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Sample records for acute psychiatric hospitalization

  1. Day hospital versus admission for acute psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Max; Crowther, Ruth; Sledge, William Hurt; Rathbone, John; Soares-Weiser, Karla

    2014-01-01

    Background Inpatient treatment is an expensive way of caring for people with acute psychiatric disorders. It has been proposed that many of those currently treated as inpatients could be cared for in acute psychiatric day hospitals. Objectives To assess the effects of day hospital versus inpatient care for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (June 2010) which is based on regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO. We approached trialists to identify unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of day hospital versus inpatient care, for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Studies were ineligible if a majority of participants were under 18 or over 65, or had a primary diagnosis of substance abuse or organic brain disorder. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted and cross-checked data. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous data. We calculated weighted or standardised means for continuous data. Day hospital trials tend to present similar outcomes in slightly different formats, making it difficult to synthesise data. We therefore sought individual patient data so that we could re-analyse outcomes in a common format. Main results Ten trials (involving 2685 people) met the inclusion criteria. We obtained individual patient data for four trials (involving 646 people). We found no difference in the number lost to follow-up by one year between day hospital care and inpatient care (5 RCTs, n = 1694, RR 0.94 CI 0.82 to 1.08). There is moderate evidence that the duration of index admission is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (4 RCTs, n = 1582, WMD 27.47 CI 3.96 to 50.98). There is very low evidence that the duration of day patient care (adjusted days/month) is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (3 RCTs, n = 265, WMD 2.34 days

  2. Nurse-police coalition: improves safety in acute psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Allen, Diane E; Harris, Frank N; de Nesnera, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Although police officers protect and secure the safety of citizens everywhere, nurses are the primary guardians of patient safety within the treatment milieu. At New Hampshire Hospital, both nurses and police officers share ownership of this responsibility, depending on the needs that arise specific to each profession. Psychiatric nurses take pride in their ability to de-escalate agitated and potentially aggressive patients; however, times arise when the best efforts of nurses fail, or when a situation requires intervention from police officers. Nurses and police officers at New Hampshire Hospital have worked together for many years to develop a trusting, respectful alliance. This coalition has resulted in a safe, clear, orderly process for transfer of authority from nurses to police during violent, clinically unmanageable psychiatric emergencies. Nurses and police officers work collaboratively toward the common goal of ensuring safety for patients and staff, while also acknowledging the unique strengths of each profession.

  3. Relationship between Psychiatric Nurse Work Environments and Nurse Burnout in Acute Care General Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Nancy P.; Aiken, Linda H.; McClaine, Lakeetra; Hanlon, Alexandra L

    2010-01-01

    Following deinstitutionalization, inpatient psychiatric services moved from state institutions to general hospitals. Despite the magnitude of these changes, evaluations of the quality of inpatient care environments in general hospitals are limited. This study examined the extent to which organizational factors of the inpatient psychiatric environments are associated with psychiatric nurse burnout. Organizational factors were measured by an instrument endorsed by the National Quality Forum. Robust clustered regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between organizational factors in 67 hospitals and levels of burnout for 353 psychiatric nurses. Lower levels of psychiatric nurse burnout was significantly associated with inpatient environments that had better overall quality work environments, more effective managers, strong nurse-physician relationships, and higher psychiatric nurse-to-patient staffing ratios. These results suggest that adjustments in organizational management of inpatient psychiatric environments could have a positive effect on psychiatric nurses’ capacity to sustain safe and effective patient care environments. PMID:20144031

  4. Pharmacist-initiated prior authorization process to improve patient care in a psychiatric acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Allen, Shari N; Ojong-Salako, Mebanga

    2015-02-01

    A prior authorization (PA) is a requirement implemented by managed care organizations to help provide medications to consumers in a cost-effective manner. The PA process may be seen as a barrier by prescribers, pharmacists, pharmaceutical companies, and consumers. The lack of a standardized PA process, implemented prior to a patient's discharge from a health care facility, may increase nonadherence to inpatient prescribed medications. Pharmacists and other health care professionals can implement a PA process specific to their institution. This article describes a pharmacist-initiated PA process implemented at an acute care psychiatric hospital. This process was initiated secondary to a need for a standardized process at the facility. To date, the process has been seen as a valuable aspect to patient care. Plans to expand this process include collecting data with regards to adherence and readmissions as well as applying for a grant to help develop a program to automate the PA program at this facility.

  5. Retrospective analysis of absconding behaviour by acute care consumers in one psychiatric hospital campus in Australia.

    PubMed

    Mosel, Krista A; Gerace, Adam; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear

    2010-06-01

    Absconding is increasingly being recognized as a problem within mental health settings with significant risks for consumers. This study examines absconding behaviours across three acute care wards within an Australian psychiatric hospital campus over a 12-month period. A descriptive statistical analysis determined the rate of absconding from 49 consumers who absconded 64 times. The absconding rate was 13.33% (absconding events), with most absconding events arising from males diagnosed with schizophrenia (57.14%) aged between 20 and 29 years, and with 62.50% of absconding events occurring whilst consumers were on their first 21-day detention order. Nearly half of all absconding events were by consumers who had absconded previously, with the highest proportion of events occurring during nursing handover. A profile of people who abscond, time of day of absconding, legal status and repeated absconding behaviours are described. The emergent profile of consumers who absconded within this study bears some similarities to that described in overseas research, although in this study consumers were slightly older and 25% of absconders were female. Of particular interest are findings that identify the timings of absconding events in relation to a consumer's legal status. Implications for practice, including assessment of risk of absconding and management, are considered.

  6. Outpatient mental health service use by older adults after acute psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Proctor, Enola; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    This study described outpatient mental health service used by elderly patients discharged from acute inpatient psychiatric treatment for depression, assessed services barriers, and identified factors related to the use of outpatient mental health services. The sample consisted of 199 elderly patients discharged home from a geropsychiatric unit of an urban midwestern hospital. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with use of various mental health services. Almost three quarters of the elderly patients saw a psychiatrist within 6 weeks postdischarge, but few used other outpatient mental health services. The most frequently reported barriers to use included (1) cost of services, (2) personal belief that depression would improve on its own, and (3) lack of awareness of available services. The use of various outpatient services was differentially related to predisposing, need, and enabling factors. Female patients, those residing in rural areas, and those who wanted to solve their problems on their own were less likely to use outpatient mental health services. Patients who reported greater levels of functional impairment, resided in rural areas, and perceived that getting services required too much time were less likely to see a psychiatrist in the postacute period. African American patients were more likely than whites to use day treatment programs. This may be related to the fact that most day treatment centers were located in areas where the majority of residents were African Americans.

  7. Patients' lived seclusion experience in acute psychiatric hospital in the United States: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ezeobele, I E; Malecha, A T; Mock, A; Mackey-Godine, A; Hughes, M

    2014-05-01

    The findings revealed that the patients perceived seclusion as an intervention that is punitive and a means used by the staff to exert control. Patients perceived that staff incitements and lack of communication skills led to their being secluded. The findings provided recommendations and strategies for seclusion reduction that were based on the patients' first-hand seclusion experiences. This phenomenological study used Husserlian's philosophy to explore and describe the lived experiences of psychiatric patients who were secluded at a free-standing acute care hospital located in South-western United States (US). The study is crucial because very few studies have been conducted in this area in the US. The study examined a purposive sample of 20 patients, 3 days post-seclusion. Data were generated through face-to-face, semi-structured interviews incorporating open-ended questions and probes to facilitate discussion until saturation was reached. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and data analysed using Colaizzi's seven steps method. Results were described according to the themes and subthemes identified. Findings uncovered four themes: (1) alone in the world; (2) staff exert power and control; (3) resentment towards staff; and (4) time for meditation. The findings from this study illuminated the views surrounding patients' seclusion experience. It provided first-hand information on the patients' seclusion experience that might be helpful to the mental health professionals in the seclusion reduction process.

  8. Clinical Application of the "Scribble Technique" with Adults in an Acute Inpatient Psychiatric Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanes, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    The "scribble technique," described by Florence Cane's book, "The Artist in Each of Us" (1983), has historically been employed by art therapists as a technique to reduce inhibitions and liberate spontaneous imagery from the unconscious. Reviews the technique and presents examples produced by adult patients in an acute inpatient psychiatric ward.…

  9. Psychiatric hospitalization in Poland.

    PubMed

    Frydman, L

    1983-01-01

    An overview of psychiatric hospitalization in Poland is presented in the context of Polish political and socio-cultural developments. The areas addressed include: the characteristics of the patient population; the organization of Polish mental health service; the nature of psychiatric treatment; psychiatric legislation; patients' rights; and the training and social status of the various mental health professionals. In spite of the meager resources allocated to mental health services, and the consequent staff shortages and overcrowded, drab living conditions in psychiatric facilities, the care afforded patients is generally humane and nonoppressive. Polish psychiatry has succeeded in maintaining its professional autonomy and has assumed a leadership role in the modernization of its service delivery system.

  10. Elements of Successful School Reentry after Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Elysia V.; Welfare, Laura E.; Williams, Amy M.

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric hospitalization is an intensive intervention designed to stabilize adolescents who are experiencing an acute mental health crisis. Reintegrating to school after discharge from psychiatric hospitalization can be overwhelming for many adolescents (E. V. Clemens, L. E. Welfare, & A. M. Williams, 2010). The authors used a consensual…

  11. Improving acute psychiatric hospital services according to inpatient experiences. A user-led piece of research as a means to empowerment.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jim; Boyle, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This paper has been undertaken by people with experience with mental health issues and mental health care systems. The aim of the research was to explore psychiatric inpatients' strategies for coping with mental ill health and in what ways acute inpatient psychiatric hospital services are facilitative to the individual attempting recovery. Ten focus groups were facilitated and data were analysed through systematic content analysis. Findings revealed that the main areas of concern for inpatients were: information, communication, relationships, activities, self-help, patient involvement in care treatment plans, and the physical environment. The authors also make a case to improve the status of user-led research as a means to understand the needs of mental health service users. PMID:19148819

  12. Inpatient Suicide in a Chinese Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jie; Ran, Mao-Sheng; Hao, Yuantao; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Guo, Yangbo; Su, Jinghua; Lu, Huixian

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the risk factors for suicide among psychiatric inpatients in China. In this study we identified the risk factors of suicide among psychiatric inpatients at Guangzhou Psychiatric Hospital. All psychiatric inpatients who died by suicide during the 1956-2005 period were included in this study. Using a case-control design, 64…

  13. The ecological relationship between deprivation, social isolation and rates of hospital admission for acute psychiatric care: a comparison of London and New York City.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Sarah; Copeland, Alison; Fagg, James; Congdon, Peter; Almog, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Justine

    2006-03-01

    We report on comparative analyses of small area variation in rates of acute hospital admissions for psychiatric conditions in Greater London around the year 1998 and in New York City (NYC) in 2000. Based on a theoretical model of the factors likely to influence psychiatric admission rates, and using data from the most recent population censuses and other sources, we examine the association with area indicators designed to measure access to hospital beds, socio-economic deprivation, social fragmentation and ethnic/racial composition. We report results on admissions for men and women aged 15-64 for all psychiatric conditions (excluding self-harm), drug-related substance abuse/addiction, schizophrenia and affective disorders. The units of analysis in NYC were 165 five-digit Zip Code Areas and, in London, 760 electoral wards as defined in 1998. The analysis controls for age and sex composition and, as a proxy for access to care, spatial proximity to hospitals with psychiatric beds. Poisson regression modeling incorporating random effects was used to control for both overdispersion in the counts of admissions and for the effects of spatial autocorrelation. The results for NYC and London showed that local admission rates for all types of condition were positively and significantly associated with deprivation and the association is independent of demographic composition or 'access' to beds. In NYC, social fragmentation showed a significant association with admissions due to affective disorders and schizophrenia, and for drug dependency among females. Racial minority concentration was significantly and positively associated with admissions for schizophrenia. In London, social fragmentation was associated positively with admissions for men and women due to schizophrenia and affective disorders. The variable measuring racial/ethnic minority concentration for London wards showed a negative association with admission rates for drug dependency and for affective disorders. We

  14. The ecological relationship between deprivation, social isolation and rates of hospital admission for acute psychiatric care: a comparison of London and New York City.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Sarah; Copeland, Alison; Fagg, James; Congdon, Peter; Almog, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Justine

    2006-03-01

    We report on comparative analyses of small area variation in rates of acute hospital admissions for psychiatric conditions in Greater London around the year 1998 and in New York City (NYC) in 2000. Based on a theoretical model of the factors likely to influence psychiatric admission rates, and using data from the most recent population censuses and other sources, we examine the association with area indicators designed to measure access to hospital beds, socio-economic deprivation, social fragmentation and ethnic/racial composition. We report results on admissions for men and women aged 15-64 for all psychiatric conditions (excluding self-harm), drug-related substance abuse/addiction, schizophrenia and affective disorders. The units of analysis in NYC were 165 five-digit Zip Code Areas and, in London, 760 electoral wards as defined in 1998. The analysis controls for age and sex composition and, as a proxy for access to care, spatial proximity to hospitals with psychiatric beds. Poisson regression modeling incorporating random effects was used to control for both overdispersion in the counts of admissions and for the effects of spatial autocorrelation. The results for NYC and London showed that local admission rates for all types of condition were positively and significantly associated with deprivation and the association is independent of demographic composition or 'access' to beds. In NYC, social fragmentation showed a significant association with admissions due to affective disorders and schizophrenia, and for drug dependency among females. Racial minority concentration was significantly and positively associated with admissions for schizophrenia. In London, social fragmentation was associated positively with admissions for men and women due to schizophrenia and affective disorders. The variable measuring racial/ethnic minority concentration for London wards showed a negative association with admission rates for drug dependency and for affective disorders. We

  15. Deprivation of liberty in psychiatric hospital care: the patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Kuosmanen, Lauri; Hätönen, Heli; Malkavaara, Heikki; Kylmä, Jari; Välimäki, Maritta

    2007-09-01

    Deprivation of liberty in psychiatric hospitals is common world-wide. The aim of this study was to find out whether patients had experienced deprivation of their liberty during psychiatric hospitalization and to explore their views about it. Patients (n = 51) in two acute psychiatric inpatient wards were interviewed in 2001. They were asked to describe in their own words their experiences of being deprived of their liberty. The data were analysed by inductive content analysis. The types of deprivation of liberty in psychiatric hospital care reported by these patients were: restrictions on leaving the ward and on communication, confiscation of property, and various coercive measures. The patients' experiences of being deprived of their liberty were negative, although some saw the rationale for using these interventions, considering them as part of hospital care.

  16. Psychiatric Hospitalization after Deliberate Self-Poisoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Gregory L.; Safranko, Ivan; Lewin, Terry J.; Whyte, Ian M.; Bryant, Jennifer L.

    2006-01-01

    The decision for psychiatric hospitalization after deliberate self-poisoning (DSP) is not well understood. This study, a longitudinal cohort study of 3,148 consecutive DSP patients found 920 (29.2%) subjects were referred for psychiatric hospitalization, 576 (18.3%) on involuntary basis. A logistic regression analysis showed increased risk for:…

  17. Characteristics and Needs of Psychiatric Patients With Prolonged Hospital Stay

    PubMed Central

    Afilalo, Marc; Soucy, Nathalie; Xue, Xiaoqing; Colacone, Antoinette; Jourdenais, Emmanuelle; Boivin, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the characteristics and needs prior to, on admission, during the first month in hospital, at the thirtieth day of hospitalization and posthospital discharge of psychiatric patients occupying acute beds. Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted in 2 tertiary care hospitals. Adult patients hospitalized on a psychiatric unit for 30 days were identified. Data was collected from their medical charts and interviews with their health care team. The categorization of acute and nonacute status at day 30 was based on the health care professional’s evaluation. Descriptive and univariate analyses were performed. Results: A total of 262 patients were identified (mean age 45 years), 66% lived at home and 11% were homeless. More than one-half were cognitively impaired and a few had special medical needs. Ninety-seven per cent had been admitted from the emergency department. At day 30, 81% of patients required acute care, while 19% (95% CI 15% to 24%) occupied an acute care bed, despite the resolution of their acute condition. The main reason preventing discharge of nonacute patients was the difficulty or inability to find appropriate resources that met patients’ needs. As for patients who required acute care, the most common psychiatric issues were delusions or hallucinations (34%), inability to take medications independently (23.6%), and inadequate control of aggression or impulsivity (16.5%). Conclusions: Prevention of the discharge of nonacute patients is largely due to the difficulty in finding appropriate resources that meet patients’ needs. Improved access to community and subacute care resources could potentially facilitate the hospital discharge of psychiatric nonacute patients. PMID:26174218

  18. [Family and psychiatric hospitalization in a general hospital].

    PubMed

    de Mello, Rita Mello; Schneider, Jacó Fernando

    2011-06-01

    This study aims to identify the reasons that lead relatives to hospitalize patients in a psychiatric unit of a general hospital. It is a qualitative study based on Alfred Schutz' phenomenological sociology. Fourteen relatives, each with one family member hospitalized, were interviewed from August to October 2009. The guiding question of the phenomenological interview was "What do you expect from psychiatric hospitalization in a general hospital?". Phenomenological sociology was used to understand and interpret the interviews. Statements showed three concrete categories, that lead to the reasons for: treatment guidelines and continuity; prospects for improvement; ideas about normality. This research shows the experiences of relatives, contributing with mental health professionals' reflection about their actions and about the involvement of families in a general hospital's psychiatric unit. PMID:21987981

  19. Violent psychiatric inpatients in a public hospital.

    PubMed

    Morrison, E F

    1990-01-01

    Violence in inpatient psychiatric settings is a clinically significant and relevant problem requiring attention by the psychiatric community. Despite the prevalence of research on violent behavior, few nursing studies have been conducted that explore the components of nursing care that may influence the amount of violence occurring in inpatient psychiatric settings. The purpose of the study was to identify the characteristics of violent patients and the components of nursing care that are related to violent patient behavior. A qualitative study was conducted using participant observation and grounded theory methodology. Data were collected in a metropolitan public hospital over a 9-month period. Six categories of violent patients were identified during data analysis: (1) the user, (b) the outlaw, (c) the rebel without a cause, (d) the little big man, (e) the child, and (6) the vamp. Implications of the study for clinicians working in inpatient psychiatric settings are discussed.

  20. Service dogs, psychiatric hospitalization, and the ADA.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Russ S; Thomas, Kelly Jones; Leong, Stephanie L; Ragukonis, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A service dog is defined as "any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability." Some psychiatric patients may depend on a service dog for day-to-day functioning. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) established certain rights and responsibilities for individuals with disabilities and health care providers. Psychiatric hospitalization of a patient with a service dog may pose a problem and involves balancing the requirement to provide safe and appropriate psychiatric care with the rights of individuals with disabilities. This Open Forum examines issues that arise in such circumstances, reviews the literature, and provides a foundation for the development of policies and procedures.

  1. Service dogs, psychiatric hospitalization, and the ADA.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Russ S; Thomas, Kelly Jones; Leong, Stephanie L; Ragukonis, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A service dog is defined as "any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability." Some psychiatric patients may depend on a service dog for day-to-day functioning. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) established certain rights and responsibilities for individuals with disabilities and health care providers. Psychiatric hospitalization of a patient with a service dog may pose a problem and involves balancing the requirement to provide safe and appropriate psychiatric care with the rights of individuals with disabilities. This Open Forum examines issues that arise in such circumstances, reviews the literature, and provides a foundation for the development of policies and procedures. PMID:25321094

  2. A CBT Approach to Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Kim J.

    2005-01-01

    During a psychiatric hospitalization of 5 to 10 days, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) strategies can be used for the management of inpatients and to support the transition to outpatient treatment. This format was chosen after several years of frustration dealing with crisis inpatient care. The use of CBT is well known, and it seemed that an…

  3. Practice of Acute and Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Psychiatric Clinic of a University Hospital from Turkey: between 2007 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Sengul, Melike Ceyhan Balci; Kenar, Ayse Nur Inci; Hanci, Ezgi; Sendur, İbrahim; Sengul, Cem; Herken, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be given as the form of acute, continuation or maintenance ECT according to the process of administration. We report our 7 years’ observation with acute and maintenance ECT in a university hospital in Turkey. Methods The medical records of the hospitalized patients treated with acute or maintenance ECT between the years 2007 and 2013 was retrospectively analyzed. The sociodemographic characteristics, diagnosis, data of ECT and the co-administered psychotropic drugs were recorded. The frequency of ECT was calculated by identifying the total number of the hospitalized patients during the study period from the hospital records. Results A total number of 1,432 female and 1,141 male patients hospitalized in a period of 7 years, with a total number of 111 patients treated with ECT. The ratio of ECT was 4%, maintenance/acute ECT 11%. For acute ECT, affective disorders (65.3%) and psychotic disorders (21.6%) were among the leading diagnoses. Maintenance ECT, the diagnosis was; 6 affective disorders, 4 psychotic disorders and 1 obsessive compulsive disorder. There was a significant difference between the patients receiving acute and maintenance ECT in terms of age, duration of illness, and number of previous hospitalizations and ECTs. Conclusion The percentage of patients treated with acute ECT is lower in our institution than that in many other institutions from our country. Acute and maintenance ECT should be considered as an important treatment option particularly for patients with long disease duration, a high number of hospitalizations and a history of benefiting from previous ECTs. PMID:26792041

  4. Understanding those who seek frequent psychiatric hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Phyllis; Kirkpatrick, Helen

    2002-02-01

    In the period after deinstitutionalization, there has been a rise in hospital readmission rates. It is estimated that the readmission rate for individuals who are frequent users of psychiatric inpatient services is approximately 40% to 50% within 1 year of hospital discharge. Attempts to determine predictors of recidivism have identified multiple variables, some of which are mutually contradictory. Furthermore, comparison among studies is difficult given methodological and theoretical limitations. Despite such issues, however, one consistent predictor of frequent rehospitalization is a person's history of past psychiatric hospital admissions. It seems that those who have shown a pattern of seeking inpatient services in the past tend to repeat this treatment-seeking behavior. The aim of this report is to critically examine some of the predictors of rehospitalization. A better understanding of those who engage in the persistent pattern of seeking inpatient services may assist nurses in planning care that is more suited for their needs. PMID:11877602

  5. Postoperative hospital course of patients with history of severe psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S; McCartney, J R; Saravay, S M; Katz, E

    1987-09-01

    The postoperative hospital course of 54 patients with a past history of psychiatric illness was studied through chart review. Both chronic schizophrenics and chronic depressives tolerated surgical procedures well, without any unusual difficulties or exacerbation of psychiatric illness. They represented no management problems. Patients with acute, severe upset in the preoperative period (regardless of diagnosis) presented most of the management problems postoperatively. PMID:3678811

  6. Crisis hospitalization on a psychiatric emergency service.

    PubMed

    Breslow, R E; Klinger, B I; Erickson, B J

    1993-09-01

    The availability of short-stay beds for brief admissions to a Psychiatric Emergency Service (PES) is a model that meets a variety of patient and system needs, allowing time to develop alternatives to hospitalization or gain diagnostic clarity, serving a respite function, providing a hospital setting that does not gratify dependency needs, and relieving inpatient census pressures. An eight-bed service for brief inpatient stays of up to 3 days was developed on a PES which serves a large nine-country catchment area in northeastern New York State. Admissions to this unit would otherwise have gone to a medical school teaching hospital psychiatric unit or a state psychiatric center. Fifty-one consecutive admissions were studied. The majority of patients were dischargeable in the short time frame and did not require transfer for longer-term care. The patients as a group showed improvement in psychiatric symptomatology and rated high satisfaction with the program. Most patients were diagnosed with schizophrenia or personality disorder (PD). Suicidality and substance abuse were frequent. The PD patients had a strong association with suicidality and some association with substance abuse, whereas the schizophrenics had more psychiatric symptomatology. PD patients were more likely to be discharged, leading us to propose a rationale for why this group may be uniquely suited to this approach. The study was replicated after a year on another sample of 51 consecutive admissions, confirming the earlier results and providing a 1-year follow-up on the program.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8307344

  7. Psychiatric hospital challenges for healthcare security officers.

    PubMed

    White, Donald E

    2003-01-01

    Security and Safety managers in today's healthcare facilities need to use creative thinking and resourcefulness, to juggle competing issues in psychiatric hospitals, wards, or units. Using a 3-step process of accountability, access control, and scenario exercises, these managers can mitigate the real-world risk assessment discoveries that might not be evident in well-documented facility policies, staff training, or even written surveys. PMID:12629788

  8. Comparison of assessment and management of suicidal risk for acute psychiatric assessment between two state sponsored hospitals in England and Italy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranbir; Verdolini, Norma; Agius, Mark; Moretti, Patrizia; Quartesan, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    The risk of suicide is one of the most important risk factors looked into for acute psychiatric assessments that influences the management plan. The prevalence of suicide is on a rise across European countries; as a consequence, the different countries have created specific guidelines and policies in order to prevent suicides in the acute settings. These guidelines are based on both different cultural aspects as well as the different organization of the mental health system in the different countries. This paper wants to present the comparison between the guidelines of two European countries, England and Italy, in order to evaluate the systems, understand differences and common contact points. The different European countries could learn one from the other and a European shared point of view may be a way forward to create better understanding and preventing the risk of suicide across the population. PMID:26417782

  9. [THE CLINICAL ORGANIZATIONAL SUBSTANTIATION OF NEW TECHNOLOGY OF HOSPITAL PSYCHIATRIC CARE].

    PubMed

    Podsevatkin, V G; Blinov, D S; Podsevatkin, D V; Podsevatkina, S V; Smirnova, O A

    2015-01-01

    The new technology of hospital psychiatric care, developed and implemented in the Mordovia republican clinical hospital, permits resolving problems of hospitalism, lethality, pharmaceutical resistance and others. The essence of this technology is in staging of hospital care under condition of intensification and standardization of curative diagnostic process, implementation of complex approach to treatment of psychiatric disorders. The patient sequentially passes through three stages: intensive diagnostics and intensive treatment (intensive care department, intensive therapy department), supportive therapy (general psychiatric department); rehabilitation measures (curative rehabilitative department). The concentration of resources at the first stage, application of intensive therapy techniques permit in the shortest period to arrest acute psychotic symptomatic. The described new technology of hospital psychiatric care permits enhancing effectiveness of treatment, significantly shorten period of hospitalization (37.5 days), to obtain lasting and qualitative remission, to rehabilitate most fully social working status of patient and to significantly decrease lethality.

  10. PSYCHIATRIC ASPECTS OF CLINICAL PRACTICE IN GENERAL HOSPITALS: A SURVEY OF NON-PSYCHIATRIC CLINICIANS

    PubMed Central

    Chadda, R.K.; Shome, S.

    1996-01-01

    The present work was carried out to study the awareness of non-psychiatric clinicians working in a teaching general hospital about the frequency of psychiatric morbidity in their clinical practice, their utilization of psychiatric consultation services, and opinion about utility of liaison psychiatry in general hospitals. A substantial proportion of doctors underestimated the psychiatric morbidity especially about unexplained physical symptoms and specific depressive symptoms in their patients. Psychiatric consultation services were not sufficiently utilised by a large number of clinicians. Most ofthemfelt the need to improve upon undergraduate medical education in psychiatry in India as well as a desire to have consultation - liaison psychiatric units in India. PMID:21584151

  11. Predicting hospital aggression in secure psychiatric care

    PubMed Central

    Priday, Lee J.; Ireland, Carol A.; Chu, Simon; Kilcoyne, Jennifer; Mulligan, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Background Risk assessment instruments have become a preferred means for predicting future aggression, claiming to predict long-term aggression risk. Aims To investigate the predictive value over 12 months and 4 years of two commonly applied instruments (Historical, Clinical and Risk Management - 20 (HCR-20) and Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG)). Method Participants were adult male psychiatric patients detained in a high secure hospital. All had a diagnosis of personality disorder. The focus was on aggression in hospital. Results The actuarial risk assessment (VRAG) was generally performing better than the structured risk assessment (HCR-20), although neither approach performed particularly well overall. Any value in their predictive potential appeared focused on the longer time period under study (4 years) and was specific to certain types of aggression. Conclusions The value of these instruments for assessing aggression in hospital among patients with personality disorder in a high secure psychiatric setting is considered. Declaration of interest J.L.I., C.A.M. and J.K. are employed by the trust where the data were collected. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703760

  12. Impact of Patients’ Psychiatric Hospitalization on Caregivers: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Bridget Elizabeth; Faulkner, Madelaine; Doyle, Otima; Daniel, Stephanie S; Goldston, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article was to systematically review literature on the impact of patients’ psychiatric hospitalizations on caregivers. Implications for practice and research are presented. Methods A systematic search of Web of Knowledge, PsychInfo, and Medline (PubMed) was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published before August 31, 2013. Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed method studies were included if they focused on caregiver outcomes and contained data collected directly from caregivers of patients who had been psychiatrically hospitalized. Results Twenty-nine articles met the inclusion criteria. Caregivers are heterogeneous in their reaction to the psychiatric hospitalization; however, many report distress. Caregivers also often report that they experience stigma, disruptions in daily life, worse physical health, economic strain, and changes in relationships following hospitalization. Negative reactions to the hospitalization may decrease over time, but can remain elevated when compared to the general population. Nonetheless, many caregivers also experience positive changes as a result of the hospitalization. The reaction of caregivers may be influenced by the severity of the patient’s psychiatric problems as well as the caregiver’s demographics and style of coping. Conclusions Caregivers experience a range of reactions to the psychiatric hospitalizations and providing caregivers with psychoeducation on their possible reaction as well as techniques to assist them may improve clinical outcomes for patients. Future research is needed to understand the heterogeneity in caregiver’s reactions to the patient’s psychiatric hospitalization. PMID:25686810

  13. Psychiatric Hospitalization among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, David S.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined predictors of psychiatric hospitalization among children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Data were collected from 760 caregivers of children with ASD. Cox regression was used to determine factors associated with hospitalization. Almost 11% were hospitalized. Youth in single parent homes were more likely to be hospitalized…

  14. The quality of psychiatric services provided by an Australian tertiary hospital emergency department: a client perspective.

    PubMed

    Summers, Monica; Happell, Brenda

    2002-10-01

    The mainstreaming of psychiatric services within the general health care system has created fundamental changes to the manner in which clients access acute psychiatric services. A review of the literature suggests that this process has been problematic. The current study involved the conduct of telephone interviews with psychiatric clients (n = 136) to ascertain their level of satisfaction with the services received in the emergency department of a Melbourne Metropolitan Hospital. The results were analysed using descriptive statistics. The study participants indicated a high level of satisfaction. Particular emphasis was placed upon the availability of staff with psychiatric qualifications and experience to provide treatment, support and care. Dissatisfaction was noted by some clients regarding lengthy waiting times, lack of privacy in the triage area and negative attitudes of emergency department staff. These findings support the value of psychiatric consultancy services in the emergency department, and further identify the need for triage guidelines to be tailored to the needs of mental health clients.

  15. AN ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITALIZATIONS.

    PubMed

    Bloom, B L

    1968-10-01

    In order to develop some understanding of community social structure and its association with psychiatric inpatient medical care patterns, first admission rates for psychiatric disorders into both public and private facilities were determined for each of the 33 census tracts of Pueblo, Colorado. At the same time a cluster analysis was made of the structure of these tracts. Four well- defined clusters were identified (socio-economic affluence, young marrieds, social isolation, and social disequilibrium) and strikingly high differential relationships found between the cluster scores and psychiatric inpatient care patterns. Implications of the findings for preventive strategies and for. social etiology hypotheses are presented.

  16. The reimbursement blues. A psychiatric hospital copes with decreasing reimbursement and declining admissions.

    PubMed

    Hume, S K

    1991-03-01

    Beginning in 1989, Harbor View Mercy Hospital, a freestanding psychiatric facility in Fort Smith, AR, saw a flattening of growth in inpatient days and declines in discharges. In addition to decreasing admissions, it faces the problems of decreasing reimbursement, the need to provide more services with fewer resources, and greater government regulations. The greatest problem is inadequate reimbursement. Psychiatric hospitals fare worse than their acute care counterparts under both Medicaid and Medicare. To fulfill its mission to serve those in need, Harbor View has allocated 43 percent of its revenue budget this year to cover charity care, bad debt, etc. Ron Summerhill, the hospital's chief administrative officer, predicts a slowdown in the growth and profitability of psychiatric services in both the for-profit and not-for-profit sectors. But he is combating this trend by increasing use of managed care arrangements, diversifying, offering more outpatient services, and advocating for change in the reimbursement situation. PMID:10109228

  17. Prevalence and Correlates of Autism in a State Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, David S.; Lawer, Lindsay J.; Branch, Kira; Brodkin, Edward S.; Healey, Kristin; Witalec, Robert; Johnson, Donielle N.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2012-01-01

    This study estimated the ASD prevalence in a psychiatric hospital and evaluated the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) combined with other information for differential diagnosis. Chart review, SRS and clinical interviews were collected for 141 patients at one hospital. Diagnosis was determined at case conference. Receiver operating characteristic…

  18. A Controlled Comparison of Psychiatric Day Treatment and Inpatient Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Stephen; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Seriously ill female psychiatric patients (N=59) were randomly assigned to an inpatient or day service. Data indicate the day treatment is, on the whole, superior to inpatient treatment in subjective distress, community functioning, family burden, total hospital cost, and days of attachment to the hospital program. (Author)

  19. Patient Management and Psychopharmacological Treatment Associated to Smoking Ban in an Acute Psychiatric Unit.

    PubMed

    Bergé, Daniel; Mané, Anna; Fonseca, Francina; Toll, Alba; Merino, Ana; Pérez, Victor; Bulbena, Antoni

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates differences in terms of clinical and treatment management in psychiatric hospitalization associated to smoking ban. We collected data regarding medication, socio-demographic and admission characteristics from all patients admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital before and after a smoking ban was in force. We also assessed a limited sample of patients before and after the ban regarding nicotine dependence, motivation to quit smoking and attitudes towards the ban. More number of leaves of absence and movement restrictions during the ban period occurred in comparison to the pre-ban period. On the contrary a lack of significant differences in terms of hospital stay (duration, rate of voluntary admissions and voluntary discharges), use of sedatives and doses of antipsychotics was found. A period of adjustment regarding the deal with leave of access and facilitate nicotine replacement treatment may help future psychiatric facilities planning smoking free policies.

  20. Designing sustainable acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cory, Alistair

    2008-01-01

    The need to provide sustainable hospitals lies in the fact that we have an obligation to act responsibly towards good stewardship of our environment and the world's precious resources, ensuring a healthy future for coming generations. As such, a sustainable hospital must sit squarely in a sustainable society, and the global and local context should be considered when designing a sustainable health facility.

  1. Correlates of hopelessness in psychiatrically hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Kashani, J H; Soltys, S M; Dandoy, A C; Vaidya, A F; Reid, J C

    1991-01-01

    The importance of hopelessness within the study of childhood psychiatric disorders is becoming increasingly apparent. The present study divides a child inpatient sample (age 7 to 12 years) into two groups based on scores from the Kazdin Hopelessness Scale for Children. Comparisons made between the two groups on various measures showed that children with high hopelessness had lower cognitive ability, "difficult child" temperament characteristics, more anxiety, lower self-esteem, and a higher degree of psychopathology than the low-hopelessness group. The role of hopelessness in academic success and future psychopathology are discussed.

  2. Deconstructing the language of psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Mohr, W K

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to deconstruct the language of psychiatric nurses' documentation and charting. Employing concepts developed by post-modern theorists, everyday professional activities can be examined in unique ways that uncover how they conceal or skew rather than reveal and illumine patient conditions. The study design and sample was exploratory; content analysis with first and second level analyses. Nine major categories of charting entry were found. Deconstruction of the language and discourse of nursing through a Foucaultian lens goes beyond what is manifest to what is not said. Professional assumptions about patients and the social construction of patients and patient problems are exposed. PMID:10320487

  3. Serum Dopamine Beta Hydroxylase and Maltreatment in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvin, Matthew; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Males (ages 7 to 17) in a psychiatric hospital were studied while off psychoactive medication to determine how serum dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH) activity varies with childhood maltreatment experiences. Lowest DBH levels were found in boys maltreated before 72 months of age or with the principal diagnosis of conduct disorder solitary aggressive…

  4. Children in Foster Care: Before, during, and after Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persi, Joe; Sisson, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that foster children are at greater risk for mental health problems than are children in the general population, very little is known about the smaller group of foster children admitted to psychiatric hospitals. The present study sought to determine whether foster children admitted to inpatient care are a distinct…

  5. [Eating disorders and psychiatric day hospital treatment].

    PubMed

    Mekui, C A; Weber, K

    2015-02-11

    Eating disorders are complex pathologies characterised by the entanglement between physical and mental aspects and by their high impact on health. Studies on care models showed the need for other therapeutic modalities due to the complexity of treatments, the risk of recurrence after hospitalisation, as well as to the cost and duration of hospital stays. Day hospitals specific to these disorders have been created, albeit with very few studies. Even though the available studies tend to find good therapeutic efficacy, they are disparate, describing care centres that are rather different in their structure and theoretical approach, and factors of therapeutic efficacy are not always well described.

  6. The Pathway to Excellence Experience: One Psychiatric Hospital's Journey.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Jane S; Jackson, Jennifer M; Palyo, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric nurse executives and managers face an ongoing challenge to create positive professional work environments that support the recruitment and retention of the best nurses. The Pathway to Excellence program is an organizational credentialing program that designates a hospital as a workplace of choice for nursing. This article describes one psychiatric hospital's journey to become and maintain a Pathway to Excellence designation in the midst of transition. Challenges faced and novel approaches used, along the journey, are shared. The use of Appreciative Inquiry techniques has led to positive changes and heightened energy among nurses. Our experiences suggest that effective shared governance is central to a hospital's Pathway to Excellence success. We attribute the steady increase in the retention rate of nurses, in large part, to the Pathway to Excellence program.

  7. Neuropsychological and psychiatric profiles in acute encephalitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Pewter, Stephen M; Williams, W Huw; Haslam, Catherine; Kay, Janice M

    2007-01-01

    Acute encephalitis is an inflammation of brain tissue that can result from activity in the central nervous system (CNS) of a number of viruses. Although the neurological and psychiatric effects of encephalitis in the acute phase of the illness are well-known (Caroff, Mann, Gliatto, Sullivan, & Campbell, 2001), larger scale studies of the pattern of neuropsychological and psychiatric impairment following recovery from the acute inflammatory phase are less apparent. This paper reports the results of neuropsychological testing with a range of standardised cognitive measures in a case series of long-term post-acute participants. Psychiatric abnormality is examined using the SCL-90-R self-report scale of distress (Derogatis, 1983). We also examined the role of emerging insight in the aetiology of depression in this population. Two clusters of cognitive dysfunction were observed, one group of primarily herpes simplex cases showing a severe generalised deficit across a number of cognitive domains and a second cluster showing a variety of more isolated disorders of executive function. Abnormally high levels of distress were reported by participants, with depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, interpersonal sensitivity and phobic anxiety most significantly increased. Depression was found to be least severe in those with most accurate insight into their problems. Examining the correlations between cognitive and psychiatric test results demonstrates a relationship between depression and interpersonal anxiety and specific cognitive measures. Obsessive-compulsive behaviour and phobic anxiety, however, appear to exist independently of the assessed cognitive deficits.

  8. Neuropsychological and psychiatric profiles in acute encephalitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Pewter, Stephen M; Williams, W Huw; Haslam, Catherine; Kay, Janice M

    2007-01-01

    Acute encephalitis is an inflammation of brain tissue that can result from activity in the central nervous system (CNS) of a number of viruses. Although the neurological and psychiatric effects of encephalitis in the acute phase of the illness are well-known (Caroff, Mann, Gliatto, Sullivan, & Campbell, 2001), larger scale studies of the pattern of neuropsychological and psychiatric impairment following recovery from the acute inflammatory phase are less apparent. This paper reports the results of neuropsychological testing with a range of standardised cognitive measures in a case series of long-term post-acute participants. Psychiatric abnormality is examined using the SCL-90-R self-report scale of distress (Derogatis, 1983). We also examined the role of emerging insight in the aetiology of depression in this population. Two clusters of cognitive dysfunction were observed, one group of primarily herpes simplex cases showing a severe generalised deficit across a number of cognitive domains and a second cluster showing a variety of more isolated disorders of executive function. Abnormally high levels of distress were reported by participants, with depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, interpersonal sensitivity and phobic anxiety most significantly increased. Depression was found to be least severe in those with most accurate insight into their problems. Examining the correlations between cognitive and psychiatric test results demonstrates a relationship between depression and interpersonal anxiety and specific cognitive measures. Obsessive-compulsive behaviour and phobic anxiety, however, appear to exist independently of the assessed cognitive deficits. PMID:17676531

  9. Should psychiatric patients be granted access to their hospital records?

    PubMed

    Sergeant, H

    1986-12-01

    Beginning in September 1987, the British public will have the right to consult their computerized medical records and by extension, it is expected, noncomputerized ones as well. The author analyzed the case notes of 100 consecutive patients admitted under his care to a psychiatric day hospital. He classified material likely to affect patients adversely as puzzling or unintelligible, alarming, apparently insulting or objectionable, or sensitive information from or about others. Sergeant rejects proposals to omit sensitive material, to keep secret notes, or to grant access only to some psychiatric patients or to deny access to psychiatric patients as a class. Maintaining that there is no dividing line between somatic and psychological medicine, he concludes that access to personal health data for all patients should be limited to the disclosure of bare administrative details. Further information should be supplied within the traditional medical consultation.

  10. 42 CFR 482.62 - Condition of participation: Special staff requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.62 Section 482.62 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS Requirements for Specialty Hospitals § 482.62 Condition of participation: Special staff requirements for psychiatric hospitals. The hospital must have adequate numbers of...

  11. 42 CFR 482.60 - Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hospitals. 482.60 Section 482.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... HOSPITALS Requirements for Specialty Hospitals § 482.60 Special provisions applying to psychiatric hospitals. Psychiatric hospital must— (a) Be primarily engaged in providing, by or under the supervision of a doctor...

  12. Psychiatric Disorders in Children and Adolescents Attending Pediatric Out Patient Departments of Tertiary Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Jesmin, Akhter; Rahman, Khan Muhammad Zillur; Muntasir, Maruf Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Psychiatric disorders are increasingly recognized among children and adolescents in Bangladesh. Psychiatric disorders are more common in children with chronic and acute pediatric disorders. Our study was designed to determine the psychiatric disorders among children and adolescents attending pediatric outpatient departments of tertiary care hospitals. Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out from July 2012 to February 2013 in pediatric outpatient departments of three prime tertiary level hospitals of Dhaka, Bangladesh. A purposive sampling technique was used. A total of 240 male and female children aged 5 to 16 years old were included in the study. We used a semi-structured questionnaire to obtain sociodemographic and other relevant clinical information about the children and their families from their parents or caregivers and a validated parent version of the Bangla Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) for measuring psychopathology. Results The mean age of the children was 9.0± 2.6 years. The majority (71%) of children were in the 5–10 year age group. The male/female ratio was 1.2:1. Among the respondents, 18% were found to have a psychiatric disorder. Behavioral disorders, emotional disorders, and developmental disorders were found in 9.0%, 15.0% and 0.4% respectively. Hyperkinetic disorder was the single most frequent (5.0%) psychiatric disorder. Conclusions A significant number of children were found to have psychiatric disorders. Our study indicates the importance of identification and subsequent management of psychiatric conditions among the pediatric population. PMID:27403237

  13. Doing participant observation in a psychiatric hospital-- research ethics resumed.

    PubMed

    Oeye, Christine; Bjelland, Anne Karen; Skorpen, Aina

    2007-12-01

    Social scientists who employ participant observation methods in medical settings are often held accountable for their research methods, specifically in regard to medical research ethics. However, the medical research ethics tradition rubs uneasily against participant observation and the anthropological understanding of the research process. The underlying premise for considering research ethics in the current case is the notion of the vulnerability of psychiatric patients as a participant group. Based on this notion of vulnerability among psychiatric patients, this article discusses the epistemological grounds for vulnerability in anthropological and medical research ethics. The authors draw on their experience with the Regional Committee for Medical Research Ethics in Norway, and the consequences of the guidelines used for participant observation as a research method in a psychiatric hospital. Social science researchers are required to follow medical ethical guidelines, such as informed consent, the principle of voluntariness, and estimation of risks and benefits. Ethnographers have found these guidelines to be obstructive when doing social science research in a psychiatric hospital. The article suggests the need for reformulation of research guidelines for participant observation in medical settings.

  14. End-of-life care in a psychiatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, Lauren Z.; Denton, David; Minton, Ollie

    2016-01-01

    Since the Liverpool Care Pathway has been withdrawn in the UK, clinicians supporting the palliative needs of patients have faced further challenges, particularly for patients with dementia who are unable to go to a hospice owing to challenging behaviours. It is becoming more important for different services to provide long-term palliative care for patients with dementia. Mental health trusts should construct end-of-life care policies and train staff members accordingly. Through collaborative working, dying patients may be kept where they are best suited. We present the case study of a patient who received end-of-life care at a psychiatric hospital in the UK. We aim to demonstrate how effective end-of-life care might be provided in a psychiatric hospital, in accordance with recent new palliative care guidelines, and highlight potential barriers. PMID:27280036

  15. Psychiatric hospitalization of children in Florida. Legal aspects.

    PubMed

    Mutch, S A; Myers, W C

    1994-07-01

    The hospitalization of children in psychiatric hospitals and their associated rights or lack thereof remains an important issue. Much attention has been focused on children's rights in Florida, most recently with the cases of Gregory K. and Kimberly Mays. On a national level, Hillary Rodham Clinton has drawn attention to children's rights through her advocacy for children. The commitment of children to mental health facilities in Florida deserves examination. This is an important issue, not only to the psychiatrist who tests youths, but also to the family practitioner, internist, or any other referring physician who is involved in the case of the child and the family. It is imperative that the primary care physician as well as the psychiatrist know and understand the limitations and requirements for civil commitment of a child in a psychiatric setting.

  16. Psychiatric hospitalization of children in Florida. Legal aspects.

    PubMed

    Mutch, S A; Myers, W C

    1994-07-01

    The hospitalization of children in psychiatric hospitals and their associated rights or lack thereof remains an important issue. Much attention has been focused on children's rights in Florida, most recently with the cases of Gregory K. and Kimberly Mays. On a national level, Hillary Rodham Clinton has drawn attention to children's rights through her advocacy for children. The commitment of children to mental health facilities in Florida deserves examination. This is an important issue, not only to the psychiatrist who tests youths, but also to the family practitioner, internist, or any other referring physician who is involved in the case of the child and the family. It is imperative that the primary care physician as well as the psychiatrist know and understand the limitations and requirements for civil commitment of a child in a psychiatric setting. PMID:7964573

  17. Treatment needs, diagnoses and use of services for acutely admitted psychiatric patients in northwest Russia and northern Norway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We compared demography, diagnoses and clinical needs in acutely admitted psychiatric hospital patients in northwest Russia and northern Norway. Method All acutely admitted psychiatric patients in 1 psychiatric hospital in north-west Russia and 2 in northern Norway were in a three months period assessed with HoNOS and a Norwegian form developed to study acute psychiatric services (MAP). Data from a total of 841 patients were analysed (377 Norwegian, 464 Russian) with univariate and multivariate statistics. Results Russian patients were more often males who had paid work. 2/3 were diagnosed with alcohol and organic disorders, and 70% reported problems related to sleep. Depression was widespread, as were problems associated with occupation. Many more Norwegian patients were on various forms of social security and lived in community supported homes. They had a clinical profile of affective disorders, use of drugs, suicidality and problems with activities involved of daily life. Slightly more Norwegian patients were involuntary admitted. Conclusion Acutely admitted psychiatric patients in North West Russia and Northern Norwegian showed different clinical profiles: alcohol, depression and organic disorders characterised Russian patients, affective disorders, suicidality and use of drugs characterised the Norwegians. Whereas Norwegian patients are mainly referred from GPs the Russians come via 1.line psychiatric services (“dispensaries”). Average length of stay for Russian patients was 2.5 times longer than that of the Norwegian. PMID:23317010

  18. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals. 424.13 Section 424.13 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... PAYMENT Certification and Plan Requirements § 424.13 Requirements for inpatient services of...

  19. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.61 Section 482.61 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS Requirements for Specialty Hospitals § 482.61 Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals. The medical records maintained by a...

  20. [DRGs in psychiatric hospital financing exemplified by Hungary. A model for Germany?].

    PubMed

    Maylath, E

    2000-12-01

    One of the most important provisions incorporated in the reform of the German health sector has been the introduction of a per case prospective payment system for hospitals with the exception of admissions to psychiatric care. The reasons for the exclusion of psychiatric care are unclear, but it is as a result all the more interesting to look at the experience of Hungary, where in-patient psychiatric care has been financed on the basis of diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) for the past seven years. The article describes how in the early 1990's the funding of the Hungarian health service was reorganized from being a state-financed system with a set budget to a system financed by contributions. Parallel to this development, service-related financing was introduced. In the hospital sector this involved DRGs. At the beginning of 1993 the Hungarian DRGs comprised only 437 categories, but this has since increased to 758. Furthermore, other characteristics are listed which, apart from the number of groups, differentiate the Hungarian DRGs from the AP-DRGs. Among other things, service-related financing includes non-typical areas such as psychiatry. In this case, it covers in-patient psychiatric care in an unusual combination of DRGs in the acute case category (50% of all beds in psychiatric units in Hungary are for acute cases) with daily nursing charges in the chronic case category. An analysis is given in the article of 16 homogeneous diagnostic categories in psychiatric care, followed by experiences gathered in conjunction with the application of this approach in this particular sphere, with special reference to three problem areas. These are as follows: the trend towards diagnoses with a relatively high weighting; the practice of charging for psychiatric DRGs in somatic wards; and, finally, the perpetuation of poor service structures and practices through DRGs. In general, evidently the introduction of psychiatric DRGs may also be recommended in Germany because of the

  1. [Historicizing nursing and patients at a psychiatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Borenstein, Miriam Süsskind; Pereira, Valdete Preve; Ribas, Dorotéa Löes; Ribeiro, Anesilda Alves de Almeida

    2003-01-01

    This is a historical research whose objective is to historicize the nursing team and the patients at the Hospital Colônia Sant'Ana (HCS), in the period from 1941 to 1960. Five employees that worked at the Hospital in the period of the study were interviewed and other documental sources were used. To analyze the data Foucault's theory was used. HCS was the main pole of psychiatric care in the Santa Catarina. The nursing team was constituted by the nuns, "male nurses" and "watchmen". The institution received indigent, private, and health insurance covered patients, who were diagnosed with many different problems, and some who were more of a social case than anything else. The general conditions of the Hospital were precarious. The studied period made possible visualize that the treatment given to the patients, as well as the work conditions offered to the workers, were distant from the ideal, and that it was part of a national policy, characterized by the creation of state macro psychiatric hospitals.

  2. The Use of Physical Restraint in Norwegian Adult Psychiatric Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Background. The use of coercion within the psychiatric services is problematic and raises a range of ethical, legal, and clinical questions. “Physical restraint” is an emergency procedure used in psychiatric hospitals to control patients that pose an imminent physical danger. We wished to review the literature published in scientific peer-reviewed journals describing studies on the use of physical restraint in Norway, in order to identify the current state of knowledge and directions for future research. Design. The databases PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for studies relating to physical restraint (including holding) in Norwegian psychiatric hospitals, supplemented with hand searches. Results. 28 studies were included. Most of the studies were on rates of restraint, but there were also some studies on perceptions of patients and staff, case studies, and ethnographic studies. There was only one intervention study. There are differences in use between wards and institutions, which in part may be explained by differences in patient populations. Staff appear to be less negative to the use of restraint than patients. Conclusions. The studies that were identified were primarily concerned with rates of use and with patients' and staff's perspectives. More interventional studies are needed to move the field forward. PMID:26682211

  3. [Suicide in psychiatric hospitals : Results, risk factors and therapeutic measures].

    PubMed

    Wolfersdorf, M; Vogel, R; Vogl, R; Grebner, M; Keller, F; Purucker, M; Wurst, F M

    2016-05-01

    Suicide prevention is a core responsibility of psychiatry and psychotherapy. Periods of change in psychiatric inpatient treatment concepts are usually also accompanied by an increase in psychopathological behavior and with increased suicide rates in psychiatric hospitals, as seen in the 1970s and 1980s in Germany. That this represented a real increase of inpatient suicides during those years was confirmed and subsequently the number and rate of inpatient suicides has decreased from approximately 280 out of 100,000 admissions of patients in 1980 to approximately 50 in 2014. Death can also occur in psychiatric hospitals and an absolute prevention is not possible even under optimal conditions of therapy and nursing, communication and security. The suicide rate has clearly decreased over the last two decades in relation to admissions. The group of young male schizophrenic patients newly identified as having a high clinical suicide risk has decreased among the suicide victims whereas the percentage of severely depressed patients with delusions has increased. This reduction could be associated with the comprehensive improvements in educational and training programs in the field of suicide and suicide prevention, objectification of coping methods, development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, improvements in therapy and relationship possibilities and a general reduction in the number of suicides in Germany. PMID:27090898

  4. Clinical outcomes and mortality associated with weekend admission to psychiatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rashmi; Chesney, Edward; Cullen, Alexis E.; Tulloch, Alex D.; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; McGuire, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies indicate that risk of mortality is higher for patients admitted to acute hospitals at the weekend. However, less is known about clinical outcomes among patients admitted to psychiatric hospitals. Aims To investigate whether weekend admission to a psychiatric hospital is associated with worse clinical outcomes. Method Data were obtained from 45 264 consecutive psychiatric hospital admissions. The association of weekend admission with in-patient mortality, duration of hospital admission and risk of readmission was investigated using multivariable regression analyses. Secondary analyses were performed to investigate the distribution of admissions, discharges, in-patient mortality, episodes of seclusion and violent incidents on different days of the week. Results There were 7303 weekend admissions (16.1%). Patients who were aged between 26 and 35 years, female or from a minority ethnic group were more likely to be admitted at the weekend. Patients admitted at the weekend were more likely to present via acute hospital services, other psychiatric hospitals and the criminal justice system than to be admitted directly from their own home. Weekend admission was associated with a shorter duration of admission (B coefficient −21.1 days, 95% CI −24.6 to −17.6, P<0.001) and an increased risk of readmission in the 12 months following index admission (incidence rate ratio 1.13, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.18, P<0.001), but in-patient mortality (odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.23, P = 0.30) was not greater than for weekday admission. Fewer episodes of seclusion occurred at the weekend but there was no significant variation in deaths during hospital admission or violent incidents on different days of the week. Conclusions Being admitted at the weekend was not associated with an increased risk of in-patient mortality. However, patients admitted at the weekend had shorter admissions and were more likely to be readmitted, suggesting that they may represent a

  5. [Psychiatric hospitalization for mental illness: past, present and future].

    PubMed

    Martínez Ferretti, José María

    2011-01-01

    The use of psychiatric hospitalization for mental illness has evolved through Modernity. In the last century, indefinite and involuntary committal was a widespread practice but has now become an extraordinary and short-term therapeutic recourse. Even though law experts, doctors and other mental health professionals agree on the benefits of this shift, in practice there are disagreements rooted in the shortcomings of health service providers. The current medical and legal criteria for hospitalization of patients with mental disorders should move away from the concept of endangerment and embrace therapeutic procedures and social care. New contemporary challenges, such as drugs and violence, require the implementation of a social strategy that is more comprehensive than medical treatment. This article presents a series of case studies describing the circumstances that led to the hospitalization of mental health patients, mostly in the city of Buenos Aires. PMID:22091456

  6. Physician Prescribing Practices of Vitamin D in a Psychiatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Trigoboff, Eileen; Opler, Lewis; Demler, Tammie Lee

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D supplementation has become an increasingly popular prescribing practice, despite our limited knowledge of both the definition and degree of deficiency as well as the expected benefits or risks of exogenous administration. Many of the hypothesized benefits of vitamin D supplementation include a variety of improvements in mental health; however, these claims are not consistently or robustly supported by current research. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of what is currently known about vitamin D deficiency and about outcomes of supplementation as well as a summary of the data relative to prescribing practices for inpatients in an urban psychiatric hospital. PMID:27803841

  7. [Psychiatric Hospital San Juan de Dios. One hundred years later].

    PubMed

    Cocula-León, Horacio

    2014-01-01

    Mental health and psychiatric diseases have always attracted people's and health authorities' attention due to its magical approach, the lack of knowledge that surrounds them, and, at the same time, the religious fear they provoke. Both have played an important role in the history of humanity, of public health politics, and of physicians. The places where psychiatric patients were treated are of historical interest, because through the historical knowledge we can identify an approach from the science and the health policies that prevailed in each age. At the beginning of the 20th century, it was developed in México a new model of hospital care attention to psychiatric patients. La Casa de Salud San Juan de Dios para Pacientes Alienados is an example; the concept "alienated patients" suggests a social and cultural perspective. This paper presents a chronological type description of one of the major institutions involved in mental health care in México. Similarly, it shows a review of the events that affected the religious order San Juan de Dios from 1901 to 2012, when the hospitaller order was reinstated in México and established the Casa de Salud San Juan de Dios para Pacientes Alienados in the town of Zapopan, Jalisco, institution that exists up to the present day and keeps participating in the mental health care in the state of Jalisco, with the current name of Servicios de Salud San Juan de Dios.

  8. Psychiatric disorders and clinical correlates of suicidal patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital in Tokyo

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital with suicidal behavior (SB) are considered to be especially at high risk of suicide. However, the number of studies that have addressed this patient population remains insufficient compared to that of studies on suicidal patients in emergency or medical settings. The purpose of this study is to seek features of a sample of newly admitted suicidal psychiatric patients in a metropolitan area of Japan. Method 155 suicidal patients consecutively admitted to a large psychiatric center during a 20-month period, admission styles of whom were mostly involuntary, were assessed using Structured Clinical Interviews for DSM-IV Axis I and II Disorders (SCID-I CV and SCID-II) and SB-related psychiatric measures. Associations of the psychiatric diagnoses and SB-related characteristics with gender and age were examined. Results The common DSM-IV axis I diagnoses were affective disorders 62%, anxiety disorders 56% and substance-related disorders 38%. 56% of the subjects were diagnosed as having borderline PD, and 87% of them, at least one type of personality disorder (PD). SB methods used prior to admission were self-cutting 41%, overdosing 32%, self-strangulation 15%, jumping from a height 12% and attempting traffic death 10%, the first two of which were frequent among young females. The median (range) of the total number of SBs in the lifetime history was 7 (1-141). Severity of depressive symptomatology, suicidal intent and other symptoms, proportions of the subjects who reported SB-preceding life events and life problems, and childhood and adolescent abuse were comparable to those of the previous studies conducted in medical or emergency service settings. Gender and age-relevant life-problems and life events were identified. Conclusions Features of the studied sample were the high prevalence of affective disorders, anxiety disorders and borderline PD, a variety of SB methods used prior to admission and frequent SB repetition

  9. A 5-year retrospective study of demographic, anamnestic, and clinical factors related to psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescent patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Cimino, Nina; Di Pietro, Elena; Pollutri, Gabriella; Neviani, Vittoria; Ferri, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychiatric emergencies of children and adolescents have greatly increased during the last years, but this phenomenon has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between acute psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescents and selected variables to highlight risk factors for psychiatric emergencies. Methods This retrospective research was conducted in the acute psychiatric public ward, Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment (SPDT), and in the residential facility for adolescents, “The Medlar”, located in Modena. The sample was constituted by all adolescent patients (n=101, age range 14–18) who had acute hospitalizations (n=140) in SPDT and had been successively transferred to “The Medlar” (n=83), from February 2, 2010 to January 31, 2015. From clinical charts, we extracted demographic and anamnestic characteristics of patients and clinical variables related to hospitalizations. Data were statistically analyzed. Results Sixty-one percent of our patients lived with one divorced parent, with adoptive or immigrant family, or in institutions; 51% had experienced stressful events during childhood; 81% had a normal intellective level, but only 6% presented regular school performance. Parental psychiatric illness was negatively related, in a statistically significantly way, with onset age of adolescent mental disorders (coefficient −2.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −3.53 to 1.01, P<0.001, single linear regression; odds ratio: 4.39, 95% CI: 1.43–13.47, P<0.010, single logistic regression). The most frequent reasons for admission were aggressive behavior in males and suicide risk in females (P=0.002). The most frequent psychiatric diagnosis at SPDT discharge was “conduct disorder”, more frequent in males, followed by “adjustment disorder”, more frequent in females (P=0.001). In SPDT, the adolescent hospitalizations progressively increased fivefold at the end of the observation period

  10. Transnational Disorders: Returned Migrants at Oaxaca's Psychiatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Whitney L

    2015-03-01

    This article examines experiences of returned migrants seeking mental health care at the public psychiatric hospital in Oaxaca, Mexico. Approximately one-third of the hospital's patients have migration experience, and many return to Oaxaca due to mental health crises precipitated by conditions of structural vulnerability and "illegality" in the United States. Once home, migrants, their families, and their doctors struggle to interpret and allay these "transnational disorders"-disorders structurally produced and personally experienced within the borders of more than one country. Considering how space and time shape illness and treatment among transnational migrants, I contend that a critical phenomenology of illegality must incorporate migrant experience and political economy on both sides of the border before, during, and after migration.

  11. A review of offenders remanded in a State Psychiatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Lim, L E; Chan, K L; Tan, L L; Sung, M; Loh, M I; Straughan, P T

    2000-03-01

    Patients remanded over a two-year period to Woodbridge Hospital by Court Order were studied retrospectively. Schizophrenia was the most common diagnosis, theft and robbery the most prevalent offences. Males greatly outnumbered females. There were important gender differences, with males tending to commit sexual offences and females, theft and mischief. Males were less likely to be acquainted with their victims but those who caused hurt were more likely to know their victims. Outrage of modesty and theft were more likely to be committed against strangers. The reconviction rate was 26%, with repeat offenders more likely to commit sexual offences and theft. Patients who had previous psychiatric hospitalisation were more likely to be attending follow-up prior to and after release from remand and were more likely to have schizophrenia. Those assessed to be fit to plead were either fined or given jail sentences. Unsoundness of mind and unfitness to plead were associated with further remand in this hospital.

  12. Robert Schumann in the psychiatric hospital at Endenich.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Robert Schumann (1810-1856) spent the last two-and-a-half years of his life in the private psychiatric hospital in Endenich. His medical records emerged in 1991 and were published by B. R. Appel in 2006. Daily entries document the treatment typical at that time for what was at first considered to be "melancholy with delusions": Shielding from stimuli, physical procedures, and a dietary regimen. The feared, actual diagnosis, a "general (incomplete) paralysis," becomes a certainty in the course of the paranoid-hallucinatory symptoms with cerebro-organic characteristics and agitated states, differences in pupil size, and increasing speech disturbances. In the medicine of the time, syphilis is just emerging as the suspected cause, and the term "progressive paralysis" is coined as typical for the course. Proof of the Treponema pallidum infection and the serologic reaction is not obtained until 1906. People close to Robert, in particular his wife Clara and the circle of friends around Brahms and Joachim, cared intensively for him and suffered under the therapeutic isolation. The medical records and illness-related letters contradict the theory that Schumann was disposed of by being put into the psychiatric hospital; they show the concern of all during the unfavorable illness course. PMID:25684293

  13. Robert Schumann in the psychiatric hospital at Endenich.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Robert Schumann (1810-1856) spent the last two-and-a-half years of his life in the private psychiatric hospital in Endenich. His medical records emerged in 1991 and were published by B. R. Appel in 2006. Daily entries document the treatment typical at that time for what was at first considered to be "melancholy with delusions": Shielding from stimuli, physical procedures, and a dietary regimen. The feared, actual diagnosis, a "general (incomplete) paralysis," becomes a certainty in the course of the paranoid-hallucinatory symptoms with cerebro-organic characteristics and agitated states, differences in pupil size, and increasing speech disturbances. In the medicine of the time, syphilis is just emerging as the suspected cause, and the term "progressive paralysis" is coined as typical for the course. Proof of the Treponema pallidum infection and the serologic reaction is not obtained until 1906. People close to Robert, in particular his wife Clara and the circle of friends around Brahms and Joachim, cared intensively for him and suffered under the therapeutic isolation. The medical records and illness-related letters contradict the theory that Schumann was disposed of by being put into the psychiatric hospital; they show the concern of all during the unfavorable illness course.

  14. Improving Awareness of an Acute Psychiatric Unit's Capacity for Admission.

    PubMed

    Benolkin, Lauren; Kinstler, Dan; Delaney, Kathleen R

    2015-08-01

    New admissions to psychiatric inpatient units can significantly impact the environment and level of safety. Maintaining safety is a core and critical responsibility of nursing, but nurses are often overlooked in the decision to admit a patient. Missed opportunities for dialogue between nurses and the admitting physician challenge nurses' ability to proactively manage the therapeutic environment. When nurses are limited in this ability, the outcome can be an unpredictable and unstable milieu. In a 25-bed acute psychiatric inpatient unit, a formalized communication system among the multidisciplinary admission team was developed. Data collected over 1 year demonstrated improved safety. Increasing the admitting provider's awareness of the current unit acuity and involving the nursing staff early in the admission process improved collaboration among care team members and reduced risks to maintaining milieu safety. PMID:26268479

  15. Bedding, not boarding. Psychiatric patients boarded in hospital EDs create crisis for patient care and hospital finances.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Beth

    2013-11-18

    As the supply of psychiatric beds dwindles, hospitals are devising innovative ways handle psych patients who come through the emergency department. Some collaborate with other hospitals, use separate pysch EDs or refer patients to residential treatment centers.

  16. [Discharge Dynamics and Related Factors of Long-stay Patients in Psychiatric Hospitals].

    PubMed

    Kono, Toshiaki; Shiraishi, Hiromi; Tachimori, Hisateru; Koyama, Asuka; Naganuma, Yoichi; Takeshima, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    significantly correlated with the diagnosis, district, hospital founder, and presence of psychiatric emergency or acute-phase treatment (acute-phase-type) wards in hospitals, but not with the hospitalization type, presence of psychiatric long-term care wards, or presence of senile dementia wards. The probability of discharge (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]) regarding the diagnosis was higher in dementia (2.47 [2.23-2.74]), alcoholism (2.09 [1.71-2.55]), depression (2.07 [1.65-2.59]), and bipolar disorder (1.70 [1.35-2.16]) than in schizophrenia (reference). Regarding the district, the probability was higher in Kinki (1.32 [1.12-1.54]) and Kyushu (1.27 [1.14-1.42]) than Kanto (reference). The probability was also lower in private hospitals (0.58 [0.51-0.66]) than in public/university hospitals (reference), and higher in hospitals with acute-phase-type wards (1.24 [1.14-1.35]) than in those without them (reference). The most common residential setting post-discharge for the total sample of weighted Group B patients was temporary hospitalization in another department prearranging psychiatric readmission (THAD, 35.8%), followed by death (18.2%), living with families/relatives (LF/R, 11.3%), a residential care facility for the aged (RCF-A, 9.5%), residential care facility for the disabled (RCF-D, 8.6%), hospitalization in another psychiatric hospital (7.4%), living alone (LA, 4.3%), permanent hospitalization in another department (PHAD, 4.3%), and others (0.7%). In dementia, death was common (31.0%) ; LF/R (1.8%) and LA (0.0%) were rare. As the age increased, the proportions of LF/R, LA, RCF-D, RCF-A, PHAD, and death changed; particularly, LA decreased and death increased markedly with age. Additionally, THAD amounted to approximately 40% in every age class of 40 years or older, contrasting with 11.4% in those under 40 years. The study's limitations include a low response rate, the elapsed time after the survey, and lack of attention paid to symptom severity. Nevertheless, it

  17. READMIT: a clinical risk index to predict 30-day readmission after discharge from acute psychiatric units.

    PubMed

    Vigod, Simone N; Kurdyak, Paul A; Seitz, Dallas; Herrmann, Nathan; Fung, Kinwah; Lin, Elizabeth; Perlman, Christopher; Taylor, Valerie H; Rochon, Paula A; Gruneir, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    Our aim was to create a clinically useful risk index, administered prior to discharge, for determining the probability of psychiatric readmission within 30 days of hospital discharge for general psychiatric inpatients. We used population-level sociodemographic and health administrative data to develop a predictive model for 30-day readmission among adults discharged from an acute psychiatric unit in Ontario, Canada (2008-2011), and converted the final model into a risk index system. We derived the predictive model in one-half of the sample (n = 32,749) and validated it in the other half of the sample (n = 32,750). Variables independently associated with 30-day readmission (forming the mnemonic READMIT) were: (R) Repeat admissions; (E) Emergent admissions (i.e. harm to self/others); (D) Diagnoses (psychosis, bipolar and/or personality disorder), and unplanned Discharge; (M) Medical comorbidity; (I) prior service use Intensity; and (T) Time in hospital. Each 1-point increase in READMIT score (range 0-41) increased the odds of 30-day readmission by 11% (odds ratio 1.11, 95% CI 1.10-1.12). The index had moderate discriminative capacity in both derivation (C-statistic = 0.631) and validation (C-statistic = 0.630) datasets. Determining risk of psychiatric readmission for individual patients is a critical step in efforts to address the potentially avoidable high rate of this negative outcome. The READMIT index provides a framework for identifying patients at high risk of 30-day readmission prior to discharge, and for the development, evaluation and delivery of interventions that can assist with optimizing the transition to community care for patients following psychiatric discharge.

  18. The process of whistleblowing in a Japanese psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Kayoko; Hayama, Yumiko; Asai, Atsushi; Kosugi, Shinji

    2008-09-01

    This study aims to unveil the process of whistleblowing. Two nursing staff members who worked in a psychiatric hospital convicted of large-scale wrongdoing were interviewed. Data were analyzed using a modified grounded theory approach. Analysis of the interviews demonstrated that they did not decide to whistleblow when they were suspicious or had an awareness of wrongdoing. They continued to work, driven by appreciation, affection, and a sense of duty. Their decision to whistleblow was ultimately motivated by firm conviction. Shortly after whistleblowing, wavering emotions were observed, consisting of a guilty conscience, fear of retribution, and pride, which subsequently transformed to stable emotions containing a sense of relief and regret for delayed action. It is necessary for nurses to recognize that their professional responsibility is primarily to patients, not to organizations. Nurses should also have professional judgment about appropriate allegiance and actions.

  19. Acute care hospitals' accountability to provincial funders.

    PubMed

    Kromm, Seija K; Ross Baker, G; Wodchis, Walter P; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used.

  20. Acute care hospitals' accountability to provincial funders.

    PubMed

    Kromm, Seija K; Ross Baker, G; Wodchis, Walter P; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used. PMID:25305386

  1. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children. PMID:27613655

  2. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children.

  3. Psychiatric hospitalization in Ontario: the revolving door in perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Woogh, C. M.; Meier, H. M.; Eastwood, M. R.

    1977-01-01

    Ontario government statistics have indicated that during the 1960s the proportion of readmissions to psychiatric hospitals doubled to form two thirds of all admissions. Since this pertained to events rather than to individuals, a cohort of patients first admitted in 1969 was followed for 4 years to trace the pattern of readmission and the characteristics of patients at risk of readmission. Routinely returned data were linked and a sample from the greater metropolitan Toronto area was randomly selected. Of the cohort, 31% were readmitted, 8% three or more times. Age and diagnosis distinguished those readmitted. Most with multiple readmissions were under 25 years of age. Although diagnoses were equally distributed on first admission among psychotic, neurotic and other nonpsychotic disorders, with no significant change on readmission or multiple readmission, there was a predictably greater proportion of functional psychoses among the high-risk group and also an equal representation of personality, addictive and the remaining nonpsychotic conditions. The vulnerable few are identifiable early in their intermittent hospital career. It can be concluded that statistics suggesting that two thirds of admissions are readmissions are misleading. PMID:856431

  4. Nursing interventions for substance use during psychiatric hospital admissions: Clinical context and predictors.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Duncan; Warren, Jonathan; Odubanwo, Adewunmi; Bowers, Len

    2015-12-01

    Empirical information about how nurses manage substance use on psychiatric wards is lacking. The aims of the study were to identify the frequency and clinical features of incidents among a sample of inpatients over a 12-month period and how nursing staff intervened. Electronic, anonymized inpatient records were searched for incidents of substance use on 17 acute psychiatric wards in four hospitals in London. Searches were conducted for all patients admitted during 2012 and details of incidents and patient characteristics were extracted for analysis. Substance use was reported for 291 patients, with 25 incidents per 100 patients admitted to hospital. Only half of the incidents were followed by a response that specifically addressed the patients' substance use behaviour. These interactions usually concerned the circumstances and reasons for use, but rarely involved specific support for patients' substance use problems. The likelihood of staff taking any form of action was increased if the patient had been formally admitted, and was reduced if the patient was subject to containment during the shift or had a history of self-harm. The results demonstrate that nurses require specific training and guidance on supporting substance using patients. PMID:26300518

  5. A comparison of acute psychiatric care under Medicaid carve-outs, HMOs, and fee-for-service.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Christopher G; Chafets, Julia

    2010-11-01

    This study compares the use of acute psychiatric hospitalization; selected outcomes, including rehospitalization; as well as costs associated with the health maintenance organization (HMO), carve-out, and fee-for-service models as implemented in the Massachusetts Medicaid program between FY1994 and FY2000. This is a longitudinal analysis that primarily uses unduplicated individual data from the Massachusetts Case Mix database. Analyses focus on 56,518 individuals who were psychiatrically hospitalized on acute units within 57 hospitals. They employ Cox regression to compare rehospitalization among the three programs. The hypotheses were strongly supported: HMOs have the most substantial impacts in minimizing service provision, with the carve-out program having an impact intermediate between the HMO and fee-for-service programs. Lower utilization rates were associated with lower overall rates of hospitalization, shorter lengths of stay, fewer repeated stays, and less geographic access and greater displacement of psychiatric patients to medical units. The final model of rehospitalization has an overall predictive accuracy of 59.6%.

  6. Daily weather variables and affective disorder admissions to psychiatric hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have reported that admission rates in patients with affective disorders are subject to seasonal variation. Notwithstanding, there has been limited evaluation of the degree to which changeable daily meteorological patterns influence affective disorder admission rates. A handful of small studies have alluded to a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (heat waves in particular), wind direction and sunshine. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test, ARIMA and time-series regression analyses to examine whether daily meteorological variables—namely wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, hours of sunshine, sunlight radiation and temperature—influence admission rates for mania and depression across 12 regions in Ireland over a 31-year period. Although we found some very weak but interesting trends for barometric pressure in relation to mania admissions, daily meteorological patterns did not appear to affect hospital admissions overall for mania or depression. Our results do not support the small number of papers to date that suggest a link between daily meteorological variables and affective disorder admissions. Further study is needed.

  7. Smoking bans in secure psychiatric hospitals and prisons.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Danny H; Rees, Megan A

    2014-09-01

    The proposal of complete smoking bans in closed institutions, such as prisons and psychiatric hospitals, creates a tension between individual "rights" and the health of all members of that community. Smokers in closed institutions generally smoke more, suffer more health consequences and are less likely to quit than smokers in other settings. Complete smoking bans do not cause an increase in behavioural problems, nor do bans cause worsening of mental illness or quality of life. Although infrequently tested, the responsibility of public institutions to protect others from second-hand smoke has usually outweighed any individual "right to smoke" in legal judgments. A substantial cultural shift may be required from considering smoking a "rare pleasure" during detention to the realisation that smoking is the most significant reversible health risk factor for this population. The implementation of complete smoking bans in closed institutions is challenging and requires careful and proactive planning by staff. As complete smoking bans are being considered in many institutions and jurisdictions, this column presents a review of the evidence base and ethical issues involved.

  8. Daily weather variables and affective disorder admissions to psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have reported that admission rates in patients with affective disorders are subject to seasonal variation. Notwithstanding, there has been limited evaluation of the degree to which changeable daily meteorological patterns influence affective disorder admission rates. A handful of small studies have alluded to a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (heat waves in particular), wind direction and sunshine. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test, ARIMA and time-series regression analyses to examine whether daily meteorological variables--namely wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, hours of sunshine, sunlight radiation and temperature--influence admission rates for mania and depression across 12 regions in Ireland over a 31-year period. Although we found some very weak but interesting trends for barometric pressure in relation to mania admissions, daily meteorological patterns did not appear to affect hospital admissions overall for mania or depression. Our results do not support the small number of papers to date that suggest a link between daily meteorological variables and affective disorder admissions. Further study is needed.

  9. Smoking bans in secure psychiatric hospitals and prisons.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Danny H; Rees, Megan A

    2014-09-01

    The proposal of complete smoking bans in closed institutions, such as prisons and psychiatric hospitals, creates a tension between individual "rights" and the health of all members of that community. Smokers in closed institutions generally smoke more, suffer more health consequences and are less likely to quit than smokers in other settings. Complete smoking bans do not cause an increase in behavioural problems, nor do bans cause worsening of mental illness or quality of life. Although infrequently tested, the responsibility of public institutions to protect others from second-hand smoke has usually outweighed any individual "right to smoke" in legal judgments. A substantial cultural shift may be required from considering smoking a "rare pleasure" during detention to the realisation that smoking is the most significant reversible health risk factor for this population. The implementation of complete smoking bans in closed institutions is challenging and requires careful and proactive planning by staff. As complete smoking bans are being considered in many institutions and jurisdictions, this column presents a review of the evidence base and ethical issues involved. PMID:25341317

  10. Recidivism risk factors are correlated with a history of psychiatric hospitalization among sex offenders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung C; Hanson, R Karl

    2016-08-01

    Sexual offenders are more likely to have a history of psychiatric hospitalization compared with the general population. This finding suggests that a history of psychiatric hospitalization is a plausible risk factor for the initiation of sexual crimes. It is less clear, however, whether psychiatric hospitalization is associated with risk factors for criminal recidivism. Consequently, the current study examined the correlates of psychiatric hospitalization and its relevance for risk assessment in a sample of sexual offenders on community supervision (N = 947). In this sample, a history of psychiatric hospitalization significantly increased the rate of sexual recidivism (hazard ratio = 1.95). After controlling for well-established risk factors, however, the association was no longer statistically significant. Consequently, this study supported an indirect effect of a history of psychiatric hospitalization, such that the association between psychiatric symptoms and recidivism was mediated by criminogenic needs (e.g., poor general self-regulation, loneliness, and social rejection). Replication studies are needed to confirm this association, and to further understand the link between mental illness and recidivism for sexual offenders. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27504645

  11. Recidivism risk factors are correlated with a history of psychiatric hospitalization among sex offenders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung C; Hanson, R Karl

    2016-08-01

    Sexual offenders are more likely to have a history of psychiatric hospitalization compared with the general population. This finding suggests that a history of psychiatric hospitalization is a plausible risk factor for the initiation of sexual crimes. It is less clear, however, whether psychiatric hospitalization is associated with risk factors for criminal recidivism. Consequently, the current study examined the correlates of psychiatric hospitalization and its relevance for risk assessment in a sample of sexual offenders on community supervision (N = 947). In this sample, a history of psychiatric hospitalization significantly increased the rate of sexual recidivism (hazard ratio = 1.95). After controlling for well-established risk factors, however, the association was no longer statistically significant. Consequently, this study supported an indirect effect of a history of psychiatric hospitalization, such that the association between psychiatric symptoms and recidivism was mediated by criminogenic needs (e.g., poor general self-regulation, loneliness, and social rejection). Replication studies are needed to confirm this association, and to further understand the link between mental illness and recidivism for sexual offenders. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. Detection, occurrence and fate of 22 psychiatric pharmaceuticals in psychiatric hospital and municipal wastewater treatment plants in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shengliu; Jiang, Xiaoman; Xia, Xinghui; Zhang, Haixia; Zheng, Shaokui

    2013-03-01

    The liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS) method coupled with an automated solid-phase extraction procedure has been developed to identify 22 psychiatric pharmaceuticals, including seven anxiolytic-sedative-hypnotics, six antidepressants, and nine anti-schizophrenia drugs, in wastewater samples from two psychiatric hospital wastewater treatment plants (P-WWTPs) and three municipal wastewater treatment plants (M-WWTPs) in Beijing, China. Analyte recoveries from spiking experiments in the WWTP influent and effluent at three concentrations ranged from 70% to 110%, excluding sulpiride, ziprasidone, and olanzapine. Method detection limits for five, eight, and nine analytes in the WWTP influent and effluent were 20-80, 1-16, and <1 ng L(-1), respectively. High psychiatric pharmaceutical concentrations (e.g., ∼942 ng L(-1) oxazepam, 5552-12,782 ng L(-1) clozapine, 2762-9832 ng L(-1) sulpiride, and 2030-4967 ng L(-1) quetiapine) were frequently observed in P-WWTP influent compared to M-WWTPs. Although P-WWTPs typically had higher removal rates, significantly higher concentrations of the target compounds were observed in the P-WWTP secondary effluent than in the M-WWTP influent (e.g., ∼752 ng L(-1) oxazepam, ∼8183 ng L(-1) clozapine, ∼10,833 ng L(-1) sulpiride, and ∼1168 ng L(-1) quetiapine). Thus, the discharge control of psychiatric pharmaceuticals from psychiatric hospitals requires improvement. PMID:23228908

  13. Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N = 181, n = 146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p = 0.021), support for innovation (p = 0.042) and task orientation (p = 0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing.

  14. Defining the Needs of Patients with Intellectual Disabilities in the High Security Psychiatric Hospitals in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, S. D.; Dolan, M.; Johnston, S.; Middleton, H.; Harty, M. A.; Carlisle, J.; Thornicroft, G.; Appleby, L.; Jones, P.

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that a substantial proportion of the patients with intellectual disabilities (ID) in the high security psychiatric hospitals (HSPHs) should be transferred to more appropriate services to cater for their specific needs in the longer term. The individual and placement needs of high secure psychiatric patients detained…

  15. The Measurement, Analysis and Implementation of a Corporate Image Program: The Case of a Psychiatric Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbeck, Matt A.; Buchanan, Gary W.

    1987-01-01

    Measured a psychiatric hospital's image, using qualitative and quantitative methods. Used data from the consumer public to illustrate the development and implementation of an image program stressing multi-public awareness, preference and utilization of the hospital's services vis-a-vis the hospital's mission statement. This study demonstrated…

  16. [Collaboration of the general practitioner and the psychiatrist with the psychiatric hospital. A literature review].

    PubMed

    Spiessl, H; Cording, C

    2000-05-01

    Co-operation of physicians in private practice with psychiatric hospitals was investigated in Germany scarcely until now, although evaluation of consumer satisfaction is of great importance to quality assurance in psychiatry. In this paper, findings from previous studies are presented together with data from interviews with general practitioners and psychiatrists, evaluating their expectations regarding psychiatric hospitals. Substantial problem area in collaboration is referral to the psychiatric hospital. Apart from sociodemographic and disease-related variables, referral practice depends on referring physician's attitudes and competence in psychiatry, and provider influences like delay of admission, communication with referring physician, and competence of the hospital. As conclusion, constructive collaboration must be developed at the interface of outpatient and inpatient care. On account of increasing diversification of psychiatric services, functional network should be an ongoing goal to improve treatment continuity of patients with mental disorders. PMID:10858945

  17. Psychiatric diagnoses after hospitalization with work-related burn injuries in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Naomi J; Bonauto, David K; Adams, Darrin

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to describe workers who were hospitalized with work-related burn injuries and their psychiatric sequelae in Washington State. Psychiatric sequelae of interest were depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and other anxiety disorders. Workers' compensation claims meeting a definition for a hospitalized burn patient from Washington State from January 2001 through April 2008 were analyzed. The resulting claims were searched for the presence of certain psychiatric diagnoses or treatment codes, and descriptive analyses performed. In Washington State during the time period, the prevalence of claims with psychiatric diagnoses after hospitalization with burn injury was 19%. Claims with psychiatric diagnoses had higher medical costs and more days of time loss than those without these diagnoses. Workers with electrical burns in the construction industry and in construction and extraction occupations had a higher proportion of psychiatric sequelae. Burns are devastating yet preventable injuries. Workers who were hospitalized with work-related burn injuries, particularly those in certain industries and occupations and those with electrical burns, are at high risk for developing serious psychiatric sequelae with major costs to both the individual and the society.

  18. Discharging patients from acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Helen

    2016-02-10

    Planning for patient discharge is an essential element of any admission to an acute setting, but may often be left until the patient is almost ready to leave hospital. This article emphasises why discharge planning is important and lists the essential principles that should be addressed to ensure that patients leave at an optimum time, feeling confident and safe to do so. Early assessment, early planning and co-ordination of all the teams involved in the patient's care are essential. Effective communication between the various teams and with the patient and their family or carer(s) is necessary. Patients should leave hospital with all the information, medications and equipment they require. Appropriate plans should have been developed and communicated to the receiving community or non-acute team. When patient discharge is effective, complications as a result of extended lengths of hospital stay are prevented, hospital beds are used efficiently and readmissions are reduced.

  19. Switch Function and Pathological Dissociation in Acute Psychiatric Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chui-De; Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chien, Yi-Ling; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Liu, Chih-Min; Yeh, Yei-Yu; Hwu, Hai-Gwo

    2016-01-01

    Swift switching, along with atypical ability on updating and inhibition, has been found in non-clinical dissociators. However, whether swift switching is a cognitive endophenotype that intertwines with traumatisation and pathological dissociation remains unknown. Unspecified acute psychiatric patients were recruited to verify a hypothesis that pathological dissociation is associated with swift switching and traumatisation may explain this relationship. Behavioural measures of intellectual function and three executive functions including updating, switching and inhibition were administered, together with standardised scales to evaluate pathological dissociation and traumatisation. Our results showed superior control ability on switching and updating in inpatients who displayed more symptoms of pathological dissociation. When all three executive functions were entered as predictors, in addition to intellectual quotient and demographic variables to regress upon pathological dissociation, switching rather than updating remained the significant predictor. Importantly, the relationship between pathological dissociation and switching became non-significant when the effect of childhood trauma were controlled. The results support a trauma-related switching hypothesis which postulates swift switching as a cognitive endophenotype of pathological dissociation; traumatisation in childhood may explain the importance of swift switching. PMID:27123578

  20. Treatment of forensic patients: an expanding role for public psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Linhorst, D M; Turner, M A

    1999-02-01

    This article explores the increased role of state-operated public psychiatric hospitals in treating forensic patients. Patients with a forensic legal status have a mental illness and are involved with the criminal justice system. Using data from Missouri's forensic system, the article compares the characteristics of voluntary hospital patients with those of the largest hospitalized group of forensic patients--those found not guilty by reason of insanity (NGRI). Overall, NGRI patients tended to be higher functioning, less likely to have committed assaultive acts, and more likely to have substance abuse and personality disorder diagnoses. The article explores the treatment needs of forensic patients who reside in public psychiatric hospitals and discusses the effect of the strong presence of forensic patients in public psychiatric hospitals on social work practice, including clinical work with forensic patients, social work administration, and social work advocacy.

  1. Restless leg syndrome in hospitalized psychiatric patients in Lebanon: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Talih, Farid; Ajaltouni, Jean; Kobeissy, Firas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To characterize and describe the prevalence of restless leg syndrome (RLS) in hospitalized psychiatric patients and to investigate the correlations between patient profile and RLS. Methods Demographic information, psychiatric diagnoses, psychotropic medication use, and history of substance use were collected from hospitalized psychiatric patients at the American University of Beirut Medical Center; Beirut, Lebanon. A validated questionnaire to evaluate RLS symptomatology was also administered to 126 participants who agreed to participate, as well as questionnaires for insomnia, depression, and anxiety symptoms. Statistical analysis was conducted to detect the prevalence of RLS among the participants and to examine correlations with RLS in a hospitalized psychiatric population. Results Out of the 126 participants who completed the survey, RLS was detected in 18% of the participants. Of interest, RLS was also found to be associated with higher depressive symptomatology, suicidal ideation, and working night shifts. PMID:27785035

  2. Improving Psychiatric Hospital Care for Pediatric Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Gabriels, Robin L.; Agnew, John A.; Beresford, Carol; Morrow, Mary Ann; Mesibov, Gary; Wamboldt, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and/or intellectual disabilities (ID) are at greater risk for psychiatric hospitalization compared to children with other disorders. However, general psychiatric hospital environments are not adapted for the unique learning styles, needs, and abilities of this population, and there are few specialized hospital-based psychiatric care programs in the United States. This paper compares patient outcomes from a specialized psychiatric hospital program developed for pediatric patients with an ASD and/or ID to prior outcomes of this patient population in a general psychiatric program at a children's hospital. Record review data indicate improved outcomes for patients in the specialized program of reduced recidivism rates (12% versus 33%) and decreased average lengths of inpatient stay (as short as 26 days versus 45 days). Available data from a subset of patients (n = 43) in the specialized program showed a decrease in irritability and hyperactivity behaviors from admission to discharge and that 35 previously undetected ASD diagnoses were made. Results from this preliminary study support specialized psychiatric care practices with this population to positively impact their health care outcomes. PMID:22934179

  3. Through the lens of the hospital magazine: Downshire and Holywell psychiatric hospitals in the 1960s and 1970s.

    PubMed

    Prior, Pauline; McClelland, Gillian

    2013-12-01

    An exploration of the pages of two psychiatric hospital magazines, Speedwell from Holywell Hospital, Antrim, and The Sketch from Downshire Hospital, Downpatrick, reveals the activity-filled lives of patients and staff during the 1960s and 1970s. This was a time of great change in mental health care. It was also a time of political turbulence in Northern Ireland. With large in-patient populations, both hospitals had a range of occupational and sporting activities available to patients and staff. The magazines formed part of the effort to promote the ethos of a therapeutic community. While hospital magazines may be viewed as one aspect of an institutional system that allowed people to cut themselves off from the wider society, they also provided opportunities for budding writers to express their views on life in a hospital from the service-user perspective. As such, they offer some valuable insights into the lives of psychiatric patients.

  4. The Use of Movies to Facilitate Family Engagement in Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, David

    2007-01-01

    Studies indicate that the impact of family involvement may be the most important predictor of successful psychiatric hospitalization of adolescents. Yet the ability to engage both an adolescent and his or her family in family therapy in the context of what is often an involuntary hospitalization is a major challenge. A number of promising…

  5. Validation of the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS) with Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenson, Lance P.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Hollander, Beth L. G.; Dyl, Jennifer; Rizzo, Christie J.; Steinley, Douglas L.; Spirito, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the concurrent validity of the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS) for adolescent inpatients aged 12 to 18. The results reveal moderate agreement between ChIPS diagnoses and Schedule for Affective Disorder sand Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime version diagnoses.

  6. Effects of Multiple Maltreatment Experiences among Psychiatrically Hospitalized Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boxer, Paul; Terranova, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Relying on indicators coded from information collected routinely during intake assessments at a secure inpatient psychiatric facility, this study examined the extent to which different forms of maltreatment accounted for variations in youths' emotional and behavioral problems. Methods: Clinical information was reviewed for a large (N =…

  7. Treatment concepts of day hospitals for general psychiatric patients. Findings from a national survey in Germany.

    PubMed

    Seidler, Klaus-Peter; Garlipp, Petra; Machleidt, Wielant; Haltenhof, Horst

    2006-03-01

    Psychiatric day hospital treatment concepts have to deal with a wide spectrum of mental disorders. We raised the question, if day hospitals can be differentiated concerning their treatment concepts and if so how much this is reflected in their structural and procedural features. In 1999 a survey was initiated concerning structure, concept and method of treatment in psychiatric day hospitals for adults in Germany. Furthermore data concerning rate of utilization, patients' characteristics and aspects of referral and further treatment were ascertained. One hundred and seventy-three (63.4%) of 273-day hospitals contacted took part in the inquiry. The data were interpreted using multivariate as well as non-parametric procedures. The results show that treatment concepts of day hospitals can be specified as three main areas of function (psychotherapy, crisis intervention orientated treatment alternative, rehabilitation) and four therapeutic orientations (psychodynamic social psychiatric, behavioral social psychiatric, psychodynamic, sociotherapeutic). Structural features are predominantly comparable and the differences found concerning the treatment concepts are especially related to patients' characteristics and some procedural features. The conclusion is that the differentiation of day hospital treatment concepts should be taken into consideration in planning psychosocial treatment services as well as in day hospital evaluation research.

  8. Mortality, Rehospitalisation and Violent Crime in Forensic Psychiatric Patients Discharged from Hospital: Rates and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Seena; Wolf, Achim; Fimińska, Zuzanna; Larsson, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine rates and risk factors for adverse outcomes in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric services. Method We conducted a historical cohort study of all 6,520 psychiatric patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals between 1973 and 2009 in Sweden. We calculated hazard ratios for mortality, rehospitalisation, and violent crime using Cox regression to investigate the effect of different psychiatric diagnoses and two comorbidities (personality or substance use disorder) on outcomes. Results Over mean follow-up of 15.6 years, 30% of patients died (n = 1,949) after discharge with an average age at death of 52 years. Over two-thirds were rehospitalised (n = 4,472, 69%), and 40% violently offended after discharge (n = 2,613) with a mean time to violent crime of 4.2 years. The association between psychiatric diagnosis and outcome varied—substance use disorder as a primary diagnosis was associated with highest risk of mortality and rehospitalisation, and personality disorder was linked with the highest risk of violent offending. Furthermore comorbid substance use disorder typically increased risk of adverse outcomes. Conclusion Violent offending, premature mortality and rehospitalisation are prevalent in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals. Individualised treatment plans for such patients should take into account primary and comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. PMID:27196309

  9. Impact of the Syrian Crisis on the Hospitalization of Syrians in a Psychiatric Setting.

    PubMed

    Lama, Souaiby; François, Kazour; Marwan, Zoghbi; Sami, Richa

    2016-01-01

    Determine the impact of the Syrian crisis on the hospitalization of Syrians in a psychiatric setting. All Syrians admitted to a psychiatric hospital in Lebanon between the 1st of January 2009 and the 31st of December 2013 were included. Number of admissions, psychiatric disorders and demographic and clinical data relative to patients were compared between those admitted before and after the crisis. 44 patients were admitted before the crisis and 106 after it. The distribution of diagnosis varied significantly after the crisis (p = 0.056) with the majority of patients being admitted for schizophrenia (37.7 %). The prevalence of suicidal ideation was higher after the crisis (p = 0.03) but suicidal attempts, need for electroconvulsive therapy and length of hospitalization did not differ significantly between both groups. Clinicians should be aware of the possible burden of mental illness in Syrians after the beginning of the Syrian crisis.

  10. [Developmental status and goals in occupational therapy. The "Guidelines for Occupational Therapy in Psychiatric Hospitals"].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, K; Kunze, H

    1987-01-01

    Work therapy, or ergotherapy, is a recognised and permanent part of psychiatric treatment and medical rehabilitation. It is also an essential part of psychiatric diagnosis and therapy; furthermore, it enables the patient to develop and stabilise a realistic image of himself and contributes to the prevention and reduction of damage caused by hospitalism. The present status of work therapy was checked in 74 psychiatric hospitals throughout the Federal Republic of Germany, resulting in the need for further development of present practical procedures. A working group was created by the Federal Ministry of Labour and National Welfare within the framework of the model programme for psychiatry, at the suggestion of a Federal Working Group of the organisations running public mental hospitals in the FRG. The aim of this working group was to develop a specialised concept of work therapy. The group consisted of experts from clinical practice as well as from the Federal German Labour Office Institution, psychiatric consultants of the Federal Government and the Land Governments, as well as from the Land Government sponsors of state social welfare services. The "Guidelines for Work Therapy in Psychiatric Hospitals and Departments of Psychiatry" are officially considered to be a suitable basis for further development work in the field of ergotherapy.

  11. A crisis management quality improvement initiative in a children's psychiatric hospital: design, implementation, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Paccione-Dyszlewski, Margaret R; Conelea, Christine A; Heisler, Walter C; Vilardi, Jodie C; Sachs, Henry T

    2012-07-01

    Behavioral crisis management, including the use of seclusion and restraint, is the most high risk process in the psychiatric care of children and adolescents. The authors describe hospital-wide programmatic changes implemented at a children's psychiatric hospital that aimed to improve the quality of crisis management services. Pre/post quantitative and qualitative data suggest reduced restraint and seclusion use, reduced patient and staff injury related to crisis management, and increased patient satisfaction during the post-program period. Factors deemed beneficial in program implementation are discussed.

  12. The Jewish psychiatric hospital, Zofiówka, in Otwock, Poland.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Mary V

    2015-03-01

    The T4 euthanasia programme within Nazi Germany has been well researched, but much less is known about the extermination of psychiatric patients in Nazi-occupied territories during the same period. In Poland 20,000 mentally ill patients were deliberately killed during the German occupation. This paper traces the history of one psychiatric hospital, Zofiówka, in Otwock, south-east of Warsaw. The hospital once served the Jewish population of Poland and was the largest, most prestigious neuropsychiatric centre in the country. It is now in ruins and said to be haunted by ghosts.

  13. Suicidal Ideation of Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents has One-Year Predictive Validity for Suicide Attempts in Girls Only

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qingmei; Czyz, Ewa K.; Kerr, David C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Clinicians commonly incorporate adolescents’ self-reported suicidal ideation into formulations regarding adolescents’ risk for suicide. Data are limited, however, regarding the extent to which adolescent boys’ and girls’ reports of suicidal ideation have clinically significant predictive validity in terms of subsequent suicidal behavior. This study examined psychiatrically hospitalized adolescent boys’ and girls’ self-reported suicidal ideation as a predictor of suicide attempts during the first year following hospitalization. A total of 354 adolescents (97 boys; 257 girls; ages 13–17 years) hospitalized for acute suicide risk were evaluated at the time of hospitalization as well as 3, 6, and 12 months later. Study measures included the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire-Junior, Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, Children’s Depression Rating Scale-Revised, Beck Hopelessness Scale, Youth Self-Report, and Personal Experiences Screen Questionnaire. The main study outcome was presence and number of suicide attempt(s) in the year after hospitalization, measured by the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children. Results indicated a significant interaction between suicidal ideation, assessed during first week of hospitalization, and gender for the prediction of subsequent suicide attempts. Suicidal ideation was a significant predictor of subsequent suicide attempts for girls, but not boys. Baseline history of multiple suicide attempts was a significant predictor of subsequent suicide attempts across genders. Results support the importance of empirically validating suicide risk assessment strategies separately for adolescent boys and girls. Among adolescent boys who have been hospitalized due to acute suicide risk, low levels of self-reported suicidal ideation may not be indicative of low risk for suicidal behavior following hospitalization. PMID:23996157

  14. [Treatment in psychiatric day hospital in comparison with inpatient wards in different European health care systems--objectives of EDEN project].

    PubMed

    Kiejna, Andrzej; Kallert, Thomas W; Rymaszewska, Joanna

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents the objectives and design of an ongoing multicenter randomized, controlled trial EDEN (European Day Hospital EvaluatioN). The EDEN-study aims to evaluate the efficacy of acute psychiatric treatment in a day hospital setting in five European centres: Dresden, London, Michalovce, Prague and Wroclaw. The main hypothesis is that day hospital treatment for acute psychiatric patients is as effective as conventional inpatient hospital care. The objectives of the study are to evaluate the viability and effectiveness of day hospitals for acute psychiatric treatment, to identify subgroups of patients with a more or less favourable outcome so that the treatment setting might be specifically applied and to ascertain the cost-effectiveness of day hospital treatment compared to conventional inpatient treatment. The study utilises a Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) design with repeated measures at a maximum of six time points: at admission (t1), one week after admission (t2), four weeks after admission (t3), discharge (t4), three months after discharge (t5), and 12 months after discharge (t6). A combination of well-established standardised assessment instruments and open questions is used in 6 time periods. If the findings accept the main hypothesis of the study, some practical consequences could be inevitable: at a mental health policy level, these results could lead to an increase in the capacity of day hospitals; at the clinical level clinicians could redefine their concepts of care to consider the day hospital as an alternative to conventional inpatient treatment; from economic point of view could lead to reduction of treatment costs.

  15. [Fates at the psychiatric hospital of Klagenfurt during National Socialism].

    PubMed

    Oberlerchner, Herwig; Stromberger, Helge

    2013-01-01

    In this article the fate of Mr. B. is described as an example for the fate of hundreds of mentally ill patients of the "Landes-Irrenanstalt of Klagenfurt", murdered during the era of National Socialism. This extraordinary fate marks two outstanding aspects of history of medicine, the treatment of syphilis with malaria and the organised mass murder of mentally ill people during the cynic era of National Socialism. Beyond this historical perspective reconstructive biographical work together with relatives is presented as a proactive duty of psychiatric institutions.

  16. Hospitalization due to drug use did not change after a decade of the Psychiatric Reform

    PubMed Central

    Balbinot, Alexandre Dido; Horta, Rogério Lessa; da Costa, Juvenal Soares Dias; Araújo, Renata Brasil; Poletto, Simone; Teixeira, Marina Bressaneli

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To investigate whether the psychiatric hospitalization rates due to use of psychoactive substances and average time of hospitalization suffered any changes after the first decade of effective implementation of the psychiatric reform in Brazil. METHODS This article examines the evolution of hospitalizations due to disorders arising from the use of alcohol or other substances in the state of Santa Catarina, Southern Brazil, from 2000 to 2012. This is an ecological, time-series study, which uses data from admissions obtained by the Informatics Service of the Brazilian Unified Health System. Hospitalization rates by 100,000 inhabitants and average time of occupancy of beds were estimated. Coefficients of variation of these rates were estimated by Poisson Regression. RESULTS The total and male hospitalization rates did not vary (p = 0.056 and p = 0.244, respectively). We observed an increase of 3.0% for the female sex (p = 0.049). We did not observe any significant variation for occupancy time of beds. CONCLUSIONS The deployment of services triggered by the Brazilian psychiatric reform was not accompanied by a reduction of hospitalization rates or mean occupancy time of hospitalized patients during this first decade of implementation of the reform. PMID:27253902

  17. Clinical Presentation of General Paralysis of the Insane in a Dutch Psychiatric Hospital, 1924-1954.

    PubMed

    Daey Ouwens, Ingrid M; Lens, C Elisabeth; Fiolet, Aernoud T L; Ott, Alewijn; Koehler, Peter J; Verhoeven, Willem M A

    2015-01-01

    General paralysis of the insane (GPI) or dementia paralytica was once a fatal complication of syphilitic infection and a major reason for psychiatric hospitalization. Nowadays, physicians consider GPI to be exceptional. It should be noted, however, that syphilis re-emerged worldwide at the turn of the 20th to 21st century and a revival of GPI can, therefore, be expected. Advanced diagnosis is crucial in that treatment in the early, inflammatory phase is warranted before irreversible tissue damage occurs. Therefore, a renewed clinical awareness of the broad spectrum of psychiatric and neurologic signs and symptoms of GPI is needed. In this historical cohort study, comprising 105 patients with GPI admitted to the Dutch Vincent van Gogh Psychiatric Hospital in the period 1924-1954, the clinical presentation of this invalidating disorder is investigated and described in detail.

  18. Clinical Features, Psychiatric Assessment, and Longitudinal Outcome of Suicide Attempters Admitted to a Tertiary Emergency Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Alcinéia Donizeti; Sponholz, Alcion; Mantovani, Célia; Pazin-Filho, Antônio; Passos, Afonso Dinis Costa; Botega, Neury José; Del-Ben, Cristina Marta

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize admissions to an emergency hospital due to suicide attempts and verify outcomes in 2 years. Data were collected from medical records and were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression. The sample consisted of 412 patients (58.7% women; mean age = 32.6 years old, SD = 14.3). Self-poisoning was the most frequent method (84.0%), and they were diagnosed mainly as depressive (40.3%) and borderline personality disorders (19.1%). Previous suicide attempts and current psychiatric treatment were reported by, respectively, 32.0% and 28.4%. Fifteen patients (3.6%, 9 males) died during hospitalization. At discharge, 79.3% were referred to community-based psychiatric services. Being male (OR = 2.11; 95% CI = 1.25-3.55), using violent methods (i.e., hanging, firearms, and knives) (OR = 1.96; 95% CI = 1.02-3.75) and psychiatric treatment history (OR = 2.58; 95% CI = 1.53-4.36) were predictors for psychiatric hospitalization. Of 258 patients followed for 2 years, 10 (3.9%) died (3 suicide), and 24 (9.3%) undertook new suicide attempts. Patients with a history of psychiatric treatment had higher risks of new suicide attempts (OR = 2.46, 95% CI = 1.07-5.65). Suicide attempters admitted to emergency hospitals exhibit severe psychiatric disorders, and despite interventions, they continue to present high risks for suicide attempts and death. PMID:25961847

  19. Reducing Maladaptive Family Interaction by Involving Significant Others of Hospitalized Psychiatric Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabel, Sanford

    The program was set up to involve, on a continuing basis, the significant other of frequently-readmitted hospitalized psychiatric VA patients. The couples identified their characteristic strengths, and their maladaptive ways of functioning, and were expected to make use of alternative ways of behaving which were recommended by the staff. A…

  20. A Functional Model of Quality Assurance for Psychiatric Hospitals and Corresponding Staffing Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamis-Gould, Edna; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A model for quality assurance (QA) in psychiatric hospitals is described. Its functions (general QA, utilization review, clinical records, evaluation, management information systems, risk management, and infection control), subfunctions, and corresponding staffing requirements are reviewed. This model was designed to foster standardization in QA…

  1. 42 CFR 482.62 - Condition of participation: Special staff requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... program. (d) Standard: Nursing services. The hospital must have a qualified director of psychiatric nursing services. In addition to the director of nursing, there must be adequate numbers of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and mental health workers to provide nursing care necessary under...

  2. 42 CFR 482.62 - Condition of participation: Special staff requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... program. (d) Standard: Nursing services. The hospital must have a qualified director of psychiatric nursing services. In addition to the director of nursing, there must be adequate numbers of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and mental health workers to provide nursing care necessary under...

  3. Working Models of Attachment in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents: Relation to Psychopathology and Personality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstein, Diana S.; Horowitz, Harvey A.

    This study examined the role of attachment in adolescent psychopathology among psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents. Subjects consisted of 60 adolescents and 27 of their mothers. Measures included the Adult Attachment Interview classification for both the adolescents and their mothers, and a battery of diagnostic and personality assessment of…

  4. Task and structural correlates of organizational effectiveness in private psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mark, B

    1985-06-01

    This exploration of the relationships between task and structural variables and two dimensions of organizational effectiveness in 76 private psychiatric hospitals revealed that high levels of centralization were associated with patient care effectiveness. High levels of centralization and formalization were associated with administrative effectiveness. An enhancing effect of organizational structure is suggested as contributing to organizational effectiveness.

  5. [How the Feast of Corpus Christi at the psychiatric hospital of Sarthe became a historical event].

    PubMed

    Guillemain, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    Can the historian, passionate about archives, build a historical narrative based mainly on the memories of nurses? Could the caregivers, who are themselves players in the history of psychiatry write it? When the former hears the individual accounts of the latter, history is written. The history of the Feast of Corpus Christi at the psychiatric hospital of Le Mans.

  6. Assaultive Behavior in State Psychiatric Hospitals: Differences Between Forensic and Nonforensic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linhorst, Donald M.; Scott, Lisa Parker

    2004-01-01

    Forensic patients are occupying an increasingly large number of beds in state psychiatric hospitals. The presence of these mentally ill offenders has raised concerns about the risk they present to nonforensic patients. This study compared the rate of assaults and factors associated with assaultive behavior among 308 nonforensic patients and two…

  7. Predictors of Treatment Response for Suicidal Youth Referred for Emergency Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huey, Jr., Stanley J.; Henggeler, Scott W.; Rowland, Melisa D.; Halliday-Boykins, Colleen A.; Cunningham, Phillippe B.; Pickrel, Susan G.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated factors that predicted poor treatment response for 70 suicidal youth (ages 10 to 17 years; 67% African American) who received either multisystemic therapy (MST) or inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. Following treatment, suicidal youth were classified as either treatment responders or nonresponders based on caregiver or…

  8. Mothers with Severe Psychiatric Illness and Their Newborns: A Hospital-Based Model of Perinatal Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almeida, Ana; Merminod, Gaelle, Schechter, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    Women with severe psychiatric illness face numerous risks and challenges during pregnancy and as parents. Mental health professionals can help these mothers and their infants by supporting the attachment relationship and by providing the external supports that are necessary for successful parenting. The authors describe a hospital-based…

  9. White Matter Hyperintensities and Their Associations with Suicidality in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Stefan; Noam, Gil G.; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Kwon, Bae J.; Clark, Megan A.; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Increasingly, researchers and clinicians are recognizing that there may be biological markers associated with increased risk of suicide. The objective of this study was to compare white matter hyperintensities in psychiatrically hospitalized children and youth with and without a history of suicide attempt while controlling for other…

  10. Racial Disparities in Mental Health Outcomes after Psychiatric Hospital Discharge among Individuals with Severe Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eack, Shaun M.; Newhill, Christina E.

    2012-01-01

    Racial disparities in mental health outcomes have been widely documented in noninstitutionalized community psychiatric samples, but few studies have specifically examined the effects of race among individuals with the most severe mental illnesses. A sample of 925 individuals hospitalized for severe mental illness was followed for a year after…

  11. A Four-Year Analysis of Adolescent Self-Destructive Behavior and Psychiatric Hospitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Alan J.

    Data were gathered on a statewide basis in 102 Illinois counties on both the incidence and prevalence of adolescent public psychiatric hospitalizations and the identified self-destructive behaviors: (1) completed suicides; (2) assaultive behaviors; (3) runaway behavior; (4) substance abuse; and (5) teenage births, from fiscal year 1985 through…

  12. [Initial psychiatric experiences of Philippe Pinel at the Belhomme Hospital].

    PubMed

    Postel, J

    1983-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate Philippe Pinel's psychiatric experience, his practice in "la maison de santé Belhomme" and his first publications which were concerned with the treatment of mental patients and appeared in "La Gazette de Santé" which he edited between 1785 and 1789. During that time, the main preoccupation of the future head doctor of "La Salpétrière" had been to ensure the application and the development of moral treatment, in its practical modalities as well as its theoretic rationalization. Meanwhile, the institutional aspect of this therapy had the upper hand over the individual cure. This evolution brought Pinel and his successors to neglect the latter. In this connection we can regret that Philippe Pinel did not continue to have more private practice for this allowed him to follow first his experience and research (individual cure) in this field of rational psychotherapy, that of moral treatment. PMID:6360324

  13. A blueprint for smaller local acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2011-02-01

    Giving his presentation as one of three speakers in a Architects for Health (AfH)-led session addressing the broader topic of "How to achieve excellence in an age of austerity" at last October's Healthcare Estates conference, Mungo Smith, a founding director and design lead at leading UK healthcare architects MAAP, discussed a booklet he recently co-authored with Andy Black, chair of international healthcare strategic consultancy Durrow, and Johannes Eggen, a partner at NSW Architects and Planners in Oslo. In it the authors argue that there is no reason why "gold standard" acute hospital care cannot be cost-effectively delivered from small, well-equipped local hospitals in the future, but that achieving this will require "a number of (current) NHS conventions to be defied".

  14. Characteristics of psychiatric admissions and aspects of overcrowding at the general Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Chin, C N; Kadir, A B; Jeyarajah, S

    1993-06-01

    This study examined admissions, final diagnoses and mean duration of stay of patients in the Psychiatric Wards at the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. The male ward was severely overcrowded by 125% over the maximum bed capacity. The majority were psychotic, mainly schizophrenic. The female ward had 76% occupancy, also mainly psychotic. Neurotics, alcohol dependents and personality disorders formed less than 5% of the admissions. There was no difference in the mean duration of stay of patients of both UKM and GHKL Units stratified for diagnosis and disposal except for newly diagnosed schizophrenics. There is an urgent need for more male psychiatric beds/wards.

  15. From the psychiatric hospital to the community: integrating conditional release and contingency management.

    PubMed

    Elbogen, E B; Tomkins, A J

    2000-01-01

    Psychiatric hospital recidivism has been and continues to be a persistent problem in treating individuals with chronic mental illness. Conditional release, a form of involuntary outpatient commitment, has been suggested as one possible solution. Guided by therapeutic jurisprudence, this article presents a proposal about conditional release that would maximize convergence of social values and would be empirically testable. Specifically, a scientifically validated treatment intervention for individuals with chronic mental illness, contingency management, is integrated with conditional release. From this proposal, a number of empirical hypotheses and legal questions about discharging psychiatric patients are generated and discussed.

  16. Schizophrenia and tobacco smoking in a Spanish psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    LLerena, Adrián; de la Rubia, Alfredo; Peñas-Lledó, Eva M; Diaz, Francisco J; de Leon, Jose

    2003-04-01

    This study in a Spanish hospital replicated two US studies suggesting that schizophrenia is associated with smoking when compared with other severe mental illnesses. Neither antipsychotics nor institutionalism could explain this relationship. Seventy of the 100 schizophrenic and 53 of the 100 non-schizophrenic inpatients were current smokers. After correcting for confounding factors, schizophrenia increased the risk of smoking by 2- to 3-fold. Heavy smoking was not associated with schizophrenia.

  17. Psychiatric commitment and involuntary hospitalization: an ethical perspective.

    PubMed

    Levenson, J L

    As a psychiatrist, I have focused in this paper on the medical model view of commitment. Directed against the medical model is the civil liberties position, mostly put forward by attorneys, which values autonomy over beneficence and sees psychiatric decision-making as biased, imprecise, and too paternalistic. Like the moral principles they champion, neither of these positions is "wrong." The tension between them is inevitable and sometimes beneficial. The conflict is inevitable because the proponents differ in their missions and how they think. Attorneys (and philosophers) think in terms of the general case, of classes of situations, whereas psychiatrists focus on individuals as unique. Chodoff has also pointed out that the medical model is a utilitarian one, i.e. the morality of an act is determined by, on balance, whether it increases the good for the individual or society. The civil liberties position, on the other hand, is a deontological one, i.e. the end does not justify the means; some moral principles must be considered even if they do not lead to maximally good outcomes. This conflict between positions can be ultimately beneficial, if we recognize that each is fighting for a good. As a society, we should expect psychiatrists and other mental health professionals to try their utmost to treat the mentally ill, and attorneys to protect their rights. When we view it as such a moral dilemma, "we are confronted not with melodrama, a contest of right against wrong, but rather with tragedy, a conflict of one right--to be at physical liberty--against another right--to be free dehumanizing disease."

  18. Reassessing the high proportion of involuntary psychiatric hospital admissions in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Bola, John R; Park, Eon-Ha; Kim, Seong-Yeon

    2011-10-01

    The 2007 WHO-AIMS report on the mental health system of South Korea documented progress towards a national mental health plan, protection of human rights, and growth of community based services. Yet concern was expressed that the high proportion of involuntary to total psychiatric hospitalizations (92%) may indicate an excessively coercive system. Involuntary hospitalization in Korea rose from 117 to 132 (per 100,000) between 2000 and 2006. In 2000, the median rate in the European Union (EU) was 74 per 100,000 (Range: 6-218). While Korea's involuntary hospitalization rate is within the EU range, its proportion of involuntary hospitalizations is three times that of the highest EU country (30%, Sweden). Underdevelopment of voluntary psychiatric services and culturally mandated family referrals resulting in involuntary hospitalization are apparent reasons for the high proportion of involuntary hospitalizations. Population-based rates per 100,000 more accurately describe involuntary hospitalization than the proportion (ratio) measure used in the WHO-AIMS reports. PMID:21416122

  19. Vitamin D status of adolescent inpatients in a secure psychiatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Simon A.; Riordan-Eva, Elliott; Bhandari, Bharathi; Ferdinandez, Uresh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to use routinely collected data on vitamin D levels of adolescents detained in a secure psychiatric hospital to see if this at-risk group for vitamin D deficiency do in fact have low vitamin D levels. Methods: Vitamin D blood levels were collated from clinical records of inpatients admitted to Bluebird House, a medium secure adolescent unit, since 2012. Corresponding data were gathered to include gender, ethnic status and age. Blood levels were assessed on admission to the unit and after treatment with vitamin D supplementation, if indicated. Results: Only 3 out of the 35 patients (8.6%) had adequate vitamin D levels (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25-OHD] > 50 nmol/l). A total of 23 patients (65.7%) had levels consistent with deficiency (25-OHD < 30 nmol/l) with the remaining 9 patients (25.7%) showing levels indicating possible deficiency (25-OHD 30–50 nmol/l. Conclusions: Vitamin D levels were low in our sample of young people admitted to a secure psychiatric hospital. This is the first published study of vitamin D levels in a secure adolescent psychiatric hospital. The results point to the need for routine prescription of vitamin D to adolescents held in secure conditions such as hospitals, secure children’s homes and youth offender institutes. PMID:27536343

  20. Characteristics of psychiatric hospitalizations with multiple mechanical restraint episodes versus hospitalization with a single mechanical restraint episode.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Parra, Jose; Guzik, Justyna; Garcia-Sanchez, Juan A; Pino-Benitez, Isabel; Aguilera-Serrano, Carlos; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermin

    2016-10-30

    We investigated the characteristics of multiple episodes of mechanical restraint versus a single episode in a psychiatric ward of a public general hospital. The following characteristics were associated with multiple restraints: young age, length of hospital stay, not being readmitted within 30 days from previous discharge, and admission in the previous year before the implementation of an intervention program to reduce mechanical restraint. The study suggests that both organizational factors and patients' disturbed behaviour are associated with the risk of being mechanically restrained several times.

  1. Characteristics of psychiatric hospitalizations with multiple mechanical restraint episodes versus hospitalization with a single mechanical restraint episode.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Parra, Jose; Guzik, Justyna; Garcia-Sanchez, Juan A; Pino-Benitez, Isabel; Aguilera-Serrano, Carlos; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermin

    2016-10-30

    We investigated the characteristics of multiple episodes of mechanical restraint versus a single episode in a psychiatric ward of a public general hospital. The following characteristics were associated with multiple restraints: young age, length of hospital stay, not being readmitted within 30 days from previous discharge, and admission in the previous year before the implementation of an intervention program to reduce mechanical restraint. The study suggests that both organizational factors and patients' disturbed behaviour are associated with the risk of being mechanically restrained several times. PMID:27497291

  2. Psychiatric morbidity, phenomenology and management in hospitalized female foreign domestic workers in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Zahreddine, Nada; Hady, Rima Talaat; Chammai, Rabih; Kazour, François; Hachem, Dory; Richa, Sami

    2014-07-01

    40 million female domestic workers worldwide experience the inhumane conditions associated with this unregulated occupation, a situation that induces psychiatric morbidities in many. The case in Lebanon is not any better where it is estimated that one foreign domestic worker (FDW) commits suicide weekly. 33 female FDW and 14 female Lebanese (control group, CG) were enrolled. Brief Psychotic Rating Scale (BPRS) and Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scales were administered on admission and discharge and socio-demographic, living conditions, mental health care data and phenomenological observations were collected. Sexual, physical, and verbal abuses were detected in FDW (12.5, 37.5, and 50.0 %. respectively). 66.7 % of them were diagnosed with brief psychotic episode. The mean duration of hospital stay (13.1 days) was significantly lower in the FDW group. The mean cumulative antipsychotic dose of the FDW was 337.1 mg of chlorpromazine equivalent and the mean BPRS total pre-score of FDW was 66.4 with a much improved state on the CGI global improvement scale, all of which were nonsignificantly different from the CG. Striking phenomenological findings among FDW were acute anorexia (39.4 %), nudity (30.3 %), catatonic features (21.2 %), and delusion of pregnancy (12.1 %). Inpatient FDW are more diagnosed with psychotic than affective disorders and receive approximately similar treatment as controls in spite of the trend to rapidly discharge and deport the worker to limit the costs. Both groups presented with similar severity, although the FDW had peculiar phenomenological observations.

  3. Psychiatric morbidity, phenomenology and management in hospitalized female foreign domestic workers in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Zahreddine, Nada; Hady, Rima Talaat; Chammai, Rabih; Kazour, François; Hachem, Dory; Richa, Sami

    2014-07-01

    40 million female domestic workers worldwide experience the inhumane conditions associated with this unregulated occupation, a situation that induces psychiatric morbidities in many. The case in Lebanon is not any better where it is estimated that one foreign domestic worker (FDW) commits suicide weekly. 33 female FDW and 14 female Lebanese (control group, CG) were enrolled. Brief Psychotic Rating Scale (BPRS) and Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scales were administered on admission and discharge and socio-demographic, living conditions, mental health care data and phenomenological observations were collected. Sexual, physical, and verbal abuses were detected in FDW (12.5, 37.5, and 50.0 %. respectively). 66.7 % of them were diagnosed with brief psychotic episode. The mean duration of hospital stay (13.1 days) was significantly lower in the FDW group. The mean cumulative antipsychotic dose of the FDW was 337.1 mg of chlorpromazine equivalent and the mean BPRS total pre-score of FDW was 66.4 with a much improved state on the CGI global improvement scale, all of which were nonsignificantly different from the CG. Striking phenomenological findings among FDW were acute anorexia (39.4 %), nudity (30.3 %), catatonic features (21.2 %), and delusion of pregnancy (12.1 %). Inpatient FDW are more diagnosed with psychotic than affective disorders and receive approximately similar treatment as controls in spite of the trend to rapidly discharge and deport the worker to limit the costs. Both groups presented with similar severity, although the FDW had peculiar phenomenological observations. PMID:24370752

  4. [A wide-ranging project to the best use of S. Niccolo Psychiatric Hospital].

    PubMed

    Vannozzi, Francesca

    2007-01-01

    The S. Niccolò Psychiatric Hospital was one of the most important health institutions not only for Siena but for the entire Tuscan district and beyond. It was known to serve all the catchment area for mentally ill patients coming from other cities. At a national level, it is also one of the most beautiful models of hospital architecture of the "village" type, the expression of a late nineteenth-century tendency to perceive mental disorders as illnesses that could be improved and cured through "moral treatment", with work and distraction as the principal therapeutic instruments. The closure of the psychiatric hospital in Siena provided for by the Italian psychiatric reform of 1978 actually took place over an extremely long period of time. It was definitively closed only on 30 September 1999 and was the last psychiatric hospital in Tuscany to cease its activity. Its history, the importance it had for the considerable number of committed patients, the extension of the area of the hospital over 183,574 m2 and its organization in 16 edifices, mean that S. Niccolò is now an architectonic complex of great value and interest but also subject to progressive deterioration. This reality, together with the urgency of salvaging the collections of books from its very rich library and its archives of administrative documents and medical records, has led the author to prepare a wide-ranging and extremely complex project that aims at the best use of S. Niccolò. Thanks to the collaboration of a group of experts from various Faculties of the University of Siena, and beginning with a multidisciplinary study of S. Niccolò's history, the project proceeds to the identification of concrete actions of cultural policy as well. PMID:18450025

  5. Emotional reactions to involuntary psychiatric hospitalization and stigma-related stress among people with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Rüsch, Nicolas; Müller, Mario; Lay, Barbara; Corrigan, Patrick W; Zahn, Roland; Schönenberger, Thekla; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Blank, Christina; Rössler, Wulf

    2014-02-01

    Compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient treatment can be experienced as disempowering and stigmatizing by people with serious mental illness. However, quantitative studies of stigma-related emotional and cognitive reactions to involuntary hospitalization and their impact on people with mental illness are scarce. Among 186 individuals with serious mental illness and a history of recent involuntary hospitalization, shame and self-contempt as emotional reactions to involuntary hospitalization, the cognitive appraisal of stigma as a stressor, self-stigma, empowerment as well as quality of life and self-esteem were assessed by self-report. Psychiatric symptoms were rated by the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. In multiple linear regressions, more self-stigma was predicted independently by higher levels of shame, self-contempt and stigma stress. A greater sense of empowerment was related to lower levels of stigma stress and self-contempt. These findings remained significant after controlling for psychiatric symptoms, diagnosis, age, gender and the number of lifetime involuntary hospitalizations. Increased self-stigma and reduced empowerment in turn predicted poorer quality of life and reduced self-esteem. The negative effect of emotional reactions and stigma stress on quality of life and self-esteem was largely mediated by increased self-stigma and reduced empowerment. Shame and self-contempt as reactions to involuntary hospitalization as well as stigma stress may lead to self-stigma, reduced empowerment and poor quality of life. Emotional and cognitive reactions to coercion may determine its impact more than the quantity of coercive experiences. Interventions to reduce the negative effects of compulsory admissions should address emotional reactions and stigma as a stressor.

  6. Occupational stressors, burnout and coping strategies between hospital and community psychiatric nurses in a Dublin region.

    PubMed

    McTiernan, K; McDonald, N

    2015-04-01

    Burnout negatively impacts the delivery of mental health services. Psychiatric nurses face stressors that are distinct from other nursing specialities. The research was conducted in Ireland and captured a relatively large sample of respondents. The results compared the stressors, coping strategies and burnout levels between hospital and community-based psychiatric nurses. Occupational stress can negatively impact on the well-being of psychiatric nurses, which in turn can lead to poor client care. There is a dearth of published research conducted in Ireland that examines stress within the discipline. A between-groups study, undertaken in February 2011, investigated stressors, burnout and coping strategies between hospital and community-based psychiatric nurses in a Dublin region. Sixty-nine participants (8 males and 61 females), aged between 18 to 60 years voluntarily completed the Mental Health Professional Stress Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the PsychNurse Methods of Coping Scale. The findings revealed that nurses were operating in a moderately stressful environment. Stressors focused on organizational issues as opposed to client issues. The main stressors identified were lack of resources, workload and organizational structures/processes. Both groups reported average levels of emotional exhaustion, low levels of depersonalization and average levels of personal accomplishment. A Mann-Whitney U-test and Independent Samples t-test found significant differences between hospital and community-based nurses regarding depersonalization and personal accomplishment, respectively. Hospital nurses reported higher depersonalization scores, and community nurses had a greater sense of personal accomplishment. The personal accomplishment scores of hospital nurses were below mental health professional norms. No significant differences emerged regarding coping strategies. Avoidant coping strategies were favoured by both groups. It is recommended that interventions

  7. [Clinical trial of bromazepam in psychiatric hospital practice (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Brunner, H; Patris, M F

    1982-05-13

    An open trial of bromazepam (Lexomil) was conducted in 35 patients (23 men and 12 women, aged from 18 to 76 years) admitted to a psychiatry unit for various, usually old-standing, conditions associated with major anxiety. The mean effective dosage was 18 mg/day. The effectiveness of the drug administered alone was assessed in 25 patients at the end of the second week of treatment, using the Hamilton and Pull-Guelfi scales. A satisfactory response was obtained in 81% of the cases. Reactional anxiety in alcoholic and neurotic patients was found to constitute the best indication for bromazepam, the value of which during weaning from alcohol in patients admitted with threatening delirium tremens must be stressed. Bromazepam was well tolerated in 83% of the patients; side-effects (daytime somnolence and fatigue) were rare. The drug proved a potent and quick-acting tranquillizer and often resulted in a shorter stay in hospital. PMID:6124935

  8. Psychiatric comorbidity and mortality among veterans hospitalized for congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Banta, Jim E; Andersen, Ronald M; Young, Alexander S; Kominski, Gerald; Cunningham, William E

    2010-10-01

    A Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization approach was used to examine the impact of comorbid mental illness on mortality of veterans admitted to Veterans Affairs medical centers in fiscal year 2001 with a primary diagnosis of congestive heart failure (n = 15,497). Thirty percent had a psychiatric diagnosis, 4.7% died during the index hospitalization, and 11.5% died during the year following discharge. Among those with mental illness, 23.6% had multiple psychiatric disorders. Multivariable logistic regression models found dementia to be positively associated with inpatient mortality. Depression alone (excluding other psychiatric disorders) was positively associated with one-year mortality. Primary care visits were associated with a reduced likelihood of both inpatient and one-year mortality. Excepting dementia, VA patients with a mental illness had comparable or higher levels of primary care visits than those having no mental illness. Patients with multiple psychiatric disorders had more outpatient care than those with one psychiatric disorder. PMID:20968262

  9. A brief behavioral activation treatment for depression. A randomized pilot trial within an inpatient psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Hopko, Derek R; Lejuez, C W; LePage, James P; Hopko, Sandra D; McNeil, Daniel W

    2003-09-01

    The brief behavioral activation treatment for depression (BATD) is a relatively uncomplicated, time-efficient, and cost-effective method for treating depression. Because of these features, BATD may represent a practical intervention within managed care-driven, inpatient psychiatric hospitals. Based on basic behavioral theory and empirical evidence supporting activation strategies, we designed a treatment to increase systematically exposure to positive activities and thereby help to alleviate depressive affect. This study represents a pilot study that extends research on this treatment into the context of an inpatient psychiatric unit. Results demonstrate effectiveness and superiority of BATD as compared with the standard supportive treatment provided within the hospital. A large effect size was demonstrated, despite a limited sample size. The authors discuss the limitations of the study and future directions.

  10. The involvement of a consumer council in organizational decision making in a public psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Linhorst, D M; Eckert, A; Hamilton, G; Young, E

    2001-11-01

    This article describes a consumer group within a public psychiatric hospital that serves primarily a forensic population. Some barriers to participation included the severity of some clients' mental illness, an organizational culture that does not fully support participation, the lack of clients' awareness of problems or alternative actions, and inherent power imbalances between clients and staff. Despite these barriers, the consumer group has made improvements for facility clients. Some factors associated with this success included strong administrative support, the allocation of a highly qualified staff liaison to work with the group, and the integration of the group into the facility's formal decision-making structure. Lessons are offered for the development of similar groups within public psychiatric hospitals and community-based mental health agencies.

  11. Self-Determination Theory and Outpatient Follow-Up After Psychiatric Hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Sripada, Rebecca K; Bowersox, Nicholas W; Ganoczy, Dara; Valenstein, Marcia; Pfeiffer, Paul N

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether the constructs of self-determination theory-autonomy, competence, and relatedness-are associated with adherence to outpatient follow-up appointments after psychiatric hospitalization. 242 individuals discharged from inpatient psychiatric treatment within the Veterans Health Administration completed surveys assessing self-determination theory constructs as well as measures of depression and barriers to treatment. Medical records were used to count the number of mental health visits and no-shows in the 14 weeks following discharge. Logistic regression models assessed the association between survey items assessing theory constructs and attendance at mental healthcare visits. In multivariate models, none of the self-determination theory factors predicted outpatient follow-up attendance. The constructs of self-determination theory as measured by a single self-report survey may not reliably predict adherence to post-hospital care. Need factors such as depression may be more strongly predictive of treatment adherence.

  12. Acute hepatic failure among hospitalized Thai children.

    PubMed

    Poovorawan, Yong; Chongsrisawat, Voranush; Shafi, Fakrudeen; Boudville, Irving; Liu, Yanfang; Hutagalung, Yanee; Bock, Hans L

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a hospital-based study from June 2002 to December 2006 of Thai children aged 1-15 years with acute hepatic failure (AHF) to determine the causes and outcomes. Eleven children were included in the study. Hepatitis B virus was the cause of AHF in one child, infection-associated hemophagocytic syndrome was the cause in 1 child, Wilson's disease was the cause in 1 child and dengue fever was suspected to be the cause in 2 children. In 6 children the cause of AHF was unknown. Jaundice was reported in 9 of 11 children. Ten of 11 children had mild to moderate encephalopathy on admission. Five of 11 children died due to AHF. No liver transplantations were performed among the children in this study. Further studies into the relationship between dengue infection and AHF are needed.

  13. Effort-reward imbalance and burnout among German nurses in medical compared with psychiatric hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Schulz, M; Damkröger, A; Heins, C; Wehlitz, L; Löhr, M; Driessen, M; Behrens, J; Wingenfeld, K

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether nurses' efforts and rewards, as well as the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) and burnout, differ between subjects working in psychiatric vs. medical hospitals and between nurses under education and examined nurses respectively. Furthermore, the relationship between ERI and burnout was evaluated. Nursing is associated with high levels of emotional strain and heavy workloads. Burnout and a negative ERI can result in high absenteeism and turnover and have been identified as reasons why nurses leave their profession. In the last decade, working conditions of the nursing profession have changed in Germany, but somatic and psychiatric hospitals developed in different ways. This development may lead to different profiles. A sample of 389 nurses (78.8% female) in four German hospitals was investigated. A total of 147 nurses worked in psychiatric hospitals and 236 nurses worked in medical (somatic) hospitals. Fifty participants were still under education. The Effort-Reward Imbalance Inventory measures effort, reward and overcommitment at job and provides an imbalance score between effort and reward. The Maslach Burnout Inventory with the subscales, emotional exhaustion, lack of accomplishment and depersonalization, was also used. Nurses working in medical hospitals reported more burnout and had higher ERI scores. Subjects under education were comparable to examined nurses in terms of burnout but had lower ERI scores. Multiple regression analyses showed all ERI scales to be significant predictors for emotional exhaustion, while age, field of work and educational status further predict effort or ERI respectively. At present, the working situation of nurses in different settings appears to be characterized by a perceived imbalance of effort and reward and is associated with a high risk of developing burnout symptoms.

  14. Using Claims Data to Generate Clinical Flags Predicting Short-term Risk of Continued Psychiatric Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Bradley D.; Pangilinan, Maria; Sorbero, Mark J; Marcus, Sue; Donahue, Sheila; Xu, Yan; Smith, Thomas E; Essock, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Objective As health information technology advances, efforts to use administrative data to inform real-time treatment planning for individuals are increasing, despite few empirical studies demonstrating that such administrative data predict subsequent clinical events. Medicaid claims for individuals with frequent psychiatric hospitalizations were examined to test how well patterns of service use predict subsequent high short-term risk of continued psychiatric hospitalizations. Methods Medicaid claims files from New York and Pennsylvania were used to identify Medicaid recipients aged 18-64 with two or more inpatient psychiatric admissions during a target year ending March 31, 2009. Definitions from a quality-improvement initiative were used to identify patterns of inpatient and outpatient service use and prescription fills suggestive of clinical concerns. Generalized estimating equations and Markov models were applied to examine claims through March, 2011, to see what patterns of service use were sufficiently predictive of additional hospitalizations to be clinically useful. Results 11,801 unique individuals in New York and 1,859 in Pennsylvania identified met the cohort definition. In both Pennsylvania and New York, multiple recent hospitalizations, but not failure to use outpatient services or failure to fill medication prescriptions, were significant predictors of high risk of continued frequent hospitalizations, with odds ratios greater than 4.0. Conclusions Administrative data can be used to identify individuals at high risk of continued frequent hospitalizations. Such information could be used by payers and system administrators to authorize special services (e.g., mobile outreach) for such individuals as part of efforts to promote service engagement and prevent rapid rehospitalizations. PMID:25022360

  15. Staff representations and tobacco-related practices in a psychiatric hospital with an indoor smoking ban.

    PubMed

    Keizer, Ineke; Gex-Fabry, Marianne; Bruegger, Aurélia; Croquette, Patrice; Khan, Aqal Nawaz

    2014-04-01

    The present study describes representations about smoking and practices related to patient smoking among staff of a large public psychiatric hospital. A survey was performed using a specially designed questionnaire. The return rate was 72.4% (n = 155). A large proportion of staff recognized the importance of both smoking status and mental health for patient's well-being (46.9%), and believed that smoking cessation was possible for psychiatric patients (58.6%). However, the role of the psychiatric hospital was perceived as providing information (85.3%) and helping to diminish cigarette consumption (51%), rather than proposing smoking cessation (29.5%). Staff daily practice included reminding patients of smoking restrictions (43.9%), managing cigarettes (46.5%), and nicotine replacement therapy (24.3%). A principal component analysis of tobacco-related practices revealed two main factors (59.8% of variance): basic hospital actions (factor 1) and more specialized interventions (factor 2), which were significantly associated with higher worries about personally developing smoke-related illnesses (Spearman r = 0.38, P < 0.0001). Compared with non-smokers, smokers reported higher perceived vulnerability to develop an illness due to tobacco and a higher level of worry about this. The discussion highlights the need to redefine roles and expectancies of mental health staff, and improve training and collaboration with experts, in order to improve efficiency concerning tobacco issues.

  16. [The psychiatric hospital: a place where language is reconstructed through the group].

    PubMed

    Herrera, F

    2015-09-16

    Within the psychiatric hospital, the caregiver is faced with difficult choices regarding the to respond to the suffering of the patient, to accompany him and sometimes forcing him to accept care. The hospital is a place of pressures from within and from outside, where the caregiver must perform a balancing act, with multiple conflicting roles. He must respect patient rights and his resources, his safety and those of others, the understanding of his difficulties, the expectations of the family and the limits of reality. This care has a fundamental ethical dimension. The team discussion allows for a conflictual cooperation between caregivers, which makes possible caring for our patients in crisis.

  17. Treatment satisfaction and recovery in Saami and Norwegian patients following psychiatric hospital treatment: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sørlie, Tore; Nergård, Jens-Ivar

    2005-06-01

    Treatment, treatment satisfaction and recovery in Saami and Norwegian patients treated in a psychiatric hospital were compared. Although half of the Saami patients preferred to speak Saami with their therapists, only one patient did. The extensive use of traditional helpers was only partly recognized. Despite no differences in type and amount of treatment or symptom-change during the hospital stay, the Saami patients showed less satisfaction with all investigated treatment parameters including contact with staff, treatment alliance, information and global treatment satisfaction. There was less agreement between the ratings of the therapists and the Saami patients. Suggestions for improvements are made.

  18. Women in acute psychiatric units, their characteristics and needs: a review

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Michaela; Lau, Yasmine; Sethi, Faisil

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method Recent policy guidelines published by the Department of Health highlight the need to develop gender-sensitive psychiatric services. However, very little is currently known about the specific characteristics and needs of female patients entering acute psychiatric wards, particularly psychiatric intensive care units. This article aims to review the current literature on what is known about this group of patients. PubMed, Embase and PsycINFO were systematically searched using a number of key terms. Results A total of 27 articles were obtained. The findings were divided into four categories: admission characteristics, treatment needs, risk management and outcomes after discharge. Gender differences were found in diagnosis and presentation. Clinical implications The differences observed in the reviewed studies suggest that women may have different assessment and treatment needs, and ultimately, different philosophies of care. A dearth of studies in this area indicates that if services are to develop in line with government policies, more research is needed. PMID:27752346

  19. Deliberate Self-harm seen in a Government Licensed Private Psychiatric Hospital and Institute.

    PubMed

    Krishnaram, Vaithiyam Devendran; Aravind, Vaithiyam Krishnaram; Vimala, A Rupavathy

    2016-01-01

    Majority of the published studies on suicide deal with identifying the sociodemographic and psychosocial aspects of suicide attempters and those who have completed suicide or to identify the characteristic differences between the two groups. There are very few studies focusing mainly or only on deliberate self harm. Most of these are hospital based studies or in a setting of general hospital psychiatry units. The present study is from Ram Psychiatry Hospital and Institute, a government licensed private psychiatric institute at Madurai, Tamil Nadu. It is a prospective study of individuals with self harm behavior mostly without the intention to kill, attending the psychiatry outpatient department of the hospital for the period of one year (January to December 2014) a total number of 140 cases are registered. Sociodemographic, clinical profiles with Axis I or Axis II diagnosis or otherwise, and the initiating or precipitating cause or mode of self-injury or self-harm are studied. The results are presented and discussed.

  20. Periodontal Health among Non-Hospitalized Chronic Psychiatric Patients in Mangaluru City-India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rashmi; Kota, Keshava Pai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A substantial section of society constituting the mentally ill and psychiatric patients deserve special attention. Evidence has suggested that psychological factors have contributed to an increase in the susceptibility to periodontal disease. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate the gingival and periodontal health of chronically non-hospitalized psychiatric patients in Mangaluru city, India. Materials and Methods Forty one psychiatric patients having chronic psychiatric illness and on neuroleptic medications for a minimum of 2 years were included in the study. The control group consisted of 41 healthy dental patients who were selected to match the study group by age and gender, and for both groups 20 teeth excluding the third molars should be present. Demographic characteristics, dental examination including gingival index and periodontal health according to the community periodontal index were recorded for each patient in both the groups. Results In the psychiatric patient group (Group A) 47.1% subjects were suffering from schizophrenia and 17.6% subjects were having mood disorder. Gingivitis varied from mild to severe among the patients of both the groups. Bleeding on probing (CPI 1) was recorded in 23.5% in Group A and 14.6% in Group B. Dental calculus (CPI 2) in 38.2% in Group A and 58.5% in Group B of the subjects, 20.6% with at least one 4mm to 5mm pocket (CPI 3), and 17.6% with at least one 6mm pocket (CPI 4). Conclusion The present study underlines a considerable need for prevention and treatment of periodontal disease among chronic psychiatric patients in Mangaluru city. Every effort should be made to increase the awareness of this cohort regarding the importance of oral hygiene practices and on the early diagnosis of periodontal problems. PMID:27656561

  1. [Closing forensic psychiatric hospitals in Italy: a new deal for mental health care?].

    PubMed

    Casacchia, Massimo; Malavolta, Maurizio; Bianchini, Valeria; Giusti, Laura; Di Michele, Vittorio; Giosuè, Patricia; Ruggeri, Mirella; Biondi, Massimo; Roncone, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The date of March 31, 2015, following the Law 81/2014, has marked a historical transition with the final closure of the six forensic psychiatric hospitals in Italy. This law identifies a new pathway of care that involves small-scale high therapeutic profile facilities (Residenze per la Esecuzione della Misura di Sicurezza, REMS) instead of the old forensic psychiatric hospitals. The Law promotes a new recovery-oriented rehabilitation approach for the persons with mental disorders who committed a criminal offence, but lack criminal responsibility and deemed as socially dangerous. After a brief description of what happens abroad, this article highlights the positive aspects of the law that, as a whole, has to be considered innovative and unavoidable. The main debated problems are also reviewed, including the lack of changes to the Criminal Code; the improper equation between insanity and mental illness and social dangerousness; the evaluation of "socially dangerousness", based solely on "subjective qualities" of the person, assessed out of his/her context, without paying attention to family and social conditions suitable for discharge; the expensive implementation of the REMS, mainly based on security policies and less on care and rehabilitation, the delay in their construction, and the search for residential alternatives structures; the uncertain boundaries of professional responsibility. Finally, several actions are suggested that can support the implementation of the law: information programs addressed to the general population; training activities for mental health professionals; systematic monitoring and evaluation of the outcomes of the care provided to the forensic psychiatric population; implementation of Agreement Protocols and a better cooperation with the judiciary. Scientific societies dealing with psychosocial rehabilitation need to be involved in such issues relating to the identification of the best care and rehabilitation pathways, which should be

  2. [Closing forensic psychiatric hospitals in Italy: a new deal for mental health care?].

    PubMed

    Casacchia, Massimo; Malavolta, Maurizio; Bianchini, Valeria; Giusti, Laura; Di Michele, Vittorio; Giosuè, Patricia; Ruggeri, Mirella; Biondi, Massimo; Roncone, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The date of March 31, 2015, following the Law 81/2014, has marked a historical transition with the final closure of the six forensic psychiatric hospitals in Italy. This law identifies a new pathway of care that involves small-scale high therapeutic profile facilities (Residenze per la Esecuzione della Misura di Sicurezza, REMS) instead of the old forensic psychiatric hospitals. The Law promotes a new recovery-oriented rehabilitation approach for the persons with mental disorders who committed a criminal offence, but lack criminal responsibility and deemed as socially dangerous. After a brief description of what happens abroad, this article highlights the positive aspects of the law that, as a whole, has to be considered innovative and unavoidable. The main debated problems are also reviewed, including the lack of changes to the Criminal Code; the improper equation between insanity and mental illness and social dangerousness; the evaluation of "socially dangerousness", based solely on "subjective qualities" of the person, assessed out of his/her context, without paying attention to family and social conditions suitable for discharge; the expensive implementation of the REMS, mainly based on security policies and less on care and rehabilitation, the delay in their construction, and the search for residential alternatives structures; the uncertain boundaries of professional responsibility. Finally, several actions are suggested that can support the implementation of the law: information programs addressed to the general population; training activities for mental health professionals; systematic monitoring and evaluation of the outcomes of the care provided to the forensic psychiatric population; implementation of Agreement Protocols and a better cooperation with the judiciary. Scientific societies dealing with psychosocial rehabilitation need to be involved in such issues relating to the identification of the best care and rehabilitation pathways, which should be

  3. [Neurological and psychiatric disorders following acute arsine poisoning (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Frank, G

    1976-07-15

    Follow-up study of 6 workers, who after survival of an acute arsine poisoning, developed psychopathologic and neurologic abnormalities. The symptoms appeared after a latency of 1 to 6 months indicating a toxic polyneuropathy and a mild psycho-organic syndrome. The severity of these reversible manifestations was directly related to the period of time of exposure to arsine. The clinical picture of arsine polyneuropathy was similar to that observed in arsenic poisoning, suggesting that arsine polyneuropathy is due to the action of arsenic. The psychopathologic syndrome corresponds to the so-called "Vergiftungsspätfolgesyndrom" and therefore does not appear to be a specific sequel of arsine poisoning.

  4. Qualitative study on the placement of Huntington disease patients in a psychiatric hospital: perceptions of Maltese nurses.

    PubMed

    Scerri, Josianne; Cassar, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Individuals with adult or juvenile Huntington disease can be cared for within psychiatric hospitals. In this paper, nurses' perceptions about the appropriateness of a psychiatric setting for these patients were explored. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 10 Maltese nurses involved in the care of these individuals. Their responses were analyzed using thematic analysis. Three main themes were identified from this study: (i) Huntington disease is not a mental illness; (ii) the lack of specialized staff and equipment within a psychiatric setting; and (iii) a need for alternative care options. The findings provide an insight into the perceptions of nurses, as they play a key role in the care and management of individuals with Huntington disease in a psychiatric setting. The findings demonstrated the need to provide alternative residential options in the community, and to improve the care and support provided both within psychiatric hospitals and the community through staff education and the provision of necessary facilities and equipment.

  5. Patients Discharged Against Medical Advice from a Psychiatric Hospital in Iran: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhmoonesi, Fatemeh; Khademloo, Mohammad; Pazhuheshgar, Samaneh

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Self- discharged patients are at high risk for readmission and ultimately higher cost for care. We intended to find the proportion of patients who leave hospital against medical advice and explore some of their characteristics. Methods: This prospective study of discharge against medical advice was conducted in psychiatric wards of Zare hospital in Iran, 2011. A psychologist recorded some information on a checklist based on the documented information about the patient who wanted to leave against medical advice. The psychologist interviewed these patients and recorded the reasons for discharge against medical advice. Descriptive statistics were calculated for the variables. Results: The rate of premature discharge was 34.4%. Compared to patients with regular discharges, patients with premature discharge were significantly more likely to be male, self-employed, to have co morbid substance abuse and first admission and positive family history of psychiatric disorder. Disappearance of symptoms was the most frequent reason for premature discharge. Conclusion: The 34.4% rate of premature discharge observed in our study is higher than rate reported in other studies. One possible explanation is our teaching hospital serves a low-income urban area and most patients had low socioeconomic status. Further studies are needed to compare teaching and non-teaching hospital about the rate of premature discharge and the reasons of patients who want to leave against medical advice. PMID:24762365

  6. [Wish to change smoking behaviour among staff and patients of a psychiatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Grempler, Julia; Droste-Arndt, Hildegard; Flammer, Erich; Steinert, Tilman

    2012-05-01

    Objective To examine smoking behaviour and motivation to reach abstinence among staff and patients of a psychiatric hospital.Methods In two due day surveys all in-patients and staff of the Centre for Psychiatry Weissenau were interviewed by a questionnaire.Results The response rate was 78.5 %. 442 (48 %) out of 933 subjects (523 patients, 410 staff) were smokers. Patients were smoking more frequently than staff (58 % vs. 34 %) and were more severely nicotine-dependent. Significant gender differences were observed with regard to prevalence and nicotin dependence. 57 % said they wanted to stop smoking and 34 % would appreciate therapeutic offers. There were no significant differences between patients and staff.Conclusions Psychiatric patients are as motivated as staff for offers about smoking cessation. There is a need for therapeutic offers. PMID:22422161

  7. Education for Life: Assessment of the Role of a Recreational Programme in the Rehabilitation of Day Patients in a Psychiatric Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Robert

    1984-01-01

    With a working definition of rehabilitation, the author assesses the therapeutic recreation program at a psychiatric hospital to determine whether it enabled psychiatric day patients to overcome social disabilities and make a full return to community life. (SK)

  8. Admission to psychiatric hospital in the early and late postpartum periods: Scottish national linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Langan Martin, Julie; McLean, Gary; Cantwell, Roch; Smith, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe weekly admission rates for affective and non-affective psychosis, major depression and other psychiatric disorders in the early and late postpartum periods. To assess the impact of socioeconomic status, age and parity on admission rates. Methods Scottish maternity records were linked to psychiatric hospital admissions. 3290 pregnancy-related psychiatric admissions were assessed. Weekly admission rates were calculated for the pregnancy period, early postpartum period (6 weeks after birth) and late postpartum period (up to 2 years after birth), and compared with pre-pregnancy rates (up to 2 years before pregnancy). Admission rates were generated by calculating the total number of admissions for each time period divided by the number of weeks in the period. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were generated for each time period, using deprivation, age, parity and record of previous psychiatric hospital care-adjusted Poisson regression models. Results Women from more deprived social quintiles accounted for the largest proportion of admissions across all time periods. Compared with pre-pregnancy period, admission rates fell during pregnancy, increased markedly during the early postpartum period, and remained elevated for 2 years after childbirth. Within the most affluent quintile, admission IRRs were higher in the early postpartum period (IRR=1.29, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.59) than in the late postpartum period (IRR=0.87, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.98). For the late postpartum period, there was a positive association between higher maternal age and admission IRRs (ages 20–35 years, IRR=1.35, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.54 and age>40 years IRR=1.72, 95% CI 1.41 to 2.09). Conclusions Rates of psychiatric admission fell during pregnancy and increased in the early postpartum period (particularly during the first 2 weeks after birth), and remained elevated above baseline during the 2-year late postpartum period. An understanding of how social deprivation, age and parity

  9. Hospital-based, acute care following ambulatory surgery center discharge

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Justin P.; Vashi, Anita A.; Ross, Joseph S.; Gross, Cary P.

    2014-01-01

    Background As a measure of quality, ambulatory surgery centers have begun reporting rates of hospital transfer at discharge. However, this may underestimate patient’s acute care needs after care. We conducted this study to determine rates and evaluate variation in hospital transfer and hospital-based, acute care within 7 days among patients discharged from ambulatory surgery centers. Methods Using data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we identified adult patients who underwent a medical or surgical procedure between July 2008 and September 2009 at ambulatory surgery centers in California, Florida, and Nebraska. The primary outcomes were hospital transfer at the time of discharge and hospital-based, acute care (emergency department visits or hospital admissions) within 7-days expressed as the rate per 1,000 discharges. At the ambulatory surgery center level, rates were adjusted for age, sex, and procedure-mix. Results We studied 3,821,670 patients treated at 1,295 ambulatory surgery centers. At discharge, the hospital transfer rate was 1.1/1,000 discharges (95% CI, 1.1–1.1). Among patients discharged home, the hospital-based, acute care rate was 31.8/1,000 discharges (95% CI, 31.6–32.0). Across ambulatory surgery centers, there was little variation in adjusted hospital transfer rates (median=1.0/1,000 discharges [25th–75th percentile=1.0–2.0]), while substantial variation existed in adjusted hospital-based, acute care rates (28.0/1,000 [21.0–39.0]). Conclusions Among adult patients undergoing ambulatory surgery center care, hospital transfer at discharge is a rare event. In contrast, the hospital-based, acute care rate is nearly 30-fold higher, varies across centers, and may be a more meaningful measure for discriminating quality. PMID:24787100

  10. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hospitalization when a SNF bed is not available. (1) A physician may certify or recertify need for continued hospitalization if the physician finds that the patient could receive proper treatment in a SNF but no bed is available in a participating SNF. (2) If this is the basis for the physician's certification...

  11. Dromokaition Psychiatric Hospital of Athens: from its establishment in 1887 to the era of deinstitutionalization.

    PubMed

    Fiste, Markella; Ploumpidis, Dimitrios; Tsiamis, Costas; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Effie; Liappas, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Dromokaition Psychiatric Hospital opened its doors in 1887, following the donation made by Zorzis Dromokaitis from the island of Chios. Private donations and all forms of charities had contributed to a large extent in the establishment of hospitals across Greece, during the late 19th and the early 20th century. Dromokaition was one of them but it was also unique, as it was the first psychiatric hospital in Athens, admitting patients from every part of the country. This paper aimed at highlighting the long service of the institution through the different historical periods the country went through. We present the chronicle of its foundation, the development of its inner structure, and the medical and organizational influences which it received, along the way. The therapeutic methods used during the first decades of its operation reflected the corresponding European standards of the time. As a model institution from its foundation, it followed closely the prevailing European guidelines, throughout its historical path, either as an independent institution or as an integrated one within the National Health Service. PMID:25694790

  12. Utility of an integrated electronic suicide alert system in a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Madan, Alok; Mahoney, Jane; Allen, Jon G; Ellis, Thomas; Hardesty, Susan; Oldham, John M; Fowler, J Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Management of suicide-related behaviors in a hospital is challenging. This article (1) describes integration of an electronic suicide risk notification system to improve assessment of psychiatric inpatients, (2) details the manner in which these alerts complement standard of care, and (3) provides support of using aggregate data to inform administrative decision-making. Complementing routine clinical care and under the supervision of an assessment coordinator, adult inpatients at a specialty psychiatric hospital complete a computerized battery of outcome assessments throughout the course of their hospitalization. A critical-item response notification system for suicide-related behaviors was implemented within the larger, assessment architecture, sending an alert e-mail to unit staff if patients endorsed suicidal ideation on any 1 of 6 critical items. Analysis of aggregate data over a 19-month period reveal a linear trend of increasing rate of suicide alerts from October 2012 to April 2013 (Phase A) with a stabilization at the heightened level from July 2013 to April 2014 (Phase B), R = 0.697, P = .007. Findings suggest that more nuanced training in the management of suicide-related behavior may be necessary and that traditional approaches to staffing may need to accommodate patient acuity. The communication innovation of this system is in line with the Joint Commission's emphasis on designing and implementing patient-centered systems that enhance quality of care, including improved safety. PMID:25830616

  13. Antipsychotic Medication Prescribing Practices Among Adult Patients Discharged From State Psychiatric Inpatient Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    HOLLEN, VERA; SCHACHT, LUCILLE

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The goal of this study was to explore antipsychotic medication prescribing practices in a sample of 86,034 patients discharged from state psychiatric inpatient hospitals and to find the prevalence of patients discharged with no antipsychotic medications, on antipsychotic monotherapy, and on antipsychotic polypharmacy. For patients discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy, the study explored the adjusted rates of antipsychotic polypharmacy, the reasons patients were discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy, the proportion of antipsychotic polypharmacy by mental health disorder, and the characteristics associated with being discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed all discharges for adult patients (18 to 64 y of age) from state psychiatric inpatient hospitals between January 1 and December 31, 2011. The relationship among variables was explored using χ2, t test, and analysis of variance. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy. Results: The prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy was 12%. Of the discharged patients receiving at least 1 antipsychotic medication (adjusted rate), 18% were on antipsychotic polypharmacy. The strongest predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy being prescribed were having a diagnosis of schizophrenia and a length of stay of 90 days or more. Patients were prescribed antipsychotic polypharmacy primarily to reduce their symptoms. Conclusions: Antipsychotic polypharmacy continues at a high enough rate to affect nearly 10,000 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia each year in state psychiatric inpatient hospitals. Further analysis of the clinical presentation of these patients may highlight particular aspects of the illness and its previous treatment that are contributing to practices outside the best-practice guideline. An increased understanding of trend data, patient characteristics, and national benchmarks provides an opportunity for

  14. Justice at work and psychiatric morbidity among the personnel of an Italian hospital.

    PubMed

    Gigantesco, Antonella

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the association between justice in the workplace (and other psychosocial factors) and mental health among healthcare professionals. It was conducted in a sample of hospital employees in Italy. The prevalence of mental disorders was assessed and the relationships between having a disorder and the level of perceived justice, job control and effort-reward imbalance were investigated. Psychiatric morbidity among professionals with higher perceived justice were 0.3-0.9 times lower than those among those with lower perceived justice. This finding suggests that improving fairness at work does matter for disease prevention and mental health promotion policy.

  15. [Core principles for the regulation of placement subject to public law in psychiatric hospitals - with explanations].

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    While the provisions of the highest courts concerning the involuntary commitment and treatment in psychiatric hospitals of people unable to give their consent are being implemented, in many federal states corresponding adjustments to the rules governing involuntary commitment in accordance with the mental health laws and laws on involuntary commitment are still pending. In states where new regulations do exist, legal experts express doubts that they conform to the Constitution and the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The DGPPN has formulated key parameters for involuntary commitment from a clinical perspective, which should be taken into account in the new regulations of the individual federal states. PMID:26868108

  16. A Systematic Review of Music Therapy Practice and Outcomes with Acute Adult Psychiatric In-Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Catherine; Odell-Miller, Helen; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported. Review Methods A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis. Results 98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions. Conclusions No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to

  17. A Qualitative Analysis Exploring Explanatory Models of Aggression and Violence in a Small Cohort of Rural Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents, Their Parents, and Selected Hospital Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Daniel C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the etiology and cultural underpinnings of adolescent violence as collective case study analysis of three inter-related groups: psychiatrically hospitalized rural adolescents, their parent/guardian, and various hospital staff. Violence among adolescents is a serious societal issue that has had varying…

  18. 77 FR 4908 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2011-19719 of August 18, 2011 (76 FR 51476), the final rule entitled... Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2012 Rates; Corrections AGENCY: Centers...

  19. 77 FR 27869 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Web page at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR . Free public access... CFR Parts 412, 413, 424, et. al Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year...

  20. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Printing Office Web page at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR . Free... 42 CFR Parts 412, 413, 424, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal...

  1. Psychiatric Morbidity and Correlates in Postpartum Women in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Narendra; Nagaraj, Anil Kumar Mysore; Koudike, Umashree; Majgi, Sumanth Mallikarjuna

    2016-01-01

    Background: A range of psychological disorders occur in women in the postpartum period apart from the traditional blues, postpartum depression and psychosis. These include obsession of infanticide, PTSD, morbid preoccupations regarding child birth and disorders of mother-infant relationships, though they are under emphasized. Methods: it is a cross-sectional study conducted in the tertiary maternity care hospital. A total of 152 study subjects were interviewed on MINI (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Inventory) and GAF (Global Assessment of Functioning) within 2 weeks after delivery. Results: The psychiatric morbidity was seen in 67 (44%) of the study subjects. About 26% of subjects had Depressive disorder NOS. Obsessive harm to the child, Panic disorder, Social phobia were the other disorders identified. There were no cases of Mania, Bipolar disorder, psychosis, post traumatic stress disorder or substance use disorder diagnosed across the sample. The Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) score averaged 87.8. Statistically significant association was seen to be present between psychiatric illness and number of previous still births and dead children before this delivery (P = 0.045). Conclusions: The study reveals that psychiatric co-morbidity is very common in the postpartum period and can be detected as early as first week after delivery. Social phobia identified as a common association is a new finding and needs further replication. It needs a larger sample with a prospective assessment to generalize the findings of our study. PMID:27570341

  2. 77 FR 34326 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... Disease FR Federal Register HAI Healthcare-Associated Infection HBIPS Hospital-Based Inpatient Psychiatric... INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2012-9985 of May 11, 2012 (77 FR 27870), there were a number of....asp . III. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2012-9985 of May 11, 2012 (77 FR 27870), make the...

  3. The association between depressive symptoms in the community, non-psychiatric hospital admission and hospital outcomes: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Prina, A. Matthew; Cosco, Theodore D.; Dening, Tom; Beekman, Aartjan; Brayne, Carol; Huisman, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper aims to systematically review observational studies that have analysed whether depressive symptoms in the community are associated with higher general hospital admissions, longer hospital stays and increased risk of re-admission. Methods We identified prospective studies that looked at depressive symptoms in the community as a risk factor for non-psychiatric general hospital admissions, length of stay or risk of re-admission. The search was carried out on MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library Database, and followed up with contact with authors and scanning of reference lists. Results Eleven studies fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria, and all were deemed to be of moderate to high quality. Meta-analysis of seven studies with relevant data suggested that depressive symptoms may be a predictor of subsequent admission to a general hospital in unadjusted analyses (RR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.28–1.44), but findings after adjustment for confounding variables were inconsistent. The narrative synthesis also reported depressive symptoms to be independently associated with longer length of stay, and higher re-admission risk. Conclusions Depressive symptoms are associated with a higher risk of hospitalisation, longer length of stay and a higher re-admission risk. Some of these associations may be mediated by other factors, and should be explored in more details. PMID:25466985

  4. Total quality in acute care hospitals: guidelines for hospital managers.

    PubMed

    Holthof, B

    1991-08-01

    Quality improvement can not focus exclusively on peer review and the scientific evaluation of medical care processes. These essential elements have to be complemented with a focus on individual patient needs and preferences. Only then will hospitals create the competitive advantage needed to survive in an increasingly market-driven hospital industry. Hospital managers can identify these patients' needs by 'living the patient experience' and should then set the hospital's quality objectives according to its target patients and their needs. Excellent quality program design, however, is not sufficient. Successful implementation of a quality improvement program further requires fundamental changes in pivotal jobholders' behavior and mindset and in the supporting organizational design elements.

  5. The permeable institution: an ethnographic study of three acute psychiatric wards in London.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Alan; Lelliott, Paul; Seale, Clive

    2006-10-01

    In Asylums, Goffman [1961. Asylums. London: Penguin] identified some permeable features of the old mental hospitals but presented them as exceptions to the rule and focused on their impermeable aspects. We argue that this emphasis is no longer valid and offer an alternative ideal type that better represents the reality of everyday life in contemporary 'bricks and mortar' psychiatric institutions. We call this the "permeable institution". The research involved participant observation of between 3 and 4 months and interviews with patients, patient advocates and staff on 3 psychiatric wards. Evidence for permeability includes that ward membership is temporary and changes rapidly (patients tend to have very short stays and staff turnover is high); patients maintain contact with the outside world during their stay; and institutional identities are blurred to the point where visitors or new patients can easily mistake staff and patients for one another. Permeability has both positive consequences (e.g., reduced risk of institutionalism), and negative consequences (e.g., unwanted people coming into hospital to cause trouble, and illicit drug use among patients). Staff employ various methods to regulate their ward's permeability, within certain parameters. The metaphor of the total/closed institution remains valuable, but it fails to capture the highly permeable nature of the psychiatric institutions we studied. Analysts may therefore find the permeable institution a more helpful reference point or ideal type against which to examine and compare empirical cases. Perhaps most helpful is to conceptualise a continuum of institutional permeability with total and permeable institutions at each extreme.

  6. The social worker as primary psychiatric consultant to the general hospital emergency room.

    PubMed

    Wallace, S R; Ward, J T; Goldberg, R J; Slaby, A E

    1985-01-01

    Providing coverage for the increasing number of psychiatric and social crises presenting in general hospital emergency rooms presents a challenge during this era of economic contraction. A model is presented for the development of a crisis team without additional funding, utilizing half-day shifts contributed by clinical social workers who hold full-time positions elsewhere in the hospital. Effective and efficient emergency clinical work required that the social workers be taught about biomedical issues pertinent to presentations, along with instruction as to why and when to seek consultation from backup psychiatrists. Quality of care and continued skill development are addressed through the use of a systematic data base and interdisciplinary case conferences using the psychiatrist as a consultant regarding psychopharmacological and diagnostic issues.

  7. [The psychiatric hospital: a place where language is reconstructed through the group].

    PubMed

    Herrera, F

    2015-09-16

    Within the psychiatric hospital, the caregiver is faced with difficult choices regarding the to respond to the suffering of the patient, to accompany him and sometimes forcing him to accept care. The hospital is a place of pressures from within and from outside, where the caregiver must perform a balancing act, with multiple conflicting roles. He must respect patient rights and his resources, his safety and those of others, the understanding of his difficulties, the expectations of the family and the limits of reality. This care has a fundamental ethical dimension. The team discussion allows for a conflictual cooperation between caregivers, which makes possible caring for our patients in crisis. PMID:26591080

  8. Assaultive behavior in state psychiatric hospitals: differences between forensic and nonforensic patients.

    PubMed

    Linhorst, Donald M; Scott, Lisa Parker

    2004-08-01

    Forensic patients are occupying an increasingly large number of beds in state psychiatric hospitals. The presence of these mentally ill offenders has raised concerns about the risk they present to nonforensic patients. This study compared the rate of assaults and factors associated with assaultive behavior among 308 nonforensic patients and two groups of forensic patients including 469 patients found not guilty by reason of insanity and 76 pretrial patients. Consistent with other studies, nonforensic patients had higher rates of assaults than either group of forensic patients. However, being a forensic patient did not affect the odds of assault when controlling for the effects of demographic and clinical variables in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Factors associated with assaults in each of the three patient groups were identified using multivariate analyses. Implications are presented for treatment of assaultive behavior, mixing of forensic and nonforensic patients within state hospitals, forensic release policies, and future research.

  9. Recycling former psychiatric hospitals in New Zealand: echoes of deinstitutionalisation and restructuring.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Alun E; Kearns, Robin A; Moon, Graham

    2009-03-01

    This paper addresses a gap in the understanding of the geography of deinstitutionalisation: the fate of closed asylums. We contend that the closure process was an exercise in both deinstitutionalisation and welfare state restructuring, and examine discourses surrounding the re-use of two former psychiatric hospitals in New Zealand-Seaview in Hokitika and Kingseat near Auckland. Drawing on an analysis of media coverage and field observation, we consider former asylums as sites of celebrity. We find the shadow of stigma to be prominent, manifested directly in suggestions that the former hospitals be used as prisons and in the partial redevelopment of one as a 'horror theme park'. Indirectly, we see stigma reflected in the physical deterioration of the asylums prior to closure. While this stigmatising is attributable in the first instance to deinstitutionalisation, the evidence suggests strongly that it was co-opted and exploited by the forces of restructuring. PMID:18499501

  10. Distinctiveness of management in a university psychiatric hospital as a public health institution.

    PubMed

    Koncina, Miroslav

    2008-06-01

    The distinctiveness of management of a university psychiatric hospital which has the status of a public health institution is manifested in the following ways: * Distinctive features and characteristics of managing service provider organizations compared to those whose operational results involve tangible products; * Distinctive features of management which originate from its role as a regional hospital and a tertiary research and educational institution in the field of psychiatry, with special importance for the Republic of Slovenia as a whole; * Distinctive features of management that are defined by the social and legal framework of operation of public health institutions and their special social mission. This paper therefore discusses the specific theoretical and practical findings regarding management of service provider organizations from the viewpoint of their social mission and significance, as well as their legal organization, internal structure and values.

  11. Distinctiveness of management in a university psychiatric hospital as a public health institution.

    PubMed

    Koncina, Miroslav

    2008-06-01

    The distinctiveness of management of a university psychiatric hospital which has the status of a public health institution is manifested in the following ways: * Distinctive features and characteristics of managing service provider organizations compared to those whose operational results involve tangible products; * Distinctive features of management which originate from its role as a regional hospital and a tertiary research and educational institution in the field of psychiatry, with special importance for the Republic of Slovenia as a whole; * Distinctive features of management that are defined by the social and legal framework of operation of public health institutions and their special social mission. This paper therefore discusses the specific theoretical and practical findings regarding management of service provider organizations from the viewpoint of their social mission and significance, as well as their legal organization, internal structure and values. PMID:18587280

  12. Substance abuse and the risk of readmission of people with schizophrenia at Amanuel Psychiatric Hospital, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Bimerew, M S; Sonn, F C T; Kortenbout, W P

    2007-06-01

    Frequent readmissions of people with schizophrenia pose considerable pressure on the psychiatric service provision of Amanuel Psychiatric Hospital. The purpose of the study was to ascertain factors mainly contributing to the rate of readmissions of people with schizophrenia. Descriptive survey methods and qualitative focus group interviews were employed to conduct the study. Random sampling techniques were used to select 43 respondents of people with schizophrenia from 231 people with schizophrenia who were readmitted for two or more times in the last two years and who gained access during the time of the study. Structured interviews were used for respondents of people with schizophrenia. Fourteen (N=14) family members/caregivers were selected using purposive sampling methods for focus group discussions. Quantitative data was analyzed using the SPSS Version 11.00 program and the qualitative data was analyzed by generating themes and categories. The results suggest that alcohol and khat abuse were contributing factors for the rate of readmissions of people with schizophrenia into the Amanuel Psychiatric Hospital. It was found that communities contribute to the problems of substance abuse by providing and/or selling it to those mentally ill people. The study also revealed that patients use alcohol and khat in order to tolerate the severe side effects of the anti-psychotic drugs, to suppress hunger due to shortage of food and to avoid drowsiness. Raising community awareness, psycho-education, strengthening the capacities of caretakers and laws to prevent substance abuse, as well as campaigning to prevent people from abusing mentally ill sufferers, should be established. PMID:17703825

  13. Psychiatric treatment outcomes of preschool children in a family day hospital.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jörg Michael; Averbeck-Holocher, Marlies; Romer, Georg; Fürniss, Tilman; Achtergarde, Sandra; Postert, Christian

    2015-04-01

    This study describes the treatment outcomes of preschoolers with severe mental health problems who were treated at the child psychiatric family day hospital for preschool children in Münster, Germany. The eclectic multi-modal treatment combines behavioral and psychodynamic techniques for both parents and children in various settings within an intermittent attendance structure provided by a multi-disciplinary team. This study evaluated 185 children with the Caregiver-Teacher Report Form (C-TRF/1.5-5), which was completed by therapists, and the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL/1.5-5), which was completed by mothers, at admission and discharge. The mothers' ratings of their children were statistically adjusted for the distortion caused by their own psychopathology. After treatment, the patients showed significant improvement on the C-TRF/CBCL Total Problem score with an average Cohen's d = -0.50 based on therapists' ratings, d = -0.97 for the non-adjusted maternal ratings, and d = -0.68 for the adjusted maternal ratings. We conclude that specialized family day hospitals may successfully treat preschool psychiatric patients.

  14. Police referrals to a psychiatric hospital: experiences of nurses caring for police-referred admissions.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Reshin; O'Brien, Louise; Gillies, Donna; Andrew, Sharon

    2013-08-01

    Police are a major source of referral to psychiatric hospitals in industrialized countries with mental health legislation. However, little attention has been paid to nurses' experience of caring for police-referred patients to psychiatric hospitals. This study utilized a Heideggerian phenomenological framework to explore the experiences of nine nurses caring for patients referred by the police, through semistructured interviews. Two major themes emerged from the hermeneutic analyses of interviews conducted with nurse participants: (i) 'expecting "the worst" '; and (ii) 'balancing therapeutic care and forced treatment'. Expecting 'the worst' related to the perceptions nurse participants had about patients referred by the police. This included two sub-themes: (i) 'we are here to care for whoever they bring in'; and (ii) 'but who deserves care?' The second theme balancing therapeutic care and forced treatment included the sub-themes: (i) 'taking control, taking care'; and (ii) 'managing power'. The study raises ethical and skill challenges for nursing including struggling with the notion of who deserves care, and balancing the imperatives of legislation with the need to work within a therapeutic framework. PMID:23009594

  15. Challenges in Obtaining HIV Testing in an Acute Involuntary Inpatient Psychiatric Setting.

    PubMed

    Weller, Jennifer; Levitt, Gwen; Myers, Robert; Riley, Aaron; Gesmundo, Celsius-Kit

    2016-01-01

    Even in health care professions, a stigma remains for patients with co-occurring HIV and serious mental illness. Researchers at a large, urban medical center encountered this stigma when they attempted to initiate a study of cognition in psychiatric inpatients with and without HIV who were seen as vulnerable in the context of research. Education efforts and advocacy on the part of the research team was instrumental and resulted in system-wide changes in the hospital, including the addition of HIV testing to the psychiatric admission laboratory panel. Within the first year that routine laboratory orders included an HIV test, the rate of testing ordered by inpatient-attending psychiatrists reached 60% of admissions. As of 2014, 13 HIV tests were found to be HIV seropositive in inpatients, with four of those cases classified as new-onset, as opposed to two positive tests in the year prior to our study. PMID:27426407

  16. A comparison of studies from the United States and western Europe on psychiatric hospitalization referrals for youths exhibiting suicidal behavior.

    PubMed

    Safer, D J

    1996-09-01

    A comprehensive literature review that rates of adolescent suicide-behavior based referrals from emergency rooms (ER) to psychiatric impatient facilities in the United States (U.S.) and in Western Europe (WE). Also compared on both sides of the Atlantic were the characteristics of suicidal youths seen at the ER and those admitted to psychiatric hospital units. The major findings were as follows. (1) Youths at both geographical locations who were seen at the ERs for suicidal behavior were very similar with respect to age and gender. (2) A median of 39% of youths seen in U.S. ERs for suicidal behavior were referred for inpatient psychiatric treatment; in WE, the median was 12%. (3) In the U.S., suicidal youths referred from the ER to psychiatric inpatient care were predominantly female (2.5:1) and mainly midadolescent in age (median age = 15). (4) In WE, the majority of those suicidal youths referred for psychiatric hospitalization were male (1:1.2) and in their late adolescent years (median age = 17). Thus, far fewer but more at risk youths presenting with suicidal behavior were admitted to psychiatric hospitals in WE than in the U.S. Presumably this is due largely to cross-Atlantic differences in malpractice patterns, academic perspectives, and medical care financing. PMID:8899134

  17. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for posthospital care, if appropriate. (b) Certification of need for hospitalization when a SNF bed is... physician finds that the patient could receive proper treatment in a SNF but no bed is available in a participating SNF. (2) If this is the basis for the physician's certification or recertification, the...

  18. Deliberate Self-harm seen in a Government Licensed Private Psychiatric Hospital and Institute

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaram, Vaithiyam Devendran; Aravind, Vaithiyam Krishnaram; Vimala, A. Rupavathy

    2016-01-01

    Majority of the published studies on suicide deal with identifying the sociodemographic and psychosocial aspects of suicide attempters and those who have completed suicide or to identify the characteristic differences between the two groups. There are very few studies focusing mainly or only on deliberate self harm. Most of these are hospital based studies or in a setting of general hospital psychiatry units. The present study is from Ram Psychiatry Hospital and Institute, a government licensed private psychiatric institute at Madurai, Tamil Nadu. It is a prospective study of individuals with self harm behavior mostly without the intention to kill, attending the psychiatry outpatient department of the hospital for the period of one year (January to December 2014) a total number of 140 cases are registered. Sociodemographic, clinical profiles with Axis I or Axis II diagnosis or otherwise, and the initiating or precipitating cause or mode of self-injury or self-harm are studied. The results are presented and discussed. PMID:27114626

  19. Psychiatric Hospital Bed Numbers and Prison Population Sizes in 26 European Countries: A Critical Reconsideration of the Penrose Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Blüml, Victor; Waldhör, Thomas; Kapusta, Nestor D.; Vyssoki, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, there has been a revived interest in the validity of the Penrose hypothesis, which was originally postulated over 75 years ago. It suggests an inverse relationship between the numbers of psychiatric hospital beds and the sizes of prison population. This study aims to investigate the association between psychiatric hospital beds and prison populations in a large sample of 26 European countries between 1993 and 2011. Methods The association between prison population sizes and numbers of psychiatric hospital beds was assessed by means of Spearman correlations and modeled by a mixed random coefficient regression model. Socioeconomic variables were considered as covariates. Data were retrieved from Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union. Outcomes Mean Spearman correlation coefficients between psychiatric beds and prison population showed a significant negative association (-0.35; p = <0.01). However, in the mixed regression model including socioeconomic covariates there were no significant fixed parameter estimates. Meanwhile, the covariance estimates for the random coefficients psychiatric beds (σ2 = 0.75, p = <0.01) and year (σ2 = 0.0007, p = 0.03) yielded significant results. Interpretation These findings do not support the general validity of the Penrose hypothesis. Notably, the results of the mixed-model show a significant variation in the magnitude and direction of the association of psychiatric hospital bed numbers and the prison population sizes between countries. In this sense, our results challenge the prevalent opinion that a reduction of psychiatric beds subsequently leads to increasing incarcerations. These findings also work against the potential stigmatization of individuals suffering from mental disorders as criminals, which could be an unintentional byproduct of the Penrose hypothesis. PMID:26529102

  20. A comparison of olanzapine and risperidone on the risk of psychiatric hospitalization in the naturalistic treatment of patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Zhu, Baojin; Faries, Douglas; Ernst, Frank R

    2004-01-01

    Background Decreasing hospital admissions is important for improving outcomes for people with schizophrenia and for reducing cost of hospitalization, the largest expenditure in treating this persistent and severe mental illness. This prospective observational study compared olanzapine and risperidone on one-year psychiatric hospitalization rate, duration, and time to hospitalization in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia in usual care. Methods We examined data of patients newly initiated on olanzapine (N = 159) or risperidone (N = 112) who continued on the index antipsychotic for at least one year following initiation. Patients were participants in a 3-year prospective, observational study of schizophrenia patients in the US. Outcome measures were percent of hospitalized patients, total days hospitalized per patient, and time to first hospitalization during the one-year post initiation. Analyses employed a generalized linear model with adjustments for demographic and clinical variables. A two-part model was used to confirm the findings. Time to hospitalization was measured by the Kaplan-Meier survival formula. Results Compared to risperidone, olanzapine-treated patients had significantly lower hospitalization rates, (24.1% vs. 14.4%, respectively, p = 0.040) and significantly fewer hospitalization days (14.5 days vs. 9.9 days, respectively, p = 0.035). The mean difference of 4.6 days translated to $2,502 in annual psychiatric hospitalization cost savings per olanzapine-treated patient, on average. Conclusions Consistent with prior clinical trial research, treatment-adherent schizophrenia patients who were treated in usual care with olanzapine had a lower risk of psychiatric hospitalization than risperidone-treated patients. Lower hospitalization costs appear to more than offset the higher medication acquisition cost of olanzapine. PMID:15175112

  1. The importance of relationships in mental health care: A qualitative study of service users' experiences of psychiatric hospital admission in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Gilburt, Helen; Rose, Diana; Slade, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Background While a number of studies have looked at life on service users' experiences of life on psychiatric wards, no research exists that have approached these experiences from the user perspective since the introduction of community care. Methods This user-led study uses a participatory approach to develop an understanding of the processes and themes which define the user experience of hospitalisation. Nineteen service users who had all had inpatient stays in psychiatric hospitals in London were interviewed in the community. Results Relationships formed the core of service users' experiences. Three further codes, treatment, freedom and environment defined the role of hospital and its physical aspects. Themes of communication, safety, trust, coercion, and cultural competency contributed to the concept of relationships. Conclusion Relationships with an individual which comprised effective communication, cultural sensitivity, and the absence of coercion resulted in that person being attributed with a sense of trust. This resulted in the patient experiencing the hospital as a place of safety in terms of risk from other patients and staff. Barriers to positive relationships included ineffective and negative communication, a lack of trust, a lack of safety in terms of staff as ineffective in preventing violence, and as perpetrators themselves, and the use of coercion by staff. This unique perspective both acts as a source of triangulation with previous studies and highlights the importance of the therapeutic relationship in providing a safe and therapeutic milieu for the treatment of people with acute mental health problems. PMID:18439254

  2. Acute Suicidal Affective Disturbance (ASAD): A confirmatory factor analysis with 1442 psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Ian H; Rufino, Katrina A; Rogers, Megan L; Ellis, Thomas E; Joiner, Thomas E

    2016-09-01

    Acute Suicidal Affective Disturbance (ASAD) is a newly proposed diagnostic entity that characterizes rapid onset suicidal intent. This study aims to confirm the factor structure of ASAD among psychiatric inpatients, and to determine the clinical utility of ASAD in predicting suicide attempt status. Overall, 1442 psychiatric inpatients completed a battery of self-report questionnaires assessing symptoms theorized to comprise the ASAD construct. Utilizing these data, a confirmatory factor analysis with a one-factor solution was performed. Regression analyses were employed to determine if the ASAD construct predicted past suicide attempts, and analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were employed to determine if ASAD symptoms differed by the presence and number of past suicide attempts. The one-factor solution indicated good fit: χ(2)(77) = 309.1, p < 0.001, Tucker-Lewis Index (TLI) = 0.96, comparative fit index (CFI) = 0.97, root-mean-square error of approximation (RMSEA) = 0.05. Controlling for depressive disorders and current symptoms, the ASAD construct significantly predicted the presence of a past suicide attempt. Moreover, ASAD differentiated in the expected directions between individuals with a history of multiple suicide attempts, individuals with a single suicide attempt, and individuals with no history of a suicide attempt. Acute Suicidal Affective Disturbance (ASAD) appears to be a unified construct that predicts suicidal behavior and is distinct from an already-defined mood disorder. PMID:27344228

  3. Content-Area Framework for Conducting Family Meetings for Acutely Ill Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Pon, Natalie C; Gordon, Mollie R; Coverdale, John; Nguyen, Phuong T

    2016-09-01

    Family meetings are a critically important component of managing acutely psychiatrically ill patients, and learning how to conduct such a meeting is critically important in the training of psychiatrists. Because we found no published comprehensive tools that dealt with the biopsychosocial content areas to be covered in family meetings in acute psychiatric settings, we developed and present such a comprehensive tool that is based in part on a review of existing tools utilized by other disciplines. This article describes the specific steps involved in premeeting planning, the formal topic areas that might be canvassed during the meeting, and postmeeting documentation and debriefing. The general content areas for discussion during the meeting include the setting of goals and expectations, relevant history-gathering, assessment of the family's understanding of the issues at stake, formal psychoeducation, and review of specific treatment strategies and clinical progress. The meeting may also include a discussion of resources available to the patient and family members and a review of issues related to the safety of the patient and others, management of early warning signs, and sensitive topics such as trauma, abuse, or violence that may play a role in the presentation or treatment of the patient to best translate established goals into a longer term plan of care. Implementation of this comprehensive and necessarily structured model should enhance the patient's and family's understanding of the issues at stake and should improve satisfaction, promote trust and an effective working alliance, and enhance the quality of the biopsychosocial care plan. PMID:27648507

  4. Systematic review of antibiotic consumption in acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bitterman, R; Hussein, K; Leibovici, L; Carmeli, Y; Paul, M

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotic consumption is an easily quantifiable performance measure in hospitals and might be used for monitoring. We conducted a review of published studies and online surveillance reports reporting on antibiotic consumption in acute care hospitals between the years 1997 and 2013. A pooled estimate of antibiotic consumption was calculated using a random effects meta-analysis of rates with 95% confidence intervals. Heterogeneity was assessed through subgroup analysis and metaregression. Eighty studies, comprising data from 3130 hospitals, met the inclusion criteria. The pooled rate of hospital-wide consumption was 586 (95% confidence interval 540 to 632) defined daily doses (DDD)/1000 hospital days (HD) for all antibacterials. However, consumption rates were highly heterogeneous. Antibacterial consumption was highest in intensive care units, at 1563 DDD/1000 HD (95% confidence interval 1472 to 1653). Hospital-wide antibacterial consumption was higher in Western Europe and in medium-sized, private and university-affiliated hospitals. The methods of data collection were significantly associated with consumption rates, including data sources, dispensing vs. purchase vs. usage data, counting admission and discharge days and inclusion of low-consumption departments. Heterogeneity remained in all subgroup analyses. Major heterogeneity currently precludes defining acceptable antibiotic consumption ranges in acute care hospitals. Guidelines on antibiotic consumption reporting that will account for case mix and a minimal set of hospital characteristics recommending standardized methods for monitoring and reporting are needed. PMID:26899826

  5. 78 FR 38679 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... Program. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2013-10234 of May 10, 2013 (78 FR 27486... errors. ] III. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2013-10234 of May 10, 2013 (78 FR 27486), make the...-AR53 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

  6. 77 FR 60315 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2012-19079 of August 31, 2012 (77 FR 53258), there were a... effective date requirements. ] IV. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2012-19079 of August 31, 2012 (77 FR...-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

  7. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ...We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and other legislation. In addition, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine......

  8. Post–Acute Care Use and Hospital Readmission after Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tiffanie K.; Fuchs, Barry D.; Small, Dylan S.; Halpern, Scott D.; Hanish, Asaf; Umscheid, Craig A.; Baillie, Charles A.; Kerlin, Meeta Prasad; Gaieski, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The epidemiology of post–acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis remains largely unknown. Objectives: To examine the rate of post–acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis and to examine risk factors and outcomes for hospital readmissions after sepsis. Methods: In an observational cohort study conducted in an academic health care system (2010–2012), we compared post–acute care use at discharge and hospital readmission after 3,620 sepsis hospitalizations with 108,958 nonsepsis hospitalizations. We used three validated, claims-based approaches to identify sepsis and severe sepsis. Measurements and Main Results: Post–acute care use at discharge was more likely after sepsis, driven by skilled care facility placement (35.4% after sepsis vs. 15.8%; P < 0.001), with the highest rate observed after severe sepsis. Readmission rates at 7, 30, and 90 days were higher postsepsis (P < 0.001). Compared with nonsepsis hospitalizations (15.6% readmitted within 30 d), the increased readmission risk was present regardless of sepsis severity (27.3% after sepsis and 26.0–26.2% after severe sepsis). After controlling for presepsis characteristics, the readmission risk was found to be 1.51 times greater (95% CI, 1.38–1.66) than nonsepsis hospitalizations. Readmissions after sepsis were more likely to result in death or transition to hospice care (6.1% vs. 13.3% after sepsis; P < 0.001). Independent risk factors associated with 30-day readmissions after sepsis hospitalizations included age, malignancy diagnosis, hospitalizations in the year prior to the index hospitalization, nonelective index admission type, one or more procedures during the index hospitalization, and low hemoglobin and high red cell distribution width at discharge. Conclusions: Post–acute care use and hospital readmissions were common after sepsis. The increased readmission risk after sepsis was observed regardless of sepsis severity and was associated with

  9. Clinico-Epidemiological Profile of Psychiatric Disorders Among Children in a Tertiary Care Hospital of Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Subba, Sonu Hangma; Guha, Arunav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction According to the World Health Organization (WHO), mental health disorders are one of the leading causes of disability worldwide and it is as common in children. Anywhere between one to three children may be suffering from psychiatric disorders at any point in time. Aim This study intended to find the pattern of psychiatric disorders and associated sociodemographic factors among children attending the psychiatric department in a tertiary care hospital in Southern India. Materials and Methods An analysis was conducted of patients who attended the psychiatric clinic from April 2012 to March 2013. Disorders were classified according to International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition (ICD-10) criteria. Data obtained was analysed by SPSS 11.5 version. Chi-square test was used to see association and p<0.05 was taken as significant. Results The mean age of the children was 10.9 years (SD=4.3). Predominance of males was noticed. It was seen that the male children, mostly suffered from Pervasive and specific developmental disorders (n=105; 31.1%). While in the female children, a prominence of anxiety, dissociative, stress-related, somatoform and other non-psychotic mental disorders was seen (n=52; 27.1%). Co-morbidity of psychiatric disorders was seen with intellectual disability and a seasonal predominance of psychiatric disorders was seen during autumn. Conclusion Children presenting with psychiatric disorders in the hospital showed a wide age range and among them, males outnumbered females. Psychiatric disorders showed seasonal variation and the types of disorder varied significantly with age, gender and religion. PMID:27134978

  10. Brief Report: Understanding Crisis Behaviors in Hospitalized Psychiatric Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder--Iceberg Assessment Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Kate H.; Barnes, Julia C.; Young, Nicholas D.; Gabriels, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    Children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at risk for emotional dysregulation and behavior problems that can escalate to levels requiring psychiatric hospitalization. Evaluating the etiology of such behaviors can be challenging for health care providers, as individuals with ASD can have difficulty self-reporting concerns.…

  11. The Contribution of Children's Temperamental Fear and Effortful Control to Restraint and Seclusion during Inpatient Treatment in a Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgett, David J.; Valentino, Kristin; Hayden, Lisa C.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined temperament characteristics as risk factors for restraint and seclusion (R/S) events in psychiatrically hospitalized youth, extending work that has sought to identify R/S risk factors and research examining temperament-behavior problem associations that has largely relied upon community samples. It was anticipated that…

  12. Overutilization of acute-care beds in Veterans Affairs hospitals.

    PubMed

    Smith, C B; Goldman, R L; Martin, D C; Williamson, J; Weir, C; Beauchamp, C; Ashcraft, M

    1996-01-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals would have substantial overutilization of acute care beds and services because of policies that emphasize inpatient care over ambulatory care. Reviewers from 24 randomly selected VA hospitals applied the InterQual ISD* (Intensity, Severity, Discharge) criteria for appropriateness concurrently to a random sample of 2,432 admissions to acute medical, surgical, and psychiatry services. Reliability of hospital reviewers in applying the ISD* criteria was tested by comparing their reviews with those of a small group of expert reviewers. Validity of the ISD* criteria was tested by comparing the assessments of master reviewers with the implicit judgments of panels of nine physicians. The physician panels validated the ISD* admission criteria for medicine and surgery (74% agreement with master reviewers, kappa > 0.4), whereas the psychiatry criteria were not validated (66% agreement, kappa 0.29). Hospital reviewers reliably used all three criteria sets (> 83% agreement with master reviewers, kappa > 0.6). Rates of nonacute admissions to acute medical and surgical services were > 38% as determined by the hospital and master reviewers and by the physician panels. Nonacute rates of continued stay were > 32% for both medicine and surgery services. Similar rates of nonacute admissions and continued stay were found for all 24 hospitals. Reasons for nonacute admissions and continued stay included lack of an ambulatory care alternative, conservative physician practices, delays in discharge planning, and social factors such as homelessness and long travel distances to the hospital. Using criteria that the authors showed to be reliable and valid, substantial overutilization of acute medicine and surgical beds was found in a representative sample of VA hospitals. Correcting this situation will require changes in physician practice patterns, development of ambulatory care alternatives to inpatient

  13. Psychosocial functioning of individuals with schizophrenia in community housing facilities and the psychiatric hospital in Zurich.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Matthias; Briner, David; Kawohl, Wolfram; Seifritz, Erich; Baumgartner-Nietlisbach, Gabriela

    2015-12-15

    Individuals with severe mental illness frequently have difficulties in obtaining and maintaining adequate accommodation. If they are not willing or able to adapt to requirements of traditional supported housing institutions they may live in sheltered and emergency accommodation. Adequate mental health services are rarely available in these facilities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate mental health, functional and social status of individuals living in community sheltered housing facilities. A cross-sectional survey of n=338 individuals in sheltered housing compared to a sample of patients at intake in acute inpatient psychiatry (n=619) concerning clinical and social variables was carried out in the catchment area of Zurich. Matched subsamples of individuals with schizophrenia (n=168) were compared concerning functioning and impairments on the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS). Individuals with schizophrenia in sheltered housing (25% of the residents) have significantly more problems concerning substance use, physical illness, psychopathological symptoms other than psychosis and depression, and relationships, daily activities and occupation than patients with schizophrenia at intake on an acute psychiatric ward. Community sheltered accommodation although conceptualized to prevent homelessness in the general population de facto serve as housing facilities for individuals with schizophrenia and other severe mental illness.

  14. Psychosocial functioning of individuals with schizophrenia in community housing facilities and the psychiatric hospital in Zurich.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Matthias; Briner, David; Kawohl, Wolfram; Seifritz, Erich; Baumgartner-Nietlisbach, Gabriela

    2015-12-15

    Individuals with severe mental illness frequently have difficulties in obtaining and maintaining adequate accommodation. If they are not willing or able to adapt to requirements of traditional supported housing institutions they may live in sheltered and emergency accommodation. Adequate mental health services are rarely available in these facilities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate mental health, functional and social status of individuals living in community sheltered housing facilities. A cross-sectional survey of n=338 individuals in sheltered housing compared to a sample of patients at intake in acute inpatient psychiatry (n=619) concerning clinical and social variables was carried out in the catchment area of Zurich. Matched subsamples of individuals with schizophrenia (n=168) were compared concerning functioning and impairments on the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS). Individuals with schizophrenia in sheltered housing (25% of the residents) have significantly more problems concerning substance use, physical illness, psychopathological symptoms other than psychosis and depression, and relationships, daily activities and occupation than patients with schizophrenia at intake on an acute psychiatric ward. Community sheltered accommodation although conceptualized to prevent homelessness in the general population de facto serve as housing facilities for individuals with schizophrenia and other severe mental illness. PMID:26416587

  15. Therapy of Acute Hypertension in Hospitalized Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Tennille N.; Shatat, Ibrahim F.

    2014-01-01

    Acute hypertension (HTN) in hospitalized children and adolescents occurs relatively frequently and in some cases, if not recognized and treated promptly, it can lead to hypertensive crisis with potentially significant morbidity and mortality. In contrast to adults, where acute HTN is most likely due to uncontrolled primary HTN, children and adolescents with acute HTN are more likely to have secondary HTN. This review will briefly cover evaluation of acute HTN and various age specific etiologies of secondary HTN and provide more in-depth discussion on treatment target, potential risks of acute HTN therapy, available pediatric data on intravenous and oral antihypertensive agents, and propose treatment schema including unique therapy of specific secondary HTN scenarios. PMID:24522943

  16. Managing aggression in a psychiatric hospital using a behaviour plan: a case study.

    PubMed

    Bisconer, S W; Green, M; Mallon-Czajka, J; Johnson, J S

    2006-10-01

    This paper focuses on the critical role of nursing in implementing a behaviour plan in a psychiatric hospital. The plan was implemented with a 40-year-old man with a long history of aggression towards others and self. The study used a single-subject research design with baseline and intervention phases (AB Design). Data were collected on (1) frequency of incidents of aggression towards others and self; (2) use of restrictive interventions to manage aggression (i.e. restraints, pro re nata medication, 1:1 special observation); and (3) frequency of staff injury. The data show a decrease in frequency of aggression towards others and self, a concurrent reduction in the use of restrictive interventions to manage aggression, and a decrease in incidents of staff injury. The behaviour plan helped staff maintain a safe and therapeutic milieu. The behaviour plan has given the patient an opportunity to learn positive replacement behaviours and skills, and the opportunity eventually to leave the hospital to live in a less restrictive community home. PMID:16965469

  17. Patient outcomes following discharge from secure psychiatric hospitals: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Seena; Fimińska, Zuzanna; Cocks, Christopher; Coid, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Background Secure hospitals are a high-cost, low-volume service consuming around a fifth of the overall mental health budget in England and Wales. Aims A systematic review and meta-analysis of adverse outcomes after discharge along with a comparison with rates in other clinical and forensic groups in order to inform public health and policy. Method We searched for primary studies that followed patients discharged from a secure hospital, and reported mortality, readmissions or reconvictions. We determined crude rates for all adverse outcomes. Results In total, 35 studies from 10 countries were included, involving 12 056 patients out of which 53% were violent offenders. The crude death rate for all-cause mortality was 1538 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 1175–1901). For suicide, the crude death rate was 325 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 235–415). The readmission rate was 7208 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 5916–8500). Crude reoffending rates were 4484 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 3679–5287), with lower rates in more recent studies. Conclusions There is some evidence that patients discharged from forensic psychiatric services have lower offending outcomes than many comparative groups. Services could consider improving interventions aimed at reducing premature mortality, particularly suicide, in discharged patients. PMID:26729842

  18. Time of the year and absconding from a psychiatric hospital in Trinidad

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Akleema; Maharajh, Hari D.

    2003-01-01

    Personal characteristics of patients and environmental factors at psychiatric hospitals have been identified as predictors of absconding. This study seeks to establish a relationship between time of the year and absconding. All characteristics of absconders were analysed over a two-year period using hospital records (N= 104). Public holidays and lunar phases were obtained through almanacs for each year; and school vacation period was determined by reference to a school academic calendar. Friday was the most popular day of the week for absconding, males tend to escape more on the weekends compared to females, females tend to escape more during the wet season, and Christmas was the most popular holiday season for absconding to take place. The full moon phase had the largest percentage of absconding when compared to other phases. Recommendations are that the system of patient care should be client driven at all times and greater supervision of patients is needed on weekends, vacation periods and during the full moon phase. PMID:21206811

  19. Time of the year and absconding from a psychiatric hospital in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akleema; Maharajh, Hari D

    2003-01-01

    Personal characteristics of patients and environmental factors at psychiatric hospitals have been identified as predictors of absconding. This study seeks to establish a relationship between time of the year and absconding. All characteristics of absconders were analysed over a two-year period using hospital records (N= 104). Public holidays and lunar phases were obtained through almanacs for each year; and school vacation period was determined by reference to a school academic calendar. Friday was the most popular day of the week for absconding, males tend to escape more on the weekends compared to females, females tend to escape more during the wet season, and Christmas was the most popular holiday season for absconding to take place. The full moon phase had the largest percentage of absconding when compared to other phases. Recommendations are that the system of patient care should be client driven at all times and greater supervision of patients is needed on weekends, vacation periods and during the full moon phase.

  20. A prospective study of lipids and serotonin as risk markers of violence and self-harm in acute psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Roaldset, John O; Bakken, Anne M; Bjørkly, Stål

    2011-04-30

    Cross-sectional studies have reported an association between lipids and serotonin levels and aggression, but a literature search revealed a paucity of prospective studies. Subjects of the present naturalistic study were 254 of all (489) involuntary and voluntary acutely admitted patients to a psychiatric hospital during 1year. Serum lipids and platelet serotonin at admission were prospectively compared with recorded intra-institutional and 1-year post-discharge violence and self-harm. Total cholesterol had a significant negative relationship to inpatient suicidal behaviour and inpatient violent behaviour and to 3-month post-discharge violent behaviour. Triglycerides were a significant marker of inpatient self-mutilation and of self-mutilation in combination with suicidal behaviour at 3 and 12 months of follow-up. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) had a significant negative relationship to violence at 12-months, and to repeated violence in seven patients with two or more admissions. The post-discharge relationships between total cholesterol and violence and between triglycerides and self-harm remained significant even when controlling for other possible explanatory variables in a multivariate model. Results did not change after controlling for current medication at admission. There was no association between platelet serotonin and violence or self-harm. Future research may examine if lipid measurements add incremental validity to established clinical risk assessment procedures of violent and self-harm behaviour.

  1. Acute Kidney Injury is More Common in Acute Haemorrhagic Stroke in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ray, N C; Chowdhury, M A; Sarkar, S R

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after acute stroke and is an independent predictor of both early and long-term mortality after acute stroke. Acute kidney injury is associated with increased mortality in haemorrhagic stroke patients. This cross sectional observational study was conducted in Nephrology, Neuromedicine and Medicine department of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital, Mymensingh from July 2012 to June 2014. A total of 240 patients with newly detected acute stroke confirmed by CT scan of brain were included in this study. According to this study, 15.42% of acute stroke patients developed AKI. Among the patients with haemorrhagic stroke 21.87% developed AKI while only 13.07% patients with ischaemic stroke developed AKI. So, early diagnosis and management of AKI in patients with acute stroke especially in haemorrhagic stroke is very important to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these patients. PMID:26931240

  2. Viral etiology in infants hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Azkur, Dilek; Özaydın, Eda; Dibek-Mısırlıoğlu, Emine; Vezir, Emine; Tombuloğlu, Duygu; Köse, Gülşen; Kocabaş, Can N

    2014-01-01

    Acute bronchiolitis is predominantly a viral disease. Respiratory syncytial virus is the most common agent, but other newly identified viruses have also been considered as causes. The aim of the present study is to determine the respiratory viruses causing acute bronchiolitis in hospitalized infants. Infants younger than 2 years of age who were hospitalized for acute viral bronchiolitis in a children's hospital between November 2011 and May 2012 were evaluated for the presence of viruses as etiologic agents using a realtime polymerase chain reaction method.A total of 55 infants were included in this study. The mean age of the children was 6.98±5.53 months, and 63.6% were male. In the 55 children, 63 viruses were detected. A single viral pathogen was detected in 47 (85.5%) patients, and two viruses were co-detected in 8 (14.6%) patients. Respiratory syncytial virus was the most common virus identified, accounting for 25 (45.5%) cases, followed by rhinovirus (n=9, 16.4%), and human metapneumovirus (n = 8, 14.5%).Although respiratory syncytial virus remains the major viral pathogen in infants hospitalized for acute broncholitis, more than half of bronchiolitis cases are associated with other respiratory viruses.

  3. 'Shared-rhythm cooperation' in cooperative team meetings in acute psychiatric inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Vuokila-Oikkonen, P; Janhonen, S; Vaisanen, L

    2004-04-01

    The cooperative team meeting is one of the most important interventions in psychiatric care. The purpose of this study was to describe the participation of patients and significant others in cooperative team meetings in terms of unspoken stories. The narrative approach focused on storytelling. The data consisted of videotaped cooperative team meetings (n = 11) in two acute closed psychiatric wards. The QRS NVivo computer program and the Holistic Content Reading method were used. During the process of analysis, the spoken and unspoken stories were analysed at the same time. According to the results, while there was some evident shared-rhythm cooperation (the topics of discussion were shared and the participants had eye contact), there were many instances where the interaction was controlled and defined by health care professionals. This lack of shared rhythm in cooperation, as defined in terms of storytelling, was manifested as monologue and the following practices: the health care professionals controlled the storytelling by sticking to their opinions, by giving the floor or by pointing with a finger and visually scanning the participants, by interrupting the speaker or by allowing the other experts to sit passively. Implications for mental health nursing practice are discussed.

  4. The Twenty-Year Trajectory of Suicidal Activity Among Post-Hospital Psychiatric Men and Women with Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Kalman J; Harrow, Martin; Clews, Kelsey

    2016-07-01

    The Chicago Follow-up Study has followed the course of severe mental illness among psychiatric patients for more than 20 years after their index hospitalization. Among these patients are 97 schizophrenia patients, 45 patients with schizoaffective disorders, 102 patients with unipolar nonpsychotic depression, and 53 patients with a bipolar disorder. Maximum suicidal activity (suicidal ideation, suicidal attempts and suicide completions) generally declines over the 3 time periods (early, middle, and late follow-ups) following discharge from the acute psychiatric hospitalization for both males and females across diagnostic categories with two exceptions: female schizophrenia patients and female bipolar patients. A weighted mean suicidal activity score tended to decrease across follow-ups for male patients in the schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and depressive diagnostic groups with an uneven trend in this direction for the male bipolars. No such pattern emerges for our female patients except for female depressives. Males' suicidal activity seems more triggered by psychotic symptoms and potential chronic disability while females' suicidal activity seems more triggered by affective symptoms. PMID:26881891

  5. A critical black feminist ethnography of treatment for women with co-occurring disorders in the psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Creswell, Laryssa M

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of women diagnosed with co-occurring disorders on the treatments provided by a state psychiatric hospital so that appropriate recommendations for changes in treatment may be made. Critical ethnography was used and the data was viewed through the lens of intersectionality from the black feminist perspective. Seven women hospitalized in one psychiatric hospital in the Mid-Atlantic region participated in the study. Data was collected via semistructured interviews, Consumer Perceptions of Care survey, researcher's observations, and archival data. Three major findings emerged: (1) Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) was identified as a beneficial treatment, (2) a lack of trust in the system and people in the system, and (3) housing or homelessness was perceived as a barrier. Based on the results of this study, it is recommended clinicians, administrators, and policy makers listen closely to individuals receiving treatment to make decisions regarding treatment accordingly.

  6. Ownership and financial sustainability of German acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Augurzky, Boris; Engel, Dirk; Schmidt, Christoph M; Schwierz, Christoph

    2012-07-01

    This paper considers the role of ownership form for the financial sustainability of German acute care hospitals over time. We measure financial sustainability by a hospital-specific yearly probability of default (PD) trying to mirror the ability of hospitals to survive in the market in the long run. The results show that private ownership is associated with significantly lower PDs than public ownership. Moreover, path dependence in the PD is substantial but far from 100%, indicating a large number of improvements and deteriorations in financial sustainability over time. Yet, the general public hospitals have the highest path dependence. Overall, this indicates that public hospitals, which are in a poor financial standing, remain in that state or even deteriorate over time, which may be conflicting with financial sustainability.

  7. A randomized trial of a mental health consumer-managed alternative to civil commitment for acute psychiatric crisis.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Thomas K; Stoneking, Beth C; Humphreys, Keith; Sundby, Evan; Bond, Jason

    2008-09-01

    This experiment compared the effectiveness of an unlocked, mental health consumer-managed, crisis residential program (CRP) to a locked, inpatient psychiatric facility (LIPF) for adults civilly committed for severe psychiatric problems. Following screening and informed consent, participants (n = 393) were randomized to the CRP or the LIPF and interviewed at baseline and at 30-day, 6-month, and 1-year post admission. Outcomes were costs, level of functioning, psychiatric symptoms, self-esteem, enrichment, and service satisfaction. Treatment outcomes were compared using hierarchical linear models. Participants in the CRP experienced significantly greater improvement on interviewer-rated and self-reported psychopathology than did participants in the LIPF condition; service satisfaction was dramatically higher in the CRP condition. CRP-style facilities are a viable alternative to psychiatric hospitalization for many individuals facing civil commitment. PMID:18626766

  8. Acute lead poisoning in nursing home and psychiatric patients from the ingestion of lead-based ceramic glazes.

    PubMed

    Vance, M V; Curry, S C; Bradley, J M; Kunkel, D B; Gerkin, R D; Bond, G R

    1990-10-01

    To our knowledge, acute inorganic lead poisoning from single ingestions of lead compounds has been only rarely reported. During a 14-month period, we were contacted regarding eight instances of acute ingestions of liquid lead-based ceramic glazes by mentally impaired residents of nursing homes or psychiatric facilities participating in ceramic arts programs. While some ingestions did not cause toxic effects, some patients developed acute lead poisoning characterized by abdominal pain, anemia, and basophilic stippling of red blood cells. In the blood of several patients, lead concentrations were far above normal (4 to 9.5 mumol/L). Urinary lead excretions were tremendously elevated during chelation therapy, with one patient excreting 535.9 mumol/L of lead during a 6-day period, the largest lead excretion ever reported in a patient suffering from acute lead poisoning, to our knowledge. All patients recovered following supportive care and appropriate use of chelating agents. Lead-based glazes are commonly found in nursing homes and psychiatric facilities. We suspect that acute or chronic lead poisoning from the ingestion(s) of lead-based ceramic glazes may be an unrecognized but not uncommon problem among such residents. We urge physicians to take ingestions of lead-based glazes seriously and to consider the diagnosis of lead poisoning in nursing home and psychiatric patients who have participated in ceramic crafts programs. PMID:2222094

  9. Mechanical and pharmacological restraints in acute psychiatric wards--why and how are they used?

    PubMed

    Knutzen, Maria; Bjørkly, Stål; Eidhammer, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Steinar; Helen Mjøsund, Nina; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Sandvik, Leiv; Friis, Svein

    2013-08-30

    Restraint use has been reported to be common in acute psychiatry, but empirical research is scarce concerning why and how restraints are used. This study analysed data from patients' first episodes of restraint in three acute psychiatric wards during a 2-year study period. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors for type and duration of restraint. The distribution of restraint categories for the 371 restrained patients was as follows: mechanical restraint, 47.2%; mechanical and pharmacological restraint together, 35.3%; and pharmacological restraint, 17.5%. The most commonly reported reason for restraint was assault (occurred or imminent). It increased the likelihood of resulting in concomitant pharmacological restraint. Female patients had shorter duration of mechanical restraint than men. Age above 49 and female gender increased the likelihood of pharmacological versus mechanical restraint, whereas being restrained due to assault weakened this association. Episodes with mechanical restraint and coinciding pharmacological restraint lasted longer than mechanical restraint used separately, and were less common among patients with a personality disorder. Diagnoses, age and reason for restraint independently increased the likelihood for being subjected to specific types of restraint. Female gender predicted type of restraint and duration of episodes.

  10. The relationship between organizational culture and performance in acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Rowena; Mannion, Russell; Davies, Huw T O; Harrison, Stephen; Konteh, Fred; Walshe, Kieran

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between senior management team culture and organizational performance in English acute hospitals (NHS Trusts) over three time periods between 2001/2002 and 2007/2008. We use a validated culture rating instrument, the Competing Values Framework, to measure senior management team culture. Organizational performance is assessed using a wide range of routinely collected indicators. We examine the associations between organizational culture and performance using ordered probit and multinomial logit models. We find that organizational culture varies across hospitals and over time, and this variation is at least in part associated in consistent and predictable ways with a variety of organizational characteristics and routine measures of performance. Moreover, hospitals are moving towards more competitive culture archetypes which mirror the current policy context, though with a stronger blend of cultures. The study provides evidence for a relationship between culture and performance in hospital settings.

  11. The relationship between organizational culture and performance in acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Rowena; Mannion, Russell; Davies, Huw T O; Harrison, Stephen; Konteh, Fred; Walshe, Kieran

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between senior management team culture and organizational performance in English acute hospitals (NHS Trusts) over three time periods between 2001/2002 and 2007/2008. We use a validated culture rating instrument, the Competing Values Framework, to measure senior management team culture. Organizational performance is assessed using a wide range of routinely collected indicators. We examine the associations between organizational culture and performance using ordered probit and multinomial logit models. We find that organizational culture varies across hospitals and over time, and this variation is at least in part associated in consistent and predictable ways with a variety of organizational characteristics and routine measures of performance. Moreover, hospitals are moving towards more competitive culture archetypes which mirror the current policy context, though with a stronger blend of cultures. The study provides evidence for a relationship between culture and performance in hospital settings. PMID:23159305

  12. Thyroid dysfunction in major psychiatric disorders in a hospital based sample

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Calvin, Sam; Singh, Jyotin Kshitiz; Thomas, Binston; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Abnormalities in thyroid hormonal status is common in major psychiatric disorders. Although the relevance of thyroid dysfunction to bipolar disorder is well-recognized, yet the association between thyroid dysfunction and schizophrenia-spectrum disorders is under-emphasized. The aim of this study was to examine and compare the rates of abnormal thyroid hormonal status in patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and mood disorders in an inpatient tertiary care general hospital psychiatry unit. Methods: This was a retrospective hospital-based study on 468 inpatient samples. Data on serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), T3 (triiodothyroxine), T4 (L-thyroxine), free unbound fractions of T3 and T4 (FT3 and FT4) were obtained from records of 343 patients, 18 patients were anti-TPO (anti thyroid peroxidase antibody) positive. The rates of abnormal thyroid hormonal status were compared using the chi square test. Results: Abnormal thyroid hormonal status in general, and presence of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, in particular were seen in 29.3, 25.17 and 4.08 per cent patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, respectively. These were comparable to the rates in patients with mood disorders (23.24, 21.62 and 1.62%, respectively). Eleven of the 18 patients with antiTPO positivity had a schizophrenia-spectrum disorder. There were no gender differences. Interpretation & conclusions: Thyroid dysfunction was present in patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorder as well as mood disorders. Autoimmune thyroid disease was more commonly seen in patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders compared to mood disorders. The findings reiterate the relevance of screening patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders for abnormal thyroid hormonal status. PMID:24521631

  13. [Religion and psychiatric disorders in patients admitted to a university general hospital].

    PubMed

    Soeiro, Rachel Esteves; Colombo, Elisabetta S; Ferreira, Marianne H F; Guimarães, Paula S A; Botega, Neury J; Dalgalarrondo, Paulo

    2008-04-01

    In order to evaluate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in a Brazilian general hospital and their association with religious denomination and religiosity, 253 inpatients were interviewed. A socio-demographic questionnaire and an instrument for diagnosis of mental disorders (MINI-Plus) were applied. Distribution of religious denominations was: Catholic 63.2% (n=177), Evangelical Protestant 20.4% (n=57), Spiritist 4.3% (n=12), traditional Protestant 2.3% (n=8), and "no religion" 7.5% (n=21). Degree of religiosity was: very religious 43.2% (n=116), religious 46.9% (n=129), hardly religious 9.8% (n=27), and not at all religious 1.1% (n=3). Evangelical (Pentecostal) religious affiliation and frequent attendance at worship services were associated with fewer alcohol problems. Membership in an Evangelical (Pentecostal) church may thus have an inhibitory effect on alcohol dependence or abuse. Intensity of religiosity was moderately associated with overall prevalence of disorders, especially bipolar disorder. It is reasonable to conclude that extreme situations (very intense versus very limited religious participation) are related to this finding, associating both an exacerbated pursuit of religion and alienation from it with altered mental states.

  14. Self-evaluation by adolescents in a psychiatric hospital school token program.

    PubMed

    Santogrossi, D A; O'leary, K D; Romanczyk, R G; Kaufman, K F

    1973-01-01

    Nine adolescent boys with a history of high rates of disruptive classroom behavior were selected from a psychiatric hospital school and placed in a remedial reading class after school in which various factors in a token reinforcement program involving self-evaluation were investigated. The effects of self-evaluation, in the form of a rating the students gave themselves about the appropriateness of their classroom behavior, were first assessed. While the students' ratings of their own behavior correlated highly with the teacher's ratings and evaluations made by independent observers, the self-evaluations did not lead to a reduction in disruptive behavior. A token reinforcement program, in which the teacher rated the students' level of appropriate behavior and in which the students traded earned rating points for prizes, clearly led to a reduction of disruptive behavior. When the students were given the opportunity to evaluate their own behavior and to receive rewards in exchange for the evaluation, they returned to their former rates of disruptive behavior. PMID:16795409

  15. Excess non-psychiatric hospitalizations among employees with mental disorders: a 10-year prospective study of the GAZEL cohort

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo Da Silva, M; Lemogne, C; Melchior, M; Zins, M; Van Der Waerden, J; Consoli, S M; Goldberg, M; Elbaz, A; Singh-Manoux, A; Nabi, H

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine whether non-psychiatric hospitalizations rates were higher in those with mental disorders. Method In a cohort of 15 811 employees, aged 35–50 years in 1989, mental disorder status was defined from 1989 to 2000. Hospitalizations for all-causes, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and cancer, were recorded yearly from 2001 to 2011. Negative binomial regression models were used to estimate hospitalization rates over the follow-up. Results After controlling for baseline sociodemographic factors, health-related behaviors, self-rated health, and self-reported medical conditions, participants with a mental disorder had significantly higher rates of all-cause hospitalization [incidence rate ratio, IRR = 1.20 (95%, 1.14–1.26)], as well as hospitalization due to MI [IRR = 1.44 (95%, 1.12–1.85)]. For stroke, the IRR did not reach statistical significance [IRR = 1.37 (95%, 0.95–1.99)] and there was no association with cancer [IRR = 1.01 (95%, 0.86–1.19)]. A similar trend was observed when mental disorders groups were considered (no mental disorder, depressive disorder, mental disorders due to psychoactive substance use, other mental disorders, mixed mental disorders, and severe mental disorder). Conclusion In this prospective cohort of employees with stable employment as well as universal access to healthcare, we found participants with mental disorders to have higher rates of non-psychiatric hospitalizations. PMID:25289581

  16. Hospital Mortality in the United States following Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Michael E.; Marshall, Emily J.; Matheny, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common reason for hospital admission and complication of many inpatient procedures. The temporal incidence of AKI and the association of AKI admissions with in-hospital mortality are a growing problem in the world today. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of AKI and its association with in-hospital mortality in the United States. AKI has been growing at a rate of 14% per year since 2001. However, the in-hospital mortality associated with AKI has been on the decline starting with 21.9% in 2001 to 9.1 in 2011, even though the number of AKI-related in-hospital deaths increased almost twofold from 147,943 to 285,768 deaths. We discuss the importance of the 71% reduction in AKI-related mortality among hospitalized patients in the United States and draw on the discussion of whether or not this is a phenomenon of hospital billing (coding) or improvements to the management of AKI. PMID:27376083

  17. Correlation between levels of conflict and containment on acute psychiatric wards: the city-128 study.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Len; Stewart, Duncan; Papadopoulos, Chris; Iennaco, Joanne DeSanto

    2013-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Attainment of safe, calm inpatient psychiatric wards that are conducive to positive therapeutic care is crucial. On such wards, rates of coerced medication, seclusion, manual restraint and other types of containment are comparatively low, and, usually, rates of conflict-for example, aggression, substance use, and absconding-are also low. Sometimes, however, wards maintain low rates of containment even when conflict rates are high. This study investigated wards with the counterintuitive combination of low containment and high conflict or high containment and low conflict. METHODS The authors conducted a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data collected from 136 acute psychiatric wards across England in 2004-2005. The wards were categorized into four groups on the basis of median splits of containment and conflict rates: high conflict and high containment, high conflict and low containment, low conflict and low containment, and low conflict and high containment. Features significantly associated with these ward types were identified. RESULTS Among the variables significantly associated with the various typologies, some-for example, environmental quality-were changeable, and others-such as social deprivation of the area served-were fixed. High-conflict, low-containment wards had higher rates of male staff and lower-quality environments than other wards. Low-conflict, high-containment wards had higher numbers of beds. High-conflict, high-containment wards utilized more temporary staff as well as more unqualified staff. No overall differences were associated with low-conflict, low-containment wards. CONCLUSIONS Wards can make positive changes to achieve a low-containment, nonpunitive culture, even when rates of patient conflict are high.

  18. Spaces for smoking in a psychiatric hospital: social capital, resistance to control, and significance for 'therapeutic landscapes'.

    PubMed

    Wood, Victoria J; Curtis, Sarah E; Gesler, Wil; Spencer, Ian H; Close, Helen J; Mason, James M; Reilly, Joe G

    2013-11-01

    This paper reports on research framed by theories of therapeutic landscapes and the ways that the social, physical and symbolic dimensions of landscapes relate to wellbeing and healing. We focus especially on the question of how attributes of therapeutic landscapes are constructed in different ways according to the variable perspectives of individuals and groups. Through an ethnographic case study in a psychiatric hospital in the North of England we explore the perceived significance for wellbeing of 'smoking spaces' (where tobacco smoking is practiced in ways that may, or may not be officially sanctioned). We interpret our findings in light of literature on how smoking spaces are linked to the socio-geographical power relations that determine how smoking is organised within the hospital and how this is understood by different groups using the hospital building. We draw on qualitative research findings from discussion groups, observations, and interviews with patients, carers and staff. These focused on their views about the building design and setting of the new psychiatric hospital in relation to their wellbeing, and issues relating to smoking spaces emerged as important for many participants. Creating and managing smoking spaces as a public health measure in psychiatric hospitals is shown to be a controversial issue involving conflicting aims for health and wellbeing of patients and staff. Our findings indicate that although from a physical health perspective, smoking is detrimental, the spaces in which patients and staff smoke have social and psychological significance, providing a forum for the creation of social capital and resistance to institutional control. While the findings relate to one case study setting, the paper illustrates issues of wider relevance and contributes to an international literature concerning the tensions between perceived psychological and psychosocial benefits of smoking vs. physical harm that smoking is likely to cause. We consider

  19. Spaces for smoking in a psychiatric hospital: social capital, resistance to control, and significance for 'therapeutic landscapes'.

    PubMed

    Wood, Victoria J; Curtis, Sarah E; Gesler, Wil; Spencer, Ian H; Close, Helen J; Mason, James M; Reilly, Joe G

    2013-11-01

    This paper reports on research framed by theories of therapeutic landscapes and the ways that the social, physical and symbolic dimensions of landscapes relate to wellbeing and healing. We focus especially on the question of how attributes of therapeutic landscapes are constructed in different ways according to the variable perspectives of individuals and groups. Through an ethnographic case study in a psychiatric hospital in the North of England we explore the perceived significance for wellbeing of 'smoking spaces' (where tobacco smoking is practiced in ways that may, or may not be officially sanctioned). We interpret our findings in light of literature on how smoking spaces are linked to the socio-geographical power relations that determine how smoking is organised within the hospital and how this is understood by different groups using the hospital building. We draw on qualitative research findings from discussion groups, observations, and interviews with patients, carers and staff. These focused on their views about the building design and setting of the new psychiatric hospital in relation to their wellbeing, and issues relating to smoking spaces emerged as important for many participants. Creating and managing smoking spaces as a public health measure in psychiatric hospitals is shown to be a controversial issue involving conflicting aims for health and wellbeing of patients and staff. Our findings indicate that although from a physical health perspective, smoking is detrimental, the spaces in which patients and staff smoke have social and psychological significance, providing a forum for the creation of social capital and resistance to institutional control. While the findings relate to one case study setting, the paper illustrates issues of wider relevance and contributes to an international literature concerning the tensions between perceived psychological and psychosocial benefits of smoking vs. physical harm that smoking is likely to cause. We consider

  20. Psychological Evaluation of Acute Low Back Pain in Hospital Workers

    PubMed Central

    Lamontagne, Yves; Bousquet, Pierre; Elie, Robert; Courtois, Monique

    1983-01-01

    Personality, anxiety and depression were assessed in 62 hospital workers divided in three experimental groups: those with acute organic low back pain, those with acute functional low back pain, and asymptomatic control subjects. Results showed no statistical differences between groups in the evaluation of personality. Asymptomatic subjects had significantly lower scores for trait anxiety and depression than did patients suffering from low back pain. Patients with pain of organic origin were also more depressed than were patients with pain of functional origin. Anxiety and depression are two psychological variables which must be examined in acute back pain problems. Further studies should be conducted to develop more accurate psychological instruments to evaluate the large population of patients suffering from low back pain. PMID:21283394

  1. What happens when 55% of acute psychiatric beds are closed in six days: an unexpected naturalistic observational study

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Matt; Mitchell, Anji; Parkin, Lindsay; Confue, Phil; Shankar, Rohit; Wilson-James, Diane; Marshall, Mike; Edgecombe, Maria; Keaney, Bernie; Gill, Kiran; Harrison, Juliet

    2016-01-01

    Objective The sudden closure of 30 out of 54 acute psychiatric beds in Cornwall presented a stressful challenge to staff but also a natural experiment on how a service dealt with this situation. We aimed to evaluate the outcomes of patients needing to leave the closed ward, how bed occupancy rates were affected and the impact on admission rates. Design A service evaluation of the impact of the ward closure. Setting A comprehensive secondary NHS mental health service in Cornwall serving 550,000 population. Main outcome measures The destination of the patients needing to leave the acute unit, the effect of the closure on bed occupancy, admission rates and serious untoward incidents. Results Of 26 patients needing to be moved from the acute ward, only 10 needed an acute psychiatric bed. None of the seven patients who had been on the ward longer than nine weeks needed an acute unit. Admission rates fell over the subsequent three months. There was no increase in serious incidents due to the closure. Conclusions This naturalistic event suggests that many patients on acute units could be cared for elsewhere, especially recovery/rehabilitation care environments, if political and financial urgency is present. Admission rates are responsive to the pressure on beds. PMID:27757241

  2. Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder at Psychiatric Discharge Predict General Hospital Admission for Self-Harm.

    PubMed

    Mellesdal, Liv; Gjestad, Rolf; Johnsen, Erik; Jørgensen, Hugo A; Oedegaard, Ketil J; Kroken, Rune A; Mehlum, Lars

    2015-12-01

    We investigated whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was predictor of suicidal behavior even when adjusting for comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and other salient risk factors. To study this, we randomly selected 308 patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital because of suicide risk. Baseline interviews were performed within the first days of the stay. Information concerning the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals over the subsequent 6 months was retrieved through linkage with the regional hospital registers. A censored regression analysis of hospital admissions for self-harm indicated significant associations with both PTSD (β = .21, p < .001) and BPD (β = .27, p < .001). A structural model comprising two latent BPD factors, dysregulation and relationship problems, as well as PTSD and several other variables, demonstrated that PTSD was an important predictor of the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals(B = 1.52, p < .01). Dysregulation predicted self-harm directly (B = 0.28, p < .05), and also through PTSD [corrected]. These results suggested that PTSD and related dysregulation problems could be important treatment targets for a reduction in the risk of severe self-harm in high-risk psychiatric patients.

  3. Central venous catheter infection in adults in acute hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Jones, Clare A

    As well as the human cost, central venous catheter (CVC)-related bloodstream infections significantly inflate hospital costs, mainly through increased length of stay in hospital, particularly in intensive care. This literature review appraises recent research on measures used to minimize CVC-related infection and compares it with current best practice. Randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews published on the subject between 2000 and 2005 were reviewed, concentrating on non-tunnelled, short-term CVCs in the acute hospital setting. The new evidence mainly backs up current best practice. However, skin disinfection could be improved by using alcoholic chlorhexidine followed by aqueous povidone-iodine before CVC insertion. Also, alcoholic chlorhexidine is the preferred solution for cleaning the hubs/connectors before accessing the CVC. Good hand hygiene and quality control and education programmes are vital to improve patient care. More research is needed to clarify the effectiveness of certain interventions and technologies, such as antimicrobial CVCs.

  4. Determinants of mental illness stigma for adolescents discharged from psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Moses, Tally

    2014-05-01

    Little is known about the factors that increase the risk for enacted mental illness stigma (i.e. rejection, devaluation and exclusion) as perceived by the stigmatized person. This is particularly true for the population of adolescents diagnosed with a mental illness. The aim of this study was to address this question and examine select social and clinical factors that predict enacted stigma (self-reported) with research that follows eighty American adolescents for 6 months following a first psychiatric hospitalization. Drawing on social identity theory, and research on stigma-threatening environments, social group identification and social support, this study tested four hypotheses: affiliation or identification with higher status and lower status peers predicts more and less stigma respectively (H1); a greater and more supportive social network, and more perceived family support predict less stigma (H2); greater severity of internalizing and externalizing symptoms predicts more stigma (H3); and poorer school functioning predicts more stigma (H4). Results indicated that about 70% of adolescents reported experiencing enacted stigma (at 6 months); disrespect or devaluation was more common than outright social rejection. Using OLS regression analyses, the results provided partial support for H1, H3 and H4, while H2 was not supported. The baseline factors found to be most predictive of enacted stigma ratings at 6-months were: affiliating with more friends with mental health problems, identifying with the 'populars' peer group, higher internalizing symptom ratings, and self-reported disciplinary problems at school. These four factors remained significant when controlling for initial enacted stigma ratings, pointing to their importance in determining changes in social stigma experiences in the follow-up period. They also remained significant when controlling for perceived public stigma ratings at follow-up, indicating that the findings were not due to generalized

  5. A worldwide assessment of the frequency of suicide, suicide attempts, or psychiatric hospitalization after predictive testing for Huntington disease.

    PubMed Central

    Almqvist, E W; Bloch, M; Brinkman, R; Craufurd, D; Hayden, M R

    1999-01-01

    Prior to the implementation of predictive-testing programs for Huntington disease (HD), significant concern was raised concerning the likelihood of catastrophic events (CEs), particularly in those persons receiving an increased-risk result. We have investigated the frequency of CEs-that is, suicide, suicide attempt, and psychiatric hospitalization-after an HD predictive-testing result, through questionnaires sent to predictive-testing centers worldwide. A total of 44 persons (0.97%) in a cohort of 4,527 test participants had a CE: 5 successful suicides, 21 suicide attempts, and 18 hospitalizations for psychiatric reasons. All persons committing suicide had signs of HD, whereas 11 (52.4%) of 21 persons attempting suicide and 8 (44.4%) of 18 who had a psychiatric hospitalization were symptomatic. A total of 11 (84.6%) of 13 asymptomatic persons who experienced a CE during the first year after HD predictive testing received an increased-risk result. Factors associated with an increased risk of a CE included (a) a psychiatric history

  6. Acute effects of electroconvulsive therapy on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in psychiatric disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Prohovnik, I.; Alderson, P.O.; Sackheim, H.A.; Decina, P.; Kahn, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is frequently used in the treatment of major depression and other psychiatric disorders; its mechanism of action is not established, but previous evidence suggests that it is associated with postictal metabolic suppression. The authors have used measurements of rCBF as an index of cortical metabolic activity to study the acute effects of ECT. Measurements of rCBF were made in 32 cortical regions in 10 patients (pts) following one minute breathing of Xe-133 (5mCi/L); the measurements were performed 30min before and 50min after ECT. Bilateral ECT was administered to six pts (five diagnosed as major depressives and one schizophrenic) and unilateral ECT to four (all diagnosed as unipolar or bipolar affective disorder). The total rCBF material consists of 52 measurements in these pts, made before and after 16 bilateral and 10 unilateral treatments. ECT was found to cause significant reduction of rCBF. Mean hemispheric flows (using the Initial Slope Index to measure grey-matter flow) were reduced by about 5% in both hemispheres following bilateral treatment. Unilateral treatment caused a 9% reduction of flow in the treated hemisphere, but only 2% contralaterally. Regional patterns of flow decreases also differed between the two treatment modes: bilateral frontal reductions were found after bilateral treatment, whereas unilateral ECT caused a widespread flow reduction in the treated hemisphere, and almost no effect contralaterally. These results suggest that rCBF studies are useful for assessing ECT, and indicate that the acute cerebral effects of ECT vary with the mode of treatment.

  7. [A social psychiatric study on foreign-born inpatients at Tokyo Metropolitan Matsuzawa hospital].

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Y; Hayashi, N; Ebata, K; Kaneko, T

    1994-01-01

    The authors carried out a chart review study of 293 foreign-born patients who were admitted to Tokyo Metropolitan Matsuzawa Hospital from January 1986 to December 1992. We divided the subjects into three groups according to their living status in Japan, Immigrant group: 66 long-term residents, Resident group: 188 short-term residents with purposes of work or study, and Visitor group: 39 temporary visitors for sightseeing or business. The subjects came from 43 countries in the world, 70.3% (206/293) of whom were those from Asian countries. The subjects grew in number every year and the noticeable feature was a drastic increase in the number of Resident group (e.g. 6 patients in 1986, 63 in 1992). The mean duration (SD) of hospitalization for Immigrant group was the longest among the groups (Immigrant group: 58.7 (55.0) days, Resident group: 31.9 (35.0) days, Visitor group: 19.0 (16.3) days). The frequent diagnoses at discharge based on ICD-9, were schizophrenia (59.7%) and reactive psychosis (19.1%). The significantly larger proportion of Visitor group had previous psychiatric histories in their homeland than other groups (Visitor group: 56.4%, Immigrant group: 24.2%, Resident group: 23.9%). 70.0% (205/293) of the subjects could not use Japanese in usual settings and the number of them had been increasing every year. This communication difficulty had caused serious inconvenience in the treatment. All of Visitor group, and 71.8% (135/188) of Resident group could not receive social securities, and there were difficulties for them to raise money for their medical treatment and living expenses. 92.3% among Visitor group, 91.0% of Resident group and 21.2% of Immigrant group returned to their homeland after inpatient treatment. The result indicated that we must immediately establish the interpreter dispatch system for foreign-born patients and that of the social securities guaranteeing their medical care and living expenses.

  8. Neural network modeling of the level of observation decision in an acute psychiatric ward.

    PubMed

    Penny, W D; Frost, D P

    1997-02-01

    Patients in an acute psychiatric ward need to be observed with varying levels of closeness. We report a series of experiments in which neural networks were trained to model this "level of observation" decision. One hundred eighty-seven such clinical decisions were used to train and test the networks which were evaluated by a multitrial v-fold cross-validation procedure. One neural network modeling approach was to break down the decision process into four subproblems, each of which was solved by a perceptron unit. This resulted in a hierarchical perceptron network having a structure that was equivalent to a sparsely connected two-layer perceptron. Neural network approaches were compared with nearest neighbor, linear regression, and naive Bayes classifiers. The hierarchical and sparse neural networks were the most accurate classifiers. This shows that the decision process is nonlinear, that neural nets can be more accurate than other statistical approaches, and that hierarchical decomposition is a useful methodology for neural network design.

  9. Prevalence and Predictors of Domestic-Violence towards Wives by their Psychiatric Hospitalized Husbands

    PubMed Central

    Sahraian, Ali; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Hashemi, Seyed Hamzeh; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Ahmadzadeh, Laaya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Violence imposed on wives by their inpatient psychiatric husbands has not been studied yet. The current study surveyed the rates and predictors of violence committed by inpatient psychiatric husbands towards their wives. Methods: A convenient sample of wives of 209 married male psychiatric inpatients completed a self-reported questionnaire. They were asked about physical, emotional, social and economic abuse. Results: More than 80% of the husbands socially abused their wives; 73.0% of the wives had been regularly beaten by their husbands; the rate for humiliation was 77.2%; and only 14.1% of the wives reported that their sexual relationship with their husbands is with desire. Conclusion There is a dramatic high rate of different types of abuse toward wives by their inpatient psychiatric husbands. They are commonly victimized by their husbands. Moreover, different types of violence always co-occur. Future studies should consider this important issue which is unfortunately an ignored research area. PMID:27006668

  10. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Medical records must stress the psychiatric components of the record, including history of findings and... record of mental status; (4) Note the onset of illness and the circumstances leading to admission;...

  11. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Medical records must stress the psychiatric components of the record, including history of findings and... record of mental status; (4) Note the onset of illness and the circumstances leading to admission;...

  12. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Medical records must stress the psychiatric components of the record, including history of findings and... record of mental status; (4) Note the onset of illness and the circumstances leading to admission;...

  13. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... Medical records must stress the psychiatric components of the record, including history of findings and... record of mental status; (4) Note the onset of illness and the circumstances leading to admission;...

  14. An analysis of catering options within NHS acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J L; Desombre, T; Eves, A; Kipps, M

    1999-01-01

    Reforms of the NHS's healthcare structure have placed additional pressure on all aspects of hospital management. Evaluation of the effects of these reforms is difficult without more information on current conditions. Hospital catering in acute care trusts has little contemporary background research available. With this in mind, a survey of all the acute care NHS trusts within the eight regions in England was undertaken to investigate the hospital meal service process. A mailed questionnaire asked for the meal production system, food service method and food delivery personnel used by each trust, and a copy of a weekly menu. Results, from an 80.7 per cent response rate, indicate that most trusts use batch cooking to prepare their meals, and plated meal service to deliver the food to the wards. Almost 75 per cent of the trusts use nurses, at least in part, to serve food. English foodstuffs dominate the menus. Most of the trusts have moved towards meeting the goals set by the Patients' Charter and other NHS recommendations. PMID:10724573

  15. An analysis of catering options within NHS acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J L; Desombre, T; Eves, A; Kipps, M

    1999-01-01

    Reforms of the NHS's healthcare structure have placed additional pressure on all aspects of hospital management. Evaluation of the effects of these reforms is difficult without more information on current conditions. Hospital catering in acute care trusts has little contemporary background research available. With this in mind, a survey of all the acute care NHS trusts within the eight regions in England was undertaken to investigate the hospital meal service process. A mailed questionnaire asked for the meal production system, food service method and food delivery personnel used by each trust, and a copy of a weekly menu. Results, from an 80.7 per cent response rate, indicate that most trusts use batch cooking to prepare their meals, and plated meal service to deliver the food to the wards. Almost 75 per cent of the trusts use nurses, at least in part, to serve food. English foodstuffs dominate the menus. Most of the trusts have moved towards meeting the goals set by the Patients' Charter and other NHS recommendations.

  16. Person-environment interaction in a new secure forensic state psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Jon E; Kelly, Sean P; Margiotta, David T; Hegvik, Donna K; Vaher, Kairi A; Kaya, Rachel Tamiko

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the person-environment interaction effects of environmental design on ward climate, safety, job satisfaction, and treatment outcomes within a new high security forensic psychiatric facility. Participants included male and female adult psychiatric inpatients and staff members at different security stages. Data were collected once before and twice after the experimental group moved into the new building. The control group remained in the same facilities. Contrary to expectations, the new building had limited effects on the measured variables.

  17. The views of psychiatric patients and their treating physicians of court-ordered compulsory hospitalization for criminal acts.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Y; Kimhi, R; Stawski, M; Elizur, A

    1997-01-01

    The legal responsibility for the mentally ill has long been a dilemma. Public opinion regarding the law which states that the mentally ill, in a psychotic state, are not responsible for their actions, is divided. The study assessed 30 psychiatric patients, committed by court order, following a criminal act on their part. No relationship was found between the nature of their offense and a psychiatric disorder. Patients who committed more serious crimes, such as murder, tended to have committed fewer criminal acts in the past. Sixty-nine percent of the patients think that the mentally ill are not responsible for their actions and 59% agreed with the judge's decision to hospitalize them. On a concrete level, over two-thirds of the patients were able to distinguish right from wrong. The treating physicians related mainly to the patients' illnesses rather than to the crimes for which they were committed.

  18. [Patients with schizophrenia in forensic-psychiatric hospitals (section 63 German Penal Code) in North Rhine-Westphalia].

    PubMed

    Kutscher, S; Schiffer, B; Seifert, D

    2009-02-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the development of the number of patients with schizophrenia in detention (section 63 German Penal Code) in North Rhine-Westphalia and the characterization of these patients. Patients with schizophrenia are examined, by using a standardized questionnaire answered by the attending psychiatrist or psychologist (n = 531). During the last 12 years the number of patients with schizophrenia in forensic-psychiatric hospitals has increased three times, whereas the number of patients with other diagnoses heightened only twofold. The patients with schizophrenia showed high rates of psychiatric comorbidities (substance disorders 73.9 %, personality disorders 17.2 %), previous inpatient treatments (78.3 % with a mean of 7.5 stays) and previous convictions (63.4 %). Almost half of these convictions (46.6 %) were violent offences (e. g. assault, homicide). Possible explanations for this development are discussed.

  19. Prevalence of Psychiatric Morbidity in Females amongst Infertile Couples- A Hospital Based Report

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Pragati; Goyal, Lajya Devi; Kaur, Gurmeet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Infertility leads to significant stress among couple and the reaction to infertility differs among males and females. Aim To know the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in infertile couples and compare the prevalence of various psychiatric disorders among husband and wife. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 50 couples diagnosed with infertility from outdoor clinics. Both male and female partner of couple were interviewed for detailed history and clinical examination was done. General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) was applied to detect any psychological strain in couples and in those with illness, final diagnosis were made on the basis of DSM -IV (TR). The data thus generated was subjected to appropriate Statistical Analysis. Results Out of the 50 couples, 54% of females had psychiatric morbidity. The most common diagnosis amongst the female participants was MDD (Major Depressive Disorder) (18%), whereas the second most common diagnosis was GAD (Generalized Anxiety Disorder) (16%). Psychiatric morbidity was found in only 26% of males suffering with Adjustment Disorder being most common diagnosis (8%) and Dysthymia and MDD as the second most common diagnosis (6% each). Majority of patients having psychiatric morbidity were from age group 20-29 years. The difference between females and male counterparts was statistically significant. Conclusion Psychiatric morbidity was higher among female partners than male partners. The difference was statistically significant and the situation needs further workup. PMID:27630933

  20. Prevalence of Psychiatric Morbidity in Females amongst Infertile Couples- A Hospital Based Report

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Pragati; Goyal, Lajya Devi; Kaur, Gurmeet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Infertility leads to significant stress among couple and the reaction to infertility differs among males and females. Aim To know the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in infertile couples and compare the prevalence of various psychiatric disorders among husband and wife. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 50 couples diagnosed with infertility from outdoor clinics. Both male and female partner of couple were interviewed for detailed history and clinical examination was done. General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) was applied to detect any psychological strain in couples and in those with illness, final diagnosis were made on the basis of DSM -IV (TR). The data thus generated was subjected to appropriate Statistical Analysis. Results Out of the 50 couples, 54% of females had psychiatric morbidity. The most common diagnosis amongst the female participants was MDD (Major Depressive Disorder) (18%), whereas the second most common diagnosis was GAD (Generalized Anxiety Disorder) (16%). Psychiatric morbidity was found in only 26% of males suffering with Adjustment Disorder being most common diagnosis (8%) and Dysthymia and MDD as the second most common diagnosis (6% each). Majority of patients having psychiatric morbidity were from age group 20-29 years. The difference between females and male counterparts was statistically significant. Conclusion Psychiatric morbidity was higher among female partners than male partners. The difference was statistically significant and the situation needs further workup.

  1. Acute exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms during influenza treatment with oseltamivir in chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chen-Chia; Liu, Chia-Chien; Chen, Ying-Sheue

    2015-06-01

    Influenza treatment and prophylaxis with oseltamivir are critically important in reducing the morbidity and mortality of patients in chronic psychiatric facilities. Abnormal behavior, delusions, perceptual disturbances, mania, and depression have all been reported as oseltamivir-related psychiatric side effects. We hereby report two chronic schizophrenia patients in Taiwan manifesting psychiatric instability who were being treated with oseltamivir for suspected influenza infection, and further discuss other potential contributing factors. The possibility that oseltamivir can cause psychotic or affective symptoms suggests that additional caution is necessary for its use in patients with an established psychiatric diagnosis. PMID:25823677

  2. The potential consequences of informal interpreting practices for assessment of patients in a South African psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Kilian, Sanja; Swartz, Leslie; Dowling, Tessa; Dlali, Mawande; Chiliza, Bonginkosi

    2014-04-01

    In South Africa health care practitioners are commonly professionals who speak only one, or at most two, of the languages spoken by their patients. This provides for language provision challenges, since many patients are not proficient in English or Afrikaans and ad hoc and haphazard arrangements are made for interpreting by untrained personnel. As part of a larger study (conducted in 2010) in a public psychiatric hospital, we report here on the potential consequences for diagnostic assessments of 13 psychiatric evaluations mediated by ad hoc interpreters who were employed as health care workers and household aides. The psychiatric evaluations were recorded and transcribed verbatim. The first author checked for accuracy of transcription and translations, and the two members of the author team who are both senior African language academics rechecked transcription and translation. We used the typology developed by Vasquez and Javier (1991) to study interpreter errors (i.e. omissions, additions and substitutions). All errors were independently rated by a senior psychiatrist and a senior clinical psychologist to determine whether the errors were likely to have a bearing on clinical decisions concerning the patient and to rate whether errors deemed clinically significant contributed to making the patient appear more ill psychiatrically, or less ill. Of the 57 errors recorded, 46% were rated as likely to have an impact on the goal of the clinical session. Raters concurred that the clinically significant errors contributed towards potentially making the patient look more psychiatrically ill. Detailed analyses of evaluations demonstrate the complexity of informal interpreter positioning regarding issues of diagnosis and cultural factors in illness. Evaluations conducted where clinicians and interpreters are not trained in language and interpreting issues may create a distorted picture of the patients' mental health conditions.

  3. Psychiatric wards: places of safety?

    PubMed

    Jones, J; Nolan, P; Bowers, L; Simpson, A; Whittington, R; Hackney, D; Bhui, K

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, the purpose and quality of provision delivered in acute inpatient psychiatric settings have been increasingly questioned. Studies from a service user perspective have reported that while some psychiatric inpatients feel safe and cared for, others feel their time in hospital is neither safe nor therapeutic. This paper explores the experiences of service users on acute inpatient psychiatric wards in England, with a particular focus on their feelings of safety and security. Interviews were conducted with 60 psychiatric inpatients in England. The majority of service users felt safe in hospital and felt supported by staff and other service users. However, anything that threatened their sense of security such as aggression, bullying, theft, racism and the use of alcohol and drugs on the ward, made some respondents feel insecure and unsafe. Psychiatric wards are still perceived by many as volatile environments, where service users feel forced to devise personal security strategies in order to protect themselves and their property. It would appear that there remains much to do before research findings and policies are implemented in ways that facilitate all service users to derive the maximum benefit from their inpatient experience.

  4. Psychiatric wards: places of safety?

    PubMed

    Jones, J; Nolan, P; Bowers, L; Simpson, A; Whittington, R; Hackney, D; Bhui, K

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, the purpose and quality of provision delivered in acute inpatient psychiatric settings have been increasingly questioned. Studies from a service user perspective have reported that while some psychiatric inpatients feel safe and cared for, others feel their time in hospital is neither safe nor therapeutic. This paper explores the experiences of service users on acute inpatient psychiatric wards in England, with a particular focus on their feelings of safety and security. Interviews were conducted with 60 psychiatric inpatients in England. The majority of service users felt safe in hospital and felt supported by staff and other service users. However, anything that threatened their sense of security such as aggression, bullying, theft, racism and the use of alcohol and drugs on the ward, made some respondents feel insecure and unsafe. Psychiatric wards are still perceived by many as volatile environments, where service users feel forced to devise personal security strategies in order to protect themselves and their property. It would appear that there remains much to do before research findings and policies are implemented in ways that facilitate all service users to derive the maximum benefit from their inpatient experience. PMID:20465757

  5. [Pre-hospital management of acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Lefort, Hugues; Fradin, Jordan; Blgnand, Michel; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2015-03-01

    The medical management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) follows the recommendations of international medical societies. The call to the emergency services by the patient triggers a race against the clock in pre-hospital care. It is essential to reduce the duration of the inadequate perfusion of the heart in order to limit its consequences. An effective reperfusion strategy must be planned in advance taking into account the logistical constraints. It is crucial that the general public is educated to recognise the signs of ACS and to call the emergency services immediately (such as 15, 112 or 991). PMID:26040140

  6. Analyzing staffing trade-offs on acute care hospital units.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Steven; Vonderhaar, Kate; Stewart, Jennifer; Virkstis, Katherine; Terry, Anne

    2014-10-01

    Given today's resource-limited environment, nurse leaders must make judicious staffing decisions to deliver safe, cost-effective care. Investing in 1 element of staffing often requires scaling back in another. A national cross section of acute care hospital unit leaders was surveyed regarding staffing resources, including nurse workload, education, specialty certification, experience, and level of support staff. The authors report findings from the survey and discuss the trade-offs observed among units regarding nurse-to-patient ratios and the proportion of baccalaureate-prepared nurses. PMID:25208268

  7. Examining financial performance indicators for acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Jeffrey H; Wheeler, John R C

    2013-01-01

    Measuring financial performance in acute care hospitals is a challenge for those who work daily with financial information. Because of the many ways to measure financial performance, financial managers and researchers must decide which measures are most appropriate. The difficulty is compounded for the non-finance person. The purpose of this article is to clarify key financial concepts and describe the most common measures of financial performance so that researchers and managers alike may understand what is being measured by various financial ratios.

  8. [Epidemiology of acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients in China].

    PubMed

    Lang, Xiabing; Yang, Yi; Chen, Jianghua

    2016-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a disease spectrum ranging from minimal elevation of serum creatinine to complete renal failure. It is significantly associated with increased mortality, length of hospital stay and medical care cost. With the increasing awareness of the importance of AKI, several high quality and multicenter epidemiological studies have been published recently in China. However, the results differ a lot due to the differences in regional economic development, the selection of target population and testing indicators, the disease definition and study strategies. The reported incidence of AKI in China is much lower than that in the developed countries. This article will analyze the current status and the problems facing AKI epidemiological studies of hospitalized patients with our own data and those from literature. The article intends to clarify the burden of AKI,to increase the awareness of AKI among clinicians and policy makers for achieving the goal of "zero by 2025" in China. PMID:27273996

  9. [Investigation on acute stroke patients being admitted to hospital].

    PubMed

    Zi, X; Song, Z; Fan, X

    1999-01-01

    One hundred and twelve patients with acute stroke were studied. The results revealed that about 42 percent of 112 patients could get to hospital within 6 hours after onset, in which included 60.4 percent of the hemorrhagic group and 28.1 percent of the infarction group. Comparatively, among 30.3 percent of 112 patients CT scan was carried out within 6 hours, which included 41.7 percent of the hemorrhagic group and 21.8 percent of the infarction group. Linear correlation analysis was studied between admission time(AT) and the assessment of neural function defect(ANFD). The results showed that there was significant negative correlation between AT and ANFD in stroke patients. After analysing the serial reasons of delaying hospitalization, the authors have found that the key factor is the ignorance of the importance of stroke in early stage. PMID:12080684

  10. Adverse outcomes following hospitalization in acutely ill older patients

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Roger Y; Miller, William C

    2008-01-01

    Background The longitudinal outcomes of patients admitted to acute care for elders units (ACE) are mixed. We studied the associations between socio-demographic and functional measures with hospital length of stay (LOS), and which variables predicted adverse events (non-independent living, readmission, death) 3 and 6 months later. Methods Prospective cohort study of community-living, medical patients age 75 or over admitted to ACE at a teaching hospital. Results The population included 147 subjects, median LOS of 9 days (interquartile range 5–15 days). All returned home/community after hospitalization. Just prior to discharge, baseline timed up and go test (TUG, P < 0.001), bipedal stance balance (P = 0.001), and clinical frailty scale scores (P = 0.02) predicted LOS, with TUG as the only independent predictor (P < 0.001) in multiple regression analysis. By 3 months, 59.9% of subjects remained free of an adverse event, and by 6 months, 49.0% were event free. The 3 and 6-month mortality was 10.2% and 12.9% respectively. Almost one-third of subjects had developed an adverse event by 6 months, with the highest risk within the first 3 months post discharge. An abnormal TUG score was associated with increased adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.28, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03 to 1.59, P = 0.03. A higher FMMSE score (adjusted HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82 to 0.96, P = 0.003) and independent living before hospitalization (adjusted HR 0.42, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.84, P = 0.01) were associated with reduced risk of adverse outcome. Conclusion Some ACE patients demonstrate further functional decline following hospitalization, resulting in loss of independence, repeat hospitalization, or death. Abnormal TUG is associated with prolonged LOS and future adverse outcomes. PMID:18479512

  11. Nurses' medication administration practices at two Singaporean acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Choo, Janet; Johnston, Linda; Manias, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall compliance with accepted medication administration procedures, and explored the distractions they faced during medication administration at two acute care hospitals in Singapore. A total of 140 registered nurses, 70 from each hospital, participated in the study. At both hospitals, nurses were distracted by personnel, such as physicians, radiographers, patients not under their care, and telephone calls, during medication rounds. Deviations from accepted medication procedures were observed. At one hospital, the use of a vest during medication administration alone was not effective in avoiding distractions during medication administration. Environmental factors and distractions can impact on the safe administration of medications, because they not only impair nurses' level of concentration, but also add to their work pressure. Attention should be placed on eliminating distractions through the use of appropriate strategies. Strategies that could be considered include the conduct of education sessions with health professionals and patients about the importance of not interrupting nurses while they are administering medications, and changes in work design.

  12. Electronic Medical Record-Based Predictive Model for Acute Kidney Injury in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Laszczyńska, Olga; Severo, Milton; Azevedo, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) are at risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Lack of specific treatment has meant that efforts have focused on early diagnosis and timely treatment. Advanced algorithms for clinical assistance including AKI prediction models have potential to provide accurate risk estimates. In this project, we aim to provide a clinical decision supporting system (CDSS) based on a self-learning predictive model for AKI in patients of an acute care hospital. Data of all in-patient episodes in adults admitted will be analysed using "data mining" techniques to build a prediction model. The subsequent machine-learning process including two algorithms for data stream and concept drift will refine the predictive ability of the model. Simulation studies on the model will be used to quantify the expected impact of several scenarios of change in factors that influence AKI incidence. The proposed dynamic CDSS will apply to future in-hospital AKI surveillance in clinical practice. PMID:27577501

  13. Long-term acute care hospitals and Georgia Medicaid: Utilization, outcomes, and cost

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Evan S.; Willis, Carla; Rencher, William C; Zhou, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Because most research on long-term acute care hospitals has focused on Medicare, the objective of this research is to describe the Georgia Medicaid population who received care at a long-term acute care hospital, the type and volume of services provided by these long-term acute care hospitals, and the costs and outcomes of these services. For those with select respiratory conditions, we descriptively compare costs and outcomes to those of patients who received care for the same services in acute care hospitals. Methods: We describe Georgia Medicaid recipients admitted to a long-term acute care hospital between 2011 and 2012. We compare them to a population of Georgia Medicaid recipients admitted to an acute care hospital for one of five respiratory diagnosis-related groups. Measurements used include patient descriptive information, admissions, diagnosis-related groups, length of stay, place of discharge, 90-day episode costs, readmissions, and patient risk scores. Results: We found that long-term acute care hospital admissions for Medicaid patients were fairly low (470 90-day episodes) and restricted to complex cases. We also found that the majority of long-term acute care hospital patients were blind or disabled (71.2%). Compared to patients who stayed at an acute care hospital, long-term acute care hospital patients had higher average risk scores (13.1 versus 9.0), lengths of stay (61 versus 38 days), costs (US$143,898 versus US$115,056), but fewer discharges to the community (28.4% versus 51.8%). Conclusion: We found that the Medicaid population seeking care at long-term acute care hospitals is markedly different than the Medicare populations described in other long-term acute care hospital studies. In addition, our study revealed that Medicaid patients receiving select respiratory care at a long-term acute care hospital were distinct from Medicaid patients receiving similar care at an acute care hospital. Our findings suggest that state Medicaid

  14. The periodicities in and biometeorological relationships with bed occupancy of an acute psychiatric ward in Antwerp, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, M.; de Meyer, F.; Peeters, D.; Meltzer, H.; Schotte, C.; Scharpe, S.; Cosyns, P.

    1993-06-01

    Recently, some investigators have established a seasonal pattern in normal human psychology, physiology and behaviour, and in the incidence of psychiatric psychopathology. In an attempt to elucidate the chronopsy and meteotropism in the latter, we have examined the chronograms of, and the biometeorological relationships to bed occupancy of the psychiatric ward of the Antwerp University Hospital during three consecutive calendar years (1987 1989). Weather data for the vicinity were provided by a local meteorological station and comprise mean atmospheric pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and minutes of sunlight and precipitation/day. The number of psychiatric beds occupied during the study period exhibited a significant seasonal variation. Peaks in bed occupancy were observed in March and November, with lows in August. An important part of the variability in the number of beds occupied could be explained by the composite effects of weather variables of the preceding weeks. Our results suggest that short-term fluctuations in atmospheric activity may dictate some of the periodicities in psychiatric psychopathology.

  15. 'Therapeutic landscapes' and the importance of nostalgia, solastalgia, salvage and abandonment for psychiatric hospital design.

    PubMed

    Wood, Victoria J; Gesler, Wil; Curtis, Sarah E; Spencer, Ian H; Close, Helen J; Mason, James; Reilly, Joe G

    2015-05-01

    We examine emotional reactions to changes to medical spaces of care, linked with past experiences. In this paper we draw on findings from a qualitative study of the transfer of psychiatric inpatient care from an old to a newly built facility. We show how the meanings attributed to 'therapeutic landscapes' from one׳s past can evoke emotions and memories, manifesting in ideas about nostalgia, solastalgia, salvage and abandonment, which can impinge on one׳s present therapeutic experience. We reflect on how consideration of these ideas might contribute to better future design of psychiatric inpatient facilities and the wellbeing of those using them.

  16. The current state of physical activity and exercise programs in German-speaking, Swiss psychiatric hospitals: results from a brief online survey

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Serge; Colledge, Flora; Beeler, Nadja; Pühse, Uwe; Kalak, Nadeem; Sadeghi Bahmani, Dena; Mikoteit, Thorsten; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Gerber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity and exercise programs (PAEPs) are an important factor in increasing and maintaining physical and mental health. This holds particularly true for patients with psychiatric disorders undergoing treatment in a psychiatric hospital. To understand whether the benefits reported in the literature are mirrored in current treatment modalities, the aim of the present study was to assess the current state of PAEPs in psychiatric hospitals in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. Methods All psychiatric hospitals (N=55) in the German-speaking part of Switzerland were contacted in spring 2014. Staff responsible for PAEPs were asked to complete an online questionnaire covering questions related to PAEPs such as type, frequency, staff training, treatment rationale, importance of PAEPs within the treatment strategy, and possible avenues to increase PAEPs. Results Staff members of 48 different psychiatric hospitals completed the survey. Hospitals provided the following therapeutic treatments: relaxation techniques (100%), sports therapy (97%), activity-related psychotherapeutic interventions (95%), physiotherapy (85%), body therapies (59%), far-east techniques (57%), and hippotherapy (22%). Frequencies ranged from once/week to five times/week. Approximately 25% of patients participated in the PAEPs. Interventions were offered irrespective of psychiatric disorders. PAEP providers wanted and needed more vocational training. Conclusion All participating psychiatric hospitals offer a broad variety of PAEPs in their treatment curricula. However, the majority of inpatients do not participate in PAEPs. Furthermore, those who do participate cannot continue to do so following discharge. PAEP providers need specific extended vocational trainings and believe that the potential of PA should be improved. PMID:27350748

  17. A cross-sectional prospective study of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication in acute psychiatric wards: patient, staff and ward characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous research on mental health care has shown considerable differences in use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication among different wards and geographical areas. This study investigates to what extent use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication for involuntary admitted patients in Norwegian acute psychiatric wards is associated with patient, staff and ward characteristics. The study includes data from 32 acute psychiatric wards. Methods Multilevel logistic regression using Stata was applied with data from 1016 involuntary admitted patients that were linked to data about wards. The sample comprised two hierarchical levels (patients and wards) and the dependent variables had two values (0 = no use and 1 = use). Coercive measures were defined as use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary depot medication during hospitalization. Results The total number of involuntary admitted patients was 1214 (35% of total sample). The percentage of patients who were exposed to coercive measures ranged from 0-88% across wards. Of the involuntary admitted patients, 424 (35%) had been secluded, 117 (10%) had been restrained and 113 (9%) had received involuntary depot medication at discharge. Data from 1016 patients could be linked in the multilevel analysis. There was a substantial between-ward variance in the use of coercive measures; however, this was influenced to some extent by compositional differences across wards, especially for the use of restraint. Conclusions The substantial between-ward variance, even when adjusting for patients' individual psychopathology, indicates that ward factors influence the use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication and that some wards have the potential for quality improvement. Hence, interventions to reduce the use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication should take into account organizational and environmental factors. PMID:20370928

  18. Surveillance for hospitalized acute respiratory infection in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J; Lindblade, Kim A

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  19. Surveillance for Hospitalized Acute Respiratory Infection in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Verani, Jennifer R.; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J.; Lindblade, Kim A.

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  20. PCL-R Psychopathy Predicts Disruptive Behavior Among Male Offenders in a Dutch Forensic Psychiatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrand, Martin; De Ruiter, Corine; Nijman, Henk

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between psychopathy, according to the Dutch language version of Hare's Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R), and various types of disruptive behavior during inpatient forensic psychiatric treatment is investigated. Ninety-two male participants were administered the PCL-R following admission to an inpatient forensic…

  1. Opinions about Treatment Modalities among Patients Involuntarily Committed to a Forensic Psychiatric Hospital in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Vuorio, Osmo; Koivisto, Hanna; Paavola, Paula; Hakola, Panu

    2004-01-01

    Patient satisfaction studies concerning various treatment modalities are few among involuntary forensic psychiatric treatment. They indicate general satisfaction with medication, interactive treatment and occupational therapy but dissatisfaction with lack of privacy, insufficiently explained rules and inadequately explained reasons of seclusion.…

  2. Leisure Activity and Hospital Readmission of Short-Term Psychiatric Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMinn, Sheri B.; Lay, C. Marvin

    William Menninger (1948) reported research results indicating a significant relationship in a former patient's ability to stay well and his participation in recreation. J. Bates (1963) indicated one reason patients return to psychiatric facilities was the lack of skills that center around recreation. This study was conducted to investigate the…

  3. Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders Using Psychiatric Hospitals in Ontario: Clinical Profile and Service Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsky, Yona; Gracey, Carolyn; Bradley, Elspeth

    2009-01-01

    Background: Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) represent a small, but challenging sub-group of patients within Ontario's mental health care system. However, few studies have documented the clinical characteristics of this population and examined how such individuals differ from other psychiatric patients, with or without intellectual…

  4. [Accreditation model for acute hospital care in Catalonia, Spain].

    PubMed

    López-Viñas, M Luisa; Costa, Núria; Tirvió, Carmen; Davins, Josep; Manzanera, Rafael; Ribera, Jaume; Constante, Carles; Vallès, Roser

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of an accreditation model for healthcare centres in Catalonia which was launched for acute care hospitals, leaving open the possibility of implementing it in the rest of lines of service (mental health and addiction, social health, and primary healthcare centres) is described. The model is based on the experience acquired over more tan 31 years of hospital accreditation and quality assessment linked to management. In January 2006 a model with accreditation methodology adapted to the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model was launched. 83 hospitals are accredited, with an average of 82.6% compliance with the standards required for accreditation. The number of active assessment bodies is 5, and the accreditation period is 3 years. A higher degree of compliance of the so-called "agent" criteria with respect to "outcome" criteria is obtained. Qualitative aspects for implementation to be stressed are: a strong commitment both from managers and staff in the centres, as well as a direct and fluent communication between the accreditation body (Ministry of Health of the Government of Catalonia) and accredited centres. Professionalism of audit bodies and an optimal communication between audit bodies and accredited centres is also added.

  5. [Accreditation model for acute hospital care in Catalonia, Spain].

    PubMed

    López-Viñas, M Luisa; Costa, Núria; Tirvió, Carmen; Davins, Josep; Manzanera, Rafael; Ribera, Jaume; Constante, Carles; Vallès, Roser

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of an accreditation model for healthcare centres in Catalonia which was launched for acute care hospitals, leaving open the possibility of implementing it in the rest of lines of service (mental health and addiction, social health, and primary healthcare centres) is described. The model is based on the experience acquired over more tan 31 years of hospital accreditation and quality assessment linked to management. In January 2006 a model with accreditation methodology adapted to the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model was launched. 83 hospitals are accredited, with an average of 82.6% compliance with the standards required for accreditation. The number of active assessment bodies is 5, and the accreditation period is 3 years. A higher degree of compliance of the so-called "agent" criteria with respect to "outcome" criteria is obtained. Qualitative aspects for implementation to be stressed are: a strong commitment both from managers and staff in the centres, as well as a direct and fluent communication between the accreditation body (Ministry of Health of the Government of Catalonia) and accredited centres. Professionalism of audit bodies and an optimal communication between audit bodies and accredited centres is also added. PMID:25128363

  6. XYY males. Some clinical and psychiatric aspects deriving from a survey of 1,811 males in hospitals for the mentally handicapped.

    PubMed

    Hunter, H

    1977-11-01

    A survey of 1,811 mentally handicapped males in eighteen hospitals is described. Males discovered with supernumerary Y chromosomes numbered 15, of whom 12 were 47,XYY. Some of the physical, social, psychological and psychiatric findings are described and compared with groups matched for IQ and height. The main psychiatric findings are diminished intelligence, retardation in development of secondary sexual characteristics, and poor emotional control leading to inadequate social adaptive patters which are described and discussed.

  7. Acute Nonbacterial Gastroenteritis in Hospitalized Children: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Shokrollahi, Mohammad Reza; Noorbakhsh, Samileh; Monavari, Hamid Reza; Ghavidel Darestani, Sahar; Vosoughi Motlagh, Ahmad; Javadi Nia, Shima

    2014-01-01

    Background: Viral acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a major cause of morbidity in childhood and leads to hospitalization in developed countries, such as Iran. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and viral types (rotavirus, adenovirus, human parechoviruses-1, and human bocavirus) of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis in hospitalized children. Patients and Materials: This was a across-sectional prospective study performed at the Pediatric Department of Rasoul Hospital, Tehran, Iran (2009-2011) on 80 hospitalized children with viral AGE. All Stool samples were collected on viral transport media. Human bocavirus (HBoV) was detected using the Real-time PCR TaqMan method. Molecular detection of human parechovirus type 1 (HPeV-1) RNA in stool samples was done using a specific nested reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Rota and adeno virus antigens were sought by rapid chromatographic tests. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Fever was determined in 47.5% of cases (38), nausea and vomiting in 42.5% (34), respiratory symptoms in 16.3% (13), abdominal pain in 76%. Duration of diarrhea was 1-30 days (mean = 6.3 + 4.3 days). No dehydration was observed in 43.5% of subjects, mild dehydration in 33.8%, moderate dehydration in 17.5% and severe dehydration in 5% of cases. Positive rotavirus was found in 48.8% of cases (39), adenovirus in 20% (16), HBoV in 8% (6) and HPeV-1 in 23.2% (19), and adeno and rotaviruses co-infection in 6% (4). The frequency of positive HBoV was significantly lower than adeno and rotaviruses infection (P value = 0.0001). Rotavirus was more frequent in males (P value = 0.003) and in young children (17.49 months vs. 21.44 months) [P value = 0.03, CI = -13.4, 5.5]. Rotavirus infection was related to the degree of dehydration (P value = 0.001) but was not related to the presence of vomiting or fever (P value > 0.5). Conclusions: This study indicates that viral agents, especially rotavirus (48

  8. Implementing a Music Therapy Program at a New 72-Hour Acute Psychiatric Admissions Unit: A Case Study of a Patient Who Was Malingering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Because of the relatively poor treatment available, the high financial costs of hospitalization, multiple and complex issues of persons with severe mental illnesses, and advancements in pharmacotherapy, psychiatric patients are often only hospitalized for a few days before they are discharged. Thus, brief psychosocial interventions for persons who…

  9. Violence in public sector psychiatric hospitals. Benchmarking nursing staff injury rates.

    PubMed

    Love, C C; Hunter, M E

    1996-05-01

    1. Violence toward healthcare workers, particularly psychiatric nursing staff, has only recently been identified as a workplace health hazard. An occupational health perspective underscores the need for proactive monitoring and heightens incentives for prevention through the introduction of external regulation. 2. Nursing staff injury rates from violence alone are higher than injuries seen in industries traditionally considered high risk such as mining, lumber, and heavy construction. Nursing employment categories at particular risk include psychiatric technicians, male staff, and on-unit supervisory personnel. 3. It is exceedingly difficult to accurately measure the extent of violence in a given facility and injury rates are known to underestimate the actual number of violent events that occur. Nursing staff, labor organizations, and managers must work toward more reliable monitoring and risk prevention programs. PMID:8732980

  10. The incidence of acute hospital-treated eye injuries.

    PubMed

    Karlson, T A; Klein, B E

    1986-10-01

    Little information is available on the incidence and severity of eye injuries despite the disfigurement and vision loss they cause. From a population-based study in Dane County, Wisconsin, the incidence of acute hospital-treated eye injuries was 423/100,000 residents in 1979. The most common causes of eye injuries were assaults, work-related events, sports and recreational activities, motor vehicle crashes, and falls. Consumer products were involved in almost 70% (9/13) of severe eye injuries classified as severe. Injuries from fireworks were not found at all in this population. Implementing known strategies for eye injury prevention would substantially reduce their incidence. These include requiring certified eye protectors at workplaces and in sports activities whenever possible rather than making their use voluntary. For the preponderance of eye injuries, however, modifying potentially hazardous consumer products, including the interior of passenger cars, will be necessary. PMID:3767676

  11. Team clinical supervision in acute hospital wards: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Bev; Ockerby, Cherene M; Johnson, Susan; Smenda, Helen; Bucknall, Tracey K

    2013-03-01

    Clinical supervision provides a strategy to mitigate nurses' workplace stress and enhance retention, but the literature provides little guidance about its implementation beyond mental health nursing. This study explored the feasibility of implementing and evaluating ward-based team clinical supervision for general nurses on two separate wards at one public and one private hospital. Nurses completed the Work Environment Questionnaire pre- (n = 36) and postintervention (n = 27), and focus groups (n = 20) explored their perceptions of supervision. Staff were unfamiliar with clinical supervision, so information sessions were required. The questionnaire may not have been suitable to evaluate this type of intervention. Focus group findings revealed that team supervision improved communication, enhanced working relationships, and empowered nurses to challenge existing practices, which had a positive impact on their perceived stress. This study provides insights to guide implementation and evaluation of clinical supervision in acute settings. PMID:21531902

  12. Does Sense of Control Predict Depression Among Individuals After Psychiatric Hospital Discharge?

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoo Jung; Fusco, Rachel A

    2015-11-01

    Sense of control is known to be related to depression. Yet, few studies have examined the role of sense of control as related to depression for discharged psychiatric patients. In this study the longitudinal relationship between sense of control and depressive mood was examined using the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Study, a 6-wave, 1-year study of 948 ethnically diverse postdischarge psychiatric patients. Sense of control was decomposed into 2 components (i.e., a time-invariant as well as a time-varying component) and so as to examine which component of sense of control would more accurately explain this relationship. Results demonstrated that time-varying sense of control significantly predicted changes in depressive mood during the transition to community environment. Time-invariant sense of control, however, was not significantly related to changes in depressive mood. Findings of this study hold important implications for intervention practice with people before or after psychiatric discharge, including the need for incorporation of therapeutic and psychoeducational efforts that bolster sense of control.

  13. Diagnostic value of procalcitonin in acutely hospitalized elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Steichen, O; Bouvard, E; Grateau, G; Bailleul, S; Capeau, J; Lefèvre, G

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate procalcitonin as an adjunct to diagnose bacterial infections in older patients. One hundred seventy-two patients admitted to an acute-care geriatric unit during a 6-month period were prospectively included, 39 of them with an invasive bacterial infection. The best cut-off value to rule in a bacterial infection was 0.51 microg/l with sensitivity 64% and specificity 94%. The best cut-off value to rule out a bacterial infection was 0.08 microg/l with sensitivity 97% and specificity 20%. Procalcitonin was inconclusive (between 0.08 and 0.51 microg/l) for 112 admissions. Procalcitonin over 0.51 microg/l was useless 22 times out of 33 (infection already ruled in on clinical grounds) and misleading in eight of the 11 remaining cases (no infection). Procalcitonin below 0.08 microg/l was useless 23 times out of 27 (infection already ruled out on clinical grounds) and misleading in one of the four remaining cases (infection). Despite a good overall diagnostic accuracy, the clinical usefulness of PCT to diagnose invasive bacterial infections in elderly patients hospitalized in an acute geriatric ward appears to be very limited. PMID:19727867

  14. Treatments for common psychiatric conditions among adults during acute, rehabilitation, and reintegration phases.

    PubMed

    Difede, Joann; Cukor, Judith; Lee, Francis; Yurt, Roger

    2009-12-01

    Common and pernicious adult psychiatric disorders consequent to burn injury include post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and new-onset substance abuse disorder. Diagnosing and treating these disorders is complicated by the complex psychosocial issues associated with burns including grief, pain, role impairment, disfigurement, dysfunction, stigma, as well as financial and legal issues. Additionally, pre-morbid psychiatric and neurological illnesses are risk factors for burns, adding to the challenge of diagnosis and treatment. This article will focus on the diagnosis and treatment of PTSD and MDD consequent to burn trauma, as these are the major psychiatric outcomes, addressing the attendant psychosocial problems as threads in this post-trauma tapestry.

  15. Delirium and dementia in acute hospitals: assessing the impact of RMN input.

    PubMed

    Law, Emma

    2008-11-01

    There is evidence that provision for the mental health needs of older people in acute hospitals is generally poor. This article describes a study undertaken over a nine-month period at Perth Royal Infirmary, a 317-bed district general hospital. The study sought to measure the impact of input from an RMN in an acute hospital setting and within a multidisciplinary liaison model. The article examines the implications, preparation, implementation and evaluation of RMN input, and the baseline knowledge and expectations of acute hospital staff when caring for patients with dementia and delirium.

  16. SOCIALIZATION OF THE YOUNGER PSYCHIATRIC PATIENT--THE COMMUNITY AND THE HOSPITAL-A DUAL RESPONSIBILITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GIORDANO, JOSEPH; AND OTHERS

    TO ASSIST YOUNG, MENTAL PATIENTS IN OVERCOMING SOME OF THEIR SOCIAL DEFICITS, TWO RESOCIALIZATION PROJECTS (PRE- AND POST-DISCHARGE) WERE INITIATED TO MOVE THE PATIENT FROM A MENTAL HOSPITAL SETTING INTO THE LARGER COMMUNITY, WITH A COMMUNITY CENTER AS THE LEARNING GROUND. CAREFULLY SELECTED PATIENTS FROM THE HOSPITAL WERE GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO…

  17. 28 CFR 549.44 - Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric medication. 549.44 Section 549.44 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT... facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric medication....

  18. 28 CFR 549.44 - Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric medication. 549.44 Section 549.44 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT... facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric medication....

  19. 28 CFR 549.44 - Voluntary hospitalization in a suitable facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric medication. 549.44 Section 549.44 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT... facility for psychiatric care or treatment, and voluntary administration of psychiatric medication....

  20. Relationship between mean daily ambient temperature range and hospital admissions for schizophrenia: Results from a national cohort of psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Sung, Tzu-I; Chen, Mu-Jean; Lin, Chuan-Yao; Lung, Shih-Chun; Su, Huey-Jen

    2011-12-01

    Environmental temperature is known to correlate with schizophrenia, but little is known about the association with changes in temperature. This 12-year study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the mean daily range of ambient temperature and schizophrenia admissions in a national cohort of psychiatric inpatients in Taiwan. Meteorological data provided by the Central Weather Bureau of Taiwan were interpolated to create representative estimates. Psychiatric inpatient admissions in all hospitals with medical services enrolled in the current health care insurance system were retrieved from the 1996-2007 Psychiatric Inpatient Medical Claim dataset of the National Health Insurance Research Database. Generalized linear models with Poisson distributions were used to analyze the impact of mean diurnal change of temperature on schizophrenia admissions, controlling for internal correlations and demographic covariates. The daily temperature range varied between 1.7°C and 12.1°C (1st to 99th percentile). The relative risk of schizophrenia admission was significantly increased at a temperature range of 3.2°C (10th percentile), and the maximum was at 12.1°C (99th percentile); however, no such association was found with schizoaffective disorder. When restricted to the capital and largest city, the effects of temperature range were prominent and may correlate with temperature itself. The joint effect of temperature and temperature range was associated with elevated risk, particularly at cooler temperatures. A positive correlation was found between increasing temperature range and schizophrenia admissions. The increase in morbidity at high percentiles suggests that the increasing dynamics of temperature range are a valid reflection of risk, highlighting the need for precautionary action. PMID:22018962

  1. Predicting U.S. Army suicides after hospitalizations with psychiatric diagnoses in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Warner, LTC Christopher H.; Ivany, LTC Christopher; Petukhova, Maria V.; Rose, Sherri; Bromet, Evelyn J.; Brown, LTC Millard; Cai, Tianxi; Colpe, Lisa J.; Cox, Kenneth L.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Gruber, Michael J.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Lewandowski-Romps, Lisa; Li, Junlong; Millikan-Bell, Amy M.; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Rosellini, Anthony J.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Stein, Murray B.; Wessely, Simon; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Ursano, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The U.S. Army experienced a sharp rise in suicides beginning in 2004. Administrative data show that among those at highest risk are soldiers in the 12 months after inpatient treatment of a psychiatric disorder. OBJECTIVE To develop an actuarial risk algorithm predicting suicide in the 12 months after US Army soldier inpatient treatment of a psychiatric disorder to target expanded post-hospital care. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS There were 53,769 hospitalizations of active duty soldiers in 2004–2009 with ICD-9-CM psychiatric admission diagnoses. Administrative data available prior to hospital discharge abstracted from a wide range of data systems (socio81 demographic, Army career, criminal justice, medical/pharmacy) were used to predict suicides in the subsequent 12 months using machine learning methods (regression trees, penalized regressions) designed to evaluate cross-validated linear, nonlinear, and interactive predictive associations. MAIN OUTCOME Suicides of soldiers hospitalized with psychiatric disorders in the 12 months after hospital discharge. RESULTS 68 soldiers died by suicide within 12 months of hospital discharge (12.0% of all Army suicides), equivalent to 263.9 suicides/100,000 person-years compared to 18.5 suicides/100,000 person-years in the total Army. Strongest predictors included socio-demographics (male, late age of enlistment), criminal offenses (verbal violence, weapons possession), prior suicidality, aspects of prior psychiatric inpatient and outpatient treatment, and disorders diagnosed during the focal hospitalizations. 52.9% of post-hospital suicides occurred after the 5% of hospitalizations with highest predicted suicide risk (3,824.1 suicides/100,000 person years). These highest-risk hospitalizations also accounted for significantly elevated proportions of several other adverse post-hospital outcomes (unintentional injury deaths, suicide attempts, re-hospitalizations). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The high concentration

  2. Clinical assessment and management of psychiatric patients' violent and aggressive behaviors in general hospital.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Kunsook Song; Saladino, Joseph P

    2007-10-01

    Patients with co-morbid psychiatric disorders exhibiting violent and aggressive behaviors can be a challenge for nurses in medical-surgical units. They can deliver effective, safe care by assessing risk and building a rapport with the patient during the admission process; utilizing crisis prevention strategies, including appropriate medication administration, environmental, psychobiological, counseling, and health teaching interventions; and employing conflict resolution technique. Utilizing the nursing process, the nurse can provide effective therapeutic interventions to promote safety for both the patient and the nurse. PMID:18072668

  3. Comparing apples to apples: the relative financial performance of Manitoba's acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Watson, Diane; Finlayson, Greg; Jacobs, Philip

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents comparative financial ratios that can be adopted by health system administrators and policy analysts to begin to evaluate the performance of acute care hospitals. We combined financial, statistical and clinical information for 73 acute care hospitals in Manitoba for fiscal 1997/98 to calculate 15 indicators of financial performance. Our findings suggest that there is variability between hospital types in their average costs per weighted case, cost structure and financial performance.

  4. Sex Differences in Clinical Characteristics, Hospital Management Practices, and In-Hospital Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized in a Vietnamese Hospital with a First Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hoa L.; Ha, Duc Anh; Phan, Dat Tuan; Nguyen, Quang Ngoc; Nguyen, Viet Lan; Nguyen, Nguyen Hanh; Nguyen, Ha; Goldberg, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Vietnam. We conducted a pilot study of Hanoi residents hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) at the Vietnam National Heart Institute in Hanoi. The objectives of this observational study were to examine sex differences in clinical characteristics, hospital management, in-hospital clinical complications, and mortality in patients hospitalized with an initial AMI. Methods The study population consisted of 302 Hanoi residents hospitalized with a first AMI at the largest tertiary care medical center in Hanoi in 2010. Results The average age of study patients was 66 years and one third were women. Women were older (70 vs. 64 years) and were more likely than men to have had hyperlipidemia previously diagnosed (10% vs. 2%). During hospitalization, women were less likely to have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) compared with men (57% vs. 74%), and women were more likely to have developed heart failure compared with men (19% vs. 10%). Women experienced higher in-hospital case-fatality rates (CFRs) than men (13% vs. 4%) and these differences were attenuated after adjustment for age and history of hyperlipidemia (OR: 2.64; 95% CI: 1.01, 6.89), and receipt of PCI during hospitalization (OR: 2.09; 95% CI: 0.77, 5.09). Conclusions Our pilot data suggest that among patients hospitalized with a first AMI in Hanoi, women experienced higher in-hospital CFRs than men. Full-scale surveillance of all Hanoi residents hospitalized with AMI at all Hanoi medical centers is needed to confirm these findings. More targeted and timely educational and treatment approaches for women appear warranted. PMID:24752383

  5. Work engagement supports nurse workforce stability and quality of care: nursing team-level analysis in psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Van Bogaert, P; Wouters, K; Willems, R; Mondelaers, M; Clarke, S

    2013-10-01

    Research in healthcare settings reveals important links between work environment factors, burnout and organizational outcomes. Recently, research focuses on work engagement, the opposite (positive) pole from burnout. The current study investigated the relationship of nurse practice environment aspects and work engagement (vigour, dedication and absorption) to job outcomes and nurse-reported quality of care variables within teams using a multilevel design in psychiatric inpatient settings. Validated survey instruments were used in a cross-sectional design. Team-level analyses were performed with staff members (n = 357) from 32 clinical units in two psychiatric hospitals in Belgium. Favourable nurse practice environment aspects were associated with work engagement dimensions, and in turn work engagement was associated with job satisfaction, intention to stay in the profession and favourable nurse-reported quality of care variables. The strongest multivariate models suggested that dedication predicted positive job outcomes whereas nurse management predicted perceptions of quality of care. In addition, reports of quality of care by the interdisciplinary team were predicted by dedication, absorption, nurse-physician relations and nurse management. The study findings suggest that differences in vigour, dedication and absorption across teams associated with practice environment characteristics impact nurse job satisfaction, intention to stay and perceptions of quality of care. PMID:22962847

  6. Work engagement supports nurse workforce stability and quality of care: nursing team-level analysis in psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Van Bogaert, P; Wouters, K; Willems, R; Mondelaers, M; Clarke, S

    2013-10-01

    Research in healthcare settings reveals important links between work environment factors, burnout and organizational outcomes. Recently, research focuses on work engagement, the opposite (positive) pole from burnout. The current study investigated the relationship of nurse practice environment aspects and work engagement (vigour, dedication and absorption) to job outcomes and nurse-reported quality of care variables within teams using a multilevel design in psychiatric inpatient settings. Validated survey instruments were used in a cross-sectional design. Team-level analyses were performed with staff members (n = 357) from 32 clinical units in two psychiatric hospitals in Belgium. Favourable nurse practice environment aspects were associated with work engagement dimensions, and in turn work engagement was associated with job satisfaction, intention to stay in the profession and favourable nurse-reported quality of care variables. The strongest multivariate models suggested that dedication predicted positive job outcomes whereas nurse management predicted perceptions of quality of care. In addition, reports of quality of care by the interdisciplinary team were predicted by dedication, absorption, nurse-physician relations and nurse management. The study findings suggest that differences in vigour, dedication and absorption across teams associated with practice environment characteristics impact nurse job satisfaction, intention to stay and perceptions of quality of care.

  7. AGE AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN ACUTE STROKE HOSPITAL PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Kes, Vanja Bašić; Jurašić, Miljenka-Jelena; Zavoreo, Iris; Lisak, Marijana; Jelec, Vjekoslav; Matovina, Lucija Zadro

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the most important cause of adult disability worldwide and in Croatia. In the past, stroke was almost exclusively considered to be a disease of the elderly; however, today the age limit has considerably lowered towards younger age. The aim of this study was to determine age and gender impact on stroke patients in a Croatian urban area during one-year survey. The study included all acute stroke patients admitted to our Department in 2004. A compiled stroke questionnaire was fulfilled during hospitalization by medical personnel on the following items: stroke risk factors including lifestyle habits (smoking and alcohol), pre-stroke physical ability evaluation, stroke evolution data, laboratory and computed tomography findings, outcome data and post-stroke disability assessment. Appropriate statistical analysis of numerical and categorical data was performed at the level of p < 0.05. Analysis was performed on 396 patients, 24 of them from the younger adult stroke group. Older stroke patients had worse disability at hospital discharge and women had worse disabilities at both stroke onset and hospital discharge, probably due to older age at stroke onset. Younger patients recovered better, while older patients had to seek secondary medical facilities more often, as expected. The most important in-hospital laboratory findings in young stroke patients were elevated lipid levels, while older patients had elevated serum glucose and C-reactive protein. Stroke onset in younger patients most often presented with sudden onset headache; additionally, onset seizure was observed more frequently than expected. Stroke risk factor analysis showed that women were more prone to hypertension, chronic heart failure and atrial fibrillation, whereas men had carotid disease more frequently, were more often smokers and had higher alcohol intake. Additionally, age analysis showed that heart conditions and smoking were more prevalent among older

  8. Organization of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban Hospitals in Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Bhimaraj, Arvind; Perpich, Denise

    2004-01-01

    One in 4 Americans lives in a rural community and relies on rural hospitals and medical systems for emergent care of acute myocardial infarctions (AMI). The infrastructure and organization of AMI care in rural and urban Kansas hospitals was examined. Using a nominal group process, key elements within hospitals that might influence quality of AMI…

  9. Lessons learned from study of depression in cardiovascular patients in an acute-care heart and vascular hospital.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael; Brennan, J Michael; Vish, Nancy; Adams, Jenny; Muldoon, Mary; Renbarger, Tara; Garner, John

    2013-01-01

    Depression is highly prevalent in patients with cardiovascular disease, but questions about the effectiveness of screening and intervention remain unanswered. To evaluate the effects of proactive intervention at an acute-care heart and vascular hospital, patients who reported depressive symptoms on admission were randomized to an active, counseling-based depression intervention plus standard care (referral to a primary or psychiatric care physician) or to standard care alone. Despite early termination of patient enrollment because of lower-than-expected recruitment rates, the project had a positive impact. By involving and educating staff, the investigators raised awareness and improved the process of identifying and helping depressed patients. The lessons in study design and execution gained from this experience will help ensure success in future studies of this condition.

  10. Patient safety culture in two Finnish state-run forensic psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kuosmanen, Anssi; Tiihonen, Jari; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Eronen, Markku; Turunen, Hannele

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture refers to the way patient safety is regarded and implemented within an organization and the structures and procedures in place to support this. The aim of this study was to evaluate patient safety culture, identify areas for improvement, and establish a baseline for improving state hospitals in Finland. Cross-sectional design data were collected from two state-run forensic hospitals in Finland using an anonymous, Web-based survey targeted to hospital staff based on the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire. The response rate was 43% (n = 283). The overall patient safety level was rated as excellent or very good by 58% of respondents. The highest positive grade was for "teamwork within units" (72%). The lowest rating was for "nonpunitive response to errors" (26% positive). Good opportunities for supplementary education had a statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) effect on 9 of 12 Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture dimensions. Statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) differences in patient safety culture were also found in the staff's educational background, manager status, and between the two hospitals. These findings suggest there are a number of patient safety problems related to cultural dimensions. Supplementary education was shown to be a highly significant factor in transforming patient safety culture and should therefore be taken into account alongside sufficient resources. PMID:24256983

  11. Impact of tornadoes on hospital admissions for acute cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Palacios, Federico; Casanegra, Ana Isabel; Shapiro, Alan; Phan, Minh; Hawkins, Beau; Li, Ji; Stoner, Julie; Tafur, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of data describing cardiovascular events after tornado outbreaks. We proposed to study the effects of tornadoes on the incidence of cardiovascular events at a tertiary care institution. Population and methods Hospital admission records from a single center situated in a tornado-prone area three months before and after a 2013 tornado outbreak were abstracted. To control for seasonal variation, we also abstracted data from the same period of the prior year (control). Hospital admissions for cardiovascular events (CVEs) including acute myocardial infarction, stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) were summated by zip codes, and compared by time period. Results There were 22,607 admissions analyzed, of which 6,705 (30%), 7,980 (35%), and 7,922 (35%) were during the pre-tornado, post-tornado, and control time frames, respectively. There were 344 CVE in the controls, 317 CVE in pre-tornado and 364 CVEs in post tornado periods. There was no difference in the prevalence of CVE during the post-tornado season compared with the control (PPR = 1.05 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.21, p = 0.50) or the pre-tornado season (PPR= 0.96, 95% CI: 0.83 to 1.21, p = 0.63). Conclusion In conclusion, tornado outbreaks did not increase the prevalence of cardiovascular events. In contrast to the effect of hurricanes, implementation of a healthcare policy change directed toward the early treatment and prevention of cardiovascular events after tornadoes does not seem warranted. PMID:26388119

  12. The effects of daily weather variables on psychosis admissions to psychiatric hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2013-07-01

    Several studies have noted seasonal variations in admission rates of patients with psychotic illnesses. However, the changeable daily meteorological patterns within seasons have never been examined in any great depth in the context of admission rates. A handful of small studies have posed interesting questions regarding a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (especially heat waves) and sunshine. In this study, we used simple non-parametric testing and more complex ARIMA and time-series regression analysis to examine whether daily meteorological patterns (wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, sunshine, sunlight and temperature) exert an influence on admission rates for psychotic disorders across 12 regions in Ireland. Although there were some weak but interesting trends for temperature, barometric pressure and sunshine, the meteorological patterns ultimately did not exert a clinically significant influence over admissions for psychosis. Further analysis is needed.

  13. Tensions between policy and practice: A qualitative analysis of decisions regarding compulsory admission to psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Fistein, Elizabeth C; Clare, Isabel C H; Redley, Marcus; Holland, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    The use of detention for psychiatric treatment is widespread and sometimes necessary. International human rights law requires a legal framework to safeguard the rights to liberty and personal integrity by preventing arbitrary detention. However, research suggests that extra-legal factors may influence decisions to detain. This article presents observational and interview data to describe how decisions to detain are made in practice in one jurisdiction (England and Wales) where a tension between policy and practice has been described. The analysis shows that practitioners mould the law into 'practical criteria' that appear to form a set of operational criteria for identifying cases to which the principle of soft paternalism may be applied. Most practitioners also appear willing, albeit often reluctantly, to depart from their usual reliance on the principle of soft paternalism and authorise detention of people with the capacity to refuse treatment, in order to prevent serious harm. We propose a potential resolution for the tension between policy and practice: two separate legal frameworks to authorise detention, one with a suitable test of capacity, used to enact soft paternalism, and the other to provide legal justification for detention for psychiatric treatment of the small number of people who retain decision-making capacity but nonetheless choose to place others at risk by refusing treatment. This separation of detention powers into two systems, according to the principle that justifies the use of detention would be intellectually coherent, consistent with human rights instruments and, being consistent with the apparent moral sentiments of practitioners, less prone to idiosyncratic interpretations in practice. PMID:27062108

  14. Nursing sabbatical in the acute care hospital setting: a cost-benefit analysis.

    PubMed

    Schaar, Gina L; Swenty, Constance F; Phillips, Lori A; Embree, Jennifer L; McCool, Isabella A; Shirey, Maria R

    2012-06-01

    Practice-based acute care nurses experience a high incidence of burnout and dissatisfaction impacting retention and innovation and ultimately burdening the financial infrastructure of a hospital. Business, industry, and academia have successfully implemented professional sabbaticals to retain and revitalize valuable employees; however, the use is infrequent among acute care hospitals. This article expands upon the synthesis of evidence supporting nursing sabbaticals and suggests this option as a fiscally sound approach for nurses practicing in the acute care hospital setting. A cost-benefit analysis and human capital management strategies supporting nursing sabbaticals are identified. PMID:22617700

  15. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Certification of need for hospitalization when a SNF bed is not available. (1) The physician may certify or... treatment in a SNF but no bed is available in a participating SNF. (2) If this is the basis for the... physician is expected to continue efforts to place the patient in a participating SNF as soon as a...

  16. Evaluating Psychiatric Hospital Admission Decisions for Children in Foster Care: An Optimal Classification Tree Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowden, Jessica A.; Leon, Scott C.; Bryant, Fred B.; Lyons, John S.

    2007-01-01

    This study explored clinical and nonclinical predictors of inpatient hospital admission decisions across a sample of children in foster care over 4 years (N = 13,245). Forty-eight percent of participants were female and the mean age was 13.4 (SD = 3.5 years). Optimal data analysis (Yarnold & Soltysik, 2005) was used to construct a nonlinear…

  17. The end of the mental hospital. A review of the psychiatric experience in Trieste.

    PubMed

    Dell'Acqua, G; Cogliati Dezza, M G

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the closing of the mental hospital in Trieste and the establishing of a comprehensive community mental health service, over a period of 13 years from 1971. In 1971 the hospital had 1058 patients. By 1975 there were 656 patients, 403 of whom were guests, in effect ordinary citizens who had nowhere else to live. The paper describes this dramatic and innovative transformation, the rearrangement of wards, the abolition of shock therapies, the establishment of many flats and group homes, the starting of a cleaning cooperative employing ex-patients to do the work they previously did as "ergotherapy", the first mass exodus of the patients into the city. The paper goes on to describe the opening of 7 mental health centres between 1975 and 1977 and the present existing network of services. At this time the hospital buildings were converted into a variety of uses for the benefit of the local people. It describes in greater detail the philosophy and practice of one of these centres at Barcola and how the dialectical relationship between staff and client works to create a flexible and responsive service. It ends by repeating the assertion that the closure of the mental hospital is a first necessary step towards an improved mental health service for everyone.

  18. The assessment of risk management systems for patients on Warrants of the Lieutenant Governor in Ontario psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    McKerrow, W

    1989-01-01

    An assessment of risk management systems for patients on Warrants of the Lieutenant Governor in the provincial psychiatric hospitals was conducted. The assessment revealed that, to date, with some exceptions, the system has coped reasonably well. However, with a present count of over 400, and the ever increasing number of patients on warrants, there is a pressing need to improve the overall coordination of the system. The numbers, types and location of beds required to serve the system must be reviewed. Staff needs and training must be addressed. Increased numbers of coordinated research studies and improved information systems are required. System-wide policies and procedures for releasing information to policy, employers and home operators are necessary. As well, there must be a consistent approach in dealing with potential abuse of alcohol and non-prescribed drugs. Systems for authorizing and documenting patient privileges can be improved in some hospitals. A set of guidelines for interpreting terms and conditions of warrants is necessary. Lastly, information for staff treating patients on warrants should be developed and distributed.

  19. Influence of drugs of abuse and alcohol upon patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards: physician's assessment compared to blood drug concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mordal, Jon; Medhus, Sigrid; Holm, Bjørn; Mørland, Jørg; Bramness, Jørgen G

    2013-06-01

    In acute psychiatric services, rapid and accurate detection of psychoactive substance intake may be required for appropriate diagnosis and intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between (a) drug influence as assessed by physicians and (b) blood drug concentrations among patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards. We also explored the possible effects of age, sex, and psychotic symptoms on physician's assessment of drug influence. In a cross-sectional study, the sample comprised 271 consecutive admissions from 2 acute psychiatric wards. At admission, the physician on call performed an overall judgment of drug influence. Psychotic symptoms were assessed with the positive subscale of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Blood samples were screened for a wide range of psychoactive substances, and quantitative results were used to calculate blood drug concentration scores. Patients were judged as being under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol in 28% of the 271 admissions. Psychoactive substances were detected in 56% of the blood samples. Altogether, 15 different substances were found; up to 8 substances were found in samples from 1 patient. Markedly elevated blood drug concentration scores were estimated for 15% of the patients. Physician's assessment was positively related to the blood drug concentration scores (r = 0.52; P < 0.001), to symptoms of excitement, and to the detection of alcohol, cannabis, and amphetamines. The study demonstrates the major impact of alcohol and drugs in acute psychiatric settings and illustrates the challenging nature of the initial clinical assessment.

  20. Exploring Reasons for Bed Pressures in Winnipeg Acute Care Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menec, Verena H.; Bruce, Sharon; MacWilliam, Leonard R.

    2005-01-01

    Hospital overcrowding has plagued Winnipeg and other Canadian cities for years. This study explored factors related to overcrowding. Hospital files were used to examine patterns of hospital use from fiscal years 1996/1997 to 1999/2000. Chart reviews were conducted to examine appropriateness of admissions and hospital stays during one pressure…

  1. SUICIDAL IDEATORS IN THE PSYCHIATRIC FACILITY OF A GENERAL HOSPITAL - A PSYCHODEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE

    PubMed Central

    Unni, Sadanandan K.E.; Mani, Annie J.

    1996-01-01

    As a part of the basis for planning of prevention of suicide and suicide attempt, 154 suicidal ideators registered between 1988 and 1991, were recruited for an analysis of their psychiatric morbidity pattern. 59.74% had depression. The representation of substance abuse disorder and psychoses were 9.74% each 7.14% had neurotic disorders. 9.09% had bipolar affective disorder and 0.65% had normal mental status. 40% of the sample were housewives. Majority of them were between the age group of 16 and45years, having an educational status below 10th Standard The four year follow up findings showed that 8 of the sample completed suicide, of which four were suffering from psychosis. Repeaters suffered from disociation disorder. 15 of the depressives had resistant depression with nonremittent suicidal ideas. Psychotic patients and patients with somatic complaints were not free communicators of their suicidal idea. Implication of the results in the cunicalmanagement and further research on these patients are discussed. PMID:21584150

  2. Cognitive and Social Factors Associated with NSSI and Suicide Attempts in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Jennifer; Frazier, Elisabeth A.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Burke, Taylor; Sloan, Emma; Spirito, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Although non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide attempts (SA) frequently co-occur among youth, there is increasing evidence that both the risk factors and the phenomenology of the behaviors are distinct. This study examined how individuals who engage in NSSI only, individuals who attempt suicide only, and those who have histories of both NSSI and at least one suicide attempt may differ in terms of cognitions and perceived social support. Participants were 185 adolescents (78.1% female) between the ages of 13 and 18 recruited from a psychiatric inpatient facility in the northeastern United States. One hundred forty-eight teens were identified with a history of self-injurious behavior and divided into three groups: NSSI only (n=45), SA only (n=24) or both NSSI and SA (NSSI+SA; n=79). Analyses showed that the NSSI+SA group exhibited more cognitive errors, negative self-statements, and negative views of self, world, and future, as well as less perceived familial support than either the NSSI or SA only groups. There were no differences between groups on perceived support from teachers or peers. No significant demographic or diagnostic differences were found between the NSSI and SA groups. Limitations and clinical implications of the current research are discussed. PMID:23588400

  3. Prevalence of a history of sexual abuse among female psychiatric patients in a state hospital system.

    PubMed

    Craine, L S; Henson, C E; Colliver, J A; MacLean, D G

    1988-03-01

    Fifty-one percent of a sample of 105 female state hospital patients were found to have been sexually abused as children or adolescents. In the majority of cases, hospital staff were unaware that the patients had histories of sexual abuse, and only 20 percent of the abused patients believed they had been adequately treated for sexual abuse. Sixty-six percent of the abused patients met the diagnostic criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder, although none had received that diagnosis. Compared with patients who had not been sexually abused, abused patients were significantly more likely to have 17 of 32 symptoms commonly linked with sexual abuse. Every patient who was positive for six symptoms--compulsive sexual behavior, chemical dependency, sadomasochistic sexual fantasy, sexual identity issues, chronic fatigue, and loss of interest in sex--had been sexually abused.

  4. [Treatment of eating disorders in adolescents--the view of a child and adolescence psychiatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Ernst; Hansen, Berit; Korte, Alexander; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike

    2005-04-01

    The paper presents--in the sense of clinical guidelines--reality of clinical care in a child and adolescence university hospital specialised on eating disorders. Need of a multimodal therapeutic approach is emphasized, including normalisation of weight and eating behaviour, nursing and pedagogical measures, individual, group and family therapy, completed by body therapy, art and music therapy and in case psychopharmacotherapy. Recommendations for overcoming weak spots are made.

  5. Psychiatric hospitalizations for affective disorders in Warsaw, Poland: Effect of season and intensity of sunlight.

    PubMed

    Dominiak, Monika; Swiecicki, Lukasz; Rybakowski, Janusz

    2015-09-30

    The purpose of this study was to assess any associations between the number of hospitalizations for affective disorders, seasons of the year and the intensity of sunlight in Poland, a country with a very changeable climate and significant seasonal fluctuations. We analyzed 2837 admissions with affective disorders hospitalized in the Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology in Warsaw, between 2002 and 2010 (mania, n=380, mixed episode, n=131, bipolar depression, n=736, recurrent depression, n=681, single depressive episode, n=909). For each diagnostic group admission time series were created and categorized into subgroups according to sex and age, and these were analyzed by means of the Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) method. Regression models and correlations were used to assess the influence of the intensity of sunlight on the number of hospitalizations. Most mania admissions were noted in spring/summer months and in midwinter, mixed episode-late spring and winter, and depression (bipolar, recurrent and single depressive episode)-spring and autumn months. The association between frequency of admissions and monthly hours of sunshine was observed in some age and sex subgroups of patients with bipolar disorder and single depressive episode. The results support the seasonality of admissions of patients with affective disorders.

  6. "Talking in a new way": older individuals' experiences of group work in an acute psychiatric ward.

    PubMed

    Partington, Jennifer; Gee, Susan; Leith, Anne-Marie; Croucher, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Group work is frequently used in mental health, however qualitative studies on service-users' views are rare. Semistructured interviews explored 12 participants' experiences of a café-style social group and a mutual-aid group offered on an older persons psychiatric ward in Christchurch, New Zealand. The values of the strengths-based approach underpinning the groups were reflected back in the experience of an affirming environment, an exchange of strengths, and the capacity to change. The appeal of the café-style may be culturally specific to European women however, reinforcing the importance of an awareness of culture and diversity.

  7. Perceived quality of an alternative to acute hospitalization: an analytical study at a community hospital in Hallingdal, Norway.

    PubMed

    Lappegard, Øystein; Hjortdahl, Per

    2014-10-01

    There is growing international interest in the geography of health care provision, with health care providers searching for alternatives to acute hospitalization. In Norway, the government has recently legislated for municipal authorities to develop local health services for a selected group of patients, with a quality equal to or better than that provided by hospitals for emergency admissions. General practitioners in Hallingdal, a rural district in southern Norway, have for several years referred acutely somatically ill patients to a community hospital, Hallingdal sjukestugu (HSS). This article analyzes patients' perceived quality of HSS to demonstrate factors applicable nationally and internationally to aid in the development of local alternatives to general hospitals. We used a mixed-methods approach with questionnaires, individual interviews and a focus group interview. Sixty patients who were taking part in a randomized, controlled study of acute admissions at HSS answered the questionnaire. Selected patients were interviewed about their experiences and a focus group interview was conducted with representatives of local authorities, administrative personnel and health professionals. Patients admitted to HSS reported statistically significant greater satisfaction with several care aspects than those admitted to the general hospital. Factors highlighted by the patients were the quiet and homelike atmosphere; a small facility which allowed them a good overall view of the unit; close ties to the local community and continuity in the patient-staff relationship. The focus group members identified some overarching factors: an interdisciplinary and holistic approach, local ownership, proximity to local general practices and close cooperation with the specialist health services at the hospital. Most of these factors can be viewed as general elements relevant to the development of local alternatives to acute hospitalization both nationally and internationally. This

  8. [Management of acute pain therapy: guidelines, recommendations and current practice in german hospitals].

    PubMed

    Erlenwein, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Organisational requirements and the education and training of stuff provide the basis for an adequate supply of quality in acute pain and should be the focus of efforts. Although organizational recommendations of the German guideline on "treatment of acute perioperative and post-traumatic pain" have been increasingly established in practice within the last few years, in many German hospitals there is still lagging far behind in the implementation of general supply conditions, such as regular pain measurement or the introduction of appropriate standardized treatment protocols for all areas of the hospital.As specialized care structures acute pain services have been implemented in 80% of the German hospitals, but only 45% of them meet quality criteria. Due to the heterogeneous realization of acute pain management in different hospitals, it comes apparent, that general guideline recommendations and binding definitions are required to achieve adequate supply conditions. PMID:26863643

  9. Microbiology of acute mastoiditis and complicated or refractory acute otitis media among hospitalized children in the postvaccination era.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulos, Polyvios; Chrysovergis, Aristeidis; Xirogianni, Athanasia; Nikolopoulos, Thomas P; Radiotis, Alexandros; Lebessi, Evangelia; Tsakanikos, Michail; Tzanakaki, Georgina; Tsolia, Maria N

    2014-01-01

    In the post-heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era, Streptococcus pneumoniae remains the leading cause of acute mastoiditis and other complicated or refractory acute otitis media among hospitalized children in our settings. Serotype 19A is predominant, invasive and multidrug resistant causing more than half of all mastoiditis cases, two-thirds of cases with subperiosteal abscess and all those requiring mastoidectomy. Continuous surveillance is required.

  10. Schizophrenia and tobacco smoking: a replication study in another US psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    de Leon, Jose; Tracy, Joseph; McCann, Eileen; McGrory, Amy; Diaz, Francisco J

    2002-07-01

    A prior study in a US state hospital suggested that schizophrenia is more closely associated with tobacco smoking when compared with other severe mental illnesses. This second study, in a neighborhood hospital, tries to (1) replicate that schizophrenia is associated with smoking and heavy smoking, and (2) rule out that this relationship is explained by substance use. The methodology was very similar to the first study. The sample included 588 inpatients. Logistic regression was used to develop models of variables associated with smoking or heavy smoking. The frequency of current smoking for the total, schizophrenic and non-schizophrenic samples were respectively 71, 75, and 55%. The sequence of frequencies from the highest to lowest was the same as in the first study: male schizophrenic patients, male non-schizophrenic patients, female schizophrenic patients and female non-schizophrenic patients. This second study consistently replicated the relationship between schizophrenia and smoking (after correcting for other variables) including history of alcohol and drug abuse or dependence. Only one of two definitions of heavy smoking showed a significant association with schizophrenia. In summary, these two studies suggest that schizophrenia is strongly associated with smoking. Neither substance use, antipsychotics, nor institutionalism can explain this relationship.

  11. Post-Acute Home Care and Hospital Readmission of Elderly Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K.

    2004-01-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce…

  12. End-of-Life Care in an Acute Care Hospital: Linking Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

    2011-01-01

    The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be…

  13. Quality of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban US Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; MacLehose, Richard F.; Hart, L. Gary; Beaver, Shelli K.; Every,Nathan; Chan,Leighton

    2004-01-01

    Context: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a common and important cause of admission to US rural hospitals, as transport of patients with AMI to urban settings can result in unacceptable delays in care. Purpose: To examine the quality of care for patients with AMI in rural hospitals with differing degrees of remoteness from urban centers.…

  14. Use of Acute Care Hospitals by Long-Stay Patients: Who, How Much, and Why?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Coster, Carolyn; Bruce, Sharon; Kozyrskyj, Anita

    2005-01-01

    The effects of long-term hospitalizations can be severe, especially among older adults. In Manitoba, between fiscal years 1991/1992 and 1999/2000, 40 per cent of acute care hospital days were used by the 5 per cent of patients who had long stays, defined as stays of more than 30 days. These proportions were remarkably stable, despite major changes…

  15. [Special challenges in the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe].

    PubMed

    Marugg, Donat

    2015-04-22

    Oberengadin Hospital in Samedan is faced with particular challenges, as the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe (1750 m = 5,740 ft above sea level). The factors responsible for this are elevation-related and meteorological/climatic influences, as well as seasonal variations in Südbünden's demographic structure due to tourism.

  16. [Special challenges in the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe].

    PubMed

    Marugg, Donat

    2015-04-22

    Oberengadin Hospital in Samedan is faced with particular challenges, as the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe (1750 m = 5,740 ft above sea level). The factors responsible for this are elevation-related and meteorological/climatic influences, as well as seasonal variations in Südbünden's demographic structure due to tourism. PMID:26072605

  17. Consultant input in acute medical admissions and patient outcomes in hospitals in England: a multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Derek; Lambourne, Adrian; Percival, Frances; Laverty, Anthony A; Ward, David K

    2013-01-01

    Recent recommendations for physicians in the UK outline key aspects of care that should improve patient outcomes and experience in acute hospital care. Included in these recommendations are Consultant patterns of work to improve timeliness of clinical review and improve continuity of care. This study used a contemporaneous validated survey compared with clinical outcomes derived from Hospital Episode Statistics, between April 2009 and March 2010 from 91 acute hospital sites in England to evaluate systems of consultant cover for acute medical admissions. Clinical outcomes studied included adjusted case fatality rates (aCFR), including the ratio of weekend to weekday mortality, length of stay and readmission rates. Hospitals that had an admitting Consultant presence within the Acute Medicine Unit (AMU, or equivalent) for a minimum of 4 hours per day (65% of study group) had a lower aCFR compared with hospitals that had Consultant presence for less than 4 hours per day (p<0.01) and also had a lower 28 day re-admission rate (p<0.01). An 'all inclusive' pattern of Consultant working, incorporating all the guideline recommendations and which included the minimum Consultant presence of 4 hours per day (29%) was associated with reduced excess weekend mortality (p<0.05). Hospitals with >40 acute medical admissions per day had a lower aCFR compared to hospitals with fewer than 40 admissions per day (p<0.03) and had a lower 7 day re-admission rate (p<0.02). This study is the first large study to explore the potential relationships between systems of providing acute medical care and clinical outcomes. The results show an association between well-designed systems of Consultant working practices, which promote increased patient contact, and improved patient outcomes in the acute hospital setting.

  18. [The geriatric psychiatric day hospital: an analysis of 5 years of activities].

    PubMed

    Trifonov, E G; Ognev, A E

    1997-01-01

    233 patients (53 men and 180 women) at the age of 60 years and older were treated in day gerontopsychiatric out-patient clinic for 5 years. 60-69 year old patients prevailed (146 individuals). Nearly all mental diseases characteristic for the old age were found in such patients; majority of patients suffered from schizophrenia (31.3%) and affective pathology (25.8%). Vascular form of dementia prevailed among the patients with dementia while atrophic degenerative dementia was rarely observed (2 patients). Syndromological distribution revealed that the main groups were formed by patients with depressions (41.6%) as well as individuals with neurosis- and psychopathic-like conditions (37.3%). Mental disorders with paranoid syndromes were observed in 8.6% of the patients. It is shown that day gerontopsychiatric out-patient clinic had some preferences in comparison with usual mental hospitals and psychoneurological out-patient clinic.

  19. [Staff-patient meetings at the psychiatric unit of a university hospital center].

    PubMed

    Gelin, E; Havet, J M; Wargny-Citti, E; Lesage, V; Pascalis, G

    1987-10-01

    Staff/patients meetings have been held for 10 years within a mental teaching hospital for adults. The meeting was initiated by a clinical psychologist still in charge of it. The patients have developed the following themes: (i) entrance conditions, (ii) everyday life information, (iii) inconveniences, (iv) mental illness, (v) the exclusion process. The least severely affected patients will exclude the other ones on ground of insanity. Yet all patients consider themselves banned from society, and even feel rejected by the stall at times. The meeting is meant as a regular talk scène. Individual or collective conflicts arising between the patients can be settled there. Patient passivity may also be counteracted. Staff seminar should work up clearly the data provided by the meeting.

  20. Body Mass Index and Hospital Mortality in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome Receiving Care in a University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Camprubi, Mercedes; Cabrera, Sandra; Sans, Jordi; Vidal, Georgina; Salvadó, Teresa; Bardají, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Although obesity is a well-established cardiovascular risk factor, some controversy has arisen with regard to its effect on hospital mortality in patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome. Methods. Clinical and anthropometric variables were analyzed in patients consecutively admitted for acute coronary syndrome to a university hospital between 2009 and 2010, and the correlation of those variables with hospital mortality was examined. Results. A total of 824 patients with a diagnosis of myocardial infarction or unstable angina were analyzed. Body mass index was an independent factor in hospital mortality (odds ratio 0.739 (IC 95%: 0.597 − 0.916), P = 0.006). Mortality in normal weight (n = 218), overweight (n = 399), and obese (n = 172) subjects was 6.1%, 3.1%, and 4.1%, respectively, with no statistically significant differences between the groups. Conclusions. There is something of a paradox in the relationship between body mass index and hospital mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome in that the mortality rate decreases as body mass index increases. However, no statistically significant differences have been found in normal weight, overweight, or obese subjects. PMID:22900151

  1. The impact of the Great East Japan earthquake on mandatory psychiatric emergency hospitalizations in Tokyo: a retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Aoki, A; Aoki, Y; Harima, H

    2012-10-09

    On 11 March 2011, the eastern part of Japan was struck by a magnitude 9.0 quake. About 20 000 people were killed or were missing, and a nuclear crisis followed. In Tokyo, people were indirectly exposed to the earthquake and nuclear crisis by TV broadcast. The aim of our study was to evaluate the potential effect of the series of catastrophes on psychiatric emergency hospitalizations in Tokyo. Clinical records of patients who were mandatorily admitted to Tokyo Metropolitan Matsuzawa Hospital by law because of urgent risk to self or others were reviewed. Records regarding the 2 years of investigation, which include the 6 months after the earthquake, were reviewed. The six months after the earthquake were compared with the eighteen months before the earthquake in clinical and demographic data using independent t-tests or χ(2) tests. During the 6 months before and after the earthquake, 97 and 127 people were mandatorily admitted. χ(2) Tests demonstrated a significant increase in the number of patients after the earthquake (P = 0.045), attributable to the significant increase in the number of patients with schizophrenia after the earthquake (P = 0.011, 32 vs 56), whereas there were no significant differences in the number of patients with other diagnoses between those two periods. Independent t-tests revealed that patients admitted after the earthquake had marginally significantly shorter periods of education compared with those admitted before the earthquake (13.78 vs 12.82 years, P = 0.084). This work suggests that patients with schizophrenia were more sensitive to indirect exposure to the earthquake and that a shorter period of education was a potential risk factor.

  2. The impact of the Great East Japan earthquake on mandatory psychiatric emergency hospitalizations in Tokyo: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, A; Aoki, Y; Harima, H

    2012-01-01

    On 11 March 2011, the eastern part of Japan was struck by a magnitude 9.0 quake. About 20 000 people were killed or weremissing, and a nuclear crisis followed. In Tokyo, people were indirectly exposed to the earthquake and nuclear crisis by TV broadcast. The aim of our study was to evaluate the potential effect of the series of catastrophes on psychiatric emergency hospitalizations in Tokyo. Clinical records of patients who were mandatorily admitted to Tokyo Metropolitan Matsuzawa Hospital by law because of urgent risk to self or others were reviewed. Records regarding the 2 years of investigation, which include the 6 months after the earthquake, were reviewed. The six months after the earthquake were compared with the eighteen months before the earthquake in clinical and demographic data using independent t-tests or χ2 tests. During the 6 months before and after the earthquake, 97 and 127 people were mandatorily admitted. χ2 Tests demonstrated a significant increase in the number of patients after the earthquake (P=0.045), attributable to the significant increase in the number of patients with schizophrenia after the earthquake (P=0.011, 32 vs 56), whereas there were no significant differences in the number of patients with other diagnoses between those two periods. Independent t-tests revealed that patients admitted after the earthquake had marginally significantly shorter periods of education compared with those admitted before the earthquake (13.78 vs 12.82 years, P=0.084). This work suggests that patients with schizophrenia were more sensitive to indirect exposure to the earthquake and that a shorter period of education was a potential risk factor. PMID:23032944

  3. [Recruitment and selection of human resources in a psychiatric hospital at a municipality of São Paulo].

    PubMed

    Mazon, L; Trevizan, M A

    2000-08-01

    This paper aims at disseminating the experience of recruiting and selecting human resources in a psychiatric hospital in the city of Ribeirão Preto, a philanthropic institution with one hundred and four beds that assists pharmaco-dependent patients with mental problems. It presently has eighty-four employees and a high staff turnover in different sectors. As trainees, we realized that the high turnover impaieds the development of activities at the organization as well as prevented a better care delivery to clients. Therefore, we were invited to integrate a team that was made responsible for the recruitment and selection of human resources for this institution. After these procedures and the respective follow-up by those in charge of different sectors, our purpose is to reduce the turnover, implement larger institutional engagement and more synchrony among employees, reduce expenses and bureaucratic activities related to hiring and laying off personnel, reduce operational work and implementing more assisting activities in terms of planning, orientation, execution and evaluation. PMID:11235244

  4. The politics of black patients' identity: ward-rounds on the 'black side' of a South African psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Swartz, L

    1991-06-01

    There are many macrosocial studies of the political organisation of health and mental health care in South Africa, and the maldistribution of resources by race is well known. Little attention, however, has been given to the minutiae of the negotiation of power in the clinical setting. This article, which reports on part of a larger study of aspects of culture in South African psychiatry, focuses on interactions in ward-rounds on the 'Black side' of a South African psychiatric hospital. Through analysis of cases, the complexity of interpreting what transpires in such a setting and the central role that the concept of culture has in debates amongst staff members are demonstrated. Close analysis demonstrates the inadequacy of models which seek to locate the institutional racism of apartheid psychiatry in the motives of individual clinicians. Clinicians may simultaneously reproduce and subvert aspects of apartheid practice. A consideration of the social positioning of the clinician both as a South African and as a practitioner of psychiatry is central to the development of psychiatry in a post-apartheid South Africa.

  5. The politics of black patients' identity: ward-rounds on the 'black side' of a South African psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Swartz, L

    1991-06-01

    There are many macrosocial studies of the political organisation of health and mental health care in South Africa, and the maldistribution of resources by race is well known. Little attention, however, has been given to the minutiae of the negotiation of power in the clinical setting. This article, which reports on part of a larger study of aspects of culture in South African psychiatry, focuses on interactions in ward-rounds on the 'Black side' of a South African psychiatric hospital. Through analysis of cases, the complexity of interpreting what transpires in such a setting and the central role that the concept of culture has in debates amongst staff members are demonstrated. Close analysis demonstrates the inadequacy of models which seek to locate the institutional racism of apartheid psychiatry in the motives of individual clinicians. Clinicians may simultaneously reproduce and subvert aspects of apartheid practice. A consideration of the social positioning of the clinician both as a South African and as a practitioner of psychiatry is central to the development of psychiatry in a post-apartheid South Africa. PMID:1874004

  6. Open-label treatment with risperidone of 26 psychiatrically-hospitalized children and adolescents with mixed diagnoses and aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Buitelaar, J K

    2000-01-01

    Open-label risperidone was administered to 26 subjects (24 boys: 19 with borderline IQ and 5 with mild mental retardation), 10-18 years old, who were hospitalized for treatment of psychiatric disorders associated with aggressive behavior. Risperidone was given in daily doses ranging from 0.5 to 4 mg for periods of 2-12 months. Treatment response was monitored by means of the improvement scale of the CGI and the modified OAS. Extrapyramidal side effects were measured on the ESRS. Fourteen (54%) of 26 subjects had a marked reduction in aggression; 10 subjects had a moderate reduction; two subjects had mild changes; and none worsened. Two subjects had a marked weight gain in the first 8 weeks of treatment. In seven of the 22 children who continued taking risperidone after week 8, tiredness and sedation that necessitated dose reduction emerged between weeks 8 and 16. These results suggest that risperidone may be useful when treating severe aggressive behavior in children and adolescents. Weight gain and sedation can be troublesome side effects.

  7. Factors Affecting the Agreement Between Emergency Psychiatrists and General Practitioners Regarding Involuntary Psychiatric Hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Pierre Alexis; Duhamel, Alain; Behal, Hélène; Zouitina-Lietaert, Nadia; Duthilleul, Julie; Marquette, Louise; Ducrocq, François; Vaiva, Guillaume; Rolland, Benjamin

    2016-06-21

    Important discrepancies exist between physicians in deciding when to perform involuntary hospitalization measures (IHMs). The factors underlying these differences are poorly known.We conducted a two-year single-center retrospective study in France on patients who were referred to the emergency department (ED) with an IHM certificate written by a private-practice General Practitioner (GP). For each consultation, the official IHM motive was categorized into four groups: Suicide; Psychosis, Mania, or Melancholia (PMM); Agitation; and Other. The alcohol status of the patient was also noted. The factors underlying the ED psychiatrists' confirmation of the use of IHMs were determined using a logistic regression model. One hundred eighty-nine cases were found (165 patients; 44.2 ± 16 years, 41.3% women). The ED psychiatrists confirmed the use of IHMs in 123 instances (65.1% agreement rate). Multivariate analyses found that IHM disagreement was significantly associated with patient alcohol status and the reason for referral. Specifically, there was an increased risk of IHM disagreement when the patient had an alcohol-positive status (OR = 15.80; 95% CI [6.45-38.67]; p < 0.0001) and when the motive for IHM was "agitation" compared with "suicide" (OR = 11.44; 95% CI[3.38-38.78]; p < 0.0001). These findings reflect significant disparities between GPs and ED psychiatrists regarding the decision to proceed to an IHM.

  8. The impact of dementia on length of stay in acute hospitals in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Sheelah; O'Shea, Eamon

    2015-09-01

    The outcomes for those with dementia admitted to acute hospitals are often poor, with higher mortality, increased risk of institutionalisation and longer length of stay. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of dementia on length of stay and the associated cost of care in acute hospitals in Ireland. People with a recorded diagnosis of dementia were found to have a significantly longer length of stay than those with no recorded dementia. Multiplying the excess length of stay by the number of dementia-related admissions gave an estimate of 246,908 additional hospital days per annum due to dementia at an associated additional annual cost of over €199 million. Improving the experience of those with dementia in acute hospitals will likely lead to cost savings for the health service; however, it will require a number of measures including: earlier diagnosis, training for medical professionals and improvements in the built environment.

  9. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.

    PubMed

    2013-08-19

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2013. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes that were applied to the LTCH PPS by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these updates and statutory changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or have revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. In addition, we are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the

  10. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.

    PubMed

    2013-08-19

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2013. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes that were applied to the LTCH PPS by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these updates and statutory changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or have revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. In addition, we are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the

  11. Factors Affecting the Agreement Between Emergency Psychiatrists and General Practitioners Regarding Involuntary Psychiatric Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Geoffroy, Pierre Alexis; Duhamel, Alain; Behal, Hélène; Zouitina-Lietaert, Nadia; Duthilleul, Julie; Marquette, Louise; Ducrocq, François; Vaiva, Guillaume; Rolland, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Important discrepancies exist between physicians in deciding when to perform involuntary hospitalization measures (IHMs). The factors underlying these differences are poorly known. We conducted a two-year single-center retrospective study in France on patients who were referred to the emergency department (ED) with an IHM certificate written by a private-practice General Practitioner (GP). For each consultation, the official IHM motive was categorized into four groups: Suicide; Psychosis, Mania, or Melancholia (PMM); Agitation; and Other. The alcohol status of the patient was also noted. The factors underlying the ED psychiatrists’ confirmation of the use of IHMs were determined using a logistic regression model. One hundred eighty-nine cases were found (165 patients; 44.2 ± 16 years, 41.3% women). The ED psychiatrists confirmed the use of IHMs in 123 instances (65.1% agreement rate). Multivariate analyses found that IHM disagreement was significantly associated with patient alcohol status and the reason for referral. Specifically, there was an increased risk of IHM disagreement when the patient had an alcohol-positive status (OR = 15.80; 95% CI [6.45–38.67]; p < 0.0001) and when the motive for IHM was “agitation” compared with “suicide” (OR = 11.44; 95% CI[3.38–38.78]; p < 0.0001). These findings reflect significant disparities between GPs and ED psychiatrists regarding the decision to proceed to an IHM. PMID:27324574

  12. [Pre-hospital care management of acute spinal cord injury].

    PubMed

    Hess, Thorsten; Hirschfeld, Sven; Thietje, Roland; Lönnecker, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Acute injury to the spine and spinal cord can occur both in isolation as also in the context of multiple injuries. Whereas a few decades ago, the cause of paraplegia was almost exclusively traumatic, the ratio of traumatic to non-traumatic causes in Germany is currently almost equivalent. In acute treatment of spinal cord injury, restoration and maintenance of vital functions, selective control of circulation parameters, and avoidance of positioning or transport-related additional damage are in the foreground. This article provides information on the guideline for emergency treatment of patients with acute injury of the spine and spinal cord in the preclinical phase. PMID:27070515

  13. Factors Contributing to Readmission of Seniors into Acute Care Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoster, Vaughn; Ehlman, Katie; Conners, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Medicare spending is expected to increase by 79% between the years 2010 and 2020, caused, in-part, by hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. This study identified factors contributing to hospital readmissions in a midwest heath service area (HSA), using Coleman's Transition Care Model as the theoretical framework. The researchers…

  14. Governing board structure, business strategy, and performance of acute care hospitals: a contingency perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Young, G; Beekun, R I; Ginn, G O

    1992-01-01

    Contingency theory suggests that for a hospital governing board to be effective in taking on a more active role in strategic management, the board needs to be structured to complement the overall strategy of the organization. A survey study was conducted to examine the strategies of acute care hospitals as related to the structural characteristics of their governing boards. After controlling for organizational size and system membership, results indicated a significant relationship between the governing board structure of 109 acute care hospitals and their overall business strategy. Strategy also accounted for more of the variance in board structure than either organization size or system membership. Finally, the greater the match between board structure and hospital strategy, the stronger the hospitals' financial performance. PMID:1399656

  15. Governing board structure, business strategy, and performance of acute care hospitals: a contingency perspective.

    PubMed

    Young, G; Beekun, R I; Ginn, G O

    1992-10-01

    Contingency theory suggests that for a hospital governing board to be effective in taking on a more active role in strategic management, the board needs to be structured to complement the overall strategy of the organization. A survey study was conducted to examine the strategies of acute care hospitals as related to the structural characteristics of their governing boards. After controlling for organizational size and system membership, results indicated a significant relationship between the governing board structure of 109 acute care hospitals and their overall business strategy. Strategy also accounted for more of the variance in board structure than either organization size or system membership. Finally, the greater the match between board structure and hospital strategy, the stronger the hospitals' financial performance.

  16. The outcomes of psychiatric inpatients by proportion of experienced psychiatrists and nurse staffing in hospital: New findings on improving the quality of mental health care in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyu-Tae; Kim, Sun Jung; Jang, Sung-In; Hahm, Myung-Il; Kim, Seung Ju; Lee, Seo Yoon; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2015-10-30

    Readmission rates for mental health care are higher in South Korea than other Organization for Economic Development (OECD) countries. Therefore, it is worthwhile to continue investigating how to reduce readmissions. Taking a novel approach, we determined the relationship between psychiatrist experience and mental health care readmission rates. We used National Health Insurance claim data (N=21,315) from 81 hospitals to analyze readmissions within 30 days of discharge for "mood disorders" or "schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders" during 2010-2013. In this study, multilevel models that included both patient and hospital-level variables were analyzed to examine associations with readmission. Readmissions within 30 days of discharge accounted for 1079 (5.1%) claims. Multilevel analysis demonstrated that the proportion of experienced psychiatrists at a hospital was inversely associated with risk of readmission (OR: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.74-0.84 per 10% increase in experienced psychiatrists). Readmission rates for psychiatric disorders within 30 days of discharge were lower in hospitals with a higher number of nurses (OR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.94-0.96 per 10 nurses). In conclusion, health policymakers and hospital managers should make an effort to reduce readmissions for psychiatric disorders and other diseases by considering the role that physician experience plays and nurse staffing. PMID:26260566

  17. [Dichotomy of psychiatric and somatic emergency care; fundamental flaw should be addressed].

    PubMed

    Tuerlings, Joep H A M; Pelger, E C M Noor; de Pont, Boudewijn J H B; van Waarde, Jeroen A

    2015-01-01

    In the Netherlands, acute psychiatric care is characterised by mind-body dualism. For acute psychiatric patients, the first port of call is the general practitioner (GP); after-hour care is provided by the out-of-hours GP service. In contrast to patients with other medical illnesses, the out-of-hours GP service does not usually refer patients with acute psychiatric issues to the accident and emergency (A&E) department of the general hospital, but to the local ambulant psychiatric 'crisis' service. However, some of these patients still end up at the A&E department, as our three cases demonstrate. Integration of the out-of-hours GP service, A&E and acute psychiatric care, therefore, would enable elimination of the current partitioning of somatic and psychiatric medicine in acute emergency care. This solution would not only improve acute emergency care, but would also ensure a targeted and efficient implementation of services and might even lead to a decreased stigmatisation of psychiatric patients in general. PMID:26230348

  18. Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats

    PubMed Central

    Radcliffe, Jonathan; Bird, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method We report the results of a clinical audit of patients' reactions to two types of talking therapy groups facilitated by assistant psychologists and psychology graduates on three acute wards. Patients' experiences of problem-solving and interpersonal group formats were explored via focus groups and structured interviews with 29 group participants. Results Both group formats generated high satisfaction ratings, with benefits related mostly to generic factors. Clinical implications Adequately trained and supported assistant psychologists and psychology graduates can provide supportive talking groups that patients find helpful. PMID:27512586

  19. Serious mental illness and acute hospital readmission in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Jennifer S; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Goldberg, Richard; Langenberg, Patricia; Day, Hannah R; Morgan, Daniel J; Comer, Angela C; Harris, Anthony D; Furuno, Jon P

    2012-01-01

    Patients with serious mental illness (SMI), particularly those with other chronic illnesses, may be vulnerable to unplanned hospital readmission. The authors hypothesized that SMI would be associated with increased 30-day hospital readmission in a cohort of adult patients with comorbid diabetes admitted to a tertiary care facility from 2005 to 2009. SMI was defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, discharge diagnosis codes for schizophrenia, schizoaffective, bipolar, manic, or major depressive disorders, or other psychosis. The primary outcome was 30-day readmission to the index hospital. Among 26 878 eligible admissions, the prevalence of SMI was 6% and the incidence of 30-day hospital admission was 16%. Among patients aged <35 years, SMI was significantly associated with decreased odds of 30-day hospital readmission (odds ratio [OR] = 0.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.17, 0.91). However, among patients ≥35 years, SMI was not significantly associated with 30-day hospital readmission (OR = 1.11; 95% CI = 0.86, 1.42). SMI may not be associated with increased odds of 30-day hospital readmission in this population.

  20. Serious mental illness and acute hospital readmission in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Jennifer S; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Goldberg, Richard; Langenberg, Patricia; Day, Hannah R; Morgan, Daniel J; Comer, Angela C; Harris, Anthony D; Furuno, Jon P

    2012-01-01

    Patients with serious mental illness (SMI), particularly those with other chronic illnesses, may be vulnerable to unplanned hospital readmission. The authors hypothesized that SMI would be associated with increased 30-day hospital readmission in a cohort of adult patients with comorbid diabetes admitted to a tertiary care facility from 2005 to 2009. SMI was defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, discharge diagnosis codes for schizophrenia, schizoaffective, bipolar, manic, or major depressive disorders, or other psychosis. The primary outcome was 30-day readmission to the index hospital. Among 26 878 eligible admissions, the prevalence of SMI was 6% and the incidence of 30-day hospital admission was 16%. Among patients aged <35 years, SMI was significantly associated with decreased odds of 30-day hospital readmission (odds ratio [OR] = 0.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.17, 0.91). However, among patients ≥35 years, SMI was not significantly associated with 30-day hospital readmission (OR = 1.11; 95% CI = 0.86, 1.42). SMI may not be associated with increased odds of 30-day hospital readmission in this population. PMID:22539798

  1. Characteristics of patients frequently subjected to pharmacological and mechanical restraint--a register study in three Norwegian acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Knutzen, Maria; Bjørkly, Stål; Eidhammer, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Steinar; Mjøsund, Nina Helen; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Sandvik, Leiv; Friis, Svein

    2014-01-30

    This retrospective study from three catchment-area-based acute psychiatric wards showed that of all the pharmacologically and mechanically restrained patients (n=373) 34 (9.1%) had been frequently restrained (6 or more times). These patients accounted for 39.2% of all restraint episodes during the two-year study period. Adjusted binary logistic regression analyses showed that the odds for being frequently restrained were 91% lower among patients above 50 years compared to those aged 18-29 years; a threefold increase (OR=3.1) for those admitted 3 times or more compared to patients with only one stay; and, finally, a threefold increase (OR=3.1) if the length of stay was 16 days or more compared to those admitted for 0-4 days. Among frequently restrained patients, males (n=15) had significantly longer stays than women (n=19), and 8 of the females had a diagnosis of personality disorder, compared to none among males. Our study showed that being frequently restrained was associated with long inpatient stay, many admissions and young age. Teasing out patient characteristics associated with the risk of being frequently restraint may contribute to reduce use of restraint by developing alternative interventions for these patients.

  2. Development and validation of scales to measure organisational features of acute hospital wards.

    PubMed

    Adams, A; Bond, S; Arber, S

    1995-12-01

    In order to make comparisons between wards and explain variations in outcomes of nursing care, there is a growing need in nursing research for reliable and valid measures of the organisational features of acute hospital wards. This research developed The Ward Organisational Features Scales (WOFS); each set of six scales comprising 14 subscales which measure discrete dimensions of acute hospital wards. A study of a nationally representative sample of 825 nurses working in 119 acute wards in 17 hospitals, drawn from seven Regional Health Authorities in England provides evidence for the structure, reliability and validity of this comprehensive set of measures related to: the physical environment of the ward, professional nursing practice, ward leadership, professional working relationships, nurses' influence and job satisfaction. Implications for further research are discussed.

  3. Variations and Determinants of Hospital Costs for Acute Stroke in China

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jade W.; Heeley, Emma L.; Jan, Stephen; Huang, Yining; Huang, Qifang; Wang, Ji-Guang; Cheng, Yan; Xu, En; Yang, Qidong; Anderson, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    Background The burden of stroke is high and increasing in China. We modelled variations in, and predictors of, the costs of hospital care for patients with acute stroke in China. Methods and Findings Baseline characteristics and hospital costs for 5,255 patients were collected using the prospective register-based ChinaQUEST study, conducted in 48 Level 3 and 14 Level 2 hospitals in China during 2006–2007. Ordinary least squares estimation was used to determine factors associated with hospital costs. Overall mean cost of hospitalisation was 11,216 Chinese Yuan Renminbi (CNY) (≈US$1,602) per patient, which equates to more than half the average annual wage in China. Variations in cost were largely attributable to stroke severity and length of hospital stay (LOS). Model forecasts showed that reducing LOS from the mean of 20 days for Level 3 and 18 days for Level 2 hospitals to a duration of 1 week, which is common among Western countries, afforded cost reductions of 49% and 19%, respectively. Other lesser determinants varied by hospital level: in Level 3 hospitals, health insurance and the occurrence of in-hospital complications were each associated with 10% and 18% increases in cost, respectively, whilst treatment in a teaching hospital was associated with approximately 39% decrease in cost on average. For Level 2 hospitals, stroke due to intracerebral haemorrhage was associated with a 19% greater cost than for ischaemic stroke. Conclusions Changes to hospital policies to standardise resource use and reduce the variation in LOS could attenuate costs and improve efficiencies for acute stroke management in China. The success of these strategies will be enhanced by broader policy initiatives currently underway to reform hospital reimbursement systems. PMID:20927384

  4. Acute generalized weakness in patients referred to Amirkola Children’s Hospital from 2005 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Salehiomran, Mohammad Reza; Naserkhaki, Somayeh; Hajiahmadi, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diseases that cause acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) often progress rapidly, thus may cause life threatening complications, therefore, their diagnosis and cure are important. This study was carried out to investigate the causes of acute generalized weakness in children referred to Amirkola Children’s Hospital, in Babol, Iran. Methods: In this case series, the epidemiological causes of the disease and clinical features of 15 cases with acute generalized weakness from April 2005 to September 2010 were evaluated. The data were collected and analyzed. Results: The mean age of cases was 4.7±3.5 years. The male/female ratio was 2. Twenty cases had Guillain-Barre syndrome, two with myositis and one with periodic hyperkalemic paralysis. Conclusion: Guillain-Barre syndrome is the most common cause of AFP in children admitted due to acute generalized weakness in Amirkola Children’s Hospital. PMID:24358438

  5. Gender inequality in acute coronary syndrome patients at Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Mirghani, Hyder O.; Elnour, Mohammed A.; Taha, Akasha M.; Elbadawi, Abdulateef S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gender differences among patients with the acute coronary syndrome is still being debated, no research has been done on gender inequality among coronary syndrome patients in Sudan. Objectives: To study gender differences in presentation, management, and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome in Sudan. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive longitudinal study was conducted in Omdurman Teaching Hospital between July 2014 and August 2015. Patients were invited to sign a written informed consent form, were interviewed and examined by a physician, and then followed during their hospital stay. Information collected includes coronary risk factors, vital signs, echocardiography findings, arrhythmias, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, and death. The Ethical Committee of Omdurman Teaching Hospital approved the research. Results: A total of 197 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients were included, 43.1% were females. A significant statistical difference was evident between males and females regarding the type of acute coronary syndrome, its presentation, and time of presentation to the hospital, smoking, and receipt of thrombolysis (P < 0.05). No differences were found with regard to age, hypertension, diabetes, family history of myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, and in-hospital acute coronary complications (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Women were less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy, present with chest pain, and diagnosed with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. No gender differences were found in acute coronary syndrome risk factors apart from smoking, which was more common in males, and there were no differences between males and females as regards in-hospital complications. PMID:27186156

  6. A nurse-physician co-leadership model in psychiatric hospitals: results of a survey among leading staff members in three sites.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Tilman; Goebel, Rita; Rieger, Wolfgang

    2006-12-01

    In three psychiatric hospitals in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, a physician-nurse shared leadership model was implemented in 1997 by the hospital management. The whole hospital, departments, and single wards are led each by a leadership team consisting of a physician, psychologist or social worker and a nurse, being responsible for organization, staff, and budgets. The consequences for staff opinion in leadership positions were evaluated. All 165 leading staff members of all professional groups were anonymously interviewed with a questionnaire containing 45 items regarding their satisfaction with this new leadership model. The response rate was 79.4%. Overall, the leading staff members were satisfied with the shared leadership model both in their own clinical practice and in general. Non-medical staff members were significantly more in favour of several aspects of shared leadership than physicians, but even the latter reported to be generally satisfied. However, both professional groups estimated leading positions to be only modestly attractive. The results yield some evidence that the change from traditional leadership models to the physician-nurse shared leadership model may have advantages in the management of psychiatric hospitals. PMID:17064321

  7. A nurse-physician co-leadership model in psychiatric hospitals: results of a survey among leading staff members in three sites.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Tilman; Goebel, Rita; Rieger, Wolfgang

    2006-12-01

    In three psychiatric hospitals in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, a physician-nurse shared leadership model was implemented in 1997 by the hospital management. The whole hospital, departments, and single wards are led each by a leadership team consisting of a physician, psychologist or social worker and a nurse, being responsible for organization, staff, and budgets. The consequences for staff opinion in leadership positions were evaluated. All 165 leading staff members of all professional groups were anonymously interviewed with a questionnaire containing 45 items regarding their satisfaction with this new leadership model. The response rate was 79.4%. Overall, the leading staff members were satisfied with the shared leadership model both in their own clinical practice and in general. Non-medical staff members were significantly more in favour of several aspects of shared leadership than physicians, but even the latter reported to be generally satisfied. However, both professional groups estimated leading positions to be only modestly attractive. The results yield some evidence that the change from traditional leadership models to the physician-nurse shared leadership model may have advantages in the management of psychiatric hospitals.

  8. Psychiatric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Wheat, Santina; Dschida, Dorothy; Talen, Mary R

    2016-06-01

    Psychiatric emergencies are acute disturbances in thought, behavior, mood, or social relationship that require immediate intervention as defined by the patient, family, or social unit to save the patient and/or others from imminent danger. Ensuring the safety of the patient, surrounding persons, and the medical team is the first step of evaluation. Treatment focuses on stabilization of the patient, then on specific symptoms and ultimately the cause of symptoms. There are important legal considerations, particularly regarding involuntary admissions. It is important to debrief with the patient, surrounding family, and the health care team to ensure a continued therapeutic alliance and the emotional health of all involved. PMID:27262012

  9. [How should be a psychiatric hospital to take in and utilize the psycho-social approaches in Japan? -- From the view point of psychiatry, medical model, medical system and economical management system].

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Kohei; Horikawa, Yuriko

    2012-01-01

    The author developed argument that a cause of the present condition of our country, in which psycho-social approaches have not fully spread though its clinical efficacy has been well recognized, is in the medical institution side. Because, our psychiatric reforms over 17 years, that reduced the average duration of hospitalization from about 2156 days to 61 days, has attained by deployment of various psycho-social approaches based on "therapeutic community model" and "psychodynamic team treatment". Furthermore, it has done by the affinity, continuity and complementarities of "psychodynamic team treatment" and psychosocial approaches with following special features. That is, since psycho-social approaches is 1. techniques to acquire the social life skill and to prevent re-hospitalization, 2. the group psychotherapy by facilitating the patient's mutual help capability, 3. based on "acceptance of the disease" by "noticing the diagnosis". Even if the therapeutic orientation or assumption of the psychiatric hospital does not comprehend above all of 1-3, it is important whether it is in the same direction or not. In other words, it is the issue of the medical-economical-management system, medical model and also the kind of psychiatry that is the source of them. Our hospital is for short term hospitalization and in focus on the outpatient treatment with "psychodynamic team treatment" based on "therapeutic community model". That is why our hospital has a potential advantage to take in and utilize the psycho-social approaches. On the other hand, there is the same reason why it is difficult for the traditional psychiatric hospital for long term hospitalization with higher hierarchical "physical medicine model" based on the descriptive psychiatry. The further problem is that both psychiatric hospital staff and psycho-social therapists do not realize it. The most important issue for us is having the recognition and exploring the method not to adapt to a psychiatric hospital but

  10. Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control in Acute-Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Sydnor, Emily R. M.; Perl, Trish M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Health care-associated infections (HAIs) have become more common as medical care has grown more complex and patients have become more complicated. HAIs are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. Growing rates of HAIs alongside evidence suggesting that active surveillance and infection control practices can prevent HAIs led to the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control programs. The role for infection control programs has grown and continues to grow as rates of antimicrobial resistance rise and HAIs lead to increasing risks to patients and expanding health care costs. In this review, we summarize the history of the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control, common HAIs and the pathogens causing them, and the structure and role of a hospital epidemiology and infection control program. PMID:21233510

  11. Effects of outsourced nursing on quality outcomes in long-term acute-care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M Raymond; Kerr, Bernard J; Burtner, Joan; Ledlow, Gerald; Fulton, Larry V

    2011-03-01

    Use of outsourced nurses is often a stop-gap measure for unplanned vacancies in smaller healthcare facilities such as long-term acute-care hospitals (LTACHs). However, the relationship of utilization levels (low, medium, or high percentages) of nonemployees covering staff schedules often is perceived to have negative relationships with quality outcomes. To assess this issue, the authors discuss the outcomes of their national study of LTACH hospitals that indicated no relationship existed between variations in percentage of staffing by contracted nurses and selected outcomes in this post-acute-care setting.

  12. Utilisation of acute hospitals by age and sex in Australia, 1985.

    PubMed

    Mathers, C D; Moore, G

    1989-01-01

    This paper provides estimates of the utilisation rates of acute care (short-stay) hospitals, by age and sex, for the Australian population. Separation and bed-day rates per 1000 persons for public, Repatriation and private hospitals in 1985 have been estimated by age group, for each sex, in each State and Territory in Australia. The Australian Base Grant, negotiated between the Commonwealth, States and Territories in the new Medicare Agreements, distributes funds for the care and treatment of Medicare patients in public hospitals. The national bed-day utilisation rates reported in this article, have been used as the basis for population weights to allocate these funds. This paper presents the data and methods used to derive these weights, and examines the differences between them and the actual State and Territory utilisation patterns in 1985. The impact of population ageing on the overall utilisation rates for acute hospitals in Australia is examined.

  13. Another link to improving the working environment in acute care hospitals: registered nurses' spirit at work.

    PubMed

    Urban, Ann-Marie; Wagner, Joan I

    2013-12-01

    Hospitals are situated within historical and socio-political contexts; these influence the provision of patient care and the work of registered nurses (RNs). Since the early 1990s, restructuring and the increasing pressure to save money and improve efficiency have plagued acute care hospitals. These changes have affected both the work environment and the work of nurses. After recognizing this impact, healthcare leaders have dedicated many efforts to improving the work environment in hospitals. Admirable in their intent, these initiatives have made little change for RNs and their work environment, and thus, an opportunity exists for other efforts. Research indicates that spirit at work (SAW) not only improves the work environment but also strengthens the nurse's power to improve patient outcomes and contribute to a high-quality workplace. In this paper, we present findings from our research that suggest SAW be considered an important component in improving the work environment in acute care hospitals.

  14. Diagnostic delays and dilemmas. Management of affected patients in the psychiatric inpatient unit of a general children's hospital.

    PubMed

    Fennig, S; Fennig, S

    1999-01-01

    We present the role of the medical-psychiatric unit in the management of children and adolescents with somatic symptoms in whom diagnosis remains uncertain or delayed, which can lead to severe impairment in the child's normal development and functioning and cause anger and hostility in the families. We describe two patients, one with cyclic vomiting syndrome, considered a medical disorder, and the other with conversion disorder, considered a psychiatric disorder. Both patients had had multiple ER admissions and outpatient visits with elaborate and expensive diagnostic workups. On admission to our unit, a coherent and integrated treatment plan was finally formulated and successfully implemented. We discuss the advantage of the medical-psychiatric unit for simultaneous medical and psychosocial intervention early in the development of symptoms and signs. The units need to be ready and able to cope with a wide range of medical and psychiatric disorders with different levels of gravity. PMID:10228893

  15. Trends, victims, and injuries in injurious patient assaults on adult, geriatric, and child/adolescent psychiatric units in US hospitals, 2007-2013.

    PubMed

    Staggs, Vincent S

    2015-04-01

    While rates of other nurse-sensitive adverse outcomes have declined in recent years, little is known about trends in rates of assault by psychiatric inpatients. The primary purpose of this study was to examine recent trends in injurious assault rates against patients and staff on adult, geriatric, and child/adolescent psychiatric units, using data from a nationwide sample of hospitals. A secondary aim was to assess the frequency with which patients and various types of hospital staff were reported as the most severely injured victim. National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators® data from 2007 to 2013 were extracted. The sample comprised 345 hospitals (324 general, 5 pediatric, 16 psychiatric), 438 adult, 75 geriatric, and 105 child/adolescent units, each with assault rate data from at least three of the seven study years. All but four states in the United States were represented. Spearman's rank coefficients were used to test for time trends. In 16.3 million patient days, nearly three-quarters of the 14,877 injurious assaults by patients involved injury only to hospital staff, whereas one-fifth resulted in injury only to patients. A registered nurse was named most frequently as the most severely injured victim (32.1% of assaults), and nursing staff of all types accounted for 64.9% of the most severely injured. Assault rates did not change significantly over time. Unlike several other nursing-sensitive adverse outcomes that have been the focus of policymakers, assault rates have not declined in recent years and remain a problem in need of more focused attention.

  16. Development and internal validation of a pediatric acute asthma prediction rule for hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Donald H; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Moons, Karel GM; Harrell, Frank E; Hartert, Tina V

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinicians have difficulty predicting need for hospitalization in children with acute asthma exacerbations. Objective To develop and internally validate a multivariable Asthma Prediction Rule (APR) to inform hospitalization decision-making in children ages 5-17 years with acute asthma exacerbations. Methods Between April, 2008 and February, 2013 we enrolled a prospective cohort of patients ages 5-17 years with asthma who presented to our pediatric emergency department with acute exacerbations. Predictors for APR modeling included 15 demographic characteristics, asthma chronic control measures, and pulmonary examination findings in participants at the time of triage and before treatment. The primary outcome variable for APR modeling was need for hospitalization (length-of-stay > 24 hr for those admitted to hospital or relapse for those discharged). A secondary outcome was the hospitalization decision of the clinical team. We used penalized maximum likelihood multiple logistic regression modeling to examine the adjusted association of each predictor variable with the outcome. Backward step-down variable selection techniques were used to yield reduced-form models. Results Data from 928 of 933 participants was used for prediction rule modeling, with median [IQR] age 8.8 [6.9, 11.2] years, 61% male, and 59% African-American race. Both full (penalized) and reduced-form models for each outcome calibrated well, with bootstrap-corrected c-indices of 1.74 and 0.73 for need for hospitalization and 0.81 in each case for hospitalization decision. Conclusion The APR predicts the need for hospitalization of children with acute asthma exacerbations using predictor variables available at the time of presentation to an emergency department. PMID:25609324

  17. Acute pain services in Europe: a 17-nation survey of 105 hospitals. The EuroPain Acute Pain Working Party.

    PubMed

    Rawal, N; Allvin, R

    1998-05-01

    A 17-nation survey was undertaken with the aim of studying the availability of acute pain services (APS) and the use of newer analgesic techniques, such as epidural and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). A questionnaire was mailed to selected anaesthesiologists in 105 European hospitals from 17 countries. Depending on the population, between five and ten representative hospitals from each country were selected by a country coordinator. A total of 101 (96.2%) completed questionnaires were returned. A majority of respondents were dissatisfied with pain management on surgical wards. Pain management was better in post-anaesthesia care units (PACUs); however, 27% of participating hospitals did not have PACUs. There were no organized APS in 64% of hospitals, although anaesthesiologists from chronic pain centres were available for consultation. In the hospitals that had APS, the responsible person for the APS was either: (1) a junior anaesthesiologist (senior anaesthesiologist available for consultation); or (2) a specially trained nurse (supervised by consultant anaesthesiologists). Many anaesthesiologists were unable to introduce techniques such as PCA on wards because of the high equipment costs. Although 40% of hospitals used a visual analogue scale (VAS) or other methods for assessment of pain intensity, routine pain assessment and documenting on a vital sign chart was rarely practised. There was a great variation in routines for opioid prescription and documentation procedures. Nursing regulations regarding injection of drugs into epidural and intrathecal catheters also varied considerably between countries. This survey of 105 hospitals from 17 European countries showed that over 50% of anaesthesiologists were dissatisfied with post-operative pain management on surgical wards. Only 34% of hospitals had an organized APS, and very few hospitals used quality assurance measures such as frequent pain assessment and documentation. There is a need to establish organized

  18. [Adverse perinatal and infant outcomes among children born to mothers with major mental disorders in a psychiatric hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscila Krauss; Vieira, Cláudia Lima; Santos, Jacqueline Fernandes de Cintra; Lima, Lúcia Abelha; Legay, Letícia Fortes; Lovisi, Giovanni Marcos

    2014-08-01

    Adverse perinatal and infant outcomes are the leading causes of infant morbidity and mortality in developing countries like Brazil. Among the risk factors are maternal mental disorders. A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted based on passive follow-up using probabilistic record linkage to estimate the prevalence of adverse perinatal and infant outcomes in children of women admitted to a public psychiatric hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and who gave birth from 1999 to 2009. Prevalence rates were: low birth weight (27.6%), prematurity (17.4%), malformations (2.5%), stillbirths (4.8%), and neonatal deaths (3.7%). Associated factors were deficient prenatal care, schizophrenia, and low income. The results corroborate the high prevalence of adverse perinatal and infant outcomes in mothers with major mental disorders, and that screening of psychiatric symptoms and specialized care by mental health professionals are essential throughout prenatal and postpartum care.

  19. Application of Barcoding to Reduce Error of Patient Identification and to Increase Patient's Information Confidentiality of Test Tube Labelling in a Psychiatric Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsiu-Chu; Li, Hsing; Chang, Hsin-Fei; Lu, Mei-Rou; Chen, Feng-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Learning from the experience of another medical center in Taiwan, Kaohsiung Municipal Kai-Suan Psychiatric Hospital has changed the nursing informatics system step by step in the past year and a half . We considered ethics in the original idea of implementing barcodes on the test tube labels to process the identification of the psychiatric patients. The main aims of this project are to maintain the confidential information and to transport the sample effectively. The primary nurses had been using different work sheets for this project to ensure the acceptance of the new barcode system. In the past two years the errors in the blood testing process were as high as 11,000 in 14,000 events per year, resulting in wastage of resources. The actions taken by the nurses and the new barcode system implementation can improve the clinical nursing care quality, safety of the patients, and efficiency, while decreasing the cost due to the human error. PMID:26262221

  20. Why are patients with acute stroke admitted to hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Bamford, J; Sandercock, P; Warlow, C; Gray, M

    1986-01-01

    Data on 515 consecutive patients registered with the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project were used to compare the characteristics of those patients who were admitted to hospital within one month after their first stroke with those who remained in the community during that time. Twenty eight patients had their stroke while in hospital for other conditions, and of the remaining 487, 266 were admitted. Though patients with a severe neurological deficit were significantly more likely to be admitted, 47 out of 202 such patients were managed in the community. In a substudy of 162 consecutive patients the general practitioners' reasons for either arranging admission to hospital or continuing with community care in the first week after the stroke were ascertained. Sixty patients were admitted. The only reason for admission was diagnostic uncertainty in five cases (though this was a contributing factor in 25) and to provide nursing or general, non-medical care in 25. Patients who lived alone were more likely to be admitted. All 12 patients who presented directly to the casualty department were admitted, though only five had had a severe stroke. A stroke service that provides a facility for rapid outpatient and domiciliary diagnosis as well as a rapidly acting domiciliary nursing team might reduce the number of patients with stroke admitted to hospital without adversely affecting the quality of patient care: this should be properly evaluated. PMID:3085852

  1. Bereavement Support in an Acute Hospital: An Irish Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Trish; Foreman, Maeve; Curry, Philip; O'Driscoll, Siobhan; McCormack, Martin

    2008-01-01

    In the first Irish study to examine a hospital-based bereavement care program, 1 year's cohort of bereaved people was surveyed. A response rate of over 40% provided 339 completed questionnaires from bereaved next-of-kin. The findings suggest that a tiered pyramid model of bereavement care (the Beaumont model) may be functional in a number of ways.…

  2. A randomised controlled trial of extended brief intervention for alcohol dependent patients in an acute hospital setting (ADPAC)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Alcohol dependence affects approximately 3% of the English population, and accounts for significant medical and psychiatric morbidity. Only 5.6% of alcohol-dependent individuals ever access specialist treatment and only a small percentage ever seek treatment. As people who are alcohol dependent are more likely to have experienced health problems leading to frequent attendance at acute hospitals it would seem both sensible and practical to ensure that this setting is utilised as a major access point for treatment, and to test the effectiveness of these treatments. Methods/Design This is a randomised controlled trial with a primary hypothesis that extended brief interventions (EBI) delivered to alcohol-dependent patients in a hospital setting by an Alcohol Specialist Nurse (ASN) will be effective when compared to usual care in reducing overall alcohol consumption and improving on the standard measures of alcohol dependence. Consecutive patients will be screened for alcohol misuse in the Emergency Department (ED) of a district general hospital. On identification of an alcohol-related problem, following informed written consent, we aim to randomize 130 patients per group. The ASN will discharge to usual clinical care all control group patients, and plan a programme of EBI for treatment group patients. Follow-up interview will be undertaken by a researcher blinded to the intervention at 12 and 24 weeks. The primary outcome measure is level of alcohol dependence as determined by the Severity of Alcohol Dependence Questionnaire (SADQ) score. Secondary outcome measures include; Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) score, quantity and frequency of alcohol consumption, health-related quality of life measures, service utilisation, and patient experience. The trial will also allow an assessment of the cost-effectiveness of EBI in an acute hospital setting. In addition, patient experience will be assessed using qualitative methods. Discussion This paper

  3. 76 FR 19365 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... payments published in the FY 2011 IPPS final rule (75 FR 50042). Overall, all hospitals will experience an... exceptions policy (see the FY 2005 IPPS final rule, 69 FR 49105). ** This hospital has been assigned a wage... 2011 IPPS/LTCHPPS final rule) appeared in the August 16, 2010 Federal Register (75 FR 50042) and...

  4. 76 FR 59263 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... care hospital quality measures. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2011-19719 of August 18, 2011 (76 FR 51476), the final rule entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective... requirements. IV. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2011-19719 of August 18, 2011 (76 FR 51476), make...

  5. Effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in patients on an acute care psychiatric unit: a randomized three group effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Stigma is a major social barrier that can restrict access to and willingness to seek psychiatric care. Psychiatric consumers may use secrecy and withdrawal in an attempt to cope with stigma. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in acute care psychiatric inpatients using a randomized design with wait-list control. Participants (N=83) were randomly assigned by cluster to one of three single-session group-based conditions: music therapy, education, or wait-list control. Participants in the music therapy and education conditions completed only posttests while participants in the wait-list control condition completed only pretests. The music therapy condition was a group songwriting intervention wherein participants composed lyrics for "the stigma blues." Results indicated significant differences in measures of discrimination (experienced stigma), disclosure (self-stigma), and total stigma between participants in the music therapy condition and participants in the wait-list control condition. From the results of this randomized controlled investigation, music therapy may be an engaging and effective psychosocial technique to treat stigma. Limitations, suggestions for future research, and implications for clinical practice and psychiatric music therapy research are provided.

  6. [History of psychiatric care].

    PubMed

    Häfner, H

    2006-01-01

    The lecture incorporates stages of the Ettelbruck jubilee-hospital into european psychiatric history of the two last centuries. Beginning with social exclusion in the sense of a Michel Foucauld ("Central Hospice"), then turning into a typical large psychiatric hospital the CHNP is nowadays a specialized clinic with national tasks within the network of mental health community care. Milestones of this evolution are: the isolation theory of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries; eugenics and euthanasia on patients in Nazi-Germany; the second psychiatric revolution after World War 2 and it's impact in Luxembourg.

  7. Prehospital and in-hospital delays in acute stroke care.

    PubMed

    Evenson, K R; Rosamond, W D; Morris, D L

    2001-05-01

    Current guidelines emphasize the need for early stroke care. However, significant delays occur during both the prehospital and in-hospital phases of care, making many patients ineligible for stroke therapies. The purpose of this study was to systematically review and summarize the existing scientific literature reporting prehospital and in-hospital stroke delay times in order to assist future delivery of effective interventions to reduce delay time and to raise several key issues which future studies should consider. A comprehensive search was performed to find all published journal articles which reported on the prehospital or in-hospital delay time for stroke, including intervention studies. Since 1981, at least 48 unique reports of prehospital delay time for patients with stroke, transient ischemic attack, or stroke-like symptoms were published from 17 different countries. In the majority of studies which reported median delay times, the median time from symptom onset to arrival in the emergency department was between 3 and 6 h. The in-hospital times from emergency department arrival to being seen by an emergency department physician, initiation and interpretation of a computed tomography (CT) scan, and being seen by a neurologist were consistently longer than recommended. However, prehospital delay comprised the majority of time from symptom onset to potential treatment. Definitions and methodologies differed across studies, making direct comparisons difficult. This review suggests that the majority of stroke patients are unlikely to arrive at the emergency department and receive a diagnostic evaluation in under 3 h. Further studies of stroke delay and corresponding interventions are needed, with careful attention to definitions and methodologies. PMID:11359072

  8. Discharge Planning in Acute Care Hospitals in Israel: Services Planned and Levels of Implementation and Adequacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auslander, Gail K.; Soskolne, Varda; Stanger, Varda; Ben-Shahar, Ilana; Kaplan, Giora

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the implementation, adequacy, and outcomes of discharge planning. The authors carried out a prospective study of 1,426 adult patients discharged from 11 acute care hospitals in Israel. Social workers provided detailed discharge plans on each patient. Telephone interviews were conducted two weeks post-discharge. Findings…

  9. Identifying reasons for delays in acute hospitals using the Day-of-Care Survey method.

    PubMed

    Reid, Erica; King, Andrew; Mathieson, Alex; Woodcock, Thomas; Watkin, Simon W

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a new tool called 'Day-of-Care Survey', developed to assess inpatient delays in acute hospitals. Using literature review, iterative testing and feedback from professional groups, a national multidisciplinary team developed the survey criteria and methodology. Review teams working in pairs visited wards and used case records and bedside charts to assess the patient's status against severity of illness and service intensity criteria. Patients who did not meet the survey criteria for acute care were identified and delays were categorised. From March 2012 to December 2013, nine acute hospitals across Scotland, Australia and England were surveyed. A total of 3,846 adult general inpatient beds (excluding intensive care and maternity) were reviewed. There were 145 empty beds at the time of surveys across the nine sites, with 270 definite discharges planned on the day of the survey. The total number of patients not meeting criteria for acute care was 798/3,431 (23%, range 18-28%). Six factors accounted for 61% (490/798) of the reasons why patients not meeting acute care criteria remained in hospital. This survey gives important insights into the challenges of managing inpatient flow using system level information as a method to target interventions designed to address delay. PMID:25824060

  10. Identifying reasons for delays in acute hospitals using the Day-of-Care Survey method.

    PubMed

    Reid, Erica; King, Andrew; Mathieson, Alex; Woodcock, Thomas; Watkin, Simon W

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a new tool called 'Day-of-Care Survey', developed to assess inpatient delays in acute hospitals. Using literature review, iterative testing and feedback from professional groups, a national multidisciplinary team developed the survey criteria and methodology. Review teams working in pairs visited wards and used case records and bedside charts to assess the patient's status against severity of illness and service intensity criteria. Patients who did not meet the survey criteria for acute care were identified and delays were categorised. From March 2012 to December 2013, nine acute hospitals across Scotland, Australia and England were surveyed. A total of 3,846 adult general inpatient beds (excluding intensive care and maternity) were reviewed. There were 145 empty beds at the time of surveys across the nine sites, with 270 definite discharges planned on the day of the survey. The total number of patients not meeting criteria for acute care was 798/3,431 (23%, range 18-28%). Six factors accounted for 61% (490/798) of the reasons why patients not meeting acute care criteria remained in hospital. This survey gives important insights into the challenges of managing inpatient flow using system level information as a method to target interventions designed to address delay.

  11. Predictors and in-hospital outcomes of preoperative acute kidney injury in patients with type A acute aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Ren, Hong-Mei; Hu, Chun-Yan; Que, Bin; Ai, Hui; Wang, Chun-Mei; Sun, Li-Zhong; Nie, Shao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common after surgery for acute aortic dissection (AAD) and increases in-hospital and long-term mortality. However, few data exist on the clinical and prognostic relevance of early preoperative AKI in patients with type A AAD. We aimed to determine the incidence and predictors of preoperative AKI and the impact of AKI on in-hospital outcomes in patients with type A AAD. Methods From May 2009 to June 2014, we retrospectively enrolled 178 patients admitted to our hospital within 48 h from symptom onset and receiving open surgery for type A AAD. The patients were divided into no AKI and AKI groups and staged with AKI severity according to the KDIGO criteria before surgery. Results AKI occurred in 41 patients (23.0%). The incidence of in-hospital complications was significantly higher in patients with preoperative AKI compared to no AKI (41.5% vs. 9.5%, P < 0.001), including renal infarction (7.3% vs. 0, P = 0.012), and it increased with AKI severity (Ptrend < 0.001). Patients with AKI had higher in-hospital mortality compared with patients without AKI, although no significant difference was found (14.6% vs. 5.1%, P = 0.079). Multivariate analysis indicated that male gender, diastolic blood pressure on admission and bilateral renal artery involvement were independent predictors of preoperative AKI in patients with type A AAD. Conclusions Early AKI before surgery was common in patients with type A AAD, and was associated with increased in-hospital complications. Male gender, diastolic blood pressure on admission and bilateral renal artery involvement were major predictors for preoperative AKI. PMID:27781058

  12. Predictors of poor hospital discharge outcome in acute stroke due to atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Melissa J; Tayal, Ashis H; Schlenk, Elizabeth A

    2015-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent cause of acute ischemic stroke that results in severe neurological disability and death despite treatment with intravenous thrombolysis (intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator [rtPA]). We performed a retrospective review of a single-center registry of patients treated with intravenous rtPA for stroke. The purposes of this study were to compare intravenous rtPA treated patients with stroke with and without AF to examine independent predictors of poor hospital discharge outcome (in-hospital death or hospital discharge to a skilled nursing facility, long-term acute care facility, or hospice care). A univariate analysis was performed on 144 patients receiving intravenous rtPA for stroke secondary to AF and 190 patients without AF. Characteristics that were significantly different between the two groups were age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, length of hospital stay, gender, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking status, presence of large cerebral infarct, and hospital discharge outcome. Bivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that patients with stroke secondary to AF with a poor hospital discharge outcome had a greater likelihood of older age, higher initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores, longer length of hospital stay, intubation, and presence of large cerebral infarct compared with those with good hospital discharge outcome (discharged to home or inpatient rehabilitation or signed oneself out against medical advice). A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that older age, longer length of hospital stay, and presence of large cerebral infarct were independent predictors of poor hospital discharge outcome. These predictors can guide nursing interventions, aid the multidisciplinary treating team with treatment decisions, and suggest future directions for research. PMID:25503541

  13. Measuring gain-sharing dividends in acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Barbusca, A; Cleek, M

    1994-01-01

    Hospitals have responded to industry consolidation by increasing productivity with nonmanagement, group-incentive compensation, known as gain sharing. A nationwide study conducted to obtain quantitative performance data for gain-sharing programs revealed that they are most successful during the initial stages of the program. Many variables affect the size of employee bonuses and the duration of employee support. Employers must identify how to appropriately install their gain-sharing program so that employee motivation, participation, and trust in management are maximized. PMID:8206759

  14. Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Podgorny, Kelly; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Bratzler, Dale W.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Greene, Linda; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Saiman, Lisa; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Kaye, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Previously published guidelines are available that provide comprehensive recommendations for detecting and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The intent of this document is to highlight practical recommendations in a concise format designed to assist acute care hospitals in implementing and prioritizing their surgical site infection (SSI) prevention efforts. This document updates “Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals,”1 published in 2008. This expert guidance document is sponsored by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and is the product of a collaborative effort led by SHEA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise. The list of endorsing and supporting organizations is presented in the introduction to the 2014 updates.2 PMID:24799638

  15. Management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients after hospitalization for acute exacerbation.

    PubMed

    Osthoff, Mirjam; Leuppi, Jörg D

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this review is to sum up the literature regarding the management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) after hospitalization for an acute exacerbation. Guidelines recommend a follow-up 4-6 weeks after hospitalization to assess coping strategies, inhaler technique, the need for long-term oxygen therapy and the measurement of FEV(1). This review discusses the follow-up of patients with exacerbations of COPD, the use and value of spirometry in their further management, the potential benefit of home monitoring, the value of long-term oxygen therapy, the value of self-management programs including the use of action plans, the potential benefit of noninvasive ventilation as well as the value of early rehabilitation. There is not enough literature to allow specific recommendations and to define components of a care plan after hospitalization for an acute exacerbation; however, early rehabilitation should be included.

  16. Internet and technology transfer in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the survey-2000 measuring technology transfer and, specifically, Internet usage. The purpose of the survey was to measure the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business-to-business and customers. These results are compared with responses to the same questions in survey-1997. Changes in response are noted and discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discuss the survey design and provide a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals. (1) Thefirst article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2)

  17. Initiation or maintenance of beta-blocker therapy in patients hospitalized for acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Passos, Luiz Carlos; Oliveira, Márcio Galvão; Duraes, Andre Rodrigues; Trindade, Thiago Moreira; Barbosa, Andréa Cristina Costa

    2016-08-01

    Background Beta-blockers have been recommended for patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction for their long-term benefits. However, the tolerance to betablockers in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure should be evaluated. Objective To estimate the proportion of patients hospitalized with acute heart failure who can tolerate these agents in clinical practice and compare the clinical outcomes of patients who can and cannot tolerate treatment with beta-blockers. Setting Two reference hospitals in cardiology. Methods Retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients hospitalized for acute heart failure between September 2008 and May 2012. Population-based sample. During the study period, 325 patients were admitted consecutively, including 194 individuals with an acute heart failure diagnosis and systolic left ventricular dysfunction and ejection fraction ≤45 %, who were candidates for the initiation or continuation of beta-blockers. Main outcome measure The percentage of patients intolerant to beta-blockers and the clinical characteristics of patients. Results On admission, 61.8 % of patients were already using beta-blockers, and 73.2 % were using beta-blockers on discharge. During hospitalization, 85 % of patients used these agents for some period. The main reasons for not using betablockers were low cardiac output syndrome (24.4 %), bradycardia (24.4 %), severe hypotension or shock (17.8 %), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (13.3 %). Patients who were intolerant or did not use a beta-blocker had a longer hospital stay (18.3 vs. 11.0 days; p < .001), greater use of vasoactive drugs (41.5 vs. 16.3 %; p < .001, CI 1.80-7.35), sepsis and septic shock (RR = 3.02; CI 95 % 1.59-5.75), and higher mortality rate during hospitalization (22.6 vs. 2.9 %; p < .001; CI 3.05-32.26). Conclusion Beta-blockers could be used in 73.2 % of patients hospitalized for acute heart failure. Patients who can not tolerate BB presented

  18. [Task analysis of clinical laboratory physician in acute hospital].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Junko

    2013-06-01

    Appropriate communications between clinical divisions and clinical laboratories are required to improve the quality of health care in hospitals. In this paper, the routine work of a clinical laboratory physician is presented. 1. In order to support attentive medical practice, we have established a consultation service system for handling questions from medical staff. The main clients are doctors and clinical laboratory technologists. 2. In order to improve the quality of infectious disease analysis, we have recommended obtaining two or more blood culture sets to achieve good sensitivity. The order rate of multiple blood culture sets increased 90% or more in 2011. 3. In order to provide appropriate blood transfusion, we intervene in inappropriate transfusion plans. 4. In order to support prompt decision making, we send E-mails to physicians regarding critical values. 5. We send reports on the morphology of cells(peripheral blood and bone marrow), IEP, flow cytometry, irregular antibodies, and so on. It has been realized that doctors want to know better solutions immediately rather than the best solution tomorrow morning. We would like to contribute to improving the quality of health care in Saitama Cooperative Hospital as clinical laboratory physicians.

  19. Oppositional defiant disorder symptoms in relation to psychopathic traits and aggression among psychiatrically hospitalized children: ADHD symptoms as a potential moderator.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stephen P; Luebbe, Aaron M; Fite, Paula J; Greening, Leilani; Stoppelbein, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is associated with elevated rates of psychopathic traits and aggression. However, it remains unclear if attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms exacerbate these relations, particularly in samples of children who are severely clinically distressed. The purpose of the present study was to test ADHD symptoms as a potential moderator of the relations of ODD symptoms to psychopathic traits (i.e., callous-unemotional [CU] traits, narcissism) and to aggressive subtypes (i.e., proactive, reactive aggression) in a large sample of children in an acute psychiatric inpatient facility (n = 699; ages 6-12). Multiple regression analyses indicated that, after controlling for child demographic variables, ADHD symptoms marginally exacerbated the relation between ODD symptoms and CU traits. Both ODD and ADHD symptoms had an additive, but not a multiplicative effect, in predicting narcissism. In addition, for a subset of the full sample for whom data were available (n =351), ADHD symptoms exacerbated the relation between ODD symptoms and both reactive and proactive aggression. These results suggest that ADHD symptoms tend to have a negative effect on the relation between ODD symptoms and markers of antisociality among children receiving acute psychiatric care.

  20. Prevalence of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity among Children Attending Outpatient Clinic in Psychiatric Teaching Hospital in Erbil City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakir, Lana Nabeel; Sulaiman, Karwan Hawez

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is one of the common psychiatric disorder in childhood and it affects on children socially and academically. The aim of this study is to find out the prevalence of Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder among the studied population, describe its association with certain…

  1. Psychiatric In-Patients Away from Home: Accounts by People with Intellectual Disabilities in Specialist Hospitals outside Their Home Localities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinn, Deborah; Hall, Ian; Ali, Afia; Hassell, Holly; Patkas, Iannis

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study reflects a growing concern with the placement of people with intellectual disabilities and complex mental health problems in out of area placements at a distance from their families and communities. Materials and methods: We interviewed service users (n = 17) living in out of area in-patient psychiatric units using a…

  2. Job Stress and Self-Efficacy among Psychiatric Nursing Working in Mental Health Hospitals at Cairo, Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Rania. A.

    2016-01-01

    Nursing stress is considered a problem that affects the practice worldwide. Job stress is a harmful response physically and emotionally when the nurses' skills, resources, and needs could not fulfill the requirement of the job. This study was aimed to assess job stress and self-efficacy among psychiatric nursing working in mental health hospitals…

  3. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  4. Multi-unit Providers Survey. For-profits report decline in acute-care hospitals ... newcomers to top 10.

    PubMed

    Bellandi, D; Kirchheimer, B

    1999-05-24

    For-profit hospital systems cleaned house last year. After years of adding hospitals, investor-owned operators shed facilities in 1998, recording the first decline in the number of acute-care hospitals they've owned or managed since 1991, according to our 23rd annual Multi-unit Providers Survey.

  5. 78 FR 15882 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... FR 60315) included several corrections to figures and data for the Hospital Readmissions Reduction... August 31, 2012 Federal Register (77 FR 53258), we published a final rule entitled ``Medicare Program... the October 3, 2012 Federal Register (77 FR 60315); October 17, 2012 Federal Register (77 FR...

  6. 75 FR 60640 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    .... Background In FR Doc. 2010-19092 of August 16, 2010 (75 FR 50042), there were a number of technical errors... FR Doc. 2010-19092 of August 16, 2010, make the following corrections: A. Corrections to the Preamble..., 485, and 489 RIN 0938-AP80; RIN 0938-AP33 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective...

  7. 75 FR 34614 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... Hefter, (410) 786-4487. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2010-12563 of June 2, 2010... correction notice. III. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2010-12563 of June 2, 2010, make the following... care hospital prospective payment system (FY 2010 IPPS/RY 2010 LTCH PPS) notice), there were...

  8. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... Physician Order and Certification for Payment of Hospital Inpatient Services under Medicare Part A Issues. Susanne Seagrave, (410) 786-0044, Physician Order and Certification for Payment of Inpatient... line FQHC Federally qualified health center FR Federal Register FTE Full-time equivalent FUH...

  9. Rationale, Design, Methodology and Hospital Characteristics of the First Gulf Acute Heart Failure Registry (Gulf CARE)

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Kadhim J.; Panduranga, Prashanth; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi; Al-Habib, Khalid; Al-Suwaidi, Jassim; Al-Mahmeed, Wael; Al-Faleh, Husam; El-Asfar, Abdelfatah; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Ridha, Mustafa; Bulbanat, Bassam; Al-Jarallah, Mohammed; Bazargani, Nooshin; Asaad, Nidal; Amin, Haitham

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is paucity of data on heart failure (HF) in the Gulf Middle East. The present paper describes the rationale, design, methodology and hospital characteristics of the first Gulf acute heart failure registry (Gulf CARE). Materials and Methods: Gulf CARE is a prospective, multicenter, multinational registry of patients >18 year of age admitted with diagnosis of acute HF (AHF). The data collected included demographics, clinical characteristics, etiology, precipitating factors, management and outcomes of patients admitted with AHF. In addition, data about hospital readmission rates, procedures and mortality at 3 months and 1-year follow-up were recorded. Hospital characteristics and care provider details were collected. Data were entered in a dedicated website using an electronic case record form. Results: A total of 5005 consecutive patients were enrolled from February 14, 2012 to November 13, 2012. Forty-seven hospitals in 7 Gulf States (Oman, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Kuwait, United Gulf Emirates, Qatar and Bahrain) participated in the project. The majority of hospitals were community hospitals (46%; 22/47) followed by non-University teaching (32%; 15/47 and University hospitals (17%). Most of the hospitals had intensive or coronary care unit facilities (93%; 44/47) with 59% (28/47) having catheterization laboratory facilities. However, only 29% (14/47) had a dedicated HF clinic facility. Most patients (71%) were cared for by a cardiologist. Conclusions: Gulf CARE is the first prospective registry of AHF in the Middle East, intending to provide a unique insight into the demographics, etiology, management and outcomes of AHF in the Middle East. HF management in the Middle East is predominantly provided by cardiologists. The data obtained from this registry will help the local clinicians to identify the deficiencies in HF management as well as provide a platform to implement evidence based preventive and treatment strategies to reduce the burden of HF in

  10. 'She's manipulative and he's right off': a critical analysis of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language in the acute inpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Bridget; Manias, Elizabeth

    2006-06-01

    Remarks such as 'she's manipulative' and 'he's right off' are familiar to psychiatric nurses. This paper critiques the language nurses use in acute inpatient psychiatry services, highlighting the diverse discourses implicated in nurses' writing and speaking about patients. Based on a review of the literature, this paper examines ethnographic studies and discourse analyses of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language. A prominent debate in the literature surrounds nurses' use of standardized language, which is the use of set terms for symptoms and nursing activities. This review of spoken descriptions of patients highlights nurses' use of informal and local descriptions, incorporating elements of moral judgement, common sense language and empathy. Research into written accounts in patient files and records show nurses' use of objectifying language, the dominance of medicine and the emergence of the language of bureaucracy in health services. Challenges to the language of psychiatry and psychiatric nursing arise from fields as diverse as bioscience, humanism and social theory. Authors who focus on the relationship between language, power and the discipline of nursing disagree in regard to their analysis of particular language as a constructive exercise of power by nurses. Thus, particular language is in some instances endorsed and in other instances censured, by nurses in research and practice. In this paper, a Foucauldian analysis provides further critique of taken-for-granted practices of speech and writing. Rather than censoring language, we recommend that nurses, researchers and educators attend to nurses' everyday language and explore what it produces for nurses, patients and society.

  11. 'She's manipulative and he's right off': a critical analysis of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language in the acute inpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Bridget; Manias, Elizabeth

    2006-06-01

    Remarks such as 'she's manipulative' and 'he's right off' are familiar to psychiatric nurses. This paper critiques the language nurses use in acute inpatient psychiatry services, highlighting the diverse discourses implicated in nurses' writing and speaking about patients. Based on a review of the literature, this paper examines ethnographic studies and discourse analyses of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language. A prominent debate in the literature surrounds nurses' use of standardized language, which is the use of set terms for symptoms and nursing activities. This review of spoken descriptions of patients highlights nurses' use of informal and local descriptions, incorporating elements of moral judgement, common sense language and empathy. Research into written accounts in patient files and records show nurses' use of objectifying language, the dominance of medicine and the emergence of the language of bureaucracy in health services. Challenges to the language of psychiatry and psychiatric nursing arise from fields as diverse as bioscience, humanism and social theory. Authors who focus on the relationship between language, power and the discipline of nursing disagree in regard to their analysis of particular language as a constructive exercise of power by nurses. Thus, particular language is in some instances endorsed and in other instances censured, by nurses in research and practice. In this paper, a Foucauldian analysis provides further critique of taken-for-granted practices of speech and writing. Rather than censoring language, we recommend that nurses, researchers and educators attend to nurses' everyday language and explore what it produces for nurses, patients and society. PMID:16643343

  12. Standardised surveillance of Clostridium difficile infection in European acute care hospitals: a pilot study, 2013.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, Sofie M; Kinross, Pete; Gastmeier, Petra; Behnke, Michael; Kola, Axel; Delmée, Michel; Pavelkovich, Anastasia; Mentula, Silja; Barbut, Frédéric; Hajdu, Agnes; Ingebretsen, André; Pituch, Hanna; Macovei, Ioana S; Jovanović, Milica; Wiuff, Camilla; Schmid, Daniela; Olsen, Katharina Ep; Wilcox, Mark H; Suetens, Carl; Kuijper, Ed J

    2016-07-21

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains poorly controlled in many European countries, of which several have not yet implemented national CDI surveillance. In 2013, experts from the European CDI Surveillance Network project and from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control developed a protocol with three options of CDI surveillance for acute care hospitals: a 'minimal' option (aggregated hospital data), a 'light' option (including patient data for CDI cases) and an 'enhanced' option (including microbiological data on the first 10 CDI episodes per hospital). A total of 37 hospitals in 14 European countries tested these options for a three-month period (between 13 May and 1 November 2013). All 37 hospitals successfully completed the minimal surveillance option (for 1,152 patients). Clinical data were submitted for 94% (1,078/1,152) of the patients in the light option; information on CDI origin and outcome was complete for 94% (1,016/1,078) and 98% (294/300) of the patients in the light and enhanced options, respectively. The workload of the options was 1.1, 2.0 and 3.0 person-days per 10,000 hospital discharges, respectively. Enhanced surveillance was tested and was successful in 32 of the hospitals, showing that C. difficile PCR ribotype 027 was predominant (30% (79/267)). This study showed that standardised multicountry surveillance, with the option of integrating clinical and molecular data, is a feasible strategy for monitoring CDI in Europe. PMID:27472820

  13. Practitioner Perspectives on Delivering Integrative Medicine in a Large, Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Nate, Kent C.; Griffin, Kristen H.; Christianson, Jon B.; Dusek, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. We describe the process and challenges of delivering integrative medicine (IM) at a large, acute care hospital, from the perspectives of IM practitioners. To date, minimal literature that addresses the delivery of IM care in an inpatient setting from this perspective exists. Methods. Fifteen IM practitioners were interviewed about their experience delivering IM services at Abbott Northwestern Hospital (ANW), a 630-bed tertiary care hospital. Themes were drawn from codes developed through analysis of the data. Results. Analysis of interview transcripts highlighted challenges of ensuring efficient use of IM practitioner resources across a large hospital, the IM practitioner role in affecting patient experiences, and the ways practitioners navigated differences in IM and conventional medicine cultures in an inpatient setting. Conclusions. IM practitioners favorably viewed their role in patient care, but this work existed within the context of challenges related to balancing supply and demand for services and to integrating an IM program into the established culture of a large hospital. Hospitals planning IM programs should carefully assess the supply and demand dynamics of offering IM in a hospital, advocate for the unique IM practitioner role in patient care, and actively support integration of conventional and complementary approaches. PMID:26693242

  14. Narratives of change and reform processes: global and local transactions in French psychiatric hospital reform after the Second World War.

    PubMed

    Henckes, Nicolas

    2009-02-01

    As with the rest of biomedicine, psychiatry has, since the Second World War, developed under the strong influence of the transnational accumulation of a whole series of practices and knowledge. Anthropology has taught us to pay attention to the transactions between local-level actors and those operating at the global level in the construction of this new world of medicine. This article examines the role played by the recommendations of the WHO Expert Committee of Mental Health in the reform of the French mental health system during the 1950s. Rooted in the experience of practitioners and administrators participating in the process of reforming local psychiatric systems, the recommendations of the WHO Expert Committee developed a new vision of regulating psychiatry, based on professionalism and an idea of a normativity of the doctor-patient relation. This article shows how, by mobilizing the WHO reports' recommendations, French administrators and doctors succeeded in creating a typically French object: "the psychiatric sector", founded on elaborating a new mandate for the psychiatric profession. The article thus questions the deinstitutionalization model as an explanation of transformations of the structure of the French psychiatry system in the post-war period.

  15. The Economic Crisis and Acute Myocardial Infarction: New Evidence Using Hospital-Level Data

    PubMed Central

    Maggioni, Aldo Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Objective This research sought to assess whether and to what extent the ongoing economic crisis in Italy impacted hospitalizations, in-hospital mortality and expenditures associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods The data were obtained from the hospital discharge database of the Italian Health Ministry and aggregated at the hospital level. Each hospital (n = 549) was observed for 4 years and was geographically located within a “Sistema Locale del Lavoro” (SLL, i.e., clusters of neighboring towns with a common economic structure). For each SLL, the intensity of the crisis was determined, defined as the 2012–2008 increase in the area-specific unemployment rate. A difference-in-differences (DiD) approach was employed to compare the increases in AMI-related outcomes across different quintiles of crisis intensity. Results Hospitals located in areas with the highest intensity of crisis (in the fifth quintile) had an increase of approximately 30 AMI cases annually (approximately 13%) compared with hospitals in area with lower crisis intensities (p<0.001). A significant increase in total hospital days was observed (13%, p<0.001) in addition to in-hospital mortality (17%, p<0.001). As a consequence, an increase of around €350.000 was incurred in annual hospital expenditures for AMI (approximately 36%, p<0.001). Conclusions More attention should be given to the increase in health needs associated with the financial crisis. Policies aimed to contrast unemployment in the community by keeping and reintegrating workers in jobs could also have positive impacts on adverse health outcomes, especially in areas of high crisis intensity. PMID:26574745

  16. Effects of Medicare BBA spending reductions on the profitability of general acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sear, Alan M

    2004-01-01

    The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 was intended to reduce spending by about $115 billion from the Medicare Hospital Insurance trust fund over a five-year period. Several studies were funded by the hospital industry that indicated that the actual reductions would be far greater than $115 billion and that these reductions would have a devastating effect on U.S. hospital finances. In 1999, Congress passed the Balanced Budget Refinement Act, which added back about $11 billion in spending for fiscal years 2000 through 2002. In 2000, Congress passed the Benefits Improvement and Protection Act, which restored another $37 billion in spending over a five-year period. These cutbacks were going into effect at the same time as a cyclical decline in hospital operating margins occurred. This study was designed to determine if any separate effect of the Balanced Budget Act could be detected in the operating margins of general acute care hospitals in Tampa Bay, Florida. Operating margins were analyzed for 25 hospitals for a 12-year period (1990 through 2001), and a regression model was tested in which the dependent variable was the difference in mean operating margins for each hospital between the 1990 through 1997 period and the 1998 through 2001 period. The mean percentage of hospital revenue derived from Medicare, five other revenue source variables, and three hospital structural variables were used as the predictor variables. A statistically significant decline in operating margins was seen between these two periods, but Medicare revenue did not account for a significant amount of the variance. Thus, it was concluded that the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 did not significantly affect the operating margins of the study hospitals. Implications for Medicare policy are addressed. PMID:15074120

  17. Viral etiology of acute lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized young children in a children's referral hospital in Iran.

    PubMed

    Pourakbari, Babak; Mahmoudi, Shima; Movahedi, Zahra; Halimi, Shahnaz; Momeni, Shervin; Hosseinpour-Sadeghi, Reihaneh; Mamishi, Setareh

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are considered major causes of acute respiratory tract infections among children under 5 years old. In this study we investigated the prevalence of three respiratory viruses--respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza virus (INF) and adenovirus (ADV)--among hospitalized children with acute viral lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from children under five who had been hospitalized for LRTIs. The clinical data, including demographic data (age and sex), vital symptoms and signs at admission, duration of fever, duration of hospitalization, chest X-ray findings and outcome were considered. All inpatient specimens were tested by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for RSV and the INF-A, INF-B and parainfluenza viruses and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ADV. Out of those from 232 patients, 58 (25%) specimens were positive for either RSV, INF or ADV. The most predominant pathogens were RSV (40 cases, 17.2%), followed by INF (10 cases, 4%; including 8 type A and 2 type B) and ADV (8 cases, 3.4%). A total of 32 (55.1%) viral cases were identified in the spring, followed by 19 (32.7%) in the autumn and 7 (12%) in the winter. There was no significant correlation between clinical symptoms and the individual virus detected. In our study, RSV and INF were the two most common causes of LRTIs. These data are helpful for guiding the development of further vaccines as well as the use of antiviral drugs. Further studies will be needed to investigate other respiratory viruses such as parainfluenza, human metapneumovirus and rhinovirus. PMID:25818953

  18. Hospital staff's perceptions of risk associated with the discharge of elderly people from acute hospital care.

    PubMed

    Macmillan, M S

    1994-02-01

    As part of the exploratory work for a project on discharge planning of elderly people (75+ years of age) from acute care, the concept of risk was discussed with a sample of consultants; ward sisters; staff nurses; a social worker; occupational therapist; pharmacist; and some physiotherapists. The factors which they identified as being relevant to 'risky discharges' were organized under seven headings: medical factors; mobility; social surroundings; personality; habits; social support; and external factors. These findings are presented within the context of a review of relevant literature and some conclusions are drawn.

  19. Symptom, Family, and Service Predictors of Children's Psychiatric Rehospitalization within One Year of Discharge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blader, Joseph C.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate predictors of readmission to inpatient psychiatric treatment for children aged 5 to 12 discharged from acute-care hospitalization. Method: One hundred nine children were followed for 1 year after discharge from inpatient care. Time to rehospitalization was the outcome of interest. Predictors of readmission, examined via…

  20. The costs and service implications of substituting intermediate care for acute hospital care.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, Leslie; Lawrence, David

    2006-05-01

    Intermediate care is part of a package of initiatives introduced by the UK Government mainly to relieve pressure on acute hospital beds and reduce delayed discharge (bed blocking). Intermediate care involves caring for patients in a range of settings, such as in the home or community or in nursing and residential homes. This paper considers the scope of intermediate care and its role in relation to acute hospital services. In particular, it develops a framework that can be used to inform decisions about the most cost-effective care pathways for given clinical situations, and also for wider planning purposes. It does this by providing a model for evaluating the costs of intermediate care services provided by different agencies and techniques for calibrating the model locally. It finds that consistent application of the techniques over a period of time, coupled with sound planning and accounting, should result in savings to the health economy. PMID:16643707

  1. The costs and service implications of substituting intermediate care for acute hospital care.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, Leslie; Lawrence, David

    2006-05-01

    Intermediate care is part of a package of initiatives introduced by the UK Government mainly to relieve pressure on acute hospital beds and reduce delayed discharge (bed blocking). Intermediate care involves caring for patients in a range of settings, such as in the home or community or in nursing and residential homes. This paper considers the scope of intermediate care and its role in relation to acute hospital services. In particular, it develops a framework that can be used to inform decisions about the most cost-effective care pathways for given clinical situations, and also for wider planning purposes. It does this by providing a model for evaluating the costs of intermediate care services provided by different agencies and techniques for calibrating the model locally. It finds that consistent application of the techniques over a period of time, coupled with sound planning and accounting, should result in savings to the health economy.

  2. Hospital-Based Acute Care Use in Survivors of Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ortego, Alexandra; Gaieski, David F.; Fuchs, Barry D.; Jones, Tiffanie; Halpern, Scott D.; Small, Dylan S.; Sante, S. Cham; Drumheller, Byron; Christie, Jason D.; Mikkelsen, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Septic shock is associated with increased long-term morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about the use of hospital-based acute care in survivors after hospital discharge. The objectives of the study were to examine the frequency, timing, causes, and risk factors associated with Emergency Department (ED) visits and hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary, academic hospital in the United States. Patients Patients admitted with septic shock (serum lactate ≥ 4 mmol/L or refractory hypotension) and discharged alive to a non-hospice setting between 2007 and 2010. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results The co-primary outcomes were all-cause hospital readmission and ED visits (treat-and-release encounters) within 30 days to any of the three health system hospitals. Of 269 at-risk survivors, 63 (23.4%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 18.2, 28.5) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge and another 12 (4.5%, 95% CI: 2.3, 7.7) returned to the ED for a treat-and-release visit. Readmissions occurred within 15 days of discharge in 75% of cases and were more likely in oncology patients (p=0.001) and patients with a longer hospital length of stay (p=0.04). Readmissions were frequently due to another life-threatening condition and resulted in death or discharge to hospice in 16% of cases. The reasons for readmission were deemed potentially related to the index septic shock hospitalization in 78% (49/63) of cases. The most common cause was infection-related, accounting for 46% of all 30-day readmissions, followed by cardiovascular or thromboembolic events (18%). Conclusions The use of hospital-based acute care appeared to be common in septic shock survivors. Encounters often led to readmission within 15 days of discharge, were frequently due to another acute condition, and appeared to result in substantial morbidity and mortality. Given the potential public health implications of

  3. Clinical Risk Factors for In-Hospital Adverse Cardiovascular Events After Acute Drug Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Alex F.; Hoffman, Robert S.; Stimmel, Barry; Vlahov, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It was recently demonstrated that adverse cardiovascular events (ACVE) complicate a high proportion of hospitalizations for patients with acute drug overdoses. The aim of this study was to derive independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdoses. Methods This prospective cohort study was conducted over 3 years at two urban university hospitals. Patients were adults with acute drug overdoses enrolled from the ED. In-hospital ACVE was defined as any of myocardial injury, shock, ventricular dysrhythmia, or cardiac arrest. Results There were 1,562 patients meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria (mean age, 41.8 years; female, 46%; suicidal, 38%). ACVE occurred in 82 (5.7%) patients (myocardial injury, 61; shock, 37; dysrhythmia, 23; cardiac arrests, 22) and there were 18 (1.2%) deaths. On univariate analysis, ACVE risk increased with age, lower serum bicarbonate, prolonged QTc interval, prior cardiac disease, and altered mental status. In a multivariable model adjusting for these factors as well as patient sex and hospital site, independent predictors were: QTc > 500 msec (3.8% prevalence, odds ratio [OR] 27.6), bicarbonate < 20 mEql/L (5.4% prevalence, OR 4.4), and prior cardiac disease (7.1% prevalence, OR 9.5). The derived prediction rule had 51.6% sensitivity, 93.7% specificity, and 97.1% negative predictive value; while presence of two or more risk factors had 90.9% positive predictive value. Conclusions The authors derived independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdose, which should be validated in future studies as a prediction rule in distinct patient populations and clinical settings. PMID:25903997

  4. The Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry - II (ASAP-II): a comparative study of psychiatric intensive care units in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Schoevers, Robert; van Wijk, Cecile Gijsbers; Mulder, Wijnand; Hornbach, Annett; Barkhof, Emile; Klaassen, André; van Egmond, Marieke; van Venrooij, Janine; Bijpost, Yan; Nusselder, Hans; van Herrewaarden, Marjan; Maksimovic, Igor; Achilles, Alexander; Dekker, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Background The number of patients in whom mental illness progresses to stages in which acute, and often forced treatment is warranted, is on the increase across Europe. As a consequence, more patients are involuntarily admitted to Psychiatric Intensive Care Units (PICU). From several studies and reports it has become evident that important dissimilarities exist between PICU's. The current study seeks to describe organisational as well as clinical and patient related factors across ten PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region, adjusted for or stratified by level of urbanization. Method/Design This paper describes the design of the Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry II (ASAP-II). This study is a prospective observational cohort study comparing PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region on various patient characteristics, treatment aspects and recovery related variables. Dissimilarities were measured by means of collecting standardized forms which were filled out in the framework of care as usual, by means of questionnaires filled out by mental health care professionals and by means of extracting data from patient files for every consecutive patient admitted at participating PICU's during a specific time period. Urbanization levels for every PICU were calculated conform procedures as proposed by the Dutch Central Bureau for Statistics (CBS). Discussion The current study may provide a deeper understanding of the differences between psychiatric intensive care units that can be used to promote best practice and benchmarking procedures, and thus improve the standard of care. PMID:19725981

  5. [What should general hospital psychiatry do in a community?].

    PubMed

    Takehisa, Takahashi

    2003-01-01

    Some experiences in Nagano Red Cross hospital and Nagano Prefecture are presented, and the role of general hospital psychiatry (GHP) in a community is discussed. Psychiatric services in Nagano prefecture with population 2.21 million consist of four blocks. Our unit is in north block, providing treatment for acute phase and, in 2000, 1504 cases were new outpatients, daily outpatients were 198 cases and new inpatients were 604 cases including 146 emergency inpatients. In fiscal 2001, 25.6% of notifications of involuntary hospitalization from all psychiatric hospitals were submitted from GHP occupying 12.9% psychiatric beds, and 129 notifications from our unit were largest in Nagano prefecture. Total 7 GHPs with beds are presented by some data, suggesting two types as GHP. One type has relatively many new inpatients by small beds with short-term hospitalization like our GHP, and another type has relatively small new inpatients by large beds with long-term hospitalization like conventional mental hospital. It is necessary for GHP to pursue the former type, and to functionally differentiate from psychiatric hospital. Results of psychiatric emergency system in Nagano prefecture are presented. Designated hospitals are our GHP with 60 beds in north block, Prefectural Hospital with 310 beds in south block, National Sanatorium with 280 beds in east block and rotating 5 psychiatric hospitals with total 968 beds in west block. GHP with 60 beds hospitalized more emergency new cases than other psychiatric hospitals with large beds and discharged 84% of emergency inpatients to their home. Recently, short-term hospitalization of general hospital beds has rapidly progressed, and shared goal settings are needed, and treatment plans with teamwork by various types of experts have started from community-based home care. This teamwork will be expected throughout community psychiatric services. Although until today GHP's ward unit is financially disadvantageous, patients anticipate

  6. [Acute kidney insufficiency of obstetric origin. Experience at the Santo Tomas Hospital (1966-1981)].

    PubMed

    Díaz, J H; de Gordón, G; Hernández, L; Medina, R

    1990-01-01

    The authors review 24 cases of acute renal failure of obstetric etiology occurred in Hospital Santo Tomás, which represents a frequency of 1.375/10,000, with a bimodal distribution and the main causes were toxemia of pregnancy and sepsis. All cases were of the oliguric type and a kidney biopsy was performed in 17 cases, revealing an acute tubular necrosis in 16 and a diffuse cortical necrosis in the other case. Two patients (8.3%) died and one did not received nephrology treatment as the other 23 patients. The fetal mortality was 37.5% and the Apgar was good in 2, fair in one and bad in 2. A 50% of the complications were infections and nine patients tolerated different surgical procedures after the installation of the acute renal failure. The follow-up of 12 patients shows no evidence of renal failure.

  7. Health Literacy and Mortality: A Cohort Study of Patients Hospitalized for Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Candace D; Cawthon, Courtney; Kripalani, Sunil; Liu, Dandan; Storrow, Alan B; Roumie, Christianne L

    2015-01-01

    Background More than 30% of patients hospitalized for heart failure are rehospitalized or die within 90 days of discharge. Lower health literacy is associated with mortality among outpatients with chronic heart failure; little is known about this relationship after hospitalization for acute heart failure. Methods and Results Patients hospitalized for acute heart failure and discharged home between November 2010 and June 2013 were followed through December 31, 2013. Nurses administered the Brief Health Literacy Screen at admission; low health literacy was defined as Brief Health Literacy Screen ≤9. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were time to first rehospitalization and, separately, time to first emergency department visit within 90 days of discharge. Cox proportional hazards models determined their relationships with health literacy, adjusting for age, gender, race, insurance, education, comorbidity, and hospital length of stay. For the 1379 patients, average age was 63.1 years, 566 (41.0%) were female, and 324 (23.5%) had low health literacy. Median follow-up was 20.7 months (interquartile range 12.8 to 29.6 months), and 403 (29.2%) patients died. Adjusted hazard ratio for death among patients with low health literacy was 1.34 (95% CI 1.04, 1.73, P=0.02) compared to Brief Health Literacy Screen >9. Within 90 days of discharge, there were 415 (30.1%) rehospitalizations and 201 (14.6%) emergency department visits, with no evident association with health literacy. Conclusions Lower health literacy was associated with increased risk of death after hospitalization for acute heart failure. There was no evident relationship between health literacy and 90-day rehospitalization or emergency department visits. PMID:25926328

  8. Quality of Life of Patients After an Acute Coronary Event: Hospital Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Cristiane Maria Carvalho Costa; Macedo, Luciana Bilitario; Gomes, Lilian Tapioca Jones Cunha; de Oliveira, Paula Luzia Seixas Pereira; Albuquerque, Iana Verena Santana; Lemos, Amanda Queiroz; Brasil, Cristina Aires; Prado, Eloisa Pires Ferreira; Macedo, Pedro Santiago; de Oliveira, Francisco Tiago Oliveira; dos Reis, Helena Franca Correia; Darze, Eduardo Sahade; Guimaraes, Armenio Costa

    2014-01-01

    Background The acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has a high morbi-mortality rate, including physical deficiencies and functional limitations with impact on quality of life. Cardiovascular rehabilitation 1 (CVR1) should begin as early as possible, to enable improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. Previous studies have shown association of cardiovascular diseases with quality of life, in which depression and anxiety are the domains most altered. The aim of the study is to verify the impact of an acute coronary event on quality of life at the moment of hospital discharge. Methodology This was a cross-sectional study, with ACS patients hospitalized in ICU of a private hospital in the city of Salvador, Brazil, submitted to CVR1. The quality of life questionnaire Euroqol-5D was applied on discharge from hospital. Patients included in the study were those with ACV, who had medical permission to walk, had not been submitted to acute surgical treatment, were time and space oriented, and over the age of 18 years. Patients excluded from the study were those with cognitive, orthopedic and neurological problems, who used orthesis on a lower limb, and were in any condition of risk at the time of beginning with CVR1. Data were collected by a previously trained ICU team. Results Data were collected of 63 patients who revealed compromise in the domains of pain/feeling ill (20.63%) and anxiety/depression (38.09%). Statistical significance was observed in the association between sex and pain/feeling ill (P < 0.01), sex and anxiety/depression (P < 0.01), diabetes and mobility (P < 0.01), hereditary factors and anxiety/depression (p < 0.01), BMI and pain/feeling ill (P < 0.01). Conclusion In this sample of patients, on discharge from hospital after ACS, the pain/feeling ill and anxiety/depression domains were shown to be compromised. PMID:25110540

  9. Using Discrete Event Computer Simulation to Improve Patient Flow in a Ghanaian Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Best, Allyson M.; Dixon, Cinnamon A.; Kelton, W. David; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Crowding and limited resources have increased the strain on acute care facilities and emergency departments (EDs) worldwide. These problems are particularly prevalent in developing countries. Discrete event simulation (DES) is a computer-based tool that can be used to estimate how changes to complex healthcare delivery systems, such as EDs, will affect operational performance. Using this modality, our objective was to identify operational interventions that could potentially improve patient throughput of one acute care setting in a developing country. Methods We developed a simulation model of acute care at a district level hospital in Ghana to test the effects of resource-neutral (e.g. modified staff start times and roles) and resource-additional (e.g. increased staff) operational interventions on patient throughput. Previously captured, de-identified time-and-motion data from 487 acute care patients were used to develop and test the model. The primary outcome was the modeled effect of interventions on patient length of stay (LOS). Results The base-case (no change) scenario had a mean LOS of 292 minutes (95% CI 291, 293). In isolation, neither adding staffing, changing staff roles, nor varying shift times affected overall patient LOS. Specifically, adding two registration workers, history takers, and physicians resulted in a 23.8 (95% CI 22.3, 25.3) minute LOS decrease. However, when shift start-times were coordinated with patient arrival patterns, potential mean LOS was decreased by 96 minutes (95% CI 94, 98); and with the simultaneous combination of staff roles (Registration and History-taking) there was an overall mean LOS reduction of 152 minutes (95% CI 150, 154). Conclusions Resource-neutral interventions identified through DES modeling have the potential to improve acute care throughput in this Ghanaian municipal hospital. DES offers another approach to identifying potentially effective interventions to improve patient flow in emergency and acute

  10. A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Updates.

    PubMed

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Anderson, Deverick J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Calfee, David P; Dubberke, Erik R; Ellingson, Katherine D; Gerding, Dale N; Haas, Janet P; Kaye, Keith S; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Salgado, Cassandra D; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M; Fishman, Neil O; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2014-08-01

    Since the publication of "A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals" in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS).

  11. Plasma glucose, lactate, sodium, and potassium levels in children hospitalized with acute alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Tõnisson, Mailis; Tillmann, Vallo; Kuudeberg, Anne; Väli, Marika

    2010-09-01

    The aim of our research was to study prevalence of changes in plasma levels of lactate, potassium, glucose, and sodium in relation to alcohol concentration in children hospitalized with acute alcohol intoxication (AAI). Data from 194 under 18-year-old children hospitalized to the two only children's hospital in Estonia over a 2-year period were analyzed. The pediatrician on call filled in a special form on the clinical symptoms of AAI; a blood sample was drawn for biochemical tests, and a urine sample taken to exclude narcotic intoxication. The most common finding was hyperlactinemia occurring in 66% of the patients (n=128) followed by hypokalemia (<3.5 mmol/L) in 50% (n=97), and glucose above of reference value (>6.1 mmol/L) in 40.2% of the children (n=78). Hypernatremia was present in five children. In conclusion, hyperlactinemia, hypokalemia, and glucose levels above of reference value are common biochemical findings in children hospitalized with acute AAI. PMID:20846615

  12. Acute procedural complications and in-hospital events after percutaneous coronary interventions Eptifibatide versus Abciximab

    SciTech Connect

    Ajani, Andrew E.; Waksman, Ron; Gruberg, Luis; Sharma, Arvind K.; Lew, Robert; Pinnow, Ellen; Canos, Daniel A.; Cheneau, Edouard; Castagna, Marco; Satler, Lowell; Pichard, Augusto; Kent, Kenneth M

    2003-03-01

    Background: Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists reduce peri-angioplasty ischemic complications and improve in-hospital outcome in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Prior studies have demonstrated favorable results with both eptifibatide and abciximab. The purpose of this study was to assess whether there are any differences in rates of acute procedural complications and in-hospital events with the use of these two agents. Methods: A retrospective review of 359 elective PCIs from June 1998 to August 2000 identified 152 PCIs treated with eptifibatide (bolus 180 {mu}g/kg, infusion 2 {mu}g/kg/min for 12-48 h) and 205 PCIs treated with abciximab (bolus 0.25 mg/kg, infusion 10 {mu}g/min for 12 h). All patients received IIb/IIIa antagonists at the initiation of the intervention. Results: The clinical demographics, the angiographic morphology, the indications, and the procedural details were similar in both groups. In the eptifibatide group, the maximum ACT was lower (235{+-}45 vs. 253{+-}40, P<.0001). The incidence of major procedural and in-hospital events was compared. Eptifibatide and abciximab had similar rates of major complications (death or myocardial infarction) (1.4% vs. 2.9%), repeat PTCA (3.4% vs. 1.9%), and major bleeding (3.3% vs. 4.3%). Conclusions: Eptifibatide is comparable to abciximab in regards to acute procedural complications and in-hospital events after PCI.

  13. A compendium of strategies to prevent healthcare-associated infections in acute care hospitals: 2014 updates.

    PubMed

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Anderson, Deverick J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Calfee, David P; Dubberke, Erik R; Ellingson, Katherine D; Gerding, Dale N; Haas, Janet P; Kaye, Keith S; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Salgado, Cassandra D; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M; Fishman, Neil O; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2014-08-01

    Since the publication of "A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals" in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS).

  14. The Conscientious Practice Policy: a futility policy for acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Mark R

    2005-08-01

    Much attention has been paid in recent years to the conflict that may occur when patients or their families insist on a therapy that the physician feels would be futile. In 1999 the Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs of the American Medical Association recommended that all health-care institutions adopt a policy on medical futility that follows a fair process. Development of such a policy has proved problematic for many hospitals. The Conscientious Practice Policy at Lawrence & Memorial Hospital was developed as a response to the AMA recommendation. It outlines a specific process to be followed in the event that a physician wishes to refuse to provide a requested therapy, whether that refusal is based on perceived futility or other concerns. The policy was subsequently modified slightly and adopted by two other Connecticut acute care hospitals.

  15. End-of-life care in an acute care hospital: linking policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

    2011-07-01

    The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be effective, health care professionals who provide hospital care will need to respond to its patient-centered purpose. Health services will also be called upon to train health care professionals to work with dying people in a more participatory way and to assist them to develop the clinical processes that support shared decision making. Health professionals who manage clinical workplaces become central in reshaping this practice environment by promoting patient-centered care policy objectives and restructuring health service systems to routinely incorporate patient and family preferences about care at key points in the patient's care episode.

  16. The effectiveness of wellness programs as a strategy for cost containment in acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ginn, Gregory O

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of hospital-based wellness programs in lowering both the acuity of illness of patients and the total expenses of acute care hospitals from a strategic management perspective. The subjects for this cross-sectional study were 164 community hospitals in 27 urban areas of Texas. The findings show that, after controlling for size, the number of wellness programs was significantly and negatively related to both the acuity of illness and total expenses. Further, the number of wellness programs offered did not vary significantly by type of ownership. The study concludes that reimbursement policies designed to provide financial incentives to promote wellness have been effective and suggests future directions for the evolution of health care management. PMID:15816225

  17. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2017 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Graduate Medical Education; Hospital Notification Procedures Applicable to Beneficiaries Receiving Observation Services; Technical Changes Relating to Costs to Organizations and Medicare Cost Reports; Finalization of Interim Final Rules With Comment Period on LTCH PPS Payments for Severe Wounds, Modifications of Limitations on Redesignation by the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board, and Extensions of Payments to MDHs and Low-Volume Hospitals. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2017. Some of these changes will implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform Act of 2013, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Notice of Observation Treatment and Implications for Care Eligibility Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are providing the estimated market basket update to apply to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2017. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2017. In addition, we are making changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education payments; establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific Medicare providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities), including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program; implementing statutory provisions that require hospitals and CAHs to furnish notification to Medicare beneficiaries, including Medicare Advantage enrollees, when the beneficiaries receive outpatient observation services for more than 24 hours; announcing the implementation of the Frontier Community Health Integration Project Demonstration; and

  18. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2017 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Graduate Medical Education; Hospital Notification Procedures Applicable to Beneficiaries Receiving Observation Services; Technical Changes Relating to Costs to Organizations and Medicare Cost Reports; Finalization of Interim Final Rules With Comment Period on LTCH PPS Payments for Severe Wounds, Modifications of Limitations on Redesignation by the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board, and Extensions of Payments to MDHs and Low-Volume Hospitals. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2017. Some of these changes will implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform Act of 2013, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Notice of Observation Treatment and Implications for Care Eligibility Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are providing the estimated market basket update to apply to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2017. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2017. In addition, we are making changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education payments; establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific Medicare providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities), including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program; implementing statutory provisions that require hospitals and CAHs to furnish notification to Medicare beneficiaries, including Medicare Advantage enrollees, when the beneficiaries receive outpatient observation services for more than 24 hours; announcing the implementation of the Frontier Community Health Integration Project Demonstration; and

  19. Patients' own statements of their future risk for violent and self-harm behaviour: a prospective inpatient and post-discharge follow-up study in an acute psychiatric unit.

    PubMed

    Roaldset, John Olav; Bjørkly, Stål

    2010-06-30

    Recently patients' responsibility for and ownership of their own treatment have been emphasised. A literature search on patients'' structured self-reported assessment of future risk of violent, suicidal or self mutilating behaviour failed to disclose any published empirical research. The present prospective naturalistic study comprised all involuntary and voluntary acutely admitted patients (n=489) to a psychiatric hospital during one year. Patients' self-reported risks of violence and self-harm at admission and at discharge were compared with episodes recorded during hospital stay and 3 months post-discharge. Patients' predictions were significant concerning violent, suicidal and self-injurious behaviour, with AUC values of 0.73 (95%CI=0.61-0.85), 0.92 (95%CI=0.88-0.96) and 0.82 (95%CI=0.67-0.98) for hospital stay, and 0.67 (95%CI=0.58-0.76), 0.63 (95%CI=0.55-0.72) and 0.66 (95%CI=0.57-0.76) after 3 months, respectively. Moderate or higher risk predictions remained significant in multivariate analysis, and risk of violence even after gender stratification. Self-harm predictions were significant for women. Moderate or higher risk scores remained significant predictors of violence one year post-discharge. Controlling for readmissions the results remained the same. Low sensitivity limits the clinical value, but relatively high positive predictive values might be clinically important. Still future research is recommended to explore if self prediction is a valid adjuvant method to established risk assessment procedures.

  20. Family influence and psychiatric care: Physical treatments in Devon mental hospitals, c. 1920 to the 1970s☆

    PubMed Central

    Baur, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    ‘What is it that appears to make the mentally ill so vulnerable to therapeutic experimentation?’1 One commentator wrote in the 1990s, regarding mental hospitals as repressive, coercive and custodial institutions where medical staff subjected patients to orgies of experimentation. A careful study of surviving documents of the Devon County Lunatic Asylum (DCLA), however, paints a different picture. Rather than medical staff, patients’ relatives and the wider community exercised a considerable influence over a patient's hospital admission and discharge, rendering the therapeutic regime in the middle of the 20th century the result of intense negotiations between the hospital and third parties. PMID:23876990

  1. Young Hispanic Women Experience Higher In-Hospital Mortality Following an Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Fátima; Foody, JoAnne M; Wang, Yun; López, Lenny

    2015-01-01

    Background Although mortality rates for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have declined for men and women, prior studies have reported a sex gap in mortality such that younger women were most likely to die after an AMI. Methods and Results We sought to explore the impact of race and ethnicity on the sex gap in AMI patterns of care and mortality for younger women in a contemporary patient cohort. We constructed multivariable hierarchical logistic regression models to examine trends in AMI hospitalizations, procedures, and in-hospital mortality by sex, age (<65 and ≥65 years), and race/ethnicity (white, black, and Hispanic). Analyses were derived from 194 071 patients who were hospitalized for an AMI with available race and ethnicity data from the 2009–2010 National Inpatient Sample. Hospitalization rates, procedures (coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary interventions, and cardiac bypass surgery), and inpatient mortality were analyzed across age, sex, and race/ethnic groups. There was significant variation in hospitalization rates by age and race/ethnicity. All racial/ethnic groups were less likely to undergo invasive procedures compared with white men (P<0.001). After adjustment for comorbidities, younger Hispanic women experienced higher in-hospital mortality compared with younger white men, with an odds ratio of 1.5 (95% CI 1.2 to 1.9), adjusted for age and comorbidities. Conclusion We found significant racial and sex disparities in AMI hospitalizations, care patterns, and mortality, with higher in-hospital mortality experienced by younger Hispanic women. Future studies are necessary to explore determinants of these significant racial and sex disparities in outcomes for AMI. PMID:26353998

  2. The Clinical Course of Cirrhosis Patients Hospitalized for Acute Hepatic Deterioration: A Prospective Bicentric Study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; Yan, Huadong; Zhou, Zhibo; Fang, Hong; Li, Jiawei; Ye, Honghua; Sun, Wenjie; Zhou, Wenhong; Ye, Jingfen; Yang, Qiao; Yang, Ying; Hu, Yaoren; Chen, Zhi; Sheng, Jifang

    2015-11-01

    Patients with cirrhosis are vulnerable to acute hepatic insults and are more likely to develop rapid hepatic deterioration. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical course of patients with cirrhosis and hospitalized for acute hepatic deterioration (AHD).This is a prospective study involving 163 patients with cirrhosis and AHD. The occurrence of organ failures, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and infections during hospital stay were recorded and the relationship between organ failure and death or SIRS/infection was subsequently analyzed.Of 163 patients, 35 did not develop any organ failure during in-hospital follow-ups (90-day mortality: 0%); 84 had intrahepatic organ failures (IH-OFs, defined by liver and/or coagulation failure) (90-day mortality: 22.0%); and 44 patients developed extra-hepatic organ failures (EH-OFs, defined by kidney, cerebral, circulation, and respiratory failure) on the basis of IH-OF with a 90-day mortality of 90.9%. On multivariable analysis by a Cox proportion hazard model, age, WBC, presence of IH-OF, and EH-OF all predicted 90-day death. A logistic regression analysis identified SIRS being associated with the development of EH-OF. Furthermore, IH-OF at admission and infections occurred during the hospital stay were shown to be another 2 potential risk factors.The clinical course of cirrhosis patients with acute hepatic injury was characterized by 3 consecutive stages (AHD, IH-OF, and EH-OF), which provided a clear risk stratification. The PIRO criteria provided an accurate frame for prognostication of those patients. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome may be a target for blocking the progression to the EH-OF stage.

  3. The Clinical Course of Cirrhosis Patients Hospitalized for Acute Hepatic Deterioration

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yu; Yan, Huadong; Zhou, Zhibo; Fang, Hong; Li, Jiawei; Ye, Honghua; Sun, Wenjie; Zhou, Wenhong; Ye, Jingfen; Yang, Qiao; Yang, Ying; Hu, Yaoren; Chen, Zhi; Sheng, Jifang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with cirrhosis are vulnerable to acute hepatic insults and are more likely to develop rapid hepatic deterioration. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical course of patients with cirrhosis and hospitalized for acute hepatic deterioration (AHD). This is a prospective study involving 163 patients with cirrhosis and AHD. The occurrence of organ failures, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and infections during hospital stay were recorded and the relationship between organ failure and death or SIRS/infection was subsequently analyzed. Of 163 patients, 35 did not develop any organ failure during in-hospital follow-ups (90-day mortality: 0%); 84 had intrahepatic organ failures (IH-OFs, defined by liver and/or coagulation failure) (90-day mortality: 22.0%); and 44 patients developed extra-hepatic organ failures (EH-OFs, defined by kidney, cerebral, circulation, and respiratory failure) on the basis of IH-OF with a 90-day mortality of 90.9%. On multivariable analysis by a Cox proportion hazard model, age, WBC, presence of IH-OF, and EH-OF all predicted 90-day death. A logistic regression analysis identified SIRS being associated with the development of EH-OF. Furthermore, IH-OF at admission and infections occurred during the hospital stay were shown to be another 2 potential risk factors. The clinical course of cirrhosis patients with acute hepatic injury was characterized by 3 consecutive stages (AHD, IH-OF, and EH-OF), which provided a clear risk stratification. The PIRO criteria provided an accurate frame for prognostication of those patients. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome may be a target for blocking the progression to the EH-OF stage. PMID:26632701

  4. Precipitating Factors for Acute Heart Failure Hospitalization and Long-Term Survival.

    PubMed

    Berkovitch, Anat; Maor, Elad; Sabbag, Avi; Chernomordik, Fernando; Elis, Avishay; Arbel, Yaron; Goldenberg, Ilan; Grossman, Ehud; Klempfner, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients have frequent exacerbations leading to high consumption of medical services and recurrent hospitalizations.Different precipitating factors have various effects on long-term survival.We investigated 2212 patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of either acute HF or acute exacerbation of chronic HF. Patients were divided into 2 primary precipitant groups: ischemic (N = 979 [46%]) and nonischemic (N = 1233 [54%]). The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality.Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the presence of a nonischemic precipitant was associated with a favorable in-hospital outcome (OR 0.64; CI 0.43-0.94), but with a significant increase in the risk of 10-year mortality (HR 1.12; CI 1.01-1.21). Consistently, the cumulative probability of 10-year mortality was significantly higher among patients with a nonischemic versus ischemic precipitant (83% vs 90%, respectively; Log-rank P value <0.001). Subgroup analysis showed that among the nonischemic precipitant, the presence of renal dysfunction and infection were both associated with poor short-term outcomes (OR 1.56, [P < 0.001] and OR 1.35 [P < 0.001], respectively), as well as long-term (HR 1.59 [P < 0.001] and HR 1.24 [P < 0.001], respectively).Identification of precipitating factors for acute HF hospitalization has important short- and long-term implications that can be used for improved risk stratification and management. PMID:26717369

  5. Social Work Discharge Planning in Acute Care Hospitals in Israel: Clients' Evaluation of the Discharge Planning Process and Adequacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soskolne, Varda; Kaplan, Giora; Ben-Shahar, Ilana; Stanger, Varda; Auslander, Gail. K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the associations of patients' characteristics, hospitalization factors, and the patients' or family assessment of the discharge planning process, with their evaluation of adequacy of the discharge plan. Method: A prospective study. Social workers from 11 acute care hospitals in Israel provided data on 1426 discharged…

  6. Risk-adjusted antibiotic consumption in 34 public acute hospitals in Ireland, 2006 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Oza, Ajay; Donohue, Fionnuala; Johnson, Howard; Cunney, Robert

    2016-01-01

    As antibiotic consumption rates between hospitals can vary depending on the characteristics of the patients treated, risk-adjustment that compensates for the patient-based variation is required to assess the impact of any stewardship measures. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of patient-based administrative data variables for adjusting aggregate hospital antibiotic consumption rates. Data on total inpatient antibiotics and six broad subclasses were sourced from 34 acute hospitals from 2006 to 2014. Aggregate annual patient administration data were divided into explanatory variables, including major diagnostic categories, for each hospital. Multivariable regression models were used to identify factors affecting antibiotic consumption. Coefficient of variation of the root mean squared errors (CV-RMSE) for the total antibiotic usage model was very good (11%), however, the value for two of the models was poor (> 30%). The overall inpatient antibiotic consumption increased from 82.5 defined daily doses (DDD)/100 bed-days used in 2006 to 89.2 DDD/100 bed-days used in 2014; the increase was not significant after risk-adjustment. During the same period, consumption of carbapenems increased significantly, while usage of fluoroquinolones decreased. In conclusion, patient-based administrative data variables are useful for adjusting hospital antibiotic consumption rates, although additional variables should also be employed. PMID:27541730

  7. Risk-adjusted antibiotic consumption in 34 public acute hospitals in Ireland, 2006 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Oza, Ajay; Donohue, Fionnuala; Johnson, Howard; Cunney, Robert

    2016-08-11

    As antibiotic consumption rates between hospitals can vary depending on the characteristics of the patients treated, risk-adjustment that compensates for the patient-based variation is required to assess the impact of any stewardship measures. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of patient-based administrative data variables for adjusting aggregate hospital antibiotic consumption rates. Data on total inpatient antibiotics and six broad subclasses were sourced from 34 acute hospitals from 2006 to 2014. Aggregate annual patient administration data were divided into explanatory variables, including major diagnostic categories, for each hospital. Multivariable regression models were used to identify factors affecting antibiotic consumption. Coefficient of variation of the root mean squared errors (CV-RMSE) for the total antibiotic usage model was very good (11%), however, the value for two of the models was poor (> 30%). The overall inpatient antibiotic consumption increased from 82.5 defined daily doses (DDD)/100 bed-days used in 2006 to 89.2 DDD/100 bed-days used in 2014; the increase was not significant after risk-adjustment. During the same period, consumption of carbapenems increased significantly, while usage of fluoroquinolones decreased. In conclusion, patient-based administrative data variables are useful for adjusting hospital antibiotic consumption rates, although additional variables should also be employed. PMID:27541730

  8. The impact of psychiatric comorbidity on Medicare reimbursement for inpatient medical care.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J; Daly, J; Golinger, R C

    1994-01-01

    Funding for psychiatric consultation-liaison (C-L) services has been a difficult problem. It has been suggested that the identification of psychiatric co-morbidities in Medicare patients on medical services could generate incremental hospital revenue by moving patients from a lower to a higher paying Diagnostic Related Group (DRG). This increased revenue could be used as a means of supporting the psychiatric C-L service. This study documents the financial impact of screening for and documenting psychiatric co-morbidities on a general acute medical service. We clinically assessed 100 consecutive Medicare admissions and found 25 psychiatric co-morbidities in 20 patients. In only one case did the psychiatric diagnosis result in moving the case to a higher DRG. However, the need for psychiatric consultation remains evident as there was significant lack of recognition and documentation of the psychiatric diagnoses by the medical team. The authors discuss both the financial and clinical implications of screening medical inpatients for psychiatric co-morbidities and propose directions for further studies in this area.

  9. The impact of psychiatric comorbidity on Medicare reimbursement for inpatient medical care.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J; Daly, J; Golinger, R C

    1994-01-01

    Funding for psychiatric consultation-liaison (C-L) services has been a difficult problem. It has been suggested that the identification of psychiatric co-morbidities in Medicare patients on medical services could generate incremental hospital revenue by moving patients from a lower to a higher paying Diagnostic Related Group (DRG). This increased revenue could be used as a means of supporting the psychiatric C-L service. This study documents the financial impact of screening for and documenting psychiatric co-morbidities on a general acute medical service. We clinically assessed 100 consecutive Medicare admissions and found 25 psychiatric co-morbidities in 20 patients. In only one case did the psychiatric diagnosis result in moving the case to a higher DRG. However, the need for psychiatric consultation remains evident as there was significant lack of recognition and documentation of the psychiatric diagnoses by the medical team. The authors discuss both the financial and clinical implications of screening medical inpatients for psychiatric co-morbidities and propose directions for further studies in this area. PMID:8039679

  10. Cost-effectiveness of Out-of-Hospital Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve; Ward, Matt; Penn-Ashman, Jerry; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2015-01-01

    Study objective We determine the cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compared with standard care for adults presenting to emergency medical services with acute respiratory failure. Methods We developed an economic model using a United Kingdom health care system perspective to compare the costs and health outcomes of out-of-hospital CPAP to standard care (inhospital noninvasive ventilation) when applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with acute respiratory failure. The model assigned each patient a probability of intubation or death, depending on the patient’s characteristics and whether he or she had out-of-hospital CPAP or standard care. The patients who survived accrued lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and health care costs according to their age and sex. Costs were accrued through intervention and hospital treatment costs, which depended on patient outcomes. All results were converted into US dollars, using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development purchasing power parities rates. Results Out-of-hospital CPAP was more effective than standard care but was also more expensive, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £20,514 per QALY ($29,720/QALY) and a 49.5% probability of being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold. The probability of out-of-hospital CPAP’s being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold depended on the incidence of eligible patients and varied from 35.4% when a low estimate of incidence was used to 93.8% with a high estimate. Variation in the incidence of eligible patients also had a marked influence on the expected value of sample information for a future randomized trial. Conclusion The cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital CPAP is uncertain. The incidence of patients eligible for out-of-hospital CPAP appears to be the key determinant of cost-effectiveness. PMID:25737210

  11. A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Updates

    PubMed Central

    Yokoe, Deborah S.; Anderson, Deverick J.; Berenholtz, Sean M.; Calfee, David P.; Dubberke, Erik R.; Ellingson, Katherine D.; Gerding, Dale N.; Haas, Janet P.; Kaye, Keith S.; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A.; Nicolle, Lindsay E.; Salgado, Cassandra D.; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M.; Fishman, Neil O.; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A.; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A.; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M.; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J.; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A.; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L.

    2014-01-01

    Since the publication of “A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals” in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS). PMID:25026611

  12. Intranet usage and potential in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the Survey-2000 measuring Intranet and its potential in health care. The survey measured the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. Business-to-business electronic commerce and electronic commerce for customers were measured. Since the Intranet was not studied in survey-1997, no comparisons could be made. Therefore the results were presented and discussed. The Intranet data were compared with the Internet data and statistically significant differences were presented and analyzed. This information will assist hospitals to plan Internet and Intranet technology. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the Survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discusses the survey design and provides a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals.(1) The first article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2) The second article based upon the survey results discusses distribution of Internet usage and rating of Internet usage applied to specific applications. Homepages, advertising, and electronic commerce are discussed from an Internet perspective. PMID:11708394

  13. Acute pain management services: a comparison between Air Force and U.S. hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rayos, C L; McDonough, J P

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to assess the prevalence of acute pain management services (APMS) in Air Force medical facilities. There are no published reports on the current status of Air Force pain programs. This study used a telephone survey to all facilities worldwide that house an anesthesia department. Anesthesia providers in charge of pain services or department chiefs were interviewed from December 1996 to May 1997. Respondents were asked questions related to the initiation of a formal APMS, components, and familiarity with the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research guidelines on pain management. Data analysis described current practices and used chi 2 analysis to compare results with a national study of U.S. hospitals. Air Force anesthesia departments (45%) had established as many acute pain services as U.S. hospitals (42%). Formal pain programs are becoming more prevalent in Air Force hospitals. These findings suggest an increased awareness of the need for pain management and future establishment of pain programs.

  14. The use of acute hospital services by elderly residents of nursing and residential care homes.

    PubMed

    Godden, S; Pollock, A M

    2001-11-01

    The objective of this study was to compare hospitalisation rates by cause of admission, hospital death rates and length of stay for residents from nursing and residential care homes with those in the community. This is a retrospective study of acute hospital emergency admissions in one health district, Merton, Sutton and Wandsworth between April 1996 and March 1997. Data linkage and manual look up were used to derive emergency hospital admissions for residents of care homes aged 65 and over. Admission rates were calculated for cause, length of stay and hospital death for residents of care homes and in the community with relative risks. The relative risk of emergency admission from a care home compared with the community was 1.39 for all diagnoses, 2.68 for all injuries, and 3.96 for fracture of neck of femur. The relative risk of dying in hospital for care home residents was 2.58 overall, and 3.64 in the first 48 hours of a hospital stay (all P-values <0.0001). Admission rates were higher from residential than from nursing homes. There was some increase in admissions from homes during holiday periods and over Christmas. In conclusion, there are major difficulties in monitoring admissions from nursing and residential care homes due to poor quality recording and inaccuracies in NHS coding. This was compounded by an absence of data on the age and sex profile and healthcare needs of the resident population in care homes. Prospective studies are required to ascertain when admission is avoidable and when it is appropriate. The information strategy needs to ensure that routine data sources are capable of monitoring the use of hospital services by residents of care homes.

  15. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  16. Transporting Forensic Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Dike, Charles C; Nicholson, Elizabeth; Young, John L

    2015-12-01

    Patients in a forensic psychiatric facility often require escorted transport to medical facilities for investigations or treatments of physical health ailments. Transporting these patients presents significant safety and custody challenges because of the nature of patients housed in forensic psychiatric facilities. A significant proportion of these patients may be transfers from the Department of Corrections (DOC) under legal mandates for psychiatric evaluation and treatment better provided in a hospital setting, and most of them will return to the DOC. Although departments of correction have protocols for escorting these potentially dangerous individuals, it is unclear whether receiving psychiatric hospitals have established procedures for maintaining the safety of others and custody of these individuals during transportation outside the hospital facility. The literature is sparse on precautions to be observed when transporting dangerous forensic psychiatric patients, including those with high escape risk. In this article, we describe one forensic inpatient facility's procedure for determining the appropriate level needed to transport these individuals outside of the forensic facility. We also describe the risk assessment procedure for determining level of transport. These are quality improvement measures resulting from a critical review of an incident of escape from the forensic facility several years ago.

  17. Transporting Forensic Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Dike, Charles C; Nicholson, Elizabeth; Young, John L

    2015-12-01

    Patients in a forensic psychiatric facility often require escorted transport to medical facilities for investigations or treatments of physical health ailments. Transporting these patients presents significant safety and custody challenges because of the nature of patients housed in forensic psychiatric facilities. A significant proportion of these patients may be transfers from the Department of Corrections (DOC) under legal mandates for psychiatric evaluation and treatment better provided in a hospital setting, and most of them will return to the DOC. Although departments of correction have protocols for escorting these potentially dangerous individuals, it is unclear whether receiving psychiatric hospitals have established procedures for maintaining the safety of others and custody of these individuals during transportation outside the hospital facility. The literature is sparse on precautions to be observed when transporting dangerous forensic psychiatric patients, including those with high escape risk. In this article, we describe one forensic inpatient facility's procedure for determining the appropriate level needed to transport these individuals outside of the forensic facility. We also describe the risk assessment procedure for determining level of transport. These are quality improvement measures resulting from a critical review of an incident of escape from the forensic facility several years ago. PMID:26668224

  18. Hepatic Dysfunction in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Thyrotoxicosis: A Decade of Experience

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Richard M.; Dean, Diana S.; Barsness, Gregory W.

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid disease is a common condition, and thyroid hormone excess or deficiency is known to have wide-ranging effects on a variety of organ systems. Our objective is to describe the magnitude, biochemical features, and clinical characteristics of hepatic abnormalities in patients with acute thyrotoxicosis. We performed a retrospective review of all patients admitted to our institution between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2008 with a discharge diagnosis of acute thyrotoxicosis excluding iatrogenic causes. The records of these patients were reviewed and data extracted regarding demographic, biochemical, and clinical data particularly relevant to liver function. Fourteen patients were identified of which eleven had liver studies performed. The majority (90.9%) had Graves disease. Nine of eleven patients (81.8%) had some degree of hepatic abnormality. Seven patients (63.6%) had an elevation in one or both transaminases, and two (18.2%) had isolated synthetic dysfunction as manifested as an elevated INR and/or decreased albumin without transaminitis. The mean magnitude of deviation from the normal range was greater in the transaminases as compared to bilirubin, INR, or albumin. Definitive treatment was radioiodine ablation in six cases (54.5%) and surgical thyroidectomy in two cases (18.2%). Noniatrogenic acute thyrotoxicosis requiring hospitalization is a rare condition which is most frequently caused by Graves disease. The majority of patients have disordered liver tests of a highly variable nature, making the recognition of this association important in the care of patients presenting with acute thyrotoxicosis. PMID:23251814

  19. Nutritional assessment of patients with acute leukemia during induction chemotherapy: association with hospital outcomes.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Ali; Ghoreishi, Zohreh; Abedi Miran, Mahdi; Sanaat, Zohreh; Ostadrahimi, Alireza; Eivazi Ziaei, Jamal; Ghayour Nahand, Mousa; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Sorusheh, Yashar; Esmaili, Heidarali

    2014-08-01

    Cancer-related malnutrition causes morbidity and reduced survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional and inflammatory status of patients with acute leukemia in association with duration of neutropenic fever (DNF) and length of hospital stay (LHS) during induction chemotherapy. Fifty-five patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n = 28) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 27) completed the study. There were significant differences between the two groups according to LHS and DNF (p = 0.022 and p = 0.012, respectively): both had a longer period in patients with AML. The patients were statistically different according to body mass index (BMI), pre-albumin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and patient-generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) score (p = 0.049, p = 0.028, p < 0.001, p = 0.030). In patients with ALL, serum albumin and pre-albumin levels were associated with LHS and DNF, respectively. Moreover, PG-SGA score was associated with DNF. In patients with AML, BMI and second pre-albumin level < 10 mg/dL were associated with DNF. Pre-albumin was the common indicator for chemotherapy-related complications in patients with both ALL and AML. Early nutritional assessment can help to find patients with acute leukemia who need nutritional support, and it may contribute to better outcome and less toxicity.

  20. Acute Care For Elders Units Produced Shorter Hospital Stays At Lower Cost While Maintaining Patients’ Functional Status

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Deborah E.; Palmer, Robert M.; Kresevic, Denise M.; Fortinsky, Richard H.; Kowal, Jerome; Chren, Mary-Margaret; Landefeld, C. Seth

    2013-01-01

    Acute Care for Elders Units offer enhanced care for older adults in specially designed hospital units. The care is delivered by interdisciplinary teams, which can include geriatricians, advanced practice nurses, social workers, pharmacists, and physical therapists. In a randomized controlled trial of 1,632 elderly patients, length-of-stay was significantly shorter—6.7 days per patient versus 7.3 days per patient—among those receiving care in the Acute Care for Elders Unit compared to usual care. This difference produced lower total inpatient costs—$9,477 per patient versus $10,451 per patient—while maintaining patients’ functional abilities and not increasing hospital readmission rates. The practices of Acute Care for Elders Units, and the principles they embody, can provide hospitals with effective strategies for lowering costs while preserving quality of care for hospitalized elders. PMID:22665834

  1. Prolonged stays in hospital acute geriatric care units: identification and analysis of causes.

    PubMed

    Parent, Vivien; Ludwig-Béal, Stéphanie; Sordet-Guépet, Hélène; Popitéan, Laura; Camus, Agnès; Da Silva, Sofia; Lubrano, Anne; Laissus, Frederick; Vaillard, Laurence; Manckoundia, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    In France, the population of very old frail patients, who require appropriate high-quality care, is increasing. Given the current economic climate, the mean duration of hospitalization (MDH) needs to be optimized. This prospective study analyzed the causes of prolonged hospitalization in an acute geriatric care unit. Over 6 months, all patients admitted to the target acute geriatric care unit were included and distributed into two groups according to a threshold stay of 14 days: long MDH group (LMDHG) and short MDH group (SMDHG). These two groups were compared. 757 patients were included. The LMDHG comprised 442 with a mean age of 86.7 years, of whom 67.65% were women and the SMDHG comprised 315 with a mean age of 86.6 years, of whom 63.2% were women. The two groups were statistically similar for age, sex, living conditions at home (alone or not, help), medical history and number of drugs. Patients in the LMDHG were more dependent (p=0.005), and were more likely to be hospitalized for social reasons (p=0.024) and to have come from their homes (p=0.011) than those in the SMDHG. The reasons for the prolonged stay, more frequent in the LMDHG than the SMDHG (p<0.05), were principally: waiting for imaging examinations, medical complications, and waiting for discharge solutions, assistance from social workers and/or specialist consultations. In order to reduce the MDH in acute geriatric care unit, it is necessary to consider the particularities of the patients who are admitted, their medico-socio-psychological management, access to technical facilities/consultations and post-discharge accommodation. PMID:27277146

  2. Time to rehospitalization in patients with major depression vs. those with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder in a public psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Hua; Chen, Ming-Chao; Chou, Li-Shiu; Lin, Chieh-Hsin; Chen, Cheng-Chung; Lane, Hsien-Yuan

    2010-12-30

    Compared rehospitalization rates in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder to patients with major depressive disorder remains unclear. This study aimed to compare the time to rehospitalization of the three groups. Other clinical variables were also examined. Rehospitalization status was monitored for all admitted inpatients with schizophrenia (n=637), bipolar I disorder (n=197), or major depressive disorder (n=191), from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2006. Time to rehospitalization within 1 year after discharge was measured using the Kaplan-Meier method. Risk factors associated with rehospitalization were examined using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. The three groups were comparable for comorbid alcohol abuse/dependence, family history of severe psychiatric illness, years of education, and number of previous hospitalizations. No significant differences were noted among the three groups for the time to rehospitalization or the time to discontinuation. Age onset and number of previous admission were associated with risks of rehospitalization. This study suggests that the major depressive disorder, schizophrenia, and bipolar I disorder have comparable influences on time to rehospitalization and discontinuation from treatment and that earlier onset of illness and more previous hospitalizations are associated with higher risks of rehospitalization. Further prospective research is warranted. PMID:20494450

  3. Why are some patients admitted to psychiatric hospital while others are not? A study assessing risk during the admission interview and relationship to outcome.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Glenn E; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; O'Connor, Nick; Cleary, Michelle

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine what patient characteristics are used to decide whether a patient is or is not admitted to a psychiatric hospital, and what happens to those not admitted. A further aim was to determine if high levels of risk on admission predict seclusions, length of stay, or readmission within 28 days. Data were collected prospectively on consecutive presentations to an admission office via case notes and electronic databases. Eighty percent (100/127) of the adults presenting to the admission office over a typical month were admitted to hospital. Patients were more likely to be admitted if they were experiencing psychosis or exacerbation of schizophrenia, referred by other doctors or mental health teams, had a legal reason for referral, or if they were homeless. There was no association between risk for violence or suicide and seclusion rates, length of stay, or being readmitted within 28 days. It was reassuring to find that 85% of those not admitted were referred to other mental health providers, and none required admission over the following month. This study found high rates of seclusion and readmissions within 1 year, which requires further study to find strategies to reduce these rates. PMID:22039923

  4. Dissection of the prongs of ALI. A retrospective assessment of criminal responsibility by the psychiatric staff of the Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center.

    PubMed

    Silver, S B; Spodak, M K

    1983-01-01

    The staff of the Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center has systematically reassessed the impact of the proposed modification of the ALI test removing the second prong. Findings of this retrospective survey reveal few changes in the composite staff opinions reported by the hospital but many variations in the opinions of individual psychiatrists when rating the prongs independently. The effect of these changes in Maryland (while difficult to anticipate) might be an increase in litigation. The resulting fiscal impact, therefore, not only could affect the Division of Corrections but also could increase court costs. The data suggest that rather than limiting psychiatric testimony and ensuring that only the sickest patients are exculpated, the proposed truncation of ALI may have paradoxical consequences. There may be more frequent battles of the experts based on less rigorous science and potential exclusion of affective psychosis from appropriate access to the defense of insanity. While the study methods and sample size prohibit reliable conclusions concerning the likelihood of these consequences in vivo, the issues raised strongly support a need for further investigation before a relatively well-functioning legal framework is changed in favor of the untested rubric of the proposed modifications of ALI.

  5. Problems, solutions and actions: addressing barriers in acute hospital care for indigenous Australians and New Zealanders.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Patricia M; MacIsaac, Andrew; Cameron, James; Jeremy, Richmond; Mahar, Leo; Anderson, Ian

    2012-10-01

    The burden of cardiovascular disease for Indigenous people in Australia and New Zealand is high and reflects the failings of our health care system to meet their needs. Improving the hospital care for Indigenous people is critical in improving health outcomes. This paper provides the results from a facilitated discussion on the disparities in acute hospital care and workforce issues. The workshop was held in Alice Springs, Australia at the second Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ) Indigenous Cardiovascular Health Conference. Critical issues to be addressed include: addressing systemic racism; reconfiguring models of care to address the needs of Indigenous people; cultural competence training for all health professionals; increasing participation of Indigenous people in the health workforce; improving information systems and facilitating communication across the health care sector and with Indigenous communities.

  6. Geographic variation of failure-to-rescue in public acute hospitals in New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Assareh, Hassan; Ou, Lixin; Chen, Jack; Hillman, Kenneth; Flabouris, Arthas; Hollis, Stephanie J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide acceptance of Failure-to-Rescue (FTR) as a patient safety indicator (defined as the deaths among surgical patients with treatable complications), no study has explored the geographic variation of FTR in a large health jurisdiction. Our study aimed to explore the spatiotemporal variations of FTR rates across New South Wales (NSW), Australia. We conducted a population-based study using all admitted surgical patients in public acute hospitals during 2002-2009 in NSW, Australia. We developed a spatiotemporal Poisson model using Integrated Nested Laplace Approximation (INLA) methods in a Bayesian framework to obtain area-specific adjusted relative risk. Local Government Area (LGA) was chosen as the areal unit. LGA-aggregated covariates included age, gender, socio-economic and remoteness index scores, distance between patient residential postcode and the treating hospital, and a quadratic time trend. We studied 4,285,494 elective surgical admissions in 82 acute public hospitals over eight years in NSW. Around 14% of patients who developed at least one of the six FTR-related complications (58,590) died during hospitalization. Of 153 LGAs, patients who lived in 31 LGAs, accommodating 48% of NSW patients at risk, were exposed to an excessive adjusted FTR risk (10% to 50%) compared to the state-average. They were mostly located in state's centre and western Sydney. Thirty LGAs with a lower adjusted FTR risk (10% to 30%), accommodating 8% of patients at risk, were mostly found in the southern parts of NSW and Sydney east and south. There were significant spatiotemporal variations of FTR rates across NSW over an eight-year span. Areas identified with significantly high and low FTR risks provide potential opportunities for policy-makers, clinicians and researchers to learn from the success or failure of adopting the best care for surgical patients and build a self-learning organisation and health system. PMID:25310260

  7. Hospital mortality in acute coronary syndrome: differences related to gender and use of percutaneous coronary procedures

    PubMed Central

    Aguado-Romeo, María J; Márquez-Calderón, Soledad; Buzón-Barrera, María L

    2007-01-01

    Background To identify differences among men and women with acute coronary syndrome in terms of in-hospital mortality, and to assess whether these differences are related to the use of percutaneous cardiovascular procedures. Methods Observational study based on the Minimum Basic Data Set. This encompassed all episodes of emergency hospital admissions (46,007 cases, including 16,391 women and 29,616 men) with a main diagnosis of either myocardial infarction or unstable angina at 32 hospitals within the Andalusian Public Health System over a four-year period (2000–2003). The relationship between gender and mortality was examined for the population as a whole and for stratified groups depending on the type of procedures used (diagnostic coronary catheterisation and/or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty). These combinations were then adjusted for age group, main diagnosis and co-morbidityharlson score). Results During hospitalisation, mortality was 9.6% (4,401 cases out of 46,007), with 11.8% for women and 8.3% for men. There were more deaths among older patients with acute myocardial infarction and greater co-morbidity. Lower mortality was shown in patients undergoing diagnostic catheterisation and/or PTCA. After adjusting for age, diagnosis and co-morbidity, mortality affected women more than men in the overall population (OR 1.14, 95% CI: 1.06–1.22) and in the subgroup of patients where no procedure was performed (OR 1.16, 95% CI: 1.07–1.24). Gender was not an explanatory variable in the subgroups of patients who underwent some kind of procedure. Conclusion Gender has not been associated to in-hospital mortality in patients who undergo some kind of percutaneous cardiovascular procedure. However, in the group of patients without either diagnostic catheterisation or angioplasty, mortality was higher in women than in men. PMID:17631037

  8. Prognostic indicators of adverse renal outcome and death in acute kidney injury hospital survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hamzić-Mehmedbašić, Aida; Rašić, Senija; Balavac, Merima; Rebić, Damir; Delić-Šarac, Marina; Durak-Nalbantić, Azra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Data regarding prognostic factors of post-discharge mortality and adverse renal function outcome in acute kidney injury (AKI) hospital survivors are scarce and controversial. Objectives: We aimed to identify predictors of post-discharge mortality and adverse renal function outcome in AKI hospital survivors. Patients and Methods: The study group consisted of 84 AKI hospital survivors admitted to the tertiary medical center during 2-year period. Baseline clinical parameters, with renal outcome 3 months after discharge and 6-month mortality were evaluated. According survival and renal function outcome, patients were divided into two groups. Results: Patients who did not recover renal function were statistically significantly older (P < 0.007) with higher Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score (P < 0.000) and more likely to have anuria and oliguria (P = 0.008) compared to those with recovery. Deceased AKI patients were statistically significantly older (P < 0.000), with higher CCI score (P < 0.000), greater prevalence of sepsis (P =0.004), higher levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) (P < 0.017) and ferritin (P < 0.051) and lower concentrations of albumin (P<0.01) compared to survivors. By multivariate analysis, independent predictors of adverse renal outcome were female gender (P =0.033), increasing CCI (P =0.000), presence of pre-existing chronic kidney disease (P =0.000) and diabetes mellitus (P =0.019) as well as acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) (P =0.032), while protective factor for renal function outcome was higher urine output (P =0.009). Independent predictors of post-discharge mortality were female gender (P =0.04), higher CCI score (P =0.001) and sepsis (P =0.034). Conclusion: Female AKI hospital survivors with increasing burden of comorbidities, diagnosis of sepsis and ADHF seem to be at high-risk for poor post-discharge outcome. PMID:27471736

  9. Human metapneumovirus in patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Annick; Manoha, Catherine; Bour, Jean-Baptiste; Abbas, Rachid; Fournel, Isabelle; Tiv, Michel; Pothier, Pierre; Astruc, Karine; Aho-Glélé, Ludwig Serge

    2016-08-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to estimate the prevalence of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infections in patients hospitalized for acute respiratory infection (ARI) and to study factors associated with this prevalence. Medline and ScienceDirect databases were searched for prospective observational studies that screened hospitalized patients with ARI for hMPV by RT-PCR, with data available at December 27, 2014. The risk of bias was assessed regarding participation rate, definition of ARI, description of diagnostic technique, method of inclusion identical for all subjects, standardized and identical sampling method for all subjects, analysis performed according to the relevant subgroups, and presentation of data sources. Random-effect meta-analysis with arcsine transformation and meta-regressions was used. In the 75 articles included, the prevalence of hMPV among hospitalized ARI was 6.24% (95% CI 5.25-7.30). An effect of the duration of the inclusion period was observed (p=0.0114), with a higher prevalence of hMPV in studies conducted during periods of 7-11 months (10.56%, 95% CI 5.97-16.27) or complete years (7.55%, 95% CI 5.90-9.38) than in periods of 6 months or less (5.36%, 95% CI 4.29-6.54). A significant increase in the incidence with increasing distance from the equator was observed (p=0.0384). hMPV should be taken into account as a possible etiology in hospitalized ARI.

  10. Adverse Effects of Oral Nonselective and cyclooxygenase-2-Selective NSAIDs on Hospitalization for Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-I.; Shih, Chia-Jen; Chen, Yung-Tai; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Yang, Chih-Yu; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Chu, Dachen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the association between the use of nonselective or cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-selective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) in a general Asian population. We conducted an observational, nationwide, nested case–control cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database between 2010 and 2012. AKI cases were defined as hospitalization with a principle diagnosis of AKI. Each case was matched to 4 randomly selected controls based on age, sex, and the month and year of cohort entry. Odds ratios (ORs) were used to demonstrate the association between hospitalization for AKI and current, recent, or past use of an oral NSAID. During the study period, we identified 6199 patients with AKI and 24,796 matched controls. Overall, current users (adjusted OR 2.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.28–3.28) and recent users (adjusted OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01–1.35) were associated with increased risk of hospitalization for AKI. The risk was also similar for nonselective NSAIDs. However, neither current nor recent use of COX-2 inhibitors was significantly associated with AKI events. Our study supported that the initiation of nonselective NSAIDs rather than COX-2 inhibitors is associated with an increased risk of AKI requiring hospitalization. Future randomized trials are needed to elucidate these findings. PMID:26945352

  11. [Hospital outcome in acute coronary syndrome in the period 1987-2001 in West-Herzegovina canton--retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Vasilj, Ivan; Ostojić, Zdenko; Ostojić, Ljerka; Zelenika, D; Misković, J

    2006-01-01

    Objective of the study is to show prevalence of hospital mortality of acute coronary syndrome in pre-war (1987-1991), war (1992-1996) and after war period (1997-2001) among inhabitants of West-Herzegovina canton living in the following municipalities: Siroki Brijeg, Posusje, Grude and Ljubuski (88,992 inhabitants). Collected were data on patients who were admitted in the hospital due to acute coronar syndrome (category I 20, 21, 22- X revision, ICD) in the above period in Mostar. Data were analyzed in regard to sex, age and disease output. Hospital morality in 15 year period for both sex were 15.0 %, men 12.1 %, and women 20.2 %. Statistically it was not found significant differences in the period 1987-2001 in regards to total hospital mortality of men and women and separate hospital mortality of men. Differences were found in women where considerable larger number was in pre-war and post-war period in comparison with war period. The largest hospital mortality was in total and for women in the pre-war period and for men was during the war period. The smallest hospital mortality was in total and for women during the war and for men in pre-war period. We find that lower hospital mortality in women was caused by lower hospital admission because of war time and problems with transport and that larger number of women deceased before admission to the hospital.

  12. Acute Q fever in Portugal. Epidemiological and clinical features of 32 hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Palmela, Carolina; Badura, Robert; Valadas, Emília

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii. The main characteristic of acute Q fever is its clinical polymorphism, usually presenting as a febrile illness with varying degrees of hepatitis and/or pneumonia. Q fever is endemic in Portugal, and it is an obligatory notifiable disease since 1999. However, its epidemiological and clinical characteristics are still incompletely described. Methods We performed a retrospective study of 32 cases admitted in the Infectious Diseases Department, Santa Maria’s University Hospital, from January 2001 to December 2010, in whom acute Q fever was diagnosed by the presence of antibodies to phase II Coxiella burnetii antigens associated with a compatible clinical syndrome. Results Out of the 32 cases recorded, 29 (91%) were male, with a male:female ratio of 9.7:1. Individuals at productive age were mainly affected (88%, n=28, with ages between 25 and 64 years). Clinically, the most common manifestation of acute Q fever was hepatic involvement (84%, n=27), which occurred isolated in 53% (n=17) of the cases. Hepatitis was more severe, presenting with higher values of liver function tests, in patients presenting both pulmonary and hepatic involvement. Additionally, we report one case of myocarditis and another one with neurological involvement. Empiric but appropriate antibiotic therapy was given in 66% (n=21) of the cases. There was a complete recovery in 94% (n=30) of the patients, and one death. We confirmed the sub-notification of this disease in Portugal, with only 47% (n=15) of the cases notified. Conclusion In Portugal further studies are needed to confirm our results. From the 32 cases studied, acute Q fever presented more frequently as a febrile disease with hepatic involvement affecting mainly young male individuals. Furthermore, acute Q fever is clearly underdiagnosed and underreported in Portugal, which suggests that an increased awareness of the disease is needed, together with a broader use

  13. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Method Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Results Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2%) were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3%) patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV) in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%), Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3) in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8%) and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3). Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36) of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. Conclusion The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection. PMID:22490115

  14. Association of Hyperglycemia with In-Hospital Mortality and Morbidity in Libyan Patients with Diabetes and Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Benamer, Sufyan; Eljazwi, Imhemed; Mohamed, Rima; Masoud, Heba; Tuwati, Mussa; Elbarsha, Abdulwahab M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia on admission and during hospital stay is a well-established predictor of short-term and long-term mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Our study investigated the impact of blood glucose levels on admission and in-hospital hyperglycemia on the morbidity and mortality of Libyan patients admitted with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina). Methods In this retrospective study, the records of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome to The 7th Of October Hospital, Benghazi, Libya, between January 2011 and December 2011 were reviewed. The level of blood glucose on admission, and the average blood glucose during the hospital stay were recorded to determine their effects on in-hospital complications (e.g. cardiogenic shock, acute heart failure, arrhythmias, and/or heart block) and mortality. Results During the study period, 121 patients with diabetes were admitted with acute coronary syndrome. The mortality rate in patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome was 12.4%. Patients with a mean glucose level greater than 200mg/dL had a higher in-hospital mortality and a higher rate of complications than those with a mean glucose level ≤200mg/dL (27.5% vs. 2.6%, p<0.001 and 19.7% vs. 45.5%, p=0.004, respectively). There was no difference in in-hospital mortality between patients with a glucose level at admission ≤140mg/dL and those admitted with a glucose level >140mg/dL (6.9% vs. 14.3%; p=0.295), but the rate of complications was higher in the latter group (13.8% vs. 34.1%; p=0.036). Patients with admission glucose levels >140mg/dL also had a higher rate of complications at presentation (26.4% vs. 6.9%; p=0.027). Conclusion In patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome, hyperglycemia during hospitalization predicted a worse outcome in terms of the rates of in-hospital complications and in-hospital mortality. Hyperglycemia at the time of admission was also associated with

  15. Admission avoidance and early discharge of acute hospital admissions: an accident and emergency based scheme

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, C; Whitwell, D; Sarsfield, B; Maimaris, C

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To validate an accident and emergency (A&E) based approach to assisting early discharge or avoiding admission to acute hospital beds by means of two separate teams, one in hospital and the other in the community, working closely together at the interface between primary and secondary health care. Design—A purpose designed admission avoidance (AA) team was established in the A&E department, and a target group of patients identified whose admissions might be avoided or curtailed. A rapid response community team (RRCT) based in Cambridge was also established to provide basic health care to patients in their homes after discharge from hospital. The key elements of the project were rapid assessment, careful selection of patients, early decision making at senior level, and close liaison with the community team. Results—During the first year (1999) of the project the AA team assessed 785 patients and 257 patients were eventually discharged home to the care of the RRCT. Of these, 149 patients (58%) were comparable to a historical control group (from 1997/98), with regard to their demographic and clinical characteristics and care needs, and had an average length of hospital stay of 1.7 days compared with 6.3 days for the control group. The remaining 108 patients were not directly comparable but were supported by the teams because the benefits were clear and exclusion would have been unethical. These patients had an average length of stay of seven days. The readmission rate was 3 of 257(1.2%) for the intervention group and 8 of 531(1.5%) for the control group. A limited patient satisfaction survey among patients cared for at home revealed that 97% of patients were "satisfied to very satisfied" with the care provided. The RRCT had also looked after an additional 194 patients from other sources (total = 451), including postoperative orthopaedic early discharges from an adjacent hospital. The average length of care at home by the RRCT for all 451 patients was 6

  16. Frequency of nurse-physician collaborative behaviors in an acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Nair, Dawn Marie; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; McNulty, Rita; Click, Elizabeth R; Glembocki, Margaret M

    2012-03-01

    A new culture bolstering collaborative behavior among nurses and physicians is needed to merge the unique strengths of both professions into opportunities to improve patient outcomes. To meet this challenge it is fundamental to comprehend the current uses of collaborative behaviors among nurses and physicians. The purpose of this descriptive study was to delineate frequently used from infrequently used collaborative behaviors of nurses and physicians in order to generate data to support specific interventions for improving collaborative behavior. The setting was an acute care hospital, and participants included 114 registered nurses and 33 physicians with active privileges. The Nurse-Physician Collaboration Scale was used to measure the frequency of use of nurse-physician collaborative behaviors self-reported by nurses and physicians. The background variables of gender, age, education, ethnicity, years of experience, years practiced at the current acute care hospital, practice setting and professional certification were accessed. In addition to analyzing the frequency of collaborative behaviors, this study compares levels of collaborative behavior reported by nurses and physicians. PMID:22145999

  17. Simple In-Hospital Interventions to Reduce Door-to-CT Time in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Taheraghdam, Aliakbar; Rikhtegar, Reza; Mehrvar, Kaveh; Mehrara, Mehrdad; Hassasi, Rogayyeh; Aliyar, Hannane; Farzi, Mohammadamin; Hasaneh Tamar, Somayyeh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, a time dependent therapy, can reduce the morbidity and mortality of acute ischemic stroke. This study was designed to assess the effect of simple in-hospital interventions on reducing door-to-CT (DTC) time and reaching door-to-needle (DTN) time of less than 60 minutes. Methods. Before any intervention, DTC time was recorded for 213 patients over a one-year period at our center. Five simple quality-improvement interventions were implemented, namely, call notification, prioritizing patients for CT scan, prioritizing patients for lab analysis, specifying a bed for acute stroke patients, and staff education. After intervention, over a course of 44 months, DTC time was recorded for 276 patients with the stroke code. Furthermore DTN time was recorded for 106 patients who were treated with IV thrombolytic therapy. Results. The median DTC time significantly decreased in the postintervention period comparing to the preintervention period [median (IQR); 20 (12–30) versus 75 (52.5–105), P < 0.001]. At the postintervention period, the median (IQR) DTN time was 55 (40–73) minutes and proportion of patients with DTN time less than 60 minutes was 62.4% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Our interventions significantly reduced DTC time and resulted in an acceptable DTN time. These interventions are feasible in most hospitals and should be considered. PMID:27478641

  18. Impact of vaccination uptake on hospitalizations due to rotavirus acute gastroenteritis in 2 different socioeconomic areas of Spain.

    PubMed

    Giménez Sánchez, Francisco; Nogueira, Esperanza Jiménez; Sánchez Forte, Miguel; Ibáñez Alcalde, Mercedes; Cobo, Elvira; Angulo, Raquel; Garrido Fernández, Pablo

    2016-04-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of hospitalization due to acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in infants and toddlers. However, rotavirus vaccination has been associated with a decline in hospitalization rates due to rotavirus AGE. A descriptive retrospective study was conducted to analyze the impact of rotavirus vaccination on the rate of hospitalizations due to AGE among children ≤2 years old in 2 areas of the province of Almería, Spain. After eight years of rotavirus vaccination, rates of hospitalizations due to rotavirus AGE are diminished. This decline is closely related to vaccine coverage in the studied areas.

  19. [Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of acute diarrhea in adults at a hospital from Cordoba city].

    PubMed

    Polo Friz, H; Toloza, S; Acosta, H; Toloza, C; Unsain, F; Marconetto, G; Massanet, P; Canova, S; Celli, J; Abdala, O; Gandini, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the clinical and epidemiologic presentation features of adult acute diarrhea in a general hospital form Córdoba City. All the patients older than 14 years old who assisted to the Hospital Nacional de Clínicas Central Guard for acute diarrhea, during the periods: A (15-12-89 to 15-03-90), B (15-12-93 to 15-03-94) and C (15-12-94 to 15-03-95), were included. 594 patients were studied: 337 female (56.7%) and 257 male, 143 in the period A, 250 in B and 201 in C. The means +/- SD age was 34.6 +/- 13.3 and stool loose per day at admission 7.3 +/- 4.7. Eighty six percent of patients presented liquid consistent stool, 89.6% abdominal pain, 44.7% vomiting and 18.8% bloody stools. The rate of patients who consulted Central Guard referring acute diarrhea increased from period A (2.4%) to B (3.61%); p = 0.002 and decreased form B to C (2.85%); p = 0.01. The mean (+/- SD) days transcurred from the beginning of diarrhea episode till consultation was 3.5 +/- 2.7; 2.7 +/- 2.3 y 2.9 +/- 3.5 in the periods A, B and C respectively, statistically significant difference between A and B, p < 0.01. Thirty six percent, 21.1% and 23.1% of patients presented mucus with their stools in the periods A, B and C (p = 0.01), and high temperature 61.1%, 48.1% and 48.5% respectively (p = 0.04). Twenty seven percent of stools samples cultures became positive in the periods A, 17.6% in B and 11.5% in C, statistically significant difference between A and C; p = 0.008. The results show that in a general hospital from Córdoba City the adult acute diarrhea is a frequent cause of consult. In the last years there were modifications in its clinical an epidemiologic presentation features. PMID:10436614

  20. [Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of acute diarrhea in adults at a hospital from Cordoba city].

    PubMed

    Polo Friz, H; Toloza, S; Acosta, H; Toloza, C; Unsain, F; Marconetto, G; Massanet, P; Canova, S; Celli, J; Abdala, O; Gandini, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the clinical and epidemiologic presentation features of adult acute diarrhea in a general hospital form Córdoba City. All the patients older than 14 years old who assisted to the Hospital Nacional de Clínicas Central Guard for acute diarrhea, during the periods: A (15-12-89 to 15-03-90), B (15-12-93 to 15-03-94) and C (15-12-94 to 15-03-95), were included. 594 patients were studied: 337 female (56.7%) and 257 male, 143 in the period A, 250 in B and 201 in C. The means +/- SD age was 34.6 +/- 13.3 and stool loose per day at admission 7.3 +/- 4.7. Eighty six percent of patients presented liquid consistent stool, 89.6% abdominal pain, 44.7% vomiting and 18.8% bloody stools. The rate of patients who consulted Central Guard referring acute diarrhea increased from period A (2.4%) to B (3.61%); p = 0.002 and decreased form B to C (2.85%); p = 0.01. The mean (+/- SD) days transcurred from the beginning of diarrhea episode till consultation was 3.5 +/- 2.7; 2.7 +/- 2.3 y 2.9 +/- 3.5 in the periods A, B and C respectively, statistically significant difference between A and B, p < 0.01. Thirty six percent, 21.1% and 23.1% of patients presented mucus with their stools in the periods A, B and C (p = 0.01), and high temperature 61.1%, 48.1% and 48.5% respectively (p = 0.04). Twenty seven percent of stools samples cultures became positive in the periods A, 17.6% in B and 11.5% in C, statistically significant difference between A and C; p = 0.008. The results show that in a general hospital from Córdoba City the adult acute diarrhea is a frequent cause of consult. In the last years there were modifications in its clinical an epidemiologic presentation features.

  1. Prehospitalization Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury during Hospitalization for Serious Infections in the REGARDS Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Henry E.; Powell, T. Clark; Gutiérrez, Orlando M.; Griffin, Russell; Safford, Monika M.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Acute kidney injury (AKI) frequently occurs in hospitalized patients. In this study, we determined prehospitalization characteristics associated with AKI in community-dwelling adults hospitalized for a serious infection. Methods We used prospective data from 30,239 participants of the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, a national cohort of community-dwelling adults ≥45 years old. We identified serious infection hospitalizations between 2003 and 2012. Using the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria, we defined AKI as an increase in serum creatinine (sCr) ≥0.3 mg/dl from the first inpatient sCr measurement during the first 7 hospitalization days. We excluded individuals with a history of renal transplant or preexisting end-stage renal disease as well as individuals with <2 sCr measurements. We identified baseline characteristics (sociodemographics, health behaviors, chronic medical conditions, biomarkers, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory, statin, or antihypertensive medication use) independently associated with AKI events using multivariable generalized estimating equations. Results Over a median follow-up of 4.5 years (interquartile range 2.4-6.3), we included 2,074 serious infection hospitalizations among 1,543 individuals. AKI occurred in 296 of 2,074 hospitalizations (16.5%). On multivariable analysis, prehospitalization characteristics independently associated with AKI among individuals hospitalized for a serious infection included a history of diabetes [odds ratio (OR) 1.38; 95% CI 1.02-1.89], increased cystatin C (OR 1.73 per SD; 95% CI 1.20-2.50), and increased albumin-to-creatinine ratio (OR 1.19 per SD; 95% CI 1.007-1.40). Sex, race, hypertension, myocardial infarction, estimated glomerular filtration rate, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory, statin, or antihypertensive medications were not associated with AKI. Conclusions

  2. Hospital transfer for primary coronary angioplasty in high risk patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Straumann, E; Yoon, S; Naegeli, B; Frielingsdorf, J; Gerber, A; Schuiki, E; Bertel, O

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the feasibility, safety, and associated time delays of interhospital transfer in patients with acute myocardial infarction for primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA).
DESIGN AND PATIENTS—Prospective observational study with group comparison in a single centre. 68 consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction transferred for primary PTCA from other hospitals (group A) were compared with 78 patients admitted directly to the referral centre (group B).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Patient groups were analysed with regard to baseline characteristics, time intervals from onset of chest pain to balloon angioplasty, hospital stay, and follow up outcome.
RESULTS—Patients in group A presented with a higher rate of cardiogenic shock initially than patients in group B (25% v 6%, p = 0.01) and had been resuscitated more frequently before PTCA (22% v 5%, p = 0.01). No deaths or other serious complications occurred during interhospital transfer. Median transfer time was 63 (range 40-115) minutes for helicopter transport (median 42 (28-122) km, n = 14), and 50 (18-110) minutes by ground ambulance (median 8 (5-68) km, n = 54). The median time interval from the decision to perform coronary arteriography to balloon inflation was 96 (45-243) minutes in group A and 52 (17-214) minutes in group B (p = 0.0001). In transferred patients (group A) the transportation associated delay and the longer in-hospital median decision time (50 (10-1120) minutes in group A v 15 (0-210) minutes in group B, p = 0.002) concurred with a longer total period of ischaemia (239 (114-1307) minutes in group A v 182 (75-1025) minutes in group B, p = 0.02) since the beginning of chest pain. Success of PTCA (TIMI 3 flow in 95% of all patients), in-hospital mortality (7% v 9%, mortality for patients not in cardiogenic shock 0% v 4%), and follow up after median 235 days was similarly favourable in groups A and B

  3. Psychiatric diagnosis, psychiatric power and psychiatric abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Szasz, T

    1994-01-01

    Psychiatric abuse, such as we usually associate with practices in the former Soviet Union, is related not to the misuse of psychiatric diagnoses, but to the political power intrinsic to the social role of the psychiatrist in totalitarian and democratic societies alike. Some reflections are offered on the modern, therapeutic state's proclivity to treat adults as patients rather than citizens, disjoin rights from responsibilities, and thus corrupt the language of political-philosophical discourse. PMID:7996558

  4. Wischnewski ulcers and acute pancreatitis in two hospitalized patients with cirrhosis, portal vein thrombosis, and hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D A; Aronson, J F; Rajaraman, S; Veasey, S P

    1999-09-01

    Accidental hypothermia has been described in the forensic literature but reports of occurrence in hospitalized patients are rare. Associated anatomic lesions include acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis and characteristic acute gastric ulcers termed Wischnewski ulcers. We report here two patients with cirrhosis and ascites; one also had hepatocellular carcinoma. Portal vein thrombosis, acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis and Wischnewski ulcers were present in both. The clinical records documented hypothermia that progressed over several days. Temperature nadirs of 31.0 degrees C (87.8 degrees F) and 32.2 degrees C (90.0 degrees F) were recorded in each patient, respectively, one day before death, although each transiently reached temperatures that did not register on standard monitoring devices. This is the first report that chronicles antemortem body temperatures in hypothermic patients with Wischnewski ulcers and pancreatitis at autopsy. Also, the association of these findings with portal vein thrombosis and cirrhosis has not been previously described. We discuss this constellation of findings with regard to possible mechanistic interrelations. PMID:10486964

  5. Sources of work-related acute fatigue in United States hospital nurses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Daraiseh, Nancy M; Davis, Kermit G; Pan, Wei

    2014-03-01

    This study identified the nursing work activities that could be the primary sources of work-related acute fatigue in US hospital nurses. Continuous recording of working heart rate and random observations of nursing activities were applied to collect data from eight nurses during two consecutive 12 h day shifts. Using descriptive statistics and random-effect analysis of variance, the contributions of individual nursing work activities to acute fatigue were compared based on the activity frequencies and nurses' corresponding heart rate elevations. Of 860 observed nursing-related work activities, manual patient-handling, bedside-care, care-coordinating, and walking/standing activities accounted for 5%, 16%, 38%, and 41%, respectively. After controlling for the differences of participant and shift, the percentage of working heart rate to maximal heart rate of manual patient-handling (64.3%), bedside-care (59.7%), and walking/standing (57.4%) activities were significantly higher than that of care-coordinating activities (52.3%, F[3, 38.0]  = 7.5, P < 0.001). These findings suggest that bedside care and walking/standing, other than manual patient handling, contributed most to the level of acute fatigue.

  6. ["Should the staff's attitude towards the patients remain unchanged, I will not guarantee anything." Protest masculinity and coping of "rebellious patients" at the Heidelberg University Psychiatric Hospital on the eve of deinstitutionalization].

    PubMed

    Schwamm, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the illness experiences of male patients from the Heidelberg University Psychiatric Hospital during the protests against Psychiatry in the year 1973. Protest is one of the most important expressions of masculinity in socially disadvantaged men, such as men with mental disorders. The analysis of 100 medical records shows that some patients tried to construct themselves as men in a way that was explicitly motivated by antipsychiatric ideas: They questioned psychiatric authority, behaved "sexually inappropriate", or used drugs. On the eve of psychiatric reform in West Germany those patients were well aware that the alternative--complying with the treatment--would put them at considerable risk. In addition to the usual inference of hegemonic or normative masculinities as risk-factors, the behavior of those ,,rebellious patients" has to be interpreted as individual coping strategies.

  7. ["Should the staff's attitude towards the patients remain unchanged, I will not guarantee anything." Protest masculinity and coping of "rebellious patients" at the Heidelberg University Psychiatric Hospital on the eve of deinstitutionalization].

    PubMed

    Schwamm, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the illness experiences of male patients from the Heidelberg University Psychiatric Hospital during the protests against Psychiatry in the year 1973. Protest is one of the most important expressions of masculinity in socially disadvantaged men, such as men with mental disorders. The analysis of 100 medical records shows that some patients tried to construct themselves as men in a way that was explicitly motivated by antipsychiatric ideas: They questioned psychiatric authority, behaved "sexually inappropriate", or used drugs. On the eve of psychiatric reform in West Germany those patients were well aware that the alternative--complying with the treatment--would put them at considerable risk. In addition to the usual inference of hegemonic or normative masculinities as risk-factors, the behavior of those ,,rebellious patients" has to be interpreted as individual coping strategies. PMID:26219192

  8. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  9. Is use of mechanical ventilation a reasonable proxy indicator for coma among Medicare patients hospitalized for acute stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Horner, R D; Sloane, R J; Kahn, K L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain whether use of mechanical ventilation on admission to the hospital is a proxy indicator of coma (i.e., very severe stroke) among acute stroke patients. METHODS: A secondary analysis of data from a medical record review on a nationally representative sample of 2,824 Medicare patients, ages 65 years or older, who were hospitalized for stroke in 1982-1983 or 1985-1986 in 297 acute care hospitals in 30 areas within five geographically dispersed states. RESULTS: Use of mechanical ventilation on the first day of hospitalization was significantly associated with level of consciousness on admission: < 2 percent of noncomatose patients versus 17.5 percent of comatose (p < .001). With a high specificity and high likelihood ratio for a positive test, use of mechanical ventilation on the first day of hospitalization ruled-in coma. It was also significantly associated with severity of illness, prognostic indicators (i.e., admission through the emergency room, admission to intensive care, and having a "do-not-resuscitate" order written during the hospital stay), and with in-hospital death. Adjusting for patient demographics, stroke type, comorbidity, and process of care, early initiation of mechanical ventilation remained significantly associated with both coma and in-hospital death. CONCLUSIONS: A stroke patient's use of mechanical ventilation on the first day of hospitalization is a valid proxy indicator of level of consciousness. PMID:9460489

  10. Clinical outcomes of dialysis-treated acute kidney injury patients at the university of port harcourt teaching hospital, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Emem-Chioma, Pedro Chimezie; Alasia, Datonye Dennis; Wokoma, Friday Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Background. Acute kidney injury in adults is a common cause of hospitalization, associated with high morbidity and mortality especially in developing countries. In spite of RRT the in-hospital mortality rates remain high even in the developed countries. Though a proportion of our patients receive renal replacement therapy as part of their management, data on outcomes are sparse. Study Objective. To determine the clinical outcomes of dialysis-treated AKI in our hospital. Methods. A retrospective analysis of the clinical data of all adult AKI patients treated with haemodialysis at the University of Teaching Hospital during an interrupted six-year period was conducted. Analysis was done using SPSS version 17.0. Results. 34 males and 28 females with mean age of 41.3 ± 18.5 years were studied. The leading causes of AKI were sepsis (22.7%), acute glomerulonephritis (20.5%), acute gastroenteritis (15.9%), and toxic nephropathies (11.4%) and presented with mean e-GFR of 14.7 ± 5.8 mls/min/1.73 m(2). Of the 62 patients, 29 (46.8%) were discharged from the hospital, 27 (43.5%) died in hospital, while 6 (9.7%) absconded from treatment. Survivors had better Rifle grade than those who died (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Hospital mortality rate of dialysis-treated AKI patients is high and the severity of renal damage at presentation may be an important factor.

  11. Prevalence of Type A Acute Aortic Dissection in Patients With Out-Of-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Sakata, Kenji; Sakurai, Yasuo; Yoshimuta, Tsuyoshi; Morishita, Yuka; Nara, Satoshi; Takahashi, Isao; Hirokami, Mitsugu; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2016-06-01

    Postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) has been recently reported to be useful for detecting causes of death in the emergency department. In this study, the incidence and causes of death of type A acute aortic dissection (AAD) were investigated in patients who experienced out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest (OHCPA) using PMCT. PMCT or enhanced computed tomography was performed in 311 of 528 consecutive patients experiencing OHCPA. A total of 23 (7%) of 311 patients were diagnosed with type A AAD based on clinical courses and CT findings. Eighteen consecutive patients who did not experience OHCPA were diagnosed with type A AAD during the same period. Pre-hospital death was observed in 21 (51%) of 41 patients with type A AAD. Bloody pericardial effusion was observed more frequently in patients who experienced OHCPA with type A AAD than in those who did not experience OHCPA with type A AAD (91% vs 28%, respectively; p <0.05). In conclusion, the incidence of type A AAD was common (7%) in patients who experienced OHCPA, with a high rate of pre-hospital death. Aortic rupture to the intrapericardial space was considered the major cause of death in patients who experienced OHCPA with type A AAD. PMID:27067619

  12. Vulnerabilities to Temperature Effects on Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Bo Yeon; Lee, Eunil; Lee, Suji; Heo, Seulkee; Jo, Kyunghee; Kim, Jinsun; Park, Man Sik

    2015-01-01

    Most previous studies have focused on the association between acute myocardial function (AMI) and temperature by gender and age. Recently, however, concern has also arisen about those most susceptible to the effects of temperature according to socioeconomic status (SES). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI by subpopulations (gender, age, living area, and individual SES) in South Korea. The Korea National Health Insurance (KNHI) database was used to examine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI during 2004–2012. We analyzed the increase in AMI hospital admissions both above and below a threshold temperature using Poisson generalized additive models (GAMs) for hot, cold, and warm weather. The Medicaid group, the lowest SES group, had a significantly higher RR of 1.37 (95% CI: 1.07–1.76) for heat and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.04–1.20) for cold among subgroups, while also showing distinctly higher risk curves than NHI for both hot and cold weather. In additions, females, older age group, and those living in urban areas had higher risks from hot and cold temperatures than males, younger age group, and those living in rural areas. PMID:26580643

  13. Hospital environment fungal contamination and aspergillosis risk in acute leukaemia patients in Sousse (Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Gheith, Soukeina; Ranque, Stéphane; Bannour, Wadiaa; Ben Youssef, Yosra; Khelif, Abderrahim; Ben Said, Moncef; Njah, Mansour; Saghrouni, Fatma

    2015-06-01

    Hospital environment is considered the main source of invasive aspergillosis (IA) in leukemic patients. This study aimed to describe Aspergillus colonisation in leukemic patients and their hospital environment and to test whether Aspergillus environmental contamination was associated with IA. For a 2-year period including 14-month renovation work, 91 acute leukaemia inpatients at the hematology department of University hospital in Sousse (Tunisia) were prospectively included. The incidence of probable IA (EORTC/MSG criteria) was 9.9%. Fifty-six Aspergillus were isolated from 53 (6.5%) of 811 sputa collected from 35 (38.5%) patients. Aspergillus spp. were isolated in 59.7% of 494 air samples and in 52.8% of 1579 surface samples taken in the patients' room. Aspergillus section Nigri (72.7%) was the most frequent. Aspergillus contamination peaked in autumn and winter on surface and in summer and autumn in air samples and was higher (P = 0.03) during the renovation work period. Multivariate analysis showed that for each Aspergillus section Nigri CFU airborne contamination IA risk increased by 1.05 (P = 0.04). In Tunisia, Aspergillus section Nigri and Flavi, but not Fumigati, are chiefly involved in IA. Our findings support swift implementation of airborne fungal contamination control measures in areas where immunocompromised patient are hospitalised.

  14. The Influence of Prehospital Systemic Corticosteroid Use on Development of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Hospital Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V.; Lee, Augustine S.; Gajic, Ognjen; Festic, Emir

    2015-01-01

    Objective The role of systemic corticosteroids in pathophysiology and treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome is controversial. Use of prehospital systemic corticosteroid therapy may prevent the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome and improve hospital outcomes. Design This is a preplanned retrospective subgroup analysis of the prospectively identified cohort from a trial by the U.S. Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group designed to validate the Lung Injury Prediction Score. Setting Twenty-two acute care hospitals. Patients Five thousand eighty-nine patients with at least one risk factor for acute respiratory distress syndrome at the time of hospitalization. Intervention Propensity-based analysis of previously recorded data. Measurements and Main Results Three hundred sixty-four patients were on systemic corticosteroids. Prevalence of acute respiratory distress syndrome was 7.7% and 6.9% (odds ratio, 1.1 [95% CI, 0.8–1.7]; p = 0.54) for patients on systemic corticosteroid and not on systemic corticosteroids, respectively. A propensity for being on systemic corticosteroids was derived through logistic regression by using all available covariates. Subsequently, 354 patients (97%) on systemic corticosteroids were matched to 1,093 not on systemic corticosteroids by their propensity score for a total of 1,447 patients in the matched set. Adjusted risk for acute respiratory distress syndrome (odds ratio, 0.96 [95% CI, 0.54–1.38]), invasive ventilation (odds ratio, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.62–1.12]), and inhospital mortality (odds ratio, 0.97 [95% CI, 0.63–1.49]) was then calculated from the propensity-matched sample using conditional logistic regression model. No significant associations were present. Conclusions Prehospital use of systemic corticosteroids neither decreased the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome among patients hospitalized with at one least risk factor, nor affected the need for mechanical ventilation or hospital

  15. Incidence, Outcomes, and Risk Factors of Community-Acquired and Hospital-Acquired Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chien-Ning; Lee, Chien-Te; Su, Chien-Hao; Wang, Yu-Ching Lily; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Tain, You-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The disease burden and outcomes of community-acquired (CA-) and hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) are not well understood. The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence, outcomes, and risk factors of AKI in a large Taiwanese adult cohort. This retrospective cohort study examined 734,340 hospital admissions from a group of hospitals within an organization in Taiwan between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2014. Patients with AKI at discharge were classified as either CA- or HA-AKI based on the RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss of function, end stage of kidney disease) classification criteria. Outcomes were in-hospital mortality, dialysis, recovery of renal function, and length of stay. Risks of developing AKI were determined using multivariate logistic regression based on demographic and baseline clinical characteristics and nephrotoxin use before admission. AKI occurred in 1.68% to 2% hospital discharges among adults without and with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD), respectively. The incidence of CA-AKI was 17.25 and HA-AKI was 8.14 per 1000 admissions. The annual rate of CA-AKI increased from 12.43 to 19.96 per 1000 people, but the change in HA-AKI was insignificant. Comparing to CA-AKI, those with HA-AKI had higher levels of in-hospital mortality (26.07% vs 51.58%), mean length of stay (21.25 ± 22.35 vs 35.84 ± 34.62 days), and dialysis during hospitalization (1.45% vs 2.06%). Preexisting systemic diseases, including CKD were associated with increased risks of CA-AKI, and nephrotoxic polypharmacy increased risk of both CA- and HA-AKI. Patients with HA-AKI had more severe outcomes than patients with CA-AKI, and demonstrated different spectrum of risk factors. Although patients with CA-AKI with better outcomes, the incidence increased over time. It is also clear that optimal preventive and management strategies of HA- and CA-AKI are urgently needed to limit the risks in susceptible individuals. PMID:27175701

  16. Is there a link between the hospital-acquired injurious fall rates in US acute care hospitals and these institutions' implementation levels of computerized systems?

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Hu, Hsou Mei; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2011-12-01

    Medicare no longer reimburses acute care hospitals for the costs of additional care required due to hospital-acquired injuries. Consequently, this study explored the effective computerized systems to inform practice for better interventions to reduce fall risk. It provided a correlation between type of computerized system and hospital-acquired injurious fall rates at acute care hospitals in California, Florida, and New York. It used multiple publicly available data sets, with the hospital as the unit of analysis. Descriptive and Pearson correlation analyses were used. The analysis included 462 hospitals. Significant correlations could be categorized into two groups: (1) meaningful computerized systems that were associated with lower injurious fall rates: the decision support systems for drug allergy alerts, drug-drug interaction alerts, and drug-laboratory interaction alerts; and (2) computerized systems that were associated with higher injurious fall rates: the decision support system for drug-drug interaction alerts and the computerized provider order entry system for radiology tests. Future research may include additional states, multiple years of data, and patient-level data to validate this study's findings. This effort may further inform policy makers and the public about effective clinical computerized systems provided to clinicians to improve their practice decisions and care outcomes.

  17. [Collaboration with specialists and regional primary care physicians in emergency care at acute hospitals provided by generalists].

    PubMed

    Imura, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    A role of acute hospitals providing emergency care is becoming important more and more in regional comprehensive care system led by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. Given few number of emergent care specialists in Japan, generalists specializing in both general internal medicine and family practice need to take part in the emergency care. In the way collaboration with specialists and regional primary care physicians is a key role in improving the quality of emergency care at acute hospitals. A pattern of collaborating function by generalists taking part in emergency care is categorized into four types. PMID:26915241

  18. [University professors in the Soviet Occupation Zone and the German Democratic Republic up to 1961: Academic alternation of generations at university psychiatric hospitals].

    PubMed

    Kumbier, E; Haack, K

    2015-05-01

    After WWII a politically guided staffing policy foresaw an exchange program for professors from the Soviet Occupation Zone and the German Democratic Republic (GDR). In the field of medicine this initiative was not successful. With respect to university psychiatric/neurological hospitals this experiment failed as a result of a shortage of personnel due to the consequences of war, denazification and people migrating into western occupation zones. Criteria for politically selecting promising young talent which had been propagated by the Socialist Unity Party of Germany (Sozialistische Einheitspartei Deutschlands, SED) were thus not relevant in academic medicine until 1961; however, the communist rulers had great interest in bringing professional and academic resources up to date. Politically implicated representatives in the field were also included in this process. At the forefront was the interest in functioning medical care and education in order to be able to train much needed health professionals. At the end of the 1950s a new generation of professors was established at the university hospitals. This generation rotation demonstrated the politically intended replacement of the "old" professor generation and the transition to a new GDR generation that had been trained after 1945. This second generation of professors inherited vacant professorships and defined and shaped research and academia until the end of the GDR much more than the previous generation had and also more than the one that followed. The generation of professors continued to feel a strong affiliation with their academic teachers and consequently continued their tradition in the sense of a school, for the most part independent of political circumstances.

  19. From acute care to home care: the evolution of hospital responsibility and rationale for increased vertical integration.

    PubMed

    Dilwali, Prashant K

    2013-01-01

    The responsibility of hospitals is changing. Those activities that were once confined within the walls of the medical facility have largely shifted outside them, yet the requirements for hospitals have only grown in scope. With the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the development of accountable care organizations, financial incentives are focused on care coordination, and a hospital's responsibility now includes postdischarge outcomes. As a result, hospitals need to adjust their business model to accommodate their increased need to impact post-acute care settings. A home care service line can fulfill this role for hospitals, serving as an effective conduit to the postdischarge realm-serving as both a potential profit center and a risk mitigation offering. An alliance between home care agencies and hospitals can help improve clinical outcomes, provide the necessary care for communities, and establish a potentially profitable product line.

  20. Cost effectiveness of day and inpatient psychiatric treatment: results of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Creed, F.; Mbaya, P.; Lancashire, S.; Tomenson, B.; Williams, B.; Holme, S.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare direct and indirect costs of day and inpatient treatment of acute psychiatric illness. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial with outcome and costs assessed over 12 months after the date of admission. SETTING: Teaching hospital in an inner city area. SUBJECTS: 179 patients with acute psychiatric illness referred for admission who were suitable for random allocation to day hospital or inpatient treatment. 77 (43%) patients had schizophrenia. INTERVENTIONS: Routine inpatient or day hospital treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Direct and indirect costs over 12 months, clinical symptoms, social functioning, and burden on relatives over the follow up period. RESULTS: Clinical and social outcomes were similar at 12 months, except that inpatients improved significantly faster than day patients and burden on relatives was significantly less in the day hospital group at one year. Median direct costs to the hospital were 1923 pounds (95% confidence interval 750 pounds to 3174 pounds) per patient less for day hospital treatment than inpatient treatment. Indirect costs were greater for day patients; when these were included, overall day hospital treatment was 2165 pounds cheaper than inpatient treatment (95% confidence interval of median difference 737 pounds to 3593 pounds). Including costs to informants when appropriate meant that day hospital treatment was 1994 pounds per patient cheaper (95% confidence interval 600 pounds to 3543 pounds). CONCLUSIONS: Day patient treatment is cheaper for the 30-40% of potential admissions that can be treated in this way. Carers of day hospital patients may bear additional costs. Carers of all patients with acute psychiatric illness are often themselves severely distressed at the time of admission, but day hospital treatment leads to less burden on carers in the long term. PMID:9161310