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Sample records for acute psychiatric admissions

  1. Improving Awareness of an Acute Psychiatric Unit's Capacity for Admission.

    PubMed

    Benolkin, Lauren; Kinstler, Dan; Delaney, Kathleen R

    2015-08-01

    New admissions to psychiatric inpatient units can significantly impact the environment and level of safety. Maintaining safety is a core and critical responsibility of nursing, but nurses are often overlooked in the decision to admit a patient. Missed opportunities for dialogue between nurses and the admitting physician challenge nurses' ability to proactively manage the therapeutic environment. When nurses are limited in this ability, the outcome can be an unpredictable and unstable milieu. In a 25-bed acute psychiatric inpatient unit, a formalized communication system among the multidisciplinary admission team was developed. Data collected over 1 year demonstrated improved safety. Increasing the admitting provider's awareness of the current unit acuity and involving the nursing staff early in the admission process improved collaboration among care team members and reduced risks to maintaining milieu safety. PMID:26268479

  2. Day hospital versus admission for acute psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Max; Crowther, Ruth; Sledge, William Hurt; Rathbone, John; Soares-Weiser, Karla

    2014-01-01

    Background Inpatient treatment is an expensive way of caring for people with acute psychiatric disorders. It has been proposed that many of those currently treated as inpatients could be cared for in acute psychiatric day hospitals. Objectives To assess the effects of day hospital versus inpatient care for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (June 2010) which is based on regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO. We approached trialists to identify unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of day hospital versus inpatient care, for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Studies were ineligible if a majority of participants were under 18 or over 65, or had a primary diagnosis of substance abuse or organic brain disorder. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted and cross-checked data. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous data. We calculated weighted or standardised means for continuous data. Day hospital trials tend to present similar outcomes in slightly different formats, making it difficult to synthesise data. We therefore sought individual patient data so that we could re-analyse outcomes in a common format. Main results Ten trials (involving 2685 people) met the inclusion criteria. We obtained individual patient data for four trials (involving 646 people). We found no difference in the number lost to follow-up by one year between day hospital care and inpatient care (5 RCTs, n = 1694, RR 0.94 CI 0.82 to 1.08). There is moderate evidence that the duration of index admission is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (4 RCTs, n = 1582, WMD 27.47 CI 3.96 to 50.98). There is very low evidence that the duration of day patient care (adjusted days/month) is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (3 RCTs, n = 265, WMD 2.34 days

  3. The ecological relationship between deprivation, social isolation and rates of hospital admission for acute psychiatric care: a comparison of London and New York City.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Sarah; Copeland, Alison; Fagg, James; Congdon, Peter; Almog, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Justine

    2006-03-01

    We report on comparative analyses of small area variation in rates of acute hospital admissions for psychiatric conditions in Greater London around the year 1998 and in New York City (NYC) in 2000. Based on a theoretical model of the factors likely to influence psychiatric admission rates, and using data from the most recent population censuses and other sources, we examine the association with area indicators designed to measure access to hospital beds, socio-economic deprivation, social fragmentation and ethnic/racial composition. We report results on admissions for men and women aged 15-64 for all psychiatric conditions (excluding self-harm), drug-related substance abuse/addiction, schizophrenia and affective disorders. The units of analysis in NYC were 165 five-digit Zip Code Areas and, in London, 760 electoral wards as defined in 1998. The analysis controls for age and sex composition and, as a proxy for access to care, spatial proximity to hospitals with psychiatric beds. Poisson regression modeling incorporating random effects was used to control for both overdispersion in the counts of admissions and for the effects of spatial autocorrelation. The results for NYC and London showed that local admission rates for all types of condition were positively and significantly associated with deprivation and the association is independent of demographic composition or 'access' to beds. In NYC, social fragmentation showed a significant association with admissions due to affective disorders and schizophrenia, and for drug dependency among females. Racial minority concentration was significantly and positively associated with admissions for schizophrenia. In London, social fragmentation was associated positively with admissions for men and women due to schizophrenia and affective disorders. The variable measuring racial/ethnic minority concentration for London wards showed a negative association with admission rates for drug dependency and for affective disorders. We

  4. The ecological relationship between deprivation, social isolation and rates of hospital admission for acute psychiatric care: a comparison of London and New York City.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Sarah; Copeland, Alison; Fagg, James; Congdon, Peter; Almog, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Justine

    2006-03-01

    We report on comparative analyses of small area variation in rates of acute hospital admissions for psychiatric conditions in Greater London around the year 1998 and in New York City (NYC) in 2000. Based on a theoretical model of the factors likely to influence psychiatric admission rates, and using data from the most recent population censuses and other sources, we examine the association with area indicators designed to measure access to hospital beds, socio-economic deprivation, social fragmentation and ethnic/racial composition. We report results on admissions for men and women aged 15-64 for all psychiatric conditions (excluding self-harm), drug-related substance abuse/addiction, schizophrenia and affective disorders. The units of analysis in NYC were 165 five-digit Zip Code Areas and, in London, 760 electoral wards as defined in 1998. The analysis controls for age and sex composition and, as a proxy for access to care, spatial proximity to hospitals with psychiatric beds. Poisson regression modeling incorporating random effects was used to control for both overdispersion in the counts of admissions and for the effects of spatial autocorrelation. The results for NYC and London showed that local admission rates for all types of condition were positively and significantly associated with deprivation and the association is independent of demographic composition or 'access' to beds. In NYC, social fragmentation showed a significant association with admissions due to affective disorders and schizophrenia, and for drug dependency among females. Racial minority concentration was significantly and positively associated with admissions for schizophrenia. In London, social fragmentation was associated positively with admissions for men and women due to schizophrenia and affective disorders. The variable measuring racial/ethnic minority concentration for London wards showed a negative association with admission rates for drug dependency and for affective disorders. We

  5. Psychiatric Inpatient Admissions of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Predictive Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowley, Amy; Newton, Jonathan; Sturmey, Peter; Bouras, Nick; Holt, Geraldine

    2005-01-01

    Information on admission to psychiatric inpatient units is lacking from the literature on contemporary services for people with intellectual disability and mental health needs. Here we report on predictors of admission for a cohort of 752 adults from this population living in community settings; 83 were admitted. We also report on two subsamples…

  6. Clinical outcomes and mortality associated with weekend admission to psychiatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rashmi; Chesney, Edward; Cullen, Alexis E.; Tulloch, Alex D.; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; McGuire, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies indicate that risk of mortality is higher for patients admitted to acute hospitals at the weekend. However, less is known about clinical outcomes among patients admitted to psychiatric hospitals. Aims To investigate whether weekend admission to a psychiatric hospital is associated with worse clinical outcomes. Method Data were obtained from 45 264 consecutive psychiatric hospital admissions. The association of weekend admission with in-patient mortality, duration of hospital admission and risk of readmission was investigated using multivariable regression analyses. Secondary analyses were performed to investigate the distribution of admissions, discharges, in-patient mortality, episodes of seclusion and violent incidents on different days of the week. Results There were 7303 weekend admissions (16.1%). Patients who were aged between 26 and 35 years, female or from a minority ethnic group were more likely to be admitted at the weekend. Patients admitted at the weekend were more likely to present via acute hospital services, other psychiatric hospitals and the criminal justice system than to be admitted directly from their own home. Weekend admission was associated with a shorter duration of admission (B coefficient −21.1 days, 95% CI −24.6 to −17.6, P<0.001) and an increased risk of readmission in the 12 months following index admission (incidence rate ratio 1.13, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.18, P<0.001), but in-patient mortality (odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.23, P = 0.30) was not greater than for weekday admission. Fewer episodes of seclusion occurred at the weekend but there was no significant variation in deaths during hospital admission or violent incidents on different days of the week. Conclusions Being admitted at the weekend was not associated with an increased risk of in-patient mortality. However, patients admitted at the weekend had shorter admissions and were more likely to be readmitted, suggesting that they may represent a

  7. Daily weather variables and affective disorder admissions to psychiatric hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have reported that admission rates in patients with affective disorders are subject to seasonal variation. Notwithstanding, there has been limited evaluation of the degree to which changeable daily meteorological patterns influence affective disorder admission rates. A handful of small studies have alluded to a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (heat waves in particular), wind direction and sunshine. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test, ARIMA and time-series regression analyses to examine whether daily meteorological variables—namely wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, hours of sunshine, sunlight radiation and temperature—influence admission rates for mania and depression across 12 regions in Ireland over a 31-year period. Although we found some very weak but interesting trends for barometric pressure in relation to mania admissions, daily meteorological patterns did not appear to affect hospital admissions overall for mania or depression. Our results do not support the small number of papers to date that suggest a link between daily meteorological variables and affective disorder admissions. Further study is needed.

  8. Daily weather variables and affective disorder admissions to psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have reported that admission rates in patients with affective disorders are subject to seasonal variation. Notwithstanding, there has been limited evaluation of the degree to which changeable daily meteorological patterns influence affective disorder admission rates. A handful of small studies have alluded to a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (heat waves in particular), wind direction and sunshine. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test, ARIMA and time-series regression analyses to examine whether daily meteorological variables--namely wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, hours of sunshine, sunlight radiation and temperature--influence admission rates for mania and depression across 12 regions in Ireland over a 31-year period. Although we found some very weak but interesting trends for barometric pressure in relation to mania admissions, daily meteorological patterns did not appear to affect hospital admissions overall for mania or depression. Our results do not support the small number of papers to date that suggest a link between daily meteorological variables and affective disorder admissions. Further study is needed.

  9. Implementing a Music Therapy Program at a New 72-Hour Acute Psychiatric Admissions Unit: A Case Study of a Patient Who Was Malingering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Because of the relatively poor treatment available, the high financial costs of hospitalization, multiple and complex issues of persons with severe mental illnesses, and advancements in pharmacotherapy, psychiatric patients are often only hospitalized for a few days before they are discharged. Thus, brief psychosocial interventions for persons who…

  10. The reimbursement blues. A psychiatric hospital copes with decreasing reimbursement and declining admissions.

    PubMed

    Hume, S K

    1991-03-01

    Beginning in 1989, Harbor View Mercy Hospital, a freestanding psychiatric facility in Fort Smith, AR, saw a flattening of growth in inpatient days and declines in discharges. In addition to decreasing admissions, it faces the problems of decreasing reimbursement, the need to provide more services with fewer resources, and greater government regulations. The greatest problem is inadequate reimbursement. Psychiatric hospitals fare worse than their acute care counterparts under both Medicaid and Medicare. To fulfill its mission to serve those in need, Harbor View has allocated 43 percent of its revenue budget this year to cover charity care, bad debt, etc. Ron Summerhill, the hospital's chief administrative officer, predicts a slowdown in the growth and profitability of psychiatric services in both the for-profit and not-for-profit sectors. But he is combating this trend by increasing use of managed care arrangements, diversifying, offering more outpatient services, and advocating for change in the reimbursement situation. PMID:10109228

  11. The Use of the Addiction Severity Index Psychiatric Composite Scores to Predict Psychiatric Inpatient Admissions.

    PubMed

    Drymalski, Walter M; Nunley, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence of co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders indicates a need for integrated behavioral health treatment that addresses both types of disorder simultaneously. One component of this integrated treatment is the use of an assessment process that can concurrently identify the presence of each class of disorder. The Addiction Severity Index (ASI) has been extensively used and researched in the field of substance use disorders for over 30 years. The ASI has seven sections, including a section on substance use disorders and a section on psychiatric symptoms, making it a potential candidate for a co-occurring screen during intake. The following study utilized a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to determine an optimal cutoff score on the ASI psychiatric composite score to identify which individuals seeking substance use disorder treatment were admitted to the Milwaukee County Behavioral Health Division's psychiatric hospital in the year subsequent to their ASI administration. Of the 19,320 individuals who completed an initial ASI in our system, 343 had an inpatient admission. The receiver operating characteristic curve was statistically significant, with an area under the curve of 0.75. A cutoff of 0.27 had a sensitivity of 0.77 and a specificity of 0.61, such that over 60% (11,963/19,320) of the sample was excluded. These results suggest that the ASI psychiatric composite score may be a useful initial screen to identify those with potential mental health problems/needs in a behavioral health system attempting to integrate addiction and mental health services. PMID:27580192

  12. The Use of the Addiction Severity Index Psychiatric Composite Scores to Predict Psychiatric Inpatient Admissions.

    PubMed

    Drymalski, Walter M; Nunley, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence of co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders indicates a need for integrated behavioral health treatment that addresses both types of disorder simultaneously. One component of this integrated treatment is the use of an assessment process that can concurrently identify the presence of each class of disorder. The Addiction Severity Index (ASI) has been extensively used and researched in the field of substance use disorders for over 30 years. The ASI has seven sections, including a section on substance use disorders and a section on psychiatric symptoms, making it a potential candidate for a co-occurring screen during intake. The following study utilized a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to determine an optimal cutoff score on the ASI psychiatric composite score to identify which individuals seeking substance use disorder treatment were admitted to the Milwaukee County Behavioral Health Division's psychiatric hospital in the year subsequent to their ASI administration. Of the 19,320 individuals who completed an initial ASI in our system, 343 had an inpatient admission. The receiver operating characteristic curve was statistically significant, with an area under the curve of 0.75. A cutoff of 0.27 had a sensitivity of 0.77 and a specificity of 0.61, such that over 60% (11,963/19,320) of the sample was excluded. These results suggest that the ASI psychiatric composite score may be a useful initial screen to identify those with potential mental health problems/needs in a behavioral health system attempting to integrate addiction and mental health services.

  13. Admission to psychiatric hospital in the early and late postpartum periods: Scottish national linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Langan Martin, Julie; McLean, Gary; Cantwell, Roch; Smith, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe weekly admission rates for affective and non-affective psychosis, major depression and other psychiatric disorders in the early and late postpartum periods. To assess the impact of socioeconomic status, age and parity on admission rates. Methods Scottish maternity records were linked to psychiatric hospital admissions. 3290 pregnancy-related psychiatric admissions were assessed. Weekly admission rates were calculated for the pregnancy period, early postpartum period (6 weeks after birth) and late postpartum period (up to 2 years after birth), and compared with pre-pregnancy rates (up to 2 years before pregnancy). Admission rates were generated by calculating the total number of admissions for each time period divided by the number of weeks in the period. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were generated for each time period, using deprivation, age, parity and record of previous psychiatric hospital care-adjusted Poisson regression models. Results Women from more deprived social quintiles accounted for the largest proportion of admissions across all time periods. Compared with pre-pregnancy period, admission rates fell during pregnancy, increased markedly during the early postpartum period, and remained elevated for 2 years after childbirth. Within the most affluent quintile, admission IRRs were higher in the early postpartum period (IRR=1.29, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.59) than in the late postpartum period (IRR=0.87, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.98). For the late postpartum period, there was a positive association between higher maternal age and admission IRRs (ages 20–35 years, IRR=1.35, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.54 and age>40 years IRR=1.72, 95% CI 1.41 to 2.09). Conclusions Rates of psychiatric admission fell during pregnancy and increased in the early postpartum period (particularly during the first 2 weeks after birth), and remained elevated above baseline during the 2-year late postpartum period. An understanding of how social deprivation, age and parity

  14. Intervention to reduce inpatient psychiatric admission in a metropolitan city.

    PubMed

    Amirsadri, Alireza; Mischel, Edward; Haddad, Luay; Tancer, Manuel; Arfken, Cynthia L

    2015-02-01

    When psychiatric hospitalization is over-used, it represents a financial drain and failure of care. We evaluated implementation and cessation of transporting people medically certified for psychiatric hospitalization to a central psychiatric emergency service for management and re-evaluation of hospitalization need. After implementation, the hospitalization rate declined 89% for 346 transported patients; only four of the nonhospitalized patients presented in crisis again in the next 30 days. Following cessation, the hospitalization rate jumped 59% compared to the preceding year. Costs declined 78.7% per diverted patient. The findings indicate that it is possible to reduce hospitalization and costs, and maintain quality care.

  15. Characteristics of psychiatric admissions and aspects of overcrowding at the general Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Chin, C N; Kadir, A B; Jeyarajah, S

    1993-06-01

    This study examined admissions, final diagnoses and mean duration of stay of patients in the Psychiatric Wards at the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. The male ward was severely overcrowded by 125% over the maximum bed capacity. The majority were psychotic, mainly schizophrenic. The female ward had 76% occupancy, also mainly psychotic. Neurotics, alcohol dependents and personality disorders formed less than 5% of the admissions. There was no difference in the mean duration of stay of patients of both UKM and GHKL Units stratified for diagnosis and disposal except for newly diagnosed schizophrenics. There is an urgent need for more male psychiatric beds/wards.

  16. No effect of lunar cycle on psychiatric admissions or emergency evaluations.

    PubMed

    McLay, Robert N; Daylo, Amado A; Hammer, Paul S

    2006-12-01

    It is a popularly held belief that psychiatric behavior worsens during a full moon. Research in this area has yielded mixed results. Records from Naval Medical Center San Diego for 1993-2001 were examined to see whether there were higher rates of psychiatric admission associated with particular phases of the moon. Records from 8,473 admissions revealed that there were no more admission on days with a full moon, a new moon, any quarter of the moon, a waxing moon, or a waning moon. This held true for psychiatric patients as a whole, as well as for individuals with particular diagnoses, such as those with a mood disorder or psychotic disorder. Records from 1,909 emergency psychiatric evaluations that occurred between 2002 and 2003 were also examined to see whether a higher percentage of patients might present, but not require hospitalization, during a particular phase of the moon. Once again, no significant effect was found. In summary, lunar phase was not associated in any significant way with psychiatric admissions or emergency presentation.

  17. The effects of daily weather variables on psychosis admissions to psychiatric hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2013-07-01

    Several studies have noted seasonal variations in admission rates of patients with psychotic illnesses. However, the changeable daily meteorological patterns within seasons have never been examined in any great depth in the context of admission rates. A handful of small studies have posed interesting questions regarding a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (especially heat waves) and sunshine. In this study, we used simple non-parametric testing and more complex ARIMA and time-series regression analysis to examine whether daily meteorological patterns (wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, sunshine, sunlight and temperature) exert an influence on admission rates for psychotic disorders across 12 regions in Ireland. Although there were some weak but interesting trends for temperature, barometric pressure and sunshine, the meteorological patterns ultimately did not exert a clinically significant influence over admissions for psychosis. Further analysis is needed.

  18. Age distribution curve in psychiatric admissions inversely correlates with Life Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Le Bon, Olivier; Le Bon, Serge-Daniel

    2014-09-30

    A strong inverse correlation was found between the age-distribution curve of psychiatric admissions and the U-bend Life Satisfaction curve. It may indicate that the peak of mental disorders at midlife reflects a less satisfactory period of life or, conversely, that the mental health load burdens of Life Satisfaction.

  19. Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatric Admission Rates and Subsequent One-Year Mortality in England: 1998-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Anthony; Clacey, Joe; Seagroatt, Valerie; Goldacre, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background: Adolescence is a time of very rapid change not only in physical but also psychological development. During the teenage years there is a reported rise in the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate age- and sex-specific National Health Service (NHS) hospital inpatient admission rates for psychiatric…

  20. Patient Management and Psychopharmacological Treatment Associated to Smoking Ban in an Acute Psychiatric Unit.

    PubMed

    Bergé, Daniel; Mané, Anna; Fonseca, Francina; Toll, Alba; Merino, Ana; Pérez, Victor; Bulbena, Antoni

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates differences in terms of clinical and treatment management in psychiatric hospitalization associated to smoking ban. We collected data regarding medication, socio-demographic and admission characteristics from all patients admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital before and after a smoking ban was in force. We also assessed a limited sample of patients before and after the ban regarding nicotine dependence, motivation to quit smoking and attitudes towards the ban. More number of leaves of absence and movement restrictions during the ban period occurred in comparison to the pre-ban period. On the contrary a lack of significant differences in terms of hospital stay (duration, rate of voluntary admissions and voluntary discharges), use of sedatives and doses of antipsychotics was found. A period of adjustment regarding the deal with leave of access and facilitate nicotine replacement treatment may help future psychiatric facilities planning smoking free policies.

  1. Psychiatric comorbidity in alcoholics treated at an institution with both coerced and voluntary admission.

    PubMed

    Sallmén, B; Nilsson, L; Berglund, M

    1997-01-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity in alcoholics admitted to a rehabilitation center on either a voluntary or a coerced basis were studied. A group of 104 alcoholics (37 coerced and 35 voluntarily admitted men; and 21 coerced and ten voluntarily admitted women) with a mean age (SD) of 43 +/- 8 years were assessed by means of a Structural Clinical Interview in accordance with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM)-III-R (SCID). The interview took place a mean of 7 days after admission. The frequencies of lifetime/current axis I psychiatric comorbidity (substance use disorders excluded) were 66 and 61%, respectively. Drug dependence was present in 41 and 39%, respectively, of the cases. Thirty-seven percent had a lifetime diagnosis, and 33% a current diagnosis of affective disorders, 27 and 23%, respectively, of anxiety disorders and 20 and 13%, respectively, of non-organic psychotic disorders. In a subsample of 20 subjects, depressive symptoms were found to be stable during the course of treatment. No differences in frequency of psychiatric comorbidity were found between coerced and voluntarily admitted patients (67 and 56%, respectively) or between men and women (65 and 52%, respectively). The combination of psychiatric comorbidity and drug dependence was overrepresented among the coerced patients (50 vs 16%). It was concluded that the frequencies of psychiatric comorbidity were high in the present group. The co-occurrence of alcohol dependence, drug dependence and psychiatric comorbidity was more frequent among subjects who were coercively treated.

  2. Epidemiology of Acute Symptomatic Seizures among Adult Medical Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Nwani, Paul Osemeke; Nwosu, Maduaburochukwu Cosmas; Nwosu, Monica Nonyelum

    2016-01-01

    Acute symptomatic seizures are seizures occurring in close temporal relationship with an acute central nervous system (CNS) insult. The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of presentation and etiological risk factors of acute symptomatic seizures among adult medical admissions. It was a two-year retrospective study of the medical files of adults patients admitted with acute symptomatic seizures as the first presenting event. There were 94 cases of acute symptomatic seizures accounting for 5.2% (95% CI: 4.17–6.23) of the 1,802 medical admissions during the period under review. There were 49 (52.1%) males and 45 (47.9%) females aged between 18 years and 84 years. The etiological risk factors of acute symptomatic seizures were infections in 36.2% (n = 34) of cases, stroke in 29.8% (n = 28), metabolic in 12.8% (n = 12), toxic in 10.6% (n = 10), and other causes in 10.6% (n = 10). Infective causes were more among those below fifty years while stroke was more in those aged fifty years and above. CNS infections and stroke were the prominent causes of acute symptomatic seizures. This is an evidence of the “double tragedy” facing developing countries, the unresolved threat of infectious diseases on one hand and the increasing impact of noncommunicable diseases on the other one. PMID:26904280

  3. Admission glycaemia and outcome in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Müdespacher, Damaris; Radovanovic, Dragana; Camenzind, Edoardo; Essig, Manfred; Bertel, Osmund; Erne, Paul; Eberli, Franz Robert; Gutzwiller, Felix

    2007-12-01

    Some studies of patients with acute myocardial infarction have reported that hyperglycaemia at admission may be associated with a worse outcome. This study sought to evaluate the association of blood glucose at admission with the outcome of unselected patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Using the Acute Myocardial Infarction and unstable angina in Switzerland (AMIS Plus) registry, ACS patients were stratified according to their blood glucose on admission: group 1: 2.80-6.99 mmol/L, group 2: 7.00-11.09 mmol/L and group 3: > 11.10 mmol/L. Odds ratios for in-hospital mortality were calculated using logistic regression models. Of 2,786 patients, 73% were male and 21% were known to have diabetes. In-hospital mortality increased from 3% in group 1 to 7% in group 2 and to 15% in group 3. Higher glucose levels were associated with larger enzymatic infarct sizes (p<0.001) and had a weak negative correlation with angiographic or echographic left ventricular ejection fraction. High admission glycaemia in ACS patients remains a significant independent predictor of in-hospital mortality (adjusted OR 1.08; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.05-1.14, p<0.001) per mmol/L. The OR for in-hospital mortality was 1.04 (95% CI 0.99-1.1; p=0.140) per mmol/L for patients with diabetes but 1.21 (95% CI 112-1.30; p<0.001) per mmol/L for non-diabetic patients. In conclusion, elevated glucose level in ACS patients on admission is a significant independent predictor of in-hospital mortality and is even more important for patients who do not have known diabetes.

  4. Women in acute psychiatric units, their characteristics and needs: a review

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Michaela; Lau, Yasmine; Sethi, Faisil

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method Recent policy guidelines published by the Department of Health highlight the need to develop gender-sensitive psychiatric services. However, very little is currently known about the specific characteristics and needs of female patients entering acute psychiatric wards, particularly psychiatric intensive care units. This article aims to review the current literature on what is known about this group of patients. PubMed, Embase and PsycINFO were systematically searched using a number of key terms. Results A total of 27 articles were obtained. The findings were divided into four categories: admission characteristics, treatment needs, risk management and outcomes after discharge. Gender differences were found in diagnosis and presentation. Clinical implications The differences observed in the reviewed studies suggest that women may have different assessment and treatment needs, and ultimately, different philosophies of care. A dearth of studies in this area indicates that if services are to develop in line with government policies, more research is needed. PMID:27752346

  5. What happens when 55% of acute psychiatric beds are closed in six days: an unexpected naturalistic observational study

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Matt; Mitchell, Anji; Parkin, Lindsay; Confue, Phil; Shankar, Rohit; Wilson-James, Diane; Marshall, Mike; Edgecombe, Maria; Keaney, Bernie; Gill, Kiran; Harrison, Juliet

    2016-01-01

    Objective The sudden closure of 30 out of 54 acute psychiatric beds in Cornwall presented a stressful challenge to staff but also a natural experiment on how a service dealt with this situation. We aimed to evaluate the outcomes of patients needing to leave the closed ward, how bed occupancy rates were affected and the impact on admission rates. Design A service evaluation of the impact of the ward closure. Setting A comprehensive secondary NHS mental health service in Cornwall serving 550,000 population. Main outcome measures The destination of the patients needing to leave the acute unit, the effect of the closure on bed occupancy, admission rates and serious untoward incidents. Results Of 26 patients needing to be moved from the acute ward, only 10 needed an acute psychiatric bed. None of the seven patients who had been on the ward longer than nine weeks needed an acute unit. Admission rates fell over the subsequent three months. There was no increase in serious incidents due to the closure. Conclusions This naturalistic event suggests that many patients on acute units could be cared for elsewhere, especially recovery/rehabilitation care environments, if political and financial urgency is present. Admission rates are responsive to the pressure on beds. PMID:27757241

  6. Demographics of acute admissions to a National Spinal Injuries Unit

    PubMed Central

    Boran, S.; Street, J.; Higgins, T.; McCormack, D.; Poynton, A. R.

    2009-01-01

    This prospective demographic study was undertaken to review the epidemiology and demographics of all acute admissions to the National Spinal Injuries Unit in Ireland for the 5 years to 2003. The study was conducted at the National Spinal Injuries Unit, Mater Miscericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Records of all patients admitted to our unit from 1999 to 2003 were compiled from a prospective computerized spinal database. In this 5-year period, 942 patients were acutely hospitalized at the National Spinal Injuries Unit. There were 686 (73%) males and 256 (27%) females, with an average age of 32 years (range 16–84 years). The leading cause of admission with a spinal injury was road traffic accidents (42%), followed by falls (35%), sport (11%), neoplasia (7.5%) and miscellaneous (4.5%). The cervical spine was most commonly affected (51%), followed by lumbar (28%) and thoracic (21%). On admission 38% of patients were ASIA D or worse, of which one-third were AISA A. Understanding of the demographics of spinal column injuries in unique populations can help us to develop preventative and treatment strategies at both national and international levels. PMID:19283414

  7. Admission avoidance and early discharge of acute hospital admissions: an accident and emergency based scheme

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, C; Whitwell, D; Sarsfield, B; Maimaris, C

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To validate an accident and emergency (A&E) based approach to assisting early discharge or avoiding admission to acute hospital beds by means of two separate teams, one in hospital and the other in the community, working closely together at the interface between primary and secondary health care. Design—A purpose designed admission avoidance (AA) team was established in the A&E department, and a target group of patients identified whose admissions might be avoided or curtailed. A rapid response community team (RRCT) based in Cambridge was also established to provide basic health care to patients in their homes after discharge from hospital. The key elements of the project were rapid assessment, careful selection of patients, early decision making at senior level, and close liaison with the community team. Results—During the first year (1999) of the project the AA team assessed 785 patients and 257 patients were eventually discharged home to the care of the RRCT. Of these, 149 patients (58%) were comparable to a historical control group (from 1997/98), with regard to their demographic and clinical characteristics and care needs, and had an average length of hospital stay of 1.7 days compared with 6.3 days for the control group. The remaining 108 patients were not directly comparable but were supported by the teams because the benefits were clear and exclusion would have been unethical. These patients had an average length of stay of seven days. The readmission rate was 3 of 257(1.2%) for the intervention group and 8 of 531(1.5%) for the control group. A limited patient satisfaction survey among patients cared for at home revealed that 97% of patients were "satisfied to very satisfied" with the care provided. The RRCT had also looked after an additional 194 patients from other sources (total = 451), including postoperative orthopaedic early discharges from an adjacent hospital. The average length of care at home by the RRCT for all 451 patients was 6

  8. Impact of tornadoes on hospital admissions for acute cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Palacios, Federico; Casanegra, Ana Isabel; Shapiro, Alan; Phan, Minh; Hawkins, Beau; Li, Ji; Stoner, Julie; Tafur, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of data describing cardiovascular events after tornado outbreaks. We proposed to study the effects of tornadoes on the incidence of cardiovascular events at a tertiary care institution. Population and methods Hospital admission records from a single center situated in a tornado-prone area three months before and after a 2013 tornado outbreak were abstracted. To control for seasonal variation, we also abstracted data from the same period of the prior year (control). Hospital admissions for cardiovascular events (CVEs) including acute myocardial infarction, stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) were summated by zip codes, and compared by time period. Results There were 22,607 admissions analyzed, of which 6,705 (30%), 7,980 (35%), and 7,922 (35%) were during the pre-tornado, post-tornado, and control time frames, respectively. There were 344 CVE in the controls, 317 CVE in pre-tornado and 364 CVEs in post tornado periods. There was no difference in the prevalence of CVE during the post-tornado season compared with the control (PPR = 1.05 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.21, p = 0.50) or the pre-tornado season (PPR= 0.96, 95% CI: 0.83 to 1.21, p = 0.63). Conclusion In conclusion, tornado outbreaks did not increase the prevalence of cardiovascular events. In contrast to the effect of hurricanes, implementation of a healthcare policy change directed toward the early treatment and prevention of cardiovascular events after tornadoes does not seem warranted. PMID:26388119

  9. READMIT: a clinical risk index to predict 30-day readmission after discharge from acute psychiatric units.

    PubMed

    Vigod, Simone N; Kurdyak, Paul A; Seitz, Dallas; Herrmann, Nathan; Fung, Kinwah; Lin, Elizabeth; Perlman, Christopher; Taylor, Valerie H; Rochon, Paula A; Gruneir, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    Our aim was to create a clinically useful risk index, administered prior to discharge, for determining the probability of psychiatric readmission within 30 days of hospital discharge for general psychiatric inpatients. We used population-level sociodemographic and health administrative data to develop a predictive model for 30-day readmission among adults discharged from an acute psychiatric unit in Ontario, Canada (2008-2011), and converted the final model into a risk index system. We derived the predictive model in one-half of the sample (n = 32,749) and validated it in the other half of the sample (n = 32,750). Variables independently associated with 30-day readmission (forming the mnemonic READMIT) were: (R) Repeat admissions; (E) Emergent admissions (i.e. harm to self/others); (D) Diagnoses (psychosis, bipolar and/or personality disorder), and unplanned Discharge; (M) Medical comorbidity; (I) prior service use Intensity; and (T) Time in hospital. Each 1-point increase in READMIT score (range 0-41) increased the odds of 30-day readmission by 11% (odds ratio 1.11, 95% CI 1.10-1.12). The index had moderate discriminative capacity in both derivation (C-statistic = 0.631) and validation (C-statistic = 0.630) datasets. Determining risk of psychiatric readmission for individual patients is a critical step in efforts to address the potentially avoidable high rate of this negative outcome. The READMIT index provides a framework for identifying patients at high risk of 30-day readmission prior to discharge, and for the development, evaluation and delivery of interventions that can assist with optimizing the transition to community care for patients following psychiatric discharge.

  10. Neuropsychological and psychiatric profiles in acute encephalitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Pewter, Stephen M; Williams, W Huw; Haslam, Catherine; Kay, Janice M

    2007-01-01

    Acute encephalitis is an inflammation of brain tissue that can result from activity in the central nervous system (CNS) of a number of viruses. Although the neurological and psychiatric effects of encephalitis in the acute phase of the illness are well-known (Caroff, Mann, Gliatto, Sullivan, & Campbell, 2001), larger scale studies of the pattern of neuropsychological and psychiatric impairment following recovery from the acute inflammatory phase are less apparent. This paper reports the results of neuropsychological testing with a range of standardised cognitive measures in a case series of long-term post-acute participants. Psychiatric abnormality is examined using the SCL-90-R self-report scale of distress (Derogatis, 1983). We also examined the role of emerging insight in the aetiology of depression in this population. Two clusters of cognitive dysfunction were observed, one group of primarily herpes simplex cases showing a severe generalised deficit across a number of cognitive domains and a second cluster showing a variety of more isolated disorders of executive function. Abnormally high levels of distress were reported by participants, with depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, interpersonal sensitivity and phobic anxiety most significantly increased. Depression was found to be least severe in those with most accurate insight into their problems. Examining the correlations between cognitive and psychiatric test results demonstrates a relationship between depression and interpersonal anxiety and specific cognitive measures. Obsessive-compulsive behaviour and phobic anxiety, however, appear to exist independently of the assessed cognitive deficits.

  11. Neuropsychological and psychiatric profiles in acute encephalitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Pewter, Stephen M; Williams, W Huw; Haslam, Catherine; Kay, Janice M

    2007-01-01

    Acute encephalitis is an inflammation of brain tissue that can result from activity in the central nervous system (CNS) of a number of viruses. Although the neurological and psychiatric effects of encephalitis in the acute phase of the illness are well-known (Caroff, Mann, Gliatto, Sullivan, & Campbell, 2001), larger scale studies of the pattern of neuropsychological and psychiatric impairment following recovery from the acute inflammatory phase are less apparent. This paper reports the results of neuropsychological testing with a range of standardised cognitive measures in a case series of long-term post-acute participants. Psychiatric abnormality is examined using the SCL-90-R self-report scale of distress (Derogatis, 1983). We also examined the role of emerging insight in the aetiology of depression in this population. Two clusters of cognitive dysfunction were observed, one group of primarily herpes simplex cases showing a severe generalised deficit across a number of cognitive domains and a second cluster showing a variety of more isolated disorders of executive function. Abnormally high levels of distress were reported by participants, with depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, interpersonal sensitivity and phobic anxiety most significantly increased. Depression was found to be least severe in those with most accurate insight into their problems. Examining the correlations between cognitive and psychiatric test results demonstrates a relationship between depression and interpersonal anxiety and specific cognitive measures. Obsessive-compulsive behaviour and phobic anxiety, however, appear to exist independently of the assessed cognitive deficits. PMID:17676531

  12. The association between depressive symptoms in the community, non-psychiatric hospital admission and hospital outcomes: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Prina, A. Matthew; Cosco, Theodore D.; Dening, Tom; Beekman, Aartjan; Brayne, Carol; Huisman, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper aims to systematically review observational studies that have analysed whether depressive symptoms in the community are associated with higher general hospital admissions, longer hospital stays and increased risk of re-admission. Methods We identified prospective studies that looked at depressive symptoms in the community as a risk factor for non-psychiatric general hospital admissions, length of stay or risk of re-admission. The search was carried out on MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library Database, and followed up with contact with authors and scanning of reference lists. Results Eleven studies fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria, and all were deemed to be of moderate to high quality. Meta-analysis of seven studies with relevant data suggested that depressive symptoms may be a predictor of subsequent admission to a general hospital in unadjusted analyses (RR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.28–1.44), but findings after adjustment for confounding variables were inconsistent. The narrative synthesis also reported depressive symptoms to be independently associated with longer length of stay, and higher re-admission risk. Conclusions Depressive symptoms are associated with a higher risk of hospitalisation, longer length of stay and a higher re-admission risk. Some of these associations may be mediated by other factors, and should be explored in more details. PMID:25466985

  13. Oral flora of elderly patients following acute medical admission.

    PubMed

    Preston, A J; Gosney, M A; Noon, S; Martin, M V

    1999-01-01

    The human oral microflora is diverse and is usually predominately composed of Gram-positive bacteria. It is uncommon to find Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) in healthy mouths. The incidence of infection with GNB rises in institutionalised, frail elderly subjects. There is also evidence of an association between intra-oral GNB presence and denture wearing. There have been few studies which have investigated intra-oral GNB carriage in acutely ill elderly patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the oral flora of a group of elderly patients during an acute medical admission and to investigate any associations between the oral microflora and existing medical or oral factors. A total of 28 patients (17 females and 11 males; age: 74-93 years) on a care for the elderly ward were studied. Epidemiological data, detailed medical histories and oral examinations were undertaken. In addition, oral swabs of the palate area were taken to determine their oral flora. Twelve (43%) of the patients had GNB in their oral cavities. These patients were suffering from a variety of medical conditions and were on various drug regimes. There was a correlation between oral GNB presence and denture use. There was no association between GNB presence and denture hygiene. As oropharyngeal GNB colonisation can be associated with infections such as aspiration pneumonia, it is important in patients at risk that intra-oral organisms are identified and managed.

  14. Nursing interventions for substance use during psychiatric hospital admissions: Clinical context and predictors.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Duncan; Warren, Jonathan; Odubanwo, Adewunmi; Bowers, Len

    2015-12-01

    Empirical information about how nurses manage substance use on psychiatric wards is lacking. The aims of the study were to identify the frequency and clinical features of incidents among a sample of inpatients over a 12-month period and how nursing staff intervened. Electronic, anonymized inpatient records were searched for incidents of substance use on 17 acute psychiatric wards in four hospitals in London. Searches were conducted for all patients admitted during 2012 and details of incidents and patient characteristics were extracted for analysis. Substance use was reported for 291 patients, with 25 incidents per 100 patients admitted to hospital. Only half of the incidents were followed by a response that specifically addressed the patients' substance use behaviour. These interactions usually concerned the circumstances and reasons for use, but rarely involved specific support for patients' substance use problems. The likelihood of staff taking any form of action was increased if the patient had been formally admitted, and was reduced if the patient was subject to containment during the shift or had a history of self-harm. The results demonstrate that nurses require specific training and guidance on supporting substance using patients. PMID:26300518

  15. Religious Affiliation as a Predictor of Involuntary Psychiatric Admission: A Brazilian 1-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Caio Borba; Loch, Alexandre Andradade

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze factors associated with the legal status at psychiatric admission of individuals with psychosis or bipolar disorder in a Latin-American cultural setting. Methods: Prospective observational study was conducted in São Paulo, Brazil. We analyzed 169 individuals with bipolar or psychotic disorder in need of hospitalization. Sociodemographic data, data on the psychiatric disorder, information about the hospital stay, and data at time of discharge were collected. Their families were also contacted by telephone and interviews were conducted at 1, 2, 6, and 12 months post-discharge as a follow-up. Results: Eighty-eight patients (52%) had a voluntary admission and 81 (48%) had an involuntary admission (IA). The average length of admission was similar in both groups (17.4 vs. 17.3 days, p = 0.22). It was significantly more common for IA patients to be admitted because of other-directed aggressiveness (47.7 vs. 65.4%, p = 0.02). The percentage of individuals that needed physical restraint during hospital stay among IA patients was also significantly higher (11.4 vs. 25.9%, p = 0.01). Having any religious affiliations was significantly related to an IA status as well (OR = 4–6.48). Conclusion: Our results suggest that cultural factors related to religious affiliations might play an important role in determining psychiatric hospitalization legal status. Religion might possibly influence someone’s judgment and insight about his/her psychiatric disorder. This study restates the importance of dealing with the subject of religion with patients. PMID:25157344

  16. Relationship between mean daily ambient temperature range and hospital admissions for schizophrenia: Results from a national cohort of psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Sung, Tzu-I; Chen, Mu-Jean; Lin, Chuan-Yao; Lung, Shih-Chun; Su, Huey-Jen

    2011-12-01

    Environmental temperature is known to correlate with schizophrenia, but little is known about the association with changes in temperature. This 12-year study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the mean daily range of ambient temperature and schizophrenia admissions in a national cohort of psychiatric inpatients in Taiwan. Meteorological data provided by the Central Weather Bureau of Taiwan were interpolated to create representative estimates. Psychiatric inpatient admissions in all hospitals with medical services enrolled in the current health care insurance system were retrieved from the 1996-2007 Psychiatric Inpatient Medical Claim dataset of the National Health Insurance Research Database. Generalized linear models with Poisson distributions were used to analyze the impact of mean diurnal change of temperature on schizophrenia admissions, controlling for internal correlations and demographic covariates. The daily temperature range varied between 1.7°C and 12.1°C (1st to 99th percentile). The relative risk of schizophrenia admission was significantly increased at a temperature range of 3.2°C (10th percentile), and the maximum was at 12.1°C (99th percentile); however, no such association was found with schizoaffective disorder. When restricted to the capital and largest city, the effects of temperature range were prominent and may correlate with temperature itself. The joint effect of temperature and temperature range was associated with elevated risk, particularly at cooler temperatures. A positive correlation was found between increasing temperature range and schizophrenia admissions. The increase in morbidity at high percentiles suggests that the increasing dynamics of temperature range are a valid reflection of risk, highlighting the need for precautionary action. PMID:22018962

  17. Influence of drugs of abuse and alcohol upon patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards: physician's assessment compared to blood drug concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mordal, Jon; Medhus, Sigrid; Holm, Bjørn; Mørland, Jørg; Bramness, Jørgen G

    2013-06-01

    In acute psychiatric services, rapid and accurate detection of psychoactive substance intake may be required for appropriate diagnosis and intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between (a) drug influence as assessed by physicians and (b) blood drug concentrations among patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards. We also explored the possible effects of age, sex, and psychotic symptoms on physician's assessment of drug influence. In a cross-sectional study, the sample comprised 271 consecutive admissions from 2 acute psychiatric wards. At admission, the physician on call performed an overall judgment of drug influence. Psychotic symptoms were assessed with the positive subscale of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Blood samples were screened for a wide range of psychoactive substances, and quantitative results were used to calculate blood drug concentration scores. Patients were judged as being under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol in 28% of the 271 admissions. Psychoactive substances were detected in 56% of the blood samples. Altogether, 15 different substances were found; up to 8 substances were found in samples from 1 patient. Markedly elevated blood drug concentration scores were estimated for 15% of the patients. Physician's assessment was positively related to the blood drug concentration scores (r = 0.52; P < 0.001), to symptoms of excitement, and to the detection of alcohol, cannabis, and amphetamines. The study demonstrates the major impact of alcohol and drugs in acute psychiatric settings and illustrates the challenging nature of the initial clinical assessment.

  18. Does the quality and outcomes framework reduce psychiatric admissions in people with serious mental illness? A regression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gutacker, Nils; Mason, Anne R; Kendrick, Tony; Goddard, Maria; Gravelle, Hugh; Gilbody, Simon; Aylott, Lauren; Wainwright, June; Jacobs, Rowena

    2015-01-01

    Background The Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) incentivises general practices in England to provide proactive care for people with serious mental illness (SMI) including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other psychoses. Better proactive primary care may reduce the risk of psychiatric admissions to hospital, but this has never been tested empirically. Methods The QOF data set included 8234 general practices in England from 2006/2007 to 2010/2011. Rates of hospital admissions with primary diagnoses of SMI or bipolar disorder were estimated from national routine hospital data and aggregated to practice level. Poisson regression was used to analyse associations. Results Practices with higher achievement on the annual review for SMI patients (MH9), or that performed better on either of the two lithium indicators for bipolar patients (MH4 or MH5), had more psychiatric admissions. An additional 1% in achievement rates for MH9 was associated with an average increase in the annual practice admission rate of 0.19% (95% CI 0.10% to 0.28%) or 0.007 patients (95% CI 0.003 to 0.01). Conclusions The positive association was contrary to expectation, but there are several possible explanations: better quality primary care may identify unmet need for secondary care; higher QOF achievement may not prevent the need for secondary care; individuals may receive their QOF checks postdischarge rather than prior to admission; individuals with more severe SMI may be more likely to be registered with practices with better QOF performance; and QOF may be a poor measure of the quality of care for people with SMI. PMID:25897027

  19. Improving Sepsis Management in the Acute Admissions Unit.

    PubMed

    Adcroft, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a common condition with a major impact on healthcare resources and expenditure. We therefore wanted to investigate and improve how the acute admission unit (AAU) at the Great Western Hospital (GWH) is managing patients who present directly to the unit with sepsis. In order to obtain this information, an audit was undertaken against the College of Emergency Medicine standards used by the emergency department within GWH and across the UK. Data was retrospectively collected for 30 patients with a diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock. The notes were scrutinized with regard to the implementation of College of Emergency Medicine standards for the management of sepsis. This meant that performance in the AAU was compared against the emergency department at GWH and national figures. The data collected shows performance is below national standards with regard to documentation of high flow oxygen use (AAU: 24%, ED 100%; national median: 50%; CEM standard 95%), crystalloid fluid boluses (AAU: 52%; ED: 90%; national median: 83%; CEM standard 100%), lactate measurements (AAU: 66%, ED: 93%; national median: 80%; CEM standard 95%), and obtainment of blood cultures (AAU: 52%; ED 73%; national median: 77%; CEM standard: 95%). Only 3% of patients received all six parts of the sepsis bundle. Since auditing in 2012/2013 we have introduced a sepsis proforma based on a current proforma being used within Severn Deanery. This proforma uses the 'Sepsis Six' bundle appropriate to ward based care. We have raised awareness of sepsis implications and management through the creation of a 'sepsis working group' to educate both junior doctors and nurses. In turn, this has led to education through the use of posters, pocket reference cards, and teaching sessions. Re-audit shows significant improvement in administering all parts of the Sepsis Six bundle and an 8% improvement in patients receiving all six of the bundle.

  20. Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder at Psychiatric Discharge Predict General Hospital Admission for Self-Harm.

    PubMed

    Mellesdal, Liv; Gjestad, Rolf; Johnsen, Erik; Jørgensen, Hugo A; Oedegaard, Ketil J; Kroken, Rune A; Mehlum, Lars

    2015-12-01

    We investigated whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was predictor of suicidal behavior even when adjusting for comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and other salient risk factors. To study this, we randomly selected 308 patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital because of suicide risk. Baseline interviews were performed within the first days of the stay. Information concerning the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals over the subsequent 6 months was retrieved through linkage with the regional hospital registers. A censored regression analysis of hospital admissions for self-harm indicated significant associations with both PTSD (β = .21, p < .001) and BPD (β = .27, p < .001). A structural model comprising two latent BPD factors, dysregulation and relationship problems, as well as PTSD and several other variables, demonstrated that PTSD was an important predictor of the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals(B = 1.52, p < .01). Dysregulation predicted self-harm directly (B = 0.28, p < .05), and also through PTSD [corrected]. These results suggested that PTSD and related dysregulation problems could be important treatment targets for a reduction in the risk of severe self-harm in high-risk psychiatric patients.

  1. [Comprehensive Assessment of Psychiatric Residents: An Addition to the Program Admission Process].

    PubMed

    Luis, E Jaramillo G; Elena, Martín C

    2012-01-01

    The training of medical specialists is a long and complex process. Its purpose is to guarantee the society that they are the right professionals to meet the health needs of the population. The first step to ensure this objective is the admission process. In psychiatry this process, monitoring resident students and the criteria for each one are different in each country. Admission in Colombia is a heterogeneous process, not standardized, which varies greatly from one university to another, even between private and public universities. At the National University of Colombia, the admissions process is handled by the Admissions Office and includes: a written test for which you must obtain a minimum score, a resume rating and an interview. The Teaching Committee and the Department of Psychiatry considered the admission procedure in general to be good, but in need of refinement. Due to the experience of some teachers and given the current rules, a "comprehensive assessment" for master and doctoral students was required and in 1996 it was decided that this method of assessment for admission to a specialization in Psychiatry would serve to complement the admission process. The article describes the experience of the process and its outcomes, strengths and weaknesses.

  2. Does psychopathology at admission predict the length of inpatient stay in psychiatry? Implications for financing psychiatric services

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The debate on appropriate financing systems in inpatient psychiatry is ongoing. In this context, it is important to control resource use in terms of length of stay (LOS), which is the most costly factor in inpatient care and the one that can be influenced most easily. Previous studies have shown that psychiatric diagnoses provide only limited justification for explaining variation in LOS, and it has been suggested that measures such as psychopathology might be more appropriate to predict resource use. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between LOS and psychopathological syndromes or symptoms at admission as well as other characteristics such as sociodemographic and clinical variables. Methods We considered routine medical data of patients admitted to the Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich in the years 2008 and 2009. Complete data on psychopathology at hospital admission were available in 3,220 inpatient episodes. A subsample of 2,939 inpatient episodes was considered in final statistical models, including psychopathology as well as complete datasets of further measures (e.g. sociodemographic, clinical, treatment-related and psychosocial variables). We used multivariate linear as well as logistic regression analysis with forward selection procedure to determine the predictors of LOS. Results All but two syndrome scores (mania, hostility) were positively related to the length of stay. Final statistical models showed that syndromes or symptoms explained about 5% of the variation in length of stay. The inclusion of syndromes or symptoms as well as basic treatment variables and other factors led to an explained variation of up to 25%. Conclusions Psychopathological syndromes and symptoms at admission and further characteristics only explained a small proportion of the length of inpatient stay. Thus, according to our sample, psychopathology might not be suitable as a primary indicator for estimating LOS and contingent costs. This might be

  3. Evaluating Psychiatric Hospital Admission Decisions for Children in Foster Care: An Optimal Classification Tree Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowden, Jessica A.; Leon, Scott C.; Bryant, Fred B.; Lyons, John S.

    2007-01-01

    This study explored clinical and nonclinical predictors of inpatient hospital admission decisions across a sample of children in foster care over 4 years (N = 13,245). Forty-eight percent of participants were female and the mean age was 13.4 (SD = 3.5 years). Optimal data analysis (Yarnold & Soltysik, 2005) was used to construct a nonlinear…

  4. Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy: A Brief Intervention for Psychiatric Inpatients Admitted After a Suicide Attempt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Cox, Daniel W.; Greene, Farrah N.

    2012-01-01

    To date, no empirically based inpatient intervention for individuals who have attempted suicide exists. We present an overview of a novel psychotherapeutic approach, Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT), currently under development and empirical testing for inpatients who have been admitted for a recent suicide attempt. PACT is adapted from an…

  5. Psychiatric intervention and repeated admission to emergency centres due to drug overdose

    PubMed Central

    Yamana, Hayato; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Ando, Shuntaro; Okamura, Tsuyoshi; Kumakura, Yousuke; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Kasai, Kiyoto

    2015-01-01

    Background Repeated drug overdose is a major risk factor for suicide. Data are lacking on the effect of psychiatric intervention on preventing repeated drug overdose. Aims To investigate whether psychiatric intervention was associated with reduced readmission to emergency centres due to drug overdose. Method Using a Japanese national in-patient database, we identified patients who were first admitted to emergency centres for drug overdose in 2010–2012. We used propensity score matching for patient and hospital factors to compare readmission rates between intervention (patients undergoing psychosocial assessment) and unexposed groups. Results Of 29 564 eligible patients, 13 035 underwent psychiatric intervention. In the propensity-matched 7938 pairs, 1304 patients were readmitted because of drug overdose. Readmission rate was lower in the intervention than in the unexposed group (7.3% v. 9.1% respectively, P<0.001). Conclusions Psychiatric intervention was associated with reduced readmission in patients who had taken a drug overdose. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703741

  6. Consultant input in acute medical admissions and patient outcomes in hospitals in England: a multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Derek; Lambourne, Adrian; Percival, Frances; Laverty, Anthony A; Ward, David K

    2013-01-01

    Recent recommendations for physicians in the UK outline key aspects of care that should improve patient outcomes and experience in acute hospital care. Included in these recommendations are Consultant patterns of work to improve timeliness of clinical review and improve continuity of care. This study used a contemporaneous validated survey compared with clinical outcomes derived from Hospital Episode Statistics, between April 2009 and March 2010 from 91 acute hospital sites in England to evaluate systems of consultant cover for acute medical admissions. Clinical outcomes studied included adjusted case fatality rates (aCFR), including the ratio of weekend to weekday mortality, length of stay and readmission rates. Hospitals that had an admitting Consultant presence within the Acute Medicine Unit (AMU, or equivalent) for a minimum of 4 hours per day (65% of study group) had a lower aCFR compared with hospitals that had Consultant presence for less than 4 hours per day (p<0.01) and also had a lower 28 day re-admission rate (p<0.01). An 'all inclusive' pattern of Consultant working, incorporating all the guideline recommendations and which included the minimum Consultant presence of 4 hours per day (29%) was associated with reduced excess weekend mortality (p<0.05). Hospitals with >40 acute medical admissions per day had a lower aCFR compared to hospitals with fewer than 40 admissions per day (p<0.03) and had a lower 7 day re-admission rate (p<0.02). This study is the first large study to explore the potential relationships between systems of providing acute medical care and clinical outcomes. The results show an association between well-designed systems of Consultant working practices, which promote increased patient contact, and improved patient outcomes in the acute hospital setting.

  7. Strategic direction or operational confusion: level of service user involvement in Irish acute admission unit care.

    PubMed

    Patton, D

    2013-04-01

    Mental health care in Ireland has been in the midst of a modernization of services since the mid 1980s. Embellished in this change agenda has been the need for better care and services with a particular emphasis on greater levels of user involvement. Acute admission units provide a setting for mental health care to be delivered to people who are unable to be cared for in a community setting. Through discussion of findings from semi-structured telephone interviews with 18 acute admission unit staff nurses, the aim of this paper is to explore the level of involvement service users have in acute unit care in Ireland. Reporting on one qualitative component of a larger mixed method study, findings will show that acute admission unit staff nurses generally involve service users in their care by facilitating their involvement in the nursing process, interacting with them regularly and using different communication approaches. However, participants identified barriers to service user involvement, such as growing administrative duties. It can tentatively be claimed that, within an Irish context, acute admission unit service users are involved in their care and are communicated with in an open and transparent way.

  8. The quality of patient experience of short-stay acute medical admissions: findings of the Adult Inpatient Survey in England.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Paul; Harris, Mary L; Bell, Derek

    2013-12-01

    Introduction of the specialty of acute medicine and of acute medical units (AMUs) in the UK have been associated with improvements in mortality, length of stay and flow, but there is no literature on the patient experience during the early phase of acute medical admissions. We analysed the Adult Inpatient Survey (AIPS) findings for short-stay unscheduled medical admissions who did not move from their first admission ward (n=3325) and therefore are likely to have been managed entirely in the AMU. We compared these with short-stay emergencies in other specialties (n=3420) and short-stay scheduled admissions (n=10,347). Scheduled admissions reported a better experience for all survey items. Scores for unscheduled admissions were worse in medical patients compared with other specialties for pain control, privacy, involvement, information, and for a number of questions relating to information on discharge. The specialty of acute medicine should work to improve future patient experience.

  9. Admission From Nursing Home Residence Increases Acute Mortality After Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Pim A. D.; Bot, Arjan G. J.; Neuhaus, Valentin; Menendez, Mariano E.; Vrahas, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the effect of preinjury residence on inpatient mortality following hip fracture. This study addressed whether (1) admission from a nursing home residence and (2) admission from another hospital were associated with higher inpatient mortality after a hip fracture. Methods: Using the National Hospital Discharge Survey database, we analyzed an estimated 2 124 388 hip fractures discharges, from 2001 to 2007. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify whether admission from a nursing home and admission from another hospital were independent risk factors for inpatient mortality. Our primary null hypothesis is that there is no difference in inpatient mortality rates after hip fracture in patients admitted from a nursing home, compared to other forms of admission. The secondary null hypothesis is that there is no difference in inpatient mortality after hip fracture in patients whose source of admission was another hospital, compared to other sources of admission. Results: Almost 4% of the patients were admitted from a nursing home and 6% from another hospital. The mean age was 79 years and 71% were women. The majority of patients were treated with internal fixation. Admission from a nursing home residence (odds ratio [OR] of 2.1, confidence interval [CI] 1.9-2.3) and prior hospital stay (OR 3.4, CI 3.2-3.7) were associated with a higher risk of inpatient mortality after accounting for other comorbidities and type of treatment. Conclusions: Patients transferred to an acute care hospital from a long-term care facility or another acute care hospital are at particularly high risk of inpatient death. This subset of patients should be considered separately from patients admitted from other sources. Level of Evidence: Prognostic level II. PMID:26328224

  10. Reduced Admissions for Acute Myocardial Infarction Associated with a Public Smoking Ban: Matched Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, Dong-Chul; Torabi, Mohammad R.

    2007-01-01

    There has been no research linking implementation of a public smoking ban and reduced incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) among nonsmoking patients. An ex post facto matched control group study was conducted to determine whether there was a change in hospital admissions for AMI among nonsmoking patients after a public smoking ban was…

  11. Seasonal pattern in admissions and mortality from acute myocardial infarction in elderly patients in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Hosseini, Shidokht; Baradaran, Hamid Reza; Roohafza, Hamidreza; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Asadi-Lari, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Seasonal variation in admissions and mortality due to acute myocardial infarction has been observed in different countries. Since there are scarce reports about this variation in Iran, this study was carried out to determine the existence of seasonal rhythms in hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction, and in mortality due to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in elderly patients in Isfahan city. METHODS This prospective hospital-based study included a total of 3990 consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction admitted to 13 hospitals from January 2002 to December 2007. Seasonal variations were analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier table, log rank test, and Cox regression model. RESULTS There was a statistically significant relationship between the occurrence of heart disease based on season and type of acute myocardial infarction anatomical (P < 0.001). The relationship between the occurrence of death and season and type of AMI according to International Classification of Diseases code 10 (ICD) was also observed and it was statistically significant (P = 0.026). Hazard ratio for death from acute myocardial infarction were 0.96 [Confidence interval of 95% (95% CI) = 0.78-1.18], 0.9 (95%CI = 0.73-1.11), and 1.04 (95%CI = 0.85-1.26) during spring, summer, and winter, respectively. CONCLUSION There is seasonal variation in hospital admission and mortality due to AMI; however, after adjusting in the model only gender and age were significant predictor factors. PMID:24963314

  12. Stable admission rate for acute asthma in Danish children since 1977.

    PubMed

    Sevelsted, Astrid; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Bisgaard, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Childhood asthma is consistently reported to have increased in recent decades in most westernized countries, but it is unknown if this increase is similar across severities. We aimed to study the time-trend of acute hospital admission and readmission for asthma of school-aged children in the recent 35 years in Denmark. We analyzed time-trends in the national incidence rate of hospitalization for acute severe asthma in children aged 5-15 in Denmark during the 35-year period 1977-2012 in the Danish national registry. Only in-patient admissions with a principal diagnosis of asthma (ICD-8: 493** or ICD-10: J45** or J46**) were included. Among children with asthma hospitalizations, we investigated the risk of readmission beyond 1 month of first admission. Admissions were summarized as rates per thousand person years at risk. The overall time-trend is stable with a rate of one admission per year per thousand children at risk and a per-year incidence rate ratio 0.999 [95 % CI 0.997-1.001]. The rate of any readmission decreased from approximately 20 per thousand children in the eighties to less than 10 in the early nineties before stabilizing at around 10 per thousand children from mid-nineties and onwards. During 35 years of nation-wide follow-up, we find a highly stable incidence rate of first hospital admission for acute severe asthma in children. Moreover, rates of readmission halved during the seventies and stabilized in the last twenty years. In conclusion, our data suggest that the reported increase in childhood asthma is mainly due to less severe cases.

  13. Police referrals to a psychiatric hospital: experiences of nurses caring for police-referred admissions.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Reshin; O'Brien, Louise; Gillies, Donna; Andrew, Sharon

    2013-08-01

    Police are a major source of referral to psychiatric hospitals in industrialized countries with mental health legislation. However, little attention has been paid to nurses' experience of caring for police-referred patients to psychiatric hospitals. This study utilized a Heideggerian phenomenological framework to explore the experiences of nine nurses caring for patients referred by the police, through semistructured interviews. Two major themes emerged from the hermeneutic analyses of interviews conducted with nurse participants: (i) 'expecting "the worst" '; and (ii) 'balancing therapeutic care and forced treatment'. Expecting 'the worst' related to the perceptions nurse participants had about patients referred by the police. This included two sub-themes: (i) 'we are here to care for whoever they bring in'; and (ii) 'but who deserves care?' The second theme balancing therapeutic care and forced treatment included the sub-themes: (i) 'taking control, taking care'; and (ii) 'managing power'. The study raises ethical and skill challenges for nursing including struggling with the notion of who deserves care, and balancing the imperatives of legislation with the need to work within a therapeutic framework. PMID:23009594

  14. Reassessing the high proportion of involuntary psychiatric hospital admissions in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Bola, John R; Park, Eon-Ha; Kim, Seong-Yeon

    2011-10-01

    The 2007 WHO-AIMS report on the mental health system of South Korea documented progress towards a national mental health plan, protection of human rights, and growth of community based services. Yet concern was expressed that the high proportion of involuntary to total psychiatric hospitalizations (92%) may indicate an excessively coercive system. Involuntary hospitalization in Korea rose from 117 to 132 (per 100,000) between 2000 and 2006. In 2000, the median rate in the European Union (EU) was 74 per 100,000 (Range: 6-218). While Korea's involuntary hospitalization rate is within the EU range, its proportion of involuntary hospitalizations is three times that of the highest EU country (30%, Sweden). Underdevelopment of voluntary psychiatric services and culturally mandated family referrals resulting in involuntary hospitalization are apparent reasons for the high proportion of involuntary hospitalizations. Population-based rates per 100,000 more accurately describe involuntary hospitalization than the proportion (ratio) measure used in the WHO-AIMS reports. PMID:21416122

  15. Switch Function and Pathological Dissociation in Acute Psychiatric Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chui-De; Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chien, Yi-Ling; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Liu, Chih-Min; Yeh, Yei-Yu; Hwu, Hai-Gwo

    2016-01-01

    Swift switching, along with atypical ability on updating and inhibition, has been found in non-clinical dissociators. However, whether swift switching is a cognitive endophenotype that intertwines with traumatisation and pathological dissociation remains unknown. Unspecified acute psychiatric patients were recruited to verify a hypothesis that pathological dissociation is associated with swift switching and traumatisation may explain this relationship. Behavioural measures of intellectual function and three executive functions including updating, switching and inhibition were administered, together with standardised scales to evaluate pathological dissociation and traumatisation. Our results showed superior control ability on switching and updating in inpatients who displayed more symptoms of pathological dissociation. When all three executive functions were entered as predictors, in addition to intellectual quotient and demographic variables to regress upon pathological dissociation, switching rather than updating remained the significant predictor. Importantly, the relationship between pathological dissociation and switching became non-significant when the effect of childhood trauma were controlled. The results support a trauma-related switching hypothesis which postulates swift switching as a cognitive endophenotype of pathological dissociation; traumatisation in childhood may explain the importance of swift switching. PMID:27123578

  16. Tensions between policy and practice: A qualitative analysis of decisions regarding compulsory admission to psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Fistein, Elizabeth C; Clare, Isabel C H; Redley, Marcus; Holland, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    The use of detention for psychiatric treatment is widespread and sometimes necessary. International human rights law requires a legal framework to safeguard the rights to liberty and personal integrity by preventing arbitrary detention. However, research suggests that extra-legal factors may influence decisions to detain. This article presents observational and interview data to describe how decisions to detain are made in practice in one jurisdiction (England and Wales) where a tension between policy and practice has been described. The analysis shows that practitioners mould the law into 'practical criteria' that appear to form a set of operational criteria for identifying cases to which the principle of soft paternalism may be applied. Most practitioners also appear willing, albeit often reluctantly, to depart from their usual reliance on the principle of soft paternalism and authorise detention of people with the capacity to refuse treatment, in order to prevent serious harm. We propose a potential resolution for the tension between policy and practice: two separate legal frameworks to authorise detention, one with a suitable test of capacity, used to enact soft paternalism, and the other to provide legal justification for detention for psychiatric treatment of the small number of people who retain decision-making capacity but nonetheless choose to place others at risk by refusing treatment. This separation of detention powers into two systems, according to the principle that justifies the use of detention would be intellectually coherent, consistent with human rights instruments and, being consistent with the apparent moral sentiments of practitioners, less prone to idiosyncratic interpretations in practice. PMID:27062108

  17. A prospective study of lipids and serotonin as risk markers of violence and self-harm in acute psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Roaldset, John O; Bakken, Anne M; Bjørkly, Stål

    2011-04-30

    Cross-sectional studies have reported an association between lipids and serotonin levels and aggression, but a literature search revealed a paucity of prospective studies. Subjects of the present naturalistic study were 254 of all (489) involuntary and voluntary acutely admitted patients to a psychiatric hospital during 1year. Serum lipids and platelet serotonin at admission were prospectively compared with recorded intra-institutional and 1-year post-discharge violence and self-harm. Total cholesterol had a significant negative relationship to inpatient suicidal behaviour and inpatient violent behaviour and to 3-month post-discharge violent behaviour. Triglycerides were a significant marker of inpatient self-mutilation and of self-mutilation in combination with suicidal behaviour at 3 and 12 months of follow-up. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) had a significant negative relationship to violence at 12-months, and to repeated violence in seven patients with two or more admissions. The post-discharge relationships between total cholesterol and violence and between triglycerides and self-harm remained significant even when controlling for other possible explanatory variables in a multivariate model. Results did not change after controlling for current medication at admission. There was no association between platelet serotonin and violence or self-harm. Future research may examine if lipid measurements add incremental validity to established clinical risk assessment procedures of violent and self-harm behaviour.

  18. [Androcur (cyproterone acetate in sex offenses--follow-up of psychiatric admissions].

    PubMed

    Ahrens, R

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the follow-up study of 31 sexual offenders with diminished criminal responsibility or irresponsibility who were treated with Androcur (cyproterone acetate, CPA) in depot injection form connected with psychotherapy during and after their legal psychiatric hospitalisation. There were paedophiliac, exhibitionistic, hetero-sexual aggressive, and mixed sexual deviant acts. 30 patients were visited by the author in their environment, 1 patient had died. Half of the patients had a hetero-sexual relationship. 3 patients had children. 28 of the 31 patients were free. After the treatment with CPA 2 kinds of relapses could be distinguished: homologue r. (4 pat.) and residual r. (5 pat.). As to the duration of the treatment after discharge, 2 groups of patients can be distinguished: 1 group needed Androcur for a comparatively short time (up to c. 3 years), the other group for a longer time (up to c. 5 years). The anti-androgenic treatment was accompanied by psychotherapy and social therapy as well as during the hospitalisation and after discharge. The mutual effect of Androcur and psychotherapy was successful as is to be seen by the final result of this follow-up study.

  19. Psychiatric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Wheat, Santina; Dschida, Dorothy; Talen, Mary R

    2016-06-01

    Psychiatric emergencies are acute disturbances in thought, behavior, mood, or social relationship that require immediate intervention as defined by the patient, family, or social unit to save the patient and/or others from imminent danger. Ensuring the safety of the patient, surrounding persons, and the medical team is the first step of evaluation. Treatment focuses on stabilization of the patient, then on specific symptoms and ultimately the cause of symptoms. There are important legal considerations, particularly regarding involuntary admissions. It is important to debrief with the patient, surrounding family, and the health care team to ensure a continued therapeutic alliance and the emotional health of all involved. PMID:27262012

  20. Challenges in Obtaining HIV Testing in an Acute Involuntary Inpatient Psychiatric Setting.

    PubMed

    Weller, Jennifer; Levitt, Gwen; Myers, Robert; Riley, Aaron; Gesmundo, Celsius-Kit

    2016-01-01

    Even in health care professions, a stigma remains for patients with co-occurring HIV and serious mental illness. Researchers at a large, urban medical center encountered this stigma when they attempted to initiate a study of cognition in psychiatric inpatients with and without HIV who were seen as vulnerable in the context of research. Education efforts and advocacy on the part of the research team was instrumental and resulted in system-wide changes in the hospital, including the addition of HIV testing to the psychiatric admission laboratory panel. Within the first year that routine laboratory orders included an HIV test, the rate of testing ordered by inpatient-attending psychiatrists reached 60% of admissions. As of 2014, 13 HIV tests were found to be HIV seropositive in inpatients, with four of those cases classified as new-onset, as opposed to two positive tests in the year prior to our study. PMID:27426407

  1. Acute kidney injury on admission to the intensive care unit: where to go from here?

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Marlies

    2008-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common problem, especially in critically ill patients. In Critical Care, Kolhe and colleagues report that 6.3% of 276,731 patients in 170 intensive care units (ICUs) in the UK had evidence of severe AKI within the first 24 hours of admission to ICU. ICU and hospital mortality as well as length of stay in hospital were significantly increased. In light of this serious burden on individuals and the health system in general, the following commentary discusses the current state of knowledge of AKI in ICU and calls for more attention to preventive strategies.

  2. Vulnerabilities to Temperature Effects on Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Bo Yeon; Lee, Eunil; Lee, Suji; Heo, Seulkee; Jo, Kyunghee; Kim, Jinsun; Park, Man Sik

    2015-01-01

    Most previous studies have focused on the association between acute myocardial function (AMI) and temperature by gender and age. Recently, however, concern has also arisen about those most susceptible to the effects of temperature according to socioeconomic status (SES). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI by subpopulations (gender, age, living area, and individual SES) in South Korea. The Korea National Health Insurance (KNHI) database was used to examine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI during 2004–2012. We analyzed the increase in AMI hospital admissions both above and below a threshold temperature using Poisson generalized additive models (GAMs) for hot, cold, and warm weather. The Medicaid group, the lowest SES group, had a significantly higher RR of 1.37 (95% CI: 1.07–1.76) for heat and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.04–1.20) for cold among subgroups, while also showing distinctly higher risk curves than NHI for both hot and cold weather. In additions, females, older age group, and those living in urban areas had higher risks from hot and cold temperatures than males, younger age group, and those living in rural areas. PMID:26580643

  3. Nurse-police coalition: improves safety in acute psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Allen, Diane E; Harris, Frank N; de Nesnera, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Although police officers protect and secure the safety of citizens everywhere, nurses are the primary guardians of patient safety within the treatment milieu. At New Hampshire Hospital, both nurses and police officers share ownership of this responsibility, depending on the needs that arise specific to each profession. Psychiatric nurses take pride in their ability to de-escalate agitated and potentially aggressive patients; however, times arise when the best efforts of nurses fail, or when a situation requires intervention from police officers. Nurses and police officers at New Hampshire Hospital have worked together for many years to develop a trusting, respectful alliance. This coalition has resulted in a safe, clear, orderly process for transfer of authority from nurses to police during violent, clinically unmanageable psychiatric emergencies. Nurses and police officers work collaboratively toward the common goal of ensuring safety for patients and staff, while also acknowledging the unique strengths of each profession.

  4. Apparent temperature and acute myocardial infarction hospital admissions in Copenhagen, Denmark: a case-crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The influence of temperature on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has not been investigated as extensively as the effects of broader outcomes of morbidity and mortality. Sixteen studies reported inconsistent results and two considered confounding by air pollution. We addressed some of the methodological limitations of the previous studies in this study. Methods This is the first study of the association between the daily 3-hour maximum apparent temperature (Tappmax) and AMI hospital admissions in Copenhagen. The study period covered 1 January 1999-31 December 2006, stratified in warm (April - September) and cold (October - March) periods. A case-crossover epidemiology study design was applied. Models were adjusted for public holidays and influenza, confounding by PM10, NO2 and CO was investigated, the lag and non-linear effects of Tappmax was examined, effect modification by age, sex and SES was explored, and the results of the case-crossover models were compared to those of the generalised additive Poisson time-series and generalised estimating equation models. Results 14 456 AMI hospital admissions (12 995 people) occurred during the study period. For an inter-quartile range (6 or 7°C) increase in the 5-day cumulative average of Tappmax, a 4% (95% CI:-2%; 10%) and 9% (95% CI: 3%; 14%) decrease in the AMI admission rate was observed in the warm and cold periods, respectively. The 19-65 year old group, men and highest SES group seemed to be more susceptible in the cold period. Conclusion An increase in Tappmax is associated with a decrease in AMI admissions during the colder months. PMID:22463704

  5. Utilizing Chinese Admission Records for MACE Prediction of Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Danqing; Huang, Zhengxing; Chan, Tak-Ming; Dong, Wei; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) prediction of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is important for a number of applications including physician decision support, quality of care assessment, and efficient healthcare service delivery on ACS patients. Admission records, as typical media to contain clinical information of patients at the early stage of their hospitalizations, provide significant potential to be explored for MACE prediction in a proactive manner. Methods: We propose a hybrid approach for MACE prediction by utilizing a large volume of admission records. Firstly, both a rule-based medical language processing method and a machine learning method (i.e., Conditional Random Fields (CRFs)) are developed to extract essential patient features from unstructured admission records. After that, state-of-the-art supervised machine learning algorithms are applied to construct MACE prediction models from data. Results: We comparatively evaluate the performance of the proposed approach on a real clinical dataset consisting of 2930 ACS patient samples collected from a Chinese hospital. Our best model achieved 72% AUC in MACE prediction. In comparison of the performance between our models and two well-known ACS risk score tools, i.e., GRACE and TIMI, our learned models obtain better performances with a significant margin. Conclusions: Experimental results reveal that our approach can obtain competitive performance in MACE prediction. The comparison of classifiers indicates the proposed approach has a competitive generality with datasets extracted by different feature extraction methods. Furthermore, our MACE prediction model obtained a significant improvement by comparison with both GRACE and TIMI. It indicates that using admission records can effectively provide MACE prediction service for ACS patients at the early stage of their hospitalizations. PMID:27649220

  6. Diagnostic importance of admission platelet volume indices in patients with acute chest pain suggesting acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Mohammad Reza; Taghipour-Sani, Leila; Rezaei, Yousef; Rostami, Rahim

    2014-01-01

    Objective Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a challenging issue in cardiovascular medicine. Given platelet role in atherothrombosis, we sought to determine whether platelet indices can be used as diagnostic tests for patients who suffered from an acute chest discomfort. Methods We prospectively enrolled 862 patients with an acute chest pain and 184 healthy matched controls. They were divided into four groups: 184 controls, 249 of non-ACS, 421 of unstable angina (UA), and 192 of myocardial infarction (MI) cases. Blood samples were collected at admission to the emergency department for routine hematologic tests. Results The mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), and platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR) were significantly greater in patients with MI compared with those of non-ACS or control subjects. Negative and significant correlations existed between MPV, PDW, and P-LCR values and platelet count (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves showed that the MPV, PDW, and P-LCR with cut-off values of 9.15 fL, 11.35 fL, and 20.25% and with area under the curves of 0.563, 0.557, and 0.560, respectively, detected MI patients among those who had chest discomfort. The sensitivities and specificities were found to be 72% and 40%, 73% and 37%, and 68% and 44% for MPV, PDW, and P-LCR, respectively. Conclusion An elevated admission MPV, PDW, and P-LCR may be of benefit to detect chest pain resulting in MI from that of non-cardiac one, and also for risk stratification of patients who suffered from an acute chest discomfort. PMID:25634396

  7. Clinical Application of the "Scribble Technique" with Adults in an Acute Inpatient Psychiatric Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanes, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    The "scribble technique," described by Florence Cane's book, "The Artist in Each of Us" (1983), has historically been employed by art therapists as a technique to reduce inhibitions and liberate spontaneous imagery from the unconscious. Reviews the technique and presents examples produced by adult patients in an acute inpatient psychiatric ward.…

  8. Why are some patients admitted to psychiatric hospital while others are not? A study assessing risk during the admission interview and relationship to outcome.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Glenn E; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; O'Connor, Nick; Cleary, Michelle

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine what patient characteristics are used to decide whether a patient is or is not admitted to a psychiatric hospital, and what happens to those not admitted. A further aim was to determine if high levels of risk on admission predict seclusions, length of stay, or readmission within 28 days. Data were collected prospectively on consecutive presentations to an admission office via case notes and electronic databases. Eighty percent (100/127) of the adults presenting to the admission office over a typical month were admitted to hospital. Patients were more likely to be admitted if they were experiencing psychosis or exacerbation of schizophrenia, referred by other doctors or mental health teams, had a legal reason for referral, or if they were homeless. There was no association between risk for violence or suicide and seclusion rates, length of stay, or being readmitted within 28 days. It was reassuring to find that 85% of those not admitted were referred to other mental health providers, and none required admission over the following month. This study found high rates of seclusion and readmissions within 1 year, which requires further study to find strategies to reduce these rates. PMID:22039923

  9. Fostering a culture of engagement: a pilot study of the outcomes of training mental health nurses working in two UK acute admission units in brief solution-focused therapy techniques.

    PubMed

    Hosany, Z; Wellman, N; Lowe, T

    2007-10-01

    It is widely acknowledged that there are major concerns about quality of care, ward atmosphere, the nature of nurse-patient interactions and patient outcomes in UK psychiatric acute admission units. Brief solution-focused therapy (SFT) is an approach which aims to shift the focus of interactions in professional care away from the traditional concentration on an individual's problems and weaknesses towards a more proactive identification of their strengths and positive coping mechanisms. This approach relies on a collaborative engagement with patients, in which the nurse or therapist using simple language aims to help the patient construct a plan to ensure their immediate safety while working to identify, focus on and reinforce their strengths and coping mechanisms in the achievement of identified future goals. This paper reports on a pilot study whose principal objective was to determine whether a short training in brief SFT for psychiatric nurses can produce measurable improvements in nurse-patient interactions in two psychiatric acute admission wards. In this study, 36 nurses undertook a 2-day training course in SFT and were followed up 3 months after training. Positive results were obtained on a number of measures indicating that nurses had acquired knowledge and skills and were applying SFT techniques in their clinical work.

  10. Observational, longitudinal study of delirium in consecutive unselected acute medical admissions: age-specific rates and associated factors, mortality and re-admission

    PubMed Central

    Pendlebury, ST; Lovett, NG; Smith, SC; Dutta, N; Bendon, C; Lloyd-Lavery, A; Mehta, Z; Rothwell, PM

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to determine age-specific rates of delirium and associated factors in acute medicine, and the impact of delirium on mortality and re-admission on long-term follow-up. Design Observational study. Consecutive patients over two 8-week periods (2010, 2012) were screened for delirium on admission, using the confusion assessment method (CAM), and reviewed daily thereafter. Delirium diagnosis was made using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Fourth Edition (DSM IV) criteria. For patients aged ≥65 years, potentially important covariables identified in previous studies were collected with follow-up for death and re-admission until January 2014. Participants 503 consecutive patients (age median=72, range 16–99 years, 236 (48%) male). Setting Acute general medicine. Results Delirium occurred in 101/503 (20%) (71 on admission, 30 during admission, 17 both), with risk increasing from 3% (6/195) at <65 years to 14% (10/74) for 65–74 years and 36% (85/234) at ≥75 years (p<0.0001). Among 308 patients aged >65 years, after adjustment for age, delirium was associated with previous falls (OR=2.47, 95% CI 1.45 to 4.22, p=0.001), prior dementia (2.08, 1.10 to 3.93, p=0.024), dependency (2.58, 1.48 to 4.48, p=0.001), low cognitive score (5.00, 2.50 to 9.99, p<0.0001), dehydration (3.53, 1.91 to 6.53, p<0.0001), severe illness (1.98, 1.17 to 3.38, p=0.011), pressure sore risk (5.56, 2.60 to 11.88, p<0.0001) and infection (4.88, 2.85 to 8.36, p<0.0001). Patients with delirium were more likely to fall (OR=4.55, 1.47 to 14.05, p=0.008), be incontinent of urine (3.76, 2.15 to 6.58, p<0.0001) or faeces (3.49, 1.81–6.73, p=0.0002) and be catheterised (5.08, 2.44 to 10.54, p<0.0001); and delirium was associated with stay >7 days (2.82, 1.68 to 4.75, p<0.0001), death (4.56, 1.71 to 12.17, p=0.003) and an increase in dependency among survivors (2.56, 1.37 to 4.76, p=0.003) with excess mortality still evident at 2-year follow-up. Patients with

  11. Can the US minimum data set be used for predicting admissions to acute care facilities?

    PubMed

    Abbott, P A; Quirolgico, S; Candidate, D; Manchand, R; Canfield, K; Adya, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper is intended to give an overview of Knowledge Discovery in Large Datasets (KDD) and data mining applications in healthcare particularly as related to the Minimum Data Set, a resident assessment tool which is used in US long-term care facilities. The US Health Care Finance Administration, which mandates the use of this tool, has accumulated massive warehouses of MDS data. The pressure in healthcare to increase efficiency and effectiveness while improving patient outcomes requires that we find new ways to harness these vast resources. The intent of this preliminary study design paper is to discuss the development of an approach which utilizes the MDS, in conjunction with KDD and classification algorithms, in an attempt to predict admission from a long-term care facility to an acute care facility. The use of acute care services by long term care residents is a negative outcome, potentially avoidable, and expensive. The value of the MDS warehouse can be realized by the use of the stored data in ways that can improve patient outcomes and avoid the use of expensive acute care services. This study, when completed, will test whether the MDS warehouse can be used to describe patient outcomes and possibly be of predictive value. PMID:10384674

  12. Hospital Admissions for Acute Myocardial Infarction, Angina, Stroke, and Asthma After Implementation of Arizona's Comprehensive Statewide Smoking Ban

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Michele E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the impact of Arizona's May 2007 comprehensive statewide smoking ban on hospital admissions for diagnoses for which there is evidence of a causal relationship with secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure (acute myocardial infarction [AMI], angina, stroke, and asthma). Methods. We compared monthly hospital admissions from January 2004 through May 2008 for these primary diagnoses and 4 diagnoses not associated with SHS (appendicitis, kidney stones, acute cholecystitis, and ulcers) for Arizona counties with preexisting county or municipal smoking bans and counties with no previous bans. We attributed reductions in admissions to the statewide ban if they occurred only in diagnoses associated with SHS and if they were larger in counties with no previous bans. We analyzed the data with Poisson regressions, controlling for seasonality and admissions trends. We also estimated cost savings. Results. Statistically significant reductions in hospital admissions were seen for AMI, angina, stroke, and asthma in counties with no previous bans over what was seen in counties with previous bans. No ban variable coefficients were statistically significant for diagnoses not associated with SHS. Conclusions. Arizona's statewide smoking ban decreased hospital admissions for AMI, stroke, asthma, and angina. PMID:20466955

  13. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk assessment and prophylaxis in acute orthopaedic admissions: improving compliance with national guidelines.

    PubMed

    Watts, Laura; Grant, David

    2014-01-01

    "Each year over 25,000 people die from Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) contracted in hospital. This is more than the combined total of deaths from breast cancer, AIDS and traffic accidents". (1) Orthopaedic patients are at particular risk of VTE. In 2011, the project team carried out an audit into compliance with national VTE assessment guidelines on all acute trauma and orthopaedic admissions during a two week period at a District General Hospital. The study demonstrated that compliance was initially low, but showed a large improvement following the implementation of simple measures. The measures included: asking consultants to remind junior doctors, putting posters up in the trauma doctors office, asking nursing staff to check for a VTE assessment on admission to the ward, and putting reminders on the patient name board. The project team subsequently recommended an alteration to the hospital's computer system to incorporate a check of VTE assessment and prophylaxis. A second assessment using the same methodology sought to assess whether the previous improvements were sustained and the impact of this computer system alteration. Overall, compliance with national VTE guidance improved further.

  14. [Relationship between the courses of clinical Features of patients with schizophrenia in adolescents and admission to psychiatric clinic].

    PubMed

    Hattori, Isao; Miyauchi, Toshiro

    2005-01-01

    In order to improve diagnosis of schizophrenia with onset in adolescents at an early stage, we investigated in detail the clinical features of 74 patients with schizophrenia, (23 males) at adolescents psychiatric clinic. Many of the subjects had been suffering from the illness about 14 years old but had not undergone their first psychiatric examination until a few years later. A high percentage (more than 80%) of our subjects presented psychiatric symptoms such as delusional remembrance, delusional moods, delusions of persecution and hypobulia. Additionally, more than 60% of our subjects presented auditory hallucinations. In general, teenage patients with schizophrenia onset show vague symptoms such as anxiety, embarrassment and strange moods rather than obvious hallucinations. Nevertheless, it was possible to identify certain clinical features of this disorder in adolescents: many patients suffer delusional remembrance, delusional moods and delusions of persecution immediately after the onset of the illness. Gradually, problematic behaviors such as anorexia, self injury, offences against their families, voluntary vomiting, etc., develop, but patients do not always receive psychiatric examination at this stage. After socially obvious problems such as school refusal, withdrawal from social activities and lowering of school record develop over a period of time, patients may be urged to undergo psychiatric examination. Our research again underlines the difficulty of achieving diagnosis of schizophrenia at an early stage. The key to early diagnosis appears to be the accurate identification of psychiatric symptoms in the early stages of the illness at school, or at home if possible, before socially problematic behaviors arise.

  15. [Neurological and psychiatric disorders following acute arsine poisoning (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Frank, G

    1976-07-15

    Follow-up study of 6 workers, who after survival of an acute arsine poisoning, developed psychopathologic and neurologic abnormalities. The symptoms appeared after a latency of 1 to 6 months indicating a toxic polyneuropathy and a mild psycho-organic syndrome. The severity of these reversible manifestations was directly related to the period of time of exposure to arsine. The clinical picture of arsine polyneuropathy was similar to that observed in arsenic poisoning, suggesting that arsine polyneuropathy is due to the action of arsenic. The psychopathologic syndrome corresponds to the so-called "Vergiftungsspätfolgesyndrom" and therefore does not appear to be a specific sequel of arsine poisoning.

  16. Improving venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in acute urological admissions during out of hours through the introduction of a urological admission proforma.

    PubMed

    Gerakopoulos, Efstratios

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) kills more people than breast cancer, road traffic accidents, and AIDS combined, accounting for approximately 25,000 in-hospital deaths in England annually. The cost to the NHS is estimated at £640 million/annum. The most important element of VTE risk assessment strategy in England is to risk assess all patients for VTE on admission. The aim of our quality improvement programme (QIP) was to monitor our practice regarding VTE prophylaxis of the patients' admitted urgently in our department, and then implement a measure to increase compliance if found to be poor. Our standards were based on the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines which state that all urgently admitted patients must have a completed VTE assessment form within 24 hours of admission and receive appropriate VTE prophylaxis including low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and/or TED stockings. Our initial audit was conducted over a period of five weeks. All adult patients acutely admitted out of hours (5pm to 8am) were included. We then introduced a specially designed urological admissions proforma and organised several teaching sessions for junior doctors who facilitated acute admissions. Re-audit was performed using the same methods and timescale measuring improvement. Second re-audit six months after the introduction of the proforma, following the induction of the new cohort of junior doctors. - Primary audit: n=44. Proportion of: completed VTE form=56%, LMWH appropriately prescribed=65%,TEDS=35%. VTE related complications=3 - 1st re-audit: n=42. Proportion of: completed VTE form=93%, LMWH appropriately prescribed=83%,TEDS=64%. VTE related complications=0 - 2nd re-audit:n=43. Proportion of: completed VTE form=92%, LMWH prescribed=84%, TEDS=76%. VTE related complications=1 There has been a significant increase of compliance with the NICE guidelines regarding VTE prophylaxis within our department through introducing the specially designed

  17. 28 CFR 549.42 - Involuntary admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Administrative Safeguards for Psychiatric Treatment and Medication § 549.42 Involuntary admission... voluntarily consent either to psychiatric admission or to medication, is subject to judicial...

  18. 28 CFR 549.42 - Involuntary admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Administrative Safeguards for Psychiatric Treatment and Medication § 549.42 Involuntary admission... voluntarily consent either to psychiatric admission or to medication, is subject to judicial...

  19. Characteristics of patients frequently subjected to pharmacological and mechanical restraint--a register study in three Norwegian acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Knutzen, Maria; Bjørkly, Stål; Eidhammer, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Steinar; Mjøsund, Nina Helen; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Sandvik, Leiv; Friis, Svein

    2014-01-30

    This retrospective study from three catchment-area-based acute psychiatric wards showed that of all the pharmacologically and mechanically restrained patients (n=373) 34 (9.1%) had been frequently restrained (6 or more times). These patients accounted for 39.2% of all restraint episodes during the two-year study period. Adjusted binary logistic regression analyses showed that the odds for being frequently restrained were 91% lower among patients above 50 years compared to those aged 18-29 years; a threefold increase (OR=3.1) for those admitted 3 times or more compared to patients with only one stay; and, finally, a threefold increase (OR=3.1) if the length of stay was 16 days or more compared to those admitted for 0-4 days. Among frequently restrained patients, males (n=15) had significantly longer stays than women (n=19), and 8 of the females had a diagnosis of personality disorder, compared to none among males. Our study showed that being frequently restrained was associated with long inpatient stay, many admissions and young age. Teasing out patient characteristics associated with the risk of being frequently restraint may contribute to reduce use of restraint by developing alternative interventions for these patients.

  20. Hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction before and after implementation of a comprehensive smoke-free policy in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Sebrié, Ernesto Marcelo; Sandoya, Edgardo; Hyland, Andrew; Bianco, Eduardo; Glantz, Stanton A; Cummings, K Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Stimulated by the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, many countries in Latin America adopted comprehensive smoke-free policies. In March 2006, Uruguay became the first Latin American country to adopt 100% smoke-free national legislation, which ended smoking in all indoor public places and workplaces, including restaurants and bars. The objective of this study was to evaluate trends in hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease 2 years before and 2 years after the policy was implemented in Uruguay. Methods Reports of hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (International Classification of Disease-10 I21) from 37 hospitals (79% of all hospital admissions in the country), representing the period 2 years before and 2 years after the adoption of a nationwide smoke-free policy in Uruguay (between 1 March 2004 and 29 February 2008), were reviewed. A time series analysis was undertaken to compare the average monthly number of events of hospital admission for AMI before and after the smoke-free law. Results A total of 7949 hospital admissions for AMI were identified during the 4-year study period. Two years after the smoke-free policy was enacted, hospital admissions for AMI fell by 22%. The same pattern and roughly the same magnitude of reduction in AMI admissions were observed for patients seen in public and private hospitals, men, women and people aged 40–65 years and older than 65 years. Conclusions The national smoke-free policy implemented in Uruguay in 2006 was associated with a significant reduction in hospital admissions for AMI. PMID:22337557

  1. A randomized trial of a mental health consumer-managed alternative to civil commitment for acute psychiatric crisis.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Thomas K; Stoneking, Beth C; Humphreys, Keith; Sundby, Evan; Bond, Jason

    2008-09-01

    This experiment compared the effectiveness of an unlocked, mental health consumer-managed, crisis residential program (CRP) to a locked, inpatient psychiatric facility (LIPF) for adults civilly committed for severe psychiatric problems. Following screening and informed consent, participants (n = 393) were randomized to the CRP or the LIPF and interviewed at baseline and at 30-day, 6-month, and 1-year post admission. Outcomes were costs, level of functioning, psychiatric symptoms, self-esteem, enrichment, and service satisfaction. Treatment outcomes were compared using hierarchical linear models. Participants in the CRP experienced significantly greater improvement on interviewer-rated and self-reported psychopathology than did participants in the LIPF condition; service satisfaction was dramatically higher in the CRP condition. CRP-style facilities are a viable alternative to psychiatric hospitalization for many individuals facing civil commitment. PMID:18626766

  2. Model-based testing for space-time interaction using point processes: An application to psychiatric hospital admissions in an urban area.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sebastian; Warnke, Ingeborg; Rössler, Wulf; Held, Leonhard

    2016-05-01

    Spatio-temporal interaction is inherent to cases of infectious diseases and occurrences of earthquakes, whereas the spread of other events, such as cancer or crime, is less evident. Statistical significance tests of space-time clustering usually assess the correlation between the spatial and temporal (transformed) distances of the events. Although appealing through simplicity, these classical tests do not adjust for the underlying population nor can they account for a distance decay of interaction. We propose to use the framework of an endemic-epidemic point process model to jointly estimate a background event rate explained by seasonal and areal characteristics, as well as a superposed epidemic component representing the hypothesis of interest. We illustrate this new model-based test for space-time interaction by analysing psychiatric inpatient admissions in Zurich, Switzerland (2007-2012). Several socio-economic factors were found to be associated with the admission rate, but there was no evidence of general clustering of the cases. PMID:27246269

  3. A Systematic Review of Music Therapy Practice and Outcomes with Acute Adult Psychiatric In-Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Catherine; Odell-Miller, Helen; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported. Review Methods A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis. Results 98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions. Conclusions No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to

  4. Risk of Care Home Placement following Acute Hospital Admission: Effects of a Pay-for-Performance Scheme for Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kasteridis, Panagiotis; Goddard, Maria; Jacobs, Rowena; Santos, Rita; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Beatriz; McGonigal, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Quality and Outcomes Framework, or QOF, rewards primary care doctors (GPs) in the UK for providing certain types of care. Since 2006, GPs have been paid to identify patients with dementia and to conduct an annual review of their mental and physical health. During the review, the GP also assesses the carer’s support needs, including impact of caring, and ensures that services are co-ordinated across care settings. In principle, this type of care should reduce the risk of admission to long-term residential care directly from an acute hospital ward, a phenomenon considered to be indicative of poor quality care. However, this potential effect has not previously been tested. Methods Using English data from 2006/07 to 2010/11, we ran multilevel logit models to assess the impact of the QOF review on the risk of care home placement following emergency admission to acute hospital. Emergency admissions were defined for (a) people with a primary diagnosis of dementia and (b) people with dementia admitted for treatment of an ambulatory care sensitive condition. We adjusted for a wide range of potential confounding factors. Results Over the study period, 19% of individuals admitted to hospital with a primary diagnosis of dementia (N = 31,120) were discharged to a care home; of those admitted for an ambulatory care sensitive condition (N = 139,267), the corresponding figure was 14%. Risk factors for subsequent care home placement included older age, female gender, vascular dementia, incontinence, fall, hip fracture, and number of comorbidities. Better performance on the QOF review was associated with a lower risk of care home placement but only when the admission was for an ambulatory care sensitive condition. Conclusions The QOF dementia review may help to reduce the risk of long-term care home placement following acute hospital admission. PMID:27227403

  5. The effect of solar-geomagnetic activity during and after admission on survival in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vencloviene, Jone; Babarskiene, Ruta; Milvidaite, Irena; Kubilius, Raimondas; Stasionyte, Jolanta

    2014-08-01

    A number of studies have established the effects of solar-geomagnetic activity on the human cardio-vascular system. It is plausible that the heliophysical conditions existing during and after hospital admission may affect survival in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We analyzed data from 1,413 ACS patients who were admitted to the Hospital of Kaunas University of Medicine, Lithuania, and who survived for more than 4 days. We evaluated the associations between active-stormy geomagnetic activity (GMA), solar proton events (SPE), and solar flares (SF) that occurred 0-3 days before and after admission, and 2-year survival, based on Cox's proportional-hazards model, controlling for clinical data. After adjustment for clinical variables, active-stormy GMA on the 2nd day after admission was associated with an increased (by 1.58 times) hazard ratio (HR) of cardiovascular death (HR = 1.58, 95 % CI 1.07-2.32). For women, geomagnetic storm (GS) 2 days after SPE occurred 1 day after admission increased the HR by 3.91 times (HR = 3.91, 95 % CI 1.31-11.7); active-stormy GMA during the 2nd-3rd day after admission increased the HR by over 2.5 times (HR = 2.66, 95 % CI 1.40-5.03). In patients aged over 70 years, GS occurring 1 day before or 2 days after admission, increased the HR by 2.5 times, compared to quiet days; GS in conjunction with SF on the previous day, nearly tripled the HR (HR = 3.08, 95 % CI 1.32-7.20). These findings suggest that the heliophysical conditions before or after the admission affect the hazard ratio of lethal outcome; adjusting for clinical variables, these effects were stronger for women and older patients.

  6. The effect of solar-geomagnetic activity during and after admission on survival in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Vencloviene, Jone; Babarskiene, Ruta; Milvidaite, Irena; Kubilius, Raimondas; Stasionyte, Jolanta

    2014-08-01

    A number of studies have established the effects of solar-geomagnetic activity on the human cardio-vascular system. It is plausible that the heliophysical conditions existing during and after hospital admission may affect survival in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We analyzed data from 1,413 ACS patients who were admitted to the Hospital of Kaunas University of Medicine, Lithuania, and who survived for more than 4 days. We evaluated the associations between active-stormy geomagnetic activity (GMA), solar proton events (SPE), and solar flares (SF) that occurred 0-3 days before and after admission, and 2-year survival, based on Cox's proportional-hazards model, controlling for clinical data. After adjustment for clinical variables, active-stormy GMA on the 2nd day after admission was associated with an increased (by 1.58 times) hazard ratio (HR) of cardiovascular death (HR=1.58, 95 % CI 1.07-2.32). For women, geomagnetic storm (GS) 2 days after SPE occurred 1 day after admission increased the HR by 3.91 times (HR=3.91, 95 % CI 1.31-11.7); active-stormy GMA during the 2nd-3rd day after admission increased the HR by over 2.5 times (HR=2.66, 95 % CI 1.40-5.03). In patients aged over 70 years, GS occurring 1 day before or 2 days after admission, increased the HR by 2.5 times, compared to quiet days; GS in conjunction with SF on the previous day, nearly tripled the HR (HR=3.08, 95 % CI 1.32-7.20). These findings suggest that the heliophysical conditions before or after the admission affect the hazard ratio of lethal outcome; adjusting for clinical variables, these effects were stronger for women and older patients.

  7. Impact of admission serum total cholesterol level on in-hospital mortality in patients with acute aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xintian; Su, Xi; Zeng, Hesong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To find out the association between serum total cholesterol (TC) on admission and in-hospital mortality in patients with acute aortic dissection (AAD). Methods: From January 2007 to January 2014, we enrolled 1492 consecutive AAD patients with serum TC measured immediately on admission. Baseline characteristics and in-hospital mortality were compared between the patients with serum TC above and below the median (4.00 mmol/L). Propensity score matching (PSM) was used to account for known confounders in the study. Cox proportional hazard model was performed to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for admission serum TC levels. Results: With the use of PSM, 521 matched pairs of patients with AAD were yielded in this analysis due to their similar propensity scores. Patients with admission serum TC < 4.00 mmol/L, as compared with those with admission serum TC ≥ 4.00 mmol/L, had higher in-hospital mortality (11.7% vs. 5.8%; HR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.33-3.19, P = 0.001). Stratified analysis according to Stanford classification showed that the inverse association between admission serum TC and in-hospital mortality was observed in patients with Type-A AAD (24.0% vs. 11.3%; HR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.33 - 3.57, P = 0.002) but not in those with Type-B AAD (3.8% vs. 2.2%; HR, 1.71; 95% CI, 0.67 - 4.34, P = 0.261). Conclusions: Lower serum TC level on admission was strongly associated with higher in-hospital mortality in patients with Type-A AAD. PMID:27648044

  8. The effect of solar-geomagnetic activity during and after admission on survival in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Vencloviene, Jone; Babarskiene, Ruta; Milvidaite, Irena; Kubilius, Raimondas; Stasionyte, Jolanta

    2014-08-01

    A number of studies have established the effects of solar-geomagnetic activity on the human cardio-vascular system. It is plausible that the heliophysical conditions existing during and after hospital admission may affect survival in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We analyzed data from 1,413 ACS patients who were admitted to the Hospital of Kaunas University of Medicine, Lithuania, and who survived for more than 4 days. We evaluated the associations between active-stormy geomagnetic activity (GMA), solar proton events (SPE), and solar flares (SF) that occurred 0-3 days before and after admission, and 2-year survival, based on Cox's proportional-hazards model, controlling for clinical data. After adjustment for clinical variables, active-stormy GMA on the 2nd day after admission was associated with an increased (by 1.58 times) hazard ratio (HR) of cardiovascular death (HR=1.58, 95 % CI 1.07-2.32). For women, geomagnetic storm (GS) 2 days after SPE occurred 1 day after admission increased the HR by 3.91 times (HR=3.91, 95 % CI 1.31-11.7); active-stormy GMA during the 2nd-3rd day after admission increased the HR by over 2.5 times (HR=2.66, 95 % CI 1.40-5.03). In patients aged over 70 years, GS occurring 1 day before or 2 days after admission, increased the HR by 2.5 times, compared to quiet days; GS in conjunction with SF on the previous day, nearly tripled the HR (HR=3.08, 95 % CI 1.32-7.20). These findings suggest that the heliophysical conditions before or after the admission affect the hazard ratio of lethal outcome; adjusting for clinical variables, these effects were stronger for women and older patients. PMID:24018849

  9. Treatment needs, diagnoses and use of services for acutely admitted psychiatric patients in northwest Russia and northern Norway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We compared demography, diagnoses and clinical needs in acutely admitted psychiatric hospital patients in northwest Russia and northern Norway. Method All acutely admitted psychiatric patients in 1 psychiatric hospital in north-west Russia and 2 in northern Norway were in a three months period assessed with HoNOS and a Norwegian form developed to study acute psychiatric services (MAP). Data from a total of 841 patients were analysed (377 Norwegian, 464 Russian) with univariate and multivariate statistics. Results Russian patients were more often males who had paid work. 2/3 were diagnosed with alcohol and organic disorders, and 70% reported problems related to sleep. Depression was widespread, as were problems associated with occupation. Many more Norwegian patients were on various forms of social security and lived in community supported homes. They had a clinical profile of affective disorders, use of drugs, suicidality and problems with activities involved of daily life. Slightly more Norwegian patients were involuntary admitted. Conclusion Acutely admitted psychiatric patients in North West Russia and Northern Norwegian showed different clinical profiles: alcohol, depression and organic disorders characterised Russian patients, affective disorders, suicidality and use of drugs characterised the Norwegians. Whereas Norwegian patients are mainly referred from GPs the Russians come via 1.line psychiatric services (“dispensaries”). Average length of stay for Russian patients was 2.5 times longer than that of the Norwegian. PMID:23317010

  10. ACE Inhibitor and Angiotensin Receptor-II Antagonist Prescribing and Hospital Admissions with Acute Kidney Injury: A Longitudinal Ecological Study

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Laurie A.; Abel, Gary A.; Chaudhry, Afzal N.; Tomson, Charles R.; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Roland, Martin O.; Payne, Rupert A.

    2013-01-01

    Background ACE Inhibitors (ACE-I) and Angiotensin-Receptor Antagonists (ARAs) are commonly prescribed but can cause acute kidney injury (AKI) during intercurrent illness. Rates of hospitalization with AKI are increasing. We aimed to determine whether hospital AKI admission rates are associated with increased ACE-I/ARA prescribing. Methods and Findings English NHS prescribing data for ACE-I/ARA prescriptions were matched at the level of the general practice to numbers of hospital admissions with a primary diagnosis of AKI. Numbers of prescriptions were weighted for the demographic characteristics of general practices by expressing prescribing as rates where the denominator is Age, Sex, and Temporary Resident Originated Prescribing Units (ASTRO-PUs). We performed a mixed-effect Poisson regression to model the number of admissions for AKI occurring in each practice for each of 4 years from 1/4/2007. From 2007/8-2010/11, crude AKI admission rates increased from 0.38 to 0.57 per 1000 patients (51.6% increase), and national annual ACE-I/ARA prescribing rates increased by 0.032 from 0.202 to 0.234 (15.8% increase). There was strong evidence (p<0.001) that increases in practice-level prescribing of ACE-I/ARA over the study period were associated with an increase in AKI admission rates. The increase in prescribing seen in a typical practice corresponded to an increase in admissions of approximately 5.1% (rate ratio = 1.051 for a 0.03 per ASTRO-PU increase in annual prescribing rate, 95%CI 1.047-1.055). Using the regression model we predict that 1,636 (95%CI 1,540-1,780) AKI admissions would have been avoided if prescribing rates were at the 2007/8 level, equivalent to 14.8% of the total increase in AKI admissions. Conclusion In this ecological analysis, up to 15% of the increase in AKI admissions in England over a 4-year time period is potentially attributable to increased prescribing of ACE-I and ARAs. However, these findings are limited by the lack of patient level

  11. Four-Stage Audit Demonstrating Increased Uptake of HIV Testing in Acute Neurology Admissions Using Staged Practical Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sokhi, Dilraj Singh; Oxenham, Chantal; Coates, Rebecca; Forbes, Mhairi; Gupta, Nadi K.; Blackburn, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Background UK National Guidelines (UKNG) advise HIV testing in clinically indicated neurological presentations. We audited the impact of our practical strategies to increase uptake of HIV testing at a regional acute neurology admissions unit. Methods We audited HIV testing in 4 periods over 2 years: before we designed a UKNG-based “HIV testing in Neurology” protocol (“pre-protocol”); after dissemination of the protocol alone (“post-protocol”); post-protocol dissemination combined with both a tailored departmental admissions clerking proforma to prompt for HIV testing & consenting, and regular focussed tutorials to doctors on HIV testing in neurological patients (“post-proforma”); and finally one year after the post-proforma period (“+1 year”). We also looked at the total number of HIV tests sent from the unit during the two-year period. We assessed significance using Fisher’s exact test. Results 47.8% of all acute neurology non-stroke admissions were eligible for HIV testing during all the audit periods. Testing rates were as follows: pre-protocol 21.9%; post-protocol 36.6%; post-proforma 83.3%; and at +1 year 65.4% (p<0.05 for both post-protocol and +1 year when compared to pre-protocol). Documentation of consent for HIV testing improved from 25% to 67.6% with the HIV-tailored clerking proforma. The total number of HIV tests requested from the unit doubled in the post-proforma period compared to pre-protocol (p<0.05). Conclusion In conclusion: the combination of an HIV testing protocol, a tailored departmental clerking proforma and regular focussed teaching to doctors on indications for HIV testing led to a sustained increase in HIV testing uptake in our regional acute neurology admissions unit. PMID:26335351

  12. Association of Indoor Smoke-Free Air Laws with Hospital Admissions for Acute Myocardial Infarction and Stroke in Three States

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, Brett R.; Juster, Harlan R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To examine whether comprehensive smoke-free air laws enacted in Florida, New York, and Oregon are associated with reductions in hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke. Methods. Analyzed trends in county-level, age-adjusted, hospital admission rates for AMI and stroke from 1990 to 2006 (quarterly) for Florida, 1995 to 2006 (monthly) for New York, and 1998 to 2006 (monthly) for Oregon to identify any association between admission rates and passage of comprehensive smoke-free air laws. Interrupted time series analysis was used to adjust for the effects of preexisting moderate local-level laws, seasonal variation in hospital admissions, differences across counties, and a secular time trend. Results. More than 3 years after passage of statewide comprehensive smoke-free air laws, rates of hospitalization for AMI were reduced by 18.4% (95% CI: 8.8–28.0%) in Florida and 15.5% (95% CI: 11.0–20.1%) in New York. Rates of hospitalization for stroke were reduced by 18.1% (95% CI: 9.3–30.0%) in Florida. The few local comprehensive laws in Oregon were not associated with reductions in AMI or stroke statewide. Conclusion. Comprehensive smoke-free air laws are an effective policy tool for reducing the burden of AMI and stroke. PMID:22778759

  13. Acute Suicidal Affective Disturbance (ASAD): A confirmatory factor analysis with 1442 psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Ian H; Rufino, Katrina A; Rogers, Megan L; Ellis, Thomas E; Joiner, Thomas E

    2016-09-01

    Acute Suicidal Affective Disturbance (ASAD) is a newly proposed diagnostic entity that characterizes rapid onset suicidal intent. This study aims to confirm the factor structure of ASAD among psychiatric inpatients, and to determine the clinical utility of ASAD in predicting suicide attempt status. Overall, 1442 psychiatric inpatients completed a battery of self-report questionnaires assessing symptoms theorized to comprise the ASAD construct. Utilizing these data, a confirmatory factor analysis with a one-factor solution was performed. Regression analyses were employed to determine if the ASAD construct predicted past suicide attempts, and analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were employed to determine if ASAD symptoms differed by the presence and number of past suicide attempts. The one-factor solution indicated good fit: χ(2)(77) = 309.1, p < 0.001, Tucker-Lewis Index (TLI) = 0.96, comparative fit index (CFI) = 0.97, root-mean-square error of approximation (RMSEA) = 0.05. Controlling for depressive disorders and current symptoms, the ASAD construct significantly predicted the presence of a past suicide attempt. Moreover, ASAD differentiated in the expected directions between individuals with a history of multiple suicide attempts, individuals with a single suicide attempt, and individuals with no history of a suicide attempt. Acute Suicidal Affective Disturbance (ASAD) appears to be a unified construct that predicts suicidal behavior and is distinct from an already-defined mood disorder. PMID:27344228

  14. Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N = 181, n = 146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p = 0.021), support for innovation (p = 0.042) and task orientation (p = 0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing.

  15. Content-Area Framework for Conducting Family Meetings for Acutely Ill Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Pon, Natalie C; Gordon, Mollie R; Coverdale, John; Nguyen, Phuong T

    2016-09-01

    Family meetings are a critically important component of managing acutely psychiatrically ill patients, and learning how to conduct such a meeting is critically important in the training of psychiatrists. Because we found no published comprehensive tools that dealt with the biopsychosocial content areas to be covered in family meetings in acute psychiatric settings, we developed and present such a comprehensive tool that is based in part on a review of existing tools utilized by other disciplines. This article describes the specific steps involved in premeeting planning, the formal topic areas that might be canvassed during the meeting, and postmeeting documentation and debriefing. The general content areas for discussion during the meeting include the setting of goals and expectations, relevant history-gathering, assessment of the family's understanding of the issues at stake, formal psychoeducation, and review of specific treatment strategies and clinical progress. The meeting may also include a discussion of resources available to the patient and family members and a review of issues related to the safety of the patient and others, management of early warning signs, and sensitive topics such as trauma, abuse, or violence that may play a role in the presentation or treatment of the patient to best translate established goals into a longer term plan of care. Implementation of this comprehensive and necessarily structured model should enhance the patient's and family's understanding of the issues at stake and should improve satisfaction, promote trust and an effective working alliance, and enhance the quality of the biopsychosocial care plan. PMID:27648507

  16. Five Years of Acute Stroke Unit Care: Comparing ASU and Non-ASU Admissions and Allied Health Involvement.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Isobel J; Evans, Malcolm; McMullen-Roach, Sarah; Marquez, Jodie; Parsons, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Background. Evidence indicates that Stroke Units decrease mortality and morbidity. An Acute Stroke Unit (ASU) provides specialised, hyperacute care and thrombolysis. John Hunter Hospital, Australia, admits 500 stroke patients each year and has a 4-bed ASU. Aims. This study investigated hospital admissions over a 5-year period of all strokes patients and of all patients admitted to the 4-bed ASU and the involvement of allied health professionals. Methods. The study retrospectively audited 5-year data from all stroke patients admitted to John Hunter Hospital (n = 2525) and from nonstroke patients admitted to the ASU (n = 826). The study's primary outcomes were admission rates, length of stay (days), and allied health involvement. Results. Over 5 years, 47% of stroke patients were admitted to the ASU. More male stroke patients were admitted to the ASU (chi(2) = 5.81; P = 0.016). There was a trend over time towards parity between the number of stroke and nonstroke patients admitted to the ASU. When compared to those admitted elsewhere, ASU stroke patients had a longer length of stay (z = -8.233; P = 0.0000) and were more likely to receive allied healthcare. Conclusion. This is the first study to report 5 years of ASU admissions. Acute Stroke Units may benefit from a review of the healthcare provided to all stroke patients. The trends over time with respect to the utilisation of the John Hunter Hospitall's ASU have resulted in a review of the hospitall's Stroke Unit and allied healthcare.

  17. Quantifying alcohol-related emergency admissions in a UK tertiary referral hospital: a cross-sectional study of chronic alcohol dependency and acute alcohol intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Vardy, J; Keliher, T; Fisher, J; Ritchie, F; Bell, C; Chekroud, M; Clarey, F; Blackwood, L; Barry, L; Paton, E; Clark, A; Connelly, R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Alcohol is responsible for a proportion of emergency admissions to hospital, with acute alcohol intoxication and chronic alcohol dependency (CAD) implicated. This study aims to quantify the proportion of hospital admissions through our emergency department (ED) which were thought by the admitting doctor to be (largely or partially) a result of alcohol consumption. Setting ED of a UK tertiary referral hospital. Participants All ED admissions occurring over 14 weeks from 1 September to 8 December 2012. Data obtained for 5497 of 5746 admissions (95.67%). Primary outcome measures Proportion of emergency admissions related to alcohol as defined by the admitting ED clinician. Secondary outcome measures Proportion of emergency admissions due to alcohol diagnosed with acute alcohol intoxication or CAD according to ICD-10 criteria. Results 1152 (21.0%, 95% CI 19.9% to 22.0%) of emergency admissions were thought to be due to alcohol. 74.6% of patients admitted due to alcohol had CAD, and significantly greater than the 26.4% with ‘Severe’ or ‘Very Severe’ acute alcohol intoxication (p<0.001). Admissions due to alcohol differed to admissions not due to alcohol being on average younger (45 vs 56 years, p<0.001) more often male (73.4% vs 45.1% males, p<0.001) and more likely to have a diagnosis synonymous with alcohol or related to recreational drug use, pancreatitis, deliberate self-harm, head injury, gastritis, suicidal ideation, upper gastrointestinal bleeds or seizures (p<0.001). An increase in admissions due to alcohol on Saturdays reflects a surge in admissions with acute alcohol intoxication above the weekly average (p=0.003). Conclusions Alcohol was thought to be implicated in 21% of emergency admissions in this cohort. CAD is responsible for a significantly greater proportion of admissions due to alcohol than acute intoxication. Interventions designed to reduce alcohol-related admissions must incorporate measures to tackle CAD. PMID:27324707

  18. Impact of integrated health system changes, accelerated due to an earthquake, on emergency department attendances and acute admissions: a Bayesian change-point analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schluter, Philip J; Hamilton, Greg J; Deely, Joanne M; Ardagh, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Objective To chart emergency department (ED) attendance and acute admission following a devastating earthquake in 2011 which lead to Canterbury's rapidly accelerated integrated health system transformations. Design Interrupted time series analysis, modelling using Bayesian change-point methods, of ED attendance and acute admission rates over the 2008–2014 period. Setting ED department within the Canterbury District Health Board; with comparison to two other district health boards unaffected by the earthquake within New Zealand. Participants Canterbury's health system services ∼500 000 people, with around 85 000 ED attendances and 37 000 acute admissions per annum. Main outcome measures De-seasoned standardised population ED attendance and acute admission rates overall, and stratified by age and sex, compared before and after the earthquake. Results Analyses revealed five global patterns: (1) postearthquake, there was a sudden and persisting decrease in the proportion of the population attending the ED; (2) the growth rate of ED attendances per head of population did not change between the pre-earthquake and postearthquake periods; (3) postearthquake, there was a sudden and persisting decrease in the proportion of the population admitted to hospital; (4) the growth rate of hospital admissions per head of the population declined between pre-earthquake and postearthquake periods and (5) the most dramatic reduction in hospital admissions growth after the earthquake occurred among those aged 65+ years. Extrapolating from the projected and fitted deseasoned rates for December 2014, ∼676 (16.8%) of 4035 projected hospital admissions were avoided. Conclusions While both necessarily and opportunistically accelerated, Canterbury's integrated health systems transformations have resulted in a dramatic and sustained reduction in ED attendances and acute hospital admissions. This natural intervention experiment, triggered by an earthquake, demonstrated that

  19. The importance of relationships in mental health care: A qualitative study of service users' experiences of psychiatric hospital admission in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Gilburt, Helen; Rose, Diana; Slade, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Background While a number of studies have looked at life on service users' experiences of life on psychiatric wards, no research exists that have approached these experiences from the user perspective since the introduction of community care. Methods This user-led study uses a participatory approach to develop an understanding of the processes and themes which define the user experience of hospitalisation. Nineteen service users who had all had inpatient stays in psychiatric hospitals in London were interviewed in the community. Results Relationships formed the core of service users' experiences. Three further codes, treatment, freedom and environment defined the role of hospital and its physical aspects. Themes of communication, safety, trust, coercion, and cultural competency contributed to the concept of relationships. Conclusion Relationships with an individual which comprised effective communication, cultural sensitivity, and the absence of coercion resulted in that person being attributed with a sense of trust. This resulted in the patient experiencing the hospital as a place of safety in terms of risk from other patients and staff. Barriers to positive relationships included ineffective and negative communication, a lack of trust, a lack of safety in terms of staff as ineffective in preventing violence, and as perpetrators themselves, and the use of coercion by staff. This unique perspective both acts as a source of triangulation with previous studies and highlights the importance of the therapeutic relationship in providing a safe and therapeutic milieu for the treatment of people with acute mental health problems. PMID:18439254

  20. Point-of-Admission Serum Electrolyte Profile of Children less than Five Years Old with Dehydration due to Acute Diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Okposio, Matthias Mariere; Onyiriuka, Alphonsus Ndidi; Abhulimhen-Iyoha, Blessing Imuetiyan

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective: Fluid, electrolytes and acid base disturbances are responsible for most deaths due to acute diarrhoea. The aim of this study is to describe the point-of-admission serum electrolyte profile of children with dehydration due to acute diarrhoea. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the serum electrolyte levels of 185 children with dehydration due to acute diarrhoea were assessed at the point of admission at the Diarrhoea Treatment and Training Unit of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital. The age of the study population ranged from 29 days to 59 months. Results: Out of a total of 185 subjects, 30 (16.2%), 114 (61.6%), and 41 (22.2%) had severe, moderate and mild dehydration, respectively. In addition, hyponatraemic dehydration was the most common type of dehydration, accounting for 60.5% of cases. Metabolic acidosis and hypokalaemia occurred in 59.5% and 44.3% of cases, respectively. Only the serum bicarbonate level was significantly affected by degree of dehydration (p = 0.001). Age of more than 12 months and presence of vomiting were significantly associated with hyponatraemia (p = 0.005 & p = 0.02), while age of less than or equal 12 months and absence of vomiting were associated with metabolic acidosis (p = 0.04 & p = 0.03). Conclusion: The degree of dehydration appears to be a good predictor of the occurrence of metabolic acidosis while age is a risk factor for hyponatraemia and metabolic acidosis. PMID:26865828

  1. 'Shared-rhythm cooperation' in cooperative team meetings in acute psychiatric inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Vuokila-Oikkonen, P; Janhonen, S; Vaisanen, L

    2004-04-01

    The cooperative team meeting is one of the most important interventions in psychiatric care. The purpose of this study was to describe the participation of patients and significant others in cooperative team meetings in terms of unspoken stories. The narrative approach focused on storytelling. The data consisted of videotaped cooperative team meetings (n = 11) in two acute closed psychiatric wards. The QRS NVivo computer program and the Holistic Content Reading method were used. During the process of analysis, the spoken and unspoken stories were analysed at the same time. According to the results, while there was some evident shared-rhythm cooperation (the topics of discussion were shared and the participants had eye contact), there were many instances where the interaction was controlled and defined by health care professionals. This lack of shared rhythm in cooperation, as defined in terms of storytelling, was manifested as monologue and the following practices: the health care professionals controlled the storytelling by sticking to their opinions, by giving the floor or by pointing with a finger and visually scanning the participants, by interrupting the speaker or by allowing the other experts to sit passively. Implications for mental health nursing practice are discussed.

  2. Pharmacist-initiated prior authorization process to improve patient care in a psychiatric acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Allen, Shari N; Ojong-Salako, Mebanga

    2015-02-01

    A prior authorization (PA) is a requirement implemented by managed care organizations to help provide medications to consumers in a cost-effective manner. The PA process may be seen as a barrier by prescribers, pharmacists, pharmaceutical companies, and consumers. The lack of a standardized PA process, implemented prior to a patient's discharge from a health care facility, may increase nonadherence to inpatient prescribed medications. Pharmacists and other health care professionals can implement a PA process specific to their institution. This article describes a pharmacist-initiated PA process implemented at an acute care psychiatric hospital. This process was initiated secondary to a need for a standardized process at the facility. To date, the process has been seen as a valuable aspect to patient care. Plans to expand this process include collecting data with regards to adherence and readmissions as well as applying for a grant to help develop a program to automate the PA program at this facility.

  3. Impact of universal health coverage on urban–rural inequity in psychiatric service utilisation for patients with first admission for psychosis: a 10-year nationwide population-based study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chih-Lin; Chen, Pei-Chun; Huang, Ling-Ya; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Tung, Yu-Chi; Liu, Chen-Chung; Chen, Wei J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the disparities in psychiatric service utilisation over a 10-year period for patients with first admission for psychosis in relation to urban–rural residence following the implementation of universal health coverage in Taiwan. Design Population-based retrospective cohort study. Setting Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database, which has a population coverage rate of over 99% and contains all medical claim records of a nationwide cohort of patients with at least one psychiatric admission between 1996 and 2007. Participants 69 690 patients aged 15–59 years with first admission between 1998 and 2007 for any psychotic disorder. Main exposure measure Patients’ urban–rural residence at first admissions. Main outcome measures Absolute and relative inequality indexes of the following quality indicators after discharge from the first admission: all-cause psychiatric readmission at 2 and 4 years, dropout of psychiatric outpatient service at 30 days, and emergency department (ED) treat-and-release encounter at 30 days. Results Between 1998 and 2007, the 4-year readmission rate decreased from 65% to 58%, the 30-day dropout rate decreased from 18% to 15%, and the 30-day ED encounter rate increased from 8% to 10%. Risk of readmission has significantly decreased in rural and urban patients, but at a slower speed for the rural patients (p=0.026). The adjusted HR of readmission in rural versus urban patients has increased from 1.00 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.04) in 1998–2000 to 1.08 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.12) in 2005–2007, indicating a mild widening of the urban–rural gap. Urban–rural differences in 30-day dropout and ED encounter rates have been stationary over time. Conclusions The universal health coverage in Taiwan did not narrow urban–rural inequity of psychiatric service utilisation in patients with psychosis. Therefore, other policy interventions on resource allocation, service delivery and quality of care are needed to improve

  4. Acute lead poisoning in nursing home and psychiatric patients from the ingestion of lead-based ceramic glazes.

    PubMed

    Vance, M V; Curry, S C; Bradley, J M; Kunkel, D B; Gerkin, R D; Bond, G R

    1990-10-01

    To our knowledge, acute inorganic lead poisoning from single ingestions of lead compounds has been only rarely reported. During a 14-month period, we were contacted regarding eight instances of acute ingestions of liquid lead-based ceramic glazes by mentally impaired residents of nursing homes or psychiatric facilities participating in ceramic arts programs. While some ingestions did not cause toxic effects, some patients developed acute lead poisoning characterized by abdominal pain, anemia, and basophilic stippling of red blood cells. In the blood of several patients, lead concentrations were far above normal (4 to 9.5 mumol/L). Urinary lead excretions were tremendously elevated during chelation therapy, with one patient excreting 535.9 mumol/L of lead during a 6-day period, the largest lead excretion ever reported in a patient suffering from acute lead poisoning, to our knowledge. All patients recovered following supportive care and appropriate use of chelating agents. Lead-based glazes are commonly found in nursing homes and psychiatric facilities. We suspect that acute or chronic lead poisoning from the ingestion(s) of lead-based ceramic glazes may be an unrecognized but not uncommon problem among such residents. We urge physicians to take ingestions of lead-based glazes seriously and to consider the diagnosis of lead poisoning in nursing home and psychiatric patients who have participated in ceramic crafts programs. PMID:2222094

  5. Mechanical and pharmacological restraints in acute psychiatric wards--why and how are they used?

    PubMed

    Knutzen, Maria; Bjørkly, Stål; Eidhammer, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Steinar; Helen Mjøsund, Nina; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Sandvik, Leiv; Friis, Svein

    2013-08-30

    Restraint use has been reported to be common in acute psychiatry, but empirical research is scarce concerning why and how restraints are used. This study analysed data from patients' first episodes of restraint in three acute psychiatric wards during a 2-year study period. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors for type and duration of restraint. The distribution of restraint categories for the 371 restrained patients was as follows: mechanical restraint, 47.2%; mechanical and pharmacological restraint together, 35.3%; and pharmacological restraint, 17.5%. The most commonly reported reason for restraint was assault (occurred or imminent). It increased the likelihood of resulting in concomitant pharmacological restraint. Female patients had shorter duration of mechanical restraint than men. Age above 49 and female gender increased the likelihood of pharmacological versus mechanical restraint, whereas being restrained due to assault weakened this association. Episodes with mechanical restraint and coinciding pharmacological restraint lasted longer than mechanical restraint used separately, and were less common among patients with a personality disorder. Diagnoses, age and reason for restraint independently increased the likelihood for being subjected to specific types of restraint. Female gender predicted type of restraint and duration of episodes.

  6. Relationship between Psychiatric Nurse Work Environments and Nurse Burnout in Acute Care General Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Nancy P.; Aiken, Linda H.; McClaine, Lakeetra; Hanlon, Alexandra L

    2010-01-01

    Following deinstitutionalization, inpatient psychiatric services moved from state institutions to general hospitals. Despite the magnitude of these changes, evaluations of the quality of inpatient care environments in general hospitals are limited. This study examined the extent to which organizational factors of the inpatient psychiatric environments are associated with psychiatric nurse burnout. Organizational factors were measured by an instrument endorsed by the National Quality Forum. Robust clustered regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between organizational factors in 67 hospitals and levels of burnout for 353 psychiatric nurses. Lower levels of psychiatric nurse burnout was significantly associated with inpatient environments that had better overall quality work environments, more effective managers, strong nurse-physician relationships, and higher psychiatric nurse-to-patient staffing ratios. These results suggest that adjustments in organizational management of inpatient psychiatric environments could have a positive effect on psychiatric nurses’ capacity to sustain safe and effective patient care environments. PMID:20144031

  7. Correlation between levels of conflict and containment on acute psychiatric wards: the city-128 study.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Len; Stewart, Duncan; Papadopoulos, Chris; Iennaco, Joanne DeSanto

    2013-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Attainment of safe, calm inpatient psychiatric wards that are conducive to positive therapeutic care is crucial. On such wards, rates of coerced medication, seclusion, manual restraint and other types of containment are comparatively low, and, usually, rates of conflict-for example, aggression, substance use, and absconding-are also low. Sometimes, however, wards maintain low rates of containment even when conflict rates are high. This study investigated wards with the counterintuitive combination of low containment and high conflict or high containment and low conflict. METHODS The authors conducted a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data collected from 136 acute psychiatric wards across England in 2004-2005. The wards were categorized into four groups on the basis of median splits of containment and conflict rates: high conflict and high containment, high conflict and low containment, low conflict and low containment, and low conflict and high containment. Features significantly associated with these ward types were identified. RESULTS Among the variables significantly associated with the various typologies, some-for example, environmental quality-were changeable, and others-such as social deprivation of the area served-were fixed. High-conflict, low-containment wards had higher rates of male staff and lower-quality environments than other wards. Low-conflict, high-containment wards had higher numbers of beds. High-conflict, high-containment wards utilized more temporary staff as well as more unqualified staff. No overall differences were associated with low-conflict, low-containment wards. CONCLUSIONS Wards can make positive changes to achieve a low-containment, nonpunitive culture, even when rates of patient conflict are high.

  8. The severity of initial acute kidney injury at admission of geriatric patients significantly correlates with subsequent in-hospital complications.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Wu, Chia-Yi; Lin, Yu-Feng; Hsu, Nin-Chieh; Chen, Jin-Shing; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2015-09-10

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with higher hospital mortality. However, the relationship between geriatric AKI and in-hospital complications is unclear. We prospectively enrolled elderly patients (≥65 years) from general medical wards of National Taiwan University Hospital, part of whom presented AKI at admission. We recorded subsequent in-hospital complications, including catastrophic events, incident gastrointestinal bleeding, hospital-associated infections, and new-onset electrolyte imbalances. Regression analyses were utilized to assess the associations between in-hospital complications and the initial AKI severity. A total of 163 elderly were recruited, with 39% presenting AKI (stage 1: 52%, stage 2: 23%, stage 3: 25%). The incidence of any in-hospital complication was significantly higher in the AKI group than in the non-AKI group (91% vs. 68%, p < 0.01). Multiple regression analyses indicated that elderly patients presenting with AKI had significantly higher risk of developing any complication (Odds ratio [OR] = 3.51, p = 0.01) and new-onset electrolyte imbalance (OR = 7.1, p < 0.01), and a trend toward more hospital-associated infections (OR = 1.99, p = 0.08). The risk of developing complications increased with higher AKI stage. In summary, our results indicate that initial AKI at admission in geriatric patients significantly increased the risk of in-hospital complications.

  9. Prognostic accuracy of cerebral blood flow measurement by perfusion computed tomography, at the time of emergency room admission, in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Wintermark, Max; Reichhart, Marc; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Maeder, Philippe; Chalaron, Marc; Schnyder, Pierre; Bogousslavsky, Julien; Meuli, Reto

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic accuracy of perfusion computed tomography (CT), performed at the time of emergency room admission, in acute stroke patients. Accuracy was determined by comparison of perfusion CT with delayed magnetic resonance (MR) and by monitoring the evolution of each patient's clinical condition. Twenty-two acute stroke patients underwent perfusion CT covering four contiguous 10mm slices on admission, as well as delayed MR, performed after a median interval of 3 days after emergency room admission. Eight were treated with thrombolytic agents. Infarct size on the admission perfusion CT was compared with that on the delayed diffusion-weighted (DWI)-MR, chosen as the gold standard. Delayed magnetic resonance angiography and perfusion-weighted MR were used to detect recanalization. A potential recuperation ratio, defined as PRR = penumbra size/(penumbra size + infarct size) on the admission perfusion CT, was compared with the evolution in each patient's clinical condition, defined by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). In the 8 cases with arterial recanalization, the size of the cerebral infarct on the delayed DWI-MR was larger than or equal to that of the infarct on the admission perfusion CT, but smaller than or equal to that of the ischemic lesion on the admission perfusion CT; and the observed improvement in the NIHSS correlated with the PRR (correlation coefficient = 0.833). In the 14 cases with persistent arterial occlusion, infarct size on the delayed DWI-MR correlated with ischemic lesion size on the admission perfusion CT (r = 0.958). In all 22 patients, the admission NIHSS correlated with the size of the ischemic area on the admission perfusion CT (r = 0.627). Based on these findings, we conclude that perfusion CT allows the accurate prediction of the final infarct size and the evaluation of clinical prognosis for acute stroke patients at the time of emergency evaluation. It may also provide

  10. Acute effects of electroconvulsive therapy on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in psychiatric disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Prohovnik, I.; Alderson, P.O.; Sackheim, H.A.; Decina, P.; Kahn, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is frequently used in the treatment of major depression and other psychiatric disorders; its mechanism of action is not established, but previous evidence suggests that it is associated with postictal metabolic suppression. The authors have used measurements of rCBF as an index of cortical metabolic activity to study the acute effects of ECT. Measurements of rCBF were made in 32 cortical regions in 10 patients (pts) following one minute breathing of Xe-133 (5mCi/L); the measurements were performed 30min before and 50min after ECT. Bilateral ECT was administered to six pts (five diagnosed as major depressives and one schizophrenic) and unilateral ECT to four (all diagnosed as unipolar or bipolar affective disorder). The total rCBF material consists of 52 measurements in these pts, made before and after 16 bilateral and 10 unilateral treatments. ECT was found to cause significant reduction of rCBF. Mean hemispheric flows (using the Initial Slope Index to measure grey-matter flow) were reduced by about 5% in both hemispheres following bilateral treatment. Unilateral treatment caused a 9% reduction of flow in the treated hemisphere, but only 2% contralaterally. Regional patterns of flow decreases also differed between the two treatment modes: bilateral frontal reductions were found after bilateral treatment, whereas unilateral ECT caused a widespread flow reduction in the treated hemisphere, and almost no effect contralaterally. These results suggest that rCBF studies are useful for assessing ECT, and indicate that the acute cerebral effects of ECT vary with the mode of treatment.

  11. Neural network modeling of the level of observation decision in an acute psychiatric ward.

    PubMed

    Penny, W D; Frost, D P

    1997-02-01

    Patients in an acute psychiatric ward need to be observed with varying levels of closeness. We report a series of experiments in which neural networks were trained to model this "level of observation" decision. One hundred eighty-seven such clinical decisions were used to train and test the networks which were evaluated by a multitrial v-fold cross-validation procedure. One neural network modeling approach was to break down the decision process into four subproblems, each of which was solved by a perceptron unit. This resulted in a hierarchical perceptron network having a structure that was equivalent to a sparsely connected two-layer perceptron. Neural network approaches were compared with nearest neighbor, linear regression, and naive Bayes classifiers. The hierarchical and sparse neural networks were the most accurate classifiers. This shows that the decision process is nonlinear, that neural nets can be more accurate than other statistical approaches, and that hierarchical decomposition is a useful methodology for neural network design.

  12. Retrospective analysis of absconding behaviour by acute care consumers in one psychiatric hospital campus in Australia.

    PubMed

    Mosel, Krista A; Gerace, Adam; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear

    2010-06-01

    Absconding is increasingly being recognized as a problem within mental health settings with significant risks for consumers. This study examines absconding behaviours across three acute care wards within an Australian psychiatric hospital campus over a 12-month period. A descriptive statistical analysis determined the rate of absconding from 49 consumers who absconded 64 times. The absconding rate was 13.33% (absconding events), with most absconding events arising from males diagnosed with schizophrenia (57.14%) aged between 20 and 29 years, and with 62.50% of absconding events occurring whilst consumers were on their first 21-day detention order. Nearly half of all absconding events were by consumers who had absconded previously, with the highest proportion of events occurring during nursing handover. A profile of people who abscond, time of day of absconding, legal status and repeated absconding behaviours are described. The emergent profile of consumers who absconded within this study bears some similarities to that described in overseas research, although in this study consumers were slightly older and 25% of absconders were female. Of particular interest are findings that identify the timings of absconding events in relation to a consumer's legal status. Implications for practice, including assessment of risk of absconding and management, are considered.

  13. Outpatient mental health service use by older adults after acute psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Proctor, Enola; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    This study described outpatient mental health service used by elderly patients discharged from acute inpatient psychiatric treatment for depression, assessed services barriers, and identified factors related to the use of outpatient mental health services. The sample consisted of 199 elderly patients discharged home from a geropsychiatric unit of an urban midwestern hospital. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with use of various mental health services. Almost three quarters of the elderly patients saw a psychiatrist within 6 weeks postdischarge, but few used other outpatient mental health services. The most frequently reported barriers to use included (1) cost of services, (2) personal belief that depression would improve on its own, and (3) lack of awareness of available services. The use of various outpatient services was differentially related to predisposing, need, and enabling factors. Female patients, those residing in rural areas, and those who wanted to solve their problems on their own were less likely to use outpatient mental health services. Patients who reported greater levels of functional impairment, resided in rural areas, and perceived that getting services required too much time were less likely to see a psychiatrist in the postacute period. African American patients were more likely than whites to use day treatment programs. This may be related to the fact that most day treatment centers were located in areas where the majority of residents were African Americans.

  14. Patients' lived seclusion experience in acute psychiatric hospital in the United States: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ezeobele, I E; Malecha, A T; Mock, A; Mackey-Godine, A; Hughes, M

    2014-05-01

    The findings revealed that the patients perceived seclusion as an intervention that is punitive and a means used by the staff to exert control. Patients perceived that staff incitements and lack of communication skills led to their being secluded. The findings provided recommendations and strategies for seclusion reduction that were based on the patients' first-hand seclusion experiences. This phenomenological study used Husserlian's philosophy to explore and describe the lived experiences of psychiatric patients who were secluded at a free-standing acute care hospital located in South-western United States (US). The study is crucial because very few studies have been conducted in this area in the US. The study examined a purposive sample of 20 patients, 3 days post-seclusion. Data were generated through face-to-face, semi-structured interviews incorporating open-ended questions and probes to facilitate discussion until saturation was reached. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and data analysed using Colaizzi's seven steps method. Results were described according to the themes and subthemes identified. Findings uncovered four themes: (1) alone in the world; (2) staff exert power and control; (3) resentment towards staff; and (4) time for meditation. The findings from this study illuminated the views surrounding patients' seclusion experience. It provided first-hand information on the patients' seclusion experience that might be helpful to the mental health professionals in the seclusion reduction process.

  15. Admission Values of D-dimer and C-reactive Protein (CRP) Predict the Long-term Outcomes in Acute Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kentaro; Tamune, Hidetaka; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective Admission D-dimer and C-reactive protein (CRP) values have been reported to predict the short-term outcomes in acute aortic dissection (AAD). However, the association between D-dimer values and the long-term outcomes has not been investigated. Methods The primary endpoints included events determined to be all-cause death, recurrence of aortic dissection, aortic rupture, and surgical intervention for the aortic aneurysm following the first hospital discharge. We performed a receiver operating characteristic analysis and determined the optimal cut-off levels of admission D-dimer, admission CRP and peak CRP values in terms of the sensitivity and specificity for predicting the presence of events. Using the optimal cut-off values, we performed a multiple Cox analysis and investigated the hazard ratio of admission D-dimer, admission CRP and peak CRP. Patients We retrospectively identified 173 AAD patients hospitalized between January 2005 and December 2013. Results A multiple Cox regression analysis revealed that the hazard ratios were 3.4 for admission D-dimer [95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.5 to 7.3, p=0.004] and 2.7 for admission CRP (95% CI 1.2 to 5.5, p=0.014). Conclusion Admission D-dimer and CRP values may predict the long-term outcomes in AAD. Moreover, admission D-dimer values may be a valuable marker to predict not only the short-term outcomes, but also the long-term outcomes in AAD. PMID:27432090

  16. Mortality and Revascularization following Admission for Acute Myocardial Infarction: Implication for Rural Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Thad E.; Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary; Kaboli, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Annually, over 3,000 rural veterans are admitted to Veterans Health Administration (VA) hospitals for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), yet no studies of AMI have utilized the VA rural definition. Methods: This retrospective cohort study identified 15,870 patients admitted for AMI to all VA hospitals. Rural residence was identified…

  17. Acute exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms during influenza treatment with oseltamivir in chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chen-Chia; Liu, Chia-Chien; Chen, Ying-Sheue

    2015-06-01

    Influenza treatment and prophylaxis with oseltamivir are critically important in reducing the morbidity and mortality of patients in chronic psychiatric facilities. Abnormal behavior, delusions, perceptual disturbances, mania, and depression have all been reported as oseltamivir-related psychiatric side effects. We hereby report two chronic schizophrenia patients in Taiwan manifesting psychiatric instability who were being treated with oseltamivir for suspected influenza infection, and further discuss other potential contributing factors. The possibility that oseltamivir can cause psychotic or affective symptoms suggests that additional caution is necessary for its use in patients with an established psychiatric diagnosis. PMID:25823677

  18. A comparison of acute psychiatric care under Medicaid carve-outs, HMOs, and fee-for-service.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Christopher G; Chafets, Julia

    2010-11-01

    This study compares the use of acute psychiatric hospitalization; selected outcomes, including rehospitalization; as well as costs associated with the health maintenance organization (HMO), carve-out, and fee-for-service models as implemented in the Massachusetts Medicaid program between FY1994 and FY2000. This is a longitudinal analysis that primarily uses unduplicated individual data from the Massachusetts Case Mix database. Analyses focus on 56,518 individuals who were psychiatrically hospitalized on acute units within 57 hospitals. They employ Cox regression to compare rehospitalization among the three programs. The hypotheses were strongly supported: HMOs have the most substantial impacts in minimizing service provision, with the carve-out program having an impact intermediate between the HMO and fee-for-service programs. Lower utilization rates were associated with lower overall rates of hospitalization, shorter lengths of stay, fewer repeated stays, and less geographic access and greater displacement of psychiatric patients to medical units. The final model of rehospitalization has an overall predictive accuracy of 59.6%.

  19. Very Long-Term Prognostic Role of Admission BNP in Non-ST Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bassan, Fernando; Bassan, Roberto; Esporcatte, Roberto; Santos, Braulio; Tura, Bernardo

    2016-01-01

    Background BNP has been extensively evaluated to determine short- and intermediate-term prognosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome, but its role in long-term mortality is not known. Objective To determine the very long-term prognostic role of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) for all-cause mortality in patients with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTEACS). Methods A cohort of 224 consecutive patients with NSTEACS, prospectively seen in the Emergency Department, had BNP measured on arrival to establish prognosis, and underwent a median 9.34-year follow-up for all-cause mortality. Results Unstable angina was diagnosed in 52.2%, and non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, in 47.8%. Median admission BNP was 81.9 pg/mL (IQ range = 22.2; 225) and mortality rate was correlated with increasing BNP quartiles: 14.3; 16.1; 48.2; and 73.2% (p < 0.0001). ROC curve disclosed 100 pg/mL as the best BNP cut-off value for mortality prediction (area under the curve = 0.789, 95% CI= 0.723-0.854), being a strong predictor of late mortality: BNP < 100 = 17.3% vs. BNP ≥ 100 = 65.0%, RR = 3.76 (95% CI = 2.49-5.63, p < 0.001). On logistic regression analysis, age >72 years (OR = 3.79, 95% CI = 1.62-8.86, p = 0.002), BNP ≥ 100 pg/mL (OR = 6.24, 95% CI = 2.95-13.23, p < 0.001) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (OR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.97-0.99, p = 0.049) were independent late-mortality predictors. Conclusions BNP measured at hospital admission in patients with NSTEACS is a strong, independent predictor of very long-term all-cause mortality. This study allows raising the hypothesis that BNP should be measured in all patients with NSTEACS at the index event for long-term risk stratification. PMID:26840056

  20. A study on the pre-admission characteristics of patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hu, S C

    1991-05-01

    To clarify an appropriate policy to implement Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in Taiwan based on the profiles of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and to compare the differences of clinical features accompanied by AMI between Orientals and Westerners, 63 consecutive patients with definite AMI entering the emergency room (ER) from September 1989 through January 1990 were studied. Several interesting facts were found: 1) 9.5% (6/63) of patients took public ambulance to seek medical help; 2) 89% came from out of our jurisdiction, and 62% (39/63) were referred from general practitioners or the ER of community hospitals; 3) There were 5 truly delayed cases (7.9%) owing to a lack of sense of danger in case of chest pain; 4) 50% of our cases occurred during sleeping; 5) The time of onset peaked from 0 AM to 6 AM; 6) While 63.5% of patients visited ER within 6 hours after the onset of acute symptoms, only 12.7% were treated with thrombolytic therapy; and 7) AMI patients stayed in ER for an average of over 4 hours. With limited cases, although trends were evident, firm conclusions were not warranted. The following crucial recommendations are suggested: 1) EMS system in terms of caring of AMI patients still needs a well-designed study to map out an appropriate policy; 2) The strengthening education to physicians working in ER or to all primary care physicians of an early use of thrombolytic agents in indicated cases should be warranted to offer timely therapy when necessary; 3) General public should be educated to call for medical help as soon as possible in case of chest pain. PMID:1680983

  1. Acute effects of aircraft noise on cardiovascular admissions - an interrupted time-series analysis of a six-day closure of London Heathrow Airport caused by volcanic ash.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Tim; Campbell, Michael J; Maheswaran, Ravi

    2016-08-01

    Acute noise exposure may acutely increase blood pressure but the hypothesis that acute exposure to aircraft noise may trigger cardiovascular events has not been investigated. This study took advantage of a six-day closure of a major airport in April 2010 caused by volcanic ash to examine if there was a decrease in emergency cardiovascular hospital admissions during or immediately after the closure period, using an interrupted daily time-series study design. The population living within the 55dB(A) noise contour was substantial at 0.7 million. The average daily admission count was 13.9 (SD 4.4). After adjustment for covariates, there was no evidence of a decreased risk of hospital admission from cardiovascular disease during the closure period (relative risk 0.97 (95% CI 0.75-1.26)). Using lags of 1-7 days gave similar results. Further studies are needed to investigate if transient aircraft noise exposure can trigger acute cardiovascular events. PMID:27494958

  2. Traffic related air pollution and acute hospital admission for respiratory diseases in Drammen, Norway 1995-2000.

    PubMed

    Oftedal, Bente; Nafstad, Per; Magnus, Per; Bjørkly, Sonja; Skrondal, Anders

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the associations between seven ambient air pollutants [particulate matter (PM10), nitrous dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3), benzene, formaldehyde and toluene] and acute hospital admissions for respiratory diseases in Drammen, Norway 1995-2000. Time-series analysis of counts was performed by means of generalized additive models with log link and Poisson distribution. The results showed that benzene was the pollutant having the strongest association with respiratory diseases for the total study period, the relative risk of an interquartile increase of benzene was 1.095 with 95% confidence interval: 1.031-1.163. The corresponding results were 1.049 (0.990-1.112) for formaldehyde, 1.044 (1.000-1.090) for toluene, 1.064 (1.019-1.111) for NO2, 1.043 (1.011-1.075) for SO2, 0.990 (0.936-1.049) for O3 and 1.022 (0.990-1.055) for PM10. Dividing the total study period into two 3-year periods, there was a substantial reduction in the exposure levels of the volatile organic compounds (benzene, formaldehyde and toluene) from the first to the second period. Separate analyses for the second time period showed weaker association between these pollutants and the health outcome. This study provides further evidence for short-term respiratory health effects of traffic related air pollution.

  3. Impact of Admission Glycosylated Hemoglobin A1c on Angiographic Characteristics and Short Term Clinical Outcomes of Nondiabetic Patients with Acute ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    El-sherbiny, Islam; Nabil, Baher; Saber, Tamer; Abdelgawad, Fathy Elsayed

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to assess the predictive value of admission HbA1c level in nondiabetic patients presented by acute STEMI, on outcome of PCI and short term outcome of adverse cardiac events. Methods. 60 nondiabetic patients were admitted to Cardiology Department, Zagazig University Hospital, with acute STMI: 27 patients with HbA1c levels of 4.5% to 6.4% (group 1), 17 patients with HbA1c levels of 6.5% to 8.5% (group 2), and 16 patients with HbA1c levels higher than 8.5% (group 3). Either invasive intervention was done at admission by (pPCI) or coronary angiography was done within month (3–28 days) from taking thrombolytic. Participants were followed up for 6 months. Results. There was significant difference among different groups of HbA1c as regards the number of diseased vessels, severity of CAD lesions (p value < 0.01), and TIMI flow grades (p value < 0.05). There was significant difference among different groups as regards the adverse cardiac events on short term follow-up period (p value < 0.05). Conclusion. The present study showed that admission higher HbA1c level in patients presented by acute STEMI is associated with more severe CAD, lower rate of complete revascularization, and higher incidence of adverse cardiac events. PMID:26697259

  4. Treatments for common psychiatric conditions among adults during acute, rehabilitation, and reintegration phases.

    PubMed

    Difede, Joann; Cukor, Judith; Lee, Francis; Yurt, Roger

    2009-12-01

    Common and pernicious adult psychiatric disorders consequent to burn injury include post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and new-onset substance abuse disorder. Diagnosing and treating these disorders is complicated by the complex psychosocial issues associated with burns including grief, pain, role impairment, disfigurement, dysfunction, stigma, as well as financial and legal issues. Additionally, pre-morbid psychiatric and neurological illnesses are risk factors for burns, adding to the challenge of diagnosis and treatment. This article will focus on the diagnosis and treatment of PTSD and MDD consequent to burn trauma, as these are the major psychiatric outcomes, addressing the attendant psychosocial problems as threads in this post-trauma tapestry.

  5. Air Pollution and Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admission in Alberta, Canada: A Three-Step Procedure Case-Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Kindzierski, Warren; Kaul, Padma

    2015-01-01

    Adverse associations between air pollution and myocardial infarction (MI) are widely reported in medical literature. However, inconsistency and sensitivity of the findings are still big concerns. An exploratory investigation was undertaken to examine associations between air pollutants and risk of acute MI (AMI) hospitalization in Alberta, Canada. A time stratified case-crossover design was used to assess the transient effect of five air pollutants (carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitric oxide (NO), ozone (O3) and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 (PM2.5)) on the risk of AMI hospitalization over the period 1999-2009. Subgroups were predefined to see if any susceptible group of individuals existed. A three-step procedure, including univariate analysis, multivariate analysis, and bootstrap model averaging, was used. The multivariate analysis was used in an effort to address adjustment uncertainty; whereas the bootstrap technique was used as a way to account for regression model uncertainty. There were 25,894 AMI hospital admissions during the 11-year period. Estimating health effects that are properly adjusted for all possible confounding factors and accounting for model uncertainty are important for making interpretations of air pollution-health effect associations. The most robust findings included: (1) only 1-day lag NO2 concentrations (6-, 12- or 24-hour average), but not those of CO, NO, O3 or PM2.5, were associated with an elevated risk of AMI hospitalization; (2) evidence was suggested for an effect of elevated risk of hospitalization for NSTEMI (Non-ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction), but not for STEMI (ST segment elevation myocardial infarction); and (3) susceptible subgroups included elders (age ≥65) and elders with hypertension. As this was only an exploratory study there is a need to replicate these findings with other methodologies and datasets.

  6. Assessment tools for determining appropriateness of admission to acute care of persons transferred from long-term care facilities: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Residents of long-term care facilities have a high risk of acute care admission. Estimates of the frequency of inappropriate transfers vary substantially throughout the studies and various assessment tools have been used. The purpose of this study is to systematically review and describe the internationally existing assessment tools used for determining appropriateness of hospital admissions among long-term care residents. Method Systematic review of the literature of two databases (PubMed and CINAHL®). The search covered seven languages and the period between January 2000 and December 2012. All quantitative studies were included if any assessment tool for appropriateness of hospital and/or emergency department admission of long-term care residents was used. Two pairs of independent researchers extracted the data. Results Twenty-nine articles were included, covering study periods between 1991 and 2009. The proportion of admissions considered as inappropriate ranged from 2% to 77%. Throughout the studies, 16 different assessment tools were used; all were based on expert opinion to some extent; six also took into account published literature or interpretation of patient data. Variation between tools depended on the concepts studied, format and application, and aspects evaluated. Overall, the assessment tools covered six aspects: specific medical diagnoses (assessed by n = 8 tools), acuteness/severity of symptoms (n = 7), residents’ characteristics prior to admission (n = 6), residents’ or families’ wishes (n = 3), existence of a care plan (n = 1), and availability or requirement of resources (n = 10). Most tools judged appropriateness based on one fulfilled item; five tools judged appropriateness based on a balance of aspects. Five tools covered only one of these aspects and only six considered four or more aspects. Little information was available on the psychometric properties of the tools. Conclusions Most assessment tools

  7. The effect of solar-geomagnetic activity during hospital admission on coronary events within 1 year in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vencloviene, J.; Babarskiene, R.; Milvidaite, I.; Kubilius, R.; Stasionyte, J.

    2013-12-01

    Some evidence indicates the deterioration of the cardiovascular system during space storms. It is plausible that the space weather conditions during and after hospital admission may affect the risk of coronary events in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We analyzed the data of 1400 ACS patients who were admitted to the Hospital Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, and who survived for more than 4 days. We evaluated the associations between geomagnetic storms (GS), solar proton events (SPE), and solar flares (SF) that occurred 0-3 days before and after hospital admission and the risk of cardiovascular death (CAD), non-fatal ACS, and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) during a period of 1 year; the evaluation was based on the multivariate logistic model, controlling for clinical data. After adjustment for clinical variables, GS occurring in conjunction with SF 1 day before admission increased the risk of CAD by over 2.5 times. GS 2 days after SPE occurred 1 day after admission increased the risk of CAD and CABG by over 2.8 times. The risk of CABG increased by over 2 times in patients admitted during the day of GS and 1 day after SPE. The risk of ACS was by over 1.63 times higher for patients admitted 1 day before or after solar flares.

  8. The permeable institution: an ethnographic study of three acute psychiatric wards in London.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Alan; Lelliott, Paul; Seale, Clive

    2006-10-01

    In Asylums, Goffman [1961. Asylums. London: Penguin] identified some permeable features of the old mental hospitals but presented them as exceptions to the rule and focused on their impermeable aspects. We argue that this emphasis is no longer valid and offer an alternative ideal type that better represents the reality of everyday life in contemporary 'bricks and mortar' psychiatric institutions. We call this the "permeable institution". The research involved participant observation of between 3 and 4 months and interviews with patients, patient advocates and staff on 3 psychiatric wards. Evidence for permeability includes that ward membership is temporary and changes rapidly (patients tend to have very short stays and staff turnover is high); patients maintain contact with the outside world during their stay; and institutional identities are blurred to the point where visitors or new patients can easily mistake staff and patients for one another. Permeability has both positive consequences (e.g., reduced risk of institutionalism), and negative consequences (e.g., unwanted people coming into hospital to cause trouble, and illicit drug use among patients). Staff employ various methods to regulate their ward's permeability, within certain parameters. The metaphor of the total/closed institution remains valuable, but it fails to capture the highly permeable nature of the psychiatric institutions we studied. Analysts may therefore find the permeable institution a more helpful reference point or ideal type against which to examine and compare empirical cases. Perhaps most helpful is to conceptualise a continuum of institutional permeability with total and permeable institutions at each extreme.

  9. Identifying risk factors for progression to critical care admission and death among individuals with acute pancreatitis: a record linkage analysis of Scottish healthcare databases

    PubMed Central

    Mole, Damian J; Gungabissoon, Usha; Johnston, Philip; Cochrane, Lynda; Hopkins, Leanne; Wyper, Grant M A; Skouras, Christos; Dibben, Chris; Sullivan, Frank; Morris, Andrew; Ward, Hester J T; Lawton, Andrew M; Donnan, Peter T

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Acute pancreatitis (AP) can initiate systemic complications that require support in critical care (CC). Our objective was to use the unified national health record to define the epidemiology of AP in Scotland, with a specific focus on deterministic and prognostic factors for CC admission in AP. Setting Health boards in Scotland (n=4). Participants We included all individuals in a retrospective observational cohort with at least one episode of AP (ICD10 code K85) occurring in Scotland from 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2012. 3340 individuals were coded as AP. Methods Data from 16 sources, spanning general practice, community prescribing, Accident and Emergency attendances, hospital in-patient, CC and mortality registries, were linked by a unique patient identifier in a national safe haven. Logistic regression and gamma models were used to define independent predictive factors for severe AP (sAP) requiring CC admission or leading to death. Results 2053 individuals (61.5% (95% CI 59.8% to 63.2%)) met the definition for true AP (tAP). 368 patients (17.9% of tAP (95% CI 16.2% to 19.6%)) were admitted to CC. Predictors of sAP were pre-existing angina or hypertension, hypocalcaemia and age 30–39 years, if type 2 diabetes mellitus was present. The risk of sAP was lower in patients with multiple previous episodes of AP. In-hospital mortality in tAP was 5.0% (95% CI 4.1% to 5.9%) overall and 21.7% (95% CI 19.9% to 23.5%) in those with tAP necessitating CC admission. Conclusions National record-linkage analysis of routinely collected data constitutes a powerful resource to model CC admission and prognosticate death during AP. Mortality in patients with AP who require CC admission remains high. PMID:27311912

  10. Hypothetical performance of syndrome-based management of acute paediatric admissions of children aged more than 60 days in a Kenyan district hospital.

    PubMed Central

    English, Mike; Berkley, James; Mwangi, Isiah; Mohammed, Shebbe; Ahmed, Maimuna; Osier, Faith; Muturi, Neema; Ogutu, Bernhards; Marsh, Kevin; Newton, Charles R. J. C.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the outpatient, syndrome-based approach of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) protocol could be extended to the inpatient arena to give clear and simple minimum standards of care for poorly resourced facilities. METHODS: A prospective, one-year admission cohort retrospectively compared hypothetical performance of syndrome-based management with paediatrician-defined final diagnosis. Admission syndrome definitions were based on local adaptations to the IMCI protocol that encompassed 20 clinical features, measurement of oxygen saturation, and malaria microscopy. FINDINGS: After 315 children with clinically obvious diagnoses (e.g. sickle cell disease and burns) were excluded, 3705 admission episodes were studied. Of these, 2334 (63%) met criteria for at least one severe syndrome (mortality 8% vs <1% for "non-severe" cases), and half of these had features of two or more severe syndromes. No cases of measles were seen. Syndrome-based treatment would have been appropriate (sensitivity >95%) for severe pneumonia, severe malaria, and diarrhoea with severe dehydration, and probably for severe malnutrition (sensitivity 71%). Syndrome-directed treatment suggested the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in 75/133 (56% sensitivity) children with bacteraemic and 63/71 (89% sensitivity) children with meningitis. CONCLUSIONS: Twenty clinical features, oxygen saturation measurements, and results of malaria blood slides could be used for inpatient, syndrome-based management of acute paediatric admissions. The addition of microscopy of the cerebrospinal fluid and haemoglobin measurements would improve syndrome-directed treatment considerably. This approach might rationalize admission policy and standardize inpatient paediatric care in resource-poor countries, although the clinical detection of bacteraemia remains a problem. PMID:12764512

  11. Plasma suPAR levels are associated with mortality, admission time, and Charlson Comorbidity Index in the acutely admitted medical patient: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is the soluble form of the membrane-bound receptor (uPAR) expressed predominantly on various immune cells. Elevated plasma suPAR concentration is associated with increased mortality in various patient groups, and it is speculated that suPAR is a low-grade inflammation marker reflecting on disease severity. The aim of this prospective observational study was to determine if the plasma concentration of suPAR is associated with admission time, re-admission, disease severity/Charlson Comorbidity Index Score, and mortality. Methods We included 543 patients with various diseases from a Danish Acute Medical Unit during a two month period. A triage unit ensured that only medical patients were admitted to the Acute Medical Unit. SuPAR was measured on plasma samples drawn upon admission. Patients were followed-up for three months after inclusion by their unique civil registry number and using Danish registries to determine admission times, readmissions, International Classification of Diseases, 10th Edition (ICD-10) diagnoses, and mortality. Statistical analysis was used to determine suPAR's association with these endpoints. Results Increased suPAR was significantly associated with 90-day mortality (4.87 ng/ml in survivors versus 7.29 ng/ml in non-survivors, P < 0.0001), higher Charlson Score (P < 0.0001), and longer admission time (P < 0.0001), but not with readmissions. The association with mortality remained when adjusting for age, sex, C-reactive protein (CRP), and Charlson Score. Furthermore, among the various Charlson Score disease groups, suPAR was significantly higher in those with diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and liver disease compared to those without comorbidities. Conclusions SuPAR is a marker of disease severity, admission time, and risk of mortality in a heterogeneous cohort of patients with a variety of diseases. The independent value of suPAR suggests it could be of value in

  12. The association between normal-range admission potassium levels in Israeli patients with acute coronary syndrome and early and late outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shlomai, Gadi; Berkovitch, Anat; Pinchevski-Kadir, Shiran; Bornstein, Gil; Leibowitz, Avshalom; Goldenberg, Ilan; Grossman, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Abnormal serum potassium levels are associated with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias and mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether different levels of serum potassium, within the normal range, are associated with worse outcomes. The present study comprised 1277 patients with AMI and normal-range admission potassium levels (3.5–5.2 mEq/L), who were enrolled and prospectively followed up in the Acute Coronary Syndrome Israeli Survey between 2010 and 2013. Patients were divided into 4 quartiles based on admission potassium levels; “normal-low” (K ≥ 3.5 and K ≤ 3.9), “normal-moderate” (K > 3.9 and K ≤ 4.18), “normal-high” (K > 4.18 and K ≤ 4.45), and “normal-very high” (K > 4.45 and K ≤ 5.2). We analyzed the association between admission serum potassium levels and 7 days in-hospital complication rates, and 30-day and 1-year all-cause mortality rates. Patients with “normal-very high” potassium displayed increased frequency of baseline clinical risk factors and experienced a higher rate of acute kidney injury during hospitalization compared with the “normal-low” group (7.7% vs 2.4%; P = 0.002). However, the rate of in-hospital ventricular arrhythmias was similar across the range of admission potassium levels (overall P = 0.26), Multivariate analysis showed that compared with “low-normal” potassium values, patients with “normal-very high” potassium levels experienced increased risk for 30-days (adjusted hazard ratio 2.88, 95% confidence interval 1.05–7.87, P = 0.039) and 1-year all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 1.98, 95% confidence interval 1.05–3.75, P = 0.034). In patients admitted with AMI, admission serum potassium levels of 4.45 to 5.2 mEq/L are not associated with in-hospital ventricular arrhythmias, but are associated with increased short and long-term mortality. PMID:27281080

  13. Effects of acute organophosphate poisoning on pituitary target gland hormones at admission, discharge and three months after poisoning: A hospital based pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Pinaki; Kamath, Shruthi S.; Bhalla, Ashish; Shah, V.N.; Srinivasan, Anand; Gupta, Prakamya; Singh, Surjit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Organophosphate compound (OPC) poisoning is common in the developing countries such as India. The acute and later effects of OPC poisoning on pituitary and target gland hormones is largely unknown. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was conducted at Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research between January 2012 and March 2013. Fourteen patients (8 males, age 18-50 years) with acute OPC poisoning were included in the study based on the history and clinical features, documented decreased in plasma cholinesterase activity or presence of the OPC in gastric lavage/blood samples. The hormonal parameters were done at baseline, at the time of discharge and at three months of follow-up. Results: A total of 14 patients out of 46 with the mean age of 30.1 ± 10.3 years were finally eligible for the study. Hormonal alterations at admission were similar to sick euhormonal syndrome. Overall 7 of them had nine hormonal deficits at three months of follow up, 4 having sub normal basal cortisol level and two each had low testosterone and growth hormone and only one had thyroxine deficiency. Conclusion: Acute organophosphate poisoning results in endocrine dysfunction akin to sick euhormonal syndrome. However, in a small subset of patients, varying level of hormonal insufficiency may occur either at admission or later. These observations need re-validation in a larger group of patients with specific OPC. PMID:25593838

  14. "Talking in a new way": older individuals' experiences of group work in an acute psychiatric ward.

    PubMed

    Partington, Jennifer; Gee, Susan; Leith, Anne-Marie; Croucher, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Group work is frequently used in mental health, however qualitative studies on service-users' views are rare. Semistructured interviews explored 12 participants' experiences of a café-style social group and a mutual-aid group offered on an older persons psychiatric ward in Christchurch, New Zealand. The values of the strengths-based approach underpinning the groups were reflected back in the experience of an affirming environment, an exchange of strengths, and the capacity to change. The appeal of the café-style may be culturally specific to European women however, reinforcing the importance of an awareness of culture and diversity.

  15. Hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction before and after implementation of a comprehensive smoke-free policy in Uruguay: experience through 2010

    PubMed Central

    Sebrié, Ernesto Marcelo; Sandoya, Edgardo; Bianco, Eduardo; Hyland, Andrew; Cummings, K Michael; Glantz, Stanton A

    2015-01-01

    Background Comprehensive smoke-free laws have been followed by drops in hospitalisations for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), including in a study with 2 years follow-up for such a law in Uruguay. Methods Multiple linear and negative binomial regressions for AMI admissions (ICD-10 code 121) from 37 hospitals for 2 years before and 4 years after Uruguay implemented a 100% nationwide smoke-free law. Results Based on 11 135 cases, there was a significant drop of −30.9 AMI admissions/month (95% CI −49.8 to −11.8, p=0.002) following implementation of the smoke-free law. The effect of the law did not increase or decrease over time following implementation (p=0.234). This drop represented a 17% drop in AMI admissions following the law (IRR=0.829, 95% CI 0.743 to 0.925, p=0.001). Conclusions Adding two more years of follow-up data confirmed that Uruguay’s smoke-free law was followed by a substantial and sustained reduction in AMI hospitalisations. PMID:25324157

  16. Rising United States Hospital Admissions for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Recent Trends and Economic Impact

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Keith S.; Patel, Dipen A.; Stephens, Jennifer M.; Khachatryan, Alexandra; Patel, Ayush; Johnson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of ambulatory patients seeking treatment for skin and skin structure infections (SSSI) are increasing. The objective of this study is to determine recent trends in hospital admissions and healthcare resource utilization and identify covariates associated with hospital costs and mortality for hospitalized adult patients with a primary SSSI diagnosis in the United States. Methods We performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis (years 2005–2011) of data from the US Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample. Recent trends, patient characteristics, and healthcare resource utilization for patients hospitalized with a primary SSSI diagnosis were evaluated. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were conducted to assess patient and hospital characteristics. Results A total of 1.8% of hospital admissions for the years 2005 through 2011 were for adult patients with a SSSI primary diagnosis. SSSI-related hospital admissions significantly changed during the study period (P < .001 for trend) ranging from 1.6% (in 2005) to 2.0% (in 2011). Mean hospital length of stay (LOS) decreased from 5.4 days in the year 2005 to 5.0 days in the year 2011 (overall change, P < .001) with no change in hospital costs. Patients with postoperative wound infections had the longest hospital stays (adjusted mean, 5.81 days; 95% confidence interval (CI), 5.80–5.83) and highest total costs (adjusted mean, $9388; 95% CI, $9366-$9410). Year of hospital admission was strongly associated with mortality; infection type, all patient refined diagnosis related group severity of illness level, and LOS were strongly associated with hospital costs. Conclusions Hospital admissions for adult patients in the United States with a SSSI primary diagnosis continue to increase. Decreasing hospital inpatient LOS and mortality rate may be due to improved early treatment. Future research should focus on identifying alternative treatment processes for patients with SSSI

  17. Change of Serum BNP Between Admission and Discharge After Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Is a Better Predictor of 6-Month All-Cause Mortality Than the Single BNP Value Determined at Admission

    PubMed Central

    De Vecchis, Renato; Ariano, Carmelina; Giandomenico, Giuseppe; Di Maio, Marco; Baldi, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    Background B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is regarded as a reliable predictor of outcome in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). However, according to some scholars, a single isolated measurement of serum BNP at the time of hospital admission would not be sufficient to provide reliable prognostic information. Methods A retrospective study was carried out on patients hospitalized for ADHF, who had then undergone follow-up of at least 6 months, in order to see if there was any difference in midterm mortality among patients with rising BNP at discharge as compared to those with decreasing BNP at discharge. Medical records had to be carefully examined to divide the case records into two groups, the former characterized by an increase in BNP during hospitalization, and the latter showing a decrease in BNP from the time of admission to the time of discharge. Results Ultimately, 177 patients were enrolled in a retrospective study. Among them, 53 patients (29.94%) had increased BNPs at the time of discharge relative to admission, whereas 124 (70.06%) exhibited decreases in serum BNP during their hospital stay. The group with patients who exhibited BNP increases at the time of discharge had higher degree of congestion evident in the higher frequency of persistent jugular venous distention (odds ratio: 3.72; P = 0.0001) and persistent orthopnea at discharge (odds ratio: 2.93; P = 0.0016). Moreover, patients with increased BNP at the time of discharge had a lower reduction in inferior vena cava maximum diameter (1.58 ± 2.2 mm vs. 6.32 ± 1.82 mm; P = 0.001 (one-way ANOVA)). In contrast, there was no significant difference in weight loss when patients with increased BNP at discharge were compared to those with no such increase. A total of 14 patients (7.9%) died during the 6-month follow-up period. Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that BNP increase at the time of discharge was an independent predictor of 6-month all-cause mortality after

  18. Change of Serum BNP Between Admission and Discharge After Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Is a Better Predictor of 6-Month All-Cause Mortality Than the Single BNP Value Determined at Admission

    PubMed Central

    De Vecchis, Renato; Ariano, Carmelina; Giandomenico, Giuseppe; Di Maio, Marco; Baldi, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    Background B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is regarded as a reliable predictor of outcome in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). However, according to some scholars, a single isolated measurement of serum BNP at the time of hospital admission would not be sufficient to provide reliable prognostic information. Methods A retrospective study was carried out on patients hospitalized for ADHF, who had then undergone follow-up of at least 6 months, in order to see if there was any difference in midterm mortality among patients with rising BNP at discharge as compared to those with decreasing BNP at discharge. Medical records had to be carefully examined to divide the case records into two groups, the former characterized by an increase in BNP during hospitalization, and the latter showing a decrease in BNP from the time of admission to the time of discharge. Results Ultimately, 177 patients were enrolled in a retrospective study. Among them, 53 patients (29.94%) had increased BNPs at the time of discharge relative to admission, whereas 124 (70.06%) exhibited decreases in serum BNP during their hospital stay. The group with patients who exhibited BNP increases at the time of discharge had higher degree of congestion evident in the higher frequency of persistent jugular venous distention (odds ratio: 3.72; P = 0.0001) and persistent orthopnea at discharge (odds ratio: 2.93; P = 0.0016). Moreover, patients with increased BNP at the time of discharge had a lower reduction in inferior vena cava maximum diameter (1.58 ± 2.2 mm vs. 6.32 ± 1.82 mm; P = 0.001 (one-way ANOVA)). In contrast, there was no significant difference in weight loss when patients with increased BNP at discharge were compared to those with no such increase. A total of 14 patients (7.9%) died during the 6-month follow-up period. Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that BNP increase at the time of discharge was an independent predictor of 6-month all-cause mortality after

  19. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... Hospitals Medical, Psychiatric, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review § 456.170 Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. (a) Before admission to a mental hospital or before authorization for...

  20. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... Hospitals Medical, Psychiatric, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review § 456.170 Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. (a) Before admission to a mental hospital or before authorization for...

  1. [Patient admission to a child and adolescent psychiatric polyclinic. Referral, patient information, preparation, concepts, expectations and fears of children, adolescents and their parents].

    PubMed

    Stösser, D; Klosinski, G

    1995-03-01

    This study investigates 77 families i.e. their children, aged 7-17, and their parents, who attended the out-patient clinic of the child psychiatric department for the first time. It was intended to examine and outline the subjective situation on entering the clinic. A structured verbal interview was conducted with the children before the start of the actual examination procedure, while a written questionnaire was submitted to the parents. Among the questioned items were modes of referral, references, sources of information, knowledge and preparedness, ideas, expectations and apprehensions about the institution and its treatments. The answer that were obtained reflected a lack of self-determination on the part of the children and the strength of influence exerted by the parents along with other relevant authorities. The children were often taken to the clinic without any active consent on their part. When asked about hopes of improvement they did not often confirm. Similarly fears about the impending examination were at first denied by most children but subsequently conceded, when concrete suggestions were made. Strikingly the better informed and prepared, children were able to admit to their fears more often. The results of the parental questionnaire illustrate an extensive lack of information about the institution that the families were actually attending. It may be concluded that the parents had also been little assertive when preparing their children for the examination. When asked about their expectations the parents primarily quoted "help" and "advice". Scepticism about the examination came only at the bottom of the list.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7784354

  2. Shocking Admission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric; Millman, Sierra

    2007-01-01

    Marilee Jones's career had been a remarkable success. She joined Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT's) admissions office in 1979, landing a job in Cambridge at a time when boys ruled the sandbox of the admissions profession. Her job was to help MIT recruit more women, who then made up less than one-fifth of the institute's students. She…

  3. Suicide Mortality of Suicide Attempt Patients Discharged from Emergency Room, Nonsuicidal Psychiatric Patients Discharged from Emergency Room, Admitted Suicide Attempt Patients, and Admitted Nonsuicidal Psychiatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Jae W.; Park, Subin; Yi, Ki K.; Hong, Jin P.

    2012-01-01

    The suicide mortality rate and risk factors for suicide completion of patients who presented to an emergency room (ER) for suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, patients who presented to an ER for psychiatric problems other than suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, psychiatric inpatients…

  4. Patient characteristics associated with risk of first hospital admission and readmission for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) following primary care COPD diagnosis: a cohort study using linked electronic patient records

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, L C; Lee, R J; Butcher, I; Weir, C J; Fischbacher, C M; McAllister, D; Wild, S H; Hewitt, N; Hardie, R M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate patient characteristics of an unselected primary care population associated with risk of first hospital admission and readmission for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). Design Retrospective open cohort using pseudonymised electronic primary care data linked to secondary care data. Setting Primary care; Lothian (population approximately 800 000), Scotland. Participants Data from 7002 patients from 72 general practices with a COPD diagnosis date between 2000 and 2008 recorded in their primary care record. Patients were followed up until 2010, death or they left a participating practice. Main outcome measures First and subsequent admissions for AECOPD (International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 10 codes J44.0, J44.1 in any diagnostic position) after COPD diagnosis in primary care. Results 1756 (25%) patients had at least 1 AECOPD admission; 794 (11%) had at least 1 readmission and the risk of readmission increased with each admission. Older age at diagnosis, more severe COPD, low body mass index (BMI), current smoking, increasing deprivation, COPD admissions and interventions for COPD prior to diagnosis in primary care, and comorbidities were associated with higher risk of first AECOPD admission in an adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression model. More severe COPD and COPD admission prior to primary care diagnosis were associated with increased risk of AECOPD readmission in an adjusted Prentice-Williams-Peterson model. High BMI was associated with a lower risk of first AECOPD admission and readmission. Conclusions Several patient characteristics were associated with first AECOPD admission in a primary care cohort of people with COPD but fewer were associated with readmission. Prompt diagnosis in primary care may reduce the risk of AECOPD admission and readmission. The study highlights the important role of primary care in preventing or delaying a first AECOPD admission. PMID:26801463

  5. Global and regional burden of hospital admissions for severe acute lower respiratory infections in young children in 2010: a systematic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Harish; Simões, Eric AF; Rudan, Igor; Gessner, Bradford D; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Zhang, Jian Shayne F; Feikin, Daniel R; Mackenzie, Grant A; Moiïsi, Jennifer C; Roca, Anna; Baggett, Henry C; Zaman, Syed MA; Singleton, Rosalyn J; Lucero, Marilla G; Chandran, Aruna; Gentile, Angela; Cohen, Cheryl; Krishnan, Anand; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Arguedas, Adriano; Clara, Alexey Wilfrido; Andrade, Ana Lucia; Ope, Maurice; Ruvinsky, Raúl Oscar; Hortal, María; McCracken, John P; Madhi, Shabir A; Bruce, Nigel; Qazi, Shamim A; Morris, Saul S; El Arifeen, Shams; Weber, Martin W; Scott, J Anthony G; Brooks, W Abdullah; Breiman, Robert F; Campbell, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The annual number of hospital admissions and in-hospital deaths due to severe acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) in young children worldwide is unknown. We aimed to estimate the incidence of admissions and deaths for such infections in children younger than 5 years in 2010. Methods We estimated the incidence of admissions for severe and very severe ALRI in children younger than 5 years, stratified by age and region, with data from a systematic review of studies published between Jan 1, 1990, and March 31, 2012, and from 28 unpublished population-based studies. We applied these incidence estimates to population estimates for 2010, to calculate the global and regional burden in children admitted with severe ALRI in that year. We estimated in-hospital mortality due to severe and very severe ALRI by combining incidence estimates with case fatality ratios from hospital-based studies. Findings We identified 89 eligible studies and estimated that in 2010, 11·9 million (95% CI 10·3–13·9 million) episodes of severe and 3·0 million (2·1–4·2 million) episodes of very severe ALRI resulted in hospital admissions in young children worldwide. Incidence was higher in boys than in girls, the sex disparity being greatest in South Asian studies. On the basis of data from 37 hospital studies reporting case fatality ratios for severe ALRI, we estimated that roughly 265 000 (95% CI 160 000–450 000) in-hospital deaths took place in young children, with 99% of these deaths in developing countries. Therefore, the data suggest that although 62% of children with severe ALRI are treated in hospitals, 81% of deaths happen outside hospitals. Interpretation Severe ALRI is a substantial burden on health services worldwide and a major cause of hospital referral and admission in young children. Improved hospital access and reduced inequities, such as those related to sex and rural status, could substantially decrease mortality related to such infection

  6. Admissions Testing & Institutional Admissions Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossler, Don; Kalsbeek, David

    2009-01-01

    The array of admissions models and the underlying, and sometimes conflicting goals people have for college admissions, create the dynamics and the tensions that define the contemporary context for enrollment management. The senior enrollment officer must ask, for example, how does an institution try to assure transparency, equality of access,…

  7. Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats

    PubMed Central

    Radcliffe, Jonathan; Bird, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method We report the results of a clinical audit of patients' reactions to two types of talking therapy groups facilitated by assistant psychologists and psychology graduates on three acute wards. Patients' experiences of problem-solving and interpersonal group formats were explored via focus groups and structured interviews with 29 group participants. Results Both group formats generated high satisfaction ratings, with benefits related mostly to generic factors. Clinical implications Adequately trained and supported assistant psychologists and psychology graduates can provide supportive talking groups that patients find helpful. PMID:27512586

  8. Serum glucose level at hospital admission correlates with left ventricular systolic dysfunction in nondiabetic, acute coronary patients: the Hellenic Heart Failure Study.

    PubMed

    Chrysohoou, Christina; Pitsavos, Christos; Aggelopoulos, Panagiotis; Skoumas, John; Tsiamis, Eleftherios; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the relation between serum glucose levels at hospital admission and left ventricular systolic function in nondiabetic patients with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Of the 1000 ACS patients who were consecutively enrolled during 2007-2008, 583 (63 +/- 13 years, 20% females) nondiabetic patients were studied in this work. Of these, 254 presented left ventricular systolic dysfunction (ejection fraction <40%). Biochemical measurements and detailed medical information were recorded in all participants. Patients having glucose levels at hospital admission in the highest tertile (>155 mg/dl) had lower left ventricular ejection fraction (40% vs 45%, P = 0.003), were older (66 +/- 11 vs 61 +/- 13, P = 0.004) and less physically active (49% vs 63%, P = 0.02), had higher troponin (14.7 +/- 39.7 vs 5.6 +/- 13.5, P = 0.03), higher brain natriuretic peptide (510.39 +/- 932.33 vs 213.4 +/- 301.14, P = 0.008), higher C-RP (42.26 +/- 55.26 vs 26.46 +/- 38.18, P = 0.04), lower creatinine clearance levels (68 +/- 33 vs.81 +/- 31, P = 0.009), higher white blood cell count (13 416 +/- 16 420 vs 9310 +/- 3020, P = 0.001), and lower body mass index (26.8 +/- 4 vs 27.2 +/- 4.4, P = 0.07), compared to those in the lowest tertile (<114 mg/dl). The multiadjusted logistic regression analysis revealed that a 10 mg/dl difference in glucose levels was independently associated with 8% (95% confidence interval 2%-14%) higher likelihood of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Low glucose concentrations at hospital admission in nondiabetic post-ACS patients is a predictor for the appearance of left ventricular dysfunction, and could be a target marker for risk stratification.

  9. Anemia, Blood Transfusion Requirements and Mortality Risk in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults Requiring Acute Medical Admission to Hospital in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhoff, Andrew D.; Lawn, Stephen D.; Schutz, Charlotte; Burton, Rosie; Boulle, Andrew; Cobelens, Frank J.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Background. Morbidity and mortality remain high among hospitalized patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in sub-Saharan Africa despite widespread availability of antiretroviral therapy. Severe anemia is likely one important driver, and some evidence suggests that blood transfusions may accelerate HIV progression and paradoxically increase short-term mortality. We investigated the relationship between anemia, blood transfusions, and mortality in a South African district hospital. Methods. Unselected consecutive HIV-infected adults requiring acute medical admission to a Cape Town township district hospital were recruited. Admission hemoglobin concentrations were used to classify anemia severity according to World Health Organization/AIDS Clinical Trials Group criteria. Vital status was determined at 90 days, and Cox regression analyses were used to determine independent predictors of mortality. Results. Of 585 HIV-infected patients enrolled, 578 (98.8%) were included in the analysis. Anemia was detected in 84.8% of patients and was severe (hemoglobin, 6.5–7.9 g/dL) or life-threatening (hemoglobin, <6.5 g/dL) in 17.3% and 13.3%, respectively. Within 90 days of the date of admission, 13.5% (n = 78) patients received at least 1 blood transfusion with red cell concentrate and 77 (13.3%) patients died. In univariable analysis, baseline hemoglobin and receipt of blood transfusion were associated with increased mortality risk. However, in multivariable analysis, neither hemoglobin nor receipt of a blood transfusion were independently associated with greater mortality risk. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome-defining illnesses other than tuberculosis and impaired renal function independently predicted mortality. Conclusions. Newly admitted HIV-infected adults had a high prevalence of severe or life-threatening anemia and blood transfusions were frequently required. However, after adjustment for confounders, blood transfusions did not confer an

  10. The impact of psychiatric comorbidity on Medicare reimbursement for inpatient medical care.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J; Daly, J; Golinger, R C

    1994-01-01

    Funding for psychiatric consultation-liaison (C-L) services has been a difficult problem. It has been suggested that the identification of psychiatric co-morbidities in Medicare patients on medical services could generate incremental hospital revenue by moving patients from a lower to a higher paying Diagnostic Related Group (DRG). This increased revenue could be used as a means of supporting the psychiatric C-L service. This study documents the financial impact of screening for and documenting psychiatric co-morbidities on a general acute medical service. We clinically assessed 100 consecutive Medicare admissions and found 25 psychiatric co-morbidities in 20 patients. In only one case did the psychiatric diagnosis result in moving the case to a higher DRG. However, the need for psychiatric consultation remains evident as there was significant lack of recognition and documentation of the psychiatric diagnoses by the medical team. The authors discuss both the financial and clinical implications of screening medical inpatients for psychiatric co-morbidities and propose directions for further studies in this area.

  11. The impact of psychiatric comorbidity on Medicare reimbursement for inpatient medical care.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J; Daly, J; Golinger, R C

    1994-01-01

    Funding for psychiatric consultation-liaison (C-L) services has been a difficult problem. It has been suggested that the identification of psychiatric co-morbidities in Medicare patients on medical services could generate incremental hospital revenue by moving patients from a lower to a higher paying Diagnostic Related Group (DRG). This increased revenue could be used as a means of supporting the psychiatric C-L service. This study documents the financial impact of screening for and documenting psychiatric co-morbidities on a general acute medical service. We clinically assessed 100 consecutive Medicare admissions and found 25 psychiatric co-morbidities in 20 patients. In only one case did the psychiatric diagnosis result in moving the case to a higher DRG. However, the need for psychiatric consultation remains evident as there was significant lack of recognition and documentation of the psychiatric diagnoses by the medical team. The authors discuss both the financial and clinical implications of screening medical inpatients for psychiatric co-morbidities and propose directions for further studies in this area. PMID:8039679

  12. Glasgow Coma Scale and Its Components on Admission: Are They Valuable Prognostic Tools in Acute Mixed Drug Poisoning?

    PubMed Central

    Eizadi Mood, N.; Sabzghabaee, A. M.; Yadegarfar, Gh.; Yaraghi, A.; Ramazani Chaleshtori, M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. The verbal, eye, and motor components of Glasgow coma scale (GCS) may be influenced by poisoned patients' behavior in an attempted suicide. So, the values of admission GCS and its components for outcomes prediction in mixed drugs poisoning were investigated. Materials and Methods. A followup study data was performed on patients with mixed drugs poisoning. Outcomes were recorded as without complications and with complications. Discrimination was evaluated by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). Results. There was a significant difference between the mean value of each component of GCS as well as the total GCS between patients with and without complication. Discrimination was best for GCS (AUC: 0.933 ± 0.020) and verbal (0.932 ± 0.021), followed by motor (0.911 ± 0.025), then eye (0.89 ± 0.028). Conclusions. Admission GCS and its components seem to be valuable in outcome prediction of patients with mixed drug poisoning. PMID:21559299

  13. Effect of Admission Oral Diuretic Dose on Response to Continuous versus Bolus Intravenous Diuretics in Acute Heart Failure: An Analysis from DOSE-AHF

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ravi V.; McNulty, Steven; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Felker, G. Michael; Braunwald, Eugene; Givertz, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Results from the Diuretic Optimization Strategies in Acute Heart Failure (DOSE-AHF) study suggest that an initial continuous infusion of loop diuretics is not superior to bolus dosing with regard to clinical endpoints in AHF. We hypothesized that outpatient furosemide dose was associated with congestion and poorer renal function, and explored the hypothesis that a continuous infusion may be more effective in patients on higher outpatient diuretic doses. Methods DOSE-AHF randomized 308 patients within 24 hours of admission to high vs. low initial intravenous diuretic dose given as either a continuous infusion or bolus. We compared baseline characteristics and assessed associations between mode of administration (bolus vs. continuous) and outcomes in patients receiving high-dose (≥120 mg furosemide equivalent, n=177) versus low-dose (<120 mg furosemide equivalent, n=131) outpatient diuretics. Results Patients on higher doses of furosemide were less frequently on renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (P=.01), and had worse renal function and more advanced symptoms. There was a significant interaction between outpatient dose and mode of therapy (P=0.01) with respect to net fluid loss at 72 hours after adjusting for creatinine and intensification strategy. Admission diuretic dose was associated with an increased risk of death or rehospitalization at 60 days (adjusted HR=1.08 per 20-mg increment in dose, 95% CI 1.01–1.16, P=.03). Conclusions In acute HF, patients on higher diuretic doses have greater disease severity, and may benefit from an initial bolus strategy. PMID:23194486

  14. Effects of short-term exposure to air pollution on hospital admissions of young children for acute lower respiratory infections in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Le, Truong Giang; Ngo, Long; Mehta, Sumi; Do, Van Dzung; Thach, T Q; Vu, Xuan Dan; Nguyen, Dinh Tuan; Cohen, Aaron

    2012-06-01

    There is emerging evidence, largely from studies in Europe and North America, that economic deprivation increases the magnitude of morbidity and mortality related to air pollution. Two major reasons why this may be true are that the poor experience higher levels of exposure to air pollution, and they are more vulnerable to its effects--in other words, due to poorer nutrition, less access to medical care, and other factors, they experience more health impact per unit of exposure. The relations among health, air pollution, and poverty are likely to have important implications for public health and social policy, especially in areas such as the developing countries of Asia where air pollution levels are high and many live in poverty. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of exposure to air pollution on hospital admissions of young children for acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI*) and to explore whether such effects differed between poor children and other children. ALRI, which comprises pneumonia and bronchiolitis, is the largest single cause of mortality among young children worldwide and is responsible for a substantial burden of disease among young children in developing countries. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of the health effects of air pollution in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam. For these reasons, the results of this study have the potential to make an important contribution to the growing literature on the health effects of air pollution in Asia. The study focused on the short-term effects of daily average exposure to air pollutants on hospital admissions of children less than 5 years of age for ALRI, defined as pneumonia or bronchiolitis, in HCMC during 2003, 2004, and 2005. Admissions data were obtained from computerized records of Children's Hospital 1 and Children's Hospital 2 (CH1 and CH2) in HCMC. Nearly all children hospitalized for respiratory illnesses in the city are admitted to one of these two pediatric

  15. Effects of short-term exposure to air pollution on hospital admissions of young children for acute lower respiratory infections in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Le, Truong Giang; Ngo, Long; Mehta, Sumi; Do, Van Dzung; Thach, T Q; Vu, Xuan Dan; Nguyen, Dinh Tuan; Cohen, Aaron

    2012-06-01

    There is emerging evidence, largely from studies in Europe and North America, that economic deprivation increases the magnitude of morbidity and mortality related to air pollution. Two major reasons why this may be true are that the poor experience higher levels of exposure to air pollution, and they are more vulnerable to its effects--in other words, due to poorer nutrition, less access to medical care, and other factors, they experience more health impact per unit of exposure. The relations among health, air pollution, and poverty are likely to have important implications for public health and social policy, especially in areas such as the developing countries of Asia where air pollution levels are high and many live in poverty. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of exposure to air pollution on hospital admissions of young children for acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI*) and to explore whether such effects differed between poor children and other children. ALRI, which comprises pneumonia and bronchiolitis, is the largest single cause of mortality among young children worldwide and is responsible for a substantial burden of disease among young children in developing countries. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of the health effects of air pollution in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam. For these reasons, the results of this study have the potential to make an important contribution to the growing literature on the health effects of air pollution in Asia. The study focused on the short-term effects of daily average exposure to air pollutants on hospital admissions of children less than 5 years of age for ALRI, defined as pneumonia or bronchiolitis, in HCMC during 2003, 2004, and 2005. Admissions data were obtained from computerized records of Children's Hospital 1 and Children's Hospital 2 (CH1 and CH2) in HCMC. Nearly all children hospitalized for respiratory illnesses in the city are admitted to one of these two pediatric

  16. Six-year outcomes in first admission adolescent inpatients: clinical and cognitive characteristics at admission as predictors.

    PubMed

    Pogge, David L; Insalaco, Brie; Bertisch, Hilary; Bilginer, Lale; Stokes, John; Cornblatt, Barbara A; Harvey, Philip D

    2008-07-15

    Persistent functional disability is common after even a single psychiatric admission in people with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, but less is known about other conditions and about adolescent onset patients. This study examined clinical symptoms and cognitive performance at the time of the first admission for the prediction of 6-year outcomes. First admission adolescent patients with a variety of psychiatric diagnoses were assessed with comprehensive clinical ratings of psychopathology, a neuropsychological assessment, and received clinical diagnoses while experiencing their first psychiatric admission. They were contacted 6 years after discharge and examined with a structured assessment of psychiatric symptoms and functioning. Despite the low levels of overall impairment at follow-up, at least 20% of the variance in depression, psychosis, poor peer relationships and poor school attendance 6 years after the hospital admission were predicted by information collected during the hospitalization. Attentional deficits during admission predicted the presence of psychosis at follow-up more substantially than psychotic symptoms during admission, as well as predicting risk for relapse. Attentional deficits during a first psychiatric admission predicted risk for manifesting psychosis at 6-year follow-up to a more substantial degree than either a psychosis diagnosis or psychotic symptoms at admission. In contrast to psychosis, depression at follow-up was predicted by admission symptomatology, but not by cognitive deficits. PMID:18534688

  17. Effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in patients on an acute care psychiatric unit: a randomized three group effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Stigma is a major social barrier that can restrict access to and willingness to seek psychiatric care. Psychiatric consumers may use secrecy and withdrawal in an attempt to cope with stigma. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in acute care psychiatric inpatients using a randomized design with wait-list control. Participants (N=83) were randomly assigned by cluster to one of three single-session group-based conditions: music therapy, education, or wait-list control. Participants in the music therapy and education conditions completed only posttests while participants in the wait-list control condition completed only pretests. The music therapy condition was a group songwriting intervention wherein participants composed lyrics for "the stigma blues." Results indicated significant differences in measures of discrimination (experienced stigma), disclosure (self-stigma), and total stigma between participants in the music therapy condition and participants in the wait-list control condition. From the results of this randomized controlled investigation, music therapy may be an engaging and effective psychosocial technique to treat stigma. Limitations, suggestions for future research, and implications for clinical practice and psychiatric music therapy research are provided.

  18. The European positional paper on rhinosinusitis and nasal polyps: has the introduction of guidance on the management of sinus disease affected uptake of surgery and acute admissions for sinusitis?

    PubMed

    Cosway, Ben; Tomkinson, Alun; Owens, David

    2013-03-01

    Rhinosinusitis is a common condition with adults experiencing 2-5 episodes per year. The European Positional Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps (EP3OS) published in 2005 and updated in 2007 provided evidence-based guidelines on the management of sinus disease promoting a conservative approach to treatment. This study examines the effect of EP3OS on sinus surgery uptake and acute admissions for sinusitis in England and Wales. A retrospective study using the national electronic health databases of England (Hospital Episodes Statistics, HES online) and Wales (Patient Episodes Database of Wales, PEDW) was undertaken from 2000 to 2010 using the OPCS-4 codes E12-E17 (sinus surgery) and ICD10 code J01 (acute admission for sinusitis). Data were analysed for effect following the introduction of the EP3OS in 2005 using linear regression and Chi squared analysis. 116,370 sinus procedures and 10,916 acute admissions for sinusitis were made during the study period. No significant decrease in sinus surgery procedures occurred following the introduction of the EP3OS as may have been expected (p > 0.05), although subgroup analysis suggested a significant increase in Wales (p < 0.05). In addition, significant increases in acute admissions for sinusitis were observed following the introduction of EP3OS (p < 0.05). However, subgroup analysis suggested this was not the case in Wales (p > 0.05). The EP3OS appears to have had little impact on the rates of sinus surgery but more conservative approaches to managing of sinus disease may have led to an increase in acute admissions. Further research is required to investigate whether changes in practice were adopted.

  19. Protein-based profiling of the immune response to uropathogenic Escherichia coli in adult patients immediately following hospital admission for acute cystitis.

    PubMed

    Sundac, Lana; Dando, Samantha J; Sullivan, Matthew J; Derrington, Petra; Gerrard, John; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-08-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are common infections in humans. Despite the substantial healthcare cost represented by these infections, the human immune response associated with the infection immediately following the onset of symptoms in patients remains largely undefined. We performed a prospective study aimed at defining the milieu of urinary cytokines in adult inpatients in the 24-48 h period immediately following hospital admission for acute cystitis due to UPEC. Urine samples, analyzed using 27-target multiplex protein assays, were used to generate immune profiles for patients and compared to age- and gender-matched healthy controls. The levels of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly elevated in urine as a result of infection, an observation consistent with prior findings in murine models and clinical literature. We also identified significant responses for several novel factors not previously associated with the human response to UTI, including Interleukin (IL)-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-17A, eotaxin, Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and several growth factors. These data establish crucial parallels between the human immune response to UPEC and murine model UTI studies, and emphasize the complex but poorly defined nature of the human immune response to UPEC, particularly in the immediate period following the onset of symptoms for acute cystitis. PMID:27354295

  20. Protein-based profiling of the immune response to uropathogenic Escherichia coli in adult patients immediately following hospital admission for acute cystitis.

    PubMed

    Sundac, Lana; Dando, Samantha J; Sullivan, Matthew J; Derrington, Petra; Gerrard, John; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-08-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are common infections in humans. Despite the substantial healthcare cost represented by these infections, the human immune response associated with the infection immediately following the onset of symptoms in patients remains largely undefined. We performed a prospective study aimed at defining the milieu of urinary cytokines in adult inpatients in the 24-48 h period immediately following hospital admission for acute cystitis due to UPEC. Urine samples, analyzed using 27-target multiplex protein assays, were used to generate immune profiles for patients and compared to age- and gender-matched healthy controls. The levels of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly elevated in urine as a result of infection, an observation consistent with prior findings in murine models and clinical literature. We also identified significant responses for several novel factors not previously associated with the human response to UTI, including Interleukin (IL)-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-17A, eotaxin, Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and several growth factors. These data establish crucial parallels between the human immune response to UPEC and murine model UTI studies, and emphasize the complex but poorly defined nature of the human immune response to UPEC, particularly in the immediate period following the onset of symptoms for acute cystitis.

  1. Improving acute psychiatric hospital services according to inpatient experiences. A user-led piece of research as a means to empowerment.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jim; Boyle, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This paper has been undertaken by people with experience with mental health issues and mental health care systems. The aim of the research was to explore psychiatric inpatients' strategies for coping with mental ill health and in what ways acute inpatient psychiatric hospital services are facilitative to the individual attempting recovery. Ten focus groups were facilitated and data were analysed through systematic content analysis. Findings revealed that the main areas of concern for inpatients were: information, communication, relationships, activities, self-help, patient involvement in care treatment plans, and the physical environment. The authors also make a case to improve the status of user-led research as a means to understand the needs of mental health service users. PMID:19148819

  2. Psychiatric UR worksheet.

    PubMed

    Barnes, H

    1988-01-01

    This worksheet was developed in response to an ever increasing number and intensity of admission and concurrent telephone reviews conducted by third and fourth-party payors. This worksheet was developed as an aid in information gathering for subsequent telephone and other reviews. The left-margin headings evolved from queries for information from the most demanding psychiatric nurse reviewers. When I have fully addressed all the information in my review, it is usually no problem in obtaining certification for admission or continued stay for the patient.

  3. Characteristics and Needs of Psychiatric Patients With Prolonged Hospital Stay

    PubMed Central

    Afilalo, Marc; Soucy, Nathalie; Xue, Xiaoqing; Colacone, Antoinette; Jourdenais, Emmanuelle; Boivin, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the characteristics and needs prior to, on admission, during the first month in hospital, at the thirtieth day of hospitalization and posthospital discharge of psychiatric patients occupying acute beds. Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted in 2 tertiary care hospitals. Adult patients hospitalized on a psychiatric unit for 30 days were identified. Data was collected from their medical charts and interviews with their health care team. The categorization of acute and nonacute status at day 30 was based on the health care professional’s evaluation. Descriptive and univariate analyses were performed. Results: A total of 262 patients were identified (mean age 45 years), 66% lived at home and 11% were homeless. More than one-half were cognitively impaired and a few had special medical needs. Ninety-seven per cent had been admitted from the emergency department. At day 30, 81% of patients required acute care, while 19% (95% CI 15% to 24%) occupied an acute care bed, despite the resolution of their acute condition. The main reason preventing discharge of nonacute patients was the difficulty or inability to find appropriate resources that met patients’ needs. As for patients who required acute care, the most common psychiatric issues were delusions or hallucinations (34%), inability to take medications independently (23.6%), and inadequate control of aggression or impulsivity (16.5%). Conclusions: Prevention of the discharge of nonacute patients is largely due to the difficulty in finding appropriate resources that meet patients’ needs. Improved access to community and subacute care resources could potentially facilitate the hospital discharge of psychiatric nonacute patients. PMID:26174218

  4. Acute paediatric bite injuries treated on inpatient basis: a 10-year retrospective study and criteria for hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Shipkov, Hristo; Stefanova, Penka; Sirakov, Vladimir; Stefanov, Rumen; Dachev, Dimitar; Simeonov, Martin; Ivanov, Biser; Nenov, Momchil

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute bite wounds in children treated on an inpatient basis over a 10-year period and the criteria for inpatient treatment. This study comprised all acute mammalian bite injuries in relation to all paediatric bite injuries seen at the Emergency Surgical Department (ESD). Inclusion criteria were: aged between 0-18 years; acute human or animal bite injuries (presenting for the first time); and inpatient treatment. Exclusion criteria were: bite wounds treated elsewhere and referred for complications; bites treated on an outpatient basis referred for complications; and all insect bites. Over 10 years, 12,948 children were seen at the ESD. There were 167 children (0.77%) with mammalian bite wounds. Twelve of them responded to the inclusion criteria. They presented 7.18% of all mammalian bite injuries and 0.09% of all paediatric emergency visits at the ESD. The average age was 3.82 ± 1.63 years (from 1.3-7 years). The time elapsed between the accident to the wound debridement was 118.64 ± 101.39 minutes. There were 10 dogs, one horse, and one rabbit bite. Surgical treatment comprised debridement, saline irrigation, and primary closure or reconstruction. All patients received antibiotics in the postoperative period. The average hospital stay was 5.92 ± 2.39 days. In one case a partial distal flap necrosis occurred. Animal bite injuries treated on an inpatient basis are predominantly dog bites in young children under 10 years of age, with deep, extended, and commonly multiple injuries. Only 7% of paediatric bite injuries require inpatient treatment.

  5. Oral disopyramide after admission to hospital with suspected acute myocardial infarction. U. K. Rythmodan Multicentre Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    A multi-centre double-blind randomized study is reported in which the effect on mortality of oral disopyramide (300 mg loading dose, then 100 mg qds) was compared with placebo in 1985 patients entering hospital with suspected acute myocardial infarction. Treatment was commenced with 24 hr of onset of symptoms (mean time to first dose 9 hr) and continued until discharge from hospital or 14 days, whichever came first. Nine-hundred and ninety-five patients were allocated to disopyramide and 990 to placebo. The overall mortality, calculated on an intention-to-treat basis, was 7.2% for the disopyramide and 5.6% for the placebo patients. Among those patients with proven infarction mortality was 9.5% of 687 on disopyramide and 7.4% of 716 on placebo. These differences are not statistically significant. Patients with cardiac failure or hypotension at entry did not fare worse on disopyramide, but those with a conduction defect did. Reinfarction was not significantly influenced by disopyramide. The prophylactic use of disopyramide in patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction does not reduce mortality or the incidence of early reinfarction. PMID:6369290

  6. 'She's manipulative and he's right off': a critical analysis of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language in the acute inpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Bridget; Manias, Elizabeth

    2006-06-01

    Remarks such as 'she's manipulative' and 'he's right off' are familiar to psychiatric nurses. This paper critiques the language nurses use in acute inpatient psychiatry services, highlighting the diverse discourses implicated in nurses' writing and speaking about patients. Based on a review of the literature, this paper examines ethnographic studies and discourse analyses of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language. A prominent debate in the literature surrounds nurses' use of standardized language, which is the use of set terms for symptoms and nursing activities. This review of spoken descriptions of patients highlights nurses' use of informal and local descriptions, incorporating elements of moral judgement, common sense language and empathy. Research into written accounts in patient files and records show nurses' use of objectifying language, the dominance of medicine and the emergence of the language of bureaucracy in health services. Challenges to the language of psychiatry and psychiatric nursing arise from fields as diverse as bioscience, humanism and social theory. Authors who focus on the relationship between language, power and the discipline of nursing disagree in regard to their analysis of particular language as a constructive exercise of power by nurses. Thus, particular language is in some instances endorsed and in other instances censured, by nurses in research and practice. In this paper, a Foucauldian analysis provides further critique of taken-for-granted practices of speech and writing. Rather than censoring language, we recommend that nurses, researchers and educators attend to nurses' everyday language and explore what it produces for nurses, patients and society.

  7. 'She's manipulative and he's right off': a critical analysis of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language in the acute inpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Bridget; Manias, Elizabeth

    2006-06-01

    Remarks such as 'she's manipulative' and 'he's right off' are familiar to psychiatric nurses. This paper critiques the language nurses use in acute inpatient psychiatry services, highlighting the diverse discourses implicated in nurses' writing and speaking about patients. Based on a review of the literature, this paper examines ethnographic studies and discourse analyses of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language. A prominent debate in the literature surrounds nurses' use of standardized language, which is the use of set terms for symptoms and nursing activities. This review of spoken descriptions of patients highlights nurses' use of informal and local descriptions, incorporating elements of moral judgement, common sense language and empathy. Research into written accounts in patient files and records show nurses' use of objectifying language, the dominance of medicine and the emergence of the language of bureaucracy in health services. Challenges to the language of psychiatry and psychiatric nursing arise from fields as diverse as bioscience, humanism and social theory. Authors who focus on the relationship between language, power and the discipline of nursing disagree in regard to their analysis of particular language as a constructive exercise of power by nurses. Thus, particular language is in some instances endorsed and in other instances censured, by nurses in research and practice. In this paper, a Foucauldian analysis provides further critique of taken-for-granted practices of speech and writing. Rather than censoring language, we recommend that nurses, researchers and educators attend to nurses' everyday language and explore what it produces for nurses, patients and society. PMID:16643343

  8. Comparison of assessment and management of suicidal risk for acute psychiatric assessment between two state sponsored hospitals in England and Italy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranbir; Verdolini, Norma; Agius, Mark; Moretti, Patrizia; Quartesan, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    The risk of suicide is one of the most important risk factors looked into for acute psychiatric assessments that influences the management plan. The prevalence of suicide is on a rise across European countries; as a consequence, the different countries have created specific guidelines and policies in order to prevent suicides in the acute settings. These guidelines are based on both different cultural aspects as well as the different organization of the mental health system in the different countries. This paper wants to present the comparison between the guidelines of two European countries, England and Italy, in order to evaluate the systems, understand differences and common contact points. The different European countries could learn one from the other and a European shared point of view may be a way forward to create better understanding and preventing the risk of suicide across the population. PMID:26417782

  9. The Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry - II (ASAP-II): a comparative study of psychiatric intensive care units in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Schoevers, Robert; van Wijk, Cecile Gijsbers; Mulder, Wijnand; Hornbach, Annett; Barkhof, Emile; Klaassen, André; van Egmond, Marieke; van Venrooij, Janine; Bijpost, Yan; Nusselder, Hans; van Herrewaarden, Marjan; Maksimovic, Igor; Achilles, Alexander; Dekker, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Background The number of patients in whom mental illness progresses to stages in which acute, and often forced treatment is warranted, is on the increase across Europe. As a consequence, more patients are involuntarily admitted to Psychiatric Intensive Care Units (PICU). From several studies and reports it has become evident that important dissimilarities exist between PICU's. The current study seeks to describe organisational as well as clinical and patient related factors across ten PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region, adjusted for or stratified by level of urbanization. Method/Design This paper describes the design of the Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry II (ASAP-II). This study is a prospective observational cohort study comparing PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region on various patient characteristics, treatment aspects and recovery related variables. Dissimilarities were measured by means of collecting standardized forms which were filled out in the framework of care as usual, by means of questionnaires filled out by mental health care professionals and by means of extracting data from patient files for every consecutive patient admitted at participating PICU's during a specific time period. Urbanization levels for every PICU were calculated conform procedures as proposed by the Dutch Central Bureau for Statistics (CBS). Discussion The current study may provide a deeper understanding of the differences between psychiatric intensive care units that can be used to promote best practice and benchmarking procedures, and thus improve the standard of care. PMID:19725981

  10. Patients' own statements of their future risk for violent and self-harm behaviour: a prospective inpatient and post-discharge follow-up study in an acute psychiatric unit.

    PubMed

    Roaldset, John Olav; Bjørkly, Stål

    2010-06-30

    Recently patients' responsibility for and ownership of their own treatment have been emphasised. A literature search on patients'' structured self-reported assessment of future risk of violent, suicidal or self mutilating behaviour failed to disclose any published empirical research. The present prospective naturalistic study comprised all involuntary and voluntary acutely admitted patients (n=489) to a psychiatric hospital during one year. Patients' self-reported risks of violence and self-harm at admission and at discharge were compared with episodes recorded during hospital stay and 3 months post-discharge. Patients' predictions were significant concerning violent, suicidal and self-injurious behaviour, with AUC values of 0.73 (95%CI=0.61-0.85), 0.92 (95%CI=0.88-0.96) and 0.82 (95%CI=0.67-0.98) for hospital stay, and 0.67 (95%CI=0.58-0.76), 0.63 (95%CI=0.55-0.72) and 0.66 (95%CI=0.57-0.76) after 3 months, respectively. Moderate or higher risk predictions remained significant in multivariate analysis, and risk of violence even after gender stratification. Self-harm predictions were significant for women. Moderate or higher risk scores remained significant predictors of violence one year post-discharge. Controlling for readmissions the results remained the same. Low sensitivity limits the clinical value, but relatively high positive predictive values might be clinically important. Still future research is recommended to explore if self prediction is a valid adjuvant method to established risk assessment procedures.

  11. The periodicities in and biometeorological relationships with bed occupancy of an acute psychiatric ward in Antwerp, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, M.; de Meyer, F.; Peeters, D.; Meltzer, H.; Schotte, C.; Scharpe, S.; Cosyns, P.

    1993-06-01

    Recently, some investigators have established a seasonal pattern in normal human psychology, physiology and behaviour, and in the incidence of psychiatric psychopathology. In an attempt to elucidate the chronopsy and meteotropism in the latter, we have examined the chronograms of, and the biometeorological relationships to bed occupancy of the psychiatric ward of the Antwerp University Hospital during three consecutive calendar years (1987 1989). Weather data for the vicinity were provided by a local meteorological station and comprise mean atmospheric pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and minutes of sunlight and precipitation/day. The number of psychiatric beds occupied during the study period exhibited a significant seasonal variation. Peaks in bed occupancy were observed in March and November, with lows in August. An important part of the variability in the number of beds occupied could be explained by the composite effects of weather variables of the preceding weeks. Our results suggest that short-term fluctuations in atmospheric activity may dictate some of the periodicities in psychiatric psychopathology.

  12. Cost effectiveness of day and inpatient psychiatric treatment: results of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Creed, F.; Mbaya, P.; Lancashire, S.; Tomenson, B.; Williams, B.; Holme, S.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare direct and indirect costs of day and inpatient treatment of acute psychiatric illness. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial with outcome and costs assessed over 12 months after the date of admission. SETTING: Teaching hospital in an inner city area. SUBJECTS: 179 patients with acute psychiatric illness referred for admission who were suitable for random allocation to day hospital or inpatient treatment. 77 (43%) patients had schizophrenia. INTERVENTIONS: Routine inpatient or day hospital treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Direct and indirect costs over 12 months, clinical symptoms, social functioning, and burden on relatives over the follow up period. RESULTS: Clinical and social outcomes were similar at 12 months, except that inpatients improved significantly faster than day patients and burden on relatives was significantly less in the day hospital group at one year. Median direct costs to the hospital were 1923 pounds (95% confidence interval 750 pounds to 3174 pounds) per patient less for day hospital treatment than inpatient treatment. Indirect costs were greater for day patients; when these were included, overall day hospital treatment was 2165 pounds cheaper than inpatient treatment (95% confidence interval of median difference 737 pounds to 3593 pounds). Including costs to informants when appropriate meant that day hospital treatment was 1994 pounds per patient cheaper (95% confidence interval 600 pounds to 3543 pounds). CONCLUSIONS: Day patient treatment is cheaper for the 30-40% of potential admissions that can be treated in this way. Carers of day hospital patients may bear additional costs. Carers of all patients with acute psychiatric illness are often themselves severely distressed at the time of admission, but day hospital treatment leads to less burden on carers in the long term. PMID:9161310

  13. An acute in-patient psychiatric service for 16- to 17-year-old adolescents in the UK: a descriptive evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Duddu, Venu; Rhouma, Abdulhakim; Qureshi, Masood; Chaudhry, Imran Bashir; Drake, Terry; Sumra, Altaf; Husain, Nusrat

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method The need for an age-appropriate in-patient service for 16- to 17-year-olds led to the development of a 6-bed acute admissions unit in a non-metropolitan county in the UK. We provide a descriptive evaluation of the first 2 years of its operation. All admissions from April 2010 to March 2012 were reviewed, clinical details systematically recorded and descriptively analysed. Results Ninety-seven young people were admitted during this period (a third were compulsorily detained under the Mental Health Act 1983). The average length of stay was 3–4 weeks. The most common presenting complaints were self-harm and low mood, usually in the context of life events and childhood adversity. Nearly half had substance misuse and other risk-taking behaviours. A third presented with psychotic symptoms. Adjustment and anxiety disorders were most common, followed by alcohol/substance use disorders, depressive illnesses and psychotic illnesses. Comorbidity was the rule rather than the exception. Most patients improved by the time of discharge. Clinical implications The unit provides an accessible and effective age-appropriate service and is likely to constitute an important component of the comprehensive child and adolescent mental health service strategy in the county. PMID:27752345

  14. Predictors of Specialized Inpatient Admissions for Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modi, Miti; McMorris, Carly; Palucka, Anna; Raina, Poonam; Lunsky, Yona

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) have complex mental health needs and may seek specialized ID psychiatric services. This study reports on predictors of specialized inpatient admissions for 234 individuals with ID who received outpatient services at a psychiatric hospital. Overall, from 2007-2012, 55 of the 234 outpatients were triaged…

  15. Substance use disorders in an adolescent inpatient psychiatric population.

    PubMed

    Deas-Nesmith, D; Campbell, S; Brady, K T

    1998-04-01

    This study examined the comorbidity of substance use disorders and other psychiatric disorders in adolescent populations. The study population was comprised of 100 consecutive admissions, ages 13 to 17, to an acute care adolescent psychiatric inpatient unit for substance use disorders. Patients were assessed using the Personal Experience Screening Questionnaire (PESQ) and the substance-use disorder portion of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM III-R (SCID-R). Thirty-three (33%) patients were identified as having a substance abuse or dependence diagnosis. There was no significant difference in the age between substance users and nonsubstance users. There were significantly more whites in the substance-using group. Sixty percent of all adolescents interviewed had histories of sexual or physical trauma, with trauma being significantly more common in the substance-using group. There were no significant differences in the number or type of other Axis I or Axis II diagnoses between the two groups. While substance users and nonsubstance users had no significant difference in the number of past psychiatric hospitalizations, nonsubstance users had significantly more past medical hospitalizations. These results indicate that high rates of comorbid substance abuse and psychiatric disorders exist in adolescents, and more in-depth study of comorbidity among adolescents is warranted. PMID:9581443

  16. Substance use disorders in an adolescent inpatient psychiatric population.

    PubMed Central

    Deas-Nesmith, D.; Campbell, S.; Brady, K. T.

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the comorbidity of substance use disorders and other psychiatric disorders in adolescent populations. The study population was comprised of 100 consecutive admissions, ages 13 to 17, to an acute care adolescent psychiatric inpatient unit for substance use disorders. Patients were assessed using the Personal Experience Screening Questionnaire (PESQ) and the substance-use disorder portion of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM III-R (SCID-R). Thirty-three (33%) patients were identified as having a substance abuse or dependence diagnosis. There was no significant difference in the age between substance users and nonsubstance users. There were significantly more whites in the substance-using group. Sixty percent of all adolescents interviewed had histories of sexual or physical trauma, with trauma being significantly more common in the substance-using group. There were no significant differences in the number or type of other Axis I or Axis II diagnoses between the two groups. While substance users and nonsubstance users had no significant difference in the number of past psychiatric hospitalizations, nonsubstance users had significantly more past medical hospitalizations. These results indicate that high rates of comorbid substance abuse and psychiatric disorders exist in adolescents, and more in-depth study of comorbidity among adolescents is warranted. PMID:9581443

  17. A cross-sectional prospective study of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication in acute psychiatric wards: patient, staff and ward characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous research on mental health care has shown considerable differences in use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication among different wards and geographical areas. This study investigates to what extent use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication for involuntary admitted patients in Norwegian acute psychiatric wards is associated with patient, staff and ward characteristics. The study includes data from 32 acute psychiatric wards. Methods Multilevel logistic regression using Stata was applied with data from 1016 involuntary admitted patients that were linked to data about wards. The sample comprised two hierarchical levels (patients and wards) and the dependent variables had two values (0 = no use and 1 = use). Coercive measures were defined as use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary depot medication during hospitalization. Results The total number of involuntary admitted patients was 1214 (35% of total sample). The percentage of patients who were exposed to coercive measures ranged from 0-88% across wards. Of the involuntary admitted patients, 424 (35%) had been secluded, 117 (10%) had been restrained and 113 (9%) had received involuntary depot medication at discharge. Data from 1016 patients could be linked in the multilevel analysis. There was a substantial between-ward variance in the use of coercive measures; however, this was influenced to some extent by compositional differences across wards, especially for the use of restraint. Conclusions The substantial between-ward variance, even when adjusting for patients' individual psychopathology, indicates that ward factors influence the use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication and that some wards have the potential for quality improvement. Hence, interventions to reduce the use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication should take into account organizational and environmental factors. PMID:20370928

  18. Impact of risperidone long acting injection on resource utilization in psychiatric secondary care.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M; Currie, A; Lloyd, K; Price, M; Peperell, Kate

    2008-03-01

    Risperidone long acting injection (RLAI) is the only long acting atypical antipsychotic available in the UK. Its impact on NHS resource use has not been widely studied. This review of medical records was conducted to quantify the impact of RLAI on NHS psychiatric secondary care resource use, primarily in terms of episodes of inpatient hospital care 12 months before and 12 months after RLAI initiation. Data on number of hospitalizations and hospital bed days were collected retrospectively, from patient notes and hospital databases in four acute psychiatric units in the UK for all individuals with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who were prescribed RLAI more than 12 months previously. Data were collected on 100 individuals (58 male) with a mean age 40.8 years (range 19-70). The median duration of illness before RLAI initiation was 12 years (range six months to 43 years). There were 62 admissions in the 12 months pre-RLAI, falling to 22 admissions in the 12 months post-RLAI. Number of admissions, we argue, offer a more reliable indicator of the impact of treatment than total hospital bed days in this type of study. In this study there were 40 fewer admissions in the 12 months after RLAI was initiated compared with the previous 12 months. This is important as readmission is a good proxy measure of relapse, and adherence to medication is known to be a key factor in relapse prevention. PMID:18308820

  19. A comparison of symptoms and drug use between patients with methamphetamine associated psychoses and patients diagnosed with schizophrenia in two acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Medhus, Sigrid; Mordal, Jon; Holm, Bjørn; Mørland, Jørg; Bramness, Jørgen G

    2013-03-30

    Psychosis induced by the use of amphetamine or methamphetamine leads to dramatic symptoms and frequent readmissions and poses diagnostic challenges. Earlier studies have often relied on history taking and/or urine samples to reveal drug use. The aim of this study was to compare the psychotic symptoms of two groups: (1) acutely admitted patients who tested positive for methamphetamines and were diagnosed with drug-induced or methamphetamine-induced psychoses and (2) acutely admitted patients who tested negative for methamphetamines and were diagnosed with schizophrenia. Blood and urine samples were used. In addition, we investigated whether the severity of symptoms, in those who tested positive, was related to the blood concentration of methamphetamine. Of 285 patients who volunteered blood and/or urine samples within 48h of admission, 37 (13%) had recently taken methamphetamine. Positive psychotic symptoms between the two groups were compared by PANSS using the positive subscale. The results showed no differences in positive psychotic symptoms between the two groups. The severity of positive psychotic symptoms in patients with three different levels of urine/blood methamphetamine concentrations, were compared. We found no clinically or statistically significant relationship between blood methamphetamine levels and severity of psychotic symptoms.

  20. 42 CFR 456.481 - Admission certification and plan of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Individuals Under Age 21: Admission and Plan of Care Requirements § 456.481 Admission certification and plan of care. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a recipient under age 21— (a) The... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Admission certification and plan of care....

  1. Psychiatric diagnosis, psychiatric power and psychiatric abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Szasz, T

    1994-01-01

    Psychiatric abuse, such as we usually associate with practices in the former Soviet Union, is related not to the misuse of psychiatric diagnoses, but to the political power intrinsic to the social role of the psychiatrist in totalitarian and democratic societies alike. Some reflections are offered on the modern, therapeutic state's proclivity to treat adults as patients rather than citizens, disjoin rights from responsibilities, and thus corrupt the language of political-philosophical discourse. PMID:7996558

  2. ST-segment deviation in lead aVR on admission is not associated with left ventricular function at predischarge in first anterior wall ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yukie; Tamura, Akira; Kotoku, Munenori; Kadota, Junichi

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that the analysis of ST-segment deviation in lead aVR on admission provides useful information on angiographic coronary anatomy and risk stratification in acute coronary syndromes. However, the association between ST-segment deviation in lead aVR on admission and left ventricular (LV) function has not been fully investigated in anterior wall acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. In this study, 237 patients with first anterior wall acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were examined. The patients were divided into the following 3 groups according to ST-segment deviation in lead aVR on admission: 85 with ST-segment elevation ≥0.5 mm (group A), 106 without ST-segment deviation (group B), and 46 with ST-segment depression ≥0.5 mm (group C). LV ejection fractions at predischarge were compared among the 3 groups. Among the 3 groups, there were significant differences in the prevalences of proximal left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) occlusion (group A 75.3%, group B 56.6%, group C 45.7%, p = 0.002), long LAD (group A 27.1%, group B 31.1%, group C 56.5%, p = 0.002), and good collaterals to the LAD (group A 40.0%, group B 25.4%, group C 17.4%, p = 0.01). LV ejection fractions at predischarge did not differ among the 3 groups (group A 56.4 ± 12.5%, group B 56.9 ± 12.7%, group C 53.3 ± 12.2%, p = 0.26). On a multiple regression analysis, establishment of Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction grade 3 flow, proximal LAD occlusion, and long LAD were associated with the LV ejection fraction at predischarge. In conclusion, ST-segment deviation in lead aVR on admission is not associated with LV function at predischarge in first anterior wall acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

  3. Predicting language improvement in acute stroke patients presenting with aphasia: a multivariate logistic model using location-weighted atlas-based analysis of admission CT perfusion scans

    PubMed Central

    Payabvash, Seyedmehdi; Kamalian, Shahmir; Fung, Steve; Wang, Yifei; Passanese, John; Kamalian, Shervin; Souza, Leticia CS; Kemmling, Andre; Harris, Gordon J.; Halpern, Elkan F.; Gonzalez, R. Gilberto; Furie, Karen L.; Lev, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To construct a multivariate model for prediction of early aphasia improvement in stroke patients using admission CT perfusion (CTP) and CT angiography (CTA). Methods Fifty-eight consecutive patients with aphasia due to first-time ischemic stroke of the left hemisphere were included. Language function was assessed based on patients’ admission and discharge NIHSS and clinical records. All patients had brain CTP and CTA within 9 hours of symptom onset. For image analysis, all CTPs were automatically coregistered to MNI-152 brain space and parcellated into mirrored cortical and subcortical regions. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to find independent imaging and clinical predictors of language recovery. Results By the time of discharge, 21 (36%) patients demonstrated improvement of language. Independent factors predicting improvement in language included relative cerebral blood flow of angular gyrus gray matter (Brodmann’s area 39) and lower third of insular ribbon, proximal cerebral artery occlusion on admission CTA, and aphasia score on admission NIHSS exam. Using these 4 variables, we developed a multivariate logistic regression model that could estimate the probability of early improvement in stroke patients presenting with aphasia and predict functional outcome with 91% accuracy. Conclusion An imaging-based location weighted multivariate model is developed to predict early language improvement of aphasic patients using admission data collected within 9-hours of stroke onset. This pilot model should be validated in a larger, prospective study; however, the semi-automated atlas-based analysis of brain CTP, along with the statistical approach, could be generalized for prediction of other outcome measures in stroke patients. PMID:20488905

  4. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Services for Individuals Under Age 21: Admission and Plan of Care Requirements § 456.482 Medical... under age 21, the medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations required by §§ 456.170, and 456.370...

  5. Psychiatric illness in the New Zealand Maori.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, P S

    1989-12-01

    This paper compares psychiatric illness in the contemporary Maori with that in the non-Maori New Zealander. The ethnic data available are all from secondary sources. The limitations of this and the problems of achieving a satisfactory definition of "a Maori" are discussed. The data suggest that the Maori have a slightly greater risk of psychiatric hospitalization than the non-Maori. First admission rates for schizophrenia are higher for the Maori, as are the readmission rates. First admission rates for major affective illness are roughly comparable in the two groups, and those for neuroses and neurotic depression are lower in the Maori. Rates of admission for alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence and personality disorders are much higher for the Maori male aged 20-40 years and this group is at greatest risk of psychiatric hospitalization. A larger proportion of Maori are admitted involuntarily, especially under the Criminal Justice Act. The median stay in hospital is not longer for the Maori but their re-admissions are more frequent. The Maori have shown an increase in first psychiatric admission rates since the 1950s, with rapid increases in the early 60s and the 80s. The rates for psychotic disorders have been relatively constant and the most significant changes have been for alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence and personality disorders. The author relates this historical change to socioeconomic and politico-cultural factors, particularly the stress of rapid urbanization. PMID:2610653

  6. Acute effects of particulate air pollution on respiratory admissions: results from APHEA 2 project. Air Pollution and Health: a European Approach.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, R W; Anderson, H R; Sunyer, J; Ayres, J; Baccini, M; Vonk, J M; Boumghar, A; Forastiere, F; Forsberg, B; Touloumi, G; Schwartz, J; Katsouyanni, K

    2001-11-15

    The APHEA 2 project investigated short-term health effects of particles in eight European cities. In each city associations between particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microm (PM(10)) and black smoke and daily counts of emergency hospital admissions for asthma (0-14 and 15-64 yr), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and all-respiratory disease (65+ yr) controlling for environmental factors and temporal patterns were investigated. Summary PM(10) effect estimates (percentage change in mean number of daily admissions per 10 microg/m(3) increase) were asthma (0-14 yr) 1.2% (95% CI: 0.2, 2.3), asthma (15-64 yr) 1.1% (0.3, 1.8), and COPD plus asthma and all-respiratory (65+ yr) 1.0% (0.4, 1.5) and 0.9% (0.6, 1.3). The combined estimates for Black Smoke tended to be smaller and less precisely estimated than for PM(10). Variability in the sizes of the PM(10) effect estimates between cities was also investigated. In the 65+ groups PM(10) estimates were positively associated with annual mean concentrations of ozone in the cities. For asthma admissions (0-14 yr) a number of city-specific factors, including smoking prevalence, explained some of their variability. This study confirms that particle concentrations in European cities are positively associated with increased numbers of admissions for respiratory diseases and that some of the variation in PM(10) effect estimates between cities can be explained by city characteristics.

  7. Acute psychosis in a verified Huntington disease gene carrier with subtle motor signs: psychiatric criteria should be considered for the diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Nagel, M; Rumpf, H J; Kasten, M

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, progressive, autosomal dominant disorder. Some patients develop severe chorea or cognitive symptoms. The genetic defect causes progressive atrophy of the striatum, the cortex and extrastriatal structures (Sheperd GM. Corticostriatal connectivity and its role in disease. Nat Rev Neurosci 2013;14:278-91). The precise timing of clinical diagnosis of HD is poorly characterized and is mainly based on motor symptoms (Huntington, Study and Group. Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale: reliability and consistency. Huntington Study Group. Mov Discord 1996:136-42). Patients suffering from HD frequently show cognitive or affective symptoms even before manifesting motor signs. Psychiatric symptoms like depression, apathy, aggression, and disinhibition are common, and suicide rates are over four times higher than in the general population (Di Maio L, Squitieri F, Napolitano G, Campanella G, Trofatter JA, Conneally PM. Suicide risk in Huntington's disease. J Med Genet 1993;30:293-5). This case report of a female patient with genetically proven HD is of special interest because motor or cognitive impairment were absent whereas she suffered from symptoms of an acute and severe psychosis likely to be symptomatic signs of HD.

  8. Finding solutions through empowerment: a preliminary study of a solution-orientated approach to nursing in acute psychiatric settings.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, C; Jackson, S; Barker, P

    2003-12-01

    Acute inpatient care is not a therapeutic milieu, perhaps owing to the lack of nursing skills. Solution-focused therapy (SFT) has been successful in US inpatient facilities in relation to both objective and subjective 'measures'. This paper reports a study of SFT in a UK context, with the aim of developing a user-friendly SFT training course and assessing its impact on both nurses and clients, via a multifaceted, triangulated data collection design. Nurses' knowledge and clinical performance were assessed, as was the client's perspective. There was a significant difference in nurses' SFT knowledge after training and strong evidence of the model being used in practice during the course of training, although nursing documentation was not fully completed. Eighty-three per cent of nurses said that they would continue using the model, and clients found the SFT approach helpful. The findings match the US experience of using SFT.

  9. [Involuntary admission of addict during early pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Hondius, Adger J K; Stikker, Tineke E; Wennink, J M B Hanneke; Honig, Adriaan

    2012-01-01

    A 30-year-old cocaine-dependent woman was 16 weeks pregnant. Because of possible endangerment of the fetus, an involuntary provisional admission was authorized. Of particular interest is the application of the Dutch Act on Formal Admissions to Psychiatric Hospitals for the primary diagnosis 'addiction' and the fact that the fetus was regarded as a legal 'other'. In severe cases of addiction combined with pregnancy an earlier intervention is needed and arrangement of accelerated legal custody of the newborn before birth should be considered. For the protection of the unborn, we advocate a stricter application of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Information for addicted women with preconception counselling can help prevent a compulsory admission. PMID:22258443

  10. Influence of psychiatric comorbidity on 30-day readmissions for heart failure, myocardial infarction, and pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmedani, Brian K.; Solberg, Leif I.; Copeland, Laurel; Fang, Ying; Stewart, Christine; Hu, Jianhui; Nerenz, David R.; Williams, L. Keoki; Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E.; Waxmonsky, Jeanette; Lu, Christine Y.; Waitzfelder, Beth E.; Owen-Smith, Ashli A.; Coleman, Karen J.; Lynch, Frances L.; Ahmed, Ameena T.; Beck, Arne L.; Rossom, Rebecca C.; Simon, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) implemented a policy in 2012 that penalizes hospitals for ‘excessive’ all-cause hospital readmissions within 30 days after discharge for heart failure (HF), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and pneumonia. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of psychiatric comorbidities on 30-day all-cause readmissions for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, and pneumonia. Methods Longitudinal study from 2009-2011 within 11 Mental Health Research Network (MHRN) affiliated health systems. Data were derived from the HMO Research Network Virtual Data Warehouse. Participants were individuals admitted to the hospital for HF, AMI, and pneumonia. All index inpatient hospitalizations for HF, AMI and pneumonia were captured (n=160,169 patient index admissions). Psychiatric diagnoses were measured for the year prior to admission. All-cause readmissions within 30 days of discharge were the outcome variable. Results Approximately 18% of all individuals with these conditions were readmitted within 30-days. The rate was 5% greater for individuals with a past-year psychiatric comorbidity (21.7%) than for those without (16.5%; p<.001). Depression, anxiety, and dementia were associated with more readmissions for those with index hospitalizations for all three conditions independently and combined (p<.05). Substance use and bipolar disorders were linked with higher readmissions for those with initial HF and pneumonia hospitalizations (p<.05). Readmission rates declined overall from 2009-2011. Conclusions Individuals with HF, AMI, and pneumonia experience high rates of readmission, but psychiatric comorbidities appear to increase that risk. Future readmission interventions should consider adding mental health components. PMID:25642610

  11. AN ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITALIZATIONS.

    PubMed

    Bloom, B L

    1968-10-01

    In order to develop some understanding of community social structure and its association with psychiatric inpatient medical care patterns, first admission rates for psychiatric disorders into both public and private facilities were determined for each of the 33 census tracts of Pueblo, Colorado. At the same time a cluster analysis was made of the structure of these tracts. Four well- defined clusters were identified (socio-economic affluence, young marrieds, social isolation, and social disequilibrium) and strikingly high differential relationships found between the cluster scores and psychiatric inpatient care patterns. Implications of the findings for preventive strategies and for. social etiology hypotheses are presented.

  12. Psychiatric disorders in individuals diagnosed with infantile autism as children: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Rich, Bente; Isager, Torben; Nedergaard, Niels Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence and types of psychiatric disorders in a clinical sample of 118 individuals diagnosed as children with infantile autism (IA) with psychiatric disorders in 336 matched controls from the general population using data from the nationwide Danish Psychiatric Central Register. The average observation time was 32.5 years, and mean age at follow-up was 40.6 years (range 25-55 years). Of the 118 individuals with IA, 57 (48.3%) had been in contact with psychiatric hospitals (inpatient hospitalization or outpatient visits) during the follow-up period, compared with 20/336 (6.0%) in the control group (p < 0.0001). This observation should alert general psychiatrists to the possibility of additional treatable psychiatric disorders occurring in individuals with IA. Of the 118 individuals in the IA group, 20 individuals (17%) had been given a comorbid psychiatric diagnosis during the observation period, compared with 9 individuals (2.7%) in the control group. Of the subjects with IA, 3.4% had received a diagnosis of schizophrenia (F20) at least once since the index admission in childhood, 0.8% had been diagnosed with delusional disorder (F22), 0.8% with acute psychotic disorder (F23), and 1.6% with unspecified non-organic psychosis (F29). In the control group, 0.9% had been diagnosed with schizophrenia (p = 0.08). In the group with IA, 3.4% had received a diagnosis in the broad category of affective disorders compared with 1.2% in the control group (p = 0.21). Issues associated with using registers in the ascertainment of co-occurring psychiatric disorders in IA are discussed.

  13. Randomised controlled trial of day patient versus inpatient psychiatric treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Creed, F; Black, D; Anthony, P; Osborn, M; Thomas, P; Tomenson, B

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the proportion of acutely ill psychiatric patients who can be treated in a day hospital and compare the outcome of day patient and inpatient treatment. DESIGN--Prospective randomised controlled trial of day patient versus inpatient treatment after exclusion of patients precluded by severity of illness or other factors from being treated as day patients. All three groups assessed at three and 12 months. SETTING--Teaching hospital serving small socially deprived inner city area. Day hospital designed to take acute admissions because of few beds. PATIENTS--175 Patients were considered, of whom 73 could not be allocated. Of the remaining 102 patients, 51 were allocated to each treatment setting but only 89 became established in treatment--namely, 41 day patients and 48 inpatients. 73 Of these 89 patients were reassessed at three months and 70 at one year. INTERVENTIONS--Standard day patient and inpatient treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Discharge from hospital and return to previous level of social functioning; reduction of psychiatric symptoms, abnormal behaviour, and burden on relatives. RESULTS--33 Of 48 inpatients were discharged at three months compared with 17 of 41 day patients. But at one year 9 of 48 inpatients and three of 41 day patients were in hospital. 18 Of 35 day patients and 16 of 39 inpatients were at their previous level of social functioning at one year. The only significant difference at three months was a greater improvement in social role performance in the inpatients. At one year there was no significant difference between day patients and inpatients in present state examination summary scores and social role performance, burden, or behaviour. CONCLUSIONS--Roughly 40% of all acutely ill patients presenting for admission to a psychiatric unit may be treated satisfactorily in a well staffed day hospital. The outcome of treatment is similar to that of inpatient care but might possibly reduce readmissions. The hospital costs

  14. Effect of extended physiotherapy and high-dose vitamin D on rate of falls and hospital re-admission after acute hip fracture: a randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guidelines for post-fracture care of elderly hip fracture patients are not established despite the significant socio-economic burden of post hip fracture morbidity and mortality. Using a factorial design, we studied the effects of extended physiotherapy (supervised 1 hour per day during acute care p...

  15. Hospital Admission Patterns in Children with CAH: Admission Rates and Adrenal Crises Decline with Age

    PubMed Central

    Rushworth, R. Louise; Falhammar, Henrik; Munns, Craig F.; Maguire, Ann M.; Torpy, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To examine patterns of hospitalisation for acute medical conditions in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). Design. A retrospective study of hospitalisation using administrative data. Setting. All hospitals in NSW, Australia. Patients. All patients admitted with CAH and a random sample of admissions in patients aged 0 to 18 years without adrenal insufficiency (AI). Main Outcome Measures. Admissions and comorbidities by age and sex. Results. Of 573 admissions for medical problems in CAH children, 286 (49.9%) were in males, and 236 (41.2%) had a principal diagnosis of CAH or had an adrenal crisis (AC). 37 (6.5%) ACs were recorded. An infection was found in 43.5% (n = 249) of the CAH patient admissions and 51.7% (n = 1613) of the non-AI group, p < 0.001. Children aged up to one year had the highest number of admissions (n = 149) and six ACs (four in males). There were 21 ACs recorded for children aged 1–5 years. Older CAH children had fewer admissions and fewer ACs. No in-hospital deaths were recorded. Conclusions. Admission for medical problems in CAH children declines with age. An AC was recorded in 6.5% of the admissions, with the majority of ACs occurring in the 1 to 5 years age group and there were no deaths. PMID:26880914

  16. 28 CFR 549.41 - Voluntary admission and psychotropic medication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... medication. 549.41 Section 549.41 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Administrative Safeguards for Psychiatric Treatment and Medication § 549.41 Voluntary admission and psychotropic medication. (a) A sentenced inmate may be...

  17. 28 CFR 549.41 - Voluntary admission and psychotropic medication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... medication. 549.41 Section 549.41 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Administrative Safeguards for Psychiatric Treatment and Medication § 549.41 Voluntary admission and psychotropic medication. (a) A sentenced inmate may be...

  18. What Admissions Officials Think

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Over the past two decades, college admissions has become a prime-time preoccupation. Most people know at least something about the process, especially if they have a teenager in high school and a college guide on their coffee table. Nonetheless, widespread public misconceptions persist about admissions requirements, the selection process, and the…

  19. A Stunning Admission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Few people set out to become admissions counselors, say people in the profession. But the field is requiring skills that are more demanding and varied than ever. And at a time when universities are looking especially hard at the bottom line, people in admissions need to constantly learn new things and make themselves indispensable. Counselors…

  20. Technology in International Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    In a relatively short time, technology applications have become an essential feature of the admissions business. They make the jobs of international admissions professionals easier in many ways, allowing for more robust communication with applicants and counselors, a streamlined application process, and quicker access to information about…

  1. Psychiatric services in China: or, Mao versus Freud.

    PubMed

    Allodi, F; Dukszta, J

    1978-10-01

    Reportedly, the People's Republic of China has made great progress in health care services, particularly at preventive, primary and community levels. Information on their psychiatric services is still scarce. A group of 12 health professionals visited the country for three weeks in July 1977. This paper provides a description and an analysis of the network of mental health services using a sample of one mental hospital, six general hospitals and a number of health units in cities, factories and communes. The basic principles of policy and administration are those of a collective socialism with strong central guidelines and considerable local administrative initiative. Admissions to the mental hospital in Shanghai reveal that 83% are young acute schizophrenic cases and very few are neurotic or non-psychotic. This distribution stands in great contrast with admissions to mental hospitals in the West, as is the case in Canada, where schizophrenics represent only 12% of all first admissions to mental hospitals and non-psychotic or minor conditions amount to two-thirds. An impressionistic survey of Chinese traditional medicine rooms in general hospitals revealed that a good proportion of their cases (60-70%) are diagnosed as suffering from minor organic or vague organic conditions without evidence of organic pathology and which in the West would be considered as neurotic or psychosomatic conditions. Outside the institutions, in the communes of the rural and urban areas behavioural, interpersonal and family problems are not defined specifically as mental health problems, but handled within the moral and political ideology prevalent in the country. None of the general hospitals visited had a psychiatric unit, but every patient in every hospital or health unit in the cities and countryside received a combination of traditional Chinese medicine (herbal preparations, acupuncture and moxibustion) besides the Western or modern type of treatment. Officially mental illness is not

  2. A 5-year retrospective study of demographic, anamnestic, and clinical factors related to psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescent patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Cimino, Nina; Di Pietro, Elena; Pollutri, Gabriella; Neviani, Vittoria; Ferri, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychiatric emergencies of children and adolescents have greatly increased during the last years, but this phenomenon has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between acute psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescents and selected variables to highlight risk factors for psychiatric emergencies. Methods This retrospective research was conducted in the acute psychiatric public ward, Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment (SPDT), and in the residential facility for adolescents, “The Medlar”, located in Modena. The sample was constituted by all adolescent patients (n=101, age range 14–18) who had acute hospitalizations (n=140) in SPDT and had been successively transferred to “The Medlar” (n=83), from February 2, 2010 to January 31, 2015. From clinical charts, we extracted demographic and anamnestic characteristics of patients and clinical variables related to hospitalizations. Data were statistically analyzed. Results Sixty-one percent of our patients lived with one divorced parent, with adoptive or immigrant family, or in institutions; 51% had experienced stressful events during childhood; 81% had a normal intellective level, but only 6% presented regular school performance. Parental psychiatric illness was negatively related, in a statistically significantly way, with onset age of adolescent mental disorders (coefficient −2.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −3.53 to 1.01, P<0.001, single linear regression; odds ratio: 4.39, 95% CI: 1.43–13.47, P<0.010, single logistic regression). The most frequent reasons for admission were aggressive behavior in males and suicide risk in females (P=0.002). The most frequent psychiatric diagnosis at SPDT discharge was “conduct disorder”, more frequent in males, followed by “adjustment disorder”, more frequent in females (P=0.001). In SPDT, the adolescent hospitalizations progressively increased fivefold at the end of the observation period

  3. Psychiatric wards: places of safety?

    PubMed

    Jones, J; Nolan, P; Bowers, L; Simpson, A; Whittington, R; Hackney, D; Bhui, K

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, the purpose and quality of provision delivered in acute inpatient psychiatric settings have been increasingly questioned. Studies from a service user perspective have reported that while some psychiatric inpatients feel safe and cared for, others feel their time in hospital is neither safe nor therapeutic. This paper explores the experiences of service users on acute inpatient psychiatric wards in England, with a particular focus on their feelings of safety and security. Interviews were conducted with 60 psychiatric inpatients in England. The majority of service users felt safe in hospital and felt supported by staff and other service users. However, anything that threatened their sense of security such as aggression, bullying, theft, racism and the use of alcohol and drugs on the ward, made some respondents feel insecure and unsafe. Psychiatric wards are still perceived by many as volatile environments, where service users feel forced to devise personal security strategies in order to protect themselves and their property. It would appear that there remains much to do before research findings and policies are implemented in ways that facilitate all service users to derive the maximum benefit from their inpatient experience.

  4. Psychiatric wards: places of safety?

    PubMed

    Jones, J; Nolan, P; Bowers, L; Simpson, A; Whittington, R; Hackney, D; Bhui, K

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, the purpose and quality of provision delivered in acute inpatient psychiatric settings have been increasingly questioned. Studies from a service user perspective have reported that while some psychiatric inpatients feel safe and cared for, others feel their time in hospital is neither safe nor therapeutic. This paper explores the experiences of service users on acute inpatient psychiatric wards in England, with a particular focus on their feelings of safety and security. Interviews were conducted with 60 psychiatric inpatients in England. The majority of service users felt safe in hospital and felt supported by staff and other service users. However, anything that threatened their sense of security such as aggression, bullying, theft, racism and the use of alcohol and drugs on the ward, made some respondents feel insecure and unsafe. Psychiatric wards are still perceived by many as volatile environments, where service users feel forced to devise personal security strategies in order to protect themselves and their property. It would appear that there remains much to do before research findings and policies are implemented in ways that facilitate all service users to derive the maximum benefit from their inpatient experience. PMID:20465757

  5. [DRGs in psychiatric hospital financing exemplified by Hungary. A model for Germany?].

    PubMed

    Maylath, E

    2000-12-01

    One of the most important provisions incorporated in the reform of the German health sector has been the introduction of a per case prospective payment system for hospitals with the exception of admissions to psychiatric care. The reasons for the exclusion of psychiatric care are unclear, but it is as a result all the more interesting to look at the experience of Hungary, where in-patient psychiatric care has been financed on the basis of diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) for the past seven years. The article describes how in the early 1990's the funding of the Hungarian health service was reorganized from being a state-financed system with a set budget to a system financed by contributions. Parallel to this development, service-related financing was introduced. In the hospital sector this involved DRGs. At the beginning of 1993 the Hungarian DRGs comprised only 437 categories, but this has since increased to 758. Furthermore, other characteristics are listed which, apart from the number of groups, differentiate the Hungarian DRGs from the AP-DRGs. Among other things, service-related financing includes non-typical areas such as psychiatry. In this case, it covers in-patient psychiatric care in an unusual combination of DRGs in the acute case category (50% of all beds in psychiatric units in Hungary are for acute cases) with daily nursing charges in the chronic case category. An analysis is given in the article of 16 homogeneous diagnostic categories in psychiatric care, followed by experiences gathered in conjunction with the application of this approach in this particular sphere, with special reference to three problem areas. These are as follows: the trend towards diagnoses with a relatively high weighting; the practice of charging for psychiatric DRGs in somatic wards; and, finally, the perpetuation of poor service structures and practices through DRGs. In general, evidently the introduction of psychiatric DRGs may also be recommended in Germany because of the

  6. Crisis hospitalization on a psychiatric emergency service.

    PubMed

    Breslow, R E; Klinger, B I; Erickson, B J

    1993-09-01

    The availability of short-stay beds for brief admissions to a Psychiatric Emergency Service (PES) is a model that meets a variety of patient and system needs, allowing time to develop alternatives to hospitalization or gain diagnostic clarity, serving a respite function, providing a hospital setting that does not gratify dependency needs, and relieving inpatient census pressures. An eight-bed service for brief inpatient stays of up to 3 days was developed on a PES which serves a large nine-country catchment area in northeastern New York State. Admissions to this unit would otherwise have gone to a medical school teaching hospital psychiatric unit or a state psychiatric center. Fifty-one consecutive admissions were studied. The majority of patients were dischargeable in the short time frame and did not require transfer for longer-term care. The patients as a group showed improvement in psychiatric symptomatology and rated high satisfaction with the program. Most patients were diagnosed with schizophrenia or personality disorder (PD). Suicidality and substance abuse were frequent. The PD patients had a strong association with suicidality and some association with substance abuse, whereas the schizophrenics had more psychiatric symptomatology. PD patients were more likely to be discharged, leading us to propose a rationale for why this group may be uniquely suited to this approach. The study was replicated after a year on another sample of 51 consecutive admissions, confirming the earlier results and providing a 1-year follow-up on the program.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8307344

  7. [Treatment in psychiatric day hospital in comparison with inpatient wards in different European health care systems--objectives of EDEN project].

    PubMed

    Kiejna, Andrzej; Kallert, Thomas W; Rymaszewska, Joanna

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents the objectives and design of an ongoing multicenter randomized, controlled trial EDEN (European Day Hospital EvaluatioN). The EDEN-study aims to evaluate the efficacy of acute psychiatric treatment in a day hospital setting in five European centres: Dresden, London, Michalovce, Prague and Wroclaw. The main hypothesis is that day hospital treatment for acute psychiatric patients is as effective as conventional inpatient hospital care. The objectives of the study are to evaluate the viability and effectiveness of day hospitals for acute psychiatric treatment, to identify subgroups of patients with a more or less favourable outcome so that the treatment setting might be specifically applied and to ascertain the cost-effectiveness of day hospital treatment compared to conventional inpatient treatment. The study utilises a Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) design with repeated measures at a maximum of six time points: at admission (t1), one week after admission (t2), four weeks after admission (t3), discharge (t4), three months after discharge (t5), and 12 months after discharge (t6). A combination of well-established standardised assessment instruments and open questions is used in 6 time periods. If the findings accept the main hypothesis of the study, some practical consequences could be inevitable: at a mental health policy level, these results could lead to an increase in the capacity of day hospitals; at the clinical level clinicians could redefine their concepts of care to consider the day hospital as an alternative to conventional inpatient treatment; from economic point of view could lead to reduction of treatment costs.

  8. Emergency department census of patients awaiting admission following reorganisation of an admissions process

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, E D; Bennett, K; O'Riordan, D; Silke, B

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To determine the impact of reorganisation of an acute admissions process on numbers of people in the emergency department (ED) awaiting admission to a hospital bed in a major teaching hospital. Methods We studied all emergency medical patients admitted to St James' Hospital, Dublin, between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2004. In 2002, patients were admitted to a variety of wards from the ED when a hospital bed became available. In 2003, two centrally located wards were reconfigured to function as an acute medical admissions unit (AMAU) (bed capacity 59), and all emergency patients were admitted directly to this unit from the ED (average 15 admissions per day). The maximum permitted length of stay on the AMAU was 5 days. We recorded the number of patients in the ED, who were awaiting the availability of a hospital bed, at 0700 and 1700 on the days of recording during the 36 month study period. Results The impact of the AMAU reduced overall hospital length of stay from 7 days in 2002 to 5 days in 2003 and 2004 (p<0.0001). The median number of patients waiting in the ED for a hospital bed reduced from 14 in 2002 to 9 in 2003 and 8 in 2004 (p<0.0001). While age and sex of patients did not differ over the years, the factors that independently contributed to the number of patients awaiting admission were the day of the week, the month of the year, and and the extent of the comorbidity index on the previous day's intake (p<0.0001). Conclusions This study found that reorganisation of a system for acute medical admissions can significantly impact on the number of patients awaiting admission to a hospital bed, and allow an ED to operate efficiently and at a level of risk acceptable to patients. PMID:16627837

  9. Predictors of emergency room visits or acute hospital admissions prior to death among hospice palliative care clients in Ontario: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospice palliative care (HPC) is a philosophy of care that aims to relieve suffering and improve the quality of life for clients with life-threatening illnesses or end of life issues. The goals of HPC are not only to ameliorate clients’ symptoms but also to reduce unneeded or unwanted medical interventions such as emergency room visits or hospitalizations (ERVH). Hospitals are considered a setting ill-prepared for end of life issues; therefore, use of such acute care services has to be considered an indicator of poor quality end of life care. This study examines predictors of ERVH prior to death among HPC home care clients. Methods A retrospective cohort study of a sample of 764 HPC home care clients who received services from a community care access centre (CCAC) in southern Ontario, Canada. All clients were assessed using the Resident Assessment Instrument for Palliative Care (interRAI PC) as part of normal clinical practice between April 2008 and July 2010. The Andersen-Newman framework for health service utilization was used as a conceptual model for the basis of this study. Logistic regression and Cox regression analyses were carried out to identify predictors of ERVH. Results Half of the HPC clients had at least one or more ERVH (n = 399, 52.2%). Wish to die at home (OR = 0.54) and advanced care directives (OR = 0.39) were protective against ERVH. Unstable health (OR = 0.70) was also associated with reduced probability, while infections such as prior urinary tract infections (OR = 2.54) increased the likelihood of ERVH. Clients with increased use of formal services had reduced probability of ERVH (OR = 0.55). Conclusions Findings of this study suggest that predisposing characteristics are nearly as important as need variables in determining ERVH among HPC clients, which challenges the assumption that need variables are the most important determinants of ERVH. Ongoing assessment of HPC clients is essential in reducing ERVH

  10. [Alcohol consumption in patients with psychiatric disorders: assessment and treatment].

    PubMed

    Lang, J-P; Bonnewitz, M-L; Kusterer, M; Lalanne-Tongio, L

    2014-09-01

    Alcohol consumption in France exceeds the European average (12.7L of pure alcohol/habitant/year in 2009 for an average of 12.5 L). This consumption has a major professional, social and health impact on the individuals and their families. The cost of such, estimated in Europe to be of 155.8 billion Euros in 2010, is the highest among the central nervous system diseases in Europe, far higher than that of depression or dementia. Patients suffering from psychiatric disorders are more frequently affected by problems related to alcohol use than the general population. They are also more vulnerable to the immediate and subsequent consequences of their consumption. The alcohol related disorders that are often accompanied by risk taking and other addictive behaviour require a global assessment of the addiction, with and without substance, and of the complications. These have a strong impact on risk taking, compliance with care, and the morbidity of somatic and psychiatric disorders, as well as access to optimal care and the life span of patients suffering from psychiatric disorders. The development of addictology care, with integrative treatment programs, is recommended in response to these public health issues. Nevertheless, specific addictology practices and partners with addictology care structures are still scarcely developed in psychiatry. Firstly, it would be necessary to set up such integrated treatments through the systematisation of an "addictology" checkup on admission, a global assessment of addictive behaviour and cognitive disorders, using pragmatic tools that are user-friendly for the care teams, maintain the reduction in risk taking, and apply prescriptions for addiction to psychotropic treatments, in liaison with the referring general practitioner. As early as possible, accompanied by specific training in addictology for the psychiatrists and the mental health nursing teams, such care could be enhanced by the development of liaison and advanced psychiatric

  11. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Medical records must stress the psychiatric components of the record, including history of findings and... record of mental status; (4) Note the onset of illness and the circumstances leading to admission;...

  12. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Medical records must stress the psychiatric components of the record, including history of findings and... record of mental status; (4) Note the onset of illness and the circumstances leading to admission;...

  13. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Medical records must stress the psychiatric components of the record, including history of findings and... record of mental status; (4) Note the onset of illness and the circumstances leading to admission;...

  14. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... Medical records must stress the psychiatric components of the record, including history of findings and... record of mental status; (4) Note the onset of illness and the circumstances leading to admission;...

  15. Frequency of low-risk hospital admissions for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Butler, J; Hanumanthu, S; Chomsky, D; Wilson, J R

    1998-01-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common reasons for admission to acute care hospitals. A proportion of these admissions are probably low risk and could be managed in subacute care facilities, resulting in substantial cost savings. To investigate the proportion of low-risk hospital admissions for heart failure, all admissions for heart failure to Vanderbilt University Medical Center between July 1993 and June 1995 were identified (n = 743). One hundred twenty of these admissions were randomly selected, reviewed, and classified into a high-risk versus low-risk group on admission based on the severity of heart failure and the presence of life-threatening complications. Of the 120 admissions, 57 (48%) were classified as high risk based on the presence of moderate to severe heart failure for the first time or recurrent heart failure with a major complicating factor. Sixteen admissions (28%) were associated with adverse outcomes, including myocardial infarction in 5 (9%), intubation in 6 (11%), and death in 4 (7%). Sixty-three admissions (52%) were classified as low risk based on the presence of new-onset mild heart failure or mild to moderate recurrent heart failure with no complicating factors. Most of these admissions were for dyspnea without any life-threatening complication; 57 (91%) had no evidence of interstitial or alveolar pulmonary edema, and arterial oxygen saturation averaged 95 +/- 3%. Only 3 of these low risk admissions (5%) were associated with an adverse cardiovascular event. None of the patients died. These data suggest that over half of the patients admitted for heart failure to an acute care facility are low risk and probably could be managed in a subacute care setting, resulting in large cost savings. PMID:9462604

  16. Hospital admissions syndromic surveillance--Connecticut, September 200-November 2003.

    PubMed

    Dembek, Zygmunt F; Carley, K; Siniscalchi, A; Hadler, J

    2004-09-24

    On September 11, 2001, the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CDPH) initiated daily, statewide syndromic surveillance based on unscheduled hospital admissions (HASS). The system's objectives were to monitor for outbreaks caused by Category A biologic agents and evaluate limits in space and time of identified outbreaks. Thirty-two acute-care hospitals were required to report their previous day's unscheduled admissions for 11 syndromes (pneumonia, hemoptysis, respiratory distress, acute neurologic illness, nontraumatic paralysis, sepsis and nontraumatic shock, fever with rash, fever of unknown cause, acute gastrointestinal illness, and possible cutaneous anthrax, and suspected illness clusters). Admissions for pneumonia, gastrointestinal illness, and sepsis were reported most frequently; admissions for fever with rash, possible cutaneous anthrax, and hemoptysis were rare. A method for determining the difference between random and systemic variation was used to identify differences of >/=3 standard deviations for each syndrome from a 6-month moving average. HASS was adapted to meet changing surveillance needs (e.g., surveillance for anthrax, smallpox, and severe acute respiratory syndrome). HASS was sensitive enough to reflect annual increases in hospital-admission rates for pneumonia during the influenza season and to confirm an outbreak of gastrointestinal illness. Follow-up of HASS neurologic-admissions reports has led to diagnosis of West Nile virus encephalitis cases. Report validation, syndrome-criteria standardization among hospitals, and expanded use of outbreak-detection algorithms will enhance the system's usefulness.

  17. Risk factors associated with psychiatric readmission.

    PubMed

    Lorine, Kim; Goenjian, Haig; Kim, Soeun; Steinberg, Alan M; Schmidt, Kendall; Goenjian, Armen K

    2015-06-01

    The present study focused on identifying risk factors for early readmission of patients discharged from an urban community hospital. Retrospective chart reviews were conducted on 207 consecutive inpatient psychiatric admissions that included patients who were readmitted within 15 days, within 3 to 6 months, and not admitted for at least 12 months post-discharge. Findings indicated that a diagnosis of schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder (OR = 18; 95% CI 2.70-117.7; p < 0.05), history of alcohol abuse (OR = 9; 95% CI 1.80-40.60; p < 0.05), number of previous psychiatric hospitalizations (OR = 2; 95% CI 1.28-3.73; p < 0.05), and type of residence at initial admission (e.g., homeless, OR = 29; 95% CI 3.99-217; p < 0.05) were significant risk factors for early readmission, where OR compares readmission group 1 versus group 3 in the multinomial logistic regression. Initial positive urine drug screen, history of drug abuse or incarceration, and legal status at initial admission did not predict early readmission. Reducing the risk factors associated with psychiatric readmissions has the potential to lead to the identification and development of preventative intervention strategies that can significantly improve patient safety, quality of care, well-being, and contain health care expenditures. PMID:25974053

  18. Lights, Camera, Counseling, Admission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, Andrew Scott

    1993-01-01

    Considers the use of video in college recruiting. Outlines the development and production of a television series that deals with the college admission and selection process. Notes that the series is broadcast on both education and public access cable stations. Describes series "American College Focus" as model to be used by school counselors and…

  19. The Admissions Equity Struggle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Eric

    2012-01-01

    It has been a long, litigious road from Heman Sweatt, an African-American mail carrier who wanted to attend the prestigious, all-White law school at the University of Texas at Austin in 1946, to Abigail Fisher, a White high school student who failed to win undergraduate admission to the same university a half-century later. Depending on what the…

  20. Acute care inpatients with long-term delayed-discharge: evidence from a Canadian health region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute hospital discharge delays are a pressing concern for many health care administrators. In Canada, a delayed discharge is defined by the alternate level of care (ALC) construct and has been the target of many provincial health care strategies. Little is known on the patient characteristics that influence acute ALC length of stay. This study examines which characteristics drive acute ALC length of stay for those awaiting nursing home admission. Methods Population-level administrative and assessment data were used to examine 17,111 acute hospital admissions designated as alternate level of care (ALC) from a large Canadian health region. Case level hospital records were linked to home care administrative and assessment records to identify and characterize those ALC patients that account for the greatest proportion of acute hospital ALC days. Results ALC patients waiting for nursing home admission accounted for 41.5% of acute hospital ALC bed days while only accounting for 8.8% of acute hospital ALC patients. Characteristics that were significantly associated with greater ALC lengths of stay were morbid obesity (27 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±14.6), psychiatric diagnosis (13 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±6.2), abusive behaviours (12 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±10.7), and stroke (7 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±5.0). Overall, persons with morbid obesity, a psychiatric diagnosis, abusive behaviours, or stroke accounted for 4.3% of all ALC patients and 23% of all acute hospital ALC days between April 1st 2009 and April 1st, 2011. ALC patients with the identified characteristics had unique clinical profiles. Conclusions A small number of patients with non-medical days waiting for nursing home admission contribute to a substantial proportion of total non-medical days in acute hospitals. Increases in nursing home capacity or changes to existing funding arrangements should target the sub-populations identified in this

  1. Practice of Acute and Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Psychiatric Clinic of a University Hospital from Turkey: between 2007 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Sengul, Melike Ceyhan Balci; Kenar, Ayse Nur Inci; Hanci, Ezgi; Sendur, İbrahim; Sengul, Cem; Herken, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be given as the form of acute, continuation or maintenance ECT according to the process of administration. We report our 7 years’ observation with acute and maintenance ECT in a university hospital in Turkey. Methods The medical records of the hospitalized patients treated with acute or maintenance ECT between the years 2007 and 2013 was retrospectively analyzed. The sociodemographic characteristics, diagnosis, data of ECT and the co-administered psychotropic drugs were recorded. The frequency of ECT was calculated by identifying the total number of the hospitalized patients during the study period from the hospital records. Results A total number of 1,432 female and 1,141 male patients hospitalized in a period of 7 years, with a total number of 111 patients treated with ECT. The ratio of ECT was 4%, maintenance/acute ECT 11%. For acute ECT, affective disorders (65.3%) and psychotic disorders (21.6%) were among the leading diagnoses. Maintenance ECT, the diagnosis was; 6 affective disorders, 4 psychotic disorders and 1 obsessive compulsive disorder. There was a significant difference between the patients receiving acute and maintenance ECT in terms of age, duration of illness, and number of previous hospitalizations and ECTs. Conclusion The percentage of patients treated with acute ECT is lower in our institution than that in many other institutions from our country. Acute and maintenance ECT should be considered as an important treatment option particularly for patients with long disease duration, a high number of hospitalizations and a history of benefiting from previous ECTs. PMID:26792041

  2. The Epidemiology of Psychiatric Disorders among Repeat DUI Offenders Accepting a Treatment-Sentencing Option

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Howard J.; Nelson, Sarah E.; LaPlante, Debi A.; LaBrie, Richard A.; Albanese, Mark; Caro, Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity likely contributes to driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol among repeat offenders. This study presents one of the first descriptions of the prevalence and comorbidity of psychiatric disorders among repeat DUI offenders in treatment. Participants included all consenting eligible admissions (N=729) to a 2-week…

  3. The Epidemiology of Psychiatric Disorders among Repeat DUI Offenders Accepting a Treatment-Sentencing Option

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Howard J.; Nelson, Sarah E.; LaPlante, Debi A.; LaBrie, Richard A.; Albanese, Mark; Caro, Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity likely contributes to driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol among repeat offenders. This study presents one of the first descriptions of the prevalence and comorbidity of psychiatric disorders among repeat DUI offenders in treatment. Participants included all consenting eligible admissions (N = 729) to a 2-week…

  4. First-admission rates and marital status of schizophrenics.

    PubMed

    Munk-Jørgensen, P

    1987-08-01

    All patients who were first-admitted to Danish psychiatric institutions in the calendar years 1970, 1973, 1976, 1979, and 1982 and who were diagnosed as schizophrenics at least once within a 2-year period of observation from the first day of the first admission are followed up by means of the nation-wide Danish Psychiatric Register (totally 1,175 males and 665 females). Sex and age specific first-admission rates of schizophrenia show that the difference between male and female rates especially appears in the age group 15-24 years. In this age group the peak incidence is found for both sexes, also if the patients only diagnosed as schizophrenics at a later admission are included. The ratio of male to female incidence rates are not changed by inclusion of the latter patients. A higher frequency of married or formerly married patients is found among the schizophrenics who were diagnosed late in the course of treatment than among those who were so at first-admission. This might be a manifestation of a less severe symptomatology which could explain the tendency to hesitate in diagnosing patients as schizophrenics.

  5. Elements of Successful School Reentry after Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Elysia V.; Welfare, Laura E.; Williams, Amy M.

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric hospitalization is an intensive intervention designed to stabilize adolescents who are experiencing an acute mental health crisis. Reintegrating to school after discharge from psychiatric hospitalization can be overwhelming for many adolescents (E. V. Clemens, L. E. Welfare, & A. M. Williams, 2010). The authors used a consensual…

  6. Use of Inpatient Psychiatric Services by Children and Youth under Age 18, United States, 1980. Mental Health Statistical Note No. 175.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milazzo-Sayre, Laura J.; And Others

    The report examines data from three sample surveys of admissions during 1980 to the inpatient psychiatric services of state and mental hospitals and private psychiatric hospitals and the separate inpatient psychiatric services of non-federal general hospitals. Findings revealed that an estimated 81,532 persons under 18 years were admitted to…

  7. Irresistible impulse: psychiatric viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Weil, F

    1989-01-01

    The responses of the psychiatric profession to the legal criteria applied to irresistible impulse in cases of psychotic offenders are examined. An illustrative case, and its legal consequences, support the desirability of the psychiatric approach.

  8. Diagnostic Stability of Psychiatric Disorders in Re-Admitted Psychiatric Patients in Kerman, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Fatemeh; Nakhaee, Nouzar; Sabahi, Abdolreza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several studies have evaluated the stability of psychiatric diagnosis follow in readmission of patients in psychiatric hospitals. However, there is little data concerning this matter from Iran. This study is designed to evaluate this diagnostic stability of the commonest psychiatric disorders in Iran. Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the long-term diagnostic stability of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders among re-admitted patients at the Shahid Beheshti teaching hospital in Kerman, Iran. Patients and Methods: This study was based on 485 adult patients re-admitted at the Shahid Beheshti hospital between July and November 2012. All of the diagnoses were made according to DSM IV TR. Prospective and retrospective consistency and the ratio of patients who were obtained a diagnosis in at least 75%, 100% of the admissions were calculated. Results: The most frequent diagnoses at the first admission were bipolar disorder (48.5%) and Major depressive disorder (18.8%). The most stable diagnosis was bipolar disorder (71% prospective consistency, 69.4% retrospective consistency). Schizoaffective disorder had the greatest diagnostic instability (28.5% prospective consistency, 16.6% retrospective consistency). Conclusions: Among the cases evaluated, bipolar disorder had the most stability in diagnosis and the stability of schizoaffective disorder was poor. PMID:25168983

  9. Impulse control disorders in psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Müller, Astrid; Rein, Katharina; Kollei, Ines; Jacobi, Andrea; Rotter, Andrea; Schütz, Patricia; Hillemacher, Thomas; de Zwaan, Martina

    2011-08-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in a European psychiatric inpatient sample. Two hundred thirty four consecutive psychiatric inpatients (62% female) were examined using a module of the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV) that has been developed for ICDs (SCID-ICD). In addition to intermittent explosive disorder, pyromania, kleptomania, pathological gambling, and trichotillomania, the proposed ICDs not otherwise specified were assessed, including compulsive buying, nonparaphilic compulsive sexual behavior, pathological internet use, and pathological skin picking. Based on the SCID-ICD, a lifetime ICD rate of 23.5% and a current ICD rate of 18.8% were found. The most frequent ICDs were pathological skin picking (lifetime 7.3%, current 6.8%), compulsive buying (lifetime 6.8%, current 6.0%), and intermittent explosive disorder (lifetime 5.6%, current 3.4%). In contrast, referring to admission diagnoses taken from patients' charts only 3.8% of the inpatients were diagnosed with any current ICD. Individuals with comorbid ICD were significantly younger and had more admission diagnoses other than ICD. The results suggest high rates of ICDs among psychiatric inpatients that remain to be under-diagnosed in clinical routine.

  10. Substance abuse in an inpatient psychiatric sample.

    PubMed

    Brady, K; Casto, S; Lydiard, R B; Malcolm, R; Arana, G

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between psychoactive drug abuse and psychopathology is complex. There have been few systematic explorations of substance abuse in psychiatric populations since the recent epidemic of cocaine abuse. To update and further explore the relationship between psychiatric illness and substance abuse, 100 consecutively admitted patients to an inpatient psychiatry unit were administered a drug and alcohol use/abuse questionnaire. Sixty-four percent endorsed current or past problems with substance abuse and 29% met DSM-III-R criteria for substance abuse in the 30 days prior to admission. For the major diagnostic categories, there were no significant differences between groups in percentages of patients with substance abuse disorders. There was a trend (p less than or equal to .2) toward an increased number of lifetime psychiatric hospitalizations in the substance-abusing group. Alcohol was the most common drug of choice followed by stimulants, cannabis, and sedative hypnotics. Differences in drug choices between diagnostic categories are discussed. Forty-three percent of urine drug screens obtained were positive, and of those with positive urine drug screens, 42% denied drug use upon admission. Only 40% of patients with current or past substance abuse problems had received treatment for their chemical dependency. In our sample, while substance abuse was very prevalent, it was underreported and undertreated.

  11. Frequent visitors to psychiatric emergency services: staff attitudes and temporal patterns.

    PubMed

    Arfken, Cynthia; Zeman, Lori Lackman; Yeager, Lindsay; Mischel, Edward; Amirsadri, Alireza

    2002-11-01

    Providing quality psychiatric emergency services is becoming more difficult as utilization rates soar, especially by individuals who are frequent visitors. To address this issue, a staff survey and analysis of admission patterns were conducted. Staff were more likely to believe that frequent visitors sought care because they had difficulty accessing alternative services, had basic needs unmet, were substance abusers, wanted inpatient admission, and were noncompliant with treatment plans. The 1999 temporal admission pattern documented that frequent visitors' admissions were higher during the first week of the month and inclement weather. Surprisingly, the infrequent visitors' admissions also were higher during the first week of the month. Together, these findings suggest that, in this urban location, frequent visitors are disadvantaged individuals lacking support and alternative treatment settings who use psychiatric emergency services to meet basic needs.

  12. Acute cocaine-related health problems in patients presenting to an urban emergency department in Switzerland: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Emergency departments may be a useful information source to describe the demographics and clinical characteristics of patients with acute cocaine-related medical problems. We therefore conducted a retrospective analysis of 165 acute, laboratory-confirmed cocaine intoxications admitted to an urban emergency department in Switzerland between January 2007 and March 2011. Results A total of 165 patients with a mean age of 32 years were included. Most patients were male (73%) and unemployed (65%). Only a minority (16%) had abused cocaine alone while 84% of the patients had used at least one additional substance, most commonly ethanol (41%), opioids (38%), or cannabis (36%) as confirmed by their detection in blood samples. The most frequently reported symptoms were chest pain (21%), palpitations (19%), anxiety (36%) and restlessness (36%). Psychiatric symptoms were present in 64%. Hypertension and tachycardia were observed in 53% and 44% of the patients, respectively. Severe poisonings only occurred in patients with multiple substance intoxication (15%). Severe intoxications were non-significantly more frequent with injected drug use compared to nasal, oral, or inhalational drug use. Severe complications included acute myocardial infarction (2 cases), stroke (one case), and seizures (3 cases). Most patients (75%) were discharged home within 24 h after admission. A psychiatric evaluation in the ED was performed in 24% of the patients and 19% were referred to a psychiatric clinic. Conclusions Patients with acute cocaine intoxication often used cocaine together with ethanol and opioids and presented with sympathomimetic toxicity and/or psychiatric disorders. Severe acute toxicity was more frequent with multiple substance use. Toxicity was typically short-lasting but psychiatric evaluation and referral was often needed. PMID:24666782

  13. Understanding those who seek frequent psychiatric hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Phyllis; Kirkpatrick, Helen

    2002-02-01

    In the period after deinstitutionalization, there has been a rise in hospital readmission rates. It is estimated that the readmission rate for individuals who are frequent users of psychiatric inpatient services is approximately 40% to 50% within 1 year of hospital discharge. Attempts to determine predictors of recidivism have identified multiple variables, some of which are mutually contradictory. Furthermore, comparison among studies is difficult given methodological and theoretical limitations. Despite such issues, however, one consistent predictor of frequent rehospitalization is a person's history of past psychiatric hospital admissions. It seems that those who have shown a pattern of seeking inpatient services in the past tend to repeat this treatment-seeking behavior. The aim of this report is to critically examine some of the predictors of rehospitalization. A better understanding of those who engage in the persistent pattern of seeking inpatient services may assist nurses in planning care that is more suited for their needs. PMID:11877602

  14. Psychiatric evidence in criminal courts: the need for better understanding.

    PubMed

    Muzaffar, Sajid

    2011-07-01

    The rules of admissibility of expert evidence from mental health professionals are not clear. The task of a psychiatrist providing expert opinion to criminal courts is far from clear. Psychiatric experts are trained in a particular set of ethical and philosophical frameworks. They have expertise in the diagnosis and management of behaviours arising from mental disorders. The concept of mental disorder itself is a dimensional one. Such a dimensional view of human behaviour and mental disorders is hard to fit into the categorical view of human behaviour that the law follows. The task of the psychiatric expert is to marry these two philosophically different branches. Such a task would be facilitated by clear rules of admissibility of expert psychiatric evidence, clear definition of the roles and limitations of psychiatric evidence in criminal cases, a better understanding and training of mental health professionals in legal principles and a better understanding by the legal professionals of the mental health concepts. This article aims to analyse the legal basis of the admissibility of expert mental health evidence, the differences in the philosophies of the two disciplines and the challenges in addressing legal criteria while staying faithful to the ethos of psychiatry and psychology.

  15. 42 CFR 485.914 - Condition of participation: Admission, initial evaluation, comprehensive assessment, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... reasons for the admission. (ii) A psychiatric evaluation, completed by a psychiatrist, non-physician... physical factors, as well as suicide risk factors. (x) A drug profile that includes a review of all of the... treatment plan at time of discharge. (iii) The client's most recent physician orders. (iv) Any...

  16. Application of Level of Care Utilization System for Psychiatric and Addiction Services (LOCUS) to psychiatric practice in Japan: a preliminary assessment of validity and sensitivity to change.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Taku; Yagi, Fukashi; Yoshizumi, Akira

    2013-08-01

    We applied an American medical necessity scale, Level of Care Utilization System for Psychiatric and Addiction Services (LOCUS), to psychiatric practice in Japan. This is an exploratory analysis of empirical data of 272 patients. We examined the relationships between levels of care of LOCUS and clinical variables, contribution of care levels on admission decision, and changes in care levels over time. Inpatients showed significantly higher levels of care than outpatients. Levels of care showed significant strong inverse correlations to Global Assessment Scale (GAS) scores, and significant moderate correlations to admission types, care environment, and diagnostic subgroups in almost all groups. Levels of care contributed as much to the admission decision as GAS scores. Levels of care significantly decreased from the time of admission to discharge. Our preliminary evidence indicates that LOCUS is valid and sensitive to change, and applicable for clinical use in Japan.

  17. The Changing College Admissions Scene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sjogren, Cliff

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the status of college admissions and some of the forces that influenced college admissions policies during each of four three-year periods: the Sputnik Era (1957-60), the Postwar Baby Boom Era (1964-67), the "New Groups" Era (1971-74), and the Stable Enrollment Era (1978-81). (PGD)

  18. Psychiatric morbidity in prisoners

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sandeep Kumar; Singh, Paramjit; Gargi, Parshotam D.; Goyal, Samta; Garg, Aseem

    2011-01-01

    Context: The prevalence of psychiatric illness in correctional settings is significantly elevated, with higher than community rates reported for most mental disorders. Aims: (1) To examine the socio-demographic profile of convicted prisoners. (2) To evaluate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in convicted prisoners. Materials and Methods: 500 convicts were assessed for psychiatric morbidity with the help of (a) Socio-demographic proforma, (b) Pareek Udai and Trivedi G's socio-economic status scale (rural) (household schedule), (c) Kuppuswamy's economic status scale (urban) and (d) Present State Examination (PSE). Results: 23.8% of the convicted prisoners were suffering from psychiatric illness excluding substance abuse. 56.4% of the prisoners had history of substance abuse / dependence prior to incarceration. Conclusions: The results suggest that a substantial burden of psychiatric morbidity exists in the prison population of India and the burden of psychiatric illness in this vulnerable and marginalized population poses a serious challenge to psychiatrists. PMID:22135446

  19. Adverse Drug Reactions Causing Admission to a Paediatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Ruairi M.; Mason, Jennifer R.; Bird, Kim A.; Kirkham, Jamie J.; Peak, Matthew; Williamson, Paula R.; Nunn, Anthony J.; Turner, Mark A.; Pirmohamed, Munir; Smyth, Rosalind L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s) To obtain reliable information about the incidence of adverse drug reactions, and identify potential areas where intervention may reduce the burden of ill-health. Design Prospective observational study. Setting A large tertiary children’s hospital providing general and specialty care in the UK. Participants All acute paediatric admissions over a one year period. Main Exposure Any medication taken in the two weeks prior to admission. Outcome Measures Occurrence of adverse drug reaction. Results 240/8345 admissions in 178/6821 patients admitted acutely to a paediatric hospital were thought to be related to an adverse drug reaction, giving an estimated incidence of 2.9% (95% CI 2.5, 3.3), with the reaction directly causing, or contributing to the cause, of admission in 97.1% of cases. No deaths were attributable to an adverse drug reaction. 22.1% (95% CI 17%, 28%) of the reactions were either definitely or possibly avoidable. Prescriptions originating in the community accounted for 44/249 (17.7%) of adverse drug reactions, the remainder originating from hospital. 120/249 (48.2%) reactions resulted from treatment for malignancies. The drugs most commonly implicated in causing admissions were cytotoxic agents, corticosteroids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vaccines and immunosuppressants. The most common reactions were neutropenia, immunosuppression and thrombocytopenia. Conclusions Adverse drug reactions in children are an important public health problem. Most of those serious enough to require hospital admission are due to hospital-based prescribing, of which just over a fifth may be avoidable. Strategies to reduce the burden of ill-health from adverse drug reactions causing admission are needed. PMID:23226510

  20. Adolescents and Dual Diagnosis in a Psychiatric Emergency Service.

    PubMed

    Matali, José Luis; Andión, Oscar; Pardo, Marta; Iniesta, Raquel; Serrano, Eduard; San, Luis

    2016-03-02

    In recent years, both the prevalence of drug use and related child and adolescent psychiatric emergencies have risen sharply. There are few studies about the impact on child and adolescent emergency services. This study has a twofold aim. The first is to describe the prevalence of substance use disorders, mental disorders and dual diagnosis (substance use problems plus mental disorder) in adolescents in psychiatric emergency service. The second is to analyze clinical and healthcare differences between patients with dual diagnosis and patients with a mental disorder without substance use disorder.We retrospectively reviewed 4012 discharge forms for emergencies treated at the psychiatric emergency department during the period 2007-2009. We obtained a sample of 1795 visits. This sample was divided into two groups: the dual diagnosis group (n = 477) and the psychiatric disorder group (n = 1318).The dual diagnosis group accounted for 26.5% of psychiatric emergencies analyzed. Compared to the psychiatric disorder group,the dual diagnosis group had significantly more conduct disorders, social problems, involuntariness in the visit, less hospital admissions and less connection with the healthcare network.Adolescents with a dual diagnosis account for a high percentage of visits at child and adolescent psychiatric emergency services. This patient group requires specialized care both at emergency services and in specific units. Accordingly, these units should play a triple role when handling dual diagnosis: detection, brief treatment and referral to a specialised unit.

  1. Adolescents and Dual Diagnosis in a Psychiatric Emergency Service.

    PubMed

    Matali, José Luis; Andión, Oscar; Pardo, Marta; Iniesta, Raquel; Serrano, Eduard; San, Luis

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, both the prevalence of drug use and related child and adolescent psychiatric emergencies have risen sharply. There are few studies about the impact on child and adolescent emergency services. This study has a twofold aim. The first is to describe the prevalence of substance use disorders, mental disorders and dual diagnosis (substance use problems plus mental disorder) in adolescents in psychiatric emergency service. The second is to analyze clinical and healthcare differences between patients with dual diagnosis and patients with a mental disorder without substance use disorder.We retrospectively reviewed 4012 discharge forms for emergencies treated at the psychiatric emergency department during the period 2007-2009. We obtained a sample of 1795 visits. This sample was divided into two groups: the dual diagnosis group (n = 477) and the psychiatric disorder group (n = 1318).The dual diagnosis group accounted for 26.5% of psychiatric emergencies analyzed. Compared to the psychiatric disorder group,the dual diagnosis group had significantly more conduct disorders, social problems, involuntariness in the visit, less hospital admissions and less connection with the healthcare network.Adolescents with a dual diagnosis account for a high percentage of visits at child and adolescent psychiatric emergency services. This patient group requires specialized care both at emergency services and in specific units. Accordingly, these units should play a triple role when handling dual diagnosis: detection, brief treatment and referral to a specialised unit. PMID:26990268

  2. Psychiatric disorders and clinical correlates of suicidal patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital in Tokyo

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital with suicidal behavior (SB) are considered to be especially at high risk of suicide. However, the number of studies that have addressed this patient population remains insufficient compared to that of studies on suicidal patients in emergency or medical settings. The purpose of this study is to seek features of a sample of newly admitted suicidal psychiatric patients in a metropolitan area of Japan. Method 155 suicidal patients consecutively admitted to a large psychiatric center during a 20-month period, admission styles of whom were mostly involuntary, were assessed using Structured Clinical Interviews for DSM-IV Axis I and II Disorders (SCID-I CV and SCID-II) and SB-related psychiatric measures. Associations of the psychiatric diagnoses and SB-related characteristics with gender and age were examined. Results The common DSM-IV axis I diagnoses were affective disorders 62%, anxiety disorders 56% and substance-related disorders 38%. 56% of the subjects were diagnosed as having borderline PD, and 87% of them, at least one type of personality disorder (PD). SB methods used prior to admission were self-cutting 41%, overdosing 32%, self-strangulation 15%, jumping from a height 12% and attempting traffic death 10%, the first two of which were frequent among young females. The median (range) of the total number of SBs in the lifetime history was 7 (1-141). Severity of depressive symptomatology, suicidal intent and other symptoms, proportions of the subjects who reported SB-preceding life events and life problems, and childhood and adolescent abuse were comparable to those of the previous studies conducted in medical or emergency service settings. Gender and age-relevant life-problems and life events were identified. Conclusions Features of the studied sample were the high prevalence of affective disorders, anxiety disorders and borderline PD, a variety of SB methods used prior to admission and frequent SB repetition

  3. 32 CFR 242.5 - Admission procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... HEALTH SCIENCES § 242.5 Admission procedures. (a) Application—(1) Civilians. Civilians seeking admission to the School of Medicine shall make direct application following instructions published in...

  4. Experiences of patients with borderline personality disorder with the brief admission intervention: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Helleman, Marjolein; Goossens, Peter J J; Kaasenbrood, Ad; van Achterberg, Theo

    2014-10-01

    Brief admission is a crisis intervention for patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD), and refers to a clinical admission at a psychiatric hospital for a period of 1-5 nights. Patients formulate a treatment plan together with their community mental health nurse about the maximum frequency allowed for these brief admissions. The purpose of the study was to describe the lived experiences of patients with BPD with use of the brief admission intervention. The study used a phenomenological approach. Inclusion criteria were a diagnosis of BPD, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV criteria; experience with brief admission, and sufficient understanding of the Dutch language. A total of 16 female patients and one male patient participated in the study. Thematic analysis of the transcripts of the interviews revealed four major meaning units: (i) organization of the brief admission; (ii) contact with a nurse; (iii) time out from daily life; and (iv) experienced value for the patient. Patients highlighted the quality of the contact with a nurse as the most important aspect of the brief admission. Nurses should be aware of the importance of connecting with patients who have BPD during a brief admission, particularly in light of the interpersonal hypersensitivity that characterizes these patients.

  5. Predictors of psychiatric rehospitalization among elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chun Yin Terry

    2015-01-01

    The population of Hong Kong and the proportion of elderly people have been increasing rapidly. The aim of this retrospective cohort study is to determine predictive factors for psychiatric rehospitalization within 2 years among elderly patients who were discharged from psychiatric wards, in attempt to reduce their rehospitalization rate and to reintegrate them into the community. Patients aged 65 and over, who were discharged from psychiatric wards of Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital from 1 March 2010 to 29 February 2012, were identified. Rehospitalization within 2 years after discharge was the primary outcome measure, and the time to rehospitalization was measured as the secondary outcome. Patients were subgrouped into readmitted and non-readmitted groups. Logistic regression and Cox regression analyses were applied to the potential predictive factors with odds ratios and hazard ratios obtained, respectively, for the significant findings. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were plotted for graphical representation of the study results in survival analysis. 368 individuals satisfying the study criteria were identified. The same four factors were shown to be significantly associated with rehospitalization in both multiple logistic regression and Cox regression survival analysis. Referral to other psychiatric disciplines upon discharge (p< 0.001, OR=0.325, HR=0.405) was associated with a lower rehospitalization risk and correlated to a longer time to rehospitalization. History of suicidal behaviors (p< 0.001, OR=4.906, HR=3.161), history of violent behaviors (p< 0.001, OR=5.443, HR=3.935) and greater number of previous psychiatric admissions (p< 0.001, OR=1.250, HR=1.121)  were associated with a higher rehospitalization risk and predicted earlier rehospitalization. The rehospitalization rate of elderly patients was 5.2% at 1 month, 9.5% at 3 months, 15.0% at 6 months, 17.1% at 1 year, 18.8% at 1.5 year and 20.9% at 2 years. PMID:26870319

  6. Differential Freshman Admission by Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suddick, David E.; McBee, M. Louise

    1974-01-01

    The authors report on a study whose purpose was to determine if, after adjusting for initial differences in high school averages and SAT scores via separate regression equations, differential admissions criterion by sex is justifiable. No justification is found. (RP)

  7. Antipsychotic Medications and Risk of Acute Coronary Syndrome in Schizophrenia: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hsing-Cheng; Yang, Shu-Yu; Liao, Ya-Tang; Chen, Chiao-Chicy; Kuo, Chian-Jue

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the risk of developing acute coronary syndrome requiring hospitalization in association with the use of certain antipsychotic medications in schizophrenia patients. Methods A nationwide cohort of 31,177 inpatients with schizophrenia between the ages of 18 and 65 years whose records were enrolled in the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan from 2000 to 2008 and were studied after encrypting the identifications. Cases (n = 147) were patients with subsequent acute coronary syndrome requiring hospitalization after their first psychiatric admission. Based on a nested case-control design, each case was matched with 20 controls for age, sex and the year of first psychiatric admission using risk-set sampling. The effects of antipsychotic agents on the development of acute coronary syndrome were assessed using multiple conditional logistic regression and sensitivity analyses to confirm any association. Results We found that current use of aripiprazole (adjusted risk ratio [RR] = 3.68, 95% CI: 1.27–10.64, p<0.05) and chlorpromazine (adjusted RR = 2.96, 95% CI: 1.40–6.24, p<0.001) were associated with a dose-dependent increase in the risk of developing acute coronary syndrome. Although haloperidol was associated with an increased risk (adjusted RR = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.20–3.44, p<0.01), there was no clear dose-dependent relationship. These three antipsychotic agents were also associated with an increased risk in the first 30 days of use, and the risk decreased as the duration of therapy increased. Sensitivity analyses using propensity score-adjusted modeling showed that the results were similar to those of multiple regression analysis. Conclusions Patients with schizophrenia who received aripiprazole, chlorpromazine, or haloperidol could have a potentially elevated risk of developing acute coronary syndrome, particularly at the start of therapy. PMID:27657540

  8. Australian prisoners of war of the Japanese: post-war psychiatric hospitalisation and psychological morbidity.

    PubMed

    Tennant, C; Goulston, K; Dent, O

    1986-09-01

    Evidence of chronic psychiatric and psychosomatic morbidity was found in a randomly selected sample of Australian prisoners of war (POWs) of the Japanese over the 40-year period following the Second World War. A clinical interview revealed more contemporary depressive and anxiety disorders and more post-war psychiatric illness overall than in a comparison group of randomly selected combatant veterans of the Pacific and South East Asian campaign. The POWs were no more likely to have had psychiatric admissions than non-POWs and fewer of them had had multiple psychiatric admissions. POWs had more duodenal ulcers than controls but otherwise their physical health was similar, as was their age-adjusted mortality in the post-war years. Finally, POWs were more likely to have Totally and Permanently Incapacitated Service Pensions than controls. PMID:3467712

  9. The psychiatric inpatient physical health assessment sheet (PIPHAS): a useful tool to improve the speed, efficiency, and documentation of physical examination in new psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Pettipher, Alexander; Ovens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    There is increased morbidity and mortality among patients suffering from mental illness. This is believed to be multi-factorial. Poor access to healthcare, the stigma of mental illness, reduced clinic attendance, lifestyle factors, and side effects of medications are cited as possible contributing factors. It is therefore vital to perform a physical examination to identify previously undiagnosed conditions during the admission of a psychiatric inpatient. The Royal College of Psychiatrists recommends that all patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital should receive a full physical examination on admission, or within twenty-four hours of admission. A snapshot audit was carried out at Prospect Park Hospital in Reading, which highlighted that The Royal College of Psychiatrist's recommendation, along with Trust guidelines regarding physical examination were not being met, with only 78 out of 111 patients (70.3%) undergoing an examination during their admission. In addition to this, examinations were often poorly documented and not covering all examination domains. A psychiatric inpatient physical health assessment sheet (PIPHAS) was designed and introduced, providing a quick and standardised approach to the documentation of a physical examination. After the intervention was put into practice, its impact was assessed by performing a retrospective review of the admission clerking notes of the next 100 admissions to Prospect Park Hospital. Following the introduction of the PIPHAS form there was an increase in the number of patients undergoing physical examination on admission to hospital (75 out of 100 patients, 75%). There was also an increase in the thorough documentation of all examination domains (e.g. respiratory examination) for patients that had a completed PIPHAS form scanned within their medical records. This quality improvement project demonstrates that the PIPHAS form is a useful tool to improve the speed, efficiency, and documentation of a thorough physical

  10. [History of psychiatric care].

    PubMed

    Häfner, H

    2006-01-01

    The lecture incorporates stages of the Ettelbruck jubilee-hospital into european psychiatric history of the two last centuries. Beginning with social exclusion in the sense of a Michel Foucauld ("Central Hospice"), then turning into a typical large psychiatric hospital the CHNP is nowadays a specialized clinic with national tasks within the network of mental health community care. Milestones of this evolution are: the isolation theory of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries; eugenics and euthanasia on patients in Nazi-Germany; the second psychiatric revolution after World War 2 and it's impact in Luxembourg.

  11. [Anticonvulsants treatment of psychiatric disorder in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Bidzan, Leszek

    2006-01-01

    Agents introduced for the treatment of epilepsy have also been usedsimultaneously for psychiatric indications. The therapeutic effects of anticonvulsants are recognized in many psychiatric disorders. Growing literature suggests that anticonvulsant medication have efficacy in treating acute mania, bipolar disorder, psychotic disorders, behavioral disturbances especially agitation and impulsive aggression and anxiety, alcohol withdrawal and dependence. However, study of anticonvulsants among elderly patients has been limited. Further research in the field of psychogeriatry is needed to clarify the efficacy and tolerance of anticonvulsants. PMID:17203814

  12. [From admission team to hospital bed management].

    PubMed

    Pochini, Angelo; Augellone, Elisa; Enei, Rosanna; Gaetani, Laura; Paolucci, Simona; Ursumando, Diana; Mitello, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    Reduction on number of hospital beds i.e. on patients' admission among hospitals in Lazio has lead to a reformulation of health service framework within Lazio indentifying hospital as the only place to go to treat acute and urgent diseases. San Camillo-Forlanini, the largest hospital in Rome, according to the regional health plan, the recovery plan and the redevelopment of network hospital has had a significant reduction of hospital beds leading, as consequence, to the need of an internal reorganization. In order to correctly address this issue, the management of the Hospital started in February 2008 a project, setting up a group made up by nursing coordinators which had as a main aim to manage the number of hospital beds needed for emergencies. This group has been called "Admission Team" and nurses within the group are familiar with hospital policies and organization. The team collaborates daily with physicians and nurses in  emergency room, in order to decide the most appropriate health care protocol for each patient. The project follows a specific methodology i.e. Systemic Analysis. Over the years this project has contributed to the improvement to a number of indicators and more generally to the health care within the hospital together with the enhancement of education of new managerial roles among health professional. In 2009, the Regional Council of Lazio has recognized this project as strategic within private and public hospitals.

  13. 45 CFR 618.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 618.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by...

  14. Psychiatric hospitalization in Poland.

    PubMed

    Frydman, L

    1983-01-01

    An overview of psychiatric hospitalization in Poland is presented in the context of Polish political and socio-cultural developments. The areas addressed include: the characteristics of the patient population; the organization of Polish mental health service; the nature of psychiatric treatment; psychiatric legislation; patients' rights; and the training and social status of the various mental health professionals. In spite of the meager resources allocated to mental health services, and the consequent staff shortages and overcrowded, drab living conditions in psychiatric facilities, the care afforded patients is generally humane and nonoppressive. Polish psychiatry has succeeded in maintaining its professional autonomy and has assumed a leadership role in the modernization of its service delivery system.

  15. Neuroinflammation and psychiatric illness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence support the pathogenic role of neuroinflammation in psychiatric illness. While systemic autoimmune diseases are well-documented causes of neuropsychiatric disorders, synaptic autoimmune encephalitides with psychotic symptoms often go under-recognized. Parallel to the link between psychiatric symptoms and autoimmunity in autoimmune diseases, neuroimmunological abnormalities occur in classical psychiatric disorders (for example, major depressive, bipolar, schizophrenia, and obsessive-compulsive disorders). Investigations into the pathophysiology of these conditions traditionally stressed dysregulation of the glutamatergic and monoaminergic systems, but the mechanisms causing these neurotransmitter abnormalities remained elusive. We review the link between autoimmunity and neuropsychiatric disorders, and the human and experimental evidence supporting the pathogenic role of neuroinflammation in selected classical psychiatric disorders. Understanding how psychosocial, genetic, immunological and neurotransmitter systems interact can reveal pathogenic clues and help target new preventive and symptomatic therapies. PMID:23547920

  16. Psychiatric testimony in Britain.

    PubMed

    Chiswick, D

    1989-01-01

    In the criminal-justice system psychiatric evidence may be relevant both before and after conviction. The scope of psychiatric testimony in the criminal courts has been more restricted in Britain than it has been elsewhere. It is generally confined to questions of fitness to plead, responsibility and disposal after conviction. A distinction must be made between matters of clinical psychiatry and those of moral culpability or legal competence. When psychiatric evidence strays from purely clinical questions there is an increased likelihood of misuse and abuse. Even when considering clinical issues there are factors of a non-clinical nature which may distort the type of evidence given. The implications of these matters for psychiatric witnesses are discussed. It is suggested that forensic psychiatrists are refining their role as expert witnesses.

  17. Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Families Guide Skip breadcrumb navigation Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Quick Links Facts For Families Guide Facts For ... Families Guide - Search No. 52; Updated November 2012 Evaluation by a child and adolescent psychiatrist is appropriate ...

  18. A multidisciplinary team case management approach reduces the burden of frequent asthma admissions

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Hannah; Davis, Jenny; Evans, Sian; Flower, Laura; Tan, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Up to 10% of asthmatics have “difficult asthma”; however, they account for 80% of asthma-related expenditure and run the highest risk of acute severe exacerbations. An estimated 75% of admissions for asthma are avoidable. Guidelines advise that these patients be managed by an experienced specialist multidisciplinary team (MDT). We aimed to assess the impact of a case management strategy delivered via specialist MDTs on acute healthcare utilisation of patients with frequent asthma admissions. An MDT (consultant, specialist nurse, physiotherapist and psychologist) case management strategy was introduced in 2010 at University Hospital Southampton Foundation Trust (Southampton, UK) to support patients with frequent asthma admissions during admission and then in clinic. To assess efficacy, we systematically searched the hospital database for patients acutely admitted for asthma on two or more occasions in 2010, 2011 and 2012. Data were collected retrospectively covering patient demographics, admission details, asthma severity and comorbidity. From 2010 to 2012, 84 patients were admitted on two or more occasions per year (80% female, mean body mass index 31 kg·m−2 and 55% psychological comorbidity). After introducing an MDT approach repeat asthma admissions fell by 33% from 127 in 2010 to 84 in 2012 (p=0.0004). In addition, bed days fell by 52% from 895 in 2010 to 430 in 2010 (p=0.015). An MDT case management approach significantly reduces hospitalisation in difficult asthma patients with prior frequent admission. PMID:27730207

  19. Psychiatric disorders and sleep issues.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Eliza L

    2014-09-01

    Sleep issues are common in people with psychiatric disorders, and the interaction is complex. Sleep disorders, particularly insomnia, can precede and predispose to psychiatric disorders, can be comorbid with and exacerbate psychiatric disorders, and can occur as part of psychiatric disorders. Sleep disorders can mimic psychiatric disorders or result from medication given for psychiatric disorders. Impairment of sleep and of mental health may be different manifestations of the same underlying neurobiological processes. For the primary care physician, key tools include recognition of potential sleep effects of psychiatric medications and familiarity with treatment approaches for insomnia in depression and anxiety.

  20. Diversion from custody. I: Psychiatric assessment at the magistrates' court.

    PubMed

    Joseph, P L; Potter, M

    1993-03-01

    The homeless mentally disordered defendant facing minor charges poses considerable problems regarding appropriate disposal. Psychiatric assessment may be required in order to facilitate the court's decision, but this is often available only after remand in custody. A psychiatric assessment service based at two inner-London magistrates' courts is described. Over 18 months, 201 defendants were referred. They were predominantly male, single, and of no fixed abode, suffering from serious psychiatric disorder; these defendants had often received previous in-patient treatment, frequently as detained patients. They typically were recidivists charged with minor offences. Following initial assessment, 25% were admitted to hospital, 50% were released, and 25% returned to custody. The Crown Prosecution Service discontinued 29% of cases. For those admitted directly to hospital, the mean (s.d.) time from arrest to hospital admission was 5.8 (6.8) days, significantly quicker than with prison-based assessments.

  1. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva-dos-Santos, Amílcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires' disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms. PMID:27547478

  2. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires' Disease.

    PubMed

    Coentre, Ricardo; Silva-Dos-Santos, Amílcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires' disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms. PMID:27547478

  3. Psychiatric emergency rates during the Christmas season in the years 1991 to 1997.

    PubMed

    Velamoor, V R; Cernovsky, Z Z; Voruganti, L P

    1999-10-01

    We compared the number of psychiatric admissions from the emergency room during the Christmas season, defined as the rate for the month of December, with those in other months. The psychiatric emergency rates were recorded for each month over six consecutive years, 1991 to 1997. The average number of emergency patients in none of the 12 months differed significantly from any of the remaining months (ANOVA, p > .05). Our data and those of other authors do not support the clinical lore that Christmas season is associated with higher rate of psychiatric emergencies.

  4. [Dichotomy of psychiatric and somatic emergency care; fundamental flaw should be addressed].

    PubMed

    Tuerlings, Joep H A M; Pelger, E C M Noor; de Pont, Boudewijn J H B; van Waarde, Jeroen A

    2015-01-01

    In the Netherlands, acute psychiatric care is characterised by mind-body dualism. For acute psychiatric patients, the first port of call is the general practitioner (GP); after-hour care is provided by the out-of-hours GP service. In contrast to patients with other medical illnesses, the out-of-hours GP service does not usually refer patients with acute psychiatric issues to the accident and emergency (A&E) department of the general hospital, but to the local ambulant psychiatric 'crisis' service. However, some of these patients still end up at the A&E department, as our three cases demonstrate. Integration of the out-of-hours GP service, A&E and acute psychiatric care, therefore, would enable elimination of the current partitioning of somatic and psychiatric medicine in acute emergency care. This solution would not only improve acute emergency care, but would also ensure a targeted and efficient implementation of services and might even lead to a decreased stigmatisation of psychiatric patients in general. PMID:26230348

  5. [Dual diagnosis in psychiatric inpatients: prevalence and general characteristics].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Jiménez, Roberto; Aragüés, María; Jiménez-Arriero, Miguel Angel; Ponce, Guillermo; Muñoz, Antonio; Bagney, Alexandra; Hoenicka, Janet; Palomo, Tomás

    2008-06-01

    Comorbidity between a substance use disorder (SUD) and another psychiatric disorder is known as dual diagnosis. It is of great relevance due to its important clinical consequences and costs of care. There are practically no published studies on dual diagnosis prevalence in patients admitted to psychiatric hospitalization units in general hospitals (PHUGH) in our country. The objectives were to estimate the prevalence of dual diagnosis in psychiatric inpatients admitted consecutively to a Psychiatric Hospitalization Unit (Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain) in one year, to compare clinical and sociodemographic variables between the dual diagnosis group (DD group) and the group with a psychiatric disorder but no SUD (PD group), and to study the types of substances used. This is a retrospective study, based on the review of the clinical charts of the 257 patients admitted to this PHUGH in one year. The results showed that, excluding nicotine dependence, 24.9% of our inpatients had a SUD as well as another psychiatric disorder. A statistically significant predominance of men was found in the DD group, as well as a younger age at the time of the study, at the beginning of their psychiatric attention and on their first psychiatric admission, and they had received diagnoses of schizophrenia or related psychoses more often than the PD group, who had mostly affective disorders. The substances most frequently used in the DD group were alcohol (78.1%), cannabis (62.5%), and cocaine (51.6%). Due to the high prevalence and repercussions of dual diagnosis, it would be advisable to have specialized therapeutic programs for its treatment. PMID:18717266

  6. Counting the cost of diabetic hospital admissions from a multi-ethnic population in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Gulliford, M C; Ariyanayagam-Baksh, S M; Bickram, L; Picou, D; Mahabir, D

    1995-12-01

    Many middle-income countries are experiencing an increase in diabetes mellitus but patterns of morbidity and resource use from diabetes in developing countries have not been well described. We evaluated hospital admission with diabetes among different ethnic groups in Trinidad. We compiled a register of all patients with diabetes admitted to adult medical, general surgical, and ophthalmology wards at Port of Spain Hospital, Trinidad. During 26 weeks, 1447 patients with diabetes had 1722 admissions. Annual admission rates, standardized to the World Population, for the catchment population aged 30-64 years were 1031 (95% CI 928 to 1134) per 100,000 in men and 1354 (1240 to 1468) per 100,000 in women. Compared with the total population, admission rates were 33% higher in the Indian origin population and 47% lower in those of mixed ethnicity. The age-standardized rate of amputation with diabetes in the general population aged 30-64 years was 54 (37 to 71) per 100,000. The hospital admission fatality rate was 8.9% (95%CI 7.6% to 10.2%). Mortality was associated with increasing age, admission with hyperglycaemia, elevated serum creatinine, cardiac failure or stroke and with lower-limb amputation during admission. Diabetes accounted for 13.6% of hospital admissions and 23% of hospital bed occupancy. Admissions associated with disorders of blood glucose control or foot problems accounted for 52% of diabetic hospital bed occupancy. The annual cost of admissions with diabetes was conservatively estimated at TT+ 10.66 million (UK 1.24 million pounds). In this community diabetes admission rates were high and varied according to the prevalence of diabetes. Admissions, fatalities and resource use were associated with acute and chronic complications of diabetes. Investing in better quality preventive clinical care for diabetes might provide an economically advantageous policy for countries like Trinidad and Tobago.

  7. Transporting Forensic Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Dike, Charles C; Nicholson, Elizabeth; Young, John L

    2015-12-01

    Patients in a forensic psychiatric facility often require escorted transport to medical facilities for investigations or treatments of physical health ailments. Transporting these patients presents significant safety and custody challenges because of the nature of patients housed in forensic psychiatric facilities. A significant proportion of these patients may be transfers from the Department of Corrections (DOC) under legal mandates for psychiatric evaluation and treatment better provided in a hospital setting, and most of them will return to the DOC. Although departments of correction have protocols for escorting these potentially dangerous individuals, it is unclear whether receiving psychiatric hospitals have established procedures for maintaining the safety of others and custody of these individuals during transportation outside the hospital facility. The literature is sparse on precautions to be observed when transporting dangerous forensic psychiatric patients, including those with high escape risk. In this article, we describe one forensic inpatient facility's procedure for determining the appropriate level needed to transport these individuals outside of the forensic facility. We also describe the risk assessment procedure for determining level of transport. These are quality improvement measures resulting from a critical review of an incident of escape from the forensic facility several years ago.

  8. Transporting Forensic Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Dike, Charles C; Nicholson, Elizabeth; Young, John L

    2015-12-01

    Patients in a forensic psychiatric facility often require escorted transport to medical facilities for investigations or treatments of physical health ailments. Transporting these patients presents significant safety and custody challenges because of the nature of patients housed in forensic psychiatric facilities. A significant proportion of these patients may be transfers from the Department of Corrections (DOC) under legal mandates for psychiatric evaluation and treatment better provided in a hospital setting, and most of them will return to the DOC. Although departments of correction have protocols for escorting these potentially dangerous individuals, it is unclear whether receiving psychiatric hospitals have established procedures for maintaining the safety of others and custody of these individuals during transportation outside the hospital facility. The literature is sparse on precautions to be observed when transporting dangerous forensic psychiatric patients, including those with high escape risk. In this article, we describe one forensic inpatient facility's procedure for determining the appropriate level needed to transport these individuals outside of the forensic facility. We also describe the risk assessment procedure for determining level of transport. These are quality improvement measures resulting from a critical review of an incident of escape from the forensic facility several years ago. PMID:26668224

  9. College Admissions: Beyond Conventional Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Standardized admissions tests such as the SAT (originally stood for "Scholastic Aptitude Test") and the ACT measure only a narrow segment of the skills needed to become an active citizen and possibly a leader who makes a positive, meaningful, and enduring difference to the world. The problem with these tests is that they promised, under what have…

  10. Admission to Selective Schools, Alphabetically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurajda, Stepan; Munich, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    One's position in an alphabetically sorted list may be important in determining access to over-subscribed public services. Motivated by anecdotal evidence, we investigate the importance of the position in the alphabet of Czech students for their admission chances into over-subscribed schools. Empirical evidence based on the population of students…

  11. Admissions Plan Goes beyond Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Northeastern University's Torch Scholars Program is designed to seek out first-generation students who would not qualify under the university's regular admissions process. The scholarships go to motivated students who have shown determination in overcoming personal challenges. Northeastern believes the experiment will enhance the socioeconomic…

  12. Using Multimedia for Admission Recruitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gudema, Louis

    1995-01-01

    Multimedia can grab the attention of prospective students in an engaging, appealing way, while giving admission officers the opportunity to deliver information about every facet of campus life. Describes multimedia, its potential, and the production process as well as five current distribution methods. Discusses appropriateness of multimedia for…

  13. Admission Conditions and Graduates' Employability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexandre, Fernando; Portela, Miguel; Sa, Carla

    2009-01-01

    In a context of increasing competition for students, admission conditions have been used as an instrument in a strategy of differentiation. Such a strategy is guided by short-run concerns, that is, the immediate need to attract more students. This article takes a longer term view, by examining graduates' employability. The authors find that…

  14. College Admission: Profession or Industry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thacker, Lloyd

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how the condition and fate of both the college admissions profession and liberal arts education are linked, and how they are both threatened by elements of commercialism. Argues for reasserting professionalism by looking beyond the competitive advantage of the college's interest to serve a broader function as trustees of students'…

  15. PCL-R Psychopathy Predicts Disruptive Behavior Among Male Offenders in a Dutch Forensic Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrand, Martin; De Ruiter, Corine; Nijman, Henk

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between psychopathy, according to the Dutch language version of Hare's Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R), and various types of disruptive behavior during inpatient forensic psychiatric treatment is investigated. Ninety-two male participants were administered the PCL-R following admission to an inpatient forensic…

  16. Pharmacogenomics in Psychiatric Practice.

    PubMed

    El-Mallakh, Rif S; Roberts, R Jeannie; El-Mallakh, Peggy L; Findlay, Lillian Jan; Reynolds, Kristen K

    2016-09-01

    Pharmacogenomic testing in psychiatry is becoming an established clinical procedure. Several vendors provide clinical interpretation of combinatorial pharmacogenomic testing of gene variants that have documented predictive implications regarding either pharmacologic response or adverse effects in depression and other psychiatric conditions. Such gene profiles have demonstrated improvements in outcome in depression, and reduction of cost of care of patients with inadequate clinical response. Additionally, several new gene variants are being studied to predict specific response in individuals. Many of these genes have demonstrated a role in the pathophysiology of depression or specific depressive symptoms. This article reviews the current state-of-the-art application of psychiatric pharmacogenomics. PMID:27514465

  17. A novel trigger for acute coronary syndromes: the effect of lunar cycles on the incidence and in-hospital prognosis of acute coronary syndromes--a 3-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Oomman, Abraham; Ramachandran, P; Shanmugapriya; Subramanian, Priya; Nagaraj, B M S

    2003-04-01

    Circadian variations in the incidence of hypertension and coronary events are well known with early morning surges. Effect of lunar cycles on various medical illnesses like seizures and psychiatric disturbances are documented. However, the effect of lunar cycles on coronary events has been sparsely documented. The authors studied the incidence of acute coronary events and admission patterns in the departments of emergency medicine and cardiology. Inclusion criteria included unstable angina, non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (MI) and ST elevation MI. Exclusion criteria included chest pain syndromes which were subsequently deemed non-cardiac by invasive or non-invasive investigations. Data from 1999 to 2001 were analysed. Admissions on full moon days were compared with those on new moon days. There were 30 full moon days and 30 new moon days and 223 admissions on full moon days and 266 on new moon days. This difference was statistically significant [p = .005]. Sixty-seven per cent were males and the rest were females. Subgroup analysis of mortality, postinfarction angina, effect on diabetics and hypertensives were done which showed an increased trend in new moon days. It is concluded that there is increased incidence of acute coronary events associated with new moon days.

  18. Postoperative hospital course of patients with history of severe psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S; McCartney, J R; Saravay, S M; Katz, E

    1987-09-01

    The postoperative hospital course of 54 patients with a past history of psychiatric illness was studied through chart review. Both chronic schizophrenics and chronic depressives tolerated surgical procedures well, without any unusual difficulties or exacerbation of psychiatric illness. They represented no management problems. Patients with acute, severe upset in the preoperative period (regardless of diagnosis) presented most of the management problems postoperatively. PMID:3678811

  19. 10 CFR 2.708 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... admission of the genuineness and authenticity of any relevant document described in or attached to the... document for which an admission of genuineness and authenticity is requested must be delivered with...

  20. Deprivation of liberty in psychiatric hospital care: the patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Kuosmanen, Lauri; Hätönen, Heli; Malkavaara, Heikki; Kylmä, Jari; Välimäki, Maritta

    2007-09-01

    Deprivation of liberty in psychiatric hospitals is common world-wide. The aim of this study was to find out whether patients had experienced deprivation of their liberty during psychiatric hospitalization and to explore their views about it. Patients (n = 51) in two acute psychiatric inpatient wards were interviewed in 2001. They were asked to describe in their own words their experiences of being deprived of their liberty. The data were analysed by inductive content analysis. The types of deprivation of liberty in psychiatric hospital care reported by these patients were: restrictions on leaving the ward and on communication, confiscation of property, and various coercive measures. The patients' experiences of being deprived of their liberty were negative, although some saw the rationale for using these interventions, considering them as part of hospital care.

  1. Psychiatric personnel, risk management and the new institutionalism.

    PubMed

    Hazelton, M

    1999-12-01

    This article reports the findings of a series of ethnographic research interviews conducted with psychiatric personnel in one region of Tasmania between 1995 and 1997. These interviews formed part of a more wide-ranging project examining changes in the regulatory practices of psychiatric personnel in the light of the professional, media and policy discourses that inform them, especially in relation to the impact of social justice reforms spelt out in recent Australian mental health policy. In discussing the nature of psychiatric work the personnel interviewed returned repeatedly to the themes of safety and risk management. The study presents an analysis of discourses deployed around these themes and argues that concerns over safety and risk are central to the emergence of a new institutionalism in acute in-patient psychiatric services.

  2. Increased Guillain-Barre syndrome admissions in Shiraz, southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Anahid; Heydari, Seyed Taghi; Lankarani, Kamran Bagheri

    2013-01-01

    Background Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is an acute immune-mediated peripheral neuropathy usually after an incident. This study was performed to investigate the basic epidemiologic features of GBS in south of Iran. Methods We studied consecutive patients with GBS in Nemazi Hospital of Shiraz, southern Iran. Demographic characteristics of the subjects, i.e. age, sex, and length of hospital stay were extracted. Information regarding yearly admissions for the entire hospital was also gathered. The prevalence of GBS per 10,000 hospital admissions was calculated and stratified by sex and year. Yearly prevalence was compared using the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results From January 2000 to December 2009, 389 (232 males and 157 females) patients with GBS were admitted in our center. The mean age of patients was 29.8 ± 23.0 years and their mean length of hospital stay was 12.9 ± 11.6 days. The overall mortality rate was 6%. The ratio of admissions due to GBS to the total admissions was significantly higher in 2009, the year of an influenza A (H1N1) virus pandemic. Conclusion There appears to be an increase in the incidence of GBS in Shiraz. This is in parallel with the increasing trend of some other autoimmune diseases. PMID:24250891

  3. Atmospheric pollutants and hospital admissions due to pneumonia in children

    PubMed Central

    Negrisoli, Juliana; Nascimento, Luiz Fernando C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the relationship between exposure to air pollutants and hospitalizations due to pneumonia in children of Sorocaba, São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Time series ecological study, from 2007 to 2008. Daily data were obtained from the State Environmental Agency for Pollution Control for particulate matter, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, besides air temperature and relative humidity. The data concerning pneumonia admissions were collected in the public health system of Sorocaba. Correlations between the variables of interest using Pearson cofficient were calculated. Models with lags from zero to five days after exposure to pollutants were performed to analyze the association between the exposure to environmental pollutants and hospital admissions. The analysis used the generalized linear model of Poisson regression, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: There were 1,825 admissions for pneumonia, with a daily mean of 2.5±2.1. There was a strong correlation between pollutants and hospital admissions, except for ozone. Regarding the Poisson regression analysis with the multi-pollutant model, only nitrogen dioxide was statistically significant in the same day (relative risk - RR=1.016), as well as particulate matter with a lag of four days (RR=1.009) after exposure to pollutants. CONCLUSIONS: There was an acute effect of exposure to nitrogen dioxide and a later effect of exposure to particulate matter on children hospitalizations for pneumonia in Sorocaba. PMID:24473956

  4. Minimum Alcohol Prices and Outlet Densities in British Columbia, Canada: Estimated Impacts on Alcohol-Attributable Hospital Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinhui; Martin, Gina; Macdonald, Scott; Vallance, Kate; Treno, Andrew; Ponicki, William; Tu, Andrew; Buxton, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated whether periodic increases in minimum alcohol prices were associated with reduced alcohol-attributable hospital admissions in British Columbia. Methods. The longitudinal panel study (2002–2009) incorporated minimum alcohol prices, density of alcohol outlets, and age- and gender-standardized rates of acute, chronic, and 100% alcohol-attributable admissions. We applied mixed-method regression models to data from 89 geographic areas of British Columbia across 32 time periods, adjusting for spatial and temporal autocorrelation, moving average effects, season, and a range of economic and social variables. Results. A 10% increase in the average minimum price of all alcoholic beverages was associated with an 8.95% decrease in acute alcohol-attributable admissions and a 9.22% reduction in chronic alcohol-attributable admissions 2 years later. A Can$ 0.10 increase in average minimum price would prevent 166 acute admissions in the 1st year and 275 chronic admissions 2 years later. We also estimated significant, though smaller, adverse impacts of increased private liquor store density on hospital admission rates for all types of alcohol-attributable admissions. Conclusions. Significant health benefits were observed when minimum alcohol prices in British Columbia were increased. By contrast, adverse health outcomes were associated with an expansion of private liquor stores. PMID:23597383

  5. [The rights of psychiatric patients].

    PubMed

    Baudis, P

    1995-05-01

    The author gives a historical account of patient's rights and in particular the development of codes of rights of psychiatric patients during the past twenty years. He describes differences in attitudes to rights of psychiatric patients in different societies and the different emphasis on patient's rights, as compared with rights of society. Briefly the so far most elaborated account of rights of psychiatric patients submitted by the American Psychiatric Association is described.

  6. Length of Stay and Achievement of Functional Milestones in a Rural First Nations Population in Northwestern Ontario during Acute-Care Admission after Total Hip Replacement: A Retrospective Chart Review

    PubMed Central

    Brunton, Nicole; Hopman, Wilma M.; Kelly, Len

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To understand the postoperative acute-care physiotherapy course for First Nations people returning after total hip replacement (THR) to remote communities with limited rehabilitation services and to evaluate length of stay and attainment of functional milestones after THR to determine to what extent an urban-based clinical pathway is transferrable to and effective for First Nations patients in a rural setting. Methods: Data were collected retrospectively by reviewing charts of patients who underwent THR in the Northwest Ontario catchment area from 2007 through 2012. Results: For the 36 patient charts reviewed, median length of stay (LOS) at the Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre (SLMHC) was 7.5 days (range 2–335); median LOS from time of surgery at the regional hospital (Thunder Bay Regional Health Centre) to discharge from SLMHC was 13.5 days; and median time for mobilizing and stairs was 9 days (range 1–93). Conclusion: Commonly accepted urban clinical pathways are not a good fit for smaller rural hospitals from which First Nations patients return to remote communities without rehabilitation services. LOS in a rural acute-care facility is similar to LOS in an urban rehabilitation facility. PMID:26839456

  7. Pathological Gambling: Psychiatric Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westphal, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Three psychiatric conceptual models: addictive, obsessive-compulsive spectrum and mood spectrum disorder have been proposed for pathological gambling. The objectives of this paper are to (1) evaluate the evidence base from the most recent reviews of each model, (2) update the evidence through 2007 and (3) summarize the status of the evidence for…

  8. Teaching psychiatric ethics.

    PubMed

    Bloch, S

    1988-11-01

    In the last decade, we have witnessed a burgeoning of interest in ethical issues amongst psychiatrists. Teaching of the subject, however, remains at a rudimentary stage. Various approaches to such instruction are available, particularly modelling (students observe their experienced counterpart), the case method (examining specific clinical situations which involve a need for ethical decision-making), and the seminar approach (trainees are exposed to a core body of knowledge, mainly theoretical in nature). Faced with these different teaching models, the University of Oxford Department of Psychiatry has opted for a blend of all three approaches, which incorporates two goals: an increase in the trainees' sensitivity to the many intricate moral dilemmas facing the psychiatric profession; and their familiarity with salient concepts in moral philosophy which constitute a basis for ethical reasoning and which have a bearing on clinical practice. The teaching programme comprises the following: a pair of trainees prepares a presentation on an aspect of psychiatric ethics under the supervision of a senior psychiatrist. A moral philosopher assumes the role of discussant of the ethical problems raised by the trainees; this is followed by a general discussion. Topics have included involuntary hospitalization, dual loyalty, suicide, psychiatric diagnosis, and ethical issues in various spheres of psychiatric practice such as sex therapy, psychotherapy and child psychiatry. The approach has worked effectively and proved rewarding to all participants involved. PMID:3226351

  9. Psychiatric Morbidity Following Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, B.N.; Swain, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    A Case of cerebral neurocysticercosis reported with manic episode on first presentation which was confirmed after CT scan of Brain. Psychiatric manifestation showed a gradual decline following treatment with medication. Normal social and occupational functioning was ensured by prolonged treatment with Mood Stabilizer. PMID:21224909

  10. Policies Governing Admission to Jordanian Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massadeh, Nassar

    2012-01-01

    This paper intends to discuss the policy of admission to Jordanian public universities. This admission rules are variable and open to almost 100% of the graduates from secondary schools. This might refer to the historical events and economic conditions that the country has gone through since its establishment. Furthermore, the admission policy is…

  11. 10 CFR 1042.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 1042.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission,...

  12. 10 CFR 1042.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 1042.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission,...

  13. 29 CFR 36.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 36.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission, or...

  14. 29 CFR 36.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 36.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission, or...

  15. 29 CFR 36.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 36.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission, or...

  16. 18 CFR 1317.220 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... § 1317.220 Admissions. (a) Admissions to educational institutions prior to June 24, 1973, are not covered... shall be deemed to be an educational institution. (c) Application of §§ 1317.300 through .310. Except as... admission or recruitment in violation of §§ 1317.300 through 1317.310. (d) Educational institutions....

  17. Admission to Medical Education in Ten Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burn, Barbara B., Ed.

    As part of a study of access and admission to higher education in Germany and the United States, a group of papers on medical admissions in various countries was commissioned. The papers presented in this book reveal wide differences in admissions policies and procedures. Barbara Burn examines some of the major issues in a foreword: representation…

  18. 7 CFR 501.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Admission. 501.2 Section 501.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON U.S. MEAT ANIMAL RESEARCH CENTER, CLAY CENTER, NEBRASKA § 501.2 Admission. Admission to...

  19. 7 CFR 501.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Admission. 501.2 Section 501.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON U.S. MEAT ANIMAL RESEARCH CENTER, CLAY CENTER, NEBRASKA § 501.2 Admission. Admission to...

  20. 7 CFR 501.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Admission. 501.2 Section 501.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON U.S. MEAT ANIMAL RESEARCH CENTER, CLAY CENTER, NEBRASKA § 501.2 Admission. Admission to...

  1. 7 CFR 501.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Admission. 501.2 Section 501.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON U.S. MEAT ANIMAL RESEARCH CENTER, CLAY CENTER, NEBRASKA § 501.2 Admission. Admission to...

  2. 7 CFR 501.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Admission. 501.2 Section 501.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON U.S. MEAT ANIMAL RESEARCH CENTER, CLAY CENTER, NEBRASKA § 501.2 Admission. Admission to...

  3. The Ethics of Need-Blind Admission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jump, James W.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the need for consensus about the ethics of need-blind admission by focusing on principles concerning the practice of college admissions. Argues that colleges should not abandon need-blind admissions but should, instead, remove expectations that colleges should meet the full needs of all the students they accept. (RJM)

  4. 29 CFR 36.220 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Admissions. 36.220 Section 36.220 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 36.220 Admissions. (a) Admissions to educational institutions prior to June 24, 1973, are not covered by...

  5. The Evolution of College Admission Requirements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beale, Andrew V.

    2012-01-01

    The development of college admissions requirements during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was basically the story of the admission policies and practices at Harvard College. Candidates for admission were examined on their ability to read and translate Latin and Greek, and a careful check was made of their character and background. With…

  6. The Role of Noncognitive Assessment in Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoerle, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Confident that understanding and employing new approaches to assessment is a top priority for admissions professionals, the Secondary School Admission Test Board (SSATB) recently launched a Think Tank on the Future of Admission Assessment, with a two-year timeline and a charge to educate its membership and inspire greater innovation in admissions…

  7. Why Do Students Repeat Admissions Tests?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Martha S.

    Attitudes and beliefs about the admissions process, especially the role of standardized testing in admissions, were examined for students who took a standardized admissions test more than once. Their attitudes were compared with those of students who did not repeat the test. About 200 preveterinary students who had taken the Veterinary Aptitude…

  8. Fairness and Undergraduate Admission: A Qualitative Exploration of Admissions Choices at the University of Oxford

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimdars, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The article investigates unequal admissions patterns at the University of Oxford. Statistical work shows differences in admission rates by social class, ethnicity, gender, qualification status and secondary schooling. In-depth interviews with admissions tutors, college and university officials and observations of eight admissions meetings provide…

  9. Greek-Cypriot mental health nurses' professional satisfaction and association with mild psychiatric symptoms.

    PubMed

    Karanikola, Maria N K; Kaite, Charis

    2013-08-01

    The present descriptive correlational study aims to explore among Greek-Cypriot mental health nurses (MHNs) the level of professional satisfaction, potential differences with regard to vocational characteristics, and associations with anxiety and depressive symptoms. A random sample of 225 Greek-Cypriot MHNs employed in hospital and community settings completed Hamilton's Anxiety Scale, Beck's Depression Inventory, and Stamps's Index of Work Satisfaction. Moderate levels of overall professional satisfaction of 4.38 (±0.58) were detected. Work experience was positively correlated with satisfaction from payment (τ = 0.230, P < 0.0001). Men seemed to be more satisfied with organizational policies (P = 0.0043) and performed tasks (P = 0.027) than women. Nurses working in psychiatric clinics of general hospitals experienced higher levels of professional satisfaction in general, and more satisfaction from organizational policies, autonomy, and task requirements than nurses working in community settings, substance misuse programs, and community mental health centres (P = 0.001). Nurses working in acute/admission settings were the less satisfied, compared to nurses working in rehabilitation wards (P = 0.017). Professional satisfaction was associated with anxiety (τ = 0.280, P < 0.0001) and depressive (τ = 0.246, P < 0.0001) symptoms. Greek-Cypriot MHNs seem to get moderate satisfaction from their work, whilst professional satisfaction is associated with their psychological well-being. Targeted managerial interventions and longitudinal research are warranted.

  10. Diagnostic delays and dilemmas. Management of affected patients in the psychiatric inpatient unit of a general children's hospital.

    PubMed

    Fennig, S; Fennig, S

    1999-01-01

    We present the role of the medical-psychiatric unit in the management of children and adolescents with somatic symptoms in whom diagnosis remains uncertain or delayed, which can lead to severe impairment in the child's normal development and functioning and cause anger and hostility in the families. We describe two patients, one with cyclic vomiting syndrome, considered a medical disorder, and the other with conversion disorder, considered a psychiatric disorder. Both patients had had multiple ER admissions and outpatient visits with elaborate and expensive diagnostic workups. On admission to our unit, a coherent and integrated treatment plan was finally formulated and successfully implemented. We discuss the advantage of the medical-psychiatric unit for simultaneous medical and psychosocial intervention early in the development of symptoms and signs. The units need to be ready and able to cope with a wide range of medical and psychiatric disorders with different levels of gravity. PMID:10228893

  11. Acute mastoiditis--revisited.

    PubMed

    Luntz, M; Keren, G; Nusem, S; Kronenberg, J

    1994-09-01

    The clinical course and causative organisms were studied in 18 patients with acute mastoiditis, 13 of whom (72%) had no previous history of middle ear disease. Their age ranged from 5 months to 21 years, and duration of middle ear symptoms immediately prior to admission ranged from 1 to 45 days (average 9.7 days). None had undergone a myringotomy prior to admission, while 13 (72%) had been receiving antibiotic treatment for acute otitis media. Three were admitted with intracranial complications. Bacteria were isolated in 10 of the 16 patients in whom samples were available for bacterial culture, and included Streptococcus pneumonia (2), Streptococcus pyogenes (2), Staphylococcus aureus (2), Staphlococcus coagulase negative (2), Klebsiella pneumonia (1), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1). Of the 17 patients treated by us, 11 received surgery. Acute otitis media, secretory otitis media, acute mastoiditis, subacute mastoiditis and masked mastoiditis create a continuum. Antibiotic treatment for acute otitis media cannot be considered as an absolute safeguard against acute mastoiditis. When antibiotics are prescribed for acute mastoiditis before culture result is available, an anti-staphylococcal agent should be included. At least some patients with acute mastoiditis develop a primary infection of the bony framework of the middle ear cleft. The prevalence of the intracranial complications in acute mastoiditis is still high and may appear soon after or concomitant with the first sign of acute mastioditis.

  12. [Suicide in psychiatric hospitals : Results, risk factors and therapeutic measures].

    PubMed

    Wolfersdorf, M; Vogel, R; Vogl, R; Grebner, M; Keller, F; Purucker, M; Wurst, F M

    2016-05-01

    Suicide prevention is a core responsibility of psychiatry and psychotherapy. Periods of change in psychiatric inpatient treatment concepts are usually also accompanied by an increase in psychopathological behavior and with increased suicide rates in psychiatric hospitals, as seen in the 1970s and 1980s in Germany. That this represented a real increase of inpatient suicides during those years was confirmed and subsequently the number and rate of inpatient suicides has decreased from approximately 280 out of 100,000 admissions of patients in 1980 to approximately 50 in 2014. Death can also occur in psychiatric hospitals and an absolute prevention is not possible even under optimal conditions of therapy and nursing, communication and security. The suicide rate has clearly decreased over the last two decades in relation to admissions. The group of young male schizophrenic patients newly identified as having a high clinical suicide risk has decreased among the suicide victims whereas the percentage of severely depressed patients with delusions has increased. This reduction could be associated with the comprehensive improvements in educational and training programs in the field of suicide and suicide prevention, objectification of coping methods, development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, improvements in therapy and relationship possibilities and a general reduction in the number of suicides in Germany. PMID:27090898

  13. Ethical issues in psychiatric research.

    PubMed

    Barry, Liliana Kalogjera

    2009-06-01

    The field of psychiatric research ethics has evolved in recent years. This evolution seems to stem from the efforts of various groups (eg, medical ethicists, regulatory bodies, and the profession's own association, the APA) and from increased understanding of the endeavor of psychiatric empirical research. Current data regarding mental illness highlight the need for the continued expansion of psychiatric research to help relieve the suffering of the many individuals whom mental illness affects. The ethics for psychiatric research should parallel this expansion of psychiatric research to ensure that studies sufficiently address ethical considerations and thus foster the proper, delicate balance between progress and protection (see Table 1).

  14. Re-audit of physical examination on admission.

    PubMed

    Drury, Andrew; Eriksson, Erik; Marriott, Rebecca; Symeon, Christopher; Chan, Jeni

    2011-09-01

    Re-audit of the physical examination of older adults admitted to one of two inpatient Older Adult wards at the Maudsley Hospital found that on admission, only 58% of patients had a brief physical examination and 43% had a full physical examination, and after 72 hours only 65% had a full physical examination. This is a slight improvement on the previous audit but still falls short of the target of 90% of patients having a full physical examination within 72 hours of admission. Recommendations include education of junior and senior doctors of the need for physical examination via presentation of audit and distribution of results, consideration of the use of a proforma to gather information on physical examination which may have been done in an acute hospital and a further re-audit to see if outcomes have improved.

  15. Psychiatric adverse effects of pediatric corticosteroid use.

    PubMed

    Drozdowicz, Linda B; Bostwick, J Michael

    2014-06-01

    Corticosteroids, highly effective drugs for myriad disease states, have considerable neuropsychiatric adverse effects that can manifest in cognitive disorders, behavioral changes, and frank psychiatric disease. Recent reviews have summarized these effects in adults, but a comprehensive review on corticosteroid effects in children has not been published since 2005. Here, we systematically review articles published since then that, we find, naturally divide into 3 main areas: (1) chronic effects of acute prenatal and neonatal exposure associated with prematurity and congenital conditions; (2) immediate behavioral effects of acute exposure via oncological protocols; and (3) acute behavioral effects of sporadic use in children and adolescents with other conditions. PsycInfo, MEDLINE, Embase, and Scopus were queried to identify articles reporting psychiatric adverse effects of corticosteroids in pediatric patients. Search terms included corticosteroids, adrenal cortex hormones, steroid psychosis, substance-induced psychoses, glucocorticoids, dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, prednisone, adverse effects, mood disorders, mental disorders, psychosis, psychotic, psychoses, side effect, chemically induced, emotions, affective symptoms, toxicity, behavior, behavioral symptoms, infant, child, adolescent, pediatric, paediatric, neonatal, children, teen, and teenager. Following guidelines for systematic reviews from the Potsdam Consultation on Meta-Analysis, we have found it difficult to draw specific conclusions that are more than general impressions owing to the quality of the available studies. We find a mixed picture with neonates exposed to dexamethasone, with some articles reporting eventual deficits in neuropsychiatric functioning and others reporting no effect. In pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, corticosteroid use appears to correlate with negative psychiatric and behavioral effects. In children treated with corticosteroids for noncancer conditions

  16. [Tinnitus and psychiatric comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Goebel, G

    2015-04-01

    Tinnitus is an auditory phantom phenomenon characterized by the sensation of sounds without objectively identifiable sound sources. To date, its causes are not well understood. The perceived severity of tinnitus correlates more closely to psychological and general health factors than to audiometric parameters. Together with limbic structures in the ventral striatum, the prefrontal cortex forms an internal "noise cancelling system", which normally helps to block out unpleasant sounds, including the tinnitus signal. If this pathway is compromised, chronic tinnitus results. Patients with chronic tinnitus show increased functional connectivity in corticolimbic pathways. Psychiatric comorbidities are common in patients who seek help for tinnitus or hyperacusis. Clinicians need valid screening tools in order to identify patients with psychiatric disorders and to tailor treatment in a multidisciplinary setting.

  17. Screening, detecting and enhancing the yield of previously undiagnosed hepatitis B and C in patients with acute medical admissions to hospital: A pilot project undertaken at the Vancouver General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kapeluto, Jordanna E; Kadatz, Matthew; Wormsbecker, Andrew; Sidhu, Kiran; Yoshida, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) represent an increasing health burden and morbidity in Canada. Viral hepatitis, specifically HCV, has high prevalence among persons born between 1945 and 1965, with 45% to 85% of infected adults asymptomatic and unaware of their infection. Screening has been shown to be cost effective in the detection and treatment of viral hepatitis. OBJECTIVE: To quantify incidence and identify undocumented HBV and HCV infection in hospitalized patients at a single centre with secondary analysis of risk factors as part of a quality improvement initiative. METHODS: A one-time antibody test was conducted in patients admitted to the acute medicine and gastroenterology services. RESULTS: Over a 12-week period, hospital screening for HBV and HCV was performed in 37.3% of 995 admitted patients. There was identification of 15 previously undiagnosed cases of HCV (4%) and 36 undocumented cases of occult (ie, antihepatitis B core antigen seropositive) or active (ie, hepatitis B surface antigen seropositive) HBV (9.7%). Among patients with positive screens, 60% of seropositive HCV patients had no identifiable risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of HBV and HCV infection among hospitalized patients in Vancouver was higher than that of the general population. Risk factors for contraction are often not identified. These results can be used as part of an ongoing discussion regarding a ‘seek and treat’ approach to the detection and treatment of chronic blood-borne viral illnesses. PMID:24945186

  18. Culture and psychiatric diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2013-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, neurobiologists and anthropologists have criticized the rigidity of its diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations, as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis - composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress - as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. This chapter surveys these recommendations to demonstrate how culture and context interact with psychiatric diagnosis at multiple levels. A greater appreciation of the interplay between culture, context, and biology can help clinicians improve diagnostic and treatment planning.

  19. A Fatal Case of Acute Butane-Propane Poisoning in a Prisoner Under Psychiatric Treatment: Do These 2 Factors Have an Arrhythmogenic Interaction, Thus Increasing the Cardiovascular Risk Profile?

    PubMed

    Gioia, Sara; Lancia, Massimo; Bacci, Mauro; Suadoni, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    Sudden death due to inhalation of aliphatic hydrocarbons such as butane and propane is well described in the literature. The main mechanism involved is the induction of a fatal cardiac arrhythmia. This phenomenon is frequently associated with prisoners who accidentally die while sniffing these volatile substances with an abuse purpose. Furthermore, such prisoners are often under psychiatric treatment; specific drugs belonging to this pharmacological class lead to a drug-related QT interval prolongation, setting the stage for torsade de pointes. In this article, we present the case of a prisoner died after sniffing a butane-propane gas mixture from a prefilled camping stove gas canister. The man was under psychiatric drugs due to mental disorders. He was constantly subjected to electrocardiogram to monitor the QTc (corrected QT interval), which was 460 milliseconds long. Toxicological analysis on cadaveric samples was performed by means of gas chromatography (head space) and revealed the presence of butane and propane at low levels. The aim of this article was to discuss a possible arrhythmogenic interaction of QT interval prolongation induced by psychiatric drugs and butane-propane inhalations, increasing the cardiovascular risk profile. In other words, evidence may suggest that prisoners, under these circumstances, are more likely to experience cardiovascular adverse effects. We believe that this study underlines the need to take this hypothesis into account to reduce death risk in prison and any medical-related responsibilities. Further studies are needed to validate the hypothesis.

  20. A Fatal Case of Acute Butane-Propane Poisoning in a Prisoner Under Psychiatric Treatment: Do These 2 Factors Have an Arrhythmogenic Interaction, Thus Increasing the Cardiovascular Risk Profile?

    PubMed

    Gioia, Sara; Lancia, Massimo; Bacci, Mauro; Suadoni, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    Sudden death due to inhalation of aliphatic hydrocarbons such as butane and propane is well described in the literature. The main mechanism involved is the induction of a fatal cardiac arrhythmia. This phenomenon is frequently associated with prisoners who accidentally die while sniffing these volatile substances with an abuse purpose. Furthermore, such prisoners are often under psychiatric treatment; specific drugs belonging to this pharmacological class lead to a drug-related QT interval prolongation, setting the stage for torsade de pointes. In this article, we present the case of a prisoner died after sniffing a butane-propane gas mixture from a prefilled camping stove gas canister. The man was under psychiatric drugs due to mental disorders. He was constantly subjected to electrocardiogram to monitor the QTc (corrected QT interval), which was 460 milliseconds long. Toxicological analysis on cadaveric samples was performed by means of gas chromatography (head space) and revealed the presence of butane and propane at low levels. The aim of this article was to discuss a possible arrhythmogenic interaction of QT interval prolongation induced by psychiatric drugs and butane-propane inhalations, increasing the cardiovascular risk profile. In other words, evidence may suggest that prisoners, under these circumstances, are more likely to experience cardiovascular adverse effects. We believe that this study underlines the need to take this hypothesis into account to reduce death risk in prison and any medical-related responsibilities. Further studies are needed to validate the hypothesis. PMID:26332645

  1. Psychiatric Patients Experiences with Mechanical Restraints: An Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    Lanthén, Klas; Rask, Mikael; Sunnqvist, Charlotta

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine psychiatric patients' experience of mechanical restraints and to describe the care the patients received. Background. All around the world, threats and violence perpetrated by patients in psychiatric emergency inpatient units are quite common and are a prevalent factor concerning the application of mechanical restraints, although psychiatric patients' experiences of mechanical restraints are still moderately unknown. Method. A qualitative design with an inductive approach were used, based on interviews with patients who once been in restraints. Results. This study resulted in an overbridging theme: Physical Presence, Instruction and Composed Behaviour Can Reduce Discontent and Trauma, including five categories. These findings implicated the following: information must be given in a calm and sensitive way, staff must be physically present during the whole procedure, and debriefing after the incident must be conducted. Conclusions. When mechanical restraints were unavoidable, the presence of committed staff during mechanical restraint was important, demonstrating the significance of training acute psychiatric nurses correctly so that their presence is meaningful. Nurses in acute psychiatric settings should be required to be genuinely committed, aware of their actions, and fully present in coercive situations where patients are vulnerable. PMID:26199931

  2. SARS: hospital infection control and admission strategies.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pak-Leung; Tang, Xiao-Ping; Seto, Wing-Hong

    2003-11-01

    Nosocomial clustering with transmission to health care workers, patients and visitors is a prominent feature of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Hospital outbreaks of SARS typically occurred within the first week after admission of the very first SARS cases when the disease was not recognized and before isolation measures were implemented. In the majority of nosocomial infections, there was a history of close contact with a SARS patient, and transmission occurred via large droplets, direct contact with infectious material or by contact with fomites contaminated by infectious material. In a few instances, potential airborne transmission was reported in association with endotracheal intubation, nebulised medications and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation of SARS patients. In all SARS-affected countries, nosocomial transmission of the disease was effectively halted by enforcement of routine standard, contact and droplet precautions in all clinical areas and additional airborne precautions in the high-risk areas. In Hong Kong, where there are few private rooms for patient isolation, some hospitals have obtained good outcome by having designated SARS teams and separate wards for patient triage, confirmed SARS cases and step-down of patients in whom SARS had been ruled out. In conclusion, SARS represents one of the new challenges for those who are involved in hospital infection control. As SARS might re-emerge, all hospitals should take advantage of the current SARS-free interval to review their infection control programmes, alert mechanisms, response capability and to repair any identified inadequacies.

  3. [Collaboration of the general practitioner and the psychiatrist with the psychiatric hospital. A literature review].

    PubMed

    Spiessl, H; Cording, C

    2000-05-01

    Co-operation of physicians in private practice with psychiatric hospitals was investigated in Germany scarcely until now, although evaluation of consumer satisfaction is of great importance to quality assurance in psychiatry. In this paper, findings from previous studies are presented together with data from interviews with general practitioners and psychiatrists, evaluating their expectations regarding psychiatric hospitals. Substantial problem area in collaboration is referral to the psychiatric hospital. Apart from sociodemographic and disease-related variables, referral practice depends on referring physician's attitudes and competence in psychiatry, and provider influences like delay of admission, communication with referring physician, and competence of the hospital. As conclusion, constructive collaboration must be developed at the interface of outpatient and inpatient care. On account of increasing diversification of psychiatric services, functional network should be an ongoing goal to improve treatment continuity of patients with mental disorders. PMID:10858945

  4. Patterns of Utilization and Outcomes of Inpatient Psychiatric Treatment in Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin E.; Saw, Anne; Zane, Nolan W.; Murphy, Beth L.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the knowledge of racial/ethnic disparities in mental health treatment utilization comes from studies examining outpatient services, and less is known about these disparities in inpatient services. This empirical gap may limit our understanding of these disparities since inpatient treatment is the most intensive form of specialty mental health care for patients with psychological disorders. We conducted a systematic chart review of 129 Asian American and 198 White American psychiatric inpatients to examine patterns of inpatient psychiatric treatment utilization. Demographic and clinical data were extracted from admission and discharge records during a two-year timeframe. Patterns of diagnoses revealed that Asian American patients utilized inpatient services for more severe psychiatric diagnoses compared to White American patients. Despite this, there were no racial/ethnic differences in levels of functional impairment at admission, and there were no racial/ethnic differences in length of treatment stay. For Asian American patients, level of psychosocial functioning at admission predicted length of stay. A better understanding of patterns of inpatient treatment use is needed to meet the clinical needs of Asian Americans with psychiatric disorders. PMID:25984267

  5. Forensic psychiatric examinations: competency.

    PubMed

    Koson, D F

    1982-01-01

    The many definitions of competency in civil, criminal, and domestic relations law are discussed with emphasis on the various legal criteria for competency and the different classes of psychiatric information required to apply the criteria to a given case. Within the context of a general discussion of forensic examinations, techniques for gathering the right kind of information are systematically related to the exigencies of evaluating past, present, or future mental states by selectively altering the focus of mental status evaluations and history-taking. In addition, special investigative techniques such as hypnosis, Amytal sodium interview, stress interview, psychological testing, and others are discussed.

  6. Gastrointestinal Emergency Room Admissions and Florida Red Tide Blooms.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Bean, Judy A; Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Grief, Lynne; Nierenberg, Kate; Reich, Andrew; Watkins, Sharon; Naar, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    Human exposure to brevetoxins during Florida red tide blooms formed by Karenia brevis has been documented to cause acute gastrointestinal, neurologic, and respiratory health effects.. Traditionally, the routes of brevetoxin exposure have been through the consumption of contaminated bivalve shellfish and the inhalation of contaminated aerosols. However, recent studies using more sensitive methods have demonstrated the presence of brevetoxins in many components of the aquatic food web which may indicate potential alternative routes for human exposure.This study examined whether the presence of a Florida red tide bloom affected the rates of admission for a gastrointestinal diagnosis to a hospital emergency room in Sarasota, FL. The rates of gastrointestinal diagnoses admissions were compared for a 3-month time period in 2001 when Florida red tide bloom was present onshore to the same 3-month period in 2002 when no Florida red tide bloom occurred. A significant 40% increase in the total number of gastrointestinal emergency room admissions for the Florida red tide bloom period was found compared to the non red tide period.These results suggest that the healthcare community may experience a significant and unrecognized impact from patients needing emergency medical care for gastrointestinal illnesses during Florida red tide blooms. Thus, additional studies characterizing the potential sources of exposure to the toxins, as well as the dose/effect relationship of brevetoxin exposure, should be undertaken.

  7. Drug related admissions to a cardiology department; frequency and avoidability.

    PubMed

    Hallas, J; Haghfelt, T; Gram, L F; Grodum, E; Damsbo, N

    1990-10-01

    Three hundred and sixty-six consecutive patients admitted to a department of cardiology were evaluated for drug events as a cause of admission. The drug events considered were adverse drug reactions (ADR) and dose-related therapeutic failures (DTF). 'Definite' or 'probable' drug events accounted for 15 admissions (4.1%, 95% confidence limits 2.3-6.7%), of which eleven were ADR and four were DTF. With the inclusion of six 'possible' drug events, the rate of drug-related hospitalizations (DRH) was 5.7%. DRHs were characterized by a preponderance of acute admissions and elderly patients. Hypokalaemia (less than 3.5 mM) was observed in 27 (16%) patients receiving diuretics, and could be related to four cases of arrhythmias (two 'probable' and two 'possible' ADR). The average serum potassium level was similar in diuretic treated patients with or without drugs to counteract hypokalaemia, irrespective of the drugs chosen. Among the 15 'definite'/'probable' DRHs, five were considered to be due to an error in prescription, and a further five cases were judged to have been avoidable had appropriate measures been taken by prescribing physicians. A DRH educational intervention programme should primarily deal with non-compliance or with prescription of diuretics or digoxin, since these problems constitute the majority of cases of DRH. No specific group of doctors could be targeted as responsible for DRH, avoidable or not. PMID:2266347

  8. 75 FR 71441 - Universal Health Services, Inc. and Psychiatric Solutions, Inc.; Analysis of Agreement Containing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... facilities that would be eliminated by the proposed acquisition. In each of the local markets, consumers have... operating in three local acute inpatient psychiatric care markets to acquirers who receive the approval of... removing an actual, direct, and substantial competitor from three local markets for acute...

  9. Association of Intensive Care Unit Admission With Mortality Among Older Patients With Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Thomas S.; Sjoding, Michael W.; Ryan, Andrew M.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.; Cooke, Colin R.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Among patients whose need for intensive care is uncertain, the relationship of intensive care unit (ICU) admission with mortality and costs is unknown. OBJECTIVE To estimate the relationship between ICU admission and outcomes for elderly patients with pneumonia. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS Retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries (aged >64 years) admitted to 2988 acute care hospitals in the United States with pneumonia from 2010 to 2012. EXPOSURES ICU admission vs general ward admission. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcome was 30-day all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included Medicare spending and hospital costs. Patient and hospital characteristics were adjusted to account for differences between patients with and without ICU admission. To account for unmeasured confounding, an instrumental variable was used—the differential distance to a hospital with high ICU admission (defined as any hospital in the upper 2 quintiles of ICU use). RESULTS Among 1 112 394 Medicare beneficiaries with pneumonia, 328 404 (30%) were admitted to the ICU. In unadjusted analyses, patients admitted to the ICU had significantly higher 30-day mortality, Medicare spending, and hospital costs than patients admitted to a general hospital ward. Patients (n = 553 597) living closer than the median differential distance (<3.3 miles) to a hospital with high ICU admission were significantly more likely to be admitted to the ICU than patients living farther away (n = 558 797) (36%for patients living closer vs 23%for patients living farther, P < .001). In adjusted analyses, for the 13%of patients whose ICU admission decision appeared to be discretionary (dependent only on distance), ICU admission was associated with a significantly lower adjusted 30-day mortality (14.8%for ICU admission vs 20.5%for general ward admission, P = .02; absolute decrease, −5.7%[95%CI, −10.6%, −0.9%]), yet there were no significant differences in Medicare spending or hospital

  10. [Psychiatric dossier and firing.].

    PubMed

    Beau, R

    1985-01-01

    This article is part of a general outline on the Psychiatry of Work, and with the help of case histories, looks upon a sector not well researched in the literature: the direct or indirect use of the psychiatric file in the firing of an employee. The first case presents a patient known as such, who had become too ill to reintegrate his job and who needed help having his fundamental rights recognized. In the second case, the employer, on the strength of a psychiatric evaluation he himself had ordered, fired an employee, invoquing a refusal on his part to accept treatment. Testimonies revealed afterwards that abnormal pressures were used on this employee. The author concludes that in similar cases, caution is necessary especially when the demand for an evaluation comes from the employer. He wishes that in an overall perspective of social réintégration, the therapeutic teams give more attention to the réintégration in the work field.

  11. Validity and reliability of an inpatient severity of psychiatric illness measure.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Bentson H; Kovas, Anne E; Haugan, Shelby L; Pollack, David A; Mahler, Jo M

    2005-01-01

    Inpatient psychiatric severity measures are often used but few psychometric data are available. This study evaluated the psychometric properties (reliability and validity) of a measure used to assess severity of psychiatric illness among inpatients. Using the severity measure, minimally trained raters conducted retrospective patient record reviews to assess medical necessity for psychiatric hospitalization. The data analysis compared 135 civilly committed psychiatric inpatients with a heterogeneous group of 248 psychiatric inpatients at a general hospital. The severity measure showed acceptable inter-rater reliability in both populations. Two-way analysis of variance showed that the intra-class correlation coefficient for the total score was 0.65 for general hospital subjects and 0.63 for civilly committed subjects. Differences in mean scores were substantial (15 out of a possible 75 points for general hospital subjects versus 42 for civilly committed subjects, Mann-Whitney U = 562, p < 0.001). As expected, all civilly committed subjects were well above admission cut-off score of 12, versus only 64% of the general hospital patients. The measure is appropriate for retrospective severity assessment and may also be useful for pre-admission screening.

  12. Recent Trends in Advance Directives at Nursing Home Admission and One Year after Admission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAuley, William J.; Buchanan, Robert J.; Travis, Shirley S.; Wang, Suojin; Kim, MyungSuk

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Advance directives are important planning and decision-making tools for individuals in nursing homes. Design and Methods: By using the nursing facility Minimum Data Set, we examined the prevalence of advance directives at admission and 12 months post-admission. Results: The prevalence of having any advance directive at admission declined…

  13. Behaviour Management Problems as Predictors of Psychotropic Medication and Use of Psychiatric Services in Adults with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsakanikos, Elias; Costello, Helen; Holt, Geraldine; Sturmey, Peter; Bouras, Nick

    2007-01-01

    We examined behaviour management problems as predictors of psychotropic medication, use of psychiatric consultation and in-patient admission in a group of 66 adults with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD) and intellectual disability (ID) and 99 controls matched in age, gender and level of ID. Overall, people with PDD had higher rates of most…

  14. The relationship of respiratory and cardiovascular hospital admissions to the southern California wildfires of 2003

    PubMed Central

    Delfino, R J; Brummel, S; Wu, J; Stern, H; Ostro, B; Lipsett, M; Winer, A; Street, D H; Zhang, L; Tjoa, T; Gillen, D L

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is limited information on the public health impact of wildfires. The relationship of cardiorespiratory hospital admissions (n = 40 856) to wildfire-related particulate matter (PM2.5) during catastrophic wildfires in southern California in October 2003 was evaluated. Methods Zip code level PM2.5 concentrations were estimated using spatial interpolations from measured PM2.5, light extinction, meteorological conditions, and smoke information from MODIS satellite images at 250 m resolution. Generalised estimating equations for Poisson data were used to assess the relationship between daily admissions and PM2.5, adjusted for weather, fungal spores (associated with asthma), weekend, zip code-level population and sociodemographics. Results Associations of 2-day average PM2.5 with respiratory admissions were stronger during than before or after the fires. Average increases of 70 μg/m3 PM2.5 during heavy smoke conditions compared with PM2.5 in the pre-wildfire period were associated with 34% increases in asthma admissions. The strongest wildfire-related PM2.5 associations were for people ages 65– 99 years (10.1% increase per 10 μg/m3 PM2.5, 95% CI 3.0% to 17.8%) and ages 0–4 years (8.3%, 95% CI 2.2% to 14.9%) followed by ages 20–64 years (4.1%, 95% CI 20.5% to 9.0%). There were no PM2.5–asthma associations in children ages 5–18 years, although their admission rates significantly increased after the fires. Per 10 μg/m3 wildfire-related PM2.5, acute bronchitis admissions across all ages increased by 9.6% (95% CI 1.8% to 17.9%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admissions for ages 20–64 years by 6.9% (95% CI 0.9% to 13.1%), and pneumonia admissions for ages 5–18 years by 6.4% (95% CI 21.0% to 14.2%). Acute bronchitis and pneumonia admissions also increased after the fires. There was limited evidence of a small impact of wildfire-related PM2.5 on cardiovascular admissions. Conclusions Wildfire-related PM2.5 led to increased respiratory

  15. [Theophylline overdoses on admission to a resuscitation unit].

    PubMed

    Laaban, J P; Dupeyron, J P; Coignet, M C; Bedos, J P; Poirier, T; Rochemaure, J

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess in a prospective fashion the causes and the frequency of overdosage with Theophylline on admission to intensive care units, in patients on long term treatment with oral Theophylline and/or had previously received an intravenous injection (IV) of Aminophylline. In 72 patients [52 chronic airflow obstruction (or BPCO), 21 asthmatics] admitted for acute respiratory insufficiency (IRA) the blood level of Theophylline on admission to intensive care (T0) was determined systematically, and was in the toxic range (greater than 29 mg/l) in 17% of cases (12/72). In patients with T0 greater than 20 mg/l, repeat measurements of Theophylline clearance were carried out: 12 hours after admission by studying the fall in plasma levels (Cl1), then after 8 days (+/- 5) while perfusing IV Aminophylline at a constant flow (Cl2) and finally after changing over to slow release oral Theophylline 18 days (+/- 10) after admission (Cl3). Cl1 was less than 35 ml/kg/h in 9 patients (group I) and greater than 55 ml/kg/h in 3 patients (group II). All the patients in group I were on oral Theophylline in a dose which was not excessive (mean 10.6 +/- 3.3 mg/kg/24 h) and only one patient received an injection of IV Aminophylline. In group I, the clearance of Theophylline was very low initially (Cl1 = 18.6 +/- 9.6 ml/kg/h) and finally rose (Cl2 = 34.7 +/- 14 ml/kg/h p less than 0.02; and Cl3 = 46.9 +/- 24 ml/kg/h p less than 0.02).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3616118

  16. Occupational Psychiatric Disorders in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    We searched databases and used various online resources to identify and systematically review all articles on occupational psychiatric disorders among Korean workers published in English and Korean before 2009. Three kinds of occupational psychiatric disorders were studied: disorders related to job stress and mental illness, psychiatric symptoms emerging in victims of industrial injuries, and occupational psychiatric disorders compensated by Industrial Accident Compensation Insurance (IACI). Korea does not maintain official statistical records for occupational psychiatric disorders, but several studies have estimated the number of occupational psychiatric disorders using the Korea Workers' Compensation and Welfare Service (COMWEL, formerly KLWC) database. The major compensated occupational psychiatric disorders in Korea were "personality and behavioral disorders due to brain disease, damage, and dysfunction", "other mental disorders due to brain damage and dysfunction and to physical diseases", "reactions to severe stress and adjustment disorders", and "depressive episodes". The most common work-related psychiatric disorders, excluding accidents, were "neurotic, stress-related, and somatoform disorders" followed by "mood disorders". PMID:21258596

  17. College Students with Psychiatric Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Delar K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on college students with psychiatric disabilities. It defines and discusses various psychiatric conditions such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and personality disorders. It concludes with accommodations that a college professor can make to help these students succeed in higher education. (Contains 1…

  18. The Psychiatric Disorders of Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Charles R.; Lucas, Alexander R.

    A general textbook on the psychiatric disorders of childhood, the book is intended to be an introductory text for students and practitioners working with children (such as psychiatric and pediatric residents and psychologists, teachers, medical students). The genesis of mental illness is discussed in terms of the contributions of heredity and the…

  19. Admission to Law School: New Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Marjorie M.; Zedeck, Sheldon

    2012-01-01

    Standardized tests have been increasingly controversial over recent years in high-stakes admission decisions. Their role in operationalizing definitions of merit and qualification is especially contested, but in law schools this challenge has become particularly intense. Law schools have relied on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and an INDEX…

  20. Alphabetical Order Effects in School Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurajda, Štepán; Münich, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    If school admission committees use alphabetically sorted lists of applicants in their evaluations, one's position in the alphabet according to last name initial may be important in determining access to selective schools. Jurajda and Münich (2010) "Admission to Selective Schools, Alphabetically". "Economics of Education…

  1. 43 CFR 41.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Admission. 41.300 Section 41.300 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited §...

  2. 15 CFR 8a.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Admission. 8a.300 Section 8a.300 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited §...

  3. 18 CFR 1317.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Admission. 1317.300 Section 1317.300 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission...

  4. 38 CFR 17.365 - Admission priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Admission priorities. 17.365 Section 17.365 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of the Philippines § 17.365 Admission priorities. Appropriate provisions of §...

  5. 45 CFR 86.21 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex... of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by any recipient...

  6. 49 CFR 25.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 25.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be...

  7. 14 CFR 1253.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex... basis of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by any recipient...

  8. 28 CFR 54.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 54.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be...

  9. 28 CFR 54.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 54.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be...

  10. Admissions and Preferences: Sequel to Defunis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James B.

    1973-01-01

    Three unresolved affirmative action admissions problems are examined: the role of students in admissions decisions, the validity of racial quotas, and to what extent applicants are entitled to due process protection of the fourteenth ammendment. Included is a synopsis of DeFunis v. Odegaard, which upheld a reverse discrimination claim. (JT)

  11. Lexical Profiles of Thailand University Admission Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherngchawano, Wirun; Jaturapitakkul, Natjiree

    2014-01-01

    University Admission Tests in Thailand are important documents which reflect Thailand's education system. To study at a higher education level, all students generally need to take the University Admission Tests designed by the National Institute of Educational Testing Service (NIETS). For the English test, vocabulary and reading comprehension is…

  12. 7 CFR 503.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Admission. 503.2 Section 503.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.2 Admission. No person will be admitted to PIADC,...

  13. 7 CFR 503.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Admission. 503.2 Section 503.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.2 Admission. No person will be admitted to PIADC,...

  14. 7 CFR 503.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Admission. 503.2 Section 503.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.2 Admission. No person will be admitted to PIADC,...

  15. 7 CFR 503.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Admission. 503.2 Section 503.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.2 Admission. No person will be admitted to PIADC,...

  16. 7 CFR 503.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Admission. 503.2 Section 503.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.2 Admission. No person will be admitted to PIADC,...

  17. 38 CFR 17.365 - Admission priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Admission priorities. 17.365 Section 17.365 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of the Philippines § 17.365 Admission priorities. Appropriate provisions of §...

  18. 38 CFR 17.365 - Admission priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Admission priorities. 17.365 Section 17.365 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of the Philippines § 17.365 Admission priorities. Appropriate provisions of §...

  19. 38 CFR 17.365 - Admission priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Admission priorities. 17.365 Section 17.365 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of the Philippines § 17.365 Admission priorities. Appropriate provisions of §...

  20. 38 CFR 17.365 - Admission priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Admission priorities. 17.365 Section 17.365 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of the Philippines § 17.365 Admission priorities. Appropriate provisions of §...

  1. 45 CFR 86.21 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex... of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by any recipient...

  2. 45 CFR 86.21 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex... of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by any recipient...

  3. The Terms and Tasks of "Open Admissions"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Robert A.

    1976-01-01

    Noting the need to define the terms used for policies which are changing the role of admissions offices, the author defines "open admissions" as "universal opportunity for post-secondary schooling" and points out changes in the core tasks of recruiting, selecting, counseling, and management of student records and data. (JT)

  4. 14 CFR 1253.220 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Admissions. 1253.220 Section 1253.220 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 1253.220 Admissions....

  5. 14 CFR 1253.220 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Admissions. 1253.220 Section 1253.220 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 1253.220 Admissions....

  6. 14 CFR 1253.220 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Admissions. 1253.220 Section 1253.220 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 1253.220 Admissions....

  7. 14 CFR 1253.220 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Admissions. 1253.220 Section 1253.220 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 1253.220 Admissions....

  8. 14 CFR § 1253.220 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Admissions. § 1253.220 Section § 1253.220 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 1253.220 Admissions....

  9. Grade Inflation and Law School Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wongsurawat, Winai

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the evidence on whether grade inflation has led to an increasing emphasis on standardized test scores as a criterion for law school admissions. Design/methodology/approach: Fit probabilistic models to admissions data for American law schools during the mid to late 1990s, a period during which…

  10. Simulated Admissions Exercise in Health Services Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quatrano, Louis A.; And Others

    This workbook is intended for use in a Simulated Admissions Exercise (SAE). Done in group settings, the SAE establishes mock admissions committees which work through simulated student applications to choose a certain number to be "admitted" to a hypothetical class of students. The applicants are seeking positions in a health services…

  11. Understanding the Bologna Process for Admissions Officers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxton, Mary; Johnson, Johnny Kent; Nathanson, Gloria; Paver, William; Watkins, Robert

    2009-01-01

    In Spring 2008, senior members of the international admission and credential evaluation community met to deliberate over the admission and placement of Bologna Compliant degree holders into U.S. graduate programs. This group comprised several individuals holding top leadership positions in NAFSA, AACRAO, and closely allied groups involved in…

  12. 45 CFR 86.21 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex... of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by any recipient...

  13. 43 CFR 41.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex... basis of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by any recipient...

  14. Profile of poisoning admissions in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rajasuriar, R; Awang, R; Hashim, S B H; Rahmat, H R B H

    2007-02-01

    We retrospectively reviewed poisoning admissions to all government health facilities from 1999 to 2001, in an effort to expand our current knowledge on poisoning in Malaysia to a level that better reflects a nationwide burden. There were 21 714 admissions reported with 779 deaths. The case-fatality rate was 35.88/1000 admissions. The majority of admissions (89.7%) and deaths (98.9%) occurred in adults. Some 55.1% of all admissions were female, mostly involving pharmaceutical agents. Male poisoning admissions were more often due to chemical substances. The prevalence of poisoning and death was highest among Indians compared to all other races in Malaysia. Overall, the majority of poisoning admissions were due to pharmaceutical agents, with agents classified as non-opioid analgesics, anti-pyretics and anti-rheumatics the most common. Pesticides accounted for the largest number of fatalities. It was also the commonest substance reported in cases of intentional self-harm. Most cases of poisoning admissions occurred due to accidental exposure (47%), followed by cases of intentional self-harm (20.7%). Overall, this study has managed to contribute substantial additional information regarding the epidemiology of poisoning in Malaysia, highlighting important issues, such as the rampant poisonings involving pesticides and analgesics, as well as the high prevalence of poisoning among Indians in Malaysia.

  15. An Economic Analysis of College Admission Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costrell, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of relaxed college admission standards vary across students. A relaxed standard may raise the number of graduates but reduces nongraduates' productivity. The effect on the graduation rate is ambiguous, since "marginal" college attendees are less likely to graduate. A lower admission standard reduces performance among students exceeding…

  16. Profile in Action: Linking Admission and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Carla M.

    2013-01-01

    A profile-oriented retention strategy embraces the admission process as a powerful lever in improving retention and completion rates and recognizes that the student profile can be shaped by changes in admission policies or priorities--even within the current market position of the institution. In addition, the student body can be oriented toward…

  17. An Admissions Race that's Already Won

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Mitchell L.

    2008-01-01

    The author recently spent a year and a half in the admissions office of a highly selective Eastern college as an ethnographer, seeking to understand just how admissions officers make their decisions. He accompanied them on recruitment trips to high schools and college fairs, helped manage their offices' relentless current of visitors and mail, and…

  18. 44 CFR 68.9 - Admissible evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Admissible evidence. 68.9... PROCEDURES § 68.9 Admissible evidence. (a) Legal rules of evidence shall not be in effect at adminstrative hearings. However, only evidence relevant to issues within the scope of review under § 68.8 shall...

  19. Broader Indications for Psychiatric Consultation

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Paul

    1987-01-01

    A liaison approach to psychiatric consultation increases the patient population who can benefit from psychiatric assessment during hospitalization for medical or surgical conditions. It also broadens the scope of the psychiatric investigation of the individual patient. The meaning of the illness to the patient, and the patient's present methods of adapting to his or her illness are important considerations. Unconscious concerns, which interfere with the patient's compliance to medical treatment, may be sufficiently clarified and resolved so that medical progress is expedited. Psychiatric consultation can be used to prevent an untoward psychological reaction to illness, if this is foreseen. This preventive consultation, which is often possible only because of the family physician's awareness of the psychological vulnerability of some of her or his patients, can result in reduced medical and psychiatric morbidity. PMID:21263836

  20. Psychiatric morbidity in primary care.

    PubMed

    al-Haddad, M K; al-Garf, A; al-Jowder, S; al-Zurba, F I

    1999-01-01

    The prevalence of hidden psychiatric morbidity was assessed using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HAD). A total of 149 Bahraini patients aged > or = 16 years were selected randomly from those attending primary health care centres for problems other than psychiatric illness. The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity using GHQ was 45.1% (cut-off > or = 5) and 27.1% (cut-off > or = 9). Using the HAD scale, the prevalence was 44.4% (cut-off > or = 8) and 23.6% (cut-off > or = 11). Psychiatric morbidity was more common in women aged 50-55 years, in divorcees or widows and in lesser educated patients. Either instrument could be used to diagnose psychiatric illness.

  1. Case of acute psychosis from herbal supplements.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Erica; Stoebner, Adam; Weatherill, Jay; Kutscher, Eric

    2008-05-01

    A recent study estimates that 15.2 percent of American adults use nonprescription dietary supplements for weight loss. Sale of ephedrine- and ephedrine-alkaloid-containing products was prohibited by the Food and Drug Administration in February 2004 after research demonstrated an increased risk of arrhythmia, mortality and hypertension following use of products containing these sympathomimetics. Subsequently, nutritional supplement manufacturers have turned to other products to promote weight loss. The following paper reports a case study of a 28-year-old woman with no prior psychiatric history who was hospitalized secondary to an acute psychotic episode. The patient reported starting several weight-loss and nutritional sports supplements approximately one week prior to admission. The relationship between the onset of psychosis and the initiation of the dietary supplements strongly suggests a correlation exists. Heightened consumer education regarding the contents of dietary supplements, along with their potential for causing adverse effects when used alone or in combination with other medications, is warranted. Patients who choose to take dietary supplements should be encouraged to inform their health care providers about the supplements they are taking.

  2. Exorcism: a psychiatric viewpoint.

    PubMed Central

    Trethowan, W. H.

    1976-01-01

    Doctors, for several reasons, should be concerned with exorcism is the view of Professor Trethowan, who in this paper, looks at the main features of exorcism as practised in the middle ages and now appearing in the modern world, as was seen in the recent Ossett case in Britain. He examines in some detail the nature of supposed demoniacal possession and describes its symptoms and signs. He also touches on the social, as opposed to the religious, background in which demoniacal possession flourished (not lacking in the world today), so leading to an examination of the psychodynamic aspects of demoniacal possession and the question of absolute evil. Finally he compares the techniques of exorcism and of modern psychiatric practice. PMID:966260

  3. Custody, care and country of origin: demographic and diagnostic admission statistics at an inner-city adult psychiatry unit.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Brendan D; Emechebe, Afam; Anamdi, Chike; Duffy, Richard; Murphy, Niamh; Rock, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Involuntary detention is a feature of psychiatric care in many countries. We previously reported an involuntary admission rate of 67.7 per 100,000 population per year in inner-city Dublin (January 2008-December 2010), which was higher than Ireland's national rate (38.5). We also found that the proportion of admissions that was involuntary was higher among individuals born outside Ireland (33.9%) compared to those from Ireland (12.0%), apparently owing to increased diagnoses of schizophrenia in the former group. In the present study (January 2011-June 2013) we again found that the proportion of admissions that was involuntary was higher among individuals from outside Ireland (32.5%) compared to individuals from Ireland (9.9%) (p<0.001), but this is primarily attributable to a lower rate of voluntary admission among individuals born outside Ireland (206.1 voluntary admissions per 100,000 population per year; deprivation-adjusted rate: 158.5) compared to individuals from Ireland (775.1; deprivation-adjusted rate: 596.2). Overall, admission rates in our deprived, inner-city catchment area remain higher than national rates and this may be attributable to differential effects of Ireland's recent economic problems on different areas within Ireland. The relatively low rate of voluntary admission among individuals born outside Ireland may be attributable to different patterns of help-seeking which mental health services in Ireland need to take into account in future service-planning. Other jurisdictions could also usefully focus attention not just on rates on involuntary admission among individuals born elsewhere, but also rates of voluntary admission which may provide useful insights for service-planning and delivery.

  4. Psychiatric manifestations of treatable hereditary metabolic disorders in adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Detecting psychiatric disorders of secondary origin is a crucial concern for the psychiatrist. But how can this reliably be done among a large number of conditions, most of which have a very low prevalence? Metabolic screening undertaken in a population of subjects with psychosis demonstrated the presence of treatable metabolic disorders in a significant number of cases. The nature of the symptoms that should alert the clinician is also a fundamental issue and is not limited to psychosis. Hereditary metabolic disorders (HMD) are a rare but important cause of psychiatric disorders in adolescents and adults, the signs of which may remain isolated for years before other more specific organic signs appear. HMDs that present purely with psychiatric symptoms are very difficult to diagnose due to low awareness of these rare diseases among psychiatrists. However, it is important to identify HMDs in order to refer patients to specialist centres for appropriate management, disease-specific treatment and possible prevention of irreversible physical and neurological complications. Genetic counselling can also be provided. This review focuses on three HMD categories: acute, treatable HMDs (urea cycle abnormalities, remethylation disorders, acute intermittent porphyria); chronic, treatable HMDs (Wilson’s disease, Niemann-Pick disease type C, homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis); and chronic HMDs that are difficult to treat (lysosomal storage diseases, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, creatine deficiency syndrome). We also propose an algorithm for the diagnosis of HMDs in patients with psychiatric symptoms. PMID:25478001

  5. Obstructive Uropathy Secondary to Missed Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hydronephrosis is a rare complication of acute appendicitis. We present a case of missed appendicitis in a 52-year-old female which presented as a right-sided hydronephrosis. 2 days after admission to the Department of Urology CT revealed acute appendicitis for what open appendectomy was performed. Acute appendicitis can lead to obstructive uropathy by periappendiceal inflammation due to adjacency. Urologists, surgeons, and emergency physicians should be aware of this rare complication of atypical acute appendicitis.

  6. Temporal dynamics of emergency department and hospital admissions of pediatric asthmatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, Daniel; Levine, Elissa; Timmins, Sidey; Weiss, Sheila R.; Bollinger, Mary E.; Blaisdell, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease that can result in exacerbations leading to urgent care in emergency departments (EDs) and hospitals. We examined seasonal and temporal trends in pediatric asthma ED (1997-1999) and hospital (1986-1999) admission data so as to identify periods of increased risk of urgent care by age group, gender, and race. All pediatric ED and hospital admission data for Maryland residents occurring within the state of Maryland were evaluated. Distinct peaks in pediatric ED and hospital asthma admissions occurred each year during the winter-spring and autumn seasons. Although the number and timing of these peaks were consistent across age and racial groups, the magnitude of the peaks differed by age and race. The same number, timing, and relative magnitude of the major peaks in asthma admissions occurred statewide, implying that the variables affecting these seasonal patterns of acute asthma exacerbations occur statewide. Similar gross seasonal trends are observed worldwide. Although several environmental, infectious, and psychosocial factors have been linked with increases in asthma exacerbations among children, thus far they have not explained these seasonal patterns of admissions. The striking temporal patterns of pediatric asthma admissions within Maryland, as described here, provide valuable information in the search for causes.

  7. Maternal mortality and morbidity: epidemiology of intensive care admissions in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, H; Dias, T; Jayawardena, A

    2013-12-01

    Maternal mortality reviews are used globally to assess the quality of health-care services. With the decline in the number of maternal deaths, it has become difficult to derive meaningful conclusions that could have an impact on quality of care using maternal mortality data. The emphasis has recently shifted to severe acute maternal morbidity (SAMM), as an adjunct to maternal mortality reviews. Due to its heterogeneity, there are difficulties in recognising SAMM. The problem of identifying SAMM accurately is the main issue in investigating them. However, admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) provides an unambiguous, management-based inclusion criterion for a SAMM. ICU data are available across health-care settings prospectively and retrospectively, making them a tool that could be studied readily. However, admission to the ICU depends on many factors, such as accessibility and the availability of high-dependency units, which will reduce the need for ICU admission. Thresholds for admission vary widely and are generally higher in facilities that handle a heavier workload. In addition, not all women with SAMM receive intensive care. However, women at the severe end of the spectrum of severe morbidity will almost invariably receive intensive care. Notwithstanding these limitations, the epidemiology of intensive care admissions in pregnancy will provide valuable data about women with severe morbidity. The overall rate of obstetric ICU admission varies from 0.04% to 4.54%.

  8. Equipercentile linking of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and the Clinical Global Impression Scale in a catchment area.

    PubMed

    Leucht, Stefan; Engel, Rolf R; Davis, John M; Kissling, Werner; Meyer Zur Capellen, Katrin; Schmauß, Max; Messer, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    Recent analyses tried to explain the meaning of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale total score (BPRS) and its percentage change from baseline by equipercentile linking with the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI). A major limitation was that they were conducted in clinical trial populations limiting generalisability to 'real-world' patients. We therefore replicated the findings in a large sample covering patients admitted to a state hospital with a catchment area. BPRS and CGI ratings at admission (n=1772) and at discharge from all patients with schizophrenic disorders (ICD-10 F20.0-F20.9) admitted between 2005 and 2008 were compared using equipercentile linking. Being considered "mildly ill" according to the CGI severity score approximately corresponded to a BPRS total score of 25, "moderately ill" to a BPRS of 33-35, "markedly ill" to a BPRS of 50 and severely ill to a BPRS of 70. To be "minimally improved" according to the CGI change score was associated with a mean BPRS reduction of 13%; and "much improved" with 50% BPRS reduction. The linking functions were not identical, but overall comparable to those in previous randomised trial samples. The suggestion that a 50% BPRS reduction from baseline is a clinically meaningful definition of response in acutely ill patients was reinforced.

  9. Gender, status, and psychiatric labels.

    PubMed

    Kroska, Amy; Harkness, Sarah K; Brown, Ryan P; Thomas, Lauren S

    2015-11-01

    We examine a key modified labeling theory proposition-that a psychiatric label increases vulnerability to competence-based criticism and rejection-within task- and collectively oriented dyads comprised of same-sex individuals with equivalent education. Drawing on empirical work that approximates these conditions, we expect the proposition to hold only among men. We also expect education, operationalized with college class standing, to moderate the effects of gender by reducing men's and increasing women's criticism and rejection. But, we also expect the effect of education to weaken when men work with a psychiatric patient. As predicted, men reject suggestions from teammates with a psychiatric history more frequently than they reject suggestions from other teammates, while women's resistance to influence is unaffected by their teammate's psychiatric status. Men also rate psychiatric patient teammates as less powerful but no lower in status than other teammates, while women's teammate assessments are unaffected by their teammate's psychiatric status. Also as predicted, education reduces men's resistance to influence when their teammate has no psychiatric history. Education also increases men's ratings of their teammate's power, as predicted, but has no effect on women's resistance to influence or teammate ratings. We discuss the implications of these findings for the modified labeling theory of mental illness and status characteristics theory.

  10. Use of novel psychoactive substances by inpatients on general adult psychiatric wards

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Jack L; Mogford, Daniel V; Lawrence, Rebecca J; Lawrie, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Non-illicit alternatives to controlled drugs, known as novel psychoactive substances (NPS), have recently risen to prominence. They are readily available, with uncertain pharmacology and no widely available assay. Given that psychiatric patients are at risk of comorbid substance abuse, we hypothesised that NPS use would be present in the psychiatric population, and sought to determine its prevalence and investigate the characteristics of those who use these drugs with a retrospective review of discharge letters. Setting General adult inpatient wards of a psychiatric hospital in a Scottish city. Participants All adult inpatients (18–65) discharged from general psychiatric wards between 1 July 2014 and 31 December 2014. Of the 483 admissions identified, 46 were admissions for maintenance electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and were excluded. Of the remaining 437 admissions, 49 discharge letters were unobtainable, leaving 388 admissions to analyse. Primary outcome measure The mention, or lack thereof, of NPS use in discharge letters was our planned primary outcome measure and was also the primary outcome measure we used in our analysis. Results NPS use was identified in 22.2% of admissions, contributing to psychiatric symptoms in 59.3%. In comparison to non-users, NPS users were younger (p<0.01), male and more likely to have a forensic history ((p<0.001) for both). The diagnosis of drug-induced psychosis was significantly more likely in NPS users (p<0.001, OR 18.7, 95% CI 8.1 to 43.0) and the diagnosis of depression was significantly less likely (p<0.005, OR 0.133, CI 0.031 to 0.558). Use of cannabis was significantly more likely in NPS users (p<0.001, OR 4.2, CI 2.5 to 7.1), as was substitute opiate prescribing (p<0.001, OR 3.7, CI 1.8 to 7.4). Conclusions NPS use was prevalent among young, male psychiatric inpatients, in particular those with drug-induced psychosis and often occurred alongside illicit drug use. PMID:27165643

  11. Re-Admissions Following Hip Fracture Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hahnel, James; Burdekin, Hannah; Anand, Sanjeev

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hip fractures in the elderly are a growing problem with a predicted incidence of 117,000 cases per year by 2016. Re-admission following a healthcare episode is an important outcome measure, which reflects non-fatal adverse events and indicates the natural history of disease. The purpose of this observational, multicentre audit was to examine rates and reasons for re-admission following hip fracture, to identify areas in the index admission and rehabilitation care that could be improved to prevent re-admission. PATIENTS AND METHODS A total of 535 patients (> 65 years old) in two district general hospitals in the UK who underwent hip fracture surgery were recruited into the study. RESULTS Of the study cohort, 72 patients (13.5%) died during their index admission and 88 (19.0%) of 463 patients were re-admitted once within 3 months. Causes of re-admission were attributed to medical (54.8%), failure to rehabilitate (23.8%), orthopaedic (19.0%) and surgical (2.4%) reasons. Infection was the most common (31.0%) reason for re-admission and arguably the most treatable. During the 3-month postoperative period, the mortality rate was 21.3%, increasing in those re-admitted to 35.1% representing the frailty of this group of patients. CONCLUSIONS High rates of re-admission are seen following discharge in elderly patients with hip fractures. Re-admitted patients have high mortality rates. Understanding causes of re-admission may help to reduce this burden. PMID:19558764

  12. The quality of psychiatric services provided by an Australian tertiary hospital emergency department: a client perspective.

    PubMed

    Summers, Monica; Happell, Brenda

    2002-10-01

    The mainstreaming of psychiatric services within the general health care system has created fundamental changes to the manner in which clients access acute psychiatric services. A review of the literature suggests that this process has been problematic. The current study involved the conduct of telephone interviews with psychiatric clients (n = 136) to ascertain their level of satisfaction with the services received in the emergency department of a Melbourne Metropolitan Hospital. The results were analysed using descriptive statistics. The study participants indicated a high level of satisfaction. Particular emphasis was placed upon the availability of staff with psychiatric qualifications and experience to provide treatment, support and care. Dissatisfaction was noted by some clients regarding lengthy waiting times, lack of privacy in the triage area and negative attitudes of emergency department staff. These findings support the value of psychiatric consultancy services in the emergency department, and further identify the need for triage guidelines to be tailored to the needs of mental health clients.

  13. Circadian Disruption in Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephanie G; Benca, Ruth M

    2015-12-01

    Evidence suggests that abnormalities in circadian rhythms might prove causally or pathophysiologically significant in psychiatric illness. The circadian regulation of hormonal and behavioral timekeeping processes is often altered in patients with major depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, and a susceptibility to rhythm instability may contribute to the functional impairment. For some patients, interventions that stabilize or resynchronize circadian rhythms prove therapeutically effective. Circadian disruption in the clinical profiles of most psychiatric illnesses and the treatment efficacy of chronobiological interventions suggest that attention to circadian phenotypes in a range of psychiatric disorders may help to uncover shared pathophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:26568124

  14. Comparative study of forensic psychiatric system between China and America.

    PubMed

    Li, Gangqin; Gutheil, Thomas G; Hu, Zeqing

    2016-01-01

    Laws and regulations about the forensic psychiatric systems in China and America were compared, and suggestions for improving the forensic psychiatric system of China were provided. There are many differences regarding the role of the forensic psychiatrist, the initiation of the assessment and the admission of expert opinion because of elements in the legal systems in China and America. The Chinese system has the advantages of objectivity, cost saving and high efficiency; but it has deficiencies in procedural justice and the admission of expert opinion. China can persist with the current system while taking measures to give more rights to the litigants to participate in their assessment, and while improving the quality and utility of the expert opinion; however, this review article will compare broadly the two systems without addressing human rights issues or procedural justice issues, nor will it presume to address the entirety of Chinese systems. In addition, China is developing its legal system for dealing with the mentally ill defendant in situations involving the criminal justice system and civil commitment. Although China enacted new laws regarding the mandatory treatment for the mentally ill, both in criminal and civil systems, there remain many aspects to be improved, including but not limited to a system of review of the decision to detain a patient on psychiatric grounds, and the need for provisions in the laws preventing indefinite detention. From this viewpoint, America's laws and regulations are instructive for us, in matters such as the method of dealing with the mentally ill defendant who is "incompetent to stand trial", "not guilty only by reason of insanity" or "guilty but mentally ill". The conditional release of the committed mentally ill person and the special programs in the forensic security hospital are all worthy of study by China in order to manage the mentally ill offender and to reduce the recidivism rate.

  15. Comparative study of forensic psychiatric system between China and America.

    PubMed

    Li, Gangqin; Gutheil, Thomas G; Hu, Zeqing

    2016-01-01

    Laws and regulations about the forensic psychiatric systems in China and America were compared, and suggestions for improving the forensic psychiatric system of China were provided. There are many differences regarding the role of the forensic psychiatrist, the initiation of the assessment and the admission of expert opinion because of elements in the legal systems in China and America. The Chinese system has the advantages of objectivity, cost saving and high efficiency; but it has deficiencies in procedural justice and the admission of expert opinion. China can persist with the current system while taking measures to give more rights to the litigants to participate in their assessment, and while improving the quality and utility of the expert opinion; however, this review article will compare broadly the two systems without addressing human rights issues or procedural justice issues, nor will it presume to address the entirety of Chinese systems. In addition, China is developing its legal system for dealing with the mentally ill defendant in situations involving the criminal justice system and civil commitment. Although China enacted new laws regarding the mandatory treatment for the mentally ill, both in criminal and civil systems, there remain many aspects to be improved, including but not limited to a system of review of the decision to detain a patient on psychiatric grounds, and the need for provisions in the laws preventing indefinite detention. From this viewpoint, America's laws and regulations are instructive for us, in matters such as the method of dealing with the mentally ill defendant who is "incompetent to stand trial", "not guilty only by reason of insanity" or "guilty but mentally ill". The conditional release of the committed mentally ill person and the special programs in the forensic security hospital are all worthy of study by China in order to manage the mentally ill offender and to reduce the recidivism rate. PMID:27292971

  16. Psychiatric hospitalization in Ontario: the revolving door in perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Woogh, C. M.; Meier, H. M.; Eastwood, M. R.

    1977-01-01

    Ontario government statistics have indicated that during the 1960s the proportion of readmissions to psychiatric hospitals doubled to form two thirds of all admissions. Since this pertained to events rather than to individuals, a cohort of patients first admitted in 1969 was followed for 4 years to trace the pattern of readmission and the characteristics of patients at risk of readmission. Routinely returned data were linked and a sample from the greater metropolitan Toronto area was randomly selected. Of the cohort, 31% were readmitted, 8% three or more times. Age and diagnosis distinguished those readmitted. Most with multiple readmissions were under 25 years of age. Although diagnoses were equally distributed on first admission among psychotic, neurotic and other nonpsychotic disorders, with no significant change on readmission or multiple readmission, there was a predictably greater proportion of functional psychoses among the high-risk group and also an equal representation of personality, addictive and the remaining nonpsychotic conditions. The vulnerable few are identifiable early in their intermittent hospital career. It can be concluded that statistics suggesting that two thirds of admissions are readmissions are misleading. PMID:856431

  17. Patterns in admission delays to outpatient methadone treatment in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gryczynski, Jan; Schwartz, Robert P; Salkever, David S; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Jaffe, Jerome H

    2011-12-01

    Waiting lists for methadone treatment have existed in many U.S. communities, but little is known nationally about what patient and service system factors are related to admission delays that stem from program capacity shortfalls. Using a combination of national data sources, this study examined patterns in capacity-related admission delays to outpatient methadone treatment in 40 U.S. metropolitan areas (N = 28,920). Patient characteristics associated with admission delays included racial/ethnic minority status, lower education, criminal justice referral, prior treatment experience, secondary cocaine or alcohol use, and co-occurring psychiatric problems. Injection drug users experienced fewer delays, as did self-pay patients and referrals from health care and addiction treatment providers. Higher community-level utilization of methadone treatment was associated with delay, whereas delays were less common in communities with higher utilization of alternative modalities. These findings highlight potential disparities in timely admission to outpatient methadone treatment. Implications for improving treatment access and service system monitoring are discussed.

  18. Care systematization in psychiatric nursing within the psychiatric reform context.

    PubMed

    Hirdes, A; Kantorski, L P

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to approach care systematization in psychiatric nursing in two psychiatric disorder patients who attended 'Nossa Casa', São Lourenço do Sul, RS, Brazil. Nossa Casa services psychiatric patients in the community, focussing on: (i) permanence in their environment, allowing patients to remain close to their families and social spheres; (ii) integral attendance to meet individual needs; (iii) respecting individual differences; (iv) rehabilitation practices; and (v) social reinsertion. Concepts and assumptions of the psychiatric reform and the Irving's nursing process were used as theoretical-methodological references to elaborate this systematization. A therapeutic project for the psychiatric patient was elaborated, in accordance with the interdisciplinary proposal accepted by Nossa Casa. Interdisciplinary team intervention, guided by a previously discussed common orientation and defined through an individualized therapeutic project, allowed for an effective process of psychosocial rehabilitation. The authors concluded that a therapeutic project based on the mentioned premises leads to consistent, comprehensive, dialectical and ethical assistance in mental health, thereby reinstating the citizenship of psychiatric patients.

  19. [Psychiatric advance directives--medical models into psychiatric medicine].

    PubMed

    Mautner, Sigal; Lachman, Max; Kaplan, Zeev; Shalev, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Since the year 2005, in the field of general medicine, the legislature in Israel determined ways to implement medically advanced directives according to the power of the law. Different states in the world had implemented parallel legislation for patients who suffer from mental illness. Psychiatric Advance Directives is a legitimate document which is valid in Australia, New Zealand, Scotland, England and in 25 countries in the U.S.A. Psychiatric advance directives (PAD's) allow competent persons, through advance instructions, to state their preferences for future mental health treatment in the event of an incapacitating psychiatric crisis. Self Determination Theory, Self Care and Autonomy are dominant supportive approaches in the creation of Psychiatric Advance Directives. Research conducted on psychiatric advance directives shows positive potential benefits for mental health clients, therapists and psychiatrists. More research in that area must be conducted. Psychiatric advance directives are currently developed and implemented with the cooperation of the Tauber Foundation and the Beer Sheva Mental Health Center. This is the first step in learning of effective ways to use this intervention in Israel and change perceptions toward a positive connection between medical efficiency and client preferences.

  20. Lessons learned from study of depression in cardiovascular patients in an acute-care heart and vascular hospital.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael; Brennan, J Michael; Vish, Nancy; Adams, Jenny; Muldoon, Mary; Renbarger, Tara; Garner, John

    2013-01-01

    Depression is highly prevalent in patients with cardiovascular disease, but questions about the effectiveness of screening and intervention remain unanswered. To evaluate the effects of proactive intervention at an acute-care heart and vascular hospital, patients who reported depressive symptoms on admission were randomized to an active, counseling-based depression intervention plus standard care (referral to a primary or psychiatric care physician) or to standard care alone. Despite early termination of patient enrollment because of lower-than-expected recruitment rates, the project had a positive impact. By involving and educating staff, the investigators raised awareness and improved the process of identifying and helping depressed patients. The lessons in study design and execution gained from this experience will help ensure success in future studies of this condition.

  1. [Open trial of sultopride in psychiatric emergencies].

    PubMed

    Kamal, S; Grivois, H

    1983-03-24

    The effectiveness of sultopride in acute psychiatric syndromes with prominent agitation was tested in patients seen in the emergency department of a general hospital. Among 32 patients, 26 were given a single injection of 200 mg and 6 had two injections. Seven items were evaluated at ten minute intervals for one hour. Results showed excellent control of agitation and anxiety but little effect on delirium, hallucinations and depression. Furthermore, the patients' unwillingness to be cared for can be overcome by this agent and diagnosis, therapy and orientation can be established. These good results are partly achieved as early as 20 minutes after the injection. Psychomotor agitation thus appears to be the choice indication of sultopride.

  2. Inpatient Suicide in a Chinese Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jie; Ran, Mao-Sheng; Hao, Yuantao; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Guo, Yangbo; Su, Jinghua; Lu, Huixian

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the risk factors for suicide among psychiatric inpatients in China. In this study we identified the risk factors of suicide among psychiatric inpatients at Guangzhou Psychiatric Hospital. All psychiatric inpatients who died by suicide during the 1956-2005 period were included in this study. Using a case-control design, 64…

  3. Epigenetic approaches to psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ptak, Carolyn; Petronis, Arturas

    2010-01-01

    Psychiatric diseases place a tremendous burden on affected individuals, their caregivers, and the health care system. Although evidence exists for a strong inherited component to many of these conditions, dedicated efforts to identify DNA sequence-based causes have not been exceptionally productive, and very few pharmacologic treatment options are clinically available. Many features of psychiatric diseases are consistent with an epigenetic dysregulation, such as discordance of monozygotic twins, late age of onset, parent-of-origin and sex effects, and fluctuating disease course. In recent years, experimental technologies have significantly advanced, permitting indepth studies of the epigenome and its role in maintenance of normal genomic functions, as well as disease etiopathogenesis. Here, we present an epigenetic explanation for many characteristics of psychiatric disease, review the current literature on the epigenetic mechanisms involved in major psychosis, Alzheimer's disease, and autism spectrum disorders, and describe some future directions in the field of psychiatric epigenomics. PMID:20373664

  4. Psychiatric Emergencies in Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael P; Nordstrom, Kimberly; Shah, Asim A; Vilke, Gary M

    2015-11-01

    Psychiatric emergencies in pregnancy can be difficult to manage. The authors (both practicing psychiatrists and emergency clinicians) review the evaluation and treatment of common mental health diagnoses in pregnancy.

  5. Marketing in Admissions: The Information System Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wofford, O. Douglas; Timmerman, Ed

    1982-01-01

    A marketing information system approach for college admissions is outlined that includes objectives, information needs and sources, a data collection format, and information evaluation. Coordination with other institutional information systems is recommended. (MSE)

  6. The Impact of Bakke on Admissions Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Ron; Macklin, Dave

    1980-01-01

    The Bakke decision will cause institutions to strengthen academic support programs, improve admissions procedures, and develop stronger evaluation programs. Institutions will see more "reverse discrimination" cases in the future. (Author)

  7. School holidays and admissions with asthma.

    PubMed

    Storr, J; Lenney, W

    1989-01-01

    The admission rate for asthma at a children's hospital was studied over an 11 year period. Admissions varied unpredictably over periods of a few days, but there was a repeated yearly pattern of peaks and troughs with an interval of several weeks. The short term variation could be attributed to chance effects alone, excluding any important role for short term influences--for example, weather changes--in precipitating asthma admissions. There was a definite association between the longer term variation and school holidays. The admission rate fell during holidays and there were two or more peaks during terms. The pattern is consistent with a largely viral aetiology for asthmatic attacks throughout the year. We postulate that school holidays disrupt the spread of viral infections in a community, with synchronisation of subsequent attacks. Travel during holidays may facilitate acquisition of new viral strains by the community.

  8. School holidays and admissions with asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Storr, J; Lenney, W

    1989-01-01

    The admission rate for asthma at a children's hospital was studied over an 11 year period. Admissions varied unpredictably over periods of a few days, but there was a repeated yearly pattern of peaks and troughs with an interval of several weeks. The short term variation could be attributed to chance effects alone, excluding any important role for short term influences--for example, weather changes--in precipitating asthma admissions. There was a definite association between the longer term variation and school holidays. The admission rate fell during holidays and there were two or more peaks during terms. The pattern is consistent with a largely viral aetiology for asthmatic attacks throughout the year. We postulate that school holidays disrupt the spread of viral infections in a community, with synchronisation of subsequent attacks. Travel during holidays may facilitate acquisition of new viral strains by the community. PMID:2923458

  9. Psychiatric aspects of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Somaiya, Mansi; Kumar, Santhosh; Avasthi, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is essentially characterized by the motor symptoms in the form of resting tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia. However, over the years it has been recognized that motor symptoms are just the “tip of the iceberg” of clinical manifestations of PD. Besides motor symptoms, PD characterized by many non-motor symptoms, which include cognitive decline, psychiatric disturbances (depression, psychosis and impulse control), sleep difficulties, autonomic failures (gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, urinary, thermoregulation) and pain syndrome. This review evaluates the various aspects of psychiatric disorders including cognitive decline and sleep disturbances in patients with PD. The prevalence rate of various psychiatric disorders is high in patients with PD. In terms of risk factors, various demographic, clinical and treatment-related variables have been shown to be associated with higher risk of development of psychiatric morbidity. Evidence also suggests that the presence of psychiatric morbidity is associated with poorer outcome. Randomized controlled trials, evaluating the various pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD are meager. Available evidence suggests that tricyclic antidepressants like desipramine and nortriptyline are efficacious for management of depression. Among the antipsychotics, clozapine is considered to be the best choice for management of psychosis in patients with PD. Among the various cognitive enhancers, evidence suggest efficacy of rivastigmine in management of dementia in patients with PD. To conclude, this review suggests that psychiatric morbidity is highly prevalent in patients with PD. Hence, a multidisciplinary approach must be followed to improve the overall outcome of PD. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of various other measures for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD. PMID:25552854

  10. Factors Affecting the Downward Mobility of Psychiatric Patients: A Korean Study of National Health Insurance Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to examine the magnitude of and the factors associated with the downward mobility of first-episode psychiatric patients. Methods: This study used the claims data from the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. The study population included 19 293 first-episode psychiatric inpatients diagnosed with alcohol use disorder (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision [ICD-10] code F10), schizophrenia and related disorders (ICD-10 codes F20-F29), and mood disorders (ICD-10 codes F30-F33) in the first half of 2005. This study included only National Health Insurance beneficiaries in 2005. The dependent variable was the occurrence of downward mobility, which was defined as a health insurance status change from National Health Insurance to Medical Aid. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess factors associated with downward drift of first-episode psychiatric patients. Results: About 10% of the study population who were National Health Insurance beneficiaries in 2005 became Medical Aid recipients in 2007. The logistic regression analysis showed that age, gender, primary diagnosis, type of hospital at first admission, regular use of outpatient clinic, and long-term hospitalization are significant predictors in determining downward drift in newly diagnosed psychiatric patients. Conclusions: This research showed that the downward mobility of psychiatric patients is affected by long-term hospitalization and medical care utilization. The findings suggest that early intensive intervention might reduce long-term hospitalization and the downward mobility of psychiatric patients. PMID:26841885

  11. Improving Psychiatric Hospital Care for Pediatric Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Gabriels, Robin L.; Agnew, John A.; Beresford, Carol; Morrow, Mary Ann; Mesibov, Gary; Wamboldt, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and/or intellectual disabilities (ID) are at greater risk for psychiatric hospitalization compared to children with other disorders. However, general psychiatric hospital environments are not adapted for the unique learning styles, needs, and abilities of this population, and there are few specialized hospital-based psychiatric care programs in the United States. This paper compares patient outcomes from a specialized psychiatric hospital program developed for pediatric patients with an ASD and/or ID to prior outcomes of this patient population in a general psychiatric program at a children's hospital. Record review data indicate improved outcomes for patients in the specialized program of reduced recidivism rates (12% versus 33%) and decreased average lengths of inpatient stay (as short as 26 days versus 45 days). Available data from a subset of patients (n = 43) in the specialized program showed a decrease in irritability and hyperactivity behaviors from admission to discharge and that 35 previously undetected ASD diagnoses were made. Results from this preliminary study support specialized psychiatric care practices with this population to positively impact their health care outcomes. PMID:22934179

  12. Psychiatric manifestations in cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Fraidakis, M J

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a rare and severe, but treatable, inborn disorder of bile acid biosynthesis and sterol storage with autosomal recessive inheritance and variable clinical presentation. CTX treatment consists of chenodeoxycholic acid and must be started as early as possible to prevent permanent disability. Psychiatric manifestations are rare and non-specific, and often lead to significant diagnostic and treatment delay. Therefore, better recognition of the gamut of psychiatric manifestations in CTX can diminish the risk of misdiagnosis and irreversible neurological deterioration. We hereby describe the psychiatric features in CTX. A complete review of all published cases of CTX in the medical literature was undertaken and the case reports with psychiatric presentation were collected and analyzed. We also describe the psychiatric features in relation to the neurological semeiology in six patients with CTX diagnosed at the La Salpêtrière Hospital. We conclude that psychiatric manifestations in CTX follow a bimodal/bitemporal pattern, appearing early in the disease course in the form of a behavioral/personality disorder associated with learning difficulties or mental retardation, or manifesting in advanced disease in the setting of dementia as rich neuropsychiatric syndromes, such as frontal, orbitofrontal or frontotemporal syndromes of cortico-subcortical dementia encompassing behavioral/personality disturbance, affective/mood disorders or psychotic disorders. Behavioral/personality disturbance in childhood or adolescence, especially when accompanied by learning difficulties, should therefore lead to further investigation to exclude CTX, as early diagnosis and treatment is critical for prognosis. PMID:24002088

  13. Psychiatric morbidity, phenomenology and management in hospitalized female foreign domestic workers in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Zahreddine, Nada; Hady, Rima Talaat; Chammai, Rabih; Kazour, François; Hachem, Dory; Richa, Sami

    2014-07-01

    40 million female domestic workers worldwide experience the inhumane conditions associated with this unregulated occupation, a situation that induces psychiatric morbidities in many. The case in Lebanon is not any better where it is estimated that one foreign domestic worker (FDW) commits suicide weekly. 33 female FDW and 14 female Lebanese (control group, CG) were enrolled. Brief Psychotic Rating Scale (BPRS) and Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scales were administered on admission and discharge and socio-demographic, living conditions, mental health care data and phenomenological observations were collected. Sexual, physical, and verbal abuses were detected in FDW (12.5, 37.5, and 50.0 %. respectively). 66.7 % of them were diagnosed with brief psychotic episode. The mean duration of hospital stay (13.1 days) was significantly lower in the FDW group. The mean cumulative antipsychotic dose of the FDW was 337.1 mg of chlorpromazine equivalent and the mean BPRS total pre-score of FDW was 66.4 with a much improved state on the CGI global improvement scale, all of which were nonsignificantly different from the CG. Striking phenomenological findings among FDW were acute anorexia (39.4 %), nudity (30.3 %), catatonic features (21.2 %), and delusion of pregnancy (12.1 %). Inpatient FDW are more diagnosed with psychotic than affective disorders and receive approximately similar treatment as controls in spite of the trend to rapidly discharge and deport the worker to limit the costs. Both groups presented with similar severity, although the FDW had peculiar phenomenological observations.

  14. Psychiatric morbidity, phenomenology and management in hospitalized female foreign domestic workers in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Zahreddine, Nada; Hady, Rima Talaat; Chammai, Rabih; Kazour, François; Hachem, Dory; Richa, Sami

    2014-07-01

    40 million female domestic workers worldwide experience the inhumane conditions associated with this unregulated occupation, a situation that induces psychiatric morbidities in many. The case in Lebanon is not any better where it is estimated that one foreign domestic worker (FDW) commits suicide weekly. 33 female FDW and 14 female Lebanese (control group, CG) were enrolled. Brief Psychotic Rating Scale (BPRS) and Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scales were administered on admission and discharge and socio-demographic, living conditions, mental health care data and phenomenological observations were collected. Sexual, physical, and verbal abuses were detected in FDW (12.5, 37.5, and 50.0 %. respectively). 66.7 % of them were diagnosed with brief psychotic episode. The mean duration of hospital stay (13.1 days) was significantly lower in the FDW group. The mean cumulative antipsychotic dose of the FDW was 337.1 mg of chlorpromazine equivalent and the mean BPRS total pre-score of FDW was 66.4 with a much improved state on the CGI global improvement scale, all of which were nonsignificantly different from the CG. Striking phenomenological findings among FDW were acute anorexia (39.4 %), nudity (30.3 %), catatonic features (21.2 %), and delusion of pregnancy (12.1 %). Inpatient FDW are more diagnosed with psychotic than affective disorders and receive approximately similar treatment as controls in spite of the trend to rapidly discharge and deport the worker to limit the costs. Both groups presented with similar severity, although the FDW had peculiar phenomenological observations. PMID:24370752

  15. Psychiatric symptoms in temporal lobe epilepsy with left mesial hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun; Kim, Sang Hoon; Park, Sang Hag; Choo, Il Han; Kim, Seung Gon

    2015-04-01

    A 16-year-old woman was referred to us for depression and persistent suicidal and homicidal ideation. From 2010, the patient visited a neurologist due to recurrent grand mal epilepsy, auditory and visual hallucinations, episodic memory loss, and persistent depression. Upon admission, it was revealed through clinical history taking that she had suffered from chronic bullying from same-sex peers and sexual abuse, twice, from an adult male in the neighborhood when she was 10 years old. A brain magnetic resonance imaging study showed left mesial hippocampal sclerosis. The patient exhibited improvement of her psychiatric symptoms after treatment with a combination of fluoxetine (30 mg) and aripiprazole (10 mg). Children and adolescents with epilepsy experience conflicts in the family, challenges at school, stigma, and psychosocial limitations or deprivations due to their comorbid psychiatric symptoms and hence, psychiatric evaluation and early intervention is important when treating these patients. PMID:25866531

  16. THE PSYCHIATRIC ASPECTS OF WILSON'S DISEASE-A STUDY FROM A NEUROLOGY UNIT

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajeev; Datta, Sunil; Jayaseelan, L.; Gnanmuthu, Chandran; Kuruvilla, K.

    1996-01-01

    A series of 31 cases of Wilson's disease (WD) were assessed retrospectively on a range of variables including psychiatric, neurologic and biochemical data recorded at index admission over a period of 7 years. 18 patients (58%) showed psychopathological features. 5 patients (16.1%) were reported to have poor scholastic performance at the onset of illness and 1 patient (3.2%) had abnormal behaviour (mania like) many years prior to the appearance of neurological symptoms. The most common psychiatric features were cognitive impairment (45.2%), affective symptomatology (41.9%) and behavioural abnormalities (29%). Only one patient had a schizophrenia like psychosis. The psychiatric manifestation of Wilson′s disease as they present in our setting and their clinical relevance are discussed. PMID:21584132

  17. Impact of the Syrian Crisis on the Hospitalization of Syrians in a Psychiatric Setting.

    PubMed

    Lama, Souaiby; François, Kazour; Marwan, Zoghbi; Sami, Richa

    2016-01-01

    Determine the impact of the Syrian crisis on the hospitalization of Syrians in a psychiatric setting. All Syrians admitted to a psychiatric hospital in Lebanon between the 1st of January 2009 and the 31st of December 2013 were included. Number of admissions, psychiatric disorders and demographic and clinical data relative to patients were compared between those admitted before and after the crisis. 44 patients were admitted before the crisis and 106 after it. The distribution of diagnosis varied significantly after the crisis (p = 0.056) with the majority of patients being admitted for schizophrenia (37.7 %). The prevalence of suicidal ideation was higher after the crisis (p = 0.03) but suicidal attempts, need for electroconvulsive therapy and length of hospitalization did not differ significantly between both groups. Clinicians should be aware of the possible burden of mental illness in Syrians after the beginning of the Syrian crisis.

  18. Psychiatric Symptoms in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with Left Mesial Hippocampal Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyun; Kim, Sang Hoon; Park, Sang Hag; Choo, Il Han

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old woman was referred to us for depression and persistent suicidal and homicidal ideation. From 2010, the patient visited a neurologist due to recurrent grand mal epilepsy, auditory and visual hallucinations, episodic memory loss, and persistent depression. Upon admission, it was revealed through clinical history taking that she had suffered from chronic bullying from same-sex peers and sexual abuse, twice, from an adult male in the neighborhood when she was 10 years old. A brain magnetic resonance imaging study showed left mesial hippocampal sclerosis. The patient exhibited improvement of her psychiatric symptoms after treatment with a combination of fluoxetine (30 mg) and aripiprazole (10 mg). Children and adolescents with epilepsy experience conflicts in the family, challenges at school, stigma, and psychosocial limitations or deprivations due to their comorbid psychiatric symptoms and hence, psychiatric evaluation and early intervention is important when treating these patients. PMID:25866531

  19. Accountability and psychiatric disorders: how do forensic psychiatric professionals think?

    PubMed

    Höglund, Pontus; Levander, Sten; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Radovic, Susanna

    2009-01-01

    Swedish penal law does not exculpate on the grounds of diminished accountability; persons judged to suffer from severe mental disorder are sentenced to forensic psychiatric care instead of prison. Re-introduction of accountability as a condition for legal responsibility has been advocated, not least by forensic psychiatric professionals. To investigate how professionals in forensic psychiatry would assess degree of accountability based on psychiatric diagnoses and case vignettes, 30 psychiatrists, 30 psychologists, 45 nurses, and 45 ward attendants from five forensic psychiatric clinics were interviewed. They were asked (i) to judge to which degree (on a dimensional scale from 1 to 5) each of 12 psychiatric diagnoses might affect accountability, (ii) to assess accountability from five case vignettes, and (iii) to list further factors they regarded as relevant for their assessment of accountability. All informants accepted to provide a dimensional assessment of accountability on this basis and consistently found most types of mental disorders to reduce accountability, especially psychotic disorders and dementia. Other factors thought to be relevant were substance abuse, social network, personality traits, social stress, and level of education.

  20. Acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    Cumming, Gordon R.

    1974-01-01

    While rheumatic fever is relatively uncommon except where there are poor and crowded living conditions, sporadic acute attacks continue to occur in a family or pediatric medical practice. The physician's role in management of the sore throat in the diagnosis of suspected cases of rheumatic fever and in follow-up for continued prophylaxis is discussed. The frequency of admissions and presenting features of 159 patients with acute rheumatic fever is reviewed. Continued surveillance is required if we are to achieve a further reduction in attack rate and complications. PMID:4419123

  1. Psychiatric comorbidity in forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Palijan, Tija Zarković; Muzinić, Lana; Radeljak, Sanja

    2009-09-01

    For the past several years a numerous studies in the field of forensic psychiatry confirmed a close relationship between violent offenders and comorbid substance abuse. The comorbid substance abuse in violent offenders was usually unrecognized and misdiagnosed. Furthermore, comorbidity in forensic psychiatry describes the co-occurrence of two or more conditions or psychiatric disorder known in the literature as dual diagnosis and defined by World Health Organization (WHO). In fact, many violent offenders have multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Recent studies have confirmed causal relationship between major psychiatric disorders and concomitant substance abuse (comorbidity) in 50-80% of forensic cases. In general, there is a high level of psychiatric comorbidity in forensic patients with prevalence of personality disorders (50-90%), mood disorders (20-60%) and psychotic disorders (15-20%) coupled with substance abuse disorders. Moreover, the high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities could be found in mentally retarded individuals, as well as, in epileptic patients. Drugs and alcohol abuse can produce serious psychotoxic effects that may lead to extreme violent behavior and consequently to serious criminal offence such as physical assault, rape, armed robbery, attempted murder and homicide, all due to an altered brain function and generating psychotic-like symptoms. Studies have confirmed a significant statistical relevance in causal relationship between substance abuse and violent offences. In terms of forensic psychiatry, the comorbidity strongly contributes in the process of establishing psychiatric diagnosis of diminished mental capacity or insanity at the time of the offence in the course of clinical assessment and evaluation of violent offenders. Today, the primary focus of forensic psychiatry treatment services (in-patient or community) is management of the violent offenders with psychiatric comorbidity which requires a multilevel, evidence based approach to

  2. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Alcohol Dependence.

    PubMed

    Fein, George

    2015-12-01

    We review our clinical studies of psychiatric comorbidity in short-term and long-term abstinent and in treatment naïve alcoholics (STAA, LTAA and TNA). TNA ypically have less severe alcoholism than treated abstinent samples and evidence less severe psychiatric disturbance. Lifetime psychiatric diagnoses are the norm for STAA and LTAA but not for TNA. Individuals with alcohol and drug use disorders show greater antisocial personality disturbance, but do not show differences in the mood or anxiety domains or in borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms. The studies show that alcoholics can achieve and maintain abstinence in the face of ongoing mood, anxiety, or BPD problems. By contrast, for ASPD, LTAA essentially stop current antisocial behaviors in all seven domains of antisocial behaviors. We believe that ongoing antisocial behavior is not consistent with maintaining abstinence, and that LTAA modify their antisocial behavior despite continued elevated social deviance proneness and antisocial dispositionality. Abstinent individuals without lifetime psychiatric disorders and TNA show more (subdiagnostic threshold) psychiatric symptoms and abnormal psychological measures than non-alcoholic controls in the mood, anxiety, BPD, and antisocial domains. In summary, our studies show that although LTAA have achieved multi-year abstinence, they still report significant psychological distress compared to NAC. We believe this distress may negatively affect their quality of life. This suggests the importance of developing effective care models to address comorbid mental health problems in LTAA. We also show that antisocial personality disorder symptoms decline to the levels seen in normal controls, and that excluding individuals from research with a psychiatric diagnosis does not control for subdiagnostic psychiatric differences between alcoholics and controls. PMID:26590836

  3. Special Admissions Students: Dis-Engaged from the Educational Enterprise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinchcliff-Pelias, Mary; Lind, Scott L.; Treinen, Kristen P.

    Special admissions programs may offer access into higher education for students who, for various reasons, do not meet the institutions' standard admissions criteria. Once the special admissions status has been granted, these programs provide support to these students. This paper is not a critique of special admissions programs in general or…

  4. 6 CFR 17.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preference in admission. 17.305 Section 17.305... the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 17.305 Preference in admission. A recipient to which §§ 17.300 through 17.310 apply shall not give preference to applicants for admission, on...

  5. 49 CFR 25.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preference in admission. 25.305 Section 25.305... Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 25.305 Preference in admission. A recipient to which §§ 25.300 through 25.310 apply shall not give preference to applicants for admission, on the basis of attendance...

  6. 22 CFR 229.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preference in admission. 229.305 Section 229... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 229.305 Preference in admission. A recipient to which §§ 229.300 through 229.310 apply shall not give preference to applicants for admission, on the basis...

  7. 43 CFR 41.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preference in admission. 41.305 Section 41... Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 41.305 Preference in admission. A recipient to which §§ 41.300 through 41.310 apply shall not give preference to applicants for admission, on the...

  8. 15 CFR 8a.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preference in admission. 8a.305... on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 8a.305 Preference in admission. A recipient to which §§ 8a.300 through 8a.310 apply shall not give preference to applicants for admission,...

  9. 22 CFR 146.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preference in admission. 146.305 Section 146... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 146.305 Preference in admission. A recipient to which §§ 146.300 through 146.310 apply shall not give preference to applicants for admission, on the basis...

  10. 41 CFR 101-4.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Preference in admission... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 101-4.305 Preference in admission. A recipient to which §§ 101-4.300 through 101-4.310 apply shall not give preference to applicants for admission, on the...

  11. 45 CFR 86.22 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preference in admission. 86.22 Section 86.22... on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 86.22 Preference in admission. A recipient to which this subpart applies shall not give preference to applicants for admission, on the...

  12. 40 CFR 5.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preference in admission. 5.305 Section... on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 5.305 Preference in admission. A recipient to which §§ 5.300 through 5.310 apply shall not give preference to applicants for admission,...

  13. 31 CFR 28.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preference in admission. 28.305... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 28.305 Preference in admission. A recipient to which §§ 28.300 through 28.310 apply shall not give preference to applicants for admission,...

  14. 34 CFR 104.42 - Admissions and recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Admissions and recruitment. 104.42 Section 104.42... ASSISTANCE Postsecondary Education § 104.42 Admissions and recruitment. (a) General. Qualified handicapped... admission or recruitment by a recipient to which this subpart applies. (b) Admissions. In administering...

  15. 15 CFR 8b.20 - Admission and recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Admission and recruitment. 8b.20... Secondary Education § 8b.20 Admission and recruitment. (a) General. Qualified handicapped may not, on the basis of handicap, be denied admission or be subjected to discrimination in admission or recruitment...

  16. Air pollution and hospital admissions in Southern Ontario: the acid summer haze effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, D.V.; Sizto, R.

    1987-08-01

    Air pollution data from 17 sampling stations between Windsor and Peterborough in Southern Ontario, for January, February, July, and August in 1974 and 1976 to 1983, have been analyzed. Each station reported O/sub 3/, NO/sub 3/, SO/sub 2/, and the coefficient of haze (COH) every hour and aerosol sulfates for a 24-hr period every sixth day using glass-fiber filters. Data on mean daily temperature and relative humidity for the region were also recorded. It is shown that there are high correlations between different pollutants and between these and temperature in the summer. In the summer, sulfate levels were significantly correlated with relative humidity. In winter, the highest correlation was between COH and NO/sub 2/. Over the 9-year period, SO/sub 2/ levels in both winter and summer have fallen considerably; there have been no significant trends in O/sub 3/, NO/sub 3/, or COH data. Aerosol sulfates increased between 1976 and 1980 in both summer and winter and have since declined slightly. Hospital admission data for the 79 acute care hospitals serving the region, which contains about 5.9 million people, have been analyzed on a daily basis for the same months of the same years. Total admissions and total respiratory admissions have declined about 15% over the period, but asthma admissions appear to have risen. The asthma category of admissions is complicated by the effects of a change in ICD coding in 1979. It has been shown that significant correlations exist between O/sub 3/, SO/sub 4/, SO/sub 2/, and temperature, on the one hand, and deviations from the mean respiratory admissions for that day of the week, for that season, for that year, on the other. These correlations exist if asthma is excluded from the diagnoses. In winter, asthma admissions are correlated with temperature only. A group of nonrespiratory conditions showed no correlations with air pollutants in winter or summer.

  17. The effect of coarse ambient particulate matter on first, second, and overall hospital admissions for respiratory disease among the elderly

    SciTech Connect

    Yue Chen; Qiuying Yang; Daniel Krewski; Richard T. Burnett; Yuanli Shi; Kimberlyn M. McGrail

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this article is to examine differences in the effect of ambient particulate matter on first, second, and overall hospital admissions for respiratory disease among the elderly. 8989 adults 65 yr of age or older living in the greater Vancouver area who were admitted to hospital for any acute respiratory disease (ICD-9 codes 460-519) between June 1, 1995, and March 31, 1999 were studied. Time-series analysis was used to evaluate the association between respiratory admissions and daily measures of particulate matter (PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5}, and PM{sub 10-2.5} in urban air, after adjustment for gaseous copollutants (CO, O{sub 3}, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2}) and meteorological variables. Repeated admissions for respiratory disease were common among the elderly. Approximately 30% of the subjects were readmitted to hospital after the first admission; 9% had more than 2 admissions for respiratory disease during the 4-yr study period. PM{sub 10-2.5} was significantly associated with the second and overall admissions for respiratory disease, but not with the first admission. The adjusted relative risks for an increment of 4.2 {mu} g/m{sup 3} in-day average PM{sub 10-2.5} concentrations were 1.03 for the first admission, 1.22 for the second admission, and 1.06 for overall admissions. There was no significant association between PM{sub 2.5} and hospital admissions for respiratory disease among the elderly. The data suggest that (1) people with a history of respiratory admissions are at a higher risk of respiratory disease in relation to particulate air pollution in urban areas, (2) analyses based on overall rather than repeated hospital admissions lead to lower estimates of the risk of respiratory disease associated with particulate air pollution, and (3) PM{sub 10-2.5} has a larger effect on respiratory admissions than PM{sub 2.5}.

  18. The role of the asthma nurse in treatment compliance and self-management following hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Morice, A H; Wrench, C

    2001-11-01

    Effective self-management and treatment compliance is important in achieving good symptom control in asthma. The aim of this study was to determine whether asthma nurse intervention during hospital admission could increase knowledge and improve self-management and whether this would influence the number of emergency call-out visits by Genera Practitioners (GPs) and hospital re-admissions. Patients with acute asthma (n=80) were assessed by the asthma nurse within 24 h of admission using a British Thoracic Society (BTS) guideline-based questionnaire. Main outcome measures were: know edge of inhalers, self-management plans, peak flow monitoring, recognition of worsening symptoms and appropriate emergency action, Following randomization, half received nurse intervention during hospitalization. All received a follow-up questionnaire 6 weeks post-discharge and again at 6 months (response rates 86% and 81% respectively). GPs were contacted by postal questionnaire after 4 months. Questionnaire responses indicated an increase in knowledge in the intervention group, along with an ability to identify appropriate action on worsening symptoms. Emergency GP call-outs were more frequent in the control group in the 4 months post-discharge. Hospital re-admission rates were similar in both groups. Asthma nurse intervention appeared to increase knowledge of asthma management, maintained throughout the study period, but had no significant impact on reducing re-admissions to hospital.

  19. Differential Effects of Temperature Extremes on Hospital Admission Rates for Respiratory Disease between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory.

    PubMed

    Green, Donna; Bambrick, Hilary; Tait, Peter; Goldie, James; Schultz, Rosalie; Webb, Leanne; Alexander, Lisa; Pitman, Andrew

    2015-12-03

    The health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians may be exacerbated by climate change if temperature extremes have disproportionate adverse effects on Indigenous people. To explore this issue, we analysed the effect of temperature extremes on hospital admissions for respiratory diseases, stratified by age, Indigenous status and sex, for people living in two different climates zones in the Northern Territory during the period 1993-2011. We examined admissions for both acute and chronic respiratory diagnoses, controlling for day of the week and seasonality variables. Our analysis showed that: (1) overall, Indigenous hospital admission rates far exceeded non-Indigenous admission rates for acute and chronic diagnoses, and Top End climate zone admission rates exceeded Central Australia climate zone admission rates; (2) extreme cold and hot temperatures were associated with inconsistent changes in admission rates for acute respiratory disease in Indigenous and non-Indigenous children and older adults; and (3) no response to cold or hot temperature extremes was found for chronic respiratory diagnoses. These findings support our two hypotheses, that extreme hot and cold temperatures have a different effect on hospitalisations for respiratory disease between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, and that these health risks vary between the different climate zones. We did not, however, find that there were differing responses to temperature extremes in the two populations, suggesting that any increased vulnerability to climate change in the Indigenous population of the Northern Territory arises from an increased underlying risk to respiratory disease and an already greater existing health burden.

  20. The Reliability of Psychiatric Diagnosis Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Eric; France, Cheryl; El-Missiry, Ahmed; John, Collin

    2006-01-01

    Background: The authors reviewed the topic of reliability of psychiatric diagnosis from the turn of the 20th century to present. The objectives of this paper are to explore the reasons of unreliability of psychiatric diagnosis and propose ways to improve the reliability of psychiatric diagnosis. Method: The authors reviewed the literature on the concept of reliability of psychiatric diagnosis with emphasis on the impact of interviewing skills, use of diagnostic criteria, and structured interviews on the reliability of psychiatric diagnosis. Results: Causes of diagnostic unreliability are attributed to the patient, the clinician and psychiatric nomenclature. The reliability of psychiatric diagnosis can be enhanced by using diagnostic criteria, defining psychiatric symptoms and structuring the interviews. Conclusions: The authors propose the acronym ‘DR.SED,' which stands for diagnostic criteria, reference definitions, structuring the interview, clinical experience, and data. The authors recommend that clinicians use the DR.SED paradigm to improve the reliability of psychiatric diagnoses. PMID:21103149

  1. Addressing psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Woody, G E; McLellan, A T; O'Brien, C P; Luborsky, L

    1991-01-01

    Research studies indicate that addressing psychiatric comorbidity can improve treatment for selected groups of substance-abusing patients. However, the chances for implementing the necessary techniques on a large scale are compromised by the absence of professional input and guidance within programs. This is especially true in public programs, which treat some of the most disadvantaged, disturbed, and socially destructive individuals in the entire mental health system. One starting point for upgrading the level of knowledge and training of staff members who work in this large treatment system could be to develop a better and more authoritative information dissemination network. Such a system exists in medicine; physicians are expected to read appropriate journals and to guide their treatment decisions using the data contained in the journals. Standards of practice and methods for modifying current practice are within the tradition of reading new facts, studying old ones, and comparing treatment outcome under different conditions with what is actually being done. No such general system of information-gathering or -sharing exists, particularly in public treatment programs. One of the most flagrant examples of this "educational shortfall" can be found among those methadone programs that adamantly insist on prescribing no more than 30 to 35 mg/day for all patients, in spite of the overwhelming evidence that these dose levels generally are inadequate. In some cases, program directors are unaware of studies that have shown the relationship between dose and outcome. In other cases, they are aware of the studies but do not modify their practices accordingly. This example of inadequate dosing is offered as an example of one situation that could be improved by adherence to a system of authoritative and systematic information dissemination. Many issues in substance abuse treatment do not lend themselves to information dissemination as readily as that of methadone dosing

  2. Assessing Practical Intelligence in Business School Admissions: A Supplement to the Graduate Management Admissions Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedlund, Jennifer; Wilt, Jeanne M.; Nebel, Kristina L.; Ashford, Susan J.; Sternberg, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is the most widely used measure of managerial potential in MBA admissions. GMAT scores, although predictive of grades in business school, leave much of the variance in graduate school performance unexplained. The GMAT also produces disparities in test scores between groups, generating the potential for…

  3. Self-Reported Usual Care for Self-Directed Violence during the Six Months Prior to Emergency Department Admission

    PubMed Central

    Comtois, Katherine Anne; Kerbrat, Amanda H.; Atkins, David C.; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Katon, Wayne J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The literature describing the health services individuals receive prior to and following self-directed violence is limited. Objectives This study examines services received for the six months preceding admission to an urban county medical center emergency department for self-directed violence. We predicted that individuals with at least one prior act of self-directed violence in the past six months would have received more services than those for whom the index admission was their only recent act. Method Participants were recruited from emergency department admissions during shifts selected to maximize representativeness. Participants (n=202) were interviewed using the Suicide Attempt Self-Injury Interview, Suicide Attempt Self-Injury Count, Treatment History Interview, MINI, Brief Symptom Index, and SF-12. Results The majority of index acts of self-directed violence (79%) were suicide attempts. The participants were characterized by low socio-economic status, substantial symptomatology, low physical and mental health functioning, and multiple psychiatric diagnoses. In the preceding six months, 34% were admitted to a hospital and 56% received crisis services (including 44% in the ED). While three quarters (76%) had seen an outpatient medical provider and most (70%) received psychotropic medications, less than half of the sample received psychiatric services (40%) or outpatient psychosocial treatment (48%). As predicted, utilization for most types of usual care was higher for those engaging in self-directed violence in the six months preceding the index admission. Conclusions Individuals admitted to this emergency department for self-directed violence received inadequate outpatient psychosocial and psychiatric services despite severe illness and disability. PMID:25494233

  4. Impact of country of birth on hospital admission for women of childbearing age in Sweden: a five year follow up study

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, E; Malmstrom, M; Sundquist, J; Johansson, S

    2003-01-01

    Study objective: This study examines whether morbidity, defined as the first psychiatric hospital admission and the first somatic hospital admission, differs among subgroups of foreign born and second generation (that is, native born with at least one parent born abroad) women compared with Swedish born women (that is, with both parents native born) after adjusting for sociodemographic factors. Design Setting: In this follow up study the population consisted of 1 452 944 women, of whom 369 771 have an immigrant background (including second generation immigrants), aged 20–45 years. The population of 31 December 1993 was followed up to 31 December 1998. Differences in risk (hazard ratio) between different groups of immigrant women were estimated, adjusting for age, marital status, number of children, and disposable income. Main results: All four groups of foreign born women had higher age adjusted risks (HRs varied from 1.44 to 1.67) for a first psychiatric hospital admission than Swedish born women. The risk decreased only marginally when the sociodemographic factors were taken into consideration. Additionally, second generation women also had a higher age adjusted risk (HR = 1.42; CI = 1.37 to 1.48) than Swedish born women. The risk decreased only slightly in the main effect model. However, on analysing country of birth and first somatic hospital admissions, only non-European refugee women showed an increased age adjusted risk (HR = 1.26; CI = 1.24 to 1.29), which remained after adjusting for sociodemographic factors. Conclusions: Foreign born and second generation women of childbearing age had a higher risk than Swedish born women for a first psychiatric hospital admission. However, only non-European refugees were at higher risk of somatic hospital admissions. PMID:14600113

  5. Moral learning in psychiatric rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Sitvast, J E; Widdershoven, G A M; Abma, T A

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate moral learning in persons with a psychiatric disability who participated in a nursing intervention, called the photo-instrument. This intervention is a form of hermeneutic photography. The findings are based on a multiple case study of 42 patients and additional interviews with eight of them. Photo groups were organized within three settings of psychiatric services: ambulatory as well as clinical, all situated in the Netherlands. Data were analysed according to hermeneutic and semiotic principles. Two cases are presented. Findings show that voice and face are concepts that help to identify elements of moral learning in the rehabilitation process of persons with a psychiatric disability. During the process patients become more aware of their responsibilities towards themselves and others.

  6. [Movement disorders is psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Hidasi, Zoltan; Salacz, Pal; Csibri, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Movement disorders are common in psychiatry. The movement disorder can either be the symptom of a psychiatric disorder, can share a common aetiological factor with it, or can be the consequence of psychopharmacological therapy. Most common features include tic, stereotypy, compulsion, akathisia, dyskinesias, tremor, hypokinesia and disturbances of posture and gait. We discuss characteristics and clinical importance of these features. Movement disorders are frequently present in mood disorders, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, catatonia, Tourette-disorder and psychogenic movement disorder, leading to differential-diagnostic and therapeutical difficulties in everyday practice. Movement disorders due to psychopharmacotherapy can be classified as early-onset, late-onset and tardive. Frequent psychiatric comorbidity is found in primary movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, Wilson's disease, Huntington's disease, diffuse Lewy-body disorder. Complex neuropsychiatric approach is effective concerning overlapping clinical features and spectrums of disorders in terms of movement disorders and psychiatric diseases.

  7. Family violence and psychiatric disorder.

    PubMed

    Bland, R; Orn, H

    1986-03-01

    The relationship between family violence and psychiatric disorders was examined using standardized diagnostic interviews of 1200 randomly selected residents of a large Canadian city. The results showed that higher than expected proportions of those exhibiting violent behavior had a psychiatric diagnosis and the rate of violent behaviors in those with diagnoses (54.4%) significantly (p less than .0001) exceeds the rate in the remainder of the sample (15.5%). Particularly high rates of violence are found in those where alcoholism is combined with antisocial personality disorder and/or recurrent depression (80-93%). Also at high risk for violence are those who have made suicide attempts (over 50%) and those who have been arrested for non-traffic offences (two-thirds). These data suggest that psychiatric disorders have a strong relationship to violent behavior, and are not in agreement with the predominantly sociological explanations of family violence.

  8. [Movement disorders is psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Hidasi, Zoltan; Salacz, Pal; Csibri, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Movement disorders are common in psychiatry. The movement disorder can either be the symptom of a psychiatric disorder, can share a common aetiological factor with it, or can be the consequence of psychopharmacological therapy. Most common features include tic, stereotypy, compulsion, akathisia, dyskinesias, tremor, hypokinesia and disturbances of posture and gait. We discuss characteristics and clinical importance of these features. Movement disorders are frequently present in mood disorders, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, catatonia, Tourette-disorder and psychogenic movement disorder, leading to differential-diagnostic and therapeutical difficulties in everyday practice. Movement disorders due to psychopharmacotherapy can be classified as early-onset, late-onset and tardive. Frequent psychiatric comorbidity is found in primary movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, Wilson's disease, Huntington's disease, diffuse Lewy-body disorder. Complex neuropsychiatric approach is effective concerning overlapping clinical features and spectrums of disorders in terms of movement disorders and psychiatric diseases. PMID:25577484

  9. Affirmative action policy in medical school admissions.

    PubMed

    Frazer, Ricardo A

    2005-02-01

    Legal challenges to affirmative action are growing, a trend suggesting that a proactive stance is needed to maintain a policy that still has viability, legitimacy, and utility. Medical schools admissions offices in the United States emphasize the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT), even though many studies have found that grade point averages are better single predictors of future academic achievement, regardless of the student's socioeconomic or racial category. The current essay suggests there is an overreliance on the MCAT in medical school admissions. Medical colleges should encourage the development of additional applicant selection criteria, while continuing to use affirmative action programs, in part to address the need for increased community-oriented health care. PMID:15741705

  10. Religious ideas and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Beit-Hallahmi, B; Argyle, M

    1977-01-01

    The evidence presented above points to the need for considering factors other than purely religious ones in determining the role of religious ideas in psychiatric disorders. The occurrence of religious ideas as part of the content of individual delusional systems in psychiatric patients can be explained on the basis of exposure to religious ideas through the social environment. It may be also related to the prominence of religion, vis-a-vis other belief systems, in the social envirnment. When considering psychopathological explanations for intense religious experiences, one has to be conscious again of the social factors involved. When an unusual experience having religious content becomes normative in a certain group (for whatever reasons), trying to explain its appearance on the basis of individual psychodynamics or psychopathology becomes very difficult. There seems to be an inverse relationship between the social nature of a religious experience and its psychopathological nature, i.e., there is more psychopathology in individuals reporting solitary religious experiences, or individual religious ideas. Thus the solitary experience seems to be more influenced by disturbed individual dynamics, but in other cases social factors seem to be crucial. Our overall conclusion is that a psychiatric analysis of the role of religious factors in psychopathology has to be first a social-psychiatric analysis. An individual presenting psychiatric symptoms and religious ideas has to be evaluated in light of his social background, since the specific content of psychiatric symptoms seems to be determined by social background factors. Individual psychodynamics determine the appearance of symptoms, but their particular form will be the result of these background factors, one of which is religion. PMID:863602

  11. Prevalence and Predictors of Adverse Events in Older Surgical Patients: Impact of the Present on Admission Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hongsoo; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Kovner, Christine; Zhao, Zhonglin; Boockvar, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: To examine the effects of the present on admission (POA) indicator on the prevalence of and factors associated with postsurgical adverse events in older patients. Design and Methods: This is a secondary data analysis of 82,898 surgical patients aged 65 years or older in 252 acute care hospitals in California in 2004. Four…

  12. The nature of psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Kendler, Kenneth S

    2016-02-01

    A foundational question for the discipline of psychiatry is the nature of psychiatric disorders. What kinds of things are they? In this paper, I review and critique three major relevant theories: realism, pragmatism and constructivism. Realism assumes that the content of science is real and independent of human activities. I distinguish two "flavors" of realism: chemistry-based, for which the paradigmatic example is elements of the periodic table, and biology-based, for which the paradigm is species. The latter is a much better fit for psychiatry. Pragmatism articulates a sensible approach to psychiatric disorders just seeking categories that perform well in the world. But it makes no claim about the reality of those disorders. This is problematic, because we have a duty to advocate for our profession and our patients against other physicians who never doubt the reality of the disorders they treat. Constructivism has been associated with anti-psychiatry activists, but we should admit that social forces play a role in the creation of our diagnoses, as they do in many sciences. However, truly socially constructed psychiatric disorders are rare. I then describe powerful arguments against a realist theory of psychiatric disorders. Because so many prior psychiatric diagnoses have been proposed and then abandoned, can we really claim that our current nosologies have it right? Much of our current nosology arose from a series of historical figures and events which could have gone differently. If we re-run the tape of history over and over again, the DSM and ICD would not likely have the same categories on every iteration. Therefore, we should argue more confidently for the reality of broader constructs of psychiatric illness rather than our current diagnostic categories, which remain tentative. Finally, instead of thinking that our disorders are true because they correspond to clear entities in the world, we should consider a coherence theory of truth by which disorders

  13. Brain Tumours Simulating Psychiatric Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, G. E.

    1963-01-01

    Brain tumours may present with symptoms indistinguishable from psychiatric disease. The impression of most psychiatrists is that individuals suffering from brain tumour rarely appear among their patients. A priori reasoning based on evidence from neurological, neurosurgical and pathological sources suggests the contrary. The present study is a frequency analysis of cases of previously undiagnosed brain tumours admitted to either an open psychoneurotic ward or a mental hospital over a period of 15 years. The results support the impression held by psychiatrists that brain tumours are uncommon among psychiatric patients. PMID:13954870

  14. The nature of psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Kendler, Kenneth S

    2016-02-01

    A foundational question for the discipline of psychiatry is the nature of psychiatric disorders. What kinds of things are they? In this paper, I review and critique three major relevant theories: realism, pragmatism and constructivism. Realism assumes that the content of science is real and independent of human activities. I distinguish two "flavors" of realism: chemistry-based, for which the paradigmatic example is elements of the periodic table, and biology-based, for which the paradigm is species. The latter is a much better fit for psychiatry. Pragmatism articulates a sensible approach to psychiatric disorders just seeking categories that perform well in the world. But it makes no claim about the reality of those disorders. This is problematic, because we have a duty to advocate for our profession and our patients against other physicians who never doubt the reality of the disorders they treat. Constructivism has been associated with anti-psychiatry activists, but we should admit that social forces play a role in the creation of our diagnoses, as they do in many sciences. However, truly socially constructed psychiatric disorders are rare. I then describe powerful arguments against a realist theory of psychiatric disorders. Because so many prior psychiatric diagnoses have been proposed and then abandoned, can we really claim that our current nosologies have it right? Much of our current nosology arose from a series of historical figures and events which could have gone differently. If we re-run the tape of history over and over again, the DSM and ICD would not likely have the same categories on every iteration. Therefore, we should argue more confidently for the reality of broader constructs of psychiatric illness rather than our current diagnostic categories, which remain tentative. Finally, instead of thinking that our disorders are true because they correspond to clear entities in the world, we should consider a coherence theory of truth by which disorders

  15. Psychiatric pharmacogenomics in pediatric psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Wall, Christopher A; Croarkin, Paul E; Swintak, Cosima; Koplin, Brett A

    2012-10-01

    This article provides an overview of where psychiatric pharmacogenomic testing stands as an emerging clinical tool in modern psychotropic prescribing practice, specifically in the pediatric population. This practical discussion is organized around the state of psychiatric pharmacogenomics research when choosing psychopharmacologic interventions in the most commonly encountered mental illnesses in youth. As with the rest of the topics on psychopharmacology for children and adolescents in this publication, a clinical vignette is presented, this one highlighting a clinical case of a 16 year old genotyped during hospitalization for recalcitrant depression.

  16. Optogenetics in psychiatric animal models.

    PubMed

    Wentz, Christian T; Oettl, Lars-Lennart; Kelsch, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    Optogenetics is the optical control of neuronal excitability by genetically delivered light-activated channels and pumps and represents a promising tool to fuel the study of circuit function in psychiatric animal models. This review highlights three developments. First, we examine the application of optogenetics in one of the neuromodulators central to the pathophysiology of many psychiatric disorders, the dopaminergic system. We then discuss recent work in translating functional magnetic resonance imaging in small animals (in which optogenetics can be employed to reveal physiological mechanisms underlying disease-related alterations in brain circuits) to patients. Finally, we describe emerging technological developments for circuit manipulation in freely behaving animals.

  17. Trend study on the association between hospital admissions and the health of Dutch older adults (1995–2009)

    PubMed Central

    Galenkamp, Henrike; Deeg, Dorly J H; de Jongh, Renate T; Kardaun, Jan W P F; Huisman, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Objectives An increase in hospital admission rates in older people may reflect improved access to healthcare, but also declining health trends in the older population. Owing to a lack of individual-level data, the latter possibility has received little attention. The current study examines associations between health status and hospitalisation rates of older adults in the Netherlands. Design Observational individual-level data linked to hospital register data. Setting Data from 1995 to 2009 from the nationally representative Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam were linked to the Dutch Hospital Discharge Register. Participants A total of 5681 observations of 2520 respondents across 4 measurement points (each with a follow-up of 36 months; ages 65–88 years). Outcome measures The contribution of health, demographic, psychosocial and lifestyle characteristics to time trends in hospitalisation was assessed in multivariate models. Results Between 1995 and 2009, the percentage with 1 or more overnight admissions (planned or acute) increased slightly from 38.1% to 39.7%. This was due to an increase in acute admission only (22.2–27.0%). Increased prevalences of chronic diseases, functional limitations and polypharmacy accounted for part of the observed increase in acute admissions. In addition, a more than doubled prevalence of day admissions over time was observed (12.3–28.3%), a trend that was unrelated to changes in individual characteristics. Conclusions This trend study showed a contribution of declines in population health to increases in acute hospital admissions. Since these declines did not provide a full explanation, healthcare reforms and increases in treatment possibilities in this period are likely to have contributed as well. PMID:27531734

  18. Teaching Psychodynamics to Psychiatric Residents through Psychiatric Outpatient Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardoso Zoppe, Eva Helena C.; Schoueri, Patricia; Castro, Monica; Neto, Francisco Lotufo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluates whether a course that was designed for first-year psychiatric residents and that specifically addressed psychodynamic principles fostered residents' progress in knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding these concepts. Methods: The course was given in the 2005 academic year to all residents (N=18) in their first…

  19. [Lope de Vegas comedy "Los locos de Valencia" a view of a 16th century psychiatric institution].

    PubMed

    Dieckhöfer, K

    1975-01-01

    With the comedy "Los locos de Valencia" (The Insane of Valencia) Lope de Vega left us valuable evidence of the nursing of the insane in the 16th century. After a summarizing presentation of the intricate plot of the play the manifold details about admission, general treatment of the mentally ill as well as the habits in the oldest psychiatric institution of the world are communicated and analysed by means of citations form comedy. Furthermore, an attempt is being made to demonstrate the nosolgic understanding of the Humanist and non-physician Lope de Vega for the psychiatric conditions and way of living from the same source.

  20. Psychiatric Disorders in Children and Adolescents 24 Months After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Max, Jeffrey E.; Friedman, Keren; Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Bigler, Erin D.; Hanten, Gerri; Schachar, Russell J.; Saunders, Ann E.; Dennis, Maureen; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Chapman, Sandra B.; Yang, Tony T.; Levin, Harvey S.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to better understand the occurrence of novel psychiatric disorders (NPDs) in children with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in relation to preinjury variables, injury-related variables, and concurrent neurocognitive outcome. Eighty-seven children aged 5–14 years who had experienced mTBI were studied from consecutive hospital admissions with semistructured psychiatric interviews soon after injury (baseline). Fifty-four children were reassessed 24 months postinjury. Standardized instruments were used to evaluate injury severity, lesion characteristics, preinjury variables (lifetime psychiatric disorder, family psychiatric history, family function, socioeconomic status, psychosocial adversity, adaptive function, and academic function), and finally, postinjury neurocognitive and adaptive function. At 24 months postinjury, NPDs had occurred in 17 of 54 (31%) participants. NPD at 24 months was related to frontal white matter lesions and was associated with estimated preinjury reading, preinjury adaptive function, and concurrent deficits in reading, processing speed, and adaptive function. These findings extend earlier reports that the psychiatric morbidity after mTBI in children is more common than previously thought, and moreover, it is linked to preinjury individual variables and injury characteristics and is associated with postinjury adaptive and neurocognitive functioning. PMID:25923850

  1. A theoretical framework for psychiatric nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Onega, L L

    1991-01-01

    Traditionally, specific theoretical frameworks which are congruent with psychiatric nursing practice have been poorly articulated. The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss a philosophical base, a theoretical framework, application to psychiatric nursing, and issues related to psychiatric nursing knowledge development and practice. A philosophical framework that is likely to be congruent with psychiatric nursing, which is based on the nature of human beings, health, psychiatric nursing and reality, is identified. Aaron Antonovsky's Salutogenic Model is discussed and applied to psychiatric nursing. This model provides a helpful way for psychiatric nurses to organize their thinking processes and ultimately improve the health care services that they offer to their clients. Goal setting and nursing interventions using this model are discussed. Additionally, application of the use of Antonovsky's model is made to nursing research areas such as hardiness, uncertainty, suffering, empathy and literary works. Finally, specific issues related to psychiatric nursing are addressed.

  2. Test of Treatment in Psychiatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Feras Ali

    2011-01-01

    Due to lack of laboratorial investigations in psychiatric practice, tests of treatment are often used to aid diagnosis. This article provides examples of test of treatment in psychiatric practice and outlines their limitations. PMID:22506439

  3. Psychiatric morbidity associated with motor vehicle accidents.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, E B; Hickling, E J; Taylor, A E; Loos, W

    1995-08-01

    The primary purpose of this report was to determine the extent of psychiatric morbidity and comorbidity among a sample of recent victims of motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) in comparison to a nonaccident control population. Victims of recent MVAs (N = 158), who sought medical attention as a result of the MVA, were assessed in a University-based research clinic, 1 to 4 months after the accident for acute psychiatric and psychosocial consequences as well as for pre-MVA psychopathology using structured clinical interviews (Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale, SCID, SCID-II, LIFE Base). Age- and gender-matched controls (N = 93) who had had no MVAs in the past year served as controls. Sixty-two MVA victims (39.2%) met DSM-III-R criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and 55 met DSM-IV criteria. The MVA victims who met the criteria for PTSD were more subjectively distressed and had more impairment in role function (performance at work/school/homemaking, relationships with family or friends) than the MVA victims who did not meet the PTSD criteria or the controls. A high percentage (53%) of the MVA-PTSD group also met the criteria for current major depression, with most of that developing after the MVA. A prior history of major depression appears to be a risk factor for developing PTSD after an MVA (p = .0004): 50% of MVA victims who developed PTSD had a history of previous major depression, as compared with 23% of those with a less severe reaction to the MVA. A prior history of PTSD from earlier trauma also is associated with developing PTSD or a subsyndromal form of it (25.2%) (p = .0012). Personal injury MVAs exact substantial psychosocial costs on the victims. Early intervention, especially in vulnerable populations, might prevent some of this.

  4. [THE CLINICAL ORGANIZATIONAL SUBSTANTIATION OF NEW TECHNOLOGY OF HOSPITAL PSYCHIATRIC CARE].

    PubMed

    Podsevatkin, V G; Blinov, D S; Podsevatkin, D V; Podsevatkina, S V; Smirnova, O A

    2015-01-01

    The new technology of hospital psychiatric care, developed and implemented in the Mordovia republican clinical hospital, permits resolving problems of hospitalism, lethality, pharmaceutical resistance and others. The essence of this technology is in staging of hospital care under condition of intensification and standardization of curative diagnostic process, implementation of complex approach to treatment of psychiatric disorders. The patient sequentially passes through three stages: intensive diagnostics and intensive treatment (intensive care department, intensive therapy department), supportive therapy (general psychiatric department); rehabilitation measures (curative rehabilitative department). The concentration of resources at the first stage, application of intensive therapy techniques permit in the shortest period to arrest acute psychotic symptomatic. The described new technology of hospital psychiatric care permits enhancing effectiveness of treatment, significantly shorten period of hospitalization (37.5 days), to obtain lasting and qualitative remission, to rehabilitate most fully social working status of patient and to significantly decrease lethality.

  5. The Psychoactive Effects of Psychiatric Medication: The Elephant in the Room

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, David; Porter, Sally

    2013-01-01

    The psychoactive effects of psychiatric medications have been obscured by the presumption that these medications have disease-specific actions. Exploiting the parallels with the psychoactive effects and uses of recreational substances helps to highlight the psychoactive properties of psychiatric medications and their impact on people with psychiatric problems. We discuss how psychoactive effects produced by different drugs prescribed in psychiatric practice might modify various disturbing and distressing symptoms, and we also consider the costs of these psychoactive effects on the mental well-being of the user. We examine the issue of dependence, and the need for support for people wishing to withdraw from psychiatric medication. We consider how the reality of psychoactive effects undermines the idea that psychiatric drugs work by targeting underlying disease processes, since psychoactive effects can themselves directly modify mental and behavioral symptoms and thus affect the results of placebo-controlled trials. These effects and their impact also raise questions about the validity and importance of modern diagnosis systems. Extensive research is needed to clarify the range of acute and longer-term mental, behavioral, and physical effects induced by psychiatric drugs, both during and after consumption and withdrawal, to enable users and prescribers to exploit their psychoactive effects judiciously in a safe and more informed manner. PMID:24592667

  6. Poetry Therapy in Psychiatric Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Catherine J.

    Poetry therapy has been in use with adult psychiatric patients at Saint Elizabeths Hospital, Washington, D.C, for 10 years. The treatment used involves reading poetry, listening to recordings, studying poets, and writing poetry. The patients' choice of poems is not restricted by the staff, but different types of poetry appeal to different types of…

  7. Functional and psychiatric vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Staab, J P

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral factors have long been recognized as affecting spatial orientation and balance function. Neuroanatomic and neurophysiologic studies conducted worldwide over the last 30 years have substantially advanced our knowledge about the inherently strong connectivity among threat/anxiety, vestibular, visual, and somatosensory systems in the brain. Clinical investigations have shed greater light on the nature of functional and psychiatric disorders that manifest or magnify vestibular morbidity. Concepts of these syndromes have changed over 150 years. Even their nomenclature has had different meanings in different eras. This chapter will review functional and psychiatric vestibular disorders. Terminology will follow the International Classification of Diseases, 11th edition, beta draft and the International Classification of Vestibular Disorders. Anxiety plays a central role in behavioral vestibular morbidity. Anxiety, traumatic stress, obsessive, and depressive disorders may be primary causes of episodic and chronic vestibular symptoms or secondary complications of other vestibular disorders. These psychiatric illnesses affect 30-50% of patients who consult neurologists or otologists for vestibular symptoms. Coexisting psychiatric disorders adversely affect treatment for patients with structural vestibular diseases, especially when unrecognized. Persistent postural-perceptual dizziness is the leading cause of long-term vestibular disability. Fortunately, pharmacologic, psychotherapeutic, and rehabilitative treatments of these illnesses have improved in recent years. PMID:27638082

  8. Associations among Major Psychiatric Diagnoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Abraham W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined the frequency and associations of multiple diagnoses in 205 psychiatric inpatients, assessing past and current episodes of illness. Over one-half of the sample received more than one diagnosis. Alcoholism, antisocial personality, and drug dependence formed one group; primary depression, primary mania, and secondary affective disorder,…

  9. PSYCHIATRIC CLINICS IN THE SCHOOLS.

    PubMed

    Maccurdy, J T

    1916-12-01

    The purpose of this important paper by Doctor MacCurdy is to point out why psychiatric clinics in the schools may offer reasonable hope of reducing insanity in the later life of the pupils. And since it is undoubtedly true that the next problem of public health administration will be concerned with mental disorders, where better to begin than with the school child?

  10. Job satisfaction in psychiatric nursing.

    PubMed

    Ward, M; Cowman, S

    2007-08-01

    In recent years, mental health services across Europe have undergone major organizational change with a move from institutional to community care. In such a context, the impact of change on the job satisfaction of psychiatric nurses has received little attention in the literature. This paper reports on the job satisfaction of psychiatric nurses and data were collected in 2003. The population of qualified psychiatric nurses (n = 800) working in a defined geographical health board area was surveyed. Methodological triangulation with a between-methods approach was used in the study. Data were collected on job satisfaction using a questionnaire adopted from the Occupational Stress Indicator. A response rate of 346 (43%) was obtained. Focus groups were used to collect qualitative data. Factors influencing levels of job satisfaction predominantly related to the nurses work location. Other factors influencing job satisfaction included choice of work location, work routine, off duty/staff allocation arrangements, teamwork and working environment. The results of the study highlight to employers of psychiatric nurses the importance of work location, including the value of facilitating staff with choices in their working environment, which may influence the recruitment and retention of nurses in mental health services. PMID:17635253

  11. Comorbidity of Psychiatric Disorders and Parental Psychiatric Disorders in a Sample of Iranian Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Moini, Rozita

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the psychiatric comorbidity of a clinical sample of children with ADHD and the psychiatric disorders in their parents. Method: Structured psychiatric interviews assessing lifetime psychiatric disorders by "DSM-IV" criteria, using the Farsi version of the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia. Results: The mean age…

  12. Low self-esteem and psychiatric patients: Part II – The relationship between self-esteem and demographic factors and psychosocial stressors in psychiatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Salsali, Mahnaz; Silverstone, Peter H

    2003-01-01

    Background The objective of the present study was to identify the effects and relative importance of demographic factors and psychosocial stressors on self-esteem of psychiatric patients. Method The present study was carried out on a consecutive sample of 1,190 individuals attending an open-access psychiatric outpatient clinic. Patients were diagnosed according to DSM III-R diagnostic criteria following detailed assessments. At screening, patients and controls completed two self-esteem questionnaires, the Rosenberg self-esteem scale and the Janis and Field Social Adequacy scale. In addition, a large amount of demographic and psychosocial data was collected on all patients. Results Significantly increased self-esteem was observed with an increase in age, educational achievement and income. Employed patients showed significantly higher self-esteem compared to unemployed patients. Female patients had a significantly lower self-esteem compared to male patients. The self-esteem of psychiatric patients did not vary significantly with their marital status. No relationship was detected between acute stressors and the self-esteem of psychiatric patients, although severe enduring stressors were associated with lower self-esteem in psychiatric patients. Conclusion The results of this large study demonstrate that the self-esteem of adult psychiatric patients is affected by a number of demographic and psychosocial factors including age, sex, educational status, income, employment status, and enduring psychosocial stressors. PMID:12622872

  13. Increased hospital admissions associated with extreme-heat exposure in King County, Washington, 1990-2010

    PubMed Central

    Isaksen, Tania Busch; Yost, Michael G.; Hom, Elizabeth K.; Ren, You; Lyons, Hilary; Fenske, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Increased morbidity and mortality have been associated with extreme heat events, particularly in temperate climates. Few epidemiologic studies have considered the impact of extreme heat events on hospitalization rates in the Pacific Northwest region. This study quantifies the historical (May to September 1990-2010) heat-morbidity relationship in the most populous Pacific Northwest County -King County, Washington. A relative risk (RR) analysis was used to explore the association between heat and all non-traumatic hospitalizations on 99th percentile heat days, while a time series analysis using a piece-wise linear model approximation was used to estimate the effect that heat’s intensity has on hospitalizations, adjusted for temporal trends and day of the week. A non-statistically significant 2% [95% CI: 1.02 (0.98, 1.05)] increase in hospitalization risk, on a heat day versus a non-heat day, was noted for all-ages, all non-traumatic causes. When considering the effect heat intensity has on admissions, we found a statistically significant 1.59% (95% CI: 0.9%, 2.29%) increase in admissions per degree increase in humidex above 37.4 °C. Admissions stratified by cause and age produced statistically significant results with both relative risk and time series analyses for nephritis and nephrotic syndromes, acute renal failure and natural heat exposure hospitalizations. This study demonstrates that heat, expressed as humidex, is associated with increased hospital admissions. When stratified by age and cause of admission, the non-elderly (less than 85) age groups experience significant risk for: nephritis and nephrotic syndromes, acute renal failure, natural heat exposure, COPD and asthma hospitalizations. PMID:25719287

  14. 44 CFR 19.220 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Admissions. 19.220 Section 19.220 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES...

  15. False confessions, expert testimony, and admissibility.

    PubMed

    Watson, Clarence; Weiss, Kenneth J; Pouncey, Claire

    2010-01-01

    The confession of a criminal defendant serves as a prosecutor's most compelling piece of evidence during trial. Courts must preserve a defendant's constitutional right to a fair trial while upholding the judicial interests of presenting competent and reliable evidence to the jury. When a defendant seeks to challenge the validity of that confession through expert testimony, the prosecution often contests the admissibility of the expert's opinion. Depending on the content and methodology of the expert's opinion, testimony addressing the phenomenon of false confessions may or may not be admissible. This article outlines the scientific and epistemological bases of expert testimony on false confession, notes the obstacles facing its admissibility, and provides guidance to the expert in formulating opinions that will reach the judge or jury. We review the 2006 New Jersey Superior Court decision in State of New Jersey v. George King to illustrate what is involved in the admissibility of false-confession testimony and use the case as a starting point in developing a best-practice approach to working in this area. PMID:20542936

  16. 49 CFR 25.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Admission. 25.300 Section 25.300 Transportation....310 apply, except as provided in §§ 25.225 and §§ 25.230. (b) Specific prohibitions. (1) In...) Subject to § 25.235(d), shall treat disabilities related to pregnancy, childbirth, termination...

  17. 49 CFR 25.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Admission. 25.300 Section 25.300 Transportation....310 apply, except as provided in §§ 25.225 and §§ 25.230. (b) Specific prohibitions. (1) In...) Subject to § 25.235(d), shall treat disabilities related to pregnancy, childbirth, termination...

  18. 49 CFR 25.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Admission. 25.300 Section 25.300 Transportation....310 apply, except as provided in §§ 25.225 and §§ 25.230. (b) Specific prohibitions. (1) In...) Subject to § 25.235(d), shall treat disabilities related to pregnancy, childbirth, termination...

  19. 40 CFR 85.1504 - Conditional admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conditional admission. 85.1504 Section 85.1504 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Importation of Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Engines §...

  20. 40 CFR 85.1504 - Conditional admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conditional admission. 85.1504 Section 85.1504 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Importation of Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Engines §...

  1. 40 CFR 85.1504 - Conditional admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conditional admission. 85.1504 Section 85.1504 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Importation of Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Engines §...

  2. 40 CFR 85.1504 - Conditional admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conditional admission. 85.1504 Section 85.1504 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Importation of Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Engines §...

  3. 40 CFR 85.1504 - Conditional admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conditional admission. 85.1504 Section 85.1504 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Importation of Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Engines §...

  4. "Stealth Applicants" Are Changing the Admissions Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Jeff Rickey is a numbers guy. But three years ago, a colleague asked him about something he'd never counted: applicants who came out of nowhere. The question intrigued Mr. Rickey, dean of admissions and financial aid at Earlham College in Indiana. He found that 17 percent of the college's applicants that year had not called, taken a tour, or…

  5. 43 CFR 4.1141 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... request, or for the admission of the truth of any specified relevant matter of fact. (b) Each matter of... directed serves on the requesting party— (1) A sworn statement denying specifically the relevant matters of... matters involved are privileged or irrelevant or that the request is otherwise improper in whole or...

  6. 43 CFR 4.1141 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... request, or for the admission of the truth of any specified relevant matter of fact. (b) Each matter of... directed serves on the requesting party— (1) A sworn statement denying specifically the relevant matters of... matters involved are privileged or irrelevant or that the request is otherwise improper in whole or...

  7. 17 CFR 12.33 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... truth of any matters set forth in the request that relate to statements or opinions of fact or of the...) Reply. Each matter of which an admission is requested shall be separately set forth. The matter is... the matter. If objection is made, the reasons therefor shall be stated. The answer shall...

  8. 42 CFR 412.3 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES General Provisions § 412.3 Admissions. (a) For... patient history and comorbidities, the severity of signs and symptoms, current medical needs, and the...

  9. 24 CFR 3.220 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Admissions. 3.220 Section 3.220 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL...

  10. 24 CFR 3.220 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Admissions. 3.220 Section 3.220 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL...

  11. 24 CFR 3.220 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Admissions. 3.220 Section 3.220 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL...

  12. 24 CFR 3.220 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Admissions. 3.220 Section 3.220 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL...

  13. 24 CFR 3.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Admission. 3.300 Section 3.300 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL...

  14. 24 CFR 3.220 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Admissions. 3.220 Section 3.220 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL...

  15. 24 CFR 3.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Admission. 3.300 Section 3.300 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL...

  16. 24 CFR 3.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Admission. 3.300 Section 3.300 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL...

  17. 24 CFR 3.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Admission. 3.300 Section 3.300 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL...

  18. 45 CFR 618.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Admission. 618.300 Section 618.300 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS... manner and under the same policies as any other temporary disability or physical condition; and (4)...

  19. 45 CFR 618.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Admission. 618.300 Section 618.300 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS... manner and under the same policies as any other temporary disability or physical condition; and (4)...

  20. University Admissions. Policy Note. Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    University admissions, like many other aspects of the higher education sector, are going through a time of significant change. From 2012, universities will receive full funding under the Commonwealth Grants Scheme (CGS) for as many places as they offer. Previously, the Government limited the number of funded places, with a tolerance band for…