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Sample records for acute pesticide poisoning

  1. [Acute poisoning by pesticides in children].

    PubMed

    Leveau, P

    2016-07-01

    Acute pesticide poisoning in children is rare but potentially serious. Some clinical patterns (toxidromes) are suggestive of the drug class: cholinergic crisis for organophosphate or carbamate insecticides; neurological syndrome for rodenticides; digestive and respiratory syndrome for herbicides. Treatment is symptomatic and only a few patients are treated with an antidote: atropine and pralidoxime for organophosphate insecticides, vitamin K for anticoagulant rodenticides. PMID:27266642

  2. Management of acute organophosphorus pesticide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Eddleston, Michael; Buckley, Nick A; Eyer, Peter; Dawson, Andrew H

    2008-01-01

    Summary Organophosphorus pesticide self-poisoning is an important clinical problem in rural regions of the developing world, and kills an estimated 200 000 people every year. Unintentional poisoning kills far fewer people but is a problem in places where highly toxic organophosphorus pesticides are available. Medical management is difficult, with case fatality generally more than 15%. We describe the limited evidence that can guide therapy and the factors that should be considered when designing further clinical studies. 50 years after first use, we still do not know how the core treatments—atropine, oximes, and diazepam—should best be given. Important constraints in the collection of useful data have included the late recognition of great variability in activity and action of the individual pesticides, and the care needed cholinesterase assays for results to be comparable between studies. However, consensus suggests that early resuscitation with atropine, oxygen, respiratory support, and fluids is needed to improve oxygen delivery to tissues. The role of oximes is not completely clear; they might benefit only patients poisoned by specific pesticides or patients with moderate poisoning. Small studies suggest benefit from new treatments such as magnesium sulphate, but much larger trials are needed. Gastric lavage could have a role but should only be undertaken once the patient is stable. Randomised controlled trials are underway in rural Asia to assess the effectiveness of these therapies. However, some organophosphorus pesticides might prove very difficult to treat with current therapies, such that bans on particular pesticides could be the only method to substantially reduce the case fatality after poisoning. Improved medical management of organophosphorus poisoning should result in a reduction in worldwide deaths from suicide. PMID:17706760

  3. Recognition and management of acute pesticide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Simpson, William M; Schuman, Stanley H

    2002-04-15

    Most poisonings from pesticides do not have a specific antidote, making decontamination the most important intervention. For maximal benefit to the patient, skin, eye, and gastric decontamination should be undertaken while specifics of the poisoning are being determined. As in most illnesses and injuries, the history of the poisoning is of great importance and will determine specific needs for decontamination and therapy, if any exist. Protection of health care workers during the decontamination process is important and frequently overlooked. Skin decontamination is primarily accomplished with large volumes of water, soap, and shampoo. Gastric decontamination by lavage is indicated if ingestion of the poisoning has occurred within 60 minutes of patient presentation. Activated charcoal, combined with a cathartic, is also indicated in most poisonings presenting within 60 minutes of ingestion. With large volume ingestion poisonings, activated charcoal may be used after 60 minutes, but little data exist to support this practice. Syrup of ipecac is no longer recommended for routine use. The cholinergic syndrome "all faucets on" characterizes poisoning by organophosphates and carbamates. Organochlorine insecticides (lindane and other treatments for scabies and lice) can produce seizures with excessive use or use on large areas of nonintact skin. Non-dipyridyl herbicides, biocides (including pyrethrins, pyrethroids, and Bacillus thuringiensis) rarely produce anything other than mild skin, eye, and/or gastrointestinal irritation on topical exposure or ingestion.

  4. Acute pesticide poisoning and pesticide registration in Central America.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Catharina; Corriols, Marianela; Bravo, Viria

    2005-09-01

    The International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations has been for 20 years the most acknowledged international initiative for reducing negative impact from pesticide use in developing countries. We analyzed pesticide use and poisoning in Central America, particularly in Costa Rica and Nicaragua, and evaluated whether registration decisions are based on such data, in accordance with the FAO Code. Extensive use of very hazardous pesticides continues in Central America and so do poisonings with organophosphates, carbamates, endosulfan and paraquat as the main causative agents. Central American governments do not carry out or commission scientific risk assessments. Instead, guidelines from international agencies are followed for risk management through the registration process. Documentation of pesticide poisonings during several decades never induced any decision to ban or restrict a pesticide. However, based on the official surveillance systems, in 2000, the ministers of health of the seven Central American countries agreed to ban or restrict twelve of these pesticides. Now, almost 4 years later, restrictions have been implemented in El Salvador and in Nicaragua public debate is ongoing. Chemical and agricultural industries do not withdraw problematic pesticides voluntarily. In conclusion, the registration processes in Central America do not comply satisfactorily with the FAO Code. However, international regulatory guidelines are important in developing countries, and international agencies should strongly extend its scope and influence, limiting industry involvement. Profound changes in international and national agricultural policies, steering towards sustainable agriculture based on non-chemical pest management, are the only way to reduce poisonings.

  5. Acute pesticide poisoning and pesticide registration in Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Wesseling, Catharina . E-mail: cwesseli@una.ac.cr; Corriols, Marianela; Bravo, Viria

    2005-09-01

    The International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations has been for 20 years the most acknowledged international initiative for reducing negative impact from pesticide use in developing countries. We analyzed pesticide use and poisoning in Central America, particularly in Costa Rica and Nicaragua, and evaluated whether registration decisions are based on such data, in accordance with the FAO Code. Extensive use of very hazardous pesticides continues in Central America and so do poisonings with organophosphates, carbamates, endosulfan and paraquat as the main causative agents. Central American governments do not carry out or commission scientific risk assessments. Instead, guidelines from international agencies are followed for risk management through the registration process. Documentation of pesticide poisonings during several decades never induced any decision to ban or restrict a pesticide. However, based on the official surveillance systems, in 2000, the ministers of health of the seven Central American countries agreed to ban or restrict twelve of these pesticides. Now, almost 4 years later, restrictions have been implemented in El Salvador and in Nicaragua public debate is ongoing. Chemical and agricultural industries do not withdraw problematic pesticides voluntarily. In conclusion, the registration processes in Central America do not comply satisfactorily with the FAO Code. However, international regulatory guidelines are important in developing countries, and international agencies should strongly extend its scope and influence, limiting industry involvement. Profound changes in international and national agricultural policies, steering towards sustainable agriculture based on non-chemical pest management, are the only way to reduce poisonings.

  6. Respiratory Failure in Acute Organophosphorus Pesticide Self-Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Eddleston, Michael; Mohamed, Fahim; Davies, James OJ; Eyer, Peter; Worek, Franz; Sheriff, MH Rezvi; Buckley, Nick A

    2006-01-01

    Background: Acute organophosphorus (OP) pesticide poisoning is a major clinical problem in the developing world. Textbooks ascribe most deaths to respiratory failure occurring in one of two distinct clinical syndromes - acute cholinergic respiratory failure or the intermediate syndrome. The delayed failure appears to be due to respiratory muscle weakness, but its pathophysiology is not yet clear. Aim: To describe the clinical patterns of OP-induced respiratory failure and to determine whether the two syndromes are clinically distinct. Design: Prospective cohort study of 376 patients with confirmed OP poisoning. Methods: Patients were observed throughout their admission to three Sri Lankan hospitals. Exposure was confirmed by butyrylcholinesterase and blood OP assays. Results: Ninety of 376 patients (24%) required intubation, 52 (58%) within 2 hrs of admission while unconscious with cholinergic features. Twenty-nine (32%) were well on admission but then required intubation after 24 hrs while conscious and without cholinergic features. These two syndromes were not clinically distinct and had much overlap. In particular, some patients who required intubation on arrival subsequently recovered conscious but could not be extubated, requiring ventilation for up to 6 days. Discussion: Respiratory failure did not occur as two discrete clinical syndromes within distinct time frames. Instead, the pattern of failure was variable and overlapped in some patients. There seemed to be two underlying mechanisms - an early acute mixed central and peripheral respiratory failure, and a late peripheral respiratory failure - rather than two defined clinical syndromes. PMID:16861715

  7. Estimates of acute pesticide poisoning in agricultural workers in less developed countries.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, Melville H

    2005-01-01

    The benefits of crop protection products have to be balanced against the risks to farmers and other agricultural workers handling and applying them. The extent of acute pesticide poisoning in these workers, particularly in less developed countries, has often been based on inadequate information. A number of approaches have been taken by researchers to acquire information on pesticide poisoning. These have resulted in worldwide (global) estimates and regional, localised or field assessments. The methods include descriptive epidemiology, cross-sectional and case studies. Attempts to estimate global pesticide poisonings have often been based upon extrapolations and assumptions from chemical-related fatalities in a small number of countries; such estimates do not provide reliable data. Epidemiological studies, relying mainly on hospital and poison centre data, have been biased towards the more severe poisonings, whereas field studies indicate that occupational pesticide poisoning is associated with less severe and minor effects. Many reports do not adequately distinguish between intentional, accidental and occupational pesticide poisoning statistics or are dominated by cases of intentional (suicidal) poisoning which, by their nature, result in severe or fatal results. The majority of reports do not adequately describe whether individual cases are minor, moderate or severe poisonings. In order to assess information on acute pesticide poisoning in agricultural workers in less developed countries and to draw conclusions on the extent and severity of occupational poisoning, the most recent (post-1990) literature was reviewed. Data were also derived from the World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the International Labour Office (ILO). The collected information was analysed to assess the extent and severity of occupational acute pesticide poisoning in less developed countries. Occupational acute pesticide poisonings in these

  8. Survey of acute pesticide poisoning among agricultural workers in four Asian countries*

    PubMed Central

    Jeyaratnam, J.; Lun, K. C.; Phoon, W. O.

    1987-01-01

    The study investigated the extent of acute pesticide poisoning in selected agricultural communities in Indonesia, Malaysia, Sri Lanka and Thailand, as well as the contributing factors, because it is believed that this type of poisoning is a major problem in developing countries, but not in the industrialized countries, despite their extensive use of pesticides. The study confirmed the existence of this problem, which was found to be due to inadequate knowledge of the safe practices in the use of pesticides among users and to the lack of suitable protective clothing for use by agricultural workers in hot and humid climates. PMID:3500805

  9. [Pesticide poisoning].

    PubMed

    Ferrer, A

    2003-01-01

    Pesticides are one of the families of chemical products most widely used by man. They have been used above all to combat pests because of their effect on harvests and as vectors of transmissible diseases. Pesticides can be classified according to their use (insecticides, fungicides, herbicides, raticides em leader ) or by their chemical family (organochlorates, organophosphates, carbamates, pyrethroids, Bipyridilium compounds, inorganic salts em leader ). All of them are biocides, which normally implies a high toxicity for humans, which has been a cause for concern since the mid-XX century due to the widespread and indiscriminate use of these products. Exposure to pesticides can have effects that are acute, chronic and long-term. Some organochlorate compounds (such as DDT) were the first to be used in massive fumigations to fight malaria and have had to be banned because of their capacity for bioaccumulation and environmental persistence. The danger represented by the widespread presence of these agents has been demonstrated in numerous episodes of human toxic epidemics, producers of a high morbidity/mortality, described for nearly all chemical families: organochlorate insecticides and fungicides, organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, organomercurial fungicides and inorganic salts. These episodes have above all been caused through the ingestion of foodstuffs and in the occupational field. Other causes of health concern are their carcinogenic capacity and occasional reproductive alterations. The principal characteristics of some of the most relevant families are presented. PMID:12813483

  10. Pharmacotherapy to protect the neuromuscular junction after acute organophosphorus pesticide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bird, Steven B; Krajacic, Predrag; Sawamoto, Keigo; Bunya, Naofumi; Loro, Emanuele; Khurana, Tejvir S

    2016-06-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticide poisoning is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world, affecting an estimated three million people annually. Much of the morbidity is directly related to muscle weakness, which develops 1-4 days after poisoning. This muscle weakness, termed the intermediate syndrome (IMS), leads to respiratory, bulbar, and proximal limb weakness and frequently necessitates the use of mechanical ventilation. While not entirely understood, the IMS is most likely due to persistently elevated acetylcholine (ACh), which activates nicotinic ACh receptors at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Thus, the NMJ is potentially a target-rich area for the development of new therapies for acute OP poisoning. In this manuscript, we discuss what is known about the IMS and studies investigating the use of nicotinic ACh receptor antagonists to prevent or mitigate NMJ dysfunction after acute OP poisoning. PMID:27258847

  11. Acute pesticide poisoning among cut-flower farmers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jinky Leilanie

    2007-09-01

    The study reported here looked at adverse health effects associated with pesticide exposure among cut-flower farmers in La Trinidad, Philippines. Survey questionnaires and detailed physical and laboratory examinations were administered to 114 and 102 respondents, respectively, to determine pesticide exposure, work and safety practices, individual and family illnesses, and cholinesterase levels. Results showed that pesticide application was the activity most frequently associated with pesticide exposure, and entry was mostly ocular and dermal. Involvement of the skin was noted, with 21 percent of farmers having integumentary abnormalities. Upon physical examination, 90 respondents, or 88.2 percent of those examined, were found to have abnormal peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR). Abnormal temperature was found in 81.3 percent, and the next most frequent finding was abnormal general-survey results, at 75.5 percent. In 51 percent, cholinesterase levels were below the mean value of 0.7 delta pH/hour. (The unit of measure A pH/hour refers to the change in cholinesterase activity as measured by the difference between the initial pH and the final pH when acetylcholine solution has been added to the red blood cell for 1 1/2 hours. A decrease in cholinesterase activity will produce a low delta pH/hour level) In 25.5 percent, a more than 10 percent depression in the level of RBC cholinesterase was found. Certain hematological parameters were also abnormal, namely hemoglobin, hematocrit, and eosinophil count. Using Pearson's r, the author found that factors strongly associated with illness due to pesticides include use of a contaminated piece of fabric to wipe off sweat (p = .01) and reuse of pesticide containers to store water (p = .01), Recycling of containers poses great health hazards and risks of contamination, and the current recommendation is that used containers should be buried. There was a moderate relationship between illness and average number of years of pesticide

  12. Acute work-related poisoning by pesticides in The Netherlands; a one year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Meulenbelt, J; de Vries, I

    1997-01-01

    The National Poisons Control Centre of the National Institute of Public Health and the Environment in the Netherlands conducted a prospective study on acute poisoning arising from exposure to pesticides in agricultural workers. The study was performed to determine the extent and severity of acute pesticide poisoning in the Netherlands and the working conditions that lead to these poisonings. All cases of potential acute occupational intoxication by pesticides in which the Poisons Control Centre was consulted in 1991 were thoroughly studied by an occupational hygienist and a specialist in internal medicine. With the consent of the patients and their physicians, the patients' medical condition and the working conditions leading to exposure were investigated on the spot. After the exclusion of 73 patients (27 non-occupational exposures, 7 occupational exposures in non-agricultural workers, 1 accident occurred abroad, 32 patients with illnesses unrelated to pesticides and 6 who could not be traced for follow-up), 54 cases of possible acute work-related pesticide poisoning remained for study. In 37 of the 54 events there was a direct relation between exposure to pesticides and acute health problems. In one patient doubt remained about the origin of the complaints and in 16 of the 54 cases pesticide poisoning was highly unlikely and the complaints could be attributed to other diseases. In the 37 remaining cases symptoms consisted of skin and/or eye lesions (23 cases) and systemic health effects (14 cases). Exposure to the soil disinfectant 1,3-dichloropropene resulted in severe skin damage. Direct contact of pesticides with the eyes invariability resulted in local irritation. Severe systemic poisonings occurred after exposure to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides and the soil disinfectant methyl bromide. Investigations at the site of the exposure revealed 43 cases of clear exposure to pesticides, in which, except for two cases, 1 worker per incident was involved

  13. Suspected Pesticide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Sellar, Christine; Ferguson, Joyce A.

    1991-01-01

    Of 1125 calls to a regional poison control center about suspected pesticide poisonings, more than half concerned children younger than 6 years, most of whom had ingested small amounts and required no treatment other than drinking fluids. Adults represented a small proportion of victims, but were more likely to have consumed moderate or large quantities, to have symptoms, and to need referral. PMID:21228985

  14. Influence of pesticide regulation on acute poisoning deaths in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Darren M.; Karunarathna, Ayanthi; Buckley, Nick A.; Manuweera, Gamini; Sheriff, M. H. Rezvi; Eddleston, Michael

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess in a developing Asian country the impact of pesticide regulation on the number of deaths from poisoning. These regulations, which were implemented in Sri Lanka from the 1970s, aimed to reduce the number of deaths - the majority from self-poisoning - by limiting the availability and use of highly toxic pesticides. METHODS: Information on legislative changes was obtained from the Ministry of Agriculture, national and district hospital admission data were obtained from the Sri Lanka Health Statistics Unit, and individual details of deaths by pesticide poisoning were obtained from a manual review of patients' notes and intensive care unit records in Anuradhapura. FINDINGS: Between 1986 and 2000, the total national number of admissions due to poisoning doubled, and admissions due to pesticide poisoning increased by more than 50%. At the same time, the case fatality proportion (CFP) fell for total poisonings and for poisonings due to pesticides. In 1991_92, 72% of pesticide-induced deaths in Anuradhapura were caused by organophosphorus (OP) and carbamate pesticides - in particular, the WHO class I OPs monocrotophos and methamidophos. From 1991, the import of these pesticides was reduced gradually until they were banned for routine use in January 1995, with a corresponding fall in deaths. Unfortunately, their place in agricultural practice was taken by the WHO class II organochlorine endosulfan, which led to a rise in deaths from status epilepticus - from one in 1994 to 50 in 1998. Endosulfan was banned in 1998, and over the following three years the number of endosulfan deaths fell to three. However, at the end of the decade, the number of deaths from pesticides was at a similar level to that of 1991, with WHO class II OPs causing the most deaths. Although these drugs are less toxic than class I OPs, the management of class II OPs remains difficult because they are, nevertheless, still highly toxic, and their toxicity is exacerbated by the paucity

  15. Acute Anticholinesterase Pesticide Poisoning Caused a Long-Term Mortality Increase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hung-Sheng; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Hung-Jung; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Guo, How-Ran

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute anticholinesterase pesticide (organophosphate and carbamate) poisoning (ACPP) often produces severe complications, and sometimes death. We investigated the long-term mortality of patients with ACPP because it is not sufficiently understood. In this retrospective nationwide population-based cohort study, 818 patients with ACPP and 16,360 healthy comparisons from 1999 to 2010 were selected from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. They were followed until 2011. Ninety-four (11.5%) ACPP patients and 793 (4.9%) comparisons died (P < 0.01) during follow-up. The incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of death were 2.5 times higher in ACPP patients than in comparisons (P < 0.01). The risk of death was particularly high in the first month after ACPP (IRR: 92.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 45.0–191.0) and still high for ∼6 months (IRR: 3.8; 95% CI: 1.9–7.4). After adjusting for age, gender, selected comorbidities, geographic area, and monthly income, the hazard ratio of death for ACPP patients was still 2.4 times higher than for comparisons. Older age (≥35 years), male gender, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, hypertension, stroke, mental disorder, and lower monthly income also predicted death. ACPP significantly increased long-term mortality. In addition to early follow-up after acute treatment, comorbidity control and socioeconomic assistance are needed for patients with ACPP. PMID:26222853

  16. Acute organophosphorus poisoning.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, Sheemona; Bhattacharyya, Rajasri; Banerjee, Dibyajyoti

    2014-04-20

    Acute organophosphorus poisoning continues to be a detrimental problem and a potential cause of mortality especially in developing countries. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase enzyme is the main mechanism of toxicity of such pesticides and measurement of acetylcholinesterase activity is the commonly used laboratory diagnosis approved for the purpose. It is now proved beyond any doubt that early intervention is beneficial for cases of acute organophosphorus poisoning and, therefore, considerable current interest has been generated for development of point of care testing tool for screening of the same. However, to the best of our knowledge so far the matter is not reviewed from the view of point of care testing tool development. In this paper, this subject is reviewed highlighting the methodological aspects and point of care testing tool development in the context of organophosphorus poisoning.

  17. Acute poisoning in a child following topical treatment of head lice (pediculosis capitis) with an organophosphate pesticide.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Muddathir H; Adeel, Ahmed Awad; Alhaboob, Ali Abdu N; Ashri, Ahmed M; Salih, Mustafa A

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report of acute organophosphate poisoning in a child treated with topical application of Diazinon-60 (WHO Class II toxicity) for head lice (pediculosis capitis). The patient presented with neurological symptoms and signs. After emergency respiratory and circulatory resuscitation the patient underwent dermal decontamination and was treated with atropine, high flow oxygen and pralidoxime. Scanning electron micrographs of scalp hair specimens revealed both viable and empty head lice nits (lice eggs that attach to the hair shaft). The patient was hospitalized for seven days and discharged after full recovery. The case highlights the importance of raising the awareness of health workers and the community about the danger of misusing pesticides for the treatment of head lice. PMID:27651556

  18. Acute poisoning in a child following topical treatment of head lice (pediculosis capitis) with an organophosphate pesticide

    PubMed Central

    Adeel, Ahmed Awad; Alhaboob, Ali Abdu N; Ashri, Ahmed M; Salih, Mustafa A

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report of acute organophosphate poisoning in a child treated with topical application of Diazinon-60 (WHO Class II toxicity) for head lice (pediculosis capitis). The patient presented with neurological symptoms and signs. After emergency respiratory and circulatory resuscitation the patient underwent dermal decontamination and was treated with atropine, high flow oxygen and pralidoxime. Scanning electron micrographs of scalp hair specimens revealed both viable and empty head lice nits (lice eggs that attach to the hair shaft). The patient was hospitalized for seven days and discharged after full recovery. The case highlights the importance of raising the awareness of health workers and the community about the danger of misusing pesticides for the treatment of head lice. PMID:27651556

  19. Pesticide poisonings in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, C; Castillo, L; Elinder, C G

    1993-08-01

    A descriptive epidemiologic study, conducted in Costa Rica, investigated the incidence of pesticide poisonings with special attention to agricultural workers and occupational exposure. Information from three national registers (occupational accident and disease reports, hospitalizations, and deaths) were used. During 1986, 1800 occupational accidents caused by pesticides were reported; between 1980 and 1986 altogether 3330 persons were hospitalized and 429 died. Cholinesterase inhibitors caused 71% of the reported occupational accidents, 63% of the hospitalizations, and 36% of the deaths. Paraquat caused 21% of the occupational accidents, 24% of the hospitalizations, and 60% of the deaths. Hospitalizations and deaths were 13 and 11 times, respectively, more frequent among agricultural workers than among the rest of the population. High-risk groups for occupational poisonings included agricultural workers aged 15-29 years, female workers, and banana plantation workers. The yearly incidence of symptomatic occupational pesticide poisonings among agricultural workers was estimated at 4.5%.

  20. Searching for the Cases of Acute Organophosphorus Pesticides Poisoning by JOIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futagami, Kojiro; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Horioka, Masayoshi; Asakura, Hajime; Fukagawa, Mitsuro

    Cholinesterase reactivator PAM (Pralidoxime) is used in the treatment of organophosphates poisoning with anticholinergic agent atropine. However, some reports demonstrated recently that PAM has inefficacy in some cases of so-called low toxicity organophosphates poisoning. So, to atempt to discuss the efficacy of PAM in clinical treatment, we searched for the case reports of these poisoning by JOIS. In this time, we compared with the specificity of each data bases and presented some examples in this on-line information retrieval.

  1. Acute Anticholinesterase Pesticide Poisoning Caused a Long-Term Mortality Increase: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hung-Sheng; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Hung-Jung; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Guo, How-Ran

    2015-07-01

    Acute anticholinesterase pesticide (organophosphate and carbamate) poisoning (ACPP) often produces severe complications, and sometimes death. We investigated the long-term mortality of patients with ACPP because it is not sufficiently understood. In this retrospective nationwide population-based cohort study, 818 patients with ACPP and 16,360 healthy comparisons from 1999 to 2010 were selected from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. They were followed until 2011. Ninety-four (11.5%) ACPP patients and 793 (4.9%) comparisons died (P < 0.01) during follow-up. The incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of death were 2.5 times higher in ACPP patients than in comparisons (P < 0.01). The risk of death was particularly high in the first month after ACPP (IRR: 92.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 45.0-191.0) and still high for ~6 months (IRR: 3.8; 95% CI: 1.9-7.4). After adjusting for age, gender, selected comorbidities, geographic area, and monthly income, the hazard ratio of death for ACPP patients was still 2.4 times higher than for comparisons. Older age (≥35 years), male gender, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, hypertension, stroke, mental disorder, and lower monthly income also predicted death. ACPP significantly increased long-term mortality. In addition to early follow-up after acute treatment, comorbidity control and socioeconomic assistance are needed for patients with ACPP.

  2. The power of poison: pesticide poisoning of Africa's wildlife.

    PubMed

    Ogada, Darcy L

    2014-08-01

    Poisons have long been used to kill wildlife throughout the world. An evolution has occurred from the use of plant- and animal-based toxins to synthetic pesticides to kill wildlife, a method that is silent, cheap, easy, and effective. The use of pesticides to poison wildlife began in southern Africa, and predator populations were widely targeted and eliminated. A steep increase has recently been observed in the intensity of wildlife poisonings, with corresponding population declines. However, the majority of poisonings go unreported. Under national laws, it is illegal to hunt wildlife using poisons in 83% of African countries. Pesticide regulations are inadequate, and enforcement of existing legislation is poor. Few countries have forensic field protocols, and most lack storage and testing facilities. Methods used to poison wildlife include baiting carcasses, soaking grains in pesticide solution, mixing pesticides to form salt licks, and tainting waterholes. Carbofuran is the most widely abused pesticide in Africa. Common reasons for poisoning are control of damage-causing animals, harvesting fish and bushmeat, harvesting animals for traditional medicine, poaching for wildlife products, and killing wildlife sentinels (e.g., vultures because their aerial circling alerts authorities to poachers' activities). Populations of scavengers, particularly vultures, have been decimated by poisoning. Recommendations include banning pesticides, improving pesticide regulations and controlling distribution, better enforcement and stiffer penalties for offenders, increasing international support and awareness, and developing regional pesticide centers.

  3. The power of poison: pesticide poisoning of Africa's wildlife.

    PubMed

    Ogada, Darcy L

    2014-08-01

    Poisons have long been used to kill wildlife throughout the world. An evolution has occurred from the use of plant- and animal-based toxins to synthetic pesticides to kill wildlife, a method that is silent, cheap, easy, and effective. The use of pesticides to poison wildlife began in southern Africa, and predator populations were widely targeted and eliminated. A steep increase has recently been observed in the intensity of wildlife poisonings, with corresponding population declines. However, the majority of poisonings go unreported. Under national laws, it is illegal to hunt wildlife using poisons in 83% of African countries. Pesticide regulations are inadequate, and enforcement of existing legislation is poor. Few countries have forensic field protocols, and most lack storage and testing facilities. Methods used to poison wildlife include baiting carcasses, soaking grains in pesticide solution, mixing pesticides to form salt licks, and tainting waterholes. Carbofuran is the most widely abused pesticide in Africa. Common reasons for poisoning are control of damage-causing animals, harvesting fish and bushmeat, harvesting animals for traditional medicine, poaching for wildlife products, and killing wildlife sentinels (e.g., vultures because their aerial circling alerts authorities to poachers' activities). Populations of scavengers, particularly vultures, have been decimated by poisoning. Recommendations include banning pesticides, improving pesticide regulations and controlling distribution, better enforcement and stiffer penalties for offenders, increasing international support and awareness, and developing regional pesticide centers. PMID:24716788

  4. [Acute arsenic poisoning].

    PubMed

    Montelescaut, Etienne; Vermeersch, Véronique; Commandeur, Diane; Huynh, Sophie; Danguy des Deserts, Marc; Sapin, Jeanne; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Acute arsenic poisoning is a rare cause of suicide attempt. It causes a multiple organs failure caused by cardiogenic shock. We report the case of a patient admitted twelve hours after an ingestion of trioxide arsenic having survived thanks to a premature treatment.

  5. [Acute arsenic poisoning].

    PubMed

    Montelescaut, Etienne; Vermeersch, Véronique; Commandeur, Diane; Huynh, Sophie; Danguy des Deserts, Marc; Sapin, Jeanne; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Acute arsenic poisoning is a rare cause of suicide attempt. It causes a multiple organs failure caused by cardiogenic shock. We report the case of a patient admitted twelve hours after an ingestion of trioxide arsenic having survived thanks to a premature treatment. PMID:25486670

  6. Diagnosis & Treatment of Poisoning by Pesticides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Pesticide Programs.

    This report succinctly discusses the steps necessary to diagnose and treat poisoning from pesticides, especially organophosphates, carbamates and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Immediate and continuing steps in the care of poisoning victims are outlined with supportive information on where to locate emergency assistance. (CS)

  7. Suspected poisoning of domestic animals by pesticides.

    PubMed

    Caloni, Francesca; Cortinovis, Cristina; Rivolta, Marina; Davanzo, Franca

    2016-01-01

    A retrospective study was carried out by reviewing all suspected cases of domestic animal poisoning attributed to pesticides, reported to the Milan Poison Control Centre (MPCC) between January 2011 and December 2013. During this period, pesticides were found to be responsible for 37.3% of all suspected poisoning enquiries received (815). The most commonly species involved was the dog (71.1% of calls) followed by the cat (15.8%), while a limited number of cases involved horses, goats and sheep. Most cases of exposure (47.1%) resulted in mild to moderate clinical signs. The outcome was reported in 59.9% of these cases, with death occurring in 10.4% of them. Insecticides (40.8%) proved to be the most common group of pesticides involved and exposure to pyrethrins-pyrethroids accounted for the majority of calls. According to the MPCC data, there has been a decrease in the number of suspected poisonings cases attributed to pesticides that have been banned by the EU, including aldicarb, carbofuran, endosulfan and paraquat. In contrast, there has been an increase of suspected poisoning cases attributed to the neonicotinoids, imidacloprid and acetamiprid, probably due to their widespread use in recent years. Cases of suspected poisoning that involved exposure to rodenticides accounted for 27.6% of calls received by the MPCC and anticoagulant rodenticides were the primary cause of calls, with many cases involving brodifacoum and bromadiolone. Herbicides were involved in 14.2% of calls related to pesticides and glyphosate was the main culprit in cases involving dogs, cats, horses, goats and sheep. As far as exposure to molluscicides (11.5%) and fungicides (5.9%), most of the cases involved dogs and the suspected poisoning agents were metaldehyde and copper compounds respectively. The data collected are useful in determining trends in poisoning episodes and identifying newly emerging toxicants, thus demonstrating the prevalence of pesticides as causative agents in animal

  8. Suspected poisoning of domestic animals by pesticides.

    PubMed

    Caloni, Francesca; Cortinovis, Cristina; Rivolta, Marina; Davanzo, Franca

    2016-01-01

    A retrospective study was carried out by reviewing all suspected cases of domestic animal poisoning attributed to pesticides, reported to the Milan Poison Control Centre (MPCC) between January 2011 and December 2013. During this period, pesticides were found to be responsible for 37.3% of all suspected poisoning enquiries received (815). The most commonly species involved was the dog (71.1% of calls) followed by the cat (15.8%), while a limited number of cases involved horses, goats and sheep. Most cases of exposure (47.1%) resulted in mild to moderate clinical signs. The outcome was reported in 59.9% of these cases, with death occurring in 10.4% of them. Insecticides (40.8%) proved to be the most common group of pesticides involved and exposure to pyrethrins-pyrethroids accounted for the majority of calls. According to the MPCC data, there has been a decrease in the number of suspected poisonings cases attributed to pesticides that have been banned by the EU, including aldicarb, carbofuran, endosulfan and paraquat. In contrast, there has been an increase of suspected poisoning cases attributed to the neonicotinoids, imidacloprid and acetamiprid, probably due to their widespread use in recent years. Cases of suspected poisoning that involved exposure to rodenticides accounted for 27.6% of calls received by the MPCC and anticoagulant rodenticides were the primary cause of calls, with many cases involving brodifacoum and bromadiolone. Herbicides were involved in 14.2% of calls related to pesticides and glyphosate was the main culprit in cases involving dogs, cats, horses, goats and sheep. As far as exposure to molluscicides (11.5%) and fungicides (5.9%), most of the cases involved dogs and the suspected poisoning agents were metaldehyde and copper compounds respectively. The data collected are useful in determining trends in poisoning episodes and identifying newly emerging toxicants, thus demonstrating the prevalence of pesticides as causative agents in animal

  9. Acute lead arsenate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Tallis, G A

    1989-12-01

    Three cases of acute lead arsenate poisoning which occurred in South Australia during a 12 month interval are described. The case reports demonstrate a number of features of the characteristic clinical syndrome which may follow ingestion of lead arsenate. The recommended management is immediate gastric lavage and subsequent chelation therapy with calcium EDTA and dimercaprol. Early gastric lavage may prevent significant lead absorption. However, arsenic acid (produced in the stomach when lead arsenate reacts with hydrochloric acid) is relatively water soluble and prompt gastric lavage is unlikely to prevent extensive arsenic absorption. It remains controversial as to whether chelation with dimercaprol prevents arsenical neuropathy.

  10. Acute arsenic poisoning in two siblings.

    PubMed

    Lai, Melisa W; Boyer, Edward W; Kleinman, Monica E; Rodig, Nancy M; Ewald, Michele Burns

    2005-07-01

    We report a case series of acute arsenic poisoning of 2 siblings, a 4-month-old male infant and his 2-year-old sister. Each child ingested solubilized inorganic arsenic from an outdated pesticide that was misidentified as spring water. The 4-month-old child ingested a dose of arsenic that was lethal despite extraordinary attempts at arsenic removal, including chelation therapy, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, exchange transfusion, and hemodialysis. The 2-year-old fared well with conventional therapy.

  11. [Acute salicylate poisoning].

    PubMed

    Reingardiene, Dagmara; Lazauskas, Robertas

    2006-01-01

    Although aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) has become widely available without prescription, cases of self-poisoning due to overdose of salicylates are quite uncommon, with a low reported mortality. However, severe poisoning with these preparations is life threatening. Besides the aspirin, there are other sources of salicylate poisoning, such as an excessive application of topical agents, ingestion of salicylate containing ointments, use of keratolytic agents or agents containing methyl salicylate (e.g. oil of wintergreen). Most of these preparations are liquid, highly concentrated and lipid soluble, and, therefore, they are able to provoke a severe, rapid salicylate poisoning. On the basis of clinical and metabolic features or salicylate concentration in plasma it is very important to diagnose severe poisoning with salicylates in time and prescribe an adequate treatment. In the present review article various aspects of salicylate poisoning and its treatment are discussed: epidemiology, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of salicylates, clinical manifestations of their toxicity, management, enhanced elimination and prognosis.

  12. Acute arsenic poisoning diagnosed late.

    PubMed

    Shumy, Farzana; Anam, Ahmad Mursel; Kamruzzaman, A K M; Amin, Md Robed; Chowdhury, M A Jalil

    2016-04-01

    Acute arsenicosis, although having a 'historical' background, is not common in our times. This report describes a case of acute arsenic poisoning, missed initially due to its gastroenteritis-like presentation, but suspected and confirmed much later, when the patient sought medical help for delayed complications after about 2 months.

  13. Acute arsenic poisoning diagnosed late.

    PubMed

    Shumy, Farzana; Anam, Ahmad Mursel; Kamruzzaman, A K M; Amin, Md Robed; Chowdhury, M A Jalil

    2016-04-01

    Acute arsenicosis, although having a 'historical' background, is not common in our times. This report describes a case of acute arsenic poisoning, missed initially due to its gastroenteritis-like presentation, but suspected and confirmed much later, when the patient sought medical help for delayed complications after about 2 months. PMID:26508422

  14. Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Donald P.

    This manual aids health professionals in recognizing and treating pesticide poisonings. Suggested treatments are appropriate for implementation in the small hospitals and clinics which usually receive the victims of pesticide poisoning. Classes of compounds covered include: (1) organophosphate cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides; (2) carbamate…

  15. Correlation between Cholinesterase and Paraoxonase 1 Activities:Case Series of Pesticide Poisoning Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Richard, S Austin; Frank, Elizabeth A; D'Souza, Cletus J M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Acute exposure to pesticide due to suicidal poisoning is the most extensive cause of pesticide exposure, compared with all other causes including agricultural or industrial exposure. Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate group of pesticides can inhibit acetylcholinesterase; on the other hand, paraoxonase1 can detoxify organophosphate poisoning by hydrolyzing organophosphate metabolites. Methods: We have compared the serum paraoxonase1 status and cholinesterase activity of subjects who attempted to commit suicide by consuming OP pesticide. Cholinesterase and paraoxonase1 activity were measured spectrophotometrically using butyrylthiocholine and phenyl acetate as substrates, respectively. Results: A positive correlation was found between serum paraoxonase1 activity and cholinesterase activity among pesticide consumed subjects. Conclusion: Our results suggest that subjects with higher paraoxonase1 activity may have a better chance of detoxifying the lethal effect of acute organophosphate poisoning. PMID:24163803

  16. Acute arsenic poisoning in two siblings.

    PubMed

    Lai, Melisa W; Boyer, Edward W; Kleinman, Monica E; Rodig, Nancy M; Ewald, Michele Burns

    2005-07-01

    We report a case series of acute arsenic poisoning of 2 siblings, a 4-month-old male infant and his 2-year-old sister. Each child ingested solubilized inorganic arsenic from an outdated pesticide that was misidentified as spring water. The 4-month-old child ingested a dose of arsenic that was lethal despite extraordinary attempts at arsenic removal, including chelation therapy, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, exchange transfusion, and hemodialysis. The 2-year-old fared well with conventional therapy. PMID:15995066

  17. Severity and prognosis of acute organophosphorus pesticide poisoning are indicated by C-reactive protein and copeptin levels and APACHE II score

    PubMed Central

    WU, XINKUAN; XIE, WEI; CHENG, YUELEI; GUAN, QINGLONG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and copeptin, in addition to the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) scores, in patients with acute organophosphorus pesticide poisoning (AOPP). A total of 100 patients with AOPP were included and divided into mild, moderate and severe groups according to AOPP diagnosis and classification standards. Blood samples were collected from all patients on days 1, 3 and 7 following AOPP. The concentrations of CRP and copeptin in the plasma were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All AOPP patients underwent APACHE II scoring and the diagnostic value of these scores was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic curves (ROCs). On days 1, 3 and 7 after AOPP, the levels of CRP and copeptin were increased in correlation with the increase in AOPP severity, and were significantly higher compared with the control groups. Furthermore, elevated CRP and copeptin plasma levels were detected in patients with severe AOPP on day 7, whereas these levels were reduced in patients with mild or moderate AOPP. APACHE II scores, blood lactate level, acetylcholine esterase level, twitch disappearance time, reactivating agent dose and inability to raise the head were the high-risk factors that affected the prognosis of AOPP. Patients with plasma CRP and copeptin levels higher than median values had worse prognoses. The areas under curve for ROCs were 0.89, 0.75 and 0.72 for CRP levels, copeptin levels and APACHE II scores, respectively. In addition, the plasma contents of CRP and copeptin are increased according to the severity of AOPP. Therefore, the results of the present study suggest that CRP and copeptin levels and APACHE II scores may be used for the determination of AOPP severity and the prediction of AOPP prognosis. PMID:26997996

  18. [Acute carbon monoxide poisoning].

    PubMed

    Raphaël, Jean-Claude

    2008-04-30

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is still complicated by a high mortality and morbidity rate. Diagnosis can be obvious but is most of time difficult and sometimes remained unknown. It is usually based on clinical signs and must be confirmed by assessment of CO level in room air or in patient's expired breathing or blood and detection of a source. Mild neurological sequelae are very common. Normobaric oxygen is the first line treatment. Comatose and pregnant patients must undergo hyperbaric oxygen. All CO poisoning has to be declared to sanitary authority, which will in turn conduct a technical inspection to remove the source. The patient must be informed that he is at risk of new poisoning and of neurological complications. Progress in prevention and research in therapeutics are needed in order to reduce CO related morbidity.

  19. 75 FR 22401 - Petition from Pesticide Poisoning Victims United; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... AGENCY Petition from Pesticide Poisoning Victims United; Notice of Availability AGENCY: Environmental... petition from Pesticide Poisoning Victims United, a division of the Pitchfork Rebellion. The petitioners... the Agency Taking? EPA is announcing availability of a petition from Pesticide Poisoning...

  20. Acute arsenical poisoning in Dunedin.

    PubMed

    Gillies, A J; Taylor, A J

    1979-05-23

    Four cases of acute poisoning with arsenic are described. Although no new approach to therapy is proposed it is suggested from the data of arsenic recovery from the dialysate of one of the patients studied, that peritoneal dialysis is unlikely to be satisfactory.

  1. [Acute phostoxin poisoning].

    PubMed

    Idali, B; Miguil, M; Moutawakkil, S; Bouaggad, A; Guartit, A; Abassi, O; Ben Aguida, M

    1995-04-01

    Phostoxin is a mixture of aluminium phosphide and ammonium carbonate. When exposed to water, it releases phosphorus hydrogen (PH3), a highly-poisonous gas. In Morocco, death rate from suicide due to self-administration of phostoxin pills is high. Clinical signs include abrupt digestive and nervous disorders. Pulmonary oedema or cardiogenic shock dominate early prognosis. Liver and renal damage is secondary. Prevention requires both legal constraints and regulation of sales. PMID:7761363

  2. Pilot study on agricultural pesticide poisoning in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Ouedraogo, Mustapha; Ouedraogo, Richard; Ilboudo, Sylvain; Guissou, Pierre I.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiologic data related to agricultural pesticide poisoning cases in Burkina Faso were collected. The study was carried out using retrospective (from January 2002 to June 2010) surveys conducted among farmers and healthcare centers. One hundred and fifty-three (153) pest control products were recorded during the survey and 56 active ingredients were identified. Out of the 153 pest control products, 49 (i.e. 32%) were authorized for sale in Burkina Faso. The main risk factors are socio-demographic characteristics of farmers, their low education level, and some attitudes and practices on using agricultural pesticides. Pesticide poisonings are relatively frequent and their management was not always efficacious. Actions are needed to reduce pesticide poisoning as a global public health problem and to improve management of pesticide poisoning. To this purpose, advanced investigations should be carried out over a longer period of time to complement the present pilot study. PMID:24678256

  3. Early management after self-poisoning with an organophosphorus or carbamate pesticide – a treatment protocol for junior doctors

    PubMed Central

    Eddleston, Michael; Dawson, Andrew; Karalliedde, Lakshman; Dissanayake, Wasantha; Hittarage, Ariyasena; Azher, Shifa; Buckley, Nick A

    2004-01-01

    Severe organophosphorus or carbamate pesticide poisoning is an important clinical problem in many countries of the world. Unfortunately, little clinical research has been performed and little evidence exists with which to determine best therapy. A cohort study of acute pesticide poisoned patients was established in Sri Lanka during 2002; so far, more than 2000 pesticide poisoned patients have been treated. A protocol for the early management of severely ill, unconscious organophosphorus/carbamate-poisoned patients was developed for use by newly qualified doctors. It concentrates on the early stabilisation of patients and the individualised administration of atropine. We present it here as a guide for junior doctors in rural parts of the developing world who see the majority of such patients and as a working model around which to base research to improve patient outcome. Improved management of pesticide poisoning will result in a reduced number of suicides globally. PMID:15566582

  4. Predicting Outcome in Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning with a Poison Severity Score or the Glasgow Coma Scale

    PubMed Central

    Davies, James O. J.; Eddleston, Michael; Buckley, Nick A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Organophosphorus pesticide poisoning kills around 200,000 people each year, principally due to self poisoning in the Asia-Pacific region. Aim: We wished to assess whether patients at high risk of death could be identified accurately using clinical parameters soon after hospital admission. Design: We evaluated the usefulness of the International Program on Chemical Safety Poison Severity Score (IPCS PSS) and the Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) prospectively for predicting death in patients poisoned by organophosphorus pesticides. Methods: Data were collected as part of a multicentre cohort study in Sri Lanka. Study doctors saw all patients on admission, collecting data on pulse, blood pressure, pupil size, need for intubation, and GCS. Results: 1365 patients with a history of acute organophosphorus poisoning were included. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated for the IPCS PSS and GCS on admission. The IPCS PSS and GCS had similar ROC area under the curves (AUC) and best cut points as determined by Youden's index (AUC/sensitivity/specificity 0.81/0.78/0.79 for IPCS PSS ≥ grade 2 and 0.84/0.79/0.79 for GCS ≤13). The predictive value varied with the pesticide ingested, being more accurate for dimethoate poisoning and less accurate for fenthion poisoning (GCS AUC 0.91 compared to 0.69). Conclusions: GCS and the IPCS PSS were similarly effective at predicting outcome. Patients presenting with a GCS ≤ 13 need intensive monitoring and treatment. However, the identity of the organophosphate must be taken into account since the half of all patients who died from fenthion poisoning only had mild symptoms at presentation. PMID:18319295

  5. Acute arsenic toxicity--an opaque poison.

    PubMed

    Gray, J R; Khalil, A; Prior, J C

    1989-08-01

    We report a patient with fatal acute arsenic poisoning presenting as vomiting and diarrhea with the finding of intra-abdominal radiopacities on radiographs. These represent the classic features of acute arsenic toxicity and are detailed here as a reminder to others facing a similar puzzling patient with this potentially treatable poisoning.

  6. Structural equation modeling of pesticide poisoning, depression, safety, and injury.

    PubMed

    Beseler, Cheryl L; Stallones, Lorann

    2013-01-01

    The role of pesticide poisoning in risk of injuries may operate through a link between pesticide-induced depressive symptoms and reduced engagement in safety behaviors. The authors conducted structural equation modeling of cross-sectional data to examine the pattern of associations between pesticide poisoning, depressive symptoms, safety knowledge, safety behaviors, and injury. Interviews of 1637 Colorado farm operators and their spouses from 964 farms were conducted during 1993-1997. Pesticide poisoning was assessed based on a history of ever having been poisoned. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale was used to assess depressive symptoms. Safety knowledge and safety behaviors were assessed using ten items for each latent variable. Outcomes were safety behaviors and injuries. A total of 154 injuries occurred among 1604 individuals with complete data. Pesticide poisoning, financial problems, health, and age predicted negative affect/somatic depressive symptoms with similar effect sizes; sex did not. Depression was more strongly associated with safety behavior than was safety knowledge. Two safety behaviors were significantly associated with an increased risk of injury. This study emphasizes the importance of financial problems and health on depression, and provides further evidence for the link between neurological effects of past pesticide poisoning on risk-taking behaviors and injury.

  7. Multi-organ Dysfunction Syndrome with Dual Organophosphate Pesticides Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ajay; Pandya, Himanshu V; Dave, Nikhil; Mehta, Manan

    2013-09-01

    Organophosphate (OP) pesticide self-poisoning is common in developing countries. Poisoning with dual OP compounds is rare. Multi-organ dysfunction after OP poisoning has a high mortality rate. We report the case of a 27-year-old man who developed multi-organ dysfunction syndrome with fatal outcome after intentional ingestion of 50:50 mixture of two OP compounds, dichlorvos and profenofos.

  8. Multi-organ Dysfunction Syndrome with Dual Organophosphate Pesticides Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ajay; Pandya, Himanshu V.; Dave, Nikhil; Mehta, Manan

    2013-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) pesticide self-poisoning is common in developing countries. Poisoning with dual OP compounds is rare. Multi-organ dysfunction after OP poisoning has a high mortality rate. We report the case of a 27-year-old man who developed multi-organ dysfunction syndrome with fatal outcome after intentional ingestion of 50:50 mixture of two OP compounds, dichlorvos and profenofos. PMID:24403738

  9. Acute poisoning with Tricholoma equestre.

    PubMed

    Anand, Jacek Sein; Chwaluk, Paweł; Sut, Michał

    2009-01-01

    Four cases, including three adults and one child, suffering from acute poisoning with Tricholoma equestre were described. The patients had eaten from 100 to 400 grams of the mushroom within a few consecutive meals. After consuming about 1000 grams of Tricholoma equestre for 3-4 days, the subjects developed fatigue, muscle weakness, myalgia, and in two cases acute respiratory failure with the need of respiratorotherapy. Maximal serum CK was 48136 U/L in the adults and 306 U/L in children. Maximal serum levels of AST and ALT were 802 U/L and 446 U/L in adults and 39 U/L, and 56 U/L in a child. All routine biochemical tests were within normal range. No other causes of rhabdomyolysis such as parasitic or viral infections, immune diseases, trauma or exposure to medications were found. Patient, aged 72 yrs., who developed acute respiratory failure, died in the second day of hospitalization. In other patients all the above mentioned symptoms and biochemical abnormalities disappeared from 2 to 3 weeks of hospitalization. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of appearance of rhabdo-myolysis after repeated consumption of large quantities of Tricholoma equestre. PMID:19788144

  10. Patterns of Acute Poisoning in Childhood in Zagazig, Egypt: An Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Basheir A.; Siam, Mohamed G.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acute poisoning represents one of the most common medical emergencies in childhood. In view of paucity of literature on accidental poisoning among children in Egypt, this study was designed to describe the pattern of childhood poisoning in Zagazig University Hospitals. Patients and Methods. This retrospective study included 300 children up to 12 years with acute poisoning admitted to the Pediatric Department and Poisoning Treatment Unit, Zagazig University Hospitals, from January 2011 to August 2012. Complete epidemiological and clinical data were recorded and analyzed. Results. Three hundred of poisoned children were enrolled in this study. Children from 1 to 6 years were more liable to poisoning (81%). More boys than girls were poisoned at all age groups. The majority of all cases (99%) were due to accidental poisoning. Overall, 32% of the poisoned cases were living in Zagazig city while 68% were living in the rural areas. The presenting symptoms were classic in 60% of the cases. Pesticides, therapeutic drugs, and cleaning and disinfectant agents were the most frequent poisoning agents (28.7%, 22.7%, and 17.0%, resp.). In 86.0% of cases, observation with or without supportive measures together with decontamination and specific antidote therapy whenever needed was sufficient. Conclusion. Most of the poisonings were due to accidental ingestions by infants and young children. Pesticides and medications were the most commonly involved agents. PMID:27351009

  11. Acute arsenic poisoning: clinical and histopathological features.

    PubMed

    Bartolomé, B; Córdoba, S; Nieto, S; Fernández-Herrera, J; García-Díez, A

    1999-12-01

    We report a woman with acute arsenic poisoning, who developed an erythroderma with vesicles and pustules after the ingestion of 8-16 g of sodium arsenite. Simultaneously, she presented a herpes simplex virus infection. Skin biopsies showed unique features which included multiple small pigment granules inside and outside the histiocytes. In our opinion, these findings are consistent with acute arsenic poisoning, and constitute the first histological description of this entity in skin.

  12. Mad honey poisoning mimicking acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sammy P L; Lam, Y H; Ng, Vember C H; Lau, F L; Sze, Y C; Chan, W T; Mak, Tony W L

    2013-08-01

    We report a case of acute poisoning in a 48-year-old man who presented with chest pain, abdominal pain, dizziness, sweatiness, blurred vision, and severe hypotension after ingestion of honey. His electrocardiogram showed sinus bradycardia and transient ST elevation. He made a good recovery after treatment with atropine and close monitoring. Grayanotoxin was detected in his urine and the honey he ingested, which confirmed a diagnosis of mad honey poisoning. This is a condition prevalent in the Black Sea region around Turkey but rarely seen locally. Although mad honey poisoning is life-threatening, early use of atropine is life-saving. Such poisoning may present with ST elevation in the electrocardiogram and symptoms mimicking acute myocardial infarction. It is therefore essential for clinicians to recognise this unusual form of poisoning and avoid the disastrous use of thrombolytic therapy.

  13. The need for translational research on antidotes for pesticide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Nick A; Eddleston, Michael; Dawson, Andrew H

    2006-01-01

    Summary Pesticide poisoning kills hundreds of thousands of people in the Asia Pacific region each year. The majority are from deliberate self-poisoning with organophosphorus pesticides (OP), aluminium phosphide and paraquat. The current response from a public health, medical and research perspective is inadequate. There are few proven or effective treatments; in addition, very little clinical research has been done to transfer antidotes shown to work in animal studies into clinical practice. The human toxicity of pesticides is poorly studied and better information might inform a more sustained and appropriate regulatory response. Further understanding may also lead to improvement in diagnosis and treatment. The few effective treatments are not being recommended or delivered in an optimal and timely fashion to poisoned patients. A regional approach to facilitate appropriate pricing, packaging and delivery of antidotes is required. PMID:16405459

  14. The characteristics of emergency department presentations related to acute herbicide or insecticide poisoning in South Korea between 2011 and 2014.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong Mi; Chun, Byeong Jo; Cho, Yong Soo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine epidemiologic data regarding acute herbicide or insecticide poisoning in adults from 2011 to 2014 at the national level in South Korea. Further, the association between governmental regulations involving pesticides and changes in pesticide poisoning occurrences over time was determined. Data were obtained from the emergency department (ED)-based Injury In-depth Surveillance system conducted by the Korea Center for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC). Governmental regulations on pesticides were downloaded from the homepage of the Korea Rural Development Administration. Pesticides were classified according to guidelines provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) and by the respective Resistance Action Committee (RAC). Trends in the number of ED presentations and case fatality rate (CFR) due to pesticide poisoning were investigated. The overall CFR due to poisoning from herbicides or insecticides in adults in South Korea was 16.8% during 2011-2014. However, CFR significantly decreased over the 4-year period. The ED presentations of paraquat (PQ) poisoning fell significantly, whereas poisoning due to glyphosate, glufosinate, or combined herbicides increased markedly over the 4 years. Between 2011 and 2013, PQ was the most common pesticide poisoning, whereas glyphosate became the most frequent in 2014. PQ produced the highest rate of fatality followed by endosulfan. Although the frequency of PQ poisoning decreased, which may be attributed to governmental regulations, the CFR and incidence of pesticide poisoning in adults remain a public health concern that needs to be addressed. PMID:27267557

  15. Deaths from pesticide poisoning in Spain from 1991 to 1996.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Repetto, R; Soria, M L; Gimenez, M P; Menendez, M; Repetto, M

    1998-06-01

    Data on 184 deaths from pesticide poisonings that occurred in Spain from 1991 to 1996 have been collated via a survey from the National Institute of Toxicology, Sevilla. Organophosphates and carbamates accounted for the majority of the cases. Other substances involved were organochlorines such as endosulfan and the herbicide paraquat.

  16. Antidotes for acute cyanide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Borron, Stephen W; Baud, Frederic J

    2012-08-01

    Cyanide poisoning can present in multiple ways, given its widespread industrial use, presence in combustion products, multiple physical forms, and chemical structures. The primary target of toxicity is mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase. The onset and severity of poisoning depend on the route, dose, physicochemical structure and other variables. Common poisoning features include dyspnea, altered respiratory patterns, abnormal vital signs, altered mental status, seizures, and lactic acidosis. Our present knowledge supports cyanide poisoning treatment based on excellent supportive care with adjunctive antidotal therapy. Multiple antidotes exist and vary in regional availability. All currently marketed antidotes appear to be effective. Antidotal mechanisms include chelation, formation of stable, less toxic complexes, methemoglobin induction, and sulfane sulfur supplementation for detoxification by endogenous rhodanese. Each antidote has advantages and disadvantages. For example, hydroxocobalamin is safer than the methemoglobin inducers in patients with smoke inhalation. Research for new, safer and more effective cyanide antidotes continues.

  17. Zebrafish Models for Human Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Faria, Melissa; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Padrós, Francesc; Babin, Patrick J; Sebastián, David; Cachot, Jérôme; Prats, Eva; Arick Ii, Mark; Rial, Eduardo; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Mathieu, Guilaine; Le Bihanic, Florane; Escalon, B Lynn; Zorzano, Antonio; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2015-10-22

    Terrorist use of organophosphorus-based nerve agents and toxic industrial chemicals against civilian populations constitutes a real threat, as demonstrated by the terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990 s or, even more recently, in the Syrian civil war. Thus, development of more effective countermeasures against acute organophosphorus poisoning is urgently needed. Here, we have generated and validated zebrafish models for mild, moderate and severe acute organophosphorus poisoning by exposing zebrafish larvae to different concentrations of the prototypic organophosphorus compound chlorpyrifos-oxon. Our results show that zebrafish models mimic most of the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this toxidrome in humans, including acetylcholinesterase inhibition, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and calcium dysregulation as well as inflammatory and immune responses. The suitability of the zebrafish larvae to in vivo high-throughput screenings of small molecule libraries makes these models a valuable tool for identifying new drugs for multifunctional drug therapy against acute organophosphorus poisoning.

  18. Zebrafish Models for Human Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Faria, Melissa; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Padrós, Francesc; Babin, Patrick J; Sebastián, David; Cachot, Jérôme; Prats, Eva; Arick Ii, Mark; Rial, Eduardo; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Mathieu, Guilaine; Le Bihanic, Florane; Escalon, B Lynn; Zorzano, Antonio; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2015-01-01

    Terrorist use of organophosphorus-based nerve agents and toxic industrial chemicals against civilian populations constitutes a real threat, as demonstrated by the terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990 s or, even more recently, in the Syrian civil war. Thus, development of more effective countermeasures against acute organophosphorus poisoning is urgently needed. Here, we have generated and validated zebrafish models for mild, moderate and severe acute organophosphorus poisoning by exposing zebrafish larvae to different concentrations of the prototypic organophosphorus compound chlorpyrifos-oxon. Our results show that zebrafish models mimic most of the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this toxidrome in humans, including acetylcholinesterase inhibition, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and calcium dysregulation as well as inflammatory and immune responses. The suitability of the zebrafish larvae to in vivo high-throughput screenings of small molecule libraries makes these models a valuable tool for identifying new drugs for multifunctional drug therapy against acute organophosphorus poisoning. PMID:26489395

  19. Zebrafish Models for Human Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Melissa; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Padrós, Francesc; Babin, Patrick J.; Sebastián, David; Cachot, Jérôme; Prats, Eva; Arick II, Mark; Rial, Eduardo; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Mathieu, Guilaine; Le Bihanic, Florane; Escalon, B. Lynn; Zorzano, Antonio; Soares, Amadeu M.V.M; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2015-01-01

    Terrorist use of organophosphorus-based nerve agents and toxic industrial chemicals against civilian populations constitutes a real threat, as demonstrated by the terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990 s or, even more recently, in the Syrian civil war. Thus, development of more effective countermeasures against acute organophosphorus poisoning is urgently needed. Here, we have generated and validated zebrafish models for mild, moderate and severe acute organophosphorus poisoning by exposing zebrafish larvae to different concentrations of the prototypic organophosphorus compound chlorpyrifos-oxon. Our results show that zebrafish models mimic most of the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this toxidrome in humans, including acetylcholinesterase inhibition, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and calcium dysregulation as well as inflammatory and immune responses. The suitability of the zebrafish larvae to in vivo high-throughput screenings of small molecule libraries makes these models a valuable tool for identifying new drugs for multifunctional drug therapy against acute organophosphorus poisoning. PMID:26489395

  20. [Acute poisoning. Apropos of 1200 cases].

    PubMed

    Ginies, G; Lamisse, F; Gautier, J; Choutet, P; Breteau, M; Bourin, M; Renard, J P

    The team studied 1 200 cases of acute intoxications both accidental and self inflicted, self inflicted poisonings are much more frequent than accidental ones and in general occur more often amongst the young and by women; the median age is about thirty. Barbituric are often the means. There is a progressive increase in the use of tranquilizers and of thymo-analeptics as their use becomes greater. A mixture of poisons increases the dangers because this frequently results in more rapid loss of consciousness; also more than one poison increases the risk of shock and of thermo-regulation, respiratory problems necessitate intubation and artificial respiration which both increase the risk of assification. The characteristics of certain poisons are stressed and in particular the thymo-analeptics; also the supervision of the patients in an intensive care unit.

  1. Acute poisoning types and prevalence in Shanghai, China, from January 2010 to August 2011.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingshuo; Xiang, Ping; Zhuo, Xianyi; Shen, Min

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, the number of cases of acute poisoning has increased in China, yet; currently, there is no detailed report published that addresses acute poisoning in the mainland of China. We collected biological samples from 466 cases of suspected acute poisoning at the hospitals in Shanghai, China, and examined them using spectroscopy, chromatography and chromatography/mass spectrometry. Of the 466 cases, 230 cases (100 men and 130 women) were positively confirmed as acute poisonings. There were 80 types of compounds identified in this study. Medications were the most frequent substances identified, and the other substances included pesticides, multiple compounds, volatile compounds, natural toxins, and others. The results of this study indicate a need for strengthening the education about and management of the rational and safe use of drugs in Shanghai.

  2. Acute Poisoning in Children in Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Mendonça, Dilton; Menezes, Marta Silva; Matos, Marcos Antônio Almeida; Rebouças, Daniel Santos; Filho, Jucelino Nery da Conceição; de Assis, Reginara Souza; Carneiro, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Acute poisoning is a frequent accident in childhood, particularly in children under 4 years of age. This was a descriptive study with data collected from standardized forms of the Poison Control Center and patient record charts. All the cases of acute poisoning in children aged 0 to 14 years during the period 2008 to 2012 were selected. The variables studied comprised characteristics of the events and toxic agents, clinical development, and outcome. A total of 657 cases of acute poisoning, with higher frequency in the age-group from 1 to 4 years (48.7%) and male sex (53.4%), were recorded. The occurrences were accidental in 92% of the cases, and 5.8% were due to suicide attempts. Among the toxic agents, medications (28.5%), venomous animals (19.3%), nonvenomous animals (10%), household cleaning products (9.0%), and raticide agents (8.7%) predominated. The majority of cases were characterized as light (73.5%) and around 18% required hospitalization, and there was low lethality (0.5%). PMID:27335994

  3. Acute Poisoning in Children in Bahia, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues Mendonça, Dilton; Menezes, Marta Silva; Matos, Marcos Antônio Almeida; Rebouças, Daniel Santos; Filho, Jucelino Nery da Conceição; de Assis, Reginara Souza; Carneiro, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Acute poisoning is a frequent accident in childhood, particularly in children under 4 years of age. This was a descriptive study with data collected from standardized forms of the Poison Control Center and patient record charts. All the cases of acute poisoning in children aged 0 to 14 years during the period 2008 to 2012 were selected. The variables studied comprised characteristics of the events and toxic agents, clinical development, and outcome. A total of 657 cases of acute poisoning, with higher frequency in the age-group from 1 to 4 years (48.7%) and male sex (53.4%), were recorded. The occurrences were accidental in 92% of the cases, and 5.8% were due to suicide attempts. Among the toxic agents, medications (28.5%), venomous animals (19.3%), nonvenomous animals (10%), household cleaning products (9.0%), and raticide agents (8.7%) predominated. The majority of cases were characterized as light (73.5%) and around 18% required hospitalization, and there was low lethality (0.5%). PMID:27335994

  4. Acute Oral Poisoning Due to Chloracetanilide Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Su-Jin; Choi, Sang-Cheon; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young; Song, Ho-Yeon; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2012-01-01

    Chloracetanilide herbicides (alachlor, butachlor, metachlor) are used widely. Although there are much data about chronic low dose exposure to chloracetanilide in humans and animals, there are few data about acute chloracetanilide poisoning in humans. This study investigated the clinical feature of patients following acute oral exposure to chloracetanilide. We retrospectively reviewed the data on the patients who were admitted to two university hospitals from January 2006 to December 2010. Thirty-five patients were enrolled. Among them, 28, 5, and 2 cases of acute alachlor, metachlor, butachlor poisoning were included. The mean age was 49.8 ± 15.4 yr. The poison severity score (PSS) was 17 (48.6%), 10 (28.6%), 5 (14.3%), 2 (5.7%), and 1 (2.9%) patients with a PSS of 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The age was higher for the symptomatic patients (1-4 PSS) than that for the asymptomatic patients (0 PSS) (43.6 ± 15.2 vs 55.7 ± 13.5). The arterial blood HCO3 ¯ was lower in the symptomatic patients (1-4 PSS) than that in the asymptomatic patients (0 PSS). Three patients were a comatous. One patient died 24 hr after the exposure. In conclusion, although chloracetanilide poisoning is usually of low toxicity, elder patients with central nervous system symptoms should be closely monitored and cared after oral exposure. PMID:22323855

  5. Acute oral poisoning due to chloracetanilide herbicides.

    PubMed

    Seok, Su-Jin; Choi, Sang-Cheon; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young; Song, Ho-Yeon; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2012-02-01

    Chloracetanilide herbicides (alachlor, butachlor, metachlor) are used widely. Although there are much data about chronic low dose exposure to chloracetanilide in humans and animals, there are few data about acute chloracetanilide poisoning in humans. This study investigated the clinical feature of patients following acute oral exposure to chloracetanilide. We retrospectively reviewed the data on the patients who were admitted to two university hospitals from January 2006 to December 2010. Thirty-five patients were enrolled. Among them, 28, 5, and 2 cases of acute alachlor, metachlor, butachlor poisoning were included. The mean age was 49.8 ± 15.4 yr. The poison severity score (PSS) was 17 (48.6%), 10 (28.6%), 5 (14.3%), 2 (5.7%), and 1 (2.9%) patients with a PSS of 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The age was higher for the symptomatic patients (1-4 PSS) than that for the asymptomatic patients (0 PSS) (43.6 ± 15.2 vs 55.7 ± 13.5). The arterial blood HCO₃⁻ was lower in the symptomatic patients (1-4 PSS) than that in the asymptomatic patients (0 PSS). Three patients were a comatous. One patient died 24 hr after the exposure. In conclusion, although chloracetanilide poisoning is usually of low toxicity, elder patients with central nervous system symptoms should be closely monitored and cared after oral exposure.

  6. Analysis of 1,000 consecutive cases of acute poisoning in the suburb of Tokyo leading to hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, M; Matsuo, H; Tanaka, J; Yamashita, M

    1996-02-01

    We have analyzed retrospectively 1,000 consecutive admissions due to acute poisonings over 13 years. Total mortality was 27%. Acute poisonings due to pesticides, therapeutic drugs and other substances were 518, 332 and 150 cases with mortalities of 51, 1 and 5%, respectively. The most frequent cause of acute poisoning was paraquat/diquat products, whose mortality reached 76% (220 deaths/291 cases). The second most frequent cause was organophosphate/carbamate products with a mortality of 24% (37/155). When these 2 pesticides are excluded, the mortality was only 3% (15/554). To reduce instances of paraquat/diquat poisoning, dilution of the available product or formulation in other than liquid form would be desirable, because no effective treatment is currently available. In cases of organophosphate/carbamate poisoning, early hospitalization and stabilization is crucial.

  7. [Acute and chronic cadmium poisoning].

    PubMed

    Andujar, P; Bensefa-Colas, L; Descatha, A

    2010-02-01

    Cadmium is a metallic impurity in various minerals. The two main cadmium exposure sources in general population are food and tobacco smoking. Its industrial exploitation has grown in the early twentieth century. Cadmium is used in accumulators or alkaline batteries (80%) and in pigments for paints or plastics (10%), in electrolytic process by deposit or by cadmium plating on metals or to reduce melting points (welding rods...). Cadmium is a cumulative toxic substance whose half-time for elimination is about 20 to 40 years and it is mainly stored in the liver and kidneys. Inhalation of cadmium oxide fumes may cause inhalation fevers or chemical pneumonitis. Cadmium chronic poisoning causes mainly renal tubulopathy and could be the cause of osteomalacia and diffuse osteoporosis. Cadmium is classified as certain carcinogen agent for humans by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The most relevant biological index exposure is the urinary cadmium. According to literature, no chelating agent can be still used in human cadmium poisonings. In France, some diseases caused by occupational exposure to cadmium may be compensated.

  8. [Peripheral neuropathy caused by acute arsenic poisoning].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Campos, J; Ramos-Peek, J; Martínez-Barros, M; Zamora-Peralta, M; Martínez-Cerrato, J

    1998-01-01

    Although peripheral neuropathy is a fairly common finding in chronic arsenic poisoning, little is known about the acute effects of this metal on peripheral nerves. This report shows clinical and electrophysiological findings in a patient who developed peripheral neuropathy only three days after a high-dose ingestion of this metal due to a failed suicide attempt. We speculate that peripheral nerves and some cranial nerves can show not only clinical but also subclinical involvement that can only be detected by neurophysiological studies.

  9. Acute poisoning: understanding 90% of cases in a nutshell

    PubMed Central

    Greene, S; Dargan, P; Jones, A

    2005-01-01

    The acutely poisoned patient remains a common problem facing doctors working in acute medicine in the United Kingdom and worldwide. This review examines the initial management of the acutely poisoned patient. Aspects of general management are reviewed including immediate interventions, investigations, gastrointestinal decontamination techniques, use of antidotes, methods to increase poison elimination, and psychological assessment. More common and serious poisonings caused by paracetamol, salicylates, opioids, tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, benzodiazepines, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and cocaine are discussed in detail. Specific aspects of common paediatric poisonings are reviewed. PMID:15811881

  10. Secondary poisoning of eagles following intentional poisoning of coyotes with anticholinesterase pesticides in western Canada.

    PubMed

    Wobeser, G; Bollinger, T; Leighton, F A; Blakley, B; Mineau, P

    2004-04-01

    Records of eagles, coyotes (Canis latrans), and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) necropsied at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, between 1967 and 2002 were reviewed for cases suggestive of anticholinesterase poisoning. From 1993 to 2002, 54 putative poisoning incidents involving 70 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and 10 golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetus) were identified. Of these, 50 incidents occurred in Saskatchewan, two were in Manitoba, and one occurred in each of Alberta and the Northwest Territories. The diagnosis was confirmed in eight instances by demonstration of pesticide in ingesta from eagles or known use of pesticide at the site together with brain cholinesterase (AChE) reduction of >50% in at least one animal. A presnmptive diagnosis of poisoning was made in 33 incidents based on brain AChE reduction of >50% in at least one animal; 13 incidents were considered suspicious because of circumstantial evidence of the death of eagles in association with other species and limited AChE reduction. Other wild species were found dead in 85% of the incidents involving eagles. Coyotes, foxes, black-billed magpies (Pica pica), and striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) were associated with 34, six, six, and three incidents, respectively. There were eight additional incidents that did not involve eagles in which poisoning was diagnosed in coyotes. Carbofuran was identified in nine incidents. Carbamate poisoning was indicated on the basis of reactivation of brain AChE activity in two additional incidents. Brain AChE activity was not reduced from normal in eagles in four of seven incidents in which carbofuran was identified. The organophosplorous insecticide terbufos was found together with carbofuran in one incident. Brain AChE activity was measured in wild canids and in eagles in 15 incidents; in all of these incidents, brain AChE was redulced by >50% in at least one mammal, whereas this level of reduction occrred in eagles in

  11. Secondary poisoning of eagles following intentional poisoning of coyotes with anticholinesterase pesticides in western Canada.

    PubMed

    Wobeser, G; Bollinger, T; Leighton, F A; Blakley, B; Mineau, P

    2004-04-01

    Records of eagles, coyotes (Canis latrans), and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) necropsied at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, between 1967 and 2002 were reviewed for cases suggestive of anticholinesterase poisoning. From 1993 to 2002, 54 putative poisoning incidents involving 70 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and 10 golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetus) were identified. Of these, 50 incidents occurred in Saskatchewan, two were in Manitoba, and one occurred in each of Alberta and the Northwest Territories. The diagnosis was confirmed in eight instances by demonstration of pesticide in ingesta from eagles or known use of pesticide at the site together with brain cholinesterase (AChE) reduction of >50% in at least one animal. A presnmptive diagnosis of poisoning was made in 33 incidents based on brain AChE reduction of >50% in at least one animal; 13 incidents were considered suspicious because of circumstantial evidence of the death of eagles in association with other species and limited AChE reduction. Other wild species were found dead in 85% of the incidents involving eagles. Coyotes, foxes, black-billed magpies (Pica pica), and striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) were associated with 34, six, six, and three incidents, respectively. There were eight additional incidents that did not involve eagles in which poisoning was diagnosed in coyotes. Carbofuran was identified in nine incidents. Carbamate poisoning was indicated on the basis of reactivation of brain AChE activity in two additional incidents. Brain AChE activity was not reduced from normal in eagles in four of seven incidents in which carbofuran was identified. The organophosplorous insecticide terbufos was found together with carbofuran in one incident. Brain AChE activity was measured in wild canids and in eagles in 15 incidents; in all of these incidents, brain AChE was redulced by >50% in at least one mammal, whereas this level of reduction occrred in eagles in

  12. 75 FR 36654 - Petition from Pesticide Poisoning Victims United; Notice of Availability; Extension of Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... of April 28, 2010 (75 FR 22401) (FRL-8822-8). EPA is hereby extending the comment period, which was... AGENCY Petition from Pesticide Poisoning Victims United; Notice of Availability; Extension of Comment... Pesticide Poisoning Victims United that asks the Agency to undertake a number of actions to...

  13. Unequal Efficacy of Pyridinium Oximes in Acute Organophosphate Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Antonijevic, Biljana; Stojiljkovic, Milos P.

    2007-01-01

    The use of organophosphorus pesticides results in toxicity risk to non-target organisms. Organophosphorus compounds share a common mode of action, exerting their toxic effects primarily via acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. Consequently, acetylcholine accumulates in the synaptic clefts of muscles and nerves, leading to overstimulation of cholinergic receptors. Acute cholinergic crisis immediately follows exposure to organophosphate and includes signs and symptoms resulting from hyperstimulation of central and peripheral muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. The current view of the treatment of organophosphate poisoning includes three strategies, i.e. the use of an anticholinergic drug (e.g., atropine), cholinesterase-reactivating agents (e.g., oximes) and anticonvulsant drugs (e.g., benzodiazepines). Oximes, as a part of antidotal therapy, ensure the recovery of phosphylated enzymes via a process denoted as reactivation of inhibited AChE. However, both experimental results and clinical findings have demonstrated that different oximes are not equally effective against poisonings caused by structurally different organophosphorus compounds. Therefore, antidotal characteristics of conventionally used oximes can be evaluated regarding how close the certain substance is to the theoretical concept of the universal oxime. Pralidoxime (PAM-2), trimedoxime (TMB-4), obidoxime (LüH-6), HI-6 and HLö-7 have all been demonstrated to be very effective in experimental poisonings with sarin and VX. TMB-4 and LüH-6 may reactivate tabun-inhibited AChE, whereas HI-6 possesses the ability to reactivate the soman-inhibited enzyme. An oxime HLö-7 seems to be an efficient reactivator of AChE inhibited by any of the four organophosphorus warfare agents. According to the available literature, the oximes LüH-6 and TMB-4, although relatively toxic, are the most potent to induce reactivation of AChE inhibited by the majority of organophosphorus pesticides. Since there are no reports of

  14. Immunotherapy in acute arsenic poisoning.

    PubMed

    Leikin, J B; Goldman-Leikin, R E; Evans, M A; Wiener, S; Hryhorczuk, D O

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the use of immunotherapy on the treatment of sodium arsenite toxicity. Female balb/c mice injected with arsanilic acid conjugated to a carrier protein (ovalbumin) were shown to produce antibodies (arsenic reactive serum, ARS) reactive with arsanilic acid and sodium arsenite. Serum was tested for anti-ARS antibodies using a solid phase radioimmunoassay. The antisera bound to ARS conjugated to the synthetic copolymer glutamic acid60 tyrosine30 when diluted as high as 1:4096. Following multiple injections of 100 micrograms of arsanilic acid--ovalbumin compound, mortality on injection with sodium arsenite 0.87 mg/kg i.p. one week later decreased to 0 deaths in 22 pretreated mice vs 9 deaths in 29 untreated mice (31% mortality; p less than .005). No decrease in mortality was noted at higher challenges (1.15 mg/kg) of sodium arsenite. Antisera from pretreated mice was injected 0.1 cc i.p. into 12 week old female balb/c mice followed by an injection of sodium arsenite 0.87 mg/kg i.p. at 10 minutes. Again a protective effect was observed with 0 deaths in 18 mice vs eight deaths in 21 mice (38%; p less than .005). Seventeen additional mice were given an injection of 0.87 mg/kg i.p. of sodium arsenite. After 30 minutes, all mice became symptomatic whereupon antisera 0.1 cc i.p. was given. The one day mortality (2/17, 12%) was possibly lower than the combined control mortality (17/50, 34%; p less than 0.07). There was no change in mortality noted when antisera was administered to mice acutely exposed to 5 mg/kg HgCl2.

  15. Acute iron poisoning. Rescue with macromolecular chelators.

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, J R; Hallaway, P E; Hedlund, B E; Eaton, J W

    1989-01-01

    Acute iron intoxication is a frequent, sometimes life-threatening, form of poisoning. Present therapy, in severe cases, includes oral and intravenous administration of the potent iron chelator, deferoxamine. Unfortunately, high dose intravenous deferoxamine causes acute hypotension additive with that engendered by the iron poisoning itself. To obviate this problem, we have covalently attached deferoxamine to high molecular weight carbohydrates such as dextran and hydroxyethyl starch. These macromolecular forms of deferoxamine do not cause detectable decreases in blood pressure of experimental animals, even when administered intravenously in very large doses, and persist in circulation much longer than the free drug. These novel iron-chelating substances, but not deferoxamine itself, will prevent mortality from otherwise lethal doses of iron administered to mice either orally or intraperitoneally. Further reflecting this enhanced therapeutic efficacy, the high molecular weight iron chelators also abrogate iron-mediated hepatotoxicity, suppressing the release of alanine aminotransferase. We conclude that high molecular weight derivatives of deferoxamine hold promise for the effective therapy of acute iron intoxication and may also be useful in other clinical circumstances in which control of free, reactive iron is therapeutically desirable. PMID:2794068

  16. Acute adult poisoning cases admitted to a university hospital in Tabriz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Islambulchilar, M; Islambulchilar, Z; Kargar-Maher, M H

    2009-04-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the etiological and demographical characteristics of acute adult poisoning cases admitted to a university hospital in Tabriz, Iran. This retrospective study was performed on 1342 poisoning admissions to a university hospital from 2003 to 2005, by data collection from the medical records of patients. Poisonings were 5.40% of the total admissions. There was a predominance of female patients (55.7%) compared to male patients (44.3%) with a female-to-male ratio of 1.2:1. Most poisonings occurred in the age range of 11-20 years (38.9%). Drugs were the most common cause of poisonings (60.8%). Among the drug poisonings, benzodiazepines (40.31%) were the most frequent agents, followed by antidepressants (31.98%). The seasonal distribution in poisoning patients suggested a peak in spring (28%) and summer (27.5%). In 9.8% of cases accidental and in 90.2% intentional poisonings were evident. Most suicide attempts were made by women (58.51%) and unmarried people (51.4%).The mean duration of hospitalization was 3.02 +/- 2.8 days. There were 28 (2.3%) deaths; the majority (13 cases) was due to pesticides. This was a university hospital-based study, so these results may not be representative of the general population. Despite this drawback, these data still provide important information on the characteristics of the poisoning in this part of Iran. To prevent such poisonings, the community education about the danger of central nervous system-acting drugs and reducing the exposure period of people to pesticides are recommended. PMID:19734268

  17. Acute Pancreatitis Caused By Mushroom Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Karahan, Samet; Erden, Abdulsamet; Cetinkaya, Ali; Avci, Deniz; Ortakoyluoglu, Adile Irfan; Karagoz, Hatice; Bulut, Kadir; Basak, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Of the more than 5000 species of mushrooms known, 100 types are toxic and approximately 10% of these toxic types can cause fatal toxicity. A type of mushroom called Amanita phalloides is responsible for 95% of toxic mushroom poisonings. In this article, we report 2 cases of mushroom poisonings caused by Lactarius volemus, known as Tirmit by the local people. The patient and his wife were admitted to the emergency room with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting 20 hours after consuming Lactarius volemus, an edible type of mushroom. The patients reported that they had been collecting this mushroom from the mountains and eating them for several years but had never developed any clinicopathology to date. Further examination of the patients revealed a very rare case of acute pancreatitis due to mushroom intoxication. The male patient was admitted to the intensive care unit while his wife was followed in the internal medicine service, because of her relative mild clinical symptoms. Both patients recovered without sequelae and were discharged. In this article, we aimed to emphasize that gastrointestinal symptoms are often observed in mushroom intoxications and can be confused with acute pancreatitis, thus leading to misdiagnosis of patients. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can improve patients’ prognosis and prevent the development of complications. PMID:26835473

  18. Glyphosate poisoning with acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Darshana Sudip; Khot, Rajashree; Joshi, P P; Pandharipande, Madhuri; Nagpure, Keshav

    2014-01-01

    GlySH-surfactant herbicide (GlySH), one of the most commonly used herbicides worldwide, has been considered as minimally toxic to humans. However, clinical toxicologists occasionally encounter cases of severe systemic toxicity. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) states that 'GlySH' is of relatively low oral and acute dermal toxicity. It does not have anticholinesterase effect and no organophosphate-like central nervous system (CNS) effects. The clinical features range from skin and throat irritation to hypotension and death. Severe GlySH-surfactant poisoning is manifested by gastroenteritis, respiratory disturbances, altered mental status, hypotension refractory to the treatment, renal failure, and shock.[1] GlySH intoxication has a case fatality rate 3.2-29.3%. Pulmonary toxicity and renal toxicity seem to be responsible for mortality. Metabolic acidosis, abnormal chest X-ray, arrhythmias, and elevated serum creatinine levels are useful prognostic factors for predicting GlySH mortality.[2] There is no antidote and the mainstay of treatment for systemic toxicity is decontamination and aggressive supportive therapy. We report a case of acute pulmonary edema, which is a rare but severe manifestation of oral GlySH poisoning, where patient survived with aggressive supportive therapy. PMID:25948977

  19. Increased Risk of Dementia in Patients With Acute Organophosphate and Carbamate Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiun-Nong; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Lai, Chung-Hsu; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Yang, Chih-Hui; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate (CM) are the most commonly used pesticides against insects. Little is known regarding the relationship between dementia and acute OP and CM poisoning. A nationwide population-based cohort study was conducted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. The incidence and relative risk of dementia were assessed in patients hospitalized for acute OP and CM poisoning from 2000 to 2011. The comparison cohort was matched with the poisoned cohort at a 4:1 ratio based on age, sex, and the year of hospitalization. During the follow-up period, the incidence of dementia was 29.4 per 10,000 person-years in the poisoned group, and represented a 1.98-fold increased risk of dementia compared with the control cohort (95% confidence interval, 1.59–2.47). This study provides evidence on the association between dementia and acute OP and CM poisoning. Regular follow-up of poisoned patients for dementia is suggested. PMID:26200627

  20. Pesticide poisoning and neurobehavioral function among farm workers in Jiangsu, People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xujun; Wu, Ming; Yao, Hongyan; Yang, Yaming; Cui, Mengjing; Tu, Zhibin; Stallones, Lorann; Xiang, Huiyun

    2016-01-01

    Pesticides remain an integral part of agricultural activities worldwide. Although there have been a number of studies over the last two decades concerning the adverse effects of pesticide poisoning and chronic long term exposures on neurobehavioral function, the impact of recent pesticide poisoning and long term pesticide exposure on neurobehavioral function in Chinese farm workers has not been reported. China is the largest user of pesticides worldwide and figures suggest 53,300-123,000 Chinese people are poisoned every year. A case control study was conducted to examine the impact of recent pesticide poisoning on neurobehavioral function and the relationship between years worked in agriculture and lower performance on neurobehavioral tests. A total of 121 farm workers who self-reported recent pesticide poisonings within the previous 12 months (case group) and 80 farm workers who reported no pesticide poisoning in the previous 12 months (control group) were recruited from three areas of Jiangsu Province, China. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommended neurobehavioral core test battery (NCTB) was used to assess neurobehavioral functioning among cases and controls. Student's t tests and two-way covariance analysis (ANCOVA) were used to test for significant differences in the neurobehavioral test results between the groups. Scores on the Profile of Mood States (POMS) in the recently poisoned group were significantly higher for anger-hostility, depression-dejection, tension-anxiety and lower for vigor-activity compared to controls (p < .05). Digit span, digit symbol, Benton visual retention and pursuit aiming scores were all significantly lower among the recently poisoned group compared to the controls (p < .05). Two-way ANCOVA indicated significantly lower performance in correct pursuit aiming and higher error pursuit aiming amongst the recently poisoned group and those who had worked for more than 30 years in agriculture (p < .05). These findings provide

  1. [Early onset of torsades de Pointes and elevated levels of serum troponin I due to acute arsenic poisoning].

    PubMed

    Ortega Carnicer, J; Ruiz Lorenzo, F; Mañas García, D; Ceres Alabau, F

    2006-03-01

    Most cases of acute arsenic poisoning occur through accidental or voluntary ingestion of pesticides or insecticides, and all body systems are affected. Arsenic can prolong the QT interval and lead to torsades of Pointes, a crucial type of arrhythmia characteristic of such QT interval prolongation. In our revision of the literature, there have been found only 5 cases of torsades of Pointes due to acute arsenic poisoning. Recently, there have been published four additional cases in patients with refractory or recurrent acute promyelocytic leukemia being treated with arsenic trioxide. In all nine cases, torsades of pointes appeared slowly after poisoning. Herein is described a case of acute arsenic poisoning which led to an early onset of torsades of Pointes, hypopotasemia and high levels of serum troponin I.

  2. Arsenic pesticides and environmental pollution: exposure, poisoning, hazards and recommendations.

    PubMed

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Mohammad, Amina El-Hosini; Morsy, Tosson A

    2013-08-01

    Arsenic is a metalloid element. Acute high-dose exposure to arsenic can cause severe systemic toxicity and death. Lower dose chronic arsenic exposure can result in subacute toxicity that can include peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy, skin eruptions, and hepatotoxicity. Long-term effects of arsenic exposure include an in Due to the physiologic effects of the arsenic on all body systems, thus, chronic arsenic-poisoned patient is a major nursing challenge. The critical care nurse provides valuable assessment and interventions that prevent major multisystem complications from arsenic toxicity.

  3. The role of private pesticide vendors in preventing access to pesticides for self-poisoning in rural Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Weerasinghe, Manjula; Pearson, Melissa; Peiris, Ravi; Dawson, Andrew H; Eddleston, Michael; Jayamanne, Shaluka; Agampodi, Suneth; Konradsen, Flemming

    2014-04-01

    In 15% to 20% of self-poisoning cases, the pesticides used are purchased from shops just prior to ingestion. We explored how pesticide vendors interacted with customers at risk of self-poisoning to identify interventions to prevent such poisonings. Two strategies were specifically discussed: selling pesticides only to farmers bearing identity cards or customers bearing pesticide 'prescriptions'. Vendors reported refusing to sell pesticides to people thought to be at risk of self-poisoning, but acknowledged the difficulty of distinguishing them from legitimate customers; vendors also stated they did want to help to improve identification of such customers. The community did not blame vendors when pesticides used for self-poison were purchased from their shops. Vendors have already taken steps to restrict access, including selling low toxic products, counselling and asking customer to return the next day. However, there was little support for the proposed interventions of 'identity cards' and 'prescriptions'. Novel public health approaches are required to complement this approach.

  4. Community uptake of safe storage boxes to reduce self-poisoning from pesticides in rural Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Konradsen, Flemming; Pieris, Ravi; Weerasinghe, Manjula; van der Hoek, Wim; Eddleston, Michael; Dawson, Andrew H

    2007-01-01

    Background Acute poisoning by agricultural pesticides is a well established global public health problem. Keeping pesticides under safe storage is now promoted as a potential way to reduce the number of severe poisoning cases. However, there have been no published studies documenting the feasibility of such an approach. Therefore, the objective of the study presented here was to determine community perceptions and use of in-house safe storage boxes for pesticides in rural Sri Lanka. Methods Boxes with a lock, to be used for the in-house safe storage of pesticides, were distributed to 200 randomly selected farming households in two agricultural communities. A baseline survey determined pesticide storage practices and household characteristics prior to distribution. The selected households were encouraged to make use of the box at community meetings and during a single visit to each household one month after distribution. No further encouragement was offered. A follow-up survey assessed storage practices seven months into the project. Results Following the distribution of the boxes the community identified a number of benefits including the protection of pesticide containers against exposure from the rain and sun and a reduced risk of theft. Data were analysed for 172 households that reported agricultural use of pesticides at follow-up. Of these, 141 (82%) kept pesticides in the house under lock against 3 (2%) at baseline. As expected, the distribution of boxes significantly reduced the number of households storing pesticides in the field, from 79 (46%) at baseline to 4 (2%) at follow-up. There was a significant increase in the number of households keeping pesticides safe from children between baseline (64%) and seven months after the distribution of boxes (89%). The same was true for adults although less pronounced with 51% at baseline and 66% at follow-up. Conclusion The farming community appreciated the storage boxes and made storage of pesticides safer

  5. [Acute poisoning from arsenous anhydride ingestion. A clinical case].

    PubMed

    Marcovigi, P; Calbi, G; Valtancoli, E; Calbi, P

    1993-06-01

    A clinical case of acute poisoning after ingestion of arsenic trioxide is reported. We have, in particular, underlined the importance of identification of arsenic in faeces and urine for diagnosis and therapy.

  6. Serum Metabolomics in Rats after Acute Paraquat Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyi; Ma, Jianshe; Zhang, Meiling; Wen, Congcong; Huang, Xueli; Sun, Fa; Wang, Shuanghu; Hu, Lufeng; Lin, Guanyang; Wang, Xianqin

    2015-01-01

    Paraquat is one of the most widely used herbicides in the world and is highly toxic to humans and animals. In this study, we developed a serum metabolomic method based on GC/MS to evaluate the effects of acute paraquat poisoning on rats. Pattern recognition analysis, including both principal component analysis and partial least squares-discriminate analysis revealed that acute paraquat poisoning induced metabolic perturbations. Compared with the control group, the level of octadecanoic acid, L-serine, L-threonine, L-valine, and glycerol in the acute paraquat poisoning group (36 mg/kg) increased, while the levels of hexadecanoic acid, D-galactose, and decanoic acid decreased. These findings provide an overview of systematic responses to paraquat exposure and metabolomic insight into the toxicological mechanism of paraquat. Our results indicate that metabolomic methods based on GC/MS may be useful to elucidate the mechanism of acute paraquat poisoning through the exploration of biomarkers. PMID:26133715

  7. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning alters hemorheological parameters in human.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Baris; Arihan, Okan; Coskun, Figen; Dikmenoglu-Falkmarken, Neslihan H

    2016-01-01

    Acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning seriously hinders oxygen delivery to tissues. This harmful effect of CO may be aggravated by accompanying changes in the viscosity of blood. We had previously reported increased plasma viscosity in people chronically exposed to CO. This study was planned to test our hypothesis that acute CO poisoning increases blood viscosity. For this purpose four main parameters contributing to blood viscosity - hematocrit, erythrocyte deformability, erythrocyte aggregation and plasma viscosity - were determined in patients with acute CO poisoning and compared with healthy controls. Plasma viscosity and erythrocyte aggregation tendency were lower in the CO group (p <  0.05). Erythrocyte deformability was also lower in CO group (p <  0.05). Our results indicate that acute CO poisoning has diverse effects on hemorheological parameters such as attenuating hematocrit value, plasma viscosity, erythrocyte aggregation tendency and erythrocyte deformability.

  8. Carbon monoxide poisoning and nonoliguric acute renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Bessoudo, R.; Gray, J.

    1978-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning in a 37-year-old man was complicated by neurologic damage, skin changes, muscle necrosis and nonoliguric renal failure. The relation between nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure in carbon monoxide poisoning is reviewed. Recognition of the acute renal failure in such cases is important, for this complication can be fatal; the prognosis is excellent, however, if proper medical management is provided. PMID:679099

  9. Acute poisonings and sudden deaths in Crete: a five-year review (1991-1996).

    PubMed

    Christakis-Hampsas, M; Tutudakis, M; Tsatsakis, A M; Assithianakis, P; Alegakis, A; Katonis, P G; Michalodimitrakis, E N

    1998-08-01

    Fatal and non-fatal acute poisonings and other sudden deaths examined in the Toxicology Laboratory of University Hospital of Iraklion, Crete, from 1991 to 1996 mainly involved the abuse of drugs (heroin, flunitrazepam and other psychoactive substances), accidental poisonings or suicide attempts with pesticides (carbamates, organophosphates, paraquat), other chemicals (cyanide salts, paint thinner, chlorine), traffic accidents, drownings and violent deaths (gunshots). Many of the cases were related to poisonous gases or volatiles (carbon monoxide, methylbromide). Fatalities due to alcohol and methylene-dioxy-ethyl amphetamine were also examined. Amphetamine and alcohol-related deaths due to drowning were more recent. A significant number of cases were related to the accidental ingestion of alcohol, drugs or suicide attempts by children. Some of the cases were treated successfully in various Cretan hospitals, while others had fatal outcomes due to late hospital admission. PMID:9682411

  10. Acute abdominal pain and constipation due to lead poisoning.

    PubMed

    Mongolu, S; Sharp, P

    2013-01-01

    Although uncommon, lead poisoning should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases of unexplained acute abdominal pain in both adults and children. We present the case of a 35-year-old Asian male who presented with abdominal pain and constipation secondary to lead poisoning. Initially, the source of lead exposure was not apparent; this was later found to be due to ingestion of an Ayurvedic herbal medicine for the treatment of infertility. Lead poisoning due to the ingestion of Ayurvedic remedies is well described. We discuss the diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of lead poisoning. This case illustrates one of the rarer medical causes of acute abdominal pain and emphasizes the need to take a thorough history (including specific questioning regarding the use of over-the-counter and traditional/ herbal remedies) in cases of suspected poisoning or drug toxicity.

  11. Acute Poisonings Admitted to a Tertiary Level Intensive Care Unit in Northern India: Patient Profile and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, Ashu Sara; Pannu, Aman; Arora, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Background Poisoning is becoming a real health care burden for developing countries like India. An improved knowledge of the patterns of poisonings, as well as the clinical course and outcomes of these cases can help to formulate better preventive and management strategies. Aim To study the demographic and clinical profiles of patients admitted to the ICU with acute poisoning and to study the factors that predict their mortality. Materials and Methods Retrospective two years (September 1, 2010 to August 31, 2012) study of all consecutive patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with acute poisoning at a tertiary care hospital in Northern India. Results Out of the 67 patients admitted to the ICU during the study period, the majority were young (median age 29 years) males (69%) who had consumed poison intentionally. Pesticides were the most commonly employed poison, notably organophosphorus compounds (22 patients, 32.8%) and aluminium phosphide (14 patients, 20.9%). While the overall mortality from all poisonings was low (18%), aluminium phosphide was highly toxic, with a mortality rate of 35%. The factors at ICU admission that were found to be associated with a significant risk of death were, high APACHE II and SOFA scores (p =0.0001 and p=0.006, respectively), as well as the need for mechanical ventilation and drugs for vasoactive support (p=0.012 and p= 0.0001, respectively). Conclusion Use of pesticides for intentional poisoning continues to be rampant in Northern India, with many patients presenting in a critical condition to tertiary level hospitals. Pesticide regulations laws, educational awareness, counseling and poison information centers will help to curtail this public health problem. PMID:26557594

  12. Acute tramadol poisoning and its clinical and laboratory findings

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Soltaninejad, Kambiz; Shadnia, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tramadol is a centrally acting analgesic with opioid and nonopioid properties, which extensively used in the relief of mild to moderate pain. Tramadol poisoning is a common cause of acute pharmaceutical poisoning in Iran. There are a few studies about clinical and laboratory findings related to acute tramadol poisoning. Therefore, the aim of this study was to demonstrate the clinical and laboratory findings in tramadol acute poisoning cases. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective descriptive study of patients with acute tramadol poisoning who referred to Loghman Hakim Hospital Poison Center during January to April 2012. Data such as patient's age, sex, time of ingestion, ingested dose, cause of poisoning, mean duration of hospitalization, patient's clinical presentations, laboratory findings, therapeutic measures, and patient's outcome have collected in a predesigned checklist. Results: A total of 144 patients including 111 men (77%) and 33 women (23%) with acute tramadol poisoning was included in this study. The mean ingested dose was 1971.2 mg (100-20000 mg). Seizure (47.91%) was the most frequent clinical symptom. Blood gas on admission showed pH (7.3 ± 0.1), PCO2 (49.7 ± 8.6 mmHg) and HCO3− (24.1 ± 3.8 mEq/L), indicating pure acute respiratory acidosis may be occurred in tramadol-intoxicated patients. There were significant differences between tramadol-intoxicated cases with and without a seizure with regard to the time interval between ingestion and admission on hospital, ingested dose and PCO2. Conclusion: Seizure and rise of PCO2 were the most findings in this study. PMID:25535500

  13. Treatment of acute carbon monoxide poisoning with induced hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Byoung-Joon; Im, Yong-Gyun; Park, Eunjung; Min, Young-Gi; Choi, Sang-Cheon

    2016-01-01

    Objective The effect of induced hypothermia on severe acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning remains to be addressed further. We investigated the effect of induced hypothermia on severe acute CO poisoning. Methods Retrospective chart review was conducted for patients who diagnosed as severe acute CO poisoning in emergency department and underwent induced hypothermia from May 2013 to May 2014. Hospital courses with critical medication and major laboratory results were investigated through the chart review. Results Among total 227 patients with acute CO poisoning during the period of study, patients with severe acute CO poisoning were 15. All patients underwent induced hypothermia with a temperature goal 33°C. Initial and follow-up levels of S100B protein after induced hypothermia were 0.47 μg/L (interquartile range, 0.11 to 0.71) and 0.10 μg/L (interquartile range, 0.06 to 0.37), respectively (P = 0.01). The mean Glasgow Coma Scales at emergency department admission was 6.87 ± 3.36. Except 1 patient who expired after cardiopulmonary resuscitation, Glasgow Coma Scales at 30-day of hospital discharge were 15 in 10 patients (71.4%), 14 in 1 patient (7.1%), 13 in 1 patient (7.1%), and 6 in 2 patients (14.2%). Seven patients (46.7%) developed delayed neurologic sequelae. Four patients showed mild types of delayed neurologic sequelae and 3 showed moderate to severe types of delayed neurologic sequelae. Conclusion Most of patients underwent induced hypothermia had a good recovery from severe acute CO poisoning. Therefore, induced hypothermia may be considered as a possible treatment in severe acute CO poisoning. PMID:27752625

  14. Respiratory failure of acute organophosphate and carbamate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Tsao, T C; Juang, Y C; Lan, R S; Shieh, W B; Lee, C H

    1990-09-01

    Respiratory failure (RF) developed in 43 (40.2 percent) of 107 patients with acute organophosphate or carbamate poisoning; 22 (51.2 percent) died. The 64 patients who did not develop RF survived. All cases of RF developed within 96 hours after poisoning: within 24 hours in 35 patients (acute onset) and between 24 and 96 hours in eight patients (subacute onset). Severity of poisoning was the primary determinating factor for RF. Cardiovascular collapse and pneumonia were also associated with RF. In 19 patients with cardiovascular collapse, 17 had acute onset of RF and two had subacute onset. In 28 patients with pneumonia, 17 developed acute onset of RF and eight developed subacute onset. No organophosphorus compound caused RF more frequently than another. The duration of ventilator support for subacute RF was significantly longer than for acute RF (287 +/- 186 vs 115 +/- 103 hours, p = 0.02). The use of pralidoxime did not reduce the incidence of RF. We found that severity of poisoning, cardiovascular collapse, and pneumonia were the predisposing factors to RF. The golden time for treatment of acute organophosphate or carbamate poisoning was the initial 96 hours. No RF occurred after this time. Aggressive treatment and prevention of the above three factors will reduce the incidence of RF, or in other words, reduce the mortality.

  15. Organophosphate Poisoning and Subsequent Acute Kidney Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Feng-You; Chen, Wei-Kung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lai, Ching-Yuan; Wu, Yung-Shun; Lin, I-Ching; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Small numbers of the papers have studied the association between organophosphate (OP) poisoning and the subsequent acute kidney injury (AKI). Therefore, we used the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) to study whether patients with OP poisoning are associated with a higher risk to have subsequent AKI. The retrospective cohort study comprised patients aged ≥20 years with OP poisoning and hospitalized diagnosis during 2000–2011 (N = 8924). Each OP poisoning patient was frequency-matched to 4 control patients based on age, sex, index year, and comorbidities of diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary artery disease, and stroke (N = 35,696). We conducted Cox proportional hazard regression analysis to estimate the effects of OP poisoning on AKI risk. The overall incidence of AKI was higher in the patients with OP poisoning than in the controls (4.85 vs 3.47/1000 person-years). After adjustment for age, sex, comorbidity, and interaction terms, patients with OP poisoning were associated with a 6.17-fold higher risk of AKI compared with the comparison cohort. Patients with highly severe OP poisoning were associated with a substantially increased risk of AKI. The study found OP poisoning is associated with increased risk of subsequent AKI. Future studies are encouraged to evaluate whether long-term effects exist and the best guideline to prevent the continuously impaired renal function. PMID:26632728

  16. Effects of a provincial ban of two toxic organophosphorus insecticides on pesticide poisoning hospital admissions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background. Pesticide self-poisoning causes one third of global suicides. Sri Lanka halved its suicide rate by banning WHO Class I organophosphorus (OP) insecticides and then endosulfan. However, poisoning with Class II toxicity OPs, particularly dimethoate and fenthion, remains a problem. We aimed to determine the effect and feasibility of a ban of the two insecticides in one Sri Lankan district. Methods. Sale was banned in June 2003 in most of Polonnaruwa District, but not Anuradhapura District. Admissions with pesticide poisoning to the district general hospitals was prospectively recorded from 2002. Results. Hospital admissions for dimethoate and fenthion poisoning fell by 43% after the ban in Polonnaruwa, while increasing by 23% in Anuradhapura. The pesticide case fatality fell from 14.4% to 9.0% in Polonnaruwa (odds ratio [OR] 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.41–0.84) and 11.3% to 10.6% in Anuradhapura (OR 0.93, 95%CI 0.70–1.25; p = 0.051). This reduction was not sustained, with case fatality in Polonnaruwa rising to 12.1% in 2006–2007. Further data analysis indicated that the fall in case fatality had actually been due to a coincidental reduction in case fatality for pesticide poisoning overall, in particular for paraquat poisoning. Conclusions. We found that the insecticides could be effectively banned from agricultural practice, as shown by the fall in hospital admissions, with few negative consequences. However, the ban had only a minor effect on pesticide poisoning deaths because it was too narrow. A study assessing the agricultural and health effects of a more comprehensive ban of highly toxic pesticides is necessary to determine the balance between increased costs of agriculture and reduced health care costs and fewer deaths. PMID:22372788

  17. Acute Pesticide Illnesses Associated with Off-Target Pesticide Drift from Agricultural Applications: 11 States, 1998–2006

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo-Jeong; Mehler, Louise; Beckman, John; Diebolt-Brown, Brienne; Prado, Joanne; Lackovic, Michelle; Waltz, Justin; Mulay, Prakash; Schwartz, Abby; Mitchell, Yvette; Moraga-McHaley, Stephanie; Gergely, Rita

    2011-01-01

    Background: Pesticides are widely used in agriculture, and off-target pesticide drift exposes workers and the public to harmful chemicals. Objective: We estimated the incidence of acute illnesses from pesticide drift from outdoor agricultural applications and characterized drift exposure and illnesses. Methods: Data were obtained from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s Sentinel Event Notification System for Occupational Risks–Pesticides program and the California Department of Pesticide Regulation. Drift included off-target movement of pesticide spray, volatiles, and contaminated dust. Acute illness cases were characterized by demographics, pesticide and application variables, health effects, and contributing factors. Results: From 1998 through 2006, we identified 2,945 cases associated with agricultural pesticide drift from 11 states. Our findings indicate that 47% were exposed at work, 92% experienced low-severity illness, and 14% were children (< 15 years). The annual incidence ranged from 1.39 to 5.32 per million persons over the 9-year period. The overall incidence (in million person-years) was 114.3 for agricultural workers, 0.79 for other workers, 1.56 for nonoccupational cases, and 42.2 for residents in five agriculture-intensive counties in California. Soil applications with fumigants were responsible for the largest percentage (45%) of cases. Aerial applications accounted for 24% of cases. Common factors contributing to drift cases included weather conditions, improper seal of the fumigation site, and applicator carelessness near nontarget areas. Conclusions: Agricultural workers and residents in agricultural regions had the highest rate of pesticide poisoning from drift exposure, and soil fumigations were a major hazard, causing large drift incidents. Our findings highlight areas where interventions to reduce off-target drift could be focused. PMID:21642048

  18. The global distribution of fatal pesticide self-poisoning: Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gunnell, David; Eddleston, Michael; Phillips, Michael R; Konradsen, Flemming

    2007-01-01

    Background Evidence is accumulating that pesticide self-poisoning is one of the most commonly used methods of suicide worldwide, but the magnitude of the problem and the global distribution of these deaths is unknown. Methods We have systematically reviewed the worldwide literature to estimate the number of pesticide suicides in each of the World Health Organisation's six regions and the global burden of fatal self-poisoning with pesticides. We used the following data sources: Medline, EMBASE and psycINFO (1990–2007), papers cited in publications retrieved, the worldwide web (using Google) and our personal collections of papers and books. Our aim was to identify papers enabling us to estimate the proportion of a country's suicides due to pesticide self-poisoning. Results We conservatively estimate that there are 258,234 (plausible range 233,997 to 325,907) deaths from pesticide self-poisoning worldwide each year, accounting for 30% (range 27% to 37%) of suicides globally. Official data from India probably underestimate the incidence of suicides; applying evidence-based corrections to India's official data, our estimate for world suicides using pesticides increases to 371,594 (range 347,357 to 439,267). The proportion of all suicides using pesticides varies from 4% in the European Region to over 50% in the Western Pacific Region but this proportion is not concordant with the volume of pesticides sold in each region; it is the pattern of pesticide use and the toxicity of the products, not the quantity used, that influences the likelihood they will be used in acts of fatal self-harm. Conclusion Pesticide self-poisoning accounts for about one-third of the world's suicides. Epidemiological and toxicological data suggest that many of these deaths might be prevented if (a) the use of pesticides most toxic to humans was restricted, (b) pesticides could be safely stored in rural communities, and (c) the accessibility and quality of care for poisoning could be improved

  19. [Neurological and psychiatric disorders following acute arsine poisoning (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Frank, G

    1976-07-15

    Follow-up study of 6 workers, who after survival of an acute arsine poisoning, developed psychopathologic and neurologic abnormalities. The symptoms appeared after a latency of 1 to 6 months indicating a toxic polyneuropathy and a mild psycho-organic syndrome. The severity of these reversible manifestations was directly related to the period of time of exposure to arsine. The clinical picture of arsine polyneuropathy was similar to that observed in arsenic poisoning, suggesting that arsine polyneuropathy is due to the action of arsenic. The psychopathologic syndrome corresponds to the so-called "Vergiftungsspätfolgesyndrom" and therefore does not appear to be a specific sequel of arsine poisoning.

  20. Relationship Between Acute Benzodiazepine Poisoning and Acute Pancreatitis Risk: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Geng-Wang; Hung, Dong-Zong; Chen, Wei-Kung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, I-Ching; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-12-01

    We designed a population-based retrospective cohort study to investigate the association between the event of benzodiazepine (BZD) poisoning and the risk of acute pancreatitis.In the present study, 12,893 patients with BZD poisoning during 2000 to 2011 were enrolled and matched with 4 comparison patients according to mean age and sex. We determined the cumulative incidences and adjusted hazard ratios of acute pancreatitis.A significant association was observed between BZD poisoning and acute pancreatitis. After adjustment for potential risk factors, the patients with BZD poisoning had a 5.33-fold increased risk of acute pancreatitis compared with the controls without BZD poisoning (HR = 5.33, 95% CI = 2.26-12.60). The results revealed that acute pancreatitis in patients with BZD poisoning occurred in a follow-up time of ≤1 month (HR = 50.0, P < .001), and the risk of acute pancreatitis was no different between the patients with and without BZD poisoning when the follow-up time was >1 month (HR = 1.07, P > .05).This population-based study revealed the positive correlation between the event of BZD poisoning and an increased risk of acute pancreatitis. The findings warrant further large-scale and in-depth investigation.

  1. [Acute cyanide poisoning in an infant].

    PubMed

    Haasnoot, K; van Vught, A J; Meulenbelt, J; Bergman, L R

    1989-09-01

    An infant of 9 months was admitted to hospital in comatose condition; cyanide poisoning was suspected. This poisoning was caused by the desorption of hydrocyanic acid from building materials after the house had been fumigated with hydrocyanic acid under strict supervision and observed safety measures. Administration of 4-dimethyl-aminophenol, a methaemoglobin inducer, and sodium thiosulphate together with supportive measures, led to complete recovery of the infant, although the general hypotony persisted for a few weeks. PMID:2797290

  2. Acute Plant Poisoning and Antitoxin Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Eddleston, Michael; Persson, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Plant poisoning is normally a problem of young children who unintentionally ingest small quantities of toxic plants with little resulting morbidity and few deaths. In some regions of the world, however, plants are important clinical problems causing much morbidity and mortality. While deaths do occur after unintentional poisoning with plants such as Atractylis gummifera (bird-lime or blue thistle) and Blighia sapida (ackee tree), the majority of deaths globally occur following intentional self-poisoning with plants such as Thevetia peruviana (yellow oleander) and Cerbera manghas (pink-eyed cerbera or sea mango). Antitoxins developed against colchicine and cardiac glycosides would be useful for plant poisonings - anti-digoxin Fab fragments have been shown to be highly effective in T. peruviana poisoning. Unfortunately, their great cost limits their use in the developing world where they would make a major difference in patient management. Therapy for some other plant poisonings might also benefit from the development of antitoxins. However, until issues of cost and supply are worked out, plant anti-toxins are going to remain a dream in many of the areas where they are now urgently required. PMID:12807314

  3. Poisoning of animals in the Los Angeles area with pesticides during 1977.

    PubMed

    Maddy, K T; Winter, J

    1980-12-01

    During 1977, there were 289 pesticide exposure incidents involving animals that were handled by the Thomas J. Fleming Memorial Poison Information Center in Los Angeles. Almost all of this service was provided to veterinarians and most of the incidents involved dogs. Cases handled by this center are considered typical for small animal practices in urban areas of California. Ingestion was the major route of exposure. As recently as 10 years ago, arsenic, strychnine, and phosphorus were major causes of such poisonings. During 1977, the n-methylcarbamates (27%), anticoagulants (19%), and organo-phosphates (15%) were the major pesticides involved in exposure incidents. Lesser percentages of cases attributed to a specific chemical included: Vacor (5%), metaldehyde (4%), chlorinated hydrocarbons (4%), and arsenicals (4%). A variety of other pesticides, classified as miscellaneous, were also involved in poisonings to a lesser extent.

  4. Confirmed organophosphorus and carbamate pesticide poisonings in South African wildlife (2009-2014).

    PubMed

    Botha, Christo J; Coetser, Heleen; Labuschagne, Leonie; Basson, Andre

    2015-01-01

    During a six-year period (from January 2009 to December 2014), specimens collected from 344 cases of suspected organophosphorus and carbamate pesticide poisonings in wildlife, including birds, were submitted to the Toxicology Laboratory (ARC-OVI) for analysis. A positive diagnosis was made in 135 (39%) of these cases. The majority of cases were from birds, which included Cape vultures (Gyps coprotheres) and African white-backed vultures (Gyps africanus) and bateleur eagles (Terathopius ecaudatus). In one incident 49 vultures were killed when a farmer intentionally laced carcasses with carbofuran in an attempt to control jackal predation. There were 22 incidents of poisoning in helmeted guineafowl (Numida meleagris). On nine different occasions blue cranes (Anthropoides paradiseus) were poisoned, in one incident 14 birds were reported to have been killed. Over the period of investigation, there were 20 cases of poisoning involving mammalian species, the majority being vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus). The carbamate pesticides were responsible for 57 incidents of poisoning. Aldicarb, carbofuran and methomyl were detected in 26, 18 and 12 cases respectively. The majority of organophosphorus pesticide poisonings were caused by diazinon (n = 19), monocrotophos (n = 13) and methamidophos (n = 10). PMID:26824339

  5. Pesticide poisoning trend analysis of 13 years: a retrospective study based on telephone calls at the National Poisons Information Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi.

    PubMed

    Peshin, Sharda Shah; Srivastava, Amita; Halder, Nabanita; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2014-02-01

    The study was designed to analyze the incidence and pattern of pesticide poisoning calls reported to the National Poisons Information Centre (NPIC), AIIMS, New Delhi and highlight the common classes of pesticides involved in poisoning. The telephone calls received by the Centre during the thirteen year period (1999-2012) were entered into a preset proforma and then into a retrievable database. A total of 4929 calls of pesticide poisoning were recorded. The data was analyzed with respect to age, gender, mode and type of poisoning. The age ranged from 1 to 65 years with the preponderance of males (M = 62.19%, F = 37.80%). The age group mainly involved in poisoning was 18-35 years. While 59.38% calls pertained to household pesticides, 40.61% calls related to agricultural pesticides. The common mode of poisoning was intentional (64.60%) followed by accidental (34.40%) and unknown (1%). Amongst the household pesticides, the highest number of calls were due to pyrethroids (26.23%) followed by rodenticides (17.06%), organophosphates (6.26%), carbamates (4.95%) and others (4.86%). In agricultural pesticides group, the organophosphates (9.79%) ranked the first followed by, aluminium phosphide (9.65%), organochlorines (9.31%), pyrethroids (3.87%), herbicides, weedicides and fungicides (3.20%), ethylene dibromide (2.82%), and others (1.70%). The data analysis shows a high incidence of poisoning due to household pesticides as compared to agricultural pesticides, clearly emphasizing the need for creating awareness and education about proper use and implementation of prevention programmes.

  6. Increased Risk of Dementia in Patients With Acute Organophosphate and Carbamate Poisoning: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiun-Nong; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Lai, Chung-Hsu; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Yang, Chih-Hui; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-07-01

    Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate (CM) are the most commonly used pesticides against insects. Little is known regarding the relationship between dementia and acute OP and CM poisoning. A nationwide population-based cohort study was conducted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. The incidence and relative risk of dementia were assessed in patients hospitalized for acute OP and CM poisoning from 2000 to 2011. The comparison cohort was matched with the poisoned cohort at a 4:1 ratio based on age, sex, and the year of hospitalization. During the follow-up period, the incidence of dementia was 29.4 per 10,000 person-years in the poisoned group, and represented a 1.98-fold increased risk of dementia compared with the control cohort (95% confidence interval, 1.59-2.47). This study provides evidence on the association between dementia and acute OP and CM poisoning. Regular follow-up of poisoned patients for dementia is suggested.

  7. Chronic Neuropsychological Sequelae of Cholinesterase Inhibitors in the Absence of Structural Brain Damage: Two Cases of Acute Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Roldán-Tapia, Lola; Leyva, Antonia; Laynez, Francisco; Santed, Fernando Sánchez

    2005-01-01

    Here we describe two cases of carbamate poisoning. Patients AMF and PVM were accidentally poisoned by cholinesterase inhibitors. The medical diagnosis in both cases was overcholinergic syndrome, as demonstrated by exposure to cholinesterase inhibitors. The widespread use of cholinesterase inhibitors, especially as pesticides, produces a great number of human poisoning events annually. The main known neurotoxic effect of these substances is cholinesterase inhibition, which causes cholinergic overstimulation. Once AMF and PVM had recovered from acute intoxication, they were subjected to extensive neuropsychological evaluation 3 and 12 months after the poisoning event. These assessments point to a cognitive deficit in attention, memory, perceptual, and motor domains 3 months after intoxication. One year later these sequelae remained, even though the brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scans were interpreted as being within normal limits. We present these cases as examples of neuropsychological profiles of long-term sequelae related to acute poisoning by cholinesterase inhibitor pesticides and show the usefulness of neuropsychological assessment in detecting central nervous system dysfunction in the absence of biochemical or structural markers. PMID:15929901

  8. Organophosphate and carbamate pesticide poisoning: the usefulness of a computerized clinical information system.

    PubMed

    Lerman, Y; Hirshberg, A; Shteger, Z

    1984-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate poisoning are still a worldwide health problem causing numerous fatalities in humans. Physicians who have no clinical toxicological experience with these compounds may have difficulties in promptly identifying the etiologic agent and managing the acute phase of the poisoning. We describe the potential use of a computerized medical information system that includes clinical data on 236 cases of OP and carbamate poisoning, and may improve the management of such poisoning. The methods of constructing the system, the first results of using the system, and the medical institutions that can benefit from such systems are discussed.

  9. An epidemic of pesticide poisoning in Nicaragua: implications for prevention in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, R; Hruska, A J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of the Northwestern Nicaraguan Ministry of Health surveillance system for detecting pesticide poisonings. METHODS. Cases were reported to the regional department of epidemiology through daily telephone reports and through monthly consolidated reports from each of the 18 health centers of the National Health Service. Reporting forms were also distributed to the four area hospitals. RESULTS. During June and July 1987, an epidemic of 548 pesticide poisoning was detected in northwestern Nicaragua. Seventy-seven percent of the poisonings were caused by carbofuran or methamidophos. Of the work-related cases (91% of reported poisonings), more than 80% occurred among maize farmers and on small to medium land holdings (fewer than 140 hectares). Nineteen percent of the work-related cases involved children under 16 years of age. CONCLUSIONS. Unsafe working conditions such as manual application of pesticides and the use of backpack sprayers, the introduction of a hazardous powdered formulation of carbofuran highly restricted in the developed world, and agricultural subsidies that encouraged the use of hazardous pesticides all contributed to the epidemic. PMID:8238678

  10. Profile of acute poisoning in three health districts of Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Kasule, Mary

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background This study sought to characterise acute poisoning cases seen in three health districts of Botswana. Method A retrospective review of patients’ records was conducted and included patients treated from January 2004 to December 2005. Data on the demographic status of the patients, information about the poisonous agent(s) involved, and the circumstances and outcomes of the poisoning incidents were recorded on a pre-tested data collection form. Results A total of 590 cases of acute poisoning were included in the analysis. The most affected age category was that of children aged less than six years, who constituted 33.4% of the cases. Most incidents were recorded in the urban district of Gaborone. Seventy-eight percent (78%) of the incidents were accidental, with the remainder being intentional. The poisonous agents involved were pharmaceuticals (26.6%), natural toxins (25.6%), household products (14.6%), foods (14.4%), alcohol (6.9%), traditional medicines (4.7%), unspecified agents (3.2%), and agrochemicals (2.7%). The most common route of poison exposure was by oral (82.2%), followed by dermal contact (16.5%), while the inhalation of gases occurred in 1.2% of cases. An incidence rate of 4.7/1000, a case fatality rate of 3.8/100, and 1.5% of deaths were recorded over the two-year period. Conclusion In conclusion, it can be stated that acute poisoning involved mainly young children and resulted in an incidence rate of 4.7/1000, a case fatality rate of 3.8/100, and 1.5% of deaths over the two-year period. There were differences based on age category, gender and residence of the victims, the types of toxic agents involved, as well as the circumstances and the outcomes of the poisoning incidents. Given the fact that pharmaceuticals, natural toxins, household products and foods were the agents most commonly involved, targeted interventions should take these differences into account in addressing the problem of acute poisoning.

  11. The tragedy of Tauccamarca: a human rights perspective on the pesticide poisoning deaths of 4 children in the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Erika

    2003-01-01

    The pesticide poisoning deaths of 24 children in an isolated Peruvian village make a compelling case that corporate accountability for pesticide poisonings in the developing south should be examined from a human rights perspective. Highly toxic pesticides cannot be used safely under prevailing socioeconomic conditions. The industry asserts that the deaths of these children were accidental, blaming misuse. Tragedies such as these poisonings are not accidents, but foreseeable, and therefore preventable. Sales of highly toxic pesticides that cause repeated and predictable poisonings violate the fundamental human rights to life, health, and security of person. The Tauccamarca tragedy is a clear example of the urgency of applying a precautionary, human rights approach to pesticide issues in the developing south.

  12. The initial hyperglycemia in acute type II pyrethroid poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongseob; Moon, Jeongmi; Chun, Byeongjo

    2015-04-01

    This retrospective observational case series study was conducted to describe the clinical feature of acute type II pyrethroid poisoning, and to investigate whether hyperglycemia at presentation can predict the outcome in patients with type II pyrethroid poisoning. This study included 104 type II pyrethroid poisoned patients. The complication rate and mortality rate was 26.9% and 2.9% in type II pyrethroid poisoned patients. The most common complication was respiratory failure followed by acidosis and hypotension. In non-diabetic type II pyrethroid poisoned patients, patients with complications showed a higher frequency of hyperglycemia, abnormalities on the initial X ray, depressed mentality, lower PaCO2 and HCO3- levels, and a higher WBC and AST levels at the time of admission compared to patients without complication. Hyperglycemia was an independent factor for predicting complications in non-diabetic patients. Diabetic patients had a significantly higher incidence of complications than non-diabetic patients. However, there was no significant predictive factor for complications in patients with diabetes mellitus probably because of small number of diabetes mellitus. In contrast to the relatively low toxicity of pyrethroids in mammals, type II pyrethroid poisoning is not a mild disease. Hyperglycemia at presentation may be useful to predict the critical complications in non-diabetic patients. PMID:25829802

  13. The initial hyperglycemia in acute type II pyrethroid poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongseob; Moon, Jeongmi; Chun, Byeongjo

    2015-04-01

    This retrospective observational case series study was conducted to describe the clinical feature of acute type II pyrethroid poisoning, and to investigate whether hyperglycemia at presentation can predict the outcome in patients with type II pyrethroid poisoning. This study included 104 type II pyrethroid poisoned patients. The complication rate and mortality rate was 26.9% and 2.9% in type II pyrethroid poisoned patients. The most common complication was respiratory failure followed by acidosis and hypotension. In non-diabetic type II pyrethroid poisoned patients, patients with complications showed a higher frequency of hyperglycemia, abnormalities on the initial X ray, depressed mentality, lower PaCO2 and HCO3- levels, and a higher WBC and AST levels at the time of admission compared to patients without complication. Hyperglycemia was an independent factor for predicting complications in non-diabetic patients. Diabetic patients had a significantly higher incidence of complications than non-diabetic patients. However, there was no significant predictive factor for complications in patients with diabetes mellitus probably because of small number of diabetes mellitus. In contrast to the relatively low toxicity of pyrethroids in mammals, type II pyrethroid poisoning is not a mild disease. Hyperglycemia at presentation may be useful to predict the critical complications in non-diabetic patients.

  14. Severe Propanil [N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl) propanamide] Pesticide Self-Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Eddleston, Michael; Rajapakshe, Manjula; Roberts, Darren; Reginald, K; Sheriff, M H Rezvi; Dissanayake, Wasantha; Buckley, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Background propanil pesticide poisoning can produce methaemoglobinaemia, tissue hypoxia, and depression of CNS and respiratory system. It has been recorded only rarely worldwide and most current poison texts consider propanil to be of low toxicity. However, propanil self-poisoning is a significant clinical problem in parts of Sri Lanka and a not uncommon cause of death. Aim of study to report the clinical features and management of severe propanil poisoning. Patients and Methods we report a retrospective case series of patients who were treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) of and/or died in Anuradhapura General Hospital between 1998 and early 2002. Results sixteen patients were identified. Common manifestations of toxicity included confusion, reduced conscious level, cyanosis, and respiratory depression. Marked haemolysis was noted in several patients. Nine deaths occurred due to respiratory depression and cardiorespiratory arrest. Management was difficult given the lack of IV methylene blue, inability to measure methaemoglobin levels, and paucity of ICU beds. Conclusions this series indicates that propanil poisoning can be a severe form of self-poisoning, particularly in resource-poor settings. We have now initiated the establishment of a prospective series of propanil poisoned patients to further describe its clinical features, responsiveness to therapy, and case fatality rate. PMID:12507053

  15. Transient and reversible parkinsonism after acute organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Arima, Hajime; Sobue, Kazuya; So, MinHye; Morishima, Tetsuro; Ando, Hirkoshi; Katsuya, Hirotada

    2003-01-01

    Parkinsonism is a rare complication in patients with organophosphate poisoning. To date there have been two cases of transient parkinsonism after acute and severe cholinergic crisis, both of which were successfully treated using amantadine, an anti-parkinsonism drug. We report on an 81-year-old woman who was admitted for the treatment of acute severe organophosphate poisoning. Although acute cholinergic crisis was treated successfully with large doses of atropine and 2-pyridine aldoxime methiodide (PAM), extrapyramidal manifestations were noticed on hospital day 6. The neurological symptoms worsened, and the diagnosis of parkinsonism was made by a neurologist on hospital day 9. Immediately, biperiden (5mg), an anti-parkinsonism drug, was administered intravenously, and her symptoms markedly improved. From the following day, biperiden (5 mg/day) was given intramuscularly for eight days. Subsequently, neurological symptoms did not relapse, and no drugs were required. Our patient is the third case of parkinsonism developing after an acute severe cholinergic crisis and the first case successfully treated with biperiden. Patients should be carefully observed for the presence of neurological signs in this kind of poisoning. If present, an anti-parkinsonism drug should be considered.

  16. Acute Poisoning During Pregnancy: Observations from the Toxicology Investigators Consortium.

    PubMed

    Zelner, Irene; Matlow, Jeremy; Hutson, Janine R; Wax, Paul; Koren, Gideon; Brent, Jeffrey; Finkelstein, Yaron

    2015-09-01

    Acute poisonings during pregnancy pose a particular challenge to health care providers because of the potential for an immediate life threat or possible life-long implications for both the mother and fetus, including teratogenicity of the poison or its antidote. We describe recent consequential exposures among pregnant women in the USA. We identified all poisoning cases involving pregnant women that were catalogued by the medical toxicology services across the 37 sites of the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Registry of the American College of Medical Toxicology between January 2010 and December 2012. Of 17,529 exposure cases reported in the ToxIC Registry, 103 (0.6 %) involved pregnant women, 80 % of whom were symptomatic and about a quarter displayed a specific toxidrome. The majority of cases (n = 53; 51.5 %) involved intentional exposures, most commonly to pharmaceutical agents, followed by unintentional pharmaceutical exposures (10 %) and withdrawal syndromes (9 %). Non-opioid analgesics were the most common class of agents encountered (31 %), followed by sedative-hypnotics/muscle relaxants (18 %), opioids (17 %), anti-convulsants (10 %), and anti-depressants (10 %). Over a third of cases involved exposure to multiple substances, and 32 % involved exposure to more than one drug class. The most commonly administered antidotes were N-acetylcysteine (23 %), sodium bicarbonate (10 %), flumazenil (4 %), and physostigmine (4 %). About half of acute poisoning cases among pregnant women presenting for emergency care involved intentional exposures, mostly with over-the-counter analgesics and psychoactive medications. Clinicians should be cognizant of the unique circumstances, maternal and fetal risks, and management principles of the acutely poisoned pregnant woman.

  17. Long-term neurobehavioral effects of mild poisonings with organophosphate and n-methyl carbamate pesticides among banana workers.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Catharina; Keifer, Matthew; Ahlbom, Anders; McConnell, Rob; Moon, Jai-Dong; Rosenstock, Linda; Hogstedt, Christer

    2002-01-01

    Organophosphate poisoning has been associated with chronic neurobehavioral dysfunction, but no epidemiologic data exist with regard to long-term consequences from carbamate poisoning. This cross-sectional study evaluated the neurobehavioral performances of 81 banana workers who, on average 27 months earlier, had received medical attention not requiring hospitalization for mild occupational poisoning by either an organophosphate or a carbamate pesticide. These performances were compared with those of 130 banana workers who had never sought medical attention for pesticide poisoning. Poisoned subjects did less well than controls on tests measuring psychomotor and visuomotor skills, language function, and affect, the differences being significant for coding skills on the Digit-Symbol test and two tests of neuropsychiatric symptoms. These deficits, in particular a marked increase of neuropsychiatric symptoms, occurred among the organophosphate-poisoned subjects, but small deficits in performance were also seen in the carbamate-poisoned subjects. The performances of the previously poisoned subjects who had had contact with cholinesterase inhibitors within three months before testing were particularly poor. These findings in workers with mild poisoning are consistent with previous findings of persistent damage to the central nervous system from organophosphate poisoning. The possibility of persistent neurobehavioral effects associated with poisonings by nmethyl carbamate insecticides cannot be excluded. Workers with histories of poisoning may be more susceptible to neurobehavioral effects with subsequent exposures.

  18. Hydroxocobalamin treatment of acute cyanide poisoning from apricot kernels.

    PubMed

    Cigolini, Davide; Ricci, Giogio; Zannoni, Massimo; Codogni, Rosalia; De Luca, Manuela; Perfetti, Paola; Rocca, Giampaolo

    2011-05-24

    Clinical experience with hydroxocobalamin in acute cyanide poisoning via ingestion remains limited. This case concerns a 35-year-old mentally ill woman who consumed more than 20 apricot kernels. Published literature suggests each kernel would have contained cyanide concentrations ranging from 0.122 to 4.09 mg/g (average 2.92 mg/g). On arrival, the woman appeared asymptomatic with a raised pulse rate and slight metabolic acidosis. Forty minutes after admission (approximately 70 min postingestion), the patient experienced headache, nausea and dyspnoea, and was hypotensive, hypoxic and tachypnoeic. Following treatment with amyl nitrite and sodium thiosulphate, her methaemoglobin level was 10%. This prompted the administration of oxygen, which evoked a slight improvement in her vital signs. Hydroxocobalamin was then administered. After 24 h, she was completely asymptomatic with normalised blood pressure and other haemodynamic parameters. This case reinforces the safety and effectiveness of hydroxocobalamin in acute cyanide poisoning by ingestion.

  19. Hydroxocobalamin treatment of acute cyanide poisoning from apricot kernels.

    PubMed

    Cigolini, Davide; Ricci, Giogio; Zannoni, Massimo; Codogni, Rosalia; De Luca, Manuela; Perfetti, Paola; Rocca, Giampaolo

    2011-09-01

    Clinical experience with hydroxocobalamin in acute cyanide poisoning via ingestion remains limited. This case concerns a 35-year-old mentally ill woman who consumed more than 20 apricot kernels. Published literature suggests each kernel would have contained cyanide concentrations ranging from 0.122 to 4.09 mg/g (average 2.92 mg/g). On arrival, the woman appeared asymptomatic with a raised pulse rate and slight metabolic acidosis. Forty minutes after admission (approximately 70 min postingestion), the patient experienced headache, nausea and dyspnoea, and was hypotensive, hypoxic and tachypnoeic. Following treatment with amyl nitrite and sodium thiosulphate, her methaemoglobin level was 10%. This prompted the administration of oxygen, which evoked a slight improvement in her vital signs. Hydroxocobalamin was then administered. After 24 h, she was completely asymptomatic with normalised blood pressure and other haemodynamic parameters. This case reinforces the safety and effectiveness of hydroxocobalamin in acute cyanide poisoning by ingestion.

  20. Homicidal acute formalin poisoning in an infant from a rural sericulture family presenting with multisystem failure.

    PubMed

    Y C, Beeregowda; A, Srihari; Pradan, Shashi K; P, Susheela; Y C, Manjunatha

    2013-05-01

    Acute poisoning of formalin is rare because of its strong irritating effect and alarming odor. Although few cases of acute poisoning in adults have been reported in literature, to our knowledge, this is the first case report of formalin poisoning in an infant presenting with multisystem failure. Despite proper supportive treatment in the absence of antidote, the infant died within 13 hours after deliberate poisoning.

  1. Paradox findings may challenge orthodox reasoning in acute organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Eyer, Peter; Worek, Franz; Thiermann, Horst; Eddleston, Michael

    2010-09-01

    It is generally accepted that inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the most important acute toxic action of organophosphorus compounds, leading to accumulation of acetylcholine followed by a dysfunction of cholinergic signaling. However, the degree of AChE inhibition is not uniformly correlated with cholinergic dysfunction, probably because the excess of essential AChE varies among tissues. Moreover, the cholinergic system shows remarkable plasticity, allowing modulations to compensate for dysfunctions of the canonical pathway. A prominent example is the living (-/-) AChE knockout mouse. Clinical experience indicates that precipitous inhibition of AChE leads to more severe poisoning than more protracted yet finally complete inhibition. The former situation is seen in parathion, the latter in oxydemeton methyl poisoning. At first glance, this dichotomy is surprising since parathion is a pro-poison and has to be activated to the oxon, while the latter is still the ultimate inhibitor. Also oxime therapy in organophosphorus poisoning apparently gives perplexing results: Oximes are usually able to reactivate diethylphosphorylated AChE, but the efficiency may be occasionally markedly smaller than expected from kinetic data. Dimethylphosphorylated AChE is in general less amenable to oxime therapy, which largely fails in some cases of dimethoate poisoning where aging was much faster than expected from a dimethylphosphorylated enzyme. Similarly, poisoning by profenofos, an O,S-dialkyl phosphate, leads to a rapidly aged enzyme. Most surprisingly, these patients were usually well on admission, yet their erythrocyte AChE was completely inhibited. Analysis of the kinetic constants of the most important reaction pathways, determination of the reactant concentrations in vivo and comparison with computer simulations may reveal unexpected toxic reactions. Pertinent examples will be presented and the potentially underlying phenomena discussed. PMID:19883634

  2. Acute respiratory failure following severe arsenic poisoning.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, C; Davies, S; McGowan, T; Schorer, A; Drage, C

    1979-11-01

    A 47-year-old man had an episode of severe respiratory failure after acute intoxication with arsenic. Features of the initial clinical presentation included nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, acute psychosis, diffuse skin rash, and marked pancytopenia. A peripheral neuropathy then developed which resulted in severe weakness of all muscles of the limbs, the shoulder and pelvis girdles, and the trunk. The neuropathy continued to progress despite treatment with dimercaprol (BAL in oil). Five weeks after the initial exposure, the patient was no longer able to maintain adquate ventilation and required mechanical ventilatory support. Improvement in the patient's neuromuscular status permitted successful weaning from the ventilator after one month of mechanical ventilation. Long-term follow-up revealed no further respiratory difficulty and slow improvement in the strength of the peripheral muscles.

  3. Acute kidney injury by arsine poisoning: the ultrastructural pathology of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Young; Eom, Minseob; Yang, Jae Won; Han, Byoung Geun; Choi, Seung Ok; Kim, Jae Seok

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is a terribly poisonous material. There have been many reports of arsine poisoning in workers, and a few have discussed acute kidney injury by arsine. But literatures which investigated the pathologic findings are uncommon, and especially, the ones describing ultrastructural findings are rare. Here, we report an incident of acute arsine poisoning complicated by acute kidney injury and suggest the characteristics of the renal pathology in arsine-induced renal injury, especially the ultrastructural findings.

  4. Atropine maintenance dosage in patients with severe organophosphate pesticide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk; Worek, Franz; Radtke, Maria; Eyer, Peter; Eyer, Florian; Felgenhauer, Norbert; Zilker, Thomas

    2011-09-25

    Although the importance of atropine in therapy of organophosphate (OP) poisoning is generally recognized, its dosing is a matter of debate. A retrospective analysis of atropine dosing was undertaken in 34 patients who had been enrolled in a clinical study assessing obidoxime effectiveness in OP-poisoning. All patients were severely intoxicated (suicidal attempts) and required artificial ventilation. Atropine was administered routinely by intensive care physicians for life-threatening muscarinic symptoms, with the recommendation to favor low dosage. The pharmacological active enantiomere S-hyoscyamine was determined by a radioreceptor assay. When RBC-AChE activity ranged between 10% and 30%, S-hyoscyamine plasma concentrations of approx. 5 nmol L⁻¹ were sufficient. This concentration could be maintained with about 0.005 mg h⁻¹ kg⁻¹ atropine. Only when RBC-AChE was completely inhibited, therapy of cholinergic crisis required atropine doses up to 0.06 mg h⁻¹ kg⁻¹. Elimination half-life of S-hyoscyamine was 1.5 h, showing occasionally a second slow elimination phase with t(½)=12 h. Malignant arrhythmias were observed in some 10% of our cases, which occurred late and often in the absence of relevant glandular cholinergic signs, when the S-hyoscyamine concentration was below 2.5 nmol L⁻¹. Arrhythmias mostly resolved on reinstitution of atropine.

  5. Clinical outcomes and kinetics of propanil following acute self-poisoning: a prospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Darren M; Heilmair, Renate; Buckley, Nick A; Dawson, Andrew H; Fahim, Mohamed; Eddleston, Michael; Eyer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background Propanil is an important cause of death from acute pesticide poisoning, of which methaemoglobinaemia is an important manifestation. However, there is limited information about the clinical toxicity and kinetics. The objective of this study is to describe the clinical outcomes and kinetics of propanil following acute intentional self-poisoning. Methods 431 patients with a history of propanil poisoning were admitted from 2002 until 2007 in a large, multi-centre prospective cohort study in rural hospitals in Sri Lanka. 40 of these patients ingested propanil with at least one other poison and were not considered further. The remaining 391 patients were classified using a simple grading system on the basis of clinical outcomes; methaemoglobinaemia could not be quantified due to limited resources. Blood samples were obtained on admission and a subset of patients provided multiple samples for kinetic analysis of propanil and the metabolite 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA). Results There were 42 deaths (median time to death 1.5 days) giving a case fatality of 10.7%. Death occurred despite treatment in the context of cyanosis, sedation, hypotension and severe lactic acidosis consistent with methaemoglobinaemia. Treatment consisted primarily of methylene blue (1 mg/kg for one or two doses), exchange transfusion and supportive care when methaemoglobinaemia was diagnosed clinically. Admission plasma concentrations of propanil and DCA reflected the clinical outcome. The elimination half-life of propanil was 3.2 hours (95% confidence interval 2.6 to 4.1 hours) and the concentration of DCA was generally higher, more persistent and more variable than propanil. Conclusion Propanil is the most lethal herbicide in Sri Lanka after paraquat. Methylene blue was largely prescribed in low doses and administered as intermittent boluses which are expected to be suboptimal given the kinetics of methylene blue, propanil and the DCA metabolite. But in the absence of controlled studies the

  6. Anticholinesterase poisoning of birds: Field monitoring and diagnosis of acute poisoning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.; Fleming, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    Organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides are cholinesterase (ChE) inhibiting chemicals that have been responsible for avian die-offs. Identification of chemicals implicated in these die-offs is difficult and sometimes conclusions are solely circumstantial. However, when marked depression (inhibition) of brain ChE activity accompanies organophosphorus or carbamate residues in body tissues or ingesta, cause-effect diagnosis is enhanced. To achieve this end, normal brain ChE activity is estimated for controls of the affected species and then die-off specimens are individually evaluated for evidence of ChE inhibition. This approach to evaluation of antiChE poisoning may also be used to monitor exposure of vertebrates to field application of organophosphorus or carbamate pesticides. Problems associated with this kind of evaluation, and the main topic of this report, include variability of brain ChE activity among species, postmortem influences of ambient conditions (storage or field) on ChE activity, and differential patterns of ChE activity when inhibited by organophosphorus or carbamate compounds. Other topics discussed are the ChE assay procedure, example case reports and interpretation, and research needed for improving the diagnostic utility of ChE activity in a field situation.

  7. Acute arsenic poisoning: clinical, toxicological, histopathological, and forensic features.

    PubMed

    Tournel, Gilles; Houssaye, Cédric; Humbert, Luc; Dhorne, Christine; Gnemmi, Viviane; Bécart-Robert, Anne; Nisse, Patrick; Hédouin, Valéry; Gosset, Didier; Lhermitte, Michel

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a suicide case by acute arsenic intoxication via intravenous injection. A 30-year-old woman injected arsenic As (V) (sodium arseniate disodique: Disodium Hydrogena Arsenik RP) in a successful suicide attempt. Three hours following administration, the woman developed severe digestive symptoms. She was admitted to a hospital and transferred to the intensive care unit within 12 h of the massive administration of arsenic. Despite therapeutic efforts, over the next 2 h she developed multiorgan failure and died. A postmortem examination was performed. Pulmonary edema and congestion of liver were apparent. As (V) and As (III) were determined by high performance liquid chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after mineralization of samples by concentrated nitric acid. Toxicological analysis revealed high concentrations of arsenic in biological fluids as well as in organs. Histopathological examination showed a typical indication of myocarditis. These findings were in agreement with acute arsenic poisoning. The symptoms developed by this young woman (intoxication by intravenous administration) were comparable to oral intoxication. The clinical signs, survival time, and administration type are discussed in light of the literature on acute and chronic arsenic poisoning.

  8. Acute lead poisoning in two users of illicit methamphetamine

    SciTech Connect

    Allcott, J.V. III; Barnhart, R.A.; Mooney, L.A.

    1987-07-31

    Acute lead poisoning can present a difficult diagnostic dilemma, with symptoms that mimic those of hepatitis, nephritis, and encephalopathy. The authors report two cases in intravenous methamphetamine users who presented with abnormal liver function values, low hematocrit values, basophilic stippling of red blood cells, and elevated blood lead levels. Both patients excreted large amounts of lead in their urine after treatment with edetic acid, followed by resolution of their symptoms. Lead contamination was proved in one drug sample. Basophilic stippling of the red blood cells was the one key laboratory result that led to the definitive diagnosis in both cases.

  9. Acute cyanide poisoning among jewelry and textile industry workers.

    PubMed

    Coentrão, Luís; Moura, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Limited work has focused on occupational exposures that may increase the risk of cyanide poisoning by ingestion. A retrospective chart review of all admissions for acute cyanide poisoning by ingestion for the years 1988 to 2008 was conducted in a tertiary university hospital serving the largest population in the country working in jewelry and textile facilities. Of the 9 patients admitted to the hospital during the study period, 8 (7 males, 1 female; age 36 ± 11 years, mean ± SD) attempted suicide by ingestion of potassium cyanide used in their profession as goldsmiths or textile industry workers. Five patients had severe neurologic impairment and severe metabolic acidosis (pH 7.02 ± 0.08, mean ± SD) with high anion gap (23 ± 4 mmol/L, mean ± SD). Of the 5 severely intoxicated patients, 3 received antidote therapy (sodium thiosulfate or hydroxocobalamin) and resumed full consciousness in less than 8 hours. All patients survived without major sequelae. Cyanide intoxication by ingestion in our patients was mainly suicidal and occurred in specific jobs where potassium cyanide is used. Metabolic acidosis with high anion is a good surrogated marker of severe cyanide poisoning. Sodium thiosulfate and hydroxocobalamin are both safe and effective antidotes.

  10. Is oxygen required before atropine administration in organophosphorus or carbamate pesticide poisoning? – A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Konickx, L. A.; Bingham, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Early and adequate atropine administration in organophosphorus (OP) or carbamate insecticide poisoning improves outcome. However, some authors advise that oxygen must be given before atropine due to the risk of inducing ventricular dysrhythmias in hypoxic patients. Because oxygen is frequently unavailable in district hospitals of rural Asia, where the majority of patients with insecticide poisoning present, this guidance has significant implications for patient care. The published evidence for this advice is weak. We therefore performed a patient cohort analysis to look for early cardiac deaths in patients poisoned by anticholinesterase pesticides. Methods We analysed a prospective Sri Lankan cohort of OP or carbamate-poisoned patients treated with early atropine without the benefit of oxygen for evidence of early deaths. The incidence of fatal primary cardiac arrests within 3 h of admission was used as a sensitive (but non-specific) marker of possible ventricular dysrhythmias. Results The cohort consisted of 1957 patients. The incidence of a primary cardiac death within 3 h of atropine administration was 4 (0.2%) of 1957 patients. The majority of deaths occurred at a later time point from respiratory complications of poisoning. Conclusion We found no evidence of a high number of early deaths in an observational study of 1957 patients routinely given atropine before oxygen that might support guidance that oxygen must be given before atropine. The published literature indicates that early and rapid administration of atropine during resuscitation is life-saving. Therefore, whether oxygen is available or not, early atropinisation of OP- and carbamate-poisoned patients should be performed. PMID:24810796

  11. Severe but reversible acute kidney injury resulting from Amanita punctata poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eunjung; Cheong, Ka-Young; Lee, Min-Jeong; Kim, Seirhan; Shin, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Heungsoo; Park, In-Whee

    2015-01-01

    Mushroom-related poisoning can cause acute kidney injury. Here we report a case of acute kidney injury after ingestion of Amanita punctata, which is considered an edible mushroom. Gastrointestinal symptoms occurred within 24 hours from the mushroom intake and were followed by an asymptomatic period, acute kidney injury, and elevation of liver and pancreatic enzymes. Kidney function recovered with supportive care. Nephrotoxic mushroom poisoning should be considered as a cause of acute kidney injury. PMID:26779427

  12. Autonomic Function following Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Sudheera S.; Pathirana, Kithsiri D.

    2012-01-01

    Autonomic dysfunction after chronic low level exposure to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides has been consistently reported in the literature, but not following a single acute overdose. In order to study autonomic function after an acute OP overdose, sixty-six overdose patients were compared to 70 matched controls. Assessment of autonomic function was done by heart rate response to standing, deep breathing (HR-DB) and Valsalva manoeuvre; blood pressure (BP) response to standing and sustained hand grip; amplitude and latency of sympathetic skin response (SSR); pupil size and post-void urine volume. The patients were assessed one and six weeks after the exposure. The number of patients who showed abnormal autonomic function compared to standard cut-off values did not show statistically significantly difference from that of controls by Chi-Square test. When compared to the controls at one week the only significant differences consistent with autonomic dysfunction were change of diastolic BP 3 min after standing, HR-DB, SSR-Amplitude, SSR-Latency, post-void urine volume and size of the pupil. At 6 weeks significant recovery of autonomic function was observed and only HR-DB was decreased to a minor degree, −5 beats/min [95%CI 2–8]. This study provides good evidence for the lack of long term autonomic dysfunction following acute exposure to OP pesticides. PMID:22655091

  13. Cortical venous infarcts and acute limb ischaemia in acute carbon monoxide poisoning: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad Farooq; Iqbal, Beenish; Gilani, Nooman

    2016-06-01

    A case of carbon monoxide poisoning is presented with unusual complications; some of which have not been reported previously. A 48-years-old Asian male presented to the emergency department with dyspnoea, altered state of consciousness and pale discolouration of skin after being locked inside a factory room with burning coal. Patient was in acute respiratory distress. Arterial blood gas analysis showed respiratory acidosis with hypoxaemia. On 3rd day, patient developed dark coloured urine and right upper limb ischaemia. Acute renal failure was diagnosed. A doppler ultrasound showed stenosis of radial and ulnar arteries. 0n 8th day, patient regained consciousness and complained of loss of vision. An MRI of the brain revealed bilateral occipital venous infarcts. Cortical venous infarcts and arterial stenosis are rare complications of acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

  14. A hospital base epidemiology and pattern of acute adult poisoning across Iran: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Malihe; Ghaemi, Kazem; Mehrpour, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Poisoning is one of the most important health issues in the world. There is no exact statistic regarding the epidemiology of poisoning in Iran. The aim of this systematic review was to study the epidemiology of poisoning of adults in Iran. Methods All the published papers regarding the epidemiology and patterns of adult poisonings in different parts of Iran were reviewed in bibliographical databases, including SID, Iran Medex, Medlib, Magiran and Embase, Scopus, PubMed, and Google Scholar, without time limitation up to March 21, 2016. We searched for the terms poisoning, Iran, and epidemiology. After the final analysis, 38 articles that fulfilled all the required conditions were selected. Result In this article, we show that in most Iranian cities, except Ahvaz, pharmaceutical drugs, especially psychiatric pharmaceutical drugs, are the most common cause of poisoning in adults. In the Southwest region of Iran, poisoning due to envenomation is a very common. Although pesticide and opioid poisonings are less common, they are an important cause of death due to poisoning in Iran. Conclusion Pharmaceutical drugs are the most common cause of poisoning in most Iranian cities and it is recommended not to store pharmaceutical drugs at home and to set special rules regarding proper description of pharmaceutical drugs. More public health instruction is essential in the Southwest cities of Iran in order to reduce animal poisonings. PMID:27790337

  15. Poisoning of raptors with organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides with emphasis on Canada, U.S. and U.K.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mineau, P.; Fletcher, M.R.; Glaser, L.C.; Thomas, N.J.; Brassard, C.; Wilson, L.K.; Elliott, J.E.; Lyon, L.A.; Henny, C.J.; Bollinger, T.; Porter, S.L.

    1999-01-01

    We reviewed cases of raptor mortality resulting from cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides. We compiled records from the U.S., U.K. and Canada for the period 1985-95 (520 incidents) and surveyed the relevant literature to identify the main routes of exposure and those products that led to the greatest number of poisoning cases. A high proportion of cases in the U.K. resulted from abusive uses of pesticides (willful poisoning). The proportion was smaller in North America where problems with labeled uses of pesticides were as frequent as abuse cases. Poisoning resulting from labeled use was possible with a large number of granular pesticides and some seed treatments through secondary poisoning or through the ingestion of contaminated invertebrates, notably earthworms. With the more toxic products, residue levels in freshly-sprayed insects were high enough to cause mortality. The use of organophosphorus products as avicides and for the topical treatment of livestock appeared to be common routes of intoxication. The use of insecticides in dormant oils also gave rise to exposure that can be lethal or which can debilitate birds and increase their vulnerability. A few pesticides of high toxicity were responsible for the bulk of poisoning cases. Based on limited information, raptors appeared to be more sensitive than other bird species to organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides. Some of the more significant risk factors that resulted in raptor poisonings were: insectivory and vermivory; opportunistic taking of debilitated prey; scavenging, especially if the gastrointestinal tracts are consumed; presence in agricultural areas; perceived status as pest species; and flocking or other gregarious behavior at some part of their life cycle. Lethal or sublethal poisoning should always be considered in the diagnosis of dead or debilitated raptors even when another diagnosis (e.g., electrocution, car or building strike) is apparent. Many cases of poisoning are not currently

  16. Acute dapsone poisoning in a 3-year-old child: Case report with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sunilkumar, Menon Narayanankutty; Ajith, Thekkuttuparambil Ananthanarayanan; Parvathy, Vadakut Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Dapsone (DDS-diamino diphenyl sulphone) is a sulfone antibiotic being used for a variety of clinical conditions. Poisoning in children by DDS is rarely reported. Poisoning in acute cases will be frequently unrecognized due to relative lack of severe signs and symptoms. Methemoglobinemia is the major life-threatening situation associated with poisoning of DDS. Hence, any delay for medical attention can lead to increased rate of mortality. In this case, we describe acute DDS poisoning in a 3-year-old child and the successful management using intravenous methylene blue. PMID:26488029

  17. To identify morbidity and mortality predictors in acute organophosphate poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Muley, Arti; Shah, Chaitri; Lakhani, Jitendra; Bapna, Mani; Mehta, Jigar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Organophosphorus poisoning remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality, but no definite parameters have been identified as predictors of outcome. Prediction of morbidity at presentation might help in decision making in places of limited resources like rural settings in developing countries. Materials and Methods: A total of 76 cases were included in this retrospective cohort study. Logged relative risk of requirement of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay >7 days was measured in patients with serum acetylcholinesterase (s. acetylcholinesterase) <1000 versus >1000, presenting in <2 h versus ≥ 2 h after exposure, with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≤12 versus >12 and in patients with SpO2 <85% versus ≥85% at room air at presentation. Results: S. acetylcholinesterase <1000, time elapsed after ingestion to presentation ≥ 2 h and SpO2 (at room air) at presentation <85% were found to have positive association with requirement of ventilation. GCS ≤ 12 had a significant association with both requirement of ventilation and hospital stay >7 days. Conclusion: S. acetylcholinesterase, SpO2 at room air, GCS, and duration of exposure at presentation can be used to identify the requirement of special care in acute organophosphorus poisoning. This can aid in decision making regarding admission to intensive care unit and referral in the places with limited resources. PMID:24914258

  18. Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... gas heater and any other gas-, oil- or wood-fueled appliances serviced regularly. Be sure these appliances ... on the skin, rinse it off with running water and remove any poisoned clothing. If the poison ...

  19. Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... talking with the Poison Control Center. GETTING HELP Call the Poison Control Center emergency number at 1-800-222-1222. DO NOT wait until the person has symptoms before you call. Try to have the following information ready: The ...

  20. Predicting Outcome using Butyrylcholinesterase Activity in Organophosphorus Pesticide Self-Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Eddleston, Michael; Eyer, Peter; Worek, Franz; Rezvi Sheriff, MH; Buckley, Nick A

    2008-01-01

    Background The usefulness of a low butyrylcholinesterase activity on admission for predicting severity in acute organophosphorus insecticide poisoning has long been debated. Previous studies have been confounded by the inclusion of multiple insecticides with differing inhibitory kinetics. Aim We aimed to assess the usefulness of admission butyrylcholinesterase activity, together with plasma organophosphorus concentration, for predicting death with identified organophosphorus insecticides. Design A prospective cohort of self-poisoned patients Methods We prospectively studied 91 and 208 patients with proven dimethoate or chlorpyrifos self-poisoning treated using a standard protocol. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase activity and organophosphorus concentration were measured on admission and clinical outcomes recorded. Results The usefulness of a plasma butyrylcholinesterase activity <600mU/ml on admission varied markedly - while highly sensitive in chlorpyrifos poisoning (sensitivity 11/11 deaths; 100%, 95%CI 71.5-100), its specificity was only 17.7% (95%CI 12.6-23.7). In contrast, while poorly sensitive for deaths in dimethoate poisoning (12/25 patients; 48%, 95%CI 27.9-68.7) it was reasonably specific (86.4%, 95%CI 75.7-93.6). A high organophosphorus concentration on admission was associated with worse outcome; however, a clear threshold concentration was only present for dimethoate poisoning. Conclusions Plasma butyrylcholinesterase activity on admission can provide useful information; however, it must be interpreted carefully. It can only be used to predict need for critical care and death when the insecticide ingested is known and its sensitivity and specificity for that insecticide has been studied. Plasma concentration of some organophosphorus insecticides predicts outcome. The development of rapid bedside tests for organophosphorus detection may aid early assessment of severity. PMID:18375477

  1. Pesticide exposure in children.

    PubMed

    Roberts, James R; Karr, Catherine J

    2012-12-01

    Pesticides are a collective term for a wide array of chemicals intended to kill unwanted insects, plants, molds, and rodents. Food, water, and treatment in the home, yard, and school are all potential sources of children's exposure. Exposures to pesticides may be overt or subacute, and effects range from acute to chronic toxicity. In 2008, pesticides were the ninth most common substance reported to poison control centers, and approximately 45% of all reports of pesticide poisoning were for children. Organophosphate and carbamate poisoning are perhaps the most widely known acute poisoning syndromes, can be diagnosed by depressed red blood cell cholinesterase levels, and have available antidotal therapy. However, numerous other pesticides that may cause acute toxicity, such as pyrethroid and neonicotinoid insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, and rodenticides, also have specific toxic effects; recognition of these effects may help identify acute exposures. Evidence is increasingly emerging about chronic health implications from both acute and chronic exposure. A growing body of epidemiological evidence demonstrates associations between parental use of pesticides, particularly insecticides, with acute lymphocytic leukemia and brain tumors. Prenatal, household, and occupational exposures (maternal and paternal) appear to be the largest risks. Prospective cohort studies link early-life exposure to organophosphates and organochlorine pesticides (primarily DDT) with adverse effects on neurodevelopment and behavior. Among the findings associated with increased pesticide levels are poorer mental development by using the Bayley index and increased scores on measures assessing pervasive developmental disorder, inattention, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Related animal toxicology studies provide supportive biological plausibility for these findings. Additional data suggest that there may also be an association between parental pesticide use and adverse birth

  2. Pesticide exposure in children.

    PubMed

    Roberts, James R; Karr, Catherine J

    2012-12-01

    Pesticides are a collective term for a wide array of chemicals intended to kill unwanted insects, plants, molds, and rodents. Food, water, and treatment in the home, yard, and school are all potential sources of children's exposure. Exposures to pesticides may be overt or subacute, and effects range from acute to chronic toxicity. In 2008, pesticides were the ninth most common substance reported to poison control centers, and approximately 45% of all reports of pesticide poisoning were for children. Organophosphate and carbamate poisoning are perhaps the most widely known acute poisoning syndromes, can be diagnosed by depressed red blood cell cholinesterase levels, and have available antidotal therapy. However, numerous other pesticides that may cause acute toxicity, such as pyrethroid and neonicotinoid insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, and rodenticides, also have specific toxic effects; recognition of these effects may help identify acute exposures. Evidence is increasingly emerging about chronic health implications from both acute and chronic exposure. A growing body of epidemiological evidence demonstrates associations between parental use of pesticides, particularly insecticides, with acute lymphocytic leukemia and brain tumors. Prenatal, household, and occupational exposures (maternal and paternal) appear to be the largest risks. Prospective cohort studies link early-life exposure to organophosphates and organochlorine pesticides (primarily DDT) with adverse effects on neurodevelopment and behavior. Among the findings associated with increased pesticide levels are poorer mental development by using the Bayley index and increased scores on measures assessing pervasive developmental disorder, inattention, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Related animal toxicology studies provide supportive biological plausibility for these findings. Additional data suggest that there may also be an association between parental pesticide use and adverse birth

  3. Aspects on antidote therapy in acute poisoning affecting the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Persson, H

    1984-01-01

    The number of toxic substances affecting the nervous system through acute or chronic exposure is overwhelming. This survey will elucidate the possibilities of antidote therapy in some acute cases of poisoning, caused by nervous system toxicants. Antidotes exert their therapeutic effects through a variety of mechanisms: Adsorption, formation of inert complexes, inhibited conversion to toxic metabolites, enhancement of endogenous detoxification, interference at receptor sites, and physiological antagonism. The application of these principles in treating some poisonings caused by important nervous system toxicants will be considered. This survey is by no means comprehensive, but rather gives some relevant examples and deals only with acute poisoning.

  4. [Acute coronary syndrome with impaired left ventricular function in a carbon monoxide poisoning].

    PubMed

    Capilla, E; Pons, F; Poyet, R; Kerebel, S; Jego, C; Louge, P; Cellarier, G-R

    2016-02-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is the leading cause of death by poisoning in France. Neuropsychological symptoms are most common. We report on a patient with acute coronary syndrome and transient left ventricular dysfunction in carbon monoxide poisoning. Patient improved under hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Coronary angiography shows no significant lesion leading to myocardial stunning diagnose. Patients exposed to carbon monoxide must have systematic cardiac evaluation with electrocardiogram and dosage of biomarkers.

  5. [Acute gamma-butyrolactone poisoning with withdrawal syndrome].

    PubMed

    Chwaluk, Paweł; Rejmak, Grazyna

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) is a solvent that are part of many consumer products and in most countries can be legally purchased in the form of almost pure substance. After ingestion GBL is rapidly converted to gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). In recent years, GBL became a legal alternative to GHB, which is used widely since 1990s as a club drug and date rape drug. It is believed that abuse of GBL is not frequent in Europe, except for certain specific groups, mainly in urban centers in the west of the continent. We present a case of acute GBL poisoning with the withdrawal syndrome in 23-year-old man living in a rural area in eastern Poland. The patient was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) because of coma of unknown origin. On admission erosions of the lips and mouth was seen. Ethyl alcohol was not present in blood sample, urine screening tests for drugs were negative. During his stay in the ICU patient required ventilatory support, was periodically agitated with muscular jerks and opisthotonos. The later medical history revealed that the patient from two years used GBL, which purchased as wheels cleaner. The tolerance developed, and the interruption of use of substance triggered symptoms of withdrawal. GBL abuse occurs in different social groups and is at risk for acute toxicity and the development of physical dependence. PMID:22010460

  6. Mortality from and incidence of pesticide poisoning in South Korea: findings from National Death and Health Utilization Data between 2006 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Cha, Eun Shil; Khang, Young-Ho; Lee, Won Jin

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide poisoning has been recognized as an important public health issue around the world. The objectives of this study were to report nationally representative figures on mortality from and the incidence of pesticide poisoning in South Korea and to describe their epidemiologic characteristics. We calculated the age-standardized rates of mortality from and the incidence of pesticide poisoning in South Korea by gender and region from 2006 through 2010 using registered death data obtained from Statistics Korea and national healthcare utilization data obtained from the National Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service of South Korea. During the study period of 2006 through 2010, a total of 16,161 deaths and 45,291 patients related to pesticide poisoning were identified, marking respective mortality and incidence rates of 5.35 and 15.37 per 100,000 population. Intentional self-poisoning was identified as the major cause of death due to pesticides (85.9%) and accounted for 20.8% of all recorded suicides. The rates of mortality due to and incidence of pesticide poisoning were higher in rural than in urban areas, and this rural-urban discrepancy was more pronounced for mortality than for incidence. Both the rate of mortality due to pesticide poisoning and its incidence rate increased with age and were higher among men than women. This study provides the magnitude and epidemiologic characteristics for mortality from and the incidence of pesticide poisoning at the national level, and strongly suggests the need for further efforts to prevent pesticide self-poisonings, especially in rural areas in South Korea.

  7. Acute Human Lethal Toxicity of Agricultural Pesticides: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Senarathna, Lalith; Mohamed, Fahim; Gawarammana, Indika; Bowe, Steven J.; Manuweera, Gamini; Buckley, Nicholas A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Agricultural pesticide poisoning is a major public health problem in the developing world, killing at least 250,000–370,000 people each year. Targeted pesticide restrictions in Sri Lanka over the last 20 years have reduced pesticide deaths by 50% without decreasing agricultural output. However, regulatory decisions have thus far not been based on the human toxicity of formulated agricultural pesticides but on the surrogate of rat toxicity using pure unformulated pesticides. We aimed to determine the relative human toxicity of formulated agricultural pesticides to improve the effectiveness of regulatory policy. Methods and Findings We examined the case fatality of different agricultural pesticides in a prospective cohort of patients presenting with pesticide self-poisoning to two clinical trial centers from April 2002 to November 2008. Identification of the pesticide ingested was based on history or positive identification of the container. A single pesticide was ingested by 9,302 patients. A specific pesticide was identified in 7,461 patients; 1,841 ingested an unknown pesticide. In a subset of 808 patients, the history of ingestion was confirmed by laboratory analysis in 95% of patients. There was a large variation in case fatality between pesticides—from 0% to 42%. This marked variation in lethality was observed for compounds within the same chemical and/or WHO toxicity classification of pesticides and for those used for similar agricultural indications. Conclusion The human data provided toxicity rankings for some pesticides that contrasted strongly with the WHO toxicity classification based on rat toxicity. Basing regulation on human toxicity will make pesticide poisoning less hazardous, preventing hundreds of thousands of deaths globally without compromising agricultural needs. Ongoing monitoring of patterns of use and clinical toxicity for new pesticides is needed to identify highly toxic pesticides in a timely manner. Please see later in the

  8. Applied clinical pharmacology and public health in rural Asia – preventing deaths from organophosphorus pesticide and yellow oleander poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Eddleston, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Self-poisoning with pesticides or plants is a major clinical problem in rural Asia, killing several hundred thousand people every year. Over the last 17 years, our clinical toxicology and pharmacology group has carried out clinical studies in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka to improve treatment and reduce deaths. Studies have looked at the effectiveness of anti-digoxin Fab in cardiac glycoside plant poisoning, multiple dose activated charcoal in all poisoning, and pralidoxime in moderate toxicity organophosphorus insecticide poisoning. More recently, using a Haddon matrix as a guide, we have started conducting public health and animal studies to find strategies that may work outside of the hospital. Based on the 2009 GSK Research in Clinical Pharmacology prize lecture, this review shows the evolution of the group's research from a clinical pharmacology approach to one that studies possible interventions at multiple levels, including the patient, the community and government legislation. PMID:22943579

  9. Development of a surveillance program for occupational pesticide poisoning: lessons learned and future directions.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, P G; Shannon, J

    1999-01-01

    The authors describe the growth from 1987 through 1996 of the Occupational Pesticide Poisoning Surveillance Program at the Texas Department of Health. The program was initially based on a Sentinel Event Notification System for Occupational Risks (SENSOR) model, using sentinel providers to report cases, supplementing the passive reporting by physicians that was required by law. The model was evaluated after five years, and significant changes were implemented to improve case ascertainment. Current active surveillance methods emphasize collaboration with a number of agencies and organizations for identification of cases and follow-up. The number of confirmed occupational cases increased from 9 workers in 1987 to 99 workers in 1996. The evolution from a passive system to an active surveillance program expanded the number of reported cases and strengthened inter-agency collaborations.

  10. [A toxicometric assessment of pneumonias and acute respiratory failure in poisonings].

    PubMed

    Iskandarov, A I

    1993-01-01

    The author analyzes clinical and morphologic manifestations of pneumonia and the conditions under which acute respiratory failure formed in 572 subjects who suffered poisoning with psychotropic and soporific drugs, chlorinated hydrocarbons, organophosphorus insecticides, caustic poisons, alcohol and its surrogates. Toxicometric (quantitative) assessment of the toxic effects and measurement of the toxins concentrations under which respiratory failure developed helped detect new mechanisms in the patho- and thanatogenesis of pneumonias and acute respiratory failure in poisonings. These data are of great interest for practical forensic medicine, since they permit substantiating the causes of death in various types of poisonings. The diagram proposed by the author permits assessment of the initial chemical trauma from the clinical and morphologic picture of poisoning.

  11. [Analysis of the structure and causes of acute poisoning of chemical etiology in the Northern Fleet].

    PubMed

    Khankevich, Iu R; Askerko, I V; Myznikov, I L; Domashov, V I

    2012-02-01

    Data for the incidence of acute poisoning among the personnel of the Northern Fleet in 2002-2010 is analyzed, its dynamics and proportion of primary morbidity of sailors. In the class of clinical entity of "injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes" proportion of poisoning in servicemen of different categories was ranging from 0.5 to 1.8%. Deaths occurred in 23.4% of cases of poisoning. Among the causes of poisoning major were--failure to comply with requirements to ensure safe conditions of military service and safe conduct of work, personal indiscipline of injured. Proposals for the prevention of poisoning in the current conditions of service in the Navy are suggested.

  12. Using poisons information service data to assess the acute harms associated with novel psychoactive substances.

    PubMed

    Wood, D M; Hill, S L; Thomas, S H L; Dargan, P I

    2014-01-01

    Novel psychoactive substances (NPS) can cause significant acute toxicity but usually little is known about their toxicity when they enter the recreational drug scene. Current data sources include online user forums, user questionnaires, case reports/series, and deaths; however, these are limited by their focus on sub-populations and generally include severe cases and specific geographical areas. Approximately 54% of countries have at least one poisons information service (in 2012 there were 274 worldwide) providing advice to healthcare professionals and/or the public on poisoning. They provide advice on recreational drug and NPS toxicity. In 2012, 2.5% of telephone enquiries to the UK National Poisons Information Service and 2.4% of enquiries to US poisons centres related to recreational drugs. Data are collected at population level and can be used to complement other data sources with clinical details on acute NPS toxicity and geographical/time patterns of toxicity. Like other acute NPS toxicity data, poisons centre data should be interpreted within their limitations, notably the absence of analytical confirmation and reliance on secondary reporting of clinical features. This manuscript demonstrates the breadth and depth of poisons information service data in the literature with a focus on mephedrone and synthetic cannabinoid-receptor agonists. In our opinion it would be possible to develop a more robust and systematic reporting system using a network of poisons information services both within and across countries that would be complimentary to other datasets on acute NPS toxicity and allow more accurate data triangulation.

  13. A case report of massive acute boric acid poisoning.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Francesco; Brusasco, Claudia; Palermo, Salvatore; Belvederi, Giulio

    2010-02-01

    Boric acid comes as colourless, odourless white powder and, if ingested, has potential fatal effects including metabolic acidosis, acute renal failure and shock. An 82-year-old male was brought to the emergency room 3 h after unintentional ingestion of a large amount of boric acid. Clinical course was monitored by collecting data at admittance, 12 h after admission, every 24 h for 5 days and again 1 week after admission. During the first 132 h, serum and urinary concentrations of boric acid were measured. Serum boric acid levels decreased from 1800 to 530 microg/ml after haemodialysis and from 530 to 30 microg/ml during the forced diuresis period. During dialysis, boric acid clearance averaged 235 ml/min with an extraction ratio of 70%. The overall patient's condition steadily improved over 84 h after admission. In conclusion, early treatment with forced diuresis and haemodialysis may be considered for boric acid poisoning, even if signs of renal dysfunction are not apparent, to prevent severe renal damage and its complications.

  14. A rare neurological complication of acute organophosphorous poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kalyanam, Balamurali; Narayana, Sarala; Kamarthy, Prabhakar

    2013-05-01

    Organophosphorous (OP) compound poisoning is one of the most common causes for admission to the Medical Intensive Care Unit. The morbidity and mortality associated with OP poisoning is due to the action of the compound at the muscarinic, nicotinic receptors, and the central nervous system. Here is a rare case of extrapyramidal manifestations occurring in the intermediate phase of OP poisoning, use of amantidine led to subsiding of the symptoms. PMID:24082514

  15. A Rare Neurological Complication of Acute Organophosphorous Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanam, Balamurali; Narayana, Sarala; Kamarthy, Prabhakar

    2013-01-01

    Organophosphorous (OP) compound poisoning is one of the most common causes for admission to the Medical Intensive Care Unit. The morbidity and mortality associated with OP poisoning is due to the action of the compound at the muscarinic, nicotinic receptors, and the central nervous system. Here is a rare case of extrapyramidal manifestations occurring in the intermediate phase of OP poisoning, use of amantidine led to subsiding of the symptoms. PMID:24082514

  16. Metabolic changes in rat urine after acute paraquat poisoning and discriminated by support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Wen, Congcong; Wang, Zhiyi; Zhang, Meiling; Wang, Shuanghu; Geng, Peiwu; Sun, Fa; Chen, Mengchun; Lin, Guanyang; Hu, Lufeng; Ma, Jianshe; Wang, Xianqin

    2016-01-01

    Paraquat is quick-acting and non-selective, killing green plant tissue on contact; it is also toxic to human beings and animals. In this study, we developed a urine metabonomic method by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to evaluate the effect of acute paraquat poisoning on rats. Pattern recognition analysis, including both partial least squares discriminate analysis and principal component analysis revealed that acute paraquat poisoning induced metabolic perturbations. Compared with the control group, the levels of benzeneacetic acid and hexadecanoic acid of the acute paraquat poisoning group (intragastric administration 36 mg/kg) increased, while the levels of butanedioic acid, pentanedioic acid, altronic acid decreased. Based on these urinary metabolomics data, support vector machine was applied to discriminate the metabolomic change of paraquat groups from the control group, which achieved 100% classification accuracy. In conclusion, metabonomic method combined with support vector machine can be used as a useful diagnostic tool in paraquat-poisoned rats.

  17. Salvianolic Acids Attenuate Rat Hippocampal Injury after Acute CO Poisoning by Improving Blood Flow Properties

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Li; Zhang, Yan-Lin; Li, Zong-Yang; Zhu, Ming-Xia; Yao, Wei-Juan; Zhao, Jin-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning causes the major injury and death due to poisoning worldwide. The most severe damage via CO poisoning is brain injury and mortality. Delayed encephalopathy after acute CO poisoning (DEACMP) occurs in forty percent of the survivors of acute CO exposure. But the pathological cause for DEACMP is not well understood. And the corresponding therapy is not well developed. In order to investigate the effects of salvianolic acid (SA) on brain injury caused by CO exposure from the view point of hemorheology, we employed a rat model and studied the dynamic of blood changes in the hemorheological and coagulative properties over acute CO exposure. Compared with the groups of CO and 20% mannitol + CO treatments, the severe hippocampal injury caused by acute CO exposure was prevented by SA treatment. These protective effects were associated with the retaining level of hematocrit (Hct), plasma viscosity, fibrinogen, whole blood viscosities and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in red blood cells (RBCs). These results indicated that SA treatment could significantly improve the deformation of erythrocytes and prevent the damage caused by CO poisoning. Meanwhile, hemorheological indexes are good indicators for monitoring the pathological dynamic after acute CO poisoning. PMID:25705671

  18. [Poison cases and types of poisons based on data obtained of patients hospitalized from 1995-2009 with acute poisoning in the second internal ward in a multi-profile provincial hospital in Tarnow].

    PubMed

    Lata, Stanisław; Janiszewski, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    The thesis presents a short history and organization of an acute poisoning centre in the1995 functioning within the internal diseases department in a multi-profile provincial hospital. The data show the number of patients treated beetween 1995-2009 an the types of toxic substances that caused poisoning. The conclusions presented refer to the role of the centre to help people suffering from acute poisoning within the city of Tarnow.

  19. Continued implication of the banned pesticides carbofuran and aldicarb in the poisoning of domestic and wild animals of the Canary Islands (Spain).

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Suárez, Norberto; Boada, Luis D; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A; González-Moreo, Federico; Suárez-Pérez, Alejandro; Camacho, María; Zumbado, Manuel; Almeida-González, Maira; Del Mar Travieso-Aja, María; Luzardo, Octavio P

    2015-02-01

    Although nowadays the intentional poisoning of domestic and wild animals is a crime in EU, in the past the poison was used in rural areas of a number of European countries to kill animals that were considered harmful for human activities. In Spain evidences indicate that intentional poisonings continue to occur throughout the entire country nowadays. This situation seems to be of particular concern in the Canary Islands (Spain), where this study was performed. Our results confirmed that 225 animals were poisoned by pesticides over the study period (32 months; 2010-2013). The intentionality of the poisoning was confirmed in 117 cases. It has to be highlighted that the other 108 animals also died by pesticide poisoning, although the intentionality was only suspected. This incidence is currently the highest reported in any region from European Union. The pesticides carbofuran, bromadiolone, brodifacoum and aldicarb were the most frequently detected involved. Among the affected species, it has to be highlighted that endangered species are frequently affected in poisoning incidents. Notably, chemicals banned in the EU (carbofuran and aldicarb) were identified in approximately 75% of cases, and in almost 100% of baits, which suggests that these pesticides are still available to the population. Several circumstances may explain these results. Firstly, little control over the sale and possession of pesticide products, and the potential existence of an illegal market of pesticides banned in the European Union in the neighbouring African continent. In addition, the limited awareness of the population about the dangerousness of these compounds, for the environment, animals, or even people, make the situation very worrying in these islands. Stronger regulations, control of legal and illegal pesticide use, development of educational programs and legal action in poisoning incidents are needed to decrease the impact of pesticide misuse on wildlife and domestic animals.

  20. Continued implication of the banned pesticides carbofuran and aldicarb in the poisoning of domestic and wild animals of the Canary Islands (Spain).

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Suárez, Norberto; Boada, Luis D; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A; González-Moreo, Federico; Suárez-Pérez, Alejandro; Camacho, María; Zumbado, Manuel; Almeida-González, Maira; Del Mar Travieso-Aja, María; Luzardo, Octavio P

    2015-02-01

    Although nowadays the intentional poisoning of domestic and wild animals is a crime in EU, in the past the poison was used in rural areas of a number of European countries to kill animals that were considered harmful for human activities. In Spain evidences indicate that intentional poisonings continue to occur throughout the entire country nowadays. This situation seems to be of particular concern in the Canary Islands (Spain), where this study was performed. Our results confirmed that 225 animals were poisoned by pesticides over the study period (32 months; 2010-2013). The intentionality of the poisoning was confirmed in 117 cases. It has to be highlighted that the other 108 animals also died by pesticide poisoning, although the intentionality was only suspected. This incidence is currently the highest reported in any region from European Union. The pesticides carbofuran, bromadiolone, brodifacoum and aldicarb were the most frequently detected involved. Among the affected species, it has to be highlighted that endangered species are frequently affected in poisoning incidents. Notably, chemicals banned in the EU (carbofuran and aldicarb) were identified in approximately 75% of cases, and in almost 100% of baits, which suggests that these pesticides are still available to the population. Several circumstances may explain these results. Firstly, little control over the sale and possession of pesticide products, and the potential existence of an illegal market of pesticides banned in the European Union in the neighbouring African continent. In addition, the limited awareness of the population about the dangerousness of these compounds, for the environment, animals, or even people, make the situation very worrying in these islands. Stronger regulations, control of legal and illegal pesticide use, development of educational programs and legal action in poisoning incidents are needed to decrease the impact of pesticide misuse on wildlife and domestic animals. PMID

  1. Characteristics of Children with Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Ankara: A Single Centre Experience

    PubMed Central

    Unsal Sac, Rukiye; Bostancı, İlknur; Şimşek, Yurda; Bilge Dallar, Yıldız

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to define characteristics of children with acute carbon monoxide poisoning. Eighty children hospitalized with acute carbon monoxide poisoning were recruited prospectively over a period of 12 months. Sociodemographic features, complaints and laboratory data were recorded. When the patient was discharged, necessary preventive measures to be taken were explained to parents. One month later, the parents were questioned during a control examination regarding the precautions that they took. The ages of the cases were between one month and 16 yr. Education levels were low in 86.2% of mothers and 52.6% of fathers. All families had low income and 48.8% did not have formal housing. The source of the acute carbon monoxide poisoning was stoves in 71.2% of cases and hot-water heaters in 28.8% of cases. Three or more people were poisoned at home in 85.1% of the cases. The most frequent symptoms of poisoning were headache and vertigo (58.8%). Median carboxyhemoglobin levels at admission to the hospital and discharge were measured as 19.5% and 1.1% (P < 0.001). When families were called for re-evaluation, it was determined that most of them had taken the necessary precautions after the poisoning incident (86.3%). This study determined that children with acute childhood carbon monoxide poisoning are usually from families with low socioeconomic and education levels. Education about prevention should be provided to all people who are at risk of carbon monoxide poisoning before a poisoning incident occurs. PMID:26713060

  2. Characteristics of Children with Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Ankara: A Single Centre Experience.

    PubMed

    Unsal Sac, Rukiye; Taşar, Medine Ayşin; Bostancı, İlknur; Şimşek, Yurda; Bilge Dallar, Yıldız

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to define characteristics of children with acute carbon monoxide poisoning. Eighty children hospitalized with acute carbon monoxide poisoning were recruited prospectively over a period of 12 months. Sociodemographic features, complaints and laboratory data were recorded. When the patient was discharged, necessary preventive measures to be taken were explained to parents. One month later, the parents were questioned during a control examination regarding the precautions that they took. The ages of the cases were between one month and 16 yr. Education levels were low in 86.2% of mothers and 52.6% of fathers. All families had low income and 48.8% did not have formal housing. The source of the acute carbon monoxide poisoning was stoves in 71.2% of cases and hot-water heaters in 28.8% of cases. Three or more people were poisoned at home in 85.1% of the cases. The most frequent symptoms of poisoning were headache and vertigo (58.8%). Median carboxyhemoglobin levels at admission to the hospital and discharge were measured as 19.5% and 1.1% (P < 0.001). When families were called for re-evaluation, it was determined that most of them had taken the necessary precautions after the poisoning incident (86.3%). This study determined that children with acute childhood carbon monoxide poisoning are usually from families with low socioeconomic and education levels. Education about prevention should be provided to all people who are at risk of carbon monoxide poisoning before a poisoning incident occurs.

  3. Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Exposure to Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Offie P.; Nsouly-Maktabi, Hala; Genkinger, Jeanine M.; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Ortega-Garcia, Juan Antonio; Colantino, Drew; Barr, Dana B.; Luban, Naomi L.; Shad, Aziza T.; Nelson, David

    2013-01-01

    Organophosphates are pesticides ubiquitous in the environment and have been hypothesized as one of the risk factors for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this study, we evaluated the associations of pesticide exposure in a residential environment with the risk for pediatric ALL. This is a case–control study of children newly diagnosed with ALL, and their mothers (n = 41 child–mother pairs) were recruited from Georgetown University Medical Center and Children's National Medical Center in Washington, DC, between January 2005 and January 2008. Cases and controls were matched for age, sex, and county of residence. Environmental exposures were determined by questionnaire and by urinalysis of pesticide metabolites using isotope dilution gas chromatography–high-resolution mass spectrometry. We found that more case mothers (33%) than controls (14%) reported using insecticides in the home (P < 0.02). Other environmental exposures to toxic substances were not significantly associated with the risk of ALL. Pesticide levels were higher in cases than in controls (P < 0.05). Statistically significant differences were found between children with ALL and controls for the organophosphate metabolites diethylthiophosphate (P < 0.03) and diethyldithiophosphate (P < 0.05). The association of ALL risk with pesticide exposure merits further studies to confirm the association. PMID:19571777

  4. Analytical methods used in the United Kingdom Wildlife Incident Investigation Scheme for the detection of animal poisoning by pesticides.

    PubMed

    Brown, Peter M; Turnbull, Gordon; Charman, Sheonaidh; Charlton, Andrew J A; Jones, Ainsley

    2005-01-01

    The United Kingdom Wildlife Incident Investigation Scheme (WIIS) investigates cases of suspected poisoning of wildlife, honey bees, and companion animals by pesticides. Together with field inquiries and veterinary post-mortem examinations, the analytical procedures presented here provide a comprehensive approach to the investigation of these cases. The paper covers selection of animal tissues for analysis and methods suitable for the analysis of honey bees and for various types of bait. Seven multiresidue methods cover around 130 pesticides, and methods are also described for a further 8 compounds. These methods are currently used on samples submitted to the Scheme in England and Wales.

  5. Acetaminophen Poisoning and Risk of Acute Pancreatitis: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sy-Jou; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether acetaminophen poisoning is associated with a higher risk of acute pancreatitis. We conducted a retrospective cohort study by using the longitudinal population-based database of Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI) program between 2000 and 2011. The acetaminophen cohort comprised patients aged ≥ 20 years with newly identified acetaminophen poisoning (N = 2958). The comparison cohort comprised randomly selected patients with no history of acetaminophen poisoning. The acetaminophen and comparison cohorts were frequency matched by age, sex, and index year (N = 11,832) at a 1:4 ratio. Each patient was followed up from the index date until the date an acute pancreatitis diagnosis was made, withdrawal from the NHI program, or December 31, 2011. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine the effects of acetaminophen on the risk of acute pancreatitis.The risk of acute pancreatitis was 3.11-fold higher in the acetaminophen cohort than in the comparison cohort (11.2 vs 3.61 per 10,000 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.40 (95% confidence interval, 1.29-4.47). The incidence rate was considerably high in patients who were aged 35 to 49 years, men, those who had comorbidities, and within the first year of follow-up.Acetaminophen poisoning is associated with an increased risk of acute pancreatitis. Additional prospective studies are necessary to verify how acetaminophen poisoning affects the risk of acute pancreatitis.

  6. Organophosphate Poisoning and Subsequent Acute Kidney Injury Risk: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Feng-You; Chen, Wei-Kung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lai, Ching-Yuan; Wu, Yung-Shun; Lin, I-Ching; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-11-01

    Small numbers of the papers have studied the association between organophosphate (OP) poisoning and the subsequent acute kidney injury (AKI). Therefore, we used the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) to study whether patients with OP poisoning are associated with a higher risk to have subsequent AKI.The retrospective cohort study comprised patients aged ≥20 years with OP poisoning and hospitalized diagnosis during 2000-2011 (N = 8924). Each OP poisoning patient was frequency-matched to 4 control patients based on age, sex, index year, and comorbidities of diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary artery disease, and stroke (N = 35,696). We conducted Cox proportional hazard regression analysis to estimate the effects of OP poisoning on AKI risk.The overall incidence of AKI was higher in the patients with OP poisoning than in the controls (4.85 vs 3.47/1000 person-years). After adjustment for age, sex, comorbidity, and interaction terms, patients with OP poisoning were associated with a 6.17-fold higher risk of AKI compared with the comparison cohort. Patients with highly severe OP poisoning were associated with a substantially increased risk of AKI.The study found OP poisoning is associated with increased risk of subsequent AKI. Future studies are encouraged to evaluate whether long-term effects exist and the best guideline to prevent the continuously impaired renal function.

  7. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACMT Recognition Awards Annual Scientific Meeting Travel Scholarships Pesticides Public Health > Public > Toxicology FAQ's > Pesticides Pesticides What are pesticides ? How do pesticides work ? How ...

  8. Cholestatic presentation of yellow phosphorus poisoning.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, C P; Goel, Amit; Basu, Debdatta

    2014-01-01

    Yellow phosphorus, a component of certain pesticide pastes and fireworks, is well known to cause hepatotoxicity. Poisoning with yellow phosphorus classically manifests with acute hepatitis leading to acute liver failure which may need liver transplantation. We present a case of yellow phosphorus poisoning in which a patient presented with florid clinical features of cholestasis highlighting the fact that cholestasis can rarely be a presenting feature of yellow phosphorus hepatotoxicity. PMID:24554916

  9. Comparison of two commonly practiced atropinisation regimens in acute organophosphorus and carbamate poisoning, doubling doses vs ‘ad hoc’ - a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Perera, P.M.S.; Shahmy, S.; Gawarammana, I.; Dawson, A.H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective There is wide variation and lack of evidence in current recommendations for atropine dosing schedules leading to subsequent variation in clinical practice. Therefore we sought to examine the safety and effectiveness of a titrated versus ‘ad hoc’ atropine treatment regimen in a cohort of patients with acute cholinesterase inhibitor pesticide poisoning. Design A prospective cohort study was conducted in 3 district secondary referral hospitals in Sri Lanka using a structured data collection form that collected details of clinical symptoms and outcomes of cholinesterase inhibitor pesticide poisoning, atropine doses and signs of atropinisation. We compared two hospitals that used a titrated dosing protocol based on a structured monitoring sheet for atropine infusion with another hospital using an ‘ad hoc’ regime. Findings During the study 272 symptomatic patients with anticholinesterase poisoning requiring atropine were admitted to the three hospitals. Outcomes of death and ventilation were analyzed for all patients, 226 patients were prospectively assessed for atropine toxicity. At baseline patients in the titrated dose cohort had clinical signs consistent with greater toxicity. This in part may be due to ingestion of more toxic OPs. They received less pralidoxime and atropine and were less likely to develop features of atropine toxicity such as delirium (1% vs 17%), hallucinations (1% vs 35%) or either (1% vs 35%) and need for patient restraint (3% vs 48%) compared with the ‘ad hoc’ dose regime. After adjusting for the pesticides ingested, there was no difference in mortality and ventilatory rates between protocols. Conclusions ‘Ad hoc’ high dose atropine regimens are associated with more frequent atropine toxicity without any obvious improvement in patient outcome compared with doses titrated to clinical effect. Atropine doses should be titrated against response and toxicity. Further education and the use of a structured monitoring sheet may

  10. Comparison of two commonly practiced atropinization regimens in acute organophosphorus and carbamate poisoning, doubling doses vs. ad hoc: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Perera, P M S; Shahmy, S; Gawarammana, I; Dawson, A H

    2008-06-01

    There is a wide variation and lack of evidence in current recommendations for atropine dosing schedules leading to subsequent variation in clinical practice. Therefore, we sought to examine the safety and effectiveness of a titrated vs. ad hoc atropine treatment regimen in a cohort of patients with acute cholinesterase inhibitor pesticide poisoning. A prospective cohort study was conducted in three district secondary referral hospitals in Sri Lanka using a structured data collection form that collected details of clinical symptoms and outcomes of cholinesterase inhibitor pesticide poisoning, atropine doses, and signs of atropinization. We compared two hospitals that used a titrated dosing protocol based on a structured monitoring sheet for atropine infusion with another hospital using an ad hoc regime. During the study, 272 symptomatic patients with anticholinesterase poisoning requiring atropine were admitted to the three hospitals. Outcomes of death and ventilation were analyzed for all patients, 226 patients were prospectively assessed for atropine toxicity. At baseline, patients in the titrated dose cohort had clinical signs consistent with greater toxicity. This in part may be due to ingestion of more toxic organophosphates. They received less pralidoxime and atropine, and were less likely to develop features of atropine toxicity, such as delirium (1% vs. 17%), hallucinations (1% vs. 35%), or either (1% vs. 35%) and need for patient restraint (3% vs. 48%) compared with the ad hoc dose regime. After adjusting for the pesticides ingested, there was no difference in mortality and ventilatory rates between protocols. Ad hoc high dose atropine regimens are associated with more frequent atropine toxicity without any obvious improvement in patient outcome compared with doses titrated to clinical effect. Atropine doses should be titrated against response and toxicity. Further education and the use of a structured monitoring sheet may assist in more appropriate

  11. Biological valuation of extra-corporeal techniques in acute poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bismuth, C

    1990-01-01

    The efficiency of dialysis methods a/o hemoperfusion in acute poisoning cannot be clinically estimated, because: a) Concomitant intestinal absorption, hepatic metabolism and urinary excretion must be taken into account. b) With supportive treatment alone, spontaneous recovery usually occurs in 98% of the intoxications in Intensive Care Units. The efficiency of these methods can only be estimated biologically. Measuring the blood level at the beginning and the end of the treatment as well as measuring the clearances of the drug is misleading. A better method is to measure the amount of extracted drug, either indirectly by calculation (from hourly differences of arteriovenous measures of drug concentration multiplied by the blood flow) or directly by elution of the cartridge or measures in dialysis fluid. Plasma kinetics under dialysis a/o hemoperfusion should be compared with spontaneous toxicokinetic of the substance and not with pharmacokinetic data. The experience of toxicologists has shown dialysis a/o hemoperfusion to be ineffective for drugs with weak extra-cellular distribution (such as Digoxine, Tricyclic drugs, heavy Metals, Colchicine). In the case of intoxication with Paraquat or Paracetamol, there is a negative correlation between the amount of removed intoxicant and the survival: death is likely to occur when the procedure has been very productive. In the case of intoxication by hypnotic drugs, one hemodialysis a/o hemoperfusion allows the removal of an average of 4-12% of the ingested barbiturates, 7-17% of the ingested Meprobamate. Whether these results can be judged satisfactory, life-saving of insignificant is largely a matter of personal standards. PMID:2239063

  12. Hospital Performance Indicators and Their Associated Factors in Acute Child Poisoning at a Single Poison Center, Central Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Menyfah Q; Al-Jeriasy, Majed I; Al-Assiri, Mohammed H; Afesh, Lara Y; Alhammad, Fahad; Salam, Mahmoud

    2015-12-01

    Admission rate and length of stay (LOS) are two hospital performance indicators that affect the quality of care, patients' satisfaction, bed turnover, and health cost expenditures. The aim of the study was to identify factors associated with higher admission rates and extended average LOS among acutely poisoned children at a single poison center, central Saudi Arabia.This is a cross-sectional, poison and medical chart review between 2009 and 2011. Exposures were child characteristics, that is, gender, age, body mass index (BMI), health history, and Canadian 5-level triage scale. Poison incident characteristics were, that is, type, exposure route, amount, form, home remedy, and arrival time to center. Admission status and LOS were obtained from records. Chronic poisoning, plant allergies, and venomous bites were excluded. Bivariate and regression analyses were applied. Significance at P < 0.05.Of the 315 eligible cases, (72%) were toddlers with equal gender distribution, (58%) had normal BMI, and (77%) were previously healthy. Poison substances were pharmaceutical drugs (63%) versus chemical products (37%). Main exposure route was oral (98%). Home remedy was observed in (21.9%), which were fluids, solutes, and/or gag-induced vomiting. Almost (52%) arrived to center >1 h. Triage levels: non-urgent cases (58%), less urgent (11%), urgent (18%), emergency (12%), resuscitative (1%). Admission rate was (20.6%) whereas av. LOS was 13 ± 22 h. After adjusting and controlling for confounders, older children (adj.OR = 1.19) and more critical triage levels (adj.OR = 1.35) were significantly associated with higher admission rates compared to younger children and less critical triage levels (adj.P = 0.006) and (adj.P = 0.042) respectively. Home remedy prior arrival was significantly associated with higher av. LOS (Beta = 9.48, t = 2.99), compared to those who directly visited the center, adj.P = 0.003.Hospital administrators are cautioned

  13. Hospital Performance Indicators and Their Associated Factors in Acute Child Poisoning at a Single Poison Center, Central Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Menyfah Q; Al-Jeriasy, Majed I; Al-Assiri, Mohammed H; Afesh, Lara Y; Alhammad, Fahad; Salam, Mahmoud

    2015-12-01

    Admission rate and length of stay (LOS) are two hospital performance indicators that affect the quality of care, patients' satisfaction, bed turnover, and health cost expenditures. The aim of the study was to identify factors associated with higher admission rates and extended average LOS among acutely poisoned children at a single poison center, central Saudi Arabia.This is a cross-sectional, poison and medical chart review between 2009 and 2011. Exposures were child characteristics, that is, gender, age, body mass index (BMI), health history, and Canadian 5-level triage scale. Poison incident characteristics were, that is, type, exposure route, amount, form, home remedy, and arrival time to center. Admission status and LOS were obtained from records. Chronic poisoning, plant allergies, and venomous bites were excluded. Bivariate and regression analyses were applied. Significance at P < 0.05.Of the 315 eligible cases, (72%) were toddlers with equal gender distribution, (58%) had normal BMI, and (77%) were previously healthy. Poison substances were pharmaceutical drugs (63%) versus chemical products (37%). Main exposure route was oral (98%). Home remedy was observed in (21.9%), which were fluids, solutes, and/or gag-induced vomiting. Almost (52%) arrived to center >1 h. Triage levels: non-urgent cases (58%), less urgent (11%), urgent (18%), emergency (12%), resuscitative (1%). Admission rate was (20.6%) whereas av. LOS was 13 ± 22 h. After adjusting and controlling for confounders, older children (adj.OR = 1.19) and more critical triage levels (adj.OR = 1.35) were significantly associated with higher admission rates compared to younger children and less critical triage levels (adj.P = 0.006) and (adj.P = 0.042) respectively. Home remedy prior arrival was significantly associated with higher av. LOS (Beta = 9.48, t = 2.99), compared to those who directly visited the center, adj.P = 0.003.Hospital administrators are cautioned

  14. [Homeostasis changes during rehabilitation period after acute chemical poisoning].

    PubMed

    Badalian, A V; Luzhnikov, E A; Gol'dfarb, Iu S; Godkov, M A; Khvatov, V B; Bitkova, E E; El'kov, A N; Il'iashenko, K K; Nikulina, V P; Matveev, S B

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with review of 78 patients of rehabilitation toxicological unit. The patients received resuscitation and detoxification. All patients were divided into three groups; 1st group--patients after poisoning with psychopharmaceuticals, 2nd group--patients after poisoning with cauterizing liquids and 3rd group--patients with encephalopathy after poisoning with neurotoxin (psychopharmaceuticals, narcotics and ethanol). Disorders of rheology, haemostasis and endotoxicosis accrued in all groups. These disorders were a signs of the erythrocytes and platelets aggregation developing and viscoelasticity disorder. Homeostasis changes during rehabilitation period need an accurate diagnostics for purposeful treatment of the defined disorders.

  15. An interesting cause of pulmonary emboli: Acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Sevinc, A.; Savli, H.; Atmaca, H.

    2005-07-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning, a public health problem of considerable significance, is a relatively frequent event today, resulting in thousands of hospitalizations annually. A 70-year-old lady was seen in the emergency department with a provisional diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning. The previous night, she slept in a tightly closed room heated with coal ember. She was found unconscious in the morning with poor ventilation. She had a rare presentation of popliteal vein thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, and possible tissue necrosis with carbon monoxide poisoning. Oxygen treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin (nadroparine) and warfarin therapy resulted in an improvement in both popliteal and pulmonary circulations. In conclusion, the presence of pulmonary emboli should be sought in patients with carbon monoxide poisoning.

  16. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning: Emergency management and hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Severance, H.W.; Kolb, J.C.; Carlton, F.B.; Jorden, R.C.

    1989-10-01

    An ice storm in February 1989 resulted in numerous incidences of carbon monoxide poisoning in central Mississippi secondary to exposure to open fires in unventilated living spaces. Sixteen cases were treated during this period at the University of Mississippi Medical Center and 6 received Hyperbaric Oxygen therapy. These 6 cases and the mechanisms of CO poisoning are discussed and recommendations for emergency management are reviewed.10 references.

  17. Pesticide exposure in children.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    This statement presents the position of the American Academy of Pediatrics on pesticides. Pesticides are a collective term for chemicals intended to kill unwanted insects, plants, molds, and rodents. Children encounter pesticides daily and have unique susceptibilities to their potential toxicity. Acute poisoning risks are clear, and understanding of chronic health implications from both acute and chronic exposure are emerging. Epidemiologic evidence demonstrates associations between early life exposure to pesticides and pediatric cancers, decreased cognitive function, and behavioral problems. Related animal toxicology studies provide supportive biological plausibility for these findings. Recognizing and reducing problematic exposures will require attention to current inadequacies in medical training, public health tracking, and regulatory action on pesticides. Ongoing research describing toxicologic vulnerabilities and exposure factors across the life span are needed to inform regulatory needs and appropriate interventions. Policies that promote integrated pest management, comprehensive pesticide labeling, and marketing practices that incorporate child health considerations will enhance safe use. PMID:23184103

  18. Acute kidney injury and disseminated intravascular coagulation due to mercuric chloride poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Dhanapriya, J.; Gopalakrishnan, N.; Arun, V.; Dineshkumar, T.; Sakthirajan, R.; Balasubramaniyan, T.; Haris, M.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic heavy metal and occurs in organic and inorganic forms. Inorganic mercury includes elemental mercury and mercury salts. Mercury salts are usually white powder or crystals, and widely used in indigenous medicines and folk remedies in Asia. Inorganic mercury poisoning causes acute kidney injury (AKI) and gastrointestinal manifestations and can be life-threatening. We describe a case with unknown substance poisoning who developed AKI and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis. Later, the consumed substance was proven to be mercuric chloride. His renal failure improved over time, and his creatinine normalized after 2 months. PMID:27194836

  19. [Acute poisoning of an infant by cutaneous application of a local counterirritant and pulmonary antiseptic salve].

    PubMed

    Dupeyron, J P; Quattrocchi, F; Castaing, H; Fabiani, P

    1976-01-01

    The case of acute poisoning reported here raises the question of the harmlessness of preparations destined for cutaneous application in infants. After describing the method perfected for the identification and estimation of camphor, menthol and thymol in biological material, the authors present the toxicological, clinical and biological arguments in favour of the notion that the cutaneous resorption of these substances was responsible for this acute intoxication in an infant. Particular attention should be paid to poisoning which may result, in the newborn and infant, from the cutaneous application of active substances. PMID:1010000

  20. Comparative analysis of acute toxic poisoning in 2003 and 2011: analysis of 3 academic hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hak-Soo; Kim, Jung-Youn; Choi, Sung-Hyuk; Yoon, Young-Hoon; Moon, Sung-Woo; Hong, Yun-Sik; Lee, Sung-Woo

    2013-10-01

    Social factors may affect the available sources of toxic substances and causes of poisoning; and these factors may change over time. Additionally, understanding the characteristics of patients with acute toxic poisoning is important for treating such patients. Therefore, this study investigated the characteristics of patients with toxic poisoning. Patients visiting one of 3 hospitals in 2003 and 2011 were included in this study. Data on all patients who were admitted to the emergency departments with acute toxic poisoning were retrospectively obtained from medical records. Total 939 patients were analyzed. The average age of patients was 40.0 ± 20 yr, and 335 (36.9%) patients were men. Among the elements that did not change over time were the facts that suicide was the most common cause, that alcohol consumption was involved in roughly 1 of 4 cases, and that there were more women than men. Furthermore, acetaminophen and doxylamine remained the most common poisoning agents. In conclusion, the average patient age and psychotic drug poisoning has increased over time, and the use of lavage treatment has decreased.

  1. A Case of Mushroom Poisoning with Russula subnigricans: Development of Rhabdomyolysis, Acute Kidney Injury, Cardiogenic Shock, and Death

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mushroom exposures are increasing worldwide. The incidence and fatality of mushroom poisoning are reported to be increasing. Several new syndromes in mushroom poisoning have been described. Rhabdomyolytic mushroom poisoning is one of new syndromes. Russula subnigricans mushroom can cause delayed-onset rhabdomyolysis with acute kidney injury in the severely poisoned patient. There are few reports on the toxicity of R. subnigricans. This report represents the first record of R. subnigricans poisoning with rhabdomyolysis in Korea, describing a 51-year-old man who suffered from rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, severe hypocalcemia, respiratory failure, ventricular tachycardia, cardiogenic shock, and death. Mushroom poisoning should be considered in the evaluation of rhabdomyolysis of unknown cause. Furthermore, R. subnigricans should be considered in the mushroom poisoning with rhabdomyolysis. PMID:27366018

  2. Should hyperbaric oxygen be used to treat the pregnant patient for acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoesen, K.B.; Camporesi, E.M.; Moon, R.E.; Hage, M.L.; Piantadosi, C.A. )

    1989-02-17

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is the leading cause of death due to poisoning. Although uncommon, CO poisoning does occur during pregnancy and can result in fetal mortality and neurological malformations in fetuses who survive to term. Uncertainty arises regarding the use of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) as a treatment for the pregnant patient because of possible adverse effects on the fetus that could be induced by oxygen at high partial pressures. While the dangers of hyperoxia to the fetus have been demonstrated in animal models, careful review of animal studies and human clinical experience indicates that the short duration of hyperoxic exposure attained during HBO therapy for CO poisoning can be tolerated by the fetus in all stages of pregnancy and reduces the risk of death or deformity to the mother and fetus. A case is presented of acute CO poisoning during pregnancy that was successfully treated with HBO. Recommendations are suggested for the use of HBO during pregnancy.

  3. Multi-residue method for the determination of pesticides and pesticide metabolites in honeybees by liquid and gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry--Honeybee poisoning incidents.

    PubMed

    Kiljanek, Tomasz; Niewiadowska, Alicja; Semeniuk, Stanisław; Gaweł, Marta; Borzęcka, Milena; Posyniak, Andrzej

    2016-02-26

    A method for the determination of 200 pesticides and pesticide metabolites in honeybee samples has been developed and validated. Almost 98% of compounds included in this method are approved to use within European Union, as active substances of plant protection products or veterinary medicinal products used by beekeepers to control mites Varroa destructor in hives. Many significant metabolites, like metabolites of imidacloprid, thiacloprid, fipronil, methiocarb and amitraz, are also possible to detect. The sample preparation was based on the buffered QuEChERS method. Samples of bees were extracted with acetonitrile containing 1% acetic acid and then subjected to clean-up by dispersive solid phase extraction (dSPE) using a new Z-Sep+ sorbent and PSA. The majority of pesticides, including neonicotionoids and their metabolites, were analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) but some of pesticides, especially pyrethroid insecticides, were analyzed by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The procedure was validated according to the Guidance document SANCO/12571/2013 at four concentration levels: 1, 5, 10 and 100 ng/g bees and verified in the international proficiency test. The analysis of bee samples spiked at the limit of quantification (LOQ) showed about 98% mean recovery value (trueness) and 97% of analytes showed recovery in the required range of 70-120% and RSDr (precision) below 20%. Linearity and matrix effects were also established. The LOQs of pesticides were in the range of 1-100 ng/g. The developed method allows determination of insecticides at concentrations of 10 ng/g or less, except abamectin and tebufenozide. LOQ values are lower than the median lethal doses LD50 for bees. The method was used to investigate more than 70 honeybee poisoning incidents. Data about detected pesticides and their metabolites are included. PMID:26830634

  4. Multi-residue method for the determination of pesticides and pesticide metabolites in honeybees by liquid and gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry--Honeybee poisoning incidents.

    PubMed

    Kiljanek, Tomasz; Niewiadowska, Alicja; Semeniuk, Stanisław; Gaweł, Marta; Borzęcka, Milena; Posyniak, Andrzej

    2016-02-26

    A method for the determination of 200 pesticides and pesticide metabolites in honeybee samples has been developed and validated. Almost 98% of compounds included in this method are approved to use within European Union, as active substances of plant protection products or veterinary medicinal products used by beekeepers to control mites Varroa destructor in hives. Many significant metabolites, like metabolites of imidacloprid, thiacloprid, fipronil, methiocarb and amitraz, are also possible to detect. The sample preparation was based on the buffered QuEChERS method. Samples of bees were extracted with acetonitrile containing 1% acetic acid and then subjected to clean-up by dispersive solid phase extraction (dSPE) using a new Z-Sep+ sorbent and PSA. The majority of pesticides, including neonicotionoids and their metabolites, were analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) but some of pesticides, especially pyrethroid insecticides, were analyzed by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The procedure was validated according to the Guidance document SANCO/12571/2013 at four concentration levels: 1, 5, 10 and 100 ng/g bees and verified in the international proficiency test. The analysis of bee samples spiked at the limit of quantification (LOQ) showed about 98% mean recovery value (trueness) and 97% of analytes showed recovery in the required range of 70-120% and RSDr (precision) below 20%. Linearity and matrix effects were also established. The LOQs of pesticides were in the range of 1-100 ng/g. The developed method allows determination of insecticides at concentrations of 10 ng/g or less, except abamectin and tebufenozide. LOQ values are lower than the median lethal doses LD50 for bees. The method was used to investigate more than 70 honeybee poisoning incidents. Data about detected pesticides and their metabolites are included.

  5. [Mallory-Weiss syndrome in acute poisoning with non-caustic substances].

    PubMed

    Sinev, Iu V; Luzhnikov, E A; Sordiia, D G

    1990-09-01

    The authors presented the results of diagnostic and therapeutic esophagogastroduodenoscopy in the Mallory-Weiss syndrome observed in patients with acute ++non-caustic poisoning. Altogether 47 patients were investigated for suspected gastrointestinal bleeding. The Mallory-Weiss syndrome was detected in 20 (42.5%) patients. Therapeutic endoscopic intervention was performed in 5 cases of this syndrome to stop bleeding.

  6. [Dynamics of blood gases and acid-base balance in patients with carbon monoxide acute poisoning].

    PubMed

    Polozova, E V; Shilov, V V; Bogachova, A S; Davydova, E V

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of blood gases and acid-base balance covered patients with carbon monoxide acute poisoning, in accordance with inhalation trauma presence. Evidence is that thermochemical injury of respiratory tract induced severe acid-base dysbalance remaining decompensated for a long time despite the treatment.

  7. Organophosphate poisoning complicated by a tachyarrhythmia and acute respiratory distress syndrome in a child.

    PubMed

    Nel, L; Hatherill, M; Davies, J; Andronikou, S; Stirling, J; Reynolds, L; Argent, A

    2002-10-01

    A 9-year-old child presented with documented organophosphate insecticide poisoning. His course was initially complicated by a tachyarrhythmia with QT-interval prolongation that responded promptly to intravenous magnesium. However, following partial recovery, he developed progressive acute respiratory distress syndrome characterized by irreversible fibrosis and obliteration of the lung parenchyma. PMID:12354276

  8. Oral administration of lactulose: a novel therapy for acute carbon monoxide poisoning via increasing intestinal hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dan-Feng; Hu, Hui-Jun; Sun, Xue-Jun; Meng, Xiang-En; Zhang, Yu; Pan, Shu-Yi

    2016-01-01

    It has been known that the pathophysiology of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is related to hypoxia, the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. Studies have shown that the novel, safe and effective free radical scavenger, hydrogen, has neuroprotective effects in both acute CO poisoning and delayed neuropsychological sequelae in CO poisoning. Orally administered lactulose, which may be used by some intestinal bacteria as a food source to produce endogenous hydrogen, can ameliorate oxidative stress. Based on the available findings, we hypothesize that oral administration of lactulose may be a novel therapy for acute CO poisoning via increasing intestinal hydrogen production.

  9. A review of acute cyanide poisoning with a treatment update.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Jillian

    2011-02-01

    Cyanide causes intracellular hypoxia by reversibly binding to mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase a(3). Signs and symptoms of cyanide poisoning usually occur less than 1 minute after inhalation and within a few minutes after ingestion. Early manifestations include anxiety, headache, giddiness, inability to focus the eyes, and mydriasis. As hypoxia progresses, progressively lower levels of consciousness, seizures, and coma can occur. Skin may look normal or slightly ashen, and arterial oxygen saturation may be normal. Early respiratory signs include transient rapid and deep respirations. As poisoning progresses, hemodynamic status may become unstable. The key treatment is early administration of 1 of the 2 antidotes currently available in the United States: the well-known cyanide antidote kit and hydroxocobalamin. Hydroxocobalamin detoxifies cyanide by binding with it to form the renally excreted, non-toxic cyanocobalamin. Because it binds with cyanide without forming methemoglobin, hydroxocobalamin can be used to treat patients without compromising the oxygen-carrying capacity of hemoglobin.

  10. Cardiac manifestations of acute carbamate and organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Saadeh, A. M.; Farsakh, N. A.; al-Ali, M. K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the frequency, extent, and pathogenesis of the cardiac complications accompanying organophosphate and carbamate poisoning. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: A medical intensive care unit (MICU) of a general hospital. SUBJECTS: 46 adult patients admitted over a five year period with a diagnosis of organophosphate or carbamate poisoning. RESULTS: Cardiac complications developed in 31 patients (67%). These were: non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, 20 (43%); cardiac arrhythmias, 11 (24%); electrocardiographic abnormalities including prolonged Q-Tc interval, 31 (67%); ST-T changes, 19 (41%); and conduction defects, 4 (9%). Sinus tachycardia occurred in 16 patients (35%) and sinus bradycardia in 13 (28%). Hypertension developed in 10 patients (22%) and hypotension in eight (17%). Eight patients (17%) needed respiratory support because of respiratory depression. Although more than two thirds of the patients (67%) had a prolonged Q-Tc interval, none had polymorphic ventricular tachycardia of the torsade de pointes type. Two patients died from ventricular fibrillation, an in hospital mortality of 4%. CONCLUSIONS: Cardiac complications often accompany poisoning with these compounds, particularly during the first few hours. Hypoxaemia, acidosis, and electrolyte derangements are major predisposing factors. Intensive supportive treatment in intensive or coronary care facilities with administration of atropine in adequate doses early in the course of the illness will reduce the mortality. PMID:9196418

  11. An epidemiological study of acute carbon monoxide poisoning in the West Midlands

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, R. C.; Saunders, P. J.; Smith, G.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the epidemiology of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning in a defined population, identifying those at greatest risk from acute poisoning resulting in admission to hospital or death. METHODS: A retrospective study with routinely collected information, set in the former West Midlands Regional Health Authority; population of 5.2 million. The data comprised 939 deaths and 701 hospital admissions due to CO poisoning between January 1988 to December 1994. The main outcome measures were age and sex standardised incidence rates (SIRs) for non-intentional, suicidal, and undetermined poisonings for health authorities and the linear relation with socioeconomic deprivation. RESULTS: Overall rate of non-intentional poisonings over the 7 year period was 7.6/100,000, an annual rate of 1.1/100,000. The 7 year rates were highest in people > or = 85; men 24.0/100,000 and women 19.7/100,000. For suicides the 7 year rate was 19.6/100,000, an annual rate of 2.8/100,000. The 7 year rates were highest for men of 35-39, 64.1/100,000, and for women aged 45-49, 15.3/100,000. None of the causes of poisoning were related to deprivation. Non-intentional poisonings showed a strong seasonal variation with the highest rates being recorded in the months October to March. Increased rates of poisoning were found in the rural districts of the West Midlands. There seems to have been a decline in suicides coinciding with the introduction of three way catalytic converters on cars. CONCLUSIONS: Elderly people and the very young are at the greatest risk from non- intentional CO poisoning and rates are highest in the winter months. Although deaths from non-intentional CO poisoning are declining nationally, in the West Midlands they have remained stable and hospital admissions are increasing. It is not solely an urban phenomenon with rates for non-intentional CO poisoning and suicides higher in the rural districts. Health authorities need to consider all populations in any prevention

  12. [Acute toxicity of different type pesticide surfactants to Daphnia magna].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-huan; Li, Hua; Chen, Cheng-yu; Li, Jian-tao; Liu, Feng

    2013-08-01

    By using the standard test methods in Experimental Guideline for Environmental Safety Evaluation of Chemical Pesticide to aquatic organisms, a comparative study was conducted on the acute toxicity of 39 nonionic, 6 anionic, and 3 cationic surfactants to Daphnia magna. The acute toxicity of three cationic surfactants 1427, 1227 and C8-10 to D. magna belonged to virulent level, and the toxicity of 1427 was the highest, with the EC50 value being 0.97 x 10(-2) mg x L(-1). The acute toxicity of nonionic surfactants polyoxyethylene ether castor oil EL, Tween, and Span emulsifiers belonged to low level, but the toxicity of alkylphenol polyoxyethylene ether and fatty alcohol polyoxyethylene ether surfactants was relatively high, of which, AEO-7 and AEO-5 displayed high toxicity, with the EC50 value being 0.82 and 0.97 mg x L(-1), respectively. In these surfactants, the more liposolubility, the higher the toxicity was. Most of the anionic surfactants were medium in toxicity, but the acute toxicity of NNO belonged to high toxicity, with the EC50 value being 0.17 mg x L(-1).

  13. Clinical outcomes of adverse cardiovascular events in patients with acute dapsone poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kyung Sik; Kim, Hyung Il; Kim, Oh Hyun; Cha, Kyoung Chul; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kang Hyun; Hwang, Sung Oh; Cha, Yong Sung

    2016-01-01

    Objective Adverse cardiovascular events (ACVEs) account for a large proportion of the morbidities and mortalities associated with drug overdose emergencies. However, there are no published reports regarding outcomes of ACVEs associated with acute dapsone poisoning. Here, the authors retrospectively analyzed ACVEs reported within 48 hours of treatment in patients with acute dapsone poisoning and assessed the significance of ACVEs as early predictors of mortality. Methods Sixty-one consecutive cases of acute dapsone poisoning that were diagnosed and treated at a regional emergency center between 2006 and 2014 were included in the study. An ACVE was defined as myocardial injury, shock, ventricular dysrhythmia, cardiac arrest, or any combination of these occurring within the first 48 hours of treatment for acute dapsone poisoning. Results Nineteen patients (31.1%) had evidence of myocardial injury (elevation of serum troponin-I level or electrocardiography signs of ischemia) after dapsone overdose, and there were a total of 19 ACVEs (31.1%), including one case of shock (1.6%). Fourteen patients (23.0%) died from pneumonia or multiple organ failure, and the incidence of ACVEs was significantly higher among non-survivors than among survivors (64.3% vs. 21.3%, P=0.006). ACVE was a significant predictor of mortality (odds ratio, 5.690; 95% confidence interval, 1.428 to 22.675; P=0.014). Conclusion The incidence of ACVE was significantly higher among patients who died after acute dapsone poisoning. ACVE is a significant predictor of mortality after dapsone overdose, and evidence of ACVE should be carefully sought in these patients. PMID:27752614

  14. Does the Clock Make the Poison? Circadian Variation in Response to Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Hooven, Louisa A.; Sherman, Katherine A.; Butcher, Shawn; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Circadian clocks govern daily physiological and molecular rhythms, and putative rhythms in expression of xenobiotic metabolizing (XM) genes have been described in both insects and mammals. Such rhythms could have important consequences for outcomes of chemical exposures at different times of day. To determine whether reported XM gene expression rhythms result in functional rhythms, we examined daily profiles of enzyme activity and dose responses to the pesticides propoxur, deltamethrin, fipronil, and malathion. Methodology/Principal Findings Published microarray expression data were examined for temporal patterns. Male Drosophila were collected for ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase (ECOD), esterase, glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and, and uridine 5′-diphosphoglucosyltransferase (UGT) enzyme activity assays, or subjected to dose-response tests at four hour intervals throughout the day in both light/dark and constant light conditions. Peak expression of several XM genes cluster in late afternoon. Significant diurnal variation was observed in ECOD and UGT enzyme activity, however, no significant daily variation was observed in esterase or GST activity. Daily profiles of susceptibility to lethality after acute exposure to propoxur and fipronil showed significantly increased resistance in midday, while susceptibility to deltamethrin and malathion varied little. In constant light, which interferes with clock function, the daily variation in susceptibility to propoxur and in ECOD and UGT enzyme activity was depressed. Conclusions/Significance Expression and activities of specific XM enzymes fluctuate during the day, and for specific insecticides, the concentration resulting in 50% mortality varies significantly during the day. Time of day of chemical exposure should be an important consideration in experimental design, use of pesticides, and human risk assessment. PMID:19649249

  15. Follow-up after acute poisoning by substances of abuse: a prospective observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Vallersnes, Odd Martin; Jacobsen, Dag; Ekeberg, Øivind; Brekke, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Objective To chart follow-up of patients after acute poisoning by substances of abuse, register whether patients referred to specialist health services attended, and whether patients contacted a general practitioner (GP) after the poisoning episode. Design Observational cohort study. Setting A primary care emergency outpatient clinic in Oslo, Norway. Subjects Patients ≥12 years treated for acute poisoning by substances of abuse were included consecutively from October 2011 to September 2012. Main outcome measures Follow-up initiated at discharge, proportion of cases in which referred patients attended within three months, and proportion of cases in which the patient consulted a GP the first month following discharge. Results There were 2343 episodes of acute poisoning by substances of abuse. In 391 (17%) cases the patient was hospitalised, including 49 (2%) in psychiatric wards. In 235 (10%) cases the patient was referred to specialist health services, in 91 (4%) advised to see their GP, in 82 (3%) to contact social services, in 74 (3%) allotted place in a homeless shelter, and in 93 (4%) other follow-up was initiated. In 1096 (47%) cases, the patient was discharged without follow-up, and in a further 324 (14%), the patient self-discharged. When referred to specialist health services, in 200/235 (85%) cases the patient attended within three months. Among all discharges, in 527/1952 (27%) cases the patient consulted a GP within one month. When advised to see their GP, in 45/91 (49%) cases the patient did. Conclusion Attendance was high for follow-up initiated after acute poisoning by substances of abuse. Key Points Despite poor long-term prognosis, patients treated for acute poisoning by substances of abuse are frequently not referred to follow-up.Nearly all patients referred to specialist health services attended, indicating the acute poisoning as an opportune moment for intervention.Advising patients to contact their GP was significantly associated with

  16. Children, Learning, and Poisons Don't Mix: Kick the Pesticide Habit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., Albany, NY.

    This brochure examines basic information about pesticides and their use in and around schools, how children are exposed to pesticides and their health effects, and how a school can kick the habit of using pesticides. A special issues section covers the chemicals that should not be part of a school pest control effort, the restricted use of…

  17. Our recent experiences with sarin poisoning cases in Japan and pesticide users with references to some selected chemicals.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Kazuhito

    2007-03-01

    Attention has been paid to neurobehavioral effects of occupational and environmental exposures to chemicals such as pesticides, heavy metals and organic solvents. The area of research that includes neurobehavioral methods and effects in occupational and environmental health has been called "Occupational and Environmental Neurology and Behavioral Medicine." The methods, by which early changes in neurological, cognitive and behavioral function can be assessed, include neurobehavioral test battery, neurophysiological methods, questionnaires and structured interview, biochemical markers and imaging techniques. The author presents his observations of neurobehavioral and neurophysiological effects in Tokyo subway sarin poisoning cases as well as in pesticide users (tobacco farmers) in Malaysia in relation to Green Tobacco Sickness (GTS). In sarin cases, a variety effects were observed 6-8 months after exposure, suggesting delayed neurological effects. Studies on pesticide users revealed that organophosphorus and dithiocarbamate affected peripheral nerve conduction and postural balance; subjective symptoms related to GTS were also observed, indicating the effects of nicotine absorbed from wet tobacco leaves. In addition, non-neurological effects of pesticides and other chemicals are presented, in relation to genetic polymorphism and oxidative stress.

  18. Our recent experiences with sarin poisoning cases in Japan and pesticide users with references to some selected chemicals.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Kazuhito

    2007-03-01

    Attention has been paid to neurobehavioral effects of occupational and environmental exposures to chemicals such as pesticides, heavy metals and organic solvents. The area of research that includes neurobehavioral methods and effects in occupational and environmental health has been called "Occupational and Environmental Neurology and Behavioral Medicine." The methods, by which early changes in neurological, cognitive and behavioral function can be assessed, include neurobehavioral test battery, neurophysiological methods, questionnaires and structured interview, biochemical markers and imaging techniques. The author presents his observations of neurobehavioral and neurophysiological effects in Tokyo subway sarin poisoning cases as well as in pesticide users (tobacco farmers) in Malaysia in relation to Green Tobacco Sickness (GTS). In sarin cases, a variety effects were observed 6-8 months after exposure, suggesting delayed neurological effects. Studies on pesticide users revealed that organophosphorus and dithiocarbamate affected peripheral nerve conduction and postural balance; subjective symptoms related to GTS were also observed, indicating the effects of nicotine absorbed from wet tobacco leaves. In addition, non-neurological effects of pesticides and other chemicals are presented, in relation to genetic polymorphism and oxidative stress. PMID:16730798

  19. Acute ammonium dichromate poisoning in a 2 year-old child.

    PubMed

    Sunilkumar, Menon Narayanankutty; Ajith, Thekkuttuparambil Ananthanarayanan; Parvathy, Vadakut Krishnan

    2014-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium compounds are most commonly used in printing, dyeing, plastics and rayon manufacturing. Poisoning in children by ammonium dichromate, an odorless and bright orange-red crystal, are rarely reported. Acute poisoning will result in death due to multi-organ failure. The target organs that are affected by this poison are the respiratory system, kidneys, liver, eyes and skin. On ingestion, initially there is a relative lack of severe symptoms and signs. Hence, the delay in seeking medical attention could lead to the increased rate of mortality. In this case study, we report the ingestion of ammonium dichromate by a child. Despite appropriate management, such as hepatic supportive measures and plasma transfusion, the toxicity progressed to multi-organ failure and death. PMID:25425845

  20. The Anion Gap is a Predictive Clinical Marker for Death in Patients with Acute Pesticide Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Hyo; Park, Samel; Lee, Jung-Won; Hwang, Il-Woong; Moon, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Park, Su-Yeon; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2016-07-01

    Pesticide formulation includes solvents (methanol and xylene) and antifreeze (ethylene glycol) whose metabolites are anions such as formic acid, hippuric acid, and oxalate. However, the effect of the anion gap on clinical outcome in acute pesticide intoxication requires clarification. In this prospective study, we compared the anion gap and other parameters between surviving versus deceased patients with acute pesticide intoxication. The following parameters were assessed in 1,058 patients with acute pesticide intoxication: blood chemistry (blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, glucose, lactic acid, liver enzymes, albumin, globulin, and urate), urinalysis (ketone bodies), arterial blood gas analysis, electrolytes (Na(+), K(+), Cl(-) HCO3 (-), Ca(++)), pesticide field of use, class, and ingestion amount, clinical outcome (death rate, length of hospital stay, length of intensive care unit stay, and seriousness of toxic symptoms), and the calculated anion gap. Among the 481 patients with a high anion gap, 52.2% had a blood pH in the physiologic range, 35.8% had metabolic acidosis, and 12.1% had acidemia. Age, anion gap, pesticide field of use, pesticide class, seriousness of symptoms (all P < 0.001), and time lag after ingestion (P = 0.048) were significant risk factors for death in univariate analyses. Among these, age, anion gap, and pesticide class were significant risk factors for death in a multiple logistic regression analysis (P < 0.001). In conclusions, high anion gap is a significant risk factor for death, regardless of the accompanying acid-base balance status in patients with acute pesticide intoxication.

  1. Ulinastatin suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in the hippocampus of rats with acute paraquat poisoning.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Shi-Xing; Xing, Bao-Peng; Sun, Ming-Li

    2015-03-01

    Lung injury is the main manifestation of paraquat poisoning. Few studies have addressed brain damage after paraquat poisoning. Ulinastatin is a protease inhibitor that can effectively stabilize lysosomal membranes, prevent cell damage, and reduce the production of free radicals. This study assumed that ulinastatin would exert these effects on brain tissues that had been poisoned with paraquat. Rat models of paraquat poisoning were intraperitoneally injected with ulinastatin. Simultaneously, rats in the control group were administered normal saline. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that most hippocampal cells were contracted and nucleoli had disappeared in the paraquat group. Fewer cells in the hippocampus were concentrated and nucleoli had disappeared in the ulinastatin group. Western blot assay showed that expressions of GRP78 and cleaved-caspase-3 were significantly lower in the ulinastatin group than in the paraquat group. Immunohistochemical findings showed that CHOP immunoreactivity was significantly lower in the ulinastatin group than in the paraquat group. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling staining showed that the number of apoptotic cells was reduced in the paraquat and ulinastatin groups. These data confirmed that endoplasmic reticular stress can be induced by acute paraquat poisoning. Ulinastatin can effectively inhibit this stress as well as cell apoptosis, thereby exerting a neuroprotective effect.

  2. Acute lead poisoning in western Canadian cattle - A 16-year retrospective study of diagnostic case records.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Vanessa; Blakley, Barry

    2016-04-01

    This study describes the epidemiology of acute lead poisoning in western Canadian cattle over the 16-year period of 1998 to 2013 and reports background bovine tissue lead concentrations. Case records from Prairie Diagnostic Services, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, identified 525 cases of acute lead toxicity over the investigational period. Poisonings were influenced by year (P < 0.0001) and month (P < 0.0001). Submissions were highest in 2009 (15.6%), 2001 (11.2%), and 2006 (9.9%). Most cases were observed during May, June, and July (62.3%). Cattle 6 months of age and younger were frequently poisoned (53.5%; P < 0.0001). Beef breeds were predominantly poisoned. Mean toxic lead concentrations (mg/kg wet weight) in the blood, liver, and kidney were 1.30 ± 1.70 (n = 301), 33.5 ± 80.5 (n = 172), and 56.3 ± 39.7 (n = 61). Mean normal lead concentrations in the blood, liver, and kidney were 0.036 ± 0.003 mg/kg (n= 1081), 0.16 ± 0.63 mg/kg (n = 382), and 0.41 ± 0.62 mg/kg (n = 64).

  3. Acute lead poisoning in western Canadian cattle - A 16-year retrospective study of diagnostic case records.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Vanessa; Blakley, Barry

    2016-04-01

    This study describes the epidemiology of acute lead poisoning in western Canadian cattle over the 16-year period of 1998 to 2013 and reports background bovine tissue lead concentrations. Case records from Prairie Diagnostic Services, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, identified 525 cases of acute lead toxicity over the investigational period. Poisonings were influenced by year (P < 0.0001) and month (P < 0.0001). Submissions were highest in 2009 (15.6%), 2001 (11.2%), and 2006 (9.9%). Most cases were observed during May, June, and July (62.3%). Cattle 6 months of age and younger were frequently poisoned (53.5%; P < 0.0001). Beef breeds were predominantly poisoned. Mean toxic lead concentrations (mg/kg wet weight) in the blood, liver, and kidney were 1.30 ± 1.70 (n = 301), 33.5 ± 80.5 (n = 172), and 56.3 ± 39.7 (n = 61). Mean normal lead concentrations in the blood, liver, and kidney were 0.036 ± 0.003 mg/kg (n= 1081), 0.16 ± 0.63 mg/kg (n = 382), and 0.41 ± 0.62 mg/kg (n = 64). PMID:27041761

  4. Policymaking ‘under the radar’: a case study of pesticide regulation to prevent intentional poisoning in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Melissa; Zwi, Anthony B; Buckley, Nicholas A; Manuweera, Gamini; Fernando, Ravindra; Dawson, Andrew H; McDuie-Ra, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Background Suicide in Sri Lanka is a major public health problem and in 1995 the country had one of the highest rates of suicide worldwide. Since then reductions in overall suicide rates have been largely attributed to efforts to regulate a range of pesticides. The evolution, context, events and implementation of the key policy decisions around regulation are examined. Methods This study was undertaken as part of a broader analysis of policy in two parts—an explanatory case study and stakeholder analysis. This article describes the explanatory case study that included an historical narrative and in-depth interviews. Results A timeline and chronology of policy actions and influence were derived from interview and document data. Fourteen key informants were interviewed and four distinct policy phases were identified. The early stages of pesticide regulation were dominated by political and economic considerations and strongly influenced by external factors. The second phase was marked by a period of local institution building, the engagement of local stakeholders, and expanded links between health and agriculture. During the third phase the problem of self-poisoning dominated the policy agenda and closer links between stakeholders, evidence and policymaking developed. The fourth and most recent phase was characterized by strong local capacity for policymaking, informed by evidence, developed in collaboration with a powerful network of stakeholders, including international researchers. Conclusions The policy response to extremely high rates of suicide from intentional poisoning with pesticides shows a unique and successful example of policymaking to prevent suicide. It also highlights policy action taking place ‘under the radar’, thus avoiding policy inertia often associated with reforms in lower and middle income countries. PMID:24362640

  5. "P" Is for Poison: Update on Pesticide Use in California Schools. CPR Series Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olle, Teresa M.

    This report reveals school pesticide use, pest management decision-making notification, and record keeping in California school systems. All 13 of the most populous school districts that responded to the survey reported using 1 or more of 42 particularly hazardous cancer-causing pesticides. The majority of California schools have failed to adopt…

  6. Impact of Xuebijing and ulinastatin as assistance for hemoperfusion in treating acute paraquat poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: As the effect of Xuebijing as combined treatment in hemoperfusion (HP) toward acute paraquat (PQ) poisoning is not clear. We retrospectively analyzed 119 cases of acute paraquat poisoning in Tianjin first central hospital; the patients were divided into 3 groups based on treatment. Control (group A) patients underwent standard hemoperfusion with conventional treatment, while the experimental groups combined hemoperfusion with Xuebijing (group B) or ulinastatin (group C). Standard biomedical indicators, such as organ dysfunction and mortality were recorded and compiled, both in short (<7 days) and long (7-28 days) terms. Then, the effect of Xuebijing in combination to the standard (HP) treatment was evaluated by direct comparison. The results showed that using either Xuebijing or ulinastatin as additional treatment to standard HP significantly helped the overall outcomes, as evidenced by lower organ dysfunction and mortality. In addition, Xuebijing (group B) yielded a more pronounced improvement compared with ulinastatin (group C) in combination with HP (All P<0.05). Our findings indicated that both Xuebijing and ulinastatin provided positive impacts on HP treatment toward acute paraquat poisoning, with better outcomes observed with Xuebijing, which should be considered for more frequent use in clinical practice. PMID:26550361

  7. Use of OpdA, an organophosphorus (OP) hydrolase, prevents lethality in an African green monkey model of acute OP poisoning.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Colin J; Carville, Angela; Ward, Jeanine; Mansfield, Keith; Ollis, David L; Khurana, Tejvir; Bird, Steven B

    2014-03-20

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides are a diverse class of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors that are responsible for tremendous morbidity and mortality worldwide, killing approximately 300,000 people annually. Enzymatic hydrolysis of OPs is a potential therapy for acute poisoning. OpdA, an OP hydrolase isolated from Agrobacterium radiobacter, has been shown to decrease lethality in rodent models of OP poisoning. This study investigated the effects of OpdA on AChE activity, plasma concentrations of OP, and signs of toxicity after administration of dichlorvos to nonhuman primates. A dose of 75 mg/kg dichlorvos given orally caused apnea within 10 min with a progressive decrease in heart rate. Blood AChE activity decreased to zero within 10 min. Respirations and AChE activity did not recover. The mean dichlorvos concentration rose to a peak of 0.66 μg/ml. Treated monkeys received 1.2mg/kg OpdA iv immediately after poisoning with dichlorvos. In Opda-treated animals, heart and respiratory rates were unchanged from baseline over a 240-minute observation period. AChE activity slowly declined, but remained above 25% of baseline for the entire duration. Dichlorvos concentrations reached a mean peak of 0.19 μg/ml at 40 min after poisoning and decreased to a mean of 0.05 μg/ml at 240 min. These results show that OpdA hydrolyzes dichlorvos in an African green monkey model of lethal poisoning, delays AChE inhibition, and prevents lethality.

  8. Acute oxalate nephropathy caused by ethylene glycol poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jung Woong; Lee, Jong-Ho; Son, In Sung; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Do Young; Hwang, Yong; Chung, Hyun Ah; Choi, Hong Seok; Lim, So Dug

    2012-01-01

    Ethylene glycol (EG) is a sweet-tasting, odorless organic solvent found in many agents, such as anti-freeze. EG is composed of four organic acids: glycoaldehyde, glycolic acid, glyoxylic acid and oxalic acid in vivo. These metabolites are cellular toxins that can cause cardio-pulmonary failure, life-threatening metabolic acidosis, central nervous system depression, and kidney injury. Oxalic acid is the end product of EG, which can precipitate to crystals of calcium oxalate monohydrate in the tubular lumen and has been linked to acute kidney injury. We report a case of EG-induced oxalate nephropathy, with the diagnosis confirmed by kidney biopsy, which showed acute tubular injury of the kidneys with extensive intracellular and intraluminal calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal depositions. PMID:26889430

  9. Ammonium dichromate poisoning: A rare cause of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, H.; Gopi, M.; Arumugam, A.

    2014-01-01

    Ammonium dichromate is an inorganic compound frequently used in screen and color printing. Being a strong oxidizing agent, it causes oxygen free radical injury resulting in organ failure. We report a 25-year-old female who presented with acute kidney injury after consumption of ammonium dichromate. She was managed successfully with hemodialysis and supportive measures. This case is reported to highlight the toxicity of ammonium dichromate. PMID:25484533

  10. Prediction and validation of hemodialysis duration in acute methanol poisoning.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Philippe; Mac-Way, Fabrice; Desmeules, Simon; De Serres, Sacha A; Julien, Anne-Sophie; Douville, Pierre; Ghannoum, Marc; Agharazii, Mohsen

    2015-11-01

    The duration of hemodialysis (HD) in methanol poisoning (MP) is dependent on the methanol concentration, the operational parameters used during HD, and the presence and severity of metabolic acidosis. However, methanol assays are not easily available, potentially leading to undue extension or premature termination of treatment. Here we provide a prediction model for the duration of high-efficiency HD in MP. In a retrospective cohort study, we identified 71 episodes of MP in 55 individuals who were treated with alcohol dehydrogenase inhibition and HD. Four patients had residual visual abnormality at discharge and only one patient died. In 46 unique episodes of MP with high-efficiency HD the mean methanol elimination half-life (T1/2) during HD was 108 min in women, significantly different from the 129 min in men. In a training set of 28 patients with MP, using the 90th percentile of gender-specific elimination T1/2 (147 min in men and 141 min in women) and a target methanol concentration of 4 mmol/l allowed all cases to reach a safe methanol of under 6 mmol/l. The prediction model was confirmed in a validation set of 18 patients with MP. High-efficiency HD time in hours can be estimated using 3.390 × (Ln (MCi/4)) for women and 3.534 × (Ln (MCi/4)) for men, where MCi is the initial methanol concentration in mmol/l, provided that metabolic acidosis is corrected.

  11. Acute methoxetamine and amphetamine poisoning with fatal outcome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wiergowski, Marek; Anand, Jacek Sein; Krzyżanowski, Maciej; Jankowski, Zbigniew

    2014-08-01

    Methoxetamine (MXE) is a psychoactive substance distributed mostly via the Internet and is not liable to legal regulation in Poland. MXE has a toxicity profile similar to that of ketamine but longer-lasting effects. The paper describes a case of acute poisoning that resulted from recreational use of MXE and amphetamine and ended in death. In mid-July 2012, a 31-year old man was admitted to the clinical toxicology unit in Gdańsk because of poisoning with an unknown psychoactive substance. The patient was transported to the emergency department (ED) at 5:15 a.m. in a very poor general condition, in a deep coma, with acute respiratory failure, hyperthermia (> 39°C) and generalized seizures. Laboratory tests showed marked leukocytosis, signs of massive rhabdomyolysis, hepatic failure and beginning of acute renal failure. Despite intensive therapy, the patient died 4 weeks after the poisoning in the course of multi-organ dysfunction syndrome. Chemical and toxicological studies of serum and urine samples collected on the poisoning day at 1:40 p.m. confirmed that amphetamine and MXE had been taken earlier that day. Concentration of amphetamine in the serum (0.06 μg/ml) was within the non-toxic range, while MXE (0.32 μg/ml) was within the toxic range of concentrations. Amphetamine was also detected in the patient's hair, which suggested a possibility of its use within the last dozen weeks or so. The serious clinical course of intoxication and co-existence of amphetamine and MXE in the patient's blood and urine suggest the possibility of adverse interactions between them.

  12. Acute methoxetamine and amphetamine poisoning with fatal outcome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wiergowski, Marek; Anand, Jacek Sein; Krzyżanowski, Maciej; Jankowski, Zbigniew

    2014-08-01

    Methoxetamine (MXE) is a psychoactive substance distributed mostly via the Internet and is not liable to legal regulation in Poland. MXE has a toxicity profile similar to that of ketamine but longer-lasting effects. The paper describes a case of acute poisoning that resulted from recreational use of MXE and amphetamine and ended in death. In mid-July 2012, a 31-year old man was admitted to the clinical toxicology unit in Gdańsk because of poisoning with an unknown psychoactive substance. The patient was transported to the emergency department (ED) at 5:15 a.m. in a very poor general condition, in a deep coma, with acute respiratory failure, hyperthermia (> 39°C) and generalized seizures. Laboratory tests showed marked leukocytosis, signs of massive rhabdomyolysis, hepatic failure and beginning of acute renal failure. Despite intensive therapy, the patient died 4 weeks after the poisoning in the course of multi-organ dysfunction syndrome. Chemical and toxicological studies of serum and urine samples collected on the poisoning day at 1:40 p.m. confirmed that amphetamine and MXE had been taken earlier that day. Concentration of amphetamine in the serum (0.06 μg/ml) was within the non-toxic range, while MXE (0.32 μg/ml) was within the toxic range of concentrations. Amphetamine was also detected in the patient's hair, which suggested a possibility of its use within the last dozen weeks or so. The serious clinical course of intoxication and co-existence of amphetamine and MXE in the patient's blood and urine suggest the possibility of adverse interactions between them. PMID:25060403

  13. Poisoning severity score, APACHE II and GCS: effective clinical indices for estimating severity and predicting outcome of acute organophosphorus and carbamate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sam, Kishore Gnana; Kondabolu, Krishnakanth; Pati, Dipanwita; Kamath, Asha; Pradeep Kumar, G; Rao, Padma G M

    2009-07-01

    Self-poisoning with organophosphorus (OP) compounds is a major cause of morbidity and mortality across South Asian countries. To develop uniform and effective management guidelines, the severity of acute OP poisoning should be assessed through scientific methods and a clinical database should be maintained. A prospective descriptive survey was carried out to assess the utility of severity scales in predicting the outcome of 71 organophosphate (OP) and carbamate poisoning patients admitted during a one year period at the Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, India. The Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) scores, predicted mortality rate (PMR) and Poisoning severity score (PSS) were estimated within 24h of admission. Significant correlation (P<0.05) between PSS and GCS and APACHE II and PMR scores were observed with the PSS scores predicting mortality significantly (P< or =0.001). A total of 84.5% patients improved after treatment while 8.5% of the patients were discharged with severe morbidity. The mortality rate was 7.0%. Suicidal poisoning was observed to be the major cause (80.2%), while other reasons attributed were occupational (9.1%), accidental (6.6%), homicidal (1.6%) and unknown (2.5%) reasons. This study highlights the application of clinical indices like GCS, APACHE, PMR and severity scores in predicting mortality and may be considered for planning standard treatment guidelines.

  14. Poisoning of cats and dogs by the carbamate pesticides aldicarb and carbofuran.

    PubMed

    de Siqueira, Adriana; Salvagni, Fernanda Auciello; Yoshida, Alberto Soiti; Gonçalves-Junior, Vagner; Calefi, Atilio Sersun; Fukushima, André Rinaldi; Spinosa, Helenice de Souza; Maiorka, Paulo César

    2015-10-01

    The intentional and accidental poisoning of animals and people is a threat to public health and safety worldwide. Necropsies and histopathological examinations of 26 cats and 10 dogs poisoned by the carbamates aldicarb and carbofuran, confirmed by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detector (HPLC-DAD) were analysed, with variable post mortem interval and conservation of the carcass. Biological matrices were collected for toxicological and histopathological analyses. High performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detector (HPLC-DAD) was utilized to detect aldicarb and its metabolites, aldicarb sulphoxide and aldicarb sulphone, and carbofuran. The variable post mortem interval and the method of conservation of the carcass may be harmful to toxicological, necroscopic and histopathological analyses, that should be performed in order to provide reliable evidences to investigate possible poisoning of animals, which is cruel crime, and are usually linked to domestic or social conflict.

  15. Effect of glucose in mice after acute experimental poisoning with arsenic trioxide (As2O3).

    PubMed

    Reichl, F X; Szinicz, L; Kreppel, H; Fichtl, B; Forth, W

    1990-01-01

    Carbohydrate depletion (glucose and glycogen) was reported to be a major problem in acute arsenic poisoning. In the present paper the effectiveness of glucose substitution was investigated in mice after acute experimental poisoning with As2O3. Four groups of ten mice each received As2O3, 12.9 mg/kg, s.c. After the injection the first group remained without further treatment, the second received saline every 2 h, the third 5% glucose, and the fourth 5% glucose +0.12 IE insulin/kg i.p. Groups 5 and 6, five mice each, received either saline or glucose only. Group 7, five mice, remained without any treatment. Immediately after death the livers were removed for the enzymatic determination of glucose and glycogen. Mice receiving As2O3 only died within 22 h. The mean survival time was 12.4 h. In mice receiving As2O3 and after that saline, glucose, or glucose + insulin, an increase in the survival time to 30.8, 40.7, and 43.6 h, respectively, was observed. All mice which died showed a significant decrease in the liver glucose and glycogen content, compared to control animals. In livers of survivors, the glucose and glycogen content was not different to the control groups. The data support the assumption that carbohydrate depletion is an important factor in arsenic toxicity, and its substitution should be considered in the treatment of arsenic poisoning.

  16. [Neurotoxicology of pesticides].

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Hiroo

    2015-01-01

    Pesticides have been used for many years for preventing, destroying, repelling, or mitigating pests such as insects, rodents, and weeds. However, most pesticides are not completely specific for pests and can also induce damage to the human nervous system. In particular, insecticides often directly targets the nervous system by affecting major targets such as the neuro-transmitter metabolism, neuronal receptors, and ion channels; acetylcholine (ACh) esterase for organo-phosphates and carbamates, nicotinic ACh receptor for neonicotinoids, γ-aminobutyric acid receptors/chloride channels for organochlorides and fipronil, and voltage-gated sodium channel for pyrethroids. Additional targets include sites in the sodium channels, glutamate-gated chloride channels, and octopamine and ryanodine receptors. Several pesticides also produce adverse neurological effects indirectly by disrupting the general cellular mechanisms that support the high metabolic activity of the nervous system. Nowadays, more potent pesticides are being developed as replacements for the older, harmful ones. Pesticide neurotoxicity in humans may involve the central or peripheral nervous system or both and may induce typical neuronal damage in case of acute poisoning even by new agents. However, whether effect of exposure to pesticides at below acute-poisoning threshold level remains unclear. Moreover, neurotoxicology for behavioral and higher-brain function remains an unresolved and a challenging problem.

  17. Pesticides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherma, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    This review is devoted to methods for the determination of residues of pesticides and some related industrial chemicals. Topics include: residue methods, sampling, chromatography, organochlorine pesticides, organophosphorus pesticides, carbamate insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, pyrethrins, fumigants, and related chemicals. (MVL)

  18. Effects of acute organophosphate poisoning on pituitary target gland hormones at admission, discharge and three months after poisoning: A hospital based pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Pinaki; Kamath, Shruthi S.; Bhalla, Ashish; Shah, V.N.; Srinivasan, Anand; Gupta, Prakamya; Singh, Surjit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Organophosphate compound (OPC) poisoning is common in the developing countries such as India. The acute and later effects of OPC poisoning on pituitary and target gland hormones is largely unknown. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was conducted at Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research between January 2012 and March 2013. Fourteen patients (8 males, age 18-50 years) with acute OPC poisoning were included in the study based on the history and clinical features, documented decreased in plasma cholinesterase activity or presence of the OPC in gastric lavage/blood samples. The hormonal parameters were done at baseline, at the time of discharge and at three months of follow-up. Results: A total of 14 patients out of 46 with the mean age of 30.1 ± 10.3 years were finally eligible for the study. Hormonal alterations at admission were similar to sick euhormonal syndrome. Overall 7 of them had nine hormonal deficits at three months of follow up, 4 having sub normal basal cortisol level and two each had low testosterone and growth hormone and only one had thyroxine deficiency. Conclusion: Acute organophosphate poisoning results in endocrine dysfunction akin to sick euhormonal syndrome. However, in a small subset of patients, varying level of hormonal insufficiency may occur either at admission or later. These observations need re-validation in a larger group of patients with specific OPC. PMID:25593838

  19. Acute Self-Induced Poisoning With Sodium Ferrocyanide and Methanol Treated With Plasmapheresis and Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Successfully

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenning; Sun, Mingli; Zhao, Hongyu; Zhao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Self-induced poisoning with chemicals is one of the most commonly used suicide methods. Suicide attempts using massive pure sodium ferrocyanide and methanol are rare. This article discusses the management of acute intentional self-poisoning using sodium ferrocyanide and methanol. We present a case of acute self-induced poisoning using sodium ferrocyanide and methanol admitted to our hospital 2 hours after ingestion. He was deeply unconscious and unresponsive to painful stimuli. The laboratory findings showed acute kidney injury and severe metabolic acidosis. We took effective measures including endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation to ensure the vital signs were stable. Subsequently, we treated the patient using gastric lavage, bicarbonate, ethanol, plasmapheresis (plasma exchange), and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) successfully. He gradually recovered from poisoning and was discharged without abnormalities on the 6th day. Follow-up for 3 months revealed no sequelae. Blood purification including plasmapheresis and CRRT is an effective method to scavenge toxicants from the body for acute self-poisoning with sodium ferrocyanide and methanol. Treatment strategies in the management of poisoning, multiple factors including the removal efficiency of toxin, the protection of vital organs, and the maintenance of homeostasis must be considered. PMID:26020397

  20. Effects of Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning on Function of Peripheral Nerves: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Sudheera S.; Pathirana, Kithsiri D.; Buckley, Nick A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Following acute organophosphorus (OP) poisoning patients complain of numbness without objective sensory abnormalities or other features of OP induced delayed polyneuropathy. The aim of this study was to measure peripheral nerve function after acute exposure to OP. Methods A cohort study was conducted with age, gender and occupation matched controls. Motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), amplitude and area of compound muscle action potential (CMAP), sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV), F- waves and electromyography (EMG) on the deltoid and the first dorsal interosseous muscles on the dominant side were performed, following acute OP poisoning. All neurophysiological assessments except EMG were performed on the controls. Assessments were performed on the day of discharge from the hospital (the first assessment) and six weeks (the second assessment) after the exposure. The controls were assessed only once. Results There were 70 patients (50 males) and 70 controls. Fifty-three patients attended for the second assessment. In the first assessment MNCV of all the motor nerves examined, CMAP amplitude and SNCV of ulnar nerve, median and ulnar F-wave occurrence in the patients were significantly reduced compared to the controls. In the second assessment significant reduction was found in SNCV of both sensory nerves examined, MNCV of ulnar nerve, CMAP amplitude of common peroneal nerve, F-wave occurrence of median and ulnar nerves. No abnormalities were detected in the patients when compared to the standard cut-off values of nerve conduction studies except F-wave occurrence. EMG studies did not show any abnormality. Conclusion There was no strong evidence of irreversible peripheral nerve damage following acute OP poisoning, however further studies are required. PMID:23185328

  1. Acute animal and human poisonings from cyanotoxin exposure - A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wood, Roslyn

    2016-05-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms are a potential health hazard due to the ability of some species to produce toxins that are harmful to other living organisms. This review provides a comprehensive summary of anecdotal and case reports on acute poisonings in animals and humans attributable to cyanotoxin exposure in fresh- and brackish-waters. Approximately two-thirds of reported poisonings have occurred in Europe and the United States. Dogs and livestock account for the majority of reported cases involving animal exposure to cyanotoxins, while recreational activities are responsible for approximately half of reported incidents involving human exposure. Due to data limitations it is difficult to estimate the total number of animals and humans affected by cyanotoxins, however, some general observations regarding frequency and numbers affected are made. The review demonstrates that cyanotoxins have, and will likely to continue to have, potentially serious consequences for public health and animal welfare worldwide.

  2. Acute animal and human poisonings from cyanotoxin exposure - A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wood, Roslyn

    2016-05-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms are a potential health hazard due to the ability of some species to produce toxins that are harmful to other living organisms. This review provides a comprehensive summary of anecdotal and case reports on acute poisonings in animals and humans attributable to cyanotoxin exposure in fresh- and brackish-waters. Approximately two-thirds of reported poisonings have occurred in Europe and the United States. Dogs and livestock account for the majority of reported cases involving animal exposure to cyanotoxins, while recreational activities are responsible for approximately half of reported incidents involving human exposure. Due to data limitations it is difficult to estimate the total number of animals and humans affected by cyanotoxins, however, some general observations regarding frequency and numbers affected are made. The review demonstrates that cyanotoxins have, and will likely to continue to have, potentially serious consequences for public health and animal welfare worldwide. PMID:26995270

  3. Acute poisoning of friesian heifers by Solanum macrocarpon L. ssp dasyphyllum.

    PubMed

    Bizimenyera, E S

    2003-08-01

    Solanum macrocarpon (African eggplant) is a tropical plant widely cultivated as a delicious vegetable; the non-edible wild variety called Solanum macrocarpon L. ssp dasyphyllum (the wild African eggplant) bears thorns or spikes on the stem and leaves. Thirteen yearling heifers on a dairy farm in Uganda suffered acute poisoning after eating berries of S. macrocarpon L. ssp dasyphyllum. There was sudden onset of anorexia, copious salivation, severe dysentery and passage of red urine. The animals also had central nervous derangement (incordination, walking blindly) and exudative dermatitis. Four heifers died. Necropsy lesions were icterus, hemorrhages, gastroenteritis, lympadenomegally, and friable and bronze colored livers and kidneys. The rumen and reticulum contained masses of the plant seeds. This is the first report of cattle poisoning by this plant.

  4. The Anion Gap is a Predictive Clinical Marker for Death in Patients with Acute Pesticide Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide formulation includes solvents (methanol and xylene) and antifreeze (ethylene glycol) whose metabolites are anions such as formic acid, hippuric acid, and oxalate. However, the effect of the anion gap on clinical outcome in acute pesticide intoxication requires clarification. In this prospective study, we compared the anion gap and other parameters between surviving versus deceased patients with acute pesticide intoxication. The following parameters were assessed in 1,058 patients with acute pesticide intoxication: blood chemistry (blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, glucose, lactic acid, liver enzymes, albumin, globulin, and urate), urinalysis (ketone bodies), arterial blood gas analysis, electrolytes (Na+, K+, Cl- HCO3-, Ca++), pesticide field of use, class, and ingestion amount, clinical outcome (death rate, length of hospital stay, length of intensive care unit stay, and seriousness of toxic symptoms), and the calculated anion gap. Among the 481 patients with a high anion gap, 52.2% had a blood pH in the physiologic range, 35.8% had metabolic acidosis, and 12.1% had acidemia. Age, anion gap, pesticide field of use, pesticide class, seriousness of symptoms (all P < 0.001), and time lag after ingestion (P = 0.048) were significant risk factors for death in univariate analyses. Among these, age, anion gap, and pesticide class were significant risk factors for death in a multiple logistic regression analysis (P < 0.001). In conclusions, high anion gap is a significant risk factor for death, regardless of the accompanying acid-base balance status in patients with acute pesticide intoxication. PMID:27366016

  5. The Anion Gap is a Predictive Clinical Marker for Death in Patients with Acute Pesticide Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Hyo; Park, Samel; Lee, Jung-Won; Hwang, Il-Woong; Moon, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Park, Su-Yeon; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2016-07-01

    Pesticide formulation includes solvents (methanol and xylene) and antifreeze (ethylene glycol) whose metabolites are anions such as formic acid, hippuric acid, and oxalate. However, the effect of the anion gap on clinical outcome in acute pesticide intoxication requires clarification. In this prospective study, we compared the anion gap and other parameters between surviving versus deceased patients with acute pesticide intoxication. The following parameters were assessed in 1,058 patients with acute pesticide intoxication: blood chemistry (blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, glucose, lactic acid, liver enzymes, albumin, globulin, and urate), urinalysis (ketone bodies), arterial blood gas analysis, electrolytes (Na(+), K(+), Cl(-) HCO3 (-), Ca(++)), pesticide field of use, class, and ingestion amount, clinical outcome (death rate, length of hospital stay, length of intensive care unit stay, and seriousness of toxic symptoms), and the calculated anion gap. Among the 481 patients with a high anion gap, 52.2% had a blood pH in the physiologic range, 35.8% had metabolic acidosis, and 12.1% had acidemia. Age, anion gap, pesticide field of use, pesticide class, seriousness of symptoms (all P < 0.001), and time lag after ingestion (P = 0.048) were significant risk factors for death in univariate analyses. Among these, age, anion gap, and pesticide class were significant risk factors for death in a multiple logistic regression analysis (P < 0.001). In conclusions, high anion gap is a significant risk factor for death, regardless of the accompanying acid-base balance status in patients with acute pesticide intoxication. PMID:27366016

  6. Acute lead poisoning in nursing home and psychiatric patients from the ingestion of lead-based ceramic glazes.

    PubMed

    Vance, M V; Curry, S C; Bradley, J M; Kunkel, D B; Gerkin, R D; Bond, G R

    1990-10-01

    To our knowledge, acute inorganic lead poisoning from single ingestions of lead compounds has been only rarely reported. During a 14-month period, we were contacted regarding eight instances of acute ingestions of liquid lead-based ceramic glazes by mentally impaired residents of nursing homes or psychiatric facilities participating in ceramic arts programs. While some ingestions did not cause toxic effects, some patients developed acute lead poisoning characterized by abdominal pain, anemia, and basophilic stippling of red blood cells. In the blood of several patients, lead concentrations were far above normal (4 to 9.5 mumol/L). Urinary lead excretions were tremendously elevated during chelation therapy, with one patient excreting 535.9 mumol/L of lead during a 6-day period, the largest lead excretion ever reported in a patient suffering from acute lead poisoning, to our knowledge. All patients recovered following supportive care and appropriate use of chelating agents. Lead-based glazes are commonly found in nursing homes and psychiatric facilities. We suspect that acute or chronic lead poisoning from the ingestion(s) of lead-based ceramic glazes may be an unrecognized but not uncommon problem among such residents. We urge physicians to take ingestions of lead-based glazes seriously and to consider the diagnosis of lead poisoning in nursing home and psychiatric patients who have participated in ceramic crafts programs. PMID:2222094

  7. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cause harm to crops, people, or animals. Pesticides can help get rid of them. Pesticides are not just insect killers. They also include ... mildew, germs, and more. Many household products contain pesticides. Pesticides can protect your health by killing germs, ...

  8. Depression and Pesticide Exposures among Private Pesticide Applicators Enrolled in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Beseler, Cheryl L.; Stallones, Lorann; Hoppin, Jane A.; Alavanja, Michael C.R.; Blair, Aaron; Keefe, Thomas; Kamel, Freya

    2008-01-01

    Background We evaluated the relationship between diagnosed depression and pesticide exposure using information from private pesticide applicators enrolled in the Agricultural Health Study between 1993 and 1997 in Iowa and North Carolina. Methods There were 534 cases who self-reported a physician-diagnosed depression and 17,051 controls who reported never having been diagnosed with depression and did not feel depressed more than once a week in the past year. Lifetime pesticide exposure was categorized in three mutually exclusive groups: low (< 226 days, the reference group), intermediate (226–752 days), and high (> 752 days). Two additional measures represented acute high-intensity pesticide exposures: an unusually high pesticide exposure event (HPEE) and physician-diagnosed pesticide poisoning. Logistic regression analyses were performed relating pesticide exposure to depression. Results After adjusting for state, age, education, marital status, doctor visits, alcohol use, smoking, solvent exposure, not currently having crops or animals, and ever working a job off the farm, pesticide poisoning was more strongly associated with depression [odds ratio (OR) = 2.57; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.74–3.79] than intermediate (OR = 1.07; 95% CI, 0.87–1.31) or high (OR = 1.11; 95% CI, 0.87–1.42) cumulative exposure or an HPEE (OR = 1.65; 95% CI, 1.33–2.05). In analysis of a subgroup without a history of acute poisoning, high cumulative exposure was significantly associated with depression (OR = 1.54; 95% CI, 1.16–2.04). Conclusion These findings suggest that both acute high-intensity and cumulative pesticide exposure may contribute to depression in pesticide applicators. Our study is unique in reporting that depression is also associated with chronic pesticide exposure in the absence of a physician-diagnosed poisoning. PMID:19079725

  9. Residential Proximity to Agricultural Pesticide Applications and Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rull, Rudolph P.; Gunier, Robert; Von Behren, Julie; Hertz, Andrew; Crouse, Vonda; Buffler, Patricia A.; Reynolds, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    Ambient exposure from residential proximity to applications of agricultural pesticides may contribute to the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Using residential histories collected from the families of 213 ALL cases and 268 matched controls enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study, the authors assessed residential proximity within a half-mile (804.5 meters) of pesticide applications by linking address histories with reports of agricultural pesticide use. Proximity was ascertained during different time windows of exposure, including the first year of life and the child’s lifetime through the date of diagnosis for cases or reference for controls. Agricultural pesticides were categorized a priori into groups based on similarities in toxicological effects, physicochemical properties, and target pests or uses. The effects of moderate and high exposure for each group of pesticides were estimated using conditional logistic regression. Elevated ALL risk was associated with lifetime moderate exposure, but not high exposure, to certain physicochemical categories of pesticides, including organophosphates, cholorinated phenols, and triazines, and with pesticides classified as insecticides or fumigants. A similar pattern was also observed for several toxicological groups of pesticides. These findings suggest future directions for the identification of specific pesticides that may play a role in the etiology of childhood leukemia. PMID:19700145

  10. The Assessment of Electroencephalographic Changes and Memory Disturbances in Acute Intoxications with Industrial Poisons

    PubMed Central

    Chalupa, B.; Synková, J.; Ševčík, M.

    1960-01-01

    A report is given of the results of the electroencephalogram (EEG) and of an experimental memory examination in a group of 22 cases of acute carbon monoxide and solvents poisoning of varying severity. An abnormal EEG recording, most often in the form of theta activity 5-6 sec., was found in 12 patients; memory disturbances were found in 13 cases. There was correlation between the results of the two examinations as well as with the clinical classification of the degree of intoxication. The methods are suitable for the solving of various theoretical and practical questions in industrial toxicology. PMID:13692202

  11. Evidence for metal poisoning in acute deaths of large red drum (Scianeops ocellata)

    SciTech Connect

    Cardeihac, P.T.; Simpson, C.F.; White, F.H.; Thompson, N.P.; Carr, W.E.

    1981-12-01

    Two of the approximately 100 large, mature, red drum found dead or dying in Florida's Indian River and Mosquito Lagoon were examined. Determinations were made of serum electrolyte concentrations, total proteins, albumins, globulins, creatinine values, and enzyme activity. Concentrations of copper, zinc, arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, lead, and selenium were determined by atomic aborption. The outstanding histological lesions were found in the gills of a moribund specimen. Results indicate that the acute episode was triggered by ingestion of copper, zinc, and arsenic. However, cadmium, mercury and chromium may have been contributory by binding with metallothionein and thus lowering tolerance to metal poisoning. (JMT)

  12. Stonefish poisoning.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Richard Mark

    2004-01-01

    Scuba diving is becoming an increasingly popular recreation. Divers are traveling further afield, often to remote dive locations. These locations are often home to poisonous marine creatures such as stonefish. A case of acute stonefish poisoning in a scuba diver is described, including his treatment, the difficulties encountered with his management and evacuation, and his subsequent return to full health. The proper management of stonefish poisoning is reviewed, and the implications for divers traveling to remote locations are given.

  13. Abnormal pancreatic enzymes and their prognostic role after acute paraquat poisoning.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Wang, Meng; Gao, Yanxia; Yang, Wen; Xu, Qun; Eddleston, Michael; Li, Li; Yu, Xuezhong

    2015-11-25

    Ingestion of paraquat causes multi-organ failure. Prognosis is best estimated through measurement of blood paraquat concentrations but this facility is not available in most hospitals. We studied the prognostic significance of abnormal pancreatic enzymes for survival. Patients with acute paraquat poisoning were recruited. An extensive series of blood tests including serum amylase were serially checked. Patients were sorted according to their serum amylase activity (normal [<220 U/L], mildly elevated [220 to 660 U/L], elevated [>660 U/L]), and survival compared between groups. 177 patients were enrolled to the study, of whom 67 died and 110 survived. 122 (70.62%), 27 (15.25%) and 25 (14.13%) patients were in the normal, mildly elevated and elevated amylase activity groups, respectively. The case fatality in the elevated group was 100% compared to 17% in the normal group (P < 0.001). We found four independent factors for paraquat death prediction: amylase, PaCO2, leukocyte number, and neutrophil percentage. Models using pancreatic enzyme activity showed good prediction power. We have found that abnormal pancreatic enzymes are useful prognostic marker of death after acute paraquat poisoning. Including serum amylase activity into a prognostic model provides a good prognostication.

  14. Abnormal pancreatic enzymes and their prognostic role after acute paraquat poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Wang, Meng; Gao, Yanxia; Yang, Wen; Xu, Qun; Eddleston, Michael; Li, Li; Yu, Xuezhong

    2015-01-01

    Ingestion of paraquat causes multi-organ failure. Prognosis is best estimated through measurement of blood paraquat concentrations but this facility is not available in most hospitals. We studied the prognostic significance of abnormal pancreatic enzymes for survival. Patients with acute paraquat poisoning were recruited. An extensive series of blood tests including serum amylase were serially checked. Patients were sorted according to their serum amylase activity (normal [<220 U/L], mildly elevated [220 to 660 U/L], elevated [>660 U/L]), and survival compared between groups. 177 patients were enrolled to the study, of whom 67 died and 110 survived. 122 (70.62%), 27 (15.25%) and 25 (14.13%) patients were in the normal, mildly elevated and elevated amylase activity groups, respectively. The case fatality in the elevated group was 100% compared to 17% in the normal group (P < 0.001). We found four independent factors for paraquat death prediction: amylase, PaCO2, leukocyte number, and neutrophil percentage. Models using pancreatic enzyme activity showed good prediction power. We have found that abnormal pancreatic enzymes are useful prognostic marker of death after acute paraquat poisoning. Including serum amylase activity into a prognostic model provides a good prognostication. PMID:26603772

  15. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rats. Because of the widespread use of agricultural chemicals in food production, people are exposed to ... effects of these pesticide residues. Results from the Agricultural Health Study, an ongoing study of pesticide exposures ...

  16. Utility of the Measurement of Carboxyhemoglobin Level at the Site of Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Rural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Makoto; Fujino, Yasuhisa; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Sato, Masayuki; Mori, Kiyofumi; Beppu, Takaaki; Inoue, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study examined the hypothesis that correlations exist between the carbon monoxide exposure time and the carboxyhemoglobin concentration at the site of carbon monoxide poisoning, using a pulse carbon monoxide oximeter in rural areas or the carboxyhemoglobin concentration measured at a given medical institution. Background. In previous studies, no definitive relationships between the arterial blood carboxyhemoglobin level and the severity of carbon monoxide poisoning have been observed. Method. The subjects included patients treated for acute carbon monoxide poisoning in whom a medical emergency team was able to measure the carboxyhemoglobin level at the site of poisoning. We examined the relationship between the carboxyhemoglobin level at the site of poisoning and carbon monoxide exposure time and the relationships between the arterial blood carboxyhemoglobin level and carbon monoxide exposure time. Results. A total of 10 patients met the above criteria. The carboxyhemoglobin levels at the site of poisoning were significantly and positively correlated with the exposure time (rs = 0.710, p = 0.021), but the arterial blood carboxyhemoglobin levels were not correlated with the exposure time. Conclusion. In rural areas, the carboxyhemoglobin level measured at the site of carbon monoxide poisoning correlated with the exposure time. PMID:27239377

  17. Utility of the Measurement of Carboxyhemoglobin Level at the Site of Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Rural Areas.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Makoto; Fujino, Yasuhisa; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Sato, Masayuki; Mori, Kiyofumi; Beppu, Takaaki; Inoue, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study examined the hypothesis that correlations exist between the carbon monoxide exposure time and the carboxyhemoglobin concentration at the site of carbon monoxide poisoning, using a pulse carbon monoxide oximeter in rural areas or the carboxyhemoglobin concentration measured at a given medical institution. Background. In previous studies, no definitive relationships between the arterial blood carboxyhemoglobin level and the severity of carbon monoxide poisoning have been observed. Method. The subjects included patients treated for acute carbon monoxide poisoning in whom a medical emergency team was able to measure the carboxyhemoglobin level at the site of poisoning. We examined the relationship between the carboxyhemoglobin level at the site of poisoning and carbon monoxide exposure time and the relationships between the arterial blood carboxyhemoglobin level and carbon monoxide exposure time. Results. A total of 10 patients met the above criteria. The carboxyhemoglobin levels at the site of poisoning were significantly and positively correlated with the exposure time (rs = 0.710, p = 0.021), but the arterial blood carboxyhemoglobin levels were not correlated with the exposure time. Conclusion. In rural areas, the carboxyhemoglobin level measured at the site of carbon monoxide poisoning correlated with the exposure time.

  18. Epidemiology and toxicology of arsenic poisoning in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Selby, L A; Case, A A; Osweiler, G D; Hayes, H M

    1977-08-01

    Arsenic poisoning is one of the more important causes of heavy metal poisoning in domestic animals. Two species--dogs and cattle--are intoxicated more frequently than other animals; yet sporadic instances of poisoning have been observed in cats, horses, and pigs. Cases observed by veterinary clinicians are either peracute, acute, or chronic intoxications. Frequently the initial and only indication that a severe problem exists with peracute poisoning in a cattle herd is dead animals. Chronic intoxications are also observed in cattle. Acute intoxication is the most common form of arsenic poisoning observed and documented in the dog. Also intoxicated dogs were younger, i.e., 2-6 months of age. Arsenic is a severe alimentary tract irritant in domestic animals, and treatment in most instances consists mainly of symptomatic and supportive treatment. The source of intoxication, when it can be determined, is usually dips, sprays, powders, or vegetation contaminated by pesticides containing arsenic.

  19. Role of biomarkers of nephrotoxic acute kidney injury in deliberate poisoning and envenomation in less developed countries

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Fahim; Endre, Zoltan H; Buckley, Nicholas A

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) has diverse causes and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. In less developed countries (LDC), nephrotoxic AKI (ToxAKI) is common and mainly due to deliberate ingestion of nephrotoxic pesticides, toxic plants or to snake envenomation. ToxAKI shares some pathophysiological pathways with the much more intensively studied ischaemic AKI, but in contrast to ischaemic AKI, most victims are young, previously healthy adults. Diagnosis of AKI is currently based on a rise in serum creatinine. However this may delay diagnosis because of the kinetics of creatinine. Baseline creatinine values are also rarely available in LDC. Novel renal injury biomarkers offer a way forward because they usually increase more rapidly in AKI and are normally regarded as absent or very low in concentration, thereby reducing the need for a baseline estimate. This should increase sensitivity and speed of diagnosis. Specificity should also be increased for urine biomarkers since many originate from the renal tubular epithelium. Earlier diagnosis of ToxAKI should allow earlier initiation of appropriate therapy. However, translation of novel biomarkers of ToxAKI into clinical practice requires better understanding of non-renal factors in poisoning that alter biomarkers and the influence of dose of nephrotoxin on biomarker performance. Further issues are establishing LDC population-based normal ranges and assessing sampling and analytical parameters for low resource settings. The potential role of renal biomarkers in exploring ToxAKI aetiologies for chronic kidney disease of unknown origin (CKDu) is a high research priority in LDC. Therefore, developing more sensitive biomarkers for early diagnosis of nephrotoxicity is a critical step to making progress against AKI and CKDu in the developing world. PMID:26099916

  20. Intentional poisoning cases of animals with anticholinesterase pesticide-carbofuran in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Tennakoon, Sakunthala; Perera, Bandumala; Haturusinghe, Lathika

    2009-04-01

    Carbofuran is a broad spectrum insecticide and nematicide which inhibits acetyl cholinesterase. Several intentional poisoning cases of animals and birds including crows, dogs, cow, and elephant, using carbofuran were reported in Sri Lanka. Qualitative analysis of carbofuran in biological specimens was carried out using T.L.C and GC-MS. The quantitative analysis was carried out by HPLC using Zorbax Eclips XDB-C18 (150 x 4.6 mm I.D x 5 microm particle size) column with acetonitrile: water 25:75 v/v mobile phase and UV detection at 210 nm. The liquid-liquid extraction with chloroform was reproducible and sensitive. The procedure was validated in terms of linearity (0.996poisoning. The fatal carbofuran levels detected were in the range of 42-910 microg/g in crow's gizzard and contents, 50-800 microg/g in dog's stomach contents, 13-20 microg/g in dog's liver, 0.9 microg/g in cow's stomach and contents, 35 microg/g in elephant's stomach and contents.

  1. Acute lead poisoning with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in calves on a farm receiving land application of sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, C.R.; Tuomari, D.; Reddy, C.; Logan, T.J.

    1986-03-01

    A total of 3 cases of acute lead poisoning in calves was confirmed by atomic absorption spectrophotometric analysis of biological samples, presence of an acute lead exposure source, clinical signs of impaired vision in one case and eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in another case. One of two other calves which died approximately 2 months earlier had nervous signs and it is likely that they also had lead poisoning. Dams of two of the cases did not have elevated lead levels. Municipal sewage sludge had been applied to most fields on the farm during the preceding 5 year period. There had been approximately a doubling of the lead content in the soil; however, the foodstuffs produced on the farm had low lead concentrations. The extremely high lead levels in the abomasal contents and feces of calves eliminated sludge as the source of the lead in this acute poisoning episode. The contents of oil filters, accessible to calves but not to adult cattle, had lead levels as high as 26,922 micrograms/g and was the most likely lead source responsible for this lead intoxication. It appears that the manifestation of eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in lead poisoning cases may occur in young calves as well as in cows and in acute as well as in chronic intoxications.

  2. Can poisons stimulate bees? Appreciating the potential of hormesis in bee-pesticide research.

    PubMed

    Cutler, G Christopher; Rix, Rachel R

    2015-10-01

    Hormesis, a biphasic dose response whereby exposure to low doses of a stressor can stimulate biological processes, has been reported in many organisms, including pest insects when they are exposed to low doses of a pesticide. However, awareness of the hormesis phenomenon seems to be limited among bee researchers, in spite of the increased emphasis of late on pollinator toxicology and risk assessment. In this commentary, we show that there are several examples in the literature of substances that are toxic to bees at high doses but stimulatory at low doses. Appreciation of the hormetic dose response by bee researchers will improve our fundamental understanding of how bees respond to low doses of chemical stressors, and may be useful in pollinator risk assessment.

  3. The prognostic value of the Glasgow coma scale, serum acetylcholinesterase and leukocyte levels in acute organophosphorus poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Cander, Basar; Dur, Ali; Yildiz, Mesut; Koyuncu, Feridun; Girisgin, Abdullah Sadik; Gul, Mehmet; Okumus, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Organophosphate poisoning (OP) is a serious clinical condition that may sometimes be fatal. The aim of this study was to determine whether the Glasgow coma scale (GCS), and serum acetylcholinesterase and leukocyte levels have prognostic value in acute OP poisoning. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective review of records of patients admitted to the intensive care unit of Selcuk University, Meram Medical Faculty, Emergency Department, Konya, Turkey, between January 2006 and January 2009. METHODS: We studied acutely OP-poisoned patients admitted within 24 hours after OP exposure. RESULTS: The mean age of the 25 patients was 37 years (range, 20-80 years). Three (12%) of the 25 patients (male-female ratio, 12:13) died. The mean GCS values of the patients who died were significantly lower compared to those of the group that survived (4 vs 11.7, respectively P<.05). While the mean serum acetylcholinesterase levels were lower in the patients who died, the difference in the mean serum acetylcholinesterase levels between the patients who died and the ones who survived was not statistically significant (3841 IU/L vs. 1768 IU/L, respectively). CONCLUSION: Although serum cholinesterase values can be used in the quick diagnosis, their efficiency at predicting outcome in patients with OP poisoning has not been established. It has also been determined that serum leukocyte values have no prognostic value in OP poisoning, but GCS values have been found to be effective in predicting the outcome. PMID:21422653

  4. Lanolin poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Wool wax poisoning; Wool alcohol poisoning; Glossylan poisoning; Golden dawn poisoning; Sparklelan poisoning ... Symptoms of lanolin poisoning include: Diarrhea Rash Swelling and redness of skin Vomiting

  5. [On the importance of a comprehensive study for diagnostics of death from acute ethanol poisoning and coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Porodenko, V A; Korkhmazov, V T

    2011-01-01

    Over 30 000 cases of acute poisoning with ethyl alcohol and its surrogates are recorded annually in this country. Differential diagnostics between fatal poisoning and death from coronary heart disease encounters serious difficulties. The authors report a comprehensive forensic chemical, morphometric, and pathomorphological study of the activity of ethanol-oxidizing enzyme systems in the internal organs. The results of histochemical examination provide a basis for the extension of diagnostic potential of the available methods and the enhancement of the objective value of expert reports. PMID:21866846

  6. Acute Pancreatitis, Hepatitis and Bone Erosion in Acute Yellow Phosphorous Compound Poisoning – A Rare Complication

    PubMed Central

    Kamarthi, Prabhakar; Gopu, Arun Vardharaju; Prasad, Reddy; Srinivasa, Chandrakala

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of acute pancreatitis and hepatitis following ingestion of yellow phosphorous. The condition of the patient progressed to encephalopathy and bony erosion of the nasal septum. Fungal mass was observed in both the nasal cavities by endoscopy. Microbiological investigation revealed the identity of the fungus as Aspergillus flavus and Candida tropicalis. Patient improved with fluconazole treatment. PMID:27504287

  7. Acute Pancreatitis, Hepatitis and Bone Erosion in Acute Yellow Phosphorous Compound Poisoning - A Rare Complication.

    PubMed

    Kamarthi, Prabhakar; Subramani, Parimala; Gopu, Arun Vardharaju; Prasad, Reddy; Srinivasa, Chandrakala

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of acute pancreatitis and hepatitis following ingestion of yellow phosphorous. The condition of the patient progressed to encephalopathy and bony erosion of the nasal septum. Fungal mass was observed in both the nasal cavities by endoscopy. Microbiological investigation revealed the identity of the fungus as Aspergillus flavus and Candida tropicalis. Patient improved with fluconazole treatment. PMID:27504287

  8. Characteristics and determinants of adult patients with acute poisoning attending the accident and emergency department of a teaching hospital in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Khudair, I F; Jassim, Z; Hanssens, Y; Alsaad, W A

    2013-09-01

    Data about etiologic and demographic characteristics of acute poisoning in adults in Qatar are lacking. This prospective observational study was undertaken to analyze characteristics and possible determinants of acute poisoning in adults in Qatar. During 2010, 18,073 patients attended the emergency department of Hamad General Hospital, a teaching hospital in Qatar. Out of them, 599 (3.3%) patients were diagnosed as "poisoning case" with either chemical or pharmaceutical substances. The prevalence rate of poisoning incidence was 35.3/100,000 population. Seven patients died, corresponding with a case-fatality rate of 0.39/1000. The majority were male (65%) and the mean age was 34 years. The poisons involved were mainly chemicals (61.6%) and pharmaceuticals (38.4%). Female, mainly single, suffered more intentional poisoning compared to male. Of the patients aged 60 years and above (7.2%), the majority (95.3%) suffered unintentional poisoning with pharmaceuticals; 56% with warfarin, 12% with digoxin and 7% with insulin. Multivariate analysis shows that female gender, single status, younger than 35 years of age, being poisoned by pharmaceutical products, and the need for hospitalization are significant determinants for acute intentional poisoning after adjusting all other possible covariates. The findings of this study can be used to establish awareness and prophylactic campaigns in Qatar.

  9. [The morphofunctional features of the heart associated with acute morphine poisoning during the period of chronic drug intoxication].

    PubMed

    Altaeva, A Zh; Galitsky, F A; Zhakupova, T Z; Aidarkulov, A Sh; Selivokhina, N V; Zhunisov, S S

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to improve forensic medical diagnostics of the cases of death associated with morphine poisoning based on the investigation into the biochemical changes in blood and pericardial fluid as well as morphological changes in the myocardial structures. The studies were carried out with the use of thin-layer chromatography, colorimetric and morphological methods including hematoxylin and eosin, Lee's methylene blue, and van Gieson's picrofuscin staining. These techniques were supplemented by light and polarization microscopy. The study has demonstrated the presence of morphine in 99.16% of the blood and pericardial samples obtained in the cases of poisoning. The comparison of the results of biochemical and pathomorphological studies of the myocardium made it possible to evaluate the functional and morphological conditions of the heart in the case of acute morphine poisoning during the period of chronic drug intoxication.

  10. Combined administration of hyperbaric oxygen and hydroxocobalamin improves cerebral metabolism after acute cyanide poisoning in rats.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M B; Olsen, N V; Hyldegaard, O

    2013-11-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) or intravenous hydroxocobalamin (OHCob) both abolish cyanide (CN)-induced surges in interstitial brain lactate and glucose concentrations. HBOT has been shown to induce a delayed increase in whole blood CN concentrations, whereas OHCob may act as an intravascular CN scavenger. Additionally, HBOT may prevent respiratory distress and restore blood pressure during CN intoxication, an effect not seen with OHCob administration. In this report, we evaluated the combined effects of HBOT and OHCob on interstitial lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations as well as lactate-to-pyruvate ratio in rat brain by means of microdialysis during acute CN poisoning. Anesthetized rats were allocated to three groups: 1) vehicle (1.2 ml isotonic NaCl intra-arterially); 2) potassium CN (5.4 mg/kg intra-arterially); 3) potassium CN, OHCob (100 mg/kg intra-arterially) and subsequent HBOT (284 kPa in 90 min). OHCob and HBOT significantly attenuated the acute surges in interstitial cerebral lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations compared with the intoxicated rats given no treatment. Furthermore, the combined treatment resulted in consistent low lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations, as well as in low lactate-to-pyruvate ratios compared with CN intoxicated controls. In rats receiving OHCob and HBOT, respiration improved and cyanosis disappeared, with subsequent stabilization of mean arterial blood pressure. The present findings indicate that a combined administration of OHCob and HBOT has a beneficial and persistent effect on the cerebral metabolism during CN intoxication.

  11. Evaluation of acceptability and use of lockable storage devices for pesticides in Sri Lanka that might assist in prevention of self-poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Hawton, Keith; Ratnayeke, Lakshmi; Simkin, Sue; Harriss, Louise; Scott, Vanda

    2009-01-01

    Background Self-poisoning with pesticides is a major reason for high suicide rates in rural areas of many developing countries. Safer storage of pesticides may be one means of prevention. We have conducted a study to assess the acceptability and use of lockable boxes for storing pesticides in rural Sri Lanka. Methods Four hundred lockable metal storage boxes were given to farming households, 100 in each of four villages. Assessment interviews were conducted by Sumithrayo (NGO) field workers immediately after boxes were supplied (T1), 11 – 14 weeks later (T2), 30 weeks later (T3), and 18 months later (T4). Data on suicide and self-harm were collected from local police and hospitals. Results At T1 only 1.8% (7/396) of households reported locking up pesticides, 72.5% (279/385) easy access to pesticides for adults and 50.4% (195/387) easy access for children. At T3 most informants in households using pesticides reported using the box all (82.3%, 298/362) or most of the time (7.2%, 26/362). Informants usually reported always locking the box (92.8%, 336/362) and most boxes were locked on inspection (93.6%, 339/362). By T4 there was some reduction in reporting that the box was kept locked all of the time (75.2%, 267/355) and the box being locked on inspection (73.8%, 262/355). Easy child access to the key was reported in relatively few households (10.7% at T4), although interviewers judged that this was possible in rather more (20.6%). Most informants regarded the box as useful (100% at T3 and 99.4% at T4), with convenience for storage, security, avoiding wastage, and protection of children being major factors. A message on the box about how to deal with bad feelings and the importance of safer storage was well received. The locks had been broken or the key lost in a few households. Conclusion Introduction of lockable boxes for storing pesticides to farming households in Sri Lanka appeared to be acceptable. Most households used the boxes responsibly, although there was

  12. The development, validation and application of a GC-dual detector (NPD-ECD) multi-pesticide residue method for monitoring bee poisoning incidents.

    PubMed

    Łozowicka, Bożena

    2013-11-01

    A simple multiresidue method based on matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) combined with clean-up has been developed for the simultaneous screening of 153 pesticides in honeybees suspected of suffering from pesticide poisoning during field spraying. Extraction and clean-up were carried out in a glass column containing anhydrous sulphate, 2.0g of octadecyl (C18) and a 2.0-g sample of bees (23 insects on average) macerated with 4.0g of Florisil. An additional layer of anhydrous sodium sulphate was added, and acetonitrile was used as the elution solvent. This combination of clean-up steps ensured an efficient purification. A gas chromatograph with dual selective detectors for electron capture and nitrogen-phosphorous was used. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) with the one-step clean-up procedure is the most effective extraction technique. MSPD method recoveries ranged from 70 to 118%, with precision values expressed as a relative standard of <20%, except for 10 pesticides that had recoveries of 50-70% and two with 120-130%. Low limits of detection (0.003-0.04μg/g) and quantification (0.005-0.05μg/g) were readily achieved with this method for all tested pesticides. A "top down" empirical model was used to estimate the expanded uncertainty at 28% on average (coverage factor k=2, confidence level 95%). The MSPD method was successfully used on real bee samples to analyse four acaricides, 55 fungicides, 16 herbicides and 78 insecticides from various regions of Poland. A total of 33 honeybee samples from suspected pesticide poisoning incidents were analysed, in which 17 different pesticides were determined (14 insecticides and three fungicides). The pesticides most often found in honeybees were cypermethrin (in 51% of the samples, 0.008-0.563µg/bee), chlorpyrifos (27%, 0.001-51.5µg/bee) and biphentin (21%, 0.002-0.012µg/bee).

  13. Association of Pesticide Exposure with Neurologic Dysfunction and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Freya; Hoppin, Jane A.

    2004-01-01

    Poisoning by acute high-level exposure to certain pesticides has well-known neurotoxic effects, but whether chronic exposure to moderate levels of pesticides is also neurotoxic is more controversial. Most studies of moderate pesticide exposure have found increased prevalence of neurologic symptoms and changes in neurobehavioral performance, reflecting cognitive and psychomotor dysfunction. There is less evidence that moderate exposure is related to deficits in sensory or motor function or peripheral nerve conduction, but fewer studies have considered these outcomes. It is possible that the most sensitive manifestation of pesticide neurotoxicity is a general malaise lacking in specificity and related to mild cognitive dysfunction, similar to that described for Gulf War syndrome. Most studies have focused on organophosphate insecticides, but some found neuro-toxic effects from other pesticides, including fungicides, fumigants, and organochlorine and carbamate insecticides. Pesticide exposure may also be associated with increased risk of Parkinson disease; several classes of pesticides, including insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides, have been implicated. Studies of other neurodegenerative diseases are limited and inconclusive. Future studies will need to improve assessment of pesticide exposure in individuals and consider the role of genetic susceptibility. More studies of pesticides other than organophosphates are needed. Major unresolved issues include the relative importance of acute and chronic exposure, the effect of moderate exposure in the absence of poisoning, and the relationship of pesticide-related neurotoxicity to neurodegenerative disease. PMID:15198914

  14. Fatal cases of acute suicidal sodium and accidental zinc fluorosilicate poisoning. Review of acute intoxications due to fluoride compounds.

    PubMed

    Lech, Teresa

    2011-03-20

    Fluoride, of all inorganic substances, is among the least likely to be identified by a routine toxicological analysis. Acute poisonings with salts of hydrofluoric or fluorosilicic acid, however, although relatively uncommon, may occur. Some fluorosilicates, salts of fluorosilicic acid (e.g. Al, Zn, Pb, Mg) are used as stone consolidants, others (e.g. sodium fluorosilicate)--in the production of enamel and milk glass, or as insecticide. In this paper, two fatal cases of poisonings are presented: a suicide involving sodium fluorosilicate of a 39-year-old male who died in his flat, without hospitalization, and an accidental ingestion of zinc fluorosilicate solution (probably due to mistaking it for mineral water) by a 38-year-old male at his workplace (building), who died about 3h after ingestion of the liquid, in spite of intensive care at hospitals. Post-mortem samples were examined by the use of the spectrophotometric method with lanthanum nitrate and alizarin complexone for fluorine (after isolation of fluoride compounds by the microdiffusion method) and using a flame atomic absorption spectrometry method for zinc (after mineralization of biological material by sulfuric and nitric acids). In the first case, the results were: blood--130 μg F/ml, stomach--1150 μg F/g, small intestine content --19.6 μg F/g, kidney--56.0 μg F/g, and urine--1940 μg F/ml. In the second case, the contents of fluorine and zinc in blood and internal organs were the following: blood--6.03 μg F/ml, 23.8 μg Zn/ml; brain--1.39 μg F/g, 7.54 μg Zn/g; stomach--152 μg Zn/g; stomach content--293 μg F/g, 84.4 μg Zn/g; small intestine--37.5 μg Zn/g; small intestine content--63.4 μg F/g, 19.6 μg Zn/g; liver--9.49 μg F/g, 81.0 μg Zn/g; kidney--29.6 μg F/g, 39.2 μg Zn/g; and exceeded the normal levels of these elements in biological material many times. In addition, in stomach and liver large amounts of silica were detected. In the paper, a review of acute intoxications with various

  15. Acute lead poisoning in western Canadian cattle — A 16-year retrospective study of diagnostic case records

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Vanessa; Blakley, Barry

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the epidemiology of acute lead poisoning in western Canadian cattle over the 16-year period of 1998 to 2013 and reports background bovine tissue lead concentrations. Case records from Prairie Diagnostic Services, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, identified 525 cases of acute lead toxicity over the investigational period. Poisonings were influenced by year (P < 0.0001) and month (P < 0.0001). Submissions were highest in 2009 (15.6%), 2001 (11.2%), and 2006 (9.9%). Most cases were observed during May, June, and July (62.3%). Cattle 6 months of age and younger were frequently poisoned (53.5%; P < 0.0001). Beef breeds were predominantly poisoned. Mean toxic lead concentrations (mg/kg wet weight) in the blood, liver, and kidney were 1.30 ± 1.70 (n = 301), 33.5 ± 80.5 (n = 172), and 56.3 ± 39.7 (n = 61). Mean normal lead concentrations in the blood, liver, and kidney were 0.036 ± 0.003 mg/kg (n= 1081), 0.16 ± 0.63 mg/kg (n = 382), and 0.41 ± 0.62 mg/kg (n = 64). PMID:27041761

  16. [The effect of immunofan on the immunity system characteristics and lipid peroxidation parameters upon acute chemical poisoning].

    PubMed

    Zabrodskiĭ, P F; Germanchuk, V G; Nodel', M L; Vasilenko, O A; Aredakov, A N

    2004-01-01

    The results of experiments on Wistar rats under conditions of acute poisoning with 0.75 LD50 of zarin (isopropylmethyl fluorophosphonate), luisite (beta-chlorovinyl dichloroarsine), arsenic chloride, and dichloroethane showed that a four-day treatment with immunofan in a dose of 10 microg/kg restored the immune status characteristics (antibody formation to T-dependent antigen, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, natural killer cell activity, and delayed type hypersensitivity) and the related LPO parameters.

  17. Refrigerant poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Coolant poisoning; Freon poisoning; Fluorinated hydrocarbon poisoning; Sudden sniffing death syndrome ... should call if you have any questions about poisoning or poison prevention. It does NOT need to ...

  18. Plasma copeptin as a predictor of intoxication severity and delayed neurological sequelae in acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Pang, Li; Wang, He-Lei; Wang, Zhi-Hao; Wu, Yang; Dong, Ning; Xu, Da-Hai; Wang, Da-Wei; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Nan

    2014-09-01

    The present study was designed to assess the usefulness of measuring plasma levels of copeptin (a peptide co-released with the hypothalamic stress hormone vasopressin) as a biomarker for the severity of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning and for predicting delayed neurological sequelae (DNS). Seventy-two patients with CO poisoning and 72 sex and age matched healthy individuals were recruited. Plasma copeptin levels were measured on admission from CO poisoning patients and for healthy individuals at study entry by using a sandwich immunoassay. The CO poisoning patients were divided into two groups according to severity (unconscious and conscious) and occurrence of DNS. The mean plasma copeptin levels (52.5±18.5 pmol/L) in the unconscious group were significantly higher than in the conscious group (26.3±12.7 pmol/L) (P<0.001). Plasma copeptin levels of more than 39.0 pmol/L detected CO poisoning with severe neurological symptoms e.g. unconsciousness (sensitivity 84.6% and specificity 81.4%). The plasma copeptin levels were higher in patients with DNS compared to patients without DNS (52.2±20.6 pmol/L vs. 27.9±14.8 pmol/L, P<0.001). Plasma copeptin levels higher than 40.5 pmol/L predicted the development of DNS (sensitivity 77.8%, specificity 82.1%). Plasma copeptin levels were identified as an independent predictor for intoxication severity [odds ratio (OR) 1.261, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.112-1.638, P=0.002] and DNS (OR 1.313, 95% CI 1.106-1.859, P=0.001). Thus, plasma copeptin levels independently related to intoxication severity and were identified as a novel biomarker for predicting DNS after acute CO poisoning.

  19. Hypotension in Severe Dimethoate Self-Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Davies, James; Roberts, Darren; Eyer, Peter; Buckley, Nick; Eddleston, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute self-poisoning with the organophosphorus (OP) pesticide dimethoate has a human case fatality three-fold higher than poisoning with chlorpyrifos despite similar animal toxicity. The typical clinical presentation of severe dimethoate poisoning is quite distinct from that of chlorpyrifos and other OP pesticides: many patients present with hypotension that progresses to shock and death within 12–48 h post-ingestion. The pathophysiology of this syndrome is not clear. Case reports We present here three patients with proven severe dimethoate poisoning. Clinically, all had inappropriate peripheral vasodilatation and profound hypotension on presentation, which progressed despite treatment with atropine, i.v. fluids, pralidoxime chloride, and inotropes. All died 2.5–32 h post-admission. Continuous cardiac monitoring and quantification of troponin T provided little evidence for a primary cardiotoxic effect of dimethoate. Conclusion Severe dimethoate self-poisoning causes a syndrome characterized by marked hypotension with progression to distributive shock and death despite standard treatments. A lack of cardiotoxicity until just before death suggests that the mechanism is of OP-induced low systemic vascular resistance (SVR). Further invasive studies of cardiac function and SVR, and post-mortem histology, are required to better describe this syndrome and to establish the role of vasopressors and high-dose atropine in therapy. PMID:19003596

  20. Acute arsenic poisoning treated by intravenous dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and combined extrarenal epuration techniques.

    PubMed

    Hantson, Philippe; Haufroid, Vincent; Buchet, Jean-Pierre; Mahieu, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic poisoning was diagnosed in a 26-year-old man who had been criminally intoxicated over the last two weeks preceding admission by the surreptitious oral administration of probably 10 g of arsenic trioxide (As2O3). The patient developed severe manifestations of toxic hepatitis and pancreatitis, and thereafter neurological disorders, respiratory distress, acute renal failure, and cardiovascular disturbances. In addition to supportive therapy, extrarenal elimination techniques and chelating agents were used. Dimercaprol (BAL) and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA or succimer) were used simultaneously as arsenic chelating agents for two days, and thereafter DMSA was used alone. DMSA was administered by intravenous (20 mg/kg/d for five days, then 10 mg/kg/d for six days) and intraperitoneal route. Intravenous DMSA infusion was well tolerated and resulted in an increase in arsenic blood concentration immediately after the infusion. Continuous venovenous hemofiltration combined with hemodialysis, and peritoneal dialysis were proposed to enhance arsenic elimination. It was calculated that over an 11-day period 14.5 mg arsenic were eliminated by the urine, 26.7 mg by hemodialysis, 17.8 mg by peritoneal dialysis, and 7.8 mg by continuous venovenous hemofiltration. These amounts appeared negligible with regard to the probable ingested dose. The patient died on day 26 from the consequences of multiple organ failure, with subarachnoid hemorrhage and generalized infection caused by Aspergillus fumigatus.

  1. Fatal acute poisoning from massive inhalation of gasoline vapors: case report and comparison with similar cases.

    PubMed

    Papi, Luigi; Chericoni, Silvio; Bresci, Francesco; Giusiani, Mario

    2013-03-01

    We describe a case of an acute lethal poisoning with hydrocarbons resulting from massive accidental inhalation of gasoline vapors. The victim, a 50-year-old man was found unconscious inside a control room for the transport of unleaded fuel. Complete autopsy was performed and showed evidence of congestion and edema of the lungs. Toxicological investigation was therefore fundamental to confirm exposure to fumes of gasoline. Both venous and arterial blood showed high values of volatiles in particular for benzene (39.0 and 30.4 μg/mL, respectively), toluene (23.7 and 20.4 μg/mL), and xylene isomers (29.8 and 19.3 μg/mL). The relatively low values found in the lungs are consistent with the fact that the subject, during the rescue, underwent orotracheal intubation followed by resuscitation techniques, while the low concentrations for all substances found in urine and kidneys could point to a death that occurred in a very short time after first contact with the fumes of gasoline.

  2. Citrus peel extract attenuates acute cyanide poisoning-induced seizures and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2014-01-01

    The primary aimed of this study was to investigate the potential protective effects of methanolic extract of citrus peel (MECP) on acute cyanide (KCN) poisoning-induced seizures and oxidative stress in rats. The intraperitoneal LD50 value of KCN (6.3 mg/Kg bwt), based on 24 hrs mortality, was significantly increased by 9, 52 or 113% by oral administration of MECP (500 mg/Kg bwt) pre-administered for 1, 2 and 3 days, respectively, in rats in a time-dependent manner. Intraperitoneal injection of the sublethal dose of KCN (3 mg/Kg bwt) into rats increased, 24 hrs later, lipid peroxidation (LPO), nitric oxide (NO), glutamate levels and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex. KCN also decreased brain glutathione (GSH) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in these animals. Pre-treatment of rats with MECP inhibited KCN-induced increases in LPO, NO, and glutamate levels and AChE activity as well as decreases in brain GSH level and SOD and CAT activities. In addition, KCN significantly decreased norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin levels in different brain regions which were resolved by MECP. From the present results, it can be concluded that the neuroprotective effects of MECP against KCN-induced seizures and oxidative stress may be due to the inhibition of oxidative stress overproduction and maintenance of antioxidant defense mechanisms.

  3. Rare alleles within the CYP2E1 (MEOS system) could be associated with better short-term health outcome after acute methanol poisoning.

    PubMed

    Hubacek, Jaroslav A; Pelclova, Daniela; Seidl, Zdenek; Vaneckova, Manuela; Klempir, Jiri; Ruzicka, Evzen; Ridzon, Petr; Urban, Pavel; Fenclova, Zdenka; Petrik, Vit; Diblik, Pavel; Kuthan, Pavel; Miovsky, Michal; Janikova, Barbara; Adamkova, Vera; Zakharov, Sergey

    2015-02-01

    Genetic polymorphisms influence the metabolism of ethanol and methanol, but the potential effects of genetic predisposition on the clinical course, outcome and short-term health sequelae of acute methanol poisoning are unknown. To evaluate the role of the MEOS system in methanol poisoning, we analysed the effect of three polymorphisms (RsaI - rs2031920; PstI - rs3813867; insertion/deletion I/D) within the CYP2E1 enzyme (MEOS system) in 50 adult survivors of methanol poisoning and compared their genotype frequencies with 460 controls. The minor allele frequencies of all three polymorphisms were below 5% in both groups. We did not detect significant differences in the genotype frequencies between survivors of methanol poisoning and controls (p = 0.34 for the RsaI variant; p = 0.59 for the PstI variant and p = 0.21 for the I/D polymorphism). The carriers of at least one minor allele in the CYP2E1 gene had less severe clinical symptoms and better short-term outcome after acute poisoning. Variants within the CYP2E1 gene are likely not significant genetic determinants of acute methanol poisoning (if survivors are analysed), but they may influence the severity of methanol poisoning and its visual/central nervous system (CNS) outcome.

  4. Acute oral and percutaneous toxicity of pesticides to mallards: Correlations with mammalian toxicity data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, R.H.; Haegele, M.A.; Tucker, R.K.

    1979-01-01

    Acute oral (po) and 24-hr percutaneous (perc) LD50 values for 21 common pesticides (19 anticholinesterases, of which 18 were organophosphates, and one was a carbamate; one was an organochlorine central nervous system stimulant; and one was an organonitrogen pneumotoxicant) were determined in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Three of the pesticides tested were more toxic percutaneously than orally. An index to the percutaneous hazard of a pesticide, the dermal toxicity index (DTI = po LD50/perc LD50 ? 100), was also calculated for each pesticide. These toxicity values in mallards were compared with toxicity data for rats from the literature. Significant positive correlations were found between log po and log percutaneous LD50 values in mallards (r = 0.65, p 0.10). Variations in percutaneous methodologies are discussed with reference to interspecies variation in toxicity values. It is recommended that a mammalian DTI value approaching 30 be used as a guideline for the initiation of percutaneous toxicity studies in birds, when the po LD50 and/or projected percutaneous LD50 are less than expected field exposure levels.

  5. Pesticide-related health problems and farmworkers.

    PubMed

    Moses, M

    1989-03-01

    1. Migrant and seasonal farmworkers are primarily ethnic minorities who are excluded from federal laws that protect other workers. Farmworkers live and work under substandard conditions that place them at increased risk of pesticide-related illness. 2. Agriculture uses 80% of all pesticides in the U.S. Handlers who mix, load and apply pesticides as well as workers cultivating and harvesting crops sprayed with them are at risk of acute poisoning or even death from their exposures. Drift and run-off of agricultural pesticides pollute the air, soil and water, creating additional hazards to workers' families, community residents, and the environment. 3. Chronic effects, including cancer in adults and children, adverse reproductive outcomes, delayed neuropathy and neurobehavioral effects, are also associated with occupational and environmental exposure to pesticides. PMID:2647086

  6. Fatal parathion poisoning in Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Etzel, R. A.; Forthal, D. N.; Hill, R. H.; Demby, A.

    1987-01-01

    In May and June 1986, 49 persons in Sierra Leone were acutely poisoned by the organothiophosphate insecticide, parathion. Fourteen people died. Illness occurred in three episodes at two different locations that were 44 km apart. A study of 21 cases and 22 household controls was undertaken to explore which factors were associated with the development of the symptoms. Cases were more likely than controls to have eaten bread in the 4 hours before becoming ill (odds ratio, 12.7; 95% confidence interval, 2.4-83.8). Scrapings of residue from the floor of the truck that had brought the wheat flour from the mill to the general store where the baker purchased it were positive for parathion, suggesting that the flour had been contaminated during transport. Pesticide poisoning is a common problem in the developing world, and public health measures such as restricting the use of parathion may help to prevent fatal poisonings. PMID:3501344

  7. Bioconcentration and Acute Intoxication of Brazilian Freshwater Fishes by the Methyl Parathion Organophosphate Pesticide

    PubMed Central

    Bosco de Salles, João; Matos Lopes, Renato; de Salles, Cristiane M. C.; Cassano, Vicente P. F.; de Oliveira, Manildo Marcião; Cunha Bastos, Vera L. F.; Bastos, Jayme Cunha

    2015-01-01

    Three species of freshwater Brazilian fishes (pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus; piavussu, Leporinus macrocephalus, and curimbatá, Prochilodus lineatus) were exposed to an acute dose of 5 ppm methyl parathion organophosphate pesticide. Three to five individuals per species were exposed, one at a time, to 40 liters tap water spiked with Folidol 600. Pesticide concentrations and cholinesterase (ChE) activities were evaluated in serum, liver, brain, heart, and muscle. The bioconcentration of methyl parathion was similar for all studied fishes. Brain tissue showed the highest pesticide concentration, reaching 80 ppm after exposure for 30 min to methyl parathion. Three to 5 hours of 5 ppm methyl parathion exposure provoked the death of all P. lineatus at 92% brain AChE inhibition, whereas fish from the other two species survived for up to 78 hours with less than 80% brain AChE inhibition. Our results indicate that acute toxic effects of methyl parathion to fish are correlated with brain AChE sensitivity to methyl paraoxon. PMID:26339593

  8. Bioconcentration and Acute Intoxication of Brazilian Freshwater Fishes by the Methyl Parathion Organophosphate Pesticide.

    PubMed

    de Salles, João Bosco; Lopes, Renato Matos; de Salles, Cristiane M C; Cassano, Vicente P F; de Oliveira, Manildo Marcião; Bastos, Vera L F Cunha; Bastos, Jayme Cunha

    2015-01-01

    Three species of freshwater Brazilian fishes (pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus; piavussu, Leporinus macrocephalus, and curimbatá, Prochilodus lineatus) were exposed to an acute dose of 5 ppm methyl parathion organophosphate pesticide. Three to five individuals per species were exposed, one at a time, to 40 liters tap water spiked with Folidol 600. Pesticide concentrations and cholinesterase (ChE) activities were evaluated in serum, liver, brain, heart, and muscle. The bioconcentration of methyl parathion was similar for all studied fishes. Brain tissue showed the highest pesticide concentration, reaching 80 ppm after exposure for 30 min to methyl parathion. Three to 5 hours of 5 ppm methyl parathion exposure provoked the death of all P. lineatus at 92% brain AChE inhibition, whereas fish from the other two species survived for up to 78 hours with less than 80% brain AChE inhibition. Our results indicate that acute toxic effects of methyl parathion to fish are correlated with brain AChE sensitivity to methyl paraoxon. PMID:26339593

  9. [Acute dietary poisoning by white hellebore (Veratrum album L.). Clinical and analytical data. A propos of 5 cases].

    PubMed

    Garnier, R; Carlier, P; Hoffelt, J; Savidan, A

    1985-01-01

    Five cases of acute accidental poisoning with White Hellebore are reported. All cases occurred several minutes after the ingestion of home-made gentian wine. The clinical signs were nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, hypotension and bradycardia. The initial ECG showed sinus bradycardia in 4 cases. In one patient, complete atrioventricular block with an ectopic atrial bradycardia and an intermittent idioventricular rhythm was recorded. Symptomatic treatment and/or atropine led to recovery within a few hours. These symptoms suggested poisoning with a veratrum alkaloid. The White Hellebore (Veratrum Album L.) and the Yellow Gentian (Gentiana Lutea L.) often grow side by side in the fields; it is easy to confuse the two plants before they flower if one is not a botanist. Each gentian wine was analysed by thin layer chromatography and chemical ionisation spectrometry. All the wines contained Veratrum alkaloids.

  10. Diazinon poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Bazinon poisoning; Diazol poisoning; Gardentox poisoning; Knox-Out poisoning; Spectracide poisoning ... Below are symptoms of diazinon poisoning in different parts of the ... No breathing Bladder and kidneys: Increased urination Eyes, ...

  11. Malathion poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Carbofos poisoning; Compound 4049 poisoning; Cythion poisoning; Fosfothion poisoning; Mercaptothion poisoning ... Below are symptoms of malathion poisoning in different parts of the ... No breathing Bladder and kidneys Increased urination Eyes, ...

  12. Investigation on acute toxicity and behavioral changes in Channa punctatus (Bloch) due to organophosphate pesticide profenofos.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Atindra Kumar; Nagpure, N S; Trivedi, Sunil P; Kumar, Ravindra; Kushwaha, Basdeo; Lakra, Wazir S

    2011-10-01

    Acute toxicity of an organophosphate pesticide profenofos (O-4-bromo-2- chlorophenyl-O-ethyl S-propyl phosphorothioate) to freshwater fish, Channa punctatus (Bloch), was studied in a static bioassay. Estimated 96-hour LC(50) of profenofos was found to be 2.68 μgL(-1). On the basis of the obtained LC(50) values for 96-hour exposure intervals, profenofos can be rated as highly toxic to C. punctatus. Fish exposed to profenofos showed hyper excitability, discoloration, erratic swimming, and secretion of excess amounts of mucus on the body and gills with eventual exhaustion and death. PMID:21770742

  13. Hair analysis for drug abuse. XIV. Identification of substances causing acute poisoning using hair root. I. Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Y; Kikura, R; Yasuhara, M; Mukai, T

    1997-01-17

    A hair root was evaluated as a specimen for proving acute methamphetamine (MA) poisonings using an animal model and fatal cases of MA intoxicaton. First of all, male pigmented hairy rats (n = 5) were administered with acute poisonous doses (20, 40 and 60 mg/kg) of MA and the hair roots were plucked out with a hair nipper 5 min and 0.5, 1, 2, 6 and 24 h after i.p. injection. The hair root samples were, directly or after washing with detergent, extracted with methanol/5 N HCl (20:1) under vortex mixing at room temperature for 14 h. After evaporation, the residue was derivatized with pentafluoropropionic anhydride and analyzed with GC/MS. From all samples including a 5-min sample, MA was detected at high concentrations (approximately 150 ng/mg) with a small amount of amphetamine (AP). Many animals died within 120 min of administration, but the concentrations in the hair roots increased up to 120 min and then slowly decreased until 24 h. Although MA was definitely detected anytime in the hair roots, almost no MA was found in 24-h plasma. In comparison of the drug levels in hair roots between the washed group and the unwashed group, the levels of the washed group were as a whole 4-5-fold higher than those of the unwashed group. These differences show that most of the drug incorporated into hair root is still not immobilized in the early stage. The ratios of the MA remainder in the washed samples increased with the elapse of time in all cases. However, the slope of the curves definitely dropped after the death of rats, probably due to the stopping of the hair growth and the incorporation of drug into the hair shaft. The ratios of AP/MA after death became a plateau probably due to the stoppage of the activity of metabolism after death, while those before death had increased over time. We analyzed the specimens of hair root of four men who died mainly due to acute poisonings with MA. Consequently, MA in the hair roots was detected at high concentrations, 30.5-134.6 ng

  14. Severe oral and intravenous insecticide mixture poisoning with diabetic ketoacidosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The widespread use of pesticides in public health protection and agricultural pest control has caused severe environmental pollution and health hazards, especially in developing countries, including cases of severe acute and chronic human poisoning. Diabetic ketoacidosis is an uncommon manifestation of acute pesticide poisoning. Suicidal pesticide poisoning by injection is also an unusual way to take poison. We report a severe pesticide mixture poisoning case with diabetic ketoacidosis in an adult with improved outcome after supportive treatment and large doses of atropine. Case presentation A 30-year-old unmarried Moroccan Arab male with a previous history of active polysubstance abuse and behavior disorders had ingested and self injected intravenously into his forearm an unknown amount of a mixture of chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin. He developed muscarinic and nicotinic symptoms with hypothermia, inflammation in the site of the pesticide injection without necrosis. Red blood cell cholinesterase and plasma cholinesterase were very low (<10%). By day 3, the patient developed stroke with hypotension (80/50 mmHg) and tachycardia (143 pulses /min). Laboratory tests showed severe hyperglycemia (4.49 g/dL), hypokaliemia (2.4 mEq/L), glycosuria, ketonuria and low bicarbonate levels (12 mEq/L) with improvement after intensive medical treatment and treatment by atropine. Conclusion Suicidal poisonings with self-injection of insecticide were rarely reported but could be associated with severe local and systemic complications. The oxidative stress caused by pyrethroids and organophosphates poisoning could explain the occurrence of hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis. PMID:25078103

  15. Pyrethroid pesticide exposure and risk of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guodong; Shi, Rong; Gao, Yu; Zhang, Yan; Kamijima, Michihiro; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Wang, Guoquan; Feng, Chao; Tian, Ying

    2012-12-18

    Significant amounts of pyrethroid pesticides are used throughout China. Previous studies have suggested that exposure to pesticides may increase the risk of childhood cancer; however, few studies have focused on pyrethroid metabolites. We investigated five nonspecific metabolites of pyrethroid pesticides found in children's urine and examined the correlation with childhood leukemia. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in Shanghai between 2010 and 2011. The study included 176 children aged 0-14 years and 180 controls matched for age and sex. Compared with those in the lowest quartiles of total and individual metabolites, the highest quartiles were associated with an approximate 2-fold increased risk of ALL [total metabolites: odds ratio (OR) = 2.75, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.43-5.29; cis-DCCA: OR = 2.21, 95% CI, 1.16-4.19; trans-DCCA: OR = 2.33, 95% CI, 1.23-4.41; and 3-PBA: OR = 1.84, 95% CI, 1.00-3.38], and most of the positive trends were significant (p < 0.05). Our findings suggest that urinary levels of pyrethroid metabolites may be associated with an elevated risk of childhood ALL and represent a previously unreported quantitative exposure assessment for childhood leukemia.

  16. Temperature-dependent acute toxicity of methomyl pesticide on larvae of 3 Asian amphibian species.

    PubMed

    Lau, Edward Tak Chuen; Karraker, Nancy Elizabeth; Leung, Kenneth Mei Yee

    2015-10-01

    Relative to other animal taxa, ecotoxicological studies on amphibians are scarce, even though amphibians are experiencing global declines and pollution has been identified as an important threat. Agricultural lands provide important habitats for many amphibians, but often these lands are contaminated with pesticides. The authors determined the acute toxicity, in terms of 96-h median lethal concentrations, of the carbamate pesticide methomyl on larvae of 3 Asian amphibian species, the Asian common toad (Duttaphrynus melanostictus), the brown tree frog (Polypedates megacephalus), and the marbled pygmy frog (Microhyla pulchra), at 5 different temperatures (15 °C, 20 °C, 25 °C, 30 °C, and 35 °C) to examine the relationships between temperature and toxicity. Significant interspecific variation in methomyl sensitivity and 2 distinct patterns of temperature-dependent toxicity were found. Because high proportions of malformation among the surviving tadpoles were observed, a further test was carried out on the tree frog to determine effect concentrations using malformation as the endpoint. Concentrations as low as 1.4% of the corresponding 96-h median lethal concentrations at 25 °C were sufficient to cause malformation in 50% of the test population. As the toxicity of pesticides may be significantly amplified at higher temperatures, temperature effects should not be overlooked in ecotoxicological studies and derivation of safety limits in environmental risk assessment and management.

  17. Pesticides and Health in Vegetable Production in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Macharia, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants of pesticide-related cost of illness (COI) and acute symptoms, using a balanced panel of 363 farmers interviewed from seven major vegetable producing districts of Kenya. Finding shows that the incidences of pesticide-related health impairments have increased. Variation in number of symptoms and symptom severity significantly explained COI. The personal protective equipment (PPE), education level, record keeping, and geographical location considerably determined health impairments. Encouraging the proper use of PPE and record keeping of pesticide use could greatly reduce poisoning cases and COI.

  18. Pesticides and Health in Vegetable Production in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Macharia, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants of pesticide-related cost of illness (COI) and acute symptoms, using a balanced panel of 363 farmers interviewed from seven major vegetable producing districts of Kenya. Finding shows that the incidences of pesticide-related health impairments have increased. Variation in number of symptoms and symptom severity significantly explained COI. The personal protective equipment (PPE), education level, record keeping, and geographical location considerably determined health impairments. Encouraging the proper use of PPE and record keeping of pesticide use could greatly reduce poisoning cases and COI. PMID:26783515

  19. Arsenic poisoning.

    PubMed

    Schoolmeester, W L; White, D R

    1980-02-01

    Arsenic poisoning continues to require awareness of its diverse clinical manifestations. Industry is the major source of arsenic exposure. Although epidemiologic studies strongly contend that arsenic is carcinogenic, there are little supportive research data. Arsenic poisoning, both acute and chronic, is often overlooked initially in the evaluation of the patient with multisystem disease, but once it is suspected, many accurate methods are available to quantitate the amount and duration of exposure. Treatment with dimercaprol remains the mainstay of therapy, and early treatment is necessary to prevent irreversible complications.

  20. The activity of the Ang/Tie-2 system in the brain that suffered acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suping; Liu, Zanhua; Qu, Jing; Wang, Xiaoting

    2013-10-01

    Acute carbon monoxide poisoning (ACMP) leads to significant toxicity of the central nervous system and heart, and even death, following it, some patients suffered delayed encephalopathy. Until now, no theory had explained it exactly. It was reported that neovascularization was found in acute ischemic brains and also that angiopoietins (Ang) play important roles in the process of angiogenesis, for example, the members of Ang family, Ang-1 and Ang-2 may promote angiogenesis by combining with endothelial-specific cell surface tyrosine kinase receptor Tie-2. Interestingly, some studies suggested that small vascular injury may play an important role in the pathogenesis of delayed encephalopathy after carbon monoxide poisoning. Does neovascularization also occur in the brains after ACMP? Do Ang also take part in the pathologic processes in the brains that suffered ACMP? People know little about it. In the present study, we showed that neovascularization also occurred in the brains that suffered ACMP, and there are two expression peaks of Ang-1, Ang-2 and Tie-2, respectively, in the mice brains on the 3rd day and the 7th day following ACMP, and draw a conclusion that the Ang/Tie-2 system takes part in the pathologic processes in the brains that suffered ACMP by participating in neovascularization.

  1. Acute kidney injury by cantharidin poisoning following a silly bet on an ugly beetle.

    PubMed

    Cotovio, Patrícia; Silva, Cristina; Guedes Marques, Maria; Ferrer, Francisco; Costa, Fátima; Carreira, Armando; Campos, Mário

    2013-04-01

    Cantharidin is a poisonous substance secreted by blister beetles, including the 'Spanish fly'. Historically, cantharidin was used as an aphrodisiac, vesicant and abortifacient. Symptoms of poisoning include gastrointestinal and genitourinary mucosal irritation along with renal dysfunction. We present the case of a reckless 23-year-old soldier who accepted the challenge of eating a beetle (Berberomeloe majalis). Six hours later he was admitted to the emergency room with abdominal pain, dysuria, gross haematuria with clots, hypotension, fever and renal insufficiency. With intravenous fluid therapy, he recovered clinically. Laboratory parameters returned to normal within 1 week. PMID:26019851

  2. Acute kidney injury by cantharidin poisoning following a silly bet on an ugly beetle

    PubMed Central

    Cotovio, Patrícia; Silva, Cristina; Guedes Marques, Maria; Ferrer, Francisco; Costa, Fátima; Carreira, Armando; Campos, Mário

    2013-01-01

    Cantharidin is a poisonous substance secreted by blister beetles, including the ‘Spanish fly’. Historically, cantharidin was used as an aphrodisiac, vesicant and abortifacient. Symptoms of poisoning include gastrointestinal and genitourinary mucosal irritation along with renal dysfunction. We present the case of a reckless 23-year-old soldier who accepted the challenge of eating a beetle (Berberomeloe majalis). Six hours later he was admitted to the emergency room with abdominal pain, dysuria, gross haematuria with clots, hypotension, fever and renal insufficiency. With intravenous fluid therapy, he recovered clinically. Laboratory parameters returned to normal within 1 week. PMID:26019851

  3. Reversible cerebral periventricular white matter changes with corpus callosum involvement in acute toluene-poisoning.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Liu, Chi-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Substance poisoning, such as toluene intoxication, has seldom been reported in the relevant literature. The documented cerebral neuroimaging has mostly described reversible symmetrical white matter changes in both the cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres. This paper presents 2 patients with toluene poisoning, whose brain magnetic resonance imaging studies showed a similar picture that included extra involvement over the corpus callosum; however, such corpus callosum involvement has never been mentioned and is quite rare in the literature. We discussed the underlying neuropathological pathways in this article. Hopefully, these cases will provide first-line clinicians with some valuable information with regard to toluene intoxication and clinical neuroimaging presentations.

  4. Surviving acute cyanide poisoning: a longitudinal neuropsychological investigation with interval MRI.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Adith; Lee, Teresa; Sachdev, Perminder

    2014-03-19

    We report the case of a 22-year-old woman who presented with self-poisoning by cyanide ingestion. We have elected to pay particular attention to describing the neuropsychological sequelae of cyanide poisoning, and the evolution of these deficits over a 6-month period. Prominent deficits in episodic memory were noted from an early stage, which were consistent with the findings noted on structural neuroimaging. These deficits remained persistent, although improving in severity over the follow-up period. No focal neurological deficits or abnormal involuntary movements emerged, and the patient's overall functional status remained satisfactory. The patient's psychiatric presentation and background history are briefly discussed.

  5. The health significance of pesticide variability in individual commodity items.

    PubMed

    Marrs, T C

    2000-07-01

    The observed phenomenon of variability of residues in individual fruit and vegetables has a number of implications for risk assessment. The main implication is that the possibility of acute toxic effects in humans has to be considered, where items are commonly consumed unprocessed, are commonly consumed at a single sitting and the pesticide involved has substantial acute toxicity. The main groups of pesticides of concern are the anticholinesterase organophosphates and carbamates. The problem partly arises from the fact that, with some older pesticides, studies of the type most appropriate for setting acute reference doses (ARfDs) have not been carried out. As a result ARfDs are based on studies of length that is greater than ideal. While there is little evidence from the scientific or medical literature that food-borne pesticide poisoning is occurring on any major scale, the symptomatology of such poisoning would be non-specific and the pattern in the population, sporadic. Hence it is likely that pesticide-related illness, through food, would be missed. It is concluded that risk assessments should be improved, using refined safety factors, more appropriate studies and better intake data. The reasons for the variability could be sought and remedied or the application conditions of the pesticide modified.

  6. The role of S100B protein, neuron-specific enolase, and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the evaluation of hypoxic brain injury in acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Akdemir, H U; Yardan, T; Kati, C; Duran, L; Alacam, H; Yavuz, Y; Okuyucu, A

    2014-11-01

    The main purpose of this study was to assess the role of S100B protein, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the evaluation of hypoxic brain injury in acute carbon monoxide (CO)-poisoned patients. This cross-sectional study was conducted among the patients with acute CO poisoning who referred to the emergency department in a 1-year period. Serum levels of S100B protein, NSE, and GFAP were determined on admission. A total of 55 CO-poisoned patients (mean age ± standard deviation, 45 ± 20.3 years; 60% women) were included in the study. The control group consisted of 25 healthy adults. The patients were divided into two groups according to whether they were conscious or unconscious. The serum levels of S100B, NSE, and GFAP were higher in patients than that in the control group. There was no significant difference between unconscious and conscious patients with respect to these markers. There was a statistically significant difference between the conscious and unconscious patients and the control group in terms of S100B and NSE levels. There was also a statistically significant difference between the unconscious patients and the control group in terms of GFAP levels. Increased serum S100B, NSE, and GFAP levels are associated with acute CO poisoning. These biomarkers can be useful in assessing the clinical status of patients with CO poisoning.

  7. High pesticide exposure events and central nervous system function among pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Starks, Sarah E; Gerr, Fred; Kamel, Freya; Lynch, Charles F; Alavanja, Michael C; Sandler, Dale P; Hoppin, Jane A

    2011-01-01

    Purpose While acute pesticide poisoning can be associated with persistent adverse central nervous system (CNS) effects, little is known about the effect of episodic and unusually high pesticide exposure events (HPEEs) that typically do not result in acute poisoning. The objective of this investigation was to examine the association between HPEEs and CNS function among licensed pesticide applicators enrolled in the Agricultural Health Study (AHS). Methods In 2006–2008, 693 male participants, with no history of a physician-diagnosed pesticide poisoning, completed nine neurobehavioral tests to assess memory, motor speed, sustained attention, verbal learning, and visual scanning and processing. Information on HPEEs and pesticide poisonings was obtained from previous AHS interviews. Associations between HPEEs and neurobehavioral outcomes were estimated with linear regression controlling for age and outcome-specific covariates. Results A history of at least one HPEE was reported by 156 (23%) participants. Adverse associations were observed between HPEEs and two of the nine neurobehavioral tests. On a test of visual scanning and processing (Digit-Symbol), participants with HPEEs were 4.2 seconds slower (95% CI: −7.27, −1.11) than those without HPEEs, equivalent to the effect of 3.9 years of age in this population. On a test of visual scanning and motor speed (Sequences A), participants with HPEEs were 2.5 seconds slower (95% CI: −4.53, −0.41) than those without HPEEs, equivalent to the effect of 3.9 years of age. No significant associations were observed between HPEEs and the other neurobehavioral tests. Conclusions HPEEs may contribute to adverse CNS outcomes independent of diagnosed pesticide poisoning. PMID:21927986

  8. Pesticide regulations and farm worker safety: the need to improve pesticide regulations in Viet Nam

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Des; Miller, Greg; Rutherford, Shannon; Chu, Cordia

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Agricultural pesticide use in Viet Nam has more than tripled since 1990. However, pesticide legislation and regulations have not been developed in response to this large increase in usage, as a result of which pesticides pose a serious threat to human health and the environment. This paper identifies the need to improve pesticide regulations in Viet Nam through a comparative analysis of pesticide regulations in Viet Nam and the United States of America, where the rate of acute poisoning among agricultural workers is much lower than in Viet Nam and where information pertaining to pesticide regulations is made accessible to the public. The analysis identified several measures that would help to improve Viet Nam’s pesticide regulations. These include enhancing pesticide legislation, clarifying the specific roles and active involvement of both the environmental and health sectors; performing a comprehensive risk–benefit evaluation of pesticide registration and management practices; improving regulations on pesticide suspension and cancellation, transport, storage and disposal; developing import and export policies and enhancing pesticide-related occupational safety programmes. PMID:22690037

  9. Acute toxicity of agricultural pesticides to embryo-larval and juvenile African catfish Clarias gariepinus.

    PubMed

    Agbohessi, P T; Imorou Toko, I; Houndji, A; Gillardin, V; Mandiki, S N M; Kestemont, P

    2013-05-01

    Acute toxicities of Tihan 175 O-TEQ, as well as its active ingredients flubendiamide and spirotetramat, and of Thionex 350 EC (active compound endosulfan) were measured for embryo-larval and juvenile stages of the African catfish Clarias gariepinus to assess risks of pesticide use in the cotton basin in Benin (West Africa). For embryo-larval stages, Tihan was more toxic (LC5048h 20 ppm) than Thionex (LC5048h 56 ppm), and flubendiamide was more toxic (LC5048h 2.0 ppm) than spirotetramat (LC5048h 8.44 ppm). All decreased hatching rates. Tihan and spirotetramat disturbed larval swimming coordination; flubendiamide induced tail cleavage. For juvenile fish, Thionex was more toxic (LC5096h 0.22 ppm) than Tihan (LC5096h 8.8 ppm), and flubendiamide (LC5096h 4.7 ppm) was more toxic than spirotetramat (LC5096h 6.0 ppm). Eggs were more resistant than juvenile fish to all tested pesticides except flubendiamide. Although Thionex was more toxic to juvenile fish, replacing Thionex with Tihan may be undesirable for survival of eggs and larvae.

  10. Pesticide Use and Self-Reported Health Symptoms Among Rice Farmers in Zanzibar.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marisa; Stadlinger, Nadja; Mmochi, Aviti J; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia; Marrone, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    The agrarian population in low- and middle-income countries suffers from a number of adverse health effects due to pesticide exposure. In Zanzibar, the government subsidizes pesticides to enhance local rice production. The objectives of this study were to assess Zanzibar smallholder rice farmers' pesticide use and self-reported health symptoms in relation to pesticide exposure, training, and use of protective measures and to raise awareness for future local policy formulation. An exploratory cross-sectional interviewer-administered study was conducted among 99 rice farmers. Participants were selected based on convenience sampling and stratified by expected exposure category. The study participants reported using pesticides in World Health Organization (WHO) Class II. Of pesticide users, 61% reported one or more symptoms of possible acute pesticide poisoning. Only 50% of pesticide users had received training in safe handling and application of pesticides, but those who had displayed a higher use of protective measures. Farmers who did not use protective measures were more likely to have reported skin irritation and headache, which, together with eye irritation, were the most commonly reported acute symptoms. The main sociodemographic differences between the expected exposure categories of pesticide users and nonusers were in gender and education level. Scaling up of training in safe handling and application of pesticides is needed. Further studies are required to better understand the mechanisms behind the choice to use pesticides or not. PMID:27439957

  11. [Italian Program for Surveillance of Acute Pesticide-Related Illnesses: cases identified in 2005].

    PubMed

    Settimi, L; Davanzo, F; Travaglia, A; Locatelli, C; Cilento, I; Volpe, C; Russo, A; Miceli, G; Fracassi, A; Maiozzi, P; Marcello, I; Sesan, F; Urbani, E

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, the Italian System for Surveillance of Acute Pesticide-Related Illnesses (SIAF) identified 625 cases, among which 520 unintentionally exposed. The majority of these subjects were men (75%) and aged 26-65 years (65%). About 63% of all exposures occurred at work. Severity for these illnesses was low for 94% and moderate for 5%. Four cases were classified as illnesses of high severity. Some 70% of all the reported exposures occurred between May and September. The active ingredients responsible for the largest number of cases were: glyphosate (n. 56), copper sulphate (n. 55), methomyl (n. = 52), metam-sodium (n. 24). Three episodes of collective environmental exposure to soil fumigants involving 23 subjects were also detected.

  12. Piperonyl butoxide with pyrethrins poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Borron, SW. Pyrethrins, repellants, and other pesticides. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management of Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  13. Notes from the Field: Acute Sulfuryl Fluoride Poisoning in a Family - Florida, August 2015.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Prakash R; Clark, Grethel; Jackson, William L; Calvert, Geoffrey M

    2016-01-01

    On August 19, 2015, the Florida Department of Health (FDOH) was notified by the Florida Poison Information Center Network and a local hospital of possible sulfuryl fluoride poisonings affecting a family in Martin County, in southeastern Florida. Sulfuryl fluoride is a highly toxic (toxicity category I) gas fumigant used for termite control of homes and buildings.* FDOH personnel in Martin County commenced an investigation and identified a family of five (a grandmother, mother, father, son, and daughter) exposed to sulfuryl fluoride after their house was fumigated. The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Criminal Investigation Division also conducted an investigation after being notified by FDOH. Medical records were reviewed, and the father was interviewed by FDOH.

  14. Acute Cyanide Poisoning: Hydroxocobalamin and Sodium Thiosulfate Treatments with Two Outcomes following One Exposure Event.

    PubMed

    Meillier, Andrew; Heller, Cara

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide is rapidly reacting and causes arrest of aerobic metabolism. The symptoms are diffuse and lethal and require high clinical suspicion. Remediation of symptoms and mortality is highly dependent on quick treatment with a cyanide antidote. Presently, there are two widely accepted antidotes: sodium thiosulfate and hydroxocobalamin. These treatments act on different components of cyanide's metabolism. Here, we present two cases resulting from the same source of cyanide poisoning and the use of both antidotes separately used with differing outcomes.

  15. Validated analytical methodology for the simultaneous determination of a wide range of pesticides in human blood using GC-MS/MS and LC-ESI/MS/MS and its application in two poisoning cases.

    PubMed

    Luzardo, Octavio P; Almeida-González, Maira; Ruiz-Suárez, Norberto; Zumbado, Manuel; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A; Meilán, María José; Camacho, María; Boada, Luis D

    2015-09-01

    Pesticides are frequently responsible for human poisoning and often the information on the involved substance is lacking. The great variety of pesticides that could be responsible for intoxication makes necessary the development of powerful and versatile analytical methodologies, which allows the identification of the unknown toxic substance. Here we developed a methodology for simultaneous identification and quantification in human blood of 109 highly toxic pesticides. The application of this analytical scheme would help in minimizing the cost of this type of chemical identification, maximizing the chances of identifying the pesticide involved. In the methodology that we present here, we use a liquid-liquid extraction, followed by one single purification step, and quantitation of analytes by a combination of liquid and gas chromatography, both coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, which is operated in the mode of multiple reaction monitoring. The methodology has been fully validated, and its applicability has been demonstrated in two recent cases involving one self-poisoning fatality and one non-fatal homicidal attempt.

  16. Phosphorus poisoning in waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coburn, D.R.; DeWitt, J.B.; Derby, J.V.; Ediger, E.

    1950-01-01

    Black ducks and mallards were found to be highly susceptible to phosphorus poisoning. 3 mg. of white phosphorus per kg. of body weight given in a single dose resulted in death of a black duck in 6 hours. Pathologic changes in both acute and chronic poisoning were studied. Data are presented showing that diagnosis can be made accurately by chemical analysis of stored tissues in cases of phosphorus poisoning.

  17. Acute and chronic toxicity of the benzoylurea pesticide, lufenuron, in the fish, Colossoma macropomum.

    PubMed

    Rafaela Leão Soares, Priscila; Lucas Corrêa de Andrade, André; Pinheiro Santos, Thamiris; Caroline Barros Lucas da Silva, Stephannie; Freitas da Silva, Jadson; Rodrigues Dos Santos, Amanda; Hugo Lima da Silva Souza, Elton; Magliano da Cunha, Franklin; Wanderley Teixeira, Valéria; Sales Cadena, Marilia Ribeiro; Bezerra de Sá, Fabrício; Bezerra de Carvalho Júnior, Luiz; Gonçalves Cadena, Pabyton

    2016-10-01

    Lufenuron is a benzoylurea insecticide that interfere in chitin synthesis in insects. Although lufenuron is widely used in agriculture and aquaculture, rare are studies described that relates to possible toxic effects in fish. This work aimed to evaluate acute and chronic toxic effects of benzoylurea pesticide (lufenuron) on biological parameters of Colossoma macropomum (Tambaqui). In the acute test, juveniles of Tambaqui were divided into control group and five experimental groups with exposure from 0.1 to 0.9 mg/L of lufenuron for 96 h. Animals were also submitted to chronic toxicity test for four months in concentrations of 0.1 and 0.3 mg/L of lufenuron, the concentration used in the treatment of ectoparasites in fish and 50% of LC50 96 h, respectively. The presence of hemorrhages was observed in eyes, fins and operculum of fish exposed to 0.7 and 0.9 mg/L of lufenuron. Histological analysis showed changes in the morphology of fish gills submitted to acute toxicity test, as lamellar aneurysm and blood congestion inside lamellae. Lufenuron promoted damage in fish retina as in ability to respond to stimuli in photoreceptors and in ON-bipolar cells in acute test. In chronic test, blood glucose analysis and morphometric parameters showed no significant differences (p > 0.05). In general, Tambaqui exhibited behaviors associated with stress when exposed to lufenuron. Thus, lufenuron showed several toxic effects in relation to biological parameters in Tambaqui. This concerns about the use and discard of lufenuron, and indicates the requirement of environmental actions to prevent potential contamination of aquatic biota. PMID:27448754

  18. Acute and chronic toxicity of the benzoylurea pesticide, lufenuron, in the fish, Colossoma macropomum.

    PubMed

    Rafaela Leão Soares, Priscila; Lucas Corrêa de Andrade, André; Pinheiro Santos, Thamiris; Caroline Barros Lucas da Silva, Stephannie; Freitas da Silva, Jadson; Rodrigues Dos Santos, Amanda; Hugo Lima da Silva Souza, Elton; Magliano da Cunha, Franklin; Wanderley Teixeira, Valéria; Sales Cadena, Marilia Ribeiro; Bezerra de Sá, Fabrício; Bezerra de Carvalho Júnior, Luiz; Gonçalves Cadena, Pabyton

    2016-10-01

    Lufenuron is a benzoylurea insecticide that interfere in chitin synthesis in insects. Although lufenuron is widely used in agriculture and aquaculture, rare are studies described that relates to possible toxic effects in fish. This work aimed to evaluate acute and chronic toxic effects of benzoylurea pesticide (lufenuron) on biological parameters of Colossoma macropomum (Tambaqui). In the acute test, juveniles of Tambaqui were divided into control group and five experimental groups with exposure from 0.1 to 0.9 mg/L of lufenuron for 96 h. Animals were also submitted to chronic toxicity test for four months in concentrations of 0.1 and 0.3 mg/L of lufenuron, the concentration used in the treatment of ectoparasites in fish and 50% of LC50 96 h, respectively. The presence of hemorrhages was observed in eyes, fins and operculum of fish exposed to 0.7 and 0.9 mg/L of lufenuron. Histological analysis showed changes in the morphology of fish gills submitted to acute toxicity test, as lamellar aneurysm and blood congestion inside lamellae. Lufenuron promoted damage in fish retina as in ability to respond to stimuli in photoreceptors and in ON-bipolar cells in acute test. In chronic test, blood glucose analysis and morphometric parameters showed no significant differences (p > 0.05). In general, Tambaqui exhibited behaviors associated with stress when exposed to lufenuron. Thus, lufenuron showed several toxic effects in relation to biological parameters in Tambaqui. This concerns about the use and discard of lufenuron, and indicates the requirement of environmental actions to prevent potential contamination of aquatic biota.

  19. Survival pattern in patients with acute organophosphate poisoning on mechanical ventilation: A retrospective intensive care unit-based study in a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Syed M; Das, Bikramjit; Nadeem, Abu; Samal, Rajiv K

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Organophosphorus (OP) compound poisoning is one of the most common poisonings in India. The aim of the study was to study the outcomes and predictors of mortality in patients with acute OP poisoning requiring mechanical ventilation. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted in the intensive care unit and 117 patients were included. Diagnosis was performed from the history taken either from the patient or from the patient's relatives. Demographic data, month of the year, mode of poisoning, common age group, duration of mechanical ventilation, time of starting pralidoxime (PAM), and mortality were recorded. Chi square test, Pearson correlation test, and multivariate binary logistic regression analysis was used. Data are presented as mean ± SD. Results: 91.86% (79/86) of cases were suicidal and remaining cases were accidental. Duration of mechanical ventilation varied from less than 48 hours to more than 7 days. Mortality rate was 33.3%, 7.2%, and 100% in those who required mechanical ventilation for more than 7 days, 5 to 7 days, and 2 to 4 days, respectively. Lag time was less than 6 hrs in 13 patients and all of them survived. 17.1% and 28.1% patients died in whom PAM was started 6 to 12 hrs and 13 to 24 hrs after poisoning, respectively. There was statistically significant positive correlation between lag time of starting of PAM with duration of mechanical ventilation and total dose of PAM (P < 0.0001). None of the predictors age, lag time, severity of poisoning, and duration of ventilation were independent predictors of death. Overall mortality rate was 18.6%. Conclusion: Mortality from OP compound poisoning is directly proportionate to the severity of poisoning, delay in starting PAM, and duration of mechanical ventilation. Death is not dependent on a single factor, rather contributory to these factors working simultaneously. PMID:24700893

  20. Djenkol bean poisoning (djenkolism): an unusual cause of acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Segasothy, M; Swaminathan, M; Kong, N C; Bennett, W M

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a patient with acute renal failure that resulted from the ingestion of djenkol beans. Features of acute djenkolism include nausea, vomiting, bilateral loin pain, gross hematuria, and oliguria. The blood urea level was 16.2 mmol/L and the serum creatinine was 460 mumol/L. Phase contrast microscopy of the urinary sediment indicated that the hematuria was nonglomerular. Ultrasound of the kidneys showed slightly enlarged kidneys with no features of obstruction. Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis similar to the single animal study reported in the literature. With conservative therapy, which included rehydration with normal saline and alkalinization of the urine with sodium bicarbonate, the acute renal failure resolved. Based on its chemistry, djenkol bean-associated acute renal failure may be analogous to acute uric acid nephropathy. PMID:7810535

  1. Djenkol bean poisoning (djenkolism): an unusual cause of acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Segasothy, M; Swaminathan, M; Kong, N C; Bennett, W M

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a patient with acute renal failure that resulted from the ingestion of djenkol beans. Features of acute djenkolism include nausea, vomiting, bilateral loin pain, gross hematuria, and oliguria. The blood urea level was 16.2 mmol/L and the serum creatinine was 460 mumol/L. Phase contrast microscopy of the urinary sediment indicated that the hematuria was nonglomerular. Ultrasound of the kidneys showed slightly enlarged kidneys with no features of obstruction. Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis similar to the single animal study reported in the literature. With conservative therapy, which included rehydration with normal saline and alkalinization of the urine with sodium bicarbonate, the acute renal failure resolved. Based on its chemistry, djenkol bean-associated acute renal failure may be analogous to acute uric acid nephropathy.

  2. Chronic Arsenic Poisoning Probably Caused by Arsenic-Based Pesticides: Findings from an Investigation Study of a Household.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfang; Ye, Feng; Wang, Anwei; Wang, Da; Yang, Boyi; Zheng, Quanmei; Sun, Guifan; Gao, Xinghua

    2016-01-16

    In addition to naturally occurring arsenic, man-made arsenic-based compounds are other sources of arsenic exposure. In 2013, our group identified 12 suspected arsenicosis patients in a household (32 living members). Of them, eight members were diagnosed with skin cancer. Interestingly, all of these patients had lived in the household prior to 1989. An investigation revealed that approximately 2 tons of arsenic-based pesticides had been previously placed near a well that had supplied drinking water to the family from 1973 to 1989. The current arsenic level in the well water was 620 μg/L. No other high arsenic wells were found near the family's residence. Based on these findings, it is possible to infer that the skin lesions exhibited by these family members were caused by long-term exposure to well water contaminated with arsenic-based pesticides. Additionally, biochemical analysis showed that the individuals exposed to arsenic had higher levels of aspartate aminotransferase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase than those who were not exposed. These findings might indicate the presence of liver dysfunction in the arsenic-exposed individuals. This report elucidates the effects of arsenical compounds on the occurrence of high levels of arsenic in the environment and emphasizes the severe human health impact of arsenic exposure.

  3. Chronic Arsenic Poisoning Probably Caused by Arsenic-Based Pesticides: Findings from an Investigation Study of a Household.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfang; Ye, Feng; Wang, Anwei; Wang, Da; Yang, Boyi; Zheng, Quanmei; Sun, Guifan; Gao, Xinghua

    2016-01-01

    In addition to naturally occurring arsenic, man-made arsenic-based compounds are other sources of arsenic exposure. In 2013, our group identified 12 suspected arsenicosis patients in a household (32 living members). Of them, eight members were diagnosed with skin cancer. Interestingly, all of these patients had lived in the household prior to 1989. An investigation revealed that approximately 2 tons of arsenic-based pesticides had been previously placed near a well that had supplied drinking water to the family from 1973 to 1989. The current arsenic level in the well water was 620 μg/L. No other high arsenic wells were found near the family's residence. Based on these findings, it is possible to infer that the skin lesions exhibited by these family members were caused by long-term exposure to well water contaminated with arsenic-based pesticides. Additionally, biochemical analysis showed that the individuals exposed to arsenic had higher levels of aspartate aminotransferase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase than those who were not exposed. These findings might indicate the presence of liver dysfunction in the arsenic-exposed individuals. This report elucidates the effects of arsenical compounds on the occurrence of high levels of arsenic in the environment and emphasizes the severe human health impact of arsenic exposure. PMID:26784217

  4. Chronic Arsenic Poisoning Probably Caused by Arsenic-Based Pesticides: Findings from an Investigation Study of a Household

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongfang; Ye, Feng; Wang, Anwei; Wang, Da; Yang, Boyi; Zheng, Quanmei; Sun, Guifan; Gao, Xinghua

    2016-01-01

    In addition to naturally occurring arsenic, man-made arsenic-based compounds are other sources of arsenic exposure. In 2013, our group identified 12 suspected arsenicosis patients in a household (32 living members). Of them, eight members were diagnosed with skin cancer. Interestingly, all of these patients had lived in the household prior to 1989. An investigation revealed that approximately 2 tons of arsenic-based pesticides had been previously placed near a well that had supplied drinking water to the family from 1973 to 1989. The current arsenic level in the well water was 620 μg/L. No other high arsenic wells were found near the family’s residence. Based on these findings, it is possible to infer that the skin lesions exhibited by these family members were caused by long-term exposure to well water contaminated with arsenic-based pesticides. Additionally, biochemical analysis showed that the individuals exposed to arsenic had higher levels of aspartate aminotransferase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase than those who were not exposed. These findings might indicate the presence of liver dysfunction in the arsenic-exposed individuals. This report elucidates the effects of arsenical compounds on the occurrence of high levels of arsenic in the environment and emphasizes the severe human health impact of arsenic exposure. PMID:26784217

  5. Acute poisoning following ingestion of medicines: initial management. How to treat life-threatening complications and to evaluate the risk of delayed effects and psychological distress.

    PubMed

    2010-12-01

    Acute poisoning following ingestion of medications, both intentional and unintentional, is frequent and more or less severe. It is often unclear whether a toxic dose has been ingested. This review examines the initial management of patients with suspected acute poisoning, based on a review of the literature using the standard Prescrire methodology. We examined clinical practice guidelines, which are mostly based on observational, pharmacological and toxicological data, as well as empirical data. Few comparative trials are available. In life-threatening situations, the first priority is to call an emergency response mobile unit and to implement life-support techniques, i.e., resuscitation for cardiorespiratory arrest; respiratory support if necessary; and the left lateral head-down position and glucose injection if the patient is unconscious. Prompt, initial measures may also include: anticonvulsant injection for status epilepticus (diazepam, for example); a sedative for extreme agitation (diazepam or clorazepate if there is no risk of respiratory depression; otherwise haloperidol); atropine for severe bradycardia; elevating the legs for hypotension; and naloxone in case of respiratory depression due to opioids. Drug poisoning can be life-threatening.The extent of the risk should be assessed by questioning the patient and close contacts, examining the immediate environment, and carrying out a clinical examination to identify a major toxic condition. The severity of poisoning is assessed by gathering all information about the patient, the drug(s) ingested, the circumstances of ingestion, and any other substances ingested at the same time. A poison control centre may be called to assist with diagnosis, to predict the clinical consequences, and to guide patient management. Activated charcoal can reduce the gastrointestinal absorption of some drugs. It should be given as soon as possible, preferably within 2 hours after ingestion of a drug known to be adsorbed by

  6. Acute salt poisoning due to different oral rehydration solution (ORS) packet sizes.

    PubMed

    Quereshi, Umar A; Bhat, Javeed I; Ali, Syed W; Mir, Abid A; Kambay, Altaf H; Bhat, Imtiyaz N

    2010-06-01

    The packing and composition of ORS has undergone a change since its introduction. In India, some companies are manufacturing smaller pouches (4.2 g) to be dissolved in 200 ml of water. Therefore, out of confusion some prescribers routinely advise the patients to dissolve the standard formulation ORS pouch (21 g) in a glass (200 ml) of water. Two cases are discussed. First patient developed salt poisoning due to improper dilution and recovered after rapid correction. In the second patient improper reconstitution led to hypernatremia and death.

  7. Health aspects of organophosphorous pesticides in asian countries.

    PubMed

    Balali-Mood, M; Balali-Mood, K; Moodi, M; Balali-Mood, B

    2012-01-01

    Organophosphorous (OP) pesticides are used frequently in agriculture, particularly in Asian countries over the past decades. Poisoning by these agents, either as acute or chronic in these nations, is a serious health problem. OP pesticides residue in fruits and vegetables that may not induce early clinical features, could also affect the human health. Therefore, medical and health professionals should be aware and learn more on the toxicology, prevention and proper management of OP poisoning. The well-known mechanism of OP toxicity is the inhibition of acetyl cholinesterase, resulting in an accumulation of acetylcholine and continued stimulation of acetylcholine receptors. Therefore, they are also called anticholinesterase agents. Determination of blood acetyl cholinesterase and butyryl cholinesterase activities remains a mainstay for the rapid initial screening of OP pesticides. Quantitative analysis of OP and their degradation products in plasma and urine by mass spectrometric methods is a more specific method, but is expensive and limited to specialized laboratories. Therefore, history of OP pesticides exposure and clinical manifestations of a cholinergic syndrome is sufficient for management of the exposed patients. However, electrophysiological tests may be required for the diagnosis of delayed neuropathy of OP poisoning. The standard management of OP poisoning includes decontamination, atropine sulphate with an oxime. Recent advances focus on blood alkalinisation and magnesium sulphate as promising adjunctive therapies. Preventive measures in OP exposure are of great importance in human health in developing countries. Therefore, regulations and controls on safe use of OP particularly in Asian countries are recommended.

  8. Distinct influence of filter strips on acute and chronic pesticide aquatic environmental exposure assessments across U.S. EPA scenarios.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, George J; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael; Fox, Garey A

    2013-01-01

    Vegetative filter strips (VFS) are proposed for protection of receiving water bodies and aquatic organisms from pesticides in runoff, but there is debate regarding the efficiency and filter size requirements. This debate is largely due to the belief that no quantitative methodology exists for predicting runoff buffer efficiency when conducting acute and/or chronic environmental exposure assessments. Previous research has proposed a modeling approach that links the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) PRZM/EXAMS with a well-tested process-based model for VFS (VFSMOD). In this research, we apply the modeling framework to determine (1) the most important input factors for quantifying mass reductions of pesticides by VFS in aquatic exposure assessments relative to three distinct U.S. EPA scenarios encompassing a wide range of conditions; (2) the expected range in percent reductions in acute and chronic estimated environmental concentrations (EECs); and (3) the differential influence of VFS when conducting acute versus chronic exposure assessments. This research utilized three, 30-yr U.S. EPA scenarios: Illinois corn, California tomato, and Oregon wheat. A global sensitivity analysis (GSA) method identified the most important input factors based on discrete uniform probability distributions for five input factors: VFS length (VL), organic-carbon sorption coefficient (K(oc)), half-lives in both water and soil phases, and application timing. For percent reductions in acute and chronic EECs, VL and application timing were consistently the most important input factors independent of EPA scenario. The potential ranges in acute and chronic EECs varied as a function of EPA scenario and application timing. Reductions in acute EECs were typically less than percent reductions in chronic EECs because acute exposure was driven primarily by large individual rainfall and runon events. Importantly, generic specification of VFS design characteristics equal across scenarios

  9. Paraffin poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Wax poisoning - paraffin ... number will let you talk to experts in poisoning. They will give you further instructions. This is ... should call if you have any questions about poisoning or poison prevention. It does NOT need to ...

  10. Methanol poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Wood alcohol poisoning ... number will let you talk to experts in poisoning. They will give you further instructions. This is ... should call if you have any questions about poisoning or poison prevention. You can call 24 hours ...

  11. Coronary artery bypass grafting in a patient with organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Pieris, Rajeeva R; Fernando, Ravindra

    2015-01-01

    A 43-year-old male, with no previous history of mental illness, was diagnosed with coronary heart disease, after which he became acutely depressed and attempted suicide by ingesting an organophosphate pesticide. He was admitted to an intensive care unit and treated with pralidoxime, atropine, and oxygen. His coronary occlusion pattern required early coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. His family, apprehensive of a repeat suicidal attempt, requested surgery be performed as soon as possible. He recovered well from the OP poisoning and was mentally fit to express informed consent 2 weeks after admission. Seventeen days after poisoning, he underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and recovered uneventfully. Six years later, he remains in excellent health. We report this case because to the best of our knowledge there is no literature regarding CABG performed soon after organophosphate poisoning.

  12. [Paracetamol: therapeutic action, pathogenesis and treatment of acute poisonings complicated by severe liver damage].

    PubMed

    Kołaciński, Zbigniew; Rusiński, Piotr

    2003-01-01

    The biosynthesis of prostaglandins proceeds in the presence of fatty acid cycloxygenases (COX-1, COX-2). COX-1 is responsible for the synthesis of prostaglandins indispensable for normal homeostasis, while COX-2 regulates local expression of pro-inflammatory prostaglandins. Paracetamol is a selective inhibitor of COX-2 thus having an analgesic and antipyretic potential. The drug is metabolised primarily in the liver. About 5% of the dose transforms into N-acetylo-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI), a highly active compound. Ingestion of a single paracetamol dose higher than 8 g leads to a depletion of hepatic glutathione reserves and a loss of the detoxifying property of the liver. As a result, hepatic necrosis develops. The specific antidote is N-acetylcysteine (NAC). If applied within 10-15 h since the poisoning it enables complete survival. The efficacy of specific treatment decreases after 24 h but blood paracetamol is an indication for NAC therapy. The surviving patients with advanced paracetamol poisoning require long-lasting conservative treatment with ornithine and phospholipids as well as a light diet. PMID:14569887

  13. A Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship for acute oral toxicity of pesticides on rats: Validation, domain of application and prediction.

    PubMed

    Hamadache, Mabrouk; Benkortbi, Othmane; Hanini, Salah; Amrane, Abdeltif; Khaouane, Latifa; Si Moussa, Cherif

    2016-02-13

    Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) models are expected to play an important role in the risk assessment of chemicals on humans and the environment. In this study, we developed a validated QSAR model to predict acute oral toxicity of 329 pesticides to rats because a few QSAR models have been devoted to predict the Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) of pesticides on rats. This QSAR model is based on 17 molecular descriptors, and is robust, externally predictive and characterized by a good applicability domain. The best results were obtained with a 17/9/1 Artificial Neural Network model trained with the Quasi Newton back propagation (BFGS) algorithm. The prediction accuracy for the external validation set was estimated by the Q(2)ext and the root mean square error (RMS) which are equal to 0.948 and 0.201, respectively. 98.6% of external validation set is correctly predicted and the present model proved to be superior to models previously published. Accordingly, the model developed in this study provides excellent predictions and can be used to predict the acute oral toxicity of pesticides, particularly for those that have not been tested as well as new pesticides.

  14. Lack of clinical symptoms in an acute arsenic poisoning: an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, A F; Schiaffino, S; Ballesteros, J L; Gil, F; Pla, A; Villanueva, E

    1998-12-01

    A 32-y-old woman was admitted to Granada University Hospital for attempted suicide by ingestion of an ant-killer containing 10% sodium arsenate and 5% pyrethrins. Neither gastrointestinal distress nor hepatic, renal, or neurologic disturbances were clinically observed. However, the presence of toxic levels of arsenic (14 mg/L) was confirmed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in a sample of urine taken about 12 h after poisoning. An uneventful clinical course was observed, and the patient was discharged after 6 days upon her request. Long-term follow-up was unavailable. From a Medline search over the years 1985-1998 only one similar report also dealing with sodium arsenate was found. Different pathogenic hypotheses are discussed in the light of the clinical data.

  15. Limitations and challenges in treatment of acute chemical warfare agent poisoning.

    PubMed

    Thiermann, Horst; Worek, Franz; Kehe, Kai

    2013-12-01

    Recent news from Syria on a possible use of chemical warfare agents made the headlines. Furthermore, the motivation of terrorists to cause maximal harm shifts these agents into the public focus. For incidents with mass casualties appropriate medical countermeasures must be available. At present, the most important threats arise from nerve agents and sulfur mustard. At first, self-protection and protection of medical units from contamination is of utmost importance. Volatile nerve agent exposure, e.g. sarin, results in fast development of cholinergic crisis. Immediate clinical diagnosis can be confirmed on-site by assessment of acetylcholinesterase activity. Treatment with autoinjectors that are filled with 2mg atropine and an oxime (at present obidoxime, pralidoxime, TMB-4 or HI-6) are not effective against all nerve agents. A more aggressive atropinisation has to be considered and more effective oximes (if possible with a broad spectrum or a combination of different oximes) as well as alternative strategies to cope with high acetylcholine levels at synaptic sites should be developed. A further gap exists for the treatment of patients with sustained cholinergic crisis that has to be expected after exposure to persistent nerve agents, e.g. VX. The requirement for long-lasting artificial ventilation can be reduced with an oxime therapy that is optimized by using the cholinesterase status for guidance or by measures (e.g. scavengers) that are able to reduce the poison load substantially in the patients. For sulfur mustard poisoning no specific antidote is available until now. Symptomatic measures as used for treatment of burns are recommended together with surgical or laser debridement. Thus, huge amounts of resources are expected to be consumed as wound healing is impaired. Possible depots of sulfur mustard in tissues may aggravate the situation. More basic knowledge is necessary to improve substantially therapeutic options. The use of stem cells may provide a new

  16. Acute and chronic methyl mercury poisoning impairs rat adrenal and testicular function

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, G.V.; Meikle, A.W.

    1980-05-01

    Animals poisoned with methyl mercury (CH/sub 3/Hg) exhibit stress intolerance and decreased sexual activity, which suggest both adrenal and testicular dysfunction. Adrenal and testicular function was studied in male rats after treatment with CH/sub 3/Hg. In animals treated chronically, the adrenal glands were markedly hyperplastic with enlargement of the zona fasciculata. The mean basal serum levels of corticosterone were similar in experimental (17.8 ..mu..g/dl) and control (16.8 ..mu..g/dl) groups. However, with ether stress, experimental animals had a subnormal response, and the mean serum levels of corticosterone increased to only 23.9 ..mu../dl compared to 40.6 ..mu..g/dl in the controls. Exogenous ACTH stimulation produced a mean level of 19.0 ..mu..g/dl in the CH/sub 3/Hg-treated animals and 49.7 ..mu..g/dl in the controls. In vitro studies demonstrated a defect in the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone. A profound impairment in swimming was partially reversed with glucocorticoid therapy. In animals treated with CH/sub 3/Hg, serum testosterone was lower than normal in the basal state. Human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation increased the mean serum concentration of testosterone to 23.4 ng/ml in controls, but it was only 4.50 ng/ml in experimental animals. The data indicate that CH/sub 3/Hg poisoning impairs adrenal and testicular steroid hormone secretion, which accounts in part for the diminished stress tolerance and decreased sexual activity observed in CH/sub 3/Hg-intoxicated animals.

  17. Limitations and challenges in treatment of acute chemical warfare agent poisoning.

    PubMed

    Thiermann, Horst; Worek, Franz; Kehe, Kai

    2013-12-01

    Recent news from Syria on a possible use of chemical warfare agents made the headlines. Furthermore, the motivation of terrorists to cause maximal harm shifts these agents into the public focus. For incidents with mass casualties appropriate medical countermeasures must be available. At present, the most important threats arise from nerve agents and sulfur mustard. At first, self-protection and protection of medical units from contamination is of utmost importance. Volatile nerve agent exposure, e.g. sarin, results in fast development of cholinergic crisis. Immediate clinical diagnosis can be confirmed on-site by assessment of acetylcholinesterase activity. Treatment with autoinjectors that are filled with 2mg atropine and an oxime (at present obidoxime, pralidoxime, TMB-4 or HI-6) are not effective against all nerve agents. A more aggressive atropinisation has to be considered and more effective oximes (if possible with a broad spectrum or a combination of different oximes) as well as alternative strategies to cope with high acetylcholine levels at synaptic sites should be developed. A further gap exists for the treatment of patients with sustained cholinergic crisis that has to be expected after exposure to persistent nerve agents, e.g. VX. The requirement for long-lasting artificial ventilation can be reduced with an oxime therapy that is optimized by using the cholinesterase status for guidance or by measures (e.g. scavengers) that are able to reduce the poison load substantially in the patients. For sulfur mustard poisoning no specific antidote is available until now. Symptomatic measures as used for treatment of burns are recommended together with surgical or laser debridement. Thus, huge amounts of resources are expected to be consumed as wound healing is impaired. Possible depots of sulfur mustard in tissues may aggravate the situation. More basic knowledge is necessary to improve substantially therapeutic options. The use of stem cells may provide a new

  18. Acute toxicity and ecotoxicological risk assessment of rice pesticides to Lithobates catesbeianus tadpoles.

    PubMed

    França, Fernanda Menezes; De Paiva, Teresa C Brazil; Marcantônio, Adriana S; Teixeira, Patrícia C; Ferreira, Cláudia Maris

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the acute toxicity of some pesticides used in irrigated rice farming to Lithobates catesbeianus tadpoles. The LC 50-96h for commercial formulations containing bentazon, penoxsulam, vegetable oil, permethrin and carbofuran, separately and their mixtures, were determined at the proportions commonly used in the field. The limits of risk concentrations of these products for the studied species were also established. The LC 50-96h for tadpoles was 4,530 mg L(-1) for bentazon; 7.52 mg L(-1) for penoxsulam + 145.66 mg L(-1) of vegetable oil; 81.57 mg L(-1) for vegetable oil; 0.10 mg L(-1) for permethrin; 29.90 mg L(-1) for carbofuran (active ingredients), and 38.79 times the dose used in the field for the mixture of these products. The environmental risk was determined only for permethrin, and care should be taken when using the vegetable oil. PMID:25844861

  19. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Puncturing and Bloodletting at Twelve Hand Jing Points to Treat Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning as Adjunct to First Aid Treatment: A Study Protocol.

    PubMed

    Yue, Ying; Pan, Xingfang; Zhang, Sai; Jin, Jun; Wang, Wei; Wang, Dongqiang; Han, Dexin; Wang, Guirong; Hu, Qunliang; Kang, Jingqing; Ding, Shasha; Yang, Yi; Bu, Huaien; Guo, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning (ACOP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many countries. Twelve Hand Jing Points (THJP) have been believed to be effective to treat all kinds of emergency calls in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for more than 3000 years. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of THJP in curing acute carbon monoxide poisoning in first aid treatment. This paper reports the protocol of the trial. Methods/Design. This RCT is a multicenter, randomized, controlled study undergoing in China. The compliant patients are divided into the bloodletting group and standard of care group. With first aid treatments given to both of the groups, the bloodletting group is bleeding at THJP upon being hospitalized. Primary outcomes and secondary outcomes will be measured and compared between these two groups. Before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 30 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours after treatment, patients' basic vital signs and state of consciousness were observed. Before treatment and 1 and 4 hours after treatment, carboxyhemoglobin concentration in venous blood samples was detected. Discussion. The objective of this study is to provide convincing evidence to clarify the efficacy and safety of THJP for early treatment of acute carbon monoxide poisoning. PMID:26339271

  20. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Puncturing and Bloodletting at Twelve Hand Jing Points to Treat Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning as Adjunct to First Aid Treatment: A Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Ying; Pan, Xingfang; Zhang, Sai; Jin, Jun; Wang, Wei; Wang, Dongqiang; Han, Dexin; Wang, Guirong; Hu, Qunliang; Kang, Jingqing; Ding, Shasha; Yang, Yi; Bu, Huaien; Guo, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning (ACOP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many countries. Twelve Hand Jing Points (THJP) have been believed to be effective to treat all kinds of emergency calls in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for more than 3000 years. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of THJP in curing acute carbon monoxide poisoning in first aid treatment. This paper reports the protocol of the trial. Methods/Design. This RCT is a multicenter, randomized, controlled study undergoing in China. The compliant patients are divided into the bloodletting group and standard of care group. With first aid treatments given to both of the groups, the bloodletting group is bleeding at THJP upon being hospitalized. Primary outcomes and secondary outcomes will be measured and compared between these two groups. Before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 30 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours after treatment, patients' basic vital signs and state of consciousness were observed. Before treatment and 1 and 4 hours after treatment, carboxyhemoglobin concentration in venous blood samples was detected. Discussion. The objective of this study is to provide convincing evidence to clarify the efficacy and safety of THJP for early treatment of acute carbon monoxide poisoning. PMID:26339271

  1. High lethality and minimal variation after acute self-poisoning with carbamate insecticides in Sri Lanka – implications for global suicide prevention

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Thomas; Selvarajah, Liza R.; Mohamed, Fahim; Jayamanne, Shaluka; Gawarammana, Indika; Mostafa, Ahmed; Buckley, Nicholas A.; Roberts, Michael S.; Eddleston, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Highly hazardous organophosphorus (OP) insecticides are responsible for most pesticide poisoning deaths. As they are removed from agricultural practice, they are often replaced by carbamate insecticides of perceived lower toxicity. However, relatively little is known about poisoning with these insecticides. Methods: We prospectively studied 1288 patients self-poisoned with carbamate insecticides admitted to six Sri Lankan hospitals. Clinical outcomes were recorded for each patient and plasma carbamate concentration measured in a sample to confirm the carbamate ingested. Findings: Patients had ingested 3% carbofuran powder (719), carbosulfan EC25 liquid (25% w/v, 389), or fenobucarb EC50 liquid (50% w/v, 127) formulations, carbamate insecticides of WHO Toxicity Classes Ib, II, and II, respectively. Intubation and ventilation was required for 183 (14.2%) patients while 71 (5.5%) died. Compared with carbofuran, poisoning with carbosulfan or fenobucarb was associated with significantly higher risk of death [carbofuran 2.2%; carbosulfan 11.1%, OR 5.5 (95% CI 3.0–9.8); fenobucarb 6.3%, OR 3.0 (1.2–7.1)] and intubation [carbofuran 6.1%; carbosulfan 27.0%, OR 5.7 (3.9–8.3); fenobucarb 18.9%, OR 3.6 (2.1–6.1)]. The clinical presentation and cause of death did not differ markedly between carbamates. Median time to death was similar: carbofuran 42.3 h (IQR 5.5–67.3), carbosulfan 21.3 h (11.5–71.3), and fenobucarb 25.3 h (17.3–72.1) (p = 0.99); no patients showed delayed onset of toxicity akin to the intermediate syndrome seen after OP insecticide poisoning. For survivors, median duration of intubation was 67.8 h (IQR 27.5–118.8) with no difference in duration between carbamates. Reduced GCS at presentation was associated with worse outcome although some patients with carbosulfan died after presentation with normal GCS. Conclusions: We did not find carbamate insecticide self-poisoning to vary markedly according to the carbamate

  2. [Study of blood concentration analysis for formate in acute methanol poisoning].

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Go; Okazawa, Katsuko; Shimizu, Takahiro; Otagiri, Sayoko; Fuwa, Fumiko; Nakagawa, Saori; Yamato, Susumu

    2015-09-01

    A 53-year-old woman ingested about 300 mL of 95% methanol. After immediate ethanol antagonist therapy and hemodialysis, she recovered completely. Few days later, the plasma concentration of methanol and formate was measured. A gas chromatography was used for the plasma methanol concentration measurement, and a colorimetric method was used for plasma formate concentration measurement (Formate Colorimetric Assay Kit; BioVision, California, USA). Patient's plasma methanol concentration before hemodialysis was 676.9 mg/dL and plasma formate concentration was 16.9 mg/dL. By removing blood methanol and formate using hemodialysis before formate accumulations in the body, the patient was discharged without any sequelae. We were able to obtain correlation between a gas chromatography and colorimetric method without gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, with good correlation coefficients. The sensitivity was sufficient for analyzing blood sample. Monitoring formate concentration is useful in determining the treatment and evaluating the prognosis of methanol poisoning. We suggest that this colorimetric method is useful in a facility with no access to a gas chromatography in order to measure a plasma formate concentration.

  3. Ischemic colitis associated with acute carbon monoxide poisoning--a case report.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Lindell K; Deru, Kayla

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is common, but it has rarely been reported to cause ischemic colitis. In this case, a 34-year-old female with depression presented to an emergency department after a period of unconsciousness, with urinary and bowel incontinence, following exposure to car exhaust. Her carboxyhemoglobin level was 23%. She had metabolic acidosis. She was transferred to our facility for hyperbaric oxygen treatment, where she had intractable nausea/vomiting with abdominal pain and bright-red bleeding per rectum. She exhibited lower abdominal tenderness and hypoactive bowel sounds. Vital signs were: temperature 36.8 degrees C; blood pressure 137/ 86 mmHg; heart rate 114 beats/minute; respiratory rate 28 breaths/minute. The patient's electrocardiogram showed sinus tachycardia with T-wave inversions in leads I, aVL and V3-V6. The troponin I level peaked at 3.7 ng/ml. Echocardiogram showed a reduced ejection fraction of 30%-35%, with akinesis in the posterior lateral and distal anterior distributions. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed diffuse colonic mural thickening, supporting mesenteric ischemia. Sigmoidoscopy showed edematous friable pale mucosa from rectum to distal sigmoid colon. Hyperbaric oxygen was deferred based on the patient's status. Over three days, the initial hematochezia progressed to melena and then resolved. Adenosine cardiac stress MRI was normal. She was transferred to the psychiatry service and discharged four days later. Four years later, she has no gastrointestinal, cardiac or cognitive problems. PMID:27265995

  4. Ischemic colitis associated with acute carbon monoxide poisoning--a case report.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Lindell K; Deru, Kayla

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is common, but it has rarely been reported to cause ischemic colitis. In this case, a 34-year-old female with depression presented to an emergency department after a period of unconsciousness, with urinary and bowel incontinence, following exposure to car exhaust. Her carboxyhemoglobin level was 23%. She had metabolic acidosis. She was transferred to our facility for hyperbaric oxygen treatment, where she had intractable nausea/vomiting with abdominal pain and bright-red bleeding per rectum. She exhibited lower abdominal tenderness and hypoactive bowel sounds. Vital signs were: temperature 36.8 degrees C; blood pressure 137/ 86 mmHg; heart rate 114 beats/minute; respiratory rate 28 breaths/minute. The patient's electrocardiogram showed sinus tachycardia with T-wave inversions in leads I, aVL and V3-V6. The troponin I level peaked at 3.7 ng/ml. Echocardiogram showed a reduced ejection fraction of 30%-35%, with akinesis in the posterior lateral and distal anterior distributions. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed diffuse colonic mural thickening, supporting mesenteric ischemia. Sigmoidoscopy showed edematous friable pale mucosa from rectum to distal sigmoid colon. Hyperbaric oxygen was deferred based on the patient's status. Over three days, the initial hematochezia progressed to melena and then resolved. Adenosine cardiac stress MRI was normal. She was transferred to the psychiatry service and discharged four days later. Four years later, she has no gastrointestinal, cardiac or cognitive problems.

  5. [Drug poisoning].

    PubMed

    Gainza, I; Nogué, S; Martínez Velasco, C; Hoffman, R S; Burillo-Putze, G; Dueñas, A; Gómez, J; Pinillos, M A

    2003-01-01

    A review is made of acute poisoning by opiates and its treatment in the emergency services, bearing in mind the progressive decline in the number of cases presented with the arrival of new forms of their administration, as well as the presence of new addictive drugs that have resulted in a shift in consumption habits. Reference is also made to the way in which the different types of existing substances originated, with the aim of achieving a better understanding of their use and in order to administer the most suitable treatment when poisoning occurs. Cocaine poisoning is discussed, with reference to its clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment. The consumption of illegal drugs in our country has undergone a notable change in recent years, with heroin being relegated and the incorporation of cocaine, amphetamine derivatives such as "ecstasy" (MDMA), "liquid ecstasy" (GHB) and, to a lesser extent, ketamine. A review is made of cannabis and its derivates, from the history of its consumption and the preparations employed to the effects produced in the different bodily systems. A brief explanation is also given of its metabolites and its principal mechanisms of action. Finally, we comment on the effects of LSD and hallucinogenic mushrooms.

  6. Acute arsenic poisoning: absence of polyneuropathy after treatment with 2,3-dimercaptopropanesulphonate (DMPS).

    PubMed

    Moore, D F; O'Callaghan, C A; Berlyne, G; Ogg, C S; Davies, H A; House, I M; Henry, J A

    1994-09-01

    Two men aged 19 and 21 years ingested 1 g and 4 g respectively from 3 kg of a white crystalline powder that they thought was a substance of abuse. It was later identified as almost pure arsenic trioxide. Both had nausea and vomiting and one developed acute renal failure. Each was treated with 2,3-dimercaptopropanesulphonate (DMPS), and made a full recovery with no evidence of prolonged renal or neurological impairment. The DMPS-arsenic complex is probably associated with lower penetration into the CNS and as a consequence treatment with DMPS may result in lower acute and chronic neurotoxicity than treatment with the currently standard recommended chelating agent dimercaprol (British Anti-Lewisite; BAL).

  7. Probabilistic acute dietary exposure assessments to captan and tolylfluanid using several European food consumption and pesticide concentration databases.

    PubMed

    Boon, Polly E; Svensson, Kettil; Moussavian, Shahnaz; van der Voet, Hilko; Petersen, Annette; Ruprich, Jiri; Debegnach, Francesca; de Boer, Waldo J; van Donkersgoed, Gerda; Brera, Carlo; van Klaveren, Jacob D; Busk, Leif

    2009-12-01

    Probabilistic dietary acute exposure assessments of captan and tolylfluanid were performed for the populations of the Czech Republic, Denmark, Italy, the Netherlands and Sweden. The basis for these assessments was national databases for food consumption and pesticide concentration data harmonised at the level of raw agricultural commodity. Data were obtained from national food consumption surveys and national monitoring programmes and organised in an electronic platform of databases connected to probabilistic software. The exposure assessments were conducted by linking national food consumption data either (1) to national pesticide concentration data or (2) to a pooled database containing all national pesticide concentration data. We show that with this tool national exposure assessments can be performed in a harmonised way and that pesticide concentrations of other countries can be linked to national food consumption surveys. In this way it is possible to exchange or merge concentration data between countries in situations of data scarcity. This electronic platform in connection with probabilistic software can be seen as a prototype of a data warehouse, including a harmonised approach for dietary exposure modelling.

  8. Hydroxyethyl Starch Could Save a Patient With Acute Aluminum Phosphide Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Marashi, Sayed Mahdi; Nasri Nasrabadi, Zeynab; Jafarzadeh, Mostafa; Mohammadi, Sogand

    2016-07-01

    A 40-year-old male patient with suicidal ingestion of one tablet of aluminium phosphide was referred to the department of toxicology emergency of Baharloo Hospital, Tehran, Iran. The garlic odor was smelled from the patient and abdominal pain and continuous vomiting as well as agitation and heartburn were the first signs and symptoms. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures at the arrival time were 95 and 67 mmHg, respectively. Gastric lavage with potassium permanganate (1:10,000), and 2 vials of sodium bicarbonate through a nasogastric tube was started for the patient and the management was continued with free intravenous infusion of 1 liter of NaCl 0.9% serum plus NaHCO3, hydrocortisone acetate (200 mg), calcium gluconate (1 g) and magnesium sulfate (1 g). Regarding the large intravenous fluid therapy and vasoconstrictor administering (norepinephrine started by 5 µg/min and continued till 15 µg/min), there were no signs of response and the systolic blood pressure was 49 mmHg. At this time, hydroxyethyl starch (HES) (6% hetastarch 600/0.75 in 0.9% sodium chloride) with a dose of 600 cc in 6 hours was started for the patient. At the end of therapy with HES, the patient was stable with systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 110 and 77 mmHg, respectively. He was discharged on the 6th day after the psychological consultation, with normal clinical and paraclinical examinations. This is the first report of using HES in the management of AlP poisoning and its benefit to survive the patient. PMID:27424021

  9. [Pecularities of correction of alcohol affctions of liver in patients with acute ethanol poisoning in the setting of consequence of toxic effect of ethanol].

    PubMed

    Shilov, V V; batotsyrenov, B V; Vasil'ev, S A; Shikalova, I A; Kuznetsov, O A

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this work was to test the usage of infusion of hepatoprotector "remaxol" in intensive therapy of acute ethanol poisoning accompanied with severe alcohol affections of the lever. In the result of the examination and treatment of 130 patients it was established that severe alcohol poisonings registered on alcohol abused patients with toxic hepatopathy, are always accompanied with serious metabolic violations. In the process of a comparative valuation of the using of heptral (ademethionin) and remaxol in the intensive therapy of alcohol poisonings it has been revealed that the using of remaxol led to improvement of the clinic of that poisonings, what had been registered as a decrease of frequency and duration of an alcohol delirium from 33,9% to 10,8%, a decrease of frequency of secondary lung complication from 18,5 to 3,1%, a decrease of a duration of treatment in intensive care unit from 7,3 +/- 0,6 to 5,6 +/- 0,3 and a hospital treatment duration from 11,8 +/- 0,5 to 9,0 +/- 0,3 days. Biochemical investigation has shown that using as heptral, as remaxol led to improvement of lever damages due to alcohol. However remaxol compared with heptral was better in the treatment of metabolic violations.

  10. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Experiments Stories Lessons Topics Games Activities Lessons MENU Lead Poisoning Kids Homepage Topics Pollution Lead Poisoning What is ... you can avoid contact with it! Sources of Lead Poisoning HOUSE PAINTS: Before1950, lead-based paint was used ...

  11. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Lead Poisoning What is it and who is affected? Lead is a highly toxic substance, exposure to which ... and children can suffer from the effects of lead poisoning, but childhood lead poisoning is much more frequent. ...

  12. Acetone poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Dimethyl formaldehyde poisoning; Dimethyl ketone poisoning; Nail polish remover poisoning ... Acetone can be found in: Nail polish remover Some cleaning solutions Some glues, including rubber cement Some lacquers Other products may also contain acetone.

  13. Prognosis for children with acute liver failure due to Amanita phalloides poisoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachulski, Marcin F.; Kamińska-Gocał, Diana; Dądalski, Maciej; Socha, Piotr; Mulawka, Jan J.

    2011-10-01

    The primary objective of this article is to find new effective methods of diagnosis of urgent liver transplantation after Amanita phalloides intoxication amongst pediatric patients. The research was carried out using a medical database of pediatric patients who suffered from acute liver failure after amatoxin consumption. After data preprocessing and attribute selection steps, a two-phase experiment was conducted, which incorporated a wide variety of data mining algorithms. The results deliver two equivalent classification models with simple decision structure and reasonable quality of surgery prediction.

  14. [Mercury poisoning].

    PubMed

    Bensefa-Colas, L; Andujar, P; Descatha, A

    2011-07-01

    Mercury is a widespread heavy metal with potential severe impacts on human health. Exposure conditions to mercury and profile of toxicity among humans depend on the chemical forms of the mercury: elemental or metallic mercury, inorganic or organic mercury compounds. This article aims to reviewing and synthesizing the main knowledge of the mercury toxicity and its organic compounds that clinicians should know. Acute inhalation of metallic or inorganic mercury vapours mainly induces pulmonary diseases, whereas chronic inhalation rather induces neurological or renal disorders (encephalopathy and interstitial or glomerular nephritis). Methylmercury poisonings from intoxicated food occurred among some populations resulting in neurological disorders and developmental troubles for children exposed in utero. Treatment using chelating agents is recommended in case of symptomatic acute mercury intoxication; sometimes it improves the clinical effects of chronic mercury poisoning. Although it is currently rare to encounter situations of severe intoxication, efforts remain necessary to decrease the mercury concentration in the environment and to reduce risk on human health due to low level exposure (dental amalgam, fish contamination by organic mercury compounds…). In case of occupational exposure to mercury and its compounds, some disorders could be compensated in France. Clinicians should work with toxicologists for the diagnosis and treatment of mercury intoxication.

  15. Intravenous Cobinamide Versus Hydroxocobalamin for Acute Treatment of Severe Cyanide Poisoning in a Swine (Sus scrofa) Model

    PubMed Central

    Bebarta, Lt Col Vikhyat S.; Tanen, David A.; Boudreau, Susan; Castaneda, Maria; Zarzabal, Lee A.; Vargas, Toni; Boss, Gerry R.

    2015-01-01

    Study objective Hydroxocobalamin is a Food and Drug Administration–approved antidote for cyanide poisoning. Cobinamide is a potential antidote that contains 2 cyanide-binding sites. To our knowledge, no study has directly compared hydroxocobalamin with cobinamide in a severe, cyanide-toxic large-animal model. Our objective is to compare the time to return of spontaneous breathing in swine with acute cyanide-induced apnea treated with intravenous hydroxocobalamin, intravenous cobinamide, or saline solution (control). Methods Thirty-three swine (45 to 55 kg) were intubated, anesthetized, and instrumented (continuous mean arterial pressure and cardiac output monitoring). Anesthesia was adjusted to allow spontaneous breathing with FiO2 of 21% during the experiment. Cyanide was continuously infused intravenously until apnea occurred and lasted for 1 minute (time zero). Animals were then randomly assigned to receive intravenous hydroxocobalamin (65 mg/kg), cobinamide (12.5 mg/kg), or saline solution and monitored for 60 minutes. A sample size of 11 animals per group was selected according to obtaining a power of 80%, an α of .05, and an SD of 0.17 in mean time to detect a 20% difference in time to spontaneous breathing. We assessed differences in time to death among groups, using Kaplan-Meier estimation methods, and compared serum lactate, blood pH, cardiac output, mean arterial pressure, respiratory rate, and minute ventilation time curves with repeated-measures ANOVA. Results Baseline weights and vital signs were similar among groups. The time to apnea and cyanide dose required to achieve apnea were similar. At time zero, mean cyanide blood and lactate concentrations and reduction in mean arterial pressure from baseline were similar. In the saline solution group, 2 of 11 animals survived compared with 10 of 11 in the hydroxocobalamin and cobinamide groups (P<.001 between the 2 treated groups and the saline solution group). Time to return of spontaneous breathing

  16. Pesticide Health and Safety Challenges Facing Informal Sector Workers: A Case of Small-scale Agricultural Workers in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ngowi, Aiwerasia; Mrema, Ezra; Kishinhi, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    The Tanzania informal sector is growing fast, with precarious working conditions and particular hazards for women and children in agriculture. Hazardous agricultural chemicals including pesticides are mostly imported and have been used for many years. Despite the role played by pesticides in food security and vector control, these chemicals are responsible for acute and chronic illnesses among communities. The availability of obsolete persistent organic pesticides on the open market indicates existence of an inadequate regulatory system. People who get injured or ill in the agriculture sector in Tanzania receive health services in primary health care facilities where professionals have little or no knowledge of pesticides. We are presenting the pesticide health and safety challenges faced by small-scale farmers who fall in the informal sector. Achievements that have been made by the government and other players to reduce and prevent pesticide exposures and poisoning are also outlined. PMID:27406110

  17. Pesticide Health and Safety Challenges Facing Informal Sector Workers: A Case of Small-scale Agricultural Workers in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ngowi, Aiwerasia; Mrema, Ezra; Kishinhi, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    The Tanzania informal sector is growing fast, with precarious working conditions and particular hazards for women and children in agriculture. Hazardous agricultural chemicals including pesticides are mostly imported and have been used for many years. Despite the role played by pesticides in food security and vector control, these chemicals are responsible for acute and chronic illnesses among communities. The availability of obsolete persistent organic pesticides on the open market indicates existence of an inadequate regulatory system. People who get injured or ill in the agriculture sector in Tanzania receive health services in primary health care facilities where professionals have little or no knowledge of pesticides. We are presenting the pesticide health and safety challenges faced by small-scale farmers who fall in the informal sector. Achievements that have been made by the government and other players to reduce and prevent pesticide exposures and poisoning are also outlined.

  18. Impacts of stage-specific acute pesticide exposure on predicted population structure of the soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, S.; Chasse, J.; Butler, R.A.; Morrill, W.; Van Beneden, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    A combined laboratory and modeling approach was used to assess the impact of selected pesticides on early life stages of the soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria. Clams were exposed for 24 h as veligers or pediveligers to the broad-spectrum herbicide hexazinone [3-cyclohexyl-6-(dimethylamino)-1-methyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4 (1h,3h)-dione; (Velpar®)], the phenoxyacetic acid herbicide, 2,4-D (2,4- dichlorophenoxyacetic acid; Agway® Super BK 32), or phosmet (Imidan®). In addition, juvenile clams were exposed for 24 h to 2,4-D and their growth monitored for 21 months. Laboratory experiments indicated veligers were more sensitive to acute pesticide exposure than pediveligers, with 2,4-D exposed veligers exhibiting the lowest survival among all treatments. Relative to controls, juvenile clams exposed to 0.5 ppm 2,4-D had enhanced survival following the initial 3 months of grow out. Juveniles exposed to 0.5 ppm, 5 ppm and 10 ppm 2,4-D showed an initial growth delay relative to control clams, but at 21 months post exposure these clams were significantly larger than control clams. Data from the larval and juvenile exposures were used to generate a stage-specific matrix model to predict the effect of pesticide exposure on clam populations. Impacts on simulated clam populations varied with the pesticide and stage exposed. For example, 2,4-D exposure of veligers and pediveligers significantly reduced predicted recruitment as well as population growth rate compared to controls, but juvenile exposure to 2,4-D did not significantly reduce population growth rate. With the exception of veligers exposed to 10 ppm, hexazinone exposure at the both veliger and pediveliger stages significantly reduced predicted recruitment success compared to 0 ppm controls. Hexazinone exposure also reduced modeled population growth rates, but these reductions were only slight in the pediveliger exposure simulations. Veliger and pediveliger exposure to phosmet reduced modeled population growth rate in a dose

  19. Sampling strategies for estimating acute and chronic exposures of pesticides in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crawford, Charles G.

    2004-01-01

    The Food Quality Protection Act of 1996 requires that human exposure to pesticides through drinking water be considered when establishing pesticide tolerances in food. Several systematic and seasonally weighted systematic sampling strategies for estimating pesticide concentrations in surface water were evaluated through Monte Carlo simulation, using intensive datasets from four sites in northwestern Ohio. The number of samples for the strategies ranged from 4 to 120 per year. Sampling strategies with a minimal sampling frequency outside the growing season can be used for estimating time weighted mean and percentile concentrations of pesticides with little loss of accuracy and precision, compared to strategies with the same sampling frequency year round. Less frequent sampling strategies can be used at large sites. A sampling frequency of 10 times monthly during the pesticide runoff period at a 90 km 2 basin and four times monthly at a 16,400 km2 basin provided estimates of the time weighted mean, 90th, 95th, and 99th percentile concentrations that fell within 50 percent of the true value virtually all of the time. By taking into account basin size and the periodic nature of pesticide runoff, costs of obtaining estimates of time weighted mean and percentile pesticide concentrations can be minimized.

  20. Antagonism of Acute Sulfide Poisoning in Mice by Nitrite Anion without Methemoglobinemia.

    PubMed

    Cronican, Andrea A; Frawley, Kristin L; Ahmed, Humza; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim

    2015-07-20

    There are currently no FDA-approved antidotes for H2S/sulfide intoxication. Sodium nitrite, if given prophylactically to Swiss Webster mice, was shown to be highly protective against the acute toxic effects of sodium hydrosulfide (∼LD40 dose) with both agents administered by intraperitoneal injections. However, sodium nitrite administered after the toxicant dose did not detectably ameliorate sulfide toxicity in this fast-delivery, single-shot experimental paradigm. Nitrite anion was shown to rapidly produce NO in the bloodstream, as judged by the appearance of EPR signals attributable to nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin, together amounting to less than 5% of the total hemoglobin present. Sulfide-intoxicated mice were neither helped by the supplemental administration of 100% oxygen nor were there any detrimental effects. Compared to cyanide-intoxicated mice, animals surviving sulfide intoxication exhibited very short knockdown times (if any) and full recovery was extremely fast (∼15 min) irrespective of whether sodium nitrite was administered. Behavioral experiments testing the ability of mice to maintain balance on a rotating cylinder showed no motor impairment up to 24 h post sulfide exposure. It is argued that antagonism of sulfide inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by NO is the crucial antidotal activity of nitrite rather than formation of methemoglobin.

  1. [Acute diazepam poisoning in experimental animals and the effect of centrophenoxine on it].

    PubMed

    Mirchev, N

    1976-01-01

    The author carried out studies on 20 white rats (weight of 150 gm) and 40 white mice (weight of 20 gm), equal number of both sexes administering oraly respective doses of diazepam in a dose of 650 mg/body weight and 620 mg/body weight, having in mind the LD50 determined by him (730 mg/body weight for rats and 535 mg/body weight for mice). In this way he induced acute intoxication especially gravely manifested in mice. After two hours, when the rats were in a comatous state, he introduced oraly centrophenoxine in a dose of 50 mg/body weight in half of the animals, but the other animals remained as controls. Mice succumed to coma after two and a half hours. In half of them he administered oraly centrophenoxine in a boose of 50 mg/body weight, which dose was repeated after two hours, but the remaining animals remained as controls. All rats, treated with centrophenoxine, remained alive and recovered quickly from the intoxication while four of the control animals died, but in the remaining alive animals the recovery was very slow. Only four of the mice treated with centrophenoxine died, but in the remaining alive mice the signs of intoxication disappeared quickly. Twelve of the control animals died, but the remaining animals recovered very quickly. The obtained results corresponded to the favourable effect of centophenoxine, observed by us, in treatment of persons, intoxicated by diazepam.

  2. Feeding response in marine copepods as a measure of acute toxicity of four anti-sea lice pesticides.

    PubMed

    Van Geest, Jordana L; Burridge, Les E; Fife, Frederick J; Kidd, Karen A

    2014-10-01

    Anti-sea lice pesticides used in salmon aquaculture are released directly into the environment where non-target organisms, including zooplankton, may be exposed. The toxicity of four pesticides to field-collected copepods was examined in 1-h exposures with lethality and feeding endpoints determined 5-h post-exposure using staining techniques. Copepods were immobilized within 1 h, at aquaculture treatment concentrations of deltamethrin (AlphaMax), cypermethrin (Excis), and hydrogen peroxide (InteroxParamove50). All organisms showed vital staining, indicating immobilized organisms were still alive, thus LC50s were not determined. Feeding on carmine particles was inhibited and EC50s ranged from 0.017 to 0.067 μg deltamethrin/L, 0.098-0.36 μg cypermethrin/L, and 2.6-10 mg hydrogen peroxide/L, representing 30- to 117-fold, 13- to 51-fold, and 120- to 460-fold dilutions of the respective aquaculture treatments. No effects were observed in copepods exposed to azamethiphos (Salmosan) at 5-times the aquaculture treatment. Acute exposure to three of the four pesticides affected feeding and mobility of copepods at environmentally-realistic concentrations.

  3. Acute toxic effects of three pesticides on Pseudomonas putida monitored by microcalorimeter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Lun; Yao, Jun; Wang, Fei; Bramanti, Emilia; Maskow, Thomas; Zaray, Gyula

    2009-02-01

    A series of calorimetric experiments were performed to investigate the toxic effects of beta-cypermethrin (BCP), bensulfuron-methyl (BSM) and prometryne (PM) on Pseudomonas putida (P. putida). The metabolic action of P. putida on the three pesticides was studied by obtaining power-time curves. The growth of P. putida was inhibited completely in each case when the concentrations of pesticides were up to 80 micro g mL(- 1). The relationships between the inhibitory ratio (k) and doses of contaminants were approximately linear for the three pesticides. The total heat dissipated per milliliter (Q(total)) for the pesticides decreased during the course of the experiment. The OD(600) of P. putida growth in the absence and presence of pesticides was also obtained. The power-time curves of P. putida growth coincided with its turbidity curves. This elucidates that microcalorimetric method agrees well with the routine microbiological method. Among these three pesticides, BSM was found to be the most toxic with an IC(50) of 19.24 micro g mL(- 1) against P. putida. PM exhibited moderate virulence with an IC(50) of 27.86 micro g mL(- 1) and BCP had the lowest toxicity with an IC(50) of 39.64 micro g mL(- 1). PMID:19130374

  4. [Characteristics of the pharmacological treatment of toxic liver damage in patients with an alcohol abused syndrome and an acute severe ethanol poison].

    PubMed

    Shilov, V V; Shikalova, I A; Vasil'ev, S A; Loladze, A T; Batotsyrenov, B V

    2012-01-01

    The examination of 130 patients with an alcohol abused syndrome and a severe ethanol poison have revealed that ethanol action are accompanied by significant metabolic disturbances. The comparative evaluation of the inclusion of heptral and remaxol in the treatment has shown that remaxol improves the clinical course of mentioned disorders decreasing the frequency and duration of alcohol delirium. Patients treated with this drug spent less time in acute care and their treatment duration was shorter. Remaxol reduces more effectively the severity of metabolic disorders.

  5. [Oxidative stress and antioxidant therapy with alpha-lipoic acid inclusion in acute poisoning by herbicide based on 2,4-dichlorphenoxyacetic acid].

    PubMed

    Kharchenko, O A; Balan, H M; Bubalo, N N; Mymrenko, T V

    2014-01-01

    In patients with acute poisoning amine salt herbicide 2,4-D develops oxidative stress with simultaneous inhibition of intracellular and extracellular antioxidant factors. These changes are more pronounced with neurological disorders that occur in conjunction with a toxic damage of liver or heart. The inclusion of a comprehensive detoxification therapy alpha-lipoic acid not only promotes a more pronounced therapeutic effect but also an earlier recourse cytolytic syndrome, a marked recovery of levels of malondialdehyde and indices of antioxidant system (superoxide dismutase and ceruloplasmin) than for patients in the comparison group. PMID:24908976

  6. Evaluation of efficacy of resin hemoperfusion in patients with acute 2,4-dinitrophenol poisoning by dynamic monitoring of plasma toxin concentration

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xue-hong; Jiang, Jiu-kun; Lu, Yuan-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The intoxications caused by 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP), even death, have been frequently reported in recent years. This study aims to investigate the dynamic changes of plasma toxin concentration and explore the clinical value of resin hemoperfusion (HP) in the treatment of patients with acute 2,4-DNP poisoning. Methods: We reported 16 cases of acute 2,4-DNP poisoning through occupational exposure due to ignoring the risk of poisoning. The blood samples were collected from the 14 survivors. According to the different treatments of resin HP, the survivors were divided into routine HP (n=5) and intensive HP (n=9) groups. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectroscopy (UPLC-MS/MS) was used to detect the 2,4-DNP concentration in plasma in this study. Results: The 14 survivors recovered very well after treatment. The initial plasma 2,4-DNP concentrations (C 1) of survivors ranged from 0.25 to 41.88 µg/ml (mean (12.56±13.93) µg/ml). A positive correlation existed between initial plasma 2,4-DNP concentration (C 1) and temperature. The elimination of 2,4-DNP was slow and persistent, and the total clearance rates of plasma toxin from the 1st to 3rd day (R 3), the 3rd to 7th day (R 3–7), and the 1st to 7th day (R 7), were only (53.03±14.04)%, (55.25±10.50)%, and (78.29±10.22)%, respectively. The plasma toxin was cleared up to 25 d after poisoning in most of the patients. The R 3, R 3–7, and R 7 in the intensive HP group were all apparently higher than those in the routine HP group, with statistical significance (P<0.05). Simultaneously, the elimination half-life (t 1/2) of 2,4-DNP in the intensive HP group was apparently shorter than that in the routine HP group, with statistical significance (P<0.05). Conclusions: The clinicians should be aware of this slow and persistent process in the elimination of plasma 2,4-DNP. Higher initial plasma toxin concentration resulted in a more severe fever for the patient. According to the

  7. Ischemia-modified albumin levels in the prediction of acute critical neurological findings in carbon monoxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Daş, Murat; Çevik, Yunsur; Erel, Özcan; Çorbacioğlu, Şeref Kerem

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether serum ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) levels in patients with carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning were higher compared with a control group of healthy volunteers. In addition, the study sought to determine if there was a correlation between serum IMA levels and carboxyhemoglobin (COHB) levels and other critical neurological findings (CNFs). In this prospective study, the IMA levels of 100 patients with CO poisoning and 50 control individuals were compared. In addition, the IMA and COHB levels were analyzed according to absence or presence CNFs in patients with CO poisoning. The levels of IMA (mg/dL) on admittance, and during the 1(st) hour and 3(rd) hour, in patients with CO poisoning (49.90 ± 35.43, 30.21 ± 14.81, and 21.87 ± 6.03) were significantly higher, compared with the control individuals (17.30 ± 2.88). The levels of IMA in the 6(th) hour were not higher compared with control individuals. The levels of IMA on admittance, and during the 1(st) hour, 3(rd) hour, and 6(th) hour, and COHB (%) levels in patients who had CNFs were higher compared with IMA levels and COHB levels in patients who had no CNFs (p < 0.001). However, when the multivariate model was created, it was observed that IMA level on admittance was a poor indicator for prediction of CNFs (odds ratio = 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.08). We therefore concluded that serum IMA levels could be helpful in the diagnosis of CO poisoning. However, we believe that IMA levels cannot be used to predict which patients will develop CNFs due to CO poisoning.

  8. Foxglove poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Foxglove poisoning most often occurs from sucking the flowers or eating the seeds, stems, or leaves of ... The poisonous substances are found in: Flowers, leaves, stems, and seeds of the foxglove plant Heart medicine (digitalis glycoside)

  9. Ethanol poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002644.htm Ethanol poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Ethanol poisoning is caused by drinking too much alcohol. ...

  10. Starch poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Cooking starch poisoning; Laundry starch poisoning ... Cooking and laundry starch are both made from vegetable products, most commonly: Corn Potatoes Rice Wheat Both are usually considered nonpoisonous (nontoxic), but ...

  11. Poisonous Plants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH POISONOUS PLANTS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Photo courtesy ... U.S. Department of Agriculture Many native and exotic plants are poisonous to humans when ingested or if ...

  12. Copper poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 75. Holland MG. Pulmonary toxicology. ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 9. Jones AL, Dargan PI. ...

  13. Acute nickel carbonyl poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kurta, D L; Dean, B S; Krenzelok, E P

    1993-01-01

    Nickel carbonyl [Ni(CO)4], is formed when metallic nickel combines with carbon monoxide. It is used in the refining process of nickel and as a catalyst in petroleum, plastic, and rubber production. Nickel carbonyl is considered to be one of the most toxic chemicals used industrially and the magnitude of its morbidity and mortality has been compared to that of hydrogen cyanide. A 46-year-old man presented to the emergency department 24 hours after accidental occupational exposure to nickel carbonyl. He admitted to dermal contamination and inhaling the vapor from his clothing after his respiratory protection was removed. On presentation the patient was alert and oriented, complained of shortness of breath, chest tightness, and paresthesias. Examination revealed decreased breath sounds bilaterally and arterial blood gas PO2 of 39% with calculated O2 saturation of 75%. After face mask O2 at 60% his PO2 increased to 85%. The patient required 60% O2 with continuous positive airway pressure of 5 for 4 days. Disulfiram (Antabuse) was administered for the first 2 days until sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (dithiocarb) was obtained. Disulfiram was used because it is metabolized to two molecules of dithiocarb and is hypothetically of value. Dithiocarb was obtained and continued over the next several days. The patient's urine nickel level on the day of admission was 172 micrograms/dL (normal < 5 micrograms/dL) and a serum level of 14.6 micrograms/dL (normal .26-.46 micrograms/dL). The patient's condition gradually improved over the next 10 days. Nickel carbonyl exposure produces mild transient initial symptoms which are followed within 24 hours by more severe life-threatening events.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Acute nickel carbonyl poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kurta, D L; Dean, B S; Krenzelok, E P

    1993-01-01

    Nickel carbonyl [Ni(CO)4], is formed when metallic nickel combines with carbon monoxide. It is used in the refining process of nickel and as a catalyst in petroleum, plastic, and rubber production. Nickel carbonyl is considered to be one of the most toxic chemicals used industrially and the magnitude of its morbidity and mortality has been compared to that of hydrogen cyanide. A 46-year-old man presented to the emergency department 24 hours after accidental occupational exposure to nickel carbonyl. He admitted to dermal contamination and inhaling the vapor from his clothing after his respiratory protection was removed. On presentation the patient was alert and oriented, complained of shortness of breath, chest tightness, and paresthesias. Examination revealed decreased breath sounds bilaterally and arterial blood gas PO2 of 39% with calculated O2 saturation of 75%. After face mask O2 at 60% his PO2 increased to 85%. The patient required 60% O2 with continuous positive airway pressure of 5 for 4 days. Disulfiram (Antabuse) was administered for the first 2 days until sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (dithiocarb) was obtained. Disulfiram was used because it is metabolized to two molecules of dithiocarb and is hypothetically of value. Dithiocarb was obtained and continued over the next several days. The patient's urine nickel level on the day of admission was 172 micrograms/dL (normal < 5 micrograms/dL) and a serum level of 14.6 micrograms/dL (normal .26-.46 micrograms/dL). The patient's condition gradually improved over the next 10 days. Nickel carbonyl exposure produces mild transient initial symptoms which are followed within 24 hours by more severe life-threatening events.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8383493

  15. Carbolic acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Phenol poisoning; Phenylic acid poisoning; Hydroxybenzene poisoning; Phenic acid poisoning; Benzenol poisoning ... Below are symptoms of carbolic acid poisoning in different parts of the ... urine Decreased urine output No urine output EYES, EARS, ...

  16. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Sal soda poisoning; Soda ash poisoning; Disodium salt poisoning; Carbonic acid poisoning; Washing soda poisoning ... number will let you talk to experts in poisoning. They will give you further instructions. This is ...

  17. Is the measurement of serum formate concentration useful in the diagnostics of acute methanol poisoning? A prospective study of 38 patients.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Sergey; Kurcova, Ivana; Navratil, Tomas; Salek, Tomas; Komarc, Martin; Pelclova, Daniela

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this article was to study the role of serum formate (S-formate) in diagnosing methanol poisoning. A prospective study was undertaken of 38 patients from the Czech methanol mass poisoning in 2012 - median age 51 [interquartile range (IQR) 37-62] years with confirmed methanol poisoning. S-formate was measured enzymatically. The receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve was used to examine the predictive ability of S-formate. Asymptomatic patients had median S-formate of 1.9 (IQR 1.5-2.4) mmol/L. The median S-formate was 15.2 (IQR 13.9-17.6) mmol/L in symptomatic subjects with visual disturbances, 15.4 (12.1-18.0) mmol/L in subjects with dyspnoea and 15.7 (IQR 12.8-18.5) mmol/L in comatose patients. The differences in serum formate concentrations in symptomatic patients depending on clinical features were not significant (all p > 0.05). Patients with long-term visual sequelae of poisoning had median S-formate of 16.1 (IQR 14.3-19.9) mmol/L; with central nervous system (CNS) sequelae, patients had 15.9 (IQR 14.2-19.5) mmol/L. In lethal cases, the median S-formate was 15.2 (IQR 13.8-15.9) mmol/L. The probability of a poor outcome (death or survival with sequelae) was higher than 90% in patients with S-formate ≥17.5 mmol/L, S-lactate ≥7.0 mmol/L and/or pH <6.87. The ROC analysis showed that the corresponding areas under the curve (AUC) were 0.64 (0.44-0.85 CI 95%) for S-formate, 0.75 (0.56-0.93 CI 95%) for 'S-formate+S-lactate' and only 0.54 (0.38-0.69 CI 95%) for serum methanol, which is lower than for S-formate (p < 0.05). The measurement of S-formate is an important tool in the laboratory diagnostics and clinical management of acute methanol poisoning. S-formate ≥3.7 mmol/L can lead to the first clinical signs of visual toxicity, indicating haemodialysis. S-formate ≥11-12 mmol/L is associated with visual/CNS sequelae and a lethal outcome.

  18. Pesticides and myocardial infarction incidence and mortality among male pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study.

    PubMed

    Mills, Katherine T; Blair, Aaron; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Sandler, Dale P; Hoppin, Jane A

    2009-10-01

    Acute organophosphate and carbamate pesticide poisonings result in adverse cardiac outcomes. The cardiac effects of chronic low-level pesticide exposure have not been studied. The authors analyzed self-reported lifetime use of pesticides reported at enrollment (1993-1997) and myocardial infarction mortality through 2006 and self-reported nonfatal myocardial infarction through 2003 among male pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study. Using proportional hazard models, the authors estimated the association between lifetime use of 49 pesticides and fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction. There were 476 deaths from myocardial infarction among 54,069 men enrolled in the study and 839 nonfatal myocardial infarctions among the 32,024 participants who completed the follow-up interview. Fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarctions were associated with commonly reported risk factors, including age and smoking. There was little evidence of an association between having used pesticides, individually or by class, and myocardial infarction mortality (e.g., insecticide hazard ratio (HR) = 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.67, 1.24; herbicide HR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.49, 1.10) or nonfatal myocardial infarction incidence (e.g., insecticide HR = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.66, 1.09; herbicide HR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.61, 1.36). There was no evidence of a dose response with any pesticide measure. In a population with low risk for myocardial infarction, the authors observed little evidence of increased risk of myocardial infarction mortality or nonfatal myocardial infarction associated with the occupational use of pesticides.

  19. Pesticides and Myocardial Infarction Incidence and Mortality Among Male Pesticide Applicators in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Katherine T.; Blair, Aaron; Freeman, Laura E. Beane; Sandler, Dale P.

    2009-01-01

    Acute organophosphate and carbamate pesticide poisonings result in adverse cardiac outcomes. The cardiac effects of chronic low-level pesticide exposure have not been studied. The authors analyzed self-reported lifetime use of pesticides reported at enrollment (1993–1997) and myocardial infarction mortality through 2006 and self-reported nonfatal myocardial infarction through 2003 among male pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study. Using proportional hazard models, the authors estimated the association between lifetime use of 49 pesticides and fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction. There were 476 deaths from myocardial infarction among 54,069 men enrolled in the study and 839 nonfatal myocardial infarctions among the 32,024 participants who completed the follow-up interview. Fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarctions were associated with commonly reported risk factors, including age and smoking. There was little evidence of an association between having used pesticides, individually or by class, and myocardial infarction mortality (e.g., insecticide hazard ratio (HR) = 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.67, 1.24; herbicide HR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.49, 1.10) or nonfatal myocardial infarction incidence (e.g., insecticide HR = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.66, 1.09; herbicide HR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.61, 1.36). There was no evidence of a dose response with any pesticide measure. In a population with low risk for myocardial infarction, the authors observed little evidence of increased risk of myocardial infarction mortality or nonfatal myocardial infarction associated with the occupational use of pesticides. PMID:19700503

  20. Glasgow Coma Scale and Its Components on Admission: Are They Valuable Prognostic Tools in Acute Mixed Drug Poisoning?

    PubMed Central

    Eizadi Mood, N.; Sabzghabaee, A. M.; Yadegarfar, Gh.; Yaraghi, A.; Ramazani Chaleshtori, M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. The verbal, eye, and motor components of Glasgow coma scale (GCS) may be influenced by poisoned patients' behavior in an attempted suicide. So, the values of admission GCS and its components for outcomes prediction in mixed drugs poisoning were investigated. Materials and Methods. A followup study data was performed on patients with mixed drugs poisoning. Outcomes were recorded as without complications and with complications. Discrimination was evaluated by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). Results. There was a significant difference between the mean value of each component of GCS as well as the total GCS between patients with and without complication. Discrimination was best for GCS (AUC: 0.933 ± 0.020) and verbal (0.932 ± 0.021), followed by motor (0.911 ± 0.025), then eye (0.89 ± 0.028). Conclusions. Admission GCS and its components seem to be valuable in outcome prediction of patients with mixed drug poisoning. PMID:21559299

  1. Black nightshade poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Nightshade poisoning; Morelle noire poisoning; Wonderberry poisoning ... Black nightshade poisoning can affect many areas of the body. EYES, EARS, NOSE, MOUTH, AND THROAT Dry mouth Enlarged (dilated) pupils ...

  2. Blue nightshade poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Bittersweet poisoning; Bitter nightshade poisoning; Scarlet berry poisoning; Weedy nightshade poisoning ... slow Shock LUNGS Slow breathing NERVOUS SYSTEM Delirium Fever Hallucinations Headache Loss of sensation Paralysis WHOLE BODY ...

  3. OCCUPATIONAL CARBAMATE POISONING IN THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Tongpoo, Achara; Sriapha, Charuwan; Wongvisawakorn, Sunun; Rittilert, Panee; Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Wananukul, Winai

    2015-07-01

    Carbamate insecticide is a leading cause of poisoning in Thailand. The objective of this study was to characterize the clinical manifestations and modes of occupational exposure in carbamate poisoning cases. We retrospectively studied all the cases of carbamate poisoning due to occupational exposure recorded in the Ramathibodi Poison Center Toxic Exposure Surveillance system during 2005 to 2010. Demographic data, clinical manifestations and severity were analyzed statistically. During the study period, 3,183 cases were identified, of which 170 (5.3%) were deemed to be due to occupational exposure. Ninety-six cases (56.5%) and 35 cases (20.6%) were poisoned by carbofuran and methomyl, respectively. Carbofuran is sold as a 3% grain and applied by sowing; methomyl is sold as a liquid and is applied by spraying. The majority of poisoned patients did not wear personal protective equipment (PPE) while applying the carbamates. The clinical manifestations of occupational carbofuran poisoning recorded were nausea and vomiting (82.3%), headaches (56.3%) and miosis (19.8%). The clinical manifestations of methomyl poisoning were nausea and vomiting (74.3%), headaches (57.1%) and palpitations (11.4%). Most patients in both groups had mild symptoms. Only one case in each group required endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation support. There were no deaths and the lengths of hospitalization ranged from 2 hours to 2 days. Occupational carbamate poisoning cases in our series were mostly mild and the patients recovered quickly. There were only rare cases of serious symptoms. Lack of knowledge and inadequate PPE were the major factors contributing to occupational poisoning. Educating agricultural workers about correct precautions and pesticide use could minimize this type of poisoning.

  4. Metabolic complications of organophosphate and carbamate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Saadeh, A M

    2001-07-01

    The clinical manifestations of acute organophosphate (OP) and carbamate poisoning have already been well described. Most of these reports were on the cardiac, neurologic, respiratory and other clinical complications of these compounds. However, very little attention has been given to the metabolic aspects of this problem, particularly those accompanying carbamate poisoning. This paper describes the metabolic complications seen in 84 adult patients after acute poisoning with these compounds.

  5. Farmers' knowledge, practices and injuries associated with pesticide exposure in rural farming villages in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pesticides in Tanzania are extensively used for pest control in agriculture. Their usage and unsafe handling practices may potentially result in high farmer exposures and adverse health effects. The aim of this study was to describe farmers’ pesticide exposure profile, knowledge about pesticide hazards, experience of previous poisoning, hazardous practices that may lead to Acute Pesticide Poisoning (APP) and the extent to which APP is reported. Methods The study involved 121 head- of-household respondents from Arumeru district in Arusha region. Data collection involved administration of a standardised questionnaire to farmers and documentation of storage practices. Unsafe pesticide handling practices were assessed through observation of pesticide storage, conditions of personal protective equipment (PPE) and through self-reports of pesticide disposal and equipment calibration. Results Past lifetime pesticide poisoning was reported by 93% of farmers. The agents reported as responsible for poisoning were Organophosphates (42%) and WHO Class II agents (77.6%). Storage of pesticides in the home was reported by 79% of farmers. Respondents with higher education levels were significantly less likely to store pesticides in their home (PRR High/Low = 0.3; 95% CI = 0.1-0.7) and more likely to practice calibration of spray equipment (PRR High/Low = 1.2; 95% CI = 1.03-1.4). However, knowledge of routes of exposure was not associated with safety practices particularly for disposal, equipment wash area, storage and use of PPE . The majority of farmers experiencing APP in the past (79%) did not attend hospital and of the 23 farmers who did so in the preceding year, records could be traced for only 22% of these cases. Conclusions The study found a high potential for pesticide exposure in the selected community in rural Tanzania, a high frequency of self-reported APP and poor recording in hospital records. Farmers’ knowledge levels appeared to be unrelated to their

  6. A report of acute ethanol poisoning in a child: mouthwash versus cologne, perfume and after-shave.

    PubMed

    Hornfeldt, C S

    1992-01-01

    The ingestion of ethanol-containing products, such as cologne, perfume and after-shave, in children under six years of age is common, but serious poisoning is rarely reported. Thus, it has been recently suggested that children ingesting up to 3.5 ounces of these products may be safely observed at home as long as they remain asymptomatic. While it may be assumed that products with a significantly lower alcohol content represent a much smaller poisoning hazard, mouthwashes are a relatively frequent cause of serious poisoning in children. In the following case report, 75 milliliters of mouthwash caused hypoglycemia, coma and manifestations of tonic seizure activity. Because of the palatable nature of mouthwash, wine and liquor, it appears that children are more apt to drink large quantities, consuming dangerous amounts of ethanol. The apparent safety of cologne, perfume, and after-shave may be due to a lack of palatability as well as the irritant nature of high concentrations of ethanol. This case suggests that consumer items such as mouthwash should be packaged in child-resistant containers.

  7. Notes from the field: Acute pesticide-related illness resulting from occupational exposure to acrolein - Washington and California, 1993-2009.

    PubMed

    2013-04-26

    Acrolein is an aquatic herbicide used in the western United States to prevent impaired water flow in irrigation canals. Despite its toxicity, few cases of acrolein-related illness have been reported in the literature. On August 15, 2012, an irrigation district notified the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries (L&I) of acrolein-related illness in one of its pesticide applicators. L&I inspected the site and interviewed the exposed worker, coworkers, and employer. The Washington State Department of Health assisted by obtaining medical records, interviewing the patient and hospital staff, and reviewing information obtained from L&I. To look for additional cases, CDC reviewed data from the SENSOR-Pesticides program* and the California Department of Pesticide Regulation for 1993-2009, the most recent years of data availability, and identified seven additional cases of acute acrolein-related illness.

  8. Profile of poisoning admissions in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rajasuriar, R; Awang, R; Hashim, S B H; Rahmat, H R B H

    2007-02-01

    We retrospectively reviewed poisoning admissions to all government health facilities from 1999 to 2001, in an effort to expand our current knowledge on poisoning in Malaysia to a level that better reflects a nationwide burden. There were 21 714 admissions reported with 779 deaths. The case-fatality rate was 35.88/1000 admissions. The majority of admissions (89.7%) and deaths (98.9%) occurred in adults. Some 55.1% of all admissions were female, mostly involving pharmaceutical agents. Male poisoning admissions were more often due to chemical substances. The prevalence of poisoning and death was highest among Indians compared to all other races in Malaysia. Overall, the majority of poisoning admissions were due to pharmaceutical agents, with agents classified as non-opioid analgesics, anti-pyretics and anti-rheumatics the most common. Pesticides accounted for the largest number of fatalities. It was also the commonest substance reported in cases of intentional self-harm. Most cases of poisoning admissions occurred due to accidental exposure (47%), followed by cases of intentional self-harm (20.7%). Overall, this study has managed to contribute substantial additional information regarding the epidemiology of poisoning in Malaysia, highlighting important issues, such as the rampant poisonings involving pesticides and analgesics, as well as the high prevalence of poisoning among Indians in Malaysia.

  9. Poisonous plants.

    PubMed

    Kellerman, T S

    2009-03-01

    South Africa is blessed with one of the richest floras in the world, which--not surprisingly--includes many poisonous plants. Theiler in the founding years believed that plants could be involved in the aetiologies of many of the then unexplained conditions of stock, such as gousiekte and geeldikkop. His subsequent investigations of plant poisonings largely laid the foundation for the future Sections of Toxicology at the Institute and the Faculty of Veterinary Science (UP). The history of research into plant poisonings over the last 100 years is briefly outlined. Some examples of sustained research on important plant poisonings, such as cardiac glycoside poisoning and gousiekte, are given to illustrate our approach to the subject and the progress that has been made. The collation and transfer of information and the impact of plant poisonings on the livestock industry is discussed and possible avenues of future research are investigated.

  10. A series of patients in the emergency department diagnosed with copper poisoning: recognition equals treatment.

    PubMed

    Gunay, Nurullah; Yildirim, Cuma; Karcioglu, Ozgur; Gunay, Nahide Ekici; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Usalan, Celalettin; Kose, Ataman; Togun, Ismail

    2006-07-01

    Only scarce data are available on chronic copper poisoning in general toxicology literature. This paper reports four patients with chronic copper poisoning and one patient with acute poisoning. The cases with chronic poisoning in our study consisted of four members of a farmer family presenting to the emergency department (ED) with malaise, weakness, abdominal pain, headache, dizziness, tightness in the chest, leg and back pain, accompanied by significant anemia (hemoglobin [Hb]: 8.7 - 9.5 g/dl). They were hospitalized and investigated thoroughly, although there were no other findings or clues enlightening the etiology of anemia. The anemia was attributed to chronic copper exposure acquired from vegetables containing copper. The diagnosis was established by ruling out other possible etiologies and history coupled with laboratory findings. The patients were discharged with the recommendation on diet to avoid consumption of pesticide-treated vegetables. Their Hb values were between 10 and 11.4 g/dl on the 15th day, and between 12 and 14 g/dl after two months. Their symptoms had also resolved completely in two months. The patient with acute intoxication (5th case) had ingested copper oxychloride with suicidal intent. He was admitted with anuria and hemolytic anemia. After being hospitalized for fifteen days, he was diagnosed with chronic renal failure and was scheduled for a dialysis program. Acute poisoning is more deliberate, while chronic exposure may result in atypical findings. In conclusion, physicians working in primary care and EDs should consider copper poisoning in patients presenting with anemia, abdominal pain, headache, tightness in the chest, and leg and back pain.

  11. Outsmarting Poison Ivy and Other Poisonous Plants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Updates Outsmarting Poison Ivy and Other Poisonous Plants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... hang in loose clusters. back to top Poison Plant Rashes Aren’t Contagious Poison ivy and other ...

  12. Jerusalem cherry poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Christmas cherry poisoning; Winter cherry poisoning; Ground cherry poisoning ... The effects of Jerusalem cherry poisoning mostly affect the primarily gastrointestinal (often delayed 8 to10 hours), and central nervous system. This type of poisoning can be very ...

  13. Hemlock (Conium Maculatum) Poisoning In A Child.

    PubMed

    Konca, Capan; Kahramaner, Zelal; Bosnak, Mehmet; Kocamaz, Halil

    2014-03-01

    Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) is a plant that is poisonous for humans and animals. Accidental ingestion of the plant may result in central nervous system depression, respiratory failure, acute rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure and even death. The main treatment of hemlock poisoning is supportive care. The case of a 6-year-old girl who was admitted to the emergency department with complaints of burning sensation in mouth, hypersalivation, tremor in hands and ataxia after ingestion of poison hemlock is presented here with clinical and laboratory features. In this case, we aim to report that accidental ingestion of plants resembling vegetables that are consumed daily can lead to serious complications and even death.

  14. Alterations in gills of Lepomis gibbosus, after acute exposure to several xenobiotics (pesticide, detergent and pharmaceuticals): morphometric and biochemical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Sara; Correia, Alberto T; Antunes, Sara C; Nunes, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    In recent decades, scientific research about the effects of anthropogenic xenobiotics on non-target organisms has increased. Among the likely effects, some studies reported the evaluation of biochemical and morphological changes in specific tissues or organs of fishes, such as gills, which are key organs for the direct action of pollutants in the aquatic environment. This work intended to assess biochemical [oxidative stress/phase II conjugation isoenzymes glutathione S-transferase (GSTs)] and morphological [secondary lamellar length (SLL), secondary lamellar width (SLW), interlamellar distance (ID), basal epithelial thickness (BET) and proportion of the secondary lamellae available for gas exchange (PAGE)] changes in gills, after acute exposure to the pesticide chlorfenvinphos, the detergent sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) and to the anticholinesterasic pharmaceuticals (neostigmine and pyridostigmine). Our results point to a significant, eventually hormetic, effect in the activity of GSTs following exposure to chlorfenvinphos that significantly increased the activity of GSTs at concentration of 0.2 mg/L. The activity of GSTs increased significantly after exposure to 100 mg/L of neostigmine. Considering the morphometric analysis of the gills, the data obtained showed that chlorfenvinphos exerted mainly minor architectural alterations in gills, with the exception of the highest tested concentration of chlorfenvinphos that produced also a slight decrease of the PAGE. The overall conclusions point to a null or negligible toxicity of the selected toxicants towards L. gibbosus, which may be reverted if exposure is withdrawn.

  15. Neurotoxicity of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Keifer, Matthew C; Firestone, Jordan

    2007-01-01

    Several pesticides such as organophosphates, carbamates and the organochlorine pesticides directly target nervous tissue as their mechanism of toxicity. In several others, such as the fumigants, the nervous system is affected by toxicological mechanisms that diffusely affect most or all tissues in the body. Both the central and peripheral nervous system are involved in the acute toxidromes of many pesticides resulting in acute short-term effects. There is strong human epidemiological evidence for persistent nervous system damage following acute intoxication with several important pesticide groups such as organophosphates and certain fumigants. However, whether persistent nervous system damage follows chronic low-level exposure to pesticides in adults (particularly organophosphpates), and whether in utero and/or early childhood exposure leads to persistent nervous system damage, is a subject of study at present. Parkinson's Disease, one of the most common chronic central nervous system diseases, has been linked to pesticide exposure in some studies, but other studies have failed to find an association. Several new pesticidal chemicals such as the neo-nicotinoids and fipronil have central nervous system effects, but only case reports are available to date on acute human intoxications with several of these. Little data are yet available on whether long-term effects result from these chemicals. Several ongoing or recently completed studies should add valuable insight into the effects of pesticides on the human nervous system particularly the effect of low-dose, chronic exposure both in adults and children.

  16. Cholinergic Crisis after Rodenticide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Waseem, Muhammad; Perry, Christopher; Bomann, Scott; Pai, Meena; Gernsheimer, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Rodenticides have historically been common agents in attempted suicides. As most rodenticides in the United States (U.S.) are superwarfarins, these ingestions are generally managed conservatively with close monitoring for coagulopathy, and if necessary, correction of any resulting coagulopathy. However, alternate forms of rodenticides are imported illegally into the U.S. and may be ingested either accidentally or in suicide attempts. We present an unusual case of poisoning by the illegally imported rodenticide, “Tres Pasitos.” The main ingredient of this rat poison is aldicarb, a potent carbamate pesticide that causes fulminant cholinergic crisis. This case is relevant and timely because carbamates and organophosphates are still used as insecticides and emergency physicians (EP) working in rural areas may have to evaluate and manage patients with these poisonings. As international travel and immigration have increased, so has the possibility of encountering patients who have ingested toxic substances from other countries. In addition, there has been increased concern about the possibility of acts of terrorism using chemical substances that cause cholinergic toxidromes.1,2 EPs must be able to recognize and manage these poisonings. This report describes the mechanism of action, clinical manifestations, laboratory evaluation and management of this type of poisoning. The pertinent medical literature on poisoning with aldicarb and similar substances is reviewed. PMID:21293782

  17. Predictors of Morbidity and Mortality in Organophosphorus Poisoning: A Case Study in Rural Hospital in Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Banday, Tanveer Hassan; Tathineni, Bharath; Desai, Mehul Surendra; Naik, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides poisoning can result from occupational, accidental or intentional exposure. Clinical manifestations include cholinergic syndromes, central nervous (CNS) system and cardiovascular disorders. Death is usually due to cardiovascular and respiratory failure. Aim: To evaluate various parameters that can predict outcome of patients in OP poisoning. Materials and Methods: A prospective study conducted in Department of Medicine, Adichunchingiri Institute Of medical Sciences and Research Centre, Karnataka, over period of 1 year. Diagnosis of OP poisoning was based on clinical history of exposure to OP compound and low serum pseudocholinesterase levels. Results: In the present study 133 patients were enrolled, out of which 98.5% were suicidal cases and only 1.5% had accidental exposure. Majority of cases were young male, with F/M ratio 1:3.2. Mortality rates were higher in younger people and in patients who required prolonged ventilator support. The mortality rate was directly proportional to amount of poison consumed, lag time, organ failure (Acute Renal Failure) and plasma pseudocholinesterase levels. Acute complications were frequently noted and were related to morbidity and mortality. No strict relationship was found between liver dysfunction, electrolyte disturbance and clinical outcome. Conclusion: This case study concluded that mortality is directly proportionate to the lag time, amount of OP substances consumed, clinical severity, pseudocholinesterase levels, Acute renal failure and duration of ventilatory support. This study highlights the importance of rapid diagnosis, and initiation of early and effective treatment, which may result in less number complications and also decreases the mortality rates. PMID:26199922

  18. Mechanism for the acute effects of organophosphate pesticides on the adult 5-HT system

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Sarah J.; Savy, Claire Y.; Campbell, Matthew; Dodds, Rebecca; Gomes, Larissa Kruger; Laws, Grace; Watson, Anna; Blain, Peter G.; Morris, Christopher M.; Gartside, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) is involved in mood disorder aetiology and it has been reported that (organophosphate) OP exposure affects 5-HT turnover. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying OP effects on the adult 5-HT system. First, acute in vivo administration of the OP diazinon (0, 1.3, 13 or 39 mg/kg i.p.) to male Hooded Lister rats inhibited the activity of the cholinergic enzyme acetylcholinesterase in blood and in the hippocampus, dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), striatum and prefrontal cortex. Diazinon-induced cholinesterase inhibition was greatest in the DRN, the brain's major source of 5-HT neurones. Second, acute in vivo diazinon exposure (0 or 39 mg/kg i.p.) increased the basal firing rate of DRN neurones measured ex vivo in brain slices. The excitatory responses of DRN neurones to α1-adrenoceptor or AMPA/kainate receptor activation were not affected by in vivo diazinon exposure but the inhibitory response to 5-HT was attenuated, indicating 5-HT1A autoreceptor down-regulation. Finally, direct application of the diazinon metabolite diazinon oxon to naive rat brain slices increased the firing rate of DRN 5-HT neurones, as did chlorpyrifos-oxon, indicating the effect was not unique to diazinon. The oxon-induced augmentation of firing was blocked by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine and the AMPA/kainate glutamate receptor antagonist DNQX. Together these data indicate that 1) acute OP exposure inhibits DRN cholinesterase, leading to acetylcholine accumulation, 2) the acetylcholine activates nicotinic receptors on 5-HT neurones and also on glutamatergic neurones, thus releasing glutamate and activating 5-HT neuronal AMPA/kainate receptors 3) the increase in 5-HT neuronal activity, and resulting 5-HT release, may lead to 5-HT1A autoreceptor down-regulation. This mechanism may be involved in the reported increase in risk of developing anxiety and depression following occupational OP exposure. PMID

  19. Central nervous system function and organophosphate insecticide use among pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Starks, Sarah E; Gerr, Fred; Kamel, Freya; Lynch, Charles F; Jones, Michael P; Alavanja, Michael C; Sandler, Dale P; Hoppin, Jane A

    2011-01-01

    Acute organophosphate (OP) pesticide exposure is associated with adverse central nervous system (CNS) outcomes, however, little is known about the neurotoxicity of chronic exposures that do not result in acute poisoning. To examine associations between long-term pesticide use and CNS function, neurobehavioral (NB) tests were administered to licensed pesticide applicators enrolled in the Agricultural Health Study (AHS) in Iowa and North Carolina. Between 2006 and 2008, 701 male participants completed nine NB tests to assess memory, motor speed and coordination, sustained attention, verbal learning and visual scanning and processing. Data on ever-use and lifetime days of use of 16 OP pesticides were obtained from AHS interviews conducted before testing between 1993 and 2007 and during the NB visit. The mean age of participants was 61 years (SD = 12). Associations between pesticide use and NB test performance were estimated with linear regression controlling for age and outcome-specific covariates. NB test performance was associated with lifetime days of use of some pesticides. Ethoprop was significantly associated with reduced performance on a test of motor speed and visual scanning. Malathion was significantly associated with poor performance on a test of visual scanning and processing. Conversely, we observed significantly better test performance for five OP pesticides. Specifically, chlorpyrifos, coumaphos, parathion, phorate, and tetrachlorvinphos were associated with better verbal learning and memory; coumaphos was associated with better performance on a test of motor speed and visual scanning; and parathion was associated with better performance on a test of sustained attention. Several associations varied by state. Overall, our results do not provide strong evidence that long-term OP pesticide use is associated with adverse CNS-associated NB test performance among this older sample of pesticide applicators. Potential reasons for these mostly null associations

  20. Detergent poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002777.htm Detergent poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Detergents are powerful cleaning products that may contain strong ...

  1. Wax poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Crayons poisoning ... This ingredient is found in: Crayons Candles Canning wax Note: This list may not be all-inclusive. ... If a child eats a small amount of crayon, the wax will pass through the child's system ...

  2. Pokeweed poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... highest amounts of poison are found in the roots, leaves, and stems. Small amounts are in the ... is no guarantee that they are safe. The roots should never be eaten. Symptoms most often appear ...

  3. Yew poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... poisoning occurs when someone eats pieces of this plant. This article is for information only. DO NOT use it ... information: Person's age, weight, and condition Name and part of the plant that was swallowed, if known Time it was ...

  4. Gasoline poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    The poisonous ingredients in gasoline are chemicals called hydrocarbons, which are substances that contain only hydrogen and ... Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ...

  5. Lacquer poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Poisoning from lacquers is due to hydrocarbons, which are substances that contain only hydrogen and carbon. ... Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  6. Menthol poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Menthol is used to add peppermint flavor to candy and other products. It is also used in certain skin lotions and ointments. This article discusses menthol poisoning from swallowing pure menthol. This article is ...

  7. Food poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... at picnics, school cafeterias, large social functions, or restaurants. When germs get into the food, it is ... an unsafe way during preparation in grocery stores, restaurants, or homes. Food poisoning can occur after eating ...

  8. Mistletoe poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002883.htm Mistletoe poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mistletoe is an evergreen plant with white berries. Mistletoe ...

  9. Merthiolate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... once widely used as germ-killer and a preservative in many different products, including vaccines. Merthiolate poisoning ... the throat (endoscopy) to see burns in the food pipe (esophagus) and stomach Chest x-ray EKG ( ...

  10. Successful Use of Hydroxocobalamin and Sodium Thiosulfate in Acute Cyanide Poisoning: A Case Report with Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Sergey; Vaneckova, Manuela; Seidl, Zdenek; Diblik, Pavel; Kuthan, Pavel; Urban, Pavel; Navratil, Tomas; Pelclova, Daniela

    2015-09-01

    Hydroxocobalamin is an effective first-line antidote used mainly in monotherapy of cyanide poisonings, while the opinions are different on the effects of its combination with sodium thiosulfate. A 58-year-old male committed a suicide attempt by ingesting of 1200-1500 mg of potassium cyanide; he was unconscious for 1-1.5 min. after ingestion with the episode of generalized seizures. On admission to the ICU, the patient was acidotic (pH 7.28; HCO3 14.0 mmol/L, base excess -12.7 mmol/L, saturation O2 0.999) with high serum lactate (12.5 mmol/L). Hydroxocobalamin was administered 1.5 hr after ingestion in two subsequent intravenous infusions at a total dose of 7.5 g. The infusion was followed by continuous intravenous administration of 1 mL/hr/kg of 10% sodium thiosulfate at a total dose of 12 g. No complications and adverse reactions were registered. Serum lactate decreased to 0.6 mmol/L the same day, and arterial blood gases became normal (pH 7.49; HCO3 27.2 mmol/L, base excess 2.2 mmol/L, saturation O2 0.994). The follow-up examination 5 months later revealed no damage of basal ganglia and cerebellum on magnetic resonance imaging. The neurological examination revealed no pathological findings. On the ocular coherence tomography, the retinal nerve fibres layer was normal. In visual evoked potentials, there was a normal evoked complex on the left eye and minor decrease in amplitude on the right eye. Combination of hydroxocobalamin and sodium thiosulfate can have a positive effect on the survival without long-term neurological and visual sequelae in the cases of massive cyanide poisonings due to the possibility of a potentiation or synergism of hydroxocobalamin effects by sodium thiosulfate. This synergism can be explained by the different time-points of action of two antidotes: the initial and immediate effect of hydroxocobalamin, followed by the delayed, but more persistent effect of sodium thiosulfate.

  11. The Long-Term Effects of Organophosphates Poisoning as a Risk Factor of CVDs: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Li; Chang, Shih-Yu; Sung, Fung-Chang; Tai, Sally C. W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Organophosphorus pesticides are widely used throughout the world. Because of their ease of availability, organophosphorus compounds are commonly used for self-poisoning in developing countries. The acute effects of exposure to organophosphorus pesticides are well known, but the chronic effects are unclear. Recent studies suggest that abnormalities of the central and peripheral nervous systems persisted for up to 5 years after acute poisoning due to a single large dose of organophosphates (OPs). However, the long-term effects on cardiovascular diseases are poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings An OPs-exposed cohort (N = 7,561) and an age- and gender-matched control cohort (N = 30,244), both identified from the National Health Insurance Research Database, were compared. We utilized the multivariable Cox proportional model to estimate the risks of developing arrhythmia, coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF). The patients with acute poisoning from OPs had higher incidence rates of arrhythmia (5.89 vs. 3.61 per 1,000 person-years), CAD (9.10 vs. 6.88 per 1,000 person-years), and CHF (3.89 vs. 2.98 per 1,000 person-years) compared with that of the non-OPs poisoning cohort, with a crude subhazard ratio (SHR) of 1.40, 1.13, and 1.12, respectively. Additionally, a significantly higher risk of arrhythmia was observed in the OPs poisoning cohort (adjusted SHR = 1.25) compared with the non-OPs poisoning cohort, particularly in male patients (adjusted SHR = 1.33) and those under 49 years of age (adjusted SHR = 3.16). After accounting for the competing risks of death, there was a higher risk of arrhythmia and CAD during a three year follow-up period (adjusted SHR = 1.50 for arrhythmia; adjusted SHR = 1.10 for CAD). We also found an adjusted SHR of 1.36 associated with developing CHF after 6 years of follow-up for OPs poisoning cohort. Conclusions Acute OPs poisoning may continuously impact human health through mechanisms that are

  12. 21 CFR 509.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS UNAVOIDABLE CONTAMINANTS IN ANIMAL FOOD AND FOOD... poisonous or deleterious substance, other than a pesticide chemical, that is also a food additive will be... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances....

  13. 21 CFR 109.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION UNAVOIDABLE CONTAMINANTS IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION AND FOOD... poisonous or deleterious substance, other than a pesticide chemical, that is also a food additive, will be... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances....

  14. Dose-additivity modeling for acute and repeated exposure to a mixture of N-methycarbamate Pesticides

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of N-methylcarbamate pesticides is attributed to the reversible inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) enzymes in the central and peripheral nervous system. The inhibition of ChE following a single exposure to this class of pesticides has been modeled using a dose-additi...

  15. [New causes of animal poisoning in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Schediwy, M; Mevissen, M; Demuth, D; Kupper, J; Naegeli, H

    2015-03-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the frequency, etiology, therapy and prognosis of animal poisoning registered from 2003 to 2012. The relevant cases reported to the Swiss Toxicological Information Center (STIC) were compared with those from previously examined periods. Human medicines not approved for animals and pesticides represented the most common causes of poisoning in dogs. Novel cases occurred as a consequence of the exposure of dogs to ricinus fertilizers, grape residues from wineries, pepper lachrymatory spray and dry bouillon. Cats are still freequently poisoned by pyrethroid drugs that should be administered only to dogs. Agrochmical products are the main source of toxicities in farm animals. Most poisonings in horses and exotic animals took place due to toxic plants. In addition, two tigers died of a secondary poisoning after ingestion of meat from euthanized calves. PMID:26753326

  16. Age and criminal poisonings.

    PubMed

    Stankova, Evgenia; Gesheva, Margarita; Hubenova, Aneta

    2005-01-01

    We present a series of 8 cases of acute combined poisonings, occurred in an identical way in patients over 70 years of age for a period of 6 months. The way of exposure, characteristic of the clinical presentation, complications and the outcome of the intoxications, as well as the therapeutic approach is described. In all of the cases combined drug intoxication with benzodiazepines and opiates have been proved. The impact of the combination of two toxic substances: the first causing rapid and brief suppression of the consciousness and the second, causing prolonged continuation of the already suppressed consciousness, on the clinical course is discussed. The similarities in the circumstances of the exposure, clinical course of the poisonings, the identified toxic substances, lead to the consideration of criminal characteristic of the poisonings. The contact with the corresponding authorities brought off the disclosure of a group of criminals, committed the intentional intoxications with the aim of robbery. Age, with all its various characteristics, has been discussed as a factor for occurrence of criminal poisonings. PMID:16225098

  17. Hyperbaric programs in the United States: Locations and capabilities of treating decompression sickness, arterial gas embolisms, and acute carbon monoxide poisoning: survey results.

    PubMed

    Chin, Walter; Jacoby, Laura; Simon, Olivia; Talati, Nisha; Wegrzyn, Gracelene; Jacoby, Rachelle; Proano, Jacob; Sprau, Susan E; Markovitz, Gerald; Hsu, Rita; Joo, Ellie

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is the primary treatment for arterial gas embolism, decompression sickness and acute carbon monoxide poisoning. Though there has been a proliferation of hyperbaric centers throughout the United States, a scarcity of centers equipped to treat emergency indications makes transport of patients necessary. To locate and characterize hyperbaric chambers capable of treating emergency cases, a survey of centers throughout the entire United States was conducted. Using Google, Yahoo, HyperbaricLink and the UHMS directory, a database for United States chambers was created. Four researchers called clinicians from the database to administer the survey. All centers were contacted for response until four calls went unreturned or a center declined to be included. The survey assessed chamber readiness to respond to high-acuity patients, including staff availability, use of medical equipment such as ventilators and intravenous infusion devices, and responding yes to treating hyperbaric emergencies within a 12-month period. Only 43 (11.9%, N = 361) centers had equipment, intravenous infusion pumps and ventilators, and staff necessary to treat high-acuity patients. Considering that a primary purpose of hyperbaric oxygen therapy is the treatment of arterial gas embolism and decompression sickness, more hyperbaric centers nationwide should be able to accommodate these emergency cases quickly and safely. PMID:27000011

  18. Hyperbaric programs in the United States: Locations and capabilities of treating decompression sickness, arterial gas embolisms, and acute carbon monoxide poisoning: survey results.

    PubMed

    Chin, Walter; Jacoby, Laura; Simon, Olivia; Talati, Nisha; Wegrzyn, Gracelene; Jacoby, Rachelle; Proano, Jacob; Sprau, Susan E; Markovitz, Gerald; Hsu, Rita; Joo, Ellie

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is the primary treatment for arterial gas embolism, decompression sickness and acute carbon monoxide poisoning. Though there has been a proliferation of hyperbaric centers throughout the United States, a scarcity of centers equipped to treat emergency indications makes transport of patients necessary. To locate and characterize hyperbaric chambers capable of treating emergency cases, a survey of centers throughout the entire United States was conducted. Using Google, Yahoo, HyperbaricLink and the UHMS directory, a database for United States chambers was created. Four researchers called clinicians from the database to administer the survey. All centers were contacted for response until four calls went unreturned or a center declined to be included. The survey assessed chamber readiness to respond to high-acuity patients, including staff availability, use of medical equipment such as ventilators and intravenous infusion devices, and responding yes to treating hyperbaric emergencies within a 12-month period. Only 43 (11.9%, N = 361) centers had equipment, intravenous infusion pumps and ventilators, and staff necessary to treat high-acuity patients. Considering that a primary purpose of hyperbaric oxygen therapy is the treatment of arterial gas embolism and decompression sickness, more hyperbaric centers nationwide should be able to accommodate these emergency cases quickly and safely.

  19. Poisons and fever.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Rowsey, P J

    1998-02-01

    1. Dysfunction of the thermoregulatory system is one of many pathologies documented in experimental animals and humans exposed to toxic chemicals. The mechanism of action responsible for many types of poison-induced fevers is not understood. Some elevations in body temperature are attributed to the peripheral actions of some poisons that stimulate metabolic rate and cause a forced hyperthermia. Exposure to organophosphate (OP) pesticides and certain metal fumes appears to cause a prolonged, regulated elevation in body temperature (Tb). 2. Activation of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) and the production of prostaglandin (PG)E2 in central nervous system (CNS) thermoregulatory centres is required to elicit a fever. Activating the COX-PGE2 pathway by a poison may occur by one of three mechanisms: (i) induction of cell-mediated immune responses and the subsequent release of cytokines; (ii) induction of lipid peroxidation in the CNS; and (iii) direct neurochemical activation. 3. Radiotelemetric monitoring of core temperature in unstressed rodents has led to an experimental animal model of poison-induced fever. Rats administered the OP agents chlorpyrifos and diisopropyl fluorophosphate display an initial hypothermic response lasting approximately 24 h, followed by an elevation in diurnal core temperature for 24-72 h after exposure. The hyperthermia is apparently a result of the activation of the COX-PGE2 pathway because it is blocked by the anti-pyretic sodium salicylate. Overall, the delayed hyperthermia resulting from OP exposure involves activation of thermoregulatory pathways that may be similar to infection-mediated fever. PMID:9493505

  20. Shaving cream poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Shaving lotion poisoning ... number will let you talk to experts in poisoning. They will give you further instructions. This is ... should call if you have any questions about poisoning or poison prevention. It does NOT need to ...

  1. Lip moisturizer poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Chapstick poisoning ... number will let you talk to experts in poisoning. They will give you further instructions. This is ... should call if you have any questions about poisoning or poison prevention. It does NOT need to ...

  2. Photographic fixative poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Photographic developer poisoning; Hydroquinone poisoning; Quinone poisoning; Sulfite poisoning ... Hydroquinones Quinones Sodium thiosulfate Sodium sulfite/bisulfite Boric acid Photographic fixative can also break down (decompose) to form sulfur dioxide gas.

  3. Pesticides and healthy public policy.

    PubMed

    Labonte, R N

    1989-01-01

    Despite concern over long-term human and environmental health risks, Canadian and international pesticide use continues to increase. Enormous gaps in pesticide toxicity data persist and, though equivocal, there is mounting evidence that certain pesticide families are carcinogenic. Farmworkers are at greatest risk of pesticide poisoning and long-term health effects, and unions representing farmworkers have initiated a boycott of California grapes to draw attention to the need to reduce pesticide use and improve health and safety conditions. The boycott is a model of "healthy public policy" in action, and can be one element in a public health strategy to reduce significantly pesticide use and promote less toxic alternatives and less chemically dependent forms of agriculture and silviculture. PMID:2790629

  4. Association of Blood Lead Level with Neurological Features in 972 Children Affected by an Acute Severe Lead Poisoning Outbreak in Zamfara State, Northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Jane; Thurtle, Natalie; Cooney, Lauren; Ariti, Cono; Ahmed, Abdulkadir Ola; Ashagre, Teshome; Ayela, Anthony; Chukwumalu, Kingsley; Criado-Perez, Alison; Gómez-Restrepo, Camilo; Meredith, Caitlin; Neri, Antonio; Stellmach, Darryl; Sani-Gwarzo, Nasir; Nasidi, Abdulsalami; Shanks, Leslie; Dargan, Paul I.

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) investigated reports of high mortality in young children in Zamfara State, Nigeria, leading to confirmation of villages with widespread acute severe lead poisoning. In a retrospective analysis, we aimed to determine venous blood lead level (VBLL) thresholds and risk factors for encephalopathy using MSF programmatic data from the first year of the outbreak response. Methods and Findings We included children aged ≤5 years with VBLL ≥45 µg/dL before any chelation and recorded neurological status. Odds ratios (OR) for neurological features were estimated; the final model was adjusted for age and baseline VBLL, using random effects for village of residence. 972 children met inclusion criteria: 885 (91%) had no neurological features; 34 (4%) had severe features; 47 (5%) had reported recent seizures; and six (1%) had other neurological abnormalities. The geometric mean VBLLs for all groups with neurological features were >100 µg/dL vs 65.9 µg/dL for those without neurological features. The adjusted OR for neurological features increased with increasing VBLL: from 2.75, 95%CI 1.27–5.98 (80–99.9 µg/dL) to 22.95, 95%CI 10.54–49.96 (≥120 µg/dL). Neurological features were associated with younger age (OR 4.77 [95% CI 2.50–9.11] for 1–<2 years and 2.69 [95%CI 1.15–6.26] for 2–<3 years, both vs 3–5 years). Severe neurological features were seen at VBLL <105 µg/dL only in those with malaria. Interpretation Increasing VBLL (from ≥80 µg/dL) and age 1–<3 years were strongly associated with neurological features; in those tested for malaria, a positive test was also strongly associated. These factors will help clinicians managing children with lead poisoning in prioritising therapy and developing chelation protocols. PMID:24740291

  5. Scombroid Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Lerke, Peter A.; Werner, S. Benson; Taylor, Stephen L.; Guthertz, Linda S.

    1978-01-01

    An outbreak of scombroid poisoning occurred in San Francisco in the fall of 1977. The vehicle was sashimi prepared from spoiled tuna fish. Prompt public health measures prevented further consumption of the implicated food. Laboratory studies showed the presence in the tuna of bacterial species capable of producing large amounts of histamine, a substance strongly implicated in scombroid poisoning. Chemical analysis showed that histamine is very unevenly distributed in the flesh of spoiling tuna, therefore accounting for the sometimes random occurrence of disease among people eating the same food at the same table. PMID:569397

  6. Carbofuran poisoning detected by mass spectrometry of butyrylcholinesterase adduct in human serum.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Ricordel, Ivan; Tong, Larry; Schopfer, Lawrence M; Baud, Frédéric; Mégarbane, Bruno; Maury, Eric; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2009-03-01

    Carbofuran is a pesticide whose acute toxicity is due to inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) in plasma is inhibited by carbofuran and serves as a biomarker of poisoning by carbofuran. The goal was to develop a method to positively identify poisoning by carbofuran. Sera from an attempted murder and an attempted suicide were analyzed for the presence of carbofuran adducts on BChE. The BChE from 1 ml of serum was rapidly purified on a 0.2 ml procainamide-Sepharose column. Speed was essential because the carbofuran-BChE adduct decarbamylates with a half-life of about 2 h. The partially purified BChE was boiled to denature the protein, thus stopping decarbamylation and making the protein vulnerable to digestion with trypsin. The labeled peptide was partially purified by HPLC before analysis by LC/MS/MS in the multiple reaction monitoring mode on the QTRAP 2000 mass spectrometer. Carbofuran was found to be covalently bound to Ser 198 of human BChE in serum samples from two poisoning cases. Multiple reaction monitoring triggered MS/MS spectra positively identified the carbofuran-BChE adduct. In conclusion a mass spectrometry method to identify carbofuran poisoning in humans has been developed. The method uses 1 ml of serum and detects low-level exposure associated with as little as 20% inhibition of plasma butyrylcholinesterase.

  7. [Arsenic poisoning: a special gastroenteritis...].

    PubMed

    Ganster, F; Kuteifan, K; Mootien, Y; Harry, P; Guiot, P

    2009-06-01

    Arsenic (As) intoxication is nowadays extremely rare. Two cases of acute and chronic As criminal poisoning leading to death of a couple of retired people, are reported. Clinical presentation was simulating a gastro-enteritidis with fast evolution to refractory shock. Toxicological analysis confirmed this diagnostic, with respectively blood As concentrations at 579 and 21 765 microg/l for our two patients.

  8. Acute Poisonings from Synthetic Cannabinoids - 50 U.S. Toxicology Investigators Consortium Registry Sites, 2010-2015.

    PubMed

    Riederer, Anne M; Campleman, Sharan L; Carlson, Robert G; Boyer, Edward W; Manini, Alex F; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that acute intoxications by synthetic cannabinoids are increasing in the United States (1,2). Synthetic cannabinoids, which were research compounds in the 1980s, are now produced overseas; the first shipment recognized to contain synthetic cannabinoids was seized at a U.S. border in 2008 (3). Fifteen synthetic cannabinoids are Schedule I controlled substances (3), but enforcement is hampered by the continual introduction of new chemical compounds (1,3). Studies of synthetic cannabinoids indicate higher cannabinoid receptor binding affinities, effects two to 100 times more potent than Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (the principal psychoactive constituent of cannabis), noncannabinoid receptor binding, and genotoxicity (4,5). Acute synthetic cannabinoid exposure reportedly causes a range of mild to severe neuropsychiatric, cardiovascular, renal, and other effects (4,6,7); chronic use might lead to psychosis (6,8). During 2010-2015, physicians in the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) treated 456 patients for synthetic cannabinoid intoxications; 277 of the 456 patients reported synthetic cannabinoids as the sole toxicologic agent. Among these 277 patients, the most common clinical signs of intoxication were neurologic (agitation, central nervous system depression/coma, and delirium/toxic psychosis). Relative to all cases logged by 50 different sites in the ToxIC Case Registry, there was a statistically significant association between reporting year and the annual proportion of synthetic cannabinoid cases. In 2015, reported cases of synthetic cannabinoid intoxication increased at several ToxIC sites, corroborating reported upward trends in the numbers of such cases (1,2) and underscoring the need for prevention. PMID:27413997

  9. Pesticide Safety for Farmworkers = Uso Seguro de Pesticidas para los Trabajadores del Campo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poli, Bonnie; Fluker, Sam S.

    A booklet for farmworkers and employers uses illustrations and simple text in English and Spanish to inform about the dangers, precautions, and use of pesticides. Topics covered include methods of pesticide absorption; signs/symptoms of pesticide poisoning; first aid; residues; appropriate work clothes; safe and unsafe pesticide practices; how to…

  10. Poison Ivy

    MedlinePlus

    ... poison ivy”. The plant is found around the world, but it usually doesn’t grow in the desert or in high elevations. It usually grows in clusters in the woods, up in trees, and on the ground. Every part of the ...

  11. Paradichlorobenzene poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... level of alertness). Before Calling Emergency Have this information ready: Person's age, weight, and condition (for example, is the person awake or alert?) Name of the product Time it was swallowed Amount swallowed However, DO NOT delay calling ... Poison Control Your local ...

  12. Lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Rekus, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    Construction workers who weld, cut or blast structural steel coated with lead-based paint are at significant risk of lead poisoning. Although technology to control these exposures may not have existed when the lead standard was promulgated, it is available today. Employers who do not take steps to protect their employees from lead exposure may be cited and fined severely for their failure.

  13. Antifreeze poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... breathing machine Chest x-ray CT scan (advanced brain imaging) EKG (electrocardiogram or heart tracing) Intravenous fluids (through a vein) Medicines to reverse the effects of the poison Tube placed ... Sometimes the person will need it for the rest of their life.

  14. Poison Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Safety & Prevention ... Content Article Body Post the Poison Help number 1-800-222-1222 on the emergency list next to every phone in your home and in your cell phone. A toddler or preschooler who vomits may ...

  15. Poison Ivy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ground. It is usually found in groups of many plants and looks like weeds growing from 6 inches ... or anything else that may have touched the plant (like camping, sporting, fishing or hunting gear). If you develop a poison ivy rash, it will go away on its own in 1 to 3 ...

  16. An electrophysiological study of the intermediate syndrome of organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Lorenzoni, Paulo José; Gasparetto, Juliano; Kay, Cláudia Suemi Kamoi; Scola, Rosana Herminia; Werneck, Lineu César

    2010-09-01

    Acute organophosphate (OP) poisoning is commonly seen in emergency medicine. Neurologists must be alert to detect neuromuscular transmission failure and other neurological complications that follow OP poisoning. We report a 37-year-old male with acute OP poisoning to emphasize the electrophysiological abnormalities during the intermediate syndrome (IMS). Motor nerve conduction studies revealed that a single nerve stimulation evoked a repetitive compound muscle action potential, whereas repetitive nerve stimulation resulted in a combination of a decrement-increment pattern and a repetitive fade response. Thus, electrophysiological studies can be used to monitor patients with IMS, and these test results correlate well with clinical findings in acute OP poisoning. PMID:20483619

  17. Glyphosate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bradberry, Sally M; Proudfoot, Alex T; Vale, J Allister

    2004-01-01

    Glyphosate is used extensively as a non-selective herbicide by both professional applicators and consumers and its use is likely to increase further as it is one of the first herbicides against which crops have been genetically modified to increase their tolerance. Commercial glyphosate-based formulations most commonly range from concentrates containing 41% or more glyphosate to 1% glyphosate formulations marketed for domestic use. They generally consist of an aqueous mixture of the isopropylamine (IPA) salt of glyphosate, a surfactant, and various minor components including anti-foaming and colour agents, biocides and inorganic ions to produce pH adjustment. The mechanisms of toxicity of glyphosate formulations are complicated. Not only is glyphosate used as five different salts but commercial formulations of it contain surfactants, which vary in nature and concentration. As a result, human poisoning with this herbicide is not with the active ingredient alone but with complex and variable mixtures. Therefore, It is difficult to separate the toxicity of glyphosate from that of the formulation as a whole or to determine the contribution of surfactants to overall toxicity. Experimental studies suggest that the toxicity of the surfactant, polyoxyethyleneamine (POEA), is greater than the toxicity of glyphosate alone and commercial formulations alone. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that glyphosate preparations containing POEA are more toxic than those containing alternative surfactants. Although surfactants probably contribute to the acute toxicity of glyphosate formulations, the weight of evidence is against surfactants potentiating the toxicity of glyphosate. Accidental ingestion of glyphosate formulations is generally associated with only mild, transient, gastrointestinal features. Most reported cases have followed the deliberate ingestion of the concentrated formulation of Roundup (The use of trade names is for product identification purposes only and

  18. Complications of quinine poisoning.

    PubMed

    Boland, M E; Roper, S M; Henry, J A

    1985-02-16

    Of 165 patients admitted to hospital with acute quinine poisoning 70 (42%) had visual symptoms. 19 were left with a permanent visual deficit, though none was left completely blind. 5 patients died. Bilateral stellate ganglion block was carried out on 34 patients with impaired visual acuity or blindness, but an improvement of symptoms was reported in only 4 cases. It is concluded that stellate ganglion blockade is not effective enough to justify its regular use in quinine-induced amblyopia. Quinine overdose can have serious consequences, and the drug should not be prescribed indiscriminately. PMID:2857431

  19. A drug from poison: how the therapeutic effect of arsenic trioxide on acute promyelocytic leukemia was discovered.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yi; Li, Runhong; Zhang, Daqing

    2013-06-01

    It is surprising that, while arsenic trioxide (ATO) is now considered as "the single most active agent in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL)", the most important discoverer remains obscure and his original papers have not been cited by a single English paper. The discovery was made during the Cultural Revolution when most Chinese scientists and doctors struggled to survive. Beginning with recipes from a countryside practitioner that were vague in applicable diseases, Zhang TingDong and colleagues proposed in the 1970s that a single chemical in the recipe is most effective and that its target is APL. More than 20 years of work by Zhang and colleagues eliminated the confusions about whether and how ATO can be used effectively. Other researchers, first in China and then in the West, followed his lead. Retrospective analysis of data from his own group proved that APL was indeed the most sensitive target. Removal of a trace amount of mercury chloride from the recipe by another group in his hospital proved that only ATO was required. Publication of Western replication in 1998 made the therapy widely accepted, though neither Western, nor Chinese authors of English papers on ATO cited Zhang's papers in the 1970s. This article focuses on the early papers of Zhang, but also suggests it worth further work to validate Chinese reports of ATO treatment of other cancers, and infers that some findings published in Chinese journals are of considerable value to patients and that doctors from other countries can benefit from the clinical experience of Chinese doctors with the largest population of patients.

  20. A drug from poison: how the therapeutic effect of arsenic trioxide on acute promyelocytic leukemia was discovered.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yi; Li, Runhong; Zhang, Daqing

    2013-06-01

    It is surprising that, while arsenic trioxide (ATO) is now considered as "the single most active agent in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL)", the most important discoverer remains obscure and his original papers have not been cited by a single English paper. The discovery was made during the Cultural Revolution when most Chinese scientists and doctors struggled to survive. Beginning with recipes from a countryside practitioner that were vague in applicable diseases, Zhang TingDong and colleagues proposed in the 1970s that a single chemical in the recipe is most effective and that its target is APL. More than 20 years of work by Zhang and colleagues eliminated the confusions about whether and how ATO can be used effectively. Other researchers, first in China and then in the West, followed his lead. Retrospective analysis of data from his own group proved that APL was indeed the most sensitive target. Removal of a trace amount of mercury chloride from the recipe by another group in his hospital proved that only ATO was required. Publication of Western replication in 1998 made the therapy widely accepted, though neither Western, nor Chinese authors of English papers on ATO cited Zhang's papers in the 1970s. This article focuses on the early papers of Zhang, but also suggests it worth further work to validate Chinese reports of ATO treatment of other cancers, and infers that some findings published in Chinese journals are of considerable value to patients and that doctors from other countries can benefit from the clinical experience of Chinese doctors with the largest population of patients. PMID:23645104

  1. Endrin-food-poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, D. E.

    1967-01-01

    Between 3 June and 15 July 1967 four explosive outbreaks of acute poisoning with the insecticide endrin occurred in Doha in Qatar and Hofuf in Saudi Arabia. Altogether 874 persons were hospitalized and 26 died. It is estimated that many others were poisoned whose symptoms were not so severe as to cause them to seek medical care or to enter hospital. The author describes the course of the outbreaks and the measures taken to ascertain their cause and prevent their extension and recurrence. It was found that the victims had eaten bread made from flour contaminated with endrin. In two different ships, both of them loaded and off-loaded at different ports, flour and endrin had been stowed in the same hold, with the endrin above the flour. In both ships the endrin containers had leaked and penetrated the sacks of flour which was later used to make bread. These two unconnected but nearly simultaneous mass poisonings emphasize the importance of regulating the carriage of insecticides and other toxic chemicals in such a way as to prevent the contamination of foodstuffs and similar substances during transport; both the World Health Organization and the Inter-Governmental Maritime Consultative Organization are working towards the establishment of regulations and practices to that end. PMID:5301732

  2. [Superwarfarine Poisoning].

    PubMed

    Freixo, Ana; Lopes, Luís; Carvalho, Manuela; Araújo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The superwarfarin-type anticoagulant rodenticides are used throughout the world and distinguish themselves from warfarin for its high potency and long acting anticoagulant activity. Easy access to these products enables the accidental or deliberate human poisoning. A case of voluntary rodenticide poisoning (RATIBRONÂ) by a woman who ingested an estimated 27.5 mg of bromadiolone total quantity for two weeks, with minor bleeding episodes, whose reversal of the anticoagulant effect with the correction of the abnormal values of the clotting tests took about one month to reverse is reported here. The correction of the haemostasis defects takes usually a long time and there are no treatment guidelines, but a gradually vitamin K dosage reduction, as out patients, along with the monitoring of the International Normalized Ratio levels, allows a safe evaluation of the therapeutic response.

  3. [Superwarfarine Poisoning].

    PubMed

    Freixo, Ana; Lopes, Luís; Carvalho, Manuela; Araújo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The superwarfarin-type anticoagulant rodenticides are used throughout the world and distinguish themselves from warfarin for its high potency and long acting anticoagulant activity. Easy access to these products enables the accidental or deliberate human poisoning. A case of voluntary rodenticide poisoning (RATIBRONÂ) by a woman who ingested an estimated 27.5 mg of bromadiolone total quantity for two weeks, with minor bleeding episodes, whose reversal of the anticoagulant effect with the correction of the abnormal values of the clotting tests took about one month to reverse is reported here. The correction of the haemostasis defects takes usually a long time and there are no treatment guidelines, but a gradually vitamin K dosage reduction, as out patients, along with the monitoring of the International Normalized Ratio levels, allows a safe evaluation of the therapeutic response. PMID:26421794

  4. Is plasma {beta}-glucuronidase a novel human biomarker for monitoring anticholinesterase pesticides exposure? A Malaysian experience

    SciTech Connect

    Inayat-Hussain, Salmaan H. |. E-mail: salmaan@mib.gov.my; Lubis, Syarif Husin; Sakian, Noor Ibrahim Mohamed; Ghazali, Ahmad Rohi; Ali, Noor Suhailah; El Sersi, Magdi; Toong, Lee Mun; Zainal, Awang Mat; Hashim, Suhaimi; Ghazali, Mohd Shariman; Saidin, Mohd Nazri; Rahman, Ab Razak Ab; Rafaai, Mohd Jamil Mohd; Omar, Sollahudin; Rapiai, Rafiah; Othman, Radziah; Chan, Lee Tiong; Johari, Amran; Soon, Wong Hing; Salleh, Abdul Rahim; Satoh, Tetsuo

    2007-03-15

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the effects of acute and chronic pesticide exposure on the plasma {beta}-glucuronidase enzyme activity among five patients of acute pesticide poisoning in Tengku Ampuan Rahimah Hospital, Klang, 230 farmers in the MADA area, Kedah and 49 fishermen in Setiu, Terengganu. The duration of pesticide exposure among the patients was unknown, but the plasma samples from patients were collected on day one in the hospital. The duration of pesticide exposure among the farmers was between 1 and 45 years. The {beta}-glucuronidase activity was compared with plasma cholinesterase activity in the same individual. The plasma cholinesterase activity was measured using Cholinesterase (PTC) Reagent set kit (Teco Diagnostics, UK) based on colorimetric method, while the plasma {beta}-glucuronidase activity was measured fluorometrically based on {beta}-glucuronidase assay. The plasma cholinesterase activity was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) among the patients (1386.786 {+-} 791.291 U/L/min) but the inhibition in plasma cholinesterase activity among the farmers (7346.5 {+-} 1860.786 U/L/min) was not significant (p > 0.05). The plasma {beta}-glucuronidase activity among the farmers was significantly elevated (p < 0.05) (0.737 {+-} 0.425 {mu}M/h) but not significant among the patients (p > 0.05). The plasma cholinesterase activity was positively correlated with the plasma {beta}-glucuronidase activity among the farmers (r = 0.205, p < 0.01) but not among the patients (r = 0.79, p > 0.05). Thus, plasma {beta}-glucuronidase enzyme activity can be measured as a biomarker for the chronic exposure of pesticide. However, further studies need to be performed to confirm whether plasma {beta}-glucuronidase can be a sensitive biomarker for anticholinesterase pesticide poisoning.

  5. Lead poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Landrigan, P J; Todd, A C

    1994-01-01

    Lead poisoning is the most common disease of environmental origin in the United States today. Adult lead poisoning results primarily from exposure by inhalation in the workplace. Pediatric lead poisoning results principally from the ingestion of lead from environmental media, including paint chips, dust, soil, drinking water, ceramics, and medications. Lead is toxic to many organ systems, among them developing erythrocytes, the kidneys, and the nervous system. Lead-induced toxicity to the central nervous system causes delayed development, diminished intelligence, and altered behavior. In young children, this effect has been demonstrated convincingly to occur at blood lead levels between 10 and 20 micrograms per dl. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended that a blood lead level of 10 micrograms per dl or higher be considered evidence of increased lead absorption, and the National Academy of Sciences has concurred in that recommendation. Unresolved issues in need of further study include the frequency of screening young children for lead, the question of whether women should be offered screening for lead before conceiving a pregnancy, the role of x-ray fluorescence analysis in assessing lead in bone, and the appropriate legislative response of the United States government to lead-based paint abatement. PMID:7941534

  6. Influence of exposure to pesticides on serum components and enzyme activities of cytotoxicity among intensive agriculture farmers.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Antonio F; Amparo Gómez, M; Pérez, Vidal; García-Lario, Jose V; Pena, Gloria; Gil, Fernando; López, Olga; Rodrigo, Lourdes; Pino, Guadalupe; Pla, Antonio

    2006-09-01

    Although the effects of acute pesticide poisoning are well known for the pesticides most currently used, hardly any data exist on health effects after long-term low-dose exposures. Major unresolved issues include the effect of moderate exposure in the absence of poisoning. The increased utilization of pesticides other than organophosphates makes it even more difficult to find associations. In this study a cohort of 106 intensive agriculture workers were assessed twice during the course of a spraying season for changes in serum biochemistry, namely enzymes reflecting cytotoxicity (AST, ALT, LDH, CK, and amino-oxidase) and other biochemical parameters, such as markers of nephrotoxicity (urea, creatinine) and lipid profile (cholesterol and triglycerides). Several criteria for estimating pesticide exposure were used, the most important one being serum cholinesterase depression greater than 25% from baseline to peak exposure. Our results revealed an association of pesticide exposure with changes in AST (increased activity), LDH, and amino-oxidase (decreased activity) as well as with changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus (lower and higher levels, respectively). These results provide support for a very slight impairment of the liver function, but overall these findings are consistent with no clinically significant hepatotoxicity. Intriguingly, paraoxonase-1 R allele was found to be an independent predictor of higher rates of AST and lower rates of amino-oxidase, so that it may play a supporting role as an individual marker of susceptibility on pesticide-induced health effects. In conclusion, different biomarkers might be used to detect early biochemical effects of pesticides before adverse clinical health effects occur. PMID:16620808

  7. Clinitest tablets poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Urine sugar reagent poisoning; Anhydrous Benedict's reagent poisoning ... Symptoms of poisoning from Clinitest tablets are: Blood in urine Burns and burning pain in the mouth and throat Collapse Convulsions ...

  8. Mercuric chloride poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mercuric chloride is a very poisonous form of mercury. It is a type of mercury salt. There are different types of mercury poisonings . This article discusses poisoning from swallowing mercuric ...

  9. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  10. Influence of organophosphate poisoning on human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Marina; Koppe, Franziska; Stenger, Bernhard; Brochhausen, Christoph; Schmidt, Annette; Steinritz, Dirk; Thiermann, Horst; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Pohl, Christine

    2013-12-01

    Organophosphourus compounds (OPC, including nerve agents and pesticides) exhibit acute toxicity by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. Lung affections are frequent complications and a risk factor for death. In addition, epidemiological studies reported immunological alterations after OPC exposure. In our experiments we investigated the effects of organophosphourus pesticides dimethoate and chlorpyrifos on dendritic cells (DC) that are essential for the initial immune response, especially in the pulmonary system. DC, differentiated from the monocyte cell line THP-1 by using various cytokines (IL-4, GM-CSF, TNF-α, Ionomycin), were exposed to organophosphourus compounds at different concentrations for a 24h time period. DC were characterized by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence using typical dendritic cell markers (e.g., CD11c, CD209 and CD83). After OPC exposure we investigated cell death, the secretion profile of inflammatory mediators, changes of DC morphology, and the effect on protein kinase signalling pathways. Our results revealed a successful differentiation of THP-1 into DC. OPC exposure caused a significant concentration-dependent influence on DC: Dendrites of the DC were shortened and damaged, DC-specific cell surface markers (i.e., CD83and CD209) decreased dramatically after chlorpyrifos exposure. Interestingly, the effects caused by dimethoate were in general less pronounced. The organophosphourus compounds affected the release of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1ß and IL-8. The anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was significantly down regulated. Protein kinases like the Akt family or ERK, which are essential for cell survival and proliferation, were inhibited by both OPC. These findings indicate that the tested organophosphourus compounds induced significant changes in cell morphology, inhibited anti-inflammatory cytokines and influenced important protein signalling pathways which are involved in regulation of apoptosis. Thus our results highlight

  11. Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC.gov . Lead Home Calendar of Events National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week Archived Materials CDC's Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program Advisory Committee (ACCLPP) Current Activities Blood ...

  12. Protecting Yourself from Poisonous Plants

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIOSH NIOSH Fast Facts: Protecting Yourself from Poisonous Plants Language: English Español (Spanish) Kreyol Haitien (Hatian Creole) ... outdoors is at risk of exposure to poisonous plants, such as poison ivy, poison oak, and poison ...

  13. Pesticides and the Third World.

    PubMed

    Forget, G

    1991-01-01

    Many developing countries are importing industrial processes that make use of toxic chemicals. By the same token, pesticides, which are toxic by design, are also used increasingly in agriculture and in public health programs to control pests and vector-borne diseases. Recent estimates suggest that pesticides account for more than 20,000 fatalities yearly, and that most of these will have occurred in developing countries. This may actually be a gross underreporting. Although organophosphate and carbamate insecticides are still responsible for many of those poisoning cases, herbicides such as paraquat are also increasingly being implicated in fatal poisoning cases. Newer pesticides such as the synthetic derivatives of pyrethrin, which were believed to be relatively safe to humans, now appear to be implicated in some serious cases of intoxication. Community-based pest control using locally available botanical pesticides could have severe consequences unless the toxicity of these compounds is carefully assessed relative to nontarget organisms. A high proportion of pesticide intoxications appear to be due to lack of knowledge, unsafe attitudes, and dangerous practices. The technology available to small farmers for pesticide application is often inappropriate: faulty sprayers, lack of protective equipment adapted to tropical conditions, nonexistent first-aid provisions. Agricultural extension is often not oriented to the transfer of information relative to the dangers inherent in the use of pesticides. The lack of information at all levels may be one of the most important causative factors of chemical intoxication in developing countries. Research should at this time concentrate on behaviors leading to chemical intoxication. This should be done concurrently with proper prospective and retrospective surveys of poisonings in developing country communities. More information should be sought relative to the decision processes of import, legislation, and licensing. Research

  14. Agricultural pesticide use in developing countries: health effects and research needs.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, C; McConnell, R; Partanen, T; Hogstedt, C

    1997-01-01

    Large worker populations in the Third World are exposed to increasing amounts of pesticides, including pesticides severely restricted and banned in industrialized countries. Studies on knowledge, attitudes, and practices indicate that unsafe use of pesticides is the rule in Third World countries. Surveys of acute poisonings show high rates in these countries, despite underregistration. The scarce studies on chronic health outcomes demonstrate neurotoxic, reproductive, and dermatologic effects. Exposure assessment consists mainly of cholinesterase testing, and few studies have quantified dermal and respiratory exposure. The few intervention studies demonstrate the need for evaluation of the impact of preventive measures and policies. There is no evidence that widespread "safe-use" programs have greatly affected exposure and morbidity. It was concluded that research should focus on simple methods for surveillance of exposure and on surveillance of acute illness and its causes in order to develop and evaluate rapid local interventions. Studies on chronic effects should be carried out in selected countries, aiming at long-term and broader interventions. Policies that promote the use of pesticides should be critically evaluated. North-South and South-South research collaborations must be encouraged to address this global health problem.

  15. Influence of body size on swimming performance of four species of neonatal natricine snakes acutely exposed to a cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticide.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, William A; Winne, Christopher T

    2006-05-01

    Locomotor performance is an important fitness-related trait in reptiles because of its potential influence on prey capture and predator avoidance. Because cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides disrupt neuromuscular signaling, reduction in performance seems to be a logical translation of this biochemical disruption to the organism level. In the present study, we compared the swimming performance of four species of natricine snakes acutely exposed to a formulation of carbaryl to determine whether neonatal body size or skin permeability influences responsiveness. Exposure to high concentrations of carbaryl (2.5-5.0 mg/L) resulted in reduced swimming performance in all four species of snakes, and species responded similarly to the pesticide once body size was accounted for allometrically. Using traditional methods in physiological ecology to estimate skin permeability (a parameter that influences the dose of contaminant absorbed), we found that water flux across the integument also scaled allometrically with body surface area and, therefore, was similar among species after controlling for this relationship. We suggest that future studies examining the effects of repeated low-dose exposure to cholinesterase inhibitors on performance parameters will be useful in assessing the ecological significance of our findings.

  16. Russula subnigricans Poisoning: From Gastrointestinal Symptoms to Rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shide; Mu, Maoyuan; Yang, Fangwan; Yang, Chunfei

    2015-09-01

    Wild mushroom poisoning is often reported to cause acute liver or renal failure. However, acute rhabdomyolysis caused by wild mushroom poisoning has rarely been reported. We describe 7 patients of 1 family with Russula subnigricans Hongo poisoning. Their clinical manifestations varied from gastrointestinal symptoms to rhabdomyolysis, with 1 fatality. Our report provides supporting evidence that rhabdomyolysis may result from ingestion of R subnigricans mushrooms. A key to survival for patients with rhabdomyolysis caused by R subnigricans poisoning may be early recognition and intensive supportive care.

  17. Management of carbon monoxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Ilano, A L; Raffin, T A

    1990-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is a major cause of illness and death in the United States. Most cases result from exposure to the internal combustion engine and to stoves burning fossil fuels. Most cases of accidental exposure are preventable if proper precautions are taken; however, when cases arise, their presenting signs and symptoms are nonspecific and often lead to a misdiagnosis resembling a flu-like viral illness. As a result, the incidence of acute CO poisoning is underestimated. The effects of CO poisoning are due to tissue hypoxia, with the CNS and the heart being the most susceptible target organs due to their high oxygen needs. Prolonged hypoxia due to high CO levels may lead to cardiac arrhythmias or arrest (or both) and a variety of neurologic sequelae. Treatment is directed toward the relief of tissue hypoxia and the removal of CO from the body. Severity of poisoning can be divided into three levels based on CO levels in the blood. Administration of normobaric 100 percent oxygen is the therapy of choice for most cases, while hyperbaric oxygen therapy is reserved for severe poisonings.

  18. Organophosphate pesticides-induced changes in the redox status of rat tissues and protective effects of antioxidant vitamins.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vibhuti; Srivastava, Nalini

    2015-04-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) pesticides are among the most toxic synthetic chemicals purposefully added in the environment. The common use of OP insecticides in public health and agriculture results in an environmental pollution and a number of acute and chronic poisoning events. Present study was aimed to evaluate the potential of monocrotophos and quinalphos to effect the redox status and glutathione (GSH) homeostasis in rat tissues and find out whether antioxidant vitamins have some protection on the pesticide-induced alterations. The results showed that these pesticides alone or in combination, caused decrease in the levels of GSH and the corresponding increase in the levels of GSSG, decreasing the GSH/GSSG ratio. The results also showed that NADPH/NADP(+) and NADH/NAD(+) ratios were decreased in the liver and brain of rats on exposure with mococrotophos, quinalphos, and their mixture. These pesticides, alone or in combination, caused alterations in the activities of GSH reductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the rat tissues. However, the expression of the GSH recycling enzymes did not show significant alterations as compared to control. From the results, it can be concluded that these pesticides generate oxidative stress but their effects were not synergistic when given together and prior feeding of antioxidant vitamins tend to reduce the toxicities of these pesticides.

  19. Pesticide Acute Toxicity Is a Better Correlate of U.S. Grassland Bird Declines than Agricultural Intensification

    PubMed Central

    Mineau, Pierre; Whiteside, Mélanie

    2013-01-01

    Common agricultural birds are in decline, both in Europe and in North America. Evidence from Europe suggests that agricultural intensification and, for some species, the indirect effects of pesticides mediated through a loss of insect food resource is in part responsible. On a state-by-state basis for the conterminous Unites States (U.S.), we looked at several agronomic variables to predict the number of grassland species increasing or declining according to breeding bird surveys conducted between 1980 and 2003. Best predictors of species declines were the lethal risk from insecticide use modeled from pesticide impact studies, followed by the loss of cropped pasture. Loss of permanent pasture or simple measures of agricultural intensification such as the proportion of land under crop or the proportion of farmland treated with herbicides did not explain bird declines as well. Because the proportion of farmland treated with insecticides, and more particularly the lethal risk to birds from the use of current insecticides feature so prominently in the best models, this suggests that, in the U.S. at least, pesticide toxicity to birds should be considered as an important factor in grassland bird declines. PMID:23437392

  20. House of Poison: Poisons in the Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Rosanne

    One of a series of instructional materials produced by the Literacy Council of Alaska, this booklet provides information about common household poisons. Using a simplified vocabulary and shorter sentences, it provides statistics concerning accidental poisonings; a list of the places poisons are usually found in the home; steps to make the home…

  1. Pesticide-related illness among migrant farm workers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Das, R; Steege, A; Baron, S; Beckman, J; Harrison, R

    2001-01-01

    Surveillance data show that pesticide-related illness is an important cause of acute morbidity among migrant farm workers in California. A few categories (organophosphates and carbamates, inorganic compounds, and pyrethroids) account for over half of the cases of acute illness. Skin effects dominate the illnesses, although ocular and systemic effects are also common. Exposures occur in various ways (e.g., residues, drift), suggesting that the use of pesticides creates a hazardous work environment for all farm workers. The health care system provided through the Migrant Health Program appears to be underutilized, partially due to barriers to health care access. Pesticide hazards should be ranked based on acute toxicity, chronic toxicity (including reproductive risks), carcinogenic potency, volume applied, and magnitude of worker poisonings. Current surveillance effort should be supported. Risk prevention should focus on substitution of safer compounds, establishing effective protections, and ensuring that these measures are enforced. Improved education for health care providers should be a priority. Growers should be educated about alternative forms of pest control and incentives should be provided to encourage their use. PMID:11783860

  2. Prevention of Food Poisoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Quartermaster School, Ft. Lee, VA.

    The programed text provides a single lesson, four-hour, correspondence subcourse on the prevention of food poisoning. It covers the following areas: a definition of food poisoning; chemical food poisoning; biological food poisoning; causes and prevention of trichinosis; six factors controlling bacteria growth; bacterial infection; prevention of…

  3. Poisons information in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chao, T C; Tay, M K; Bloodworth, B C; Lim, K H

    1993-03-01

    The Poisons Information Centre (PIC) provides viral and timely information to prevent and manage poisoning episodes. Comprehensive information on household, agricultural and industrial chemicals, natural toxins, pharmaceuticals, local antidote stocks and local poisons experts is retrieved from the Centre's computerised information system and printed literature. Public subscribers can obtain poisons information through Teleview.

  4. Recent advances in evaluation of oxime efficacy in nerve agent poisoning by in vitro analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Worek, F. . E-mail: FranzWorek@Bundeswehr.org; Eyer, P.; Aurbek, N.; Szinicz, L.; Thiermann, H.

    2007-03-15

    The availability of highly toxic organophosphorus (OP) warfare agents (nerve agents) underlines the necessity for an effective medical treatment. Acute OP toxicity is primarily caused by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Reactivators (oximes) of inhibited AChE are a mainstay of treatment, however, the commercially available compounds, obidoxime and pralidoxime, are considered to be rather ineffective against various nerve agents, e.g. soman and cyclosarin. This led to the synthesis and investigation of numerous oximes in the past decades. Reactivation of OP-inhibited AChE is considered to be the most important reaction of oximes. Clinical data from studies with pesticide-poisoned patients support the assumption that the various reactions between AChE, OP and oxime, i.e. inhibition, reactivation and aging, can be investigated in vitro with human AChE. In contrast to animal experiments such in vitro studies with human tissue enable the evaluation of oxime efficacy without being affected by species differences. In the past few years numerous in vitro studies were performed by different groups with a large number of oximes and methods were developed for extrapolating in vitro data to different scenarios of human nerve agent poisoning. The present status in the evaluation of new oximes as antidotes against nerve agent poisoning will be discussed.

  5. The essential role of a poison center in handling an outbreak of barium carbonate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Deng, J F; Jan, I S; Cheng, H S

    1991-04-01

    Acute barium salt poisoning may cause acute hypokalemia and result in respiratory paralysis and ventricular tachyarrhythmias. The early nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms of barium poisoning due to food contamination could be confused with other benign food poisonings. Early diagnosis and initiation of intensive supportive care is essential. We report an outbreak of acute barium carbonate poisoning, occurring at a family reunion party, which resulted in 9 hospital admissions. All of the victims initially developed nausea, vomiting, abdominal colic, dizziness and watery diarrhea followed by numbness of the face and distal extremities 1-2 h after ingesting fried flour-coated sweet potatoes. The flour was later confirmed to be contaminated with barium carbonate. One person died in the emergency room with a serum potassium level of 0.8 mEq/L. Two other victims developed ventricular tachycardia and respiratory paralysis but completely recovered with the treatment advice provided by the poison center. The poison center was successful in helping to make the correct diagnosis in a timely manner, immediately distribute the treatment protocol, and coordinate the laboratory confirmation of barium carbonate poisoning.

  6. Neurotoxic marine poisoning.

    PubMed

    Isbister, Geoffrey K; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2005-04-01

    Marine poisoning results from the ingestion of marine animals that contain toxic substances and causes substantial illness in coastal regions. Three main clinical syndromes of marine poisoning have important neurological symptoms-ciguatera, tetrodotoxin poisoning, and paralytic shellfish poisoning. Ciguatera is the commonest syndrome of marine poisoning and is characterised by moderate to severe gastrointestinal effects (vomiting, diarrhoea, and abdominal cramps) and neurological effects (myalgia, paraesthesia, cold allodynia, and ataxia), but is rarely lethal. Tetrodotoxin poisoning and paralytic shellfish poisoning are less common but have a higher fatality rate than ciguatera. Mild gastrointestinal effects and a descending paralysis are characteristic of these types of poisoning. In severe poisoning, paralysis rapidly progresses to respiratory failure. Diagnosis of all types of marine poisoning is made from the circumstances of ingestion (type of fish and location) and the clinical effects. Because there are no antidotes, supportive care, including mechanical ventilation in patients with severe paralysis, is the mainstay of treatment.

  7. Recent Advances in the Clinical Management of Lead Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kianoush, Sina; Sadeghi, Mahmood; Balali-Mood, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Lead poisoning is a historic universal disease. Acute or chronic lead exposure may cause reversible or even permanent damages in human beings. Environmental lead exposure is a global health concern in children. Occupational lead poisoning is still a health issue, particularly in developing countries. During the last decades, new methods and medications have been advocated for the prevention and treatment of lead poisoning. This review deals mainly with recent developments in the management of lead poisoning. Sources of lead exposure are introduced, and methods for the primary prevention of lead poisoning are discussed. Details for the screening of adults and children are also explained to serve as a practical guideline for the secondary prevention. Standard chelation therapy in different groups and up-to-date less toxic new medications for the treatment of lead poisoning are finally discussed. Our published clinical research on the therapeutic effects of garlic tablets in mild to moderate occupational lead poisoning will also be discussed.

  8. [Arsenic - Poison or medicine?].

    PubMed

    Kulik-Kupka, Karolina; Koszowska, Aneta; Brończyk-Puzoń, Anna; Nowak, Justyna; Gwizdek, Katarzyna; Zubelewicz-Szkodzińska, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is commonly known as a poison. Only a few people know that As has also been widely used in medicine. In the past years As and its compounds were used as a medicine for the treatment of such diseases as diabetes, psoriasis, syphilis, skin ulcers and joint diseases. Nowadays As is also used especially in the treatment of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has recognized arsenic as an element with carcinogenic effect evidenced by epidemiological studies, but as previously mentioned it is also used in the treatment of neoplastic diseases. This underlines the specificity of the arsenic effects. Arsenic occurs widely in the natural environment, for example, it is present in soil and water, which contributes to its migration to food products. Long exposure to this element may lead to liver damages and also to changes in myocardium. Bearing in mind that such serious health problems can occur, monitoring of the As presence in the environmental media plays a very important role. In addition, the occupational risk of As exposure in the workplace should be identified and checked. Also the standards for As presence in food should be established. This paper presents a review of the 2015 publications based on the Medical database like PubMed and Polish Medical Bibliography. It includes the most important information about arsenic in both forms, poison and medicine.

  9. Trends of Pesticide Exposure and Related Cases in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jinky Leilanie; Cosca, Katherine Z.; Del mundo, Jocelyn

    2010-01-01

    The study aims to provide a comprehensive trend of pesticide poisoning cases in the Philippines as well as pesticide exposures, and risk factors related to the adverse effects of pesticide. Records were gathered from the National Poison Control and Management Center (NPCMC), the Philippine General Hospital, De La Salle Medical Center, and other hospitals, and reviewed research studies conducted in the Philippines. Based on hospital surveys, the number of pesticide cases as well as mortality trends have been increasing. Studies from 2006 to 2010 showed that human health especially those of the farmers is at risk due to pesticide exposure. Illnesses and symptoms such as headache, skin abnormalities, fatigue, fever, and weaknesses were the common health complaints experienced by the farmers as reported in the research studies. Moreover, the studies showed risk factors to pesticide exposure, work practices, and pesticide residues in environmental media that could be contributory to pesticide poisoning cases. Government agencies should intensify their surveillance and regulation on both household and agricultural pesticides. The state of pesticide-related illnesses mirrors the poor safety practices among farmers as well as lack of necessary supervision from the government agencies. PMID:25649374

  10. [Subacute arsenic poisoning].

    PubMed

    Ghariani, M; Adrien, M L; Raucoules, M; Bayle, J; Jacomet, Y; Grimaud, D

    1991-01-01

    A cas is reported of a 23-year-old man who voluntarily took a massive dose of arsenic (at least 8 g). In spite of the ingested amount and the acute nature of the poisoning, the patient survived 8 days. Gastrointestinal, neurologic and cardiac features were predominant including nausea, vomiting, choleroid diarrhoea, encephalopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and finally a fatal toxic cardiomyopathy. Metabolic acidosis, moderate cytolysis and an anticoagulant effect were also observed. This unique characteristic was partly due to a circulating anticoagulant with prothrombinase activity, as well as direct antivitamin K activity. Postmortem examination revealed: a congestive oesophagitis; a necrosing gastritis involving all the stomach wall; diffuse hepatic steatosis; skin lesions with vascular congestion and dermoepidermal detachment; discrete subepicardial congestive lesions. Arsenic was found in all tissues.

  11. Lindane poisonings.

    PubMed

    Davies, J E; Dedhia, H V; Morgade, C; Barquet, A; Maibach, H I

    1983-02-01

    One percent lindane, widely used to treat scabies and pediculosis, presents toxicologic problems when used excessively. A 16-year-old mentally retarded boy accidentally ingested approximately 392 g of 1% lindane shampoo and recovered. A 2-month-old, 4.5-kg, male infant was found dead in his crib after excessive application of a 1% lindane lotion. In the former patient, initial serum levels of lindane were 206 parts per billion (ppb) declining to 1.0 ppb after 25 days. In the latter, lindane was identified in the brain at a concentration of 110 ppb. Brain levels of lindane were three times greater than the levels found in the blood. Although the relationship of this pesticide exposure to the fatal outcome in the second case was conjectural, it was illustrative of the problem of interpreting CNS events that occur shortly after excessive exposure to this insecticide.

  12. A systematic review of aluminium phosphide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Mehrpour, Omid; Jafarzadeh, Mostafa; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2012-03-01

    Every year, about 300,000 people die because of pesticide poisoning worldwide. The most common pesticide agents are organophosphates and phosphides, aluminium phosphide (AlP) in particular. AlP is known as a suicide poison that can easily be bought and has no effective antidote. Its toxicity results from the release of phosphine gas as the tablet gets into contact with moisture. Phosphine gas primarily affects the heart, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and kidneys. Poisoning signs and symptoms include nausea, vomiting, restlessness, abdominal pain, palpitation, refractory shock, cardiac arrhythmias, pulmonary oedema, dyspnoea, cyanosis, and sensory alterations. Diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion, positive silver nitrate paper test to phosphine, and gastric aspirate and viscera biochemistry. Treatment includes early gastric lavage with potassium permanganate or a combination with coconut oil and sodium bicarbonate, administration of charcoal, and palliative care. Specific therapy includes intravenous magnesium sulphate and oral coconut oil. Moreover, acidosis can be treated with early intravenous administration of sodium bicarbonate, cardiogenic shock with fluid, vasopresor, and refractory cardiogenic shock with intra-aortic baloon pump or digoxin. Trimetazidine may also have a useful role in the treatment, because it can stop ventricular ectopic beats and bigeminy and preserve oxidative metabolism. This article reviews the epidemiological, toxicological, and clinical/pathological aspects of AlP poisoning and its management.

  13. Amatoxin-containing mushroom (Lepiota brunneoincarnata) familial poisoning.

    PubMed

    Varvenne, David; Retornaz, Karine; Metge, Prune; De Haro, Luc; Minodier, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Serious to fatal toxicity may occur with amanitin-containing mushrooms ingestions. A Lepiota brunneoincarnata familial poisoning with hepatic toxicity is reported. In such poisonings, acute gastroenteritis may be firstly misdiagnosed leading to delay in preventing liver dysfunction by silibinin or penicillin G. Mushroom picking finally requires experience and caution.

  14. Pesticide illness, farm practices, and neurological symptoms among farm residents in Colorado.

    PubMed

    Stallones, Lorann; Beseler, Cheryl

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association between pesticides and neurological symptoms among a population exposed to organophosphate chemicals as a result of agricultural use. Chronic sequelae of acute pesticide poisoning from organophosphate compounds include a variety of neurological symptoms including restlessness, irritability, and trouble sleeping. Individuals who have had an acute pesticide poisoning have been reported to suffer a wide range of neurological symptoms that occur from weeks to months after the initial episode. Data for this study came from a cross-sectional survey of farmers and their spouses conducted in an eight-county area in north-eastern Colorado. Neurological characteristics were assessed to determine their relationship with previously reported pesticide-related illnesses. Symptoms that were significantly associated with a previous poisoning were difficulty concentrating [OR 2.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22, 3.50]; relatives noticing person had trouble remembering things (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.47, 4.39); making notes to remember things (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.20, 3.97); finding it hard to understand the meaning of newspapers, magazines, and books (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.01, 3.60); felt irritable (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.08, 3.12); felt depressed (OR 2.82, 95% CI 1.65, 4.81); had heart palpitations without exertion (OR 2.83, 95% CI 1.22, 6.54); sleeping more than usual (OR 3.58, 95% CI 1.95, 6.58); difficulty moving fingers or grasping things (OR 2.08, 95% CI 1.06, 3.24); and headaches at least once a week (OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.06, 3.24). Stepwise regression was used to identify the best explanatory model of pesticide-related illness. Variables that were associated with increased odds of illness were being male, being depressed, sleeping too much, and using crop organophosphates.

  15. Antimicrobial Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... menu Learn the Issues Air Chemicals and Toxics Climate Change Emergencies Greener Living Health and Safety Land and Cleanup Pesticides Waste Water Science & Technology Air Climate Change Ecosystems Health Land, Waste and Cleanup Pesticides Substances ...

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for carbon monoxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Lindell K

    2014-01-01

    Despite established exposure limits and safety standards, and the availability of carbon monoxide (CO) alarms, each year 50,000 people in the United States visit emergency departments for CO poisoning. Carbon monoxide poisoning can occur from brief exposures to high levels of CO, or from longer exposures to lower levels. Common symptoms include headaches, nausea and vomiting, dizziness, general malaise, and altered mental status. Some patients may have chest pain, shortness of breath and myocardial ischemia, and may require mechanical ventilation and treatment of shock. Individuals poisoned by CO often go on to develop neurological problems, including cognitive sequelae, anxiety and depression, persistent headaches, dizziness, sleep problems, motor weakness, vestibular and balance problems, gaze abnormalities, peripheral neuropathies, hearing loss, tinnitus and Parkinsonian-like syndrome. While breathing oxygen hastens the removal of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb), hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) hastens COHb elimination and favorably modulates inflammatory processes instigated by CO poisoning, an effect not observed with breathing normobaric oxygen. Hyperbaric oxygen improves mitochondrial function, inhibits lipid peroxidation transiently, impairs leukocyte adhesion to injured microvasculature, and reduces brain inflammation caused by the CO-induced adduct formation of myelin basic protein. Based upon three supportive randomized clinical trials in humans and considerable evidence from animal studies, HBO2 should be considered for all cases of acute symptomatic CO poisoning. Hyperbaric oxygen is indicated for CO poisoning complicated by cyanide poisoning, often concomitantly with smoke inhalation.

  17. Incidence of animal poisoning cases in the Czech Republic: current situation

    PubMed Central

    Modrá, Helena; Svobodová, Zdeňka

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the most frequent cases of poisoning in farm animals, horses, cats, dogs, wild animals, fish and honey-bees in the Czech Republic. At present, there are fewer cases of acute poisoning caused by high doses of toxic substances but there are more and more cases of chronic poisoning as a consequence of environmental pollution. PMID:21217846

  18. Arsenic poisoning. Ongoing diagnostic and social problem.

    PubMed

    Fuortes, L

    1988-01-01

    Arsenic, commonly found in insecticides, herbicides, and industrial materials, is involved in the majority of heavy metal poisonings reported in the United States. Accidental poisoning appears to be most common in the pediatric age-group, whereas intentional and covert poisonings predominate in adults. Diagnosis is often difficult. The clinical presentations of arsenic poisoning, both acute and chronic types, represent a wide spectrum, largely dependent on route of exposure, chemical form, and dose. Because the patient or others providing the history may suppress information on exposure and because toxic levels of arsenic in the system drop rapidly in the first 24 hours, swift administration of diagnostic tests is important. Physician follow-up is determined by the route of exposure to arsenic and may involve referral to a social service network or a mental health facility.

  19. Pesticide Safety for Non-Certified Mixers, Loaders and Applicators = Uso Seguro de Pesticidas para Mezcladores, Cargadores y Aplicadores no Certificados.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poli, Bonnie; Fluker, Sam S.

    Written in English and Spanish and completely illustrated, this manual provides basic safety information for pesticide workers. Mixers, loaders, and applicators work with pesticides at their greatest strength and have the highest risk of poisoning. Understanding the pesticide label is the first step to pesticide safety. The words…

  20. Contamination of the freshwater ecosystem by pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, Oliver B.

    1966-01-01

    A large part of our disquieting present-day pesticide problem is intimately tied to the freshwater ecosystem. Economic poisons are used in so many types of terrain to control so many kinds of organisms that almost all lakes and streams are likely to be contaminated. In addition to accidental contamination many pesticides are deliberately applied directly to fresh waters for suppression of aquatic animals or plants. The problem is intensified because of the extreme susceptibility of freshwater organisms. The complexity of freshwater environments and their variety makes it difficult to comprehend the total effect of pesticides.

  1. Hepatic venoocclusive disease and perisinusoidal fibrosis secondary to arsenic poisoning.

    PubMed

    Labadie, H; Stoessel, P; Callard, P; Beaugrand, M

    1990-10-01

    Hepatic injury secondary to arsenic poisoning has been known long but is poorly documented. A case of a patient with hepatic injury following severe arsenic poisoning is reported. Histological study of the liver demonstrated acute venoocclusive disease and perisinusoidal fibrosis. This case indicates that arsenic poisoning causes veno-occlusive disease in humans. It also suggests that hepatic damage in arsenic poisoning is secondary to vascular endothelial injury and supports the hypothesis that different patterns of hepatic vascular injury might proceed from a common mechanism.

  2. Arsenic: the forgotten poison?

    PubMed

    Barton, E N; Gilbert, D T; Raju, K; Morgan, O S

    1992-03-01

    Chronic arsenic poisoning is an uncommon cause of peripheral neuropathy in Jamaica. A patient with this disorder is described. The insidious nature of chronic arsenic poisoning, with its disabling complications, is emphasised.

  3. Household glue poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... SW, Burns MJ, eds. Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management of Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 94. Zosel AE. General approach to the poisoned patient. In: Adams JG, ...

  4. Hand lotion poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002708.htm Hand lotion poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hand lotion poisoning occurs when someone swallows hand lotion or ...

  5. Bubble bath soap poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002762.htm Bubble bath soap poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bubble bath soap poisoning occurs when someone swallows bubble bath soap. ...

  6. Furniture polish poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... eyes, or ears Severe stomach pain Throat swelling Vomiting, possibly bloody Blood in your stools If the poison touched your skin or eyes you may have: Skin burns and irritation Vision loss If the poison is ...

  7. Potassium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    This article discusses poisoning from swallowing or touching potassium hydroxide or products that contain this chemical. This article is for information only. Do NOT use it to treat or manage an actual poison exposure. If ...

  8. Toluene and xylene poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Xylene poisoning ... Below are symptoms of toluene and xylene poisoning in different parts of the body. EYES, EARS, NOSE, AND THROAT Blurred vision Burning pain Hearing loss STOMACH AND INTESTINES Bloody stools Abdominal ...

  9. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... them in. The most common symptoms of CO poisoning are Headache Dizziness Weakness Nausea Vomiting Chest pain ... often hard to tell if someone has CO poisoning, because the symptoms may be like those of ...

  10. Cold wave lotion poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Thioglycolate poisoning ... Below are symptoms of cold wave lotion poisoning in different parts of the body. EYES, EARS, NOSE, AND THROAT Mouth irritation Burning and redness of the eyes Possibly serious damage to ...

  11. Boric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Borax poisoning ... The main symptoms of boric acid poisoning are blue-green vomit, diarrhea, and a bright red rash on the skin. Other symptoms may include: Blisters Collapse Coma Convulsions Drowsiness ...

  12. Hair bleach poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002702.htm Hair bleach poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hair bleach poisoning occurs when someone swallows hair bleach or ...

  13. Plant fertilizer poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Plant fertilizers and household plant foods are used to improve plant growth. Poisoning can occur if someone swallows these products. Plant fertilizers are mildly poisonous if small amounts are swallowed. ...

  14. Bracken fern poisoning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum) is found throughout the world and enzootic hematuria, bright blindness, and bracken staggers. This chapter reviews the plant, the various poisoning syndrome that it produces, the current strategies to prevent poisoning, and recommended treatments....

  15. Ciguatera Fish Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... By Syndrome Life Cycle Impacts Human Health Wildlife Ecosystems Socioeconomic Freshwater Regions Distribution - U.S. Distribution - World Maps ... Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning Cyanobacteria Medical Community ... Fish Poisoning Causative organisms: Gambierdiscus ...

  16. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe ... discusses poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do ...

  17. [Natural toxin poisoning].

    PubMed

    Tsunematsu, Satoshi

    2012-08-01

    Natural toxin poisoning often occurs when amateur who has no expert knowledge of food collects and cooks the wrong material. In many cases, the symptoms of natural toxin poisoning are mild and the patients recover from illness within a day. However, if the patients have respiratory or neurological symptoms after several hours of intake, the patients must go to hospital immediately. Mushroom poisoning is often reported and puffer fish poisoning is sometimes reported in Japan.

  18. Pesticide personal protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Branson, D H; Sweeney, M

    1991-01-01

    A fairly large established data base provides information on clothing worn by U.S. and Canadian farmers to work with pesticides, their attitudes and beliefs about pesticide risk, and clothing as a dermal barrier. Very limited similar data are available for farmers in less developed countries. Clearly, farmers perceive the benefits of pesticides to far exceed any risks. While few report poisoning symptoms, most believe that their usual work clothing offers a sufficient pesticide barrier, and few wear special-purpose protective clothing. Gloves of various materials, including cotton and leather, appear to be the major protective clothing item. Although farmers feel that their usual work clothing provides excellent protection, fabric penetration research does not support this. Shirting-weight fabrics offer some limited protection against light spray of field-strenght pesticides. Heavier-weight fabrics, such as denim and twill, are better barriers. With a heavier spray or a spill, usual work clothing does not give sufficient protection. Greater protection can usually be achieved with the use of a fluorocarbon finished fabric, such as Scotchgard or Zepel. Scotchgard can readily be applied at home. A durable-press finish does not appear to improve fabric's pesticide-barrier resistance and some data suggest that it may decrease barrier properties. A second alternative for increased protection is the use of a special-purpose fabric, such as a coated nonwoven or possibly Gore-Tex. Numerous other new "waterproof breathable" fabrics have recently come to the market. Many of these are finished or coated fabrics and one would expect them to be at least somewhat resistant to pesticides. However, they have not been tested. Wearing an additional layer also appears to be another clothing strategy to minimize exposure. Fabric penetration research also shows that pesticide formulation, volume or spray regime, concentration, and active ingredients influence the barrier properties of

  19. Pesticide personal protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Branson, D H; Sweeney, M

    1991-01-01

    A fairly large established data base provides information on clothing worn by U.S. and Canadian farmers to work with pesticides, their attitudes and beliefs about pesticide risk, and clothing as a dermal barrier. Very limited similar data are available for farmers in less developed countries. Clearly, farmers perceive the benefits of pesticides to far exceed any risks. While few report poisoning symptoms, most believe that their usual work clothing offers a sufficient pesticide barrier, and few wear special-purpose protective clothing. Gloves of various materials, including cotton and leather, appear to be the major protective clothing item. Although farmers feel that their usual work clothing provides excellent protection, fabric penetration research does not support this. Shirting-weight fabrics offer some limited protection against light spray of field-strenght pesticides. Heavier-weight fabrics, such as denim and twill, are better barriers. With a heavier spray or a spill, usual work clothing does not give sufficient protection. Greater protection can usually be achieved with the use of a fluorocarbon finished fabric, such as Scotchgard or Zepel. Scotchgard can readily be applied at home. A durable-press finish does not appear to improve fabric's pesticide-barrier resistance and some data suggest that it may decrease barrier properties. A second alternative for increased protection is the use of a special-purpose fabric, such as a coated nonwoven or possibly Gore-Tex. Numerous other new "waterproof breathable" fabrics have recently come to the market. Many of these are finished or coated fabrics and one would expect them to be at least somewhat resistant to pesticides. However, they have not been tested. Wearing an additional layer also appears to be another clothing strategy to minimize exposure. Fabric penetration research also shows that pesticide formulation, volume or spray regime, concentration, and active ingredients influence the barrier properties of

  20. Lead Poisoning (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Lead Poisoning KidsHealth > For Parents > Lead Poisoning Print A A ... Family en español La intoxicación por plomo About Lead Poisoning If you have young kids, it's important to ...

  1. Lead Poisoning in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M., Ed.; Linakis, James G., Ed.; Anderson, Angela C., Ed.

    The magnitude of childhood lead poisoning has been inexplicably neglected by modern medicine and by legislators. However, since the 1970s, increased attention has been focused on lead poisoning, and advances have been made in several areas, including understanding of the neurodevelopmental and behavioral ramifications of lead poisoning, and…

  2. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, A. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Early symptoms of lead poisoning in children are often overlooked. Lead poisoning has its greatest effects on the brain and nervous system. The obvious long-term solution to the lead poisoning problem is removal of harmful forms of the metal from the environment. (JN)

  3. Lead poisoning: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendel, Neil

    1993-01-01

    A problem that should be of great concern to all of us is the lead poisoning of children. First, I would like to present a short overview concerning the reasons everyone should care about lead poisoning, then discuss the history of lead poisoning, what is happening today across the country, and the future.

  4. Repetitive obidoxime treatment induced increase of red blood cell acetylcholinesterase activity even in a late phase of a severe methamidophos poisoning: A case report.

    PubMed

    Steinritz, Dirk; Eyer, Florian; Worek, Franz; Thiermann, Horst; John, Harald

    2016-02-26

    Accidental self-poisoning or deliberate use in suicidal intent of organophosphorus pesticides (OPP), which are widely used in agriculture, represent a health problem worldwide. Symptoms of poisoning are characterized by acute cholinergic crisis caused by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. A 75-year-old male patient ingested 20ml of an OPP solution containing 10% methamidophos in suicidal intent. In the course of poisoning typical clinical symptoms of cholinergic crisis (miosis, bradycardia, hypotension, hypersalivation and impairment of neurologic status) were evident. Butyryl (plasma) cholinesterase (BChE) and red blood cell acetylcholinesterase (RBC-AChE) revealed decreased activities, thus specific treatment with the enzyme reactivator obidoxime was started. Inhibitory activity of the patient's plasma indicated significant amounts of persisting methamidophos in the circulation and was still found on day 4 after ingestion. Due to missing spontaneous breathing on day 6, obidoxime was administered again. Afterwards a significant increase of RBC-AChE activity was found. The patient was extubated on day 10 and a restitution ad integrum was achieved. In conclusion, obidoxime is a potent reactivator of OPP-inhibited AChE. A repetitive and prolonged administration of obidoxime should be considered in cases of severe methamidophos poisoning and should be tailored with an advanced analytical biomonitoring.

  5. Poison centers, poison prevention, and the pediatrician.

    PubMed

    Lovejoy, F H; Robertson, W O; Woolf, A D

    1994-08-01

    The first poison centers were established in the United States in the early 1950s, stimulated by an American Academy of Pediatrics' survey of office-based pediatric practices which ascertained that its members had no place to turn for ingredient information on medications and household products. With the help of the Academy, pediatrician Dr. Edward Press, the Illinois Department of Health, and several community hospitals, the first poison center emerged. Over the subsequent 40 years, remarkable progress has occurred in the fields of clinical toxicology, poison control, and poison prevention. Yet despite these accomplishments, challenging clouds are appearing on the horizon which threaten these gains. This commentary, by the authors who have viewed and participated in a large part of the history of this progress, will focus on these major accomplishments with an emphasis on (a) poison prevention utilizing the pre-event (primary prevention), (b) the event (secondary prevention), and (c) the postevent (tertiary prevention) model.

  6. Cleistanthus collinus poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Chrispal, Anugrah

    2012-01-01

    Cleistanthus collinus, a toxic shrub, is used for deliberate self-harm in rural South India. MEDLINE (PUBMED) and Google were searched for published papers using the search/ MeSH terms “Cleistanthus collinus,” “Euphorbiaceae,” “Diphyllin,” “Cleistanthin A,” Cleistanthin B” and “Oduvanthalai.” Non-indexed journals and abstracts were searched by tracing citations in published papers. The toxic principles in the leaf include arylnaphthalene lignan lactones — Diphyllin and its glycoside derivatives Cleistanthin A and B. Toxin effect in animal models demonstrate neuromuscular blockade with muscle weakness, distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) and type 2 respiratory failure with conflicting evidence of cardiac involvement. Studies suggest a likely inhibition of thiol/thiol enzymes by the lignan-lactones, depletion of glutathione and ATPases in tissues. V-type H+ ATPase inhibition in the renal tubule has been demonstrated. Mortality occurs in up to 40% of C. collinus poisonings. Human toxicity results in renal tubular dysfunction, commonly dRTA, with resultant hypokalemia and normal anion gap metabolic acidosis. Aggressive management of these metabolic derangements is crucial. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is seen in severe cases. Cardiac rhythm abnormalities have been demonstrated in a number of clinical studies, though the role of temporary cardiac pacemakers in reducing mortality is uncertain. Consumption of decoctions of C. collinus leaves, hypokalemia, renal failure, severe metabolic acidosis, ARDS and cardiac arrhythmias occur in severe poisonings and predict mortality. Further study is essential to delineate mechanisms of organ injury and interventions, including antidotes, which will reduce mortality. PMID:22787347

  7. Risk assessment and management of occupational exposure to pesticides in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Maroni, M; Fanetti, Anna Clara; Metruccio, Francesca

    2006-01-01

    Nearly 50% of the world labour force is employed in agriculture. Over the last 50 years, agriculture has deeply changed with a massive utilisation of pesticides and fertilisers to enhance crop protection and production, food quality and food preservation. Pesticides are also increasingly employed for public health purposes and for domestic use. Pesticide are unique chemicals as they are intrinsically toxic for several biological targets, are deliberately spread into the environment, and their toxicity has a limited species selectivity. Pesticide toxicity depends on the compound family and is generally greater for the older compounds; in humans, they are responsible for acute poisonings as well as for long term health effects, including cancer and adverse effects on reproduction. Due to their intrinsic toxicity, in most countries a specific and complex legislation prescribes a thorough risk assessment process for pesticides prior to their entrance to the market (pre-marketing risk assessment). The post-marketing risk assessment takes place during the use of pesticides and aims at assessing the risk for exposed operators. The results of the risk assessment are the base for the health surveillance of exposed workers. Occupational exposure to pesticides in agriculture concerns product distributors, mixers and loaders, applicators, bystanders, and rural workers re-entering the fields shortly after treatment. Assessing and managing the occupational health risks posed by the use of pesticides in agriculture is a complex but essential task for occupational health specialists and toxicologists. In spite of the economic and social importance of agriculture, the health protection of agricultural workforce has been overlooked for too many years, causing an heavy tribute paid in terms of avoidable diseases, human sufferance, and economic losses. Particularly in the developing countries, where agricultural work is one of the predominant job, a sustainable model of development

  8. Biochemical and toxicological evidence of neurological effects of pesticides: the example of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Moretto, A; Colosio, C

    2011-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is frequently reported to be associated with pesticide exposure but the issue has not yet been solved because the data are inconsistent and the studies suffer from several biases and limitations. The aim of this article is to summarise available biochemical and toxicological data on some pesticides, particularly on paraquat, that might help in the evaluation of epidemiological data. The nigrostriatal system appears to be particularly sensitive to oxidative damage caused by different mechanisms and agents, thus supporting the epidemiological evidence that Parkinson's disease is in fact an environmental disease. In available experimental studies, animals have been treated with a high single or a few doses of pesticide, and have been followed up for a few days or weeks after treatment. Moreover, experimental data indicate additive/synergistic effects of different pesticides that act on different targets within the dopaminergic system. In these conditions and to a different extent, pesticides such as paraquat, maneb and other dithiocarbamates, pyrethroids, rotenone, and dieldrin cause neurotoxic effects that may suggest a possible role in the development of a PD-like syndrome in animals. Although, all the characteristics of PD cannot be reproduced by any single chemical, these data can be of help for understanding the role of pesticide exposure in human PD development. On the other hand farmers are exposed for days or weeks during several years to much lower doses than those used in experimental studies. Therefore, a firm conclusion on the role of pesticide exposure on the increased risk of developing PD cannot be drawn. However, it is suggested that close follow up of survivors of acute poisonings by these pesticides, or identification in epidemiological studies of such subjects or of those reporting episodes of accidentally high exposure will certainly provide information useful for the understanding of the relevance of actual human exposure

  9. Acute toxicity of resmethrin, malathion and methoprene to larval and juvenile American lobsters (Homarus amemcanus) and analysis of pesticide levels in surface waters after Scourge™, Anvil™ and Altsoid™ application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zulkosky, Ann M.; Ruggieri, Joseph P.; Terracciano, Stephen A.; Brownawell, Bruce J.; McElroy, Anne E.

    2005-01-01

    Acute toxicity and immune response, combined with temperature stress effects, were evaluated in larval and juvenile American lobsters (Homarus americanus) exposed to malathion, resmethrin and methoprene. These pesticides were used to control West Nile virus in New York in 1999, the same year the American lobster population collapsed in western Long Island Sound (LIS). Whereas the suite of pesticides used for mosquito control changed in subsequent years, a field study was also conducted to determine pesticide concentrations in surface waters on Long Island and in LIS after operational applications. The commercial formulations used in 2002 and 2003—Scourge, Anvil and Altosid—contain the active ingredients resmethrin, sumithrin and methoprene, respectively. Concentrations of the synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO) were also measured as a proxy for pesticide exposure. Acute mortality in Stage I-II larval lobsters demonstrated that they are extremely sensitive to continuous resmethrin exposure. Resmethrin LC50s for larval lobsters determined under flow-through conditions varied from 0.26–0.95 μg L−1 in 48- and 96-h experiments at 16°C, respectively. Increased temperature (24°C) did not significantly alter resmethrin toxicity. Malathion and methoprene were less toxic than resmethrin. The 48-h LC50 for malathion was 3.7 μg L−1 and methoprene showed no toxicity at the highest (10 μg L−1) concentration tested. Phenoloxidase activity was used as a measure of immune response for juvenile lobsters exposed to sublethal pesticide concentrations. In continuous exposures to sublethal doses of resmethrin (0.03 μg L−1) or malathion (1 μg L−1) for 7 d at 16 or 22°C, temperature had a significant effect on phenoloxidase activity (P ≤ 0.006) whereas pesticide exposure did not (P = 0.880). The analytical methods developed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (LC-TOF-MS) provided high sensitivity with mass

  10. Poisoning: Effective Clinical Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Turner, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    Poisoning accounts for 40-60% of suicides, is the commonest medical emergency in small children, and an important source of occupational injury. Prevention of unintentional poisoning involves primarily education of parents. In intervention, the patient—not the poison—must be treated. Self-poisoners require supportive but firm handling. Treatment is directed towards prevention of further absorption, removal of absorbed poison, symptomatic or supportive therapy, and administration of systemic antidotes. Careful attention should be paid to the physician's legal responsibilities in cases of poisoning. Imagesp2032-a PMID:21286544

  11. Utility of population models to reduce uncertainty and increase value relevance in ecological risk assessments of pesticides: an example based on acute mortality data for daphnids.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Niklas; Stark, John D

    2012-04-01

    Traditionally, ecological risk assessments (ERA) of pesticides have been based on risk ratios, where the predicted concentration of the chemical is compared to the concentration that causes biological effects. The concentration that causes biological effect is mostly determined from laboratory experiments using endpoints on the level of the individual (e.g., mortality and reproduction). However, the protection goals are mostly defined at the population level. To deal with the uncertainty in the necessary extrapolations, safety factors are used. Major disadvantages with this simplified approach is that it is difficult to relate a risk ratio to the environmental protection goals, and that the use of fixed safety factors can result in over- as well as underprotective assessments. To reduce uncertainty and increase value relevance in ERA, it has been argued that population models should be used more frequently. In the present study, we have used matrix population models for 3 daphnid species (Ceriodaphnia dubia, Daphnia magna, and D. pulex) to reduce uncertainty and increase value relevance in the ERA of a pesticide (spinosad). The survival rates in the models were reduced in accordance with data from traditional acute mortality tests. As no data on reproductive effects were available, the conservative assumption that no reproduction occurred during the exposure period was made. The models were used to calculate the minimum population size and the time to recovery. These endpoints can be related to the European Union (EU) protection goals for aquatic ecosystems in the vicinity of agricultural fields, which state that reversible population level effects are acceptable if there is recovery within an acceptable (undefined) time frame. The results of the population models were compared to the acceptable (according to EU documents) toxicity exposure ratio (TER) that was based on the same data. At the acceptable TER, which was based on the most sensitive species (C. dubia

  12. Environmental impact of pesticides in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Sameeh A

    2008-01-01

    The first use of petroleum-derived pesticides in Egyptian agriculture was initiated in 1950. Early applications consisted of distributing insecticidal dusts containing DDT/BHC/S onto cotton fields. This practice was followed by use of toxaphene until 1961. Carbamates, organophosphates, and synthetic pyrethroids were subsequently used, mainly for applications to cotton. In addition to the use of about 1 million metric tons (t) of pesticides in the agricultural sector over a 50-yr period, specific health and environmental problems are documented in this review. Major problems represented and discussed in this review are human poisoning, incidental toxicity to farm animals, insect pest resistance, destruction of beneficial parasites and predators, contamination of food by pesticide residues, and pollution of environmental ecosystems. Several reports reveal that chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticide residues are still detectable in several environmental compartments; however, these residues are in decline. Since 1990, there is a growing movement toward reduced consumption of traditional pesticides and a tendency to expand use of biopesticides, including "Bt," and plant incorporated protectants (PIPs). On the other hand, DDT and lindane were used for indoor and hygienic purposes as early as 1952. Presently, indoor use of pesticides for pest control is widespread in Egypt. Accurate information concerning the types and amounts of Egyptian household pesticide use, or numbers of poisoning or contamination incidents, is unavailable. Generally, use of indoor pesticides is inadequately managed. The results of a survey of Egyptian farmers' attitudes toward pesticides and their behavior in using them garnered new insights as to how pesticides should be better controlled and regulated in Egypt.

  13. Marijuana poisoning.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C; Newquist, Kristin L

    2013-02-01

    , tremors, hypothermia, and bradycardia. Higher dosages may additionally cause nystagmus, agitation, tachypnea, tachycardia, ataxia, hyperexcitability, and seizures. Treatment of marijuana ingestion in animals is largely supportive. Vital signs including temperature and heart rate and rhythm must be continually monitored. Stomach content and urine can be tested for cannabinoids. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry can be utilized for THC detection but usually may take several days and are not practical for initiation of therapy. Human urine drug-screening tests can be unreliable for confirmation of marijuana toxicosis in dogs owing to the interference of a large number of the metabolites in canine urine. False negatives may also arise if testing occurs too recently following THC ingestion. Thus, the use of human urine drug-screening tests in dogs remains controversial. No specific antidote presently exists for THC poisoning. Sedation with benzodiazepines may be necessary if dogs are severely agitated. Intravenous fluids may be employed to counter prolonged vomiting and to help control body temperature. Recently, the use of intralipid therapy to bind the highly lipophilic THC has been utilized to help reduce clinical signs. The majority of dogs experiencing intoxication after marijuana ingestion recover completely without sequellae. Differential diagnoses of canine THC toxicosis include human pharmaceuticals with central nervous system stimulatory effects, drugs with central nervous system depressant effects, macrolide parasiticides, xylitol, and hallucinogenic mushrooms.

  14. Marijuana poisoning.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C; Newquist, Kristin L

    2013-02-01

    , tremors, hypothermia, and bradycardia. Higher dosages may additionally cause nystagmus, agitation, tachypnea, tachycardia, ataxia, hyperexcitability, and seizures. Treatment of marijuana ingestion in animals is largely supportive. Vital signs including temperature and heart rate and rhythm must be continually monitored. Stomach content and urine can be tested for cannabinoids. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry can be utilized for THC detection but usually may take several days and are not practical for initiation of therapy. Human urine drug-screening tests can be unreliable for confirmation of marijuana toxicosis in dogs owing to the interference of a large number of the metabolites in canine urine. False negatives may also arise if testing occurs too recently following THC ingestion. Thus, the use of human urine drug-screening tests in dogs remains controversial. No specific antidote presently exists for THC poisoning. Sedation with benzodiazepines may be necessary if dogs are severely agitated. Intravenous fluids may be employed to counter prolonged vomiting and to help control body temperature. Recently, the use of intralipid therapy to bind the highly lipophilic THC has been utilized to help reduce clinical signs. The majority of dogs experiencing intoxication after marijuana ingestion recover completely without sequellae. Differential diagnoses of canine THC toxicosis include human pharmaceuticals with central nervous system stimulatory effects, drugs with central nervous system depressant effects, macrolide parasiticides, xylitol, and hallucinogenic mushrooms. PMID:23796481

  15. Scombroid poisoning: a review.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, James M

    2010-08-15

    Scombroid poisoning, also called histamine fish poisoning, is an allergy-like form of food poisoning that continues to be a major problem in seafood safety. The exact role of histamine in scombroid poisoning is not straightforward. Deviations from the expected dose-response have led to the advancement of various possible mechanisms of toxicity, none of them proven. Histamine action levels are used in regulation until more is known about the mechanism of scombroid poisoning. Scombroid poisoning and histamine are correlated but complicated. Victims of scombroid poisoning respond well to antihistamines, and chemical analyses of fish implicated in scombroid poisoning generally reveal elevated levels of histamine. Scombroid poisoning is unique among the seafood toxins since it results from product mishandling rather than contamination from other trophic levels. Inadequate cooling following harvest promotes bacterial histamine production, and can result in outbreaks of scombroid poisoning. Fish with high levels of free histidine, the enzyme substrate converted to histamine by bacterial histidine decarboxylase, are those most often implicated in scombroid poisoning. Laboratory methods and screening methods for detecting histamine are available in abundance, but need to be compared and validated to harmonize testing. Successful field testing, including dockside or on-board testing needed to augment HACCP efforts will have to integrate rapid and simplified detection methods with simplified and rapid sampling and extraction. Otherwise, time-consuming sample preparation reduces the impact of gains in detection speed on the overall analysis time.

  16. 40 CFR 170.230 - Pesticide safety training for handlers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... acute and chronic effects, delayed effects, and sensitization. (iii) Routes by which pesticides can.... (ix) Prevention, recognition, and first aid treatment of heat-related illness. (x) Safety...

  17. 40 CFR 170.230 - Pesticide safety training for handlers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... acute and chronic effects, delayed effects, and sensitization. (iii) Routes by which pesticides can.... (ix) Prevention, recognition, and first aid treatment of heat-related illness. (x) Safety...

  18. Arsine poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kleinfeld, M J

    1980-12-01

    A 31-year-old patient was admitted to the hospital because of dark red urine which on examination was found to be due to extracellular hemoglobin. The cause of the hemoglobinuria was exposure to arsine gas from a cylinder thought to be empty. The worker's exposure time was approximately one to two minutes. The degree of hemolytic anemia required only one unit of packed red cells. The patient was hydrated intravenously to avoid acute tubular necrosis. The arsenic content in the urine taken was 0.72 mg/L on the day of admission and dropped to 0.1 mg/L on the fourth day of hospitalization. The patient was discharged eight days after admission, when clinical and hematological status had improved sufficiently. Occupational history revealed that protective procedures employed in the handling of the cylinders containing the arsine gas were inadequate. It was found that the valve on one of the cylinders was half-opened and leaking and that the dust caps, which were attached to the outside of the valves of the cylinders, were present on some and not on others and, where present, had been hand-tightened and not wrench-tightened. Moreover, the cylinders although specified to be empty, were not, according to regulations requiring pressure to be less than 25 pounds gauge or 45 absolute.

  19. Human exposures to pesticides in the United States.

    PubMed

    Langley, Ricky L; Mort, Sandra Amiss

    2012-01-01

    Pesticides are used in most homes, businesses, and farms to control a variety of pests, including insects, weeds, fungi, rodents, and even microbial organisms. Inappropriate use of pesticides can lead to adverse effects to humans and the environment. This study provides updated information on the magnitude of adverse pesticide exposures in the United States. Data on pesticide exposure were obtained from calls to poison control centers (PCCs) reported by the American Association of Poison Control Centers. Estimates of emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and health care costs were reported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), and deaths from pesticide poisonings reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) WONDER (Wide-ranging Online Data for Epidemiologic Research). An average of 23 deaths occur each year with pesticides as the underlying cause of death, most due to suicidal ingestions. An average of 130,136 calls to poison control centers were reported from 2006 to 2010, with an average of 20,116 cases (17.8%) treated in health care facilities annually. AHQR reported an annual average of 7385 emergency room visits during 2006 to 2008, and 1419 annual hospitalizations during 2005 to 2009. Excluding cost from lost work time, hospital physician fees, and pesticide-induced cancers, the annual national cost associated with pesticide exposures was estimated as nearly $200 million USD based on data from emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and for deaths. Pesticide exposures remain a significant public health issue. Health care providers, cooperative extension agents, and pesticide manufactures can help prevent exposures by increasing education of parents and workers, encourage use of less toxic agents, and encourage the practice of integrated pest management.

  20. Pesticides and Human Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control a pest Integrated Pest Management What are pesticides? Herbicides Disinfectants Fungicides Insecticides Natural and Biological Pesticides ... Rodenticides Other types of pesticides Disponible en español Pesticides and Human Health Pesticides have a specific purpose ...