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Sample records for acute portal vein

  1. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mallet, Thierry; Soltys, Remigiusz; Loarte, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is the blockage or narrowing of the portal vein by a thrombus. It is relatively rare and has been linked with the presence of an underlying liver disease or prothrombotic disorders. We present a case of a young male who presented with vague abdominal symptoms for approximately one week. Imaging revealed the presence of multiple nonocclusive thrombi involving the right portal vein, the splenic vein, and the left renal vein, as well as complete occlusion of the left portal vein and the superior mesenteric vein. We discuss pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of both acute and chronic thrombosis. The presence of PVT should be considered as a clue for prothrombotic disorders, liver disease, and other local and general factors that must be carefully investigated. It is hoped that this case report will help increase awareness of the complexity associated with portal vein thrombosis among the medical community. PMID:25802795

  2. Portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Yogesh K; Bodh, Vijay

    2015-03-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of portal hypertension. PVT occurs in association with cirrhosis or as a result of malignant invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma or even in the absence of associated liver disease. With the current research into its genesis, majority now have an underlying prothrombotic state detectable. Endothelial activation and stagnant portal blood flow also contribute to formation of the thrombus. Acute non-cirrhotic PVT, chronic PVT (EHPVO), and portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis are the three main variants of portal vein thrombosis with varying etiological factors and variability in presentation and management. Procoagulant state should be actively investigated. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy for acute non-cirrhotic PVT, with supporting evidence for its use in cirrhotic population as well. Chronic PVT (EHPVO) on the other hand requires the management of portal hypertension as such and with role for anticoagulation in the setting of underlying prothrombotic state, however data is awaited in those with no underlying prothrombotic states. TIPS and liver transplant may be feasible even in the setting of PVT however proper selection of candidates and type of surgery is warranted. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy have some role. TARE is a new modality for management of HCC with portal vein invasion. PMID:25941431

  3. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Yogesh K.; Bodh, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of portal hypertension. PVT occurs in association with cirrhosis or as a result of malignant invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma or even in the absence of associated liver disease. With the current research into its genesis, majority now have an underlying prothrombotic state detectable. Endothelial activation and stagnant portal blood flow also contribute to formation of the thrombus. Acute non-cirrhotic PVT, chronic PVT (EHPVO), and portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis are the three main variants of portal vein thrombosis with varying etiological factors and variability in presentation and management. Procoagulant state should be actively investigated. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy for acute non-cirrhotic PVT, with supporting evidence for its use in cirrhotic population as well. Chronic PVT (EHPVO) on the other hand requires the management of portal hypertension as such and with role for anticoagulation in the setting of underlying prothrombotic state, however data is awaited in those with no underlying prothrombotic states. TIPS and liver transplant may be feasible even in the setting of PVT however proper selection of candidates and type of surgery is warranted. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy have some role. TARE is a new modality for management of HCC with portal vein invasion. PMID:25941431

  4. Endovascular Treatment of Acute Portal Vein Thrombosis After Liver Transplantation in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar Borges, Marcus Vinicius; Moreira, Airton Mota; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Maksoud, Joao Gilberto

    2006-06-15

    Although operative techniques in hepatic transplantation have reduced the time and mortality on waiting lists, the rate of vascular complications associated with these techniques has increased. Stenosis or thrombosis of the portal vein is an infrequent complication, and if present, surgical treatment is considered the traditional management. This article describes a case of acute portal vein thrombosis after liver transplantation from a living donor to a child managed by percutaneous techniques.

  5. Heterotopic auxiliary rat liver transplantation with flow-regulated portal vein arterialization in acute hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Schleimer, Karina; Kalder, Johannes; Grommes, Jochen; Jalaie, Houman; Tawadros, Samir; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael; Kokozidou, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In acute hepatic failure auxiliary liver transplantation is an interesting alternative approach. The aim is to provide a temporary support until the failing native liver has regenerated.(1-3) The APOLT-method, the orthotopic implantation of auxiliary segments- averts most of the technical problems. However this method necessitates extensive resections of both the native liver and the graft.(4) In 1998, Erhard developed the heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation (HALT) utilizing portal vein arterialization (PVA) (Figure 1). This technique showed promising initial clinical results.(5-6) We developed a HALT-technique with flow-regulated PVA in the rat to examine the influence of flow-regulated PVA on graft morphology and function (Figure 2). A liver graft reduced to 30 % of its original size, was heterotopically implanted in the right renal region of the recipient after explantation of the right kidney.  The infra-hepatic caval vein of the graft was anastomosed with the infrahepatic caval vein of the recipient. The arterialization of the donor's portal vein was carried out via the recipient's right renal artery with the stent technique. The blood-flow regulation of the arterialized portal vein was achieved with the use of a stent with an internal diameter of 0.3 mm. The celiac trunk of the graft was end-to-side anastomosed with the recipient's aorta and the bile duct was implanted into the duodenum. A subtotal resection of the native liver was performed to induce acute hepatic failure. (7) In this manner 112 transplantations were performed. The perioperative survival rate was 90% and the 6-week survival rate was 80%. Six weeks after operation, the native liver regenerated, showing an increase in weight from 2.3±0.8 g to 9.8±1 g. At this time, the graft's weight decreased from 3.3±0.8 g to 2.3±0.8 g. We were able to obtain promising long-term results in terms of graft morphology and function. HALT with flow-regulated PVA reliably bridges acute hepatic failure

  6. Heterotopic Auxiliary Rat Liver Transplantation With Flow-regulated Portal Vein Arterialization in Acute Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Schleimer, Karina; Kalder, Johannes; Grommes, Jochen; Jalaie, Houman; Tawadros, Samir; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael; Kokozidou, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In acute hepatic failure auxiliary liver transplantation is an interesting alternative approach. The aim is to provide a temporary support until the failing native liver has regenerated.1-3 The APOLT-method, the orthotopic implantation of auxiliary segments- averts most of the technical problems. However this method necessitates extensive resections of both the native liver and the graft.4 In 1998, Erhard developed the heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation (HALT) utilizing portal vein arterialization (PVA) (Figure 1). This technique showed promising initial clinical results.5-6 We developed a HALT-technique with flow-regulated PVA in the rat to examine the influence of flow-regulated PVA on graft morphology and function (Figure 2). A liver graft reduced to 30 % of its original size, was heterotopically implanted in the right renal region of the recipient after explantation of the right kidney.  The infra-hepatic caval vein of the graft was anastomosed with the infrahepatic caval vein of the recipient. The arterialization of the donor’s portal vein was carried out via the recipient’s right renal artery with the stent technique. The blood-flow regulation of the arterialized portal vein was achieved with the use of a stent with an internal diameter of 0.3 mm. The celiac trunk of the graft was end-to-side anastomosed with the recipient’s aorta and the bile duct was implanted into the duodenum. A subtotal resection of the native liver was performed to induce acute hepatic failure. 7 In this manner 112 transplantations were performed. The perioperative survival rate was 90% and the 6-week survival rate was 80%. Six weeks after operation, the native liver regenerated, showing an increase in weight from 2.3±0.8 g to 9.8±1 g. At this time, the graft’s weight decreased from 3.3±0.8 g to 2.3±0.8 g. We were able to obtain promising long-term results in terms of graft morphology and function. HALT with flow-regulated PVA reliably bridges acute hepatic failure

  7. Transjugular Portal Venous Stenting in Inflammatory Extrahepatic Portal Vein Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schaible, Rolf; Textor, Jochen; Decker, Pan; Strunk, Holger; Schild, Hans

    2002-12-15

    We report the case of a 37-year-old man with necrotizing pancreatitis associated with inflammatory extrahepatic portal vein stenosis and progressive ascites. Four months after the acute onset, when no signs of infection were present, portal decompression was performed to treat refractory ascites. Transjugulartranshepatic venoplasty failed to dilate the stenosis in the extrahepatic portion of the portal vein sufficiently. Therefore a Wallstent was implanted, resulting in almost normal diameter of the vessel. In follow-up imaging studies the stent and the portal vein were still patent 12 months after the intervention and total resolution of the ascites was observed.

  8. [Portal vein thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Seijo-Ríos, Susana; García-Pagán, Juan Carlos

    2010-03-01

    Thrombosis of the splenoportal axis not associated with liver cirrhosis or tumoral disease is the second cause of portal hypertension in the western world. In up to 60% of cases, an underlying systemic prothrombotic disorder can be identified as an etiological factor. One third of cases are caused by local factors and the coexistence of several entities is not unusual. Therefore, an etiologic diagnosis is essential in these patients. Early anticoagulation therapy in the acute phase of thrombosis of the splenoportal axis significantly affects the probability of recanalization and consequently the prognosis of these patients. In the chronic phase of splenoportal thrombosis (or portal cavernoma), the symptoms are caused by the complications of established portal hypertension. To date, anticoagulation therapy is limited to patients in whom an underlying prothrombotic disorder has been demonstrated. PMID:19733938

  9. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt, Mechanical Aspiration Thrombectomy, and Direct Thrombolysis in the Treatment of Acute Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Bovio, Giulio; Dahamane, M'Hamed; Centanaro, Monica

    2007-09-15

    A patient was admitted because of severe abdominal pain, anorexia, and intestinal bleeding. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography demonstrated acute portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (PSMVT). The patient was treated percutaneously with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS), mechanical aspiration thrombectomy, and direct thrombolysis, and 1 week after the procedure, complete patency of the portal and superior mesenteric veins was demonstrated. TIPS, mechanical aspiration thrombectomy, and direct thrombolysis together are promising endovascular techniques for the treatment of symptomatic acute PSMVT.

  10. Portal Vein Thrombosis in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Kaiser; Jacob, Mathew; Asthana, Sonal

    2013-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is being increasingly recognized in patients with advanced cirrhosis and in those undergoing liver transplantation. Reduced flow in the portal vein is probably responsible for clotting in the spleno-porto-mesenteric venous system. There is also increasing evidence that hypercoagulability occurs in advanced liver disease and contributes to the risk of PVT. Ultrasound based studies have reported a prevalence of PVT in 10–25% of cirrhotic patients without hepatocellular carcinoma. Partial thrombosis of the portal vein is more common and may not have pathophysiological consequences. However, there is high risk of progression of partial PVT to complete PVT that may cause exacerbation of portal hypertension and progression of liver insufficiency. It is thus, essential to accurately diagnose and stage PVT in patients waiting for transplantation and consider anticoagulation therapy. Therapy with low molecular weight heparin and vitamin K antagonists has been shown to achieve complete and partial recanalization in 33–45% and 15–35% of cases respectively. There are however, no guidelines to help determine the dose and therapeutic efficacy of anticoagulation in patients with cirrhosis. Anticoagulation therapy related bleeding is the most feared complication but it appears that the risk of variceal bleeding is more likely to be dependent on portal pressure rather than solely related to coagulation status. TIPS has also been reported to restore patency of the portal vein. Patients with complete PVT currently do not form an absolute contraindication for liver transplantation. Thrombectomy or thromboendovenectomy is possible in more than 75% of patients followed by anatomical end-to-end portal anastomosis. When patency of the portal vein and/or superior mesenteric vein is not achieved, only non-anatomical techniques (reno-portal anastomosis or cavo-portal hemitransposition) can be performed. These techniques, which do not fully reverse portal

  11. Portal vein occlusion after biliary metal stent placement in hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kyung Hee; Kim, Jin Bae; Chang, Yoon Jung; Kim, Hyo Jung; Baek, Il Hyun; Ko, Jin Seok; Woo, Ji Young; Kim, Hong Dae; Lee, Myung Seok

    2008-06-01

    Acute symptomatic portal vein obstruction related to biliary stenting is an extremely rare but life-threatening complication. This usually occurs in patients with either tumor invasion into the portal vein or pre-existing portal vein thrombus. Therefore, the portal vein should be carefully evaluated before placing a biliary metallic stent in such patients. We describe a case of acute portal vein obstruction after placing metallic biliary stents in a patient with a periductal-infiltrating type of hilar cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:20485610

  12. Preduodenal portal vein: its surgical significance.

    PubMed

    Makey, D A; Bowen, J C

    1978-11-01

    Preduodenal portal vein is a rare anatomical variant which may be one of many anomalies in the neonate with duodenal "atresia." Preduodenal portal vein also may be an occasional finding in an adult undergoing biliary, gastric, or pancreatic surgery. Awareness and recognition of the anomaly are essential for the avoidance of injury during such operations. We report here a symptomless patient whose preduodenal portal vein was discovered at cholecystectomy. PMID:715684

  13. Pancreatic pseudocyst rupture into the portal vein.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Brian C; Kasa, David; Mazer, Mark A

    2009-07-01

    A patient with a pancreatic pseudocyst rupture into the portal vein with a resultant noninfectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome and subsequent portal vein thrombosis diagnosed by computed tomography and ultrasonography is reported. A review of the existing English literature on this rare complication is also provided. PMID:19561436

  14. Acute TIPS occlusion due to iatrogenic arteriovenous shunt in a cirrhotic patient with total portal vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hatzidakis, Adam; Kouroumalis, Elias; Kehagias, Elias; Digenakis, Emmanuel; Samonakis, Dimitrios; Tsetis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old man with portal hypertension was admitted with decompensated alcoholic cirrhosis and diuretic resistant ascites. Ultrasound revealed partial portal thrombosis. Due to diuretic intolerance, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was decided during which a hepatic arterial branch was inadvertently catheterized. Finally, TIPS was created, but the patient continued gaining weight. Color-Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS) showed upper stent part patency with absence of flow in lower stent portion. Twenty-five days later, the patient presented melena. Endoscopy revealed blood emerging from the Vater papilla. Hepatic angiography revealed arteriovenous shunt between a hepatic arterial branch and the proximal part of the TIPS shunt. Covered stent placement restored sufficient TIPS flow. The patient deteriorated and died 1 month later. We found out that our major technical drawback was that we did not inject a small amount of contrast after puncturing the supposed portal vein, in order to confirm correct position of the needle. PMID:26767123

  15. Spontaneous Resolution of Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Banumukala, Vishnu; Babu, Adarsh

    2008-01-01

    A 56-year-old male was admitted with symptoms of belching, abdominal pain and weight loss of 2 weeks duration. Examination revealed hepatosplenomegaly which was confirmed by computed tomography (CT). CT images also revealed filling defects in the portal vein and intrahepatic branches consistent with thrombosis and hepatosplenic infarcts. Alkaline phosphatase was elevated at 688 units, all other investigations, including full blood count, coagulation screen and tumour markers, were normal. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography did not reveal any mass in the porta hepatis. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy were normal. Liver biopsy was normal and did not reveal any evidence of lymphoma. The raised alkaline phosphatase settled to reference range over a period of 3 weeks. Thrombophilia screen was negative. Contrast CT of the abdomen performed after 4 weeks displayed revascularisation of the previously thrombosed portal vein and intrahepatic branches. The patient has remained asymptomatic since and we note spontaneous recanalisation of the previously occluded portal vein. PMID:21490872

  16. Spontaneous resolution of portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Banumukala, Vishnu; Babu, Adarsh

    2008-01-01

    A 56-year-old male was admitted with symptoms of belching, abdominal pain and weight loss of 2 weeks duration. Examination revealed hepatosplenomegaly which was confirmed by computed tomography (CT). CT images also revealed filling defects in the portal vein and intrahepatic branches consistent with thrombosis and hepatosplenic infarcts. Alkaline phosphatase was elevated at 688 units, all other investigations, including full blood count, coagulation screen and tumour markers, were normal. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography did not reveal any mass in the porta hepatis. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy were normal. Liver biopsy was normal and did not reveal any evidence of lymphoma. The raised alkaline phosphatase settled to reference range over a period of 3 weeks. Thrombophilia screen was negative. Contrast CT of the abdomen performed after 4 weeks displayed revascularisation of the previously thrombosed portal vein and intrahepatic branches. The patient has remained asymptomatic since and we note spontaneous recanalisation of the previously occluded portal vein. PMID:21490872

  17. Surgical Access to Jejunal Veins for Local Thrombolysis and Stent Placement in Portal Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schellhammer, Frank; Esch, Jan Schulte am; Hammerschlag, Sascha; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Fuerst, Guenter

    2008-07-15

    Portal vein thrombosis is an infrequent entity, which may cause high morbidity and mortality. We report a case of portal vein thrombosis due to benign stenosis following partial pancreatoduodenectomy with segmental replacement of the portal vein by a Gore-tex graft. Using a surgical access to jenunal veins, local thrombolysis, mechanical fragmentation of thrombus, and stent placement were successfully performed.

  18. Transradial Approach for Transcatheter Selective Superior Mesenteric Artery Urokinase Infusion Therapy in Patients with Acute Extensive Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Maoqiang Guo Liping; Lin Hanying; Liu Fengyong; Duan Feng; Wang Zhijun

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of transradial approach for transcatheter superior mesenteric artery (SMA) urokinase infusion therapy in patients with acute extensive portal and superior mesenteric venous thrombosis. During a period of 7 years, 16 patients with acute extensive thrombosis of the portal (PV) and superior mesenteric veins (SMV) were treated by transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy by way of the radial artery. The mean age of the patients was 39.5 years. Through the radial sheath, a 5F Cobra catheter was inserted into the SMA, and continuous infusion of urokinase was performed for 5-11 days (7.1 {+-} 2.5 days). Adequate anticoagulation was given during treatment, throughout hospitalization, and after discharge. Technical success was achieved in all 16 patients. Substantial clinical improvement was seen in these 16 patients after the procedure. Minor complications at the radial puncture site were observed in 5 patients, but trans-SMA infusion therapy was not interrupted. Follow-up computed tomography scan before discharge demonstrated nearly complete disappearance of PV-SMV thrombosis in 9 patients and partial recanalization of PV-SMV thrombosis in 7 patients. The 16 patients were discharged 9-19 days (12 {+-} 6.0 days) after admission. Mean duration of follow-up after hospital discharge was 44 {+-} 18.5 months, and no recurrent episodes of PV-SMV thrombosis developed during that time period. Transradial approach for transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy in addition to anticoagulation is a safe and effective therapy for the management of patients with acute extensive PV-SMV thrombosis.

  19. Percutaneous Transumbilical Portal Vein Embolization in a Patient with a Ruptured Hepatocellular Carcinoma Supplied by the Portal Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soo Chin; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Chung, Jin Wook; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2011-02-15

    We describe a case of a ruptured hepatocellular carcinoma supplied by the portal vein that was successfully treated with portal vein embolization via a percutaneous transumbilical approach. A contrast material-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scan showed the presence of a large hypervascular tumor on portal venous phase as well as right hepatic vein thrombosis and hemoperitoneum that prevented portal vein embolization by the use of the percutaneous and transjugular transhepatic approach. The use of percutaneous transumbilical portal vein embolization can be an alternative option in this situation.

  20. Portal vein involvement in hepatocellular carcinoma: dynamic CT features

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, D.; Grenier, P.; Larde, D.; Vasile, N.

    1984-07-01

    The authors conducted a retrospective examination of 62 hepatocellular carcinomas, taking dynamic CT scans of selected sections after an intravenous contrast bolus. The proximal portal vein was involved in 40% of cases and distal segment in 16%. Angiographic correlation was available in 23 patients. The characteristic appearance of tumor within the portal vein was noted in many cases; in others, distinction between tumor and bland thrombus could not be made. Peripheral portal vein obstruction was suggested when a small, hypervascular tumor became hypodense during the portal phase of CT. The frequency and significance of these CT signs of portal vein involvement are discussed.

  1. Hepatic myospherulosis complicating portal vein embolisation

    PubMed Central

    Lui, P C W; Luk, I S C; Lee, C K L; Lui, Y H; Leung, C Y; Choi, C H

    2004-01-01

    Aims: Myospherulosis is a rare condition characterised by sac-like structures containing spheroid bodies in cysts or cystic spaces in the tissue. This condition has not previously been reported in the liver. The association with previous portal vein embolisation using a mixture of butyl 2-cyanoacrylate and ethiodised oil and the proposed mechanism of pathogenesis are discussed. Methods: Samples from 8 patients treated by hepatectomy after portal vein embolisation using a mixture of butyl 2-cyanoacrylate and ethiodised oil were retrieved from the archives of the United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong. The histological specimens were reviewed. A panel of histochemical and immunohistochemical stains was used. Results: All cases showed hepatic myospherulosis within the veins. The veins were denuded of endothelium, which was replaced by granulation tissue and fibrous tissue with a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Foreign body-type giant cells (six cases) and eosinophilic infiltrates (seven cases) were noted in most cases. Both parent bodies and endobodies were stained red by Papanicolaou and Masson’s trichrome and stained blue by solochrome cyanine. The endobodies showed immunoreactivity towards glycophorin A. They were negative for Alcian blue, periodic acid Schiff, Grocott, and Ziehl-Neelsen stains. Conclusions: The endobodies of myospherulosis may be misdiagnosed as fungi or algae by the unwary. The clinical history, intravascular location, lack of staining with periodic acid Schiff and Grocott stains, and positive glycophorin A staining are generally sufficient for a confident diagnosis of myospherulosis. PMID:14747440

  2. Portal Vein Embolization: What Do We Know?

    SciTech Connect

    Denys, Alban; Prior, John; Bize, Pierre; Duran, Rafael; Baere, Thierry De; Halkic, Nermin; Demartines, Nicolas

    2012-10-15

    Portal vein embolization (PVE) has been developed to increase the size of the future remnant liver (FRL) left in place after major hepatectomy, thus reducing the risk of postoperative liver insufficiency. PVE consist in embolizing preoperatively portal branches of the segments that will be resected. Indication is based on preoperative measurements of the FRL by computed tomography and its ratio with either the theoretical liver volume or by direct measurement of the functional liver volume. After PVE, the volume and function of the FRL increases in 3 to 6 weeks, permitting extensive resections in patients otherwise contraindicated for liver resection. The PVE technique is variable from one center to another; however n-butyl-cyano-acrylate provides an interesting compromise between hypertrophy rate and procedure risk.

  3. Disastrous Portal Vein Embolization Turned into a Successful Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrocky, Tomas; Kettenbach, Joachim; Lopez-Benitez, Ruben Kara, Levent

    2015-10-15

    Portal vein embolization (PVE) may be performed before hemihepatectomy to increase the volume of future liver remnant (FLR) and to reduce the risk of postoperative liver insufficiency. We report the case of a 71-year-old patient with hilar cholangiocarcinoma undergoing PVE with access from the right portal vein using a mixture of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate and ethiodized oil. During the procedure, nontarget embolization of the left portal vein occurred. An aspiration maneuver of the polymerized plug failed; however, the embolus obstructing portal venous flow in the FLR was successfully relocated into the right portal vein while carefully bypassing the plug with a balloon catheter, inflating the balloon, and pulling the plug into the main right portal vein.

  4. Restriction of drinking water abrogates splanchnic vasodilation and portal hypertension in portal vein-ligated rats.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Akos; Schuligoi, Rufina; Lippe, Irmgard T; Stauber, Rudolf E

    2009-01-01

    Portal hypertension is associated with splanchnic vasodilation which is claimed responsible for the maintenance of chronically elevated portal pressure. Vasopressin analogues are used in the treatment of acute variceal bleeding, since they effectively reduce splanchnic blood flow and portal pressure. Dehydration stimulates the release of endogenous vasopressin release. Here we compared the effects of deprivation of drinking water for 18 h with those of vasopressin infusion on mesenteric hemodynamics in portal vein-ligated (PVL) and sham-operated (SHAM) rats. Blood flow in the superior mesenteric artery was measured with the ultrasonic transit time shift technique. Deprivation of drinking water had no hemodynamic effects in SHAM rats, but completely reversed the mesenteric hyperemia and portal hypertension in PVL rats to figures measured in SHAM rats, without altering blood pressure. Similarly, intravenous infusion of low doses of arginine vasopressin (1-10 pmol/min) selectively reduced mesenteric blood flow in PVL rats but had little effect in SHAM rats. These data suggest that control of water balance or aquaretic drugs might have beneficial effects on splanchnic hemodynamics and portal pressure in advanced liver disease, possibly by stimulating endogenous vasopressin release. PMID:18987488

  5. [Myeloproliferative diseases as causative agents of portal and hepatic veins thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Culafić, Dj; Miljić, P; Perisić, M; Djuranović, S; Popović, D; Krstić, M; Jovanović, I; Pavlović, A; Mijalković, N; Sokić-Milutinović, A; Pesko, P

    2007-01-01

    Thrombosis of portal and hepatic veins is one of the most severe complications and most important causes of death of patients with chronic myeloproliferative diseases. Based on results of the past studies, myeloproliferative diseases were the causes of hepatic veins thrombosis in 30% and portal vein thrombosis in 20% of patients. The study presented 4 patients with myeloproliferative diseases complicated by thrombosis of splanchnic veins, aiming at the illustration of issue complexity in diagnostics and therapy. Two patients with portal vein thrombosis and recurring hemorrhage from esophageal varicosity were described. The first case was planned for shunting, while another case sustained bleeding on what account his anticoagulant therapy was discontinued, but it caused mesenterial thrombosis resulting in lethal outcome. Another two patients had hepatic veins thrombosis. Due to frequent, life-threatening bleeding from the esophageal and gastric varices, a patient with chronic Budd-Chiari syndrome and lineal vein thrombosis underwent mesocaval shunting. An immediate postoperative period was manifested by multiple thrombosis and hemorrhages that ended in his death. A patient with the acute Budd-Chiari syndrome was administered myelosuppressants and anticoagulants on time so reperfusion was restored. In myeloproliferative diseases, thrombosis of portal and hepatic veins gives rise to excessive portal hypertension with profuse hemorrhage from the esophageal and gastric varicosity which is difficult to manage because of complex coagulation disorders. PMID:17633867

  6. Combined portal vein resection for hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Tao; Chen, Jie; Xie, Zhi-Bo; Ma, Liang; Liu, Jun-Jie; Zhu, Shao-Liang; Wu, Fei-Xiang; Li, Le-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgery is the only curative therapy for patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HCCA). Combined portal vein resection (PVR) could achieve negative resection margins in HCCA patients with portal vein invasion. This systematic review aimed to analysis the efficiency of combined PVR for HCCA. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, and clinical trial registries were searched through April 2015. Risk ratios (RRs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Results: The analysis included 21 retrospective studies, altogether involving 2403 patients (patients with PVR, n=637; patients without PVR, n=1766). Patients with PVR were likely to have more advanced HCCA (lymphatic invasion: RR=1.14, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.28; perineural invasion: RR=1.31, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.63) and suffered less curative resections (RR=0.89, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.99). Postoperative morbidity was similar between patients with or without PVR (RR=1.06, 95% CI 0.94 to 1.02). Patients with PVR suffered higher mortality rate (RR=1.52, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.18), and worse 5-year survival rate (RR=0.67, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.91). Conclusion: Combined PVR for HCCA patients would not increase postoperative morbidity rate. However, ascribed to PVR group concluded more advanced HCCA patients; patients with PVR had increased postoperative mortality rate and worse survival rate. The results still need further high quality trails for validation. PMID:26885035

  7. Stent Recanalization of Chronic Portal Vein Occlusion in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Cwikiel, Wojciech; Solvig, Jan; Schroder, Henrik

    2000-07-15

    An 8-year-old boy with a 21/2 year history of portal hypertension and repeated bleedings from esophageal varices, was referred for treatment. The 3.5-cm-long occlusion of the portal vein was passed and the channel created was stabilized with a balloon-expandable stent; a portosystemic stent-shunt was also created. The portosystemic shunt closed spontaneously within 1 month, while the recanalized segment of the portal vein remained open. The pressure gradient between the intrahepatic and extrahepatic portal vein branches dropped from 17 mmHg to 0 mmHg. The pressure in the portal vein dropped from 30 mmHg to 17 mmHg and the bleedings stopped. The next dilation of the stent was performed 12 months later due to an increased pressure gradient; the gastroesophageal varices disappeared completely. Further dilation of the stent was planned after 2, 4, and 6 years.

  8. Portal Vein Thrombosis After Laparoscopic Splenectomy: An Ongoing Clinical Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Miniati, Douglas N.; Padidar, Arash M.; Kee, Stephen T.; Krummel, Thomas M.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) following open splenectomy is a potentially lethal complication with an incidence of up to 6%. The objective of this report is to describe our management of a recent laparoscopic case, discuss current therapies, and consider antiplatelet therapy for prophylaxis. Methods: Medical records, laboratory studies, and imaging studies pertaining to a recent case of a laparoscopic splenectomy were examined. Current literature related to this topic was reviewed. Results: A 16-year-old girl underwent laparoscopic splenectomy for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Her preoperative platelet count was 96K. She was discharged on postoperative day 1 after an uneventful operation including division of the splenic hilum with an endoscopic linear stapler. On postoperative day 20, she presented with a 5-day history of epigastric pain, nausea, and low-grade fevers without peritoneal signs. Her white blood cell count was 17.3; her platelets were 476K. Computed tomography demonstrated thrombosis of the splenic, superior mesenteric, and portal veins propagating into the liver. Heparinization was begun followed by an unsuccessful attempt at pharmacologic and mechanical thrombolysis by interventional radiology. Over the next 5 days, her pain resolved, she tolerated a full diet, was converted to oral anticoagulation and sent home. Follow-up radiographic studies demonstrated the development of venous collaterals and cavernous transformation of the portal vein. Discussion: No standard therapy for PVT exists; several approaches have been described. These include systemic anticoagulation, systemic or regional medical thrombolysis, mechanical thrombolysis, and surgical thrombectomy. Unanswered questions exist about the most effective acute therapy, duration of anticoagulation, and the potential efficacy of routine prophylaxis with perioperative antiplatelet agents. PVT following splenectomy occurs with both the open and laparoscopic approach. PMID

  9. Portal vein aneurysm demonstrated by blood pool SPECT.

    PubMed

    Fukui, H; Kashiwagi, T; Kimura, K; Goto, M; Takei, Y; Kasahara, A; Kawano, S; Fusamoto, H; Kozuka, T; Kamada, T

    1992-11-01

    Portal vein aneurysms are rare and are occasionally suggested by ultrasound and usually confirmed by invasive angiography. Such a case was diagnosed by scintigraphic studies, most importantly blood pool SPECT, which clearly separates it from hepatic cysts. PMID:1424375

  10. Endovascular Treatment of a Portal Vein Tear During TIPSS

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Richard J.T.; Rose, John D.G.

    2000-03-15

    During a transjugular portosystemic stent-shunt (TIPSS) procedure a portal vein laceration occurred with subsequent intraperitoneal hemorrhage. A PTFE-covered nitinol stent was successfully placed eliminating the leak and creating a functioning portosystemic shunt. This case demonstrates both the importance of portal vein puncture more than 1 cm from the bifurcation and the necessity of maintaining a stock of available stent-grafts.

  11. [A case of portal vein stenting for portal vein stenosis due to pancreatic cancer recurrence after pancreatoduodenectomy].

    PubMed

    Sawatsubashi, Takahiro; Morioka, Nobuhiro; Shimizu, Takao; Nakatsuka, Hideki

    2014-11-01

    We report a case of portal vein stenosis due to pancreatic cancer recurrence that was successfully treated with intravenous stent implantation. The patient was a 70-year-old man who had undergone a subtotal stomach-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy with the modified Child method for pancreatic cancer. He was readmitted due to melena, dorsal pain, and severe ascites 8 months after the operation. Computed tomography (CT) findings revealed that pancreatic cancer recurrence had narrowed the portal vein. Neither gastrointestinal nor colon endoscopy could locate the source of gastrointestinal bleeding. Bleeding from the varices increased, and a hepatopetal collateral was considered to be the cause. We therefore placed an intravenous stent at the site of portal vein stenosis, by the transileocolic portal vein. After the stent placement, no further gastrointestinal hemorrhagic episodes occurred. PMID:25731472

  12. Portal vein thrombosis with protein C-S deficiency in a non-cirrhotic patient

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Leal, Gustavo A; Morán, Segundo; Corona-Cedillo, Roberto; Brom-Valladares, Rocío

    2014-01-01

    There are several conditions that can lead to portal vein thrombosis (PVT), including including infection, malignancies, and coagulation disorders. Anew condition of interest is protein C and S deficiencies, associated with hypercoagulation and recurrent venous thromboembolism. We report the case of a non-cirrhotic 63-year-old male diagnosed with acute superior mesenteric vein thrombosis and PVT and combined deficiencies in proteins C and S, recanalized by short-term low molecular heparin plus oral warfarin therapy. PMID:25068006

  13. Palliative Portal Vein Stent Placement in Malignant and Symptomatic Extrinsic Portal Vein Stenosis or Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Novellas, Sebastien; Denys, Alban Bize, Pierre; Brunner, Philippe; Motamedi, Jean Paul; Gugenheim, Jean; Caroli, Francois-Xavier; Chevallier, Patrick

    2009-05-15

    This article evaluates the results of portal vein (PV) stent placement in patients with malignant extrinsic lesions stenosing or obstructing the PV and causing symptomatic PV hypertension (PVHT). Fourteen patients with bile duct cancer (n = 7), pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 4), or another cancer (n = 3) underwent percutaneous transhepatic portal venous stent placement because of gastroesophageal or jejunal varices (n = 9), ascites (n = 7), and/or thrombocytopenia (n = 2). Concurrent tumoral obstruction of the main bile duct was treated via the transhepatic route in the same session in four patients. Changes in portal venous pressure, complications, stent patency, and survival were evaluated. Mean {+-} standard deviation (SD) gradient of portal venous pressure decreased significantly immediately after stent placement from 11.2 mmHg {+-} 4.6 to 1.1 mmHg {+-} 1.0 (P < 0.00001). Three patients had minor complications, and one developed a liver abscess. During a mean {+-} SD follow-up of 134.4 {+-} 123.3 days, portal stents remained patent in 11 patients (78.6%); stent occlusion occurred in 3 patients, 2 of whom had undergone previous major hepatectomy. After stent placement, PVHT symptoms were relieved in four (57.1%) of seven patients who died (mean survival, 97 {+-} 71.2 days), and relieved in six (85.7%) of seven patients still alive at the end of follow-up (mean follow-up, 171.7 {+-} 153.5 days). Stent placement in the PV is feasible and relatively safe. It helped to relieve PVHT symptoms in a single session.

  14. [Treatment of non-cirrhotic, non-tumoural portal vein thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Llop, Elba; Seijo, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis of the splenoportal axis not associated with liver cirrhosis or neoplasms is a rare disease whose prevalence ranges from 0.7 to 3.7 per 100,000 inhabitants. However, this entity is the second most common cause of portal hypertension. Prothrombotic factors are present as an underlying cause in up to 70% of patients and local factors in 10-50%. The coexistence of several etiological factors is frequent. Clinical presentation may be acute or chronic (portal cavernomatosis). The acute phase can present as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, rectorrhagia, intestinal congestion, and ischemia. In this phase, early initiation of anticoagulation is essential to achieve portal vein recanalization and thus improve patient prognosis. In the chronic phase, symptoms are due to portal hypertension syndrome. In this phase, the aim of treatment is to treat or prevent the complications of portal hypertension. Anticoagulation is reserved to patients with a proven underlying thrombophilic factor. PMID:26547613

  15. Transsplenic portal vein reconstruction-transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in a patient with portal and splenic vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Salsamendi, Jason T; Gortes, Francisco J; Shnayder, Michelle; Doshi, Mehul H; Fan, Ji; Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2016-09-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a potential complication of cirrhosis and can worsen outcomes after liver transplant (LT). Portal vein reconstruction-transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (PVR-TIPS) can restore flow through the portal vein (PV) and facilitate LT by avoiding complex vascular conduits. We present a case of transsplenic PVR-TIPS in the setting of complete PVT and splenic vein (SV) thrombosis. The patient had a 3-year history of PVT complicated by abdominal pain, ascites, and paraesophageal varices. A SV tributary provided access to the main SV and was punctured percutaneously under ultrasound scan guidance. PV access, PV and SV venoplasty, and TIPS placement were successfully performed without complex techniques. The patient underwent LT with successful end-to-end anastomosis of the PVs. Our case suggests transsplenic PVR-TIPS to be a safe and effective alternative to conventional PVR-TIPS in patients with PVT and SV thrombosis. PMID:27594947

  16. Anatomy of the Portal Vein Bifurcation: Implication for Transjugular Intrahepatic Portal Systemic Shunts

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Philip Chong-hei Ng, Wai Fu; Lam, Christine Suk-yee; Tsui, Polly Po; Faruqi, Asma

    2003-06-15

    Purpose: The relationship of the portalvein bifurcation to the liver capsule in Asians, which is an important landmark for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, has not previously been described. Methods: The anatomy of the portal vein bifurcation was studied in 70 adult Chinese cadavers; it was characterized as intrahepatic or extrahepatic. The length of the exposed portion of the right and left portal veins was measured when the bifurcation was extrahepatic. Results: The portal vein bifurcation was intrahepatic in 37 cadavers (53%) and extrahepatic in 33 cadavers (47%). The mean length of the right and left extrahepatic portal veins was 0.96 cm and 0.85 cm respectively.Both were less than or equal to 2 cm in 94% of the cadavers with extrahepatic bifurcation. There was no correlation between the presence of cirrhosis and the location of the portal vein bifurcation(p 1.0). There was no statistically significant difference in liver mass in cadavers with either extrahepatic or intrahepatic bifurcation (p =0.40). Conclusions: These findings suggest that fortransjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt placement, a portal vein puncture 2 cm from the bifurcation will be safe in most cases.

  17. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Invading the Main Portal Vein: Treatment with Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization and Portal Vein Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xuebin Wang Jianhua Yan Zhiping Qian Sheng Liu Rong

    2009-01-15

    To retrospectively analyze the therapeutic results of percutaneous transhepatic portal vein stenting (PTPVS) and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) treatment in 58 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) invading the main portal vein (MPV). A total of 58 procedures of PTPVS were performed, immediately after which TACE was undertaken to control HCC. The clinical effects, complications, digital subtraction angiographic appearance, stent patency rates, cumulative survival rates, and predictive factors for survival were evaluated. The Kaplan-Meyer method and the log rank test were used for survival analysis. Multivariable analysis was also conducted by the Cox proportional hazard model. No patient died during stent placement or within the first 24 h. No severe procedure-related complications were observed. After stent placement, the mean {+-} standard deviation portal venous pressure levels decreased from 41.43 {+-} 8.56 cmH{sub 2}O to 37.19 {+-} 7.89 cmH{sub 2}O (p < 0.01). At the time of analysis, 9 of the 58 patients survived. The 60-, 180-, 360-, and 720-day cumulative patency rates were 98.1%, 71.0%, 52.6%, and 42.1%, respectively, with a mean patency time of 552.9 {+-} 88.2 days and a median patency time of 639.00 {+-} 310.00 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 31.40-1246.60) days. The 60-, 180-, 360-, and 720-day cumulative survival rates for the total study population were 74.1%, 27.1%, 17.2%, and 13.8%, respectively, with a median survival time of 113 {+-} 27.29 (95% CI, 59.51-166.49) days. In the univariate analysis, the following six variables were significantly associated with the prognosis: (1) HCC type; (2) Child-Pugh grade; (3) MPV stenosis/occlusion; (4) arteriovenous shunt; (5) iodized oil deposition; and (6) number of TACE procedure. In addition, having diffuse-type HCC and Child-Pugh grade B disease were each independent factors associated with decreased survival time in the multivariate analysis. PTPVS-TACE is feasible and may be

  18. Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection to the Portal Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Wyttenbach, Marina; Carrel, Thierry; Schuepbach, Peter; Tschaeppeler, Heinz; Triller, Juergen

    1996-03-15

    Anomalous pulmonary venous return represents a rare congenital anomaly with wide anatomic and physiologic variability. We report a case of a newborn with a rare form of total infracardiac anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC). The pulmonary veins draining both lungs formed two vertical veins, which joined to a common pulmonary trunk below the diaphragm. This venous channel connected to the portal vein through the esophageal hiatus. The diagnosis was suggested by color Doppler sonography and confirmed by intravenous digital subtraction angiography, which allowed definition of the anatomy.

  19. [Portal vein thrombosis and rupture of the esophagus secondary to a barotrauma].

    PubMed

    Prignet, J M; Duval, J L; Raynard, B; Louvety, S; Flandrin, P; Thouard, H; Künkel, D

    1996-02-01

    Portal vein thrombosis complicating a trauma is rare. We report a case of portal vein thrombosis associated with esophageal rupture after a blast injury due to the explosion of a pressurized nitrogen bottle. Portal vein thrombosis was discovered during oesophageal reconstruction, 70 days after the initial injury. A favorable outcome was observed. PMID:8734315

  20. Portal hypertension associated with primary hypoplasia of the hepatic portal vein in dogs.

    PubMed

    Van den Ingh, T S; Rothuizen, J; Meyer, H P

    1995-10-21

    Portal hypertension caused by primary hypoplasia of the portal vein was diagnosed in 42 dogs. The portal hypertension was manifested by the presence of multiple portosystemic collateral vessels. The main clinical signs were retarded growth or weight loss, apathy, intermittent diarrhoea and vomiting, anorexia, abdominal distension and polydipsia. Major findings at physical examination were ascites in 23 dogs and neurological signs in 16 dogs. The dogs had increased activities of liver enzymes in plasma and increased fasting levels of total bile acids and ammonia; in many of the dogs the packed red cell volume, total serum protein and albumin were low. Gross inspection of the portal vein revealed a patent but underdeveloped extrahepatic vein in 13 of the dogs. Microscopic examination of the liver revealed hypoplasia of the intrahepatic portal veins in all the dogs, and this was associated with minor arteriolar proliferation and absence of fibrosis in 12 of them, with moderate to marked arteriolar proliferation often combined with ductular proliferation in 13, and with marked portal fibrosis (formerly described as hepatoportal fibrosis) with a varying number of arteriolar and bile ductular structures in 17 of the dogs. The disease affected mainly young dogs, and was most likely to have been of congenital origin. PMID:8560700

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement in Patients with Cirrhosis and Concomitant Portal Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Thuong G. Van Hodge, Justin; Funaki, Brian; Lorenz, Jonathan; Rosenblum, Jordan; Straus, Christopher; Leef, Jeff

    2006-10-15

    Purpose. To determine the safety and efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation in patients with liver cirrhosis complicated by thrombosed portal vein. Methods. This study reviewed 15 cases of TIPS creation in 15 cirrhotic patients with portal vein thrombosis at our institution over an 8-year period. There were 2 women and 13 men with a mean age of 53 years. Indications were refractory ascites, variceal hemorrhage, and refractory pleural effusion. Clinical follow-up was performed in all patients. Results. The technical success rate was 75% (3/4) in patients with chronic portal vein thrombosis associated with cavernomatous transformation and 91% (10/11) in patients with acute thrombosis or partial thrombosis, giving an overall success rate of 87%. Complications included postprocedural encephalopathy and localized hematoma at the access site. In patients with successful shunt placement, the total follow-up time was 223 months. The 30-day mortality rate was 13%. Two patients underwent liver transplantation at 35 days and 7 months, respectively, after TIPS insertion. One patient had an occluded shunt at 4 months with an unsuccessful revision. The remaining patients had functioning shunts at follow-up. Conclusion. TIPS creation in thrombosed portal vein is possible and might be a treatment option in certain patients.

  2. Portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis: Controversies and latest developments

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Damian J; Perera, M Thamara PR; Chen, Frederick; Olliff, Simon; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is encountered in liver cirrhosis, particularly in advanced disease. It has been a feared complication of cirrhosis, attributed to significant worsening of liver disease, poorer clinical outcomes and potential inoperability at liver transplantation; also catastrophic events such as acute intestinal ischaemia. Optimal management of PVT has not yet been addressed in any consensus publication. We review current literature on PVT in cirrhosis; its prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnosis, impact on the natural history of cirrhosis and liver transplantation, and management. Studies were identified by a search strategy using MEDLINE and Google Scholar. The incidence of PVT increases with increasing severity of liver disease: less than 1% in well-compensated cirrhosis, 7.4%-16% in advanced cirrhosis. Prevalence in patients undergoing liver transplantation is 5%-16%. PVT frequently regresses instead of uniform thrombus progression. PVT is not associated with increased risk of mortality. Optimal management has not been addressed in any consensus publication. We propose areas for future research to address unresolved clinical questions. PMID:26078553

  3. Limitations of Percutaneous Techniques in the Treatment of Portal Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bilbao, Jose I.; Vivas, Isabel; Elduayen, Beatriz; Alonso, Carlos; Gonzalez-Crespo, Inaki; Benito, Alberto; Martinez-Cuesta, Antonio

    1999-09-15

    New therapeutic alternatives to portal vein thrombosis (PVT) include the percutaneous, transhepatic infusion of fibrinolytic agents, balloon dilatation, and stenting. These maneuvers have proven to be effective in some cases with acute, recent PVT. We have treated two patients with acute PVT via transhepatic or transjugular approaches and by using pharmacologic and mechanical thrombolysis and thrombectomy. Although both patients clinically improved, morphologic results were only fair and partial rethrombosis was observed. The limitations of percutaneous procedures in the recanalization of acute PVT in noncirrhotic patients are discussed.

  4. Novel Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus: Safety and Feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Mizandari, Malkhaz; Ao, Guokun; Zhang Yaojun; Feng Xi; Shen Qiang; Chen Minshan; Lau, Wan Yee; Nicholls, Joanna; Jiao Long; Habib, Nagy

    2013-02-15

    We report our experience of the safety of partial recanalization of the portal vein using a novel endovascular radiofrequency (RF) catheter for portal vein tumor thrombosis. Six patients with liver cancer and tumor thrombus in the portal vein underwent percutaneous intravascular radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using an endovascular bipolar RF device. A 0.035-inch guidewire was introduced into a tributary of the portal vein and through which a 5G guide catheter was introduced into the main portal vein. After manipulation of the guide catheter over the thrombus under digital subtraction angiography, the endovascular RF device was inserted and activated around the thrombus. There were no observed technique specific complications, such as hemorrhage, vessel perforation, or infection. Post-RFA portography showed partial recanalization of portal vein. RFA of portal vein tumor thrombus in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma is technically feasible and warrants further investigation to assess efficacy compared with current recanalization techniques.

  5. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt with covered stents for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian-Bo; Feng, Chao; Zhu, Qiao-Hua; He, Xiao-Feng; Li, Yan-Hao; Chen, Yong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) with covered stents for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with main portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). METHODS: Eleven advanced HCC patients (all male, aged 37-78 years, mean: 54.3 ± 12.7 years) presented with acute massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 9) or refractory ascites (n = 2) due to tumor thrombus in the main portal vein. The diagnosis of PVTT was based on contrast-enhanced computed tomography and color Doppler sonography. The patients underwent TIPS with covered stents. Clinical characteristics and average survival time of 11 patients were analyzed. Portal vein pressure was assessed before and after TIPS. The follow-up period was 2-18 mo. RESULTS: TIPS with covered stents was successfully completed in all 11 patients. The mean portal vein pressure was reduced from 32.0 to 11.8 mmHg (t = 10.756, P = 0.000). Gastrointestinal bleeding was stopped in nine patients. Refractory ascites completely disappeared in one patient and was alleviated in another. Hepatic encephalopathy was observed in six patients and was resolved with drug therapy. During the follow-up, ultrasound indicated the patency of the shunt and there was no recurrence of symptoms. Death occurred 2-14 mo (mean: 5.67 mo) after TIPS in nine cases, which were all due to multiple organ failure. In the remaining two cases, the patients were still alive at the 16- and 18-mo follow-up, respectively. CONCLUSION: TIPS with covered stents for HCC patients with tumor thrombus in the main portal vein is technically feasible, and short-term efficacy is favorable. PMID:24587637

  6. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC AND ULTRASONOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF CAVERNOUS TRANSFORMATION OF THE OBSTRUCTED PORTAL VEIN IN SMALL ANIMALS.

    PubMed

    Specchi, Swan; Pey, Pascaline; Ledda, Gianluca; Lustgarten, Meghann; Thrall, Donald; Bertolini, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    In humans, the process of development of collateral vessels with hepatopetal flow around the portal vein in order to bypass an obstruction is called "cavernous transformation of the portal vein." The purpose of this retrospective, cross-sectional, multicentric study was to describe presumed cavernous transformation of the portal vein in small animals with portal vein obstruction using ultrasound and multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Databases from three different institutions were searched for patients with an imaging diagnosis of cavernous transformation of the portal vein secondary to portal vein obstruction of any cause. Images were retrieved and reanalyzed. With MDCT-angiography, two main portoportal collateral pathways were identified: short tortuous portoportal veins around/inside the thrombus and long portoportal collaterals bypassing the site of portal obstruction. Three subtypes of the long collaterals, often coexisting, were identified. Branches of the hepatic artery where involved in collateral circulation in nine cases. Concomitant acquired portosystemic shunts were identified in six patients. With ultrasound, cavernous transformation of the portal vein was suspected in three dogs and one cat based on visualization of multiple and tortuous vascular structures corresponding to periportal collaterals. In conclusion, the current study provided descriptive MDCT and ultrasonographic characteristics of presumed cavernous transformation of the portal vein in a sample of small animals. Cavernous transformation of the portal vein could occur as a single condition or could be concurrent with acquired portosystemic shunts. PMID:25877678

  7. Constriction rate variation produced by partial ligation of the portal vein at pre-hepatic portal hypertension induced in rats

    PubMed Central

    RODRIGUES, Daren Athiê Boy; da SILVA, Aline Riquena; SERIGIOLLE, Leonardo Carvalho; FIDALGO, Ramiro de Sousa; FAVERO, Sergio San Gregorio; LEME, Pedro Luiz Squilacci

    2014-01-01

    Background Partial portal vein ligation causes an increase in portal pressure that remains stable even after the appearance of collateral circulation, with functional adaptation to prolonged decrease in portal blood flow. Aim To assess whether different constriction rates produced by partial ligation of the vein interfere with the results of this experimental model in rats. Methods Three groups of five rats each were used; in group 1 (sham-operated), dissection and measurement of portal vein diameters were performed. Portal hypertension was induced by partial portal vein ligation, reducing its size to 0.9 mm in the remaining 10 animals, regardless of the initial diameter of the veins. Five animals with portal hypertension (group 2) underwent reoperation after 15 days and the rats in group 3 after 30 days. The calculation of the constriction rate was performed using a specific mathematical formula (1 - π r 2 / π R2) x 100% and the statistical analysis with the Student t test. Results The initial diameter of the animal's portal vein was 2.06 mm, with an average constriction rate of the 55.88%; although the diameter of the veins and the constriction rate in group 2 were lower than in group 3 (2.06 mm - 55,25% and 2.08 mm - 56.51%, respectively), portal hypertension was induced in all rats and no significant macroscopic differences were found between the animals that were reoperated after 15 days and after 30 days respectively, being the shorter period considered enough for the evaluation. Comparing the initial diameter of the vein and the rate of constriction performed in groups 2 and 3, no statistic significance was found (p>0.05). Conclusion Pre-hepatic portal hypertension in rat can be induced by the reduction of the portal vein diameter to 0.9 mm, regardless the initial diameter of the vein and the vessel constriction rate. PMID:25626939

  8. New Portal-Superior Mesenteric Vein Reconstructions Using First Jejunal Vein Flap in Pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Nobuyuki; Miki, Kenji; Kosuge, Tomoo

    2016-06-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) is the only potential treatment for pancreatic head adenocarcinomas, which are sometimes located close to or invade the portal-superior mesenteric vein (PSMV). Surgeons often attempt to obtain a negative resectional margin after resection of the PSMV. This attempt requires PSMV reconstruction through graft replacements or end-to-end anastomosis; however, possible complications should be concerned including anastomosis stenosis, damage to some of the PSMV branches, prosthetic graft infection, and that associated with autologous graft harvesting. The first jejunal artery and vein are often resected in PD with the intent of lymphadenectomy. In this study, jejunal vein flap was used for PSMV reconstruction without causing damage to any of the PSMV branches in two patients. Here, we describe the new methods of PSMV reconstruction using first jejunal vein flap in PD. PMID:26801505

  9. Transjugular Endovascular Recanalization of Splenic Vein in Patients with Regional Portal Hypertension Complicated by Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xuefeng; Nie, Ling; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Tang, Chengwei; Li, Xiao

    2013-05-02

    PurposeRegional portal hypertension (RPH) is an uncommon clinical syndrome resulting from splenic vein stenosis/occlusion, which may cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from the esophagogastric varices. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein in patients with GI bleeding secondary to RPH.MethodsFrom December 2008 to May 2011, 11 patients who were diagnosed with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and had undergone transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein were reviewed retrospectively. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed splenic vein stenosis in six cases and splenic vein occlusion in five. Etiology of RPH was chronic pancreatitis (n = 7), acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst (n = 2), pancreatic injury (n = 1), and isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (n = 1).ResultsTechnical success was achieved in 8 of 11 patients via the transjugular approach, including six patients with splenic vein stenosis and two patients with splenic vein occlusion. Two patients underwent splenic vein venoplasty only, whereas four patients underwent bare stents deployment and two covered stents. Splenic vein pressure gradient (SPG) was reduced from 21.5 ± 7.3 to 2.9 ± 1.4 mmHg after the procedure (P < 0.01). For the remaining three patients who had technical failures, splenic artery embolization and subsequent splenectomy was performed. During a median follow-up time of 17.5 (range, 3–34) months, no recurrence of GI bleeding was observed.ConclusionsTransjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein is a safe and effective therapeutic option in patients with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and is not associated with an increased risk of procedure-related complications.

  10. Use of Left Gastric Vein as an Alternative for Portal Flow Reconstruction in Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Goldoni, Marcos Bertozzi; Kruse, Cristine; Diedrich, João Alfredo; Giacomazzi, Caroline Becker; Negri, Estéfano Aurélio; Koop, Matheus; Sampaio, José Artur; Fontes, Paulo Roberto Ott; Waechter, Fábio Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is observed in up to 10% of liver transplant candidates, hindering execution of the procedure. A dilated gastric vein is an alternative to portal vein reconstruction and decompression of splanchnic bed. We present two cases of patients with portal cavernoma and dilated left gastric vein draining splanchnic bed who underwent liver transplantation. The vein was dissected and sectioned near the cardia; the proximal segment was ligated with suture and the distal segment was anastomosed to the donor portal vein. Gastroportal anastomosis is an excellent option for portal reconstruction in the presence of thrombosis or hypoplasia. It allows an adequate splanchnic drainage and direction of hepatotrophic factors to the graft. PMID:27595034

  11. Nitroglycerine effects on portal vein mechanics and oxidative stress in portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Vujanac, Andreja; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Djordjevic, Dusica; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Stojkovic, Mirjana; Celikovic, Dragan; Andjelkovic, Nebojsa; Skevin, Aleksandra Jurisic; Djuric, Dragan

    2012-01-01

    AIM: Тo examine the effects of nitroglycerine on portal vein haemodynamics and oxidative stress in patients with portal hypertension. METHODS: Thirty healthy controls and 39 patients with clinically verified portal hypertension and increased vascular resistance participated in the study. Liver diameters, portal diameters and portal flow velocities were recorded using color flow imaging/pulsed Doppler detection. Cross-section area, portal flow and index of vascular resistance were calculated. In collected blood samples, superoxide anion radical (O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), index of lipid peroxidation (measured as TBARS) and nitric oxide (NO) as a marker of endothelial response (measured as nitrite-NO2-) were determined. Time-dependent analysis was performed at basal state and in 10th and 15th min after nitroglycerine (sublingual 0.5 mg) administration. RESULTS: Oxidative stress parameters changed significantly during the study. H2O2 decreased at the end of study, probably via O2- mediated disassembling in Haber Weiss and Fenton reaction; O2- increased significantly probably due to increased diameter and tension and decreased shear rate level. Consequently O2- and H2O2 degradation products, like hydroxyl radical, initiated lipid peroxidation. Increased blood flow was to some extent lower in patients than in controls due to double paradoxes, flow velocity decreased, shear rate decreased significantly indicating non Newtonian characteristics of portal blood flow. CONCLUSION: This pilot study could be a starting point for further investigation and possible implementation of some antioxidants in the treatment of portal hypertension. PMID:22294839

  12. Pancreatitis-Induced Extrahepatic Portal Vein Stenosis Treated by Percutaneous Transhepatic Stent Placement: a Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Maleux, G. Vaninbroukx, J.; Verslype, C.; Vanbeckevoort, D.; Hootegem, P. van; Nevens, F.

    2003-08-15

    One month after onset of an acute biliary pancreatitis, a 75-year-old man developed refractory ascites. Duplex ultrasound and CT scan revealed a focal stenosis of the extrahepatic portal vein as confirmed by transhepatic direct portography. In the same session, this stenosis, responsible for symptomatic prehepaticportal hypertension, was successfully dilated and stented and afterwards a residual pressure gradient of 1 mmHg over the stented segment was measured. One week after the stenting procedure the patient was free of ascites and control physical and biochemical examination one year later is completely normal.

  13. Preoperative portal vein embolization for hepatocellular carcinoma: Consensus and controversy

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Taku; Kubota, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Thirty years have passed since the first report of portal vein embolization (PVE), and this procedure is widely adopted as a preoperative treatment procedure for patients with a small future liver remnant (FLR). PVE has been shown to be useful in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and chronic liver disease. However, special caution is needed when PVE is applied prior to subsequent major hepatic resection in cases with cirrhotic livers, and volumetric analysis of the liver segments in addition to evaluation of the liver functional reserve before PVE is mandatory in such cases. Advances in the embolic material and selection of the treatment approach, and combined use of PVE and transcatheter arterial embolization/chemoembolization have yielded improved outcomes after PVE and major hepatic resections. A novel procedure termed the associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy has been gaining attention because of the rapid hypertrophy of the FLR observed in patients undergoing this procedure, however, application of this technique in HCC patients requires special caution, as it has been shown to be associated with a high morbidity and mortality even in cases with essentially healthy livers. PMID:27028706

  14. Reconstruction of portal vein and superior mesenteric vein after extensive resection for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suh Min; Park, Daedo; Min, Sang-Il; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun-Whe; Ha, Jongwon; Kim, Sang Joon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Tumor invasion to the portal vein (PV) or superior mesenteric vein (SMV) can be encountered during the surgery for pancreatic cancer. Venous reconstruction is required, but the optimal surgical methods and conduits remain in controversies. Methods From January 2007 to July 2012, 16 venous reconstructions were performed during surgery for pancreatic cancer in 14 patients. We analyzed the methods, conduits, graft patency, and patient survival. Results The involved veins were 14 SMVs and 2 PVs. The operative methods included resection and end-to-end anastomosis in 7 patients, wedge resection with venoplasty in 2 patients, bovine patch repair in 3 patients, and interposition graft with bovine patch in 1 patient. In one patient with a failed interposition graft with great saphenous vein (GSV), the SMV was reconstructed with a prosthetic interposition graft, which was revised with a spiral graft of GSV. Vascular morbidity occurred in 4 cases; occlusion of an interposition graft with GSV or polytetrafluoroethylene, segmental thrombosis and stenosis of the SMV after end-to-end anastomosis. Patency was maintained in patients with bovine patch angioplasty and spiral vein grafts. With mean follow-up of 9.8 months, the 6- and 12-month death-censored graft survival rates were both 81.3%. Conclusion Many of the involved vein segments were repaired primarily. When tension-free anastomosis is impossible, the spiral grafts with GSV or bovine patch grafts are good options to overcome the size mismatch between autologous vein graft and portomesenteric veins. Further follow-up of these patients is needed to demonstrate long-term patency. PMID:23741692

  15. Radioembolization After Portal Vein Embolization in a Patient with Multifocal Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Burgmans, Mark C. Irani, Farah G. Chan, Wan Ying Teo, Terence K.; Kao, Yung Hsiang Goh, Anthony S.W.; Chow, Pierce K.; Lo, Richard H.

    2012-12-15

    Radioembolization is an effective locoregional therapy for patients with intermediate or advanced stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It has been shown that radioembolization is safe in patients with portal vein thrombosis. This case report describes safe radioembolization after portal vein embolization in a patient with multifocal HCC.

  16. Combined Transabdominal and Transjugular Recanalization of Thrombosed TIPS, Portal and Proximal Splenic Veins

    SciTech Connect

    Bloss, M.F.; Lenz, J.; Gemery, J.

    2003-04-15

    We present a case of TIPS occlusion in which a small caliber transhepatic safety or anchoring wire in combination witha standard transjugular approach were utilized to recanalize the TIPS,portal and splenic veins. This technique may be a useful adjunct to the typical methods used for recanalization of thrombosed TIPS, portal and splenic veins without the need of large caliber transhepatic sheath access.

  17. Application of cystoscope in surgical treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Wei, Xu-Biao; Cheng, Shu-Qun

    2016-06-14

    Development of portal vein tumor thrombus deteriorates the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma, while surgical treatment can offer a promising prognosis for selected patients. However, the possibility of residual lesions in portal vein after conventional thrombectomy is a main risk factor leading to postoperative recurrence. Therefore, ensuring the complete removal of tumor thrombus during operation is critical to improve prognosis. For the first time, we report here one case of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus in which cystoscope was successfully applied as a substitute of intravascular endoscope to visualize the cavity of the portal vein. The patient was a 61-year-old man with a 7-cm tumor in the right lobe of the liver, with tumor thrombus invading the right branch and adjacent to the conjunction of the portal vein. After removal of the tumor, the Olympus CYF-VA2 cystoscope was used to check the portal vein from the opening stump of the right branch of the portal vein. In this case, residual thrombus tissue was found near the opening stump and the conjunction of the portal vein. The residual lesion was carefully retrieved from the stump after retraction of the cystoscope. The procedure was repeated until no residual lesion was found. The whole duration time of thrombectomy was 22.5 (15 + 7.5) min. The patient was free from recurrence at 8 months after the procedure. Our work indicated that the cystoscope is a suitable substitute, with a proper size and function to check the portal vein system and ensure the curability of thrombectomy. Although well-designed clinic trails are still needed, this procedure may further improve the postoperative prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus. PMID:27298574

  18. Application of cystoscope in surgical treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Wei, Xu-Biao; Cheng, Shu-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Development of portal vein tumor thrombus deteriorates the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma, while surgical treatment can offer a promising prognosis for selected patients. However, the possibility of residual lesions in portal vein after conventional thrombectomy is a main risk factor leading to postoperative recurrence. Therefore, ensuring the complete removal of tumor thrombus during operation is critical to improve prognosis. For the first time, we report here one case of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus in which cystoscope was successfully applied as a substitute of intravascular endoscope to visualize the cavity of the portal vein. The patient was a 61-year-old man with a 7-cm tumor in the right lobe of the liver, with tumor thrombus invading the right branch and adjacent to the conjunction of the portal vein. After removal of the tumor, the Olympus CYF-VA2 cystoscope was used to check the portal vein from the opening stump of the right branch of the portal vein. In this case, residual thrombus tissue was found near the opening stump and the conjunction of the portal vein. The residual lesion was carefully retrieved from the stump after retraction of the cystoscope. The procedure was repeated until no residual lesion was found. The whole duration time of thrombectomy was 22.5 (15 + 7.5) min. The patient was free from recurrence at 8 months after the procedure. Our work indicated that the cystoscope is a suitable substitute, with a proper size and function to check the portal vein system and ensure the curability of thrombectomy. Although well-designed clinic trails are still needed, this procedure may further improve the postoperative prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus. PMID:27298574

  19. Portal, superior mesenteric and splenic vein thrombosis secondary to hyperhomocysteinemia with pernicious anemia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute portomesenteric vein thrombosis is an uncommon but serious condition with potential sequelae, such as small-bowel gangrene and end-stage hepatic failure. It is known to be caused by various pro-thrombotic states, including hyperhomocysteinemia. We describe what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported case of concomitant thrombosis of portal, superior mesenteric and splenic veins due to hyperhomocysteinemia secondary to pernicious anemia and no other risk factors. Case presentation A 60-year-old Indian man presented with epigastric pain, diarrhea and vomiting. An abdominal imaging scan showed that he had concomitant pernicious anemia and concomitant portal, superior mesenteric and splenic vein thrombosis. A work-up for the patient’s hypercoagulable state revealed hyperhomocysteinemia, an undetectable vitamin B12 level and pernicious anemia with no other thrombophilic state. He developed infarction with perforation of the small bowel and subsequent septic shock with multi-organ dysfunction syndrome, and he ultimately died due to progressive hepatic failure. Conclusion This report demonstrates that pernicious anemia, on its own, can lead to hyperhomocysteinemia significant enough to lead to lethal multiple splanchnic vein thrombosis. Our case also underscores the need to (1) consider portomesenteric thrombosis in the differential diagnosis of epigastric abdominal pain, (2) perform a complete thrombotic work-up to elucidate metabolic abnormalities that could be contributing to a pro-thrombotic state and (3) initiate aggressive measures, including early consideration of multi-visceral transplantation, in order to avoid decompensation and a significant adverse outcome. PMID:25155131

  20. Multimodality Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kang; Guo, Wei Xing; Chen, Min Shan; Mao, Yi Lei; Sun, Bei Cheng; Shi, Jie; Zhang, Yao Jun; Meng, Yan; Yang, Ye Fa; Cong, Wen Ming; Wu, Meng Chao; Lau, Wan Yee; Cheng, Shu Qun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The optimal treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) remains controversial. We aimed to investigate the best treatment for patients with HCC with PVTT. From January 2002 to January 2014, the data from all consecutive patients with HCC with PVTT who underwent surgical treatment (ST),TACE,TACE combined with sorafenib (TACE-Sor), or TACE combined with radiotherapy (TACE-RT) in the 4 largest tertiary hospitals in China were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into 3 subtypes according to the extent of PVTT in the portal vein (type I-III). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). A total of 1580 patients with HCC with PVTT were included in the study. The median survival times (MST) for ST (n = 745) for type I, II, and III patients (95% CI) were 15.9 (13.3–18.5), 12.5 (10.7–14.3), and 6.0 (4.3–7.7) months, respectively. The corresponding figures for patients after TACE (n = 604) were 9.3 (5.6–12.9), 4.9 (4.1–5.7), and 4.0 (3.1–4.9), respectively; for patients after TACE-Sor (n = 113) 12.0 (6.6–17.4), 8.9 (6.7–11.1), and 7.0 (3.0–10.9), respectively; and for patients after TACE-RT (n = 118) 12.2 (0–24.7), 10.6 (6.8–14.5), and 8.9 (5.2–12.6), respectively. Comparison among the different treatments for the 3 subtypes of PVTT patients after propensity score (PS) matching showed the effectiveness of ST to be the best for type I and type II PVTT patients, and TACE-RT was most beneficial for type III patients. Treatment was an independent risk factor of OS. ST was the best treatment for type I and II PVTT patients with Child-Pugh A and selected B liver function. TACE-RT should be given to type III PVTT patients. PMID:26986115

  1. Portal Vein Embolization Before Extended Hepatectomy in a Toddler With Mesenchymal Hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Terraz, Sylvain; Ronot, Maxime; Breguet, Romain; Anooshiravani, Mehrak; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Becker, Christoph D; Wildhaber, Barbara E

    2015-10-01

    Portal vein embolization is widely used to induce hypertrophy of the future liver remnant before extended hepatectomy, decreasing the risk of postoperative liver failure. However, this percutaneous procedure has not been previously reported in a young child. The present report describes the case of a 14-month-old patient with a large multifocal mesenchymal hamartoma of the entire right liver, successfully resected after induction of future liver remnant hypertrophy by portal vein embolization. PMID:26391943

  2. [Resection of the portal vein in pancreatectomy for cancer: technical considerations. Apropos of 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Christophe, M; Thomas, P; Le Treut, Y P; Pol, B; Brandone, J M; Capobianco, C; Bricot, R

    1991-01-01

    Out of 150 carcinomas of the pancreas operated from 1970 through 1989, 50 pancreatectomies were performed, including 4 cases of segmental resection of portal vein with total pancreatectomy (2 cases) or duodenopancreatectomy (2 cases). The technical procedure is described and discussed. Segmental resection of portal vein is rare in our experience and has been always performed out of necessity because of the over estimation of the resectability. However, mortality and post-operative stay are not increased. PMID:1859109

  3. Vascular corrosion casting: analyzing wall shear stress in the portal vein and vascular abnormalities in portal hypertensive and cirrhotic rodents.

    PubMed

    Van Steenkiste, Christophe; Trachet, Bram; Casteleyn, Christophe; van Loo, Denis; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Segers, Patrick; Geerts, Anja; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Colle, Isabelle

    2010-11-01

    Vascular corrosion casting is an established method of anatomical preparation that has recently been revived and has proven to be an excellent tool for detailed three-dimensional (3D) morphological examination of normal and pathological microcirculation. In addition, the geometry provided by vascular casts can be further used to calculate wall shear stress (WSS) in a vascular bed using computational techniques. In the first part of this study, the microvascular morphological changes associated with portal hypertension (PHT) and cirrhosis in vascular casts are described. The second part of this study consists of a quantitative analysis of the WSS in the portal vein in casts of different animal models of PHT and cirrhosis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Microvascular changes in the splanchnic, hepatic and pulmonary territory of portal hypertensive and cirrhotic mice are described in detail with stereomicroscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy. To our knowledge, our results are the first to report the vascular changes in the common bile duct ligation cirrhotic model. Calculating WSS using CFD methods is a feasible technique in PHT and cirrhosis, enabling the differentiation between different animal models. First, a dimensional analysis was performed, followed by a CFD calculation describing the spatial and temporal WSS distributions in the portal vein. WSS was significantly different between sham/cirrhotic/pure PHT animals with the highest values in the latter. Up till now, no techniques have been developed to quantify WSS in the portal vein in laboratory animals. This study showed for the first time that vascular casting has an important role not only in the morphological evaluation of animal models of PHT and cirrhosis, but also in defining the biological response of the portal vein wall to hemodynamic changes. CFD in 3D geometries can be used to describe the spatial and temporal variations in WSS in the portal vein and to better understand

  4. Management of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Matthew; Kim, Yun Hwan; Saab, Sammy; Lee, Edward Wolfgang

    2015-03-28

    Management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is complex and requires an understanding of multiple therapeutic options. PVT is present in 10%-40% of HCC at the time of diagnosis, and is an adverse prognostic factor. Management options are limited, as transplantation is generally contraindicated, and surgical resection is only rarely performed in select centers. Systemic medical therapy with sorafenib has been shown to modestly prolong survival. Transarterial chemoembolization has been performed in select cases but has shown a high incidence of complications. Emerging data on treatment of PVT with Y-90 radioembolization suggest that this modality is well-tolerated and associated with favorable overall survival. Current society guidelines do not yet specifically recommend radioembolization for patients with PVT, but this may change with the development of newer staging systems and treatment algorithms. In this comprehensive literature review, we present current and available management options with the relative advantages, disadvantages and contraindications of these treatment options with summarized data on overall survival. PMID:25834310

  5. Management of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Quirk, Matthew; Kim, Yun Hwan; Saab, Sammy; Lee, Edward Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is complex and requires an understanding of multiple therapeutic options. PVT is present in 10%-40% of HCC at the time of diagnosis, and is an adverse prognostic factor. Management options are limited, as transplantation is generally contraindicated, and surgical resection is only rarely performed in select centers. Systemic medical therapy with sorafenib has been shown to modestly prolong survival. Transarterial chemoembolization has been performed in select cases but has shown a high incidence of complications. Emerging data on treatment of PVT with Y-90 radioembolization suggest that this modality is well-tolerated and associated with favorable overall survival. Current society guidelines do not yet specifically recommend radioembolization for patients with PVT, but this may change with the development of newer staging systems and treatment algorithms. In this comprehensive literature review, we present current and available management options with the relative advantages, disadvantages and contraindications of these treatment options with summarized data on overall survival. PMID:25834310

  6. [Hydatid cyst in the hepatic hilum causing a cavernous transformation in the portal vein].

    PubMed

    Gil-Egea, M J; Alameda, F; Girvent, M; Riera, R; Sitges-Serra, A

    1998-05-01

    Portal cavernomatosis consists in the substitution of the portal vein by many fine, twisting venules leading to the liver. This phenomenon is produced as a consequence of anterior thrombosis of the portal vein and is associated with chronic pancreatitis, cancer of the pancreas, intraabdominal sepsis and cholelithiasis. The symptomatology may be nul or present as obstructive jaundice or portal hypertension. Diagnosis is made by Doppler echography. The treatment is portal shunt when symptomatology is produced. In patients with cholelithiasis requiring surgery, the shunt is advised prior to biliary surgery since perioperative hemorrhage, if present, may be incoercible as in the case herein described. We present a 84-year-old woman with portal cavernomatosis the etiology of which was a hydatidic cyst located in the hepatic bifurcation and treated with mebendazol 10 years previously. This etiology has not been previously reported. PMID:9644876

  7. Embolization therapy for bleeding from jejunal loop varices due to extrahepatic portal vein obstruction.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Rika; Yamagami, Takuji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Kajiwara, Kenji; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Hiyama, Eiso; Tashiro, Hirotaka; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Ohge, Hiroki; Awai, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Four patients underwent embolization therapy for hemorrhage from varices in the jejunal loop after choledochojejunostomy existing in hepatopetal collateral veins due to chronic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction through the afferent veins using microcoils and/or n-butyl cyanoacrylate. In all four patients, all afferent veins were successfully embolized and successful hemostasis was achieved without liver dysfunction. However, recurrence of the varices and rebleeding occurred within a year in two patients. Embolization for hemorrhage from varices in the jejunal loop after choledochojejunostomy through afferent veins is acceptable in terms of safety and is useful to achieve hemostasis in emergency circumstances. PMID:26330264

  8. Transhepatic Preoperative Portal Vein Embolization Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug: Report of Four Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Ringe, Kristina I. Weidemann, Juergen; Rosenthal, Herbert; Keberle, Marc; Chavan, Ajay; Baus, Stefan; Galanski, Michael

    2007-11-15

    The Amplatzer Vascular Plug (AVP) is a device originally intended for arterial and venous embolization in peripheral vessels. From December 2004 to March 2007 we implanted a total of 8 AVPs in the portal venous system in our institution for preoperative portal vein embolization in 4 patients (55-71 years) prior to right hemihepatectomy. AVP implantation was successful in all patients. Total occlusion of the embolized portal vein branches was achieved in all patients. There were no major complications associated with the embolization.

  9. Percutaneous Mesocaval Shunt Creation in a Patient with Chronic Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bercu, Zachary L. Sheth, Sachin B.; Noor, Amir; Lookstein, Robert A. Fischman, Aaron M. Nowakowski, F. Scott Kim, Edward Patel, Rahul S.

    2015-10-15

    The creation of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is a critical procedure for the treatment of recurrent variceal bleeding and refractory ascites in the setting of portal hypertension. Chronic portal vein thrombosis remains a relative contraindication to conventional TIPS and options are limited in this scenario. Presented is a novel technique for management of refractory ascites in a patient with hepatitis C cirrhosis and chronic portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis secondary to schistosomiasis and lupus anticoagulant utilizing fluoroscopically guided percutaneous mesocaval shunt creation.

  10. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt in a Patient with Cavernomatous Portal Vein Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamata, Hiroshi; Kumazaki, Tatsuo; Kanazawa, Hidenori; Takahashi, Shuji; Tajima, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Hiromitsu

    2000-03-15

    A 23-year-old woman with liver cirrhosis secondary to primary sclerosing cholangitis was referred to us for the treatment of recurrent bleeding from esophageal varices that had been refractory to endoscopic sclerotherapy. Her portal vein was occluded, associated with cavernous transformation. A transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was performed after a preprocedural three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography evaluation to determine feasibility. The portal vein system was recanalized and portal blood flow increased markedly after TIPS. Esophageal varices disappeared 3 weeks after TIPS. Re-bleeding and hepatic encephalopathy were absent for 3 years after the procedure. We conclude that with adequate preprocedural evaluation, TIPS can be performed safely even in patients with portal vein occlusion associated with cavernous transformation.

  11. Ramification of the portal vein at the porta hepatis in humans.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, L J; Ortale, J R

    1995-01-01

    The ramification of the portal vein at the porta hepatis was studied by anatomic dissection performed in 32 formalin fixed human livers. In all the specimens there were branches which ran towards the caudate lobe, arising from the portal vein and either from the left or the right portal branches. Tri- and quadrifurcation of the portal vein was observed. In 5 cases (16%) there were branches arising from left portal branch or portal vein and directed anteriorly to the quadrate lobe or to the region of the gall-bladder sulcus. These branches ranged from 1.0 to 6.0 mm in diameter. The portal caudate branches were divided into 3 groups. Group 1: Branches to the papillary process; 1 or 2 branches in 26 cases (82%), 3 or 5 branches in 3 cases (9%) and no branches in 3 cases (9%); Group 2: Branches to the vena cava region, including the left part of the caudate process; 1 or 2 branches in 30 cases (94%), 3 branches in 1 case (3%) and no branches in 1 case (3%); Group 3: Branches to the right part of the caudate process; 1 or 2 branches in 12 cases (37%), and no branches in 20 cases (63%). PMID:7597563

  12. Transsinusoidal Portal Vein Embolization with Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (Onyx): A Feasibility Study in Pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Smits, Maarten L. J.; Vanlangenhove, Peter Sturm, Emiel J. C.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Hav, Monirath Praet, Marleen; Vente, Maarten A. D.; Snaps, Frederic R.; Defreyne, Luc

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Portal vein embolization is performed to increase the future liver remnant before liver surgery in patients with liver malignancies. This study assesses the feasibility of a transsinusoidal approach for portal vein embolization (PVE) with the ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer, Onyx. Methods: Indirect portography through contrast injection in the cranial mesenteric artery was performed in eight healthy pigs. Onyx was slowly injected through a microcatheter from a wedged position in the hepatic vein and advanced through the liver lobules into the portal system. The progression of Onyx was followed under fluoroscopy, and the extent of embolization was monitored by indirect portography. The pigs were euthanized immediately (n = 2), at 7 days (n = 4), or at 21 days postprocedure (n = 2). All pigs underwent necropsy and the ex vivo livers were grossly and histopathologically analyzed. Results: Transsinusoidal PVE was successfully performed in five of eight pigs (63%). In 14 of 21 injections (67%), a segmental portal vein could be filled completely. A mean of 1.6 liver lobes per pig was embolized (range 1-2 lobes). There were no periprocedural adverse events. Focal capsular scarring was visible on the surface of two resected livers, yet the capsules remained intact. Histopathological examination showed no signs of recanalization or abscess formation. Mild inflammatory reaction to Onyx was observed in the perivascular parenchyma. Conclusions: The porcine portal vein can be embolized through injection of Onyx from a wedged position in the hepatic vein. Possible complications of transsinusoidal PVE and the effect on contralateral hypertrophy need further study.

  13. Portal Vein Embolization Before Liver Resection: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Lienden, K. P. van; Esschert, J. W. van den; Graaf, W. de; Bipat, S.; Lameris, J. S.; Gulik, T. M. van; Delden, O. M. van

    2013-02-15

    This is a review of literature on the indications, technique, and outcome of portal vein embolization (PVE). A systematic literature search on outcome of PVE from 1990 to 2011 was performed in Medline, Cochrane, and Embase databases. Forty-four articles were selected, including 1,791 patients with a mean age of 61 {+-} 4.1 years. Overall technical success rate was 99.3 %. The mean hypertrophy rate of the FRL after PVE was 37.9 {+-} 0.1 %. In 70 patients (3.9 %), surgery was not performed because of failure of PVE (clinical success rate 96.1 %). In 51 patients (2.8 %), the hypertrophy response was insufficient to perform liver resection. In the other 17 cases, 12 did not technically succeed (0.7 %) and 7 caused a complication leading to unresectability (0.4 %). In 6.1 %, resection was cancelled because of local tumor progression after PVE. Major complications were seen in 2.5 %, and the mortality rate was 0.1 %. A head-to-head comparison shows a negative effect of liver cirrhosis on hypertrophy response. The use of n-butyl cyanoacrylate seems to have a greater effect on hypertrophy, but the difference with other embolization materials did not reach statistical significance. No difference in regeneration is seen in patients with cholestasis or chemotherapy. Preoperative PVE has a high technical and clinical success rate. Liver cirrhosis has a negative effect on regeneration, but cholestasis and chemotherapy do not seem to have an influence on the hypertrophy response. The use of n-butyl cyanoacrylate may result in a greater hypertrophy response compared with other embolization materials used.

  14. Animal Model of Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sumit; Laerum, Frode; Brosstad, Frank; Kvernebo, Knut; Sakariassen, Kjell S.

    1998-07-15

    Purpose: To develop an animal model of acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Methods: In part I of the study nine juvenile domestic pigs were used. Each external iliac vein was transluminally occluded with a balloon catheter. Thrombin was infused through a microcatheter in one leg according to one of the following protocols: (1) intraarterial (IA): 1250 U at 25 U/min in the common femoral artery (n= 3); (2) intravenous (IV): 5000 U in the popliteal vein at 500 U/min (n= 3), or at 100 U/min (n= 3). Saline was administered in the opposite leg. After the animals were killed, the mass of thrombus in the iliofemoral veins was measured. The pudendoepiploic (PEV), profunda femoris (PF), and popliteal veins (PV) were examined. Thrombosis in the tributaries of the superficial femoral vein (SFVt) was graded according to a three-point scale (0, +, ++). In part II of the study IV administration was further investigated in nine pigs using the following three regimens with 1000 U at 25 U/min serving as the control: (1) 1000 U at 100 U/min, (2) 250 U at 25 U/min, (3) 250 U at 6.25 U/min. Results: All animals survived. In part I median thrombus mass in the test limbs was 1.40 g as compared with 0.25 g in the controls (p= 0.01). PEV, PFV and PV were thrombosed in all limbs infused with thrombin. IV infusion was more effective in inducing thrombosis in both the parent veins (mass 1.32-1.78 g) and SVFt (++ in 4 of 6 legs), as compared with IA infusion (mass 0.0-1.16 g; SFVt ++ in 1 of 3 legs). In part II thrombus mass in axial veins ranged from 1.23 to 2.86 g, and showed no relationship with the dose of thrombin or the rate of infusion. Tributary thrombosis was less extensive with 250 U at 25 U/min than with the other regimens. Conclusion: Slow distal intravenous thrombin infusion in the hind legs of pigs combined with proximal venous occlusion induces thrombosis in the leg veins that closely resembles clinical DVT in distribution.

  15. The design and fabrication of two portal vein flow phantoms by different methods

    SciTech Connect

    Yunker, Bryan E. Lanning, Craig J.; Shandas, Robin; Hunter, Kendall S.; Chen, S. James

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: This study outlines the design and fabrication techniques for two portal vein flow phantoms. Methods: A materials study was performed as a precursor to this phantom fabrication effort and the desired material properties are restated for continuity. A three-dimensional portal vein pattern was created from the Visual Human database. The portal vein pattern was used to fabricate two flow phantoms by different methods with identical interior surface geometry using computer aided design software tools and rapid prototyping techniques. One portal flow phantom was fabricated within a solid block of clear silicone for use on a table with Ultrasound or within medical imaging systems such as MRI, CT, PET, or SPECT. The other portal flow phantom was fabricated as a thin walled tubular latex structure for use in water tanks with Ultrasound imaging. Both phantoms were evaluated for usability and durability. Results: Both phantoms were fabricated successfully and passed durability criteria for flow testing in the next project phase. Conclusions: The fabrication methods and materials employed for the study yielded durable portal vein phantoms.

  16. Imaging and radiological interventions in extra-hepatic portal vein obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pargewar, Sudheer S; Desai, Saloni N; Rajesh, S; Singh, Vaibhav P; Arora, Ankur; Mukund, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) is a primary vascular condition characterized by chronic long standing blockage and cavernous transformation of portal vein with or without additional involvement of intrahepatic branches, splenic or superior mesenteric vein. Patients generally present in childhood with multiple episodes of variceal bleed and EHPVO is the predominant cause of paediatric portal hypertension (PHT) in developing countries. It is a pre-hepatic type of PHT in which liver functions and morphology are preserved till late. Characteristic imaging findings include multiple parabiliary venous collaterals which form to bypass the obstructed portal vein with resultant changes in biliary tree termed portal biliopathy or portal cavernoma cholangiopathy. Ultrasound with Doppler, computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiography and magnetic resonance portovenography are non-invasive techniques which can provide a comprehensive analysis of degree and extent of EHPVO, collaterals and bile duct abnormalities. These can also be used to assess in surgical planning as well screening for shunt patency in post-operative patients. The multitude of changes and complications seen in EHPVO can be addressed by various radiological interventional procedures. The myriad of symptoms arising secondary to vascular, biliary, visceral and neurocognitive changes in EHPVO can be managed by various radiological interventions like transjugular intra-hepatic portosystemic shunt, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, partial splenic embolization, balloon occluded retrograde obliteration of portosystemic shunt (PSS) and revision of PSS. PMID:27358683

  17. Portal vein thrombosis in a patient with Turner's syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shedeed, Soad A

    2012-03-01

    This work aimed at reporting a case of Turner's syndrome with portal vein thrombosis and elevated levels of factor VIII and von Willebrand factor. A 14-year-old Libyan girl was admitted for evaluation of infantilism and pallor; meanwhile, she was found to be of short stature, with webbing of the neck. Chromosomal studies showed monosomy pattern Turner's syndrome (45XO). Abdominal ultrasound displayed a hugely enlarged spleen. Computed tomography (CT) imaging of the abdomen revealed portal vein thrombosis and dilated venous collaterals in porta hepatis. Thrombophilia screening demonstrated elevated levels of factor VIII (207 IU dl(-1)) and von Willebrand factor (450 IU dl(-1)). It was concluded that this was a case report on the unusual finding of portal vein thrombosis in a patient with Turner's syndrome in whom high levels of factor VIII and von Willebrand factor were found. Detailed molecular epidemiological study is recommended to clarify this finding and its underlying factors. PMID:22560822

  18. Intrahepatic Left to Right Portoportal Venous Collateral Vascular Formation in Patients Undergoing Right Portal Vein Ligation

    SciTech Connect

    Lienden, K. P. van; Hoekstra, L. T.; Bennink, R. J.; Gulik, T. M. van

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: We investigated intrahepatic vascular changes in patients undergoing right portal vein ligation (PVL) or portal vein embolization (PVE) in conjunction with the ensuing hypertrophic response and function of the left liver lobe. Methods: Between December 2008 and October 2011, 7 patients underwent right PVL and 14 patients PVE. Computed tomographic (CT) volumetry to assess future remnant liver (FRL) and functional hepatobiliary scintigraphy were performed in all patients before and 3 weeks after portal vein occlusion. In 18 patients an intraoperative portography was performed to assess perfusion through the occluded portal branches. Results: In all patients after initially successful PVL, reperfused portal veins were observed on CT scan 3 weeks after portal occlusion. This was confirmed in all cases during intraoperative portography. Intrahepatic portoportal collaterals were identified in all patients in the PVL group and in one patient in the PVE group. In all other PVE patients, complete occlusion of the embolized portal branches was observed on CT scan and on intraoperative portography. The median increase of FRL volume after PVE was 41.6 % (range 10-305 %), and after PVL was only 8.1 % (range 0-102 %) (p = 0.179). There were no differences in FRL function between both groups. Conclusion: Preoperative PVE and PVL are both methods to induce hypertrophy of the FRL in anticipation of major liver resection. Compared to PVE, PVL seems less efficient in inducing hypertrophy of the nonoccluded left lobe. This could be caused by the formation of intrahepatic portoportal neocollateral vessels, through which the ligated portal branches are reperfused within 3 weeks.

  19. A totally laparoscopic associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy assisted with radiofrequency (radiofrequency assisted liver partition with portal vein ligation) for staged liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, David N.; Gall, Tamara M. H.; Fajardo, Ana; Pencavel, Tim D.; Fan, Ruifang; Sodergren, Mikael H.

    2016-01-01

    In order to induce liver hypertrophy to enable liver resection in patients with a small future liver remnant (FLR), various methods have been proposed in addition to portal vein embolisation (PVE). Most recently, the associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) technique has gained significant international interest. This technique is limited by the high morbidity associated with an in situ liver splitting and the patient undergoing two open operations. We present the case of a variant ALPPS technique performed entirely laparoscopically with no major morbidity or mortality. An increased liver volume of 57.9% was seen after 14 days. This technique is feasible to perform and compares favourably to other ALPPS methods whilst gaining the advantages of laparoscopic surgery. PMID:27500150

  20. A totally laparoscopic associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy assisted with radiofrequency (radiofrequency assisted liver partition with portal vein ligation) for staged liver resection.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Long R; Hakim, David N; Gall, Tamara M H; Fajardo, Ana; Pencavel, Tim D; Fan, Ruifang; Sodergren, Mikael H

    2016-08-01

    In order to induce liver hypertrophy to enable liver resection in patients with a small future liver remnant (FLR), various methods have been proposed in addition to portal vein embolisation (PVE). Most recently, the associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) technique has gained significant international interest. This technique is limited by the high morbidity associated with an in situ liver splitting and the patient undergoing two open operations. We present the case of a variant ALPPS technique performed entirely laparoscopically with no major morbidity or mortality. An increased liver volume of 57.9% was seen after 14 days. This technique is feasible to perform and compares favourably to other ALPPS methods whilst gaining the advantages of laparoscopic surgery. PMID:27500150

  1. Percutaneous Unilateral Biliary Metallic Stent Placement in Patients with Malignant Obstruction of the Biliary Hila and Contralateral Portal Vein Steno-Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Son, Rak Chae; Ko, Heung Kyu; Kim, Jong Woo; Ko, Gi-Young

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the outcomes of percutaneous unilateral metallic stent placement in patients with a malignant obstruction of the biliary hila and a contralateral portal vein steno-occlusion. Materials and Methods Sixty patients with a malignant hilar obstruction and unilobar portal vein steno-occlusion caused by tumor invasion or preoperative portal vein embolization were enrolled in this retrospective study from October 2010 to October 2013. All patients were treated with percutaneous placement of a biliary metallic stent, including expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE)-covered stents in 27 patients and uncovered stents in 33 patients. Results A total of 70 stents were successfully placed in 60 patients. Procedural-related minor complications, including self-limiting hemobilia (n = 2) and cholangitis (n = 4) occurred in six (10%) patients. Acute cholecystitis occurred in two patients. Successful internal drainage was achieved in 54 (90%) of the 60 patients. According to a Kaplan-Meier analysis, median survival time was 210 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 135-284 days), and median stent patency time was 133 days (95% CI, 94-171 days). No significant difference in stent patency was observed between covered and uncovered stents (p = 0.646). Stent dysfunction occurred in 16 (29.6%) of 54 patients after a mean of 159 days (range, 65-321 days). Conclusion Unilateral placement of ePTFE-covered and uncovered stents in the hepatic lobe with a patent portal vein is a safe and effective method for palliative treatment of patients with a contralateral portal vein steno-occlusion caused by an advanced hilar malignancy or portal vein embolization. No significant difference in stent patency was detected between covered and uncovered metallic stents. PMID:25995688

  2. Using autologous peritoneal graft for portal vein injury due to blunt thoracoabdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Sabuncuoglu, M Z; Dandin, O; Teomete, U; Cakir, T; Kayaalp, C

    2015-01-01

    Background Autologous vein or prosthetic materials are used as patch or tube graft for portal or caval vein reconstruction after trauma or tumor resection. Preparation of autologous veins requires extra incisions and is time consuming that is crucial especially in trauma patients. This condition adversely affects postoperative morbidity and mortality, particularly in trauma cases. Prosthetic materials may not be available in some centers, and their use is associated with an increased risk of infection. Description of case A 28-year-old hemodynamically unstable man presented to the emergency room with complete transection of main portal vein, right hepatic artery and common bile duct with tissue defect on hepatoduodenal ligament due to blunt thoracoabdominal trauma. Reconstructing of the portal vein was performed using an autologous peritoneal tube graft. Conclusion Autologous peritoneal graft is a very good option in the treatment of major vascular injuries which can not be repaired with primary suturing. It is also easy to prepare and use, safe, without a need of additional incision, as an alternative to autologous veins and prosthetic materials especially under emergency conditions. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (3): 260-262. PMID:27418787

  3. An anomalous portal vein crossing the lesser sac and ending at the upper part of ductus venosus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hee Chul; Murakami, Gen; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Cho, Baik Hwan

    2015-01-01

    In serial sagittal sections of a fetus on week 9 (crown-rump length, 36 mm), we incidentally found absence of the usual portal vein through the hepatoduodenal ligament. Instead, an anomalous portal vein originated behind the pancreatic body, crossed the lesser sac and merged with the upper part of the ductus venosus. During the course across the lesser sac, the vein provided a deep notch of the liver caudate lobe (Spiegel's lobe). The hepatoduodenal ligament contained the hepatic artery, the common bile duct and, at the right posterior margin of the ligament, and a branch of the anomalous portal vein which communicated with the usual right branch of the portal vein at the hepatic hilum. The umbilical portion of the portal vein took a usual morphology and received the umbilical vein and gave off the ductus venosus. Although it seemed not to be described yet, the present anomalous portal vein was likely to be a persistent left vitelline vein. The hepatoduodenal ligament was unlikely to include the left vitelline vein in contrast to the usual concept. PMID:26417483

  4. Essentiality of portal vein receptors in hypoglycemic counterregulation: direct proof via denervation in male canines.

    PubMed

    Ionut, Viorica; Castro, Ana Valeria B; Woolcott, Orison O; Stefanovski, Darko; Iyer, Malini S; Broussard, Josiane L; Mkrtchyan, Hasmik; Burch, Miguel; Elazary, Ram; Kirkman, Erlinda; Bergman, Richard N

    2014-04-01

    A major issue of in the treatment of diabetes is the risk of hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is detected both centrally and peripherally in the porto-hepatic area. The portal locus for hypoglycemic detection was originally described using the "local irrigation of the liver" approach in a canine model. Further work using portal vein denervation (DEN) in a rodent model characterized portal hypoglycemic sensing in detail. However, recent controversy about the relevance of rodent findings to large animals and humans prompted us to investigate the effect of portal DEN on the hypoglycemic response in the canine, a species with multiple similarities to human glucose homeostasis. Hypoglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps were performed in male canines, before (PRE) and after (POST) portal vein DEN or sham surgery (CON, control). Insulin (30 pmol/kg·min) and glucose (variable) were infused to slowly decrease systemic glycemia to 50 mg/dL over 160 minutes. The average plasma glucose during clamp steady state was: 2.9 ± 0.1 mmol DEN-PRE, 2.9 ± 0.2 mmol DEN-POST, 2.9 ± 0.1 mmol CON-PRE, and 2.8 ± 0.0 mmol CON-POST. There were no significant differences in plasma insulin between DEN and CON, PRE and POST experiments. The epinephrine response to hypoglycemia was reduced by 62% in DEN but not in CON. Steady-state cortisol was 46% lower after DEN but not after CON. Our study shows, in a large animal model, that surgical disconnection of the portal vein from the afferent pathway of the hypoglycemic counterregulatory circuitry results in a substantial suppression of the epinephrine response and a significant impact on cortisol response. These findings directly demonstrate an essential role for the portal vein in sensing hypoglycemia and relating glycemic information to the central nervous system. PMID:24428530

  5. Anatomy of the portal branches and the hepatic veins in the caudate lobe of the liver.

    PubMed

    Ortale, J R; Borges Keiralla, L C

    2004-10-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the caudate portal branches and their relationships with the hepatic caudate veins and propose a new nomenclature for the caudate branches based on their territory of distribution. We realized the fine dissection of the veins of the caudate lobe in 40 human livers fixed and preserved in formalin. In 15/40 (37.5%) cases there was a single branch to the caudate lobe. In 25/40 (62.5%) cases there was more than one branch, with a posterior caudate branch in 20/40 (50%) cases, an anterior caudate branch in 15/40 (37.5%) cases, a left caudate branch in 14/40 (35%) cases, and a right caudate branch in 8/40 (20%) cases. The most frequent combination detected (11/40, 27.5% of cases) was that of the posterior and anterior branches. The venous drainage of the caudate lobe and its papillary process was provided by the superior caudate hepatic vein in 23/40 (57.5%) cases, by the middle caudate vein in 35/40 (87.5%) cases (which was the only vein in 12/35 cases), and by the inferior caudate vein in 16/40 (40%) cases. In 11/40 (12.5%) cases there were accessory caudate veins, which emptied into the left and intermediate hepatic veins. The portal branches and the hepatic veins related to the caudate process were studied. In conclusion, the new nomenclature analyzes more precisely the distribution of the caudate portal branches. PMID:15300411

  6. Anatomy of the intrahepatic ramification of the portal vein in the right hemiliver.

    PubMed

    Ortale, J R; Naves De Freitas Azevedo, C H; Mello De Castro, C

    2000-01-01

    The ramification of the portal vein in the right hemiliver was studied by anatomic dissection in 36 formalin-fixed human livers. In 28/36 (77.8%) cases, the portal vein bifurcated into a right branch and a left branch and the right branch bifurcated into anterior and posterior segmental branches. The anterior segmental branch terminated in the anterosuperior subsegment (S(8)) in two types: bifurcated when it divided into anterior P(8) and posterior P(8 )branches towards the respective regions of S(8) (24/28 cases) and monopodal when it had a single pedicle (4/28 cases). The maximum anteroinferior subsegmental branch (P(5 )maximum) originated either from the anterior segmental branch (16/28 cases) or from the anterior P(8) branch (12/28 cases). The posterior segmental branch vascularized the posteroinferior (S(6)) and the posterosuperior (S(7)) subsegments, and was terminated in three types: fan-shaped (16/28), bifurcated (9/28) and tripodal (3/28). In 4/36 (11.1%) cases the portal vein bifurcated into a right branch and a left branch but the posterior segmental branch was not present. In 4/36 (11.1%) the right branch of the portal vein was not present. These anatomical variations are explained separately and finally all cases are considered as a whole. PMID:10867440

  7. Intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas for complex pancreatogenous hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiying; Tan, Haidong; Sun, Yongliang; Si, Shuang; Xu, Li; Liu, Xiaolei; Liu, Liguo; Zhou, Wenying; Huang, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intraoperative localization and confirmation of complete resection of the hypersecreting tissue are the 2 main challenges in the management of pancreatogenous hypoglycemia. Here, we report our experience with intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas in the management of pancreatogenous hypoglycemia. Clinical courses of 2 patients with biochemical evidence of a pancreatogenous hypoglycemia were studied. The preoperative diagnosis was multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN-1) and nesidioblastosis, respectively. Rapid intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas was used to localize and confirm complete excision of the hypersecreting tissue. Hypoglycemia was successfully treated in both the patients. In the MEN-1 patient, 2 small tumors in the head of pancreas were not resected, as they were deemed noninsulin secreting by intraoperative portal vein insulin assay, thus avoiding a total pancreatectomy. In the patient with nesidioblastosis, using intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas, an appropriate amount of pancreatic tissue was resected thereby avoiding recurrence and diabetes. This technique may be of particular value in patients with complex conditions such as MEN-1 and nesidioblastosis, to localize and achieve complete resection of hypersecreting pancreatic tissue. PMID:27367988

  8. Portal vein thrombosis, mortality and hepatic decompensation in patients with cirrhosis: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stine, Jonathan G; Shah, Puja M; Cornella, Scott L; Rudnick, Sean R; Ghabril, Marwan S; Stukenborg, George J; Northup, Patrick G

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the clinical impact of portal vein thrombosis in terms of both mortality and hepatic decompensations (variceal hemorrhage, ascites, portosystemic encephalopathy) in adult patients with cirrhosis. METHODS: We identified original articles reported through February 2015 in MEDLINE, Scopus, Science Citation Index, AMED, the Cochrane Library, and relevant examples available in the grey literature. Two independent reviewers screened all citations for inclusion criteria and extracted summary data. Random effects odds ratios were calculated to obtain aggregate estimates of effect size across included studies, with 95%CI. RESULTS: A total of 226 citations were identified and reviewed, and 3 studies with 2436 participants were included in the meta-analysis of summary effect. Patients with portal vein thrombosis had an increased risk of mortality (OR = 1.62, 95%CI: 1.11-2.36, P = 0.01). Portal vein thrombosis was associated with an increased risk of ascites (OR = 2.52, 95%CI: 1.63-3.89, P < 0.001). There was insufficient data available to determine the pooled effect on other markers of decompensation including gastroesophageal variceal bleeding or hepatic encephalopathy. CONCLUSION: Portal vein thrombosis appears to increase mortality and ascites, however, the relatively small number of included studies limits more generalizable conclusions. More trials with a direct comparison group are needed. PMID:26644821

  9. LIVER FUNCTION AFTER IRRADIATION BASED UPON CT PORTAL VEIN PERFUSION IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Pan, Charlie; Balter, James M.; Platt, Joel F.; Francis, Isaac R.; Knol, James A.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The role of radiation in the treatment of intrahepatic cancer is limited by the development of radiation-induced liver disease (RILD), which occurs weeks after the course of radiation is completed. We hypothesized that, as the pathophysiology of RILD is veno-occlusive disease, we could assess individual and regional liver sensitivity to radiation by measuring liver perfusion during a course of treatment using dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) scanning. Materials and Methods Patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing conformal radiotherapy underwent DCE-CT (to measure perfusion distribution) and an indocyanine extraction study (to measure liver function) prior to, during, and one month after treatment. We wished to determine if the residual functioning liver (i.e. those regions showing portal vein perfusion) could be used to predict overall liver function after irradiation. Results Radiation doses from 45 to 84 Gy resulted in undectable regional portal vein perfusion one month after treatment. The volume of each liver with undectable portal vein perfusion ranged from 0% to 39% and depended both on the patient’s sensitivity and dose distribution. There was a significant correlation between indocyanine green clearance and the mean of the estimated portal vein perfusion in the functional liver parenchyma (P < .001). Conclusion This study reveals substantial individual variability in the sensitivity of the liver to irradiation. In addition, these findings suggest that hepatic perfusion imaging may be a marker for liver function, and has the potential to be a tool for individualizing therapy. PMID:17855011

  10. Insight into congenital absence of the portal vein: Is it rare?

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guo-Hua Hu‚ Lai-Gen; Zhu, Jin Yang‚ Jin-Hua Mei‚ Yue-Feng

    2008-01-01

    Congenital absence of portal vein (CAPV) was a rare event in the past. However, the number of detected CAPV cases has increased in recent years because of advances in imaging techniques. Patients with CAPV present with portal hypertension (PH) or porto-systemic encephalopathy (PSE), but these conditions rarely occur until the patients grow up or become old. The patients usually visit doctors for the complications of venous shunts, hepatic or cardiac abnormalities detected by ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The etiology of this disease is not clear, but most investigators consider that it is associated with abnormal embryologic development of the portal vein. Usually, surgical intervention can relieve the symptoms and prevent occurrence of complications in CAPV patients. Moreover, its management should be stressed on a case-by-case basis, depending on the type or anatomy of the disease, as well as the symptoms and clinical conditions of the patient. PMID:18932274

  11. Selective portal vein injection for the design of syngeneic models of liver malignancy.

    PubMed

    Limani, Perparim; Borgeaud, Nathalie; Linecker, Michael; Tschuor, Christoph; Kachaylo, Ekaterina; Schlegel, Andrea; Jang, Jae-Hwi; Ungethüm, Udo; Montani, Matteo; Graf, Rolf; Humar, Bostjan; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2016-05-01

    Liver metastases are the most frequent cause of death due to colorectal cancer (CRC). Syngeneic orthotopic animal models, based on the grafting of cancer cells or tissue in host liver, are efficient systems for studying liver tumors and their (patho)physiological environment. Here we describe selective portal vein injection as a novel tool to generate syngeneic orthotopic models of liver tumors that avoid most of the weaknesses of existing syngeneic models. By combining portal vein injection of cancer cells with the selective clamping of distal liver lobes, tumor growth is limited to specific lobes. When applied on MC-38 CRC cells and their mouse host C57BL6, selective portal vein injection leads with 100% penetrance to MRI-detectable tumors within 1 wk, followed by a steady growth until the time of death (survival ∼7 wk) in the absence of extrahepatic disease. Similar results were obtained using CT-26 cells and their syngeneic Balb/c hosts. As a proof of principle, lobe-restricted liver tumors were also generated using Hepa1-6 (C57BL6-syngeneic) and TIB-75 (Balb/c-syngeneic) hepatocellular cancer cells, demonstrating the general applicability of selective portal vein injection for the induction of malignant liver tumors. Selective portal vein injection is technically straightforward, enables liver invasion via anatomical routes, preserves liver function, and provides unaffected liver tissue. The tumor models are reproducible and highly penetrant, with survival mainly dependent on the growth of lobe-restricted liver malignancy. These models enable biological studies and preclinical testing within short periods of time. PMID:26893160

  12. A new site for venous access: superficial veins of portal collateral circulation.

    PubMed

    Turc, Jean; Gergelé, Laurent; Attof, Rachid; Mottard, Nicolas; Bérend, Michel; David, Jean-Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    In case of failure of peripheral vascular access, classical alternatives are central venous or intraosseous access. We report a new site of vascular access necessitating no specific material. A 53-year-old patient with cirrhosis-induced coagulopathy, portal hypertension, and collateral abdominal portosystemic circulation required parenteral antibiotherapy. After failure of peripheral vein catheterization, he was addressed to our resuscitation room for central venous access. To avoid the risks associated with this invasive procedure, we chose an alternative approach. After skin preparation, a 20-gauge peripheral venous catheter was inserted in a dilated subcutaneous vein of abdominal wall. To our knowledge, it is the first human report of insertion of a catheter in a superficial vein of abdominal wall. It could be an alternative approach for vascular access after failure of peripheral venipuncture in patients with portal hypertension. PMID:21159464

  13. [Liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension: non-invasive measurement of blood flow in the portal vein with Doppler-duplex].

    PubMed

    Fernández, M; Chesta, J; Jirón, M I; Mánquez, P; Brahm, J

    1991-05-01

    Doppler-duplex has been widely used to quantify blood flow. Nevertheless, its usefulness in assessing portal vein flow (PVF) has been questioned due to technical problems: vessel cross sectional area measurements, interobserver variability, and PVF changes related to physiological events. This study was aimed to measure PVF in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension, to estimate changes in PVF during the respiratory cycle, and to evaluate intraobserver variability of Doppler-duplex technique. Twenty-two patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension and 22 healthy subjects were included. One operator made 6 measurements of portal vein diameter (D) and mean flow velocity in inspiration and aspiration. Area of the vessel (A) and PVF were calculated by a microprocessor. Interobserver variability was estimated for each subject and a mean was determined for each group. In the control group, PVF was 901 +/- 39 ml/min in inspiration and 633 +/- 38 ml/min in aspiration; p < 0.001. In patients with cirrhosis PVF was 1303 +/- 121 ml/min in inspiration and 1003 +/- 96 ml/min in aspiration; p < 0.001. Intraobserver variability was 6.0 +/- 0.6% for D, 12.0 +/- 3% for MV and 18.3 +/- 1.6% for PVF in healthy subjects and 5.3 +/- 0.7% for D, 9.2 +/- 0.9% for MV and 15.2 +/- 1.5% for PVF in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension. In conclusion, PVF is significantly increased in cirrhotics. PVF was higher in inspiration than espiration in both groups. The Doppler-duplex method evaluation of PVF has an important intraobserver variability (18.3 +/- 1.6%). Then, changes in PVF less than 20% are not accurately measured by this technique. PMID:1844290

  14. Associated Liver Partition and Portal Vein Ligation (ALPPS) vs Selective Portal Vein Ligation (PVL) for Staged Hepatectomy in a Rat Model. Similar Regenerative Response?

    PubMed Central

    García-Pérez, Rocío; Revilla-Nuin, Beatriz; Martínez, Carlos M.; Bernabé-García, Angel; Baroja Mazo, Alberto; Parrilla Paricio, Pascual

    2015-01-01

    Associated liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) is a two-stage hepatectomy technique which can be associated with a hypertrophic stimulus on the future liver remnant (FLR) stronger than other techniques–such as portal vein ligation (PVL). However, the reason of such hypertrophy is still unclear, but it is suggested that liver transection combined with portal vein ligation (ALPPS) during the first stage of this technique may play a key role. The aim of this study is to compare the hypertrophic stimulus on the FLR and the clinical changes associated with both ALPPS and PVL in a rat surgical model. For this purpose, three groups of SD rats were used, namely ALPPS (n = 30), PVL (n = 30) and sham-treated (n = 30). The second stage of ALPPS (hepatectomy of the atrophic lobes), was performed at day 8. Blood and FLR samples were collected at 1, 24, 48 hours, 8 days and 12 weeks after the surgeries. ALPPS provoked a greater degree of hypertrophy of the FLR than the PVL at 48 hours and 8 days (p<0.05). The molecular pattern was also different, with the highest expression of IL-1β at 24h, IL-6 at 8 days, and HGF and TNF-α at 48 hours and 8 days (p<0.05). ALPPS also brought about a mild proliferative stimulus at 12 weeks, with a higher expression of HGF and TGF-β (p<0.05) than PVL. Clinically, ALPPS caused a significant liver damage during the first 48 hours, with a recovery of liver function at day 8. In conclusion, ALPPS seems to induce higher functional hypertrophy on the FLR than PVL at day 8. Such regenerative response seems to be leaded by a complex interaction between pro-mitogenic (IL-6, HGF, TNF-α) and antiproliferative (IL1-β and TGF-β) cytokines. PMID:26630386

  15. Percutaneous Transsplenic Access to the Portal Vein for Management of Vascular Complication in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Hee Ho; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Jae, Hwan Jun; Yi, Nam-Joon; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein for management of vascular complication in patients with chronic liver diseases. Methods: Between Sept 2009 and April 2011, percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein was attempted in nine patients with chronic liver disease. Splenic vein puncture was performed under ultrasonographic guidance with a Chiba needle, followed by introduction of a 4 to 9F sheath. Four patients with hematemesis or hematochezia underwent variceal embolization. Another two patients underwent portosystemic shunt embolization in order to improve portal venous blood flow. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver. The percutaneous transsplenic access site was closed using coils and glue. Results: Percutaneous transsplenic splenic vein catheterization was performed successfully in all patients. Gastric or jejunal varix embolization with glue and lipiodol mixture was performed successfully in four patients. In two patients with a massive portosystemic shunt, embolization of the shunting vessel with a vascular plug, microcoils, glue, and lipiodol mixture was achieved successfully. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver; however, only one patient was treated successfully. Complete closure of the percutaneous transsplenic tract was achieved using coils and glue without bleeding complication in all patients. Conclusion: Percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein can be an alternative route for portography and further endovascular management in patients for whom conventional approaches are difficult or impossible.

  16. Radioembolisation and portal vein embolization before resection of large hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bouazza, Fikri; Poncelet, Arthur; Garcia, Camilo Alejandro; Delatte, Philippe; Engelhom, Jean Luc; Gomez Galdon, Maria; Deleporte, Amélie; Hendlisz, Alain; Vanderlinden, Bruno; Flamen, Patrick; Donckier, Vincent

    2015-08-28

    Resectability of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic liver disease is dramatically limited by the need to preserve sufficient remnant liver in order to avoid postoperative liver insufficiency. Preoperative treatments aimed at downsizing the tumor and promoting hypertrophy of the future remnant liver may improve resectability and reduce operative morbidity. Here we report the case of a patient with a large hepatocellular carcinoma arising from chronic liver disease. Preoperative treatment, including tumor downsizing with transarterial radioembolization and induction of future remnant liver hypertrophy with right portal vein embolization, resulted in a 53% reduction in tumor volume and compensatory hypertrophy in the contralateral liver. The patient subsequently underwent extended right hepatectomy with no postoperative signs of liver decompensation. Pathological examination demonstrated a margin-free resection and major tumor response. This new therapeutic sequence, combining efficient tumor targeting and subsequent portal vein embolization, could improve the feasibility and safety of major liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with liver injury. PMID:26327775

  17. Simultaneous bile duct and portal vein ligation induces faster atrophy/hypertrophy complex than portal vein ligation: role of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Weizheng; Chen, Geng; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Aiqun; Li, Chonghui; Lv, Wenping; Pan, Ke; Dong, Jia-hong

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein ligation (PVL) induces atrophy/hypertrophy complex (AHC). We hypothesised that simultaneous bile duct and portal vein ligation (BPL) might induce proper bile acid (BA) retention to enhance AHC by activating BA-mediated FXR signalling in the intact liver and promoting apoptosis in the ligated liver. We established rat models of 90% BPL and 90% PVL and found that BPL was well-tolerated and significantly accelerated AHC. The enhanced BA retention in the intact liver promoted hepatocyte proliferation by promoting the activation of FXR signalling, while that in the ligated liver intensified caspase3-mediated apoptosis. Decreasing the BA pools in the rats that underwent BPL could compromise these effects, whereas increasing the bile acid pools of rats that underwent PVL could induce similar effects. Second-stage resection of posterior-caudate-lobe-spearing hepatectomy was performed 5 days after BPL (B-Hx), PVL (V-Hx) or sham (S-SHx), as well as whole-caudate-lobe-spearing hepatectomy 5 days after sham (S-Hx). The B-Hx group had the most favourable survival rate (93.3%, the S-SHx group 0%, the S-Hx group 26.7%, the V-Hx group 56.7%, P < 0.01) and the most sustained regeneration. We conclude that BPL is a safe and effective method, and the acceleration of AHC was bile acid-dependent. PMID:25678050

  18. Hepatic artery injury during left hepatic trisectionectomy for colorectal liver metastasis treated by portal vein arterialization

    PubMed Central

    Hokuto, Daisuke; Nomi, Takeo; Yamato, Ichiro; Yasuda, Satoshi; Obara, Shinsaku; Yamada, Takatsugu; Kanehiro, Hiromichi; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein arterialization (PVA) has been applied as a salvage procedure in hepatopancreatobiliary surgeries, including transplantation and liver resection, with revascularization for malignancies. Here we describe the use PVA as a salvage procedure following accidental injury of the hepatic artery to the remnant liver occurred during left hepatic trisectionectomy for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). A 60-year-old man with cancer of the sigmoid colon and initially unresectable CRLM received 11 cycles of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (1500 mg/week), after which CRLM was downstaged to resectable. One month after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, a left trisectionectomy and wedge resection of segment 6 were performed. The posterior branch of the right hepatic artery, the only feeding artery to the remnant liver, was injured and totally dissected. Because microsurgical reconstruction of the artery was impossible, PVA was used; PVA is the sole known procedure available when hepatic artery reconstruction is impossible. The patient then suffered portal hypertension, and closure of arterio-portal anastomosis using an interventional technique with angiography was eventually performed on postoperative day 73. Therefore, it is considered that because PVA is associated with severe postoperative portal hypertension, closure of the arterio-portal shunt should be performed as soon as possible on diagnosing portal hypertension. PMID:26197094

  19. Hepatic artery injury during left hepatic trisectionectomy for colorectal liver metastasis treated by portal vein arterialization.

    PubMed

    Hokuto, Daisuke; Nomi, Takeo; Yamato, Ichiro; Yasuda, Satoshi; Obara, Shinsaku; Yamada, Takatsugu; Kanehiro, Hiromichi; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein arterialization (PVA) has been applied as a salvage procedure in hepatopancreatobiliary surgeries, including transplantation and liver resection, with revascularization for malignancies. Here we describe the use PVA as a salvage procedure following accidental injury of the hepatic artery to the remnant liver occurred during left hepatic trisectionectomy for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). A 60-year-old man with cancer of the sigmoid colon and initially unresectable CRLM received 11 cycles of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (1500mg/week), after which CRLM was downstaged to resectable. One month after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, a left trisectionectomy and wedge resection of segment 6 were performed. The posterior branch of the right hepatic artery, the only feeding artery to the remnant liver, was injured and totally dissected. Because microsurgical reconstruction of the artery was impossible, PVA was used; PVA is the sole known procedure available when hepatic artery reconstruction is impossible. The patient then suffered portal hypertension, and closure of arterio-portal anastomosis using an interventional technique with angiography was eventually performed on postoperative day 73. Therefore, it is considered that because PVA is associated with severe postoperative portal hypertension, closure of the arterio-portal shunt should be performed as soon as possible on diagnosing portal hypertension. PMID:26197094

  20. Percutaneous Transhepatic Catheterization of the Portal Vein: A Combined CT- and Fluoroscopy-Guided Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Weimar, Bernd; Rauber, Klaus; Brendel, Mathias D.; Bretzel, Reinhard G.; Rau, Wigbert S.

    1999-07-15

    Combined CT- and fluoroscopy-guided transhepatic portal vein catheterization was performed in 44 patients selected for pancreatic islet cell transplantation. The method allowed catheterization with a single puncture attempt in 39 patients. In four patients two attempts and in one patient four attempts were necessary. One minor hematoma of the liver capsule occurred that required no further treatment. Compared with other methods the average number of puncture attempts was reduced.

  1. Ultrasound-guided catheterization of the portal vein in 11 cows using the Seldinger technique.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Camenzind, D; Ossent, P

    2003-02-01

    Catheterization of the portal vein using the Seldinger technique [Acta Radiol. (1958) 38, 368] was performed in 11 cows. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous portocentesis, using a 25-cm, 14-gauge steel cannula, was performed from the 10th, 11th or 12th intercostal space on the right side. A stylet was placed through the cannula, which was then removed, and a polyurethane balloon-tipped catheter was advanced over the stylet into the portal vein and sutured to the skin (Seldinger, 1952). Blood samples were collected from the catheter at least once daily. The catheter was removed 9-15 days later when blood could no longer be aspirated. The cows were then slaughtered and a post-mortem examination was performed. During the study, appetite remained normal in nine of 11 cows. In three cows, the general behaviour and demeanour were mildly, but transiently, abnormal. Four cows had leucopoenia. The most frequently encountered problem was occlusion of the catheter, which usually was resolved by flushing with heparinized saline. The most common post-mortem lesion observed was an increase in fibrous connective tissue at the site of cannulation. In nine of 11cows, there was a thrombus in the portal vein at the site of catheterization. Generally, the severity of the lesions was mild. The results of this study demonstrated that ultrasound-guided percutaneous catheterization of the portal vein, using the Seldinger technique, is possible in cows. The catheter may be left in place for collection of blood samples for up to 15 days. PMID:12650501

  2. Optimal Covering Material for Stent-Grafts Placed in the Portal Vein in a Canine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Seigo; Sato, Morio Sonomura, Tetsuo; Yamada, Katsuyuki; Tanihata, Hirohiko; Ishikawa, Hime; Terada, Masaki; Sahara, Shinya; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Masashi; Mori, Ichiro

    2005-06-15

    Purpose. We evaluated the suitability of Dacron, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and small intestinal submucosa (SIS) as a covering material for stent-grafts placed in the portal vein as compared with a bare stent. Methods. Using 24 beagle dogs, either bare stents or stent-grafts covered with Dacron, PTFE, or SIS were placed in the main trunk of the portal vein in 6 animals each. Portography was performed immediately after stent placement, and at 2, 4, and 12 weeks thereafter. Next, the extracted stents or stent-grafts were examined histopathologically. Neointimal thickness adjacent to the stent wire and at the midportion between the stent wires was compared among the groups. Then, the neointimal thickness at the sub- and supragraft sites was compared between each stent-graft group. Serial changes in the histologic features of the thickened neointima were also investigated. Results. No significant difference was noted in the mean stenotic ratio of the portal vein diameter between the bare stent and PTFE groups, whereas it was significantly higher in the Dacron and SIS groups compared with the bare stent group. In neither of the studies on neointimal thickness adjacent to the stent wire and at the midportion between the stent wires were any significant differences noted between the neointimal thickness of the bare stent group and the sum of the neointimal thickness of the PTFE group, whereas the sum of the neointimal thickness of the Dacron and SIS groups was significantly greater than that of the bare stent group at both sites. In the comparison of the supragraft neointimal thickness, the SIS group showed significantly greater thickness than the PTFE group, while the difference between the Dacron and PTFE groups was not significant. In the comparison of the subgraft neointimal thickness, the Dacron and SIS groups showed significantly greater thickness than the PTFE group. Conclusion. The present results indicate that of the three covering materials examined here

  3. Percutaneous Removal of a Fractured Endostent Remnant from the Portal Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Geschwind, Jean-Francois H.; Dagli, Mandeep S.; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Arepally, Aravind A.; Venbrux, Anthony C.

    2002-03-15

    We report the case of a liver transplant patient who developed a biliary stricture 3 years postoperatively which was treated with an endostent. During endoscopic removal, the stentfractured and a portion of it lodged itself within the intrahepatic portion of a portal vein branch. The endostent fragment was retrieved percutaneously using interventional radiology techniques. Risk factors for endostent fracture and migration as well as various percutaneous retrieval methods are reviewed in this article.

  4. [Calcified portal vein thrombosis in the follow-up of surgical portocaval shunt: Sonographic findings and differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Danse, E; Horsmans, Y

    2006-11-01

    The case of a patient with large hepatic calcifications along the portal vascular network caused by long-standing portal vein thrombosis is presented. These calcifications appeared in extended portal thrombosis and were confirmed in follow-up for a surgical portocaval shunt related to portal hypertension. The differential diagnosis should distinguish these from hyperechoic patterns observed along the periportal vascular network, including intraductal biliary stones, portal venous gas, gas in the biliary tract, biliary comet tail artifacts, periportal fibrosis in parasitosis, and calcifications of the hepatic arteries. PMID:17095965

  5. Chronic Portal Vein Thrombosis After Liver Transplantation in a Child Treated by a Combined Minimally Invasive Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar Santos, Aline Cristine Barbosa; Zurstrassen, Charles Edouard; Moreira, Airton Mota; Neto, Joao Seda; Filho, Eduardo Carone; Chapchap, Paulo

    2009-09-15

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) after orthotopic liver transplantation is an infrequent complication, and when it is present surgical treatment is considered for traditional management. Percutaneous transhepatic portal vein angioplasty has been described as an option to treat PVT with a lower morbidity than conventional surgical treatments. This article describes a case of chronic PVT in a child after a living donor liver transplantation managed by percutaneous transhepatic and surgical approaches.

  6. Associating microwave ablation and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy for the treatment of huge hepatocellular carcinoma with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Xun; Sun, Chang-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) could induce extensive and rapid future liver remnant hypertrophy. However, the morbidity for ALPPS is very high. This paper reports a modified ALPPS (associating microwave ablation and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy, AMAPS), which was successfully applied in the treatment of huge hepatocellular carcinoma with cirrhosis, and the procedure of operation was greatly simplified. Hence, AMAPS is feasible and safe in selected patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis. PMID:27186574

  7. Percutaneous Transhepatic Portography for the Treatment of Early Portal Vein Thrombosis After Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Adani, Gian Luigi Baccarani, Umberto; Risaliti, Andrea; Sponza, Massimo; Gasparini, Daniele; Bresadola, Fabrizio; Anna, Dino de; Bresadola, Vittorio

    2007-11-15

    We treated three cases of early portal vein thrombosis (PVT) by minimally invasive percutaneous transhepatic portography. All patients developed PVT within 30 days of major hepatic surgery (one case each of orthotopic liver transplantation, splenectomy in a previous liver transplant recipient, and right extended hepatectomy with resection and reconstruction of the left branch of the portal vein for tumor infiltration). In all cases minimally invasive percutaneous transhepatic portography was adopted to treat this complication by mechanical fragmentation and pharmacological lysis of the thrombus. A vascular stent was also positioned in the two cases in which the thrombosis was related to a surgical technical problem. Mechanical fragmentation of the thrombus with contemporaneous local urokinase administration resulted in complete removal of the clot and allowed restoration of normal blood flow to the liver after a median follow-up of 37 months. PVT is an uncommon but severe complication after major surgery or liver transplantation. Surgical thrombectomy, with or without reconstruction of the portal vein, and retransplantation are characterized by important surgical morbidity and mortality. Based on our experience, minimally invasive percutaneous transhepatic portography should be considered an option toward successful recanalization of early PVT after major liver surgery including transplantation. Balloon dilatation and placement of a vascular stent could help to decrease the risk of recurrent thrombosis when a defective surgical technique is the reason for the thrombosis.

  8. Computed tomography arterial portography for assessment of portal vein injury after blunt hepatic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chen-Ju; Wong, Yon-Cheong; Tsang, Yuk-Ming; Wang, Li-Jen; Chen, Huan-Wu; Ku, Yi-Kang; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Huan-Wen; Kang, Shih-Ching

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Intrahepatic portal vein injuries secondary to blunt abdominal trauma are difficult to diagnose and can result in insidious bleeding. We aimed to compare computed tomography arterial portography (CTAP), reperfusion CTAP (rCTAP), and conventional computed tomography (CT) for diagnosing portal vein injuries after blunt hepatic trauma. METHODS Patients with blunt hepatic trauma, who were eligible for nonoperative management, underwent CTAP, rCTAP, and CT. The number and size of perfusion defects observed using the three methods were compared. RESULTS A total of 13 patients (seven males/six females) with a mean age of 34.5±14.1 years were included in the study. A total of 36 hepatic segments had perfusion defects on rCTAP and CT, while there were 47 hepatic segments with perfusion defects on CTAP. The size of perfusion defects on CT (239 cm3; interquartile range [IQR]: 129.5, 309.5) and rCTAP (238 cm3; IQR: 129.5, 310.5) were significantly smaller compared with CTAP (291 cm3; IQR: 136, 371) (both, P = 0.002). CONCLUSION Perfusion defects measured by CTAP were significantly greater than those determined by either rCTAP or CT in cases of blunt hepatic trauma. This finding suggests that CTAP is superior to rCTAP and CT in evaluating portal vein injuries after blunt liver trauma. PMID:26268303

  9. Tumor Regression in HCC Patient with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis after Intraportal Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is a frequent entity in HCC, which strictly limits the gold standard treatment options such as surgical resection and transarterial chemoembolization. Therefore, the prognosis of patients with PVTT is extremely poor and an emergence of seeking an alternative option for intervention is inevitable. We present a case of a 60-year-old male patient with HCC induced PVTT who was subjected to the intraportal RFA and stenting-VesOpen procedure. No additional medical intervention was performed. The repeated CT performed 5 months after the VesOpen procedure revealed significant decrease of the tumor size, patent right, and main portal vein and a recanalization of the left portal vein, which was not processed. At this time point, liver functional tests, appetite, and general condition of the patient were improved evidently. This report designates the RFA as an instrumental option of therapeutic intervention for HCC patients with PVTT. PMID:27579192

  10. Tumor Regression in HCC Patient with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis after Intraportal Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation.

    PubMed

    Mizandari, Malkhaz; Azrumelashvili, Tamta; Paksashvili, Natela; Kikodze, Nino; Pantsulaia, Ia; Janikashvili, Nona; Chikovani, Tinatin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is a frequent entity in HCC, which strictly limits the gold standard treatment options such as surgical resection and transarterial chemoembolization. Therefore, the prognosis of patients with PVTT is extremely poor and an emergence of seeking an alternative option for intervention is inevitable. We present a case of a 60-year-old male patient with HCC induced PVTT who was subjected to the intraportal RFA and stenting-VesOpen procedure. No additional medical intervention was performed. The repeated CT performed 5 months after the VesOpen procedure revealed significant decrease of the tumor size, patent right, and main portal vein and a recanalization of the left portal vein, which was not processed. At this time point, liver functional tests, appetite, and general condition of the patient were improved evidently. This report designates the RFA as an instrumental option of therapeutic intervention for HCC patients with PVTT. PMID:27579192

  11. Circumflex femoral vein thrombosis misinterpreted as acute hamstring strain.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Stergios G; Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Tsitouridis, Ioannis; Natsis, Constantinos; Parisis, Constantinos A

    2007-07-01

    The case of a 24-year-old female professional, long-distance runner who presented with acute proximal posterior thigh pain is reported. History and clinical findings were consistent with acute hamstring strain but MRI demonstrated circumflex femoral vein thrombosis. This is the first case of proximal posterior thigh pain caused by circumflex femoral vein thrombosis reported in the literature. Doctors dealing with sports injuries should be aware of this clinical entity that mimics hamstring strain. PMID:17224439

  12. Circumflex femoral vein thrombosis misinterpreted as acute hamstring strain

    PubMed Central

    Papastergiou, Stergios G; Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Tsitouridis, Ioannis; Natsis, Constantinos; Parisis, Constantinos A

    2007-01-01

    The case of a 24‐year‐old female professional, long‐distance runner who presented with acute proximal posterior thigh pain is reported. History and clinical findings were consistent with acute hamstring strain but MRI demonstrated circumflex femoral vein thrombosis. This is the first case of proximal posterior thigh pain caused by circumflex femoral vein thrombosis reported in the literature. Doctors dealing with sports injuries should be aware of this clinical entity that mimics hamstring strain. PMID:17224439

  13. Portal vein thrombosis in liver cirrhosis - the added value of contrast enhanced ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Danila, Mirela; Sporea, Ioan; Popescu, Alina; Șirli, Roxana

    2016-06-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a frequent complication of liver cirrhosis and its prevalence increases with the severity of liver disease. Patients with liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma may have either malignant or blunt (benign) PVT. In these patients, the diagnosis and characterization of PVT is important for the prognosis and further treatment. Ultrasound (US) is the modality of choice for the diagnosis of PVT. The features of PVT on B-mode (gray-scale) US include: dilatation of the portal vein, visualization of the thrombus and, in chronic PVT- cavernous transformation. Sensitivity of US in the diagnosis of PVT is improved by the use of Doppler US and of ultrasound contrast agents. In the latter years, contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) showed high sensitivity in the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant PVT and could be the diagnostic method of choice for the characterization of PVT. Blunt thrombi are avascular and will not enhance during CEUS examination, while a hyperenhancement pattern of the portal thrombus in the arterial phase, with "wash out" in the portal or late phase is typical for malignant PVT. PMID:27239658

  14. Clonorchis sinensis ova in bile juice cytology from a patient with severe hyperbilirubinemia and portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Fujiya, Keiichi; Ganno, Hideaki; Ando, Masayuki; Chong, Ja-Mun

    2016-03-01

    Infection with the trematode Clonorchis sinensis is the most common human fluke infection in East Asian populations. Although this infection is associated with obstructive jaundice or choledocholithiasis, portal vein thrombosis has not been reported. Here, we report the first case of a 60-year-old man who had both C. sinensis infection and portal vein thrombosis with severe hyperbilirubinemia (75.4 mg/dl). He initially presented with abdominal pain and jaundice. Computed tomography revealed gallstones, common bile duct calculus, and thrombus in the left main branch of the portal vein. A nasobiliary tube was inserted under endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Cytology of the bile juice revealed many C. sinensis eggs. The abdominal pain and jaundice improved following choledocholithotomy and combination treatment with a chemotherapeutic agent and anti-coagulant. This case suggests that inflammation around the portal vein as a result of C. sinensis infection has the potential to evoke portal vein thrombosis. Such cases should be treated with both a chemotherapeutic agent and anti-coagulant therapy. In conclusion, the possibility of infection with C. sinensis should be considered in patients presenting with hyperbilirubinemia and portal vein thrombosis, particularly in East Asian populations. PMID:26663478

  15. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy of portal vein thrombosis in liver cirrhosis: results in 15 patients.

    PubMed

    De Sio, I; Castellano, L; Calandra, M; Romano, M; Persico, M; Del Vecchio-Blanco, C

    1995-01-01

    Between 1988 and 1992 ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsies of thromboses in the main branches of the portal vein were carried out in 15 patients with liver cirrhosis. The aims of the study were to evaluate the usefulness, feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of this procedure in cirrhotics with known or suspected hepatocellular carcinoma. The procedure was carried out only in patients with a platelet count > or = 40,000/microL and prothrombin activity > or = 40%. A single pass, with a 22 gauge spinal needle, was performed in the portal vein lumen. Diagnosis of the aetiology of the portal vein thrombosis was obtained in all 15 cases. In 12 cases, a cytological diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma was made. In one case, the neoplastic cells aspirated were compatible with adenocarcinoma, and a subsequent colonoscopy confirmed the presence of colonic cancer. The material aspirated was compatible with chemically-induced thrombosis in one patient who had undergone several percutaneous ethanol injection sessions for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, and in the last case only blood was aspirated, thus ruling out the coexistence of hepatic cancer. We conclude that fine needle aspiration biopsy of portal vein thrombosis is a feasible, low risk procedure that facilitates the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma when fine needle biopsy of focal liver lesions fails. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of portal vein thrombosis is also useful in excluding neoplastic aetiology of portal vein thrombosis. PMID:8580410

  16. Repeated detection of gas in the portal vein after liver transplantation: A sign of EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferation?

    PubMed

    Wallot, Michael A; Klepper, Jörg; Clapuyt, Philippe; Dirsch, Olaf; Malagó, Max; Reding, Raymond; Otte, Jean Bernard; Sokal, Etienne M

    2002-08-01

    A 1-yr-old child presented with intractable right sided pleural effusion and progressive clinical deterioration 3 weeks after liver transplantation for Alagille Syndrome. He had been treated successfully for severe acute rejection before. Ultrasound and Doppler mode studies repeatedly demonstrated air in the portal vein. Intra-abdominal and intra-thoracic lymphoproliferation was detected, and EBV virus load and serology were suggestive of primary EBV infection. Liver biopsy revealed blast-like infiltrates of B-cells, considered diagnostic for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. The disease resolved upon reduction of immunosuppression. We suggest that the detection of portal vein gas in pediatric liver transplant recipients beyond the early post-operative period may be a sign of intra-abdominal post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:12234275

  17. FDG-Avid Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis from Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Contrast-Enhanced FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Xuan Canh; Nguyen, Dinh Song Huy; Ngo, Van Tan; Maurea, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): In this study, we aimed to describe the characteristics of portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT), complicating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in contrast-enhanced FDG PET/CT scan. Methods: In this retrospective study, 9 HCC patients with FDG-avid PVTT were diagnosed by contrast-enhanced fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT), which is a combination of dynamic liver CT scan, multiphase imaging, and whole-body PET scan. PET and CT DICOM images of patients were imported into the PET/CT imaging system for the re-analysis of contrast enhancement and FDG uptake in thrombus, the diameter of the involved portal vein, and characteristics of liver tumors and metastasis. Results: Two patients with previously untreated HCC and 7 cases with previously treated HCC had FDG-avid PVTT in contrast-enhanced FDG PET/CT scan. During the arterial phase of CT scan, portal vein thrombus showed contrast enhancement in 8 out of 9 patients (88.9%). PET scan showed an increased linear FDG uptake along the thrombosed portal vein in all patients. The mean greatest diameter of thrombosed portal veins was 1.8 ± 0.2 cm, which was significantly greater than that observed in normal portal veins (P<0.001). FDG uptake level in portal vein thrombus was significantly higher than that of blood pool in the reference normal portal vein (P=0.001). PVTT was caused by the direct extension of liver tumors. All patients had visible FDG-avid liver tumors in contrast-enhanced images. Five out of 9 patients (55.6%) had no extrahepatic metastasis, 3 cases (33.3%) had metastasis of regional lymph nodes, and 1 case (11.1%) presented with distant metastasis. The median estimated survival time of patients was 5 months. Conclusion: The intraluminal filling defect consistent with thrombous within the portal vein, expansion of the involved portal vein, contrast enhancement, and linear increased FDG uptake of the thrombus extended from liver tumor are findings of FDG

  18. Membrane properties of the smooth-muscle fibres of the guinea-pig portal vein.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Kuriyama, H

    1971-05-01

    The membrane activities and the various characteristic constants of the smooth-muscle membrane of the guinea-pig portal vein were investigated with the micro-electrode technique.1. The mean membrane potential was -37 mV. Spontaneous discharges appeared as regular bursts of short trains of spikes alternating with silent periods, as a mixture of single spikes and bursts of spikes appearing continuously, or as regular spikes with low frequency.2. Spontaneous spikes with overshoot were frequently observed. The maximum rate of rise of the spike was 3.7 V/sec. The shapes of the spikes were classified into three different types, i.e. pace-maker type of spike, monophasic spike and spike with a hump during the falling phase.3. Tetrodotoxin (10(-5) g/ml.) did not influence the patterns of the spontaneous train discharges nor the shape of the spike.4. Extracellularly applied outward current elicited spikes which were either monophasic or had a hump on the falling phase. Inward current elicited break excitation of the spike.5. Current-voltage relations, produced by application of inward current pulses to the tissue and measured at various distances from the stimulating partition, were linear.6. The smooth-muscle membrane of portal vein showed cable-like properties. The mean space constant of the membrane was 0.52 mm; the mean time constant of the membrane calculated from the electrotonic potential was 330 msec.7. Conduction velocity of the spike measured by insertion of two micro-electrodes was 0.58 cm/sec.8. The time constant of the foot of the propagated spike was 27 msec. The time constant of the membrane calculated from the time constant of the foot of the spike and the conduction velocity was 310 msec.9. The membrane properties of longitudinal smooth muscle of the portal vein were discussed in comparison with other veins and various visceral smooth muscles. PMID:5580862

  19. Experimental research of Fuaile medical adhesive for portal vein embolization in white rabbit models

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, TIANPENG; WANG, LIZHOU; LI, XING; SONG, JIE; WU, XIAOPING; AN, TIANZHI; ZHOU, SHI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of Fuaile medical adhesive for portal vein embolization in the treatment of a rabbit model. This study used 26 white rabbits, 14 of which were selected and assigned into seven groups (n=2) for the preliminary experiment. Fuaile medical adhesive was mixed with lipiodol at different ratios of 1:0, 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:4, 1:5 and 0:1, respectively, and administered via the portal trunk. The remaining 12 white rabbits were randomly divided into two groups (n=6). The evaluation of the results included the degree of adhesion to the vessels, the extent of embolization and the reaction of the rabbit. Hepatic and renal functions were detected prior to and at 1, 7 and 14 days post-embolization, respectively. Angiography, CT scans and pathological examinations were conducted at post-embolization. Histological examinations revealed that the topical swollen lesions were darker. Light microscopy showed embolic agents in the portal venous blood vessels and the formation of a secondary thrombus. Hepatic necrosis appeared surrounding the embolization area. Inflammatory cell infiltration of different degrees occurred in the early stage and inflammatory fibroplasia occurred in the late stage. Alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels increased at 1 day post-embolization, peaked at 7 days and was in the normal range at 14 days. The levels of blood urea nitrogen and ceruloplasmin were elevated at 1 day post-embolization and lowered to normal at 7 days. Fuaile medical adhesive is an effective, safe and inexpensive agent, used for effectively inducing embolization in the portal trunk, and the first and second branches of rabbit portal veins. The use of Fuaile therefore merits widespread application in clinical practice. PMID:26137115

  20. Resolution of preoperative portal vein thrombosis after administration of antithrombin III in living donor liver transplantation: case report.

    PubMed

    Imai, H; Egawa, H; Kajiwara, M; Nakajima, A; Ogura, Y; Hatano, E; Ueda, M; Kawaguchi, Y; Kaido, T; Takada, Y; Uemoto, S

    2009-11-01

    A 59-year-old man with hepatitis C virus-associated liver cirrhosis was transferred to our hospital to undergo living donor liver transplantation. Coagulation was impaired (prothrombin time [International Normalized Ratio], 3.27), and antithrombin III (AT-III) activity was 23% (normal, 87%-115%). Contrast-enhanced computed tomography scans revealed portal vein thrombosis (PVT) from the junction between the splenic and superior mesenteric vein to the porta hepatica; the portal vein was completely obstructed (PVT). To prevent further development of PVT, 1500 U of AT-III was administered for 3 days, elevating the AT-III activity to 50%. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan obtained 9 days after AT-III administration showed resolution of PVT. Living donor liver transplantation was safely performed without portal vein grafting. Thus, a low AT-III concentration may have an important role in the pathogenesis of PVT in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:19917415

  1. Epiploic gonadal vein as a new bypass route for extrahepatic portal venous obstruction: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Tatsuaki; Shima, Yasuo; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Negoro, Yuji; Kozuki, Akihito; Iwata, Jun; Saisaka, Yuichi; Tokumaru, Teppei; Nakamura, Toshio; Morita, Sojiro

    2015-12-01

    A 61-year-old man was referred to our hospital to treat extrahepatic portal venous obstruction. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS) was performed for the esophageal varices; however, the patient returned with massive hematemesis from gastric varices 6 months after treatment. Although the varices were treated with EIS, gastric devascularization and splenectomy concomitant with shunt surgery were required to treat uncontrollable, frequent diarrhea and abdominal distension. Because the splenic vein, left gastric vein, left portal vein, and inferior vena cava were inadequate for anastomosis, an epiploic gonadal vein bypass was performed. The bypass graft remains patent 7 months after surgery, and the patient is in good health without any clinical symptoms. We describe a new bypass route for extrahepatic portal venous obstruction. PMID:26943433

  2. [Antithrombotic property of new growing endothelial cells on the prosthetic vascular grafts--experimental study of portal vein replacement].

    PubMed

    Ohtake, S

    1997-01-01

    On experimental portal vein replacement of mongrel dogs with high porosity EPTFE grafts (fibril length: 60 microns) wrapped in omental pedicle flap, it has been reported that healing process is promoted. But it is not clear on the antithrombotic properties of the newly growing endothelial cells on prosthetic vascular grafts. PGI2 and NO are known as antithrombotic factors that restrain the agglutination of platelets. We evaluated PGI2 and NO production from the newly growing endothelial cells on prosthetic vascular grafts. High porosity EPTFE grafts were implanted at the portal veins of mongrel dogs. After 3 months we removed the grafts and tried to procure the new growing endothelial cells by trypsinization and culture them. We confirmed by using Dil-Ac-LDL that endothelial-like cells on prosthetic vascular grafts were as same as the endothelial cells. As control cells, we used the endothelial cells of canine portal vein and infra vena cava. The basal PGI2 production from each cells and the thrombin-stimulated production of PGI2 were measured by radioimmuno assay. Thrombin concentration was established at 2 unit/ml. On the basal PGI2 production there was no significant difference between the grafts and the portal veins, and between the grafts and the infra vena cava. The PGI2 production of the grafts increased significantly by stimulating with thrombin. On the thrombin-stimulated production, there was no significant difference between the grafts and the portal veins, and between the grafts and the infra vena cava. NO production of the grafts was measured by the griess reaction. On NO production there was no significant difference between the grafts and the portal veins. But the grafts produced significantly more NO than the infra vena cava (P < 0.05). This study suggests that the newly growing endothelial cells on the prosthetic vascular grafts may have the antithrombotic properties equal to the endothelial cells on the portal vein and the infra vena cava. PMID

  3. Management of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis: Review and update at 2016.

    PubMed

    Chan, Stephen L; Chong, Charing C N; Chan, Anthony W H; Poon, Darren M C; Chok, Kenneth S H

    2016-08-28

    Portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is a common phenomenon in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Compared to HCC without PVTT, HCC with PVTT is characterized by an aggressive disease course, worse hepatic function, a higher chance of complications related to portal hypertension and poorer tolerance to treatment. Conventionally, HCC with PVTT is grouped together with metastatic HCC during the planning of its management, and most patients are offered palliative treatment with sorafenib or other systemic agents. As a result, most data on the management of HCC with PVTT comes from subgroup analyses or retrospective series. In the past few years, there have been several updates on management of HCC with PVTT. First, it is evident that HCC with PVTT consists of heterogeneous subgroups with different prognoses. Different classifications have been proposed to stage the degree of portal vein invasion/thrombosis, suggesting that different treatment modalities may be individualized to patients with different risks. Second, more studies indicate that more aggressive treatment, including surgical resection or locoregional treatment, may benefit select HCC patients with PVTT. In this review, we aim to discuss the recent conceptual changes and summarize the data on the management of HCC with PVTT. PMID:27621575

  4. Extrahepatic portal vein occlusion without recurrence after pancreaticoduodenectomy and intraoperative radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsunaga, Shuichi . E-mail: smitsuna@east.ncc.go.jp; Kinoshita, Taira; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Konishi, Masaru; Nakagohri, Toshio; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Gotohda, Naoto

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: Although there are no definitive studies that characterize the survival benefit of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), the therapy does not seem to produce significant complication. In our institution, pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and IORT are often complicated by the development of extrahepatic portal vein occlusion (EHPO). The aim of this study was to characterize the phenomenon of EHPO after PD and IORT. Methods and Materials: Between September 1992 and December 2001, 107 patients received macroscopic curative PD for periampullary disease in our institution. IORT (radiation dose: 20 Gy) was performed in 53 of these patients. Criteria for diagnosis of EHPO were as follows: (1) computerized tomography findings of occlusive extrahepatic portal vein (2) symptoms of portal hypertension, and (3) confirmation to exclude tumor recurrence from origin of EHPO, because this study examined whether EHPO was a complication of PD and IORT. Results: EHPO was diagnosed in 12 patients. Among patient and operative variables, IORT was the only statistically significant factor associated with a diagnosis of EHPO (p = 0.0052). The median developed time to EHPO and overall survival after surgery in EHPO patients were 358 days and 2,562 days, respectively. Eight patients (67%) with EHPO died during the follow-up period. At 5 years after therapy, EHPO was diagnosed in 67% of survivors who had received IORT. Conclusions: Patients undergoing IORT and PD have a relatively high incidence of EHPO, and patients who develop postoperative EHPO have poor prognoses.

  5. Management of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis: Review and update at 2016

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Stephen L; Chong, Charing C N; Chan, Anthony W H; Poon, Darren M C; Chok, Kenneth S H

    2016-01-01

    Portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is a common phenomenon in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Compared to HCC without PVTT, HCC with PVTT is characterized by an aggressive disease course, worse hepatic function, a higher chance of complications related to portal hypertension and poorer tolerance to treatment. Conventionally, HCC with PVTT is grouped together with metastatic HCC during the planning of its management, and most patients are offered palliative treatment with sorafenib or other systemic agents. As a result, most data on the management of HCC with PVTT comes from subgroup analyses or retrospective series. In the past few years, there have been several updates on management of HCC with PVTT. First, it is evident that HCC with PVTT consists of heterogeneous subgroups with different prognoses. Different classifications have been proposed to stage the degree of portal vein invasion/thrombosis, suggesting that different treatment modalities may be individualized to patients with different risks. Second, more studies indicate that more aggressive treatment, including surgical resection or locoregional treatment, may benefit select HCC patients with PVTT. In this review, we aim to discuss the recent conceptual changes and summarize the data on the management of HCC with PVTT.

  6. Upregulation of des-gamma-carboxy-prothrombin after portal vein embolization in a cirrhotic patient with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sohda, Tetsuro; Iwata, Kaoru; Anan, Akira; Kunimoto, Hideo; Yotsumoto, Kaoru; Yokoyama, Keiji; Morihara, Daisuke; Takeyama, Yasuaki; Shakado, Satoshi; Osame, Akinobu; Kora, Shinichi; Ohishi, Jun; Yamauchi, Yasushi; Noritomi, Tomoaki; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Yamashita, Yuichi; Sakisaka, Shotaro

    2015-10-01

    A 73-year-old female with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) received percutaneous transhepatic portal vein embolization (PTPE) before extensive right lobe hepatectomy. Serum levels of des-gamma-carboxy-prothrombin (DCP) were increased and remained at a high level until hepatectomy. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that an increased expression of DCP was demonstrated not only in HCC tissues, but also in the non-cancerous liver of the right lobe, where portal blood flow was blocked off as a result of PTPE. The serum level of DCP is known to be greatly increased in patients with HCC accompanied by portal vein invasion. We speculate that this increased DCP level is caused by both increased DCP production in HCC tissue and the surrounding non-cancerous liver, where portal flow is blocked off as a result of portal invasion by HCC. PMID:26374567

  7. Action of polygodial on agonist-induced contractions of the rat portal vein in vitro.

    PubMed

    El Sayah, M; Filho, V C; Yunes, R A; Malheiros, A; Calixto, J B

    2000-04-01

    This study investigated the vasorelaxant action of the sesquiterpene polygodial, isolated from the bark of Drymis winteri, on rat portal vein in vitro, contracted by various agonists. Polygodial (21-342 microM) preincubated 20 min before, produced graded antagonism of the contractile responses caused by bradykinin, endothelin-1, noradrenaline, the stable analogue of thromboxane A2 U46619, substance P, neurokinin B, and senktide (an NK3-selective agonist). Polygodial, at the same concentration, also produced graded inhibition of the contractile response induced by potassium chloride and by phorbol ester. At the median inhibitory concentration (IC50) level, polygodial was approximately 114- to 177-fold more active in inhibiting mediated contractions to senktide and phorbol ester. When assessed in the tonic contraction induced by endothelin-1 (0.5 nM) or by phorbol (3 microM), polygodial (0.1-100 microM) produced concentration-dependent relaxation, with maximal inhibition (E(max)) of 62 +/- 2% and 100%, respectively. Finally, polygodial (0.1-100 microM) inhibited the rhythmic spontaneous contractions of the rat portal vein (E(max) of 75 +/- 2%). Taken together, these results suggest that the vasorelaxant actions caused by polygodial in rat portal vein are, at least in part, associated with inhibition of calcium influx through voltage-sensitive channels and interaction with protein kinase C-dependent mechanisms. In addition, these data confirm and extend our previous suggestion that polygodial preferentially antagonizes tachykinin-mediated contraction, especially the NK3-mediated responses. PMID:10774800

  8. Improved donor liver position selection and revascularization for heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation with portal vein arterialization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Yujun; Ren, Jianjun; Zhang, Junjing; Qiao, Jianliang; Meng, Xingkai

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To establish an animal model of improved donor liver position selection and revascularization for heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation with portal vein arterialization (HALT-PVA). Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were utilized to establish models. Improved HALT-PVA was conducted for the experimental rat: hepatic common artery of donor liver was end-to-side anastomosed to portal vein which was end-to-side anastomosed to the left common iliac artery of host rat, while the segments of inferior vena cava superior and inferior to the donor liver were end-to-side anastomosed to the inferior vena cava of host rat, respectively. For the control rats, liver transplantations were conducted through end-to-end anastomosis between portal vein of donor liver and stand tube placed in right renal artery of host rat, and end-to-side anastomosis between the inferior vena cava inferior to the donor liver with the inferior vena cava of host rat, while the inferior vena cava superior to the donor liver was stitched up. Besides, hepaticoenterostomy were performed to all rats and survival status were monitored. ALT, AST, TBil and CHE were tested continuously after operation, and pathological examination of liver tissues were performed. Results: The survival rate was 93.3% (14/15). ALT, AST, TBil and CHE for experimental group showed a rapider recovery of liver functions than controls. Pathological examinations of liver tissues from the experimental-group rats showed better presentation than the control-group rats. Conclusions: The improved HALT-PVA better accords with the normal anatomy, with little detriment to implanted liver, and therefore is a good model for HALT-PVA related research. PMID:26770477

  9. Shunting branch of portal vein and stent position predict survival after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ming; He, Chuang-Ye; Qi, Xing-Shun; Yin, Zhan-Xin; Wang, Jian-Hong; Guo, Wen-Gang; Niu, Jing; Xia, Jie-Lai; Zhang, Zhuo-Li; Larson, Andrew C; Wu, Kai-Chun; Fan, Dai-Ming; Han, Guo-Hong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of the shunting branch of the portal vein (PV) (left or right) and the initial stent position (optimal or suboptimal) of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 307 consecutive cirrhotic patients who underwent TIPS placement for variceal bleeding from March 2001 to July 2010 at our center. The left PV was used in 221 patients and the right PV in the remaining 86 patients. And, 224 and 83 patients have optimal stent position and sub-optimal stent positions, respectively. The patients were followed until October 2011 or their death. Hepatic encephalopathy, shunt dysfunction, and survival were evaluated as outcomes. The difference between the groups was compared by Kaplan-Meier analysis. A Cox regression model was employed to evaluate the predictors. RESULTS: Among the patients who underwent TIPS to the left PV, the risk of hepatic encephalopathy (P = 0.002) and mortality were lower (P < 0.001) compared to those to the right PV. Patients who underwent TIPS with optimal initial stent position had a higher primary patency (P < 0.001) and better survival (P = 0.006) than those with suboptimal initial stent position. The shunting branch of the portal vein and the initial stent position were independent predictors of hepatic encephalopathy and shunt dysfunction after TIPS, respectively. And, both were independent predictors of survival. CONCLUSION: TIPS placed to the left portal vein with optimal stent position may reduce the risk of hepatic encephalopathy and improve the primary patency rates, thereby prolonging survival. PMID:24574750

  10. Treatment of surgical brain injury by immune tolerance induced by intrathymic and hepatic portal vein injection of brain antigens

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weijian; Liu, Yong; Liu, Baolong; Tan, Huajun; Lu, Hao; Wang, Hong; Yan, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Surgical brain injury (SBI) defines complications induced by intracranial surgery, such as cerebral edema and other secondary injuries. In our study, intrathymic and hepatic portal vein injection of allogeneic myelin basic protein (MBP) or autogeneic brain cell suspensions were administered to a standard SBI model. Serum pro-inflammatory IL-2, anti-inflammatory IL-4 concentrations and the CD4+T/CD8+T ratio were measured at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 d after surgery to verify the establishment of immune tolerance. Furthermore, we confirmed neuroprotective effects by evaluating neurological scores at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 d after SBI. Anti-Fas ligand (FasL) immunohistochemistry and TUNEL assays of brain sections were tested at 21 d after surgery. Intrathymic injections of MBP or autogeneic brain cell suspensions functioned by both suppressing secondary inflammatory reactions and improving prognoses, whereas hepatic portal vein injections of autogeneic brain cell suspensions exerted a better effect than MBP. Intrathymic and hepatic portal vein injections of MBP had equal effects on reducing secondary inflammation and improving prognoses. Otherwise, hepatic portal vein injections of autogeneic brain cell suspensions had better outcomes than intrathymic injections of autogeneic brain cell suspensions. Moreover, the benefit of injecting antigens into the thymus was outweighed by hepatic portal vein injections. PMID:27554621

  11. Treatment of surgical brain injury by immune tolerance induced by intrathymic and hepatic portal vein injection of brain antigens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weijian; Liu, Yong; Liu, Baolong; Tan, Huajun; Lu, Hao; Wang, Hong; Yan, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Surgical brain injury (SBI) defines complications induced by intracranial surgery, such as cerebral edema and other secondary injuries. In our study, intrathymic and hepatic portal vein injection of allogeneic myelin basic protein (MBP) or autogeneic brain cell suspensions were administered to a standard SBI model. Serum pro-inflammatory IL-2, anti-inflammatory IL-4 concentrations and the CD4(+)T/CD8(+)T ratio were measured at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 d after surgery to verify the establishment of immune tolerance. Furthermore, we confirmed neuroprotective effects by evaluating neurological scores at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 d after SBI. Anti-Fas ligand (FasL) immunohistochemistry and TUNEL assays of brain sections were tested at 21 d after surgery. Intrathymic injections of MBP or autogeneic brain cell suspensions functioned by both suppressing secondary inflammatory reactions and improving prognoses, whereas hepatic portal vein injections of autogeneic brain cell suspensions exerted a better effect than MBP. Intrathymic and hepatic portal vein injections of MBP had equal effects on reducing secondary inflammation and improving prognoses. Otherwise, hepatic portal vein injections of autogeneic brain cell suspensions had better outcomes than intrathymic injections of autogeneic brain cell suspensions. Moreover, the benefit of injecting antigens into the thymus was outweighed by hepatic portal vein injections. PMID:27554621

  12. Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy: From technical evolution to oncological benefit

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Ewald, Florian; Gulati, Amit; Nashan, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) is a novel approach in liver surgery that allows for extensive resection of liver parenchyma by inducing a rapid hypertrophy of the future remnant liver. However, recent reports indicate that not all patients eligible for ALPPS will benefit from this procedure. Therefore, careful patient selection will be necessary to fully exploit possible benefits of ALPPS. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the technical evolution of ALPPS with a special emphasis on safety and oncologic efficacy. Furthermore, we review the contemporary literature regarding indication and benefits, but also limitations of ALPPS. PMID:26981186

  13. New perspectives on the management of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hyun Young

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), managing HCC with portal vein thrombosis (PVT) remains challenging. PVT is present in 10-40% of HCC cases at the time of diagnosis and its therapeutic options are very limited. Current guidelines mainly recommend sorafenib for advanced HCC with PVT, but surgery, transarterial chemoemolization, external radiation therapy, radioembolization, transarterial infusion chemotherapy, and combination therapy are also still used. Furthermore, several new emerging therapies such as the administration of immunotherapeutic agents and oncolytic viruses are under investigation. This comprehensive literature review presents current and future management options with their relative advantages and disadvantages and summary data on overall survival. PMID:26157747

  14. A Collision Probability Model of Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus Formation in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most common malignancies worldwide, with a high risk of portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). Some promising results have been achieved for venous metastases of hepatocellular carcinoma; however, the etiology of PVTT is largely unknown, and it is unclear why the incidence of PVTT is not proportional to its distance from the carcinoma. We attempted to address this issue using physical concepts and mathematical tools. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the probability of a collision event and the microenvironment of the PVTT. Our formulae suggest that the collision probability can alter the tumor microenvironment by increasing the number of tumor cells. PMID:26131562

  15. Adrenal dysfunction in portal hypertensive rats with acute hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Fa-Yauh; Wang, Sun-Sang; Tsai, Ming-Hung; Huang, Hui-Chun; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) participates in shock and poorer portal hypotensive effect to vasoconstrictors in portal hypertension with hemorrhage, the so-called splanchnic hyposensitivity. Relative adrenal insufficiency accompanies hemorrhagic shock and is found in liver disease, the 'hepatoadrenal syndrome', but the relevant interactions remain unsettled. Portal hypertensive rats were induced by partial portal vein ligation (PVL). Experiments were performed on the 14th day post PVL: (I) ACTH stimulation test for rats without or with hemorrhage; (II) Glypressin response (mean arterial pressure, MAP; portal pressure, PP) in rats (a) without hemorrhage or with hemorrhage, injected with (b) distilled water (DW), (c) dexamethasone 3 mg/kg; (III) To survey the dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoid without being confounded by endogenous adrenal hormone, glypressin response was surveyed in PVL rats with adrenalectomy: (a) without hemorrhage or with hemorrhage, injected with (b) DW; (c) dexamethasone 3 mg/kg; (d) dexamethasone 5 mg/kg. Plasma tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) concentrations and abdominal aorta (AA), superior mesenteric artery (SMA) NO synthases (NOS) mRNA expressions were determined. The results showed that ACTH induced corticosterone release similarly in PVL rats with or without hemorrhage. In bleeding PVL rats, dexamethasone (1) down-regulated AA NOS and enhanced glypressin-induced MAP elevation; (2) did not influence glypressin-induced PP reduction; (3) reduced TNF-α. In bleeding PVL and adrenalectomized rats, high-dose dexamethasone (1) down-regulated AA/SMA NOS; (2) enhanced glypressin-induced MAP elevation and PP reduction; (3) reduced TNF-α. In conclusion, bleeding portal hypertensive rats failed to enhance corticosterone release, suggesting a relative adrenal insufficiency. High-dose dexamethasone reversed systemic hypotension and splanchnic hyporesponsiveness to glypressin in adrenalectomized PVL rats accompanied by TNF-α and NOS down

  16. Adrenal Dysfunction in Portal Hypertensive Rats with Acute Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Fa-Yauh; Wang, Sun-Sang; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) participates in shock and poorer portal hypotensive effect to vasoconstrictors in portal hypertension with hemorrhage, the so-called splanchnic hyposensitivity. Relative adrenal insufficiency accompanies hemorrhagic shock and is found in liver disease, the ‘hepatoadrenal syndrome’, but the relevant interactions remain unsettled. Portal hypertensive rats were induced by partial portal vein ligation (PVL). Experiments were performed on the 14th day post PVL: (I) ACTH stimulation test for rats without or with hemorrhage; (II) Glypressin response (mean arterial pressure, MAP; portal pressure, PP) in rats (a) without hemorrhage or with hemorrhage, injected with (b) distilled water (DW), (c) dexamethasone 3 mg/kg; (III) To survey the dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoid without being confounded by endogenous adrenal hormone, glypressin response was surveyed in PVL rats with adrenalectomy: (a) without hemorrhage or with hemorrhage, injected with (b) DW; (c) dexamethasone 3 mg/kg; (d) dexamethasone 5 mg/kg. Plasma tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) concentrations and abdominal aorta (AA), superior mesenteric artery (SMA) NO synthases (NOS) mRNA expressions were determined. The results showed that ACTH induced corticosterone release similarly in PVL rats with or without hemorrhage. In bleeding PVL rats, dexamethasone (1) down-regulated AA NOS and enhanced glypressin-induced MAP elevation; (2) did not influence glypressin-induced PP reduction; (3) reduced TNF-α. In bleeding PVL and adrenalectomized rats, high-dose dexamethasone (1) down-regulated AA/SMA NOS; (2) enhanced glypressin-induced MAP elevation and PP reduction; (3) reduced TNF-α. In conclusion, bleeding portal hypertensive rats failed to enhance corticosterone release, suggesting a relative adrenal insufficiency. High-dose dexamethasone reversed systemic hypotension and splanchnic hyporesponsiveness to glypressin in adrenalectomized PVL rats accompanied by TNF-α and NOS down

  17. Selective modulation by membrane potential of desmethoxyverapamil binding to calcium channels in rat portal vein.

    PubMed

    Rakotoarisoa, L; Sayet, I; Mironneau, C; Mironneau, J

    1990-12-01

    (-)-[3H]Desmethoxyverapamil (D888) binds saturably to intact strips from rat portal vein bathed in physiological solution with a Kd value of 363 pM and a maximal binding capacity value of 15.6 fmol.mg-1 wet weight. Unlabeled dihydropyridines, phenylalkylamines and benzothiazepines inhibited (-)-[3H]D888 specific binding in a concentration-dependent manner. Scatchard analyses and dissociation kinetics of (-)-[3H]D888 binding revealed the existence of mutual allosteric interactions between (+)-isradipine, (+)-cis diltiazem and (-)-D888 binding sites in portal vein strips. When voltage-dependent Ca++ channels transported Ca++, Ba++, Sr++ or Na+ the binding capacity of (-)-[3H]D888 remained unchanged. In contrast, both depolarization (induced by elevation of external K+) and hyperpolarization (in the presence of cromakalim) induced a gradual decrease in (-)-D888 binding capacity. These observations suggest that membrane potential variation would change the conformational state of Ca++ channels, in such a way that it would be less favorable for access of (-)-[3H]D888 to the binding site. This would provide an experimental argument in favor of the "guarded receptor hypothesis" according to which membrane potential modulates ligand affinity by alteration of the amount of time during which the receptor binding site is available to (-)-[3H]D888. PMID:2175807

  18. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide: differential effects on hepatic artery vs. portal vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ke-Hong; Zhong, Qing; Xu, Jianrui; Isales, Carlos M

    2004-05-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) has been reported to have opposing effects on splanchnic blood flow. GIP infusion in dogs results in an increase in portal vein circulation but a drop in hepatic artery blood flow. In an effort to evaluate whether these different responses were related to intrinsic differences in GIP effects, we isolated canine hepatic artery (HAEC) and portal vein endothelial cells (PVEC). We report that there are differences in GIP activation of the signal transduction pathways in these two cell types. GIP stimulates secretion of endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor, from HAEC (EC50 0.28 nM) but not from PVEC. This effect could be abolished by preventing a rise in intracellular calcium, demonstrating the calcium dependence of GIP-induced ET-1 secretion from HAEC. The GIP effect was specific, as a GIP receptor antagonist blocked it. In contrast, GIP stimulated nitric oxide production from PVEC (EC50 0.09 nM) but not from HAEC. Taken together, our data demonstrate distinct differences in GIP effects on HAEC from those on PVEC. We conclude that differences in GIP stimulation of ET-1 vs. nitric oxide production in different vascular beds may account for some of the observed differences in its physiological effects. PMID:14709420

  19. Preoperative indications for extended pancreatectomy for locally advanced pancreas cancer involving the portal vein.

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, O; Ohigashi, H; Imaoka, S; Furukawa, H; Sasaki, Y; Fujita, M; Kuroda, C; Iwanaga, T

    1992-01-01

    This retrospective study attempted to determine the indications for extended pancreatectomy for locally advanced carcinoma of the pancreas, in terms of postoperative prognosis. An extended pancreatectomy with portal vein or superior mesenteric vein (PV/SMV) resection and regional lymphadenectomy was performed in 35 of 50 consecutive cancers that extended into the retroperitoneal spaces and involved the PV or SMV. Among the many background factors in the 35 resected specimens, the degree of PV/SMV invasion by the cancer was most closely associated with prognosis, despite resection of all involved PV/SMV. This factor generally correlated with the preoperative findings on the portal phase of superior mesenteric arteriograph. In 17 selected patients in whom PV/SMV invasion had been angiographically both semicircular or less and 1.2 cm (1.4 cm on the film) or less in length, the 3-year survival rate was 59%. This survival rate was significantly higher than the 29% 3-year survival rate in all 35 patients (p less than 0.05). Conversely, among the 18 patients in whom invasion was angiographically either beyond semicircular or more than 1.2 cm (1.4 cm on the film) in length, there were no 1.5-year survivors, and this result was even worse than that of 15 nonresectable cases. Based on postoperative survival, the degrees of PV/SMV invasion on preoperative angiography (narrowing pattern and length) are good indicators for aggressive pancreatectomy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Images FIG. 2. PMID:1543394

  20. Spaceflight regulates ryanodine receptor subtype 1 in portal vein myocytes in the opposite way of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dabertrand, Fabrice; Porte, Yves; Macrez, Nathalie; Morel, Jean-Luc

    2012-02-01

    Gravity has a structural role for living systems. Tissue development, architecture, and organization are modified when the gravity vector is changed. In particular, microgravity induces a redistribution of blood volume and thus pressure in the astronaut body, abolishing an upright blood pressure gradient, inducing orthostatic hypotension. The present study was designed to investigate whether isolated vascular smooth muscle cells are directly sensitive to altered gravitational forces and, second, whether sustained blood pressure changes act on the same molecular target. Exposure to microgravity during 8 days in the International Space Station induced the decrease of ryanodine receptor subtype 1 expression in primary cultured myocytes from rat hepatic portal vein. Identical results were found in portal vein from mice exposed to microgravity during an 8-day shuttle spaceflight. To evaluate the functional consequences of this physiological adaptation, we have compared evoked calcium signals obtained in myocytes from hindlimb unloaded rats, in which the shift of blood pressure mimics the one produced by the microgravity, with those obtained in myocytes from rats injected with antisense oligonucleotide directed against ryanodine receptor subtype 1. In both conditions, calcium signals implicating calcium-induced calcium release were significantly decreased. In contrast, in spontaneous hypertensive rat, an increase in ryanodine receptor subtype 1 expression was observed as well as the calcium-induced calcium release mechanism. Taken together, our results shown that myocytes were directly sensitive to gravity level and that they adapt their calcium signaling pathways to pressure by the regulation of the ryanodine receptor subtype 1 expression. PMID:22096120

  1. Primary portal vein hypoplasia and SLC2A9 mutation associated with urate urolithiasis in a Spanish water dog

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Laura; Hammond, Gawain; Mclauchlan, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a Spanish water dog with an ammonium urate urethrolith which was diagnosed with primary portal vein hypoplasia and was found to be homozygous for the mutated SLC2A9 gene. This is the first Spanish water dog described with the SLC2A9 mutation and the first case of concurrent portal vascular abnormalities and SLC2A9 mutation. PMID:26538670

  2. Therapy Algorithm for Portal Vein Thrombosis in Liver Cirrhosis: The Internist's Point of View

    PubMed Central

    Rössle, Martin; Bausch, Birke; Klinger, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment of non-malignant portal vein thrombosis (PVT) in patients with cirrhosis has been neglected in the past because of the fear of bleeding complications when using anticoagulation and due to the technical difficulties associated with the implantation of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). However, PVT has a negative impact on outcome and compromises liver transplantation, warranting treatment by using anticoagulation and TIPS. Methods This review considers studies on the treatment of PVT in cirrhosis published in the last 10 years. Unfortunately, many of these studies are limited by their retrospective design and a small sample size. Results Anticoagulation using low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) or vitamin K antagonists is effective in the treatment of patients with limited and recent PVT, resulting in a recanalization in up to 50% of the patients. TIPS (plus local measures) results in a recanalization of up to 100% and reduces the rebleeding rate considerably in patients with recent or chronic PVT. Conclusion Based on the presently limited knowledge, a therapy algorithm is suggested favouring the TIPS as a first-line treatment for PVT in patients with symptomatic portal hypertension. Patients with thus far asymptomatic portal hypertension may first receive anticoagulation, preferably using LMWH. If these patients have a condition where anticoagulation is not promising (complete, extended, chronic PVT) or ineffective, or if they are candidates for liver transplantation, the TIPS may be implanted without delay. PMID:26288607

  3. Insufficient Portal Vein Inflow in Children without Major Shunt Vessels During Living Donor Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Toshiharu; Yoshimaru, Koichiro; Yanagi, Yusuke; Esumi, Genshiro; Hayashida, Makoto; Taguchi, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Liver cirrhosis is frequently accompanied by insufficient portal vein inflow (IPVF) with large portosystemic shunts. However, pediatric cases often manifested IPVF without any apparent major portosystemic shunts. Although IPVF is a very critical issue, the intraoperative assessment has not been well established. In this study, we reviewed the intraoperative approach and the outcome of the IPVF cases at our department. MATERIAL AND METHODS Eighty-three living donor liver transplantations (LDLT) were performed from 1996 to 2014. The IPVF occurred in 5 cases and necessitated some additional assessments and intraoperative PV flow modulations. We retrospectively reviewed the operative records and analyzed the risk factors and the outcome of the IPVF. RESULTS All 5 IPVF cases were biliary atresia and the mean age at LDLT was 0.74±0.19 years old. The mean recipient PV diameter was 4.3±0.8 mm and the donor IMV patch grafts were applied. To increase the PV inflow, the collaterals around the spleen were ligated in all cases. Intraoperative portal venography was performed in 1 case for selective shunt vessel ligation. In 1 case, the graft was removed and returned to the back table to prevent graft loss during the IPVF. As a result, the final PVF/GV increased to 66.4±20.0 ml/min/100 g. CONCLUSIONS IPVF is a very critical problem. Intraoperative portal venography is helpful and collateral veins ligation is crucial. In some cases, returning the graft to the back table during the PV inflow modulation can prevent graft loss. PMID:27306916

  4. Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Tumor Thrombus Occupying the Right Atrium and Portal Vein: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin; Zhang, Binhao; Dong, Shuilin; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiaoping

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with tumor thrombus extended through the major hepatic veins and inferior vena cava into the right atrium (RA) are rare, and most cases are considered as the advanced stage with a poor prognosis.We report a case of HCC with a tumor thrombus extending into the RA and a tumor thrombus in the portal vein. A literature search for case reports was performed on PubMed.Compared with the published literature, our case is one of the youngest patients, but with the most advanced HCC that invades both the hepatic inflow and outflow vasculature. For this patient, we resected the tumor thrombus in the RA with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass, and then removed the tumor thrombus in the portal vein and ligated the left branch of portal vein. Because of insufficient remnant liver volume, microwave ablation and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization were performed to control the growth of HCC. The patient survived 6 months after surgery.This case suggests that for patients with extension of HCC into the RA and portal vein, surgery is a useful therapeutic modality, even in case that liver tumor cannot be resected. PMID:26313767

  5. Transjugular Intrahepatic Porto-Systemic Shunt Placement in a Patient with Left-Lateral Split-Liver Transplant and Mesenterico-Left Portal Vein by Pass Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto Maruzzelli, Luigi; Luca, Angelo

    2011-12-15

    This is a report of a successful placement of a transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt in a young patient with previous left-lateral, split-liver transplant and mesenterico-left portal vein by pass placement after posttransplant extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis.

  6. Very Early Presentation of Extrahepatic Portal Vein Obstruction Causing Portal Hypertension in an Infant: Uncertainties in the Management and Therapeutic Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Khodayar-Pardo, Parisá; Peña Aldea, Andrés; Ramírez González, Ana; Meseguer Carrascosa, Adela; Calabuig Bayo, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction, although rare in children, is a significant cause of portal hypertension (PHT) leading to life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding in the pediatric age group. PHT may also lead to other complications such as hyperesplenism, cholangyopathy, ascites, and even hepatopulmonary syndrome and portopulmonary hypertension that may require organ transplantation. Herein we report the case of an asymptomatic 11-month-old infant wherein a hepatomegaly and cavernous transformation of the portal vein was detected by liver ultrasound. Neither signs of thrombosis in arteriovenous system, nor affectation of biliary tract were identified in the magnetic resonance imaging study. A significant enlargement of the caudate lobe of the liver was reported. No risk factors were detected. The differential diagnosis performed was extensive. Inherited thrombophilia and storage disorders were especially considered. Liver biopsy was normal. Upper gastrointestinal esophagogastroduodenoscopy detected two small varicose cords on the distal third of the esophagus. Finding a cavernous transformation of the portal vein with evidence of collateral circulation in such an early age is a challenging condition for professionals, since PHT may lead to severe complications during childhood and can compromise growth and development. Evidence-based guidelines for the management of PHT in adults have been published. However, follow-up and treatment of pediatric patients have not yet been standardized. Moreover, management of PHT in infants faces particular difficulties such as technical restrictions that could hinder their treatment. PMID:27504083

  7. Comprehensive treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma with tumor thrombus in major portal vein

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hai-Hong; Ye, Jia-Zhou; Xie, Zhi-Bo; Peng, Yu-Chong; Chen, Jie; Ma, Liang; Bai, Tao; Chen, Jun-Ze; Lu, Zhan; Qin, Hong-Gui; Xiang, Bang-De; Li, Le-Qun

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of transcatheter arterial chemoembolisation (TACE) compared with surgical intervention and sorafenib for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with tumor thrombus extending to the main portal vein. METHODS: From 2009 to 2013, a total of 418 HCC patients with tumor thrombus extending to the main portal vein were enrolled in this study and divided into four groups. These groups underwent different treatments as follows: TACE (n = 307), surgical intervention (n = 54), sorafenib (n = 15) and palliative treatment (n = 42). Overall survival rates were determined by Kaplan-Meier method, and differences between the groups were identified through log-rank analysis. Cox’s proportional hazard model was used to identify the risk factors for survival. RESULTS: The mean survival periods for patients in the TACE, surgical intervention, sorafenib and palliative treatment groups were 10.39, 4.13, 5.54 and 2.82 mo, respectively. For the TACE group, the 3-, 6-, 12- and 24-mo survival rates were 94.1%, 85.9%, 51.5% and 0.0%, respectively. The corresponding rates were 60.3%, 22.2%, 0.0% and 0.0% for the surgical intervention group and 50.9%, 29.5%, 0.0% and 0.0% for the sorafenib group. Evidently, the results in the TACE group were significantly higher than those in the other groups (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, no significant difference among survival rates was observed between TACE with/without sorafenib (10.22 mo vs 10.52 mo, P = 0.615). No significant difference in survival rates was also found among the surgical intervention, sorafenib and palliative treatment groups (P > 0.05). These values significantly increased after TACE with/without sorafenib compared with other treatments (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: For HCC patients with tumor thrombus extending to the main portal vein, TACE can yield a higher survival rate than surgical intervention or sorafenib treatment. PMID:27053855

  8. A Novel Technique of Ilio-Portal Venous Bypass to Relieve Symptoms of Pelvic Vein Congestion in a Patient with Inferior Vena Cava Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Laurian, Claude; Mallios, Alexandros; Marteau, Veronique; Gigou, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    A 37 year old man known to have inferior vena cava agenesis, presented to our center with severe symptoms of pelvic venous congestion. Surgical approach was attempted by creating a bypass between the right external iliac vein and the portal vein using an autogenous venous bypass (superficial femoral vein). Over a three year follow up, the bypass remained patent with complete resolution of symptoms. The ilio-portal venous bypass suggests a surgical alternative that has not been previously described. PMID:27087875

  9. Indirect evidence that purinergic modulation of perivascular adrenergic neurotransmission in the portal vein is a physiological process.

    PubMed Central

    Burnstock, G.; Crowe, R.; Kennedy, C.; Török, J.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of adenine nucleotides and nucleosides on the contractile response to perivascular nerve stimulation were compared in the isolated portal vein of rabbit, rat and guinea-pig. 2-Chloroadenosine was more potent than adenosine and ATP, which were equipotent in producing inhibition of neurogenic contractions in the rabbit and rat via prejunctional P1-purinoceptors. In contrast, neurogenic contractions of the guinea-pig portal vein were not inhibited by adenosine and were potentiated by 2-chloroadenosine and, to a lesser extent, by ATP. Fluorescence histochemical localization of quinacrine, which binds to high levels of ATP, revealed a dense perivascular nerve plexus in the portal vein of rabbit and rat but not of guinea-pig. After chemical sympathectomy, quinacrine-positive nerves persisted in the rabbit (supporting other evidence for the presence of purinergic nerves) but not in the rat (supporting other evidence for ATP as a cotransmitter in adrenergic nerves). It is concluded that a prejunctional purinergic modulatory mechanism operates in adrenergic neurotransmission in the portal vein of rabbit and rat but not guinea-pig, and it is suggested that this indicates a physiological mechanism. Images Figure 6 PMID:6329393

  10. Image guided portal vein access techniques in TIPS creation and considerations regarding their use

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is a difficult procedure to perform and accessing the portal vein is a very challenging step. There are three broad categories of image guided TIPS creation techniques. Each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. TIPS procedure carries some risk of complications regardless of the guidance technique employed. The technology for TIPS has evolved in parallel with the expanding indications for TIPS. Ultrasound guidance technique offers a safe option, particularly for patients with challenging anatomy. Patient safety should always come first and the US guided technique should be more routinely used. Experience is the main factor in the success of TIPS. Other factors to consider in reducing the all-cause morbidity and mortality are patient selection, patient management and the clinical setting. PMID:27385392

  11. Role of Hyperhomocysteinemia and Methylene Tetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Polymorphism in Idiopathic Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghaznavi, Habib; Soheili, Zahra; Samiei, Shahram; Soltanpour, Mohammad Soleiman

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare and life-threatening vascular disorder characterized by obstruction or narrowing of the portal vein. Hyperhomocysteinemia and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism has been studied in PVT patients with conflicting results. In the present study the association of hyperhomocysteinemia and MTHFR C677T polymorphism with PVT risk was investigated in Iranians. Materials and Methods: Our study population consisted of 10 idiopathic PVT patients and 80 healthy control subjects matched for age and sex. MTHFR C677T polymorphism was genotyped by the polymerase chain reaction technique combined with restriction enzyme fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique and plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) levels were determined by enzyme immunoassay method. Results: Mean plasma tHcy levels were significantly higher in PVT patients (20.2±6.8) than control subjects (10.9±4.7) (P=0.001). Moreover, plasma tHcy levels were significantly higher in 677T allele carriers relative to 677C allele carriers in both PVT patients (P=0.01) and control subjects (P=0.03). Neither homozygote nor heterozygote genotypes of MTHFR C677T polymorphism correlated significantly with PVT risk (P>0.05). Moreover, MTHFR C677T polymorphism didn’t increase the risk of PVT under dominant (CT+TT vs. CC) or recessive (TT vs. CC+CT) genetic models analyzed (P>0.05). The difference in frequency of minor 677T allele between PVT patients and control subjects was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: Based on the current study, we suggest that hyperhomocysteinemia constitutes a significant and common risk factor for PVT. Also, MTHFR C677T polymorphism is not a risk factor for PVT but is a contributing factor for elevated plasma tHcy levels. PMID:27051654

  12. Hepatic resection or transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ninggang; Wei, Xiaodong; Zhang, Dongzhi; Chai, Wenxiao; Che, Ming; Wang, Jiangye; Du, Binbin

    2016-06-01

    The role of hepatic resection in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with accompanying portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) remains controversial. This study aimed to evaluate the surgical outcomes of hepatic resection compared with those of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in HCC patients. A retrospective study was conducted using the medical records of 230 HCC patients with portal vein invasion who underwent hepatic resection (96 patients) or TACE (134 patients). The baseline characteristics, tumor characteristics, clinicopathological parameters, and overall survival rates were compared between the 2 groups. The baseline and tumor characteristics were comparable between the hepatic resection and TACE groups. The overall complication rate was 35.4% in the hepatic resection group, which was significantly lower than that in the TACE group (73.0%, P <0.001). However, the serious complication rate (grade ≥3) in the hepatic resection group was 13.5%, which was significantly higher than that in the TACE group (P = 0.003). The cumulative overall survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years in the hepatic resection group were 86.5%, 60.4%, and 33.3%, respectively. These rates were much higher than those in the TACE group (1-year: 77.6%; 3-year: 47.8%; and 5-year: 20.9%; P = 0.021). The long-term survival was notably better in the patients with types I and II PVTT than in the patients with types III and IV PVTT (P <0.05). The univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that types III and IV PVTT and TACE may have contributed to the poor overall survival following surgery. In HCC patients with PVTT and compensated liver function, hepatic resection is a safe and effective surgical protocol, particularly for patients with type I or II PVTT. PMID:27367992

  13. Diffusion-Weighted MRI of Malignant versus Benign Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jhii-Hyun; Cho, Eun-Suk; Chung, Jae-Joon; Kim, Joo Hee; Kim, Ki Whang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To validate the diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) for differentiation of benign from malignant portal vein thrombosis. Materials and Methods The Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study and waived informed consent. A total of 59 consecutive patients (52 men and 7 women, aged 40–85 years) with grossly defined portal vein thrombus (PVT) on hepatic MRI were retrospectively analyzed. Among them, liver cirrhosis was found in 45 patients, and hepatocellular carcinoma in 47 patients. DWI was performed using b values of 50 and 800 sec/mm2 at 1.5-T unit. A thrombus was considered malignant if it enhanced on dynamic CT or MRI; otherwise, it was considered bland. There were 18 bland thrombi and 49 malignant thrombi in 59 patients, including 8 patients with simultaneous benign and malignant PVT. Mean apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of benign and malignant PVTs were compared by using Mann-Whitney U test. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results The mean ADC ± standard deviation of bland and malignant PVT were 1.00 ± 0.39 × 10-3 mm2/sec and 0.92 ± 0.25 × 10-3 mm2/sec, respectively; without significant difference (p = 0.799). The area under ROC curve for ADC was 0.520. An ADC value of > 1.35 × 10-3 mm2/sec predicted bland PVT with a specificity of 94.6% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 84.9–98.9%) and a sensitivity of 22.2% (95% CI: 6.4–47.6%), respectively. Conclusion Due to the wide range and considerable overlap of the ADCs, DWI cannot differentiate the benign from malignant thrombi efficiently. PMID:27390544

  14. The value of primary vascular stents in management of early portal vein stenosis after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Tsan; Kuo, Yu-Ting; Lee, King-Teh; Shih, Ming-Chen; Huang, Jian-Wei; Su, Wen-Lung; Chen, Chau-Yun; Huang, Yu-Ling; Wang, Shen-Nien; Chuang, Shih-Chang; Kuo, Kung-Kai; Chen, Jong-Shyone

    2016-03-01

    If portal vein stenosis (PVS) occurs within 1 month after liver transplantation (LT), especially within 1 week, it can be catastrophic and result in rapid loss of the grafts and mortality. Although surgical treatments have been considered standard treatment for PVS, patients are usually unable to receive operations or re-transplantations, because of their critical conditions and a shortage of grafts. Recently, primary percutaneous transhepatic portal vein stents (PTPS) were suggested as alternative and less-invasive treatments of PVS. However, because lethal complications may follow these primary stent placements for patients in early stages after LT, primary PTPS placements for patients suffering PVS 1 month after LT has been suggested. From November 2009 to July 2015, 38 consecutive adult patients underwent LT at our institution. Among them, six recipients suffered PVS within 1 month after LT. Technical success was achieved in all six patients. Clinical success was obtained in two of the four patients suffering PVS within 1 week after LT, and in the other two patients suffering PVS>1 week after LT. All surviving patients and their grafts were in good condition, and their stents remained patent. Our experience showed that primary PTPS placements can be used to effectively treat patients with PVS encountered within 1 month, and even within 1 week, after LT with acceptable short-term results. However, possible fatal complications should be kept in mind. Long-term results of these procedures need further follow-up. PMID:27106002

  15. Foam Sclerotherapy Using Polidocanol (Aethoxysklerol) for Preoperative Portal Vein Embolization in 16 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Myung-su; Kim, Kyung Sik; Kim, Soon II; Won, Jong Youn; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Kwang-Hun

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical safety and effectiveness of foam sclerotherapy using polidocanol for preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) before hemihepatectomy of the liver. Materials and Methods: From March 2006 to October 2008, foam sclerotherapy using polidocanol was performed in 16 patients (male-to-female ratio of 12:4, age range 48-75 years [mean 62]) for PVE. Patients were diagnosed with Klatskin tumor (n = 13), gallbladder (GB) cancer (n = 2), or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (n = 1). The foam was composed of a 1:2:1 ratio of 3% polidocanol (Aethoxysklerol; Kreussler Pharma, Wiesbaden, Germany), room air, and contrast media (Xenetix 350; Guerbet, Aulnay-Sous-Bois, France). The total amount of polidocanol used (2 to 8 mL [mean 4.6]) varied according to the volume of the target portal vein. We calculated the volume of future liver remnant (FLR) before and after PVE and evaluated complications associated with the use of polidocanol foam sclerotherapy for PVE. Results: Technical success was achieved in all patients. All patients were comfortable throughout the procedure and did not experience pain during sclerotherapy. No periprocedural morbidity or mortality occurred. Patients underwent a liver dynamic computed tomography (CT) scan 2-4 weeks after PVE. FLR increased significantly after PVE using polidocanol foam from 19.3% (range 16-35%) before PVE to 27.8% (range 23-42%) after PVE (p = 0.001). All patients were operable for hemihepatectomy of the liver and achieved effective resection. Conclusion: Foam sclerotherapy using polidocanol is clinically safe and effective for preoperative PVE.

  16. Hepatic resection or transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ninggang; Wei, Xiaodong; Zhang, Dongzhi; Chai, Wenxiao; Che, Ming; Wang, Jiangye; Du, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The role of hepatic resection in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with accompanying portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) remains controversial. This study aimed to evaluate the surgical outcomes of hepatic resection compared with those of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in HCC patients. A retrospective study was conducted using the medical records of 230 HCC patients with portal vein invasion who underwent hepatic resection (96 patients) or TACE (134 patients). The baseline characteristics, tumor characteristics, clinicopathological parameters, and overall survival rates were compared between the 2 groups. The baseline and tumor characteristics were comparable between the hepatic resection and TACE groups. The overall complication rate was 35.4% in the hepatic resection group, which was significantly lower than that in the TACE group (73.0%, P <0.001). However, the serious complication rate (grade ≥3) in the hepatic resection group was 13.5%, which was significantly higher than that in the TACE group (P = 0.003). The cumulative overall survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years in the hepatic resection group were 86.5%, 60.4%, and 33.3%, respectively. These rates were much higher than those in the TACE group (1-year: 77.6%; 3-year: 47.8%; and 5-year: 20.9%; P = 0.021). The long-term survival was notably better in the patients with types I and II PVTT than in the patients with types III and IV PVTT (P <0.05). The univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that types III and IV PVTT and TACE may have contributed to the poor overall survival following surgery. In HCC patients with PVTT and compensated liver function, hepatic resection is a safe and effective surgical protocol, particularly for patients with type I or II PVTT. PMID:27367992

  17. Hepatic Artery Doppler Indices in Children with Extra Hepatic Portal Vein Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Randhir, Jesudoss; Chandrasekaran, Satyabhama; Sathiyasekaran, Malathi; Venkataraman, Jayanthi

    2013-01-01

    Doppler measurement provides information on the hemodynamics in the hepatic artery and the portal venous system. Aim To study the hepatic artery hemodynamics in children with extra hepatic portal vein obstruction. Materials and methods Hepatic artery indices were studied using Doppler indices in 15 children (<12 years) with extra hepatic portal hypertension (EHPVO) and obliterated esophageal varices. The hepatic artery resistive index, the arterial acceleration time and the acceleration index were used to determine the flow pattern within the hepatic artery. Controls were 15 healthy age-sex matched children, belonging to the same socioeconomic strata in absence of liver disease. Results The mean age of the children was 8.43 ± 3.2 years and male female ratio was 4:1. All the children had obliterated esophageal varices. The hepatic artery resistive index in the children with EHPVO was normal and similar to controls. The hepatic arterial early systolic acceleration index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls (436 ± 290 vs 214 ± 100; P value <0.004). The hepatic arterial acceleration time though low in the cases (86 ± 35 cm/s) was not statistically different from the controls (128 ± 14 cm/s). Conclusion There was a significant increase in hepatic arterial early systolic acceleration in children with chronic EHPVO. The latter may be responsible for an increase in hepatic arterial in flow velocity in a slow flow system despite a normal resistive index. PMID:25755483

  18. Endovascular Treatment of Acute Thrombosis of Cerebral Veins and Sinuses

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Sergey Borisovich; Bocharov, Aleksei Vasilievich; Mikeladze, Ketevan; Gasparian, Sergey Surenovich; Serova, Natalia Konstantinovna; Shakhnovich, Alexander Romanovich

    2014-01-01

    Summary Acute thrombosis of cerebral veins and sinuses (ATCVS) is a multifactorial disease with grave consequences. Because of its rare occurrence there are no proven treatment guidelines. Sixteen patients with ATCVS were treated. The final diagnosis was confirmed by digital subtraction angiography. Sinus catheterization was performed via transfemoral venous access. Treatment included mechanical manipulation of thrombi and thrombolytic therapy. A regression of clinical symptoms with a concomitant decrease of intracranial hypertension was achieved in all patients. Long-term results were studied in eight patients: none presented clinical signs of intracranial hypertension. Endovascular transvenous recanalization is an effective treatment for acute thrombosis of cerebral veins and sinuses. Along with the local thrombolysis, significant potential in the treatment of this complex pathology lies in the transvenous endovascular techniques of mechanical thrombus extraction, especially in patients with intracranial hemorrhage for whom the use of thrombolytic agents is restricted. PMID:25196622

  19. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound in differentiating malignant from benign portal vein thrombosis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tarantino, Luciano; Ambrosino, Pasquale; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) may occur in liver cirrhosis patients. Malignant PVT is a common complication in cirrhotic patients with concomitant hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and, in some cases, it may be even the initial sign of an undetected HCC. Detection of malignant PVT in a patient with liver cirrhosis heavily affects the therapeutic strategy. Gray-scale ultrasound (US) is widely unreliable for differentiating benign and malignant thrombi. Although effective for this differential diagnosis, fine-needle biopsy remains an invasive technique. Sensitivity of color-doppler US in detection of malignant thrombi is highly dependent on the size of the thrombus. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MRI) can be useful to assess the nature of portal thrombus, while limited data are currently available about the role of positron emission tomography (PET) and PET-CT. In contrast with CT, MRI, PET, and PET-CT, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is a fast, effective, well tolerated and cheap technique, that can be performed even in the same session in which the thrombus has been detected. CEUS can be performed bedside and can be available also in transplanted patients. Moreover, CT and MRI only yield a snapshot analysis during contrast diffusion, while CEUS allows for a continuous real-time imaging of the microcirculation that lasts several minutes, so that the whole arterial phase and the late parenchymal phase of the contrast diffusion can be analyzed continuously by real-time US scanning. Continuous real-time monitoring of contrast diffusion entails an easy detection of thrombus maximum enhancement. Moreover, continuous quantitative analyses of enhancement (wash in - wash out studies) by CEUS during contrast diffusion is nowadays available in most CEUS machines, thus giving a more sophisticated and accurate evaluation of the contrast distribution and an increased confidence in diagnosis in difficult cases. In conclusion

  20. Endovenous saphenous vein ablation in patients with acute isolated superficial-vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The possible benefits of endovenous saphenous ablation (EVSA) as initial treatment in patients presenting with isolated superficial-vein thrombosis (SVT) and saphenous vein reflux include: (1) definitive treatment of the underlying pathology and (2) elimination of the saphenous vein as a path for pulmonary emboli, which (3) may eliminate the need for anticoagulation. Methods: In a ten-year review of 115 limbs presenting with acute isolated SVT, 72 limbs (71 patients) with saphenous reflux were given a choice of two treatments following an explanation of the risks and benefits of each. Group I limbs (n = 41) were treated with office EVSA using radiofrequency or laser with or without thrombophlebectomy if performed within 45 days of diagnosis. Post-treatment anticoagulants were not given. Group II limbs (n = 31) were treated with compression hose and repeat Duplex within one week, with added anticoagulants if SVT extended into the thigh. Results: In group I, mean interval from diagnosis to treatment was 13.7 days. One calf deep vein thrombosis was noted. In group II no complications were noted. In late follow-up of group II patients, 12/29 underwent EVSA more than 45 days after initial presentation. Conclusions: The safety and efficacy of EVSA and thrombophlebectomy appear indistinguishable from conservative measures and may be offered as initial treatment to patients presenting with SVT and saphenous reflux. PMID:24307241

  1. Portal Vein Embolization as an Oncosurgical Strategy Prior to Major Hepatic Resection: Anatomic, Surgical, and Technical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Orcutt, Sonia T.; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Sultenfuss, Mark; Hailey, Brian S.; Sparks, Anthony; Satpathy, Bighnesh; Anaya, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) is used to extend the indications for major hepatic resection, and it has become the standard of care for selected patients with hepatic malignancies treated at major hepatobiliary centers. To date, various techniques with different embolic materials have been used with similar results in the degree of liver hypertrophy. Regardless of the specific strategy used, both surgeons and interventional radiologists must be familiar with each other’s techniques to be able to create the optimal plan for each individual patient. Knowledge of the segmental anatomy of the liver is paramount to fully understand the liver segments that need to be embolized and resected. Understanding the portal vein anatomy and the branching variations, along with the techniques used to transect the portal vein during hepatic resection, is important because these variables can affect the PVE procedure and the eventual surgical resection. Comprehension of the advantages and disadvantages of approaches to the portal venous system and the various embolic materials used for PVE is essential to best tailor the procedures for each patient and to avoid complications. Before PVE, meticulous assessment of the portal vein branching anatomy is performed with cross-sectional imaging, and embolization strategies are developed based on the patient’s anatomy. The PVE procedure consists of several technical steps, and knowledge of these technical tips, potential complications, and how to avoid the complications in each step is of great importance for safe and successful PVE and ultimately successful hepatectomy. Because PVE is used as an adjunct to planned hepatic resection, priority must always be placed on safety, without compromising the integrity of the future liver remnant, and close collaboration between interventional radiologists and hepatobiliary surgeons is essential to achieve successful outcomes. PMID:27014696

  2. Portal Vein Embolization as an Oncosurgical Strategy Prior to Major Hepatic Resection: Anatomic, Surgical, and Technical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Orcutt, Sonia T; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Sultenfuss, Mark; Hailey, Brian S; Sparks, Anthony; Satpathy, Bighnesh; Anaya, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) is used to extend the indications for major hepatic resection, and it has become the standard of care for selected patients with hepatic malignancies treated at major hepatobiliary centers. To date, various techniques with different embolic materials have been used with similar results in the degree of liver hypertrophy. Regardless of the specific strategy used, both surgeons and interventional radiologists must be familiar with each other's techniques to be able to create the optimal plan for each individual patient. Knowledge of the segmental anatomy of the liver is paramount to fully understand the liver segments that need to be embolized and resected. Understanding the portal vein anatomy and the branching variations, along with the techniques used to transect the portal vein during hepatic resection, is important because these variables can affect the PVE procedure and the eventual surgical resection. Comprehension of the advantages and disadvantages of approaches to the portal venous system and the various embolic materials used for PVE is essential to best tailor the procedures for each patient and to avoid complications. Before PVE, meticulous assessment of the portal vein branching anatomy is performed with cross-sectional imaging, and embolization strategies are developed based on the patient's anatomy. The PVE procedure consists of several technical steps, and knowledge of these technical tips, potential complications, and how to avoid the complications in each step is of great importance for safe and successful PVE and ultimately successful hepatectomy. Because PVE is used as an adjunct to planned hepatic resection, priority must always be placed on safety, without compromising the integrity of the future liver remnant, and close collaboration between interventional radiologists and hepatobiliary surgeons is essential to achieve successful outcomes. PMID:27014696

  3. Combined transmesenteric and transhepatic recanalization of chronic portal and mesenteric vein occlusion to treat bleeding duodenal varices.

    PubMed

    Sabri, Saher S; Caldwell, Stephen H; Kumer, Sean C; Schmitt, Timothy M; Maluf, Daniel G; Angle, John F; Saad, Wael E

    2014-08-01

    Two patients presented with bleeding duodenal varices secondary to mesenteric and portal vein chronic occlusion. After a failed transhepatic recanalization, a combined transmesenteric and transhepatic approach was used to recanalize the chronic portal and mesenteric venous obstruction. The occluded segment was treated with transmesenteric stent placement in one patient and stent placement and coil embolization of varices in the second patient. Follow-up imaging and endoscopy showed decompression of the duodenal varices in both patients and absence of further bleeding episodes. PMID:25085062

  4. Use of the umbilical vein to study the splanchnic and portal beds in shock and trauma: II. Metabolic studies.

    PubMed

    Hankins, J R; Gill, W; Zipser, M E; Blumenfeld, W; Cowley, R A

    1974-07-01

    Perumbilical portal vein catheters and arterial and central venous catheters were inserted in 16 patients recovering from trauma or other shock-producing events, and in 5 patients who later developed shock. This permitted serial measurement of blood gases, pH, and the levels of ammonia, lactate and certain other metabolites in all three circulatory systems simultaneously. Nine of the trauma patients were never in shock, had no liver disease or injury and consequently formed a baseline group for comparison with the shock patients. In the shock patients there was a significant degree of hypoxemia in the portal venous blood and an increase in the arterialportal oxygen saturation difference. Their portal venous blood showed a lower pH and a higher pCO(2) than did the portal blood of the patients who had never been in shock. In 3 of the 4 shock patients who died, the total blood lactate showed a greater increase in portal venous than in the arterial or central venous blood. In shock there was also an increase in portal venous blood ammonia which was later accompanied by increments in arterial and central venous blood ammonia. This suggests impairment of hepatic urea synthesis, allowing escape of ammonia through the liver. These phenomena, when added to the finding previously reported of an elevated portal venous pressure in some shock patients, lend support to the hypothesis that in certain cases of shock there is increased impedance to flow of portal blood through the liver with resultant stasis in the portal-splanchnic bed and ischemichypoxic hepatocellular injury. PMID:4835964

  5. Preoperative portal vein embolization in liver cancer: indications, techniques and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Favelier, Sylvain; Chevallier, Olivier; Estivalet, Louis; Genson, Pierre-Yves; Pottecher, Pierre; Gehin, Sophie; Krausé, Denis; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative liver failure is a severe complication of major hepatectomies, in particular in patients with a chronic underlying liver disease. Portal vein embolization (PVE) is an approach that is gaining increasing acceptance in the preoperative treatment of selected patients prior to major hepatic resection. Induction of selective hypertrophy of the non-diseased portion of the liver with PVE in patients with either primary or secondary hepatobiliary, malignancy with small estimated future liver remnants (FLR) may result in fewer complications and shorter hospital stays following resection. Additionally, PVE performed in patients initially considered unsuitable for resection due to lack of sufficient remaining normal parenchyma may add to the pool of candidates for surgical treatment. A thorough knowledge of hepatic segmentation and portal venous anatomy is essential before performing PVE. In addition, the indications and contraindications for PVE, the methods for assessing hepatic lobar hypertrophy, the means of determining optimal timing of resection, and the possible complications of PVE need to be fully understood before undertaking the procedure. Technique may vary among operators, but cyanoacrylate glue seems to be the best embolic agent with the highest expected rate of liver regeneration for PVE. The procedure is usually indicated when the remnant liver accounts for less than 25-40% of the total liver volume. Compensatory hypertrophy of the non-embolized segments is maximal during the first 2 weeks and persists, although to a lesser extent during approximately 6 weeks. Liver resection is performed 2 to 6 weeks after embolization. The goal of this article is to discuss the rationale, indications, techniques and outcomes of PVE before major hepatectomy. PMID:26682142

  6. Preoperative Portal Vein Embolization Tailored to Prepare the Liver for Complex Resections: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Baere, T. de Robinson, J. M.; Deschamps, F.; Rao, P.; Teriitheau, C.; Goere, D.; Elias, D.

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) tailored to prepare the liver for complex and extended resections. During the past 5 years, 12 PVEs were performed in noncirrhotic patients with liver metastases from colon cancer (n = 10), choroidal melanoma (n = 1), and leiomyosarcoma (n = 1) to prepare complex anatomical liver resections in patients with small future remnant livers. These liver resections planned to preserve only segment IV in four patients, segments IV, V, and VIII in four patients, segments II, III, VI, and VII in three patients, and segments V and VI in one patient. PVE was performed under general anesthesia with a flow-guided injection of a mixture of cyanoacrylate and Lipiodol using a 5-Fr catheter. All portal branches feeding the liver segments to be resected were successfully embolized with cyanoacrylate except one, which was occluded with coils due to the risk of reflux with cyanoacrylate. After a mean of 32 days, CT volumetry revealed a mean hypertrophy of the unembolized liver of 47 {+-} 25% (range, 21-88%). Liver resections could be performed in 10 patients but were canceled in 2, due to the occurrence of a new hepatic tumor in one and an insufficiently increased volume in the other. Among the 10 patients who underwent the liver resection, 1 died of postoperative sepsis, 3 died 3 to 32 months after surgery, including 1 death unrelated to cancer, and 6 were alive after 6 to 36 months after surgery. In conclusion, in this preliminary report, PVE appears to be feasible and able to induce hypertrophy of the future remnant liver before a complex and extended hepatectomy. Further evaluation is needed in a larger cohort.

  7. Usefulness of portal vein pressure for predicting the effects of tolvaptan in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Ai; Atsukawa, Masanori; Tsubota, Akihito; Kondo, Chisa; Okubo, Tomomi; Arai, Taeang; Itokawa, Norio; Narahara, Yoshiyuki; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate influencing factors of treatment response, then tolvaptan has been approved in Japan for liquid retention. METHODS: We herein conducted this study to clarify the influencing factors in 40 patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis complicated by liquid retention. Tolvaptan was administered at a dosage of 7.5 mg once a day for patients with conventional diuretic-resistant hepatic edema for 7 d. At the initiation of tolvaptan, the estimated hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) value which was estimated portal vein pressure was measured using hepatic venous catheterization. We analyzed the effects of tolvaptan and influencing factors associated with treatment response. RESULTS: Subjects comprised patients with a median age of 65 (range, 40-82) years. According to the Child-Pugh classification, class A was 3 patients, class B was 19, and class C was 18. Changes from the baseline in body weight were -1.0 kg (P = 2.04 × 10-6) and -1.3 kg (P = 1.83 × 10-5), respectively. The median HVPG value was 240 (range, 105-580) mmH2O. HVPG was only significant influencing factor of the weight loss effect. When patients with body weight loss of 2 kg or greater from the baseline was defined as responders, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the optimal HVPG cutoff value was 190 mmH2O in predicting treatment response. The response rate was 87.5% (7/8) in patients with HVPG of 190 mmH2O or less, whereas it was only 12.5% (2/16) in those with HVPG of greater than 190 mmH2O (P = 7.46 × 10-4). We compared each characteristics factors between responders and non-responders. As a result, HVPG (P = 0.045) and serum hyaluronic acid (P = 0.017) were detected as useful factors. CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that tolvaptan in the treatment of liquid retention could be more effective for patients with lower portal vein pressure. PMID:27275103

  8. Vascular resection in pancreatic adenocarcinoma with portal or superior mesenteric vein invasion

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Gang; Xie, Kun-Lin; Wu, Hong

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate long-term survival after the Whipple operation with superior mesenteric vein/portal vein resection (SMV/PVR) in relation to resection length. METHODS: We evaluated 118 patients who underwent the Whipple operation for pancreatic adenocarcinoma at our Department of Hepatobiliary Pancreatic Surgery between 2005 and 2010. Fifty-eight of these patients were diagnosed with microscopic PV/SMV invasion by frozen-section examination and underwent SMV/PVR. In 28 patients, the length of SMV/PVR was ≤ 3 cm. In the other 30 patients, the length of SMV/PVR was > 3 cm. Clinical and survival data were analyzed. RESULTS: SMV/PVR was performed successfully in 58 patients. There was a significant difference between the two groups (SMV/PVR ≤ 3 cm and SMV/PVR > 3 cm) in terms of the mean survival time (18 mo vs 11 mo) and the overall 1- and 3-year survival rates (67.9% and 14.3% vs 41.3% and 5.7%, P < 0.02). However, there was no significant difference in age (64 years vs 58 years, P = 0.06), operative time (435 min vs 477 min, P = 0.063), blood loss (300 mL vs 383 mL, P = 0.071) and transfusion volume (85.7 mL vs 166.7 mL, P = 0.084) between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Patients who underwent the Whipple operation with SMV/PVR ≤ 3 cm had better long-term survival than those with > 3 cm resection. PMID:24379594

  9. Interobserver Variability in Target Definition for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With and Without Portal Vein Thrombus: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Theodore S.; Bosch, Walter R.; Krishnan, Sunil; Kim, Tae K.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Shyn, Paul; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Seong, Jinsil; Haddock, Michael G.; Cheng, Jason C.; Feng, Mary U.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Roberge, David; Crane, Christopher; Dawson, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Defining hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gross tumor volume (GTV) requires multimodal imaging, acquired in different perfusion phases. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the variability in contouring and to establish guidelines and educational recommendations for reproducible HCC contouring for treatment planning. Methods and Materials Anonymous, multiphasic planning computed tomography scans obtained from 3 patients with HCC were identified and distributed to a panel of 11 gastrointestinal radiation oncologists. Panelists were asked the number of HCC cases they treated in the past year. Case 1 had no vascular involvement, case 2 had extensive portal vein involvement, and case 3 had minor branched portal vein involvement. The agreement between the contoured total GTVs (primary + vascular GTV) was assessed using the generalized kappa statistic. Agreement interpretation was evaluated using Landis and Koch’s interpretation of strength of agreement. The S95 contour, defined using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm consensus at the 95% confidence level, was created for each case. Results Of the 11 panelists, 3 had treated >25 cases in the past year, 2 had treated 10 to 25 cases, 2 had treated 5 to 10 cases, 2 had treated 1 to 5 cases, 1 had treated 0 cases, and 1 did not respond. Near perfect agreement was seen for case 1, and substantial agreement was seen for cases 2 and 3. For case 2, there was significant heterogeneity in the volume identified as tumor thrombus (range 0.58–40.45 cc). For case 3, 2 panelists did not include the branched portal vein thrombus, and 7 panelists contoured thrombus separately from the primary tumor, also showing significant heterogeneity in volume of tumor thrombus (range 4.52–34.27 cc). Conclusions In a group of experts, excellent agreement was seen in contouring total GTV. Heterogeneity exists in the definition of portal vein thrombus that may impact treatment planning

  10. Detection of fumarate-glutathione adducts in the portal vein blood of rats: evidence for rapid dimethylfumarate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dibbert, Stefan; Clement, Bernd; Skak-Nielsen, Tine; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Rostami-Yazdi, Martin

    2013-07-01

    Dimethylfumarate (DMF), the essential ingredient of the drug product Fumaderm®, is used to treat psoriasis with a recognized favorable long-term safety profile. Interestingly, the mode of action and the pharmacokinetics of DMF in psoriasis or multiple sclerosis are not fully explored. It is known that DMF as an α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acid ester forms an adduct with the antioxidant glutathione in vitro via a Michael-type addition within a very short period of time. In addition, it was shown that this reaction also takes place in vivo since the mercapturic acid of DMF was detected in urine of psoriasis patients after oral intake of Fumaderm®. To verify the hypothesis that DMF reacts with GSH already in or even before entering the portal vein blood an in vivo study in rats was initiated and portal vein blood was analyzed for the presence of DMF, MMF, GS-DMS and break down products, after DMF was given directly into the small intestine. The results show that no free DMF could be detected in the rat portal vein blood at any time point. MMF was the dominant metabolite and GS-DMS was also detectable in portal vein blood. In the rat mucosa the glutathione adducts of DMF and MMF were present. The data obtained provide evidence that the modulation of immune-mediated inflammatory pathways responsible for development of psoriasis and MS are targeted by DMF regulating redox-sensitive pathways for which the reaction with glutathione by DMF plays a crucial role. PMID:23525570

  11. Significant cohort of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease with portal vein thrombosis in transplant waiting list

    PubMed Central

    Basaranoglu, Metin; Najjar, Sonia M; Demirbag, Ali Ebag; Senturk, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To characterize non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) presentation with esophageal varices. METHODS: We carried out a retrospective cohort study on 258 patients with esophageal varices at a single tertiary referral center. These patients underwent diagnosis of several liver diseases, including: NAFLD-associated cirrhosis, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, Wilson disease, autoimune liver diseases, and others. RESULTS: Of the 258 patients, 39% of patients exhibited esophageal varices due to NAFLD-associated cirrhosis. Of the 38 (14.7%) patients developed hepatocellular carcinoma during follow-up, 52% were due to hepatitis B, 26% due to hepatitis C and 13.2% due to NAFLD. Of the 258 patients, 50.0% with NAFLD, 33.3% with hepatitis B, 26.3% with hepatitis C, and 58.3% with other diseases were alive at the end of the 5-year period with a significant difference according to the Kaplan-Meier log Rank test (P = 0.040). Portal vein thrombosis was detected in 47.5% of patients with NAFLD, in 29% of patients with hepatitis B, in 17% of patients with hepatitis C, and in 62% of patients with other related diseases (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Our study showed a proportionally greater elevation in liver transplant candidacy in patients with NAFLD and portal vein thrombosis. Older patients were more prone to developing cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and a high mortality rate. However, younger patients exhibited more portal vein thrombosis and gastric varices. PMID:26981175

  12. Postoperative portal vein thrombosis and gastric hemorrhage associated with late-onset hemorrhage from the common hepatic artery after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Watanobe, Ikuo; Ito, Yuzuru; Akimoto, Eigo; Sekine, Yuuki; Haruyama, Yurie; Amemiya, Kota; Miyano, Shozo; Kosaka, Taijiro; Machida, Michio; Kitabatake, Toshiaki; Kojima, Kuniaki

    2016-02-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare but serious postoperative complication of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). We reported a case of late-onset postoperative PVT with hemorrhage from the common hepatic artery (CHA) in a 73-year-old man who underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD) for duodenum papilla cancer, followed by reconstruction using the modified Child's technique. The pancreaticojejunostomy was achieved by end-to-side, 2-layer invagination anastomosis without pancreatic duct stenting. Drain removal and hospital discharge were scheduled on postoperative day (POD) 18, but blood-stained fluid in the drain and sudden hematemesis were noted. Emergency surgery was performed because PVT and imaging findings were suggestive of necrosis of the lifted jejunum. Although no jejunal necrosis was identified during surgery, bleeding from the side of the CHA was detected and the bleeding point was suture-closed to achieve hemostasis. We suspected late-onset postoperative arterial hemorrhage and subsequent hematoma formation, which caused portal vein compression and PVT formation. We chose a conservative treatment strategy for PVT, taking into account the operation time, intraoperative vital signs and blood flow in the portal vein. Despite the complicated postoperative course, he was discharged home in a fully ambulatory state on POD 167. PMID:26925150

  13. Postoperative portal vein thrombosis and gastric hemorrhage associated with late-onset hemorrhage from the common hepatic artery after pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yuzuru; Akimoto, Eigo; Sekine, Yuuki; Haruyama, Yurie; Amemiya, Kota; Miyano, Shozo; Kosaka, Taijiro; Machida, Michio; Kitabatake, Toshiaki; Kojima, Kuniaki

    2016-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare but serious postoperative complication of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). We reported a case of late-onset postoperative PVT with hemorrhage from the common hepatic artery (CHA) in a 73-year-old man who underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD) for duodenum papilla cancer, followed by reconstruction using the modified Child's technique. The pancreaticojejunostomy was achieved by end-to-side, 2-layer invagination anastomosis without pancreatic duct stenting. Drain removal and hospital discharge were scheduled on postoperative day (POD) 18, but blood-stained fluid in the drain and sudden hematemesis were noted. Emergency surgery was performed because PVT and imaging findings were suggestive of necrosis of the lifted jejunum. Although no jejunal necrosis was identified during surgery, bleeding from the side of the CHA was detected and the bleeding point was suture-closed to achieve hemostasis. We suspected late-onset postoperative arterial hemorrhage and subsequent hematoma formation, which caused portal vein compression and PVT formation. We chose a conservative treatment strategy for PVT, taking into account the operation time, intraoperative vital signs and blood flow in the portal vein. Despite the complicated postoperative course, he was discharged home in a fully ambulatory state on POD 167. PMID:26925150

  14. Radiotherapy as valid modality for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Hee Chul

    2016-01-01

    Although the current standard treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is sorafenib, many previous studies have established the need for a reliable local modality for PVTT control, which is a major cause of liver function deterioration and metastasis. Additionally, there is growing evidence for the prognostic significance of PVTT classification according to the location of tumor thrombosis. Favorable outcomes can be obtained by applying local modalities, including surgery or transarterial chemoembolization, especially in second-order or distal branch PVTT. Rapid control of PVTT could maintain or improve liver function and reduce intrahepatic as well as distant metastasis. Radiotherapy (RT) is one of the main locoregional treatment modalities in oncologic fields, but has rarely been used in HCC because of concerns regarding hepatic toxicity. However, with the development of advanced techniques, RT has been increasingly applied in HCC management. Randomized studies have yet to definitively prove the benefit of RT, but several comparative studies have justified the application of RT in HCC. The value of RT is especially noticeable in HCC with PVTT; several prospective and retrospective studies have reported favorable outcomes, including a 40% to 60% objective response rate and median overall survival of 15 mo to 20 mo in responders. In this review, we evaluate the role of RT as an alternative local modality in HCC with PVTT. PMID:27570422

  15. Resveratrol Reduces the Incidence of Portal Vein System Thrombosis after Splenectomy in a Rat Fibrosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Meng; Xue, Wanli; Ma, Zhenhua; Bai, Jigang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the preventive effect of resveratrol (RES) on the formation of portal vein system thrombosis (PVST) in a rat fibrosis model. Methods. A total of 64 male SD rats, weighing 200–300 g, were divided into five groups: Sham operation, Splenectomy I, Splenectomy II, RES, and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), with the former two groups as nonfibrosis controls. Blood samples were subjected to biochemical assays. Platelet apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry. All rats were euthanized for PVST detection one week after operation. Results. No PVST occurred in nonfibrosis controls. Compared to Splenectomy II, the incidences of PVST in RES and LMWH groups were significantly decreased (both p < 0.05). Two rats in LMWH group died before euthanasia due to intra-abdominal hemorrhage. In RES group, significant decreases in platelet aggregation, platelet radical oxygen species (ROS) production, and increase in platelet nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and platelet apoptosis were observed when compared with Splenectomy II (all p < 0.001), while in LMWH group only significant decrease in platelet aggregation was observed. Conclusion. Prophylactic application of RES could safely reduce the incidence of PVST after splenectomy in cirrhotic rat. Regulation of platelet function and induction of platelet apoptosis might be the underlying mechanisms. PMID:27433290

  16. Portal vein embolization effect on colorectal cancer liver metastasis progression: Lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sharif, Eman; Simoneau, Eve; Hassanain, Mazen

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM) is the major cause of death in patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. The gold standard treatment of CRLM is surgical resection. Yet, in the past, more than half of these patients were deemed unresectable due to the inadequate future liver remnant (FLR). The introduction of efficient portal vein embolization (PVE) preoperatively allowed more resections of metastasis in CRLM patients by stimulating adequate liver hypertrophy. However, several experimental and clinical studies reported tumor progression after PVE which critically influences the subsequent management of these patients. The underlying pathophysiological mechanism of tumor progression post-PVE is still not fully understood. In spite of the adverse effects of PVE, it remains a potentially curative procedure in patients who would remain otherwise unresectable because of the insufficient FLR. Currently, the challenge is to halt tumor proliferation following PVE in patients who require this technique. This could potentially be achieved by either attempting to suppress the underlying oncologic stimulus or by inhibiting tumor growth once observed after PVE, without jeopardizing liver regeneration. More research is still required to better identify patients at risk of experiencing tumor growth post-PVE. PMID:26468450

  17. [A case of surgical resection for liver metastasis of gastric cancer with portal vein tumor thrombus].

    PubMed

    Hata, Tomoki; Wada, Hiroshi; Tomimaru, Yoshito; Tomokuni, Akira; Hama, Naoki; Kawamoto, Koichi; Kobayashi, Shogo; Asaoka, Tadafumi; Marubashi, Shigeru; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Umeshita, Koji; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro; Nagano, Hiroaki

    2014-11-01

    A 58-year-old man presented with anorexia and weight loss in April 2010. Endoscopic examination revealed a type 3 tumor extending from the gastric cardia to the antrum. Preoperative imaging showed liver metastasis (S8; 2 cm) and direct invasion of the cancer into the pancreas. We administered 4 courses of chemotherapy (DCS) for the unresectable tumor; the impact of the therapy was partial response (PR). We performed total gastrectomy, D2 dissection, splenectomy, distal pancreatectomy, and partial hepatectomy (S8) in April 2011. The patient was treated with 8 courses of adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1. In April 2012, abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a solitary recurrent lesion in the liver (S2). After 7 courses of chemotherapy(weekly paclitaxel), abdominal CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a tumor thrombus in the portal vein extending from P2 to the umbilical portion (UP). We performed left hepatectomy and cholecystectomy due to the absence of new lesions. Histopathological findings revealed that the poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma had metastasized to the liver. Abdominal CT revealed the presence of multiple recurrent metastases in the liver, 4 months after the surgery. The patient died 27 months after the initial surgery and 7 months after the last operation. PMID:25731448

  18. Radiotherapy as valid modality for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Hee Chul

    2016-08-14

    Although the current standard treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is sorafenib, many previous studies have established the need for a reliable local modality for PVTT control, which is a major cause of liver function deterioration and metastasis. Additionally, there is growing evidence for the prognostic significance of PVTT classification according to the location of tumor thrombosis. Favorable outcomes can be obtained by applying local modalities, including surgery or transarterial chemoembolization, especially in second-order or distal branch PVTT. Rapid control of PVTT could maintain or improve liver function and reduce intrahepatic as well as distant metastasis. Radiotherapy (RT) is one of the main locoregional treatment modalities in oncologic fields, but has rarely been used in HCC because of concerns regarding hepatic toxicity. However, with the development of advanced techniques, RT has been increasingly applied in HCC management. Randomized studies have yet to definitively prove the benefit of RT, but several comparative studies have justified the application of RT in HCC. The value of RT is especially noticeable in HCC with PVTT; several prospective and retrospective studies have reported favorable outcomes, including a 40% to 60% objective response rate and median overall survival of 15 mo to 20 mo in responders. In this review, we evaluate the role of RT as an alternative local modality in HCC with PVTT. PMID:27570422

  19. Therapeutic and clinical aspects of portal vein thrombosis in patients with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Primignani, Massimo; Tosetti, Giulia; La Mura, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a frequent complication in cirrhosis, particularly in advanced stages of the disease. As for general venous thromboembolism, risk factors for PVT are slow blood flow, vessel wall damage and hypercoagulability, all features of advanced cirrhosis. Actually, the old dogma of a hemorrhagic tendency in cirrhosis has been challenged by new laboratory tools and the clinical evidence that venous thrombosis also occurs in cirrhosis. The impaired hepatic synthesis of both pro- and anticoagulants leads to a rebalanced hemostasis, more liable to be tipped towards thrombosis or even bleeding. Conventional anticoagulant drugs (low molecular weight heparin or vitamin K antagonists) may be used in cirrhosis patients with PVT, particularly in those eligible for liver transplantation, to prevent thrombosis progression thus permitting/facilitating liver transplant. However, several doubts exist on the level of anticoagulation achieved as estimated by coagulation tests, on the efficacy of treatment monitoring and on the correct timing for discontinuation in non-transplant candidates, while in transplant candidates there is expert consensus on continuing anticoagulation until transplantation. The recent introduction of direct acting oral anticoagulant drugs (DOACs) in other clinical settings generates much interest on their possible application in patients with cirrhosis and PVT. However, DOACs were not evaluated yet in patients with liver disease and cannot be recommended for the present time. PMID:26689354

  20. Resveratrol Reduces the Incidence of Portal Vein System Thrombosis after Splenectomy in a Rat Fibrosis Model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Xue, Wanli; Ma, Zhenhua; Bai, Jigang; Wu, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the preventive effect of resveratrol (RES) on the formation of portal vein system thrombosis (PVST) in a rat fibrosis model. Methods. A total of 64 male SD rats, weighing 200-300 g, were divided into five groups: Sham operation, Splenectomy I, Splenectomy II, RES, and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), with the former two groups as nonfibrosis controls. Blood samples were subjected to biochemical assays. Platelet apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry. All rats were euthanized for PVST detection one week after operation. Results. No PVST occurred in nonfibrosis controls. Compared to Splenectomy II, the incidences of PVST in RES and LMWH groups were significantly decreased (both p < 0.05). Two rats in LMWH group died before euthanasia due to intra-abdominal hemorrhage. In RES group, significant decreases in platelet aggregation, platelet radical oxygen species (ROS) production, and increase in platelet nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and platelet apoptosis were observed when compared with Splenectomy II (all p < 0.001), while in LMWH group only significant decrease in platelet aggregation was observed. Conclusion. Prophylactic application of RES could safely reduce the incidence of PVST after splenectomy in cirrhotic rat. Regulation of platelet function and induction of platelet apoptosis might be the underlying mechanisms. PMID:27433290

  1. Pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis is an independent risk factor for graft loss due to hepatic artery thrombosis in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Stine, Jonathan G.; Pelletier, Shawn J.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Porte, Robert J.; Northup, Patrick G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatic artery thrombosis is an uncommon but catastrophic complication following liver transplantation. We hypothesize that recipients with portal vein thrombosis are at increased risk. Methods Data on all liver transplants in the U.S. during the MELD era through September 2014 were obtained from UNOS. Status one, multivisceral, living donor, re-transplants, pediatric recipients and donation after cardiac death were excluded. Logistic regression models were constructed for hepatic artery thrombosis with resultant graft loss within 90 days of transplantation. Results 63,182 recipients underwent transplantation; 662 (1.1%) recipients had early hepatic artery thrombosis; of those, 91 (13.8%) had pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis, versus 7.5% with portal vein thrombosis but no hepatic artery thrombosis (p < 0.0001). Portal vein thrombosis was associated with an increased independent risk of hepatic artery thrombosis (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.71–2.76, p < 0.001) as was donor risk index (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.65–2.48, p < 0.001). Heparin use at cross clamp, INR, and male donors were all significantly associated with lower risk. Discussion Pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis is associated with post-transplant hepatic artery thrombosis independent of other factors. Recipients with portal vein thrombosis might benefit from aggressive coagulation management and careful donor selection. More research is needed to determine causal mechanism. PMID:27017168

  2. Ovarian Vein Thrombosis Presenting as Acute Abdomen in Puerperium

    PubMed Central

    Mannini, Luca; Aldinucci, Martina; Ghizzoni, Viola; Fambrini, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Postpartum Ovarian Vein Thrombosis (POVT) is a rare, but serious condition that causes slow quadrant pain in the postpartum period. POVT must be considered in the differential diagnosis of postpartum acute abdomen. We hereby report a case on a 36-year-old Italian woman who developed an acute abdomen a week after spontaneous vaginal delivery. She had persistent fever and constipation. Diagnosis of POVT was made with an abdominal Computed Tomography (CT) and treatment with heparin and broad-spectrum antibiotics were started. After 72 hours, the patient was switched from low molecular weight heparin to oral anticoagulant treatment. After 5 months a complete recanalization was demonstrated by abdomen CT and the treatment was stopped 6 months after diagnosis. POVT is a diagnosis of exclusion in the puerperium. This case illustrated that POVT may also occur in low risk patient. PMID:27042537

  3. Peripheral portal vein-oriented non-dilated bile duct puncture for percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Hiroaki; Kato, Atsushi; Takayashiki, Tsukasa; Kuboki, Satoshi; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Furukawa, Katsunori; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of peripheral portal vein (PV)-oriented non-dilated bile duct (BD) puncture for percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). METHODS: Thirty-five patients with non-dilated BDs underwent PTBD for the management of various biliary disorders, including benign bilioenteric anastomotic stricture (n = 24), BD stricture (n = 5) associated with iatrogenic BD injury, and postoperative biliary leakage (n = 6). Under ultrasonographic guidance, percutaneous transhepatic puncture using a 21-G needle was performed along the running course of the peripheral targeted non-dilated BD (preferably B6 for right-sided approach, and B3 for left-sided approach) or along the accompanying PV when the BD was not well visualized. This technique could provide an appropriate insertion angle of less than 30° between the puncture needle and BD running course. The puncture needle was then advanced slightly beyond the accompanying PV. The needle tip was moved slightly backward while injecting a small amount of contrast agent to obtain the BD image, followed by insertion of a 0.018-inch guide wire (GW). A drainage catheter was then placed using a two-step GW method. RESULTS: PTBD was successful in 33 (94.3%) of the 35 patients with non-dilated intrahepatic BDs. A right-sided approach was performed in 25 cases, while a left-sided approach was performed in 10 cases. In 31 patients, the first PTBD attempt proved successful. Four cases required a second attempt a few days later to place a drainage catheter. PTBD was successful in two cases, but the second attempt also failed in the other two cases, probably due to poor breath-holding ability. Although most patients (n = 26) had been experiencing cholangitis with fever (including septic condition in 8 cases) before PTBD, only 5 (14.3%) patients encountered PTBD procedure-related complications, such as transient hemobilia and cholangitis. No major complications such as bilioarterial fistula or portal thrombosis were

  4. Is Post-TIPS Anticoagulation Therapy Necessary in Patients with Cirrhosis and Portal Vein Thrombosis? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Jiang, Ming-Shan; Zhang, Hai-Long; Weng, Ning-Na; Luo, Xue-Feng; Li, Xiao; Yang, Li

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To determine whether posttransjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement anticoagulation therapy could benefit patients with cirrhosis and portal vein thrombosis (PVT) from the perspective of a change in portal vein patency status and clinical outcomes. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from each patient. From October 2012 to February 2014, patients with cirrhosis and PVT who underwent TIPS placement were randomly assigned to the anticoagulation therapy or control group. All patients were followed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the TIPS procedure. Outcome measures were a change of portal vein patency status and clinical measures including gastrointestinal rebleeding, shunt dysfunction, hepatic encephalopathy, and survival. Student t test, χ(2) test, Fisher exact test, Mann-Whitney U test, and logistical regression were applied where appropriate. Results A total of 64 patients were enrolled in the study, with 31 allocated to the anticoagulation group and 33 allocated to the control group. Overall, thrombi were improved in 61 patients (96.8%) after the procedure. PVT recanalization (ie, complete disappearance; reconstruction of cavernous transformation) was achieved in 26 patients (83.9%) in the anticoagulation therapy group and in 23 (71.8%) patients in tthe control group (P = .252). The presence of a superior mesenteric vein thrombus may help predict recanalization failure (unadjusted relative risk = 0.243; 95% confidence interval: 0.070, 0.843; P = .026). Clinical outcomes were also similar between the two groups. Conclusion Anticoagulation therapy may not be necessary in certain patients with PVT because TIPS placement alone can achieve a high persistent recanalization rate. (©) RSNA, 2015. PMID:26653681

  5. Conjoined unification venoplasty for triple portal vein branches of right liver graft: a case report and technical refinement

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jae Hyun; Song, Gi-Won; Moon, Deok-Bog; Park, Gil-Chun; Kim, Seok-Hwan; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous portal vein (PV) branching of the donor liver is uncommon and usually makes two, or rarely, more separate PV branches at the right liver graft. Autologous PV Y-graft interposition has long been regarded as the standard procedure, but is currently replaced with the newly developed technique of conjoined unification venoplasty (CUV) due to its superior results. Herein, we presented a case of CUV application to three PV openings of a right liver graft. The recipient was a 32-year-old male patient with hepatitis B virus-associated liver cirrhosis. The living liver donor was his 33-year-old sister who had a type III PV anomaly, but the right posterior PV branch was bifurcated early into separate branches of the segments VI and VII, thus three right liver PV branches were cut separately. We used the CUV technique consisting of placement of a small vein unification patch between three PV orifices, followed by overlying coverage with a crotch-opened autologous portal Y-graft. The portal Y-graft was excised and its crotches were incised to make a wide common orifice. Three bidirectional running sutures were required to attach the crotch-opened autologous portal Y-graft. After portal reperfusion, the conjoined PV portion bulged like a tennis ball, providing a wide range of alignment tolerance. The patient recovered uneventfully from the liver transplantation operation. The CUV technique enabled uneventful reconstruction of triple donor PV orifices. Thus, CUV can be a useful and effective technical option for reconstruction of right liver grafts with various anomalous PVs. PMID:27212992

  6. Conjoined unification venoplasty for triple portal vein branches of right liver graft: a case report and technical refinement.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jae Hyun; Hwang, Shin; Song, Gi-Won; Moon, Deok-Bog; Park, Gil-Chun; Kim, Seok-Hwan; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-05-01

    Anomalous portal vein (PV) branching of the donor liver is uncommon and usually makes two, or rarely, more separate PV branches at the right liver graft. Autologous PV Y-graft interposition has long been regarded as the standard procedure, but is currently replaced with the newly developed technique of conjoined unification venoplasty (CUV) due to its superior results. Herein, we presented a case of CUV application to three PV openings of a right liver graft. The recipient was a 32-year-old male patient with hepatitis B virus-associated liver cirrhosis. The living liver donor was his 33-year-old sister who had a type III PV anomaly, but the right posterior PV branch was bifurcated early into separate branches of the segments VI and VII, thus three right liver PV branches were cut separately. We used the CUV technique consisting of placement of a small vein unification patch between three PV orifices, followed by overlying coverage with a crotch-opened autologous portal Y-graft. The portal Y-graft was excised and its crotches were incised to make a wide common orifice. Three bidirectional running sutures were required to attach the crotch-opened autologous portal Y-graft. After portal reperfusion, the conjoined PV portion bulged like a tennis ball, providing a wide range of alignment tolerance. The patient recovered uneventfully from the liver transplantation operation. The CUV technique enabled uneventful reconstruction of triple donor PV orifices. Thus, CUV can be a useful and effective technical option for reconstruction of right liver grafts with various anomalous PVs. PMID:27212992

  7. Stereotactic body radiotherapy combined with transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    KANG, JINGBO; NIE, QING; DU, RUI; ZHANG, LIPING; ZHANG, JUN; LI, QILIANG; LI, JIANGUO; QI, WENJIE

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy, toxicity and adverse effects of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) combined with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). A total of 101 patients diagnosed with primary HCC with PVTT were enrolled in this study and were randomly divided into three groups as follows: group A, 34 patients treated with γ-SBRT followed by TACE; group B, 37 patients treated with TACE followed by γ-SBRT; and group C, 30 patients treated with γ-SBRT alone. The effective response rate for the entire patient sample was 87.1% (88/101) following a 3-month treatment. The differences in the response rate, survival rate, α-fetoprotein level restoration rate and rate of improvement of abdominal distention and discomfort between groups A and B were not statistically significant (P>0.05). However, the rates of groups A and B were higher compared to those of group C (P<0.05). The exacerbation rate of liver function in group A was lower compared to that in group B (P<0.05), although it exhibited no statistically significant difference from that in group C (P>0.05). No severe radiation-related complications were reported during the follow-up period. The combination of γ-SBRT and TACE was shown to be a relatively effective local treatment for primary HCC patients with PVTT. Compared to γ-SBRT followed by TACE and γ-SBRT alone, TACE followed by γ-SBRT may exert a negative effect on liver function. These results suggested that the combination of TACE and γ-SBRT may be considered a relatively effective, safe and feasible treatment method for primary HCC patients with PVTT, although TACE followed by γ-SBRT may negatively affect liver function. PMID:24649306

  8. Use Of Yttrium-90 Microspheres In Patients With Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma & Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Andrea L.; Burke, Charles T.; Kennedy, Andrew S.; Moore, Dominic T.; Mauro, Matthew A.; Dixon, Robert D.; Stavas, Joseph M.; Bernard, Stephen A.; Khandani, Amir H.; O'Neil, Bert H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Patients with portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have limited treatment options due to increased disease burden and diminished hepatic perfusion. 90Y-microspheres may be better tolerated than chemoembolization in these patients. Here we review the safety and efficacy of 90Y-microsphere use for HCC with major PVT. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of HCC with main (n=10) or first (n=12) branch PVT treated with 90Y-microspheres (n=22) was conducted. CLIP scores ranged from 2 to 5 with 18% scoring 4 or greater. Response was determined 8-12 weeks following treatment using magnetic resonance or computed tomography and RECIST criteria. Overall survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results 32 treatments (26 glass, 6 resin) were administered to 22 patients. Common grade 1–2 toxicities included abdominal pain (38%), nausea (28%), fatigue (22%). Four post-therapy hospitalizations occurred, all <48hrs in duration. 1 death occurred 10 days following therapy Response data: 2 partial responses, progressive disease 42%, stable disease 50% of treatments. Median overall survival (OS) was 7 months from time of initial 90Y-microsphere treatment. Child-Pugh A patients had a median OS of 7.7 months; B and C = 2.7 months (p = 0.01). Median OS for CLIP scores 2–3 was 7 months versus 1.3 months for scores 4–5 (p = 0.04). Conclusions 90Y-microspheres are tolerated in patients with HCC and major PVT. Compared with chemoembolization, rates of severe adverse events appear low. Radiographic response rates are low. Median OS of 7 months is promising and warrants further study versus systemic therapy. PMID:20691606

  9. Clinical outcome comparison between TIPS and EBL in patients with cirrhosis and portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Zhao, He; Wang, Xiaoze; Zhang, Hailong; Jiang, Mingshan; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Luo, Xuefeng; Yang, Li; Li, Xiao

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the clinical outcomes of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) and endoscopic band ligation (EBL) in patients with cirrhosis and portal vein thrombosis (PVT). We retrospectively reviewed the January to September 2010 data from our database and included 25 patients with cirrhosis and PVT who underwent successful TIPS creation. We selected another 25 patients who underwent EBL matching for age, sex, and Child-Pugh-Turcotte class. The outcome measures included changes in the PVT status before and after the treatments, the rebleeding rate, and the overall survival. The mean follow-up was 25.1 ± 8.7 months in the EBL group and 25.6 ± 8.5 months in the TIPS group (P = 0.85). After treatments, the PVT severity improved in 40% and worsened in 25% of patients who did not undergo TIPS, compared with 87% and none of the patients who underwent TIPS (P < 0.001). Previous splenectomy (OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.02-0.76, P = 0.024) and patency status of TIPS (OR 20.8, 95% CI 3.0-141.8, P = 0.002) were the independent factors associated with PVT disappearance. The 1- and 2-year rebleeding rates were, respectively, 44.6% and 59.0% in the EBL group, and 12.5% and 25.2% in the TIPS group (P = 0.002). The 1- and 2-year survival rates were, respectively, 95.7% and 85.2% in the EBL group, and 96% and 78.7% in the TIPS group (P = 0.203). The MELD score was the only independent predictive factor for survival (HR 1.73, 95% CI 1.27-2.37, P = 0.001). Compared with EBL, TIPS contributed to PVT improvement and reduced the risk of rebleeding without providing a survival benefit for patients with PVT. PMID:25504374

  10. Radiotherapy Plus Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Invading the Portal Vein: Long-Term Patient Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sang Min; Lim, Young-Suk; Won, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jong Hoon; Kim, Kang Mo; Lee, Han Chu; Chung, Young-Hwa; Lee, Yung Sang; Lee, Sung Gyu; Park, Jin-hong; Suh, Dong Jin

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have evaluated the clinical outcomes of patients after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). Methods and Materials: A registry database of 412 patients treated with TACE and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for HCC with PVTT between August 2002 and August 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. The radiotherapy volume included the PVTT, with a 2- to 3-cm margin to cover adjacent HCC. Intrahepatic primary HCC was managed by TACE before or after radiotherapy. Results: Median patient age was 52 years old, and 88.1% of patients were male. Main or bilateral PVTT was observed in 200 (48.5%) patients. Median radiation dose was 40 Gy (range, 21-60 Gy) delivered in 2- to 5-Gy fractions. We found that 3.6% of patients achieved a complete response and that 24.3% of patients achieved a partial response. The response and progression-free rates of PVTT were 39.6% and 85.6%, respectively. Median patient survival was 10.6 months, and the 1- and 2-year survival rates were 42.5% and 22.8%, respectively. Significant independent variables associated with overall survival included advanced tumor stage, alpha-fetoprotein level, degree of PVTT, and response to radiotherapy. Forty-one patients (10.0%) showed grade 3-4 hepatic toxicity during or 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. Grades 2-3 gastroduodenal complications were observed in 15 patients (3.6%). Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for PVTT in patients with HCC. These results suggested that the combination of TACE and radiotherapy is a treatment option for relieving and/or stabilizing PVTT in patients with advanced HCC.

  11. Occlusion of a hepatic artery to portal vein fistula with Bucrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Kerlan, R.K. Jr.; Hoddick, W.K.; Pogany, A.C.; Bank, W.O.; Sollenberger, R.D.

    1983-08-01

    A 49-year-old woman with cirrhosis and portal hypertension was evaluated for a portal-systemic shunt procedure following recurrent variceal hemorrhage. The preoperative visceral angiogram demonstrated a hepatic arterial to portal venous fistula, presumably a complication of a previous liver biopsy. The fistula was successfully closed using isobutyl-2-cyanoacrylate (Bucrylate) delivered through a flow-directed, calibrated-leak balloon microcatheter.

  12. Living Donor Liver Transplantation for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis after Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Han, Dai Hoon; Joo, Dong Jin; Kim, Myoung Soo; Choi, Gi Hong; Choi, Jin Sub; Park, Young Nyun; Seong, Jinsil; Han, Kwang Hyub; Kim, Soon Il

    2016-09-01

    Locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein thrombosis carries a 1-year survival rate <10%. Localized concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), followed by hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC), was recently introduced in this setting. Here, we report our early experience with living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in such patients after successful down-staging of HCC through CCRT and HAIC. Between December 2011 and September 2012, eight patients with locally advanced HCC at initial diagnosis were given CCRT, followed by HAIC, and underwent LDLT at the Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea. CCRT [45 Gy over 5 weeks with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as HAIC] was followed by HAIC (5-FU/cisplatin combination every 4 weeks for 3-12 months), adjusted for tumor response. Down-staging succeeded in all eight patients, leaving no viable tumor thrombi in major vessels, although three patients first underwent hepatic resections. Due to deteriorating liver function, transplantation was the sole therapeutic option and offered a chance for cure. The 1-year disease-free survival rate was 87.5%. There were three instances of post-transplantation tumor recurrence during follow-up monitoring (median, 17 months; range, 10-22 months), but no deaths occurred. Median survival time from initial diagnosis was 33 months. Four postoperative complications recorded in three patients (anastomotic strictures: portal vein, 2; bile duct, 2) were resolved through radiologic interventions. Using an intensive tumor down-staging protocol of CCRT followed by HAIC, LDLT may be a therapeutic option for selected patients with locally advanced HCC and portal vein tumor thrombosis. PMID:27401662

  13. Living Donor Liver Transplantation for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis after Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dai Hoon; Joo, Dong Jin; Kim, Myoung Soo; Choi, Gi Hong; Choi, Jin Sub; Park, Young Nyun; Seong, Jinsil

    2016-01-01

    Locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein thrombosis carries a 1-year survival rate <10%. Localized concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), followed by hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC), was recently introduced in this setting. Here, we report our early experience with living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in such patients after successful down-staging of HCC through CCRT and HAIC. Between December 2011 and September 2012, eight patients with locally advanced HCC at initial diagnosis were given CCRT, followed by HAIC, and underwent LDLT at the Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea. CCRT [45 Gy over 5 weeks with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as HAIC] was followed by HAIC (5-FU/cisplatin combination every 4 weeks for 3–12 months), adjusted for tumor response. Down-staging succeeded in all eight patients, leaving no viable tumor thrombi in major vessels, although three patients first underwent hepatic resections. Due to deteriorating liver function, transplantation was the sole therapeutic option and offered a chance for cure. The 1-year disease-free survival rate was 87.5%. There were three instances of post-transplantation tumor recurrence during follow-up monitoring (median, 17 months; range, 10–22 months), but no deaths occurred. Median survival time from initial diagnosis was 33 months. Four postoperative complications recorded in three patients (anastomotic strictures: portal vein, 2; bile duct, 2) were resolved through radiologic interventions. Using an intensive tumor down-staging protocol of CCRT followed by HAIC, LDLT may be a therapeutic option for selected patients with locally advanced HCC and portal vein tumor thrombosis. PMID:27401662

  14. Mediation by the same muscarinic receptor subtype of phasic and tonic contractile activities in the rat isolated portal vein.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaffendorf, M.; Van Zwieten, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of several agonists on the phasic and tonic contractile responses to muscarinic receptor stimulation have been investigated in the rat portal vein in vitro. 2. Neither chemical denervation with 6-hydroxydopamine nor the presence of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin, influenced the spontaneous or the stimulated myogenic activity of the portal vein. 3. Indomethacin and NG-nitro-L-arginine were used to investigate the influence of vasoactive factors in this preparation. They slightly increased the frequency and the amplitude of the spontaneous myogenic activity of the portal vein, respectively. NG-nitro-L-arginine but not indomethacin enhanced the maximal phasic response to carbachol. Both indomethacin and NG-nitro-L-arginine failed to influence the tonic response to carbachol. 4. Muscarinic agonists increased phasic activity according to the rank order of potency: acetylcholine > muscarine > methacholine > carbachol > aceclidine > bethanechol. These effects were superimposed on a sustained contracture at higher concentrations. Oxotremorine was more potent than arecoline in increasing the mechanical phasic activity, without inducing a sustained contracture. Pilocarpine and McN A343 were weak agonists, producing submaximal effects only on phasic activity. 5. The muscarinic antagonists AF-DX116, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine (4-DAMP), P-fluorohexahydrosiladiphenidol (pFHHSiD) and pirenzepine antagonized the phasic and tonic mechanical responses to carbachol. Although the tonic contracture was slightly more sensitive to all antagonists studied, the rank order of potency: 4-DAMP > pFHHSiD > pirenzepine > AF-DX 116 was the same for both types of responses, which is indicative of a M3-receptor subtype.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8428203

  15. Establishment of a novel rat model of different degrees of portal vein stenosis following 70% partial hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lulu; Luo, Yan; Ma, Lin; Wang, Hong; Ling, Wenwu; Li, Jiawu; Qi, Xiaoying; Lu, Qiang; Chen, Kefei

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation may fail due to complications of insufficient portal vein (PV) flow such as portal vein stenosis (PVS). Therefore, establishing a model to explore the effect of PV flow on liver regeneration is crucial and essential. Rats were randomly divided into 6 groups: sham operation rats group; 70% partial hepatectomy (PH) group (group A); PVS groups with mild, moderate, or severe stenosis (group B–D) and portal vein ligation (PVL) group. PVS was produced by ligating PV with parallelly placed needles of different gauges. Ultrasound was performed to validate the stenosis ratio (SR) and velocity ratio (VR) at the prestenotic and stenotic site. Rats were sacrificed on day 1,3,7, and 14 after surgery, and liver regeneration rate (LRR) was calculated. We successfully established rat models of different degrees of PVS following 70%PH in 72 rats. The SRs of each PVS group were 44.8 ± 5.23%, 59.3 ± 4.07% and 69.5 ± 2.17%, which showed no statistical differences compared with those measured by stenosis ratio measured by ultrasound. The survival rate in groups A-D were 100%, 83.3%, 66.7% and 50% respectively. Differences were demonstrated between groups A and C, as well as groups A and D (both P<0.05). Moreover, LRR negatively correlated with SRu and VR, and the correlation coefficients were −0.534 and −0.522, respectively. The rat model we established has the potential to be applied in most conditions of liver regeneration with reduced PV inflow, and it provides a foundation for further exploring the relationship between PV hemodynamic changes and liver regeneration. PMID:26822935

  16. A long-surviving case of gastric cancer with main portal vein tumor thrombus after surgical resection and postoperative S-1 therapy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shinsuke; Nagai, Erina; Taki, Yusuke; Watanabe, Masaya; Takahashi, Michiro; Kyoden, Yusuke; Ohata, Ko; Kanemoto, Hideyuki; Oba, Noriyuki; Taku, Keisei; Suzuki, Makoto; Takagi, Masakazu

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer patients with main portal vein tumor thrombus usually have a short survival time, owing to its aggressive behavior. Herein, we report a long-surviving case of gastric cancer with main portal vein tumor thrombus. A 78-year-old man presenting with anorexia and body weight loss was diagnosed with gastric cancer. The patient was referred to our hospital for further examination and treatment. Endoscopy revealed a type 3 tumor (8.0 cm in length) in the body of the stomach. Biopsy led to the diagnosis of moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Enhanced computed tomography revealed a large tumor thrombus extending from the gastric coronary vein to the portal trunk. A total gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy, splenectomy, and thrombectomy was performed. Postoperative chemotherapy with S-1 was administered for 18 months. The patient died a natural death without recurrence at 49 postoperative months. To the best of our knowledge, the patient was the oldest to be diagnosed with gastric cancer with main portal vein tumor thrombus at diagnosis, who survived >36 months. Although gastric cancer with main portal vein tumor thrombus is a rare occurrence, its prognosis is extremely poor. Intensive surgery and long-term chemotherapy may be effective at improving survival time in these patients. PMID:27318995

  17. Stent Compression in Iliac Vein Compression Syndrome Associated with Acute Ilio-Femoral Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hun; Kim, Jin Woo; Hong, You Sun; Lim, Sang Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to evaluate stent compression in iliac vein compression syndrome (IVCS) and to identify its association with stent patency. Materials and Methods Between May 2005 and June 2014, after stent placement for the treatment of IVCS with acute ilio-femoral deep vein thrombosis, follow-up CT venography was performed in 48 patients (35 women, 13 men; age range 23-87 years; median age 56 years). Using follow-up CT venography, the degree of the stent compression was calculated and used to divide patients into two groups. Possible factors associated with stent compression and patency were evaluated. The cumulative degree of stent compression and patency rate were analyzed. Results All of the stents used were laser-cut nitinol stents. The proportion of limbs showing significant stent compression was 33%. Fifty-six percent of limbs in the significant stent compression group developed stent occlusion. On the other hand, only 9% of limbs in the insignificant stent compression group developed stent occlusion. Significant stent compression was inversely correlated with stent patency (p < 0.001). The median patency period evaluated with Kaplan-Meier analysis was 20.0 months for patients with significant stent compression. Other factors including gender, age, and type of stent were not correlated with stent patency. Significant stent compression occurred most frequently (87.5%) at the upper end of the stent (ilio-caval junction). Conclusion Significant compression of nitinol stents placed in IVCS highly affects stent patency. Therefore, in order to prevent stent compression in IVCS, nitinol stents with higher radial resistive force may be required. PMID:26175570

  18. Interobserver Variability in Target Definition for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With and Without Portal Vein Thrombus: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S.; Bosch, Walter R.; Krishnan, Sunil; Kim, Tae K.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Seong, Jinsil; Haddock, Michael G.; Cheng, Jason C.; Feng, Mary U.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Roberge, David; and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Defining hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gross tumor volume (GTV) requires multimodal imaging, acquired in different perfusion phases. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the variability in contouring and to establish guidelines and educational recommendations for reproducible HCC contouring for treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Anonymous, multiphasic planning computed tomography scans obtained from 3 patients with HCC were identified and distributed to a panel of 11 gastrointestinal radiation oncologists. Panelists were asked the number of HCC cases they treated in the past year. Case 1 had no vascular involvement, case 2 had extensive portal vein involvement, and case 3 had minor branched portal vein involvement. The agreement between the contoured total GTVs (primary + vascular GTV) was assessed using the generalized kappa statistic. Agreement interpretation was evaluated using Landis and Koch's interpretation of strength of agreement. The S95 contour, defined using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm consensus at the 95% confidence level, was created for each case. Results: Of the 11 panelists, 3 had treated >25 cases in the past year, 2 had treated 10 to 25 cases, 2 had treated 5 to 10 cases, 2 had treated 1 to 5 cases, 1 had treated 0 cases, and 1 did not respond. Near perfect agreement was seen for case 1, and substantial agreement was seen for cases 2 and 3. For case 2, there was significant heterogeneity in the volume identified as tumor thrombus (range 0.58-40.45 cc). For case 3, 2 panelists did not include the branched portal vein thrombus, and 7 panelists contoured thrombus separately from the primary tumor, also showing significant heterogeneity in volume of tumor thrombus (range 4.52-34.27 cc). Conclusions: In a group of experts, excellent agreement was seen in contouring total GTV. Heterogeneity exists in the definition of portal vein thrombus that may impact treatment planning

  19. Leiurus quinquestriatus venom inhibits BRL 34915-induced /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux from the rat portal vein

    SciTech Connect

    Quast, U.; Cook, N.S.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of the crude venom of the Israeli scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus on the /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux stimulated by the K/sup +/ channel opener BRL 34915 in the rat portal vein was examined. Applied alone, the venom greatly increased the spontaneous mechanical activity of and the concomitant /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux from the vessel. When the excitability of the vein was suppressed by the dihydropyridine calcium antagonist, PN 200-110, the /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux stimulated by BRL 34915 could be shown to be inhibited by the venom. From the concentration dependence of this inhibition an IC/sub 50/ value of 0.17 +/- 0.01 mg/ml was estimated. This venom is thus the most potent blocker of BRL 34915-evoked /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux reported so far. 17 references, 2 figures.

  20. Spironolactone inhibition of contraction and calcium channels in rat portal vein.

    PubMed Central

    Dacquet, C.; Loirand, G.; Mironneau, C.; Mironneau, J.; Pacaud, P.

    1987-01-01

    1. The effects of spironolactone have been studied on the mechanical activity of rat portal vein strips and the calcium channel currents of isolated cells using the patch clamp technique (whole-cell configuration). 2. Spironolactone (50 nM to 0.1 mM) depressed both K+-induced and twitch contractions within 5-6 min. This inhibitory effect was overcome by elevating the calcium concentration in the perfusing solution. 3. Spironolactone (60 microM) depressed the transient contractions induced in a Ca2+-free, EGTA-containing solution by either acetylcholine (0.1 mM) or noradrenaline (10 microM). The effect of spironolactone was dependent on a reduction in the filling of the internal calcium store. 4. Rapidly inactivating calcium channel current was maintained in the presence of spironolactone (60 microM), while slowly inactivating calcium channel current was blocked in a concentration-dependent manner. Half-inhibition of slow calcium channel current was obtained at concentrations between 5-7 microM. 5. Administration of spironolactone (10 microM) at rest reduced calcium channel current by about 70% (tonic inhibition). Repetitive depolarizations (300 ms long pulses to zero mV, applied between 0.05 and 0.5 Hz) had no further inhibitory effect on the inward current (absence of use-dependence). 6. When cells were held at depolarized membrane potentials at which slow calcium current was inactivated by about 80%, the inhibitory effect of spironolactone (10 microM) was similar to that obtained with cells normally polarized. Spironolactone (10 microM) had no effect on the voltage-dependence of inactivation of the calcium channel current. 7. Our results suggest that spironolactone acts primarily on the plasma membrane by depressing inward current through slow calcium channels. This effect may be explained by a preferential binding of the drug to the resting state of the slow calcium channel. In addition, spironolactone may depress contractions dependent on the release of calcium

  1. Stretch-dependent smooth muscle differentiation in the portal vein-role of actin polymerization, calcium signaling, and microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Albinsson, Sebastian; Bhattachariya, Anirban; Hellstrand, Per

    2014-04-01

    The mechanical forces acting on SMC in the vascular wall are known to regulate processes such as vascular remodeling and contractile differentiation. However, investigations to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of mechanotransduction in smooth muscle have been hampered by technical limitations associated with mechanical studies on pressurized small arteries, due primarily to the small amount of available tissue. The murine portal vein is a relatively large vessel showing myogenic tone that in many respects recapitulates the properties of small resistance vessels. Studies on stretched portal veins to elucidate mechanisms of mechanotransduction in the vascular wall have shown that stretch-sensitive regulation of contractile differentiation is mediated via Rho-activation and actin polymerization, while stretch-induced growth is regulated by the MAPK pathway. In this review, we have summarized findings on mechanotransduction in the portal vein with focus on stretch-induced contractile differentiation and the role of calcium, actin polymerization and miRNAs in this response. PMID:24238368

  2. Application of liver three-dimensional printing in hepatectomy for complex massive hepatocarcinoma with rare variations of portal vein: preliminary experience

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Nan; Fang, Chihua; Fan, Yingfang; Yang, Jian; Zeng, Ning; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Background: To discuss the role of Liver 3D printing in the treatment of complex massive hepatocarcinoma with rare variations of portal vein. Methods: Data of enhanced computed tomography (CT) were imported into the medical image three-dimensional visualization system (MI-3DVS) to create Standard Template Library (STL) files, which were read by 3D printer to construct life-size 3D physical liver model. The preoperative surgical planning was performed on the 3D model according to individualized segmentation, volume calculation, and virtual operation. Results: The 3D printing liver model was consistent with the model in MI-3DVS. The segment 4 portal vein (S4PV) was absent and variant S4PV originated from right anterior portal vein (RAPV). The preoperative surgical planning was designed according to the relationship between tumor and portal vein variation. Theoretically, the residual liver volume was 40.76%, if the right hemihepatctomy was carried out after the trunk of right portal vein (RPV) ligated. However, the actual residual volume was only 21.37% due to the variant S4PV originates from RAPV, thus, right trisegmentectomy would have to be performed. Interestingly, after optimization, the residual liver volume increased to 57.25% as narrow-margin right hemihepatectomy with the variant S4PV reserved were performed. The final resection was determined to be narrow-margin right hemihepatectomy. The actual surgical procedure was consistent with the preoperative surgical planning. Conclusion: Liver 3D printing may be a safe and effective technique to improve the success rate of surgery and reduce the operation risk for patients with complex massive hepatocarcinoma with variations of portal vein. PMID:26770510

  3. Role of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy in colorectal liver metastases: A review

    PubMed Central

    Hasselgren, Kristina; Sandström, Per; Björnsson, Bergthor

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the Western world. Approximately half of patients will develop liver metastases, which is the most common cause of death. The only potentially curative treatment is surgical resection. However, many patients retain a to small future liver remnant (FLR) to allow for resection directly. There are therefore strategies to decrease the tumor with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and to increase the FLR. An accepted strategy to increase the FLR is portal vein occlusion (PVO). A concern with this strategy is that a large proportion of patients will never be operated because of progression during the interval between PVO and resection. ALPPS (associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy) is a new procedure with a high resection rate. A concern with this approach is the rather high frequency of complications and high mortality, compared to PVO. In this review, it is shown that with ALPPS the resection rate was 97.1% for CRLM and the mortality rate for all diagnoses was 9.6%. The mortality rate was likely lower for patients with CRLM, but some data were lacking in the reports. Due to the novelty of ALPPS, the indications and technique are not yet established but there are arguments for ALPPS in the context of CRLM and a small FLR. PMID:25914457

  4. Activation of store-operated channels by noradrenaline via protein kinase C in rabbit portal vein myocytes.

    PubMed

    Albert, A P; Large, W A

    2002-10-01

    In the present study we have investigated the role of diacylglycerol (DAG) and protein kinase C (PKC) in mediating activation of Ca(2+)-permeable store-operated channels (SOCs) by noradrenaline in rabbit portal vein smooth muscle cells. With cell-attached recording, bath application of noradrenaline, 1-oleoyl-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG) and phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) evoked single channel currents. The biophysical properties of these channel currents were similar to those of the channel currents activated by depletion of internal Ca(2+) stores with cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). The activation of SOCs in cell-attached recording by noradrenaline, OAG, PDBu, CPA and the acetoxymethyl ester form of BAPTA (BAPTA-AM) was markedly inhibited by the PKC inhibitors chelerythrine and RO-31-8220. In isolated outside-out patches CPA did not evoke SOCs but noradrenaline stimulated SOC activity, which was reduced by about 90 % by PKC inhibitors. The addition of the serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitors calyculin A and microcystin also stimulated SOCs in isolated outside-out patches. It is concluded that in rabbit portal vein myocytes, noradrenaline activates SOCs via DAG and PKC, possibly by a store-independent mechanism. In addition in this cell type it appears that PKC and phosphorylation may play an important role in stimulating SOC activity in response to depletion of internal Ca(2+) stores by CPA and BAPTA-AM. PMID:12356885

  5. Effects of cicletanine on whole-cell currents of single smooth muscle cells from the guinea-pig portal vein.

    PubMed Central

    Noack, T.; Deitmer, P.

    1993-01-01

    1. Smooth muscle cells of the guinea-pig portal vein were dispersed by enzymatic treatment and recordings of membrane currents were made in the whole-cell mode by the patch-clamp technique. The effects of extracellular application of cicletanine-hydrochloride on the whole-cell currents of isolated smooth muscle cells from the guinea-pig portal vein were studied in solutions containing a normal concentration of calcium (2.5 mM). 2. Cicletanine, 10 to 100 microM, reduced the voltage-dependent inward calcium current with an IC50 of 250 microM. These effects of cicletanine were reversible. 3. The action of cicletanine on calcium currents can be interpreted as a decrease of the availability of calcium channels but not by an alteration of the time course or voltage-dependency of inactivation. 4. The control calcium current was enhanced by application of Bay K 8644. On this enhanced inward current, cicletanine also exerted inhibitory effects which were not use-dependent. 5. Cicletanine, 1 to 100 microM, did not enhance outward potassium currents. 6. It is concluded that at least one component of the vasorelaxant effects of cicletanine is produced by inhibition of calcium currents. PMID:7684299

  6. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Creation in Budd-Chiari Syndrome: Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Direct Simultaneous Puncture of the Portal Vein and Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Boyvat, Fatih Aytekin, Cueneyt; Harman, Ali; Ozin, Yasemin

    2006-10-15

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is an uncommon disorder that can be life-threatening, depending on the degree of hepatic venous outflow obstruction. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) provides decompression of the congested liver but the hepatic vein obstruction makes the procedure more difficult. We describe a modified method that involved a single percutaneous puncture of the portal vein and inferior vena cava simultaneously for TIPS creation in a patient with BCS.

  7. Acute proximal deep vein thrombosis: presentation in a chiropractic office

    PubMed Central

    Kopansky-Giles, Deborah R; Grod, Jaroslaw P; Crowther, Edward R

    1995-01-01

    The diagnosis of acute proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) can be difficult to make on the basis of clinical findings alone. Since it may be encountered by all clinicians, chiropractors must be aware of the often confusing clinical picture with which it may present. In its early stages patients may present with posterior thigh, calf and groin pain, symptoms that may mimic other types of biomechanical disorders. Because 50% of patients with DVT may develop life threatening thromboembolism, early detection and appropriate referral is crucial. To highlight the clinical presentation of DVT and the phenomenon of “silent embolism” the case of a 58-year-old male presenting to a chiropractic office for assessment and treatment of low back and leg pain is presented. The prevalence, etiology and risk factors associated with its onset are reviewed. Physical examination findings, diagnostic imaging and treatment are discussed. Considerations in the chiropractic management of the post-thrombolytic patient are highlighted. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2

  8. Effective use of gemcitabine in the treatment of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells of the pancreas with portal vein tumor thrombus.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Masato; Uchinami, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Go; Takahashi, Tomokazu; Nakagawa, Yasuhiko; Andoh, Hideaki; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Nanjo, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yuzo

    2012-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman had an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells (UCWOGC) in the body of the pancreas with massive portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). Because the PVTT progressed so rapidly into the right portal branch, the patient first underwent distal pancreatectomy and tumor thrombectomy to prevent life-threatening portal venous obstruction. Although a recurrent PVTT had developed early postoperatively, systemic gemcitabine treatment was so effective that it induced complete remission 5 months after the initiation of chemotherapy. The patient continued to be in complete response for 12 months, and has survived for 19 months since surgery. PMID:22892493

  9. Cattell-Braasch Maneuver Combined with Artery-First Approach for Superior Mesenteric-Portal Vein Resection During Pancreatectomy.

    PubMed

    Del Chiaro, Marco; Segersvärd, Ralf; Rangelova, Elena; Coppola, Alessandro; Scandavini, Chiara Maria; Ansorge, Christoph; Verbeke, Caroline; Blomberg, John

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatectomy associated with superior mesenteric-portal vein (SMPV) resection is currently considered the standard of care for patients with pancreatic tumors involving the major peripancreatic veins. However, a standard approach for resection and reconstruction is not defined yet. The aim of this study is to analyze the feasibility and short-term results of an original Cattell-Braasch artery-first approach (CBAF) for the resection of SMPV during pancreatectomy. Of 144 pancreatectomies with vascular resection undertaken from 2008 to 2013 at Karolinska University Hospital, 45 (31.2 %) were performed combining a Cattell-Braasch maneuver with an artery-first approach (from 2011 to 2013). The mean patient age was 65.2 years. Thirty-seven (82.2 %) patients underwent pancreatoduodenectomy and 8 (17.8 %) total pancreatectomy. Histology showed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in 42 patients (93.3 %). The median length of the resected SMPV segment was 4.6 cm (range 3-7). In all patients, a direct end-to-end anastomosis was performed without graft interposition. In nine cases (20 %), an arterial resection was also performed. There was no mortality in this series, and the morbidity rate was 35.5 %. Combined CBAF for the resection of SMPV during pancreatectomy seems to be safe and effective. The reconstruction of the resected vessels is possible in many cases without graft interposition, even if the resected vein segment is of considerable length. PMID:26423804

  10. Portal Vein Thrombosis in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Diagnostic Accuracy of Gadoxetic Acid-enhanced MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Lee, Jeong Min; Yoon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Kyung Bun; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To assess the diagnostic performance of gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the evaluation of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board. The requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. A total of 366 patients with HCC who underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging between January 2007 and May 2013, including 134 with malignant PVT, 49 with benign PVT, and 183 without PVT matched for age and sex, comprised our study population. PVTs were complete in 125 patients and partial in 58 and were located in a major portal vein (n = 159) or segmental portal vein (n = 24). Two radiologists independently reviewed the MR images and assessed the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in the detection and characterization of PVT according to location (major vs segmental) and type (complete vs partial). The Fisher exact or χ(2) test was used to evaluate sensitivity difference between the subsets. Results Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging showed good sensitivity (reviewer 1, 84% [154 of 183 patients]; reviewer 2, 70% [129 of 183 patients]) and high specificity (reviewer 1, 89% [163 of 183 patients]; reviewer 2, 96% [176 of 183 patients]) in the detection of PVT. Diagnostic accuracy for differentiating malignant PVT from benign PVT was high (reviewer 1, 92% [141 of 154 patients]; reviewer 2, 95% [122 of 129 patients]). However, there was slightly lower sensitivity for detecting segmental PVT compared with that of major PVT in the malignant PVT group (reviewer 1, 95% [104 of 110 patients] vs 88% [21 of 24 patients]; reviewer 2, 82% [90 of 110 patients] vs 79% [19 of 24 patients]; P = .203 and .775 for reviewers 1 and 2, respectively). Conclusion Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging provided good diagnostic performance in the detection of PVT and the differentiation of malignant from benign PVT in patients with HCC

  11. Present status and future perspectives of ALPPS (associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy).

    PubMed

    Donati, Marcello; Basile, Francesco; Oldhafer, Karl J

    2015-01-01

    First International Consensus Meeting, Hamburg, Germany, 27-28 February 2015 More than 160 participants took part in the conference for 2 days. A total of 58 world renown experts on ALPPS (associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy) were invited from all over the world. The faculty was divided into many different subgroups that were in contact during the 2-3 months before the conference analyzing all the most important aspects of this technique and summarizing it in a common structured work to be presented during the congress, giving final recommendations in the form of bulleted point statements. The aim was to gain a solid basis of preliminary agreement on many controversial aspects of ALPPS. A poster area was also organized with 35 posters reporting mostly mono-institutional experiences on single aspects of the technique from all five continents. PMID:26260803

  12. Concurrent biliary drainage and portal vein embolization in preparation for extended hepatectomy in patients with biliary cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Jan; Eriksson, Sam; Nørgaard Larsen, Peter; Keussen, Inger; Christiansen Frevert, Susanne; Lindell, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with perihilar cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer extending into the hilum often present with jaundice and a small future liver remnant (FLR). If resectable, preoperative biliary drainage and portal vein embolization (PVE) are indicated. Classically, these measures have been performed sequentially, separated by 4–6 weeks. Purpose To report on a new regime where percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) and PVE are performed simultaneously, shortening the preoperative process. Material and Methods Six patients were treated with concurrent PTBD and PVE under general anesthesia. Results Surgical exploration followed the combined procedure after 35 days (range, 28–51 days). The FLR ratio increased from 22% to 32%. Three patients developed cholangitis after the procedure. Conclusion The combined approach of PTBD and PVE seems feasible, but more studies on morbidity are warranted. PMID:25992300

  13. Safety and effectiveness of renoportal bypass in patients with complete portal vein thrombosis: an analysis of 10 patients.

    PubMed

    Quintini, Cristiano; Spaggiari, Mario; Hashimoto, Koji; Aucejo, Federico; Diago, Teresa; Fujiki, Masato; Winans, Charles; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Trenti, Loris; Kelly, Dympna; Eghtesad, Bijan; Miller, Charles

    2015-03-01

    The presence of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is still considered by many transplantation centers to be an absolute contraindication to liver transplantation because of the technical difficulties that it can present and its association with a higher rate of patient morbidity and mortality. Renoportal bypass (RPB) can help to remove these barriers. This study describes our institution's experience with RPB through the description of a new and successful simplified surgical strategy, a patient and graft outcome analysis, intraoperative vascular flow measurements, and the use of splenic artery embolization (SAE) as an effective adjunct for treating sporadic cases of unrelieved portal hypertension. Between January 2004 and January 2013, 10 patients with grade 4 PVT underwent RPB. At the last follow-up (42.2 ± 21.1 months), the patient and graft survival rates were 100%. Five patients (50%) experienced posttransplant ascites, and 2 of those underwent proximal SAE to modulate the liver inflow and overcome the ascites. Three patients (30%) experienced transient kidney injury in the early posttransplant period and were treated efficiently with medical therapy. The renoportal flows were close to the desirable 100 mL/100 g of liver tissue in all cases. The experience and data support RPB as a feasible and easily reproducible technique without the risks and technical challenges associated with the tedious dissection of a cavernous hilum. PMID:25420619

  14. Portal Vein Embolization with Radiolabeled Polyvinyl Alcohol Particles in a Swine Model: Hepatic Distribution and Implications for Pancreatic Islet Cell Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Richard J.; Mercer, John R.; Al-Saif, Faisal; Molinari, Michele; Ashforth, Robert A.; Rajotte, Ray V.; Conner-Spady, Barbara; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2009-05-15

    The distribution of radiolabeled polyvinyl alcohol microspheres (PVAMs) when infused into the portal vein of domestic swine was investigated, with the purpose of assessing implications for pancreatic islet cell transplantation. PVAMs measuring 100-300 {mu}m (Contour SE) and labeled with {sup 99m}Tc were infused into the main portal vein of 12 swine, with intermittent portal venous pressure measurements. The infusion catheter was introduced antegradely via direct or indirect cannulation of the portal vein. The liver was subsequently divided into anatomical segments. Radioactivity (decay corrected) was measured for {sup 99m}Tc microsphere synthesis, dose preparation, gross organ activities, tissue samples, and blood. Particulate labeling, catheter positioning, and infusion were successful in all cases. The number of particles used was (185,000 {+-} 24,000) with a volume of 1 ml. Mean portal pressure at 5 min was significantly higher than baseline, but without a significant difference at 15 min. Extrahepatic tissue and serum radioactivity was negligible. A significant difference in number of radioactive particles per gram was detected between segments 6/7 and segments 5/8. Intrasegmental activity was analyzed, and for segments 2/3 a significant difference in the percentage dose per gram across samples was demonstrated (P = 0.001). Effective and stable radiolabeling of PVAMs with {sup 99m}Tc-sulfur colloid was demonstrated. Portal venous infusion of 100- to 300-{mu}m particles showed entrapment in the sinusoidal hepatic system with transient portal pressure elevation. Preferential embolization into the right lateral and posterior segments occurs, suggesting that flow dynamics/catheter tip position plays a role in particle distribution.

  15. Survival outcomes of hepatic resection compared with transarterial chemoembolization or sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Min; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Lee, Yoo Jin; Choi, Wang Yong; Choi, Sei Myong; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok; Kang, Koo Jeong; Kim, Young Hwan; Chauhan, Anil Kumar; Park, Soo Young; Tak, Won Young; Kweon, Young Oh; Kim, Byung Seok; Lee, Chang Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Treating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) remains controversial. We compared the outcomes of hepatic resection (HR), transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), and sorafenib therapy as treatments for HCC with PVTT. Methods: Patients diagnosed as HCC with PVTT between January 2000 and December 2011 who received treatment with sorafenib, HR, or TACE were included. Patients with main PVTT, superior mesenteric vein tumor thrombosis, or Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) class C were excluded. The records of 172 patients were analyzed retrospectively. HR, TACE, and sorafenib treatment were performed is 40, 80, and 52 patients respectively. PVTT was classified as either involving the segmental branch (type I) or extending to involve the right or left portal vein (type II). Results: The median survival time was significantly longer in the HR group (19.9 months) than in the TACE and sorafenib groups (6.6 and 6.2 months, respectively; both p<0.001), and did not differ significantly between the latter two groups (p=0.698). Among patients with CTP class A, type I PVTT or unilobar-involved HCC, the median survival time was longer in the HR group than in the TACE and sorafenib groups (p=0.006). In univariate analyses, the initial treatment method, tumor size, PVTT type, involved lobe, CTP class, and presence of cirrhosis or ascites were correlated with overall survival. The significant prognostic factors for overall survival in Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis were initial treatment method (HR vs. TACE: hazard ratio=1.750, p=0.036; HR vs. sorafenib: hazard ratio=2.262, p=0.006), involved lobe (hazard ratio=1.705, p=0.008), PVTT type (hazard ratio=1.617, p=0.013), and CTP class (hazard ratio=1.712, p=0.012). Conclusions: Compared with TACE or sorafenib, HR may prolong the survival of patients with HCC in cases of CTP class A, type I PVTT or unilobar-involved HCC. PMID:27044767

  16. In vitro vascular responsiveness to norepinephrine in experimental portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bomzon, A; Jacob, G; Lee, S S; Meddings, J

    1991-02-01

    It has been postulated that loss of response to norepinephrine accounts in part for the portal hypertension, systemic hypotension, and generalised vascular dilatation of chronic liver disease. The in vitro vascular responsiveness to norepinephrine was measured in aortic rings and portal veins excised from four different rat models of hepatic disease with and without portal hypertension, hepatocellular damage, and hyperbilirubinemia--the carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) cirrhotic rat with portal hypertension, the five-week chronic bile duct ligated and resected (CBDL) cirrhotic rat with portal hypertension and hyperbilirubinemia, the 10-day partial ligated portal vein (PVL) portal hypertensive rat without hepatocellular damage and hyperbilirubinemia, and the three-day bile duct ligated (ABDL) rat with acute hepatocellular damage and hyperbilirubinemia but without portal hypertension. Sham-treated or operated groups for each model were also prepared. Vascular reactivity of the aortic rings to norepinephrine was potentiated in the three portal hypertensive groups, and attenuated in the model of acute cholestasis. No consistent pattern of response to norepinephrine was evident in the portal veins. Based upon the presented in vitro data and the discussed limitations of an in vitro study, we conclude that it is unlikely that the loss of response to norepinephrine accounts for the portal hypertension, systemic hypotension, and generalised vascular dilatation of chronic liver disease. PMID:2040106

  17. Comparison of the Treatment Efficiency of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation via Tail and Portal Veins in CCl4-Induced Mouse Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Nhung Hai; Nguyen, Nam Hai; Le, Trinh Van; Vu, Ngoc Bich; Huynh, Nghia; Nguyen, Thanh Van; Le, Huy Minh; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2016-01-01

    Because of self-renewal, strong proliferation in vitro, abundant sources for isolation, and a high differentiation capacity, mesenchymal stem cells are suggested to be potentially therapeutic for liver fibrosis/cirrhosis. In this study, we evaluated the treatment effects of mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) on mouse liver cirrhosis induced by carbon tetrachloride. Portal and tail vein transplantations were examined to evaluate the effects of different injection routes on the liver cirrhosis model at 21 days after transplantation. BM-MSCs transplantation reduced aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase levels at 21 days after injection. Furthermore, BM-MSCs induced positive changes in serum bilirubin and albumin and downregulated expression of integrins (600- to 7000-fold), transforming growth factor, and procollagen-α1 compared with the control group. Interestingly, both injection routes ameliorated inflammation and liver cirrhosis scores. All mice in treatment groups had reduced inflammation scores and no cirrhosis. In conclusion, transplantation of BM-MSCs via tail or portal veins ameliorates liver cirrhosis in mice. Notably, there were no differences in treatment effects between tail and portal vein administrations. In consideration of safety, we suggest transfusion of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells via a peripheral vein as a potential method for liver fibrosis treatment. PMID:26839564

  18. D-dimer and portal vein status in splenectomized Egyptian β-thalassemia major patients: a prospective single-thalassemia center experience.

    PubMed

    Elalfy, Mohsen Saleh; Andrawes, Nevine Gamal; Sadek, Azza Mohamad; Hussein, Omar; Abdou, Abeer

    2012-04-01

    Splenectomy is a recognized cause of portal vein thrombosis. Thirty-six β-thalassemia major (β-TM) patients were followed up for 36 months to evaluate changes in D-dimer levels (as a possible marker for thrombosis development) and portal vein status (by portal duplex ultrasound) at both early and late postlaparoscopic splenectomy periods. They were classified into group I if they were splenectomized in the study period (n = 12), or group II if they were splenectomized during the 5 years preceding the period (n = 24). In group I, D-dimer was measured 5 times: 1 day presplenectomy, the 1st week, 6th week, and 6th month postsplenectomy, and at the study end, whereas in group II, D-dimer was measured twice: at the study entry and end. Portal duplex was done 1 week postsplenectomy (group I) and at study end in both groups. Presplenectomy D-dimer levels in group I were significantly higher compared with the 6th month (P = .042) and study end (P = .03), whereas 1st week (postsplenectomy) D-dimer levels had a high mean of 3497.3 ng/mL, lowered at the 6th week (P = .017), at the 6th month (P = .008), and at study end (P = .005). D-dimer levels in group II showed no difference between study entry and end (P = .104). Portal vein "diameter and flow" were within normal findings in both groups. In this 3-year prospective study, a subclinical hypercoagulable state was detected 1 day prior to splenectomy and in the early postsplenectomy period, as evidenced by high D-dimer levels. Laparoscopic splenectomy was not associated with portal venous thrombosis either clinically or by duplex sonography. PMID:22475301

  19. Outcomes of Adjuvant Chemoradiation After Pancreaticoduodenectomy With Mesenterico-Portal Vein Resection for Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Hristov, Boris; Reddy, Sushanth; Lin, Steven H.; Cameron, John L.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Swartz, Michael J.; Edil, Barish H.; Kemp, Clinton; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation (CRT) offers patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma a chance for extended survival. In some patients, however, resection is difficult because of vascular involvement by the carcinoma, necessitating resection and grafting of the mesenterico-portal vessels. The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes between pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) with and without mesenterico-portal vein resection (VR) in patients receiving adjuvant CRT for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2005, 160 patients underwent PD with 5-FU-based adjuvant CRT followed by maintenance chemotherapy at the Johns Hopkins Hospital; 20 (12.5%) of the 160 underwent VR. Clinical outcomes, including median survival, overall survival, and complication rates were assessed for both groups. Results: Patients who underwent VR had significantly longer operative times (p = 0.009), greater intraoperative blood loss (p = 0.01), and longer postoperative lengths of stay (p = 0.03). However, postoperative morbidity, median survival, and overall survival rates were similar between the two groups. Most patients (70%) from both groups were able to complete CRT, and a subgroup analysis demonstrated no appreciable differences in terms of complications. None of the VR patients who received adjuvant CRT developed veno-occlusive disease or graft failure/leakage. Conclusion: In a cohort of patients treated with adjuvant 5-FU-based CRT at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, having a VR at the time of PD resulted in similar complication rates and survival. These data support the feasibility and safety of adjuvant CRT in patients undergoing VR at the time of PD.

  20. The membrane properties of the smooth muscle of the guinea-pig portal vein in isotonic and hypertonic solutions.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, H; Oshima, K; Sakamoto, Y

    1971-08-01

    The membrane properties of the longitudinal smooth muscle of the guinea-pig portal vein were investigated under various experimental conditions.1. In isotonic Krebs solution, the membrane potential (-48.7 mV), the maximum rates of rise and fall of the spike (4.6 and 2.3 V/sec respectively), the space constant (0.61 mm), the conduction velocity of excitation (0.97 cm/sec) and the time constant of the foot of the propagated spike (18.4 msec) were measured.2. The various parameters of the muscle membrane in the isotonic solution were compared with those in the hypertonic solution prepared by the addition of solid sucrose (twice the normal tonicity).3. When the muscles were perfused with hypertonic solution, marked depolarization of the membrane and increased membrane resistance occurred. These were probably due to reduction of the K permeability, increased internal resistance of the muscle and shrinkage of the muscle fibre.4. The membrane potential in isotonic and hypertonic solutions was analysed into two components, i.e. the metabolic (electrogenic Na-pump) and the ionic (electrical diffusion potential) component in the various environmental conditions.(a) In isotonic and hypertonic solutions, the membrane was depolarized by lowering the temperature or by removal of K ion from the solutions. When the tissues were rewarmed or on readdition of K ion, the membrane was markedly hyperpolarized. These hyperpolarizations of the membrane were suppressed by treatment with ouabain (10(-5) g/ml.), by warming to only 20 degrees C and by K-free solution.(b) The relationships between the membrane potential and the [K](o) in isotonic Krebs, in the hypertonic (sucrose) Krebs, in the Na-free (Tris) Krebs and in the Cl-deficient (C(6)H(5)SO(3)) Krebs were observed. The maximum slopes of the membrane depolarization against tenfold changes of [K](o) were much lower than that expected if it behaved like a K electrode.(c) In Na-free (Tris) solution, the membrane was not depolarized in

  1. Multimodality Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus: A Large-Scale, Multicenter, Propensity Mathching Score Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kang; Guo, Wei Xing; Chen, Min Shan; Mao, Yi Lei; Sun, Bei Cheng; Shi, Jie; Zhang, Yao Jun; Meng, Yan; Yang, Ye Fa; Cong, Wen Ming; Wu, Meng Chao; Lau, Wan Yee; Cheng, Shu Qun

    2016-03-01

    The optimal treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) remains controversial. We aimed to investigate the best treatment for patients with HCC with PVTT. From January 2002 to January 2014, the data from all consecutive patients with HCC with PVTT who underwent surgical treatment (ST),TACE,TACE combined with sorafenib (TACE-Sor), or TACE combined with radiotherapy (TACE-RT) in the 4 largest tertiary hospitals in China were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into 3 subtypes according to the extent of PVTT in the portal vein (type I-III). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). A total of 1580 patients with HCC with PVTT were included in the study. The median survival times (MST) for ST (n = 745) for type I, II, and III patients (95% CI) were 15.9 (13.3-18.5), 12.5 (10.7-14.3), and 6.0 (4.3-7.7) months, respectively. The corresponding figures for patients after TACE (n = 604) were 9.3 (5.6-12.9), 4.9 (4.1-5.7), and 4.0 (3.1-4.9), respectively; for patients after TACE-Sor (n = 113) 12.0 (6.6-17.4), 8.9 (6.7-11.1), and 7.0 (3.0-10.9), respectively; and for patients after TACE-RT (n = 118) 12.2 (0-24.7), 10.6 (6.8-14.5), and 8.9 (5.2-12.6), respectively. Comparison among the different treatments for the 3 subtypes of PVTT patients after propensity score (PS) matching showed the effectiveness of ST to be the best for type I and type II PVTT patients, and TACE-RT was most beneficial for type III patients. Treatment was an independent risk factor of OS. ST was the best treatment for type I and II PVTT patients with Child-Pugh A and selected B liver function. TACE-RT should be given to type III PVTT patients. PMID:26986115

  2. [Surgical tactics in acute thrombophlebitis of the varicose dilated great saphenous vein].

    PubMed

    Zhenetl', Z D; Zhane, A K; Tliusten, R Iu; Gladchenko, G M; Cherepakhina, T I

    1986-03-01

    A comparative analysis of results of the operative and conservative methods of treatment of acute thrombophlebitis of varicose dilated large subcutaneous vein was performed. The conservative treatment of the disease is shown to be timetaking, does not exclude the following recidivation of the thrombotic process and operative treatment. Radical venectomy for acute thrombophlebitis of the varicose dilated large subcutaneous vein is thought to be the method of choice since it prevents developing thromboembolism of the pulmonary artery, cures the patient from the main disease and facilitates earlier occupational rehabilitation. PMID:3727290

  3. Living Donor Liver Transplantation for Unresectable Liver Adenomatosis Associated with Congenital Absence of Portal Vein: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Brasoveanu, Vladislav; Ionescu, Mihnea Ioan; Grigorie, Razvan; Mihaila, Mariana; Bacalbasa, Nicolae; Dumitru, Radu; Herlea, Vlad; Iorgescu, Andreea; Tomescu, Dana; Popescu, Irinel

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 21 Final Diagnosis: Unresectable liver adenomatosis associated with congenital absence of portal vein Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Living donor liver transplantation Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Rare disease Background: Abernethy malformation (AM), or congenital absence of portal vein (CAPV), is a very rare disease which tends to be associated with the development of benign or malignant tumors, usually in children or young adults. Case Report: We report the case of a 21-year-old woman diagnosed with type Ib AM (portal vein draining directly into the inferior vena cava) and unresectable liver adenomatosis. The patient presented mild liver dysfunction and was largely asymptomatic. Living donor liver transplantation was performed using a left hemiliver graft from her mother. Postoperatively, the patient attained optimal liver function and at 9-month follow-up has returned to normal life. Conclusions: We consider that living donor liver transplantation is the best therapeutic solution for AM associated with unresectable liver adenomatosis, especially because compared to receiving a whole liver graft, the waiting time on the liver transplantation list is much shorter. PMID:26386552

  4. Efficacy of peritoneovenous shunt for treating tolvaptan-resistant refractory ascites in a cirrhotic patient with portal vein thrombosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    SHIGETO, KOTA; KAWAGUCHI, TAKUMI; NIIZEKI, TAKASHI; KUNITAKE, YASUSHI; TAKEDATSU, HIDETOSHI; TONAN, TATSUYUKI; FUJIMOTO, KIMINORI; TANAKA, MASATOSHI; ABE, TOSHI; NAITO, HISANORI; TORIMURA, TAKUJI

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneovenous shunt is normally used for the treatment of refractory ascites. However, its efficacy in treating tolvaptan-resistant refractory ascites has not been reported thus far. In addition, the impact of peritoneovenous shunt on the prognosis of cirrhotic patients remains controversial. In the present report, a case of tolvaptan-resistant refractory ascites associated with liver cirrhosis and portal vein thrombosis is described. The male patient was diagnosed with hepatitis C virus-related liver cirrhosis at the age of 51 years. At the age of 56 years, the patient developed portal vein thrombosis, resulting in the development of refractory ascites. Since the ascites was resistant to treatment with a low-sodium diet and diuretics such as tolvaptan, a peritoneovenous shunt was implanted upon obtaining consent. The shunt immediately increased the urine volume, and the ascites was markedly decreased. The patient's body weight decreased from 62.7 to 57.1 kg in 2 days, and his ascites symptom inventory-7 score decreased from 23 to 0 points in 31 days. Although the patient succumbed to sepsis on day 486 following the shunt implant, his activities of daily living were preserved until 8 days prior to mortality. Thus, the present case supports the efficacy of peritoneovenous shunt for the treatment of tolvaptan-resistant refractory ascites associated with liver cirrhosis and portal vein thrombosis. Furthermore, the present case suggests that peritoneovenous shunt may prolong the survival of cirrhotic patents with refractory ascites. PMID:27123091

  5. Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver in a young female: treatment with portal vein embolization and liver trisectonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gargavanis, Athanasios A.; Katsiki, Evangelia D.; Salveridis, Nikolaos T.; Antoniadis, Nikolaos A.; Papanikolaou, Vasileios

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated Embryonal Sarcoma of the Liver (UESL) is a tumor highly malignant, of mesenchymal origin. It is a rare finding in adults, though less rare in children. The strategy to be followed and the therapeutic targets to be reached for this tumor, in adult cases, remain ambiguous and controversial. Herein we report the case of a 29 year old female patient with a massive UESL and we describe our therapeutic approach. A 29 year-old female patient was referred to our center with severe intermittent epigastric pain and fever due to a voluminous liver tumor: Needle biopsy was of no specific findings and surgical excision was decided. Right portal vein embolization and selective embolization of the segment's IV branch was performed in order to achieve adequate future liver remnant (FLR). Right trisectonectomy was then performed, with uneventful post operative period and the patient was discharged at the 11th post operative day. UESL is a rare tumor that needs aggressive surgical approach and multidisciplinary team management is of paramount importance. PMID:27621753

  6. Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver in a young female: treatment with portal vein embolization and liver trisectonectomy.

    PubMed

    Giakoustidis, Dimitrios E; Gargavanis, Athanasios A; Katsiki, Evangelia D; Salveridis, Nikolaos T; Antoniadis, Nikolaos A; Papanikolaou, Vasileios

    2016-08-01

    Undifferentiated Embryonal Sarcoma of the Liver (UESL) is a tumor highly malignant, of mesenchymal origin. It is a rare finding in adults, though less rare in children. The strategy to be followed and the therapeutic targets to be reached for this tumor, in adult cases, remain ambiguous and controversial. Herein we report the case of a 29 year old female patient with a massive UESL and we describe our therapeutic approach. A 29 year-old female patient was referred to our center with severe intermittent epigastric pain and fever due to a voluminous liver tumor: Needle biopsy was of no specific findings and surgical excision was decided. Right portal vein embolization and selective embolization of the segment's IV branch was performed in order to achieve adequate future liver remnant (FLR). Right trisectonectomy was then performed, with uneventful post operative period and the patient was discharged at the 11(th) post operative day. UESL is a rare tumor that needs aggressive surgical approach and multidisciplinary team management is of paramount importance. PMID:27621753

  7. Techniques of TIPS in the treatment of liver cirrhosis combined with incompletely occlusive main portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mengfei; Yue, Zhendong; Zhao, Hongwei; Wang, Lei; Fan, Zhenhua; He, Fuliang; Yao, Jiannan; Dong, Xiaoqun; Liu, Fuquan

    2016-01-01

    The patients of liver cirrhosis associated with portal vein thrombosis (PVT) can be effectively treated by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPS). Although the corresponding TIPS procedures have already performed on the patients to different types of PVT, the procedures are not specific and the relationship between different types of PVT and technical success rate of TIPS is unclear. What's more, we aimed to explore the relationship between survival and vascular patency immediately after TIPS. 191 subjects underwent retrospective assessment. Appropriate TIPS procedures were performed based on our more specific classification. The overall success rate of TIPS was 95.8% (183/191). Success rate was significantly different between Grade II and Grade IV thrombosis (χ(2) = 5.294, P = 0.021). The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-and 5-year survival rates were 95.6%, 89.1%, 83.1%, 76.5% and 67.8%, respectively. The overall survival time of completely patent PV and incomplete patent PV immediately after TIPS was 57.05 ± 0.75 vs. 39.12 ± 2.64 months, respectively (P < 0.0001). We conclude that appropriate TIPS procedures and lower grade of PVT are essential for better technical success rate of TIPS. The patency of target vessels is important for survival. PMID:27620282

  8. [A case of HCC with portal vein thrombosis treated with multidisciplinary treatment combined with preoperative SBRT and radical resection].

    PubMed

    Marubashi, Shigeru; Gotoh, Kunihito; Akita, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Hidenori; Sugimura, Keijiro; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Motoori, Masaaki; Kishi, Kentaro; Noura, Shingo; Ohue, Masayuki; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Masahiko; Ishikawa, Osamu; Sakon, Masato

    2014-11-01

    A 70s man with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) (Vp-HCC) in the main trunk (Vp4) was referred to our hospital. He was negative for hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV), and his liver function was well preserved. The main tumor was in the right lobe and exceeded 10 cm in diameter. There were no intrahepatic metastases to the left lobe. The patient underwent stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) (48 Gy/4 fractions) to the area of the PVTT. Six days after SBRT, the patient underwent right lobectomy for removal of PVTT. The postoperative course was uneventful, and low-dose 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin(FP)intra-arterial chemotherapy was administered for 3 months. Histopathological findings for the tumor indicated a poorly differentiated HCC, vp4, with moderate to severe tumor necrosis or degeneration in the area that received SBRT. Tumor markers (alpha-fetoprotein [AFP], proteins induced by vitamin K absence [PIVKA-II]) decreased within the normal range, and there was no apparent HCC recurrence 6 months after the hepatectomy. Multidisciplinary treatment combined with preoperative SBRT and radical resection for Vp-HCC was feasible and effective in this case. PMID:25731445

  9. Effect of He-Ne laser irradiation on spontaneous contractive activity and basal tone level of rat portal vein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrishchev, Nikolai N.; Barabanova, Valeria V.; Mikhailova, Irina A.; Chephu, Svetlana G.

    2000-11-01

    To study the effect of He-Ne irradiation (632.8 nm, 15 mW/cm2) on spontaneous contractive activity the fragments of rat portal vein weremounted isometrically in Krebs buffer. Irradiation of vessel fragments by He-Ne laser during 3,5 and 10 min caused the decrease of ton up to 50%, which lasted in postirradiation period (the observation time - 10 min). The frequency of phasic and tonic contractions did not change, but the amplitude increased up to 40% as compared to the initial level. The decreased basal tone level and the increased amplitude of phasic oscillations lasted in postirradiation period. Adding NO synthasa blocator (N - nitro-L-arginine) to Krebs solution before irradiation caused no significant changes mentioned above parameters. Irradiation and coputing of the same parameters of spontaneous contractive activity of vena porta caused no effects, mentioned in the absence of the blocator. From the results it is concluded that the decrease of tone is evoked by the increase of EDRF production and cGMP. The increase of amplitude of phasic and tonic contractions is connected with increase of Ca++ entry in every contraction cycle as a result of membrane Ca++ pool increase.

  10. Ionic mechanisms involved in the strontium-induced spike and plateau in the smooth muscle of rat portal vein.

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, K; Yamamoto, Y

    1983-01-01

    The action of Sr on the smooth muscle of rat portal vein was studied electrophysiologically using micro-electrodes. By replacing Ca with Sr (2.5 mM), the spontaneous membrane activity was altered and spikes were followed by a long lasting plateau potential. The mechanisms which generated the spike and the plateau in the Sr-induced activity were elucidated. As the concentration of Sr was increased, the peak potential and the maximum rates of rise and fall of the initial spike in each discharge increased. The peak potential varied by 15.2 mV with a 10-fold change in [Sr]o. As there was a decrease in the membrane resistance during the plateau, an increase in the permeability of the membrane for Sr, Cl or Na could be responsible for generation of the plateau. The amplitude of the plateau decreased with increase in the concentration of Sr, remained unchanged in a low-Cl solution, but was diminished in a low-Na solution. Mn (1-2 mM) inhibited not only the spike but also the plateau. TEA (20 mM) shifted the plateau potential in a positive direction and the plateau became permanent. When inward currents were applied in the presence of TEA, spikes with large overshoots and small rates of fall were induced. These results indicate that Sr and K conductances of the membrane generate the spike and that slow-inactivating voltage-dependent Na conductance produces the plateau. PMID:6875907

  11. Arrival time parametric imaging of the hemodynamic balance changes between the hepatic artery and the portal vein during deep inspiration, using Sonazoid-enhanced ultrasonography: A case of Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wakui, Noritaka; Takayama, Ryuji; Matsukiyo, Yasushi; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Kobayashi, Kojiro; Mukozu, Takanori; Nakano, Shigeru; Ikehara, Takashi; Nagai, Hidenari; Igarashi, Yoshinori; Sumino, Yasukiyo

    2013-07-01

    This case report concerns a 40-year-old male who had previously been treated for an esophageal varix rupture, at the age of 30 years. The medical examination at that time revealed occlusion of the inferior vena cava in the proximity of the liver, leading to the diagnosis of the patient with Budd-Chiari syndrome. The progress of the patient was therefore monitored in an outpatient clinic. The patient had no history of drinking or smoking, but had suffered an epileptic seizure in 2004. The patient's family history revealed nothing of note. In February 2012, color Doppler ultrasonography (US) revealed a change in the blood flow in the right portal vein branch, from hepatopetal to hepatofugal, during deep inspiration. Arrival time parametric imaging (At-PI), using Sonazoid-enhanced US, was subsequently performed to examine the deep respiration-induced changes observed in the hepatic parenchymal perfusion. US images captured during deep inspiration demonstrated hepatic parenchymal perfusion predominantly in red, indicating that the major blood supply was the hepatic artery. During deep expiration, the portal venous blood flow remained hepatopetal, and hepatic parenchymal perfusion was displayed predominantly in yellow, indicating that the portal vein was the major source of the blood flow. The original diagnostic imaging results were reproduced one month subsequently by an identical procedure. At-PI enabled an investigation into the changes that were induced in the hepatic parenchymal perfusion by a compensatory mechanism involving the hepatic artery. These changes occurred in response to a reduction in the portal venous blood flow, as is observed in the arterialization of hepatic blood flow that is correlated with the progression of chronic hepatitis C. It has been established that the peribiliary capillary plexus is important in the regulation of hepatic arterial blood flow. However, this case demonstrated that the peribiliary capillary plexus also regulates acute

  12. Potassium channel modulation in rat portal vein by ATP depletion: a comparison with the effects of levcromakalim (BRL 38227).

    PubMed Central

    Noack, T.; Edwards, G.; Deitmer, P.; Weston, A. H.

    1992-01-01

    1. The effects of levcromakalim and of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) depletion on membrane potential and ionic currents were studied in freshly-dispersed smooth muscle cells of rat portal vein by use of combined voltage- and current-clamp techniques. 2. Levcromakalim (1 microM) induced a glibenclamide-sensitive, non-inactivating K-current (IKCO) and simultaneously inhibited the slow, transient outward, delayed rectifier K-current (ITO). Levcromakalim also hyperpolarized the portal vein cells by approximately 20 mV. 3. Reduction of intracellular ATP by removal of glucose and carboxylic acids from the recording pipette and of glucose from the bath fluid, induced a slowly-developing, non-inactivating and glibenclamide-sensitive K-current (Imet) within 60-300 s after breaking the membrane patch. Imet reached peak amplitude after 300-900 s, remained at a plateau for 200-800 s and then slowly ran down. At the peak of Imet, the cells were hyperpolarized by approximately 20 mV and their input conductance was increased by 42%. 4. At the time of maximum development of Imet, the delayed rectifier current, ITO, was reduced by 48%. 5. In the absence of glucose and carboxylic acids, addition of 1 microM free ATP to the recording pipette almost doubled the magnitude of Imet. At a holding potential of -10 mV, Imet was increased from 124 +/- 11 pA to 228 +/- 54 pA whereas the time-course of development and run-down of Imet was unaffected. 6. During the development and after the run-down of Imet, levcromakalim (1-10 microM) failed to induce IKCO. 7. Stationary fluctuation analysis of the current noise associated with Imet revealed a unitary conductance of between 10-20 pS in a physiological potassium gradient. A second contaminating current with an underlying unitary conductance of approximately 150 pS remained after Imet had run down. 8. It is concluded that IKCO induced by levcromakalim and Imet are carried by the same population of relatively small conductance, glibenclamide

  13. Characteristics of contractile response of isolated portal veins from chronic portal hypertensive rats under altered levels of external K+, Ca2+, and norepinephrine concentrations: a comparison with normal Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, T; Arita, M; Kobayashi, M

    1988-01-01

    We studied contractile properties of portal veins isolated from chronic portal hypertensive rats (PHR) resulting from liver cirrhosis, a model obtained by repeated subcutaneous injections of CCl4 (2 mg/kg) twice weekly for over 45 weeks. Portal venous pressure in vivo was significantly higher in PHR (167.0 +/- 38.7 mmH2O) than in the control normal Wistar rats (NWR) (102.0 +/- 25.5 mmH2O). A pair of portal veins from PHR and NWR were mounted longitudinally in an organ bath and perfused with Tyrode's solution with different K+, Ca2+, and norepinephrine concentrations. The isometric tension was measured by a strain-gauge. Under control conditions, spontaneous phasic contractile force, corrected by cross-sectional area, was greater, and the frequency was lower in PHR than in NWR preparations. The averaged peak contractile force measured at different [K]o (5.4-86.4 mM) was also greater in PHR than in NWR. Force of the tonic contraction measured at different [Ca]o (0.45-5.4 mM), under conditions of 86.4 mM [K]o was significantly larger in PHR than in NWR preparations. However, the Ca2+ sensitivity of both preparations was the same. D-600 (greater than or equal to 0.1 microM) inhibited the tonic contraction in both preparations with an identical sensitivity to the drug. In the presence of norepinephrine (10 microM), the Ca2+ sensitivity of the tonic contraction increased both in PHR and NWR preparations. The increase was more pronounced in PHR and was completely reversed in the presence of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor blocker, prazosin (0.1 microM). The alpha 1-adrenoceptor sensitivity to norepinephrine was not altered in PHR preparations. The rate of Ca2+ release and uptake of intracellular Ca2+ seemed identical in both preparations. Thus, in the absence of norepinephrine, the phasic and tonic contractile forces of portal veins from PHR are larger than that of NWR, probably due to increased membrane Ca2+ permeability. The PHR preparations have a higher affinity for external

  14. Autoradiographic study of the regional distribution of gastric blood flow in portal hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Geraghty, J.G.; Angerson, W.J.; Carter, D.C. )

    1989-11-01

    This study measures regional gastric blood flow in portal hypertensive rats at three separate periods after portal vein ligation using quantitative autoradiography with 14C-labeled iodoantipyrine. The level of corpus mucosal blood flow was significantly reduced in 3-day portal vein-ligated animals compared with sham-operated control animals (30.4 +/- 2.3 vs. 47.1 +/- 5.6 ml/100 g.min). There was no significant difference in corpus mucosal blood flow between portal vein-ligated and sham-operated animals at 7- and 28-day periods, although the level of perfusion was higher in the 28-day portal vein-ligated group. There was no significant difference in antral mucosal or muscle blood flow between portal hypertensive and control animals at any of the study periods. We conclude that the acute period after portal vein ligation is associated with a reduced corpus mucosal microcirculation but that this effect is not sustained in portal hypertensive animals studied at later intervals after portal vein ligation.

  15. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography-Based Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Shintaro; Sato, Morio Suwa, Kazuhiro; Kishi, Kazushi; Shimono, Chigusa; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tanihata, Hirohiko; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). Methods and Materials: Patients with HCC with PVTT in the first branch and/or main trunk were selected for this study. The optimal beam directions for 3D-CRT were explored using a Tc-99m-galactosyl human serum albumin SPECT image for guidance. The SPECT image was classified as either wedge type or localized type. The clinical target volume to a total dose of 45 or 50 Gy per 18-20 fractions included the main tumor and PVTT in the wedge type and PVTT alone in the localized type. Results: Twenty-six patients were enrolled: 18 with wedge type and 8 with localized type. Mean tumor size was 7.1 cm (range, 4.4-12.3 cm). Clinical target volumes of wedge type vs. localized type were 111.2 cm{sup 3} vs. 48.4 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.010), respectively. Mean dose to normal liver and mean dose to functional liver were 1185 cGy and 988 cGy (p = 0.001) in wedge type and 1046 cGy and 1043 cGy (p = 0.658) in localized type, respectively. Despite an incidence of Child-Pugh B and C of 57.7%, no patients experienced radiation-induced liver disease. The progression of PVTT was inhibited, with an incidence of 92.2%; survival rates at 1 and 2 years were 44% and 30%, respectively. Conclusion: Single photon emission computed tomography-based 3D-CRT enables irradiation of both the main tumor and PVTT with low toxicity and promising survival.

  16. Radioembolization Is a Safe and Effective Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Thrombosis: A Propensity Score Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young Youn; Lee, Minjong; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Yun Hwan; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Bae, Si Hyun; Kim, Do Young; Heo, Jeong; Kim, Yoon Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Limited treatment options are available for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein thrombosis (PVT). Transarterial radioembolization using Yttrium-90 microspheres is a new treatment modality for HCC with PVT. For this analysis, we compared responses to treatment with radioembolization and with sorafenib. Methods We evaluated 32 patients who were part of a multicenter retrospective cohort. All patients had PVT without extrahepatic metastasis and were treated with radioembolization in one of six tertiary referral hospitals in Korea. We retrospectively enrolled another 31 consecutive PVT patients without extrahepatic metastasis from a single center who received sorafenib treatment to serve as the control group. We used inverse probability weighting (IPW) using propensity scores to adjust for the between-group differences in baseline characteristics. Results At 3 months, the response rate and disease control rate were 32.1% (9/32) and 57.1% (16/32), respectively, in the radioembolization group and 3.2% (1/31) and 41.9% (13/31) in the sorafenib group. Median overall survival (OS) and time to progression (TTP) were not significantly different between the radioembolization group and the sorafenib group (13.8 months and 10.0 months, P = 0.22; and 6.0 months and 6.0 months, P = 0.08; respectively). No differences in OS (P = 0.97) or TTP (P = 0.34) were observed after IPW was applied to balance the population characteristics. The sorafenib group showed significantly more grade 3/4 adverse effects than the radioembolization group (P < 0.01). Conclusion HCC patients with PVT who underwent radioembolization achieved comparable survival to patients who received sorafenib, even after application of IPW. The radioembolization group also experienced fewer severe adverse effects. Radioembolization can be considered a new treatment option for patients with HCC with PVT. PMID:27149067

  17. Use of Double-Occlusion Balloon Catheter: Preoperative Portal Vein Embolization for Induction of Future Remnant Liver Hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min Joo; Choo, Sung Wook Do, Young Soo; Park, Kwang Bo; Han, Yoon Hee; Choo, In Wook; Cho, Jae Min; Cho, Jae Won; Kim, Sung Joo; Sohn, Tae Sung

    2004-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of using double-occlusion balloon catheters in preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) to induce future remnant liver hypertrophy. Materials and Methods: PVE was achieved with gelatin sponges by using double-occlusion balloon catheter in seventeen patients with hepatobiliary malignant tumors. The ipsilateral approach was used in thirteen patients and the contralateral approach in four patients due to large size of tumor in the right hepatic lobe.Surgery was performed in 15 patients, 14-27 days (mean, 21.9 days)after PVE. Computed tomographic liver volumetric studies were performed before embolization and before surgery. The changes in aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), prothrombintime (PT), and total bilirubin levels before and after the PVE were evaluated. Complications were evaluated after PVE. Results: PVE using double-occlusion balloon catheter was successful in all cases, irrespective of approach technique. The future remnant liver (FRL) volumes were 251-920 cm{sup 3} (mean, 437cm{sup 3}) before PVE and 281-1042 cm{sup 3} (mean, 555cm{sup 3}) after PVE. The mean increase in the volume of the FRL was 28.6%; this represented 37% of the pre resection volume of the liver. Clinical and biologic tolerance of PVE was mandatory. There were no complications. Conclusions: PVE using the double-occlusion balloon catheter is safe and well-tolerated and can be performed technically with ease. This hypertrophy allows hepatectomy to be performed safely when the FRL volume is initially insufficient inpatients with hepatobiliary tumors.

  18. Portal Vein Embolization before Right Hepatectomy: Improved Results Using n-Butyl-Cyanoacrylate Compared to Microparticles Plus Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Guiu, Boris Bize, Pierre; Gunthern, Daniel; Demartines, Nicolas; Halkic, Nermin; Denys, Alban

    2013-10-15

    Background: There is currently no consensus in the literature on which embolic agent induces the greatest degree of liver hypertrophy after portal vein embolization (PVE). Only experimental results in a pig model have demonstrated an advantage of n-butyl-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) over 3 other embolic materials (hydrophilic gel, small and large polyvinyl alcohol particles) for PVE. Therefore, the aim of this human study was to retrospectively compare the results of PVE using NBCA with those using spherical microparticles plus coils. Methods: A total of 34 patients underwent PVE using either NBCA (n = 20), or spherical microparticles plus coils (n = 14). PVE was decided according to preoperative volumetry on the basis of contrast-enhanced CT. Groups were compared for age, sex, volume of the left lobe before PVE and future remnant liver ratio (FRL) (volume of the left lobe/total liver volume - tumor volume). The primary end point was the increase in left lobe volume 1 month after PVE. Secondary end points were procedure complications and biological tolerance. Results: Both groups were similar in terms of age, sex ratio, left lobe volume, and FRL before PVE. NBCA induced a greater increase in volume after PVE than did microparticles plus coils (respectively, +74 {+-} 69 % and +23 {+-} 14 %, p < 0.05). The amount of contrast medium used for the procedure was significantly larger when microparticles and coils rather than NBCA were used (respectively, 264 {+-} 43 ml and 162 {+-} 34 ml, p < 0.01). The rate of PVE complications as well as the biological tolerance was similar in both groups. Conclusion: NBCA seems more effective than spherical microparticles plus coils to induce left-lobe hypertrophy.

  19. Percutaneous Portal Vein Embolization Increases the Feasibility and Safety of Major Liver Resection for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Injured Liver

    PubMed Central

    Azoulay, Daniel; Castaing, Denis; Krissat, Jinane; Smail, Alloua; Marin Hargreaves, Guillermo; Lemoine, Antoinette; Emile, Jean-François; Bismuth, Henri

    2000-01-01

    Objective To assess the influence of preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) on the long-term outcome of liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in injured liver. Summary Background Data On an healthy liver, PVE of the liver to be resected induces hypertrophy of the remnant liver and increases the safety of hepatectomy. On injured liver, this effect is still debated. Methods During the study period, 10 patients underwent preoperative PVE and 19 patients did not before resection of three or more liver segments for HCC in injured liver (cirrhosis or fibrosis). PVE was performed when the estimated rate of remnant functional liver parenchyma (ERRFLP) assessed by computed tomographic scan volumetry was less than 40%. Results In all patients, PVE was feasible. There were no deaths or complications. The ERRFLP after PVE was significantly increased compared with the pre-PVE value. Liver resection was performed after PVE in 9 of 10 patients, with surgical death and complication rates of 0% and 45%, respectively. PVE increased the number of resections of three or more segments by 47% (9/19). Overall actuarial survival rates with or without previous PVE (89%, 67%, and 44% vs. 80%, 53%, and 53% at 1, 3 and 5 years, respectively) and disease-free actuarial survival rates (86%, 64%, and 21% vs. 55%, 17%, and 17% at 1, 3, and 5 years respectively) after hepatectomy were comparable. Conclusion With the use of PVE, more patients with previously unresectable HCC in injured liver can benefit from resection. Long-term survival rates are comparable to those after resection without PVE. PMID:11066138

  20. L-type and Ca2+ release channel-dependent hierarchical Ca2+ signalling in rat portal vein myocytes.

    PubMed

    Arnaudeau, S; Boittin, F X; Macrez, N; Lavie, J L; Mironneau, C; Mironneau, J

    1997-11-01

    Ca2+ signalling events and whole-cell Ca2+ currents were analyzed in single myocytes from rat portal vein by using a laser scanning confocal microscope combined with the patch-clamp technique. In myocytes in which the intracellular Ca2+ store was depleted or Ca2+ release channels were blocked by 10 microM ryanodine, inward Ca2+ currents induced slow and sustained elevations of [Ca2+]i. These Ca2+ responses were suppressed by 1 microM oxodipine and by depolarizations to +120 mV, a potential close to the reversal potential for Ca2+ ions, suggesting that they reflected Ca2+ influx through L-type Ca2+ channels. With functioning intracellular Ca2+ stores, flash photolysis of caged Ca2+ gave rise to a small increase in [Ca2+]i with superimposed Ca2+ sparks, reflecting the opening of clustered Ca2+ release channels. Brief Ca2+ currents in the voltage range from -30 to +10 mV triggered Ca2+ sparks or macrosparks that did not propagate in the entire line-scan image. Increasing the duration of Ca2+ current for 100 ms or more allowed the trigger of propagating Ca2+ waves which originated from the same initiation sites as the caffeine-activated response. Both Ca2+ sparks and initiation sites of Ca2+ waves activated by Ca2+ currents were observed in the vicinity of areas that excluded the Ca2+ probes, reflecting infoldings of the plasma membrane close to the sarcoplasmic reticulum, as revealed by fluorescent markers. The hierarchy of Ca2+ signalling events, from submicroscopic fundamental events to elementary events (sparks) and propagated waves, provides an integrated mechanism to regulate vascular tone. PMID:9448946

  1. The efficacy and safety of postoperative adjuvant transarterial embolization and radiotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma patients with portal vein tumor thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Tao; Chen, Jie; Xie, Zhi-Bo; Wu, Fei-Xiang; Wang, Si-Da; Liu, Jun-Jie; Li, Le-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to find out the safety and efficiency of postoperative adjuvant transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and radiotherapy (RT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). Methods From 2009 to 2010, a total of 92 HCC patients with PVTT were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patients were divided into three groups according to their adjuvant therapies (conservative group, n=51; TACE group, n=31; RT group, n=10). Results In our analysis, median survival in patients with postoperative adjuvant TACE (21.91±3.60 months) or RT (14.53±1.61 months) was significantly longer than patients with hepatectomy alone (8.99±1.03 months). But the difference between adjuvant TACE and RT was of no significance (P=0.716). Also a similar result could be observed in median disease-free survival: conservative group (6.51±1.44 months), TACE group (13.98±3.38 months), and RT group (14.03±2.40 months). Treatment strategies (hazard ratio [HR] =0.411, P<0.001) and PVTT type (HR =4.636, P<0.001) were the independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Similarly, the risk factors were the same when multivariate analysis was conducted in disease-free survival (treatment strategies, HR =0.423, P<0.001; PVTT type, HR =4.351, P<0.001) and recurrence (treatment strategies, HR =0.459, P=0.030; PVTT type, HR =2.908, P=0.047). Patients with PVTT type I had longer overall survival than patients with PVTT type II (median survival: 18.43±2.88 months vs 11.59±1.45 months, P=0.035). Conclusion Postoperative adjuvant TACE and RT may be a choice for HCC patients with PVTT. PMID:27390524

  2. Stepwise approach to curative surgery using percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage and portal vein embolization for severe bile duct injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Honmyo, Naruhiko; Kuroda, Shintaro; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Ishiyama, Kohei; Ide, Kentaro; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Ohira, Masahiro; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-12-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) has been recently adapted to acute cholecystitis. Major bile duct injury during LC, especially Strasberg-Bismuth classification type E, can be a critical problem sometimes requiring hepatectomy. Safety and definitive treatment without further morbidities, such as posthepatectomy liver failure, is required. Here, we report a case of severe bile duct injury treated with a stepwise approach using (99m)Tc-galactosyl human serum albumin ((99m)Tc-GSA) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT fusion imaging to accurately estimate liver function.A 52-year-old woman diagnosed with acute cholecystitis underwent LC at another hospital and was transferred to our university hospital for persistent bile leakage on postoperative day 20. She had no jaundice or infection, although an intraperitoneal drainage tube discharged approximately 500 ml of bile per day. Recorded operation procedure showed removal of the gallbladder with a part of the common bile duct due to its misidentification, and each of the hepatic ducts and right hepatic artery was injured. Abdominal enhanced CT revealed obstructive jaundice of the left liver and arterial shunt through the hilar plate to the right liver. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography revealed type E4 or more advanced bile duct injury according to the Bismuth-Strasberg classification. We planned a stepwise approach using percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage (PTCD) and portal vein embolization (PVE) for secure right hemihepatectomy and biliary-jejunum reconstruction and employed (99m)Tc-GSA SPECT/CT fusion imaging to estimate future remnant liver function. The left liver function rate had changed from 26.2 % on admission to 26.3 % after PTCD and 54.5 % after PVE, while the left liver volume rate was 33.8, 33.3, and 49.6 %, respectively. The increase of liver function was higher than that of volume (28.3 vs. 15.8 %). On postoperative day 63, the curative operation, right

  3. Recanalization of post-transplant late-onset long segmental portal vein thrombosis with bidirectional transhepatic and transmesenteric approach.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, Shunsuka; Isobe, Yoshinori; Kasahara, Mureo; Miyazaki, Osamu; Sakamoto, Seisuke; Uchida, Hajime; Shigeta, Takanobu; Masaki, Hidekazu

    2013-03-01

    PV complications are the most frequent vascular complications in pediatric LT. We have experienced a case with chronic postoperative PVT that necessitates combined transhepatic and transmesenteric approach and have confirmed mid-term patency. An eight-yr-old boy had successful LDLT with a left lateral segment graft at the age of two months for HBV-related acute liver failure. Seven years after transplantation, the patient suddenly showed a melena with hypovolemic shock. Doppler ultrasound and CT revealed intrahepatic bile duct dilatation and main PVT with collateral formation at hepatic hilus and mesenterium of the Roux-en-Y jejunal loop. Urgent splenic artery embolization was performed to control the bleeding and was temporarily effective. Therefore, recanalization of PVO was attempted. Because of long segmental PVO and steep angle between the intrahepatic PV and the portal trunk, bidirectional transhepatic and transmesenteric approach was selected and resulted in deploying three metallic stents necessitating additional infusion thrombolytic therapy. The patient is now followed as an outpatient with patent stents for two yr since the procedure. For the rescue of these patients, recanalization of obstructed PV trunk with bidirectional approach would be feasible with better graft survival and less invasiveness than conventional surgical interventions. PMID:23442104

  4. Extraordinary cause of acute gastric dilatation and hepatic portal venous gas: Chronic use of synthetic cannabinoid

    PubMed Central

    Sevinc, Mert Mahsuni; Kinaci, Erdem; Bayrak, Savas; Yardimci, Aytul Hande; Cakar, Ekrem; Bektaş, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Addiction to synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) is a growing social and health problem worldwide. Chronic use of SCs may cause adverse effects in the gastrointestinal system. We describe a very rare case of acute gastric dilatation (AGD) and hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG), with findings of acute abdomen resulting from chronic use of a SC, Bonzai. AGD and HPVG were detected by computerized tomography examination. Patchy mucosal ischemia was seen in endoscopic examination. Despite the findings of an acute abdomen, a non-surgical approach with nasogastric decompression, antibiotic therapy, and close radiologic and endoscopic follow-up was preferred in the presented case. Clinical and radiologic findings decreased dramatically on the first day, and endoscopic findings gradually disappeared over 7 d. In conclusion, this case shows that chronic use of a SC may cause AGD and accompanying HPVG, which can be managed non-surgically despite the findings of acute abdomen. PMID:26457032

  5. Acute wiiitis representing as thrombosis of the inferior vena cava and left pelvic veins.

    PubMed

    Brodmann, M; Gary, T; Hafner, F; Eller, P; Deutschmann, H; Pilger, E; Seinost, G

    2015-08-01

    Deep venous thrombosis as a result of venous wall injury provoked by trauma is a common finding. It often occurs in patients with sportive overstraining, caused by over fatigue of the body structures. In 2007, the entity of "acute wiiitis" was first described in a letter to the New England Journal of Medicine. Acute wiiitis sums up all affections, mainly skeletal and muscle affections, provoked by playing Nintendo Wii, a very common and loved video-game system. Deep venous thrombosis as a consequence of Nintendo Wii has not been described so far. We present a patient with a massive free floating thrombus of the left pelvic veins originating from the gluteal veins and reaching into the inferior vena cava after playing Nintendo Wii. PMID:24681523

  6. Pharmacologically induced release and modulation of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine (NE) from the isolated portal vein of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Q.; Westfall, T.C.

    1986-03-05

    The purpose of the present study was to probe the mechanism for the enhancement of the field-stimulation induced release of /sup 3/H-NE from blood vessels of the SHR compared to normotensive rats. The results of two types of experiments are reported here. First, the effect of nicotine as well as tyramine in inducing the release of /sup 3/H-NE from the superfused portal vein was compared to field stimulation. Secondly, the modulatory effect of serotonin (5-HT) and methacholine (M) on the field stimulation induced release of /sup 3/H-NE was examined. In contrast to the enhancement of the field stimulation induced release of /sup 3/H-NE from the portal vein of the SHR compared to WKY, both nicotine and tyramine produced a similar release of NE from blood vessel obtained from both strains. The fractional release of /sup 3/H-NE to 10/sup -4/, 10/sup -3/ and 10/sup -2/M nicotine was 0.21, 0.67 and 45.5 from WKY and 0.14, 0.68 and 42.4 from SHR. The fractional release of /sup 3/H-NE to 10/sup -4/ and 10/sup -3/M tyramine was 6 and 17 from WKY compared to 7.5 and 17.5 from SHR. The inhibition of /sup 3/H-NE release from the portal vein by both 5-HT and M was similar in blood vessels obtained from SHR and WKY. These results are consistent with there being a defect in the exocytotic induced release of NE from noradrenergic neurons at the vascular neuroeffector junction.

  7. The role of three-dimensional imaging in optimizing diagnosis, classification and surgical treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus☆

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xu-Biao; Xu, Jie; Li, Nan; Yu, Ying; Shi, Jie; Guo, Wei-Xing; Cheng, Hong-Yan; Wu, Meng-Chao; Lau, Wan-Yee; Cheng, Shu-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Background Accurate assessment of characteristics of tumor and portal vein tumor thrombus is crucial in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma. Aims Comparison of the three-dimensional imaging with multiple-slice computed tomography in the diagnosis and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus. Method Patients eligible for surgical resection were divided into the three-dimensional imaging group or the multiple-slice computed tomography group according to the type of preoperative assessment. The clinical data were collected and compared. Results 74 patients were enrolled into this study. The weighted κ values for comparison between the thrombus type based on preoperative evaluation and intraoperative findings were 0.87 for the three-dimensional reconstruction group (n = 31) and 0.78 for the control group (n = 43). Three-dimensional reconstruction was significantly associated with a higher rate of en-bloc resection of tumor and thrombus (P = 0.025). Using three-dimensional reconstruction, significant correlation existed between the predicted and actual volumes of the resected specimens (r = 0.82, P < 0.01), as well as the predicted and actual resection margins (r = 0.97, P < 0.01). Preoperative three-dimensional reconstruction significantly decreased tumor recurrence and tumor-related death, with hazard ratios of 0.49 (95% confidential interval, 0.27–0.90) and 0.41 (95% confidential interval, 0.21–0.78), respectively. Conclusion For hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus, three-dimensional imaging was efficient in facilitating surgical treatment and benefiting postoperative survivals. PMID:27017169

  8. A High Circulating Tumor Cell Count in Portal Vein Predicts Liver Metastasis From Periampullary or Pancreatic Cancer: A High Portal Venous CTC Count Predicts Liver Metastases.

    PubMed

    Tien, Yu Wen; Kuo, Hsun-Chuan; Ho, Be-Ing; Chang, Ming-Chu; Chang, Yu-Ting; Cheng, Mei-Fang; Chen, Huai-Lu; Liang, Ting-Yung; Wang, Chien-Fang; Huang, Chia-Yi; Shew, Jin-Yuh; Chang, Ying Chih; Lee, Eva Y H P; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) released from a periampullary or pancreatic cancer can be more frequently detected in the portal than the systemic circulation and potentially can be used to identify patients with liver micrometastases. Aims of this study is to determine if CTCs count in portal venous blood of patients with nonmetastatic periampullary or pancreatic adenocarcinoma can be used as a predictor for subsequent liver metastases. CTCs were quantified in portal and peripheral venous blood samples collected simultaneously during pancreaticoduodenectomy in patients with presumed periampullary or pancreatic adenocarcinoma without image-discernible metastasis. Postoperatively patients were monitored for liver metastasis by abdominal magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography every 3 months for 1 year. Sixty patients with a pathological diagnosis of periampullary or pancreatic adenocarcinoma were included in the study. Multivariate analysis indicated that portal CTC count was a significant predictor for liver metastases within 6 months after surgery. Eleven of 13 patients with a high portal CTCs count (defined as >112 CMx Platform estimated CTCs in 2 mL blood) developed liver metastases within 6 months after surgery. In contrast, only 6 of 47 patients with a low portal CTC count developed liver metastases (P < 0.0001). A value of 112 CMx Platform estimated CTCs had 64.7% sensitivity and 95.4% specificity to predict liver metastases within 6 months after surgery. We concluded that a high CTC count in portal venous blood collected during pancreaticoduodenectomy in patients with periampullary or pancreatic adenocarcinoma without metastases detected by currently available imaging tools is a significant predictor for liver metastases within 6 months after surgery. PMID:27100430

  9. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis via Small Saphenous Veins for Treating Acute Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Xu, Xiao-dong; Gao, Peng; Yu, Ji-Xiang; Li, Yu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Meng, Ran-ran

    2016-01-01

    Background There is little data comparing catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) via small saphenous veins vs. systematic thrombolysis on complications and efficacy in acute deep venous thrombosis patients. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of CDT via the small saphenous veins with systematic thrombolysis for patients with acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Material/Methods Sixty-six patients with acute DVT admitted from June 2012 to December 2013 were divided into 2 groups: 27 patients received systemic thrombolysis (ST group) and 39 patients received CDT via the small saphenous veins (CDT group). The thrombolysis efficiency, limb circumference differences, and complications such as post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) in the 2 groups were recorded. Results The angiograms demonstrated that all or part of the fresh thrombus was dissolved. There was a significant difference regarding thrombolysis efficiency between the CDT group and ST group (71.26% vs. 48.26%, P=0.001). In both groups the postoperative limb circumference changes were higher compared to the preoperative values. The differences between postoperative limb circumferences on postoperative days 7 and 14 were significantly higher in the CDT group than in the ST group (all P<0.05). The incidence of postoperative PTS in the CDT group (17.9%) was significantly lower in comparison to the ST group (51.85%) during the follow-up (P=0.007). Conclusions Catheter-directed thrombolysis via the small saphenous veins is an effective, safe, and feasible approach for treating acute deep venous thrombosis. PMID:27552357

  10. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis via Small Saphenous Veins for Treating Acute Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Xu, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Peng; Yu, Ji-Xiang; Li, Yu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Meng, Ran-Ran

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is little data comparing catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) via small saphenous veins vs. systematic thrombolysis on complications and efficacy in acute deep venous thrombosis patients. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of CDT via the small saphenous veins with systematic thrombolysis for patients with acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT). MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty-six patients with acute DVT admitted from June 2012 to December 2013 were divided into 2 groups: 27 patients received systemic thrombolysis (ST group) and 39 patients received CDT via the small saphenous veins (CDT group). The thrombolysis efficiency, limb circumference differences, and complications such as post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) in the 2 groups were recorded. RESULTS The angiograms demonstrated that all or part of the fresh thrombus was dissolved. There was a significant difference regarding thrombolysis efficiency between the CDT group and ST group (71.26% vs. 48.26%, P=0.001). In both groups the postoperative limb circumference changes were higher compared to the preoperative values. The differences between postoperative limb circumferences on postoperative days 7 and 14 were significantly higher in the CDT group than in the ST group (all P<0.05). The incidence of postoperative PTS in the CDT group (17.9%) was significantly lower in comparison to the ST group (51.85%) during the follow-up (P=0.007). CONCLUSIONS Catheter-directed thrombolysis via the small saphenous veins is an effective, safe, and feasible approach for treating acute deep venous thrombosis. PMID:27552357

  11. Time-resolved measurements of phosphate release by cycling cross-bridges in portal vein smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    He, Z H; Ferenczi, M A; Brune, M; Trentham, D R; Webb, M R; Somlyo, A P; Somlyo, A V

    1998-12-01

    The rate of release of inorganic phosphate (Pi) from cycling cross-bridges in rabbit portal-anterior mesenteric vein smooth muscle was determined by following the fluorescence of the Pi-reporter, MDCC-PBP (Brune, M., J. L. Hunter, S. A. Howell, S. R. Martin, T. L. Hazlett, J. E. T. Corrie, and M. R. Webb. 1998. Biochemistry. 37:10370-10380). Cross-bridge cycling was initiated by photolytic release of ATP from caged-ATP in Triton-permeabilized smooth muscles in rigor. When the regulatory myosin light chains (MLC20) had been thiophosphorylated, the rate of Pi release was biphasic with an initial rate of 80 microM s-1 and amplitude 108 microM, decreasing to 13.7 microM s-1. These rates correspond to fast and slow turnovers of 1.8 s-1 and 0.3 s-1, assuming 84% thiophosphorylation of 52 microM myosin heads. Activation by Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation subsequent to ATP release resulted in slower Pi release, paralleling the rate of contraction that was also slower than after thiophosphorylation, and was also biphasic: 51 microM s-1 and 13.2 microM s-1. These rates suggest that the activity of myosin light chain kinase and phosphatase ("pseudo-ATPase") contributes <20% of the ATP usage during cross-bridge cycling. The extracellular "ecto-nucleotidase" activity was reduced eightfold by permeabilization, conditions in which the ecto-ADPase was 17% of the ecto-ATPase. Nevertheless, the remaining ecto-ATPase activity reduced the precision of the estimate of cross-bridge ATPase. We conclude that the transition from fast to slow ATPase rates reflects the properties and forces directly acting on cross-bridges, rather than the result of a time-dependent decrease in activation (MLC20 phosphorylation) occurring in intact smooth muscle. The mechanisms of slowing may include the effect of positive strain on cross-bridges, inhibition of the cycling rate by high affinity Mg-ADP binding, and associated state hydrolysis. PMID:9826623

  12. A voltage-dependent outward current with fast kinetics in single smooth muscle cells isolated from rabbit portal vein.

    PubMed

    Beech, D J; Bolton, T B

    1989-05-01

    1. Single smooth muscle cells were isolated enzymatically from the rabbit portal vein. They were voltage-clamped at room temperature using the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique. 2. When cells were bathed in physiological salt solution, depolarization from a holding potential of -70 mV elicited a time-dependent outward current which reached a maximum within 0.2-0.5 s, but when a more negative holding potential was used, an additional outward current could be activated. The current (Ifo) developed rapidly, was transient and seemed to be carried by potassium ions (K+). 3. The steady-state inactivation plot for Ifo was steeply voltage-dependent between -90 and -60 mV, current being 50% inactivated at -78 mV. The activation threshold was around -65 mV. The activation and inactivation kinetics were fast and voltage-dependent. When the test potential was -35 mV, peak current occurred after about 15 ms and the decay was complete within 250 ms. Recovery from inactivation was maximal after 1 s at -100 mV but was about five times slower at -70 mV. 4. The outward current Ifo was blocked completely by 4-aminopyridine (5 mM) or phencyclidine (0.1 mM), but was insensitive to tetraethylammonium ions (32 mM), apamin (0.1 microM), charybdotoxin from the venom of Leiurus quinquestriatus (0.1 microM), toxin-I from the venom of Dendroaspis polylepis (1 microM) or the putative K+ channel opener, cromakalim (10 microM). 5. The steady-state inactivation range and activation threshold, kinetics of activation and inactivation all showed a marked dependence on the concentration of divalent cations in the bathing solution. This effect was consistent with the hypothesis that Ifo was affected by membrane surface potential. The current did not seem to be Ca2+-activated. 6. Ifo closely resembled the A-current which has been described previously in neurones but not in smooth muscle. PMID:2600838

  13. Characterisation of a novel cell line (CSQT-2) with high metastatic activity derived from portal vein tumour thrombus of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, T; Hu, H S; Feng, Y X; Shi, J; Li, N; Guo, W X; Xue, J; Xie, D; Liu, S R; Wu, M C; Cheng, S Q

    2010-01-01

    Background: Portal vein tumour thrombus (PVTT) is highly associated with the progression and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, there are no appropriate cell models of PVTT with which to study the biological and physiological characteristics of PVTT. Methods: Primary cell culture was performed by the use of a successive xenograft line called PVTT-#1, which was obtained from a 60-year-old male HCC patient accompanied by PVTT. Results: A successive cell line named CSQT-2 was established. The cell line showed aggressive phenotypes in terms of cell growth, survival, migration, xenograft and metastasis. Moreover, an orthotopic transplantation assay showed that PVTT can be generated in nude mice when CSQT-2 cells were inoculated in the liver and that it shows a typical migratory tendency in the vascular branches of portal vein. Moreover, the established CSQT-2 cells also showed varied expression of tumour-initiating cell (TIC) markers such as CD133, CD90 and EpCAM. Conclusion: Establishment of CSQT-2 may provide a suitable model with which to investigate the molecular mechanisms of PVTT-related HCC. PMID:20461085

  14. Assessment of Liver Function Using 99mTc-Mebrofenin Hepatobiliary Scintigraphy in ALPPS (Associating Liver Partition and Portal Vein Ligation for Staged Hepatectomy)

    PubMed Central

    Cieslak, Kasia P.; Olthof, Pim B.; van Lienden, Krijn P.; Besselink, Marc G.; Busch, Olivier R.C.; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Bennink, Roelof J.

    2015-01-01

    ALPPS (associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy) is a new surgical technique for patients in whom conventional treatment is not feasible due to insufficient future remnant liver (FRL). During the first stage of ALPPS, accelerated hypertrophy of the FRL is induced by ligation of the portal vein and in situ split of the liver. In the second stage, the deportalized liver is removed when the FRL volume has reached ≥25% of total liver volume. However, FRL volume does not necessarily reflect FRL function. 99mTc-mebrofenin hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) with SPECT-CT is a quantitative test enabling regional assessment of parenchymal uptake function using a validated cut-off value for the prediction of postoperative liver failure (2.7%/min/m2). This paper describes the changes in FRL function and FRL volume in a 79-year-old patient diagnosed with metachronous colonic liver metastases who underwent ALPPS. We have observed a substantial difference between the increase in FRL volume and FRL function suggesting that HBS with SPECT-CT enables monitoring of the FRL function and could be a useful tool in the timing of resection in the second stage of the ALPPS procedure. PMID:26675783

  15. The effects of bepridil, compared with calcium-channel inhibitors and calmodulin antagonists on both spontaneous activity and contractions induced by potassium or phenylephrine in rat portal vein.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J K; Winslow, E; Marshall, R J

    1986-12-16

    Bepridil is known to block calcium channels in some vascular tissues. Recent work has shown that bepridil also antagonises calmodulin. The present study attempted to more fully characterize the vasodilator actions of bepridil by comparing it with the known calcium channel blocking drugs, nifedipine, diltiazem, verapamil and flunarizine, the calmodulin inhibitors, trifluoperazine and W7 and propylmethylenedioxyindene, which is thought to act intracellularly, on rat portal vein. The relative activities of the test drugs were compared on spontaneous activity and on all components of the contractile responses to potassium and phenylephrine. Bepridil inhibited all components of the potassium and phenylephrine responses equally, actions similar to those of the intracellular acting drugs. The exception to this was trifluoperazine which also exerted alpha-adrenoceptor blocking actions. In contrast the calcium channel blocking drugs, with the exception of verapamil, inhibited the tonic component of both spasmogen responses more than the phasic component. Bepridil like the intracellular acting drugs, but unlike the calcium channel blockers, markedly increased the frequency of spontaneous contractions whilst reducing amplitude. It is concluded that the profile of bepridil on rat portal vein more closely resembles that of intracellularly acting drugs than that of classical calcium channel inhibitors. PMID:3493163

  16. Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) procedure for hepatocellular carcinoma with chronic liver disease: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Papamichail, Michail; Pizanias, Michail; Yip, Vincent; Prassas, Evangellos; Prachalias, Andreas; Quaglia, Alberto; Peddu, Praveen; Heaton, Nigel; Srinivasan, Parthi

    2016-05-01

    The incidence of complications after liver resection is closely related to functional future liver remnant (FLR). The standard approach to augment FLR is surgical or radiological occlusion of the artery or portal vein on the tumor side. Associated liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALLPS) has been introduced as an alternative method to augment FLR. It offers rapid and effective hypertrophy for resecting liver metastases. However, data regarding its application in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with a background of chronic liver disease are limited. Here we describe the use of ALPPS procedure to manage a large solitary HCC with a background of chronic liver disease. The rising incidence of HCC has increased the number of surgical resections in patients with advanced stage liver disease not considered for liver transplantation. We reviewed reported experience of ALPPS in established chronic liver disease and current therapeutic modalities for HCC on a background of chronic liver disease in patients with potential liver insufficiency where tumor burden is beyond liver transplant criteria. PMID:27212995

  17. Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) procedure for hepatocellular carcinoma with chronic liver disease: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Pizanias, Michail; Yip, Vincent; Prassas, Evangellos; Prachalias, Andreas; Quaglia, Alberto; Peddu, Praveen; Heaton, Nigel; Srinivasan, Parthi

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of complications after liver resection is closely related to functional future liver remnant (FLR). The standard approach to augment FLR is surgical or radiological occlusion of the artery or portal vein on the tumor side. Associated liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALLPS) has been introduced as an alternative method to augment FLR. It offers rapid and effective hypertrophy for resecting liver metastases. However, data regarding its application in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with a background of chronic liver disease are limited. Here we describe the use of ALPPS procedure to manage a large solitary HCC with a background of chronic liver disease. The rising incidence of HCC has increased the number of surgical resections in patients with advanced stage liver disease not considered for liver transplantation. We reviewed reported experience of ALPPS in established chronic liver disease and current therapeutic modalities for HCC on a background of chronic liver disease in patients with potential liver insufficiency where tumor burden is beyond liver transplant criteria. PMID:27212995

  18. M1 macrophage infiltrations and histological changes in the liver after portal vein embolization using fibrinogen and OK432 in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tetsu; Marubashi, Shigeru; Kenjo, Akira; Tsuchiya, Takao; Kimura, Takashi; Sato, Naoya; Watanabe, Junichiro; Tasaki, Kazuhiro; Hashimoto, Yuko; Wada, Ikuo; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2016-05-01

    The mechanism of anti-tumor effect of transarterial Immuno-Embolization (TIE) using OK-432 has not been well elucidated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the tissue injury and immune response after portal venous embolization (PVE) with/without OK-432. Embolic materials (L group: lipiodol, LF group: lipiodol+fibrinogen, LO group: lipiodol+OK-432, LFO group: lipiodol+fibrinogen+OK-432) were administered via the right portal vein in Wistar rats. The histological findings in LFO group demonstrated liver damage with severe architectural changes. The concentrations of CD68(+) cells were observed in a time-dependent manner; it was significantly increased in the LO group on day 1 and in the LFO group on day 3. CD68(+)CD163(-) macrophages significantly increased in the LFO group on day 7 (P<0.05). In conclusion, PVE with fibrinogen and OK-432 markedly increased the CD68(+)CD163(-) infiltrating macrophages around the peri-portal area in the liver. This novel technique could be applied as immune-enhanced chemo-embolization of liver tumors. PMID:27062693

  19. A High Circulating Tumor Cell Count in Portal Vein Predicts Liver Metastasis From Periampullary or Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Yu Wen; Kuo, Hsun-Chuan; Ho, Be-Ing; Chang, Ming-Chu; Chang, Yu-Ting; Cheng, Mei-Fang; Chen, Huai-Lu; Liang, Ting-Yung; Wang, Chien-Fang; Huang, Chia-Yi; Shew, Jin-Yuh; Chang, Ying Chih; Lee, Eva YHP; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) released from a periampullary or pancreatic cancer can be more frequently detected in the portal than the systemic circulation and potentially can be used to identify patients with liver micrometastases. Aims of this study is to determine if CTCs count in portal venous blood of patients with nonmetastatic periampullary or pancreatic adenocarcinoma can be used as a predictor for subsequent liver metastases. CTCs were quantified in portal and peripheral venous blood samples collected simultaneously during pancreaticoduodenectomy in patients with presumed periampullary or pancreatic adenocarcinoma without image-discernible metastasis. Postoperatively patients were monitored for liver metastasis by abdominal magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography every 3 months for 1 year. Sixty patients with a pathological diagnosis of periampullary or pancreatic adenocarcinoma were included in the study. Multivariate analysis indicated that portal CTC count was a significant predictor for liver metastases within 6 months after surgery. Eleven of 13 patients with a high portal CTCs count (defined as >112 CMx Platform estimated CTCs in 2 mL blood) developed liver metastases within 6 months after surgery. In contrast, only 6 of 47 patients with a low portal CTC count developed liver metastases (P < 0.0001). A value of 112 CMx Platform estimated CTCs had 64.7% sensitivity and 95.4% specificity to predict liver metastases within 6 months after surgery. We concluded that a high CTC count in portal venous blood collected during pancreaticoduodenectomy in patients with periampullary or pancreatic adenocarcinoma without metastases detected by currently available imaging tools is a significant predictor for liver metastases within 6 months after surgery. PMID:27100430

  20. Gastric 17β-estradiol in portal vein and liver Esr1 make a circadian rhythm in systemic circulation in male rats.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroto; Yoshida, Saori; Sun, Ying-Jie; Shirasawa, Nobuyuki; Naito, Akira

    2016-08-01

    The hemodynamics of 17β-estradiol (E2) synthesized and secreted from the stomach has been revealed gradually. This study aimed to clarify the circadian rhythm of E2 synthesis and secretion in the stomach, and the relationship between the expression of hepatic estrogen receptor (ER) α and serum E2 levels in systemic circulation. Wistar male rats were maintained in a room with a 12-h light and 12-h dark cycle (lights on from 0700 to 1900 h), and were sacrificed at every 4-hour interval starting at 0800 h. The results showed that the expression of gastric Cyp19a1 was higher in nighttime than in daytime, and that the portal venous E2 level was 2.2 times higher at 2400 h than that at 1200 h. The arterial E2 level was also the highest at 2400 h, and showed an apparent circadian rhythm positively correlated with portal venous E2 levels. Conversely, the expression of liver Esr1 peaked at 1200 h and turned to decrement at 2400 h. The population of immunoreactive nuclei with ERα antibody decreased at 2400 h compared with that at 1200 h. The regression analysis showed that the liver Esr1 mRNA was negatively correlated to portal venous and arterial E2 levels. It could be concluded that the circadian rhythm of the systemic E2 level depended both on the amounts of gastric E2 in the portal vein and on the Esr1 expression in the liver. PMID:27165169

  1. [Open thrombectomy in treatment of acute thromboses of lower-limb deep veins].

    PubMed

    Shaĭdakov, E V; Porembskaia, O Ia; Tsarev, O I; Khmel'niker, S M

    2014-01-01

    Thrombosis of lower-limb deep veins is one of the most common vascular diseases in the world. For a long time the generally accepted treatment policy was conservative therapy with anticoagulants. The article is a review of the literature containing the results of studies carried out over the past two decades and confirming efficacy of surgical treatment for acute venous thrombosis. Presented are the data showing that thrombectomy performed within the first 10-14 days from the onset of the disease, improving quality of life of patients and preventing invalidization thereof. The gained world experience makes it possible to work out the most effective approaches to treatment of acute venous thromboses. PMID:25646547

  2. Ultrasound strain elastography in assessment of cortical mechanical behavior in acute renal vein occlusion: in vivo animal model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; He, Wen; Cheng, Ling-Gang; Li, Xiao-Ya; Zhang, Xiou-Ru; Juluru, Krishna; Al Khori, Noor; Coya, Adrienne; Min, Robert

    2015-01-01

    To assess the correlation of quantitative ultrasound strain parameters with the severity of cortical edema in renal vein occlusion, we prospectively performed ultrasound strain elastography on a canine acute renal vein occlusion model prior to and following 10, 20, and 40min of renal vein ligation. Strain and strain relaxation time representing the deformation and relaxation of the renal cortices and reference soft tissue were produced by the external compression with the ultrasound transducer and estimated using commercially available 2-D speckle tracking software. Cortical thickness was additionally measured. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to examine the difference in cortical thickness, strain ratio (mean cortical strain divided by mean reference tissue strain), and strain relaxation time ratio (cortical relaxation time divided by reference tissue relaxation time) prior to and after renal vein ligation. Pearson's correlation coefficient was applied to test the relationship between strain parameters and the time of the renal vein ligation. There was a strong positive correlation between the duration of renal vein ligation and strain (R(2)=0.97) and strain relaxation time (R(2)=0.98) ratios. Significant differences in strain and strain relaxation time ratios were found at all measured timepoints (all P≪.001). Cortical thickness, however, showed no significant difference between timepoints (P=.065). Our result suggest that strain and strain relaxation time ratios may be used as quantitative markers for the assessment of the renal cortical mechanical behavior in subclinical acute renal vein occlusion. PMID:25481219

  3. Ultrasonography of the spleen, liver, gallbladder, caudal vena cava and portal vein in healthy calves from birth to 104 days of age

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many of the ultrasonographic abdominal findings of adult cattle probably also apply to calves. However, significant changes associated with ruminal growth and transition from a milk to a roughage diet occur in young calves during the first few months, and it can be expected that ultrasonographic features of organs adjacent to the rumen such as spleen and liver also undergo significant changes. These have not been investigated to date and therefore the goal of this study was to describe ultrasonographic findings of the spleen, liver, gallbladder, caudal vena cava and portal vein in six healthy calves from birth to 104 days of age. Standing calves were examined ultrasonographically six times at three-week intervals starting on the first or second day of life using a 5.0-MHz transducer and techniques described previously. Results The spleen was imaged on the left at the 5th to 12th intercostal spaces. The dorsal and ventral visible limits ran from cranioventral to caudodorsal because of superimposition of the lungs. The size of the spleen was largest at the 7th and 8th intercostal spaces and the maximum thickness was measured at the 9th to 12th intercostal spaces. The liver was seen in all calves on the right and could be imaged at the 5th to 12th intercostal spaces and the area caudal to the last rib. Similar to the spleen, the dorsal visible margin of the liver ran parallel to the ventral border of the lungs. The visible size of the liver was largest at the 8th to 11th intercostal spaces and the maximum thickness was measured at the 8th and 9th intercostal spaces. The parenchymal pattern consisted of numerous fine echoes homogeneously distributed over the entire organ. The gallbladder was most commonly seen at the 9th intercostal space and was circular, oval or pear-shaped on ultrasonograms. It extended beyond the ventral border of the liver depending on the amount of bile. The caudal vena cava was triangular in cross section but sometimes had a round or

  4. Portal Vein Thrombosis in a Preterm Newborn with Mutation of the MTHFR and PAI-1 Genes and Sepsis by Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Giuffrè, Mario; Verso, Clelia Lo; Serra, Gregorio; Moceri, Giovanni; Cimador, Marcello; Corsello, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    Objective This report discusses the role of both congenital and acquired risk factors in the pathogenesis of portal vein thrombosis (PVT). Study Design We describe the clinical management and treatment of PVT in a preterm newborn with a homozygous mutation of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) genes and sepsis by Candida parapsilosis. Results Although literature data suggest a minor role of genetic factors in thrombophilia in the case of only one mutation, we hypothesize that combined thrombophilic genetic defects may have a cumulative effect and significantly increase the thrombotic risk. Conclusion It could be appropriate to include more detailed analyses of procoagulant and fibrinolytic factors in the diagnostic workup of neonatal thrombosis, also through the investigation of genetic polymorphisms. The anticoagulant therapy and the removal of concurrent risk factors remain basic steps for the adequate management and prevention of complications. PMID:27603544

  5. Noradrenaline activates a calcium-activated chloride conductance and increases the voltage-dependent calcium current in cultured single cells of rat portal vein.

    PubMed

    Pacaud, P; Loirand, G; Mironneau, C; Mironneau, J

    1989-05-01

    1. Membrane responses were recorded by a patch pipette technique in cultured cells isolated from rat portal vein. Using the whole-cell mode, pressure ejections of noradrenaline evoked depolarization (current clamp) and inward current (voltage clamp) at membrane potentials of -60 to -70 mV. The noradrenaline-induced response was reversibly blocked by prazosin indicating that the response was mediated by alpha 1-adrenoceptors. 2. The ionic mechanism of the noradrenaline-induced inward current was investigated in potassium-free caesium-containing solutions. Alteration of the chloride equilibrium potential produced similar changes in the reversal potential of the noradrenaline-induced current, indicating that noradrenaline opened chloride-selective channels. There was no evidence implicating sodium or calcium as the charge-carrying ion. 3. Caffeine applied in the bathing solution also induced a transient increase in chloride conductance but the noradrenaline-induced response was lost after application of caffeine. This is interpreted to mean that the increase in chloride conductance induced by noradrenaline and caffeine can occur as a consequence of a rise in intracellular calcium concentration depending on release of calcium from the same intracellular stores. 4. In the presence of caffeine, noradrenaline increased both the voltage-dependent calcium and chloride membrane conductances during application of repetitive depolarizing pulses. It is concluded that in isolated cells of the rat portal vein the depolarization in response to noradrenaline is mediated by an increase in chloride conductance depending on both the calcium release from intracellular stores and the increase of the voltage-dependent calcium current. PMID:2470458

  6. Technical refinement in living-donor liver transplantation for hepatoblastoma with main portal vein tumor thrombosis - a pullout technique.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Seisuke; Matsunami, Masatoshi; Sasaki, Kengo; Uchida, Hajime; Shigeta, Takanobu; Fukuda, Akinari; Matsumoto, Kimikazu; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Tanaka, Ryuhei; Kasahara, Mureo

    2014-12-01

    We present a case of a two-yr-old boy diagnosed with HBT with complete main PVTT. HBT was located in the bilateral lobe with PVTT involving the confluence of the SMV and the SpV. Cisplatin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy was delivered; main tumor shrank and AFP levels decreased to below one hundredth. However, PVTT remained in the bilateral portal branches to the main trunk of PV. We describe the technical details of the portal venous tumor thrombectomy that was succeeded by a LDLT. The patient remained healthy 2.5 yr after LDLT, showing good patency of the PV with no evidence of recurrence of tumor. PMID:25213021

  7. Intestinal Infarction Caused by Thrombophlebitis of the Portomesenteric Veins as a Complication of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis After Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rui; Tian, Xiaodong; Xie, Xuehai; Yang, Yinmo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The clinical symptoms of pylephlebitis caused by acute appendicitis are varied and atypical, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor outcomes. Here, we report a case of intestinal necrosis caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins as a complication of acute appendicitis after appendectomy. The patient had acute abdominal pain with tenderness and melena on the 3rd day after appendectomy for the treatment of gangrenous appendicitis. He was diagnosed with intestinal infarction caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins based on enhanced CT and diagnostic abdominal paracentesis. The patient was treated by bowel excision anastomosis and thrombectomy. After postoperative antibiotic and anticoagulation treatments, the patient recovered well and was discharged 22 days after the 2nd operation. A follow-up CT scan showed no recurrence of portomesenteric veins thrombosis 3 months later. Thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins is a rare but fatal complication of acute appendicitis. For all the cases with acute abdominal pain, the possibility of thrombophlebitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis. Once pylephlebitis is suspected, enhanced CT scan is helpful for early diagnosis, and sufficient control of inflammation as well as anticoagulant therapy should be performed. PMID:26091450

  8. False-positive liver scans due to portal hypertension: correlation with percutaneous transhepatic portograms in 33 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Takayasu, K.; Moriyama, N.; Suzuki, M.; Yamada, T.; Fukutake, T.; Shima, Y.; Kobayashi, C.; Musha, H.; Okuda, K.

    1983-04-01

    Tc-99m-phytate scanning of the liver and percutaneous transhepatic catheterization of the portal vein were performed in 33 patients--26 with cirrhosis, 3 with chronic active hepatitis, 2 with idiopathic portal hypertension, and 2 with unresolved acute hepatitis. A discrete defect in the porta hepatis area was seen in 6 of 28 patients who had portal vein pressure above 200 mm H2O. In 5 of the 6 patients with a false-positive scan, the umbilical portion of the left portal vein branch was dilated (larger than 25 x 20 mm) on the portogram, with or without a patent paraumbilical vein. The anatomical basis of this phenomenon is discussed, and it is suggested that this area be given special attention.

  9. Acute deep vein thrombosis and endovascular techniques: It is time for a new aggiornamento!

    PubMed

    Pernès, J-M; Auguste, M; Kovarski, S; Borie, H; Renaudin, J-M; Coppe, G

    2012-10-01

    The stated aims of treating acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) are to prevent a pulmonary embolism, stop the clot from spreading, reduce the risk of a recurrence; they are less concerned with the late morbidity associated with post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). In accordance with the French (Afssaps, 2009) and North American (ACCP, 2008) recommendations, anticoagulants (LMWH, heparin, AVK) form the cornerstone for treating DVT. These treatments appear to be far less effective in preventing post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS), associated with venous hypertension, residual occlusion, and with reflux caused by valve incompetence. Given that, the new aim is to optimise the prevention of PTS, the ACCP guidelines, unlike those of Afssaps, "suggest" for selected patients suffering from acute iliofemoral DVT, the use of both classic anticoagulants, and in situ percutaneous administration of thrombolytic drugs (recommendation grade 2B) and simultaneous correction of any underlying anatomical anomalies using angioplasty and stenting (recommendation 2C). Contemporary endovascular methods, referred to collectively as "facilitated" thrombolysis, combine low doses of rtPa or Urokinase administered locally, and the removal of the clot using various mechanical, rotating, rheolytic systems, or using ultrasound. The results of non-randomised, heterogeneous studies objectivised a lysis rate of 80%, a 50% lower risk of haemorrhage complications compared with systemic thrombolysis (<4%), and a clear reduction in treatment time (one-shot methods possible for procedures lasting less than 2 hours). This data ties in with the modern "open vein" concept which underpins the hope of an improvement in the late prognosis of acute DVT, through the removal of a clot, thereby improving permeability and valve integrity; this hypothesis is supported by the results at 24 months of a randomised CaVent objectifying absolute risk reduction of 15% in the thrombolysis in situ. The current randomised study (ATTRACT

  10. Unusual Tumors Causing Extrahepatic Portal Venous Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, B. C.; Dhiman, R. K.; Ghoshal, U. C.; Puri, A. S.; Sikora, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction has been reported to be associated with tumors of liver, bile ducts and pancreas. We report two cases, one with gastric leiomyosarcoma and another with Non Hodgkin’s lymphoma, complicated by portal vein block and presenting with gastric variceal bleeding. Portal vein block in both cases was due to direct vascular infiltration. Development of portal hypertension posed difficulties in management. PMID:8725458

  11. Improved Hepatocyte Engraftment After Portal Vein Occlusion in LDL Receptor-Deficient WHHL Rabbits and Lentiviral-Mediated Phenotypic Correction In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Goulinet-Mainot, Sylvie; Tranchart, Hadrien; Groyer-Picard, Marie-Thérèse; Lainas, Panagiotis; Saloum Diop, Papa; Holopherne, Delphine; Gonin, Patrick; Benihoud, Karim; Ba, Nathalie; Gauthier, Olivier; Franco, Dominique; Guettier, Catherine; Pariente, Danièle; Weber, Anne; Dagher, Ibrahim; Huy Nguyen, Tuan

    2012-02-01

    Innovative cell-based therapies are considered as alternatives to liver transplantation. Recent progress in lentivirus-mediated hepatocyte transduction has renewed interest in cell therapy for the treatment of inherited liver diseases. However, hepatocyte transplantation is still hampered by inefficient hepatocyte engraftment. We previously showed that partial portal vein embolization (PVE) improved hepatocyte engraftment in a nonhuman primate model. We developed here an ex vivo approach based on PVE and lentiviral-mediated transduction of hepatocytes from normal (New Zealand White, NZW) and Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits: the large animal model of familial hypercholesterolemia type IIa (FH). FH is a life-threatening human inherited autosomal disease caused by a mutation in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene, which leads to severe hypercholesterolemia and premature coronary heart disease. Rabbit hepatocytes were isolated from the resected left liver lobe, and the portal branches of the median lobes were embolized with Histoacryl® glue under radiologic guidance. NZW and WHHL hepatocytes were each labeled with Hoechst dye or transduced with lentivirus expressing GFP under the control of a liver-specific promoter (mTTR, a modified murine transthyretin promoter) and were then immediately transplanted back into donor animals. In our conditions, 65-70% of the NZW and WHHL hepatocytes were transduced. Liver repopulation after transplantation with the Hoechst-labeled hepatocytes was 3.5 ± 2%. It was 1.4 ± 0.6% after transplantation with either the transduced NZW hepatocytes or the transduced WHHL hepatocytes, which was close to that obtained with Hoechst-labeled cells, given the mean transduction efficacy. Transgene expression persisted for at least 8 weeks posttransplantation. Transduction of WHHL hepatocytes with an LDLR-encoding vector resulted in phenotypic correction in vitro as assessed by internalization of fluorescent LDL ligands

  12. Improved Hepatocyte Engraftment After Portal Vein Occlusion in LDL Receptor-Deficient WHHL Rabbits and Lentiviral-Mediated Phenotypic Correction In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Goulinet-Mainot, Sylvie; Tranchart, Hadrien; Groyer-Picard, Marie-Thérèse; Lainas, Panagiotis; Saloum Diop, Papa; Holopherne, Delphine; Gonin, Patrick; Benihoud, Karim; Ba, Nathalie; Gauthier, Olivier; Franco, Dominique; Guettier, Catherine; Pariente, Danièle; Weber, Anne; Dagher, Ibrahim; Huy Nguyen, Tuan

    2012-01-01

    Innovative cell-based therapies are considered as alternatives to liver transplantation. Recent progress in lentivirus-mediated hepatocyte transduction has renewed interest in cell therapy for the treatment of inherited liver diseases. However, hepatocyte transplantation is still hampered by inefficient hepatocyte engraftment. We previously showed that partial portal vein embolization (PVE) improved hepatocyte engraftment in a nonhuman primate model. We developed here an ex vivo approach based on PVE and lentiviral-mediated transduction of hepatocytes from normal (New Zealand White, NZW) and Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits: the large animal model of familial hypercholesterolemia type IIa (FH). FH is a life-threatening human inherited autosomal disease caused by a mutation in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene, which leads to severe hypercholesterolemia and premature coronary heart disease. Rabbit hepatocytes were isolated from the resected left liver lobe, and the portal branches of the median lobes were embolized with Histoacryl® glue under radiologic guidance. NZW and WHHL hepatocytes were each labeled with Hoechst dye or transduced with lentivirus expressing GFP under the control of a liver-specific promoter (mTTR, a modified murine transthyretin promoter) and were then immediately transplanted back into donor animals. In our conditions, 65–70% of the NZW and WHHL hepatocytes were transduced. Liver repopulation after transplantation with the Hoechst-labeled hepatocytes was 3.5 ± 2%. It was 1.4 ± 0.6% after transplantation with either the transduced NZW hepatocytes or the transduced WHHL hepatocytes, which was close to that obtained with Hoechst-labeled cells, given the mean transduction efficacy. Transgene expression persisted for at least 8 weeks posttransplantation. Transduction of WHHL hepatocytes with an LDLR-encoding vector resulted in phenotypic correction in vitro as assessed by internalization of fluorescent LDL

  13. Brachytherapy with Iodine-125 seeds strand for treatment of main portal vein tumor thrombi: an experimental study in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Luo, Jianjun; Liu, Qingxin; Ma, Jingqin; Qu, Xudong; Yang, Minjie; Yan, Zhiping; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to establish an animal model of implanted main portal vein tumor thrombus (MPVTT) and to evaluate safety and efficacy of brachy therapy with Iodine-125 (125I) seeds strand to treat MPVTT of rabbit. VX2 tumor thrombus was implanted in main portal vein (MPV) of 32 New Zealand white rabbits. These rabbits were randomly divided into treatment group (Group T, T1-T16) and control group (Group C, C1-C16). 125I seeds and blank seeds strand were implanted in MPV of rabbits in Group T and C, respectively. Changes of general condition, body weight and blood laboratory examination were monitored at every time point after procedure. 2 weeks later, 8 rabbits of each group were sacrificed for pathologic examination. The rest of rabbits were dissected postmortem, and therapeutic effects were evaluated on basis of multi-detector computed tomography and histopathology. Ki-67 labeling index (Ki-67 LI) and apoptosis index (AI) were compared between two groups. Overall survival period was recorded. At every time point after brachytherapy, more serious weight loss were detected in Group C. Results of liver function tests and blood cells counts showed no significant difference between two groups. Mean volume of tumor tissue within MPV were 565.40 ± 220.90 mm3 in Group T and 2269.90 ± 437.00 mm3 in Group C (P < 0.001). (Ki-67 LI) and AI were (4.14 ± 1.84)% and (6.51 ± 1.92)% in Group T, compared with (33.82 ± 6.07)% and (0.91 ± 0.26)% in Group C, respectively (P < 0.001). Media survival time of rabbits were 39.50 ± 2.37 days in Group T and 27.38 ± 1.22 days in Group C, respectively (P = 0.001). In conclusion, injecting and suspensory fixing VX2 tumor strip into MPV is a reliable method to establish MPVTT animal model. Brachytherapy with 125I seeds strand was safe and effective to treat VX2 tumor strand inoculated in the MPV of rabbit. PMID:27152237

  14. Simultaneous acute deep vein thrombosis and acute brucellosis. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Andaç, Şeyda; Kalender, Mehmet; Yıldırım, Onur; İmre, Ayfer

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease common in developing countries. Vascular complications, including arterial and venous, associated with Brucella infection have rarely been reported. A case of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) developing after a diagnosis of acute brucellosis in a young milkman is presented. A 26-year-old man presented with pain in the right leg. The patient's medical history included a diagnosis of brucellosis in our hospital where he had presented with complaints of weakness and fever. Peripheral venous Doppler ultrasound showed DVT, and the patient was treated with anticoagulants. The patient was discharged with warfarin therapy and anti-brucellosis treatment. Although rare, some infectious agents may cause vascular pathologies. Patients presenting with symptoms of DVT or similar vascular pathologies should be assessed for infectious agents, particularly in those coming from Brucella-endemic areas. PMID:27516795

  15. Simultaneous acute deep vein thrombosis and acute brucellosis. A case report.

    PubMed

    Salihi, Salih; Andaç, Şeyda; Kalender, Mehmet; Yıldırım, Onur; İmre, Ayfer

    2016-06-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease common in developing countries. Vascular complications, including arterial and venous, associated with Brucella infection have rarely been reported. A case of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) developing after a diagnosis of acute brucellosis in a young milkman is presented. A 26-year-old man presented with pain in the right leg. The patient's medical history included a diagnosis of brucellosis in our hospital where he had presented with complaints of weakness and fever. Peripheral venous Doppler ultrasound showed DVT, and the patient was treated with anticoagulants. The patient was discharged with warfarin therapy and anti-brucellosis treatment. Although rare, some infectious agents may cause vascular pathologies. Patients presenting with symptoms of DVT or similar vascular pathologies should be assessed for infectious agents, particularly in those coming from Brucella-endemic areas. PMID:27516795

  16. Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Renal Cell Carcinoma Complicated by Renal Vein and Inferior Vena Cava Involvement.

    PubMed

    Sugase, Taro; Akimoto, Tetsu; Kubo, Taro; Imai, Toshimi; Otani-Takei, Naoko; Miki, Takuya; Takeda, Shin-Ichi; Nukui, Akinori; Muto, Shigeaki; Morita, Tatsuo; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is caused by diverse pathologies, although it may occasionally result from concurrent renal efflux disturbances. We herein describe a case of AKI in a patient complicated by renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with renal vein and inferior vena cava (IVC) involvement. A neoplastic thrombus which disrupted the blood flow in the renal vein appeared to play a role in the rapid decline in the renal function. Such a scenario has rarely been mentioned in the previous literature describing the cases of RCC complicated by AKI. Concerns regarding the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for RCC are also discussed. PMID:27580548

  17. Selective Thrombolysis in Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis: Evaluation of Adjuvant Therapy In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sumit; Brosstad, Frank; Sakariassen, Kjell S.

    1999-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate in a porcine model of acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) the efficacy of dalteparin and antithrombin with respect to heparin for local adjuvant therapy during selective thrombolysis, and the utility of nitroglycerin and iloprost as heparin supplements. Methods: DVT was induced in both hind limbs using a previously described technique (n = 20). Thirty minutes later, the animal was heparinized (2500 IU IV), and bilateral sequestrated thrombolysis was performed using 8 mg alteplase: both external iliac veins were endoluminally occluded with Swan-Ganz catheters, and a multi-sideport infusion wire coaxially introduced through each catheter and advanced into the ipsilateral popliteal vein. In the control limbs, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) 8 mg was injected as 0.8-ml boluses at 3-min intervals for 2 hr as a 0.25-mg/ml solution containing heparin 50 IU/ml (n 20). On the contralateral side, heparin was substituted with either dalteparin 50 IU/ml (n = 5) or antithrombin 12.5 IU/ml (n = 5), or supplemented with either nitroglycerin 0.075 mg/ml (n = 5) or iloprost (150 ng/ml) (n = 5). Blood samples were taken at predetermined intervals to measure the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), prothrombin time (PT), and fibrinogen concentration. At autopsy, the thrombus mass in the iliofemoral veins was measured, and the extent of residual thrombosis in the venous tributaries graded at four sites. Results: Bilateral thrombolysis was successfully completed in all animals. The median thrombus mass in the iliofemoral veins after thrombolysis was 0.48 g (range 0.06-1.58 g), 0.95 g (0.59-1.29 g), 0.74 g (0.52-0.96 g), and 0.29 g (0.0-0.77 g) for dalteparin, antithrombin, iloprost, and nitroglycerin respectively, as compared with 0.53 g (0.18-0.88 g) (p = 0.69), 0.97 g (0.46-1.15 g) (p = 0.69), 0.53 g (0.48-1.10 g) (p = 0.69), and 0.18 g (0.13-1.04 g) (p = 0.5) for the respective controls. Likewise, the severity of residual thrombosis in the venous

  18. Sinistral Portal Hypertension: Presentation, Radiological Findings, and Treatment Options - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kokabi, Nima; Lee, Edward; Echevarria, Carlos; Loh, Christopher; Kee, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Sinistral portal hypertension occurs when a pathological process causes occlusion of the splenic vein. The resultant elevated splenic bed venous pressure causes formation of gastric varices which can lead to hematemesis as a common presentation for this disease process. We present a case of sinistral portal hypertension in a patient with acute hematemesis as the primary presentation. Despite the challenging diagnosis process, the patient underwent splenectomy and was managed appropriately according to previously published literature. PMID:22470692

  19. Hepatic Artery and Portal Vein Doppler Indexes in Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Before and After Treatment to Prevent Unnecessary Health Care Costs

    PubMed Central

    Tarzamni, Mohammad Kazem; Khoshbaten, Manouchehr; Sadrarhami, Shohreh; Daneshpajouhnejad, Parnaz; Jalili, Javad; Gholamian, Masoud; Shahmoradi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: We tested whether hepatic haemodynamics assessed by Doppler ultrasonography can be a predictor of response to therapy in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to prevent further unnecessary diagnostic tests and interventions. Methods: Forty eight consecutive patients affected by NAFLD, who refered to some clinics in Tabriz, Iran between 2009 and 2011 were included in the study. Response to therapy was assessed by decrease in liver enzyme levels. Three liver Doppler parameters (hepatic artery resistance index [RI], hepatic artery pulsatility index [PI] and portal vein waveform [PVW]) were analysed in all subjects who showed a decrease in liver function tests results. Wilcoxon and paired student's t-test were used for analysis. Results: Forty eight subjects with NAFLD were included in the study during 21 months, out of which 22 (39.1% male - mean age: 37.6 ± 8.3) responded to the treatment and formed the basis of this study. Mean hepatic artery RI increased significantly from 0.60 ± 0.07 to 0.83 ± 0.27before and after treatment, however, there was no significant differences between hepatic artery PI or PVW. Conclusions: Increase in hepatic artery RI assessed by Doppler ultrasound may provide information on improvement of NAFLD in patients during the course of therapy. PMID:24829735

  20. Association between Portal Vein Thrombosis and Survival in Non-Liver-Transplant Patients with Liver Cirrhosis: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Junna; Yang, Man; Ren, Weirong; Jia, Jia; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2015-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature was performed to analyze the association between portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and survival in non-liver-transplant patients with liver cirrhosis. PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for all relevant papers which evaluated the prognostic value of PVT in predicting the survival of liver cirrhosis. Meta-analyses were not conducted because the ways of data expression and lengths of follow-up were heterogeneous among studies. Overall, 13 papers were included. The 5-day, 6-week, and 1-year mortality were investigated in 1, 3, and 1 studies, respectively; and all of them were not significantly different between cirrhotic patient with and without PVT. By comparison, the 3-year mortality was reported in 1 study; and it was significantly increased by the presence of PVT. The overall mortality was analyzed in 5 studies; and the association with overall mortality and PVT was significant in 4 studies, but not in another one. However, as for the cirrhotic patients undergoing surgical or interventional shunts, the overall mortality was not significantly associated with the presence of PVT in 4 studies. In conclusion, the presence of PVT might be associated with the long-term mortality in non-liver-transplant patients with liver cirrhosis, but not with the short-term mortality. PMID:25810714

  1. Liver Hypertrophy After Percutaneous Portal Vein Embolization: Comparison of N-Butyl-2-Cyanocrylate Versus Sodium Acrylate-Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer Particles in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Theocharis, Stamatis; Ptohis, Nikolaos Alexopoulou, Efthimia; Mantziaras, George; Kelekis, Nikolaos L. Brountzos, Elias N.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Percutaneous portal vein embolization (PPVE) induces hypertrophy of the future liver remnant before hepatic resection. The ideal embolic material has not yet been determined. We compared N-butyl-2-cyanocrylate (NBCA) with sodium acrylate-vinyl alcohol copolymer particles using a swine model. Materials and Methods: Twelve pigs underwent PPVE. Six pigs (group A) were embolized with NBCA, and 6 pigs (group B) were embolized with sodium acrylate-vinyl alcohol copolymer particles. Computed tomographic volumetry of the embolized lobe (EL) and the nonembolized lobe (NEL), along with liver function tests, was performed before and at 14 and 28 days after embolization. Tissue samples from both lobes were taken 14 and 28 days after PPVE. Results: NEL-volume and NEL-ratio increases were significantly higher in group A at 14 and 28 days after PPVE (78 and 52% and 91 and 66%, respectively) than in group B (32 and 12% and 28 and 10%, respectively) (p < 0.05). Percent change of the EL-volume was significantly higher for group A at 28 days after PPVE. No statistically significant difference was found between the groups regarding hepatocyte proliferation on the NEL and apoptosis on the EL at both time intervals. Conclusion: PPVE using NBCA is more efficient and causes more NEL hypertrophy than microspheres.

  2. Thermal Ablation by High-Intensity-Focused Ultrasound Using a Toroid Transducer Increases the Coagulated Volume and Allows Coagulation Near Portal and Hepatic veins in Pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Melodelima, D.; N'Djin, W. A.; Parmentier, H.; Chapelon, J. Y.; Rivoire, M.

    2009-04-14

    A new geometry of HIFU transducer is described to enlarge the coagulated volume. The geometry of the transducer was not spherical. The surface of the transducer was built based on a toroid geometry. The transducer was generated by the revolution of a circle about an axis lying in its plane. Eight emitters operating at a frequency of 3 MHz were diced out of a single toroid piezocomposite element. Each of the eight emitters was divided into 32 transducers. The focal zone is conical and located at 70 mm from the transducer. A 7.5 MHz ultrasound imaging probe is placed in the centre of the device for guiding the treatment. Our long-term objective is to develop a device that can be used during surgery. In vivo trials have been performed on 13 pigs to demonstrate this new principle and to evaluate the vascular tolerance of the treatment. This new geometry combined with consecutive activation of the eight emitters around the toroid allows achieving a mean thermal ablation of 7.0{+-}2.5 cm3 in 40 seconds. All lesions were visible with high contrast on sonograms. The correlation between the size of lesions observed on sonograms and during gross examination was 92%. This allows the user to easily enlarge the coagulated volume by juxtaposing single lesions. The pigs tolerate the treatment well over the experimental period even when coagulation was produced through portal and/or hepatic veins.

  3. Mitochondrial Ca²⁺ handling is crucial for generation of rhythmical Ca²⁺ waves in vascular interstitial cells from rabbit portal vein.

    PubMed

    Harhun, Maksym I

    2015-09-01

    Vasomotion is the rhythmical changes in vascular tone of various blood vessels. It was proposed that in rabbit portal vein (RPV) the spontaneous contractile activity is driven by vascular interstitial cells (VICs), since RPV VICs generate rhythmical changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) associated with membrane depolarisation in these cells. In this work, using confocal imaging in Fluo-3 loaded RPV VICs we studied if generation of rhythmical [Ca(2+)]i changes is affected when Ca(2+) handling by mitochondria is compromised. We also visualised mitochondria in VICs using Mito Tracker Green fluorescent dye. Our results showed that freshly dispersed RPV VICs generated rhythmical [Ca(2+)]i oscillations with a frequency of 0.2-0.01 Hz. Imaging of VICs stained with Mito Tracker Green revealed abundant mitochondria in these cells with a higher density of the organelles in sub-plasmalemmar region compared to the central region of the cell. Oligomycin, an ATP synthase inhibitor, did not affect the amplitude and frequency of rhythmical [Ca(2+)]i oscillations. In contrast, two uncoupling agents, carbonylcyanide-3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and carbonylcyanide-4-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) effectively abolished rhythmical [Ca(2+)]i changes with simultaneous increase in basal [Ca(2+)]i in RPV VICs. These data suggest that in RPV VICs mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling is important for the generation of rhythmical [Ca(2+)]i changes which underlie the spontaneous rhythmical contractile activity in this vessel. PMID:26104918

  4. Collateral Pathways in Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram S.

    2012-01-01

    Presence of portosystemic collateral veins (PSCV) is common in portal hypertension due to cirrhosis. Physiologically, normal portosystemic anastomoses exist which exhibit hepatofugal flow. With the development of portal hypertension, transmission of backpressure leads to increased flow in these patent normal portosystemic anastomoses. In extrahepatic portal vein obstruction collateral circulation develops in a hepatopetal direction and portoportal pathways are frequently found. The objective of this review is to illustrate the various PSCV and portoportal collateral vein pathways pertinent to portal hypertension in liver cirrhosis and EHPVO. PMID:25755456

  5. [Effect of dopamine on the portal pressure].

    PubMed

    Benko, H; Peschl, L; Schüller, J; Neumayr, A

    1975-01-01

    1. An infusion of 3 gamma/kg/min dopamine causes a significant increase in the renal plasma flow and the glomerulum filtration rate. This dosage does not cause a change of the mean systolic and arterial pressure. This effect may also be observed in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. 2. The wedged hepatic vein pressure, an indicator for the portal pressure, only shows a slight increase (9,46 +/- 9,41%) as compared to the initial pressure produced by the mentioned dose. Measurements of the spleen pulpa pressure, which likewise indicates the portal pressure, showed an increase of pressure up to 100% due to pressing or coughing. 3. If in the case of bleeding oesophageal varices acute renal failure might develop, the advantage of the effect of dopamine in stimulating the blood flow through the kidneys may be considered more important than the minute danger of a slight increase of the portal pressure, which might provoke haemorrhage. PMID:1220517

  6. Regenerative and fibrotic pathways in canine hepatic portosystemic shunt and portal vein hypoplasia, new models for clinical hepatocyte growth factor treatment

    PubMed Central

    Spee, Bart; Penning, Louis C; van den Ingh, Ted SGAM; Arends, Brigitte; IJzer, Jooske; van Sluijs, Frederik J; Rothuizen, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Background We analyzed two spontaneous dog diseases characterized by subnormal portal perfusion and reduced liver growth: (i) congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) without fibrosis and (ii) primary portal vein hypoplasia (PPVH), a disease associated with fibrosis. These pathologies, that lack inflammation or cholestasis, may represent simplified models to study liver growth and fibrosis. To investigate the possible use of those models for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) treatment, we studied the functionality of HGF signaling in CPSS and PPVH dogs and compared this to aged-matched healthy controls. Results We used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) to analyze the mRNA expression of HGF, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), and relevant mediators in liver biopsies from cases with CPSS or PPVH, in comparison with healthy control dogs. CPSS and PPVH were associated with a decrease in mRNA expression of HGF and of MET proto-oncogene (c-MET). Western blot analysis confirmed the Q-PCR results and showed that intracellular signaling components (protein kinase B/Akt, ERK1/2, and STAT3) were functional. The TGF-β1 mRNA levels were unchanged in CPSS whereas there was a 2-fold increase in PPVH indicating an active TGF-β1 pathway, consistent with the observation of fibrosis seen in PPVH. Western blots on TGF-β1 and phosphorylated Smad2 confirmed an activated pro-fibrotic pathway in PPVH. Furthermore, Q-PCR showed an increase in the amount of collagen I present in PPVH compared to CPSS and control, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Conclusion The pathophysiological differences between CPSS and PPVH can adequately be explained by the Q-PCR measurements and Western blots. Although c-MET levels were reduced, downstream signaling seemed to be functional and provides a rational for HGF-supplementation in controlled studies with CPSS and PPVH. Furthermore both diseases may serve as simplified models for comparison with more complex chronic

  7. Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Thrombosis: Impact of Early Response to 4 Weeks of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen-Chun; Hung, Chien-Fu; Chen, Wei-Ting; Lin, Shi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of early response (ER) to hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) on outcomes of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) complicated with major portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). Methods Thirty-nine patients receiving HAIC with low-dose cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil (5FU), and leucovorin were enrolled. One course of HAIC consisted of 5 days of treatment and 2 days rest per week for 4 consecutive weeks. ER was categorized as complete response, partial response, or minor response and was determined by World Health Organization criteria with dynamic computed tomography findings performed within 1 week after the first course of HAIC. Results Thirteen (33%) patients achieved an ER. Twelve (92.3%) of these 13 ER patients achieved a higher overall response than all but one (3.8%) of the 26 non-early responders (NERs) (p<0.001). ER was the exclusive independent favorable factor for survival (p=0.003). Downstaging of tumors was noted in 76.9% of ERs, and these patients could proceed to locoregional therapies. ER patients subsequently had a higher 1-year survival (76.9% vs. 3.8%, p<0.001) and 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) (84.6% vs. 15.4%, p<0.001) than those for NERs. Only 8% of patients experienced grade 3 or higher toxicity during the first 4-week course of HAIC. Conclusions HAIC can yield a satisfactory ER for advanced HCC with PVTT. Moreover, achievement of ER after HAIC in advanced HCC with PVTT is strongly associated with better overall survival and PFS. PMID:26734578

  8. Overall survival in response to sorafenib versus radiotherapy in unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma with major portal vein tumor thrombosis: propensity score analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study investigated the survival benefits of sorafenib vs. radiotherapy (RT) in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) in the main trunk or the first branch. Methods Ninety-seven patients were retrospectively reviewed. Forty patients were enrolled by the Kanagawa Liver Study Group and received sorafenib, and 57 consecutive patients received RT in our hospital. Overall survival was compared between the two groups with PVTT by propensity score (PS) analysis. Factors associated with survival were evaluated by multivariate analysis. Results The median treatment period with sorafenib was 45 days, while the median total radiation dose was 50 Gy. The Child-Pugh class and the level of invasion into hepatic large vessels were significantly more advanced in the RT group than in the sorafenib group. Median survival did not differ significantly between the sorafenib group (4.3 months) and the RT group (5.9 months; P = 0.115). After PS matching (n = 28 per group), better survival was noted in the RT group than in the sorafenib group (median survival, 10.9 vs. 4.8 months; P = 0.025). A Cox model showed that des-γ-carboxy prothrombin <1000 mAU/mL at enrollment and RT were significant independent predictors of survival in the PS model (P = 0.024, HR, 0.508; 95% CI, 0.282 to 0.915; and P = 0.007, HR, 0.434; 95% CI, 0.235 to 0.779; respectively). Conclusions RT is a better first-line therapy than sorafenib in patients who have advanced unresectable HCC with PVTT. PMID:24886354

  9. Preoperative Estimation of Future Remnant Liver Function Following Portal Vein Embolization Using Relative Enhancement on Gadoxetic Acid Disodium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, Shigeru; Inaba, Yoshitaka; Sano, Tsuyoshi; Yamaura, Hidekazu; Kato, Mina; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Senda, Yoshiki; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To retrospectively evaluate relative enhancement (RE) in the hepatobiliary phase of gadoxetic acid disodium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging as a preoperative estimation of future remnant liver (FRL) function in a patients who underwent portal vein embolization (PVE). Materials and Methods In 53 patients, the correlation between the indocyanine green clearance (ICG-K) and RE imaging was analyzed before hepatectomy (first analysis). Twenty-three of the 53 patients underwent PVE followed by a repeat RE imaging and ICG test before an extended hepatectomy and their results were further analyzed (second analysis). Whole liver function and FRL function were calculated on the MR imaging as follows: RE x total liver volume (RE Index) and FRL-RE x FRL volume (Rem RE Index), respectively. Regarding clinical outcome, posthepatectomy liver failure (PHLF) was evaluated in patients undergoing PVE. Results Indocyanine green clearance correlated with the RE Index (r = 0.365, p = 0.007), and ICG-K of FRL (ICG-Krem) strongly correlated with the Rem RE Index (r = 0.738, p < 0.001) in the first analysis. Both the ICG-Krem and the Rem RE Index were significantly correlated after PVE (r = 0.508, p = 0.013) at the second analysis. The rate of improvement of the Rem RE Index from before PVE to after PVE was significantly higher than that of ICG-Krem (p = 0.014). Patients with PHLF had a significantly lower Rem RE Index than patients without PHLF (p = 0.023). Conclusion Relative enhancement imaging can be used to estimate FRL function after PVE. PMID:25995681

  10. Portal Vein Embolization Using a Nitinol Plug (Amplatzer Vascular Plug) in Combination with Histoacryl Glue and Iodinized Oil: Adequate Hypertrophy with a Reduced Risk of Nontarget Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Clare L. Low, Deborah; Matson, Matthew B.; Renfrew, Ian; Fotheringham, Tim

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether portal vein embolization (PVE) using a nitinol vascular plug in combination with histoacryl glue and iodinized oil minimizes the risk of nontarget embolization while obtaining good levels of future liver remnant (FLR) hypertrophy. Between November 2005 and August 2008, 16 patients (8 females, 8 males; mean age, 63 {+-} 3.6 years), each with a small FLR, underwent right ipsilateral transhepatic PVE prior to major hepatectomy. Proximal PVE was initially performed by placement of a nitinol vascular plug, followed by distal embolization using a mixture of histoacryl glue and iodinized oil. Pre- and 6 weeks postprocedural FLR volumes were calculated using computed tomographic imaging. Selection for surgery required an FLR of 0.5% of the patient's body mass. Clinical course and outcome of surgical resection for all patients were recorded. At surgery, the ease of hepatectomy was subjectively assessed in comparison to previous experience following PVE with alternative embolic agents. PVE was successful in all patients. Mean procedure time was 30.4 {+-} 2.5 min. Mean absolute increase in FLR volume was 68.9% {+-} 12.0% (p = 0.00005). There was no evidence of nontarget embolization during the procedure or on subsequent imaging. Nine patients proceeded to extended hepatectomy. Six patients demonstrated disease progression. One patient did not achieve sufficient hypertrophy in relation to body mass to undergo hepatic resection. At surgery, the hepatobiliary surgeons observed less periportal inflammation compared to previous experience with alternative embolic agents, facilitating dissection at extended hepatectomy. In conclusion, ipsilateral transhepatic PVE using a single nitinol plug in combination with histoacryl glue and iodinized oil simplifies the procedure, offering short procedural times with minimal risk of nontarget embolization. Excellent levels of FLR hypertrophy are achieved enabling safe extended hepatectomy.

  11. Demonstration of Metabolic and Cellular Effects of Portal Vein Ligation Using Multi-Modal PET/MRI Measurements in Healthy Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Harsányi, László; Budai, András; Pekli, Damján; Korsós, Diána; Horváth, Ildikó; Kovács, Noémi; Karlinger, Kinga

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In the early recognition of portal vein ligation (PVL) induced tumor progression, positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) could improve diagnostic accuracy of conventionally used methods. It is unknown how PVL affects metabolic patterns of tumor free hepatic tissues. The aim of this preliminary study is to evaluate the effect of PVL on glucose metabolism, using PET/MRI imaging in healthy rat liver. Materials and Methods Male Wistar rats (n = 30) underwent PVL. 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) PET/MRI imaging (nanoScan PET/MRI) and morphological/histological examination were performed before (Day 0) and 1, 2, 3, and 7 days after PVL. Dynamic PET data were collected and the standardized uptake values (SUV) for ligated and non-ligated liver lobes were calculated in relation to cardiac left ventricle (SUVVOI/SUVCLV) and mean liver SUV (SUVVOI/SUVLiver). Results PVL induced atrophy of ligated lobes, while non-ligated liver tissue showed compensatory hypertrophy. Dynamic PET scan revealed altered FDG kinetics in both ligated and non-ligated liver lobes. SUVVOI/SUVCLV significantly increased in both groups of lobes, with a maximal value at the 2nd postoperative day and returned near to the baseline 7 days after the ligation. After PVL, ligated liver lobes showed significantly higher tracer uptake compared to the non-ligated lobes (significantly higher SUVVOI/SUVLiver values were observed at postoperative day 1, 2 and 3). The homogenous tracer biodistribution observed before PVL reappeared by 7th postoperative day. Conclusion The observed alterations in FDG uptake dynamics should be taken into account during the assessment of PET data until the PVL induced atrophic and regenerative processes are completed. PMID:24599299

  12. Peri-portal lymphedema in association with an acute adrenal insufficiency: case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We report the case of a patient with peri-portal lymphedema in association with severe adrenal insufficiency. To the best of our knowledge, this association was not previously reported in the literature. Peri-portal lymphedema is usually seen in cases such as blunt abdominal trauma, hepatic congestion and post–liver transplantation. Case presentation We present the case of a 28-year-old Indian man who presented to our hospital with adrenal crisis and was treated accordingly. Computed tomography of his abdomen showed evidence of peri-portal lymphedema (edema) with some free fluid collection. We excluded other causes of this pathology and followed the patient’s condition after steroid replacement therapy. We found no other contributing factors to the patient’s peri-portal lymphedema apart from the adrenal crisis, which was more consolidated when we followed the patient after steroid replacement therapy, during which follow-up computed tomography showed complete resolution of the pathology. Conclusions We conclude following an extensive MEDLINE® search that this is the first case to be reported for the association between peri-portal lymphedema and adrenal insufficiency, after having excluded all other causes of peri-portal lymphedema. This signifies reporting of this case as the first one in the medical literature. PMID:24661563

  13. Acute Central Retinal Vein Occlusion Secondary to Reactive Thrombocytosis after Splenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Oncel Acir, Nursen; Borazan, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of central retinal vein occlusion was reported in a young patient. Central retinal vein occlusion was probably related to secondary to reactive thrombocytosis after splenectomy. The patient was treated with steroids for papilledema and administered coumadin and aspirin. The symptoms resolved, and the findings returned to normal within three weeks. Current paper emphasizes that, besides other well-known thrombotic events, reactive thrombocytosis after splenectomy may cause central retinal vein occlusion, which may be the principal symptom of this risky complication. Thus, it can be concluded that followup for thrombocytosis and antithrombotic treatment, when necessary, are essential for these cases. PMID:25276452

  14. Neonatal vitelline vein aneurysm with thrombosis: prompt treatment should be needed.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Hong; Yu, Hyeong Won; Kim, Hyun-Young; Jo, Heui Seung

    2015-12-01

    Vitelline veins are a pair of embryonic structures. The veins develop the portal vein system. Serious problems occur if the vitelline vein does not regress and becomes an aneurysm. Thrombus formation in the vitelline vein aneurysm could lead to portal vein thrombosis and portal hypertension unless promptly and correctly treated. Though vitelline vein aneurysm is an extremely rare anomaly, it rapidly progresses to portal vein thrombosis that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment. We reported a case of neonatal vitelline vein aneurysm and thrombosis that was cured by prompt operation. PMID:26665130

  15. A systematic review and meta-analysis of feasibility, safety and efficacy of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) versus two-stage hepatectomy (TSH).

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhipeng; Tang, Wei; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-10-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to review the regeneration rate of future liver remnant (FLR) and perioperative outcomes after associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) and two-stage hepatectomy (TSH). A web search was performed in "MEDLINE", "EMBASE", and "SCIENCE DIRECT" databases using both subject headings (MeSH) and truncated word to identify all the articles published that related to this topic. Pooled risk ratios were calculated for categorical variables and mean differences for continuous variables using the fixed-effects and random-effects models for meta-analysis. Three studies involved 282 patients, of whom 234 were in the TSH group and 48 in the ALPPS group. Morbidity was experienced in 56.3% patients in the ALPPS group and 36.1% in the TSH group. There was a statistical difference (RR = 1.08; Z = 3.24; 95% CI, p = 0.001). Second surgeries were performed successfully in 79.1% patients in the portal vein embolization (PVE) group and 100% in the ALPPS group. There was a statistical difference (Z = 2.48; 95% CI, p = 0.01). The mean regeneration rate of FLR in the ALPPS group was 56.4% compared with 52.8% in the TSH group. There was no statistical difference (95% CI, p = 0.34). So from the outcome of this meta-analysis, TSH had a similar remnant liver regeneration ability compared to ALPPS while the morbidity and mortality rates were relatively low. Cancer progression while waiting for the staged liver resection after portal vein embolization was a drawback for TSH. PMID:26559020

  16. Complicated Azygos Vein Aneurysm in an Infant Presenting with Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Song, Jinyoung; Kang, I-Seok; Yang, Ji-Hyuk; Jun, Tae-Gook

    2016-01-01

    Azygos vein aneurysm is a rare cause of mediastinal mass. Most cases present as an incidental finding on imaging modalities, but in few cases the thrombosis in the aneurysm leads to pulmonary thromboembolism, which may require surgical resection. We present a case where, for the first time, a case of a complicated azygos vein aneurysm was diagnosed in infancy, which required surgical resection. PMID:27014359

  17. Complicated Azygos Vein Aneurysm in an Infant Presenting with Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Song, Jinyoung; Huh, June; Kang, I-Seok; Yang, Ji-Hyuk; Jun, Tae-Gook

    2016-03-01

    Azygos vein aneurysm is a rare cause of mediastinal mass. Most cases present as an incidental finding on imaging modalities, but in few cases the thrombosis in the aneurysm leads to pulmonary thromboembolism, which may require surgical resection. We present a case where, for the first time, a case of a complicated azygos vein aneurysm was diagnosed in infancy, which required surgical resection. PMID:27014359

  18. Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis in Venous Aneurysm following Closure of the Chronic Traumatic Arteriovenous Fistulae of the Lower Extremities

    PubMed Central

    Orrapin, Saranat; Arworn, Supapong; Rerkasem, Kittipan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic arteriovenous fistula (AVF) commonly results from an unrecognized vascular injury. In this report, there were two cases of chronic traumatic AVF of the legs with a long history of stab (case 1) and shotgun wounds (case 2). Both cases presented with varicose veins together with hyperpigmentation around the ankle of the affected leg. Angiograms showed a single large AVF in case 1, whereas, in case 2, there was a single large AVF together with multiple small AVFs. In both cases large venous aneurysm was found next to a large AVF. An open surgical AVF closure for the large AVF was performed in case 1 successfully, but patient developed acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in a large venous aneurysm. In the second case, in order to prevent DVT, only closure of the large AVF was performed, which preserved arterial flow into the venous aneurysm. Case 2 did not have acute DVT. This report raised the concern about acute DVTs in venous aneurysms following the closure of chronic traumatic AVF in terms of prevention. Also chronic traumatic AVF is commonly due to misdiagnosis in the initial treatment, so complete and serial physical examinations in penetrating vascular injury patients are of paramount importance. PMID:27293948

  19. Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis in Venous Aneurysm following Closure of the Chronic Traumatic Arteriovenous Fistulae of the Lower Extremities.

    PubMed

    Orrapin, Saranat; Arworn, Supapong; Rerkasem, Kittipan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic arteriovenous fistula (AVF) commonly results from an unrecognized vascular injury. In this report, there were two cases of chronic traumatic AVF of the legs with a long history of stab (case 1) and shotgun wounds (case 2). Both cases presented with varicose veins together with hyperpigmentation around the ankle of the affected leg. Angiograms showed a single large AVF in case 1, whereas, in case 2, there was a single large AVF together with multiple small AVFs. In both cases large venous aneurysm was found next to a large AVF. An open surgical AVF closure for the large AVF was performed in case 1 successfully, but patient developed acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in a large venous aneurysm. In the second case, in order to prevent DVT, only closure of the large AVF was performed, which preserved arterial flow into the venous aneurysm. Case 2 did not have acute DVT. This report raised the concern about acute DVTs in venous aneurysms following the closure of chronic traumatic AVF in terms of prevention. Also chronic traumatic AVF is commonly due to misdiagnosis in the initial treatment, so complete and serial physical examinations in penetrating vascular injury patients are of paramount importance. PMID:27293948

  20. Imbalance of Pro- vs. Anti-Coagulation Factors in Chinese Patients with Budd-Chiari Syndrome and Non-Cirrhotic Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Chuangye; Yin, Zhanxin; Wu, Feifei; Fan, Daiming; Han, Guohong

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim The coagulation abnormalities in non-cirrhotic Budd-Chiari syndrome (NC-BCS) and non-cirrhotic portal vein thrombosis (NC-PVT) are unclear. We conducted this case-control study to investigate the coagulation profile of NC-BCS and NC-PVT in Chinese patients. Methods We measured the levels of factors II, V, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, XII, protein C (PC), protein S (PS) and antithrombin (AT) in blood samples from 37 NC-BCS patients, 74 NC-PVT patients, and 100 healthy controls. The levels and ratios of pro- and anti-coagulation factors were compared between patients with NC-BCS and healthy controls, between different types of NC-BCS and between NC-PVT and healthy controls. Results In patients with NC-BCS, factor VIII (P<0.001) was significantly elevated; factor V (P<0.001), VII (P<0.001), IX (P = 0.003), X (P<0.001), XI (P<0.001), XII (P<0.001), PC (P<0.001) and AT (P<0.001) were significantly decreased; and no difference was observed for factor II (P = 0.088) and PS (P = 0.199) compared with healthy controls. Factor VIII-to-PC (P = 0.008), factor VIII-to-PS (P = 0.037) and factor VIII-to-AT (P = 0.001) were significantly increased; other ratios were significantly reduced or did not show any difference. No differences were observed between different types of NC-BCS for individual pro- and anti-coagulation factors or the ratios between them. Among patients with NC-PVT, factor VIII (P<0.001) was significantly elevated and other factors were significantly decreased. Factor II-to-PC (P<0.001), factor VIII-to-PC (P<0.001), factor IX-to-PC (P<0.001), factor VIII-to-PS (P<0.001), factor II-to-AT (P<0.001), factor VIII-to-AT (P<0.001) and factor IX-to-AT (P<0.001) were significantly increased; all other ratios for NC-PVT were significantly reduced or did not show any significant difference. Conclusions NC-BCS and NC-PVT are associated with elevated levels of factor VIII and the decreased levels of PC and AT were probably the most significant features of

  1. Thrombosis of a Superior Mesenteric Vein Aneurysm: Transarterial Thrombolysis and Transhepatic Aspiration Thrombectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Hechelhammer, L.; Crook, D.W.; Widmer, U.; Wildermuth, S.; Pfammatter, T.

    2004-09-15

    We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain due to acute thrombosis of a superior and inferior mesenteric vein aneurysm, which was treated by a combination of arterial thrombolysis and transhepatic thrombus aspiration. At the last follow-up CT, 21 months following this procedure, there was no evidence of rethrombosis, and the patient continues to do well under oral anticoagulation. The literature regarding these uncommon mesenteric vein aneurysms without portal vein involvement, as well as their treatment options, is reviewed.

  2. Hepatoportography via the Umbilical Vein

    PubMed Central

    White, J. J.; Skinner, G. B.; MacLean, L. D.

    1966-01-01

    The umbilical vein in adults is patent but collapsed. There is a membranous valve at its entrance into the left portal vein. Cannulation of the portal vein via the umbilical vein permits direct access to the portal system for portography and hepatography. This procedure was performed under local or general anesthesia in 30 patients and was successful in 22. It is useful in the investigation of patients with portal hypertension, and suspected intrahepatic tumours or abscesses. It gives excellent contrast visualization of the liver and definition of lesions as small as 1.0 cm. This technique is superior to both hepatic scanning and splenoportography. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:5924949

  3. [Idiopathic non-cirrhotic portal hypertension: An update].

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, Julien; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Valla, Dominique-Charles

    2015-10-01

    Idiopathic non-cirrhotic portal hypertension is an under-estimated cause of portal hypertension. The diagnosis requires the exclusion of cirrhosis, common causes of chronic liver disease and venous obstruction of the portal and hepatic veins. It has been associated with various extra-hepatic conditions that are most frequently immunologic, prothrombotic, hematologic and toxic. The most frequent clinical complications are variceal hemorrhage and portal vein thrombosis. Complications of portal hypertension should be managed as in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:26362514

  4. [Combination Chemotherapy Using Sorafenib and Hepatic Arterial Infusion with a Fine-Powder Formulation of Cisplatin for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis--A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tadashi; Kanazawa, Akishige; Shimizu, Sadatoshi; Murata, Akihiro; Sakae, Masayuki; Kurihara, Shigeaki; Tashima, Tetsuzo; Deguchi, Sota; Nakai, Takashi; Kawasaki, Yasuko; Kioka, Kiyohide

    2015-11-01

    Sorafenib has been a standard therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein thrombosis. Hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) is still preferably performed in Japan because of its relatively good tumor-shrinking effect. We report a case of advanced multiple HCC with portal thrombus that responded to combination chemotherapy with sorafenib and repeat hepatic arterial infusion with a fine-powder formulation of cisplatin (IA-call®). A 57-year-old man presented for the treatment of HCC with alcoholic cirrhosis. Multiple HCC were found to be rapidly progressing with portal thrombosis. HAIC with IA-call® was performed, but the tumors progressed. TAE was performed 3 times thereafter and the main tumor shrunk to some extent. A month after the last TAE, the HCC was found to progress again, and oral sorafenib was administered. A reservoir and catheter were placed and HAIC with low-dose 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin was performed for 3 cycles following 1 HAIC cycle with epirubicin and mitomycin C, which was not effective. For 10 months after initial therapy, HAIC using IA-call® has been performed once for 6 weeks. After performing HAIC with IA-call® 5 times, the serum levels of HCC tumor markers AFP and PIVKA-Ⅱdecreased, and the tumors continued to shrink and were not stained on enhanced CT scan. The patient has been alive for 23 months after the initial therapy and has maintained stable disease. PMID:26805203

  5. Experimental TIPS with spiral Z-stents in swine with and without induced portal hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Saxon, Richard R.; Nishimine, Kiyoshi; Nishida, Norifumi; Uchida, Barry T.

    1997-05-15

    Purpose. To assess the suitability of spiral Z-stents for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) and the influence of portal hypertension on shunt patency in young swine. Methods. TIPS were established using spiral Z-stents in 14 domestic swine. In 7 animals, the portal venous pressure was normal; in the other 7, acute portal hypertension was induced by embolization of portal vein branches. Follow-up portal venography and histologic evaluations were done from 1 hr to 12 weeks after TIPS. Results. Follow-up transhepatic portal venograms showed progressive narrowing of the shunt, most priminent in the midportion of the tract. Ingrowth of liver parenchyma between the stent wires found after 3 weeks led to progressive shunt narrowing and shunt occlusion by 12 weeks. A pseudointima grew rapidly inside the stent, peaked in thickness around 4 weeks, and decreased later. Acutely created portal hypertension rapidly returned to normal and there was no difference in TIPS patency between the two groups of animals. Conclusion. Although the spiral Z-stent can be used as a device for creation of TIPS in patients with cirrhotic livers, it is associated with extensive liver ingrowth in swine that leads to rapid shunt occlusion. Portal hypertension was only transient in this model.

  6. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of unusual portal vascular abnormalities in two cats.

    PubMed

    McConnell, J F; Sparkes, A H; Ladlow, J; Doust, R; Davies, S

    2006-06-01

    Two cases of ascites secondary to portal vascular abnormalities associated with portal hypertension are described. In the first case a five-month-old cat was presented with recurrent ascites and investigations showed that the underlying cause was a hepatic arteriovenous fistula. Ultrasonography showed direct communication of the coeliac artery and right branch of the portal vein. There was also hepatofugal flow in the main portal vein consistent with portal hypertension. The ultrasonographic features were similar to those seen in dogs with hepatic arteriovenous fistulae. In the second case, ascites, portal hypertension and an intraluminal mass in the main portal vein was diagnosed in a 16-year-old cat that had been presented with hyperthyroidism and hepatomegaly. Acquired portosystemic collaterals involving the left renal vein were present. Additional diagnostic investigations were not permitted. Ultrasonography was useful in both cases to document portal hypertension and the underlying cause. PMID:16761986

  7. Comparative analysis of portal hepatic infiltrating leucocytes in acute drug-induced liver injury, idiopathic autoimmune and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Foureau, D M; Walling, T L; Maddukuri, V; Anderson, W; Culbreath, K; Kleiner, D E; Ahrens, W A; Jacobs, C; Watkins, P B; Fontana, R J; Chalasani, N; Talwalkar, J; Lee, W M; Stolz, A; Serrano, J; Bonkovsky, H L

    2015-04-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is often caused by innate and adaptive host immune responses. Characterization of inflammatory infiltrates in the liver may improve understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of DILI. This study aimed to enumerate and characterize leucocytes infiltrating liver tissue from subjects with acute DILI (n = 32) versus non-DILI causes of acute liver injury (n = 25). Immunostains for CD11b/CD4 (Kupffer and T helper cells), CD3/CD20 (T and B cells) and CD8/CD56 [T cytotoxic and natural killer (NK) cells] were evaluated in biopsies from subjects with acute DILI, either immunoallergic (IAD) or autoimmune (AID) and idiopathic autoimmune (AIH) and viral hepatitis (VH) and correlated with clinical and pathological features. All biopsies showed numerous CD8(+) T cells and macrophages. DILI cases had significantly fewer B lymphocytes than AIH and VH and significantly fewer NK cells than VH. Prominent plasma cells were unusual in IAD (three of 10 cases), but were associated strongly with AIH (eight of nine) and also observed in most with AID (six of nine). They were also found in five of 10 cases with VH. Liver biopsies from subjects with DILI were characterized by low counts of mature B cells and NK cells in portal triads in contrast to VH. NK cells were found only in cases of VH, whereas AIH and VH both showed higher counts of B cells than DILI. Plasma cells were associated most strongly with AIH and less so with AID, but were uncommon in IAD. PMID:25418487

  8. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) in the Treatment of Venous Symptomatic Chronic Portal Thrombosis in Non-cirrhotic Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bilbao, Jose I. Elorz, Mariana; Vivas, Isabel; Martinez-Cuesta, Antonio; Bastarrika, Gorka; Benito, Alberto

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: To present a series of cases of non-cirrhotic patients with symptomatic massive portal thrombosis treated by percutaneous techniques. All patients underwent a TIPS procedure in order to maintain the patency of the portal vein by facilitating the outflow. Methods: A total of six patients were treated for thrombosis of the main portal vein (6/6); the main right and left branches (3/6) and the splenic vein (5/6) and superior mesenteric vein (6/6). Two patients had a pancreatic malignancy; one patient with an orthotopic liver transplant had been surgically treated for a pancreatic carcinoma. Two patients had idiopathic thrombocytosis, and in the remaining patient no cause for the portal thrombosis was identified. During the initial procedure in each patient one or more approaches were tried: transhepatic (5/6), transileocolic (1/6), trans-splenic (1/6) or transjugular (1/6). In all cases the procedure was completed with a TIPS with either ultrasound guidance (3/6), 'gun-shot' technique (2/6) or fluoroscopic guidance (1/6).Results: No complications were observed during the procedures. One patient had a repeat episode of variceal bleeding at 30 months, one patient remained asymptomatic and was lost to follow-up at 24 months, two patients were successfully treated surgically (cephalic duodenopancreatectomy) and are alive at 4 and 36 months. One patient remains asymptomatic (without new episodes of abdominal pain) at 16 months of follow-up. One patient died because of tumor progression at 10 months. Conclusion: Percutaneous techniques for portal recanalization are an interesting alternative even in non-acute thrombosis. Once flow has been restored in the portal vein TIPS may be necessary to obtain an adequate outflow, hence facilitating and maintaining the portal flow.

  9. Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    Varicose veins are swollen, twisted veins that you can see just under the skin. They usually occur in ... of the body. Hemorrhoids are a type of varicose vein. Your veins have one-way valves that help ...

  10. Acute respiratory distress associated with external jugular vein catheterization in the newborn.

    PubMed

    Bitar, Fadi F; Obeid, Mounir; Dabbous, Ibrahim; Hayek, Paula; Akel, Samir; Mroueh, Salman

    2003-12-01

    We report on the acute onset of respiratory distress secondary to fluid accumulation in the chest within hours of placement of an external jugular venous line in a newborn. External jugular venous catheterization in the newborn is a procedure with potentially serious complications, and should be avoided unless the patient is monitored closely. PMID:14618649

  11. Asymmetry of Deep Medullary Veins on Susceptibility Weighted MRI in Patients with Acute MCA Stroke Is Associated with Poor Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Mucke, Johanna; Möhlenbruch, Markus; Kickingereder, Philipp; Kieslich, Pascal J.; Bäumer, Philipp; Gumbinger, Christoph; Purrucker, Jan; Mundiyanapurath, Sibu; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Bendszus, Martin; Radbruch, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Due to its sensitivity to deoxyhemoglobin, susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) enables the visualization of deep medullary veins (DMV) in patients with acute stroke, which are difficult to depict under physiological circumstances. This study assesses the asymmetric appearance of prominent DMV as an independent predictor for stroke severity and outcome. Materials and Methods SWI of 86 patients with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke were included. A scoring system from 0 (no visible DMV) to 3 (very prominent DMV) was applied for both hemispheres separately. A difference of scores between ipsi- and contralateral side was defined as asymmetric (AMV+). Occurrence of AMV+ was correlated with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) Score on admission and discharge, as well as the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at discharge. Ordinal regression analysis was used to evaluate NIHSS and mRS as predictors of stroke severity, clinical course of disease and outcome. Results 55 patients displayed AMV+ while 31 did not show an asymmetry (AMV–). Median NIHSS on admission was 17 (11–21) in the AMV+ group and 9 (5–15) in the AMV– group (p = 0.001). On discharge median NIHSS was 11 (5–20) for AMV+ and 5 (2–14) for AMV– (p = 0.005). The median mRS at discharge was 4 (3–5) in the AMV+ group and 3 (1–4) in AMV– (p = 0.001). Odds ratio was 3.19 (95% CI: 1.24–8.21) for AMV+ to achieve a higher mRS than AMV– (p = 0.016). Conclusion The asymmetric appearance of DMV on SWI is a fast and easily evaluable parameter for the prediction of stroke severity and can be used as an additional imaging parameter in patients with acute MCA stroke. PMID:25849958

  12. Portal Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Hepatitis C Additional Content Medical News Portal Hypertension By Steven K. Herrine, MD NOTE: This is ... Hepatic Encephalopathy Jaundice in Adults Liver Failure Portal Hypertension Portal hypertension is abnormally high blood pressure in ...

  13. Association between retinal hemorrhagic pattern and macular perfusion status in eyes with acute branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Muraoka, Yuki; Uji, Akihito; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ooto, Sotaro; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Ayako; Iida, Yuto; Miwa, Yuko; Hata, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    This prospective study included 63 eyes with acute branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) to evaluate the retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the posterior poles and explore their clinical relevance in macular perfusion differentiation. Retinal hemorrhagic patterns and macular perfusion status were evaluated via fundus photography and fluorescein angiography, respectively. Macular perfusion was judged as nonischemic in 30, ischemic in 28, and undeterminable in 5 among the 63 eyes. Predominant hemorrhagic patterns were flame-shaped in 39 (67.2%) and non-flame-shaped in 19 (32.8%) eyes. All 39 eyes with a flame-shaped hemorrhage showed a nonischemic macula. Of the 19 eyes classified as having a non-flame-shaped hemorrhage, 13 (68.4%) had an ischemic macula and 6 (31.6%) had a nonischemic macula (P < 0.001). Parallelism in eyes with a flame-shaped hemorrhage was higher than in those with a non-flame-shaped hemorrhage (P < 0.001), and in those with a nonischemic macula versus those with an ischemic macula (P < 0.001). The area under the curve for parallelism was 0.975 (P < 0.001), suggesting an accurate diagnostic parameter for macular perfusion differentiation. In conclusion, we objectively evaluated retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the posterior pole in BRVO using the parallelism method, which was useful in differentiating macular perfusion status. PMID:27334338

  14. Retinal vein occlusion and the risk of acute myocardial infarction development: a 12-year nationwide cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Tyler Hyungtaek; Han, John Seungsoo; Oh, Jaewon; Kim, Dong Wook; Kang, Seok-Min; Chung, Eun Jee

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the risk of developing acute myocardial infarction (AMI) following retinal vein occlusion (RVO). A retrospective cohort study was performed from the National Health Insurance Service and comprised 1,025,340 random subjects who were followed from 2002 to 2013. Patients with RVO in 2002 were excluded. The RVO group was composed of patients who received an initial RVO diagnosis between January 2003 and December 2007 (n = 1677). The comparison group was selected (five patients per RVO patient; n = 8367) using propensity score matching according to sociodemographic factors and the year of enrolment. Each patient was tracked until 2013. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used. AMI developed in 7.6% of the RVO group and 5.3% of the comparison group (p < 0.001) for 7.7 median follow-up periods. RVO increased the risk of AMI development [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.25; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.02 to 1.52]. In the subgroup analysis, RVO patients aged <65 years and the males within this age group had an adjusted HR of 1.47 (95% CI 1.10 to 1.98) and an adjusted HR of 2.00 (95% CI 1.38 to 2.91) for AMI development, respectively. RVO was significantly associated with AMI development. PMID:26924150

  15. Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Varicose Veins? Español Varicose (VAR-i-kos) veins are swollen, ... can form in other parts of the body. Varicose veins are a common condition. They usually cause few ...

  16. Portal and splanchnic hemodynamics after partial splenic embolization in cirrhotic patients with hypersplenism.

    PubMed

    Helaly, Ahmed Z; Al-Warraky, Mohamed S; El-Azab, Gasser I; Kohla, Mohamed A S; Abdelaal, Elsayed E

    2015-12-01

    To assess the acute effects of partial splenic embolization (PSE) on portal and splanchnic hemodynamics in patients with cirrhosis. Ninety-five patients with hypersplenism were included in the study. Duplex examinations were performed before and 3 and 7 days after PSE. Portal and splanchnic hemodynamics including vessel cross-sectional area (CSA), mean flow velocities (cm/s), blood flows (mL/min), Doppler indices as portal congestion index (CI), liver vascular index, hepatic artery and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) pulsatility and resistive indices (PI and RI), were performed before and after PSE. In our study, 69 of 95 patients were males (72.6%) and 26 females (27.3%). Chronic hepatitis C virus infection was the main cause of cirrhosis (81.1%). PSE failed technically in six patients (6.3%). After PSE, both CSA and CI significantly decreased (p < 0.05 and <0.01). The portal vein velocity significantly increased (p < 0.01). The portal flow volume (892.4 ± 151 mL/min) did not show significant changes. The hepatic artery RI and PI showed a steady increase that became significant 7 days post-PSE (p < 0.05). The RI and PI of SMA increased significantly after 7 days of PSE (p < 0.05). PSE has an immediate portal decompression effect in patients with portal hypertension without reduction in portal flow. This effect on portal pressure should be investigated in future studies as a potential tool for management of acute variceal bleeding when other medical procedures fail. PMID:26547369

  17. Ligation of left renal vein as a salvage procedure for splenorenal shunt after living donor liver transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cho, S Y; Kim, S H; Lee, K W; Park, S J; Han, S-S; Kim, Y-K

    2009-12-01

    We describe a case of recovered portal flow by ligation of the left renal vein (LRV) as a salvage procedure for a spontaneous splenorenal shunt (SRS) occurring the next day after right liver living donor transplantation (LDLT). Doppler ultrasonography showed normal graft portal venous flow immediately after LDLT, but nearly total diversion of portal flow into the existing splenorenal shunt was observed on the next day. Portal flow normalized after ligation of the LRV by relaparotomy. The patient recovered fully without complication and was discharged on the 17th postoperative day. He remains well at 14 months after the operation, returning to his previous occupation. This case was neither associated with acute rejection nor with small-for-size graft, which may increase intrahepatic vascular resistance, causing portal flow steal through shunts. Even though patients with preoperative SRS show normal portal flow immediately after transplantation, close monitoring is necessary for a possible decrease or loss of portal flow. If portal flow becomes insufficient, ligation of LRV as a salvage procedure is an important option that can be considered even after transplantation. PMID:20005377

  18. Percutaneous Closure of a Coronary Artery-to-Vein Graft Anastomotic Pseudoaneurysm Presenting as Acute Coronary Syndrome after Recent Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Suresh; Gupta, Kamal; Wiley, Mark; Parashara, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm formation has been reported in degenerated coronary artery saphenous vein bypass grafts, as well as in native coronary arteries after interventional procedures or blunt trauma. In contrast, pseudoaneurysm formation arising from the anastomotic site of native coronary vessels soon after coronary artery bypass grafting is rare, and neither the clinical presentation of this phenomenon nor its treatment is well described. We present the case of a 63-year-old man, a recent coronary artery bypass grafting patient, who presented with acute coronary syndrome due to a large and expanding pseudoaneurysm of the saphenous vein-to-ramus intermedius artery graft anastomosis. After several attempts, we successfully treated the pseudoaneurysm by means of percutaneous coil embolization. To our knowledge, this is the first report of acute coronary syndrome secondary to a pseudoaneurysm at the coronary artery–saphenous vein graft anastomosis. In addition, this appears to be the first report of the percutaneous treatment of such a pseudoaneurysm by means of coil embolization. PMID:26175645

  19. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis of Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis in the Lower Extremity of a Child with Interrupted Inferior Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Oguzkurt, Levent Ozkan, Ugur; Tercan, Fahri; Koc, Zafer

    2007-04-15

    We present the case of a 14-year-old girl who developed acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in her right lower extremity. Laboratory testing revealed protein S deficiency, and the patient's father also had this abnormality with a history of lower extremity DVT. Manual thromboaspiration followed by catheter-directed thrombolysis resulted in total clearance of all thrombi. Computed tomography and later venography revealed an interrupted inferior vena cava. Catheter-directed thrombolysis is an established treatment for adults with acute DVT. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to describe catheter-directed thrombolysis in a pediatric patient with lower extremity DVT. Our results suggest that catheter-directed thrombolysis is safe and effective for use in selected older children and adolescents with acute DVT in the lower extremity.

  20. Noncirrhotic portal fibrosis after Wilms' tumor therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.A.; Marshall, G.S.; Neblett, W.W.; Gray, G.; Ghishan, F.K.

    1986-04-01

    A 9-yr-old girl developed massive hemorrhage from esophageal varices 2 yr after combined modality therapy for Wilms' tumor. Evaluation showed a patent extrahepatic portal venous system and an elevated splenic pulp pressure. In contrast to previous reports of hepatopathy after irradiation injury, histologic sections of the liver did not demonstrate occlusion of the central veins, but rather a diffuse obliteration of intrahepatic portal venous radicles. This pattern of noncirrhotic portal fibrosis has not been described following antitumor therapy.

  1. Results of portal systemic shunts in Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Vons, C; Smadja, C; Bourstyn, E; Szekely, A M; Bonnet, P; Franco, D

    1986-01-01

    Nine patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) were treated by a portal systemic shunt. One had thrombosis of the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) and another had complete obstruction of the retrohepatic inferior vena cava (IVC). All other patients had a marked stenosis of the retrohepatic IVC with caval pressure ranging from 12 to 24 mmHg (mean: 17 mmHg). Seven patients had an interposition mesocaval shunt using an autologous jugular vein. The patient with a thrombosed SMV had a portoatrial shunt. The patient with an obstructed IVC had a cavoatrial shunt after an erroneous portacaval shunt had failed to relieve ascites. There were no operative deaths and no major postoperative complications. One patient died 19 months after operation of acute leukemia complicating polycythemia rubra vera. All other patients were alive and well 8 months to 6 years after operation. None of them had encephalopathy. These results suggest several comments: Portal systemic shunts are a good treatment for BCS and have a low operative risk. The mesocaval shunt is an efficient procedure, even when there is stenosis of the IVC with high caval pressure; shunts to the right atrium should be performed only in the case of complete obstruction or inaccessibility of the IVC. The long-term prognosis is excellent, except in patients with potential malignancies. Therefore, portal systemic shunts should be indicated early in patients with symptomatic BCS. PMID:3963896

  2. Portal hypertension as portrayed by marked hepatosplenomegaly: case report

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    The liver is vulnerable to as host of disease processes, including portal hypertension. This is a severe hepatic condition in which the liver is subject to numerous imbalances: increased hepatic blood flow, increased portal vein pressure due to extrahepatic portal vein obstruction, and/or increases in hepatic blood flow resistance. Although many diseases states may be responsible for the development of portal hypertension, it is most commonly associated with moderately severe or advanced cirrhosis. Advanced, untreated portal hypertension may cause additional complications such as hepatosplenomegaly, gastrointestinal bleeding, and ascites.

  3. Acute Effects of Liver Vein Occlusion by Stent-Graft Placed in Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Channel: An Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Keussen, Inger Bergqvist, Lennart; Rissler, Pehr; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2006-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of hepatic vein occlusion by stent-graft used in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). The experiments were performed in six healthy pigs under general anesthesia. Following percutaneous transhepatic implantation of a port-a-cath in the right hepatic vein, TIPS was created with a stent-graft (Viatorr; W L Gore, Flagstaff, AZ, USA). The outflow from the hepatic vein, blocked by the stent-graft was documented by injection of contrast medium and repeated injections of {sup 99}Tc{sup m}-labeled human serum albumin through the port-a-cath. After 2 weeks, the outflow was re-evaluated, the pigs were sacrificed, and histopathologic examination of the liver was performed. Occlusion of the hepatic vein by a stent-graft had a short and temporary effect on the outflow. Histopathological examination from the affected liver segment showed no divergent pattern. Stent-grafts used in TIPS block the outflow from the liver vein, but do not have a prolonged circulatory effect and do not affect the liver parenchyma.

  4. Non-endoscopic management strategies for acute esophagogastric variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Satapathy, Sanjaya K.; Sanyal, Arun J

    2014-01-01

    Acute variceal bleeding is a potentially life threatening complication of portal hypertension. Management consists of emergent hemostasis, therapy directed at hemodynamic resuscitation, protection of the airway, and prevention and treatment of complications including prophylactic use of antibiotics. Endoscopic treatment remains the mainstay in the management of acute variceal bleeding in combination with pharmacotherapy aimed at reducing portal pressure. Patients failing first-line therapy are triaged for non-endoscopic means of achieving hemostasis such as TIPS, BRTO or surgically created shunt procedures as rescue procedures, the choice depends on the source of bleeding (esophageal or gastric), size of the varices, portal vein patency, presence or absence of gastro-renal shunt, hepatic reserve and local expertise. The current chapter, intends to highlight only the current non endoscopic treatment approaches for control of acute variceal bleeding. PMID:25440928

  5. Thrombophilic genetic factors PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT as risk factors of alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and portal vein thrombosis, in a Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Mario; Pasta, Francesca; Pasta, Linda

    2015-08-15

    The thrombophilic genetic factors (THRGFs), PAI-1 4G-4G, MTHFR 677TT, V Leiden 506Q and Prothrombin 20210A, were studied as risk factors in 865 Caucasian patients with liver cirrhosis, consecutively enrolled from June 2008 to January 2014. A total of 582 HCV, 80 HBV, 94 alcohol, (82 with more than one etiologic factor) and 191 cryptogenic patients with liver cirrhosis had been consecutively enrolled; 243 patients showed portal vein thrombosis (PVT). At least one of the above THRGFs was present in 339/865 patients (39.2%). PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT were the most frequent THRGFs, statistically significant in patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis, and PVT: respectively 24 and 28, 50 and 73, and 65 and 83 (all chi-square tests>3.84, and p values<0.05). Two logistic regression analysis, using PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT, as dependent variable, confirmed the independent significant relationship of these THRGFs with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and PVT. PAI 1 and MTHFR 677 genotypes, deviated from those expected in populations in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (all p values<0.05), in the subgroups of patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and presence of PVT. Our study shows the pivotal role of PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT in patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis, and PVT, in a Caucasian population. In conclusion, thrombo and fibro-genetic mechanisms of PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT, could have a role in the development of liver cirrhosis, mainly in patients without HCV and HBV, and PVT. PMID:25987440

  6. Early vein graft failure leading to acute myocardial infarction, dehiscence and haemopericardium treated by percutaneous coil embolisation and balloon tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Kanakadandi, Uday; Huang, Juxiang; Lee, Kwan

    2014-01-01

    Early vein graft failure is a well-described early complication of coronary artery bypass grafting. Revascularisation with emergency percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) may limit the extent of myocardial damage and is associated with lower procedural complications compared than with emergency redo bypass surgery. We describe a case of an early saphenous vein graft (SVG) thrombosis presenting as an inferior ST-elevation to our non-surgical PCI site, complicated by SVG graft dehiscence leading to cardiac tamponade, which we treated with coil embolisation and balloon tamponade during the patient's transfer to a surgical facility for emergent haemopericardium evacuation. PMID:24496067

  7. Focus on Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other veins often mistaken for varicose veins are spider veins and reticular veins, which are the visible ... greenish-blue veins that appear in our legs. Spider veins or teleangiectesias are tiny veins that you ...

  8. Anatomy of hepatic arteriolo-portal venular shunts evaluated by 3D micro-CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Timothy L; Knudsen, Bruce E; Anderson, Jill L; Vercnocke, Andrew J; Jorgensen, Steven M; Ritman, Erik L

    2014-01-01

    The liver differs from other organs in that two vascular systems deliver its blood – the hepatic artery and the portal vein. However, how the two systems interact is not fully understood. We therefore studied the microvascular geometry of rat liver hepatic artery and portal vein injected with the contrast polymer Microfil®. Intact isolated rat livers were imaged by micro-CT and anatomic evidence for hepatic arteriolo-portal venular shunts occurring between hepatic artery and portal vein branches was found. Simulations were performed to rule out the possibility of the observed shunts being artifacts resulting from image blurring. In addition, in the case of specimens where only the portal vein was injected, only the portal vein was opacified, whereas in hepatic artery injections, both the hepatic artery and portal vein were opacified. We conclude that mixing of the hepatic artery and portal vein blood can occur proximal to the sinusoidal level, and that the hepatic arteriolo-portal venular shunts may function as a one-way valve-like mechanism, allowing flow only from the hepatic artery to the portal vein (and not the other way around). PMID:24684343

  9. What Causes Varicose Veins?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Varicose Veins? Weak or damaged valves in the veins can ... space. These are varicose veins. Normal Vein and Varicose Vein Figure A shows a normal vein with a ...

  10. Effect of peritoneo-venous shunt on portal pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, A K; Leevy, C M

    1989-01-01

    The cause of variceal bleed after a peritoneo-venous shunt is not known. Portal haemodynamic consequences of a peritoneo-venous shunt are poorly understood. The most critical period after a peritoneo-venous shunt is the early postoperative period when rapid mobilisation of peritoneal fluid occurs. Serial changes in the portal pressure during the early postoperative period have not been recorded. In the present study preoperative wedge hepatic vein (WHV), right atrial (RA) and pulmonary capillary wedged (PCW) pressures, cardiac index (CI), and plasma volume (PV) were measured in five alcoholic cirrhotic patients with tense ascites for up to 20 hours postoperatively. The longterm effect was assessed by repeating the intrahepatic and/or wedged hepatic vein pressures in three of the surviving patients after 10 to 20 months. A significant increase in the circulatory dynamics and portal pressure was seen within two hours after shunt placement. Wedged hepatic vein pressure increased from 27.6 (8.2) mmHg to 37.2 (9.2) mmHg (p less than 0.01), RA pressure increased from 6.8 (1.5) mmHg to 14.0 (4.3) mmHg (p less than 0.05), PCW increased from 7.2 (3.5) mmHg to 19.3 (5.7) mmHg (p less than 0.01), CI increased from 3.4 (0.27) lit/m2/min to 4.3 (0.85) lit/m2/min (p less than 0.05). This was accompanied by a 34% increase in the plasma volume from 1838.5 (142.1) to 2471.4 (210) ml/m2. These derangements were maintained up to 20 hours postoperatively. After 10 to 20 months, repeat measurements revealed a return to preoperative measurements. It is concluded that there is an acute increase portal pressure after a peritoneo-venous shunt attributed to increased circulation plasma volume, resulting from rapid mobilisation of ascitic fluid after the shunt. A sudden increase in portal pressure might be an important provoking factor for variceal bleeding after peritoneo-venus shunt. PMID:2920931

  11. [Recanalization of lower-limb deep veins as an index of efficacy of treatment for acute venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, M R; Sapelkin, S V; Boldin, B V; Leont'ev, S G; Neskhodimov, L A

    2016-01-01

    The authors analysed the results of examination and treatment of a total of 102 patients presenting with iliofemoral venous thrombosis. During treatment, ultrasonographic duplex scanning was used to determine the localization of the proximal margin of thrombotic masses, the time of appearing of the first signs of recanalization, its degree at various levels of the deep venous system, as well as alteration in velocity of the venous blood flow in the deep veins of the lower limbs. The dynamics of clinical symptoms was assessed by the visual analogue scale. Clinical and instrumental examination was performed on day 10, and then 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after the beginning of treatment. The patients were subdivided into three groups. Group One comprised 38 patients receiving therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin (enoxaprin) followed by switching to indirect anticoagulants (warfarin) combined with venotonics (original highly-purified diosmin 600 mg once daily). Group Two was composed of 33 patients receiving rivaroxaban at a dose of 15 mg twice daily for 3 weeks, followed by 20 mg once daily. Group Tree patients (n=31) were also given rivaroxaban according to the above-described standard regimen but in combination with venotonics (original highly-purified diosmin 600 mg once daily). The obtained findings showed that prescribing rivaroxaban to patients from the first day of the disease made it possible to considerably improve and accelerate the processes of restoration of patency of deep veins of lower extremities as compared with the patients taking vitamin K antagonists (warfarin). In patients receiving rivaroxaban, there were no cases of residual thrombotic occlusions of the major veins, and recanalization in three fourths of patients was assessed as good and in the remaining third as moderate. In the warfarin group, occlusion in the iliac veins was noted to persist persisted in 13% of patients, with good recanalization observed only in half of the patients. Addition

  12. Portal Annular Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Harnoss, Jonathan M.; Harnoss, Julian C.; Diener, Markus K.; Contin, Pietro; Ulrich, Alexis B.; Büchler, Markus W.; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Friedrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Portal annular pancreas (PAP) is an asymptomatic congenital pancreas anomaly, in which portal and/or mesenteric veins are encased by pancreas tissue. The aim of the study was to determine the role of PAP in pancreatic surgery as well as its management and potential complication, specifically, postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF). On the basis of a case report, the MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science databases were systematically reviewed up to September 2012. All articles describing a case of PAP were considered. In summary, 21 studies with 59 cases were included. The overall prevalence of PAP was 2.4% and the patients' mean (SD) age was 55.9 (16.2) years. The POPF rate in patients with PAP (12 pancreaticoduodenectomies and 3 distal pancreatectomies) was 46.7% (in accordance with the definition of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery). Portal annular pancreas is a quite unattended pancreatic variant with high prevalence and therefore still remains a clinical challenge to avoid postoperative complications. To decrease the risk for POPF, attentive preoperative diagnostics should also focus on PAP. In pancreaticoduodenectomy, a shift of the resection plane to the pancreas tail should be considered; in extensive pancreatectomy, coverage of the pancreatic remnant by the falciform ligament could be a treatment option. PMID:25207658

  13. Vein Problems Related to Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor if you think you have them. Spider Veins Spider veins are a smaller version of varicose veins and a less serious type of telangiectasias. Spider veins involve the capillaries, the smallest blood vessels ...

  14. The portal immunosuppressive storm: relevance to islet transplantation?

    PubMed

    Shapiro, A M James; Gallant, Heather L; Hao, Er Geng; Lakey, Jonathan R T; McCready, Tara; Rajotte, Ray V; Yatscoff, Randall W; Kneteman, Norman M

    2005-02-01

    Outcomes in clinical islet transplantation improved substantially with the introduction of combined sirolimus and tacrolimus immunosuppression. However, multiple islet preparations are often required to achieve insulin independence, suggesting that islet engraftment may not be optimal when these agents are absorbed via the portal vein. The current study was designed to assess the differential concentrations of immunosuppressive drugs within the portal and systemic circulations of a large animal model, to assess the local concentrations of drugs to which islets are exposed early after implantation. Chronic catheters were placed in the portal vein and carotid artery of 6 mongrel dogs, and immunosuppressants were administered orally. Blood samples were drawn simultaneously from portal and systemic catheters, and drug concentrations were analyzed. Peak immunosuppressant levels as well as area under the curve were dramatically elevated in portal blood relative to systemic levels for all drugs tested. This "portal storm" of immunosuppression may be relevant to intrahepatic islet transplantation. PMID:15665744

  15. [Experience in treating portal thromboses in patients with chronic myeloproliferative diseases].

    PubMed

    Melikyan, A L; Sukhanova, G A; Vakhrusheva, M V; Subortseva, I N; Orel, E B

    2016-01-01

    Patients with myeloproliferative diseases (MPD) are noted to be at high risk for portal thromboses. This problem gives rise to disability if it is untimely treated or resistant to therapy. The paper gives the experience of the Outpatient Department of the Hematology Research Center, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, in using antithrombin III in MPD patients (3 patients with primary myelofibrosis, 3 with essential thrombocythemia) and acute and subacute portal vein thromboses resistant to therapy with direct anticoagulants. In all 5 cases, the use of antithrombin III in combination with low-molecular-weight heparin showed a positive clinical effect as rapid relief of pain syndrome and comparatively early (3-week to 1.5-2-month) recanalization of thrombosed vessels. Three clinical cases are described in detail. PMID:26978616

  16. Portal pyaemia secondary to open haemorrhoidectomy: need for prophylactic broad spectrum antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Raghunath; Natarajan, Arjun; Krishna, Sunil; Thangavelu, Siddharth

    2013-01-01

    A 70-year-old man presenting with long standing grade 3 Haemorrhoids, underwent open haemorrhoidectomy under spinal anaesthesia. The patient passed stools on subsequent day and there was no bleeding per rectum. On day 5, he complained of dull aching upper abdominal pain. On physical examination, the abdomen was soft and there was mild tenderness in the epigastric region. Subsequently, he developed high temperature with chills and rigors. His condition failed to improve and the abdominal pain increased in severity. There was no pain in the perianal region and per rectum examination was normal. Leucocyte count rose to 12×109/L and there were toxic changes on peripheral smear. Blood culture grew Staphylococcus aureus. Liver enzymes were mildly elevated. Coagulation profile was deranged. Fibrin degradation products were positive. D-dimer was high. CT revealed acute thrombosis of left portal vein and microabscesses suggestive of portal pyaemia. PMID:23814220

  17. Portal cavernoma caused by a calcified hydatid cyst of the liver (case report).

    PubMed

    Colovic, Radoje B; Grubor, Nikica M; Colic, Momcilo U; Colovic, Natasa R; Atkinson, Henry Dushan E

    2008-03-01

    A portal cavernoma is a network of porto-porto collateral dilated tortuous veins lying within the hepatoduodenal ligament, which develops as a sequel to portal vein obstruction. This can be the result of extra-hepatic portal vein obstruction from local extrinsic occlusion, or by a prothrombotic disorder, or both. A 56-year-old woman presented with right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Examination and investigations revealed the presence of gallstones, a cavernous portal vein, several calcified hydatid cysts within the liver, grade III haemorrhoids, but no oesophageal varicosities. She had no previous abdominal surgery, and had normal full laboratory workup, including inflammatory markers, clotting analyses, and thrombophilia screen. At open surgery it became apparent that the portal cavernoma had been caused by local pressure from a calcified hydatid cyst of the caudate lobe of the liver. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of portal cavernoma caused by a hydatid cyst of the liver. PMID:18301307

  18. Idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Riggio, Oliviero; Gioia, Stefania; Pentassuglio, Ilaria; Nicoletti, Valeria; Valente, Michele; d'Amati, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    The term idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension (INCPH) has been recently proposed to replace terms, such as hepatoportal sclerosis, idiopathic portal hypertension, incomplete septal cirrhosis, and nodular regenerative hyperplasia, used to describe patients with a hepatic presinusoidal cause of portal hypertension of unknown etiology, characterized by features of portal hypertension (esophageal varices, nonmalignant ascites, porto-venous collaterals), splenomegaly, patent portal, and hepatic veins and no clinical and histological signs of cirrhosis. Physicians should learn to look for this condition in a number of clinical settings, including cryptogenic cirrhosis, a disease known to be associated with INCPH, drug administration, and even chronic alterations in liver function tests. Once INCPH is clinically suspected, liver histology becomes mandatory for the correct diagnosis. However, pathologists should be familiar with the histological features of INCPH, especially in cases in which histology is not only requested to exclude liver cirrhosis. PMID:27555800

  19. Idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Riggio, Oliviero; Gioia, Stefania; Pentassuglio, Ilaria; Nicoletti, Valeria; Valente, Michele; d’Amati, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    The term idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension (INCPH) has been recently proposed to replace terms, such as hepatoportal sclerosis, idiopathic portal hypertension, incomplete septal cirrhosis, and nodular regenerative hyperplasia, used to describe patients with a hepatic presinusoidal cause of portal hypertension of unknown etiology, characterized by features of portal hypertension (esophageal varices, nonmalignant ascites, porto-venous collaterals), splenomegaly, patent portal, and hepatic veins and no clinical and histological signs of cirrhosis. Physicians should learn to look for this condition in a number of clinical settings, including cryptogenic cirrhosis, a disease known to be associated with INCPH, drug administration, and even chronic alterations in liver function tests. Once INCPH is clinically suspected, liver histology becomes mandatory for the correct diagnosis. However, pathologists should be familiar with the histological features of INCPH, especially in cases in which histology is not only requested to exclude liver cirrhosis. PMID:27555800

  20. The umbilical and paraumbilical veins of man.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, B F; Tudor, R G

    1980-01-01

    During its transit through the umbilicus structural changes occur in the thick wall of the extra-abdominal segment of the umbilical vein whereby the components of the intra-abdominal segment acquire an essentially longitudinal direction and become arranged in fibro-elastic and fibro-muscular zones. The vein lumen becomes largely obliterated by asymmetrical proliferation of loose subendothelial conective tissue. The latter forms a new inner zone within which a small segment of the lumen persists in an eccentric position. This residual lumen transmits blood to the portal system from paraumbilical and systemic sources, and is retained in the upper part of the vein, even in old age. A similar process of lumen closure is observed in the ductus venosus. In early childhood the lower third of the vein undergoes breakdown, with fatty infiltration, resulting in its complete division into vascular fibro-elastic strands, and in old age some breakdown occurs in the outermost part of the wall of the upper two thirds. The paraumbilical veins are thick-walled and of similar structure to the umbilical vein. Together they constitute an accessory portal system which is confined between the layers of the falciform ligament and is in communication with the veins of the ventral abdominal wall. The constituents form an ascending series, namely, Burow's veins, the umbilical vein, and Sappey's inferior and superior veins. The main channel of Sappey's inferior veins may be the remnant of the right umbilical vein since it communicates with the right rectus sheath and often communicates directly with the portal system within the right lobe of the liver. The results are of significance in relation to clinical usage of the umbilical vein. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 Fig. 21 Fig. 22 Fig. 23 Fig. 24 Fig. 25 Fig. 26 Fig. 27 Fig. 28 Fig. 29 PMID:7400038

  1. Hepatic venography in noncirrhotic idiopathic portal hypertension: comparison with cirrhosis of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Futagawa, S.; Fukazawa, M.; Musha, H.

    1981-11-01

    Free and wedged hepatic venography were carried out in 37 patients with idiopathic portal hypertension (IPH) and the findings compared with those in 88 patients with cirrhosis of the liver. Characteristic changes in IPH included frequent vein-to-vein anastomoses, narrower angles between large veins and their tributaries, smooth and wavy middle-sized to large branches (giving a general ''weeping willow'' appearance), homogeneous sinusoidal filling, and minimal to absent filling of the portal venous system on wedged retrograde portography. In cirrhosis, by contrast, changes included rare vein-to-vein anastomoses, wide angles between veins and tributaries, irregular stenoses of large veins and branches at various levels, spotty sinusoidal filling, and frequent retrograde flow in the portal venous system. Hepatic venography is helpful in differentiating IPH from cirrhosis.

  2. Utility of endoscopic ultrasound in patients with portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hammoud, Ghassan M; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-10-21

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has revolutionized the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to patients with gastrointestinal disorders. Its application in patients with liver disease and portal hypertension is increasing. Patients with chronic liver disease are at risk for development of portal hypertension sequale such as ascites, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and gastroesophageal varices. Bleeding esophageal and gastric varices are among the most common causes of mortality in patients with cirrhosis. Thus, early detection and treatment improve the outcome in this population. EUS can improve the detection and diagnosis of gastroesophageal varices and collateral veins and can provide endoscopic therapy of gastroesophageal varices such as EUS-guided sclerotherapy of esophageal collateral vessels and EUS-guided cynoacrylate (Glue) injection of gastric varices. EUS can also provide knowledge on the efficacy of pharmacotherapy of portal hypertension. Furthermore, EUS can provide assessment and prediction of variceal recurrence after endoscopic therapy and assessment of portal hemodynamics such as E-Flow and Doppler study of the azygous and portal veins. Moreover, EUS-guided fine needle aspiration may provide cytologic diagnosis of focal hepatic tumors and analysis of free abdominal fluid. Using specialized EUS-guided needle biopsy, a sample of liver tissue can be obtained to diagnose and evaluate for chronic liver disease. EUS-guided fine needle injection can be used to study portal vein pressure and hemodynamics, and potentially could be used to assist in exact measurement of portal vein pressure and placement of intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. PMID:25339809

  3. Varicose vein - noninvasive treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Sclerotherapy; Laser therapy - varicose veins; Radiofrequency vein ablation; Endovenous thermal ablation; Ambulatory phlebectomy; Transilluminated power phlebotomy; Endovenous laser ablation; Varicose vein ...

  4. Secure portal.

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Cynthia Lee

    2007-09-01

    There is a need in security systems to rapidly and accurately grant access of authorized personnel to a secure facility while denying access to unauthorized personnel. In many cases this role is filled by security personnel, which can be very costly. Systems that can perform this role autonomously without sacrificing accuracy or speed of throughput are very appealing. To address the issue of autonomous facility access through the use of technology, the idea of a ''secure portal'' is introduced. A secure portal is a defined zone where state-of-the-art technology can be implemented to grant secure area access or to allow special privileges for an individual. Biometric technologies are of interest because they are generally more difficult to defeat than technologies such as badge swipe and keypad entry. The biometric technologies selected for this concept were facial and gait recognition. They were chosen since they require less user cooperation than other biometrics such as fingerprint, iris, and hand geometry and because they have the most potential for flexibility in deployment. The secure portal concept could be implemented within the boundaries of an entry area to a facility. As a person is approaching a badge and/or PIN portal, face and gait information can be gathered and processed. The biometric information could be fused for verification against the information that is gathered from the badge. This paper discusses a facial recognition technology that was developed for the purposes of providing high verification probabilities with low false alarm rates, which would be required of an autonomous entry control system. In particular, a 3-D facial recognition approach using Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis is described. Gait recognition technology, based on Hidden Markov Models has been explored, but those results are not included in this paper. Fusion approaches for combining the results of the biometrics would be the next step in realizing the secure portal

  5. Radioisotopic splenoportography in patients with portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Samejima, N; Ikeda, K; Yokoyama, Y; Hirata, S

    1989-05-01

    Radio-isotopic splenoportography was performed by injecting 99mTcO4- into the spleens of 46 patients with portal hypertension and 14 patients with various disorders not having portal hypertension. No collateral circulation was demonstrated in the 14 patients without portal hypertension whereas some RI-images of portosystemic collaterals were found in 40 (87.0 per cent) of the 46 patients with portal hypertension. Collaterals were divided into an ascending group and a descending group, the appearance rate of ascending collaterals being 80.4 per cent and that of descending collaterals, 41.3 per cent. There were 3 image patterns in the ascending group, namely, an AZ-pattern in which the azygos vein was demonstrated; a SC-pattern in which the RI-bolus ascended along the esophagus to the neck and the subclavian vein; and an EG-pattern which showed stagnation of the RI-bolus in the esophagogastric region. There were 4 patterns in the descending group, namely; a pattern of gastro-renal caval shunt (GR-pattern); reverse flow patterns into the umbilical or paraumbilical veins (UV-pattern); into the superior mesenteric vein (SMV-pattern); and into the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV-pattern). The appearance of the EG-pattern was seen most frequently (74.4 per cent). The usefulness of this method for surveying the collateral circulation in portal hypertension, estimating the risk of esophageal variceal bleeding and evaluating its treatments, was suggested by the results of this study. PMID:2674500

  6. Varicose vein stripping

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002952.htm Varicose vein stripping To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. Vein stripping is surgery to remove varicose veins in the legs. Description Varicose veins are swollen, ...

  7. Altered blood-brain barrier permeability in rats with prehepatic portal hypertension turns to normal when portal pressure is lowered

    PubMed Central

    Eizayaga, Francisco; Scorticati, Camila; Prestifilippo, Juan P; Romay, Salvador; Fernandez, Maria A; Castro, José L; Lemberg, Abraham; Perazzo, Juan C

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the blood-brain barrier integrity in prehepatic portal hypertensive rats induced by partial portal vein ligation, at 14 and 40 d after ligation when portal pressure is spontaneously normalized. METHODS: Adult male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: Group I: Sham14d , sham operated; Group II: PH14d , portal vein stenosis; (both groups were used 14 days after surgery); Group III: Sham40d, Sham operated and Group IV: PH40d Portal vein stenosis (Groups II and IV used 40 d after surgery). Plasma ammonia, plasma and cerebrospinal fluid protein and liver enzymes concentrations were determined. Trypan and Evans blue dyes, systemically injected, were investigated in hippocampus to study blood-brain barrier integrity. Portal pressure was periodically recorded. RESULTS: Forty days after stricture, portal pressure was normalized, plasma ammonia was moderately high, and both dyes were absent in central nervous system parenchyma. All other parameters were reestablished. When portal pressure was normalized and ammonia level was lowered, but not normal, the altered integrity of blood-brain barrier becomes reestablished. CONCLUSION: The impairment of blood-brain barrier and subsequent normalization could be a mechanism involved in hepatic encephalopathy reversibility. Hemodynamic changes and ammonia could trigger blood-brain barrier alterations and its reestablishment. PMID:16552803

  8. Varicose vein - noninvasive treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Sclerotherapy; Laser therapy - varicose veins; Radiofrequency vein ablation; Endovenous thermal ablation; Ambulatory phlebectomy; Transilluminated power phlebotomy; Endovenous laser ablation; Varicose ...

  9. Splenic Vein Thrombosis with Oesophageal Varices: A Late Complication of Umbilical Vein Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Vos, L. J. M.; Potocky, V.; Bröker, F. H. L.; Vries, J. A. De; Postma, L.; Edens, E.

    1974-01-01

    On the basis of observations made on three infants, a description is given of a late complication of umbilical vein catheterization not hitherto reported. The children showed the symptoms of thrombosis of the splenic vein with secondary splenomegaly and marked gastric and/or esophageal varices, while the portal vein showed no abnormality. The diagnosis was preoperatively established by means of selective angiography of the superior mesenteric artery and the splenic artery. Treatment in these three cases consisted of splenectomy, with good clinical and radiological results. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:4842977

  10. [Association of biliary calculosis and portal cavernomatosis].

    PubMed

    Crespi, C; De Giorgio, A M

    1992-08-01

    This paper reports the case of a woman, who underwent surgery because of cholelithiasis, with intraoperative finding of prehepatic portal hypertension from portal vein thrombosis ("portal cavernoma") with healthy liver, later confirmed by angiographic studies. This rare pathologic association carries a higher risk of major operative complications; therefore the Authors agree with the general belief that, for these cases, biliary tract surgery should be as simple and safe as possible. In the case of preoperative diagnosis of biliary disease associated with portal cavernoma, should a surgical approach on the biliary tract be required, we agree on the advisability of performing a shunting procedure before any kind of biliary surgery. In case of variceal bleeding endoscopic sclerotherapy will be the first choice; surgical procedures (shunting) should be seen as a second choice in case of rebleeding after sclerotherapy. PMID:1407632

  11. Acute Superior Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis: Transcatheter Thrombolysis and Aspiration Thrombectomy Therapy by Combined Route of Superior Mesenteric Vein and Artery in Eight Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuofei Liu, Baochen Ding, Weiwei He, Changsheng Wu, Xingjiang Li, Jieshou

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo assess the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of catheter-directed thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy by combined route of superior mesenteric vein and artery (SMV+SMA) for acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis (ASMVT).MethodsThis retrospective study reviewed eight ASMVT patients with transcatheter direct thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy via SMV and indirect thrombolysis via SMA during a period of 14 months. The demographics, etiology, risk factors, therapeutic effect, complications, mortality, and follow-up of the study population were assessed. Anatomic and imaging classification of location and extent of thrombus at diagnosis and degree of thrombus lysis were described.ResultsTechnical success was achieved with substantial improvement in symptoms and thrombus resolution after thrombolytic therapy in all patients. The local urokinase infusion by SMA and SMV was performed for 5–7 (6.13 ± 0.83) and 7–15 (12 ± 2.51) days. Anticoagulation was performed catheter-directed and then orally throughout hospitalization and after discharge. Four patients required delayed localized bowel resection after thrombolytic therapy with no death. Thrombolytic therapy was not interrupted despite minor bleeding at the puncture site in two patients and sepsis in another two postoperatively. Nearly complete removal of thrombus was demonstrated by contrast-enhanced CT scan and portography before discharge. Patients were discharged in 10–27 (19.25 ± 4.89) days after admission. No recurrence developed during the follow-up of 10–13 (12.13 ± 0.99) months.ConclusionsCatheter-directed thrombolytic and aspiration therapy via SMV+SMA is beneficial for ASMVT in avoiding patient death, efficient resolving thrombus, rapid improving symptoms, reversing extensive intestinal ischemia, averting bowel resection, or localizing infarcted bowel segment and preventing short bowel syndrome.

  12. Evolution of portal hypertension and mechanisms involved in its maintenance in a rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Sikuler, E.; Kravetz, D.; Groszmann, R.J.

    1985-06-01

    In rats with portal hypertension induced by partial ligation of the portal vein, the authors have recently demonstrated an increased portal venous inflow that becomes an important factor in the maintenance of portal hypertension. The sequence of events that leads into this circulatory disarray is unknown. The authors evaluated chronologically the chain of hemodynamic changes that occurred after portal hypertension was induced by partial ligation of the portal vein. In this model it is possible to follow, from the initiation of the portal-hypertensive state, the interaction between blood flow and resistance in the portal system as well as the relation between the development of portal-systemic shunting and the elevated portal venous inflow. The study was performed in 45 portal-hypertensive rats and in 29 sham-operated rats. Blood flow and portal-systemic shunting were measured by radioactive microsphere techniques. The constriction of the portal vein was immediately followed by a resistance-induced portal hypertension characterized by increased portal resistance (9.78 +/- 0.89 vs. 4.18 +/- 0.71 dyn X s X cm-5 X 10(4), mean +/- SE, P less than 0.01), increased portal pressure (17.7 +/- 0.9 vs. 9.5 +/- 0.6 mmHg, P less than 0.001), and decreased portal venous inflow (3.93 +/- 0.26 vs. 6.82 +/- 0.49 ml X min-1 X 100 g body wt-1, P less than 0.001).

  13. Hepatic Veins and Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis in a Child Treated by Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar Santos, Aline Cristine Barbosa; Tannuri, Uenis; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2010-06-15

    We report the case of a 9-year-old boy with portal hypertension, due to Budd-Chiari syndrome, and retrohepatic inferior vena cava thrombosis, submitted to a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) by connecting the suprahepatic segment of the inferior vena cava directly to the portal vein. After 3 months, the withdrawal of anticoagulants promoted the thrombosis of the TIPS. At TIPS revision, thrombosis of the TIPS and the main portal vein and clots at the splenic and the superior mesenteric veins were found. Successful angiography treatment was performed by thrombolysis and balloon angioplasty of a severe stenosis at the distal edge of the stent.

  14. Hepatic Arterioportal Fistula: A Curable Cause of Portal Hypertension in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Billing, J. S.

    1997-01-01

    Hepatic arterioportal fistulae are a rare cause of portal hypertension. The case is reported of a twoyear old girl with a congenital arterioportal fistula, who presented with splenomegaly and ascites. Colour doppler ultrasound showed a large shunt between the left hepatic artery and a branch of the left portal vein, producing a reversal of flow in the main portal vein. She was treated by a formal left hemihepatectomy, which has been successful in eliminating the fistula and its consequent portal hypertension in the long term. The literature regarding arterioportal fistulae and their treatment is reviewed. PMID:9298386

  15. Balloon Occlusion Portography to Diagnose New-Onset Left Hepatic Vein Thrombosis and Widening of an Existing Wallstent TIPS by Palmaz Stents for Recurrent Portal Hypertension and Variceal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Cope, Constantin; Baum, Richard A.; Haskal, Ziv J.

    1996-09-15

    A 31-year-old man with Child's class A micronodular cirrhosis, left lobe hypertrophy, and a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) which had been placed 6 months earlier, was admitted for recurrent esophageal bleeding and a portosystemic gradient of 42 mmHg. Balloon occlusion portography documented unsuspected ostial thrombosis of the previously patent left hepatic vein. This was considered the cause of the pressure rise. As it was not possible to insert a second TIPS in parallel, the shunt, stented originally with 10-mm Wallstents, was overdilated to 12 mm, and two 12-mm Palmaz stents were placed coaxially, reducing the portosystemic pressure gradient to 13 mmHg.

  16. Therapeutic potential of transplanted placental mesenchymal stem cells in treating Chinese miniature pigs with acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stem cell-based therapy to treat liver diseases is a focus of current research worldwide. So far, most such studies depend on rodent hepatic failure models. The purpose of this study was to isolate mesenchymal stem cells from human placenta (hPMSCs) and determine their therapeutic potential for treating Chinese experimental miniature pigs with acute liver failure (ALF). Methods hPMSCs were isolated and analyzed for their purity and differentiation potential before being employed as the donor cells for transplantation. ALF models of Chinese experimental miniature pigs were established and divided into four groups: no cell transplantation; hPMSCs transplantation via the jugular vein; X-ray-treated hPMSCs transplantation via the portal vein; and hPMSCs transplantation via the portal vein. The restoration of biological functions of the livers receiving transplantation was assessed via a variety of approaches such as mortality rate determination, serum biochemical analysis, and histological, immunohistochemical, and genetic analysis. Results hPMSCs expressed high levels of CD29, CD73, CD13, and CD90, had adipogenic, osteogenic, and hepatic differentiation potential. They improved liver functions in vivo after transplantation into the D-galactosamine-injured pig livers as evidenced by the fact that ALT, AST, ALP, CHE, TBIL, and TBA concentrations returned to normal levels in recipient ALF pigs. Meanwhile, histological data revealed that transplantation of hPMSCs via the portal vein reduced liver inflammation, decreased hepatic denaturation and necrosis, and promoted liver regeneration. These ameliorations were not found in the other three groups. The result of 7-day survival rates suggested that hPMSCs transplantation via the portal vein was able to significantly prolong the survival of ALF pigs compared with the other three groups. Histochemistry and RT-PCR results confirmed the presence of transplanted human cells in recipient pig livers (Groups III, IV

  17. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Deep Vein Thrombosis Overview What is deep vein thrombosis? Deep vein thrombosis (also called DVT) is a blood clot in a vein deep inside your body. These clots usually occur in your leg veins. While DVT is a fairly common condition, it is ...

  18. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein clots occur in the ... vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem ...

  19. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein clots occur in the lower leg or ... vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a ...

  20. [Clinical study of radioisotopic splenoportography in portal hypertension].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Y

    1990-02-01

    Radioisotopic splenoportography was performed in 55 patients with portal hypertension, in whom 52 had various degrees of esophagogastric varices, and in 20 patients without portal hypertension. In the patients with varices, collateral images were obtained in 50 patients (96%) by this method and no image was obtained in the patients without varices. The rate of positively imaged collaterals was as follows: Esophageal varices 69%, the left gastric vein 85%, the short gastric veins 48%, RI stasis in esophagogastric region 65%, the azygos vein 46%, the subclavian vein 25%, the para-umbilical veins 46%, splenorenal /gastrorenal shunts 19%, the inferior mesenteric vein 17%, the left intercostal veins 6%, and Arantius's duct 4%. These rates were superior to that obtained from the conventional transarterial portography. There were some correlations between RI-images by this method and clinical and laboratory findings; patients with ascending collaterals alone tended to have extensive and severe varices and higher rate of bleeding, on the other hand, variceal bleeding was not found and episodes of portosystemic encephalopathy frequently occurred in patients with descending collaterals alone. After successful sclerotherapy, RI-images of esophageal varices disappeared in 92% of the patients. Radioisotopic splenoportography appears to be a useful diagnostic and follow-up modality for patients with portal hypertension and esophagogastric varices. PMID:2325608

  1. Establishment of a reversible model of prehepatic portal hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Dou, Jian; Gao, Qing-Jun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to improve upon the traditional model of pre-hepatic portal hypertension in rats, and simulate the anhepatic phase of orthotopic liver transplantation without veno-venous bypass. A reversible model of portal hypertension was induced by portal vein ligation, with a label ring ligated along the portal vein. A total of 135 male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: i) Normal control (NC) group; ii) portal hypertensive control (PHTC) group; and iii) reperfusion (R) group. In the R group, rats with portal hypertension underwent simultaneous clamping of the portal triad and retrohepatic vena cava for 1 h, followed by removal of the clamps to enable blood reperfusion. Portal venography and portal vein pressure were recorded during the surgery. Arterial oxygen pressure (PaO2), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and total bilirubin (TBil) levels were determined, and pathological changes of the liver were investigated by immunohistochemical staining. The results demonstrated that, 3 weeks after portal vein ligation, the vein area and the free portal pressures in the PHTC group were significantly increased compared with those in the NC group. The serum ALT and AST levels in the R group at different time points were significantly elevated compared with those in the PHTC group, and reached their maximal levels at 24 h after reperfusion. Furthermore, the PaO2 at 24 h after reperfusion was significantly decreased. In conclusion, the reversible model of pre-hepatic portal hypertension in rats was successfully established using the introduction of a label ring. This model may be useful for basic research focusing on the anhepatic phase of orthotopic liver transplantation without veno-venous bypass. PMID:27446299

  2. Fetal liver hematopoietic stem cell niches associate with portal vessels

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Jalal A.; Mendelson, Avital; Kunisaki, Yuya; Birbrair, Alexander; Kou, Yan; Arnal-Estapé, Anna; Pinho, Sandra; Ciero, Paul; Nakahara, Fumio; Ma’ayan, Avi; Bergman, Aviv; Merad, Miriam; Frenette, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the cellular basis of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche in the bone marrow has been characterized, the nature of the fetal liver (FL) niche is not yet elucidated. We show that Nestin+NG2+ pericytes associate with portal vessels, forming a niche promoting HSC expansion. Nestin+NG2+ cells and HSCs scale during development with the fractal branching patterns of portal vessels, tributaries of the umbilical vein. After closure of the umbilical inlet at birth, portal vessels undergo a transition from Neuropilin-1+Ephrin-B2+ artery to EphB4+ vein phenotype, associated with a loss of periportal Nestin+NG2+ cells and emigration of HSCs away from portal vessels. These data support a model in which HSCs are titrated against a periportal vascular niche with a fractal-like organization enabled by placental circulation. PMID:26634440

  3. Serial Measurements of Splanchnic Vein Diameters in Rats Using High-Frequency Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Bridget M.; Krieger-Burke, Teresa; Fink, Gregory D.; Watts, Stephanie W.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate serial ultrasound imaging in rats as a fully non-invasive method to (1) quantify the diameters of splanchnic veins in real time as an indirect surrogate for the capacitance function of those veins, and (2) assess the effects of drugs on venous dimensions. A 21 MHz probe was used on anesthetized male Sprague–Dawley rats to collect images containing the portal vein (PV), superior mesenteric vein (SMV), abdominal inferior vena cava (IVC), and splenic vein (SpV; used as a landmark in timed studies) and the abdominal aorta (AA). Stable landmarks were established that allowed reproducible quantification of cross-sectional diameters within an animal. The average diameters of vessels measured every 5 min over 45 min remained within 0.75 ± 0.15% (PV), 0.2 ± 0.09% (SMV), 0.5 ± 0.12% (IVC), and 0.38 ± 0.06% (AA) of baseline (PV: 2.0 ± 0.12 mm; SMV: 1.7 ± 0.04 mm; IVC: 3.2 ± 0.1 mm; AA: 2.3 ± 0.14 mm). The maximal effects of the vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 2 mg/kg, i.v. bolus) on venous diameters were determined 5 min post SNP bolus; the diameters of all noted veins were significantly increased by SNP, while mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreased 29 ± 4 mmHg. By contrast, administration of the venoconstrictor sarafotoxin (S6c; 5 ng/kg, i.v. bolus) significantly decreased PV and SpV, but not IVC, SMV, or AA, diameters 5 min post S6c bolus; MAP increased by 6 ± 2 mmHg. In order to determine if resting splanchnic vein diameters were stable over much longer periods of time, vessel diameters were measured every 2 weeks for 8 weeks. Measurements were found to be highly reproducible within animals over this time period. Finally, to evaluate the utility of vein imaging in a chronic condition, images were acquired from 4-week deoxycorticosterone acetate salt (DOCA-salt) hypertensive and normotensive (SHAM) control rats. All vessel diameters increased from baseline while MAP increased (67 ± 4 mmHg) in DOCA-salt rats

  4. Serial Measurements of Splanchnic Vein Diameters in Rats Using High-Frequency Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Bridget M; Krieger-Burke, Teresa; Fink, Gregory D; Watts, Stephanie W

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate serial ultrasound imaging in rats as a fully non-invasive method to (1) quantify the diameters of splanchnic veins in real time as an indirect surrogate for the capacitance function of those veins, and (2) assess the effects of drugs on venous dimensions. A 21 MHz probe was used on anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats to collect images containing the portal vein (PV), superior mesenteric vein (SMV), abdominal inferior vena cava (IVC), and splenic vein (SpV; used as a landmark in timed studies) and the abdominal aorta (AA). Stable landmarks were established that allowed reproducible quantification of cross-sectional diameters within an animal. The average diameters of vessels measured every 5 min over 45 min remained within 0.75 ± 0.15% (PV), 0.2 ± 0.09% (SMV), 0.5 ± 0.12% (IVC), and 0.38 ± 0.06% (AA) of baseline (PV: 2.0 ± 0.12 mm; SMV: 1.7 ± 0.04 mm; IVC: 3.2 ± 0.1 mm; AA: 2.3 ± 0.14 mm). The maximal effects of the vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 2 mg/kg, i.v. bolus) on venous diameters were determined 5 min post SNP bolus; the diameters of all noted veins were significantly increased by SNP, while mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreased 29 ± 4 mmHg. By contrast, administration of the venoconstrictor sarafotoxin (S6c; 5 ng/kg, i.v. bolus) significantly decreased PV and SpV, but not IVC, SMV, or AA, diameters 5 min post S6c bolus; MAP increased by 6 ± 2 mmHg. In order to determine if resting splanchnic vein diameters were stable over much longer periods of time, vessel diameters were measured every 2 weeks for 8 weeks. Measurements were found to be highly reproducible within animals over this time period. Finally, to evaluate the utility of vein imaging in a chronic condition, images were acquired from 4-week deoxycorticosterone acetate salt (DOCA-salt) hypertensive and normotensive (SHAM) control rats. All vessel diameters increased from baseline while MAP increased (67 ± 4 mmHg) in DOCA-salt rats

  5. NET PORTAL AND HEPATIC FLUX OF NUTRIENTS IN GROWING WETHERS FED HIGH CONCENTRATE DIETS WITH OSCILLATING PROTEIN CONCENTRATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that oscillating dietary CP would improve N retention by increasing urea-N recycling to the rumen, compared to static dietary CP regimens. Chronic indwelling catheters were surgically implanted in a abdominal artery, mesenteric vein, hepatic vein, and portal vein of 18 growing Dorse...

  6. Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Complicated by Sinistral Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kaley, Kristin; Lamb, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is known for vague symptoms that lead to a delay in diagnosis, and hence most cases are found at an advanced stage. Many complications can happen secondary to pancreatic cancer including diabetes, malabsorption, and deep venous thrombosis. Sinistral (segmental or left-sided) portal hypertension (SPH) refers to portal hypertension confined to the left-sided segment of the portal venous system namely the splenic side, and the most common etiology is splenic vein thrombosis (SVT). We present here a case of a 66-year-old male with advanced pancreatic cancer who died due to bleeding secondary to SVT. We advise physicians caring for these patients to be aware of this complication, which may also be the manifestation of an undiagnosed pancreatic cancer. PMID:27555987

  7. Portal hypertension and ascites in extramedullary hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Amarapurkar, Pooja; Parekh, Sunil; Amarapurkar, Anjali; Amarapurkar, Deepak

    2012-06-01

    Myeloproliferative diseases (MPD) are clonal stem cell disorders which mainly include polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), and idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF). They are characterized by leucocytosis, thrombocytosis, erythrocytosis, splenomegaly, and bone marrow hypercellularity. This might also result in extramedullary hematopoiesis. Abdominal manifestation has been recognized as a feature of these disorders. Splenomegaly and hepatomegaly are fairly common as opposed to ascites which is rare. The MPDs mainly affect the hepatic circulatory systems. The common hepatic manifestations are Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS), portal vein thrombosis (PVT), and nodular regenerative hyperplasia. A few other features seen in MPDs are caused by extramedullary hematopoiesis, increased hepatic blood flow, and secondary hemosiderosis from multiple blood transfusions. Portal hypertension is found in up to 7% of patients. We report a case of portal hypertension with ascites in a patient with extramedullary hematopoiesis treated with transjugular intrahepatic portocaval shunt (TIPS). PMID:25755427

  8. Prevalence of Splanchnic Vein Thrombosis in Pancreatitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenda; Qi, Xingshun; Chen, Jiang; Su, Chunping; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2015-01-01

    Splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT) may be negatively associated with the prognosis of pancreatitis. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of literatures to explore the prevalence of SVT in pancreatitis. All observational studies regarding the prevalence of SVT in pancreatitis were identified via PubMed and EMBASE databases. The prevalence of SVT was pooled in the total of patients with pancreatitis. And it was also pooled in the subgroup analyses according to the stage and causes of pancreatitis, location of SVT, and regions where the studies were performed. After the review of 714 studies, 44 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses showed a pooled prevalence of SVT of 13.6% in pancreatitis. According to the stage of pancreatitis, the pooled prevalence of SVT was 16.6% and 11.6% in patients with acute and chronic pancreatitis, respectively. According to the causes of pancreatitis, the pooled prevalence of SVT was 12.2% and 14.6% in patients with hereditary and autoimmune pancreatitis. According to the location of SVT, the pooled prevalence of portal vein, splenic vein, and mesenteric vein thrombosis was 6.2%, 11.2%, and 2.7% in pancreatitis. The prevalence of SVT in pancreatitis was 16.9%, 11.5%, and 8.5% in Europe, America, and Asia, respectively. PMID:26451142

  9. Portal Cavernoma Cholangiopathy: Consensus Statement of a Working Party of the Indian National Association for Study of the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Radha K.; Saraswat, Vivek A.; Valla, Dominique C.; Chawla, Yogesh; Behera, Arunanshu; Varma, Vibha; Agarwal, Swastik; Duseja, Ajay; Puri, Pankaj; Kalra, Naveen; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram S.; Bhatia, Vikram; Sharma, Malay; Kumar, Manoj; Gupta, Subhash; Taneja, Sunil; Kaman, Leileshwar; Zargar, Showkat A.; Nundy, Samiran; Singh, Shivaram P.; Acharya, Subrat K.; Dilawari, Jang B.

    2014-01-01

    Portal cavernoma cholangiopathy (PCC) is defined as abnormalities in the extrahepatic biliary system including the cystic duct and gallbladder with or without abnormalities in the 1st and 2nd generation biliary ducts in a patient with portal cavernoma. Presence of a portal cavernoma, typical cholangiographic changes on endoscopic or magnetic resonance cholangiography and the absence of other causes of these biliary changes like bile duct injury, primary sclerosing cholangitis, cholangiocarcinoma etc are mandatory to arrive a diagnosis. Compression by porto-portal collateral veins involving the paracholedochal and epicholedochal venous plexuses and cholecystic veins and ischemic insult due to deficient portal blood supply or prolonged compression by collaterals bring about biliary changes. While the former are reversible after porto-systemic shunt surgery, the latter are not. Majority of the patients with PCC are asymptomatic and approximately 21% are symptomatic. Symptoms in PCC could be in the form of long standing jaundice due to chronic cholestasis, or biliary pain with or without cholangitis due to biliary stones. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography has no diagnostic role because it is invasive and is associated with risk of complications, hence it is reserved for therapeutic procedures. Magnetic resonance cholangiography and portovenography is a noninvasive and comprehensive imaging technique, and is the modality of choice for mapping of the biliary and vascular abnormalities in these patients. PCC is a progressive condition and symptoms develop late in the course of portal hypertension only in patients with severe or advanced changes of cholangiopathy. Asymptomatic patients with PCC do not require any treatment. Treatment of symptomatic PCC can be approached in a phased manner, coping first with biliary clearance by nasobiliary or biliary stent placement for acute cholangitis and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy for biliary stone removal; second, with

  10. Portal annular pancreas: the pancreatic duct ring sign on MRCP.

    PubMed

    Lath, Chinar O; Agrawal, Dilpesh S; Timins, Michael E; Wein, Melissa M

    2015-12-01

    Portal annular pancreas is a rare pancreatic variant in which the uncinate process of the pancreas extends and fuses to the dorsal surface of the body of the pancreas by surrounding the portal vein. It is asymptomatic, but it can be mistaken for a pancreatic head mass on imaging and could also have serious consequences during pancreatic surgery, if unrecognized. We report this case of a 53-year-old female patient who was diagnosed to have portal annular pancreas on the basis of an unusual course (ring appearance) of the main pancreatic duct on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, not described earlier in the radiology literature. PMID:26649117

  11. Portal annular pancreas: the pancreatic duct ring sign on MRCP

    PubMed Central

    Lath, Chinar O.; Agrawal, Dilpesh S.; Timins, Michael E.; Wein, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    Portal annular pancreas is a rare pancreatic variant in which the uncinate process of the pancreas extends and fuses to the dorsal surface of the body of the pancreas by surrounding the portal vein. It is asymptomatic, but it can be mistaken for a pancreatic head mass on imaging and could also have serious consequences during pancreatic surgery, if unrecognized. We report this case of a 53-year-old female patient who was diagnosed to have portal annular pancreas on the basis of an unusual course (ring appearance) of the main pancreatic duct on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, not described earlier in the radiology literature. PMID:26649117

  12. Massive bleeding in pregnancy from ruptured oesophageal varices complicating portal hypertension: a cautionary tale

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Alison; Girling, Joanna; Cotzias, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare complication of pancreatitis and can cause portal hypertension and oesophageal varices. Variceal rupture carries a high mortality. We report a case of successful pregnancy complicated by two episodes of massive variceal bleeding in a woman with PVT, and discuss how this might have been prevented.

  13. Acquisition of Portal Venous Circulating Tumor Cells From Patients With Pancreaticobiliary Cancers by Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Catenacci, Daniel V. T.; Chapman, Christopher G.; Xu, Peng; Koons, Ann; Konda, Vani J.; Siddiqui, Uzma D.; Waxman, Irving

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Tumor cells circulate in low numbers in peripheral blood; their detection is used predominantly in metastatic disease. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of sampling portal venous blood via endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) to count portal venous circulating tumor cells (CTCs), compared with paired peripheral CTCs, in patients with pancreaticobiliary cancers (PBCs). METHODS In a single-center cohort study, we evaluated 18 patients with suspected PBCs. Under EUS guidance, a 19-gauge EUS fine needle was advanced transhepatically into the portal vein and as many as four 7.5-mL aliquots of blood were aspirated. Paired peripheral blood samples were obtained. Epithelial-derived CTCs were sorted magnetically based on expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecules; only those with a proper morphology and found to be CD45 negative and positive for cytokeratins 8, 18, and/ or 19 and 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole were considered to be CTCs. For 5 samples, CTCs also were isolated by flow cytometry and based on CD45 depletion. ImageStream was used to determine the relative protein levels of P16, SMAD4, and P53. DNA was extracted from CTCs for sequencing of select KRAS codons. RESULTS There were no complications from portal vein blood acquisition. We detected CTCs in portal vein samples from all 18 patients (100%) vs peripheral blood samples from only 4 patients (22.2%). Patients with confirmed PBCs had a mean of 118.4 ± 36.8 CTCs/7.5 mL portal vein blood, compared with a mean of 0.8 ± 0.4 CTCs/7.5 mL peripheral blood (P < .01). The 9 patients with nonmetastatic, resectable, or borderline-resectable PBCs had a mean of 83.2 CTCs/7.5 mL portal vein blood (median, 62.0 CTCs/7.5 mL portal vein blood). In a selected patient, portal vein CTCs were found to carry the same mutations as those detected in a metastatic lymph node and expressed similar levels of P16, SMAD4, and P53 proteins. CONCLUSIONS It is feasible and safe to collect portal venous blood from

  14. Advances in the treatment of portal hypertension in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Kimer, N; Wiese, S; Mo, S; Møller, S; Bendtsen, F

    2016-08-01

    Non-selective beta-blockers and handling of esophageal varices has been key elements in the treatment of portal hypertension in recent decades. Liver vein catheterization has been essential in diagnosis and monitoring of portal hypertension, but ongoing needs for noninvasive tools has led to research in areas of both biomarkers, and transient elastography, which displays promising results in discerning clinically significant portal hypertension. Novel research into the areas of hepatic stellate cell function and the dynamic components of portal hypertension has revealed promising areas of treatment modalities, targeting intestinal decontamination, angiogenesis, inflammation and oxidative stress. Future studies may reveal if these initiatives lead to developments of new drugs for treatment of portal hypertension. PMID:26982499

  15. Guide wire migration during femoral vein catheterization.

    PubMed

    Khatami, Mohammad Reza; Abbasi, Rozita; Sadigh, Gelareh

    2010-10-01

    Central vein catheterization is a routine and relatively safe procedure in critically ill patients. Complications with this procedure depend to the site of catheterization and the skill of the operator. In addition to the common complications with femoral vein catheterization there are some rare usually preventable side effects related to guide wire and catheter. In our patient who underwent femoral catheterization for acute hemodialysis, we report migration of guide wire through the systemic circulation from the femoral vein to the jugular vein. This is a very rare complication that is a human error and is totally preventable by doing the procedure by a skilled doctor and considering the standards described for central vein catheter insertion. PMID:20852377

  16. Bone marrow transplantation in the rat. III. Structure of the liver inflammatory lesion in acute graft-versus-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    Leszczynski, D.; Renkonen, R.; Haeyry, P.

    1985-08-01

    The liver is a major parenchymal target organ of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) after bone marrow transplantation in the rat. The authors have analyzed the nature of cellular infiltrates in the liver using monoclonal antibodies against white cell subsets and investigated the anatomic distribution of the inflammatory cell subsets inside the liver parenchyma. Several types of white cells are present in a normal control liver: In the portal area the T-helper (Th) cells predominate, (surface) immunoglobulin-expressing B cells are present in ample numbers, and most of the phagocytes are Ia-positive. In the central vein area the T-suppressor/killer cells (Tsk) dominate, no B cells are present, and most of the phagocytes are Ia-negative. During aGVHD the number of T cells increases rapidly in the portal area; and after an initial strong increase, the Th/Tsk ratio decreases but remains still above 1. In the central vein area there is also an increase in the number of T cells, compared with that in the syngeneic recipient, but the Th/Tsk ratio rapidly decreases and remains uniformly below 1. During aGVHD the B cells entirely disappear from the portal area, whereas a small but distinct number of mature plasma cells with intracellular immunoglobulin appear in the central vein area. Following irradiation the Ia-positive phagocytic cells entirely disappear from the portal area and decrease distinctly in number in the central vein area. During aGVHD the number of Ia-positive phagocytes increases again in both locations. In the central vein area the positive phagocytes are seen over the background level, and, concomitantly, the Ia-negative phagocytes disappear.

  17. Influence of G-forces and hypodynamia on the portal system of the liver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozdova, A. V.

    1975-01-01

    Longitudinally and transversely applied g-forces as intolerable levels cause damage to the interlobular veins of the liver, with maximum damage caused by dorso-ventral g-force application. The portal vein system is more resilient with respect to g-forces at the limit of tolerance.

  18. Portal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, L.W.

    1982-03-23

    A portal radiation monitor combines .1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  19. Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension Overview What is cirrhosis? In people who have ... lead to coma and death. What is portal hypertension? Normally, blood is carried to the liver by ...

  20. Portal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, Lyle W.

    1985-01-01

    A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  1. Inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis in Crohn`s disease: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Coralnick, J.R.; Budin, J.A.; Sedarat, A.

    1996-01-01

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis has been described in association with such risk factors as coagulation disorders, postoperative dehydration, sepsis, and trauma. CT and ultrasound have greatly facilitated early diagnosis, and the features of superior mesenteric and portal vein thrombosis are well recognized. We present a case of inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis in a patient with Crohn`s disease. To our knowledge, this entity has not been reported in the radiologic literature. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  2. The Advent of Portals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Mary E.

    2002-01-01

    Explains portals as tools that gather a variety of electronic information resources, including local library resources, into a single Web page. Highlights include cross-database searching; integration with university portals and course management software; the ARL (Association of Research Libraries) Scholars Portal Initiative; and selected vendors…

  3. Evaluating Open Source Portals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, Dion; Luyt, Brendan; Chua, Alton; Yee, See-Yong; Poh, Kia-Ngoh; Ng, How-Yeu

    2008-01-01

    Portals have become indispensable for organizations of all types trying to establish themselves on the Web. Unfortunately, there have only been a few evaluative studies of portal software and even fewer of open source portal software. This study aims to add to the available literature in this important area by proposing and testing a checklist for…

  4. Demonstration of normal and dilated testicular veins by multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Karcaaltincaba, Musturay

    2011-04-01

    Recent advances in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) technology enabled better visualization of testicular (gonadal) vein using submillimeter slice thickness and three-dimensional images. Normally, the testicular vein measures 1-3 mm and drains into the inferior vena cava and left renal vein on the right and left sides, respectively. They can be seen in most patients during MDCT studies. Curved planar and volume-rendered images can be used to display testicular veins. We aim to demonstrate MDCT findings of normal testicular vein and its pathologies including varicocele, varices, the testicular vascular pedicle sign, and phlebolith. The testicular vein can be dilated owing to varicocele or portal hypertension and in patients with intraabdominal seminomas arising from undescended testis. The testicular vein can also cause ureteral compression at the crossing point. Understanding MDCT findings of the normal testicular vein and its various pathologies can allow a correct diagnosis, thereby avoiding further diagnostic tests. PMID:21519988

  5. Embolization of portal-systemic shunts in cirrhotic patients with chronic recurrent hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurabayashi, Shin; Sezai, Shuichi; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Masanori; Oka, Hiroshi

    1997-03-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of embolization of portal-systemic shunts in cirrhotic patients with chronic recurrent hepatic encephalopathy (CRHE). Methods. Seven cirrhotic patients with CRHE refractory to medical treatment (3 men and 4 women, mean age 66 years) were studied. Five patients had splenorenal shunts, 1 had a gastrorenal shunt, and 1 had an intrahepatic portal vein-hepatic vein shunt. Shunt embolization was performed using stainless steel coils, with a percutaneous transhepatic portal vein approach in 4 patients and a transrenal vein approach in 3 patients. Results. After embolization, the shunt disappeared in 4 patients on either ultrasound pulsed Doppler monitoring or portography. Complications observed in the 7 patients were fever, transient pleural effusion, ascites, and mild esophageal varices. For 3-6 months after embolization, the 4 patients whose shunts disappeared showed minimal or no reappearance of a shunt, and had no recurrence of encephalopathy. The serum ammonia levels decreased and electroencephalograms also improved. One of the 4 patients, who developed mild esophageal varices, required no treatment. Treatment was effective in 3 of the 4 patients (75%) who underwent embolization via a transhepatic portal vein. Conclusion. Transvascular embolization of shunts improved the outcome in 4 of 7 patients. The most effective embolization was achieved via the percutaneous transhepatic portal vein approach.

  6. Successful liver transplantation in a patient with splanchnic vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism due to polycythemia vera with Jak2v617f mutation and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, Emanuela; Pedrazzi, Paola; Marietta, Marco; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio; Villa, Erica; Luppi, Mario; Girardis, Massimo

    2013-10-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a rare complication of heparin treatment resulting in a severe acquired thrombophilic condition with an associated mortality of about 10 %. We report the first case of successful urgent liver transplantation (LT) in a patient with end-stage liver disease due to a Budd-Chiari syndrome, portal vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism due to acquired thrombophilia associated to polycythemia vera carrying JAK2V617F gene mutation and HIT in the acute phase. Lepirudin was used to provide anticoagulation in the LT perioperative period that was performed without haemorrhagic and thrombotic complications despite the donor received heparin during liver explantation. PMID:23277116

  7. Noncirrhotic Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rajekar, Harshal; Vasishta, Rakesh K; Chawla, Yogesh K; Dhiman, Radha K

    2011-01-01

    Portal hypertension is characterized by an increase in portal pressure (> 10 mmHg) and could be a result of cirrhosis of the liver or of noncirrhotic diseases. When portal hypertension occurs in the absence of liver cirrhosis, noncirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) must be considered. The prognosis of this disease is much better than that of cirrhosis. Noncirrhotic diseases are the common cause of portal hypertension in developing countries, especially in Asia. NCPH is a heterogeneous group of diseases that is due to intrahepatic or extrahepatic etiologies. In general, the lesions in NCPH are vascular in nature and can be classified based on the site of resistance to blood flow. In most cases, these disorders can be explained by endothelial cell lesions, intimal thickening, thrombotic obliterations, or scarring of the intrahepatic portal or hepatic venous circulation. Many different conditions can determine NCPH through the association of these various lesions in various degrees. Many clinical manifestations of NCPH result from the secondary effects of portal hypertension. Patients with NCPH present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, splenomegaly, ascites after gastrointestinal bleeding, features of hypersplenism, growth retardation, and jaundice due to portal hypertensive biliopathy. Other sequelae include hyperdynamic circulation, pulmonary complications, and other effects of portosystemic collateral circulation like portosystemic encephalopathy. At present, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatments are the treatments of choice for portal hypertension. The therapy of all disorders causing NCPH involves the reduction of portal pressure by pharmacotherapy or portosystemic shunting, apart from prevention and treatment of complications of portal hypertension. PMID:25755321

  8. Management of portal hypertension derived from uncommon causes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Lee, Hae Min; Lee, Seung Ho; Won, Jong Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertension can arise from any condition interfering with normal blood flow at any level within the portal system. Herein, we presented two uncommon cases of the portal hypertension and its treatment with brief literature review. A 71-year-old man who underwent right hemihepatectomy revealed a tumor recurrence adjacent to the inferior vena cava (IVC). After radiofrequency ablation (RFA) with lymph node dissection, he was referred for abdominal distension. The abdomen computed tomography scan showed severe ascites with a narrowing middle hepatic vein (MHV) and IVC around the RFA site. After insertion of two stents at the IVC and MHV, the ascites disappeared. Another 73-year-old man underwent right trisectionectomy of liver and segmental resection of the portal vein (PV). After operation, he underwent conservative management due to continuous abdominal ascites. The abdomen computed tomography scan showed severe ascites with obliteration of the left PV. After insertion of stent, the ascites disappeared. A decrease of the pressure gradient between the PV and IVC is one of the important treatment strategies for portal hypertension. Vascular stent is useful in the reduction of pressure gradient and thus, can be a treatment option for portal hypertension. PMID:27212996

  9. Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Education FAQs Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis FAQ174, August 2011 PDF ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  10. Deteriorated portal flow may cause liver failure in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma being treated with sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Akihiro; Umeno, Narihiro; Harada, Shigeru; Tanaka, Kosuke; Kato, Masaki; Kotoh, Kazuhiro

    2016-06-01

    We encountered two patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who showed rapid progression of liver failure during sorafenib treatment. One had portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) and the other developed portal vein thrombosis (PVT) during the treatment, and both of them experienced the elevation of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) concentration during the administration of sorafenib. Their clinical courses indicate that the liver failure might have been caused by sorafenib-induced liver hypoxia, being amplified in the circumstances with reduced portal flow. To our best knowledge, all the reported patients who achieved complete remission (CR) during sorafenib monotherapy had a condition that could decrease portal blood flow. We hypothesized that pathogenesis of disease may be similar in HCC patients who achieve CR and those who experience liver failure while on sorafenib. Sorafenib treatment of patients with HCC and deteriorated portal flow may be a double-edged sword. PMID:27284486

  11. Deteriorated portal flow may cause liver failure in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma being treated with sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Akihiro; Umeno, Narihiro; Harada, Shigeru; Tanaka, Kosuke; Kato, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    We encountered two patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who showed rapid progression of liver failure during sorafenib treatment. One had portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) and the other developed portal vein thrombosis (PVT) during the treatment, and both of them experienced the elevation of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) concentration during the administration of sorafenib. Their clinical courses indicate that the liver failure might have been caused by sorafenib-induced liver hypoxia, being amplified in the circumstances with reduced portal flow. To our best knowledge, all the reported patients who achieved complete remission (CR) during sorafenib monotherapy had a condition that could decrease portal blood flow. We hypothesized that pathogenesis of disease may be similar in HCC patients who achieve CR and those who experience liver failure while on sorafenib. Sorafenib treatment of patients with HCC and deteriorated portal flow may be a double-edged sword. PMID:27284486

  12. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Deep Vein Thrombosis? Español Deep vein thrombosis (throm-BO-sis), or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Blood clots occur when blood ...

  13. Varicose veins and venous insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Varicose veins are swollen, twisted, and enlarged veins that you can see under the skin. They are often ... from the blood that collects there, which causes varicose veins. Smaller varicose veins that you can see on ...

  14. [Mexican consensus on portal hypertension].

    PubMed

    Narváez-Rivera, R M; Cortez-Hernández, C A; González-González, J A; Tamayo-de la Cuesta, J L; Zamarripa-Dorsey, F; Torre-Delgadillo, A; Rivera-Ramos, J F J; Vinageras-Barroso, J I; Muneta-Kishigami, J E; Blancas-Valencia, J M; Antonio-Manrique, M; Valdovinos-Andraca, F; Brito-Lugo, P; Hernández-Guerrero, A; Bernal-Reyes, R; Sobrino-Cossío, S; Aceves-Tavares, G R; Huerta-Guerrero, H M; Moreno-Gómez, N; Bosques-Padilla, F J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the Mexican Consensus on Portal Hypertension was to develop documented guidelines to facilitate clinical practice when dealing with key events of the patient presenting with portal hypertension and variceal bleeding. The panel of experts was made up of Mexican gastroenterologists, hepatologists, and endoscopists, all distinguished professionals. The document analyzes themes of interest in the following modules: preprimary and primary prophylaxis, acute variceal hemorrhage, and secondary prophylaxis. The management of variceal bleeding has improved considerably in recent years. Current information indicates that the general management of the cirrhotic patient presenting with variceal bleeding should be carried out by a multidisciplinary team, with such an approach playing a major role in the final outcome. The combination of drug and endoscopic therapies is recommended for initial management; vasoactive drugs should be started as soon as variceal bleeding is suspected and maintained for 5 days. After the patient is stabilized, urgent diagnostic endoscopy should be carried out by a qualified endoscopist, who then performs the corresponding endoscopic variceal treatment. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be regarded as an integral part of treatment, started upon hospital admittance and continued for 5 days. If there is treatment failure, rescue therapies should be carried out immediately, taking into account that interventional radiology therapies are very effective in controlling refractory variceal bleeding. These guidelines have been developed for the purpose of achieving greater clinical efficacy and are based on the best evidence of portal hypertension that is presently available. PMID:23664429

  15. Branch retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Sadaf; Mirza, Sajid Ali; Shokh, Ishrat

    2008-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusions (RVO) are the second commonest sight threatening vascular disorder. Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) are the two basic types of vein occlusion. Branch retinal vein occlusion is three times more common than central retinal vein occlusion and- second only to diabetic retinopathy as the most common retinal vascular cause of visual loss. The origin of branch retinal vein occlusion undoubtedly includes both systemic factors such as hypertension and local anatomic factors such as arteriovenous crossings. Branch retinal vein occlusion causes a painless decrease in vision, resulting in misty or distorted vision. Current treatment options don't address the underlying aetiology of branch retinal vein occlusion. Instead they focus on treating sequelae of the occluded venous branch, such as macular oedema, vitreous haemorrhage and traction retinal detachment from neovascularization. Evidences suggest that the pathogenesis of various types of retinal vein occlusion, like many other ocular vascular occlusive disorders, is a multifactorial process and there is no single magic bullet that causes retinal vein occlusion. A comprehensive management of patients with retinal vascular occlusions is necessary to correct associated diseases or predisposing abnormalities that could lead to local recurrences or systemic event. Along with a review of the literature, a practical approach for the management of retinal vascular occlusions is required, which requires collaboration between the ophthalmologist and other physicians: general practitioner, cardiologist, internist etc. as appropriate according to each case. PMID:19385476

  16. Varicose Veins and Other Vein Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How To's Related Topics Peripheral Artery Disease Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Varicose Veins and Other ...

  17. Glutamine synthetase activity and glutamate uptake in hippocampus and frontal cortex in portal hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Gabriela Beatriz; Fernández, María Alejandra; Roselló, Diego Martín; Tomaro, María Luján; Balestrasse, Karina; Lemberg, Abraham

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and glutamate uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex (FC) from rats with prehepatic portal vein hypertension. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided into sham-operated group and a portal hypertension (PH) group with a regulated stricture of the portal vein. Animals were sacrificed by decapitation 14 d after portal vein stricture. GS activity was determined in the hippocampus and FC. Specific uptake of radiolabeled L-glutamate was studied using synaptosome-enriched fractions that were freshly prepared from both brain areas. RESULTS: We observed that the activity of GS increased in the hippocampus of PH rats, as compared to control animals, and decreased in the FC. A significant decrease in glutamate uptake was found in both brain areas, and was more marked in the hippocampus. The decrease in glutamate uptake might have been caused by a deficient transport function, significantly and persistent increase in this excitatory neurotransmitter activity. CONCLUSION: The presence of moderate ammonia blood levels may add to the toxicity of excitotoxic glutamate in the brain, which causes alterations in brain function. Portal vein stricture that causes portal hypertension modifies the normal function in some brain regions. PMID:19533812

  18. Posttransplant Complex Inferior Venacava Balloon Dilatation After Hepatic Vein Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Kohli, Vikas; Wadhawan, Manav; Gupta, Subhash; Roy, Vipul

    2010-02-15

    Orthotopic and living related liver transplantation is an established mode of treatment of end-stage liver disease. One of the major causes of postoperative complications is vascular anastomotic stenosis. One such set of such complications relates to hepatic vein, inferior vena cava (IVC), or portal vein stenosis, with a reported incidence of 1-3%. The incidence of vascular complications is reported to be higher in living donor versus cadaveric liver transplants. We encountered a patient with hepatic venous outflow tract obstruction, where the hepatic vein had been previously stented, but the patient continued to have symptoms due to additional IVC obstruction. The patient required double-balloon dilatation of the IVC simultaneously from the internal jugular vein and IVC.

  19. Pancreatectomy with vein reconstruction: technique matters

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Monica M; Tran, Thuy B; Klausner, Jill; Hwa, Kim J; Poultsides, George A; Norton, Jeffrey A; Visser, Brendan C

    2015-01-01

    Background A variety of techniques have been described for portal vein (PV) and/or superior mesenteric vein (SMV) resection/reconstruction during a pancreatectomy. The ideal strategy remains unclear. Methods Patients who underwent PV/SMV resection/reconstruction during a pancreatectomy from 2005 to 2014 were identified. Medical records and imaging were retrospectively reviewed for operative details and outcomes, with particular emphasis on patency. Results Ninety patients underwent vein resection/reconstruction with one of five techniques: (i) longitudinal venorrhaphy (LV, n = 17); (ii) transverse venorrhaphy (TV, n = 9); (iii) primary end-to-end (n = 28); (iv) patch venoplasty (PV, n = 17); and (v) interposition graft (IG, n = 19). With a median follow-up of 316 days, thrombosis was observed in 16/90 (18%). The rate of thrombosis varied according to technique. All patients with primary end-to-end or TV remained patent. LV, PV and IG were all associated with significant rates of thrombosis (P = 0.001 versus no thrombosis). Comparing thrombosed to patent, there were no differences with respect to pancreatectomy type, pre-operative knowledge of vein involvement and neoadjuvant therapy. Prophylactic aspirin was used in 69% of the total cohort (66% of patent, 81% of thrombosed) and showed no protective benefit. Conclusions Primary end-to-end and TV have superior patency than the alternatives after PV/SMV resection and should be the preferred techniques for short (<3 cm) reconstructions. PMID:26223388

  20. Reversible Decrease of Portal Venous Flow in Cirrhotic Patients: A Positive Side Effect of Sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Coriat, Romain; Gouya, Hervé; Mir, Olivier; Ropert, Stanislas; Vignaux, Olivier; Chaussade, Stanislas; Sogni, Philippe; Pol, Stanislas; Blanchet, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Portal hypertension, the most important complication with cirrhosis of the liver, is a serious disease. Sorafenib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor is validated in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Because angiogenesis is a pathological hallmark of portal hypertension, the goal of our study was to determine the effect of sorafenib on portal venous flow and portosystemic collateral circulation in patients receiving sorafenib therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Porto-collateral circulations were evaluated using a magnetic resonance technique prior sorafenib therapy, and at day 30. All patients under sorafenib therapy had a decrease in portal venous flow of at least 36%. In contrast, no specific change was observed in the azygos vein or the abdominal aorta. No portal venous flow modification was observed in the control group. Sorafenib is the first anti-angiogenic therapy to demonstrate a beneficial and reversible decrease of portal venous flow among cirrhotic patients. PMID:21340026

  1. Statins activate the canonical hedgehog-signaling and aggravate non-cirrhotic portal hypertension, but inhibit the non-canonical hedgehog signaling and cirrhotic portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Uschner, Frank E.; Ranabhat, Ganesh; Choi, Steve S.; Granzow, Michaela; Klein, Sabine; Schierwagen, Robert; Raskopf, Esther; Gautsch, Sebastian; van der Ven, Peter F. M.; Fürst, Dieter O.; Strassburg, Christian P.; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Mae Diehl, Anna; Trebicka, Jonel

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis but also portal vein obstruction cause portal hypertension (PHT) and angiogenesis. This study investigated the differences of angiogenesis in cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic PHT with special emphasis on the canonical (Shh/Gli) and non-canonical (Shh/RhoA) hedgehog pathway. Cirrhotic (bile duct ligation/BDL; CCl4 intoxication) and non-cirrhotic (partial portal vein ligation/PPVL) rats received either atorvastatin (15 mg/kg; 7d) or control chow before sacrifice. Invasive hemodynamic measurement and Matrigel implantation assessed angiogenesis in vivo. Angiogenesis in vitro was analysed using migration and tube formation assay. In liver and vessel samples from animals and humans, transcript expression was analyzed using RT-PCR and protein expression using Western blot. Atorvastatin decreased portal pressure, shunt flow and angiogenesis in cirrhosis, whereas atorvastatin increased these parameters in PPVL rats. Non-canonical Hh was upregulated in experimental and human liver cirrhosis and was blunted by atorvastatin. Moreover, atorvastatin blocked the non-canonical Hh-pathway RhoA dependently in activated hepatic steallate cells (HSCs). Interestingly, hepatic and extrahepatic Hh-pathway was enhanced in PPVL rats, which resulted in increased angiogenesis. In summary, statins caused contrary effects in cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic portal hypertension. Atorvastatin inhibited the non-canonical Hh-pathway and angiogenesis in cirrhosis. In portal vein obstruction, statins enhanced the canonical Hh-pathway and aggravated PHT and angiogenesis. PMID:26412302

  2. Current role of portal vein embolization/hepatic artery chemoembolization.

    PubMed

    Kokudo, Norihiro; Makuuchi, Masatoshi

    2004-04-01

    This article has reviewed indications, methods, and results of PVE and TACE for hepatobiliary tumors. PVE is applied mainly to increase the safety of major hepatic resection in patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma, HCC, or metastatic liver tumors. Hepatic arterial embolization causes selective ischemia of the liver tumor and enhances the cytotoxicity of the chemotherapeutic agent administered concomitantly. A survival benefit of TACE in patients with unresectable or recurrent HCC has been demonstrated. The significance of preoperative TACE is still controversial. TACE is routinely performed before PVE in HCC patients. PMID:15062666

  3. The CEOS Water Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Satoko; Sekioka, Shinichi; Kuroiwa, Kaori; Kudo, Yoshiyuki; Koide, Michihiro

    2014-05-01

    The CEOS Water is a one of the DIAS (Data Integration and Analysis System, http://www.editoria.u-tokyo.ac.jp/projects/dias/?locale=en_US) data distributed systems. The CEOS Water Portal system is distributed in the sense that, while the portal system is located in Tokyo, the data is located in archive centers which are globally distributed. For example, some in-situ data is archived at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, USA. The NWP station time series and global gridded model output data is archived at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPIM) in cooperation with the World Data Centerfor Climate in Hamburg, Germany. Part of satellite data is archived at DIAS storage at the University of Tokyo, Japan. This portal does not store data. Instead, according to requests made by users on the web page, it retrieves data from distributed data centers on-the-fly and lets them download and see rendered images/plots. Considering the popularity among water related data centers, OpenDAP protocol is mainly being used between this portal and most of data centers. And this portal also is connected to a kind of data brokering system, which is already connected to multiple data centers. For this interface, OpenSearch protocol is being used. The CEOS Water Portal intends to extend its users to include decision makers and officers like river administrators by facilitating a feedback loop. One example of data and information flow centered on the CEOS Water Portal is shown below. (1)Scientists get various data needed for Model Calculation (WEB-DHM, for example) via the portal. (2)Scientists use Model output data and do analysis. (3)Scientists register their use cases into the portal. (4)Decision makers and officers can refer and acquire use cases and data easily. Users can access the CEOS Water Portal system at http://waterportal.ceos.org/.

  4. Isolated gastric variceal bleeding caused by splenic lymphoma-associated splenic vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bao-Chung; Wang, Hong-Hau; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Shih, Yu-Lueng; Chang, Wei-Kuo; Hsieh, Tsai-Yuan

    2013-10-28

    Isolated gastric varices (IGV) can occur in patients with left-sided portal hypertension resulting from splenic vein occlusion caused by thrombosis or stenosis. In left-sided portal hypertension, blood flows retrogradely through the short and posterior gastric veins and the gastroepiploic veins, leading to the formation of an IGV. The most common causes of splenic vein occlusion are pancreatic diseases, such as pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis, or a pseudocyst. However, various other cancers, such as colon, gastric, or renal cancers, have also been known to cause splenic vein occlusion. Our patient presented with a rare case of IGV bleeding induced by splenic lymphoma-associated splenic vein occlusion. Splenectomy, splenic artery embolization, and stenting of the splenic vein are the current treatment choices. Chemotherapy, however, is an alternative effective treatment for splenic vein occlusion caused by chemotherapy-sensitive tumors. Our patient responded well to chemotherapy with a cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, oncovin, and prednisolone regimen, and the splenic vein occlusion resolved after the lymphoma regressed. PMID:24187474

  5. Automated detection of periventricular veins on 7 T brain MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijf, Hugo J.; Bouvy, Willem H.; Zwanenburg, Jaco J. M.; Viergever, Max A.; Biessels, Geert Jan; Vincken, Koen L.

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is common in elderly persons and a leading cause of cognitive decline, dementia, and acute stroke. With the introduction of ultra-high field strength 7.0T MRI, it is possible to visualize small vessels in the brain. In this work, a proof-of-principle study is conducted to assess the feasibility of automatically detecting periventricular veins. Periventricular veins are organized in a fan-pattern and drain venous blood from the brain towards the caudate vein of Schlesinger, which is situated along the lateral ventricles. Just outside this vein, a region-of- interest (ROI) through which all periventricular veins must cross is defined. Within this ROI, a combination of the vesselness filter, tubular tracking, and hysteresis thresholding is applied to locate periventricular veins. All detected locations were evaluated by an expert human observer. The results showed a positive predictive value of 88% and a sensitivity of 95% for detecting periventricular veins. The proposed method shows good results in detecting periventricular veins in the brain on 7.0T MR images. Compared to previous works, that only use a 1D or 2D ROI and limited image processing, our work presents a more comprehensive definition of the ROI, advanced image processing techniques to detect periventricular veins, and a quantitative analysis of the performance. The results of this proof-of-principle study are promising and will be used to assess periventricular veins on 7.0T brain MRI.

  6. Monte Carlo portal dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, P.W. . E-mail: mary.chin@physics.org

    2005-10-15

    This project developed a solution for verifying external photon beam radiotherapy. The solution is based on a calibration chain for deriving portal dose maps from acquired portal images, and a calculation framework for predicting portal dose maps. Quantitative comparison between acquired and predicted portal dose maps accomplishes both geometric (patient positioning with respect to the beam) and dosimetric (two-dimensional fluence distribution of the beam) verifications. A disagreement would indicate that beam delivery had not been according to plan. The solution addresses the clinical need for verifying radiotherapy both pretreatment (without the patient in the beam) and on treatment (with the patient in the beam). Medical linear accelerators mounted with electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were used to acquire portal images. Two types of EPIDs were investigated: the amorphous silicon (a-Si) and the scanning liquid ion chamber (SLIC). The EGSnrc family of Monte Carlo codes were used to predict portal dose maps by computer simulation of radiation transport in the beam-phantom-EPID configuration. Monte Carlo simulations have been implemented on several levels of high throughput computing (HTC), including the grid, to reduce computation time. The solution has been tested across the entire clinical range of gantry angle, beam size (5 cmx5 cm to 20 cmx20 cm), and beam-patient and patient-EPID separations (4 to 38 cm). In these tests of known beam-phantom-EPID configurations, agreement between acquired and predicted portal dose profiles was consistently within 2% of the central axis value. This Monte Carlo portal dosimetry solution therefore achieved combined versatility, accuracy, and speed not readily achievable by other techniques.

  7. Effect of hypokinesia and the combined action of gravitational load and hypokinesia on the structure of the hepatic portal system.

    PubMed

    Drozdova, A V

    1975-10-01

    General hypokinesia during 1--6 weeks resulted in dilatation of the interlobular veins. sinusoids and central veins. The sequence of alterations corresponded to terms of hypokinesia. After exposure to "gravitation stress--hypokinesia for 1--6 weeks" stagnation in the portal system of the liver was less than after exposure to hypokinesia alone, but unevenness of lumens in the interlobular veins and sinusoids was more pronounced. The foci of the vessel spasm were determined. The signs of stagnation in the system of the portal vein and unevenness of the width of all the links of the portal bed were most pronounced after combination "hypokinesia for 1--6 weeks-- gravitation stress". PMID:1191061

  8. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation Improves Portal Hemodynamics in Patients with Hepatitis B Virus-related Decompensated Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Qinzhi; Cai, Ting; Zhang, Shun; Hu, Airong; Zhang, Xingfen; Wang, Yinyin; Huang, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may eventually lead to decompensated liver cirrhosis, which is a terminal illness. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of autologous peripheral blood stem cell (APBSC) transplantation to improve portal vein hemodynamics in patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis. Patients and Methods: This prospective study included 68 hospitalized patients who were diagnosed with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis. These patients were divided into two groups: the transplantation group included 33 patients, while the control group included 35. Both groups received conventional medical treatment simultaneously, and APBSC transplantation was performed on the patients in the transplantation group. We evaluated the effects of APBSC transplantation on postoperative liver function using the following indices: total bilirubin, serum prothrombin and albumin, spleen size, and portal vein hemodynamics. Postoperatively, all of the patients were followed up at 24, 36, and 48 weeks. Results: The transplantation group had no serious reactions. Compared with the control group, albumin and prothrombin activity in the transplantation group was significantly improved at 24, 36, and 48 weeks after the procedure, and spleen length and portal vein diameter were substantially reduced at 48 weeks. The velocity of peak portal vein blood flow and mean maximum portal vein blood flow were greatly increased in the APBSC transplantation group at 36 and 48 weeks, respectively; however, there was also decreased portal vein diameter, which reduced portal vein pressure in patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis. Conclusions: APBSC transplantation greatly benefits HBV-linked decompensated cirrhosis patients and should be recommended in clinical practice. PMID:26977164

  9. Varicose veins and venous insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001109.htm Varicose veins and venous insufficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Varicose veins are swollen, twisted, and enlarged veins that you ...

  10. Measurement of normal portal venous blood flow by Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Brown, H S; Halliwell, M; Qamar, M; Read, A E; Evans, J M; Wells, P N

    1989-04-01

    The volume flow rate of blood in the portal vein was measured using a duplex ultrasound system. The many errors inherent in the duplex method were assessed with particular reference to the portal vein and appropriate correction factors were obtained by in vitro calibration. The effect of posture on flow was investigated by examining 45 healthy volunteers in three different positions; standing, supine and tilted head down at 20 degrees from the horizontal. The mean volume blood flow in the supine position was 864 (188)ml/min (mean 1SD). When standing, the mean volume blood flow was significantly reduced by 26% to 662 (169)ml/min. There was, however, no significant difference between flow when supine and when tilted head down at 20 degrees from the horizontal. PMID:2653973

  11. [Diagnosis and treatment of portal thrombosis in liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Seijo, Susana; García-Criado, Angeles; Darnell, Anna; García-Pagán, Juan Carlos

    2012-11-01

    Improved imaging techniques and the routine use of color Doppler ultrasound in the follow-up of patients with liver cirrhosis has increased diagnosis of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) in these patients. The extension of PVT should be evaluated with computed tomography angiography or magnetic resonance angiography. The natural history of PVT in cirrhosis and its impact on liver disease is unknown but it seems clear that PVT could increase the morbidity and mortality associated with liver transplantation and can even be a contraindication to this procedure when the thrombus extends to the superior mesenteric vein. Anticoagulation is a relatively safe and effective treatment in achieving recanalization of the splenoportal axis or in preventing progression of thrombosis and is therefore frequently used. The use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) is reserved for patients unresponsive to anticoagulation or in those with severe complications of portal hypertension. PMID:22534116

  12. Meso-Rex shunt for immediate portal revascularization in pediatric liver transplantation: first report.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Jairo; Fusaro, Fabio; de Magnée, Catherine; Clapuyt, Philippe; Reding, Raymond

    2012-09-01

    We describe the case of a 13-month-old girl transplanted for biliary atresia with PV hypoplasia. She received the left liver lobe of her mother and presented intraoperative portal thrombosis. Because of technical reasons, the opportunity to have conventional PV reconstruction using the donor left PV stump was lost. Immediate conversion to a meso-Rex shunt, using the recipient jugular vein as a bridge between the superior mesenteric vein and the graft Rex recessus, allowed excellent portal revascularization of the transplant. We suggest that synchronous meso-Rex shunt may constitute a valid alternative to truncal PV anastomosis during pediatric LT. PMID:21923884

  13. The portal lobule in rat liver fibrosis: a re-evaluation of the liver unit.

    PubMed

    Bhunchet, E; Wake, K

    1998-02-01

    We re-evaluated three schemes of liver organization: the classic lobule, the portal lobule, and Rappaport's liver acinus. The lobular angioarchitecture of normal rat liver and the three-dimensional structure of pseudolubules found in rat livers with fibrosis induced by swine serum were compared with the classic lobule of the pig. Normal and fibrotic rat livers and pig livers were perfused, injected with either India ink or 0.75% OsO4 through the portal and/or hepatic vein, and immersionfixed. Whole lobes and hand-cut thick sections were made transparent with a solution of benzyl benzoate and methyl salicylate. The angioarchitecture of normal rat liver differs from pig liver. In the former, terminal portal branches and central veins interdigitate, and in the latter, numerous terminal portal branches that arise from interlobular portal veins establish a vascular basket surrounding one central vein and forming classic lobule. The structure of liver acinus is never found in the pig liver. The terminal portal branch, together with the terminal hepatic artery and bile duct, are present inside each pseudolobule of fibrotic rat livers. Blood from the terminal portal branch flows through inlet venules into radiating sinusoids, and, at the periphery converges into newly formed septal and angular outlet venules; these venules terminate in fibrotic central veins located at each corner. Pseudolobules are not rugby ball-like as Rappaport's liver acini are but are polyhedron in shape. The rat pseudolobules are comparable with the portal lobule; its structure and microcirculation are the reverse of the pig classic lobule. Rat pseudolobules are different from liver acini, as shown by the following: 1) their three-dimensional shape is different; and 2) they have a reverse relationship to classic lobules while acini are defined to subdivide classic lobules. In normal and fibrotic rat livers, the liver unit is the portal lobule with a terminal portal branch as the axial branch and

  14. Space Development Grid Portal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the development of a portal to provide secure and distributed grid computing for Payload Operations Integrated Center and Mission Control Center ground services.

  15. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for acute variceal gastrointestinal bleeding: Indications, techniques and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Loffroy, R; Favelier, S; Pottecher, P; Estivalet, L; Genson, P Y; Gehin, S; Krausé, D; Cercueil, J-P

    2015-01-01

    Acute variceal bleeding is a life-threatening condition that requires a multidisciplinary approach for effective therapy. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure is a minimally invasive image-guided intervention used for secondary prevention of bleeding and as salvage therapy in acute bleeding. Emergency TIPS should be considered early in patients with refractory variceal bleeding once medical treatment and endoscopic sclerotherapy fail, before the clinical condition worsens. Furthermore, admission to specialized centers is mandatory in such a setting and regional protocols are essential to be organized effectively. This procedure involves establishment of a direct pathway between the hepatic veins and the portal veins to decompress the portal venous hypertension that is the source of the patient's bleeding. The procedure is technically challenging, especially in critically ill patients, and has a mortality of 30%-50% in the emergency setting, but has an effectiveness greater than 90% in controlling bleeding from gastro-esophageal varices. This review focuses on the role of TIPS in the setting of variceal bleeding, with emphasis on current indications and techniques for TIPS creation, TIPS clinical outcomes, and the role of adjuvant embolization of varices. PMID:26094039

  16. Retinal vein occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Berrocal MH, Rodriguez FJ, et al. Pan-American Collaborative Retina Study Group (PACORES). Comparison of two doses ... retinal vein occlusion: results from the Pan-American Collaborative Retina Study Group at 6 months of follow- ...

  17. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    You were treated for deep venous thrombosis (DVT). This is a condition in which a blood clot forms in a vein that is not on ... especially if it gets worse upon taking a deep breath in You cough up blood

  18. Popliteal vein aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Falkowski, A; Poncyljusz, W; Zawierucha, D; Kuczmik, W

    2006-06-01

    The incidence of a popliteal vein aneurysm is extremely low. Two cases of this rare venous anomaly are described. The epidemiology, morphology, and diagnostic methods are discussed and the potentially dangerous complications and treatment methods are presented. PMID:16796307

  19. From portal to splanchnic venous thrombosis: What surgeons should bear in mind

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Quirino; Spoletini, Gabriele; Pinheiro, Rafael S; Melandro, Fabio; Guglielmo, Nicola; Lerut, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to review the evolution of surgical management of portal (PVT) and splanchnic venous thrombosis (SVT) in the context of liver transplantation over the last 5 decades. PVT is more commonly managed by endovenous thrombectomy, while SVT requires more complex technical expedients. Several surgical techniques have been proposed, such as extensive eversion thrombectomy, anastomosis to collateral veins, reno-portal anastomosis, cavo-portal hemi-transposition, portal arterialization and combined liver-intestinal transplantation. In order to achieve satisfactory outcomes, careful planning of the surgical strategy is mandatory. The excellent results that are obtained nowadays confirm that, even extended, splanchnic thrombosis is no longer an absolute contraindication for liver transplantation. Patients with advanced portal thrombosis may preferentially be referred to specialized centres, in which complex vascular approaches and even multivisceral transplantation are performed. PMID:25232448

  20. Hepatic versus pulmonary uptake of particles injected into the portal circulation in sheep. Endotoxin escapes hepatic clearance causing pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    DeCamp, M M; Warner, A E; Molina, R M; Brain, J D

    1992-07-01

    Removal of circulating particulates (bacteria, cell debris, endotoxin) is accomplished in most species by macrophages resident in the liver and spleen. We have shown that sheep and other species have phagocytic macrophages resident in their pulmonary capillaries. Moreover, these pulmonary intravascular macrophages accomplish the bulk of uptake of injected tracer particles, bacteria, or endotoxin (LPS). Because bacteria or LPS of intestinal origin enter the portal circulation, they would first encounter hepatic mononuclear phagocytes. We sought to determine the extent to which particulates injected into the portal circulation of sheep would be taken up by liver or by lung macrophages. Sheep (four per group) were injected via a mesenteric vein with radiolabeled gold colloid, magnetic iron oxide particles, live Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or 125I E. coli endotoxin. For each, the uptake pattern was determined 1 h after injection. Lung and liver were also fixed to determine the cells responsible for uptake and subsequent inflammatory changes. We found that for circulating gold colloid, iron oxide particles, or bacteria, hepatic uptake predominated, and Kupffer cells were responsible. After hepatic uptake of bacteria, inflammatory changes were confined to the liver. In contrast, nearly 50% of endotoxin escaped hepatic clearance and was subsequently removed by the lungs. We then saw inflammatory changes in both lungs and liver. Thus, hepatic macrophages are active in species with pulmonary intravascular macrophages, partially sparing the lungs from uptake and acute inflammation. Endotoxin, however, may elude hepatic uptake, be sequestered in the lungs, and initiate inflammation there. PMID:1320819

  1. Effects of propranolol and sucralfate on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in chronic portal hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, P; Duchateau, A; Thiéfin, G; Zeitoun, P

    1987-10-01

    In a rat model of chronic portal hypertension we studied ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage and the effects of pretreatment by propranolol and sucralfate. Susceptibility to ethanol was increased in chronic portal hypertensive rats compared with sham-operated rats (55 +/- 8% vs. 25 +/- 4%). Both acute pretreatment (10 min) and chronic pretreatment (3 weeks) with propranolol reduced gastric mucosal injury induced by ethanol in portal hypertensive rats, compared with saline-treated rats. Acute and chronic pretreatment with propranolol had no protective effect in sham-operated rats. In portal hypertensive rats, sucralfate in two different doses (500 and 125 mg/kg) protected the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced gastric injury compared with animals receiving saline (2 +/- 1% and 3 +/- 2% vs. 25 +/- 3%). Sucralfate at the higher dose did not reduce portal pressure in portal hypertensive rats. We conclude that: (1) chronic portal hypertension increases ethanol-induced gastric damage; (2) acute and chronic propranolol treatment reduces ethanol-induced gastric injury in portal hypertensive rats, probably by decreasing portal hypertension; (3) sucralfate has a cytoprotective effect in portal hypertensive rats without reducing portal pressure. These results suggest a potential application of sucralfate in patients otherwise treated by sclerotherapy. PMID:3693860

  2. 8. EAST PORTAL AND DECK VIEW, FROM EAST, SHOWING PORTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. EAST PORTAL AND DECK VIEW, FROM EAST, SHOWING PORTAL CONFIGURATION AND LATERAL BRACING, STEEL MESH FLOOR, METAL RAILINGS, AND PORTION OF EAST APPROACH - Glendale Road Bridge, Spanning Deep Creek Lake on Glendale Road, McHenry, Garrett County, MD

  3. 7. WEST PORTAL AND DECK VIEW, FROM WEST, SHOWING PORTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. WEST PORTAL AND DECK VIEW, FROM WEST, SHOWING PORTAL CONFIGURATION AND LATERAL BRACING, STEEL MESH FLOOR, AND METAL RAILINGS - Glendale Road Bridge, Spanning Deep Creek Lake on Glendale Road, McHenry, Garrett County, MD

  4. Radioisotopic flow scanning for portal blood flow and portal hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Hesdorffer, C.S.; Bezwoda, W.R.; Danilewitz, M.D.; Esser, J.D.; Tobias, M.

    1987-08-01

    The use of a simple, noninvasive, isotope scanning technique for the determination of relative portal blood flow and detection of portal hypertension is described. Using this technique the presence of portal hypertension was demonstrated in seven of nine patients known to have elevated portal venous pressure. By contrast, esophageal varices were demonstrated in only five of these patients, illustrating the potential value of the method. Furthermore, this technique has been adapted to the study of portal blood flow in patients with myeloproliferative disorders with splenomegaly but without disturbances in hepatic architecture. Results demonstrate that the high relative splenic flow resulting from the presence of splenomegaly may in turn be associated with elevated relative portal blood flow and portal hypertension. The theoretic reasons for the development of flow-related portal hypertension and its relationship to splenic blood flow are discussed.

  5. Perspective view of south portal. Note how portal angles about ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of south portal. Note how portal angles about 5' forward over the approach. - Red Oak Creek Bridge, Spanning (Big) Red Oak Creek, Huel Brown Road (Covered Bridge Road), Woodbury, Meriwether County, GA

  6. Elevation, west portal. Sign on portal reads Watson Mill Bridge, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation, west portal. Sign on portal reads Watson Mill Bridge, est. 1885. - Watson Mill Bridge, Spanning South Fork Broad River, Watson Mill Road, Watson Mill Bridge State Park, Comer, Madison County, GA

  7. Spontaneous common iliac vein rupture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    DePass, Ian E.

    1998-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman, admitted because of acute lower quadrant abdominal pain but no history of trauma, underwent laparotomy for a suspected ruptured aortic aneurysm. Exploration revealed a 20-mm longitudinal tear in the left iliac vein. The vein was repaired primarily. Her postoperative course was complicated by deep vein thrombosis. Spontaneous rupture of the iliac vein without trauma is rare. but occurs predominantly in healthy white women between the ages of 40 and 80 years. Various causative mechanisms have been described: inflammation of the vessel wall secondary to thrombophlebitis, proximal obstruction of the iliac vein and spontaneous rupture without obstruction or thrombosis. In many cases an increase in intra-abdominal pressure is noted. PMID:9854541

  8. Overproduction of nitric oxide inhibits vascular reactivity in portal hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi-Ru; Wu, Jin-Sheng; He, Ze-Sheng; Ma, Qing-Jiu; Gao, De-Ming

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the relationship between nitric oxide (NO) and hyperdynamic circulatory status in portal hypertension. METHODS: Twenty male Sprague Dawley rats (weighing 200 ± 20 g) were randomized into two groups: portal hypertension group (n = 12) and sham-operated control group (n = 8). The portal hypertensive model was established by means of graded constriction of the portal vein. The concentrations of nitrite (NO2-) in the portal vein and peripheral blood were measured by fluorometric assay to reflect NO levels. The reactivity of isolated abdominal aortic rings from rats with partial portal vein constriction and controls was determined by assessing response to administration of potassium chloride (KCl) (10–80 mmol/L) and phenylephrine (10-9-10-4 mol/L) with or without preincubation with NO synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA). RESULTS: Serum concentrations of NO2- in the portal vein blood (0.766 ± 0.097 μmol/L) and peripheral blood (0.687 ± 0.092 μmol/L) were elevated in portal hypertensive rats, as compared with the concentrations in controls (0.613 ± 0.084 μmol/L and 0.591 ± 0.045 μmol/L respectively, both P < 0.01). In addition, the rates of NO2- in portal vein blood were markedly higher than those in peripheral blood (P < 0.05) in the portal hypertensive rats. Abdominal aortic rings from rats with portal vein constriction exhibited significantly impaired contractility to phenylephrine and KCl, as compared with the control rats. The EC50 values of KCl were markedly higher in the portal hypertensive rings (26.5 ± 0.9 mmol/L) than in the control rings (22.3 ± 1.7 mmol/L, P < 0.01), as were the EC50 values of phenylephrine (37.2 ± 0.4 nmol/L vs control rings: 28.1 ± 0.2 nmol/L, P < 0.01). After preincubation of rings with L-NNA, the difference in EC50 values between portal hypertensive and control rings was no longer statistically significant for either KCl (20.18 ± 0.8 mmol/L vs 19.4 ± 1.2 mmol/L, P > 0.05) or phenylephrine (22

  9. Repeated pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis leads to intractable gastric variceal bleeding: A case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shan-Hong; Zeng, Wei-Zheng; He, Qian-Wen; Qin, Jian-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Tao; Wang, Zhao; He, Xuan; Zhou, Xiao-Lei; Fan, Quan-Shui; Jiang, Ming-De

    2015-01-01

    Gastric varices (GV) are one of the most common complications for patients with portal hypertension. Currently, histoacryl injection is recommended as the initial treatment for bleeding of GV, and this injection has been confirmed to be highly effective for most patients in many studies. However, this treatment might be ineffective for some types of GV, such as splenic vein thrombosis-related localized portal hypertension (also called left-sided, sinistral, or regional portal hypertension). Herein, we report a case of repeated pancreatitis-induced complete splenic vein thrombosis that led to intractable gastric variceal bleeding, which was treated by splenectomy. We present detailed radiological and pathological data and blood rheology analysis (the splenic artery - after a short gastric vein or stomach vein - gastric coronary vein - portal vein). The pathophysiology can be explained by the abnormal direction of blood flow in this patient. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case for which detailed pathology and blood rheology data are available. PMID:26488031

  10. Repeated pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis leads to intractable gastric variceal bleeding: A case report and review.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shan-Hong; Zeng, Wei-Zheng; He, Qian-Wen; Qin, Jian-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Tao; Wang, Zhao; He, Xuan; Zhou, Xiao-Lei; Fan, Quan-Shui; Jiang, Ming-De

    2015-10-16

    Gastric varices (GV) are one of the most common complications for patients with portal hypertension. Currently, histoacryl injection is recommended as the initial treatment for bleeding of GV, and this injection has been confirmed to be highly effective for most patients in many studies. However, this treatment might be ineffective for some types of GV, such as splenic vein thrombosis-related localized portal hypertension (also called left-sided, sinistral, or regional portal hypertension). Herein, we report a case of repeated pancreatitis-induced complete splenic vein thrombosis that led to intractable gastric variceal bleeding, which was treated by splenectomy. We present detailed radiological and pathological data and blood rheology analysis (the splenic artery - after a short gastric vein or stomach vein - gastric coronary vein - portal vein). The pathophysiology can be explained by the abnormal direction of blood flow in this patient. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case for which detailed pathology and blood rheology data are available. PMID:26488031

  11. Pregnancy with Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neelam; Negi, Neha; Aggarwal, Aakash; Bodh, Vijay; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2014-01-01

    Even though pregnancy is rare with cirrhosis and advanced liver disease, but it may co-exist in the setting of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension as liver function is preserved but whenever encountered together is a complex clinical dilemma. Pregnancy in a patient with portal hypertension presents a special challenge to the obstetrician as so-called physiological hemodynamic changes associated with pregnancy, needed for meeting demands of the growing fetus, worsen the portal hypertension thereby putting mother at risk of potentially life-threatening complications like variceal hemorrhage. Risks of variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation increase many fold during pregnancy. Optimal management revolves round managing the portal hypertension and its complications. Thus management of such cases requires multi-speciality approach involving obstetricians experienced in dealing with high risk cases, hepatologists, anesthetists and neonatologists. With advancement in medical field, pregnancy is not contra-indicated in these women, as was previously believed. This article focuses on the different aspects of pregnancy with portal hypertension with special emphasis on specific cause wise treatment options to decrease the variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation. Based on extensive review of literature, management from pre-conceptional period to postpartum is outlined in order to have optimal maternal and perinatal outcomes. PMID:25755552

  12. Target detection portal

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Brusseau, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    A portal apparatus for screening persons or objects for the presence of trace amounts of target substances such as explosives, narcotics, radioactive materials, and certain chemical materials. The portal apparatus can have a one-sided exhaust for an exhaust stream, an interior wall configuration with a concave-shape across a horizontal cross-section for each of two facing sides to result in improved airflow and reduced washout relative to a configuration with substantially flat parallel sides; air curtains to reduce washout; ionizing sprays to collect particles bound by static forces, as well as gas jet nozzles to dislodge particles bound by adhesion to the screened person or object. The portal apparatus can be included in a detection system with a preconcentrator and a detector.

  13. Dietary starch sources affect net portal appearance of amino acids and glucose in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, T-J; Dai, Q-Z; Yin, Y-L; Zhang, J; Huang, R-L; Ruan, Z; Deng, Z; Xie, M

    2008-05-01

    Four male pigs (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire; average initial (mean ± SEM) BW = 22.5 ± 1.1 kg), fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein, ileal vein and carotid artery, were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square experimental design to measure the effect of dietary starch sources on the net portal appearance of glucose and amino acids. Dietary starch sources were resistant starch (RS), maize, sticky rice and brown rice. Diets were provided at 0730, 1530 and 2330 h during a 6-day adjustment period and 1-day collection period. On day 7 of each period, blood samples were collected from the portal vein and carotid artery at 0730 h (prior to feeding) and hourly up to 8 h after meal. Blood samples were used to determine glucose, amino acid, packed cell volume and partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). When calculated per 100 g feed intake, cumulative portal glucose appearance was lower (P < 0.05) for resistant starch than for maize, sticky rice or brown rice up to 8 h after the meal. Cumulative portal glucose appearance was higher (P < 0.05) for sticky rice and brown rice than for other diets until 4 h after the meal, but maize had higher cumulative glucose appearance after 4 h. Net cumulative portal concentrations of most amino acids for resistant starch were also reduced (P < 0.05) than for the other starch sources. Cumulative portal appearance of amino acid represented 48.39%, 63.76%, 61.80% and 59.18% of dietary intake for resistant starch, maize, sticky rice and brown rice, respectively. Collectively, our results indicate that dietary starch sources substantially affect the appearance of amino acids and glucose in the portal circulation. PMID:22443597

  14. Portal hypertensive biliopathy: A single center experience and literature review.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Vanessa; Puerta, Andrés; Santos, Luisa Fernanda; Pérez, Juan Manuel; Varón, Adriana; Botero, Rafael Claudino

    2013-03-27

    Portal hypertensive biliopathy (PHB) is characterized by anatomical and functional abnormalities of the intrahepatic, extrahepatic and pancreatic ducts, in patients with portal hypertension associated to extrahepatic portal vein obstruction and less frequently to cirrhosis. These morphological changes, consisting in dilatation and stenosis of the biliary tree, are due to extensive venous collaterals occurring in an attempt to decompress the portal venous blockage. It is usually asymptomatic until it progresses to more advanced stages with cholestasis, jaundice, biliary sludge, gallstones, cholangitis and finally biliary cirrhosis. Imaging modalities of the biliary tree such as Doppler ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are essential to establish the diagnosis and the need of therapeutical interventions. Once the diagnosis is established, treatment with ursodesoxycholic acid seems to be beneficial. Decompression of the biliary tree to dilate, remove stones or implant biliary prosthesis by endoscopic or surgical procedures (hepato-yeyunostomy) usually resolves the cholestatic picture and prevents septic complications. The ideal treatment is the decompression of the portal system, with transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt or a surgical porto-systemic shunt. Unfortunately, few patients will be candidates for these procedures due to the extension of the thrombotic process. The purpose of this paper is to report the first 3 cases of PHB seen in a Colombian center and to review the literature. PMID:23556047

  15. Relationship between Specific Distributions of Isolated Soleal Vein Thrombosis and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ohgi, Nagako

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The relationship between specific distributions of isolated soleal vein thrombosis (SVT) and risk factors was investigated. Subjects and Methods: The subjects included 93 patients with SVT diagnosed with ultrasonography. Results: In the acute thrombus distribution, the thrombi of central veins were significantly more frequent than the thrombi of medial veins in the unilateral SVT. The thrombi of central veins were not more significantly frequent than the thrombi of medial veins in the bilateral SVT. Conclusion: The risk factors of bilateral SVT are considered to be different from that of the unilateral SVT. (*English translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol 2013; 53: 159-166) PMID:25298825

  16. A Librarian's Perspective on Portals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Explains what Web portals are and discusses the benefits of a strategic alliance in portal building among campus information technology, libraries, and other campus groups. Suggests that by using robust channel capabilities, an enterprise portal can provide content from various parts of the university and promote resource discovery. (EV)

  17. Ten Keys to the Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2011-01-01

    Successful web portals help users stay informed, in touch, and up to speed. They are also a telling window into the efficiency of one's institution. To develop a cutting-edge portal takes planning, communication, and research. In this article, the author presents and discusses 10 keys to portal success: (1) make critical info visible; (2) make the…

  18. Bilateral Emphysematous Pyelonephritis with Hepatic Portal Venous Gas: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mao Li; Nording, Hasnizal; Lim, Chen Hong

    2015-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis is a rare life-threatening condition caused by a severe acute necrotising infection of the renal parenchyma and its perinephric tissues, and it is commonly seen in diabetic patients. There is a rare association between emphysematous pyelonephritis and hepatic portal venous gas. Hepatic portal venous gas is an uncommon radiological finding, which implies a significant underlying abdominal disease. The management of emphysematous pyelonephritis has evolved from prompt nephrectomy to medical therapy. In the present report, we present a case of a diabetic woman diagnosed with bilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis with hepatic portal venous gas that was successfully managed medically despite the presence of poor prognostic factors, such as acute renal failure and thrombocytopenia. PMID:26715900

  19. Perivascular mast cells regulate vein graft neointimal formation and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Grassia, Gianluca; Cambrook, Helen; Ialenti, Armando; MacRitchie, Neil; Carberry, Jaclyn; Lawrence, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Emerging evidence suggests an important role for mast cells in vein graft failure. This study addressed the hypothesis that perivascular mast cells regulate in situ vascular inflammatory and proliferative responses and subsequent vein graft neointimal lesion formation, using an optimized local mast cell reconstitution method. Methods and Results. Neointimal hyperplasia was induced by insertion of a vein graft into the right carotid artery in wild type and mast cell deficient KitW−sh/W−sh mice. In some experiments, mast cells were reconstituted systemically (tail vein injection of bone marrow-derived mast cells) or locally (directly into the right neck area) prior to vein grafting. Vein graft neointimal lesion formation was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in KitW−sh/W−sh mice. Mast cell deficiency reduced the number of proliferating cells, and inhibited L-selectin, CCL2, M-CSF and MIP-3α expression in the vein grafts. Local but not systemic mast cell reconstitution restored a perivascular mast cell population that subsequently promoted neointimal formation in mast cell deficient mice. Conclusion. Our data demonstrate that perivascular mast cells play a key role in promoting neointima formation by inducing local acute inflammatory and proliferative responses. These results suggest that ex vivo intraoperative targeting of mast cells may have therapeutic potential for the prevention of pathological vein graft remodeling. PMID:26312183

  20. Pelvic Vein Embolisation in the Management of Varicose Veins

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnam, Lakshmi A.; Marsh, Petra; Holdstock, Judy M.; Harrison, Charmaine S.; Hussain, Fuad F.; Whiteley, Mark S.; Lopez, Anthony

    2008-11-15

    Pelvic vein incompetence is common in patients with atypical varicose veins, contributing to their recurrence after surgery. Therefore, refluxing pelvic veins should be identified and treated. We present our experience with pelvic vein embolisation in patients presenting with varicose veins. Patients presenting with varicose veins with a duplex-proven contribution from perivulval veins undergo transvaginal duplex sonography (TVUS) to identify refluxing pelvic veins. Those with positive scans undergo embolisation before surgical treatment of their lower limb varicose veins. A total of 218 women (mean age of 46.3 years) were treated. Parity was documented in the first 60 patients, of whom 47 (78.3%) were multiparous, 11 (18.3%) had had one previous pregnancy, and 2 (3.3%) were nulliparous. The left ovarian vein was embolised in 78%, the right internal iliac in 64.7%, the left internal iliac in 56.4%, and the right ovarian vein in 42.2% of patients. At follow-up TVUS, mild reflux only was seen in 16, marked persistent reflux in 6, and new reflux in 3 patients. These 9 women underwent successful repeat embolisation. Two patients experienced pulmonary embolisation of the coils, of whom 1 was asymptomatic and 1 was successfully retrieved; 1 patient had a misplaced coil protruding into the common femoral vein; and 1 patient had perineal thrombophlebitis. The results of our study showed that pelvic venous embolisation by way of a transjugular approach is a safe and effective technique in the treatment of pelvic vein reflux.

  1. Ovarian vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Jenayah, Amel Achour; Saoudi, Sarra; Boudaya, Fethia; Bouriel, Ines; Sfar, Ezzeddine; Chelli, Dalenda

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian vein thrombosis (OVT) is a rare cause of abdominal pain that may mimic a surgical abdomen. It is most often diagnosed during the postpartum period. In this report, we present four cases of postoperative ovarian vein thrombosis. The complications of OVT can be significant, and the diagnosis relies on a careful examination of the radiographic findings. It can occur with lower quadrant abdominal pain, especially in the setting of recent pregnancy, abdominal surgery, pelvic inflammatory disease, or malignancy. Diagnosis can be made with confidence using ultrasound, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Treatment of ovarian vein thrombosis is particularly important in the post-partum patients, with anticoagulation therapy being the current recommendation. PMID:26526119

  2. Acquired Jugular Vein Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Hopsu, Erkki; Tarkkanen, Jussi; Vento, Seija I.; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Venous malformations of the jugular veins are rare findings. Aneurysms and phlebectasias are the lesions most often reported. We report on an adult patient with an abruptly appearing large tumorous mass on the left side of the neck identified as a jugular vein aneurysm. Upon clinical examination with ultrasound, a lateral neck cyst was primarily suspected. Surgery revealed a saccular aneurysm in intimate connection with the internal jugular vein. Histology showed an organized hematoma inside the aneurysmal sac, which had a focally thinned muscular layer. The terminology and the treatment guidelines of venous dilatation lesions are discussed. For phlebectasias, conservative treatment is usually recommended, whereas for saccular aneurysms, surgical resection is the treatment of choice. While an exact classification based on etiology and pathophysiology is not possible, a more uniform taxonomy would clarify the guidelines for different therapeutic modalities for venous dilatation lesions. PMID:20107571

  3. Portal hypertensive enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mekaroonkamol, Parit; Cohen, Robert; Chawla, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Portal hypertensive enteropathy (PHE) is a condition that describes the pathologic changes and mucosal abnormalities observed in the small intestine of patients with portal hypertension. This entity is being increasingly recognized and better understood over the past decade due to increased accessibility of the small intestine made possible by the introduction of video capsule endoscopy and deep enteroscopy. Though challenged by its diverse endoscopic appearance, multiple scoring systems have been proposed to classify the endoscopic presentation and grade its severity. Endoscopic findings can be broadly categorized into vascular and non-vascular lesions with many subtypes of both categories. Clinical manifestations of PHE can range from asymptomatic incidental findings to fatal gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Classic endoscopic findings in the setting of portal hypertension may lead to a prompt diagnosis. Occasionally histopathology and cross sectional imaging like computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging may be helpful in establishing a diagnosis. Management of overt bleeding requires multidisciplinary approach involving hepatologists, endoscopists, surgeons, and interventional radiologists. Adequate resuscitation, reduction of portal pressure, and endoscopic therapeutic intervention remain the main principles of the initial treatment. This article reviews the existing evidence on PHE with emphasis on its classification, diagnosis, clinical manifestations, endoscopic appearance, pathological findings, and clinical management. A new schematic management of ectopic variceal bleed is also proposed. PMID:25729469

  4. Arterial, portal, or systemic chemotherapy for patients with hepatic metastasis of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kemeny, N; Fata, F

    1999-01-01

    Hepatic metastases from colorectal carcinoma are common and may be resected for cure. The response of liver metastases to systemic chemotherapy is low. In contrast, hepatic arterial chemotherapy produces higher response rates than systemic chemotherapy, but randomized trials have not definitely proved a survival advantage because they allowed cross over. Most adjuvant portal vein chemotherapy studies have shown a survival advantage over the control group, but it is not clear whether this benefit is from the portal vein therapy or from immediate postoperative chemotherapy, since there is rarely a reduction in liver metastases. We describe the results of systemic, hepatic artery infusion, and portal therapy for patients with liver metastases of colorectal carcinoma. PMID:10436236

  5. Varicose vein surgery.

    PubMed

    Kendler, Micheal; Fellmer, Peter T; Wetzig, Tino

    2012-03-01

    Venous diseases are common in the general population. After a comprehensive diagnostic evaluation, an individual therapeutic approach should be selected on the basis of the findings, with the aim of treating the diseased vein segments and improving quality of life. Numerous therapeutic options are available for the treatment of varicose veins. In addition to conservative methods such as compression therapy, exercise or drugs, surgical procedures such as traditional surgery, thermal ablation techniques or sclerotherapy can be performed. Recent developments include the use of endoluminal water vapor or mechano-chemical endovenous ablation. PMID:22222053

  6. Portal hypertension in kala-azar

    PubMed Central

    Datta, D. V.; Saha, S.; Grover, S. L.; Singh, Samant A.; Chakravarti, R. N.; Chhuttani, P. N.

    1972-01-01

    The present study records haemodynamic studies in three patients with kala-azar, a parasitic disease. All the three patients had high intrasplenic pressure, mild to moderate elevation of wedged hepatic vein pressure, and increased or normal estimated hepatic blood flow. Liver histology showed marked proliferation and swelling of Kupffer cells in the sinusoids. One patient was studied serially for nine months following treatment which showed persistent elevation of intrasplenic pressure though wedge pressure and liver blood flow touched normal levels. Liver biopsy was essentially normal at this stage. These findings may have some relevance to the role of different parasitic infections in the pathogenesis of a heterogeneous group of non-cirrhotic portal fibroses. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 6 PMID:5045707

  7. Relevance of plasma malondialdehyde level and severity of portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng-Lan; Zhu, Xin-Yan; Zhang, Dong-Wei; Zhang, Zhao-Jie; Gao, Heng-Jun; Yang, Chang-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Portal hypertension is one of the death reasons for the liver cirrhosis patients. The oxidative stress is related to the occurrence and development of portal hypertension in cirrhosis. Malondialdehyde (MDA), one of the lipid peroxides, increases substantially in cirrhotic patients. Aims: To evaluate the relevance between the MDA level and portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients. Methods: 60 liver cirrhotic patients and 30 healthy controls were enrolled. The plasma MDA level and general blood tests including ALT, AST, ALB, total bilirubin, and platelet were measured. All people enrolled accepted endoscopic examination and B-Ultrasound check to evaluate the severity of portal hypertension. Results: The MDA plasma level of cirrhotic patients was significantly higher than the controls (P<0.001) and increased significantly accompanied by the severity of liver fibrosis and portal hypertension (P<0.01). Further, the plasma MDA level of cirrhotic patients was significantly correlated with Child-Pugh classification of cirrhosis (r=0.820, P<0.001), the degree of esophageal varices (r=0.857, P<0.001) and the width of portal vein (r=0.652, P<0.001). The ROC curve analyses showed that the plasma MDA level is a strong predictor of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Conclusions: Plasma MDA level may correlate with the severity of portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients. PMID:26379897

  8. Renal vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys. Possible Complications Complications may include: Acute renal failure (especially if thrombosis occurs in a dehydrated child) ... Saunders; 2012:chap 34. Read More Acute kidney failure Arteriogram Blood ... embolus Renal Tumor Update Date 5/19/2015 Updated by: ...

  9. Elastomechanical properties of bovine veins.

    PubMed

    Rossmann, Jenn Stroud

    2010-02-01

    Veins have historically been discussed in qualitative, relative terms: "more compliant" than arteries, subject to "lower pressures". The structural and compositional differences between arteries and veins are directly related to the different functions of these vessels. Veins are often used as grafts to reroute flow from atherosclerotic arteries, and venous elasticity plays a role in the development of conditions such as varicose veins and valvular insufficiency. It is therefore of clinical interest to determine the elastomechanical properties of veins. In the current study, both tensile and vibration testing are used to obtain elastic moduli of bovine veins. Representative stress-strain data are shown, and the mechanical and failure properties reported. Nonlinear and viscoelastic behavior is observed, though most properties show little strain rate dependence. These data suggest parameters for constitutive modeling of veins and may inform the design and testing of prosthetic venous valves as well as vein grafts. PMID:20129420

  10. Living with Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Deep Vein Thrombosis NHLBI Resources Pulmonary Embolism (Health Topics) Non-NHLBI Resources Deep Vein Thrombosis (MedlinePlus) Pulmonary Embolism (MedlinePlus) Clinical Trials ...

  11. [Hassab's operation for left-sided portal hypertension after pancreatoduodenectomy].

    PubMed

    Goto, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Ippei; Shinzeki, Makoto; Toyama, Hirochika; Asari, Sadaki; Ueta, Azusa; Ishida, Jun; Nanno, Yoshihide; So, Shinichi; Kinoshita, Hisoka; Matsumoto, Taku; Kuramitsu, Kaori; Tanaka, Motofumi; Takebe, Atsushi; Kido, Masahiro; Ajiki, Tetsuo; Fukumoto, Takumi; Ku, Yonson

    2014-11-01

    Here, we report a case of Hassab's operation for left-sided portal hypertension after pancreatoduodenectomy. A 69-year old man underwent pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer in 2006 in which the splenic vein was ligated near the portal vein and then divided. The patient suffered repeated episodes of anemia between 2010 and 2013. However, we could not identify the bleeding site at that time. In 2011, local recurrence was detected. Disease progression occurred despite chemotherapy treatment, which was then discontinued. The left-sided portal hypertension gradually progressed, and the collateral vessels became dilated. In 2014, he was examined in our department for gastrointestinal bleeding. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed bleeding from gastric varices. Gastrointestinal bleeding ceased after endoscopic injection sclerotherapy ( EIS) was performed; however, the bleeding recurred. Balloon retrograde transvenous occlusion (BRTO) could not be performed because blood flow was not detected within the gastro-renal shunt. An emergency surgery was performed. Surgical splenectomy and devascularization (Hassab's operation) were performed. After surgery, the gastric body varices and gastrointestinal anastomosis disappeared and the bleeding did not occur. He is currently receiving outpatient treatment. PMID:25731474

  12. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-01-01

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed. PMID:26730278

  13. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-12-28

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed. PMID:26730278

  14. Effects of portal hypertension on responsiveness of rat mesenteric artery and aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Cawley, T; Geraghty, J; Osborne, H; Docherty, J R

    1995-01-01

    1. We have examined the effects of pre-hepatic portal hypertension on the responsiveness of rat small mesenteric arteries and aorta. Rats were made portal hypertensive by creating a calibrated portal vein stenosis, or sham-operated. 2. In rat mesenteric arteries, there was no significant difference between portal hypertensive and sham-operated animals in the contractile potency of noradrenaline (NA), but the maximum contractile responses to NA, U46619 and KCl were significantly increased in vessels from portal hypertensive animals. This altered maximum contractile response was not due to alterations in smooth muscle mass. 3. In rat mesenteric arteries, there were no significant differences between portal hypertensive and sham-operated animals in endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine (ACh). The difference between portal hypertensive and sham-operated rats in the maximum response to U46619 was maintained following a combination of methylene blue (1 microM) and NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (100 microM), suggesting that any differences in endothelial function do not explain differences in the response to vasoconstrictors. 4. In rat aorta, there were no significant differences between portal hypertensive and sham-operated animals in the contractile response to NA or KCl or in the endothelium-dependent relaxations to ACh. 5. In pithed rats, there was no difference between portal hypertensive and sham-operated animals in the pressor potency of NA. 6. It is concluded that portal hypertension produces an increase in the contractile response to the vasoconstrictors NA, U46619 and KCl in rat mesenteric arteries but not in the aorta. This suggests that the diminished responsiveness to vasoconstrictors reported in portal hypertensive rats in vivo is not due to a diminished responsiveness at the level of the vascular smooth muscle. PMID:7773539

  15. Embolization of percutaneous transhepatic portal venous access tract with N-butyl cyanoacrylate

    PubMed Central

    Park, S Y; Kim, J; Kim, B W; Wang, H J; Kim, S S; Cheong, J Y; Cho, S W

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (N-BCA) embolization of percutaneous transhepatic portal venous access tract and to establish an appropriate technique. Methods: 40 consecutive patients underwent percutaneous transhepatic portal venous intervention for various reasons. Embolization of percutaneous transhepatic portal venous access tract was performed after the procedure in all of the patients using N-BCA and Lipiodol® (Lipiodol Ultra Fluide; Laboratoire Guerbet, Aulnay-sous-Bois, France) mixture. Immediate ultrasonography and fluoroscopy were performed to evaluate perihepatic haematoma formation and unintended embolization of more than one segmental portal vein. Follow-up CT was performed, and haemoglobin and haematocrit levels were checked to evaluate the presence of bleeding. Results: Immediate haemostasis was achieved in all of the patients, without development of perihepatic haematoma or unintended embolization of more than one segmental portal vein. Complete embolization of percutaneous access tract was confirmed in 39 out of 40 patients by CT. Seven patients showed decreased haemoglobin and haematocrit levels. Other complications included mild pain at the site of embolization and mild fever, which resolved after conservative management. 16 patients died during the follow-up period owing to progression of the underlying disease. Conclusion: Embolization of percutaneous transhepatic portal vein access tract with N-BCA is feasible and technically safe. With the appropriate technique, N-BCA can be safely used as an alternate embolic material since it is easy to use and inexpensive compared with other embolic materials. Advances in knowledge: This is the first study to investigate the efficacy of N-BCA for percutaneous transhepatic portal venous access tract embolization. PMID:25027034

  16. Capsule Endoscopy for Portal Hypertensive Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertensive enteropathy (PHE) is a mucosal abnormality of the small bowel that is observed in patients with portal hypertension (PH) and can lead to gastrointestinal bleeding and anemia. The pathogenesis is still not completely understood. The introduction of new endoscopic methods, including capsule endoscopy (CE) or balloon-assisted enteroscopy, has increased the detection of these abnormalities. CE can also serve as a road map for deciding subsequent interventions and evaluating the treatment effect. The prevalence of PHE is reportedly 40–70% in patients with PH. Endoscopic findings can be roughly divided into vascular and nonvascular lesions such as inflammatory-like lesions. Traditionally, PHE-associated factors include large esophageal varices, portal hypertensive gastropathy or colopathy, Child-Turcotte-Pugh class B or C, a history of variceal treatment, and acute gastrointestinal bleeding. More recently, on using scoring systems, a high computed tomography or transient elastography score was reportedly PHE-related factors. However, the prevalence of PHE and its related associated factors remain controversial. The management of PHE has not yet been standardized. It should be individualized according to each patient's situation, the availability of therapy, and each institutional expertise. PMID:26819613

  17. Capsule Endoscopy for Portal Hypertensive Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seong Ran; Kim, Jin-Oh

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertensive enteropathy (PHE) is a mucosal abnormality of the small bowel that is observed in patients with portal hypertension (PH) and can lead to gastrointestinal bleeding and anemia. The pathogenesis is still not completely understood. The introduction of new endoscopic methods, including capsule endoscopy (CE) or balloon-assisted enteroscopy, has increased the detection of these abnormalities. CE can also serve as a road map for deciding subsequent interventions and evaluating the treatment effect. The prevalence of PHE is reportedly 40-70% in patients with PH. Endoscopic findings can be roughly divided into vascular and nonvascular lesions such as inflammatory-like lesions. Traditionally, PHE-associated factors include large esophageal varices, portal hypertensive gastropathy or colopathy, Child-Turcotte-Pugh class B or C, a history of variceal treatment, and acute gastrointestinal bleeding. More recently, on using scoring systems, a high computed tomography or transient elastography score was reportedly PHE-related factors. However, the prevalence of PHE and its related associated factors remain controversial. The management of PHE has not yet been standardized. It should be individualized according to each patient's situation, the availability of therapy, and each institutional expertise. PMID:26819613

  18. Current management of the complications of portal hypertension: variceal bleeding and ascites

    PubMed Central

    Dib, Nina; Oberti, Frédéric; Calès, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Portal hypertension is one of the main consequences of cirrhosis. It results from a combination of increased intrahepatic vascular resistance and increased blood flow through the portal venous system. The condition leads to the formation of portosystemic collateral veins. Esophagogastric varices have the greatest clinical impact, with a risk of bleeding as high as 30% within 2 years of medium or large varices developing. Ascites, another important complication of advanced cirrhosis and severe portal hypertension, is sometimes refractory to treatment and is complicated by spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and hepatorenal syndrome. We describe the pathophysiology of portal hypertension and the current management of its complications, with emphasis on the prophylaxis and treatment of variceal bleeding and ascites. PMID:16682712

  19. Non-cirrhotic portal hypertension in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: a new challenge in antiretroviral therapy era.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Díaz, Hortensia; Mariño Callejo, Ana; García Rodríguez, José Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) has been recently reported as a liver disease in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected patients under antiretroviral therapy (ART). Combination of non-exclusive mechanisms has been described: primary endothelial damage of terminal portal veins induced by HIV or immunologic disorders, mitochondrial toxicity by didanosine and prothrombotic state. It is characterized by heterogeneous liver histological findings, frequently identified as nodular regenerative hyperplasia and clinical manifestations of portal hypertension with well-preserved liver function. We describe herein two HIV-infected patients with clinical picture suggestive of NCPH. Besides the case reports, we briefly address questions to apply to patient care in clinical practice. PMID:21760875

  20. Non-Cirrhotic Portal Hypertension in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients: A New Challenge in Antiretroviral Therapy Era

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez Díaz, Hortensia; Mariño Callejo, Ana; García Rodríguez, José Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) has been recently reported as a liver disease in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected patients under antiretroviral therapy (ART). Combination of non-exclusive mechanisms has been described: primary endothelial damage of terminal portal veins induced by HIV or immunologic disorders, mitochondrial toxicity by didanosine and prothrombotic state. It is characterized by heterogeneous liver histological findings, frequently identified as nodular regenerative hyperplasia and clinical manifestations of portal hypertension with well-preserved liver function. We describe herein two HIV-infected patients with clinical picture suggestive of NCPH. Besides the case reports, we briefly address questions to apply to patient care in clinical practice. PMID:21760875

  1. IDL Grid Web Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massimino, P.; Costa, A.

    2008-08-01

    Image Data Language is a software for data analysis, visualization and cross-platform application development. The potentiality of IDL is well-known in the academic scientific world, especially in the astronomical environment where thousands of procedures are developed by using IDL. The typical use of IDL is the interactive mode but it is also possible to run IDL programs that do not require any interaction with the user, submitting them in batch or background modality. Through the interactive mode the user immediately receives images or other data produced in the running phase of the program; in batch or background mode, the user will have to wait for the end of the program, sometime for many hours or days to obtain images or data that IDL produced as output: in fact in Grid environment it is possible to access to or retrieve data only after completion of the program. The work that we present gives flexibility to IDL procedures submitted to the Grid computer infrastructure. For this purpose we have developed an IDL Grid Web Portal to allow the user to access the Grid and to submit IDL programs granting a full job control and the access to images and data generated during the running phase, without waiting for their completion. We have used the PHP technology and we have given the same level of security that Grid normally offers to its users. In this way, when the user notices that the intermediate program results are not those expected, he can stop the job, change the parameters to better satisfy the computational algorithm and resubmit the program, without consuming the CPU time and other Grid resources. The IDL Grid Web Portal allows you to obtain IDL generated images, graphics and data tables by using a normal browser. All conversations from the user and the Grid resources occur via Web, as well as authentication phases. The IDL user has not to change the program source much because the Portal will automatically introduce the appropriate modification before

  2. Spontaneous Iliac Vein Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Hyung Sub; Lee, Taeseung

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous iliac vein rupture (SIVR) is a rare entity, which usually occurs without a precipitating factor, but can be a life-threatening emergency often requiring an emergency operation. This is a case report of SIVR in a 62-year-old female who presented to the emergency room with left leg swelling. Workup with contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a left leg deep vein thrombosis with May-Thurner syndrome and a hematoma in the pelvic cavity without definite evidence of arterial bleeding. She was managed conservatively without surgical intervention, and also underwent inferior vena cava filter insertion and subsequent anticoagulation therapy for pulmonary thromboembolism. This case shows that SIVR can be successfully managed with close monitoring and conservative management, and anticoagulation may be safely applied despite the patient presenting with venous bleeding. PMID:26217647

  3. 29 CFR 785.24 - Principles noted in Portal-to-Portal Bulletin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Principles noted in Portal-to-Portal Bulletin. 785.24... of Principles Preparatory and Concluding Activities § 785.24 Principles noted in Portal-to-Portal Bulletin. In November, 1947, the Administrator issued the Portal-to-Portal Bulletin (part 790 of...

  4. 29 CFR 785.24 - Principles noted in Portal-to-Portal Bulletin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Principles noted in Portal-to-Portal Bulletin. 785.24... of Principles Preparatory and Concluding Activities § 785.24 Principles noted in Portal-to-Portal Bulletin. In November, 1947, the Administrator issued the Portal-to-Portal Bulletin (part 790 of...

  5. 29 CFR 785.24 - Principles noted in Portal-to-Portal Bulletin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Principles noted in Portal-to-Portal Bulletin. 785.24... of Principles Preparatory and Concluding Activities § 785.24 Principles noted in Portal-to-Portal Bulletin. In November, 1947, the Administrator issued the Portal-to-Portal Bulletin (part 790 of...

  6. 29 CFR 785.24 - Principles noted in Portal-to-Portal Bulletin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Principles noted in Portal-to-Portal Bulletin. 785.24... of Principles Preparatory and Concluding Activities § 785.24 Principles noted in Portal-to-Portal Bulletin. In November, 1947, the Administrator issued the Portal-to-Portal Bulletin (part 790 of...

  7. Iliac Vein Stent Fracture Due to a Migrated Retrievable Vena Cava Filter.

    PubMed

    Yim, Nam Yeol; Kim, Jae Kyu; Kim, Hyoung Ook; Kang, Yang Jun; Jung, Hye Doo

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of iliac vein stent fracture due to hooking by a migrated retrievable inferior vena cava filter in a 55-year-old woman with acute deep venous thrombosis related to May-Thurner syndrome. PMID:26912396

  8. [Portal thrombosis: the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects and clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Giordano, G; Angelelli, G; Margari, A; Mustacchio, N; Scattarella, M; Macarini, L; Cannone, G; Ialongo, P

    1994-05-01

    The authors report their experience, from 1983 to 1992, in the treatment of portal vein thrombosis and discuss various aetiological factor of obstruction also underlining the frequent and important association with portal hypertension. The authors emphasize the crucial role of the modern diagnostic techniques such as endoscopy and imaging radiology (U.S., C.T., angiography). Although these techniques not always allow a conclusive evidence in relation to aetiology, however, it is possible to have a rationale for the treatment, i.e. medical, sclerotherapeutic or surgical. As related to the surgical procedures, the authors--based on their personal experience--believe the best are the non-derivative ones. PMID:7524597

  9. Insulin exerts metabolic and growth-promoting effects by a direct action on the liver in vivo: clarification of the functional significance of the portal vascular link between the beta cells of the pancreatic islets and the liver.

    PubMed Central

    Griffen, S C; Russell, S M; Katz, L S; Nicoll, C S

    1987-01-01

    The functional significance of the portal vascular link between the beta cells of the pancreatic islets and the liver has not been established. Previous studies indicated that insulin does not acutely regulate glucose metabolism by a direct hepatic effect. More recent observations suggest that the role of insulin in regulating body growth may be mediated, at least in part, by the liver. Our experiments were designed to test whether insulin can promote body growth and regulate glucose metabolism by a direct hepatic action in vivo. Rats were made diabetic by injections of streptozotocin, and insulin or solvent was infused into the jugular vein (JV) or the hepatic portal vein (HPV) for 14 days using catheters that were attached to osmotic minipumps. Infusion of a low dose of insulin (2 units per kg per day) into the JV had no effects on the hyperglycemia, body weight gain, tail growth, tibial epiphysial cartilage plate thickness, or serum levels of somatomedin C in the diabetic rats. However, the same dose given into the HPV caused a 30% reduction of blood glucose and stimulated a significant degree of growth, as determined by all indices. Infusion of a higher dose of insulin (5 units per kg per day) into either vein caused full restoration of body weight gain and tail growth and it restored the glycemic status almost to normal. However, it did not increase the tibial epiphysial plate width or serum somatomedin C levels above those of the rats given the low dose of the hormone into the HPV. These results indicate that insulin can act directly on the liver to promote body growth and to regulate glucose metabolism. The significance of direct delivery of insulin from the pancreatic beta cells to the liver may be as much for growth control as for glucose homeostasis. Images PMID:3313390

  10. 8. Detail, skewed portal bracing at west portal, also showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail, skewed portal bracing at west portal, also showing boxed endposts, latticed upper transverse and diagonal sway bracing, laced vertical members, view to northeast, 210mm lens. - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 301.85, Milepost 301.85, Pollard Flat, Shasta County, CA

  11. Acute Liver Allograft Antibody-Mediated Rejection: an inter-institutional study of routine histopathological features

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Jacqueline G.; Shiller, S. Michelle; Bellamy, Christopher; Nalesnik, Michael A.; Kaneku, Hugo; Terasaki, Paul I.; Klintmalm, Göran B.; Demetris, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) occurs in a minority of sensitized liver transplant recipients. Although histopathologic characteristics have been described, a generalizable scoring system used to trigger a more in-depth analysis is needed to screen for this rare but important finding. Toward this goal, we created a training and validation cohort from 3 high volume liver transplant programs of putative acute AMR and control cases that were evaluated blindly by 4 independent transplant pathologists. The evaluations were performed on H&E sections alone without knowledge of serum DSA results nor C4d stains. Characteristics strongly correlated with acute AMR included portal eosinophilia (OR=4.37, p<0.001), portal vein endothelial cell hypertrophy (OR=2.88, p<0.001), and eosinophilic central venulitis (OR=2.48, p=0.003). These and other characteristics were incorporated into models created from the training cohort alone. The final Acute-AMR (aAMR) score exhibited a strong correlation with acute AMR in the training (OR=2.86, p<0.001) and validation cohort (OR=2.49, p<0.001). SPSS tree classification was used to select 2 cutoffs, one that optimized specificity at a score >1.75 (sensitivity = 34%, specificity = 87%) and a second that optimized sensitivity at a score >1.0 (sensitivity = 81%, specificity = 71%). In conclusion, routine histopathological features of the aAMR score can be used to screen for acute AMR on routine H&E in liver transplant biopsies, a diagnosis that requires substantiation by donor-specific HLA alloantibody testing, C4d staining, and exclusion of other insults. PMID:25045154

  12. A case of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension associated with anti-retroviral therapy in a Japanese patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Keishiro; Uehira, Tomoko; Otera, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Yusuke; Watanabe, Dai; Kodama, Yoshinori; Kuzushita, Noriyoshi; Nishida, Yasuharu; Mita, Eiji; Mano, Masayuki; Shirasaka, Takuma

    2014-09-01

    The diagnosis of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH), a rare but potentially life-threatening complication in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals, often occurs only after the emergence of fatal manifestations such as bleeding of esophageal varices. We herein report a female Japanese HIV patient who developed NCPH approximately 4 years after discontinuation of 65 months of didanosine (ddI) administration. The patient presented with severe ascites, bloody bowel discharge, extreme abdominal swelling, and symptoms of portal hypertension but no sign of liver cirrhosis. Examination revealed esophageal varices, oozing-like bleeding from a wide part of the colon, significant atrophy of the right lobe of the liver, and arterio-portal shunting and recanalization from the left medial segment branch of the portal vein to a paraumbilical vein, but no visible obstruction of the main trunk of the portal vein. Treatment for esophageal varices consisted of coagulation therapy with argon plasma after enforcement by endoscopic sclerotherapy and oral administration of β-blockers for elevated portal blood pressure. The patient has not experienced gastrointestinal bleeding in the approximately 5 years since the diagnosis of NCPH. Reviewing this case suggests the importance of suspecting NCPH in HIV patients with liver dysfunction of unknown etiology with a history of ddI and other purine analogs use, as well as the importance of controlling portal hypertension and esophageal varices in the treatment of NCPH. PMID:25034388

  13. NON-INVASIVE PREDICTORS OF PORTAL HYPERTENSION IN PATIENTS WITH HEPATITIS C VIRUS RELATED HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA.

    PubMed

    Mohran, Zakaria; Sakr, Mohamed; Barakat, Eman; Elbaz, Ahmed; Al-Hamid, Mohamed Abd; Abou-Elmaaty, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    The reference standard for portal venous pressure measurement which is clinically important for estimating the. feasibility of resection of hepatocellular carcinoma is the hepatic venous pressure gradient, which is, invasive and expqnsive. The present study evaluated the noninvasive parameters for assessment of portal hypertension in Child A patients with hepatocellular carcinoma on top of hepatitis C virus. A total of 112 patients were subjected to clinical assessment, biochemical assay, ultrasonographic Doppler study, triphasic spiral abdominal computed tomography, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and hepatic venous pressure gradient measurement. According to hepatic venous pressure gradient measurement, they were classified into groups: GI: 58 patients with hepatic venous pressure gradient <10 mmHg and GII: 54 patients with hepatic venous pressure gradient > or = 10 mmHg. Significant variables in univariate analysis were included in a multivariate analysis to establish a model for prediction of clinically significant portal hypertension. Results showed that portal vein diameter > or = 1.3 cm, mono or biphasic pattern of flow in hepatic veins and Giannini index < or = 909 were independent risk factors for the clinically significant portal hypertension as indicated by HVPG > or = 10 mmHg. A model with highest likelihood ratio and good fitness was created. This prediction model was displayed by the receiver operating characteristic curve and under the curve area was 0.969 (0.938-1). PMID:26939231

  14. Of Portals, Policies, and Poets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunt, Rick; Pennock, Lea

    2006-01-01

    Universities are drawn to portals as an effective way of organizing and delivering campus services and information. In a university environment, where the desire for local autonomy and the impetus for centralization are in constant tension, a portal seems especially appealing because it allows local solutions through a shared medium. But the fact…

  15. All Roads Lead to Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heid, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    Portals are taking off on campuses nationwide. According to "Campus Computing 2006," the Campus Computing Project's survey of 540 two- and four-year public and private colleges and universities across the US, portal deployment for four-year public residential universities jumped from 28 to 74 percent of responding institutions between the…

  16. The Power in the Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    Educational portals put together links to sites and resources educators would be interested in viewing. They eliminate the hours of searching that might be invested if typical search engines were used. Educational portals feature lessons, units, printable resources, creative ideas, and more. Many of these sites are free, while others are…

  17. NSTA Portal to Science Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The National Science Teachers Association's (NSTA) Science Safety Advisory Board recently launched the Safety in the Science Classroom portal. This portal serves as a gateway to safety resources for teachers, supervisors, and administrators. It also contains an evolving list of safety resources for elementary, middle, and high schools. The list…

  18. Reversed portal flow: Clinical influence on the long-term outcomes in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Takayuki; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Sekimoto, Tadashi; Shimada, Taro; Takahashi, Masanori; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the natural history and the longitudinal outcomes in cirrhotic patients with non-forward portal flow (NFPF). METHODS: The present retrospective study consisted of 222 cirrhotic patients (120 males and 102 females; age, 61.7 ± 11.1 years). The portal hemodynamics were evaluated at baseline and during the observation period using both pulsed and color Doppler ultrasonography. The diameter (mm), flow direction, mean flow velocity (cm/s), and mean flow volume (mL/min) were assessed at the portal trunk, the splenic vein, the superior mesenteric vein, and the collateral vessels. The average values from 2 to 4 measurements were used for the data analysis. The portal flow direction was defined as follows: forward portal flow (FPF) for continuous hepatopetal flow; bidirectional flow for to-and-fro flow; and reversed flow for continuous hepatofugal flow. The bidirectional flow and the reversed flow were classified as NFPF in this study. The clinical findings and prognosis were compared between the patients with FPF and those with NFPF. The median follow-up period was 40.9 mo (range, 0.3-156.5 mo). RESULTS: Twenty-four patients (10.8%) demonstrated NFPF, accompanied by lower albumin level, worse Child-Pugh scores, and model for end-stage liver disease scores. The portal hemodynamic features in the patients with NFPF were smaller diameter of the portal trunk; presence of short gastric vein, splenorenal shunt, or inferior mesenteric vein; and advanced collateral vessels (diameter > 8.7 mm, flow velocity > 10.2 cm/s, and flow volume > 310 mL/min). The cumulative incidence rates of NFPF were 6.5% at 1 year, 14.5% at 3 years, and 23.1% at 5 years. The collateral vessels characterized by flow velocity > 9.5 cm/s and those located at the splenic hilum were significant predictive factors for developing NFPF. The cumulative survival rate was significantly lower in the patients with NFPF (72.2% at 1 year, 38.5% at 3 years, 38.5% at 5 years) than in those with forward

  19. Bone mesenchymal stem cell transplantation via four routes for the treatment of acute liver failure in rats

    PubMed Central

    SUN, LIHUA; FAN, XIAOTANG; ZHANG, LIJUAN; SHI, GUIXIU; AILI, MAIMAITI; LU, XIAOBO; JIANG, TAO; ZHANG, YUEXIN

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we assessed the efficiency of four BMSC transplantation methods as a therapy for liver failure. A rat model (80 Sprague-Dawley rats) of D-galactosamine (D-gal)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute liver failure (ALF) was established and the rats were divided into 5 groups: a hepatic artery injection group, a portal vein injection group, a vena caudalis injection group, an intraperitoneal injection group and a control group (16 per group). Following transplantation, the liver tissue and blood samples were collected on days 1, 3 and 7, we detected the EdU (5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine)-labeled cells homing to the liver tissue and assessed the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cysteine-containing aspartate-specific protease (caspase)-3 expression in the liver tissue and detected the levels of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in the liver tissues. Compared with the control group, the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and damage to the liver tissue in the hepatic artery group, the portal vein group and the vena caudalis group improved in vivo. The expression of PCNA and HGF in the liver was higher and caspase-3 expression was lower in the hepatic artery injection group, the portal vein injection group and the vena caudalis injection group than that in the intraperitoneal injection and control groups. The EdU-labeled BMSCs were only observed homing to the liver tissue in these three groups. However, no significant differences were observed between these three groups. Liver function in the rats with ALF was improved following BMSC transplantation via 3 endovascular implantation methods (through the hepatic artery, portal vein and vena caudalis). These 3 methods were effective in transplanting BMSCs for the treatment of ALF. However, the selection of blood vessel in the implantation pathway does not affect the transplantation outcome. Transplantation via

  20. Health literacy and patient portals.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yulong; Orr, Martin; Warren, Jim

    2015-06-01

    Health literacy has been described as the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions. Improving health literacy may serve to promote concordance with therapy, engage patients in their own health care, and improve health outcomes. Patient portal technology aims at enabling patients and families to have easy access to key information in their own medical records and to communicate with their health care providers electronically. However, there is a gap in our understanding of how portals will improve patient outcome. The authors believe patient portal technology presents an opportunity to improve patient concordance with prescribed therapy, if adequate support is provided to equip patients (and family/carers) with the knowledge needed to utilise the health information available via the portals. Research is needed to understand what a health consumer will use patient portals for and how to support a user to realise the technology's potential. PMID:26125067

  1. The use of hemospray in portal hypertensive bleeding; a case series.

    PubMed

    Smith, L A; Morris, A J; Stanley, A J

    2014-02-01

    Hemospray is a haemostatic agent licensed for endoscopic haemostasis of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) in Europe and Canada. Hemospray has been shown to be safe and effective in achieving haemostasis in bleeding peptic ulcers in a prospective clinical study and several further case series have described the use of hemospray in other non-variceal causes of gastrointestinal bleeding. Portal hypertensive gastropathy and colopathy are common in patients with portal hypertension. As hemospray is an easy to apply, non-contact method, which can cover large areas of mucosa, it may be of benefit in acute non-variceal portal hypertensive bleeding. We present data from the first four consecutive patients presenting to our institution with acute haemorrhage secondary to non-variceal diffuse portal hypertensive bleeding treated with hemospray. PMID:24140803

  2. Hepatocellular carcinoma with extension to the diaphragm, falciform ligament, rectus abdominis and paraumbilical vein

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, R; Abdullah, BJJ; Rajasingam, V

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary tumour of the liver. The most common extrahepatic metastatic sites are the lung, lymph nodes, bones and adrenal glands. All forms of HCC demonstrate a tendency for vascular invasion, producing extensive intrahepatic metastases and, occasionally, portal vein or inferior vena cava extension with spread into the right atrium in extreme cases. Tumour spread of abdominal diseases via hepatic ligaments has also been previously reported. We report a rare case of hepatocellular carcinoma with extension into the falciform ligament, overlying rectus sheath and adjacent diaphragm with concomitant infiltration into the recanalised paraumbilical vein. PMID:21611019

  3. [Coronary veins and coronary sinus tributary veins in Africans].

    PubMed

    Yangni-Angate, H; Kokoua, A; Kouassi, R; Kassanyou, S; Gnagne, Y; Guessan, G N; Cowppli-Bony, P; Memel, J B

    1995-01-01

    This anatomical study carried out on 40 African adults hearts studied branches of the coronary sinus. By using of injection of the coronary arteries and corrosion of the myocardium, the study identified certain peculiarities of the small coronary vein and the posterior descending interventricular vein in Africans. PMID:8519704

  4. Complications of cerebral vein and sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ferro, José M; Canhâo, P

    2008-01-01

    Thrombosis of the dural sinus and encephalic veins (CVT) is an infrequent condition accounting for less than 1% of all strokes. Several recent prospective series, in particular the large International Study on Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus Thrombosis cohort, definitely have shown a more benign prognosis compared with that of arterial strokes: CVT has an acute case fatality of less than 5%, and almost 80% of patients recover without sequelae. However, patients surviving the acute phase of CVT are at risk of a number of complications such as recurrence of any thrombotic events in about 7%, recurrence of CVT in about 2-12%, seizures in 5 to 32%, visual loss due to optic atrophy in percentages that range from less than 1 to 5%, presence of dural fistula (there are no data available about exact frequency) and neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric sequelae characterized by aphasia, abulia and depression. However, there is only little information on the long-term neuropsychological outcome. Studies investigating professional status, cognitive performance, depressive symptoms and quality of life evidenced depression and anxiety in 2/3 of CVT patients despite an apparent good recovery in 87% of these patients. Thus, patients should be encouraged to return to previous occupations and hobbies and reassured about the very low risk of recurrence. PMID:18004061

  5. Activation of portal-hepatic osmoreceptors in rats: role of calcium, acetylcholine and cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Stoppini, L; Baertschi, A J

    1984-11-01

    Osmoreceptors are sensory organs of paramount importance in water and electrolyte balance, yet the mechanisms for their activation are virtually unknown. Peripheral osmoreceptors have been localised in the hepatic portal vein area of rats. We thus superfused the portal adventitia with 0.2 ml of 4% NaCl before and after various pharmacological pretreatments (0.4 ml of 1 mM solutions) of the portal area, while monitoring the neural activity of the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system. Portal superfusion with verapamil, to reduce Ca-influx, reversibly inhibited the response to osmotic stimuli by up to 50% (P less than 0.0005). Such inhibition (58%; P less than 0.0005) was also seen with portal superfusion by atropine. Atropine did not affect hypothalamo-neurohypophysial responses to stimulation of portal bradykinin receptors with 0.2 ml 1 muM bradykinin, and portal superfusion with acetylcholine activated the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system. The results thus support the hypothesis of a cholinergic neurotransmission linking portal osmoreceptive structures and afferent nerve endings. Diamide, which inhibits water efflux in frog skin, also reversibly inhibited responses to osmotic stimuli by 38% (P less than 0.0005). Pretreatments with trifluoperazine, a calmodulin inhibitor, and cordycepin, an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, diminished responses to osmotic stimuli by 30-45% (P less than 0.005), while cAMP and theophilline potentiated them by 38% (P less than 0.0005). Responses to bradykinin superfusion were reduced 20-30% (P less than 0.05) by both cordycepin and cAMP. The results suggest that portal osmoreceptors release acetylcholine to excite afferent nerves when exposed to an osmotic gradient. The mechanism of this release may be mediated by an efflux of water and an increase of intracellular calcium activity and cAMP. PMID:6150955

  6. Isolated Facial Vein Thrombophlebitis: A Variant of Lemierre Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karnov, Kirstine K.S.; Lilja-Fischer, Jacob; Randrup, Thomas Skov

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre syndrome is a rare complication of acute tonsillitis. It is caused by the anaerobic bacterium Fusobacterium necrophorum and is characterized by bacteremia and septic thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Dissemination of septic emboli may occur. The diagnosis can be difficult since different organs can be involved. We discuss a case of Lemierre syndrome in a 35-year-old woman with isolated thrombophlebitis of the facial vein and fusobacteria growth in blood culture. This case emphasizes the need for awareness of the condition. PMID:25734123

  7. The Portuguese Climate Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Sandra; Deus, Ricardo; Nogueira, Miguel; Viterbo, Pedro; Miranda, Miguel; Antunes, Sílvia; Silva, Alvaro; Miranda, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    The Portuguese Local Warming Website (http://portaldoclima.pt) has been developed in order to support the society in Portugal in preparing for the adaptation to the ongoing and future effects of climate change. The climate portal provides systematic and easy access to authoritative scientific data ready to be used by a vast and diverse user community from different public and private sectors, key players and decision makers, but also to high school students, contributing to the increase in knowledge and awareness on climate change topics. A comprehensive set of regional climate variables and indicators are computed, explained and graphically presented. Variables and indicators were built in agreement with identified needs after consultation of the relevant social partners from different sectors, including agriculture, water resources, health, environment and energy and also in direct cooperation with the Portuguese National Strategy for Climate Change Adaptation (ENAAC) group. The visual interface allows the user to dynamically interact, explore, quickly analyze and compare, but also to download and import the data and graphics. The climate variables and indicators are computed from state-of-the-art regional climate model (RCM) simulations (e.g., CORDEX project), at high space-temporal detail, allowing to push the limits of the projections down to local administrative regions (NUTS3) and monthly or seasonal periods, promoting local adaptation strategies. The portal provides both historical data (observed and modelled for the 1971-2000 period) and future climate projections for different scenarios (modelled for the 2011-2100 period). A large effort was undertaken in order to quantify the impacts of the risk of extreme events, such as heavy rain and flooding, droughts, heat and cold waves, and fires. Furthermore the different climate scenarios and the ensemble of RCM models, with high temporal (daily) and spatial (~11km) detail, is taken advantage in order to

  8. The parallel virtual file system for portals.

    SciTech Connect

    Schutt, James Alan

    2004-04-01

    This report presents the result of an effort to re-implement the Parallel Virtual File System (PVFS) using Portals as the transport. This report provides short overviews of PVFS and Portals, and describes the design and implementation of PVFS over Portals. Finally, the results of performance testing of both stock PVFS and PVFS over Portals are presented.

  9. 29 CFR 785.34 - Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. 785.34 Section 785.34 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... of Principles Traveltime § 785.34 Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. The Portal...

  10. 29 CFR 785.34 - Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. 785.34 Section 785.34 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... of Principles Traveltime § 785.34 Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. The Portal...

  11. 29 CFR 785.34 - Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. 785.34 Section 785.34 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... of Principles Traveltime § 785.34 Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. The Portal...

  12. Infrared imaging of varicose veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordmans, Herke Jan; de Zeeuw, Raymond; Verdaasdonk, Ruud M.; Wittens, Cees H. A.

    2004-06-01

    It has been established that varicose veins are better visualized with infrared photography. As near-infrared films are nowadays hard to get and to develop in the digital world, we investigated the use of digital photography of varicose veins. Topics that are discussed are illumination setup, photography and digital image enhancement and analysis.

  13. The NUCLEONICA Nuclear Science Portal

    SciTech Connect

    Magill, Joseph; Dreher, Raymond

    2009-08-19

    NUCLEONICA (www.nucleonica.net) is a new nuclear science web portal which provides a customisable, integrated environment and collaboration platform using the latest internet 'Web 2.0' technology. NUCLEONICA is aimed at professionals, academics and students working in nuclear power, health physics and radiation protection, nuclear and radio-chemistry, and astrophysics. A unique feature of the portal is the wide range of user friendly web-based nuclear science applications. The portal is also ideal for education and training purposes and as a knowledge management platform to preserve nuclear knowledge built up over many decades.

  14. Association of Oesophageal Varices and Splanchnic Vein Thromboses in Patients with JAK2-Positive Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Presentation of Two Cases and Data from a Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Link, Cornelia S.; Platzbecker, Uwe; Kroschinsky, Frank; Pannach, Sven; Thiede, Christian; Platzek, Ivan; Ehninger, Gerhard; Schuler, Markus K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oesophageal varices and gastrointestinal bleeding are common complications of liver cirrhosis. More rarely, oesophageal varices occur in patients with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension that results from thromboses of portal or splanchnic veins. Case Report We describe 2 young men who initially presented with varices as a result of portal vein thromboses. In the clinical follow-up, both were tested positive for a JAK2 mutation and consequently diagnosed with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). In an attempt to characterise the frequency of gastrointestinal complications in patients with JAK2-positive MPNs, we retrospectively analysed all known affected patients from our clinic for the diagnosis of portal vein thromboses and oesophageal varices. Strikingly, 48% of those who had received an oesophagogastroduodenoscopy had detectable oesophageal or gastric varices, and 82% of those suffered from portal or splanchnic vein thromboses. Conclusion While the association between JAK2, myeloproliferative disease and thrombotic events is well established, patients with idiopathic oesophageal varices are not regularly tested for JAK2 mutations. However, the occurrence of oesophageal varices may be the first presenting symptom of a MPN with a JAK2 mutation, and affected patients may profit from a close haematological monitoring to assure the early detection of developing MPN. PMID:23898274

  15. The economics of vein disease.

    PubMed

    Sales, Clifford M; Podnos, Joan; Levison, Jonathan

    2007-09-01

    The management of cosmetic vein problems requires a very different approach than that for the majority of most other vascular disorders that occur in a vascular surgery practice. This article focuses on the business aspects of a cosmetic vein practice, with particular attention to the uniqueness of these issues. Managing patient expectations is critical to the success of a cosmetic vein practice. Maneuvering within the insurance can be difficult and frustrating for both the patient and the practice. Practices should use cost accounting principles to evaluate the success of their vein work. Vein surgery--especially if performed within the office--can undergo an accurate break-even analysis to determine its profitability. PMID:17911565

  16. The Management of Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fan; Zhang, Shiyi; Sun, Yan; Ren, Shiyan; Liu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to review the current management modalities for varicose veins. There are a variety of management modalities for varicose veins. The outcomes of the treatment of varicose veins are different. The papers on the management of varicose veins were reviewed and the postoperative complications and efficacy were compared. Foam sclerotherapy and radiofrequency ablation were associated with less pain and faster recovery than endovenous laser ablation and surgical stripping. Patients undergoing endovenous laser ablation and radiofrequency ablation are most likely to have a faster recovery time and earlier return to work in comparison with those undergoing conventional high ligation and stripping. A randomized controlled study in multiple centers is warranted to verify which approach is better than others for the treatment of varicose veins. PMID:25594661

  17. Percutaneous Retrograde Sclerotherapy for Refractory Bleeding of Jejunal Varices: Direct Injection via Superficial Epigastric Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Manabu Nakata, Waka; Isoda, Norio Yoshizawa, Mitsuyo; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2012-02-15

    Small-bowel varices are rare and almost always occur in cases with portal hypertension. We encountered a patient with bleeding jejunal varices due to liver cirrhosis. Percutaneous retrograde sclerotherapy was performed via the superficial epigastric vein. Melena disappeared immediately after treatment. Disappearance of jejunal varices was confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. After 24 months of follow-up, no recurrent melena was observed.

  18. Sagittal vein thrombosis caused by central vein catheter.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Karim, Hosein; Heydar Pour, Behzad; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis, including thrombosis of cerebral veins and major dural sinuses, is an uncommon disorder in the general population. However, it has a higher frequency among patients younger than 40 years of age, patients with thrombophilia, pregnant patients or those receiving hormonal contraceptive therapy or has foreign body such as catheter in their veins or arterial system. In this case report, we described clinical and radiological findings in a patient with protein C-S deficiency and malposition of central vein catheter. PMID:25796028

  19. Hidden Magnetic Portals Around Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    A NASA-sponsored researcher at the University of Iowa has developed a way for spacecraft to hunt down hidden magnetic portals in the vicinity of Earth. These gateways link the magnetic field of our...

  20. Vein Graft-Coated Vascular Stents: A Feasibility Study in a Canine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Schellhammer, Frank; Haberstroh, Joerg; Wakhloo, Ajay K.; Gottschalk, Eva; Schumacher, Martin

    1998-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate different vein grafts for luminal coating of endovascular stents in normal canine arteries. Methods: Twenty-four tantalum Strecker stents were coated with either autologous (n= 10), denatured heterologous (n= 11), or denatured homologous vein grafts (n= 3). The carotid artery (n= 11) and the iliac artery (n= 13) were stented using a transfemoral approach. Angiograms were performed at days 0, 7, and 21, and months 3, 6, and 9. All grafts underwent histological examination. Results: Eight of 10 autologous vein grafts showed patency during the whole observation period of 9 months, without histological signs of inflammation. Denatured heterologous vein grafts revealed acute (n= 3), subacute (n= 5), or delayed (n= 3) vessel occlusion. Hyaloid transformation of the vein graft and lympho-plasmacellular formations were seen. Denatured homologous vein grafts showed acute vessel occlusion. Although significant inflammatory tissue response was seen, no host-versus-graft reaction was present. Conclusion: Autologous vein graft-coated stents showed good biocompatibility in canine arteries. Preparation was cumbersome and required surgical venae-sectio. Denatured vein grafts, however, were limited by inflammatory reactions.