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Sample records for acute portal vein

  1. Chylous ascites caused by acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Eun; Chae, Kwon Mook

    2011-12-01

    Chylous ascites is defined as the accumulation of chyle in the peritoneum due to obstruction or rupture of the peritoneal or retroperitoneal lymphatic glands. Chylous ascites that arises from acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis is very rare. We report here on a case of chylous ascite that was caused by acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis, in which the patient showed an impressive response to conservative therapy with total parenteral nutrition and octerotide. We also review the relevant literature about chylous ascites with particular reference to the management of this rare disease.

  2. Chylous ascites caused by acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Eun

    2011-01-01

    Chylous ascites is defined as the accumulation of chyle in the peritoneum due to obstruction or rupture of the peritoneal or retroperitoneal lymphatic glands. Chylous ascites that arises from acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis is very rare. We report here on a case of chylous ascite that was caused by acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis, in which the patient showed an impressive response to conservative therapy with total parenteral nutrition and octerotide. We also review the relevant literature about chylous ascites with particular reference to the management of this rare disease. PMID:22319743

  3. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mallet, Thierry; Soltys, Remigiusz; Loarte, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is the blockage or narrowing of the portal vein by a thrombus. It is relatively rare and has been linked with the presence of an underlying liver disease or prothrombotic disorders. We present a case of a young male who presented with vague abdominal symptoms for approximately one week. Imaging revealed the presence of multiple nonocclusive thrombi involving the right portal vein, the splenic vein, and the left renal vein, as well as complete occlusion of the left portal vein and the superior mesenteric vein. We discuss pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of both acute and chronic thrombosis. The presence of PVT should be considered as a clue for prothrombotic disorders, liver disease, and other local and general factors that must be carefully investigated. It is hoped that this case report will help increase awareness of the complexity associated with portal vein thrombosis among the medical community. PMID:25802795

  4. Gas in Hepatic Portal Veins with Gastric Massive Dilatation and Pneumatosis in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mushtaq, Nadeem; Pateria, Vibhor; Ahmad, Imtiyaz; Kulshreshtha, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Gas in portal veins is a rare phenomenon observed secondary to bowel ischaemia and necrosis. A young girl with history of pica ingestion presented with acute abdomen with huge distension. Investigation revealed air in hepatic portal veins, air within stomach wall, and massive distension of stomach secondary to acute pancreatitis. Successful conservative treatment confirmed the current concept that all cases of hepatic portal venous gas do not warrant immediate surgical intervention. PMID:26557565

  5. Portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Yogesh K; Bodh, Vijay

    2015-03-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of portal hypertension. PVT occurs in association with cirrhosis or as a result of malignant invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma or even in the absence of associated liver disease. With the current research into its genesis, majority now have an underlying prothrombotic state detectable. Endothelial activation and stagnant portal blood flow also contribute to formation of the thrombus. Acute non-cirrhotic PVT, chronic PVT (EHPVO), and portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis are the three main variants of portal vein thrombosis with varying etiological factors and variability in presentation and management. Procoagulant state should be actively investigated. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy for acute non-cirrhotic PVT, with supporting evidence for its use in cirrhotic population as well. Chronic PVT (EHPVO) on the other hand requires the management of portal hypertension as such and with role for anticoagulation in the setting of underlying prothrombotic state, however data is awaited in those with no underlying prothrombotic states. TIPS and liver transplant may be feasible even in the setting of PVT however proper selection of candidates and type of surgery is warranted. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy have some role. TARE is a new modality for management of HCC with portal vein invasion.

  6. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Yogesh K.; Bodh, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of portal hypertension. PVT occurs in association with cirrhosis or as a result of malignant invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma or even in the absence of associated liver disease. With the current research into its genesis, majority now have an underlying prothrombotic state detectable. Endothelial activation and stagnant portal blood flow also contribute to formation of the thrombus. Acute non-cirrhotic PVT, chronic PVT (EHPVO), and portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis are the three main variants of portal vein thrombosis with varying etiological factors and variability in presentation and management. Procoagulant state should be actively investigated. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy for acute non-cirrhotic PVT, with supporting evidence for its use in cirrhotic population as well. Chronic PVT (EHPVO) on the other hand requires the management of portal hypertension as such and with role for anticoagulation in the setting of underlying prothrombotic state, however data is awaited in those with no underlying prothrombotic states. TIPS and liver transplant may be feasible even in the setting of PVT however proper selection of candidates and type of surgery is warranted. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy have some role. TARE is a new modality for management of HCC with portal vein invasion. PMID:25941431

  7. Endovascular Treatment of Acute Portal Vein Thrombosis After Liver Transplantation in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar Borges, Marcus Vinicius; Moreira, Airton Mota; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Maksoud, Joao Gilberto

    2006-06-15

    Although operative techniques in hepatic transplantation have reduced the time and mortality on waiting lists, the rate of vascular complications associated with these techniques has increased. Stenosis or thrombosis of the portal vein is an infrequent complication, and if present, surgical treatment is considered the traditional management. This article describes a case of acute portal vein thrombosis after liver transplantation from a living donor to a child managed by percutaneous techniques.

  8. Extrahepatic Portal Vein Obstruction and Portal Vein Thrombosis in Special Situations: Need for a New Classification

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Zeeshan A.; Bhat, Riyaz A.; Bhadoria, Ajeet S.; Maiwall, Rakhi

    2015-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction is a vascular disorder of liver, which results in obstruction and cavernomatous transformation of portal vein with or without the involvement of intrahepatic portal vein, splenic vein, or superior mesenteric vein. Portal vein obstruction due to chronic liver disease, neoplasm, or postsurgery is a separate entity and is not the same as extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. Patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction are generally young and belong mostly to Asian countries. It is therefore very important to define portal vein thrombosis as acute or chronic from management point of view. Portal vein thrombosis in certain situations such as liver transplant and postsurgical/liver transplant period is an evolving area and needs extensive research. There is a need for a new classification, which includes all areas of the entity. In the current review, the most recent literature of extrahepatic portal vein obstruction is reviewed and summarized. PMID:26021771

  9. Interventional treatment for symptomatic acute-subacute portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng-Yong; Wang, Mao-Qiang; Fan, Qing-Sheng; Duan, Feng; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Song, Peng

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To summarize our methods and experience with interventional treatment for symptomatic acute-subacute portal vein and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (PV-SMV) thrombosis. METHODS: Forty-six patients (30 males, 16 females, aged 17-68 years) with symptomatic acute-subacute portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis were accurately diagnosed with Doppler ultrasound scans, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. They were treated with interventional therapy, including direct thrombolysis (26 cases through a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt; 6 through percutaneous transhepatic portal vein cannulation) and indirect thrombolysis (10 through the femoral artery to superior mesenteric artery catheterization; 4 through the radial artery to superior mesenteric artery catheterization). RESULTS: The blood reperfusion of PV-SMV was achieved completely or partially in 34 patients 3-13 d after thrombolysis. In 11 patients there was no PV-SMV blood reperfusion but the number of collateral vessels increased significantly. Symptoms in these 45 patients were improved dramatically without severe operational complications. In 1 patient, the thrombi did not respond to the interventional treatment and resulted in intestinal necrosis, which required surgical treatment. In 3 patients with interventional treatment, thrombi re-formed 1, 3 and 4 mo after treatment. In these 3 patients, indirect PV-SMV thrombolysis was performed again and was successful. CONCLUSION: Interventional treatment, including direct or indirect PV-SMV thrombolysis, is a safe and effective method for patients with symptomatic acute-subacute PV-SMV thrombosis. PMID:19859995

  10. Prepancreatic preduodenal portal vein.

    PubMed

    Lal, N S; Kuruvila, A P; Natesh, P B; Koshy, M M; Anandakumar, M

    1992-10-01

    We report a 17 year old girl with prepancreatic and preduodenal portal vein. She presented with recurrent vomiting. Barium study revealed malrotation of the gut. Laparotomy confirmed malrotation of the gut with a prepancreatic and preduodenal portal vein. The patient is asymptomatic after gastrojejunostomy and vagotomy.

  11. Heterotopic Auxiliary Rat Liver Transplantation With Flow-regulated Portal Vein Arterialization in Acute Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Schleimer, Karina; Kalder, Johannes; Grommes, Jochen; Jalaie, Houman; Tawadros, Samir; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael; Kokozidou, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In acute hepatic failure auxiliary liver transplantation is an interesting alternative approach. The aim is to provide a temporary support until the failing native liver has regenerated.1-3 The APOLT-method, the orthotopic implantation of auxiliary segments- averts most of the technical problems. However this method necessitates extensive resections of both the native liver and the graft.4 In 1998, Erhard developed the heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation (HALT) utilizing portal vein arterialization (PVA) (Figure 1). This technique showed promising initial clinical results.5-6 We developed a HALT-technique with flow-regulated PVA in the rat to examine the influence of flow-regulated PVA on graft morphology and function (Figure 2). A liver graft reduced to 30 % of its original size, was heterotopically implanted in the right renal region of the recipient after explantation of the right kidney.  The infra-hepatic caval vein of the graft was anastomosed with the infrahepatic caval vein of the recipient. The arterialization of the donor’s portal vein was carried out via the recipient’s right renal artery with the stent technique. The blood-flow regulation of the arterialized portal vein was achieved with the use of a stent with an internal diameter of 0.3 mm. The celiac trunk of the graft was end-to-side anastomosed with the recipient’s aorta and the bile duct was implanted into the duodenum. A subtotal resection of the native liver was performed to induce acute hepatic failure. 7 In this manner 112 transplantations were performed. The perioperative survival rate was 90% and the 6-week survival rate was 80%. Six weeks after operation, the native liver regenerated, showing an increase in weight from 2.3±0.8 g to 9.8±1 g. At this time, the graft’s weight decreased from 3.3±0.8 g to 2.3±0.8 g. We were able to obtain promising long-term results in terms of graft morphology and function. HALT with flow-regulated PVA reliably bridges acute hepatic failure

  12. Mortality after portal vein embolization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eung Chang; Park, Sang-Jae; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Hyeong Min; Lee, Seung Duk; Kim, Seong Hoon; Lee, In Joon; Kim, Hyun Beom

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Portal vein embolization (PVE) is increasingly performed worldwide to reduce the possibility of liver failure after extended hepatectomy, by inducing future liver remnant (FLR) hypertrophy and atrophy of the liver planned for resection. The procedure is known to be very safe and to have few procedure-related complications. In this study, we described 2 elderly patients with Bismuth–Corlette type IV Klatskin tumor who underwent right trisectional PVE involving the embolization of the right portal vein, the left medial sectional portal branch, and caudate portal vein. Within 1 week after PVE, patients went into sepsis combined with bile leak and died within 1 month. Sepsis can cause acute liver failure in patients with chronic liver disease. In this study, the common patient characteristics other than sepsis, that is, trisectional PVE; chronic alcoholism; aged >65 years; heart-related comorbidity; and elevated serum total bilirubin (TB) level (7.0 mg/dL) at the time of the PVE procedure in 1 patient, and concurrent biliary procedure, that is, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage in the other patient might have affected the outcomes of PVE. These cases highlight that PVE is not a safe procedure. Care should be taken to minimize the occurrence of infectious events because sepsis following PVE can cause acute liver failure. Additionally, prior to performing PVE, the extent of PVE, chronic alcohol consumption, age, comorbidity, long-lasting jaundice, concurrent biliary procedure, etc. should be considered for patient safety. PMID:28178122

  13. Partial Portal Vein Arterialization Attenuates Acute Bile Duct Injury Induced by Hepatic Dearterialization in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jishu; Wu, Junli; Gao, Wentao; Li, Qiang; Jiang, Kuirong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic infarcts or abscesses occur after hepatic artery interruption. We explored the mechanisms of hepatic deprivation-induced acute liver injury and determine whether partial portal vein arterialization attenuated this injury in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either complete hepatic arterial deprivation or partial portal vein arterialization, or both. Hepatic ischemia was evaluated using biochemical analysis, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Hepatic ATP levels, the expression of hypoxia- and inflammation-associated genes and proteins, and the expression of bile transporter genes were assessed. Complete dearterialization of the liver induced acute liver injury, as evidenced by the histological changes, significantly increased serum biochemical markers, decreased ATP content, increased expression of hypoxia- and inflammation-associated genes and proteins, and decreased expression of bile transporter genes. These detrimental changes were extenuated but not fully reversed by partial portal vein arterialization, which also attenuated ductular reaction and fibrosis in completely dearterialized rat livers. Collectively, complete hepatic deprivation causes severe liver injury, including bile infarcts and biloma formation. Partial portal vein arterialization seems to protect against acute ischemia-hypoxia-induced liver injury. PMID:27872855

  14. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt, Mechanical Aspiration Thrombectomy, and Direct Thrombolysis in the Treatment of Acute Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Bovio, Giulio; Dahamane, M'Hamed; Centanaro, Monica

    2007-09-15

    A patient was admitted because of severe abdominal pain, anorexia, and intestinal bleeding. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography demonstrated acute portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (PSMVT). The patient was treated percutaneously with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS), mechanical aspiration thrombectomy, and direct thrombolysis, and 1 week after the procedure, complete patency of the portal and superior mesenteric veins was demonstrated. TIPS, mechanical aspiration thrombectomy, and direct thrombolysis together are promising endovascular techniques for the treatment of symptomatic acute PSMVT.

  15. Portal Vein Stenting for Portal Biliopathy with Jaundice.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Dongho; Park, Kwang Bo; Lim, Seong Joo; Hwang, Jin Ho; Sinn, Dong Hyun

    2016-04-01

    Portal biliopathy refers to obstruction of the bile duct by dilated peri- or para-ductal collateral channels following the main portal vein occlusion from various causes. Surgical shunt operation or endoscopic treatment has been reported. Herein, we report a case of portal biliopathy that was successfully treated by interventional portal vein recanalization.

  16. Preduodenal portal vein: surgery and radiographic appearance.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, E T; Burton, E M; Hixson, S D; Hollabaugh, R S

    1990-12-01

    Preduodenal portal vein is rare, with 63 cases reported in the literature. In general, this anomaly occurs in children with associated small bowel obstruction. We report a newborn infant who presented with duodenal stenosis, mongolism, and preduodenal portal vein. Treatment consisted of a duodenoduodenal anastomosis without mobilizing the portal vein. The correlation between imaging techniques and the operative findings is discussed. Because identification of preduodenal portal vein at surgery is important, preoperative sonography may be useful in selected cases to define the position of the vein.

  17. Preduodenal portal vein: its surgical significance.

    PubMed

    Makey, D A; Bowen, J C

    1978-11-01

    Preduodenal portal vein is a rare anatomical variant which may be one of many anomalies in the neonate with duodenal "atresia." Preduodenal portal vein also may be an occasional finding in an adult undergoing biliary, gastric, or pancreatic surgery. Awareness and recognition of the anomaly are essential for the avoidance of injury during such operations. We report here a symptomless patient whose preduodenal portal vein was discovered at cholecystectomy.

  18. [Preduodenal portal vein (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tovar, J A; Benavent, M; Bachiller, C; Díez-Pardo, J A

    1978-01-01

    Three cases of preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) observed in newborns and young infants are reported. In two patients the diagnosis was made during operations for duodenal stenosis and in the remaining one while operating for midgut volvulus and necrosis. In no case was the PDPV responsible for the clinical picture but in all three patients it was accompanied by other causes of obstruction: annular pancreas, extrinsic adhesive bands and malrotation. In one case there was also an asplenia, and polisplenia was present in another one. Both had malrotation and some degree of abnormal visceral asimmetry. The incidence of associated malformations in 52 previously reported cases is analyzed, and the more convincing embriological explanation for this anomaly is commented upon.

  19. Cholestasis in children with portal vein obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Franchi, Stéphanie; Gauthier, Frédéric; Fabre, Monique; Pariente, Danièle; Bernard, Olivier

    2005-04-01

    We describe cholestasis as a result of bile duct abnormalities in 8 children with portal vein obstruction. In a clinical, biochemical and radiological investigation of 121 children with cavernous transformation of the portal vein seen between 1986 and 2000, 8 presented with jaundice, pruritus, and/or raised serum aminotransferases and/or gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma GT) activities. Each displayed dilation and narrowing of intra- and/or extrahepatic bile ducts. Surgical decompression of the portal system (portal-systemic or Rex anastomosis) resulted in the regression of the signs of cholestasis in all children. We conclude that children with portal vein obstruction may exhibit clinically significant cholestasis as a result of external compression of the bile duct by the cavernoma.

  20. Portal vein aneurysm: What to know.

    PubMed

    Laurenzi, Andrea; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria; Lionetti, Raffaella; Meniconi, Roberto Luca; Colasanti, Marco; Vennarecci, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Portal vein aneurysm is an unusual vascular dilatation of the portal vein, which was first described by Barzilai and Kleckner in 1956 and since then less than 200 cases have been reported. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the international literature to better clarify various aspects of this rare nosological entity and provide clear evidence-based summary, when available, of the clinical and surgical management. A systematic literature search of the Pubmed database was performed for all articles related to portal vein aneurysm. All articles published from 1956 to 2014 were examined for a total of 96 reports, including 190 patients. Portal vein aneurysm is defined as a portal vein diameter exceeding 1.9 cm in cirrhotic patients and 1.5 cm in normal livers. It can be congenital or acquired and portal hypertension represents the main cause of the acquired version. Surgical indication is considered in case of rupture, thrombosis or symptomatic aneurysms. Aneurysmectomy and aneurysmorrhaphy are considered in patients with normal liver, while shunt procedures or liver transplantation are the treatment of choice in case of portal hypertension. Being such a rare vascular entity its management should be reserved to high-volume tertiary hepato-biliary centres.

  1. Preduodenal portal vein in the adult.

    PubMed

    Papaziogas, T; Papaziogas, B; Paraskevas, G; Lazaridis, C; Patsas, A

    2000-09-01

    We present three cases of preduodenal portal vein in adult people, which were diagnosed in our department. All of them were identified during elective operation for cholelithiasis, caused some technical difficulties to the performance of the operation, but led to no major intraoperative or postoperative complications. None of them had any preoperative symptoms, which could be related to this anomaly. The preduodenal portal vein is a rare congenital anomaly, which is usually discovered in infants or children due to the obstruction of the duodenum. In adults, it is often asymptomatic, and is usually discovered as an accidental finding during laparotomy for other reason. The postcontrast CT can set the diagnosis, when this anomaly is suspected. Despite its rarity, this anomaly is of great surgical importance, because it can predispose to intraoperative complications including hemorrhage from the abnormal vein, or damage to the biliary tract or the distented duodenum. The anterior position of the portal vein results from the persistence of the ventral anastomosis between the two vitelline veins and the distal portion of the right vitelline vein, with subsequent atrophy of the cranial part of the left vitelline and dorsal anastomotic vein.

  2. Preduodenal portal vein in an adult--angiography and CT.

    PubMed

    Sasai, K; Sano, A; Nishizawa, S; Imanaka, K; Kuroda, Y

    1985-01-01

    We report on an adult case of preduodenal portal vein illustrated by computed tomography (CT) and angiography. These diagnostic modalities were initially performed to evaluate a coexisting pancreatic cancer. Contrast-enhanced CT demonstrated unusual positioning of the portal vein ventral to the duodenum. The superior mesenteric-portal vein, which was L-shaped and convexly caudad, strongly suggested this anomalous condition.

  3. Duodenal web with preduodenal portal vein.

    PubMed

    Golombek, S; Bilgi, J; Ukabiala, O

    1995-06-01

    This article described an unusual case of an infant with duodenal atresia and preduodenal portal vein without Down's syndrome or other anatomical anomalies associated with this condition. Duodenoduodenostomy was effective. Enteral feeding was re-established 72 hours post-operatively and the patient was discharged home one day later.

  4. Successful Portal Vein Stent Placement in a Child with Cavernomatous Replacement of the Portal Vein After Partial Liver Transplantation: The Importance of a Recognizable Portal Vein Remnant.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, Roberto; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Caruso, Settimo; Ricotta, Calogero; Riva, Silvia; Burgio, Gaetano; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo

    2015-12-01

    Late portal vein thrombosis with cavernomatous replacement has been reported in 4.5% of pediatric patients who have undergone partial liver transplantation. In such cases, minimally invasive radiological treatments have a high failure rate. We report a successful case of percutaneous recanalization of the portal vein remnant, and subsequent stent placement, in a pediatric patient who underwent left lateral split liver transplantation with cavernomatous replacement of the portal vein.

  5. Percutaneous Transumbilical Portal Vein Embolization in a Patient with a Ruptured Hepatocellular Carcinoma Supplied by the Portal Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soo Chin; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Chung, Jin Wook; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2011-02-15

    We describe a case of a ruptured hepatocellular carcinoma supplied by the portal vein that was successfully treated with portal vein embolization via a percutaneous transumbilical approach. A contrast material-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scan showed the presence of a large hypervascular tumor on portal venous phase as well as right hepatic vein thrombosis and hemoperitoneum that prevented portal vein embolization by the use of the percutaneous and transjugular transhepatic approach. The use of percutaneous transumbilical portal vein embolization can be an alternative option in this situation.

  6. Transradial Approach for Transcatheter Selective Superior Mesenteric Artery Urokinase Infusion Therapy in Patients with Acute Extensive Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Maoqiang Guo Liping; Lin Hanying; Liu Fengyong; Duan Feng; Wang Zhijun

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of transradial approach for transcatheter superior mesenteric artery (SMA) urokinase infusion therapy in patients with acute extensive portal and superior mesenteric venous thrombosis. During a period of 7 years, 16 patients with acute extensive thrombosis of the portal (PV) and superior mesenteric veins (SMV) were treated by transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy by way of the radial artery. The mean age of the patients was 39.5 years. Through the radial sheath, a 5F Cobra catheter was inserted into the SMA, and continuous infusion of urokinase was performed for 5-11 days (7.1 {+-} 2.5 days). Adequate anticoagulation was given during treatment, throughout hospitalization, and after discharge. Technical success was achieved in all 16 patients. Substantial clinical improvement was seen in these 16 patients after the procedure. Minor complications at the radial puncture site were observed in 5 patients, but trans-SMA infusion therapy was not interrupted. Follow-up computed tomography scan before discharge demonstrated nearly complete disappearance of PV-SMV thrombosis in 9 patients and partial recanalization of PV-SMV thrombosis in 7 patients. The 16 patients were discharged 9-19 days (12 {+-} 6.0 days) after admission. Mean duration of follow-up after hospital discharge was 44 {+-} 18.5 months, and no recurrent episodes of PV-SMV thrombosis developed during that time period. Transradial approach for transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy in addition to anticoagulation is a safe and effective therapy for the management of patients with acute extensive PV-SMV thrombosis.

  7. Preduodenal portal vein: a cause of prenatally diagnosed duodenal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Choi, S O; Park, W H

    1995-10-01

    Preduodenal portal vein is a rare congenital anomaly that causes high intestinal obstruction. The authors report on a newborn who was diagnosed as having duodenal obstruction at 30 weeks' gestation. During surgery the patient was found to have duodenal obstruction caused by a preduodenal portal vein. Malrotation was an associated finding. Treatment consisted of Ladd's procedure and a diamond-shaped duodenoduodenostomy performed anterior to the portal vein.

  8. Preduodenal portal vein in the adult.

    PubMed

    Ooshima, I; Maruyama, T; Ootsuki, K; Ozaki, M

    1998-01-01

    Preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) is a rare developmental anomaly. We recently encountered this anomaly in a 73-year-old woman who had gastric cancer and colonic cancer with liver metastasis. The PDPV was diagnosed preoperatively by computed tomography and angiography. To the best of our knowledge, there are only 19 adult cases reported in the world literature, with this additional case being reported here. In infants the anomaly has often been associated with duodenal obstruction, but in adults it is often symptomless. We discuss the disease process, embryology, diagnosis, association with other anomalies, and surgical treatment.

  9. Disastrous Portal Vein Embolization Turned into a Successful Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrocky, Tomas; Kettenbach, Joachim; Lopez-Benitez, Ruben Kara, Levent

    2015-10-15

    Portal vein embolization (PVE) may be performed before hemihepatectomy to increase the volume of future liver remnant (FLR) and to reduce the risk of postoperative liver insufficiency. We report the case of a 71-year-old patient with hilar cholangiocarcinoma undergoing PVE with access from the right portal vein using a mixture of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate and ethiodized oil. During the procedure, nontarget embolization of the left portal vein occurred. An aspiration maneuver of the polymerized plug failed; however, the embolus obstructing portal venous flow in the FLR was successfully relocated into the right portal vein while carefully bypassing the plug with a balloon catheter, inflating the balloon, and pulling the plug into the main right portal vein.

  10. Endovascular management for significant iatrogenic portal vein bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Woo; Shin, Ji Hoon; Park, Jonathan K; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Ko, Gi-Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Sung, Kyu-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite conservative treatment, hemorrhage from an intrahepatic branch of the portal vein can cause hemodynamic instability requiring urgent intervention. Purpose To retrospectively report the outcomes of hemodynamically significant portal vein bleeding after endovascular management. Material and Methods During a period of 15 years, four patients (2 men, 2 women; median age, 70.5 years) underwent angiography and embolization for iatrogenic portal vein bleeding. Causes of hemorrhage, angiographic findings, endovascular treatment, and complications were reported. Results Portal vein bleeding occurred after percutaneous liver biopsy (n = 2), percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (n = 1), and percutaneous cholecystostomy (n = 1). The median time interval between angiography and percutaneous procedure was 5 h (range, 4-240 h). Common hepatic angiograms including indirect mesenteric portograms showed active portal vein bleeding into the peritoneal cavity with (n = 1) or without (n = 2) an arterioportal (AP) fistula, and portal vein pseudoaneurysm alone with an AP fistula (n = 1). Successful transcatheter arterial embolization (n = 2) or percutaneous transhepatic portal vein embolization (n = 2) was performed. Embolic materials were n-butyl cyanoacrylate alone (n = 2) or in combination with gelatin sponge particles and coils (n = 2). There were no major treatment-related complications or patient mortality within 30 days. Conclusion Patients with symptomatic or life-threatening portal vein bleeding following liver-penetrating procedures can successfully be managed with embolization.

  11. Congenital duodenal obstruction due to a preduodenal portal vein.

    PubMed

    Pathak, D; Sarin, Yogesh Kumar

    2006-05-01

    Only about 80 cases of pre-duodenal portal vein (PDPV), a rare congenital anomaly of portal vein development that was first described by Knight in 1921, have been reported till date.[1] We report a neonate with duodenal obstruction caused by PDPV and briefly review the available literature.

  12. Prepancreatic postduodenal portal vein: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Masafumi; Taenaka, Naoyuki; Nishimura, Shigehiko; Kawamura, Tetsuo; Aki, Toshihiko; Yamaki, Kenichiro; Enomoto, Hitoshi; Kosaka, Kinshi; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiko

    2003-01-01

    We report an unusual case of a prepancreatic postduodenal portal vein (PPPV), incidentally discovered during total gastrectomy. If it had not been noticed, this portal vein might have been ligated and divided with disastrous consequences. This anomaly was not diagnosed preoperatively, but it could have been. Although embryological anomalies of the portal venous system, such as PPPV and preduodenal portal vein, are rarely encountered in abdominal surgery, surgeons must be aware of their possibility and be able to recognize them to avoid major intraoperative injury.

  13. Portal Vein Recanalization and Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Creation for Chronic Portal Vein Thrombosis: Technical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Thornburg, Bartley; Desai, Kush; Hickey, Ryan; Kulik, Laura; Ganger, Daniel; Baker, Talia; Abecassis, Michael; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad

    2016-03-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is common in cirrhotic patients and presents a challenge at the time of transplant. Owing to the increased posttransplant morbidity and mortality associated with complete PVT, the presence of PVT is a relative contraindication to liver transplantation at many centers. Our group began performing portal vein (PV) recanalization and transjugular intrahepatic portostystemic shunt placement (PVR-TIPS) several years ago to optimize the transplant candidacy of patients with PVT. The procedure has evolved to include transsplenic access to assist with recanalization, which is now our preferred method due to its technical success without significant added morbidity. Here, we describe in detail our approach to PVR-TIPS with a focus on the transsplenic method. The procedure was attempted in 61 patients and was technically successful in 60 patients (98%). After transitioning to transsplenic access to assist with recanalization, the technical success rate has improved to 100%. The recanalized portal vein and TIPS have maintained patency during follow-up, or to the time of transplant, in 55 patients (92%) with a mean follow-up of 16.7 months. In total, 23 patients (38%) have undergone transplant, all of whom received a physiologic anastomosis (end-to-end anastomosis in 22 of 23 patients, 96%). PVR-TIPS placement should be considered as an option for patients with chronic PVT in need of transplantation. Transsplenic access makes the procedure technically straightforward and should be considered as the primary method for recanalization.

  14. Stent Recanalization of Chronic Portal Vein Occlusion in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Cwikiel, Wojciech; Solvig, Jan; Schroder, Henrik

    2000-07-15

    An 8-year-old boy with a 21/2 year history of portal hypertension and repeated bleedings from esophageal varices, was referred for treatment. The 3.5-cm-long occlusion of the portal vein was passed and the channel created was stabilized with a balloon-expandable stent; a portosystemic stent-shunt was also created. The portosystemic shunt closed spontaneously within 1 month, while the recanalized segment of the portal vein remained open. The pressure gradient between the intrahepatic and extrahepatic portal vein branches dropped from 17 mmHg to 0 mmHg. The pressure in the portal vein dropped from 30 mmHg to 17 mmHg and the bleedings stopped. The next dilation of the stent was performed 12 months later due to an increased pressure gradient; the gastroesophageal varices disappeared completely. Further dilation of the stent was planned after 2, 4, and 6 years.

  15. Giant Intrahepatic Portal Vein Aneurysm: Leave it or Treat it?

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Amit; Rampal, Jagdeesh S; Nageshwar Reddy, D

    2017-03-01

    Portal vein aneurysm (PVA) is a rare vascular dilatation of the portal vein. It is a rare vascular anomaly representing less than 3% of all visceral aneurysms and is not well understood. Usually, PVA are incidental findings, are asymptomatic, and clinical symptoms are proportionally related to size. Patients present with nonspecific epigastric pain or gastrointestinal bleeding with underlying portal hypertension. PVA may be associated with various complications such as biliary tract compression, portal vein thrombosis/rupture, duodenal compression, gastrointestinal bleeding, and inferior vena cava obstruction. Differential diagnoses of portal vein aneurysms are solid, cystic, and hypervascular abdominal masses, and it is important that the radiologists be aware of their multi-modality appearance; hence, the aim of this article was to provide an overview of the available literature to better simplify various aspects of this rare entity and diagnostic appearance on different modality with available treatment options. In our case, a 55-year-old male patient came to the gastroenterology OPD for further management of pancreatitis with portal hypertension and biliary obstruction with plastic stents in CBD and PD for the same. In this article, we have reported a case of largest intrahepatic portal vein aneurysm and its management by endovascular technique. As per our knowledge, this is the largest intrahepatic portal vein aneurysm and first case where the endovascular technique was used for the treatment of the same.

  16. Duodenal obstruction due to a preduodenal portal vein.

    PubMed

    Vilakazi, Mnc; Ismail, F; Swanepoel, H M; Muller, E W; Lockhat, Z I

    2014-01-01

    An infant presented with clinical signs and symptoms suggestive of a pyloric stenosis. On abdominal ultrasound, pyloric stenosis was excluded, and other causes for proximal duodenal obstruction, such as a duodenal web or annular pancreas, were suspected. At surgery, the cause was found to be due to an anterior portal vein or preduodenal portal vein, compressing the duodenum. There were no associated findings such as midgut malrotation, duodenal web and congenital anomalies. The treatment was a diamond-shaped duodeno-duodenostomy anterior to the portal vein. The patient improved after surgery.

  17. Isolated inferior mesenteric portal hypertension with giant inferior mesenteric vein and anomalous inferior mesenteric vein insertion

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, G. Raghavendra; Billa, Srikar; Bhandari, Pavaneel; Hussain, Aijaz

    2013-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal hypertension is not an uncommon disease in childhood, but isolated inferior mesenteric portal varices and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleed have not been reported till date. A 4-year-old girl presented with lower GI bleed. Surgical exploration revealed extrahepatic portal vein obstruction with giant inferior mesenteric vein and colonic varices. Inferior mesenteric vein was joining the superior mesenteric vein. The child was treated successfully with inferior mesenteric – inferior vena caval anastomosis. The child was relieved of GI bleed during the follow-up. PMID:23798814

  18. Ligation of superior mesenteric vein and portal to splenic vein anastomosis after superior mesenteric-portal vein confluence resection during pancreaticoduodenectomy – Case report

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianlin; Abbas, Jihad; Hoetzl, Katherine; Allison, David; Osman, Mahamed; Williams, Mallory; Zelenock, Gerald B.

    2014-01-01

    62 year old Caucasian female with pancreatic head mass abutting the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) presented with fine needle aspiration biopsy confirmed diagnosis of ductal adenocarcinoma. CT scan showed near complete obstruction of portal vein and large SMV collateral development. After 3 months of neoadjuvant therapy, her portal vein flow improved significantly, SMV collateral circulation was diminished. Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and superior mesenteric portal vein (SMPV) confluence resection were performed; A saphenous vein interposition graft thrombosed immediately. The splenic vein remnant was distended and adjacent to the stump of the portal vein. Harvesting an internal jugular vein graft required extra time and using a synthetic graft posed a risk of graft thrombosis or infection. As a result, we chose to perform a direct anastomosis of the portal and splenic vein in a desperate situation. The anastomosis decompressed the mesenteric venous system, so we then ligated the SMV. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course, except transient ascites. She redeveloped ascites more than one year later. At that time a PET scan showed bilateral lung and right femur metastatic disease. She expired 15 months after PD. Conclusion The lessons we learned are (1) Before SMPV confluence resection, internal jugular vein graft should be ready for reconstruction. (2) Synthetic graft is an alternative for internal jugular vein graft. (3) Direct portal vein to SMV anastomosis can be achieved by mobilizing liver. (4) It is possible that venous collaterals secondary to SMV tumor obstruction may have allowed this patient's post-operative survival. PMID:25568802

  19. Preduodenal Portal Vein with Situs Inversus Totalis causing Duodenal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    D’souza, Flavia; Bendre, Pradnya

    2016-01-01

    Congenital duodenal obstruction sometimes may be secondary to unusual entities like preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) the identification of which is very important to avoid inadvertent injury or incorrect surgery. A 6-day old neonate presented with congenital duodenal obstruction. Investigations revealed situs inversus totalis with many congenital cardiovascular anomalies. At operation preduodenal portal vein and malrotation were found. Correction of malrotation and bypass duodeno-duodenostomy were done. PMID:27398325

  20. Preduodenal portal vein--a cause of intestinal obstruction?

    PubMed

    Esscher, T

    1980-10-01

    A preduodenal position of the portal vein is a rare anomaly reported in 52 cases in the literature. Two additional cases are reported here. In 54% of the cases of preduodenal portal vein (PPV) was combined with high intestinal obstruction and in one half of these cases PPV was considered obstructive. A critical review of these cases given the impression that obstructive PPV could well be a misinterpretation of the obstructive situation and the existence of obstructive PPV is doubted.

  1. Preduodenal Portal Vein with Situs Inversus Totalis causing Duodenal Obstruction.

    PubMed

    D'souza, Flavia; Nage, Amol; Bendre, Pradnya

    2016-01-01

    Congenital duodenal obstruction sometimes may be secondary to unusual entities like preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) the identification of which is very important to avoid inadvertent injury or incorrect surgery. A 6-day old neonate presented with congenital duodenal obstruction. Investigations revealed situs inversus totalis with many congenital cardiovascular anomalies. At operation preduodenal portal vein and malrotation were found. Correction of malrotation and bypass duodeno-duodenostomy were done.

  2. Progression of Thrombus in Portal Vein, Superior Mesenteric Vein, and Splenic Vein Even on Anticoagulation in a Patient with Ascending Colonic Malignancy with Liver Metastasis: Portal Vein Thrombosis versus Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Sule, Ashish; Borja, Annamarie; Chin, Tay Jam

    2016-12-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) in a setting of liver metastasis is not easy to treat as it may be portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). A 77-year-old male patient was diagnosed as ascending colon carcinoma, underwent right hemicolectomy in 1991 with a recurrence in July 2009. In August 2009, he underwent computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen which showed evidence of superior mesenteric vein thrombosis with no liver metastasis. He was started with anticoagulation and decision was to treat long term. He was admitted with mesenteric artery ischemic symptoms in February 2012 on anticoagulation. CT scan abdomen and pelvis in February 2012 showed tumor thrombus involving the superior mesenteric vein, portal vein, and splenic vein with hepatic metastasis. His tumor marker chorioembryonic antigen was 34 µg/L. He was continued on anticoagulation. A repeat CT scan abdomen after 2 years (in January 2014) showed, increase in size of hepatic metastasis, extensive thrombus involving the superior mesenteric vein, portal vein, and splenic vein with collaterals. Mesentery was congested due to extensive superior mesenteric vein thrombus. He finally succumbed in June 2014. It is very important to differentiate PVT from PVTT as the prognosis is different. PVTT progresses despite of long-term anticoagulation with poor prognosis.

  3. [Treatment of nontumoral portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Bañares, Rafael; Catalina, María-Vega

    2014-07-01

    Portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis is a relatively common complication associated with the presence of an accompanying prothrombotic phenotype of advanced cirrhosis. The consequences of portal vein thrombosis are relevant because it can be associated with impaired hepatic function, might contraindicate hepatic transplantation and could increase morbidity in the surgical procedure. There is controversy concerning the most effective treatment of portal vein thrombosis, which is based on information that is seldom robust and whose primary objective is to achieve a return to vessel patency. Various studies have suggested that starting anticoagulation therapy early is associated with portal vein repatency more frequently than without treatment and has a low rate of complications. There are no proven data on the type of anticoagulant (low-molecular-weight heparins or dicoumarin agents) and the treatment duration. The implementation of TIPS is technically feasible in thrombosis without cavernous transformation and is associated with portal vein recanalization in a significant proportion of cases. Thrombolytic therapy does not appear to present an adequate balance between efficacy and safety; its use is therefore not supported for this indication. The proper definition of treatment for portal vein thrombosis requires properly designed studies to delimit the efficacy and safety of the various alternatives.

  4. Palliative Portal Vein Stent Placement in Malignant and Symptomatic Extrinsic Portal Vein Stenosis or Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Novellas, Sebastien; Denys, Alban Bize, Pierre; Brunner, Philippe; Motamedi, Jean Paul; Gugenheim, Jean; Caroli, Francois-Xavier; Chevallier, Patrick

    2009-05-15

    This article evaluates the results of portal vein (PV) stent placement in patients with malignant extrinsic lesions stenosing or obstructing the PV and causing symptomatic PV hypertension (PVHT). Fourteen patients with bile duct cancer (n = 7), pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 4), or another cancer (n = 3) underwent percutaneous transhepatic portal venous stent placement because of gastroesophageal or jejunal varices (n = 9), ascites (n = 7), and/or thrombocytopenia (n = 2). Concurrent tumoral obstruction of the main bile duct was treated via the transhepatic route in the same session in four patients. Changes in portal venous pressure, complications, stent patency, and survival were evaluated. Mean {+-} standard deviation (SD) gradient of portal venous pressure decreased significantly immediately after stent placement from 11.2 mmHg {+-} 4.6 to 1.1 mmHg {+-} 1.0 (P < 0.00001). Three patients had minor complications, and one developed a liver abscess. During a mean {+-} SD follow-up of 134.4 {+-} 123.3 days, portal stents remained patent in 11 patients (78.6%); stent occlusion occurred in 3 patients, 2 of whom had undergone previous major hepatectomy. After stent placement, PVHT symptoms were relieved in four (57.1%) of seven patients who died (mean survival, 97 {+-} 71.2 days), and relieved in six (85.7%) of seven patients still alive at the end of follow-up (mean follow-up, 171.7 {+-} 153.5 days). Stent placement in the PV is feasible and relatively safe. It helped to relieve PVHT symptoms in a single session.

  5. [Treatment of non-cirrhotic, non-tumoural portal vein thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Llop, Elba; Seijo, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis of the splenoportal axis not associated with liver cirrhosis or neoplasms is a rare disease whose prevalence ranges from 0.7 to 3.7 per 100,000 inhabitants. However, this entity is the second most common cause of portal hypertension. Prothrombotic factors are present as an underlying cause in up to 70% of patients and local factors in 10-50%. The coexistence of several etiological factors is frequent. Clinical presentation may be acute or chronic (portal cavernomatosis). The acute phase can present as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, rectorrhagia, intestinal congestion, and ischemia. In this phase, early initiation of anticoagulation is essential to achieve portal vein recanalization and thus improve patient prognosis. In the chronic phase, symptoms are due to portal hypertension syndrome. In this phase, the aim of treatment is to treat or prevent the complications of portal hypertension. Anticoagulation is reserved to patients with a proven underlying thrombophilic factor.

  6. Portal vein thrombosis with protein C-S deficiency in a non-cirrhotic patient

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Leal, Gustavo A; Morán, Segundo; Corona-Cedillo, Roberto; Brom-Valladares, Rocío

    2014-01-01

    There are several conditions that can lead to portal vein thrombosis (PVT), including including infection, malignancies, and coagulation disorders. Anew condition of interest is protein C and S deficiencies, associated with hypercoagulation and recurrent venous thromboembolism. We report the case of a non-cirrhotic 63-year-old male diagnosed with acute superior mesenteric vein thrombosis and PVT and combined deficiencies in proteins C and S, recanalized by short-term low molecular heparin plus oral warfarin therapy. PMID:25068006

  7. Polysplenia syndrome with preduodenal portal vein detected in adults

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyung-Il; Jeon, Tae Yong; Sim, Mun Sup; Kim, Suk

    2008-01-01

    Polysplenia syndrome, defined as the presence of multiple spleens of almost equal volume, is a rare condition involving congenital anomalies in multiple organ systems. We report this anomaly in a 41-year-old female who underwent a left lateral sectionectomy due to recurrent cholangitis and impacted left lateral duct stones. Polysplenia syndrome with preduodenal vein was diagnosed preoperatively by computed tomography (CT) and surgery was done safely. Although the polysplenia syndrome with preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) in adult is rarely encountered, surgeons need to understand the course of the portal vein and exercise caution in approaching the biliary tract. PMID:19009663

  8. Polysplenia syndrome with preduodenal portal vein detected in adults.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyung-Il; Jeon, Tae Yong; Sim, Mun Sup; Kim, Suk

    2008-11-07

    Polysplenia syndrome, defined as the presence of multiple spleens of almost equal volume, is a rare condition involving congenital anomalies in multiple organ systems. We report this anomaly in a 41-year-old female who underwent a left lateral sectionectomy due to recurrent cholangitis and impacted left lateral duct stones. Polysplenia syndrome with preduodenal vein was diagnosed preoperatively by computed tomography (CT) and surgery was done safely. Although the polysplenia syndrome with preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) in adult is rarely encountered, surgeons need to understand the course of the portal vein and exercise caution in approaching the biliary tract.

  9. Investigating the efficacy of subharmonic aided pressure estimation for portal vein pressures and portal hypertension monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Jaydev K.; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G.; Eisenbrey, John R.; Merton, Daniel A.; Liu, Ji-Bin; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Wang, Hsin-Kai; Park, Suhyun; Dianis, Scott; Chalek, Carl L.; Lin, Feng; Thomenius, Kai E.; Brown, Daniel B.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of using subharmonic emissions from Sonazoid microbubbles (GE Healthcare, Oslo, Norway) to track portal vein pressures and pressure changes was investigated in 14 canines using either slow- or high-flow models of portal hypertension (PH). A modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) operating in subharmonic mode (ftransmit:2.5MHz, freceive:1.25MHz) was used to collect RF data at 10-40% incident acoustic power levels with 2-4 transmit cycles (in triplicate), before and after inducing PH. A pressure catheter (Millar Instruments, Inc., Houston, TX) provided reference portal vein pressures. At optimum insonification, subharmonic signal amplitude changes correlated with portal vein pressure changes; r ranged from -0.82 to -0.94 and from -0.70 to -0.73 for PH models considered separately or together, respectively. The subharmonic signal amplitudes correlated with absolute portal vein pressures (r: -0.71 to -0.79). Statistically significant differences between subharmonic amplitudes, before and after inducing PH, were noted (p≤0.01). Portal vein pressures estimated using SHAPE did not reveal significant differences (p>0.05) with respect to the pressures obtained using the Millar pressure catheter. Subharmonic aided pressure estimation may be useful clinically for portal vein pressure monitoring. PMID:22920550

  10. Investigating the efficacy of subharmonic aided pressure estimation for portal vein pressures and portal hypertension monitoring.

    PubMed

    Dave, Jaydev K; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Eisenbrey, John R; Merton, Daniel A; Liu, Ji-Bin; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Wang, Hsin-Kai; Park, Suhyun; Dianis, Scott; Chalek, Carl L; Lin, Feng; Thomenius, Kai E; Brown, Daniel B; Forsberg, Flemming

    2012-10-01

    The efficacy of using subharmonic emissions from Sonazoid microbubbles (GE Healthcare, Oslo, Norway) to track portal vein pressures and pressure changes was investigated in 14 canines using either slow- or high-flow models of portal hypertension (PH). A modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA) operating in subharmonic mode (f(transmit): 2.5 MHz, f(receive): 1.25 MHz) was used to collect radiofrequency data at 10-40% incident acoustic power levels with 2-4 transmit cycles (in triplicate) before and after inducing PH. A pressure catheter (Millar Instruments, Inc., Houston, TX, USA) provided reference portal vein pressures. At optimum insonification, subharmonic signal amplitude changes correlated with portal vein pressure changes; r ranged from -0.82 to -0.94 and from -0.70 to -0.73 for PH models considered separately or together, respectively. The subharmonic signal amplitudes correlated with absolute portal vein pressures (r: -0.71 to -0.79). Statistically significant differences between subharmonic amplitudes, before and after inducing PH, were noted (p ≤ 0.01). Portal vein pressures estimated using subharmonic aided pressure estimation did not reveal significant differences (p > 0.05) with respect to the pressures obtained using the Millar pressure catheter. Subharmonic-aided pressure estimation may be useful clinically for portal vein pressure monitoring.

  11. Absent portal vein bifurcation: a rare variant and its clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Panda, Sitansu; Bahinipati, Pravakar

    2014-01-01

    Portal vein branching anomaly occurs due to aberration of normal anastomotic patterns and involution of vitelline veins during development of portal vein. Anatomical knowledge of portal vein and its branching pattern is important for hepatobiliary surgeon and gastrointestinal intervention radiologist. We are reporting a case of absence of portal vein bifurcation showing single main intrahepatic portal vein with gradual decreasing caliber distally, in a young female patient on contrast-enhanced computed tomography study of abdomen. Few cases of absence of portal bifurcation have been reported in literature so far. PMID:25276482

  12. Effect of fluid shear stress on portal vein remodeling in a rat model of portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bin; Liang, Jian; Deng, Xin; Chen, Ran; Peng, Peichun

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To explore the effects and mechanisms of fluid shear stress on portal vein remodeling in a rat model of portal hypertension. Methods. Subcutaneous injections of CCl4 were given to establish a rat model of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Biomechanical technology was adopted to determine the dynamic changes of haemodynamic indices and fluid shear stress. Nitric oxide (NO), synthase (NOS), and endothelin-1 (ET-1) of the portal vein blood were measured. Changes in geometric structure and ultrastructure of the portal vein were observed using optical and electron microscopy. Results. After the CC14 injections, rat haemodynamics were notably altered. From week 4 onwards, PVP, PVF, and PVR gradually and significantly increased (P < 0.05 versus baseline). The fluid shear stress declined from week 4 onwards (P < 0.01 versus control group). NO, NOS, and ET-1 increased after repeated CCI4 injections. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed thickened portal vein walls, with increased inside and outside diameters. Electron microscopy revealed different degrees of endothelial cell degeneration, destruction of basement membrane integrity, proliferating, and hypertrophic smooth muscle cells. Conclusions. Fluid shear stress not only influenced the biomechanical environment of the portal vein but also participated in vascular remodeling.

  13. Anatomy of the Portal Vein Bifurcation: Implication for Transjugular Intrahepatic Portal Systemic Shunts

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Philip Chong-hei Ng, Wai Fu; Lam, Christine Suk-yee; Tsui, Polly Po; Faruqi, Asma

    2003-06-15

    Purpose: The relationship of the portalvein bifurcation to the liver capsule in Asians, which is an important landmark for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, has not previously been described. Methods: The anatomy of the portal vein bifurcation was studied in 70 adult Chinese cadavers; it was characterized as intrahepatic or extrahepatic. The length of the exposed portion of the right and left portal veins was measured when the bifurcation was extrahepatic. Results: The portal vein bifurcation was intrahepatic in 37 cadavers (53%) and extrahepatic in 33 cadavers (47%). The mean length of the right and left extrahepatic portal veins was 0.96 cm and 0.85 cm respectively.Both were less than or equal to 2 cm in 94% of the cadavers with extrahepatic bifurcation. There was no correlation between the presence of cirrhosis and the location of the portal vein bifurcation(p 1.0). There was no statistically significant difference in liver mass in cadavers with either extrahepatic or intrahepatic bifurcation (p =0.40). Conclusions: These findings suggest that fortransjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt placement, a portal vein puncture 2 cm from the bifurcation will be safe in most cases.

  14. Selection and Outcome of Portal Vein Resection in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Akimasa

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Five-year survival of pancreatic cancer after pancreatectomy is very low, and surgical resection is the only option to cure this dismal disease. The standard surgical procedure is pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) for pancreatic head cancer. The morbidity and especially the mortality of PD have been greatly reduced. Portal vein resection in pancreatic cancer surgery is one attempt to increase resectability and radicality, and the procedure has become safe to perform. Clinicohistopathological studies have shown that the most important indication for portal vein resection in patients with pancreatic cancer is the ability to obtain cancer-free surgical margins. Otherwise, portal vein resection is contraindicated. PMID:24281213

  15. Preduodenal Portal Vein Associated with Duodenal Obstruction of other Etiology: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Punit; Shaikh, Mishraz; Mirza, Bilal; Jaiman, Richa; Arshad, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    DuodenalPreduodenal portal vein is a rare and interesting entity which often causes duodenal obstruction. It is also associated with other congenital anomalies. We report here three cases of preduodenal portal vein associated with other anomalies causing duodenal obstruction not related to direct compression by portal vein itself. PMID:27896162

  16. Preduodenal Portal Vein Associated with Duodenal Obstruction of other Etiology: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Punit; Shaikh, Mishraz; Mirza, Bilal; Jaiman, Richa; Arshad, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    DuodenalPreduodenal portal vein is a rare and interesting entity which often causes duodenal obstruction. It is also associated with other congenital anomalies. We report here three cases of preduodenal portal vein associated with other anomalies causing duodenal obstruction not related to direct compression by portal vein itself.

  17. Portal hypertension associated with primary hypoplasia of the hepatic portal vein in dogs.

    PubMed

    Van den Ingh, T S; Rothuizen, J; Meyer, H P

    1995-10-21

    Portal hypertension caused by primary hypoplasia of the portal vein was diagnosed in 42 dogs. The portal hypertension was manifested by the presence of multiple portosystemic collateral vessels. The main clinical signs were retarded growth or weight loss, apathy, intermittent diarrhoea and vomiting, anorexia, abdominal distension and polydipsia. Major findings at physical examination were ascites in 23 dogs and neurological signs in 16 dogs. The dogs had increased activities of liver enzymes in plasma and increased fasting levels of total bile acids and ammonia; in many of the dogs the packed red cell volume, total serum protein and albumin were low. Gross inspection of the portal vein revealed a patent but underdeveloped extrahepatic vein in 13 of the dogs. Microscopic examination of the liver revealed hypoplasia of the intrahepatic portal veins in all the dogs, and this was associated with minor arteriolar proliferation and absence of fibrosis in 12 of them, with moderate to marked arteriolar proliferation often combined with ductular proliferation in 13, and with marked portal fibrosis (formerly described as hepatoportal fibrosis) with a varying number of arteriolar and bile ductular structures in 17 of the dogs. The disease affected mainly young dogs, and was most likely to have been of congenital origin.

  18. Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection to the Portal Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Wyttenbach, Marina; Carrel, Thierry; Schuepbach, Peter; Tschaeppeler, Heinz; Triller, Juergen

    1996-03-15

    Anomalous pulmonary venous return represents a rare congenital anomaly with wide anatomic and physiologic variability. We report a case of a newborn with a rare form of total infracardiac anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC). The pulmonary veins draining both lungs formed two vertical veins, which joined to a common pulmonary trunk below the diaphragm. This venous channel connected to the portal vein through the esophageal hiatus. The diagnosis was suggested by color Doppler sonography and confirmed by intravenous digital subtraction angiography, which allowed definition of the anatomy.

  19. [Infrequent digestive pathology associated with a preduodenal portal vein].

    PubMed

    Blanco Domínguez, J A; Roqués Serradilla, J L; Gutiérrez Cantó, M A

    1984-04-15

    We report two cases of preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) has with two different clinical pictures. The first case has an intestinal obstruction in infancy caused by PDPV. In the second child, the PDPV was only an operative finding in the newborn. We report for the first time PDPV associated with Hirschsprung disease.

  20. Duodeno-Jejunal Varicosities Following Extrahepatic Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Varsamidakis, Nick; Hobbs, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A 31 year old man, under investigation for melena, was found at endoscopy to have varicosities at the site of a duodeno-jejunostomy which had been performed for duodenal atresia when he was three days old. Angiography revealed an occluded portal vein with an extensive collateral circulation. At laparotomy some of the collateral vessels were found to pass through the anastomotic site and directly into the left lobe of the liver. The portal pressure was found to be minimally elevated. Resection of the anastomotic segment was performed with reconstruction using a Roux en Y jejunal loop. Bleeding from collateral vessels passing through an anastomosis site in a patient with extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis has not previously been reported. PMID:1610726

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement in Patients with Cirrhosis and Concomitant Portal Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Thuong G. Van Hodge, Justin; Funaki, Brian; Lorenz, Jonathan; Rosenblum, Jordan; Straus, Christopher; Leef, Jeff

    2006-10-15

    Purpose. To determine the safety and efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation in patients with liver cirrhosis complicated by thrombosed portal vein. Methods. This study reviewed 15 cases of TIPS creation in 15 cirrhotic patients with portal vein thrombosis at our institution over an 8-year period. There were 2 women and 13 men with a mean age of 53 years. Indications were refractory ascites, variceal hemorrhage, and refractory pleural effusion. Clinical follow-up was performed in all patients. Results. The technical success rate was 75% (3/4) in patients with chronic portal vein thrombosis associated with cavernomatous transformation and 91% (10/11) in patients with acute thrombosis or partial thrombosis, giving an overall success rate of 87%. Complications included postprocedural encephalopathy and localized hematoma at the access site. In patients with successful shunt placement, the total follow-up time was 223 months. The 30-day mortality rate was 13%. Two patients underwent liver transplantation at 35 days and 7 months, respectively, after TIPS insertion. One patient had an occluded shunt at 4 months with an unsuccessful revision. The remaining patients had functioning shunts at follow-up. Conclusion. TIPS creation in thrombosed portal vein is possible and might be a treatment option in certain patients.

  2. Colorectal variceal bleeding in patients with extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis and idiopathic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Orozco, H; Takahashi, T; Mercado, M A; Prado-Orozco, E; Ferral, H; Hernandez-Ortiz, J; Esquivel, E

    1992-03-01

    We report three patients with colonic variceal bleeding secondary to portal hypertension, 0.5% of all cases with hemorrhagic portal hypertension studied by us in the last 16 years. One patient had idiopathic portal hypertension, and the others had extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis. Colonic varices were documented in all three cases by angiogram; large arteriovenous fistulas in the territory of the superior mesenteric artery and between the inferior mesenteric artery and hemorrhoidal veins were demonstrated in one patient. Two patients underwent colonoscopy; colonic varices were seen in only one. Two patients also had bled from esophagogastric varices. One patient underwent descending colon and sigmoid resection after failure to control bleeding with ligation of arterial supply; one patient underwent the Sugiura procedure, plus transanal ligation of hemorrhoids and rectal varices. At 3 months, 2 years, and 4 years of follow-up, the patients were in good general condition without any evidence of rebleeding.

  3. Diagnosis of pancreatic duct-portal vein fistula; a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anthony; Malden, Eric; Kugelmas, Marcelo; Kortz, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Pseudocysts containing activated enzymes are a common complication of pancreatitis. Pseudocysts can rupture into adjacent structures including the peritoneal cavity, adjacent organs, and rarely vascular structures. While arterial pseudoaneurysms and venous thrombosis or occlusion are well known complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis, only 17 cases of pancreas-portal venous fistula have been encountered in review of the literature. A patient with chronic pancreatitis presented with a history of weight loss, fatigue and was found to have a pancreatic duct-portal vein fistula. The patient was treated surgically with good outcome.

  4. Portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis: Controversies and latest developments

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Damian J; Perera, M Thamara PR; Chen, Frederick; Olliff, Simon; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is encountered in liver cirrhosis, particularly in advanced disease. It has been a feared complication of cirrhosis, attributed to significant worsening of liver disease, poorer clinical outcomes and potential inoperability at liver transplantation; also catastrophic events such as acute intestinal ischaemia. Optimal management of PVT has not yet been addressed in any consensus publication. We review current literature on PVT in cirrhosis; its prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnosis, impact on the natural history of cirrhosis and liver transplantation, and management. Studies were identified by a search strategy using MEDLINE and Google Scholar. The incidence of PVT increases with increasing severity of liver disease: less than 1% in well-compensated cirrhosis, 7.4%-16% in advanced cirrhosis. Prevalence in patients undergoing liver transplantation is 5%-16%. PVT frequently regresses instead of uniform thrombus progression. PVT is not associated with increased risk of mortality. Optimal management has not been addressed in any consensus publication. We propose areas for future research to address unresolved clinical questions. PMID:26078553

  5. Novel Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus: Safety and Feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Mizandari, Malkhaz; Ao, Guokun; Zhang Yaojun; Feng Xi; Shen Qiang; Chen Minshan; Lau, Wan Yee; Nicholls, Joanna; Jiao Long; Habib, Nagy

    2013-02-15

    We report our experience of the safety of partial recanalization of the portal vein using a novel endovascular radiofrequency (RF) catheter for portal vein tumor thrombosis. Six patients with liver cancer and tumor thrombus in the portal vein underwent percutaneous intravascular radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using an endovascular bipolar RF device. A 0.035-inch guidewire was introduced into a tributary of the portal vein and through which a 5G guide catheter was introduced into the main portal vein. After manipulation of the guide catheter over the thrombus under digital subtraction angiography, the endovascular RF device was inserted and activated around the thrombus. There were no observed technique specific complications, such as hemorrhage, vessel perforation, or infection. Post-RFA portography showed partial recanalization of portal vein. RFA of portal vein tumor thrombus in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma is technically feasible and warrants further investigation to assess efficacy compared with current recanalization techniques.

  6. Limitations of Percutaneous Techniques in the Treatment of Portal Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bilbao, Jose I.; Vivas, Isabel; Elduayen, Beatriz; Alonso, Carlos; Gonzalez-Crespo, Inaki; Benito, Alberto; Martinez-Cuesta, Antonio

    1999-09-15

    New therapeutic alternatives to portal vein thrombosis (PVT) include the percutaneous, transhepatic infusion of fibrinolytic agents, balloon dilatation, and stenting. These maneuvers have proven to be effective in some cases with acute, recent PVT. We have treated two patients with acute PVT via transhepatic or transjugular approaches and by using pharmacologic and mechanical thrombolysis and thrombectomy. Although both patients clinically improved, morphologic results were only fair and partial rethrombosis was observed. The limitations of percutaneous procedures in the recanalization of acute PVT in noncirrhotic patients are discussed.

  7. Segmentation and reconstruction of hepatic veins and intrahepatic portal vein based on the coronal sectional anatomic dataset.

    PubMed

    Lou, Li; Liu, Shu Wei; Zhao, Zhen Mei; Heng, Pheng Ann; Tang, Yu Chun; Li, Zheng Ping; Xie, Yong Ming; Chui, Yim Pan

    2009-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of intrahepatic vessels is very useful in visualizing the complex anatomy of hepatic veins and intrahepatic portal vein. It also provides a 3D anatomic basis for diagnostic imaging and surgical operation on the liver. In the present study, we built a 3D digitized model of hepatic veins and intrahepatic portal vein based on the coronal sectional anatomic dataset of the liver. The dataset was obtained using the digital freezing milling technique. The pre-reconstructed structures were identified and extracted, and then were segmented by the method of manual intervention. The digitized model of hepatic veins and intrahepatic portal vein was established using 3D medical visualization software. This model facilitated a continuous and dynamic displaying of the hepatic veins and intrahepatic portal vein at different orientations, which demonstrated the complicated relationship of adjacent hepatic veins and intrahepatic portal vein realistically in the 3D space. This study indicated that high-quality 2D images, precise data segmentation, and suitable 3D reconstruction methods ensured the reality and accuracy of the digital visualized model of hepatic veins and intrahepatic portal vein.

  8. Interruption of the inferior vena cava with azygos termination associated with congenital absence of portal vein.

    PubMed

    Le Borgne, J; Paineau, J; Hamy, A; Dupas, B; Lerat, F; Raoul, S; Hamel, A; Robert, R; Armstrong, O; Rogez, J M

    2000-01-01

    The authors report an exceptional and well-documented case of interruption of the retrohepatic segment of the inferior vena cava with an "azygos continuation", combined with absence of the portal vein. The only known combination of congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava and the portal vein was that of an "azygos continuation" and a preduodenal portal vein. The double interruption, portal and inferior caval, may be associated with a disturbance of preferential flows induced by the left umbilical thrust. According to hemodynamic theory, the left umbilical flow is the determining factor in organogenesis of the portal vein and the retrohepatic segment of the inferior vena cava.

  9. Preduodenal portal vein: a potential laparoscopic cholecystectomy nightmare.

    PubMed

    Bhorat, N; Thomson, S R; Anderson, F

    2009-02-01

    Variations of biliary anatomy are well described. Those of most relevance to the operative surgeon are the variations of the extrahepatic ducts and their relationships to the right hepatic artery and its branches. We describe another even rarer congenital anomaly of a preduodenal portal vein. Its embryological derivation and presentation are discussed to heighten awareness of its recognition and reduce the potential of a serious operative misadventure.

  10. Reconstruction of isolated caudate portal vein in left liver graft.

    PubMed

    Kokudo, Norihiro; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Kaneko, Junichi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Sano, Keiji; Makuuchi, Masatoshi

    2004-09-01

    The addition of the caudate lobe to a left liver graft is known to increase graft volume by 9% and has been shown to be useful for overcoming borderline graft-recipient size mismatch in adult living donor liver transplantation. To assure full graft viability and regeneration, all of the feeding vessels for the caudate lobe should be preserved or reconstructed. However, more knowledge is needed about portal vein reconstruction for the caudate lobe. From January 1996 to August 2003, 238 living donor liver transplantations were performed at our institution. Of these, 67 donors underwent left hepatectomy with the caudate lobe and the middle hepatic vein. An isolated caudate portal vein originating from the left sidewall of the portal branches for the Spiegelian lobe (P1) was encountered in 9 donors (13.4%). The isolated P1 was reconstructed in 3 of the 9 cases using the pantaloon technique or interposition of an autovein graft. There were no complications related to P1 reconstruction and patency was confirmed by computerized tomography (CT) 1 month after transplantation. In the remaining 6 cases, the isolated P1 was very small (less than .5 mm) and did not require reconstruction. Isolated P1s are relatively rare, but when they are both present and large, it is advisable to undertake reconstruction that assures full graft function of the caudate lobe.

  11. Surgical Implications of Portal Vein Variations and Liver Segmentations: A Recent Update.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Showkathali; Iqbal, Raiz; Iqbal, Faiz

    2017-02-01

    The Couinaud's liver segmentation is based on the identification of portal vein bifurcation and origin of hepatic veins. It is widely used clinically, because it is better suited for surgery and is more accurate in localizing and monitoring various intra parenchymal lesions. According to standard anatomy, the portal vein bifurcates into right and left branches; the left vein drains segment II, III and IV and the right vein divides into two secondary branches - the anterior portal vein drains segments V and VIII, and the posterior drains segments VI and VII. The portal vein variants such as portal trifurcation, with division of the main portal vein into the left, right anterior, and posterior branches, and the early origin of the right posterior branch directly from the main portal vein were found to be more frequent and was seen in about 20 - 35% of the population. Accurate knowledge of the portal variants and consequent variations in vascular segments are essential for intervention radiologists and transplant surgeons in the proper diagnosis during radiological investigations and in therapeutic applications such as preparation for biopsy, Portal Vein Embolization (PVE), Transjugular Intrahepatic Porto-Systemic Shunt (TIPS), tumour resection and partial hepatectomy for split or living donor transplantations. The advances in the knowledge will reduce intra and postoperative complications and avoid major catastrophic events. The purpose of the present review is to update the normal and variant portal venous anatomy and their implications in the liver segmentations, complex liver surgeries and various radiological intervention procedures.

  12. Surgical Implications of Portal Vein Variations and Liver Segmentations: A Recent Update

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Raiz; Iqbal, Faiz

    2017-01-01

    The Couinaud’s liver segmentation is based on the identification of portal vein bifurcation and origin of hepatic veins. It is widely used clinically, because it is better suited for surgery and is more accurate in localizing and monitoring various intra parenchymal lesions. According to standard anatomy, the portal vein bifurcates into right and left branches; the left vein drains segment II, III and IV and the right vein divides into two secondary branches - the anterior portal vein drains segments V and VIII, and the posterior drains segments VI and VII. The portal vein variants such as portal trifurcation, with division of the main portal vein into the left, right anterior, and posterior branches, and the early origin of the right posterior branch directly from the main portal vein were found to be more frequent and was seen in about 20 - 35% of the population. Accurate knowledge of the portal variants and consequent variations in vascular segments are essential for intervention radiologists and transplant surgeons in the proper diagnosis during radiological investigations and in therapeutic applications such as preparation for biopsy, Portal Vein Embolization (PVE), Transjugular Intrahepatic Porto-Systemic Shunt (TIPS), tumour resection and partial hepatectomy for split or living donor transplantations. The advances in the knowledge will reduce intra and postoperative complications and avoid major catastrophic events. The purpose of the present review is to update the normal and variant portal venous anatomy and their implications in the liver segmentations, complex liver surgeries and various radiological intervention procedures. PMID:28384848

  13. Preduodenal portal vein with situs inversus and duodenal atresia.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Y; Lombrozo, R; Dintsman, M

    1986-02-01

    In a 7-day-old infant referred because of bile-stained vomiting, jaundice and lack of meconium, radiological examination revealed the 'double-bubble' sign of duodenal atresia as well as dextrocardia. This infant also had a strawberry haemangioma on the right shoulder. Operation disclosed situs inversus and a preduodenal portal vein as well as duodenal atresia. A side-to-side duodeno-jejunostomy was performed successfully without damage to the anomalous vein. The history of polyhydramnion during gestation, the presence of other anomalies, the rapid onset of bile-stained vomiting and the classic 'double-bubble' sign, together appeared to indicate that the duodenal atresia was intrinsic and not due to the external pressure of the anomalous vein on the duodenum.

  14. Hypersensitivity of mesenteric veins to 5-hydroxytryptamine- and ketanserin-induced reduction of portal pressure in portal hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, S. A.; Groszmann, R. J.; Kaumann, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    Isolated superior mesenteric veins from portal hypertensive rats were 3 to 10 times more sensitive to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 3 times less sensitive to (-)-noradrenaline than veins from sham-operated rats. The sensitivity to vasopressin did not differ in the 2 groups. Ketanserin competitively antagonized the effects of 5-HT in superior mesenteric veins and portal veins with high affinity (KB values 0.1-0.3 nM), as expected for 5-HT2-receptors. The affinity of ketanserin for 5-HT2-receptors was similar in veins from normal, sham-operated or portal-hypertensive rats. Intraportal injections of low doses of 5-HT caused increases in portal pressure which were more pronounced in portal hypertensive rats than in sham-operated rats and were blocked by 0.3 mg kg-1 ketanserin in both groups. Ketanserin 0.3 mg kg-1 did not block the portal pressor response to (-)-noradrenaline in either group of rats. In portal hypertensive rats but not in sham-operated rats, 0.3 mg kg-1 ketanserin caused decreases in portal pressure, portal flow and cardiac output, as estimated by radioactive microspheres. The reduction in portal pressure caused by ketanserin was due mainly to a decrease in portal venous inflow secondary to a decreased cardiac output. The reduction in cardiac output, which was observed only in the portal hypertensive rats but not in sham-operated rats, is consistent with venous dilatation and pooling of blood in the portal venous system. The venous pooling could be secondary to the blockade of 5-HT2-receptors in the portal venous system. It is proposed that ketanserin should be explored for the treatment of patients with portal hypertension. PMID:3801785

  15. Transjugular Endovascular Recanalization of Splenic Vein in Patients with Regional Portal Hypertension Complicated by Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xuefeng; Nie, Ling; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Tang, Chengwei; Li, Xiao

    2013-05-02

    PurposeRegional portal hypertension (RPH) is an uncommon clinical syndrome resulting from splenic vein stenosis/occlusion, which may cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from the esophagogastric varices. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein in patients with GI bleeding secondary to RPH.MethodsFrom December 2008 to May 2011, 11 patients who were diagnosed with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and had undergone transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein were reviewed retrospectively. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed splenic vein stenosis in six cases and splenic vein occlusion in five. Etiology of RPH was chronic pancreatitis (n = 7), acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst (n = 2), pancreatic injury (n = 1), and isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (n = 1).ResultsTechnical success was achieved in 8 of 11 patients via the transjugular approach, including six patients with splenic vein stenosis and two patients with splenic vein occlusion. Two patients underwent splenic vein venoplasty only, whereas four patients underwent bare stents deployment and two covered stents. Splenic vein pressure gradient (SPG) was reduced from 21.5 ± 7.3 to 2.9 ± 1.4 mmHg after the procedure (P < 0.01). For the remaining three patients who had technical failures, splenic artery embolization and subsequent splenectomy was performed. During a median follow-up time of 17.5 (range, 3–34) months, no recurrence of GI bleeding was observed.ConclusionsTransjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein is a safe and effective therapeutic option in patients with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and is not associated with an increased risk of procedure-related complications.

  16. Portal Vein Inflow From Enlarged Coronary Vein in Liver Transplantation: Surgical Approach and Technical Tips: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Safwan, M; Nagai, S; Abouljoud, M S

    2016-11-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is common in patients with end-stage liver disease, with an incidence as high as 26% in liver transplant candidates. It is known to be associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality posttransplantation, and its management can be challenging. The management options range from a simple thrombendvenectomy to multivisceral transplantation in cases with diffuse portomesenteric thrombosis. We report a case of liver transplantation in which we performed a rare reconstruction of the portal vein. Briefly, the patient had diffuse portomesenteric thrombosis, calcified aneurysmosis, and a large collateral coronary vein, to which we directly anastomosed the donor portal vein in an end-to-side fashion. This report describes a unique surgical approach for similar cases of severe portal vein thrombosis in liver transplant candidates.

  17. Intrahepatic portal-vein gas associated with rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Esposito, F; Senese, R; Salvatore, P; Vallone, G

    2011-03-01

    Rotavirus enteritis is an infectious disease of the small bowel caused by an RNA reovirus. It is manifested by cytotoxic diarrhea [1]. Rotavirus is the most common viral cause of enteritis (incidence 15-35%) [2]. In infants and children with abdominal pain and diarrhea, ultrasonography is the diagnostic study of choice, and its use has increased significantly in young patients. We describe two cases in which portal-vein gas was detected on abdominal ultrasound scans in children with severe dehydration secondary to rotavirus gastroenteritis, which resolved rapidly after treatment.

  18. Blood infection with Enterobacter aerogenes--an unusual cause of portal vein gas.

    PubMed

    Fayyaz, Afshan

    2011-01-01

    Portal vein gas was once thought of as an invariably fatal condition. Now, with the availability of better equipment and expertise, the condition is more frequently diagnosed. A case of fever with rigors is presented and on ultrasound and CT examination was found to have portal venous gas which resolved with adequate antibiotic treatment. Blood culture revealed growth of gram negative bacillus; Enterobacter aerogenes. Patient was investigated further for portal vein gas, and although no other cause for the development of portal vein gas was found, she was treated with antibiotics and showed an immediate response. The aim of this case report is to highlight the benign causes of portal vein gas as well as to discuss the causes which warrant immediate surgery. Portal vein gas may herald a more ominous condition, which if intercepted in its course may result in complete cure.

  19. Endovascular Reconstruction of Extrahepatic Portal Vein in Noncirrhotic and Nonmalignant Chronic Portal Vein Thrombosis Secondary to an Iatrogenic Stenotic Lesion.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Hernandez, Manuel; Hinojosa, Carlos A; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Elenes, Erika; Torre, Aldo

    2016-11-01

    Portal vein (PV) thrombosis (PVT) in the absence of liver disease or thrombophilia is rare. We report a 57-year-old male with a history of stage 3 chronic kidney disease who presented at the emergency department 18 months after abdominal surgery with progressive abdominal pain and distention. Computed tomography revealed PVT with multiple collaterals and moderate ascites. He had undergone partial gastrectomy and gastrojejunal anastomosis at an outside facility for gastrointestinal stromal tumors that caused an iatrogenic stenotic lesion in the PV. The patient underwent balloon angioplasty and endovascular deployment of an 8 mm × 100 mm Viabahn covered stent (W. L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, Arizona) in the extrahepatic PV via a transhepatic approach; the device allowed complete restoration of prograde portal flow with clinical improvement. At 6 months from the intervention, he remains symptom-free with normal liver function tests and patent endoprosthesis on antiplatelet therapy.

  20. Preoperative portal vein embolization for hepatocellular carcinoma: Consensus and controversy

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Taku; Kubota, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Thirty years have passed since the first report of portal vein embolization (PVE), and this procedure is widely adopted as a preoperative treatment procedure for patients with a small future liver remnant (FLR). PVE has been shown to be useful in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and chronic liver disease. However, special caution is needed when PVE is applied prior to subsequent major hepatic resection in cases with cirrhotic livers, and volumetric analysis of the liver segments in addition to evaluation of the liver functional reserve before PVE is mandatory in such cases. Advances in the embolic material and selection of the treatment approach, and combined use of PVE and transcatheter arterial embolization/chemoembolization have yielded improved outcomes after PVE and major hepatic resections. A novel procedure termed the associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy has been gaining attention because of the rapid hypertrophy of the FLR observed in patients undergoing this procedure, however, application of this technique in HCC patients requires special caution, as it has been shown to be associated with a high morbidity and mortality even in cases with essentially healthy livers. PMID:27028706

  1. Vasculogenic mimicry in hepatocellular carcinoma contributes to portal vein invasion

    PubMed Central

    Zhisheng, Zhang; Lin, Cui; Yayun, Qian; Feng, Jin; Hao, Gu; Shintaro, Ishikawa; Hisamitsu, Tadashi; Shiyu, Guo; Yanqing, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Portal vein invasion (PVI) is common in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and largely contributes to tumor recurrence after radical tumor resection or liver transplantation. Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) was an independent vascular system lined with tumor cells and associated with poor prognosis of HCC. The present study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between VM and portal vein invasion. A total of 44 HCC cases receiving anatomic liver resection were included in the study and were divided into groups with and without PVI. The prevalence of VM in each group was examined by CD34-PAS dual staining. The regulatory molecules of VM formation such as Notch1, Vimentin and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were investigated by immunohistochemical staining. Analysis was performed to explore the association of PVI, VM and the VM regulatory molecules. PVI was found in 40.91% (18/44) cases and VM was found in 38.64% (17/44) cases in total samples. The incidence of VM was 72.22% (13/18) in PVI group while it was 15.38% (4/26) in non-PVI group (P<0.001), VM formation was positively correlated with PVI (r=0.574, P<0.001). The VM forming regulatory molecules such as Notch1, Vimentin, MMP-2 and MMP-9 were found to be correlated with PVI in HCC patients. Taken together, our results suggested that VM formation, alone with its regulatory molecules, is the promoting factor of PVI in hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27793002

  2. Prepancreatic postduodenal portal vein: a rare vascular variant detected on imaging.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vishal Kumar; Rajesh, S; Bhatnagar, Shorav; Dev, Ankur; Mukund, Amar; Arora, Ankur

    2013-09-01

    Anomalous preduodenal portal vein is a rare abdominal vascular variant; even rarer is the prepancreatic postduodenal position. We report an anomalous portal vein positioned in between duodenum and pancreatic head detected on contrast enhanced computed tomography. Awareness and accurate radiological interpretation of this unique and rare vascular pattern can prevent inadvertent injury during surgical and radiological interventions.

  3. Calcification of Cryopreserved Arterial Graft Causing Delayed Obstruction of Portal Vein Flow After Liver Transplant.

    PubMed

    Cimsit, Bayindir; Yankol, Yucel; Mecit, Nesimi; Kanmaz, Turan; Acarli, Koray; Kalayoglu, Munci

    2015-10-01

    In patients with biliary atresia, portal vein problems may cause challenges for liver transplant. Interposition grafts have been used for vascular anastomoses in transplant recipients with varied success. A cryopreserved iliac artery graft was used for the reconstruction of the portal vein in a 29-month-old infant with biliary atresia. At 17 months after transplant, she developed upper gastrointestinal bleeding that was caused by portal vein occlusion because of vascular calcifications in the graft. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed esophageal varices with fresh bleeding, and the varices were band ligated. At 3 months after the bleeding episode, the patient was asymptomatic and biochemical tests were normal. In summary, liver transplant with cryopreserved iliac artery graft may be complicated by calcifications and portal vein occlusion, and caution is advised in using this graft material for portal vein anastomoses.

  4. Novel Image Guidance Techniques for Portal Vein Targeting During Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Creation.

    PubMed

    Farsad, Khashayar; Kaufman, John A

    2016-03-01

    The most challenging part of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation is arguably the transvenous access from the hepatic vein to the portal vein. As experience and technology have evolved, the image guidance aspect of this critical step in the procedure has become more robust. Improved means to target the portal vein include both direct and indirect methods of portal vein opacification, cross-sectional imaging for both targeting and access, and novel use of transabdominal and intravascular ultrasound guidance. These techniques are described herein.

  5. Portal flow into the liver through veins at the site of biliary-enteric anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, M; Heianna, J; Yasuda, K; Tate, E; Watarai, J; Shibata, S; Sato, T; Yamamoto, Y

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the role played by jejunal veins in hepatopetal flow after biliary-enteric anastomosis and to evaluate the helical CT features of hepatopetal flow through the anastomosis. We retrospectively analyzed helical CT images of the liver in 31 patients with biliary-enteric anastomosis who underwent hepatic angiography with (n=13) or without (n=18) CT arterial portography within 2 weeks of the CT examination during the last 4 years. Arterial portography showed hepatopetal flow through small vessels located (communicating veins) between the elevated jejunal veins and the intrahepatic portal branches in two (9%) of 22 patients with a normal portal system. Helical CT showed focal parenchymal enhancement around the anastomosis in these two patients. All nine patients with extrahepatic portal vein occlusion (100%) had hepatopetal flow through the anastomosis, and four of the nine had decreased portal flow. CT revealed small communicating veins in two of these four patients. In five patients with normal portal perfusion despite extrahepatic portal vein occlusion, CT detected dilated communicating veins and elevated jejunal veins. The presence of communicating veins and/or focal parenchymal enhancement around the anastomosis indicates hepatopetal flow through the elevated jejunal veins.

  6. Application of cystoscope in surgical treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Wei, Xu-Biao; Cheng, Shu-Qun

    2016-06-14

    Development of portal vein tumor thrombus deteriorates the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma, while surgical treatment can offer a promising prognosis for selected patients. However, the possibility of residual lesions in portal vein after conventional thrombectomy is a main risk factor leading to postoperative recurrence. Therefore, ensuring the complete removal of tumor thrombus during operation is critical to improve prognosis. For the first time, we report here one case of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus in which cystoscope was successfully applied as a substitute of intravascular endoscope to visualize the cavity of the portal vein. The patient was a 61-year-old man with a 7-cm tumor in the right lobe of the liver, with tumor thrombus invading the right branch and adjacent to the conjunction of the portal vein. After removal of the tumor, the Olympus CYF-VA2 cystoscope was used to check the portal vein from the opening stump of the right branch of the portal vein. In this case, residual thrombus tissue was found near the opening stump and the conjunction of the portal vein. The residual lesion was carefully retrieved from the stump after retraction of the cystoscope. The procedure was repeated until no residual lesion was found. The whole duration time of thrombectomy was 22.5 (15 + 7.5) min. The patient was free from recurrence at 8 months after the procedure. Our work indicated that the cystoscope is a suitable substitute, with a proper size and function to check the portal vein system and ensure the curability of thrombectomy. Although well-designed clinic trails are still needed, this procedure may further improve the postoperative prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus.

  7. Balloon-Occlusion Technique for Managing Portal Vein Hemorrhage in Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Seal, John B.; Bohorquez, Humberto; Battula, Naren; DeGregorio, Lucia; Bugeaud, Emily; Bruce, David S.; Carmody, Ian C.; Cohen, Ari J.; Loss, George E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is relatively common among candidates for liver transplantation and can present significant intraoperative challenges. Depending on the extent of PVT, thromboendovenectomy (TEV), portal bypass, or systemic inflow may be required to restore portal inflow. While TEV is the most commonly used approach to restore anatomic portal inflow, portal vein injury and life-threatening hemorrhage are risks with this technique. Case Report: We present a salvage technique for managing portal vein injury during TEV using intraluminal balloon occlusion of the portal vein during portal vein repair and reconstruction. This alternative mode of bleeding control optimizes exposure to the retropancreatic space and avoids direct application of vascular clamps that can cause further injury to the vessel and surrounding tissue. Conclusion: Careful preoperative planning and anticipation of potential problems are essential for safe and effective management of complex PVT intraoperatively. The balloon-occlusion technique can facilitate safe and efficient repair of a portal vein injury during TEV for liver transplantation. PMID:28331452

  8. Portal vein thrombosis relevance on liver cirrhosis: Italian Venous Thrombotic Events Registry.

    PubMed

    Violi, Francesco; Corazza, Roberto Gino; Caldwell, Stephen Hugh; Perticone, Francesco; Gatta, Angelo; Angelico, Mario; Farcomeni, Alessio; Masotti, Michela; Napoleone, Laura; Vestri, Annarita; Raparelli, Valeria; Basili, Stefania

    2016-12-01

    Portal vein thrombosis may occur in cirrhosis; nevertheless, its prevalence, and predictors are still elusive. To investigate this issue, the Italian Society of Internal Medicine undertook the "Portal vein thrombosis Relevance On Liver cirrhosis: Italian Venous thrombotic Events Registry" (PRO-LIVER). This prospective multicenter study includes consecutive cirrhotic patients undergoing Doppler ultrasound examination of the portal area to evaluate the prevalence and incidence of portal vein thrombosis over a 2-year scheduled follow-up. Seven hundred and fifty-three (68 % men; 64 ± 12 years) patients were included in the present analysis. Fifty percent of the cases were cirrhotic outpatients. Viral (44 %) etiology was predominant. Around half of the patients had a mild-severity disease according to the Child-Pugh score; hepatocellular carcinoma was present in 20 %. The prevalence of ultrasound-detected portal vein thrombosis was 17 % (n = 126); it was asymptomatic in 43 % of the cases. Notably, more than half of the portal vein thrombosis patients (n = 81) were not treated with anticoagulant therapy. Logistic step-forward multivariate analysis demonstrated that previous portal vein thrombosis (p < 0.001), Child-Pugh Class B + C (p < 0.001), hepatocellular carcinoma (p = 0.01), previous upper gastrointestinal bleeding (p = 0.030) and older age (p = 0.012) were independently associated with portal vein thrombosis. Portal vein thrombosis is a frequent complication of cirrhosis, particularly in patients with moderate-severe liver failure. The apparent undertreatment of patients with portal vein thrombosis is a matter of concern and debate, which should be addressed by planning interventional trials especially with newer oral anticoagulants. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01470547.

  9. Effect of carbohydrate on portal vein blood flow during exercise.

    PubMed

    Rehrer, N J; Goes, E; DuGardeyn, C; Reynaert, H; DeMeirleir, K

    2005-04-01

    Effects of carbohydrate ingestion and exercise on portal vein blood flow were studied. Flow was measured by pulsed-electronic Doppler. Eight male subjects performed four tests after a standardised breakfast and 5 h fast. Beverages were CHO (10 % glucose, 30 mmol . l (-1) NaCl) and W (water, 30 mmol . l (-1) NaCl). Exercise experiments comprised a resting measurement, 10 min warm-up and 60 min 70 % VO(2)max cycling. Every 10 min subjects stopped cycling briefly (approximately 30 s) for measurements. Beverage was consumed after warm-up (500 ml) and at 20 and 40 min (250 ml). Similar tests were done at rest. Blood samples were taken concurrently with flow measurements for hormonal concentrations. Exercise decreased blood flow (repeated measures ANOVA, p < 0.0001) and carbohydrate ingestion increased flow (p = 0.015). At rest, flow was greater with CHO than with W at 20 (177 +/- 31; 101 +/- 25 %, resp.) (mean +/- SE), 30 (209 +/- 37; 120 +/- 20 %), 40 (188 +/- 32; 108 +/- 12 %), and 60 min (195 +/- 19; 112 +/- 12 %) (1-way ANOVA, Fisher's PLSD, p < 0.05). Flow was similar during exercise with CHO and W, with a tendency for CHO to maintain flow better, at 10 (124 +/- 27; 77 +/- 21 %), 20 (81 +/- 10; 60 +/- 13 %), 30 (106 +/- 26; 56 +/- 10 %), 40 (109 +/- 28; 54 +/- 8 %), 50 (85 +/- 17; 54 +/- 13 %), and 60 min (61 +/- 15; 47 +/- 7 %). A positive correlation between glucagon and flow and an inverse correlation between noradrenaline and flow were observed. Exercise reduces, and carbohydrate increases, portal vein flow. Changes in plasma concentrations suggest that noradrenaline and glucagon, respectively, may play a role in modulating flow.

  10. Left Aberrant Gastric Vein Causing Isolated Left Hepatic Portal Venous Gas Secondary to an Incarcerated Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Kartik; Anandpara, Karan; Dey, Amit K.; Kedar, Pradnya; Hira, Priya; Kale, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) is an ominous radiological sign suggestive of underlying intestinal sepsis, infection or trauma. Portal pneumatosis secondary to gastric pathologies is rare. Case Report We report a rare case of a 34-year-old man who presented with acute epigastric pain and vomiting, diagnosed to have an incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia causing gastric pneumatosis and resultant portal venous gas. Conclusions Our case highlights an unusual presentation of gastric pneumatosis secondary to an incarcerated hiatal hernia with resultant portal venous gas involving only the left lobe of the liver. An aberrant left gastric vein was responsible for this phenomenon in our case. A sound understanding of anatomical variants is thus crucial to radiological diagnosis. PMID:26251676

  11. Portal vein thrombosis associated with protein C deficiency and elevated Factor VIII in hepatosplenic schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Leite, Luiz Arthur Calheiros; Ferreira, Rita de Cássia dos Santos; Hatzlhofer, Betânia Lucena Domingues; Correia, Maria Conceição Barros; Bandeira, Ângela Pontes; Owen, James Stuart; Lima, Vera Lúcia de Menezes; Domingues, Ana Lúcia Coutinho; Lopes, Edmundo Pessoa

    2016-03-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is considered a vaso-occlusive process that can appear during the course of hepatosplenic Schistosoma mansoni, but may result from impaired portal blood flow or be associated with acquired or inherited thrombophilic factors. Here, we report the case of a 67-year-old woman who developed thrombocytopenia as a result of hypersplenism. Following the diagnosis of hepatosplenic schistosomiasis, portal vein thrombosis was detected by ultrasound examination, while haematological tests revealed low levels of protein C (43.3%) and high levels of factor VIII (183.1%). The pathogenesis of portal vein thrombosis remains unclear in some patients with S. mansoni. We recommend, therefore, that early clinical and haemostatic investigations are done to evaluate risk of portal vein thrombosis and hence avoid further complications.

  12. Risk Factors for Portal Vein Thrombosis in Patients With Cirrhosis Awaiting Liver Transplantation in Shiraz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran; Homayon, Katayon; Motevalli, Dorna; Heidari, Seyed Taghi; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Malek-Hosseini, Seyed Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Portal vein thrombosis is a fairly common and potentially life-threatening complication in patients with liver cirrhosis. The risk factors for portal vein thrombosis in these patients are still not fully understood. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the associations between various risk factors in cirrhotic patients and the development of portal vein thrombosis. Patients and Methods: In this case-control study performed at the Shiraz organ transplantation center, Iran, we studied 219 patients (> 18 years old) with liver cirrhosis, who were awaiting liver transplants in our unit, from November 2010 to May 2011. The patients were evaluated by history, physical examination, and laboratory tests, including factor V Leiden, prothrombin gene mutation, Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) mutation, and serum levels of protein C, protein S, antithrombin III, homocysteine, factor VIII, and anticardiolipin antibodies. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the assessed hypercoagulable states between patients with or without portal vein thrombosis. A history of previous variceal bleeding with subsequent endoscopic treatment in patients with portal vein thrombosis was significantly higher than in those without it (P = 0.013, OR: 2.526, 95% CI: 1.200 - 5.317). Conclusions: In our population of cirrhotic patients, treatment of variceal bleeding predisposed the patients to portal vein thrombosis, but hypercoagulable disorders by themselves were not associated with portal vein thrombosis. PMID:26977162

  13. Hypoplasia of the left portal vein territory of the human liver: a case study.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong-Hyun; Murakami, Gen; Lee, Moo Sam; Song, Chang Ho; Han, Eui-Hyeog; Jin, Zhe-Wu; Cho, Baik-Hwan

    2003-01-01

    Although reports of hypoplasia or absence of the liver of left lobe are not few, descriptions of the intrahepatic vessels are rare but valuable for discussion of the pathogenesis. The present report demonstrates a case of the left surgical lobe hypoplasia that is characterized by 1) the scar-like lobe with few parenchymal tissue and dilated bile ducts, 2) no Spiegel's lobe with the portal vein stuck to the inferior vena cava, 3) unusual configurations of the right hepatic vein and the 8th segmental portal vein branch, 4) the hepatic groove on S8, and 5) the trifurcation pattern of the portal vein primary division. According to the macroscopic and histological observations, we hypothesized that the secondary abnormal peritoneal fusion occurred in utero and/or during the postnatal growth, and that it involved the left portal vein and other adjacent structures, resulting in severe atrophy of the left surgical lobe. PMID:14676439

  14. Portal vein delivery of viral vectors for gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Alexandra; Schlachterman, Alexander; Cooper, Mario; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Raymer, Robin A; Bellinger, Dwight A; Herzog, Roland W; Nichols, Timothy C

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a very complex organ with a large variety of functions, making it an attractive organ for gene replacement therapy. Many genetic disorders can be corrected by delivering gene products directly into the liver using viral vectors. In this chapter, we will describe gene delivery via portal vein administration in mice and dogs to correct the blood coagulation disorder hemophilia B. Although there are multiple delivery routes for both viral and non-viral vectors in animals, portal vein administration delivers vectors directly and efficiently into the liver. Complete correction of murine hemophilia B and multi-year near-correction of canine hemophilia B have been achieved following portal vein delivery of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors expressing factor IX from hepatocyte-specific promoters. Peripheral vein injection can lead to increased vector dissemination to off-target organ such as the lung and spleen. Below, we will describe portal vein injection delivery route via laparotomy.

  15. [Septic portal vein thrombosis as a rare complication of Crohn disease with retroperitoneal abscess].

    PubMed

    Diehl, S J; Lehmann, K J; Manthe, S; Georgi, M

    1996-03-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is a rare complication of inflammatory bowel disease and occurs particularly in patients with ulcerative colitis. This report describes a patient with known Crohn's disease since 1980 who developed retroperitoneal abscesses and subsequently a septic portal vein thrombosis. After 10 years of remission, clinical deterioration, jaundice, and fever occurred. An abdominal CT-study confirmed the ultrasonic presumptive diagnosis of two retroperitoneal abscesses close to the pancreas tail. Another CT, one week later, showed furthermore a portal vein thrombosis. Only by intensive care treatment was it possible to control the critical situation.

  16. Extrahepatic portal vein aneurysm after liver transplantation in a child: case report.

    PubMed

    Molinares, Beatriz; Alvarez, Sergio; García, Vanessa; Sepúlveda, Maria Elsy; Yepes, Nora Luz; Peláez, Sebastián

    2013-02-01

    Portal vein aneurysms are very rare and represent <3% of all venous aneurysms. They can be congenital or acquired. Most patients do not have liver disease at diagnosis. Although uncommon, portal vein aneurysm has been described after liver transplant. We report the case of a six-yr-old girl who presented with an aneurysm of the extrahepatic portal vein after segmental liver transplantation. Because the patient was asymptomatic and owing to its extrahepatic location, this aneurysm has been successfully followed by clinical exam and imaging for four yr.

  17. Liver transplantation in the presence of portal vein thrombosis: report from a single center.

    PubMed

    Orlando, G; De Luca, L; Toti, L; Zazza, S; Angelico, M; Casciani, C U; Tisone, G

    2004-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a frequent finding in liver transplantation, the management of which depends mainly on its extent. In cases of mild to moderate PVT, a low dissection of the portal trunk, a jump graft, or direct implantation of graft portal vein into large venous collaterals or thrombectomy offer alternatives. For severe PVT anecdotal reports suggest that cavoportal hemitransposition, portal arterialization, or combined liver and intestine transplantation may be attempted, although the results to date are not satisfactory. When extensive perivenous and venous inflammatory changes reach the infrapancreatic region, liver transplantation probably should not be performed due to the high mortality rate.

  18. Prevention and treatment of rethrombosis after liver transplantation with an implantable pump of the portal vein.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhengrong; Yan, Lunan; Zhao, Jichun; Li, Bo; Wen, Tianfu; Xu, Mingqing; Wang, Wentao; Chen, Zheyu; Yang, Jiaying

    2010-03-01

    Implantable pumps have been used to prevent deep vein thrombosis and other diseases. In this article, we report for the first time the prevention and treatment of rethrombosis of the portal vein in liver transplantation with an implantable pump of the portal vein. Four hundred four orthotopic liver transplantation cases were retrospectively reviewed and divided into 3 groups: portal vein thrombosis (PVT) patients with an implantable pump (n = 28), PVT patients without an implantable pump (n = 20), and patients without preexisting PVT (n = 356). The following parameters for the 3 groups of patients were calculated and compared: (1) preoperative parameters, including baseline data of the donors and recipients and times of graft ischemia; (2) intraoperative and postoperative parameters, including surgery time, red blood cell and plasma transfusion, platelet concentrate transfusion, bleeding and primary graft malfunction, and duration of the hospital and intensive care unit stays; and (3) follow-up information for the patency of the portal vein, rethrombosis rate, stenosis and reoperation (relaparotomy or retransplantation), in-hospital mortality, and actuarial 1-year survival rate. Among the 3 groups of recipients, no significant differences were detected in preoperative and intraoperative parameters. However, compared to PVT patients without an implantable pump, PVT patients with an implantable pump showed remarkable reductions in their postoperative hospital stay, rethrombosis, reoperation rate, and in-hospital mortality. An implantable pump of the portal vein in liver transplantation patients can prevent and facilitate the treatment of portal vein rethrombosis and is associated with a reduction of in-hospital mortality.

  19. Portal hypertensive hemorrhage from a left gastroepiploic vein caput medusa in an adhesed umbilical hernia.

    PubMed

    Sze, Daniel Y; Magsamen, Karl E; McClenathan, James H; Keeffe, Emmet B; Dake, Michael D

    2005-02-01

    Caput medusa is a frequent incidental finding in patients with portal hypertension that usually represents paraumbilical vein portosystemic collateral vessels draining into body wall systemic veins. A symptomatic caput medusa was seen in a morbidly obese patient after an umbilical hernia repair, which was fed not by the left portal vein but by the left gastroepiploic vein, in a recurrent adhesed umbilical hernia that likely contained herniated omentum. Refractory hemorrhage from this caput medusa was successfully treated by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation and balloon-occluded variceal sclerosis.

  20. Multimodality Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kang; Guo, Wei Xing; Chen, Min Shan; Mao, Yi Lei; Sun, Bei Cheng; Shi, Jie; Zhang, Yao Jun; Meng, Yan; Yang, Ye Fa; Cong, Wen Ming; Wu, Meng Chao; Lau, Wan Yee; Cheng, Shu Qun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The optimal treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) remains controversial. We aimed to investigate the best treatment for patients with HCC with PVTT. From January 2002 to January 2014, the data from all consecutive patients with HCC with PVTT who underwent surgical treatment (ST),TACE,TACE combined with sorafenib (TACE-Sor), or TACE combined with radiotherapy (TACE-RT) in the 4 largest tertiary hospitals in China were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into 3 subtypes according to the extent of PVTT in the portal vein (type I-III). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). A total of 1580 patients with HCC with PVTT were included in the study. The median survival times (MST) for ST (n = 745) for type I, II, and III patients (95% CI) were 15.9 (13.3–18.5), 12.5 (10.7–14.3), and 6.0 (4.3–7.7) months, respectively. The corresponding figures for patients after TACE (n = 604) were 9.3 (5.6–12.9), 4.9 (4.1–5.7), and 4.0 (3.1–4.9), respectively; for patients after TACE-Sor (n = 113) 12.0 (6.6–17.4), 8.9 (6.7–11.1), and 7.0 (3.0–10.9), respectively; and for patients after TACE-RT (n = 118) 12.2 (0–24.7), 10.6 (6.8–14.5), and 8.9 (5.2–12.6), respectively. Comparison among the different treatments for the 3 subtypes of PVTT patients after propensity score (PS) matching showed the effectiveness of ST to be the best for type I and type II PVTT patients, and TACE-RT was most beneficial for type III patients. Treatment was an independent risk factor of OS. ST was the best treatment for type I and II PVTT patients with Child-Pugh A and selected B liver function. TACE-RT should be given to type III PVTT patients. PMID:26986115

  1. Duodenal obstruction due to a preduodenal portal vein in a newborn.

    PubMed

    Georgacopulo, P; Vigi, V

    1980-06-01

    Intestinal obstruction due to a preduodenal portal vein is rare. A case report illustrates the possibility that in the newborn this vascular anomaly, which is often symptomless, may lead to intestinal obstruction requiring surgical correction.

  2. Obstruction of the duodenum by a preduodenal portal vein in situs inversus.

    PubMed

    Duncan, N D; Trotman, H; Seepersaud, M; Dundas, S E; Thame, M; Antoine, M

    2007-06-01

    Mirror image transposition of abdominal and thoracic viscera is termed situs inversus. Duodenal obstruction in situs inversus is rare. A preduodenal portal vein, though not uncommon in situs inversus, rarely causes duodenal obstruction. Where obstruction by a preduodenal portal vein is diagnosed, a duodeno-duodenostomy is the recommended treatment. A duodenal diaphragm and other more common causes of duodenal obstruction should also be excluded in these patients.

  3. Preduodenal portal vein and anomalous continuation of inferior vena cava: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Y; Nishimura, K; Kawakami, S; Kimura, I; Nakano, Y; Konishi, J

    1991-01-01

    Four cases of a rare congenital anomaly, preduodenal portal vein (PPV), are presented. Preduodenal portal vein is known to be frequently associated with other anomalies including intestinal malrotation, situs inversus, biliary atresia, and pancreatic, splenic, and cardiac anomalies. Of our four cases, three had azygos or hemiazygos continuation of the inferior vena cava and other anomalies. We want to call attention to association of azygos or hemiazygos continuation of inferior vena cava with PPV.

  4. Preduodenal portal vein: a 3-case series demonstrating varied presentations in infants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Hong; Cho, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Hae-Young

    2013-10-01

    Preduodenal portal vein, a rare anomaly, could be found in any age groups. In pediatrics it may present with a duodenal obstruction by itself or other coexisting anomalies; however it usually present with an asymptomatic or incidental findings during other surgery in adults. This anomaly has a clinical importance due to the possibility of accidental damage to portal vein. In addition to describing a series of 3 cases with different manifestation in infants, discuss about this anomaly with a review of relevant literature.

  5. Usefulness of artificial jump graft to portal vein thrombosis in deceased donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hong Pil; Yang, Jae Do; Bae, Sang In; Hwang, Si Eun; Cho, Baik Hwan; Yu, Hee Chul

    2015-03-01

    Severe portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is often considered a relative contraindication for living donor liver transplantation due to high associated risks and morbidity. Meanwhile, improvement in operative techniques, resulting in higher success rates has removed PVT from the list of contraindications in deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT). In this report, we describe a surgical technique for DDLT using polytetrafluoroethylene graft from the inferior mesenteric vein for portal inflow in patient with portomesenteric thrombosis.

  6. Increased reactivity to 5-hydroxytryptamine of portal veins from mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Silva, C L; Morel, N; Lenzi, H L; Noël, F

    1998-07-01

    In chronic severe infection with Schistosoma mansoni, portal hypertension accompanied by anatomical changes of the portal vasculature can develop as a consequence of granulomatous response to eggs. Mice infected unisexually with male worms were used in the present study in order to investigate a direct effect of worms on the reactivity of their host portal vein. A higher reactivity in the presence of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), but not in the presence of KCl 100 mM solution, was observed in portal vein from infected mice compared to healthy mice. It was characterized by an increase in the maximal contraction and sensitivity to 5-HT. Blockade of NO-synthase with N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) induced a small increase in 5-HT potency in the portal vein from non-infected mice, but did not change the amplitude of the contractions. In portal veins from infected mice, preincubation with L-NAME did not affect the reactivity to 5-HT. Histological analysis indicated endothelial damage, subendothelial fibrous plaques, and focal areas of inflammatory infiltrates in the adventitial layer. As a conclusion, these results show that unisexual infection of mice with male S. mansoni increased the reactivity of the portal vein to 5-HT which seems to be only partially related to an alteration in the endothelial production of nitric oxide.

  7. Portal Vein Embolization: Impact of Chemotherapy and Genetic Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Deipolyi, Amy R.; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Khademhosseini, Ali; Naidu, Sailendra; Borad, Mitesh; Sahin, Burcu; Mathur, Amit K.; Oklu, Rahmi

    2017-01-01

    We characterized the effect of systemic therapy given after portal vein embolization (PVE) and before hepatectomy on hepatic tumor and functional liver remnant (FLR) volumes. All 76 patients who underwent right PVE from 2002–2016 were retrospectively studied. Etiologies included colorectal cancer (n = 44), hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 17), cholangiocarcinoma (n = 10), and other metastases (n = 5). Imaging before and after PVE was assessed. Chart review revealed systemic therapy administration, SNaPshot genetic profiling, and comorbidities. Nine patients received systemic therapy; 67 did not. Tumor volume increased 28% in patients who did not receive and decreased −24% in patients who did receive systemic therapy (p = 0.026), with no difference in FLR growth (28% vs. 34%; p = 0.645). Among 30 patients with genetic profiling, 15 were wild type and 15 had mutations. Mutations were an independent predictor of tumor growth (p = 0.049), but did not impact FLR growth (32% vs. 28%; p = 0.93). Neither cirrhosis, hepatic steatosis, nor diabetes impacted changes in tumor or FLR volume (p > 0.20). Systemic therapy administered after PVE before hepatic lobectomy had no effect on FLR growth; however, it was associated with decreasing tumor volumes. Continuing systemic therapy until hepatectomy may be warranted, particularly in patients with genetic mutations. PMID:28257031

  8. 3D modeling of patient-specific geometries of portal veins using MR images.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; George, Stephanie; Martin, Diego R; Tannenbaum, Allen R; Giddens, Don P

    2006-01-01

    In this note, we present an approach for developing patient-specific 3D models of portal veins to provide geometric boundary conditions for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the blood flow inside portal veins. The study is based on MRI liver images of individual patients to which we apply image registration and segmentation techniques and inlet and outlet velocity profiles acquired using PC-MRI in the same imaging session. The portal vein and its connected veins are then extracted and visualized in 3D as surfaces. Image registration is performed to align shifted images between each breath-hold when the MRI images are acquired. The image segmentation method first labels each voxel in the 3D volume of interest by using a Bayesian probability approach, and then isolates the portal veins via active surfaces initialized inside the vessel. The method was tested with two healthy volunteers. In both cases, the main portal vein and its connected veins were successfully modeled and visualized.

  9. Percutaneous Mesocaval Shunt Creation in a Patient with Chronic Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bercu, Zachary L. Sheth, Sachin B.; Noor, Amir; Lookstein, Robert A. Fischman, Aaron M. Nowakowski, F. Scott Kim, Edward Patel, Rahul S.

    2015-10-15

    The creation of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is a critical procedure for the treatment of recurrent variceal bleeding and refractory ascites in the setting of portal hypertension. Chronic portal vein thrombosis remains a relative contraindication to conventional TIPS and options are limited in this scenario. Presented is a novel technique for management of refractory ascites in a patient with hepatitis C cirrhosis and chronic portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis secondary to schistosomiasis and lupus anticoagulant utilizing fluoroscopically guided percutaneous mesocaval shunt creation.

  10. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt in a Patient with Cavernomatous Portal Vein Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamata, Hiroshi; Kumazaki, Tatsuo; Kanazawa, Hidenori; Takahashi, Shuji; Tajima, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Hiromitsu

    2000-03-15

    A 23-year-old woman with liver cirrhosis secondary to primary sclerosing cholangitis was referred to us for the treatment of recurrent bleeding from esophageal varices that had been refractory to endoscopic sclerotherapy. Her portal vein was occluded, associated with cavernous transformation. A transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was performed after a preprocedural three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography evaluation to determine feasibility. The portal vein system was recanalized and portal blood flow increased markedly after TIPS. Esophageal varices disappeared 3 weeks after TIPS. Re-bleeding and hepatic encephalopathy were absent for 3 years after the procedure. We conclude that with adequate preprocedural evaluation, TIPS can be performed safely even in patients with portal vein occlusion associated with cavernous transformation.

  11. The inferior mesenteric vein to the left gonadal vein shunt for gastroesophageal varices and extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis after living donor liver transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Sato, Y; Yamamoto, S; Oya, H; Kokai, H; Hatakeyama, K

    2012-03-01

    This 59-year-old woman underwent living donor liver transplantation using a left lobe graft as an aid for autoimmune hepatitis in 2003. Splenectomy was also performed because of blood type incompatibility. Follow-up endoscopic and computed tomography examinations showed gastroesophageal varices with extra hepatic portal vein thrombosis in 2007 that increased (esophageal varices [EV]: locus superior [Ls], moderately enlarged, beady varices [F2], Blue varices [Cb], presence of small in number and localized red color sign [RC1] and telangiectasia [TE+], gastric varices [GV]: extension from the cardiac orifice to the fornix [Lg-cf], moderately enlarged, beady varices [F2], white varices [Cw], absence of red color sign [RC-]). Portal venous flow to the gastroesophageal varices was also confirmed from a large right gastric vein. The splenic vein was thrombosed. Blood flow to the liver graft was totally supplied from the hepatic artery. The graft was functioning well. Because these gastroesophageal varices had a high risk of variceal bleeding, we decided to proceed with a portal reconstruction of a surgical portosystemic shunt in 2008. Severe adhesions were observed around the portal vein. It was impossible to perform portal reconstruction. There were relatively fewes adhesious in the left lower side of the abdominal cavity. We decided to create an inferior mesenteric vein to left gonadal vein shunt. The portal vein pressure decreased from 31.0 to 21.5 cm H2O thereafter. The postoperative course was smooth without any complication. This patient was discharged on the postoperative day 15. Follow-up endoscopic study showed the improvement in the gastroesophageal varices (EV: Ls, F2, Cb, RC(-), GV: Lg-c, F2, Cw, RC-) at 3 months after the operation. We also comfirmed the patency of the shunt by serial computed tomography examinations.

  12. Transsinusoidal Portal Vein Embolization with Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (Onyx): A Feasibility Study in Pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Smits, Maarten L. J.; Vanlangenhove, Peter Sturm, Emiel J. C.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Hav, Monirath Praet, Marleen; Vente, Maarten A. D.; Snaps, Frederic R.; Defreyne, Luc

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Portal vein embolization is performed to increase the future liver remnant before liver surgery in patients with liver malignancies. This study assesses the feasibility of a transsinusoidal approach for portal vein embolization (PVE) with the ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer, Onyx. Methods: Indirect portography through contrast injection in the cranial mesenteric artery was performed in eight healthy pigs. Onyx was slowly injected through a microcatheter from a wedged position in the hepatic vein and advanced through the liver lobules into the portal system. The progression of Onyx was followed under fluoroscopy, and the extent of embolization was monitored by indirect portography. The pigs were euthanized immediately (n = 2), at 7 days (n = 4), or at 21 days postprocedure (n = 2). All pigs underwent necropsy and the ex vivo livers were grossly and histopathologically analyzed. Results: Transsinusoidal PVE was successfully performed in five of eight pigs (63%). In 14 of 21 injections (67%), a segmental portal vein could be filled completely. A mean of 1.6 liver lobes per pig was embolized (range 1-2 lobes). There were no periprocedural adverse events. Focal capsular scarring was visible on the surface of two resected livers, yet the capsules remained intact. Histopathological examination showed no signs of recanalization or abscess formation. Mild inflammatory reaction to Onyx was observed in the perivascular parenchyma. Conclusions: The porcine portal vein can be embolized through injection of Onyx from a wedged position in the hepatic vein. Possible complications of transsinusoidal PVE and the effect on contralateral hypertrophy need further study.

  13. Portal Vein Embolization Before Liver Resection: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Lienden, K. P. van; Esschert, J. W. van den; Graaf, W. de; Bipat, S.; Lameris, J. S.; Gulik, T. M. van; Delden, O. M. van

    2013-02-15

    This is a review of literature on the indications, technique, and outcome of portal vein embolization (PVE). A systematic literature search on outcome of PVE from 1990 to 2011 was performed in Medline, Cochrane, and Embase databases. Forty-four articles were selected, including 1,791 patients with a mean age of 61 {+-} 4.1 years. Overall technical success rate was 99.3 %. The mean hypertrophy rate of the FRL after PVE was 37.9 {+-} 0.1 %. In 70 patients (3.9 %), surgery was not performed because of failure of PVE (clinical success rate 96.1 %). In 51 patients (2.8 %), the hypertrophy response was insufficient to perform liver resection. In the other 17 cases, 12 did not technically succeed (0.7 %) and 7 caused a complication leading to unresectability (0.4 %). In 6.1 %, resection was cancelled because of local tumor progression after PVE. Major complications were seen in 2.5 %, and the mortality rate was 0.1 %. A head-to-head comparison shows a negative effect of liver cirrhosis on hypertrophy response. The use of n-butyl cyanoacrylate seems to have a greater effect on hypertrophy, but the difference with other embolization materials did not reach statistical significance. No difference in regeneration is seen in patients with cholestasis or chemotherapy. Preoperative PVE has a high technical and clinical success rate. Liver cirrhosis has a negative effect on regeneration, but cholestasis and chemotherapy do not seem to have an influence on the hypertrophy response. The use of n-butyl cyanoacrylate may result in a greater hypertrophy response compared with other embolization materials used.

  14. Imaging and radiological interventions in extra-hepatic portal vein obstruction.

    PubMed

    Pargewar, Sudheer S; Desai, Saloni N; Rajesh, S; Singh, Vaibhav P; Arora, Ankur; Mukund, Amar

    2016-06-28

    Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) is a primary vascular condition characterized by chronic long standing blockage and cavernous transformation of portal vein with or without additional involvement of intrahepatic branches, splenic or superior mesenteric vein. Patients generally present in childhood with multiple episodes of variceal bleed and EHPVO is the predominant cause of paediatric portal hypertension (PHT) in developing countries. It is a pre-hepatic type of PHT in which liver functions and morphology are preserved till late. Characteristic imaging findings include multiple parabiliary venous collaterals which form to bypass the obstructed portal vein with resultant changes in biliary tree termed portal biliopathy or portal cavernoma cholangiopathy. Ultrasound with Doppler, computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiography and magnetic resonance portovenography are non-invasive techniques which can provide a comprehensive analysis of degree and extent of EHPVO, collaterals and bile duct abnormalities. These can also be used to assess in surgical planning as well screening for shunt patency in post-operative patients. The multitude of changes and complications seen in EHPVO can be addressed by various radiological interventional procedures. The myriad of symptoms arising secondary to vascular, biliary, visceral and neurocognitive changes in EHPVO can be managed by various radiological interventions like transjugular intra-hepatic portosystemic shunt, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, partial splenic embolization, balloon occluded retrograde obliteration of portosystemic shunt (PSS) and revision of PSS.

  15. The design and fabrication of two portal vein flow phantoms by different methods

    SciTech Connect

    Yunker, Bryan E. Lanning, Craig J.; Shandas, Robin; Hunter, Kendall S.; Chen, S. James

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: This study outlines the design and fabrication techniques for two portal vein flow phantoms. Methods: A materials study was performed as a precursor to this phantom fabrication effort and the desired material properties are restated for continuity. A three-dimensional portal vein pattern was created from the Visual Human database. The portal vein pattern was used to fabricate two flow phantoms by different methods with identical interior surface geometry using computer aided design software tools and rapid prototyping techniques. One portal flow phantom was fabricated within a solid block of clear silicone for use on a table with Ultrasound or within medical imaging systems such as MRI, CT, PET, or SPECT. The other portal flow phantom was fabricated as a thin walled tubular latex structure for use in water tanks with Ultrasound imaging. Both phantoms were evaluated for usability and durability. Results: Both phantoms were fabricated successfully and passed durability criteria for flow testing in the next project phase. Conclusions: The fabrication methods and materials employed for the study yielded durable portal vein phantoms.

  16. The design and fabrication of two portal vein flow phantoms by different methods

    PubMed Central

    Yunker, Bryan E.; Dodd, Gerald D.; Chen, S. James; Chang, Samuel; Lanning, Craig J.; Scherzinger, Ann L.; Shandas, Robin; Feng, Yusheng; Hunter, Kendall S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study outlines the design and fabrication techniques for two portal vein flow phantoms. Methods: A materials study was performed as a precursor to this phantom fabrication effort and the desired material properties are restated for continuity. A three-dimensional portal vein pattern was created from the Visual Human database. The portal vein pattern was used to fabricate two flow phantoms by different methods with identical interior surface geometry using computer aided design software tools and rapid prototyping techniques. One portal flow phantom was fabricated within a solid block of clear silicone for use on a table with Ultrasound or within medical imaging systems such as MRI, CT, PET, or SPECT. The other portal flow phantom was fabricated as a thin walled tubular latex structure for use in water tanks with Ultrasound imaging. Both phantoms were evaluated for usability and durability. Results: Both phantoms were fabricated successfully and passed durability criteria for flow testing in the next project phase. Conclusions: The fabrication methods and materials employed for the study yielded durable portal vein phantoms. PMID:24506653

  17. Imaging and radiological interventions in extra-hepatic portal vein obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pargewar, Sudheer S; Desai, Saloni N; Rajesh, S; Singh, Vaibhav P; Arora, Ankur; Mukund, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) is a primary vascular condition characterized by chronic long standing blockage and cavernous transformation of portal vein with or without additional involvement of intrahepatic branches, splenic or superior mesenteric vein. Patients generally present in childhood with multiple episodes of variceal bleed and EHPVO is the predominant cause of paediatric portal hypertension (PHT) in developing countries. It is a pre-hepatic type of PHT in which liver functions and morphology are preserved till late. Characteristic imaging findings include multiple parabiliary venous collaterals which form to bypass the obstructed portal vein with resultant changes in biliary tree termed portal biliopathy or portal cavernoma cholangiopathy. Ultrasound with Doppler, computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiography and magnetic resonance portovenography are non-invasive techniques which can provide a comprehensive analysis of degree and extent of EHPVO, collaterals and bile duct abnormalities. These can also be used to assess in surgical planning as well screening for shunt patency in post-operative patients. The multitude of changes and complications seen in EHPVO can be addressed by various radiological interventional procedures. The myriad of symptoms arising secondary to vascular, biliary, visceral and neurocognitive changes in EHPVO can be managed by various radiological interventions like transjugular intra-hepatic portosystemic shunt, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, partial splenic embolization, balloon occluded retrograde obliteration of portosystemic shunt (PSS) and revision of PSS. PMID:27358683

  18. Atresia of right pulmonary veins and anomalous left pulmonary venous drainage into portal circulation

    PubMed Central

    Šamánek, M.; Tůma, S.; Benešová, D.; Povýšilová, V.; Pražský, F.; Čápová, E.

    1974-01-01

    Šamánek, M., Tůma, S., Benešová, D., Povýšilová, V., Pražský, F., and Čápová, E. (1974).Thorax, 29, 446-450. Atresia of right pulmonary veins and anomalous left pulmonary venous drainage into portal circulation. An anomaly of pulmonary venous drainage in a male newborn infant is described whereby the left pulmonary veins entered the portal vein and the right pulmonary veins were atretic. A correct diagnosis was made by detecting high-oxygen saturation in the hepatic veins, right-to-left shunt at atrial level, and increased pulmonary artery wedge pressure in comparison with the left atrial pressure, and was confirmed by angiography. Images PMID:4850684

  19. Percutaneous Retroperitoneal Splenorenal Shunt for Symptomatic Portal Vein Thrombosis After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pulitano, C; Rogan, C; Sandroussi, C; Verran, D; McCaughan, G W; Waugh, R; Crawford, M

    2015-08-01

    Acute or recurrent bleeding from ectopic varices is a potentially life-threatening condition in rare patients with extrahepatic complete portal vein thrombosis (PVT) after liver transplantation (LT). In this setting, the role of interventional radiology is very limited and surgical shunts, in particular splenorenal shunts are usually used, despite the high associated mortality. We present the first reports of the clinical use of a new minimally invasive technique, percutaneous retroperitoneal splenorenal shunt (PRESS), in two LT recipients with life-threatening variceal hemorrhage secondary to PVT. Both patients had a successful PRESS using a transplenic approach with resolution of bleeding, avoiding the need for a potentially complicated laparotomy. The PRESS procedure is a useful addition to the interventional armamentarium that can be used in cases unsuitable for surgical shunt, and refractory to endoscopic management. In the future, this technique may be an alternative to surgical shunts as the standard procedure in patients with extra-hepatic PVT, just as the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure has become for the management of portal hypertension in the absence of PVT. Longer-term follow-up will be needed to establish the long-term success of this procedure.

  20. Portal veins of mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni exhibit an increased reactivity to 5-hydroxytryptamine.

    PubMed

    Silva, C L; Morel, N; Noël, F

    1998-01-01

    In chronic severe infection with Schistosoma mansoni, portal hypertension and related vascular alterations usually develop as a consequence of granulomatous response to eggs. In order to investigate a putative direct effect of worms on the reactivity of their host portal vein, mice infected only with male worms were used in the present study. An higher reactivity to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) characterized by an increase in the maximal contraction and sensitivity was observed in portal vein from infected mice compared to healthy mice. Blockade of NO-synthase with l-NAME induced a small increase in 5-HT potency in portal vein from non-infected mice without changing the amplitude of the contractions, whereas it did not alter the reactivity of veins from infected mice. The present results show that unisexual infection of mice with male S. mansoni increased the reactivity of the portal vein to 5-HT which seems to be partially related to an alteration in the nitric oxide release by endothelium.

  1. Multimodality imaging of primary extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO): what every radiologist should know

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, S K

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a frequent complication of liver cirrhosis, but it can also occur as a primary vascular disorder amid absent liver disease. Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) refers to the obstruction of the extrahepatic portal vein with or without involvement of the intrahepatic portal vein branches, splenic and/or superior mesenteric vein. It is a distinct disorder that excludes PVT occurring in concurrence with liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The term “EHPVO” implies chronicity and is principally reserved for a long-standing condition characterized by cavernous transformation of the portal vein. The most characteristic imaging manifestation is the formation of portoportal collaterals (via the venous plexi of Petren and Saint) that allow hepatopetal flow. However, this collateral circulation is insufficient resulting in clinically significant pre-hepatic portal hypertension, wherein the liver function and structure remain preserved until late. Although the long-term (more than 10 years) survival with controlled variceal bleeding is up to 100%, affected individuals have an impaired quality of life owing to portal cavernoma cholangiopathy, hypersplenism, neurocognitive dysfunction and growth retardation. Imaging diagnosis is not always straightforward as the collaterals can also present as a tumour-like solid mass that can be inadvertently biopsied. Moreover, EHPVO has its implications for the biliary tree, arterial circulation, liver/splenic volumes and stiffness, which merit proper understanding but have not been so well described in literature. In this review, we present the complete spectrum of the vascular, biliary and visceral changes with a particular emphasis on what our medical/surgical hepatology colleagues need to know from us in the pre-operative and post-operative settings. PMID:26111208

  2. Cellular mechanisms involved in the increased contraction of portal veins from Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, C L M; Lenzi, H L; Silva, V F M; Paulo, F O; Noël, F

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported that portal veins from mice infected with male Schistosoma mansoni exhibited an increased reactivity to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Here, we extended our observations to mice infected by both male and female worms and we further investigated another constrictor agent and the mechanism(s) responsible for the enhanced maximal contraction ( E(max)). Bisexual infection increased the E(max) of 5-HT (from 0.66+/-0.06 mN.s to 1.56+/-0.38 mN.s), in a similar way to the unisexual (male) infection. Infection with male worms increased portal vein reactivity to acetylcholine, as revealed by a higher E(max) (1.03+/-0.2 mN.s) in relation to non-infected control animals ( E(max)= 0.54+/-0.08 mN.s). Sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) inhibition with 100 nM thapsigargin reduced the E(max) of 5-HT by 35% in both tissues, discharging a deficiency of SERCA pump in infected animals. In contrast, the number of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (L-type) was higher in portal veins from infected than non-infected control mice. Inhibition of Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels (Cl(Ca)) with 10 micro M niflumic acid reduced the E(max) of 5-HT in portal veins more from infected than non-infected animals (remaining tension = 60.9+/-2.2% and 70.4+/-2.3%, respectively). Histopathological analysis revealed an increased content of collagen and elastin in portal veins from male S. mansoni-infected mice, compatible with an increased intraluminal pressure. In conclusion, male S. mansoni altered portal vein physiology, increasing the E(max) of two vasoconstrictors, possibly by increasing membrane depolarisation through a more effective opening of Cl(Ca) channels, with calcium entering through L-type Ca(2+) channels.

  3. Intrahepatic Left to Right Portoportal Venous Collateral Vascular Formation in Patients Undergoing Right Portal Vein Ligation

    SciTech Connect

    Lienden, K. P. van; Hoekstra, L. T.; Bennink, R. J.; Gulik, T. M. van

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: We investigated intrahepatic vascular changes in patients undergoing right portal vein ligation (PVL) or portal vein embolization (PVE) in conjunction with the ensuing hypertrophic response and function of the left liver lobe. Methods: Between December 2008 and October 2011, 7 patients underwent right PVL and 14 patients PVE. Computed tomographic (CT) volumetry to assess future remnant liver (FRL) and functional hepatobiliary scintigraphy were performed in all patients before and 3 weeks after portal vein occlusion. In 18 patients an intraoperative portography was performed to assess perfusion through the occluded portal branches. Results: In all patients after initially successful PVL, reperfused portal veins were observed on CT scan 3 weeks after portal occlusion. This was confirmed in all cases during intraoperative portography. Intrahepatic portoportal collaterals were identified in all patients in the PVL group and in one patient in the PVE group. In all other PVE patients, complete occlusion of the embolized portal branches was observed on CT scan and on intraoperative portography. The median increase of FRL volume after PVE was 41.6 % (range 10-305 %), and after PVL was only 8.1 % (range 0-102 %) (p = 0.179). There were no differences in FRL function between both groups. Conclusion: Preoperative PVE and PVL are both methods to induce hypertrophy of the FRL in anticipation of major liver resection. Compared to PVE, PVL seems less efficient in inducing hypertrophy of the nonoccluded left lobe. This could be caused by the formation of intrahepatic portoportal neocollateral vessels, through which the ligated portal branches are reperfused within 3 weeks.

  4. Gastric pneumatosis associated with preduodenal portal vein, duodenal atresia, and asplenia.

    PubMed

    Kataria, R; Bhatnagar, V; Wadhwa, S; Mitra, D K

    1998-11-01

    An 8-day-old newborn presented with non-bilious vomiting, upper abdominal fullness, and failure to pass meconium. Plain radiographs revealed gastric pneumatosis (GP). At operation, he was found to have a non-obstructive preduodenal portal vein, preampullary duodenal atresia, asplenia, and malrotation. The baby was treated by duodeno-duodenostomy without mobilizing the portal vein and correction of the malrotation according to Ladd's procedure. He made an uneventful recovery and the GP resolved spontaneously. The malformative process was believed to have occurred at or soon after the 5th week of gestation, and the GP probably resulted from intramural air tracking through mucosal tears caused by high intragastric pressure.

  5. Case report of biliary atresia associated with preduodenal portal vein, ventricular septal defect and bilobed spleen.

    PubMed

    Yamagiwa, I; Ohta, M; Obata, K; Washio, M

    1988-04-01

    A case report of biliary atresia associated with preduodenal portal vein is presented with a review of 27 similar cases previously reported. The occurrence of associated anomalies in these 28 cases has a much higher frequency (82%) than coincidental association. They were associated with cardiovascular anomalies in 71%, polysplenia in 68%, malrotation of the intestine in 61%, situs inversus in 22% and duodenal atresia in 9%. Developmental anomaly is considered to participate strongly in the aetiology of biliary atresia combined with preduodenal portal vein.

  6. Preduodenal portal vein in association with midgut malrotation and duodenal web-triple anomaly?

    PubMed

    Singal, Arbinder Kumar; Ramu, Chithra; Paul, Sarah; Matthai, John

    2009-02-01

    Preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) is a rare anomaly in which the portal vein passes anterior to the duodenum rather than posteriorly. Generally asymptomatic, PDPV may rarely cause duodenal obstruction or may coexist with other anomalies. We report a neonate who presented with duodenal obstruction and was found out to have 3 coexisting anomalies, each of which can lead to duodenal obstruction independently-PDPV, midgut malrotation, and duodenal web. A duodenoduodenostomy and a Ladd procedure were done, and the child recovered uneventfully. The mechanism of obstruction, interesting metabolic aberrations observed, outcome, and relevant literature are presented.

  7. Malrotation of the intestine and preduodenal portal vein associated with abdominal situs inversus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Rosa; Lugo-Vicente, Humberto

    2007-03-01

    Abdominal situs inversus is a rare condition usually associated with malformations of asymmetric organs such as the heart, liver, spleen and malrotation of the intestines. A case of abdominal situs inversus with intestinal malrotation and preduodenal portal vein is reported. Patient underwent prophylactic Ladd's procedure and preduodenal portal vein was left undisturbed during surgery. This case highlights the importance of rigorous investigation of anatomic features prior to surgery in a patient with heterotaxia. The authors advocate radiological investigation of patients with heterotaxia and prophylactic Ladd's procedure in those with intestinal malrotation.

  8. Neonatal intestinal volvulus and preduodenal portal vein associated with situs ambiguus: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshihiko; Nakano, Miwako; Yamazawa, Kazuki; Maeyama, Katsuhiro; Endo, Masao

    2011-05-01

    Situs ambiguus is a rare lateralization anomaly that is frequently associated with other malformations, including preduodenal portal vein (PDPV), intestinal malrotation, and cardiovascular anomalies. This is a case report on a newborn that was clinically diagnosed with situs ambiguus and midgut volvulus. During surgery the patient was found to have intestinal malrotation, Meckel's diverticulum, and PDPV that was not a direct cause of duodenal obstruction. The patient was treated with Ladd's procedure and resection of Meckel's diverticulum. It is important to be familiar with the spectrum of situs anomalies to prevent trauma to the portal vein with serious complications during surgery.

  9. Preduodenal portal vein: a 3-case series demonstrating varied presentations in infants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Hae-Young

    2013-01-01

    Preduodenal portal vein, a rare anomaly, could be found in any age groups. In pediatrics it may present with a duodenal obstruction by itself or other coexisting anomalies; however it usually present with an asymptomatic or incidental findings during other surgery in adults. This anomaly has a clinical importance due to the possibility of accidental damage to portal vein. In addition to describing a series of 3 cases with different manifestation in infants, discuss about this anomaly with a review of relevant literature. PMID:24106688

  10. A totally laparoscopic associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy assisted with radiofrequency (radiofrequency assisted liver partition with portal vein ligation) for staged liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, David N.; Gall, Tamara M. H.; Fajardo, Ana; Pencavel, Tim D.; Fan, Ruifang; Sodergren, Mikael H.

    2016-01-01

    In order to induce liver hypertrophy to enable liver resection in patients with a small future liver remnant (FLR), various methods have been proposed in addition to portal vein embolisation (PVE). Most recently, the associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) technique has gained significant international interest. This technique is limited by the high morbidity associated with an in situ liver splitting and the patient undergoing two open operations. We present the case of a variant ALPPS technique performed entirely laparoscopically with no major morbidity or mortality. An increased liver volume of 57.9% was seen after 14 days. This technique is feasible to perform and compares favourably to other ALPPS methods whilst gaining the advantages of laparoscopic surgery. PMID:27500150

  11. An anomalous portal vein crossing the lesser sac and ending at the upper part of ductus venosus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hee Chul; Murakami, Gen; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Cho, Baik Hwan

    2015-01-01

    In serial sagittal sections of a fetus on week 9 (crown-rump length, 36 mm), we incidentally found absence of the usual portal vein through the hepatoduodenal ligament. Instead, an anomalous portal vein originated behind the pancreatic body, crossed the lesser sac and merged with the upper part of the ductus venosus. During the course across the lesser sac, the vein provided a deep notch of the liver caudate lobe (Spiegel's lobe). The hepatoduodenal ligament contained the hepatic artery, the common bile duct and, at the right posterior margin of the ligament, and a branch of the anomalous portal vein which communicated with the usual right branch of the portal vein at the hepatic hilum. The umbilical portion of the portal vein took a usual morphology and received the umbilical vein and gave off the ductus venosus. Although it seemed not to be described yet, the present anomalous portal vein was likely to be a persistent left vitelline vein. The hepatoduodenal ligament was unlikely to include the left vitelline vein in contrast to the usual concept. PMID:26417483

  12. Hydatid liver cyst causing portal vein thrombosis and cavernous transformation: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kirmizi, Serdar; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Yilmaz, Sezai

    2016-01-01

    A 33-year-old male with abdominal distention after meals was admitted to the hospital. He had a history of surgery for hydatid liver cyst. The cyst was located at the liver hilum and there were portal venous thrombosis and cavernous transformation. It had been treated with partial cystectomy, omentoplasty and albendazole. Two years later at the admission to our center, his laboratory tests were in normal ranges. Abdominal imaging methods revealed splenomegaly, portal vein thrombosis, cavernous transformation and the previously operated hydatid liver cyst. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy demonstrated esophageal and gastric fundal varices. Due to his young age and low risk for surgery, the patient was planned for surgical treatment of both pathologies at the same time. At laparotomy, hydatid liver cyst was obliterated with omentum and there was no sign of active viable hydatid disease. A meso-caval shunt with an 8 mm in-diameter graft was created. In the postoperative period, his symptoms and endoscopic varices were regressed. There were four similar cases reported in the literature. This one was the youngest and the only one treated by a surgical shunt. Hydatid liver cysts that located around the hilum can lead to portal vein thrombosis and cavernous thrombosis. Treatment should consist of both hydatid liver cyst and portal hypertension. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first case of surgically treated portal vein thrombosis that was originated from a hydatid liver cyst. PMID:27895860

  13. Hydatid liver cyst causing portal vein thrombosis and cavernous transformation: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kirmizi, Serdar; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Yilmaz, Sezai

    2016-01-01

    A 33-year-old male with abdominal distention after meals was admitted to the hospital. He had a history of surgery for hydatid liver cyst. The cyst was located at the liver hilum and there were portal venous thrombosis and cavernous transformation. It had been treated with partial cystectomy, omentoplasty and albendazole. Two years later at the admission to our center, his laboratory tests were in normal ranges. Abdominal imaging methods revealed splenomegaly, portal vein thrombosis, cavernous transformation and the previously operated hydatid liver cyst. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy demonstrated esophageal and gastric fundal varices. Due to his young age and low risk for surgery, the patient was planned for surgical treatment of both pathologies at the same time. At laparotomy, hydatid liver cyst was obliterated with omentum and there was no sign of active viable hydatid disease. A meso-caval shunt with an 8 mm in-diameter graft was created. In the postoperative period, his symptoms and endoscopic varices were regressed. There were four similar cases reported in the literature. This one was the youngest and the only one treated by a surgical shunt. Hydatid liver cysts that located around the hilum can lead to portal vein thrombosis and cavernous thrombosis. Treatment should consist of both hydatid liver cyst and portal hypertension. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first case of surgically treated portal vein thrombosis that was originated from a hydatid liver cyst.

  14. LIVER FUNCTION AFTER IRRADIATION BASED UPON CT PORTAL VEIN PERFUSION IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Pan, Charlie; Balter, James M.; Platt, Joel F.; Francis, Isaac R.; Knol, James A.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The role of radiation in the treatment of intrahepatic cancer is limited by the development of radiation-induced liver disease (RILD), which occurs weeks after the course of radiation is completed. We hypothesized that, as the pathophysiology of RILD is veno-occlusive disease, we could assess individual and regional liver sensitivity to radiation by measuring liver perfusion during a course of treatment using dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) scanning. Materials and Methods Patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing conformal radiotherapy underwent DCE-CT (to measure perfusion distribution) and an indocyanine extraction study (to measure liver function) prior to, during, and one month after treatment. We wished to determine if the residual functioning liver (i.e. those regions showing portal vein perfusion) could be used to predict overall liver function after irradiation. Results Radiation doses from 45 to 84 Gy resulted in undectable regional portal vein perfusion one month after treatment. The volume of each liver with undectable portal vein perfusion ranged from 0% to 39% and depended both on the patient’s sensitivity and dose distribution. There was a significant correlation between indocyanine green clearance and the mean of the estimated portal vein perfusion in the functional liver parenchyma (P < .001). Conclusion This study reveals substantial individual variability in the sensitivity of the liver to irradiation. In addition, these findings suggest that hepatic perfusion imaging may be a marker for liver function, and has the potential to be a tool for individualizing therapy. PMID:17855011

  15. Direct Portal Vein Thrombosis Visualization with T2*-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuanming; Hu, Alice; Haacke, Mark; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Jun; Zhou, Daiquan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To investigate the feasibility of direct magnetic resonance portal vein thrombosis (PVT) visualization with T2*-weighted imaging (T2*WI) without contrast agent. METHODS: Thirty patients with PVT were included in this study. All of them were imaged with contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) as well as non-contrast MRI T1, T2 and T2*WI. Imaging data was independently analyzed by two experienced radiologists. T2*WI of all PVT was compared slice-by-slice with each of the comparison sequences (T1WI, T2WI and CE-CT) on the following categories: the location, size, boundary, and conspicuity of thrombus and portal veins. RESULTS: The average score of PVT visualization in T2*WI was higher than T1WI and T2WI in location, size, boundary and conspicuity (t = 7.54 - 84.16, P<0.05), and higher than CE-CT in boundary and conspicuity (t = 3.03- 6.98, P<0.05). For portal vein visualization, there was no significant score difference in left, middle and right portal veins between CE-CT and T2*WI (t = -1.76- 1.35, P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest T2*WI can characterize PVT accurately with high quality without the use of intravenous contrast agents. PMID:24046533

  16. Esophageal and duodenal atresia with preduodenal common bile duct and portal vein in a newborn.

    PubMed

    Patti, G; Marrocco, G; Mazzoni, G; Catarci, A

    1985-04-01

    The presence of a preduodenal portal vein is an extremely rare event. Even rarer is its association with a preduodenal position of the common bile duct. In the case reported both these abnormalities were simultaneously associated with an esophageal atresia without fistula and atresia of the second duodenal portion.

  17. Obesity is an independent risk factor for pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis in liver recipients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Portal vein thrombosis is a frequent complication in end-stage cirrhosis with a considerable peri-operative risk for liver transplant candidates. We aimed to characterize the pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis in a cohort of liver transplant recipients, and to identify independent risk factors for this complication. Methods 380 consecutive primary orthotopic liver transplants were performed in the Digestive Surgery Department of “12 de Octubre” Hospital (Madrid, Spain), between January 2001 and December 2006. The main risk factors considered were smoking, obesity, metabolic disorders, previous immobility, surgery or trauma, nephrotic syndrome, associated tumor, inflammatory disease, neoplasm myeloprolipherative. Furthermore we have reported genetic thrombophilia results for 271 recipients. Results Sixty-two (16.3%) patients developed pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis and its presence had no impact in the overall survival of liver recipients. Obesity was the only independent risk factor for pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis. Conclusion We recommend close control of cardiovascular factors in patients with liver cirrhosis in order to avoid associated thrombosis. PMID:22909075

  18. Insight into congenital absence of the portal vein: Is it rare?

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guo-Hua Hu‚ Lai-Gen; Zhu, Jin Yang‚ Jin-Hua Mei‚ Yue-Feng

    2008-01-01

    Congenital absence of portal vein (CAPV) was a rare event in the past. However, the number of detected CAPV cases has increased in recent years because of advances in imaging techniques. Patients with CAPV present with portal hypertension (PH) or porto-systemic encephalopathy (PSE), but these conditions rarely occur until the patients grow up or become old. The patients usually visit doctors for the complications of venous shunts, hepatic or cardiac abnormalities detected by ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The etiology of this disease is not clear, but most investigators consider that it is associated with abnormal embryologic development of the portal vein. Usually, surgical intervention can relieve the symptoms and prevent occurrence of complications in CAPV patients. Moreover, its management should be stressed on a case-by-case basis, depending on the type or anatomy of the disease, as well as the symptoms and clinical conditions of the patient. PMID:18932274

  19. Preduodenal portal vein: Two cases with differing presentation.

    PubMed

    Stevens, J C; Morton, D; McElwee, R; Hamit, H F

    1978-03-01

    Preduodenal or precholedochal veins are rare developmental anomalies of considerable surgical importance. Injury to these structures because of failure to recognize them during operations for unrelated diseases may result in thrombosis or hemorrhage. We recently encountered this anomaly twice, once in a newborn infant with duodenal obstruction and once in a 54-year-old woman undergoing cholecystectomy. The preduodenal vein was not the primary cause of obstruction in the infant, but injury to the previously unrecognized percholedochal vein in the woman resulted in a considerable loss of blood. Besides describing and illustrating these two cases, we also discuss the anatomy and the embryology of these structures and briefly review the patterns of 44 previously reported cases that we found.

  20. Hepatic portal vein denervation impairs oral glucose tolerance but not exenatide's effect on glycemia.

    PubMed

    Ionut, Viorica; Castro, Ana Valeria B; Woolcott, Orison O; Stefanovski, Darko; Iyer, Malini S; Broussard, Josiane L; Burch, Miguel; Elazary, Ram; Kolka, Cathryn M; Mkrtchyan, Hasmik; Bediako, Isaac Asare; Bergman, Richard N

    2014-10-15

    The hepatoportal area is an important glucohomeostatic metabolic sensor, sensing hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, and hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). We have reported previously that activation of hepatoportal sensors by intraportal infusion of glucose and GLP-1 or by subcutaneous administration of GLP-1 receptor activator exenatide and of intraportal glucose improved glycemia independent of corresponding changes in pancreatic hormones. It is not clear whether this effect is mediated via the portal vein (PV) or by direct action on the liver itself. To test whether receptors in the PV mediate exenatide's beneficial effect on glucose tolerance, we performed 1) paired oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) with and without exenatide and 2) intravenous glucose tolerance tests before and after PV denervation in canines. Denervation of the portal vein affected oral glucose tolerance; post-denervation (POST-DEN) OGTT glucose and insulin AUC were 50% higher than before denervation (P = 0.01). However, portal denervation did not impair exenatide's effect to improve oral glucose tolerance (exenatide effect: 48 ± 12 mmol·l⁻¹·min before vs. 64 ± 26 mmol·l⁻¹·min after, P = 0.67). There were no changes in insulin sensitivity or secretion during IVGTTs. Portal vein sensing might play a role in controlling oral glucose tolerance during physiological conditions but not in pharmacological activation of GLP-1 receptors by exenatide.

  1. Portal vein stent placement with or without varix embolization of jejunal variceal bleeding after hepatopancreatobiliary surgery.

    PubMed

    Shim, Dong Jae; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Gi-Young; Kim, Yook; Han, Kichang; Gwon, Dong-Il; Ko, Heung-Kyu

    2017-04-01

    Background Extrahepatic portal hypertension after surgery involving the duodenum or jejunum might result in massive ectopic variceal bleeding. Purpose To report the results of portal vein stent placement with the addition of variceal embolization. Material and Methods Between January 2000 and June 2015, portal vein stent placement was attempted in 477 patients. Of these, 22 patients (age, 63 ± 10 years) with jejunal variceal bleeding caused by portal vein obstruction after surgery were included in this study. Computed tomography (CT) findings before and after treatment and the rates of technical and clinical success, complications, and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results Stent placement was successful in 19 of 22 patients. Additional variceal embolization was performed in five cases. Clinical success, defined as the cessation of bleeding without recurrence within 1 month, was achieved in 18 of 19 patients with technical success. One patient developed recurrent bleeding 4 days after stent placement and was successfully treated with additional variceal embolization. There were no procedure-related complications. A regression of the jejunal varices was noted in 14 of 19 patients on follow-up CT scans. During the follow-up period (258 days; range, 7-1196 days), stent occlusion and recurrent bleeding occurred in six and four patients, respectively, of the 19 patients who achieved technical success. Statistical analyses revealed no significant differences regarding stent patency between benign and malignant strictures. Conclusion Percutaneous, transhepatic, portal vein stent placement with or without jejunal variceal embolization appears to be a safe and effective treatment for jejunal variceal bleeding after surgery.

  2. Clinical analysis of living donor liver transplantation in patients with portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Say-June; Kim, Dong-Goo; Park, Jung-Hyun; Moon, In-Sung; Lee, Myung-Duk; Kim, Ji-Il; Yoon, Young-Chul; Yoo, Young-Kyung

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve outcomes in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) patients with portal vein thrombosis (PVT). Of 246 adult patients who underwent LDLT with a right lobe graft between January 2000 and May 2007, PVT was diagnosed in 50 patients (20.3%), who were further subdivided into partial (n = 39, 78%) and complete (n = 11, 22%) types. Patients with PVT, especially complete PVT, showed high incidences of variceal bleeding (p = 0.021), operative RBC transfusion (p < 0.046) and a post-transplantation complications related to bleeding (p = 0.058). We also classified PVT according to its location and the presence of collaterals: type I (n = 41, 82%): PVT localized above the confluence of the splenic and superior mesenteric veins (SMV); type II (n = 7, 14%): PVT extending below the confluence with a patent distal SMV; type III (n = 2, 4%): complete portal vein and SMV thrombosis except for a coronary vein. LDLT could be safely undertaken in patients with PVT without increased mortality. In our type II and III PVT, when thrombectomy fails, jump grafting using a cryopreserved vessel may serve as a reliable alternative method to restore portal flow.

  3. In vivo quantitation of the rat liver's ability to eliminate endotoxin from portal vein blood

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamaguchi, K.; Babb, J.L.; Gans, H.

    1982-12-01

    The in vivo uptake of endotoxin by the liver from portal vein blood was assessed during a single passage through the liver. /sup 51/Cr labeled and unlabeled endotoxin were infused in different amounts into the femoral vein of three groups of lead-sensitized rats: a nonoperated, a sham-operated, and a surgically created reversed Eck fistula (REF) group. Whereas in the former two the infused endotoxin encounters the lung as the first filter organ, the liver performs this function in the latter experimental model. The mortality rates observed in control and sham-operated, lead-sensitized rats were found to correlate closely and reproducibly to the degree of endotoxemia. This assay was then applied to determine the amount of endotoxin eliminated by the liver by establishing, in the REF rat, the amounts of endotoxin that escaped hepatic clearance. The capacity of the liver to eliminate endotoxin from portal vein blood during a single passage increases as the portal vein endotoxin level rises; it approaches a maximum, suggesting that endotoxin's interaction with the Kupffer cells conforms to classical saturation kinetics. A Lineweaver-Burk plot prepared from these data indicates that the maximal in vivo capacity of the liver to remove endotoxin from portal vein blood approximates 1.5 micrograms/gm liver/hr. Data obtained with the use of radiolabeled endotoxin corroborate the information obtained with the bioassay technique. Endotoxin eliminated by the Kupffer cells in these quantities is slowly disintegrated; 4 hr after termination of the endotoxin infusion, less than 4% of the radiolabel is found in the urine and none in the bile. These observations indicate that the Kupffer cell's functional capacity to sequester and detoxify endotoxin is extensive and far exceeds the requirements imposed by physiological and most pathological conditions.

  4. Mechanistic insights of rapid liver regeneration after associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for stage hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Moris, Demetrios; Vernadakis, Spyridon; Papalampros, Alexandros; Vailas, Michail; Dimitrokallis, Nikolaos; Petrou, Athanasios; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    AIM To highlight the potential mechanisms of regeneration in the Associating Liver Partition and Portal vein ligation for Stage hepatectomy models (clinical and experimental) that could unlock the myth behind the extraordinary capability of the liver for regeneration, which would help in designing new therapeutic options for the regenerative drive in difficult setup, such as chronic liver diseases. Associating Liver Partition and Portal vein ligation for Stage hepatectomy has been recently advocated to induce rapid future liver remnant hypertrophy that significantly shortens the time for the second stage hepatectomy. The introduction of Associating Liver Partition and Portal vein ligation for Stage hepatectomy in the surgical armamentarium of therapeutic tools for liver surgeons represented a real breakthrough in the history of liver surgery. METHODS A comprehensive literature review of Associating Liver Partition and Portal vein ligation for Stage hepatectomy and its utility in liver regeneration is performed. RESULTS Liver regeneration after Associating Liver Partition and Portal vein ligation for Stage hepatectomy is a combination of portal flow changes and parenchymal transection that generate a systematic response inducing hepatocyte proliferation and remodeling. CONCLUSION Associating Liver Partition and Portal vein ligation for Stage hepatectomy represents a real breakthrough in the history of liver surgery because it offers rapid liver regeneration potential that facilitate resection of liver tumors that were previously though unresectable. The jury is still out though in terms of safety, efficacy and oncological outcomes. As far as Associating Liver Partition and Portal vein ligation for Stage hepatectomy -induced liver regeneration is concerned, further research on the field should focus on the role of non-parenchymal cells in liver regeneration as well as on the effect of Associating Liver Partition and Portal vein ligation for Stage hepatectomy in liver

  5. Imaging diagnosis--celiacomesenteric trunk and portal vein hypoplasia in a pit bull terrier.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Mario; Martino, Rosmara; Assad, Eyad Abu

    2014-01-01

    The computed tomography (CT) imaging findings of a celiacomesenteric trunk (CMT) in a 1-year-old dog with primary hypoplasia of the portal vein (PHPV) are described. Computed tomography angiography revealed acquired porto-systemic shunts secondary to portal hypertension and a common origin of the celiac and cranial mesenteric arteries. The imaging findings and the association of a CMT with other vascular diseases have never been reported in dogs. The recognition of this rare arterial anomaly should prompt to investigate possible concurrent vascular diseases and may influence the planning of abdominal surgeries.

  6. Percutaneous Transsplenic Access to the Portal Vein for Management of Vascular Complication in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Hee Ho; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Jae, Hwan Jun; Yi, Nam-Joon; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein for management of vascular complication in patients with chronic liver diseases. Methods: Between Sept 2009 and April 2011, percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein was attempted in nine patients with chronic liver disease. Splenic vein puncture was performed under ultrasonographic guidance with a Chiba needle, followed by introduction of a 4 to 9F sheath. Four patients with hematemesis or hematochezia underwent variceal embolization. Another two patients underwent portosystemic shunt embolization in order to improve portal venous blood flow. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver. The percutaneous transsplenic access site was closed using coils and glue. Results: Percutaneous transsplenic splenic vein catheterization was performed successfully in all patients. Gastric or jejunal varix embolization with glue and lipiodol mixture was performed successfully in four patients. In two patients with a massive portosystemic shunt, embolization of the shunting vessel with a vascular plug, microcoils, glue, and lipiodol mixture was achieved successfully. Portal vein recanalization was attempted in three patients with a transplanted liver; however, only one patient was treated successfully. Complete closure of the percutaneous transsplenic tract was achieved using coils and glue without bleeding complication in all patients. Conclusion: Percutaneous transsplenic access to the portal vein can be an alternative route for portography and further endovascular management in patients for whom conventional approaches are difficult or impossible.

  7. Surgical implications of preduodenal portal vein in the adult. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Y; Tanaka, M; Okuyama, T

    1994-07-01

    Occasionally, a preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) is found in pediatric patients with intestinal obstruction due to duodenal compression. In adults, it is often symptom-less and is an exceptionally rare condition. It is of surgical importance, however, because the vein lies in the most superficial position ventral to the common bile duct and is easily damaged during operations involving the biliary tract and duodenum. We recently treated a patient with PDPV, which stimulated a review of the disease process, including diagnosis, association with other anomalies, and surgical treatment.

  8. Radioembolisation and portal vein embolization before resection of large hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bouazza, Fikri; Poncelet, Arthur; Garcia, Camilo Alejandro; Delatte, Philippe; Engelhom, Jean Luc; Galdon, Maria Gomez; Deleporte, Amélie; Hendlisz, Alain; Vanderlinden, Bruno; Flamen, Patrick; Donckier, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Resectability of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic liver disease is dramatically limited by the need to preserve sufficient remnant liver in order to avoid postoperative liver insufficiency. Preoperative treatments aimed at downsizing the tumor and promoting hypertrophy of the future remnant liver may improve resectability and reduce operative morbidity. Here we report the case of a patient with a large hepatocellular carcinoma arising from chronic liver disease. Preoperative treatment, including tumor downsizing with transarterial radioembolization and induction of future remnant liver hypertrophy with right portal vein embolization, resulted in a 53% reduction in tumor volume and compensatory hypertrophy in the contralateral liver. The patient subsequently underwent extended right hepatectomy with no postoperative signs of liver decompensation. Pathological examination demonstrated a margin-free resection and major tumor response. This new therapeutic sequence, combining efficient tumor targeting and subsequent portal vein embolization, could improve the feasibility and safety of major liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with liver injury. PMID:26327775

  9. Portal Vein Stenting Combined with Iodine-125 Seeds Endovascular Implantation Followed by Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tanyang; Zhu, Tongyin; Zhang, Yuelin; Nie, Chunhui; Ai, Jing; Zhou, Guanhui; Zhang, Aibin; Dong, Meng-Jie; Wang, Wei-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Aim was to assess the therapeutic value of portal vein stenting (PVS) combined with iodine-125 seed (125I seed) strand endovascular implantation followed by transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for treating patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). This was a retrospective study of 34 patients aged 29–81 years, diagnosed HCC with PVTT, and treated with PVS combined with 125I seed strand endovascular implantation followed by TACE between January 2012 and August 2014. Survival, stent patency, technical success rate, complications related to the procedure, and adverse events were recorded. The technical success rate was 100%. No serious procedure-related adverse event was recorded. The median survival was 147 days. The cumulative survival rates and stent patency rates at 90, 180, and 360 days were 94.1%, 61.8%, and 32.4% and 97.1% (33/34), 76.9% (24/34), and 29.4% (10/34), respectively. PVS combined with 125I seed strand endovascular implantation followed by TACE is feasible for patients with HCC and PVTT. It resulted in appropriate survival and stent patency, with no procedure-related adverse effects. PMID:27999793

  10. Congenital duodenal obstruction with preduodenal portal vein and situs inversus totalis: report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Ram Mohan; Mukherjee, Partha Pratik; Mukhopadhyay, B; Mandal, Kartik Chandra

    2013-06-01

    Preduodenal portal vein is a rare congenital anomaly that causes high intestinal obstruction. The authors report two interesting cases of preduodenal portal vein that were diagnosed as having congenital duodenal obstruction. As there is a high potential for surgical risk, this anomaly is of special interest to the surgeon and should be kept in mind. Here, we discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis and management along with a review of the literature.

  11. Pancreatectomy for carcinoma of the head of the pancreas associated with multiple anomalies including the preduodenal portal vein.

    PubMed

    Matsusue, S; Kashihara, S; Koizumi, S

    1984-09-01

    Total pancreatectomy was performed for carcinoma of the head of the pancreas associated with multiple anomalies in the peripancreatic region and of the pancreas. The anomalies were preduodenal portal vein, annular pancreas with agenesis of the dorsal pancreas, left-sided gallbladder, polysplenia and high mobile right colon. The surgical implications of pancreatectomy for such anatomical abnormalities, especially preduodenal portal vein, and the usefulness of ultrasonography for the preoperative evaluation are given attention.

  12. Chronic Portal Vein Thrombosis After Liver Transplantation in a Child Treated by a Combined Minimally Invasive Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar Santos, Aline Cristine Barbosa; Zurstrassen, Charles Edouard; Moreira, Airton Mota; Neto, Joao Seda; Filho, Eduardo Carone; Chapchap, Paulo

    2009-09-15

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) after orthotopic liver transplantation is an infrequent complication, and when it is present surgical treatment is considered for traditional management. Percutaneous transhepatic portal vein angioplasty has been described as an option to treat PVT with a lower morbidity than conventional surgical treatments. This article describes a case of chronic PVT in a child after a living donor liver transplantation managed by percutaneous transhepatic and surgical approaches.

  13. Percutaneous Transhepatic Catheterization of the Portal Vein: A Combined CT- and Fluoroscopy-Guided Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Weimar, Bernd; Rauber, Klaus; Brendel, Mathias D.; Bretzel, Reinhard G.; Rau, Wigbert S.

    1999-07-15

    Combined CT- and fluoroscopy-guided transhepatic portal vein catheterization was performed in 44 patients selected for pancreatic islet cell transplantation. The method allowed catheterization with a single puncture attempt in 39 patients. In four patients two attempts and in one patient four attempts were necessary. One minor hematoma of the liver capsule occurred that required no further treatment. Compared with other methods the average number of puncture attempts was reduced.

  14. Preduodenal portal vein, malrotation, and high jejunal atresia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Baglaj, Maciej; Gerus, Sylwester

    2012-01-01

    Preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) is a rare congenital anomaly. In most patients, it is associated with other congenital defects including situs inversus, malrotation, and biliary atresia or occurs as part of the heterotaxia syndrome or polysplenia syndrome. We describe a newborn affected by high jejunal atresia, malrotation, and a complex cardiac anomaly, in whom PDPV was diagnosed at early relaparotomy because of stenosis of the jejunal anastomosis. Occurrence of PDPV with intestinal atresia has not been previously reported in the literature.

  15. [Surgical treatment of hemorrhage of esophageal varices secondary to thrombosis of the portal vein].

    PubMed

    Orozco-Zepeda, H; Takahashi, T; Angel Mercado, M; García-Tsao, G; Hernández-Ortiz, J

    1990-01-01

    The Sugiura Procedure (SP) was performed in 27 patients with hemorrhagic portal hypertension secondary to extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis without associated liver disease (EPVT). There were fourteen females and 13 males. Mean age was 28 +/- 14 years. The causes of EPVT were: protein C deficiency-2 cases, antithrombin III deficiency-1 case, omphalitis history-2 cases, pancreatitis history-1 case and idiopathic-21 cases. The SP was completed with two surgical stages in 14 patients and with one operation in nine. There was one operative death. One patient developed mild postoperative encephalopathy, and two patients re-bled at long-term. Actuarial survival was 82% at five and ten years. It is concluded that the SP is a good alternative for the management of hemorrhagic portal hypertension secondary to EPVT.

  16. Portal vein-circulating tumor cells predict liver metastases in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bissolati, Massimiliano; Sandri, Maria Teresa; Burtulo, Giovanni; Zorzino, Laura; Balzano, Gianpaolo; Braga, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer patients underwent surgical resection often present distant metastases early after surgery. Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been correlated to a worse oncological outcome in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The objective of this pilot study is to investigate the possible prognostic role of CTCs in patients undergoing surgery for pancreatic cancer. In 20 patients undergoing pancreatic resection, 10 mL blood sample was collected intraoperatively from both systemic circulation (SC) and portal vein (PV). Blood sample was analyzed for CTCs with CellSearch® system. All patients underwent an oncologic follow-up for at least 3 years, quarterly. CTCs were detected in nine (45%) patients: five patients had CTCs in PV only, three patients in both SC and PV, and one patient in SC only. CTC-positive and CTC-negative patients were similar for demographics and cancer stage pattern. No significant differences were found in both overall and disease-free survival between CTC-positive and CTC-negative patients. At 3-year follow-up, portal vein CTC-positive patients presented a higher rate of liver metastases than CTC-negative patients (53 vs. 8%, p = 0.038). CTCs were found in 45% of the patients. No correlation between CTCs and survival was found. The presence of CTCs in portal vein has been associated to higher rate of liver metastases after surgery.

  17. Percutaneous Transhepatic Portography for the Treatment of Early Portal Vein Thrombosis After Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Adani, Gian Luigi Baccarani, Umberto; Risaliti, Andrea; Sponza, Massimo; Gasparini, Daniele; Bresadola, Fabrizio; Anna, Dino de; Bresadola, Vittorio

    2007-11-15

    We treated three cases of early portal vein thrombosis (PVT) by minimally invasive percutaneous transhepatic portography. All patients developed PVT within 30 days of major hepatic surgery (one case each of orthotopic liver transplantation, splenectomy in a previous liver transplant recipient, and right extended hepatectomy with resection and reconstruction of the left branch of the portal vein for tumor infiltration). In all cases minimally invasive percutaneous transhepatic portography was adopted to treat this complication by mechanical fragmentation and pharmacological lysis of the thrombus. A vascular stent was also positioned in the two cases in which the thrombosis was related to a surgical technical problem. Mechanical fragmentation of the thrombus with contemporaneous local urokinase administration resulted in complete removal of the clot and allowed restoration of normal blood flow to the liver after a median follow-up of 37 months. PVT is an uncommon but severe complication after major surgery or liver transplantation. Surgical thrombectomy, with or without reconstruction of the portal vein, and retransplantation are characterized by important surgical morbidity and mortality. Based on our experience, minimally invasive percutaneous transhepatic portography should be considered an option toward successful recanalization of early PVT after major liver surgery including transplantation. Balloon dilatation and placement of a vascular stent could help to decrease the risk of recurrent thrombosis when a defective surgical technique is the reason for the thrombosis.

  18. Portal vein tumor thrombus is a bottleneck in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ju-Xian; Shi, Jie; Li, Nan; Guo, Wei-Xing; Wu, Meng-Chao; Lau, Wan-Yee; Cheng, Shu-Qun

    2016-01-01

    The effect of portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) on the prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma has become clear over the past several decades. However, identifying the mechanisms and performing the diagnosis and treatment of PVTT remain challenging. Therefore, this study aimed to summarize the progress in these areas. A computerized literature search in Medline and EMBASE was performed with the following combinations of search terms: “hepatocellular carcinoma” AND “portal vein tumor thrombus.” Although several signal transduction or molecular pathways related to PVTT have been identified, the exact mechanisms of PVTT are still largely unknown. Many biomarkers have been reported to detect microvascular invasion, but none have proved to be clinically useful because of their low accuracy rates. Sorafenib is the only recommended therapeutic strategy in Western countries. However, more treatment options are recommended in Eastern countries, including surgery, radiotherapy (RT), transhepatic arterial chemoembolization (TACE), transarterial radioembolization (TARE), and sorafenib. Therefore, we established a staging system based on the extent of portal vein invasion. Our staging system effectively predicts the long-term survival of PVTT patients. Currently, several clinical trials had shown that surgery is effective and safe in some PVTT patients. RT, TARE, and TACE can also be performed safely in patients with good liver function. However, only a few comparative clinical trials had compared the effectiveness of these treatments. Therefore, more randomized controlled trials examining the extent of PVTT should be conducted in the future. PMID:28154776

  19. Tumor Regression in HCC Patient with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis after Intraportal Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is a frequent entity in HCC, which strictly limits the gold standard treatment options such as surgical resection and transarterial chemoembolization. Therefore, the prognosis of patients with PVTT is extremely poor and an emergence of seeking an alternative option for intervention is inevitable. We present a case of a 60-year-old male patient with HCC induced PVTT who was subjected to the intraportal RFA and stenting-VesOpen procedure. No additional medical intervention was performed. The repeated CT performed 5 months after the VesOpen procedure revealed significant decrease of the tumor size, patent right, and main portal vein and a recanalization of the left portal vein, which was not processed. At this time point, liver functional tests, appetite, and general condition of the patient were improved evidently. This report designates the RFA as an instrumental option of therapeutic intervention for HCC patients with PVTT. PMID:27579192

  20. Preferential expression of connexin37 and connexin40 in the endothelium of the portal veins during mouse liver development.

    PubMed

    Shiojiri, Nobuyoshi; Niwa, Tohru; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Koike, Toru

    2006-06-01

    Hepatic blood vessels consist of the hepatic artery and three types of venous channels (the portal veins, the sinusoids, and the hepatic veins). This study was undertaken to analyze, by immunohistochemistry, connexin expression throughout the vascular development of the fetal mouse liver with special attention being given to portal vein development. In the adult liver, connexin37 and connexin40 were expressed in the endothelium of the portal vein and hepatic artery, but not in those of the hepatic vein and sinusoids. Connexin43 was expressed in mesothelial cells and smooth muscle cells of the portal veins. The preferential expression of connexin37 and connexin40 in portal veins was seen throughout liver development, including its primordium formation stage (10.5-day or 11.5-day stage), although connexin37 expression was transiently seen in free nonparenchymal cells in fetal stages. The differentiation of each blood vessel in the hepatic vascular system may occur in early developmental stages, soon after hepatic primordium formation.

  1. Omental vein catheter thrombolysis for acute porto-mesenteric vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Annabelle L; Cleary, Muriel A; Cholewczynski, Walter; Sumpio, Bauer E; Atweh, Nabil A

    2013-05-01

    Mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT) is an uncommon clinical condition with potential high morbidity. We report here a patient who presented with acute-onset MVT and bowel infarction, which was successfully ameliorated with intramesenteric vein thrombolytic therapy.

  2. Acute Portal Hypertension Models in Dogs: Low- and High-Flow Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Jaydev K; Liu, Ji-Bin; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Eisenbrey, John R; Merton, Daniel A; Machado, Priscilla; Zhao, Hongjia; Altemus, Joseph; Needleman, Laurence; Brown, Daniel B; Forsberg, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    Effective animal models are needed to evaluate the feasibility of new techniques to assess portal hypertension (PH). Here we developed 2 canine models of acute PH by increasing intrasinusoidal resistance and by increasing the portal vein (PV) flow volume to test the efficacy of a noninvasive technique to evaluate PH. The acute low-flow PH model was based on embolization of liver circulation by using a gelatin sponge material. The acute high-flow PH model was based on increasing the PV flow volume by using an arteriovenous (A-V) shunt from the femoral artery and saline infusion. PV pressures and diameters were assessed before and after inducing PH. Pressure values and diameters were obtained from the inferior vena cava in 3 unmanipulated controls. The low-flow model of PH was repeatable and successfully increased PV pressure by an average of 16.5 mm Hg within 15 min. The high-flow model of PH failed to achieve increased PV pressures. However, saline supplementation of the portal circulation in the high-flow model led to mean increases in PV pressures of 12.8 mm Hg within 20 min. Pulsatility in the PV was decreased in the low-flow model and increased in the high-flow model relative to baseline. No changes in PV diameter were noted in either model. These acute PH models are relatively straightforward to implement and may facilitate the evaluation of new techniques to assess PH. PMID:23114046

  3. Acute portal hypertension models in dogs: low- and high-flow approaches.

    PubMed

    Dave, Jaydev K; Liu, Ji-Bin; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Eisenbrey, John R; Merton, Daniel A; Machado, Priscilla; Zhao, Hongjia; Altemus, Joseph; Needleman, Laurence; Brown, Daniel B; Forsberg, Flemming

    2012-10-01

    Effective animal models are needed to evaluate the feasibility of new techniques to assess portal hypertension (PH). Here we developed 2 canine models of acute PH by increasing intrasinusoidal resistance and by increasing the portal vein (PV) flow volume to test the efficacy of a noninvasive technique to evaluate PH. The acute low-flow PH model was based on embolization of liver circulation by using a gelatin sponge material. The acute high-flow PH model was based on increasing the PV flow volume by using an arteriovenous (A-V) shunt from the femoral artery and saline infusion. PV pressures and diameters were assessed before and after inducing PH. Pressure values and diameters were obtained from the inferior vena cava in 3 unmanipulated controls. The low-flow model of PH was repeatable and successfully increased PV pressure by an average of 16.5 mm Hg within 15 min. The high-flow model of PH failed to achieve increased PV pressures. However, saline supplementation of the portal circulation in the high-flow model led to mean increases in PV pressures of 12.8 mm Hg within 20 min. Pulsatility in the PV was decreased in the low-flow model and increased in the high-flow model relative to baseline. No changes in PV diameter were noted in either model. These acute PH models are relatively straightforward to implement and may facilitate the evaluation of new techniques to assess PH.

  4. Discrepant imaging findings of portal vein thrombosis with dynamic computed tomography and computed tomography during arterial portography in hepatocellular carcinoma: possible cause leading to inappropriate treatment selection.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Hidenori; Kumada, Takashi; Tada, Toshifumi; Mizuno, Kazuyuki; Kobayashi, Natsuko; Inukai, Yosuke; Takeda, Akira; Sone, Yasuhiro

    2017-04-01

    We encountered a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma who had discrepant imaging findings on portal vein thrombosis with portal phase dynamic computed tomography (CT) and CT during arterial portography (CTAP). CTAP, via the superior mesenteric artery and via the splenic artery, both showed a portal perfusion defect in the right hepatic lobe, indicating portal vein thrombosis in the main trunk of the right portal vein. Portal phase dynamic CT clearly depicted portal perfusion of the same hepatic area. Transarterial chemoembolization was successfully performed, but it was associated with severe liver injury. Clinicians should be cautious about this possible discrepancy based on imaging technique. The inaccurate evaluation of portal vein thrombosis may result in inappropriate treatment selection, which can worsen patient prognosis.

  5. Extrahepatic portal vein occlusion without recurrence after pancreaticoduodenectomy and intraoperative radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsunaga, Shuichi . E-mail: smitsuna@east.ncc.go.jp; Kinoshita, Taira; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Konishi, Masaru; Nakagohri, Toshio; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Gotohda, Naoto

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: Although there are no definitive studies that characterize the survival benefit of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), the therapy does not seem to produce significant complication. In our institution, pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and IORT are often complicated by the development of extrahepatic portal vein occlusion (EHPO). The aim of this study was to characterize the phenomenon of EHPO after PD and IORT. Methods and Materials: Between September 1992 and December 2001, 107 patients received macroscopic curative PD for periampullary disease in our institution. IORT (radiation dose: 20 Gy) was performed in 53 of these patients. Criteria for diagnosis of EHPO were as follows: (1) computerized tomography findings of occlusive extrahepatic portal vein (2) symptoms of portal hypertension, and (3) confirmation to exclude tumor recurrence from origin of EHPO, because this study examined whether EHPO was a complication of PD and IORT. Results: EHPO was diagnosed in 12 patients. Among patient and operative variables, IORT was the only statistically significant factor associated with a diagnosis of EHPO (p = 0.0052). The median developed time to EHPO and overall survival after surgery in EHPO patients were 358 days and 2,562 days, respectively. Eight patients (67%) with EHPO died during the follow-up period. At 5 years after therapy, EHPO was diagnosed in 67% of survivors who had received IORT. Conclusions: Patients undergoing IORT and PD have a relatively high incidence of EHPO, and patients who develop postoperative EHPO have poor prognoses.

  6. Management of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis: Review and update at 2016

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Stephen L; Chong, Charing C N; Chan, Anthony W H; Poon, Darren M C; Chok, Kenneth S H

    2016-01-01

    Portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is a common phenomenon in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Compared to HCC without PVTT, HCC with PVTT is characterized by an aggressive disease course, worse hepatic function, a higher chance of complications related to portal hypertension and poorer tolerance to treatment. Conventionally, HCC with PVTT is grouped together with metastatic HCC during the planning of its management, and most patients are offered palliative treatment with sorafenib or other systemic agents. As a result, most data on the management of HCC with PVTT comes from subgroup analyses or retrospective series. In the past few years, there have been several updates on management of HCC with PVTT. First, it is evident that HCC with PVTT consists of heterogeneous subgroups with different prognoses. Different classifications have been proposed to stage the degree of portal vein invasion/thrombosis, suggesting that different treatment modalities may be individualized to patients with different risks. Second, more studies indicate that more aggressive treatment, including surgical resection or locoregional treatment, may benefit select HCC patients with PVTT. In this review, we aim to discuss the recent conceptual changes and summarize the data on the management of HCC with PVTT. PMID:27621575

  7. Evaluation of the portal vein after duodenoduodenostomy for congenital duodenal stenosis associated with the preduodenal superior mesenteric vein, situs inversus, polysplenia, and malrotation.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Koichi; Nakamura, Tetsuro; Azuma, Takashi; Yoshida, Tatusyuki; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Nakahira, Masashi; Nishigaki, Kyoichi; Kawahira, Yoichi; Ueno, Takayoshi

    2007-02-01

    A male infant weighting 2970 g with total situs inversus, polysplenia, malrotation, duodenal stenosis, and complex cardiac anomalies, was admitted to our hospital. At 4 days of age, he underwent surgery that revealed a blood vessel passing over the duodenum from the mesenterium to the porta hepatis. A loose overbridging duodenoduodenostomy was performed to prevent compression of the vessel. The cardiac anomalies were corrected, and he could eat unrestricted diets. At the age of 1 year and 3 months, a 3-dimensional computed tomographic scan demonstrated that the vessel on the duodenum was the superior mesenteric vein (SMV), and it formed the portal vein with the splenic vein at the porta hepatis. Further, the scan revealed no compression of the SMV at the anastomosis. Doppler ultrasonography revealed a normal portal blood flow of 118.6 mL/min. This report describes the junction between the SMV and the splenic vein in a patient who had the SMV passing over the duodenum from the mesenterium. Correctly, patients previously diagnosed with a preduodenal portal vein could have a preduodenal SMV. The loose overbridging duodenoduodenostomy had advantages not only in passage of the anastomosis but also in maintenance of the portal blood flow for the congenital duodenal obstruction with the preduodenal SMV.

  8. Molecular variants of KCNQ channels expressed in murine portal vein myocytes: a role in delayed rectifier current.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Susumu; Sergeant, Gerard P; Greenwood, Iain A; Horowitz, Burton

    2003-05-16

    We have analyzed the expression of KCNQ genes in murine portal vein myocytes and determined that of the 5 known KCNQ channels, only KCNQ1 was expressed. In addition to the full-length KCNQ1 transcript, a novel spliced form (termed KCNQ1b) was detected that had a 63 amino acid truncation at the C-terminus. KCNQ1b was not detected in heart or brain but represented approximately half the KCNQ1 transcripts expressed in PV. Antibodies specific for KCNQ1a stained cell membranes from portal vein myocytes and HEK cells expressing the channel. However, because the antibodies were generated against an epitope in the deleted, C-terminal portion of the protein, these antibodies did not stain HEK cells expressing KCNQ1b. In murine portal vein myocytes, in the presence of 5 mmol/L 4-aminopyridine, an outwardly rectifying K+ current was recorded that was sensitive to linopirdine, a specific blocker of KCNQ channels. Currents produced by the heterologous expression of KCNQ1a or KCNQ1b were inhibited by similar concentrations of linopirdine, and linopirdine prolonged the time-course of the action potential in isolated portal vein myocytes. Our data suggest that these two KCNQ1 splice forms are expressed in murine portal vein and contribute to the delayed rectifier current in these myocytes.

  9. A Portal Vein Injection Model to Study Liver Metastasis of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Erica T.; Fischer, Jacob; Schedin, Pepper

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in women worldwide. Liver metastasis is involved in upwards of 30% of cases with breast cancer metastasis, and results in poor outcomes with median survival rates of only 4.8 - 15 months. Current rodent models of breast cancer metastasis, including primary tumor cell xenograft and spontaneous tumor models, rarely metastasize to the liver. Intracardiac and intrasplenic injection models do result in liver metastases, however these models can be confounded by concomitant secondary-site metastasis, or by compromised immunity due to removal of the spleen to avoid tumor growth at the injection site. To address the need for improved liver metastasis models, a murine portal vein injection method that delivers tumor cells firstly and directly to the liver was developed. This model delivers tumor cells to the liver without complications of concurrent metastases in other organs or removal of the spleen. The optimized portal vein protocol employs small injection volumes of 5 - 10 μl, ≥ 32 gauge needles, and hemostatic gauze at the injection site to control for blood loss. The portal vein injection approach in Balb/c female mice using three syngeneic mammary tumor lines of varying metastatic potential was tested; high-metastatic 4T1 cells, moderate-metastatic D2A1 cells, and low-metastatic D2.OR cells. Concentrations of ≤ 10,000 cells/injection results in a latency of ~ 20 - 40 days for development of liver metastases with the higher metastatic 4T1 and D2A1 lines, and > 55 days for the less aggressive D2.OR line. This model represents an important tool to study breast cancer metastasis to the liver, and may be applicable to other cancers that frequently metastasize to the liver including colorectal and pancreatic adenocarcinomas. PMID:28060292

  10. Preduodenal portal vein with preduodenal common bile duct: an extremely rare anomaly.

    PubMed

    Shah, Omar J; Robbani, Irfan; Khuroo, Mohammad S

    2009-04-01

    Preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) may occur as an isolated event and result in no symptoms, or it may found at autopsy as an incidental finding; associated preduodenal common bile duct (PDCBD) is an extremely rare event. To the 8 reported cases of PDPV with PDCBD, we add this rare case. Such a discovery is often incidental and of little import; however, it takes on major importance for hepatobiliary surgeons because the accidental damage of PDPV with PDCBD can lead to serious consequences. In addition to describing and illustrating this case, we discuss its relevant anatomy, embryology and associated malformations.

  11. Complications of Portal Vein Embolization: Evaluation on Cross-Sectional Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Yoo Kyeong

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein embolization (PVE) is known as an effective and safe preoperative procedure that increases the future liver remnant (FLR) in patients with insufficient FLR. However, some possible major complications can lead to non-resectability or delayed elective surgery that results in increased morbidity and mortality. Although the majority of these complications are rare, knowledge of the radiologic findings of post-procedural complications facilitate an accurate diagnosis and ensure prompt management. We accordingly reviewed the CT findings of the complications of PVE. PMID:26357502

  12. A Collision Probability Model of Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus Formation in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most common malignancies worldwide, with a high risk of portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). Some promising results have been achieved for venous metastases of hepatocellular carcinoma; however, the etiology of PVTT is largely unknown, and it is unclear why the incidence of PVTT is not proportional to its distance from the carcinoma. We attempted to address this issue using physical concepts and mathematical tools. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the probability of a collision event and the microenvironment of the PVTT. Our formulae suggest that the collision probability can alter the tumor microenvironment by increasing the number of tumor cells. PMID:26131562

  13. Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy: From technical evolution to oncological benefit

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Ewald, Florian; Gulati, Amit; Nashan, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) is a novel approach in liver surgery that allows for extensive resection of liver parenchyma by inducing a rapid hypertrophy of the future remnant liver. However, recent reports indicate that not all patients eligible for ALPPS will benefit from this procedure. Therefore, careful patient selection will be necessary to fully exploit possible benefits of ALPPS. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the technical evolution of ALPPS with a special emphasis on safety and oncologic efficacy. Furthermore, we review the contemporary literature regarding indication and benefits, but also limitations of ALPPS. PMID:26981186

  14. Portal vein and systemic adiponectin concentrations are closely linked with hepatic glucose and lipoprotein kinetics in extremely obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Magkos, Faidon; Fabbrini, Elisa; Patterson, Bruce W; Eagon, J Christopher; Klein, Samuel

    2011-11-01

    Low systemic plasma adiponectin concentrations are associated with abnormalities in hepatic glucose and lipoprotein metabolism in obese people. However, the relationship between the delivery of adiponectin to the liver via the portal vein and hepatic glucose and lipoprotein metabolism is not known. We examined the relationship between hepatic substrate metabolism (glucose rate of appearance into plasma and hepatic very low-density lipoprotein [VLDL]-triglyceride [TG] and VLDL-apolipoprotein B-100 [apoB-100] secretion rates, determined by using stable isotope-labeled tracer techniques) and portal vein adiponectin concentration, in 8 insulin-resistant, extremely obese subjects (body mass index, 65 ± 7 kg/m(2)). Portal vein adiponectin concentration was inversely associated with basal glucose rate of appearance (r = -0.820, P = .013) and VLDL-TG (r = -0.823, P = .012) and VLDL-apoB-100 (r = -0.787, P = .020) secretion rates. Very similar correlations were obtained for radial artery adiponectin as a result of a mirroring relationship between portal and arterial adiponectin concentrations (r = 0.899, P = .002) and the absence of significant arteriovenous concentration differences (P = .570). Insulin resistance, assessed with the homeostasis model assessment score, was also strongly associated with hepatic glucose and lipid metabolic parameters, as well as with adiponectin concentrations in the portal vein and radial artery. These results suggest that adiponectin delivery to the liver, whether via the portal or the systemic circulation, may be an important regulator of basal hepatic glucose, VLDL-TG, and VLDL-apoB-100 production rates in obese people, possibly through direct effects on the liver or changes in hepatic insulin sensitivity. However, portal vein adiponectin does not appear to be superior to arterial adiponectin as a marker of hepatic metabolic dysregulation. Additional studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism(s) responsible for the strong association

  15. Primary portal vein hypoplasia and SLC2A9 mutation associated with urate urolithiasis in a Spanish water dog

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Laura; Hammond, Gawain; Mclauchlan, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a Spanish water dog with an ammonium urate urethrolith which was diagnosed with primary portal vein hypoplasia and was found to be homozygous for the mutated SLC2A9 gene. This is the first Spanish water dog described with the SLC2A9 mutation and the first case of concurrent portal vascular abnormalities and SLC2A9 mutation. PMID:26538670

  16. Jagged1 in the portal vein mesenchyme regulates intrahepatic bile duct development: insights into Alagille syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Jennifer J.; Zovein, Ann C.; Koh, Huilin; Radtke, Freddy; Weinmaster, Gerry; Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the human Notch ligand jagged 1 (JAG1) result in a multi-system disorder called Alagille syndrome (AGS). AGS is chiefly characterized by a paucity of intrahepatic bile ducts (IHBD), but also includes cardiac, ocular, skeletal, craniofacial and renal defects. The disease penetration and severity of the affected organs can vary significantly and the molecular basis for this broad spectrum of pathology is unclear. Here, we report that Jag1 inactivation in the portal vein mesenchyme (PVM), but not in the endothelium of mice, leads to the hepatic defects associated with AGS. Loss of Jag1 expression in SM22α-positive cells of the PVM leads to defective bile duct development beyond the initial formation of the ductal plate. Cytokeratin 19-positive cells are detected surrounding the portal vein, yet they are unable to form biliary tubes, revealing an instructive role of the vasculature in liver development. These findings uncover the cellular basis for the defining feature of AGS, identify mesenchymal Jag1-dependent and -independent stages of duct development, and provide mechanistic information for the role of Jag1 in IHBD formation. PMID:21062863

  17. Effects of cytochrome P450 inhibitors on potassium currents and mechanical activity in rat portal vein.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, G.; Zygmunt, P. M.; Högestätt, E. D.; Weston, A. H.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of the cytochrome P450 inhibitors, proadifen, clotrimazole and 17-octadecynoic acid (17-ODYA) on K-currents in freshly-isolated single cells derived from rat portal vein and on mechanical activity in whole veins were studied. 2. When cells were stepped from -90 mV to a series of test potentials (from -80 to +50 mV), a delayed rectifier current (IK(V)) and an A-type current (IK(A)) could be identified. Proadifen (10 microM), clotrimazole (30 microM) and 17-ODYA (5 microM) each inhibited IK(V) but had little effect on IK(A). 3. When cells were held at -10 mV to inactivate the time-dependent K-currents, IK(V) and IK(A), levcromakalim (3 microM) induced a time-independent outward K-current (IK(ATP)) which was totally inhibited by clotrimazole (30 microM) and almost fully inhibited by proadifen (10 microM). 17-ODYA (5 microM) had no effect on IK(ATP) and exerted only a minor inhibitory action on this current at 20 microM. 4. 17-ODYA (5 microM) potentiated current flow through the large conductance, Ca-sensitive K-channel (BKCa). In contrast, proadifen (10 microM) had no effect on IBK(Ca) whereas clotrimazole (30 microM) exerted a small but significant inhibitory action. 5. Proadifen (10 microM) and clotrimazole (30 microM) each inhibited the magnitude but increased the frequency of spontaneous contractions in whole portal veins. 17-ODYA (5 microM) had no effect on spontaneous contractions but these were inhibited when the concentration of 17-ODYA was increased to 50 microM. 6. The spasmolytic effect of levcromakalim on spontaneous contractions was antagonized by proadifen (10-30 microM) in a concentration-dependent manner but 17-ODYA (up to 50 microM) was without effect. 7. These results in portal vein show that cytochrome P450 inhibitors exert profound effects on a variety of K-channel subtypes. This suggests that enzymes dependent on this cofactor may be important regulators of K-channel activity in smooth muscle. The relevance of these findings for the

  18. Transjugular Intrahepatic Porto-Systemic Shunt Placement in a Patient with Left-Lateral Split-Liver Transplant and Mesenterico-Left Portal Vein by Pass Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto Maruzzelli, Luigi; Luca, Angelo

    2011-12-15

    This is a report of a successful placement of a transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt in a young patient with previous left-lateral, split-liver transplant and mesenterico-left portal vein by pass placement after posttransplant extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis.

  19. Anticoagulation therapy prevents portal-splenic vein thrombosis after splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wei; Lu, Shi-Chun; Li, Guan-Yin; Li, Chuan-Yun; Wu, Ju-Shan; Guo, Qing-Liang; Wang, Meng-Long; Li, Ning

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare the incidence of early portal or splenic vein thrombosis (PSVT) in patients treated with irregular and regular anticoagulantion after splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 301 patients who underwent splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization for portal hypertension due to cirrhosis between April 2004 and July 2010. Patients were categorized into group A with irregular anticoagulation and group B with regular anticoagulation, respectively. Group A (153 patients) received anticoagulant monotherapy for an undesignated time period or with aspirin or warfarin without low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) irregularly. Group B (148 patients) received subcutaneous injection of LMWH routinely within the first 5 d after surgery, followed by oral warfarin and aspirin for one month regularly. The target prothrombin time/international normalized ratio (PT/INR) was 1.25-1.50. Platelet and PT/INR were monitored. Color Doppler imaging was performed to monitor PSVT as well as the effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy. RESULTS: The patients’ data were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Among the patients, 94 developed early postoperative mural PSVT, including 63 patients in group A (63/153, 41.17%) and 31 patients in group B (31/148, 20.94%). There were 50 (32.67%) patients in group A and 27 (18.24%) in group B with mural PSVT in the main trunk of portal vein. After the administration of thrombolytic, anticoagulant and anti-aggregation therapy, complete or partial thrombus dissolution achieved in 50 (79.37%) in group A and 26 (83.87%) in group B. CONCLUSION: Regular anticoagulation therapy can reduce the incidence of PSVT in patients who undergo splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization, and regular anticoagulant therapy is safer and more effective than irregular anticoagulant therapy. Early and timely thrombolytic therapy is imperative and feasible for the prevention of PSVT. PMID:22807615

  20. Congenital atresia of portal vein with portocaval shunt associated with cardiac defects, skeletal deformities, and skin lesions in a boy.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Manphool; Lal, Anupam; Thapa, Babu R; Prakash, Mahesh; Shanbhogue, Krishna P; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2008-08-01

    Congenital absence of portal vein is a rare anomaly that results from aberrant venous development in early embryonic life. The intestinal and splenic venous drainage bypass the liver and may drain directly into inferior vena cava or the left renal vein or the left hepatic vein. This rare anomaly is commonly associated with other congenital malformations and generally limited to females. We describe a rare case of aberrant portal vein development with congenital portocaval shunt (end-to-side) in a 3.5-year male child associated with cardiac defects (atrial and ventricular septal defects), skeletal deformities (flexion deformity and clinodactyly of digits and toes), and lichen planus with café au lait macules of skin.

  1. Therapeutic efficacy and stent patency of transhepatic portal vein stenting after surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ung Bae; Kim, Chang Won; Kim, Tae Un; Choo, Ki Seok; Jang, Joo Yeon; Nam, Kyung Jin; Chu, Chong Woo; Ryu, Je Ho

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate portal vein (PV) stenosis and stent patency after hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery, using abdominal computed tomography (CT). METHODS Percutaneous portal venous stenting was attempted in 22 patients with significant PV stenosis (> 50%) - after hepatobiliary or pancreatic surgery - diagnosed by abdominal CT. Stents were placed in various stenotic lesions after percutaneous transhepatic portography. Pressure gradient across the stenotic segment was measured in 14 patients. Stents were placed when the pressure gradient across the stenotic segment was > 5 mmHg or PV stenosis was > 50%, as observed on transhepatic portography. Patients underwent follow-up abdominal CT and technical and clinical success, complications, and stent patency were evaluated. RESULTS Stent placement was successful in 21 patients (technical success rate: 95.5%). Stents were positioned through the main PV and superior mesenteric vein (n = 13), main PV (n = 2), right and main PV (n = 1), left and main PV (n = 4), or main PV and splenic vein (n = 1). Patients showed no complications after stent placement. The time between procedure and final follow-up CT was 41-761 d (mean: 374.5 d). Twenty stents remained patent during the entire follow-up. Stent obstruction - caused by invasion of the PV stent by a recurrent tumor - was observed in 1 patient in a follow-up CT performed after 155 d after the procedure. The cumulative stent patency rate was 95.7%. Small in-stent low-density areas were found in 11 (55%) patients; however, during successive follow-up CT, the extent of these areas had decreased. CONCLUSION Percutaneous transhepatic stent placement can be safe and effective in cases of PV stenosis after hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery. Stents show excellent patency in follow-up abdominal CT, despite development of small in-stent low-density areas. PMID:27956806

  2. Giant Splenorenal Shunt in a Young Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis/Primary Biliary Cholangitis Overlap Syndrome and Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, F.; Greco, L.; Manuelli, M.; Manzia, T. M.; Sergiacomi, G.

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of giant Splenorenal Shunt (SRS) associated with portal vein thrombosis in a 37-year-old woman with a twelve-year history of autoimmune hepatitis/primary biliary cholangitis overlap syndrome. At the moment of the CT examination laboratory tests showed creatinine 1.5 mg/dl, bilirubin 1.5 mg/dl, INR 3, and Na 145 mmol/l and the Model End-Stage Liver Disease score was 24. Extensive calcified thrombosis causing complete occlusion of the portal vein lumen and partially occluding the origin of the superior mesenteric vein was present and a small calcified thrombus in the Splenic Vein lumen was also evident. SRS was located among the spleen hilum and the left kidney with a maximum diameter of 3.25 cm and was associated with dilatation of left renal vein and inferior vena cava. After a multidisciplinary evaluation the patient was put on the Regional Liver Transplant waiting list and liver transplantation was performed successfully. Although portal vein thrombosis and SRS are common occurrences in cirrhotic patients, the impact in the natural history of the disease is still unclear. Careful management and accurate imaging protocols are essential in the evaluation of those patients. PMID:28316856

  3. Very Early Presentation of Extrahepatic Portal Vein Obstruction Causing Portal Hypertension in an Infant: Uncertainties in the Management and Therapeutic Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Khodayar-Pardo, Parisá; Peña Aldea, Andrés; Ramírez González, Ana; Meseguer Carrascosa, Adela; Calabuig Bayo, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction, although rare in children, is a significant cause of portal hypertension (PHT) leading to life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding in the pediatric age group. PHT may also lead to other complications such as hyperesplenism, cholangyopathy, ascites, and even hepatopulmonary syndrome and portopulmonary hypertension that may require organ transplantation. Herein we report the case of an asymptomatic 11-month-old infant wherein a hepatomegaly and cavernous transformation of the portal vein was detected by liver ultrasound. Neither signs of thrombosis in arteriovenous system, nor affectation of biliary tract were identified in the magnetic resonance imaging study. A significant enlargement of the caudate lobe of the liver was reported. No risk factors were detected. The differential diagnosis performed was extensive. Inherited thrombophilia and storage disorders were especially considered. Liver biopsy was normal. Upper gastrointestinal esophagogastroduodenoscopy detected two small varicose cords on the distal third of the esophagus. Finding a cavernous transformation of the portal vein with evidence of collateral circulation in such an early age is a challenging condition for professionals, since PHT may lead to severe complications during childhood and can compromise growth and development. Evidence-based guidelines for the management of PHT in adults have been published. However, follow-up and treatment of pediatric patients have not yet been standardized. Moreover, management of PHT in infants faces particular difficulties such as technical restrictions that could hinder their treatment. PMID:27504083

  4. Very Early Presentation of Extrahepatic Portal Vein Obstruction Causing Portal Hypertension in an Infant: Uncertainties in the Management and Therapeutic Limitations.

    PubMed

    Khodayar-Pardo, Parisá; Peña Aldea, Andrés; Ramírez González, Ana; Meseguer Carrascosa, Adela; Calabuig Bayo, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction, although rare in children, is a significant cause of portal hypertension (PHT) leading to life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding in the pediatric age group. PHT may also lead to other complications such as hyperesplenism, cholangyopathy, ascites, and even hepatopulmonary syndrome and portopulmonary hypertension that may require organ transplantation. Herein we report the case of an asymptomatic 11-month-old infant wherein a hepatomegaly and cavernous transformation of the portal vein was detected by liver ultrasound. Neither signs of thrombosis in arteriovenous system, nor affectation of biliary tract were identified in the magnetic resonance imaging study. A significant enlargement of the caudate lobe of the liver was reported. No risk factors were detected. The differential diagnosis performed was extensive. Inherited thrombophilia and storage disorders were especially considered. Liver biopsy was normal. Upper gastrointestinal esophagogastroduodenoscopy detected two small varicose cords on the distal third of the esophagus. Finding a cavernous transformation of the portal vein with evidence of collateral circulation in such an early age is a challenging condition for professionals, since PHT may lead to severe complications during childhood and can compromise growth and development. Evidence-based guidelines for the management of PHT in adults have been published. However, follow-up and treatment of pediatric patients have not yet been standardized. Moreover, management of PHT in infants faces particular difficulties such as technical restrictions that could hinder their treatment.

  5. [Clinical features of liver cirrhosis complicated by portal vein thrombosis and related risk factors].

    PubMed

    Lin, G S; Xu, Q; Zhao, S Y; Zhang, Y X

    2016-07-20

    Objective: To investigate the clinical features of patients with liver cirrhosis complicated by portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and related risk factors. Methods: A total of 65 patients with liver cirrhosis complicated by PVT who were diagnosed and treated from June 2013 to June 2015 were enrolled as PVT group, and 70 cirrhotic patients without PVT were enrolled as controls (non-PVT group). The data collected included general information, results of laboratory examination, imaging findings, clinical manifestations, and complications. The clinical features were compared between the two groups, and related risk factors were screened out. Results: There were no significant differences between the PVT group and non-PVT group in age, sex, nation, etiology, white blood cell count, platelet count, international normalized ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, serum creatinine, total bilirubin, and the diameter of the splenic vein (all P > 0.05), while between these two groups, there were significant differences in D-dimer (1.87±1.45 mg/ml vs 0.55±0.58 mg/ml, P < 0.05), fibrinogen degradation product (FDP) level (18.57±19.46 μg/ml vs 5.45±6.00 μg/ml, P < 0.05), hemoglobin (99.32±26.73 g/L vs 112.64±25.03 g/L, P < 0.05), albumin (28.51±5.19 g/L vs 33.07±7.94 g/L, P < 0.05), the diameter of the portal vein (12.53±2.70 mm vs 11.17±1.79 mm, P < 0.05), spleen thickness (5.12±0.95 cm vs 4.56±0.83 cm, P < 0.05), spleen length (15.35±3.21 cm vs 13.86±2.82 cm, P < 0.05), and Child-Pugh score (7.66±2.06 vs 6.93±1.87, P < 0.05). The two groups showed no significant differences in diarrhea, ileus, hepatorenal syndrome, and hepatic encephalopathy (P > 0.05), but showed significant differences in abdominal pain (18 vs 7 cases, P < 0.05), fever (17 vs 4 cases, P < 0.05), esophageal variceal bleeding (22 vs 9 cases, P < 0.05), and spontaneous peritonitis (24 vs 12 cases, P < 0.05). D-dimer (OR = 4.290, P < 0.000) and mean platelet volume (OR = 1.294, P

  6. Comprehensive treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma with tumor thrombus in major portal vein

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hai-Hong; Ye, Jia-Zhou; Xie, Zhi-Bo; Peng, Yu-Chong; Chen, Jie; Ma, Liang; Bai, Tao; Chen, Jun-Ze; Lu, Zhan; Qin, Hong-Gui; Xiang, Bang-De; Li, Le-Qun

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of transcatheter arterial chemoembolisation (TACE) compared with surgical intervention and sorafenib for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with tumor thrombus extending to the main portal vein. METHODS: From 2009 to 2013, a total of 418 HCC patients with tumor thrombus extending to the main portal vein were enrolled in this study and divided into four groups. These groups underwent different treatments as follows: TACE (n = 307), surgical intervention (n = 54), sorafenib (n = 15) and palliative treatment (n = 42). Overall survival rates were determined by Kaplan-Meier method, and differences between the groups were identified through log-rank analysis. Cox’s proportional hazard model was used to identify the risk factors for survival. RESULTS: The mean survival periods for patients in the TACE, surgical intervention, sorafenib and palliative treatment groups were 10.39, 4.13, 5.54 and 2.82 mo, respectively. For the TACE group, the 3-, 6-, 12- and 24-mo survival rates were 94.1%, 85.9%, 51.5% and 0.0%, respectively. The corresponding rates were 60.3%, 22.2%, 0.0% and 0.0% for the surgical intervention group and 50.9%, 29.5%, 0.0% and 0.0% for the sorafenib group. Evidently, the results in the TACE group were significantly higher than those in the other groups (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, no significant difference among survival rates was observed between TACE with/without sorafenib (10.22 mo vs 10.52 mo, P = 0.615). No significant difference in survival rates was also found among the surgical intervention, sorafenib and palliative treatment groups (P > 0.05). These values significantly increased after TACE with/without sorafenib compared with other treatments (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: For HCC patients with tumor thrombus extending to the main portal vein, TACE can yield a higher survival rate than surgical intervention or sorafenib treatment. PMID:27053855

  7. Portal, mesenteric, and splenic vein thromboses after endovascular embolization for gastrointestinal bleeding caused by a splenic arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Ding, Pengxu; Li, Zhen; Han, Xin-Wei; Wang, Zhong-Gao; Zhang, Wen-Guang; Fu, Ming-Ti

    2014-07-01

    We present an unusual case of portal, mesenteric, and splenic vein thromboses after endovascular embolization for gastrointestinal bleeding caused by a splenic arteriovenous fistula. The thromboses were successfully treated with anticoagulation therapy. The patient was a 37-year-old woman who presented with portal hypertension manifested by gastrointestinal bleeding with no evidence of liver disease. Splenic arteriography confirmed the presence of a high-flow arteriovenous fistulous communication from the splenic artery directly into the splenic vein. The arteriovenous fistula was successfully treated with percutaneous transarterial embolization by embolization coils and the patient achieved effective hemostasis. Low-molecular-weight heparin and warfarin were administrated to prevent thrombosis in the portal venous system after the procedure. Although anticoagulants were immediately administered, thromboses of the portal, mesenteric, and splenic veins were diagnosed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography after 10 days. Complete recanalization of the portal venous system confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography was achieved by administering warfarin orally for 3 months.

  8. An unusual case: a giant paraesophageal hiatal hernia with intrathoracic spleen, preduodenal portal vein, malrotation, and left inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Başaklar, A Can; Sönmez, Kaan; Karabulut, Ramazan; Türkyilmaz, Zafer; Moralioğlu, Serdar

    2007-12-01

    A giant paraesophageal hiatal hernia with preduodenal portal vein, nonrotating gut, intrathoracic spleen, and left inferior vena cava has not been reported to date. This set of complex anomalies can have significant clinical implications. Awareness of these anomalies is essential to avoid further complications.

  9. Preduodenal portal vein causing duodenal obstruction associated with situs inversus, intestinal malrotation, and polysplenia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Mordehai, J; Cohen, Z; Kurzbart, E; Mares, A J

    2002-04-01

    Preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) is a rare anomaly described in only 82 patients in the literature. In a few patients, the PDPV was the direct cause of duodenal obstruction. The authors have treated a newborn with PDPV associated with total situs inversus, intestinal malrotation and polysplenia who presented clinically with duodenal obstruction.

  10. Successful pregnancy outcome in decompensated chronic liver disease with portal vein thrombosis: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Kamani, Lubna; Hussain, Riaz; Siddique, Shoaib

    2011-07-01

    Pregnancy is rare in women with decompensated chronic liver disease. In this case report, we describe a case of a young woman who presented with hepatitis B-related decompensated chronic liver disease with portal vein thrombosis having successful full-term uneventful pregnancy.

  11. Image guided portal vein access techniques in TIPS creation and considerations regarding their use

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is a difficult procedure to perform and accessing the portal vein is a very challenging step. There are three broad categories of image guided TIPS creation techniques. Each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. TIPS procedure carries some risk of complications regardless of the guidance technique employed. The technology for TIPS has evolved in parallel with the expanding indications for TIPS. Ultrasound guidance technique offers a safe option, particularly for patients with challenging anatomy. Patient safety should always come first and the US guided technique should be more routinely used. Experience is the main factor in the success of TIPS. Other factors to consider in reducing the all-cause morbidity and mortality are patient selection, patient management and the clinical setting. PMID:27385392

  12. Diffusion-Weighted MRI of Malignant versus Benign Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jhii-Hyun; Cho, Eun-Suk; Chung, Jae-Joon; Kim, Joo Hee; Kim, Ki Whang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To validate the diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) for differentiation of benign from malignant portal vein thrombosis. Materials and Methods The Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study and waived informed consent. A total of 59 consecutive patients (52 men and 7 women, aged 40–85 years) with grossly defined portal vein thrombus (PVT) on hepatic MRI were retrospectively analyzed. Among them, liver cirrhosis was found in 45 patients, and hepatocellular carcinoma in 47 patients. DWI was performed using b values of 50 and 800 sec/mm2 at 1.5-T unit. A thrombus was considered malignant if it enhanced on dynamic CT or MRI; otherwise, it was considered bland. There were 18 bland thrombi and 49 malignant thrombi in 59 patients, including 8 patients with simultaneous benign and malignant PVT. Mean apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of benign and malignant PVTs were compared by using Mann-Whitney U test. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results The mean ADC ± standard deviation of bland and malignant PVT were 1.00 ± 0.39 × 10-3 mm2/sec and 0.92 ± 0.25 × 10-3 mm2/sec, respectively; without significant difference (p = 0.799). The area under ROC curve for ADC was 0.520. An ADC value of > 1.35 × 10-3 mm2/sec predicted bland PVT with a specificity of 94.6% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 84.9–98.9%) and a sensitivity of 22.2% (95% CI: 6.4–47.6%), respectively. Conclusion Due to the wide range and considerable overlap of the ADCs, DWI cannot differentiate the benign from malignant thrombi efficiently. PMID:27390544

  13. Foam Sclerotherapy Using Polidocanol (Aethoxysklerol) for Preoperative Portal Vein Embolization in 16 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Myung-su; Kim, Kyung Sik; Kim, Soon II; Won, Jong Youn; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Kwang-Hun

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical safety and effectiveness of foam sclerotherapy using polidocanol for preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) before hemihepatectomy of the liver. Materials and Methods: From March 2006 to October 2008, foam sclerotherapy using polidocanol was performed in 16 patients (male-to-female ratio of 12:4, age range 48-75 years [mean 62]) for PVE. Patients were diagnosed with Klatskin tumor (n = 13), gallbladder (GB) cancer (n = 2), or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (n = 1). The foam was composed of a 1:2:1 ratio of 3% polidocanol (Aethoxysklerol; Kreussler Pharma, Wiesbaden, Germany), room air, and contrast media (Xenetix 350; Guerbet, Aulnay-Sous-Bois, France). The total amount of polidocanol used (2 to 8 mL [mean 4.6]) varied according to the volume of the target portal vein. We calculated the volume of future liver remnant (FLR) before and after PVE and evaluated complications associated with the use of polidocanol foam sclerotherapy for PVE. Results: Technical success was achieved in all patients. All patients were comfortable throughout the procedure and did not experience pain during sclerotherapy. No periprocedural morbidity or mortality occurred. Patients underwent a liver dynamic computed tomography (CT) scan 2-4 weeks after PVE. FLR increased significantly after PVE using polidocanol foam from 19.3% (range 16-35%) before PVE to 27.8% (range 23-42%) after PVE (p = 0.001). All patients were operable for hemihepatectomy of the liver and achieved effective resection. Conclusion: Foam sclerotherapy using polidocanol is clinically safe and effective for preoperative PVE.

  14. Hepatic resection or transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ninggang; Wei, Xiaodong; Zhang, Dongzhi; Chai, Wenxiao; Che, Ming; Wang, Jiangye; Du, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The role of hepatic resection in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with accompanying portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) remains controversial. This study aimed to evaluate the surgical outcomes of hepatic resection compared with those of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in HCC patients. A retrospective study was conducted using the medical records of 230 HCC patients with portal vein invasion who underwent hepatic resection (96 patients) or TACE (134 patients). The baseline characteristics, tumor characteristics, clinicopathological parameters, and overall survival rates were compared between the 2 groups. The baseline and tumor characteristics were comparable between the hepatic resection and TACE groups. The overall complication rate was 35.4% in the hepatic resection group, which was significantly lower than that in the TACE group (73.0%, P <0.001). However, the serious complication rate (grade ≥3) in the hepatic resection group was 13.5%, which was significantly higher than that in the TACE group (P = 0.003). The cumulative overall survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years in the hepatic resection group were 86.5%, 60.4%, and 33.3%, respectively. These rates were much higher than those in the TACE group (1-year: 77.6%; 3-year: 47.8%; and 5-year: 20.9%; P = 0.021). The long-term survival was notably better in the patients with types I and II PVTT than in the patients with types III and IV PVTT (P <0.05). The univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that types III and IV PVTT and TACE may have contributed to the poor overall survival following surgery. In HCC patients with PVTT and compensated liver function, hepatic resection is a safe and effective surgical protocol, particularly for patients with type I or II PVTT. PMID:27367992

  15. Classification of hypervascular liver lesions based on hepatic artery and portal vein blood supply coefficients calculated from triphasic CT scans.

    PubMed

    Boas, F Edward; Kamaya, Aya; Do, Bao; Desser, Terry S; Beaulieu, Christopher F; Vasanawala, Shreyas S; Hwang, Gloria L; Sze, Daniel Y

    2015-04-01

    Perfusion CT of the liver typically involves scanning the liver at least 20 times, resulting in a large radiation dose. We developed and validated a simplified model of tumor blood supply that can be applied to standard triphasic scans and evaluated whether this can be used to distinguish benign and malignant liver lesions. Triphasic CTs of 46 malignant and 32 benign liver lesions were analyzed. For each phase, regions of interest were drawn in the arterially enhancing portion of each lesion, as well as the background liver, aorta, and portal vein. Hepatic artery and portal vein blood supply coefficients for each lesion were then calculated by expressing the enhancement curve of the lesion as a linear combination of the enhancement curves of the aorta and portal vein. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and hypervascular metastases, on average, both had increased hepatic artery coefficients compared to the background liver. Compared to HCC, benign lesions, on average, had either a greater hepatic artery coefficient (hemangioma) or a greater portal vein coefficient (focal nodular hyperplasia or transient hepatic attenuation difference). Hypervascularity with washout is a key diagnostic criterion for HCC, but it had a sensitivity of 72 % and specificity of 81 % for diagnosing malignancy in our diverse set of liver lesions. The sensitivity for malignancy was increased to 89 % by including enhancing lesions that were hypodense on all phases. The specificity for malignancy was increased to 97 % (p = 0.039) by also examining hepatic artery and portal vein blood supply coefficients, while maintaining a sensitivity of 76 %.

  16. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided placement of a transhepatic portal vein stent in a live porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Young; Seo, Dong Wan; Kang, Hyeon-Ji; Cho, Min Keun; Song, Tae Jun; Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Percutaneous portal vein (PV) stent placement is used to manage PV occlusion or stenosis caused by malignancy. The use of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has expanded to include vascular interventions. The aim of this study was to examine the technical feasibility and safety of EUS-guided transhepatic PV stent placement in a live porcine model. Materials and Methods: EUS-guided transhepatic PV stent placement was performed in six male miniature pigs under general anesthesia using forward-viewing echoendoscope. Under EUS guidance, the left intrahepatic PV was punctured with a 19-gauge fine-needle aspiration (FNA) needle and a 0.025 inch guidewire inserted through the needle and into the main PV. The FNA needle was then withdrawn and a needle-knife inserted to dilate the tract. Under EUS and fluoroscopic guidance, a noncovered metal stent was inserted over the guidewire and released into the main PV. Results: A PV stent was placed successfully in all six pigs with no technical problems or complications. The patency of the stent in the main PV was confirmed using color Doppler EUS and transhepatic portal venography. Necropsy of the first three animals revealed no evidence of bleeding and damage to intra-abdominal organs or vessels. No complications occurred in the remaining three animals during the 8 weeks observation period. Conclusions: EUS-guided transhepatic PV stent placement can be both technically feasible and safe in a live animal model. PMID:27803904

  17. Assessment of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography of the hepatic vein for detection of hemodynamic changes associated with experimentally induced portal hypertension in dogs.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Keitaro; Hiramoto, Akira; Michishita, Asuka; Takagi, Satoshi; Hoshino, Yuki; Itami, Takaharu; Lim, Sue Yee; Osuga, Tatsuyuki; Nakamura, Sayuri; Ochiai, Kenji; Nakamura, Kensuke; Ohta, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) of the hepatic vein for the detection of hemodynamic changes associated with experimentally induced portal hypertension in dogs. ANIMALS 6 healthy Beagles. PROCEDURES A prospective study was conducted. A catheter was surgically placed in the portal vein of each dog. Hypertension was induced by intraportal injection of microspheres (10 to 15 mg/kg) at 5-day intervals via the catheter. Microsphere injections were continued until multiple acquired portosystemic shunts were created. Portal vein pressure (PVP) was measured through the catheter. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography was performed before and after establishment of hypertension. Time-intensity curves were generated from the region of interest in the hepatic vein. Perfusion variables measured for statistical analysis were hepatic vein arrival time, time to peak, time to peak phase (TTPP), and washout ratio. The correlation between CEUS variables and PVP was assessed by use of simple regression analysis. RESULTS Time to peak and TTPP were significantly less after induction of portal hypertension. Simple regression analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between TTPP and PVP. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE CEUS was useful for detecting hemodynamic changes associated with experimentally induced portal hypertension in dogs, which was characterized by a rapid increase in the intensity of the hepatic vein. Furthermore, TTPP, a time-dependent variable, provided useful complementary information for predicting portal hypertension. IMPACT FOR HUMAN MEDICINE Because the method described here induced presinusoidal portal hypertension, these results can be applied to idiopathic portal hypertension in humans.

  18. Preduodenal portal vein in adult with polysplenia syndrome revisited with a case report.

    PubMed

    G A, Latha; Kagali, Nagaraj A; M, Shridhar; Prasad, B S Satish

    2014-04-01

    Preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) is a rare developmental anomaly. In infants, this is often associated with duodenal obstruction or biliary atresia. It is generally asymptomatic in adults (Ooshima et al., Hepato-Biliary-Pancreat Surg 5(4):455-458, 1998). Here, we report a singular case of adult PDPV that was discovered accidentally during emergency laparotomy for peritonitis due to gastric perforation in a 38-year-old lady. A plethora of congenital anomalies was uncovered, which is consistent with the reported cases of classical polysplenia syndrome, viz., multiple spleens of equal volume, visceral heterotaxia, right (Rt.)-sided stomach, a left (Lt.)-sided or a large midline liver, malrotation of intestine, a short pancreas, PDPV and IVC abnormalities (Gayer et al., Abdom Imaging 24:178-184, 1999). In addition, abnormalities like anamolous origin of Lt. gastric and splenic arteries from the abdominal aorta with absent celiac trunk, hepatic artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery, hepatic veins draining directly to Rt. atrium, etc. along with hypertrophic and lipomatous interatrial septum have also been detected during further investigations. As of now, we have come across 29 cases of adult PDPV reported in world literature and we are reporting our unique case with a review of literature on anomalies of visceral organs associated with PDPV.

  19. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound in differentiating malignant from benign portal vein thrombosis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tarantino, Luciano; Ambrosino, Pasquale; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) may occur in liver cirrhosis patients. Malignant PVT is a common complication in cirrhotic patients with concomitant hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and, in some cases, it may be even the initial sign of an undetected HCC. Detection of malignant PVT in a patient with liver cirrhosis heavily affects the therapeutic strategy. Gray-scale ultrasound (US) is widely unreliable for differentiating benign and malignant thrombi. Although effective for this differential diagnosis, fine-needle biopsy remains an invasive technique. Sensitivity of color-doppler US in detection of malignant thrombi is highly dependent on the size of the thrombus. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MRI) can be useful to assess the nature of portal thrombus, while limited data are currently available about the role of positron emission tomography (PET) and PET-CT. In contrast with CT, MRI, PET, and PET-CT, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is a fast, effective, well tolerated and cheap technique, that can be performed even in the same session in which the thrombus has been detected. CEUS can be performed bedside and can be available also in transplanted patients. Moreover, CT and MRI only yield a snapshot analysis during contrast diffusion, while CEUS allows for a continuous real-time imaging of the microcirculation that lasts several minutes, so that the whole arterial phase and the late parenchymal phase of the contrast diffusion can be analyzed continuously by real-time US scanning. Continuous real-time monitoring of contrast diffusion entails an easy detection of thrombus maximum enhancement. Moreover, continuous quantitative analyses of enhancement (wash in - wash out studies) by CEUS during contrast diffusion is nowadays available in most CEUS machines, thus giving a more sophisticated and accurate evaluation of the contrast distribution and an increased confidence in diagnosis in difficult cases. In conclusion

  20. Left branch of portal vein thrombosis in a liver transplant recipient with donation after cardiac death donor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Maogen; Ju, Weiqiang; Lin, Xiaohong; Zhao, Qiang; Wang, Dongping; He, Xiaoshun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is one of the most severe complications after liver transplantation, which usually causes graft loss and recipient mortality. The founding of the embolic branch of portal system and its result are not well described in the literature. Clinical findings and diagnoses: We report here an unusual case of complete right branch thrombosis of portal vein after orthotopic liver transplantation from a donation after cardiac death donor, without obvious malaise. The interventions and outcomes: The branch thrombosis of portal vein was detected by Doppler ultrasound 11 days after transplantation, followed by angiography for further verification. After treatment with urgent indwelling catheter thrombolysis with urokinase, results improved and the patient showed stable liver function. The patient has been in remission for 22 months with normal graft function. Conclusion: In this case report, we show that frequent ultrasound inspection should be adopted to detect the unobstructed vessel in the early stage of liver transplantation, and local thrombolytic therapy can be used to prevent liver injury and keep the vessel open. PMID:27930543

  1. Catheter directed interventions for acute deep vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Kohlbrenner, Ryan; Kolli, Kanti P.; Lehrman, Evan; Taylor, Andrew G.; Fidelman, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an extremely common form of vascular disease and impacts a great number of patients worldwide. Acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a subset of VTE and is traditionally been treated with anticoagulation. There is good quality data which suggests the use of catheter directed interventions for the treatment of acute DVT with the aim of reducing post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). The present review will discuss the various therapies available for acute DVT, focusing on catheter directed interventions, ranging from traditional anticoagulation to the most novel forms of aspiration thrombectomy. PMID:28123980

  2. Advanced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis cirrhosis: A high-risk population for pre-liver transplant portal vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Stine, Jonathan G; Argo, Curtis K; Pelletier, Shawn J; Maluf, Daniel G; Caldwell, Stephen H; Northup, Patrick G

    2017-01-01

    AIM To examine if liver transplant recipients with high-risk non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are at increased risk for pre-transplant portal venous thrombosis. METHODS Data on all liver transplants in the United States from February 2002 through September 2014 were analyzed. Recipients were sorted into three distinct groups: High-risk (age > 60, body mass index > 30 kg/m2, hypertension and diabetes), low-risk and non-NASH cirrhosis. Multivariable logistic regression models were constructed. RESULTS Thirty-five thousand and seventy-two candidates underwent liver transplantation and of those organ recipients, 465 were transplanted for high-risk and 2775 for low-risk NASH. Two thousand six hundred and twenty-six (7.5%) recipients had pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis; 66 (14.2%) of the high-risk NASH group had portal vein thrombosis vs 328 (11.8%) of the low-risk NASH group. In general, all NASH recipients were less likely to be male or African American and more likely to be obese. In adjusted multivariable regression analyses, high-risk recipients had the greatest risk of pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis with OR = 2.11 (95%CI: 1.60-2.76, P < 0.001) when referenced to the non-NASH group. CONCLUSION Liver transplant candidates with high-risk NASH are at the greatest risk for portal vein thrombosis development prior to transplantation. These candidates may benefit from interventions to decrease their likelihood of clot formation and resultant downstream hepatic decompensating events. Prospective study is needed. PMID:28217250

  3. Portal Vein Embolization as an Oncosurgical Strategy Prior to Major Hepatic Resection: Anatomic, Surgical, and Technical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Orcutt, Sonia T.; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Sultenfuss, Mark; Hailey, Brian S.; Sparks, Anthony; Satpathy, Bighnesh; Anaya, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) is used to extend the indications for major hepatic resection, and it has become the standard of care for selected patients with hepatic malignancies treated at major hepatobiliary centers. To date, various techniques with different embolic materials have been used with similar results in the degree of liver hypertrophy. Regardless of the specific strategy used, both surgeons and interventional radiologists must be familiar with each other’s techniques to be able to create the optimal plan for each individual patient. Knowledge of the segmental anatomy of the liver is paramount to fully understand the liver segments that need to be embolized and resected. Understanding the portal vein anatomy and the branching variations, along with the techniques used to transect the portal vein during hepatic resection, is important because these variables can affect the PVE procedure and the eventual surgical resection. Comprehension of the advantages and disadvantages of approaches to the portal venous system and the various embolic materials used for PVE is essential to best tailor the procedures for each patient and to avoid complications. Before PVE, meticulous assessment of the portal vein branching anatomy is performed with cross-sectional imaging, and embolization strategies are developed based on the patient’s anatomy. The PVE procedure consists of several technical steps, and knowledge of these technical tips, potential complications, and how to avoid the complications in each step is of great importance for safe and successful PVE and ultimately successful hepatectomy. Because PVE is used as an adjunct to planned hepatic resection, priority must always be placed on safety, without compromising the integrity of the future liver remnant, and close collaboration between interventional radiologists and hepatobiliary surgeons is essential to achieve successful outcomes. PMID:27014696

  4. Staged liver resection for perihilar liver tumors using a tourniquet in the umbilical fissure and sequential portal vein embolization on the fourth postoperative day (a modified ALTPS).

    PubMed

    Robles Campos, Ricardo; Brusadin, Roberto; López Conesa, Asunción; Parrilla Paricio, Pascual

    2014-12-01

    Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) achieves the hypertrophy of the future liver remnant in seven days. We achieved the same hypertrophy placing a tourniquet in the parenchimal transection line associating a right portal vein ligation (associating liver tourniquet and right portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy-ALTPS). In perihiliar tumors a«non touch» technique should be performed. ALPPS y ALTPS do not comply with this technical aspect because a dissection of the hilum is carried out in both procedures during the portal dissection. To avoid this problem we devised a new method called sequential ALTPS. It consists of placing a tourniquet in the umbilical fissure without ligation of the right portal vein during the first stage. Subsequently, on the 4(th) postoperative day we perform a percutaneous right portal vein embolization. We present the first case of this new technique in which we have obtained a hypertrophy of 77% of the future liver remnant seven days after portal vein embolization. In the second stage a right trisectionectomy was performed with inferior vena cava resection with a goretex graft replacement.

  5. Effects of high-copper feeding on portal ammonia absorption and on oxygen consumption by portal vein-drained organs and by the whole animal in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Yen, J T; Nienaber, J A

    1993-08-01

    Growing gilts that had catheters inserted into the portal vein, ileal vein, and carotid artery and that were trained to consume 1.2 kg of a 16% CP corn-soybean meal basal diet once daily were used. In Trial 1, hourly simultaneous measurements of the O2 consumption by portal vein-drained organs (PVDO) and by the whole animal during the 24- to 30-h postprandial period were conducted in eight pigs (33.8 +/- .6 kg). After initial measurements, four pigs continued to receive the basal diet and four pigs were fed a basal diet +250 ppm of Cu. Following a 7-d acclimation period, the second series of measurements were made. In pigs fed the diet supplemented with Cu, the PVDO and whole-animal O2 consumptions and the fraction of whole-animal O2 consumption used by PVDO were not different (P > .05) between the initial and second series. In Trial 2, seven gilts (38.5 +/- .9 kg) were used for measurements of net portal NH3 absorption and the O2 consumption by PVDO and by the whole animal during the 0- to 6-h postprandial period. The second series of measurements were made 7 d after four pigs were fed the diet supplemented with Cu. For pigs fed the diet supplemented with Cu, during the second series of measurements, the net portal NH3 absorption was lowered (P < .05). No differences (P > .05) in PVDO and whole-animal O2 consumptions and the fraction of whole-animal O2 consumption used by PVDO were found between the initial and second series.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Preoperative portal vein embolization in liver cancer: indications, techniques and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Favelier, Sylvain; Chevallier, Olivier; Estivalet, Louis; Genson, Pierre-Yves; Pottecher, Pierre; Gehin, Sophie; Krausé, Denis; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative liver failure is a severe complication of major hepatectomies, in particular in patients with a chronic underlying liver disease. Portal vein embolization (PVE) is an approach that is gaining increasing acceptance in the preoperative treatment of selected patients prior to major hepatic resection. Induction of selective hypertrophy of the non-diseased portion of the liver with PVE in patients with either primary or secondary hepatobiliary, malignancy with small estimated future liver remnants (FLR) may result in fewer complications and shorter hospital stays following resection. Additionally, PVE performed in patients initially considered unsuitable for resection due to lack of sufficient remaining normal parenchyma may add to the pool of candidates for surgical treatment. A thorough knowledge of hepatic segmentation and portal venous anatomy is essential before performing PVE. In addition, the indications and contraindications for PVE, the methods for assessing hepatic lobar hypertrophy, the means of determining optimal timing of resection, and the possible complications of PVE need to be fully understood before undertaking the procedure. Technique may vary among operators, but cyanoacrylate glue seems to be the best embolic agent with the highest expected rate of liver regeneration for PVE. The procedure is usually indicated when the remnant liver accounts for less than 25-40% of the total liver volume. Compensatory hypertrophy of the non-embolized segments is maximal during the first 2 weeks and persists, although to a lesser extent during approximately 6 weeks. Liver resection is performed 2 to 6 weeks after embolization. The goal of this article is to discuss the rationale, indications, techniques and outcomes of PVE before major hepatectomy. PMID:26682142

  7. Preoperative Portal Vein Embolization Tailored to Prepare the Liver for Complex Resections: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Baere, T. de Robinson, J. M.; Deschamps, F.; Rao, P.; Teriitheau, C.; Goere, D.; Elias, D.

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) tailored to prepare the liver for complex and extended resections. During the past 5 years, 12 PVEs were performed in noncirrhotic patients with liver metastases from colon cancer (n = 10), choroidal melanoma (n = 1), and leiomyosarcoma (n = 1) to prepare complex anatomical liver resections in patients with small future remnant livers. These liver resections planned to preserve only segment IV in four patients, segments IV, V, and VIII in four patients, segments II, III, VI, and VII in three patients, and segments V and VI in one patient. PVE was performed under general anesthesia with a flow-guided injection of a mixture of cyanoacrylate and Lipiodol using a 5-Fr catheter. All portal branches feeding the liver segments to be resected were successfully embolized with cyanoacrylate except one, which was occluded with coils due to the risk of reflux with cyanoacrylate. After a mean of 32 days, CT volumetry revealed a mean hypertrophy of the unembolized liver of 47 {+-} 25% (range, 21-88%). Liver resections could be performed in 10 patients but were canceled in 2, due to the occurrence of a new hepatic tumor in one and an insufficiently increased volume in the other. Among the 10 patients who underwent the liver resection, 1 died of postoperative sepsis, 3 died 3 to 32 months after surgery, including 1 death unrelated to cancer, and 6 were alive after 6 to 36 months after surgery. In conclusion, in this preliminary report, PVE appears to be feasible and able to induce hypertrophy of the future remnant liver before a complex and extended hepatectomy. Further evaluation is needed in a larger cohort.

  8. [Thrombosis of the internal jugular vein secondary to acute pharyngotonsillitis].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Giselle; Lijdens, Yesica; Demarchi, María Victoria; Martínez Corvalán, María Pía; Razetti, Juan; Boccio, Carlos

    2014-12-01

    Acute pharyngotonsillitis is one of the most common diseases in children and adolescents. The most frequent etiology is virus, followed by bacteria. The main bacterial agent is beta hemolytic Streptococcus group A. A rare complication of pharyngeal infectious processes is septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein. The diagnosis is suspected in the presence of an inflammatory unilateral neck swelling. The diagnosis is confirmed by contrast computed tomography. Treatment consists of prolonged administration of antibiotics, being the use of anticoagulants controversial. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential to prevent persistent vascular occlusion and progression of the thrombus, which can cause pulmonary emboli. In the present study, we present a teenager with thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein secondary to acute streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis. Clinical manifestations, diagnostic methods and treatment of this rare vascular complication are described herein.

  9. A high incidence of native portal vein thrombosis in veterans undergoing liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gayowski, T J; Marino, I R; Doyle, H R; Echeverri, L; Mieles, L; Todo, S; Wagener, M; Singh, N; Yu, V L; Fung, J J; Starzl, T E

    1996-02-01

    The incidence of native portal vein thrombosis (PVT) in liver transplant recipients has been reported to range from 2.1 to 13.8%. We have identified an inordinately high incidence of PVT in a consecutive series of U.S. veterans receiving liver transplants. Between October 1989 and February 1994, 88 consecutive U.S. veterans received 99 orthotopic liver transplants under primary Tacrolimus (Prograf, formerly FK506) based immunosuppression. A number of clinical features were examined in an effort to identify risk factors for PVT and outcome was compared to patients without PVT. Native PVT was present in 23/88 (26%) patients. All of these patients were male U.S. veterans with a mean age of 47 years. When compared to the 65 patients without PVT, we found no significant difference with respect to underlying liver disease, age, Childs-Pugh score (mean = 12), UNOS status as defined prior to April 1995 (95% UNOS 3 or 4), previous abdominal surgery, or liver volume. Median blood loss for patients with PVT (21 units of packed red blood cells) was greater than for those without PVT (14 units, P = 0.04). Portal thrombectomy was performed in 11 patients, 11 patients required mesoportal jump grafts, and 1 patient had an interposition graft. Standard veno-venous bypass was used in 10 patients with single bypass utilized for the remainder. Actuarial patient survival for all patients at 1, 2, and 4 years was 88, 85, and 79%, respectively. There was no significant difference in patients with or without PVT. Patients with PVT had poorer graft survival than patients without PVT (86% vs 65%, 1 year; 81% vs 65%, 2 years; 81% vs 61%, 4 years; P = 0.03); however, this was not related to technical problems with the portal venous inflow. PVT occurred in 26% of U.S. veterans undergoing liver transplantation. These patients had significantly higher operative blood loss and poorer graft survival. The high incidence of postnecrotic cirrhosis in a predominantly male group of patients with

  10. Vascular resection in pancreatic adenocarcinoma with portal or superior mesenteric vein invasion

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Gang; Xie, Kun-Lin; Wu, Hong

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate long-term survival after the Whipple operation with superior mesenteric vein/portal vein resection (SMV/PVR) in relation to resection length. METHODS: We evaluated 118 patients who underwent the Whipple operation for pancreatic adenocarcinoma at our Department of Hepatobiliary Pancreatic Surgery between 2005 and 2010. Fifty-eight of these patients were diagnosed with microscopic PV/SMV invasion by frozen-section examination and underwent SMV/PVR. In 28 patients, the length of SMV/PVR was ≤ 3 cm. In the other 30 patients, the length of SMV/PVR was > 3 cm. Clinical and survival data were analyzed. RESULTS: SMV/PVR was performed successfully in 58 patients. There was a significant difference between the two groups (SMV/PVR ≤ 3 cm and SMV/PVR > 3 cm) in terms of the mean survival time (18 mo vs 11 mo) and the overall 1- and 3-year survival rates (67.9% and 14.3% vs 41.3% and 5.7%, P < 0.02). However, there was no significant difference in age (64 years vs 58 years, P = 0.06), operative time (435 min vs 477 min, P = 0.063), blood loss (300 mL vs 383 mL, P = 0.071) and transfusion volume (85.7 mL vs 166.7 mL, P = 0.084) between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Patients who underwent the Whipple operation with SMV/PVR ≤ 3 cm had better long-term survival than those with > 3 cm resection. PMID:24379594

  11. Schistosoma mansoni infection enhances host portal vein contraction: role of potassium channels and p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Araujo, F P; Quintas, L E M; Noël, F; Silva, C L M

    2007-07-01

    Murine Schistosoma mansoni infection is related to an increased contraction of portal vein in response to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). The present study addressed a putative alteration of ion channels and enzymes involved in vascular contraction. In control group, either inhibition of K+ channels sensitive to ATP (K(ATP)) or Ca2+ (BK(Ca)) increased 5-HT-induced contraction, but the same did not occur in infected mice. On the other hand, inhibition of p38 MAP kinase markedly decreased the vascular contraction to 5-HT in the infected mice with minor effects in the control group. Accordingly, we observed a higher density of phospho-p38 MAP kinase, that refers to the fully active state of the enzyme, in portal veins from infected mice as compared to control animals. These results suggest that the reduced function of K(ATP) and BK(Ca) channels along with an increased contribution of p38 MAP kinase contribute to the increased contraction of portal veins to 5-HT observed in murine schistosomiasis.

  12. Metabolic inhibition enhances Ca(2+)-activated K+ current in smooth muscle cells of rabbit portal vein.

    PubMed

    Miller, A L; Morales, E; Leblanc, N R; Cole, W C

    1993-12-01

    The effect of metabolic inhibition on macroscopic and single-channel K+ currents in isolated rabbit portal vein myocytes was investigated by patch-clamp technique. Depression of adenosine triphosphate synthesis was produced by 2-deoxy-D-glucose (10 mM) and either cyanide (2 mM) or dinitrophenol (50 microM). Outward quasi-steady-state current evoked by a ramp protocol and outward time-dependent current during step depolarizations were increased during metabolic inhibition. The reversal potential for quasi-steady-state current shifted negatively toward equilibrium potential of K+ during treatment consistent with a role for K+ conductance and hyperpolarization of membrane potential. The macroscopic K+ current affected was 1) voltage dependent, 2) inhibited by intracellular Ca2+ chelation and low tetraethylammonium ion (1 mM) but unaffected by 4-aminopyridine (2 mM), and 3) associated with a rise in intracellular Ca2+ assessed by indo 1. Metabolic inhibition caused an increase in voltage-dependent large-conductance K+ channel (120-130 pS) activity in cell-attached patches of myocytes bathed in physiological solution (140 mM K+ in pipette). The channels were blocked in a flickery fashion by tetraethylammonium ion (0.5 mM) and inhibited with charybdotoxin (100 nM). We conclude that metabolic inhibition increases the activity of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels in vascular smooth muscle.

  13. Transarterial Ethanol Ablation Combined with Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Biao; You, Xin; Yuan, Min lan; Qin, Tian Qiang; Duan, Lin Jia; He, Jiao; Fei, Ze Jun; Zhou, Xuan; Zan, Rui Yu; Liao, Zheng Yin

    2016-01-01

    Background The prognosis for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is extremely poor. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of transarterial ethanol ablation (TEA) for the treatment of HCC with PVTT. Methods Patients were treated with TEA for PVTT under cone-beam computed tomography and traditional transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with epirubicin for intrahepatic lesions. Results Seventeen men were successfully treated with TACE plus TEA. The mean overall survival was 18.3 ± 9.0 months (95% CI: 13.7 - 3.0 months). The quality of life (QoL) score increased from 56.9 ± 15.7 before the procedure to 88.5 ± 11.7 at 4 weeks after the procedure. Lipiodol accumulation grades of 3, 2, 1, and 0 were obtained in 3 (17.6%), 8 (47.1%), 6 (35.3%), and 0 (0%) patients, respectively. Conclusions TEA is a safe and effective method for treating patients with PVTT, offering advantages for QoL, response rate after TEA, and OS. PMID:27799963

  14. Therapeutic and clinical aspects of portal vein thrombosis in patients with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Primignani, Massimo; Tosetti, Giulia; La Mura, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a frequent complication in cirrhosis, particularly in advanced stages of the disease. As for general venous thromboembolism, risk factors for PVT are slow blood flow, vessel wall damage and hypercoagulability, all features of advanced cirrhosis. Actually, the old dogma of a hemorrhagic tendency in cirrhosis has been challenged by new laboratory tools and the clinical evidence that venous thrombosis also occurs in cirrhosis. The impaired hepatic synthesis of both pro- and anticoagulants leads to a rebalanced hemostasis, more liable to be tipped towards thrombosis or even bleeding. Conventional anticoagulant drugs (low molecular weight heparin or vitamin K antagonists) may be used in cirrhosis patients with PVT, particularly in those eligible for liver transplantation, to prevent thrombosis progression thus permitting/facilitating liver transplant. However, several doubts exist on the level of anticoagulation achieved as estimated by coagulation tests, on the efficacy of treatment monitoring and on the correct timing for discontinuation in non-transplant candidates, while in transplant candidates there is expert consensus on continuing anticoagulation until transplantation. The recent introduction of direct acting oral anticoagulant drugs (DOACs) in other clinical settings generates much interest on their possible application in patients with cirrhosis and PVT. However, DOACs were not evaluated yet in patients with liver disease and cannot be recommended for the present time. PMID:26689354

  15. Duodenal stenosis resulting from a preduodenal portal vein and an operation for scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Masumoto, Kouji; Teshiba, Risa; Esumi, Genshiro; Nagata, Kouji; Nakatsuji, Takanori; Nishimoto, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Sadako; Sumitomo, Kenzo; Taguchi, Tomoaki

    2009-08-21

    A preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) is known to be a rare cause of duodenal stenosis. We treated a 22-year-old male patient with malnutrition as a result of PDPV and a previously performed operation for scoliosis, who showed an improvement in quality of life after being treated with a combination of nutritional support and surgery. The patient with PDPV had been admitted to our department with duodenal stenosis, ranging from the first to third portions. He had suffered from vomiting since 1 year of age, and he developed malnutrition during the last 6-mo period after orthopedic surgery for scoliosis. The stenosis was related to both the PDPV and the previously performed operation for scoliosis. After receiving nutritional support for 6 mo, a gastrojejunostomy with Braun's anastomosis for the first portion and a duodenojejunostomy for the second and third portions were performed. The postoperative course was almost uneventful. Three months later, he was discharged and able to attend university. In patients with widespread duodenal stenosis, there may be a complicated cause, such as PDPV and duodenal stretching induced by previous spinal surgery.

  16. Duodenal stenosis resulting from a preduodenal portal vein and an operation for scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Masumoto, Kouji; Teshiba, Risa; Esumi, Genshiro; Nagata, Kouji; Nakatsuji, Takanori; Nishimoto, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Sadako; Sumitomo, Kenzo; Taguchi, Tomoaki

    2009-01-01

    A preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) is known to be a rare cause of duodenal stenosis. We treated a 22-year-old male patient with malnutrition as a result of PDPV and a previously performed operation for scoliosis, who showed an improvement in quality of life after being treated with a combination of nutritional support and surgery. The patient with PDPV had been admitted to our department with duodenal stenosis, ranging from the first to third portions. He had suffered from vomiting since 1 year of age, and he developed malnutrition during the last 6-mo period after orthopedic surgery for scoliosis. The stenosis was related to both the PDPV and the previously performed operation for scoliosis. After receiving nutritional support for 6 mo, a gastrojejunostomy with Braun’s anastomosis for the first portion and a duodenojejunostomy for the second and third portions were performed. The postoperative course was almost uneventful. Three months later, he was discharged and able to attend university. In patients with widespread duodenal stenosis, there may be a complicated cause, such as PDPV and duodenal stretching induced by previous spinal surgery. PMID:19701980

  17. Radiotherapy as valid modality for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Hee Chul

    2016-01-01

    Although the current standard treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is sorafenib, many previous studies have established the need for a reliable local modality for PVTT control, which is a major cause of liver function deterioration and metastasis. Additionally, there is growing evidence for the prognostic significance of PVTT classification according to the location of tumor thrombosis. Favorable outcomes can be obtained by applying local modalities, including surgery or transarterial chemoembolization, especially in second-order or distal branch PVTT. Rapid control of PVTT could maintain or improve liver function and reduce intrahepatic as well as distant metastasis. Radiotherapy (RT) is one of the main locoregional treatment modalities in oncologic fields, but has rarely been used in HCC because of concerns regarding hepatic toxicity. However, with the development of advanced techniques, RT has been increasingly applied in HCC management. Randomized studies have yet to definitively prove the benefit of RT, but several comparative studies have justified the application of RT in HCC. The value of RT is especially noticeable in HCC with PVTT; several prospective and retrospective studies have reported favorable outcomes, including a 40% to 60% objective response rate and median overall survival of 15 mo to 20 mo in responders. In this review, we evaluate the role of RT as an alternative local modality in HCC with PVTT. PMID:27570422

  18. Multidisciplinary management of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus - Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgical Hospital consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuqun; Yang, Jiamei; Shen, Feng; Zhou, Weiping; Wang, Yi; Cong, Wenming; Yang, Guang Shun; Cheng, Hongyan; Hu, Heping; Gao, Chunfang; Guo, Jia; Li, Aijun; Meng, Yan; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Yang, Yefa; Qian, Guojun; Luo, Ming; Hu, Bing; Man, Xiaobo; Zhang, Baohua; Su, Changqing; Zhou, Feiguo; Li, Nan; Shi, Jie; Wang, Meng; Zheng, Yaxin; Guo, Weixing; Sun, Juxian; Wang, Hongyang; Lau, Wan-Yee; Wu, Meng-Chao

    2016-06-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) complicated by portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) is associated with poor prognosis, early recurrence of HCC, and limited treatment options. Current guidelines do not have standardized diagnostic and treatment modalities, thus creating a need for a multidisciplinary treatment model for standardization of the treatment. Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgical Hospital (China) convened two working parties of experts from all the departments, to consolidate the current evidence, prevailing vision for the future, and experience of the practicing clinicians engaged in HCC management, so as to develop a consensus for PVTT diagnosis and treatment according to the GRADE system. Based on the quality of the existing evidence and the strength of recommendations, the consensus statements were categorized into 3 evidence levels (A/B/C) and 5 classes (I/II/IIa/IIb/III).The panel discussed and provided clarity on the management and research options in the field of HCC with PVTT. In addition, the panel also assessed the quality of the cited studies and assigned grades to the recommendation statements. Among the group of experts, there was excellent agreement with regard to effective diagnosis and treatment of HCC with PVTT. The recommendations of this consensus will provide guidance to physicians and clinical researchers on the effective management of HCC with PVTT.

  19. Portal vein arterialization: a salvage procedure for a totally de-arterialized liver. The Paul Brousse Hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Bhangui, Prashant; Salloum, Chady; Lim, Chetana; Andreani, Paola; Ariche, Arie; Adam, René; Castaing, Denis; Kerba, Tech; Azoulay, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background Portal vein arterialization (PVA) has been used as a salvage inflow technique when hepatic artery (HA) reconstruction is deemed impossible in liver transplantation (LT) or hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB) surgery. Outcomes and the management of possible complications have not been well described. Methods The present study analysed outcomes in 16 patients who underwent PVA during the period from February 2005 to January 2011 for HA thrombosis post-LT (n = 7) or after liver resection (n = 1), during curative resection for locally advanced HPB cancers (requiring HA interruption) (n = 7) and for HA resection without reconstruction (n = 1). In addition, a literature review was conducted. Results Nine patients were women. The median age of the patients was 58 years (range: 30–72 years). Recovery of intrahepatic arterial signals and PVA shunt patency were documented using Doppler ultrasound until the last follow-up (or until shunt thrombosis in some cases). Of five postoperative deaths, two occurred as a result of haemorrhagic shock, one as a result of liver ischaemia and one as a result of sepsis. The fifth patient died at home of unknown cause. Three patients (19%) had major bleeding related to portal hypertension (PHT). Of these, two underwent re-exploration and one underwent successful shunt embolization to control the bleeding. Four patients (25%) had early shunt thrombosis, two of whom underwent a second PVA. After a median follow-up of 13 months (range: 1–60 months), 10 patients (63%) remained alive with normal liver function and one submitted to retransplantation. Conclusions Portal vein arterialization results in acceptable rates of survival in relation to spontaneous outcomes in patients with completely de-arterialized livers. The management of complications (especially PHT) after the procedure is challenging. Portal vein arterialization may represent a salvage option or a bridge to liver retransplantation and thus may make curative resection in

  20. Conjoined unification venoplasty for triple portal vein branches of right liver graft: a case report and technical refinement.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jae Hyun; Hwang, Shin; Song, Gi-Won; Moon, Deok-Bog; Park, Gil-Chun; Kim, Seok-Hwan; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-05-01

    Anomalous portal vein (PV) branching of the donor liver is uncommon and usually makes two, or rarely, more separate PV branches at the right liver graft. Autologous PV Y-graft interposition has long been regarded as the standard procedure, but is currently replaced with the newly developed technique of conjoined unification venoplasty (CUV) due to its superior results. Herein, we presented a case of CUV application to three PV openings of a right liver graft. The recipient was a 32-year-old male patient with hepatitis B virus-associated liver cirrhosis. The living liver donor was his 33-year-old sister who had a type III PV anomaly, but the right posterior PV branch was bifurcated early into separate branches of the segments VI and VII, thus three right liver PV branches were cut separately. We used the CUV technique consisting of placement of a small vein unification patch between three PV orifices, followed by overlying coverage with a crotch-opened autologous portal Y-graft. The portal Y-graft was excised and its crotches were incised to make a wide common orifice. Three bidirectional running sutures were required to attach the crotch-opened autologous portal Y-graft. After portal reperfusion, the conjoined PV portion bulged like a tennis ball, providing a wide range of alignment tolerance. The patient recovered uneventfully from the liver transplantation operation. The CUV technique enabled uneventful reconstruction of triple donor PV orifices. Thus, CUV can be a useful and effective technical option for reconstruction of right liver grafts with various anomalous PVs.

  1. Radiotherapy Plus Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Invading the Portal Vein: Long-Term Patient Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sang Min; Lim, Young-Suk; Won, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jong Hoon; Kim, Kang Mo; Lee, Han Chu; Chung, Young-Hwa; Lee, Yung Sang; Lee, Sung Gyu; Park, Jin-hong; Suh, Dong Jin

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have evaluated the clinical outcomes of patients after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). Methods and Materials: A registry database of 412 patients treated with TACE and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for HCC with PVTT between August 2002 and August 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. The radiotherapy volume included the PVTT, with a 2- to 3-cm margin to cover adjacent HCC. Intrahepatic primary HCC was managed by TACE before or after radiotherapy. Results: Median patient age was 52 years old, and 88.1% of patients were male. Main or bilateral PVTT was observed in 200 (48.5%) patients. Median radiation dose was 40 Gy (range, 21-60 Gy) delivered in 2- to 5-Gy fractions. We found that 3.6% of patients achieved a complete response and that 24.3% of patients achieved a partial response. The response and progression-free rates of PVTT were 39.6% and 85.6%, respectively. Median patient survival was 10.6 months, and the 1- and 2-year survival rates were 42.5% and 22.8%, respectively. Significant independent variables associated with overall survival included advanced tumor stage, alpha-fetoprotein level, degree of PVTT, and response to radiotherapy. Forty-one patients (10.0%) showed grade 3-4 hepatic toxicity during or 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. Grades 2-3 gastroduodenal complications were observed in 15 patients (3.6%). Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for PVTT in patients with HCC. These results suggested that the combination of TACE and radiotherapy is a treatment option for relieving and/or stabilizing PVTT in patients with advanced HCC.

  2. Impaired liver function attenuates liver regeneration and hypertrophy after portal vein embolization

    PubMed Central

    Kageyama, Yumiko; Kokudo, Takashi; Amikura, Katsumi; Miyazaki, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Amane; Sakamoto, Hirohiko

    2016-01-01

    AIM To clarify the clinical factors associated with liver regeneration after major hepatectomy and the hypertrophic rate after portal vein embolization (PVE). METHODS A total of 63 patients who underwent major hepatectomy and 13 patients who underwent PVE in a tertiary care hospital between January 2012 and August 2015 were included in the analysis. We calculated the remnant liver volume following hepatectomy using contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) performed before and approximately 3-6 mo after hepatectomy. Furthermore, we calculated the liver volume using CT performed 2-4 wk after PVE. Preoperative patient characteristics and laboratory data were analyzed to identify factors affecting postoperative liver regeneration or hypertrophy rate following PVE. RESULTS The remnant liver volume/total liver volume ratio negatively correlated with the liver regeneration rate after hepatectomy (ρ = -0.850, P < 0.001). The regeneration rate was significantly lower in patients with an indocyanine green retention rate at 15 min (ICG-R15) of ≥ 20% in the right hepatectomy group but not in the left hepatectomy group. The hypertrophic rate after PVE positively correlated with the regeneration rate after hepatectomy (ρ = 0.648, P = 0.017). In addition, the hypertrophic rate after PVE was significantly lower in patients with an ICG-R15 ≥ 20% and a serum total bilirubin ≥ 1.5 mg/dL. CONCLUSION The regeneration rate after major hepatectomy correlated with hypertrophic rate after PVE. Both of them were attenuated in the presence of impaired liver function. PMID:27729956

  3. Acute thigh compartment syndrome post femoral vein catheterization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Mark W

    2008-08-01

    This case report presents a previously unreported etiology of acute thigh compartment syndrome following ipsilateral femoral vein catheterization, including clinical results and a brief review of the literature.

  4. Occlusion of a hepatic artery to portal vein fistula with Bucrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Kerlan, R.K. Jr.; Hoddick, W.K.; Pogany, A.C.; Bank, W.O.; Sollenberger, R.D.

    1983-08-01

    A 49-year-old woman with cirrhosis and portal hypertension was evaluated for a portal-systemic shunt procedure following recurrent variceal hemorrhage. The preoperative visceral angiogram demonstrated a hepatic arterial to portal venous fistula, presumably a complication of a previous liver biopsy. The fistula was successfully closed using isobutyl-2-cyanoacrylate (Bucrylate) delivered through a flow-directed, calibrated-leak balloon microcatheter.

  5. Ovarian Vein Thrombosis Presenting as Acute Abdomen in Puerperium

    PubMed Central

    Mannini, Luca; Aldinucci, Martina; Ghizzoni, Viola; Fambrini, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Postpartum Ovarian Vein Thrombosis (POVT) is a rare, but serious condition that causes slow quadrant pain in the postpartum period. POVT must be considered in the differential diagnosis of postpartum acute abdomen. We hereby report a case on a 36-year-old Italian woman who developed an acute abdomen a week after spontaneous vaginal delivery. She had persistent fever and constipation. Diagnosis of POVT was made with an abdominal Computed Tomography (CT) and treatment with heparin and broad-spectrum antibiotics were started. After 72 hours, the patient was switched from low molecular weight heparin to oral anticoagulant treatment. After 5 months a complete recanalization was demonstrated by abdomen CT and the treatment was stopped 6 months after diagnosis. POVT is a diagnosis of exclusion in the puerperium. This case illustrated that POVT may also occur in low risk patient. PMID:27042537

  6. [Surgical treatment of acute deep leg and pelvic vein trombosis].

    PubMed

    Gall, F; Husfeldt, K J

    1977-08-25

    In the last 3 years 93 cases of iliofermoral trombosis were treated by surgery. We prefer the method used by Brunner, but under general anaesthesia and using a Bentley-Autotransfusion-System (ATS). The average age of our patients was 55 years (age ranged between 17 and 87 years). No lethal pulmonary embolism was observed. 2, 1 percent of the patients died following apoplex or acute heart failure. Of 67 patients who were operated on 6 months ago or more 70 percent have no further complaints, 28 percent still have some residual edema and only 2 patients have a severe postthrombotic syndrome. 50 percent of 40 control-phlebograms demonstrated patency of all veins. 20 percent had short segmentary occlusions with definite signs of recanalisation, while in 27 percent of the cases occlusions of the lower leg and thigh were found, the iliac veins being free. Only 2 postoperative phlebograms showed a complete iliofemoral venous occlusion. Our results prove, that the operative thrombectomy is a successful method, with which the main complications of the iliofemoral thrombosis-pulmonary embolisation and postthrombotic syndrome-can difinitely be reduced. Also because of better long term results, the operative therapy of acute ilofemoral thrombosis should be generally prefered instead of conservative treatment.

  7. Living Donor Liver Transplantation for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis after Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dai Hoon; Joo, Dong Jin; Kim, Myoung Soo; Choi, Gi Hong; Choi, Jin Sub; Park, Young Nyun; Seong, Jinsil

    2016-01-01

    Locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein thrombosis carries a 1-year survival rate <10%. Localized concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), followed by hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC), was recently introduced in this setting. Here, we report our early experience with living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in such patients after successful down-staging of HCC through CCRT and HAIC. Between December 2011 and September 2012, eight patients with locally advanced HCC at initial diagnosis were given CCRT, followed by HAIC, and underwent LDLT at the Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea. CCRT [45 Gy over 5 weeks with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as HAIC] was followed by HAIC (5-FU/cisplatin combination every 4 weeks for 3–12 months), adjusted for tumor response. Down-staging succeeded in all eight patients, leaving no viable tumor thrombi in major vessels, although three patients first underwent hepatic resections. Due to deteriorating liver function, transplantation was the sole therapeutic option and offered a chance for cure. The 1-year disease-free survival rate was 87.5%. There were three instances of post-transplantation tumor recurrence during follow-up monitoring (median, 17 months; range, 10–22 months), but no deaths occurred. Median survival time from initial diagnosis was 33 months. Four postoperative complications recorded in three patients (anastomotic strictures: portal vein, 2; bile duct, 2) were resolved through radiologic interventions. Using an intensive tumor down-staging protocol of CCRT followed by HAIC, LDLT may be a therapeutic option for selected patients with locally advanced HCC and portal vein tumor thrombosis. PMID:27401662

  8. Interobserver Variability in Target Definition for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With and Without Portal Vein Thrombus: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S.; Bosch, Walter R.; Krishnan, Sunil; Kim, Tae K.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Seong, Jinsil; Haddock, Michael G.; Cheng, Jason C.; Feng, Mary U.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Roberge, David; and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Defining hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gross tumor volume (GTV) requires multimodal imaging, acquired in different perfusion phases. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the variability in contouring and to establish guidelines and educational recommendations for reproducible HCC contouring for treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Anonymous, multiphasic planning computed tomography scans obtained from 3 patients with HCC were identified and distributed to a panel of 11 gastrointestinal radiation oncologists. Panelists were asked the number of HCC cases they treated in the past year. Case 1 had no vascular involvement, case 2 had extensive portal vein involvement, and case 3 had minor branched portal vein involvement. The agreement between the contoured total GTVs (primary + vascular GTV) was assessed using the generalized kappa statistic. Agreement interpretation was evaluated using Landis and Koch's interpretation of strength of agreement. The S95 contour, defined using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm consensus at the 95% confidence level, was created for each case. Results: Of the 11 panelists, 3 had treated >25 cases in the past year, 2 had treated 10 to 25 cases, 2 had treated 5 to 10 cases, 2 had treated 1 to 5 cases, 1 had treated 0 cases, and 1 did not respond. Near perfect agreement was seen for case 1, and substantial agreement was seen for cases 2 and 3. For case 2, there was significant heterogeneity in the volume identified as tumor thrombus (range 0.58-40.45 cc). For case 3, 2 panelists did not include the branched portal vein thrombus, and 7 panelists contoured thrombus separately from the primary tumor, also showing significant heterogeneity in volume of tumor thrombus (range 4.52-34.27 cc). Conclusions: In a group of experts, excellent agreement was seen in contouring total GTV. Heterogeneity exists in the definition of portal vein thrombus that may impact treatment planning

  9. Leiurus quinquestriatus venom inhibits BRL 34915-induced /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux from the rat portal vein

    SciTech Connect

    Quast, U.; Cook, N.S.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of the crude venom of the Israeli scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus on the /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux stimulated by the K/sup +/ channel opener BRL 34915 in the rat portal vein was examined. Applied alone, the venom greatly increased the spontaneous mechanical activity of and the concomitant /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux from the vessel. When the excitability of the vein was suppressed by the dihydropyridine calcium antagonist, PN 200-110, the /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux stimulated by BRL 34915 could be shown to be inhibited by the venom. From the concentration dependence of this inhibition an IC/sub 50/ value of 0.17 +/- 0.01 mg/ml was estimated. This venom is thus the most potent blocker of BRL 34915-evoked /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux reported so far. 17 references, 2 figures.

  10. Cardiovascular MR imaging findings of total anomalous pulmonary venous connection to the portal vein in a patient with right atrial isomerism.

    PubMed

    Koplay, Mustafa; Paksoy, Yahya; Erol, Cengiz; Arslan, Derya; Kivrak, Ali Sami; Karaaslan, Sevim

    2012-12-01

    Total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC) is a rare congenital cardiovascular anomaly in which the pulmonary veins fail to join to the left atrium and drain directly to the right atrium or to one of the systemic veins. This anomaly is frequently seen together with complex cardiac anomalies especially as a part of right atrial isomerism syndrome. Atrial isomerism is called that the same morphological structure of both atria. We reported a very rare case demonstrating TAPVC between the portal vein and the pulmonary veins in a patient with right atrial isomerism by magnetic resonance imaging.

  11. Macroscopic K+ currents in single smooth muscle cells of the rabbit portal vein.

    PubMed Central

    Hume, J R; Leblanc, N

    1989-01-01

    1. Single smooth muscle cells isolated from rabbit portal vein were voltage clamped at room temperature using the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique. These cells exhibited a mean resting potential of -47.9 mV and a mean input resistance of 376 M omega. 2. Using small tip diameter micropipettes (to avoid dialysis of the cells), depolarizing voltage-clamp pulses from a holding potential of -50 mV elicited two distinct outward currents: a quasi-instantaneous background current and a time-dependent current that did not appear to inactivate (delayed rectifier). Upon return to the holding potential, an outward tail current decaying back to the holding current was observed. 3. The time course of development of the tail current as estimated from envelopes of tail current protocols followed the kinetics of activation of the delayed rectifier elicited during the preceding test pulse. The tail current reversed close to the equilibrium potential for K+ ions indicating that it is mainly carried by potassium ions. 4. Using large tip diameter micropipettes to internally dialyse the cells (EGTA = 0.1 mM; ATP = 5 mM), two additional outward currents having transient kinetics were revealed: a smooth transient outward current (Ito) and spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs). Ito was found to be mainly selective for K+ ions and exhibited voltage-dependent inactivation with half-maximal availability near -40 mV. 5. Removal of calcium from the bathing solution significantly reduced the background current and abolished both Ito and STOCs. The delayed rectifier current appeared to be insensitive to this procedure. The two types of transient outward currents were never recorded when EGTA was elevated to 5 mM inside the micropipette whereas the background and delayed rectifier currents were not affected. These results suggested that Ito and the spontaneous transient outward currents are activated by internal calcium. 6. External application of TEA (0.5-20 m

  12. Portal vein embolization for induction of selective hepatic hypertrophy prior to major hepatectomy: rationale, techniques, outcomes and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Li, David; Madoff, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to modulate the future liver remnant (FLR) is a key component of modern oncologic hepatobiliary surgery practice and has extended surgical candidacy for patients who may have been previously thought unable to survive liver resection. Multiple techniques have been developed to augment the FLR including portal vein embolization (PVE), associating liver partition and portal vein ligation (ALPPS), and the recently reported transhepatic liver venous deprivation (LVD). PVE is a well-established means to improve the safety of liver resection by redirecting blood flow to the FLR in an effort to selectively hypertrophy and ultimately improve functional reserve of the FLR. This article discusses the current practice of PVE with focus on summarizing the large number of published reports from which outcomes based practices have been developed. Both technical aspects of PVE including volumetry, approaches, and embolization agents; and clinical aspects of PVE including data supporting indications, and its role in conjunction with chemotherapy and transarterial embolization will be highlighted. PVE remains an important aspect of oncologic care; in large part due to the substantial foundation of information available demonstrating its clear clinical benefit for hepatic resection candidates with small anticipated FLRs. PMID:28154774

  13. Potential role of the neuropeptide CGRP in the induction of differentiation of rat hepatic portal vein wall.

    PubMed

    Thiévent, A; Sena, S; Parlakian, A; Breuzard, G; Beley, A; Rochette, L; Connat, J L

    2005-09-01

    The media of the rat hepatic portal vein is composed of an internal circular muscular layer (CL) and an external longitudinal muscular layer (LL). These two perpendicular layers differentiate progressively from mesenchymal cells within the first month after birth. In this paper, we studied the development of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) innervation during post-natal differentiation of the vessel. We show that CGRP innervation is already present around the vessel at birth in the future adventitia but far from the lumen of the vessel. Progressively, CGRP immunoreactive fibers reached first LL then CL. CL by itself become only innervated at day 14 after birth. This corresponds to the time at which thick filaments (myosin) are visible in electron microscopy and desmin visualisable by immunocytochemistry. Furthermore, we provide evidence by autoradiography, that binding sites for CGRP are transiently expressed on the portal vein media at day 1 and 14 after birth. Vascular smooth muscle cells were transfected with constructs containing promoters for desmin or smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (smMHC). CGRP treatment of the cells significantly increased the expression of smMHC. Overall these results suggest that CGRP can potentially influence the differentiation of smooth muscle cells from the vessel wall.

  14. Lobar hepatocellular carcinoma with ipsilateral portal vein tumor thrombosis treated with yttrium-90 glass microsphere radioembolization: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Pracht, M; Edeline, J; Lenoir, L; Latournerie, M; Mesbah, H; Audrain, O; Rolland, Y; Clément, B; Raoul, J L; Garin, E; Boucher, E

    2013-01-01

    Portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is a common complication of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and has a negative impact on prognosis. This characteristic feature led to the rationale of the present trial designed to assess the efficacy and the safety of yttrium-90 glass-microsphere treatment for advanced-stage lobar HCC with ipsilateral PVTT. 18 patients with unresectable lobar HCC and ipsilateral PVTT were treated in our institution with (90)Y-microS radioembolization. Patients were evaluated every 3 to 6 months for response, survival, and toxicity. Mean follow-up was 13.0 months (2.2-50.6). Outcomes were: complete response (n = 2), partial response (n = 13), stable disease (n = 1), and progressive disease (n = 2) giving a disease control rate of 88.9%. Four patients were downstaged. Treating lobar hepatocellular carcinoma with ipsilateral portal vein thrombosis with yttrium-90 glass-microsphere radioembolization is safe and efficacious. Further clinical trials are warranted to confirm these results and to compare (90)Y-microS with sorafenib, taking into account not only survival but also the possibility of secondary surgery for putative curative intention after downstaging.

  15. Prejunctional histamine H3-receptors inhibit electrically evoked endogenous noradrenaline overflow in the portal vein of freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Smit, J; Coppes, R P; van Tintelen, E J; Roffel, A F; Zaagsma, J

    1997-02-01

    The effects of intra-arterial injection of different doses of the selective histamine H3-receptor agonist R-alpha-methylhistamine and the selective histamine H3-receptor antagonist thioperamide on basal and electrically evoked noradrenaline overflow in the portal vein as well as on mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were investigated in permanently instrumented freely moving rats. R-alpha-Methylhistamine (0.01, 0.1 and 1 mumol/kg) inhibited the evoked noradrenaline overflow up to 43%, the ED50 value being 0.013 mumol/kg. Thioperamide (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mumol/kg) antagonized the effect of 1.0 mumol/kg R-alpha-methylhistamine dose-dependently, evoked overflow returning to control values at 1.0 mumol/kg of the antagonist; thioperamide alone had no effect on electrically evoked noradrenaline overflow. Basal noradrenaline levels, blood pressure and heart rate were not at all influenced by R-alpha-methylhistamine and thioperamide, alone or in combination. The results clearly show the presence of prejunctional histamine H3-receptors inhibiting the electrically evoked noradrenaline overflow from vascular sympathetic nerve terminals in the portal vein of freely moving rats.

  16. [Enzyme levels and morphological picture of normal and cirrhotic rat livers following portal vein ligation and subcutaneous transposition of the spleen].

    PubMed

    Zelder, O; Dorn, R; Bürcklein, H H; Bode, Ch; Bode, J C; Jerusalem, C R

    1975-01-01

    The effect of portal vein ligation after subcutaneous transposition of the spleen is investigated on enzyme-activities. and morphological pattern of the normal and cirrhotic rat-liver. The increase of glycolytic enzyme-activities and the decrease of enzyme-activities of oxidative metabolic pathways can be explained by adaptation on throttled blood supply of the liver. Significant decrease of arginase-activity (urea-cycle) can not be explained by reduced protein content of food (pair-fed-animals). Diminished substrate (ammonia)-level (NH3/t/hepatocytes) may be an explanation. Histological pattern of normal and cirrhotic rat liver is nearly unchanged after portal vein ligation.

  17. Cadaveric liver transplantation in biliary atresia splenic malformation syndrome with the absence of retrohepatic inferior vena cava, preduodenal portal vein, and intestinal malrotation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sen-Oran, E; Yankol, Y; Tuzun, B; Kocak, B; Kanmaz, T; Acarli, K; Kalayoglu, M

    2008-01-01

    A 9-month-old female infant with biliary atresia underwent cadaveric liver transplantation due to progressive cholestatic hepatitis following a Kasai operation. She had biliary atresia splenic malformation syndrome (BASM) composed of an absent retrohepatic inferior vena cava with an azygous connection, preduodenal portal vein, polysplenia, and intestinal malrotation. A portal vein thrombosis developed on the 4th postoperative day requiring immediate treatment by thrombectomy. The patient is well with normal liver function at 3 months follow-up. Although BASM may render the transplantation more difficult, the presence of BASM is no longer a contraindication to liver transplantation.

  18. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma as a cause of obstructive jaundice with simultaneous extrahepatic portal vein obstruction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Masao; Umekita, Nobutaka; Noda, Kazumasa

    2008-07-07

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a rare cause of biliary obstruction. To the best of our knowledge, non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the peripancreatic region causing obstructive jaundice with simultaneous portal vein (PV) invasion has not yet been reported. We present a 50-year-old patient with obstructive jaundice whose extrahepatic portal vein was obstructed by the invasion of a peripancreatic non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The patient denied any other symptoms such as recurrent fever, night sweat and loss of body weight. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a 10 cm mass in the retroperitoneal space behind the head of the pancreas causing obstruction of the distal bile duct and the PV. A pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy combined with a PV resection was performed. The PV was reconstructed using an autologous right internal jugular vein graft. The resected specimen showed endoluminal invasion of both the bile duct and the PV. Histological examination showed the mass consisting of diffuse sheets of large malignant lymphoid cells. These cells were positive for CD20 and CD79a, partially positive for CD10, and negative for CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8 and CD30. The pathologic diagnosis was diffuse large B-cell type non-Hodgkin lymphoma and the patient was transferred to the Department of Hematology and Oncology for chemotherapy. He received four cycles of combined chemotherapy including cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone plus rituximab, and three cycles of intrathecal chemoprophylaxis including methotorexate, cytosine arbinoside and prednisone. The patient is alive with no evidence of the disease for 7 mo after operation and will receive additional courses of chemotherapy.

  19. Total cytoplasmic calcium in relaxed and maximally contracted rabbit portal vein smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, M; Shuman, H; Somlyo, A P; Somlyo, A V

    1984-01-01

    The concentration of total cytoplasmic Ca in vascular smooth muscle was measured by electron probe microanalysis of strips of rabbit portal anterior mesenteric vein that were rapidly frozen either when relaxed or during a maintained (30 min) maximal contraction stimulated with high K and noradrenaline. Strips were also frozen and analysed after incubation in Ca-free, high-Mg2+ solution. Probe diameters of 0.1-0.2 micron and 1.0-1.5 micron were used to measure, respectively, cytoplasmic and cellular (including stored) Ca. There was a highly significant increase (P less than 0.0005) in cytoplasmic Ca of 1.0 +/- 0.2 (S.D.) mmol Ca/kg dry wt. from 0.8 +/- 0.2 (S.E. of mean) mmol/kg dry wt. (n = 262 spectra, six animals) to 1.8 +/- 0.2 (S.E. of mean) mmol Ca/kg dry wt. (n = 296 spectra, six animals), during maximal contraction. This increase is greater than can be accounted for by Ca binding to calmodulin and to myosin, suggesting the presence of other Ca-binding proteins in smooth muscle. A small amount (0.4-0.6 mmol/kg dry wt.) of cytoplasmic Ca remained after incubation in Ca-free, high-Mg2+ EGTA solution. This tightly bound, cytoplasmic Ca is insufficient to account for the total amount of divalent cation known to be bound to F-actin. We conclude that Mg is the major inexchangeably bound cation in F-actin in smooth as in striated muscle. In the contracted muscles, the cellular Ca concentration, measured with the large probes that include Ca stored in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (s.r.), was 3.2 +/- 0.3 (S.E. of mean) mmol Ca/kg dry wt. (n = 93), significantly higher than the cytoplasmic Ca concentration measured with small probes. This value of cellular Ca is probably an underestimate, as the large-diameter probes did not cover all of the peripheral s.r. The cellular Ca (measured with large probes) was highest in the contracted and lower in the relaxed tissue, and was significantly reduced in the muscles incubated in Ca-free solution. In contracted muscle, cytoplasmic

  20. Renal Vein and Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis: A Rare Extrasplanchnic Complication of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Choksi, Dhaval; Chaubal, Alisha; Pipaliya, Nirav; Ingle, Meghraj; Sawant, Prabha

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disorder often associated with various complications. Approximately one fourth of patients with acute pancreatitis develop vascular complications, of which venous thrombosis forms a major group. Extrasplanchnic venous thrombosis is less common, and simultaneous renal vein and inferior vena cava thrombosis is reported only twice. We report a case of alcohol-related acute pancreatitis complicated by simultaneous renal vein and inferior vena cava thrombosis. PMID:28008405

  1. Evaluation of sorafenib in Chinese unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma patients with prior surgery and portal vein tumor thrombosis: A subset analysis of GIDEON study data.

    PubMed

    Ye, Sheng-Long; Chen, Xiaoping; Yang, Jiamei; Bie, Ping; Zhang, Shuijun; Liu, Fengyong; Liu, Luming; Zhou, Jie; Dou, Kefeng; Yip, Christina Sm; Yang, Xiaolei

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the safety and efficacy of sorafenib in Chinese patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. Data of 338 Chinese patients from the Global Investigation of therapeutic DEcisions in hepatocellular carcinoma and Of its treatment with sorafeNib study database were included. Patients were divided into those who received and did not receive sorafenib prior to surgical resection and those with and without portal vein tumor thrombosis. In the non-surgery group, the median survival was 302 days (95% confidence interval: 244-371), and the median time from diagnosis to death was 428 days (95% confidence interval: 352-556); in the surgery group, half of the patients survived for 345 days and the median time from diagnosis to death was 1000 days (95% confidence interval: 750-2816). Median progression-free survival and median time to progression were not different between the two groups. Median overall survival was 360 days (95% confidence interval: 309-435) in the non-portal vein tumor thrombosis group and 240 days (95% confidence interval: 181-296) in the portal vein tumor thrombosis group; median time between hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosis and death was 750 days (95% confidence interval: 472-1000) and 420 days (95% confidence interval: 252-567), respectively, in the two groups. Median progression-free survival was 209 days (95% confidence interval: 166-264) for patients without portal vein tumor thrombosis and 154 days (95% confidence interval: 112-202) for patients with portal vein tumor thrombosis; median time to progression was 295 days (95% confidence interval: 209-463) and 221 days, respectively. Adverse events were generally comparable regardless of prior surgery and portal vein tumor thrombosis status. We thus conclude that earlier administration of sorafenib may result in improved outcomes in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma and portal vein tumor thrombosis.

  2. Heme oxygenase-2 products activate IKCa: role of CO and iron in guinea pig portal vein smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hristov, Kiril L; Gagov, Hristo S; Itzev, Dimitar; Duridanova, Dessislava B

    2004-01-01

    Hemin (10 microM) and carbon monoxide (CO) increased iberiotoxin-blockable IKCa in portal vein smooth muscle cells. CO-induced IKCa activation was abolished by 10 microM ODQ, 10 microM cyclopiazonic acid and 1 microM KT5823. The hemin-induced effect on IKCa was abolished by pretreatment with Sn-protoporphyrin IX, a heme oxygenase inhibitor and Fe2+ chelator but was insensitive to inhibitors of soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). There was no effect of hemin on IKCa in the presence of 3 microM dithiotreitol into the bath or 3 mM glutathione into the pipette solution. Superoxide dismutase (1000 U/ml) or catalase (3000 U/ml) added into the pipette solution also abolished the effect of hemin on IKCa in this tissue. Additionally, 10 microM hemin could not influence IKCa in Ca2+-free external solution or in the presence of 30 microM SKF 95356. It was concluded that CO increases IKCa via its "conventional" signaling pathway, which involves soluble GC and PKG activation and subsequent stimulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump activity resulting in Ca2+-dependent activation of IKCa due to the accumulation of Ca2+ into the space near the plasma membrane. On the other hand, internally produced CO could not yield the same IKCa increase, while Fe2+ derived from heme oxygenase 2-dependent degradation of hemin in portal vein smooth muscle cells gives rise to reactive oxygen species namely hydroxyl and superoxide radicals. Both radicals are responsible for the SKF 95356-sensitive non-selective cation channel activation, the Ca2+ influx and the subsequent increase of Ca2+ concentration near the plasma membrane that augments the KCa channel activity.

  3. Portal Vein Embolization with Radiolabeled Polyvinyl Alcohol Particles in a Swine Model: Hepatic Distribution and Implications for Pancreatic Islet Cell Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Richard J.; Mercer, John R.; Al-Saif, Faisal; Molinari, Michele; Ashforth, Robert A.; Rajotte, Ray V.; Conner-Spady, Barbara; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2009-05-15

    The distribution of radiolabeled polyvinyl alcohol microspheres (PVAMs) when infused into the portal vein of domestic swine was investigated, with the purpose of assessing implications for pancreatic islet cell transplantation. PVAMs measuring 100-300 {mu}m (Contour SE) and labeled with {sup 99m}Tc were infused into the main portal vein of 12 swine, with intermittent portal venous pressure measurements. The infusion catheter was introduced antegradely via direct or indirect cannulation of the portal vein. The liver was subsequently divided into anatomical segments. Radioactivity (decay corrected) was measured for {sup 99m}Tc microsphere synthesis, dose preparation, gross organ activities, tissue samples, and blood. Particulate labeling, catheter positioning, and infusion were successful in all cases. The number of particles used was (185,000 {+-} 24,000) with a volume of 1 ml. Mean portal pressure at 5 min was significantly higher than baseline, but without a significant difference at 15 min. Extrahepatic tissue and serum radioactivity was negligible. A significant difference in number of radioactive particles per gram was detected between segments 6/7 and segments 5/8. Intrasegmental activity was analyzed, and for segments 2/3 a significant difference in the percentage dose per gram across samples was demonstrated (P = 0.001). Effective and stable radiolabeling of PVAMs with {sup 99m}Tc-sulfur colloid was demonstrated. Portal venous infusion of 100- to 300-{mu}m particles showed entrapment in the sinusoidal hepatic system with transient portal pressure elevation. Preferential embolization into the right lateral and posterior segments occurs, suggesting that flow dynamics/catheter tip position plays a role in particle distribution.

  4. Concurrent hepatic artery and portal vein thrombosis after orthotopic liver transplantation with preserved allografts.

    PubMed

    Khan, Arshad; Park, P; Oberholzer, Jose; Tzvetanov, Ivo; Garcia Roca, Raquel; Gaba, Ron C; Benedetti, Enrico; Jeon, Hoonbae

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to early HAT, late HAT has an insidious clinical presentation. Nevertheless, biliary and vascular reconstructions in this late setting are unlikely to improve outcome. Patent portal flow makes an important contribution to the viability of liver in case of late HAT while the allograft reconstitutes intrahepatic arterial flow through neovascularization. Concurrent HAT with PVT without immediate graft necrosis is extremely rare, and allograft and patient survival are seemingly impossible without retransplantation. In fact, hepatopetal arterial and portal venous neovascularization are known albeit obscure phenomena that can preserve posttransplant hepatic function under the extenuating circumstances of complete interruption of blood flow to the graft. We describe two such cases that developed combined HAT and PVT more than six months after OLT with perfect preservation of graft function. The survival of allografts in our cases was due to extensive hepatopetal arterial and portal venous collateralization. Simultaneous HAT and PVT after OLT are rare events and almost uniformly fatal, if they occur early. Due to paucity of such cases, however, underlying mechanisms and etiology remain elusive, and despite radiological diagnosis of these complications, there is no way to predict these events in the wake of stable graft function.

  5. Survival outcomes of hepatic resection compared with transarterial chemoembolization or sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Min; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Lee, Yoo Jin; Choi, Wang Yong; Choi, Sei Myong; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok; Kang, Koo Jeong; Kim, Young Hwan; Chauhan, Anil Kumar; Park, Soo Young; Tak, Won Young; Kweon, Young Oh; Kim, Byung Seok; Lee, Chang Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Treating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) remains controversial. We compared the outcomes of hepatic resection (HR), transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), and sorafenib therapy as treatments for HCC with PVTT. Methods: Patients diagnosed as HCC with PVTT between January 2000 and December 2011 who received treatment with sorafenib, HR, or TACE were included. Patients with main PVTT, superior mesenteric vein tumor thrombosis, or Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) class C were excluded. The records of 172 patients were analyzed retrospectively. HR, TACE, and sorafenib treatment were performed is 40, 80, and 52 patients respectively. PVTT was classified as either involving the segmental branch (type I) or extending to involve the right or left portal vein (type II). Results: The median survival time was significantly longer in the HR group (19.9 months) than in the TACE and sorafenib groups (6.6 and 6.2 months, respectively; both p<0.001), and did not differ significantly between the latter two groups (p=0.698). Among patients with CTP class A, type I PVTT or unilobar-involved HCC, the median survival time was longer in the HR group than in the TACE and sorafenib groups (p=0.006). In univariate analyses, the initial treatment method, tumor size, PVTT type, involved lobe, CTP class, and presence of cirrhosis or ascites were correlated with overall survival. The significant prognostic factors for overall survival in Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis were initial treatment method (HR vs. TACE: hazard ratio=1.750, p=0.036; HR vs. sorafenib: hazard ratio=2.262, p=0.006), involved lobe (hazard ratio=1.705, p=0.008), PVTT type (hazard ratio=1.617, p=0.013), and CTP class (hazard ratio=1.712, p=0.012). Conclusions: Compared with TACE or sorafenib, HR may prolong the survival of patients with HCC in cases of CTP class A, type I PVTT or unilobar-involved HCC. PMID:27044767

  6. Evaluation of postprandial hyperemia in superior mesenteric artery and portal vein in healthy and cirrhotic humans: an operator-blind echo-Doppler study.

    PubMed

    Sabbá, C; Ferraioli, G; Genecin, P; Colombato, L; Buonamico, P; Lerner, E; Taylor, K J; Groszmann, R J

    1991-04-01

    In an operator-blind design, we used an echo-Doppler duplex system to examine superior mesenteric artery and portal vein hemodynamics on two consecutive mornings in 12 fasting cirrhotic patients and 12 matched controls, randomized to a standardized 355 kcal mixed-liquid meal vs. water. Cross-sectional area and mean velocity were recorded from the portal vein and superior mesenteric artery at 30 min intervals, from 0 min to 150 min after ingestion. Flows were calculated. Pulsatility index, an index related to vascular resistance, was obtained for the mesenteric artery. Baseline flows did not differ between cirrhotic patients and control patients, but pulsatility index was reduced in the cirrhotic subjects. Maximal postprandial hyperemia was attained at 30 min. Cirrhotic patients showed a blunted hyperemic response to food. In normal controls, portal vein area increased significantly after the meal from 30 min to 150 min, whereas in cirrhotic patients a significant difference occurred only at 30 min. Pulsatility index in both groups was significantly reduced after eating, and this reduction persisted up to 150 min. No changes after ingestion of water were observed. Echo-Doppler was very sensitive in detecting postprandial splanchnic hemodynamic changes and differences between cirrhotic patients and normal subjects. Mesenteric artery pulsatility index was more sensitive than flow in detecting baseline hemodynamic differences. In cirrhotic patients, portal postprandial hyperemia was mainly related to the increase in mean velocity.

  7. Bile acid flux through portal but not peripheral veins inhibits CYP7A1 expression without involvement of ileal FGF19 in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Shang, Quan; Guo, Grace L; Honda, Akira; Shi, Daniel; Saumoy, Monica; Salen, Gerald; Xu, Guorong

    2014-08-15

    It was proposed that CYP7A1 expression is suppressed through the gut-hepatic signaling pathway fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 15/19-fibroblast growth factor receptor 4, which is initiated by activation of farnesoid X receptor in the intestine rather than in the liver. The present study tested whether portal bile acid flux alone without ileal FGF19 could downregulate CYP7A1 expression in rabbits. A rabbit model was developed by infusing glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) through the splenic vein to bypass ileal FGF19. Study was conducted in four groups of rabbits: control; bile fistula + bovine serum albumin solution perfusion (BF); BF + GDCA (by portal perfusion); and BF + GDCA-f (by femoral perfusion). Compared with only BF, BF + GDCA (6 h portal perfusion) suppressed CYP7A1 mRNA, whereas BF + GDCA-f (via femoral vein) with the same perfusion rate of GDCA did not show inhibitory effects. Meanwhile, there was a decrease in ileal FGF19 expression and portal FGF19 protein levels, but an equivalent increase in biliary bile acid outputs in both GDCA perfusion groups. This study demonstrated that portal bile acid flux alone downregulated CYP7A1 expression with diminished FGF19 expression and protein levels, whereas the same bile acid flux reaching the liver through the hepatic artery via femoral vein had no inhibitory effect on CYP7A1. We propose that bile acid flux through the portal venous system may be a kind of "intestinal factor" that suppresses CYP7A1 expression.

  8. Outcomes of Adjuvant Chemoradiation After Pancreaticoduodenectomy With Mesenterico-Portal Vein Resection for Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Hristov, Boris; Reddy, Sushanth; Lin, Steven H.; Cameron, John L.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Swartz, Michael J.; Edil, Barish H.; Kemp, Clinton; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation (CRT) offers patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma a chance for extended survival. In some patients, however, resection is difficult because of vascular involvement by the carcinoma, necessitating resection and grafting of the mesenterico-portal vessels. The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes between pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) with and without mesenterico-portal vein resection (VR) in patients receiving adjuvant CRT for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2005, 160 patients underwent PD with 5-FU-based adjuvant CRT followed by maintenance chemotherapy at the Johns Hopkins Hospital; 20 (12.5%) of the 160 underwent VR. Clinical outcomes, including median survival, overall survival, and complication rates were assessed for both groups. Results: Patients who underwent VR had significantly longer operative times (p = 0.009), greater intraoperative blood loss (p = 0.01), and longer postoperative lengths of stay (p = 0.03). However, postoperative morbidity, median survival, and overall survival rates were similar between the two groups. Most patients (70%) from both groups were able to complete CRT, and a subgroup analysis demonstrated no appreciable differences in terms of complications. None of the VR patients who received adjuvant CRT developed veno-occlusive disease or graft failure/leakage. Conclusion: In a cohort of patients treated with adjuvant 5-FU-based CRT at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, having a VR at the time of PD resulted in similar complication rates and survival. These data support the feasibility and safety of adjuvant CRT in patients undergoing VR at the time of PD.

  9. Multimodality Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus: A Large-Scale, Multicenter, Propensity Mathching Score Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kang; Guo, Wei Xing; Chen, Min Shan; Mao, Yi Lei; Sun, Bei Cheng; Shi, Jie; Zhang, Yao Jun; Meng, Yan; Yang, Ye Fa; Cong, Wen Ming; Wu, Meng Chao; Lau, Wan Yee; Cheng, Shu Qun

    2016-03-01

    The optimal treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) remains controversial. We aimed to investigate the best treatment for patients with HCC with PVTT. From January 2002 to January 2014, the data from all consecutive patients with HCC with PVTT who underwent surgical treatment (ST),TACE,TACE combined with sorafenib (TACE-Sor), or TACE combined with radiotherapy (TACE-RT) in the 4 largest tertiary hospitals in China were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into 3 subtypes according to the extent of PVTT in the portal vein (type I-III). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). A total of 1580 patients with HCC with PVTT were included in the study. The median survival times (MST) for ST (n = 745) for type I, II, and III patients (95% CI) were 15.9 (13.3-18.5), 12.5 (10.7-14.3), and 6.0 (4.3-7.7) months, respectively. The corresponding figures for patients after TACE (n = 604) were 9.3 (5.6-12.9), 4.9 (4.1-5.7), and 4.0 (3.1-4.9), respectively; for patients after TACE-Sor (n = 113) 12.0 (6.6-17.4), 8.9 (6.7-11.1), and 7.0 (3.0-10.9), respectively; and for patients after TACE-RT (n = 118) 12.2 (0-24.7), 10.6 (6.8-14.5), and 8.9 (5.2-12.6), respectively. Comparison among the different treatments for the 3 subtypes of PVTT patients after propensity score (PS) matching showed the effectiveness of ST to be the best for type I and type II PVTT patients, and TACE-RT was most beneficial for type III patients. Treatment was an independent risk factor of OS. ST was the best treatment for type I and II PVTT patients with Child-Pugh A and selected B liver function. TACE-RT should be given to type III PVTT patients.

  10. A rare case of portal vein gas: accidental hydrogen peroxide ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Zengin, Suat; Al, Behcet; Genç, Sinan; Yarbil, Pınar; Yilmaz, Demet Ari; Gulsen, Murat Taner

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a colourless and odourless liquid with oxidant characteristics used for various purposes. Whereas in lower concentrations (3%), H2O2 is used as a disinfectant in home cleaning products and wound care, in higher concentrations (35%) it is used in textile and paper industry as a bleaching agent and is diluted for use in lightening hair dyes. Like other caustic substances, direct injuries may develop if H2O2 is swallowed and systemic air embolisms may occur due to the resultant gaseous oxygen. This study discusses a patient who was detected with the presence of gas in the portal venous system due to H2O2 intoxication and was treated conservatively. PMID:22669852

  11. Polysplenia syndrome with agenesis of the dorsal pancreas and preduodenal portal vein presenting with obstructive jaundice—a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Low, J P; Williams, D; Chaganti, J R

    2011-01-01

    Polysplenia, as part of the heterotaxy syndrome, is a rare embryological disorder which results from failure of development of the usual left–right asymmetry of organs. It is often associated with cardiac and biliary abnormalities, which are the usual causes of death in early neonatal life. A congenitally short pancreas and abnormalities with portal vein formation, gut malrotations and inferior vena cava anomalies are known to be associated with this rare syndrome. We report a case of polysplenia in an adult female presenting with obstructive jaundice owing to choledocholithiasis, possibly formed by biliary stasis as a result of compression of the common bile duct by the preduodenal portal vein, and review the literature. The patient was also found to have complete agenesis of the dorsal pancreas on CT and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. PMID:22011826

  12. Polysplenia syndrome with agenesis of the dorsal pancreas and preduodenal portal vein presenting with obstructive jaundice--a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Low, J P; Williams, D; Chaganti, J R

    2011-11-01

    Polysplenia, as part of the heterotaxy syndrome, is a rare embryological disorder which results from failure of development of the usual left-right asymmetry of organs. It is often associated with cardiac and biliary abnormalities, which are the usual causes of death in early neonatal life. A congenitally short pancreas and abnormalities with portal vein formation, gut malrotations and inferior vena cava anomalies are known to be associated with this rare syndrome. We report a case of polysplenia in an adult female presenting with obstructive jaundice owing to choledocholithiasis, possibly formed by biliary stasis as a result of compression of the common bile duct by the preduodenal portal vein, and review the literature. The patient was also found to have complete agenesis of the dorsal pancreas on CT and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

  13. Effect of He-Ne laser irradiation on spontaneous contractive activity and basal tone level of rat portal vein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrishchev, Nikolai N.; Barabanova, Valeria V.; Mikhailova, Irina A.; Chephu, Svetlana G.

    2000-11-01

    To study the effect of He-Ne irradiation (632.8 nm, 15 mW/cm2) on spontaneous contractive activity the fragments of rat portal vein weremounted isometrically in Krebs buffer. Irradiation of vessel fragments by He-Ne laser during 3,5 and 10 min caused the decrease of ton up to 50%, which lasted in postirradiation period (the observation time - 10 min). The frequency of phasic and tonic contractions did not change, but the amplitude increased up to 40% as compared to the initial level. The decreased basal tone level and the increased amplitude of phasic oscillations lasted in postirradiation period. Adding NO synthasa blocator (N - nitro-L-arginine) to Krebs solution before irradiation caused no significant changes mentioned above parameters. Irradiation and coputing of the same parameters of spontaneous contractive activity of vena porta caused no effects, mentioned in the absence of the blocator. From the results it is concluded that the decrease of tone is evoked by the increase of EDRF production and cGMP. The increase of amplitude of phasic and tonic contractions is connected with increase of Ca++ entry in every contraction cycle as a result of membrane Ca++ pool increase.

  14. Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver in a young female: treatment with portal vein embolization and liver trisectonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gargavanis, Athanasios A.; Katsiki, Evangelia D.; Salveridis, Nikolaos T.; Antoniadis, Nikolaos A.; Papanikolaou, Vasileios

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated Embryonal Sarcoma of the Liver (UESL) is a tumor highly malignant, of mesenchymal origin. It is a rare finding in adults, though less rare in children. The strategy to be followed and the therapeutic targets to be reached for this tumor, in adult cases, remain ambiguous and controversial. Herein we report the case of a 29 year old female patient with a massive UESL and we describe our therapeutic approach. A 29 year-old female patient was referred to our center with severe intermittent epigastric pain and fever due to a voluminous liver tumor: Needle biopsy was of no specific findings and surgical excision was decided. Right portal vein embolization and selective embolization of the segment's IV branch was performed in order to achieve adequate future liver remnant (FLR). Right trisectonectomy was then performed, with uneventful post operative period and the patient was discharged at the 11th post operative day. UESL is a rare tumor that needs aggressive surgical approach and multidisciplinary team management is of paramount importance. PMID:27621753

  15. Early prophylactic anticoagulation for portal vein system thrombosis after splenectomy: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Yao, Yingmin; Xue, Wanli; Wu, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of early prophylactic anticoagulation for the prevention of portal vein system thrombosis (PVST) after splenectomy. A systematic search of the PubMed, EMBASE, Springer and Cochrane Library databases was performed to identify studies comparing the outcomes in patients receiving or not receiving regular prophylactic anticoagulation after splenectomy. The quality of the included studies was assessed using the Jadad Score and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Heterogeneity was evaluated using the χ2 and I2 tests. The parameters that were analyzed included the incidence of PVST and anticoagulation-associated complications. A total of seven studies qualified for the review, involving 383 and 283 patients receiving or not receiving regular prophylactic anticoagulation, respectively. The incidence of PVST was significantly reduced with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.31 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.21–0.46; P<0.00001] in the regular prophylactic anticoagulation group compared with the control group. No difference in the incidence of anticoagulation-associated complications was identified between the two groups (OR=0.60, 95% CI, 0.23–1.56; P=0.30). Early prophylactic anticoagulation was associated with a reduced incidence of PVST, although it was not associated with the incidence of anticoagulation-associated complications. These results indicate that prophylactic anticoagulation could be safely administered after splenectomy, even to cirrhotic patients. PMID:27699018

  16. Efficacy of External Beam Radiation-Based Treatment plus Locoregional Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Associated with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Yang; Wang, Yu-Chao; Wu, Tsung-Han; Lee, Chen-Fang; Wu, Ting-Jung; Chou, Hong-Shiue; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Lee, Wei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is a common event in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The optimal treatment for these patients remains controversial. Methods. A retrospective review of 149 patients who had unresectable HCC associated with PVTT between January 2005 and December 2012 was performed. Outcomes related to external beam radiation-based treatment were measured, and clinicopathological features and parameters affecting prognosis were analyzed as well. Results. The radiotherapeutic response of PVTT was an important element that affected the overall treatment response of HCC. Serum α-fetoprotein < 400 ng/mL, the presence of a radiotherapeutic response on PVTT, and receiving additional locoregional therapy were significant prognostic factors affecting the survival of patients. Patients who had received additional locoregional therapy obtained a better outcome, and six of them were eventually able to undergo surgical management with curative intent. Conclusion. The outcome of HCC associated with PVTT remains pessimistic. In addition to the current recommended treatment using sorafenib, a combination of external beam radiotherapy targeting PVTT and locoregional therapy for intrahepatic HCC might be a promising strategy for patients who had unresectable HCC with PVTT. This approach could perhaps offer patients a favorable outcome as well as a possible cure with following surgical management. PMID:27999803

  17. Techniques of TIPS in the treatment of liver cirrhosis combined with incompletely occlusive main portal vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mengfei; Yue, Zhendong; Zhao, Hongwei; Wang, Lei; Fan, Zhenhua; He, Fuliang; Yao, Jiannan; Dong, Xiaoqun; Liu, Fuquan

    2016-01-01

    The patients of liver cirrhosis associated with portal vein thrombosis (PVT) can be effectively treated by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPS). Although the corresponding TIPS procedures have already performed on the patients to different types of PVT, the procedures are not specific and the relationship between different types of PVT and technical success rate of TIPS is unclear. What’s more, we aimed to explore the relationship between survival and vascular patency immediately after TIPS. 191 subjects underwent retrospective assessment. Appropriate TIPS procedures were performed based on our more specific classification. The overall success rate of TIPS was 95.8% (183/191). Success rate was significantly different between Grade II and Grade IV thrombosis (χ2 = 5.294, P = 0.021). The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-and 5-year survival rates were 95.6%, 89.1%, 83.1%, 76.5% and 67.8%, respectively. The overall survival time of completely patent PV and incomplete patent PV immediately after TIPS was 57.05 ± 0.75 vs. 39.12 ± 2.64 months, respectively (P < 0.0001). We conclude that appropriate TIPS procedures and lower grade of PVT are essential for better technical success rate of TIPS. The patency of target vessels is important for survival. PMID:27620282

  18. Portal vein aneurysm associated with Budd-Chiari syndrome treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tsauo, Jiaywei; Li, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman with Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) presented with right upper quadrant pain. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed a saccular aneurysm located at the extrahepatic portal vein main branch measuring 3.2 cm in height and 2.5 cm × 2.4 cm in diameter. The aneurysm was thought to be associated with BCS as there was no preceding history of trauma and it had not been present on Doppler ultrasound examination performed 3 years previously. Because of increasing pain and concern for complications due to aneurysm size, the decision was made to relieve the hepatic venous outflow obstruction. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was created without complications. She had complete resolution of her abdominal pain within 2 d and remained asymptomatic after 1 year of follow-up. CT scans obtained after TIPS showed that the aneurysm had decreased in size to 2.4 cm in height and 2.0 cm × 1.9 cm in diameter at 3 mo, and had further decreased to 1.9 cm in height and 1.6 cm × 1.5 cm in diameter at 1 year. PMID:25759562

  19. Activation of Hindbrain Neurons Is Mediated by Portal-Mesenteric Vein Glucosensors During Slow-Onset Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Bohland, MaryAnn; Matveyenko, Aleksey V.; Saberi, Maziyar; Khan, Arshad M.; Watts, Alan G.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoglycemic detection at the portal-mesenteric vein (PMV) appears mediated by spinal afferents and is critical for the counter-regulatory response (CRR) to slow-onset, but not rapid-onset, hypoglycemia. Since rapid-onset hypoglycemia induces Fos protein expression in discrete brain regions, we hypothesized that denervation of the PMV or lesioning spinal afferents would suppress Fos expression in the dorsal medulla during slow-onset hypoglycemia, revealing a central nervous system reliance on PMV glucosensors. Rats undergoing PMV deafferentation via capsaicin, celiac-superior mesenteric ganglionectomy (CSMG), or total subdiaphragmatic vagotomy (TSV) were exposed to hyperinsulinemic–hypoglycemic clamps where glycemia was lowered slowly over 60–75 min. In response to hypoglycemia, control animals demonstrated a robust CRR along with marked Fos expression in the area postrema, nucleus of the solitary tract, and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. Fos expression was suppressed by 65–92% in capsaicin-treated animals, as was epinephrine (74%), norepinephrine (33%), and glucagon (47%). CSMG also suppressed Fos expression and CRR during slow-onset hypoglycemia, whereas TSV failed to impact either. In contrast, CSMG failed to impact upon Fos expression or the CRR during rapid-onset hypoglycemia. Peripheral glucosensory input from the PMV is therefore required for activation of hindbrain neurons and the full CRR during slow-onset hypoglycemia. PMID:24727435

  20. Multidisciplinary management of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus – Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgical Hospital consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shuqun; Yang, Jiamei; Shen, Feng; Zhou, Weiping; Wang, Yi; Cong, Wenming; Yang, Guang shun; Cheng, Hongyan; Hu, Heping; Gao, Chunfang; Guo, Jia; Li, Aijun; Meng, Yan; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Yang, Yefa; Qian, Guojun; Luo, Ming; Hu, Bing; Man, Xiaobo; Zhang, Baohua; Su, Changqing; Zhou, Feiguo; Li, Nan; Shi, Jie; Wang, Meng; Zheng, Yaxin; Guo, Weixing; Sun, Juxian; Wang, Hongyang; Lau, Wan-yee; Wu, Meng-chao

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) complicated by portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) is associated with poor prognosis, early recurrence of HCC, and limited treatment options. Current guidelines do not have standardized diagnostic and treatment modalities, thus creating a need for a multidisciplinary treatment model for standardization of the treatment. Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgical Hospital (China) convened two working parties of experts from all the departments, to consolidate the current evidence, prevailing vision for the future, and experience of the practicing clinicians engaged in HCC management, so as to develop a consensus for PVTT diagnosis and treatment according to the GRADE system. Based on the quality of the existing evidence and the strength of recommendations, the consensus statements were categorized into 3 evidence levels (A/B/C) and 5 classes (I/II/IIa/IIb/III). The panel discussed and provided clarity on the management and research options in the field of HCC with PVTT. In addition, the panel also assessed the quality of the cited studies and assigned grades to the recommendation statements. Among the group of experts, there was excellent agreement with regard to effective diagnosis and treatment of HCC with PVTT. The recommendations of this consensus will provide guidance to physicians and clinical researchers on the effective management of HCC with PVTT. PMID:27027235

  1. In vitro characterization of the technique of portal vein embolization by injection of a surgical glue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Sandulache, Mihai-Cristinel; Lancon, Oceane; El Kadri Benkara, Khadija

    2012-11-01

    Partial embolization of the portal trunk by glue injection is a minimally invasive technique used in the case of malignant liver tumors. It is conducted few weeks prior to partial liver ablation, when the volume of the remnant liver section is too small to allow hepatectomy. The limitation of glue embolotherapy is that its clinical practice is based on empirical knowledge. The present objective is to study glue injection in a confined blood flow and investigate how the injection dynamics is coupled with glue polymerization. We first characterize polymerization under static conditions for various glue concentrations and then consider the influence of injection. An experimental setup reproduces the co-flow of two immiscible fluids. The glue mixture is injected through a capillary tube into a saline solution with the same ionic concentration, pH and viscosity as blood, flowing steadily in a straight cylindrical tube. The injected phase is visualized with a high-speed imaging system and results are compared with those obtained for non-reacting fluids. These experiments have enabled us to characterize the characteristic times of polymerization of the glue mixtures under static and dynamic conditions and understand how they affect the flow topology of the glue once injected. Biomechanics and Bioengineering Laboratory (UMR CNRS 7338).

  2. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography-Based Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Shintaro; Sato, Morio Suwa, Kazuhiro; Kishi, Kazushi; Shimono, Chigusa; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tanihata, Hirohiko; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). Methods and Materials: Patients with HCC with PVTT in the first branch and/or main trunk were selected for this study. The optimal beam directions for 3D-CRT were explored using a Tc-99m-galactosyl human serum albumin SPECT image for guidance. The SPECT image was classified as either wedge type or localized type. The clinical target volume to a total dose of 45 or 50 Gy per 18-20 fractions included the main tumor and PVTT in the wedge type and PVTT alone in the localized type. Results: Twenty-six patients were enrolled: 18 with wedge type and 8 with localized type. Mean tumor size was 7.1 cm (range, 4.4-12.3 cm). Clinical target volumes of wedge type vs. localized type were 111.2 cm{sup 3} vs. 48.4 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.010), respectively. Mean dose to normal liver and mean dose to functional liver were 1185 cGy and 988 cGy (p = 0.001) in wedge type and 1046 cGy and 1043 cGy (p = 0.658) in localized type, respectively. Despite an incidence of Child-Pugh B and C of 57.7%, no patients experienced radiation-induced liver disease. The progression of PVTT was inhibited, with an incidence of 92.2%; survival rates at 1 and 2 years were 44% and 30%, respectively. Conclusion: Single photon emission computed tomography-based 3D-CRT enables irradiation of both the main tumor and PVTT with low toxicity and promising survival.

  3. Prevalence and pattern of growth abnormalities in children with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction: Response to shunt surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Toufeeq Ahmad; Misgar, Raiz Ahmad; Laway, Bashir Ahmad; Shah, Omar Javed; Shah, Zafar Amin; Zargar, Showkat Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Growth retardation is common in children with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) and growth hormone (GH) resistance may play a dominant role. The aim of this study was to ascertain growth parameters and growth-related hormones in children with EHPVO, comparing with controls and to study the response of shunt surgery on growth parameters. Materials and Methods: The auxological and growth-related hormone profile (GH; insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 [IGFBP-3] and IGF-1) of thirty children with EHPVO were compared with controls. The effect of shunt surgery on growth parameters in 12 children was also studied. Results: The mean height standard deviation score (HSDS) of cases (−1.797 ± 1.146) was significantly lower than that of controls (−0.036 ± 0.796); the mean weight SDS of cases (−1.258 ± 0.743) was also lower than that of controls (−0.004 ± 0.533). The mean GH level of cases (5.00 ± 6.46 ng/ml) was significantly higher than that of controls (1.78 ± 2.04 ng/ml). The mean IGF-1 level of cases (100.25 ± 35.93 ng/ml) was significantly lower as compared to controls (233.53 ± 115.06 ng/ml) as was the mean IGFBP-3 level (2976.53 ± 1212.82 ng/ml in cases and 5183.28 ± 1531.28 ng/ml in controls). In 12 patients who underwent shunt surgery, growth parameters significantly improved. Conclusions: Marked decrease in weight and height SDSs associated with GH resistance is seen in children with EHPVO, which improves with shunt surgery. PMID:27867876

  4. Use of Double-Occlusion Balloon Catheter: Preoperative Portal Vein Embolization for Induction of Future Remnant Liver Hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min Joo; Choo, Sung Wook Do, Young Soo; Park, Kwang Bo; Han, Yoon Hee; Choo, In Wook; Cho, Jae Min; Cho, Jae Won; Kim, Sung Joo; Sohn, Tae Sung

    2004-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of using double-occlusion balloon catheters in preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) to induce future remnant liver hypertrophy. Materials and Methods: PVE was achieved with gelatin sponges by using double-occlusion balloon catheter in seventeen patients with hepatobiliary malignant tumors. The ipsilateral approach was used in thirteen patients and the contralateral approach in four patients due to large size of tumor in the right hepatic lobe.Surgery was performed in 15 patients, 14-27 days (mean, 21.9 days)after PVE. Computed tomographic liver volumetric studies were performed before embolization and before surgery. The changes in aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), prothrombintime (PT), and total bilirubin levels before and after the PVE were evaluated. Complications were evaluated after PVE. Results: PVE using double-occlusion balloon catheter was successful in all cases, irrespective of approach technique. The future remnant liver (FRL) volumes were 251-920 cm{sup 3} (mean, 437cm{sup 3}) before PVE and 281-1042 cm{sup 3} (mean, 555cm{sup 3}) after PVE. The mean increase in the volume of the FRL was 28.6%; this represented 37% of the pre resection volume of the liver. Clinical and biologic tolerance of PVE was mandatory. There were no complications. Conclusions: PVE using the double-occlusion balloon catheter is safe and well-tolerated and can be performed technically with ease. This hypertrophy allows hepatectomy to be performed safely when the FRL volume is initially insufficient inpatients with hepatobiliary tumors.

  5. Portal Vein Embolization before Right Hepatectomy: Improved Results Using n-Butyl-Cyanoacrylate Compared to Microparticles Plus Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Guiu, Boris Bize, Pierre; Gunthern, Daniel; Demartines, Nicolas; Halkic, Nermin; Denys, Alban

    2013-10-15

    Background: There is currently no consensus in the literature on which embolic agent induces the greatest degree of liver hypertrophy after portal vein embolization (PVE). Only experimental results in a pig model have demonstrated an advantage of n-butyl-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) over 3 other embolic materials (hydrophilic gel, small and large polyvinyl alcohol particles) for PVE. Therefore, the aim of this human study was to retrospectively compare the results of PVE using NBCA with those using spherical microparticles plus coils. Methods: A total of 34 patients underwent PVE using either NBCA (n = 20), or spherical microparticles plus coils (n = 14). PVE was decided according to preoperative volumetry on the basis of contrast-enhanced CT. Groups were compared for age, sex, volume of the left lobe before PVE and future remnant liver ratio (FRL) (volume of the left lobe/total liver volume - tumor volume). The primary end point was the increase in left lobe volume 1 month after PVE. Secondary end points were procedure complications and biological tolerance. Results: Both groups were similar in terms of age, sex ratio, left lobe volume, and FRL before PVE. NBCA induced a greater increase in volume after PVE than did microparticles plus coils (respectively, +74 {+-} 69 % and +23 {+-} 14 %, p < 0.05). The amount of contrast medium used for the procedure was significantly larger when microparticles and coils rather than NBCA were used (respectively, 264 {+-} 43 ml and 162 {+-} 34 ml, p < 0.01). The rate of PVE complications as well as the biological tolerance was similar in both groups. Conclusion: NBCA seems more effective than spherical microparticles plus coils to induce left-lobe hypertrophy.

  6. Radioembolization Is a Safe and Effective Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Thrombosis: A Propensity Score Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young Youn; Lee, Minjong; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Yun Hwan; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Bae, Si Hyun; Kim, Do Young; Heo, Jeong; Kim, Yoon Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Limited treatment options are available for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein thrombosis (PVT). Transarterial radioembolization using Yttrium-90 microspheres is a new treatment modality for HCC with PVT. For this analysis, we compared responses to treatment with radioembolization and with sorafenib. Methods We evaluated 32 patients who were part of a multicenter retrospective cohort. All patients had PVT without extrahepatic metastasis and were treated with radioembolization in one of six tertiary referral hospitals in Korea. We retrospectively enrolled another 31 consecutive PVT patients without extrahepatic metastasis from a single center who received sorafenib treatment to serve as the control group. We used inverse probability weighting (IPW) using propensity scores to adjust for the between-group differences in baseline characteristics. Results At 3 months, the response rate and disease control rate were 32.1% (9/32) and 57.1% (16/32), respectively, in the radioembolization group and 3.2% (1/31) and 41.9% (13/31) in the sorafenib group. Median overall survival (OS) and time to progression (TTP) were not significantly different between the radioembolization group and the sorafenib group (13.8 months and 10.0 months, P = 0.22; and 6.0 months and 6.0 months, P = 0.08; respectively). No differences in OS (P = 0.97) or TTP (P = 0.34) were observed after IPW was applied to balance the population characteristics. The sorafenib group showed significantly more grade 3/4 adverse effects than the radioembolization group (P < 0.01). Conclusion HCC patients with PVT who underwent radioembolization achieved comparable survival to patients who received sorafenib, even after application of IPW. The radioembolization group also experienced fewer severe adverse effects. Radioembolization can be considered a new treatment option for patients with HCC with PVT. PMID:27149067

  7. The efficacy and safety of postoperative adjuvant transarterial embolization and radiotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma patients with portal vein tumor thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Tao; Chen, Jie; Xie, Zhi-Bo; Wu, Fei-Xiang; Wang, Si-Da; Liu, Jun-Jie; Li, Le-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to find out the safety and efficiency of postoperative adjuvant transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and radiotherapy (RT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). Methods From 2009 to 2010, a total of 92 HCC patients with PVTT were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patients were divided into three groups according to their adjuvant therapies (conservative group, n=51; TACE group, n=31; RT group, n=10). Results In our analysis, median survival in patients with postoperative adjuvant TACE (21.91±3.60 months) or RT (14.53±1.61 months) was significantly longer than patients with hepatectomy alone (8.99±1.03 months). But the difference between adjuvant TACE and RT was of no significance (P=0.716). Also a similar result could be observed in median disease-free survival: conservative group (6.51±1.44 months), TACE group (13.98±3.38 months), and RT group (14.03±2.40 months). Treatment strategies (hazard ratio [HR] =0.411, P<0.001) and PVTT type (HR =4.636, P<0.001) were the independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Similarly, the risk factors were the same when multivariate analysis was conducted in disease-free survival (treatment strategies, HR =0.423, P<0.001; PVTT type, HR =4.351, P<0.001) and recurrence (treatment strategies, HR =0.459, P=0.030; PVTT type, HR =2.908, P=0.047). Patients with PVTT type I had longer overall survival than patients with PVTT type II (median survival: 18.43±2.88 months vs 11.59±1.45 months, P=0.035). Conclusion Postoperative adjuvant TACE and RT may be a choice for HCC patients with PVTT. PMID:27390524

  8. A Systematic Review on the Safety and Effectiveness of yttrium-90 Radioembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhongzhi; Jiang, Guomin; Tian, Feng; Zhu, Chunfu; Qin, Xihu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Over the past two decades, several advances have been made in the management of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). Yttrium-90 (90Y) radioembolization has recently been made a treatment option for patients with HCC and PVTT. However, there is still a need to systematicly evaluate the outcomes of 90Y radioembolization for HCC and PVTT. We aimed to assess the safety and effectiveness of 90Y radioembolization for HCC and PVTT. We performed a systematic review of clinical trials, clinical studies, and abstracts from conferences that qualified for analysis. Materials and Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Review, CINAHL, and the “gray” literature (Google Scholar) were searched for all reports (1991-2016) related to 90Y radioembolization for HCC and PVTT. Results: A total of 14 clinical studies and three abstracts from conferences including 722 patients qualified for the analysis. The median length of follow-up was 7.2 months; the median time to progression was 5.6 months, and median disease control rate was 74.3%. Radiological response data were reported in five studies, and the median reported value of patients with complete response, partial response, stable disease, and progressive disease were 3.2%, 16.5%, 31.3%, and 28%, respectively. The median survival was 9.7 months for all patients, including the median overall survival (OS) were 12.1, 6.1 months of Child-Pugh class A and B patients, and the median OS were 6.1, 13.4 months of main and branch PVTT patients, respectively. The common toxicities were fatigue, nausea/vomiting, abdominal pain, mostly not requiring medical intervention needed no medication intervention. Conclusions: 90Y radioembolization is a safe and effective treatment for HCC and PVTT. PMID:27748320

  9. Resection of metastatic liver cancer in a patient with a left-sided gallbladder and intrahepatic portal vein and bile duct anomalies: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Tomoyuki; Kajiyama, Kiyoshi; Harimoto, Norifumi; Gion, Tomonobu; Shirabe, Ken; Nagaie, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The presence of left-sided gallbladder is closely associated with multiple combined anomalies of the portal vein, hepatic vein, hepatic artery, and bile duct. This requires special attention for preoperative evaluation for the purpose of preventing postoperative complications. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 70-year-old woman with metastatic liver cancer and intrahepatic portal vein, biliary system and hepatic artery anomalies with left-sided gallbladder is reported. On computed tomography (CT), a solitary low density mass occupied from the right anterior to the posterior segment of the liver. The gallbladder bed was on the left of the hepatic fissure. On drip-infusion-cholangiography (DIC) CT three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, the left medial bile duct arose from the right umbilical portion after arising from the left lateral bile duct. Following a right hepatectomy and lymph node dissection of the hepatoduodenal ligament, hepaticojejunostomy was conducted separately to the left medial and left lateral bile duct. DISCUSSION The left-sided gallbladder accompanies with several anomalies of hepatic vascular and bile duct anomalies in a frequent manner. A safe hepatectomy needs accurate operative plans to ascertain the range of hepatectomy, because it often has the diversity of a combined anomaly. CONCLUSION Preoperative DIC-CT 3D reconstruction was extremely useful because it provided an important information that could not be obtained with 2D-DIC-CT. 3D imaging has the ability to demonstrate complex anatomical relationships, this devise is a effective new tool for making appropriate preoperative strategy. PMID:22365920

  10. Pharmacologically induced release and modulation of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine (NE) from the isolated portal vein of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Q.; Westfall, T.C.

    1986-03-05

    The purpose of the present study was to probe the mechanism for the enhancement of the field-stimulation induced release of /sup 3/H-NE from blood vessels of the SHR compared to normotensive rats. The results of two types of experiments are reported here. First, the effect of nicotine as well as tyramine in inducing the release of /sup 3/H-NE from the superfused portal vein was compared to field stimulation. Secondly, the modulatory effect of serotonin (5-HT) and methacholine (M) on the field stimulation induced release of /sup 3/H-NE was examined. In contrast to the enhancement of the field stimulation induced release of /sup 3/H-NE from the portal vein of the SHR compared to WKY, both nicotine and tyramine produced a similar release of NE from blood vessel obtained from both strains. The fractional release of /sup 3/H-NE to 10/sup -4/, 10/sup -3/ and 10/sup -2/M nicotine was 0.21, 0.67 and 45.5 from WKY and 0.14, 0.68 and 42.4 from SHR. The fractional release of /sup 3/H-NE to 10/sup -4/ and 10/sup -3/M tyramine was 6 and 17 from WKY compared to 7.5 and 17.5 from SHR. The inhibition of /sup 3/H-NE release from the portal vein by both 5-HT and M was similar in blood vessels obtained from SHR and WKY. These results are consistent with there being a defect in the exocytotic induced release of NE from noradrenergic neurons at the vascular neuroeffector junction.

  11. Diffuse Infiltrative Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis Completely Cured by Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization: Case Report with 8-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suk Bae

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer and its treatment options are determined by shape, liver function, loci, and stages of cancer. Diffuse type of infiltrative HCC accompanied by portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) has the poorest prognosis among other HCCs and there are no other prominent treatment options than systemic chemotherapy. In this study, we report a case of a 56-year-old man with diffuse infiltrative HCC accompanied by PVTT who achieved complete remission for 8 years after receiving conventional transcatheter arterial chemoembolization using adriamycin and gelfoam. PMID:27920652

  12. Advanced imaging in acute and chronic deep vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Karande, Gita Yashwantrao; Sanchez, Yadiel; Baliyan, Vinit; Mishra, Vishala; Ganguli, Suvranu; Prabhakar, Anand M.

    2016-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) affecting the extremities is a common clinical problem. Prompt imaging aids in rapid diagnosis and adequate treatment. While ultrasound (US) remains the workhorse of detection of extremity venous thrombosis, CT and MRI are commonly used as the problem-solving tools either to visualize the thrombosis in central veins like superior or inferior vena cava (IVC) or to test for the presence of complications like pulmonary embolism (PE). The cross-sectional modalities also offer improved visualization of venous collaterals. The purpose of this article is to review the established modalities used for characterization and diagnosis of DVT, and further explore promising innovations and recent advances in this field. PMID:28123971

  13. The study of absorption kinetics of berberine based on portal vein in rat, and the influence of verapamil and borneol to its absorption ability by UHPLC method.

    PubMed

    Zou, Liang; Li, Rui; Wang, Ping; Xiao, Yan; Xu, Li-Jia; He, Yu-Xin; Zhao, Gang; Peng, Lian-Xin

    2014-09-01

    This paper aims to investigate the portal-vein absorption kinetics of berberine in rat, and the influence of P-gp inhibitors such as verapamil and borneol, to its absorption ability. In the paper, a validated UHPLC method was established to determine the berberine in plasma, and the portal-vein absorption model was applied to conduct the pharmacokinetic study. Animals were divided into four groups as follow: group berberine group (BG); group verapamil + berberine group (VBG); group borneol + berberine group (BBG) and group long-term use of borneol + berberine group (LBBG). Plasma samples were obtained at regular time intervals after administration and separated on Agilent 1290 Infinity UHPLC instrument. The method showed good linearity (r = 0.9988) over wide dynamic ranges (4.08-163.20 ng/mL). Variations within- and between-batch never exceeded 7.58 and 2.21 %, respectively. The extraction recovery rates ranged from 85.34 to 111.62 %. We discovered that the AUC of four group exhibited no significant differences (P > 0.05), and co-administration of berberine with borneol of group BBG and group LBBG in advance could both reduce the T max and C max as compared to group BG (P < 0.05), while co-administration of verapamil seems to have had little influence to berberine's absorption ability.

  14. Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) procedure for hepatocellular carcinoma with chronic liver disease: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Pizanias, Michail; Yip, Vincent; Prassas, Evangellos; Prachalias, Andreas; Quaglia, Alberto; Peddu, Praveen; Heaton, Nigel; Srinivasan, Parthi

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of complications after liver resection is closely related to functional future liver remnant (FLR). The standard approach to augment FLR is surgical or radiological occlusion of the artery or portal vein on the tumor side. Associated liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALLPS) has been introduced as an alternative method to augment FLR. It offers rapid and effective hypertrophy for resecting liver metastases. However, data regarding its application in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with a background of chronic liver disease are limited. Here we describe the use of ALPPS procedure to manage a large solitary HCC with a background of chronic liver disease. The rising incidence of HCC has increased the number of surgical resections in patients with advanced stage liver disease not considered for liver transplantation. We reviewed reported experience of ALPPS in established chronic liver disease and current therapeutic modalities for HCC on a background of chronic liver disease in patients with potential liver insufficiency where tumor burden is beyond liver transplant criteria. PMID:27212995

  15. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis via Small Saphenous Veins for Treating Acute Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Xu, Xiao-dong; Gao, Peng; Yu, Ji-Xiang; Li, Yu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Meng, Ran-ran

    2016-01-01

    Background There is little data comparing catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) via small saphenous veins vs. systematic thrombolysis on complications and efficacy in acute deep venous thrombosis patients. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of CDT via the small saphenous veins with systematic thrombolysis for patients with acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Material/Methods Sixty-six patients with acute DVT admitted from June 2012 to December 2013 were divided into 2 groups: 27 patients received systemic thrombolysis (ST group) and 39 patients received CDT via the small saphenous veins (CDT group). The thrombolysis efficiency, limb circumference differences, and complications such as post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) in the 2 groups were recorded. Results The angiograms demonstrated that all or part of the fresh thrombus was dissolved. There was a significant difference regarding thrombolysis efficiency between the CDT group and ST group (71.26% vs. 48.26%, P=0.001). In both groups the postoperative limb circumference changes were higher compared to the preoperative values. The differences between postoperative limb circumferences on postoperative days 7 and 14 were significantly higher in the CDT group than in the ST group (all P<0.05). The incidence of postoperative PTS in the CDT group (17.9%) was significantly lower in comparison to the ST group (51.85%) during the follow-up (P=0.007). Conclusions Catheter-directed thrombolysis via the small saphenous veins is an effective, safe, and feasible approach for treating acute deep venous thrombosis. PMID:27552357

  16. Size of the thrombus in acute deep vein thrombosis and the significance of patients' age and sex.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, A

    1981-01-01

    To determine the significance of patients' age and sex on the size of the thrombus in acute deep vein thrombosis, 420 consecutive phlebograms with acute deep vein thrombosis were studied. A significant correlation between the size of the thrombus and increasing age of the patient as well as the sex of male was noted. It is concluded that older patients and men often are at a high risk of pulmonary embolism at the time of diagnosis.

  17. Thrombin generation in patients after acute deep-vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    ten Cate-Hoek, Arina J; Dielis, Arne W J H; Spronk, Henri M H; van Oerle, René; Hamulyák, Karly; Prins, Martin H; ten Cate, Hugo

    2008-08-01

    Thrombin generation measurement may be of value for assessing the risk of venous thromboembolism, but its long term profile has not been assessed in patients. We evaluated thrombin generation by Calibrated Automated Thrombogram (CAT) in plasma during follow up of 104 consecutive patients after an acute episode of deep venous thrombosis. Blood was drawn three times over the course of 24 months. Thrombin generation was measured in absence and presence of thrombomodulin and compared to a reference range derived from thrombin generation curves in 137 healthy volunteers. Thrombin generation of patients showed significantly higher endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) and peak height compared to the reference population. Differences were more pronounced in assays triggered with 1 pM TF. Inhibition by thrombomodulin was attenuated in patients off anticoagulants as compared to the reference population (21% vs. 42.2%, p < 0.0001); inhibition in patients on anticoagulant treatment was less pronounced (9.7%, p < 0.0001). Protein C activity, protein S antigen as well as free protein S showed highly negative correlation with ETP in all patients. A significant negative relation was found between FVIII levels and thrombomodulin induced reduction of ETP and peak height. In conclusion, thrombin generation by CAT reflects changes in coagulation status in patients following a thromboembolic event and is most sensitive at CAT analysis triggered with 1 pM TF. A role for factor VIII as an important attributable cause of hypercoagulability is reflected by the reduced inhibitory effect of thrombomodulin at high factor VIII levels.

  18. Use of right lobe graft with type IV portal vein accompanied by type IV biliary tree in living donor liver transplantation: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Shehata, Mahmoud Refaat; Jung, Sung-Won; Yu, Young-Dong; Suh, Sung-Ock

    2014-01-01

    Anatomic variations of the portal vein (PV) and bile duct (BD) are more common on the right lobe as compared with left lobe grafts in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). We recently experienced a case of LDLT for hepatocellular carcinoma combined with liver cirrhosis secondary to hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection. The only available donor had right lobe graft with type IV PV associated with type IV BD. The patient underwent relaparotomy for PV stenting due to PV stenosis. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was done for a stricture at the site of biliary reconstruction. Thereafter, the patient was discharged in good health. Our experience suggests that, the use of right lobe graft with type IV PV accompanied by type IV BD should be the last choice for LDLT, because of its technical difficulty and risks of associated complications. PMID:24949326

  19. Percutaneous electrochemotherapy in the treatment of portal vein tumor thrombosis at hepatic hilum in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhosis: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Tarantino, Luciano; Busto, Giuseppina; Nasto, Aurelio; Fristachi, Raffaele; Cacace, Luigi; Talamo, Maria; Accardo, Catello; Bortone, Sara; Gallo, Paolo; Tarantino, Paolo; Nasto, Riccardo Aurelio; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Ambrosino, Pasquale

    2017-01-01

    AIM To treated with electrochemotherapy (ECT) a prospective case series of patients with liver cirrhosis and Vp3-Vp4- portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), in order to evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of this new non thermal ablative technique in those patients. METHODS Six patients (5 males and 1 female), aged 61-85 years (mean age, 70 years), four in Child-Pugh A and two in Child-Pugh B class, entered our study series. All patients were studied with three-phase computed tomography (CT), contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy of the thrombus before ECT. All patients underwent ECT treatment (Cliniporator Vitae®, IGEA SpA, Carpi, Modena, Italy) of Vp3-Vp4 PVTT in a single session. At the end of the procedure a post-treatment biopsy of the thrombus was performed. Scheduled follow-up in all patients entailed: CEUS within 24 h after treatment; triphasic contrast-enhanced CT and CEUS at 3 mo after treatment and every six months thereafter. RESULTS Post-treatment CEUS showed complete absence of enhancement of the treated thrombus in all cases. Post-treatment biopsy showed apoptosis and necrosis of tumor cells in all cases. The follow-up ranged from 9 to 20 mo (median, 14 mo). In 2 patients, the follow-up CT and CEUS demonstrated complete patency of the treated portal vein. Other 3 patients showed a persistent avascular non-tumoral shrinked thrombus at CEUS and CT during follow-up. No local recurrence was observed at follow-up CT and CEUS in 5/6 patients. One patient was lost to follow-up because of death from gastrointestinal hemorrage 5 wk after ECT. CONCLUSION In patients with cirrhosis, ECT seems effective and safe for curative treatment of Vp3-Vp4 PVTT from HCC. PMID:28223736

  20. False-positive liver scans due to portal hypertension: correlation with percutaneous transhepatic portograms in 33 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Takayasu, K.; Moriyama, N.; Suzuki, M.; Yamada, T.; Fukutake, T.; Shima, Y.; Kobayashi, C.; Musha, H.; Okuda, K.

    1983-04-01

    Tc-99m-phytate scanning of the liver and percutaneous transhepatic catheterization of the portal vein were performed in 33 patients--26 with cirrhosis, 3 with chronic active hepatitis, 2 with idiopathic portal hypertension, and 2 with unresolved acute hepatitis. A discrete defect in the porta hepatis area was seen in 6 of 28 patients who had portal vein pressure above 200 mm H2O. In 5 of the 6 patients with a false-positive scan, the umbilical portion of the left portal vein branch was dilated (larger than 25 x 20 mm) on the portogram, with or without a patent paraumbilical vein. The anatomical basis of this phenomenon is discussed, and it is suggested that this area be given special attention.

  1. Association of Cortical Vein Filling with Clot Location and Clinical Outcomes in Acute Ischaemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Sonu; Bivard, Andrew; Stanwell, Peter; Attia, John R.; Parsons, Mark; Nilsson, Michael; Levi, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Delay in cortical vein filling during the late-venous phase (delayed-LCVF) is characterized by opacification of cerebral veins despite contrast clearance from contralateral veins on dynamic computed tomography angiography (dCTA) in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the associations of delayed-LCVF with clot location, reperfusion status at 24 hours, and 90-days functional outcome in AIS patients who received reperfusion therapy. A prospective cohort of AIS patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis was studied. Groupwise comparison, univariate, and multivariate regression analyses were used to study the association of delayed-LCVF with clot location and clinical outcomes. Of 93 patients (mean age = 72 ± 12 years) with hemispheric AIS included in the study, 46 (49%) demonstrated delayed-LCVF. Patients with delayed-LCVF demonstrated a significantly higher proportion of proximal occlusion (72% vs 13%, P =< 0.0001), and poor reperfusion at 24 hours (41% vs 11%, P = 0.001). The proportion of poor functional outcome at 90 days was not significantly different (22/56 (48%) vs 17/61 (36%), P = 0.297). The appearance of delayed-LCVF on baseline dCTA may be a surrogate for large vessel occlusion, and an early marker for poor 24-hour angiographic reperfusion. PMID:27917948

  2. Acute jugular vein thrombosis during rituximab administration: Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dada, Reyad; Zekri, Jamal; Ramal, Bilal; Ahmad, Kamel

    2016-02-01

    Rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody is licensed for the treatment of CD20 positive lymphomas. Previous studies have found rituximab, in combination with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy, is superior to cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone alone in the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and many other B-cell lymphomas. Acute hypersensitivity reactions have been reported in patients receiving rituximab infusion and usually manifesting as headache, fever, chills, sweats, skin rash, dyspnea, mild hypotension, and nausea. Acute major venous thrombosis and seizures have not been reported as manifestation of acute hypersensitivity reaction. We report on a 22-year-old woman, who was diagnosed with stage III B CD20 positive B-cell diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. During the first cycle of treatment, she developed grand-mal seizure while receiving rituximab infusion without any other features of acute hypersensitivity reaction. Imaging confirmed new onset jugular vein thrombosis with normal coagulation parameters. These events were managed by anticonvulsants and anticoagulation therapy. The patient completed eight cycles of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone without rituximab and achieved complete remission. No further complications were noted. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature describing grand-mal seizures and acute thrombosis while on rituximab treatment. Clinicians should be aware of this rare side effect, as stopping rituximab can prevent recurrence of these complications.

  3. Ultrasound strain elastography in assessment of cortical mechanical behavior in acute renal vein occlusion: in vivo animal model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; He, Wen; Cheng, Ling-Gang; Li, Xiao-Ya; Zhang, Xiou-Ru; Juluru, Krishna; Al Khori, Noor; Coya, Adrienne; Min, Robert

    2015-01-01

    To assess the correlation of quantitative ultrasound strain parameters with the severity of cortical edema in renal vein occlusion, we prospectively performed ultrasound strain elastography on a canine acute renal vein occlusion model prior to and following 10, 20, and 40min of renal vein ligation. Strain and strain relaxation time representing the deformation and relaxation of the renal cortices and reference soft tissue were produced by the external compression with the ultrasound transducer and estimated using commercially available 2-D speckle tracking software. Cortical thickness was additionally measured. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to examine the difference in cortical thickness, strain ratio (mean cortical strain divided by mean reference tissue strain), and strain relaxation time ratio (cortical relaxation time divided by reference tissue relaxation time) prior to and after renal vein ligation. Pearson's correlation coefficient was applied to test the relationship between strain parameters and the time of the renal vein ligation. There was a strong positive correlation between the duration of renal vein ligation and strain (R(2)=0.97) and strain relaxation time (R(2)=0.98) ratios. Significant differences in strain and strain relaxation time ratios were found at all measured timepoints (all P≪.001). Cortical thickness, however, showed no significant difference between timepoints (P=.065). Our result suggest that strain and strain relaxation time ratios may be used as quantitative markers for the assessment of the renal cortical mechanical behavior in subclinical acute renal vein occlusion.

  4. Catheter-directed therapy for acute renal vein thrombosis in systemic lupus erythematosus: A case report.

    PubMed

    Jong, Chien-Boon; Lo, Wei-Yung; Hsieh, Mu-Yang

    2017-02-15

    We report our experience using catheter-directed thrombectomy/thrombolysis (CDT) to treat a patient with acute renal vein thrombosis (RVT) associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A 34-year-old woman presented with persistent left flank pain, and a renal ultrasonography examination revealed an enlarged left kidney. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography confirmed the presence of acute left RVT. Because medical treatment failed to relieve her pain and the renal function was deteriorating, we attempted to salvage the occluded left renal vein using an endovascular approach. The pain was completely relieved after a CDT and an overnight urokinase infusion. A follow-up computed tomography examination revealed the complete resolution of the thrombus. The creatinine level returned to normal (1.7-0.4 mg/dL), along with contrast enhancement in the left kidney, and this suggested the preservation of renal function. To our knowledge, this is the first report utilizing CDT to treat SLE-associated RVT. When the renal function is deteriorating, CDT is worth considering for RVT if conventional medical treatment has failed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Portal biliopathy.

    PubMed

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-09-21

    Portal biliopathy refers to cholangiographic abnormalities which occur in patients with portal cavernoma. These changes occur as a result of pressure on bile ducts from bridging tortuous paracholedochal, epicholedochal and cholecystic veins. Bile duct ischemia may occur due prolonged venous pressure effect or result from insufficient blood supply. In addition, encasement of ducts may occur due fibrotic cavernoma. Majority of patients are asymptomatic. Portal biliopathy is a progressive disease and patients who have long standing disease and more severe bile duct abnormalities present with recurrent episodes of biliary pain, cholangitis and cholestasis. Serum chemistry, ultrasound with color Doppler imaging, magnetic resonance imaging with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and magnetic resonance portovenography are modalities of choice for evaluation of portal biliopathy. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography being an invasive procedure is indicated for endotherapy only. Management of portal biliopathy is done in a stepwise manner. First, endotherapy is done for dilation of biliary strictures, placement of biliary stents to facilitate drainage and removal of bile duct calculi. Next portal venous pressure is reduced by formation of surgical porto-systemic shunt or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. This causes significant resolution of biliary changes. Patients who persist with biliary symptoms and bile duct changes may benefit from surgical biliary drainage procedures (hepaticojejunostomy or choledechoduodenostomy).

  6. Portal biliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy refers to cholangiographic abnormalities which occur in patients with portal cavernoma. These changes occur as a result of pressure on bile ducts from bridging tortuous paracholedochal, epicholedochal and cholecystic veins. Bile duct ischemia may occur due prolonged venous pressure effect or result from insufficient blood supply. In addition, encasement of ducts may occur due fibrotic cavernoma. Majority of patients are asymptomatic. Portal biliopathy is a progressive disease and patients who have long standing disease and more severe bile duct abnormalities present with recurrent episodes of biliary pain, cholangitis and cholestasis. Serum chemistry, ultrasound with color Doppler imaging, magnetic resonance imaging with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and magnetic resonance portovenography are modalities of choice for evaluation of portal biliopathy. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography being an invasive procedure is indicated for endotherapy only. Management of portal biliopathy is done in a stepwise manner. First, endotherapy is done for dilation of biliary strictures, placement of biliary stents to facilitate drainage and removal of bile duct calculi. Next portal venous pressure is reduced by formation of surgical porto-systemic shunt or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. This causes significant resolution of biliary changes. Patients who persist with biliary symptoms and bile duct changes may benefit from surgical biliary drainage procedures (hepaticojejunostomy or choledechoduodenostomy). PMID:27672292

  7. Intestinal Infarction Caused by Thrombophlebitis of the Portomesenteric Veins as a Complication of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis After Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rui; Tian, Xiaodong; Xie, Xuehai; Yang, Yinmo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The clinical symptoms of pylephlebitis caused by acute appendicitis are varied and atypical, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor outcomes. Here, we report a case of intestinal necrosis caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins as a complication of acute appendicitis after appendectomy. The patient had acute abdominal pain with tenderness and melena on the 3rd day after appendectomy for the treatment of gangrenous appendicitis. He was diagnosed with intestinal infarction caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins based on enhanced CT and diagnostic abdominal paracentesis. The patient was treated by bowel excision anastomosis and thrombectomy. After postoperative antibiotic and anticoagulation treatments, the patient recovered well and was discharged 22 days after the 2nd operation. A follow-up CT scan showed no recurrence of portomesenteric veins thrombosis 3 months later. Thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins is a rare but fatal complication of acute appendicitis. For all the cases with acute abdominal pain, the possibility of thrombophlebitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis. Once pylephlebitis is suspected, enhanced CT scan is helpful for early diagnosis, and sufficient control of inflammation as well as anticoagulant therapy should be performed. PMID:26091450

  8. Thermal Ablation by High-Intensity-Focused Ultrasound Using a Toroid Transducer Increases the Coagulated Volume and Allows Coagulation Near Portal and Hepatic veins in Pigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melodelima, D.; N'Djin, W. A.; Parmentier, H.; Rivoire, M.; Chapelon, J. Y.

    2009-04-01

    A new geometry of HIFU transducer is described to enlarge the coagulated volume. The geometry of the transducer was not spherical. The surface of the transducer was built based on a toroid geometry. The transducer was generated by the revolution of a circle about an axis lying in its plane. Eight emitters operating at a frequency of 3 MHz were diced out of a single toroid piezocomposite element. Each of the eight emitters was divided into 32 transducers. The focal zone is conical and located at 70 mm from the transducer. A 7.5 MHz ultrasound imaging probe is placed in the centre of the device for guiding the treatment. Our long-term objective is to develop a device that can be used during surgery. In vivo trials have been performed on 13 pigs to demonstrate this new principle and to evaluate the vascular tolerance of the treatment. This new geometry combined with consecutive activation of the eight emitters around the toroid allows achieving a mean thermal ablation of 7.0±2.5 cm3 in 40 seconds. All lesions were visible with high contrast on sonograms. The correlation between the size of lesions observed on sonograms and during gross examination was 92%. This allows the user to easily enlarge the coagulated volume by juxtaposing single lesions. The pigs tolerate the treatment well over the experimental period even when coagulation was produced through portal and/or hepatic veins.

  9. Long-term survival following total pancreatectomy and superior mesenteric-portal vein resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    TONG, HAN-XING; ZHANG, LEI; RONG, YE-FEI; WANG, DAN-SONG; KUANG, TIAN TAO; XU, XUE-FENG; LOU, WEN-HUI; JIN, DA-YONG

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive cancer with few therapeutic options. At present, surgical resection remains the only potential curative treatment for PDAC. However, only 15–20% of patients with PDAC are eligible for lesion resection. Total pancreatectomy (TP) and superior mesenteric-portal vein resection (SMPVR) may increase the rate of resection of PDCA, but the effect of this approach on improving long-term patient outcomes remains controversial. The present study investigated a case of PDAC in the pancreatic neck of a male patient. The patient underwent a TP, combined with SMPVR, for a margin-negative resection. Following an uneventful post-operative recovery, the patient received adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The patient is currently alive at six years post-surgery, with a high quality of life. Given the clinical outcome of this patient, TP combined with SMPVR may provide PDAC patients with an opportunity for long-term survival. Therefore, patients with PDAC that is believed to be unresectable based on pre-operative assessment, may benefit from TP and SMPVR. PMID:25435983

  10. Liver Hypertrophy After Percutaneous Portal Vein Embolization: Comparison of N-Butyl-2-Cyanocrylate Versus Sodium Acrylate-Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer Particles in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Theocharis, Stamatis; Ptohis, Nikolaos Alexopoulou, Efthimia; Mantziaras, George; Kelekis, Nikolaos L. Brountzos, Elias N.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Percutaneous portal vein embolization (PPVE) induces hypertrophy of the future liver remnant before hepatic resection. The ideal embolic material has not yet been determined. We compared N-butyl-2-cyanocrylate (NBCA) with sodium acrylate-vinyl alcohol copolymer particles using a swine model. Materials and Methods: Twelve pigs underwent PPVE. Six pigs (group A) were embolized with NBCA, and 6 pigs (group B) were embolized with sodium acrylate-vinyl alcohol copolymer particles. Computed tomographic volumetry of the embolized lobe (EL) and the nonembolized lobe (NEL), along with liver function tests, was performed before and at 14 and 28 days after embolization. Tissue samples from both lobes were taken 14 and 28 days after PPVE. Results: NEL-volume and NEL-ratio increases were significantly higher in group A at 14 and 28 days after PPVE (78 and 52% and 91 and 66%, respectively) than in group B (32 and 12% and 28 and 10%, respectively) (p < 0.05). Percent change of the EL-volume was significantly higher for group A at 28 days after PPVE. No statistically significant difference was found between the groups regarding hepatocyte proliferation on the NEL and apoptosis on the EL at both time intervals. Conclusion: PPVE using NBCA is more efficient and causes more NEL hypertrophy than microspheres.

  11. Thermal Ablation by High-Intensity-Focused Ultrasound Using a Toroid Transducer Increases the Coagulated Volume and Allows Coagulation Near Portal and Hepatic veins in Pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Melodelima, D.; N'Djin, W. A.; Parmentier, H.; Chapelon, J. Y.; Rivoire, M.

    2009-04-14

    A new geometry of HIFU transducer is described to enlarge the coagulated volume. The geometry of the transducer was not spherical. The surface of the transducer was built based on a toroid geometry. The transducer was generated by the revolution of a circle about an axis lying in its plane. Eight emitters operating at a frequency of 3 MHz were diced out of a single toroid piezocomposite element. Each of the eight emitters was divided into 32 transducers. The focal zone is conical and located at 70 mm from the transducer. A 7.5 MHz ultrasound imaging probe is placed in the centre of the device for guiding the treatment. Our long-term objective is to develop a device that can be used during surgery. In vivo trials have been performed on 13 pigs to demonstrate this new principle and to evaluate the vascular tolerance of the treatment. This new geometry combined with consecutive activation of the eight emitters around the toroid allows achieving a mean thermal ablation of 7.0{+-}2.5 cm3 in 40 seconds. All lesions were visible with high contrast on sonograms. The correlation between the size of lesions observed on sonograms and during gross examination was 92%. This allows the user to easily enlarge the coagulated volume by juxtaposing single lesions. The pigs tolerate the treatment well over the experimental period even when coagulation was produced through portal and/or hepatic veins.

  12. Totally laparoscopic associating liver tourniquet and portal vein occlusion for staged hepatectomy combined with simultaneous left hemicolectomy for bilateral liver metastases of the primary colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong-wei; Li, Hong-yu; Liu, Fei; Wei, Yong-gang; Li, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Resection of the liver is often limited to the insufficient future liver remnant (FLR). To address this problem, the modification surgical technique “associating liver tourniquet and portal vein occlusion for staged hepatectomy” (ALTPS) was developed and led to quick hypertrophy in a short interval. In some colorectal cancer patients with multiple and bilobar metastases, the resection of the primary is often protracted immensely to the unpredictable postoperative complications for whom is to be treated with a liver-first approach. To overcome this problem, a simultaneous resection of the primary tumor and totally laparoscopic ALTPS for bilateral liver metastases of the primary colon cancer were performed. Case summary: A 63-year-old female patient with left colon cancer and synchronous bilateral colorectal liver metastases underwent a totally laparoscopic ALTPS and simultaneous left hemicolectomy because of the small FLR. The operative times were 460 minutes for the first stage and 240 minutes for the second stage without the need for blood transfusions. The recoveries after the first and the second operations were uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 11 of the second stage operation. Conclusion: Our case shows the totally laparoscopic ALTPS and simultaneous left hemicolectomy at step 1 for bilobar liver metastases of the primary colon cancer with no severe postoperative complications. If a resection of the primary tumor does not compromise the split procedure, the combination of pure laparoscopic ALTPS and primary resection is feasible and safe. PMID:28296776

  13. Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis Following Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Matthew J.; Garafalo, Thomas; Ko, Tak-ming; Place, Ronald J.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the second case of a superior mesenteric and portal vein thrombosis following an uneventful laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. The patient presented on postoperative day 10 with acute onset of abdominal pain and inability to tolerate oral food. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed superior mesenteric and portal venous thrombosis with questionable viability of the proximal small bowel. He was heparinized and taken for emergent exploratory laparotomy. At surgery and at a planned re-exploration the following day, the bowel was viable and no resection was needed. Despite continuation on anticoagulation therapy, he developed a pulmonary embolism. A hypercoagulable workup was normal. After continued anticoagulation therapy and supportive care, a duplex ultrasound 2 months after the event showed normal flow in both the superior mesenteric and portal veins. Possible mechanisms are discussed along with a review of the pertinent literature. PMID:12856849

  14. Portal cavernoma cholangiopathy: diagnosis, imaging, and intervention.

    PubMed

    Moomjian, Lauren N; Winks, Sarah G

    2017-01-01

    The term portal cavernoma cholangiopathy refers to the biliary tract abnormalities that accompany extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) and subsequent cavernous transformation of the portal vein. EHPVO is a primary vascular disorder of the portal vein in children and adults manifested by longstanding thrombosis of the main portal vein. Nearly all patients with EHPVO have manifestations of portal cavernoma cholangiopathy, such as extrinsic indentation on the bile duct and mild bile duct narrowing, but the majority are asymptomatic. However, progressive portal cavernoma cholangiopathy may lead to severe complications, including secondary biliary cirrhosis. A spectrum of changes is seen radiologically in the setting of portal cavernoma cholangiopathy, including extrinsic indentation of the bile ducts, bile duct stricturing, bile duct wall thickening, angulation and displacement of the extrahepatic bile duct, cholelithiasis, choledocholithiasis, and hepatolithiasis. Radiologists must be aware of this disorder in order to provide appropriate imaging evaluation and interpretation, to facilitate appropriate treatment and to distinguish this entity from its potential radiologic mimics.

  15. Simultaneous acute deep vein thrombosis and acute brucellosis. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Andaç, Şeyda; Kalender, Mehmet; Yıldırım, Onur; İmre, Ayfer

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease common in developing countries. Vascular complications, including arterial and venous, associated with Brucella infection have rarely been reported. A case of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) developing after a diagnosis of acute brucellosis in a young milkman is presented. A 26-year-old man presented with pain in the right leg. The patient's medical history included a diagnosis of brucellosis in our hospital where he had presented with complaints of weakness and fever. Peripheral venous Doppler ultrasound showed DVT, and the patient was treated with anticoagulants. The patient was discharged with warfarin therapy and anti-brucellosis treatment. Although rare, some infectious agents may cause vascular pathologies. Patients presenting with symptoms of DVT or similar vascular pathologies should be assessed for infectious agents, particularly in those coming from Brucella-endemic areas. PMID:27516795

  16. Selective Thrombolysis in Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis: Evaluation of Adjuvant Therapy In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sumit; Brosstad, Frank; Sakariassen, Kjell S.

    1999-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate in a porcine model of acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) the efficacy of dalteparin and antithrombin with respect to heparin for local adjuvant therapy during selective thrombolysis, and the utility of nitroglycerin and iloprost as heparin supplements. Methods: DVT was induced in both hind limbs using a previously described technique (n = 20). Thirty minutes later, the animal was heparinized (2500 IU IV), and bilateral sequestrated thrombolysis was performed using 8 mg alteplase: both external iliac veins were endoluminally occluded with Swan-Ganz catheters, and a multi-sideport infusion wire coaxially introduced through each catheter and advanced into the ipsilateral popliteal vein. In the control limbs, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) 8 mg was injected as 0.8-ml boluses at 3-min intervals for 2 hr as a 0.25-mg/ml solution containing heparin 50 IU/ml (n 20). On the contralateral side, heparin was substituted with either dalteparin 50 IU/ml (n = 5) or antithrombin 12.5 IU/ml (n = 5), or supplemented with either nitroglycerin 0.075 mg/ml (n = 5) or iloprost (150 ng/ml) (n = 5). Blood samples were taken at predetermined intervals to measure the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), prothrombin time (PT), and fibrinogen concentration. At autopsy, the thrombus mass in the iliofemoral veins was measured, and the extent of residual thrombosis in the venous tributaries graded at four sites. Results: Bilateral thrombolysis was successfully completed in all animals. The median thrombus mass in the iliofemoral veins after thrombolysis was 0.48 g (range 0.06-1.58 g), 0.95 g (0.59-1.29 g), 0.74 g (0.52-0.96 g), and 0.29 g (0.0-0.77 g) for dalteparin, antithrombin, iloprost, and nitroglycerin respectively, as compared with 0.53 g (0.18-0.88 g) (p = 0.69), 0.97 g (0.46-1.15 g) (p = 0.69), 0.53 g (0.48-1.10 g) (p = 0.69), and 0.18 g (0.13-1.04 g) (p = 0.5) for the respective controls. Likewise, the severity of residual thrombosis in the venous

  17. N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1)/Cap43 enhances portal vein invasion and intrahepatic metastasis in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Jun; Ogasawara, Sachiko; Kawahara, Akihiko; Nishida, Naoyo; Sanada, Sakiko; Moriya, Fukuko; Kuwano, Michihiko; Nakashima, Osamu; Yano, Hirohisa

    2008-12-01

    N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1)/Cap43 is a 43 kDa protein that is widely distributed in the body. Its expression is regulated by nickel, cobalt, hypoxic condition and others; it is reported to be weaker in tumors than normal tissues; and NDRG1/Cap43 is considered to act suppressively to tumor metastasis. This current study immunohistochemically examined NDRG1/Cap43 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and analyzed its relationship to clinicopathologic factors and prognosis. The samples were 105 surgically resected HCC tissue blocks, i.e., 18 well-differentiated HCC, 61 moderately differentiated HCC, 10 poorly differentiated HCC, 9 'nodule-in-nodule' type HCC, and 7 sarcomatous HCC. In all cases, NDRG1/Cap43 was not expressed in normal liver cells. Strong expression was found in 65 of the 105 cases (62%), i.e., in 11.1% of well-differentiated HCC, 72.1% of moderately differentiated HCC, 80.0% of poorly differentiated HCC, and 71.4% of sarcomatous HCC. In the 'nodule-in-nodule' type, its expression was found in 55.6% of their well-differentiated component, and this frequency was significantly higher than that in well-differentiated HCC (11.1%). In the cases showing strong NDRG1/Cap43 expression, frequency of portal vein invasion and of intrahepatic metastasis was significantly high. No clear relationship between the expression and prognosis was observed. NDRG1/Cap43 expression that was found in advanced HCC was thought to accelerate tumor invasion and metastasis. NDRG1/Cap43 could act as a useful biomarker of HCC.

  18. Action of niflumic acid on evoked and spontaneous calcium-activated chloride and potassium currents in smooth muscle cells from rabbit portal vein.

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, R. C.; Wang, Q.; Large, W. A.

    1994-01-01

    1. The action of niflumic acid was studied on spontaneous and evoked calcium-activated chloride (ICl(Ca)) and potassium (IK(Ca)) currents in rabbit isolated portal vein cells. 2. With the nystatin perforated patch technique in potassium-containing solutions at a holding potential of -77 mV (the potassium equilibrium potential), niflumic acid produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of spontaneous transient inward current (STIC, calcium-activated chloride current) amplitude. The concentration to reduce the STIC amplitude by 50% (IC50) was 3.6 x 10(-6) M. 3. At -77 mV holding potential, niflumic acid converted the STIC decay from a single exponential to 2 exponential components. In niflumic acid the fast component of decay was faster, and the slow component was slower than the control decay time constant. Increasing the concentration of niflumic acid enhanced the decay rate of the fast component and reduced the decay rate of the slow component. 4. The effect of niflumic acid on STIC amplitude was voltage-dependent and at -50 and +50 mV the IC50 values were 2.3 x 10(-6) M and 1.1 x 10(-6) M respectively (cf. 3.6 x 10(-6) M at -77 mV). 5. In K-free solutions at potentials of -50 mV and +50 mV, niflumic acid did not induce a dual exponential STIC decay but just increased the decay time constant at both potentials in a concentration-dependent manner. 6. Niflumic acid, in concentrations up to 5 x 10(-5) M, had no effect on spontaneous calcium-activated potassium currents.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7921628

  19. Portal Vein Embolization Using a Nitinol Plug (Amplatzer Vascular Plug) in Combination with Histoacryl Glue and Iodinized Oil: Adequate Hypertrophy with a Reduced Risk of Nontarget Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Clare L. Low, Deborah; Matson, Matthew B.; Renfrew, Ian; Fotheringham, Tim

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether portal vein embolization (PVE) using a nitinol vascular plug in combination with histoacryl glue and iodinized oil minimizes the risk of nontarget embolization while obtaining good levels of future liver remnant (FLR) hypertrophy. Between November 2005 and August 2008, 16 patients (8 females, 8 males; mean age, 63 {+-} 3.6 years), each with a small FLR, underwent right ipsilateral transhepatic PVE prior to major hepatectomy. Proximal PVE was initially performed by placement of a nitinol vascular plug, followed by distal embolization using a mixture of histoacryl glue and iodinized oil. Pre- and 6 weeks postprocedural FLR volumes were calculated using computed tomographic imaging. Selection for surgery required an FLR of 0.5% of the patient's body mass. Clinical course and outcome of surgical resection for all patients were recorded. At surgery, the ease of hepatectomy was subjectively assessed in comparison to previous experience following PVE with alternative embolic agents. PVE was successful in all patients. Mean procedure time was 30.4 {+-} 2.5 min. Mean absolute increase in FLR volume was 68.9% {+-} 12.0% (p = 0.00005). There was no evidence of nontarget embolization during the procedure or on subsequent imaging. Nine patients proceeded to extended hepatectomy. Six patients demonstrated disease progression. One patient did not achieve sufficient hypertrophy in relation to body mass to undergo hepatic resection. At surgery, the hepatobiliary surgeons observed less periportal inflammation compared to previous experience with alternative embolic agents, facilitating dissection at extended hepatectomy. In conclusion, ipsilateral transhepatic PVE using a single nitinol plug in combination with histoacryl glue and iodinized oil simplifies the procedure, offering short procedural times with minimal risk of nontarget embolization. Excellent levels of FLR hypertrophy are achieved enabling safe extended hepatectomy.

  20. Optical coherence tomography angiography in paracentral acute middle maculopathy secondary to central retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Casalino, G; Williams, M; McAvoy, C; Bandello, F; Chakravarthy, U

    2016-06-01

    PurposeTo report the clinical course and the optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) findings of patients presenting with paracentral acute middle maculopathy (PAMM) and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO).MethodsRetrospective case series. Clincal records and multimodal imaging findings of patients presenting with PAMM and CRVO were reviewed.ResultsThree eyes of three patients (2 males; mean age: 66 years) were included in the study. Mean follow-up was 9 months and images using OCTA (AngioVue OCT angiography system, Optovue, Inc., Fremont, CA, USA) were available at the last follow-up visit. During follow-up, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of case 1 was unchanged at 85 ETDRS letters and OCTA revealed a mild attenuation of the perifoveal deep capillary plexus (DCP); in case 2, BCVA changed from 83 to 77 ETDRS letters and OCTA revealed patchy areas of attenuation and pruning of the DCP; in case 3, BCVA decreased from 26 to 8 ETDRS letters and OCTA revealed extensive areas of DCP dropout.ConclusionThe natural course of visual acuity in patients with PAMM secondary to CRVO may vary. In these patients, the extent of DCP dropout on OCTA may reflect the extent of visual acuity impairment.

  1. Splanchnic vein thrombosis in necrotizing acute pancreatitis: Detection by computed tomographic venography

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Zhou, Jing; Ke, Lu; Li, Gang; Tong, Zhi-Hui; Li, Wei-Qin; Li, Jie-Shou

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomographic venography (CTV) for splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT) detection in necrotizing acute pancreatitis (AP) patients. METHODS: Forty-three patients with necrotizing AP who underwent both CTV and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) within 3 d were analyzed in this retrospective comparative study. All CTV procedures were performed with a dual-source CT scanner. The presence and location of SVT were determined via blinded imaging data analyses. RESULTS: According to the DSA results, 17 (39.5%) of the total 43 patients had SVT. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of CTV for SVT detection were 100% (95%CI: 77.1%-100%), 92.3% (95%CI: 73.4%-98.7%), 89.5% (95%CI: 65.5%-98.2%) and 100% (95%CI: 82.8%-100%), respectively. CONCLUSION: CTV is an effective examination for SVT detection in patients with necrotizing AP with high positive and negative predictive values. PMID:25469039

  2. Calcified wall portal venous aneurysm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Khairallah, Safouane; Elmansouri, Abdelmajid; Jalal, Hicham; Idrissi, Mariem Ouali; Ganouni, Najat Cherif Idrissi

    2016-01-01

    Portal vein aneurysms are extremely rare, less than 200 cases have been reported until late 2015. They are defined as a portal vein diameter exceeding 19 mm for cirrhotic patients and 15 mm in normal livers. Most patients are asymptomatic, but complications may occur. We report a case of a 68-year-old female admitted for etiological assessment of a portal hypertension revealed by an upper gastro intestinal bleeding, who was incidentally diagnosed with a portal vein aneurysm. PMID:28292056

  3. Calcified wall portal venous aneurysm: a case report.

    PubMed

    Khairallah, Safouane; Elmansouri, Abdelmajid; Jalal, Hicham; Idrissi, Mariem Ouali; Ganouni, Najat Cherif Idrissi

    2016-01-01

    Portal vein aneurysms are extremely rare, less than 200 cases have been reported until late 2015. They are defined as a portal vein diameter exceeding 19 mm for cirrhotic patients and 15 mm in normal livers. Most patients are asymptomatic, but complications may occur. We report a case of a 68-year-old female admitted for etiological assessment of a portal hypertension revealed by an upper gastro intestinal bleeding, who was incidentally diagnosed with a portal vein aneurysm.

  4. Successful liver allograft inflow reconstruction with the right gastroepiploic vein.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Rafael S; Cruz, Ruy J; Nacif, Lucas S; Vane, Matheus F; D'Albuquerque, Luiz A C

    2016-02-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is a common complication in cirrhotic patients. When portal vein thrombectomy is not a suitable option, a large collateral vessel can be used for allograft venous inflow reconstruction. We describe an unusual case of successful portal revascularization using the right gastroepiploic vein. The patient underwent a cadaveric orthotopic liver transplantation with end-to-end anastomosis of the portal vein to the right gastroepiploic vein. Six months after liver transplantation the patient is well with good liver function. The use of the right gastroepiploic vein for allograft venous reconstruction is feasible and safe, with a great advantage of avoiding the need of venous jump graft.

  5. Action of niflumic acid on evoked and spontaneous calcium-activated chloride and potassium currents in smooth muscle cells from rabbit portal vein.

    PubMed

    Hogg, R C; Wang, Q; Large, W A

    1994-07-01

    1. The action of niflumic acid was studied on spontaneous and evoked calcium-activated chloride (ICl(Ca)) and potassium (IK(Ca)) currents in rabbit isolated portal vein cells. 2. With the nystatin perforated patch technique in potassium-containing solutions at a holding potential of -77 mV (the potassium equilibrium potential), niflumic acid produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of spontaneous transient inward current (STIC, calcium-activated chloride current) amplitude. The concentration to reduce the STIC amplitude by 50% (IC50) was 3.6 x 10(-6) M. 3. At -77 mV holding potential, niflumic acid converted the STIC decay from a single exponential to 2 exponential components. In niflumic acid the fast component of decay was faster, and the slow component was slower than the control decay time constant. Increasing the concentration of niflumic acid enhanced the decay rate of the fast component and reduced the decay rate of the slow component. 4. The effect of niflumic acid on STIC amplitude was voltage-dependent and at -50 and +50 mV the IC50 values were 2.3 x 10(-6) M and 1.1 x 10(-6) M respectively (cf. 3.6 x 10(-6) M at -77 mV). 5. In K-free solutions at potentials of -50 mV and +50 mV, niflumic acid did not induce a dual exponential STIC decay but just increased the decay time constant at both potentials in a concentration-dependent manner. 6. Niflumic acid, in concentrations up to 5 x 10(-5) M, had no effect on spontaneous calcium-activated potassium currents. 7. Niflumic acid inhibited noradrenaline- and caffeine-evoked IO(Ca) with an ICM50 of 6.6 x 10-6 M, i.e.was less potent against evoked currents compared to spontaneous currents. In contrast niflumic acid(2 x 10-6 M-5 x 105 M) increased noradrenaline- and caffeine-induced IK(ca).8. The results are discussed with respect to the mechanism of block of ICl(Ca) by niflumic acid and its suitability as a pharmacological tool for assessing the role of Ic(ca) in physiological mechanisms.

  6. Comparison of intra-arterial chemoembolization with and without radiotherapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qianqian; Zhu, Kunli; Yue, Jinbo; Qi, Zhonghua; Jiang, Shumei; Xu, Xiaoqing; Feng, Rui; Wang, Renben

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Numerous studies have tried to combine transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) or hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) with radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). However, the efficacy of TACE or HAIC combined with RT versus TACE or HAIC alone remains controversial. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to compare the efficacy and safety of intra-arterial chemoembolization combined with RT versus intra-arterial chemoembolization alone for the treatment of HCC patients with PVTT. Methods PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases were systematically searched for eligible studies. Two authors independently reviewed the abstracts, extracted relevant data and rated the quality of studies. The major end points were objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), and adverse events. Results Eight studies with a total of 1,760 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled results showed that intra-arterial chemoembolization combined with RT significantly improved ORR of PVTT (OR, 4.22; 95% CI, 3.07–5.80; P<0.001) and OS (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.57–0.83; P=0.001), but did not affect ORR of primary liver tumor (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 0.67–2.79; P=0.390). The incidence of grade 3 or 4 leukopenia (OR, 5.80; 95% CI, 2.478–13.56; P<0.001) and thrombocytopenia (OR, 3.77; 95% CI, 1.06–13.43; P=0.041) was higher in the intra-arterial chemoembolization plus RT group than in the intra-arterial chemoembolization group. Conclusion Combination therapy of intra-arterial chemoembolization and RT for HCC patients with PVTT could bring higher ORR of PVTT and better survival benefits. This combination therapy was also associated with a significantly increased risk of adverse events. However, they were mostly mild to moderate and successfully treated with conservative treatment. PMID:28053537

  7. Thrombosis of a Superior Mesenteric Vein Aneurysm: Transarterial Thrombolysis and Transhepatic Aspiration Thrombectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Hechelhammer, L.; Crook, D.W.; Widmer, U.; Wildermuth, S.; Pfammatter, T.

    2004-09-15

    We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain due to acute thrombosis of a superior and inferior mesenteric vein aneurysm, which was treated by a combination of arterial thrombolysis and transhepatic thrombus aspiration. At the last follow-up CT, 21 months following this procedure, there was no evidence of rethrombosis, and the patient continues to do well under oral anticoagulation. The literature regarding these uncommon mesenteric vein aneurysms without portal vein involvement, as well as their treatment options, is reviewed.

  8. Experimental TIPS with spiral Z-stents in swine with and without induced portal hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Saxon, Richard R.; Nishimine, Kiyoshi; Nishida, Norifumi; Uchida, Barry T.

    1997-05-15

    Purpose. To assess the suitability of spiral Z-stents for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) and the influence of portal hypertension on shunt patency in young swine. Methods. TIPS were established using spiral Z-stents in 14 domestic swine. In 7 animals, the portal venous pressure was normal; in the other 7, acute portal hypertension was induced by embolization of portal vein branches. Follow-up portal venography and histologic evaluations were done from 1 hr to 12 weeks after TIPS. Results. Follow-up transhepatic portal venograms showed progressive narrowing of the shunt, most priminent in the midportion of the tract. Ingrowth of liver parenchyma between the stent wires found after 3 weeks led to progressive shunt narrowing and shunt occlusion by 12 weeks. A pseudointima grew rapidly inside the stent, peaked in thickness around 4 weeks, and decreased later. Acutely created portal hypertension rapidly returned to normal and there was no difference in TIPS patency between the two groups of animals. Conclusion. Although the spiral Z-stent can be used as a device for creation of TIPS in patients with cirrhotic livers, it is associated with extensive liver ingrowth in swine that leads to rapid shunt occlusion. Portal hypertension was only transient in this model.

  9. Thrombosis of the portal venous system.

    PubMed

    Sacerdoti, D; Serianni, G; Gaiani, S; Bolognesi, M; Bombonato, G; Gatta, A

    2007-03-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare cause of portal hypertension. Its diagnosis has been facilitated by improvements in imaging techniques, in particular Doppler sonography. The prevalence is about 1% in the general population, but much higher rates are observed in patients with hepatic cirrhosis (7%, range 0.6-17%), particularly those who also have hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (35%). The most common causes of PVT are myeloproliferative disorders, deficiencies of anticoagulant proteins, prothrombotic gene mutations, cirrhosis with portal hypertension, and HCC. Its development often requires the presence of two or more risk factors (local and/or systemic), e.g., a genetically determined thrombophilic state plus an infectious episode or abdominal surgery. It is clinically useful to distinguish between cirrhotic and noncirrhotic forms. Portal vein thrombosis is also traditionally classified as acute or chronic, but this distinction is often difficult. Color Doppler ultrasound is the first-line imaging study for diagnosis of PVT; magnetic resonance angiography and CT angiography are valid alternatives. The main complications are ischemic intestinal necrosis (in acute PVT) and esophageal varices (in chronic cases); the natural history of the latter differs depending on whether or not the thrombosis is associated with cirrhosis. The treatment of choice for PVT has never been adequately investigated. It is currently based on the use of anticoagulants associated, in some cases, with thrombolytics, but experience with the latter agents is too limited to draw any definite conclusions. In chronic thrombosis (even forms associated with cirrhosis), anticoagulant therapy is recommended and possibly, beta-blockers as well. Naturally, treatment of the underlying pathology is essential.

  10. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) in the Treatment of Venous Symptomatic Chronic Portal Thrombosis in Non-cirrhotic Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bilbao, Jose I. Elorz, Mariana; Vivas, Isabel; Martinez-Cuesta, Antonio; Bastarrika, Gorka; Benito, Alberto

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: To present a series of cases of non-cirrhotic patients with symptomatic massive portal thrombosis treated by percutaneous techniques. All patients underwent a TIPS procedure in order to maintain the patency of the portal vein by facilitating the outflow. Methods: A total of six patients were treated for thrombosis of the main portal vein (6/6); the main right and left branches (3/6) and the splenic vein (5/6) and superior mesenteric vein (6/6). Two patients had a pancreatic malignancy; one patient with an orthotopic liver transplant had been surgically treated for a pancreatic carcinoma. Two patients had idiopathic thrombocytosis, and in the remaining patient no cause for the portal thrombosis was identified. During the initial procedure in each patient one or more approaches were tried: transhepatic (5/6), transileocolic (1/6), trans-splenic (1/6) or transjugular (1/6). In all cases the procedure was completed with a TIPS with either ultrasound guidance (3/6), 'gun-shot' technique (2/6) or fluoroscopic guidance (1/6).Results: No complications were observed during the procedures. One patient had a repeat episode of variceal bleeding at 30 months, one patient remained asymptomatic and was lost to follow-up at 24 months, two patients were successfully treated surgically (cephalic duodenopancreatectomy) and are alive at 4 and 36 months. One patient remains asymptomatic (without new episodes of abdominal pain) at 16 months of follow-up. One patient died because of tumor progression at 10 months. Conclusion: Percutaneous techniques for portal recanalization are an interesting alternative even in non-acute thrombosis. Once flow has been restored in the portal vein TIPS may be necessary to obtain an adequate outflow, hence facilitating and maintaining the portal flow.

  11. An extremely rare inversion of the preduodenal portal vein and common bile duct associated with multiple malformations. Report of an adult cadaver case with a brief review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Yi, S-Q; Tanaka, S; Tanaka, A; Shimokawa, T; Ru, F; Nakatani, T

    2004-05-01

    A preduodenal position of the portal vein (PDPV) is a very rare congenital anomaly; even rarer is its association with a preduodenal position of the common bile duct (PDCBD). To the seven cases of PDCBD mentioned in the literature, we add this particularly rare case which is associated with multiple abnormalities such as situs inversus totalis, intestinal malrotation, short pancreas, bilobed spleen, accessory spleen, and abnormal ramification of the celiac axis, superior mesenteric artery and renal arteries. Besides describing and illustrating this case, we also discuss the anatomy and embryology of these structures and briefly review the patterns of previously reported cases that we found. We performed an immunohistochemical examination of the pancreas to demonstrate the ventro-dorsal pancreas in our case. For the explanation of the embryology of the PDCBD, the ventro-dorsal pancreas and PDPV malformation, we emphasized the reverse rotation of the ventral pancreas and duodenum.

  12. Intestinal Infarction Caused by Thrombophlebitis of the Portomesenteric Veins as a Complication of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis After Appendectomy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rui; Tian, Xiaodong; Xie, Xuehai; Yang, Yinmo

    2015-06-01

    The clinical symptoms of pylephlebitis caused by acute appendicitis are varied and atypical, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor outcomes. Here, we report a case of intestinal necrosis caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins as a complication of acute appendicitis after appendectomy. The patient had acute abdominal pain with tenderness and melena on the 3rd day after appendectomy for the treatment of gangrenous appendicitis. He was diagnosed with intestinal infarction caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins based on enhanced CT and diagnostic abdominal paracentesis. The patient was treated by bowel excision anastomosis and thrombectomy. After postoperative antibiotic and anticoagulation treatments, the patient recovered well and was discharged 22 days after the 2nd operation. A follow-up CT scan showed no recurrence of portomesenteric veins thrombosis 3 months later. Thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins is a rare but fatal complication of acute appendicitis. For all the cases with acute abdominal pain, the possibility of thrombophlebitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis. Once pylephlebitis is suspected, enhanced CT scan is helpful for early diagnosis, and sufficient control of inflammation as well as anticoagulant therapy should be performed.

  13. Portal Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Obesity to Liver Cancer Additional Content Medical News Portal Hypertension By Steven K. Herrine, MD, Thomas Jefferson ... Liver Hepatic Encephalopathy Jaundice in Adults Liver Failure Portal Hypertension (See also Overview of Liver Disease .) Portal ...

  14. Comparative analysis of portal hepatic infiltrating leucocytes in acute drug-induced liver injury, idiopathic autoimmune and viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Foureau, D M; Walling, T L; Maddukuri, V; Anderson, W; Culbreath, K; Kleiner, D E; Ahrens, W A; Jacobs, C; Watkins, P B; Fontana, R J; Chalasani, N; Talwalkar, J; Lee, W M; Stolz, A; Serrano, J; Bonkovsky, H L

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is often caused by innate and adaptive host immune responses. Characterization of inflammatory infiltrates in the liver may improve understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of DILI. This study aimed to enumerate and characterize leucocytes infiltrating liver tissue from subjects with acute DILI (n = 32) versus non-DILI causes of acute liver injury (n = 25). Immunostains for CD11b/CD4 (Kupffer and T helper cells), CD3/CD20 (T and B cells) and CD8/CD56 [T cytotoxic and natural killer (NK) cells] were evaluated in biopsies from subjects with acute DILI, either immunoallergic (IAD) or autoimmune (AID) and idiopathic autoimmune (AIH) and viral hepatitis (VH) and correlated with clinical and pathological features. All biopsies showed numerous CD8+ T cells and macrophages. DILI cases had significantly fewer B lymphocytes than AIH and VH and significantly fewer NK cells than VH. Prominent plasma cells were unusual in IAD (three of 10 cases), but were associated strongly with AIH (eight of nine) and also observed in most with AID (six of nine). They were also found in five of 10 cases with VH. Liver biopsies from subjects with DILI were characterized by low counts of mature B cells and NK cells in portal triads in contrast to VH. NK cells were found only in cases of VH, whereas AIH and VH both showed higher counts of B cells than DILI. Plasma cells were associated most strongly with AIH and less so with AID, but were uncommon in IAD. PMID:25418487

  15. Acute appendicitis complicated by pylephlebitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ricardo; Fernandes, Teresa; Oliveira, Maria I; Castro, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Pylephlebitis is defined as septic thrombophlebitis of the portal vein. It is a rare but serious complication of an intraabdominal infection, more commonly diverticulitis and appendicitis. It has an unspecific clinical presentation and the diagnosis is difficult. The authors report a case of a 21-year-old man with acute appendicitis complicated by pylephlebitis. The diagnosis was made with contrast enhanced CT.

  16. [Portal cavenorma: diagnosis, aetiologies and consequences].

    PubMed

    Vibert, Eric; Azoulay, Daniel; Castaing, Denis; Bismuth, Henri

    2002-12-01

    Portal cavernoma is a network of veins whose caliber, initially millimetric or microscopic, is increased and which contain hepatopedal portal blood. It results from occlusion, thrombotic and always chronic, of the extra-hepatic portal system. Diagnosis is mainly done by imaging. Clinical signs of portal cavernoma are usually related to extra-hepatic portal hypertension (hematemesis due to rupture of oeso-gastric varices, splenomegaly, rectal bleeding from ano-rectal varices, growth retardation in children) and sometimes to the cause of portal hypertension (abdominal pain, venous bowel infarction). Occurrence of portal thrombosis is often the conjunction of a local cause and a prothrombotic disorder which must be systematically detected. Biliary consequences of cavernoma are related to compression of common bile duct and are usually asymptomatic. In case of jaundice or cholangitis, portal decompression by portosystemic shunt can be performed to treat both biliary symptoms and portal hypertension.

  17. Incidence of acute deep vein thrombosis in two districts. A phlebographic study.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, A

    1980-01-01

    The incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), diagnosed by ascending phlebography, was calculated in two Swedish districts. The average incidence per thousand population and year was 0.85 in males and 0.68 in females. Before the age of 50 the incidence was very low and almost the same in both sexes. After age 50 the incidence in men markedly increased with age. A similar increase was found in women, but not before age 60. DVT occurring after age 50 was significantly more common in men than in women. The study strongly suggests male sex as a risk factor for DVT.

  18. Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... has surface (superficial) veins that are connected to deep veins by bridging (perforator) veins. Unlike arteries, which ... the valve leaflets and can develop in the deep, perforator, or superficial veins. View this table: View ...

  19. Portal and splanchnic hemodynamics after partial splenic embolization in cirrhotic patients with hypersplenism.

    PubMed

    Helaly, Ahmed Z; Al-Warraky, Mohamed S; El-Azab, Gasser I; Kohla, Mohamed A S; Abdelaal, Elsayed E

    2015-12-01

    To assess the acute effects of partial splenic embolization (PSE) on portal and splanchnic hemodynamics in patients with cirrhosis. Ninety-five patients with hypersplenism were included in the study. Duplex examinations were performed before and 3 and 7 days after PSE. Portal and splanchnic hemodynamics including vessel cross-sectional area (CSA), mean flow velocities (cm/s), blood flows (mL/min), Doppler indices as portal congestion index (CI), liver vascular index, hepatic artery and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) pulsatility and resistive indices (PI and RI), were performed before and after PSE. In our study, 69 of 95 patients were males (72.6%) and 26 females (27.3%). Chronic hepatitis C virus infection was the main cause of cirrhosis (81.1%). PSE failed technically in six patients (6.3%). After PSE, both CSA and CI significantly decreased (p < 0.05 and <0.01). The portal vein velocity significantly increased (p < 0.01). The portal flow volume (892.4 ± 151 mL/min) did not show significant changes. The hepatic artery RI and PI showed a steady increase that became significant 7 days post-PSE (p < 0.05). The RI and PI of SMA increased significantly after 7 days of PSE (p < 0.05). PSE has an immediate portal decompression effect in patients with portal hypertension without reduction in portal flow. This effect on portal pressure should be investigated in future studies as a potential tool for management of acute variceal bleeding when other medical procedures fail.

  20. Assessment of ischemia in acute central retinal vein occlusion from inner retinal reflectivity on spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Browning, David J; Punjabi, Omar S; Lee, Chong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between different spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) signs of retinal ischemia in acute central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and whether they predict anterior segment neovascularization (ASNV). Design Retrospective, observational study. Subjects Thirty-nine consecutive patients with acute CRVO and 12 months of follow-up. Methods We graded baseline SD-OCTs for increased reflectivity of the inner retina, loss of definition of inner retinal layers, presence of a prominent middle-limiting membrane (p-MLM) sign, and presence of paracentral acute middle maculopathy (PAMM). Graders were masked with respect to all clinical information. Results The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of grading–regrading by graders 1 and 2 were 0.8104, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.6686, 0.8956), and 0.7986, 95% CI (0.6475, 0.8892), respectively. The intragrader coefficients of repeatability (COR) for graders 1 and 2 were 0.94 and 0.92, respectively. The ICC of graders 1 compared with 2 was 0.8039, 95% CI (0.6544, 0.8916). The intergrader COR was 0.80. SD-OCT grades of baseline ischemia were not associated with baseline visual acuity (VA), central subfield mean thickness (CSMT), or relative afferent pupillary defect; 12-month VA, CSMT, change in VA, change in CSMT, number of antivascular endothelial growth factor injections or corticosteroid injections, or proportion of eyes developing ASNV. SD-OCT grades of ischemia did not correlate with the proportion of eyes having the p-MLM sign or PAMM. PAMM and p-MLM are milder signs of ischemia than increased reflectivity of the inner retinal layers. Eyes with PAMM can evolve, losing PAMM and gaining the p-MLM sign. Conclusion Grading of ischemia from SD-OCT in acute CRVO was repeatable within graders and reproducible across graders for the graders in this study. SD-OCT signs of ischemia are not correlated with each other and do not reliably predict subsequent ASNV. Close

  1. [2 cases of substitution of the portal vein with a dacron prosthesis during pancreatectomy for carcinoma of the head of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Marni, A; Meroni, R; Aseni, P

    1979-09-30

    The Authors report their experience concerning two cases of pancreatic carcinoma in which growth involvement of retropancreatic venous peduncle required the removal of a tract 6 and 8 cm long of the mesenteric-portal axis and its replacement with knitted dacron graft. The first patient died 8 months later due to massive pulmonar and hepatic metastases. The second patient died in the early post-operative course due to septic shock and dacron graft did not show any evidence of lumen obstruction at post-mortem examination. In spite of the lack of controlled clinical trials which provide a well defined method of staging for carcinoma of the pancreas, the authors' experience shows the possibility of extending radical resections also to cases which usually are considered unresectable and in absence of politetrafluoroethylene graft also with the use of interposed knitted dacron graft good results can be achieved.

  2. [Sequence of venous blood flow alterations in patients after recently endured acute thrombosis of lower-limb deep veins based on the findings of ultrasonographic duplex scanning].

    PubMed

    Tarkovskiĭ, A A; Zudin, A M; Aleksandrova, E S

    2009-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the sequence of alterations in the venous blood flow to have occurred within the time frame of one year after sustained acute thrombosis of the lower-limb deep veins, which was carried out using the standard technique of ultrasonographic duplex scanning. A total of thirty-two 24-to-62-year-old patients presenting with newly onset acute phlebothrombosis were followed up. All the patients were sequentially examined at 2 days, 3 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months after the manifestation of the initial clinical signs of the disease. Amongst the parameters to determine were the patency of the deep veins and the condition of the valvular apparatus of the deep, superficial and communicant veins. According to the obtained findings, it was as early as at the first stage of the phlebohaemodynamic alterations after the endured thrombosis, i. e., during the acute period of the disease, that seven (21.9%) patients were found to have developed valvular insufficiency of the communicant veins of the cms, manifesting itself in the formation of a horizontal veno-venous reflux, and 6 months later, these events were observed to have occurred in all the patients examined (100%). Afterwards, the second stage of the phlebohaemodynamic alterations was, simultaneously with the process of recanalization of the thrombotic masses in the deep veins, specifically characterized by the formation of valvular insufficiency of the latter, manifesting itself in the form of the development of a deep vertical veno-venous reflux, which was revealed at month six after the onset of the disease in 56.3% of the examined subjects, to be then observed after 12 months in 93.8% of the patients involved. Recanalization of thrombotic masses was noted to commence 3 months after the onset of thrombosis in twelve (37.5%) patients, and after 12 months it was seen to ensue in all the patients (100%), eventually ending in complete restoration of the patency of the affected

  3. Noncirrhotic portal fibrosis after Wilms' tumor therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.A.; Marshall, G.S.; Neblett, W.W.; Gray, G.; Ghishan, F.K.

    1986-04-01

    A 9-yr-old girl developed massive hemorrhage from esophageal varices 2 yr after combined modality therapy for Wilms' tumor. Evaluation showed a patent extrahepatic portal venous system and an elevated splenic pulp pressure. In contrast to previous reports of hepatopathy after irradiation injury, histologic sections of the liver did not demonstrate occlusion of the central veins, but rather a diffuse obliteration of intrahepatic portal venous radicles. This pattern of noncirrhotic portal fibrosis has not been described following antitumor therapy.

  4. Congenital abnormalities associated with extrahepatic portal hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Odièvre, M; Pigé, G; Alagille, D

    1977-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities were present in 12 out of 30 (40%) children with extrahepatic portal hypertension of unknown cause, but in only 2 out of 17 (12%) children with extnahepatic portal hypertension secondary to umbilical vein catheterization or omphalitis. The most frequent abnormalities in this series and in published reports were atrial septal defect, malformation of the biliary tract, and anomalous inferior vena cava. These findings are consistent with the view that some cases with extrahepatic portal hypertension are congenital in origin. PMID:869567

  5. Congenital abnormalities associated with extrahepatic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Odièvre, M; Pigé, G; Alagille, D

    1977-05-01

    Congenital abnormalities were present in 12 out of 30 (40%) children with extrahepatic portal hypertension of unknown cause, but in only 2 out of 17 (12%) children with extnahepatic portal hypertension secondary to umbilical vein catheterization or omphalitis. The most frequent abnormalities in this series and in published reports were atrial septal defect, malformation of the biliary tract, and anomalous inferior vena cava. These findings are consistent with the view that some cases with extrahepatic portal hypertension are congenital in origin.

  6. Intermittent pneumatic compression reduces the risk of deep vein thrombosis during post-operative lower limb immobilisation: a prospective randomised trial of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Domeij-Arverud, E; Labruto, F; Latifi, A; Nilsson, G; Edman, G; Ackermann, P W

    2015-05-01

    Deep vein thrombosis is a common complication of immobilising the lower limb after surgery. We hypothesised that intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) therapy in outpatients who had undergone surgical repair of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon could reduce the incidence of this problem. A total of 150 patients who had undergone surgical repair of the Achilles tendon were randomised to either treatment with IPC for six hours per day (n = 74) under an orthosis or treatment as usual (n = 74) in a plaster cast without IPC. At two weeks post-operatively, the incidence of deep vein thrombosis was assessed using blinded, double-reported compression duplex ultrasound. At this point, IPC was discontinued and all patients were immobilised in an orthosis for a further four weeks. At six weeks post-operatively, a second compression duplex ultrasound scan was performed. At two weeks, the incidence of deep vein thrombosis was 21% in the treated group and 37% in the control group (p = 0.042). Age over 39 years was found to be a strong risk factor for deep vein thrombosis (odds ratio (OR) = 4.84, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.14 to 10.96). Treatment with IPC, corrected for age differences between groups, reduced the risk of deep vein thrombosis at the two-week point (OR = 2.60; 95% CI 1.15 to 5.91; p =0.022). At six weeks, the incidence of deep vein thrombosis was 52% in the treated group and 48% in the control group (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.49 to 1.83). IPC appears to be an effective method of reducing the risk of deep vein thrombosis in the early stages of post-operative immobilisation of outpatients. Further research is necessary to elucidate whether it can confer similar benefits over longer periods of immobilisation and in a more heterogeneous group of patients.

  7. Portal hypertension as portrayed by marked hepatosplenomegaly: case report

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    The liver is vulnerable to as host of disease processes, including portal hypertension. This is a severe hepatic condition in which the liver is subject to numerous imbalances: increased hepatic blood flow, increased portal vein pressure due to extrahepatic portal vein obstruction, and/or increases in hepatic blood flow resistance. Although many diseases states may be responsible for the development of portal hypertension, it is most commonly associated with moderately severe or advanced cirrhosis. Advanced, untreated portal hypertension may cause additional complications such as hepatosplenomegaly, gastrointestinal bleeding, and ascites.

  8. Association between retinal hemorrhagic pattern and macular perfusion status in eyes with acute branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Muraoka, Yuki; Uji, Akihito; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ooto, Sotaro; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Ayako; Iida, Yuto; Miwa, Yuko; Hata, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    This prospective study included 63 eyes with acute branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) to evaluate the retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the posterior poles and explore their clinical relevance in macular perfusion differentiation. Retinal hemorrhagic patterns and macular perfusion status were evaluated via fundus photography and fluorescein angiography, respectively. Macular perfusion was judged as nonischemic in 30, ischemic in 28, and undeterminable in 5 among the 63 eyes. Predominant hemorrhagic patterns were flame-shaped in 39 (67.2%) and non-flame-shaped in 19 (32.8%) eyes. All 39 eyes with a flame-shaped hemorrhage showed a nonischemic macula. Of the 19 eyes classified as having a non-flame-shaped hemorrhage, 13 (68.4%) had an ischemic macula and 6 (31.6%) had a nonischemic macula (P < 0.001). Parallelism in eyes with a flame-shaped hemorrhage was higher than in those with a non-flame-shaped hemorrhage (P < 0.001), and in those with a nonischemic macula versus those with an ischemic macula (P < 0.001). The area under the curve for parallelism was 0.975 (P < 0.001), suggesting an accurate diagnostic parameter for macular perfusion differentiation. In conclusion, we objectively evaluated retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the posterior pole in BRVO using the parallelism method, which was useful in differentiating macular perfusion status. PMID:27334338

  9. Retinal vein occlusion and the risk of acute myocardial infarction development: a 12-year nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rim, Tyler Hyungtaek; Han, John Seungsoo; Oh, Jaewon; Kim, Dong Wook; Kang, Seok-Min; Chung, Eun Jee

    2016-02-29

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the risk of developing acute myocardial infarction (AMI) following retinal vein occlusion (RVO). A retrospective cohort study was performed from the National Health Insurance Service and comprised 1,025,340 random subjects who were followed from 2002 to 2013. Patients with RVO in 2002 were excluded. The RVO group was composed of patients who received an initial RVO diagnosis between January 2003 and December 2007 (n = 1677). The comparison group was selected (five patients per RVO patient; n = 8367) using propensity score matching according to sociodemographic factors and the year of enrolment. Each patient was tracked until 2013. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used. AMI developed in 7.6% of the RVO group and 5.3% of the comparison group (p < 0.001) for 7.7 median follow-up periods. RVO increased the risk of AMI development [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.25; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.02 to 1.52]. In the subgroup analysis, RVO patients aged <65 years and the males within this age group had an adjusted HR of 1.47 (95% CI 1.10 to 1.98) and an adjusted HR of 2.00 (95% CI 1.38 to 2.91) for AMI development, respectively. RVO was significantly associated with AMI development.

  10. Endovascular treatment of acute limb ischemia and proximal deep vein thrombosis using rotational thrombectomy: A review of published literature.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Michael; Stahlhoff, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Boese, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Acute and subacute ischemia of the lower extremity is still a common reason for amputation. The treatment of this condition includes the well known procedure of local thrombolysis, surgical thrombectomy and, in recent times, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy procedures such as rotational thrombectomy. However, in randomized studies Fogarty's procedure of surgical thrombectomy was associated with a high rate of perioperative complications and, in part, low technical success rates. On the other hand, local thrombolysis is associated with hemorrhage as well as high costs because of measures requiring substantial resources, such as intensive care monitoring or repeat angiographies. In several studies, the endovascular therapy options of Straub Rotarex® and Aspirex® systems, both products of technical advancements in the field, were shown to be successful in terms of amputation-free survival. Their use was also associated with low complication rates. The majority of studies were focused on arterial blood flow in the femur. However, in the meantime several registers and studies have shown that the systems can also be effectively used to treat proximal deep vein thrombosis. In the present report we review the current study-based value of rotational thrombectomy in the venous and arterial system.

  11. [Acute lithiasic cholecystitis, situs viscerum inversus, vena porta preduodenale (considerations on a clinical case)].

    PubMed

    Amadio, M; Galimberti, G B; Perovani Vicari, P

    1982-10-01

    Authors report a case of preduodenal portal vein in a woman 68 years old with acute cholecystitis in situs viscerum inversus adbominis and levocardia. Surgery was difficult. They shortly analyze also etiology and clinical manifestations of situs inversus and PPV, with related malformations. They conclude that it is important to recognize the presence of situs inversus preoperatively and everytime suspect other anatomical anomalies.

  12. Morphometric characterization of the human portal and hepatic venous trees: A quantitative support to the liver micro-anatomic models free of subunits.

    PubMed

    Almenar-Medina, Sergio; Palomar-De Lucas, Brenda; Guerrero-Albors, Ester; Ruiz-Sauri, Amparo

    2017-06-01

    Conventional models of liver microanatomy assume the presence of subunits. Nevertheless, some researchers propose that the liver is a continuous structure, free of these subunits, but with a characteristic vascular pattern. The present study describes a morphometric analysis of portal and hepatic veins in 50 human autopsy non-pathological liver samples. The main objective was to measure three proportions: 1. portal tracts / hepatic veins, 2. distributing portal veins / distributing hepatic veins and 3. terminal portal veins / terminal hepatic veins. These ratios were compared with the traditional microcirculatory liver models. Our material comprised 3,665 portal veins and 3,761 hepatic veins. The minimum diameter of half of the venous vessels of both types belongs to the interval (25μm , 60μm), given that 1881 portal veins (49.434%) and 1924 hepatic veins (50.565%) fall within this interval. We have statistically shown with the χ² test (α=0.990) that the portal and hepatic veins belonging to the interval (25μm , 400μm) (distributing veins) had an identical proportion. If the portal and hepatic veins are arranged according to the principle of interdigitation of Takashasi (1970), there should be an almost identical number of both types of veins. Our results contradict the presumably numeric preponderance of distributing portal veins with regard to the distributing hepatic veins that is inherent in the models of Kiernan, Matsumoto and Rappaport.

  13. Feasibility and Efficacy of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography-Based Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma 8 cm or More With Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus in Combination With Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Shintaro; Sato, Morio; Suwa, Kazuhiro; Kishi, Kazushi; Shimono, Chigusa; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tanihata, Hirohiko; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography-based three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (SPECT-B 3D-CRT) for large hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). Methods and Materials: HCC patients with PVTT in the first branch or main trunk, 8 cm or greater in size, were admitted to the study. SPECT, using Tc-99m-galactosyl human serum albumin, was used in radiation treatment planning to explore the optimal irradiation beam angle. SPECT enabled the minimum possible irradiation of functional liver (FL). Clinical target volume (CTV) included the main tumor and PVTT. SPECT-B 3D-CRT targeted the CTV to a total dose of 45 Gy/18 fractions. HCC outside the CTV was treated by transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). Results: Nineteen cases were enrolled in this study. The mean maximum dimension, mean CTV, and mean dose to FL were 11.0 cm (range, 8.0-20.0), 435 cm{sup 3} (range, 60-2,535), and 1,102 cGy (range, 691-1,695), respectively. Follow-up SPECT demonstrated radiation-induced dysfunctional liver. Despite the inclusion of 6 cases of Child-Pugh B or C, no patients experienced Grade 3 or worse radiation-induced liver disease. The cumulative non-progression rates of PVTT and PVTT plus main tumor were 78.0 and 43.2%, respectively. Survival rates at 1 and 2 years were 47.4 and 23.7%, respectively. Conclusions: SPECT-B 3D-CRT with TACE appears to be tolerable to cirrhotic liver and to provide promising prognosis for patients with HCC sized 8 cm or more, in comparison with previous treatment methods. A longer follow-up period is required to evaluate these findings.

  14. Thrombophilic genetic factors PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT as risk factors of alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and portal vein thrombosis, in a Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Mario; Pasta, Francesca; Pasta, Linda

    2015-08-15

    The thrombophilic genetic factors (THRGFs), PAI-1 4G-4G, MTHFR 677TT, V Leiden 506Q and Prothrombin 20210A, were studied as risk factors in 865 Caucasian patients with liver cirrhosis, consecutively enrolled from June 2008 to January 2014. A total of 582 HCV, 80 HBV, 94 alcohol, (82 with more than one etiologic factor) and 191 cryptogenic patients with liver cirrhosis had been consecutively enrolled; 243 patients showed portal vein thrombosis (PVT). At least one of the above THRGFs was present in 339/865 patients (39.2%). PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT were the most frequent THRGFs, statistically significant in patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis, and PVT: respectively 24 and 28, 50 and 73, and 65 and 83 (all chi-square tests>3.84, and p values<0.05). Two logistic regression analysis, using PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT, as dependent variable, confirmed the independent significant relationship of these THRGFs with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and PVT. PAI 1 and MTHFR 677 genotypes, deviated from those expected in populations in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (all p values<0.05), in the subgroups of patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and presence of PVT. Our study shows the pivotal role of PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT in patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis, and PVT, in a Caucasian population. In conclusion, thrombo and fibro-genetic mechanisms of PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT, could have a role in the development of liver cirrhosis, mainly in patients without HCV and HBV, and PVT.

  15. Efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis/inferior vena cava tumor thrombosis: evaluation by comparison with conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yoshiro; Yoshida, Kenji; Nishimura, Hideki; Ejima, Yasuo; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Uezono, Haruka; Ishihara, Takeaki; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Fukumoto, Takumi; Ku, Yonson; Yamaguchi, Masato; Sugimoto, Koji; Sasaki, Ryohei

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Forty-three patients with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT)/inferior vena cava tumor thrombosis (IVCTT) treated with SBRT (27 with CyberKnife (CK) and 16 with TrueBeam (TB)) from April 2013 to December 2014, and 54 treated with 3DCRT from June 2008 to March 2013 were evaluated. Dosimetric parameters, response to radiotherapy (RT) and survival outcomes were compared in total SBRT vs. 3DCRT, CK vs. 3DCRT and TB vs. 3DCRT, respectively. The median biologically effective dose 10 (BED10) values in total SBRT, CK, TB and 3DCRT were 73.4 Gy10, 75.0 Gy10, 60.5 Gy10 and 58.5 Gy10, respectively (P < 0.001 in total SBRT vs. 3DCRT, P < 0.001 in CK vs. 3DCRT, P = 0.004 in TB vs. 3DCRT). The tumor response rates were 67%, 70%, 62% and 46%, respectively (P = 0.04, P = 0.04, P = 0.25). The 1-year overall survival rates were 49.3%, 56.7%, 38.1% and 29.3%, respectively (P = 0.02, P = 0.02, P = 0.30), and the 1-year local progression rates were 20.4%, 21.9%, 18.8% and 43.6%, respectively (P = 0.01, P = 0.04, P = 0.10). The use of SBRT made it possible to achieve a higher BED10 compared with the use of 3DCRT. Improvements in local control and survival were achieved in the CK group and the total SBRT group. Our results suggest that SBRT may have the potential to be the standard RT technique for the treatment of PVTT/IVCTT. PMID:27053259

  16. [Action of DDPH in the interventional treatment of portal hypertension induced by liver cirrhosis in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Qian, J; Feng, G; Liang, H

    1998-01-01

    To explore a new way of utilizing intervential treatment to effectively decrease the portal hypertension, the animal models of liver cirrhosis accompanying portal hypertension were set up by intraportal vein injection of suspensions of Bletilla striata to 10 rabbits by means of prospective investigational method. The catheter filled with heparin solution was remained in theportal vein for infusion of drugs. Three weeks later, DDPH solution was injected into the portal vein via the catheter to determine its effect of decreasing portal vein pressure and its influence of peripheral blood pressure and heart rate. At the same time, other 10 rabbits with liver cirrhosis associated with portal hypertension were subjected to the injection of DDPH solution via the ear vein served as control group. The results showed that administration of DDPH by portal vein could rapidly, safely and effectively decrease the portal hypertenive pressure without side effects and partially reverse liver cirrhosis, as compared with injection of DDPH via peripheral veins. It was concluded that DDPH exerted its alpha 1-adrenoceptor blocking and calcium antagonistic effects, thereby significantly reduce the portal hypertension. Injection of DDPH via portal vein is a completely new and relaible method for the treatment of liver cirrhosis with portal hypertension.

  17. Anatomy of hepatic arteriolo-portal venular shunts evaluated by 3D micro-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Kline, Timothy L; Knudsen, Bruce E; Anderson, Jill L; Vercnocke, Andrew J; Jorgensen, Steven M; Ritman, Erik L

    2014-06-01

    The liver differs from other organs in that two vascular systems deliver its blood - the hepatic artery and the portal vein. However, how the two systems interact is not fully understood. We therefore studied the microvascular geometry of rat liver hepatic artery and portal vein injected with the contrast polymer Microfil(®). Intact isolated rat livers were imaged by micro-CT and anatomic evidence for hepatic arteriolo-portal venular shunts occurring between hepatic artery and portal vein branches was found. Simulations were performed to rule out the possibility of the observed shunts being artifacts resulting from image blurring. In addition, in the case of specimens where only the portal vein was injected, only the portal vein was opacified, whereas in hepatic artery injections, both the hepatic artery and portal vein were opacified. We conclude that mixing of the hepatic artery and portal vein blood can occur proximal to the sinusoidal level, and that the hepatic arteriolo-portal venular shunts may function as a one-way valve-like mechanism, allowing flow only from the hepatic artery to the portal vein (and not the other way around).

  18. Acute Effects of Liver Vein Occlusion by Stent-Graft Placed in Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Channel: An Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Keussen, Inger Bergqvist, Lennart; Rissler, Pehr; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2006-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of hepatic vein occlusion by stent-graft used in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). The experiments were performed in six healthy pigs under general anesthesia. Following percutaneous transhepatic implantation of a port-a-cath in the right hepatic vein, TIPS was created with a stent-graft (Viatorr; W L Gore, Flagstaff, AZ, USA). The outflow from the hepatic vein, blocked by the stent-graft was documented by injection of contrast medium and repeated injections of {sup 99}Tc{sup m}-labeled human serum albumin through the port-a-cath. After 2 weeks, the outflow was re-evaluated, the pigs were sacrificed, and histopathologic examination of the liver was performed. Occlusion of the hepatic vein by a stent-graft had a short and temporary effect on the outflow. Histopathological examination from the affected liver segment showed no divergent pattern. Stent-grafts used in TIPS block the outflow from the liver vein, but do not have a prolonged circulatory effect and do not affect the liver parenchyma.

  19. Spider Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose Veins Vitiligo Wrinkles Treatments and Procedures Ambulatory ... Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose Veins Vitiligo Wrinkles Treatments and Procedures Ambulatory ...

  20. An Autopsy Case of Acute Massive Hematochezia Caused by Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis: A First Report in Forensic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Mayumi; Unuma, Kana; Makino, Yohsuke; Noritake, Kanako; Yamada, Atsushi; Iwase, Hirotaro; Uemura, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (SMVT) is an uncommon cause of intestinal ischemia and massive gastrointestinal bleeding. This report describes a man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, who died of massive hematochezia due to SMVT. A medicolegal autopsy disclosed a thrombus at the superior mesenteric vein and hemorrhagic infarction of the bowel wall, an area also within the territory of the superior mesenteric vein. Liver cirrhosis, an enlarged spleen, and esophageal varices without rupture were also observed, but ulcers and variceal bleeding were not. Other organs showed no significant findings. His blood alcohol level was 0.14% w/v. Thus, this man died from severe hematochezia associated with SMVT due to liver cirrhosis and alcohol dehydration, which can lead to coagulopathy and rapid progress of thrombus formation. This is the first report on an alternate cause for massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a cirrhotic patient in a forensic autopsy.

  1. Portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, G

    2001-05-01

    Portal hypertension is the main complication of cirrhosis and is responsible for its most common complications: variceal hemorrhage, ascites, and portosystemic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension is the result of increased intrahepatic resistance and increased portal venous inflow, which in turn is the result of splanchnic vasodilatation. Vasodilatation (splanchnic and systemic) and hyperdynamic circulation are hemodynamic abnormalities typical of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Gastroesophageal varices result almost solely from portal hypertension, although the hyperdynamic circulation contributes to variceal growth and hemorrhage. Ascites results from sinusoidal hypertension and sodium retention, which is, in turn, secondary to vasodilatation and activation of neurohumoral systems. The hepatorenal syndrome represents the result of extreme vasodilatation with an extreme decrease in effective blood volume that leads to maximal activation of vasoconstrictive systems, renal vasoconstriction, and renal failure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a potentially lethal infection of ascites that occurs in the absence of a local source of infection. Portosystemic encephalopathy is a consequence of both portal hypertension (shunting of blood through portosystemic collaterals) and hepatic insufficiency that result in the accumulation of neurotoxins in the brain. This paper reviews the recent advances in the pathophysiology and management of the complications of portal hypertension.

  2. Portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2003-05-01

    Portal hypertension, the main complication of cirrhosis, is responsible for its most common complications: variceal hemorrhage, ascites, and portosystemic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension is the result of increased intrahepatic resistance and increased portal venous inflow. Vasodilatation (splanchnic and systemic) and the hyperdynamic circulation are hemodynamic abnormalities typical of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Gastroesophageal varices result almost solely from portal hypertension, although the hyperdynamic circulation contributes to variceal growth and hemorrhage. Ascites results from sinusoidal hypertension and sodium retention, which, in turn, is secondary to vasodilatation and activation of neurohumoral systems. The hepatorenal syndrome represents the result of extreme vasodilatation, with an extreme decrease in effective blood volume that leads to maximal activation of vasoconstrictive systems, renal vasoconstriction, and renal failure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a potentially lethal infection of ascites that occurs in the absence of a local source of infection. Portosystemic encephalopathy is a consequence of both portal hypertension (shunting of blood through portosystemic collaterals) and hepatic insufficiency that result in the accumulation of neurotoxins in the brain. This review covers the recent advances in the pathophysiology and management of the complications of portal hypertension.

  3. Direct transhepatic assessment of hepatic vein pressure and direction of flow using a thin needle in patients with cirrhosis and Budd-Chiari syndrome. An effective alternative to hepatic vein catheterization.

    PubMed

    Rector, W G; Redeker, A G

    1984-06-01

    Portal pressure can be accurately measured transhepatically with a Chiba needle. Since 1980, we have used transhepatic hepatic vein pressures as our zero reference for transhepatic portal pressure measurements. To validate the latter technique, we performed hepatic vein catheterization and transhepatic hepatic vein puncture in 11 patients undergoing portal pressure measurement. Transhepatic hepatic vein puncture was simple, providing pressures as reproducible as those obtained by hepatic vein and inferior vena cava catheterization. These pressures were minimally higher than simultaneous free hepatic vein and inferior vena caval pressures, possibly reflecting the more proximal location of the small hepatic vein radicles often entered by this technique. Transhepatic hepatic vein puncture is an accurate way to determine hepatic vein pressure and, combined with transhepatic portal vein pressure measurement, completely obviates the need for venous catheterization for portal pressure determination. Transhepatic hepatic vein pressure was also measured in 3 patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome. In these patients, transhepatic hepatic vein pressure was elevated and equaled or exceeded portal vein pressure. Abnormal venous collaterals were identified in all patients. Transhepatic portal pressure studies are also an appropriate way to evaluate patients suspected of having hepatic outflow obstruction.

  4. Portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2002-05-01

    Portal hypertension is the main complication of cirrhosis and is responsible for its most common complications: variceal hemorrhage, ascites, and portosystemic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension is the result of increased intrahepatic resistance and increased portal venous inflow. Vasodilatation (splanchnic and systemic) and the hyperdynamic circulation are hemodynamic abnormalities typical of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Gastroesophageal varices result almost solely from portal hypertension, although the hyperdynamic circulation contributes to variceal growth and hemorrhage. Ascites results from sinusoidal hypertension and sodium retention, which is in turn secondary to vasodilatation and activation of neurohumoral systems. Hepatic hydrothorax results from the passage of ascites across the diaphragm and into the pleural space. The hepatorenal syndrome represents the result of extreme vasodilatation with an extreme decrease in effective blood volume that leads to maximal activation of vasoconstrictive systems, renal vasoconstriction, and renal failure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a potentially lethal infection of ascites that occurs in the absence of a local source of infection. Portosystemic encephalopathy is a consequence of both portal hypertension (shunting of blood through portosystemic collaterals) and hepatic insufficiency resulting in the accumulation of neurotoxins in the brain.

  5. Vein Problems Related to Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... varicose veins include venous lakes, reticular veins, and hemorrhoids. Venous lakes are varicose veins that appear on ... flat blue veins often seen behind the knees. Hemorrhoids are varicose veins in and around the anus. ...

  6. Portal hypertension: pathophysiology, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Bloom, S; Kemp, W; Lubel, J

    2015-01-01

    Portal hypertension is an important complication of liver disease. As a result of elevated pressures within the portal vein several complications can arise, including the development of oesophageal and gastric varices, ascites, hepatic encephalopathy as well as complications secondary to circulatory dysfunction, such as hepatorenal syndrome, portopulmonary syndrome and hepatopulmonary syndrome. This review outlines the pathogenesis and diagnosis of portal hypertension and outlines the management of these various important clinical sequelae. The management of oesophageal and gastric varices is particularly important, and both the emergency management together with prophylactic management of this condition are described.

  7. Idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Riggio, Oliviero; Gioia, Stefania; Pentassuglio, Ilaria; Nicoletti, Valeria; Valente, Michele; d'Amati, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    The term idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension (INCPH) has been recently proposed to replace terms, such as hepatoportal sclerosis, idiopathic portal hypertension, incomplete septal cirrhosis, and nodular regenerative hyperplasia, used to describe patients with a hepatic presinusoidal cause of portal hypertension of unknown etiology, characterized by features of portal hypertension (esophageal varices, nonmalignant ascites, porto-venous collaterals), splenomegaly, patent portal, and hepatic veins and no clinical and histological signs of cirrhosis. Physicians should learn to look for this condition in a number of clinical settings, including cryptogenic cirrhosis, a disease known to be associated with INCPH, drug administration, and even chronic alterations in liver function tests. Once INCPH is clinically suspected, liver histology becomes mandatory for the correct diagnosis. However, pathologists should be familiar with the histological features of INCPH, especially in cases in which histology is not only requested to exclude liver cirrhosis.

  8. Idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Riggio, Oliviero; Gioia, Stefania; Pentassuglio, Ilaria; Nicoletti, Valeria; Valente, Michele; d’Amati, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    The term idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension (INCPH) has been recently proposed to replace terms, such as hepatoportal sclerosis, idiopathic portal hypertension, incomplete septal cirrhosis, and nodular regenerative hyperplasia, used to describe patients with a hepatic presinusoidal cause of portal hypertension of unknown etiology, characterized by features of portal hypertension (esophageal varices, nonmalignant ascites, porto-venous collaterals), splenomegaly, patent portal, and hepatic veins and no clinical and histological signs of cirrhosis. Physicians should learn to look for this condition in a number of clinical settings, including cryptogenic cirrhosis, a disease known to be associated with INCPH, drug administration, and even chronic alterations in liver function tests. Once INCPH is clinically suspected, liver histology becomes mandatory for the correct diagnosis. However, pathologists should be familiar with the histological features of INCPH, especially in cases in which histology is not only requested to exclude liver cirrhosis. PMID:27555800

  9. Mesenteric thrombus associated with pulmonary, splenic, portal, and caval thrombi in a dog that was presented for an acute abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Rudinsky, Adam Joseph; Parker, Valerie Jill; Guillaumin, Julien

    2016-01-01

    A 6-year-old Labrador retriever dog was presented for acute abdominal pain. A tentative diagnosis of mesenteric thrombosis was established antemortem. The dog was treated with supportive care and anti-coagulation but was ultimately euthanized due to disease-related complications. Necropsy examination confirmed an acute mesenteric thrombus along with widespread thromboembolic disease. Potential causes were protein-losing nephropathy, hepatopathy, and/or corticosteroid administration. PMID:27708446

  10. Portal pyaemia secondary to open haemorrhoidectomy: need for prophylactic broad spectrum antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Raghunath; Natarajan, Arjun; Krishna, Sunil; Thangavelu, Siddharth

    2013-06-27

    A 70-year-old man presenting with long standing grade 3 Haemorrhoids, underwent open haemorrhoidectomy under spinal anaesthesia. The patient passed stools on subsequent day and there was no bleeding per rectum. On day 5, he complained of dull aching upper abdominal pain. On physical examination, the abdomen was soft and there was mild tenderness in the epigastric region. Subsequently, he developed high temperature with chills and rigors. His condition failed to improve and the abdominal pain increased in severity. There was no pain in the perianal region and per rectum examination was normal. Leucocyte count rose to 12×10(9)/L and there were toxic changes on peripheral smear. Blood culture grew Staphylococcus aureus. Liver enzymes were mildly elevated. Coagulation profile was deranged. Fibrin degradation products were positive. D-dimer was high. CT revealed acute thrombosis of left portal vein and microabscesses suggestive of portal pyaemia.

  11. Portal pyaemia secondary to open haemorrhoidectomy: need for prophylactic broad spectrum antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Raghunath; Natarajan, Arjun; Krishna, Sunil; Thangavelu, Siddharth

    2013-01-01

    A 70-year-old man presenting with long standing grade 3 Haemorrhoids, underwent open haemorrhoidectomy under spinal anaesthesia. The patient passed stools on subsequent day and there was no bleeding per rectum. On day 5, he complained of dull aching upper abdominal pain. On physical examination, the abdomen was soft and there was mild tenderness in the epigastric region. Subsequently, he developed high temperature with chills and rigors. His condition failed to improve and the abdominal pain increased in severity. There was no pain in the perianal region and per rectum examination was normal. Leucocyte count rose to 12×109/L and there were toxic changes on peripheral smear. Blood culture grew Staphylococcus aureus. Liver enzymes were mildly elevated. Coagulation profile was deranged. Fibrin degradation products were positive. D-dimer was high. CT revealed acute thrombosis of left portal vein and microabscesses suggestive of portal pyaemia. PMID:23814220

  12. Invasive and noninvasive methods to diagnose portal hypertension and esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    de Franchis, Roberto; Dell'Era, Alessandra

    2014-05-01

    Assessing the presence of clinically significant portal hypertension and esophageal varices is clinically important in cirrhosis. The reference standard techniques to assess the presence of portal hypertension and varices are the measurement of the hepatic vein pressure gradient and esophagogastroduodenoscopy, respectively. Some newer methods have shown a good performance, but none has been proven precise enough to replace hepatic vein pressure gradient measurement or esophagogastroduodenoscopy for the diagnosis of portal hypertension or the presence and grade of esophageal varices.

  13. The significance of patient's age and sex in the interpretation of signs and symptoms in clinically suspected acute deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, A

    1982-01-01

    876 consecutive patients with clinically suspected acute deep vein thrombosis (DVR) in the leg were studied with an ascending phlebography, and the patient's age and sex were correlated to the phlebographic diagnosis. In unoperated patients a thrombus was demonstrated significantly more often in males and in older patients than in females and in younger patients. In operated patients no correlation could be noted between the phlebographic diagnosis and patients's age and sex, but a thrombus was demonstrated significantly more often in operated than in unoperated patients. The results suggest that signs and symptoms of thrombosis are less reliable in females and younger patients than in males and older patients, when a DVT is suspected clinically in unoperated patients.

  14. Case report and systematic literature review of a novel etiology of sinistral portal hypertension presenting with UGI bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Seifeldin; Bortman, Jared; Orosey, Molly; Cappell, Mitchell S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: A novel case is reported of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding from sinistral portal hypertension, caused by a left gastric artery (LGA) pseudoaneurysm (PA) compressing the splenic vein (SV) that was successfully treated with PA embolization. Case report: A 41-year-old man with previous medical history of recurrent, alcoholic pancreatitis presented with several episodes of hematemesis and abdominal pain for 48 hours. Physical examination revealed a soft abdomen, with no abdominal bruit, no pulsatile abdominal mass, and no stigmata of chronic liver disease. The hemoglobin declined acutely from 12.3 to 9.3 g/dL. Biochemical parameters of liver function and routine coagulation profile were entirely within normal limits. Abdominal CT revealed a 5-cm-wide peripancreatic mass compressing the stomach and constricting the SV. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed blood oozing from portal hypertensive gastropathy, small nonbleeding gastric cardial and fundal varices, gastric compression from the extrinsic mass, and no esophageal varices. MRCP and angiography showed that the mass was vascular, arose from the LGA, compressed the mid SV without SV thrombosis, and caused sinistral portal hypertension. At angiography, the PA was angioembolized and occluded. The patient has been asymptomatic with no further bleeding and a stable hemoglobin level during 8 weeks of follow-up. Discussion: Literature review of the 14 reported cases of LGA PA revealed that this report of acute UGI bleeding from sinistral portal hypertension from a LGA PA constricting the SV is novel; one previously reported patient had severe anemia without acute UGI bleeding associated with sinistral portal hypertension from a LGA PA. Conclusion: A patient presented with UGI bleeding from sinistral portal hypertension from a LGA PA compressing the SV that was treated by angiographic obliteration of the PA which relieved the SV compression and arrested the UGI bleeding. Primary therapy for

  15. Arteriovenous fistula and forward hypertension in the portal circulation.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, B M; Cohen, H

    1978-05-01

    The notorious predilection for rupture of splenic artery aneurysms in women of childbearing age is once more stressed by this case report. Although such ruptures usually result in a catastrophic interabdominal bleeding, in rare instances they lead to the formation of an arteriovenous fistula and consequent portal hypertension. Arterialization of the portal vein results in a progressive development of intrinsic hepatic morphologic changes and hepatoportal sclerosis, which further elevate the pressure in the portal system. This combination of pathophysiologic hemodynamic features closely resembles the original concept of Banti. He postulated that portal hypertension began with pathologic changes within the spleen which were associated with an increased blood flow through this organ. This led to increased flow and pressure in the portal venous system and ultimately cumulated in cirrhosis of the liver. This concept of the pathophysiology of portal hypertension has been universally abandoned, but it could serve as a model of the sequelae of an arteriovenous communication within the portal system.

  16. Secure portal.

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Cynthia Lee

    2007-09-01

    There is a need in security systems to rapidly and accurately grant access of authorized personnel to a secure facility while denying access to unauthorized personnel. In many cases this role is filled by security personnel, which can be very costly. Systems that can perform this role autonomously without sacrificing accuracy or speed of throughput are very appealing. To address the issue of autonomous facility access through the use of technology, the idea of a ''secure portal'' is introduced. A secure portal is a defined zone where state-of-the-art technology can be implemented to grant secure area access or to allow special privileges for an individual. Biometric technologies are of interest because they are generally more difficult to defeat than technologies such as badge swipe and keypad entry. The biometric technologies selected for this concept were facial and gait recognition. They were chosen since they require less user cooperation than other biometrics such as fingerprint, iris, and hand geometry and because they have the most potential for flexibility in deployment. The secure portal concept could be implemented within the boundaries of an entry area to a facility. As a person is approaching a badge and/or PIN portal, face and gait information can be gathered and processed. The biometric information could be fused for verification against the information that is gathered from the badge. This paper discusses a facial recognition technology that was developed for the purposes of providing high verification probabilities with low false alarm rates, which would be required of an autonomous entry control system. In particular, a 3-D facial recognition approach using Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis is described. Gait recognition technology, based on Hidden Markov Models has been explored, but those results are not included in this paper. Fusion approaches for combining the results of the biometrics would be the next step in realizing the secure portal

  17. Sclerotherapy of Varicose Veins and Spider Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Sclerotherapy of Varicose Veins and Spider Veins Sclerotherapy uses injections from a very fine, ... Sclerotherapy? What is Sclerotherapy of Varicose Veins and Spider Veins? Sclerotherapy is a minimally invasive treatment used ...

  18. Salvianolic Acid B Reducing Portal Hypertension Depends on Macrophages in Isolated Portal Perfused Rat Livers with Chronic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Jia, Hongmei; Yang, Shijun; Liu, Yuetao; Deng, Bo; Xu, Xueyan; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Hang; Zu, Chengzhe; Yin, He; Li, Ting; Song, Yijun; Wang, Yueqi; Li, Pengtao; Zou, Zhongmei; Cai, Dayong

    2012-01-01

    This study is aimed to investigate the effects of Sal B on portal hypertension (PH). PH with chronic hepatitis was induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in rats. The model was confirmed with elevated portal pressures and increased serum CD163 levels. The inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) or heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in portal triads was assessed. The isolated portal perfused rat liver (IPPRL) was performed at d0, d28, d56 , and d84 in the progression of chronic hepatitis. After constricting with phenylephrine, the portal veins were relaxed with Sal B. The EC50 of Sal B for relaxing portal veins was −2.04 × 10−9, 7.28 × 10−11, 1.52 × 10−11, and 8.44 × 10−11 mol/L at d0, d28, d56, and d84, respectively. More macrophages infiltrated in portal triads and expressed more iNOS or HO-1 as PH advanced. The areas under the curve (AUCs) of Sal B for reducing PH were positively correlated with the levels of iNOS or HO-1 in portal triads, and so did with serum CD163 levels. Sal B reduces PH in IPPRL with chronic hepatitis, via promoting portal relaxation due to macrophage-originated NO or CO in portal triads, partly at least. PMID:23118797

  19. Cross-sectional imaging of congenital and acquired abnormalities of the portal venous system

    PubMed Central

    Özbayrak, Mustafa; Tatlı, Servet

    2016-01-01

    Knowing the normal anatomy, variations, congenital and acquired pathologies of the portal venous system are important, especially when planning liver surgery and percutaneous interventional procedures. The portal venous system pathologies can be congenital such as agenesis of portal vein (PV) or can be involved by other hepatic disorders such as cirrhosis and malignancies. In this article, we present normal anatomy, variations, and acquired pathologies involving the portal venous system as seen on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMID:27731302

  20. Hepatic venography in noncirrhotic idiopathic portal hypertension: comparison with cirrhosis of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Futagawa, S.; Fukazawa, M.; Musha, H.

    1981-11-01

    Free and wedged hepatic venography were carried out in 37 patients with idiopathic portal hypertension (IPH) and the findings compared with those in 88 patients with cirrhosis of the liver. Characteristic changes in IPH included frequent vein-to-vein anastomoses, narrower angles between large veins and their tributaries, smooth and wavy middle-sized to large branches (giving a general ''weeping willow'' appearance), homogeneous sinusoidal filling, and minimal to absent filling of the portal venous system on wedged retrograde portography. In cirrhosis, by contrast, changes included rare vein-to-vein anastomoses, wide angles between veins and tributaries, irregular stenoses of large veins and branches at various levels, spotty sinusoidal filling, and frequent retrograde flow in the portal venous system. Hepatic venography is helpful in differentiating IPH from cirrhosis.

  1. Portal hypertension in vinyl chloride monomer workers. A hemodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Blendis, L M; Smith, P M; Lawrie, B W; Stephens, M R; Evans, W D

    1978-08-01

    Hemodynamic studies were performed in 5 vinyl chloride monomer workers in whom splenomegaly or thrombocytopenia was detected during a screening program at major chemical plant. Three patients had portal hypertension and collateral venous circulations, with intrasplenic pressures between 20 and 29 mm Hg and normal wedged hepatic venous pressures, but the gradient between the wedged and free hepatic vein pressures was also increased. Splenic blood flows were increased in both hypertensive and normotensive patients. There was no correlation between the splenic blood flow and the portal pressure or the presence of portal fibrosis. The portal hypertension associated with vinyl chloride exposure is mainly presinusoidal in type, and may be attributed to an abnormality of the portal vein radicles, or hepatic sinusoids.

  2. Evolution of portal hypertension and mechanisms involved in its maintenance in a rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Sikuler, E.; Kravetz, D.; Groszmann, R.J.

    1985-06-01

    In rats with portal hypertension induced by partial ligation of the portal vein, the authors have recently demonstrated an increased portal venous inflow that becomes an important factor in the maintenance of portal hypertension. The sequence of events that leads into this circulatory disarray is unknown. The authors evaluated chronologically the chain of hemodynamic changes that occurred after portal hypertension was induced by partial ligation of the portal vein. In this model it is possible to follow, from the initiation of the portal-hypertensive state, the interaction between blood flow and resistance in the portal system as well as the relation between the development of portal-systemic shunting and the elevated portal venous inflow. The study was performed in 45 portal-hypertensive rats and in 29 sham-operated rats. Blood flow and portal-systemic shunting were measured by radioactive microsphere techniques. The constriction of the portal vein was immediately followed by a resistance-induced portal hypertension characterized by increased portal resistance (9.78 +/- 0.89 vs. 4.18 +/- 0.71 dyn X s X cm-5 X 10(4), mean +/- SE, P less than 0.01), increased portal pressure (17.7 +/- 0.9 vs. 9.5 +/- 0.6 mmHg, P less than 0.001), and decreased portal venous inflow (3.93 +/- 0.26 vs. 6.82 +/- 0.49 ml X min-1 X 100 g body wt-1, P less than 0.001).

  3. Varicose Veins and Spider Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... are sold in medical supply and drugstores. Prescription-strength gradient compression hose, which offer the greatest amount ... the face. Exercise regularly to improve your leg strength, circulation, and vein strength. Focus on exercises that ...

  4. Septic thrombophlebitis of the superior mesenteric vein with bacteraemia caused by Bacteroides fragilis and Streptococcus intermedius as a complication of diverculitis.

    PubMed

    Hadano, Yoshiro; Iwata, Hiroyoshi

    2013-02-05

    A 68-year-old Japanese man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis was admitted to our hospital because of fever and haematemesis. On day 3, his blood culture became positive for Gram-negative bacilli and Gram-positive cocci, and contrast-enhanced abdominal CT revealed acute septic thrombophlebitis of the superior mesenteric vein with caecal diverculitis. Antimicrobial therapy with ampicillin-sulbactam and anticoagulant therapy were started and the blood culture grew Bacteroides fragilis and Streptococcus intermedius. On hospital day 7, the patient's condition began to improve in response to the therapy, therefore, the ampicillin-sulbactam and anticoagulant therapy was continued for 42 days. The patient was discharged home on hospital day 45. B fragilis bacteraemia of unknown source should caution the physician to search for an intra-abdominal focus, such as thrombosis of the portal vein or mesenteric vein.

  5. An Unusual Case of Gastrointestinal Bleeding from Isolated Gallbladder Varices in a Patient with Pancreatic Cancer Complicated by Portal Biliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kubachev, Kubach; Abdullaev, Elbrus; Zarkua, Nonna; Abdullaev, Abakar; Fokin, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy is the complex of abnormalities of extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts, cystic duct, and gallbladder, arising as a result of extrahepatic portal vein obstruction and noncirrhotic portal fibrosis, which can be caused by coagulopathies, tumors, inflammation, postoperative complications, dehydration, and neonatal umbilical vein catheterization. We report a case of a 55-year-old male patient with the history of pancreatic cancer and cholecystoenteric anastomosis presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding from gallbladder varices via the anastomosis. PMID:27800195

  6. Varicose vein - noninvasive treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Sclerotherapy; Laser therapy - varicose veins; Radiofrequency vein ablation; Endovenous thermal ablation; Ambulatory phlebectomy; Transilluminated power phlebotomy; Endovenous laser ablation; Varicose vein ...

  7. Hepatic Veins and Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis in a Child Treated by Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar Santos, Aline Cristine Barbosa; Tannuri, Uenis; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2010-06-15

    We report the case of a 9-year-old boy with portal hypertension, due to Budd-Chiari syndrome, and retrohepatic inferior vena cava thrombosis, submitted to a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) by connecting the suprahepatic segment of the inferior vena cava directly to the portal vein. After 3 months, the withdrawal of anticoagulants promoted the thrombosis of the TIPS. At TIPS revision, thrombosis of the TIPS and the main portal vein and clots at the splenic and the superior mesenteric veins were found. Successful angiography treatment was performed by thrombolysis and balloon angioplasty of a severe stenosis at the distal edge of the stent.

  8. Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wearing loose clothing and avoiding long periods of standing can also help. If varicose veins are painful or you don't like the way they look, your doctor may recommend procedures to remove them. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  9. Antithrombotic treatment of splanchnic vein thrombosis: results of an international registry.

    PubMed

    Ageno, Walter; Riva, Nicoletta; Schulman, Sam; Bang, Soo Mee; Sartori, Maria Teresa; Grandone, Elvira; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Barillari, Giovanni; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Dentali, Francesco

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT) is a clinical challenge due to heterogeneity of clinical presentations, increased bleeding risk, and lack of evidences from clinical trials. We performed an international registry to describe current treatment strategies and factors associated with therapeutic decisions in a large prospective cohort of unselected SVT patients. A total of 613 patients were enrolled (mean age 53.1 years, standard deviation ± 14.8); 62.6% males; the majority (468 patients) had portal vein thrombosis. Most common risk factors included cirrhosis (27.8%), solid cancer (22.3%), and intra-abdominal inflammation/infection (11.7%); in 27.4% of patients, SVT was idiopathic. During the acute phase, 470 (76.7%) patients received anticoagulant drugs, 136 patients (22.2%) remained untreated. Incidental diagnosis, single vein thrombosis, gastrointestinal bleeding, thrombocytopenia, cancer, and cirrhosis were significantly associated with no anticoagulant treatment. Decision to start patients on vitamin K antagonists after an initial course of parenteral anticoagulation was significantly associated with younger age, symptomatic onset, multiple veins involvement, and unprovoked thrombosis. Although a nonnegligible proportion of SVT patients did not receive anticoagulant treatment, the majority received the same therapies recommended for patients with usual sites thrombosis, with some differences driven by the site of thrombosis and the pathogenesis of the disease.

  10. [Portal cavernoma in children revealed by gastrointestinal haemorrhage: about a case].

    PubMed

    Basse, Idrissa; Guèye, Ndéye Rama Diagne; Diop, Dina Cyrienne Obambi; Diawara, Ndiémé Ndiaye; Ba, Aïssatou; Seck, Ndiogou; Thiongane, Aliou; Ba, Abou; Ndongo, Aliou Abdoulaye; Fall, Amadou Lamine; Boiro, Djibril; Thiam, Lamine; Mbengue, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Portal cavernoma is a venous vascular anomaly characterized by the formation of a network of veins whose caliber is increased and carrying portal blood. It is due to a thrombotic and always chronic occlusion of the extra-hepatic portal venous system. This is one of the most common causes of portal hypertension in children. Its severity is mainly associated with an high risk of gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Very few cases have been described mainly in African literature. We report the case of a 4-year old boy admitted with very abundant haematemesis, melena and dizziness associated with anemic syndrome on examination. Laboratory tests showed severe microcytic hypochromic anemia with normal renal and hepatic function. Gastrointestinal endoscopy showed esophageal varices (grade III) with red signs. Abdominal ultrasound showed portal vein formation resulting in the classic "spiderweb", in favor of a cavernoma. Abdominal CT scan confirmed portal cavernoma associated with portal hypertensive syndrome and vascular anomaly like an ectopic splenic vein anastomosis with the trunk formed by the gonadal vein and the inferior mesenteric vein. Therapeutic approach was based on blood transfusion and beta-blocker treatment. Portal cavernoma can be a major complication of vascular malformations often unknown. In case of gastrointestinal haemorrhage in children, diagnosis should be suspected. Its management requires early treatment and should be adapted to the patient's condition in order to prevent a fatal evolution.

  11. Splanchnic-aortic inflammatory axis in experimental portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aller, Maria-Angeles; de las Heras, Natalia; Nava, Maria-Paz; Regadera, Javier; Arias, Jaime; Lahera, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Splanchnic and systemic low-grade inflammation has been proposed to be a consequence of long-term prehepatic portal hypertension. This experimental model causes minimal alternations in the liver, thus making a more selective study possible for the pathological changes characteristic of prehepatic portal hypertension. Low-grade splanchnic inflammation after long-term triple partial portal vein ligation could be associated with liver steatosis and portal hypertensive intestinal vasculopathy. In fact, we have previously shown that prehepatic portal hypertension in the rat induces liver steatosis and changes in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism similar to those produced in chronic inflammatory conditions described in metabolic syndrome in humans. Dysbiosis and bacterial translocation in this experimental model suggest the existence of a portal hypertensive intestinal microbiome implicated in both the splanchnic and systemic alterations related to prehepatic portal hypertension. Among the systemic impairments, aortopathy characterized by oxidative stress, increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and profibrogenic mediators stand out. In this experimental model of long-term triple portal vein ligated-rats, the abdominal aortic proinflammatory response could be attributed to oxidative stress. Thus, the increased aortic reduced-nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H] oxidase activity could be associated with reactive oxygen species production and promote aortic inflammation. Also, oxidative stress mediated by NAD(P)H oxidase has been associated with risk factors for inflammation and atherosclerosis. The splanchnic and systemic pathology that is produced in the long term after triple partial portal vein ligation in the rat reinforces the validity of this experimental model to study the chronic low-grade inflammatory response induced by prehepatic portal hypertension. PMID:24307792

  12. Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Home For Patients Search FAQs Preventing ... Vein Thrombosis FAQ174, August 2011 PDF Format Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Women's Health What is deep vein ...

  13. Establishment of a reversible model of prehepatic portal hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Dou, Jian; Gao, Qing-Jun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to improve upon the traditional model of pre-hepatic portal hypertension in rats, and simulate the anhepatic phase of orthotopic liver transplantation without veno-venous bypass. A reversible model of portal hypertension was induced by portal vein ligation, with a label ring ligated along the portal vein. A total of 135 male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: i) Normal control (NC) group; ii) portal hypertensive control (PHTC) group; and iii) reperfusion (R) group. In the R group, rats with portal hypertension underwent simultaneous clamping of the portal triad and retrohepatic vena cava for 1 h, followed by removal of the clamps to enable blood reperfusion. Portal venography and portal vein pressure were recorded during the surgery. Arterial oxygen pressure (PaO2), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and total bilirubin (TBil) levels were determined, and pathological changes of the liver were investigated by immunohistochemical staining. The results demonstrated that, 3 weeks after portal vein ligation, the vein area and the free portal pressures in the PHTC group were significantly increased compared with those in the NC group. The serum ALT and AST levels in the R group at different time points were significantly elevated compared with those in the PHTC group, and reached their maximal levels at 24 h after reperfusion. Furthermore, the PaO2 at 24 h after reperfusion was significantly decreased. In conclusion, the reversible model of pre-hepatic portal hypertension in rats was successfully established using the introduction of a label ring. This model may be useful for basic research focusing on the anhepatic phase of orthotopic liver transplantation without veno-venous bypass. PMID:27446299

  14. Establishment of a reversible model of prehepatic portal hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Dou, Jian; Gao, Qing-Jun

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to improve upon the traditional model of pre-hepatic portal hypertension in rats, and simulate the anhepatic phase of orthotopic liver transplantation without veno-venous bypass. A reversible model of portal hypertension was induced by portal vein ligation, with a label ring ligated along the portal vein. A total of 135 male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: i) Normal control (NC) group; ii) portal hypertensive control (PHTC) group; and iii) reperfusion (R) group. In the R group, rats with portal hypertension underwent simultaneous clamping of the portal triad and retrohepatic vena cava for 1 h, followed by removal of the clamps to enable blood reperfusion. Portal venography and portal vein pressure were recorded during the surgery. Arterial oxygen pressure (PaO2), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and total bilirubin (TBil) levels were determined, and pathological changes of the liver were investigated by immunohistochemical staining. The results demonstrated that, 3 weeks after portal vein ligation, the vein area and the free portal pressures in the PHTC group were significantly increased compared with those in the NC group. The serum ALT and AST levels in the R group at different time points were significantly elevated compared with those in the PHTC group, and reached their maximal levels at 24 h after reperfusion. Furthermore, the PaO2 at 24 h after reperfusion was significantly decreased. In conclusion, the reversible model of pre-hepatic portal hypertension in rats was successfully established using the introduction of a label ring. This model may be useful for basic research focusing on the anhepatic phase of orthotopic liver transplantation without veno-venous bypass.

  15. [Selective portal-systemic shunts for bleeding portal hypertension].

    PubMed

    Orozco, H; Mercado, M A; Takahashi, T; García-Tsao, G; Guevara, L; Hernandez-Ortiz, J; Tielve, M

    1990-07-01

    At the beginning of the seventies, we began to perform regularly selective shunts for the treatment of portal hypertension. In a 15 year period, 177 patients (155 with liver cirrhosis) were operated with three kinds of selective shunts: 128 with a Warren shunt, 29 with an end to end renosplenic shunt and 20 with a splenocaval shunt. 167 cases were operated in an elective fashion. The 15 years global operative mortality, was 14.4%. Operative mortality of the Child A patients, was 11.6%. Survival for the Child A group was 74.6% at 1 year, 68.2% at 5 years and 64.6% at 15 years. Incapacitating encephalopathy was observed in 6.9%, rebleeding 6.2% and shunt thrombosis in 6.2%. Portal vein alterations in the postoperative period were observed: in 13.3% a reduction in diameter ocurred and in 20.5%, thrombosis was recorded. It is concluded that when feasible, the selective shunts are the treatment of choice for portal hypertension in those patients with good liver function.

  16. True left-sided gallbladder with a portal anomaly: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Ryosuke; Miyata, Kanji; Yuasa, Norihiro; Takeuchi, Eiji; Goto, Yasutomo; Miyake, Hideo; Nagai, Hidemasa; Hattori, Masaoki; Imura, Jiro; Hayashi, Yuuki; Kawakami, Jiro; Kobayashi, Yoichiro

    2012-11-01

    A 65-year-old female who presented with back pain was diagnosed to have the presence of biliary sludge in the gallbladder. Computed tomography showed that the round ligament connected to the left portal umbilical portion was in the normal anatomical position. However, the gallbladder was located to the left of the middle hepatic vein and the round ligament, attached to the left lateral segment of the liver. The right posterior portal vein diverged alone from the main portal vein, and there was a long stem from the right anterior and left portal veins. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy confirmed the abnormal location of the gallbladder. Most reported cases of left-sided gallbladder are caused by a right-sided round ligament, which is called a "false" left-sided gallbladder. A case of left-sided gallbladder with a normal left-sided round ligament, which is designated as a case of "true" left-sided gallbladder, is extremely rare.

  17. The ‘single big cryoballoon’ technique for acute pulmonary vein isolation in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: a prospective observational single centre study

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kyoung-Ryul Julian; Schmidt, Boris; Metzner, Andreas; Tilz, Roland; Zerm, Thomas; Köster, Ilka; Fürnkranz, Alexander; Koektuerk, Buelent; Konstantinidou, Melanie; Antz, Matthias; Ouyang, Feifan; Kuck, Karl Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Aims Cryothermal energy (CTE) ablation via a balloon catheter (Arctic Front, Cryocath™) represents a novel technology for pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). However, balloon-based PVI approaches are associated with phrenic nerve palsy (PNP). We investigated whether ‘single big cryoballoon’-deployed CTE lesions can (i) achieve acute electrical PVI without left atrium (LA) imaging and (ii) avoid PNP in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). Methods and results After double transseptal punctures, one Lasso catheter and a big 28 mm cryoballoon catheter using a steerable sheath were inserted into the LA. PV angiography and ostial Lasso recordings from all PVs were obtained. Selective PV angiography was used to evaluate balloon to LA–PV junction contact. CTE ablation lasted 300 s, and the PN was paced during freezing at right-sided PVs. Twenty-seven patients (19 males, mean age: 56 ± 9 years, LA size: 42 ± 5 mm) with PAF (mean duration: 6.6 ± 5.7 years) were included. PVI was achieved in 97/99 PVs (98%). Median (Q1; Q3) procedural, balloon, and fluoroscopy times were 220 min (190; 245), 130 min (90; 170), and 50 min (42; 69), respectively. Three transient PNP occurred after distal PV ablations. No PV stenosis occurred. Total median (Q1; Q3) follow-up time was 271 days (147; 356), and 19 of 27 patients (70%) remained in sinus rhythm (3-month blanking period). Conclusion Using the single big cryoballoon technique, almost all PVs (98%) could be electrically isolated without LA imaging and may reduce the incidence of PNP as long as distal ablation inside the septal PVs is avoided. PMID:19109353

  18. Acute Superior Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis: Transcatheter Thrombolysis and Aspiration Thrombectomy Therapy by Combined Route of Superior Mesenteric Vein and Artery in Eight Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuofei Liu, Baochen Ding, Weiwei He, Changsheng Wu, Xingjiang Li, Jieshou

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo assess the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of catheter-directed thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy by combined route of superior mesenteric vein and artery (SMV+SMA) for acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis (ASMVT).MethodsThis retrospective study reviewed eight ASMVT patients with transcatheter direct thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy via SMV and indirect thrombolysis via SMA during a period of 14 months. The demographics, etiology, risk factors, therapeutic effect, complications, mortality, and follow-up of the study population were assessed. Anatomic and imaging classification of location and extent of thrombus at diagnosis and degree of thrombus lysis were described.ResultsTechnical success was achieved with substantial improvement in symptoms and thrombus resolution after thrombolytic therapy in all patients. The local urokinase infusion by SMA and SMV was performed for 5–7 (6.13 ± 0.83) and 7–15 (12 ± 2.51) days. Anticoagulation was performed catheter-directed and then orally throughout hospitalization and after discharge. Four patients required delayed localized bowel resection after thrombolytic therapy with no death. Thrombolytic therapy was not interrupted despite minor bleeding at the puncture site in two patients and sepsis in another two postoperatively. Nearly complete removal of thrombus was demonstrated by contrast-enhanced CT scan and portography before discharge. Patients were discharged in 10–27 (19.25 ± 4.89) days after admission. No recurrence developed during the follow-up of 10–13 (12.13 ± 0.99) months.ConclusionsCatheter-directed thrombolytic and aspiration therapy via SMV+SMA is beneficial for ASMVT in avoiding patient death, efficient resolving thrombus, rapid improving symptoms, reversing extensive intestinal ischemia, averting bowel resection, or localizing infarcted bowel segment and preventing short bowel syndrome.

  19. Balloon Occlusion Portography to Diagnose New-Onset Left Hepatic Vein Thrombosis and Widening of an Existing Wallstent TIPS by Palmaz Stents for Recurrent Portal Hypertension and Variceal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Cope, Constantin; Baum, Richard A.; Haskal, Ziv J.

    1996-09-15

    A 31-year-old man with Child's class A micronodular cirrhosis, left lobe hypertrophy, and a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) which had been placed 6 months earlier, was admitted for recurrent esophageal bleeding and a portosystemic gradient of 42 mmHg. Balloon occlusion portography documented unsuspected ostial thrombosis of the previously patent left hepatic vein. This was considered the cause of the pressure rise. As it was not possible to insert a second TIPS in parallel, the shunt, stented originally with 10-mm Wallstents, was overdilated to 12 mm, and two 12-mm Palmaz stents were placed coaxially, reducing the portosystemic pressure gradient to 13 mmHg.

  20. Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Complicated by Sinistral Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kaley, Kristin; Lamb, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is known for vague symptoms that lead to a delay in diagnosis, and hence most cases are found at an advanced stage. Many complications can happen secondary to pancreatic cancer including diabetes, malabsorption, and deep venous thrombosis. Sinistral (segmental or left-sided) portal hypertension (SPH) refers to portal hypertension confined to the left-sided segment of the portal venous system namely the splenic side, and the most common etiology is splenic vein thrombosis (SVT). We present here a case of a 66-year-old male with advanced pancreatic cancer who died due to bleeding secondary to SVT. We advise physicians caring for these patients to be aware of this complication, which may also be the manifestation of an undiagnosed pancreatic cancer. PMID:27555987

  1. Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases net amino acid utilization by the portal-drained viscera of ruminatinhg calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases small intestinal mass and blood flow in ruminant calves, but its impact on nutrient metabolism across the portal-drained viscera (PDV) and liver is unknown. Eight Holstein calves with catheters in the carotid artery, mesenteric vein, portal vein and hepatic ...

  2. Combination therapy using PSE and TIO ameliorates hepatic encephalopathy due to intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt in idiopathic portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Seiichiro; Ito, Hiroyuki; Takashimizu, Shinji; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Hasebe, Terumitsu

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman treated for anemia and ascites exhibited hepatic encephalopathy. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) showed communication between the portal vein and the middle hepatic vein, indicating an intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt (PSS). Since hepatic encephalopathy of the patient was resistant to medical treatment, interventional radiology was performed for the treatment of shunt obliteration. Hepatic venography showed anastomosis between the hepatic vein branches, supporting the diagnosis of idiopathic portal hypertension (IPH). To minimize the increase in portal vein pressure after shunt obliteration, partial splenic artery embolization (PSE) was first performed to reduce portal vein blood flow. Transileocolic venous obliteration (TIO) was then performed, and intrahepatic PSS was successfully obliterated using coils with n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA). In the present case, hepatic encephalopathy due to intrahepatic PSS in the patient with IPH was successfully treated by combination therapy using PSE and TIO. PMID:27651930

  3. Serial Measurements of Splanchnic Vein Diameters in Rats Using High-Frequency Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Bridget M.; Krieger-Burke, Teresa; Fink, Gregory D.; Watts, Stephanie W.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate serial ultrasound imaging in rats as a fully non-invasive method to (1) quantify the diameters of splanchnic veins in real time as an indirect surrogate for the capacitance function of those veins, and (2) assess the effects of drugs on venous dimensions. A 21 MHz probe was used on anesthetized male Sprague–Dawley rats to collect images containing the portal vein (PV), superior mesenteric vein (SMV), abdominal inferior vena cava (IVC), and splenic vein (SpV; used as a landmark in timed studies) and the abdominal aorta (AA). Stable landmarks were established that allowed reproducible quantification of cross-sectional diameters within an animal. The average diameters of vessels measured every 5 min over 45 min remained within 0.75 ± 0.15% (PV), 0.2 ± 0.09% (SMV), 0.5 ± 0.12% (IVC), and 0.38 ± 0.06% (AA) of baseline (PV: 2.0 ± 0.12 mm; SMV: 1.7 ± 0.04 mm; IVC: 3.2 ± 0.1 mm; AA: 2.3 ± 0.14 mm). The maximal effects of the vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 2 mg/kg, i.v. bolus) on venous diameters were determined 5 min post SNP bolus; the diameters of all noted veins were significantly increased by SNP, while mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreased 29 ± 4 mmHg. By contrast, administration of the venoconstrictor sarafotoxin (S6c; 5 ng/kg, i.v. bolus) significantly decreased PV and SpV, but not IVC, SMV, or AA, diameters 5 min post S6c bolus; MAP increased by 6 ± 2 mmHg. In order to determine if resting splanchnic vein diameters were stable over much longer periods of time, vessel diameters were measured every 2 weeks for 8 weeks. Measurements were found to be highly reproducible within animals over this time period. Finally, to evaluate the utility of vein imaging in a chronic condition, images were acquired from 4-week deoxycorticosterone acetate salt (DOCA-salt) hypertensive and normotensive (SHAM) control rats. All vessel diameters increased from baseline while MAP increased (67 ± 4 mmHg) in DOCA-salt rats

  4. Aneurysms of the portal venous system. Gray-scale and color Doppler ultrasonographic findings with CT and MRI correlation.

    PubMed

    Atasoy, K C; Fitoz, S; Akyar, G; Aytaç, S; Erden, I

    1998-01-01

    Two cases of incidentally detected aneurysms involving the portal venous system are described with emphasis on gray-scale and color Doppler ultrasonographic (US) findings. Appearing on US as anechoic masses showing direct luminal continuity with the right portal vein and superior mesenteric vein, the lesions displayed spectral findings characteristic of portal venous system on color Doppler US. Dynamic helical computed tomography (CT) demonstrated simultaneous enhancement with the portal system, while the aneurysms were hypointense owing to flow void on T1-weighted spin-echo magnetic resonance (MR) images.

  5. Severe bleeding from esophageal varices resistant to endoscopic treatment in a non cirrhotic patient with portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Caronna, Roberto; Bezzi, Mario; Schiratti, Monica; Cardi, Maurizio; Prezioso, Giampaolo; Benedetti, Michele; Papini, Federica; Mangioni, Simona; Martino, Gabriele; Chirletti, Piero

    2008-01-01

    A non cirrhotic patient with esophageal varices and portal vein thrombosis had recurrent variceal bleeding unsuccessfully controlled by endoscopy and esophageal transection. Emergency transhepatic portography confirmed the thrombosed right branch of the portal vein, while the left branch appeared angulated, shifted and stenotic. A stent was successfully implanted into the left branch and the collateral vessels along the epatoduodenal ligament disappeared. In patients with esophageal variceal hemorrhage and portal thrombosis if endoscopy fails, emergency esophageal transection or nonselective portocaval shunting are indicated. The rare patients with only partial portal thrombosis can be treated directly with stenting through an angioradiologic approach. PMID:18644135

  6. Portal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, L.W.

    1982-03-23

    A portal radiation monitor combines .1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  7. Portal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, Lyle W.

    1985-01-01

    A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  8. A Fatal Case of Hepatic Portal Venous Gas Associated With Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Tahmina

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic portal venous gas is a rare cause of acute abdomen caused by leakage of air from the gastrointestinal tract to the portal venous system. The mortality is high, particularly when associated with intestinal ischemia or necrosis. We describe a fatal case of hepatic portal venous gas and pneumatosis intestinalis due to hemodialysis-related hypotension and severe atherosclerotic disease. PMID:27800516

  9. The Advent of Portals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Mary E.

    2002-01-01

    Explains portals as tools that gather a variety of electronic information resources, including local library resources, into a single Web page. Highlights include cross-database searching; integration with university portals and course management software; the ARL (Association of Research Libraries) Scholars Portal Initiative; and selected vendors…

  10. Evaluating Open Source Portals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, Dion; Luyt, Brendan; Chua, Alton; Yee, See-Yong; Poh, Kia-Ngoh; Ng, How-Yeu

    2008-01-01

    Portals have become indispensable for organizations of all types trying to establish themselves on the Web. Unfortunately, there have only been a few evaluative studies of portal software and even fewer of open source portal software. This study aims to add to the available literature in this important area by proposing and testing a checklist for…

  11. Spider Vein Removal

    MedlinePlus

    Spider veins: How are they removed? I have spider veins on my legs. What options are available ... M.D. Several options are available to remove spider veins — thin red lines or weblike networks of ...

  12. What Causes Varicose Veins?

    MedlinePlus

    ... weak or damaged, blood can back up and pool in your veins. This causes the veins to ... pressure in your veins due to overweight or obesity or pregnancy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: February ...

  13. Influence of G-forces and hypodynamia on the portal system of the liver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozdova, A. V.

    1975-01-01

    Longitudinally and transversely applied g-forces as intolerable levels cause damage to the interlobular veins of the liver, with maximum damage caused by dorso-ventral g-force application. The portal vein system is more resilient with respect to g-forces at the limit of tolerance.

  14. Portal hypertension: angiographic and hemodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Koolpe, H A; Koolpe, L

    1986-09-01

    There has been a correlation of three hemodynamic parameters with the etiology of portal hypertension and one of the major determinants of therapeutic success, namely, the direction of portal flow. The presence of a 4 mm Hg or greater gradient between the right atrium and the intrahepatic inferior vena cava associated with a "lumpy" pull-back tracing between the wedged and free positions has been associated with alcoholic liver disease. Such patients have antegrade portal flow when their AoD/HWP ratio is in the range of 2.6 to 2.0, and flow becomes stagnant or reversed below this range. Nonalcoholic liver disease is characterized by the absence of a gradient between the right atrium and the inferior vena cava and by a pull-back tracing that falls smoothly and rapidly to the free hepatic vein value. These patients have antegrade portal flow with an AoD/HWP ratio in the range of 1.7 to 1.5. The correct characterization of the cause for diffuse liver disease and direction of portal flow applies to the selection process for patients being considered for the selective distal splenorenal shunt as well as for the newer procedure of orthotopic liver transplantation. It is hoped that the wider application of these physiologic parameters, in the context of an increasing array of imaging tools for the portal system, including high-resolution ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), will continue to offer all clinicians interested in the problem of portal hypertension a reliable guide to prognosis and the success of the particular treatment provided.

  15. Prevalence of Splanchnic Vein Thrombosis in Pancreatitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenda; Qi, Xingshun; Chen, Jiang; Su, Chunping; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2015-01-01

    Splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT) may be negatively associated with the prognosis of pancreatitis. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of literatures to explore the prevalence of SVT in pancreatitis. All observational studies regarding the prevalence of SVT in pancreatitis were identified via PubMed and EMBASE databases. The prevalence of SVT was pooled in the total of patients with pancreatitis. And it was also pooled in the subgroup analyses according to the stage and causes of pancreatitis, location of SVT, and regions where the studies were performed. After the review of 714 studies, 44 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses showed a pooled prevalence of SVT of 13.6% in pancreatitis. According to the stage of pancreatitis, the pooled prevalence of SVT was 16.6% and 11.6% in patients with acute and chronic pancreatitis, respectively. According to the causes of pancreatitis, the pooled prevalence of SVT was 12.2% and 14.6% in patients with hereditary and autoimmune pancreatitis. According to the location of SVT, the pooled prevalence of portal vein, splenic vein, and mesenteric vein thrombosis was 6.2%, 11.2%, and 2.7% in pancreatitis. The prevalence of SVT in pancreatitis was 16.9%, 11.5%, and 8.5% in Europe, America, and Asia, respectively. PMID:26451142

  16. Bone marrow transplantation in the rat. III. Structure of the liver inflammatory lesion in acute graft-versus-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    Leszczynski, D.; Renkonen, R.; Haeyry, P.

    1985-08-01

    The liver is a major parenchymal target organ of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) after bone marrow transplantation in the rat. The authors have analyzed the nature of cellular infiltrates in the liver using monoclonal antibodies against white cell subsets and investigated the anatomic distribution of the inflammatory cell subsets inside the liver parenchyma. Several types of white cells are present in a normal control liver: In the portal area the T-helper (Th) cells predominate, (surface) immunoglobulin-expressing B cells are present in ample numbers, and most of the phagocytes are Ia-positive. In the central vein area the T-suppressor/killer cells (Tsk) dominate, no B cells are present, and most of the phagocytes are Ia-negative. During aGVHD the number of T cells increases rapidly in the portal area; and after an initial strong increase, the Th/Tsk ratio decreases but remains still above 1. In the central vein area there is also an increase in the number of T cells, compared with that in the syngeneic recipient, but the Th/Tsk ratio rapidly decreases and remains uniformly below 1. During aGVHD the B cells entirely disappear from the portal area, whereas a small but distinct number of mature plasma cells with intracellular immunoglobulin appear in the central vein area. Following irradiation the Ia-positive phagocytic cells entirely disappear from the portal area and decrease distinctly in number in the central vein area. During aGVHD the number of Ia-positive phagocytes increases again in both locations. In the central vein area the positive phagocytes are seen over the background level, and, concomitantly, the Ia-negative phagocytes disappear.

  17. Noncirrhotic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rajekar, Harshal; Vasishta, Rakesh K; Chawla, Yogesh K; Dhiman, Radha K

    2011-09-01

    Portal hypertension is characterized by an increase in portal pressure (> 10 mmHg) and could be a result of cirrhosis of the liver or of noncirrhotic diseases. When portal hypertension occurs in the absence of liver cirrhosis, noncirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) must be considered. The prognosis of this disease is much better than that of cirrhosis. Noncirrhotic diseases are the common cause of portal hypertension in developing countries, especially in Asia. NCPH is a heterogeneous group of diseases that is due to intrahepatic or extrahepatic etiologies. In general, the lesions in NCPH are vascular in nature and can be classified based on the site of resistance to blood flow. In most cases, these disorders can be explained by endothelial cell lesions, intimal thickening, thrombotic obliterations, or scarring of the intrahepatic portal or hepatic venous circulation. Many different conditions can determine NCPH through the association of these various lesions in various degrees. Many clinical manifestations of NCPH result from the secondary effects of portal hypertension. Patients with NCPH present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, splenomegaly, ascites after gastrointestinal bleeding, features of hypersplenism, growth retardation, and jaundice due to portal hypertensive biliopathy. Other sequelae include hyperdynamic circulation, pulmonary complications, and other effects of portosystemic collateral circulation like portosystemic encephalopathy. At present, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatments are the treatments of choice for portal hypertension. The therapy of all disorders causing NCPH involves the reduction of portal pressure by pharmacotherapy or portosystemic shunting, apart from prevention and treatment of complications of portal hypertension.

  18. Inflammation: a way to understanding the evolution of portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aller, María-Angeles; Arias, Jorge-Luis; Cruz, Arturo; Arias, Jaime

    2007-01-01

    Background Portal hypertension is a clinical syndrome that manifests as ascites, portosystemic encephalopathy and variceal hemorrhage, and these alterations often lead to death. Hypothesis Splanchnic and/or systemic responses to portal hypertension could have pathophysiological mechanisms similar to those involved in the post-traumatic inflammatory response. The splanchnic and systemic impairments produced throughout the evolution of experimental prehepatic portal hypertension could be considered to have an inflammatory origin. In portal vein ligated rats, portal hypertensive enteropathy, hepatic steatosis and portal hypertensive encephalopathy show phenotypes during their development that can be considered inflammatory, such as: ischemia-reperfusion (vasodilatory response), infiltration by inflammatory cells (mast cells) and bacteria (intestinal translocation of endotoxins and bacteria) and lastly, angiogenesis. Similar inflammatory phenotypes, worsened by chronic liver disease (with anti-oxidant and anti-enzymatic ability reduction) characterize the evolution of portal hypertension and its complications (hepatorenal syndrome, ascites and esophageal variceal hemorrhage) in humans. Conclusion Low-grade inflammation, related to prehepatic portal hypertension, switches to high-grade inflammation with the development of severe and life-threatening complications when associated with chronic liver disease. PMID:17999758

  19. [Surgery in portal hypertension. Which patient and which operation?].

    PubMed

    Mercado, M A; Takahashi, T; Rojas, G; Prado, E; Hernández, J; Tielve, M; Orozco, H

    1993-01-01

    A prospective trial of a cohort of patients (N = 94) with portal hypertension and history of bleeding was selected for surgery based on strict clinical and laboratory criteria. All of them were treated with portal blood flow preserving procedures. The following selection criteria were used: good cardiopulmonary function without pulmonary hypertension and good liver function (Child-Pugh A). All patients were operated in an elective fashion and the operations performed were: selective shunts (N = 38) (distal splenorenal and splenocaval), low diameter mesocaval shunts (N = 13) and the esophagogastric devascularization with esophageal transection (Sugiura-Futagawa) (N = 43). Patients were selected for each operation according to their anatomical conditions. Sixty-one of the patients were cirrhotics. Operative mortality was 8% and rebleeding was observed in 5% of the cases. Postoperative encephalopathy was seen in seven patients (three selective shunts, two low diameter mesocaval shunts and two devascularizations). In 13 of 62 patients postoperatively evaluated by means of angiography, portal vein thrombosis was shown (seven selective shunts, two low diameter shunts and four devascularizations). Twenty-two patients with preoperative portal vein thrombosis (and treated with a Sugiura-Futagawa operation) were excluded from postoperative angiographic evaluation. Survival (Kaplan-Meier) was 85% at 60 months. Portal blood flow preserving procedures are the treatment of choice for patients with hemorrhagic portal hypertension and good liver function. The kind of operation is selected according to the individual anatomical status of the patient.

  20. Embolization of portal-systemic shunts in cirrhotic patients with chronic recurrent hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurabayashi, Shin; Sezai, Shuichi; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Masanori; Oka, Hiroshi

    1997-03-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of embolization of portal-systemic shunts in cirrhotic patients with chronic recurrent hepatic encephalopathy (CRHE). Methods. Seven cirrhotic patients with CRHE refractory to medical treatment (3 men and 4 women, mean age 66 years) were studied. Five patients had splenorenal shunts, 1 had a gastrorenal shunt, and 1 had an intrahepatic portal vein-hepatic vein shunt. Shunt embolization was performed using stainless steel coils, with a percutaneous transhepatic portal vein approach in 4 patients and a transrenal vein approach in 3 patients. Results. After embolization, the shunt disappeared in 4 patients on either ultrasound pulsed Doppler monitoring or portography. Complications observed in the 7 patients were fever, transient pleural effusion, ascites, and mild esophageal varices. For 3-6 months after embolization, the 4 patients whose shunts disappeared showed minimal or no reappearance of a shunt, and had no recurrence of encephalopathy. The serum ammonia levels decreased and electroencephalograms also improved. One of the 4 patients, who developed mild esophageal varices, required no treatment. Treatment was effective in 3 of the 4 patients (75%) who underwent embolization via a transhepatic portal vein. Conclusion. Transvascular embolization of shunts improved the outcome in 4 of 7 patients. The most effective embolization was achieved via the percutaneous transhepatic portal vein approach.

  1. Novel Rat Model of Repetitive Portal Venous Embolization Mimicking Human Non-Cirrhotic Idiopathic Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Sabine; Hinüber, Christian; Hittatiya, Kanishka; Schierwagen, Robert; Uschner, Frank Erhard; Strassburg, Christian P.; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Spengler, Ulrich; Trebicka, Jonel

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-cirrhotic idiopathic portal hypertension (NCIPH) is characterized by splenomegaly, anemia and portal hypertension, while liver function is preserved. However, no animal models have been established yet. This study assessed a rat model of NCIPH and characterized the hemodynamics, and compared it to human NCIPH. Methods Portal pressure (PP) was measured invasively and coloured microspheres were injected in the ileocecal vein in rats. This procedure was performed weekly for 3 weeks (weekly embolization). Rats without and with single embolization served as controls. After four weeks (one week after last embolization), hemodynamics were investigated, hepatic fibrosis and accumulation of myofibroblasts were analysed. General characteristics, laboratory analyses and liver histology were collected in patients with NCIPH. Results Weekly embolization induced a hyperdynamic circulation, with increased PP. The mesenteric flow and hepatic hydroxyproline content was significantly higher in weekly embolized compared to single embolized rats (mesenteric flow +54.1%, hydroxyproline +41.7%). Mesenteric blood flow and shunt volumes increased, whereas splanchnic vascular resistance was decreased in the weekly embolization group. Fibrotic markers αSMA and Desmin were upregulated in weekly embolized rats. Discussion This study establishes a model using repetitive embolization via portal veins, comparable with human NCIPH and may serve to test new therapies. PMID:27589391

  2. Inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis in Crohn`s disease: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Coralnick, J.R.; Budin, J.A.; Sedarat, A.

    1996-01-01

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis has been described in association with such risk factors as coagulation disorders, postoperative dehydration, sepsis, and trauma. CT and ultrasound have greatly facilitated early diagnosis, and the features of superior mesenteric and portal vein thrombosis are well recognized. We present a case of inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis in a patient with Crohn`s disease. To our knowledge, this entity has not been reported in the radiologic literature. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  3. [Mexican consensus on portal hypertension].

    PubMed

    Narváez-Rivera, R M; Cortez-Hernández, C A; González-González, J A; Tamayo-de la Cuesta, J L; Zamarripa-Dorsey, F; Torre-Delgadillo, A; Rivera-Ramos, J F J; Vinageras-Barroso, J I; Muneta-Kishigami, J E; Blancas-Valencia, J M; Antonio-Manrique, M; Valdovinos-Andraca, F; Brito-Lugo, P; Hernández-Guerrero, A; Bernal-Reyes, R; Sobrino-Cossío, S; Aceves-Tavares, G R; Huerta-Guerrero, H M; Moreno-Gómez, N; Bosques-Padilla, F J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the Mexican Consensus on Portal Hypertension was to develop documented guidelines to facilitate clinical practice when dealing with key events of the patient presenting with portal hypertension and variceal bleeding. The panel of experts was made up of Mexican gastroenterologists, hepatologists, and endoscopists, all distinguished professionals. The document analyzes themes of interest in the following modules: preprimary and primary prophylaxis, acute variceal hemorrhage, and secondary prophylaxis. The management of variceal bleeding has improved considerably in recent years. Current information indicates that the general management of the cirrhotic patient presenting with variceal bleeding should be carried out by a multidisciplinary team, with such an approach playing a major role in the final outcome. The combination of drug and endoscopic therapies is recommended for initial management; vasoactive drugs should be started as soon as variceal bleeding is suspected and maintained for 5 days. After the patient is stabilized, urgent diagnostic endoscopy should be carried out by a qualified endoscopist, who then performs the corresponding endoscopic variceal treatment. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be regarded as an integral part of treatment, started upon hospital admittance and continued for 5 days. If there is treatment failure, rescue therapies should be carried out immediately, taking into account that interventional radiology therapies are very effective in controlling refractory variceal bleeding. These guidelines have been developed for the purpose of achieving greater clinical efficacy and are based on the best evidence of portal hypertension that is presently available.

  4. Successful liver transplantation in a patient with splanchnic vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism due to polycythemia vera with Jak2v617f mutation and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, Emanuela; Pedrazzi, Paola; Marietta, Marco; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio; Villa, Erica; Luppi, Mario; Girardis, Massimo

    2013-10-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a rare complication of heparin treatment resulting in a severe acquired thrombophilic condition with an associated mortality of about 10 %. We report the first case of successful urgent liver transplantation (LT) in a patient with end-stage liver disease due to a Budd-Chiari syndrome, portal vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism due to acquired thrombophilia associated to polycythemia vera carrying JAK2V617F gene mutation and HIT in the acute phase. Lepirudin was used to provide anticoagulation in the LT perioperative period that was performed without haemorrhagic and thrombotic complications despite the donor received heparin during liver explantation.

  5. Aging techniques for deep vein thrombosis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dharmarajah, B; Sounderajah, V; Rowland, S P; Leen, E L S; Davies, A H

    2015-03-01

    Deep vein thrombosis is common with an incidence of 1 in 1000. Acute thrombus removal for extensive proximal deep vein thrombosis using catheter-directed techniques highlights the need for accurate assessment of thrombus age. This systematic review summarises experimental and clinical evidence of imaging techniques for aging deep vein thrombosis. Ultrasound elastography and magnetic resonance imaging were highlighted as the most studied imaging modalities. Elastography was shown to distinguish between acute and chronic clots, despite demonstrating difficulty in accurate aging of clots older than 10 days in rat models. Elastography is noted as a feasible adjunct to current first-line imaging for deep vein thrombosis using duplex ultrasonography. Combinations of magnetic resonance imaging techniques can identify acute, sub-acute and chronic thrombi using endogenous contrast agents and provide objective standardisation of the diagnostic process, with reduced onus upon operator dependency. Further validation is required of these novel imaging techniques prior to clinical implementation for deep vein thrombosis aging.

  6. Role of the endocrine pancreas in the kalemic response to acute metabolic acidosis in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Adrogué, H J; Chap, Z; Ishida, T; Field, J B

    1985-03-01

    Metabolic acidosis due to organic acids infusion fails to elicit hyperkalemia. Although plasma potassium levels may rise, the increase is smaller than in mineral acid acidosis. The mechanisms responsible for the different effects of organic acid acidosis and mineral acid acidosis remain undefined, although dissimilar hormonal responses by the pancreas may explain dissimilar hormonal responses by the pancreas may explain the phenomena. To test this hypothesis, beta-hydroxybutyric acid (7 meq/kg) or hydrochloric acid (3 meq/kg) was infused over 30 min into conscious dogs (n = 12) with chronically implanted catheters in the portal, hepatic, and systemic circulation, and flow probes were placed around the portal vein and hepatic artery. Acid infusion studies in two groups of anesthetized dogs were also done to assess the urinary excretion of potassium (n = 14), and to evaluate the effects of acute suppression of renal electrolyte excretion on plasma potassium and on the release/uptake of potassium in peripheral tissues of the hindleg (n = 17). Ketoacid infusion caused hypokalemia and a significant increase in portal vein plasma insulin, from the basal level of 27 +/- 4 microU/ml to a maximum of 84 +/- 22 microU/ml at 10 min, without changes in glucagon levels. By contrast, mineral acid acidosis of similar severity resulted in hyperkalemia and did not increase portal insulin levels but enhanced portal glucagon concentration from control values of 132 +/- 25 pg/ml to 251 +/- 39 pg/ml at 40 min. A significant decrease in plasma glucose levels due to suppression of hepatic release was observed during ketoacid infusion, while no changes were observed with mineral acid infusion. Plasma flows in the portal vein and hepatic artery remained unchanged from control values in both acid infusion studies. Differences in renal potassium excretion were ruled out as determinants of the disparate kalemic responses to organic acid infusion compared with HCl acidosis. Evaluation of the

  7. Therapeutic Effect of Captopril, Pentoxifylline, and Cordyceps Sinensis in Pre-Hepatic Portal Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ahmed F.; El-Maraghy, Nabila N.; Ghaney, Rasha H. Abdel; Elshazly, Shimaa M.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim: Portal hypertension is an important and potentially fatal complication of liver disease whereby cellular and fibrotic alterations manifest to increase portal venous pressure. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of captopril, pentoxifylline (PTX), and cordyceps sinensis in pre-hepatic portal hypertensive rats. Settings and Design: Wister male rats were divided at random into 3 main groups: the first group: control rats. The second group: sham-operated rats and the third group: prehepatic portal hypertensive rats (PHPHT) induced by regulated pre-hepatic portal vein ligation. After 14 days, Group 3 was subdivided into 5 subgroups. Subgroup (1): portal vein-ligated (PVL) was killed at once; Subgroup (2): received distilled water for 30 days (untreated PVL group); subgroups 3-5 were treated with captopril (60 mg/kg, orally); PTX (100 mg/kg, orally); and C. sinensis (200 mg/kg, orally), respectively, as a single daily dose for 30 days. Patients and Methods: Portal pressure, nitric oxide (NO), antioxidant enzymes, Liver enzymes, and creatinine levels were measured to evaluate the status of the liver state. Results: Portal vein ligation produced significant increments in liver enzymes, NO, creatinine and portal pressure concomitant with significant decrements in glutathione content and superoxide dismutase activity. Treatment with captopril, PTX, and C. sinensis resulted in a significant reduction in liver enzymes, NO, creatinine and portal pressure and observable increase in antioxidant enzymes. Conclusions: captopril, PTX, and C. sinensis have promising effect in controlling PHPHT and reducing hyperdynamic circulatory state through reduction of portal pressure and NO level. PMID:22626797

  8. Murine study of portal hypertension associated endothelin-1 hypo-response

    PubMed Central

    Theodorakis, Nicholas; Maluccio, Mary; Skill, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate endothelin-1 hypo-responsive associated with portal hypertension in order to improve patient treatment outcomes. METHODS: Wild type, eNOS-/- and iNOS-/- mice received partial portal vein ligation surgery to induce portal hypertension or sham surgery. Development of portal hypertension was determined by measuring the splenic pulp pressure, abdominal aortic flow and portal systemic shunting. To measure splenic pulp pressure, a microtip pressure transducer was inserted into the spleen pulp. Abdominal aortic flow was measured by placing an ultrasonic Doppler flow probe around the abdominal aorta between the diaphragm and celiac artery. Portal systemic shunting was calculated by injection of fluorescent microspheres in to the splenic vein and determining the percentage accumulation of spheres in liver and pulmonary beds. Endothelin-1 hypo-response was evaluated by measuring the change in abdominal aortic flow in response to endothelin-1 intravenous administration. In addition, thoracic aorta endothelin-1 contraction was measured in 5 mm isolated thoracic aorta rings ex-vivo using an ADI small vessel myograph. RESULTS: In wild type and iNOS-/- mice splenic pulp pressure increased from 7.5 ± 1.1 mmHg and 7.2 ± 1 mmHg to 25.4 ± 3.1 mmHg and 22 ± 4 mmHg respectively. In eNOS-/- mice splenic pulp pressure was increased after 1 d (P = NS), after which it decreased and by 7 d was not significantly elevated when compared to 7 d sham operated controls (6.9 ± 0.6 mmHg and 7.3 ± 0.8 mmHg respectively, P = 0.3). Abdominal aortic flow was increased by 80% and 73% in 7 d portal vein ligated wild type and iNOS when compared to shams, whereas there was no significant difference in 7 d portal vein ligated eNOS-/- mice when compared to shams. Endothelin-1 induced a rapid reduction in abdominal aortic blood flow in wild type, eNOS-/- and iNOS-/- sham mice (50% ± 8%, 73% ± 9% and 47% ± 9% respectively). Following portal vein ligation endothelin-1 reduction in

  9. Portal hypertension: Imaging of portosystemic collateral pathways and associated image-guided therapy.

    PubMed

    Bandali, Murad Feroz; Mirakhur, Anirudh; Lee, Edward Wolfgang; Ferris, Mollie Clarke; Sadler, David James; Gray, Robin Ritchie; Wong, Jason Kam

    2017-03-14

    Portal hypertension is a common clinical syndrome, defined by a pathologic increase in the portal venous pressure. Increased resistance to portal blood flow, the primary factor in the pathophysiology of portal hypertension, is in part due to morphological changes occurring in chronic liver diseases. This results in rerouting of blood flow away from the liver through collateral pathways to low-pressure systemic veins. Through a variety of computed tomographic, sonographic, magnetic resonance imaging and angiographic examples, this article discusses the appearances and prevalence of both common and less common portosystemic collateral channels in the thorax and abdomen. A brief overview of established interventional radiologic techniques for treatment of portal hypertension will also be provided. Awareness of the various imaging manifestations of portal hypertension can be helpful for assessing overall prognosis and planning proper management.

  10. Portal hypertension: Imaging of portosystemic collateral pathways and associated image-guided therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bandali, Murad Feroz; Mirakhur, Anirudh; Lee, Edward Wolfgang; Ferris, Mollie Clarke; Sadler, David James; Gray, Robin Ritchie; Wong, Jason Kam

    2017-01-01

    Portal hypertension is a common clinical syndrome, defined by a pathologic increase in the portal venous pressure. Increased resistance to portal blood flow, the primary factor in the pathophysiology of portal hypertension, is in part due to morphological changes occurring in chronic liver diseases. This results in rerouting of blood flow away from the liver through collateral pathways to low-pressure systemic veins. Through a variety of computed tomographic, sonographic, magnetic resonance imaging and angiographic examples, this article discusses the appearances and prevalence of both common and less common portosystemic collateral channels in the thorax and abdomen. A brief overview of established interventional radiologic techniques for treatment of portal hypertension will also be provided. Awareness of the various imaging manifestations of portal hypertension can be helpful for assessing overall prognosis and planning proper management. PMID:28348478

  11. Porcine model characterizing various parameters assessing the outcome after acetaminophen intoxication induced acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Karolin; Klingert, Wilfried; Klingert, Kathrin; Morgalla, Matthias H; Schuhmann, Martin U; Leckie, Pamela; Sharifi, Yalda; Davies, Nathan A; Jalan, Rajiv; Peter, Andreas; Grasshoff, Christian; Königsrainer, Alfred; Schenk, Martin; Thiel, Christian

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the changes of hemodynamic and laboratory parameters during the course of acute liver failure following acetaminophen overdose. METHODS Eight pigs underwent a midline laparotomy following jejunal catheter placement for further acetaminophen intoxication and positioning of a portal vein Doppler flow-probe. Acute liver failure was realized by intrajejunal acetaminophen administration in six animals, two animals were sham operated. All animals were invasively monitored and received standardized intensive care support throughout the study. Portal blood flow, hemodynamic and ventilation parameters were continuously recorded. Laboratory parameters were analysed every eight hours. Liver biopsies were sampled every 24 h following intoxication and upon autopsy. RESULTS Acute liver failure (ALF) occurred after 28 ± 5 h resulted in multiple organ failure and death despite maximal support after further 21 ± 1 h (study end). Portal blood flow (baseline 1100 ± 156 mL/min) increased to a maximum flow of 1873 ± 175 mL/min at manifestation of ALF, which was significantly elevated (P < 0.01). Immediately after peaking, portal flow declined rapidly to 283 ± 135 mL/min at study end. Thrombocyte values (baseline 307 × 103/µL ± 34 × 103/µL) of intoxicated animals declined slowly to values of 145 × 103/µL ± 46 × 103/µL when liver failure occurred. Subsequent appearance of severe thrombocytopenia in liver failure resulted in values of 11 × 103/µL ± 3 × 103/µL preceding fatality within few hours which was significant (P > 0.01). CONCLUSION Declining portal blood flow and subsequent severe thrombocytopenia after acetaminophen intoxication precede fatality in a porcine acute liver failure model. PMID:28321158

  12. Comparison of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and Doppler ultrasound in the pre-operative assessment of the portal venous system.

    PubMed

    Naik, K S; Ward, J; Irving, H C; Robinson, P J

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCEMR) with Doppler ultrasound (US) in the assessment of portal venous anatomy and to analyse the causes of discrepancy. Over a 1 year period, 97 patients undergoing assessment prior to hepatic surgery underwent imaging of the liver and portal venous system using US with colour and spectral Doppler and MRI with axial T2 weighted spin echo (SE) and coronal oblique T1 weighted rapid gradient echo (GRE) imaging before and immediately after bolus injection of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol kg-1). When the US and MRI findings were discrepant, the images were reviewed by two observers and compared with surgical findings. US and DCEMR were concordant in 90 patients (portal vein patent in 80, occluded in 10). In three patients with cirrhosis and gross ascites the portal vein was reported as occluded on US and patent on MRI; surgery confirmed the MRI findings. In one patient the portal vein was patient on US but not on MRI, but there was a 3 week interval between the examinations. In three patients the portal vein was patent on US, but MRI detected occlusion of intrahepatic portal vein branches in two, and encasement of an intrahepatic branch in the third case. Spontaneous splenorenal shunts were seen in 15 patients only on MRI; varices were seen in 39 patients on MRI and in 22 patients on US. Both US and DCEMR contribute to the pre-operative assessment of the portal venous system. MRI provides additional information over US in assessing intrahepatic portal branches and detecting varices and splenorenal shunts, and is recommended for all surgical candidates and in patients with abnormal portal venous anatomy and equivocal US findings.

  13. Bone mesenchymal stem cell transplantation via four routes for the treatment of acute liver failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lihua; Fan, Xiaotang; Zhang, Lijuan; Shi, Guixiu; Aili, Maimaiti; Lu, Xiaobo; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Yuexin

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, we assessed the efficiency of four BMSC transplantation methods as a therapy for liver failure. A rat model (80 Sprague-Dawley rats) of D-galactosamine (D-gal)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute liver failure (ALF) was established and the rats were divided into 5 groups: a hepatic artery injection group, a portal vein injection group, a vena caudalis injection group, an intraperitoneal injection group and a control group (16 per group). Following transplantation, the liver tissue and blood samples were collected on days 1, 3 and 7, we detected the EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine)-labeled cells homing to the liver tissue and assessed the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cysteine-containing aspartate-specific protease (caspase)-3 expression in the liver tissue and detected the levels of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in the liver tissues. Compared with the control group, the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and damage to the liver tissue in the hepatic artery group, the portal vein group and the vena caudalis group improved in vivo. The expression of PCNA and HGF in the liver was higher and caspase-3 expression was lower in the hepatic artery injection group, the portal vein injection group and the vena caudalis injection group than that in the intraperitoneal injection and control groups. The EdU-labeled BMSCs were only observed homing to the liver tissue in these three groups. However, no significant differences were observed between these three groups. Liver function in the rats with ALF was improved following BMSC transplantation via 3 endovascular implantation methods (through the hepatic artery, portal vein and vena caudalis). These 3 methods were effective in transplanting BMSCs for the treatment of ALF. However, the selection of blood vessel in the implantation pathway does not affect the transplantation outcome. Transplantation via

  14. Statins activate the canonical hedgehog-signaling and aggravate non-cirrhotic portal hypertension, but inhibit the non-canonical hedgehog signaling and cirrhotic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Uschner, Frank E; Ranabhat, Ganesh; Choi, Steve S; Granzow, Michaela; Klein, Sabine; Schierwagen, Robert; Raskopf, Esther; Gautsch, Sebastian; van der Ven, Peter F M; Fürst, Dieter O; Strassburg, Christian P; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Diehl, Anna Mae; Trebicka, Jonel

    2015-09-28

    Liver cirrhosis but also portal vein obstruction cause portal hypertension (PHT) and angiogenesis. This study investigated the differences of angiogenesis in cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic PHT with special emphasis on the canonical (Shh/Gli) and non-canonical (Shh/RhoA) hedgehog pathway. Cirrhotic (bile duct ligation/BDL; CCl4 intoxication) and non-cirrhotic (partial portal vein ligation/PPVL) rats received either atorvastatin (15 mg/kg; 7d) or control chow before sacrifice. Invasive hemodynamic measurement and Matrigel implantation assessed angiogenesis in vivo. Angiogenesis in vitro was analysed using migration and tube formation assay. In liver and vessel samples from animals and humans, transcript expression was analyzed using RT-PCR and protein expression using Western blot. Atorvastatin decreased portal pressure, shunt flow and angiogenesis in cirrhosis, whereas atorvastatin increased these parameters in PPVL rats. Non-canonical Hh was upregulated in experimental and human liver cirrhosis and was blunted by atorvastatin. Moreover, atorvastatin blocked the non-canonical Hh-pathway RhoA dependently in activated hepatic steallate cells (HSCs). Interestingly, hepatic and extrahepatic Hh-pathway was enhanced in PPVL rats, which resulted in increased angiogenesis. In summary, statins caused contrary effects in cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic portal hypertension. Atorvastatin inhibited the non-canonical Hh-pathway and angiogenesis in cirrhosis. In portal vein obstruction, statins enhanced the canonical Hh-pathway and aggravated PHT and angiogenesis.

  15. Roadside Tracker Portal-less Portal Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Cheriyadat, Anil M.; Bradley, Eric Craig; Cunningham, Mark F.; Fabris, Lorenzo; Goddard, Jr, James Samuel; Hornback, Donald Eric; Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Kerekes, Ryan A.; Newby, Jason

    2013-07-01

    This report documents the full development cycle of the Roadside Tracker (RST) Portal-less Portal monitor (Fig. 1) funded by DHS DNDO. The project started with development of a proof-of-feasibility proto-type, proceeded through design and construction of a proof-of-concept (POC) prototype, a test-and-evaluation phase, participation in a Limited Use Exercise that included the Standoff Radiation Detections Systems developed under an Advanced Technology Demonstration and concluded with participation in a Characterization Study conducted by DNDO.

  16. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem in the lung, called a pulmonary embolism. Sitting still for a long time can make ...

  17. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000027.htm Deep vein thrombosis - discharge To use the sharing features ... page, please enable JavaScript. You were treated for deep vein thrombosis ( DVT ). This is a condition in ...

  18. Varicose vein stripping

    MedlinePlus

    ... noninvasive treatment Varicose veins Venous insufficiency Patient Instructions Surgical wound care - open Varicose veins - what to ask your doctor Review Date 6/6/2016 ... Interventional Radiology & Surgical Critical Care, Philadelphia, PA. Review provided by VeriMed ...

  19. Focus on Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... work- ing properly or have evidence of reflux. Measurement of the venous function of the leg may ... Vein stripping was the traditional treatment for bad values in the veins however it is rarely used ...

  20. Pseudothrombosis with T2-weighted fast spin-echo MR images caused by static portal venous flow in severe cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Masayuki; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Nishigaki, Youichi; Kondo, Hiroshi; Goshima, Satoshi; Maeda, Sunaho; Tomita, Eiichi; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2002-02-01

    Unenhanced T2-weighted fast spin-echo images obtained in a 65-year-old woman with severe cirrhosis showed an area of high signal intensity occupying the left second-order portal vein branch, suggesting portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis. Doppler sonography, which revealed virtually no blood flow in the vessel, also supported the diagnosis. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI subsequently revealed the patency of the vessel. The extremely slow portal venous flow was considered to be the cause of false-positive findings with unenhanced MRI and sonography.

  1. An umbilical venous catheter complication presented as acute abdomen: case report.

    PubMed

    Oztan, Mustafa O; Ilhan, Ozkan; Abay, Elif; Koyluoglu, Gokhan

    2016-12-01

    Umbilical venous catheterization has become a widely accepted intravenous route for premature babies. These catheters allow administration of parenteral nutrition and medication and facilitate blood sampling. Besides these benefits, they also have significant potential complications like portal vein thrombosis, infection, vascular or hepatic injury, arrhythmia and sepsis. One of the rare but important complication is extravasation of the fluids due to misplacement of the catheter. The typical symptoms of this condition are sudden deterioration, hepatic enlargement, hematocrit drop, hypotension and abdominal distension. We herein present a premature newborn with unusual acute abdomen findings suggesting a surgical pathology after the extravasation of total parenteral nutrition into the abdomen.

  2. Leiomyosarcoma arising from the inferior mesenteric vein

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Gennaro; Sarno, Gerardo; Barbaro, Brunella; Nuzzo, Gennaro

    2009-01-01

    Leyomiosarcomas arising from the portal/mesenteric venous system are very rare tumours, and only a few cases have been reported in the global literature. As the other leyomiosarcomas of vascular origin, they are associated with a poor prognosis. The present report describes the case of a 66-year-old woman with a leyomiosarcoma of the inferior mesenteric vein, unexpectedly found during a CT scan performed for another indication. A brief review of the literature is also given. The patient underwent radical surgical excision and enjoys a good health, without radiological signs of recurrence, 24 months after surgery. In this case, an early incidental diagnosis determined an early treatment and, probably, a favourable prognosis. This is the second case of leyomiosarcoma of the inferior mesenteric vein reported in the literature. PMID:21686492

  3. Posttransplant Complex Inferior Venacava Balloon Dilatation After Hepatic Vein Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Kohli, Vikas; Wadhawan, Manav; Gupta, Subhash; Roy, Vipul

    2010-02-15

    Orthotopic and living related liver transplantation is an established mode of treatment of end-stage liver disease. One of the major causes of postoperative complications is vascular anastomotic stenosis. One such set of such complications relates to hepatic vein, inferior vena cava (IVC), or portal vein stenosis, with a reported incidence of 1-3%. The incidence of vascular complications is reported to be higher in living donor versus cadaveric liver transplants. We encountered a patient with hepatic venous outflow tract obstruction, where the hepatic vein had been previously stented, but the patient continued to have symptoms due to additional IVC obstruction. The patient required double-balloon dilatation of the IVC simultaneously from the internal jugular vein and IVC.

  4. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation Improves Portal Hemodynamics in Patients with Hepatitis B Virus-related Decompensated Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Qinzhi; Cai, Ting; Zhang, Shun; Hu, Airong; Zhang, Xingfen; Wang, Yinyin; Huang, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may eventually lead to decompensated liver cirrhosis, which is a terminal illness. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of autologous peripheral blood stem cell (APBSC) transplantation to improve portal vein hemodynamics in patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis. Patients and Methods: This prospective study included 68 hospitalized patients who were diagnosed with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis. These patients were divided into two groups: the transplantation group included 33 patients, while the control group included 35. Both groups received conventional medical treatment simultaneously, and APBSC transplantation was performed on the patients in the transplantation group. We evaluated the effects of APBSC transplantation on postoperative liver function using the following indices: total bilirubin, serum prothrombin and albumin, spleen size, and portal vein hemodynamics. Postoperatively, all of the patients were followed up at 24, 36, and 48 weeks. Results: The transplantation group had no serious reactions. Compared with the control group, albumin and prothrombin activity in the transplantation group was significantly improved at 24, 36, and 48 weeks after the procedure, and spleen length and portal vein diameter were substantially reduced at 48 weeks. The velocity of peak portal vein blood flow and mean maximum portal vein blood flow were greatly increased in the APBSC transplantation group at 36 and 48 weeks, respectively; however, there was also decreased portal vein diameter, which reduced portal vein pressure in patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis. Conclusions: APBSC transplantation greatly benefits HBV-linked decompensated cirrhosis patients and should be recommended in clinical practice. PMID:26977164

  5. Space Development Grid Portal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the development of a portal to provide secure and distributed grid computing for Payload Operations Integrated Center and Mission Control Center ground services.

  6. Successful Treatment of Small Intestinal Bleeding in a Crohn's Patient with Noncirrhotic Portal Hypertension by Transjugular Portosystemic Shunt Placement and Infliximab Treatment.

    PubMed

    Heimgartner, Benjamin; Dawson, Heather; De Gottardi, Andrea; Wiest, Reiner; Niess, Jan Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Small intestinal bleeding in Crohn's disease patients with noncirrhotic portal hypertension and partial portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis is a life-threatening event. Here, a case is reported in which treatment with azathioprine may have resulted in nodular regenerative hyperplasia, portal hypertension and portal vein thrombosis. The 56-year-old patient with Crohn's disease developed nodular regenerative hyperplasia under treatment with azathioprine. He was admitted with severe bleeding. Gastroscopy showed small esophageal varices without bleeding stigmata. Blood was detected in the terminal ileum. CT scan revealed a partial portal vein thrombosis with extension to the superior mesenteric vein, thickening of the jejunal wall and splenomegaly. Because intestinal bleeding could not be controlled by conservative treatment, the thrombus was aspirated and a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was placed. Switching the immunosuppressive medication to infliximab controlled Crohn's disease activity. Bleeding was stopped, hemoglobin normalized, and thrombocytopenia and bowel movements improved. In summary, small intestinal bleeding in a Crohn's patient with nodular regenerative hyperplasia, portal hypertension and portal vein thrombosis can be efficiently treated by TIPS. TIPS placement together with infliximab treatment led to the improvement of the blood panel and remission in this patient.

  7. Systemic Mastocytosis Complicated by Non-Cirrhotic Portal Hypertension and Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Thomas R.; Hung, Adelina; Mohanty, Arpan

    2017-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by extracutaneous involvement of at least one organ. Although rare, infiltration of inflammatory mast cells within the portal vein may lead to obstruction of the sinusoids resulting in non-cirrhotic portal hypertension. We present a patient with known history of systemic mastocytosis with bone marrow involvement presenting with new-onset esophageal variceal bleeding. Although systemic mastocytosis is uncommon, the subsequent development of hepatic involvement and non-cirrhotic portal hypertension are discussed. Further highlighted is a lack of organization guidelines and the potential for gastrointestinal and hepatic screening of mastocytosis patients with known extracutaneous involvement. PMID:28286795

  8. Vein of Galen Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Komiyama, M.; Nakajima, H.; Nishikawa, M.; Yamanaka, K.; Iwai, Y.; Yasui, T.; Morikawa, T.; Kitano, S.; Sakamoto, H.; Nishio, A.

    2001-01-01

    Summary Eleven patients with so-called “vein of Galen aneurysms ” are reported, six of whom presented with vein of Galen aneurysmal malformations (four with choroidal type and two with mural type malformations). The remaining five patients presented with vein of Galen aneurysmal dilatations secondarily due to an arteriovenous malformation in one patient, an arteriovenous fistula in another, dural arteriovenous fistulas in two patients, and a varix in another. Treatments for these patients were individualised with consideration given to the clinical manifestations and the angioarchitecture of their lesions. Endovascular intervention played a critical role in the treatment of these vein of Galen aneurysms. PMID:20663385

  9. Perspective looking due north, south portal. Note how the portal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective looking due north, south portal. Note how the portal angles out over the approach. - Swann Bridge, Spanning Locust Fork of Black Warrior River, Swann Bridge Road, Cleveland, Blount County, AL

  10. 17. VIEW OF NORTH BRIDGE PORTAL, SHOWING ORNAMENTAL UPPER PORTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF NORTH BRIDGE PORTAL, SHOWING ORNAMENTAL UPPER PORTAL STRUT AND GEOMETRIC DECORATED GUSSET. FACING NORTHEAST. - Coverts Crossing Bridge, Spanning Mahoning River along Township Route 372 (Covert Road), New Castle, Lawrence County, PA

  11. 15. VIEW OF SOUTH BRIDGE PORTAL, SHOWING ORNAMENTAL UPPER PORTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW OF SOUTH BRIDGE PORTAL, SHOWING ORNAMENTAL UPPER PORTAL STRUT AND GUSSETS (FLORAL MOTIF). FACING SOUTHWEST. - Coverts Crossing Bridge, Spanning Mahoning River along Township Route 372 (Covert Road), New Castle, Lawrence County, PA

  12. Elevation, west portal. Sign on portal reads Watson Mill Bridge, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation, west portal. Sign on portal reads Watson Mill Bridge, est. 1885. - Watson Mill Bridge, Spanning South Fork Broad River, Watson Mill Road, Watson Mill Bridge State Park, Comer, Madison County, GA

  13. 8. EAST PORTAL AND DECK VIEW, FROM EAST, SHOWING PORTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. EAST PORTAL AND DECK VIEW, FROM EAST, SHOWING PORTAL CONFIGURATION AND LATERAL BRACING, STEEL MESH FLOOR, METAL RAILINGS, AND PORTION OF EAST APPROACH - Glendale Road Bridge, Spanning Deep Creek Lake on Glendale Road, McHenry, Garrett County, MD

  14. 7. WEST PORTAL AND DECK VIEW, FROM WEST, SHOWING PORTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. WEST PORTAL AND DECK VIEW, FROM WEST, SHOWING PORTAL CONFIGURATION AND LATERAL BRACING, STEEL MESH FLOOR, AND METAL RAILINGS - Glendale Road Bridge, Spanning Deep Creek Lake on Glendale Road, McHenry, Garrett County, MD

  15. Perspective view of south portal. Note how portal angles about ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of south portal. Note how portal angles about 5' forward over the approach. - Red Oak Creek Bridge, Spanning (Big) Red Oak Creek, Huel Brown Road (Covered Bridge Road), Woodbury, Meriwether County, GA

  16. Radioisotopic flow scanning for portal blood flow and portal hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Hesdorffer, C.S.; Bezwoda, W.R.; Danilewitz, M.D.; Esser, J.D.; Tobias, M.

    1987-08-01

    The use of a simple, noninvasive, isotope scanning technique for the determination of relative portal blood flow and detection of portal hypertension is described. Using this technique the presence of portal hypertension was demonstrated in seven of nine patients known to have elevated portal venous pressure. By contrast, esophageal varices were demonstrated in only five of these patients, illustrating the potential value of the method. Furthermore, this technique has been adapted to the study of portal blood flow in patients with myeloproliferative disorders with splenomegaly but without disturbances in hepatic architecture. Results demonstrate that the high relative splenic flow resulting from the presence of splenomegaly may in turn be associated with elevated relative portal blood flow and portal hypertension. The theoretic reasons for the development of flow-related portal hypertension and its relationship to splenic blood flow are discussed.

  17. Effect of Portal Glucose Sensing on Systemic Glucose Levels in SD and ZDF Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Atanu; Rhoads, David B.; Tavakkoli, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background The global epidemic of Type-2-Diabetes (T2D) highlights the need for novel therapeutic targets and agents. Roux-en-Y-Gastric-Bypass (RYGB) is the most effective treatment. Studies investigating the mechanisms of RYGB suggest a role for post-operative changes in portal glucose levels. We investigate the impact of stimulating portal glucose sensors on systemic glucose levels in health and T2D, and evaluated the role of sodium-glucose-cotransporter-3 (SGLT3) as the possible sensor. Methods Systemic glucose and hormone responses to portal stimulation were measured. In Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, post-prandial state was simulated by infusing glucose into the portal vein. The SGLT3 agonist, alpha-methyl-glucopyranoside (αMG), was then added to further stimulate the portal sensor. To elucidate the neural pathway, vagotomy or portal denervation was followed by αMG+glucose co-infusion. The therapeutic potential of portal glucose sensor stimulation was investigated by αMG-only infusion (vs. saline) in SD and Zucker-Diabetic-Fatty (ZDF) rats. Hepatic mRNA expression was also measured. Results αMG+glucose co-infusion reduced peak systemic glucose (vs. glucose alone), and lowered hepatic G6Pase expression. Portal denervation, but not vagotomy, abolished this effect. αMG-only infusion lowered systemic glucose levels. This glucose-lowering effect was more pronounced in ZDF rats, where portal αMG infusion increased insulin, C-peptide and GIP levels compared to saline infusions. Conclusions The portal vein is capable of sensing its glucose levels, and responds by altering hepatic glucose handling. The enhanced effect in T2D, mediated through increased GIP and insulin, highlights a therapeutic target that could be amenable to pharmacological modulation or minimally-invasive surgery. PMID:27806092

  18. Pregnancy with Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neelam; Negi, Neha; Aggarwal, Aakash; Bodh, Vijay; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2014-01-01

    Even though pregnancy is rare with cirrhosis and advanced liver disease, but it may co-exist in the setting of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension as liver function is preserved but whenever encountered together is a complex clinical dilemma. Pregnancy in a patient with portal hypertension presents a special challenge to the obstetrician as so-called physiological hemodynamic changes associated with pregnancy, needed for meeting demands of the growing fetus, worsen the portal hypertension thereby putting mother at risk of potentially life-threatening complications like variceal hemorrhage. Risks of variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation increase many fold during pregnancy. Optimal management revolves round managing the portal hypertension and its complications. Thus management of such cases requires multi-speciality approach involving obstetricians experienced in dealing with high risk cases, hepatologists, anesthetists and neonatologists. With advancement in medical field, pregnancy is not contra-indicated in these women, as was previously believed. This article focuses on the different aspects of pregnancy with portal hypertension with special emphasis on specific cause wise treatment options to decrease the variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation. Based on extensive review of literature, management from pre-conceptional period to postpartum is outlined in order to have optimal maternal and perinatal outcomes. PMID:25755552

  19. The NOAO NVO Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.; Gasson, D.; Fuentes, E.

    2007-10-01

    The NOAO NVO Portal is a web application for one-stop discovery, analysis, and access to VO-compliant imaging data and services. The current release allows for GUI-based discovery of nearly a half million images from archives such as the NOAO Science Archive, the Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 and ACS instruments, XMM-Newton, Chandra, and ESO's INT Wide-Field Survey, among others. The NOAO Portal allows users to view image metadata, footprint wire-frames, FITS image previews, and provides one-click access to science quality imaging data throughout the entire sky via the Firefox web browser (i.e., no applet or code to download). Users can stage images from multiple archives at the NOAO NVO Portal for quick and easy bulk downloads. The NOAO NVO Portal also provides simplified and direct access to VO analysis services, such as the WESIX catalog generation service. We highlight the features of the NOAO NVO Portal (http://nvo.noao.edu).

  20. Effect of heat stress on endotoxin flux across mesenteric-drained and portal-drained viscera of dairy goat.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Xue, B; Wang, K; Li, S; Li, Z

    2011-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of heat stress on endotoxin flux across mesenteric-drained and portal-drained viscera of dairy goats. Three Saanen first lactation dairy goats were surgically fitted with indwelling catheters in the portal vein, the mesenteric vein and carotid, and were kept in thermal-neutral and then heat stress environment, for examining the effect of heat stress on endotoxin absorption and redox status. Average net absorption of endotoxin (EU/h) across mesenteric-drained viscera (MDV) and portal-drained viscera (PDV) during the whole period of heat stress increased by 279.05% and 227.92% in relation to thermo-neutral period. Plasma concentration of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) in mesenteric and portal vein, and that of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in mesenteric vein, increased significantly during heat stress. Main conclusions were: (i) net absorption of endotoxin in portal vein is mainly from non-mesenteric tissues both in heat stress and in thermo-neutral condition; (ii) heat stress may lead to the significant decrease in plasma SOD, GSH-Px, CAT flux across PDV and MDV, and the significant increase in endotoxin flux across PDV and MDV; and (iii) the increase in gastrointestinal permeability in dairy goats during heat stress may not be induced by the increase in oxidative stress.

  1. Automated detection of periventricular veins on 7 T brain MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijf, Hugo J.; Bouvy, Willem H.; Zwanenburg, Jaco J. M.; Viergever, Max A.; Biessels, Geert Jan; Vincken, Koen L.

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is common in elderly persons and a leading cause of cognitive decline, dementia, and acute stroke. With the introduction of ultra-high field strength 7.0T MRI, it is possible to visualize small vessels in the brain. In this work, a proof-of-principle study is conducted to assess the feasibility of automatically detecting periventricular veins. Periventricular veins are organized in a fan-pattern and drain venous blood from the brain towards the caudate vein of Schlesinger, which is situated along the lateral ventricles. Just outside this vein, a region-of- interest (ROI) through which all periventricular veins must cross is defined. Within this ROI, a combination of the vesselness filter, tubular tracking, and hysteresis thresholding is applied to locate periventricular veins. All detected locations were evaluated by an expert human observer. The results showed a positive predictive value of 88% and a sensitivity of 95% for detecting periventricular veins. The proposed method shows good results in detecting periventricular veins in the brain on 7.0T MR images. Compared to previous works, that only use a 1D or 2D ROI and limited image processing, our work presents a more comprehensive definition of the ROI, advanced image processing techniques to detect periventricular veins, and a quantitative analysis of the performance. The results of this proof-of-principle study are promising and will be used to assess periventricular veins on 7.0T brain MRI.

  2. [Portal hypertension. Evidence-based guide].

    PubMed

    Mercado, Miguel Angel; Orozco Zepeda, Héctor; Plata-Muñoz, Juan José

    2004-01-01

    Treatment of portal hypertension has evolved widely during the last decades. Advances in physiopathology have allowed better application of therapeutic options and also have permitted to know the natural history of varices and variceal bleeding, predicting which patients have a higher risk of bleeding. It also permits probability of designing patient treatment. According to liver function and subadjacent liver disease, it is possible to offer different alternatives within the three possible scenarios (primary prophylaxis, acute bleeding episode, and secondary prophylaxis). For primary prophylaxis, pharmacotherapy offers the best choice. Endoscopic banding is also growing in these scenarios and probably will be accepted in the near future. For the acute bleeding episode, endoscopic therapy (sclerosis and/or bands) and/or pharmacologic therapy (octreotide, terlipresin) represent best choice, considering TIPS as a rescue option. Surgery is not used routinely in this scenario in most centers. For secondary prophylaxis, pharmaco- and endoscopic therapy are first-line treatments, while TIPS and surgery as second-line treatments. TIPS is mainly used in patients on a waiting list for liver transplantation. Surgery offers good results for low-risk patients, with good liver function and with portal blood-flow preserving procedures (selective shunts, extensive devascularizations). Liver transplantation is recommended for patients with poor liver function because together with portal hypertension, it treats subadjacent liver disease.

  3. Target detection portal

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Brusseau, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    A portal apparatus for screening persons or objects for the presence of trace amounts of target substances such as explosives, narcotics, radioactive materials, and certain chemical materials. The portal apparatus can have a one-sided exhaust for an exhaust stream, an interior wall configuration with a concave-shape across a horizontal cross-section for each of two facing sides to result in improved airflow and reduced washout relative to a configuration with substantially flat parallel sides; air curtains to reduce washout; ionizing sprays to collect particles bound by static forces, as well as gas jet nozzles to dislodge particles bound by adhesion to the screened person or object. The portal apparatus can be included in a detection system with a preconcentrator and a detector.

  4. Support for varicose veins.

    PubMed Central

    Fentem, P H; Goddard, M; Gooden, B A

    1976-01-01

    A method has been devised to allow reliable comparison of different strengths and constructions of support hosiery. Five garments were evaluated for the compression they exerted on the leg and their ability to limit the distension of a model varicose vein. Stockings and tights which provide modest compression can achieve worthwhile control of vein distension. PMID:1247807

  5. Dietary starch sources affect net portal appearance of amino acids and glucose in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, T-J; Dai, Q-Z; Yin, Y-L; Zhang, J; Huang, R-L; Ruan, Z; Deng, Z; Xie, M

    2008-05-01

    Four male pigs (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire; average initial (mean ± SEM) BW = 22.5 ± 1.1 kg), fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein, ileal vein and carotid artery, were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square experimental design to measure the effect of dietary starch sources on the net portal appearance of glucose and amino acids. Dietary starch sources were resistant starch (RS), maize, sticky rice and brown rice. Diets were provided at 0730, 1530 and 2330 h during a 6-day adjustment period and 1-day collection period. On day 7 of each period, blood samples were collected from the portal vein and carotid artery at 0730 h (prior to feeding) and hourly up to 8 h after meal. Blood samples were used to determine glucose, amino acid, packed cell volume and partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). When calculated per 100 g feed intake, cumulative portal glucose appearance was lower (P < 0.05) for resistant starch than for maize, sticky rice or brown rice up to 8 h after the meal. Cumulative portal glucose appearance was higher (P < 0.05) for sticky rice and brown rice than for other diets until 4 h after the meal, but maize had higher cumulative glucose appearance after 4 h. Net cumulative portal concentrations of most amino acids for resistant starch were also reduced (P < 0.05) than for the other starch sources. Cumulative portal appearance of amino acid represented 48.39%, 63.76%, 61.80% and 59.18% of dietary intake for resistant starch, maize, sticky rice and brown rice, respectively. Collectively, our results indicate that dietary starch sources substantially affect the appearance of amino acids and glucose in the portal circulation.

  6. Therapeutic approaches for portal biliopathy: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Franceschet, Irene; Zanetto, Alberto; Ferrarese, Alberto; Burra, Patrizia; Senzolo, Marco

    2016-12-07

    Portal biliopathy (PB) is defined as the presence of biliary abnormalities in patients with non-cirrhotic/non-neoplastic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) and portal cavernoma (PC). The pathogenesis of PB is due to ab extrinseco compression of bile ducts by PC and/or to ischemic damage secondary to an altered biliary vascularization in EHPVO and PC. Although asymptomatic biliary abnormalities can be frequently seen by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in patients with PC (77%-100%), only a part of these (5%-38%) are symptomatic. Clinical presentation includes jaundice, cholangitis, cholecystitis, abdominal pain, and cholelithiasis. In this subset of patients is required a specific treatment. Different therapeutic approaches aimed to diminish portal hypertension and treat biliary strictures are available. In order to decompress PC, surgical porto-systemic shunt or transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt can be performed, and treatment on the biliary stenosis includes endoscopic (Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with endoscopic sphincterotomy, balloon dilation, stone extraction, stent placement) and surgical (bilioenteric anastomosis, cholecystectomy) approaches. Definitive treatment of PB often requires multiple and combined interventions both on vascular and biliary system. Liver transplantation can be considered in patients with secondary biliary cirrhosis, recurrent cholangitis or unsuccessful control of portal hypertension.

  7. Portal hypertensive biliopathy: A single center experience and literature review.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Vanessa; Puerta, Andrés; Santos, Luisa Fernanda; Pérez, Juan Manuel; Varón, Adriana; Botero, Rafael Claudino

    2013-03-27

    Portal hypertensive biliopathy (PHB) is characterized by anatomical and functional abnormalities of the intrahepatic, extrahepatic and pancreatic ducts, in patients with portal hypertension associated to extrahepatic portal vein obstruction and less frequently to cirrhosis. These morphological changes, consisting in dilatation and stenosis of the biliary tree, are due to extensive venous collaterals occurring in an attempt to decompress the portal venous blockage. It is usually asymptomatic until it progresses to more advanced stages with cholestasis, jaundice, biliary sludge, gallstones, cholangitis and finally biliary cirrhosis. Imaging modalities of the biliary tree such as Doppler ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are essential to establish the diagnosis and the need of therapeutical interventions. Once the diagnosis is established, treatment with ursodesoxycholic acid seems to be beneficial. Decompression of the biliary tree to dilate, remove stones or implant biliary prosthesis by endoscopic or surgical procedures (hepato-yeyunostomy) usually resolves the cholestatic picture and prevents septic complications. The ideal treatment is the decompression of the portal system, with transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt or a surgical porto-systemic shunt. Unfortunately, few patients will be candidates for these procedures due to the extension of the thrombotic process. The purpose of this paper is to report the first 3 cases of PHB seen in a Colombian center and to review the literature.

  8. Therapeutic approaches for portal biliopathy: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Franceschet, Irene; Zanetto, Alberto; Ferrarese, Alberto; Burra, Patrizia; Senzolo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy (PB) is defined as the presence of biliary abnormalities in patients with non-cirrhotic/non-neoplastic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) and portal cavernoma (PC). The pathogenesis of PB is due to ab extrinseco compression of bile ducts by PC and/or to ischemic damage secondary to an altered biliary vascularization in EHPVO and PC. Although asymptomatic biliary abnormalities can be frequently seen by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in patients with PC (77%-100%), only a part of these (5%-38%) are symptomatic. Clinical presentation includes jaundice, cholangitis, cholecystitis, abdominal pain, and cholelithiasis. In this subset of patients is required a specific treatment. Different therapeutic approaches aimed to diminish portal hypertension and treat biliary strictures are available. In order to decompress PC, surgical porto-systemic shunt or transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt can be performed, and treatment on the biliary stenosis includes endoscopic (Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with endoscopic sphincterotomy, balloon dilation, stone extraction, stent placement) and surgical (bilioenteric anastomosis, cholecystectomy) approaches. Definitive treatment of PB often requires multiple and combined interventions both on vascular and biliary system. Liver transplantation can be considered in patients with secondary biliary cirrhosis, recurrent cholangitis or unsuccessful control of portal hypertension. PMID:28018098

  9. How Are Varicose Veins Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... injected into your veins. The dye outlines your veins on x-ray images. An angiogram can help your doctor confirm whether you have varicose veins or another condition. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: ...

  10. Renal transplantation with venous drainage through the superior mesenteric vein in cases of thrombosis of the inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Aguirrezabalaga, Javier; Novas, Serafín; Veiga, Francisco; Chantada, Venancio; Rey, Ignacio; Gonzalez, Marcelino; Gomez, Manuel

    2002-08-15

    Renal transplantation usually is performed by placing the graft in the iliac fossa, anastomosing the renal vein to the iliac vein or, when this is not possible, to the vena cava. When vascular complications occur, particularly on the venous side, the position of the graft may have to be changed. This report describes orthotopic renal grafts and positioning of the organ with anastomosis to the splenic vessels. Venous drainage was established directly into the mesenteric-portal territory, with two cases to the portal vein and one to the inferior mesenteric vein. A new technique for the venous drainage of the renal graft is shown. We have used this model in two cases of infrarenal inferior vena cava thrombosis. The kidney was located in a retroperitoneal position, with venous drainage to the superior mesenteric vein through an orifice in the posterior peritoneum.

  11. Ten Keys to the Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2011-01-01

    Successful web portals help users stay informed, in touch, and up to speed. They are also a telling window into the efficiency of one's institution. To develop a cutting-edge portal takes planning, communication, and research. In this article, the author presents and discusses 10 keys to portal success: (1) make critical info visible; (2) make the…

  12. Bilateral Emphysematous Pyelonephritis with Hepatic Portal Venous Gas: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mao Li; Nording, Hasnizal; Lim, Chen Hong

    2015-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis is a rare life-threatening condition caused by a severe acute necrotising infection of the renal parenchyma and its perinephric tissues, and it is commonly seen in diabetic patients. There is a rare association between emphysematous pyelonephritis and hepatic portal venous gas. Hepatic portal venous gas is an uncommon radiological finding, which implies a significant underlying abdominal disease. The management of emphysematous pyelonephritis has evolved from prompt nephrectomy to medical therapy. In the present report, we present a case of a diabetic woman diagnosed with bilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis with hepatic portal venous gas that was successfully managed medically despite the presence of poor prognostic factors, such as acute renal failure and thrombocytopenia.

  13. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous portal transplantation of peripheral blood monocytes in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Su Jong; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Won; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Yun Bin; Cho, Yuri; Lee, Dong Hyeon; Lee, Minjong; Yoo, Jeong-Ju; Cho, Eun Ju; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Yoon Jun; Kim, Chung Yong

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Liver transplantation offers the only definite cure for cirrhosis but lacking donors is problem. Stem cell therapy is attractive in this setting. In this study, we aimed to explore the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous portal transplantation of peripheral blood monocyte cell (PBMC) in cirrhotic patients. Methods A total of nine decompensated cirrhotic patients were randomized into three groups: group 1 (n = 3) was control group, group 2 (n = 3) received granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilization for 3 days, and group 3 (n = 3) received G-CSF mobilized PBMCs by leukapheresis and PBMC transplantation through ultrasound-guided percutaneous portal vein puncture. Liver function and clinical features were evaluated. Results At baseline, the Child-Turcotte-Pugh and the model for end-stage liver disease scores were comparable in study groups. Compared with group 1, there was a tendency to improve liver function in group 3 at 6 months after treatment. Treatment was tolerable and no complications were encountered related to the G-CSF mobilization or percutaneous portal administration of PBMCs. Imaging studies showed patent portal veins at the end of the study period. Conclusions Autologous PBMC transplantation through ultrasound-guided percutaneous portal vein puncture could be considered as a safe alternative treatment for decompensated cirrhotic patients. PMID:27044856

  14. [Portal hypertension in children. Follow-up after portal systemic shunts (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bernard, O; Alvarez, F; Alagille, D

    1982-01-01

    The retrospective study of 115 children in whom a successful portosystemic shunt was carried out for portal hypertension, provides the following conclusions: 1) Patency of the shunt must be checked by esophageal endoscopy, six months postoperatively. A patent shunt can be expected when the size of the spleen and/or thrombocytopenia improve in the early post-operative period. Early ultrasound examination is also very useful in that respect. 2) None of the children with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction or congenital hepatic fibrosis presented with clinical signs of portal systemic encephalopathy (PSE). 3) Eight of 30 children with cirrhosis presented with one or more clinical episodes of PSE. Some were transient allowing for a normal diet to be resumed later on. 4) It is thus advisable to give children with cirrhosis a low protein diet in the months after surgery. Protein content of the diet can usually be increased progressively over a period of one to two years. 5) Whenever splenectomy is necessary, it is mandatory to prevent pneumococcal infections with the pneumococcal vaccine and daily treatment with oral penicillin.

  15. Metadata requirements for portals.

    PubMed

    Benson, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Consensus around the requirements for metadata in patient and clinical portals would provide a sound basis for the adoption of standards. We propose a set of requirements for metadata in a way that is generic and platform independent. These requirements cover both Clinical Documents and Clinical Statements, addressing the what, who, when and where of each item.

  16. Earthdata Developer Portal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plofchan, Peter; Reese, Mark; Siarto, Jeff; Clark, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    The Earthdata Developer Portal provides clear paths to get you started with core EOSDIS applications. Each path is accompanied by an overview page that explains the goal of the path and a short overview of each element along with links for detailed documentation of each component.

  17. Total portal robotic pneumonectomy.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jose R

    2013-09-01

    Robotic pulmonary lobectomies have been reported to be technically and oncologically achievable; however, only three robotic pneumonectomy cases have been described. Two of them used a mini thoracotomy. We describe one case of a total portal robotic pneumonectomy without utility incision. We describe the step-by-step process.

  18. [Deep vein thrombosis revealing myeloproliferative syndrome in two adolescents].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, A; Heissat, S; Caron, N; Viremouneix, L; Pracros, J-P; Javouhey, E; Lachaux, A; Mialou, V

    2014-05-01

    Deep vein thrombosis occurs in 30% of patients with essential thrombocythemia, but rarely at initial diagnosis. We report two pediatric patients with essential thrombocythemia revealed by atypical deep vein thrombosis. First, a 16-year-old girl presented Budd-Chiari syndrome revealed by a hemorrhagic shock. Clinical exam revealed isolated splenomegaly. A search for thrombophilia found a factor V Leiden homozygous mutation and a Jak2 mutation. Bone marrow biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of a myeloproliferative disorder. The second case, a 17-year-old girl, had a routine examination by her physician that revealed splenomegaly. Ultrasonography displayed thrombus in the splenic and portal vein. An isolated Jak2 mutation was found and a myeloproliferative disorder was confirmed by bone marrow biopsy. The diagnosis of myeloproliferative disorder was made in both patients presenting atypical venous thrombosis with a Jak2 mutation and confirmed by bone marrow biopsy. These initial presentations of myeloproliferative disorders are rare in childhood and possibly underdiagnosed.

  19. Management of acute variceal bleeding: emphasis on endoscopic therapy.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Andrés

    2010-05-01

    Acute variceal bleeding is one of the most serious and feared complications of patients with portal hypertension. The most common cause of portal hypertension is advanced liver disease. Patients with esophageal and gastric varices may bleed because of a progressive increase in portal pressure that causes them to grow and finally rupture. This article will review the current management strategies for acute variceal bleeding with emphasis on endoscopic therapy for the acute episode.

  20. Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... helps reduce the chances that your blood will pool and clot. You should wear these stockings during ... Make lifestyle changes. Lose weight and quit smoking. Obesity and smoking increase your risk of deep vein ...

  1. What Are Varicose Veins?

    MedlinePlus

    ... family history, older age, gender, pregnancy, overweight or obesity , lack of movement, and leg trauma. Varicose veins are treated with lifestyle changes and medical procedures. The goals of treatment ...

  2. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-01-01

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed. PMID:26730278

  3. Portal copper transport in rats by albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, D.T.; Leinart, A.S.; Cousins, R.J.

    1987-03-01

    The distribution of newly absorbed copper among serum proteins obtained from the portal circulation of rats was examined by conventional and high-performance gel filtration chromatography, affinity chromatography, and Western blotting. Within 10-30 min after being administered by gavage or directly into the intestine, /sup 67/Cu and /sup 64/Cu, respectively, were recovered in the albumin fraction. By 8 h after administration of the radionuclides, virtually all of the radioactivity was found with ceruloplasmin. Affigel blue fractionation and subsequent Superose-6 chromatography further demonstrated that all of the copper in the albumin-containing fractions was in fact bound to this protein rather than high molecular weight moieties. Vascular perfusion of the isolated rat intestine, where /sup 64/Cu was infused into the lumen, showed that newly absorbed /sup 64/Cu in the vascular perfusate collected from the cannulated portal vein was associated with albumin. Uptake of radioactivity by isolated rat liver parenchymal cells from medium containing rat serum with /sup 67/Cu bound to albumin was demonstrated. In vitro binding of /sup 64/Cu to serum proteins that were transferred to nitrocellulose by Western blotting techniques showed that albumin is essentially the only protein that binds appreciable amounts of copper. The data suggest that albumin is the plasma protein that is responsible for the initial transport of copper after absorption.

  4. IVC agenesis: a rare cause of deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Man, Louise; Hendricks, Nicholas; Maitland, Hillary

    2016-04-01

    We present the case of a healthy, young Caucasian female who presented to an outside hospital with phlegmasia cerulea dolens of both lower extremities. Computed tomography angiography revealed inferior vena cava (IVC) occlusion. She was initiated on heparin infusion and transferred to University of Virginia Medical Center. Our evaluation revealed aplasia of the IVC from the infrahepatic segment to the confluence of the common iliac veins and acute bilateral iliac vein thromboses. An extensive network of collateral veins was noted. These findings were consistent with IVC agenesis. She was not pregnant or using contraception. Primary thrombophilia workup was negative. She underwent bilateral iliac vein thrombolysis and was started on anticoagulation. While IVC agenesis is rare, it carries risk for development of thrombotic sequelae and bears consideration when evaluating young patients with unexplained deep vein thrombosis, especially if extensive and bilateral.

  5. CCI Open Data Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, H.; Pechorro, E.; Bennett, V.; Farquhar, C.; Blower, J.

    2016-08-01

    The European Space Agency's (ESA's) Climate Change Initiative (CCI) Programme, producing harmonised datasets from long term Earth Observation satellite data records for a number of Essential Climate Variables (ECV's), provides a solid basis for climate science and modelling, for specialist application development and ultimately for European and global policy making.The resulting Climate Data Records (CDRs) represent a major investment of science, funding and personal effort, therefore extended access to those products is a key element of programme success.ECV datasets are currently being distributed through individual ECV teams, and access procedures and interfaces vary. To compliment and unify the work of the individual teams and to maximise the visibility and uptake of ECV data in the climate data user community within and beyond the CCI, a new ESA CCI project has started, to create a central open data portal and metadata catalogue for the ESA CCI project.This paper highlights key features of the Portal to date.

  6. 29 CFR 785.24 - Principles noted in Portal-to-Portal Bulletin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Principles noted in Portal-to-Portal Bulletin. 785.24... of Principles Preparatory and Concluding Activities § 785.24 Principles noted in Portal-to-Portal Bulletin. In November, 1947, the Administrator issued the Portal-to-Portal Bulletin (part 790 of...

  7. USGS Urban Waters Portal Overview

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation discusses urbanization and water quality trends, major stories on contaminants and biota, scientific and educational tools for watershed organizations, and the USGS Urban Waters Portal.

  8. Portal venous gas following chemotherapy for colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zalinski, S; Scatton, O; Jacqmin, S; Tacher, V; Brézault, C; Soubrane, O

    2009-05-01

    The standard of care for patients with colorectal liver metastases is a combination of chemotherapy and surgery. New chemotherapy regimens with biologic agents (cetuximab, bevacizumab) have been shown to increase tumor response rates. Although this might be beneficial and this is an expected endpoint, it should be noted that patients with synchronous colorectal and liver metastases are at risk of septic complications. We recently encountered a case of hepatic portal venous gas after two cycles of chemotherapy in a patient with right colon cancer liver metastases. Complete necrosis of the liver metastasis subsequently turned into a liver abscess, which fistulized in the right portal vein. Infection of the necrotized metastasis was thought to be promoted by the colic tumor. Although this is a dramatic situation, it does not contraindicate a curative surgical resection.

  9. Pelvic Vein Embolisation in the Management of Varicose Veins

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnam, Lakshmi A.; Marsh, Petra; Holdstock, Judy M.; Harrison, Charmaine S.; Hussain, Fuad F.; Whiteley, Mark S.; Lopez, Anthony

    2008-11-15

    Pelvic vein incompetence is common in patients with atypical varicose veins, contributing to their recurrence after surgery. Therefore, refluxing pelvic veins should be identified and treated. We present our experience with pelvic vein embolisation in patients presenting with varicose veins. Patients presenting with varicose veins with a duplex-proven contribution from perivulval veins undergo transvaginal duplex sonography (TVUS) to identify refluxing pelvic veins. Those with positive scans undergo embolisation before surgical treatment of their lower limb varicose veins. A total of 218 women (mean age of 46.3 years) were treated. Parity was documented in the first 60 patients, of whom 47 (78.3%) were multiparous, 11 (18.3%) had had one previous pregnancy, and 2 (3.3%) were nulliparous. The left ovarian vein was embolised in 78%, the right internal iliac in 64.7%, the left internal iliac in 56.4%, and the right ovarian vein in 42.2% of patients. At follow-up TVUS, mild reflux only was seen in 16, marked persistent reflux in 6, and new reflux in 3 patients. These 9 women underwent successful repeat embolisation. Two patients experienced pulmonary embolisation of the coils, of whom 1 was asymptomatic and 1 was successfully retrieved; 1 patient had a misplaced coil protruding into the common femoral vein; and 1 patient had perineal thrombophlebitis. The results of our study showed that pelvic venous embolisation by way of a transjugular approach is a safe and effective technique in the treatment of pelvic vein reflux.

  10. 8. Detail, skewed portal bracing at west portal, also showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail, skewed portal bracing at west portal, also showing boxed endposts, latticed upper transverse and diagonal sway bracing, laced vertical members, view to northeast, 210mm lens. - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 301.85, Milepost 301.85, Pollard Flat, Shasta County, CA

  11. Formation of Collateral Veins in a Graft Pancreas After a Simultaneous Pancreas and Kidney Transplantation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Choi, B H; Lee, H Y; Park, Y M; Yang, K H; Ryu, J H; Chu, C W

    2015-09-01

    A graft vein thrombosis is the main cause of early graft failure after pancreas transplantation. We report a case of formation of collateral veins in a graft pancreas after transplant. A 30-year-old woman underwent simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation. She was discharged 16 days after the operation with good pancreas and kidney function. A total occlusion of the portal vein was discovered on computed tomography (CT) performed at an outpatient clinic. She had no symptoms or signs of hyperglycemia. Venography was attempted for vein thrombectomy but failed. After 2 weeks of heparinization therapy, the edema disappeared and perfusion of the graft pancreas improved. However, the thrombotic occlusion was not resolved on CT. Arteriography of the Y-graft revealed collateral veins. She was discharged with warfarin. She is currently doing well without any symptoms or signs. This is the first reported case of collateral vein formation in a grafted pancreas after pancreas transplantation.

  12. Interrelationship between insulin resistance and portal haemodynamic abnormality in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Kazufumi; Kiyono, Soichiro; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Background: There are only limited data regarding the effect of impaired portal circulation on the glucose metabolism. The study prospectively examined the interrelationship between insulin resistance (IR) and portal haemodynamic abnormality in cirrhosis. Methods: There were 53 cirrhosis patients (61.6 ± 13.0 years) all presenting gastroesophageal varices. Portal haemodynamics by both hepatic venous catheterisation and Doppler ultrasound were examined with respect to the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-IR and HOMA2-IR. The IR was defined by HOMA-IR > 3.0 or HOMA2-IR > 2.0. Results: Forty-two patients (79.2%) had collateral vessels, 38 with left gastric vein, 12 with short/posterior gastric vein, 9 with splenorenal shunt, and 3 with inferior mesenteric vein. Multivariate analysis provided significant factors; wedged hepatic venous pressure (HR1.183, 95% CI 1.012-1.383, p=0.035) for HOMA-IR > 3.0, body mass index for HOMA2-IR > 2.0 (HR1.490, 95% CI 1.176-1.888, p=0.001), and collateral flow volume for both HOMA-IR > 3.0 (HR1.007, 95% CI 1.001-1.014, p=0.015) and HOMA2-IR > 2.0 (HR 1.007, 95% CI 1.002-1.013, p=0.009). The best cut-off value of collateral flow volume was 165 ml/min for detecting the HOMA-IR > 3.0 showing area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) 0.688 (Odds ratio, 5.33) with sensitivity 70% and specificity 69.6%, and was 165 ml/min for detecting median value of HOMA2-IR > 2.0 showing AUROC 0.698 (odds ratio, 5.7) with sensitivity 75% and specificity 65.5%. Conclusion: There is a close linkage between the IR and impaired portal haemodynamics presented by the collateral development, suggesting the underlying pathogenesis of portal hypertension in cirrhosis patients. PMID:28367084

  13. Portal venous thrombosis developing after torsion of a wandering spleen.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ö; Kiziltan, R; Almali, N; Aras, A

    2017-03-01

    Torsion of a wandering spleen is a rare disease. The symptoms and signs of this condition are only present when the splenic pedicle torts. The etiological factors are the congenital absence of the ligaments that hold the spleen in its normal anatomic position, or the relaxation of these ligaments resulting from conditions like trauma and abdominal surgery. We aimed to present a rare case with torsion of wandering spleen that consequently developed thrombosis of portal vein and its branches, taking into consideration the relevant literature.

  14. Renal vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys. Possible Complications Complications may include: Acute renal failure (especially if thrombosis occurs in a dehydrated child) ... Saunders; 2012:chap 34. Read More Acute kidney failure Arteriogram Blood ... embolus Renal Tumor Review Date 5/19/2015 Updated by: ...

  15. Laparoscopic distal splenoadrenal shunt for the treatment of portal hypertension in children with congenital hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin-Shan; Cheng, Wei; Li, Long

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The distal splenorenal shunt is an effective procedure for the treatment of portal hypertension in children. However, there has been no report about laparoscopic distal splenorenal shunt in the treatment of portal hypertension in children. Methods: From December 2015 to August 2016, 4 children with upper gastrointestinal bleeding underwent laparoscopic distal splenoadrenal shunt. Portal hypertension and splenomegaly were demonstrated on the preoperative computed tomography (CT) and sonography. The distal splenic vein was mobilized and anastomosed to the left adrenal vein laparoscopically. All patients were followed-up postoperatively. Results: The laparoscopic distal splenoadrenal shunt was successfully performed in all patients. The liver fibrosis was diagnosed by postoperative liver pathology. The operative time ranged from 180 to 360 minutes. The blood loss was minimal. The length of hospital stay was 6 to 13 days. The duration of following-up was 1 to 9 months (median: 3 months). The portal pressure and splenic size were decreased postoperatively. The complete blood count normalized and the biochemistry tests were within normal range after surgery. Postoperative ultrasound and CT confirmed shunt patency and satisfactory flow in the splenoadrenal shunt in all patients. No patient developed recurrence of variceal bleeding. Conclusions: The laparoscopic splenoadrenal shunt is a feasible treatment of portal hypertension in children. PMID:28099341

  16. Facilitation of gastric motility induced by portal infusion of hyper- and hypotonic solution in rats.

    PubMed

    Kobashi, M; Mizutani, M; Adachi, A

    1998-11-10

    The effects of the portal infusion of hyper- and hypotonic solution on gastric motility in rats were investigated. The infusion of hypertonic saline into the portal vein (portal infusion) elicited a significant enhancement of gastric contractile activity. The portal infusion of water also produced this enhancement. However, the portal infusion of isotonic saline showed no significant enhancement; nor did the infusion of water and hypertonic saline into the jugular vein. Sectioning of the hepatic branch of the vagus nerve (hepatic vagus) eliminated the enhanced responses of the gastric motility. It is therefore concluded that hepatoportal osmoreceptive afferent signals affect the gastric motility by way of the hepatic vagus. These effects on osmolarity revealed that hypotonic stimulation is more effective than hypertonic stimulation for the enhancement of motility. Sectioning of the dorsal subdiaphragmatic vagus, which includes the dorsal gastric and celiac branch, did not eliminate these responses. Sectioning of the ventral gastric vagus, in contrast, did eliminate the responses. These results suggest that vagal preganglionic neurons in the left dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus play a role in enhancement of gastric motility observed in the present research.

  17. All Roads Lead to Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heid, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    Portals are taking off on campuses nationwide. According to "Campus Computing 2006," the Campus Computing Project's survey of 540 two- and four-year public and private colleges and universities across the US, portal deployment for four-year public residential universities jumped from 28 to 74 percent of responding institutions between the…

  18. NSTA Portal to Science Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The National Science Teachers Association's (NSTA) Science Safety Advisory Board recently launched the Safety in the Science Classroom portal. This portal serves as a gateway to safety resources for teachers, supervisors, and administrators. It also contains an evolving list of safety resources for elementary, middle, and high schools. The list…

  19. Of Portals, Policies, and Poets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunt, Rick; Pennock, Lea

    2006-01-01

    Universities are drawn to portals as an effective way of organizing and delivering campus services and information. In a university environment, where the desire for local autonomy and the impetus for centralization are in constant tension, a portal seems especially appealing because it allows local solutions through a shared medium. But the fact…

  20. The Power in the Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    Educational portals put together links to sites and resources educators would be interested in viewing. They eliminate the hours of searching that might be invested if typical search engines were used. Educational portals feature lessons, units, printable resources, creative ideas, and more. Many of these sites are free, while others are…

  1. [Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Chagoya, Gloria Alejandra; Laniado-Laborín, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background: despite the proven effectiveness of preventive therapy for deep vein thrombosis, a significant proportion of patients at risk for thromboembolism do not receive prophylaxis during hospitalization. Our objective was to determine the adherence to thrombosis prophylaxis guidelines in a general hospital as a quality control strategy. Methods: a random audit of clinical charts was conducted at the Tijuana General Hospital, Baja California, Mexico, to determine the degree of adherence to deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis guidelines. The instrument used was the Caprini's checklist for thrombosis risk assessment in adult patients. Results: the sample included 300 patient charts; 182 (60.7 %) were surgical patients and 118 were medical patients. Forty six patients (15.3 %) received deep vein thrombosis pharmacologic prophylaxis; 27.1 % of medical patients received deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis versus 8.3 % of surgical patients (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: our results show that adherence to DVT prophylaxis at our hospital is extremely low. Only 15.3 % of our patients at risk received treatment, and even patients with very high risk received treatment in less than 25 % of the cases. We have implemented strategies to increase compliance with clinical guidelines.

  2. [Puncture of the brachiocephalic vein].

    PubMed

    Schlarb, K

    1986-09-01

    A specific central vein catheter for puncture of the brachiocephalic vein has been developed which is provided with a valve by which air-embolism and unwanted bleeding from the catheter are eliminated. Typical and often serious complications, which can develop on insertion of central vein catheter, can nearly be totally avoided by the puncture technique described.

  3. Proinflammatory Liver and Antiinflammatory Intestinal Mediators Involved in Portal Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Aller, Maria Angeles; Vara, Elena; Garcia, Cruz; Palma, Maria Dolores; Arias, Jorge L.; Nava, Maria Paz; Arias, Jaime

    2005-01-01

    Proinflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β, and NO) and antiinflammatory (IL-10, CO) levels were assayed in serum, liver, and small bowel in order to verify a hypothetic inflammatory etiopathogeny of portal hypertension that could be the cause of its evolutive heterogeneity. Male Wistar rats were divided into one control group (n = 11) and one group with a triple stenosing ligation of the portal vein (n = 23) after 28 days of evolution. In one subgroup of portal hypertensive rats, portal pressure, collateral venous circulation, mesenteric vasculopathy, and liver and spleen weights were determined. In the remaining rats with portal hypertension TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-10 were quantified in liver and ileum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NO synthase activity was studied in liver and ileum. CO and NO were measured in portal and systemic blood by spectrophotometry and Griess reaction, respectively. Portal hypertensive rats with mayor spleen weight show hepatomegaly and mayor development of collateral circulation. Ileum release of IL-10 (0.30 ± 0.12 versus 0.14 ± 0.02 pmol/mg protein; P < .01) is associated with a liver production of both proinflammatory mediators (TNF-α: 2 ± 0.21 versus 1.32 ± 0.60 pmol/mg protein; P < .05, IL-1β: 19.17 ± 2.87 versus 5.96 ± 1.84 pmol/mg protein; P = .005, and NO: 132.10 ± 34.72 versus 61.05 ± 8.30 nmol/mL; P = .005) and an antiinflammatory mediator (CO: 6.49 ± 2.99 versus 3.03 ± 1.59 pmol/mL; P = .005). In short-term prehepatic portal hypertension a gut-liver inflammatory loop, which could be fundamental in the regulation both of the portal pressure and of its complications, could be proposed. PMID:16030393

  4. 29 CFR 785.34 - Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. 785.34 Section 785.34 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... of Principles Traveltime § 785.34 Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. The Portal...

  5. 29 CFR 785.34 - Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. 785.34 Section 785.34 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... of Principles Traveltime § 785.34 Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. The Portal...

  6. The Portuguese Climate Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Sandra; Deus, Ricardo; Nogueira, Miguel; Viterbo, Pedro; Miranda, Miguel; Antunes, Sílvia; Silva, Alvaro; Miranda, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    The Portuguese Local Warming Website (http://portaldoclima.pt) has been developed in order to support the society in Portugal in preparing for the adaptation to the ongoing and future effects of climate change. The climate portal provides systematic and easy access to authoritative scientific data ready to be used by a vast and diverse user community from different public and private sectors, key players and decision makers, but also to high school students, contributing to the increase in knowledge and awareness on climate change topics. A comprehensive set of regional climate variables and indicators are computed, explained and graphically presented. Variables and indicators were built in agreement with identified needs after consultation of the relevant social partners from different sectors, including agriculture, water resources, health, environment and energy and also in direct cooperation with the Portuguese National Strategy for Climate Change Adaptation (ENAAC) group. The visual interface allows the user to dynamically interact, explore, quickly analyze and compare, but also to download and import the data and graphics. The climate variables and indicators are computed from state-of-the-art regional climate model (RCM) simulations (e.g., CORDEX project), at high space-temporal detail, allowing to push the limits of the projections down to local administrative regions (NUTS3) and monthly or seasonal periods, promoting local adaptation strategies. The portal provides both historical data (observed and modelled for the 1971-2000 period) and future climate projections for different scenarios (modelled for the 2011-2100 period). A large effort was undertaken in order to quantify the impacts of the risk of extreme events, such as heavy rain and flooding, droughts, heat and cold waves, and fires. Furthermore the different climate scenarios and the ensemble of RCM models, with high temporal (daily) and spatial (~11km) detail, is taken advantage in order to

  7. Ovarian vein thrombosis in Behçet disease.

    PubMed

    Tan, Justina Wei Lynn; Howe, Hwee Siew; Chng, Hiok Hee

    2012-03-01

    We describe a 35-year-old Chinese woman with Behçet disease complicated by recurrent gastrointestinal flares. During admission for acute lower abdominal pain, a computed tomographic scan of the abdomen showed thrombosis of the left ovarian vein. She was treated with increased immunosuppressant and oral anticoagulant. Although she was not compliant to oral anticoagulant with her international normalized ratio frequently subtherapeutic, her symptoms abated and the thrombosis resolved. There has been only 1 reported case of a patient with Behçet disease presenting with postpartum ovarian vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism and no reported case of Behçet disease with ovarian vein thrombosis occurring outside pregnancy and the puerperium. Ovarian vein thrombosis is a rare cause of abdominal pain that should be considered in patients with Behçet disease.

  8. The Higgs Portal and Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Assamagan, Ketevi; Chien-Yi Chen; Chou, John Paul; Curtin, David; Fedderke, Michael A.; Gershtein, Yuri; He, Xiao-Gang; Klute, Markus; Kozaczuk, Jonathon; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Lowette, Steven; No, Jose Miguel; Plehn, Tilman; Qian, Jianming; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael; Safonov, Alexei; Shelton, Jessie; Spannowsky, Michael; Su, Shufang; Walker, Devin G. E.; Willocq, Stephane; Winslow, Peter

    2016-04-18

    Higgs portal interactions provide a simple mechanism for addressing two open problems in cosmology: dark matter and the baryon asymmetry. In the latter instance, Higgs portal interactions may contain the ingredients for a strong first-order electroweak phase transition as well as new CP-violating interactions as needed for electroweak baryogenesis. These interactions may also allow for a viable dark matter candidate. We survey the opportunities for probing the Higgs portal as it relates to these questions in cosmology at the LHC and possible future colliders.

  9. The NUCLEONICA Nuclear Science Portal

    SciTech Connect

    Magill, Joseph; Dreher, Raymond

    2009-08-19

    NUCLEONICA (www.nucleonica.net) is a new nuclear science web portal which provides a customisable, integrated environment and collaboration platform using the latest internet 'Web 2.0' technology. NUCLEONICA is aimed at professionals, academics and students working in nuclear power, health physics and radiation protection, nuclear and radio-chemistry, and astrophysics. A unique feature of the portal is the wide range of user friendly web-based nuclear science applications. The portal is also ideal for education and training purposes and as a knowledge management platform to preserve nuclear knowledge built up over many decades.

  10. Portal hypertensive gastropathy with a focus on management.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Patrick; Ali, Rabia; Poles, Michael; Gross, Seth A

    2015-01-01

    Portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) is a painless condition of gastric mucosal ectasia and impaired mucosal defense, commonly seen in patients with elevated portal pressures. While it is typically asymptomatic and incidentally discovered on upper endoscopy, acute and chronic bleeding may occur. There are no definitive recommendations for treatment of asymptomatic PHG. Non-selective β-blockers represent the mainstay of therapy for chronic bleeding, while somatostatin and vasopressin and their derivatives may be used in conjunction with supportive measures for acute bleeding. Salvage therapy with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt or rarely surgical shunt is appropriate when medical management fails. The role of endoscopic therapy for PHG is controversial. Liver transplantation should be considered as a final resort in cases of refractory bleeding due to PHG.

  11. Multimodality imaging of obliterative portal venopathy: what every radiologist should know.

    PubMed

    Arora, A; Sarin, S K

    2015-02-01

    Obliterative portal venopathy (OPV) is an important cause of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension, which is often erroneously misdiagnosed as cryptogenic cirrhosis. It has a worldwide distribution with majority of cases hailing from the Asian subcontinent. However, recently the disease has gained global attention particularly because of its association with human immunodeficiency virus infection and use of antiretroviral drug therapy (didanosine). As the name suggests, the disorder is characterized by sclerosis and obliteration of the intrahepatic portal vein branches (with attendant periportal fibrosis) leading to portal hypertension amid intriguingly little liver dysfunction. It primarily affects young adults who present with clinically significant portal hypertension in the form of episodes of variceal bleed; however, contrasting liver cirrhosis, the liver function and liver structure remain normal or near normal until late in the disease process. Radiological findings during advanced disease are often indistinguishable from cirrhosis often warranting a liver biopsy. Nevertheless, recent studies have suggested that certain imaging manifestations, if present, can help us to prospectively suggest the possibility of OPV. At imaging, OPV is characterized by a wide range of intrahepatic and/or extrahepatic portal venous abnormalities with attendant changes in liver and splenic volume and stiffness. We shall, through this pictorial review, appraise the literature and illustrate the germane radiological manifestations of OPV that can be seen using different imaging modalities including ultrasonography, CT, MRI, elastography and hepatic haemodynamic studies.

  12. Adaptation of the Main Peripheral Artery and Vein to Long Term Confinement (MARS 500)

    PubMed Central

    Arbeille, Philippe; Provost, Romain; Vincent, Nicole; Aubert, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The objective was to check if 520 days in confinement (MARS 500), may affect the main peripheral arterial diameter and wall thickness and the main vein size. Method Common carotid (CC) femoral artery (FA) portal vein (PV), jugular (JG), femoral vein (FV) and tibial vein were assessed during MARS 500 by echography, performed by the subjects. A hand free volumic echographic capture method and a delayed 3D reconstruction software developed by our lab were used for collecting and measuring the vascular parameters. Results During the MARS 500 experiment the subjects performed 6 sessions among which 80% of the echographic data were of sufficient quality to be processed. No significant change was found for the Common carotid, Jugular vein, femoral artery, femoral vein, portal vein, and tibial vein diameter. CC and FA IMT (intima media thickness) were found significantly increased (14% to 28% P<0.05) in all the 6 subjects, during the confinement period and also at +2 days after the confinement period, but there was no significant difference 6 month later compare to pre MARS 500. Conclusion The experiment confirmed that even untrained to performing echography the subjects were able to capture enough echographic data to reconstruct the vessel image from which the parameters were measured. The increase in both CC and FA IMT should be in relation with the stress generated by the confined environment or absence of solar radiation, as there was no change in gravity, temperature and air in the MARS 500 module, and minor changes in physical exercise and nutrition. PMID:24475025

  13. Hidden Magnetic Portals Around Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    A NASA-sponsored researcher at the University of Iowa has developed a way for spacecraft to hunt down hidden magnetic portals in the vicinity of Earth. These gateways link the magnetic field of our...

  14. The EarthScope Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baru, C.; Ahern, T.; Anderson, G.; Behrends, K.; Casey, R.; Hoyt, B.; Kamb, L.; Lin, K.; Meertens, C.; Memon, A.; Muench, J.; Stolte, C.; Weertman, B.; Weiland, C.

    2007-12-01

    The EarthScope Portal is being developed in order to provide a unified, single-point of access to EarthScope data products from USArray, PBO, and SAFOD experiments. The portal will feature basic search and data access capabilities to allow users to discover and access EarthScope data using spatial, temporal, and other metadata- based search conditions. In this presentation, we will describe the features and design of the portal, which is being developed by a team consisting of GEON (Geosciences Network, http://www.geongrid.org), IRIS, UNAVCO, and Stanford. The portal search module invokes Web services developed by IRIS, UNAVCO, and Stanford to search for EarthScope data in the archives at each of these locations. The Web services provide information about all resources (data) that match the specified search conditions. Users will be able to select from the returned data sets, add selected data to a "data cart", and request the selected data to be packaged for download to the user. The initial services being defined are for "station discovery", to find which stations are available for specified spatial and temporal bounds, and "data discovery", to find the data sets that are available from the stations. Users will subsequently be able to choose the specific datasets, which will be assembled in a user "workspace" and available for download. The EarthScope Portal leverages the significant portal development efforts of the GEON Project at the San Diego Supercomputer Center, SDSC (http://portal.geongrid.org), and the development of Web services interfaces at the three data archive facilities. The portal is implemented using the open source GridSphere portal software infrastructure which supports the well-known Java portlet interface, viz. JSR 168 or the Portlet API. It uses a set of "core" portlets that have been developed in GEON for Data Registration, Search, and Workspace Services. We will provide a report on the current state of development of the Portal. A

  15. Gaiaverse: the Gaia's outreach portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masana, E.

    2017-03-01

    Gaiaverse (http://gaiaverse.eu) is a dissemination portal on the ESA Gaia's mission developed within the GENIUS project, an European project funded by the European Commission to boost the impact of the next European breakthrough in astrophysics, the Gaia astrometric mission. The portal was opened in July 2015. Gaiaverse is administrated by the Universitat de Barcelona (UB) and the Consorci de Serveis Universitaris de Catalunya (CSUC).

  16. Portal annular pancreas: a systematic review of a clinical challenge.

    PubMed

    Harnoss, Jonathan M; Harnoss, Julian C; Diener, Markus K; Contin, Pietro; Ulrich, Alexis B; Büchler, Markus W; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Friedrich H

    2014-10-01

    Portal annular pancreas (PAP) is an asymptomatic congenital pancreas anomaly, in which portal and/or mesenteric veins are encased by pancreas tissue. The aim of the study was to determine the role of PAP in pancreatic surgery as well as its management and potential complication, specifically, postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF).On the basis of a case report, the MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science databases were systematically reviewed up to September 2012. All articles describing a case of PAP were considered.In summary, 21 studies with 59 cases were included. The overall prevalence of PAP was 2.4% and the patients' mean (SD) age was 55.9 (16.2) years. The POPF rate in patients with PAP (12 pancreaticoduodenectomies and 3 distal pancreatectomies) was 46.7% (in accordance with the definition of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery).Portal annular pancreas is a quite unattended pancreatic variant with high prevalence and therefore still remains a clinical challenge to avoid postoperative complications. To decrease the risk for POPF, attentive preoperative diagnostics should also focus on PAP. In pancreaticoduodenectomy, a shift of the resection plane to the pancreas tail should be considered; in extensive pancreatectomy, coverage of the pancreatic remnant by the falciform ligament could be a treatment option.

  17. [Evaluation of portal circulation in healthy subjects with duplex scanning before and after meal].

    PubMed

    Kuntsevich, G I; Belolapotko, E A; Kokova, N I

    1994-01-01

    Duplex scanning was used to functionally assess the arterial and venous vascular bed in the portal circulatory system in 11 healthy persons aged 17 to 22 years before and after taking the food containing normal levels of calories. A circulatory response was studied in the celiac trunk, superior mesenteric artery, splenic and portal veins. The normal values of the diameter, linear and volumetric blood flow velocities of the vessels under study were defined. There was their increased velocity of arterial and venous flows. A nevous response to a meal was ahead of an arterial one and the increase in blood flow in the celiac trunk occurred more rapidly than in the superior mesenteric artery. It is concluded that duplex scanning is an informative and reliable tool in the study of blood flow in the portal circulatory system.

  18. Nodular transformation of the liver associated with portal and pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Portmann, B; Stewart, S; Higenbottam, T W; Clayton, P T; Lloyd, J K; Williams, R

    1993-02-01

    A case of multiple focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) of the liver associated with noncirrhotic portal hypertension and later complicated by pulmonary arterial hypertension leading to death from right heart failure is reported. In retrospect, the portal hypertension diagnosed in early life was most likely due to a congenital hypoplasia of portal vein branches and multiple FNH, a hyperplastic response of the liver parenchyma in association with anomalies of hepatic arterial branches as found within the lesions. This case may represent a form of multiple FNH syndrome restricted to the liver, because neither extrahepatic vascular malformation nor brain tumor was identified at autopsy. The FNH lesions had considerably expanded over the years, and the severe sinusoidal congestion due to chronic right-sided heart failure with subsequent prolonged parenchymal exposure to blood-borne hepatotrophic factors is a likely explanation for both the massive enlargement of FNH lesions and the nodular regenerative hyperplasia observed in the intervening parenchyma.

  19. Isolation and characterization of portal branch ligation-stimulated Hmga2-positive bipotent hepatic progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Hiroshi; Tagawa, Yoh-ichi; Tamai, Miho; Motoyama, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Shinichiro; Soeda, Junpei; Nakata, Takenari; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Hepatic progenitor cells were isolated from the portal branch-ligated liver of mice. {yields} Portal branch ligation-stimulated hepatic progenitor cells (PBLHCs) express Hmga2. {yields} PBLHCs have bidirectional differentiation capability in vitro. -- Abstract: Hepatic stem/progenitor cells are one of several cell sources that show promise for restoration of liver mass and function. Although hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), including oval cells, are induced by administration of certain hepatotoxins in experimental animals, such a strategy would be inappropriate in a clinical setting. Here, we investigated the possibility of isolating HPCs in a portal branch-ligated liver model without administration of any chemical agents. A non-parenchymal cell fraction was prepared from the portal branch-ligated or non-ligated lobe, and seeded onto plates coated with laminin. Most of the cells died, but a small number were able to proliferate. These proliferating cells were cloned as portal branch ligation-stimulated hepatic cells (PBLHCs) by the limiting dilution method. The PBLHCs expressed cytokeratin19, albumin, and Hmga2. The PBLHCs exhibited metabolic functions such as detoxification of ammonium ions and synthesis of urea on Matrigel-coated plates in the presence of oncostatin M. In Matrigel mixed with type I collagen, the PBLHCs became rearranged into cystic and tubular structures. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated the presence of Hmga2-positive cells around the interlobular bile ducts in the portal branch-ligated liver lobes. In conclusion, successful isolation of bipotent hepatic progenitor cell clones, PBLHCs, from the portal branch-ligated liver lobes of mice provides the possibility of future clinical application of portal vein ligation to induce hepatic progenitor cells.

  20. Association of Oesophageal Varices and Splanchnic Vein Thromboses in Patients with JAK2-Positive Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Presentation of Two Cases and Data from a Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Link, Cornelia S.; Platzbecker, Uwe; Kroschinsky, Frank; Pannach, Sven; Thiede, Christian; Platzek, Ivan; Ehninger, Gerhard; Schuler, Markus K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oesophageal varices and gastrointestinal bleeding are common complications of liver cirrhosis. More rarely, oesophageal varices occur in patients with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension that results from thromboses of portal or splanchnic veins. Case Report We describe 2 young men who initially presented with varices as a result of portal vein thromboses. In the clinical follow-up, both were tested positive for a JAK2 mutation and consequently diagnosed with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). In an attempt to characterise the frequency of gastrointestinal complications in patients with JAK2-positive MPNs, we retrospectively analysed all known affected patients from our clinic for the diagnosis of portal vein thromboses and oesophageal varices. Strikingly, 48% of those who had received an oesophagogastroduodenoscopy had detectable oesophageal or gastric varices, and 82% of those suffered from portal or splanchnic vein thromboses. Conclusion While the association between JAK2, myeloproliferative disease and thrombotic events is well established, patients with idiopathic oesophageal varices are not regularly tested for JAK2 mutations. However, the occurrence of oesophageal varices may be the first presenting symptom of a MPN with a JAK2 mutation, and affected patients may profit from a close haematological monitoring to assure the early detection of developing MPN. PMID:23898274