionescu, Camelia; Ismail, Gener; Mandache, Eugen; Hortopan, Monica; Constantinescu, Ileana; Iliescu, Olguta

    2003-03-01

    Renal transplantation is often associated with severe complications. Except for acute rejection, infections and toxicity of immunosuppressive treatment are the most frequent problems observed after transplantation. Infections with hepatic viruses (HBV, HDV, HCV, HGV) and cytomegalic virus (CMV) are the main infectious complications after renal transplantation. Cyclosporine toxicity is not unusual for a patient with renal transplantation and is even more frequent for patients with hepatic impairment due to viral infections. The subjects of this report are two renal transplant recipients with acute pancreatitis, severe hepatitis and acute renal failure on graft, receiving immunosuppressive therapy for maintaining renal graft function

  17. Chylous ascites caused by acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Eun; Chae, Kwon Mook

    2011-12-01

    Chylous ascites is defined as the accumulation of chyle in the peritoneum due to obstruction or rupture of the peritoneal or retroperitoneal lymphatic glands. Chylous ascites that arises from acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis is very rare. We report here on a case of chylous ascite that was caused by acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis, in which the patient showed an impressive response to conservative therapy with total parenteral nutrition and octerotide. We also review the relevant literature about chylous ascites with particular reference to the management of this rare disease.

  18. Chylous ascites caused by acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Eun

    2011-01-01

    Chylous ascites is defined as the accumulation of chyle in the peritoneum due to obstruction or rupture of the peritoneal or retroperitoneal lymphatic glands. Chylous ascites that arises from acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis is very rare. We report here on a case of chylous ascite that was caused by acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis, in which the patient showed an impressive response to conservative therapy with total parenteral nutrition and octerotide. We also review the relevant literature about chylous ascites with particular reference to the management of this rare disease. PMID:22319743

  19. [CONSERVATIVE THERAPY IN THE COMPLEX TREATMENT OF ACUTE NECROTIZING PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Khomyak, I V

    2015-07-01

    Developed and implemented a phased differentiated treatment tactics in acute necrotizing pancreatitis, based on the theory of phase course of acute pancreatitis. Treatment started with conservative measures. Applications developed set of measures allowed us to achieve recovery of 39.53% patients without any instrumental interventions performans, including diapevtycal. Laparotomy reduced frequency performance of 57.14%--in the control group to 33.07%--in the main. Mortality in the main group was 6.72%; complication rate decreased 2.26 times; postoperative mortality was 9.83%.

  20. Haematological abnormalities in acute pancreatitis. A prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, D.; Imrie, C. W.; Davidson, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with acute pancreatitis were studied prospectively in the first week of their admission using haematological and coagulation tests. Platelet counts initially fell and later returned to admission levels. Rising levels of plasma fibrinogen were recorded. The kaolin cephalin clotting time was shorter than its control in twenty-one patients. Eighteen patients had elevated fibrinogen degradation products and fourteen had a positive ethanol gelation test. It is suggested that by taking into account the results in series of individual patients a degree of intravascular coagulation may be a common feature of acute pancreatitis. In one patient (presented in detail) strong evidence for disseminated intravascular coagulation was found PMID:887529

  1. Obstructive Acute Pancreatitis Secondary to PEG Tube Migration.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Douglas F; Cho, Ryan; Cho, Allan; Nguyen, Viet; Sunnapwar, Abhijit; Womeldorph, Craig

    2016-08-01

    Percutaneous gastrostomy is a well-established method of providing enteral nutrition to patients incapable of oral intake, or for whom oral intake is insufficient to meet metabolic needs. In comparison to total parenteral nutrition, enteral feeding is advantageous in that it helps maintain gut mucosal integrity, which decreases the risk of bacterial translocation through the gastrointestinal tract. Complications include bleeding, aspiration, internal organ injury, perforation, periostomal leaks, tube dislodgement, and occlusion. Acute pancreatitis secondary to percutaneous gastrostomy tube migration is rare. We present a patient with acute obstructive pancreatitis secondary to percutaneous gastrostomy tube migration.

  2. Acute pancreatitis caused by intragastric balloon: A case report.

    PubMed

    Issa, Iyad; Taha, Alaa; Azar, Cecilio

    2016-01-01

    Obesity represents a global hazard that predisposes to many serious health problems. Various solutions have been proposed to overcome obesity ranging from dietary balance to bariatric surgery. Intragastric balloons are a widely used measure to decrease weight, although they are advocated as safe devices, some major complications have been reported. We report a case of acute pancreatitis after insertion of a gastric balloon for weight reduction. Abdominal pain associated with nausea and vomiting maybe due to acute pancreatitis caused by compression of the pancreas by the balloon. It is advisable that physicians recognise these complications early to avoid serious and severe end-results.

  3. Obstructive Acute Pancreatitis Secondary to PEG Tube Migration

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ryan; Cho, Allan; Nguyen, Viet; Sunnapwar, Abhijit; Womeldorph, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous gastrostomy is a well-established method of providing enteral nutrition to patients incapable of oral intake, or for whom oral intake is insufficient to meet metabolic needs. In comparison to total parenteral nutrition, enteral feeding is advantageous in that it helps maintain gut mucosal integrity, which decreases the risk of bacterial translocation through the gastrointestinal tract. Complications include bleeding, aspiration, internal organ injury, perforation, periostomal leaks, tube dislodgement, and occlusion. Acute pancreatitis secondary to percutaneous gastrostomy tube migration is rare. We present a patient with acute obstructive pancreatitis secondary to percutaneous gastrostomy tube migration. PMID:27847836

  4. Therapeutic effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Buyukberber, Mehmet; Savaş, M Cemil; Bagci, Cahit; Koruk, Mehmet; Gulsen, Murat T; Tutar, Ediz; Bilgic, Tugba; Ceylan, Nurdan Ö

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the therapeutic role of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in a rat model of cerulean-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: Seventy male Wistar albino rats were divided into seven groups. Acute edematous pancreatitis was induced by subcutaneous cerulein injection (20 μg/kg) four times at 1-h intervals. CAPE (30 mg/kg) was given by subcutaneous injection at the beginning (CAPE 1 group) and 12 h after the last cerulein injection (CAPE 2 group). Serum amylase, lipase, white blood cell count, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were measured, and pancreatic histopathology was assessed. RESULTS: In the AP group, amylase and lipase levels were found to be elevated and the histopathological evaluation showed massive edema and inflammation of the pancreas, with less fatty necrosis when compared with sham and control groups. Amylase and lipase levels and edema formation decreased significantly in the CAPE therapy groups (P < 0001); especially in the CAPE 2 group, edema was improved nearly completely (P = 0001). Inflammation and fatty necrosis were partially recovered by CAPE treatment. The pathological results and amylase level in the placebo groups were similar to those in the AP group. White blood cell count and TNF-α concentration was nearly the same in the CAPE and placebo groups. CONCLUSION: CAPE may be useful agent in treatment of AP but more experimental and clinical studies are needed to support our observation of beneficial effects of CAPE before clinical usage of this agent. PMID:19891017

  5. Thoracic epidural analgesia: a new approach for the treatment of acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Windisch, Olivier; Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Giraud, Raphaël; Morel, Philippe; Bühler, Léo

    2016-05-04

    This review article analyzes, through a nonsystematic approach, the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP) with a focus on the effects of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) on the disease. The benefit-risk balance is also discussed. AP has an overall mortality of 1 %, increasing to 30 % in its severe form. The systemic inflammation induces a strong activation of the sympathetic system, with a decrease in the blood flow supply to the gastrointestinal system that can lead to the development of pancreatic necrosis. The current treatment for severe AP is symptomatic and tries to correct the systemic inflammatory response syndrome or the multiorgan dysfunction. Besides the removal of gallstones in biliary pancreatitis, no satisfactory causal treatment exists. TEA is widely used, mainly for its analgesic effect. TEA also induces a targeted sympathectomy in the anesthetized region, which results in splanchnic vasodilatation and an improvement in local microcirculation. Increasing evidence shows benefits of TEA in animal AP: improved splanchnic and pancreatic perfusion, improved pancreatic microcirculation, reduced liver damage, and significantly reduced mortality. Until now, only few clinical studies have been performed on the use of TEA during AP with few available data regarding the effect of TEA on the splanchnic perfusion. Increasing evidence suggests that TEA is a safe procedure and could appear as a new treatment approach for human AP, based on the significant benefits observed in animal studies and safety of use for human. Further clinical studies are required to confirm the clinical benefits observed in animal studies.

  6. [Principles of intensive care in severe acute pancreatitis in 2008].

    PubMed

    Darvas, Katalin; Futó, Judit; Okrös, Ilona; Gondos, Tibor; Csomós, Akos; Kupcsulik, Péter

    2008-11-23

    Acute pancreatitis is a dynamic, often progressive disease; 14-20% require intensive care in its severe form due to multiorgan dysfunction and/or failure. This review was created using systematic literature review of articles published on this subject in the last 5 years. The outcome of severe acute pancreatitis is determined by the inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction - the prognostic scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, Glasgow Prognostic Index, Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment, Multi Organ Dysfunction Syndrome Scale, Ranson Scale) can be used to determine outcome. Clinical signs (age, coexisting diseases, confusion, obesity) and biochemistry values (serum amylase, lipase, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, creatinine, urea, calcium) have important prognostic roles as well. Early organ failure increases the risk of late abdominal complications and mortality. Intensive care can provide appropriate multi-function patient monitoring which helps in early recognition of complications and appropriate target-controlled treatment. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis aims at reducing systemic inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction and, on the other side, at increasing the anti-inflammatory response. Oral starvation for 24-48 hours is effective in reducing the exocrine activity of the pancreas; the efficacy of protease inhibitors is questionable. Early intravascular volume resuscitation and stable haemodynamics improve microcirculation. Early oxygen therapy and mechanical ventilation provide adequate oxygenation. Electrolyte and acid-base control can be as important as tight glucose control. Adequate pain relief can be achieved by thoracic epidural catheterization. Early enteral nutrition with immunonutrition should be used. There is evidence that affecting the coagulation cascade by activated protein C can play a role in reducing the inflammatory response. The complex therapy of acute pancreatitis includes appropriate

  7. Cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide modulates the severity of acute pancreatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    DENG, YUAN-YUAN; SHAMOON, MUHAMMAD; HE, YUE; BHATIA, MADHAV; SUN, JIA

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of mouse cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) on experimental acute pancreatitis (AP). AP is a common clinical condition characterized by acute abdominal inflammation. Innate immune cells and mediators are intrinsically linked to the pathogenesis of AP. Cathelicidins are innate immunity-derived antimicrobial peptides that exert immunomodulatory effects on various host cells. However, how cathelicidins are involved and modulate the severity and inflammatory responses of AP remains unclear. In the present study, the mouse CRAMP gene-deficient cnlp−/− mice and their wild-type C57BL/6J littermates were induced with AP by multiple hourly injections of supramaximal doses of caerulein. Serum amylase levels, pancreatic myeloperoxidase activity and histological examination were performed in order to determine the disease severity and the levels of inflammatory cytokines. Disease severity and inflammatory markers were subsequently evaluated in the control mice, cnlp−/− C57BL/6J mice with AP, and wild-type C57BL/6J mice with AP. The results demonstrated that cnlp−/− mice exhibited a more severe phenotype and inflammatory response following AP induction compared with the wild-type mice, as evidenced by increased serum amylase levels, pancreatic myeloperoxidase release, and early inflammatory mediator tumor necrosis factor-α production. Histological examination confirmed that CRAMP deficiency worsened the pancreatic inflammatory condition. These results indicate that CRAMP may be considered a novel modulatory mediator in mouse experimental AP. PMID:27035328

  8. Intracellular Hmgb1 Inhibits Inflammatory Nucleosome Release and Limits Acute Pancreatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Rui; Zhang, Qiuhong; Hou, Wen; Yan, Zhenwen; Chen, Ruochan; Bonaroti, Jillian; Bansal, Preeti; Billiar, Timothy R.; Tsung, Allan; Wang, Qingde; Bartlett, David L.; Whitcomb, David C; Chang, Eugene B.; Zhu, Xiaorong; Wang, Haichao; Lu, Ben; Tracey, Kevin J.; Cao, Lizhi; Fan, Xue-Gong; Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Tang, Daolin

    2014-01-01

    models of acute pancreatitis, intracellular HMGB1 appeared to prevent nuclear catastrophe and release of inflammatory nucleosomes to block inflammation. These findings indicate a role for the innate immune response in tissue damage. PMID:24361123

  9. Acute pancreatitis in slender-tailed meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Naples, Lisa M; Lacasse, Claude; Landolfi, Jennifer A; Langan, Jennifer N; Steiner, Jörg M; Suchodolski, Jan S; Gamble, Kathryn C

    2010-06-01

    Four adult, full-sibling slender-tailed meerkats (Suricata suricatta) were diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. The incident case presented with lethargy, anorexia, abdominal guarding, and a cranial abdominal mass. Serum was grossly lipemic, with elevated cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations and increased amylase and lipase activity. An exploratory laparotomy confirmed chylous peritonitis and included excision of a saponified spleno-duodenal mass, a partial pancreatectomy, and a splenectomy. Histopathology revealed severe, multifocal, subacute necrotizing and granulomatous pancreatitis. Within 13 days of the incident case, the second meerkat was identified with essentially identical clinical, surgical, and histologic findings. During subsequent physical examinations of apparently unaffected cohorts (n=12), physical and hematologic findings suggestive of pancreatitis were identified in the two remaining siblings of the first two cases. The definitive cause for these four cases is undetermined; however, common risk factors identified were obesity and hyperlipidemia, a change to a higher-fat diet, and genetic predisposition. To assess its usefulness in the diagnosis of meerkat pancreatitis, serum canine and feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI and fPLI) concentrations were measured in serum samples (n=61) from two unrelated meerkat populations. Although these assays are highly sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of pancreatitis in domestic carnivores, similar correlation was not apparent for meerkats. In addition, hyperlipidemia was inconsistently present in many meerkats, with no apparent correlation to the development of clinical illness. Based on these observations, sensitive and specific diagnostic tests for pancreatitis in meerkats are currently unavailable.

  10. Case of acute pancreatitis associated with Campylobacter enteritis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Rumiko; Matsumoto, Satohiro; Yoshida, Yukio

    2014-06-21

    A 25-year-old man was admitted with the chief complaints of right flank pain, watery diarrhea, and fever. Blood tests revealed high levels of inflammatory markers, and infectious enteritis was diagnosed. A stool culture obtained on admission revealed no growth of any significant pathogens. Conservative therapy was undertaken with fasting and fluid replacement. On day 2 of admission, the fever resolved, the frequency of defecation reduced, the right flank pain began to subside, and the white blood cell count started to decrease. On hospital day 4, the frequency of diarrhea decreased to approximately 5 times per day, and the right flank pain resolved. However, the patient developed epigastric pain and increased blood levels of the pancreatic enzymes. Abdominal computed tomography revealed mild pancreatic enlargement. Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed, and conservative therapy with fasting and fluid replacement was continued. A day later, the blood levels of the pancreatic enzymes peaked out. On hospital day 7, the patient passed stools with fresh blood, and Campylobacter jejuni/coli was detected by culture. Lower gastrointestinal endoscopy performed on hospital day 8 revealed diffuse aphthae extending from the terminal ileum to the entire colon. Based on the findings, pancreatitis associated with Campylobacter enteritis was diagnosed. In the present case, a possible mechanism of onset of pancreatitis was invasion of the pancreatic duct by Campylobacter and the host immune responses to Campylobacter.

  11. Activation of cellular immune response in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mora, A; Pérez-Mateo, M; Viedma, J A; Carballo, F; Sánchez-Payá, J; Liras, G

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory mediators have recently been implicated as potential markers of severity in acute pancreatitis. AIMS: To determine the value of neopterin and polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase as markers of activation of cellular immunity and as early predictors of disease severity. PATIENTS: Fifty two non-consecutive patients classified according to their clinical outcome into mild (n = 26) and severe pancreatitis (n = 26). METHODS: Neopterin in serum and the PMN elastase/A1PI complex in plasma were measured during the first three days of hospital stay. RESULTS: Within three days after the onset of acute pancreatitis, PMN elastase was significantly higher in the severe pancreatitis group. Patients with severe disease also showed significantly higher values of neopterin on days 1 and 2 but not on day 3 compared with patients with mild disease. There was a significant correlation between PMN elastase and neopterin values on days 1 and 2. PMN elastase on day 1 predicted disease severity with a sensitivity of 76.7% and a specificity of 91.6%. Neopterin did not surpass PMN elastase in the probability of predicting disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that activation of cellular immunity is implicated in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and may be a main contributory factor to disease severity. Neopterin was not superior to PMN elastase in the prediction of severity. PMID:9245935

  12. Acute pancreatitis with saw palmetto use: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Saw palmetto is a phytotherapeutic agent commercially marketed for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Evidence suggests that saw palmetto is a safe product, and mild gastrointestinal adverse effects have been reported with its use. We report a case of acute pancreatitis, possibly secondary to the use of saw palmetto. Case presentation A 61-year-old Caucasian man with a history of benign prostatic hyperplasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease developed epigastric pain associated with nausea 36 hours prior to presentation. He denied drinking alcohol prior to the development of his symptoms. His home medications included saw palmetto, lansoprazole and multivitamins. Laboratory results revealed elevated lipase and amylase levels. An abdominal ultrasound demonstrated a nondilated common bile duct, without choledocholithiasis. Computed tomography of his abdomen showed the pancreatic tail with peripancreatic inflammatory changes, consistent with acute pancreatitis. Our patient's condition improved with intravenous fluids and pain management. On the fourth day of hospitalization his pancreatic enzymes were within normal limits: he was discharged home and advised to avoid taking saw palmetto. Conclusion It is our opinion that a relationship between saw palmetto and the onset of acute pancreatitis is plausible, and prescribers and users of saw palmetto should be alert to the possibility of such adverse reactions. PMID:21867545

  13. Acute on chronic pancreatitis causing a highway to the colon with subsequent road closure: pancreatic colonic fistula presenting as a large bowel obstruction treated with pancreatic duct stenting.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Justin; Schlepp, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Context. Colonic complications associated with acute pancreatitis have a low incidence but carry an increased risk of mortality with delayed diagnosis and treatment. Pancreatic colonic fistula is most commonly associated with walled off pancreatic necrosis or abscess formation and rarely forms spontaneously. Classic clinical manifestations for pancreatic colonic fistula include diarrhea, hematochezia, and fever. Uncommonly pancreatic colonic fistula presents as large bowel obstruction. Case. We report a case of a woman with a history of recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis who presented with large bowel obstruction secondary to pancreatic colonic fistula. Resolution of large bowel obstruction and pancreatic colonic fistula was achieved with pancreatic duct stenting. Conclusion. Pancreatic colonic fistula can present as large bowel obstruction. Patients with resolved acute pancreatitis who have radiographic evidence of splenic flexure obstruction, but without evidence of mechanical obstruction on colonoscopy, should be considered for ERCP to evaluate for PCF. PCF not associated with walled off pancreatic necrosis or peritoneal abscess can be treated conservatively with pancreatic duct stenting.

  14. Cardiac tamponade, an unusual complication of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Veron Esquivel, Daniel; Aello, Gerardo; Batiz, Fernando; Fernandez Barrera, Alejandro

    2016-03-11

    A 41-year-old Hispanic man was admitted to our hospital with the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia. During his stay, he developed sudden haemodynamic instability and clinical presentation suggestive of cardiac tamponade. A transthoracic echocardiogram confirmed the diagnosis. Echocardiography-guided pericardiocentesis was performed with immediate haemodynamic improvement. The patient's condition underwent favourable evolution. The pancreatitis was resolved and a control transthoracic echocardiography was performed showing no pericardial effusion. The pathophysiology of this rare entity is unknown. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial. Although pericardiocentesis is the treatment of choice, there have been a few reports of medical treatment with encouraging results. Although the association of acute pancreatitis and tamponade are anecdotal in literature, medics should be aware of this association in order to perform prompt diagnosis.

  15. Acute pancreatitis in ICU secondary to treatment with tigecycline.

    PubMed

    Bernas Albeniz, A; Aveiga Valencia, D A; Etxeberria Zabala, L; Zaldibar-Gerrikagoitia Bilbao, J; Aguilera Celorrio, L

    2017-01-01

    Tigecycline is a broad spectrum antimicrobial agent, structurally similar to minocycline and that shares some tetracycline-related side effects. A case report is presented on a 68-year-old female who received tigecycline for a sepsis of unknown origin and who, in the following 5days, developed abdominal pain and elevated pancreatic enzymes, which suggested acute pancreatitis. After ruling out other origins, and according to the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale, tigecycline was the probable cause of the acute pancreatitis, a complication that has been reported 5 times in the database of the Spanish pharmacosurveillance system since 2009. Close monitoring of abdominal signs and symptoms is recommended during treatment with tigecycline, since adverse effects affecting the digestive system are the most prevalent ones when using this drug.

  16. Epidemiology, aetiology and outcome of acute and chronic pancreatitis: An update.

    PubMed

    Spanier, B W M; Dijkgraaf, M G W; Bruno, M J

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decades several epidemiological studies have been published reporting on incidence trends, hospital admissions, etiological factors and outcome of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Over time, the incidence of acute pancreatitis has increased in the Western countries. Also, the number of hospital admissions for both acute and chronic pancreatitis have increased. These upward time trends possibly reflect a change in the prevalence of main etiological factors (e.g. gallstones and alcohol consumption) and cofactors such as obesity and genetic susceptibility. Acute and chronic pancreatitis are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and a substantial use of health care resources. Although the case-fatality rate of acute pancreatitis decreased over time, the overall population mortality did not change for both acute and chronic pancreatitis. This chapter will focus on recent developments in the epidemiology, aetiology, natural course and outcome of both acute and chronic pancreatitis.

  17. Duration of injury correlates with necrosis in caerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis: implications for pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Tony G; Raghav, Rahul; Kumar, Ajay; Garg, Pramod K; Roy, Tara S

    2014-06-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell necrosis is indicative of severe pancreatitis and the degree of necrosis is an index of its outcome. We studied whether the dose and duration of injury correlates with severity, particularly in terms of necrosis, in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) in Swiss albino mice. In addition to control group 1 (G1), groups 2 and 3 received four injections of caerulein every hour but were sacrificed at five hours (G2) and nine hours (G3) respectively, and group 4 received eight injections and was sacrificed at nine hours (G4). The severity of pancreatitis was assessed histopathologically and biochemically. The histopathological scores of pancreatitis in groups 3 and 4 were significantly higher than in groups 1 and 2 (4 vs. 1, 4 vs. 2, 3 vs. 1, 3 vs. 2; P < 0.05). TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells were significantly higher in groups 2 and 3 compared with groups 1 and 4 (P < 0.05). Necrosis was significantly more in group 4 than other groups (37.49% (4.68) vs. 19.97% (1.60) in G2; 20.36% (1.56) in G3; P = 0.006 for G 2 vs. 4 and P = 0.019 for G 3 vs. 4). Electron microscopy revealed numerous autophagosomes in groups 2 and 3 and mitochondrial damage and necrosis in group 4. The pancreatic and pulmonary myeloperoxidase activity in group 4 was significantly higher than that in the other groups (P < 0.01). Hence, severity of pancreatitis is a function of the dose of injurious agent, while inflammation is both dose and duration dependent, which may also explain the wide spectrum of severity of AP seen in clinical practice.

  18. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure in Plasmodium vivax malaria infection, a rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Lakhotia, Manoj; Pahadiya, Hans Raj; Kumar, Harish; Singh, Jagdish; Sangappa, Jainapur Ravi; Choudhary, Prakash Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male presented with 6 days history of intermittent fever with chills, 2 days history of upper abdomen pain, distension of abdomen, and decreased urine output. He was diagnosed to have Plasmodium vivax malaria, acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure. These constellations of complications in P. vivax infection have never been reported in the past. The patient responded to intravenous chloroquine and supportive treatment. For renal failure, he required hemodialysis. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure form an unusual combination in P. vivax infection. PMID:26629455

  19. CLINICAL AND THERAPEUTIC CORRELATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH SLIGHT ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    MUNHOZ-FILHO, Clewis Henri; BATIGÁLIA, Fernando; FUNES, Hamilton Luiz Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas due to enzymatic autodigestion which can cause necrosis or multiple organ failure; its pathophysiology is not fully known yet. Aim To evaluate the correlation between clinical and therapeutic data in patients with mild acute pancreatitis. Methods A retrospective study in 55 medical records of patients admitted with acute mild pancreatitis was realized to analyze the association between age, leukocytosis, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase and lactate dehydrogenase, glucose, antibiotics, time admission and Ranson´s scores. Results There was a positive association between less intensive care (strict hydration, analgesia and monitoring of vital signs), early antibiotic therapy (monotherapy), early return to diet after 48 hours and laboratory control of the serum amylase and lipase (high in the first week and decreasing after 10 days, without any prognostic value). Conclusions Changes in the management of patients with mild acute pancreatitis, such as enteral nutrition, rational use of lower spectrum antibiotics and intensive care, have contributed significantly to the reduction of hospitalization time and mortality. PMID:25861064

  20. Enteral nutrition and immune modulation of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, Refaat A; DeWitt, Tiffany

    2014-11-21

    Enteral nutrition has been strongly recommended by major scientific societies for the nutritional management of patients with acute pancreatitis. Providing severe acute pancreatitis patients with enteral nutrition within the first 24-48 h of hospital admission can help improve outcomes compared to parenteral nutrition and no feeding. New research is focusing in on when and what to feed to best improve outcomes for acute pancreatitis patients. Early enteral nutrition have the potential to modulate the immune responses. Despite this consistent evidence of early enteral nutrition in patients with acute pancreatitis, clinical practice continues to vary due to individual clinician preference. Achieving the immune modulating effects of enteral nutrition heavily depend on proper placement of the feeding tube and managing any tube feeding associated complications. The current article reviews the immune modulating effects of enteral nutrition and pro- and prebiotics and suggests some practical tools that help improve the patient adherence and tolerance to the tube feeding. Proper selection of the type of the tube, close monitoring of the tube for its placement, patency and securing its proper placement and routine checking the gastric residual volume could all help improve the outcome. Using peptide-based and high medium chain triglycerides feeding formulas help improving feeding tolerance.

  1. Painless acute pancreatitis associated with sorafenib treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Kanemitu, Toshiyuki; Kamoto, Akihito; Satoh, Mototaka; Mori, Naoki; Sekii, Kenichiro; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Itatani, Hiroaki; Fujimoto, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor that is used for the treatment of metastatic renal-cell carcinoma. We report the case of a patient with painless acute pancreatitis associated with sorafenib treatment. The patient was a 71-year-old man who had undergone surgery for left renal carcinoma and tumor thrombus in the inferior vena cava and right atrium (IVC-RA). After a follow-up period of 3 years, he developed right adrenal metastasis and received interferon (IFN)-alpha treatment. One year later, progression of the adrenal metastasis was observed, and he was admitted to a hospital for treatment with sorafenib, which was administered at a dose of 800 mg/day. Two weeks later, he developed painless acute pancreatitis associated with sorafenib treatment. Thereafter, sorafenib treatment was discontinued, and he was treated with conservative therapy. Three weeks later, he was discharged. Even though painless acute pancreatitis associated with sorafenib treatment is rare, the possible development of painless acute pancreatitis in patients undergoing sorafenib treatment must be kept in mind.

  2. Percutaneous Drainage of Suppurative Pylephlebitis Complicating Acute Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Nouira, Kais Bedioui, Haykel; Azaiez, Olfa; Belhiba, Hend; Messaoud, Monia Ben; Ksantini, Rachid; Jouini, Mohamed; Menif, Emna

    2007-11-15

    Suppurative pylephlebitis is a rare condition with a significant mortality rate, ranging from 50% to 80%. We report a case of suppurative pylephlebitis complicating acute pancreatitis treated by percutaneous drainage in a 40-year-old woman. The patient had an uneventful recovery.

  3. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy associated with severe acute pancreatitis: A case report.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Cássio Vieira; Moreira, Alecsandro; Baima, Julio P; Franzoni, Leticia de C; Lima, Talles B; Yamashiro, Fabio da S; Coelho, Kunie Yabuki Rabelo; Sassaki, Ligia Y; Caramori, Carlos Antonio; Romeiro, Fernando G; Silva, Giovanni F

    2014-07-27

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy is a rare disease that affects women in the third trimester of pregnancy. Although infrequent, the disease can cause maternal mortality. The diagnosis is not always clear until the pregnancy is terminated, and significant complications, such as acute pancreatitis, can occur. Pancreatic involvement typically only occurs in severe cases after the development of hepatic and renal impairment. To date, little knowledge is available regarding how the disease causes pancreatitis. Treatment involves supportive measures and pregnancy interruption. In this report, we describe a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old woman at a gestational age of 27 wk and 6 d who was admitted with severe abdominal pain and vomiting. This case illustrates the clinical and laboratory overlap between acute fatty liver of pregnancy and pancreatitis, highlighting the difficulties in differentiating each disease. Furthermore, the hypothesis for this overlapping is presented, and the therapeutic options are discussed.

  4. Deletion Of XIAP reduces the severity of acute pancreatitis via regulation of cell death and nuclear factor-κB activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Yu, Jiang; Chi, Jun-Lin; Long, Fei-Wu; Yang, Hong-Wei; Chen, Ke-Ling; Lv, Zhao-Ying; Zhou, Bin; Peng, Zhi-Hai; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Zong-Guang

    2017-03-16

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) still remains a clinical challenge, not only for its high mortality but the uncontrolled inflammatory progression from acute pancreatitis (AP) to SAP. Cell death, including apoptosis and necrosis are critical pathology of AP, since the severity of pancreatitis correlates directly with necrosis and inversely with apoptosis Therefore, regulation of cell death from necrosis to apoptosis may have practicably therapeutic value. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is the best characterized member of the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAP) family, but its function in AP remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the potential role of XIAP in regulation of cell death and inflammation during acute pancreatitis. The in vivo pancreatitis model was induced by the administration of cerulein with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or by the administration of l-arginine in wild-type or XIAP-deficient mice, and ex vivo model was induced by the administration of cerulein+LPS in AR42J cell line following XIAP inhibition. The severity of acute pancreatitis was determined by serum amylase activity and histological grading. XIAP deletion on cell apoptosis, necrosis and inflammatory response were examined. Caspases activities, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and receptor-interacting protein kinase1 (RIP1) degradation were assessed by western blot. Deletion of XIAP resulted in the reduction of amylase activity, decrease of NF-κB activation and less release of TNF-α and IL-6, together with increased caspases activities and RIP1 degradation, leading to enhanced apoptosis and reduced necrosis in pancreatic acinar cells and ameliorated the severity of acute pancreatitis. Our results indicate that deletion of XIAP switches cell death away from necrosis to apoptosis and decreases the inflammatory response, effectively attenuating the severity of AP/SAP. The critical role of XIAP in cell death and inflammation suggests that

  5. Reduced Pancreatic Exocrine Function and Organellar Disarray in a Canine Model of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Bhugul, Pravin Avinash; Huang, Xince; Liu, Lewei; Pan, Liangliang; Ni, Haizhen; Chen, Bicheng; Sun, Hongwei; Zhang, Qiyu; Hehir, Michael; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pancreatic exocrine function in a canine model and to analyze the changes in organelles of pancreatic acinar cells during the early stage of acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (0.5 ml/kg) into the main pancreatic duct of dogs. The induction of AP resulted in serum hyperamylasemia and a marked reduction of amylase activity in the pancreatic fluid (PF). The pancreatic exocrine function was markedly decreased in subjects with AP compared with the control group. After the induction of AP, histological examination showed acinar cell edema, cytoplasmic vacuolization, fibroblasts infiltration, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the interstitium. Electron micrographs after the induction of AP revealed that most of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were dilated and that some of the ribosomes were no longer located on the RER. The mitochondria were swollen, with shortened and broken cristae. The present study demonstrated, in a canine model, a reduced volume of PF secretion with decreased enzyme secretion during the early stage of AP. Injury of mitochondria and dilatation and degranulation of RER may be responsible for the reduced exocrine function in AP. Furthermore, the present model and results may be useful for researching novel therapeutic measures in AP. PMID:26895040

  6. Enterococcus hirae Bacteremia Associated with Acute Pancreatitis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V.; De Aguirre, Manuel; Divito, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Enterococcus hirae has rarely been reported in humans but is not uncommon in mammals and birds. We describe a case of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia associated with acute pancreatitis, acute cholecystitis, and septic shock responsive to antibiotic therapy and supportive critical care management. Unique aspects of this case of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia are its association with acute pancreatitis and its geographical origin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia occurring in a patient in the United States. Although human infection with this organism appears to be rare, all cases reported to date describe bacteremia associated with severe and life-threatening illness. Thus, physicians need to be cognizant of the clinical significance of this heretofore little recognized pathogen. PMID:26417465

  7. Acute pancreatitis complicated with splenic rupture: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hernani, Bruno L; Silva, Pedro C; Nishio, Ricardo T; Mateus, Henrique C; Assef, José C; De Campos, Tercio

    2015-01-01

    Atraumatic splenic rupture is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis. This report describes the case of a 30-year-old man with acute pancreatitis and splenic vein thrombosis complicated by splenic rupture. The patient was admitted to the emergency department with pain in the upper abdomen that had been present for six hours and was associated with vomiting and sweating. He was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis of alcoholic etiology. Upon computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen, the pancreatitis was scored as Balthazar C grade, and a suspicious area of necrosis affecting 30% of the pancreas with splenic vein thrombosis was revealed. Seventy-two hours after admission, the patient had significant improvement in symptoms. However, he showed clinical worsening on the sixth day of hospitalization, with increasing abdominal distension and reduced hemoglobin levels. A CT angiography showed a large amount of free fluid in the abdominal cavity, along with a large splenic hematoma and contrast extravasation along the spleen artery. The patient subsequently underwent laparotomy, which showed hemoperitoneum due to rupture of the splenic parenchyma. A splenectomy was then performed, followed by ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage. PMID:26425272

  8. The pathogenesis of pulmonary edema in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Warshaw, A L; Lesser, P B; Rie, M; Cullen, D J

    1975-01-01

    Acute pulmonary edema appeared 3 or more days after the onset of acute pancreatitis in 7 patients, an approximate incidence of 8%. The severity of pancreatitis in these patients was characterized by massive requirements for intravenous colloid and by marked hypocalcemia. In addition, at least 5 of the 7 patients had very high serum levels of triglycerides at the time of hospital admission. Hemodynamic studies during pulmonary edema showed normal central venous pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Cardiac index was appropriately elevated. Respiratory treatment, consisting of endotracheal intubation and controlled ventilation with PEEP, was successful in allowing reversal of the pulmonary injury and recovery of respiratory function within 1-2 weeks in all cases. Two patients died later from pancreatic abscesses. The findings indicate that a distinct form of pulmonary injury may occur in acute pancreatitis, characterized by loss of integrity of the alveolar-capilllary membrane, leading to pulmonary edema. The mechanism of injury is not known but may be caused by circulating free fatty acids, phospholipase A, or vasoactive substances. The pulmonary membrane lesion appears to heal during the period of intensive respiratory support. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1101836

  9. Hydrocortisone treatment of early SIRS in acute experimental pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gloor, B; Uhl, W; Tcholakov, O; Roggo, A; Muller, C A; Worni, M; Büchler, M W

    2001-10-01

    This work studied the effects of hydrocortisone treatment in experimental acute pancreatitis on cytokines, phospholipase A2, and breakdown products of arachidonic acid and survival. Edematous and necrotizing pancreatitis were induced in Wistar rats by cerulein hyperstimulation and retrograde intraductal infusion of sodium taurocholate, respectively. Hydrocortisone (10 mg/kg) was administered intravenously 10 minutes after induction of acute pancreatitis. Serum was assayed for phospholipase A2; interleukin (IL) 1beta, IL-6, IL-10, thromboxane B2; Prostaglandin E2; and leukotriene B4 at five different time points. A significant release of inflammatory mediators was seen only in the severe model. Hydrocortisone powerfully suppressed arachidonic acid breakdown products and only mildly attenuated the systemic increase of phospholipase A2 and pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines. The mortality rate after 72 hr in the severe model was 86%. Hydrocortisone treatment reduced mortality to 13% (P = 0.001; Fisher's exact test). Hydrocortisone seems to be effective in the treatment of the early systemic inflammatory response syndrome associated with severe acute pancreatitis.

  10. [Protocol for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis with necrosis].

    PubMed

    Barreda, Luis; Targarona, Javier; Rodriguez, César

    2005-01-01

    The Severe Acute Pancreatic Unit of Edgardo Rebagliati Martins National Hospital was officially created in the year 2000. Up to date, we have cared for more than 195 patients with Pancreatic Necrosis. All of them have been treated under a management protocol presented by us. This has helped us to standardize treatment and also to compare results with work groups around the world. This Protocol comes from our own experience and that of our colleagues abroad with a wide knowledge in this kind of pathology abroad, with whom we maintain close ties.

  11. [The efficacy of the acute pancreatitis' surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskiĭ, V K; Rodionov, P N; Makarov, S V

    2012-01-01

    The comparative analysis of blood levels of leukocytes, lymphocytes, the leukocytic intoxication index, amylase, lipase, lactatdehydrogenase and creatinphosphokinase, measured in operated patients with the acute pancreatitis, demonstrated the general positive dynamics of the patients condition. The higher blood levels of the substances in died patients demonstrate the important prognostic value of them. The higher levels of amylase, lipase, lactatdehydrogenase and creatinphosphokinase by the end of the clinical treatment together with the normalization of the rest laboratory data may witness the higher risk of the chronisation of the pancreatitis.

  12. Octreotide treatment in patients with severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Paran, H; Mayo, A; Paran, D; Neufeld, D; Shwartz, I; Zissin, R; Singer, P; Kaplan, O; Skornik, Y; Freund, U

    2000-11-01

    We investigated the effect of octreotide in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis in a case-control study. Experimental and clinical studies on the effect of octreotide in the treatment of acute pancreatitis have shown controversial results. Since January 1992, we have been conducting a prospective randomized study on the effect of octreotide in severe acute pancreatitis, in three hospitals in Israel. The entering criteria included three or more of the Ranson prognostic signs and CT findings of severe pancreatitis. Patients were randomly assigned to conservative treatment either with or without octreotide (0.1 mg subcutaneously three times a day). The end points of the study included: complication rate (ARDS, sepsis, renal failure, pseudocyst, fistula, and abscess), length of hospital stay, and mortality. From January 1992 to December 1996, 60 patients entered the study. After evaluating the files, 10 patients were excluded due to failure to meet the entering criteria, incomplete data, or incorrect diagnosis. Of the remaining 50 patients, 25 were assigned to octreotide (treatment group) and 25 to conservative treatment only (control group). The two groups matched with regard to age, sex, etiology, and severity of the disease. The complication rate was lower in the treatment group with regard to sepsis (24% vs 76%, P = 0.0002) and ARDS (28% vs 56%, P = 0.04). The hospital stay was shorter in the treatment group (20.6 vs 33.1 days, P = 0.04). Two patients died in the treatment group and eight in the control group (P < 0.019). These results suggest that octreotide may have a beneficial effect in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis.

  13. Acute amygdaloid response to systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Engler, Harald; Doenlen, Raphael; Engler, Andrea; Riether, Carsten; Prager, Geraldine; Niemi, Maj-Britt; Pacheco-López, Gustavo; Krügel, Ute; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2011-10-01

    The amygdala, a group of nuclei located in the medial temporal lobe, is a key limbic structure involved in mood regulation, associative learning, and modulation of cognitive functions. Functional neuroanatomical studies suggest that this brain region plays also an important role in the central integration of afferent signals from the peripheral immune system. In the present study, intracerebral electroencephalography and microdialysis were employed to investigate the electrophysiological and neurochemical consequences of systemic immune activation in the amygdala of freely moving rats. Intraperitoneal administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (100 μg/kg) induced with a latency of about 2 h a significant increase in amygdaloid neuronal activity and a substantial rise in extracellular noradrenaline levels. Activated neurons in the amygdaloid complex, identified by c-Fos immunohistochemistry, were mainly located in the central nucleus and, to a lesser extent, in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala. Gene expression analysis in micropunches of the amygdala revealed that endotoxin administration induced a strong time-dependent increase in IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α mRNA levels indicating that these cytokines are de novo synthesized in the amygdala in response to peripheral immune activation. The changes in amygdaloid activity were timely related to an increase in anxiety-like behavior and decreased locomotor activity and exploration in the open-field. Taken together, these data give novel insights into different features of the acute amygdaloid response during experimental inflammation and provides further evidence that the amygdala integrates immune-derived information to coordinate behavioral and autonomic responses.

  14. Sesamol attenuates oxidative stress-mediated experimental acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Chu, P-Y; Srinivasan, P; Deng, J-F; Liu, M-Y

    2012-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially fatal disease with no known cure. The initial events in acute pancreatitis may occur within the acinar cells. We examined the effect of sesamol on (i) a cerulein-induced pancreatic acinar cancer cell line, AR42J, and (ii) cerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis in rats. Sesamol inhibited amylase activity and increased cell survival. It also inhibited medium lipid peroxidation and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine in AR42J cells compared with the cerulein-alone groups. In addition, in cerulein-treated rats, sesamol inhibited serum amylase and lipase levels, pancreatic edema, and lipid peroxidation, but it increased pancreatic glutathione and nitric oxide levels. Thus, we hypothesize that sesamol attenuates cerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis by inhibiting the pancreatic acinar cell death associated with oxidative stress in rats.

  15. The role of transpapillary drainage in management of patients with pancreatic fluid collections and pancreatic duct disruption as a consequences of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jagielski, Mateusz; Smoczyński, Marian; Adrych, Krystian

    In last thirty years we have been observing significant development of an endoscopic treatment of pancreatic fluid collections, including transmural drainage of walled-off pancreatic necrosis. Simultaneously, the use of endotherapy in treatment of main pancreatic ducts disruptions has increased. Despite many publications available in current literature, concerning the endoscopic treatment of consequences of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, the role of transpapillary drainage in management of patients with pancreatic fluid collections and pancreatic duct disruption as an after-effect of severe acute pancreatitis remains unclear and is still a current problem. This publication includes comment on the article entitled 'Early dual drainage combining transpapillary endotherapy and percutaneous catheter drainage in patients with pancreatic fistula associated with severe acute pancreatitis' published by Yokoi et al. in the July-August 2016 issue of Pancreatology together with questions to the authors. Furthermore, in the article we did pay particular attention to the role of transpapillary drainage in management of pancreatic fluid collections, especially of walled-of pancreatic necrosis.

  16. Complement component C5 deficiency reduces edema formation in murine ligation-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Merriam, L T; Webster, C; Joehl, R J

    1997-01-01

    The complement cascade is activated in humans and animals with acute pancreatitis. Activation of complement component C5 liberates C5a, C5a-desarg, and terminal complement complexes (TCCs) that increase capillary permeability, edema, and leukocyte chemotaxis at injured sites. Complement activation plays a major role in pathogenesis of capillary leak and edema formation in severe acute pancreatitis; however, the contribution of C5 (C5a/C5a-desarg, TCCs) has not been defined. Using He gene mutant mice lacking circulating C5, the role of C5 in ligation-induced acute pancreatitis was evaluated. We performed the following experiments: C5-sufficient (Hc1/Hc1) and C5-deficient (Hc0/Hc0) mice had bile and pancreatic ducts ligated. Sham-operated mice had ducts dissected but not ligated. Mice were killed at 4, 8, and 24 hr after bilepancreatic duct ligation. Serologic and morphologic evidences of acute pancreatitis were evaluated. Pancreatic edema was assessed using analysis of pancreatic water content, histologic edema score, and determination of wet weight ratio. After 4, 8, and 24 hr of bile-pancreatic duct ligation, hyperamylasemia and histologic changes of acute pancreatitis were observed in both C5-deficient and C5-sufficient mice. Edema developed in all mice with acute pancreatitis. However, when compared to C5-sufficient mice, mice deficient in C5 developed significantly less pancreatic edema at both 8 and 24 hr of bile-pancreatic duct ligation. This difference was not observed 4 hr after induction of acute pancreatitis. We conclude that C5 contributes to edema formation in murine ligation-induced acute pancreatitis. The presence of an early C5-independent phase, in conjunction with the observation of significant edema in mice deficient in C5, suggests there are other mediators of edema formation in this acute pancreatitis model.

  17. Laparoscopic necrosectomy in acute necrotizing pancreatitis: Our experience

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Mittu John; Parmar, Amit Kumar; Sahu, Diwakar; Reddy, Prasanna Kumar

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Pancreatic necrosis is a local complication of acute pancreatitis. The development of secondary infection in pancreatic necrosis is associated with increased mortality. Pancreatic necrosectomy is the mainstay of invasive management. AIMS: Surgical approach has significantly changed in the last several years with the advent of enhanced imaging techniques and minimally invasive surgery. However, there have been only a few case series related to laparoscopic approach, reported in literature to date. Herein, we present our experience with laparoscopic management of pancreatic necrosis in 28 patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective study of 28 cases [20 men, 8 women] was carried out in our institution. The medical record of these patients including history, clinical examination, investigations, and operative notes were reviewed. The mean age was 47.8 years [range, 23-70 years]. Twenty-one patients were managed by transgastrocolic, four patients by transgastric, two patients by intra-cavitary, and one patient by transmesocolic approach. RESULTS: The mean operating time was 100.8 min [range, 60-120 min]. The duration of hospital stay after the procedure was 10-18 days. Two cases were converted to open (7.1%) because of extensive dense adhesions. Pancreatic fistula was the most common complication (n = 8; 28.6%) followed by recollection (n = 3; 10.7%) and wound infection (n = 3; 10.7%). One patient [3.6%] died in postoperative period. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic pancreatic necrosectomy is a promising and safe approach with all the benefits of minimally invasive surgery and is found to have reduced incidence of major complications and mortality. PMID:25013328

  18. Factors influencing mortality in acute pancreatitis: can we alter them?

    PubMed

    Pitchumoni, C S; Patel, Nayan M; Shah, Prasanna

    2005-10-01

    Severe acture pancreatitis (SAP), a multisystem disease, is characterized by multiple organ system failure and additionally by local pancreatic complications such as necrosis, abscess, or pseudocyst. The rate of mortality in SAP, which is about 20% of all cases of acute pancreatitis (AP), may be as high as 25%, as in infected pancreatic necrosis. The factors that influence mortality in different degrees are various. Etiology for the episode, age, sex, race, ethnicity, genetic makeup, severity on admission, and the extent and nature of pancreatic necrosis (sterile vs. infected) influence the mortality. Other factors include treatment modalities such as administration of prophylactic antibiotics, the mode of feeding (TPN vs. enteral), ERCP with sphincterotomy, and surgery in selected cases. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of AP is increasing along with an increase in obesity, a bad prognostic factor. Many studies have indicated a worse prognosis in idiopathic AP compared to pancreatitis induced by alcoholism or biliary stone. The risk for SAP after ERCP is the subject of extensive study. AP after trauma, organ transplant, or coronary artery bypass surgery is rare but may be serious. Since Ranson reported early prognostic criteria, a number of attempts have been made to simplify or add new clinical or laboratory studies in the early assessment of severity. Obesity, hemoconcentration on admission, presence of pleural effusion, increased fasting blood sugar, as well as creatinine, elevated CRP in serum, and urinary trypsinogen levels are some of the well-documented factors in the literature. The role of appropriate prophylactic antibiotic therapy although still is highly controversial, in properly chosen cases appears to be beneficial and well accepted in clinical practice. Early enteral nutrition has gained much support and jejunal feeding bypassing the pancreatic stimulatory effect of it in the duodenum is desirable in selected cases. The limited

  19. Effects of clotrimazol on the acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Cekic, Arif Burak; Alhan, Etem; Usta, Arif; Türkyılmaz, Serdar; Kural, Birgül Vanizor; Erçin, Cengiz

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the influence of clotrimazol (CLTZ) on acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) induced by glycodeoxycholic acid in rats. Rats were divided into five groups as sham + saline, sham + CLTZ, sham + polyethylene glycol, ANP + saline, and ANP + CLTZ. ANP in rats was induced by glycodeoxycholic acid. The extent of acinar cell injury, mortality, systemic cardiorespiratory variables, functional capillary density (FCD), renal/hepatic functions, and changes in some enzyme markers for pancreatic and lung tissue were investigated during ANP in rats. The use of CLTZ after the induction of ANP resulted in a significant decrease in the mortality rate, pancreatic necrosis, and serum activity of amylase, alanine aminotransferase, interleukin-6, lactate dehydrogenase in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, serum concentration of urea, and tissue activity of myeloperoxidase, and malondialdehyde in the pancreas and lung and a significant increase in concentrations of calcium, blood pressure, urine output, pO2, and FCD. This study showed that CLTZ demonstrated beneficial effect on the course of ANP in rats. Therefore, it may be used in the treatment of acute pancreatitis.

  20. Therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the course of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Warzecha, Z; Ceranowicz, P; Dembinski, A; Cieszkowski, J; Kusnierz-Cabala, B; Tomaszewska, R; Kuwahara, A; Kato, I

    2010-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that pretreatment with ghrelin exhibits protective effect in the gut. Administration of ghrelin reduces gastric mucosal damage, as well as inhibits the development of experimental pancreatitis. However, this protective effect requires administration of ghrelin before gastric or pancreatic damage and thus has a limited clinical value. The aim of present study was to assess the influence of ghrelin administered after development of acute pancreatitis on the course of this disease. Acute pancreatitis was induced by cerulein. Ghrelin was administered twice a day for 1, 2, 4, 6 or 9 days at the dose of 4, 8 or 16 nmol/kg/dose. The first dose of ghrelin was given 24 hours after last injection of cerulein. The severity of acute pancreatitis was assessed between 0 h and 10 days after cessation of cerulein administration. Administration of caerulein led to the development of acute edematous pancreatitis and maximal severity of this disease was observed 24 hours after induction of pancreatitis. Treatment with ghrelin reduced morphological signs of pancreatic damage such as pancreatic edema, leukocyte infiltration and vacuolization of acinar cells, and led to earlier regeneration of the pancreas. Also biochemical indexes of the severity of acute pancreatitis, serum activity of lipase and amylase were significantly reduced in animals treated with ghrelin. These effects were accompanied by an increase in the pancreatic DNA synthesis and a decrease in serum level of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1b. Administration of ghrelin improved pancreatic blood flow in rats with acute pancreatitis. We conclude that: (1) treatment with ghrelin exhibits therapeutic effect in caerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis; (2) this effect is related, at least in part, to the improvement of pancreatic blood flow, reduction in proinflammatory interleukin-1beta and stimulation of pancreatic cell proliferation.

  1. 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Attenuates Pancreatic Beta-Cell Injury in Rats with Experimental Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wen-yi; Zhao, Liang; Xiang, Ming-wei; Mei, Fang-chao; Abliz, Ablikim; Hu, Peng; Deng, Wen-hong; Yu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a particular process with an imbalance of homeostasis, which plays an important role in pancreatitis, but little is known about how ER stress is implicated in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) induced pancreatic beta-cell injury. To investigate the effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) on the beta-cell injury following SAP and the underlying mechanism, twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operation (SO) group, SAP model group, and 4-PBA treatment group. SAP model was induced by infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. 4-PBA or normal saline was injected intraperitoneally for 3 days in respective group before successful modeling. Results showed that 4-PBA attenuated the following: (1) pancreas and islet pathological injuries, (2) serum TNF-α and IL-1β, (3) serum insulin and glucose, (4) beta-cell ultrastructural changes, (5) ER stress markers (BiP, ORP150, and CHOP), Caspase-3, and insulin expression in islet. These results suggested that 4-PBA mitigates pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP, presumably because of its role in inhibiting excessive endoplasmic reticulum stress. This may serve as a new therapeutic target for reducing pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP upon 4-PBA treatment. PMID:27656209

  2. Acute pancreatitis secondary to incarcerated paraesophageal hernia.

    PubMed

    Kafka, N J; Leitman, I M; Tromba, J

    1994-05-01

    Paraesophageal hiatus hernia can be a morbid and even lethal condition. Although many complications from this entity have been described, they almost always involve gastric incarceration and its related complications. Occasionally, the transverse colon or spleen may be involved in the hernia, causing additional symptoms. An unusual case of paraesophageal hiatus hernia involving incarceration of the pylorus, proximal duodenum, and pancreatic head is described. The patient's presentation, operative management, and perioperative course are discussed to emphasize the importance of early elective repair of paraesophageal hiatus hernia before the development of such occurrences.

  3. Is antibiotic prophylaxis beneficial in acute pancreatitis?--First update.

    PubMed

    Rada, Gabriel; Peña, José

    2015-04-23

    This Living FRISBEE (Living FRIendly Summary of the Body of Evidence using Epistemonikos) is an update of the summary published in August 2014, based on two systematic reviews appeared in January and February 2015. There is controversy about the effects of prophylactic antibiotics in acute pancreatitis. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified 18 systematic reviews including 19 randomised studies overall. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded that prophylactic antibiotics may reduce mortality and length of hospitalization in patients with acute pancreatitis, but the certainty of the evidence is low. The probability that future evidence change what we know is high.

  4. [Monitorering and complications by conservative treatment of severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Novovic, Srdan; Malmstrøm, Marie Louise; Møller Andersen, Anders; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad; Philipsen, Else; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad; Hansen, Mark Berner

    2013-05-20

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is associated with a high morbidity and a mortality risk of up to 20%. Although much progress has occurred during the latest couple of years, there are still some major controversies on important issues such as monitoring, fluid therapy, antibiotic treatment, and nutrition. In this article we describe the underlying, pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for organ failure in SAP, and the rationale for monitoring and conservative treatment of SAP.

  5. The clinical analysis of acute pancreatitis in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy after operation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanlei; Han, Zhen; Shao, Limei; Li, Yunling; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication in postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 (oxaliplatin + calcium folinate +5-FU [5-fluorouracil]) chemotherapy. In this paper, a total of 62 patients with gastrointestinal cancer were observed after the burst of acute pancreatitis. Surgery of the 62 cases of colorectal cancer patients was completed successfully. But when they underwent FOLFOX6 chemotherapy, five patients got acute pancreatitis (8.06%), four (6.45%) had mild acute pancreatitis, and one (1.61%) had severe acute pancreatitis, of which two were males (3.23%) and three females (4.84%). No patients (0.00%) had acute pancreatitis on the 1st day after chemotherapy; one patient (1.61%) got it in the first 2 and 3 days after chemotherapy; and three others (4.83%) got it in the first 4 days after chemotherapy. In the 62 patients with malignant tumors, the body mass index (BMI) was less than 18 (underweight) in six of them, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (33.33%); the BMI was 18–25 (normal weight) in 34 cases, with one case (2.94%) of acute pancreatitis; the BMI was 25–30 (overweight) in 13 cases, with 0 cases (0.00%) of acute pancreatitis; and the BMI was ≥30 (obese) in nine patients, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (22.22%). After symptomatic treatment, four patients were cured and one died; the mortality rate was 1.61%. Most of them appeared in the first 4 days after chemotherapy; the probability of this complication is significantly higher in slim and obese patients than in normal weight patients. Postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 chemotherapy have a sudden onset of acute pancreatitis occult, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis; the symptoms are difficult to control, there is high mortality and it is worthy of clinician’s attention. PMID:26392780

  6. Renal Vein and Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis: A Rare Extrasplanchnic Complication of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Choksi, Dhaval; Chaubal, Alisha; Pipaliya, Nirav; Ingle, Meghraj; Sawant, Prabha

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disorder often associated with various complications. Approximately one fourth of patients with acute pancreatitis develop vascular complications, of which venous thrombosis forms a major group. Extrasplanchnic venous thrombosis is less common, and simultaneous renal vein and inferior vena cava thrombosis is reported only twice. We report a case of alcohol-related acute pancreatitis complicated by simultaneous renal vein and inferior vena cava thrombosis. PMID:28008405

  7. Obestatin Accelerates the Recovery in the Course of Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bukowczan, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Tomaszewska, Romana

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several previous studies have shown that obestatin exhibits protective and regenerative effects in some organs including the stomach, kidney, and the brain. In the pancreas, pretreatment with obestatin inhibits the development of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, and promotes survival of pancreatic beta cells and human islets. However, no studies investigated the effect of obestatin administration following the onset of experimental acute pancreatitis. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of obestatin therapy in the course of ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis. Moreover, we tested the influence of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis and administration of obestatin on daily food intake and pancreatic exocrine secretion. Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion of the pancreas. Obestatin (8nmol/kg/dose) was administered intraperitoneally twice a day, starting 24 hours after the beginning of reperfusion. The effect of obestatin in the course of necrotizing pancreatitis was assessed between 2 and 14 days, and included histological, functional, and biochemical analyses. Secretory studies were performed on the third day after sham-operation or induction of acute pancreatitis in conscious rats equipped with chronic pancreatic fistula. Results Treatment with obestatin ameliorated morphological signs of pancreatic damage including edema, vacuolization of acinar cells, hemorrhages, acinar necrosis, and leukocyte infiltration of the gland, and led to earlier pancreatic regeneration. Structural changes were accompanied by biochemical and functional improvements manifested by accelerated normalization of interleukin-1β level and activity of myeloperoxidase and lipase, attenuation of the decrease in pancreatic DNA synthesis, and by an improvement of pancreatic blood flow. Induction of acute pancreatitis by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion significantly decreased daily food

  8. [PROGNOSTICATION OF LIMITED ACCUMULATIONS LIQUID INFECTION BY SEVERE ACUTE PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Sheiko, V D; Oganezyan, A G

    2015-07-01

    The results of examination and treatment of 53 patients on limited accumulations of liquid (LAL) for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) were analysed. In 62.5% of patients on acute aseptic LAL celebrated parapancreatyc liquid accumulation were determinened. Most (94.6%) patients infected by LAL revealed heterogeneity of their structure according ultrasonography, in 81.1%--secvestral mass in their cavity. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) observed both aseptic and infected LAL. Prognostically important criteria LAL infection in patients on SAP is the heterogeneity of echostructure in absence of a downward trend. Diagnostic puncture under ultrasound control and microbiological studies are safe methods of diagnosis by infected LAL in SAP.

  9. Effects of S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC) in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Sidhapuriwala, Jenab N; Hegde, Akhil; Ang, Abel D; Zhu, Yi Zhun; Bhatia, Madhav

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), a novel gaseous messenger, is synthesized endogenously from L-cysteine by two pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE). S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC) is a slow H(2)S releasing drug that provides cysteine, a substrate of CSE. The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of SPRC in an in vivo model of acute pancreatitis (AP) in mice. AP was induced in mice by hourly caerulein injections (50 µg/kg) for 10 hours. Mice were treated with SPRC (10 mg/kg) or vehicle (distilled water). SPRC was administered either 12 h before or 3 h before the induction of pancreatitis. Mice were sacrificed 1 h after the last caerulein injection. Blood, pancreas and lung tissues were collected and processed to measure the plasma amylase, plasma H(2)S, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities and cytokine levels in pancreas and lung. The results revealed that significant reduction of inflammation, both in pancreas and lung was associated with SPRC given 3 h prior to the induction of AP. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of SPRC were associated with reduction of pancreatic and pulmonary pro-inflammatory cytokines and increase of anti-inflammatory cytokine. SPRC administered 12 h before AP induction did not cause significant improvement in pancreatic and lung inflammation. Plasma H(2)S concentration showed significant difference in H(2)S levels between control, vehicle and SPRC (administered 3 h before AP) treatment groups. In conclusion, these data provide evidence for protective effects of SPRC in AP possibly by virtue of its slow release of endogenous H(2)S.

  10. Diabetes mellitus, exocrine pancreatic deficiency, hypertrichosis, hyperpigmentation, and chronic inflammation: confirmation of a syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Khalid; Padidela, Raja; Kapoor, Ritika R; James, Chela; Banerjee, Kausik; Harper, John; Wilson, Louise C; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2009-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is characterized by dysregulation of the immune system leading to inflammation and selective destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Mild to moderate pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is found in patients with type 1 diabetes. Diabetes mellitus may also be part of a syndrome occasionally involving hair and skin abnormalities. We report our observations on two siblings with insulin-dependent diabetes, severe exocrine pancreatic deficiency, pigmented hypertrichotic skin patches with induration and chronic inflammation. The first sibling presented at the age of 9 months with hypertrichosis and hyperpigmentation, particularly on her back and legs and then developed diabetes mellitus at the age of 4 yr. The second sibling presented with exactly the same clinical features but at a later age of 12 yr. Both siblings had severe pancreatic exocrine deficiency with chronic persistent inflammation. Some of the clinical features in these siblings resemble those described by Prendiville et al. although our patients had additional features. The chronic inflammatory response in both siblings is highly suggestive of some form of immune dysregulation. The presence of consanguinity in the parents and similarity of clinical features in the siblings are suggestive of a novel autoimmune disorder, possibly secondary to autosomal recessive inheritance.

  11. [Risk and prophylaxis acute pancreatitis while enteral tube feeding in patients operated for destructive cholecystitis].

    PubMed

    Zhurikhina, A V; Kitiashvili, I Z; Kutukov, V V; Kondrashova, Iu V

    2011-01-01

    Determined by risk and method of prophylaxis of acute pancreatitis in the postoperative enteral tube feeding in patients with destructive cholecystitis, analyzed levels of a-amylase in blood serum and clinical manifestations of acute pancreatitis in 135 operated patients. It was established that the use of nasoduodenal access is more likely to cause the elevated level of serum amylase (p<0,05) and more incidence of sings of acute pancreatitis in contrast to nasoduodenal tube placement. For the prevention of acute pancreatitis with enteral tube feeding is preferred mode designed using nasoduodenal access.

  12. Protective effect of Mimosa pudica L. in an L-arginine model of acute necrotising pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jagdeep; Sidhu, Shabir; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Khan, M U

    2016-07-01

    Mimosa pudica is used in traditional medicine for treating various disorders such as inflammatory conditions, diarrhoea, insomnia, alopecia, urogenital infections and wounds. The present study investigated the effect of M. pudica extract (MPE) on L-arginine-induced acute necrotising pancreatitis in rats. The ethanolic extract of M. pudica leaves was studied for the presence of quercetin and gallic acid using high-performance liquid chromatography. Four groups were employed-normal control rats, L-arginine control rats (two intraperitoneal [i.p.] injections of 2 g/kg at an interval of 1 h), MPE-treated rats (400 mg/kg orally) and melatonin-treated rats (positive control 10 mg/kg i.p.), which were further divided into subgroups according to time points (24 h, 3 days and 14 days). Serum amylase, lipase, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), pancreatic amylase, nucleic acid content, protein, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), thiobarbituric reactive substances, glutathione, nitrite/nitrate, collagen content and histopathological examination were carried out. MPE significantly improved acute necrotising pancreatitis by modulating diagnostic markers of pancreatitis such as serum lipase and pancreatic amylase, inflammation (TNF-α), and oxidative and nitrosative stress. Moreover, MPE administration induced regenerative changes in the pancreas evidenced by increased levels of pancreatic proteins, nucleic acid content and histopathology report. In addition, MPE improved TGF-β1 and collagen levels thereby preventing fibrosis. The current investigation indicates the novel role of MPE in reducing the severity of acute necrotising pancreatitis by plausible mechanisms such as anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic activity and by promoting repair and regeneration of the pancreas.

  13. Cystathionine-gamma-lyase gene silencing with siRNA in monocytes/macrophages protects mice against acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Badiei, A; Chambers, S T; Gaddam, R R; Fraser, R; Bhatia, M

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is an endogenous inflammatory mediator produced by cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) in monocytes/macrophages. To determine the role of H2S and macrophages in inflammation, we used small interference RNA (siRNA) to target the CSE gene and investigated its effect in a mouse model of acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis is characterised by increased levels of plasma amylase, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the pancreas and lung. SiRNA treatment attenuated inflammation in the pancreas and lungs of mice following caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. MPO activity increased in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (16.21 ± 3.571 SD fold increase over control) and treatment with siRNA significantly reduced this (mean 3.555 ± 2.522 SD fold increase over control) (p < 0.0001). Similarly, lung MPO activity increased following treatment with caerulein (3.56 ± 0.941 SD fold increase over control) while siRNA treatment significantly reduced MPO activity (0.8243 ± 0.4353 SD fold increase over control) (p < 0.0001). Caerulein treatment increased plasma amylase activity (7094 ± 207 U/l) and this significantly decreased following siRNA administration (5895 ± 115 U/l) (p < 0.0001). Cytokine and chemokine levels in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis reduced following treatment with siRNA. For example, siRNA treatment significantly decreased pancreatic and lung monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (169.8 ± 59.75 SD; 90.01 ± 46.97 SD pg/ml, respectively) compared to caerulein-treated mice (324.7 ± 103.9 SD; 222.8 ± 85.37 SD pg/ml, pancreas and lun,g respectively) (p < 0.0001). These findings show a crucial pro-inflammatory role for H2S synthesised by CSE in macrophages in acute pancreatitis and suggest CSE gene silencing with siRNA as a potential therapeutic approach for this condition.

  14. Protective effects and mechanisms of G5 PAMAM dendrimers against acute pancreatitis induced by caerulein in mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yin; Han, Yingchun; Liu, Lu; Shen, Wenwen; Zhang, Huayu; Wang, Yunan; Cui, Xin; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George; Qi, Rong

    2015-01-12

    In this study, generation 5 (G5) polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers with two different surface groups, G4.5-COOH and G5-OH, were investigated for their protective effects on pancreas injury in a caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) mouse model. Both dendrimers significantly decreased pathological changes in the pancreas and reduced the inflammatory infiltration of macrophages in pancreatic tissues. In addition, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was significantly inhibited by the two dendrimers, not only in pancreatic tissues from AP mice but also in vitro in mouse peritoneal macrophages with LPS-induced inflammation. G4.5-COOH, which had better in vivo protective effects for AP than G5-OH, led to a significant reduction in the total number of plasma white blood cells (WBCs) and monocytes in AP mice, and its anti-inflammatory mechanism was related to inhibition of the nuclear translocation of NF-κB in macrophages.

  15. [Sodium valproate as a cause of acute pancreatitis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Barreda, Luís; Rosas, Johana; Milian, William; Valdivia, Duilio; Targarona, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a commonly used medication approved by the U.S. FDA for the treatment of epilepsy, migraines and bipolar disorders. Adverse effects associated with VPA are typically benign, but there are more serious effects that are less frequent. These effects include hepatotoxicity, teratogenicity, possible polycystic ovaries with a potential sterile effect and acute pancreatitis. Even though acute pancreatitis is an adverse effect of very low frequency, it is very important due to the high mortality rate of patients with acute pancreatitis as a consequence of the use of valproic acid. In medical literature, by 2005, 80 cases of acute pancreatitis caused by valproic acid were reported, 33 of these cases were patients under the age of 18. This is a description of the clinical case of a 16 year old patient with necrotic pancreatitis caused by VPA, who was treated at the Acute Pancreatitis Unit of Edgardo Rebagliati Martins National Hospital.

  16. Silencing Mist1 Gene Expression Is Essential for Recovery from Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Anju; Humphrey, Sean E.; Steele, Rebecca E.; Hess, David A.; Taparowsky, Elizabeth J.; Konieczny, Stephen F.

    2015-01-01

    Acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas are tasked with synthesizing, packaging and secreting vast quantities of pro-digestive enzymes to maintain proper metabolic homeostasis for the organism. Because the synthesis of high levels of hydrolases is potentially dangerous, the pancreas is prone to acute pancreatitis (AP), a disease that targets acinar cells, leading to acinar-ductal metaplasia (ADM), inflammation and fibrosis—events that can transition into the earliest stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Despite a wealth of information concerning the broad phenotype associated with pancreatitis, little is understood regarding specific transcriptional regulatory networks that are susceptible to AP and the role these networks play in acinar cell and exocrine pancreas responses. In this study, we examined the importance of the acinar-specific maturation transcription factor MIST1 to AP damage and organ recovery. Analysis of wild-type and Mist1 conditional null mice revealed that Mist1 gene transcription and protein accumulation were dramatically reduced as acinar cells underwent ADM alterations during AP episodes. To test if loss of MIST1 function was primarily responsible for the damaged status of the organ, mice harboring a Cre-inducible Mist1 transgene (iMist1) were utilized to determine if sustained MIST1 activity could alleviate AP damage responses. Unexpectedly, constitutive iMist1 expression during AP led to a dramatic increase in organ damage followed by acinar cell death. We conclude that the transient silencing of Mist1 expression is critical for acinar cells to survive an AP episode, providing cells an opportunity to suppress their secretory function and regenerate damaged cells. The importance of MIST1 to these events suggests that modulating key pancreas transcription networks could ease clinical symptoms in patients diagnosed with pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26717480

  17. Novel findings in the management of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bolado, Federico; de-Madaria, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a potentially serious disease whose incidence is on the increase. Pancreas divisum does not meet the required criteria to be considered an aetiological factor. Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction may be another cause of idiopathic AP. Less invasive methods cannot replace Sphincter of Oddi manometry in diagnosis. Almost half of patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome develop organ failure, but the mechanisms involved are not completely understood. Obesity is a risk factor for severity in AP; the cause could be the presence of free unsaturated fatty acids, which have pro-inflammatory activity. Prognosis is better in patients with isolated extra-pancreatic necrosis than in those with parenchymal necrosis or with both. The mortality rate among those with infected pancreatic necrosis is 15-20%. The "moderately severe" group is widely heterogeneous and this category may require redefinition. Laparoscopic treatment of pseudocysts is an alternative to endoscopic drainage and could be the first-line option in patients requiring cholecystectomy. The use of lumen-apposing metal stents to treat pancreatic necrosis is cost-effective. Quality of life in some patients following an attack of AP is significantly impaired even at 1 year. Aggressive fluid therapy is not superior to standard fluid therapy in preventing post-ERCP AP. The role of statins in AP prevention is still unclear. Aggressive fluid resuscitation and the use of lactated Ringer solution seem to be beneficial in the treatment of AP.

  18. [CHANGES OF A TREATMENT PROGRAM FOR AN ACUTE PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Kostyrnoy, O V; Kosenko, A V; Bayomi, Imad Mokhamed Abdel S K

    2015-11-01

    Pathogenetically substantiated program of complex diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of purulent-necrotic complications (PNC) was elaborated for improvement of results of the necrotic pancreatitis treatment. With the objective to study the PNC pathogenesis and a probation of new preparations for local treatment the experimantal simulation of the disease was accomplished. There was proved, that during the disease course the integrity of pancreatic ductal system is disordered . A 42-year experience of treatment of an acute pancreatitis was analyzed. In I period (1970 - 1980) the operative interventions were conducted; in 11 period (1981 - 1991)--a scientifically substantiated conservative therapy; in III period (1992 - 2000)--the diagnostic procedures possibilities were extended, and operative intervention were performed in accordance to severe indications. There was established, that the main cause of PNC is a secondary microbal contamination occurrence on the third-fifth postoperative days, the immediate manipulations on pancreatic gland are forbidden; a one-time surgical processing of the necrosis foci is insufficient; the staged necrsequestrectomy constitutes the optimal operation.

  19. Acute coronary disease Athero-Inflammation: Therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Altman, Raul

    2003-06-20

    Antithrombotic therapy is the cornerstone of the treatment of acute coronary syndromes, but there is now evidence which indicates that by blocking inflammation, thrombosis and thus, acute coronary events, could be lowered. The concept of athero-inflammation emerges as the meeting point of different morbidities; dyslipemia, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, immunity, infection, hyperhomocyteinemia, smoking, etc. usual named as risk factors. Thus, beside specific drugs, earliest treatment, in the stage of inflammation, using anti-inflammatory drugs, should be considered since in patients with increased risk of acute coronary process are likely to have many point of origen throughout the coronary arteries. There are a body of evidences for supporting the potential of anti-inflammatory therapy to the prevention of inflammation and atherosclerosis. COX-2 inhibition may decrease endothelial inflammation reducing monocytes infiltration improving vascular cells function, plaque stability and probably resulting in a decrease of coronary atherothrombotic events.Trials including large numbers of patients in prospective double-blind randomized studies worthwhile to confirm the efficacy of NSAID, mainly, COX-2 inhibitors, together with aspirin in the prevention of coronary events in patients with acute coronary disease.

  20. Acute coronary disease Athero-Inflammation: Therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Raul

    2003-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy is the cornerstone of the treatment of acute coronary syndromes, but there is now evidence which indicates that by blocking inflammation, thrombosis and thus, acute coronary events, could be lowered. The concept of athero-inflammation emerges as the meeting point of different morbidities; dyslipemia, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, immunity, infection, hyperhomocyteinemia, smoking, etc. usual named as risk factors. Thus, beside specific drugs, earliest treatment, in the stage of inflammation, using anti-inflammatory drugs, should be considered since in patients with increased risk of acute coronary process are likely to have many point of origen throughout the coronary arteries. There are a body of evidences for supporting the potential of anti-inflammatory therapy to the prevention of inflammation and atherosclerosis. COX-2 inhibition may decrease endothelial inflammation reducing monocytes infiltration improving vascular cells function, plaque stability and probably resulting in a decrease of coronary atherothrombotic events. Trials including large numbers of patients in prospective double-blind randomized studies worthwhile to confirm the efficacy of NSAID, mainly, COX-2 inhibitors, together with aspirin in the prevention of coronary events in patients with acute coronary disease. PMID:12904261

  1. Routes of spread of pathogens into the pancreas in a feline model of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Widdison, A L; Karanjia, N D; Reber, H A

    1994-01-01

    The routes of spread of pathogens into the pancreas in acute pancreatitis were investigated. Four experiments were performed: (1) cats with and without acute pancreatitis were given 10(7) Escherichia coli (E coli) intravenously, (2) in cats with acute pancreatitis 10(8) E coli was placed in the colon. In half of them the colon was then enclosed in an impermeable bag to prevent transmural spread. (3) E coli (10(4)) was placed in the pancreatic duct in cats with and without acute pancreatitis. (4) In cats with acute pancreatitis 10(5) E coli was placed in the gall bladder. In half of them the common bile duct was ligated to prevent biliary-pancreatic reflux. After 24 hours, intravenous E coli infected the pancreas in six of nine cats with acute pancreatitis and three of 10 controls. After 72 hours E coli spread to the pancreas from the colon in six of nine cats with acute pancreatitis. This was prevented by enclosing the colon in an impermeable bag (p = 0.02). In five of six cats with acute pancreatitis and five of six controls E coli placed in the pancreatic duct colonised the pancreas within 24 hours. Pancreatic colonisation from the gall bladder occurred in five of six cats with a patent common bile duct and in three of six with an obstructed common bile duct. In conclusion, in cats E coli can spread to the pancreas by the blood stream, transmurally from the colon, and by reflux into the pancreatic duct. PMID:7959243

  2. Morphological study of the relation between accidental hypothermia and acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Foulis, A K

    1982-01-01

    There is a recognised but poorly understood association between hypothermia and acute pancreatitis. A histological study of the pancreas was made in eight patients with accidental hypothermia who had evidence of pancreatitis at necropsy. From an analysis of the patterns of parenchymal necrosis in the pancreas it was thought that there were at least three possible mechanisms for the relation between hypothermia and pancreatitis. Firstly, that ischaemic pancreatitis may result from the "microcirculatory shock" of hypothermia. Secondly, that both hypothermia and pancreatitis may be secondary to alcohol abuse: and finally, that severe pancreatitis may be the primary disease and that hypothermia results from the patients' social circumstances. Images PMID:7142433

  3. Acute pancreatitis: New developments and strategies for the hospitalist.

    PubMed

    Dick, John F; Gardner, Timothy B; Merrens, Edward J

    2016-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) remains the most common reason for hospital admission of all the gastrointestinal illnesses in the United States. Since the last narrative review in the Journal of Hospital Medicine in 2010, new developments in regard to diagnosis and classification, fluid resuscitation, antibiotic use, nutritional support, and management of complications have helped refine the approach and improve outcomes in this disease. Whereas there is still no proven pharmacologic therapy to specifically combat the inflammatory consequences of AP, recent interventions have led to increased survival, shorter length of stay, and more appropriate transfer criteria for pancreatitis patients. This case-oriented review will highlight these developments and emphasize the primary role of the hospitalist in managing AP over the course of the admission. It will focus on when to coordinate with subspecialists, how to deliver effective yet efficient hospitalized care, and how to optimize appropriate discharge planning. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:724-729. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  4. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Form a Barrier between Necrotic and Viable Areas in Acute Abdominal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bilyy, Rostyslav; Fedorov, Volodymyr; Vovk, Volodymyr; Leppkes, Moritz; Dumych, Tetiana; Chopyak, Valentyna; Schett, Georg; Herrmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) of decondensed DNA and histones that trap and immobilize particulate matter and microbial pathogens like bacteria. NET aggregates reportedly surround and isolate large objects like monosodium urate crystals, which cannot be sufficiently cleared from tissues. In the setting of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, massive tissue necrosis occurs, which is organized as pancreatic pseudocysts (1). In contrast to regular cysts, these pseudocysts are not surrounded by epithelial layers. We hypothesize that, instead, the necrotic areas observed in necrotizing pancreatitis are isolated from the surrounding healthy tissues by aggregated NETs. These may form an alternative, putatively transient barrier, separating necrotic areas from viable tissue. To test this hypothesis, we investigated histological samples from the necropsy material of internal organs of two patients with necrotizing pancreatitis and peritonitis accompanied by multiple organ failure. Tissues including the inflammatory zone were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and evaluated for signs of inflammation. Infiltrating neutrophils and NETs were detected by immunohistochemistry for DNA, neutrophil elastase (NE), and citrullinated histone H3. Interestingly, in severely affected areas of pancreatic necrosis or peritonitis, chromatin stained positive for NE and citrullinated histone H3, and may, therefore, be considered NET-derived. These NET structures formed a layer, which separated the necrotic core from the areas of viable tissue remains. A condensed layer of aggregated NETs, thus, spatially shields and isolates the site of necrosis, thereby limiting the spread of necrosis-associated proinflammatory mediators. We propose that necrotic debris may initiate and/or facilitate the formation of the NET-based surrogate barrier. PMID:27777576

  5. Activation peptide of carboxypeptidase B in serum and urine in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Appelros, S; Thim, L; Borgstrom, A

    1998-01-01

    Background—The pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis involves activation of the pancreatic proenzymes. Levels of the trypsinogen activation peptide in urine in acute pancreatitis has been shown to correlate with the severity of disease. However, this peptide is unstable in urine and, because of its low molecular mass, difficult to measure. Procarboxypeptidase B has a larger activation peptide which could be more suitable for analysis in serum and urine. 
Aims—To study the presence of the activation peptide from procarboxypeptidase B (CAPAP) in serum and urine in acute pancreatitis. 
Patients—Urine and serum samples were obtained within 48 hours of admittance from 40 patients with acute pancreatitis. Severity was classified retrospectively according to levels of C-reactive protein and clinical course. Thirty four patients with abdominal pain from other causes were studied as controls. 
Methods—CAPAP was purified from human pancreatic juice. Specific antibodies were obtained and a radioimmunoassay was developed. 
Results—Levels of CAPAP in serum and urine in acute pancreatitis correlate with the severity of the attack. CAPAP is very stable, and urine contains only CAPAP whereas, in serum, cross reacting procarboxypeptidase B is found together with CAPAP. 
Conclusions—CAPAP could be a valuable tool in the diagnosis and early determination of severity in acute pancreatitis. 

 Keywords: carboxypeptidase B; activation peptide; acute pancreatitis PMID:9505893

  6. Effects of diclofenac sodium and octreotide on treatment of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozer Cakir, Ozlem; Esen, Hasan; Toker, Aysun; Ataseven, Huseyin; Demir, Ali; Polat, Hakki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research continues to develop novel therapeutic modalities that particularly focus on the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. This study aimed to assess the effects of diclofenac sodium and octreotide, alone or in combination, on pancreatic enzymes, pancreatic myeloperoxidase activity, histopathology and apoptosis of pancreas cells, using a model of experimentally induced acute pancreatitis. Objectives: We aimed to demonstrate effects of diclofenac sodium, octreotide and their combined use on pancreatic enzymes, activity of pancreatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, histopathology and apoptosis of pancreas on treatment of caerulin-induced experimental acute pancreatitis. Materials and methods: Caerulin-induced acute pancreatitis model was created using a total of 58 male BALB-C mice of 25 gr in seven groups. Serum amylase, lipase levels and pancreatic myeloperoxidase activity were examined as well as apoptotic values in pancreatic acinar cells through TUNNEL method. Histopathology of pancreas was evaluated for presence of edema, hemorrhage, parenchymal necrosis, fat necrosis, leukocyte infiltration, and fibrosis. Results: In the diclofenac sodium group, apoptotic values in the pancreatic acinar cells were found to be statistically lower than in the acute pancreatitis group in terms of parenchymal necrosis and hemorrhage scores (P = 0.007, P = 0.002, and P = 0.052, respectively). No statistically significant differences were found in serum level of amylase, lipase, pancreatic myeloperoxidase activity and the other histopathological scores (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Diclofenac sodium, a cost-effective agent with a favorable side-effect profile, may represent a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of acute pancreatitis. Findings of this study suggest a better efficacy for diclofenac sodium monotherapy as compared to octreotide alone or octreotide/diclofenac combination. PMID:26770346

  7. Gardenia jasminoides protects against cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Won-Seok; Chae, Young-Seok; Kim, Do-Yun; Seo, Sang-Wan; Park, Hee-Je; Bae, Gi-Sang; Kim, Tae-Hyeon; Oh, Hyo-Jeong; Yun, Ki-Jung; Park, Rae-Kil; Kim, Jong-Suk; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Hwang, Sung-Yeon; Park, Sung-Joo; Song, Ho-Joon

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Gardenia jasminoides (GJ) on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) in mice. METHODS: C57BL/6 mice weighing 18-20 g were divided into three groups. (1) Normal saline-treated group, (2) treatment with GJ at a dose of 0.1 g/kg, (3) treatment with GJ at a dose of 1 g/kg. GJ was administered orally (n = 6 per group) for 1 wk. Three hours later, the mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of cerulein (50 μg/kg), a stable cholecystokinin (CCK) analogue, every hour for a total of 6 h as described previously. The mice were sacrificed at 6 h after completion of cerulein injections. Blood samples were obtained to determine serum amylase, lipase and cytokine levels. The pancreas was rapidly removed for morphologic examination and scoring. A portion of pancreas was stored at -70°C and prepared for the measurement of tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, an indicator of neutrophil sequestration, and for reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR measurements. RESULTS: Treatment with GJ decreased significantly the severity of pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. Treatment with GJ attenuated the severity of AP compared with saline-treated mice, as shown by reduction in pancreatic edema, neutrophil infiltration, serum amylase and lipase levels, serum cytokine levels, and mRNA expression of multiple inflammatory mediators. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that GJ attenuated the severity of AP as well as pancreatitis-associated lung injury. PMID:18985809

  8. Acute Pancreatitis, Hepatitis and Bone Erosion in Acute Yellow Phosphorous Compound Poisoning – A Rare Complication

    PubMed Central

    Kamarthi, Prabhakar; Gopu, Arun Vardharaju; Prasad, Reddy; Srinivasa, Chandrakala

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of acute pancreatitis and hepatitis following ingestion of yellow phosphorous. The condition of the patient progressed to encephalopathy and bony erosion of the nasal septum. Fungal mass was observed in both the nasal cavities by endoscopy. Microbiological investigation revealed the identity of the fungus as Aspergillus flavus and Candida tropicalis. Patient improved with fluconazole treatment. PMID:27504287

  9. Acute pancreatitis at the beginning of the 21st century: The state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Tonsi, Alfredo F; Bacchion, Matilde; Crippa, Stefano; Malleo, Giuseppe; Bassi, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas which can lead to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome with significant morbidity and mortality in 20% of patients. Gallstones and alcohol consumption are the most frequent causes of pancreatitis in adults. The treatment of mild acute pancreatitis is conservative and supportive; however severe episodes characterized by necrosis of the pancreatic tissue may require surgical intervention. Advanced understanding of the pathology, and increased interest in assessment of disease severity are the cornerstones of future management strategies of this complex and heterogeneous disease in the 21st century. PMID:19554647

  10. Effect of early administration of exogenous basic fibroblast growth factor on acute edematous pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qiang; Yao, Xing; Dai, Li-Cheng; Zhang, Guo-Lei; Ping, Jin-Liang; He, Jian-Fang; Han, Chun-Fan

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To observe the therapeutic effect of early administration of exogenous Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on acute edematous pancreatitis (AEP) in rats. METHODS: Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three (n = 10): normal control group (group I), AEP group (group II) and AEP with bFGF treatment group (group III). AEP was induced by subcutaneous injection of cerulein (5.5 μg/kg and 7.5 μg/kg) at 1 h interval into rats of groups II and III. Three hours after induction of AEP, 100 μg/kg bFGF was administrated intraperitoneally for 1h to group III rats. For test of DNA synthesis in acinar cells, 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling solution was intraperitoneally injected into the rats of groups II and III 24 h after bFGF treatment. The changes in serum amylase, lipase, pancreatic tissue wet/dry ratio were detected. RESULTS: In bFGF treatment group, there was a significant decrease in the volume of serum amylase, lipase and the pancreatic wet/dry weight ratio(1383.0 ± 94.6 U/L, 194.0 ± 43.6 U/L, 4.32 ± 0.32) compared to AEP group (3464 ± 223.7 U/L, 456 ±68.7 U/L, 6.89 ± 0.47) (P < 0.01), and no significant difference was found between bFGF treatment and control group (1289 ± 94.0 U/L, 171 ± 23.4 U/L, 4.12 ± 0.26, P > 0.05). The inflammatory changes such as interstitial edema, polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and vacuolization were significantly ameliorated compared to AEP group (P < 0.01). A small number of BrdU-labeled nuclei were observed in acinar cells of AEP rats (1.8 ± 0.3 nuclei/microscopic field, n = 10) while diffuse BrdU-labeled nuclei were found in bFGF-treated rats (18.9 ± 1.4 nuclei/microscopic field, n = 10) (P < 0.01). Immunohistochemical study showed increased DNA synthesis in pancreatic acinar cells. CONCLUSION: Early administration of exogenous bFGF has significant therapeutic effect on cerulein-induced acute edematous pancreatitis in rats. Its mechanism is related to the amelioration of inflammation

  11. Validation of a novel, physiologic model of experimental acute pancreatitis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Kathryn M; Wade, Terence E; Wang, Sue; Swartz-Basile, Deborah A; Pitt, Henry A; Zyromski, Nicholas J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Many experimental models of acute pancreatitis suffer from lack of clinical relevance. We sought to validate a recently reported murine model of acute pancreatitis that more closely represents the physiology of human biliary pancreatitis. Methods: Mice (C57BL/6J n=6 and CF-1 n=8) underwent infusion of 50μl of 5% sodium taurocholate (NaT) or 50μl of normal saline (NaCl) directly into the pancreatic duct. Twenty-four hours later, pancreatitis severity was graded histologically by three independent observers, and pancreatic tissue concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were determined by ELISA. Results: Twenty four hours after retrograde injection, the total pancreatitis score was significantly greater in mice infused with NaT than in those infused with NaCl (6.3 ± 1.2 vs. 1.2 ± 0.4, p<0.05). In addition, the inflammatory mediators IL-6 and MCP-1 were increased in the NaT group relative to the NaCl group. Discussion: Retrograde pancreatic duct infusion of sodium taurocholate induces acute pancreatitis in the mouse. This model is likely representative of human biliary pancreatitis pathophysiology, and therefore provides a powerful tool with which to elucidate basic mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. PMID:21416058

  12. Nifuroxazide-induced acute pancreatitis: a new side-effect for an old drug?

    PubMed

    Shindano, Akilimali; Marot, Liliane; Geubel, André P

    2007-01-01

    We report the case of a middle-aged woman who developed a typical picture of acute pancreatitis together with systemic features of immunoallergy after the intake of two capsules (200 mg) of nifuroxazide. Even if acute pancreatitis is a rare adverse event of nitrofuran derivative therapy, nifuroxazide-induced pancreatitis as not been previously described. As suggested by associated systemic features, the disease is likely of immunoallergic origin.

  13. Acetyl-L-carnitine ameliorates caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Hossam M M; Hemeida, Ramadan A M; Hassan, Mohamed I A; Abdel-Wahab, Mohammed H; Badary, Osama A; Hamada, Farid M A

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, we have addressed the possible protective role of acetyl-L-carnitine in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in male Swiss albino rats. Acute pancreatitis paradigm was developed by challenging animals with a supramaximal dose of caerulein (20 microg/kg, SC) four times at hourly intervals. Caerulein induced acute pancreatitis that was well-characterized morphologically and biochemically. Severe oedema with marked increased relative pancreatic weight, marked atrophy of acini with increased interacinar spaces, vacuolization, and extensive leucocytic infiltration were diagnostic fingerprints of the pancreatitis phenotype. A biochemical test battery that confirmed the model comprised increased plasma amylase and lipase activities, calcium levels as well as increased pancreatic enzymatic myeloperoxidase and glutathione-S-transferase activities, beside increased pancreatic contents of nitric oxide and malondialdehyde and reduced pancreatic glutathione level. Prior administration of acetyl-L-carnitine (200 mg/kg, IP) for seven consecutive days ahead of caerulein challenge alleviated all the histological and biochemical manifestations of acute pancreatitis. These results suggest a possible protective role of the carnitine ester in such a murine acute pancreatitis model probably via regulation of the oxidant/antioxidant balance, beside modulation of the myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide systems, which are involved in the inflammatory cascade that most often associate the disease.

  14. Lipocalin-2 Promotes Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma by Regulating Inflammation in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Chou, Sobeyda; Swidnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka; Badi, Niharika; Chavez-Tomar, Myrriah; Lesinski, Gregory B; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Farren, Matthew R; Mace, Thomas A; Schmidt, Carl; Liu, Yan; Deng, Defeng; Hwang, Rosa F; Zhou, Liran; Moore, Todd T; Chatterjee, Deyali; Wang, Huamin; Leng, Xiaohong; Arlinghaus, Ralph B; Logsdon, Craig D; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida

    2017-03-01

    Lipocalin-2 (LCN2) promotes malignant development in many cancer types. LCN2 is upregulated in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and in obese individuals, but whether it contributes to PDAC development is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of Lcn2 depletion on diet-induced obesity, inflammation and PDAC development. Mice with acinar cell-specific expression of KrasG12D were crossed with Lcn2-depleted animals and fed isocaloric diets with varying amounts of fat content. Pancreas were collected and analyzed for inflammation, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and PDAC. We also used a syngeneic orthotopic PDAC mouse model to study tumor growth in the presence or absence of Lcn2 expression. In addition, to understand the mechanistic role of how LCN2 could be mediating PDAC, we studied LCN2 and its specific receptor solute carrier family 22 member 17 (SLC22A17) in human pancreatic cancer stellate cells (PSC), key mediators of the PDAC stroma. Depletion of Lcn2 diminished extracellular matrix deposition, immune cell infiltration, PanIN formation and tumor growth. Notably, it also increased survival in both obesity-driven and syngeneic orthotopic PDAC mouse models. LCN2 modulated the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in PSC of the PDAC tumor microenvironment, while downregulation of LCN2-specific receptor SLC22A17 blocked these effects. Our results reveal how LCN2 acts in the tumor microenvironment links obesity, inflammation and PDAC development.

  15. Characterization and Predictive Value of Near Infrared 2-Deoxyglucose Optical Imaging in Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Cristiane; Patel, Krutika; Mishra, Vivek; Trivedi, Ram N.; Noel, Pawan; Singh, Abhilasha; Yaron, Jordan R.; Singh, Vijay P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Studying the uptake of 2-deoxy glucose (2-DG) analogs such as 2-Deoxy-2-[18F] fluoroglucose (FDG) is a common approach to identify and monitor malignancies and more recently chronic inflammation. While pancreatitis is a common cause for false positive results in human studies on pancreatic cancer using FDG, the relevance of these findings to acute pancreatitis (AP) is unknown. FDG has a short half-life. Thus, with an aim to accurately characterize the metabolic demand of the pancreas during AP in real-time, we studied the uptake of the non-radioactive, near infrared fluorescence labelled 2-deoxyglucose analog, IRDye® 800CW 2-DG probe (NIR 2-DG; Li-Cor) during mild and severe biliary AP. Methods Wistar rats (300 g; 8–12/group) were administered NIR 2-DG (10 nM; I.V.). Mild and severe biliary AP were respectively induced by biliopancreatic duct ligation (DL) alone or along with infusing glyceryl trilinoleate (GTL; 50 μL/100 g) within 10 minutes of giving NIR 2-DG. Controls (CON) only received NIR 2-DG. Imaging was done every 5–10 minutes over 3 hrs. Average Radiant Efficiency [p/s/cm²/sr]/[μW/cm²] was measured over the pancreas using the IVIS 200 in-vivo imaging system (PerkinElmer) using the Living Image® software and verified in ex vivo pancreata. Blood amylase, lipase and pancreatic edema, necrosis were measured over the course of AP. Results NIR 2-DG uptake over the first hour was not influenced by AP induction. However, while the signal declined in controls and rats with mild AP, there was significantly higher retention of NIR 2-DG in the pancreas after 1 hour in those with GTL pancreatitis. The increase was > 3 fold over controls in the GTL group and was verified to be in the pancreas ex vivo. In vitro, pancreatic acini exposed to GTL had a similar increase in NIR 2-DG uptake which was followed by progressively worse acinar necrosis. Greater retention of NIR 2-DG in vivo was associated with worse pancreatic necrosis, reduced ATP

  16. Actively using clopidogrel correlates with an increased risk of acute pancreatitis in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2015-03-15

    The aim of this study is to assess whether there is an association between clopidogrel use and risk of acute pancreatitis in Taiwan. We conducted a case-control study using the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program from 2000 to 2011. There were 5644 subjects aged 20-84 years with a first-time attack of acute pancreatitis as the case group and 22,576 randomly selected sex-matched and age-matched subjects without acute pancreatitis as the control group. We defined clopidogrel use as "actively using" if the final clopidogrel prescription was filled between 0 and 7 days before the date of diagnosing acute pancreatitis, or "not actively using" if the final clopidogrel prescription was filled ≧ 8 days before the date of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Subjects who never used clopidogrel were defined as never used. The multivariable logistic regression model was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of acute pancreatitis associated with clopidogrel use. Comparing the subjects actively using clopidogrel to those who never used clopidogrel, the adjusted OR of acute pancreatitis was 8.46 (95%CI 5.25, 13.7). The adjusted OR decreased to 1.16 among subjects not actively using clopidogrel (95%CI 0.95, 1.43). Persons actively using clopidogrel are at an increased risk of acute pancreatitis. Further studies are necessary to prove the causal relationship.

  17. [Prognostication of acute-pancreatitis-associated pulmonary injury based on determination of cytokines levels].

    PubMed

    Fedorkiv, M B; Hudz, I M; Shevchuk, I M

    2013-07-01

    The results of examination of 68 patients, admitted to hospital for an acute pancreatitis during 48 h from its occurrence, were analyzed. In all the patients the cytokines (IL-8, IL-10, TNF-alpha) content was determined in the blood, using immunoenzymal analysis. Algorithm of prognostication of an acute pancreatitis-associated pulmonary injury, basing on determination of the cytokines contents, was elaborated.

  18. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-02-06

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  19. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  20. The role of neutral endopeptidase in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Koh, Yung-Hua; Moochhala, Shabbir; Bhatia, Madhav

    2011-11-15

    Substance P (SP) is well known to promote inflammation in acute pancreatitis (AP) by interacting with neurokinin-1 receptor. However, mechanisms that terminate SP-mediated responses are unclear. Neutral endopeptidase (NEP) is a cell-surface enzyme that degrades SP in the extracellular fluid. In this study, we examined the expression and the role of NEP in caerulein-induced AP. Male BALB/c mice (20-25 g) subjected to 3-10 hourly injections of caerulein (50 μg/kg) exhibited reduced NEP activity and protein expression in the pancreas and lungs. Additionally, caerulein (10(-7) M) also downregulated NEP activity and mRNA expression in isolated pancreatic acinar cells. The role of NEP in AP was examined in two opposite ways: inhibition of NEP (phosphoramidon [5 mg/kg] or thiorphan [10 mg/kg]) followed by 6 hourly caerulein injections) or supplementation with exogenous NEP (10 hourly caerulein injections, treatment of recombinant mouse NEP [1 mg/kg] during second caerulein injection). Inhibition of NEP raised SP levels and exacerbated inflammatory conditions in mice. Meanwhile, the severity of AP, determined by histological examination, tissue water content, myeloperoxidase activity, and plasma amylase activity, was markedly better in mice that received exogenous NEP treatment. Our results suggest that NEP is anti-inflammatory in caerulein-induced AP. Acute inhibition of NEP contributes to increased SP levels in caerulein-induced AP, which leads to augmented inflammatory responses in the pancreas and associated lung injury.

  1. Effect of Diazepam on Severity of Acute Pancreatitis: Possible Involvement of Peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Alireza; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Safaei, Azadeh; Taheri, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a lethal inflammatory condition of pancreas with high mortality rate. There is a pressing need for research to explore active agents and novel mechanisms involving in the treatment of pancreatitis. Clinical studies have shown after the initial acinar cell injury plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are elevated in patients with acute pancreatitis and the degree of cytokine elevation correlates with disease severity. Diazepam may decrease interleukin release from macrophages, suppress neutrophil activities, and exhibit anti-inflammatory effects. So it is expected that in vivo pretreatment of acute pancreatitis with different doses of diazepam can attenuate its severity. Thus, we evaluated the effects of diazepam, intraperitoneally (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg i.p.), intracerebroventricularly (ICV 10 μg), and concurrently with flumazenil (1 mg/kg) on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Interestingly, the pretreatment with diazepam (5 mg/kg i.p.) reduced significantly the inflammatory response of acute pancreatitis by ameliorating pancreatic edema, amylase and lipase serum levels, myeloperoxidase activity, pancreatic TNF-alpha, and pathological alteration compared to control group. Diazepam i.c.v. was ineffective, suggesting that central benzodiazepine receptors have no significant role in this property. These results demonstrate that pretreatment with diazepam exhibits anti-inflammatory property in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis possibly through peripheral benzodiazepine receptors. PMID:23956866

  2. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube in your vein and nutrition through a feeding tube or IV. ...

  3. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... hospital for: Pain medicines Fluids given through a vein (IV) Stopping food or fluid by mouth to ...

  4. Socs1 and Socs3 degrades Traf6 via polyubiquitination in LPS-induced acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, X; Liu, Z; Cheng, X; Zheng, Y; Zeng, F; He, Y

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms involved in inflammatory development during acute pancreatitis (AP) are largely vague, especially in the transformation of acute edematous pancreatitis (AEP) into acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). This current study aims to investigate the functions of Traf6 in different AP models in vitro and in vivo, and to identify the possible regulatory mechanism in the progression of inflammation from mild to severe. Our data revealed that the level of Traf6 expression was significantly increased in the mild AP induced by caerulein, and the upregulation of Traf6 played a protective role in acinar cells against caerulein-induced apoptosis. In contrast, only Traf6 protein but not mRNA was downregulated in the severe ANP induced by combination treatment of caerulein and LPS. Mechanistic studies showed that LPS upregulated the levels of Socs1 and Socs3 expressions in acinar cells, Socs1 and Socs3 interacted Traf6 directly and degraded Traf6 protein via polyubiquitination, thereby counteracted the protective function of Traf6. In vivo study further showed that combination treatment of caerulein and LPS failed to induce an ANP model in the TLR4 knockout mice, and the level of Traf6 expression in the pancreatic tissues remained the same as that from the acute edematous pancreatitis (AEP) mouse. Taken together, our study reveals that Traf6 functioned as a protective factor in the progression of AP, and LPS-induced Socs1 and Socs3 exacerbate mild AP to severe AP, which provides evidence for developing a new therapeutic target to combat AP. PMID:26633718

  5. Serial computed tomography scanning in acute pancreatitis: a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    London, N J; Neoptolemos, J P; Lavelle, J; Bailey, I; James, D

    1989-01-01

    One hundred and two patients with acute pancreatitis had abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans within 72 hours of admission, at one week and at six weeks. Twenty eight attacks were clinically severe, 74 clinically mild. Ninety three (91%) admission scans, 85 (84%) one week scans, and 52 (51%) six week scans were abnormal. The aetiology of the pancreatitis could be inferred from 28 (27%) of admission scans, the CT sign of fatty liver having a sensitivity of 21% and specificity of 100% for alcoholic aetiology. The sensitivity of CT for gall stone aetiology was 34%, specificity 100%. The pancreatic size indices (max anteroposterior measurement of head x max anteroposterior measurement of body) of those patients with severe attacks were significantly greater than those with mild attacks on admission, at one week and at six weeks (p less than 0.004). Fourteen pseudocysts were detected by CT, five (36%) of which were clinically apparent. The pseudocyst size indices (max anteroposterior x max transverse measurement) of the pseudocysts which were clinically apparent were significantly greater than those which were not apparent (p less than 0.01) and only those pseudocysts with a size index greater than or equal to 15 cm2 required treatment. PMID:2651228

  6. Current concepts in the management of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Gautham; Venkatakrishnan, L.; Sambandam, Swaminathan; Singh, Gursharan; Kaur, Maninder; Janarthan, Krishnaveni; John, B. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis (AP) are based on the Western experience, which may be difficult to extrapolate in India due to socioeconomic constraints. Hence, modifications based on the available resources and referral patterns should be introduced so as to ensure appropriate care. We reviewed the current literature on the management of AP available in English on Medline and proposed guidelines locally applicable. Patients of AP presenting with systemic inflammatory response syndrome are at risk of moderate-severe pancreatitis and hence, should be referred to a tertiary center early. The vast majority of patients with AP have mild disease and can be managed at smaller centers. Early aggressive fluid resuscitation with controlled fluid expansion, early enteral nutrition, and culture-directed antibiotics improve outcomes in AP. Infected pancreatic necrosis should be managed in a tertiary care hospital within a multidisciplinary setup. The “step up” approach involving antibiotics, percutaneous drainage, and minimally invasive necrosectomy instituted sequentially based on clinical response has improved the outcomes in this subgroup of patients. PMID:28348985

  7. Genetics and Treatments Options for Recurrent Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Celeste A.; Whitcomb, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Opinion Statement Worldwide research efforts demonstrate a major role of gene-environment interactions for the risk, development, and progression of most pancreatic diseases, including recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis. New findings of pancreas disease-associated risk variants have been reported in the CPA1, GGT1, CLDN2, MMP1, MTHFR, and other genes. These risk genes and their regulatory regions must be added to the known pathogenic variants in the PRSS1, SPINK1, CFTR, CTRC, CASR, UBR1, SBDS, CEL, and CTSB genes. This new knowledge promises to improve disease management and prevention through personalized medicine. At the same time, however, knowledge of an increasing number of pathogenic variants, and their complicated effects when present in combination, results in increasing difficulty in interpretation and development of recommendations. Direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic testing results also adds complexity to disease management paradigms, especially without interpretation and, in many cases, proven accuracy. While improvements in the ability to rapidly and accurately interpret complex genetic tests are clearly needed, some results, such as pathogenic CFTR variants – including a new class of bicarbonate-defective mutations – and PRSS1 variants have immediate implications that direct management. In addition, discovery of pancreatitis-associated genetic variants in patients with glucose intolerance may suggest underlying type 3c diabetes, which also has implications for treatment and disease management. PMID:24954874

  8. Reverse-migrated neutrophils regulated by JAM-C are involved in acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Deqing; Zeng, Yue; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Jianghong; Mulatibieke, Tunike; Ni, Jianbo; Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2016-02-04

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) plays a key role in the promotion of the reverse transendothelial migration (rTEM) of neutrophils, which contributes to the dissemination of systemic inflammation and to secondary organ damage. During acute pancreatitis (AP), systemic inflammatory responses lead to distant organ damage and typically result in acute lung injury (ALI). Here, we investigated the role of rTEM neutrophils in AP-associated ALI and the molecular mechanisms by which JAM-C regulates neutrophil rTEM in this disorder. In this study, rTEM neutrophils were identified in the peripheral blood both in murine model of AP and human patients with AP, which elevated with increased severity of lung injury. Pancreatic JAM-C was downregulated during murine experimental pancreatitis, whose expression levels were inversely correlated with both increased neutrophil rTEM and severity of lung injury. Knockout of JAM-C resulted in more severe lung injury and systemic inflammation. Significantly greater numbers of rTEM neutrophils were present both in the circulation and pulmonary vascular washout in JAM-C knockout mice with AP. This study demonstrates that during AP, neutrophils that are recruited to the pancreas may migrate back into the circulation and then contribute to ALI. JAM-C downregulation may contribute to AP-associated ALI via promoting neutrophil rTEM.

  9. [Create the mouse model of severe acute pancreatitis induced by caerulein plus lipopolysaccharide and study on its pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Jin, Chang; Li, Ji Cheng

    2003-04-01

    To set up a nontraumatic and convenient mouse model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Caerulein(Cn) was injected the mice intraperitonealy with lipopolysaccharide(LPS). Serum amylase and pancreas weight were measured in experiment. The pathological changes of pancreas and other organs were observed under light microscope. The ultrastructure of acini were observed under transmission electron microscope (TEM). Serum NO concentration were measured and the SOD and MDA in pancreas were examined. The results in Cn + LPS group were showed that serum amylase, NO concentration and pancreas weight were increased, SOD deduced and MDA increased. Severe edema, inflammation infiltration, necrosis and different extent of hemorrhage were showed. The acini were damaged severely. And the lesion of other organs were also happened. In Cn group, there were only pancreatic interstitial edema but no parenchmal necrosis or hemorrhage, and the other organs were normal. In LPS group, pancreas were almost normal and the organs besides pancreas were only showed light inflammation infiltration. The SAP mouse model induced by caerulein plus LPS has the same pathological characteristics of human SAP, which can be used in human SAP research. The unbalance of oxygen free radical release-elimination and oxidation-antioxidation mechanisms might be involved in the pathogenesis of mouse model of severe acute pancreatitis induced by intraperitoneal injection of caerulein plus LPS.

  10. Reverse-migrated neutrophils regulated by JAM-C are involved in acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Deqing; Zeng, Yue; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Jianghong; Mulatibieke, Tunike; Ni, Jianbo; Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2016-01-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) plays a key role in the promotion of the reverse transendothelial migration (rTEM) of neutrophils, which contributes to the dissemination of systemic inflammation and to secondary organ damage. During acute pancreatitis (AP), systemic inflammatory responses lead to distant organ damage and typically result in acute lung injury (ALI). Here, we investigated the role of rTEM neutrophils in AP-associated ALI and the molecular mechanisms by which JAM-C regulates neutrophil rTEM in this disorder. In this study, rTEM neutrophils were identified in the peripheral blood both in murine model of AP and human patients with AP, which elevated with increased severity of lung injury. Pancreatic JAM-C was downregulated during murine experimental pancreatitis, whose expression levels were inversely correlated with both increased neutrophil rTEM and severity of lung injury. Knockout of JAM-C resulted in more severe lung injury and systemic inflammation. Significantly greater numbers of rTEM neutrophils were present both in the circulation and pulmonary vascular washout in JAM-C knockout mice with AP. This study demonstrates that during AP, neutrophils that are recruited to the pancreas may migrate back into the circulation and then contribute to ALI. JAM-C downregulation may contribute to AP-associated ALI via promoting neutrophil rTEM. PMID:26841848

  11. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Keith J

    2006-10-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterised by pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis leading eventually to destruction of pancreatic parenchyma and loss of exocrine and endocrine function. A model of interactions between environmental triggers of pancreatic inflammation and disease susceptibility or modifying genes (including PRSS1, SPINK1 and CFTR) provides a framework within which to understand disease pathogenesis. Early in the disease, when fibrosis is mild and pancreatic damage limited, it is difficult to distinguish CP from recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) although it is likely these represent opposite ends of a spectrum of disease with a common aetiology in which CP represents either a later disease stage or disease in individuals predisposed to generate a chronic fibrogenic inflammatory response. Pain is a dominant feature resulting in part from neuroimmune interactions within the pancreas. Diagnosis at an early stage of disease is challenging, though in later stages is dependent upon the demonstration of pancreatic fibrosis and duct ectasia using one or more imaging modalities including transabdominal and endoscopic ultrasound, CT and MRCP or ERCP. Current treatments are largely supportive and reactive. The challenge for pediatricians is to achieve diagnosis at an early stage of the disease and to develop treatments that can alter its natural history.

  12. Canine adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate severe acute pancreatitis by regulating T cells in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Song, Woo-Jin; Li, Qiang; Han, Sei-Myoung; Jeon, Kee-Ok; Park, Sang-Chul; Ryu, Min-Ok; Chae, Hyung-Kyu; Kyeong, Kweon

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is associated with systemic complications and high mortality rate in dogs. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been investigated for their therapeutic potential in several inflammation models. In the present study, the effects of canine adipose tissue-derived (cAT)-MSCs in a rat model of SAP induced by retrograde injection of 3% sodium taurocholate solution into the pancreatic duct were investigated. cAT-MSCs labeled with dioctadecyl-3,3,3′-tetramethylindo-carbocyanine perchlorate (1 × 107 cells/kg) were systemically administered to rats and pancreatic tissue was collected three days later for histopathological, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunocytochemical analyses. Greater numbers of infused cAT-MSCs were detected in the pancreas of SAP relative to sham-operated rats. cAT-MSC infusion reduced pancreatic edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and acinar cell necrosis, and decreased pancreatic expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, -6, -12, -17, and -23 and interferon-γ, while stimulating expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 in SAP rats. Moreover, cAT-MSCs decreased the number of clusters of differentiation 3-positive T cells and increased that of forkhead box P3-positive T cells in the injured pancreas. These results indicate that cAT-MSCs can be effective as a cell-based therapeutic strategy for treatment of SAP in dogs. PMID:27297425

  13. Inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome reduces the severity of experimentally-induced acute pancreatitis in obese mice

    PubMed Central

    York, Jason M; Castellanos, Karla J; Cabay, Robert J; Fantuzzi, Giamila

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP), while most often a mild and self-limiting inflammatory disease, worsens to a characteristically necrotic severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in about 20% of cases. Obesity, affecting more than a third of American adults, is a risk factor for the development of SAP, but the exact mechanism of this association has not been identified. Coincidental with chronic low-grade inflammation, activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome increases with obesity. Lean mice genetically deficient for specific components of the NLRP3 inflammasome are protected from experimentally-induced AP, indicating a direct involvement of this pathway in AP pathophysiology. We hypothesized that inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome with the sulfonylurea drug glyburide would reduce disease severity in obese mice with cerulein-induced SAP. Treatment with glyburide led to significantly reduced relative pancreatic mass and water content and less pancreatic damage and cell death in genetically obese ob/ob mice with SAP compared to vehicle-treated obese SAP mice. Glyburide administration in ob/ob mice with cerulein induced SAP also resulted in significantly reduced serum levels of interleukin-6, lipase and amylase, and led to lower production of LPS-stimulated IL-1β release in cultured peritoneal cells, compared to vehicle treated ob/ob mice with SAP. Together, these data indicate involvement of the NLRP3 inflammasome in obesity-associated SAP, and expose the possible utility of its inhibition in prevention or treatment of SAP in obese individuals. PMID:25152324

  14. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, diabetes mellitus and serum nutritional markers after acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Tepes, Bojan; Makuc, Jana; Rudolf, Sasa; Zaletel, Jelka; Vidmar, Tjasa; Seruga, Maja; Birsa, Bostjan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate impairment and clinical significance of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function in patients after acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: Patients with AP were invited to participate in the study. Severity of AP was determined by the Atlanta classification and definitions revised in 2012. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) was diagnosed by the concentration of fecal elastase-1. An additional work-up, including laboratory testing of serum nutritional markers for determination of malnutrition, was offered to all patients with low levels of fecal elastase-1 FE. Hemoglobin A1c or oral glucose tolerance tests were also performed in patients without prior diabetes mellitus, and type 3c diabetes mellitus (T3cDM) was diagnosed according to American Diabetes Association criteria. RESULTS: One hundred patients were included in the study: 75% (75/100) of patients had one attack of AP and 25% (25/100) had two or more attacks. The most common etiology was alcohol. Mild, moderately severe and severe AP were present in 67, 15 and 18% of patients, respectively. The mean time from attack of AP to inclusion in the study was 2.7 years. PEI was diagnosed in 21% (21/100) of patients and T3cDM in 14% (14/100) of patients. In all patients with PEI, at least one serologic nutritional marker was below the lower limit of normal. T3cDM was more frequently present in patients with severe AP (P = 0.031), but was also present in some patients with mild and moderately severe AP. PEI was present in all degrees of severity of AP. There were no statistically significantly differences according to gender, etiology and number of AP attacks. CONCLUSION: As exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency can develop after AP, routine follow-up of patients is necessary, for which serum nutritional panel measurements can be useful. PMID:25561813

  15. Imaging tests for accurate diagnosis of acute biliary pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Şurlin, Valeriu; Săftoiu, Adrian; Dumitrescu, Daniela

    2014-11-28

    Gallstones represent the most frequent aetiology of acute pancreatitis in many statistics all over the world, estimated between 40%-60%. Accurate diagnosis of acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP) is of outmost importance because clearance of lithiasis [gallbladder and common bile duct (CBD)] rules out recurrences. Confirmation of biliary lithiasis is done by imaging. The sensitivity of the ultrasonography (US) in the detection of gallstones is over 95% in uncomplicated cases, but in ABP, sensitivity for gallstone detection is lower, being less than 80% due to the ileus and bowel distension. Sensitivity of transabdominal ultrasonography (TUS) for choledocolithiasis varies between 50%-80%, but the specificity is high, reaching 95%. Diameter of the bile duct may be orientative for diagnosis. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) seems to be a more effective tool to diagnose ABP rather than endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), which should be performed only for therapeutic purposes. As the sensitivity and specificity of computerized tomography are lower as compared to state-of-the-art magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) or EUS, especially for small stones and small diameter of CBD, the later techniques are nowadays preferred for the evaluation of ABP patients. ERCP has the highest accuracy for the diagnosis of choledocholithiasis and is used as a reference standard in many studies, especially after sphincterotomy and balloon extraction of CBD stones. Laparoscopic ultrasonography is a useful tool for the intraoperative diagnosis of choledocholithiasis. Routine exploration of the CBD in cases of patients scheduled for cholecystectomy after an attack of ABP was not proven useful. A significant rate of the so-called idiopathic pancreatitis is actually caused by microlithiasis and/or biliary sludge. In conclusion, the general algorithm for CBD stone detection starts with anamnesis, serum biochemistry and then TUS, followed by EUS or MRCP. In the end

  16. Early complications after interventions in patients with acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ai-Lin; Guo, Qiang; Wang, Ming-Jun; Hu, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Zhao-Da

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify the possible predictors of early complications after the initial intervention in acute necrotizing pancreatitis. METHODS: We collected the medical records of 334 patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis who received initial intervention in our center. Complications associated with predictors were analyzed. RESULTS: The postoperative mortality rate was 16% (53/334). Up to 31% of patients were successfully treated with percutaneous catheter drainage alone. The rates of intra-abdominal bleeding, colonic fistula, and progressive infection were 15% (50/334), 20% (68/334), and 26% (87/334), respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that Marshall score upon admission, multiple organ failure, preoperative respiratory infection, and sepsis were the predictors of postoperative progressive infection (P < 0.05). Single organ failure, systemic inflammatory response syndrome upon admission, and C-reactive protein level upon admission were the risk factors of postoperative colonic fistula (P < 0.05). Moreover, preoperative Marshall score, organ failure, sepsis, and preoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome were the risk factors of postoperative intra-abdominal bleeding (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Marshall score, organ failures, preoperative respiratory infection, sepsis, preoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and C-reactive protein level upon admission are associated with postoperative complications. PMID:26973421

  17. Strongyloidiasis: a case with acute pancreatitis and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Makker, Jasbir; Balar, Bhavna; Niazi, Masooma; Daniel, Myrta

    2015-03-21

    Strongyloides stercoralis, a soil transmitted helminth infection, affects millions with varying prevalence worldwide. A large number of affected hosts are asymptomatic. Symptoms pertaining to pulmonary and gastrointestinal involvement may be present. Manifestations of involvement beyond lung and intestine can be seen with dissemination of infection and lethal hyperinfection. Immunosuppression secondary to use of steroids or other immunosuppressants and coexistence of human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 are the known risk factors for dissemination and hyperinfection. Diagnostic modalities comprise stool examination, serology and molecular testing. Stool tests are inexpensive but are limited by low sensitivity, whereas serologic and molecular tests are more precise but at the expense of higher cost. Treatment with Ivermectin or Albendazole as an alternative is safe and efficacious. We present a rare case of acute pancreatitis secondary to Strongyloides. High index of suspicion in patients specifically from endemic countries of origin and lack of other common etiologies of acute pancreatitis may help in early diagnosis and prompt treatment of this potentially fatal infection.

  18. Strongyloidiasis: A case with acute pancreatitis and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Jasbir; Balar, Bhavna; Niazi, Masooma; Daniel, Myrta

    2015-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis, a soil transmitted helminth infection, affects millions with varying prevalence worldwide. A large number of affected hosts are asymptomatic. Symptoms pertaining to pulmonary and gastrointestinal involvement may be present. Manifestations of involvement beyond lung and intestine can be seen with dissemination of infection and lethal hyperinfection. Immunosuppression secondary to use of steroids or other immunosuppressants and coexistence of human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 are the known risk factors for dissemination and hyperinfection. Diagnostic modalities comprise stool examination, serology and molecular testing. Stool tests are inexpensive but are limited by low sensitivity, whereas serologic and molecular tests are more precise but at the expense of higher cost. Treatment with Ivermectin or Albendazole as an alternative is safe and efficacious. We present a rare case of acute pancreatitis secondary to Strongyloides. High index of suspicion in patients specifically from endemic countries of origin and lack of other common etiologies of acute pancreatitis may help in early diagnosis and prompt treatment of this potentially fatal infection. PMID:25805946

  19. Recent advances in the investigation of pancreatic inflammation induced by large doses of basic amino acids in rodents.

    PubMed

    Kui, Balázs; Balla, Zsolt; Végh, Eszter T; Pallagi, Petra; Venglovecz, Viktória; Iványi, Béla; Takács, Tamás; Hegyi, Péter; Rakonczay, Zoltán

    2014-02-01

    It has been known for approximately 30 years that large doses of the semi-essential basic amino acid L-arginine induce severe pancreatic inflammation in rats. Recently, it has been demonstrated that L-arginine can also induce pancreatitis in mice. Moreover, other basic amino acids like L-ornithine and L-lysine can cause exocrine pancreatic damage without affecting the endocrine parenchyma and the ducts in rats. The utilization of these noninvasive severe basic amino acid-induced pancreatitis models is becoming increasingly popular and appreciated as these models nicely reproduce most laboratory and morphological features of human pancreatitis. Consequently, the investigation of basic amino acid-induced pancreatitis may offer us a better understanding of the pathogenesis and possible treatment options of the human disease.

  20. Role of human lipocalin proteins in abdominal obesity after acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ruma G; Pendharkar, Sayali A; Plank, Lindsay D; Petrov, Maxim S

    2017-03-07

    Lipocalin proteins are small regulatory peptides implicated in metabolism, inflammation, and immunity. Although lipocalin proteins have been linked to various clinical conditions, their role in the acute inflammatory setting, such as acute pancreatitis (AP), has only been sparsely investigated. Two members of the lipocalin family, lipocalin-2 (LCN-2) and retinol binding protein -4 (RBP-4), play an important role in obesity and insulin resistance. In this study, we analysed circulating levels of LCN-2 and RBP-4 in 92 individuals after AP, of whom 41 individuals had abdominal obesity and 51 did not. Binary logistic regression analyses were performed to determine whether abdominal obesity was associated with the two lipocalin proteins. Lipocalin-2 was significantly associated with abdominal obesity in the unadjusted model (Odds ratio (OR)=1.014 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.000, 1.028], P=0.05) and after adjusting for patient related (age, ethnicity, and diabetes mellitus) and pancreatitis related (aetiology, severity, recurrence, and duration of AP) characteristics (OR=1.018 [95% CI: 1.001, 1.036], p=0.04). Further, the association of LCN-2 with waist circumference was significant in individuals with alcohol aetiology of AP (β=1.082 [95% CI: 1.011, 1.158], p=0.02]. The association between RBP-4 and abdominal obesity was not significant in both unadjusted and adjusted models. These findings indicate that circulating levels of LCN-2 in patients after AP may play a role in chronic low grade inflammation associated with abdominal adiposity and that alcohol consumption may further exacerbate adipose tissue dysfunction.

  1. Acute pancreatitis: a lesser-known complication of aluminum phosphide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Verma, S K; Ahmad, S; Shirazi, N; Barthwal, S P; Khurana, D; Chugh, M; Gambhir, H S

    2007-12-01

    There have been no case reports on aluminum phosphide-induced pancreatitis in the literature available. In this report, we present the case of a young man who developed acute pancreatitis and probably acute myocarditis following ingestion of aluminum phosphide pellets in the absence of the usual risk factors and after exclusion of other possible causes of pancreatitis. In the absence of re-challenge, we put forth the probable causative association of pancreatitis with aluminum phosphide or phosphine gas, its active pesticidal component.

  2. Effects of a new cholecystokinin antagonist, TS-941, on experimental acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Naruse, S; Kitagawa, M; Ishiguro, H; Nakae, Y; Yoshikawa, T; Hayakawa, T

    1998-10-01

    The effects of a new benzodiazepine-derivative, cholecystokinin receptor antagonist, TS-941, on experimental acute pancreatitis were studied in rats. Hemorrhagic pancreatitis was induced by an infusion of a mixture of trypsin and taurocholate into the pancreatic duct. Edematous pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 40 microg/kg body weight of cerulein at 0 and 1 h after the start of the experiment. TS-941 (3 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously immediately and 3 h after the induction of pancreatitis. In trypsin-taurocholate-induced pancreatitis, TS-941, with or without the synthetic trypsin inhibitor ONO-3403, had no beneficial effects on the survival rate, pancreatic wet weight, and serum pancreatic enzymes. In cerulein-induced pancreatitis, the treatment with TS-941 significantly reduced the increases of pancreatic wet weight and serum amylase and lipase. Plasma trypsinogen activation peptide (TAP) significantly rose 1 h after the first injection of cerulein. TS-941 inhibited the liberation of TAP in cerulein-induced pancreatitis. These results show that TS-941 is effective for prevention of cerulein-induced edematous pancreatitis. ONO-3403 has beneficial effects on trypsin-taurocholate-induced hemorrhagic pancreatitis, but the combination of TS-941 and ONO-3403 has no additive effect.

  3. Biliopancreatic duct injection of ethanol as an experimental model of acute and chronic pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Unal, Ethem; Atalay, Suleyman; Tolan, Huseyin Kerem; Yuksekdag, Sema; Yucel, Metin; Acar, Aylin; Basak, Fatih; Gunes, Pembegul; Bas, Gurhan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we described an easily reproducable experimental pancreatits model induced by biliopancreatic duct injection of ethyl alcohol. Seventy Wistar albino rats were divided equally into seven groups randomly: the control group (group 1), acute pancreatitis groups; induced by 20% ethanol (group 2), 48% ethanol (group 3), 80% ethanol (group 4), chronic pancreatitis groups; induced by 20% ethanol (group 5), 48% ethanol (group 6) and by 80% ethanol (group 7). Acute pancreatitis groups were sacrified on postoperative day 3, while the control group and chronic pancreatitis groups were killed on postoperative day 7. Histopathologic evaluation was done, and P < 0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. All rats in group 3 developed acute pancreatitis (100%). Inflammatory infiltration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells, interstitial edema, and focal necrotic areas were seen in the pancreatic tissues. Similarly, all rats in group 6 developed chronic pancreatitis (100%). Interstitial fibrosis, lymphotic infiltration, ductal dilatation, acinar cell atrophy, periductal hyperplasia were seen in the pancreatic tissues. Mortality was seen only in group 7. The biliopancreatic ductal injection of 48% ethanol induced acute and chronic pancreatitis has 100% success rate.

  4. The association between red blood cell distribution width and acute pancreatitis associated lung injury in patients with acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, You-Fan; Zhang, Zhao-Xia; Cao, Wei; Meng, Cun-Ren; Xu, Shen-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) that describes red blood cell volume heterogeneity is a common laboratory test. Our aim was to focus on the association between RDW and acute pancreatitis associated lung injury (APALI). Methodology A total of 152 acute pancreatitis (AP) patients who conformed to the criteria were included in this study. The demographic data, medical histories and laboratory measures was obtained from each patient on admission, further, the medical histories and biological data were analyzed, retrospectively. Results Increased RDW at admission was observed in patients with APALI compared with the non-APALI groups. Our results exhibited that RDW was an independent risk factor for APALI after adjusting leukocyte, neutrophil percentage, random blood glucose (RBG), total bilirubin (TB) and total bile acid (TBA) (Crude model) (OR=2.671;CI 95% 1.145–6.230; P=0.023), further adjustment based on Crude model for sex and age did not attenuate the significantly high risk of APALI in patients with AP, RWD still remained a roles as an independent risk factor for APALI (OR=2.653;CI95 % 1.123–6.138; P=0.026). Conclusions Our study demonstrate that RDW at admission is associated with APALI and should be considered as an underlying risk factor of APALI. PMID:28352692

  5. Role of inflammation and its mediators in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Rong; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Shihao; Nanda, Anil; Li, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke and other forms of ischemic brain injury. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammatory response is a double-edged sword, as it not only exacerbates secondary brain injury in the acute stage of stroke but also beneficially contributes to brain recovery after stroke. In this article, we provide an overview on the role of inflammation and its mediators in acute ischemic stroke. We discuss various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses in different phases after ischemic stroke and the possible reasons for their failures in clinical trials. Undoubtedly, there is still much to be done in order to translate promising pre-clinical findings into clinical practice. A better understanding of the dynamic balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses and identifying the discrepancies between pre-clinical studies and clinical trials may serve as a basis for designing effective therapies. PMID:24006091

  6. Use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis: A case–control study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Some cases of acute pancreatitis have been reported to be associated with use of methimazole. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis on the basis of a systematic analysis. Methods: This was a population-based case–control study analyzing the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 5764 individuals aged 20–84 years with a first attack of acute pancreatitis from 1998 to 2011 as the cases and 23,056 randomly selected sex- and age-matched individuals without acute pancreatitis as the controls. Use of methimazole was categorized as “never use” and “ever use.” We estimated the relative risk of acute pancreatitis associated with the use of methimazole by calculating the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) using a multivariable logistic regression model. Results: After adjustment for confounding factors, the OR of acute pancreatitis was 0.91 in individuals with ever use of methimazole, when compared with individuals with never use of methimazole (95% CI, 0.60–1.38). Unlike methimazole use, alcohol-related disease, biliary stone, cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and hypertriglyceridemia were factors significantly associated with acute pancreatitis. Conclusions: Our study does not detect a substantial association between the use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis on the basis of systematic analysis. There appears to be a discrepancy between case reports and our systematic analysis about the association between the use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis. PMID:27127323

  7. [Acute-phase proteins in inflammation].

    PubMed

    Engler, R

    1995-01-01

    The acute phase proteins (APPs) have been empirically defined as those whose plasma concentration changes following inflammatory reaction. Those proteins whose concentrations increase are referred to as positive APP, while those whose levels decline are termed negative APP. In man, positive APP are: alpha 1 acid glycoprotein, alpha 1 protease inhibitor, alpha 1 antichymotrypsin, haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A. Great variability in the APP response between different species is observed. The principal functions of APP, result from the interaction of these proteins with ligands of various origins which give "protein-ligands" complexes. These complexes are cleared by the RES or by the hepatocyte. The results are protease inhibition, neutralization of toxic molecules such as hemoglobin or the superoxide anion, clearance of cell membranes and chromatin. The drop of the plasma concentration of negative APP during an inflammatory reaction carries a rise of free ligands (fatty acids, hormones, vitamins, trace elements). IL6 has been recognized as the principal regulator of most APP genes. The response of the hepatic cell to IL6 is characterized by the enhanced production of type 2 or IL6 specific APPs. The biochemical process of signal transduction is IL6--JAK2--APRF The set of APP genes regulated by IL1 type cytokines (type 1 APPs) is distinct from that regulated by IL6 type cytokine. IL1 and TNF alpha mediated stimulation of type 1 APP genes is synergistically enhanced by IL6 type cytokines. The biochemical process of signal transduction is IL1, IL6--Ras--MAP kinase--NFIL6 The targeted inflammatory proteic profile including the assay of C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and alpha 1 acid glycoprotein produces a "biological tool" to the clinician in order to manage an inflammatory response. IL6, a proteic marker for the future, connected with CRP, will be assayed during early inflammatory reaction.

  8. Aprotinin revisited: formulation, characterization, biodistribution and therapeutic potential of new aprotinin microemulsion in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Karasulu, H Yeşim; Oruç, Nevin; Üstündağ-Okur, Neslihan; İlem Özdemir, Derya; Ay Şenyiğit, Zeynep; Barbet Yılmaz, Funda; Aşıkoğlu, Makbule; Özkılıç, Hayal; Akçiçek, Eren; Güneri, Tamer; Özütemiz, Ömer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop aprotinin-loaded microemulsion (MA) for intravenous administration and evaluate the biodistribution and therapeutic potential of developed formulation in acute pancreatitis models in rats. Phase diagrams were constructed to identify microemulsion region and the optimal microemulsion was evaluated for physicochemical properties and treatment effect in rats, and comparisons made with the solution of aprotinin (SA). To evaluate the biodistribution of the drug by gamma scintigraphy aprotinin was radiolabeled with (99m)Tc radionuclide. Mild and severe acute pancreatitis was induced in rats by subcutaneous injections of cerulein and introductal infusion of 3% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct, respectively. In addition, serum amylase and pancreatic tissue myeloperoxidase activities were measured to evaluate the pancreatic damage. According to gamma scintigraphy and biodistribution studies, accumulation times and distribution of (99m)Tc-MA and SA were different. While MA was highly uptake by reticuloendothelial system, SA was mostly excreted by kidneys and bladder. Compared with the mild acute pancreatitis group, treatment with MA significantly decreased the serum amylase activity and pancreas myeloperoxidase activity. Furthermore, the protease inhibitor molecule aprotinin has therapeutic potential in acute pancreatitis. Finally, MA may be suggested as a promising alternative for treatment of acute pancreatitis.

  9. Use of laparoscopy for diagnosing experimentally induced acute pancreatitis in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-wook; Oh, Ye-in; Choi, Ji-hye; Kim, Dae-yong

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in dogs remains a significant challenge despite the development of advanced diagnostic methodologies. Visual inspection and pancreas biopsy using laparoscopy are generally considered to be procedures free of complications when conducted on healthy animals. However, the usefulness of laparoscopy for diagnosing acute pancreatitis has not been assessed. In the present study, the efficacy of laparoscopy for diagnosing acute pancreatitis in dogs was evaluated in animals with experimentally induced acute pancreatitis. Gross appearance of the pancreatic area was examined by laparoscopy to survey for the presence of edema, adhesions, effusion, pseudocysts, hemorrhage, and fat necrosis. Laparoscopic biopsy was performed and the histopathologic results were compared to those of pancreatic samples obtained during necropsy. The correlation between laparoscopy and histopathologic findings of the pancreas was evaluated. The presence of adhesions, effusion, and hemorrhage in the pancreatic area observed by laparoscopy significantly correlated with the histopathologic results (p < 0.05). There was no significant relationship between the histopathologic and laparoscopic biopsy findings. Results of this study suggested that laparoscopic evaluation of gross lesions has clinical significance although the laparoscopic biopsy technique has some limitations. This method combined with additional diagnostic tools can be effective for diagnosing acute pancreatitis in dogs. PMID:24962411

  10. Relative quantification of albumin and fibrinogen modifications by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in the diagnosis and monitoring of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lankes, Ulrich; Brennan, Stephen O; Walmsley, Trevor A; George, Peter M

    2015-04-15

    The increasing availability of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in clinical laboratories provides the opportunity to replace or complement present underperforming immuno- and chemometric assays. Amylase and lipase show limited specificity and sensitivity for pancreatic inflammation and lack the capacity of monitoring the disease due to their short half-lives. Previous findings suggested that cleavage products of the pancreatic enzyme carboxypeptidase A could be a more suitable indicator for defining and classifying pancreatic inflammation. The plasma proteins albumin and β-fibrinogen were digested with trypsin and truncated forms (des-Leu-albumin, and des-Gln-β-fibrinogen) quantified against their non-truncated forms by LC-MS/MS. Four hundred fifty eight samples from 83 patients were used to evaluate the novel method and affirm its suitability for detecting acute pancreatitis. A robust, selective, precise and accurate LC-MS/MS method was set up to measure the proportion of truncated proteins. Reference ranges for the proportion of the truncated albumin and β-fibrinogen were from 2% to 9% and 3% to 25%, respectively. Acute pancreatitis patients had values above these ranges and were distinctly separated from reference control individuals. The longer circulating half-lives of albumin and fibrinogen compared to pancreatic enzymes themselves provide the potential to diagnose pancreatitis more specifically over a longer time period, to monitor the course of the disease, and to track recurrent complications. The wide range of the proportion and the differential half-life of both truncated proteins could also be used for assessing the severity of pancreatitis.

  11. IRF5 controls both acute and chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Miriam; Byrne, Adam J; Blazek, Katrina; Saliba, David G; Pease, James E; Perocheau, Dany; Feldmann, Marc; Udalova, Irina A

    2015-09-01

    Whereas the importance of macrophages in chronic inflammatory diseases is well recognized, there is an increasing awareness that neutrophils may also play an important role. In addition to the well-documented heterogeneity of macrophage phenotypes and functions, neutrophils also show remarkable phenotypic diversity among tissues. Understanding the molecular pathways that control this heterogeneity should provide abundant scope for the generation of more specific and effective therapeutics. We have shown that the transcription factor IFN regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) polarizes macrophages toward an inflammatory phenotype. IRF5 is also expressed in other myeloid cells, including neutrophils, where it was linked to neutrophil function. In this study we explored the role of IRF5 in models of acute inflammation, including antigen-induced inflammatory arthritis and lung injury, both involving an extensive influx of neutrophils. Mice lacking IRF5 accumulate far fewer neutrophils at the site of inflammation due to the reduced levels of chemokines important for neutrophil recruitment, such as the chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1. Furthermore we found that neutrophils express little IRF5 in the joints and that their migratory properties are not affected by the IRF5 deficiency. These studies extend prior ones suggesting that inhibiting IRF5 might be useful for chronic macrophage-induced inflammation and suggest that IRF5 blockade would ameliorate more acute forms of inflammation, including lung injury.

  12. Novel Lipid Mediators and Resolution Mechanisms in Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Serhan, Charles N.

    2010-01-01

    Because inflammation is appreciated as a unifying basis of many widely occurring diseases, the mechanisms involved in its natural resolution are of considerable interest. Using contained, self-limited inflammatory exudates and a systems approach, novel lipid-derived mediators and pathways were uncovered in the resolution of inflammatory exudates. These new families of local mediators control both the duration and magnitude of acute inflammation as well as the return of the site to homeostasis in the process of catabasis. This new genus of specialized proresolving mediators (SPM) includes essential fatty acid–derived lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, and, most recently, maresins. These families were named based on their unique structures and potent stereoselective actions. The temporally initiated biosynthesis of SPM and their direct impact on leukocyte trafficking and macrophage-directed clearance mechanisms provide clear evidence that resolution is an active, programmed response at the tissue level. Moreover, SPM that possess anti-inflammatory (ie, limiting PMN infiltration) and proresolving (enhance macrophage uptake and clearance of apoptotic PMN and microbial particles) actions as well as stimulating mucosal antimicrobial responses demonstrate that anti-inflammation and proresolution are different responses of the host and novel defining properties of these molecules. The mapping of new resolution circuits has opened the possibility for understanding mechanisms that lead from acute to chronic inflammation, or to the resolution thereof, as well as to potential, resolution-based immunopharmacological therapies. PMID:20813960

  13. A Rare Cause of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis in a Child: Isovaleric Acidemia with Novel Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Sag, Elif; Cebi, Alper Han; Kaya, Gulay; Karaguzel, Gulay

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent acute pancreatic attacks is a rare clinical condition (2-5% of all acute pancreatis) in children and is mainly idiopathic in most cases. Sometimes it may be associated with congenital anomalies, metabolic diseases or hereditary conditions. Isovaleric acidemia (IVA) is a rare autosomal recessive amino acid metabolism disorder associated with isovaleryl coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency presenting the clinical findings such metabolic acidosis with increased anion gap, hyperammonemia, ketonemia, hypoglycemia, “the odor of sweaty feet,” abdominal pain, vomiting, feeding intolerance, shock and coma. Recurrent acute pancreatitis associated with IVA have been rarely reported. Herein; we report a child who admitted with recurrent acute pancreatic attacks and had the final diagnosis of IVA. Mutation analysis revealed a novel homozygous mutation of (p.E117K [c.349G>A]) in the IVA gene. Organic acidemias must kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of recurrent acute pancreatic attacks in children.

  14. Dual pancreas- and lung-targeting therapy for local and systemic complications of acute pancreatitis mediated by a phenolic propanediamine moiety.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianbo; Zhang, Jinjie; Fu, Yao; Sun, Xun; Gong, Tao; Jiang, Jinghui; Zhang, Zhirong

    2015-08-28

    To inhibit both the local and systemic complications with acute pancreatitis, an effective therapy requires a drug delivery system that can efficiently overcome the blood-pancreas barrier while achieving lung-specific accumulation. Here, we report the first dual pancreas- and lung-targeting therapeutic strategy mediated by a phenolic propanediamine moiety for the treatment of acute pancreatitis. Using the proposed dual-targeting ligand, an anti-inflammatory compound Rhein has been tailored to preferentially accumulate in the pancreas and lungs with rapid distribution kinetics, excellent tissue-penetrating properties and minimum toxicity. Accordingly, the drug-ligand conjugate remarkably downregulated the proinflammatory cytokines in the target organs thus effectively inhibiting local pancreatic and systemic inflammation in rats. The dual-specific targeting therapeutic strategy may help pave the way for targeted drug delivery to treat complicated inflammatory diseases.

  15. A randomised, double blind, multicentre trial of octreotide in moderate to severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, W; Buchler, M; Malfertheiner, P; Beger, H; Adler, G; Gaus, W; the, G

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The pharmacological inhibition of exocrine pancreatic secretion with the somatostatin analogue octreotide has been advocated as a specific treatment of acute pancreatitis.
AIM—To investigate the efficacy of octreotide in acute pancreatitis in a randomised, placebo controlled trial.
METHODS—302 patients from 32 hospitals, fulfilling the criteria for moderate to severe acute pancreatitis within 96 hours of the onset of symptoms, were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: group P (n=103) received placebo, while groups O1 (n=98) and O2 (n=101) received 100 and 200 µg of octreotide, respectively, by subcutaneous injection three times daily for seven days. The primary outcome variable was a score composed of mortality and 15 typical complications of acute pancreatitis.
RESULTS—The three groups were well matched with respect to pretreatment characteristics. An intent to treat analysis of all 302 patients revealed no significant differences among treatment groups with respect to mortality (P: 16%; O1: 15%; O2: 12%), the rate of newly developed complications, the duration of pain, surgical interventions, or the length of the hospital stay. A valid for efficacy analysis (251 patients) also revealed no significant differences.
CONCLUSIONS—This trial shows no benefit of octreotide in the treatment of acute pancreatitis.


Keywords: acute pancreatitis; somatostatin; octreotide; randomised controlled multicentre trial PMID:10369711

  16. Leptin treatment ameliorates acute lung injury in rats with cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gultekin, Fatma Ayca; Kerem, Mustafa; Tatlicioglu, Ertan; Aricioglu, Aysel; Unsal, Cigdem; Bukan, Neslihan

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of exogenous leptin on acute lung injury (ALI) in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: Forty-eight rats were randomly divided into 3 groups. AP was induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of cerulein (50 μg/kg) four times, at 1 h intervals. The rats received a single i.p. injection of 10 μg/kg leptin (leptin group) or 2 mL saline (AP group) after cerulein injections. In the sham group, animals were given a single i.p. injection of 2 mL saline. Experimental samples were collected for biochemical and histological evaluations at 24 h and 48 h after the induction of AP or saline administration. Blood samples were obtained for the determination of amylase, lipase, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, macrophage inflammatory peptide (MIP)-2 and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM)-1 levels, while pancreatic and lung tissues were removed for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, nitric oxide (NOx) level, CD40 expression and histological evaluation. RESULTS: Cerulein injection caused severe AP, confirmed by an increase in serum amylase and lipase levels, histopathological findings of severe AP, and pancreatic MPO activity, compared to the values obtained in the sham group. In the leptin group, serum levels of MIP-2, sICMA-1, TNF-α, and IL-1β, pancreatic MPO activity, CD40 expression in pancreas and lung tissues, and NOx level in the lung tissue were lower compared to those in the AP group. Histologically, pancreatic and lung damage was less severe following leptin administration. CONCLUSION: Exogenous leptin attenuates inflamma-tory changes, and reduces pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide levels, and CD40 expression in cerulein-induced AP and may be protective in AP associated ALI. PMID:17589942

  17. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis and its complications.

    PubMed

    Zerem, Enver

    2014-10-14

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), which is the most serious type of this disorder, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. SAP runs a biphasic course. During the first 1-2 wk, a pro-inflammatory response results in systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). If the SIRS is severe, it can lead to early multisystem organ failure (MOF). After the first 1-2 wk, a transition from a pro-inflammatory response to an anti-inflammatory response occurs; during this transition, the patient is at risk for intestinal flora translocation and the development of secondary infection of the necrotic tissue, which can result in sepsis and late MOF. Many recommendations have been made regarding SAP management and its complications. However, despite the reduction in overall mortality in the last decade, SAP is still associated with high mortality. In the majority of cases, sterile necrosis should be managed conservatively, whereas in infected necrotizing pancreatitis, the infected non-vital solid tissue should be removed to control the sepsis. Intervention should be delayed for as long as possible to allow better demarcation and liquefaction of the necrosis. Currently, the step-up approach (delay, drain, and debride) may be considered as the reference standard intervention for this disorder.

  18. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Zerem, Enver

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), which is the most serious type of this disorder, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. SAP runs a biphasic course. During the first 1-2 wk, a pro-inflammatory response results in systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). If the SIRS is severe, it can lead to early multisystem organ failure (MOF). After the first 1-2 wk, a transition from a pro-inflammatory response to an anti-inflammatory response occurs; during this transition, the patient is at risk for intestinal flora translocation and the development of secondary infection of the necrotic tissue, which can result in sepsis and late MOF. Many recommendations have been made regarding SAP management and its complications. However, despite the reduction in overall mortality in the last decade, SAP is still associated with high mortality. In the majority of cases, sterile necrosis should be managed conservatively, whereas in infected necrotizing pancreatitis, the infected non-vital solid tissue should be removed to control the sepsis. Intervention should be delayed for as long as possible to allow better demarcation and liquefaction of the necrosis. Currently, the step-up approach (delay, drain, and debride) may be considered as the reference standard intervention for this disorder. PMID:25320523

  19. [Acute pancreatitis: recent advances in understanding its pathophysiology].

    PubMed

    Telek, G; Fehér, J; Jakab, F; Claude, R

    2000-02-06

    This article reviews the recent changes in the understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology emphasizing results deriving from the more detailed comprehension of the local and systemic aspects of the inflammatory process. The authors briefly discuss those theories that have been influencing the basic philosophies of treatment efforts. The role of premature digestive enzyme activation as the principal determinant of the pathoetiology and mortality of this disease has been questioned lately, and the inflammatory explosion has been placed into the center of attention. Simultaneously with the enzyme activation, the pancreatitogenic noxious event rapidly induces the formation of oxygen derived free radicals, activation of the transcription factor NF kappa-B, with consequent citokine production, cellular adhesion molecule upregulation and leukocyte hyperstimulation. Numerous other mediator cascades are activated in parallel, the uncontrolled surge of proinflammatory stimuli, and activity of the effector cells lead to multiple organ failure in severe cases. A genetically determined catastrophe management program is set forth in the acinar cell with pancreatitis associated protein expression and activation of the apoptosis machinery. Therapeutic approaches based on these recent findings are briefly touched upon.

  20. Bacterial translocation: a potential source for infection in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, L; Munda, R; Alexander, J W; Tchervenkov, J I; Babcock, G F

    1993-09-01

    Infections from enteric bacteria are a major cause of morbidity and mortality during acute pancreatitis (AP), but the pathways by which these organisms reach distant organs remains speculative. Experiments were conducted to determine if bacterial translocation could be a mechanism for infection during this disease. AP was induced in Lewis rats by i.v. infusion of caerulein (experiment I) or ligation of the head of the pancreas (experiment II). In a third experiment, rats were gavaged with 1 x 10(8) 14C-radiolabeled Escherichia coli and pancreatitis was induced with caerulein. Results in all three experiments showed that AP increased the number of viable bacteria recovered in peritoneal fluid, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), liver, lungs, and pancreas. Radionuclide counting indicated that AP enhanced the gut permeability to 14C E. coli. To estimate the impact of AP on the magnitude of translocation and on the ability of the host to clear bacteria, the nuclide and colony-forming units (CFU) ratios were calculated between animals with and without AP. Blood, peritoneal fluid, and MLN had the highest nuclide ratio. During AP, these tissues may be the principal routes for bacterial spreading from the gut lumen. Peritoneal fluid, pancreas, and lung were the tissues with the highest CFU ratio. Bacterial killing ability of these tissues is likely impaired during AP.

  1. Proteomic analysis of heat shock-induced protection in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Fetaud-Lapierre, Vanessa; Pastor, Catherine M; Farina, Annarita; Hochstrasser, Denis F; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Lescuyer, Pierre

    2010-11-05

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas, which can result in serious morbidity or death. Acute pancreatitis severity can be reduced in experimental models by preconditioning animals with a short hyperthermia prior to disease induction. Heat shock proteins 27 and 70 are key effectors of this protective effect. In this study, we performed a comparative proteomic analysis using a combination of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis and isobaric tagging to investigate changes in pancreatic proteins expression that were associated with thermal stress, both in healthy rats and in a model of caerulein-induced pancreatitis. In agreement with previous studies, we observed modulation of heat shock and inflammatory proteins expression in response to heat stress or pancreatitis induction. We also identified numerous other proteins, whose pancreatic level changed following pancreatitis induction, when acute pancreatitis severity was reduced by prior thermal stress, or in healthy rats in response to hyperthermia. Interestingly, we showed that the expression of various proteins associated with the secretory pathway was modified in the different experimental models, suggesting that modulation of this process is involved in the protective effect against pancreatic tissue damage.

  2. Early phase of acute pancreatitis: Assessment and management

    PubMed Central

    Phillip, Veit; Steiner, Jörg M; Algül, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a potentially life-threatening disease with a wide spectrum of severity. The overall mortality of AP is approximately 5%. According to the revised Atlanta classification system, AP can be classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Severe AP often takes a clinical course with two phases, an early and a late phase, which should both be considered separately. In this review article, we first discuss general aspects of AP, including incidence, pathophysiology, etiology, and grading of severity, then focus on the assessment of patients with suspected AP, including diagnosis and risk stratification, followed by the management of AP during the early phase, with special emphasis on fluid therapy, pain management, nutrition, and antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:25133018

  3. The "golden hours" of management in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jessica M; Gardner, Timothy B

    2012-08-01

    In the past decade, a significant amount of active and enthusiastic research has changed the way we treat acute pancreatitis (AP) within the first 24 hours of presentation. We highlight the importance of rapid initiation of treatment to help prevent the considerable morbidity and mortality that can occur when interventions are delayed. We review recent data that validate simple and accurate tools for prognostication of AP to replace the older, more tedious methods that relied on numerous factors and required up to 48 hours to complete. Additionally, we aim to provide evidence-based guidelines and end points for fluid resuscitation. Finally, we hope to bring clarification to two previously controversial topics in AP treatment: the use of prophylactic antibiotics and early endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

  4. Dorsal duct sphincterotomy is effective long-term treatment of acute pancreatitis associated with pancreas divisum.

    PubMed

    Keith, R G; Shapero, T F; Saibil, F G; Moore, T L

    1989-10-01

    Nonbiliary, nonalcoholic pancreatic inflammatory disease was investigated by biochemical investigation, ultrasonography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and secretin tests. Twenty-five consecutive cases were followed up for 12 months to 10 years after treatment of disease associated with pancreas divisum, diagnosed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Thirteen patients had no recurrence of acute pancreatitis after dorsal duct sphincterotomy alone, during long-term follow-up (mean, 54 months); one patient had recurrent pancreatitis during 33 months after failed sphincterotomy. Eight patients had variable results 12 months to 8 years (mean, 49 months) after dorsal duct sphincterotomy for pancreatic pain syndrome (without amylase elevation), three were pain free, and one had recurrent pancreatitis. For 10 years after dorsal duct sphincterotomy for chronic pancreatitis, one patient had no pain relief; after subtotal pancreatectomy and pancreaticojejunostomy of the dorsal duct, both for chronic pancreatitis, one patient each was pain free and normoglycemic after 54 and 12 months, respectively. Dorsal duct sphincterotomy alone is successful in achieving long-term freedom from recurrence of acute pancreatitis associated with pancreas divisum. Pancreatic pain syndrome is not consistently improved by dorsal duct sphincterotomy. Chronic pancreatitis associated with pancreas divisum should be treated by resection or drainage procedures, not by dorsal duct sphincterotomy.

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response in pancreatic islet inflammation.

    PubMed

    Meyerovich, Kira; Ortis, Fernanda; Allagnat, Florent; Cardozo, Alessandra K

    2016-07-01

    Insulin-secreting pancreatic β-cells are extremely dependent on their endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to cope with the oscillatory requirement of secreted insulin to maintain normoglycemia. Insulin translation and folding rely greatly on the unfolded protein response (UPR), an array of three main signaling pathways designed to maintain ER homeostasis and limit ER stress. However, prolonged or excessive UPR activation triggers alternative molecular pathways that can lead to β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis. An increasing number of studies suggest a role of these pro-apoptotic UPR pathways in the downfall of β-cells observed in diabetic patients. Particularly, the past few years highlighted a cross talk between the UPR and inflammation in the context of both type 1 (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). In this article, we describe the recent advances in research regarding the interplay between ER stress, the UPR, and inflammation in the context of β-cell apoptosis leading to diabetes.

  6. Membrane Proteome Analysis of Cerulein-Stimulated Pancreatic Acinar Cells: Implication for Early Event of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jangwon; Seo, Ji Hye; Lim, Joo Weon

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Cerulein pancreatitis is similar to human edematous pancreatitis with dysregulation of the production and secretion of digestive enzymes, edema formation, cytoplasmic vacuolization and the death of acinar cells. We hypothesized that membrane proteins may be altered as the early event during the induction of acute pancreatitis. Present study aims to determine the differentially expressed proteins in the membranes of cerulein-treated pancreatic acinar cells. Methods Pancreatic acinar AR42J cells were treated with 10-8 M cerulein for 1 hour. Membrane proteins were isolated from the cells and separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis using pH gradients of 5-8. Membrane proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis of the peptide digests. The differentially expressed proteins, whose expression levels were more or less than three-fold in cerulein-treated cells, were analyzed. Results Two differentially expressed proteins (mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2, heat shock protein 60) were up-regulated while four proteins (protein disulfide isomerase, γ-actin, isocitrate dehydrogenase 3, seven in absentia homolog 1A) were down-regulated by cerulein treatment in pancreatic acinar cells. These proteins are related to cell signaling, oxidative stress, and cytoskeleton arrangement. Conclusions Oxidative stress may induce cerulein-induced cell injury and disturbances in defense mechanism in pancreatic acinar cells. PMID:20479917

  7. [Pathophysiology of hormonal, immune, metabolic changes in acute and chronic pancreatitis. Experimental and clinical studies].

    PubMed

    Trubitsyna, I E; Chikunova, B Z; Tkachenko, E V; Tsaregorodtseva, T M; Vinokurova, L V; Varvanina, G G

    2008-01-01

    There is literature review of the acute and chronic pancreatitis experimental models. Patogenetic necrosis mechanisms with fibrosis progress in pancreas were revealed. The stimulation of the proteolytic enzymes synthesis and secretion, that was examined in experiments were compared with clinical examinations. The patients with chronic pancreatitis were investigated in the Central Research Institute of Gastroenterology.

  8. Dihydro-Resveratrol Ameliorates Lung Injury in Rats with Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ze-Si; Ku, Chuen Fai; Guan, Yi-Fu; Xiao, Hai-Tao; Shi, Xiao-Ke; Wang, Hong-Qi; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Tsang, Siu Wai; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process originated in the pancreas; however, it often leads to systemic complications that affect distant organs. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is indeed the predominant cause of death in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. In this study, we aimed to delineate the ameliorative effect of dihydro-resveratrol, a prominent analog of trans-resveratrol, against acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury and the underlying molecular actions. Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats with repetitive injections of cerulein (50 µg/kg/h) and a shot of lipopolysaccharide (7.5 mg/kg). By means of histological examination and biochemical assays, the severity of lung injury was assessed in the aspects of tissue damages, myeloperoxidase activity, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. When treated with dihydro-resveratrol, pulmonary architectural distortion, hemorrhage, interstitial edema, and alveolar thickening were significantly reduced in rats with acute pancreatitis. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the activity of myeloperoxidase in pulmonary tissues were notably repressed. Importantly, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation was attenuated. This study is the first to report the oral administration of dihydro-resveratrol ameliorated acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury via an inhibitory modulation of pro-inflammatory response, which was associated with a suppression of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  9. Epidural anesthesia improves pancreatic perfusion and decreases the severity of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Samira M; Andres, Axel; Morel, Philippe; Schiffer, Eduardo; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Bühler, Leo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the safety of epidural anesthesia (EA), its effect on pancreatic perfusion and the outcome of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: From 2005 to August 2010, patients with predicted severe AP [Ranson score ≥ 2, C-reactive protein > 100 or necrosis on computed tomography (CT)] were prospectively randomized to either a group receiving EA or a control group treated by patient controlled intravenous analgesia. Pain management was evaluated in the two groups every eight hours using the visual analog pain scale (VAS). Parameters for clinical severity such as length of hospital stay, use of antibiotics, admission to the intensive care unit, radiological/clinical complications and the need for surgical necrosectomy including biochemical data were recorded. A CT scan using a perfusion protocol was performed on admission and at 72 h to evaluate pancreatic blood flow. A significant variation in blood flow was defined as a 20% difference in pancreatic perfusion between admission and 72 h and was measured in the head, body and tail of the pancreas. RESULTS: We enrolled 35 patients. Thirteen were randomized to the EA group and 22 to the control group. There were no differences in demographic characteristics between the two groups. The Balthazar radiological severity score on admission was higher in the EA group than in the control group (mean score 4.15 ± 2.54 vs 3.38 ± 1.75, respectively, P = 0.347) and the median Ranson scores were 3.4 and 2.7 respectively (P = NS). The median duration of EA was 5.7 d, and no complications of the epidural procedure were reported. An improvement in perfusion of the pancreas was observed in 13/30 (43%) of measurements in the EA group vs 2/27 (7%) in the control group (P = 0.0025). Necrosectomy was performed in 1/13 patients in the EA group vs 4/22 patients in the control group (P = 0.63). The VAS improved during the first ten days in the EA group compared to the control group (0.2 vs 2.33, P = 0.034 at 10 d). Length

  10. Pancreatitis developing in the context of acute hepatitis: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Khedmat, Hossein; Ghamar-Chehreh, Mohammad Ebrahim; Agah, Shahram; Aghaei, Aghdas

    2015-03-20

    Despite strong evidence suggestive of associations between hepatic diseases and pancreas injury, a potential relationship between acute hepatitis and acute pancreatitis has not been a matter of review; which we focused on in the current paper. Some of the main findings of this review article are: fulminant hepatitis failure represents the highest incident rate of hepatitis-related acute pancreatitis; so a screening program might be indicative in these patients. Specific characteristics of HAV-related pancreatitis are that it is a benign condition with no reported mortality; and a male preponderance in the incidence, with females developing in older ages and having shown the signs of both conditions simultaneously. The incidence of acute pancreatitis in HBV infection is the lowest, but the mortality was the highest. HEV-related acute pancreatitis was most likely to represent pseudocysts and there was an apparent ethnic-priority with Indian descents, the only reported cases in the literature. Hepatitis-related pancreatitis in liver transplant recipients was most frequent in HBV infected patients; and in IFN-induced pancreatitis, cessation of the drug was most effective in treatment, with no catastrophic event reported.

  11. [Acute pancreatitis after bilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy in patients with ectopic ACTH syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cougard, P; Peix, J L; Peschaud, F; Goudet, P

    2001-05-01

    Two cases of acute necrotizing pancreatitis after bilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy were observed in patients with an ectopic ACTH syndrome. Two reasons may be suspected: the difficulty of dissection in such patients and the specific morbidity in relation to hypercorticism.

  12. Protective Effect of Pretreatment with Acenocoumarol in Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Warzecha, Zygmunt; Sendur, Paweł; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Dembiński, Marcin; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Olszanecki, Rafał; Tomaszewska, Romana; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-10-12

    Coagulation is recognized as a key player in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The aim of the current research was to examine the effect of pretreatment with acenocoumarol on the development of acute pancreatitis (AP) evoked by cerulein.

  13. Angiopoietin-2 Is an Early Indicator of Acute Pancreatic-Renal Syndrome in Patients with Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sporek, Mateusz; Dumnicka, Paulina; Gala-Bladzinska, Agnieszka; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembinski, Artur; Stepien, Ewa; Walocha, Jerzy; Drozdz, Ryszard; Kuzniewski, Marek; Kusnierz-Cabala, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Within the first week of the disease, acute kidney injury (AKI) is among the most common causes of mortality in acute pancreatitis (AP). Recently, serum angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) has been associated with hyperdynamic state of the systemic circulation. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between Ang-2 and the clinical AP severity during the first 72 hours of the disease, and organ disfunction, including AKI. Methods. Study included patients admitted to the surgery ward, diagnosed with AP. AKI was diagnosed according to KDIGO guidelines and renal failure according to modified Marshall scoring system. Ang-2 was determined in serum with ELISA. Results. AP was classified as mild (MAP) in 71% of patients, moderately severe (MSAP) in 22%, and severe (SAP) in 8%. During the first 72 hours of AP, 11 patients developed AKI and 6 developed renal failure. Ang-2 at 24, 48, and 72 hours following the onset of AP symptoms significantly predicted SAP and MSAP, as well as AKI and renal failure. Also, Ang-2 significantly correlated with acute phase proteins as well as with the indicators of renal disfunction. Conclusions. Serum Ang-2 may be a relevant predictor of AP severity, in particular of the development of AP-renal syndrome.

  14. Angiopoietin-2 Is an Early Indicator of Acute Pancreatic-Renal Syndrome in Patients with Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sporek, Mateusz; Dumnicka, Paulina; Gala-Bladzinska, Agnieszka; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembinski, Artur; Stepien, Ewa; Walocha, Jerzy; Drozdz, Ryszard; Kuzniewski, Marek; Kusnierz-Cabala, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Within the first week of the disease, acute kidney injury (AKI) is among the most common causes of mortality in acute pancreatitis (AP). Recently, serum angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) has been associated with hyperdynamic state of the systemic circulation. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between Ang-2 and the clinical AP severity during the first 72 hours of the disease, and organ disfunction, including AKI. Methods. Study included patients admitted to the surgery ward, diagnosed with AP. AKI was diagnosed according to KDIGO guidelines and renal failure according to modified Marshall scoring system. Ang-2 was determined in serum with ELISA. Results. AP was classified as mild (MAP) in 71% of patients, moderately severe (MSAP) in 22%, and severe (SAP) in 8%. During the first 72 hours of AP, 11 patients developed AKI and 6 developed renal failure. Ang-2 at 24, 48, and 72 hours following the onset of AP symptoms significantly predicted SAP and MSAP, as well as AKI and renal failure. Also, Ang-2 significantly correlated with acute phase proteins as well as with the indicators of renal disfunction. Conclusions. Serum Ang-2 may be a relevant predictor of AP severity, in particular of the development of AP-renal syndrome. PMID:27022209

  15. Mechanisms of interleukin-22’s beneficial effects in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Chongmin; Kim, Daniel; Ou, Peiqi; Alfonso, Antonio; Stanek, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a disorder characterized by parenchymal injury of the pancreas controlled by immune cell-mediated inflammation. AP remains a significant challenge in the clinic due to a lack of specific and effective treatment. Knowledge of the complex mechanisms that regulate the inflammatory response in AP is needed for the development of new approaches to treatment, since immune cell-derived inflammatory cytokines have been recognized to play critical roles in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent studies have shown that interleukin (IL)-22, a cytokine secreted by leukocytes, when applied in the severe animal models of AP, protects against the inflammation-mediated acinar injury. In contrast, in a mild AP model, endogenous IL-22 has been found to be a predominantly anti-inflammatory mediator that inhibits inflammatory cell infiltration via the induction of Reg3 proteins in acinar cells, but does not protect against acinar injury in the early stage of AP. However, constitutively over-expressed IL-22 can prevent the initial acinar injury caused by excessive autophagy through the induction of the anti-autophagic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL. Thus IL-22 plays different roles in AP depending on the severity of the AP model. This review focuses on these recently reported findings for the purpose of better understanding IL-22’s regulatory roles in AP which could help to develop a novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:26909233

  16. Thoracic duct ligation in the rat attenuates lung injuries in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D; Tsui, N; Li, Y; Wang, F

    2013-09-01

    In acute pancreatitis (AP), inflammatory cells and products disseminated in abdominal lymph and blood induce systemic inflammation. Interruption of abdominal lymph flow, and thereby reduction of lymphatic dissemination, could alter the course of the disease. Therefore, we investigated whether thoracic duct ligation (TDL) in a rat model of cerulein-induced AP results in reduced lung damage as a marker for reduction of systemic dissemination through the lymphatic system. Thirty-four male rats were assigned to TDL (TDL-rats, n=8), AP (AP-rats, n=8), TDL+AP (TDL+AP-rats, n=9) or sham TDL (Ctr-rats, n=9) groups. TDL and sham TDL were established first. Two days later, AP was induced in AP- and TDL+AP-rats by a series of subcutaneous injections of cerulein. Vehicle was injected in the same manner in Ctr- and TDL-rats as controls. Rats were sacrificed six hours after the end of the serial injections. Histological examination showed that AP-induced damage to the pancreas and ileum were similar in AP- and TDL+AP-rats whereas lung damage was less severe in TDL+AP-rats than in AP-rats. Assays demonstrated that: hepatic and pulmonary myeloperoxidase activities were increased in AP-rats but not in the TDL+AP-rats; more Il-6 was found in AP-rat than TDL+AP-rat lungs; and lung-lavage fluid from AP-rats yielded more angiopoietin-2 than TDL+AP-rats. In conclusion, prior TDL in the rat attenuates lung damage in acute pancreatitis.

  17. Deciphering the complexity of acute inflammation using mathematical models.

    PubMed

    Vodovotz, Yoram

    2006-01-01

    Various stresses elicit an acute, complex inflammatory response, leading to healing but sometimes also to organ dysfunction and death. We constructed both equation-based models (EBM) and agent-based models (ABM) of various degrees of granularity--which encompass the dynamics of relevant cells, cytokines, and the resulting global tissue dysfunction--in order to begin to unravel these inflammatory interactions. The EBMs describe and predict various features of septic shock and trauma/hemorrhage (including the response to anthrax, preconditioning phenomena, and irreversible hemorrhage) and were used to simulate anti-inflammatory strategies in clinical trials. The ABMs that describe the interrelationship between inflammation and wound healing yielded insights into intestinal healing in necrotizing enterocolitis, vocal fold healing during phonotrauma, and skin healing in the setting of diabetic foot ulcers. Modeling may help in understanding the complex interactions among the components of inflammation and response to stress, and therefore aid in the development of novel therapies and diagnostics.

  18. Long-term outcome of acute pancreatitis: a prospective study with 118 patients.

    PubMed

    Angelini, G; Cavallini, G; Pederzoli, P; Bovo, P; Bassi, C; Di Francesco, V; Frulloni, L; Sgarbi, D; Talamini, G; Castagnini, A

    1993-01-01

    118 patients who had recovered from acute pancreatitis underwent endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERCP) during a long-term follow-up (mean 4.4 years, range 1-17) to investigate the frequency and features of residual ductal lesions. Oedematous and necrohaemorrhagic pancreatitis occurred in 35 and in 83 patients, respectively. The aetiology was biliary (39 patients), alcoholic (32), biliary-alcoholic (18) and miscellaneous (29). After oedematous pancreatitis, ERCP was normal in 31, showed obstructive pancreatitis in 2 and a slight localized and smooth stricture of the main duct in 2 patients. After necrotizing pancreatitis, 29 patients showed ductal changes without features of chronic pancreatitis, 7 obstructive, 3 chronic calcifying pancreatitis and 44 normal pictures. In 17 patients submitted to two or three ERCPs during a mean 10-year follow-up, the ductal appearance was unchanged in 12, worsened in 3, and improved in 2 patients. The aetiology of pancreatitis and frequency of recurrences was similar in patients with or without scarring lesions. We conclude that residual ductal lesions are common after acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

  19. Histopathology and pathogenesis of caerulein-, duct ligation-, and arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL6 mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Rouse, Rodney L

    2014-09-01

    Three classical rodent models of acute pancreatitis were created in an effort to identify potential pre-clinical models of drug-induced pancreatitis (DIP) and candidate non-invasive biomarkers for improved detection of DIP. Study objectives included designing a lexicon to minimize bias by capturing normal variation and spontaneous and injury-induced changes while maintaining the ability to statistically differentiate degrees of change, defining morphologic anchors for novel pancreatic injury biomarkers, and improved understanding of mechanisms responsible for pancreatitis. Models were created in male Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL6 mice through: 1) administration of the cholecystokinin analog, caerulein; 2) administration of arginine; 3) surgical ligation of the pancreatic duct. Nine morphologically detectable processes were used in the lexicon; acinar cell hypertrophy; acinar cell autophagy; acinar cell apoptosis; acinar cell necrosis; vascular injury; interstitial edema, inflammation and hemorrhage; fat necrosis; ductal changes; acinar cell atrophy. Criteria were defined for scoring levels (0 = absent, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, 3 = severe) for each lexicon component. Consistent with previous studies, histopathology scores were significant greater in rats compared to mice at baseline and after treatment. The histopathology scores in caerulein and ligation-treated rats and mice were significantly greater than those of arginine-treated rats and mice. The present study supports a multifaceted pathogenesis for acute pancreatitis in which intra-acinar trypsinogen activation, damage to acinar cells, fat cells, and vascular cells as well as activation/degranulation of mast cells and activated macrophages all contribute to the initiation and/or progression of acute inflammation of the exocrine pancreas.

  20. PKC δ mediates pro-inflammatory responses in a mouse model of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ramnath, Raina Devi; Sun, Jia; Bhatia, Madhav

    2010-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disorder of the pancreas. Protein kinase C (PKC) δ plays an important role in mediating chemokine production in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. This study aims to investigate the role of PKC δ in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and to explore the mechanisms through which PKC δ mediates pro-inflammatory signaling. Acute pancreatitis was induced in mice by ten hourly intraperitoneal injections of caerulein. PKC δ translocation inhibitor peptide (δV1-1) at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg or Tat (carrier peptide) at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg was administered to mice either 1 h before or 1 h after the first caerulein injection. One hour after the last caerulein injection, the mice were killed and pancreas, lungs, and blood were collected. Prophylactic and therapeutic treatment with δV1-1 attenuated caerulein-induced plasma amylase levels and pancreatic edema. Treatment with δV1-1 decreased myeloperoxidase activity and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 levels in both pancreas and plasma. PKC δ mediated acute pancreatitis by activating pancreatic nuclear factor κB, activator protein-1, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Moreover, blockade of PKC δ attenuated lung myeloperoxidase activity and edema. Histological examination of pancreatic and lung sections confirmed protection against acute pancreatitis. Treatment with Tat had no protective effect on acute pancreatitis. Blockade of PKC δ represents a promising prophylactic and/or therapeutic tool for the treatment of acute pancreatitis.

  1. Vocal exercise may attenuate acute vocal fold inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Katherine Verdolini; Li, Nicole Y.K.; Branski, Ryan C.; Rosen, Clark A.; Grillo, Elizabeth; Steinhauer, Kimberly; Hebda, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives/Hypotheses The objective was to assess the utility of selected “resonant voice” exercises for the reduction of acute vocal fold inflammation. The hypothesis was that relatively large-amplitude, low-impact exercises associated with resonant voice would reduce inflammation more than spontaneous speech and possibly more than voice rest. Study Design The study design was prospective, randomized, double-blind. Methods Nine vocally healthy adults underwent a 1-hr vocal loading procedure, followed by randomization to (a) a spontaneous speech condition, (b) a vocal rest condition, or (c) a resonant voice exercise condition. Treatments were monitored in clinic for 4 hr, and continued extra-clinically until the next morning. At baseline, immediately following loading, after the 4-hr in-clinic treatment, and 24 hr post baseline, secretions were suctioned from the vocal folds bilaterally and submitted to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to estimate concentrations of key markers of tissue injury and inflammation: IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MMP-8, and IL-10. Results Complete data sets were obtained for 3 markers -- IL-1β, IL-6, and MMP-8 -- for one subject in each treatment condition. For those markers, results were poorest at 24-hr follow-up in the spontaneous speech condition, sharply improved in the voice rest condition, and best in the resonant voice condition. Average results for all markers, for all responsive subjects with normal baseline mediator concentrations, revealed an almost identical pattern. Conclusions Some forms of tissue mobilization may be useful to attenuate acute vocal fold inflammation. PMID:23177745

  2. Vascular Access System for Continuous Arterial Infusion of a Protease Inhibitor in Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ganaha, Fumikiyo; Yamada, Tetsuhisa; Yorozu, Naoya; Ujita, Masuo; Irie, Takeo; Fukuda, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kunihiko; Tada, Shimpei

    1999-09-15

    We used a vascular access system (VAS) for continuous arterial infusion (CAI) of a protease inhibitor in two patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The infusion catheter was placed into the dorsal pancreatic artery in the first patient and into the gastroduodenal artery in the second, via a femoral artery approach. An implantable port was then connected to the catheter and was secured in a subcutaneous pocket prepared in the right lower abdomen. No complications related to the VAS were encountered. This system provided safe and uncontaminated vascular access for successful CAI for acute pancreatitis.

  3. Inhibition of pancreatic oxidative damage by stilbene derivative dihydro-resveratrol: implication for treatment of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Siu Wai; Guan, Yi-Fu; Wang, Juan; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Trans-resveratrol is a natural stilbenoid possessing multifarious pharmacological benefits; however, when orally consumed, it is rapidly metabolised by colonic microflora and converted to dihydro-resveratrol. Thus, this microbial metabolite is of great therapeutic relevance. In the present study, upon the oral administration of dihydro-resveratrol (10–50 mg/kg), the severity of acute pancreatitis in the cerulein-treated rats was significantly ameliorated as evidenced by decreased α-amylase activities in the plasma and lessened oedema formation in the pancreatic parenchyma. In addition, the generation of intracellular reactive oxidative products, including malondialdehyde and protein carbonyls, was accordingly reduced, so as the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. While inhibiting the activities of NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase, the depletion of glutathione was considerably restored. Importantly, the attenuation of pancreatic oxidative damage by dihydro-resveratrol was associated with a down-regulation of the nuclear factor-kappaB and phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase-serine/threonine kinase signalling pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the solubility of dihydro-resveratrol was at least 5 times higher than trans-resveratrol whilst exhibiting a much lower cytotoxicity. Collectively, the current findings accentuate new mechanistic insight of dihydro-resveratrol in pancreatic oxidative damage, and advocate its therapeutic potential for the management of acute pancreatitis, particularly for patients unresponsive to trans-resveratrol due to the lack of proper microbial strains. PMID:26971398

  4. Inhibition of pancreatic oxidative damage by stilbene derivative dihydro-resveratrol: implication for treatment of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Siu Wai; Guan, Yi-Fu; Wang, Juan; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-03-14

    Trans-resveratrol is a natural stilbenoid possessing multifarious pharmacological benefits; however, when orally consumed, it is rapidly metabolised by colonic microflora and converted to dihydro-resveratrol. Thus, this microbial metabolite is of great therapeutic relevance. In the present study, upon the oral administration of dihydro-resveratrol (10-50 mg/kg), the severity of acute pancreatitis in the cerulein-treated rats was significantly ameliorated as evidenced by decreased α-amylase activities in the plasma and lessened oedema formation in the pancreatic parenchyma. In addition, the generation of intracellular reactive oxidative products, including malondialdehyde and protein carbonyls, was accordingly reduced, so as the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. While inhibiting the activities of NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase, the depletion of glutathione was considerably restored. Importantly, the attenuation of pancreatic oxidative damage by dihydro-resveratrol was associated with a down-regulation of the nuclear factor-kappaB and phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase-serine/threonine kinase signalling pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the solubility of dihydro-resveratrol was at least 5 times higher than trans-resveratrol whilst exhibiting a much lower cytotoxicity. Collectively, the current findings accentuate new mechanistic insight of dihydro-resveratrol in pancreatic oxidative damage, and advocate its therapeutic potential for the management of acute pancreatitis, particularly for patients unresponsive to trans-resveratrol due to the lack of proper microbial strains.

  5. Effective peritoneal therapy of acute pancreatitis in the rat with glutaryl-trialanin-ethylamide: a novel inhibitor of pancreatic elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Fric, P; Slabý, J; Kasafírek, E; Kocna, P; Marek, J

    1992-01-01

    The six hour peritoneal lavage with glutaryl-trialanin-ethylamide, a low molecular competitive inhibitor of pancreatic elastase (IC50-8 mumol/l), effectively suppresses the evolution of taurocholate induced acute pancreatitis in the rat. The lavage alone is followed by a marked decrease of fat necrosis and amylase and lipase activity in serum. The area of pancreatic haemorrhage was significantly reduced only after the lavage solution was supplemented with Glt-Ala3-NHEt. The effect was not enhanced by a bolus injection of the inhibitor before starting the lavage. The combination of Glt-Ala3-NHEt with aprotinin or nafamstate mesilate produced only marginal greater benefit. The effect of Glt-Ala3-NHEt on pancreatic haemorrhage is time and dose related even with delayed onset of the lavage. Animals treated with peritoneal lavage without Get-Ala3-NHEt lived longer than controls (p less than 0.05), but by 60 hours the survival rate of both groups was almost the same (76 v 74%). All animals lavaged with Glt-Ala3-NHEt survived 120 hours and the difference in the survival rate between this and both remaining groups was significant (100% v 76% v 74% - p less than 0.05). The results were considered favourable and preliminary clinical trials of Glt-Ala3-NHEt in subjects with acute pancreatitis justified. PMID:1377154

  6. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis: can tigecycline be included in a therapeutic strategy?

    PubMed Central

    OCCHIONORELLI, S.; MORGANTI, L.; CULTRERA, R.; ANDREOTTI, D.; MACCATROZZO, S.; CAPPELLARI, L.; STANO, R.; VASQUEZ, G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute necrotizing pancreatitis is a severe and life-threatening disease. Infection, which occurs in about 30% of cases, is the most feared complication. Antibiotic therapy is still discussed and there are no clear recommendation in literature. These clinical series underline the importance of having a clear antibiotic protocol, including tigecycline, in the management of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Clinical series Six patients with clinical and radiological diagnosis of necrotizing acute pancreatitis are treated in Emergency Surgery Department, following a conservative management, which includes fluid resuscitation, intensive care unit and radiological monitoring, ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage and an antibiotic treatment protocol, that includes tigecycline. No one of the six patient undergo surgery (mean hospital stay: 44 days). In a six months follow-up all patients are alive and in good clinical conditions. Discussion Infection is the most important factor which determinate prognosis and outcome of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Antibiotic prophylaxis is still discussed and there are no clear antibiotic treatment guidelines in literature. Despite its side effects on pancreatic gland, tigecycline is successful in resolution of sepsis, caused by infected pancreatic necrosis. Conclusions Collaboration with infectivologist and a clear antibiotic protocol is fundamental to solve infected necrosis. Antibiotic treatment, set up as soon as possible, is successful in our six patients, as they recover without undergoing surgical procedures. Tigecycline offers broad coverage and efficacy against resistant pathogens for the treatment of documented pancreatic necrosis infection. However, further studies are necessary to fully understand the safety profile and efficacy of tigecycline. PMID:25827664

  7. α-Lipoic acid protects against cholecystokinin-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Joo; Seo, Sang-Wan; Choi, Ok-Sun; Park, Cheung-Seog

    2005-01-01

    AIM: α-Lipoic acid (ALA) has been used as an antioxidant. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of α-lipoic acid on cholecystokinin (CCK)-octapeptide induced acute pancreatitis in rats. METHODS: ALA at 1 mg/kg was intra-peritoneally injected, followed by 75 μg/kg CCK-octapeptide injected thrice subcutaneously after 1, 3, and 5 h. This whole procedure was repeated for 5 d. We checked the pancreatic weight/body weight ratio, the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the levels of lipase, amylase of serum. Repeated CCK octapeptide treatment resulted in typical laboratory and morphological changes of experimentally induced pancreatitis. RESULTS: ALA significantly decreased the pancreatic weight/body weight ratio and serum amylase and lipase in CCK octapeptide-induced acute pancreatitis. However, the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α were comparable in CCK octapeptide-induced acute pancreatitis. CONCLUSION: ALA may have a protective effect against CCK octapeptide-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:16097064

  8. A Case of Idiopathic Acute Pancreatitis in the First Trimester of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Tomomi; Kanasaki, Haruhiko; Oride, Aki; Ishihara, Tomoko; Kyo, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is rare in pregnancy, with an estimated incidence of approximately 1 in 1000 to 1 in 10,000 pregnancies. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy usually occurs in the third trimester. Here, we report a case of acute pancreatitis in the first trimester. A 36-year-old primigravida at 11 weeks of gestation complained of severe lower abdominal pain. The pain gradually worsened and migrated toward the epigastric region. She had no history of chronic alcoholism. Blood investigations showed elevated level of C-reactive protein (9.58 mg/dL), pancreatic amylase (170 IU/L), and lipase (332 IU/L). There was no gallstone and no abnormality in the pancreatic and biliary ducts on ultrasonography. Antinuclear antibody and IgG4 were negative and no evidence of hyperlipidemia or diabetes was found. There was also no evidence of viral infection. On the third day of hospitalization, she was diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis on magnetic resonance imaging. Medical interventions were initiated with nafamostat mesilate and ulinastatin, and parenteral nutrition was administered through a central venous catheter. On the eighth day of hospitalization, her condition gradually improved with a decreased level of pancreatic amylase and the pain subsided. After conservative management, she did not have any recurrence during her pregnancy. PMID:26843995

  9. Kynurenine–3–monooxygenase inhibition prevents multiple organ failure in rodent models of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mole, Damian J; Webster, Scott P; Uings, Iain; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Binnie, Margaret; Wilson, Kris; Hutchinson, Jonathan P; Mirguet, Olivier; Walker, Ann; Beaufils, Benjamin; Ancellin, Nicolas; Trottet, Lionel; Bénéton, Véronique; Mowat, Christopher G; Wilkinson, Martin; Rowland, Paul; Haslam, Carl; McBride, Andrew; Homer, Natalie ZM; Baily, James E; Sharp, Matthew GF; Garden, O James; Hughes, Jeremy; Howie, Sarah EM; Holmes, Duncan S; Liddle, John; Iredale, John P

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and devastating inflammatory condition of the pancreas that is considered to be a paradigm of sterile inflammation leading to systemic multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and death1,2 Acute mortality from AP-MODS exceeds 20%3 and for those who survive the initial episode, their lifespan is typically shorter than the general population4. There are no specific therapies available that protect individuals against AP-MODS. Here, we show that kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO), a key enzyme of tryptophan metabolism5, is central to the pathogenesis of AP-MODS. We created a mouse strain deficient for Kmo with a robust biochemical phenotype that protected against extrapancreatic tissue injury to lung, kidney and liver in experimental AP-MODS. A medicinal chemistry strategy based on modifications of the kynurenine substrate led to the discovery of GSK180 as a potent and specific inhibitor of KMO. The binding mode of the inhibitor in the active site was confirmed by X-ray co-crystallography at 3.2 Å resolution. Treatment with GSK180 resulted in rapid changes in levels of kynurenine pathway metabolites in vivo and afforded therapeutic protection against AP-MODS in a rat model of AP. Our findings establish KMO inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of AP-MODS and open up a new area for drug discovery in critical illness. PMID:26752518

  10. Mechanistic aspects of inflammation and clinical management of inflammation in acute gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cronstein, Bruce N; Sunkureddi, Prashanth

    2013-01-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that interleukin 1β (IL-1β) plays a central role in monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation and that the NALP3 inflammasome plays a major role in IL-1β production. These discoveries have offered new insights into the pathogenesis of acute gouty arthritis. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which monosodium urate crystals induce acute inflammation and examine the mechanisms of action (MOAs) of traditional anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g., nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, colchicine, and glucocorticoids) and biologic agents (e.g., the IL-1β antagonists anakinra, rilonacept, and canakinumab) to understand how their MOAs contribute to their safety profiles. Traditional anti-inflammatory agents may act on the IL-1β pathway at some level; however, their MOAs are broad-ranging, unspecific, and biologically complex. This lack of specificity may explain the range of systemic adverse effects associated with them. The therapeutic margins of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, colchicine, and glucocorticoids are particularly low in elderly patients and in patients with cardiovascular, metabolic, or renal comorbidities that are frequently associated with gouty arthritis. In contrast, the IL-1β antagonists act on very specific targets of inflammation, which may decrease the potential for systemic adverse effects, although infrequent but serious adverse events (including infection and administration reactions) have been reported. Because these IL-1β antagonists target an early event immediately downstream from NALP3 inflammasome activation, they may provide effective alternatives to traditional agents with minimal systemic adverse effects. Results of ongoing trials of IL-1β antagonists will likely provide clarification of their potential role in the management of acute gouty arthritis.

  11. Conserved gene regulation during acute inflammation between zebrafish and mammals.

    PubMed

    Forn-Cuní, G; Varela, M; Pereiro, P; Novoa, B; Figueras, A

    2017-02-03

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio), largely used as a model for studying developmental processes, has also emerged as a valuable system for modelling human inflammatory diseases. However, in a context where even mice have been questioned as a valid model for these analysis, a systematic study evaluating the reproducibility of human and mammalian inflammatory diseases in zebrafish is still lacking. In this report, we characterize the transcriptomic regulation to lipopolysaccharide in adult zebrafish kidney, liver, and muscle tissues using microarrays and demonstrate how the zebrafish genomic responses can effectively reproduce the mammalian inflammatory process induced by acute endotoxin stress. We provide evidence that immune signaling pathways and single gene expression is well conserved throughout evolution and that the zebrafish and mammal acute genomic responses after lipopolysaccharide stimulation are highly correlated despite the differential susceptibility between species to that compound. Therefore, we formally confirm that zebrafish inflammatory models are suited to study the basic mechanisms of inflammation in human inflammatory diseases, with great translational impact potential.

  12. [Peculiarities of treatment of the aged and elderly patients with acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, I M; Kuzenko, R T

    2013-11-01

    The results of treatment of 99 elderly and senile patients, suffering an acute pancreatitis in period of 2005 - 2013 yrs, were analyzed. Interstitial acute pancreatitis was diagnoses in 36 (36.3%) patients, focal pancreatic necrosis--in 32 (32.3%), total-subtotal pancreonecrosis--in 31 (31.3%). Miniinvasive interventions were performed in 40 (63.4%) patients, the open--in 24 (38%). The main indication for laparotomy conduction were purulent-septic complications, which is impossible to eliminate while miniinvasive methods application. Due to application of the staged treatment tactics with predominant application of miniinvasive methods, extracorporeal detoxication and improvement of the intensive therapy measures postoperative lethality in necrotic acute pancreatitis have had lowered from 16.7 to 10.3%.

  13. [Severe hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis: a case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Herrera Del Águila, Dwight Denis; Garavito Rentería, Jorge; Linarez Medina, Karen; Lizarzaburu Rodríguez, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis occurs in about 1-4% of the cases. It is the third leading cause of pancreatitis after biliary and alcoholic etiology. Hypertriglyceridemia can be caused by primary causes, lipid metabolism disorders and secondary causes. A 32 year old man, born in Huancayo, with a history of diabetes mellitus type 2, severe mixed dyslipidemia with primary hypertriglyceridemia, was admitted to emergency with 10 days of abdominal pain with moderate intensity in epigastrium and left hypochondrium spreading to dorsal region after intake of high-fat meal. 24 hours before admission, pain exacerbates increasing intensity and causing nausea and bilious vomits. Therefore, all laboratory examinations are carried out resulting in hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis. For that reason, an adequate clinical history physical examination associated with laboratory and image examinations are important to consider hypertriglyceridemia as part of the etiology of acute pancreatitis.

  14. Risk Factors for the Development of Intra-Abdominal Fungal Infections in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Schwender, Brian J.; Gordon, Stuart R.; Gardner, Timothy B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Intra-abdominal fungal infections (AFI) complicating acute pancreatitis arise in the context of pancreatic necrosis. Our goal was to determine which risk factors contribute to AFI in patients with acute pancreatitis. Methods Records were reviewed from 479 non-transfer patients admitted to our medical center with acute pancreatitis from 1985–2009. Using multivariable regression models, risk factors for AFI were identified. Results Out of 479 patients admitted with acute pancreatitis, 17 patients were subsequently found to have an AFI and 3 of these patients expired. The mean length of stay for patients with an AFI was 24 days and 76% were admitted to the intensive care unit. Patients with AFI were more likely to have received prophylactic antibiotics on admission (OR 1.7, 95% C.I. 1.2–2.3), TPN within 7 days of admission (OR 1.4, 95% C.I. 1.1–1.7) or to have necrosis on CT scan within 7 days of admission (OR 1.4, 95% C.I. 1.1–1.7). Multivariable regression models identified admission antibiotic use (OR 1.6, 95% C.I. 1.4–1.8) as the strongest predictor of AFI. Conclusion Admission antibiotics are the biggest risk factor for the development of intra-abdominal fungal infections in acute pancreatitis. Prophylactic antibiotics to prevent infected necrosis should therefore be discouraged. PMID:25872170

  15. Enteral nutrition in acute pancreatitis: a review of the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Attila; Romics, Laszlo

    2014-11-21

    The use of enteral feeding as part of the management of acute pancreatitis dates back almost two decades. This review describes the indications for and limitations of enteral feeding for the treatment of acute pancreatitis using up-to-date evidence-based data. A systematic review was carried out to analyse current data on the use of enteral nutrition in the management of acute pancreatitis. Relevant literature was analysed from the viewpoints of enteral vs parenteral feeding, early vs delayed enteral nutrition, nasogastric vs nasojejunal feeding, and early oral diet and immunonutrition, particularly glutamine and probiotic supplementation. Finally, current applicable guidelines and the effects of these guidelines on clinical practice are discussed. The latest meta-analyses suggest that enteral nutrition significantly reduces the mortality rate of severe acute pancreatitis compared to parenteral feeding. To maintain gut barrier function and prevent early bacterial translocation, enteral feeding should be commenced within the first 24 h of hospital admission. Also, the safety of nasogastric feeding, which eases the administration of enteral nutrients in the clinical setting, is likely equal to nasojejunal feeding. Furthermore, an early low-fat oral diet is potentially beneficial in patients with mild pancreatitis. Despite the initial encouraging results, the current evidence does not support the use of immunoenhanced nutrients or probiotics in patients with acute pancreatitis.

  16. [C-reactive protein and lactate dehydrogenase as single prognostic factors of severity in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Zrnić, Irena Krznarić; Milić, Sandra; Fisić, Elizabeta; Radić, Mladen; Stimac, Davor

    2007-01-01

    Ranson and Glasgow scores are routinely used for prediction of severity in acute pancreatitis. We undertook a prospective study to investigate the role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and C-reactive protein (CRP) as potential single predictors of severity in acute pancreatitis. In our study we included 100 patients with diagnosis of acute pancreatitis admitted to our hospital during last two years. The inclusion criteria consisted of a combination of clinical features, a typical case history, elevation of serum pancreatic enzymes and diagnosis confirmed by imaging studies (ultrasound or computerised tomography). We used Ranson score for assesment of severity and compared it with single parameters as LDH and CRP on the first and the third day after admission. Cut off values for predicting local and systemic complications were > or =3 for Ranson score, 320 IU for LDH and 5 mg/L for CRP. Ranson score showed highest sensitivity in the prediction of local and systemic complication of acute pancreatitis. Specificity and diagnostic accuracy were highest for LDH on the first day (67.74; 57%). Diagnostic accuracy for Ranson score and CRP on the third day after admission was around 50%. We can conclude that LDH and CRP are available, simple and economical biochemical parameters that can help us predict complications of acute pancreatitis in the early phase of the disease. They showed similar diagnostic accuracy as the far more clinically used Ranson score.

  17. UNDERSTANDING THE INTERNATIONAL CONSENSUS FOR ACUTE PANCREATITIS: CLASSIFICATION OF ATLANTA 2012

    PubMed Central

    de SOUZA, Gleim Dias; SOUZA, Luciana Rodrigues Queiroz; CUENCA, Ronaldo Máfia; JERÔNIMO, Bárbara Stephane de Medeiros; de SOUZA, Guilherme Medeiros; VILELA, Vinícius Martins

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Contrast computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are widely used due to its image quality and ability to study pancreatic and peripancreatic morphology. The understanding of the various subtypes of the disease and identification of possible complications requires a familiarity with the terminology, which allows effective communication between the different members of the multidisciplinary team. Aim: Demonstrate the terminology and parameters to identify the different classifications and findings of the disease based on the international consensus for acute pancreatitis ( Atlanta Classification 2012). Methods: Search and analysis of articles in the "CAPES Portal de Periódicos with headings "acute pancreatitis" and "Atlanta Review". Results: Were selected 23 articles containing radiological descriptions, management or statistical data related to pathology. Additional statistical data were obtained from Datasus and Population Census 2010. The radiological diagnostic criterion adopted was the Radiology American College system. The "acute pancreatitis - 2012 Rating: Review Atlanta classification and definitions for international consensus" tries to eliminate inconsistency and divergence from the determination of uniformity to the radiological findings, especially the terminology related to fluid collections. More broadly as "pancreatic abscess" and "phlegmon" went into disuse and the evolution of the collection of patient fluids can be described as "acute peripancreatic collections", "acute necrotic collections", "pseudocyst" and "necrosis pancreatic walled or isolated". Conclusion: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance represent the best techniques with sequential images available for diagnosis. Standardization of the terminology is critical and should improve the management of patients with multiple professionals care, risk stratification and adequate treatment. PMID:27759788

  18. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Acute pancreatitis Chronic pancreatitis Pancreatic abscess Shock Review Date 10/27/2015 Updated by: Subodh K. ... gastroenterologist with Gastrointestinal Specialists of Georgia, Austell, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  19. Curcumin enhances recovery of pancreatic islets from cellular stress induced inflammation and apoptosis in diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rashid, Kahkashan; Sil, Parames C.

    2015-02-01

    The phytochemical, curcumin, has been reported to play many beneficial roles. However, under diabetic conditions, the detail mechanism of its beneficial action in the glucose homeostasis regulatory organ, pancreas, is poorly understood. The present study has been designed and carried out to explore the role of curcumin in the pancreatic tissue of STZ induced and cellular stress mediated diabetes in eight weeks old male Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced with a single intraperitoneal dose of STZ (65 mg/kg body weight). Post to diabetes induction, animals were treated with curcumin at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight for eight weeks. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanism was determined using various biochemical assays, DNA fragmentation, FACS, histology, immunoblotting and ELISA. Treatment with curcumin reduced blood glucose level, increased plasma insulin and mitigated oxidative stress related markers. In vivo and in vitro experimental results revealed increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL1-β and IFN-γ), reduced level of cellular defense proteins (Nrf-2 and HO-1) and glucose transporter (GLUT-2) along with enhanced levels of signaling molecules of ER stress dependent and independent apoptosis (cleaved Caspase-12/9/8/3) in STZ administered group. Treatment with curcumin ameliorated all the adverse changes and helps the organ back to its normal physiology. Results suggest that curcumin protects pancreatic beta-cells by attenuating inflammatory responses, and inhibiting ER/mitochondrial dependent and independent pathways of apoptosis and crosstalk between them. This uniqueness and absence of any detectable adverse effect proposes the possibility of using this molecule as an effective protector in the cellular stress mediated diabetes mellitus. - Highlights: • STZ induced cellular stress plays a vital role in pancreatic dysfunction. • Cellular stress causes inflammation, pancreatic islet cell death and diabetes. • Deregulation of Nrf-2

  20. Exposure to Radiocontrast Agents Induces Pancreatic Inflammation by Activation of Nuclear Factor-kB, Calcium Signaling, and Calcineurin

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shunqian; Orabi, Abrahim I.; Le, Tianming; Javed, Tanveer A.; Sah, Swati; Eisses, John F.; Bottino, Rita; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Husain, Sohail Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Radiocontrast agents are required for radiographic procedures, but these agents can injure tissues by unknown mechanisms. We investigated whether exposure of pancreatic tissues to radiocontrast agents during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) causes pancreatic inflammation, and studied the effects of these agents on human cell lines and in mice. Methods We exposed mouse and human acinar cells to the radiocontrast agent iohexol (Omnipaque) and measured intracellular release of Ca2+, calcineurin activation (using a luciferase reporter), activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB, using a luciferase reporter), and cell necrosis (via propidium iodide uptake). We infused the radiocontrast agent into the pancreatic ducts of wild type mice (C57BL/6) to create a mouse model of post-ERCP pancreatitis; some mice were given intraperitoneal injections of the calcineurin inhibitor FK506 before and after infusion of the radiocontrast agent. CnAβ−/− mice were also used. This experiment was also performed in mice given infusions of AAV6-NF-κB-luciferase, to assess activation of this transcription factor in vivo. Results Incubation of mouse and human acinar cells, but not HEK293 or COS7 cells, with iohexol led to a peak and then plateau in Ca2+ signaling, along with activation of the transcription factors NF-κB and NFAT. Suppressing Ca2+ signaling or calcineurin with BAPTA, cyclosporine A, or FK506 prevented activation of NF-κB and acinar cell injury. Calcineurin Aβ-deficient mice were protected against induction of pancreatic inflammation by iohexol. The calcineurin inhibitor FK506 prevented contrast-induced activation of NF-κB in pancreata of mice; this was observed by live imaging of mice given infusions of AAV6- NF-kB-luciferase. Conclusions Radiocontrast agents cause pancreatic inflammation in mice, via activation of NF-κB, Ca2+ signaling, and calcineurin. Calcineurin inhibitors might be developed to prevent post-ERCP pancreatitis

  1. Inhibitory effect of anethole in nonimmune acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Domiciano, Talita Perdigão; Dalalio, Márcia Machado de Oliveira; Silva, Expedito Leite; Ritter, Alessandra Mileni Versuti; Estevão-Silva, Camila Fernanda; Ramos, Fernando Seara; Caparroz-Assef, Silvana Martins; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida

    2013-04-01

    Anethole [1-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl)benzene] occurs naturally as a major component of the essential oil of star anise (Illicium verum Hook.f., family Illiciaceae), comprising more than 90 % of its volatile components. Studies showed that this substance has antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, and anesthetic properties. In this study, the anti-inflammatory properties of anethole in animal models of nonimmune acute inflammation such as croton oil-induced ear edema and carrageenan-induced pleurisy were investigated. The investigated parameters were edema formation, leukocyte migration, and inflammatory mediators involved. Oral administration of anethole at a dose of 250 and 500 mg/kg reduced both the volume of pleural exudates and the number of migrated leukocytes. Levels of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PGE2) in the inflammatory exudate were reduced by treatment with anethole, but levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β were not significantly altered. In ear edema, the oral treatment with anethole inhibited the formation of exudate and the activity of myeloperoxidase, but not after topical administration. These results suggest that the anethole may be effective in controlling some nonimmune acute inflammation-related disease, probably by an inhibitory action on production and/or release of PGE2 and NO.

  2. The effect of CSE gene deletion in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Ang, Abel D; Rivers-Auty, Jack; Hegde, Akhil; Ishii, Isao; Bhatia, Madhav

    2013-11-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to be involved in the signaling of the inflammatory response; however, there are differing views as to whether it is pro- or anti-inflammatory. In this study, we sought to determine whether endogenously synthesized H2S via cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) plays a pro- or anti-inflammatory role in caerulein-induced pancreatitis. To investigate this, we used mice genetically deficient in CSE to elucidate the function of CSE in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. We compared the inflammatory response and tissue damage of wild-type (WT) and CSE knockout (KO) mice following 10 hourly administrations of 50 μg/kg caerulein or saline control. From this, we found that the CSE KO mice showed significantly less local pancreatic damage as well as acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury compared with the WT mice. There were also lower levels of pancreatic eicosanoid and cytokines, as well as reduced acinar cell NF-κB activation in the CSE KO mice compared with WT mice. Additionally, in WT mice, there was a greater level of pancreatic CSE expression and sulfide-synthesizing activity in caerulein-induced pancreatitis compared with the saline control. When comparing the two saline-treated control groups, we noted that the CSE KO mice showed significantly less pancreatic H2S-synthesizing activity relative to the WT mice. These results indicate that endogenous H2S generated by CSE plays a key proinflammatory role via NF-κB activation in caerulein-induced pancreatitis, and its genetic deletion affords significant protection against acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury.

  3. Early pancreatic panniculitis associated with HELLP syndrome and acute fatty liver of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, Eugene B; Sachdev, Reena; Kim, Jinah; Peng, David

    2011-10-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis represents a rare cutaneous disorder most commonly associated with acute or chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic carcinoma. We describe a case of a 17-year-old woman who presented with a 2-day history of erythematous patches involving her bilateral knees and tender, scattered red-brown nodules involving her bilateral anterior shins. She was seen during a hospitalization for emergent cesarean section and her hospital course was complicated by HELLP syndrome (defined by the presence of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelet count), acute fatty liver of pregnancy and pancreatitis. The characteristic histopathologic findings, including ghost cells, fat necrosis and granular basophilic material with dystrophic calcification, appear in later lesions. In early lesions, as was shown in this case, a neutrophilic subcutaneous infiltrate raises a differential diagnosis including infection, subcutaneous Sweet's syndrome or atypical erythema nodosum. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of pancreatic panniculitis in association with HELLP syndrome and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. Early recognition is critical, as skin lesions may precede the development of pancreatitis. Often, as in our case, the effects of pancreatitis may be life threatening.

  4. Role of Biomarkers in Diagnosis and Prognostic Evaluation of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Susanta; Mishra, Tushar Subhadarshan; Sasmal, Prakash Kumar; Rath, Satyajit; Sharma, Rakesh; Rout, Bikram; Sahu, Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially life threatening disease. The spectrum of severity of the illness ranges from mild self-limiting disease to a highly fatal severe necrotizing pancreatitis. Despite intensive research and improved patient care, overall mortality still remains high, reaching up to 30–40% in cases with infected pancreatic necrosis. Although little is known about the exact pathogenesis, it has been widely accepted that premature activation of digestive enzymes within the pancreatic acinar cell is the trigger that leads to autodigestion of pancreatic tissue which is followed by infiltration and activation of leukocytes. Extensive research has been done over the past few decades regarding their role in diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of severe acute pancreatitis. Although many standalone biochemical markers have been studied for early assessment of severity, C-reactive protein still remains the most frequently used along with Interleukin-6. In this review we have discussed briefly the pathogenesis and the role of different biochemical markers in the diagnosis and severity evaluation in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26345247

  5. Increased activity of group II phospholipase A2 in plasma in rat sodium deoxycholate induced acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Furue, S; Hori, Y; Kuwabara, K; Ikeuchi, J; Onoyama, H; Yamamoto, M; Tanaka, K

    1997-01-01

    Background—Two different types of secretory phospholipase A2 (PLA2), pancreatic group I (PLA2-I) and non-pancreatic group II (PLA2-II), have been identified and postulated to be associated with the pathogenesis of various diseases, such as acute pancreatitis, septic shock, and multiple organ failure. 
Aims—To investigate the type of secretory PLA2 responsible for its catalytic activity found in plasma and ascites of experimental acute pancreatitis. 
Methods—Acute pancreatitis of differing severity was induced by the injection of different concentrations (1% or 10%) of sodium deoxycholate (DCA) into the common biliopancreatic duct in rats, and catalytic PLA2 activity in plasma and ascites were differentiated by anti-PLA2-I antibody and specific inhibitor of PLA2-II. Survival rate and plasma amylase, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were also measured.
Results—In 1% and 10% DCA induced acute pancreatitis, plasma amylase values as well as PLA2 activity in ascites were greatly increased. PLA2 activity in plasma was also notably increased in 10% DCA induced acute pancreatitis, but not in 1% DCA induced acute pancreatitis. PLA2-I specific polyclonal antibody significantly inhibited PLA2 activity in ascites but not that in plasma. In contrast, plasma PLA2 activity was completely suppressed by PLA2-II specific inhibitor. In addition, a high mortality (93% at five hours) and a significant increase in plasma AST and ALT were noted in 10% DCA induced pancreatitis. 
Conclusion—Ascites PLA2 activity is mainly derived from PLA2-I, whereas plasma PLA2 activity is mostly derived from PLA2-II in severe acute pancreatitis, suggesting that increased plasma PLA2-II activity might be implicated in hepatic failure arising after severe acute pancreatitis. 

 Keywords: acute pancreatitis; phospholipase A2; sodium deoxycholate pancreatitis; hepatic failure PMID:9462218

  6. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure causes more severe pancreatic injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhenhua; Yang, Fanmuyi; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yongchao; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A; Ke, Zun-Ji; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2016-10-01

    Alcohol abuse increases the risk for pancreatitis. The pattern of alcohol drinking may impact its effect. We tested a hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption in combination with binge exposure imposes more severe damage to the pancreas. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: control, chronic ethanol exposure, binge ethanol exposure and chronic plus binge ethanol exposure. For the control group, mice were fed with a liquid diet for two weeks. For the chronic ethanol exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks. In the binge ethanol exposure group, mice were treated with ethanol by gavage (5g/kg, 25% ethanol w/v) daily for 3days. For the chronic plus binge exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks and exposed to ethanol by gavage during the last 3days. Chronic and binge exposure alone caused minimal pancreatic injury. However, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure induced significant apoptotic cell death. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure altered the levels of alpha-amylase, glucose and insulin. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure caused pancreatic inflammation which was shown by the macrophages infiltration and the increase of cytokines and chemokines. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased the expression of ADH1 and CYP2E1. It also induced endoplasmic reticulum stress which was demonstrated by the unfolded protein response. In addition, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, indicating oxidative stress. Therefore, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure is more detrimental to the pancreas.

  7. [Acute pancreatitis of uncommon etiology: a physiopathologic approach].

    PubMed

    García, H A; Tiscornia, O M; Gasali, F; Monti, C; Maschietto, A; Sapin, F; Molinelli Wells, N; Uchiumi, L; Sutera, S; García, M

    1999-01-01

    A review of 73 cases of acute pancreatitis (A.P.) of *A in frequent etiology is critically analyzed. The patients were allocated to the following categories: post ingestion of a large meal, dyslipemic, post ERCP, post operative, pregnancy, and puerperium linked., post urlian parotiditis, post stress, idiopathic, drug associated, post traumatic. In each of the above groups those hypotheses that are currently primarily accepted as been mainly concerned with the etiopathogenesis of the inflammatory episode were given preference. One factor upon which the authors has put special emphasis is that of frequent involvement of the nervous system through different types of autonomic are reflexes. This pathogenic mechanism is surprisingly disregarded in the literature. The interrelation ship between the severity of an AP episode and the background provided by the "pancreon" secretory activity is also emphasized. The mortality rate of the whole series was of 7 cases (9.6%). The groups that disclosed the highest rates were related to abdominal surgery (50%) and to dyslipemia (17%).

  8. Acute pancreatitis and severe hypertriglyceridaemia masking unsuspected underlying diabetic ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Aboulhosn, Kewan; Arnason, Terra

    2013-01-01

    A healthy 18-year-old girl presented to a local emergency room with 48 h of abdominal pain and vomiting. A radiological and biochemical diagnosis of moderate acute pancreatitis was made. Bloodwork demonstrated prominent hypertriglyceridaemia (HTG) of 19.5 mmol/L (severe HTG: 11.2–22.4), detectable urine ketones and a random blood glucose of 13 mmol/L dropping to 10.5 mmol/L on repeat (normal random <11). Ketone levels were deemed consistent with fasting ketosis after 48 h of vomiting. There was no known history of diabetes in the patient. Management included aggressive rehydration and pain control, yet the patient rapidly decompensated into shock requiring intensive care unit support. Blood gases revealed severe metabolic acidosis (pH 6.99) and unsuspected underlying diabetic ketoacidosis was diagnosed. The HTG gradually resolved following intravenous fluids and insulin infusion with slower correction of the metabolic acidosis. Importantly, her glycated haemoglobin was 12%, indicating the silent presence of chronic glucose elevations. PMID:24005972

  9. Acute pancreatitis and severe hypertriglyceridaemia masking unsuspected underlying diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Aboulhosn, Kewan; Arnason, Terra

    2013-09-04

    A healthy 18-year-old girl presented to a local emergency room with 48 h of abdominal pain and vomiting. A radiological and biochemical diagnosis of moderate acute pancreatitis was made. Bloodwork demonstrated prominent hypertriglyceridaemia (HTG) of 19.5 mmol/L (severe HTG: 11.2-22.4), detectable urine ketones and a random blood glucose of 13 mmol/L dropping to 10.5 mmol/L on repeat (normal random <11). Ketone levels were deemed consistent with fasting ketosis after 48 h of vomiting. There was no known history of diabetes in the patient. Management included aggressive rehydration and pain control, yet the patient rapidly decompensated into shock requiring intensive care unit support. Blood gases revealed severe metabolic acidosis (pH 6.99) and unsuspected underlying diabetic ketoacidosis was diagnosed. The HTG gradually resolved following intravenous fluids and insulin infusion with slower correction of the metabolic acidosis. Importantly, her glycated haemoglobin was 12%, indicating the silent presence of chronic glucose elevations.

  10. Type 1 Diabetes Candidate Genes Linked to Pancreatic Islet Cell Inflammation and Beta-Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Størling, Joachim; Pociot, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic immune-mediated disease resulting from the selective destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic islet β-cells. Susceptibility to the disease is the result of complex interactions between environmental and genetic risk factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 50 genetic regions that affect the risk of developing T1D. Most of these susceptibility loci, however, harbor several genes, and the causal variant(s) and gene(s) for most of the loci remain to be established. A significant part of the genes located in the T1D susceptibility loci are expressed in human islets and β cells and mounting evidence suggests that some of these genes modulate the β-cell response to the immune system and viral infection and regulate apoptotic β-cell death. Here, we discuss the current status of T1D susceptibility loci and candidate genes with focus on pancreatic islet cell inflammation and β-cell apoptosis. PMID:28212332

  11. Type 1 Diabetes Candidate Genes Linked to Pancreatic Islet Cell Inflammation and Beta-Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Størling, Joachim; Pociot, Flemming

    2017-02-16

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic immune-mediated disease resulting from the selective destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic islet β-cells. Susceptibility to the disease is the result of complex interactions between environmental and genetic risk factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 50 genetic regions that affect the risk of developing T1D. Most of these susceptibility loci, however, harbor several genes, and the causal variant(s) and gene(s) for most of the loci remain to be established. A significant part of the genes located in the T1D susceptibility loci are expressed in human islets and β cells and mounting evidence suggests that some of these genes modulate the β-cell response to the immune system and viral infection and regulate apoptotic β-cell death. Here, we discuss the current status of T1D susceptibility loci and candidate genes with focus on pancreatic islet cell inflammation and β-cell apoptosis.

  12. Artesunate ameliorates severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in rats by inhibiting expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Cen, Yanyan; Liu, Chao; Li, Xiaoli; Yan, Zifei; Kuang, Mei; Su, Yujie; Pan, Xichun; Qin, Rongxin; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Jiang; Zhou, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is a severe clinical condition with significant morbidity and mortality. Multiple organs dysfunction (MOD) is the leading cause of SAP-related death. The over-release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α is the underlying mechanism of MOD; however, there is no effective agent against the inflammation. Herein, artesunate (AS) was found to increase the survival of SAP rats significantly when injected with 3.5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct in a retrograde direction, improving their pancreatic pathology and decreasing serum amylase and pancreatic lipase activities along with substantially reduced pancreatic IL-1β and IL-6 release. In vitro, AS-pretreatment strongly inhibited IL-1β and IL-6 release and their mRNA expressions in the pancreatic acinar cells treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but exerted little effect on TNF-α release. Additionally, AS reduced the mRNA expressions of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 as well as their protein expressions in the pancreatic acinar cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that AS could significantly protect SAP rats, and this protection was related to the reduction of digestive enzyme activities and pro-inflammatory cytokine expressions via inhibition of TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. Therefore, AS may be considered as a potential therapeutic agent against SAP.

  13. Acute pancreatitis due to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a rare complication.

    PubMed

    Limon, Onder; Kantar, Funda Ugur; Sahin, Erkan; Arslan, Murat; Ugurhan, Aslı Aydınoglu

    2014-11-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is considered the treatment of choice for most renal and upper ureteral stones. Although extensive data have documented its safety, serious complications have been reported in 1% of patients, including acute pancreatitis, perirenal hematoma, urosepsis, venous thrombosis, biliary obstruction, bowel perforation, lung injury, and rupture of aortic aneurysms. Here, we report a 41-year-old woman who underwent ESWL for a calculus at the right renal pelvis and immediately developed acute pancreatitis after the procedure. Although the possibility of post-ESWL acute pancreatitisis extremely low, physicians must be aware of this complication in emergency departments.

  14. Involvement of thrombopoietin in acinar cell necrosis in L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiaqing; Wan, Rong; Hu, Guoyong; Wang, Feng; Shen, Jie; Wang, Xingpeng

    2012-10-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) plays an important role in injuries of different tissues. However, the role of TPO in acute pancreatitis (AP) is not yet known. The aim of the study was to determine the involvement of TPO in AP. Serum TPO was assayed in necrotizing pancreatitis induced by L-arginine in mice. Recombinant TPO and anti-TPO antibody were given to mice with necrotizing pancreatitis. Amylase, lipase, lactate dehydrogenase, myeloperoxidase activity and pancreatic water content were assayed in serum and tissue samples. Pancreas and lung tissue samples were also collected for histological evaluation. Immunohistochemistry of amylase α and PCNA were applied for the study of acinar regeneration and TUNEL assay for the detection of apoptosis in the pancreas. Increased levels of serum TPO were found in necrotizing pancreatitis. After TPO administration, more severe acinar necrosis was found and blockade of TPO reduced the acinar necrosis in this AP model. Acinar regeneration and apoptosis in the pancreas were affected by TPO and antibody treatment in necrotizing pancreatitis. The severity of pancreatitis-associated lung injury was worsened after TPO treatment, but attenuated after Anti-TPO antibody treatment. In conclusion, serum TPO is up-regulated in the necrotizing pancreatitis induced by L-arginine in mice and may be a risk factor for the pancreatic acinar necrosis in AP. As a pro-necrotic factor, blockade of TPO can attenuate the acinar necrosis in AP and may be a possible therapeutic intervention for AP.

  15. Acute Pancreatitis after Percutaneous Mechanical Thrombectomy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Hershberger, Richard C. Bornak, Arash; Aulivola, Bernadette; Mannava, Krishna

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: We describe a case of severe acute pancreatitis after percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) and review the literature for the occurrence of this complication. Materials and Methods: A 53-year-old man with a history of bilateral external iliac artery stent placement sought care for acute onset of lifestyle-limiting left claudication. Angiography confirmed left external iliac stent occlusion, and PMT with the AngioJet Xpeedior catheter (Possis Medical, Minneapolis MN) was performed. Results: After PMT of the occluded external iliac artery, a residual in-stent stenosis required the placement of a second iliac stent. The procedure was complicated by severe acute pancreatitis. Other causes of pancreatitis were eliminated during the patient's hospital stay. A literature review revealed nine cases of acute pancreatitis after PMT. Conclusion: Although rare, pancreatitis can be a devastating complication of PMT. The development of pancreatitis seems to be related to the products of extensive hemolysis triggering an inflammatory process. To prevent this complication, we recommend that close attention be paid to the duration and extent of PMT, thereby avoiding extensive hemolysis and subsequent complications.

  16. Luteolin protects mice from severe acute pancreatitis by exerting HO-1-mediated anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Wang, Kezhou; Yuan, Chunxiao; Xing, Rong; Ni, Jianbo; Hu, Guoyong; Chen, Fengling; Wang, Xingpeng

    2017-01-01

    Reseda odorata L. has long been used in traditional Asian medicine for the treatment of diseases associated with oxidative injury and acute inflammation, such as endotoxemia, acute lung injury, acute myocardial infarction and hepatitis. Luteolin, the main component of Reseda odorata L., which is also widely found in many natural herbs and vege tables, has been shown to induce heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression to exert anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. In this study, we aimed to examine the effects of luteolin on mice with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Cerulein and lipopolysaccharide were used to induce SAP in male Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice in the SAP group. The SAP group was divided into 4 subgroups, as follows: the vehicle, luteolin, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) only, and luteolin (Lut) + ZnPP (luteolin plus zinc protoporphyrin treatment) groups. The wet/dry weight ratios, hematoxylin and eosin staining and pathological scores of pancreatic tissues were assessed and compared to those of the control mice. Amylase, lipase, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and myeloperoxidase activities, and malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10 and HO-1 levels, as well as the expression of HO-1 were determined in serum and/or pancreatic tissue samples. SAP was successfully induced in male mice compared to normal control mice. The wet/dry weight ratios, pathological scores, and amylase and lipase activity, as well as the levels of TNFα and IL-6 were significantly reduced in the pancreatic tissues of the mice in the Lut group compared with those of the mice in the vehicle group. The Lut group exhibited a significant increase in HO-1 expression in the pancreas and enhanced serum HO-1 and IL-10 levels compared with the vehicle group. The suppression of HO-1 activity in the ZnPP group significantly abolished the protective effects of luteolin. NF-κB expression in the pancreatic tissues

  17. Continuous Regional Arterial Infusion Therapy for Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Motoo Ogino, Hiroyuki; Shimohira, Masashi; Hara, Masaki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2009-05-15

    A case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was treated in an 8-year-old girl. She experienced acute pancreatitis during treatment for M. pneumoniae. Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan revealed necrotizing pancreatitis. The computed tomographic severity index was 8 points (grade E). A protease inhibitor, ulinastatin, was provided via intravenous infusion but was ineffective. Continuous regional arterial infusion therapy was provided with gabexate mesilate (FOY-007, a protease inhibitor) and meropenem trihydrate, and the pancreatitis improved. This case suggests that infusion therapy is safe and useful in treating necrotizing pancreatitis in children.

  18. Acute Pancreatitis and Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Magno Pereira, Vítor; Marote Correia, Luís; Rodrigues, Tiago; Serrão Faria, Gorete

    2016-09-01

    The posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a neurological syndrome characterized by headache, confusion, visual disturbances and seizures associated with identifiable areas of cerebral edema on imaging studies. The authors report the case of a man, 33 years-old, leukodermic with a history of chronic alcohol and tobacco consumption, who is admitted to the emergency department for epigastric pain radiating to the back and vomiting with about six hours of evolution and an intense holocranial headache for two hours. His physical examination was remarkable for a blood pressure of 190/100 mmHg and tenderness in epigastrium. His analytical results revealed emphasis on amylase 193 U/L and lipase 934 U/L. During the observation in the emergency department,he presented a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed and suggestive of pancreatitis withoutgallstones signals. Head computed tomography showed subarachnoid haemorrhage and a small right frontal cortical haemorrhage. The brain magnetic resonance imaging done one week after admission showed areas of a bilateral and symmetrical T2 / FLAIR hyperintensities in the subcortical white matter of the parietal and superior frontal regions, suggesting a diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Abdominal computed tomography (10 days after admission) demonstrated a thickened pancreas in connection with inflammation and two small hypodense foci in the anterior part of the pancreas body, translating small foci of necrosis. The investigation of a thrombophilic defect revealed a heterozygous G20210A prothrombin gene mutation. The patient was discharged without neurological sequelae and asymptomatic. The follow-up brain magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the reversal of the lesions, confirming the diagnosis.

  19. Symptomatic Acute Pancreatitis Induced by Nilotinib: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Toshiki; Nannya, Yasuhito; Shimizu, Masahito; Seishima, Mitsuru; Tsurumi, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Nilotinib is a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor for the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias. An elevation of the pancreatic enzyme level is one of the major adverse events associated with nilotinib, but whether or not nilotinib induces symptomatic pancreatitis remains to be elucidated. The cases of two chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with nilotinib who developed symptomatic acute pancreatitis on the third and fifth day of nilotinib administration are herein presented. Since both patients had no other etiologies for pancreatitis, nilotinib was considered to be the causal agent. The withdrawal of nilotinib resulted in a prompt recovery. These cases underline the importance of recognizing pancreatitis as a possible adverse event associated with nilotinib. PMID:27904116

  20. [Mesenchymal stromal cells transplantation in acute and chronic pancreatitis in rats].

    PubMed

    Lazebnik, L B; Trubitsyna, I E; Agafonov, M A; Kniazev, O V; Liundup, A V

    2011-01-01

    Before using MSC transplantation in the clinic to conduct preclinical studies MSCs to animals with acute and chronic pancreatitis. Work out the timing and dose of MSCs. The rationale of MSCs transplantation for the regeneration of damaged pancreatic tissue. The essence of the experiments is to establish the existence of common pathogenetic mechanisms for the development of pathological processes and sanogenesis toxic damage of pancreatic tissue. The study was work out in the rat model of acute and chronic pancreatitis, to explore beneficial and adverse effects of allogeneic stem cells for regenerative-reduction processes. For cell transplantation using allogenic stromal cell fraction of bone marrow, the cell suspension was injected at a dose of 2 x 10(6) and 5 x 10(6) cells.

  1. High-mobility group box 1 protein and its role in severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiao; Li, Wei-Qin

    2015-01-01

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which belongs to the subfamily of HMG-1/-2, is a highly conserved single peptide chain consisting of 215 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of approximately 24894 Da. HMGB1 is a ubiquitous nuclear protein in mammals and plays a vital role in inflammatory diseases. Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common causes of acute abdominal pain with a poor prognosis. Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas (duration of less than six months), for which the severe form is called severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). More and more studies have shown that HMGB1 has a bidirectional effect in the pathogenesis of SAP. Extracellular HMGB1 can aggravate the pancreatic inflammatory process, whereas intracellular HMGB1 has a protective effect against pancreatitis. The mechanism of HMGB1 is multiple, mainly through the nuclear factor-κB pathway. Receptors for advanced glycation end-products and toll-like receptors (TLR), especially TLR-2 and TLR-4, are two major types of receptors mediating the inflammatory process triggered by HMGB1 and may be also the main mediators in the pathogenesis of SAP. HMGB1 inhibitors, such as ethyl pyruvate, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, can decrease the level of extracellular HMGB1 and are the promising targets in the treatment of SAP. PMID:25663762

  2. Intrascrotal Collection in an Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yengue Yengue, P.; Assenmacher, C.

    2016-01-01

    Context. An inguinoscrotal swelling occurring during an acute pancreatitis is very rare. Case Report. We report a case of right inguinoscrotal swelling appearing in connection with an interstitial edematous acute pancreatitis. We have noticed a spontaneous complete reduction of the right inguinoscrotal swelling after 10 days. Conclusion. The management of a scrotal swelling should be the least invasive possible method but also the most complete possible method to avoid unnecessary interventions. The exclusion of a pathology that could affect the vital prognosis of the testis remains the absolute priority. An acute scrotum swelling must be carried out by the clinical management by a professional and must be completed with an ultrasonography of the scrotum. Despite all that, if the original etiology of the acute scrotum remains unknown, an abdominopelvic CT scan could provide more details and so could offer a different diagnosis of exclusion, different from the diagnosis of acute idiopathic scrotal edema (AISE). This rare complication of acute pancreatitis reported could be mistaken for a more common pathology. If that complication is identified, it will not require a surgical intervention if there is a correct management of the acute pancreatitis which could justify a broader CT scan. PMID:27882260

  3. TNF-α-dependent Regulation of Acute Pancreatitis Severity by Ly-6Chi Monocytes in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Perides, George; Weiss, Eric R.; Michael, Emily S.; Laukkarinen, Johanna M.; Duffield, Jeremy S.; Steer, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    The roles of monocytes/macrophages and their mechanisms of action in the regulation of pancreatitis are poorly understood. To address these issues, we have employed genetically altered mouse strains that either express the human diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) coupled to the CD11b promoter or have global deletion of TNF-α. Targeted, conditional depletion of monocytes/macrophages was achieved by administration of diphtheria toxin (DT) to CD11b-DTR mice. We show that in the absence of DT administration, pancreatitis is associated with an increase in pancreatic content of Ly-6Chi monocytes/macrophages but that this response is prevented by prior administration of DT to CD11b-DTR mice. DT administration also reduces pancreatic edema and acinar cell injury/necrosis in two dissimilar experimental models of acute pancreatitis (a secretagogue-induced model and a model elicited by retrograde pancreatic duct infusion of sodium taurocholate). In the secretagogue-elicited model, the DT-induced decrease in pancreatitis severity is reversed by adoptive transfer of purified Ly-6Chi monocytes harvested from non-DT-treated CD11b-DTR mice or by the transfer of purified Ly-6Chi monocytes harvested from TNF-α+/+ donor mice, but it is not reversed by the transfer of Ly-6Chi monocytes harvested from TNF-α−/− donors. Our studies indicate that the Ly-6Chi monocyte subset regulates the severity of pancreatitis by promoting pancreatic edema and acinar cell injury/necrosis and that this phenomenon is dependent upon the expression of TNF-α by those cells. They suggest that therapies targeting Ly-6Chi monocytes and/or TNF-α expression by Ly-6Chi monocytes might prove beneficial in the prevention or treatment of acute pancreatitis. PMID:21343291

  4. CONTRAST-ENHANCED ULTRASONOGRAPHY OF THE PANCREAS IN HEALTHY DOGS AND IN DOGS WITH ACUTE PANCREATITIS.

    PubMed

    Rademacher, Nathalie; Schur, David; Gaschen, Frédéric; Kearney, Michael; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatitis is the most frequent disease affecting the exocrine pancreas in dogs and reliable diagnostic techniques for predicting fatal complications are lacking. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) improves detection of tissue perfusion as well as organ lesion vascular pattern. Objectives of this prospective case control study were to compare perfusion characteristics and enhancement patterns of the pancreas in healthy dogs and dogs with pancreatitis using CEUS. Ten healthy dogs and eight dogs with pancreatitis were selected based on physical examination, abdominal ultrasound, and blood analysis findings. A CEUS study of the pancreas was performed for each dog and two observers who were aware of clinical status used advanced ultrasound quantification software to analyze time-intensity curves. Perfusion patterns were compared between healthy and affected dogs. In dogs with acute pancreatitis, mean pixel and peak intensity of the pancreatic parenchyma was significantly higher than that of normal dogs (P = 0.05) in between 6 and 60 s (P = <0.0001-0.046). This corresponds to a 311% increase in mean pixel intensity in dogs with acute pancreatitis compared to healthy dogs. Wash-in rates were greater and had a consistently steeper slope to peak in dogs with pancreatitis as opposed to healthy dogs. All dogs with pancreatitis showed a decrease in pixel intensity 10-15 days after the initial examination (P = 0.011) and their times to peak values were prolonged compared to the initial exam. Findings from the current study supported the use of CEUS for diagnosing pancreatitis, pancreatic necrosis, and disease monitoring following therapy in dogs.

  5. Role of somatostatin and its analogues in the treatment of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Büchler, M W; Binder, M; Friess, H

    1994-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is caused by the activation of digestive enzymes in the pancreas and a possible treatment, therefore, is the inhibition of enzyme secretion. This approach is somewhat controversial, however, as it is not clear whether pancreatic secretion continues to occur during the course of acute pancreatitis. Animal studies show an appreciable reduction of secretion in the inflamed pancreas, but studies in humans are not conclusive. The use of somatostatin or its analogue, octreotide, has been investigated in several clinical studies. A meta analysis of six individual studies in which somatostatin was given for acute pancreatitis showed that somatostatin significantly reduces mortality. A trial in patients with moderate to severe acute pancreatitis showed a lower rate (although not statistically significant) of complications in patients treated with 3 x 200 and 3 x 500 micrograms/day octreotide, compared with controls and patients receiving a lower dose of octreotide. A further study showed a significant reduction in patient controlled analgesics in patients treated with octreotide compared with controls. Pain is the important clinical symptom of chronic pancreatitis, possibly resulting from an increased intraductal pressure during secretion. The effect on pain of the inhibition of pancreatic secretion by octreotide has been investigated in two studies. One showed no significant reduction in pain after treatment with octreotide for three days. In the other, in which octreotide was used for three weeks, significantly less pain and analgesic use was recorded during octreotide treatment than during placebo. The most common complication of chronic pancreatitis is the formation of pseudocysts. There is some evidence that octreotide may be useful in their treatment. PMID:7911442

  6. Kaempferol, a dietary flavonoid, ameliorates acute inflammatory and nociceptive symptoms in gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shi Hyoung; Park, Jae Gwang; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yang, Sungjae; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Jun Ho; Ha, Van Thai; Kim, Han Gyung; Yi, Young-Su; Kim, Ji Hye; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Sung, Nak Yoon; Lee, Mi-nam; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-07-01

    Kaempferol (KF) is the most abundant polyphenol in tea, fruits, vegetables, and beans. However, little is known about its in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy and mechanisms of action. To study these, several acute mouse inflammatory and nociceptive models, including gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain were employed. Kaempferol was shown to attenuate the expansion of inflammatory lesions seen in ethanol (EtOH)/HCl- and aspirin-induced gastritis, LPS/caerulein (CA) triggered pancreatitis, and acetic acid-induced writhing.

  7. Acute pancreatitis: rare complication of chicken pox in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Jain, A P; Pandit, A K

    2007-01-01

    Chicken pox is a highly contagious infection, caused by the varicella zoster virus. Although generally a benign, self-limited disease, varicella may be associated with serious complications especially in adults. We present acute pancreatitis- a rare complication, in otherwise healthy patients suffering from chicken pox. The presence of pancreatitis in association with chickenpox in immunocompetent patients can influence the outcome of the latter. This interesting case will hopefully increase awareness about this complication and its fatality in chicken pox.

  8. Hyperlipidemia intensifies cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis associated with activation of protein kinase C in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Jun; Sun, Jia-Bang; Li, Fei; Zhang, Shu-Wen

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of hyperlipidemia on acute pancreatitis (AP) and the possible mechanisms. METHODS: Rat models of hyperlipidemia and AP were established by Triton WR1339 and cerulein respectively. Human albumin was used to treat AP complicated by hyperlipidemia. In each group, we compared the histological score, volume of ascites, ratio of pancreatic wet/dry weight, serum amylase (AMY) and pancreatic acinar cell apoptosis. The level of protein kinase C (PKC) membrane translocation in pancreatic tissue was detected by Western blot. RESULTS: In the hyperlipidemia model established by Triton WR1339, triglyceride (TG) increased remarkably and reached its peak 6 h after injection, and most rats developed mild acute pancreatitis. Histological score, volume of ascites, ratio of wet/dry weight and serum AMY in AP animals with hyperlipidemia were obviously higher than those in AP animals (P < 0.05) and decreased after albumin therapy but not significantly (P > 0.05). Apoptotic cells detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) increased in AP animals with hyperlipidemia and did not change distinctly after albumin therapy. PKC membrane translocation level increased in AP animals with hyperlipidemia and decreased remarkably after albumin therapy (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Hyperlipidemia may induce AP or intensify pancreatic injury. Albumin therapy can not alleviate pancreatic lesion effectively. PKC activation may be one mechanism by which AP is intensified by hyperlipidemia. PMID:16718817

  9. [The effect of semax and mexidol on the course of acute pancreatitis in rats].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Iu V; Iasnetsov, V V

    2000-01-01

    The effect of semax and mexidol on the course of acute pancreatitis in rats was studied in comparison with the action of contrical, fluorouracil, and dibunol. It was established that a single intraductal or intraperitoneal administration of semax or mexidol markedly reduces the loss of experimental animals (to 10-13%), decreases hyperfermentemia, lipid peroxidation activation, and vascular permeability, improves microcirculation, and accelerates healing of the damaged pancreatic zones by substitutional repair of pancreatic acini not accompanied by coarse fibrous changes in the parenchyma. Upon the intraductal administration, semax and mexidol were more effective than contrical, fluorouracil, and dibunol.

  10. The effect of phenylbutazone on acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Louagie, Y; Hancotte-Lahaye, C; Delloye, C; Mairy, Y; De Muylder, C

    1984-01-01

    The effect of phenylbutazone on acute experimental pancreatitis was investigated in the rat. Severe necrotico-hemorrhagic pancreatitis was produced by intraductal injection of trypsin. Pretreatment by phenylbutazone did not alter the mortality rate but reduced the severity of pancreatitis as was demonstrated by histological quantification (total score 13.35 +/- 0.80 in treated rats versus 17.67 +/- 0.69 in the control group; P less than 0.01). The protective effect of phenylbutazone seems to be related to the specific anti-inflammatory properties of the drug and not to inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis.

  11. Chronic alcohol exposure exacerbates inflammation and triggers pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia through PI3K/Akt/IKK

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, XIN; LI, XUQI; MA, QINGYONG; XU, QINHONG; DUAN, WANXING; LEI, JIANJUN; ZHANG, LUN; WU, ZHENG

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) has been identified as an initiating event that can progress to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) or pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Acini transdifferentiation can be induced by persistent inflammation. Notably, compelling evidence has emerged that chronic alcohol exposure may trigger an inflammatory response of macrophages/monocytes stimulated by endotoxins. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the role of inflammation induced by chronic alcohol and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in the progression of pancreatic ADM, as well as to elucidate the possible mechanisms involved. For this purpose, cultured macrophages were exposed to varying doses of alcohol for 1 week prior to stimulation with LPS. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and regulated upon activation, normal T cell expression and secreted (RANTES) expression were upregulated in the intoxicated macrophages with activated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Following treatment with the supernatant of intoxicated macrophages, ADM of primary acinar cells was induced. Furthermore, the expression of TNF-α and RANTES, as well as the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B(Akt)/inhibitory κB kinase (IKK) signaling pathway have been proven to be involved in the ADM of acinar cells. Moreover, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were employed to further explore the induction of pancreatic ADM by chronic alcohol and LPS exposure in vivo. At the end of the treatment period, a number of physiological parameters, such as body weight, liver weight and pancreatic weight were reduced in the exposed rats. Plasma alcohol concentrations and oxidative stress levels in the serum, as well as TNF-α and RANTES expression in monocytes were also induced following chronic alcohol and LPS exposure. In addition, pancreatic ADM was induced through the PI3K/Akt/IKK signaling pathway by the augmented TNF-α and RANTES expression levels in the exposed rats. Overall, we

  12. Protective effect of melatonin and its precursor L-tryptophan on acute pancreatitis induced by caerulein overstimulation or ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Jaworek, Jolanta; Leja-Szpak, Anna; Bonior, Joanna; Nawrot, Katarzyna; Tomaszewska, Romana; Stachura, Jerzy; Sendur, Ryszard; Pawlik, Wiesław; Brzozowski, Tomasz; Konturek, Stanisław J

    2003-01-01

    Melatonin, a pineal secretory product, synthesized from l-tryptophan, has received increased attention because of its antioxidative and immunomodulatory properties. It has been detected in the gut and shown to protect the gastric mucosa, and liver from acute damage, but the role of melatonin in the protection of the pancreas against acute inflammation is not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin and its precursor, l-tryptophan, on caerulein-induced pancreatitis (CIP) and on ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-provoked pancreatitis in rats. CIP was induced by subcutaneous infusion of caerulein to the rats (25 microg/kg). I/R was induced by clamping of the inferior splenic artery for 30 min followed by 2 hr of reperfusion. Melatonin (10, 25 or 50 mg/hr) or l-tryptophan (50, 100 or 250 mg/kg) was given as a bolus intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection 30 min prior to the onset of pancreatitis. CIP and I/R were confirmed by histologic examination and manifested by typical pancreatic edema, by an increase of plasma levels of amylase (by 500% in CIP and by 40% in I/R) and the pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) (by 500%). Lipid peroxidation products such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), were increased several fold in the pancreas CIP and I/R, whereas pancreatic blood flow (PBF) was significantly reduced in these animals. Pretreatment of rats subjected to CIP or to I/R with melatonin (25 or 50 mg/kg i.p.) or l-tryptophan (100 or 250 mg/kg i.p.) significantly reduced pancreatic edema, plasma levels of amylase and TNFalpha and diminished pancreatic MDA + 4-HNE contents, while enhancing PBF, pancreatic integrity and plasma levels of the anti-inflammatory interleukin 10 (IL-10). This was accompanied by a marked and dose-dependent rise of plasma melatonin immunoreactivity. Gene expression of N-acetyl transferase, an enzyme involved in melatonin biosynthesis, was detected in the pancreas of normal rats and was

  13. Controlled clinical trial of selective decontamination for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Luiten, E J; Hop, W C; Lange, J F; Bruining, H A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A randomized, controlled, multicenter trial was undertaken in 102 patients with objective evidence of severe acute pancreatitis to evaluate whether selective decontamination reduces mortality. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Secondary pancreatic infection is the major cause of death in patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Controlled clinical trials to study the effect of selective decontamination in such patients are not available. METHODS: Between April 22, 1990 and April 19, 1993, 102 patients with severe acute pancreatitis were admitted to 16 participating hospitals. Patients were entered into the study if severe acute pancreatitis was indicated, on admission, by multiple laboratory criteria (Imrie score > or = 3) and/or computed tomography criteria (Balthazar grade D or E). Patients were randomly assigned to receive standard treatment (control group) or standard treatment plus selective decontamination (norfloxacin, colistin, amphotericin; selective decontamination group). All patients received full supportive treatment, and surveillance cultures were taken in both groups. RESULTS: Fifty patients were assigned to the selective decontamination group and 52 were assigned to the control group. There were 18 deaths in the control group (35%), compared with 11 deaths (22%) in the selective decontamination group (adjusted for Imrie score and Balthazar grade: p = 0.048). This difference was mainly caused by a reduction of late mortality (> 2 weeks) due to significant reduction of gram-negative pancreatic infection (p = 0.003). The average number of laparotomies per patient was reduced in patients treated with selective decontamination (p < 0.05). Failure of selective decontamination to prevent secondary gram-negative pancreatic infection with subsequent death was seen in only three patients (6%) and transient gram-negative pancreatic infection was seen in one (2%). In both groups of patients, all gram-negative aerobic pancreatic infection was preceded by

  14. Tinea corporis with acute inflammation caused by Trichophyton tonsurans.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Sayoko; Tanabe, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Masako; Horiguchi, Yuji

    2008-09-01

    A 13-year-old Japanese boy presented with acute skin inflammation on the extremities. He belonged to a judo club of a junior high school in which club tinea capitis and tinea corporis seemed to be prevalent. Vesicles and pustules appeared on his right forearm and right leg. They increased in numbers and formed annular lesions. Pruritic erythema appeared surrounding these lesions. Direct microscopic examination of the lesions detected hyphae, and culture for the fungi yielded yellowish colonies. The result of culture from pustules revealed Staphylococcus aureus. At first, a topical antifungal drug and systemic antibiotics seemed to cure annular lesions, but pustules arose again. A large surrounding erythema was cured by topical treatment with a steroid agent. A biopsy specimen from a pustule showed hyphae of fungi within a hair shaft and in the bulb. The restriction fragment length polymorphism in the internal transcribed spacer regions of the ribosomal gene (polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism) revealed a banding pattern compatible with Trichophyton tonsurans. Treatment with systemic itraconazole was begun and lesions disappeared immediately. Systemic antifungal therapy was needed in our case. Tinea corporis with inflammation necessitates systemic antifungal therapy.

  15. Dasatinib Reduces Lung Inflammation and Fibrosis in Acute Experimental Silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Fernanda Ferreira; Horta, Lucas Felipe Bastos; Maia, Lígia de Albuquerque; Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; da Silva, André Benedito; Morales, Marcelo Marco; Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Takiya, Christina Maeda; de Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is an occupational lung disease with no effective treatment. We hypothesized that dasatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, might exhibit therapeutic efficacy in silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Silicosis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by a single intratracheal administration of silica particles, whereas the control group received saline. After 14 days, when the disease was already established, animals were randomly assigned to receive DMSO or dasatinib (1 mg/kg) by oral gavage, twice daily, for 14 days. On day 28, lung morphofunction, inflammation, and remodeling were investigated. RAW 264.7 cells (a macrophage cell line) were incubated with silica particles, followed by treatment or not with dasatinib, and evaluated for macrophage polarization. On day 28, dasatinib improved lung mechanics, increased M2 macrophage counts in lung parenchyma and granuloma, and was associated with reduction of fraction area of granuloma, fraction area of collapsed alveoli, protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, transforming growth factor-β, and reduced neutrophils, M1 macrophages, and collagen fiber content in lung tissue and granuloma in silicotic animals. Additionally, dasatinib reduced expression of iNOS and increased expression of arginase and metalloproteinase-9 in silicotic macrophages. Dasatinib was effective at inducing macrophage polarization toward the M2 phenotype and reducing lung inflammation and fibrosis, thus improving lung mechanics in a murine model of acute silicosis. PMID:26789403

  16. Glycyrrhizin attenuates tissue injury and reduces neutrophil accumulation in experimental acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Fakhari, Shohreh; Abdolmohammadi, Kamal; Panahi, Yaser; Nikkhoo, Bahram; Peirmohammadi, Hossein; Rahmani, Mohammad Reza; Moghadam, Alireza Salek; Jalili, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Leukocyte infiltration and acinar cell injury are characteristic features of acute pancreatitis (AP). However, the signaling pathways regulating inflammation and accumulation of leukocytes into pancreas tissue remains poorly elucidated. In the current study, we investigated the effects of Glycyrrhizin (GZ) on cerulein-induced AP in mice. AP was induced in male C57BL/6 by intraperitoneal injection of 50 μg/kg cerulein hourly, with a total of 7 times. 1 hour after the last injection of cerulean, mice were treated with either 35 or 70 mg/kg of GZ. Serum amylases and lipases were measured using automated chromogenic assay, MCP-1 and MIP-2 concentrations were measured in the serum by ELISA, and the number of infiltrated inflammatory cells in the pancreas were evaluated by flow cytometry. We found that GZ treatment resulted in reduction (i) both amylase and lipase activities, (ii) the serum levels of both MCP-1 and MIP-2; and (iii) markedly attenuated cerulein-induced histopathological alternations and water contents. Furthermore, we observed that GZ significantly decreased the number of infiltrated monocytes and neutrophils into the pancreas tissue. In conclusion, we demonstrate that GZ attenuates AP signs and inhibits inflammatory cell recruitments into pancreas. PMID:24427330

  17. Increased levels of 3-hydroxykynurenine parallel disease severity in human acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Skouras, Christos; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Binnie, Margaret; Homer, Natalie Z. M.; Murray, Toby B. J.; Robertson, Darren; Briody, Lesley; Paterson, Finny; Spence, Heather; Derr, Lisa; Hayes, Alastair J.; Tsoumanis, Andreas; Lyster, Dawn; Parks, Rowan W.; Garden, O. James; Iredale, John P.; Uings, Iain J.; Liddle, John; Wright, Wayne L.; Dukes, George; Webster, Scott P.; Mole, Damian J.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) protects against multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) in experimental acute pancreatitis (AP). We aimed to precisely define the kynurenine pathway activation in relation to AP and AP-MODS in humans, by carrying out a prospective observational study of all persons presenting with a potential diagnosis of AP for 90 days. We sampled peripheral venous blood at 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 168 hours post-recruitment. We measured tryptophan metabolite concentrations and analysed these in the context of clinical data and disease severity indices, cytokine profiles and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. 79 individuals were recruited (median age: 59.6 years; 47 males, 59.5%). 57 met the revised Atlanta definition of AP: 25 had mild, 23 moderate, and 9 severe AP. Plasma 3-hydroxykynurenine concentrations correlated with contemporaneous APACHE II scores (R2 = 0.273; Spearman rho = 0.581; P < 0.001) and CRP (R2 = 0.132; Spearman rho = 0.455, P < 0.001). Temporal profiling showed early tryptophan depletion and contemporaneous 3-hydroxykynurenine elevation. Furthermore, plasma concentrations of 3-hydroxykynurenine paralleled systemic inflammation and AP severity. These findings support the rationale for investigating early intervention with a KMO inhibitor, with the aim of reducing the incidence and severity of AP-associated organ dysfunction. PMID:27669975

  18. [The glutathione system in the blood of rats and morphological changes of the pancreas under experimental acute and chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Makarchuk, V A; Ushakova, H O; Krylova, O O

    2013-01-01

    In experiment on laboratory rats the models of acute and chronic pancreatitis were developed to study the changes of lipoperoxidation-antioxidant protection system depending on morphological changes of the pancreas. The acute and chronic pancreatitis is accompanied with intensification of lipoperoxidation and gradual inhibition of antioxidant system due to development of subsequent chronization of the pathological process.

  19. Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters Are Less Toxic Than Their Parent Fatty Acids Generated during Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Krutika; Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Trivedi, Ram N.; de Oliveira, Cristiane; Singh, Vijay P.

    2017-01-01

    Although ethanol causes acute pancreatitis (AP) and lipolytic fatty acid (FA) generation worsens AP, the contribution of ethanol metabolites of FAs, ie, FA ethyl esters (FAEEs), to AP outcomes is unclear. Previously, pancreata of dying alcoholics and pancreatic necrosis in severe AP, respectively, showed high FAEEs and FAs, with oleic acid (OA) and its ethyl esters being the most abundant. We thus compared the toxicities of FAEEs and their parent FAs in severe AP. Pancreatic acini and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to FAs or FAEEs in vitro. The triglyceride of OA (i.e., glyceryl tri-oleate) or OAEE was injected into the pancreatic ducts of rats, and local and systemic severities were studied. Unsaturated FAs at equimolar concentrations to FAEEs induced a larger increase in cytosolic calcium, mitochondrial depolarization, and necro-apoptotic cell death. Glyceryl tri-oleate but not OAEE resulted in 70% mortality with increased serum OA, a severe inflammatory response, worse pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure. Our data show that FAs are more likely to worsen AP than FAEEs. Our observations correlate well with the high pancreatic FAEE concentrations in alcoholics without pancreatitis and high FA concentrations in pancreatic necrosis. Thus, conversion of FAs to FAEE may ameliorate AP in alcoholics. PMID:26878214

  20. Effects of Baicalin on inflammatory mediators and pancreatic acinar cell apoptosis in rats with sever acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Xiping, Zhang; Hua, Tian; Hanqing, Chen; Li, Chen; Binyan, Yu; Jing, Ma

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate the effects of Baicalin and Octreotide on inflammatory mediators and pancreatic acinar cells apoptosis of rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: SD rats were randomly divided into sham operated group (I group), model control group (II group), Baicalin treated group (III group) and Octreotide treated group (IV group). Each group was also divided into subgroup of 3, 6 and 12 h (n = 15). The mortality rate, ascites/body weight ratio as well as the level of endotoxin, NO and ET-1 in blood were measured. The pathological severity score of pancreas, apoptotic indexes, and expression levels of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins in each group were investigated. RESULTS: The survival rate of III and IV group has a significant difference compared with II group (P12 h < 0.05). The ascites volume, contents of inflammatory mediators in blood and pathological severity score of pancreas of III and IV group declined at different degrees compared to II group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01 or P < 0.001). Apoptotic index in III group was significantly higher than that in II group at 3 and 6 h (P3, 6 h < 0.05). Apoptotic index in IV group was significantly higher than that in II group at pancreatic tail at 6 h (P6 h < 0.05). Expression level of Bax in III group was significantly higher than that in II group (pancreatic head P3 h,6 h < 0.01, pancreatic tail P3 h < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with Octreotide in the treatment of SAP, the protective mechanisms of Baicalin include reducing the excessive inflammatory mediators’ release, inducing the pancreatic acinar cells apoptosis. PMID:21772857

  1. Fatal hypertriglyceridaemia, acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis possibly induced by quetiapine

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Kristian Roerbaek

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old man treated with quetiapine for anxiety disorder developed hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis. He was otherwise physically healthy with no family history of hyperlipidaemia. Despite aggressive intensive therapy he died of multiorgan failure within 36 h from initial presentation. While second-generation antipsychotics are well known to be causally linked to diabetes and hyperlipidaemia, this is to my knowledge the first-described case of a fatal triad of extreme hypertriglyceridaemia, acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis possibly induced by quetiapine. Clinicians should be aware of this rare clinical presentation since rapid progression to multiorgan failure can occur. Early supportive therapy should be initiated. Lactescent serum and ketoacidosis in severe acute pancreatitis should not be overlooked—initiate insulin therapy and possibly plasmapheresis in case of extreme hypertriglyceridaemia. PMID:24403385

  2. [Acute pancreatitis after endoscopic evacuation of the gall stone, presenting as duodenal perforation: a case report].

    PubMed

    Zyluk, Andrzej; Jagielski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 25-year-old patient who had sphincterotomy performed for the retrieval of gall stones form the common bile duct, and in whom, immediately after the procedure, signs and symptoms of the retroperitoneal, iatrogenic perforation of the duodenum had developed. Additionally, the patient showed clinical and biochemical symptoms of acute pancreatitis. The patient was operated on, and, intraoperatively, the duodenal perforation was not found, but excessive inflammatory infiltration of the retroperitoneal space, without bile leakage, and typical features for acute pancreatitis. The operation was confined to the duodenal and retroperitoneal space exposure, drainage and jejunostomy for nourishment. The postoperative course was uneventful, acute pancreatitis did not develop into the necrotising form, and the patient eventually recovered.

  3. Gastrostomy tube migration complicated with acute pancreatitis: Two case reports with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hawatmeh, Amer; Alkhateeb, Anas; Arqoub, Ahmad Abu; Jumean, Khalid; Shaaban, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    The percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube is an important method of providing enteral nutrition to patients with swallowing disorders and those who need long-term enteral nutritional support. The association between PEG tube migration and acute pancreatitis is rare and was previously described in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, only 11 cases have been reported in the literature. In this article, we are describing two cases of acute pancreatitis secondary to PEG tube balloon migration to the duodenum. These two case reports exemplify that PEG tube migration to the duodenum is not uncommon, and it may lead to disturbance of the biliary flow, obstruction of the ampulla of vater, and acute pancreatitis.

  4. Fatal hypertriglyceridaemia, acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis possibly induced by quetiapine.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Kristian Roerbaek

    2014-01-08

    A 27-year-old man treated with quetiapine for anxiety disorder developed hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis. He was otherwise physically healthy with no family history of hyperlipidaemia. Despite aggressive intensive therapy he died of multiorgan failure within 36 h from initial presentation. While second-generation antipsychotics are well known to be causally linked to diabetes and hyperlipidaemia, this is to my knowledge the first-described case of a fatal triad of extreme hypertriglyceridaemia, acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis possibly induced by quetiapine. Clinicians should be aware of this rare clinical presentation since rapid progression to multiorgan failure can occur. Early supportive therapy should be initiated. Lactescent serum and ketoacidosis in severe acute pancreatitis should not be overlooked-initiate insulin therapy and possibly plasmapheresis in case of extreme hypertriglyceridaemia.

  5. [TOTAL PARENTERAL NUTRITION IN A PREGNANT PATIENT WITH ACUTE PANCREATITIS AND LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE DEFICIENCY].

    PubMed

    Contreras-Bolívar, Victoria; González-Molero, Inmaculada; Valdivieso, Pedro; Olveira, Gabriel

    2015-10-01

    We present a case of severe acute pancreatitis induced by hypertriglyceridemia secondary to lipoprotein lipase (LPL) deficiency in a pregnant patient with gestational diabetes, initially maneged with diet but it was later necessary to carry out artificial nutricional support measures: total parenteral nutrition. LPL deficiency might cause severe hypertriglyceridemia, repetition acute pancreatitis which is an unwieldy and severe situation during pregnancy. Acute familial hypertriglyceridemia pancreatitis accounts for 5% of cases, including LPL deficiency. The goal of treatment is to reach triglycerides levels below 500 mg/dl, being very low fat diet the treatment of choice, drugs or plasmapheresis techniques can also be associated. TPN enriched in ω3 fatty acids and glutamine was safe and effective in our patient with significant decrease in triglyceride levels.

  6. Pathophysiological mechanisms of acute pancreatitis define inflammatory markers of clinical prognosis.

    PubMed

    Minkov, Georgi A; Halacheva, Krasimira S; Yovtchev, Yovcho P; Gulubova, Maya V

    2015-07-01

    Development of acute pancreatitis illustrates the need to understand the basic mechanisms of disease progression to drive the exploration of therapeutic options. Cytokines play a major role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis as underlying systemic inflammatory response, tissue damage, and organ dysfunction. However, little is known about circulating concentrations of these inflammatory markers and their real impact on clinical practice. Experimental studies have suggested that the prognosis for acute pancreatitis depends on the degree of pancreatic necrosis and the intensity of multisystem organ failure generated by the systemic inflammatory response. This suggests an intricate balance between localized tissue damage with proinflammatory cytokine production and a systemic anti-inflammatory response that restricts the inappropriate movement of proinflammatory agents into the circulation. Implication of such mediators suggests that interruption or blunting of an inappropriate immune response has the potential to improve outcome. A detailed understanding of pathophysiological processes and immunological aspects in patients with acute pancreatitis is the basis for the development of therapeutic strategies that will provide significant reductions in morbidity and mortality.

  7. Hemodiafiltration combined with resin-mediated absorption as a therapy for hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Mao-qin; Shi, Zai-xiang; Xu, Ji-yuan; Lu, Bo; Li, Jia-qiong; Xu, Yan-jun; Wang, Xiao-Meng; Li, Song-mei; Mo, Xun

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether hemodiafiltration combined with resin-mediated absorption is a better therapy for hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis. Patients (n = 67) with acute pancreatitis treated in ICU from January 2009 to December 2012 were included in this study. Seven of these 67 cases were diagnosed hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis (HLAP). All the 7 HLAP patients went through fast, gastrointestinal decompression, anti-shock treatment, inhibition of pancreatic secretion, antiseptic treatments, and hemoperfusion (HP) combined with continuous veno venous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF). After one round of treatment by resin adsorption, there was a significant decrease in serum triglycerides (TG) (29.78 %) and total cholesterol (TC) (24.02 %) levels (p < 0.01). TG and TC levels dropped by 49.02 and 37.66 %, respectively, after 1-day treatment of HP + CVVHDF; by 62.81 and 47.37 % on day 2 post-treatment; and by 69.57 and 49.47 % on day 3 post-treatment. All the 7 patients survived. The average time spent in the ICU was 7 ± 3.8 days, and the average duration of hospitalization was 19 ± 15.1 days. Our results show that hemoperfusion combined with hemodiafiltration is an efficient treatment as this approach can reduce plasma lipid levels effectively and reduce the risk of acute pancreatitis due to hyperlipidemia.

  8. Acute pancreatitis associated with herpes zoster: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Ye, Jun; Han, Yue-Hua

    2014-12-21

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a type of herpes virus known to cause varicella, mainly in young children, and herpes zoster in adults. Although generally non-lethal, VZV infection can be associated with serious complications, particularly in adults. Acute pancreatitis caused by VZV infection is a rare event, with reports primarily concerning immunocompromised individuals. Here we report a 44-year-old immunocompetent female who developed acute pancreatitis associated with VZV infection. The patient presented with vomiting and persistent pain in the upper quadrant less than one week after diagnosis and treatment for a herpes zoster-related rash with stabbing pain on the abdomen and dorsal right trunk side. A diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was confirmed based on abdominal pain, elevated levels of urine and serum amylase, and findings of peri-pancreatic exudation and effusions by computed tomography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. This case highlights that, though rare, acute pancreatitis should be considered in VZV patients who complain of abdominal pain, especially in the epigastric area. Early detection and proper treatment are needed to prevent the condition from deteriorating further and to minimize mortality.

  9. Conserved gene regulation during acute inflammation between zebrafish and mammals

    PubMed Central

    Forn-Cuní, G.; Varela, M.; Pereiro, P.; Novoa, B.; Figueras, A.

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio), largely used as a model for studying developmental processes, has also emerged as a valuable system for modelling human inflammatory diseases. However, in a context where even mice have been questioned as a valid model for these analysis, a systematic study evaluating the reproducibility of human and mammalian inflammatory diseases in zebrafish is still lacking. In this report, we characterize the transcriptomic regulation to lipopolysaccharide in adult zebrafish kidney, liver, and muscle tissues using microarrays and demonstrate how the zebrafish genomic responses can effectively reproduce the mammalian inflammatory process induced by acute endotoxin stress. We provide evidence that immune signaling pathways and single gene expression is well conserved throughout evolution and that the zebrafish and mammal acute genomic responses after lipopolysaccharide stimulation are highly correlated despite the differential susceptibility between species to that compound. Therefore, we formally confirm that zebrafish inflammatory models are suited to study the basic mechanisms of inflammation in human inflammatory diseases, with great translational impact potential. PMID:28157230

  10. [Effect of KSG-504, a new CCK-A-receptor antagonist, on experimental acute pancreatitis in rats and mice].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Shinagawa, K; Sugiura, M; Nagasawa, T; Akahane, M; Ajisawa, Y

    1996-04-01

    We investigated the protective and/or therapeutic effects of a new cholecystokinin receptor antagonist, KSG-504, on different types of experimental pancreatitis in the rat and mouse. The intravenous injection of KSG-504 (10, 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg) before caerulein administration to the rat inhibited the increases in plasma amylase, lipase and of pancreatic wet weight in a dose-dependent manner. The histological changes due to caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis were also decreased by KSG-504 when KSG-504 (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg) was administered after the induction of acute pancreatitis; the increases in plasma amylase, lipase and pancreatic wet weight were reduced, but the histological changes of the pancreas were not decreased significantly. In the second experiment, acute pancreatitis was induced in rats by injecting 0.3 ml of 6% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic interstitial tissue. KSG-504 administered immediately and 1.5 hr after sodium-taurocholate injection at 100 mg/kg reduced the increases of pancreatic enzymes in the plasma, pancreatic wet weight and ascites. Moreover, KSG-504 (50 and 100 mg/kg, i.v., x 2) mitigated the histological changes of taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis. Another type of acute pancreatitis was induced in mice by dl-ethionine (0.5 g/kg, p.o., x 4) and a choline-deficient diet. KSG-504 (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg) was subcutaneously administered five times every 12 hr during the experiment. KSG-504 elongated the survival of mice in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that KSG-504 has potent protective and/or therapeutic effects against acute pancreatitis and that cholecystokinin may be involved in the development of pancreatitis.

  11. G-CSF maintains controlled neutrophil mobilization during acute inflammation by negatively regulating CXCR2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Bajrami, Besnik; Zhu, Haiyan; Kwak, Hyun-Jeong; Mondal, Subhanjan; Hou, Qingming; Geng, Guangfeng; Karatepe, Kutay; Zhang, Yu C; Nombela-Arrieta, César; Park, Shin-Young; Loison, Fabien; Sakai, Jiro; Xu, Yuanfu; Silberstein, Leslie E; Luo, Hongbo R

    2016-09-19

    Cytokine-induced neutrophil mobilization from the bone marrow to circulation is a critical event in acute inflammation, but how it is accurately controlled remains poorly understood. In this study, we report that CXCR2 ligands are responsible for rapid neutrophil mobilization during early-stage acute inflammation. Nevertheless, although serum CXCR2 ligand concentrations increased during inflammation, neutrophil mobilization slowed after an initial acute fast phase, suggesting a suppression of neutrophil response to CXCR2 ligands after the acute phase. We demonstrate that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), usually considered a prototypical neutrophil-mobilizing cytokine, was expressed later in the acute inflammatory response and unexpectedly impeded CXCR2-induced neutrophil mobilization by negatively regulating CXCR2-mediated intracellular signaling. Blocking G-CSF in vivo paradoxically elevated peripheral blood neutrophil counts in mice injected intraperitoneally with Escherichia coli and sequestered large numbers of neutrophils in the lungs, leading to sterile pulmonary inflammation. In a lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury model, the homeostatic imbalance caused by G-CSF blockade enhanced neutrophil accumulation, edema, and inflammation in the lungs and ultimately led to significant lung damage. Thus, physiologically produced G-CSF not only acts as a neutrophil mobilizer at the relatively late stage of acute inflammation, but also prevents exaggerated neutrophil mobilization and the associated inflammation-induced tissue damage during early-phase infection and inflammation.

  12. G-CSF maintains controlled neutrophil mobilization during acute inflammation by negatively regulating CXCR2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bajrami, Besnik; Zhu, Haiyan; Zhang, Yu C.

    2016-01-01

    Cytokine-induced neutrophil mobilization from the bone marrow to circulation is a critical event in acute inflammation, but how it is accurately controlled remains poorly understood. In this study, we report that CXCR2 ligands are responsible for rapid neutrophil mobilization during early-stage acute inflammation. Nevertheless, although serum CXCR2 ligand concentrations increased during inflammation, neutrophil mobilization slowed after an initial acute fast phase, suggesting a suppression of neutrophil response to CXCR2 ligands after the acute phase. We demonstrate that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), usually considered a prototypical neutrophil-mobilizing cytokine, was expressed later in the acute inflammatory response and unexpectedly impeded CXCR2-induced neutrophil mobilization by negatively regulating CXCR2-mediated intracellular signaling. Blocking G-CSF in vivo paradoxically elevated peripheral blood neutrophil counts in mice injected intraperitoneally with Escherichia coli and sequestered large numbers of neutrophils in the lungs, leading to sterile pulmonary inflammation. In a lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury model, the homeostatic imbalance caused by G-CSF blockade enhanced neutrophil accumulation, edema, and inflammation in the lungs and ultimately led to significant lung damage. Thus, physiologically produced G-CSF not only acts as a neutrophil mobilizer at the relatively late stage of acute inflammation, but also prevents exaggerated neutrophil mobilization and the associated inflammation-induced tissue damage during early-phase infection and inflammation. PMID:27551153

  13. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy and risk of acute pancreatitis: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Oskarsson, Viktor; Orsini, Nicola; Sadr-Azodi, Omid; Wolk, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several case reports have suggested that women’s use of exogenous sex hormones is associated with acute pancreatitis; however, relevant epidemiologic data are sparse. We examined the association between postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy and risk of acute pancreatitis. Methods: We conducted a prospective study involving 31 494 postmenopausal women (aged 48–83 yr) from the population-based Swedish Mammography Cohort. Participants completed a baseline questionnaire in 1997 assessing their use of hormone replacement therapy. We linked the cohort to the hospital-based Swedish National Patient Register to determine hospital admissions for acute pancreatitis through 2010. Relative risks (RRs) were calculated using Cox proportional hazard models. Results: Over a total follow-up of 389 456 person-years, we identified 237 cases of incident acute pancreatitis. The age-standardized incidence rates per 100 000 person-years were 71 cases among women who had ever used hormone replacement therapy and 52 cases among women who had never used such hormones. Among ever users of hormone replacement therapy, the multivariable-adjusted RR of acute pancreatitis was 1.57 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20–2.05) compared with never users. The risk did not differ by current or past use, but it seemed to be higher among women who used systemic therapy (RR 1.92, 95% CI 1.38–2.66) and among those with duration of therapy of more than 10 years (RR 1.87, 95% CI 1.11–3.17). Interpretation: Use of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy was associated with increased risk of acute pancreatitis. Physicians should consider this potential increase in risk when prescribing such therapy. PMID:24468693

  14. The effects of the adenosine A3 receptor agonist IB-MECA on sodium taurocholate-induced experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Prozorow-Krol, Beata; Korolczuk, Agnieszka; Czechowska, Grazyna; Slomka, Maria; Madro, Agnieszka; Celinski, Krzysztof

    2013-09-01

    The role of adenosine A3 receptors and their distribution in the gastrointestinal tract have been widely investigated. Most of the reports discuss their role in intestinal inflammations. However, the role of adenosine A3 receptor agonist in pancreatitis has not been well established. The aim of this study is [corrected] to evaluate the effects of the adenosine A3 receptor agonist on the course of sodium taurocholate-induced experimental acute pancreatitis (EAP). The experiments were performed on 80 male Wistar rats, 58 of which survived, subdivided into 3 groups: C--control rats, I--EAP group, and II--EAP group treated with the adenosine A3 receptor agonist IB-MECA (1-deoxy-1-6[[(3-iodophenyl) methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl)-N-methyl-B-D-ribofuronamide at a dose of 0.75 mg/kg b.w. i.p. at 48, 24, 12 and 1 h before and 1 h after the injection of 5% sodium taurocholate solution into the biliary-pancreatic duct. Serum for α-amylase and lipase determinations and tissue samples for morphological examinations were collected at 2, 6, and 24 h of the experiment. In the IB-MECA group, α-amylase activity was decreased with statistically high significance compared to group I. The activity of lipase was not significantly different among the experimental groups but higher than in the control group. The administration of IB-MECA attenuated the histological parameters of inflammation as compared to untreated animals. The use of A3 receptor agonist IB-MECA attenuates EAP. Our findings suggest that stimulation of adenosine A3 receptors plays a positive role in the sodium taurocholate-induced EAP in rats.

  15. Yin-Chen-Hao Tang Attenuates Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Rat: An Experimental Verification of In silico Network Target Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Hong; Wang, Guijun; Qu, Jialin; Xia, Shilin; Tao, Xufeng; Qi, Bing; Zhang, Qingkai; Shang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Yin-Chen-Hao Tang (YCHT) is a classical Chinese medicine compound that has a long history of clinical use in China for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, the efficacy and mechanisms of YCHT for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) are not known. The current study investigated the pharmacological properties of YCHT against SAP and its underlying mechanisms. A computational prediction of potential targets of YCHT was initially established based on a network pharmacology simulation. The model suggested that YCHT attenuated SAP progress by apoptosis inducement, anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation and blood lipid regulation. These effects were validated in SAP rats. YCHT administration produced the following results: (1) significantly inhibited the secretion of pancreatic enzymes and protected pancreatic tissue; (2) obviously increased the number of in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and induced apoptosis; (3) markedly inhibited neutrophil infiltration to the impaired pancreas and reduced the inflammatory reaction; (4) notably enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes and decreased the nitric oxide synthase levels; (5) significantly reduced the levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein and increased high-density lipoprotein; and (6) significantly up-regulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and down-regulated nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). In summary, these results demonstrated that YCHT attenuated SAP progress by inducing apoptosis, repressing inflammation, alleviating oxidative stress and regulating lipid metabolism partially via regulation of the NF-κB/PPARγ signal pathway. PMID:27790147

  16. Antiretroviral drugs and acute pancreatitis in HIV/AIDS patients: is there any association? A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Natalia Mejias; Ferreira, Felipe Augusto Yamauti; Yonamine, Raquel Yumi; Chehter, Ethel Zimberg

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In HIV-seropositive individuals, the incidence of acute pancreatitis may achieve 40% per year, higher than the 2% found in the general population. Since 1996, when combined antiretroviral therapy, known as HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy), was introduced, a broad spectrum of harmful factors to the pancreas, such as opportunistic infections and drugs used for chemoprophylaxis, dropped considerably. Nucleotide analogues and metabolic abnormalities, hepatic steatosis and lactic acidosis have emerged as new conditions that can affect the pancreas. To evaluate the role of antiretroviral drugs to treat HIV/AIDS in a scenario of high incidence of acute pancreatitis in this population, a systematic review was performed, including original articles, case reports and case series studies, whose targets were HIV-seropositive patients that developed acute pancreatitis after exposure to any antiretroviral drugs. This association was confirmed after exclusion of other possible etiologies and/or a recurrent episode of acute pancreatitis after re-exposure to the suspected drug. Zidovudine, efavirenz, and protease inhibitors are thought to lead to acute pancreatitis secondary to hyperlipidemia. Nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, despite being powerful inhibitors of viral replication, induce a wide spectrum of side effects, including myelotoxicity and acute pancreatitis. Didanosine, zalcitabine and stavudine have been reported as causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis. They pose a high risk with cumulative doses. Didanosine with hydroxyurea, alcohol or pentamidine are additional risk factors, leading to lethal pancreatitis, which is not a frequent event. In addition, other drugs used for prophylaxis of AIDS-related opportunistic diseases, such as sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim and pentamidine, can produce necrotizing pancreatitis. Despite comorbidities that can lead to pancreatic involvement in the HIV/AIDS population, antiretroviral drug

  17. Antiretroviral drugs and acute pancreatitis in HIV/AIDS patients: is there any association? A literature review.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Natalia Mejias; Ferreira, Felipe Augusto Yamauti; Yonamine, Raquel Yumi; Chehter, Ethel Zimberg

    2014-01-01

    In HIV-seropositive individuals, the incidence of acute pancreatitis may achieve 40% per year, higher than the 2% found in the general population. Since 1996, when combined antiretroviral therapy, known as HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy), was introduced, a broad spectrum of harmful factors to the pancreas, such as opportunistic infections and drugs used for chemoprophylaxis, dropped considerably. Nucleotide analogues and metabolic abnormalities, hepatic steatosis and lactic acidosis have emerged as new conditions that can affect the pancreas. To evaluate the role of antiretroviral drugs to treat HIV/AIDS in a scenario of high incidence of acute pancreatitis in this population, a systematic review was performed, including original articles, case reports and case series studies, whose targets were HIV-seropositive patients that developed acute pancreatitis after exposure to any antiretroviral drugs. This association was confirmed after exclusion of other possible etiologies and/or a recurrent episode of acute pancreatitis after re-exposure to the suspected drug. Zidovudine, efavirenz, and protease inhibitors are thought to lead to acute pancreatitis secondary to hyperlipidemia. Nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, despite being powerful inhibitors of viral replication, induce a wide spectrum of side effects, including myelotoxicity and acute pancreatitis. Didanosine, zalcitabine and stavudine have been reported as causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis. They pose a high risk with cumulative doses. Didanosine with hydroxyurea, alcohol or pentamidine are additional risk factors, leading to lethal pancreatitis, which is not a frequent event. In addition, other drugs used for prophylaxis of AIDS-related opportunistic diseases, such as sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim and pentamidine, can produce necrotizing pancreatitis. Despite comorbidities that can lead to pancreatic involvement in the HIV/AIDS population, antiretroviral drug-induced pancreatitis

  18. Salivary Markers of Inflammation in Response to Acute Stress

    PubMed Central

    Slavish, Danica C.; Graham-Engeland, Jennifer E.; Smyth, Joshua M.; Engeland, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    There is burgeoning interest in the ability to detect inflammatory markers in response to stress within naturally occurring social contexts and/or across multiple time points per day within individuals. Salivary collection is a less invasive process than current methods of blood collection and enables intensive naturalistic methodologies, such as those involving extensive repeated measures per day over time. Yet the reliability and validity of saliva-based to blood-based inflammatory biomarkers in response to stress remains unclear. We review and synthesize the published studies that have examined salivary markers of inflammation following exposure to an acute laboratory stressor. Results from each study are reviewed by analyte (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, CRP) and stress type (social-cognitive and exercise-physical), after which methodological issues and limitations are addressed. Although the literature is limited, several inflammatory markers (including IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6) have been reliably determined from saliva and have increased significantly in response to stress across multiple studies, with effect sizes ranging from very small to very large. Although CRP from saliva has been associated with CRP in circulating blood more consistently than other biomarkers have been associated with their counterparts in blood, evidence demonstrating it reliably responds to acute stress is absent. Although the current literature is presently too limited to allow broad assertion that inflammatory biomarkers determined from saliva are valuable for examining acute stress responses, this review suggests that specific targets may be valid and highlights specific areas of need for future research. PMID:25205395

  19. Acute Recurrent Pancreatitis in Children: A Study From the Pediatric Health Information System.

    PubMed

    Pant, Chaitanya; Sferra, Thomas J; Lee, Brian R; Cocjin, Jose T; Olyaee, Mojtaba

    2016-03-01

    We investigated acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) in children using a national health care database. From 2002 to 2014, 26,435 children had a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis (AP); 10,648 discharges were index hospitalizations. A total of 6159 children had a single hospitalization for AP, whereas 4489 (42%) children underwent 15,787 rehospitalizations. Children experienced a median of 2 ARP-related hospitalizations with a median time between admissions of 86 days. Younger patients with a more severe index episode of AP were at a higher risk of ARP. ARP-related hospitalizations had an increased requirement for intensive care unit care compared with an index episode of AP.

  20. Is there a role for glutamine supplementation in the management of acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Castro-Gutiérrez, Victoria; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-08-17

    There is no consensus about the effects of glutamine supplementation for acute pancreatitis. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified 15 systematic reviews including 31 randomized controlled trials addressing the question of this article. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded glutamine supplementation might decrease infectious complications in acute pancreatitis, but it is not clear if it affects mortality or length of hospital stay because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  1. [Are urgent imaging tests indicated in the management of acute pancreatitis?].

    PubMed

    Fornell Pérez, R; Lozano Rodríguez, A

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common emergency within abdominal disease. It is accepted that two of three conditions must be fulfilled for its diagnosis: characteristic clinical presentation, characteristic laboratory findings, and/or characteristic diagnostic imaging findings. The first two conditions are the most often used, probably for reasons of efficiency and frequency. Nevertheless, the need for imaging studies is sometimes a source of conflict. For this reason, we decided to review the current evidence regarding the indication of urgent imaging tests in the management of acute pancreatitis.

  2. Extrapancreatic organ impairment during acute pancreatitis induced by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction. Effect of N-acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Manuel A; Ramudo, Laura; De Dios, Isabel

    2007-01-01

    Summary Multiple organ failure is frequently associated with acute pancreatitis (AP). Our aim was to study pulmonary, hepatic and renal complications developed in the course of AP experimentally induced in rats by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction (BPDO), differentiating the complications caused by AP itself, from those directly caused by bile duct obstruction (BDO), after ligating the choledocus. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was administered as a therapeutic approach. Myeloperoxidase activity revealed neutrophil infiltration in lungs from 12 h after BDO, even if AP was not triggered. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity indicated hepatocyte death from 48 h after BDO, and from 24 h following BPDO-induced AP onwards, an effect delayed until 48 h by NAC treatment. Rats with single cholestasis (BDO) and rats with BPDO-induced AP showed a significant increase in plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and bilirubin concentration from 12 h onwards, whose values were reduced by NAC treatment at early BPDO. No renal failure was found during 120 h of bile-pancreatic obstruction. Our results showed lung and liver impairment as a result of BDO, even if AP does not develop. Pancreatic damage and extrapancreatic complications during AP induced by BPDO were palliated by NAC treatment. PMID:17877536

  3. Preventive Effect of Cichorium Intybus L. Two Extracts on Cerulein-induced Acute Pancreatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Minaiyan, Mohsen; Ghannadi, Ali-Reza; Mahzouni, Parvin; Abed, Ali-Reza

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition of pancreas with sudden onset, high mortality rate and multiple organ failure characteristics. It has been shown that oxygen free radicals have an important role in development of pancreatitis and its complications. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-hepatotoxicity and gastroprotective properties of Cichorium intybus L. suggest that this plant may have beneficial effects in the management of acute pancreatitis. Methods: Five intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of cerulean (50 μg/ kg at 1 h intervals) in mice resulted in acute pancreatitis, which was characterized by edema, neutrophil infiltration, as well as increases in the serum levels of amylase and lipase in comparison to normal mice. Different doses of C. intybus root (CRE) and aerial parts hydroalcoholic extract (CAPE) orally (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) and intraperitoneally (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) were administrated 1.0 and 0.5 h respectively before pancreatitis induction on separate groups of male mice (n=6). Control groups treated with normal saline (5 ml/ kg) similarly. Results: Both extracts in greater test doses (100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) were effective to decrease amylase (23-36%) and lipase (27-35%) levels. In oral route, the dose of 200 mg/ kg showed a significant decrease in levels of amylase (16%) and lipase (24%) activity while the greatest dose (200 mg/kg, i.p.) was only effective to diminish inflammatory features like edema and leukocyte infiltration in pancreatitis tissue (P<0.01). Vacuolization was not significantly reduced in extracts treated groups. Conclusions: These data suggest that C. intybus hydroalcoholic extracts were effective to protect against experimental acute pancreatitis and the efficacy was partly dependent to the dose and was more significant after parenteral administration. PMID:22708031

  4. Cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats--does bacterial translocation occur via a transperitoneal pathway?

    PubMed

    Arendt, T; Wendt, M; Olszewski, M; Falkenhagen, U; Stoffregen, C; Fölsch, U R

    1997-10-01

    Bacterial infectious complications are the most common cause of morbidity and mortality associated with acute pancreatitis. Most pathogens are common gastrointestinal flora, indicating that the gut is the source of pancreatitis-related infections. However, the route whereby the microorganisms reach distant organs remains speculative. We tested the hypothesis that spread of bacteria occurs via a transperitoneal pathway. Acute interstitial pancreatitis (AIP) was induced in antibiotic (gentamicin, bacithracin, neomycin)-decontaminated rats by intravenous infusion of cerulein. Effects of pancreatic necrosis (PN) were studied in rats that received additional injections into the peritoneal cavity of pancreatic tissue obtained from donor rats. The rats were inoculated with Escherichia coli (O2:KN:H18) resistant to the antibiotics used for decontamination either orally (10(12) microorganisms; experiment I) or intraperitoneally (10(8) microorganisms; experiment II). Moreover, the rat peritoneal cavity wash was inoculated with 10(8) E. coli in vitro (experiment III). In rats with AIP and PN, recovery of the bacteria from liver, spleen, pancreas, lung, and blood following oral inoculation demonstrated that acute pancreatitis promotes bacterial translocation from the gut. The absence of E. coli in these organs following intraperitoneal inoculation showed that the bacteria do not spread from the peritoneal cavity. Rats with PN cleared E. coli from the peritoneal cavity in a shorter period than rats with AIP and controls (5 vs. 7 and 8 days; p < 0.05). The multiplication rate of E. coli in peritoneal cavity wash was lower in rats with PN than in rats with AIP and controls (p < 0.01). We conclude that (1) translocation of E. coli from the gut during cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis occurs via nonperitoneal pathways, (2) the peritoneal cavity acts as a trap for the bacteria rather than a source of bacterial seeding, and (3) PN impairs survival of E. coli in the peritoneal

  5. PKD signaling and pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. Methods This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Results Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder. PMID:26879861

  6. Elevated Serum Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 in Humans with Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vivek K.; Beaver, Kristin M.; Fisher, ffolliott M.; Singhal, Garima; Dushay, Jody R.; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria; Flier, Sarah N.

    2016-01-01

    Background The metabolic regulator Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 (FGF21) is highly expressed in the acinar pancreas, but its role in pancreatic function is obscure. It appears to play a protective role in acute experimental pancreatitis in mice. The aim of this study was to define an association between FGF21 and the course and resolution of acute pancreatitis in humans. Methods and Principal Findings Twenty five subjects with acute pancreatitis admitted from May to September 2012 to the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) were analyzed. Serial serum samples were collected throughout hospitalization and analyzed for FGF21 levels by ELISA. Twenty healthy subjects sampled three times over a four week period were used as controls. We found that, in patients with pancreatitis, serum FGF21 rises significantly and peaks four to six days after the maximum lipase level, before slowly declining. Maximum FGF21 levels were significantly greater than baseline levels for acute pancreatitis subjects (1733 vs. 638 pg/mL, P = 0.003). This maximum value was significantly greater than the highest value observed for our control subjects (1733 vs. 322 pg/mL, P = 0.0002). The ratio of active to total FGF21 did not change during the course of the disease (42.5% vs. 44.4%, P = 0.58). Fold increases in FGF21 were significantly greater in acute pancreatitis subjects than the fold difference seen in healthy subjects (4.7 vs. 2.0, P = 0.01). Higher fold changes were also seen in severe compared to mild pancreatitis (18.2 vs. 4.4, P = 0.01). The timing of maximum FGF21 levels correlated with day of successful return to oral intake (R2 = 0.21, P = 0.04). Conclusions Our results demonstrate that serum FGF21 rises significantly in humans with acute pancreatitis. The pancreas may be contributing to increased FGF21 levels following injury and FGF21 may play a role in the recovery process. PMID:27832059

  7. Interaction of complement and leukocytes in severe acute pancreatitis: potential for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Werner; Klafs, Martina; Kirschfink, Michael; Hackert, Thilo; Schneider, Lutz; Gebhard, Martha-Maria; Büchler, Markus W; Werner, Jens

    2006-11-01

    In acute pancreatitis, local as well as systemic organ complications are mediated by the activation of various inflammatory cascades. The role of complement in this setting is unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine the level of complement activation in experimental pancreatitis, to evaluate the interaction of complement and leukocyte-endothelium activation, and to assess the effects of complement inhibition by soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) in this setting. Necrotizing pancreatitis was induced in Wistar rats by the combination of intravenous cerulein and retrograde infusion of glycodeoxycholic acid into the biliopancreatic duct; edematous pancreatitis was induced by intravenous cerulein only. In control animals, a sham operation (midline laparotomy) was performed. Complement activation, leukocyte sequestration, and pancreatic as well as pulmonary injury were assessed in the presence/absence of sCR1. Increased levels of C3a were found in necrotizing but not in edematous pancreatitis. When complement activation in necrotizing pancreatitis was blocked by sCR1, levels of C3a and total hemolytic activity (CH50) were decreased. Leukocyte-endothelial interaction, as assessed by intravital microscopy, and pancreatic as well as pulmonary organ injury (wet-to-dry weight ratio, MPO activity, and histology) were ameliorated by sCR1. As a result of the present study, necrotizing but not edematous pancreatitis is characterized by significant and early complement activation. Based on the interaction of complement and leukocytes, complement inhibition by sCR1 may be a valuable option in the treatment of leukocyte-associated organ injury in severe pancreatitis.

  8. Extract of grapefruit-seed reduces acute pancreatitis induced by ischemia/reperfusion in rats: possible implication of tissue antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Dembinski, A; Warzecha, Z; Konturek, S J; Ceranowicz, P; Dembinski, M; Pawlik, W W; Kusnierz-Cabala, B; Naskalski, J W

    2004-12-01

    Grapefruit seed extract (GSE) has been shown to exert antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant activity possibly due to the presence of naringenin, the flavonoid with cytoprotective action on the gastric mucosa. No study so far has been undertaken to determine whether this GSE is also capable of preventing acute pancreatic damage induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), which is known to result from reduction of anti-oxidative capability of pancreatic tissue, and whether its possible preventive effect involves an antioxidative action of this biocomponent. In this study carried out on rats with acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis induced by 30 min partial pancreatic ischemia followed by 6 h of reperfusion, the GSE or vehicle (vegetable glycerin) was applied intragastrically in gradually increasing amounts (50-500 microl) 30 min before I/R. Pretreatment with GSE decreased the extent of pancreatitis with maximal protective effect of GSE at the dose 250 microl. GSE reduced the pancreatitis-evoked increase in serum lipase and poly-C specific ribonuclease activity, and attenuated the marked fall in pancreatic blood flow and pancreatic DNA synthesis. GSE administered alone increased significantly pancreatic tissue content of lipid peroxidation products, malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxyalkens, and when administered before I/R, GSE reduced the pancreatitis-induced lipid peroxidation. We conclude that GSE exerts protective activity against I/R-induced pancreatitis probably due to the activation of antioxidative mechanisms in the pancreas and the improvement of pancreatic blood flow.

  9. Downregulation of GRP78 and XIAP is correlated with apoptosis during cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats via regulation of caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Zhou, Bing; Wang, Rong; Yan, Hui; Li, Yuan

    2013-03-01

    Our aim in the present study was to investigate the potential roles of the 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) in the regulation of apoptosis during cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (CAP). A rat CAP model was induced by injection of cerulein (50 µg/kg), and the severity of CAP was estimated by measuring serum amylase and lipase, pancreatic edema and histological changes. Pancreatic acinar cell apoptosis was determined by terminal-deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and the expression of GRP78, XIAP and the apoptotic genes caspase-3, -7 and -9 were determined by real‑time quantitative PCR and western blotting. After induction with cerulein, increased serum amylase and lipase, pancreatic edema, inflammation and apoptosis were observed in CAP rats. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein levels of GRP78 and XIAP were significantly downregulated in CAP rats, while the mRNA levels of caspase-3, -7 and -9, as well as the cell apoptotic index were markedly increased when compared with control rats (P<0.05). The expression of GRP78 and XIAP was negatively correlated with caspase expression in CAP (P<0.05). This study suggests that the downregulation of GRP78 and XIAP were correlated with apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cells, and that this may occur through the regulation of caspase activation during CAP.

  10. Serum Triglyceride Level: A Predictor of Complications and Outcomes in Acute Pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Tariq, Hassan; Gaduputi, Vinaya; Peralta, Richard; Abbas, Naeem; Nayudu, Suresh Kumar; Thet, Phyo; Zaw, Tin; Hui, Shirley; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To study serum triglyceride level as a predictor of complications and outcomes in acute pancreatitis. Methods. In this retrospective observational study, 582 patients admitted with acute pancreatitis, who had serum triglyceride levels measured within the first 24 hours, were divided into two groups. The study group consisted of patients with a triglyceride level ≥2.26 mmol/L (group 2) and the control group consisted of triglyceride level of <2.26 mmol/L (group 1). We collected data for baseline demographics, laboratory values, incidence of complications (local and systemic), admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), ICU length of stay, length of total hospital stay, and death in the two groups. Results. A triglyceride level of ≥2.26 mmol/L was found to be an independent predictor of developing altered mental status (p: 0.004), pancreatic necrosis (p: 0.001), acute respiratory distress syndrome (p: 0001), systemic Inflammatory response syndrome (p: 0.001), acute kidney injury (p: 0.001), hospital length of stay (LOS) (p: 0.002), admission to intensive care unit (ICU) (p: 0.002), and ICU LOS (p: 0.003). Conclusion. A triglyceride level of ≥2.26 mmol/L on admission in acute pancreatitis is an independent predictor of developing local and systemic complications, hospital LOS, admission to ICU, and ICU LOS.

  11. Gelatinase B is diabetogenic in acute and chronic pancreatitis by cleaving insulin.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Francis J; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Martens, Erik; Ballaux, Florence; Geboes, Karel; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2003-05-01

    Genetic, endocrine, and environmental factors contribute to the development of diabetes. Much information has been gathered on the homeostasis mechanisms of glucose regulation by insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Here we demonstrate high expression levels of gelatinase B (matrix metalloproteinase-9, MMP-9) by neutrophils in acute pancreatitis and by ductular epithelial cells in chronic pancreatitis. Because gelatinase B processes cytokines and chemokines, we investigated whether and how gelatinase B cleaves insulin. Pure human neutrophil gelatinase B was found to destroy insulin by cleavage at 10 sites. Pancreatic islet and ductular cells are relatively spared in comparison with the complete destruction of acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas in chronic pancreatitis. High expression levels of gelatinase B are maintained in the immediate proximity of insulin-secreting beta cells. Consequently, diabetes may be worsened by enzymatic degradation of insulin by gelatinase B and by the consequent enhancement of the autoimmune process. Gelatinase B is diabetogenic in acute and chronic pancreatitis by cleaving insulin.

  12. Disruption of paracellular sealing is an early event in acute caerulein-pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Marcus; Klonowski-Stumpe, Hanne; Eckert, Mario; Lüthen, Reinhard; Häussinger, Dieter

    2004-03-01

    Caerulein-induced pancreatitis is a widely used experimental model for studies on acute pancreatitis, however, the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatitis in response to caerulein hyperstimulation are incompletely understood. We therefore studied early effects of caerulein on tight junctional integrity. Mice were injected with the cholecystokinin analogue caerulein (50microg/kg BW/h) to induce pancreatitis. In pancreatic tissue occludin, claudin 1, zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) were stained immunohistochemically and F-actin was visualized with phalloidin-TRITC. Stained sections and isolated acini were studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Under control conditions occludin, claudin1, ZO-1, and F-actin showed a linear staining pattern delineating the apical membranes of intralobular duct cells and of acinar cells. While in vitro caerulein hyperstimulation induced within 10 minutes disassembly of both occludin and ZO-1, in vivo caerulein hyperstimulation induced disassembly of occludin and claudin1 but not of ZO-1 from the tight junctions. Subsequent progressive disruption of ZO-1 was detected in a time dependent manner. Disruption of the transmembrane tight junction proteins occludin and claudin1 is an early event of caerulein hyperstimulation and may allow evasion of noxious luminal content into the interstitium, which may augment edema formation in acute pancreatitis.

  13. A Meta-Analysis of Enteral Nutrition and Total Parenteral Nutrition in Patients with Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Heming; Wang, Xingpeng; Guo, Chuanyong

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the effect of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and enteral nutrition (EN) in patients with acute pancreatitis. Methods. Randomized controlled trials of TPN and EN in patients with acute pancreatitis were searched in NCBI and CBM databases and The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. Six studies were enrolled into the analysis, and the details about the trial designs, characters of the subjects, results of the studies were reviewed by two independent authors and analyzed by STATA 11.0 software. Results. Compared with TPN, EN was associated with a significantly lower incidence of pancreatic infection complications (RR = 0.556, 95% CI 0.436∼0.709, P = .000), MOF (RR = 0.395, 95% CI 0.272∼0.573, P = .003), surgical interventions (RR = 0.556, 95% CI 0.436∼0.709, P = .000), and mortality (RR = 0.426, 95% CI 0.238∼0.764, P = .167). There was no statistic significance in non-pancreatitis-related complications (RR = 0.853, 95% CI 0.490∼1.483, P = .017). However, EN had a significantly higher incidence of non-infection-related complications (RR = 2.697, 95% CI 1.947∼3.735, P = .994). Conclusion. EN could be the preferred nutrition feeding method in patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:21687619

  14. [The therapeutic effect of somatostatin on acute severe pancreatitis: a clinical contrastive observation].

    PubMed

    Bai, G; Ma, Y

    1996-08-01

    We observed the effect of somatostatin on the treatment of acute severe pancreatitis and on the inhibition of pancreatic secretion. 21 patients with acute severe pancreatitis were divided into control group (n = 12) and treatment group (n = 9) according to the admission time from 1992 to 1995. The control group was treated regularly and the treatment group was given intravenous somatostatin within 24h of onset 6mg/day for 5-7 days besides the regular treatment. No significant difference was noted in the general conditions of the two groups on admission. The volume of stomach suction in the somatostatin treated group was lower than that in the controls on the 2nd, 3rd and 4th admission days (P < 0.05). The serum amylase level of the treatment group was lower than that of the controls. 12 complications occurred in the somatostatin treated group as compared with 17 in the control group (P > 0.05). The clinical cure time was 15.6 +/- 4.8 days for the treatment group and 21.5 +/- 7.6 days for the controls (P = 0.02). We consider that as a pancreatic secretion inhibitor somatostatin can control the disease process and shorten the clinical cure time to some extent if it is used on the early stage of acute severe pancreatitis.

  15. Effect of drugs on the pulmonary changes in experimental acute pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, A R; Taylor, T V

    1982-01-01

    Respiratory complications of acute pancreatitis are well recognised and are closely related to a poor prognosis. Using an experimental model in the rat, a decrease in lung compliance and an increase in lung weight were produced in acute pancreatitis. The effects of dexamethasone, heparin, and aspirin on these changes were studied. The mean specific lung compliance was reduced by 16% in the pancreatitis group compared with the control group (p less than 0.05) and this change was abolished by dexamethasone (p less than 0.02), heparin (p less than 0.01), and aspirin (p less than 0.001). Percentage lung weight (as percentage of total body weight) was raised by 22% in the pancreatitis group compared with the sham operation group (p less than 0.01) and this change was abolished by heparin (p less than 0.01) and aspirin (p less than 0.05), but not affected by dexamethasone (p less than 0.5). The results indicate that 'stiff' and heavy lungs occur in experimental acute pancreatitis. The fact that these changes are abolished by heparin and improved by aspirin suggests that intrapulmonary fibrin deposition is a factor in the pathogenesis of the important respiratory complications of this condition. PMID:7076022

  16. Phagocyte respiratory burst activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Bangwei; Wang, Jinsong; Liu, Zongwei; Shen, Zigang; Shi, Rongchen; Liu, Yu-Qi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Man; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Zhiren

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation resolution is an active process, the failure of which causes uncontrolled inflammation which underlies many chronic diseases. Therefore, endogenous pathways that regulate inflammation resolution are fundamental and of wide interest. Here, we demonstrate that phagocyte respiratory burst-induced hypoxia activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution. This signalling is activated following acute but not chronic inflammation. Pharmacological or genetical inhibition of the respiratory burst suppresses hypoxia and macrophage erythropoietin signalling. Macrophage-specific erythropoietin receptor-deficient mice and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) mice, which lack the capacity for respiratory burst, display impaired inflammation resolution, and exogenous erythropoietin enhances this resolution in WT and CGD mice. Mechanistically, erythropoietin increases macrophage engulfment of apoptotic neutrophils via PPARγ, promotes macrophage removal of debris and enhances macrophage migration to draining lymph nodes. Together, our results provide evidences of an endogenous pathway that regulates inflammation resolution, with important implications for treating inflammatory conditions. PMID:27397585

  17. Pancreatic stellate cells and CX3CR1: occurrence in normal pancreas, acute and chronic pancreatitis and effect of their activation by a CX3CR1 agonist

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Masahiko; Ito, Tetsuhide; Nakamura, Taichi; Hijioka, Masayuki; Igarashi, Hisato; Oono, Takamasa; Kato, Masaki; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Koichi; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Jensen, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Numerous studies suggest important roles of the chemokine, fractalkine (CX3CL1) in acute/chronic pancreatitis, however the possible mechanisms of the effects are unclear. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) can play important roles in pancreatitis, secreting inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, as well as proliferation. Therefore, we investigated CX3CL1 receptor (CX3CR1) occurrence in normal pancreas and pancreatitis (acute/chronic) tissues, and the effects of CX3CL1 on activated-PSCs. Methods CX3CR1 expression/localization in normal pancreas and pancreatitis (acute/chronic) tissues were evaluated with immunohistochemical analysis. CX3CR1 expression and effects of CX3CL1 on activated-PSCs were examined with realtime-PCR, BrdU assays and Western Blotting. Results In normal pancreas, acinar cells expressed CX3CR1 within granule-like-formations in the cytoplasm, whereas in acute/chronic pancreatitis, acinar, ductal and activated-PSCs expressed CX3CR1 on cell membranes. With activation of normal PSCs, CX3CR1 is increased. CX3CL1 activated multiple signaling cascades in PSCs. CX3CL1, did not induce inflammatory-genes expression in activated-PSCs, but induced proliferation. Conclusions CX3CR1s are expressed in normal pancreas. Expression is increased in acute/chronic pancreatitis and the CX3CR1s are activated. CX3CL1 induces proliferation of activated-PSCs without increasing release of inflammatory-mediators. These results suggest that CX3CR1 activation of PSCs could be important in their effects in pancreatitis, especially to PSCs proliferation in pancreatitis where CX3CL1 levels are elevated. PMID:24681877

  18. IL-8 gene polymorphism in acute biliary and non biliary pancreatitis: probable cause of high level parameters?

    PubMed Central

    Ozen, Filiz; Yildirim, Ibrahim Halil; Ozemir, Ibrahim Ali; Ozlu, Can; Alimoglu, Orhan

    2017-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Inflammatory mediators of the innate immune response play fundamental roles in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. The correlation between interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene polymorphism with types of acute pancreatitis and severity of pancreatitis, was evaluated in this study. Methods According to the diagnostic criteria, 176 patients with acute pancreatitis were grouped into biliary (n=83) and nonbiliary pancreatitis (n=93). Healthy blood donors (n=100) served as controls. Serum alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, total and direct bilirubin, amylase, lypase, white blood cell count and c-reactive protein levels were evaluated to correlate with IL-8 rs4073 (-251T/A) polymorphism, which was analyzed using a real-time polymerase chain reaction method with melting point analysis. Results The IL-8 AA genotype was detected with a significantly higher frequency among the patients with acute biliary pancreatitis having higher alanine transaminase levels than the median range. Homozygote alleles were significantly higher among patients with acute biliary pancreatitis having amylase levels higher than the median range. Conclusions Determination of the frequency of IL-8 polymorphism in acute pancreatitis is informative and provides further evidence concerning the role of IL-8 in laboratory tests. PMID:28317043

  19. Elimination Half-Lives of Acute Phase Proteins in Rats and Beagle Dogs During Acute Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi, Takashi; Seita, Tetsuro; Momotani, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Shunsuke; Hagimori, Kohei; Yamamoto, Shizuo

    2015-08-01

    The half-lives of typical acute phase proteins in rats and beagle dogs during acute inflammation were investigated. Acute inflammation was induced by injection of turpentine oil in rats and administration of indomethacin in beagle dogs. Serum concentrations of α2-macroglobulin (α2M) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and α1-acid glycoprotein (AAG) was measured by single radial immunodiffusion. Half-life was calculated as 0.693/elimination rate constant (K). The mean half-lives in the terminal elimination phase of α2M and AAG were 68.1 and 164.8 h, respectively. The half-life of AAG was significantly longer than that of α2M. Mean half-lives in the terminal elimination phase of CRP and AAG were 161.9 and 304.4 h, respectively. The half-life of AAG was significantly longer than that of CRP in beagle dogs. No significant differences in the half-life of AAG were observed between rats and beagle dogs. Furthermore, serum concentrations in the terminal elimination phase could be simulated with the K data acquired in this study.

  20. Role of platelet activating factor in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, S J; Dembinski, A; Konturek, P J; Warzecha, Z; Jaworek, J; Gustaw, P; Tomaszewska, R; Stachura, J

    1992-01-01

    The importance of platelet activating factor in acute pancreatitis was examined by determining the tissue content of endogenous platelet activating factor and the protective effects of TCV-309, a highly selective platelet activating factor blocker, against caerulein induced pancreatitis in rats. Infusion of caerulein (10 micrograms/kg/h) for five hours resulted in about 70% increase in pancreatic weight, 22% rise in protein content, 50% reduction in tissue blood flow, nine fold increase in tissue level of platelet activating factor and 165% rise in plasma amylase as well as histological evidence of acute pancreatitis. Such infusion of caerulein in chronic pancreatic fistula rats caused a marked increase in protein output from basal secretion of 10 mg/30 minutes to 40 mg/30 minutes in the first hour of infusion followed by a decline in protein output to 15-20 mg/30 minutes in the following hours of the experiment. Exogenous platelet activating factor (50 micrograms/kg) injected ip produced similar alterations in weight, protein content, blood flow, and histology of the pancreas but the increment in serum amylase was significantly smaller and pancreatic secretion was reduced below the basal level. TCV-309 (50 micrograms/kg) given ip before caerulein or platelet activating factor administration significantly reduced the biochemical and morphological alterations caused by caerulein and abolished those induced by exogenous platelet activating factor. These results indicate that platelet activating factor plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis probably by reducing the blood flow and increasing vascular permeability in the pancreas. PMID:1385272

  1. Waterlow score as a surrogate marker for predicting adverse outcome in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gillick, K; Elbeltagi, H; Bhattacharya, S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Introduced originally to stratify risk for developing decubitus ulcers, the Waterlow scoring system is recorded routinely for surgical admissions. It is a composite score, reflecting patients’ general condition and co-morbidities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the Waterlow score can be used as an independent surrogate marker to predict severity and adverse outcome in acute pancreatitis. Methods In this retrospective analysis, a consecutive cohort was studied of 250 patients presenting with acute pancreatitis, all of whom had their Waterlow score calculated on admission. Primary outcome measures were length of hospital stay and mortality. Secondary outcome measures included rate of intensive care unit (ICU) admission and development of complications such as peripancreatic free fluid, pancreatic necrosis and pseudocyst formation. Correlation of the Waterlow score with some known markers of disease severity and outcomes was also analysed. Results The Waterlow score correlated strongly with the most commonly used marker of disease severity, the Glasgow score (analysis of variance, p=0.0012). Inpatient mortality, rate of ICU admission and length of hospital stay increased with a higher Waterlow score (Mann–Whitney U test, p=0.0007, p=0.049 and p=0.0002 respectively). There was, however, no significant association between the Waterlow score and the incidence of three known complications of pancreatitis: presence of peripancreatic fluid, pancreatic pseudocyst formation and pancreatic necrosis. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated good predictive power of the Waterlow score for mortality (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.73), ICU admission (AUC: 0.65) and length of stay >7 days (AUC: 0.64). This is comparable with the predictive power of the Glasgow score and C-reactive protein. Conclusions The Waterlow score for patients admitted with acute pancreatitis could provide a useful tool in prospective assessment of

  2. Role of platelet activating factor in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Dembinski, A; Konturek, P J; Warzecha, Z; Jaworek, J; Gustaw, P; Tomaszewska, R; Stachura, J

    1992-09-01

    The importance of platelet activating factor in acute pancreatitis was examined by determining the tissue content of endogenous platelet activating factor and the protective effects of TCV-309, a highly selective platelet activating factor blocker, against caerulein induced pancreatitis in rats. Infusion of caerulein (10 micrograms/kg/h) for five hours resulted in about 70% increase in pancreatic weight, 22% rise in protein content, 50% reduction in tissue blood flow, nine fold increase in tissue level of platelet activating factor and 165% rise in plasma amylase as well as histological evidence of acute pancreatitis. Such infusion of caerulein in chronic pancreatic fistula rats caused a marked increase in protein output from basal secretion of 10 mg/30 minutes to 40 mg/30 minutes in the first hour of infusion followed by a decline in protein output to 15-20 mg/30 minutes in the following hours of the experiment. Exogenous platelet activating factor (50 micrograms/kg) injected ip produced similar alterations in weight, protein content, blood flow, and histology of the pancreas but the increment in serum amylase was significantly smaller and pancreatic secretion was reduced below the basal level. TCV-309 (50 micrograms/kg) given ip before caerulein or platelet activating factor administration significantly reduced the biochemical and morphological alterations caused by caerulein and abolished those induced by exogenous platelet activating factor. These results indicate that platelet activating factor plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis probably by reducing the blood flow and increasing vascular permeability in the pancreas.

  3. Acute Pancreatitis-Progress and Challenges: A Report on an International Symposium.

    PubMed

    Afghani, Elham; Pandol, Stephen J; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Sutton, Robert; Wu, Bechien U; Vege, Santhi Swaroop; Gorelick, Fred; Hirota, Morihisa; Windsor, John; Lo, Simon K; Freeman, Martin L; Lerch, Markus M; Tsuji, Yoshihisa; Melmed, Gil Y; Wassef, Wahid; Mayerle, Julia

    2015-11-01

    An international symposium entitled "Acute pancreatitis: progress and challenges" was held on November 5, 2014 at the Hapuna Beach Hotel, Big Island, Hawaii, as part of the 45th Anniversary Meeting of the American Pancreatic Association and the Japanese Pancreas Society. The course was organized and directed by Drs. Stephen Pandol, Tooru Shimosegawa, Robert Sutton, Bechien Wu, and Santhi Swaroop Vege. The symposium objectives were to: (1) highlight current issues in management of acute pancreatitis, (2) discuss promising treatments, (3) consider development of quality indicators and improved measures of disease activity, and (4) present a framework for international collaboration for development of new therapies. This article represents a compilation and adaptation of brief summaries prepared by speakers at the symposium with the purpose of broadly disseminating information and initiatives.

  4. [Comparative experimental study of antioxidant efficiency in treatment of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Kliuĭko, D A; Korik, V E; Zhidkov, S A

    2011-01-01

    The aims of our experiments on animals were (i) to evaluate by direct oximery the efficiency of various antioxidant drugs in a complex treatment of acute pancreatitis and (ii) to determine the diagnostic value of the direct oximetry method for estimation of the efficiency of medical treatment. The article presents data obtained in a group 75 outbred Guinea with a model acute pancreatitis, which were treated with mexibel (group 1), emoxipin (group 2), end cytoflavin (group 3), with subsequent investigation of the pancreatic tissues by the direct oximetry method. The obtained results confirmed that the intraperitoneal injection of cytoflavin to animals stimulates tissue respiration, improves metabolism, promotes pancreas recovery, and also improves the prognosis and reduces the lethal outcome. The efficiency of cytoflavin within the complex therapy exceeds the effect of other antioxidants (mexibel and emoxipin) under otherwise equal conditions.

  5. Gas in Hepatic Portal Veins with Gastric Massive Dilatation and Pneumatosis in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mushtaq, Nadeem; Pateria, Vibhor; Ahmad, Imtiyaz; Kulshreshtha, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Gas in portal veins is a rare phenomenon observed secondary to bowel ischaemia and necrosis. A young girl with history of pica ingestion presented with acute abdomen with huge distension. Investigation revealed air in hepatic portal veins, air within stomach wall, and massive distension of stomach secondary to acute pancreatitis. Successful conservative treatment confirmed the current concept that all cases of hepatic portal venous gas do not warrant immediate surgical intervention. PMID:26557565

  6. Spatial and temporal differences of HMGB1 expression in the pancreas of rats with acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Can; Huang, Lihua; Li, Xia; Zhu, Hongwei; Li, Zhiqiang; Yu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the spatial and temporal differences in expression between HMGB1 and early-stage inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α) in pancreas tissue in rats with acute pancreatitis. SD rats (BW 350 ± 30 g, n = 48) were randomly divided into the experimental group (n = 36) which were injected with 5% sodium taurocholate into the bilipancreatic duct retrogradely to produce acute necrotic pancreatitis (ANP) rat models, and the sham-operated (SO) group (n = 12) injected with equal dose of saline. The rats were sacrificed at different time points at 0 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h post modeling, respectively. The peripheral blood amylase and different inflammatory factors in ANP rats at different time points were detected by ELISA, and the expression of HMGB1 in the pancreatic tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry, Western blot and Q-PCR methods. Results showed that the serum amylase in the ANP model rats was significantly higher than the sham-operated group (P < 0.05). The early inflammatory factors (IL-1, TNF-α and IL-6) increased quickly at 3 h after the model induction, reached the peak level at 6 h (higher than SO group, P < 0.05), then decreased at 12 h, and at 24 h the levels were lower than those at 12 h (P < 0.05). The HMGB1 level in the pancreatitis tissue did not change significantly at 3 h and 6 h (P > 0.05), however, it increased remarkably at 12 h, and maintained up to 24 h (P > 0.05). As a late inflammatory factor, the expression of HMGB1 in acute pancreatitis was obviously later than the early inflammatory factors IL-1, TNF-α and IL-6. HMGB1 may play a key role in maintaining the development of the acute pancreatitis. PMID:26261580

  7. Spatial and temporal differences of HMGB1 expression in the pancreas of rats with acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Can; Huang, Lihua; Li, Xia; Zhu, Hongwei; Li, Zhiqiang; Yu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the spatial and temporal differences in expression between HMGB1 and early-stage inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α) in pancreas tissue in rats with acute pancreatitis. SD rats (BW 350 ± 30 g, n = 48) were randomly divided into the experimental group (n = 36) which were injected with 5% sodium taurocholate into the bilipancreatic duct retrogradely to produce acute necrotic pancreatitis (ANP) rat models, and the sham-operated (SO) group (n = 12) injected with equal dose of saline. The rats were sacrificed at different time points at 0 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h post modeling, respectively. The peripheral blood amylase and different inflammatory factors in ANP rats at different time points were detected by ELISA, and the expression of HMGB1 in the pancreatic tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry, Western blot and Q-PCR methods. Results showed that the serum amylase in the ANP model rats was significantly higher than the sham-operated group (P < 0.05). The early inflammatory factors (IL-1, TNF-α and IL-6) increased quickly at 3 h after the model induction, reached the peak level at 6 h (higher than SO group, P < 0.05), then decreased at 12 h, and at 24 h the levels were lower than those at 12 h (P < 0.05). The HMGB1 level in the pancreatitis tissue did not change significantly at 3 h and 6 h (P > 0.05), however, it increased remarkably at 12 h, and maintained up to 24 h (P > 0.05). As a late inflammatory factor, the expression of HMGB1 in acute pancreatitis was obviously later than the early inflammatory factors IL-1, TNF-α and IL-6. HMGB1 may play a key role in maintaining the development of the acute pancreatitis.

  8. Upregulation of bradykinin receptors is implicated in the pain associated with caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Yoshinori; Furuta, Sadayoshi; Hirayama, Shigeto; Miyashita, Kazuhiko; Imai, Satoshi; Narita, Michiko; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Tsukiyama, Yoshi; Yamazaki, Mitsuaki; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Narita, Minoru

    2011-07-01

    Although the way for pain management associated with acute pancreatitis has been searched for, there are not enough medications available for it. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of bradykinin (BK) in pain related to acute pancreatitis. After repeated injections of caerulein (50 μg/kg and 6 times), mice showed edema in the pancreas, and blood concentrations of pancreatic enzymes (amylase and lipase) were clearly elevated. A histopathological study demonstrated that caerulein caused tissue damage characterized by edema, acinar cell necrosis, interstitial hemorrhage, and inflammatory cell infiltrates. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of interleukin-1β and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 were significantly increased in the pancreas of caerulein-treated mice. The sensitivity of abdominal organs as measured by abdominal balloon distension was enhanced in caerulein-injected mice, suggesting that caerulein caused pancreatic hyperalgesia. Moreover, repeated treatment with caerulein resulted in cutaneous tactile allodynia of the upper abdominal region as demonstrated by the use of von Frey filaments, indicating that caerulein-treated mice exhibited referred pain. Under this condition, the mRNA levels of bradykinin B1 receptor (BKB1R) and bradykinin B2 receptor (BKB2R) were significantly increased in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Finally, we found that des-Arg⁹-(Leu⁸)-bradykinin (BKB1R antagonist) and HOE-140 (BKB2R antagonist) attenuated the acute pancreatitis pain-like state in caerulein-treated mice. These findings suggest that the upregulation of BK receptors in the DRG may, at least in part, contribute to the development of the acute pancreatitis pain-like state in mice.

  9. From acute to chronic pancreatitis: the role of mutations in the pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor gene.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Masahiko; Kuwata, Kinuko; Ohmuraya, Masaki; Ogawa, Michio

    2003-03-01

    Pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) is a potent natural inhibitor of trypsin. We proposed the hypothesis that, if the function of the PSTI is impaired by its genetic mutation, trypsin may easily promote autodigestion causing pancreatitis and we performed a mutational analysis of the PSTI gene in patients with pancreatitis. Two exonic mutations (N34S and R67C) were thought to be associated with a predisposition to pancreatitis. The N34S mutation was co-segregated with two intronic mutations, IVS1-37T>C and IVS3-69insTTTT. Although we analyzed the function of the recombinant N34S protein, we could not demonstrate the loss of function of this protein. Intronic mutations, rather than N34S itself (IVS1-37T>C + N34S + IVS3-69insTTTT complex), may be associated with the decreased function of the PSTI. Alternatively, increased digestion of N34S in vivo may be applicable. As for R67C, the conformational alteration of the protein by forming intra-molecular or inter-molecular disulfide bonds with 67Cys was strongly suggested. These results, along with the brand-new findings in PSTI knockout mice, suggest that the genetic mutation of the PSTI is one of the important mechanisms for predisposition to pancreatitis by lowering the trypsin inhibitory function.

  10. Circulating histones exacerbate inflammation in mice with acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zongmei; Liu, Yan; Li, Feng; Ren, Feng; Chen, Dexi; Li, Xiuhui; Wen, Tao

    2013-10-01

    Circulating histones are a newly recognized mediator implicated in various inflammatory diseases. It is likely that the release of histones, from dying hepatocytes or inflammatory leukocytes, into the circulation initiates and amplifies inflammation during the course of acute liver failure (ALF). In this study, we investigated a putative pathogenic role of circulating histones in a murine model of ALF induced by D-galactosamine (GalN) plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Hepatic function and histological indexes, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, hepatocyte apoptosis and the levels of circulating histone were measured in GalN/LPS-treated mice. GalN/LPS caused severe liver damage and a notable increase in plasma concentration of circulating histones. To further assess the role of circulating histones in our model, we administered exogenous histones and anti-histone H4 antibody. Notably, exogenous histones aggravated GalN/LPS-induced hepatotoxicity, whereas anti-histone antibody significantly protected mice. Circulating histones may serve as both a functional marker of ALF activity and as an inflammatory mediator contributing to the progression of ALF. Blockade of circulating histones shows potent protective effects, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for ALF.

  11. Haemorrhagic necrosis of small intestine and acute pancreatitis following open-heart surgery

    PubMed Central

    Horton, E. H.; Murthy, S. K.; Seal, R. M. E.

    1968-01-01

    Five cases of haemorrhagic necrosis of the small intestine occurring after valve replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass are described. In one case, in addition to the above, there was an unusual complication, namely acute pancreatitis. The possible causes are discussed. The importance of hypotension before, during, or after bypass, or in the post-operative phase, is stressed. Images PMID:5664708

  12. Anti-inflammatory effects of melatonin in a rat model of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Cristina; Marchena, Ana M; Holguín-Arévalo, María S; Martín-Partido, Gervasio; Rodríguez, Ana B; Paredes, Sergio D; Pariente, José A

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the protective effect of melatonin in a rat model of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. For the induction of experimental acute