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Sample records for acute phase immune

  1. Regulation of the acute phase and immune responses

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, P.B.; Grieninger, G.; Tosato, G.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the conference entitled Regulation of the acute phase and immune responses: Interleukin-L. Topics covered include: Interferon-B{sub 2}/26kDa Protein, Regulation of acute phase liver gene expression, and Genetics and regulation of expression of IL-6.

  2. Dynamics of cellular immune responses in the acute phase of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Saito, Akatsuki; Katakai, Yuko; Iwasaki, Yuki; Kurosawa, Terue; Hamano, Masataka; Higashino, Atsunori; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Kurane, Ichiro; Akari, Hirofumi

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we examined the dynamics of cellular immune responses in the acute phase of dengue virus (DENV) infection in a marmoset model. Here, we found that DENV infection in marmosets greatly induced responses of CD4/CD8 central memory T and NKT cells. Interestingly, the strength of the immune response was greater in animals infected with a dengue fever strain than in those infected with a dengue hemorrhagic fever strain of DENV. In contrast, when animals were re-challenged with the same DENV strain used for primary infection, the neutralizing antibody induced appeared to play a critical role in sterilizing inhibition against viral replication, resulting in strong but delayed responses of CD4/CD8 central memory T and NKT cells. The results in this study may help to better understand the dynamics of cellular and humoral immune responses in the control of DENV infection.

  3. The acute phase response of cod (Gadus morhua L.): expression of immune response genes.

    PubMed

    Audunsdottir, Sigridur S; Magnadottir, Bergljot; Gisladottir, Berglind; Jonsson, Zophonias O; Bragason, Birkir Th

    2012-02-01

    An acute phase response (APR) was experimentally induced in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) by intramuscular injection of turpentine oil. The change in the expression of immune related genes was monitored in the anterior kidney and the spleen over a period of 7 days. The genes examined were two types of pentraxins, apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA-I), the complement component C3, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), transferrin, cathelicidin, and hepcidin. All genes were constitutively expressed in both organs and their expression amplified by the turpentine injection. A pattern of response was observed both with respect to the organ preference and to the timing of a maximum response. The increased gene expression of the pentraxins, ApoA-I and C3 was restricted to the anterior kidney, the gene expression of IL-1β, cathelicidin, and transferrin increased in both organs, while hepcidin gene expression was only significantly increased in the spleen. The pentraxins and ApoA-I appear to be early mediators of APR in cod, possibly stimulating C3 and IL-1β response, while the antimicrobial peptides may play a minor role. The increase in transferrin gene expression in both organs, and apparent indifference to cortisol release associated with the turpentine injection, suggests that this could be a typical acute phase protein in cod.

  4. Effect of a synthetic appeasing pheromone on behavioral, neuroendocrine, immune, and acute-phase perioperative stress responses in dogs.

    PubMed

    Siracusa, Carlo; Manteca, Xavier; Cuenca, Rafaela; del Mar Alcalá, Maria; Alba, Aurora; Lavín, Santiago; Pastor, Josep

    2010-09-15

    To study the effects of a synthetic, dog-appeasing pheromone (sDAP) on the behavioral, neuroendocrine, immune, and acute-phase perioperative stress responses in dogs undergoing elective orchiectomy or ovariohysterectomy. Randomized, controlled clinical trial. 46 dogs housed in animal shelters and undergoing elective orchiectomy or ovariohysterectomy. Intensive care unit cages were sprayed with sDAP solution or sham treated with the carrier used in the solution 20 minutes prior to use. Dogs (n = 24 and 22 in the sDAP and sham treatment exposure groups, respectively) were placed in treated cages for 30 minutes before and after surgery. Indicators of stress (ie, alterations in behavioral, neuroendocrine, immune, and acute-phase responses) were evaluated perioperatively. Behavioral response variables, salivary cortisol concentration, WBC count, and serum concentrations of glucose, prolactin, haptoglobin, and C-reactive protein were analyzed. Behavioral response variables and serum prolactin concentration were influenced by sDAP exposure. Dogs exposed to sDAP were more likely to have alertness and visual exploration behaviors after surgery than were dogs exposed to sham treatment. Decreases in serum prolactin concentrations in response to perioperative stress were significantly smaller in dogs exposed to sDAP, compared with findings in dogs exposed to the sham treatment. Variables examined to evaluate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, immune system, and acute-phase responses were unaffected by treatment. sDAP appeared to affect behavioral and neuroendocrine perioperative stress responses by modification of lactotropic axis activity. Use of sDAP in a clinical setting may improve the recovery and welfare of dogs undergoing surgery.

  5. Biphasic CD8+ T-Cell Defense in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Control by Acute-Phase Passive Neutralizing Antibody Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Iseda, Sumire; Takahashi, Naofumi; Poplimont, Hugo; Nomura, Takushi; Seki, Sayuri; Nakane, Taku; Nakamura, Midori; Shi, Shoi; Ishii, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Shota; Harada, Shigeyoshi; Naruse, Taeko K.; Kimura, Akinori; Matano, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Identifying human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) control mechanisms by neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is critical for anti-HIV-1 strategies. Recent in vivo studies on animals infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and related viruses have shown the efficacy of postinfection NAb passive immunization for viremia reduction, and one suggested mechanism is its occurrence through modulation of cellular immune responses. Here, we describe SIV control in macaques showing biphasic CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses following acute-phase NAb passive immunization. Analysis of four SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaque pairs matched with major histocompatibility complex class I haplotypes found that counterparts receiving day 7 anti-SIV polyclonal NAb infusion all suppressed viremia for up to 2 years without accumulating viral CTL escape mutations. In the first phase of primary viremia control attainment, CD8+ cells had high capacities to suppress SIVs carrying CTL escape mutations. Conversely, in the second, sustained phase of SIV control, CTL responses converged on a pattern of immunodominant CTL preservation. During this sustained phase of viral control, SIV epitope-specific CTLs showed retention of phosphorylated extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)hi/phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)lo subpopulations, implying their correlation with SIV control. The results suggest that virus-specific CTLs functionally boosted by acute-phase NAbs may drive robust AIDS virus control. IMPORTANCE In early HIV infection, NAb responses are lacking and CTL responses are insufficient, which leads to viral persistence. Hence, it is important to identify immune responses that can successfully control such HIV replication. Here, we show that monkeys receiving NAb passive immunization in early SIV infection strictly control viral replication for years. Passive infusion of NAbs with CTL cross-priming capacity resulted in induction of functionally

  6. Role of Occult and Post-acute Phase Replication in Protective Immunity Induced with a Novel Live Attenuated SIV Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Claire; Ferguson, Deborah; Tudor, Hannah; Mattiuzzo, Giada; Klaver, Bep; Page, Mark; Stebbings, Richard; Das, Atze T.; Berkhout, Ben; Almond, Neil; Cranage, Martin P.

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate the role of persisting virus replication during occult phase immunisation in the live attenuated SIV vaccine model, a novel SIVmac239Δnef variant (SIVrtTA) genetically engineered to replicate in the presence of doxycycline was evaluated for its ability to protect against wild-type SIVmac239. Indian rhesus macaques were vaccinated either with SIVrtTA or with SIVmac239Δnef. Doxycycline was withdrawn from 4 of 8 SIVrtTA vaccinates before challenge with wild-type virus. Unvaccinated challenge controls exhibited ~107 peak plasma viral RNA copies/ml persisting beyond the acute phase. Six vaccinates, four SIVmac239Δnef and two SIVrtTA vaccinates exhibited complete protection, defined by lack of wild-type viraemia post-challenge and virus-specific PCR analysis of tissues recovered post-mortem, whereas six SIVrtTA vaccinates were protected from high levels of viraemia. Critically, the complete protection in two SIVrtTA vaccinates was associated with enhanced SIVrtTA replication in the immediate post-acute vaccination period but was independent of doxycycline status at the time of challenge. Mutations were identified in the LTR promoter region and rtTA gene that do not affect doxycycline-control but were associated with enhanced post-acute phase replication in protected vaccinates. High frequencies of total circulating CD8+T effector memory cells and a higher total frequency of SIV-specific CD8+ mono and polyfunctional T cells on the day of wild-type challenge were associated with complete protection but these parameters were not predictive of outcome when assessed 130 days after challenge. Moreover, challenge virus-specific Nef CD8+ polyfunctional T cell responses and antigen were detected in tissues post mortem in completely-protected macaques indicating post-challenge control of infection. Within the parameters of the study design, on-going occult-phase replication may not be absolutely required for protective immunity. PMID:28002473

  7. ACUTE PHASE DEATHS FROM MURINE POLYMICROBIAL SEPSIS ARE CHARACTERIZED BY INNATE IMMUNE SUPPRESSION RATHER THAN EXHAUSTION1

    PubMed Central

    Chiswick, Evan L.; Mella, Juan R.; Bernardo, John; Remick, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, a leading cause of death in the U.S., has poorly understood mechanisms of mortality. To address this, our model of Cecal Ligation and Puncture (CLP) induced sepsis stratifies mice as predicted to Live (Live-P) or Die (Die-P) based on plasma IL-6. Six hours post-CLP, both Live-P and Die-P groups have equivalent peritoneal bacterial colony forming units and recruitment of phagocytes. By 24hr, however, Die-P mice have increased bacterial burden, despite increased neutrophil recruitment, suggesting Die-P phagocytes have impaired bacterial killing. Peritoneal cells were used to study multiple bactericidal processes: bacterial killing, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation, and phagocytosis. Total phagocytosis and intra-phagosomal processes were determined with triple-labeled E.coli, covalently labeled with ROS and pH sensitive probes, and an ROS/pH insensitive probe for normalization. While similar proportions of Live-P and Die-P phagocytes responded to exogenous stimuli, Die-P phagocytes showed marked deficits in all parameters measured, thus suggesting immunosuppression rather than exhaustion. This contradicts the prevailing sepsis paradigm that acute phase sepsis deaths (<5 days) result from excessive inflammation, whereas chronic phase deaths (>5 days) are characterized by insufficient inflammation and immunosuppression. These data suggest that suppression of cellular innate immunity in sepsis occurs within the first six hours. PMID:26371253

  8. Selenium controls the sex-specific immune response and selenoprotein expression during the acute-phase response in mice.

    PubMed

    Stoedter, Mette; Renko, Kostja; Hög, Antonia; Schomburg, Lutz

    2010-07-01

    Selenium modifies inflammatory reactions in rodents and humans. The liver controls metabolism and transport of selenium via hepatically-derived SEPP (selenoprotein P). Intracellular SEPS (selenoprotein S) modifies endoplasmic-reticulum function and immune-cell activity. Polymorphisms in SEPS have been associated with cytokine levels and inflammatory diseases in a subset of clinical studies. In the present study, we hypothesized that sex and selenium represent decisive parameters controlling the immune response and regulation of SEPS expression in vivo. Male and female mice fed a selenium-poor diet were supplemented or not with selenite for 3 days and injected with saline or LPS (lipopolysaccharide) 24 h before analysis. Selenium supplementation mitigated the LPS-induced rise in circulating cytokines in male mice. Serum SepP and selenium concentrations decreased in response to LPS, whereas hepatic SepS was specifically up-regulated despite declining selenium concentrations in the liver. Hepatic SepS induction was mainly controlled by post-transcriptional mechanisms and attributed to hepatocytes by analysing transgenic mice. Notably, selenium supplementation was essential for an optimal SepS induction. We conclude that selenoprotein biosynthesis becomes redirected in hepatocytes during the acute-phase response at the expense of dispensable selenoproteins (e.g. SepP) and in favour of SepS expression, thereby causing declining serum selenium and improving liver function. The selenium status and sex control SepS expression and modify cytokine response patterns in serum, which might explain contradictory results on associations of SEPS genotype and inflammatory diseases in clinical studies.

  9. Acute phase reaction and acute phase proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Gruys, E.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Niewold, T.A.; Koopmans, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the systemic acute phase reaction with major cytokines involved, and the hepatic metabolic changes, negative and positive acute phase proteins (APPs) with function and associated pathology is given. It appears that APPs represent appropriate analytes for assessment of animal health. Whereas they represent non-specific markers as biological effect reactants, they can be used for assessing nutritional deficits and reactive processes, especially when positive and negative acute phase variables are combined in an index. When such acute phase index is applied to separate healthy animals from animals with some disease, much better results are obtained than with single analytes and statistically acceptable results for culling individual animals may be reached. Unfortunately at present no cheap, comprehensive and easy to use system is available for assessing various acute phase proteins in serum or blood samples at the same time. Protein microarray or fluid phase microchip technology may satisfy this need; and permit simultaneous analysis of numerous analytes in the same small volume sample and enable integration of information derived from systemic reactivity and nutrition with disease specific variables. Applying such technology may help to solve health problems in various countries not only in animal husbandry but also in human populations. PMID:16252337

  10. Acute phase proteins in animals.

    PubMed

    Cray, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Acute phase proteins (APP) were first identified in the early 1900s as early reactants to infectious disease. They are now understood to be an integral part of the acute phase response (APR) which is the cornerstone of innate immunity. APP have been shown to be valuable biomarkers as increases can occur with inflammation, infection, neoplasia, stress, and trauma. All animals--from fish to mammals--have demonstrable APP, but the type of major APP differs by species. While the primary application of these proteins in a clinical setting is prognostication, studies in animals have demonstrated relevance to diagnosis and detection and monitoring for subclinical disease. APP have been well documented in laboratory, companion, and large animals. With the advent of standardized and automated assays, these biomarkers are available for use in all fields of veterinary medicine as well as basic and clinical research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Conditional deletion of Stat3 in mammary epithelium impairs the acute phase response and modulates immune cell numbers during post-lactational regression

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Katherine; Wickenden, Julie A; Allen, Judith E; Watson, Christine J

    2012-01-01

    Mammary gland regression following weaning (involution) is associated with extensive cell death and the acquisition of an inflammatory signature. Characterizing the interplay between mammary epithelial cells, the re-emerging stroma and immune cells has implications for the understanding of the pathogenesis of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Stat3 has a role in orchestrating cell death and involution, and we sought to determine whether expression of Stat3 by the mammary epithelium also influences the innate immune environment and inflammatory cell influx in the gland. We examined mice in which Stat3 is conditionally deleted only in the mammary epithelium. Distinct sets of genes associated with the acute phase response and innate immunity are markedly up-regulated during first phase involution in a Stat3-dependent manner. During second phase involution, chitinase 3-like 1, which has been associated with wound healing and chronic inflammatory conditions, is dramatically up-regulated by Stat3. Also at this time, the number of mammary macrophages and mast cells increases per unit area, and this increase is impaired in the absence of epithelial Stat3. Furthermore, expression of arginase-1 and Ym1, markers of alternatively activated macrophages, is significantly decreased in the absence of Stat3, whilst iNOS, a marker associated with classically activated macrophages, shows significantly increased expression in the Stat3-deleted glands. Thus, Stat3 is a key transcriptional regulator of genes associated with innate immunity and wound healing and influences mammary macrophage and mast cell numbers. The presence of epithelial Stat3 appears to polarize the macrophages and epithelial cells towards an alternatively activated phenotype, since in the absence of Stat3, the gland retains a phenotype associated with classically activated macrophages. These findings have relevance to the study of pregnancy-associated breast cancer and the role of Stat3 signalling in recruitment

  12. Acute-phase protein α1-anti-trypsin: diverting injurious innate and adaptive immune responses from non-authentic threats

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, O; Baranovski, B M; Schuster, R; Kaner, Z; Freixo-Lima, G S; Bahar, N; Kalay, N; Mizrahi, M I; Brami, I; Ochayon, D E; Lewis, E C

    2015-01-01

    One would assume that the anti-inflammatory activity of α1-anti-trypsin (AAT) is the result of inhibiting neutrophil enzymes. However, AAT exhibits tolerogenic activities that are difficult to explain by serine-protease inhibition or by reduced inflammatory parameters. Targets outside the serine-protease family have been identified, supporting the notion that elastase inhibition, the only functional factory release criteria for clinical-grade AAT, is over-emphasized. Non-obvious developments in the understanding of AAT biology disqualify it from being a straightforward anti-inflammatory agent: AAT does not block dendritic cell activities, nor does it promote viral and tumour susceptibilities, stunt B lymphocyte responses or render treated patients susceptible to infections; accordingly, outcomes of elevated AAT do not overlap those attained by immunosuppression. Aside from the acute-phase response, AAT rises during the third trimester of pregnancy and also in advanced age. At the molecular level, AAT docks onto cholesterol-rich lipid-rafts and circulating lipid particles, directly binds interleukin (IL)-8, ADAM metallopeptidase domain 17 (ADAM17) and danger-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules, and its activity is lost to smoke, high glucose levels and bacterial proteases, introducing a novel entity – ‘relative AAT deficiency’. Unlike immunosuppression, AAT appears to help the immune system to distinguish between desired responses against authentic threats, and unwanted responses fuelled by a positive feedback loop perpetuated by, and at the expense of, inflamed injured innocent bystander cells. With a remarkable clinical safety record, AAT treatment is currently tested in clinical trials for its potential benefit in a variety of categorically distinct pathologies that share at least one common driving force: cell injury. PMID:25351931

  13. Acute-phase protein α1-anti-trypsin: diverting injurious innate and adaptive immune responses from non-authentic threats.

    PubMed

    Guttman, O; Baranovski, B M; Schuster, R; Kaner, Z; Freixo-Lima, G S; Bahar, N; Kalay, N; Mizrahi, M I; Brami, I; Ochayon, D E; Lewis, E C

    2015-02-01

    One would assume that the anti-inflammatory activity of α1-anti-trypsin (AAT) is the result of inhibiting neutrophil enzymes. However, AAT exhibits tolerogenic activities that are difficult to explain by serine-protease inhibition or by reduced inflammatory parameters. Targets outside the serine-protease family have been identified, supporting the notion that elastase inhibition, the only functional factory release criteria for clinical-grade AAT, is over-emphasized. Non-obvious developments in the understanding of AAT biology disqualify it from being a straightforward anti-inflammatory agent: AAT does not block dendritic cell activities, nor does it promote viral and tumour susceptibilities, stunt B lymphocyte responses or render treated patients susceptible to infections; accordingly, outcomes of elevated AAT do not overlap those attained by immunosuppression. Aside from the acute-phase response, AAT rises during the third trimester of pregnancy and also in advanced age. At the molecular level, AAT docks onto cholesterol-rich lipid-rafts and circulating lipid particles, directly binds interleukin (IL)-8, ADAM metallopeptidase domain 17 (ADAM17) and danger-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules, and its activity is lost to smoke, high glucose levels and bacterial proteases, introducing a novel entity - 'relative AAT deficiency'. Unlike immunosuppression, AAT appears to help the immune system to distinguish between desired responses against authentic threats, and unwanted responses fuelled by a positive feedback loop perpetuated by, and at the expense of, inflamed injured innocent bystander cells. With a remarkable clinical safety record, AAT treatment is currently tested in clinical trials for its potential benefit in a variety of categorically distinct pathologies that share at least one common driving force: cell injury.

  14. Atomic layer deposition coating of carbon nanotubes with zinc oxide causes acute phase immune responses in human monocytes in vitro and in mice after pulmonary exposure.

    PubMed

    Dandley, Erinn C; Taylor, Alexia J; Duke, Katherine S; Ihrie, Mark D; Shipkowski, Kelly A; Parsons, Gregory N; Bonner, James C

    2016-06-08

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a method for applying conformal nanoscale coatings on three-dimensional structures. We hypothesized that surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with polycrystalline ZnO by ALD would alter pro-inflammatory cytokine expression by human monocytes in vitro and modulate the lung and systemic immune response following oropharyngeal aspiration in mice. Pristine (U-MWCNTs) were coated with alternating doses of diethyl zinc and water over increasing ALD cycles (10 to 100 ALD cycles) to yield conformal ZnO-coated MWCNTs (Z-MWCNTs). Human THP-1 monocytic cells were exposed to U-MWCNTs or Z-MWCNTs in vitro and cytokine mRNAs measured by Taqman real-time RT-PCR. Male C57BL6 mice were exposed to U- or Z-MWCNTs by oropharyngeal aspiration (OPA) and lung inflammation evaluated at one day post-exposure by histopathology, cytokine expression and differential counting of cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cells. Lung fibrosis was evaluated at 28 days. Cytokine mRNAs (IL-6, IL-1β, CXCL10, TNF-α) in lung, heart, spleen, and liver were quantified at one and 28 days. DNA synthesis in lung tissue was measured by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake. ALD resulted in a conformal coating of MWCNTs with ZnO that increased proportionally to the number of coating cycles. Z-MWCNTs released Zn(+2) ions in media and increased IL-6, IL-1β, CXCL10, and TNF-α mRNAs in THP-1 cells in vitro. Mice exposed to Z-MWCNTs by OPA had exaggerated lung inflammation and a 3-fold increase in monocytes and neutrophils in BALF compared to U-MWCNTs. Z-MWCNTs, but not U-MWCNTs, induced IL-6 and CXCL10 mRNA and protein in the lungs of mice and increased IL-6 mRNA in heart and liver. U-MWCNTs but not Z-MWCNTs stimulated airway epithelial DNA synthesis in vivo. Lung fibrosis at 28 days was not significantly different between mice treated with U-MWCNT or Z-MWCNT. Pulmonary exposure to ZnO-coated MWCNTs produces a systemic acute phase response that

  15. Acute-phase concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein inhibit innate immune cell activation by different LPS chemotypes via different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Lutz; Alexander, Christian; Stamme, Cordula; Zähringer, Ulrich; Schumann, Ralf R

    2005-01-01

    The chain length of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a crucial factor for host-pathogen interaction during bacterial infection. While rough (R)-type and smooth (S)-type LPSs have been shown to differ in their ability to interact with the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, little is known about the differential mode of interaction with the acute-phase reactant LPS-binding protein (LBP). At lower concentrations, LBP catalyzes the binding of LPS to CD14 and enhances LPS-induced cellular activation via Toll-like receptor 4. In humans, however, concentrations of LBP in serum increase during an acute-phase response, and these LBP concentrations exhibit inhibitory effects in terms of cellular activation. The mechanisms of inhibition of LPS effects by LBP are not completely understood. Here, we report that human high-dose LBP (hd-LBP) suppresses binding of both R-type and S-type LPS to CD14 and inhibits LPS-induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB, although cellular uptake of R-type LPS was found to be increased by hd-LBP. In contrast, we found that hd-LBP enhanced the binding and uptake of S-type LPS only under serum-free conditions, whereas in the presence of serum, hd-LBP inhibited cellular binding and uptake. This inhibitory effect of serum could be mimicked by the addition of purified high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to serum-free medium, indicating an LBP-mediated transfer of preferentially S-type LPS to plasma lipoproteins such as HDL. A complete understanding of the host's mechanisms to modulate the proinflammatory effects of LPS will most likely help in the understanding of inflammation and infection and may lead to novel therapeutic intervention strategies.

  16. Metabolic Cost of the Activation of Immune Response in the Fish-Eating Myotis (Myotis vivesi): The Effects of Inflammation and the Acute Phase Response.

    PubMed

    Otálora-Ardila, Aída; Herrera M, L Gerardo; Flores-Martínez, José Juan; Welch, Kenneth C

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and activation of the acute phase response (APR) are energetically demanding processes that protect against pathogens. Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are antigens commonly used to stimulate inflammation and the APR, respectively. We tested the hypothesis that the APR after an LPS challenge was energetically more costly than the inflammatory response after a PHA challenge in the fish-eating Myotis bat (Myotis vivesi). We measured resting metabolic rate (RMR) after bats were administered PHA and LPS. We also measured skin temperature (Tskin) after the LPS challenge and skin swelling after the PHA challenge. Injection of PHA elicited swelling that lasted for several days but changes in RMR and body mass were not significant. LPS injection produced a significant increase in Tskin and in RMR, and significant body mass loss. RMR after LPS injection increased by 140-185% and the total cost of the response was 6.50 kJ. Inflammation was an energetically low-cost process but the APR entailed a significant energetic investment. Examination of APR in other bats suggests that the way in which bats deal with infections might not be uniform.

  17. Metabolic Cost of the Activation of Immune Response in the Fish-Eating Myotis (Myotis vivesi): The Effects of Inflammation and the Acute Phase Response

    PubMed Central

    Otálora-Ardila, Aída; Herrera M., L. Gerardo; Flores-Martínez, José Juan; Welch, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and activation of the acute phase response (APR) are energetically demanding processes that protect against pathogens. Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are antigens commonly used to stimulate inflammation and the APR, respectively. We tested the hypothesis that the APR after an LPS challenge was energetically more costly than the inflammatory response after a PHA challenge in the fish-eating Myotis bat (Myotis vivesi). We measured resting metabolic rate (RMR) after bats were administered PHA and LPS. We also measured skin temperature (Tskin) after the LPS challenge and skin swelling after the PHA challenge. Injection of PHA elicited swelling that lasted for several days but changes in RMR and body mass were not significant. LPS injection produced a significant increase in Tskin and in RMR, and significant body mass loss. RMR after LPS injection increased by 140–185% and the total cost of the response was 6.50 kJ. Inflammation was an energetically low-cost process but the APR entailed a significant energetic investment. Examination of APR in other bats suggests that the way in which bats deal with infections might not be uniform. PMID:27792729

  18. A nonequilibrium phase transition in immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Qi, An-Shen

    2004-07-01

    The dynamics of immune response correlated to signal transduction in immune thymic cells (T cells) is studied. In particular, the problem of the phosphorylation of the immune-receptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAM) is explored. A nonlinear model is established on the basis of experimental observations. The behaviours of the model can be well analysed using the concepts of nonequilibrium phase transitions. In addition, the Riemann-Hugoniot cusp catastrophe is demonstrated by the model. Due to the application of the theory of nonequilibrium phase transitions, the biological phenomena can be clarified more precisely. The results can also be used to further explain the signal transduction and signal discrimination of an important type of immune T cell.

  19. Heat-tolerant versus heat-sensitive Bos taurus cattle: influence of air temperature and breed on the acute phase response to a provocative immune challenge.

    PubMed

    Carroll, J A; Burdick Sanchez, N C; Chaffin, R; Chase, C C; Coleman, S W; Spiers, D E

    2013-10-01

    The difference in the acute phase response of a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive Bos taurus breed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge when housed at different air temperatures (Ta) was studied. Angus (ANG; heat-sensitive; n = 11; 306 ± 26 kg BW) and Romosinuano (RO; heat-tolerant; n = 10; 313 ± 32 kg BW) heifers were transported from the USDA Agricultural Research Service SubTropical Agricultural Research Station in Florida to the Brody Environmental Chambers at the University of Missouri, Columbia. Heifers were housed in stanchions in 4 temperature-controlled environmental chambers. Initially, Ta in the 4 chambers was cycling at thermoneutrality (TN; 18.5°C-23.5°C) for a 1-wk adjustment period, followed by an increase in 2 of the 4 chambers to cycling heat stress (HS; 24°C-38°C) for 2 wk. On day 19, heifers were fitted with jugular catheters and rectal temperature (RT) recording devices. On day 20, heifers were challenged with LPS (0.5 μg/kg BW; 0 h), sickness behavior scores (SBSs) were recorded, and blood samples were collected at 0.5-h intervals from -2 to 8 h and again at 24 h relative to LPS challenge at 0 h. Serum was isolated and stored at -80°C until analyzed for cortisol and cytokine concentrations. A breed by Ta interaction (P < 0.001) was observed for RT such that the post-LPS average RT in RO heifers housed at TN was lower than the RT of all other treatment groups (P < 0.001), whereas ANG heifers housed at HS had greater post-LPS average RT than all other treatment groups (P < 0.001). In response to LPS, HS increased SBS after LPS in RO heifers compared to RO heifers housed at TN (P < 0.001), whereas HS decreased SBS after LPS in ANG heifers compared to ANG heifers housed at TN (P = 0.014). The cortisol response to LPS was greater in TN than in HS heifers (P < 0.01) and was also greater in RO than in ANG heifers (P = 0.03). A breed by Ta interaction (P < 0.01) was observed for tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) concentration such that HS

  20. Feeding common carp Cyprinus carpio with β-glucan supplemented diet stimulates C-reactive protein and complement immune acute phase responses following PAMPs injection.

    PubMed

    Pionnier, Nicolas; Falco, Alberto; Miest, Joanna J; Shrive, Annette K; Hoole, Dave

    2014-08-01

    The effect of β-glucan as a feed additive on the serum and gene profile of C-reactive protein (CRP) and complement acute phase responses was ascertained in common carp Cyprinus carpio. In addition effects of subsequent intraperitoneal injections of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), i.e. LPS or poly(I:C), to mimic bacterial or viral infection respectively, were studied. Carp were first orally fed with β-glucan (MacroGard®) with a daily β-glucan intake of 6 mg per kg body weight or with control food for 25 days and then injected with PBS containing either LPS (4 mg/kg) or poly(I:C) (5 mg/kg) or PBS alone. Fish were sampled during the 25 days of the feeding period and up to 7 days post-PAMPs injections for serum and liver, head kidney and mid-gut tissues. Oral administration of β-glucan for 25 days significantly increased serum CRP levels and alternative complement activity (ACP). In addition, the subsequent LPS and poly(I:C) challenges significantly affected CRP and complement related gene expression profiles (crp1, crp2, c1r/s, bf/c2, c3 and masp2), with the greatest effects observed in the β-glucan fed fish. However, in fish fed β-glucan the PAMPs injections had less effects on CRP levels and complement activity in the serum than in control fed fish, suggesting that the 25 days of β-glucan immunostimulation was sufficient enough to reduce the effects of LPS and poly(I:C) injections. Results suggest that MacroGard® stimulated CRP and complement responses to PAMPs immunological challenges in common carp thus highlighting the beneficial β-glucan immunostimulant properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Immune reactions in acute viral hepatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Newble, D I; Holmes, K T; Wangel, A G; Forbes, I J

    1975-01-01

    Serial studies of PHA-induced lymphocyte transformation, serum autoantibodies, immunoglobulins and complement were performed in seventeen patients with hepatitis A and nine patients with hepatitis B. In both types of hepatitis PHA-induced transformation was markedly impaired during the 1st week after the onset of jaundice and there was less marked but prolonged impairment for a further period of 6-10 weeks. A group of eleven subjects with a previous history of hepatitis had values which were similar to those of healthy persons. Serum from patients with hepatitis A and hepatitis B contains an inhibitor of lymphocyte response to PHA. The inhibitor depresses the function of both patients' and normal lymphocytes and is only detectable during the acute phase of the illness. Washing lymphocytes free from autologous serum did not restore the PHA response to normal but the markedly impaired response present during the first 2 weeks of the illness was improved. A serum factor or factors may therefore be responsible for at least part of the impaired response of lymphocytes to PHA during the acute phase of hepatitis but does not appear to account for the more prolonged impairment of the PHA response. The protracted lymphocyte defect is possibly induced by hepatitis virus. The incidence of autoantibodies and the changes in immunoglobulin levels were similar to those reported by other workers. PMID:1204253

  2. The role of the immune system in central nervous system plasticity after acute injury.

    PubMed

    Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Donegá, Matteo; Giusto, Elena; Mallucci, Giulia; Marchetti, Bianca; Pluchino, Stefano

    2014-12-26

    Acute brain injuries cause rapid cell death that activates bidirectional crosstalk between the injured brain and the immune system. In the acute phase, the damaged CNS activates resident and circulating immune cells via the local and systemic release of soluble mediators. This early immune activation is necessary to confine the injured tissue and foster the clearance of cellular debris, thus bringing the inflammatory reaction to a close. In the chronic phase, a sustained immune activation has been described in many CNS disorders, and the degree of this prolonged response has variable effects on spontaneous brain regenerative processes. The challenge for treating acute CNS damage is to understand how to optimally engage and modify these immune responses, thus providing new strategies that will compensate for tissue lost to injury. Herein we have reviewed the available information regarding the role and function of the innate and adaptive immune responses in influencing CNS plasticity during the acute and chronic phases of after injury. We have examined how CNS damage evolves along the activation of main cellular and molecular pathways that are associated with intrinsic repair, neuronal functional plasticity and facilitation of tissue reorganization. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Immunomodulatory Drugs: Immune Checkpoint Agents in Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Hanna A; Kanakry, Christopher G; Luznik, Leo; Gojo, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsic immune responses to acute leukemia are inhibited by a variety of mechanisms, such as aberrant antigen expression by leukemia cells, secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and expression of inhibitory enzymes in the tumor microenvironment, expansion of immunoregulatory cells, and activation of immune checkpoint pathways, all leading to T cell dysfunction and/or exhaustion. Leukemic cells, similar to other tumor cells, hijack these inhibitory pathways to evade immune recognition and destruction by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Thus, blockade of immune checkpoints has emerged as a highly promising approach to augment innate anti-tumor immunity in order to treat malignancies. Most evidence for the clinical efficacy of this immunotherapeutic strategy has been seen in patients with metastatic melanoma, where anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1 antibodies have recently revolutionized treatment of this lethal disease with otherwise limited treatment options. To meet the high demand for new treatment strategies in acute leukemia, clinical testing of these promising therapies is commencing. Herein, we review the biology of multiple inhibitory checkpoints (including CTLA-4, PD-1, TIM-3, LAG-3, BTLA, and CD200R) and their contribution to immune evasion by acute leukemias. In addition, we discuss the current state of preclinical and clinical studies of immune checkpoint inhibition in acute leukemia, which seek to harness the body's own immune system to fight leukemic cells.

  4. Immunomodulatory Drugs: Immune Checkpoint Agents in Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, Hanna A.; Kanakry, Christopher G.; Luznik, Leo; Gojo, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsic immune responses to acute leukemia are inhibited by a variety of mechanisms, such as aberrant antigen expression by leukemia cells, secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and expression of inhibitory enzymes in the tumor microenvironment, expansion of immunoregulatory cells, and activation of immune checkpoint pathways, all leading to T cell dysfunction and/or exhaustion. Leukemic cells, similar to other tumor cells, hijack these inhibitory pathways to evade immune recognition and destruction by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Thus, blockade of immune checkpoints has emerged as a highly promising approach to augment innate anti-tumor immunity in order to treat malignancies. Most evidence for the clinical efficacy of this immunotherapeutic strategy has been seen in patients with metastatic melanoma, where anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1 antibodies have recently revolutionized treatment of this lethal disease with otherwise limited treatment options. To meet the high demand for new treatment strategies in acute leukemia, clinical testing of these promising therapies is commencing. Herein, we review the biology of multiple inhibitory checkpoints (including CTLA-4, PD-1, TIM-3, LAG-3, BTLA, and CD200R) and their contribution to immune evasion by acute leukemias. In addition, we discuss the current state of preclinical and clinical studies of immune checkpoint inhibition in acute leukemia, which seek to harness the body’s own immune system to fight leukemic cells. PMID:25981611

  5. Immune-modulating therapy in acute pancreatitis: fact or fiction.

    PubMed

    Akinosoglou, Karolina; Gogos, Charalambos

    2014-11-07

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is one of the most common diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, bearing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current treatment of AP remains unspecific and supportive and is mainly targeted to aggressively prevent systemic complications and organ failure by intensive care. As acute pancreatitis shares an indistinguishable profile of inflammation with sepsis, therapeutic approaches have turned towards modulating the systemic inflammatory response. Targets, among others, have included pro- and anti-inflammatory modulators, cytokines, chemokines, immune cells, adhesive molecules and platelets. Even though, initial results in experimental models have been encouraging, clinical implementation of immune-regulating therapies in acute pancreatitis has had a slow progress. Main reasons include difficulty in clinical translation of experimental data, poor understanding of inflammatory response time-course, flaws in experimental designs, need for multimodal approaches and commercial drawbacks. Whether immune-modulation in acute pancreatitis remains a fact or just fiction remains to be seen in the future.

  6. Immune-modulating therapy in acute pancreatitis: Fact or fiction

    PubMed Central

    Akinosoglou, Karolina; Gogos, Charalambos

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is one of the most common diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, bearing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current treatment of AP remains unspecific and supportive and is mainly targeted to aggressively prevent systemic complications and organ failure by intensive care. As acute pancreatitis shares an indistinguishable profile of inflammation with sepsis, therapeutic approaches have turned towards modulating the systemic inflammatory response. Targets, among others, have included pro- and anti-inflammatory modulators, cytokines, chemokines, immune cells, adhesive molecules and platelets. Even though, initial results in experimental models have been encouraging, clinical implementation of immune-regulating therapies in acute pancreatitis has had a slow progress. Main reasons include difficulty in clinical translation of experimental data, poor understanding of inflammatory response time-course, flaws in experimental designs, need for multimodal approaches and commercial drawbacks. Whether immune-modulation in acute pancreatitis remains a fact or just fiction remains to be seen in the future. PMID:25386069

  7. Multi-Agent Simulations of the Immune Response to Hiv during the Acute Stage of Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walshe, R.; Ruskin, H. J.; Callaghan, A.

    Results of multi-agent based simulations of the immune response to HIV during the acute phase of infection are presented here. The model successfully recreates the viral dynamics associated with the acute phase of infection, i.e., a rapid rise in viral load followed by a sharp decline to what is often referred to as a "set point", a result of T-cell response and emergence of HIV neutralizing antibodies. The results indicate that sufficient T Killer cell response is the key factor in controlling viral growth during this phase with antibody levels of critical importance only in the absence of a sufficient T Killer response.

  8. Body temperature modulates the antioxidant and acute immune responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Mestre-Alfaro, Antonia; Ferrer, Miguel D; Banquells, Montserrat; Riera, Joan; Drobnic, Franchek; Sureda, Antoni; Tur, Josep A; Pons, Antoni

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of whole body heat in combination with exercise on the oxidative stress and acute phase immune response. Nine male endurance-trained athletes voluntarily performed two running bouts of 45 minutes at 75-80% of VO(2max) in a climatic chamber in two conditions: cold and hot humid environment. Leukocyte, neutrophil and basophil counts significantly rose after exercise in both environments; it was significantly greater in the hot environment. Lymphocyte and neutrophil antioxidant enzyme activities and carbonyl index significantly increased or decreased after exercise only in the hot environment, respectively. The lymphocytes expression of catalase, Hsp72 and CuZn-superoxide dismutase was increased in the hot environment and Sirt3 in the cold environment, mainly during recovery. In conclusion, the increased core body temperature results in the acute phase immune response associated to intense exercise and in the immune cell adaptations to counteract the oxidative stress situation.

  9. The acute abdomen in the immune compromised host

    PubMed Central

    Power, Niall

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Recent advances in transplantation, oncology and AIDS therapy have greatly increased life expectancies of patients diagnosed with malignancy, auto-immune disorders and organ failure. However, as this immune compromised population grows, complications of such therapies have become a major source of morbidity and mortality. Classical clinical and laboratory evidence of intra-abdominal pathology may be absent in the immune compromised host. Consequently, the radiologist is increasingly called upon to diagnose acute intra-abdominal complications associated with immunodeficiency. This review explores the aetiology of the acute abdomen in the immune compromised host. The typical radiological appearances of the commonest conditions are illustrated. The challenges and limitations in the radiological diagnosis of these conditions are discussed. PMID:18442955

  10. Cellular immune profiling after sequential clofarabine and lenalidomide for high risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jain, Prachi; Klotz, Jeffrey; Dunavin, Neil; Lu, Kit; Koklanaris, Eleftheria; Draper, Debbie; Superata, Jeanine; Chinian, Fariba; Yu, Quan; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Wong, Susan; Muranski, Pawel; Barrett, A John; Ito, Sawa; Battiwalla, Minoo

    2017-01-01

    Patients with high risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) are commonly older with multiple co-morbidities, rendering them unsuitable for intensive induction chemotherapy or transplantation. We report preliminary cellular immune profiling of four cases receiving sequential clofarabine and lenalidomide for high risk MDS and AML in a phase I study. Our results highlight the potential of immune profiling for monitoring immune-modifying agents in high risk MDS and AML.

  11. Acute stress elicited by bungee jumping suppresses human innate immunity.

    PubMed

    van Westerloo, David J; Choi, Goda; Löwenberg, Ester C; Truijen, Jasper; de Vos, Alex F; Endert, Erik; Meijers, Joost C M; Zhou, Lu; Pereira, Manuel P F L; Queiroz, Karla C S; Diks, Sander H; Levi, Marcel; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; van der Poll, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Although a relation between diminished human immunity and stress is well recognized both within the general public and the scientific literature, the molecular mechanisms by which stress alters immunity remain poorly understood. We explored a novel model for acute human stress involving volunteers performing a first-time bungee jump from an altitude of 60 m and exploited this model to characterize the effects of acute stress in the peripheral blood compartment. Twenty volunteers were included in the study; half of this group was pretreated for 3 d with the β-receptor blocking agent propranolol. Blood was drawn 2 h before, right before, immediately after and 2 h after the jump. Plasma catecholamine and cortisol levels increased significantly during jumping, which was accompanied by significantly reduced ex vivo inducibility of proinflammatory cytokines as well as activation of coagulation and vascular endothelium. Kinome profiles obtained from the peripheral blood leukocyte fraction contained a strong noncanonical glucocorticoid receptor signal transduction signature after jumping. In apparent agreement, jumping down-regulated Lck/Fyn and cellular innate immune effector function (phagocytosis). Pretreatment of volunteers with propranolol abolished the effects of jumping on coagulation and endothelial activation but left the inhibitory effects on innate immune function intact. Taken together, these results indicate that bungee jumping leads to a catecholamine-independent immune suppressive phenotype and implicate noncanonical glucocorticoid receptor signal transduction as a major pathway linking human stress to impaired functioning of the human innate immune system.

  12. Acute Stress Elicited by Bungee Jumping Suppresses Human Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    van Westerloo, David J; Choi, Goda; Löwenberg, Ester C; Truijen, Jasper; de Vos, Alex F; Endert, Erik; Meijers, Joost C M; Zhou, Lu; Pereira, Manuel PFL; Queiroz, Karla CS; Diks, Sander H; Levi, Marcel; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; van der Poll, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Although a relation between diminished human immunity and stress is well recognized both within the general public and the scientific literature, the molecular mechanisms by which stress alters immunity remain poorly understood. We explored a novel model for acute human stress involving volunteers performing a first-time bungee jump from an altitude of 60 m and exploited this model to characterize the effects of acute stress in the peripheral blood compartment. Twenty volunteers were included in the study; half of this group was pretreated for 3 d with the β-receptor blocking agent propranolol. Blood was drawn 2 h before, right before, immediately after and 2 h after the jump. Plasma catecholamine and cortisol levels increased significantly during jumping, which was accompanied by significantly reduced ex vivo inducibility of proinflammatory cytokines as well as activation of coagulation and vascular endothelium. Kinome profiles obtained from the peripheral blood leukocyte fraction contained a strong noncanonical glucocorticoid receptor signal transduction signature after jumping. In apparent agreement, jumping down-regulated Lck/Fyn and cellular innate immune effector function (phagocytosis). Pretreatment of volunteers with propranolol abolished the effects of jumping on coagulation and endothelial activation but left the inhibitory effects on innate immune function intact. Taken together, these results indicate that bungee jumping leads to a catecholamine-independent immune suppressive phenotype and implicate noncanonical glucocorticoid receptor signal transduction as a major pathway linking human stress to impaired functioning of the human innate immune system. PMID:21203694

  13. A Systematic Meta-analysis of Immune Signatures in Patients With Acute Chikungunya Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Terk-Shin; Kam, Yiu-Wing; Lee, Bernett; Hapuarachchi, Hapuarachchige Chanditha; Wimal, Abeyewickreme; Ng, Lee-Ching; Ng, Lisa F. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Individuals infected with chikungunya virus (CHIKV) normally exhibit a variety of clinical manifestations during the acute phase of infection. However, studies in different patient cohorts have revealed that disease manifestations vary in frequency. Methods. Disease profiles between patients with acute CHIKV-infection and febrile patients without CHIKV were compared and examined to determine whether any clinical presentations were associated with the clinical outcome of CHIKV infection. Circulatory immune mediators profiles were then characterized and compared with data from 14 independent patient cohort studies. The particular immune mediator signature that defines acute CHIKV infection was determined. Results. Our findings revealed a specific pattern of clinical presentations of joint-specific arthralgia from this CHIKV cohort. More importantly, we identified an immune mediator signature dominated by proinflammatory cytokines, which include interferon α and γ and interleukin 2, 2R, 6, 7, 12, 15, 17, and 18, across different patient cohorts of CHIKV load associated with arthralgia. Conclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first study that associated levels of CHIKV load with arthralgia as an indicator of acute CHIKV infection. Importantly, our findings also revealed specific immune mediator signatures that can be used to better define CHIKV infection. PMID:25635123

  14. Enteral nutrition and immune modulation of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, Refaat A; DeWitt, Tiffany

    2014-11-21

    Enteral nutrition has been strongly recommended by major scientific societies for the nutritional management of patients with acute pancreatitis. Providing severe acute pancreatitis patients with enteral nutrition within the first 24-48 h of hospital admission can help improve outcomes compared to parenteral nutrition and no feeding. New research is focusing in on when and what to feed to best improve outcomes for acute pancreatitis patients. Early enteral nutrition have the potential to modulate the immune responses. Despite this consistent evidence of early enteral nutrition in patients with acute pancreatitis, clinical practice continues to vary due to individual clinician preference. Achieving the immune modulating effects of enteral nutrition heavily depend on proper placement of the feeding tube and managing any tube feeding associated complications. The current article reviews the immune modulating effects of enteral nutrition and pro- and prebiotics and suggests some practical tools that help improve the patient adherence and tolerance to the tube feeding. Proper selection of the type of the tube, close monitoring of the tube for its placement, patency and securing its proper placement and routine checking the gastric residual volume could all help improve the outcome. Using peptide-based and high medium chain triglycerides feeding formulas help improving feeding tolerance.

  15. Acute psychological stress induces short-term variable immune response.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R; Carlson, Joshua M; Ensign, Wayne Y; Woelk, Christopher H; Rana, Brinda K

    2016-03-01

    In spite of advances in understanding the cross-talk between the peripheral immune system and the brain, the molecular mechanisms underlying the rapid adaptation of the immune system to an acute psychological stressor remain largely unknown. Conventional approaches to classify molecular factors mediating these responses have targeted relatively few biological measurements or explored cross-sectional study designs, and therefore have restricted characterization of stress-immune interactions. This exploratory study analyzed transcriptional profiles and flow cytometric data of peripheral blood leukocytes with physiological (endocrine, autonomic) measurements collected throughout the sequence of events leading up to, during, and after short-term exposure to physical danger in humans. Immediate immunomodulation to acute psychological stress was defined as a short-term selective up-regulation of natural killer (NK) cell-associated cytotoxic and IL-12 mediated signaling genes that correlated with increased cortisol, catecholamines and NK cells into the periphery. In parallel, we observed down-regulation of innate immune toll-like receptor genes and genes of the MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Correcting gene expression for an influx of NK cells revealed a molecular signature specific to the adrenal cortex. Subsequently, focusing analyses on discrete groups of coordinately expressed genes (modules) throughout the time-series revealed immune stress responses in modules associated to immune/defense response, response to wounding, cytokine production, TCR signaling and NK cell cytotoxicity which differed between males and females. These results offer a spring-board for future research towards improved treatment of stress-related disease including the impact of stress on cardiovascular and autoimmune disorders, and identifies an immune mechanism by which vulnerabilities to these diseases may be gender-specific.

  16. Activation of cellular immune response in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mora, A; Pérez-Mateo, M; Viedma, J A; Carballo, F; Sánchez-Payá, J; Liras, G

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory mediators have recently been implicated as potential markers of severity in acute pancreatitis. AIMS: To determine the value of neopterin and polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase as markers of activation of cellular immunity and as early predictors of disease severity. PATIENTS: Fifty two non-consecutive patients classified according to their clinical outcome into mild (n = 26) and severe pancreatitis (n = 26). METHODS: Neopterin in serum and the PMN elastase/A1PI complex in plasma were measured during the first three days of hospital stay. RESULTS: Within three days after the onset of acute pancreatitis, PMN elastase was significantly higher in the severe pancreatitis group. Patients with severe disease also showed significantly higher values of neopterin on days 1 and 2 but not on day 3 compared with patients with mild disease. There was a significant correlation between PMN elastase and neopterin values on days 1 and 2. PMN elastase on day 1 predicted disease severity with a sensitivity of 76.7% and a specificity of 91.6%. Neopterin did not surpass PMN elastase in the probability of predicting disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that activation of cellular immunity is implicated in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and may be a main contributory factor to disease severity. Neopterin was not superior to PMN elastase in the prediction of severity. PMID:9245935

  17. [Circulating immune complexes in acute concussion of the brain].

    PubMed

    Midlenko, A I; Biktimirov, T Z; Garmashov, Iu A; Smirnova, M A; Smol'ianinova, V P

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the study was to study the count of circulating immune complexes (CIC) in the blood of children with acute concussion of the brain. The fact that CIC at high concentrations that can penetrate into the brain through the blood-brain barrier and cause complications as vasculitis, microangiopathy, proliferative processes in the meninges, enlarged ventricles of the brain, and atrophy of its tissue was borne in mind. The studies revealed a significant progressive CIC increase within 3 weeks. For correction of blood CIC levels, laser exposure was applied to the carotid and vertebral arteries and acupuncture points. For comparison, thymaline in age-specific doses was used. Laser radiation showed a significant fall of CIC at days 19-21, particular when applied to the acupuncture points. Thymaline did not affect blood CIC levels. Laser application to the acupuncture points in children with acute brain concussion should reduce the incidence of complications of brain injury disease.

  18. Haptoglobin activates innate immunity to enhance acute transplant rejection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua; Song, Yang; Colangelo, Christopher M.; Wu, Terence; Bruce, Can; Scabia, Gaia; Galan, Anjela; Maffei, Margherita; Goldstein, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Immune tolerance to transplanted organs is impaired when the innate immune system is activated in response to the tissue necrosis that occurs during harvesting and implantation procedures. A key molecule in this immune pathway is the intracellular TLR signal adaptor known as myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88). After transplantation, MyD88 induces DC maturation as well as the production of inflammatory mediators, such as IL-6 and TNF-α. However, upstream activators of MyD88 function in response to transplantation have not been identified. Here, we show that haptoglobin, an acute phase protein, is an initiator of this MyD88-dependent inflammatory process in a mouse model of skin transplantation. Necrotic lysates from transplanted skin elicited higher inflammatory responses in DCs than did nontransplanted lysates, suggesting DC-mediated responses are triggered by factors released during transplantation. Analysis of transplanted lysates identified haptoglobin as one of the proteins upregulated during transplantation. Expression of donor haptoglobin enhanced the onset of acute skin transplant rejection, whereas haptoglobin-deficient skin grafts showed delayed acute rejection and antidonor T cell priming in a MyD88-dependent graft rejection model. Thus, our results show that haptoglobin release following skin necrosis contributes to accelerated transplant rejection, with potential implications for the development of localized immunosuppressive therapies. PMID:22156194

  19. Monitoring acute phase proteins in retrovirus infected cats undergoing feline interferon-ω therapy.

    PubMed

    Leal, R O; Gil, S; Sepúlveda, N; McGahie, D; Duarte, A; Niza, M M R E; Tavares, L

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant feline interferon-ω therapy is an immunomodulator currently used in the treatment of different retroviral diseases including feline immune deficiency virus and feline leukaemia virus. Although its mechanism of action remains unclear, this drug appears to potentiate the innate response. Acute phase proteins are one of the key components of innate immunity and studies describing their use as a monitoring tool for the immune system in animals undergoing interferon-ω therapy are lacking. This study aimed to determine whether interferon-ω therapy influences acute phase protein concentrations namely serum amyloid-A, α-1-glycoprotein and C-reactive protein. A single-arm study was performed using 16 cats, living in an animal shelter, naturally infected with retroviruses and subjected to the interferon-ω therapy licensed protocol. Samples were collected before (D0), during (D10 and D30) and after therapy (D65). Serum amyloid-A and C-reactive protein were measured by specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits and α-1-glycoprotein by single radial immunodiffusion. All the acute phase proteins significantly increased in cats undergoing interferon-ω therapy (D0/D65: P<0·05) CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Acute phase proteins appear to be reasonable predictors of innate-immune stimulation and may be useful in the individual monitoring of naturally retroviral infected cats undergoing interferon-ω therapy. © 2013 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  20. In Utero Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide Alters the Postnatal Acute Phase Response in Beef Heifers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study was designed to determine the potential effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal acute phase response (APR) to an LPS challenge in heifers. Pregnant crossbred cows (n = 50) were separated into prenatal immune stimulation (PIS; n = 25; administered 0.1 microgr...

  1. Natural variations in the stress and acute phase responses of cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The initial response of the innate immune system upon activation has been defined as the acute phase response (APR). Activation of the APR results in several responses that include fever, metabolic adaptations, and changes in behavior. The APR can be modulated by many factors, with stress being th...

  2. The Innate Immune System in Acute and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Amanda S.; Mansbridge, Jonathan N.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: This review article provides an overview of the critical roles of the innate immune system to wound healing. It explores aspects of dysregulation of individual innate immune elements known to compromise wound repair and promote nonhealing wounds. Understanding the key mechanisms whereby wound healing fails will provide seed concepts for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Recent Advances: Our understanding of the complex interactions of the innate immune system in wound healing has significantly improved, particularly in our understanding of the role of antimicrobials and peptides and the nature of the switch from inflammatory to reparative processes. This takes place against an emerging understanding of the relationship between human cells and commensal bacteria in the skin. Critical Issues: It is well established and accepted that early local inflammatory mediators in the wound bed function as an immunological vehicle to facilitate immune cell infiltration and microbial clearance upon injury to the skin barrier. Both impaired and excessive innate immune responses can promote nonhealing wounds. It appears that the switch from the inflammatory to the proliferative phase is tightly regulated and mediated, at least in part, by a change in macrophages. Defining the factors that initiate the switch in such macrophage phenotypes and functions is the subject of multiple investigations. Future Directions: The review highlights processes that may be useful targets for further investigation, particularly the switch from M1 to M2 macrophages that appears to be critical as dysregulation of this switch occurs during defective wound healing. PMID:26862464

  3. Childhood acute immune thrombocytopenic purpura: 20 years later.

    PubMed

    Blanchette, Victor S; Carcao, Manuel

    2003-12-01

    Childhood acute immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a typically benign, self-limiting illness usually occurring after an infectious disease. Most affected children have platelet counts < 20 x 10 (9)/L at presentation and are at small, but definite risk for an intracranial hemorrhage. This feared complication occurs in < 1% of all children with acute ITP. There is consensus that a bone marrow aspirate should be performed in children with acute ITP and atypical features (e.g., hepatosplenomegaly), and most physicians continue to recommend this investigation before corticosteroids are administered. Issues such as hospitalization versus observation at home, and treatment versus no treatment continue to be debated; there is consensus, however, that children with extreme thrombocytopenia (platelet counts < 10 x 10 (9)/L) and/or clinically significant hemorrhage merit treatment with a regimen known to rapidly increase the circulating platelet count. Candidate regimens include high-dose intravenous (IV)/oral corticosteroids (>/= 4 mg/kg/day of prednisone or an equivalent corticosteroid preparation), IV immunoglobulin (IG; 0.8 to 1.0 g/kg once) or IV anti-D (75 microg/kg once) for Rhesus-positive patients. For those rare children with organ- or life-threatening hemorrhage (e.g., intracranial hemorrhage) multimodality therapy including platelet transfusion, IV high-dose methylprednisone (30 mg/kg, maximum 1 g) and IVIG (1 g/kg) is indicated with consideration of emergency splenectomy. Future prospective trials should include outcome measures other than the platelet count alone (e.g., bleeding scores) and health-related quality-of-life assessments. Key questions that remain to be addressed in children with acute ITP include the need for bone marrow aspiration in typical cases if corticosteroid therapy is planned, the role of hospitalization, and most important, the unresolved issue of treatment versus no treatment, especially in patients with typical features and mild

  4. [Leptin--a new acute phase reactant].

    PubMed

    Maruna, P; Gürlich, R; Frasko, R

    2001-07-01

    Leptin, 16 kDa protein and the product of the Ob gene was discovered six years ago and characterized as a fat cell hormone which maintains via specific receptors in the hypothalamus by a feedback mechanism the energy balance and body weight. Research conducted during the last three years detected further properties of this protein which include it, in addition to its basic role in mammalian metabolism, also among acute phase reactants. Leptin is as to its structure, pattern of the receptor and the postreceptor transduction mechanism close to the group of cytokines of interleukin 6, in particular the granulocytic colony stimulating factor. During infectious and non-infectious inflammatory reactions leptin synthesis is stimulated by a combination of inflammation promoting cytokines. The mechanism of induction is not known so far but the majority of investigations proves an indirect stimulating effect of the tumour necrosis factor and interleukin 1, depending on non-specified cytokines of the second stage. Investigations of cell lines and animal experiments provided evidence of some local and systemic effects of leptin which may play a physiological part in the acute phase reaction. Leptin mediates at least partly the anorectic effect of the tumour necrosis factor and interleukin 1 during inflammation. Synergically with bacterial antigens it activates macrophages, enhances their phagocytic capacity and stimulates secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory factors from macrophages. Leptin stimulates neovascularization, it has a stimulating effect on precursors of white blood cells and potentiates the effect of erythropoietin on red blood cells. It is obviously an essential factor for T-lymphocyte proliferation and development. The authors discuss also the role of leptin in the modulation of the hypothalamo-pituito-adrenal stress axis. Leptin is a factor of the inflammatory mediator network, probably essential for an adequate course of the inflammatory defence reaction.

  5. Innate immune inflammatory response in the acutely ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Angelidis, Christos; Bouras, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Gerckens, Ulrich; Cleman, Michael W; Giannopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    The "holy grail" of modern interventional cardiology is the salvage of viable myocardial tissue in the distribution of an acutely occluded coronary artery. Thrombolysis and percutaneous coronary interventions, provided they can be delivered on time, can interrupt the occlusion and save tissue. At the same time restoring the patency of the coronary vessels and providing the ischemic myocardium with blood can cause additional tissue damage. A key element of ischemic and reperfusion injury and major determinant of the evolution of damage in the injured myocardium is the inflammatory response. The innate immune system initiates and directs this response which is a prerequisite for subsequent healing. The complement cascade is set in motion following the release of subcellular membrane constituents. Endogenous 'danger' signals known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from ischemic and dying cells alert the innate immune system and activate several signal transduction pathways through interactions with the highly conserved Toll like receptors (TLRs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation directly induces pro-inflammatory cascades and triggers formation of the inflammasome. The challenge lies into designing strategies that specifically block the inflammatory cascades responsible for tissue damage without affecting those concerned with tissue healing.

  6. Acute ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction in Patients With Immune Thrombocytopenia Purpura: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Sandeep K; Lee, Edwin; Fox, John; Rachko, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is rare. We describe a case of AMI in patient with ITP. An 81-year-old woman presented with acute inferoposterior MI with low platelet count on admission (34,000/µl). Coronary angiography revealed significant mid right coronary artery (RCA) stenosis with thrombus, subsequently underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In some patients with immune thrombocytopenia purpura and acute myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention is a therapeutic option.

  7. Immune, endocrine and cardiovascular responses to controllable and uncontrollable acute stress.

    PubMed

    Isowa, Tokiko; Ohira, Hideki; Murashima, Seikou

    2006-02-01

    This study, using a triadic-yoked design, clarified the effects of controllability of acute stress on responses of immune, cardiovascular (heart rate and blood pressure), and cortisol activities. Forty-three women in their follicular phase completed a mental arithmetic task as a stressor in which controllability was manipulated by correct or yoked-bogus feedback. The task decreased proportions of CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, and CD19+ B cells, whereas it increased the numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes, natural killer (NK) cells, and NK cell activity (NKCA). Our main hypothesis that greater immune and cardiovascular responses to the task would be obtained under the uncontrollable condition than under the controllable condition was not supported. However, the uncontrollable stress condition, but not the controllable situation, led to higher correlations between heart rate or blood pressure, and various immune parameters. On the other hand, parameters of heart rate variability reflecting sympathetic and parasympathetic activities showed significant correlations only with NKCA. These results suggest that immune responses were most directly associated with cardiovascular activities under the uncontrollable condition.

  8. The Ly49E Receptor Inhibits the Immune Control of Acute Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Filtjens, Jessica; Coltel, Nicolas; Cencig, Sabrina; Taveirne, Sylvie; Van Ammel, Els; Van Acker, Aline; Kerre, Tessa; Matthys, Patrick; Taghon, Tom; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Carlier, Yves; Truyens, Carine; Leclercq, Georges

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi circulates in the blood upon infection and invades various cells. Parasites intensively multiply during the acute phase of infection and persist lifelong at low levels in tissues and blood during the chronic phase. Natural killer (NK) and NKT cells play an important role in the immune control of T. cruzi infection, mainly by releasing the cytokine IFN-γ that activates the microbicidal action of macrophages and other cells and shapes a protective type 1 immune response. The mechanisms by which immune cells are regulated to produce IFN-γ during T. cruzi infection are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is induced early upon T. cruzi infection and remains elevated until day 20 post-infection. We previously demonstrated that the inhibitory receptor Ly49E, which is expressed, among others, on NK and NKT cells, is triggered by uPA. Therefore, we compared wild type (WT) to Ly49E knockout (KO) mice for their control of experimental T. cruzi infection. Our results show that young, i.e., 4- and 6-week-old, Ly49E KO mice control the infection better than WT mice, indicated by a lower parasite load and less cachexia. The beneficial effect of Ly49E depletion is more obvious in 4-week-old male than in female mice and weakens in 8-week-old mice. In young mice, the lower T. cruzi parasitemia in Ly49E KO mice is paralleled by higher IFN-γ production compared to their WT controls. Our data indicate that Ly49E receptor expression inhibits the immune control of T. cruzi infection. This is the first demonstration that the inhibitory Ly49E receptor can interfere with the immune response to a pathogen in vivo. PMID:27891126

  9. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura as sole manifestation in a case of acute hepatitis A.

    PubMed

    Tanir, Gönül; Aydemir, Cumhur; Tuygun, Nilden; Kaya, Ozge; Yarali, Neşe

    2005-12-01

    Acute hepatitis due to hepatitis A virus is usually a benign selflimiting disease during childhood. Although many viral infections such as hepatitis B virus, Parvovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus are associated with extrahepatic autoimmune phenomena, such manifestations are rare in patients with acute hepatitis A infection. Immune thrombocytopenia is a benign, self-limiting disease in children, responding well to treatment and generally associated with viral infections. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura is rarely reported as a manifestation of acute hepatitis A. We report a five-year-old boy with immune thrombocytopenic purpura as the sole manifestation of anicteric acute hepatitis A infection. Acute hepatitis A should be included in the differential diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

  10. Immune Responses in Acute and Convalescent Patients with Mild, Moderate and Severe Disease during the 2009 Influenza Pandemic in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Mohn, Kristin G.-I.; Cox, Rebecca Jane; Tunheim, Gro; Berdal, Jan Erik; Hauge, Anna Germundsson; Jul-Larsen, Åsne; Peters, Bjoern; Oftung, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Increased understanding of immune responses influencing clinical severity during pandemic influenza infection is important for improved treatment and vaccine development. In this study we recruited 46 adult patients during the 2009 influenza pandemic and characterized humoral and cellular immune responses. Those included were either acute hospitalized or convalescent patients with different disease severities (mild, moderate or severe). In general, protective antibody responses increased with enhanced disease severity. In the acute patients, we found higher levels of TNF-α single-producing CD4+T-cells in the severely ill as compared to patients with moderate disease. Stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a subset of acute patients with peptide T-cell epitopes showed significantly lower frequencies of influenza specific CD8+ compared with CD4+ IFN-γ T-cells in acute patients. Both T-cell subsets were predominantly directed against the envelope antigens (HA and NA). However, in the convalescent patients we found high levels of both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells directed against conserved core antigens (NP, PA, PB, and M). The results indicate that the antigen targets recognized by the T-cell subsets may vary according to the phase of infection. The apparent low levels of cross-reactive CD8+ T-cells recognizing internal antigens in acute hospitalized patients suggest an important role for this T-cell subset in protective immunity against influenza. PMID:26606759

  11. Acute phase proteins response in hunting dogs.

    PubMed

    Casella, Stefania; Fazio, Francesco; Russo, Carmelo; Giudice, Elisabetta; Piccione, Giuseppe

    2013-09-01

    Haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA), C-reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cells (WBC) were assessed in 20 dogs divided into 2 groups. The dogs of group A were not subjected to hunting exercise (control group), while the dogs of group B were subjected to hunting exercise for 3 hr (experimental group). Blood samples were collected from each animal before hunting (T0), immediately after 3 hr of hunting (T1), and after 1 hr of recovery (T2). The general linear model (GLM) repeated measures procedure showed a significant difference between the 2 groups (P < 0.0001) and a significant rise (P < 0.0001) in concentration of Hp, SAA, and CRP after hunting exercise, with a consequent decline during recovery period in group B. These parameters could be considered valid and easily obtainable biomarkers in relation to hunting stress in dogs. Additional studies will continue to elucidate the magnitude and the time of response of other acute phase proteins.

  12. The onset of the progression of acute phase response mechanisms induced by extreme impacts can be followed by the decrease in blood levels of positive acute phase proteins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larina, Olga; Bekker, Anna

    Studies performed at space flights and earth-based simulation models detected the plasma indices of acute phase reaction (APR), i.e. the increase of APR cytokine mediators and alterations in the production of blood acute phase proteins (APP) at the initial stages of adaptation to altered gravity conditions. Acute phase response is the principal constituent of the functional activity of innate immunity system. Changes in plasma APPs contents are considered to serve the restoration of homeostasis state. According to trends of their concentration shifts at the evolving of acute phase reaction APPs are denoted as positive, neutral, or negative. Plasma concentrations of positive acute phase proteins α1-acid glycoprotein (α1-AGP), α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT), and neutral α2-macroglobulin (α2-M) were measured in human study at 12-hour antiorthostatic position (AOP) with 15° head down tilt and hypoxia experiments at 14% oxygen in pressure chamber. Both of these impacts were shown to produce alterations in the APP levels indicative for acute phase response. Nevertheless, in AOP experiment noticeable decrease in α1-AGP concentration occurred by hour 12, and even more pronounced decline of α1-AGP and α1-AT were found on hypoxia hours 12 and 36. Acute phase proteins α1-AGP and α2-M possess the features of proteinase inhibitors. This function is implemented by the formation of complexes with the molecules of proteolytic enzymes which subsequently are removed from the blood flow. Transient decrease in plasma concentrations of protease inhibitors on early phases of APR development was reported to result from the growth of plasma protease activity due to cathepsin release from activated leukocytes, which had not yet been compensated by enhanced APP synthesis. Being a carrier protein for positively charged and neutral substances, α1-AGP shows pronounced elevation in its blood content during APR development. As assumed, it is required for the transportation of the increased

  13. Cell-mediated immune response during experimental acute infection with bovine viral diarrhoea virus: evaluation of blood parameters.

    PubMed

    Molina, V; Risalde, M A; Sánchez-Cordón, P J; Romero-Palomo, F; Pedrera, M; Garfia, B; Gómez-Villamandos, J C

    2014-02-01

    Acute infections with bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV), a major pathogen of cattle, are often asymptomatic or produce only mild clinical symptoms. However, they may play an important role in the bovine respiratory disease complex by exerting a marked immunosuppressive effect, as a result of the death of the immunocompetent cell populations involved in controlling innate and adaptive immune responses, together with a marked reduction of both cytokine expression and co-stimulatory molecule synthesis. Although experimental research and field studies have shown that acute BVDV infection enhances susceptibility to secondary infection, the precise mechanism involved in BVDV-induced immunosuppression remains unclear. The present study is aimed at measuring a range of blood parameters in a single group of fourteen calves infected with non-cytopathic BVDV-1. Focus has been put on those related to the cell-mediated immune response just as leucocyte populations and lymphocyte subpopulations, serum concentrations of cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-4 and IL-10) and acute phase proteins [haptoglobin, serum amyloid A (SAA), fibrinogen and albumin], as well as BVDV-specific antibodies and viremia. After non-cytopathic BVDV-1 infection, clinical signs intensity was never more than moderate coinciding with the presence of viremia and leucocyte and lymphocyte depletion. An early increase in TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-12 levels in contrast to IL-1β was observed in line with a raise in haptoglobin and SAA levels on the latest days of the study. As regards IL-4 levels, no evidence was found of any changes. However, a slight increase in IL-10 was observed, matching up the TNF-α decline during the acute phase response. These findings would help to increase our knowledge of the immune mechanisms involved in acute infection with non-cytopathic BVDV-1 strains, suggesting the existence of a clear tendency towards a type 1 immune response, thereby enhancing resistance against

  14. Acute Phase Reactants as Novel Predictors of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, M. S.; Jadhav, A. B.; Hassan, A.; Meng, Qing H.

    2012-01-01

    Acute phase reaction is a systemic response which usually follows a physiological condition that takes place in the beginning of an inflammatory process. This physiological change usually lasts 1-2 days. However, the systemic acute phase response usually lasts longer. The aim of this systemic response is to restore homeostasis. These events are accompanied by upregulation of some proteins (positive acute phase reactants) and downregulation of others (negative acute phase reactants) during inflammatory reactions. Cardiovascular diseases are accompanied by the elevation of several positive acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), fibrinogen, white blood cell count, secretory nonpancreatic phospholipase 2-II (sPLA2-II), ferritin, and ceruloplasmin. Cardiovascular disease is also accompanied by the reduction of negative acute phase reactants such as albumin, transferrin, transthyretin, retinol-binding protein, antithrombin, and transcortin. In this paper, we will be discussing the biological activity and diagnostic and prognostic values of acute phase reactants with cardiovascular importance. The potential therapeutic targets of these reactants will be also discussed. PMID:24049653

  15. Understanding gut-immune interactions in management of acute infectious diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Calder, P; Hall, V

    2012-11-01

    This article discusses the role that immunity plays in the risk of diarrhoea and the potential role for probiotics in the management of acute infectious diarrhoea in older people, including antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea.

  16. [Acute-phase proteins in inflammation].

    PubMed

    Engler, R

    1995-01-01

    The acute phase proteins (APPs) have been empirically defined as those whose plasma concentration changes following inflammatory reaction. Those proteins whose concentrations increase are referred to as positive APP, while those whose levels decline are termed negative APP. In man, positive APP are: alpha 1 acid glycoprotein, alpha 1 protease inhibitor, alpha 1 antichymotrypsin, haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A. Great variability in the APP response between different species is observed. The principal functions of APP, result from the interaction of these proteins with ligands of various origins which give "protein-ligands" complexes. These complexes are cleared by the RES or by the hepatocyte. The results are protease inhibition, neutralization of toxic molecules such as hemoglobin or the superoxide anion, clearance of cell membranes and chromatin. The drop of the plasma concentration of negative APP during an inflammatory reaction carries a rise of free ligands (fatty acids, hormones, vitamins, trace elements). IL6 has been recognized as the principal regulator of most APP genes. The response of the hepatic cell to IL6 is characterized by the enhanced production of type 2 or IL6 specific APPs. The biochemical process of signal transduction is IL6--JAK2--APRF The set of APP genes regulated by IL1 type cytokines (type 1 APPs) is distinct from that regulated by IL6 type cytokine. IL1 and TNF alpha mediated stimulation of type 1 APP genes is synergistically enhanced by IL6 type cytokines. The biochemical process of signal transduction is IL1, IL6--Ras--MAP kinase--NFIL6 The targeted inflammatory proteic profile including the assay of C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and alpha 1 acid glycoprotein produces a "biological tool" to the clinician in order to manage an inflammatory response. IL6, a proteic marker for the future, connected with CRP, will be assayed during early inflammatory reaction.

  17. Acute exercise modulates BDNF and pro-BDNF protein content in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Andrea; Dimauro, Ivan; Sgrò, Paolo; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Magi, Fiorenza; Baldari, Carlo; Guidetti, Laura; Di Luigi, Luigi; Parisi, Paolo; Caporossi, Daniela

    2012-10-01

    Although several studies have shown that immune cells stimulated by in vitro stress are capable to produce neurotrophins, there is still no evidence whether physiological stress, such as exercise, can modulate the in vivo levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This work investigated whether acute exercise modulates the expression of BDNF, pro-BDNF, and p75(NTR) in the PBMCs of 10 healthy young men who performed a cycling incremental test to exhaustion (MAX) or exercised at individual anaerobic threshold (IAT). The PBMC expression of stress response proteins and the level of circulating BDNF, vascular endothelial growth growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor subunit B, basic fibroblast growth factor pro-inflammatory, and anti-inflammatory cytokines were analyzed as well. A major finding is that both sessions of acute exercise regulated the content of BDNF isoforms within PBMCs in a manner related to the physiological stress exerted. Although the pro-BDNF increased after both MAX and IAT protocols, BDNF showed a kinetics dependent on exercise type: MAX induced a 54% protein increase immediately after exercise, followed by a significant drop 60 min after its conclusion (38% lower than the baseline). Differently, in the IAT, BDNF increased significantly up to 75% from the baseline throughout the recovery phase. All physiological parameters, as well as the p75(NTR) receptor and the stress-inducible proteins, were also differently regulated by the two exercise conditions. These data supported the hypothesis that PBMCs might produce and secrete BDNF isoforms, as well as modulate the proteins p75(NTR) , Bcl-xL, hsp90, hsp27, and αB-crystallin, as part of the physiological stress response induced by acute exercise, offering a novel example of bidirectional interaction between nervous and immune systems.

  18. ACUTE PHASE IMMUNE GENE PROFILING OF SPLEEN AND PEYER’S PATCH IN NAÏVE AND VACCINATED CHICKENS FOLLOWING AVIAN INFLUENZA A (H5N1) VIRUS INFECTION

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study, we applied functional genomics tools to investigate the early immunological response of chickens to highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza virus (AIV). Infection with HPAIV usually results in the rapid death of poultry. The aim of this study was to identify host immune genes which a...

  19. The impact of microbial immune enteral nutrition on the patients with acute radiation enteritis in bowel function and immune status.

    PubMed

    Shao, Feng; Xin, Fu-Ze; Yang, Cheng-Gang; Yang, Dao-Gui; Mi, Yue-Tang; Yu, Jun-Xiu; Li, Guo-Yong

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of microbial immune enteral nutrition by microecopharmaceutics and deep sea fish oil and glutamine and Peptisorb on the patients with acute radiation enteritis in bowel function and immune status. From June 2010 to January 2013, 46 acute radiation enteritis patients in Liaocheng People's Hospital were randomized into the microbial immune enteral nutrition group and the control group: 24 patients in treatment group and 22 patients in control group. The immune microbial nutrition was given to the study group, but not to the control group. The concentration of serum albumin and prealbumin and the number of CD3 (+) T cell, CD4 (+) T cell, CD8 (+) T cell, CD4 (+)/CD8 (+) and natural killer cell of the two groups were detected on the 1, 7 and 14 days after treatment. The arm muscle circumference and triceps skinfold thickness (TSF) were recorded, and the tolerance of the two groups for enteral nutrition and intestinal symptoms was collected and then comparing the two indicators and get results. The tolerance of microbial immune enteral nutrition group about abdominal pain, bloating and diarrhea was better than the control group (P values were 0.018, 0.04 and 0.008 after 7 days; P values were 0.018, 0.015 and 0.002 after 14 days); and the cellular immune parameters were better than the control group((△) P = 0.008,([Symbol: see text]) P = 0.039, (☆) P = 0.032); No difference was found in nutrition indicators. To the patients with acute radiation enteritis, microbial immune enteral nutrition could improve the patient's immune status, and the tolerance of enteral nutrition could be better for the bowel function and the patients' rehabilitation.

  20. [Occurrence of acute infectious diarrhea during the lunar phases].

    PubMed

    Mikulecký, M; Schréter, I

    1993-08-23

    A chronobiometric analysis of 753 cases of acute infectious diarrhoea in adults in 1981-1990 in Kosice confirmed to a surprising extent recently reached conclusions of an investigation made by authors from Bratislava. The Kosice group comprised 352 cases of bacillary dysentery, 305 patients with salmonellosis, 72 with campylobacteriosis and 24 with yersiniosis. Statistically significantly fewer patients (p < 0.0001) were hospitalized during full moon, moon quarterly and new moon. In the intervals there were periods with a short-term increase of the daily admissions by cca 25%. This 7.38-day periodicity cannot be explained by the influence of the social 7-day week, as during observations extending over several years this rhythm is eliminated by a gradual shift across different phases of the moon. The authors did not find similar reports in the literature. For explanation, not only the organism of the host (variable immunity?) but also the infectious agent must be taken into account. More profound understanding of the mechanism may open the road to practical application of the described lunar relationship. Its knowledge can help already now to improve the organization of the health service.

  1. Activation of circulated immune cells and inflammatory immune adherence are involved in the whole process of acute venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Le-Min; Duan, Qiang-Lin; Yang, Fan; Yi, Xiang-Hua; Zeng, Yu; Tian, Hong-Yan; Lv, Wei; Jin, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate localization and distribution of integrin subunit β1, β2 and β3 and morphological changes of ligand-recepter binding in thrombi of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) patients and explore activation of circulated immune cells, inflammatory immune adherence and coagulation response in acute venous thrombosis. Methods: Thrombi were collected from patients with acute PE. Immunohistochemistry was done to detect the expression and distribution of integrin β1, β2 and β3 in cells within thrombi, and ligands of integrin subunit β1, β2 and β3 were also determined by immunohistochemistry within the thrombi. Results: 1) Acute venous thrombi were red thrombi composed of skeletons and filamentous mesh containing large amounts of red blood cells and white blood cells; 2) Integrin subunit β1, β2 and β3 were expressed on lymphocytes, neutrophils and platelets; 3) No expression of integrin β1 ligands: Laminin, Fibronectin, Collagen I or Collagen-II on lymphocytes; integrin β2 ligands including ICAM, factor X and iC3b are distributed on neutrophils, and ligand fibrinogen bound to neutrophils; integrin β3 was expressed on platelets which form the skeleton of thrombi and bound to fibrinogen to construct mesh structure; 4) Factor Xa was expressed on the filamentous mesh; 5) Filamentous mesh was fully filled with red blood cell dominant blood cells. Conclusion: Acute venous thrombosis is an activation process of circulated lymphocytes, neutrophils and platelets mainly, and a whole process including integrin subunit β2 and β3 binding with their ligands. Activation of immune cells, inflammatory immune adherence and coagulation response are involved in the acute venous thrombosis. PMID:24753749

  2. Immune responses of eastern fence lizards (Sceloporus undulatus) to repeated acute elevation of corticosterone.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Gail L; Langkilde, Tracy

    2014-08-01

    Prolonged elevations of glucocorticoids due to long-duration (chronic) stress can suppress immune function. It is unclear, however, how natural stressors that result in repeated short-duration (acute) stress, such as frequent agonistic social encounters or predator attacks, fit into our current understanding of the immune consequences of stress. Since these types of stressors may activate the immune system due to increased risk of injury, immune suppression may be reduced at sites where individuals are repeatedly exposed to potentially damaging stressors. We tested whether repeated acute elevation of corticosterone (CORT, a glucocorticoid) suppresses immune function in eastern fence lizards (Sceloporus undulatus), and whether this effect varies between lizards from high-stress (high baseline CORT, invaded by predatory fire ants) and low-stress (low baseline CORT, uninvaded) sites. Lizards treated daily with exogenous CORT showed higher hemagglutination of novel proteins by their plasma (a test of constitutive humoral immunity) than control lizards, a pattern that was consistent across sites. There was no significant effect of CORT treatment on bacterial killing ability of plasma. These results suggest that repeated elevations of CORT, which are common in nature, produce immune effects more typical of those expected at the acute end of the acute-chronic spectrum and provide no evidence of modulated consequences of elevated CORT in animals from high-stress sites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Acute-phase responses vary with pathogen identity in house sparrows (Passer domesticus).

    PubMed

    Coon, Courtney A C; Warne, Robin W; Martin, Lynn B

    2011-06-01

    Pathogens may induce different immune responses in hosts contingent on pathogen characteristics, host characteristics, or interactions between the two. We investigated whether the broadly effective acute-phase response (APR), a whole body immune response that occurs in response to constitutive immune receptor activation and includes fever, secretion of immune peptides, and sickness behaviors such as anorexia and lethargy, varies with pathogen identity in the house sparrow (Passer domesticus). Birds were challenged with a subcutaneous injection of either a glucan at 0.7 mg/kg (to simulate fungal infection), a synthetic double-stranded RNA at 25 mg/kg (to simulate viral infection), or LPS at 1 mg/kg (to simulate a gram-negative bacterial infection), and then body mass, core body temperature changes, sickness behaviors, and secretion of an acute-phase protein, haptoglobin, were compared. Despite using what are moderate-to-high pyrogen doses for other vertebrates, only house sparrows challenged with LPS showed measurable APRs. Febrile, behavioral, and physiological responses to fungal and viral mimetics had minimal effects.

  4. Undernutrition, the Acute Phase Response to Infection, and Its Effects on Micronutrient Status Indicators12

    PubMed Central

    Bresnahan, Kara A.; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A.

    2014-01-01

    Infection and undernutrition are prevalent in developing countries and demonstrate a synergistic relation. Undernutrition increases infection-related morbidity and mortality. The acute phase response (APR) is an innate, systemic inflammatory reaction to a wide array of disruptions in a host’s homeostasis, including infection. Released from immune cells in response to deleterious stimuli, proinflammatory cytokines act on distant tissues to induce behavioral (e.g., anorexia, weakness, and fatigue) and systemic effects of the APR. Cytokines act to increase energy and protein requirements to manifest fever and support hepatic acute phase protein (APP) production. Blood concentrations of glucose and lipid are augmented to provide energy to immune cells in response to cytokines. Additionally, infection decreases intestinal absorption of nutrients and can cause direct loss of micronutrients. Traditional indicators of iron, zinc, and vitamin A status are altered during the APR, leading to inaccurate estimations of deficiency in populations with a high or unknown prevalence of infection. Blood concentrations of APPs can be measured in nutrition interventions to assess the time stage and severity of infection and correct for the APR; however, standardized cutoffs for nutrition applications are needed. Protein-energy malnutrition leads to increased gut permeability to pathogens, abnormal immune cell populations, and impaired APP response. Micronutrient deficiencies cause specific immune impairments that affect both innate and adaptive responses. This review describes the antagonistic interaction between the APR and nutritional status and emphasizes the need for integrated interventions to address undernutrition and to reduce disease burden in developing countries. PMID:25398733

  5. Advances in researches on the immune dysregulation and therapy of severe acute pancreatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi-ping; Chen, Han-qing; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Jie

    2009-01-01

    During the development and progression of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), conspicuous immune dysregulation develops, which is mainly manifested as excessive immune response in the early stage and immunosuppression in the late stage. This process involves complex changes in a variety of immune molecules and cells, such as cytokines, complements, lymphocytes, and leukocytes. With the gradual deepening of studies on the development and progression of SAP, the role of immune dysregulation in the pathogenesis of SAP has attracted more and more attention. In this article, we review the advances in research on the immune dysregulation in SAP and the immunotherapy of this disease through exploring the formation of excessive immune response and immune suppression as well as their mutual transformation. PMID:19585666

  6. Reovirus-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Enhancement of Innate Immune Responses Against Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Kathryn; Scott, Karen J.; Rose, Ailsa; Desborough, Michael; Harrington, Kevin; Pandha, Hardev; Parrish, Christopher; Vile, Richard; Coffey, Matt; Bowen, David; Errington-Mais, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Reovirus is a naturally occurring oncolytic virus that has shown preclinical efficacy in the treatment of a wide range of tumor types and has now reached phase III testing in clinical trials. The anti-cancer activity of reovirus has been attributed to both its direct oncolytic activity and the enhancement of anti-tumor immune responses. In this study, we have investigated the direct effect of reovirus on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and its potential to enhance innate immune responses against AML, including the testing of primary samples from patients. Reovirus was found to replicate in and kill AML cell lines, and to reduce cell viability in primary AML samples. The pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon alpha (IFNα) and the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (known as RANTES [regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed, and secreted]) were also secreted from AML cells in response to virus treatment. In addition, reovirus-mediated activation of natural killer (NK) cells, within the context of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, stimulated their anti-leukemia response, with increased NK degranulation and IFNγ production and enhanced killing of AML targets. These data suggest that reovirus has the potential as both a direct cytotoxic and an immunotherapeutic agent for the treatment of AML. PMID:23515241

  7. Catecholamines, Steroids and Immune Alterations in Ischemic Stroke and Other Acute Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Juliane; Vogelgesang, Antje; Dressel, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of stroke patients is not only determined by the extent and localization of the ischemic lesion, but also by stroke-associated infections. Stroke-induced immune alterations, which are related to stroke-associated infections, have been described over the last decade. Here we review the evidence that catecholamines and steroids induced by stroke result in stroke-induced immune alterations. In addition, we compare the immune alterations observed in other acute diseases such as myocardial infarction, brain trauma, and surgical trauma with the changes seen in stroke-induced immune alterations. PMID:25276491

  8. Immune and inflammatory response in pigs during acute influenza caused by H1N1 swine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Kwit, Krzysztof; Czyżewska, Ewelina; Dors, Arkadiusz; Rachubik, Jarosław; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2014-10-01

    Swine influenza (SI) is an acute respiratory disease of pigs, caused by swine influenza virus (SIV). Little is known about the inflammatory response in the lung during acute SI and its correlation with clinical signs or lung pathology. Moreover, until now there has been a limited amount of data available on the relationship between the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the lungs and the serum concentration of acute-phase proteins (APPs) in SIV-infected pigs. In the present study, the porcine inflammatory and immune responses during acute influenza caused by H1N1 SIV (SwH1N1) were studied. Nine pigs were infected intratracheally, and five served as controls. Antibodies against SIV were measured by haemagglutination inhibition assay, and the influenza-virus-specific T-cell response was measured using a proliferation assay. C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA), and pig major acute-phase protein (Pig-MAP) the concentrations in serum and concentration of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α and IFN-γ in lung tissues were measured using commercial ELISAs.

  9. The acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection is attenuated in 5-lipoxygenase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Canavaci, Adriana M C; Sorgi, Carlos A; Martins, Vicente P; Morais, Fabiana R; de Sousa, Érika V G; Trindade, Bruno C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Rossi, Marcos A; Aronoff, David M; Faccioli, Lúcia H; Nomizo, Auro

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we examine the contribution of 5-lipoxygenase- (5-LO-) derived lipid mediators to immune responses during the acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in 5-LO gene knockout (5-LO(-/-)) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. Compared with WT mice, the 5-LO(-/-) mice developed less parasitemia/tissue parasitism, less inflammatory cell infiltrates, and a lower mortality. This resistance of 5-LO(-/-) mice correlated with several differences in the immune response to infection, including reduced PGE2 synthesis; sustained capacity of splenocytes to produce high levels of interleukin (IL)-12 early in the infection; enhanced splenocyte production of IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ; rapid T-cell polarization to secrete high quantities of IFN-γ and low quantities of IL-10; and greater numbers of CD8(+)CD44(high)CD62L(low) memory effector T cells at the end of the acute phase of infection. The high mortality in WT mice was associated with increased production of LTB4/LTC4, T cell bias to produce IFN-γ, high levels of serum nitrite, and marked protein extravasation into the peritoneal cavity, although survival was improved by treatment with a cys-LT receptor 1 antagonist. These data also provide evidence that 5-LO-derived mediators negatively affect host survival during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection.

  10. The Acute Phase of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Is Attenuated in 5-Lipoxygenase-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Canavaci, Adriana M. C.; Sorgi, Carlos A.; Martins, Vicente P.; Morais, Fabiana R.; de Sousa, Érika V. G.; Trindade, Bruno C.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Rossi, Marcos A.; Aronoff, David M.; Faccioli, Lúcia H.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we examine the contribution of 5-lipoxygenase- (5-LO-) derived lipid mediators to immune responses during the acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in 5-LO gene knockout (5-LO−/−) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. Compared with WT mice, the 5-LO−/− mice developed less parasitemia/tissue parasitism, less inflammatory cell infiltrates, and a lower mortality. This resistance of 5-LO−/− mice correlated with several differences in the immune response to infection, including reduced PGE2 synthesis; sustained capacity of splenocytes to produce high levels of interleukin (IL)-12 early in the infection; enhanced splenocyte production of IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ; rapid T-cell polarization to secrete high quantities of IFN-γ and low quantities of IL-10; and greater numbers of CD8+CD44highCD62Llow memory effector T cells at the end of the acute phase of infection. The high mortality in WT mice was associated with increased production of LTB4/LTC4, T cell bias to produce IFN-γ, high levels of serum nitrite, and marked protein extravasation into the peritoneal cavity, although survival was improved by treatment with a cys-LT receptor 1 antagonist. These data also provide evidence that 5-LO-derived mediators negatively affect host survival during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection. PMID:25165415

  11. Roles of STAT3 in Protein Secretion Pathways during the Acute-Phase Response

    PubMed Central

    Ahyi, Ayele-Nati N.; Quinton, Lee J.; Jones, Matthew R.; Ferrari, Joseph D.; Pepper-Cunningham, Zachary A.; Mella, Juan R.; Remick, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    The acute-phase response is characteristic of perhaps all infections, including bacterial pneumonia. In conjunction with the acute-phase response, additional biological pathways are induced in the liver and are dependent on the transcription factors STAT3 and NF-κB, but these responses are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that pneumococcal pneumonia and other severe infections increase expression of multiple components of the cellular secretory machinery in the mouse liver, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) translocon complex, which mediates protein translation into the ER, and the coat protein complexes (COPI and COPII), which mediate vesicular transport of proteins to and from the ER. Hepatocyte-specific mutation of STAT3 prevented the induction of these secretory pathways during pneumonia, with similar results observed following pharmacological activation of ER stress by using tunicamycin. These findings implicate STAT3 in the unfolded protein response and suggest that STAT3-dependent optimization of secretion may apply broadly. Pneumonia also stimulated the binding of phosphorylated STAT3 to promoter regions of secretion-related genes in the liver, supporting a direct role for STAT3 in their transcription. Altogether, these results identify a novel function of STAT3 during the acute-phase response, namely, the induction of secretory machinery in hepatocytes. This may facilitate the processing and delivery of newly synthesized loads of acute-phase proteins, enhancing innate immunity and preventing liver injury during infection. PMID:23460517

  12. Immune reconstitution during maintenance therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, relation to co-existing infection.

    PubMed

    El-Chennawi, Farha A; Al-Tonbary, Youssef A; Mossad, Youssef M; Ahmed, Mona A

    2008-08-01

    Immunosuppression is a major side effect of cancer chemotherapy. The process of immune reconstitution can be dissimilar according to the nature of the disease, type and doses of drugs, and age of the patients. Recently, several studies have examined immune reconstitution in children and young adults after intensive chemotherapy for solid tumours or stem cell transplantation. The aim of the present study is to evaluate immune reconstitution (cellular and humoral) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia during the maintenance phase of therapy and to correlate between the complicating infections and the abnormalities in immune system during reconstitution. To achieve this goal, 36 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (24 females and 12 males) in the maintenance phase of therapy with 12 healthy children of matched age and sex served as a control group were recruited in this study. The patients were taken consecutively from the Hematology/Oncology Outpatient Clinic of Mansoura University Children's Hospital (MUCH). They were subjected to thorough history taking, clinical examination and laboratory investigations in the form of: complete blood count, serum creatinine, liver function tests and evaluation of the immune system by estimation of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19 and CD56 (cellular immunity) by flow cytometry and immunoglobulins A, M and G (humoral immunity) at the first and the third month of maintenance therapy. The results of the study documented presence and persistence of leucopenia and lymphopenia during maintenance therapy with decreased medians of CD3, CD4 and CD8 from the first to the third month of therapy and in comparison to the control group. The other markers CD19, CD56, IgA, IgM, IgG and CD4/CD8 ratio showed increasing median from the first to the third month of therapy. Also we detect a significant correlation between infection and CD19 and serum IgM at the first month and between infection and CD19, IgM and CD4/CD8 ratio at the third month of

  13. Humoral immunity to tetanus, measles and rubella in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Onorateli, Myriam; Botana, Claudia; Peralta, Laura; Rebollo, Magali; Ruvinsky, Silvina; Guitter, Myriam; Felice, Maria S; Posadas, Mercedes; Evangelista, Silvina; Villar, Maria V; Golluscio, Mariana; Molina, Agustina; Fraquelli, Lidia

    2016-12-01

    Chemotherapy regimens and clinical support advances have improved survival in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The after-effects of treatment are a reason for concern, including damage to the immune system induced by immunosuppressive therapy which is reflected in the loss of antibody protection provided by prior immunizations. Our goal was to assess the presence of measles, rubella, and tetanus protective antibody titers among patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after completing chemotherapy. Sixty-one children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia seen at the Hospital Garrahan were included; patients had finished their chemotherapy at least 6 months earlier and had a complete immunization schedule before diagnosis. The rates of protective antibodies were 46% (CI: 32-59) for measles, 53% (CI 40-67) for tetanus, and 60% (CI 47-63) for rubella. These results strengthen the need to reconsider revaccination in this group of patients.

  14. Conventional and innate lymphocytes response at the acute phase of HEV infection in transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Abravanel, Florence; Barragué, Hugo; Dörr, Gaëlle; Sauné, Karine; Péron, Jean-Marie; Alric, Laurent; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques; Champagne, Eric

    2016-06-01

    The hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes usually benign and spontaneously resolving acute hepatitis in immunocompetent individuals. In immunocompromised patients with a solid-organ transplant (SOT), chronic infections occur in about 2/3 of cases. We aimed to evaluate the immune cells implicated at the acute phase of HEV infection. We studied the activation and memory markers on CD4, CD8, γδ and NK cells in 32 HEV-free control SOT patients and 23 SOT recipients, including 14 who became chronically infected. Samples from 7 immunocompetent individuals with an acute infection and 8 healthy donor samples were included for comparison. In acutely-infected SOT patients, NK and Vδ2 cells, but not other γδ cells, had an increased expression of CD69. Based on CD45RA/CD27 markers, solid-organ recipients infected with HEV contained a larger pool of circulating naive subsets among lymphocyte Tγδ cells. However, these alterations of Vδ2 cells were not associated with HEV clearance. Only the adaptive IFN-γ responses to HEV peptides, determined by ELISpot, were associated with a favorable outcome in immunocompromised patients. Transplanted patients mobilized their γδ cells at the acute phase of infection. Their precise role in HEV infection will thus deserve further investigations as they could be specifically immunomanipulated. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of the innate immune system in acute viral myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Vallejo, Jesus G; Kollias, George; Mann, Douglas L

    2009-05-01

    Although the adaptive immune system is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of viral myocarditis, the role of the innate immune system has not been well defined. To address this deficiency, we employed a unique line of mice that harbor a genomic "knock in" of a mutated TNF gene lacking the AU rich element (TNF(ARE/ARE)) that is critical for TNF mRNA stability and translation, in order to examine the contribution of the innate immune system in encephalomyocarditis-induced myocarditis (EMCV). Heterozygous mice (TNF(ARE/+)) were infected with 500 plaque-forming units of EMCV. TNF(ARE/+)mice had a significantly higher 14-day mortality and myocardial inflammation when compared to littermate control mice. Virologic studies showed that the viral load at 14 days was significantly lower in the hearts of TNF(ARE/+) mice. TNF(ARE/+) mice had an exaggerated proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine response in the heart following EMCV infection. Modulation of the innate immune response in TNF(ARE/+) mice by the late administration of prednisolone resulted in a significant improvement in survival and decreased cardiac inflammation, whereas early administration of prednisolone resulted in a blunted innate response and increased mortality in littermate control mice. Viewed together, these data suggest that the duration and degree of activation of the innate immune system plays a critical role in determining host outcomes in experimental viral myocarditis.

  16. T Helper Subsets, Peripheral Plasticity, and the Acute Phase Protein, α1-Antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Baranovski, Boris M.; Freixo-Lima, Gabriella S.; Lewis, Eli C.; Rider, Peleg

    2015-01-01

    The traditional model of T helper differentiation describes the naïve T cell as choosing one of several subsets upon stimulation and an added reciprocal inhibition aimed at maintaining the chosen subset. However, to date, evidence is mounting to support the presence of subset plasticity. This is, presumably, aimed at fine-tuning adaptive immune responses according to local signals. Reprograming of cell phenotype is made possible by changes in activation of master transcription factors, employing epigenetic modifications that preserve a flexible mode, permitting a shift between activation and silencing of genes. The acute phase response represents an example of peripheral changes that are critical in modulating T cell responses. α1-antitrypsin (AAT) belongs to the acute phase responses and has recently surfaced as a tolerogenic agent in the context of adaptive immune responses. Nonetheless, AAT does not inhibit T cell responses, nor does it shutdown inflammation per se; rather, it appears that AAT targets non-T cell immunocytes towards changing the cytokine environment of T cells, thus promoting a regulatory T cell profile. The present review focuses on this intriguing two-way communication between innate and adaptive entities, a crosstalk that holds important implications on potential therapies for a multitude of immune disorders. PMID:26583093

  17. Should Immune-Enhancing Formulations Be Used for Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Roosevelt, Hannah

    2016-08-01

    The potential for regulating immune function in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) through enteral-administered anti-inflammatory lipids has generated much interest over the past 20 years. Yet recommendations remain inconclusive regarding the utilization of ω-3 fatty acids in patients with ARDS and acute lung injury (ALI). Studies are limited in number, with differing methods, small sample sizes, and conflicting results, making recommendations difficult to interpret.

  18. Acute immune-mediated thrombocytopenia due to oxaliplatin administration: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pietrantonio, Filippo; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Buzzoni, Roberto; Bajetta, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    Drug-induced acute thrombocytopenia is an extremely rare side effect that may occur immediately after oxaliplatin infusion. This potentially fatal reaction is immune mediated and can be anticipated by mild hemorrhagic signs during previous administrations. This is the first report of acute thrombocytopenia occurring during adjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer with oxaliplatin. Clinicians should be aware of this adverse event in order to prevent possible serious consequences and stop further oxaliplatin administration.

  19. Infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei - immune correlates of survival in acute melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Dunachie, Susanna J; Jenjaroen, Kemajittra; Reynolds, Catherine J; Quigley, Kathryn J; Sergeant, Ruhena; Sumonwiriya, Manutsanun; Chaichana, Panjaporn; Chumseng, Suchintana; Ariyaprasert, Pitchayanant; Lassaux, Patricia; Gourlay, Louise; Promwong, Charuporn; Teparrukkul, Prapit; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Day, Nicholas P J; Altmann, Daniel M; Boyton, Rosemary J

    2017-09-22

    Melioidosis, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is a potentially lethal infection with no licensed vaccine. There is little understanding of why some exposed individuals have no symptoms, while others rapidly progress to sepsis and death, or why diabetes confers increased susceptibility. We prospectively recruited a cohort of 183 acute melioidosis patients and 21 control subjects from Northeast Thailand and studied immune parameters in the context of survival status and the presence or absence of diabetes. HLA-B*46 (one of the commonest HLA class I alleles in SE Asia) and HLA-C*01 were associated with an increased risk of death (odds ratio 2.8 and 3.1 respectively). Transcriptomic analysis during acute infection in diabetics indicated the importance of interplay between immune pathways including those involved in antigen presentation, chemotaxis, innate and adaptive immunity and their regulation. Survival was associated with enhanced T cell immunity to nine of fifteen immunodominant antigens analysed including AhpC (BPSL2096), BopE (BPSS1525), PilO (BPSS1599), ATP binding protein (BPSS1385) and an uncharacterised protein (BPSL2520). T cell immunity to GroEL (BPSL2697) was specifically impaired in diabetic individuals. This characterization of immunity associated with survival during acute infection offers insights into correlates of protection and a foundation for design of an effective multivalent vaccine.

  20. Anti-Tumor and Immune Enhancing Activities of Rice Bran Gramisterol on Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Somintara, Somsuda; Leardkamolkarn, Vijittra; Suttiarporn, Panawan; Mahatheeranont, Sugunya

    2016-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the blood that most commonly affects human adults. The specific cause of AML is unclear, but it induces abnormality of white blood cells that grow rapidly and accumulate in bone marrow interfering with the production and functions of the normal blood cells. AML patients face poor prognosis and low quality of life during chemotherapy or transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells due to the progressive impairment of their immune system. The goal of this study is to find natural products that have the potential to delay growth or eliminate the abnormal leukemic cells but cause less harmful effect to the body's immune system. The unsaponified fraction of Riceberry rice bran (RBDS) and the main pure compound, gramisterol, were studied for cytotoxicity and biological activities in WEHI-3 cells and in the leukemic mouse model induced by transplantation of WEHI-3 cells intraperitoneally. In the in vitro assay, RBDS and gramisterol exerted sub-G1 phase cell cycle arrest with a potent induction of apoptosis. Both of them effectively decreased cell cycle controlling proteins (cyclin D1 and cyclin E), suppressed cellular DNA synthesis and mitotic division, and reduced anti-apoptosis Bcl-2 protein, but increased apoptotic proteins (p53 and Bax) and activated caspase-3 enzyme in the intrinsic cell death stimulation pathway. In leukemic mice, daily feeding of RBDS significantly increased the amount of immune function-related cells including CD3+, CD19+, and CD11b+, and elevated the serum levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, and IL-12β cytokines, but suppressed IL-10 level. At the tumor sites, CD11b+ cells were polarized and became active phagocytotic cells. Treatment of mice normal immune cells with gramisterol alone or a combination of gramisterol with cytokines released from RBDS-treated leukemic mice splenocytes culture synergistically increased pSTAT1 transcriptional factor that up-regulated the genes controlling cell survival and

  1. Anti-Tumor and Immune Enhancing Activities of Rice Bran Gramisterol on Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Somintara, Somsuda; Leardkamolkarn, Vijittra; Suttiarporn, Panawan; Mahatheeranont, Sugunya

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the blood that most commonly affects human adults. The specific cause of AML is unclear, but it induces abnormality of white blood cells that grow rapidly and accumulate in bone marrow interfering with the production and functions of the normal blood cells. AML patients face poor prognosis and low quality of life during chemotherapy or transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells due to the progressive impairment of their immune system. The goal of this study is to find natural products that have the potential to delay growth or eliminate the abnormal leukemic cells but cause less harmful effect to the body’s immune system. Methods and Findings The unsaponified fraction of Riceberry rice bran (RBDS) and the main pure compound, gramisterol, were studied for cytotoxicity and biological activities in WEHI-3 cells and in the leukemic mouse model induced by transplantation of WEHI-3 cells intraperitoneally. In the in vitro assay, RBDS and gramisterol exerted sub-G1 phase cell cycle arrest with a potent induction of apoptosis. Both of them effectively decreased cell cycle controlling proteins (cyclin D1 and cyclin E), suppressed cellular DNA synthesis and mitotic division, and reduced anti-apoptosis Bcl-2 protein, but increased apoptotic proteins (p53 and Bax) and activated caspase-3 enzyme in the intrinsic cell death stimulation pathway. In leukemic mice, daily feeding of RBDS significantly increased the amount of immune function-related cells including CD3+, CD19+, and CD11b+, and elevated the serum levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, and IL-12β cytokines, but suppressed IL-10 level. At the tumor sites, CD11b+ cells were polarized and became active phagocytotic cells. Treatment of mice normal immune cells with gramisterol alone or a combination of gramisterol with cytokines released from RBDS-treated leukemic mice splenocytes culture synergistically increased pSTAT1 transcriptional factor that up-regulated the

  2. Restoration of intrahepatic regulatory T cells through MMP-9/13-dependent activation of TGF-β is critical for immune homeostasis following acute liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ling; Feng, Min; Gu, Jia; Xia, Zanxian; Zhang, Hongjun; Zheng, Sujun; Duan, Zhongping; Hu, Richard; Wang, Julie; Shi, Wei; Ji, Cheng; Shen, Yi; Chen, Guihua; Zheng, Song Guo; Han, Yuan-Ping

    2013-01-01

    During the acute liver injury, immune responses are provoked into eliciting inflammation in the acute phase. In the healing phase, the inflammation is terminated for wound healing and restoration of immune homeostasis. In this study, we sought to address how regulatory T cells (Tregs) are involved in the progression of liver injury and repair. In the acute phase, intrahepatic Tregs (CD4+FoxP3+Helios+) diminished promptly through apoptosis, which was followed by inflammation and tissue injury. In the healing phase, a new subset of Tregs (CD4+Foxp3+Helios−) was generated in correlation with the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) cascade and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) activation that were manifested mainly by hepatic stellate cells. Moreover, the induction of induced Tregs and wound healing were both impaired in mice lacking TGF-β signaling or MMPs. The depletion of induced Tregs also impeded wound healing for tissue repair. Together, this study demonstrates the mechanism that the loss of nTregs through apoptosis in the acute phase may facilitate inflammation, while regenerated Tregs through MMP9/13-dependent activation of TGF-β in the healing phase are critical to terminate inflammation and allow for wound healing. PMID:24280647

  3. Acute lymphoid changes and ongoing immune activation in SIV infection.

    PubMed

    Popov, J; McGraw, T; Hofmann, B; Vowels, B; Shum, A; Nishanian, P; Fahey, J L

    1992-01-01

    Two features of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection are emphasized: a transitory decrease in CD4 T cells in the first 2 weeks of infection followed by CD8 T-cell rise, and immune cell activation occurring by 4 weeks and persisting throughout the illness. The short-term changes included a fall in CD4 T cells by 2 weeks with partial recovery by 4 weeks and a CD8 rise that starts at 2 weeks. Subsequent characterization of CD4 T cells showed reduced expression of HLA-DR and CD25 (IL-2 receptor alpha chain) antigens later in SIV infection. Immune cell activation is evident in increased serum levels of neopterin and soluble CD8 antigen. Serum beta 2-microglobulin changes are less marked. Activation of CD8 T cells is reflected by increased percentages of cells expressing HLA-DR antigen. The B-cell numbers increased late in the course of SIV infection. Increased expression of the CD78 (Leu 21) activation phenotype was also seen in some monkeys. The immune activation changes (serum neopterin levels) induced by SIV infection in rhesus macaques appear to be associated with duration of illness, although the number of monkeys observed until death were too few for conclusive data. Thus, immune activation as well as T-cell deficiency may reflect significant immunopathogenic processes in SIV-induced disease.

  4. Dynamics of Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Subpopulations in the Acute and Subacute Phase of Legionnaires’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Jager, Cornelis P. C.; Gemen, Eugenie F. A.; Leuvenink, Jacqueline; Hilbink, Mirrian; Laheij, Robert J. F.; van der Poll, Tom; Wever, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective Absolute lymphocytopenia is recognised as an important hallmark of the immune response to severe infection and observed in patients with Legionnaires’ disease. To explore the immune response, we studied the dynamics of peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations in the acute and subacute phase of LD. Methods and Results EDTA-anticoagulated blood was obtained from eight patients on the day the diagnosis was made through detection of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 antigen in urine. A second blood sample was obtained in the subacute phase. Multiparametric flow cytometry was used to calculate lymphocyte counts and values for B-cells, T-cells, NK cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Expression of activation markers was analysed. The values obtained in the subacute phase were compared with an age and gender matched control group. Absolute lymphocyte count (×109/l, median and range) significantly increased from 0.8 (0.4–1.6) in the acute phase to 1.4 (0.8–3.4) in the subacute phase. B-cell count showed no significant change, while T-cell count (×106/l, median and range) significantly increased in the subacute phase (495 (182–1024) versus 979 (507–2708), p = 0.012) as a result of significant increases in both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts (374 (146–629) versus 763 (400–1507), p = 0.012 and 119 (29–328) versus 224 (107–862), p = 0.012). In the subacute phase of LD, significant increases were observed in absolute counts of activated CD4+ T-cells, naïve CD4+ T-cells and memory CD4+ T-cells. In the CD8+ T-cell compartment, activated CD8+ T-cells, naïve CD8+ T-cell and memory CD8+ T-cells were significantly increased (p<0.05). Conclusion The acute phase of LD is characterized by absolute lymphocytopenia, which recovers in the subacute phase with an increase in absolute T-cells and re-emergence of activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These observations are in line with the suggested role for T-cell activation in the immune response to LD. PMID

  5. Dynamics of peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations in the acute and subacute phase of Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed

    de Jager, Cornelis P C; Gemen, Eugenie F A; Leuvenink, Jacqueline; Hilbink, Mirrian; Laheij, Robert J F; van der Poll, Tom; Wever, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Absolute lymphocytopenia is recognised as an important hallmark of the immune response to severe infection and observed in patients with Legionnaires' disease. To explore the immune response, we studied the dynamics of peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations in the acute and subacute phase of LD. EDTA-anticoagulated blood was obtained from eight patients on the day the diagnosis was made through detection of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 antigen in urine. A second blood sample was obtained in the subacute phase. Multiparametric flow cytometry was used to calculate lymphocyte counts and values for B-cells, T-cells, NK cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Expression of activation markers was analysed. The values obtained in the subacute phase were compared with an age and gender matched control group. Absolute lymphocyte count (×10⁹/l, median and range) significantly increased from 0.8 (0.4-1.6) in the acute phase to 1.4 (0.8-3.4) in the subacute phase. B-cell count showed no significant change, while T-cell count (×10⁶/l, median and range) significantly increased in the subacute phase (495 (182-1024) versus 979 (507-2708), p = 0.012) as a result of significant increases in both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts (374 (146-629) versus 763 (400-1507), p = 0.012 and 119 (29-328) versus 224 (107-862), p = 0.012). In the subacute phase of LD, significant increases were observed in absolute counts of activated CD4+ T-cells, naïve CD4+ T-cells and memory CD4+ T-cells. In the CD8+ T-cell compartment, activated CD8+ T-cells, naïve CD8+ T-cell and memory CD8+ T-cells were significantly increased (p<0.05). The acute phase of LD is characterized by absolute lymphocytopenia, which recovers in the subacute phase with an increase in absolute T-cells and re-emergence of activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These observations are in line with the suggested role for T-cell activation in the immune response to LD.

  6. Chronic transplantation immunity in newts: temperature susceptibility of an effector phase in allo-skin graft rejection.

    PubMed

    Kinefuchi, Kenjiroh; Kushida, Yoshihiro; Johnouchi, Masato; Shimizu, Yuiko; Ohneda, Hikaru; Fujii, Masato; Hosono, Masamichi

    2011-07-01

    Urodele amphibians are unique due to their greatly reduced immune responsiveness compared to bony fishes, which show acute immune responsiveness. In newts, the mean survival time of allogenic skin grafts in the transplantation immunity was 48.8 ± 8.3 days at 25°C, suggesting that it occurs in a chronic manner. The graft rejection process was categorized into three stages: a latent stage with frequent blood circulation, or the immune induction phase; a vascular stoppage stage with dominant infiltrating cells of T cells; and a rejection stage showing the change of the dominant cells to monocytes/macrophages, probably as effector cells, tetntatively referred to as the immune effector phase. The immune induction phase is susceptible to the cyclophosphamide (CY) mitosis inhibitor, but not to a temperature shift from 18 to 27°C, while the immune effector phase is susceptible to temperature shifts, but not CY-treatment, although the temperature shift failed to shorten the graft survival time to less than 25 days, which nearly equals that of the secondary set of grafts where the lack of complete blood circulation is remarkable and graft rejection is resistant to CY-treatment. In contrast, a very low temperature (5-10°C) completely prevented effector generation in newts; in frogs, however, it is reported that such low temperatures did not prevent the generation of effectors. Taken together, these data suggest that chronic responses in newts are due to effector cells other than cytotoxic T cells; possible effector cells are discussed.

  7. [The nutrition of acute phase in patients with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Rie; Sebe, Mayu

    2016-03-01

    In this session, we describe the acute phase in patients with metabolic syndrome from two sides; acute disease that occurs higher in patients with metabolic syndrome such as colonary heart disease and stroke, and acute aggravation of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome. The electrolyte imbalance is frequently detected in critical ill patients. It is reported that the extreme abnormalities of ionized calcium concentrations are independent predictors of mortality. In addition, from clinical database MIMIC-Ⅱ,calcium supplementation improves clinical outcome in intensive care unit patients. Although metabolic syndrome; lifestyle-related disease, is a chronic disease, the possibility of falling into acute disease by having it becomes very high and improvement of electrolyte imbalance, especially hypocalcaemia is expected to effective on clinical outcome.

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi: dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and immune response during the chronic phase of the experimental Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Leony Cristina; Santello, Fabricia Helena; Del Vecchio Filipin, Marina; Brazão, Vânia; Caetano, Luana Naiara; Toldo, Miriam Paula Alonso; Caldeira, Jerri C; do Prado Júnior, José Clóvis

    2009-07-07

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has long been considered as a precursor for many steroid hormones. It also enhances the immune responses against a wide range of viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. The aims of this work were to evaluate the influences of exogenous DHEA treatment on Wistar rats infected with the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi during the acute and its influence on the chronic phase of infection. Animals were subcutaneous treated with 40 mg/kg body weight/day of DHEA. DHEA treatment promoted increased lymphoproliferative responses as well as enhanced concentrations of NO and IL-12. So, we point in the direction that our results validate the utility of the use of DHEA as an alternative therapy candidate against T. cruzi.

  9. Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. The Rate of Conversion from Immune-tolerant Phase to Early Immune-clearance Phase in Children with Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Hong, Suk Jin; Park, Hyo Jung; Chu, Mi Ae; Choi, Bong Seok; Choe, Byung-Ho

    2014-03-01

    The spontaneous seroconversion rate of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) virus infection in children is lower than that in adults. However, few studies have investigated the rate of transition from the immune-tolerant to the early immune-clearance phase in children. From February 2000 to August 2011, we enrolled 133 children aged <18 years who had visited the Department of Pediatrics, Kyungpook National University Hospital. All subjects were in the immune-tolerant phase of HBeAg-positive CHB virus infection. The estimated transition rate into the early immune-clearance phase was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Among the 133 enrolled pediatric CHB virus infection patients in the HBeAg-positive immune-tolerant phase, only 21 children (15.8%) had converted to the early immune-clearance phase. The average age at entry into active hepatitis was 10.6±4.8 years. The incidence of transition from the immune-tolerant to the early immune-clearance phase in these children was 1.7 episodes/100 patient-years. When analyzed by age, the estimated transition rate was 4.6%, 7.1%, and 28.0% for patients aged <6, 6-12, >12 years, respectively. In children with CHB virus infection, the estimated rate of entry into the early immune-clearance phase was 28.0% for patients aged 12-18 years, which was significantly higher than that observed for children aged <12 years (11.7%; p=0.001).

  11. Cellular Immune Responses in Seronegative Sexual Contacts of Acute Hepatitis C Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Sanaa M.; Amin, Ashraf; Madwar, Mohamed; Graham, Camilla S.; He, Qi; Al Tawil, Ahmed; Rasenack, Jens; Nakano, Tatsunori; Robertson, Betty; Ismail, Alaa; Koziel, Margaret James

    2004-01-01

    Acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) is typically defined as new viremia and antibody seroconversion. Rates and immunologic correlates of hepatitis C clearance have therefore been based on clearance of viremia only in individuals who initially had an antibody response. We sought to characterize the immunological correlates of clearance in patients with acute hepatitis C and their sexual contacts. We prospectively determined CD4+ and CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses in index patients with acute HCV and their sexual contacts who developed acute infection, either with or without spontaneous clearance, as well as those contacts who never developed viremia. Responses were measured using proliferation and ELISpot assays for CD4+ and CD8+ responses. We demonstrate in this prospective study that cellular immune responses can develop in exposed but persistently aviremic and antibody-negative individuals as well as those individuals with spontaneous clearance of acute HCV. These findings lend further credence to the importance of cellular immune responses in recovery from HCV and suggest that low exposure to HCV may lead to development of HCV-specific immune responses without ongoing HCV replication. This finding has important implications for HCV vaccine and therapeutic development. PMID:15507612

  12. Immune responses and immunopathology in acute and chronic viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eui-Cheol; Sung, Pil Soo; Park, Su-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are responsible for most cases of viral hepatitis. Infection by each type of virus results in a different typical natural disease course and clinical outcome that are determined by virological and immunological factors. HCV tends to establish a chronic persistent infection, whereas HAV does not. HBV is effectively controlled in adults, although it persists for a lifetime after neonatal infection. In this Review, we discuss the similarities and differences in immune responses to and immunopathogenesis of HAV, HBV and HCV infections, which may explain the distinct courses and outcomes of each hepatitis virus infection.

  13. Carbohydrate Supplementation and Immune Responses After Acute Exhaustive Resistance Exercise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    beverage contained aspartame, citric acid, food coloring, and acesulfame potassium (a high-intensity sweetener to make the product more palatable). On...in Sports and Exercise, 32, S369–S376. Miles, M.P., Leach, S.K., Kraemer, W.J., Dohi, K ., Bush, J.A., & Mastro, A.M. (1998). Leukocyte adhesion...Medicine, 18(Suppl.1), S2–S7. Pedersen, B.K., Rohde, T., & Ostrowski, K . (1998). Recovery of the immune system after exercise. Acta Physiologica

  14. Acute exercise does not induce an acute phase response (APR) in Standardbred trotters.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Lena; Buhl, Rikke; Nostell, Katarina; Bak, Lars; Petersen, Ellen; Lindholm, Maria; Jacobsen, Stine

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether acute strenuous exercise (1600- to 2500-m race) would elicit an acute phase response (APR) in Standardbred trotters. Blood levels of several inflammatory markers [serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin, fibrinogen, white blood cell count (WBC), and iron], muscle enzymes [creatinine kinase (CK) and aspartate transaminase (AST)], and hemoglobin were assessed in 58 Standardbred trotters before and after racing. Hemoglobin levels increased and iron levels decreased 12 to 14 h after racing and haptoglobin concentrations, white blood cell counts, and iron levels were decreased 2 and/or 7 d after racing. Concentrations of CK, AST, SAA, and fibrinogen were unaltered in response to racing. Acute strenuous exercise did not elicit an acute phase reaction. The observed acute increase in hemoglobin levels and decreases in haptoglobin and iron levels may have been caused by exercise-induced hemolysis, which indicates that horses might experience a condition similar to athlete's anemia in humans. The pathogenesis and clinical implications of the hematological and blood-biochemical changes elicited by acute exercise in Standardbred trotters in the present study warrant further investigation.

  15. Pneumonia, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, and Early Immune-Modulator Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Yil

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is caused by infectious insults, such as pneumonia from various pathogens or related to other noninfectious events. Clinical and histopathologic characteristics are similar across severely affected patients, suggesting that a common mode of immune reaction may be involved in the immunopathogenesis of ARDS. There may be etiologic substances that have an affinity for respiratory cells and induce lung cell injury in cases of ARDS. These substances originate not only from pathogens, but also from injured host cells. At the molecular level, these substances have various sizes and biochemical characteristics, classifying them as protein substances and non-protein substances. Immune cells and immune proteins may recognize and act on these substances, including pathogenic proteins and peptides, depending upon the size and biochemical properties of the substances (this theory is known as the protein-homeostasis-system hypothesis). The severity or chronicity of ARDS depends on the amount of etiologic substances with corresponding immune reactions, the duration of the appearance of specific immune cells, or the repertoire of specific immune cells that control the substances. Therefore, treatment with early systemic immune modulators (corticosteroids and/or intravenous immunoglobulin) as soon as possible may reduce aberrant immune responses in the potential stage of ARDS. PMID:28208675

  16. Circulating Microbial Products and Acute Phase Proteins as Markers of Pathogenesis in Lymphatic Filarial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Anuradha, R.; George, P. Jovvian; Pavan Kumar, N.; Fay, Michael P.; Kumaraswami, V.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2012-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis can be associated with development of serious pathology in the form of lymphedema, hydrocele, and elephantiasis in a subset of infected patients. Dysregulated host inflammatory responses leading to systemic immune activation are thought to play a central role in filarial disease pathogenesis. We measured the plasma levels of microbial translocation markers, acute phase proteins, and inflammatory cytokines in individuals with chronic filarial pathology with (CP Ag+) or without (CP Ag−) active infection; with clinically asymptomatic infections (INF); and in those without infection (endemic normal [EN]). Comparisons between the two actively infected groups (CP Ag+ compared to INF) and those without active infection (CP Ag− compared to EN) were used preliminarily to identify markers of pathogenesis. Thereafter, we tested for group effects among all the four groups using linear models on the log transformed responses of the markers. Our data suggest that circulating levels of microbial translocation products (lipopolysaccharide and LPS-binding protein), acute phase proteins (haptoglobin and serum amyloid protein-A), and inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-12, and TNF-α) are associated with pathogenesis of disease in lymphatic filarial infection and implicate an important role for circulating microbial products and acute phase proteins. PMID:22685406

  17. Functional diets modulate the acute phase protein response in Oncorhynchus mykiss subjected to chronic stress and challenged with Vibrio anguillarum.

    PubMed

    Castro-Osses, Darlyng; Carrera-Naipil, Crisleri; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian; Gonçalves, Ana Teresa

    2017-07-01

    The acute phase response to pathogens alters the production of proinflammatory cytokines that, in turn, activate the synthesis of acute phase proteins. These proteins neutralize, prevent, and indicate tissue damage, thereby influencing the specific immune response and allowing the organism to regain homeostasis. Functional diets based in pre- and probiotics are used in aquaculture to improve fish health and resistance to diseases, but there is an information gap on the mechanisms involved in these effects and if these diets are efficient when fish are raised under high stocking densities. This study aimed an evaluation of the acute phase response in Oncorhynchus mykiss fed functional diets supplemented with pre- and probiotics (i.e. mannan-oligosaccharides and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively) and challenged by either Vibrio anguillarum or chronic stress via maintenance under high stocking densities. For this, the relative expression of acute phase response related genes in liver, and of inflammatory response related genes in head kidney was evaluated by RT-qPCR. The supplemented diets differentially modulated the acute phase protein response to the assessed challenge conditions, specifically evidencing an overexpression of the genes HAPT, SAA, LECT2, and IL-1β under chronic stress and of HAPT, IL-1β, IL8, and LECT2 at 24 h post-challenge with V. anguillarum. The observed early-stage regulation of acute phase proteins and of the immune response by the probiotic S. cerevisiae and by prebiotic mannan-oligosaccharides suggests that both supplements have high immunostimulatory potentials for fish farmed under high stocking densities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Tumor necrosis factor participates in the pathogenesis of acute immune complex alveolitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, J S; Yabroff, K R; Remick, D G; Kunkel, S L; Chensue, S W; Kunkel, R G; Johnson, K J; Ward, P A

    1989-01-01

    We have examined the role of intrapulmonary TNF in a rat model of acute immune complex-triggered alveolitis. Intratracheal instillation of IgG anti-bovine serum albumin (anti-BSA) followed by intravenous infusion of BSA results in acute alveolitis. Over the 4-h course of evolving lung injury, a 10-fold increase in TNF activity occurred in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung sections and BAL cells revealed that alveolar macrophages are the chief source of TNF. Antibodies that specifically neutralize rat TNF activity were raised in rabbits immunized with recombinant mouse TNF alpha. When administered into the lungs with anti-BSA, anti-TNF resulted in a marked reduction (up to 61%) in lung injury. Intratracheal instillation of exogenous TNF alone, or in combination with anti-BSA, resulted in an increase in lung injury compared to controls. Morphometric analysis and measurements of myeloperoxidase activities in whole lung extracts from rats treated with anti-TNF revealed a marked reduction in neutrophils compared to positive controls. The anti-TNF antibody preparation did not inhibit in vitro complement activation or diminish neutrophil chemotactic activity present in activated rat serum. These data indicate that intrapulmonary TNF activity is required for the full development of acute immune complex-triggered alveolitis, that alveolar macrophages are the primary source of this cytokine, and that TNF participates in the pathogenesis of immune complex alveolitis through a mechanism involving neutrophil recruitment. Images PMID:2531759

  19. Acute and chronic over-exertion: do depressed immune responses provide useful markers?

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J; Shek, P N

    1998-04-01

    There are ethical objections to inducing cumulative muscle damage and associated decrements of performance deliberately in a healthy athlete. Available data on acute and chronic over-exertion thus include the changes of immune response observed following a single bout of exhausting exercise, sequential observations made on top-level competitors as they approach peak training periods, and longitudinal laboratory studies of heavy (but not necessarily damaging) bouts of training. In all three of these situations, subclinical muscle damage initiates an acute inflammatory response, with a resulting deterioration in physical performance. Although much smaller in degree and shorter in duration, the associated changes in immune function are similar to those seen in sepsis. There have been major advances in immunological technique over the past decade, and significant changes in a number of elements of the immune response can be identified in athletes during periods of heavy training. The most promising immunological marker of excessive training seems a decrease in salivary IgA concentration. However, no single change occurs with sufficient consistency to identify the individual competitor who is at risk of overtraining. Mechanisms can be conceived that convert a sequence of excessive training bouts into an acute and then a chronic inflammatory process, but the syndrome of overtraining has a complex overlay of biological and psychological influences. It remains more easily detected by decreases in physical performance and alterations in mood state than by changes in immune function.

  20. Cellular Immune Responses and Viral Diversity in Individuals Treated during Acute and Early HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Altfeld, Marcus; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Shankarappa, Raj; Mukherjee, Joia S.; Hecht, Frederick M.; Eldridge, Robert L.; Addo, Marylyn M.; Poon, Samuel H.; Phillips, Mary N.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Sax, Paul E.; Boswell, Steve; Kahn, James O.; Brander, Christian; Goulder, Philip J.R.; Levy, Jay A.; Mullins, James I.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2001-01-01

    Immune responses induced during the early stages of chronic viral infections are thought to influence disease outcome. Using HIV as a model, we examined virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), T helper cells, and viral genetic diversity in relation to duration of infection and subsequent response to antiviral therapy. Individuals with acute HIV-1 infection treated before seroconversion had weaker CTL responses directed at fewer epitopes than persons who were treated after seroconversion. However, treatment-induced control of viremia was associated with the development of strong T helper cell responses in both groups. After 1 yr of antiviral treatment initiated in acute or early infection, all epitope-specific CTL responses persisted despite undetectable viral loads. The breadth and magnitude of CTL responses remained significantly less in treated acute infection than in treated chronic infection, but viral diversity was also significantly less with immediate therapy. We conclude that early treatment of acute HIV infection leads to a more narrowly directed CTL response, stronger T helper cell responses, and a less diverse virus population. Given the need for T helper cells to maintain effective CTL responses and the ability of virus diversification to accommodate immune escape, we hypothesize that early therapy of primary infection may be beneficial despite induction of less robust CTL responses. These data also provide rationale for therapeutic immunization aimed at broadening CTL responses in treated primary HIV infection. PMID:11148221

  1. Hepatic acute phase proteins--regulation by IL-6- and IL-1-type cytokines involving STAT3 and its crosstalk with NF-κB-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Bode, Johannes G; Albrecht, Ute; Häussinger, Dieter; Heinrich, Peter C; Schaper, Fred

    2012-01-01

    The function of the liver as an important constituent of the immune system involved in innate as well as adaptive immunity is warranted by different highly specialized cell populations. As the major source of acute phase proteins, including secreted pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs), short pentraxins, components of the complement system or regulators of iron metabolism, hepatocytes are essential constituents of innate immunity and largely contribute to the control of a systemic inflammatory response. The production of acute phase proteins in hepatocytes is controlled by a variety of different cytokines released during the inflammatory process with IL-1- and IL-6-type cytokines as the leading regulators operating both as a cascade and as a network having additive, inhibitory, or synergistic regulatory effects on acute phase protein expression. Hence, IL-1β substantially modifies IL-6-induced acute phase protein production as it almost completely abrogates production of acute phase proteins such as γ-fibrinogen, α(2)-macroglobulin or α(1)-antichymotrypsin, whereas production of for example hepcidin, C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A is strongly up-regulated. This switch-like regulation of IL-6-induced acute phase protein production by IL-1β is due to a complex processing of the intracellular signaling events activated in response to IL-6 and/or IL-1β, with the crosstalk between STAT3- and NF-κB-mediated signal transduction being of particular importance. Recent data suggest that in this context complex formation between STAT3 and the p65 subunit of NF-κB might be of key importance. The present review summarizes the regulation of acute phase protein production focusing on the role of the crosstalk of STAT3- and NF-κB-driven pathways for transcriptional control of acute phase gene expression.

  2. Acute-phase proteins in relation to neuropsychiatric symptoms and use of psychotropic medication in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Bouwens, J A; Hubers, A A M; van Duijn, E; Cobbaert, C M; Roos, R A C; van der Mast, R C; Giltay, E J

    2014-08-01

    Activation of the innate immune system has been postulated in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD). We studied serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and low albumin as positive and negative acute-phase proteins in HD. Multivariate linear and logistic regression was used to study the association between acute-phase protein levels in relation to clinical, neuropsychiatric, cognitive, and psychotropic use characteristics in a cohort consisting of 122 HD mutation carriers and 42 controls at first biomarker measurement, and 85 HD mutation carriers and 32 controls at second biomarker measurement. Significant associations were found between acute-phase protein levels and Total Functioning Capacity (TFC) score, severity of apathy, cognitive impairment, and the use of antipsychotics. Interestingly, all significant results with neuropsychiatric symptoms disappeared after additional adjusting for antipsychotic use. High sensitivity CRP levels were highest and albumin levels were lowest in mutation carriers who continuously used antipsychotics during follow-up versus those that had never used antipsychotics (mean difference for CRP 1.4 SE mg/L; P=0.04; mean difference for albumin 3 SE g/L; P<0.001). The associations found between acute-phase proteins and TFC score, apathy, and cognitive impairment could mainly be attributed to the use of antipsychotics. This study provides evidence that HD mutation carriers who use antipsychotics are prone to develop an acute-phase response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  3. Normal Caloric Responses during Acute Phase of Vestibular Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Uk; Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Koo, Ja-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We report a novel finding of caloric conversion from normal responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase of vestibular neuritis (VN). Methods We recruited 893 patients with a diagnosis of VN at Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2003 to 2014 after excluding 28 patients with isolated inferior divisional VN (n=14) and those without follow-up tests despite normal caloric responses initially (n=14). We retrospectively analyzed the neurotological findings in four (0.5%) of the patients who showed a conversion from initially normal caloric responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase. Results In those four patients, the initial caloric tests were performed within 2 days of symptom onset, and conversion into unilateral caloric paresis was documented 1–4 days later. The clinical and laboratory findings during the initial evaluation were consistent with VN in all four patients except for normal findings in bedside head impulse tests in one of them. Conclusions Normal findings in caloric tests should be interpreted with caution during the acute phase of suspected VN. Follow-up evaluation should be considered when the findings of the initial caloric test are normal, but VN remains the most plausible diagnosis. PMID:26932259

  4. Acute phase protein response in the capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris).

    PubMed

    Bernal, Luis; Feser, Mariane; Martínez-Subiela, Silvia; García-Martínez, Juan D; Cerón, José J; Tecles, Fernando

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated the acute phase protein response in capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris). Three animal groups were used: 1) healthy animals (n=30), 2) a group in which experimental inflammation with turpentine was induced (n=6), and 3) a group affected with sarcoptic scabies (n=14) in which 10 animals were treated with ivermectin. Haptoglobin (Hp), acid-soluble glycoprotein (ASG) and albumin were analyzed in all animals. In those treated with turpentine, Hp reached its maximum value at 2 wk with a 2.7-fold increase, whereas ASG increased 1.75-fold and albumin decreased 0.87-fold 1 wk after the induction of inflammation. Capybaras affected with sarcoptic scabies presented increases in Hp and ASG of 4.98- and 3.18-fold, respectively, and a 0.87-fold decrease in albumin, compared with healthy animals. Haptoglobin and ASG can be considered as moderate, positive acute phase proteins in capybaras because they showed less than 10-fold increases after an inflammatory process and reached their peak concentrations 1 wk after the induction of inflammation. Conversely, albumin can be considered a negative acute phase protein in capybaras because it showed a reduction in concentration after inflammatory stimulus.

  5. Profiling the Humoral Immune Response of Acute and Chronic Q Fever by Protein Microarray*

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Adam; Chen, Chen; Jain, Aarti; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Jasinskas, Algimantas; Pablo, Jozelyn; Hendrix, Laura R.; Samuel, James E.; Felgner, Philip L.

    2011-01-01

    Antigen profiling using comprehensive protein microarrays is a powerful tool for characterizing the humoral immune response to infectious pathogens. Coxiella burnetii is a CDC category B bioterrorist infectious agent with worldwide distribution. In order to assess the antibody repertoire of acute and chronic Q fever patients we have constructed a protein microarray containing 93% of the proteome of Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever. Here we report the profile of the IgG and IgM seroreactivity in 25 acute Q fever patients in longitudinal samples. We found that both early and late time points of infection have a very consistent repertoire of IgM and IgG response, with a limited number of proteins undergoing increasing or decreasing seroreactivity. We also probed a large collection of acute and chronic Q fever patient samples and identified serological markers that can differentiate between the two disease states. In this comparative analysis we confirmed the identity of numerous IgG biomarkers of acute infection, identified novel IgG biomarkers for acute and chronic infections, and profiled for the first time the IgM antibody repertoire for both acute and chronic Q fever. Using these results we were able to devise a test that can distinguish acute from chronic Q fever. These results also provide a unique perspective on isotype switch and demonstrate the utility of protein microarrays for simultaneously examining the dynamic humoral immune response against thousands of proteins from a large number of patients. The results presented here identify novel seroreactive antigens for the development of recombinant protein-based diagnostics and subunit vaccines, and provide insight into the development of the antibody response. PMID:21817167

  6. Elimination Half-Lives of Acute Phase Proteins in Rats and Beagle Dogs During Acute Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi, Takashi; Seita, Tetsuro; Momotani, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Shunsuke; Hagimori, Kohei; Yamamoto, Shizuo

    2015-08-01

    The half-lives of typical acute phase proteins in rats and beagle dogs during acute inflammation were investigated. Acute inflammation was induced by injection of turpentine oil in rats and administration of indomethacin in beagle dogs. Serum concentrations of α2-macroglobulin (α2M) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and α1-acid glycoprotein (AAG) was measured by single radial immunodiffusion. Half-life was calculated as 0.693/elimination rate constant (K). The mean half-lives in the terminal elimination phase of α2M and AAG were 68.1 and 164.8 h, respectively. The half-life of AAG was significantly longer than that of α2M. Mean half-lives in the terminal elimination phase of CRP and AAG were 161.9 and 304.4 h, respectively. The half-life of AAG was significantly longer than that of CRP in beagle dogs. No significant differences in the half-life of AAG were observed between rats and beagle dogs. Furthermore, serum concentrations in the terminal elimination phase could be simulated with the K data acquired in this study.

  7. Modulation of acute immune complex-mediated tissue injury by the presence of polyionic substances.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, J. S.; Ward, P. A.; Johnson, K. J.; Ginsburg, I.

    1987-01-01

    Considerable attention has been focused on the role of electrostatic charge in the pathogenesis of immune complex-mediated tissue injury. The authors have examined the ability of cationic (histone, polyhistidine, polyarginine) and anionic (polyanetholsulfonate) polyelectrolytes to modulate acute immune complex-mediated tissue injury. Tissue injury elicited in rats by the reversed dermal Arthus reaction was increased 26-43% by addition of polyelectrolytes to antibody prior to its intradermal injection. Kinetic studies using 111In-labeled neutrophils indicated that the enhanced tissue injury was not the result of increased influx of neutrophils. Infusion of polyethylene glycol-conjugated superoxide dismutase prior to induction of the Arthus reaction resulted in 40-68% suppression of tissue injury. Concomitant in vitro functional studies (enzyme secretion, O-2 and H2O2 generation, and chemiluminescence) of rat neutrophils demonstrated that addition of polyelectrolytes to preformed immune complexes (IgG-bovine serum albumin) resulted in marked increases in O-2, H2O2, and chemiluminescence, but no increases in enzyme secretion, compared with neutrophils stimulated with immune complexes alone. The cationic polyelectrolytes did not alter the capacity of preformed immune complexes to activate complement in vitro. These studies suggest that both cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes can increase the pathogenic potential of immune complexes and that this modulation is, at least in part, mediated by enhanced generation of toxic oxygen-derived metabolites by neutrophils. PMID:3037912

  8. Lymphocyte subpopulations during acute and convalescence phases of malaria.

    PubMed

    Tongtawe, P; Chaicumpa, W; Tapchaisri, P; Looareesuwan, S; Webster, H K

    1988-06-01

    Lymphocytes of normal healthy persons were separated from blood by Ficoll-Hypaque gradient centrifugation and iron-magnet application. peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were stained by various dye-labeled monoclonal antibodies. Cells positive for specific surface markers were enumerated by a fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) and fluorescence microscope (FM). The results revealed that the percentages of cells positive with one monoclonal antibody counted by these two techniques were similar while the percentages of cells with double staining were higher when counted by FACS than by FM. Lymphocyte subpopulations of 18 patients infected with Plasmodium falciparum during acute and convalescence period were studied. Lymphocytopenia occurred during the acute infection while total white blood cell counts were normal. PBL of the patients were stained with OKT3, OKT4, OKT8, Leu-11 and a combination of Leu-7, Leu-1 monoclonal antibodies. The absolute numbers of all lymphocyte subpopulations were decreased during the acute infection while T8 positive cells were decreased in both percentage and absolute number. Thus T4:T8 ratio (1.7:1) became higher than normal (1.3:1) at this period. During convalescence phase, absolute numbers and percentages of Leu-7+, Leu-1+ and perhaps Leu-7+, Leu-11- cells which had low NK cell activity were significantly higher than during acute illness. The finding might explain why the NK cell activity was low during the convalescence period.

  9. Clinicopathological features of acute kidney injury associated with immune checkpoint inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cortazar, Frank B.; Marrone, Kristen A.; Troxell, Megan L.; Ralto, Kenneth M.; Hoenig, Melanie P.; Brahmer, Julie R.; Le, Dung T.; Lipson, Evan J.; Glezerman, Ilya G.; Wolchok, Jedd; Cornell, Lynn D.; Feldman, Paul; Stokes, Michael B.; Zapata, Sarah A.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Ott, Patrick A.; Yamashita, Michifumi; Leaf, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors (CPIs), monoclonal antibodies that target inhibitory receptors expressed on T cells, represent an emerging class of immunotherapy used in treating solid organ and hematologic malignancies. We describe the clinical and histologic features of 13 patients with CPI-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) who underwent kidney biopsy. Median time from initiation of a CPI to AKI was 91 (range, 21 to 245) days. Pyuria was present in 8 patients, and the median urine protein to creatinine ratio was 0.48 (range, 0.12 to 0.98) g/g. An extra-renal immune-related adverse event occurred prior to the onset of AKI in 7 patients. Median peak serum creatinine was 4.5 (interquartile range, 3.6-7.3) mg/dl with 4 patients requiring hemodialysis. The prevalent pathologic lesion was acute tubulointerstitial nephritis in 12 patients, with 3 having granulomatous features, and one thrombotic microangiopathy. Among the 12 patients with acute tubulointerstitial nephritis, 10 received treatment with glucocorticoids, resulting in complete or partial improvement in renal function in 2 and 7 patients, respectively. However, the two patients with acute tubulointerstitial nephritis not given glucocorticoids had no improvement in renal function. Thus, CPI-induced AKI is a new entity that presents with clinical and histologic features similar to other causes of drug-induced acute tubulointerstitial nephritis, though with a longer latency period. Glucocorticoids appear to be a potentially effective treatment strategy. Hence, AKI due to CPIs may be caused by a unique mechanism of action linked to reprogramming of the immune system, leading to loss of tolerance. PMID:27282937

  10. Clinicopathological features of acute kidney injury associated with immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cortazar, Frank B; Marrone, Kristen A; Troxell, Megan L; Ralto, Kenneth M; Hoenig, Melanie P; Brahmer, Julie R; Le, Dung T; Lipson, Evan J; Glezerman, Ilya G; Wolchok, Jedd; Cornell, Lynn D; Feldman, Paul; Stokes, Michael B; Zapata, Sarah A; Hodi, F Stephen; Ott, Patrick A; Yamashita, Michifumi; Leaf, David E

    2016-09-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors (CPIs), monoclonal antibodies that target inhibitory receptors expressed on T cells, represent an emerging class of immunotherapy used in treating solid organ and hematologic malignancies. We describe the clinical and histologic features of 13 patients with CPI-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) who underwent kidney biopsy. Median time from initiation of a CPI to AKI was 91 (range, 21 to 245) days. Pyuria was present in 8 patients, and the median urine protein to creatinine ratio was 0.48 (range, 0.12 to 0.98) g/g. An extrarenal immune-related adverse event occurred prior to the onset of AKI in 7 patients. Median peak serum creatinine was 4.5 (interquartile range, 3.6-7.3) mg/dl with 4 patients requiring hemodialysis. The prevalent pathologic lesion was acute tubulointerstitial nephritis in 12 patients, with 3 having granulomatous features, and 1 thrombotic microangiopathy. Among the 12 patients with acute tubulointerstitial nephritis, 10 received treatment with glucocorticoids, resulting in complete or partial improvement in renal function in 2 and 7 patients, respectively. However, the 2 patients with acute tubulointerstitial nephritis not given glucocorticoids had no improvement in renal function. Thus, CPI-induced AKI is a new entity that presents with clinical and histologic features similar to other causes of drug-induced acute tubulointerstitial nephritis, though with a longer latency period. Glucocorticoids appear to be a potentially effective treatment strategy. Hence, AKI due to CPIs may be caused by a unique mechanism of action linked to reprogramming of the immune system, leading to loss of tolerance. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Immune Response to Acute Focal Cerebral Ischemia and Associated Post-stroke Immunodepression: A Focused Review

    PubMed Central

    Famakin, Bolanle M.

    2014-01-01

    It is currently well established that the immune system is activated in response to transient or focal cerebral ischemia. This acute immune activation occurs in response to damage, and injury, to components of the neurovascular unit and is mediated by the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response. The initial immune activation is rapid, occurs via the innate immune response and leads to inflammation. The inflammatory mediators produced during the innate immune response in turn lead to recruitment of inflammatory cells and the production of more inflammatory mediators that result in activation of the adaptive immune response. Under ideal conditions, this inflammation gives way to tissue repair and attempts at regeneration. However, for reasons that are just being understood, immunosuppression occurs following acute stroke leading to post-stroke immunodepression. This review focuses on the current state of knowledge regarding innate and adaptive immune activation in response to focal cerebral ischemia as well as the immunodepression that can occur following stroke. A better understanding of the intricate and complex events that take place following immune response activation, to acute cerebral ischemia, is imperative for the development of effective novel immunomodulatory therapies for the treatment of acute stroke. PMID:25276490

  12. Early High-dosage Atorvastatin Treatment Improved Serum Immune-inflammatory Markers and Functional Outcome in Acute Ischemic Strokes Classified as Large Artery Atherosclerotic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Maida, Carlo; Arnao, Valentina; Corte, Vittoriano Della; Simonetta, Irene; Corpora, Francesca; Di Bona, Danilo; Maugeri, Rosario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Statins have beneficial effects on cerebral circulation and brain parenchyma during ischemic stroke and reperfusion. The primary hypothesis of this randomized parallel trial was that treatment with 80 mg/day of atorvastatin administered early at admission after acute atherosclerotic ischemic stroke could reduce serum levels of markers of immune-inflammatory activation of the acute phase and that this immune-inflammatory modulation could have a possible effect on prognosis of ischemic stroke evaluated by some outcome indicators. We enrolled 42 patients with acute ischemic stroke classified as large arteries atherosclerosis stroke (LAAS) randomly assigned in a randomized parallel trial to the following groups: Group A, 22 patients treated with atorvastatin 80 mg (once-daily) from admission day until discharge; Group B, 20 patients not treated with atorvastatin 80 mg until discharge, and after discharge, treatment with atorvastatin has been started. At 72 hours and at 7 days after acute ischemic stroke, subjects of group A showed significantly lower plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, whereas no significant difference with regard to plasma levels of IL-10, E-Selectin, and P-Selectin was observed between the 2 groups. At 72 hours and 7 days after admission, stroke patients treated with atorvastatin 80 mg in comparison with stroke subjects not treated with atorvastatin showed a significantly lower mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and modified Rankin scores. Our findings provide the first evidence that atorvastatin acutely administered immediately after an atherosclerotic ischemic stroke exerts a lowering effect on immune-inflammatory activation of the acute phase of stroke and that its early use is associated to a better functional and prognostic profile. PMID:27043681

  13. Early High-dosage Atorvastatin Treatment Improved Serum Immune-inflammatory Markers and Functional Outcome in Acute Ischemic Strokes Classified as Large Artery Atherosclerotic Stroke: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Maida, Carlo; Arnao, Valentina; Della Corte, Vittoriano; Simonetta, Irene; Corpora, Francesca; Di Bona, Danilo; Maugeri, Rosario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Statins have beneficial effects on cerebral circulation and brain parenchyma during ischemic stroke and reperfusion. The primary hypothesis of this randomized parallel trial was that treatment with 80 mg/day of atorvastatin administered early at admission after acute atherosclerotic ischemic stroke could reduce serum levels of markers of immune-inflammatory activation of the acute phase and that this immune-inflammatory modulation could have a possible effect on prognosis of ischemic stroke evaluated by some outcome indicators. We enrolled 42 patients with acute ischemic stroke classified as large arteries atherosclerosis stroke (LAAS) randomly assigned in a randomized parallel trial to the following groups: Group A, 22 patients treated with atorvastatin 80 mg (once-daily) from admission day until discharge; Group B, 20 patients not treated with atorvastatin 80 mg until discharge, and after discharge, treatment with atorvastatin has been started. At 72 hours and at 7 days after acute ischemic stroke, subjects of group A showed significantly lower plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, whereas no significant difference with regard to plasma levels of IL-10, E-Selectin, and P-Selectin was observed between the 2 groups. At 72 hours and 7 days after admission, stroke patients treated with atorvastatin 80 mg in comparison with stroke subjects not treated with atorvastatin showed a significantly lower mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and modified Rankin scores. Our findings provide the first evidence that atorvastatin acutely administered immediately after an atherosclerotic ischemic stroke exerts a lowering effect on immune-inflammatory activation of the acute phase of stroke and that its early use is associated to a better functional and prognostic profile.

  14. Early phase of acute pancreatitis: Assessment and management

    PubMed Central

    Phillip, Veit; Steiner, Jörg M; Algül, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a potentially life-threatening disease with a wide spectrum of severity. The overall mortality of AP is approximately 5%. According to the revised Atlanta classification system, AP can be classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Severe AP often takes a clinical course with two phases, an early and a late phase, which should both be considered separately. In this review article, we first discuss general aspects of AP, including incidence, pathophysiology, etiology, and grading of severity, then focus on the assessment of patients with suspected AP, including diagnosis and risk stratification, followed by the management of AP during the early phase, with special emphasis on fluid therapy, pain management, nutrition, and antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:25133018

  15. In acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, infiltrating macrophages are immune activated, whereas microglia remain immune suppressed.

    PubMed

    Vainchtein, I D; Vinet, J; Brouwer, N; Brendecke, S; Biagini, G; Biber, K; Boddeke, H W G M; Eggen, B J L

    2014-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by loss of myelin accompanied by infiltration of T-lymphocytes and monocytes. Although it has been shown that these infiltrates are important for the progression of MS, the role of microglia, the resident macrophages of the CNS, remains ambiguous. Therefore, we have compared the phenotypes of microglia and macrophages in a mouse model for MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In order to properly discriminate between these two cell types, microglia were defined as CD11b(pos) CD45(int) Ly-6C(neg) , and infiltrated macrophages as CD11b(pos) CD45(high) Ly-6C(pos) . During clinical EAE, microglia displayed a weakly immune-activated phenotype, based on the expression of MHCII, co-stimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86, and CD40) and proinflammatory genes [interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumour necrosis factor- α (TNF-α)]. In contrast, CD11b(pos) CD45(high) Ly-6C(pos) infiltrated macrophages were strongly activated and could be divided into two populations Ly-6C(int) and Ly-6C(high) , respectively. Ly-6C(high) macrophages contained less myelin than Ly-6C(int) macrophages and expression levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α were higher in Ly-6C(int) macrophages. Together, our data show that during clinical EAE, microglia are only weakly activated whereas infiltrated macrophages are highly immune reactive.

  16. Specific immune responses against epitopes derived from Aurora kinase A and B in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Vanessa; Egenrieder, Stephanie; Götz, Marlies; Herbst, Cornelia; Greiner, Jochen; Hofmann, Susanne

    2013-07-01

    Aurora kinases are serine/threonine kinases which play an important role in the process of mitosis and cell cycle regulation. Aurora kinase inhibitors are described to sensitize malignant cells to cytosine arabinoside and specific antibodies by mediating apoptosis. Aurora kinases are overexpressed in most acute leukemias but also in solid tumors. In this study we investigated whether epitopes derived from Aurora kinase A and B are able to elicit cellular immune responses in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) to investigate their role as potential targets for specific immunotherapy. Samples of eight patients with AML were analyzed in enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assays and compared with immune responses of nine healthy volunteers (HVs). Specific CD8 + T cell responses were detected against the epitopes Aura A1, A2, B1, B2, B3, B4 and B5. Immune responses for epitopes derived from Aura B were induced more frequently compared to Aura A. The antigens with the most frequent cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses were Aura B3, B4 and B5, although the number of patients tested for these antigens was low. Aura B5 did not elicit specific CTL responses in HVs. For epitope Aura B6 no immune response was detected in HVs or patients. Taken together, with the combination of Aurora kinase inhibitors and an immunotherapeutic approach, an effective blast and minimal residual disease elimination might be achieved.

  17. [Plasmapheresis in acute phase of multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica].

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Hidenori

    2014-11-01

    In acute phase of multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO), plasmapheresis (PP) should be considered as the 2nd choice treatment when corticosteroid pulse therapy results in unsuccessful. It is believed that the beneficial effects of PP occur through the elimination of pathogenic humoral and plasma factors, including autoantibodies, complement components, and cytokines. In MS, several clinical trials have shown the efficacy. However, there have been no randomized controlled trials that demonstrated the efficacy of PP in NMO. There are three methods of PP, plasma exchange, double filtration plasmapheresis and immunoadsorption plasmapheresis, available in Japan. But the difference of efficacy among these 3 methods has not been fully evaluated.

  18. Effects of acute and chronic sleep loss on immune modulation of rats.

    PubMed

    Zager, A; Andersen, M L; Ruiz, F S; Antunes, I B; Tufik, S

    2007-07-01

    Sleep deprivation is now recognized as an increasingly common condition inherent to modern society, and one that in many ways, is detrimental to certain physiological systems, namely, immune function. Although sleep is now viewed by a significant body of researchers as being essential for the proper working of a host of defense systems, the consequences of a lack of sleep on immune function remains to be fully comprehended. The aim of the current study was to investigate how paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) for 24 and 96 h and sleep restriction (SR) for 21 days by the modified multiple-platform method, and their respective 24-h recovery periods, affect immune activation in rats. To this end, we assessed circulating white blood cell counts, lymphocyte count within immune organs, as well as Ig and complement production. The data revealed that PSD for 96 h increased complement C3 and corticosterone concentration in relation to the control group. In contrast, the spleen weight, total leukocytes, and lymphocytes decreased during SR for 21 days when compared with the control group, although production of a certain class of immunoglobulin, the IgM, did increase. After recovery sleep, lymphocyte count in axillary lymph nodes grew when rats had rebound sleep after PSD for 24 h, neutrophils increased after PSD 96 h and lymphocytes numbers were higher after SR 21 days. Such alterations during sleep deprivation suggest only minor alterations of nonspecific immune parameters during acute PSD, and a significant impairment in cellular response during chronic SR.

  19. Bacterial polysaccharide immune globulin for prophylaxis of acute otitis media in high-risk children.

    PubMed

    Shurin, P A; Rehmus, J M; Johnson, C E; Marchant, C D; Carlin, S A; Super, D M; Van Hare, G F; Jones, P K; Ambrosino, D M; Siber, G R

    1993-11-01

    We evaluated the prevention of recurrences of acute otitis media (AOM) by bacterial polysaccharide immune globulin (BPIG), a hyperimmune human immune globulin prepared by immunizing donors with bacterial polysaccharide vaccines. We used a randomized, stratified, double-blind, placebo-controlled design. Children < or = 24 months of age with 1 to 3 prior episodes of AOM received BPIG, 0.5 ml/kg, or saline placebo intramuscularly at entry and 30 days later. During the 120-day follow-up period, AOM was diagnosed by using clinical criteria and was confirmed with tympanocentesis and culture of the middle ear exudates. Eighty-eight episodes of AOM were observed in 76 patients who completed the study. The incidence of AOM during the entire 120-day study period was similar in BPIG and placebo recipients. Pneumococcal AOM was significantly less frequent in BPIG recipients (0.21 episode per patient) than in placebo recipients (0.45 episode per patient; p = 0.05). Time spent free of AOM was significantly prolonged in recipients of BPIG, in comparison with placebo recipients (51 vs 35 days; p = 0.034). This study demonstrated that circulating antibody, even without stimulation of specific local immunity, may prevent infection of the middle ear. The use of immune globulin preparations for longer periods or at a higher dosage might decrease the incidence of recurrent AOM in otitis-prone children, and deserves further evaluation.

  20. Infection with Mycoplasma gallisepticum buffers the effects of acute stress on innate immunity in house finches.

    PubMed

    Fratto, Melanie; Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Davis, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    When wild animals become infected, they still must cope with the rigors of daily life, and, thus, they still can be exposed to acute stressors. The suite of physiological responses to acute stress includes modifying the innate immune system, but infections can also cause similar changes. We examined the effects of an acute stressor (capture stress) on leukocyte abundance and bacteria-killing ability (BKA) in wild birds (house finches Haemorhous mexicanus) with and without a naturally occurring infection (Mycoplasma gallisepticum) to determine whether infection alters the typical immune response to stress. Birds were captured and bled within 3 min (baseline sample) and then held in paper bags for 2 h and bled again (stress sample). From blood smears made at both time points, we obtained estimates of total white blood cell (WBC) counts and relative numbers of each cell. We also measured BKA of plasma at both time points. In uninfected birds (n = 26), total WBC count decreased by 30% over time, while in infected birds (n = 9), it decreased by 6%. Relative numbers of heterophils did not change over time in uninfected birds but increased in infected birds. Combined with a reduction in lymphocyte numbers, this led to a threefold increase in heterophil-lymphocyte values in infected birds after the stressor, compared to a twofold increase in uninfected birds. There was a nonsignificant tendency for BKA to decline with stress in uninfected birds but not in diseased birds. Collectively, these results suggest that infections can buffer the negative effects of acute stress on innate immunity.

  1. Effect of Amblyomma maculatum (Acari: Ixodidae) Saliva on the Acute Cutaneous Immune Response to Rickettsia parkeri Infection in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Banajee, K. H.; Verhoeve, V. I.; Harris, E. K.; Macaluso, K. R.

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsia parkeri Luckman (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae) is a pathogenic spotted fever group Rickettsia transmitted by Amblyomma maculatum Koch (Acari: Ixodidae) in the United States. The acute innate immune response to this pathogen and the effect of tick feeding or salivary components on this response is largely unknown. We hypothesized that A. maculatum saliva enhances R. parkeri infection via downregulation of the acute cellular and cytokine immune response. C3H/HeN mice were intradermally inoculated with R. parkeri both with and without A. maculatum saliva. Flow cytometry and microscopic evaluation of inoculation site skin suspensions revealed that neutrophils and macrophages predominated at 6 and 24 h post R. parkeri inoculation, respectively. This cellular influx was significantly downregulated when A. maculatum saliva was inoculated along with R. parkeri. Inflammatory cytokines (interferon γ and interleukins 6 and 10) were significantly elevated after R. parkeri inoculation. However, cytokine concentration and rickettsial load were not significantly modified by A. maculatum saliva during the acute phase of infection. These results revealed that tick saliva inhibits the cutaneous cellular influx during the acute phase of rickettsial infection. Further study is needed to determine the overall impact of this effect on the establishment of rickettsiosis in the host and development of disease. PMID:27521760

  2. Immunity to WT1 in the animal model and in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gaiger, A; Reese, V; Disis, M L; Cheever, M A

    2000-08-15

    The Wilms' tumor (WT1) gene participates in leukemogenesis and is overexpressed in most types of leukemia in humans. WT1 is also detectable in many types of lung, thyroid, breast, testicular, and ovarian cancers and melanoma in humans. Initial studies evaluated whether immune responses to murine WT1 can be elicited in mice. Murine and human WT1 are similar. Thus, mouse models might lead to resolution of many of the critical issues for developing WT1 vaccines. C57/BL6 (B6) mice were injected with synthetic peptides from the natural sequence of WT1 containing motifs for binding to major histocompatibility (MHC) class II molecules. Immunization induced helper T-cell responses specific for the immunizing WT1 peptides and antibody responses specific for WT1 protein. Screening of multiple murine cancer cell lines identified 2 murine cancers, TRAMP-C and BLKSV40, that "naturally" overexpress WT1. Immunization with MHC class I binding peptides induced WT1 peptide-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) that specifically lysed TRAMP-C and BLKSV40. WT1 specificity of lysis was confirmed by cold target inhibition. No toxicity was noted by histopathologic evaluation in the WT1 peptide-immunized animals. WT1 peptide immunization did not show any effect on TRAMP-C tumor growth in vivo. Immunization of B6 mice to syngeneic TRAMP-C elicited WT1-specific antibody, demonstrating that WT1 can be immunogenic in the context of cancer cells. To evaluate whether WT1 might be similarly immunogenic in humans, serum from patients with leukemia was evaluated for pre-existing antibody responses. Western blot analyses showed WT1-specific antibodies directed against the N-terminus portion of the WT1 protein in the sera of 3 of 18 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). (Blood. 2000;96:1480-1489)

  3. [Mechanism of thiol-dependence of acute phase proteins and serology of monospecific antisera in vitro].

    PubMed

    Kostiushov, V V; Kostiushova, N V; Pavlovich, S I; Sakhno, Iu P; Tymchyshyn, O L

    2001-01-01

    For the donors and for the patients with inflammatory processes is thiol-dependent the gear of immune responses in vitro an antigen--antibody on dynamics(changes) of change (+/- delta) of the contents SH- and S-S-group reaction mixtures. Thus, is conducted the analysis of interplay of proteins of an acute phase (CRP, orosomucoid and transferin) serums of a blood of the donors and patients with serology by related diagnostic (complementary) monospecific serums (MSS) against CRP (Anti-CRP), against Oroso (Anti-Oroso) i against Transf (Anti-Transf). Is established, that as against the donors, for the patients with inflammatory processes these reacting are accompanied by a phenomenon of a liberation of energy of Ag(+)-sensing non proteins SH-groups and they occur in supernatants of deprotheinized of reaction mixtures. At the same time, both for the donors, and for the patients, these reacting are accompanied modification by changes kept in repair (+/- delta) proteins SH- and S-S-rpy[symbol: see text], in integral reaction mixtures (in which one protein did not deposit). Such data testify, that the inflammatory process, apparently, can be accompanied by such rearrangement of a structurally functional condition of proteins of an acute phase, that under operating MSS in reaction mixtures descends labelised blended disulfide of communications between them and low molecular weight thiols. As a result of it there is a liberation of energy of Ag(+)-sensing non proteins SH-groups. This parameter can be used for an estimation of functional activity of proteins of an acute phase.

  4. Acute phase proteins in experimentally induced pregnancy toxemia in goats.

    PubMed

    González, Félix H D; Hernández, Fuensanta; Madrid, Josefa; Martínez-Subiela, Silvia; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Cerón, José J; Tecles, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    The present work aimed to study the behavior of acute phase proteins (haptoglobin, serum amyloid A, acid soluble glycoprotein, fibrinogen, and albumin) in fasting-induced pregnancy toxemia in goats and their relationship with classical indicators of this disorder such as beta-hydroxybutyrate and nonesterified fatty acids in the blood and decreased urine pH and ketonuria. Twelve adult Murciano-Granadina goats at the final stage of gestation were used in this experiment. Pregnancy toxemia was induced in 6 goats by fasting for 72 hr. The other 6 animals were used as control group. Ketonuria was present in 4 out of 5 fasting animals at 24 hr and in all fasting animals at 48 hr of fasting. Serum nonesterified fatty acids were significantly increased at 24, 48, and 72 hr of fasting. Beta-hydroxybutyrate and haptoglobin achieved significantly increased concentrations at 48 hr and 72 hr, respectively, remaining increased during the entire study. Serum amyloid A, acid soluble glycoprotein, fibrinogen, and albumin were not affected by fasting. In conclusion, acute phase proteins (including haptoglobin) seemed not to have an advantage over traditional markers in diagnosis of fasting-induced pregnancy toxemia in goats.

  5. Acute phase response in cattle infected with Anaplasma marginale.

    PubMed

    Nazifi, S; Razavi, S M; Kaviani, F; Rakhshandehroo, E

    2012-03-23

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the acute phase responses via the assessment of the concentration of serum sialic acids (total, lipid bound and protein bound), inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ and TNF-α) and acute phase proteins (Hp and SAA) in 20 adult crossbred cattle naturally infected by Anaplasma marginale. The infected animals were divided into 2 subgroups on the basis of parasitemia rate (<20% and >20%). Also, as a control group, 10 clinically healthy cattle from the same farms were sampled. Our data revealed significant decreases in red blood cell count (RBC), hematocrite (PCV) and hemoglobine (Hb) in infected cattle compared to healthy ones. Conversely, the concentrations of Hp, SAA, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen, serum sialic acids and the circulatory IFN-γ and TNF-α were increased in the diseased cattle (P<0.05). In addition, it was evident that the progression of parasitemia in infected cattle did not induce any significant alterations in the hematological indices (RBCs, PCV and Hb) and the concentrations of Hp, SAA, ceruloplasmin and fibrinogen. SAA was the most sensitive factor to change in the diseased cattle. Therefore, increase in SAA concentration may be a good indicator of inflammatory process in cattle naturally infected with Anaplasma marginale.

  6. Relationship between Acute Phase of Chronic Periodontitis and Meteorological Factors in the Maintenance Phase of Periodontal Treatment: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Noriko; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Morita, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    The acute phase of chronic periodontitis may occur even in patients during supportive periodontal therapy. However, the details are not fully understood. Since the natural environment, including meteorology affects human health, we hypothesized that weather conditions may affect occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between weather conditions and acute phase of chronic periodontitis in patients under supportive periodontal therapy. Patients who were diagnosed with acute phase of chronic periodontitis under supportive periodontal therapy during 2011–2013 were selected for this study. We performed oral examinations and collected questionnaires and meteorological data. Of 369 patients who experienced acute phase of chronic periodontitis, 153 had acute phase of chronic periodontitis without direct-triggered episodes. When using the autoregressive integrated moving average model of time-series analysis, the independent covariant of maximum hourly range of barometric pressure, maximum hourly range of temperature, and maximum daily wind speed were significantly associated with occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis (p < 0.05), and 3.1% of the variations in these occurrence over the study period were explained by these factors. Meteorological variables may predict occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. PMID:26251916

  7. Relationship between Acute Phase of Chronic Periodontitis and Meteorological Factors in the Maintenance Phase of Periodontal Treatment: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Noriko; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Morita, Manabu

    2015-08-05

    The acute phase of chronic periodontitis may occur even in patients during supportive periodontal therapy. However, the details are not fully understood. Since the natural environment, including meteorology affects human health, we hypothesized that weather conditions may affect occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between weather conditions and acute phase of chronic periodontitis in patients under supportive periodontal therapy. Patients who were diagnosed with acute phase of chronic periodontitis under supportive periodontal therapy during 2011-2013 were selected for this study. We performed oral examinations and collected questionnaires and meteorological data. Of 369 patients who experienced acute phase of chronic periodontitis, 153 had acute phase of chronic periodontitis without direct-triggered episodes. When using the autoregressive integrated moving average model of time-series analysis, the independent covariant of maximum hourly range of barometric pressure, maximum hourly range of temperature, and maximum daily wind speed were significantly associated with occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis (p < 0.05), and 3.1% of the variations in these occurrence over the study period were explained by these factors. Meteorological variables may predict occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis.

  8. Role of cytokines, acute-phase proteins, and chemokines in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Badolato, R; Oppenheim, J J

    1996-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has no firm etiologic basis. It progresses as an autoimmune disease and evolves into a chronic inflammatory joint disease complicated by recurrent episodes of systemic acute-phase reactions, which sometimes result in amyloidosis. Cytokines play a pivotol role in inflammation and the immune response. Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-6 are present at high levels in arthritic joints, and their blood concentration correlates with the severity of the RA. Some of the activities of the proinflammatory cytokines, such as stimulation of leukocyte infiltration and release of their proteolytic enzymes, may be mediated by acute phase proteins (APPs), such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, and by chemokines such as interleukin-8. Cytokines, chemokines, and APPs reciprocally regulate each others' expression and activities, constituting a communication network between fibroblasts, macrophages, lymphocytes, and hepatocytes. Activation of the network results in inflammation and the progressive destruction of joints and systemic symptoms characteristic of RA.

  9. Acute phase protein expression during elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus-1 viremia in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    Stanton, Jeffrey J; Cray, Carolyn; Rodriguez, Marilyn; Arheart, Kristopher L; Ling, Paul D; Herron, Alan

    2013-09-01

    Infection of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) with elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV) can be associated with rapid, lethal hemorrhagic disease and has been documented in elephant herds in human care and in the wild. Recent reports describe real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays used to monitor clinically ill elephants and also to detect subclinical EEHV1 infection in apparently healthy Asian elephants. Acute phase proteins have been demonstrated to increase with a variety of infectious etiologies in domesticated mammals but have not yet been described in elephants. In addition, the immune response of Asian elephants to EEHV1 infection has not been described. In this study, whole blood and trunk wash samples representing repeated measures from eight elephants were examined for the presence of EEHV1 using a qPCR assay. Elephants were classified into groups, as follows: whole blood negative and positive and trunk wash negative and positive. Serum amyloid A (SAA) and haptoglobin (HP) levels were compared between these groups. A significant difference in SAA was observed with nearly a threefold higher mean value during periods of viremia (P=0.011). Higher values of SAA were associated with >10,000 virus genome copies/ml EEHV1 in whole blood. There were no significant differences in HP levels, although some individual animals did exhibit increased levels with infection. These data indicate that an inflammatory process is stimulated during EEHV1 viremia. Acute phase protein quantitation may aid in monitoring the health status of Asian elephants.

  10. Acute phase response in Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Trionyx sinensis) with Aeromonas hydrophila infection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiuxia; Wang, Lu; Feng, Hong; Guo, Qionglin; Dai, Heping

    2011-04-01

    Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Trionyx sinensis) is an important culture reptile. However, little is known about its acute phase response (APR) caused by bacteria. Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a major acute phase protein (APP). In this study, a turtle SAA homologue was identified and described in reptiles. The full-length cDNA of turtle SAA was 554 bp and contained a 381 bp open reading frame (ORF) coding for a protein of 127 aa. Similar to other known SAA genes, the turtle SAA gene contained three exons and two introns. The promoter region of turtle SAA gene contained the consensus binding sites for nuclear factor (NF)-κB and c-Rel. The turtle SAA amino acid sequence shared the highest identity to avian SAA sequences. Meantime, we present the first systematic study with expression levels of five genes encoding APPs in immune response caused by Aeromonas hydrophila infection. After infection, turtle SAA mRNA was induced in liver at 8h, then increased more than 1200-fold at 2d; in spleen and kidney, the SAA mRNAs were also induced during 8h-7d, but the level was far lower than that in the liver. The complement 3 (C3), fibrinogen-gamma chain (Fb-G) and cathepsin L (CathL) mRNAs were increased in liver at 2d, whereas the albumin (ALB) mRNA was significantly decreased during 8h-7d. Our studies suggest that the APR in turtle with A. hydrophila infection is similar to that in mammals, and SAA is a major indicator of bacterial infection, especially at early stage, in reptiles. Additionally, the different expression patterns of five APP genes observed in present studies could provide clues for understanding the innate immune mechanisms in the APR of reptiles. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute psychosis in children: do not miss immune-mediated causes

    PubMed Central

    AlHakeem, Afnan S.; Mekki, Mohamed S.; AlShahwan, Saad M.; Tabarki, Brahim M.

    2016-01-01

    New-onset psychosis in children represents a complex presenting symptom. Psychosis can be attributable to a combination of factors and etiologies, and all possible causes must be systematically examined. There is growing evidence that a proportion of psychosis/psychiatric manifestations in children may be immune-mediated, and physicians should consider this etiology in each presentation of first-episode psychosis. Immune-mediated encephalopathies/encephalitis are increasingly being recognized in children with antibodies to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, Leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 or other central nervous system antigens such as Contactin-associated protein-like 2, glutamic acid decarboxylase, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid or Gamma-aminobutyric acid B. In this study, we describe 3 cases of immune-mediated encephalopathy/encephalitis with prominent psychiatric symptoms at presentation, and suggest a practical diagnostic and treatment approach for children with acute psychosis of an immune-mediated cause. PMID:27356658

  12. Glial scar and immune cell involvement in tissue remodeling and repair following acute CNS injuries.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Catarina; Schwartz, Michal

    2014-11-01

    Inadequate axonal regeneration is a common phenomenon occurring following acute injury to the central nervous system (CNS), and is often associated with permanent neurological deficits. The injured axons attempting to regenerate face the inhospitable environment of the CNS scar, which can hinder axonal growth and sprouting. In addition, in response to the insult, intense activation and infiltration of immune cells take place. Both the scar tissue and immune response, which have received a bad reputation in the context of CNS repair are essential for the overall recovery from CNS injuries, but are not optimally controlled. The glial scar contributes to protection of the spared neural tissues by establishing a boundary between damaged and salvageable tissue, and by educating the immune cells to promote the healing of the CNS tissue. In turn, the immune cells, and in particular the infiltrating macrophages, exert several functions at the lesion site, including resolution of the microglial response, control of scar tissue degradation, and production of growth factors; thereby, promoting neuronal survival, axonal regeneration, and tissue remodeling. As axonal regeneration and tissue remodeling are viewed as critical steps for the overall functional recovery following CNS injury, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms underlying the timely formation and degradation of the CNS scar, and its crosstalk with the inflammatory response, are of great importance, both biologically and clinically. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Elevation of Intact and Proteolytic Fragments of Acute Phase Proteins Constitutes the Earliest Systemic Antiviral Response in HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Holger B.; Lavender, Kerry J.; Qin, Li; Stacey, Andrea R.; Liu, Michael K. P.; di Gleria, Katalin; Simmons, Alison; Gasper-Smith, Nancy; Haynes, Barton F.; McMichael, Andrew J.; Borrow, Persephone; Kessler, Benedikt M.

    2010-01-01

    The earliest immune responses activated in acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection (AHI) exert a critical influence on subsequent virus spread or containment. During this time frame, components of the innate immune system such as macrophages and DCs, NK cells, β-defensins, complement and other anti-microbial factors, which have all been implicated in modulating HIV infection, may play particularly important roles. A proteomics-based screen was performed on a cohort from whom samples were available at time points prior to the earliest positive HIV detection. The ability of selected factors found to be elevated in the plasma during AHI to inhibit HIV-1 replication was analyzed using in vitro PBMC and DC infection models. Analysis of unique plasma donor panels spanning the eclipse and viral expansion phases revealed very early alterations in plasma proteins in AHI. Induction of acute phase protein serum amyloid A (A-SAA) occurred as early as 5–7 days prior to the first detection of plasma viral RNA, considerably prior to any elevation in systemic cytokine levels. Furthermore, a proteolytic fragment of alpha–1-antitrypsin (AAT), termed virus inhibitory peptide (VIRIP), was observed in plasma coincident with viremia. Both A-SAA and VIRIP have anti-viral activity in vitro and quantitation of their plasma levels indicated that circulating concentrations are likely to be within the range of their inhibitory activity. Our results provide evidence for a first wave of host anti-viral defense occurring in the eclipse phase of AHI prior to systemic activation of other immune responses. Insights gained into the mechanism of action of acute-phase reactants and other innate molecules against HIV and how they are induced could be exploited for the future development of more efficient prophylactic vaccine strategies. PMID:20463814

  14. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  15. The role of microglia and myeloid immune cells in acute cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Benakis, Corinne; Garcia-Bonilla, Lidia; Iadecola, Costantino; Anrather, Josef

    2015-01-01

    The immune response to acute cerebral ischemia is a major contributor to stroke pathobiology. The inflammatory response is characterized by the participation of brain resident cells and peripheral leukocytes. Microglia in the brain and monocytes/neutrophils in the periphery have a prominent role in initiating, sustaining and resolving post-ischemic inflammation. In this review we aim to summarize recent literature concerning the origins, fate and role of microglia, monocytes and neutrophils in models of cerebral ischemia and to discuss their relevance for human stroke. PMID:25642168

  16. Improved noise-immune phase-unwrapping algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusack, R.; Huntley, J. M.; Goldrein, H. T.

    1995-02-01

    An algorithm for unwrapping noisy phase maps has recently been proposed, based on the identification of discontinuity sources that mark the start or end of a 2 pi phase discontinuity. Branch cuts between sources act as barriers to unwrapping, resulting in a unique phase map that is independent of the unwrapping route. We investigate four methods for optimizing the placement of the cuts. A modified nearest neighbor approach is found to be the most successful and can reliably unwrap unfiltered speckle-interferometry phase maps with discontinuity source densities of 0.05 sources pixel-1.

  17. Double-Edged Sword: Musculoskeletal Infection Provoked Acute Phase Response in Children.

    PubMed

    Benvenuti, Michael; An, Thomas; Amaro, Emilie; Lovejoy, Steven; Mencio, Gregory; Martus, Jeffrey; Mignemi, Megan; Schoenecker, Jonathan G

    2017-04-01

    The acute phase response has a crucial role in mounting the body's response to tissue injury. Excessive activation of the acute phase response is responsible for many complications that occur in orthopedic patients. Given that infection may be considered continuous tissue injury that persistently activates the acute phase response, children with musculoskeletal infections are at markedly increased risk for serious complications. Future strategies that modulate the acute phase response have the potential to improve treatment and prevent complications associated with musculoskeletal infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Use of Dermal Substitutes in Burn Surgery: Acute Phase

    PubMed Central

    Shahrokhi, Shahriar; Anna, Arno; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2013-01-01

    Dermal substitutes are increasingly becoming an essential part of the burn care strategy. During the acute phase of burn treatment, dermal substitutes improve functional and cosmetic results long-term and thus increase quality of life. In the chronic wound setting, dermal substitutes are used to reconstruct and improve burn scars and other defects. Despite some successes in the use of dermal substitutes there are more needs and requirements to further improve outcomes and hence further research is required not only to strengthen scientific evidence regarding their effects but also to develop new technology and products. Dermal substitutes also emerge as pivotal research strategies to develop adequate scaffolds for stem cells, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications to obtain long-lasting and scarless artificial skin. This review discusses status-quo of dermal substitutes and novel strategies in the use of dermal substitutes with a focus on burn care. PMID:24393152

  19. Whole Genome Deep Sequencing of HIV-1 Reveals the Impact of Early Minor Variants Upon Immune Recognition During Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Matthew R.; Lennon, Niall J.; Power, Karen A.; Macalalad, Alexander R.; Berlin, Aaron M.; Malboeuf, Christine M.; Ryan, Elizabeth M.; Gnerre, Sante; Zody, Michael C.; Erlich, Rachel L.; Green, Lisa M.; Berical, Andrew; Wang, Yaoyu; Casali, Monica; Streeck, Hendrik; Bloom, Allyson K.; Dudek, Tim; Tully, Damien; Newman, Ruchi; Axten, Karen L.; Gladden, Adrianne D.; Battis, Laura; Kemper, Michael; Zeng, Qiandong; Shea, Terrance P.; Gujja, Sharvari; Zedlack, Carmen; Gasser, Olivier; Brander, Christian; Hess, Christoph; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Brumme, Chanson J.; Bazner, Suzane; Rychert, Jenna; Tinsley, Jake P.; Mayer, Ken H.; Rosenberg, Eric; Pereyra, Florencia; Levin, Joshua Z.; Young, Sarah K.; Jessen, Heiko; Altfeld, Marcus; Birren, Bruce W.; Walker, Bruce D.; Allen, Todd M.

    2012-01-01

    Deep sequencing technologies have the potential to transform the study of highly variable viral pathogens by providing a rapid and cost-effective approach to sensitively characterize rapidly evolving viral quasispecies. Here, we report on a high-throughput whole HIV-1 genome deep sequencing platform that combines 454 pyrosequencing with novel assembly and variant detection algorithms. In one subject we combined these genetic data with detailed immunological analyses to comprehensively evaluate viral evolution and immune escape during the acute phase of HIV-1 infection. The majority of early, low frequency mutations represented viral adaptation to host CD8+ T cell responses, evidence of strong immune selection pressure occurring during the early decline from peak viremia. CD8+ T cell responses capable of recognizing these low frequency escape variants coincided with the selection and evolution of more effective secondary HLA-anchor escape mutations. Frequent, and in some cases rapid, reversion of transmitted mutations was also observed across the viral genome. When located within restricted CD8 epitopes these low frequency reverting mutations were sufficient to prime de novo responses to these epitopes, again illustrating the capacity of the immune response to recognize and respond to low frequency variants. More importantly, rapid viral escape from the most immunodominant CD8+ T cell responses coincided with plateauing of the initial viral load decline in this subject, suggestive of a potential link between maintenance of effective, dominant CD8 responses and the degree of early viremia reduction. We conclude that the early control of HIV-1 replication by immunodominant CD8+ T cell responses may be substantially influenced by rapid, low frequency viral adaptations not detected by conventional sequencing approaches, which warrants further investigation. These data support the critical need for vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell responses to target more highly constrained

  20. Whole genome deep sequencing of HIV-1 reveals the impact of early minor variants upon immune recognition during acute infection.

    PubMed

    Henn, Matthew R; Boutwell, Christian L; Charlebois, Patrick; Lennon, Niall J; Power, Karen A; Macalalad, Alexander R; Berlin, Aaron M; Malboeuf, Christine M; Ryan, Elizabeth M; Gnerre, Sante; Zody, Michael C; Erlich, Rachel L; Green, Lisa M; Berical, Andrew; Wang, Yaoyu; Casali, Monica; Streeck, Hendrik; Bloom, Allyson K; Dudek, Tim; Tully, Damien; Newman, Ruchi; Axten, Karen L; Gladden, Adrianne D; Battis, Laura; Kemper, Michael; Zeng, Qiandong; Shea, Terrance P; Gujja, Sharvari; Zedlack, Carmen; Gasser, Olivier; Brander, Christian; Hess, Christoph; Günthard, Huldrych F; Brumme, Zabrina L; Brumme, Chanson J; Bazner, Suzane; Rychert, Jenna; Tinsley, Jake P; Mayer, Ken H; Rosenberg, Eric; Pereyra, Florencia; Levin, Joshua Z; Young, Sarah K; Jessen, Heiko; Altfeld, Marcus; Birren, Bruce W; Walker, Bruce D; Allen, Todd M

    2012-01-01

    Deep sequencing technologies have the potential to transform the study of highly variable viral pathogens by providing a rapid and cost-effective approach to sensitively characterize rapidly evolving viral quasispecies. Here, we report on a high-throughput whole HIV-1 genome deep sequencing platform that combines 454 pyrosequencing with novel assembly and variant detection algorithms. In one subject we combined these genetic data with detailed immunological analyses to comprehensively evaluate viral evolution and immune escape during the acute phase of HIV-1 infection. The majority of early, low frequency mutations represented viral adaptation to host CD8+ T cell responses, evidence of strong immune selection pressure occurring during the early decline from peak viremia. CD8+ T cell responses capable of recognizing these low frequency escape variants coincided with the selection and evolution of more effective secondary HLA-anchor escape mutations. Frequent, and in some cases rapid, reversion of transmitted mutations was also observed across the viral genome. When located within restricted CD8 epitopes these low frequency reverting mutations were sufficient to prime de novo responses to these epitopes, again illustrating the capacity of the immune response to recognize and respond to low frequency variants. More importantly, rapid viral escape from the most immunodominant CD8+ T cell responses coincided with plateauing of the initial viral load decline in this subject, suggestive of a potential link between maintenance of effective, dominant CD8 responses and the degree of early viremia reduction. We conclude that the early control of HIV-1 replication by immunodominant CD8+ T cell responses may be substantially influenced by rapid, low frequency viral adaptations not detected by conventional sequencing approaches, which warrants further investigation. These data support the critical need for vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell responses to target more highly constrained

  1. Innate humoral immune parameters in Tilapia zillii under acute stress by low temperature and crowding.

    PubMed

    Chebaani, Nadjoua; Guardiola, Francisco A; Sihem, Merbah; Nabil, Adjajdi; Oumouna, Mustapha; Meseguer, José; Esteban, María A; Cuesta, Alberto

    2014-06-01

    Redbelly tilapia (Tilapia zillii; Gervais, 1848) is one of the most valuable freshwater species in North Africa representing an important part of the continental production, especially in brackish lakes. In Algeria, T. zillii is distributed in several lakes and tributaries of some rivers in the south. Though some attempts are in progress to culture this species, many investigations covering its biology and farm management are still needed. In this sense, this is the first study attempting to evaluate some of the T. zillii immune parameters and valuable data to assess their health and well-being status. Thus, we have determined the levels of serum peroxidases as well as the alternative complement, antiprotease and bactericidal activities. Furthermore, we have also evaluated the potential impact of two acute stress factors, commonly found in fish farms, in these parameters. Although it was assessed that fish exposed to low temperatures or crowding were stressed, as indicated by their increased serum levels of cortisol and glucose, both acute stressors failed to significantly affect serum peroxidases as well as antiprotease and complement activities. However, the bactericidal activity was reduced in general but only in those exposed to crowding reached statistical significance. Further studies are needed to characterise the immune response in T. zillii as well as the effects that farming stresses may produce.

  2. Acute and chronic effects of exercise on markers of mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Nicolette C; Gleeson, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Decreased secretion rate of salivary markers of mucosal immunity, and in particular salivary immunoglobulin A (s-IgA), have been implicated as risk factors for subsequent episodes of respiratory infection in athletes. IgA is the predominant Ig in mucosal secretions and acts with innate mucosal defences to provide the 'first line of defence' against pathogens and antigens presented at the mucosa. As well as summarising the evidence concerning the effects of acute exercise and longer-term intensive training on these markers of mucosal immunity, this review explores the factors that impact upon salivary responses to exercise, such as method of saliva collection, stimulation of saliva collection and the method of reporting s-IgA data. The influence of adequate hydration and nutritional supplementation during exercise as well as exercising in extreme environmental conditions on salivary responses is also explored. Finally, the possible mechanisms underlying the acute and longer-term of effects of exercise on salivary responses are examined, with particular emphasis on the potential role of the sympathetic nervous system and the expression and mobilisation of the polymeric Ig receptor.

  3. Acute phase response in lame crossbred dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bagga, A.; Randhawa, Swaran Singh; Sharma, S.; Bansal, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study was undertaken to study acute phase response based on acute phase proteins (APPs) such as C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA), and fibrinogen in lame crossbred dairy cattle. Materials and Methods: Lame animals (n=30) were selected within 3-7 days of being noticed as lame by the farm veterinarian, from a local dairy farm in southeast Ludhiana over a period of 6 months, stratified proportionately with respect to stage of lactation with non-lame healthy cows (n=10). All the cows were otherwise healthy and did not have any other inflammatory problems such as pneumonia, enteritis, mastitis, or any kind of acute uterine inflammation. Blood samples were collected from all the animals; serum and plasma samples were separated and stored at −20°C. The levels of CRP, Hp, and SAA were estimated using Sandwich ELISA, whereas fibrinogen was estimated by heat precipitation method. Results: SAA levels in lame cows were significantly higher (22.19±0.85 µg/ml), approximately 3 times as compared to non-lame cows (8.89±0.72 µg/ml), whereas serum Hp concentration was approximately 20 times higher in the lame cattle (21.71±3.32 mg/dl) as compared to non-lame cows (1.17±0.07 mg/dl). Fibrinogen also increased in the lame cattle (3.97±0.22 g/L) as compared to non-lame group (1.40±0.17 g/L). Serum CRP levels analyzed in the lame cattle for the first time in the present study, and significant high concentration was appreciated in lame cattle (4.41±0.33 mg/L) as compared to non-lame cattle (0.61±0.14 mg/L). Lame cattle were having more of sole hemorrhages, sole ulcers, and white line lesions as compared to non-lame cattle. Conclusion: It can be concluded that lame cattle exhibit high levels of APPs including CRP, Hp, SAA, and fibrinogen as compared to non-lame cattle. PMID:27956769

  4. Optical projection tomography reveals dynamics of HEV growth after immunization with protein plus CFA and features shared with HEVs in acute autoinflammatory lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Varsha; Chyou, Susan; Stein, Jens V; Lu, Theresa T

    2012-01-01

    The vascular-stromal compartment of lymph nodes is important for lymph node function, and high endothelial venules (HEVs) play a critical role in controlling the entry of recirculating lymphocytes. In autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases, lymph node swelling is often accompanied by apparent HEV expansion and, potentially, targeting HEV expansion could be used therapeutically to limit autoimmunity. In previous studies using mostly flow cytometry analysis, we defined three differentially regulated phases of lymph node vascular-stromal growth: initiation, expansion, and the re-establishment of vascular quiescence and stabilization. In this study, we use optical projection tomography to better understand the morphologic aspects of HEV growth upon immunization with ovalbumin/CFA (OVA/CFA). We find HEV elongation as well as modest arborization during the initiation phase, increased arborization during the expansion phase, and, finally, vessel narrowing during the re-establishment of vascular quiescence and stabilization. We also examine acutely enlarged autoinflammatory lymph nodes induced by regulatory T cell depletion and show that HEVs are expanded and morphologically similar to the expanded HEVs in OVA/CFA-stimulated lymph nodes. These results reinforce the idea of differentially regulated, distinct phases of vascular-stromal growth after immunization and suggest that insights gained from studying immunization-induced lymph node vascular growth may help to understand how the lymph node vascular-stromal compartment could be therapeutically targeted in autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases.

  5. Milkvetch root improves immune function in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Donglin; Wang, Xu; Su, Qiang; Jiang, Shengyang; Yuan, Fenglai; Zhang, Caidi; Gong, Fang; Dong, Qiaojing; Shi, Jianping; Chen, Baohua

    2015-01-01

    Milkvetch root as a medicine has been used for more over 2000 years in China, can strengthen immune function, protect liver, promote urination, resist aging and stress, reduce blood pressure and extensively resist bacterium. This study explored the effects of milkvetch root on the immune function of patients with a definitive diagnosis of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The patients were randomly assigned to either the experimental or control group. All patients received conventional clinical therapy; those in the experimental group were also administered milkvetch root. The serum levels of cytokines including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-8 (IL-8), IL-1β, and IL-32 and immunocytes including T helper (Th), cytotoxic T (Tc), natural killer (NK), regulatory T (Treg) and B cells were measured 1 day before treatment and 7 and 14 days post-treatment. After bronchodilator inhalation, pulmonary function was evaluated at these same time points. The serum TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β, and IL-32 levels were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group 14 days post-treatment. The Th/Tc ratio and NK cell ratio was significantly higher but the Treg cell ratio was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group. The forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group 14 days post-treatment. These results indicate that milkvetch root can improve the immune function of patients with acute exacerbation of COPD.

  6. Immune Thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Immune Thrombocytopenia? Immune thrombocytopenia (THROM-bo-si-toe-PE-ne- ... from one person to another. Types of Immune Thrombocytopenia The two types of ITP are acute (temporary ...

  7. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A ... That Shot? en español Las vacunas Why Are Vaccinations Important? Measles, mumps, and whooping cough may seem ...

  8. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against things like measles, ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  9. Serological Evidence of Immune Priming by Group A Streptococci in Patients with Acute Rheumatic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Raynes, Jeremy M.; Frost, Hannah R. C.; Williamson, Deborah A.; Young, Paul G.; Baker, Edward N.; Steemson, John D.; Loh, Jacelyn M.; Proft, Thomas; Dunbar, P. R.; Atatoa Carr, Polly E.; Bell, Anita; Moreland, Nicole J.

    2016-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is an autoimmune response to Group A Streptococcus (GAS) infection. Repeated GAS exposures are proposed to ‘prime’ the immune system for autoimmunity. This notion of immune-priming by multiple GAS infections was first postulated in the 1960s, but direct experimental evidence to support the hypothesis has been lacking. Here, we present novel methodology, based on antibody responses to GAS T-antigens, that enables previous GAS exposures to be mapped in patient sera. T-antigens are surface expressed, type specific antigens and GAS strains fall into 18 major clades or T-types. A panel of recombinant T-antigens was generated and immunoassays were performed in parallel with serum depletion experiments allowing type-specific T-antigen antibodies to be distinguished from cross-reactive antibodies. At least two distinct GAS exposures were detected in each of the ARF sera tested. Furthermore, no two sera had the same T-antigen reactivity profile suggesting that each patient was exposed to a unique series of GAS T-types prior to developing ARF. The methods have provided much-needed experimental evidence to substantiate the immune-priming hypothesis, and will facilitate further serological profiling studies that explore the multifaceted interactions between GAS and the host. PMID:27499748

  10. [Glycosylation profile of selected acute phase proteins in children with chronic tonsillitis and allergic symptoms].

    PubMed

    Sobieska, Magdalena; Steiner, Iwona; Pucher, Beata; Grzegorowski, Michał; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2006-01-01

    Acute phase proteins may be regarded as laboratory markers of inflammatory processes of various origin, but they also play several important biological roles. As majority of them are glycoproteins alterations in glycosylations profiles form additional sign of disturbances in the cytokines network during inflammation and allow to distinguish between acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. A group of 25 children, aged from 6 to 13 years, admitted due to tonsillectomy was examined using skin tests towards specific allergens. Fifteen children out of the whole group showed reaction to pollens, whereas in ten children no allergen was detected despite clear allergic symptoms. In sera samples from every child concentrations of C-reactive protein, alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and alpha1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) were measured using rocket immunoelectrophoresis acc. to Laurell, and glycosylations profiles of AGP and ACT were determined, using crossed affino-immunoelectrophoresis acc. to Bøg-Hansen. Lower concentration of AGP and higher of ACT was shown for children allergic to pollens. Glycosylation profile of both proteins was altered towards higher reactivity with ConA for children allergic to pollens, whereas rather chronic image was observed in children allergic to unknown allergen. The latter image was similar to previously described in children with food allergies. The presence of allergic reaction may alter the cytokine network activity in children, thus affecting also the immune status, independently from chronic inflammatory process in tonsillitis.

  11. Effect of exercise and food restriction on selected markers of the acute phase response in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Conn, C A; Kozak, W E; Tooten, P C; Niewold, T A; Borer, K T; Kluger, M J

    1995-02-01

    Acute aerobic exercise has been shown to elicit physiological changes characteristic of the acute phase response (APR), a nonspecific host defense response. Regular evocation of these changes may prime the immune system to improve resistance to disease. Because food deprivation is associated with an impaired APR, food restriction may prevent these beneficial changes. We tested the hypotheses that voluntary exercise elicits an APR and that food restriction modifies this response in four groups of hamsters: ad libitum-fed sedentary, ad libitum-fed exercised, food-restricted sedentary, and food-restricted exercised. Five variables altered during an APR were examined: core temperature, serum iron, serum interleukin-6, serum amyloid A, and serum glucocorticoids measured by biotelemetry, colorimetric analysis, B-9 cell growth assay, indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and radioimmunoassay, respectively. Blood was drawn during the hamsters' inactive period after 19-20 days of access to running wheels. Resting core temperature was elevated by exercise and depressed by food restriction (P < 0.01). Iron was depressed by food restriction (P < 0.01). Cortisol, but not corticosterone, was elevated by food restriction (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences among groups in interleukin-6 (P > 0.49) or serum amyloid A (P > 0.29). We conclude that there is little evidence that voluntary exercise or exercise combined with food restriction causes an APR in hamsters.

  12. Resolution of Acute Inflammation and the Role of Resolvins in Immunity, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

    PubMed

    Sansbury, Brian E; Spite, Matthew

    2016-06-24

    Acute inflammation is a host-protective response that is mounted in response to tissue injury and infection. Initiated and perpetuated by exogenous and endogenous mediators, acute inflammation must be resolved for tissue repair to proceed and for homeostasis to be restored. Resolution of inflammation is an actively regulated process governed by an array of mediators as diverse as those that initiate inflammation. Among these, resolvins have emerged as a genus of evolutionarily conserved proresolving mediators that act on specific cellular receptors to regulate leukocyte trafficking and blunt production of inflammatory mediators, while also promoting clearance of dead cells and tissue repair. Given that chronic unresolved inflammation is emerging as a central causative factor in the development of cardiovascular diseases, an understanding of the endogenous processes that govern normal resolution of acute inflammation is critical for determining why sterile maladaptive cardiovascular inflammation perpetuates. Here, we provide an overview of the process of resolution with a focus on the enzymatic biosynthesis and receptor-dependent actions of resolvins and related proresolving mediators in immunity, thrombosis, and vascular biology. We discuss how nutritional and current therapeutic approaches modulate resolution and propose that harnessing resolution concepts could potentially lead to the development of new approaches for treating chronic cardiovascular inflammation in a manner that is not host disruptive.

  13. Effects of repetitive stress during the acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection on chronic Chagas' disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Leony Cristina; Brazão, Vânia; Filipin, Marina Del Vecchio; Santello, Fabricia Helena; Caetano, Luana Naiara; Toldo, Miriam Paula Alonso; Caldeira, Jerri C; do Prado, José Clóvis

    2009-03-01

    The effect of repetitive stress during acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) on the chronic phase of ensuing Chagas' disease was the focus of this investigation. The aim of this study was to evaluate in Wistar rats the influence of repetitive stress during the acute phase of infection (7 days) with the Y strain of T. cruzi on the chronic phase of the infection (at 180 days). Exposure to ether vapor for 1 min twice a day was used as a stressor. Repetitive stress enhanced the number of circulating parasites and cardiac tissue disorganization, from a moderate to a severe diffuse mononuclear inflammatory process and the presence of amastigote burden in the cardiac fibers. Immunological parameters revealed that repetitive stress triggered a reduced concanavalin A induced splenocyte proliferation in vitro with major effects on the late chronic phase. Serum interleukin-12 concentration decreased in both stressed and infected rats in the early phase of infection although it was higher on 180 days post-infection. These results suggest that repetitive stress can markedly impair the host's immune system and enhance the pathological process during the chronic phase of Chagas' disease.

  14. Immune Cell Repertoire and Their Mediators in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction or Stable Angina Pectoris

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wenwen; Song, Yanli; Zhou, Lin; Jiang, Jinfa; Yang, Fang; Duan, Qianglin; Che, Lin; Shen, Yuqin; Song, Haoming; Wang, Lemin

    2017-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the natural innate and adaptive immunity through gene expression and cytology levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stable angina pectoris (SAP) and controls. Methods: 210 patients with AMI, 210 with SAP, and 250 clinical controls were recruited. Whole human genome microarray analysis was performed in 20 randomly chosen subjects per group were examined to detect the expressions of complement markers, natural killer cells, T cells and B cells. The quantity of these cells and related cytokines as well as immunoglobulin levels were measured in all subjects. Results: In AMI group, the mRNA expressions of late complement component, markers of natural killer cells, CD3+, CD8+ T cells and B cells were down-regulated, while those of early complement component and CD4+T cells were up-regulated (p<0.05). In both AMI and SAP patients, the quantity of natural killer cells, CD3+, CD8+ T cells, B cells, IgM and IgG were significantly lower than those of the controls. CD4+ T cells, CH50, C3, C4, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and IFN-γ were significantly higher (p<0.05). Conclusions: In AMI patients, both of gene expressions related to complement, natural killer cells, CD3+, CD8+ T cells, B cells and the quantity of these immune cells decreased while cell number reduced in SAP patients. Immune function in both AMI and SAP patients decreased especially in AMI patients with declined gene and protein levels. To improve the immune system is a potential target for medical interventions and prevention in AMI. PMID:28260995

  15. Differential role of lipocalin-2 during immune-complex mediated acute and chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Shashidharamurthy, Rangaiah; Machiah, Deepa; Aitken, Jesse D; Putty, Kalyani; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Chassaing, Benoit; Parkos, Charles A; Selvaraj, Periasamy; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Lipocalin-2 (Lcn2) is an innate immune protein expressed by a variety of cells and is highly upregulated during several pathological conditions including immune-complex (IC) mediated inflammatory/autoimmune disorders. However, the function of Lcn2 during IC-mediated inflammation is largely unknown. Therefore our objective was to investigate the role of Lcn2 in IC-mediated diseases. Methods The upregulation of Lcn2 was determined by ELISA in three different mouse models of IC-mediated autoimmune disease: systemic lupus erythematosus, collagen-induced arthritis and serum-induced arthritis. The in vivo role of Lcn2 during IC-mediated inflammation was investigated using Lcn2 knockout (Lcn2KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates. Results Lcn2 levels were significantly elevated in all the three autoimmune disease models. Further, in an acute skin inflammation model, Lcn2KO mice demonstrated a 50% reduction in inflammation with histopathological analysis revealing strikingly reduced immune cell infiltration compared to WT mice. Administration of recombinant Lcn2 to Lcn2KO mice restored inflammation to levels observed in WT mice. Neutralization of Lcn2 using a monoclonal antibody significantly reduced inflammation in WT mice. In contrast, Lcn2KO mice developed more severe serum-induced arthritis compared to WT mice. Histological analysis revealed extensive tissue and bone destruction with significantly reduced neutrophil infiltration but considerably more macrophage migration in Lcn2KO mice when compared to WT. Conclusion These results demonstrate that Lcn2 may regulate immune cell recruitment to the site of inflammation, a process essential for the controlled initiation, perpetuation and resolution of inflammatory processes. Thus, Lcn2 may present a promising target in the treatment of IC-mediated inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. PMID:23280250

  16. Effects of acute temperature or salinity stress on the immune response in sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangyu; Yang, Hongsheng; Gao, Fei; Liu, Guangbin

    2008-12-01

    Invertebrates are increasingly raised in mariculture, where it is important to monitor immune function and to minimize stresses that could suppress immunity. The activities of phagocytosis, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and lysozyme (LSZ) were measured to evaluate the immune capacities of the sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus, to acute temperature changes (from 12 degrees C to 0 degrees C, 8 degrees C, 16 degrees C, 24 degrees C, and 32 degrees C for 72 h) and salinity changes (from 30 per thousand to 20 per thousand, 25 per thousand, and 35 per thousand for 72 h) in the laboratory. Phagocytosis was significantly affected by temperature increases in 3 h, and by salinity (25 per thousand and 35 per thousand) changes in 1 h. SOD activities decreased significantly in 0.5 h to 6 h samples at 24 degrees C. At 32 degrees C, SOD activities decreased significantly in 0.5 h and 1 h exposures, and obviously increased for 12 h exposure. CAT activities decreased significantly at 24 degrees C for 0.5 h exposure, and increased significantly at 32 degrees C in 3 h to 12 h exposures. Activities of MPO increased significantly at 0 degrees C in 0.5 h to 6 h exposures and at 8 degrees C for 1 h. By contrast, activities of MPO decreased significantly in 24 degrees C and 32 degrees C treatments. In elevated-temperature treatments, activities of LSZ increased significantly except at 32 degrees C for 6 h to 12 h exposures. SOD activity was significantly affected by salinity change. CAT activity decreased significantly after only 1 h exposure to salinity of 20 per thousand. Activities of MPO and LSZ showed that A. japonicus tolerates limited salinity stress. High-temperature stress had a much greater effect on the immune capacities of A. japonicus than did low-temperature and salinity stresses.

  17. Serum Uromodulin Levels in Prediction of Acute Kidney Injury in the Early Phase of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Gala-Błądzińska, Agnieszka; Mazur-Laskowska, Małgorzata; Dumnicka, Paulina; Sporek, Mateusz; Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Gil, Krzysztof; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Walocha, Jerzy; Kucharz, Jakub; Pędziwiatr, Michał; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Trąbka, Rafał; Kuźniewski, Marek

    2017-06-14

    In health, uromodulin is the main protein of urine. Serum uromodulin concentrations (sUMOD) have been shown to correlate with kidney function. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is among the main complications of severe acute pancreatitis (AP). No reports exist on sUMOD in patients with AP, including the diagnostic usefulness for early prediction of AP severity. We measured sUMOD during first 72 h of AP. Sixty-six adult patients with AP were recruited at the surgical ward of the District Hospital in Sucha Beskidzka, Poland. AP was diagnosed according to the Revised Atlanta Classification. Blood samples were collected at 24, 48 and 72 h of AP, and sUMOD concentrations were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent test. sUMOD decreased non-significantly during the study. Patients with severe AP had non-significantly lower sUMOD concentrations than those with mild disease. Significant positive correlation was observed between sUMOD and estimated glomerular filtration rate on each day of the study and negative correlations were shown between sUMOD and age, serum creatinine, cystatin C and urea. Patients with AKI tended to have lower sUMOD. Although sUMOD correlated significantly with kidney function in the early phase of AP, measuring sUMOD did not allow to reliably predict AP severity or development of AKI.

  18. Immune status influences fear and anxiety responses in mice after acute stress exposure.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sarah M; Sand, Joseph; Francis, T Chase; Nagaraju, Anitha; Michael, Kerry C; Keegan, Achsah D; Kusnecov, Alexander; Gould, Todd D; Tonelli, Leonardo H

    2014-05-01

    Significant evidence suggests that exposure to traumatic and/or acute stress in both mice and humans results in compromised immune function that in turn may affect associated brain processes. Additionally, recent studies in mouse models of immune deficiency have suggested that adaptive immunity may play a role during traumatic stress exposure and that impairments in lymphocyte function may contribute to increased susceptibility to various psychogenic stressors. However, rodent studies on the relationship between maladaptive stress responses and lymphocyte deficiency have been complicated by the fact that genetic manipulations in these models may also result in changes in CNS function due to the expression of targeted genes in tissues other than lymphocytes, including the brain. To address these issues we utilized mice with a deletion of recombination-activating gene 2 (Rag2), which has no confirmed expression in the CNS; thus, its loss should result in the absence of mature lymphocytes without altering CNS function directly. Stress responsiveness of immune deficient Rag2(-/-) mice on a BALB/c background was evaluated in three different paradigms: predator odor exposure (POE), fear conditioning (FC) and learned helplessness (LH). These models are often used to study different aspects of stress responsiveness after the exposure to an acute stressor. In addition, immunoblot analysis was used to assess hippocampal BDNF expression under both stressed and non-stressed conditions. Subsequent to POE, Rag2(-/-) mice exhibited a reduced acoustic startle response compared to BALB/c mice; no significant differences in behavior were observed in either FC or LH. Furthermore, analysis of hippocampal BDNF indicated that Rag2(-/-) mice have elevated levels of the mature form of BDNF compared to BALB/c mice. Results from our studies suggest that the absence of mature lymphocytes is associated with increased resilience to stress exposure in the POE and does not affect behavioral

  19. Hymenolepis diminuta and H. nana: cross immunity against the lumen phase in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, A; Onitake, K

    1987-08-01

    When BALB/c mice initially given cysticercoids of Hymenolepis diminuta orally (Day 0) were challenged with eggs or cysticercoids of H. nana, almost all the mice became completely resistant to H. nana challenges from Day 30 onward, and no luminal adults of H. nana were established. There was a tendency for the number of tissue cysticercoids recovered 4 days after egg challenge in immunized mice to be much less than that in control mice (P less than 0.001, Student's t test). However, when these cysticercoids recovered from immune group mice were inoculated into uninfected mice, they matured in the lumen. Thus, the cross immunity to H. nana challenge evoked by an initial prepatent infection with H. diminuta appeared to be directed not against the tissue phase but against the lumen phase of H. nana. When BALB/c mice initially given eggs of H. nana were challenged with H. diminuta, they became resistant to H. diminuta from Day 15 onward. When the mice given eggs of H. nana were treated with a cestocide, praziquantel, at the beginning of the expected luminal development of H. nana and experienced a tissue phase only before challenge with H. diminuta, they showed no resistance to H. diminuta. Thus, the cross immunity to H. diminuta challenge evoked by an initial patent infection with H. nana appeared to be due to the immunogens of the lumen phase of H. nana but not those of the tissue phase. The cross immunity may be, therefore, essentially evoked by the lumen phase of these two phylogenetically closely related species and not by or against the tissue phase of H. nana.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. [Acute phase reaction and immunocompetence in sepsis and SIRS].

    PubMed

    Burdon, Dan; Zabel, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of sepsis and SIRS, respectively is still rising. Mortality is 40 to 70% and, thus, remains very high in spite of major advances in intensive care medicine. Numerous experimental data have helped to explain isolated aspects of the pathophysiology of these disease states but the complex patho-mechanism remains to be elucidated. The discovery of the toll-like receptors and of the endotoxin-binding proteins LBP and BPI have substantially contributed to the understanding of the bacterial toxin-host interactions and may stimulate the development of new therapeutic strategies in the future. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines play a central role in disease evolution, however the concept of organ-derived and organ-specific damage is gaining importance. Both inflammation and counter-regulation can occur at the same time in the circulation thus, making the evaluation of the patients' immunological status difficult. Additionally, several gene polymorphisms have been detected for example within the toll-like receptor genes and TNF genes. These polymorphisms document the existence of pre-disposing factors, which influence acute phase reaction as well as immuno-competence in sepsis. Both genes and gender will play an important role in the future to identify patients at risk and potentially, to design a specific and individualized immuno-therapies.

  1. Effects of competition on acute phase proteins and lymphocyte subpopulations - oxidative stress markers in eventing horses.

    PubMed

    Valle, E; Zanatta, R; Odetti, P; Traverso, N; Furfaro, A; Bergero, D; Badino, P; Girardi, C; Miniscalco, B; Bergagna, S; Tarantola, M; Intorre, L; Odore, R

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate markers of the acute phase response (APR) in eventing horses by measuring acute phase proteins (APP) (haptoglobin, Hp, and serum amyloid A, SAA), lysozyme, protein adducts such as pentosidine-like adducts (PENT), malondialdehyde adducts (MDA), hydroxynonenal adducts (HNE) and total advanced glycation/glycoxidation end products (AGEs), complete blood count and lymphocyte subpopulations (CD4+, CD8+ and CD21+) both at rest and at the end of an eventing competition. Blood samples were collected from eight Warmblood horses (medium age 10 ± 3) during an official national 2-day event competition at rest (R) and 10 min after the arrival of the cross-country test on the second day. Exercise caused a significant increase in red blood cell number, haemoglobin, packed cell volume, neutrophils, white blood cell and lymphocyte number; however, these values remained within the normal range. The CD4+ and CD8+ cells significantly increased, whereas the CD21+ lymphocytes decreased; a significant increase in serum SAA, lysozyme and protein carbonyl derivates was also observed. Two-day event causes significant changes in APR markers such as lysozyme, protein carbonyl derivates (HNE, AGEs, PENT) and lymphocyte subpopulations. The data support the hypothesis that 2-day event may alter significantly APR markers. Limitations of the study were the relatively small sample size and sampling time conditioned by the official regulations of the event. Therefore, further studies are needed to investigate the time required for recovery to basal values in order to define the possible effects on the immune function of the athlete horse.

  2. Host immune response and acute disease in a zebrafish model of francisella pathogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vojtech, L.N.; Sanders, G.E.; Conway, C.; Ostland, V.; Hansen, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the bacterial genus Francisella are highly virulent and infectious pathogens. New models to study Francisella pathogenesis in evolutionarily distinct species are needed to provide comparative insight, as the mechanisms of host resistance and pathogen virulence are not well understood. We took advantage of the recent discovery of a novel species of Francisella to establish a zebrafish/Francisella comparative model of pathogenesis and host immune response. Adult zebraflsh were susceptible to acute Francisella-induced disease and suffered mortality in a dose-dependent manner. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we localized bacterial antigens primarily to lymphoid tissues and livers of zebraflsh following infection by intraperitoneal injection, which corresponded to regions of local cellular necrosis. Francisella sp. bacteria replicated rapidly in these tissues beginning 12 h postinfection, and bacterial titers rose steadily, leveled off, and then decreased by 7 days postinfection. Zebraflsh mounted a significant tissue-specific proinflammatory response to infection as measured by the upregulation of interleukin-l?? (IL-1??), gamma interferon, and tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA beginning by 6 h postinfection and persisting for up to 7 days postinfection. In addition, exposure of zebraflsh to heat-killed bacteria demonstrated that the significant induction of IL-?? was highly specific to live bacteria. Taken together, the pathology and immune response to acute Francisella infection in zebraflsh share many features with those in mammals, highlighting the usefulness of this new model system for addressing both general and specific questions about Francisella host-pathogen interactions via an evolutionary approach. Copyright ?? 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Acute lethal toxicity following passive immunization for treatment of murine cryptococcosis.

    PubMed Central

    Savoy, A C; Lupan, D M; Manalo, P B; Roberts, J S; Schlageter, A M; Weinhold, L C; Kozel, T R

    1997-01-01

    Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the major capsular polysaccharide of Cryptococcus neoformans alters the course of murine cryptococcosis. During studies of passive immunization for treatment of murine cryptococcosis, we noted the occurrence of an acute, lethal toxicity. Toxicity was characterized by scratching, lethargy, respiratory distress, collapse, and death within 20 to 60 min after injection of antibody. The toxic effect was observed only in mice with a cryptococcal infection and was reduced or absent in the early and late stages of disease. The clinical course and histopathology were consistent with those for shock. There was considerable variation between mouse strains in susceptibility to toxicity. Swiss Webster mice from the Charles River colony were most susceptible, followed by C3H/He, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 mice. DBA/2 mice and Swiss Webster mice from the Simonsen colony were resistant. Acute toxicity was mimicked by injection of preformed complexes of MAb and purified polysaccharide. The toxic effect was also produced by injection of MAbs into mice that were preloaded with polysaccharide. The toxic effect was not blocked by treatment of mice with chloropheniramine or anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibodies or by depletion of complement components via pretreatment with cobra venom factor. Toxicity was reduced by treatment of mice with high doses of epinephrine, dexamethasone, or chlorpromazine. Finally, the toxic effect was completely blocked by treatment of mice with the platelet-activating factor antagonist WEB 2170 BS or by pretreatment of mice with the liposome-encapsulated drug dichloromethylene diphosphonate, a procedure which depletes macrophages from the spleen and liver. PMID:9125564

  4. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome Kaposi sarcoma in the liver manifesting as acute obstructive hepatitis: another potential role for montelukast?

    PubMed

    Read, P J; Lucas, S; Morris, S; Kulasegaram, R

    2013-02-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has been described in Kaposi sarcoma, but does not usually manifest as acute hepatitis. We describe a case of rapid obstructive jaundice after initiation of antiretroviral therapy, in which the liver biopsy confirmed hepatic Kaposi sarcoma, and the clinical course was altered by the addition of montelukast.

  5. Innate immune cells express IL-17A/F in acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis and generalized pustular psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Kakeda, M; Schlapbach, Christoph; Danelon, G; Tang, M M; Cecchinato, V; Yawalkar, N; Uguccioni, M

    2014-12-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) and generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) are rare pustular skin disorders with systemic involvement. IL-17A/F is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in various neutrophilic inflammatory disorders. Here we show that IL-17A/F is highly expressed by innate immune cells such as neutrophils and mast cells in both AGEP and GPP.

  6. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and indicators of early immune stimulation: the Estelle study (SFCE)

    PubMed Central

    Ajrouche, R; Rudant, J; Orsi, L; Petit, A; Baruchel, A; Lambilliotte, A; Gambart, M; Michel, G; Bertrand, Y; Ducassou, S; Gandemer, V; Paillard, C; Saumet, L; Blin, N; Hémon, D; Clavel, J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Factors related to early stimulation of the immune system (breastfeeding, proxies for exposure to infectious agents, normal delivery, and exposure to animals in early life) have been suggested to decrease the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Methods: The national registry-based case–control study, ESTELLE, was carried out in France in 2010–2011. Population controls were frequency matched with cases on age and gender. The participation rates were 93% for cases and 86% for controls. Data were obtained from structured telephone questionnaires administered to mothers. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated using unconditional regression models adjusted for age, gender, and potential confounders. Results: In all, 617 ALL and 1225 controls aged ⩾1 year were included. Inverse associations between ALL and early common infections (OR=0.8, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.6, 1.0), non-first born (⩾3 vs 1; OR=0.7, 95% CI: 0.5, 1.0), attendance of a day-care centre before age 1 year (OR=0.7, 95% CI: 0.5, 1.0), breastfeeding (OR=0.8, 95% CI: 0.7, 1.0), and regular contact with pets (OR=0.8, 95% CI: 0.7, 1.0) in infancy were observed. Conclusions: The results support the hypothesis that conditions promoting the maturation of the immune system in infancy have a protective role with respect to ALL. PMID:25675150

  7. Developmental profile of select immune cells in mice infected with Trichinella spiralis during the intestinal phase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Trichinella spiralis can cause immunosuppression during the intestinal phase of early infection. However, changes in the peripheral blood during T. spiralis early infection remain unclear. Here, select immune cells in mice infected with 500 muscle larvae (ML) of T. spiralis during the intestinal pha...

  8. 19F MRI Detection of Acute Allograft Rejection with In Vivo Perfluorocarbon Labeling of Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hitchens, T. Kevin; Ye, Qing; Eytan, Danielle F.; Janjic, Jelena M.; Ahrens, Eric T.; Ho, Chien

    2010-01-01

    Current diagnosis of organ rejection following transplantation relies on tissue biopsy, which is not ideal due to sampling limitations and risks associated with the invasive procedure. We have previously shown that cellular MRI of iron-oxide labeled immune-cell infiltration can provide a non-invasive measure of rejection status by detecting areas of hypointensity on T2*-weighted images. In the current study, we tested the feasibility of using a fluorine-based cellular tracer agent to detect macrophage accumulation in rodent models of acute allograft rejection by fluorine-19 (19F) MRI and MRS. This study used two rat models of acute rejection, including abdominal heterotopic cardiac transplant and orthotopic kidney transplant models. Following in vivo labeling of monocytes and macrophages with a commercially available agent containing perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether, we observed 19F-signal intensity in the organs experiencing rejection by 19F MRI, and conventional 1H MRI was used for anatomical context. Immunofluorescense and histology confirmed macrophage labeling. These results are consistent with our previous studies and show the complementary nature of the two cellular imaging techniques. With no background signal, 19F MRI/MRS can provide unambiguous detection of fluorine labeled cells, and may be a useful technique for detecting and quantifying rejection grade in patients. PMID:21305593

  9. Immune complexed (IC) hepatitis C virus (HCV) in chronically and acutely HCV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Riva, E; Maggi, F; Abbruzzese, F; Bellomi, F; Giannelli, G; Picardi, A; Scagnolari, C; Folgori, A; Spada, E; Piccolella, E; Dianzani, F; Antonelli, G

    2009-02-01

    In infected individuals, hepatitis C virus (HCV) exists in various forms of circulating particles which role in virus persistence and in HCV resistance to IFN therapy is still debated. Here, the proportion of HCV bound to immunoglobulin was determined in plasma of 107 chronically infected patients harbouring different HCV genotypes and, for comparison, of six patients with acute HCV infection. The results showed that, in spite of wide individual variability, chronically HCV-infected patients exhibited an extremely high proportion of immune complexed (IC) virus regardless of plasma HCV load and infecting genotype. Moreover, no significant association was found between baseline proportion of IC HCV and response to IFN treatment. Plasma samples collected within 2 weeks of treatment from 20 patients revealed a significant decline of mean IC HCV values relative to baseline that clearly paralleled the decay of total HCV load. In acutely infected patients, circulating HCV was not IC or IC at very low levels only in patients developing chronic HCV infection. Collectively, these findings strengthen the possibility that IC virus could play a critical role in the pathogenesis of HCV infection.

  10. Isolation of a lipopolysaccharide-binding acute phase reactant from rabbit serum.

    PubMed

    Tobias, P S; Soldau, K; Ulevitch, R J

    1986-09-01

    This report describes the purification of an acute phase reactant from acute phase rabbit serum, which endows normal serum with the properties of acute phase serum, insofar as LPS is concerned. The acute phase reactant is referred to as LPS-binding protein, or LBP. LBP was purified approximately 2,000-fold by chromatography of acute phase serum on Bio-Rex 70 and Mono-Q resins. The resulting preparation consisted of two glycoproteins having molecular weights of 60,500 and 58,000; the two were obtained in a variable ratio, usually near 10:1, respectively. After separation by SDS-PAGE, the N-terminal 36 amino acid sequences of the two proteins were identical. From the N-terminal sequence, as well as other properties of LBP, LBP appears to be unrelated to any known acute phase reactants. The direct interaction of LPS and LBP was inferred from two types of evidence: first, immunoprecipitation of [3H]LPS from APRS by anti-LBP sera; and second, by the 125I-labeling of LBP when APRS-containing 125I-labeled 2-(p-azidosalicylamido)ethyl 1,3'-dithiopropionyl-LPS was photolysed. The data presented here support the concept that the 60-kD glycoprotein we have termed LBP is a newly recognized acute phase reactant that may modulate the biochemical and biologic properties of LPS in vivo.

  11. Low-dose total-body γ irradiation modulates immune response to acute proton radiation.

    PubMed

    Luo-Owen, Xian; Pecaut, Michael J; Rizvi, Asma; Gridley, Daila S

    2012-03-01

    Health risks due to exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate radiation alone or when combined with acute irradiation are not yet clearly defined. This study quantified the effects of protracted exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays with and without acute exposure to protons on the response of immune and other cell populations. C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with ⁵⁷Co (0.05 Gy at 0.025 cGy/h); subsets were subsequently exposed to high-dose/high-dose-rate proton radiation (250 MeV; 2 or 3 Gy at 0.5 Gy/min). Analyses were performed at 4 and 17 days postexposure. Spleen and thymus masses relative to body mass were decreased on day 4 after proton irradiation with or without pre-exposure to γ rays; by day 17, however, the decrease was attenuated by the priming dose. Proton dose-dependent decreases, either with or without pre-exposure to γ rays, occurred in white blood cell, lymphocyte and granulocyte counts in blood but not in spleen. A similar pattern was found for lymphocyte subpopulations, including CD3+ T, CD19+ B, CD4+ T, CD8+ T and NK1.1+ natural killer (NK) cells. Spontaneous DNA synthesis by leukocytes after proton irradiation was high in blood on day 4 and high in spleen on day 17; priming with γ radiation attenuated the effect of 3 Gy in both body compartments. Some differences were also noted among groups in erythrocyte and thrombocyte characteristics. Analysis of splenocytes activated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies showed changes in T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines. Overall, the data demonstrate that pre-exposure of an intact mammal to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays can attenuate the response to acute exposure to proton radiation with respect to at least some cell populations.

  12. Acute-phase reactants in acute myocardial infarction: impact on 5-year prognosis.

    PubMed

    Mariotti, R; Musumeci, G; De Carlo, M; Biadi, O; Caravelli, P; Limbruno, U; Mariani, M

    2001-04-01

    Acute-phase reactants have recently been shown to have a short-term and possibly long-term prognostic value in acute coronary syndromes. The aim of the present study was to retrospectively verify whether serum levels of inflammation markers can predict the occurrence of early and late cardiac events after myocardial infarction. We reevaluated 58 consecutive patients (43 men and 15 women, mean age 66 +/- 12 years) admitted to our Center during 1993 with a first myocardial infarction. Patients with non-cardiac causes of inflammation were excluded, as well as patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction <40%. From the first blood sample obtained at admission, we evaluated C-reactive protein (CRP) and alpha1-acid glycoprotein (alpha1-AGP) serum levels, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), fibrinogen levels, and the white blood cell (WBC) count. We also evaluated the highest level of serum cardiac markers. Follow-up data were collected for 55 patients in June 1999. Five in-hospital and 13 delayed cardiac deaths occurred. The mean follow-up of current survivors was 5.9 +/- 0.4 years. Patients in whom cardiac death occurred had significantly higher CRP (7.4 +/- 4.1 vs 3.0 +/- 2.4 mg/dl, p < 0.001) and alpha1-AGP levels (160 +/- 38 vs 113 +/- 24 mg/dl, p < 0.001), ESR (63 +/- 30 vs 37 +/- 25 mm/hour, p < 0.001), and WBC count (13,727 +/- 3,853 vs 10,936 +/- 3,358/mm3, p = 0.004). At multivariate analysis, higher alpha1-AGP (p < 0.001) and CRP serum levels (p = 0.02) were independent predictors of cardiac death. Patients in whom cardiac events occurred during follow-up showed higher CRP (5.7 +/- 3.7 vs 1.6 +/- 1.5 mg/dl, p < 0.001) and alpha1-AGP levels (140 +/- 36 vs 101 +/- 23 mg/dl, p < 0.001) and ESR (50 +/- 30 vs 34 +/- 26 mm/hour, p = 0.06). Higher alpha1-AGP (p < 0.001) and CRP serum levels (p = 0.03) were independent predictors of the occurrence of cardiac events. The present study shows that CRP and alpha1-AGP have an independent prognostic value in

  13. [Management of coronary artery disease at the acute phase].

    PubMed

    Chatot, Marion; Schiele, François

    2015-03-01

    In patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), early management is of prime importance. However, the median time taken by the patient to call the emergency services is often very long, up to 2 hours. The presence of a physician as first responder ensures good quality resuscitation in case of cardiac arrest, and allows recording of a first ECG, which can be very informative, especially in ACS without ST segment elevation. Treatment at this stage is limited to sublingual nitroglycerin and aspirin. If the first ECG shows ST segment elevation, the patient should be immediately oriented for reperfusion, usually by percutaneous coronary intervention. in the absence of ST segment elevation, the diagnosis of ACS remains unconfirmed. This does not imply that the risk is lesser, but rather that the risk cannot be evaluated accurately in the pre-hospital setting. The use of risk scores can guide the choice of management towards an invasive strategy, including coronary angiography (immediately, or within 24-72 hours). Low-risk patients are candidates for an invasive strategy, provided non-invasive tests demonstrate the presence of ischemia. During the hospital phase, antiplatelet treatment should be initiated and must be adapted to the patient bleeding and thrombotic risk. Clopidogrel is recommended only in patients who are not amenable to prasugrel or ticagrelor. Statin therapy should be initiated from day one, regardless of the initial cholesterol level, preferably with 80 mg atorvastatin. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers should also be prescribed to complete the medical prescription both in-hospital and in the long term.

  14. Acute phase proteins in the diagnosis of bovine subclinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Safi, Shahabeddin; Khoshvaghti, Ameneh; Jafarzadeh, Seyed Reza; Bolourchi, Mahmoud; Nowrouzian, Iradj

    2009-12-01

    The California mastitis test (CMT) and somatic cell count (SCC) are commonly used for diagnosis of subclinical mastitis in cattle. Acute phase proteins (APPs), as alternative biomarkers of mastitis, may increase in concentration in the absence of macroscopic changes in the milk, or may precede the onset of clinical signs. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of APPs measured in milk and in serum with bacterial culture for the diagnosis of bovine subclinical mastitis. One hundred and seventy-five Holstein cows were randomly selected from 7 dairy farms. Quarter milk and serum samples were taken from all cows. Milk samples were analyzed using a CMT and SCC, and for haptoglobin (MHp) and amyloid A (MAA) concentrations, and were also submitted for bacterial culture. Serum samples obtained concurrently were analyzed for haptoglobin (SHp) and amyloid A (SAA). Two-sample Wilcoxon (Mann-Whitney) test was used to compare SCC, MAA, MHp, SAA, and SHp concentrations between culture-positive and culture-negative animals. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis was used to assess the performance of each test using bacterial culture as the reference method. MAA concentration was the most accurate of the 5 tests, with a sensitivity of 90.6% and specificity of 98.3% at concentrations >16.4 mg/L. MAA and MHp had significantly larger areas under the curve than the respective serum proteins, SAA and SHp. The results suggest that measuring haptoglobin and amyloid A in milk is more accurate than serum analysis for the diagnosis of subclinical mastitis in Holstein cows.

  15. Induction of acute phase gene expression by brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Ji-Hong |; Sun, Ji-Rong; Withers, H.R.

    1995-10-15

    To investigate the in vivo acute phase molecular response of the brain to ionizing radiation, C3Hf/Sed/Kam mice were given midbrain or whole-body irradiation. Cerebral expression of interleukins (IL-1{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6), interferon (IFN-{gamma}), tumor necrosis factors (TNF-{alpha} and TNF-{beta}), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS), von Willebrand factor (vWF), {alpha}1-antichymotrypsin (EB22/5.3), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was measured at various times after various radiation doses by ribonuclease (RNase) protection assay. The effects of dexamethasone or pentoxifylline treatment of mice on radiation-induced gene expression were also examined. Levels of TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, ICAM-1, EB22/5.3, and to a lesser extent IL-1{alpha} and GFAP, messenger RNA were increased in the brain after irradiation, whether the dose was delivered to the whole body or only to the midbrain. Responses were radiation dose dependent, but were not found below 7 Gy; the exception being ICAM-1, which was increased by doses as low as 2 Gy. Most responses were rapid, peaking within 4-8 h, but antichymotrypsin and GFAP responses were delayed and still elevated at 24 h, by which time the others had subsided. Pretreatment of mice with dexamethasone or pentoxifylline suppressed radiation-induced gene expression, either partially or completely. Dexamethasone was more inhibitory than pentoxifylline at the doses chosen. The initial response of the brain to irradiation involves expression of inflammatory gene products, which are probably responsible for clinically observed early symptoms of brain radiotherapy. This mechanism explains the beneficial effects of the clinical use of steroids in such circumstances. 64 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Reassessment of HIV-1 Acute Phase Infectivity: Accounting for Heterogeneity and Study Design with Simulated Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Bellan, Steve E.; Dushoff, Jonathan; Galvani, Alison P.; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2015-01-01

    Background The infectivity of the HIV-1 acute phase has been directly measured only once, from a retrospectively identified cohort of serodiscordant heterosexual couples in Rakai, Uganda. Analyses of this cohort underlie the widespread view that the acute phase is highly infectious, even more so than would be predicted from its elevated viral load, and that transmission occurring shortly after infection may therefore compromise interventions that rely on diagnosis and treatment, such as antiretroviral treatment as prevention (TasP). Here, we re-estimate the duration and relative infectivity of the acute phase, while accounting for several possible sources of bias in published estimates, including the retrospective cohort exclusion criteria and unmeasured heterogeneity in risk. Methods and Findings We estimated acute phase infectivity using two approaches. First, we combined viral load trajectories and viral load-infectivity relationships to estimate infectivity trajectories over the course of infection, under the assumption that elevated acute phase infectivity is caused by elevated viral load alone. Second, we estimated the relative hazard of transmission during the acute phase versus the chronic phase (RHacute) and the acute phase duration (d acute) by fitting a couples transmission model to the Rakai retrospective cohort using approximate Bayesian computation. Our model fit the data well and accounted for characteristics overlooked by previous analyses, including individual heterogeneity in infectiousness and susceptibility and the retrospective cohort's exclusion of couples that were recorded as serodiscordant only once before being censored by loss to follow-up, couple dissolution, or study termination. Finally, we replicated two highly cited analyses of the Rakai data on simulated data to identify biases underlying the discrepancies between previous estimates and our own. From the Rakai data, we estimated RHacute = 5.3 (95% credibility interval [95% CrI]: 0

  17. Acute-phase reactants in periodontal disease: current concepts and future implications.

    PubMed

    Archana, Vilasan; Ambili, Ranjith; Nisha, Krishnavilasam Jayakumary; Seba, Abraham; Preeja, Chandran

    2015-05-01

    Periodontal disease has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events by unknown mechanisms. C-reactive protein is a systemic marker released during the acute phase of an inflammatory response and is a prognostic marker for cardiovascular disease, with elevated serum levels being reported during periodontal disease. Studies also reported elevated levels of various other acute-phase reactants in periodontal disease. It has been reported extensively in the literature that treatment of periodontal infections can significantly lower serum levels of C-reactive protein. Therefore, an understanding of the relationship between acute-phase response and the progression of periodontal disease and other systemic health complications would have a profound effect on the periodontal treatment strategies. In view of this fact, the present review highlights an overview of acute-phase reactants and their role in periodontal disease. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Immunoadsorption therapy for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders long after the acute phase.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masatake; Nanri, Kazunori; Taguchi, Takeshi; Ishiko, Tomoko; Yoshida, Masaharu; Yoshikawa, Noriko; Sugisaki, Kentaro; Tanaka, Nobuyuki

    2015-02-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a severe inflammatory demyelinating disease with exacerbations involving recurrent or bilateral optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis. Pulse steroid therapy is recommended as the initial, acute-phase treatment for NMO. If ineffective, treatment with plasma exchange (PE) should commence. However, no evidence exists to support the effectiveness of PE long after the acute phase. Immunoadsorption therapy (IA) eliminates pathogenic antibodies while sparing other plasma proteins. With IA, side effects of PE resulting from protein substitution can be avoided. However, whether IA is effective for NMO remains unclear. We describe a patient with anti-aquaporin-4-positive myelitis who responded to IA using a tryptophan polyvinyl alcohol gel column that was begun 52 days after disease onset following the acute phase. Even long after the acute phase when symptoms appear to be stable, IA may be effective and should not be excluded as a treatment choice.

  19. The role and importance of glycosylation of acute phase proteins with focus on alpha-1 antitrypsin in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cormac; Saldova, Radka; Wormald, Mark R; Rudd, Pauline M; McElvaney, Noel G; Reeves, Emer P

    2014-07-03

    Acute phase proteins (APPs) are a group of circulating plasma proteins which undergo changes quantitatively or qualitatively at the time of inflammation. Many of these APPs are glycosylated, and it has been shown that alterations in glycosylation may occur in inflammatory and malignant conditions. Changes in glycosylation have been studied as potential biomarkers in cancer and also in chronic inflammatory conditions and have been shown to correlate with disease severity in certain conditions. Serine protease inhibitors (serpins), many of which are also APPs, are proteins involved in the control of proteases in numerous pathways. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin (AAT) is the most abundant serpin within the circulation and is an APP which has been shown to increase in response to inflammation. The primary role of AAT is maintaining the protease/antiprotease balance in the lung, but it also possesses important anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties. Several glycoforms of AAT exist, and they possess differing properties in regard to plasma half-life and stability. Glycosylation may also be important in determining the immune modulatory properties of AAT. The review will focus on the role and importance of glycosylation in acute phase proteins with particular attention to AAT and its use as a biomarker of disease. The review describes the processes involved in glycosylation, how glycosylation changes in differing disease states, and the alterations that occur to glycans of APPs with disease and inflammation. Finally, the review explores the importance of changes in glycosylation of AAT at times of inflammation and in malignant conditions and how this may impact upon the functions of AAT.

  20. Intestinal pathogens, diarrhoea and acute phase proteins in naturally infected dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Seppä-Lassila, Leena; Orro, Toomas; Lassen, Brian; Lasonen, Riikka; Autio, Tiina; Pelkonen, Sinikka; Soveri, Timo

    2015-08-01

    In this study, the association between Eimeria spp. related signs and innate immune response in dairy calves was examined. Calves (n=100) aged 15-60 days were clinically examined and faecal samples, blood samples and deep nasopharyngeal swabs obtained. The samples were analysed for intestinal pathogens, acute phase proteins and WBC count, and respiratory tract pathogens, respectively. Diarrhoea was diagnosed in 32.6% (23.3-43.0%, 95% CI) of calves. An association between the pathogenic Eimeria spp. and diarrhoea was detected by multiple correspondence analysis. Eimeria related signs (diarrhoea, presence of pathogenic species and total oocyst count) were combined resulting a four level variable. Calves with weak signs of eimeriosis had decreased haptoglobin concentrations (p=0.02) and increased fibrinogen concentrations (p=0.048) compared to no signs. Increased haptoglobin and fibrinogen concentrations were associated with respiratory tract infection and umbilical infection. Serum amyloid A and WBC counts showed no association with signs of eimeriosis or clinical diagnoses.

  1. Acute adaptive immune response correlates with late radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Paun, Alexandra; Kunwar, Amit; Haston, Christina K

    2015-02-20

    The lung response to radiation exposure can involve an immediate or early reaction to the radiation challenge, including cell death and an initial immune reaction, and can be followed by a tissue injury response, of pneumonitis or fibrosis, to this acute reaction. Herein, we aimed to determine whether markers of the initial immune response, measured within days of radiation exposure, are correlated with the lung tissue injury responses occurring weeks later. Inbred strains of mice known to be susceptible (KK/HIJ, C57BL/6J, 129S1/SvImJ) or resistant (C3H/HeJ, A/J, AKR/J) to radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis and to vary in time to onset of respiratory distress post thoracic irradiation (from 10-23 weeks) were studied. Mice were untreated (controls) or received 18 Gy whole thorax irradiation and were euthanized at 6 h, 1d or 7 d after radiation treatment. Pulmonary CD4+ lymphocytes, bronchoalveolar cell profile & cytokine level, and serum cytokine levels were assayed. Thoracic irradiation and inbred strain background significantly affected the numbers of CD4+ cells in the lungs and the bronchoalveolar lavage cell differential of exposed mice. At the 7 day timepoint greater numbers of pulmonary Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes and reduced lavage interleukin17 and interferonγ levels were significant predictors of late stage fibrosis. Lavage levels of interleukin-10, measured at the 7 day timepoint, were inversely correlated with fibrosis score (R=-0.80, p=0.05), while serum levels of interleukin-17 in control mice significantly correlated with post irradiation survival time (R=0.81, p=0.04). Lavage macrophage, lymphocyte or neutrophil counts were not significantly correlated with either of fibrosis score or time to respiratory distress in the six mouse strains. Specific cytokine and lymphocyte levels, but not strain dependent lavage cell profiles, were predictive of later radiation-induced lung injury in this panel of inbred strains.

  2. Immune suppression blocks sodium-sensitive hypertension following recovery from ischemic acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Pechman, Kimberly R; Basile, David P; Lund, Hayley; Mattson, David L

    2008-04-01

    The present study determined the effect of immune suppression with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on sodium-sensitive hypertension following recovery from ischemia reperfusion (I/R)-induced acute renal failure. Male Sprague-Dawley rats fed 0.4% NaCl chow were subjected to 40 min bilateral I/R or control sham surgery. After 35 days of recovery, when plasma creatinine levels had returned to normal, the rats were switched to 4.0% NaCl chow for 28 days and administered vehicle or MMF (20 mg.kg(-1).day(-1) ip). High-salt mean arterial pressure was significantly higher in I/R rats (144 +/- 16 mmHg) compared with vehicle-treated sham rats (122 +/- 2 mmHg). Treatment of I/R rats with MMF during the period of high salt intake prevented the salt-induced increase in arterial pressure (114 +/- 3 mmHg). Conscious creatinine clearance was lower in I/R rats (0.27 +/- 0.07 ml.min(-1).100 g body wt(-1)) compared with vehicle-treated sham rats (0.58 +/- 0.04 ml.min(-1).100 g body wt(-1)); MMF treatment prevented the decrease in creatinine clearance in I/R rats (0.64 +/- 0.07 ml.min(-1).100 g body wt(-1)). I/R injury also significantly increased glomerular tissue damage and increased the presence of ED-1 positive (macrophages) and S100A4 positive cells (fibroblasts) in the renal interstitium. The I/R rats treated with MMF exhibited a significant reduction in infiltrating macrophages and fibroblasts and decreased histological damage. The present data indicate that infiltrating immune cells mediate or participate in the development of sodium-sensitive hypertension and renal damage in rats apparently recovered from renal I/R injury.

  3. Immunization practices in acute lymphocytic leukemia and post-hematopoietic stem cell transplant in Canadian Pediatric Hematology/Oncology centers

    PubMed Central

    Top, Karina A.; Pham-Huy, Anne; Price, Victoria; Sung, Lillian; Tran, Dat; Vaudry, Wendy; Halperin, Scott A.; De Serres, Gaston

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There are no Canadian immunization guidelines for children treated for malignancy. Guidelines do exist for patients who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), but they provide broad timeframes for initiating vaccination; there is no standard schedule. The optimal approach to immunization in these populations is unclear. We sought to describe immunization practices at Canadian Pediatric Hematology/Oncology centers. A 43-item online questionnaire was distributed to the 16 programs in the C17 research network of pediatric hematology/oncology centers to capture information on timing and criteria for immunization of patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and those who have undergone HSCT. At each center, 1–2 physicians or pharmacists completed the survey to reflect center-wide immunization practices. Responses were received from 11/16 (69%) programs; 11 respondents reported on practices for patients with ALL and 9 reported on practices for patients who are post-HSCT. In 5/11 ALL programs (45%) re-immunization is recommended routinely after chemotherapy, starting 3–6 months post-chemotherapy. In HSCT programs, timing of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination (PCV) varied from 3 months post-HSCT (4 programs) to 12 months post-HSCT (4 programs). Live vaccines were administered 24 months post-HSCT in 8/9 programs. All HSCT programs considered graft-versus-host-disease and 7 considered discontinuation of immunosuppression in immunization decisions. Pediatric hematology/oncology programs were divided in regards to re-immunization of patients with ALL post-chemotherapy. After HSCT, timing of PCV administration varied, with 4 programs initiating immunization later than Canadian guidelines recommend (3–9 months post-HSCT). These findings suggest a need to standardize immunization practices in these populations. PMID:26962702

  4. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blastic Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  5. Predictors of Longitudinal Outcomes after Unstable Response to Acute Phase Cognitive Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Lee Anna; Thase, Michael E.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2015-01-01

    After patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) respond to acute-phase cognitive therapy (CT), continuation-phase treatments may be applied to improve long-term outcomes. We clarified which CT responders experience remission, recovery, relapse, and recurrence by testing baseline demographic, clinical, and personality variables. The sample of CT responders at higher risk of relapse (N = 241) was randomized to 8 months of continuation-phase CT (C-CT), double-blinded fluoxetine or pill placebo, and followed 24 months (Jarrett & Thase, 2010). Patients with lower positive emotionality and behavioral activation at the end of acute-phase CT showed increased risk for relapse/recurrence of MDD. In addition, patients with lower positive emotionality and behavioral activation, as well as higher residual depression (including emotional, cognitive, and social facets), showed decreased probability of remission (≥6 continuous weeks of minimal or absent symptoms) after acute-phase CT. Finally, patients with greater residual depression, as well as younger age and earlier MDD onset, showed decreased probability of recovery (≥35 continuous weeks of minimal or absent symptoms) after acute-phase CT. Moderator analyses did not reveal differential prediction across the continuation phase treatment arms. These results may help clinicians gauge the prognoses and need for continuation treatment among MDD patients who respond to acute-phase CT. PMID:25985046

  6. Evasion of the Immune Response by Trypanosoma cruzi during Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Mariana S; Reis-Cunha, João Luís; Bartholomeu, Daniella C

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease that affects millions of people mainly in Latin America. To establish a life-long infection, T. cruzi must subvert the vertebrate host's immune system, using strategies that can be traced to the parasite's life cycle. Once inside the vertebrate host, metacyclic trypomastigotes rapidly invade a wide variety of nucleated host cells in a membrane-bound compartment known as the parasitophorous vacuole, which fuses to lysosomes, originating the phagolysosome. In this compartment, the parasite relies on a complex network of antioxidant enzymes to shield itself from lysosomal oxygen and nitrogen reactive species. Lysosomal acidification of the parasitophorous vacuole is an important factor that allows trypomastigote escape from the extremely oxidative environment of the phagolysosome to the cytoplasm, where it differentiates into amastigote forms. In the cytosol of infected macrophages, oxidative stress instead of being detrimental to the parasite, favors amastigote burden, which then differentiates into bloodstream trypomastigotes. Trypomastigotes released in the bloodstream upon the rupture of the host cell membrane express surface molecules, such as calreticulin and GP160 proteins, which disrupt initial and key components of the complement pathway, while others such as glycosylphosphatidylinositol-mucins stimulate immunoregulatory receptors, delaying the progression of a protective immune response. After an immunologically silent entry at the early phase of infection, T. cruzi elicits polyclonal B cell activation, hypergammaglobulinemia, and unspecific anti-T. cruzi antibodies, which are inefficient in controlling the infection. Additionally, the coexpression of several related, but not identical, epitopes derived from trypomastigote surface proteins delays the generation of T. cruzi-specific neutralizing antibodies. Later in the infection, the establishment of an anti-T. cruzi CD8

  7. Evasion of the Immune Response by Trypanosoma cruzi during Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Mariana S.; Reis-Cunha, João Luís; Bartholomeu, Daniella C.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease that affects millions of people mainly in Latin America. To establish a life-long infection, T. cruzi must subvert the vertebrate host’s immune system, using strategies that can be traced to the parasite’s life cycle. Once inside the vertebrate host, metacyclic trypomastigotes rapidly invade a wide variety of nucleated host cells in a membrane-bound compartment known as the parasitophorous vacuole, which fuses to lysosomes, originating the phagolysosome. In this compartment, the parasite relies on a complex network of antioxidant enzymes to shield itself from lysosomal oxygen and nitrogen reactive species. Lysosomal acidification of the parasitophorous vacuole is an important factor that allows trypomastigote escape from the extremely oxidative environment of the phagolysosome to the cytoplasm, where it differentiates into amastigote forms. In the cytosol of infected macrophages, oxidative stress instead of being detrimental to the parasite, favors amastigote burden, which then differentiates into bloodstream trypomastigotes. Trypomastigotes released in the bloodstream upon the rupture of the host cell membrane express surface molecules, such as calreticulin and GP160 proteins, which disrupt initial and key components of the complement pathway, while others such as glycosylphosphatidylinositol-mucins stimulate immunoregulatory receptors, delaying the progression of a protective immune response. After an immunologically silent entry at the early phase of infection, T. cruzi elicits polyclonal B cell activation, hypergammaglobulinemia, and unspecific anti-T. cruzi antibodies, which are inefficient in controlling the infection. Additionally, the coexpression of several related, but not identical, epitopes derived from trypomastigote surface proteins delays the generation of T. cruzi-specific neutralizing antibodies. Later in the infection, the establishment of an anti-T. cruzi

  8. Investigation of whether the acute hemolysis associated with Rho(D) immune globulin intravenous (human) administration for treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura is consistent with the acute hemolytic transfusion reaction model

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Ann Reed; Lee-Stroka, Hallie; Byrne, Karen; Scott, Dorothy E.; Uhl, Lynne; Lazarus, Ellen; Stroncek, David F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Immune thrombocytopenic purpura and secondary thrombocytopenia patients treated with Rho(D) immune globulin intravenous (human; anti-D IGIV) have experienced acute hemolysis, which is inconsistent with the typical presentation of extravascular hemolysis—the presumed mechanism of action of anti-D IGIV. Although the mechanism of anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis has not been established, the onset, signs/symptoms, and complications appear consistent with the intravascular hemolysis of acute hemolytic transfusion reactions (AHTRs). In transfusion medicine, the red blood cell (RBC) antigen-antibody incompatibility(-ies) that precipitate AHTRs can be detected in vitro with compatibility testing. Under the premise that anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis results from RBC antigen-antibody–mediated complement activation, this study evaluated whether the incompatibility(-ies) could be detected in vitro with a hemolysin assay, which would support the AHTR model as the hemolytic mechanism. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Seven anti-D IGIV lots were tested to determine the RBC antibody identities in those lots, including four lots that had been implicated in acute hemolytic episodes. Hemolysin assays were performed that tested each of 73 RBC specimens against each lot, including the RBCs of one patient who had experienced acute hemolysis after anti-D IGIV administration. RESULTS Only two anti-D IGIV lots contained RBC antibodies beyond those expected. No hemolysis endpoint was observed in any of the hemolysin assays. CONCLUSION Although the findings did not support the AHTR model, the results are reported to contribute knowledge about the mechanism of anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis and to prompt continued investigation into cause(s), prediction, and prevention of this potentially serious adverse event. PMID:19220820

  9. Mouse Mast Cell Tryptase mMCP-6 Is a Critical Link between Adaptive and Innate Immunity in the Chronic Phase of Trichinella spiralis Infection1

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kichul; Watts, Gerald F. M.; Oettgen, Hans C.; Friend, Daniel S.; Pemberton, Alan D.; Gurish, Michael F.; Lee, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Although the innate immune function of mast cells in the acute phase of parasitic and bacterial infections is well established, their participation in chronic immune responses to indolent infection remains incompletely understood. In parasitic infection with Trichinella spiralis, the immune response incorporates both lymphocyte and mast cell-dependent effector functions for pathogen eradication. Among the mechanistic insights still unresolved in the reaction to T. spiralis are the means by which mast cells respond to parasites and the mast cell effector functions that contribute to the immunologic response to this pathogen. We hypothesized that mast cell elaboration of tryptase may comprise an important effector component in this response. Indeed, we find that mice deficient in the tryptase mouse mast cell protease-6 (mMCP-6) display a significant difference in their response to T. spiralis larvae in chronically infected skeletal muscle tissue. Mechanistically, this is associated with a profound inability to recruit eosinophils to larvae in mMCP-6-deficient mice. Analysis of IgE-deficient mice demonstrates an identical defect in eosinophil recruitment. These findings establish that mast cell secretion of the tryptase mMCP-6, a function directed by the activity of the adaptive immune system, contributes to eosinophil recruitment to the site of larval infection, thereby comprising an integral link in the chronic immune response to parasitic infection. PMID:18354212

  10. The effect of acute ethanol intoxication on salivary proteins of innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Jankowska, Anna; Zwierz, Piotr; Czernikiewicz, Andrzej; Szulc, Agata; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2008-04-01

    Human salivary proteins: peroxidase, lysozyme, lactoferrin, and IgA, participate in the protection of oral tissues, as well as upper digestive and respiratory tracts, against a number of microbial pathogens. In the current study, we investigated the effect of acute consumption of a large dose of ethanol on representative human salivary proteins of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Eight healthy male volunteers drank an average of 2.0 g (1.4 to 2.5 g/kg) body weight of ethanol, in the form of vodka, in the 6-hour period. Samples of resting whole saliva were collected 12 hours before, then 36 and 108 hours after, the alcohol consumption. The levels of total protein, immunoglobulin A, lysozyme and lactoferrin as well as peroxidase activity were determined in saliva. At 36 hours after alcohol consumption, salivary protein and lysozyme concentrations as well as peroxidase activity were significantly decreased (p = 0.002, p = 0.043, and p = 0.003, respectively), in comparison to the values obtained at 12 hours before drinking. Between 36 and 108 hours after alcohol consumption, the salivary protein and lysozyme concentrations, as well as peroxidase activity showed a tendency to increase, although at 108 hours after the drinking session, the concentration of protein and peroxidase activity were still significantly lower than before drinking. There was no significant change in the level of lactoferrin, after the drinking session. The salivary concentration of IgA tended to increase at 36 hours after alcohol consumption, and at 108 hours it was significantly higher (p = 0.028), when compared to IgA concentration in the saliva collected before drinking (from 8% to 26% and 32% of total protein content, respectively). Our report is the first to show that acute ingestion of relatively large, yet tolerable dose of alcohol, significantly disturbs salivary antimicrobial defense system. Reduced lysozyme level and decreased peroxidase activity may contribute to increased

  11. MicroRNA-29b mediates altered innate immune development in acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L.; Scoville, Steven D.; Chen, Li; McConnell, Kathleen; Mao, Hsiaoyin C.; Ahmed, Elshafa H.; Zorko, Nicholas; Harvey, Sophia; Cole, Jordan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Costinean, Stefan; Croce, Carlo M.; Larkin, Karilyn; Byrd, John C.; Vasu, Sumithira; Blum, William; Yu, Jianhua; Freud, Aharon G.; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can have potent antileukemic activity following haplo-mismatched, T cell–depleted stem cell transplantations for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but they are not successful in eradicating de novo AML. Here, we have used a mouse model of de novo AML to elucidate the mechanisms by which AML evades NK cell surveillance. NK cells in leukemic mice displayed a marked reduction in the cytolytic granules perforin and granzyme B. Further, as AML progressed, we noted the selective loss of an immature subset of NK cells in leukemic mice and in AML patients. This absence was not due to elimination by cell death or selective reduction in proliferation, but rather to the result of a block in NK cell differentiation. Indeed, NK cells from leukemic mice and humans with AML showed lower levels of TBET and EOMES, transcription factors that are critical for terminal NK cell differentiation. Further, the microRNA miR-29b, a regulator of T-bet and EOMES, was elevated in leukemic NK cells. Finally, deletion of miR-29b in NK cells reversed the depletion of this NK cell subset in leukemic mice. These results indicate that leukemic evasion of NK cell surveillance occurs through miR-mediated dysregulation of lymphocyte development, representing an additional mechanism of immune escape in cancer. PMID:27775550

  12. Sex differences in resident immune cell phenotype underlie more efficient acute inflammatory responses in female mice.

    PubMed

    Scotland, Ramona S; Stables, Melanie J; Madalli, Shimona; Watson, Peter; Gilroy, Derek W

    2011-11-24

    Females are protected against mortality arising from severe sepsis; however, the precise mechanisms that confer this survival advantage in females over males are unclear. Resident leukocytes in resting tissues have a significant influence on circulating cytokine levels and recruitment of blood leukocytes during acute inflammatory responses. Whether the phenotype of resident leukocytes is distinct in females is unknown. In the present study, we show that the numbers of leukocytes occupying the naive peritoneal and pleural cavities is higher in female than in male mice and rats, comprising more T and B lymphocytes and macrophages. The altered immune cell composition of the female peritoneum is controlled by elevated tissue chemokine expression. Female resident macrophages also exhibit greater TLR expression and enhanced phagocytosis and NADPH oxidase-mediated bacterial killing. However, macrophage-derived cytokine production is diminished by proportionally more resident immunomodulatory CD4+ T lymphocytes. Ovarian hormones regulate macrophage phenotype, function, and numbers, but have no significant impact on T-lymphocyte populations in females. We have identified a fundamental sex difference in phenotype of resident leukocytes. We propose that the distinct resident leukocyte population in females allows aggressive recognition and elimination of diverse infectious stimuli without recruitment of circulating neutrophils or excessive cytokine production.

  13. Hepatic immune response in calves during acute subclinical infection with bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Risalde, M A; Gómez-Villamandos, J C; Pedrera, M; Molina, V; Cerón, J J; Martínez-Subiela, S; Sánchez-Cordón, P J

    2011-11-01

    Eight colostrum-deprived calves aged 8-12 weeks were inoculated intranasally with a non-cytopathic strain of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) genotype-1 and the effects on the hepatic immune response were studied. Two calves were sacrificed at each of 3, 6, 9 and 14 days post-inoculation (dpi) and two uninoculated animals were used as negative controls. BVDV was detected in hepatic macrophages and monocytes from 3 to 14dpi and in Küpffer cells (KCs) from 6 to 14dpi. Increases in the numbers of MAC387(+) KCs and monocytes, but not interstitial macrophages, differentiated by morphological features, were evident in the liver following inoculation with BVDV. There was a substantial increase in the number of monocytes positive for tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, but only small increases in the numbers of TNF-α(+) KCs and interstitial macrophages and interleukin (IL)-6(+) monocytes, KCs and interstitial macrophages. There was an increase in the number of interstitial CD3(+) T lymphocytes in the liver, but no substantial changes in the numbers of circulating CD3(+) T lymphocytes, interstitial or circulating CD4(+) or CD8(+) T lymphocytes, or CD79αcy(+) B lymphocytes. Serum haptoglobin and serum amyloid A increased transiently at 12dpi. Upregulation of some pro-inflammatory cytokines by hepatic macrophages is evident in subclinical acute BVDV type 1 infection in calves.

  14. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and indicators of early immune stimulation: a Childhood Leukemia International Consortium study.

    PubMed

    Rudant, Jérémie; Lightfoot, Tracy; Urayama, Kevin Y; Petridou, Eleni; Dockerty, John D; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Spector, Logan G; Ashton, Lesley J; Dessypris, Nikolaos; Kang, Alice Y; Miller, Margaret; Rondelli, Roberto; Simpson, Jill; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Orsi, Laurent; Roman, Eve; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2015-04-15

    The associations between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and several proxies of early stimulation of the immune system, that is, day-care center attendance, birth order, maternally reported common infections in infancy, and breastfeeding, were investigated by using data from 11 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (enrollment period: 1980-2010). The sample included 7,399 ALL cases and 11,181 controls aged 2-14 years. The data were collected by questionnaires administered to the parents. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, study, maternal education, and maternal age. Day-care center attendance in the first year of life was associated with a reduced risk of ALL (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 0.84), with a marked inverse trend with earlier age at start (P < 0.0001). An inverse association was also observed with breastfeeding duration of 6 months or more (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.94). No significant relationship with a history of common infections in infancy was observed even though the odds ratio was less than 1 for more than 3 infections. The findings of this large pooled analysis reinforce the hypothesis that day-care center attendance in infancy and prolonged breastfeeding are associated with a decreased risk of ALL.

  15. MicroRNA-29b mediates altered innate immune development in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Scoville, Steven D; Chen, Li; McConnell, Kathleen; Mao, Hsiaoyin C; Ahmed, Elshafa H; Zorko, Nicholas; Harvey, Sophia; Cole, Jordan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Costinean, Stefan; Croce, Carlo M; Larkin, Karilyn; Byrd, John C; Vasu, Sumithira; Blum, William; Yu, Jianhua; Freud, Aharon G; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2016-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can have potent antileukemic activity following haplo-mismatched, T cell-depleted stem cell transplantations for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but they are not successful in eradicating de novo AML. Here, we have used a mouse model of de novo AML to elucidate the mechanisms by which AML evades NK cell surveillance. NK cells in leukemic mice displayed a marked reduction in the cytolytic granules perforin and granzyme B. Further, as AML progressed, we noted the selective loss of an immature subset of NK cells in leukemic mice and in AML patients. This absence was not due to elimination by cell death or selective reduction in proliferation, but rather to the result of a block in NK cell differentiation. Indeed, NK cells from leukemic mice and humans with AML showed lower levels of TBET and EOMES, transcription factors that are critical for terminal NK cell differentiation. Further, the microRNA miR-29b, a regulator of T-bet and EOMES, was elevated in leukemic NK cells. Finally, deletion of miR-29b in NK cells reversed the depletion of this NK cell subset in leukemic mice. These results indicate that leukemic evasion of NK cell surveillance occurs through miR-mediated dysregulation of lymphocyte development, representing an additional mechanism of immune escape in cancer.

  16. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Indicators of Early Immune Stimulation: A Childhood Leukemia International Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Rudant, Jérémie; Lightfoot, Tracy; Urayama, Kevin Y.; Petridou, Eleni; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Spector, Logan G.; Ashton, Lesley J.; Dessypris, Nikolaos; Kang, Alice Y.; Miller, Margaret; Rondelli, Roberto; Simpson, Jill; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Orsi, Laurent; Roman, Eve; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    The associations between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and several proxies of early stimulation of the immune system, that is, day-care center attendance, birth order, maternally reported common infections in infancy, and breastfeeding, were investigated by using data from 11 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (enrollment period: 1980–2010). The sample included 7,399 ALL cases and 11,181 controls aged 2–14 years. The data were collected by questionnaires administered to the parents. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, study, maternal education, and maternal age. Day-care center attendance in the first year of life was associated with a reduced risk of ALL (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 0.84), with a marked inverse trend with earlier age at start (P < 0.0001). An inverse association was also observed with breastfeeding duration of 6 months or more (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.94). No significant relationship with a history of common infections in infancy was observed even though the odds ratio was less than 1 for more than 3 infections. The findings of this large pooled analysis reinforce the hypothesis that day-care center attendance in infancy and prolonged breastfeeding are associated with a decreased risk of ALL. PMID:25731888

  17. Safety and Efficacy of Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum in the Treatment of Acute-Phase Peyronie's Disease.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoang Minh Tue; Anaissie, James; DeLay, Kenneth J; Yafi, Faysal A; Sikka, Suresh C; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2017-10-01

    Peyronie's disease (PD), defined as the abnormal formation of fibrous plaque(s) in the tunica albuginea of the penis, is a chronic condition that afflicts 3% to 13% of the US male population; there is no current research on the efficacy and safety of collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH) in the treatment of acute phase PD. To examine the efficacy and safety of CCH in the treatment of acute-phase PD. We retrospectively reviewed the records for all patients treated with CCH for PD from April 2014 through April 2017. Patients who reported penile pain and duration of PD no longer than 12 months at presentation qualified as being in the acute phase of PD. The primary outcomes of interest were final changes in curvature after CCH treatment regardless of the number of CCH cycles received and frequency of treatment-related adverse events. Parameters of efficacy and safety were compared between acute- and stable-phase PD. A total of 162 patients were included in the study, of which 36 (22%) qualified as having acute-phase PD (group 1) and the remaining 126 (78%) qualified as having stable-phase PD (group 2). Median duration of PD was 8.5 months (range = 1-12) for group 1 and 18 months (range = 1-492) for group 2. There was no significant difference in final change in curvature between the acute and stable phases of PD (16.7° vs 15.6°; P = .654). There was no statistically significant difference in frequency of treatment-related adverse events between the acute phase (4 patients, 11%) and the stable phase (12 patients, 10%; P = .778). CCH therapy is as safe and efficacious in acute-phase PD as it is in stable-phase PD. This is the first report that assesses the safety and efficacy of CCH therapy focusing on acute-phase PD. This study was composed of a large cohort of patients receiving CCH therapy in acute- and stable-phase PD. Limitations include bias associated with retrospective studies, a small sample, and a single-center setting. Although CCH is not clearly

  18. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  19. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  20. DNA immunization with eukaryotic initiation factor-2α of Toxoplasma gondii induces protective immunity against acute and chronic toxoplasmosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Huang, Si-Yang; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Li, Zhong-Yuan; Petersen, Eskild; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2013-12-16

    Toxoplasma gondii infection is a serious health problem of humans and animals worldwide. T. gondii eukaryotic initiation factor-2α (TgIF2α) plays a crucial role in parasite viability and is an important virulence factor of T. gondii. To evaluate the vaccine potential of TgIF2α, we constructed a novel eukaryotic plasmid pVAX-IF2α expressing TgIF2α from the RH strain and validated expression and immunogenicity in vitro in the Marc145 cell expression system by indirect immunofluorescence (IFA). Administration of pVAX-IF2α intramuscularly induced specific humoral immune responses including high levels of specific TgIF2α IgG antibody and a mixed IgG1/IgG2a response with a predominance of IgG2a production. The cellular immune response was elicited, showing significant production of IFN-γ and IL-2 associated with Th1 type response, and thus strong cell-mediated cytotoxic activity with increased frequencies of IFN-γ parameters analyzed in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell compartments (CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells and CD8(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells). Immunization resulted in partial protection against acute and chronic toxoplamosis in outbred Kunming mice, demonstrated by a significantly prolonged survival time (15.9±4.6 days) after challenge with the virulent RH strain and significant reduction in brain cysts (44.1%) against chronic infection with PRU cyst in contrast to control mice. Our data suggested that pVAX-IF2α could be used as a DNA vaccine candidate against both acute and chronic T. gondii infection by the activation of effective humoral and cellular immune responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lipoxin A4, a 5-lipoxygenase pathway metabolite, modulates immune response during acute respiratory tularemia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anju; Rahman, Tabassum; Bartiss, Rose; Arabshahi, Alireza; Prasain, Jeevan; Barnes, Stephen; Musteata, Florin Marcel; Sellati, Timothy J

    2017-02-01

    Respiratory infection with Francisella tularensis (Ft) is characterized by a muted, acute host response, followed by sepsis-like syndrome that results in death. Infection with Ft establishes a principally anti-inflammatory environment that subverts host-cell death programs to facilitate pathogen replication. Although the role of cytokines has been explored extensively, the role of eicosanoids in tularemia pathogenesis is not fully understood. Given that lipoxin A4 (LXA4) has anti-inflammatory properties, we investigated whether this lipid mediator affects host responses manifested early during infection. The addition of exogenous LXA4 inhibits PGE2 release by Ft-infected murine monocytes in vitro and diminishes apoptotic cell death. Tularemia pathogenesis was characterized in 5‑lipoxygenase-deficient (Alox5(-/-)) mice that are incapable of generating LXA4 Increased release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as increased apoptosis, was observed in Alox5(-/-) mice as compared with their wild-type counterparts. Alox5(-/-) mice also exhibited elevated recruitment of neutrophils during the early phase of infection and increased resistance to lethal challenge. Conversely, administration of exogenous LXA4 to Alox5(-/-) mice made them more susceptible to infection thus mimicking wild-type animals. Taken together, our results suggest that 5-LO activity is a critical regulator of immunopathology observed during the acute phase of respiratory tularemia, regulating bacterial burden and neutrophil recruitment and production of proinflammatory modulators and increasing morbidity and mortality. These studies identify a detrimental role for the 5-LO-derived lipid mediator LXA4 in Ft-induced immunopathology. Targeting this pathway may have therapeutic benefit as an adjunct to treatment with antibiotics and conventional antimicrobial peptides, which often have limited efficacy against intracellular bacteria. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  2. Enhanced acute immune response in IL-12p35-/- mice is followed by accelerated distinct repair mechanisms in Staphylococcus aureus-induced murine brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Held, Josephin; Preuße, Corinna; Döser, Alexandra; Richter, Lydia; Heppner, Frank L; Stenzel, Werner

    2013-09-01

    Murine Staphylococcus aureus-mediated brain abscess comprises 2 major phases, an initial phase of cerebritis, followed by a healing phase characterized by capsule formation. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and IL-12p35(-/-) mice were intracerebrally infected with S. aureus to induce brain abscesses. Clinical disease activity and bacterial load were monitored. The cell populations that were involved, as well as their specific mediators, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry. In the acute phase, IL-12p35(-/-) mice were protected from disease. This was associated with enhanced recruitment of granulocytes, accompanied by upregulated expression of Il17a, Csf2 (which encodes granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor), Cxcl1, and Cxcl5, as well as increased expression of proinflammatory mediators, including Nos2 (which encodes inducible nitric oxide synthase), Ptgs2 (which encodes cyclooxygenase 2), and Tnf, that were primarily produced by granulocytes and activated microglia/macrophages. Furthermore, mechanisms associated with beneficial wound healing, including an accelerated formation of a fibrous capsule, were demonstrated by prominent VEGF-A production and collagen deposition driven by an earlier onset of T-helper 2 immunity in the absence of interleukin 12 (IL-12). Brain abscess development is orchestrated by IL-12 at different stages of disease. Our data indicate that IL-12 has a nonprotective role in the acute phase and that IL-12 deficiency results in the accelerated formation of a protective capsule during the healing phase, which we consider crucial for early recovery from disease.

  3. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  4. Validity of Sudden Gains in Acute Phase Treatment of Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Lee Anna; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined the validity of sudden gains identified with T. Z. Tang and R. J. DeRubeis's (1999) method in 2 clinical data sets that involved treatment of major depressive disorder (N=227). Sudden gains replicated among self- and clinician reports of depressive symptoms and predicted better psychosocial functioning at the acute phase…

  5. THE ACUTE PHASE RESPONSE INDUCED BY BRONCHOSCOPY WITH LAVAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bronchoscopy has been used to evaluate the inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. The procedure may affect acute inflammation in the lower respiratory tract. We reviewed consecutive bronchoscopies done in normal healthy non-smokers between April, 1998 and April, 2004. The...

  6. THE ACUTE PHASE RESPONSE INDUCED BY BRONCHOSCOPY WITH LAVAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bronchoscopy has been used to evaluate the inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. The procedure may affect acute inflammation in the lower respiratory tract. We reviewed consecutive bronchoscopies done in normal healthy non-smokers between April, 1998 and April, 2004. The...

  7. Maternal immune activation in late gestation enhances locomotor response to acute but not chronic amphetamine treatment in male mice offspring: role of the D1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Zager, Adriano; Mennecier, Gregory; Palermo-Neto, João

    2012-06-15

    Exposure to elevated levels of maternal cytokines can lead to functional abnormalities of the dopaminergic system in the adult offspring, including enhanced amphetamine (AMPH)-induced locomotion. Therefore, it seems reasonable to consider that offspring of challenged mothers would behave differently in models of addictive behavior, such as behavioral sensitization. Thus, we sought to evaluate the effects of prenatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the locomotor response to acute and chronic AMPH treatment in male mice offspring. For this purpose, LPS (Escherichia coli 0127:B8; 120 μg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to pregnant Swiss mice on gestational day 17. At adulthood, male offspring were studied under one of the following conditions: (1) locomotor response to acute AMPH treatment (2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg) in an open field test; (2) behavioral sensitization paradigm, which consists of a daily injection of AMPH (1.0 mg/kg) for 10 days and observation of locomotion in the open field on days 1, 5, 10 (development phase), 15 and 17 (expression phase). The LPS stimulated offspring showed enhancement of the locomotor-stimulant effect after an acute AMPH challenge in comparison to baseline and saline pre-treated mice. They also showed development of behavioral sensitization earlier than the saline pre-treated group, although no changes between saline and LPS pre-treated groups were observed on development or expression of locomotor behavioral sensitization to AMPH. Furthermore, there was up-regulation of D1 receptor protein level within striatum in the LPS-stimulated offspring which was strongly correlated with increased grooming behavior. Taken together, our results indicate that motor and dopaminergic alterations caused by maternal immune activation are restricted to the acute AMPH challenge, mostly due to up-regulation of the D1 receptor within the mesolimbic and nigrostriatal pathways, but no locomotor differences were observed for behavioral

  8. Antibody blockade of IL-17 family cytokines in immunity to acute murine oral mucosal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Whibley, Natasha; Tritto, Elaine; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Kolbinger, Frank; Moulin, Pierre; Brees, Dominique; Coleman, Bianca M; Mamo, Anna J; Garg, Abhishek V; Jaycox, Jillian R; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Kammüller, Michael; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2016-06-01

    Antibodies targeting IL-17A or its receptor, IL-17RA, are approved to treat psoriasis and are being evaluated for other autoimmune conditions. Conversely, IL-17 signaling is critical for immunity to opportunistic mucosal infections caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans, as mice and humans lacking the IL-17R experience chronic mucosal candidiasis. IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-17AF bind the IL-17RA-IL-17RC heterodimeric complex and deliver qualitatively similar signals through the adaptor Act1. Here, we used a mouse model of acute oropharyngeal candidiasis to assess the impact of blocking IL-17 family cytokines compared with specific IL-17 cytokine gene knockout mice. Anti-IL-17A antibodies, which neutralize IL-17A and IL-17AF, caused elevated oral fungal loads, whereas anti-IL-17AF and anti-IL-17F antibodies did not. Notably, there was a cooperative effect of blocking IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F together. Termination of anti-IL-17A treatment was associated with rapid C. albicans clearance. IL-17F-deficient mice were fully resistant to oropharyngeal candidiasis, consistent with antibody blockade. However, IL-17A-deficient mice had lower fungal burdens than anti-IL-17A-treated mice. Act1-deficient mice were much more susceptible to oropharyngeal candidiasis than anti-IL-17A antibody-treated mice, yet anti-IL-17A and anti-IL-17RA treatment caused equivalent susceptibilities. Based on microarray analyses of the oral mucosa during infection, only a limited number of genes were associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis susceptibility. In sum, we conclude that IL-17A is the main cytokine mediator of immunity in murine oropharyngeal candidiasis, but a cooperative relationship among IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F exists in vivo. Susceptibility displays the following hierarchy: IL-17RA- or Act1-deficiency > anti-IL-17A + anti-IL-17F antibodies > anti-IL-17A or anti-IL-17RA antibodies > IL-17A deficiency. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  9. Glutamate excitoxicity is the key molecular mechanism which is influenced by body temperature during the acute phase of brain stroke.

    PubMed

    Campos, Francisco; Pérez-Mato, María; Agulla, Jesús; Blanco, Miguel; Barral, David; Almeida, Angeles; Brea, David; Waeber, Christian; Castillo, José; Ramos-Cabrer, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity, metabolic rate and inflammatory response have been associated to the deleterious effects of temperature during the acute phase of stroke. So far, the association of temperature with these mechanisms has been studied individually. However, the simultaneous study of the influence of temperature on these mechanisms is necessary to clarify their contributions to temperature-mediated ischemic damage. We used non-invasive Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to simultaneously measure temperature, glutamate excitotoxicity and metabolic rate in the brain in animal models of ischemia. The immune response to ischemia was measured through molecular serum markers in peripheral blood. We submitted groups of animals to different experimental conditions (hypothermia at 33°C, normothermia at 37°C and hyperthermia at 39°C), and combined these conditions with pharmacological modulation of glutamate levels in the brain through systemic injections of glutamate and oxaloacetate. We show that pharmacological modulation of glutamate levels can neutralize the deleterious effects of hyperthermia and the beneficial effects of hypothermia, however the analysis of the inflammatory response and metabolic rate, demonstrated that their effects on ischemic damage are less critical than glutamate excitotoxity. We conclude that glutamate excitotoxicity is the key molecular mechanism which is influenced by body temperature during the acute phase of brain stroke.

  10. Glutamate Excitoxicity Is the Key Molecular Mechanism Which Is Influenced by Body Temperature during the Acute Phase of Brain Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Francisco; Pérez-Mato, María; Agulla, Jesús; Blanco, Miguel; Barral, David; Almeida, Ángeles; Brea, David; Waeber, Christian; Castillo, José; Ramos-Cabrer, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity, metabolic rate and inflammatory response have been associated to the deleterious effects of temperature during the acute phase of stroke. So far, the association of temperature with these mechanisms has been studied individually. However, the simultaneous study of the influence of temperature on these mechanisms is necessary to clarify their contributions to temperature-mediated ischemic damage. We used non-invasive Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to simultaneously measure temperature, glutamate excitotoxicity and metabolic rate in the brain in animal models of ischemia. The immune response to ischemia was measured through molecular serum markers in peripheral blood. We submitted groups of animals to different experimental conditions (hypothermia at 33°C, normothermia at 37°C and hyperthermia at 39°C), and combined these conditions with pharmacological modulation of glutamate levels in the brain through systemic injections of glutamate and oxaloacetate. We show that pharmacological modulation of glutamate levels can neutralize the deleterious effects of hyperthermia and the beneficial effects of hypothermia, however the analysis of the inflammatory response and metabolic rate, demonstrated that their effects on ischemic damage are less critical than glutamate excitotoxity. We conclude that glutamate excitotoxicity is the key molecular mechanism which is influenced by body temperature during the acute phase of brain stroke. PMID:22952923

  11. Change in Psychosocial Functioning and Depressive Symptoms during Acute-Phase Cognitive Therapy for Depression

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Todd W.; Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Lee Anna; Carmody, Thomas; Thase, Michael E.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is highly prevalent, is recurrent, and impairs people’s work, relationships, and leisure. Acute-phase treatments improve psychosocial impairment associated with MDD, but how these improvements occur is unclear. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that reductions in depressive symptoms exceed, precede, and predict improvements in psychosocial functioning. Method Patients with recurrent MDD (N = 523; 68% women, 81% Caucasian; M = 42 years old) received acute-phase Cognitive Therapy (CT; Beck, Rush, Shaw & Emery, 1979). We measured functioning and symptom severity with the Social Adjustment Scale—Self-Report (Weissman & Bothwell, 1976), Range of Impaired Functioning Tool (Leon et al., 1999), Beck Depression Inventory (Beck, Ward, Mendelson, Mock, & Erbaugh, 1961), Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (Hamilton, 1960) and Inventory for Depressive Symptomatology—Self-Report (Rush et al., 1996). We tested cross-lagged correlations between functioning and symptoms measured at baseline and the beginning, middle and end of acute phase CT. Results Pre- to post- treatment improvement in psychosocial functioning and depressive symptoms was large and inter-correlated. Depressive symptoms improved more and sooner than did psychosocial functioning. But among four assessments across the course of treatment, improvements in functioning more strongly predicted later improvement in symptoms than vice versa. Conclusions Improvements in psychosocial functioning and depressive symptoms correlate substantially during acute-phase CT, and improvements in functioning may play a role in subsequent symptom reduction during acute-phase CT. PMID:21781377

  12. Bcl-2 associated with positive symptoms of schizophrenic patients in an acute phase.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Meng-Chang; Liou, Chia-Wei; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Lin, I-Mei; Huang, Tiao-Lai

    2013-12-30

    B cell lymphoma protein-2 (Bcl-2) may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia in the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the serum levels of Bcl-2 in schizophrenic patients in an acute phase, and evaluate Bcl-2 level changes after antipsychotic treatment. We consecutively enrolled 41 schizophrenia patients in an acute phase; 28 were followed up with a 4-week antipsychotic treatment. Serum Bcl-2 levels were measured with assay kits. All patients were evaluated by examining the correlation between Bcl-2 levels and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) scores, using Pearson correlation coefficients. In schizophrenic patients in an acute phase, positive PANSS subscores were significantly negatively correlated with Bcl-2 levels. In addition, we found Bcl-2 levels had a significantly negative correlation with PANSS total scores and positive subscores in male patients in an acute phase. Using the paired t-test, we found no significant changes in Bcl-2 levels in schizophrenia patients who had received the 4-week treatment with antipsychotic drugs (n=28). In conclusion, our results suggest that Bcl-2 might be an indicator of schizophrenia severity in the acute phase. In addition, Bcl-2 levels might be associated with positive symptoms in male patients with schizophrenia.

  13. Inflammation in lung after acute myocardial infarction is induced by dendritic cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Hu, L J; Ren, W Y; Shen, Q J; Ji, H Y; Zhu, L

    2017-01-01

    The present study was performed to describe the changes of lung tissues in mice with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and also explain the cell mechanism involved in inflammation in lung. AMI was established by left coronary ligation in mice. Then mice were divided into three groups: control group, MW1 group (sampling after surgery for one week) and MW2 group (sampling after surgery for two weeks). Afterwards, measurement of lung weight and lung histology, cell sorting in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and detection of several adhesive molecules, inflammatory molecules as well as enzyme associated with inflammation were performed. Moreover, dendritic cells (DCs) were isolated from bone marrow of C57B/L6 mice. After incubating with necrotic myocardium, the expression of antigen presenting molecules, co-stimulatory molecules and inflammatory molecules were detected by flow cytometry or immunohistochemistry in DCs. We also detected T-cell proliferation after incubating with necrotic myocardium-treated DCs. AMI induced pathological changes of lung tissue and increased inflammatory cell amount in BAL fluid. AMI also increased the expression of several inflammatory factors, adhesive molecules and enzymes associated with inflammation. CD11c and TLR9, which are DC surface markers, showed a significantly increased expression in mice with AMI. Additionally, necrotic myocardium significantly increased the expression of co-stimulatory factors including CD83 and CD80, inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IFN-γ and NF-κB in DCs. Furthermore, DCs treated with necrotic myocardium also significantly promoted T-cell proliferation. AMI induced inflammation in lung and these pathological changes were mediated by DC-associated immune response.

  14. Cholecystokinin blockade alters the systemic immune response in rats with acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    de la Mano, Ana Maria; Sevillano, Sara; Manso, Manuel Antonio; Pérez, Martin; de Dios, Isabel

    2004-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is characterized by initial pancreatic injury resulting from the activation of digestive enzymes and, later, widespread inflammation to distant organs. The aim of this study was to study whether the time-course of inflammatory events during AP induced by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction (BPDO) varies after lowering the acinar enzyme content by L364,718 (0.1 mg/kg/day) administration over 7 days before inducing AP. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping was used to analyse the following at different AP stages: distribution of major circulating leucocyte subsets, activation state of circulating neutrophils and monocytes as reflected by CD11b expression and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production and the contribution of T-cell-derived pro-(TNF-α) and anti-(IL-10) inflammatory mediators. TNF-α plasma levels and neutrophil infiltration in pancreas and lung were also measured. At early BPDO times, L364,718 treatment partially inhibited leukocytosis and increase in peripheral blood neutrophils and monocytes as well as TNF-α expression by monocytes. However, from 6 h onwards after BPDO, L364,718 treatment was unable to prevent either pancreatic and lung neutrophil infiltration or the release of TNF-α from activated monocytes. By its action on circulating lymphocytes, L364,718 treatment enhanced the severity of the inflammatory response induced by BPDO. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were recruited from earlier BPDO times, and 12 h after BPDO, T cells displayed a significantly higher reserve of TNF-α able to be released under stimulation but lower functional reserve of interleukin-10 (IL-10) than observed in untreated rats. It is concluded that lowering the acinar enzyme content through L364,718 treatment prevents earlier systemic immune events in BPDO-induced AP. However, at the point of maximal injury, the inflammatory response became pronounced, largely due to the role played by activated T lymphocytes. PMID:15154913

  15. Presence of acute phase changes in zinc, iron, and copper metabolism in turkey embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Klasing, K.C.; Richards, M.P.; Darcey, S.E.; Laurin, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Acute phase changes in trace mineral metabolism were examined in turkey embryos. An endotoxin injection resulted in increased concentrations of serum copper and liver zinc and decreased concentrations of serum zinc in embryos incubated either in ovo or ex ovo. Changes in zinc and copper metabolism occurred when endotoxin either was injected intramuscularly, into the amnionic fluid, or administered onto the chorioallantoic membrane. Unlike poults, embryos did not respond to an inflammatory challenge with decreased serum iron concentrations. Acute phase changes in embryo serum zinc and copper as well as liver zinc concentrations were similar to those in poults. Increased liver zinc concentrations were associated with increased zinc in metallothionein (MT). An injection of a crude interleukin 1 preparation into embryos resulted in similar increases in hepatic zinc and MT concentrations as an endotoxin injection, suggesting a role for this cytokine in mediating the acute phase changes in embryonic zinc metabolism.

  16. Estimating mortality risk in preoperative patients using immunologic, nutritional, and acute-phase response variables.

    PubMed Central

    Christou, N V; Tellado-Rodriguez, J; Chartrand, L; Giannas, B; Kapadia, B; Meakins, J; Rode, H; Gordon, J

    1989-01-01

    We measured the delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test response, along with additional variables of host immunocompetence in 245 preoperative patients to determine which variables are associated with septic-related deaths following operation. Of the 14 deaths (5.7%), 12 were related to sepsis and in 2 sepsis was contributory. The DTH response (p less than 0.00001), age (p less than 0.0002), serum albumin (p less than 0.003), hemoglobin (p less than 0.02), and total hemolytic complement (p less than 0.03), were significantly different between those who died and those who lived. By logistic regression analysis, only the DTH skin test response (log likelihood = 41.7, improvement X2 = 6.24, p less than 0.012) and the serum albumin (log likelihood = 44.8, improvement X2 = 17.7, p less than 0.001) were significantly and independently associated with the deaths. The resultant probability of mortality calculation equation was tested in a separate validation group of 519 patients (mortality = 5%) and yielded a good predictive capability as assessed by (1) X2 = 0.08 between observed and expected deaths, NS; (2) Goodman-Kruskall G statistic = 0.673) Receiver-Operating-Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis with an area under the ROC curve, Az = 0.79 +/- 0.05. We conclude that a reduced immune response (DTH skin test anergy) plus a nutritional deficit and/or acute-phase response change are both associated with increased septic-related deaths in elective surgical patients. PMID:2472781

  17. Osteopontin Expression in Acute Immune Response Mediates Hippocampal Synaptogenesis and Adaptive Outcome Following Cortical Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Julie L.; Reeves, Thomas M.; Phillips, Linda L.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) produces axotomy, deafferentation and reactive synaptogenesis. Inflammation influences synaptic repair, and the novel brain cytokine osteopontin (OPN) has potential to support axon regeneration through exposure of its integrin receptor binding sites. This study explored whether OPN secretion and proteolysis by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) mediate the initial degenerative phase of synaptogenesis, targeting reactive neuroglia to affect successful repair. Adult rats received unilateral entorhinal cortex lesion (UEC) modeling adaptive synaptic plasticity. Over the first week postinjury, hippocampal OPN protein and mRNA were assayed and histology performed. At 1–2d, OPN protein increased up to 51 fold, and was localized within activated, mobilized glia. OPN transcript also increased over 50 fold, predominantly within reactive microglia. OPN fragments known to be derived from MMP proteolysis were elevated at 1d, consistent with prior reports of UEC glial activation and enzyme production. Postinjury minocycline immunosuppression attenuated MMP-9 gelatinase activity, which was correlated with reduction of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (LCN2) expression, and reduced OPN fragment generation. The antibiotic also attenuated removal of synapsin-1 positive axons from the deafferented zone. OPN KO mice subjected to UEC had similar reduction of hippocampal MMP-9 activity, as well as lower synapsin-1 breakdown over the deafferented zone. MAP1B and N-cadherin, surrogates of cytoarchitecture and synaptic adhesion, were not affected. OPN KO mice with UEC exhibited time dependent cognitive deficits during the synaptogenic phase of recovery. This study demonstrates that OPN can mediate immune response during TBI synaptic repair, positively influencing synapse reorganization and functional recovery. PMID:25151457

  18. Potential of acute phase proteins as predictor of postpartum uterine infections during transition period and its regulatory mechanism in dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    Manimaran, A.; Kumaresan, A.; Jeyakumar, S.; Mohanty, T. K.; Sejian, V.; Kumar, Narender; Sreela, L.; Prakash, M. Arul; Mooventhan, P.; Anantharaj, A.; Das, D. N.

    2016-01-01

    Among the various systemic reactions against infection or injury, the acute phase response is the cascade of reaction and mostly coordinated by cytokines-mediated acute phase proteins (APPs) production. Since APPs are sensitive innate immune molecules, they are useful for early detection of inflammation in bovines and believed to be better discriminators than routine hematological parameters. Therefore, the possibility of using APPs as a diagnostic and prognostic marker of inflammation in major bovine health disorders including postpartum uterine infection has been explored by many workers. In this review, we discussed specifically importance of postpartum uterine infection, the role of energy balance in uterine infections and potential of APPs as a predictor of postpartum uterine infections during the transition period and its regulatory mechanism in dairy cattle. PMID:27051191

  19. Informatic interrogation of CSF proteomic profiles from HIV-infected subjects implicates acute phase and complement systems in shifting cognitive status.

    PubMed

    Ubaida-Mohien, Ceereena; Lamberty, Benjamin; Dickens, Alex M; Mielke, Michelle M; Marcotte, Thomas; Sacktor, Ned; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott; Franklin, D; Cibrowski, Pawel; Tharakan, Ravi; McArthur, Justin C; Fox, Howard; Haughey, Norman J

    2017-04-10

    The prevalence of HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND) has not changed considerably in the last two decades. Potent antiretroviral therapy (ART) has shifted the severity of HAND to milder phenotypes, but excess morbidity and mortality continue to be associated with HAND. Changes in numerous markers of immune function, inflammation and cellular stress have been repeatedly associated with HAND but the underlying systems that drive these changes have not been identified. In this study we used systems informatics to interrogate the CSF proteomic content of longitudinal samples obtained from HIV-infected adults with stably unimpaired, stably impaired, worsening, or improving neurocognitive (NC) performance. The patterns of change in CSF protein content implicated the induction of acute phase and complement systems as important regulators of NC status. Worsening NC performance was preceded by induction of acute phase and complement systems, while improving NC performance was preceded by a downregulation of these systems.

  20. Potential of acute phase proteins as predictor of postpartum uterine infections during transition period and its regulatory mechanism in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Manimaran, A; Kumaresan, A; Jeyakumar, S; Mohanty, T K; Sejian, V; Kumar, Narender; Sreela, L; Prakash, M Arul; Mooventhan, P; Anantharaj, A; Das, D N

    2016-01-01

    Among the various systemic reactions against infection or injury, the acute phase response is the cascade of reaction and mostly coordinated by cytokines-mediated acute phase proteins (APPs) production. Since APPs are sensitive innate immune molecules, they are useful for early detection of inflammation in bovines and believed to be better discriminators than routine hematological parameters. Therefore, the possibility of using APPs as a diagnostic and prognostic marker of inflammation in major bovine health disorders including postpartum uterine infection has been explored by many workers. In this review, we discussed specifically importance of postpartum uterine infection, the role of energy balance in uterine infections and potential of APPs as a predictor of postpartum uterine infections during the transition period and its regulatory mechanism in dairy cattle.

  1. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  2. Mucosal immunization with PsaA protein, using chitosan as a delivery system, increases protection against acute otitis media and invasive infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Xu, J-H; Dai, W-J; Chen, B; Fan, X-Y

    2015-03-01

    As infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (mainly via the mucosal route) is a leading cause of acute otitis media, sinus and bacterial pneumonia, the mucosal immunity plays an important role in the prevention of pneumococcal diseases. Therefore, intranasal vaccination may be an effective immunization strategy, but requires appropriate mucosal vaccine delivery systems. In this work, chitosan was used as a mucosal delivery system to form chitosan-PsaA nanoparticles based on ionotropic gelation methods and used to immunize BALB/c mice intranasally. Compared to mice immunized with naked PsaA, levels of IFN-γ, IL-17A and IL-4 in spleen lymphocytes, the systemic (IgG in serum) and mucosal (IgA in mucosal lavage) specific antibodies were enhanced significantly in mice inoculated with chitosan-PsaA. Furthermore, increased protection against acute otitis media following middle ear challenge with pneumococcus serotype 14, and improved survival following intraperitoneal challenge with pneumococcus serotype 3 or serotype 14, was found in the mice immunized with chitosan-PsaA nanoparticles. Thus, intranasal immunization with chitosan-PsaA can successfully induce mucosal and systemic immune responses and increase protection against pneumococcal acute otitis media and invasive infections. Hence, intranasal immunization with PsaA protein, based on chitosan as a delivery system, is an efficient immunization strategy for preventing pneumococcal infections. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Lunar phases are not related to the occurrence of acute myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Eisenburger, Philip; Schreiber, Wolfgang; Vergeiner, Gernot; Sterz, Fritz; Holzer, Michael; Herkner, Harald; Havel, Christof; Laggner, Anton N

    2003-02-01

    Mass media deliver pertinacious rumours that lunar phases influence the progress and long-term results in several medical procedures. Peer reviewed studies support this, e.g. in myocardial infarction, others do not. We looked retrospectively at the dates of cardiac arrests (CA; n=368) of cardiac origin and of acute myocardial infarctions (AMI) with consecutive thrombolytic therapy or acute PTCA (n=872) and at the lunar phases at the corresponding dates. Medical data had been collected prospectively on the patient's admission. The lunar phases were defined as full moon+/-1 day, new moon+/-1 day and the days in between as waning and waxing moon. The incidence of these cardiac events at each phase was calculated as days with a case divided by the total number of days of the specific moon phase in the observation period (1992-1998). Wilcoxon Rank Test was used for statistical analysis. AMI and CA occurred on equal percentages of days within each lunar phase: AMI on 35% of all days with new moon, on 38% of full moon days, on 39% waning, and on 41% of the waxing moon days; CA on 19, 17, 16 and 16% of all days of the respective lunar phase. This difference was not significant. Lunar phases do not appear to correlate with acute coronary events leading to myocardial infarction or sudden cardiac death.

  4. Poliomyelitis: immunoglobulin-containing cells in the central nervous system in acute and convalescent phases of the human disease.

    PubMed Central

    Esiri, M M

    1980-01-01

    The immunoperoxidase method has been used to demonstrate the presence of immunoglobulin-containing cells in the central nervous system in acute and convalescent phases of poliomyelitis. These cells were found in considerable numbers in the areas of damage during the acute phase, and persisted at the same sites, though in smaller numbers, during the convalescent phase for at least 8 months. Most of the positively stained cells were plasma cells. IgA was the commonest heavy chain type demonstrated, with lesser amounts also of IgG and, during the acute phase, IgM. In the acute phase more lambda than kappa light chain was demonstrated but in the convalescent phase this ratio was reversed. More light chain than heavy chain was demonstrable during the acute phase. The significance of these results is briefly discussed. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6771081

  5. Diet‐induced obese mice exhibit altered immune responses to acute lung injury induced by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Taomei; Yuan, Guiqiang; Ren, Yi; Wang, Zhengyi; Jia, Yiping; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Deng, Junliang; Yu, Shumin; Hu, Yanchun; Shen, Liuhong; Ma, Xiaoping; Wang, Ya; Ren, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obesity has been associated with impaired immunity and increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. It also exerts protective effects against mortality secondary to acute lung injury. The effects of obesity on immune responses to acute lung injury induced by Escherichia coli were investigated to determine if the above‐mentioned differences in its effects were related to infection severity. Methods Diet‐induced obesity (DIO) and lean control mice received intranasal instillations of 109 or 1010 CFUs of E. coli. The immune responses were examined at 0 h (uninfected), 24 h, and 96 h postinfection. Results Following infection, the DIO mice exhibited higher leukocyte, interleukin (IL)−10, IL‐6, and tumor necrosis factor‐α levels and more severe lung injury than the lean mice. Following inoculation with 1010 CFUs of E. coli, the DIO mice exhibited higher mortality and more severe inflammation‐induced injury than the lean mice, but no differences in E. coli counts were noted between the two groups. However, inoculated with 109 CFUs of E. coli, the DIO mice exhibited smaller E. coli burdens at 24 h and 96 h after infection, as well as lower concentrations of IL‐10 and tumor necrosis factor‐α and less severe lung injury at 96 h after infection. Conclusions The results support the emerging view that obesity may be beneficial in the setting of milder infection but detrimental in the setting of more severe infection. PMID:27558300

  6. Hemophagocytosis in the Acute Phase of Fatal Kawasaki Disease in a 4 Month-Old Girl.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Vehbi; Karaaslan, Erhan; Özer, Samet; Gümüşer, Rüveyda; Yılmaz, Resul

    2016-07-01

    Kawasaki disease is a systemic vasculitis predominately affecting coronary arteries. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis can complicate the course of Kawasaki disease. Rare cases of secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis occurring during the acute phase of Kawasaki disease have been reported. We report here a 4 month-old girl with diffuse coronary ectasia and secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis occurring during the acute phase of incomplete Kawasaki disease. Due to the large overlap in clinical symptoms, the presence of atypical findings for Kawasaki disease should suggest the possible diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in these patients.

  7. Risk Factors and Immune Response to Hepatitis E viral Infection among Acute Hepatitis Patients in Assiut, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Seif Eldin, Salwa S.; Seddik, Ismail; Daef, Enas A.; Shata, M.T.; Raafat, Marwa; Baky, Laila Abdel; Nafeh, MA

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a common cause of acute viral hepatitis (AVH) in Egypt. We aimed to identify risk factors of HEV among acute hepatitis cases, measure HEV specific immune response to differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic infections. The study included symptomatic acute hepatitis (AH) patients (n=235) and asymptomatic contacts (n=200) to HEV cases. They completed a lifestyle questionnaire, screened for common hepatotropic viruses. Blood and serum samples were collected from patients and contacts after onset of disease and follow-up samples collected until convalescence. PBMC were separated and tested for specific HEV T-cell response by INF-ELISPOT assay. Serum samples were tested for IgM and IgG anti-hepatitis E virus by ELISA. IgM antibodies to HAV were detected in 19 patients (8.1%), 37 (15.7%) with HBV, 10 (4.3%) with HCV. HEV infection was identified in 42 (16%) patients with AVH. Of the 200 contacts, 14 (7%) had serological evidence of recent HEV asymptomatic infection, showed stronger CMI responses than HEV infected subjects (2540 ± 28 and 182 ± 389 ISCs/106 cells, respectively; P <0.05). In conclusion, HEV is a major cause of AVH in Egypt. Asymptomatic HEV patients are likely to have stronger immune responses including CMI responses, than symptomatic cases. PMID:22053611

  8. Alteration of immunologic responses on peripheral blood in the acute phase of ischemic stroke: blood genomic profiling study.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung-Hun; Kim, Ok-Joon; Shin, Dong-Ah; Song, Jihwan; Yoo, Hanna; Kim, Yu-Kyung; Kim, Jin-Kyeoung

    2012-08-15

    Peripheral blood cells and inflammatory mediators have a detrimental effect on brain during cerebral ischemia. We investigated the immunologic changes on peripheral blood in the acute phase of ischemic stroke using RNA microarray. mRNA microarray and real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for genes of interest in microarray data were analyzed in 12 stroke patients and 12 controls. Plasma matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) concentrations were measured in 120 stroke patients and 82 controls. In microarray analysis, a total of 11 genes of interest showed different expression in patients with ischemic stroke. The three most highly expressed genes were C19orf59 (chromosome 19 open reading frame 59), MMP9 and IL18RAP (interleukin-18 receptor accessory protein), whereas gene with the lowest expression was GNLY (granulysin). The expression patterns of three selected genes (MMP9, IL18RAP and GNLY) were validated by RT-PCR. The plasma concentration of MMP-9 was significantly elevated in the stroke patients, and showed a weakly positive correlation with infarct volume. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) showed that gene sets related to immunity and defense, signal transduction, transport and cell adhesion were significant in acute ischemic stroke. In the peripheral blood, numerous genes of inflammatory mediators, including MMP9, IL18RAP and GNLY, are altered in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. This stroke-specific gene expression profiling provides valuable information about the role of peripheral inflammation to the pathophysiological mechanism of ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Phase I and Phase II Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update on Currently Studied Drugs in Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Cesar; Akyol, Onat; Ho, Wing Mann; Araujo, Camila; Huang, Lei; Applegate II, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a devastating cause of death and disability, consequences of which depend on the time from ischemia onset to treatment, the affected brain region, and its size. The main targets of ischemic stroke therapy aim to restore tissue perfusion in the ischemic penumbra in order to decrease the total infarct area by maintaining blood flow. Advances in research of pathological process and pathways during acute ischemia have resulted in improvement of new treatment strategies apart from restoring perfusion. Additionally, limiting the injury severity by manipulating the molecular mechanisms during ischemia has become a promising approach, especially in animal research. The purpose of this article is to review completed and ongoing phases I and II trials for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, reviewing studies on antithrombotic, thrombolytic, neuroprotective, and antineuroinflammatory drugs that may translate into more effective treatments. PMID:28286764

  10. Phase I and Phase II Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update on Currently Studied Drugs in Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Reis, Cesar; Akyol, Onat; Ho, Wing Mann; Araujo, Camila; Huang, Lei; Applegate, Richard; Zhang, John H

    2017-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a devastating cause of death and disability, consequences of which depend on the time from ischemia onset to treatment, the affected brain region, and its size. The main targets of ischemic stroke therapy aim to restore tissue perfusion in the ischemic penumbra in order to decrease the total infarct area by maintaining blood flow. Advances in research of pathological process and pathways during acute ischemia have resulted in improvement of new treatment strategies apart from restoring perfusion. Additionally, limiting the injury severity by manipulating the molecular mechanisms during ischemia has become a promising approach, especially in animal research. The purpose of this article is to review completed and ongoing phases I and II trials for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, reviewing studies on antithrombotic, thrombolytic, neuroprotective, and antineuroinflammatory drugs that may translate into more effective treatments.

  11. Role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in shaping the effector phase of the antitumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Franciszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Boutet, Marie; Combadière, Christophe; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia

    2012-12-15

    Immune system-mediated eradication of neoplastic cells requires induction of a strong long-lasting antitumor T-cell response. However, generation of tumor-specific effector T cells does not necessarily result in tumor clearance. CTL must first be able to migrate to the tumor site, infiltrate the tumor tissue, and interact with the target to finally trigger effector functions indispensable for tumor destruction. Chemokines are involved in circulation, homing, retention, and activation of immunocompetent cells. Although some of them are known to contribute to tumor growth and metastasis, others are responsible for changes in the tumor microenvironment that lead to extensive infiltration of lymphocytes, resulting in tumor eradication. Given their chemoattractive and activating properties, a role for chemokines in the development of the effector phase of the antitumor immune response has been suggested. Here, we emphasize the role of the chemokine-chemokine receptor network at multiple levels of the T-cell-mediated antitumor immune response. The identification of chemokine-dependent molecular mechanisms implicated in tumor-specific CTL trafficking, retention, and regulation of their in situ effector functions may offer new perspectives for development of innovative immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer treatment.

  12. Phase I Trial of AZD1775 and Belinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myeloid Malignancies or Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Pediatric Immunization Distress: A Cluster Analyses of Children's, Parents', and Nurses' Behaviors During the Anticipatory Phase.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Helga; Barros, Luísa; Pereira, Ana I

    2016-05-01

    Using cluster analysis, we aimed to identify a typology of nurses', parents', and young children's behaviors during the anticipatory phase of pediatric immunizations to explore the associations between these different typologies and to determine whether these groups differed with respect to the child's procedural distress as rated by the child and the parents and with respect to the adults' self-rated distress. Immunizations given by 23 nurses to 220 children aged 3 years and 10 months to 7 years were recorded with behaviors being scored according to Child-Adult Medical Procedure Interaction Scale-Revised, to which 3 new codes were added, and rated with a 6-point Likert scale. Parents' and nurses' ratings of their own distress and of the child's distress, in addition to children's self-rating of distress were obtained. Nine adult and 12 child behavioral codes were submitted for cluster analysis. A solution with 4 clusters for children, 5 clusters for parents, and 5 clusters for nurses was retained. Our results show high consistency between child and adult clusters. During the anticipatory phase, less distressed children, characterized by either low activity or high coping, interacted with adults who showed low activity or high coping support patterns. More distressed children, characterized by resistance and behavioral distress, interacted with adults who displayed either low activity or less efficient support behaviors, such as reassurance and criticism. The results confirm previous dimensional studies and add relevant knowledge concerning typologies of participant behaviors that may be useful in understanding such behaviors and in helping providers in their management of child immunizations.

  14. Participation of the interstitium in acute immune-complex nephritis: interstitial antigen accumulation, cellular infiltrate, and MHC class II expression

    PubMed Central

    PARRA, G; HERNÁNDEZ, S; MORENO, P; RODRÍGUEZ-ITURBE, B

    2003-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) injected into the rabbits induces acute immune complex glomerulonephritis. Since albumin is filtered and reabsorbed in the tubules, we investigated whether tubulointerstitial cells participate in the pathogenesis of this experimental condition. For this purpose, we induced immune-complex nephritis in 45 rabbits with the injection of 125I-BSA and urinary BSA excretion, glomerular and tubulointerstitial BSA accumulation, lymphocyte infiltration, proliferative activity and MHC class II antigens were examined 2, 4–5 and 6–8 days after immunization. Proteinuria developed day 6–8. BSA was found in urine from day 2 (mean ± SE; 1089 ± 339 µg/24 h) and peaked on day 4 after immunization (2249 ± 1106). BSA content (cpm/g tissue) in tubulointerstitium (TI) and glomeruli were similar at day 2 (457 ± 45 and 407 ± 75, respectively), but afterward increased significantly in TI, reaching a peak level on day 5 (1026 ± 406) while remained unchanged in glomeruli (388 ± 95). At the same time, preceding the onset of proteinuria, maximal intensity of the lymphocyte infiltration, proliferative activity and MHC class II antigen expression in tubular cells, monocytes/macrophages and interstitial cells were observed. Our study shows that antigen is excreted in the urine and concentrated in TI in association with overexpression of MHC class II molecules and lymphocyte infiltration. These findings occur prior to the development of proteinuria and suggest that the tubulointerstitial cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of this model. PMID:12823277

  15. Adaptive Immunity Dysregulation in Acute Coronary Syndromes: From Cellular and Molecular Basis to Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Flego, Davide; Liuzzo, Giovanna; Weyand, Cornelia M; Crea, Filippo

    2016-11-08

    Although the early outcome of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has considerably improved in the last decade, cardiovascular diseases still represent the main cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. This is mainly because recurrence of ACS eventually leads to the pandemics of heart failure and sudden cardiac death, thus calling for a reappraisal of the mechanisms responsible for coronary instability. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of how adaptive immunity contributes to the pathogenesis of ACS and the clinical implications that arise from these new pathogenic concepts. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Circulating D-dimer and thrombomodulin levels in acute febrile phase of measles.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, K; Kato, Y

    2002-10-01

    Circulating D-dimer and thrombomodulin (TM) levels are now routinely measured in clinical laboratories. Plasma levels of D-dimer are used as a marker of fibrin formation and degradation, and serum TM is used to assess the state of endothelial cell injuries. While the levels of circulating D-dimer and TM have been investigated in many diseases, to our knowledge they have not been studied in patients with measles. We measured circulating levels of D-dimer in patients with measles to discuss whether fibrin formation and degradation occur and TM whether endothelial injury occur. The plasma levels of D-dimer and serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatinine were measured of 14 adolescent and adult Japanese patients with measles, and the serum or plasma levels of TM of 10 of these 14 patients were measured in the acute febrile phase and convalescent afebrile phase with commercially available kits. Plasma D-dimer levels were significantly higher in the acute febrile phase than in the convalescent afebrile phase in patients with measles, and no significant difference was shown in serum and plasma TM levels between the two phases. Plasma D-dimer levels were not correlated with serum or plasma TM levels in either phase. No significant differences were identified in the serum ALT and creatinine levels between the acute febrile and convalescent afebrile phases, and the levels of plasma D-dimer were not significantly correlated with the serum ALT levels. Our results indicate that while clot formation and fibrinolysis may tend to occur in patients with the acute febrile phase of measles, there may be little risk that such patients will suffer endothelial injury.

  17. Immune Complex Mediated Glomerulonephritis with Acute Thrombotic Microangiopathy following Newly Detected Hepatitis B Virus Infection in a Kidney Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Hannah; Douthwaite, Sam; Newsholme, William; Horsfield, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) presents a risk to patients and staff in renal units. To minimise viral transmission, there are international and UK guidelines recommending HBV immunisation for patients commencing renal replacement therapy (RRT) and HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients. We report the case of a 56-year-old male who was immunised against HBV before starting haemodialysis. He received a deceased donor kidney transplant three years later, at which time there was no evidence of HBV infection. After a further six years he developed an acute kidney injury; allograft biopsy revealed an acute thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and C4d staining. Due to a “full house” immunoprofile, tests including virological screening were undertaken, which revealed acute HBV infection. Entecavir treatment resulted in an improvement in viral load and kidney function. HBV genotyping demonstrated a vaccine escape mutant, suggesting “past resolved” infection that reactivated with immunosuppression, though posttransplant acquisition cannot be excluded. This is the first reported case of acute HBV infection associated with immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis and TMA. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients, which although addressed by UK guidelines is not currently practiced in all UK units. PMID:27800206

  18. Changes in numbers of leukocytes in immune organs of juvenile coho salmon after acute stress or cortisol treatment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maule, Alec G.; Schreck, Carl B.

    1990-01-01

    We examined the effects of acute stress and cortisol treatment on the number of leukocytes (normalized for fish body weight) in the blood, thymus, spleen, and anterior kidney of juvenile coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch. In acutely stressed or cortisol-fed fish, the numbers of leukocytes increased significantly in the thymus and anterior kidney, and decreased significantly in blood and spleen within 1 d after treatment. Numbers of cells in the anterior kidney, blood, and spleen returned to control levels by 3 d after treatment, but cell numbers in the thymus remained significantly greater than control values until 3–7 d after acute stress. Although dietary cortisol resulted in increased plasma cortisol titers and caused the same changes in leukocyte distribution as those caused by acute stress, the magnitude or duration of elevated cortisol levels and leukocyte numbers were not correlated. These results suggest that, although increased plasma cortisol titers induced by stress may be involved in the change in number of cells in various immune organs, factors other than cortisol are involved as well.

  19. Immune Complex Mediated Glomerulonephritis with Acute Thrombotic Microangiopathy following Newly Detected Hepatitis B Virus Infection in a Kidney Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Salter, Tracey; Burton, Hannah; Douthwaite, Sam; Newsholme, William; Horsfield, Catherine; Hilton, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) presents a risk to patients and staff in renal units. To minimise viral transmission, there are international and UK guidelines recommending HBV immunisation for patients commencing renal replacement therapy (RRT) and HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients. We report the case of a 56-year-old male who was immunised against HBV before starting haemodialysis. He received a deceased donor kidney transplant three years later, at which time there was no evidence of HBV infection. After a further six years he developed an acute kidney injury; allograft biopsy revealed an acute thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and C4d staining. Due to a "full house" immunoprofile, tests including virological screening were undertaken, which revealed acute HBV infection. Entecavir treatment resulted in an improvement in viral load and kidney function. HBV genotyping demonstrated a vaccine escape mutant, suggesting "past resolved" infection that reactivated with immunosuppression, though posttransplant acquisition cannot be excluded. This is the first reported case of acute HBV infection associated with immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis and TMA. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients, which although addressed by UK guidelines is not currently practiced in all UK units.

  20. Association of Tdap Vaccination With Acute Events and Adverse Birth Outcomes Among Pregnant Women With Prior Tetanus-Containing Immunizations.

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, Lakshmi; McCarthy, Natalie L; Kharbanda, Elyse O; McNeil, Michael M; Naleway, Allison L; Klein, Nicola P; Jackson, Michael L; Hambidge, Simon J; Lugg, Marlene M; Li, Rongxia; Weintraub, Eric S; Bednarczyk, Robert A; King, Jennifer P; DeStefano, Frank; Orenstein, Walter A; Omer, Saad B

    2015-10-20

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends the tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine for pregnant women during each pregnancy, regardless of prior immunization status. However, safety data on repeated Tdap vaccination in pregnancy is lacking. To determine whether receipt of Tdap vaccine during pregnancy administered in close intervals from prior tetanus-containing vaccinations is associated with acute adverse events in mothers and adverse birth outcomes in neonates. A retrospective cohort study in 29,155 pregnant women aged 14 through 49 years from January 1, 2007, through November 15, 2013, using data from 7 Vaccine Safety Datalink sites in California, Colorado, Minnesota, Oregon, Washington, and Wisconsin. Women who received Tdap in pregnancy following a prior tetanus-containing vaccine less than 2 years before, 2 to 5 years before, and more than 5 years before. Acute adverse events (fever, allergy, and local reactions) and adverse birth outcomes (small for gestational age, preterm delivery, and low birth weight) were evaluated. Women who were vaccinated with Tdap in pregnancy and had a prior tetanus-containing vaccine more than 5 years before served as controls. There were no statistically significant differences in rates of medically attended acute adverse events or adverse birth outcomes related to timing since prior tetanus-containing vaccination. [table: see text]. Among women who received Tdap vaccination during pregnancy, there was no increased risk of acute adverse events or adverse birth outcomes for those who had been previously vaccinated less than 2 years before or 2 to 5 years before compared with those who had been vaccinated more than 5 years before. These findings suggest that relatively recent receipt of a prior tetanus-containing vaccination does not increase risk after Tdap vaccination in pregnancy.

  1. Effect of short-term, high-dose methylprednisolone on oxidative stress in children with acute immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Cura, Musa; Koç, Ahmet; Aksoy, Nurten

    2016-01-01

    Background Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is the most common cause of acquired childhood thrombocytopenia and is characterized by increased immune-mediated destruction of circulating thrombocytes. Oxidative damage may be involved in ITP pathogenesis; paraoxonase (PON) and arylesterase (ARE) enzymes are closely associated with the cellular antioxidant system. We investigated the effect of short-term high-dose methylprednisolone (HDMP) treatment on the total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), oxidative stress index (OSI), and PON and ARE enzymatic activity in children with acute ITP. Methods Thirty children with acute ITP constituted the study group and 30 healthy children constituted the control group. Children with acute ITP were treated with HDMP: 30 mg/kg for 3 days, then 20 mg/kg for 4 days. The TOS, TAC, OSI, PON, and ARE levels were determined before and after 7 days of HDMP treatment. Results The TAC level (P<0.001), and PON (P<0.001) and ARE (P=0.001) activities were lower and the TOS (P=0.003) and OSI (P<0.001) levels were higher in children with acute ITP than those in healthy children in the control group. We also observed statistically significant increases in the TAC (P<0.01), PON (P<0.001) and ARE levels (P=0.001) and decreases in the TOS (P<0.05) and OSI levels (P<0.05) with 7 days of HDMP treatment compared to their values before treatment. Conclusion Our study demonstrated increased oxidative stress (OSI and TOC) and decreased antioxidant capacity (TAC), PON, and ARE in ITP patients and that steroid treatment could be effective in reducing the oxidative stress. PMID:28090489

  2. Effect of short-term, high-dose methylprednisolone on oxidative stress in children with acute immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Cura, Musa; Koç, Ahmet; Aksoy, Nurten; Özdemir, Zeynep Canan

    2016-12-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is the most common cause of acquired childhood thrombocytopenia and is characterized by increased immune-mediated destruction of circulating thrombocytes. Oxidative damage may be involved in ITP pathogenesis; paraoxonase (PON) and arylesterase (ARE) enzymes are closely associated with the cellular antioxidant system. We investigated the effect of short-term high-dose methylprednisolone (HDMP) treatment on the total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), oxidative stress index (OSI), and PON and ARE enzymatic activity in children with acute ITP. Thirty children with acute ITP constituted the study group and 30 healthy children constituted the control group. Children with acute ITP were treated with HDMP: 30 mg/kg for 3 days, then 20 mg/kg for 4 days. The TOS, TAC, OSI, PON, and ARE levels were determined before and after 7 days of HDMP treatment. The TAC level (P<0.001), and PON (P<0.001) and ARE (P=0.001) activities were lower and the TOS (P=0.003) and OSI (P<0.001) levels were higher in children with acute ITP than those in healthy children in the control group. We also observed statistically significant increases in the TAC (P<0.01), PON (P<0.001) and ARE levels (P=0.001) and decreases in the TOS (P<0.05) and OSI levels (P<0.05) with 7 days of HDMP treatment compared to their values before treatment. Our study demonstrated increased oxidative stress (OSI and TOC) and decreased antioxidant capacity (TAC), PON, and ARE in ITP patients and that steroid treatment could be effective in reducing the oxidative stress.

  3. Phase diagram and critical behavior of a forest-fire model in a gradient of immunity.

    PubMed

    Guisoni, Nara; Loscar, Ernesto S; Albano, Ezequiel V

    2011-01-01

    The forest-fire model with immune trees (FFMIT) is a cellular automaton early proposed by Drossel and Schwabl [Physica A 199, 183 (1993)], in which each site of a lattice can be in three possible states: occupied by a tree, empty, or occupied by a burning tree (fire). The trees grow at empty sites with probability p, healthy trees catch fire from adjacent burning trees with probability (1-g), where g is the immunity, and a burning tree becomes an empty site spontaneously. In this paper we study the FFMIT by means of the recently proposed gradient method (GM), considering the immunity as a uniform gradient along the horizontal axis of the lattice. The GM allows the simultaneous treatment of both the active and the inactive phases of the model in the same simulation. In this way, the study of a single-valued interface gives the critical point of the active-absorbing transition, whereas the study of a multivalued interface brings the percolation threshold into the active phase. Therefore we present a complete phase diagram for the FFMIT, for all range of p, where, besides the usual active-absorbing transition of the model, we locate a transition between the active percolating and the active nonpercolating phases. The average location and the width of both interfaces, as well as the absorbing and percolating cluster densities, obey a scaling behavior that is governed by the exponent α=1/(1+ν), where ν is the suitable correlation length exponent (ν(⊥) for the directed percolation transition and ν for the standard percolation transition). We also show that the GM allows us to calculate the critical exponents associated with both the order parameter of the absorbing transition and the number of particles in the multivalued interface. Besides, we show that by using the gradient method, the collapse in a single curve of cluster densities obtained for samples of different side is a very sensitive method in order to obtain the critical points and the percolation

  4. Monitoring the acute phase response to vaso-occlusive crisis in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, J; Stone, P C; Akinola, N O; Gallimore, J R; Pepys, M B

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To identify suitable acute phase proteins as objective markers of tissue ischaemia during painful vaso-occlusive crises in sickle cell disease. METHODS--The prodromal and established phases of 14 vaso-occlusive crises were studied longitudinally in 10 patients with sickle cell anaemia. Automated solid phase enzyme immunoassays were used to measure the fast responding acute phase proteins C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A protein. Slower responding glycoproteins (fibrinogen, orosomucoid, sialic acid and concanavalin-A binding) were measured in parallel. RESULTS--C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A protein increased early in crisis, sometimes within the early (prodromal) phase. Crises that resolved within 24 hours in hospital showed a minor and transient rise compared with crises that required treatment for four days or more. In eight crises treated by patients at home the acute phase response ranged from minor to a level consistent with extensive tissue ischaemia. CONCLUSIONS--Sensitive enzyme immunoassays for C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A protein are of potential value for monitoring the onset of tissue ischaemia in sickle cell crisis and for confirming subsequent resolution. PMID:7510726

  5. [Anaemia, iron index status and acute phase proteins in malaria (Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire)].

    PubMed

    Ahiboh, H; Oga, A S; Yapi, H F; Kouakou, G; Boua, K D; Edjeme, N; Monnet, D

    2008-02-01

    Clinical signs of malaria are the combined expression of several biological mechanisms. During this parasite infection, anaemia can be the consequence of several different pathogenic mechanisms. It can be an acute haemolytic anaemia due to a mechanical and immune action of the parasite or an inflammation. Besides, in Africa malaria matches with iron deficiency area. So, malarial anaemia in tropical area can be a characteristic of iron deficiency The purpose of this survey was to define the features of malarial anaemia and elucidate the link of all biological processes involved. A black population living in tropical urban areas, with fever and diagnosed Plasmodium-infection was assessed. Parasitaemia, haemoglobin, hematocrit, average corpuscular volume and average corpuscular haemoglobin were determined. For each patient, iron index status and acute phase protein were assessed with the plasmatic iron, ferritin, haptoglobin, transferrin and C-reactive protein. Regardless of gender and age, the characteristics of malarial anaemia are microcythaemia and hypochromia. Anaemia occurs as frequently as parasitaemia is high. When parasitaemia is low anaemia gets a haemolytic feature. When parasitaemia is high, anaemia gets haemolytic and inflammatory features. Anaemia occurs more often with a good iron index status.

  6. The diagnostic accuracy of acute phase proteins and proinflammatory cytokines in sheep with pneumonic pasteurellosis

    PubMed Central

    Elmoslemany, Ahmed M.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of acute phase proteins and proinflammatory cytokines in sheep with pneumonic pasteurellosis. Blood samples were collected from 56 sheep (36 naturally infected with Pasteurella multocida and 20 healthy controls) belonging to one farm in Eastern region, Saudi Arabia. Serum samples were evaluated for acute phase proteins (Haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA) and fibrinogen (Fb)), and the proinflammatory cytokines (interleukins (IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interferon-gamma (IFN-ϒ)). Additionally, nasopharyngeal swabs and bronchoalveolar lavages were collected from all animals for bacteriological examinations. Receiver operating characteristic curve was used to assess the diagnostic performance of each parameter. All parameters showed moderate to high degree of positive correlation with case-control status. There was no significant difference in the area under the curve (AUC) among acute phase proteins; however, both Hp and SAA showed better sensitivity and specificity than Fb. The proinflammatory cytokines (IL1-α, IL1-β, and IL6) showed similar and highly accurate diagnostic performance (AUC > 0.9), whereas IFN-ϒ was moderately accurate (AUC = 0.79). In conclusion, this study confirms the value of acute phase proteins and cytokines as diagnostic biomarkers of naturally occuring pneumonic pasteurellosis in sheep. PMID:27547520

  7. The effect of chronic ammonia exposure on acute phase proteins, immunoglobulin and cytokines in laying hens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ammonia is a potential health hazard to both humans and animals, causing systemic low-grade inflammation based on its levels and durations. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of 45 weeks of exposure to 30 ppm NH3 on the concentrations of acute phase proteins, immunoglobulins and c...

  8. Feasibility and safety of acute phase rehabilitation after stroke using the hybrid assistive limb robot suit.

    PubMed

    Ueba, Tetsuya; Hamada, Omi; Ogata, Toshiyasu; Inoue, Tooru; Shiota, Etsuji; Sankai, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Acute phase rehabilitation is an important treatment for improving the functional outcome of patients after stroke. The present cohort study analyzed the feasibility and safety of acute phase rehabilitation using the hybrid assistive limb robot suit in 22 patients, 7 males and 15 females (mean age 66.6 ± 17.7 years). Neurological deterioration, mortality, or other accidents were recorded as adverse events. Baseline characteristics of each patient were recorded at the first hybrid assistive limb rehabilitation. Hybrid assistive limb rehabilitation was conducted for 12.1 ± 7.0 days with the patients in stable condition. Acute phase hybrid assistive limb rehabilitation was performed a total of 84 times with no adverse events recorded except for orthostatic hypotension. Good functional outcomes were obtained in 14 patients. Orthostatic hypotension was observed during the first hybrid assistive limb rehabilitation in four patients, and was significantly associated with intracerebral hemorrhage (p = 0.007) and lower Brunnstrom stage (p = 0.033). Acute phase rehabilitation using the hybrid assistive limb suit is feasible and safe. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and lower Brunnstrom stage should be carefully monitored for orthostatic hypotension.

  9. Changes in the Neuropsychological Correlates of Clinical Dimensions between the Acute and Stable Phase of Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillem, F.; Ganeva, E.; Pampoulova, T.; Stip, E.; Lalonde, P.; Sasseville, M.

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the neuropsychological correlates of the symptom dimensions of schizophrenia vary with the clinical state in patients followed from the acute to stable the phase of the illness. Fifteen patients were assessed for symptoms (SAPS-SANS) and undergone a complete neuropsychological assessment at two…

  10. C-reactive protein and the acute phase reaction in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Bertsch, Thomas; Triebel, Jakob; Bollheimer, Cornelius; Christ, Michael; Sieber, Cornel; Fassbender, Klaus; Heppner, Hans Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    The C-reactive protein (CRP), first described as a serum component capable of precipitating the C-polysaccharide of pneumococci, is one of the most important proteins because the serum concentration rises in the acute phase reaction. The acute phase reaction is the nonspecific reaction of the body to noxious stimuli of the most varied kinds, such as infections, burns, neoplasms and tissue trauma. The CRP is synthesized in liver parenchymal cells by cytokines which are derived from stimulated leucocytes and released into the circulation. Because of its molecular structure and in synergy with the complement system, it is able to precipitate and/or lyse microorganisms, thereby rendering them harmless. Measurement of the serum CRP concentration can provide important information with respect to the diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. Due to immunosenescence in geriatric patients the synthesis of CRP appears to be limited to inflammatory stimuli; however, this phenomenon does not appear to be of major clinical relevance. Despite the introduction of new parameters of the acute phase reaction, sometimes with better performance, such as interleukin-6, procalcitonin and the soluble endotoxin receptor sCD14, measurement of CRP for diagnosis and treatment monitoring is still justified even in geriatric patients as testing is rapid, economic and nearly ubiquitously available round the clock. Biochemical markers of the acute phase reaction should always be interpreted together with the clinical picture and their specific limitations.

  11. Relationship between Acute Phase Proteins and Serum Fatty Acid Composition in Morbidly Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Ricardo; Beserra, Bruna Teles Soares; Cunha, Raphael Salles Granato; Hillesheim, Elaine; Camargo, Carolina de Quadros; Pequito, Danielle Cristina Tonello; de Castro, Isabela Coelho; Fernandes, Luiz Cláudio; Nunes, Everson Araújo; Trindade, Erasmo Benício Santos de Moraes

    2013-01-01

    Background. Obesity is considered a low-grade inflammatory state and has been associated with increased acute phase proteins as well as changes in serum fatty acids. Few studies have assessed associations between acute phase proteins and serum fatty acids in morbidly obese patients. Objective. To investigate the relationship between acute phase proteins (C-Reactive Protein, Orosomucoid, and Albumin) and serum fatty acids in morbidly obese patients. Methods. Twenty-two morbidly obese patients were enrolled in this study. Biochemical and clinical data were obtained before bariatric surgery, and fatty acids measured in preoperative serum. Results. Orosomucoid was negatively correlated with lauric acid (P = 0.027) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (P = 0.037) and positively with arachidonic acid (AA) (P = 0.035), AA/EPA ratio (P = 0.005), and n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids ratio (P = 0.035). C-Reactive Protein (CRP) was negatively correlated with lauric acid (P = 0.048), and both CRP and CRP/Albumin ratio were negatively correlated with margaric acid (P = 0.010, P = 0.008, resp.). Albumin was positively correlated with EPA (P = 0.027) and margaric acid (P = 0.008). Other correlations were not statistically significant. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that serum fatty acids are linked to acute phase proteins in morbidly obese patients. PMID:24167354

  12. Changes in the Neuropsychological Correlates of Clinical Dimensions between the Acute and Stable Phase of Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillem, F.; Ganeva, E.; Pampoulova, T.; Stip, E.; Lalonde, P.; Sasseville, M.

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the neuropsychological correlates of the symptom dimensions of schizophrenia vary with the clinical state in patients followed from the acute to stable the phase of the illness. Fifteen patients were assessed for symptoms (SAPS-SANS) and undergone a complete neuropsychological assessment at two…

  13. Modulation of the acute phase response in feedlot steers supplemented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study was designed to determine the effect of supplementing feedlot steers with Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-1079 (SC) on the acute phase response to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Steers (n = 18; 266 ± 4 kilograms body weight) were separated into three treatment groups (n = 6/treatm...

  14. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Deficient innate immunity, thymopoiesis, and gene expression response to radiation in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Leung, Wing; Neale, Geoffrey; Behm, Fred; Iyengar, Rekha; Finkelstein, David; Kastan, Michael B; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2010-06-01

    Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at an increased risk of developing secondary malignant neoplasms. Radiation and chemotherapy can cause mutations and cytogenetic abnormalities and induce genomic instability. Host immunity and appropriate DNA damage responses are critical inhibitors of carcinogenesis. Therefore, we sought to determine the long-term effects of ALL treatment on immune function and response to DNA damage. Comparative studies on 14 survivors in first complete remission and 16 siblings were conducted. In comparison to siblings on the cells that were involved in adaptive immunity, the patients had either higher numbers (CD19+ B cells and CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells) or similar numbers (alphabetaT cells and CD45RO+/RA- memory T cells) in the blood. In contrast, patients had lower numbers of all lymphocyte subsets involved in innate immunity (gammadeltaT cells and all NK subsets, including KIR2DL1+ cells, KIR2DL2/L3+ cells, and CD16+ cells), and lower natural cytotoxicity against K562 leukemia cells. Thymopoiesis was lower in patients, as demonstrated by less CD45RO-/RA+ naïve T cell and less SjTREC levels in the blood, whereas the Vbeta spectratype complexity score was similar. Array of gene expression response to low-dose radiation showed that about 70% of the probesets had a reduced response in patients. One of these genes, SCHIP-1, was also among the top-ranked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) during the whole-genome scanning by SNP microarray analysis. ALL survivors were deficient in innate immunity, thymopoiesis, and DNA damage responses to radiation. These defects may contribute to their increased likelihood of second malignancy. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Deficient Innate Immunity, Thymopoiesis, and Gene Expression Response to Radiation in Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing; Neale, Geoffrey; Behm, Fred; Iyengar, Rekha; Finkelstein, David; Kastan, Michael B.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2010-01-01

    Background Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at an increased risk of developing secondary malignant neoplasms. Radiation and chemotherapy can cause mutations and cytogenetic abnormalities and induce genomic instability. Host immunity and appropriate DNA damage responses are critical inhibitors of carcinogenesis. Therefore, we sought to determine the long-term effects of ALL treatment on immune function and response to DNA damage. Methods Comparative studies on 14 survivors in first complete remission and 16 siblings were conducted. Results In comparison to siblings on the cells that were involved in adaptive immunity, the patients had either higher numbers (CD19+ B cells and CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells) or similar numbers (αβT cells and CD45RO+/RA− memory T cells) in the blood. In contrast, patients had lower numbers of all lymphocyte subsets involved in innate immunity (γδT cells and all NK subsets, including KIR2DL1+ cells, KIR2DL2/L3+ cells, and CD16+ cells), and lower natural cytotoxicity against K562 leukemia cells. Thymopoiesis was lower in patients, as demonstrated by less CD45RO−/RA+ Naïve T cell and less SjTREC levels in the blood, whereas the Vβ spectratype complexity score was similar. Array of gene expression response to low-dose radiation showed that about 70% of the probesets had a reduced response in patients. One of these genes, SCHIP-1, was also among the top-ranked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) during the whole genome scanning by SNP microarray analysis. Conclusion ALL survivors were deficient in innate immunity, thymopoiesis, and DNA damage responses to radiation. These defects may contribute to their increased likelihood of second malignancy. PMID:20413363

  17. Protective and Pathologic Roles of the Immune Response to Mouse Hepatitis Virus Type 1: Implications for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome▿

    PubMed Central

    Khanolkar, Aaruni; Hartwig, Stacey M.; Haag, Brayton A.; Meyerholz, David K.; Epping, Lecia L.; Haring, Jodie S.; Varga, Steven M.; Harty, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Intranasal mouse hepatitis virus type 1 (MHV-1) infection of mice induces lung pathology similar to that observed in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) patients. However, the severity of MHV-1-induced pulmonary disease varies among mouse strains, and it has been suggested that differences in the host immune response might account for this variation. It has also been suggested that immunopathology may represent an important clinical feature of SARS. Little is known about the host immune response to MHV-1 and how it might contribute to some of the pathological changes detected in infected mice. In this study we show that an intact type I interferon system and the adaptive immune responses are required for controlling MHV-1 replication and preventing morbidity and mortality in resistant C57BL/6J mice after infection. The NK cell response also helps minimize the severity of illness following MHV-1 infection of C57BL/6J mice. In A/J and C3H/HeJ mice, which are highly susceptible to MHV-1-induced disease, we demonstrate that both CD4 and CD8 T cells contribute to morbidity during primary infection, and memory responses can enhance morbidity and mortality during subsequent reexposure to MHV-1. However, morbidity in A/J and C3H/HeJ mice can be minimized by treating them with immune serum prior to MHV-1 infection. Overall, our findings highlight the role of the host immune response in contributing to the pathogenesis of coronavirus-induced respiratory disease. PMID:19570864

  18. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  19. HBcAg-specific CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells modulate immune tolerance and acute exacerbation on the natural history of chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Feng, I-Che; Koay, Lok-Beng; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Kuo, Hsing-Tao; Sun, Chi-Shu; Lee, Chuan; Chuang, Wong-Lung; Liao, Shuen-Kuei; Wang, Shih-Ling; Tang, Ling-Yu; Cheng, Chia-Ju; Tsai, Sun-Lung

    2007-01-01

    Acute exacerbations (AEs) of chronic hepatitis B (CH-B) are accompanied by increased T cell responses to hepatitis B core and e antigens (HBcAg/HBeAg). Why patients are immunotolerant (IT) to the virus and why AEs occur spontaneously on the immunoactive phase remain unclear. The role of HBcAg-specific CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (T(reg)) cells in AE and IT phases was investigated in this study. The SYFPEITHI scoring system was employed to predict MHC class II-restricted epitope peptides on HBcAg overlapping with HBeAg that were used for T(reg)-cell cloning and for the construction of MHC class II tetramers to measure T(reg) cell frequencies (T(reg) f). The results showed that HBcAg-specific T(reg) f declined during AE accompanied by increased HBcAg peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte frequencies. Predominant Foxp3-expressing T(reg) cell clones were generated from patients on the immune tolerance phase, while the majority of Th1 clones were obtained from patients on the immunoactive phase. T(reg) cells from liver and peripheral blood of CH-B patients express CD152 and PD1 antigens that exhibit suppression on PBMCs proliferation to HBcAg. These data suggest that HBcAg peptide-specific T(reg) cells modulate the IT phase, and that their decline may account for the spontaneous AEs on the natural history of chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

  20. Particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response may be the causal link between particle inhalation and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Anne T; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Jackson, Petra; Poulsen, Sarah Søs; Kyjovska, Zdenka O; Halappanavar, Sabina; Yauk, Carole L; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of ambient and workplace particulate air pollution is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. One proposed mechanism for this association is that pulmonary inflammation induces a hepatic acute phase response, which increases risk of cardiovascular disease. Induction of the acute phase response is intimately linked to risk of cardiovascular disease as shown in both epidemiological and animal studies. Indeed, blood levels of acute phase proteins, such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, are independent predictors of risk of cardiovascular disease in prospective epidemiological studies. In this review, we present and review emerging evidence that inhalation of particles (e.g., air diesel exhaust particles and nanoparticles) induces a pulmonary acute phase response, and propose that this induction constitutes the causal link between particle inhalation and risk of cardiovascular disease. Increased levels of acute phase mRNA and proteins in lung tissues, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma clearly indicate pulmonary acute phase response following pulmonary deposition of different kinds of particles including diesel exhaust particles, nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes. The pulmonary acute phase response is dose-dependent and long lasting. Conversely, the hepatic acute phase response is reduced relative to lung or entirely absent. We also provide evidence that pulmonary inflammation, as measured by neutrophil influx, is a predictor of the acute phase response and that the total surface area of deposited particles correlates with the pulmonary acute phase response. We discuss the implications of these findings in relation to occupational exposure to nanoparticles. How to cite this article: WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2014, 6:517–531. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1279 PMID:24920450

  1. Acute-phase response in Babesia canis and Dirofilaria immitis co-infections in dogs.

    PubMed

    Milanović, Zorana; Ilić, Anja; Andrić, Jelena Francuski; Radonjić, Vladimir; Beletić, Anđelo; Filipović, Milica Kovačević

    2017-10-01

    Babesia canis and Dirofilaria immitis are emerging and geographically overlapping vector-borne pathogens in dogs. Infection with B. canis leads to acute-phase response (APR) that can be mild to severe and results in either non-complicated or complicated forms of the disease. The aim of this study was to determine whether acute B. canis infection is more severe in dogs with underlying asymptomatic D. immitis infection. Dogs of both sexes, different ages and breeds, with naturally occurring mono-infections with B. canis (n=13) and D. immitis (n=18) and co-infected dogs (n=7) were enrolled as well as healthy controls (n=15). Routine haematology and biochemistry, agarose gel electrophoresis (agEF) protein fraction separation and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for serum amyloid A (SAA) were performed. Based on clinical and laboratory findings, sepsis was diagnosed in the majority of dogs with acute B. canis infection with or without underlying asymptomatic D. immitis infection. Overall, haematology, biochemistry and agEF pattern changes were induced and dictated by acute B. canis infection whether or not the dogs had an asymptomatic D. immitis infection. D. immitis infection slightly influenced the level of anaemia, slightly aggravated the level of dehydration and increased the concentration of γ-globulins in acute-phase B. canis infection. D. immitis infection prevented B. canis-induced leukopenia. SAA equally increased in dogs with acute B. canis infection with or without underlying D. immitis infection. The level of SAA was not changed in dogs with asymptomatic D. immitis when compared to the controls. In conclusion, asymptomatic D. immitis infection does not influence overall APR after acute B. canis infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Protective effect of resveratrol in endotoxemia-induced acute phase response in rats.

    PubMed

    Sebai, Hichem; Ben-Attia, Mossadok; Sani, Mamane; Aouani, Ezzedine; Ghanem-Boughanmi, Néziha

    2009-04-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a glycolipid component of the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria can elicit a systemic inflammatory process leading to septic shock and death. Acute phase response is characterized by fever, leucocytosis, thrombocytopenia, altered metabolic responses and redox balance by inducing excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Resveratrol (trans-3,5,4' trihydroxystilbene) is a natural polyphenol exhibiting antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated the protective effect of resveratrol on endotoxemia-induced acute phase response in rats. When acutely administered by i.p. route, resveratrol (40 mg/kg b.w.) counteracted the effect of a single injection of LPS (4 mg/kg b.w.) which induced fever, a decrease in white blood cells (WBC) and platelets (PLT) counts. When i.p. administered during 7 days at 20 mg/kg per day (subacute treatment), resveratrol abrogated LPS-induced erythrocytes lipoperoxidation and catalase (CAT) activity depression to control levels. In the plasma compartment, LPS increased malondialdehyde (MDA) via nitric monoxide (NO) elevation and decreased iron level. All these deleterious LPS effects were reversed by a subacute resveratrol pre-treatment via a NO independent way. Resveratrol exhibited potent protective effect on LPS-induced acute phase response in rats.

  3. ACUTE ETHANOL DISRUPTS PHOTIC AND SEROTONERGIC CIRCADIAN CLOCK PHASE-RESETTING IN THE MOUSE

    PubMed Central

    Brager, Allison J.; Ruby, Christina L.; Prosser, Rebecca A.; Glass, J. David

    2011-01-01

    Background Alcohol abuse is associated with impaired circadian rhythms and sleep. Ethanol administration disrupts circadian clock phase-resetting, suggesting a mode for the disruptive effect of alcohol abuse on the circadian timing system. In this study, we extend previous work in C57BL/6J mice to: 1) characterize the SCN pharmacokinetics of acute systemic ethanol administration; 2) explore the effects of acute ethanol on photic and non-photic phase-resetting; and 2) determine if the SCN is a direct target for photic effects. Methods First, microdialysis was used to characterize the pharmacokinetics of acute i.p. injections of 3 doses of ethanol (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/kg) in the mouse suprachiasmatic (SCN) circadian clock. Second, the effects of acute i.p. ethanol administration on photic phase-delays and serotonergic ([+]8-OH-DPAT-induced) phase-advances of the circadian activity rhythm were assessed. Third, the effects of reverse-microdialysis ethanol perfusion of the SCN on photic phase-resetting were characterized. Results Peak ethanol levels from the 3 doses of ethanol in the SCN occurred within 20–40 min post-injection with half-lives for clearance ranging from 0.6–1.8 hr. Systemic ethanol treatment dose-dependently attenuated photic and serotonergic phase-resetting. This treatment also did not affect basal SCN neuronal activity as assessed by Fos expression. Intra-SCN perfusion with ethanol markedly reduced photic phase-delays. Conclusions These results confirm that acute ethanol attenuates photic phase-delay shifts and serotonergic phase-advance shifts in the mouse. This dual effect could disrupt photic and non-photic entrainment mechanisms governing circadian clock timing. It is also significant that the SCN clock is a direct target for disruptive effects of ethanol on photic shifting. Such actions by ethanol could underlie the disruptive effects of alcohol abuse on behavioral, physiological, and endocrine rhythms associated with alcoholism. PMID:21463340

  4. Aripiprazole in the acute and maintenance phase of bipolar I disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zupancic, Melanie; Gonzalez, Misty L

    2012-01-01

    Bipolar affective disorder is a disabling illness with substantial morbidity and many management challenges. Traditional mood stabilizers such as lithium, valproate, and carbamazepine are often inadequate in controlling symptoms both during the acute and maintenance phase of treatment. Aripiprazole is a second-generation antipsychotic with a unique mechanism of action. Evidence suggests that it is effective in acute manic and mixed states. There are limited data to suggest its efficacy as a maintenance agent. Future studies will be needed to better define the role of aripiprazole relative to other traditional pharmacologic agents. PMID:22298948

  5. Aripiprazole in the acute and maintenance phase of bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Melanie; Gonzalez, Misty L

    2012-01-01

    Bipolar affective disorder is a disabling illness with substantial morbidity and many management challenges. Traditional mood stabilizers such as lithium, valproate, and carbamazepine are often inadequate in controlling symptoms both during the acute and maintenance phase of treatment. Aripiprazole is a second-generation antipsychotic with a unique mechanism of action. Evidence suggests that it is effective in acute manic and mixed states. There are limited data to suggest its efficacy as a maintenance agent. Future studies will be needed to better define the role of aripiprazole relative to other traditional pharmacologic agents.

  6. Initiation of ART during Early Acute HIV Infection Preserves Mucosal Th17 Function and Reverses HIV-Related Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Schuetz, Alexandra; Deleage, Claire; Sereti, Irini; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Phuang-Ngern, Yuwadee; Estes, Jacob D.; Sandler, Netanya G.; Sukhumvittaya, Suchada; Marovich, Mary; Jongrakthaitae, Surat; Akapirat, Siriwat; Fletscher, James L. K.; Kroon, Eugene; Dewar, Robin; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Chomchey, Nitiya; Douek, Daniel C.; O′Connell, Robert J.; Ngauy, Viseth; Robb, Merlin L.; Phanuphak, Praphan; Michael, Nelson L.; Excler, Jean-Louis; Kim, Jerome H.; de Souza, Mark S.; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal Th17 cells play an important role in maintaining gut epithelium integrity and thus prevent microbial translocation. Chronic HIV infection is characterized by mucosal Th17 cell depletion, microbial translocation and subsequent immune-activation, which remain elevated despite antiretroviral therapy (ART) correlating with increased mortality. However, when Th17 depletion occurs following HIV infection is unknown. We analyzed mucosal Th17 cells in 42 acute HIV infection (AHI) subjects (Fiebig (F) stage I-V) with a median duration of infection of 16 days and the short-term impact of early initiation of ART. Th17 cells were defined as IL-17+ CD4+ T cells and their function was assessed by the co-expression of IL-22, IL-2 and IFNγ. While intact during FI/II, depletion of mucosal Th17 cell numbers and function was observed during FIII correlating with local and systemic markers of immune-activation. ART initiated at FI/II prevented loss of Th17 cell numbers and function, while initiation at FIII restored Th17 cell numbers but not their polyfunctionality. Furthermore, early initiation of ART in FI/II fully reversed the initially observed mucosal and systemic immune-activation. In contrast, patients treated later during AHI maintained elevated mucosal and systemic CD8+ T-cell activation post initiation of ART. These data support a loss of Th17 cells at early stages of acute HIV infection, and highlight that studies of ART initiation during early AHI should be further explored to assess the underlying mechanism of mucosal Th17 function preservation. PMID:25503054

  7. Initiation of ART during early acute HIV infection preserves mucosal Th17 function and reverses HIV-related immune activation.

    PubMed

    Schuetz, Alexandra; Deleage, Claire; Sereti, Irini; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Phuang-Ngern, Yuwadee; Estes, Jacob D; Sandler, Netanya G; Sukhumvittaya, Suchada; Marovich, Mary; Jongrakthaitae, Surat; Akapirat, Siriwat; Fletscher, James L K; Kroon, Eugene; Dewar, Robin; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Chomchey, Nitiya; Douek, Daniel C; O Connell, Robert J; Ngauy, Viseth; Robb, Merlin L; Phanuphak, Praphan; Michael, Nelson L; Excler, Jean-Louis; Kim, Jerome H; de Souza, Mark S; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2014-12-01

    Mucosal Th17 cells play an important role in maintaining gut epithelium integrity and thus prevent microbial translocation. Chronic HIV infection is characterized by mucosal Th17 cell depletion, microbial translocation and subsequent immune-activation, which remain elevated despite antiretroviral therapy (ART) correlating with increased mortality. However, when Th17 depletion occurs following HIV infection is unknown. We analyzed mucosal Th17 cells in 42 acute HIV infection (AHI) subjects (Fiebig (F) stage I-V) with a median duration of infection of 16 days and the short-term impact of early initiation of ART. Th17 cells were defined as IL-17+ CD4+ T cells and their function was assessed by the co-expression of IL-22, IL-2 and IFNγ. While intact during FI/II, depletion of mucosal Th17 cell numbers and function was observed during FIII correlating with local and systemic markers of immune-activation. ART initiated at FI/II prevented loss of Th17 cell numbers and function, while initiation at FIII restored Th17 cell numbers but not their polyfunctionality. Furthermore, early initiation of ART in FI/II fully reversed the initially observed mucosal and systemic immune-activation. In contrast, patients treated later during AHI maintained elevated mucosal and systemic CD8+ T-cell activation post initiation of ART. These data support a loss of Th17 cells at early stages of acute HIV infection, and highlight that studies of ART initiation during early AHI should be further explored to assess the underlying mechanism of mucosal Th17 function preservation.

  8. Murine model of immune-mediated rejection of the acute lymphoblastic leukemia 70Z/3.

    PubMed

    Labbe, Alain; Tran, Anne H; Paige, Christopher J

    2006-05-01

    70Z/3 is a murine pre-B cell leukemia line derived from BDF(1) mice and has been used in the study of signaling pathways in B cells. 70Z/3 cells were initially found to cause widespread disease upon injections in animals. We have isolated 70Z/3 variants divergent in their capacity to lead to morbidity after injections. One variant, 70Z/3-NL, elicits an immune response protecting the animal from tumor growth. Another variant, 70Z/3-L, does not induce an effective immune response and causes morbidity. We demonstrated that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells are required for the rejection of 70Z/3-NL cells. Interestingly, the immune response generated against 70Z/3-NL cells was found to protect against a challenge with the lethal variant, 70Z/3-L. This indicates that although both lines can be recognized and killed by the immune system, only 70Z/3-NL is capable of inducing a protective response. Further observations, using subclones isolated from 70Z/3-NL, demonstrated that immune recognition of a portion of the cells was sufficient for protection. Depletion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in animals injected previously with 70Z/3-NL cells showed that T cells, and not Abs, were required for the maintenance of the protection initiated by 70Z/3-NL. We tested the capacity of 70Z/3-NL cells to treat mice challenged with 70Z/3-L. We can delay injections of 70Z/3-NL and still provide protection for the animals. We have a model of immune-mediated rejection which will allow us to dissect the requirements for the initiation of immune responses against an ALL tumor cell line.

  9. Toxoplasma GRA7 effector increases turnover of immunity-related GTPases and contributes to acute virulence in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Alaganan, Aditi; Fentress, Sarah J.; Tang, Keliang; Wang, Qiuling; Sibley, L. David

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii enjoys a wide host range and is adept at surviving in both naive and activated macrophages. Previous studies have emphasized the importance of the active serine-threonine protein kinase rhoptry protein 18 (ROP18), which targets immunity-related GTPases (IRGs), in mediating macrophage survival and acute virulence of T. gondii in mice. Here, we demonstrate that ROP18 exists in a complex with the pseudokinases rhoptry proteins 8 and 2 (ROP8/2) and dense granule protein 7 (GRA7). Individual deletion mutant ∆gra7 or ∆rop18 was partially attenuated for virulence in mice, whereas the combined ∆gra7∆rop18 mutant was avirulent, suggesting these proteins act together in the same pathway. The virulence defect of the double mutant was mirrored by increased recruitment of IRGs and clearance of the parasite in IFN-γ–activated macrophages in vitro. GRA7 was shown to recognize a conserved feature of IRGs, binding directly to the active dimer of immunity-related GTPase a6 in a GTP-dependent manner. Binding of GRA7 to immunity-related GTPase a6 led to enhanced polymerization, rapid turnover, and eventual disassembly. Collectively, these studies suggest that ROP18 and GRA7 act in a complex to target IRGs by distinct mechanisms that are synergistic. PMID:24390541

  10. Preoperative ultraviolet B inflammation in skin: Modelling individual differences in acute postoperative pain and neuro-immune interactions.

    PubMed

    Lunn, T H; Dawes, J M; Denk, F; Bennett, D L; Husted, H; Kehlet, H; McMahon, S B

    2017-09-14

    Neuroimmune interactions play a vital role in many of the most common pain conditions, such as arthritis. There have been many attempts to derive clinically predictive information from an individual's inflammatory response in order to gauge subsequent pain perception. Here, we wanted to test whether this effort could be enhanced and complemented by the use of a model system which takes into account the function of not just circulating, but also tissue-resident immune cells: ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation of the skin. We conducted psychophysical and transcriptional analysis of hyperalgesia arising as a result of UVB-induced inflammation in patients before total knee arthroplasty (TKA, n = 23). Levels of acute postoperative pain were assessed and correlated with preoperative data. Cytokine and chemokine responses after UVB irradiation were found to be inversely correlated with the level of pain experienced after surgery (Spearman's ρ = -0.498). It may be possible to use this simple model to study and predict the nature of neuro-immune responses at more remote, clinically relevant sites. A simple model of UVB inflammation in the skin might predict the degree of a patient's neuro-immune response and the extent of their postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  11. Toxoplasma GRA7 effector increases turnover of immunity-related GTPases and contributes to acute virulence in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Alaganan, Aditi; Fentress, Sarah J; Tang, Keliang; Wang, Qiuling; Sibley, L David

    2014-01-21

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii enjoys a wide host range and is adept at surviving in both naive and activated macrophages. Previous studies have emphasized the importance of the active serine-threonine protein kinase rhoptry protein 18 (ROP18), which targets immunity-related GTPases (IRGs), in mediating macrophage survival and acute virulence of T. gondii in mice. Here, we demonstrate that ROP18 exists in a complex with the pseudokinases rhoptry proteins 8 and 2 (ROP8/2) and dense granule protein 7 (GRA7). Individual deletion mutant gra7 or rop18 was partially attenuated for virulence in mice, whereas the combined gra7rop18 mutant was avirulent, suggesting these proteins act together in the same pathway. The virulence defect of the double mutant was mirrored by increased recruitment of IRGs and clearance of the parasite in IFN-γ-activated macrophages in vitro. GRA7 was shown to recognize a conserved feature of IRGs, binding directly to the active dimer of immunity-related GTPase a6 in a GTP-dependent manner. Binding of GRA7 to immunity-related GTPase a6 led to enhanced polymerization, rapid turnover, and eventual disassembly. Collectively, these studies suggest that ROP18 and GRA7 act in a complex to target IRGs by distinct mechanisms that are synergistic.

  12. Impaired neuroendocrine and immune response to acute stress in medication-naive patients with a first episode of psychosis.

    PubMed

    van Venrooij, Janine A E M; Fluitman, Sjoerd B A H A; Lijmer, Jeroen G; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J; Westenberg, Herman G M; Kahn, René S; Gispen-de Wied, Christine C

    2012-03-01

    Little is known about how the biological stress response systems--the autonomic nervous system (ANS), the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and the immune system--function during psychosis. Results of studies on the effect of stress on the immune and autonomic system in patients with schizophrenia are inconsistent. The present study investigates whether the stress response is impaired in medication-naive patients with a first episode of psychosis. Ten male patients with a first episode of psychosis and 15 controls were exposed to the stress of public speaking. Parameters of the ANS (heart rate and catecholamines), the HPA axis (plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH] and cortisol), and the immune system (number and activity of natural killer [NK] cells) were measured. Peak responses were calculated to examine the relationship between stress-induced activation of the different systems. Subjective stress and anxiety before and during the task were assessed. Patients and controls displayed similar autonomic responses to acute stress. However, there was an impaired HPA axis response, slow onset and return of ACTH, and flattened cortisol response and a reduced increase in number NK cells and NK cell activity in patients with a first episode of psychosis. Furthermore, in patients, the relationship between the different stress response systems was weaker or absent compared with controls. These findings indicate that impairments in stress processing are associated with the endophenotype of psychosis and are not a result of illness progression or antipsychotic medication.

  13. HLA-DP genetic variation, proxies for early life immune modulation and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk

    PubMed Central

    Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Metayer, Catherine; Ma, Xiaomei; Selvin, Steve; Barcellos, Lisa F.; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Wiencke, John K.; Taylor, Malcolm; Brennan, Paul; Dahl, Gary V.; Moonsamy, Priscilla; Erlich, Henry A.; Trachtenberg, Elizabeth; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes are candidate genetic susceptibility loci for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We examined the effect of HLA-DP genetic variation on risk and evaluated its potential interaction with 4 proxies for early immune modulation, including measures of infectious exposures in infancy (presence of older siblings, daycare attendance, ear infections) and breastfeeding. A total of 585 ALL cases and 848 controls were genotyped at the HLA-DPA1 and DPB1 loci. Because of potential heterogeneity in effect by race/ethnicity, we included only non-Hispanic white (47%) and Hispanic (53%) children and considered these 2 groups separately in the analysis. Logistic regression analyses showed an increased risk of ALL associated with HLA-DPB1*01:01 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.43, 95% CI, 1.01-2.04) with no heterogeneity by Hispanic ethnicity (P = .969). Analyses of DPB1 supertypes showed a marked childhood ALL association with DP1, particularly for high-hyperdiploid ALL (OR = 1.83; 95% CI, 1.20-2.78). Evidence of interaction was found between DP1 and older sibling (P = .036), and between DP1 and breastfeeding (P = .094), with both showing statistically significant DP1 associations within the lower exposure categories only. These findings support an immune mechanism in the etiology of childhood ALL involving the HLA-DPB1 gene in the context of an insufficiently modulated immune system. PMID:22923493

  14. The Conserved Coronavirus Macrodomain Promotes Virulence and Suppresses the Innate Immune Response during Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fehr, Anthony R.; Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Jankevicius, Gytis; Fett, Craig; Zhao, Jincun; Athmer, Jeremiah; Meyerholz, David K.; Ahel, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ADP-ribosylation is a common posttranslational modification that may have antiviral properties and impact innate immunity. To regulate this activity, macrodomain proteins enzymatically remove covalently attached ADP-ribose from protein targets. All members of the Coronavirinae, a subfamily of positive-sense RNA viruses, contain a highly conserved macrodomain within nonstructural protein 3 (nsp3). However, its function or targets during infection remain unknown. We identified several macrodomain mutations that greatly reduced nsp3’s de-ADP-ribosylation activity in vitro. Next, we created recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) strains with these mutations. These mutations led to virus attenuation and a modest reduction of viral loads in infected mice, despite normal replication in cell culture. Further, macrodomain mutant virus elicited an early, enhanced interferon (IFN), interferon-stimulated gene (ISG), and proinflammatory cytokine response in mice and in a human bronchial epithelial cell line. Using a coinfection assay, we found that inclusion of mutant virus in the inoculum protected mice from an otherwise lethal SARS-CoV infection without reducing virus loads, indicating that the changes in innate immune response were physiologically significant. In conclusion, we have established a novel function for the SARS-CoV macrodomain that implicates ADP-ribose in the regulation of the innate immune response and helps to demonstrate why this domain is conserved in CoVs. PMID:27965448

  15. New perspectives on central and peripheral immune responses to acute traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the brain (TBI) results in a complex set of responses involving various symptoms and long-term consequences. TBI of any form can cause cognitive, behavioral and immunologic changes in later life, which underscores the problem of underdiagnosis of mild TBI that can cause long-term neurological deficits. TBI disrupts the blood–brain barrier (BBB) leading to infiltration of immune cells into the brain and subsequent inflammation and neurodegeneration. TBI-induced peripheral immune responses can also result in multiorgan damage. Despite worldwide research efforts, the methods of diagnosis, monitoring and treatment for TBI are still relatively ineffective. In this review, we delve into the mechanism of how TBI-induced central and peripheral immune responses affect the disease outcome and discuss recent developments in the continuing effort to combat the consequences of TBI and new ways to enhance repair of the damaged brain. PMID:23061919

  16. Cellular immune activation in children with acute dengue virus infections is modulated by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Myint, Khin S; Endy, Timothy P; Mongkolsirichaikul, Duangrat; Manomuth, Choompun; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Vaughn, David W; Nisalak, Ananda; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A; Libraty, Daniel H

    2006-09-01

    Apoptosis is an important modulator of cellular immune responses during systemic viral infections. Peripheral-blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) apoptosis and plasma soluble levels of CD95, a mediator of apoptosis, were determined in sequential samples from children participating in a prospective study of dengue virus (DV) infections. During the period of defervescence, levels of PBMC apoptosis were higher in children developing dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), the most severe form of illness, than in those with dengue fever (DF) and other, nondengue, febrile illnesses. CD8(+) T lymphocytes made up approximately half of the peak circulating apoptotic PBMCs in DHF and DF. Maximum plasma levels of soluble CD95 were also higher in children with DHF than in those with DF. The level of PBMC apoptosis correlated with dengue disease severity. Apoptosis appears to be involved in modulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses to DV infection and is likely involved in the evolution of immune responses in other viral hemorrhagic fevers.

  17. Immunomodulatory properties of gamithromycin and ketoprofen in lipopolysaccharide-challenged calves with emphasis on the acute-phase response.

    PubMed

    Plessers, Elke; Wyns, Heidi; Watteyn, Anneleen; Pardon, Bart; De Baere, Siegrid; Sys, Stanislas U; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2016-03-01

    Macrolide antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to be modulators of the innate immune response, irrespectively of their antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory actions. Therefore, it was our objective to evaluate whether the macrolide gamithromycin (GAM) and the NSAID ketoprofen (KETO) attenuate the acute-phase response in calves, and whether their combined administration is beneficial due to synergistic and/or additive effects. To this end, both drugs, as well as their combination, were studied in a previously developed inflammation model, i.e., the induction of an acute-phase response by an intravenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge (0.5 μg/kg body weight). Sixteen 4-week-old Holstein-Friesian calves were randomized into 4 groups: a positive control (+CONTR) group, receiving LPS but no pharmacological treatment (n=4) and a GAM (n=4), a KETO (n=4) and a GAM-KETO (n=4) group, receiving the respective drugs 1h prior to LPS administration. Clinical scoring and blood collection were performed at regular time points until 72 h post LPS challenge. Plasma concentrations of the selected cytokines (tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6)), acute-phase protein (serum amyloid A (SAA)) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were subsequently quantified. Pre-treatment with GAM had no effect in the inflammation model compared to the +CONTR group. KETO, on the other hand, completely inhibited depression, anorexia and fever. This remarkable influence was associated with a significant reduction of PGE2 synthesis by KETO, while the effect on TNF-α, IL-6 and SAA was not straightforward. The combined administration of GAM and KETO provided no synergistic or additive effects in this model, neither clinically nor regarding the studied inflammatory mediators. In conclusion, KETO entirely inhibited PGE2 synthesis, fever development and depression, while GAM did not exert any effect in this model. These results promote the concomitant

  18. Use of Recombinant Factor VIIa in a Pediatric Patient With Initial Presentation of Refractory Acute Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Severe Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Gurion, Reut; Siu, Anita; Weiss, Aaron R.; Masterson, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Severe bleeding in acute immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is rare but can cause significant complications to the patient. Here we report the case of a pediatric patient with acute ITP and hematuria refractory to anti-D immune globulin, high dose intravenous immunoglobulin G, and high dose steroids. Her hematuria was successfully treated with recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa). While further investigation on the use of rFVIIa in ITP is warranted, this case report contributes to the pediatric literature for its use during the course of an initial presentation of ITP with hemorrhagic complications. PMID:23258971

  19. Altered hepatic mRNA expression of immune response and apoptosis-associated genes after acute and chronic psychological stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Depke, Maren; Steil, Leif; Domanska, Grazyna; Völker, Uwe; Schütt, Christine; Kiank, Cornelia

    2009-09-01

    Using a combination of transcriptional profiling and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA, www.ingenuity.com) we investigated acute and chronic psychological stress induced alterations of hepatic gene expression of BALB/c mice. Already after a 2-h single stress session, up-regulation of several LPS and glucocorticoid-sensitive immune response genes and markers related to oxidative stress and apoptotic processes were observed. Support for the existence of oxidative stress was gained by measuring increased protein carbonylation, but no alterations of immune responsiveness or cell death were measured in mice after acute stress compared to the control group. When animals were repeatedly stressed during 4.5-days, we found reduced transcription of antigen presentation molecules, altered mRNA levels of immune cell signaling mediators and persisting high expression of apoptosis-related genes. These alterations were associated with a measurable immune suppression characterized by a reduced ability to clear experimental Salmonella typhimurium infection from the liver and a heightened hepatocyte apoptosis. Moreover, genes associated with anti-oxidative functions and regenerative processes were induced in the hepatic tissue of chronically stressed mice. These findings indicate that modulation of the immune response and of apoptosis-related genes is initiated already during a single acute stress exposure. However, immune suppression will only manifest in repeatedly stressed mice which additionally show induction of protective and liver regenerative genes to prevent further hepatocyte damage.

  20. Mathematical model reveals how regulating the three phases of T-cell response could counteract immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Tommaso; Chisholm, Rebecca H; Melensi, Matteo; Lorz, Alexander; Delitala, Marcello

    2015-10-01

    T cells are key players in immune action against the invasion of target cells expressing non-self antigens. During an immune response, antigen-specific T cells dynamically sculpt the antigenic distribution of target cells, and target cells concurrently shape the host's repertoire of antigen-specific T cells. The succession of these reciprocal selective sweeps can result in 'chase-and-escape' dynamics and lead to immune evasion. It has been proposed that immune evasion can be countered by immunotherapy strategies aimed at regulating the three phases of the immune response orchestrated by antigen-specific T cells: expansion, contraction and memory. Here, we test this hypothesis with a mathematical model that considers the immune response as a selection contest between T cells and target cells. The outcomes of our model suggest that shortening the duration of the contraction phase and stabilizing as many T cells as possible inside the long-lived memory reservoir, using dual immunotherapies based on the cytokines interleukin-7 and/or interleukin-15 in combination with molecular factors that can keep the immunomodulatory action of these interleukins under control, should be an important focus of future immunotherapy research.

  1. Mathematical model reveals how regulating the three phases of T-cell response could counteract immune evasion

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Tommaso; Chisholm, Rebecca H; Melensi, Matteo; Lorz, Alexander; Delitala, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    T cells are key players in immune action against the invasion of target cells expressing non-self antigens. During an immune response, antigen-specific T cells dynamically sculpt the antigenic distribution of target cells, and target cells concurrently shape the host’s repertoire of antigen-specific T cells. The succession of these reciprocal selective sweeps can result in ‘chase-and-escape’ dynamics and lead to immune evasion. It has been proposed that immune evasion can be countered by immunotherapy strategies aimed at regulating the three phases of the immune response orchestrated by antigen-specific T cells: expansion, contraction and memory. Here, we test this hypothesis with a mathematical model that considers the immune response as a selection contest between T cells and target cells. The outcomes of our model suggest that shortening the duration of the contraction phase and stabilizing as many T cells as possible inside the long-lived memory reservoir, using dual immunotherapies based on the cytokines interleukin-7 and/or interleukin-15 in combination with molecular factors that can keep the immunomodulatory action of these interleukins under control, should be an important focus of future immunotherapy research. PMID:26119966

  2. Immune stimulation during chemotherapy increases incidence of acute graft versus host disease in acute myeloid leukemia: A study on behalf of SFGM-TC and ALFA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lining; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Thomas, Xavier; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Bouhris, Jean-Henri; de Botton, Stéphane; Michallet, Mauricette; Quoc, Stéphanie Nguyen; Chantepie, Sylvain; Deconinck, Eric; Caillot, Denis; Turlure, Pascal; Vigouroux, Stéphane; Pigneux, Arnaud; Huynh, Anne; Malfuson, Jean-Valère; Loschi, Michael; Socie, Gerard; Dombret, Hervé; de la Tour, Régis Peffault; Cluzeau, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    60-70% of AML patients have an indication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) during their treatment. Graft versus host disease (GvHD), the major cause of mortality and comorbidities post-transplantation, develops by immunological mechanism and decides greatly prognosis and quality of life (QoL) of graft recipient. Current GvHD prophylaxis is not personalized. Infections, toxicities and leukemic infiltration complicate the first chemotherapy phases prior to allo-HSCT. They, to certain extent, induce local immune stimulation. Impact of immune stimulation of this period on incidence of GvHD has not been evaluated. We retrospectively studied 238 AML patients transplanted at first remission from 21 French centers in the ALFA-0702 protocol and found that cutaneous and digestive immune stimulation during induction increases the incidence of skin and gut aGVHD, respectively. Furthermore, prolonged febrile duration correlates with elevated incidence of grade II-IV aGvHD. Thus, we identified a group of patients with higher risk of aGvHD. The benefit of personalized GvHD prophylaxis should be explored in a prospective cohort to decrease incidence of aGvHD in these patients and improve their QoLs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Caerulin-induced pancreatitis in rats: Histological and genetic expression changes from acute phase to recuperation

    PubMed Central

    Magaña-Gómez, Javier; López-Cervantes, Guillermo; de la Barca, Ana María Calderón

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the histological and pancreatitis-associated protein mRNA accumulation changes of pancreas from acute phase of caerulin-induced pancreatitis to recuperation in rats. METHODS: Acute pancreatitis was induced by caerulein in male Wistar rats and followed up for 90 d by histological and mRNA analyses of pancreas. Pancreases were dissected at 0, 9, 24 h and 3, 5, 15, 30, 60, 90 d post-induction. Edema (E), polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) infiltration, cytoplasmic vacuolization (V), zymogen granule depletion (ZD) and acinar disorganization (AD) were microscopically evaluated. Accumulation of pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP) and L13A mRNAs were quantified by real-time PCR. RESULTS: The main histological changes appeared at 9 h post-induction for PMN infiltration and cytoplasmic V, while at 24 h and 3 d for E and ZD, respectively. All the parameters were recovered after 5 d, except for ZD which delayed more than 30 d. The main AD was observed after 15 d and values returned to normal after 30 d. Similarly to histological changes, accumulation of the PAP mRNA was increased at 9 h with the highest accumulation at 24 h and differences disappeared after 5 d. CONCLUSION: From the acute phase to recuperation of pancreatitis, regeneration and re-differentiation of pancreas occur and PAP expression is exclusively an acute response of pancreatitis. PMID:16810747

  4. Significance of Foxp3+CD4+ regulatory T cells in the peripheral blood of Uygur patients in the acute and chronic phases of pigeon breeder’s lung

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Biqing; Yang, Xiaohong; Li, Fengsen; Wu, Chao; Wang, Wenyi; Ding, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Pigeon breeder’s lung (PBL) is a type of lung inflammatory disease associated with the immune response to repeated pigeon-derived antigen exposure. The pathogenesis of PBL remains unclear. In this study, peripheral blood samples were collected from Uygur acute - and chronic-phase PBL patients and healthy subjects with pigeon contact. Foxp3+CD4+ regulatory T cell (Treg) activity in different phases of PBL was characterized by changes in Foxp3+CD4+ Treg, CD4+CD25+ T cell, and T lymphocyte subsets. Based on hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) diagnosis criteria, 32 PBL cases from January 2012 to December 2013 in the People’s Hospital of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region Respiratory Department were included. Lung high-resolution computed tomography was performed, and the cases were classified based on the HP phase into 15 acute-phase and 17 chronic-phase cases. The control group included 30 healthy subjects with Uygur pigeon contact. Blood samples were collected, and the T cell subsets were analyzed via flow cytometry. In both PBL groups, the Foxp3+CD4+ Treg and CD4+CD25+ and CD4+CD3+ T cell percentages and CD4+/CD8+ ratios were significantly lower than in the control group (p < 0.01). In the PBL groups, particularly the acute-phase group, the CD8+CD3+ T lymphocyte percentage was significantly higher than in the control group (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences in CD4+CD25+ cells between the PBL groups. In peripheral blood from the PBL groups, the CD4+/CD8+ ratio was positively correlated with the Foxp3+CD4+ Treg (r = 0.864, p < 0.05) and CD4+/CD25+ cell (r = 0.34, p < 0.05) percentages. Low Foxp3+CD4+ Treg expression or overconsumption may be a pathogenic factor in PBL. PMID:27448583

  5. Acute brief heat stress in late gestation alters neonatal calf innate immune functions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heat stress (HS), as one of the environmental stressors affecting the dairy industry, compromises the cow's milk production, immune function, and reproductive system. However, few studies have looked at how prenatal HS affects the offspring. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of ...

  6. Acute-Phase Fatigue Predicts Limitations with Activities of Daily Living 18 Months after First-Ever Stroke.

    PubMed

    Lerdal, Anners; Gay, Caryl L

    2017-03-01

    Fatigue during the acute phase following stroke has been shown to predict long-term physical health, specifically increased bodily pain and poorer self-rated general health. The aim of this analysis was to determine whether acute-phase fatigue also predicts patients' limitations in activities of daily living (ADL) 18 months after the first stroke. Patients with first-ever stroke (N = 88) were recruited upon admission at 2 hospitals in Norway. Patients were assessed within 2 weeks following admission and at 18 months using the Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living (BI), Fatigue Severity Scale, and Beck Depression Inventory II. The relationship between acute-phase fatigue and later activity limitations (BI < 20) was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression analysis controlling for relevant covariates and acute-phase ADL function. Acute-phase fatigue was associated with activity limitations at 18-month follow-up (P = .002), even when controlling for other predictors of ADL function, including age, gender, baseline work status, and acute-phase depressive symptoms and ADL function. Examining the reverse relationship, acute-phase activity limitations were unrelated to fatigue 18 months after stroke. Our study indicates that acute-phase fatigue may be an independent risk factor for activity limitations 18 months after stroke. This finding suggests that effective treatments for poststroke fatigue both in the acute phase and later in the recovery period may contribute to better stroke rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Early downregulation of acute phase proteins after doxorubicin exposition in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Panis, Carolina; Pizzatti, Luciana; Bufalo, Aedra Carla; Herrera, Ana Cristina; Victorino, Vanessa Jacob; Cecchini, Rubens; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy remains the first-choice option for adjuvant therapy in breast cancer. Here, we investigated the impact of the first chemotherapic cycle of doxorubicin on the plasmatic-proteomic profiling of women diagnosed with breast cancer (n = 87). Blood samples were obtained from the same patient before and after doxorubicin infusion (1 h, 60 mg/m(2)) and processed for label-free LC-MS proteomic screening. A total of 80 proteins were downregulated after chemotherapy. In silico analysis revealed that the main biological process enrolled was inflammation and canonical pathways involving acute phase proteins. TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12, TGF-β1, clusterin, and gelsolin were chosen as relevant for further validation. All selected targets presented reduced plasmatic levels after treatment. Our results indicate that doxorubicin downregulated acute phase proteins immediately after its infusion. Since such proteins are cancer promoting, its downregulation could support the effectiveness of doxorubicin along treatment.

  8. Levels of complement components, immunoglobulins and acute phase proteins in plasma during aging in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oyeyinka, G O; Salimonu, L S

    1999-01-01

    Plasma samples from Nigerians aged 6-95 years were examined for their content of complement components (C3, C4, factor B-Bf), immuloglobins (IgG, IgA, IgM IgD) and acute phase proteins (transferrin, albumin, C-reactive protein--CRP, alpha-2-macroglobulin). Albumin, was estimated colorimetrically and the other components by the single radial immunodiffusion techniques. No significant age-related changes in mean values of the four immunobulins and the four acute phase proteins could be demonstrated. Also, the mean values for C3 and Bf did not change significantly with age but C4 values rose significantly with increasing age (r -0.232: P < 0.01).

  9. Acrolein-Induced Dyslipidemia and Acute Phase Response Independenly of HMG-CoA Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Daniel J.; Prough, Russell A.; Juvan, Peter; Rezen, Tadeja; Rozman, Damjana; Haberzettl, Petra; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2012-01-01

    Scope Aldehydes are ubiquitous natural constituents of foods, water and beverages. Dietary intake represents the greatest source of exposure to acrolein and related aldehydes. Oral acrolein induces dyslipidemia acutely and chronically increases atherosclerosis in mice, yet the mechanisms are unknown. Because lipid synthesis and trafficking are largely under hepatic control, we examined hepatic genes in murine models of acute and chronic oral acrolein exposure. Methods and results Changes in hepatic gene expression were examined using a Steroltalk microarray. Acute acrolein feeding modified plasma and hepatic proteins and increased plasma triglycerides within 15 min. By 6h, acrolein altered hepatic gene expression including Insig1, Insig2 and Hmgcr genes and stimulated an acute phase response (APR) with up-regulation of serum amyloid A genes (Saa) and systemic hypoalbuminemia. To test if decreased HMG-CoA reductase activity could modify acrolein-induced dyslipidemia or the APR, mice were pretreated with simvastatin. Statin treatment, however, did not alter acrolein-induced dyslipidemia or hypoalbuminemia associated with an APR. Few hepatic genes were dysregulated by chronic acrolein feeding in apoE-null mice. These studies confirmed that acute acrolein exposure altered expression of hepatic genes involved with lipid synthesis and trafficking and APR, and thus, indicated a hepatic locus of acrolein-induced dyslipidemia and APR that was independent of HMG CoA-reductase. Conclusion Dietary intake of acrolein could contribute to cardiovascular disease risk by disturbing hepatic function. PMID:21812109

  10. Stable Remission and Recovery after Acute Phase Cognitive Therapy for Recurrent Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Lee Anna; Thase, Michael E.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Continuation phase cognitive therapy (C-CT) or fluoxetine (FLX) reduces relapse in adults with major depressive disorder (MDD; Jarrett, Minhajuddin, Gershenfeld, Friedman, & Thase, 2013). Among patients at higher risk for relapse, we hypothesized that continuation phase treatment reduces residual symptoms and facilitates stable remission and recovery. Method Outpatients (N=241) with recurrent MDD who responded to acute-phase CT with higher risk for relapse (i.e., had unstable remission defined by any of the last 7 acute-phase Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression [Hamilton, 1960] scores ≥7) were randomized to 8 months of C-CT, FLX, or pill placebo and followed 24 additional months. Psychiatric Status Ratings (Keller et al., 1987) of 1 or 2 (absent or minimal depressive symptoms) for 6 and 35 continuous weeks post-randomization defined stable remission and recovery, respectively. Results Actuarial estimates of stable remission (97%) and recovery (94%) by the end of follow-up were high and did not differ among groups. Observed (unadjusted) proportions of patients remitting (70%) and recovering (47%) before relapse or attrition were lower. During the continuation phase, C-CT (d = 0.21) and FLX (d = 0.25) patients had significantly lower mean depressive symptoms than controls, but C-CT and FLX patients did not differ from each other, nor did the three experimental groups differ during follow-up. Conclusion Many patients who responded to CT with higher relapse risk subsequently remitted and recovered after discontinuation of acute-phase treatment. After discontinuation, C-CT and FLX decreased levels of residual depressive symptoms, but neither significantly increased the likelihood of stable remission or recovery, beyond the moderate to high levels observed among patients who did not relapse. PMID:25045908

  11. ACUTE ETHANOL MODULATES GLUTAMATERGIC AND SEROTONERGIC PHASE SHIFTS OF THE MOUSE CIRCADIAN LOCK IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Rebecca A.; Mangrum, Charles A.; Glass, J. David

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is associated with sleep problems, which are often linked to circadian rhythm disturbances. However, there is no information on the direct effects of ethanol on the mammalian circadian clock. Acute ethanol inhibits glutamate signaling, which is the primary mechanism through which light resets the mammalian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Glutamate and light also inhibit circadian clock resetting induced by non-photic signals, including serotonin. Thus, we investigated the effects of acute ethanol on both glutamatergic and serotoninergic resetting of the SCN clock in vitro. We show that ethanol dose-dependently inhibits glutamate-induced phase shifts and enhances serotonergic phase shifts. The inhibition of glutamate-induced phase shifts is not affected by excess glutamate, glycine or D-serine, but is prevented by excess brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF is known to augment glutamate signaling in the SCN and to be necessary for glutamate/light-induced phase shifts. Thus, ethanol may inhibit glutamate-induced clock resetting at least in part by blocking BDNF enhancement of glutamate signaling. Ethanol enhancement of serotonergic phase shifts is mimicked by treatments that suppress glutamate signaling in the SCN, including antagonists of glutamate receptors, BDNF signaling and nitric oxide synthase. The combined effect of ethanol with these treatments is not additive, suggesting they act through a common pathway. Our data indicate further that the interaction between serotonin and glutamate in the SCN may occur downstream from nitric oxide synthase activation. Thus, acute ethanol disrupts normal circadian clock phase regulation, which could contribute to the physiological and psychological problems associated with alcohol abuse. PMID:18313227

  12. Stable remission and recovery after acute-phase cognitive therapy for recurrent major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Vittengl, Jeffrey R; Clark, Lee Anna; Thase, Michael E; Jarrett, Robin B

    2014-12-01

    Continuation-phase cognitive therapy (C-CT) or fluoxetine (FLX) reduces relapse in adults with major depressive disorder (MDD; Jarrett, Minhajuddin, Gershenfeld, Friedman, & Thase, 2013). Among patients at higher risk for relapse, we hypothesized that continuation-phase treatment reduces residual symptoms and facilitates stable remission and recovery. Outpatients (N = 241) with recurrent MDD who responded to acute-phase CT with higher risk for relapse (i.e., had unstable remission defined by any of the last 7 acute-phase scores ≥ 7 using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression; Hamilton, 1960) were randomized to 8 months of C-CT, FLX, or pill placebo and followed for 24 additional months. Psychiatric status ratings (Keller et al., 1987) of 1 or 2 (absent or minimal depressive symptoms) for 6 and 35 continuous weeks post-randomization defined stable remission and recovery, respectively. Actuarial estimates of stable remission (97%) and recovery (94%) by the end of follow-up were high and did not differ among groups. Observed (unadjusted) proportions of patients remitting (70%) and recovering (47%) before relapse or attrition were lower. During the continuation phase, C-CT (d = 0.21) and FLX (d = 0.25) patients had significantly lower mean depressive symptoms than did controls, but C-CT and FLX patients did not differ from each other, nor did the 3 experimental groups differ during follow-up. Many patients who responded to CT with higher relapse risk subsequently remitted and recovered after discontinuation of acute-phase treatment. After discontinuation, C-CT and FLX decreased levels of residual depressive symptoms, but neither significantly increased the likelihood of stable remission or recovery, beyond the moderate to high levels observed among patients who did not relapse.

  13. Acute phase proteins in dogs naturally infected with the Giant Kidney Worm (Dioctophyme renale).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Elizabeth M S; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Thomas, Funmilola; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Cerón, José J; Eckersall, P David

    2016-12-01

    Dioctophyme renale is a nematode parasite of dogs, usually found in the right kidney, causing severe damage to the renal parenchyma. The objective was to evaluate the acute phase response in dogs naturally infected with this Giant Kidney Worm and the possible effects of nephrectomy on circulating concentrations of select acute phase proteins (APP) such as serum amyloid A (SAA), C-reactive protein (CRP), and haptoglobin (HP). Nephrectomy was performed in infected dogs and the worms were collected for identification. Blood samples were taken 24 hours before surgery, and 4, 8, and 12 hours postoperatively on the following 10 consecutive days, and 28 days after surgery. Acute phase protein concentrations were determined at all time points. Cortisol concentrations were determined 24 hours before surgery and at recovery (28 days after surgery). One-way ANOVA and Friedman test were used for multiple comparisons; the Wilcoxon-signed rank test was used to compare variables, and Spearman's rho rank test was used to assess the correlation between the number of parasites recovered from the dogs and the APP concentration. Forty-five parasites were recovered from the 12 dogs evaluated in this study. Dogs showed significantly increased HP concentrations (P < .05) but lower CRP and SAA concentrations before surgery, and cortisol concentrations were significantly higher at admission when compared to recovery. No significant correlations were found between the number of parasites and APP concentrations. There is a particular acute phase response profile in dogs with kidney worm infection. Nephrectomy induced a short-term inflammatory process. © 2016 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  14. Renal infarct volume and renal function decline in acute and chronic phases.

    PubMed

    Kagaya, Saeko; Yoshie, Ojima; Fukami, Hirotaka; Sato, Hiroyuki; Saito, Ayako; Takeuchi, Yoichi; Matsuda, Ken; Nagasawa, Tasuku

    2017-03-10

    Acute renal infarction (ARI) is a rare disease. ARI causes decline in renal function in both the acute and chronic phases. However, the correlation between the volume of the infarction and degree of renal function decline has not been fully investigated. Therefore, we aimed to examine the relationship between the volume of the infarction and degree of renal function decline. We performed a single-center, retrospective, observational study investigating clinical parameters and the volume of the infarction. The volume of the infarction was measured using reconstructed computed tomography data. A total of 39 patients (mean age, 72.6 ± 13.2 years; men, 59%) were enrolled. The median infarction volume was 45 mL (interquartile range, 14-91 mL). The volume of the infarction was significantly associated with the peak lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level (median, 728 IU/L; interquartile range, 491-1227 U/L) (r = 0.58, p < 0.01) and the degree of renal function decline in both acute and chronic phases (r = -0.44, -0.38, respectively, p < 0.05). The peak LDH level was significantly correlated with the degree of renal function decline in the acute phase but not in the chronic phase (r = -0.35, -0.21; p < 0.05, N.S., respectively). The volume of the infarction may be a factor in the degree of renal function decline in ARI. Therefore, assessment of infarct volume in ARI is important.

  15. 'Living a life in shades of grey': experiencing depressive symptoms in the acute phase after stroke.

    PubMed

    Kouwenhoven, Siren E; Kirkevold, Marit; Engedal, Knut; Kim, Hesook S

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the lived experience of stroke survivors suffering from depressive symptoms in the acute phase; addressing the following questions: (a) what is the nature of depression as experienced by post-stroke patients in the acute phase? (b) what is it like to live with depression within the first weeks following stroke? Post-stroke depression occurs in at least one quarter of stroke survivors and is linked to poorer outcomes. This qualitative study is methodologically grounded in hermeneutic phenomenology, influenced by van Manen and Ricoeur. A descriptive, qualitative design was used applying in-depth interviews as the method of data collection with nine participants. The data collection took place in 2008. The material revealed two main themes that generate the feeling and description of 'living a life in shades of grey': (a) being trapped and (b) losing oneself. 'Shades of grey' could be understood as being confined in a new life-world and losing oneself as the person one knew. The participants confirmed suffering from depressive symptoms, but depression was not seen as meaningful on its own. They related their experiences of post-stroke depression in the acute phase to the losses they experienced. Nurses ought to take into account the depth of the life changes that stroke survivors may experience. There is a need for continued empirical research on how nurses may help and support stroke survivors dealing with depressive symptoms in the acute phase after stroke and how depressive symptoms develop over time. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. [Pathophysiology of hormonal, immune, metabolic changes in acute and chronic pancreatitis. Experimental and clinical studies].

    PubMed

    Trubitsyna, I E; Chikunova, B Z; Tkachenko, E V; Tsaregorodtseva, T M; Vinokurova, L V; Varvanina, G G

    2008-01-01

    There is literature review of the acute and chronic pancreatitis experimental models. Patogenetic necrosis mechanisms with fibrosis progress in pancreas were revealed. The stimulation of the proteolytic enzymes synthesis and secretion, that was examined in experiments were compared with clinical examinations. The patients with chronic pancreatitis were investigated in the Central Research Institute of Gastroenterology.

  17. The regulatory role of immunosuppressants on immune abnormalities in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DUAN, LIGENG; MA, YU; CHI, JUNLIN; WANG, XU; WESLEY, ALEXANDER J.; CHEN, XIAOLI

    2014-01-01

    The uncontrolled progression of the inflammatory cascade is the main cause underlying the development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in acute pancreatitis. In this study, we investigated the effects of several immunosuppressants on mitigating the systemic inflammatory reaction syndrome (SIRS) and the compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) associated with acute pancreatitis. A total of 93 male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 5 groups: group 1 was the sham group and group 2 underwent laparoscopic intrapancreatic duct injection of sodium taurocholate to induce pancreatitis. The remaining 3 groups were the same as group 2, with the addition of methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide or methotrexate treatment (metastab, CTX or MTX groups, respectively). Following establishment of the acute pancreatitis model, the serum levels of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in groups 2, 3, 4 and 5 were found to be significantly elevated. Following immunosuppressant administration, the levels of all inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines investigated in groups 3, 4 and 5 were decreased compared to those in group 2. The pancreatic amylase levels and pancreatic wet weight (PWW) were also decreased in groups 3, 4 and 5 compared to those in group 2. Therefore, immunosuppressants may reduce inflammation-related cytokine levels in acute pancreatitis and relieve disease progression. PMID:24649095

  18. Occurrence of acute lower limb injuries in artistic gymnasts in relation to event and exercise phase.

    PubMed

    Kirialanis, P; Malliou, P; Beneka, A; Giannakopoulos, K

    2003-04-01

    To record the incidence of lower limb injuries (acute and overuse syndromes) in Greek artistic gymnasts in relation to the event and exercise phase. A total of 162 gymnasts (83 male and 79 female athletes) participating in the Greek artistic gymnastic championships were observed weekly for the 1999-2000 season. Ninety three (61.6%) acute injuries and 58 (38.4%) overuse syndromes were recorded. The most common anatomical location was the ankle (69 cases, 45.7%), followed by the knee (40 cases, 26.5%). The rate of mild injuries was 26.6% (25 cases), that of moderate injuries was 44% (41 cases), and that of major injuries was 29% (27 cases). The incidence of injury to the ankle and knee was significantly higher in the floor exercise, especially during the landing phase, than in the other events. By its nature, gymnastics predisposes to acute injuries, but up to 75% are mild or moderate. Special attention should be paid to the floor exercise, especially the landing phase.

  19. Insufficient secretion of atrial natriuretic peptide at acute phase of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Maeda, K; Tsutamoto, T; Wada, A; Mabuchi, N; Hayashi, M; Hisanaga, T; Kamijo, T; Kinoshita, M

    2000-08-01

    To investigate the secretion of the plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), we evaluated the relationship between plasma levels of ANP and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) in 45 consecutive patients during the acute phase of AMI ( approximately 12 h after the attack) (group 1) and compared data with those obtained after 1 mo (group 2). In both groups 1 and 2, plasma ANP levels significantly correlated with PCWP. The slope of the linear regression line between the PCWP and ANP in group 1 was significantly lower, by about one-third, than that in group 2. In addition, we examined changes in ANP levels and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) over 180 min after AMI induced by injection of microspheres into the left coronary arteries of three dogs. The LVEDP and ANP levels 30 min after AMI were significantly higher than those before; however, despite the persistent high LVEDP during the 180 min after AMI, ANP levels decreased gradually and significantly to 63% of the peak level at 150 min. These findings suggest that the secretion of ANP during the acute phase of myocardial infarction may be insufficient relative to the chronic phase.

  20. Occurrence of acute lower limb injuries in artistic gymnasts in relation to event and exercise phase

    PubMed Central

    Kirialanis, P; Malliou, P; Beneka, A; Giannakopoulos, K

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To record the incidence of lower limb injuries (acute and overuse syndromes) in Greek artistic gymnasts in relation to the event and exercise phase. Methods: A total of 162 gymnasts (83 male and 79 female athletes) participating in the Greek artistic gymnastic championships were observed weekly for the 1999–2000 season. Results: Ninety three (61.6%) acute injuries and 58 (38.4%) overuse syndromes were recorded. The most common anatomical location was the ankle (69 cases, 45.7%), followed by the knee (40 cases, 26.5%). The rate of mild injuries was 26.6% (25 cases), that of moderate injuries was 44% (41 cases), and that of major injuries was 29% (27 cases). The incidence of injury to the ankle and knee was significantly higher in the floor exercise, especially during the landing phase, than in the other events. Conclusions: By its nature, gymnastics predisposes to acute injuries, but up to 75% are mild or moderate. Special attention should be paid to the floor exercise, especially the landing phase. PMID:12663355

  1. Manifestation of Latent Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction in the Acute Phase of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Kazuyuki; Okubo, Takeshi; Tanaka, Komei; Hosaka, Yukio; Tsuchida, Keiichi; Takahashi, Kazuyoshi; Oda, Hirotaka; Minamino, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Objective Left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction is a complication in 15-25% of patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and sometimes leads to catastrophic outcomes, such as cardiogenic shock or cardiac rupture. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been clarified. Methods and Results We experienced 22 cases of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy during 3 years, and 4 of these 22 cases were complicated with LVOT obstruction in the acute phase (mean age 79±5 years, 1 man, 21 women). The LVOT pressure gradient in the acute phase was 100±17 mmHg. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in one case and sigmoid-shaped septum without LVH in three cases. The complete resolution of the LVOT obstruction was achieved in a few days with normalization of the left ventricular wall motion following administration of beta-blockers. A dobutamine provocation test after normalization of the left ventricular wall motion reproduced the LVOT obstruction in all cases and revealed the presence of latent LVOT obstruction. Conclusion The manifestation of latent LVOT obstruction in the acute phase of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is one potential reason for the complication of LVOT obstruction with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:27904102

  2. The effect of lunar phases on the occurrence of acute cardiovascular diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertoprud, V. E.; Gurfinkel', Yu. I.; Goncharova, E. E.; Ivanov-Kholodnyi, G. S.; Kanonidi, H. D.; Mitrofanova, T. A.; Trubina, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    This paper analyzes the possible impact of lunar phases on the dynamics of acute cardiovascular diseases: acute myocardial infarctions (MIs) and acute brain strokes (BSs) at different levels of heliogeomagnetic activity. The superposed epoch analysis (SEA) has been applied with dates of the new moon and full moon used as reference days. A statistical analysis of a 14-year-long (1992 to 2005) series of everyday medical data from the Central Clinical Hospital no. 1 of Russian Railways (Moscow) and the parameters of heliogeomagnetic activity was carried out. It was found that daily occurrences of MIs and BSs vary with the phase of the moon. These variations are significant; they continue at different levels of heliogeomagnetic activity and are not related to the variations in geomagnetic activity identified by the same method. The effect of lunar phases on MIs and BSs is quite different. New moons and full moons have qualitatively the same effect on MIs; however, there are significant differences in the incidence of BSs during new moons and full moons.

  3. Acute-phase inflammatory response in idiopathic sudden deafness: pathogenic implications.

    PubMed

    López-González, Miguel A; Abrante, Antonio; López-Lorente, Carmen; Gómez, Antonio; Domínguez, Emilio; Esteban, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The acute-phase inflammatory response in the peripheral bloodstream can be an expression of transient cerebral ischaemia in idiopathic sudden deafness. For this, a neurological and otorhinolaryngological examination of each patient, performing tests on audiometry, and tympanometry, haemogram, and cranial magnetic resonance were performed. The acute-phase inflammatory response manifests as an increased neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio that is detected 48-72 hours after the appearance of sudden deafness. This study shows that there is an acute-phase response in the peripheral bloodstream with an increased neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio as an expression of an inflammatory process that can be caused by transient cerebral ischaemia in sudden deafness. In addition, the increased neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio can rule out a viral origin of sudden deafness, since a viral infection lowers the neutrophil count and increases the lymphocyte count, thus reducing the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio. These findings aid in understanding the pathogenic mechanisms involved in sudden deafness and offer better treatment to the patient.

  4. Acute-Phase Inflammatory Response in Idiopathic Sudden Deafness: Pathogenic Implications

    PubMed Central

    López-González, Miguel A.; Abrante, Antonio; López-Lorente, Carmen; Gómez, Antonio; Domínguez, Emilio; Esteban, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The acute-phase inflammatory response in the peripheral bloodstream can be an expression of transient cerebral ischaemia in idiopathic sudden deafness. For this, a neurological and otorhinolaryngological examination of each patient, performing tests on audiometry, and tympanometry, haemogram, and cranial magnetic resonance were performed. The acute-phase inflammatory response manifests as an increased neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio that is detected 48–72 hours after the appearance of sudden deafness. This study shows that there is an acute-phase response in the peripheral bloodstream with an increased neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio as an expression of an inflammatory process that can be caused by transient cerebral ischaemia in sudden deafness. In addition, the increased neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio can rule out a viral origin of sudden deafness, since a viral infection lowers the neutrophil count and increases the lymphocyte count, thus reducing the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio. These findings aid in understanding the pathogenic mechanisms involved in sudden deafness and offer better treatment to the patient. PMID:23258981

  5. The Kynurenine Pathway in the Acute and Chronic Phases of Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Cuartero, María Isabel; de la Parra, Juan; García-Culebras, Alicia; Ballesteros, Iván; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Moro, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenines are a wide range of catabolites which derive from tryptophan through the “Kynurenine Pathway” (KP). In addition to its peripheral role, increasing evidence shows a role of the KP in the central nervous system (CNS), mediating both physiological and pathological functions. Indeed, an imbalance in this route has been associated with several neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases. Altered KP catabolism has also been described during both acute and chronic phases of stroke; however the contribution of the KP to the pathophysiology of acute ischemic damage and of post-stroke disorders during the chronic phase including depression and vascular dementia, and the exact mechanisms implicated in the regulation of the KP after stroke are not well established yet. A better understanding of the regulation and activity of the KP after stroke could provide new pharmacological tools in both acute and chronic phases of stroke. In this review, we will make an overview of CNS modulation by the KP. We will detail the KP contribution in the ischemic damage, how the unbalance of the KP might trigger an alteration of the cognitive function after stroke as well as potential targets for the development of new drugs. PMID:25248805

  6. Presence of an acute phase response in sheep with clinical classical scrapie

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Work with experimental scrapie in sheep has been performed on-site for many years including studies on PrPSc dissemination and histopathology of organs and tissues both at preclinical and clinical stages. In this work serum was sampled at regular intervals from lambs which were infected immediately after birth and from parallel healthy controls, and examined for acute phase proteins. In contrast to earlier experiments, which extensively studied PrPSc dissemination and histopathology in peripheral tissues and brain, this experiment is focusing on examination of serum for non-PrPSc markers that discriminates the two groups, and give insight into other on-going processes detectable in serum samples. Results There was clear evidence of an acute phase response in sheep with clinical scrapie, both experimental and natural. All the three proteins, ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin and serum amyloid A, were increased at the clinical stage of scrapie. Conclusion There was evidence of a systemic measurable acute phase response at the clinical terminal end-stage of classical scrapie. PMID:22805457

  7. A phase 3 randomized trial comparing inolimomab vs usual care in steroid-resistant acute GVHD.

    PubMed

    Socié, Gérard; Vigouroux, Stéphane; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Fürst, Sabine; Bilger, Karin; Suarez, Felipe; Michallet, Mauricette; Bron, Dominique; Gard, Philippe; Medeghri, Zakaria; Lehert, Philippe; Lai, Chinglin; Corn, Tim; Vernant, Jean-Paul

    2017-02-02

    Treatment of steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains an unmet clinical need. Inolimomab, a monoclonal antibody to CD25, has shown encouraging results in phase 2 trials. This phase 3 randomized, open-label, multicenter trial compared inolimomab vs usual care in adult patients with steroid-refractory acute GVHD. Patients were randomly selected to receive treatment with inolimomab or usual care (the control group was treated with antithymocyte globulin [ATG]). The primary objective was to evaluate overall survival at 1 year without changing baseline allocated therapy. A total of 100 patients were randomly placed: 49 patients in the inolimomab arm and 51 patients in the ATG arm. The primary criteria were reached by 14 patients (28.5%) in the inolimomab and 11 patients (21.5%) in the ATG arms, with a hazard ratio of 0.874 (P = .28). With a minimum follow-up of 1 year, 26 (53%) and 31 (60%) patients died in the inolimomab and ATG arms, respectively. Adverse events were similar in the 2 arms, with fewer viral infections in the inolimomab arm compared with the ATG arm. The primary end point of this randomized phase 3 trial was not achieved. The lack of a statistically significant effect confirms the need for development of more effective treatments for acute GVHD. This trial is registered to https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/search as EUDRACT 2007-005009-24.

  8. Manifestation of Latent Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction in the Acute Phase of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Kazuyuki; Okubo, Takeshi; Tanaka, Komei; Hosaka, Yukio; Tsuchida, Keiichi; Takahashi, Kazuyoshi; Oda, Hirotaka; Minamino, Tohru

    Objective Left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction is a complication in 15-25% of patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and sometimes leads to catastrophic outcomes, such as cardiogenic shock or cardiac rupture. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been clarified. Methods and Results We experienced 22 cases of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy during 3 years, and 4 of these 22 cases were complicated with LVOT obstruction in the acute phase (mean age 79±5 years, 1 man, 21 women). The LVOT pressure gradient in the acute phase was 100±17 mmHg. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in one case and sigmoid-shaped septum without LVH in three cases. The complete resolution of the LVOT obstruction was achieved in a few days with normalization of the left ventricular wall motion following administration of beta-blockers. A dobutamine provocation test after normalization of the left ventricular wall motion reproduced the LVOT obstruction in all cases and revealed the presence of latent LVOT obstruction. Conclusion The manifestation of latent LVOT obstruction in the acute phase of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is one potential reason for the complication of LVOT obstruction with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  9. Serial profile of vitamins and trace elements during the acute phase of allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nannya, Yasuhito; Shinohara, Akihito; Ichikawa, Motoshi; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2014-03-01

    Currently, we utilize vitamins and trace elements formulations that are not prepared specifically for patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and adequacy of this strategy has not been evaluated. We prospectively measured blood level of vitamins and trace elements in 15 patients once per week at 6 time points around the acute phase of allogeneic HSCT. We provided standard nutrition support, including administration of parenteral nutrition with vitamin and trace elements formulation in case of impairment of oral intake. Most patients had vitamin B1 deficiency from the start of preparative regimens. Vitamin C deficiency was prominent throughout the acute phase of HSCT and this was significantly associated with high inflammatory markers, C-reactive protein and ferritin. Remarkable vitamin K overload associated with administration of parenteral supplementation and ferritin overload caused by repeated transfusions was observed. Moderate deficiency of zinc was at least partially linked to gastrointestinal loss by diarrhea. We revealed several features of vitamin and trace element status in the acute phase of HSCT and provided a basis for attempts to improve the nutritional condition in HSCT recipients.

  10. Placental thrombosis in acute phase abortions during experimental Toxoplasma gondii infection in sheep

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    After oral administration of ewes during mid gestation with 2000 freshly prepared sporulated oocysts of T. gondii isolate M4, abortions occurred between days 7 and 11 in 91.6% of pregnant and infected ewes. Afterwards, a further infection was carried out at late gestation in another group of sheep with 500 sporulated oocysts. Abortions happened again between days 9 and 11 post infection (pi) in 58.3% of the infected ewes. Classically, abortions in natural and experimental ovine toxoplasmosis usually occur one month after infection. Few experimental studies have reported the so-called acute phase abortions as early as 7 to 14 days after oral inoculation of oocysts, and pyrexia was proposed to be responsible for abortion, although the underline mechanism was not elucidated. In the present study, all placentas analysed from ewes suffering acute phase abortions showed infarcts and thrombosis in the caruncullar villi of the placentomes and ischemic lesions (periventricular leukomalacia) in the brain of some foetuses. The parasite was identified by PCR in samples from some placentomes of only one sheep, and no antigen was detected by immunohistochemical labelling. These findings suggest that the vascular lesions found in the placenta, and the consequent hypoxic damage to the foetus, could be associated to the occurrence of acute phase abortions. Although the pathogenesis of these lesions remains to be determined, the infectious dose or virulence of the isolate may play a role in their development. PMID:24475786

  11. Immune memory-boosting dose of rapamycin impairs macrophage vesicle acidification and curtails glycolysis in effector CD8 cells, impairing defense against acute infections.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Emily L; Smithey, Megan J; Lutes, Lydia K; Uhrlaub, Jennifer L; Nikolich-Žugich, Janko

    2014-07-15

    Direct mammalian target of rapamycin (Rapa) complex 1 inhibition by short-term low-dose Rapa treatment has recently been shown to improve CD8 T cell immunological memory. Whereas these studies focused on memory development, the impact of low-dose Rapa on the primary immune response, particularly as it relates to functional effector immunity, is far less clear. In this study, we investigated the impact of acute Rapa treatment on immune effector cell function during the primary immune response to several acute infections. We found that functional CD8 T cell and macrophage responses to both viral and intracellular bacterial pathogens were depressed in mice in vivo and in humans to phorbol ester and calcium ionophore stimulation in vitro in the face of low-dose Rapa treatment. Mechanistically, the CD8 defect was linked to impaired glycolytic switch in stimulated naive cells and the reduced formation of short-lived effector cells. Therefore, more than one cell type required for a protective effector immune response is impaired by Rapa in both mice and humans, at the dose shown to improve immune memory and extend lifespan. This urges caution with regard to the relative therapeutic costs and benefits of Rapa treatment as means to improve immune memory. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Diminished neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is a novel innate immune deficiency induced by acute ethanol exposure in polymicrobial sepsis, which can be rescued by CXCL1.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liliang; Batra, Sanjay; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2017-09-18

    Polymicrobial sepsis is the result of an exaggerated host immune response to bacterial pathogens. Animal models and human studies demonstrate that acute alcohol intoxication is a key risk factor for sepsis-induced mortality. Multiple chemokines, such as CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL5 are critical for neutrophil recruitment and proper function of neutrophils. However, it is not quite clear the mechanisms by which acute alcohol suppresses immune responses and whether alcohol-induced immunosuppression can be rescued by chemokines. Thus, we assessed whether acute ethanol challenge via gavage diminishes antibacterial host defense in a sepsis model using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and whether this immunosuppression can be rescued by exogenous CXCL1. We found acute alcohol intoxication augments mortality and enhances bacterial growth in mice following CLP. Ethanol exposure impairs critical antibacterial functions of mouse and human neutrophils including reactive oxygen species production, neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, and NET-mediated killing in response to both Gram-negative (E. coli) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) pathogens. As compared with WT (C57Bl/6) mice, CXCL1 knockout mice display early mortality following acute alcohol exposure followed by CLP. Recombinant CXCL1 (rCXCL1) in acute alcohol challenged CLP mice increases survival, enhances bacterial clearance, improves neutrophil recruitment, and enhances NET formation (NETosis). Recombinant CXCL1 (rCXCL1) administration also augments bacterial killing by alcohol-treated and E. coli- and S. aureus-infected neutrophils. Taken together, our data unveils novel mechanisms underlying acute alcohol-induced dysregulation of the immune responses in polymicrobial sepsis, and CXCL1 is a critical mediator to rescue alcohol-induced immune dysregulation in polymicrobial sepsis.

  13. Fractal analysis of lung alveoli during the acute phase vs. repair phase of an adenoviral infection in canines.

    PubMed

    Tinajero, J P; Robledo, R F; Lantz, R C; Sobonya, R E; Quan, S F; Lemen, R J; Tollinger, B J; Witten, M L

    1997-03-01

    Acute viral respiratory infections are commonly associated with alterations in lung growth. Recently, fractal techniques have been demonstrated to show changes in alveolar perimeter after canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV2) infection in a beagle puppy model. In the present study, we investigated whether the fractal dimension (Df) of the alveolar perimeter was changed in the acute phase (2-3 weeks after inoculation, 131d CAV2 group) or during the recovery phase (approximately 22 weeks after inoculation, 235d CAV2 group) after a single bout of CAV2. There were sham CAV2 groups, 130d and 238d controls, corresponding to the CAV2 groups. The Df of alveolar perimeter length was significantly increased in the 235d CAV2 puppies compared to all of the other beagle puppy groups. On the other hand, the fractal dimensions for alveolar perimeter length for the other beagle puppy groups were very similar. In a related human study of patients (age range of 25 h to 19 y, N = 11), who died of non-respiratory causes, showed no consistent change in Df of alveolar perimeter length with normal lung growth and development. We conclude that fractal analysis of alveolar perimeter length can be used as an index of permanent lung injury after insult to the growing lungs.

  14. Pre-transplant immune state defined by serum markers and alloreactivity predicts acute rejection after living donor kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vondran, Florian W R; Timrott, Kai; Kollrich, Sonja; Steinhoff, Ann-Kristin; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Schrem, Harald; Klempnauer, Juergen; Lehner, Frank; Schwinzer, Reinhard

    2014-09-01

    Acute rejection (AR) remains a major cause for long-term kidney allograft failure. Reliable immunological parameters suitable to define the pre-transplant immune state and hence the individual risk of graft rejection are highly desired to preferably adapt the immunosuppressive regimen in advance. Donor and third party alloreactivities were determined by mixed lymphocyte cultures. Soluble forms of CD25, CD30, and CD44 were detected in patients' serum by ELISA. Various lymphocyte subpopulations were measured using flow cytometry. All patients received triple immunosuppression (tacrolimus/mycophenolate mofetil/steroids) and were grouped according to biopsy results within the first year: rejection-free (RF, n = 13), borderline (BL, n = 5), or acute rejection (AR, n = 7). Patients with AR showed the highest pre-transplant alloreactivities and serum levels (sCD25/sCD30/sCD44) according to the pattern RF < BL < AR. Relying on serum analysis only, multivariate logistic regression (logit link function) yielded a prognostic score for prediction of rejection with 75.0% sensitivity and 69.2% specificity. Patients with rejection showed markedly higher pre-transplant frequencies of CD4(+) /CD8(+) T cells lacking CD28, but lower numbers of CD8(+) CD161(bright) T cells and NK cells than RF individuals. Pre-transplant immune state defined by alloreactivity, serum markers, and particular lymphocyte subsets seems to correlate with occurrence of graft rejection after kidney transplantation. A prognostic score based on pre-transplant serum levels has shown great potential for prediction of rejection episodes and should be further evaluated. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Acute canine distemper encephalitis is associated with rapid neuronal loss and local immune activation.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Penny A; Bastien-Hamel, Louis-Etienne; von Messling, Veronika

    2010-04-01

    For most virus infections of the central nervous system (CNS), immune-mediated damage, the route of inoculation and death of infected cells all contribute to the pathology observed. To investigate the role of these factors in early canine distemper neuropathogenesis, we infected ferrets either intranasally or intraperitoneally with the neurovirulent canine distemper virus strain Snyder Hill. Regardless of the route of inoculation, the virus primarily targeted the olfactory bulb, brainstem, hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas only occasional foci were detected in the cortex. The infection led to widespread neuronal loss, which correlated with the clinical signs observed. Increased numbers of activated microglia, reactive gliosis and different pro-inflammatory cytokines were detected in the infected areas, suggesting that the presence and ultimate death of infected cells at early times after infection trigger strong local immune activation, despite the observed systemic immunosuppression.

  16. Increase in Th17 and T-reg lymphocytes and decrease of IL22 correlate with the recovery phase of acute EAE in rat.

    PubMed

    Almolda, Beatriz; Costa, Manuela; Montoya, Maria; González, Berta; Castellano, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a well-established model of multiple sclerosis, is characterised by microglial activation and lymphocyte infiltration. Induction of EAE in Lewis rats produces an acute monophasic disease characterised by a single peak of disability followed by a spontaneous and complete recovery and a subsequent tolerance to further immunizations. In the current study we have performed a detailed analysis of the dynamics of different lymphocyte populations and cytokine profile along the induction, peak, recovery and post-recovery phases in this paradigm. MBP-injected rats were sacrificed attending exclusively to their clinical score, and the different populations of T-lymphocytes as well as the dynamics of different pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were analysed in the spinal cord by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Our results revealed that, during the induction and peak phases, in parallel to an increase in symptomatology, the number of CD3+ and CD4+ cells increased progressively, showing a Th1 phenotype, but unexpectedly during recovery, although clinical signs progressively decreased, the number and proportion of CD3+ and CD4+ populations remained unaltered. Interestingly, during this recovery phase, we observed a marked decrease of Th1 and an important increase in Th17 and T-reg cells. Moreover, our results indicate a specific cytokine expression profile along the EAE course characterized by no changes of IL10 and IL17 levels, decrease of IL21 on the peak, and high IL22 levels during the induction and peak phases that markedly decrease during recovery. In summary, these results revealed the existence of a specific pattern of lymphocyte infiltration and cytokine secretion along the different phases of the acute EAE model in Lewis rat that differs from those already described in chronic or relapsing-remitting mouse models, where Th17-cells were found mostly during the peak, suggesting a specific role of these

  17. Increase in Th17 and T-reg Lymphocytes and Decrease of IL22 Correlate with the Recovery Phase of Acute EAE IN Rat

    PubMed Central

    Almolda, Beatriz; Costa, Manuela; Montoya, Maria; González, Berta; Castellano, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a well-established model of multiple sclerosis, is characterised by microglial activation and lymphocyte infiltration. Induction of EAE in Lewis rats produces an acute monophasic disease characterised by a single peak of disability followed by a spontaneous and complete recovery and a subsequent tolerance to further immunizations. In the current study we have performed a detailed analysis of the dynamics of different lymphocyte populations and cytokine profile along the induction, peak, recovery and post-recovery phases in this paradigm. MBP-injected rats were sacrificed attending exclusively to their clinical score, and the different populations of T-lymphocytes as well as the dynamics of different pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were analysed in the spinal cord by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Our results revealed that, during the induction and peak phases, in parallel to an increase in symptomatology, the number of CD3+ and CD4+ cells increased progressively, showing a Th1 phenotype, but unexpectedly during recovery, although clinical signs progressively decreased, the number and proportion of CD3+ and CD4+ populations remained unaltered. Interestingly, during this recovery phase, we observed a marked decrease of Th1 and an important increase in Th17 and T-reg cells. Moreover, our results indicate a specific cytokine expression profile along the EAE course characterized by no changes of IL10 and IL17 levels, decrease of IL21 on the peak, and high IL22 levels during the induction and peak phases that markedly decrease during recovery. In summary, these results revealed the existence of a specific pattern of lymphocyte infiltration and cytokine secretion along the different phases of the acute EAE model in Lewis rat that differs from those already described in chronic or relapsing-remitting mouse models, where Th17-cells were found mostly during the peak, suggesting a specific role of these

  18. Immune modulation by cadmium and lead in the acute reporter antigen-popliteal lymph node assay.

    PubMed

    Carey, John B; Allshire, Ashley; van Pelt, Frank N

    2006-05-01

    Immune modulation by heavy metals may cause serious adverse health effects in humans, although the mechanisms involved are not well understood. Both cadmium and lead are important environmental and occupational toxins. Therefore, in the current study, the costimulatory/adjuvant effects and the T-cell-activating potential of these metals (i.e., CdCl2 and PbCl2), are examined. These immune-modulating properties are critical in the development of conditions such as allergy, hypersensitivity, and autoimmunity. Using the direct popliteal lymph node assay (PLNA) and reporter antigen-popliteal lymph node assay (RA-PLNA) both metals were examined individually for immunotoxicity. Mercury (i.e., HgCl2) was included for comparative purposes as its effects in the RA-PLNA are well documented. Seven days following a single footpad injection containing metal and/or RA (trinitrophenyl-ovalbumin [TNP-OVA] or TNP-Ficoll), BALB/c mice were sacrificed and the popliteal lymph nodes (PLNs) removed. PLN cellularity, TNP-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASCs), and lymphocyte subsets were assessed. All three metals strongly stimulated T- and B-cell proliferation and ASC production following coinjection with the RA TNP-OVA. In each case, ASC production was skewed towards the IgG1 isotype. In addition, all three metals induced IgG production to TNP-Ficoll (although relatively weakly in the case of Cd). These results show that each of these metals can provide adjuvant signals to promote lymphocyte proliferation and enhance adaptive immune responses to unrelated antigens. Skewing of immune responses towards T helper type 2 responses suggests that each of these metals can enhance allergic and hypersensitivity reactions to environmental antigens. Furthermore, the induction of IgG responses to TNP-Ficoll, a T-cell-independent antigen, indicates that each of these metals can activate neoantigen-specific T cells. T-cell activation by metals can lead to metal hypersensitivity and has been

  19. Early evaluation of immune reconstitution following allogeneic CD3/CD19-depleted grafts from alternative donors in childhood acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martínez, A; González-Vicent, M; Valentín, J; Aleo, E; Lassaletta, A; Sevilla, J; Vicario, J L; Ramírez, M; Díaz, M A

    2012-11-01

    Graft engineering procedures for hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) may improve the chance of success in matched unrelated donor (MUD) and haploidentical donor transplantations. Successful donor immune reconstitution is important to mediate GVL effects in reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) HSCT. We prospectively investigated early immune reconstitution and clinical outcome in 30 CD3/CD19-depleted MUD (n=15) or HP (n=15) HSCTs for high-risk childhood leukemia using a fludarabine-based RIC without serotherapy. The graft consisted of a mean of 10.5 × 10(6)/kg CD34+, 77 × 10(3)/kg CD3+ and 39 × 10(6)/kg CD56+ cells. After transplantation, 86% of the patients engrafted. In all, 13% of patients had >grade 3 acute GVHD. Natural killer (NK) cell, DC and T-cell recovery achieved normal values within the first 60 days after transplantation. DC recovery was dominated by the DC2(-) subset. NK-cell phenotype was altered and cytotoxicity was lower compared with their donors. EFS was 50±9% (73±11% for those in CR1 and 26±11% for those with advanced disease). Faster DC2(-) recovery was associated with better outcome, especially in the MUD setting. In summary, CD3/CD19-depleted HSCT with fludarabine-based RIC without serotherapy resulted in favorable patient survival, and rapid NK, DC and T-cell recovery.

  20. Prevention of non-immune mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury; from blood bank to patient.

    PubMed

    van Bruggen, Robin; de Korte, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a severe form of pulmonary insufficiency induced by transfusion. TRALI is the leading cause of transfusion-related death, and is caused by the infusion of either anti-leukocyte antibodies in plasma containing blood products or neutrophil priming substances that accumulate during storage of cellular blood products. Among these neutrophil priming substances are bioactive lipids, such as lyso-phosphatidylcholines (lysoPCs) and arachidonic acid, soluble CD40L (sCD40L) and possibly other, as yet unidentified substances. The accumulation of these substances during cellular blood product storage and their role in the induction of "non-immune mediated" TRALI pathogenesis are highly relevant for the current debate of the use of longer vs. shorter stored blood products. In this review, the accumulation of these different substances during storage, as well as their mode of action in inducing TRALI are discussed. In addition, different improvements in current blood banking procedures to prevent TRALI due to these non-immune mediators will be proposed.

  1. Structural Insights into Immune Recognition of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus S Protein Receptor Binding Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, J.; Sharon, C; Satkunarajah, M; Thierry, C; Cameron, C; Kelvin, D; Seetharaman, J; Cochrane, A; Plummer, F; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    The spike (S) protein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is responsible for host cell attachment and fusion of the viral and host cell membranes. Within S the receptor binding domain (RBD) mediates the interaction with angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the SARS-CoV host cell receptor. Both S and the RBD are highly immunogenic and both have been found to elicit neutralizing antibodies. Reported here is the X-ray crystal structure of the RBD in complex with the Fab of a neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibody, F26G19, elicited by immunization with chemically inactivated SARS-CoV. The RBD-F26G19 Fab complex represents the first example of the structural characterization of an antibody elicited by an immune response to SARS-CoV or any fragment of it. The structure reveals that the RBD surface recognized by F26G19 overlaps significantly with the surface recognized by ACE2 and, as such, suggests that F26G19 likely neutralizes SARS-CoV by blocking the virus-host cell interaction.

  2. Vaccines with interleukin-12-transduced acute myeloid leukemia cells elicit very potent therapeutic and long-lasting protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Dunussi-Joannopoulos, K; Runyon, K; Erickson, J; Schaub, R G; Hawley, R G; Leonard, J P

    1999-12-15

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a heterodimeric cytokine mediating a dynamic interplay between T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Preclinical studies have demonstrated that recombinant murine IL-12 (rmIL-12) promotes specific antitumor immunity mediated by T cells in several types of tumors. However, the in vivo antitumor properties of IL-12 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have not been previously reported. We show here in a murine AML model that systemic administration of rmIL-12 significantly delays tumor growth but is incapable of rescuing mice from lethal leukemia. In contrast, AML cells genetically modified to express IL-12 (IL12-AML) using murine stem cell virus (MSCV) p40 + p35 elicit very potent antileukemic activity. Vaccines with lethally irradiated IL12-AML cells protect naive mice against challenge with wild-type AML cells and, more importantly, can cure mice bearing a considerable leukemic burden. Immunized mice show no signs of systemic IL-12 toxicity and their spleen histology is comparable with naive mice spleen. In vivo depletion of IL-12, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), or CD8(+) T cells after injections with live IL12-AML cells abrogates completely the antileukemia immune responses. Studies on the in vitro effects of IFN-gamma on AML cells demonstrate enhanced expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and accessory molecules and induction of the costimulatory molecules B7.1 and B7.2, but no significant direct antiproliferative effect. (51)Cr release assays show that rejection of live IL12-AML cells supports the development of long-lasting leukemia-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that IL12-AML vaccination is a safe and potent immunotherapeutic approach that has a great potential to eliminate minimal residual disease in patients with AML.

  3. Silencing Bruton's tyrosine kinase in alveolar neutrophils protects mice from LPS/immune complex-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Krupa, Agnieszka; Fol, Marek; Rahman, Moshiur; Stokes, Karen Y; Florence, Jon M; Leskov, Igor L; Khoretonenko, Mikhail V; Matthay, Michael A; Liu, Kathleen D; Calfee, Carolyn S; Tvinnereim, Amy; Rosenfield, Gabriel R; Kurdowska, Anna K

    2014-09-15

    Previous observations made by our laboratory indicate that Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) may play an important role in the pathophysiology of local inflammation in acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We have shown that there is cross talk between FcγRIIa and TLR4 in alveolar neutrophils from patients with ALI/ARDS and that Btk mediates the molecular cooperation between these two receptors. To study the function of Btk in vivo we have developed a unique two-hit model of ALI: LPS/immune complex (IC)-induced ALI. Furthermore, we conjugated F(ab)2 fragments of anti-neutrophil antibodies (Ly6G1A8) with specific siRNA for Btk to silence Btk specifically in alveolar neutrophils. It should be stressed that we are the first group to perform noninvasive transfections of neutrophils, both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, our present findings indicate that silencing Btk in alveolar neutrophils has a dramatic protective effect in mice with LPS/IC-induced ALI, and that Btk regulates neutrophil survival and clearance of apoptotic neutrophils in this model. In conclusion, we put forward a hypothesis that Btk-targeted neutrophil specific therapy is a valid goal of research geared toward restoring homeostasis in lungs of patients with ALI/ARDS. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Silencing Bruton's tyrosine kinase in alveolar neutrophils protects mice from LPS/immune complex-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, Agnieszka; Fol, Marek; Rahman, Moshiur; Stokes, Karen Y.; Florence, Jon M.; Leskov, Igor L.; Khoretonenko, Mikhail V.; Matthay, Michael A.; Liu, Kathleen D.; Calfee, Carolyn S.; Tvinnereim, Amy; Rosenfield, Gabriel R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous observations made by our laboratory indicate that Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) may play an important role in the pathophysiology of local inflammation in acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We have shown that there is cross talk between FcγRIIa and TLR4 in alveolar neutrophils from patients with ALI/ARDS and that Btk mediates the molecular cooperation between these two receptors. To study the function of Btk in vivo we have developed a unique two-hit model of ALI: LPS/immune complex (IC)-induced ALI. Furthermore, we conjugated F(ab)2 fragments of anti-neutrophil antibodies (Ly6G1A8) with specific siRNA for Btk to silence Btk specifically in alveolar neutrophils. It should be stressed that we are the first group to perform noninvasive transfections of neutrophils, both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, our present findings indicate that silencing Btk in alveolar neutrophils has a dramatic protective effect in mice with LPS/IC-induced ALI, and that Btk regulates neutrophil survival and clearance of apoptotic neutrophils in this model. In conclusion, we put forward a hypothesis that Btk-targeted neutrophil specific therapy is a valid goal of research geared toward restoring homeostasis in lungs of patients with ALI/ARDS. PMID:25085625

  5. Neuroinflammation and disruption in working memory in aged mice after acute stimulation of the peripheral innate immune system

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Buchanan, Jessica B.; Sparkman, Nathan L.; Godbout, Jonathan P.; Freund, Gregory G.; Johnson, Rodney W.

    2008-01-01

    Acute cognitive disorders are common in elderly patients with peripheral infections but it is not clear why. Here we injected old and young mice with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mimic an acute peripheral infection and separated the hippocampal neuronal cell layers from the surrounding hippocampal tissue by laser capture microdissection and measured mRNA for several inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα) that are known to disrupt cognition. The results showed that old mice had an increased inflammatory response in the hippocampus after LPS compared to younger cohorts. Immunohistochemistry further showed more microglial cells in the hippocampus of old mice compared to young adults, and that more IL-1β-positive cells were present in the dentate gyrus and in the CA1, CA2 and CA3 regions of LPS-treated old mice compared to young adults. In a test of cognition that required animals to effectively integrate new information with a preexisting schema to complete a spatial task, we found that hippocampal processing is more easily disrupted in old animals than in younger ones when the peripheral innate immune system is stimulated. Collectively, the results suggest that aging can facilitate neurobehavioral complications associated with peripheral infections probably by allowing the over expression of inflammatory cytokines in brain areas that mediate cognitive processing. PMID:17951027

  6. Interaction of menstrual cycle phase and sexual activity predicts mucosal and systemic humoral immunity in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Tierney K; Demas, Gregory E; Heiman, Julia R

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have documented shifts in humoral immune parameters (e.g., immunoglobulins) across the menstrual cycle in healthy women. It is thought that these shifts may reflect dynamic balancing between reproduction and pathogen defense, as certain aspects of humoral immunity may disrupt conception and may be temporarily downregulated at ovulation. If so, one could expect maximal cycle-related shifts of humoral immunity in individuals invested in reproduction - that is, women who are currently sexually active - and less pronounced shifts in women who are not reproductively active (i.e., abstinent). We investigated the interaction of sexual activity, menstrual cycle phase, and humoral immunity in a sample of 32 healthy premenopausal women (15 sexually active, 17 abstinent). Participants provided saliva samples during their menses, follicular phase, ovulation (as indicated by urine test for LH surge), and luteal phase, from which IgA was assayed. Participants also provided blood samples at menses and ovulation, from which IgG was assayed. Sexually active participants provided records of their frequency of sexual activity as well as condom use. At ovulation, sexually active women had higher IgG than abstinent women (d=0.77), with women reporting regular condom use showing larger effects (d=0.63) than women reporting no condom use (d=0.11). Frequency of sexual activity predicted changes in IgA (Cohen's f(2)=0.25), with women reporting high frequency of sexual activity showing a decrease in IgA at ovulation, while women reporting low frequency or no sexual activity showing an increase in IgA at ovulation. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that shifts in humoral immunity across the menstrual cycle are associated with reproductive effort, and could contribute to the mechanisms by which women's physiology navigates tradeoffs between reproduction and immunity.

  7. Interaction of menstrual cycle phase and sexual activity predicts mucosal and systemic humoral immunity in healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Tierney K.; Demas, Gregory E.; Heiman, Julia R.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have documented shifts in humoral immune parameters (e.g., immunoglobulins) across the menstrual cycle in healthy women. It is thought that these shifts may reflect dynamic balancing between reproduction and pathogen defense, as certain aspects of humoral immunity may disrupt conception and may be temporarily downregulated at ovulation. If so, one could expect maximal cycle-related shifts of humoral immunity in individuals invested in reproduction – that is, women who are currently sexually active – and less pronounced shifts in women who are not reproductively active (i.e., abstinent). We investigated the interaction of sexual activity, menstrual cycle phase, and humoral immunity in a sample of 32 healthy premenopausal women (15 sexually active, 17 abstinent). Participants provided saliva samples during their menses, follicular phase, ovulation (as indicated by urine test for LH surge), and luteal phase, from which IgA was assayed. Participants also provided blood samples at menses and ovulation, from which IgG was assayed. Sexually active participants provided records of their frequency of sexual activity as well as condom use. At ovulation, sexually active women had higher IgG than abstinent women (d = 0.77), with women reporting regular condom use showing larger effects (d = 0.63) than women reporting no condom use (d = 0.11). Frequency of sexual activity predicted changes in IgA (Cohen’s f2 = 0.25), with women reporting high frequency of sexual activity showing a decrease in IgA at ovulation, while women reporting low frequency or no sexual activity showing an increase in IgA at ovulation. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that shifts in humoral immunity across the menstrual cycle are associated with reproductive effort, and could contribute to the mechanisms by which women’s physiology navigates tradeoffs between reproduction and immunity. PMID:26394125

  8. Physiological and behavioral responses to an acute-phase response in zebra finches: immediate and short-term effects.

    PubMed

    Sköld-Chiriac, Sandra; Nord, Andreas; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the immune system to clear pathogens and mitigate infection is a costly process that might incur fitness costs. When vertebrates are exposed to pathogens, their first line of defense is the acute-phase response (APR), which consists of a suite of physiological and behavioral changes. The dynamics of the APR are relatively well investigated in mammals and domesticated birds but still rather unexplored in passerine birds. In this study, we injected male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) with a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) to assess the potential physiological, immunological, and behavioral responses during the time course of an APR and also to record any potential short-term effects by measuring the birds during the days after the expected APR. We found that LPS-injected zebra finches decreased activity and gained less body mass during the APR, compared to control individuals. In addition, LPS-injected birds increased their production of LPS-reactive antibodies and reduced their metabolic rate during the days after the expected APR. Our results show that zebra finches demonstrate sickness behaviors during an APR but also that physiological effects persist after the expected time course of an APR. These delayed effects might be either a natural part of the progression of an APR, which is probably true for the antibody response, or a short-term carryover effect, which is probably true for the metabolic response.

  9. Acute phase proteins increase with sarcoptic mange status and severity in Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica, Schinz 1838).

    PubMed

    Ráez-Bravo, Arián; Granados, José Enrique; Cerón, José Joaquín; Cano-Manuel, Francisco Javier; Fandos, Paulino; Pérez, Jesús María; Espinosa, José; Soriguer, Ramón Casimiro; López-Olvera, Jorge Ramón

    2015-11-01

    Sarcoptic mange is a contagious skin disease caused by Sarcoptes scabiei, affecting both domestic and wild mammals, including the Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica), a medium-sized mountain ungulate almost endemic to the Iberian Peninsula. Acute phase proteins (APPs) could be an indicator of sarcoptic mange disease and severity in Iberian ibex. Serum samples from 131 healthy and sarcoptic mange-affected Iberian ibexes were collected from 2005 to 2012 in Sierra Nevada Natural Space in southern Spain. Serum alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), serum amyloid A (SAA) and haptoglobin (Hp) concentrations were quantified, and statistically significant differences according to sarcoptic mange disease and severity were assessed. Both AGP and SAA were significantly higher in the sarcoptic mange-affected ibexes than in the healthy ones as well as in the severely affected ibexes as compared to those with less than 50 % of the body surface affected. For the first time, changes in APP are reported in relation to sarcoptic mange in Iberian ibex. It is also reported for the first time that the intensity of APP increase depends on the severity of sarcoptic mange, which could be related with the pathological secondary amyloidosis, leading to organ dysfunction in severely mange-affected animals. Species and population differences in the increase of APP in response to sarcoptic mange could indicate individual and population differences in the immune capability of each population to deal with mange, population prevalence and mortality being the last indicators of such sensitivity.

  10. Acute brief heat stress in late gestation alters neonatal calf innate immune functions.

    PubMed

    Strong, R A; Silva, E B; Cheng, H W; Eicher, S D

    2015-11-01

    Heat stress, as one of the environmental stressors affecting the dairy industry, compromises the cow milk production, immune function, and reproductive system. However, few studies have looked at how prenatal heat stress (HS) affects the offspring. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of HS during late gestation on calf immunity. Calves were born to cows exposed to evaporative cooling (CT) or HS (cyclic 23-35°C) for 1 wk at 3 wk before calving. Both bull and heifer calves (CT, n=10; HS, n=10) were housed in similar environmental temperatures after birth. Both CT and HS calves received 3.78 L of pooled colostrum within 12 h after birth and were fed the same diet throughout the study. In addition to tumor necrosis factor α, IL-1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), and toll-like receptor (TLR)2, and TLR4 mRNA expression, the expression of CD14(+) and CD18(+) cells, and DEC205(+) dendritic cells were determined in whole blood samples at d 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28. The neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio, differential cell counts, and the hematocrit were also determined. During late gestation, the HS cows had greater respiration rates, rectal temperatures, and tended to spend more time standing compared with the CT cows. The HS calves had less expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and TLR2 and greater levels of IL-1β, IL-1RA, and TLR4 compared with CT calves. The HS calves also had a greater percentage of CD18(+) cells compared with the CT calves. Additionally, a greater percentage of neutrophils and lesser percentage of lymphocytes were in the HS calves compared with the CT calves. The results indicate that biomarkers of calves' immunity are affected in the first several weeks after birth by HS in the dam during late gestation.

  11. Fibrinogen-like protein 1, a hepatocyte derived protein is an acute phase reactant

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhilin; Ukomadu, Chinweike

    2008-01-25

    Fibrinogen-like protein 1 (FGL1) is a hepatocyte derived protein that is upregulated in regenerating rodent livers following partial hepatectomy. It has been implicated as a mitogen for liver cell proliferation. In this study, we show that recombinant human IL-6 induces FGL1 expression in Hep G2 cells in a pattern similar to those of acute phase reactants. Following induction of acute inflammation in rats by subcutaneous injection of turpentine oil, serum FGL1 levels are also enhanced. Although, a recent report suggests that FGL1 associates almost exclusively with the fibrin matrix, we report here that approximately 20% of the total plasma FGL1 remains free. The enhancement of FGL1 levels in vitro by IL-6 and its induction after turpentine oil injection suggest that it is an acute phase reactant. Its presence in bound and free forms in the blood also implies biological roles that extend beyond the proposed autocrine effect it has on hepatocytes during regeneration.

  12. [Application of stroke rehabilitation unit in municipal hospitals during the acute phase of cerebral infarction].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-min; Wang, Peng; Chen, Jie; Luo, Dan-hong; Shen, Wang-ming

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of stroke rehabilitation unit in municipal hospitals during the acute phase of cerebral infarction. 77 acute cerebral infarction patients were randomly assigned to stroke rehabilitation unit group and 73 to ordinary group. The NIH stroke scale (NIHSS), activities of daily living (ADL) Barthel index and average hospitalized time were compared in two groups before and after the treatment. The average NIHSS in two groups before treatment were 9.26 and 9.12 respectively (P > 0.05) but became 2.62 and 7.64 after treatment (P < 0.01). The average ADL Barthel index in two groups before the treatment were 52.04 and 53.16 (P > 0.05) but 87.26 and 64.20 after the treatment (P < 0.01). The average hospitalized time in the two groups were 22.25 and 26.67 days (P < 0.05). When stroke rehabilitation unit being applied in the acute phase of cerebral infarction, it showed positive results in the following aspects as: improving the neurological function, capabilities of managing daily life, and also shortening the days of hospitalization.

  13. [Depression in school children and adolescents carriers of acute leukemia during the treatment phase].

    PubMed

    Rivas-Molina, Nancy Susana; Mireles-Pérez, Edgar Omar; Soto-Padilla, Janet Margarita; González-Reyes, Nora Adriana; Barajas-Serrano, Tanya Lizbeth; Barrera de León, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe depression levels in school aged children and adolescents with acute leukemia during the treatment. This transversal descriptive study took place during January to September 2012 and included school aged children and adolescents, carriers of acute leukemia, in treatment at a high-ranking specialty hospital. A modified Kovacs questionnaire (C O/) was applied. They were grouped according to presence or absence of depression. Inferential statistics with x2 and Statistical package SPSS 20.0 were used. Forty-six patients were included in the study: with depression n = 43 (94%), without depression n=3 (6%), males n= 32 (70%) and females n=14 (30%), average age 8 years old (7-15). Acute lymphoblast leukemia was the most frequent n=42 patients (91 %). Depression was found in 42 patients (91 "'o), with nine presenting a minor level (21 "'o), 11 a moderate level (26 "/o), and 23 a severe level (53 "/o). Mostly during the consolidation phase, 30 patients (70"/o) patients with no relapses showed a higher incidence of depression, 23 (54 "/o) vs. with relapses 20 (47"/o) (p = 0.870); the majority had no family history of depression 41 (95 "/o) vs. 2 (5"/o) (p = 0.017). We found a high percentage of severe level depression, which affected mostly male patients, suffering a relapse during the consolidation treatment phase.

  14. [Pulmonary function of children with acute leukemia in maintenance phase of chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Macêdo, Thalita Medeiros Fernandes; Campos, Tania Fernandes; Mendes, Raquel Emanuele de França; França, Danielle Corrêa; Chaves, Gabriela Suéllen da Silva; de Mendonça, Karla Morganna Pereira Pinto

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the pulmonary function of children with acute leukemia. Cross-sectional observational analytical study that enrolled 34 children divided into groups A (17 with acute leukemia in the maintenance phase of chemotherapy) and B (17 healthy children). The groups were matched for sex, age and height. Spirometry was measured using a spirometer Microloop Viasys(®) in accordance with American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society guidelines. Maximal respiratory pressures were measured with an MVD300 digital manometer (Globalmed(®)). Maximal inspiratory pressures and maximal expiratory pressures were measured from residual volume and total lung capacity, respectively. Group A showed a significant decrease in maximal inspiratory pressures when compared to group B. No significant difference was found between the spirometric values of the two groups, nor was there any difference between maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure values in group A compared to the lower limit values proposed as reference. Children with acute leukemia, myeloid or lymphoid, during the maintenance phase of chemotherapy exhibited unchanged spirometric variables and maximal expiratory pressure; However, there was a decrease in inspiratory muscle strength. Copyright © 2014 Associação de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Pulmonary function of children with acute leukemia in maintenance phase of chemotherapy☆

    PubMed Central

    de Macêdo, Thalita Medeiros Fernandes; Campos, Tania Fernandes; Mendes, Raquel Emanuele de França; França, Danielle Corrêa; Chaves, Gabriela Suéllen da Silva; de Mendonça, Karla Morganna Pereira Pinto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the pulmonary function of children with acute leukemia. METHODS: Cross-sectional observational analytical study that enrolled 34 children divided into groups A (17 with acute leukemia in the maintenance phase of chemotherapy) and B (17 healthy children). The groups were matched for sex, age and height. Spirometry was measured using a spirometer Microloop Viasys(r) in accordance with American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society guidelines. Maximal respiratory pressures were measured with an MVD300 digital manometer (Globalmed(r)). Maximal inspiratory pressures and maximal expiratory pressures were measured from residual volume and total lung capacity, respectively. RESULTS: Group A showed a significant decrease in maximal inspiratory pressures when compared to group B. No significant difference was found between the spirometric values of the two groups, nor was there any difference between maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure values in group A compared to the lower limit values proposed as reference. CONCLUSION: Children with acute leukemia, myeloid or lymphoid, during the maintenance phase of chemotherapy exhibited unchanged spirometric variables and maximal expiratory pressure; However, there was a decrease in inspiratory muscle strength. PMID:25510995

  16. The first molluscan acute phase serum amyloid A (A-SAA) identified from oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis: molecular cloning and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Qu, Fufa; Xiang, Zhiming; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-08-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA), a major evolutionarily conserved acute-phase protein, participates in many biological processes in eukaryotic cells, including innate immunity. However, little information regarding the relationship between SAA and innate immunity in mollusks is currently available. In this report, the first bivalve SAA (referred to as ChSAA) gene was identified and characterized from the Hong Kong oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis. Its full-length cDNA is 623 bp, including a 5'-UTR of 147 bp, a 3'-UTR of 56 bp containing a poly(A) tail and an open reading frame (ORF) of 420 bp that encodes a polypeptide of 139 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequence of ChSAA comprises characteristic motifs of the SAA family, including a typical signal peptide and a conserved SAA domain. Comparison and phylogenetic analyses suggested that ChSAA shares a high identity to known acute-phase SAA proteins (A-SAAs). In addition, quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that ChSAA is constitutively expressed in all tissues examined, with the highest expression level in the mantle, and that its expression was acutely and significantly up-regulated in hemocytes following challenge by Vibrio alginolyticus (G(-)), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (G(+)) or Saccharomyces cerevisiae (fungus). Furthermore, over-expression of ChSAA via transfection with a ChSAA expression vector led to significantly increased NF-κB activity in HEK293T cells. These results suggest that ChSAA is likely to constitute a member of the A-SAA family involved in anti-pathogen responses in C. hongkongensis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Immune responses to HTLV-I(ACH) during acute infection of pig-tailed macaques.

    PubMed

    McGinn, Therese M; Wei, Qing; Stallworth, Jackie; Fultz, Patricia N

    2004-04-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I) is causally linked to adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and a chronic progressive neurological disease, HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). A nonhuman primate model that reproduces disease symptoms seen in HTLV-I-infected humans might facilitate identification of initial immune responses to the virus and an understanding of pathogenic mechanisms in HTLV-I-related disease. Previously, we showed that infection of pig-tailed macaques with HTLV-I(ACH) is associated with multiple signs of disease characteristic of both HAM/TSP and ATL. We report here that within the first few weeks after HTLV-I(ACH) infection of pig-tailed macaques, serum concentrations of interferon (IFN)-alpha increased and interleukin-12 decreased transiently, levels of nitric oxide were elevated, and activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes and CD16(+) natural killer cells in peripheral blood were observed. HTLV-I(ACH) infection elicited virus-specific antibodies in all four animals within 4 to 6 weeks; however, Tax-specific lymphoproliferative responses were not detected until 25-29 weeks after infection in all four macaques. IFN-gamma production by peripheral blood cells stimulated with a Tax or Gag peptide was detected to varying degrees in all four animals by ELISPOT assay. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from one animal that developed only a marginal antigen-specific cellular response were unresponsive to mitogen stimulation during the last few weeks preceding its death from a rapidly progressive disease syndrome associated with HTLV-I(ACH) infection of pig-tailed macaques. The results show that during the first few months after HTLV-I(ACH) infection, activation of both innate and adaptive immunity, limited virus-specific cellular responses, sustained immune system activation, and, in some cases, immunodeficiency were evident. Thus, this animal model might be valuable for understanding early stages of infection

  18. Predictors of longitudinal outcomes after unstable response to acute-phase cognitive therapy for major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Vittengl, Jeffrey R; Clark, Lee Anna; Thase, Michael E; Jarrett, Robin B

    2015-06-01

    After patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) respond to acute-phase cognitive therapy (CT), continuation-phase treatments may be applied to improve long-term outcomes. We clarified which CT responders experience remission, recovery, relapse, and recurrence by testing baseline demographic, clinical, and personality variables. The sample of CT responders at higher risk of relapse (N = 241) was randomized to 8 months of continuation-phase CT, double-blinded fluoxetine, or pill placebo, and followed 24 months (Jarrett & Thase, 2010). Patients with lower positive emotionality and behavioral activation at the end of acute-phase CT showed increased risk for relapse/recurrence of MDD. In addition, patients with lower positive emotionality and behavioral activation, as well as higher residual depression (including emotional, cognitive, and social facets), showed decreased probability of remission (≥6 continuous weeks of minimal or absent symptoms) after acute-phase CT. Finally, patients with greater residual depression, as well as younger age and earlier MDD onset, showed decreased probability of recovery (≥35 continuous weeks of minimal or absent symptoms) after acute-phase CT. Moderator analyses did not reveal differential prediction across the continuation phase treatment arms. These results may help clinicians gauge the prognoses and need for continuation treatment among MDD patients who respond to acute-phase CT. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Wilms' Tumour 1 (WT1) peptide vaccination in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia induces short-lived WT1-specific immune responses.

    PubMed

    Uttenthal, Benjamin; Martinez-Davila, Irma; Ivey, Adam; Craddock, Charles; Chen, Frederick; Virchis, Andras; Kottaridis, Panagiotis; Grimwade, David; Khwaja, Asim; Stauss, Hans; Morris, Emma C

    2014-02-01

    Wilms' Tumour 1 (WT1) is a zinc finger transcription factor that is over-expressed in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Its restricted expression in normal tissues makes it a promising target for novel immunotherapies aiming to accentuate the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response against AML. Here we report a phase I/II clinical trial of subcutaneous peptide vaccination with two separate HLA-A2-binding peptide epitopes derived from WT1, together with a pan-DR binding peptide epitope (PADRE), in Montanide adjuvant. Eight HLA-A2-positive patients with poor risk AML received five vaccination cycles at 3-weekly intervals. The three cohorts received 0·3, 0·6 and 1 mg of each peptide, respectively. In six patients, WT1-specific CTL responses were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assays and pWT126/HLA-A*0201 tetramer staining, after ex vivo stimulation with the relevant WT1 peptides. However, re-stimulation of these WT1-specific T cells failed to elicit secondary expansion in all four patients tested, suggesting that the WT1-specific CD8(+) T cells generated following vaccination may be functionally impaired. No correlation was observed between peptide dose, cellular immune response, reduction in WT1 mRNA expression and clinical response. Larger studies are indicated to confirm these findings. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Haematology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. An accurate two-phase approximate solution to the acute viral infection model

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S

    2009-01-01

    During an acute viral infection, virus levels rise, reach a peak and then decline. Data and numerical solutions suggest the growth and decay phases are linear on a log scale. While viral dynamic models are typically nonlinear with analytical solutions difficult to obtain, the exponential nature of the solutions suggests approximations can be found. We derive a two-phase approximate solution to the target cell limited influenza model and illustrate the accuracy using data and previously established parameter values of six patients infected with influenza A. For one patient, the subsequent fall in virus concentration was not consistent with our predictions during the decay phase and an alternate approximation is derived. We find expressions for the rate and length of initial viral growth in terms of the parameters, the extent each parameter is involved in viral peaks, and the single parameter responsible for virus decay. We discuss applications of this analysis in antiviral treatments and investigating host and virus heterogeneities.

  1. Suppression of Virus Specific Immune Responses by IL-10 in Acute Dengue Infection

    PubMed Central

    Malavige, Gathsaurie Neelika; Jeewandara, Chandima; Alles, K. M. Luckmaal; Salimi, Maryam; Gomes, Laksiri; Kamaladasa, Achala; Jayaratne, S. D.; Ogg, Graham Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Background Elevated IL-10 has been shown to be associated with severe dengue infection (DI). We proceeded to investigate the role of IL-10 in the pathogenesis of acute DI. Materials and methods Ex vivo and cultured IFNγ ELISpot assays for dengue virus (DENV) NS3 protein and non dengue viral proteins were carried out in 26 patients with acute DI (16 with dengue haemorrhagic fever) and 12 healthy dengue seropositive individuals from Sri Lanka. DENV serotype specific (SS) responses were determined by using a panel of SS peptides. Results Serum IL-10 level were significantly higher (p = 0.02) in those who did not have in vitro responses to DENV-SS peptides (mean 144.2 pg/ml) when compared to those who responded (mean 75.7 pg/ml). DENV-NS3 specific ex vivo IFNγ ELISpot responses were also significantly lower (p = 0.0001) in those who did not respond to DENV-SS peptides (mean 42 SFU/million PBMCs) when compared to those who responded to DENV-SS peptides (mean 1024 SFU/million PBMCs). Serum IL-10 levels correlated significantly (p = 0.03) and inversely (Spearmans R = −0.45) with ex vivo DENV-NS3 specific responses but not with ex vivo non DENV specific responses (Spearmans R = −014, p = 0.52). Blockage of IL-10 in vitro significantly increased (p = 0.04) the ex vivo IFNγ ELISpot DENV-NS3 specific responses but had no effect on responses to non DENV proteins. Conclusion IL-10 appears to contribute to the pathogenesis of acute dengue infections by inhibiting DENV-specific T cell responses, which can be restored by blocking IL-10. PMID:24040431

  2. Future of Therapy in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)--Potential Role of Immune-Based Therapies.

    PubMed

    Kebriaei, Partow; Poon, Michelle Limei

    2015-06-01

    The prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adults remains poor, and novel treatment options are needed to improve outcomes. Immunotherapeutic strategies have been a recent focus in this area, targeting specific surface antigens on the ALL blast cells. Our review concentrates on four major class of antibody therapies, namely, (1) naked and unconjugated antibodies, (2) immunoconjugates and immunotoxins, (3) bi-specific T cell engaging (BiTE) therapy, and (4) chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) expressing T cells. We review preclinical and clinical data, and update on the latest advances in this exciting field, and suggest how these therapies can be incorporated into the treatment algorithm for ALL.

  3. Are the unenhanced and excretory CT phases necessary for the evaluation of acute pyelonephritis?

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Lincoln S; Torres, Ulysses S; Souza, Saulo M; Torres, Lucas R; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2017-05-01

    Background The most widely accepted computed tomography (CT) protocol for diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis (APN) includes at least a pre- and post-contrast scan, which may expose patients to higher doses of ionizing radiation. Purpose To establish the accuracy, reproducibility, and degree of confidence in CT diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis (APN) and urolithiasis using only images obtained during the nephrographic phase. Material and Methods A retrospective study of 100 consecutive patients (88 women; age range, 19-70 years) with clinical and laboratory suspicion of APN and who underwent triphasic abdominal CT scans (non-contrast, nephrographic, and excretory phases) was performed. Two readers first evaluated independently only the nephrographic phase of scans, and, in a second session, the entire study. The diagnostic reference standard was settled by a third experienced radiologist who reviewed all triphasic scans and clinical data. Results The accuracy of only nephrographic phase for diagnosis of APN and urolithiasis was in the range of 90.3-91.78% and 96.27-99.25%, respectively. There was no significant difference in comparison with the triphasic reading (z: -0.4 - 0.2; P = 0.34-0.83). The average degree of confidence for APN also showed no significant variation for both readers ( P = 0.4 and 0.08). Almost perfect inter-observer agreements for the diagnosis of APN (k = 0.86, P < 0.001) and for urolithiasis (k = 0.84, P < 0.001) were observed when considering only the nephrographic phase. Conclusion CT assessment of APN and urolithiasis can be accurately performed using only the late nephrographic phase, with consequent dose reduction.

  4. Effects of escin on acute inflammation and the immune system in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua; Zhang, Leiming; Han, Bin; Zhu, Mei; Zhang, Xiumei

    2009-01-01

    Escin has been used extensively to treat chronic venous insufficiency, hemorrhoids, and edema resulting from cerebral ischemic damage, trauma or operation. However, no studies have looked at the anti-inflammatory properties of escin administered by intravenous injection, and it is still not clear whether escin has an effect on the immune system. This study seeks to investigate the time-dependent anti-inflammatory properties of escin and its effect on the immune system. The anti-inflammatory effect of escin was observed in carrageenan-induced paw edema and acetic acid-induced capillary permeability in mice. The immunopharmacological effects of escin were evaluated by spleen index (SI), thymus index (TI), proliferative capacity of splenocytes (PS), lymphocyte count (LC), serum TNF-alpha levels, and phagocytic rate (PR) in mice. Escin treatment showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect, similar to that seen with dexamethasone treatment. However, the duration of the anti-inflammatory response was longer with escin treatment than with dexamethasone treatment. The results also demonstrated that escin had no significant effects on SI, TI, LC, PS, TNF-alpha levels, and PR. The findings suggest that escin is a potent anti-inflammatory drug with long-lasting anti-inflammatory effects and without any immunosuppressive effects.

  5. Adiponectin confers protection from acute colitis and restricts a B cell immune response.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Stephanie; Wankell, Miriam; Charrez, Berenice; Sternberg, Jade; Kreuter, Roxane; Esmaili, Saeed; Ramezani-Moghadam, Mehdi; Devine, Carol; Read, Scott; Bhathal, Prithi; Lopata, Andreas; Ahlensteil, Golo; Qiao, Liang; George, Jacob; Hebbard, Lionel

    2017-04-21

    Adiponectin demonstrates beneficial effects in various metabolic diseases, including diabetes, and in bowel cancer. Recent data also suggest a protective role in colitis. However, the precise molecular mechanisms by which adiponectin and its receptors modulate colitis and the nature of the adaptive immune response in murine models are yet to be elucidated. Adiponectin knock-out mice were orally administered dextran sulfate sodium for 7 days and were compared with wild-type mice. The severity of disease was analyzed histopathologically and through cytokine profiling. HCT116 colonic epithelial cells were employed to analyze the in vitro effects of adiponectin and AdipoR1 interactions in colonic injury following dextran sulfate sodium treatment. Adiponectin knock-out mice receiving dextran sulfate sodium exhibited severe colitis, had greater inflammatory cell infiltration, and an increased presence of activated B cells compared with controls. This was accompanied by an exaggerated proinflammatory cytokine profile and increased STAT3 signaling. Adiponectin knock-out mouse colons had markedly reduced proliferation and increased epithelial apoptosis and cellular stress. In vitro, adiponectin reduced apoptotic, anti-proliferative, and stress signals and restored STAT3 signaling. Following the abrogation of AdipoR1 in vitro, these protective effects of adiponectin were abolished. In summary, adiponectin maintains intestinal homeostasis and protects against murine colitis through interactions with its receptor AdipoR1 and by modulating adaptive immunity. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Distinguishing Acute Encephalopathy with Biphasic Seizures and Late Reduced Diffusion from Prolonged Febrile Seizures by Acute Phase EEG Spectrum Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oguri, Masayoshi; Saito, Yoshiaki; Fukuda, Chisako; Kishi, Kazuko; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Lee, Sooyoung; Torisu, Hiroyuki; Toyoshima, Mitsuo; Sejima, Hitoshi; Kaji, Shunsaku; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Okanishi, Toru; Tomita, Yutaka; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background To differentiate the features of electroencephalography (EEG) after status epileptics in febrile children with final diagnosis of either febrile seizure (FS) or acute encephalopathy for an early diagnosis. Methods We retrospectively collected data from 68 children who had status epilepticus and for whom EEGs were recorded within 120 h. These included subjects with a final diagnosis of FS (n = 20), epileptic status (ES; n = 11), acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD; n = 18), mild encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS; n = 7), other febrile encephalopathies (n = 10), hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (n = 1), and intracranial bleeding (n = 1). Initially, all EEGs were visually assessed and graded, and correlation with outcome was explored. Representative EEG epochs were then selected for quantitative analyses. Furthermore, data from AESD (n = 7) and FS (n = 16) patients for whom EEG was recorded within 24 h were also compared. Results Although milder and most severe grades of EEG correlated with neurological outcome, the outcome of moderate EEG severity group was variable and was not predictable from usual inspection. Frequency band analysis revealed that solid delta power was not significantly different among the five groups (AESD, MERS, FS, ES and control), and that MERS group showed the highest theta band power. The ratios of delta/alpha and (delta + theta)/(alpha + beta) band powers were significantly higher in the AESD group than in other groups. The alpha and beta band powers in EEGs within 24 h from onset were significantly lower in the AESD group. The band powers and their ratios showed earlier improvement towards 24 h in FS than in AESD. Conclusion Sequential EEG recording up to 24 h from onset appeared to be helpful for distinction of AESD from FS before emergence of the second phase of AESD. PMID:27046946

  7. Distinguishing Acute Encephalopathy with Biphasic Seizures and Late Reduced Diffusion from Prolonged Febrile Seizures by Acute Phase EEG Spectrum Analysis.

    PubMed

    Oguri, Masayoshi; Saito, Yoshiaki; Fukuda, Chisako; Kishi, Kazuko; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Lee, Sooyoung; Torisu, Hiroyuki; Toyoshima, Mitsuo; Sejima, Hitoshi; Kaji, Shunsaku; Hamano, Shin-Ichiro; Okanishi, Toru; Tomita, Yutaka; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-03-01

    To differentiate the features of electroencephalography (EEG) after status epileptics in febrile children with final diagnosis of either febrile seizure (FS) or acute encephalopathy for an early diagnosis. We retrospectively collected data from 68 children who had status epilepticus and for whom EEGs were recorded within 120 h. These included subjects with a final diagnosis of FS (n = 20), epileptic status (ES; n = 11), acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD; n = 18), mild encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS; n = 7), other febrile encephalopathies (n = 10), hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (n = 1), and intracranial bleeding (n = 1). Initially, all EEGs were visually assessed and graded, and correlation with outcome was explored. Representative EEG epochs were then selected for quantitative analyses. Furthermore, data from AESD (n = 7) and FS (n = 16) patients for whom EEG was recorded within 24 h were also compared. Although milder and most severe grades of EEG correlated with neurological outcome, the outcome of moderate EEG severity group was variable and was not predictable from usual inspection. Frequency band analysis revealed that solid delta power was not significantly different among the five groups (AESD, MERS, FS, ES and control), and that MERS group showed the highest theta band power. The ratios of delta/alpha and (delta + theta)/(alpha + beta) band powers were significantly higher in the AESD group than in other groups. The alpha and beta band powers in EEGs within 24 h from onset were significantly lower in the AESD group. The band powers and their ratios showed earlier improvement towards 24 h in FS than in AESD. Sequential EEG recording up to 24 h from onset appeared to be helpful for distinction of AESD from FS before emergence of the second phase of AESD.

  8. Prognostic implications of cardiac scintigraphic parameters obtained in the early phase of acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, A.; Matsushima, H.; Satoh, A.; Hayashi, H.; Sotobata, I.

    1988-06-01

    A cohort of 76 patients with acute myocardial infarction was studied with infarct-avid scan, radionuclide ventriculography, and thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. Infarct area, left ventricular ejection fraction, and defect score were calculated as radionuclide indices of the extent of myocardial infarction. The correlation was studied between these indices and cardiac events (death, congestive heart failure, postinfarction angina, and recurrence of myocardial infarction) in the first postinfarction year. High-risk patients (nonsurvivors and patients who developed heart failure) had a larger infarct area, a lower left ventricular ejection fraction, and a larger defect score than the others. Univariate linear discriminant analysis was done to determine the optimal threshold of these parameters for distinguishing high-risk patients from others. Radionuclide parameters obtained in the early phase of acute myocardial infarction were useful for detecting both patients with grave complications and those with poor late prognosis during a mean follow-up period of 2.6 years.

  9. Acute Morphine Administration Reduces Cell-Mediated Immunity and Induces Reactivation of Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mojadadi, Shafi; Jamali, Abbas; Khansarinejad, Behzad; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Bamdad, Taravat

    2009-01-01

    Acute morphine administration is known to alter the course of herpes simplex virus infection. In this study, the effect of acute morphine administration on the reactivation of latent herpes was investigated in a mouse model. Because of the important role of cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity in the inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reactivation, the effect of acute morphine administration on CTL responses was also evaluated. Furthermore, lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ production were evaluated for their roles in the induction of the CTL response. The findings showed that acute morphine administration significantly reduced CTL responses, lymphocyte proliferation, and IFN-γ production. Furthermore, acute morphine administration has been shown to reactivate latent HSV-1. Previous studies have shown that cellular immune responses have important roles in the inhibition of HSV reactivation. These findings suggest that suppression of a portion of the cellular immune response after acute morphine administration may constitute one part of the mechanism that induces HSV reactivation. PMID:19403060

  10. [Dynamics of interferon production during different phases of the pathological process in children with acute pneumonia and relapsing bronchitis].

    PubMed

    Koval'chuk, O L

    2001-01-01

    With the purpose of gaining further insight into regularities of changes that take place in indices for the interferon status in children with acute pneumonia and current bronchitis depending on the phase of the pathological process, 112 children were examined in whom the level of serum interferon was measured together with production of alpha- and gamma-interferon by leucocytes of the peripheral blood in vitro. It is shown that in the examined patients with acute pneumonia and relapsing bronchitis in the acute period and during the phase of reparation there are differences in functioning of indices for the system of interferon.

  11. Vincristine pharmacokinetics pathway and neurotoxicity during early phases of treatment in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Lopez, Elixabet; Gutierrez-Camino, Angela; Astigarraga, Itziar; Navajas, Aurora; Echebarria-Barona, Aizpea; Garcia-Miguel, Purificacion; Garcia de Andoin, Nagore; Lobo, Carmen; Guerra-Merino, Isabel; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Garcia-Orad, Africa

    2016-05-01

    Vincristine is an important component of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment protocols that can cause neurotoxicity. Patients treated with LAL/SHOP protocols often suffer from vincristine-related neurotoxicity in early phases of treatment. Recently, a genome-wide association study connected a SNP in CEP72, involved in vincristine pharmacodynamics, with neurotoxicity during later phases of therapy, which was not replicated during induction phase. These results, together with previous studies indicating that polymorphisms in pharmacokinetic genes are associated with drug toxicity, suggest that changes in the activity or levels of vincristine transporters or metabolizers could work as predictors of vincristine-related neurotoxicity in early phases of treatment in pediatric ALL. We analyzed 150 SNPs in eight key genes involved in vincristine pharmacokinetics and in 13 miRNAs that regulate them. We studied their correlation with neurotoxicity during induction phase in 152 ALL patients treated with LAL/SHOP protocols. The strongest associations with neurotoxicity were observed for two SNPs in ABCC2. The genotypes rs3740066 GG and rs12826 GG were associated with increased neurotoxicity. Polymorphisms in ABCC2 could be novel markers for vincristine-related neurotoxicity in pediatric ALL in early phases.

  12. Interferon-related and other immune genes are downregulated in peripheral blood leukocytes in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Dosiou, Chrysoula; Lathi, Ruth B; Tulac, Suzana; Huang, S-T Joseph; Giudice, Linda C

    2004-05-01

    Interaction between the endocrine and the immune systems has been suggested by observations of sexual dimorphism of the immune response, differential susceptibility to autoimmunity between the sexes, changes in autoimmune disease activity during the menstrual cycle and in pregnancy and in vitro studies of hormonal influence on cytokine production.We hypothesized that if there is hormonal regulation of the immune response, this would be manifest in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) at different phases of the menstrual cycle. In this study, we describe gene profiling of PBLs from the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. We observe important differences in immune gene expression, with significant down-regulation of the Th1 immune response in the luteal phase. A significant number of interferon (IFN)-related genes are amongst the downregulated genes. These results support significant hormonal regulation of the immune system and may have therapeutic implications in diseases of autoimmunity in women.

  13. Restoration of energy level in the early phase of acute pediatric pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mosztbacher, Dóra; Farkas, Nelli; Solymár, Margit; Pár, Gabriella; Bajor, Judit; Szűcs, Ákos; Czimmer, József; Márta, Katalin; Mikó, Alexandra; Rumbus, Zoltán; Varjú, Péter; Hegyi, Péter; Párniczky, Andrea

    2017-02-14

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a serious inflammatory disease with rising incidence both in the adult and pediatric populations. It has been shown that mitochondrial injury and energy depletion are the earliest intracellular events in the early phase of AP. Moreover, it has been revealed that restoration of intracellular ATP level restores cellular functions and defends the cells from death. We have recently shown in a systematic review and meta-analysis that early enteral feeding is beneficial in adults; however, no reviews are available concerning the effect of early enteral feeding in pediatric AP. In this minireview, our aim was to systematically analyse the literature on the treatment of acute pediatric pancreatitis. The preferred reporting items for systematic review (PRISMA-P) were followed, and the question was drafted based on participants, intervention, comparison and outcomes: P: patients under the age of twenty-one suffering from acute pancreatitis; I: early enteral nutrition (per os and nasogastric- or nasojejunal tube started within 48 h); C: nil per os therapy; O: length of hospitalization, need for treatment at an intensive care unit, development of severe AP, lung injury (including lung oedema and pleural effusion), white blood cell count and pain score on admission. Altogether, 632 articles (PubMed: 131; EMBASE: 501) were found. After detailed screening of eligible papers, five of them met inclusion criteria. Only retrospective clinical trials were available. Due to insufficient information from the authors, it was only possible to address length of hospitalization as an outcome of the study. Our mini-meta-analysis showed that early enteral nutrition significantly (SD = 0.806, P = 0.034) decreases length of hospitalization compared with nil per os diet in acute pediatric pancreatitis. In this minireview, we clearly show that early enteral nutrition, started within 24-48 h, is beneficial in acute pediatric pancreatitis. Prospective studies and better

  14. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Injection of Hyaluronic Acid: Acute Toxicities in a Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chapet, Olivier; Decullier, Evelyne; Bin, Sylvie; Faix, Antoine; Ruffion, Alain; Jalade, Patrice; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Udrescu, Corina; Enachescu, Ciprian; Azria, David

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) in prostate cancer can be developed only if the risk of rectal toxicity is controlled. In a multicenter phase 2 trial, hypofractionated irradiation was combined with an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) to preserve the rectal wall. Tolerance of the injection and acute toxicity rates are reported. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to assess late grade 2 toxicity rates. The results described here correspond to the secondary objectives. Acute toxicity was defined as occurring during RT or within 3 months after RT and graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. HA tolerance was evaluated with a visual analog scale during the injection and 30 minutes after injection and then by use of the Common Terminology Criteria at each visit. Results: From 2010 to 2012, 36 patients with low-risk to intermediate-risk prostate cancer were included. The HA injection induced a mean pain score of 4.6/10 ± 2.3. Thirty minutes after the injection, 2 patients still reported pain (2/10 and 3/10), which persisted after the intervention. Thirty-three patients experienced at least 1 acute genitourinary toxicity and 20 patients at least 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity. Grade 2 toxicities were reported for 19 patients with urinary obstruction, frequency, or both and for 1 patient with proctitis. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were reported. At the 3-month visit, 4 patients described grade 2 obstruction or frequency, and no patients had any grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. Conclusions: The injection of HA makes it possible to deliver hypofractionated irradiation over 4 weeks with a dose per fraction of > 3 Gy, with limited acute rectal toxicity.

  15. Restoration of energy level in the early phase of acute pediatric pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mosztbacher, Dóra; Farkas, Nelli; Solymár, Margit; Pár, Gabriella; Bajor, Judit; Szűcs, Ákos; Czimmer, József; Márta, Katalin; Mikó, Alexandra; Rumbus, Zoltán; Varjú, Péter; Hegyi, Péter; Párniczky, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a serious inflammatory disease with rising incidence both in the adult and pediatric populations. It has been shown that mitochondrial injury and energy depletion are the earliest intracellular events in the early phase of AP. Moreover, it has been revealed that restoration of intracellular ATP level restores cellular functions and defends the cells from death. We have recently shown in a systematic review and meta-analysis that early enteral feeding is beneficial in adults; however, no reviews are available concerning the effect of early enteral feeding in pediatric AP. In this minireview, our aim was to systematically analyse the literature on the treatment of acute pediatric pancreatitis. The preferred reporting items for systematic review (PRISMA-P) were followed, and the question was drafted based on participants, intervention, comparison and outcomes: P: patients under the age of twenty-one suffering from acute pancreatitis; I: early enteral nutrition (per os and nasogastric- or nasojejunal tube started within 48 h); C: nil per os therapy; O: length of hospitalization, need for treatment at an intensive care unit, development of severe AP, lung injury (including lung oedema and pleural effusion), white blood cell count and pain score on admission. Altogether, 632 articles (PubMed: 131; EMBASE: 501) were found. After detailed screening of eligible papers, five of them met inclusion criteria. Only retrospective clinical trials were available. Due to insufficient information from the authors, it was only possible to address length of hospitalization as an outcome of the study. Our mini-meta-analysis showed that early enteral nutrition significantly (SD = 0.806, P = 0.034) decreases length of hospitalization compared with nil per os diet in acute pediatric pancreatitis. In this minireview, we clearly show that early enteral nutrition, started within 24-48 h, is beneficial in acute pediatric pancreatitis. Prospective studies and better

  16. Correlation between the dizziness handicap inventory and balance performance during the acute phase of unilateral vestibulopathy.

    PubMed

    Son, Eun Jin; Lee, Dong-Hee; Oh, Jeong-Hoon; Seo, Jae-Hyun; Jeon, Eun-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) is widely used to evaluate self-perceived handicap due to dizziness, and is known to correlate with vestibular function tests in chronic dizziness. However, whether DHI reflects subjective symptoms during the acute phase has not been studied. This study aims to investigate the correlations of subjective and objective measurements to highlight parameters that reflect the severity of dizziness during the first week of acute unilateral vestibulopathy. Thirty-seven patients with acute unilateral vestibulopathy were examined. Patients' subjective perceptions of dizziness were measured using the DHI, Vertigo Visual Analog Scale (VVAS), Disability Scale (DS), and Activity-Specific Balance Scale (ABC). Additionally, the oculomotor tests, Romberg and sharpened Romberg tests, functional reach test, and dynamic visual acuity tests were performed. The correlation between the DHI and other tests was evaluated. DHI-total scores exhibited a moderately positive correlation with VVAS and DS, and a moderately negative correlation with ABC. However, DHI-total score did not correlate with results of the Romberg, sharpened Romberg, or functional reach tests. When compared among four groups divided according to DHI scores, VVAS and DS scores exhibited statistically significant differences, but no significant differences were detected for other test results. Our findings revealed that the DHI correlated significantly with self-perceived symptoms measured by VVAS and DS, but not ABC. There was no significant correlation with other balance function tests during the first week of acute vestibulopathy. The results suggest that DHI, VVAS and DS may be more useful to measure the severity of acute dizziness symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Establishing a dose-response relationship between acute resistance-exercise and the immune system: Protocol for a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Szlezak, Adam Michael; Szlezak, Siri Lauluten; Keane, James; Tajouri, Lotti; Minahan, Clare

    2016-12-01

    Exercise immunology research has traditionally focussed on aerobic-exercise, however it has become apparent in more recent years that resistance-exercise can also considerably affect host immunobiology. To date however, no systematic process has been used to establish a dose-response relationship between resistance-exercise and the immune system. The present systematic review was thus conducted to determine the dose-response effects of a bout of resistance-exercise on acute leukocyte counts. In accordance with the PRISMA guidelines, a systematic literature search was conducted in the electronic databases, PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar, over the date range of 1989-2016. Following the PICO elements, eligibility criteria included: i) participants: healthy humans aged 18-40; ii) intervention: a single bout of resistance-exercise; iii) comparator: at least one comparator group; iv) outcome: acute measures of circulating leukocyte counts. Specific exclusion criteria were also applied. Risk of bias and quality of evidence was assessed using the PEDro scale. Due to the individual designs of the admitted studies, a qualitative analysis (systematic narrative synthesis) was employed in the present review. The results of the present review demonstrate that a single bout of resistance-exercise induces an acute monocytosis, neutrophilia, and lymphocytosis. It became apparent that the reviewed literature either does not consistently specify, or does not describe with sufficient detail, the time-course between the onset of exercise and the collection of blood. We recommend that researchers consider addressing this in future studies, and also collect blood measures during exercise to aid with comparison of temporal effects. Regarding the determination of a dose-response relationship, an acute neutrophilia, monocytosis and lymphocytosis appears to occur more rapidly and to a greater magnitude following a single bout of high-dose vs low-dose resistance

  18. Scintigraphic evaluation of digital circulation during the developmental and acute phases of equine laminitis

    SciTech Connect

    Trout, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Using nuclear isotopic imaging, digital circulation was sequentially evaluated at 24-hour intervals in 11 control horses and in 9 horses affected with acute laminitis, created by administration of a high-starch ration. Following intra-arterial injection of /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated albumin into the brachiocephalic trunk, a gamma camera and dedicated nuclear medicine computer were used to acquire static images of the right front foot. Dynamic vascular-phase and static interstitial-phase images were also obtained after jugular vein injection of /sup 99m/Tc diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid. These procedures were performed on standing horses, using either minimal or no tranquilization. The images were quantitatively analyzed for parameters indicative of circulation to the foot as a whole and to specific regions of interest within the foot. There was no evidence of reduced total blood flow to the lamellae during either the developmental or acute phases of laminitis. Although total flow tended to increase throughout the peripheral/external regions of the foot, statistically significant elevations were consistently present only within the lamellae. Changes indicative of decreased total blood flow were noted in the central/internal regions of the foot. These alterations usually occurred coincident with or after the onset of clinical lameness.

  19. Acute phase response, inflammation and metabolic syndrome biomarkers of Libby asbestos exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Shannahan, Jonathan H.; Alzate, Oscar; Winnik, Witold M.; Andrews, Debora; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Ghio, Andrew J.; Gavett, Stephen H.; Kodavanti, Urmila P.

    2012-04-15

    Identification of biomarkers assists in the diagnosis of disease and the assessment of health risks from environmental exposures. We hypothesized that rats exposed to Libby amphibole (LA) would present with a unique serum proteomic profile which could help elucidate epidemiologically-relevant biomarkers. In four experiments spanning varied protocols and temporality, healthy (Wistar Kyoto, WKY; and F344) and cardiovascular compromised (CVD) rat models (spontaneously hypertensive, SH; and SH heart failure, SHHF) were intratracheally instilled with saline (control) or LA. Serum biomarkers of cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and the acute phase response (APR) were analyzed. All rat strains exhibited acute increases in α-2-macroglobulin, and α1-acid glycoprotein. Among markers of inflammation, lipocalin-2 was induced in WKY, SH and SHHF and osteopontin only in WKY after LA exposure. While rat strain- and age-related changes were apparent in MetS biomarkers, no LA effects were evident. The cancer marker mesothelin was increased only slightly at 1 month in WKY in one of the studies. Quantitative Intact Proteomic profiling of WKY serum at 1 day or 4 weeks after 4 weekly LA instillations indicated no oxidative protein modifications, however APR proteins were significantly increased. Those included serine protease inhibitor, apolipoprotein E, α-2-HS-glycoprotein, t-kininogen 1 and 2, ceruloplasmin, vitamin D binding protein, serum amyloid P, and more 1 day after last LA exposure. All changes were reversible after a short recovery regardless of the acute or long-term exposures. Thus, LA exposure induces an APR and systemic inflammatory biomarkers that could have implications in systemic and pulmonary disease in individuals exposed to LA. -- Highlights: ► Biomarkers of asbestos exposure are required for disease diagnosis. ► Libby amphibole exposure is associated with increased human mortality. ► Libby amphibole increases circulating proteins involved

  20. Eating difficulties among patients 3 months after stroke in relation to the acute phase.

    PubMed

    Medin, Jörgen; Windahl, Jenny; von Arbin, Magnus; Tham, Kerstin; Wredling, Regina

    2012-03-01

    This paper is a report of a study comparing eating difficulties among patients 3 months after stroke in relation to the acute phase. There is limited knowledge of patients with eating problems early after stroke, hence the progress of eating abilities needs to be further explored. From March 2007 to June 2008 36 stroke patients with 2-7 eating difficulties or problems with reduced alertness or swallowing in the acute phase were included. Eating difficulties were detected using a structured protocol of observation of meals. In addition, stroke severity (National Institute of Health Stroke Scale), functional status (Barthel Index), unilateral neglect (Line Bisection test and Letter Cancellation test), psychological well-being (The Well-being Questionnaire-12), nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment) and oral status (Revised Oral Assessment Guide) were assessed. There were 36 participants (58% female) with a median age of 74·5 years. The proportion of eating difficulties decreased significantly from the acute phase to the 3-month follow-up in 'sitting position', 'managing food on the plate' and 'manipulating food in the mouth' and increased regarding inadequate food consumption. Improvements were shown at 3 months in stroke severity, functional status, nutritional status and neglect. Oral status and psychological well-being remained unchanged. The majority of eating problems persisted 3 months after stroke despite a marked improvement in most of the physical functions. The unchanged psychological well-being and sustained problems with food consumption indicate that factors other than physical function should be taken into account regarding eating difficulties poststroke. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Is Customization in Antidepressant Prescribing Associated with Acute-Phase Treatment Adherence?

    PubMed

    Merrick, Elizabeth L; Hodgkin, Dominic; Panas, Lee; Soumerai, Stephen B; Ritter, Grant

    2012-03-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective was to explore whether prescribing variation is associated with duration of antidepressant use during the acute phase of treatment. Improving quality of care and increasing the extent to which treatment is patient-centered and customized are interrelated goals. Prescribing variation may be considered a marker of customization, and could be associated with better antidepressant treatment adherence. METHODS: A cross-sectional secondary data analysis examining the association between providers' antidepressant prescribing variation and patient continuity of antidepressant treatment. The data source was two states' Medicaid claims for dual-eligible Medicaid/Medicare patients. The sample included 383 patients with new episodes of antidepressant treatment, representing 70 providers with at least four patients in the sample. We tested two alternate measures of prescribing concentration: 1) share of prescriber's initial antidepressant prescribing accounted for by the two most common regimens, and 2) Herfindahl index. The HEDIS performance measure of effective acute-phase treatment (at least 84 out of 114 days with antidepressant) was the dependent variable. KEY FINDINGS: In multivariate analyses, the concentration measure based on the top two regimens was significant and inversely related to duration adequacy (p <.05). The Herfindahl index measure showed a trend towards a similar inverse relationship (p<.10). CONCLUSIONS: The findings provide some support for the hypothesized relationship between prescribing variation and adequate antidepressant treatment duration during the acute phase of treatment. Future work with more detailed, clinical longitudinal data could extend this inquiry to better understand the causal mechanisms using a more direct measure of customized care.

  2. Glutamate transporter type 3 mediates isoflurane preconditioning-induced acute phase of neuroprotection in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Liaoliao; Deng, Jiao; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-09-01

    A pre-exposure to isoflurane reduces ischemic brain injury in rodents (isoflurane preconditioning). This neuroprotection has acute and delayed phases. Our previous in vitro studies suggest that the acute phase may involve excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs). We determine whether this protection involves EAAT3, the major neuronal EAAT. Adult male EAAT3 knockout mice and their wild-type littermates were exposed or were not exposed to 1.5% isoflurane for 30 min. Sixty minutes later, they were subjected to a 90- or 60-min middle cerebral arterial occlusion (MCAO). Their neurological outcomes were evaluated 24h after the MCAO. In another experiment, cerebral cortex was harvested for Western blotting at 30 min after animals were exposed to 1.5% isoflurane for 30 min. Here, we showed that isoflurane reduced brain infarct volumes and improved neurological functions of wild-type mice after a 90-min MCAO. However, isoflurane pre-exposure did not change the neurological outcome of EAAT3 knockout mice no matter whether the MCAO was for 90 min or 60 min. Isoflurane increased phospho-Akt, a survival-promoting protein, in the wild-type mice but not in the EAAT3 knockout mice. The isoflurane-induced neuroprotection in the wild-type mice was abolished by LY294004, an Akt activation inhibitor. LY294004 alone did not affect the neurological outcome of the wild-type or EAAT3 knockout mice after focal brain ischemia. These results suggest that the isoflurane preconditioning-induced acute phase of neuroprotection involves EAAT3. The downstream event includes Akt activation.

  3. Is Customization in Antidepressant Prescribing Associated with Acute-Phase Treatment Adherence?

    PubMed Central

    Merrick, Elizabeth L.; Hodgkin, Dominic; Panas, Lee; Soumerai, Stephen B.; Ritter, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The objective was to explore whether prescribing variation is associated with duration of antidepressant use during the acute phase of treatment. Improving quality of care and increasing the extent to which treatment is patient-centered and customized are interrelated goals. Prescribing variation may be considered a marker of customization, and could be associated with better antidepressant treatment adherence. Methods A cross-sectional secondary data analysis examining the association between providers' antidepressant prescribing variation and patient continuity of antidepressant treatment. The data source was two states' Medicaid claims for dual-eligible Medicaid/Medicare patients. The sample included 383 patients with new episodes of antidepressant treatment, representing 70 providers with at least four patients in the sample. We tested two alternate measures of prescribing concentration: 1) share of prescriber's initial antidepressant prescribing accounted for by the two most common regimens, and 2) Herfindahl index. The HEDIS performance measure of effective acute-phase treatment (at least 84 out of 114 days with antidepressant) was the dependent variable. Key Findings In multivariate analyses, the concentration measure based on the top two regimens was significant and inversely related to duration adequacy (p <.05). The Herfindahl index measure showed a trend towards a similar inverse relationship (p<.10). Conclusions The findings provide some support for the hypothesized relationship between prescribing variation and adequate antidepressant treatment duration during the acute phase of treatment. Future work with more detailed, clinical longitudinal data could extend this inquiry to better understand the causal mechanisms using a more direct measure of customized care. PMID:22707982

  4. Characterizing dynamic interactions between ultradian glucocorticoid rhythmicity and acute stress using the phase response curve.

    PubMed

    Rankin, James; Walker, Jamie J; Windle, Richard; Lightman, Stafford L; Terry, John R

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a dynamic oscillatory hormone signalling system that regulates the pulsatile secretion of glucocorticoids from the adrenal glands. In addition to regulation of basal levels of glucocorticoids, the HPA axis provides a rapid hormonal response to stress that is vitally important for homeostasis. Recently it has become clear that glucocorticoid pulses encode an important biological signal that regulates receptor signalling both in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues. It is therefore important to understand how stressful stimuli disrupt the pulsatile dynamics of this system. Using a computational model that incorporates the crucial feed-forward and feedback components of the axis, we provide novel insight into experimental observations that the size of the stress-induced hormonal response is critically dependent on the timing of the stress. Further, we employ the theory of Phase Response Curves to show that an acute stressor acts as a phase-resetting mechanism for the ultradian rhythm of glucocorticoid secretion. Using our model, we demonstrate that the magnitude of an acute stress is a critical factor in determining whether the system resets via a Type 1 or Type 0 mechanism. By fitting our model to our in vivo stress-response data, we show that the glucocorticoid response to an acute noise stress in rats is governed by a Type 0 phase-resetting curve. Our results provide additional evidence for the concept of a deterministic sub-hypothalamic oscillator regulating the ultradian glucocorticoid rhythm, which constitutes a highly responsive peripheral hormone system that interacts dynamically with hypothalamic inputs to regulate the overall hormonal response to stress.

  5. Thromboembolism in the Sub-Acute Phase of Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Belci, Maurizio; Van Middendorp, Joost J; Al Halabi, Ahmed; Meagher, Tom M

    2016-01-01

    To review the evidence of thromboembolism incidence and prophylaxis in the sub-acute phase of spinal cord injury (SCI) 3–6 months post injury. All observational and experimental studies with any length of follow-up and no limitations on language or publication status published up to March 2015 were included. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion and extracted data. Outcomes studied were incidence of pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the sub-acute phase of SCI. The secondary outcome was type of thromboprophylaxis. Our search identified 4305 references and seven articles that met the inclusion criteria. Five papers reported PE events and three papers reported DVT events in the sub-acute phase of SCI. Studies were heterogeneous in populations, design and outcome reporting, therefore a meta-analysis was not performed. The included studies report a PE incidence of 0.5%–6.0% and DVT incidence of 2.0%–8.0% in the sub-acute phase of SCI. Thromboprophylaxis was poorly reported. Spinal patients continue to have a significant risk of PE and DVT after the acute period of their injury. Clinicians are advised to have a low threshold for suspecting venous thromboembolism in the sub-acute phase of SCI and to continue prophylactic anticoagulation therapy for a longer period of time. PMID:27790330

  6. Altered mucosal immune response after acute lung injury in a murine model of Ataxia Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare but devastating and progressive disorder characterized by cerebellar dysfunction, lymphoreticular malignancies and recurrent sinopulmonary infections. In A-T, disease of the respiratory system causes significant morbidity and is a frequent cause of death. Methods We used a self-limited murine model of hydrochloric acid-induced acute lung injury (ALI) to determine the inflammatory answer due to mucosal injury in Atm (A-T mutated)- deficient mice (Atm-/-). Results ATM deficiency increased peak lung inflammation as demonstrated by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) neutrophils and lymphocytes and increased levels of BALF pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. IL-6, TNF). Furthermore, bronchial epithelial damage after ALI was increased in Atm-/- mice. ATM deficiency increased airway resistance and tissue compliance before ALI was performed. Conclusions Together, these findings indicate that ATM plays a key role in inflammatory response after airway mucosal injury. PMID:24884546

  7. Cellular immune response in young children accounts for recurrent acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sharad K; Pichichero, Michael E

    2013-10-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common disease in young children. Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) and Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) are the two most common pathogens that cause AOM. Over the past 5 years, our group has been studying the immunologic profile of children that experience repeated AOM infections despite tympanocentesis drainage of middle ear fluid and individualized antibiotic treatment; we call these children stringently-defined otitis prone(sOP). Although protection against AOM is primarily mediated by ototpathogen-specific antibody, our recent studies suggest that suboptimal memory B and T cell responses and an immaturity in antigen-presenting cells may play a significant role in the propensity to recurrent AOM infections. This review focuses on the studies performed to define immunologic dysfunction in sOP children.

  8. Cellular Immune Response in Young Children Accounts for Recurrent Acute Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sharad K.; Pichichero, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common disease in young children. Streptococcus pneumoniae(Spn) and Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) are the two most common pathogens that cause AOM. Over the past 5 years our group has been studying the immunologic profile of children that experience repeated AOM infections despite tympanocentesis drainage of middle ear fluid and individualized antibiotic treatment; we call these children stringently-defined otitis-prone (sOP). Although protection against AOM is primarily mediated by ototpathogen-specific antibody, our recent studies suggest that suboptimal memory B-& T- cell responses and an immaturity in antigen presenting cells may play a significant role in the propensity to recurrent AOM infections. This review focuses on the studies performed to define immunologic dysfunction in sOP children. PMID:24022464

  9. Altered mucosal immune response after acute lung injury in a murine model of Ataxia Telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Eickmeier, Olaf; Kim, Su Youn; Herrmann, Eva; Döring, Constanze; Duecker, Ruth; Voss, Sandra; Wehner, Sibylle; Hölscher, Christoph; Pietzner, Julia; Zielen, Stefan; Schubert, Ralf

    2014-05-29

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare but devastating and progressive disorder characterized by cerebellar dysfunction, lymphoreticular malignancies and recurrent sinopulmonary infections. In A-T, disease of the respiratory system causes significant morbidity and is a frequent cause of death. We used a self-limited murine model of hydrochloric acid-induced acute lung injury (ALI) to determine the inflammatory answer due to mucosal injury in Atm (A-T mutated)- deficient mice (Atm(-/-)). ATM deficiency increased peak lung inflammation as demonstrated by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) neutrophils and lymphocytes and increased levels of BALF pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. IL-6, TNF). Furthermore, bronchial epithelial damage after ALI was increased in Atm(-/-) mice. ATM deficiency increased airway resistance and tissue compliance before ALI was performed. Together, these findings indicate that ATM plays a key role in inflammatory response after airway mucosal injury.

  10. Diagnostic relevance of humoral and cell-mediated immune reactions in patients with acute viral myocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Maisch, B; Trostel-Soeder, R; Stechemesser, E; Berg, P A; Kochsiek, K

    1982-01-01

    Sera of 177 patients with acute myocarditis (10 coxsackie B 3/4, four influenza, four mumps, 15 cytomegalovirus, 144 undefined) were tested by indirect immunofluorescence for autoantibodies against heart and skeletal muscle and vital or air-dried adult cardiocytes. Antibody-dependent cytolysis, lymphocytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular lymphocytotoxicity were assessed using viral adult rat cardiocytes as target cells. Muscle-specific anti-sarcolemmal antibodies of the anti-myolemmal type--often associated with non-organ-specific anti-endothelial antibodies--were demonstrated in nine out of 10 patients with coxsackie B, in all patients with influenza and mumps and in 65 out of 144 patients with undefined myocarditis. In contrast, 13 out of 15 patients with cytomegalovirus myocarditis lacked anti-sarcolemmal antibodies but had low titre anti-inter fibrillary antibodies instead. In the presence of complement, anti-myolemmal antibodies induced cytolysis of vital cardiocytes, whereas hepatocytes remained unaffected. Titres of anti-myolemmal antibodies correlated with the degree of cardiocytolysis. The anti-myolemmal immunofluorescent pattern and the cytolytic serum activity could be absorbed with the respective viral antigens suggesting that these antibodies cross-react with moieties of the virus itself and may be both diagnostic and aetiological markers in acute viral myocarditis. Lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity against heterologous cardiac target cells could not be observed in our patients with myocarditis of proven viral aetiology. However, lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity was demonstrated in 10 ASA-positive and one ASA-negative patient with myocarditis of unknown origin. ASA-positive sera blocked lymphocytotoxicity in three of these patients. PMID:6288291

  11. Control of lipopolysaccharide-high density lipoprotein binding by acute phase protein(s).

    PubMed

    Tobias, P S; Ulevitch, R J

    1983-10-01

    When Salmonella minnesota R595 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is mixed with serum, the LPS eventually forms a complex with high density lipoprotein (HDL). Complex formation is conveniently followed by CsCl equilibrium density gradient centrifugation. When mixing 10 micrograms LPS with normal rabbit serum (NRS) at 37 degrees C in the presence of 20 mM EDTA, the half-life for LPS binding to HDL is typically 2 to 3 min. When the same experiment is performed with the use of acute phase rabbit serum (APRS; collected 24 hr post-induction with silver nitrate), the half-life for LPS binding to HDL is typically 40 to 100 min. Thus LPS binding to HDL occurs some 20- to 40-fold slower in APRS than in NRS. Two other phenomena have been found, the time dependencies of which correlate well with the time dependency of LPS binding to HDL in APRS. If LPS-APRS reaction mixtures are cooled to 4 degrees C shortly after mixing and are dialyzed against 2.5 mM HEPES, 15 mM NaCl, pH 7.4 buffer, LPS is recovered in the washed precipitates ("euglobulin precipitate") if, and only if, the LPS-HDL binding reaction is not complete. The amount of LPS in the precipitate correlates well with the amount of LPS that has not bound to HDL. The second phenomenon we observe is that the LPS-containing euglobulin precipitate prepared from LPS-acute phase serum reaction mixtures shortly after mixing also contains a protein, gp60, the concentration of which in the euglobulin precipitate correlates well with the amount of LPS in the precipitate. Thus three phenomena are kinetically well correlated in APRS: the degree of binding of LPS to HDL, the degree of appearance of LPS in a euglobulin fraction, and the concentration of protein gp60 in the euglobulin fraction. We were unable to precipitate gp60 from APRS in the absence of LPS, from APRS after the LPS has fully bound to HDL, or from normal serum in the presence or absence of LPS. The known properties of gp60 are not reminiscent of any other known acute phase

  12. [Antipsychotic Treatment of the Adult Patient in the Acute Phase of Schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana; Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; García Valencia, Jenny; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; de la Hoz, Ana María; Arenas, Álvaro; Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of different antipsychotic drugs in the management of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia in the acute phase. To formulate evidence-based recommendations on the antipsychotic (AP) drug management strategies for the treatment of the adult diagnosed with schizophrenia in the acute phase. Clinical practice guidelines were prepared, using the guidelines of the Methodology Guide of the Ministry of Health and Social Protection, in order to identify, synthesise, and evaluate the evidence and formulate recommendations as regards the management and follow-up of adult patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. The evidence of the NICE 82 guideline was adopted and updated, which answered the question on the management of the acute phase of adults with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. The evidence and its level were presented to the Guideline Development Group (GDG) in order to formulate recommendations following the methodology proposed by the GRADE approach. Clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, ziprasidone, amisulpride, paliperidone, haloperidol, quetiapine, and aripiprazole were more effective than placebo for the majority of psychotic symptoms and the abandonment of treatment, but asenapine was not. Paliperidone, risperidone, quetiapine, clozapine, and olanzapine showed significant increases in weight compared to placebo. Haloperidol, risperidone, ziprasidone, and paliperidone had a higher risk of extrapyramidal symptoms than placebo. There was a significant risk of sedation or drowsiness with, risperidone, haloperidol, ziprasidone, quetiapine, olanzapine, and clozapine in the comparisons with placebo. Of the results of the comparisons between AP, it was shown that clozapine and paliperidone had a clinically significant effect compared to haloperidol and quetiapine, respectively. Olanzapine and risperidone had a lower risk of abandoning the treatment in general, and due to adverse reactions in two comparisons of each one, haloperidol was the

  13. Modulation by enteral nutrition of the acute phase response and immune functions.

    PubMed

    Bengmark, Stig

    2003-01-01

    To use nutrition in order to limit the negative consequences of physical and mental stress is not new. Recent advances in immunology and particularly in the understanding of the chemical language used to communicate both by eukarytic and prokarotic cells has made it easier to objectively evaluate effects of various immunomodulating efforts including the use of nutrients, vitamins and antioxidants in preventing or limiting the development of disease and its late consequences.

  14. Differential acute phase immune responses by Angus and Romosinuano steers following an endotoxin challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our primary objective was to evaluate potential genetic differences between two diverse Bos taurus breeds (Angus (AG) and Romosinuano (RO)) in response to an endotoxin. The RO is a tropically adaptive Bos taurus breed developed in the Sinú valley of northern Colombia. Eighteen steers (n = 9 steers/b...

  15. SJG-136 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  16. Quantitation of acute phase proteins and protein electrophoresis in monitoring the acute inflammatory process in experimentally and naturally infected mice.

    PubMed

    Cray, Carolyn; Besselsen, David G; Hart, Jody L; Yoon, David; Rodriguez, Marilyn; Zaias, Julia; Altman, Norman H

    2010-08-01

    Serologic screening for infectious disease in sentinel mice from rodent colonies is expensive and labor-intensive, often involving multiple assays for several different infectious agents. Previously, we established normal reference ranges for the protein fractions of several laboratory strains of mice by using a commercially available agarose system of protein electrophoresis. In the current study, we address protein fractionation and quantitation of acute phase proteins (APP) in mice experimentally infected with Sendai virus or mouse parvovirus. We further investigate this methodology by using samples from sentinel mice from colonies with endemic infection. All study groups showed significant increases in gamma globulins. Various other protein fractions showed mild variable changes; significant differences were not detected for individual APP. These results contrast the significant changes observed in APP and protein electrophoresis by using the standard methods of inducing inflammatory responses through injection of complete Freund adjuvant or LPS. These present data suggest that although quantitation of individual APP may not be helpful, gamma globulin levels may reflect infection in laboratory mice and provide a possible adjunct to traditional screening methods.

  17. Immune responses following McKenzie lumbar spine exercise in individuals with acute low back pain: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Al-Obaidi, Saud; Mahmoud, Fadia

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the immune responses following 4 weeks of McKenzie lumbar spine exercise in individuals with acute low back pain (ALBP). Fifteen patients with ALBP and 15 healthy individuals volunteered in this study. Ten ml of peripheral blood were obtained from each patient before and after exercise sessions, and from healthy individuals at the beginning of the study. Flow cytometric analysis was used to evaluate the frequencies of CD4+ T lymphocyte sub-populations and the intracellular cytokine expression within this cell population. Pain perceptions were obtained at baseline and following each week of exercise sessions. In comparison with healthy subjects there was an elevated frequency of memory (CD4+CD45RO+) T cells, helper inducer (CD4+CD29+) T cells, CD3+CD16+CD56+ T cells and a lower frequency of naïve/suppressor (CD4+CD45RA+) T cells at base line in back pain patients (p<0.05). After 4 weeks of McKenzie exercise sessions, pain intensity significantly decreased (p<0.05); however, there was no significant difference in the frequency of memory (CD4+CD45RO+) T cells, helper inducer (CD4+CD29+) T cells, CD3+CD16+CD56+ T cells and naïve/ suppressor (CD4+CD45RA+) T cells at base line relative to these cell populations after exercise sessions. The percentage of Pan (CD3+) T cells expressing IL-8 and TNF-α and the CD3+ T cells expressing the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 increased significantly (p<0.05) following exercise sessions in comparison with baseline and healthy references. The reduction in pain scores did not correlate with elevated anti-inflammatory cytokines. McKenzie exercise sessions induced an immune activation state and simultaneously up regulated anti-inflammatory IL-4 cytokines that boost pain relief. Copyright © 2014 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  18. Phase I Combination of Midostaurin, Bortezomib, and Chemo in Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Fluorescent light exposure incites acute and prolonged immune responses in zebrafish (Danio rerio) skin.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Trevor J; Lu, Yuan; Boswell, Mikki; Boswell, William; Medrano, Geraldo; Walter, Sean; Ellis, Samuel; Savage, Markita; Varga, Zoltan M; Lawrence, Christian; Sanders, George; Walter, Ronald B

    2017-09-29

    Artificial light produces an emission spectrum that is considerably different than the solar spectrum. Artificial light has been shown to affect various behavior and physiological processes in vertebrates. However, there exists a paucity of data regarding the molecular genetic effects of artificial light exposure. Previous studies showed that one of the commonly used fluorescent light source (FL; 4100K or "cool white") can affect signaling pathways related to maintenance of circadian rhythm, cell cycle progression, chromosome segregation, and DNA repair/recombination in the skin of male Xiphophorus maculatus. These observations raise questions concerning the kinetics of the FL induced gene expression response, and which biological functions become modulated at various times after light exposure. To address these questions, we exposed zebrafish to 4100K FL and utilized RNA-Seq to assess gene expression changes in skin at various times (1 to 12h) after FL exposure. We found 4100K FL incites a robust early (1-2h) transcriptional response, followed by a more protracted late response (i.e., 4-12h). The early transcriptional response involves genes associated with cell migration/infiltration and cell proliferation as part of an overall increase in immune function and inflammation. The protracted late transcriptional response occurs within gene sets predicted to maintain and perpetuate the inflammatory response, as well as suppression of lipid, xenobiotic, and melatonin metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cytokine kinetics of Zika virus-infected patients from acute to reconvalescent phase.

    PubMed

    Tappe, Dennis; Pérez-Girón, José Vicente; Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Rissland, Jürgen; Ferreira, Davis F; Jaenisch, Thomas; Gómez-Medina, Sergio; Günther, Stephan; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas

    2016-06-01

    Zika virus is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus currently causing large epidemics in the Pacific Ocean region and Brazil. Clinically, Zika fever resembles dengue fever, but is less severe. Whereas the clinical syndrome and laboratory diagnostic procedures have been described, little attention was paid to the immunology of the disease and its possible use for clinical follow-up of patients. Here, we investigate the role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of Zika fever in travelers returning from Asia, the Pacific, and Brazil. Polyfunctional T cell activation (Th1, Th2, Th9, and Th17 response) was seen during the acute phase characterized by respective cytokine level increases, followed by a decrease in the reconvalescent phase.

  1. Schizodeme analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Colombian strain clones isolated from the acute phase of murine infection.

    PubMed

    Camandaroba, Edson L P; Reis, Eliana A G; Reis, Mitermayer G; Andrade, Sonia G

    2006-09-01

    Colombian strain of Trypanosoma cruzi, biodeme Type III (T. cruzi I), has been cloned by micromanipulation at two phases of the acute infection: early (10 days ) and advanced (30 days). Twelve clones were obtained therefrom. Characterization by their biological and biochemical behavior showed an identity among the several clones and their parental strain, albeit with different degrees of virulence. Molecular characterization of the kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) after amplification by polymerase chain reaction revealed identical profiles of the bands from the kDNA minicircle by the analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism for the isolated clones, their parental strain, and to the clones isolated at two different phases of the infection. Results suggest the predominance of a "principal clone", in the composition of the Colombian strain, responsible for the biological and biochemical behavior. However, no relationship was detected between the molecular profile of kDNA and the degree of virulence presented by the several clones.

  2. Serum-resistant CpG-STAT3 decoy for targeting survival and immune checkpoint signaling in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qifang; Hossain, Dewan Md Sakib; Duttagupta, Priyanka; Moreira, Dayson; Zhao, Xingli; Won, Haejung; Buettner, Ralf; Nechaev, Sergey; Majka, Marcin; Zhang, Bin; Cai, Qi; Swiderski, Piotr; Kuo, Ya-Huei; Forman, Stephen; Marcucci, Guido; Kortylewski, Marcin

    2016-03-31

    Targeting oncogenic transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can reduce blast survival and tumor immune evasion. Decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (dODNs), which comprise STAT3-specific DNA sequences are competitive inhibition of STAT3 transcriptional activity. To deliver STAT3dODN specifically to myeloid cells, we linked STAT3dODN to the Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) ligand, cytosine guanine dinucleotide (CpG). The CpG-STAT3dODN conjugates are quickly internalized by human and mouse TLR9(+)immune cells (dendritic cells, B cells) and the majority of patients' derived AML blasts, including leukemia stem/progenitor cells. Following uptake, CpG-STAT3dODNs are released from endosomes, and bind and sequester cytoplasmic STAT3, thereby inhibiting downstream gene expression in target cells. STAT3 inhibition in patients' AML cells limits their immunosuppressive potential by reduced arginase expression, thereby partly restoring T-cell proliferation. Partly chemically modified CpG-STAT3dODNs have >60 hours serum half-life which allows for IV administration to leukemia-bearing mice (50% effective dose ∼ 2.5 mg/kg). Repeated administration of CpG-STAT3dODN resulted in regression of human MV4-11 AML in mice. The antitumor efficacy of this strategy is further enhanced in immunocompetent mice by combining direct leukemia-specific cytotoxicity with immunogenic effects of STAT3 blocking/TLR9 triggering. CpG-STAT3dODN effectively reducedCbfb/MYH11/MplAML burden in various organs and eliminated leukemia stem/progenitor cells, mainly through CD8/CD4 T-cell-mediated immune responses. In contrast, small-molecule Janus kinase 2/STAT3 inhibitor failed to reproduce therapeutic effects of cell-selective CpG-STAT3dODN strategy. These results demonstrate therapeutic potential of CpG-STAT3dODN inhibitors with broad implications for treatment of AML and potentially other hematologic malignancies.

  3. Type I Interferon Induced Epigenetic Regulation of Macrophages Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Acute Respiratory Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kroetz, Danielle N.; Allen, Ronald M.; Schaller, Matthew A.; Cavallaro, Cleyton; Ito, Toshihiro; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    lungs. Finally, Setdb2 expression by Mϕ suppressed IL-2, IL-10, and IFN-γ production by CD4+ T cells in vitro, as well as proliferation in IAV-infected lungs. Collectively, these findings identify Setdb2 as a novel regulator of the immune system in acute respiratory viral infection. PMID:26709698

  4. IMMUNE CORRELATES OF ACUTE MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS INFECTION IN HOUSEHOLD CONTACTS IN KAMPALA, UGANDA

    PubMed Central

    WHALEN, CHRISTOPHER C.; CHIUNDA, ALLAN; ZALWANGO, SARAH; NSHUTI, LORNA; JONES-LOPEZ, EDWARD; OKWERA, ALPHONSE; HIRSCH, CHRISTINA; PETERS, PIERRE; BOOM, W. HENRY; MUGERWA, ROY D.

    2010-01-01

    To determine immunologic and epidemiologic correlates of acute Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in household contacts of infectious tuberculosis cases, we performed a prospective, community-based cohort study of index cases and their household contacts in Kampala, Uganda. Contacts were evaluated for tuberculin skin test (TST) conversion over two years. Interferon-γ expression was measured using a whole blood assay after stimulating with M. tuberculosis culture-filtrate. In 222 contacts with a TST less than 5 mm at baseline, the one-year rate of TST conversion was 27%. The TST conversion was associated with the infectiousness of the index case and proximity of contact. Interferon-γ levels at baseline were greater among TST converters compared with those who did not convert. The risk of TST conversion increased four-fold as the baseline interferon-γ increased 10-fold, but only in contacts with BCG vaccination. In household contacts of tuberculosis, interferon-γ responses to non-specific mycobacterial antigens may be used to make an early diagnosis of tuberculosis infection, especially in resource-limited settings where bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination is commonly used. PMID:16837709

  5. Acute effects of whole-body proton irradiation on the immune system of the mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kajioka, E. H.; Andres, M. L.; Li, J.; Mao, X. W.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Slater, J. M.; Gridley, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    The acute effects of proton whole-body irradiation on the distribution and function of leukocyte populations in the spleen and blood were examined and compared to the effects of photons derived from a (60)Co gamma-ray source. Adult female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a single dose (3 Gy at 0.4 Gy/min) of protons at spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), protons at the distal entry (E) region, or gamma rays and killed humanely at six different times thereafter. Specific differences were noted in the results, thereby suggesting that the kinetics of the response may be variable. However, the lack of significant differences in most assays at most times suggests that the RBE for both entry and peak regions of the Bragg curve was essentially 1.0 under the conditions of this study. The greatest immunodepression was observed at 4 days postexposure. Flow cytometry and mitogenic stimulation analyses of the spleen and peripheral blood demonstrated that lymphocyte populations differ in radiosensitivity, with B (CD19(+)) cells being most sensitive, T (CD3(+)) cells being moderately sensitive, and natural killer (NK1.1(+)) cells being most resistant. B lymphocytes showed the most rapid recovery. Comparison of the T-lymphocyte subsets showed that CD4(+) T helper/inducer cells were more radiosensitive than the CD8(+) T cytotoxic/suppressor cells. These findings should have an impact on future studies designed to maximize protection of normal tissue during and after proton-radiation exposure.

  6. Acute effects of whole-body proton irradiation on the immune system of the mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kajioka, E. H.; Andres, M. L.; Li, J.; Mao, X. W.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Slater, J. M.; Gridley, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    The acute effects of proton whole-body irradiation on the distribution and function of leukocyte populations in the spleen and blood were examined and compared to the effects of photons derived from a (60)Co gamma-ray source. Adult female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a single dose (3 Gy at 0.4 Gy/min) of protons at spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), protons at the distal entry (E) region, or gamma rays and killed humanely at six different times thereafter. Specific differences were noted in the results, thereby suggesting that the kinetics of the response may be variable. However, the lack of significant differences in most assays at most times suggests that the RBE for both entry and peak regions of the Bragg curve was essentially 1.0 under the conditions of this study. The greatest immunodepression was observed at 4 days postexposure. Flow cytometry and mitogenic stimulation analyses of the spleen and peripheral blood demonstrated that lymphocyte populations differ in radiosensitivity, with B (CD19(+)) cells being most sensitive, T (CD3(+)) cells being moderately sensitive, and natural killer (NK1.1(+)) cells being most resistant. B lymphocytes showed the most rapid recovery. Comparison of the T-lymphocyte subsets showed that CD4(+) T helper/inducer cells were more radiosensitive than the CD8(+) T cytotoxic/suppressor cells. These findings should have an impact on future studies designed to maximize protection of normal tissue during and after proton-radiation exposure.

  7. Sex differences in acute hormonal and subjective response to naltrexone: the impact of menstrual cycle phase

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Daniel J.O.; King, Andrea C.

    2015-01-01

    Women often exhibit larger hormonal and subjective responses to opioid receptor antagonists than men, but the biological mechanisms mediating this effect remain unclear. Among women, fluctuations in estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) across the menstrual cycle (MC) affect the endogenous opioid system. Therefore, the goal of the current study was to compare acute naltrexone response between women in the early follicular phase of the MC (low E2 and P4), women in the luteal phase of the MC (high E2 and P4), and men. Seventy healthy controls (n = 46 women) participated in two morning sessions in which they received 50 mg naltrexone or placebo in a randomized, counterbalanced order. Women were randomized to complete both sessions in either the early follicular (n = 23) or luteal phase of the MC. Serum cortisol, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone (LH), salivary cortisol, and subjective response were assessed upon arrival to the laboratory and at regular intervals after pill administration. In luteal and early follicular women but not men, naltrexone (vs. placebo) increased serum cortisol and prolactin levels from baseline; however, the naltrexone-induced increases in these hormones were significantly greater in luteal women than early follicular women. Additionally, only luteal women demonstrated an increase from baseline in salivary cortisol levels and the severity of adverse drug effects in response to naltrexone. In sum, the results indicate that luteal phase women are more sensitive to acute hormonal and subjective effects of naltrexone than early follicular women and men. These findings may have important implications for the use of naltrexone in women. PMID:25459893

  8. Sex differences in acute hormonal and subjective response to naltrexone: The impact of menstrual cycle phase.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel J O; King, Andrea C

    2015-02-01

    Women often exhibit larger hormonal and subjective responses to opioid receptor antagonists than men, but the biological mechanisms mediating this effect remain unclear. Among women, fluctuations in estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) across the menstrual cycle (MC) affect the endogenous opioid system. Therefore, the goal of the current study was to compare acute naltrexone response between women in the early follicular phase of the MC (low E2 and P4), women in the luteal phase of the MC (high E2 and P4), and men. Seventy healthy controls (n=46 women) participated in two morning sessions in which they received 50mg naltrexone or placebo in a randomized, counterbalanced order. Women were randomized to complete both sessions in either the early follicular (n=23) or luteal phase of the MC. Serum cortisol, salivary cortisol, prolactin, luteinizing hormone (LH), and subjective response were assessed upon arrival to the laboratory and at regular intervals after pill administration. In luteal and early follicular women but not men, naltrexone (vs. placebo) increased serum cortisol and prolactin levels from baseline; however, the naltrexone-induced increases in these hormones were significantly greater in luteal women than early follicular women. Additionally, only luteal women demonstrated an increase from baseline in salivary cortisol levels and the severity of adverse drug effects in response to naltrexone. In sum, the results indicate that luteal phase women are more sensitive to acute hormonal and subjective effects of naltrexone than early follicular women and men. These findings may have important implications for the use of naltrexone in women.

  9. Dynamic changes in bioelectrical impedance vector analysis and phase angle in acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Alves, Fernanda Donner; Souza, Gabriela Corrêa; Aliti, Graziella Badin; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane; Clausell, Nadine; Biolo, Andréia

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether changes in hydration status (reflecting fluid retention) would be detected by bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) and phase angle during hospitalization for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and after clinical stabilization. Patients admitted to ADHF were evaluated at admission, discharge and after clinical stabilization (3 mo after discharge) for dyspnea, weight, brain natriuretic peptide, bioelectrical impedance resistance, reactance, and phase angle. Generalized estimating equations and chi-square detected variations among the three time points of evaluation. Were included 57 patients: Mean age was 61 ± 13 y, 65% were male, LVEF was 25 ± 8%. During hospitalization there were improvements in clinical parameters and increase in resistance/height (from 250 ± 72 to 302 ± 59 Ohms/m, P < 0.001), reactance/height (from 24 ± 10 to 31 ± 9 Ohms/m, P < 0.001), and phase angle (from 5.3 ± 1.6 to 6 ± 1.6°, P = 0.007). From discharge to chronic stability, both clinical and BIVA parameters remained stable. At admission, 61% of patients had significant congestion by BIVA, and they lost more weight and had higher improvement in dyspnea during hospitalization (P < 0.05). At discharge, more patients were in the upper half of the graph (characterizing some degree of dehydration) while at chronic stability normal hydration status was more prevalent (P < 0.001). BIVA and phase angle were able to detect significant changes in hydration status during ADHF, which paralleled the clinical course of recompensation, both acutely and chronically. The classification of congestion by BIVA at admission identified patients with more pronounced changes in weight and dyspnea during compensation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Carotid endarterectomy in the acute phase of crescendo cerebral transient ischemic attacks is safe and effective.

    PubMed

    Leseche, Guy; Alsac, Jean-Marc; Castier, Yves; Fady, Francis; Lavallee, Philippa C; Mazighi, Mikael; Amarenco, Pierre

    2011-03-01

    To document the 30- and 90-day outcomes in patients with severe internal carotid artery stenosis who underwent carotid endarterectomy in the acute phase of crescendo cerebral transient ischemic attacks (CcTIAs). From January 2003 to December 2009, data from patients suffering CcTIAs with an ipsilateral severe internal carotid artery stenosis and consecutively operated in our department were prospectively collected. CcTIA patients operated in the acute phase were those who had experienced ≥ two cerebral TIAs and had been consecutively operated within 2 weeks of their first-ever TIA. Clinical assessment was by the vascular neurologist. Duplex ultrasonography was initially used for the diagnosis of severe (>70%) ipsilateral internal carotid artery and further assessed by magnetic resonance angiography and/or computed tomography angiography. Brain damage was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging or at default computed tomography scan. Perioperative medical treatment and operative techniques were standardized. Stroke, death, and major cardiac events were analyzed. Sixty-four patients sustained a median of four cerebral TIAs. Median delay to surgery from initial examination was 5 days. The mean degree of internal carotid artery stenosis was 87.9%. Of the 55 patients who had magnetic resonance imaging with diffusion-weighted imaging, 43 (78%) patients had new acute infarction in an area that corresponded to the clinical symptoms. All patients received antiplatelet therapy and statin during the intervening period. All patients underwent conventional carotid endarterectomy (CEA) with patch angioplasty (polytetrafluoroethylene). Fifty-six patients (87.5%) underwent CEA under local anesthesia with two (3.5%) utilizing selective shunting, and eight patients had general anesthesia with systematic shunting. From CEA to discharge, all patients had complete recovery of their unstable clinical syndrome. At discharge and at 1 and 3 months postoperatively, no stroke or death, or

  11. B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator targeting protects against the acute phase of graft versus host reaction by inhibiting donor anti-host cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    del Rio, Maria-Luisa; Kurtz, Josef; Perez-Martinez, Claudia; Ghosh, Arnab; Perez-Simon, José Antonio; Rodriguez-Barbosa, Jose-Ignacio

    2011-11-27

    B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) functions as a coinhibitory/costimulatory molecule that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily and exhibits a pattern of expression restricted to the hematopoietic compartment. Engagement of BTLA by its ligand, herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM), delivers negative signals to T cells, whereas engagement of HVEM receptor on T cells by surface BTLA expressed on other immune cells costimulates T activation. Previous work has reported that parental donor BTLA knock-out or HVEM knock-out T cells adoptively transferred into nonirradiated F1 recipient mice survived poorly, and the rejection of host hematopoietic cells was attenuated compared with F1 recipients receiving wild-type T cells. Parent into nonirradiated immunocompetent F1 murine model of acute graft versus host reaction, which is induced with the adoptive transfer of splenocytes from donor B6 mice (H-2(b)) into F1 recipients (BALB/c×B6, H-2(d/b)), was used as an experimental approach to test the therapeutic effect of targeting BTLA during the course of an allogeneic immune response. We herein provide evidence that administration of an anti-BTLA monoclonal antibody leads to significant reduction of donor anti-host allogeneic immune response against bone marrow and thymus during the acute phase of graft versus host reaction in a parent into nonirradiated F1 murine model of alloreactivity. Anti-BTLA protection against donor anti-host hematopoietic cell rejection correlated with impaired anti-host cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity than reduction in T-cell number infiltrating host tissues. These findings place BTLA receptor as a potential immunoregulatory target for the modulation of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated alloresponses.

  12. ACUTE PHASE PROTEIN AND ELECTROPHORESIS PROTEIN FRACTION VALUES FOR CAPTIVE AMERICAN FLAMINGOS (PHOENICOPTERUS RUBER).

    PubMed

    Delk, Katie W; Wack, Raymund F; Burgdorf-Moisuk, Anne; Kass, Philip H; Cray, Carolyn

    2015-12-01

    Protein electrophoresis has recognized applications in determining the health status of various species. While reference intervals for electrophoresis have been determined for psittacine and raptor species, there are none reported for Phoenicopteriformes species. Reference intervals for haptoglobin and protein fractions obtained by electrophoresis were determined for the American flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber) based on plasma samples from 39 captive birds. The reference intervals were as follows: haptoglobin, 0.17-0.8 mg/ml; total protein, 3.65-6.38 g/dl; prealbumin, 0.26-1.9 g/dl; albumin, 1.51-3.12 g/dl; α-1 globulin, 0.06-0.38 g/dl; α-2 globulin, 0.17-0.67 g/dl; β globulin, 0.38-1.33 g/dl; γ globulin, 0.26-0.68 g/dl; albumin : globulin ratio, 0.93-2.17. As captive flamingos often suffer from pododermatitis, feet of all flamingos were scored to determine if pododermatitis would be reflected in the acute phase proteins. Spearman rank correlation was performed on each of the protein fractions and pododermatitis scores, and only albumin had a significant correlation. This indicates that albumin, as a negative acute phase protein, may be a marker for this disease process.

  13. Acute phase protein concentrations after limited distance and long distance endurance rides in horses.

    PubMed

    Cywińska, Anna; Szarska, Ewa; Górecka, Renata; Witkowski, Lucjan; Hecold, Mateusz; Bereznowski, Andrzej; Schollenberger, Antoni; Winnicka, Anna

    2012-12-01

    Acute phase proteins (APP) have been described as useful for assessing health in human and animal patients, as they closely reflect the acute phase reaction (APR). In humans and dogs a reaction analogous to APR has also been described after prolonged or strenuous exercise. The aim of this study was to determine, if similar reactions occur in endurance horses after limited and long distance rides. Seventeen horses that successfully completed various distance competitions were tested. Routine haematological and biochemical tests were performed and the concentrations of serum amyloid A (SAA), C-reactive protein (CRP) and haptoglobin were measured. Typical endurance exercise-induced haematological and biochemical changes were observed in all horses, regardless the distance. After long distance rides, the level of SAA markedly increased, but CRP and haptoglobin concentrations remained unchanged. After limited distance rides no changes in the levels of APPs were noted. Exercise-induced APR in horses occurred only after prolonged, strenuous exertion, and differed from APR in inflammation in that only SAA concentration was increased.

  14. Hypothermia as a neuroprotective strategy in subarachnoid hemorrhage: a pathophysiological review focusing on the acute phase.

    PubMed

    Thomé, Claudius; Schubert, Gerrit A; Schilling, Lothar

    2005-04-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains a very prevalent challenge in neurosurgery associated with a high morbidity and mortality due to the lack of specific treatment modalities. The prognosis of SAH patients depends primarily on three factors: (i) the severity of the initial bleed, (ii) the endovascular or neurosurgical procedure to occlude the aneurysm and (iii) the occurrence of late sequelae, namely delayed ischemic neurological deficits due to cerebral vasospasm. While neurosurgeons and interventionalists have put significant efforts in minimizing periprocedural complications and a multitude of investigators have been devoted to the research on chronic vasospasm, the acute phase of SAH has not been studied in comparable detail. In various experimental studies during the past decade, hypothermia has been shown to reduce neuronal damage after ischemia, traumatic brain injury and other cerebrovascular diseases. Clinically, only some of these encouraging results could be reproduced. This review analyses results of studies on the effects of hypothermia on SAH with special respect to the acute phase in an experimental setting. Based on the available data, some considerations for the application of mild to moderate hypothermia in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage are given.

  15. [Relationship between acute phase reactant proteins (APRP) and fatigue during post-operative convalescence].

    PubMed

    Córdova Martínez, A; Del Villar Sordo, V

    2002-09-01

    Surgery originates an inflammatory state which triggers an acute phase response (APR). In this study, variations in the acute phase reactant proteins (APRP) and their relationship with fatigue were assessed. A total of 58 candidate patients for elective abdominal surgery participated in this study. In the preoperative period (PRE) and in the post-operative period (9 days [9-P], 27 days [27-P] and 45 days [45-P]), variations in serum APRP and fatigue were analyzed. In the post-operative period (9-P), a significant decrease in PT, ALB, PAB, TRF, and an increase in CER were observed. In 27-P, significant decreases were observed in PAB and PBR, with increased PT and CER, and without significant variations in ALB ad TRF. In the 45-P day, a concomitant increase in PT and CER was observed. Dynamometric parameters also decreased significantly in the post-operative period (9-P). In conclusion, our results demonstrate the existence of changes in serum proteins and in APRP after an elective abdominal surgical intervention, which are associated with fatigue, evaluated both by subjective and objective (dynamometry) means and the use of a mathematical model that considers weight, proteins and APRP.

  16. Acute phase proteins as promising biomarkers: Perspectives and limitations for human and veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Schrödl, Wieland; Büchler, Rita; Wendler, Sindy; Reinhold, Petra; Muckova, Petra; Reindl, Johanna; Rhode, Heidrun

    2016-11-01

    Acute phase proteins (APPs) are highly conserved plasma proteins that are increasingly secreted by the liver in response to a variety of injuries, independently of their location and cause. APPs favor the systemic regulation of defense, coagulation, proteolysis, and tissue repair. Various APPs have been applied as general diagnostic parameters for a long time. Through proteomic techniques, more and more APPs have been discovered to be differentially altered. Since they are not consistently explainable by a stereotypic hepatic expression of sets of APPs, most of these results have unfortunately been neglected or attributed to the nonspecificity of the acute phase reaction. Moreover, it appears that various extrahepatic tissues are also able to express APPs. These extrahepatic APPs show focally specific roles in tissue homeostasis and repair and are released primarily into interstitial and distal fluids. Since these focal proteins might leak into the circulatory system, mixtures of hepatic and extrahepatic APP species can be expected in blood. Hence, a selective alteration of parts of APPs might be expected. There are several hints on multiple molecular forms and fragments of tissue-derived APPs. These differences offer the chance for multiple selective determinations. Thus, specific proteoforms might indeed serve as tissue-specific disease indicators. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Association between clinical condition and F-waves changes in the acute phase of stroke.

    PubMed

    Luvizutto, Gustavo José; Bertotti, Marcelo Fernando Zeugner; Fernandes, Thiago Dias; Nunes, Hélio Rubens de Carvalho; Braga, Gabriel Pereira; Bazan, Rodrigo; Resende, Luiz Antônio de Lima

    2016-09-01

    To relate F-waves with clinical and laboratory exams in the acute phase of stroke. Inclusion criteria for this cross-sectional study were: hemiplegia, absence of previous cranial trauma, myopathy, diabetes, alcoholism or other known causes of peripheral neuropathy, and normal sensory and motor conduction. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, glycemia, glucosilate hemoglobin, and CPK were obtained at admission by routine blood exams. After hospital admission, the F-wave latencies and persistence were obtained from the deep peroneal nerve using symmetrical techniques. Evaluation of 20 individuals - mean age 66 years, 50% male and 85% Caucasian - showed association of F-wave persistence with glycemia (r = 0.71; p < 0.001) and NIHSS categorized (NIHSS 1-7 = 65.0 x NIHSS 9-23 = 100; p = 0.004). Multivariate analysis found only association of F-wave persistence with glycemia β = 0.59 (0.44-0.74); p < 0.001. The increase in the persistence of F-waves are associated with hyperglycemia in the acute phase of stroke.

  18. Measurement of serum amyloid A1 (SAA1), a major isotype of acute phase SAA.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanyuan; Yamada, Toshiyuki; Satoh, Takahiko; Okuda, Yasuaki

    2006-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA), a plasma precursor of reactive amyloid deposits, is a multigene product. SAA1 and SAA2, with primary structures that are 93% identical (98 of 104 amino acids), behave as acute phase proteins, as demonstrated by their increasing levels in plasma. Heretofore, it has been understood that SAA1 predominates and functions as an isotype in plasma. However, accurate measurements differentiating the two isotypes have not been reported. In this study, using monoclonal antibodies specific for SAA1, we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for SAA1. The levels and ratios of SAA1 in total SAA (TSAA) were investigated in healthy subjects and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The SAA1/TSAA ratio was 74 +/- 12% and 77 +/- 12% in healthy subjects and RA patients, respectively. In RA patients, the ratios were not influenced by SAA1 genotype, which has been proposed to affect plasma SAA values. The kinetics of SAA1 in inflamed patients undergoing hemodialysis was found to be parallel with total SAA and C-reactive protein. Finally, this study confirmed that SAA1 is a major isotype of acute phase SAA and may determine total SAA values. This specific assay could be used in the evaluation of SAA behavior in several clinical conditions.

  19. Relationship between production of acute-phase proteins and strength of inflammatory stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi, Takashi; Tomizawa, Misaki; Seita, Tetsurou; Tagata, Kazutoshi; Yamamoto, Shizuo

    2011-07-01

    The relationship between intensity of inflammatory stimulation and production of α(2)-macroglobulin (α2M) and α(1)-acid glycoprotein (AAG) in rats was investigated. Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with turpentine oil at doses of 0.05, 0.2 or 0.4 mL/rat. Serum levels of α2M, interleukin (IL)-6 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and AAG was measured by single radial immunodiffusion. Peak serum levels of α2M and AAG in rats injected at 0.05 mL/rat were significantly lower than those at 0.2 or 0.4 mL/rat. However, no significant differences were observed for peak serum levels of these acute-phase proteins between 0.2 and 0.4 mL/rat. Furthermore, peak serum levels of IL-6 and CINC-1 in rats injected at 0.05 mL/rat were significantly lower than those at 0.2 or 0.4 mL/rat. Thus, the production of these acute-phase proteins has upper limits, even under increased strength of inflammatory stimulation in rats injected with turpentine oil.

  20. Efficacy of acupuncture during post-acute phase of rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mikashima, Yoshinori; Takagi, Tadashi; Tomatsu, Taisuke; Horikoshi, Mariko; Ikari, Katsunori; Momohara, Shigeki

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether acupuncture is effective in reducing pain and swelling around the knee and improving range of motion (ROM) during the post-acute phase of rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Following TKA, 80 knees in 80 patients were randomly assigned to either an acupuncture treatment group (Group A) or a control group (Group C). In Group A, the complementary treatment of acupuncture was performed three times/week from postoperative day 7 until postoperative day 21. Outcome measures were: i) pain as assessed by a visual analog scale; ii) reduction of swelling around the knee as indicated by its circumference at the center of the patella; and iii) ROM of the affected knee. Group A patients had significantly reduced pain and swelling around the knees and earlier recovery of ROM than did those in Group C. Acupuncture provides effective treatment during the post-acute phase of rehabilitation after TKA with respect to pain relief, reduction of swelling around the knee, and early recovery of ROM.

  1. Neuroendocrine dysfunction in acute phase of moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, K L; Mittal, R S; Gandhi, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Most of the retrospective studies have demonstrated that traumatic brain injury mediated hypopituitarism could be more frequent than previously known. Therefore, this study has prospectively investigated pituitary function and their correlation with severity, pressure effect and Glasgow Outcome Scale in the acute phase of moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury. One hundred consecutive moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury patients from August 2012 to November 2013 formed the study group. Apart from clinical assessment, non-contrast computed tomography of the head was performed on all patients on admission. The hormonal analysis (fT3, fT4, TSH, GH, Cortisol, Prolactin) was performed within 24 hours of traumatic brain injury and was repeated on the 7th day amongst the patients who survived. Growth hormone was the most common hormone to decrease. Cortisol was the most common hormone to increase. Risk of pituitary insufficiency was increased in patients with severe traumatic brain injury, patients with increased intracranial pressure and who had low Glasgow Outcome Scale. Neuroendocrine dysfunction occurs often in the acute phase of moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury, more commonly in patients with severe traumatic brain injury, patients with pressure effects and low Glasgow Outcome Scale. Hormonal analysis should be considered in patients with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury, so that appropriate hormonal replacement can be done to optimize the clinical outcome.

  2. Acute phase reactants predict the risk of amputation in diabetic foot infection.

    PubMed

    Akinci, Baris; Yener, Serkan; Yesil, Sena; Yapar, Nur; Kucukyavas, Yasin; Bayraktar, Firat

    2011-01-01

    prediction of amputation would aid clinicians in the management of diabetic foot infections. We aimed to assess the predictive value of baseline and post-treatment levels of acute phase reactants in the outcome of patients with diabetic foot infections. we collected data prospectively during minimum follow-up of 6 months in patients with infected diabetic foot ulcers hospitalized in Dokuz Eylul University Hospital between January 1, 2003, and January 1, 2008. After excluding patients who did not attend the hospital for follow-up visits regularly (n = 36), we analyzed data from 165 foot ulcer episodes. limb ischemia and osteomyelitis were much more frequent in patients who underwent amputation. Wagner grade, which assesses ulcer depth and the presence of osteomyelitis or gangrene, was higher in patients who needed amputation. Ulcer size was slightly larger in the amputation group. Baseline and post-treatment C-reactive protein levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, white blood cell counts, and platelet counts were significantly elevated in patients who underwent amputation. Albumin levels were significantly suppressed in the amputation group. Univariate analysis showed that a 1-SD increase in baseline and post-treatment C-reactive protein levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, and white blood cell counts and a 1-SD decrease in post-treatment albumin levels were significantly associated with increased risk of amputation. Post-treatment C-reactive protein level was strongly associated with amputation risk. circulating levels of acute phase reactants were associated with amputation risk in diabetic foot infections.

  3. Effect of blonanserin on cognitive and social function in acute phase Japanese schizophrenia compared with risperidone

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hikaru; Yamada, Kenji; Kamada, Dan; Shibata, Yuka; Katsuki, Asuka; Yoshimura, Reiji; Nakamura, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aims to determine the effectiveness of blonanserin (BNS) on the cognitive and social functions of patients with schizophrenia compared with risperidone (RIS) during acute-phase (8-week) treatment. Methods A total of 39 schizophrenia inpatients were included in this study. The subjects received either BNS (N=20) or RIS (N=19), and the clinical responses were evaluated periodically. The concomitant use of mood stabilizers was not allowed. Efficacy was assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale for schizophrenia. Cognition was assessed using the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia, Japanese-language version. Social function was assessed using the Life Assessment Scale for the Mentally Ill. Results For both groups, each assessment exhibited a decrease in the mean change from baseline on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. The depression subscale was significantly improved in the BNS group compared with the RIS group at 8 weeks after administration. BNS improved verbal fluency and executive function (cognitive function) and daily living and work skills (social function). Compared with the RIS group, BNS was observed to improve daily living. Conclusion BNS may improve psychotic symptoms, cognitive function, and daily living in patients with acute-phase schizophrenia. BNS may be superior to RIS in the improvement of daily living. PMID:24707178

  4. Effect of blonanserin on cognitive and social function in acute phase Japanese schizophrenia compared with risperidone.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hikaru; Yamada, Kenji; Kamada, Dan; Shibata, Yuka; Katsuki, Asuka; Yoshimura, Reiji; Nakamura, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effectiveness of blonanserin (BNS) on the cognitive and social functions of patients with schizophrenia compared with risperidone (RIS) during acute-phase (8-week) treatment. A total of 39 schizophrenia inpatients were included in this study. The subjects received either BNS (N=20) or RIS (N=19), and the clinical responses were evaluated periodically. The concomitant use of mood stabilizers was not allowed. Efficacy was assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale for schizophrenia. Cognition was assessed using the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia, Japanese-language version. Social function was assessed using the Life Assessment Scale for the Mentally Ill. For both groups, each assessment exhibited a decrease in the mean change from baseline on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. The depression subscale was significantly improved in the BNS group compared with the RIS group at 8 weeks after administration. BNS improved verbal fluency and executive function (cognitive function) and daily living and work skills (social function). Compared with the RIS group, BNS was observed to improve daily living. BNS may improve psychotic symptoms, cognitive function, and daily living in patients with acute-phase schizophrenia. BNS may be superior to RIS in the improvement of daily living.

  5. Platelet Induction of the Acute Phase Response Is Protective in Murine Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Aggrey, Angela A.; Srivastava, Kalyan; Field, David J.; Morrell, Craig N.

    2013-01-01

    Platelets are most recognized as the cellular mediator of thrombosis, but they are increasingly appreciated for their immunomodulatory roles, including responses to Plasmodium infection. Platelet interactions with endothelial cells and leukocytes contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). Recently it has been suggested that platelets not only have an adverse role in cerebral malaria, but platelets may also be protective in animal models of uncomplicated malaria. We now demonstrate that these diverse and seemingly contradictory roles for platelets extend to cerebral malaria models and are dependent on the timing of platelet activation during infection. Our data shows that platelets are activated very early in ECM and have a central role in initiation of the acute phase response to blood stage infection. Unlike platelet depletion or inhibition post infection, pre-infection platelet depletion or treatment with a platelet inhibitor is not protective. Additionally, we show that platelet driven acute phase responses have a major role in protecting mice from ECM by limiting parasite growth. Our data now suggests that platelets have a complex role in ECM pathogenesis: platelets help limit parasite growth early post infection, but with continued platelet activation as the disease progresses, platelets contribute to ECM associated inflammation. PMID:23536632

  6. Neurohormonal activation in ischemic stroke: effects of acute phase disturbances on long-term mortality.

    PubMed

    Anne, Mäkikallio; Juha, Korpelainen; Timo, Mäkikallio; Mikko, Tulppo; Olli, Vuolteenaho; Kyösti, Sotaniemi; Heikki, Huikuri; Vilho, Myllylä

    2007-08-01

    A stress response consisting of elevated levels of cortisol and catecholamines is common after acute stroke. The plasma levels of natriuretic peptides are known to be elevated after ischemic stroke, but the relations of these neurohormonal systems in the acute phase of stroke and their impact on long-term prognosis have not been studied previously. A series of 51 consecutive patients (mean age 68+/-11 years) with an ischemic first-ever stroke underwent a comprehensive clinical investigation, scoring of their neurologic deficit by Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS), Barthel Index (BI) and Modified Ranking Scale (MRS) as well as measurements of plasma cortisol, norepinephrine, epinephrine, ACTH and atrial (N-ANP) and brain (N-BNP) natriuretic peptides on the 2nd and 7th days after ischemic stroke. The patients were followed up for 44+/-21 months. Higher levels of cortisol, ACTH and natriuretic peptides were observed in the stroke patients who died (n=22) during the follow-up than in the stroke survivors. Cortisol levels associated significantly with the 2nd and 7th day N-ANP and N-BNP levels, catecholamine levels (r= 0.55 - 0.94, p<0.01 for all) and measures of neurologic deficit (r= 0.36 - -0.44, p<0.05). High acute phase cortisol levels assessed either in the morning (RR=5.4, p<0.05) or in the evening (RR=5.8, p<0.05) predicted long-term mortality after stroke in multivariate analysis. Activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in ischemic stroke is associated with elevated levels of natriuretic peptides. High cortisol and natriuretic peptide values predict long-term mortality after ischemic stroke, suggesting that this profound neurohumoral disturbance is prognostically unfavourable.

  7. Circulating soluble programmed death-1 levels may differentiate immune-tolerant phase from other phases and hepatocellular carcinoma from other clinical diseases in chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Sang, Jiao; Han, Qunying; Lv, Yi; Zhao, Wenxuan; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Zhengwen

    2017-01-01

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) is involved in the immune dysfunction of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study analyzed the association of circulating soluble PD-1 (sPD-1) levels with the phases and clinical diseases in chronic HBV infection. Serum sPD-1 levels were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with different phases and liver diseases of chronic HBV infection. The sPD-1 levels in patients with chronic HBV infection were significantly elevated compared with HBV infection resolvers or healthy controls. According to phases, sPD-1 level in immune-tolerant phase (IT) was significantly lower than in other phases. Multivariate analysis showed that sPD-1 was an independent factor associated with IT. Area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves (AUC) showed that sPD-1 was significantly discriminative of IT from other phases with a cut-off of 1.535 ng/mL (AUC, 0.984; P<0.001). According to clinical diseases, sPD-1 level in HBV-related HCC was significantly higher than in other clinical diseases. Multivariate analysis showed that sPD-1 was an independent factor associated with HCC. The sPD-1 was significantly discriminative of HCC from other clinical diseases with a cut-off of 6.058 ng/mL (AUC, 0.962; P<0.001). The sPD-1 levels were significantly associated with HCC patients’ overall survival. HCC resection resulted in remarkable reduction in sPD-1 levels. These results demonstrate the involvement of sPD-1 in the disease course of chronic HBV infection and indicate the potential to apply sPD-1 as a biomarker for differentiating IT from other phases and HCC from other disease conditions in chronic HBV infection. PMID:28545019

  8. Sex-differences in resident immune cell phenotype underlies more efficient acute inflammatory responses in female mice

    PubMed Central

    Scotland, Ramona S.; Stables, Melanie J.; Madalli, Shimona; Watson, Peter; Gilroy, Derek W.

    2017-01-01

    Females are protected against mortality arising from severe sepsis. The precise mechanisms that confer this survival advantage in females over males are unclear. Resident leukocytes in resting tissues have a significant influence on circulating cytokine levels and recruitment of blood leukocytes during acute inflammatory responses. Whether the phenotype of resident leukocytes is distinct in females is unknown. Herein we show that the numbers of leukocytes occupying the naive peritoneal and pleural cavities is higher in female than in male mice and rats, comprising more T- and B-lymphocytes as well as macrophages. The altered immune cell composition of the female peritoneum is controlled by elevated tissue chemokine expression. Female resident macrophages also exhibit greater Toll-like receptor expression, as well as enhanced phagocytosis and NADPHoxidase-mediated bacterial killing. However, macrophage-derived cytokine production is diminished by proportionally more resident immunomodulatory CD4+ T-lymphocytes. Ovarian hormones regulate macrophage phenotype, function, and numbers but have no significant impact on T-lymphocyte populations in females. Thus we have identified a fundamental sex-difference in phenotype of resident leukocytes. We propose that the distinct resident leukocyte population in females allows aggressive recognition and elimination of diverse infectious stimuli without recruitment of circulating neutrophils or excessive cytokine production. PMID:21911834

  9. A neurodegeneration-specific gene expression signature and immune profile of acutely isolated microglia from an ALS mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Isaac M.; Morimoto, Emiko T.A.; Goodarzi, Hani; Liao, Jennifer T.; O’Keeffe, Sean; Phatnani, Hemali P.; Muratet, Michael; Carroll, Michael C.; Levy, Shawn; Tavazoie, Saeed; Myers, Richard M.; Maniatis, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are resident immune cells of the CNS that are activated by infection, neuronal injury and inflammation. Here we utilize flow cytometry and deep RNA sequencing of acutely isolated spinal cord microglia to define their activation in vivo. Analysis of resting microglia identified 29 genes that distinguish microglia from other CNS cells and peripheral macrophages/monocytes. We then analyzed molecular changes in microglia during neurodegenerative disease activation using the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS. We find that SOD1G93A microglia are not derived from infiltrating monocytes, and that both potentially neuroprotective and toxic factors are concurrently up-regulated, including Alzheimer’s disease genes. Mutant microglia differed from SOD1WT, LPS activated microglia, and M1/M2 macrophages, that define an ALS-specific phenotype. Concurrent mRNA/FACS analysis revealed post-transcriptional regulation of microglia surface receptors, and T cell-associated changes in the transcriptome. These results provide insights into microglia biology and establish a resource for future studies of neuroinflammation. PMID:23850290

  10. Myocardial changes in acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Ultrastructural evidence of immune damage and the role of microangiopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Z. A.; Andrade, S. G.; Correa, R.; Sadigursky, M.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1994-01-01

    Histological and ultrastructural studies of the hearts of dogs sacrificed 18 to 26 days after intraperitoneal inoculation with 4 x 10(5) blood forms of the 12 SF strain of Trypanosoma cruzi/kg of body weight disclosed myocarditis characterized by parasitic invasion of some myocytes, damage and necrosis of nonparasitized myocytes, and interstitial infiltration by mononuclear cells. Nonparasitized myocytes showed alterations ranging from mild edema to severe myocytolysis. These changes often were accompanied by contacts of myocytes with lymphocytes (both granular and agranular) and macrophages. These contacts were characterized by focal loss of the myocyte basement membrane and close approximation of the plasma membranes of the two cells. Contacts between lymphocytes and capillary endothelial cells were also frequent. Platelet aggregates and fibrin microthrombi were observed in some capillaries. Our findings suggest that immune effector cells play a major role in the pathogenesis of the myocyte damage and the microangiopathy in acute Chagas' disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:8203476

  11. The course of acute-phase proteins and serum cortisol in mastitis metritis agalactia (MMA) of the sow and sow performance.

    PubMed

    van Gelder, K N; Bilkei, G

    2005-01-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate changes in acute-phase proteins (APPs) during mastitis metritis agalactia (MMA) in sows. Sows with MMA (group one, n=15) and healthy sows (group two, n = 15) were evaluated at days 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 postpartum. Number of total born, liveborn, stillborn, and mummified pigs did not differ significantly between the groups. Preweaning mortality was higher (P < 0.001) among MMA sows than among healthy control animals. The offspring of healthy sows had higher (P < 0.05) weaning litter weights than the off-spring of MMA sows. Mean serum alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) concentrations were higher in MMA sows on the days 1 (P < 0.05), 5 (P = 0.05), and 10 (P < 0.001) post partum. Mean serum haptoglobin (HPT) was higher in MMA sows on days 1, 5 (P < 0.001), and 10 (P < 0.05) of lactation. Cortisol serum concentrations up to day 10 post partum were higher (P < 0.001) in MMA sows than in healthy sows. AGP was negatively correlated with litter weight, indicating that activation of the cellular immune response in sows negatively affects the growth rate of suckling piglets. Correlations were found between the overall means for weight, acute-phase proteins, and serum cortisol concentration.

  12. Impact of genotype-specific herd immunity on the circulatory dynamism of norovirus: a 10-year longitudinal study of viral acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Sakon, Naomi; Yamazaki, Kenji; Nakata, Keiko; Kanbayashi, Daiki; Yoda, Tomoko; Mantani, Masanobu; Kase, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Kazuo; Komano, Jun

    2015-03-15

    Human norovirus is a major cause of viral acute gastroenteritis worldwide. However, the transition of endemic norovirus genotypes remains poorly understood. The characteristics of natural immunity against norovirus are unclear because few studies have been performed in the natural infection setting. This prospective 10-year surveillance study of acute gastroenteritis in the province of Osaka, Japan, revealed that norovirus spread shows temporal, geographic, and age group-specific features in the humans. Genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) was detected in most sporadic pediatric cases, as well as in foodborne and nursing home outbreaks, respectively. The dominant genotypes in outbreaks at childcare facilities and schools shifted every season and involved GI, GII.2, GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6. Evidence at both the facility and individual levels indicated that genotype-specific herd immunity lasted long enough to influence the endemic norovirus genotype in the next season. Thus, norovirus circulates through human populations in a uniquely dynamic fashion.

  13. [EFFECT OF 4-METHYLPYRAZOLE ON IMMUNE RESPONSE, FUNCTION OF Th1 AND Th2 LYMPHOCYTES, AND CYTOKINE CONCENTRATION IN RAT BLOOD AFTER ACUTE METHANOL POISONING].

    PubMed

    Zabrodskii, P F; Maslyakov, V V; Gromov, M S

    2016-01-01

    It was established in experiments on noninbred albino rats that the acute intoxication with methanol (1.0 LD50) decreased cellular and humoral immune responses, Th2-lymphocyte activity (to a greater extent as compared to the function of Th1 cells), reduced the blood concentration of immunoregulatory (IFN-g, IL-2, IL-4) and proinflammatory (TNF, IL-1b, IL-6) cytokines on the average by 36.5% (p < 0.05), and did not affect the content of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-13). Methanol antidote 4-methylpyrazole (non-competitive inhibitor of alcohol dehydrogenase) administered upon acute intoxication with methanol at a dose of 1.0 DL50 partially reduces the intoxication-induced suppression of humoral and cellular immune response, activity of T-helper cells, and production of IL-4 and restores blood levels of TNF, IL-1b, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-2, IL-6 to the control values.

  14. FcRγ-dependent immune activation initiates astrogliosis during the asymptomatic phase of Sandhoff disease model mice

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Sano, Takafumi; Irisa, Masahiro; Kodama, Takashi; Saito, Takahiro; Furusawa, Eiri; Kaizu, Katsutoshi; Yanagi, Yusuke; Tsukimura, Takahiro; Togawa, Tadayasu; Yamanaka, Shoji; Itoh, Kohji; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Oishi, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is caused by the loss of β-hexosaminidase (Hex) enzymatic activity in lysosomes resulting from Hexb mutations. In SD patients, the Hex substrate GM2 ganglioside accumulates abnormally in neuronal cells, resulting in neuronal loss, microglial activation, and astrogliosis. Hexb−/− mice, which manifest a phenotype similar to SD, serve as animal models for examining the pathophysiology of SD. Hexb−/− mice reach ~8 weeks without obvious neurological defects; however, trembling begins at 12 weeks and is accompanied by startle reactions and increased limb tone. These symptoms gradually become severe by 16–18 weeks. Immune reactions caused by autoantibodies have been recently associated with the pathology of SD. The inhibition of immune activation may represent a novel therapeutic target for SD. Herein, SD mice (Hexb−/−) were crossed to mice lacking an activating immune receptor (FcRγ−/−) to elucidate the potential relationship between immune responses activated through SD autoantibodies and astrogliosis. Microglial activation and astrogliosis were observed in cortices of Hexb−/− mice during the asymptomatic phase, and were inhibited in Hexb−/− FcRγ−/− mice. Moreover, early astrogliosis and impaired motor coordination in Hexb−/− mice could be ameliorated by immunosuppressants, such as FTY720. Our findings demonstrate the importance of early treatment and the therapeutic effectiveness of immunosuppression in SD. PMID:28084424

  15. MyD88 Shapes Vaccine Immunity by Extrinsically Regulating Survival of CD4+ T Cells during the Contraction Phase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huafeng; Hung, Chiung Yu; Sinha, Meenal; Lee, Linda M.; Wiesner, Darin L.; LeBert, Vanessa; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; Suresh, Marulasiddappa; DeFranco, Anthony L.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Klein, Bruce S.; Wüthrich, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Soaring rates of systemic fungal infections worldwide underscore the need for vaccine prevention. An understanding of the elements that promote vaccine immunity is essential. We previously reported that Th17 cells are required for vaccine immunity to the systemic dimorphic fungi of North America, and that Card9 and MyD88 signaling are required for the development of protective Th17 cells. Herein, we investigated where, when and how MyD88 regulates T cell development. We uncovered a novel mechanism in which MyD88 extrinsically regulates the survival of activated T cells during the contraction phase and in the absence of inflammation, but is dispensable for the expansion and differentiation of the cells. The poor survival of activated T cells in Myd88-/- mice is linked to increased caspase3-mediated apoptosis, but not to Fas- or Bim-dependent apoptotic pathways, nor to reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL. Moreover, TLR3, 7, and/or 9, but not TLR2 or 4, also were required extrinsically for MyD88-dependent Th17 cell responses and vaccine immunity. Similar MyD88 requirements governed the survival of virus primed T cells. Our data identify unappreciated new requirements for eliciting adaptive immunity and have implications for designing vaccines. PMID:27542117

  16. Assessing the utility of the ventilation phase in ventilation-perfusion imaging for acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Lars J; Coleman, Ralph E

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to identify patient characteristics that allow the exclusion of the ventilation phase in ventilation-perfusion imaging for the evaluation of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). A total of 500 consecutive ventilation-perfusion reports with an indication for possible acute PE were retrospectively reviewed. Information on ventilation abnormalities, perfusion defects, PIOPED classification, age, sex, chest radiograph results, and presence of respiratory disease was recorded. Patients with moderate and large perfusion defects were analyzed to assess the utility of the ventilation phase on the final PIOPED classification. Moderate (n=39) or large (n=26) perfusion defects were seen in 65 (13%) studies. Of these, 46 studies (70.8%) had defects unmatched on ventilation and three (4.6%) had triple-match defects, resulting in 49 reports (75.4%) classified as intermediate (n=28) or high (n=21) probability for PE. There was a statistically significant association between unmatched defects and a clear chest radiograph (P=0.03) and an association approaching statistical significance with younger age (P=0.05). There was a strong association with respiratory disease (P=0.12) and no association with patient sex (P=0.82). The percentage of studies with unmatched defects increased from 70.8 to 76.7% (33/43, P=0.39) if patients with respiratory disease were excluded, to 82.4% (28/34, P=0.14) if abnormal chest radiographs were excluded, and to 95.7% (22/23, P=0.01) if both were excluded. There may be a subset of patients - younger patients with clear chest radiographs and no respiratory disease - for whom the ventilation phase can be excluded and the determination of a PE is based solely on perfusion abnormalities.

  17. Impaired hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific effector CD8+ T cells undergo massive apoptosis in the peripheral blood during acute HCV infection and in the liver during the chronic phase of infection.

    PubMed

    Radziewicz, Henry; Ibegbu, Chris C; Hon, Huiming; Osborn, Melissa K; Obideen, Kamil; Wehbi, Mohammad; Freeman, Gordon J; Lennox, Jeffrey L; Workowski, Kimberly A; Hanson, Holly L; Grakoui, Arash

    2008-10-01

    A majority of patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) do not sustain an effective T-cell response, and viremia persists. The mechanism leading to failure of the HCV-specific CD8(+) T-cell response in patients developing chronic infection is unclear. We investigated apoptosis susceptibility of HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells during the acute and chronic stages of infection. Although HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells in the blood during the acute phase of infection and in the liver during the chronic phase were highly activated and expressed an effector phenotype, the majority was undergoing apoptosis. In contrast, peripheral blood HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells during the chronic phase expressed a resting memory phenotype. Apoptosis susceptibility of HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells was associated with very high levels of programmed death-1 (PD-1) and low CD127 expression and with significant functional T-cell deficits. Further evaluation of the "death phase" of HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells during acute HCV infection showed that the majority of cells were dying by a process of cytokine withdrawal, mediated by activated caspase 9. Contraction during the acute phase occurred rapidly via this process despite the persistence of the virus. Remarkably, in the chronic phase of HCV infection, at the site of infection in the liver, a substantial frequency of caspase 9-mediated T-cell death was also present. This study highlights the importance of cytokine deprivation-mediated apoptosis with consequent down-modulation of the immune response to HCV during acute and chronic infections.

  18. Rapid Sequential Changeover of Expressed p44 Genes during the Acute Phase of Anaplasma phagocytophilum Infection in Horses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueqi; Rikihisa, Yasuko; Lai, Tzung-Hui; Kumagai, Yumi; Zhi, Ning; Reed, Stephen M.

    2004-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum immunodominant polymorphic major surface protein P44s have been hypothesized to go through antigenic variation, but the within-host dynamics of p44 expression has not been demonstrated. In the present study we investigated the composition and changes of p44 transcripts in the blood during the acute phase of well-defined laboratory A. phagocytophilum infections in naïve equine hosts. Three traveling waves of sequential population changeovers of the p44 transcript species were observed within a single peak of rickettsemia of less than 1 month. During the logarithmic increase, the rapid switch-off of the initial dominant transcript p44-18 occurred regardless of whether the bacterium was transmitted by ticks or by intravenous inoculation. Each of the subsequently dominant p44 transcript species was phylogenetically dissimilar from p44-18. Development of antibody to the hypervariable region of P44-18 during the rickettsemia suggests the suppression of dominance of immuno-cross-reactive p44 populations. When A. phagocytophilum was preincubated with plasma from the infected horse and then coincubated with HL-60 cells, the dominance of the p44-18 transcript was rapidly suppressed in vitro and most of the newly emerged p44 transcript species were previously undetected in this horse. This work provides experimental evidence of within-host p44 antigenic variation. Results suggest that the rapid and synchronized switch of expression is an intrinsic property of p44s reinitiated after transmission to naïve mammalian hosts and shaped upon exposure to immune plasma. PMID:15557606

  19. Selected acute phase proteins and interleukin-6 in systemic lupus erythematosus patients treated with low doses of quinagolide.

    PubMed

    Hrycek, Antoni; Pochopień-Kenig, Grazyna; Scieszka, Joanna

    2007-05-01

    The relationship between endocrine regulation and immune system has recently become the subject of intense investigations. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of selected serum acute phase proteins (APP), IL-6 and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients during quinagolide therapy. A further aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships between the above mentioned parameters. In 25 SLE patients treated with a low dose of quinagolide (12.5-50 microg per day) and in 25 healthy persons who constituted the control group, serum concentration of C-creative protein (CRP), alpha-1-antitripsin (AAT), ceruloplasmin (CER), IL-6 and prolactin (PRL) were estimated at entry and in patients after 3 months of treatment. Moreover, SLEDAI score was calculated at entry and after 3 months of therapy with quinagolide. IL-6 and PRL levels were significantly higher in SLE group whereas the concentrations of CRP, AAT and CER were higher than in the controls, but without statistical significance. After 3 month therapy statistically significant decrease of serum level of IL-6 and PRL was revealed. Statistically significant lower serum concentration of CER was also obtained after 3 months of therapy whereas serum CRP and AAT concentration was lower compared with the mean pretreatment level but the results did not reach statistical significance. A raised SLEDAI score at entry was significantly reduced after 3 month therapy and positive correlation with PRL level in examined group of patients with SLE was noted at entry. The decreased serum concentration of IL-6, APP and SLEDAI score observed during applied therapy with small dose of quinagolide confirms the hypothesis that quinagolide may become a valuable and safe drug in the therapy of patients with mild SLE.

  20. Delay of late-venous phase cortical vein filling in acute ischemic stroke patients: Associations with collateral status.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Sonu; Bivard, Andrew; Parsons, Mark; Nilsson, Michael; Attia, John R; Stanwell, Peter; Levi, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    Evaluation of the venous system may be useful in stroke prognostication and patient selection for acute intervention strategies. We report a novel phenomenon, delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling, observed on dynamic computed tomography angiography obtained using multidetector computed tomography scanner, in acute ischemic stroke patients. The aim of this study was to examine the frequency of delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling and assess its association to baseline collateral status. Dynamic computed tomography angiography images of acute ischemic stroke patients, being assessed for reperfusion therapy, were prospectively studied. Delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling was defined by late venous phase opacification of cortical veins despite contrast clearance from contralateral cortical veins on dynamic computed tomography angiography. Time to peak of maximum arterial enhancement was recorded. A total of 117 patients (mean age = 70.6 ± 13.3 years; males = 48%) with hemispheric ischemic stroke who underwent acute dynamic computed tomography angiography were included in the study. Overall, 56 (48%) demonstrated delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling. Poor collateralization (OR = 13.50; 95% CI = (4.2, 43); p ≤ 0.0001) and longer time to peak of maximum arterial enhancement (OR = 3.2; 95% CI = (1.96, 5.3); p  ≤ 0.0001) were positively associated with delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling. Delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling was independently associated with poor baseline collateral status (75% vs. 15%, p ≤ 0.0001; OR = 14.38; 95% CI = (4.33, 47.8); p ≤ 0.0001). Delayed-late venous phase cortical vein filling is frequently seen in patients with acute ischemic stroke and is associated with poor baseline collateralization.

  1. Hypocortisolism in noncomatose patients during the acute phase of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lanterna, Luigi A; Spreafico, Veronica; Gritti, Paolo; Prodam, Flavia; Signorelli, Antonio; Biroli, Francesco; Aimaretti, Gianluca

    2013-10-01

    Hypopituitarism represents a common long-term complication of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The incidence of hypocortisolism may be higher during the acute phase of SAH. Although hypocortisolism may be harmful in critically ill SAH patients, data are still lacking. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the incidence of hypocortisolism during the acute phase of SAH (15 days). Secondary objectives included an analysis of the relationship between hypocortisolism and outcome and the computation of the cortisol-time secretion curve. Clinical data of a consecutive series of 26 noncomatose patients with aneurysmal SAH were collected prospectively. The sample size was calculated considering an expected proportion of hypocortisolism of 30%, a confidence level of 95%, and a total width of confidence interval of 0.35. The definition of hypocortisolism (as taken from a statement from the critical care medicine task forces) includes random total cortisol <10 μg/dL or a Δtotal serum cortisol <9 μg/dL after 1 μg of corticotrophin hormone. Hypocortisolism was diagnosed in 11 patients (42.3%). Cortisol increment after stimulation test was always >9 μg/dl, suggesting a hypothalamic-pituitary impairment. Hypocortisolism was independently associated with a higher risk of poor outcome (P = .046) even after adjusting for age and Hunt and Hess grade. The cortisol-time secretion curve showed a peak at day 5 and a minimum at day 8. The peak at day 5 correlated with the risk of delayed cerebral ischemia (P = .001), and the cortisol concentration slope between days 1 and 8 correlated with the risk of poor outcome (P = .033). Patients with SAH are at high risk of secondary hypocortisolism during the first 15 days after bleeding. Hypocortisolism independently increases the risk of poor outcome. The acute phase of hypothalamo-pituitary dysfunction, as reflected by an abnormal day-by-day cortisol secretion pattern, may affect the risk of delayed cerebral ischemia

  2. Induction of rat alpha-1-acid glycoprotein by phenobarbital is independent of a general acute-phase response.

    PubMed

    Fournier, T; Vranckx, R; Mejdoubi, N; Durand, G; Porquet, D

    1994-10-07

    Phenobarbital (PB) induces transcription of the alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) gene, one of the major positive acute-phase proteins, the expression of which is controlled by a specific combination of glucocorticoids and cytokines. This raises questions as to the involvement of glucocorticoids and cytokine pathways in the PB-mediated effect on AGP gene expression. We found that the pattern of whole-serum proteins in PB-treated rats differed markedly from that observed during a typical acute inflammatory response (in turpentine-treated rats): levels of some positive acute-phase proteins (APP) increased slightly (alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin, hemopexin and T-kininogen), while levels of alpha 2 macroglobulin, the most sensitive marker of the acute-phase reaction, decreased. Among the negative APP, neither albumin nor prealbumin decreased while CBG increased. The cytokines involved in AGP gene regulation (mainly IL1, IL6 and TNF alpha) do not therefore seem to mediate the effect of PB on acute-phase protein expression. Glucocorticoid involvement is also ruled out by the observed enhancement of the effect of PB on AGP expression in adrenalectomized animals. Our results suggest that phenobarbital acts on AGP expression by a mechanism independent of the inflammatory pathway.

  3. The immune profile associated with acute allergic asthma accelerates clearance of influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Samarasinghe, Amali E; Woolard, Stacie N; Boyd, Kelli L; Hoselton, Scott A; Schuh, Jane M; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2014-01-01

    Asthma was the most common comorbidity in hospitalized patients during the 2009 influenza pandemic. For unknown reasons, hospitalized asthmatics had less severe outcomes and were less likely to die from pandemic influenza. Our data with primary human bronchial cells indicate that changes intrinsic to epithelial cells in asthma may protect against cytopathology induced by influenza virus. To further study influenza virus pathogenesis in allergic hosts, we aimed to develop and characterize murine models of asthma and influenza comorbidity to determine structural, physiological and immunological changes induced by influenza in the context of asthma. Aspergillus fumigatus-sensitized and -challenged C57BL/6 mice were infected with pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, either during peak allergic inflammation or during airway remodeling to gain insight into disease pathogenesis. Mice infected with the influenza virus during peak allergic inflammation did not lose body weight and cleared the virus rapidly. These mice exhibited high eosinophilia, preserved airway epithelial cell integrity, increased mucus, reduced interferon response and increased insulin-like growth factor-1. In contrast, weight loss and viral replication kinetics in the mice that were infected during the late airway remodeling phase were equivalent to flu-only controls. These mice had neutrophils in the airways, damaged airway epithelial cells, less mucus production, increased interferons and decreased insulin-like growth factor-1. The state of the allergic airways at the time of influenza virus infection alters host responses against the virus. These murine models of asthma and influenza comorbidity may improve our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of viral infections in humans with asthma.

  4. Menstrual phase and depressive symptoms differences in physiological response to nicotine following acute smoking abstinence.

    PubMed

    Allen, Sharon S; Allen, Alicia M; Kotlyar, Michael; Lunos, Scott; Al'absi, Mustafa; Hatsukami, Dorothy

    2013-06-01

    Accumulating evidence has linked depressive symptoms and sex hormones to risk for relapse; however, the specific mechanisms involved in these associations remain unknown. This randomized crossover study assessed physiological response to nicotine by menstrual phase in female smokers with and without depressive symptoms following acute smoking abstinence. Females, ages 18-40 years with regular menstrual cycles, not on exogenous hormones or psychotropic medications, who reported smoking ≥ 5 cigarettes/day were enrolled. Participants were stratified into 2 groups: no depressive symptoms (NDS; n = 23) and depressive symptoms (DS; n = 24). After 4 days of biochemically verified smoking abstinence, participants completed 2 laboratory sessions in the follicular (F) and luteal (L) phases. Participants used nicotine nasal spray at Time 0, and blood pressure, heart rate, and serum nicotine were measured at Time -1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, and 90 min. Participants (n = 47) were 29.1 ± 6.8 years old and smoked an average of 12.5 ± 5.1 cigarettes/day. The NDS group had more pronounced menstrual phase differences (F > L) in diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, and maximum concentrations of nicotine compared with the DS group (p < .05). This study observed an interaction between sex hormones and depressive symptoms such that those without depressive symptoms had a greater menstrual phase difference in the physiological response to nicotine. These data offer additional support for the role of sex hormones in the physiological response to nicotine, which may play a role in menstrual phase effects on smoking cessation.

  5. Baclofen, a GABABR agonist, ameliorates immune-complex mediated acute lung injury by modulating pro-inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shunying; Merchant, Michael L; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; McLeish, Kenneth R; Lederer, Eleanor D; Torres-Gonzalez, Edilson; Fraig, Mostafa; Barati, Michelle T; Lentsch, Alex B; Roman, Jesse; Klein, Jon B; Rane, Madhavi J

    2015-01-01

    Immune-complexes play an important role in the inflammatory diseases of the lung. Neutrophil activation mediates immune-complex (IC) deposition-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Components of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) signaling, including GABA B receptor 2 (GABABR2), GAD65/67 and the GABA transporter, are present in the lungs and in the neutrophils. However, the role of pulmonary GABABR activation in the context of neutrophil-mediated ALI has not been determined. Thus, the objective of the current study was to determine whether administration of a GABABR agonist, baclofen would ameliorate or exacerbate ALI. We hypothesized that baclofen would regulate IC-induced ALI by preserving pulmonary GABABR expression. Rats were subjected to sham injury or IC-induced ALI and two hours later rats were treated intratracheally with saline or 1 mg/kg baclofen for 2 additional hours and sacrificed. ALI was assessed by vascular leakage, histology, TUNEL, and lung caspase-3 cleavage. ALI increased total protein, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α and interleukin-1 receptor associated protein (IL-1R AcP), in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Moreover, ALI decreased lung GABABR2 expression, increased phospho-p38 MAPK, promoted IκB degradation and increased neutrophil influx in the lung. Administration of baclofen, after initiation of ALI, restored GABABR expression, which was inhibited in the presence of a GABABR antagonist, CGP52432. Baclofen administration activated pulmonary phospho-ERK and inhibited p38 MAPK phosphorylation and IκB degradation. Additionally, baclofen significantly inhibited pro-inflammatory TNF-α and IL-1βAcP release and promoted BAL neutrophil apoptosis. Protective effects of baclofen treatment on ALI were possibly mediated by inhibition of TNF-α- and IL-1β-mediated inflammatory signaling. Interestingly, GABABR2 expression was regulated in the type II pneumocytes in lung tissue sections from lung injured patients, further suggesting a

  6. Role of MRA in the detection of intracranial aneurysm in the acute phase of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pierot, Laurent; Portefaix, Christophe; Rodriguez-Régent, Christine; Gallas, Sophie; Meder, Jean-François; Oppenheim, Catherine

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) has been evaluated for the detection of unruptured intracranial aneurysms with favorable results at 3 Tesla (3T) and with similar diagnostic accuracy as both 3D time-of-flight (3D-TOF) and contrast-enhanced (CE-MRA) MRA. However, the diagnostic value and place of MRA in the detection of ruptured aneurysms has been little evaluated. Thus, the goal of this prospective single-center series was to assess the feasibility and diagnostic value of 3T 3D-TOF MRA and CE-MRA for aneurysm detection in acute non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). From March 2006 to December 2007, all consecutive patients admitted to our hospital with acute non-traumatic SAH (≤10 days) were prospectively included in this study evaluating MRA in the diagnostic workup of SAH. Feasibility of MRA and sensitivity/specificity of 3D-TOF and CE-MRA were assessed compared with gold standard DSA. In all, 84 consecutive patients (45 women, 39 men; age 23-86 years) were included. The feasibility of MRA was low (43/84, 51.2%). The reasons given for patients not undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination were clinical status (27 patients), potential delay in aneurysm treatment (11 patients) and contraindications to MRI (three patients). In patients explored by MRA, the sensitivity of CE-MRA (95%) was higher compared with 3D-TOF (86%) with similar specificity (80%). Also, 3D-TOF missed five aneurysms while CE-MRA missed two. The value of MRA in the diagnostic workup of ruptured aneurysms is limited due to its low feasibility during the acute phase of bleeding. Sensitivity for aneurysm detection was good for both MRA techniques, but tended to be better with CE-MRA. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Acute phase response, inflammation and metabolic syndrome biomarkers of Libby asbestos exposure.

    PubMed

    Shannahan, Jonathan H; Alzate, Oscar; Winnik, Witold M; Andrews, Debora; Schladweiler, Mette C; Ghio, Andrew J; Gavett, Stephen H; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2012-04-15

    Identification of biomarkers assists in the diagnosis of disease and the assessment of health risks from environmental exposures. We hypothesized that rats exposed to Libby amphibole (LA) would present with a unique serum proteomic profile which could help elucidate epidemiologically-relevant biomarkers. In four experiments spanning varied protocols and temporality, healthy (Wistar Kyoto, WKY; and F344) and cardiovascular compromised (CVD) rat models (spontaneously hypertensive, SH; and SH heart failure, SHHF) were intratracheally instilled with saline (control) or LA. Serum biomarkers of cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and the acute phase response (APR) were analyzed. All rat strains exhibited acute increases in α-2-macroglobulin, and α1-acid glycoprotein. Among markers of inflammation, lipocalin-2 was induced in WKY, SH and SHHF and osteopontin only in WKY after LA exposure. While rat strain- and age-related changes were apparent in MetS biomarkers, no LA effects were evident. The cancer marker mesothelin was increased only slightly at 1 month in WKY in one of the studies. Quantitative Intact Proteomic profiling of WKY serum at 1 day or 4 weeks after 4 weekly LA instillations indicated no oxidative protein modifications, however APR proteins were significantly increased. Those included serine protease inhibitor, apolipoprotein E, α-2-HS-glycoprotein, t-kininogen 1 and 2, ceruloplasmin, vitamin D binding protein, serum amyloid P, and more 1 day after last LA exposure. All changes were reversible after a short recovery regardless of the acute or long-term exposures. Thus, LA exposure induces an APR and systemic inflammatory biomarkers that could have implications in systemic and pulmonary disease in individuals exposed to LA.

  8. [Acute-phase proteins in the saliva of workers engaged in processing natural gas and condensate high in hydrogen sulfide].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, V I; Dotsenko, Iu I; Boĭko, O V

    2011-06-01

    The paper considers current methods for assessing the workers' health status. It shows it possible to identify increased quantities of acute-phase serum proteins upon exposure to the negative factors characteristic of the Astrakhan gas processing plant. A wider range of tests for acute-phase tissue and serum proteins is proposed to be included in order to gain a fuller insight into the influence of unfavorable industrial factors on man and to make monitoring that enables the existing health risks and the efficiency of preventive measures to be controlled.

  9. The cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity during the acute phase of brain injury.

    PubMed

    Cold, G E; Jensen, F T; Malmros, R

    1977-01-01

    Using the intra-arterial 133xenon (133Xe) method, the cerebrovascular response to acute Paco2 reduction was studied in 26 unconscious, brain-injured patients subjected to controlled ventilation. The CO2 reactivity was calculated as delta in CBF/delta Paco2. The perfusion pressure was defined as the difference between mean arterial pressure and mean intraventricular pressure. Although the CO2 reactivities did not differ significantly from that in awake, normocapnic subjects, it was low in the acute phase of injury, especially in those patients with severe outcome in whom the brain-stem reflexes were often affected. An increase of the CO2 reactivity with time was observed, indicating normal response after 1-2 weeks. Chronic hypocapnia in six unconscious patients resulted in sustained CSF pH adaptation. The question whether a delay in CSF pH adapation exerts an influence on the CO2 reactivity, and the influence of cerebral lactacidosis on the CO2 response are discussed.

  10. Effective factors on linguistic disorder during acute phase following traumatic brain injury in adults.

    PubMed

    Chabok, Shahrokh Yousefzadeh; Kapourchali, Sara Ramezani; Leili, Ehsan Kazemnezhad; Saberi, Alia; Mohtasham-Amiri, Zahra

    2012-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been known to be the leading cause of breakdown and long-term disability in people under 45 years of age. This study highlights the effective factors on post-traumatic (PT) linguistic disorder and relations between linguistic and cognitive function after trauma in adults with acute TBI. A cross-sectional design was employed to study 60 post-TBI hospitalized adults aged 18-65 years. Post-traumatic (PT) linguistic disorder and cognitive deficit after TBI were respectively diagnosed using the Persian Aphasia Test (PAT) and Persian version of Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) at discharge. Primary post-resuscitation consciousness level was determined using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Paracilinical data was obtained by CT scan technique. Multiple logistic regression analysis illustrated that brain injury severity was the first powerful significant predictor of PT linguistic disorder after TBI and frontotemporal lesion was the second. It was also revealed that cognitive function score was significantly correlated with score of each language skill except repetition. Subsequences of TBI are more commonly language dysfunctions that demand cognitive flexibility. Moderate, severe and fronto-temporal lesion can increase the risk of processing deficit in linguistic macrostructure production and comprehension. The dissociation risk of cortical and subcortical pathways related to cognitive-linguistic processing due to intracranial lesions can augment possibility of lexical-semantic processing deficit in acute phase which probably contributes to later cognitive-communication disorder.

  11. Two genes controlling acute phase responses by the antitumor polysacch aride, lentinan.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Y Y; Takahama, S; Kohara, Y; Yonekawa, H

    1996-01-01

    Lentinan, a beta-1,6;1,3-glucan, is tumor-specific for transplantable mouse solid-type tumors and it also stimulates the production of acute phase proteins (APPs). The APP response to lentinan is of the delayed type (DT-APR) and differs from that to lipopolysaccharide, which is acute. We found that the responses were genetically controlled in mice and that low responsiveness is dominant (Maeda et al. 1991). Using 123 segregants of crosses between SWR/J (a high responder) and Mus spretus (a low responder), we analyzed the linkage between DT-APR responsiveness and the DNA polymerase chain reaction-simple sequence length polymorphism (PCR-SSLP) phenotype using 80 chromosome-specific microsatellite markers. We identified two loci (ltn1.1 and ltn1.2) responsible for DT-APR. ltn1.1 is closely linked to D3Mit11 on chromosome 3 and ltn1.2 to D11Nds9 on chromosome 11 (P <0.001). The linkage analysis also suggested that ltn1.2 is the major determinant for DT-APR. Correlation between lentinan-specific IL-6 mRNA expression (the late expression) controlled recessively and DT-APR induction suggests that the ltn1 loci control some process(es) of IL-6 expression in the regulation step before NF-IL6.

  12. Acupuncture as a primary and independent treatment in the acute phases of sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yuanyuan; Lu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) is an otological emergency defined as a rapid hearing loss, seriously affects patient's social life. To data, no study has reported the treatment by acupuncture alone in the acute phase. In this report, Acupuncture and Moxibustion therapy of excitation-focus transfer is outlined. The patient was a 26-year-old young woman who had an SSHL coupled with ear fullness. The patient had no past medical history, but she had undergone variable emotions and had a history of excessive noise exposure. The patient refused to receive any medicine especially steroids and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. She just only received acupuncture treatment. Her symptoms and outcome measurements were improved every week and completely recovered after the last week. Even though the article presents a single case and is based on self-reports, there are very clear trends on how patients with SSHL responded to acupuncture treatments. PMID:27368045

  13. Body composition and phase angle in Russian children in remission from acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseytlin, G. Ja; Khomyakova, I. A.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Konovalova, M. V.; Vashura, A. Yu; Tretyak, A. V.; Godina, E. Z.; Rudnev, S. G.

    2010-04-01

    Elevated degree of body fatness and changes in other body composition parameters are known to be common effects of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children. In order to study peculiarities of somatic growth and development in ALL survivors, we describe the results of BIA body composition analysis of 112 boys and 108 girls aged 5-18 years in remission from ALL (remission time range 1-13 years) compared to data from the same number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n=220). Detrimental effect on height in ALL boys was observed, whereas girls experienced additional weight gain compared to healthy subjects. In ALL patients, resistance, body fat, and percent body fat were significantly increased. The reactance, phase angle, absolute and relative values of skeletal muscle and body cell mass were significantly decreased. Principal component analysis revealed an early prevalence of adiposity traits in the somatic growth and development of ALL girls compared to healthy controls.

  14. Telemedicine in Acute-Phase Injury Management: A Review of Practice and Advancements

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Erin R.; Thomas, Carlos A.; Mbarika, Victor W.A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To offer a systematic review of the body of literature in the emerging field of telemedicine in the management of acute-phase injuries. Materials and Methods: We conducted a literature review. Results: Telemedicine has only recently been applied to the specialties of trauma, emergency care, and surgery. The potential benefits of telemedicine include a decrease in travel expenses, enhanced continuity of care, and increased access to specialized consultants in medically underserved and rural areas. Conclusions: There still exist barriers to the use of teletechnologies in medicine that limit their wider adoption. Poor infrastructure, limited equipment availability, and insufficient access to training and education for medical personnel have prevented wider use. PMID:22694296

  15. Acute phase proteins in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in the course of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Paradowski, M; Lobos, M; Kuydowicz, J; Krakowiak, M; Kubasiewicz-Ujma, B

    1995-08-01

    We carried out estimations of the following acute phase proteins: C-reactive protein (CRP), alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), alpha-2-ceruloplasmin (CER), and alpha-2-haptoglobin (HPT) in serum and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with bacterial meningitis (BM, n = 30) and viral meningitis (VM, n = 30). We have shown that determinations of concentrations of AAG and CRP in serum and CER in CSF are useful in differentiation between BM and VM. The diagnostic power of these three tests (the areas under their ROC curves equal 0.942, 0.929, and 0.931, respectively) is bigger, though statistically not significantly, than that of traditional parameters of BM in CSF, i.e., total protein concentration and white blood cell count. Determination of AAG, CRP, and AAT in serum is a valuable monitoring marker in the course of BM treatment. Convenience of serum sampling constitutes an advantage over traditional BM parameters in CSF.

  16. Measles, mumps, and rubella antibody status and response to immunization in children after therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Aytac, Selin; Yalcin, S Songul; Cetin, Mualla; Yetgin, Sevgi; Gumruk, Fatma; Tuncer, Murat; Yurdakok, Kadriye; Gurgey, Aytemiz

    2010-08-01

    Seventy-seven patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who were in complete remission and whose therapies had been stopped for at least 6 months before enrollment in this study were retrospectively analyzed regarding their antibody status for measles, mumps, and rubella, with the aim to demonstrate the seropositivity rate after treatment in the authors' group. Each patient's serum samples were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method to determine the antibody titers before and after immunization. Measles serology was available in 77 children; 45 (58%) were seronegative. Initial ages of measle-seronegative patients were statistically lower than those of seropositive cases (median 3.29 versus 4.91 years, respectively). Mumps serology was available in 76 children; 36 (47%) were seronegative. Mumps-seropositive cases tended to have more frequent previous history of infection than seronegative cases (55.0% versus 28.6%, respectively, P = .05). Rubella serology was available in 76 children, and 20 (26.3%) were seronegative. It was determined that initial ages of rubella-seronegative patients were statistically lower than those of seropositive cases (median 3.03 versus 4.32 years, respectively). The authors concluded based on the results of their study that at a median of 3.31 years after completion of chemotherapy for ALL, the majority of cases had antibody levels lower than protective values for measles (58.4%); however, these values were 47.3% for mumps and 26.3% for rubella. Seroconversion rates after measles (55%) and mumps vaccination (57.1%) were still low. However, in the available cases, relatively adequate response to rubella vaccination (92.3%) was observed.

  17. Role of IL28B Gene Polymorphism and Cell-Mediated Immunity in Spontaneous Resolution of Acute Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Spada, Enea; Amoroso, Pietro; Taliani, Gloria; Zuccaro, Ornella; Chiriacò, Piergiorgio; Maio, Patrizia; Maio, Giuseppe; Esposito, Maria Luisa; Mariano, Corrado; Rinaldi, Roberto; Bellissima, Pietro; Tosti, Maria Elena; Del Porto, Paola; Francavilla, Ruggiero; Mellace, Vincenzo; Garbuglia, Anna Rosa; Folgori, Antonella; Mele, Alfonso; Buonocore, Salvatore; Lettieri, Gennaro; Pierri, Paola; Cosco, Lucio; Ferraro, Teresa; Scognamiglio, Paola; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Baldi, Ubaldo; Montesano, Franco; Audino, Giulia; De Stefano, Caterina; Caterini, Antonio; Cuccia, Mario; Girelli, Gabriella; Perrone, Paola; Laurenti, Luca; Piccolella, Enza; Scotta, Cristiano; Cortese, Riccardo; Nicosia, Alfredo; Vitelli, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Background. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs12979860) near the IL28B gene has been associated with spontaneous and treatment-induced hepatitis C virus clearance. We investigated predictors of spontaneous disease resolution in a cohort of patients with acute hepatitis C (AHC), analyzing epidemiological, clinical and virological parameters together with IL28B.rs12979860 genotypes and cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Methods. Fifty-six symptomatic AHC patients were enrolled and followed prospectively. CMI was measured in 31 patients at multiple time points by interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assay and was correlated to the IL28B.rs12979860 SNP. Results. Eighteen patients had a self-limiting AHC that was associated with female sex (P = .028), older age (P = .018), alanine aminotransferase level >1000 U/L (P = .027), total bilirubin level >7 mg/dL (P = .036), and IL28B.rs12979860 genotype CC (P = .030). In multivariate analysis, only CC genotype was independently associated with self-limiting AHC (odds ratio, 5.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.1–26.5). Patients with the CC genotype with self-limiting AHC had a stronger (P = .02) and broader (P = .013) CMI than patients with the CT genotype with chronically evolving AHC. In patients with chronically evolving disease, CC genotype was associated with a broader CMI compared to CT genotype (P = .028). A negative CMI was more frequently associated with CT genotype among persistently infected patients (P = .043) and with persistent infection among CT patients (P = .033). Conclusions. Self-limiting AHC was independently associated with CC genotype. The correlation between IL28B.rs12979860 genotypes and CMI is suggestive of a possible important role of CMI in favoring hepatitis C virus clearance in CC patients. PMID:23784926

  18. Dynamic innate immune responses of human bronchial epithelial cells to severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Hill, Terence E; Yoshikawa, Naoko; Popov, Vsevolod L; Galindo, Cristi L; Garner, Harold R; Peters, C J; Tseng, Chien-Te Kent

    2010-01-15

    Human lung epithelial cells are likely among the first targets to encounter invading severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Not only can these cells support the growth of SARS-CoV infection, but they are also capable of secreting inflammatory cytokines to initiate and, eventually, aggravate host innate inflammatory responses, causing detrimental immune-mediated pathology within the lungs. Thus, a comprehensive evaluation of the complex epithelial signaling to SARS-CoV is crucial for paving the way to better understand SARS pathogenesis. Based on microarray-based functional genomics, we report here the global gene response of 2B4 cells, a cloned bronchial epithelial cell line derived from Calu-3 cells. Specifically, we found a temporal and spatial activation of nuclear factor (NF)kappaB, activator protein (AP)-1, and interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3/7 in infected 2B4 cells at 12-, 24-, and 48-hrs post infection (p.i.), resulting in the activation of many antiviral genes, including interferon (IFN)-beta, -lambdas, inflammatory mediators, and many IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). We also showed, for the first time, that IFN-beta and IFN-lambdas were capable of exerting previously unrecognized, non-redundant, and complementary abilities to limit SARS-CoV replication, even though their expression could not be detected in infected 2B4 bronchial epithelial cells until 48 hrs p.i. Collectively, our results highlight the mechanics of the sequential events of antiviral signaling pathway/s triggered by SARS-CoV in bronchial epithelial cells and identify novel cellular targets for future studies, aiming at advancing strategies against SARS.

  19. Proteomics analysis of urine reveals acute phase response proteins as candidate diagnostic biomarkers for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Davalieva, Katarina; Kiprijanovska, Sanja; Komina, Selim; Petrusevska, Gordana; Zografska, Natasha Chokrevska; Polenakovic, Momir

    2015-01-01

    Despite the overall success of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in screening and detection of prostate cancer (PCa), its use has been limited due to the lack of specificity. The principal driving goal currently within PCa research is to identify non-invasive biomarker(s) for early detection of aggressive tumors with greater sensitivity and specificity than PSA. In this study, we focused on identific