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Sample records for acute pulmonary embolism-induced

  1. Septic pulmonary embolism induced by dental infection.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Yutaro; Taniguchi, Akihiko; Yuzurio, Syota; Horita, Naokatsu; Hosokawa, Shinobu; Watanabe, Yoichi; Tohmori, Hidetoshi; Ono, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    Dental infection can be an important source for septic pulmonary embolism (SPE), but only a few cases of SPE accompanying dental infection have been reported. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical features of SPE induced by dental infection. Patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria described in the text were recruited in a retrospective fashion. All 9 patients were men, with a median age of 59 years (range:47 to 74 years). Eight patients had chest pain (88.9%), 5 had a preceding toothache (55.6%) and 3 had preceding gingival swelling (33.3%). Blood cultures obtained from 7 patients were negative. Periodontitis was found in all of the cases, periapical periodontitis in 5 cases, and gingival abscess in 3 cases. The median duration of hospitalization was 15 days, and symptoms were mild in some cases. In addition to antimicrobial therapy, tooth extraction was performed in 3 cases, tooth scaling in 6. SPE induced by dental infection has prominent clinical characteristics such as male preponderance, chest pain, preceding toothache, and mild clinical course.

  2. Postoperative Acute Pulmonary Embolism Following Pulmonary Resections

    PubMed Central

    Shonyela, Felix Samuel; Liu, Bo; Jiao, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative acute pulmonary embolism after pulmonary resections is highly fatal complication. Many literatures have documented cancer to be the highest risk factor for acute pulmonary embolism after pulmonary resections. Early diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism is highly recommended and computed tomographic pulmonary angiography is the gold standard in diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism. Anticoagulants and thrombolytic therapy have shown a great success in treatment of acute pulmonary embolism. Surgical therapies (embolectomy and inferior vena cava filter replacement) proved to be lifesaving but many literatures favored medical therapy as the first choice. Prophylaxis pre and post operation is highly recommended, because there were statistical significant results in different studies which supported the use of prophylaxis in prevention of acute pulmonary embolism. Having reviewed satisfactory number of literatures, it is suggested that thoroughly preoperative assessment of patient conditions, determining their risk factors complicating to pulmonary embolism and the use of appropriate prophylaxis measures are the key options to the successful minimization or eradication of acute pulmonary embolism after lung resections. PMID:26354232

  3. Acute Intraoperative Pulmonary Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Nason, Katie S.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Acute intraoperative aspiration is a potentially fatal complication with significant associated morbidity. Patients undergoing thoracic surgery are at increased risk for anesthesia-related aspiration, largely due to the predisposing conditions associated with this complication. Awareness of the risk factors, predisposing conditions, maneuvers to decrease risk and immediate management options by both the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesia team is imperative to reducing risk and optimizing patient outcomes associated with acute intraoperative pulmonary aspiration. Based on the root-cause analyses that many of the aspiration events can be traced back to provider factors, having an experienced anesthesiologist present for high-risk cases is also critical. PMID:26210926

  4. Acute pulmonary edema associated with naphazoline ingestion.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Hidetada; Norimoto, Kazunobu; Seki, Tadahiko; Nishiguchi, Takashi; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Konobu, Toshifumi; Nishio, Kenji; Okuchi, Kazuo

    2008-03-01

    In published reports of naphazoline ingestion, clinical effects are hypertension, bradycardia, pallor, diaphoresis, and respiratory distress. We report three cases of acute pulmonary edema after the intentional ingestion of naphazoline-containing antiseptic first aid liquid. These cases presented with altered mental status, hypertension, bradycardia, and diaphoresis. Chest x-ray on admission revealed acute pulmonary edema. Two cases required mechanical ventilation. All of these clinical effects resolved within 24 hours and the patients were discharged with no sequelae. Since naphazoline stimulates the peripheral alpha-2 adrenergic receptor, we speculate that intense vasoconstriction may have elevated cardiac afterload and left atrial-ventricular blood volume and caused acute pulmonary edema.

  5. [Acute heart failure: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Marteles, Marta; Urrutia, Agustín

    2014-03-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock are two of the main forms of presentation of acute heart failure. Both entities are serious, with high mortality, and require early diagnosis and prompt and aggressive management. Acute pulmonary edema is due to the passage of fluid through the alveolarcapillary membrane and is usually the result of an acute cardiac episode. Correct evaluation and clinical identification of the process is essential in the management of acute pulmonary edema. The initial aim of treatment is to ensure hemodynamic stability and to correct hypoxemia. Other measures that can be used are vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, loop diuretics and, in specific instances, opioids. Cardiogenic shock is characterized by sustained hypoperfusion, pulmonary wedge pressure > 18 mmHg and a cardiac index < 2.2l/min/m(2). The process typically presents with hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg or a decrease in mean arterial pressure > 30 mmHg) and absent or reduced diuresis (< 0.5 ml/kg/h). The most common cause is left ventricular failure due to acute myocardial infarction. Treatment consists of general measures to reverse acidosis and hypoxemia, as well as the use of vasopressors and inotropic drugs. Early coronary revascularization has been demonstrated to improve survival in shock associated with ischaemic heart disease.

  6. An uncommon cause of acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Santosh; Giri, Smith; Bhusal, Mohan; Siwakoti, Krishmita; Pathak, Ranjan

    2016-09-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema secondary to catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy is a very uncommon and fatal initial presentation of pheochromocytoma. However, with early clinical suspicion and aggressive management, the condition is reversible. This case report describes a patient who presented with hypertension, dyspnea, and cough with bloody streaks, and who recovered within 48 hours after appropriate treatment. PMID:27575897

  7. Unilateral pulmonary edema following acute subglottic edema.

    PubMed

    Morisaki, H; Ochiai, R; Takeda, J; Nagano, M

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a case of unilateral pulmonary edema following acute subglottic edema after removal of an endotracheal tube. A 3-year-old boy, diagnosed as having nondiphtheric croup and pectus excavatum deformity, was scheduled for repair of a cleft lip. No complication occurred during the operation. After removal of the endotracheal tube, he showed dyspnea and cyanosis and was later found to have acute subglottic edema. After reintubation of the trachea, frothy pink fluid was discharged from the tube, and chest roentgenogram showed a right-sided alveolar infiltrate. Many factors may cause unilateral pulmonary edema, but it is suggested that acute subglottic edema and unilateral bronchial fragility strongly affected this episode.

  8. Surgical embolectomy for acute massive pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Senol; Toktas, Faruk; Goncu, Tugrul; Eris, Cuneyt; Gucu, Arif; Ay, Derih; Erdolu, Burak; Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Karaagac, Kemal; Vural, Hakan; Ozyazicioglu, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is associated with significant mortality rate despite diagnostic and therapeutic advances. The aim of this study was to analyze our clinical outcomes of patients with acute massive PE who underwent emergency surgical pulmonary embolectomy. Methods: This retrospective study included 13 consecutive patients undergoing emergency surgical pulmonary embolectomy for acute massive PE at our institution from March 2000 to November 2013. The medical records of all patients were reviewed for demograhic and preoperative data and postoperative outcomes. All patients presented with cardiogenic shock with severe right ventricular dysfunction confirmed by echocardiography, where 4 (30.8%) of the patients experienced cardiac arrest requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation before surgery. Results: The mean age of patients was 61.8 ± 14 years (range, 38 to 82 years) with 8 (61.5%) males. The most common risk factors for PE was the history of prior deep venous thrombosis (n = 9, 69.2%). There were 3 (23.1%) in-hospital deaths including operative mortality of 7.7% (n = 1). Ten (76.9%) patients survived and were discharged from the hospital. The mean follow-up was 25 months; follow-up was 100% complete in surviving patients. There was one case (7.7%) of late death 12 months after surgery due to renal carcinoma. Postoperative echocardiographic pressure measurements demonstrated a significant reduction (P < 0.001). At final follow-up, all patients were in New York Heart Association class I and no readmission for a recurrent of PE was observed. Conclusion: Surgical pulmonary embolectomy is a reasonable option and could be performed with acceptable results, if it is performed early in patients with acute massive PE who have not reached the profound cardiogenic shock or cardiac arrest. PMID:25664045

  9. Pulmonary Artery Denervation Reduces Pulmonary Artery Pressure and Induces Histological Changes in an Acute Porcine Model of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Nadine D.; Chang, William; Watson, Oliver; Swift, Andrew J.; Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charlie A.; Kiely, David G.; Suvarna, S. Kim; Gunn, Julian; Lawrie, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background— Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality and limited treatment options. Recent studies have shown that pulmonary artery denervation improves pulmonary hemodynamics in an experimental model and in an early clinical trial. We aimed to evaluate the nerve distribution around the pulmonary artery, to determine the effect of radiofrequency pulmonary artery denervation on acute pulmonary hypertension induced by vasoconstriction, and to demonstrate denervation of the pulmonary artery at a histological level. Methods and Results— Histological evaluation identified a circumferential distribution of nerves around the proximal pulmonary arteries. Nerves were smaller in diameter, greater in number, and located in closer proximity to the luminal aspect of the pulmonary arterial wall beyond the pulmonary artery bifurcation. To determine the effect of pulmonary arterial denervation acute pulmonary hypertension was induced in 8 pigs by intravenous infusion of thromboxane A2 analogue. Animals were assigned to either pulmonary artery denervation, using a prototype radiofrequency catheter and generator, or a sham procedure. Pulmonary artery denervation resulted in reduced mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance and increased cardiac output. Ablation lesions on the luminal surface of the pulmonary artery were accompanied by histological and biochemical alteration in adventitial nerves and correlated with improved hemodynamic parameters. Conclusions— Pulmonary artery denervation offers the possibility of a new treatment option for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Further work is required to determine the long-term efficacy and safety. PMID:26553697

  10. Medical emergencies: pulmonary embolism and acute severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, K; Ball, J

    2013-01-01

    In this, the second of two articles covering specific medical emergencies, we discuss the definitions, epidemiology, pathophysiology, acute and chronic management of pulmonary embolus and acute severe asthma. PMID:23210560

  11. Acute interstitial pneumonia and acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Swigris, Jeffrey J; Brown, Kevin K

    2006-12-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) and acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AEIPF) are similar respiratory disorders characterized by the rapid development of progressive dyspnea and cough. Both frequently lead to respiratory failure and death. Pathologically, each is characterized by the presence of a diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) pattern; in AIP, DAD is the sole pattern, whereas in AEIPF DAD is superimposed upon a background usual interstitial pneumonia. They differ in that patients with AEIPF have preexisting idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, whereas patients with AIP have no predisposing disorders to account for their disease. Because both presentations overlap with multiple other causes of acute lung injury, a comprehensive evaluation is necessary to rule out disorders such as overwhelming infection or congestive heart failure. Although a confident diagnosis can be achieved without it, a surgical lung biopsy is necessary to provide a definitive diagnosis. Despite minimal evidence, glucocorticoids are frequently begun once microbiological evaluation confirms the absence of infection. Despite therapy, the case fatality rate ranges up to 70% for both, with most patients dying in the first 2 weeks. Survivors of the acute event can recover to their previous baseline; however, most AIP survivors will stabilize with some functional impairment, whereas in those with AEIPF, progressive fibrosis with functional deterioration is the rule.

  12. Glyphosate poisoning with acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Darshana Sudip; Khot, Rajashree; Joshi, P P; Pandharipande, Madhuri; Nagpure, Keshav

    2014-01-01

    GlySH-surfactant herbicide (GlySH), one of the most commonly used herbicides worldwide, has been considered as minimally toxic to humans. However, clinical toxicologists occasionally encounter cases of severe systemic toxicity. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) states that 'GlySH' is of relatively low oral and acute dermal toxicity. It does not have anticholinesterase effect and no organophosphate-like central nervous system (CNS) effects. The clinical features range from skin and throat irritation to hypotension and death. Severe GlySH-surfactant poisoning is manifested by gastroenteritis, respiratory disturbances, altered mental status, hypotension refractory to the treatment, renal failure, and shock.[1] GlySH intoxication has a case fatality rate 3.2-29.3%. Pulmonary toxicity and renal toxicity seem to be responsible for mortality. Metabolic acidosis, abnormal chest X-ray, arrhythmias, and elevated serum creatinine levels are useful prognostic factors for predicting GlySH mortality.[2] There is no antidote and the mainstay of treatment for systemic toxicity is decontamination and aggressive supportive therapy. We report a case of acute pulmonary edema, which is a rare but severe manifestation of oral GlySH poisoning, where patient survived with aggressive supportive therapy. PMID:25948977

  13. Pulmonary artery relative area change is inversely related to ex vivo measured arterial elastic modulus in the canine model of acute pulmonary embolization.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Kellihan, Heidi B; Henningsen, Joseph; Bellofiore, Alessandro; Forouzan, Omid; Roldán-Alzate, Alejandro; Consigny, Daniel W; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H; Francois, Christopher J; Chesler, Naomi C

    2014-09-22

    A low relative area change (RAC) of the proximal pulmonary artery (PA) over the cardiac cycle is a good predictor of mortality from right ventricular failure in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). The relationship between RAC and local mechanical properties of arteries, which are known to stiffen in acute and chronic PH, is not clear, however. In this study, we estimated elastic moduli of three PAs (MPA, LPA and RPA: main, left and right PAs) at the physiological state using mechanical testing data and correlated these estimated elastic moduli to RAC measured in vivo with both phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) and M-mode echocardiography (on RPA only). We did so using data from a canine model of acute PH due to embolization to assess the sensitivity of RAC to changes in elastic modulus in the absence of chronic PH-induced arterial remodeling. We found that elastic modulus increased with embolization-induced PH, presumably a consequence of increased collagen engagement, which corresponds well to decreased RAC. Furthermore, RAC was inversely related to elastic modulus. Finally, we found MRI and echocardiography yielded comparable estimates of RAC. We conclude that RAC of proximal PAs can be obtained from either MRI or echocardiography and a change in RAC indicates a change in elastic modulus of proximal PAs detectable even in the absence of chronic PH-induced arterial remodeling. The correlation between RAC and elastic modulus of proximal PAs may be useful for prognoses and to monitor the effects of therapeutic interventions in patients with PH. PMID:25128393

  14. Meteorological parameters and severity of acute pulmonary embolism episodes.

    PubMed

    Staśkiewicz, Grzegorz; Czekajska-Chehab, Elżbieta; Przegaliński, Jerzy; Maciejewski, Marcin; Pachowicz, Marcin; Drop, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Frequency of acute pulmonary embolism episodes has been previously shown to correlate significantly with meteorological factors in the period preceding their occurrence. The purpose of the study was to analyze the relation of meteorological factors and the severity of acute pulmonary embolism, expressed by the CT-based pulmonary obstruction score. A retrospective analysis of medical data of 182 consecutive patients with acute pulmonary embolism diagnosed with CT pulmonary angiography was performed. Severity of pulmonary obstruction was assessed by analysis of CT pulmonary angiography examinations, and defined with pulmonary obstruction score by Qanadli et al. The study group was divided into low (L group, 95 patients) and high PE severity (H group, 87 patients), with a cutoff value of 50% of maximum pulmonary obstruction score. Meteorological data collected for the relevant time period were: air temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, visibility, wind speed and precipitation. No significant differences in seasonal distribution of pulmonary embolism episodes were observed. Episodes of more severe pulmonary embolism were preceded by periods of lower atmospheric pressure (1,016.35 hPA for group H, vs. 1,016.35 hPa for group L, p = 0.022). No significant relations between other meteorological factors and severity of PE were observed. The reported finding shows the need of further research on the nature of meteorological factors influence on the course of pulmonary embolism, which should be analyzed not ony regarding the frequency, but also severity of PE episodes.

  15. Acute pulmonary oedema on the Ruwenzori mountain range.

    PubMed Central

    Naeije, R; Mélot, C

    1990-01-01

    A 40 year old man had an episode of severe pulmonary oedema at 4000-5000 m during the ascent of the Margherita peak (5109 m) of Mount Stanley on the Ruwenzori. He had taken acetazolamide and high dose dexamethasone to treat symptoms of acute mountain sickness. Six years before he had been studied by right heart catheterisation as a healthy volunteer during hypoxic breathing at sea level. His pulmonary vascular reactivity had been within the normal range for 32 healthy subjects. This man had high altitude pulmonary oedema despite currently recommended treatments for acute mountain sickness and normal pulmonary vascular reactivity to hypoxia at sea level. PMID:2271350

  16. [Perioperative lung injury: acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and acute interstitial pneumonia after pulmonary resection].

    PubMed

    Hoshikawa, Yasushi; Kondo, Takashi

    2004-12-01

    The mortality rate after surgical resection for lung cancer has been reported to range between 1% and 3%, with 30% caused by acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) or acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP). Approximately 20% of patients with IPF have lung cancer, while 2% to 4% of lung cancer patients have IPF. The incidence of postoperative acute exacerbation of IPF is about 20%. Some investigations in Japan revealed that 10% to 17% of lung cancer patients undergoing lung resection, who have not been diagnosed with IPF preoperatively, have localized-usual interstitial pneumonia (Lo-UIP) lesions. Approximately 20% of patients with Lo-UIP show postoperative acute exacerbation, while about 0.5% of those without Lo-UIP develop AIP after surgery. There is no confirmed treatment or prophylaxis. Most patients who develop postoperative acute exacerbation or AIP are treated with methylpredonisolone (1,000 mg/day x 3 days), but the mortality rate is 50% or greater. We emphasize that more efforts should be made to develop strategies to prevent postoperative acute exacerbation of IPF and AIP.

  17. The pathogenesis of pulmonary edema in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Warshaw, A L; Lesser, P B; Rie, M; Cullen, D J

    1975-01-01

    Acute pulmonary edema appeared 3 or more days after the onset of acute pancreatitis in 7 patients, an approximate incidence of 8%. The severity of pancreatitis in these patients was characterized by massive requirements for intravenous colloid and by marked hypocalcemia. In addition, at least 5 of the 7 patients had very high serum levels of triglycerides at the time of hospital admission. Hemodynamic studies during pulmonary edema showed normal central venous pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Cardiac index was appropriately elevated. Respiratory treatment, consisting of endotracheal intubation and controlled ventilation with PEEP, was successful in allowing reversal of the pulmonary injury and recovery of respiratory function within 1-2 weeks in all cases. Two patients died later from pancreatic abscesses. The findings indicate that a distinct form of pulmonary injury may occur in acute pancreatitis, characterized by loss of integrity of the alveolar-capilllary membrane, leading to pulmonary edema. The mechanism of injury is not known but may be caused by circulating free fatty acids, phospholipase A, or vasoactive substances. The pulmonary membrane lesion appears to heal during the period of intensive respiratory support. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1101836

  18. Endovascular treatment for acute pulmonary embolism in neurological patient.

    PubMed

    Paul, Gunchan; Paul, Birinder S; Gautam, Parshotam L; Mohan, Bishav; Sharma, Shruti

    2015-07-01

    Among the spectrum of venous thrombo-embolic disease, acute pulmonary embolism accounts for the most life threatening manifestations with mortality exceeding 50%. It can affect many patient populations across various disciplines, hence immediate attention and aggressive treatment is crucial. With the advancement of technologies, various catheter-based devices are available to treat massive or submassive PE. In this paper we report two patients of acute pulmonary embolism with neurological issues where the life threatening emergency was successfully managed by utilizing endovascular directed thrombolytic reperfusion therapy. PMID:26609298

  19. Morphine in the treatment of acute pulmonary oedema--Why?

    PubMed

    Ellingsrud, C; Agewall, S

    2016-01-01

    Morphine has for a long time, been used in patients with acute pulmonary oedema due to its anticipated anxiolytic and vasodilatory properties, however a discussion about the benefits and risks has been raised recently. A literature search in Medline and Embase using the keywords "pulmonary oedema" OR "lung oedema" OR "acute heart failure" AND "morphine" was performed. A certain vasodilation has been described after morphine administration, but the evidence for this mechanism is relatively poor and morphine-induced anxiolysis may possibly be the most important factor of morphine in pulmonary oedema and therefore some authors have suggested benzodiazepines as an alternative treatment. Respiratory depression seems to be a less relevant clinical problem according to the literature, whereas vomiting is common, which may cause aspiration. In the largest outcome study, based on the ADHERE registry, morphine given in acute decompensated heart failure was an independent predictor of increased hospital mortality, with an odds ratio of 4.8 (95% CI: 4.52-5.18, p<0.001). Other, smaller studies have shown a significant association between morphine administration and mortality, which was lost after adjusting for confounding factors. Morphine is still used for pulmonary oedema in spite of poor scientific background data. A randomised, controlled study is necessary in order to determine the effect--and especially the risk--when using morphine for pulmonary oedema. Since the positive effects are not sufficiently documented, and since the risk for increased mortality cannot be ruled out, one can advocate that the use should be avoided.

  20. Giant pulmonary hamartoma causing acute right heart failure.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Heman M N; Page, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Giant pulmonary hamartomas are rare. We describe a case of a 59-year-old female patient with a giant chondroid hamartoma in the lower lobe of the right lung presenting with acute right heart failure. To the best of our knowledge such a unique presentation has not been previously described in the literature. PMID:24384217

  1. Catheter fragmentation of acute massive pulmonary thromboembolism: distal embolisation and pulmonary arterial pressure elevation.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, K; Tajima, H; Murata, S; Kumita, S-I; Yamamoto, T; Tanaka, K

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between pulmonary arterial pressure and distal embolisation during catheter fragmentation for the treatment of acute massive pulmonary thromboembolism with haemodynamic impairment. 25 patients with haemodynamic impairment (8 men and 17 women; aged 27-82 years) were treated by mechanical thrombus fragmentation with a modified rotating pigtail catheter. After thrombus fragmentation, all patients received local fibrinolytic therapy, followed by manual clot aspiration using a percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) guide catheter. Pulmonary arterial pressure was continuously recorded during the procedure. The Friedman test and Wilcoxon test were applied for statistical analysis. Distal embolisation was confirmed by digital subtraction angiography in 7 of the 25 patients. A significant rise in mean pulmonary arterial pressure occurred after thrombus fragmentation (before: 34.1 mmHg; after: 37.9 mmHg; p<0.05), and this group showed a significant decrease in mean pulmonary arterial pressure after thrombus aspiration (25.7 mmHg; p<0.05). No distal embolisation was seen in 18 of the 25 patients, and a significant decrease in mean pulmonary arterial pressure was confirmed after thrombus fragmentation (before: 34.2 mmHg; after: 28.1 mmHg: p<0.01), and after thrombus aspiration (23.3 mmHg; p<0.01). In conclusion, distal embolisation and a rise in pulmonary arterial pressure can occur during mechanical fragmentation using a rotating pigtail catheter for the treatment of life-threatening acute massive pulmonary thromboembolism; thrombolysis and thrombus aspiration can provide partial recanalization and haemodynamic stabilization. Continuous monitoring of pulmonary arterial pressure may contribute to the safety of these interventional procedures. PMID:18941044

  2. [PREVENTION AND CORRECTION OF PULMONARY COMPLICATIONS FOR SEVERE ACUTE PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Fedorkiv, M B

    2015-06-01

    Increased of proinflammatory cytokines levels, including interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) on severe acute pancreatitis causes vasodilatation, increased permeability of the wall, accumulation of fluid in lung tissue and pleural sinuses. Transudate from acute parapancreatyc clusters of hot liquid and abdomen falls into the chest cavity through microscopic defects in the diaphragm due to the formation of pathological pleural-peritoneal connections or the relevant pressure gradient between the abdominal and pleural cavities. Remediation and removal of acute parapancreatyc clusters combined with the use of a multicomponent drug infusion therapy Cytoflavin provide a reduction in the frequency of pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis from 48.3 to 31.0%. Use of the drug Cytoflavin reduces the severity of endogenous intoxication and mortality from acute lung injury from 12.9 to 6.1%. PMID:26521460

  3. Prognostic value of computed tomography in acute pulmonary thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Plasencia-Martínez, J M; Carmona-Bayonas, A; Calvo-Temprano, D; Jiménez-Fonseca, P

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being the standard reference for the diagnosis of acute pulmonary thromboembolism, CT angiography of the pulmonary arteries can also provide valuable information about the patient's prognosis. Although which imaging findings are useful for prognosis remains controversial, signs of right ventricular dysfunction on CT are now included in clinical algorithms for the management of pulmonary thromboembolism. However, the optimal method for obtaining these measurements while maintaining a balance between the ease of use necessary to include their evaluation in our daily activity and the loss of precision in its predictive capacity remains to be determined. Moreover, other variables associated with pulmonary thromboembolism that often go unobserved can complement the prognostic information we can offer to clinicians. This review aims to clarify some of the more controversial aspects related to the prognostic value of CT in patients with pulmonary embolisms according to the available evidence. Knowing which variables are becoming more important in the prognosis, how to detect them, and why it is important to include them in our reports will help improve the management of patients with pulmonary embolism.

  4. Massive Pulmonary Embolism at the Onset of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sorà, Federica; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Laurenti, Luca; Autore, Francesco; Giammarco, Sabrina; Sica, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Life-threatening bleeding is a major and early complication of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), but in the last years there is a growing evidence of thromboses in APL. We report the first case of a young woman with dyspnea as the first symptom of APL due to massive pulmonary embolism (PE) successfully treated with thrombolysis for PE and heparin. APL has been processed with a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) obtaining complete remission. PMID:27413520

  5. TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis during ischemic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    White, Laura E; Santora, Rachel J; Cui, Yan; Moore, Frederick A; Hassoun, Heitham T

    2012-09-01

    Despite advancements in renal replacement therapy, the mortality rate for acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unacceptably high, likely due to remote organ injury. Kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) activates cellular and soluble mediators that incite a distinct pulmonary proinflammatory and proapoptotic response. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) has been identified as a prominent death receptor activated in the lungs during ischemic AKI. We hypothesized that circulating TNF-α released from the postischemic kidney induces TNFR1-mediated pulmonary apoptosis, and we aimed to elucidate molecular pathways to programmed cell death. Using an established murine model of kidney IRI, we characterized the time course for increased circulatory and pulmonary TNF-α levels and measured concurrent upregulation of pulmonary TNFR1 expression. We then identified TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis after ischemic AKI using TNFR1-/- mice. Subsequent TNF-α signaling disruption with Etanercept implicated circulatory TNF-α as a key soluble mediator of pulmonary apoptosis and lung microvascular barrier dysfunction during ischemic AKI. We further elucidated pathways of TNFR1-mediated apoptosis with NF-κB (Complex I) and caspase-8 (Complex II) expression and discovered that TNFR1 proapoptotic signaling induces NF-κB activation. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB (Complex I) resulted in a proapoptotic phenotype, lung barrier leak, and altered cellular flice inhibitory protein signaling independent of caspase-8 (Complex II) activation. Ischemic AKI activates soluble TNF-α and induces TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis through augmentation of the prosurvival and proapoptotic TNFR1 signaling pathway. Kidney-lung crosstalk after ischemic AKI represents a complex pathological process, yet focusing on specific biological pathways may yield potential future therapeutic targets.

  6. TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis during ischemic acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    White, Laura E.; Santora, Rachel J.; Cui, Yan; Moore, Frederick A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite advancements in renal replacement therapy, the mortality rate for acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unacceptably high, likely due to remote organ injury. Kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) activates cellular and soluble mediators that incite a distinct pulmonary proinflammatory and proapoptotic response. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) has been identified as a prominent death receptor activated in the lungs during ischemic AKI. We hypothesized that circulating TNF-α released from the postischemic kidney induces TNFR1-mediated pulmonary apoptosis, and we aimed to elucidate molecular pathways to programmed cell death. Using an established murine model of kidney IRI, we characterized the time course for increased circulatory and pulmonary TNF-α levels and measured concurrent upregulation of pulmonary TNFR1 expression. We then identified TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis after ischemic AKI using TNFR1−/− mice. Subsequent TNF-α signaling disruption with Etanercept implicated circulatory TNF-α as a key soluble mediator of pulmonary apoptosis and lung microvascular barrier dysfunction during ischemic AKI. We further elucidated pathways of TNFR1-mediated apoptosis with NF-κB (Complex I) and caspase-8 (Complex II) expression and discovered that TNFR1 proapoptotic signaling induces NF-κB activation. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB (Complex I) resulted in a proapoptotic phenotype, lung barrier leak, and altered cellular flice inhibitory protein signaling independent of caspase-8 (Complex II) activation. Ischemic AKI activates soluble TNF-α and induces TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis through augmentation of the prosurvival and proapoptotic TNFR1 signaling pathway. Kidney-lung crosstalk after ischemic AKI represents a complex pathological process, yet focusing on specific biological pathways may yield potential future therapeutic targets. PMID:22728466

  7. Acute effect upon pulmonary function of low level exposure to phenol-formaldehyde-resin-coated wood.

    PubMed

    Imbus, H R; Tochilin, S J

    1988-09-01

    In order to determine whether phenol-formaldehyde-resin-coated wood particles would cause an acute decline in pulmonary function, 176 workers in 2 oriented strandboard production plants were given respiratory questionnaires and pulmonary function tests before and during their work shifts. Measurements of dust and adsorbed formaldehyde were made on the same day as the pulmonary function tests. Measured formaldehyde levels were low, and measured dust levels were low to moderate. There was no evidence of an acute effect upon pulmonary function.

  8. Disseminated fungal infection complicated with pulmonary haemorrhage in a case of acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Thulkar, S; Sharma, S; Das, P; Kumar, L

    2000-01-01

    Pulmonary haemorrhage is a common necropsy finding in acute leukaemia, however, it is rarely diagnosed during life. A man with acute myeloid leukaemia is reported who presented with disseminated fungal infection, anaemia, thrombocytopenia, and subconjuctival and petechial haemorrhages. During the course of the patient's illness, the chest infection was complicated with bilateral pulmonary haemorrhage. The diagnosis of pulmonary haemorrhage was based on characteristic clinical and radiological findings. The patient improved on treatment.


Keywords: leukaemia; pulmonary infiltrate; haemorrhage PMID:11060145

  9. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Rialp Cervera, G; del Castillo Blanco, A; Pérez Aizcorreta, O; Parra Morais, L

    2014-03-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) with conventional therapy improves the outcome of patients with acute respiratory failure due to hypercapnic decompensation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE). This review summarizes the main effects of NIV in these pathologies. In COPD, NIV improves gas exchange and symptoms, reducing the need for endotracheal intubation, hospital mortality and hospital stay compared with conventional oxygen therapy. NIV may also avoid reintubation and may decrease the length of invasive mechanical ventilation. In ACPE, NIV accelerates the remission of symptoms and the normalization of blood gas parameters, reduces the need for endotracheal intubation, and is associated with a trend towards lesser mortality, without increasing the incidence of myocardial infarction. The ventilation modality used in ACPE does not affect the patient prognosis.

  10. Follow-up CT pulmonary angiograms in patients with acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Stein, Paul D; Matta, Fadi; Hughes, Patrick G; Hourmouzis, Zak N; Hourmouzis, Nina P; Schweiss, Robert E; Bach, Jennifer A; Kazan, Viviane M; Kakish, Edward J; Keyes, Daniel C; Hughes, Mary J

    2016-10-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) angiography is associated with a non-negligible lifetime attributable risk of cancer. The risk is considerably greater for women and younger patients. Recognizing that there are risks from radiation, the purpose of this investigation was to assess the frequency of follow-up CT angiograms in patients with acute pulmonary embolism. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients aged ≥18 years with acute pulmonary embolism seen in three emergency departments from January 2013 to December 2014. Records of all patients were reviewed for at least 14 months. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed by CT angiography in 600 patients. At least one follow-up CT angiogram in 1 year was obtained in 141 of 600 (23.5 %). Two follow-ups in 1 year were obtained in 40 patients (6.7 %), 3 follow-ups were obtained in 15 patients (2.5 %), and 4 follow-ups were obtained in 3 patients (0.5 %). Among young women (aged ≤29 years) with pulmonary embolism, 10 of 21 (47.6 %) had at least 1 follow-up and 4 of 21 (19.0 %) had 2 or more follow-ups in 1 year. Among all patients, recurrent pulmonary embolism was diagnosed in 15 of 141 (10.6 %) on the first follow-up CT angiogram and in 6 of 40 (15.0 %) on the second follow-up. Follow-up CT angiograms were obtained in a significant proportion of patients with pulmonary embolism, including young women, the group with the highest risk. Alternative options might be considered to reduce the hazard of radiation-induced cancer, particularly in young women.

  11. Postmortem diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in patients with acute respiratory failure - demographics, etiologic and pulmonary histologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Ruppert, Aline D; Canzian, Mauro; Capelozzi, Vera L; Serrano, Carlos V

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Acute respiratory failure is present in 5% of patients with acute myocardial infarction and is responsible for 20% to 30% of the fatal post-acute myocardial infarction. The role of inflammation associated with pulmonary edema as a cause of acute respiratory failure post-acute myocardial infarction remains to be determined. We aimed to describe the demographics, etiologic data and histological pulmonary findings obtained through autopsies of patients who died during the period from 1990 to 2008 due to acute respiratory failure with no diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction during life. METHODS: This study considers 4,223 autopsies of patients who died of acute respiratory failure that was not preceded by any particular diagnosis while they were alive. The diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was given in 218 (4.63%) patients. The age, sex and major associated diseases were recorded for each patient. Pulmonary histopathology was categorized as follows: diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of acute myocardial infarction associated with specific histopathology was determined by logistic regression. RESULTS: In total, 147 men were included in the study. The mean age at the time of death was 64 years. Pulmonary histopathology revealed pulmonary edema as well as the presence of diffuse alveolar damage in 72.9% of patients. Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 11.9% of patients, systemic arterial hypertension in 10.1% and dilated cardiomyopathy in 6.9%. A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant positive association between acute myocardial infarction with diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary edema. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we demonstrated that in autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure as the cause of death, 5% were diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. Pulmonary histology revealed a significant inflammatory response, which has

  12. Acute Exacerbation of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. An International Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Collard, Harold R; Ryerson, Christopher J; Corte, Tamera J; Jenkins, Gisli; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Lederer, David J; Lee, Joyce S; Maher, Toby M; Wells, Athol U; Antoniou, Katerina M; Behr, Juergen; Brown, Kevin K; Cottin, Vincent; Flaherty, Kevin R; Fukuoka, Junya; Hansell, David M; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kaminski, Naftali; Kim, Dong Soon; Kolb, Martin; Lynch, David A; Myers, Jeffrey L; Raghu, Ganesh; Richeldi, Luca; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Martinez, Fernando J

    2016-08-01

    Acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis has been defined as an acute, clinically significant, respiratory deterioration of unidentifiable cause. The objective of this international working group report on acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was to provide a comprehensive update on the topic. A literature review was conducted to identify all relevant English text publications and abstracts. Evidence-based updates on the epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, prognosis, and management of acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are provided. Finally, to better reflect the current state of knowledge and improve the feasibility of future research into its etiology and treatment, the working group proposes a new conceptual framework for acute respiratory deterioration in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and a revised definition and diagnostic criteria for acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  13. Acute Exacerbation of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. An International Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Collard, Harold R; Ryerson, Christopher J; Corte, Tamera J; Jenkins, Gisli; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Lederer, David J; Lee, Joyce S; Maher, Toby M; Wells, Athol U; Antoniou, Katerina M; Behr, Juergen; Brown, Kevin K; Cottin, Vincent; Flaherty, Kevin R; Fukuoka, Junya; Hansell, David M; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kaminski, Naftali; Kim, Dong Soon; Kolb, Martin; Lynch, David A; Myers, Jeffrey L; Raghu, Ganesh; Richeldi, Luca; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Martinez, Fernando J

    2016-08-01

    Acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis has been defined as an acute, clinically significant, respiratory deterioration of unidentifiable cause. The objective of this international working group report on acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was to provide a comprehensive update on the topic. A literature review was conducted to identify all relevant English text publications and abstracts. Evidence-based updates on the epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, prognosis, and management of acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are provided. Finally, to better reflect the current state of knowledge and improve the feasibility of future research into its etiology and treatment, the working group proposes a new conceptual framework for acute respiratory deterioration in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and a revised definition and diagnostic criteria for acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27299520

  14. [Pulmonary complications of acute myocardial infarct. Therapeutic orientation].

    PubMed

    Cano, A E; Meaney, E

    1975-01-01

    The heart and the lung make up an inseparable anatomic and functional unit. The changes in one affect the other and vice versa. In acute myocardial infarction a heart failure syndrome develops. This syndrome is characterized by passive pulmonary congestion, which leads to hypoxemia. This hypoxemia indicate the functional disturbance of the lung, and the hemodinamic evolution of the disease. Arterial gases determination is the best way to assess the sickness progression. A certain paralelism exists among the central venous saturation, cardiac insufficiency and the degree of pulmonary disfunction. Such a procedure is not very appreciable and does not substitute the direct analysis of the arterial PO2. The pulmonary complications in the myocardial infarction shock are directly responsable of death in 50% of the patients. To heart failure and shock, hipperfusion and hypoxia are added. Many vessels close due to the decrease in the pulmonary flow. This brings about the release of substances that are toxic to the vessel causing an inflammatory vascular reaction. The decrease in the flow harms the lung cell and for this reason atelectasia or alveolar colapse occur; besides inducing the formation of shunts. Under these conditions the lung compliance decreases. The areas that are badly ventilated and hypoperfused can easily become infected and pneumonitis and abscesses cause even more harm to the tissue. The decrease in the speed of circulation and hematologic changes of shock, induce a diseminated intravascular coagulation. What was stated before leads to an important reduction of the lung as a depurating organ and makes the shock irreversible. As far as therapy is concerned in the prevention of vascular colaps and the improvement of the oxemia, oxygen is very useful when there is a venous congestion (clinically, X rays, and oxemia). When the concentration of O2 is lower than 50% in the cases with slight cardiac failure; do not use oxygen in higher concentrations unless the

  15. Risk stratification of patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, David; Lobo, Jose Luis; Barrios, Deisy; Prandoni, Paolo; Yusen, Roger D

    2016-02-01

    Patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) who present with arterial hypotension or shock have a high risk of death (high-risk PE), and treatment guidelines recommend strong consideration of thrombolysis in this setting. For normotensive patients diagnosed with PE, risk stratification should aim to differentiate the group of patients deemed as having a low risk for early complications (all-cause mortality, recurrent venous thromboembolism, and major bleeding) (low-risk PE) from the group of patients at higher risk for PE-related complications (intermediate-high risk PE), so low-risk patients could undergo consideration of early outpatient treatment of PE and intermediate-high risk patients would undergo close observation and consideration of thrombolysis. Clinicians should also use risk stratification and eligibility criteria to identify a third group of patients that should not undergo escalated or home therapy (intermediate-low risk PE). Such patients should initiate standard therapy of PE while in the hospital. Clinical models [e.g., Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI), simplified PESI (sPESI)] may accurately identify those at low risk of dying shortly after the diagnosis of PE. For identification of intermediate-high risk patients with acute PE, studies have validated predictive models that use a combination of clinical, laboratory and imaging variables. PMID:26768476

  16. Acute pulmonary embolism during an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Painter, Nate P; Kumar, Priya A; Arora, Harendra

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old female patient presented for an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for the removal of a biliary stent and lithotripsy. During the procedure, an acute drop in the end-tidal CO 2 , followed by cardiovascular collapse prompted the initiation of the advanced cardiac life support protocol. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) demonstrated direct evidence of pulmonary embolism. The patient was promptly treated with thrombolytic therapy and subsequently discharged home on oral warfarin therapy, with no noted sequelae. Although, there have been case reports of air embolism during an ERCP presenting with cardiovascular collapse, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of acute pulmonary embolus during this procedure. While the availability of TEE in the operating suites is quite common, quick access and interpretation capabilities in remote locations may not be as common. With the expansion of anesthesia services outside of the operating rooms, it may be prudent to develop rapid response systems that incorporate resources such as TEE and trained personnel to deal with such emergent situations.

  17. Thromboembolic resolution assessed by CT pulmonary angiography after treatment for acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    den Exter, Paul L; van Es, Josien; Kroft, Lucia J M; Erkens, Petra M G; Douma, Renée A; Mos, Inge C M; Jonkers, Gé; Hovens, Marcel M C; Durian, Marc F; ten Cate, Hugo; Beenen, Ludo F M; Kamphuisen, Pieter Willem; Huisman, Menno V

    2015-07-01

    The systematic assessment of residual thromboembolic obstruction after treatment for acute pulmonary embolism (PE) has been understudied. This assessment is of potential clinical importance, should clinically suspected recurrent PE occur, or as tool for risk stratification of cardiopulmonary complications or recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE). This study aimed to assess the rate of PE resolution and its implications for clinical outcome. In this prospective, multi-center cohort study, 157 patients with acute PE diagnosed by CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) underwent follow-up CTPA-imaging after six months of anticoagulant treatment. Two expert thoracic radiologists independently assessed the presence of residual thromboembolic obstruction. The degree of obstruction at baseline and follow-up was calculated using the Qanadli obstruction index. All patients were followed-up for 2.5 years. At baseline, the median obstruction index was 27.5 %. After six months of treatment, complete PE resolution had occurred in 84.1 % of the patients (95 % confidence interval (CI): 77.4-89.4 %). The median obstruction index of the 25 patients with residual thrombotic obstruction was 5.0 %. During follow-up, 16 (10.2 %) patients experienced recurrent VTE. The presence of residual thromboembolic obstruction was not associated with recurrent VTE (adjusted hazard ratio: 0.92; 95 % CI: 0.2-4.1).This study indicates that the incidence of residual thrombotic obstruction following treatment for PE is considerably lower than currently anticipated. These findings, combined with the absence of a correlation between residual thrombotic obstruction and recurrent VTE, do not support the routine use of follow-up CTPA-imaging in patients treated for acute PE. PMID:26017397

  18. Diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic management of acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Tapson, Victor F

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. Recognizing PE and administering anticoagulants can significantly improve patient outcomes by reducing mortality rates and preventing recurrent events. For more than 50 years, standard therapy has involved parenteral anticoagulation followed by long-term therapy with the vitamin K antagonist warfarin. However, management of warfarin therapy is challenging due to its narrow therapeutic range and interactions with genetic and environmental factors. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been developed to simplify anticoagulation and avoid the concerns associated with warfarin. DOACs are administered at a fixed dosage without routine monitoring and have few drug interactions. In recent years, DOACs have received FDA approval for the treatment of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and PE based on the results of well-conducted clinical trials. This review discusses approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of PE and the use of DOACs as an alternative to warfarin treatment for the management of the disease. While many of the indications for DOACs and concepts discussed apply to both DVT and PE, our focus will be acute PE. PMID:27450108

  19. Adjunctive Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement for Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, V. M.; Lee-Llacer, J.; Williams, J.; Ubaissi, H.; Gutierrez, G.

    2010-08-15

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are sometimes placed as an adjunct to full anticoagulation in patients with significant pulmonary embolism (PE). We aimed to determine the prevalence of adjunctive IVC filter placement in individuals diagnosed with PE, as well as the effect of adjunctive filter placement on mortality in patients with right heart strain associated with PE. This was a retrospective study of patients with acute PE treated with full anticoagulation admitted to a single academic medical center. Information abstracted from patient charts included presence or absence of right heart strain and of deep-vein thrombosis, and whether or not an IVC filter was placed. The endpoint was in-hospital mortality. Over 2.75 years, we found that 248 patients were diagnosed with acute PE, with an in-hospital mortality rate of 4.4%. The prevalence of adjunctive IVC filter placement was 13.3% (33 of 248), and the prevalence of documented right heart strain was 27.0% (67 of 248). In-hospital mortality was 10.2% in the non-filter-treated group (5 of 49), whereas there were no deaths in the filter-treated group (0 of 18); however, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.37). Both the presence of deep-vein thrombosis and of right heart strain increased the likelihood that an adjunctive IVC filter was placed (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001, respectively). At our institution, patients were treated with IVC filters in addition to anticoagulation in 13.3% of cases of acute PE. Prospective studies or large clinical registries should be conducted to clarify whether this practice improves outcomes.

  20. Multiple lung abscesses caused by Actinomyces graevenitzii mimicking acute pulmonary coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Izumikawa, Koichi; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2012-09-01

    Actinomyces graevenitzii is a newly recognized Actinomyces species that is seldom isolated from clinical specimens. A case of multiple pulmonary abscesses mimicking acute pulmonary coccidioidomycosis is described in this study, and the findings indicate that this organism is an opportunistic human pathogen.

  1. Multiple Lung Abscesses Caused by Actinomyces graevenitzii Mimicking Acute Pulmonary Coccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Actinomyces graevenitzii is a newly recognized Actinomyces species that is seldom isolated from clinical specimens. A case of multiple pulmonary abscesses mimicking acute pulmonary coccidioidomycosis is described in this study, and the findings indicate that this organism is an opportunistic human pathogen. PMID:22760049

  2. Time course of pulmonary vascular response to an acutely repetitive pulmonary microembolism in dogs--an analysis using pulmonary vascular impedance.

    PubMed

    Tobise, K; Tosaka, S; Onodera, S

    1992-05-01

    To understand the mechanism leading to progressive pulmonary hypertension, we investigated the time course of vascular response to an acutely repetitive pulmonary microembolism in dogs by using pulmonary vascular impedance. In a normal state, the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) was transiently increased by emboli, and the impedance moduli of 0 Hz (= Rin), 1.5 Hz and 3 Hz were slightly increased. A four-element electrical vascular model showed the transient increase in peripheral pulmonary vascular resistance (R2) and inertia, and reduction in compliance (C). In contrast, in a state of a slight pulmonary hypertension, mPAP was continuously increased by the same amount of emboli, and the impedance moduli of both 0 Hz and 3 Hz were significantly increased. By a four-element model, a severe increase in R2 and reduction in C were observed, and these changes continued. Therefore, although the vascular response to pulmonary microembolism basically depends on the degree of mechanical obstruction, this response is thought to be modulated by the responsiveness of pulmonary vessels at that time, which is involved in the alteration in the local characteristics of pulmonary vessels, and/or the recruitment of a new blood flow.

  3. Acute fibrinous organising pneumonia: a manifestation of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Jamous, Fady; Ayaz, Syed Zain; Choate, Jacquelyn

    2014-10-29

    A 50-year-old man was treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) for acute arthritis of his right big toe. Within a few days, he developed dyspnoea, hypoxaemia and diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. Symptoms improved with discontinuation of the antibiotic but worsened again with its reintroduction. An open lung biopsy was performed. We describe the workup performed and the factors that pointed to a final diagnosis of TMP-SMX-related pulmonary toxicity in the form of acute fibrinous organising pneumonia.

  4. The prognostic value of pulmonary embolism severity index in acute pulmonary embolism: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prognostic assessment is important for the management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE). Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI) and simple PESI (sPESI) are new emerged prognostic assessment tools for APE. The aim of this meta-analysis is to assess the accuracy of the PESI and the sPESI to predict prognostic outcomes (all-cause and PE-related mortality, serious adverse events) in APE patients, and compare between these two PESIs. Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE database were searched up to June 2012 using the terms “Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index” and “pulmonary embolism”. Summary odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for prognostic outcomes in low risk PESI versus high risk PESI were calculated. Summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC) used to estimate overall predicting accuracies of prognostic outcomes. Results Twenty-one studies were included in this meta-analysis. The results showed low-risk PESI was significantly associated with lower all-cause mortality (OR 0.13; 95% CI 0.12 to 0.15), PE-related mortality (OR 0.09; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.17) and serious adverse events (OR 0.34; 95% CI 0.29 to 0.41), with no homogeneity across studies. In sPESI subgroup, the OR of all-cause mortality, PE-related mortality, and serious adverse events was 0.10 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.14), 0.09 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.26) and 0.40 (95% CI 0.31 to 0.51), respectively; while in PESI subgroup, the OR was 0.14 (95% CI 0.13 to 0.16), 0.09 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.21), and 0.30 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.38), respectively. For accuracy analysis, the pooled sensitivity, the pooled specificity, and the overall weighted AUC for PESI predicting all-cause mortality was 0.909 (95% CI: 0.900 to 0.916), 0.411 (95% CI: 0.407 to 0.415), and 0.7853±0.0058, respectively; for PE-related mortality, it was 0.953 (95% CI: 0.913 to 0.978), 0.374 (95% CI: 0.360 to 0.388), and 0.8218±0.0349, respectively; for serious adverse events, it was 0.821 (95% CI: 0.795 to 0.845), 0

  5. Morphological changes in small pulmonary vessels are associated with severe acute exacerbation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Katsuhiro; Suzuki, Yuzo; Uto, Tomohiro; Sato, Jun; Imokawa, Shiro; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary vascular remodeling is essential for understanding the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The total cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessels has been reported to correlate with the pulmonary artery pressure, and this technique has enabled the assessment of pulmonary vascular involvements. We investigated the contribution of morphological alterations in the pulmonary vessels to severe acute exacerbation of COPD (AE-COPD). Methods This study enrolled 81 patients with COPD and 28 non-COPD subjects as control and assessed the percentage of CSA (%CSA) less than 5 mm2 (%CSA<5) and %CSA in the range of 5–10 mm2 (%CSA5–10) on high-resolution computed tomography images. Results Compared with the non-COPD subjects, the COPD patients had lower %CSA<5. %CSA<5 was positively correlated with airflow limitation and negatively correlated with the extent of emphysema. COPD patients with lower %CSA<5 showed significantly increased incidences of severe AE-COPD (Gray’s test; P=0.011). Furthermore, lower %CSA<5 was significantly associated with severe AE-COPD (hazard ratio, 2.668; 95% confidence interval, 1.225–5.636; P=0.010). Conclusion %CSA<5 was associated with an increased risk of severe AE-COPD. The distal pruning of the small pulmonary vessels is a part of the risk associated with AE-COPD, and %CSA<5 might be a surrogate marker for predicting AE-COPD. PMID:27418816

  6. Viral epidemiology of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, G; Lerikou, M; Tsiodras, S; Chranioti, Aik; Perros, E; Anagnostopoulou, U; Armaganidis, A; Karakitsos, P

    2012-02-01

    The role of viruses in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (AECOPD) needs further elucidation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the molecular epidemiology of viral pathogens in AECOPD. Patients presenting to the Emergency Room with AECOPD needing hospitalization were recruited. Oropharyngeal and sputum samples were collected in order to perform microarrays-based viral testing for the detection of respiratory viruses. A total of 200 (100%) patients were analyzed and from them in 107 (53.5%) a virus was detected. The commonest identified viruses were the human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (subtypes A and B) (40.5%), influenza virus (subtypes A, B, C) (11%), rhinovirus (8%) and human Parainfluenza Virus (subtypes A and B) (7.5%). A bacterial pathogen was isolated in 27 (14%) patients and a dual infection due to a bacterial and a viral pathogen was recognised in 14/107 patients. Patients with AECOPD and a viral infection had a lengthier hospital stay (9.2 ± 4.6 vs 7.6 ± 4.3, p < 0.01) while the severity of the disease was no related with significant differences among the groups of the study population. In conclusion, the isolation of a virus was strongly associated with AECOPD in the examined population. The stage of COPD appeared to have no relation with the frequency of the isolated viruses while dual infection with a viral and a bacterial pathogen was not rare.

  7. Syncope as a presentation of acute pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Altınsoy, Bülent; Erboy, Fatma; Tanrıverdi, Hakan; Uygur, Fırat; Örnek, Tacettin; Atalay, Figen; Tor, Meltem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Syncope is an atypical presentation for acute pulmonary embolism (APE). There are conflicting data concerning syncope and prognosis of APE. Patients and methods One hundred and seventy-nine consecutive patients aged 22–96 years (median, 68 years) with APE were retrospectively enrolled in the study. Results Prevalence of syncope was 13% (n=23) at the time of presentation. Compared to patients without syncope, those with syncope had a higher rate of central embolism (83% vs 43%, respectively, P=0.002), right ventricular dysfunction (91% vs 68%, P=0.021), and troponin positivity (80% vs 39%, P=0.001) but not 30-day mortality (13% vs 10%, P=0.716). Multivariate analysis showed that central localization (odds ratio: 9.08) and cardiac troponin positivity (odds ratio: 4.67) were the independent correlates of the presence of syncope in the patients with APE. Frequency of cardiopulmonary disease was lower, and duration from symptom onset to hospital admission was shorter in patients with syncope (P=0.138 and 0.118, respectively), although not significant. Conclusion Syncope most likely represents an intermediate condition between massive APE and hypotension. In APE patients with syncope, the prognosis seems to depend on the underlying pathology, the patient’s age, comorbidities and duration from symptom onset to hospital admission, and the use of thrombolytic therapy. PMID:27390523

  8. Relationship between colloid osmotic pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure in patients with acute cardiorespiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Weil, M H; Henning, R J; Morissette, M; Michaels, S

    1978-04-01

    Close relationships between progressive respiratory failure, roentgenographic signs of pulmonary opacification and decreases in the difference between colloid osmotic pressure of plasma and the pulmonary artery wedge pressure (colloid-hydrosatic pressure gradient) were demonstrated in 49 critically ill patients with multisystem failure, in patients in shock. The potential importance of this relationship is underscored by the observation that fatal progression of pulmonary edema was related to a critical reduction in the colloid-hydrostatic pressure gradient to levels of less than 0 mm Hg. More often, reduction in colloid osmotic pressure rather than increases in left ventricular filling pressure (pulmonary artery wedge pressure) accounted for the decline in colloid-hydrostatic pressure gradient. Routine measurement of colloid osmotic pressure, preferably in conjunction with pulmonary artery wedge pressure, is likely to improve understanding of the mechanisms of acute pulmonary edema.

  9. Viral epidemiology of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, G; Lerikou, M; Tsiodras, S; Chranioti, Aik; Perros, E; Anagnostopoulou, U; Armaganidis, A; Karakitsos, P

    2012-02-01

    The role of viruses in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (AECOPD) needs further elucidation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the molecular epidemiology of viral pathogens in AECOPD. Patients presenting to the Emergency Room with AECOPD needing hospitalization were recruited. Oropharyngeal and sputum samples were collected in order to perform microarrays-based viral testing for the detection of respiratory viruses. A total of 200 (100%) patients were analyzed and from them in 107 (53.5%) a virus was detected. The commonest identified viruses were the human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (subtypes A and B) (40.5%), influenza virus (subtypes A, B, C) (11%), rhinovirus (8%) and human Parainfluenza Virus (subtypes A and B) (7.5%). A bacterial pathogen was isolated in 27 (14%) patients and a dual infection due to a bacterial and a viral pathogen was recognised in 14/107 patients. Patients with AECOPD and a viral infection had a lengthier hospital stay (9.2 ± 4.6 vs 7.6 ± 4.3, p < 0.01) while the severity of the disease was no related with significant differences among the groups of the study population. In conclusion, the isolation of a virus was strongly associated with AECOPD in the examined population. The stage of COPD appeared to have no relation with the frequency of the isolated viruses while dual infection with a viral and a bacterial pathogen was not rare. PMID:21983132

  10. Acute endocarditis of a percutaneously placed pulmonary valve

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Karthik V; Olivieri, Laura; Jonas, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Endocarditis of percutaneously placed pulmonary valve is increasingly being recognized and reported as a potentially life-threatening complication. In this report, we discuss a 17-year-old male who presented with septic shock secondary to staphylococcal endocarditis of a percutaneously placed pulmonary valve. PMID:26556969

  11. Diagnostic Delay and Antibiotic Overuse in Acute Pulmonary Blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Alpern, Jonathan D; Bahr, Nathan C; Vazquez-Benitez, Gabriela; Boulware, David R; Sellman, Jonathan S; Sarosi, George A

    2016-04-01

    The diagnosis of blastomycosis is often delayed. We identified 28 cases of pulmonary blastomycosis in a retrospective chart review. Most patients received multiple antibiotic courses before being diagnosed, and the sputum KOH smear was rarely used. Diagnostic delay can be decreased with higher suspicion for pulmonary blastomycosis and early use of the sputum KOH smear. PMID:27419155

  12. Diagnostic Delay and Antibiotic Overuse in Acute Pulmonary Blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Alpern, Jonathan D; Bahr, Nathan C; Vazquez-Benitez, Gabriela; Boulware, David R; Sellman, Jonathan S; Sarosi, George A

    2016-04-01

    The diagnosis of blastomycosis is often delayed. We identified 28 cases of pulmonary blastomycosis in a retrospective chart review. Most patients received multiple antibiotic courses before being diagnosed, and the sputum KOH smear was rarely used. Diagnostic delay can be decreased with higher suspicion for pulmonary blastomycosis and early use of the sputum KOH smear.

  13. Diagnostic Delay and Antibiotic Overuse in Acute Pulmonary Blastomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Alpern, Jonathan D.; Bahr, Nathan C.; Vazquez-Benitez, Gabriela; Boulware, David R.; Sellman, Jonathan S.; Sarosi, George A.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of blastomycosis is often delayed. We identified 28 cases of pulmonary blastomycosis in a retrospective chart review. Most patients received multiple antibiotic courses before being diagnosed, and the sputum KOH smear was rarely used. Diagnostic delay can be decreased with higher suspicion for pulmonary blastomycosis and early use of the sputum KOH smear. PMID:27419155

  14. Acute Pulmonary Edema in an Eclamptic Pregnant Patient: A Rare Case of Takotsubo Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karamchandani, Kunal; Bortz, Brandon; Vaida, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 35 Final Diagnosis: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy Symptoms: Seizures Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cesarean section Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Acute pulmonary edema in a pregnant patient is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Takotsubo syndrome, or stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is a rare cause of acute pulmonary edema in a pregnant patient, especially prior to delivery of the fetus. Case Report: We describe a case of a pregnant patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and eclampsia and was found to have Takotsubo syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, eclampsia as a precipitating factor for Takotsubo syndrome has not been described in literature. Conclusions: Clinicians taking care of pregnant patients should be aware of the potential link between eclampsia and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Prompt correction of the precipitating cause along with supportive management as described is the key to a successful outcome. PMID:27658947

  15. Detection of experimentally produced acute pulmonary arterial occlusion by methyl iodide-131 inhalation imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Z.D.; McAfee, J.G.; Subramanian, G.

    1981-08-01

    Methyl iodide-131 (CH/sub 3/I-131) is described as an agent for detection of acute experimentally produced pulmonary arterial occlusion in dogs. When gaseous CH/sub 3/I-131 is inhaled, radioactivity passes instantaneously from the alveoli to the lung capillary bed. Where pulmonary blood flow exists, activity is washed out into the systemic circulation, but in areas of blood stasis, a transient pulmonary hot spot remains. CH/sub 3/I-131 is easily produced and inexpensive, but administration is awkward and strict radiation safety precautions are mandatory.

  16. Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Naoki; Oi, Rie; Ota, Muneyuki; Toriumi, Shinichi; Ogushi, Fumitaka

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae have been reported. However, knowledge about the pathophysiology and pharmacological treatment of this condition is insufficient. Moreover, the pulmonary vascular permeability in ARDS related to M. pneumoniae infection has not been reported. We report a case of ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability, which was successfully treated using low-dose short-term hydrocortisone, suggesting that pulmonary infiltration in ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae does not match the criteria of permeability edema observed in typical ARDS. PMID:27162691

  17. Acute pulmonary effects of ultrafine particles in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Oberdörster, G; Finkelstein, J N; Johnston, C; Gelein, R; Cox, C; Baggs, R; Elder, A C

    2000-08-01

    important difference from the behavior of larger particles. Furthermore, the pulmonary toxicity of the ultrafine Teflon fumes could be prevented by adapting the animals with short 5-minute exposures on 3 days prior to a 15-minute exposure. This shows the importance of preexposure history in susceptibility to acute effects of ultrafine particles. Aging of the fresh Teflon fumes for 3.5 minutes led to a predicted coagulation resulting in particles greater than 100 nm that no longer caused toxicity in exposed animals. This result is consistent with greater toxicity of ultrafine particles compared with accumulation-mode particles. When establishing dose-response relationships for intratracheally instilled titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles of the size of the urban ultrafine particles (20 nm) and of the urban accumulation-mode particles (250 nm), we observed significantly greater pulmonary inflammatory response to ultrafine TiO2 in rats and mice. The greater toxicity of the ultrafine TiO2 particles correlated well with their greater surface area per mass. Ultrafine particles of carbon, platinum, iron, iron oxide, vanadium, and vanadium oxide were generated by electric spark discharge and characterized to obtain particles of environmental relevance for study. The CMD of the ultrafine carbon particles was approximately 26 nm, and that of the metal particles was 15 to 20 nm, with geometric standard deviations (GSDs) of 1.4 to 1.7. For ultrafine carbon particles, approximately 100 micrograms/m3 is equivalent to 12 x 10(6) particles/cm3. Homogeneous coagulation of these ultrafine particles in an animal exposure chamber occurred rapidly at 1 x 10(7) particles/cm3, so that particles quickly grew to sizes greater than 100 nm. Thus, controlled aging of ultrafine carbon particles allowed the generation of accumulation-mode carbon particles (due to coagulation growth) for use in comparative toxicity studies. We also developed a technique to generate ultrafine particles consisting of the

  18. Acute pulmonary embolus in the course of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ziółkowska, Ewa; Windorbska, Wiesława

    2012-01-01

    Risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) is relatively high in patients with advanced chronic diseases, particularly with malignancies. Most patients with cancer have blood coagulation test abnormalities indicative of up-regulation of the coagulation cascade, increased platelet activation and aggregation. Pulmonary thromboembolism is common in patients with any cancer and incidence is increased by surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and disease progression. Manifestations range from small asymptomatic to life-threatening central PE with subsequent hypotension and cardiogenic shock. Diagnostic algorithms utilizing various noninvasive tests have been developed to determine the pretest probability of PE results of D-dimer assay, chest radiography ECG and computed tomography. The mortality in untreated PE is high (30%) but appropriate treatment may decrease it to 2–18%. The current recommended treatment for massive pulmonary embolus is either thrombolytic therapy or surgical embolectomy. PMID:23788915

  19. An interesting cause of pulmonary emboli: Acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Sevinc, A.; Savli, H.; Atmaca, H.

    2005-07-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning, a public health problem of considerable significance, is a relatively frequent event today, resulting in thousands of hospitalizations annually. A 70-year-old lady was seen in the emergency department with a provisional diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning. The previous night, she slept in a tightly closed room heated with coal ember. She was found unconscious in the morning with poor ventilation. She had a rare presentation of popliteal vein thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, and possible tissue necrosis with carbon monoxide poisoning. Oxygen treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin (nadroparine) and warfarin therapy resulted in an improvement in both popliteal and pulmonary circulations. In conclusion, the presence of pulmonary emboli should be sought in patients with carbon monoxide poisoning.

  20. Treatment of Acute Low Pressure Pulmonary Edema in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Prewitt, R. M.; McCarthy, J.; Wood, L. D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Severe pulmonary edema sometimes develops despite normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (Ppw). The equation describing net transvascular flux of lung liquid predicts decreased edema when hydrostatic pressure is reduced or when colloid osmotic pressure is increased in the pulmonary vessels. We tested these predictions in a model of pulmonary capillary leak produced in 35 dogs by intravenous oleic acid. 1 h later, the dogs were divided into five equal groups and treated for 4 h in different ways: (a) not treated, to serve as the control group (Ppw = 11.1 mm Hg); (b) given albumin to increase colloid osmotic pressure by 5 mm Hg (Ppw = 10.6 mm Hg); (c) ventilated with 10 cm H2O positive end-expiratory pressure (Peep) (transmural Ppw = 10.4 mm Hg); (d) phlebotomized to reduce Ppw to 6 mm Hg; (e) infused with nitroprusside, which also reduced Ppw to 6 mm Hg. Phlebotomy and nitroprusside reduced the edema in excised lungs by 50% (P< 0.001), but Peep and albumin did not affect the edema. Pulmonary shunt decreased on Peep and increased on nitroprusside, and lung compliance was not different among the treatment groups, demonstrating that these variables are poor indicators of changes in edema. Cardiac output decreased during the treatment period in all but the nitroprusside group, where Ppw decreased and cardiac output did not. We conclude that canine oleic acid pulmonary edema is reduced by small reductions in hydrostatic pressure, but not by increased colloid osmotic pressure, because the vascular permeability to liquid and protein is increased. These results suggest that low pressure pulmonary edema may be reduced by seeking the lowest Ppw consistent with adequate cardiac output enhanced by vasoactive agents like nitroprusside. Further, colloid infusions and Peep are not helpful in reducing edema, so they may be used in the lowest amount that provides adequate circulating volume and arterial O2 saturation on nontoxic inspired O2. Until these therapeutic principles

  1. Sporadic Multicentric Right Atrial and Right Ventricular Myxoma Presenting as Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyajit; Tripathy, Mahendra Prasad; Mohanty, Bipin Bihari; Biswas, Sutapa

    2016-01-01

    Multicentric cardiac myxoma is a rare syndrome; usually it is familial. We report a rare case of sporadic right atrium (RA) and right ventricle (RV) myxoma in a 26-year-old female presenting to our hospital for the evaluation of sudden onset of dyspnea and left precordial pain attributed to the embolization of degenerating tumor fragments to the pulmonary artery (PA). The exact incidence of sporadic multicentric RA and RV myxoma presenting as acute pulmonary embolism is unknown as multicentric RA and RV myxoma are very rare. Myxomas presenting as pulmonary embolism is <10%. Majority of cardiac myxomas present as exertional dyspnea, chest pain, positional syncope, fever, weight loss and other constitutional symptoms. Any young patient presenting with acute onset dyspnea with multiple cardiac masses may have tumor embolization to the PA diagnosis with transthoracic echocardiography and high-resolution computed tomography of thorax, fast-tracks patient transfer for urgent cardiac surgery to prevent further embolization. PMID:27293525

  2. Improved Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis by Combining Antigen and Antibody Detection

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Sarah M.; Smedema, Melinda L.; Durkin, Michelle M.; Herman, Katie M.; Hage, Chadi A.; Fuller, Deanna; Wheat, L. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis can be severe, especially following heavy inoculum exposure. Rapid diagnosis is critical and often possible by detection of antigen, but this test may be falsely negative in 17% of such cases. Antibody detection by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) may increase sensitivity and permit the measurement of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) classes of antibodies separately. Methods. Microplates coated with Histoplasma antigen were used for testing of serum from patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis and controls in the MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA. Results for IgG and IgM were reported independently. Results. IgG antibodies were detected in 87.5%, IgM antibodies in 67.5%, and IgG and/or IgM antibodies in 88.8% of patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis in this assay, while immunodiffusion, complement fixation, and antigen testing showed sensitivities of 55.0%, 73.1%, and 67.5%, respectively (n = 80). Combining antigen and antibody detection increased the sensitivity to 96.3%. Conclusions. The MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA offers increased sensitivity over current antibody tests while also allowing separate detection of IgG and IgM antibodies and complementing antigen detection. Combining antigen and EIA antibody testing provides an optimal method for diagnosis of acute pulmonary histoplasmosis. PMID:26797210

  3. PULMONARY AND CARDIAC GENE EXPRESSION FOLLOWING ACUTE ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLE INHALATION IN HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhalation of ultrafine carbon particles (ufCP) causes cardiac physiological changes without marked pulmonary injury or inflammation. We hypothesized that acute ufCP exposure of 13 months old Spontaneously Hypertensive (SH) rats will cause differential effects on the lung and hea...

  4. [Acute pulmonary edema from inhalation of the bite-block after anesthesia with a laryngeal mask].

    PubMed

    Banchereau, F; Marié, S; Pez, H; Boully-Balihaut, A; Tueux, O

    2001-12-01

    We report a case of acute pulmonary oedema, consecutive to upper airway obstruction due to the inhalation of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) bite block during recovery. The LMA was used for general anaesthesia with the bite-block provided in France. No trouble occurred during LMA insertion and anaesthesia. Symptomatic treatment provided complete resolution within a few days. PMID:11803848

  5. Small pulmonary vascular alteration and acute exacerbations of COPD: quantitative computed tomography analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiyue; Chen, Xuesong; Liu, Kouying; Xie, Weiping; Wang, Hong; Wei, Yongyue; Tang, Lijun; Zhu, Yinsu

    2016-01-01

    The morphologic alterations of pulmonary small vessels measured by computed tomography (CT) have been used to evaluate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the relationship between small pulmonary vascular alteration and acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) is not well understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessel alterations measured on CT images and investigate its relationship with the COPD severity staged by the degree of airflow limitation and the occurrence of AECOPD. We retrospectively reviewed CT scans, clinical characteristics, and pulmonary function test results of 153 patients with COPD. All the patients were divided into AECOPD and non-AECOPD group according to the COPD staging and pulmonary function test results. The percentages of the total CSA less than 5 mm2 and equal to 5–10 mm2 over the lung area (%CSA<5 and %CSA5–10, respectively) were measured. The %CSA<5 steadily decreased in relation to the increase of COPD severity. In addition, %CSA<5 of the AECOPD group was significantly lower than that of the non-AECOPD group (0.41±0.13 versus 0.68±0.18, P<0.001), and the optimal cutoff value was 0.56 (sensitivity, 0.863; specificity, 0.731). Therefore, small pulmonary vascular alteration, as measured by %CSA<5, could indicate not only the degree of COPD severity, but also the occurrence of AECOPD. PMID:27578971

  6. Small pulmonary vascular alteration and acute exacerbations of COPD: quantitative computed tomography analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyue; Chen, Xuesong; Liu, Kouying; Xie, Weiping; Wang, Hong; Wei, Yongyue; Tang, Lijun; Zhu, Yinsu

    2016-01-01

    The morphologic alterations of pulmonary small vessels measured by computed tomography (CT) have been used to evaluate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the relationship between small pulmonary vascular alteration and acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) is not well understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessel alterations measured on CT images and investigate its relationship with the COPD severity staged by the degree of airflow limitation and the occurrence of AECOPD. We retrospectively reviewed CT scans, clinical characteristics, and pulmonary function test results of 153 patients with COPD. All the patients were divided into AECOPD and non-AECOPD group according to the COPD staging and pulmonary function test results. The percentages of the total CSA less than 5 mm(2) and equal to 5-10 mm(2) over the lung area (%CSA<5 and %CSA5-10, respectively) were measured. The %CSA<5 steadily decreased in relation to the increase of COPD severity. In addition, %CSA<5 of the AECOPD group was significantly lower than that of the non-AECOPD group (0.41±0.13 versus 0.68±0.18, P<0.001), and the optimal cutoff value was 0.56 (sensitivity, 0.863; specificity, 0.731). Therefore, small pulmonary vascular alteration, as measured by %CSA<5, could indicate not only the degree of COPD severity, but also the occurrence of AECOPD. PMID:27578971

  7. Endovascular Management of Acute Pulmonary Embolism Using the Ultrasound-Enhanced EkoSonic System.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    Acute, symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) in the massive and submassive categories continues to be a healthcare concern with significant risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Despite increased awareness and venous thromboembolism prophylaxis, endovascular treatment is still an important option for many of these patients. There are a variety of techniques and devices used for treating PE, but none have been evaluated as extensively as the EkoSonic endovascular system that is also currently the only FDA-approved device for the treatment of pulmonary embolism. This article describes the use of the EkoSonic device for this patient population.

  8. A patient with possible TRALI who developed pulmonary hypertensive crisis and acute pulmonary edema during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Taiki; Nishisako, Ryo; Sato, Hideo

    2012-06-01

    There are very few case reports of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) under close hemodynamic monitoring. We encountered a case of possible TRALI during on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). A 66-year-old man who had undergone on-pump CABG was administered fresh frozen plasma (FFP). One hour after FFP transfusion, pulmonary hypertensive crisis and subsequent hypoxic decompensation occurred. A second cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) was needed for circulatory and respiratory deterioration. Extracorporeal life support (ECLS), intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP), and nitric oxide therapy were required after the surgery. Despite the severity of the initial state, his recovery was comparatively smooth. ECLS and IABP were removed on postoperative day (POD)1; the patient was extubated and discharged from the ICU on POD7 and POD12, respectively. The diagnosis of TRALI was confirmed by human leukocyte antigen antibody detection in the administered FFP. In addition, lymphocytic immunofluorescence test showed that a cross-match of the plasma from the pooled FFP against the recipient leukocytes was positive. The clinical course of the pulmonary artery hypertension was followed by a decrease in dynamic lung compliance. The mechanism of this phenomenon is unclear. However, it might suggest the possibility of vasoconstriction or obstruction of the peripheral pulmonary artery preceding lung damage, as in the case in animal models reported previously.

  9. Activation of neutral sphingomyelinase is involved in acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Cogolludo, Angel; Moreno, Laura; Frazziano, Giovanna; Moral-Sanz, Javier; Menendez, Carmen; Castañeda, Javier; González, Constancio; Villamor, Eduardo; Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Aims The mechanisms involved in hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) are not yet fully defined. The aim of the study was to determine the role of protein kinase C ζ (PKCζ) and neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) in HPV. Methods and results Ceramide content was measured by immunocytochemistry and voltage-gated potassium channel (KV) currents were recorded by the patch clamp technique in isolated rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC). Contractile responses were analysed in rat pulmonary arteries mounted in a wire myograph. Pulmonary pressure was recorded in anesthetized open-chest rats. Protein and mRNA expression were measured by western blot and RT–PCR, respectively. We found that hypoxia increased ceramide content in PASMC which was abrogated by inhibition of nSMase, but not acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase). The hypoxia-induced vasoconstrictor response in isolated pulmonary arteries and the inhibition of KV currents were strongly reduced by inhibition of PKCζ or nSMase but not aSMase. The nSMase inhibitor GW4869 prevented HPV in vivo. The vasoconstrictor response to hypoxia was mimicked by exogenous addition of bacterial Smase and ceramide. nSMase2 mRNA expression was ∼10-fold higher in pulmonary compared with mesenteric arteries. In mesenteric arteries, hypoxia failed to increase ceramide but exogenous SMase induced a contractile response. Conclusion nSMase-derived ceramide production and the activation of PKCζ are early and necessary events in the signalling cascade of acute HPV. PMID:19088082

  10. Acute pulmonary edema following inflation of arterial tourniquet.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, M C B; Pai, R B; Rao, R P

    2014-10-01

    Arterial tourniquets are used as one of the methods for reducing blood loss and for allowing blood free surgical field. A 20-year-old, 45 kg healthy female with a sphere shaped pendunculated hemangioma in the popliteal fossa of her left lower limb was applied with arterial tourniquet after exsanguination. The procedure was performed under general anesthesia. Soon after exsanguination and tourniquet inflation, the patient developed pulmonary edema which subsided after deflating the tourniquet. The clinical evolution, treatment and pathophysiology of this complication are described.

  11. Assessment and prevalence of pulmonary oedema in contemporary acute heart failure trials: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Platz, Elke; Jhund, Pardeep S.; Campbell, Ross T.; McMurray, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Pulmonary oedema is a common and important finding in acute heart failure (AHF). We conducted a systematic review to describe the methods used to assess pulmonary oedema in recent randomized AHF trials and report its prevalence in these trials. Methods and results Of 23 AHF trials published between 2002 and 2013, six were excluded because they were very small or not randomized, or missing full-length publications. Of the remaining 17 (n = 200–7141) trials, six enrolled patients with HF and reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF) and 11, patients with both HF-REF and HF with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF). Pulmonary oedema was an essential inclusion criterion, in most trials, based upon findings on physical examination (‘rales’), radiographic criteria (‘signs of congestion’), or both. The prevalence of pulmonary oedema in HF-REF trials ranged from 75% to 83% and in combined HF-REF and HF-PEF trials from 51% to 100%. Five trials did not report the prevalence or extent of pulmonary oedema assessed by either clinical examination or chest x-ray. Improvement of pulmonary congestion with treatment was inconsistently reported and commonly grouped with other signs of congestion into a score. One trial suggested that patients with rales over >2/3 of the lung fields on admission were at higher risk of adverse outcomes than those without. Conclusion Although pulmonary oedema is a common finding in AHF, represents a therapeutic target, and may be of prognostic importance, recent trials used inconsistent criteria to define it, and did not consistently report its severity at baseline or its response to treatment. Consistent and ideally quantitative, methods for the assessment of pulmonary oedema in AHF trials are needed. PMID:26230356

  12. Particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response may be the causal link between particle inhalation and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Anne T; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Jackson, Petra; Poulsen, Sarah Søs; Kyjovska, Zdenka O; Halappanavar, Sabina; Yauk, Carole L; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of ambient and workplace particulate air pollution is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. One proposed mechanism for this association is that pulmonary inflammation induces a hepatic acute phase response, which increases risk of cardiovascular disease. Induction of the acute phase response is intimately linked to risk of cardiovascular disease as shown in both epidemiological and animal studies. Indeed, blood levels of acute phase proteins, such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, are independent predictors of risk of cardiovascular disease in prospective epidemiological studies. In this review, we present and review emerging evidence that inhalation of particles (e.g., air diesel exhaust particles and nanoparticles) induces a pulmonary acute phase response, and propose that this induction constitutes the causal link between particle inhalation and risk of cardiovascular disease. Increased levels of acute phase mRNA and proteins in lung tissues, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma clearly indicate pulmonary acute phase response following pulmonary deposition of different kinds of particles including diesel exhaust particles, nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes. The pulmonary acute phase response is dose-dependent and long lasting. Conversely, the hepatic acute phase response is reduced relative to lung or entirely absent. We also provide evidence that pulmonary inflammation, as measured by neutrophil influx, is a predictor of the acute phase response and that the total surface area of deposited particles correlates with the pulmonary acute phase response. We discuss the implications of these findings in relation to occupational exposure to nanoparticles. How to cite this article: WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2014, 6:517–531. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1279 PMID:24920450

  13. One Center’s Guide to Outpatient Management of Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Acute Pulmonary Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Muirhead, Corinne A.; Sanford, Jillian N.; McCullar, Benjamin G.; Nolt, Dawn; MacDonald, Kelvin D.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic disorder characterized by acute pulmonary exacerbations that comprise increased cough, chest congestion, increased mucus production, shortness of breath, weight loss, and fatigue. Typically, severe episodes are treated in the inpatient setting and include intravenous antimicrobials, airway clearance therapy, and nutritional support. Children with less-severe findings can often be managed as outpatients with oral antimicrobials and increased airway clearance therapy at home without visiting the specialty CF center to begin treatment. Selection of specific antimicrobial agents is dependent on pathogens found in surveillance culture, activity of an agent in patients with CF, and the unique physiology of these patients. In this pediatric review, we present our practice for defining acute pulmonary exacerbation, deciding treatment location, initiating treatment either in-person or remotely, determining the frequency of airway clearance, selecting antimicrobial therapy, recommending timing for follow-up visit, and recognizing and managing treatment failures. PMID:27429564

  14. Acute promyelocytic leukemia presenting as pulmonary thromboembolism: Not all APLs bleed

    PubMed Central

    Vaid, Ashok K; Batra, Sandeep; Karanth, Suman S; Gupta, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) presenting as pulmonary thromboembolism being misdiagnosed as community-acquired pneumonia. Thrombotic phenomenon in APL are poorly understood and grossly underreported. In our case, following no response to standard antibiotic treatment, the patient was further investigated and detected to have an acute pulmonary thromboembolism following right lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Though, complete blood picture revealed only mild hyperleukocytosis, bone marrow biopsy and aspiration revealed 60% blasts and a positive t (15,17)(q22,12) and PML retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) fusion protein on molecular cytogenetics. He was diagnosed as APL and received treatment with all-transretinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) and therapeutic anticoagulation PMID:26629469

  15. Nicardipine-induced acute pulmonary edema: a rare but severe complication of tocolysis.

    PubMed

    Serena, Claire; Begot, Emmanuelle; Cros, Jérôme; Hodler, Charles; Fedou, Anne Laure; Nathan-Denizot, Nathalie; Clavel, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We report four cases of acute pulmonary edema that occurred during treatment by intravenous tocolysis using nicardipine in pregnancy patients with no previous heart problems. Clinical severity justified hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU) each time. Acute dyspnea has begun at an average of 63 hours after initiation of treatment. For all patients, the first diagnosis suspected was pulmonary embolism. The patients' condition improved rapidly with appropriate diuretic treatment and by modifying the tocolysis. The use of intravenous nicardipine is widely used for tocolysis in France even if its prescription does not have a marketing authorization. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this complication remain unclear. The main reported risk factors are spontaneous preterm labor, multiple pregnancy, concomitant obstetrical disease, association with beta-agonists, and fetal lung maturation corticotherapy. A better knowledge of this rare but serious adverse event should improve the management of patients. Nifedipine or atosiban, the efficiency of which tocolysis was also studied, could be an alternative. PMID:25215245

  16. One Center's Guide to Outpatient Management of Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Acute Pulmonary Exacerbation.

    PubMed

    Muirhead, Corinne A; Sanford, Jillian N; McCullar, Benjamin G; Nolt, Dawn; MacDonald, Kelvin D

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic disorder characterized by acute pulmonary exacerbations that comprise increased cough, chest congestion, increased mucus production, shortness of breath, weight loss, and fatigue. Typically, severe episodes are treated in the inpatient setting and include intravenous antimicrobials, airway clearance therapy, and nutritional support. Children with less-severe findings can often be managed as outpatients with oral antimicrobials and increased airway clearance therapy at home without visiting the specialty CF center to begin treatment. Selection of specific antimicrobial agents is dependent on pathogens found in surveillance culture, activity of an agent in patients with CF, and the unique physiology of these patients. In this pediatric review, we present our practice for defining acute pulmonary exacerbation, deciding treatment location, initiating treatment either in-person or remotely, determining the frequency of airway clearance, selecting antimicrobial therapy, recommending timing for follow-up visit, and recognizing and managing treatment failures. PMID:27429564

  17. Management of Acute Exacerbation of Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Suau, Salvador J; DeBlieux, Peter M C

    2016-02-01

    Acute asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations are the most common respiratory diseases requiring emergent medical evaluation and treatment. Asthma and COPD are chronic, debilitating disease processes that have been differentiated traditionally by the presence or absence of reversible airflow obstruction. Asthma and COPD exacerbations impose an enormous economic burden on the US health care budget. In daily clinical practice, it is difficult to differentiate these 2 obstructive processes based on their symptoms, and on their nearly identical acute treatment strategies; major differences are important when discussing anatomic sites involved, long-term prognosis, and the nature of inflammatory markers. PMID:26614239

  18. Acute Exacerbation of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Following Treatment for Cushing's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Nobumasa; Kaneko, Masanori; Sato, Kazuhiro; Usuda, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Junta; Maekawa, Takashi; Sasano, Hironobu; Katakami, Hideki; Kaneko, Kenzo; Kamoi, Kyuzi

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old Japanese man with mild reticular shadows in both lungs developed a lung tumor causing ectopic Cushing's syndrome. He was prescribed an adrenal inhibitor, which controlled his hypercortisolemia. However, he developed acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and died within weeks. Previous studies have suggested a dosage reduction of corticosteroids for IPF as a triggering event for acute exacerbation. The present case suggests that IPF coexisting with Cushing's syndrome may have been exacerbated after the correction of hypercortisolemia. Therefore, close monitoring of cortisol levels along with the clinical course of IPF is required in similar cases that require the correction of hypercortisolemia. PMID:26875965

  19. Acute Exacerbation of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Following Treatment for Cushing's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Nobumasa; Kaneko, Masanori; Sato, Kazuhiro; Usuda, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Junta; Maekawa, Takashi; Sasano, Hironobu; Katakami, Hideki; Kaneko, Kenzo; Kamoi, Kyuzi

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old Japanese man with mild reticular shadows in both lungs developed a lung tumor causing ectopic Cushing's syndrome. He was prescribed an adrenal inhibitor, which controlled his hypercortisolemia. However, he developed acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and died within weeks. Previous studies have suggested a dosage reduction of corticosteroids for IPF as a triggering event for acute exacerbation. The present case suggests that IPF coexisting with Cushing's syndrome may have been exacerbated after the correction of hypercortisolemia. Therefore, close monitoring of cortisol levels along with the clinical course of IPF is required in similar cases that require the correction of hypercortisolemia.

  20. [Pneumomediastinum: an aspect of pulmonary barotrauma during mechanical ventilation of acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Aissaoui, Y; En-Nafaa, I; Chkoura, K; Boughalem, M; Kamili, N Drissi

    2014-06-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a fundamental treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Despite compliance with the recommendations of protective mechanical ventilation, it can results in serious complications including the pulmonary barotrauma. This is often manifested by a pneumothorax. This observation describes an unusual aspect of barotrauma which is pneumomediastinum. The authors also point out the role of chest imaging in the management of mechanical ventilation during ARDS.

  1. Rare Presentation of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Causing Acute Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Ryan R; Kumar, Sameer; Grossman, Ronald F; Price, Charles; Srigley, John R

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare condition characterized by dysfunctional alveolar macrophages, which ineffectively clear surfactant and typically cause mild hypoxemia. Characteristic Computed Tomography findings are septal reticulations superimposed on ground-glass opacities in a crazy paving pattern, with a clear juxtaposition between affected and unaffected parenchyma. While traditionally PAP was diagnosed via biopsy, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is usually sufficient; the fluid appears milky, and on microscopic examination there are foamy macrophages with eosinophilic granules and extracellular hyaline material that is Periodic Acid-Schiff positive. Standard therapy is whole lung lavage (WLL), although novel treatments are under development. The case presented is a 55-year-old woman with six months of progressive dyspnea, who developed hypoxemic respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation; she had typical findings of PAP on imaging and BAL. WLL was ultimately successful in restoring adequate oxygenation. Respiratory failure of this magnitude is a rare finding in PAP. PMID:27445536

  2. Chronic pulmonary dysfunction following acute inhalation of butyl acrylate.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Ravindra; Ducatman, Alan; Finkel, Mitchell S; Petsonk, Edward; Hunt, Janet; Beto, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Butyl Acrylate (BA) (2-propionic acid; CH2 = CHCOOC4H9) is a colorless liquid commonly used in impregnation agents and adhesives. Dermal contact with BA has previously been reported to cause moderate skin irritation with skin sensitizing potential in humans. Health effects of inhalation of BA have not been previously reported. Accordingly, we document the health conditions of a bystander, first responder and landfill worker exposed to butyl acrylate (BA) released to the atmosphere following a collision and roadside spill in October 1998. Retrospective data were collected via chart review and analyzed for exposure, symptoms, physical findings and radiological, laboratory and spirometry results over a ten-year period. All three patients had similar respiratory symptoms including a dramatic hacking cough and dyspnea. Findings included abnormal pulmonary function tests and breath sounds. These data underscore the potential hazards of BA inhalational exposure and the need to wear additional protective equipment. PMID:23472539

  3. Clinical Features of Acute Massive Pulmonary Embolism Complicated by Radiofrequency Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue-Chun; Lin, Jiafeng; Wu, Lianpin; Li, Jia; Chen, Peng; Guang, Xue-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although pulmonary embolism (PE) complicated by radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is rare, it can be life-threatening. Our goal was to elucidate the clinical features of acute massive PE after RFCA. Of 2386 patients who underwent RFCA for supraventricular tachycardia or idiopathic ventricular arrhythmia, 4 patients (0.16%) whose cases were complicated by acute massive PE were examined. These 4 patients were female and middle-aged (range 43–52 years), and 2 of the 4 patients had iron-deficiency anemia and reactive thrombocytosis. Ablation in all patients was performed in the left heart via the right femoral arterial approach. All of the patients had a long-duration hemostasis procedure and bed rest following femoral arterial sheath removal after RFCA. All of the patients collapsed and lost consciousness during their first attempt at walking after RFCA. The emergent electrocardiogram in 2 of the 4 patients revealed an S1Q3T3 pattern, 1 patient demonstrated new onset of right bundle-branch block (RBBB) and S1Q3 pattern and Qr pattern in V1, and the remaining patient had negative T waves in leads V1, V2, and III. The emergent echocardiogram revealed right ventricular hypokinesis and pulmonary hypertension in the 4 patients with acute PE after ablation. Although all of the patients initially experienced sinus tachycardia when they recovered consciousness, 2 of the 4 patients suddenly developed intense bradycardia and lost consciousness again, and these patients finally died (50% fatality rate). All of the patients were identified by CT pulmonary angiography or pulmonary angiography. Our report suggests that although acute massive PE is highly rare, there is a real and fatal risk in patients who experienced acute massive PE after RFCA. Particular attention should be paid to the first ambulation after RFCA. Acute PE should be strongly suspected when sudden loss of consciousness occurs upon mobilization after RFCA. The new onset of S1Q3T3 pattern, RBBB

  4. Interrelation between Alterations in Pulmonary Mechanics and hemodynamics in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Interiano, Benjamin; Hyde, Richard W.; Hodges, Morrison; Yu, Paul N.

    1973-01-01

    Pulmonary mechanics were evaluated in 30 patients with acute myocardial infarction by measuring forced expiratory flow rates and total pulmonary resistance (RT) with the oscillometric method at the resonant frequency of the chest (6-8) cycle/s). During the first 3 days after infarction, forced expiratory volume (FEV) and forced mid-expiratory flow rate (FEF25-75%) were 69% and 60% of predicted values, respectively. 10 or more wk later these values were 95% and 91%. Initially, RT was 52% greater than predicted, but was only 4% greater 10 or more wk later. In 11 patients RT was measured at both resonant frequency and at 3 cycle/s. Five of these patients had no clinical signs of heart failure, but nine had abnormally high values of pulmonary artery pressure, “wedge” pressure and pulmonary extravascular water volume. All of these patients recovered. Initially, RT at resonance was 50% and RT at 3 cycle/s was 130% greater than predicted values. 2-3 wk later these figures were -3% and +6% of those predicted, respectively. At 10 wk or more, significant frequency dependence of RT had disappeared (RT at 3 cycle/s was 7% greater than RT at resonance). Isoproterenol inhalation in six patients caused no change in flow rates, RT at resonance, or RT at 3 cycle/s. RT at resonance and at 3 cycle/s, FEV, and FEF25-75% correlated significantly with the pulmonary vascular pressures. Patients with more marked arterial hypoxia and larger values for extravascular water volume had greater elevations of RT and depression of FEF25-75%, but linear correlations were not significant. Clinical signs of congestive heart failure significantly correlated with a fall in FEV and FEF25-75%, the development of frequency dependence of RT, and elevation of the pulmonary wedge pressure. The initial elevation of RT and low flow rates indicate a modest degree of airway obstruction in acute myocardial infarction. Lack of response to isoproterenol suggests that bronchial muscular constriction is not a

  5. Does acute exposure to aldehydes impair pulmonary function and structure?

    PubMed

    Abreu, Mariana de; Neto, Alcendino Cândido; Carvalho, Giovanna; Casquillo, Natalia Vasconcelos; Carvalho, Niedja; Okuro, Renata; Ribeiro, Gabriel C Motta; Machado, Mariana; Cardozo, Aléxia; Silva, Aline Santos E; Barboza, Thiago; Vasconcellos, Luiz Ricardo; Rodrigues, Danielle Araujo; Camilo, Luciana; Carneiro, Leticia de A M; Jandre, Frederico; Pino, Alexandre V; Giannella-Neto, Antonio; Zin, Walter A; Corrêa, Leonardo Holanda Travassos; Souza, Marcio Nogueira de; Carvalho, Alysson R

    2016-07-15

    Mixtures of anhydrous ethyl alcohol and gasoline substituted for pure gasoline as a fuel in many Brazilian vehicles. Consequently, the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as ketones, other organic compounds, and particularly aldehydes increased in many Brazilian cities. The current study aims to investigate whether formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, or mixtures of both impair lung function, morphology, inflammatory and redox responses at environmentally relevant concentrations. For such purpose, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either medical compressed air or to 4 different mixtures of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Eight hours later animals were anesthetized, paralyzed and lung mechanics and morphology, inflammatory cells and IL-1β, KC, TNF-α, IL-6, CCL2, MCP-1 contents, superoxide dismutase and catalalase activities were determined. The extra pulmonary respiratory tract was also analyzed. No differences could be detected between any exposed and control groups. In conclusion, no morpho-functional alterations were detected in exposed mice in relation to the control group. PMID:27102012

  6. Acute effects of a winter air pollution episode on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of children

    SciTech Connect

    Hoek, G.; Brunekreef, B. )

    1993-09-01

    The acute respiratory effects of a wintertime air pollution episode were studied in a general population sample of 112 children who were 7-12 y of age and who lived in a nonurban community. Spirometry was performed on 6 d, with a fixed interval of 3 wk between successive tests. During an air pollution episode, an additional pulmonary function test was made. Acute respiratory symptoms of the children were noted in a diary. Ambient concentrations of sulfur dioxide, black smoke, particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microns, and nitrogen dioxide were considered as exposure variables. The association of air pollution with pulmonary function and prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms was assessed by individual linear regression analysis and time series analysis, respectively. In February 1991, an air pollution episode occurred during which daily average sulfur dioxide concentrations were slightly above 100 micrograms/m3, and particulate matter (with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns) concentrations reached 174 micrograms/m3. During the episode, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and maximal mid-expiratory flow were lower than on baseline tests. Significant negative associations were found between the concentration of sulfur dioxide, black smoke, and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns. No association between prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms and the concentration of these compounds was found.

  7. Acute effects of a winter air pollution episode on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of children.

    PubMed

    Hoek, G; Brunekreef, B

    1993-01-01

    The acute respiratory effects of a wintertime air pollution episode were studied in a general population sample of 112 children who were 7-12 y of age and who lived in a nonurban community. Spirometry was performed on 6 d, with a fixed interval of 3 wk between successive tests. During an air pollution episode, an additional pulmonary function test was made. Acute respiratory symptoms of the children were noted in a diary. Ambient concentrations of sulfur dioxide, black smoke, particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microns, and nitrogen dioxide were considered as exposure variables. The association of air pollution with pulmonary function and prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms was assessed by individual linear regression analysis and time series analysis, respectively. In February 1991, an air pollution episode occurred during which daily average sulfur dioxide concentrations were slightly above 100 micrograms/m3, and particulate matter (with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns) concentrations reached 174 micrograms/m3. During the episode, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and maximal mid-expiratory flow were lower than on baseline tests. Significant negative associations were found between the concentration of sulfur dioxide, black smoke, and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns. No association between prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms and the concentration of these compounds was found.

  8. Demographic, etiological, and histological pulmonary analysis of patients with acute respiratory failure: a study of 19 years of autopsies

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Ruppert, Aline D; Canzian, Mauro; Parra, Edwin R; Farhat, Cecília; Capelozzi, Vera L

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acute respiratory failure has been one of the most important causes of death in intensive care units, and certain aspects of its pulmonary pathology are currently unknown. OBJECTIVES: The objective was to describe the demographic data, etiology, and pulmonary histopathological findings of different diseases in the autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure. METHOD: Autopsies of 4,710 patients with acute respiratory failure from 1990 to 2008 were reviewed, and the following data were obtained: age, sex, and major associated diseases. The pulmonary histopathology was categorized as diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage, and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of the concordance between the major associated diseases and specific autopsy findings was calculated using logistic regression. RESULTS: Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 33.9% of the cases and cancer in 28.1%. The pulmonary histopathology showed diffuse alveolar damage in 40.7% (1,917) of the cases. A multivariate analysis showed a significant and powerful association between diffuse alveolar damage and bronchopneumonia, HIV/AIDS, sepsis, and septic shock, between liver cirrhosis and pulmonary embolism, between pulmonary edema and acute myocardial infarction, between dilated cardiomyopathy and cancer, between alveolar hemorrhage and bronchopneumonia and pulmonary embolism, and between lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia and HIV/AIDS and liver cirrhosis. CONCLUSIONS: Bronchopneumonia was the most common diagnosis in these cases. The most prevalent pulmonary histopathological pattern was diffuse alveolar damage, which was associated with different inflammatory conditions. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the complete pathophysiological mechanisms involved with each disease and the development of acute respiratory failure. PMID:21876973

  9. Sequential Treatments with Tongsai and Bufei Yishen Granules Reduce Inflammation and Improve Pulmonary Function in Acute Exacerbation-Risk Window of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaofan; Li, Ya; Li, Jiansheng; Wang, Haifeng; Wu, Zhaohuan; Li, Hangjie; Wang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sequential treatments of Chinese medicines for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) risk window (RW) have benefits for preventing reoccurrences of AEs; however, the effects on pulmonary function, pulmonary, and systemic inflammatory biomarkers remain unclear. Methods. Cigarette-smoke/bacterial infections induced rats were randomized into Control, COPD, AECOPD, Tongsai Granule/normal saline (TSG/NS), moxifloxacin + salbutamol/NS (MXF+STL/NS), TSG/Bufei Yishen Granule (BYG), MXF+STL/STL, and TSG+MXF+STL/BYG+STL groups and given corresponding medicine(s) in AE- and/or RW phase. Body temperature, pulmonary function, blood cytology, serum amyloid A (SAA) and C-reactive protein (CRP), pulmonary histomorphology and myeloperoxidase (MPO), polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase, interleukins IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α expressions were determined. Results. Body temperature, inflammatory cells and cytokines, SAA, CRP, and pulmonary impairment were higher in AECOPD rats than stable COPD, while pulmonary function declined and recovered to COPD level in 14-18 days. All biomarkers were improved in treated groups with shorter recovery times of 4-10 days, especially in TSG+MXF+STL/BYG+STL group. Conclusion. Sequential treatments with Tongsai and Bufei Yishen Granules, during AECOPD-RW periods, can reduce inflammatory response and improve pulmonary function and shorten the recovery courses of AEs, especially the integrated Chinese and Western medicines. PMID:27563333

  10. Sequential Treatments with Tongsai and Bufei Yishen Granules Reduce Inflammation and Improve Pulmonary Function in Acute Exacerbation-Risk Window of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaofan; Li, Ya; Wang, Haifeng; Wu, Zhaohuan; Li, Hangjie; Wang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sequential treatments of Chinese medicines for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) risk window (RW) have benefits for preventing reoccurrences of AEs; however, the effects on pulmonary function, pulmonary, and systemic inflammatory biomarkers remain unclear. Methods. Cigarette-smoke/bacterial infections induced rats were randomized into Control, COPD, AECOPD, Tongsai Granule/normal saline (TSG/NS), moxifloxacin + salbutamol/NS (MXF+STL/NS), TSG/Bufei Yishen Granule (BYG), MXF+STL/STL, and TSG+MXF+STL/BYG+STL groups and given corresponding medicine(s) in AE- and/or RW phase. Body temperature, pulmonary function, blood cytology, serum amyloid A (SAA) and C-reactive protein (CRP), pulmonary histomorphology and myeloperoxidase (MPO), polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase, interleukins IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α expressions were determined. Results. Body temperature, inflammatory cells and cytokines, SAA, CRP, and pulmonary impairment were higher in AECOPD rats than stable COPD, while pulmonary function declined and recovered to COPD level in 14–18 days. All biomarkers were improved in treated groups with shorter recovery times of 4–10 days, especially in TSG+MXF+STL/BYG+STL group. Conclusion. Sequential treatments with Tongsai and Bufei Yishen Granules, during AECOPD-RW periods, can reduce inflammatory response and improve pulmonary function and shorten the recovery courses of AEs, especially the integrated Chinese and Western medicines. PMID:27563333

  11. Acute pulmonary toxicity of urban particulate matter and ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, R.; Bjarnason, S. G.; Adamson, I. Y.; Hedgecock, C.; Kumarathasan, P.; Guénette, J.; Potvin, M.; Goegan, P.; Bouthillier, L.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the acute lung toxicity of urban particulate matter in interaction with ozone. Rats were exposed for 4 hours to clean air, ozone (0.8 ppm), the urban dust EHC-93 (5 mg/m3 or 50 mg/m3), or ozone in combination with urban dust. The animals were returned to clean air for 32 hours and then injected (intraperitoneally) with [3H]thymidine to label proliferating cells and killed after 90 minutes. The lungs were fixed by inflation, embedded in glycol methacrylate, and processed for light microscopy autoradiography. Cell labeling was low in bronchioles (0.14 +/- 0.04%) and parenchyma (0.13 +/- 0.02%) of air control animals. Inhalation of EHC-93 alone did not induce cell labeling. Ozone alone increased (P < 0.05) cell labeling (bronchioles, 0.42 +/- 0.16%; parenchyma, 0.57 +/- 0.21%), in line with an acute reparative cell proliferation. The effects of ozone were clearly potentiated by co-exposure with either the low (3.31 +/- 0.31%; 0.99 +/- 0.18%) or the high (4.45 +/- 0.51%; 1.47 +/- 0.18%) concentrations of urban dust (ozone X EHC-93, P < 0.05). Cellular changes were most notable in the epithelia of terminal bronchioles and alveolar ducts and did not distribute to the distal parenchyma. Enhanced DNA synthesis indicates that particulate matter from ambient air can exacerbate epithelial lesions in the lungs. This may extend beyond air pollutant interactions, such as to effects of inhaled particles in the lungs of compromised individuals. Images Figure 1 PMID:9403707

  12. Effect of inhaled nitric oxide on pulmonary hemodynamics after acute lung injury in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Romand, J.A.; Pinsky, M.R.; Firestone, L.; Zar, H.A.; Lancaster, J.R. Jr. )

    1994-03-01

    Increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and mismatch in ventilation-to-perfusion ratio characterize acute lung injury (ALI). Pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa) decreases when nitric oxide (NO) is inhaled during hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV); thus NO inhalation may reduce PVR and improve gas exchange in ALI. The authors studied the hemodynamic and gas exchange effects of NO inhalation during HPV and then ALI in eight anesthetized open-chest mechanically ventilated dogs. Right atrial pressure, Ppa, and left ventricular and arterial pressures were measured, and cardiac output was estimated by an aortic flow probe. Shunt and dead space were also estimated. The effect of 5-min exposures to 0, 17, 28, 47, and 0 ppm inhaled NO was recorded during hyperoxia, hypoxia, and oleic acid-induced ALI. During ALI, partial [beta]-adrenergic blockage (propanolol, 0.15 mg/kg iv) was induced and 74 ppm NO was inhaled. Nitrosylhemoglobin (NO-Hb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) levels were measured. During hyperoxia, NO inhalation had no measurable effects. Hypoxia increased Ppa and calculated PVR, both of which decreased with 17 ppm NO. ALI decreased arterial Po[sub 2] and increased airway pressure, shunt, and dead space ventilation. Ppa and PVR were greater during ALI than during hyperoxia. NO inhalation had no measurable effect during ALI before or after [beta]-adrenergic blockage. MetHb remained low, and NO-Hb was unmeasurable. Bolus infusion of nitroglycerin (15 [mu]g) induced an immediate decrease in Ppa and PVR during ALI. Short-term NO inhalation does not affect PVR or gas exchange in dogs with oleic acid-induced ALI, nor does it increase NO-Hb or MetHb. In contrast, NO can diminish hypoxia-induced elevations in pulmonary vascular tone. These data suggest that NO inhalation selectively dilates the pulmonary circulation and specifically reduces HPV but not oleic acid-induced increases in pulmonary vasomotor tone. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Severe acute exacerbations and mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Soler-Cataluna, J; Martinez-Garcia, M; Roman, S; Salcedo, E; Navarro, M; Ochando, R

    2005-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often present with severe acute exacerbations requiring hospital treatment. However, little is known about the prognostic consequences of these exacerbations. A study was undertaken to investigate whether severe acute exacerbations of COPD exert a direct effect on mortality. Methods: Multivariate techniques were used to analyse the prognostic influence of acute exacerbations of COPD treated in hospital (visits to the emergency service and admissions), patient age, smoking, body mass index, co-morbidity, long term oxygen therapy, forced spirometric parameters, and arterial blood gas tensions in a prospective cohort of 304 men with COPD followed up for 5 years. The mean (SD) age of the patients was 71 (9) years and forced expiratory volume in 1 second was 46 (17)%. Results: Only older age (hazard ratio (HR) 5.28, 95% CI 1.75 to 15.93), arterial carbon dioxide tension (HR 1.07, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.12), and acute exacerbations of COPD were found to be independent indicators of a poor prognosis. The patients with the greatest mortality risk were those with three or more acute COPD exacerbations (HR 4.13, 95% CI 1.80 to 9.41). Conclusions: This study shows for the first time that severe acute exacerbations of COPD have an independent negative impact on patient prognosis. Mortality increases with the frequency of severe exacerbations, particularly if these require admission to hospital. PMID:16055622

  14. Acute pulmonary embolism caused by enlarged uterine leiomyoma: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Khademvatani, Kamal; Rezaei, Yousef; Kerachian, Abdollah; Seyyed-Mohammadzad, Mir Hossein; Eskandari, Ramin; Rostamzadeh, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 42 Final Diagnosis: Acute pulmonary embolism Symptoms: Chest pain • dyspnea Medication: Streptokinase • Warfarin Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Cardiology and Neoplasm Objective: Management of emergency care Background: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and subsequent pulmonary embolism (PE) caused by pelvic vein compression are rare and life-threatening complications of leiomyoma of the uterus. Case Report: We report a 42-year-old virgin woman with a history of leiomyoma who presented to the emergency department with complaints of dyspnea and pleuritic chest pain with transient spotting. On physical examination, she had a non-tender abdomen with a 20-week size uterus. Imaging investigations revealed an acute DVT in her left leg and a huge uterine-derived mass compressing the common iliac veins. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) demonstrated an echogenic mass in her right pulmonary artery consistent with thrombosis. The patient was completely cured using thrombolytic therapy and myomectomy, and was well at 1 year after thrombolysis. Conclusions: PE caused by pelvic vein compression is a rare complication of leiomyoma, which should be considered. Thrombolytic therapy associated with myomectomy can be implemented for treating such cases, and TEE can be used for diagnosing suspected high-risk PE. PMID:25061497

  15. Tryptophan catabolism in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Gulcev, Makedonka; Reilly, Cavan; Griffin, Timothy J; Broeckling, Corey D; Sandri, Brian J; Witthuhn, Bruce A; Hodgson, Shane W; Woodruff, Prescott G; Wendt, Chris H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Exacerbations are a leading cause of morbidity in COPD. The objective of this study was to identify metabolomic biomarkers of acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD). Methods We measured metabolites via mass spectrometry (MS) in plasma drawn within 24 hours of admission to the hospital for 33 patients with an AECOPD (day 0) and 30 days later and for 65 matched controls. Individual metabolites were measured via selective reaction monitoring with mass spectrometry. We used a mixed-effect model to compare metabolite levels in cases compared to controls and a paired t-test to test for differences between days 0 and 30 in the AECOPD group. Results We identified 377 analytes at a false discovery rate of 5% that differed between cases (day 0) and controls, and 31 analytes that differed in the AECOPD cases between day 0 and day 30 (false discovery rate: 5%). Tryptophan was decreased at day 0 of AECOPD compared to controls corresponding to an increase in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. Conclusion Patients with AECOPD have a unique metabolomic signature that includes a decrease in tryptophan levels consistent with an increase in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. PMID:27729784

  16. 30-Day Mortality in Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Prognostic Value of Clinical Scores and Anamnestic Features

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Andreas Gunter; Taute, Bettina-Maria; Baasai, Nansalmaa; Wienke, Andreas; Meyer, Hans Jonas; Schramm, Dominik; Surov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Identification of high-risk patients with pulmonary embolism is vital. The aim of the present study was to examine clinical scores, their single items, and anamnestic features in their ability to predict 30-day mortality. Materials and Methods A retrospective, single-center study from 06/2005 to 01/2010 was performed. Inclusion criteria were presence of pulmonary embolism, availability of patient records and 30-day follow-up. The following clinical scores were calculated: Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, original and simplified pulmonary embolism severity index, Glasgow Coma Scale, and euroSCORE II. Results In the study group of 365 patients 39 patients (10.7%) died within 30 days due to pulmonary embolism. From all examined scores and parameters the best predictor of 30-day mortality were the Glasgow Coma scale (≤ 10) and parameters of the circulatory system including presence of mechanical ventilation, arterial pH (< 7.335), and systolic blood pressure (< 99 mm Hg). Conclusions Easy to ascertain circulatory parameters have the same or higher prognostic value than the clinical scores that were applied in this study. From all clinical scores studied the Glasgow Coma Scale was the most time- and cost-efficient one. PMID:26866472

  17. Acute pulmonary dose–responses to inhaled multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Dale W.; Hubbs, Ann F.; Chen, Bean T.; McKinney, Walter; Mercer, Robert R.; Wolfarth, Michael G.; Battelli, Lori; Wu, Nianqiang; Sriram, Krishnan; Leonard, Stephen; Andrew, Michael; Willard, Patsy; Tsuruoka, Shuji; Endo, Morinobu; Tsukada, Takayuki; Munekane, Fuminori; Frazer, David G.; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the in vivo pulmonary toxicity of inhaled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Mice-inhaled aerosolized MWCNT (10 mg/m3, 5 h/day) for 2, 4, 8 or 12 days. MWCNT lung burden was linearly related to exposure duration. MWCNT-induced pulmonary inflammation was assessed by determining whole lung lavage (WLL) polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). Lung cytotoxicity was assessed by WLL fluid LDH activities. WLL fluid albumin concentrations were determined as a marker of alveolar air–blood barrier integrity. These parameters significantly increased in MWCNT-exposed mice versus controls and were dose-dependent. Histopathologic alterations identified in the lung included (1) bronciolocentric inflammation, (2) bronchiolar epithelial hyperplasia and hypertrophy, (3) fibrosis, (4) vascular changes and (5) rare pleural penetration. MWCNT translocated to the lymph node where the deep paracortex was expanded after 8 or 12 days. Acute inhalation of MWCNT induced dose-dependent pulmonary inflammation and damage with rapid development of pulmonary fibrosis, and also demonstrated that MWCNT can reach the pleura after inhalation exposure. PMID:22881873

  18. [Pumpless extracorporeal pulmonary care: an alternative in the treatment of persistent acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tomicic, V; Montalván, C; Espinoza, M; Graf, J; Martínez, E; Umaña, A; Torres, J

    2008-01-01

    A 34-year old woman who developed persistent and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome with underlying myelomonocytic leukemia (M4FAB) is described. After ruling out the most common causes of pulmonary infiltration in this type of patient and one week of broad spectrum antibiotics and steroids therapy, we proposed leukemic pulmonary infiltration as etiological diagnosis. Despite using a protective ventilatory strategy, recruitment maneuvers, prone position and high frequency oscillatory ventilation, her gas exchange became worse. Under this condition we used a Pumpless-Extracorporeal life assist (PELA) and begun chemotherapy. The method, arterial blood gases, hemodynamic parameters and ventilatory mechanics before and after its use are described. The patient remained on P-ELA for nine days; one week later she was extubated and ten days after she was discharged from the Intensive Care Unit the patient left the hospital in good health condition.

  19. The role of computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute and chronic pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Halil; de Roos, Albert; Geleijins, Jacob; Huisman, Menno V.; Kroft, Lucia J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a potentially life threatening condition requiring adequate diagnosis and treatment. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is excellent for including and excluding PE, therefore CT is the first-choice diagnostic imaging technique in patients suspected of having acute PE. Due to its wide availability and low invasiveness, CTPA tends to be overused. Correct implementation of clinical decision rules in diagnostic workup for PE improves adequate use of CT. Also, CT adds prognostic value by evaluating right ventricular (RV) function. CT-assessed RV dysfunction and to lesser extent central emboli location predicts PE-related mortality in normotensive and hypotensive patients, while PE embolic obstruction index has limited prognostic value. Simple RV/left ventricular (LV) diameter ratio measures >1.0 already predict risk for adverse outcome, whereas ratios <1.0 can safely exclude adverse outcome. Consequently, assessing the RV/LV diameter ratio may help identify patients who are potential candidates for treatment at home instead of treatment in the hospital. A minority of patients develop chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) following acute PE, which is a life-threatening condition that can be diagnosed by CT. In proximal CTEPH, involving the more central pulmonary arteries, thrombectomy usually results in good outcome in terms of both functional status and long-term survival rate. CT is becoming the imaging method of choice for diagnosing CTEPH as it can identify patients who may benefit from thrombectomy. New CT developments such as distensibility measurements and dual-energy or subtraction techniques may further refine diagnosis and prognosis for improved patient care. PMID:26133321

  20. Evaluation of a Western Blot Test in an Outbreak of Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Pizzini, Claudia V.; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M.; Reiss, Errol; Hajjeh, Rana; Kaufman, Leo; Peralta, José Mauro

    1999-01-01

    A western blot (WB) test was evaluated for detection of antibodies against native glycosylated and chemically deglycosylated M and H antigens of Histoplasma capsulatum in serum obtained from patients during the acute phase of pulmonary histoplasmosis that occurred during an outbreak. Of 275 serum samples tested by immunodiffusion and complement fixation (CF) samples from 40 patients affected during this outbreak and from 37 negative controls were tested by WB test. A group of patients whose sera were negative for CF antibodies and precipitins early in the acute stage of histoplasmosis but who all seroconverted during convalescence 6 weeks later were tested with the WB test. Antibodies against untreated H and M antigens were detected at a 1:100 dilution by WB test in 45% of the 20 acute-phase serum samples and in all 20 of the convalescent-phase specimens. The WB test’s sensitivity for acute-phase specimens increased to 90% (18 of 20 specimens) when H and M antigens were treated by periodate oxidation to inactivate susceptible carbohydrate epitopes. When native glycosylated antigens were used in the WB test, positive reactions were observed in negative control serum specimens (3 of 37 specimens; 8%) and in serum specimens obtained from asymptomatic persons screened as part of the outbreak investigation (13 of 20 specimens; 65%). These positive reactions were also attributed to glycosidic epitopes since the specificity of the WB test increased from 78 to 100% when periodate-treated H and M antigens were used. WB test with deglycosylated H and M antigens of histoplasmin provides a rapid, sensitive, and specific test to diagnose acute pulmonary histoplasmosis before precipitins can be detected. PMID:9874658

  1. Pulmonary histopathology in dalmatians with familial acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

    PubMed

    Syrjä, P; Saari, S; Rajamäki, M; Saario, E; Järvinen, A-K

    2009-11-01

    The histopathological changes in the lungs of 12 related Dalmatians with idiopathic acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are described. Affected dogs had multiple foci of marked atypical hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, patchy ongoing fibrosis with myofibroblastic metaplasia, smooth muscle hyperplasia and occasional honeycombing of alveolar walls, and hyperplasia of atypical type II pneumocytes. There was an abrupt transition between these proliferative lesions and areas of acute alveolar oedema with hyaline membranes in partially normal lung. Diseased areas were associated with moderate lymphohistiocytic interstitial inflammation. Immunohistochemical labelling for cytokeratin expression indicated that the metaplastic epithelium was of bronchiolar origin and that it extended into peribronchiolar alveolar spaces. Some of the bronchiolar lesions were pre-neoplastic and one adult dog suffered from bronchoalveolar carcinoma. These lesions are compared with the two forms of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia reported as causes of ARDS in man: acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) and acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The observed lesions in the Dalmatians are distinct from the diffuse alveolar damage that characterizes AIP, but show some histological similarities to the usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) that occurs in IPF with acute exacerbation in man. UIP has not previously been described in the dog.

  2. Hemodynamic assessment and acute pulmonary vasoreactivity testing in the evaluation of children with pulmonary vascular disease. Expert consensus statement on the diagnosis and treatment of paediatric pulmonary hypertension. The European Paediatric Pulmonary Vascular Disease Network, endorsed by ISHLT and DGPK.

    PubMed

    Apitz, Christian; Hansmann, Georg; Schranz, Dietmar

    2016-05-01

    Invasive assessment of haemodynamics (ventricular, pulmonary) and testing of acute vasoreactivity in the catheterisation laboratory remain the gold standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease. However, these measurements and the interpretation thereof are challenging due to the heterogeneous aetiology of PH in childhood and potentially confounding factors in the catheterisation laboratory. Patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) associated with congenital heart disease who have a cardiovascular shunt need to undergo a completely different catheterisation approach than those with idiopathic PAH lacking an anatomical cardiovascular defect. Diagnostic cardiac catheterisation of children with suspected PH usually includes right and left heart catheterisation, particularly for the initial assessment (ie, at the time of diagnosis), and should be performed in experienced centres only. Here, we present graded consensus recommendations for the invasive evaluation of children with PH including those with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease and/or ventricular dysfunction. Based on the limited published studies and our own experience we suggest a structured catheterisation protocol and two separate definitions of positive acute vasoreactivity testing (AVT): (1) AVT to assess prognosis and indication for specific PH therapy, and (2) AVT to assess operability of PAH associated with congenital heart disease. The protocol and the latter definitions may help in the systematic assessment of these patients and the interpretation of the obtained data. Beyond an accurate diagnosis in the individual patient, such a structured approach may allow systematic decision making for the initiation of a specific treatment and may assist in estimating disease progression and individual prognosis.

  3. Hemodynamic assessment and acute pulmonary vasoreactivity testing in the evaluation of children with pulmonary vascular disease. Expert consensus statement on the diagnosis and treatment of paediatric pulmonary hypertension. The European Paediatric Pulmonary Vascular Disease Network, endorsed by ISHLT and DGPK.

    PubMed

    Apitz, Christian; Hansmann, Georg; Schranz, Dietmar

    2016-05-01

    Invasive assessment of haemodynamics (ventricular, pulmonary) and testing of acute vasoreactivity in the catheterisation laboratory remain the gold standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease. However, these measurements and the interpretation thereof are challenging due to the heterogeneous aetiology of PH in childhood and potentially confounding factors in the catheterisation laboratory. Patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) associated with congenital heart disease who have a cardiovascular shunt need to undergo a completely different catheterisation approach than those with idiopathic PAH lacking an anatomical cardiovascular defect. Diagnostic cardiac catheterisation of children with suspected PH usually includes right and left heart catheterisation, particularly for the initial assessment (ie, at the time of diagnosis), and should be performed in experienced centres only. Here, we present graded consensus recommendations for the invasive evaluation of children with PH including those with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease and/or ventricular dysfunction. Based on the limited published studies and our own experience we suggest a structured catheterisation protocol and two separate definitions of positive acute vasoreactivity testing (AVT): (1) AVT to assess prognosis and indication for specific PH therapy, and (2) AVT to assess operability of PAH associated with congenital heart disease. The protocol and the latter definitions may help in the systematic assessment of these patients and the interpretation of the obtained data. Beyond an accurate diagnosis in the individual patient, such a structured approach may allow systematic decision making for the initiation of a specific treatment and may assist in estimating disease progression and individual prognosis. PMID:27053694

  4. Acute resynchronization with inhaled iloprost in a pregnant woman with idiopathic pulmonary artery hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cotrim, Carlos; Simões, Otília; Loureiro, M J; Cordeiro, Pedro; Miranda, Rita; Silva, Cecília; Avillez, Teresa; Carrageta, Manuel

    2006-05-01

    We describe the case of a pregnant woman with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, a responder in right heart catheterization, followed since the first trimester in outpatient consultations, admitted to hospital at 23 weeks gestation. She was treated with inhaled iloprost until delivery (at 34 weeks gestation) and continuous infusion of iloprost throughout the perioperative period and following days. This line of therapy has proved efficacious in previous cases. The authors present echocardiographic images that document acute changes in ventricular synchrony during inhalation of iloprost.

  5. Acute Amiodarone Pulmonary Toxicity after Drug Holiday: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Abuzaid, Ahmed; Saad, Marwan; Ayan, Mohamed; Kabach, Amjad; Mahfood Haddad, Toufik; Smer, Aiman; Arouni, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Amiodarone is reported to cause a wide continuum of serious clinical effects. It is often challenging to detect Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity (AIPT). Typically, the diagnosis is made based on the clinical settings and may be supported by histopathology results, if available. We describe a 57-year-old patient who developed severe rapidly progressive respiratory failure secondary to AIPT with acute bilateral infiltrates and nodular opacities on chest imaging. Interestingly, Amiodarone was discontinued 3 weeks prior to his presentation. He had normal cardiac filling pressures confirmed by echocardiography. To our knowledge, this is the first case of isolated acute lung injury induced by Amiodarone, three weeks after therapy cessation, with adequate clinical improvement after supportive management and high dose steroid therapy. PMID:26075108

  6. Prognostic stratification of acute pulmonary embolism: Focus on clinical aspects, imaging, and biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Masotti, Luca; Righini, Marc; Vuilleumier, Nicolas; Antonelli, Fabio; Landini, Giancarlo; Cappelli, Roberto; Ray, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) represents a common disease in emergency medicine and guidelines for diagnosis and treatment have had wide diffusion. However, PE morbidity and mortality remain high, especially when associated to hemodynamic instability or right ventricular dysfunction. Prognostic stratification to identify high risk patients needing to receive more aggressive pharmacological and closer monitoring is of utmost importance. Modern guidelines for management of acute PE are based on risk stratification using either clinical, radiological, or laboratory findings. This article reviews the modern treatment of acute PE, which is customized upon patient prognosis. Accordingly the current risk stratification tools described in the literature such as clinical scores, echocardiography, helical computer tomography, and biomarkers will be reviewed. PMID:19649307

  7. Review of ventilatory techniques to optimize mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Raghu M; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global healthcare problem. Studies vary widely in the reported frequency of mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbations of COPD. Invasive intubation and mechanical ventilation may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A good understanding of the airway pathophysiology and lung mechanics in COPD is necessary to appropriately manage acute exacerbations and respiratory failure. The basic pathophysiology in COPD exacerbation is the critical expiratory airflow limitation with consequent dynamic hyperinflation. These changes lead to further derangement in ventilatory mechanics, muscle function and gas exchange which may result in respiratory failure. This review discusses the altered respiratory mechanics in COPD, ways to detect these changes in a ventilated patient and formulating ventilatory techniques to optimize management of respiratory failure due to exacerbation of COPD. PMID:18268918

  8. Management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients after hospitalization for acute exacerbation.

    PubMed

    Osthoff, Mirjam; Leuppi, Jörg D

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this review is to sum up the literature regarding the management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) after hospitalization for an acute exacerbation. Guidelines recommend a follow-up 4-6 weeks after hospitalization to assess coping strategies, inhaler technique, the need for long-term oxygen therapy and the measurement of FEV(1). This review discusses the follow-up of patients with exacerbations of COPD, the use and value of spirometry in their further management, the potential benefit of home monitoring, the value of long-term oxygen therapy, the value of self-management programs including the use of action plans, the potential benefit of noninvasive ventilation as well as the value of early rehabilitation. There is not enough literature to allow specific recommendations and to define components of a care plan after hospitalization for an acute exacerbation; however, early rehabilitation should be included.

  9. Acute effects of inspiratory muscle warm-up on pulmonary function in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Özdal, Mustafa

    2016-06-15

    The acute effects of inspiratory muscle warm-up on pulmonary functions were examined in 26 healthy male subjects using the pulmonary function test (PFT) in three different trials. The control trial (CON) did not involve inspiratory muscle warm-up, while the placebo (IMWp) and experimental (IMW) trials involved inspiratory muscle warm-up. There were no significant changes between the IMWp and CON trials (p>0.05). All the PFT measurements, including slow vital capacity, inspiratory vital capacity, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, maximal voluntary ventilation, and maximal inspiratory pressure were significantly increased by 3.55%, 12.52%, 5.00%, 2.75%, 2.66%, and 7.03% respectively, in the subjects in the IMW trial than those in the CON trial (p<0.05). These results show that inspiratory muscle warm-up improved the pulmonary functions. The mechanisms responsible for these improvements are probably associated with the concomitant increase in the inspiratory muscle strength, and the cooperation of the upper thorax, neck, and respiratory muscles, and increased level of reactive O2 species in muscle tissue, and potentially improvement of muscle O2 delivery-to-utilization. However, further investigation is required to determine the precise mechanisms responsible from among these candidates. PMID:26903486

  10. Acute pulmonary effects of nitrogen dioxide exposure during exercise in competitive athletes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.U.; Koenig, J.Q.; Pierson, W.E.; Hanley, Q.S. )

    1991-04-01

    The acute pulmonary responses of athletes after short-term exposure to ambient concentrations of NO{sub 2} during heavy exercise have been examined. Intercollegiate male athletes were screened for history of cardiac disease, respiratory disease, allergic conditions and extensive exposure to pollutants. After completion of serum IgE level determination, exercise tolerance test and methacholine challenge test with normal results, nine healthy subjects 18 to 23 years of age were exposed to filtered air and to 0.18 and 0.30 ppm NO{sub 2} for 30 min on different days while exercising on a treadmill. Pulmonary function parameters were measured before and after each exposure. In this study, no statistically significant changes were observed in FEV1, RT PEFR, and Vmax50% after exposure to 0.18 and 0.30 ppm NO{sub 2}. For these selected healthy athletes, short-term exposure to ambient NO{sub 2} levels during heavy exercise does not affect adversely the pulmonary function.

  11. Acute effects of ambient ozone on pulmonary function of children in The Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Hoek, G.; Fischer, P.; Brunekreef, B.; Lebret, E.; Hofschreuder, P.; Mennen, M.G. )

    1993-01-01

    In the spring and summer of 1989 an epidemiologic study was conducted to evaluate the acute effects of photochemical air pollution episodes on pulmonary function of children living in three nonindustrial towns in the Netherlands. Spirometry was performed repeatedly in the schools of the children, mostly during the morning hours. Data from 533 children having more than four valid pulmonary function tests were included in the analyses. The association between previous-day ambient ozone concentration and pulmonary function was evaluated, using individual linear regression analysis and subsequent evaluation of the distribution of individual regression coefficients. One hour maximum ambient ozone concentrations frequently exceeded 160 micrograms/m3 but were all lower than the Dutch Air Quality Guideline of 240 micrograms/m3 for all three populations. Significant negative associations of previous-day ambient ozone with FVC, FEV1, peak expiratory flow (PEF), and maximal midexpiratory flow (MMEF) were observed. There were indications of systematic differences in responses among the children. Children with chronic respiratory symptoms did not have a stronger response than children without these symptoms.

  12. Risk-Adapted Management of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Recent Evidence, New Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Käberich, Anja; Wärntges, Simone; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), the third most frequent acute cardiovascular syndrome, may cause life-threatening complications and imposes a substantial socio-economic burden. During the past years, several landmark trials paved the way towards novel strategies in acute and long-term management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Risk stratification is increasingly recognized as a cornerstone for an adequate diagnostic and therapeutic management of the highly heterogeneous population of patients with acute PE. Recently published European Guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical prediction rules in combination with imaging procedures (assessment of right ventricular function) and laboratory biomarkers (indicative of myocardial stress or injury) for identification of normotensive PE patients at intermediate risk for an adverse short-term outcome. In this patient group, systemic full-dose thrombolysis was associated with a significantly increased risk of intracranial bleeding, a complication which discourages its clinical application unless hemodynamic decompensation occurs. A large-scale clinical trial program evaluating new oral anticoagulants in the initial and long-term treatment of venous thromboembolism showed at least comparable efficacy and presumably increased safety of these drugs compared to the current standard treatment. Research is continuing on catheter-directed, ultrasound-assisted, local, low-dose thrombolysis in the management of intermediate-risk PE. PMID:25386356

  13. [Complementary treatment of acute heart failure in patients with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or anemia].

    PubMed

    Carrasco Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Recio Iglesias, Jesús; Grau Amorós, Jordi

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and anemia are comorbidities with a high prevalence and impact in heart failure (HF). The presence of these comorbidities considerably worsens the prognosis of HF. Diabetic patients have a higher likelihood of developing symptoms of HF and both the treatment of diabetes and that of acute HF are altered by the coexistence of both entities. The glycemic targets in patients with acute HF are not well-defined, but could show a U-shaped relationship. Stress hyperglycemia in non-diabetic patients with HF could also have a deleterious effect on the medium-term prognosis. The inter-relationship between COPD and HF hampers diagnosis due to the overlap between the symptoms and signs of both entities and complementary investigations. The treatment of acute HF is also altered by the presence of COPD. Anemia is highly prevalent and is often the direct cause of decompensated HF, the most common cause being iron deficiency anemia. Iron replacement therapy, specifically intravenous forms, has helped to improve the prognosis of acute HF.

  14. Acute pulmonary emphysema in death by hanging: a morphometric digital study.

    PubMed

    Castiglioni, Claudia; Baumann, Pia; Fracasso, Tony

    2016-09-01

    Acute pulmonary emphysema (APE) has been described in cases of mechanical asphyxia such as ligature or manual strangulation but not in cases of hanging. In this study, we wanted to verify by morphometric digital analysis of lung tissue whether APE occurs in death by hanging.We investigated 16 cases of hanging (eight complete, eight incomplete), 10 cases of freshwater drowning (positive control group), and 10 cases of acute external bleeding (negative control group). Tissue sections were obtained from each pulmonary lobe. For each slide, five fields were randomly selected. The area of every alveolar space was measured by image analysis software. The mean alveolar area (MAA) was calculated for each group.In incomplete hanging, MAA was significantly higher than that observed in complete hanging and similar to the one observed in freshwater drowning.APE in cases of incomplete hanging can be considered as a sign of vitality. The high number of conditions that can cause alveolar distension (that were excluded in this study) limits the applicability of this vital sign in the routine forensic practice.

  15. Acute pulmonary emphysema in death by hanging: a morphometric digital study.

    PubMed

    Castiglioni, Claudia; Baumann, Pia; Fracasso, Tony

    2016-09-01

    Acute pulmonary emphysema (APE) has been described in cases of mechanical asphyxia such as ligature or manual strangulation but not in cases of hanging. In this study, we wanted to verify by morphometric digital analysis of lung tissue whether APE occurs in death by hanging.We investigated 16 cases of hanging (eight complete, eight incomplete), 10 cases of freshwater drowning (positive control group), and 10 cases of acute external bleeding (negative control group). Tissue sections were obtained from each pulmonary lobe. For each slide, five fields were randomly selected. The area of every alveolar space was measured by image analysis software. The mean alveolar area (MAA) was calculated for each group.In incomplete hanging, MAA was significantly higher than that observed in complete hanging and similar to the one observed in freshwater drowning.APE in cases of incomplete hanging can be considered as a sign of vitality. The high number of conditions that can cause alveolar distension (that were excluded in this study) limits the applicability of this vital sign in the routine forensic practice. PMID:27448112

  16. An Unusual Aneurysm of the Main Pulmonary Artery Presenting as Acute Coronary Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kholeif, Mona A.; El Tahir, Mohamed Kholeif, Yasser A.; El Watidy, Ahmed

    2006-10-15

    A 70-year old man presented with retrosternal chest pain. His electrocardiogram showed nonspecific T wave changes. Cardiac-specific troponin I (cTnI) was elevated. His condition was managed as acute coronary syndrome, following which he had two minor episodes of hemoptysis. A CT pulmonary angiogram showed no evidence of pulmonary embolism, but a large mass lesion was seen in the mediastinum. Echocardiography and cardiac MRI demonstrated a large solid mass, arising from the right ventricular outflow tract and causing compression of the main pulmonary artery (MPA). The differential diagnosis included pericardial and myocardial tumors and clotted aneurysm of the MPA. At surgery, a clotted aneurysmal sac was identified originating from the MPA and the defect was healed. Aneurysms of the MPA are rare. They most commonly present with dyspnea and chest pain. Compression of surrounding structures produces protean manifestations. A high index of suspicion coupled with imaging modalities establishes the diagnosis. Blunt trauma to the chest, at the time of an accident 4 years previously, may explain this aneurysm. The patient's presentation with chest pain was probably due to compression and/or stretching of surrounding structures. Coronary artery compression simulating acute coronary syndrome has been documented in the literature. The rise in cTnI may have been due to right ventricular strain, as a result of right ventricular outflow obstruction by the aneurysm. This has not been reported previously in the literature. The saccular morphology and narrow neck of the aneurysm predisposed to stagnation leading to clotting of the lumen and healing of the tear, which caused the diagnostic difficulty.

  17. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition attenuates right ventricular dysfunction and improves responses to dobutamine during acute pulmonary thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Neto-Neves, Evandro M; Sousa-Santos, Ozelia; Ferraz, Karina C; Rizzi, Elen; Ceron, Carla S; Romano, Minna M D; Gali, Luis G; Maciel, Benedito C; Schulz, Richard; Gerlach, Raquel F; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2013-12-01

    Activated matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) cause cardiomyocyte injury during acute pulmonary thromboembolism (APT). However, the functional consequences of this alteration are not known. We examined whether doxycycline (a MMP inhibitor) improves right ventricle function and the cardiac responses to dobutamine during APT. APT was induced with autologous blood clots (350 mg/kg) in anaesthetized male lambs pre-treated with doxycycline (Doxy, 10 mg/kg/day, intravenously) or saline. Non-embolized control lambs received doxycycline pre-treatment or saline. The responses to intravenous dobutamine (Dob, 1, 5, 10 μg/kg/min.) or saline infusions at 30 and 120 min. after APT induction were evaluated by echocardiography. APT increased mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance index by ~185%. Doxycycline partially prevented APT-induced pulmonary hypertension (P < 0.05). RV diameter increased in the APT group (from 10.7 ± 0.8 to 18.3 ± 1.6 mm, P < 0.05), but not in the Doxy+APT group (from 13.3 ± 0.9 to 14.4 ± 1.0 mm, P > 0.05). RV dysfunction on stress echocardiography was observed in embolized lambs (APT+Dob group) but not in embolized animals pre-treated with doxycycline (Doxy+APT+Dob). APT increased MMP-9 activity, oxidative stress and gelatinolytic activity in the RV. Although doxycycline had no effects on RV MMP-9 activity, it prevented the increases in RV oxidative stress and gelatinolytic activity (P < 0.05). APT increased serum cardiac troponin I concentrations (P < 0.05), doxycycline partially prevented this alteration (P < 0.05). We found evidence to support that doxycycline prevents RV dysfunction and improves the cardiac responses to dobutamine during APT. PMID:24199964

  18. Awake video-assisted thoracic surgery in acute infectious pulmonary destruction

    PubMed Central

    Egorov, Vladimir; Deynega, Igor; Ionov, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Background Many of thoracic minimally invasive interventions have been proven to be possible without general anesthesia. This article presents results of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) application under local anesthesia in patients with lung abscesses and discusses its indications in detail. Methods The study involved prospective analysis of treatment outcomes for all acute infectious pulmonary destruction (AIPD) patients undergoing VATS under local anesthesia and sedation since January 1, 2010, till December 31, 2013. Patients with pulmonary destruction cavity at periphery of large size (>5 cm) underwent non-intubated video abscessoscopy (NIVAS). Patients with pyopneumothorax (lung abscess penetration into pleural cavity) underwent non-intubated video thoracoscopy (NIVTS). Indications for NIVAS and NIVTS were as follows: cavity debridement and washing, necrotic sequestra removal, adhesion split, biopsy. All interventions were done under local anesthesia and sedation without trachea intubation and epidural anesthesia. Results Sixty-five enrolled patients had 42 NIVAS and 32 NIVTS interventions, nine patients underwent two surgeries. None of the patients required trachea intubation or epidural anesthesia. In none of our cases with conversion to thoracotomy was required. Post-surgical complications developed after 11 interventions (13%): subcutaneous emphysema (five cases), chest wall phlegmon (three cases), pulmonary bleeding (two cases), and pneumothorax (one case). One patient died due to the main disease progression. In 50 patients NIVAS and NIVTS were done within 5 to 8 days after abscess/pleural cavity draining, while in other 15 patients—immediately prior to draining; both pulmonary bleeding episodes and all cases of chest wall phlegmon took place in the latter group. Conclusions NIVAS and NIVTS under local anesthesia and sedation are well tolerated by patients, safe and should be used more often in AIPD cases. Timing of NIVAS and NIVTS procedures

  19. Differential effects of pirfenidone on acute pulmonary injury and ensuing fibrosis in the hamster model of amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Card, Jeffrey W; Racz, William J; Brien, James F; Margolin, Solomon B; Massey, Thomas E

    2003-09-01

    Pulmonary toxicity, including fibrosis, is a serious adverse effect associated with the antidysrhythmic drug amiodarone (AM). We tested the potential usefulness of pirfenidone against AM-induced pulmonary toxicity in the hamster model. Intratracheal AM administration resulted in pulmonary fibrosis 21 days posttreatment, as evidenced by an increased hydroxyproline content and histological damage. Dietary pirfenidone administration (0.5% w/w in chow), for 3 days prior to and continuously after AM, prevented fibrosis and suppressed elevation of pulmonary transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 mRNA content at 7 and 21 days post-AM. Protection against AM-induced lung damage was not observed when supplementation with pirfenidone was delayed until 7 days following AM administration, suggesting that alteration of early events in AM lung toxicity is necessary for the protective effect of pirfenidone. Both AM and bleomycin, another pulmonary fibrogen, caused inflammation 24 h after intratracheal dosing, measured as increased lactate dehydrogenase activity, protein content, and cellular alterations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, with the response to AM markedly greater than that to bleomycin. Administration of AM, but not bleomycin, also caused whole lung mitochondrial dysfunction, alveolar macrophage death, and an influx of eosinophils into the lung, of which pirfenidone was able to decrease only the latter. We conclude that: (1) AM induces alveolar macrophage death and severe, acute pulmonary inflammation with associated eosinophilia following intratracheal administration; (2) mitochondrial dysfunction may play an early role in AM pulmonary injury; and (3) pirfenidone decreases AM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in the hamster, probably through suppression of TGF-beta1 gene expression.

  20. Pulmonary function of children with acute leukemia in maintenance phase of chemotherapy☆

    PubMed Central

    de Macêdo, Thalita Medeiros Fernandes; Campos, Tania Fernandes; Mendes, Raquel Emanuele de França; França, Danielle Corrêa; Chaves, Gabriela Suéllen da Silva; de Mendonça, Karla Morganna Pereira Pinto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the pulmonary function of children with acute leukemia. METHODS: Cross-sectional observational analytical study that enrolled 34 children divided into groups A (17 with acute leukemia in the maintenance phase of chemotherapy) and B (17 healthy children). The groups were matched for sex, age and height. Spirometry was measured using a spirometer Microloop Viasys(r) in accordance with American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society guidelines. Maximal respiratory pressures were measured with an MVD300 digital manometer (Globalmed(r)). Maximal inspiratory pressures and maximal expiratory pressures were measured from residual volume and total lung capacity, respectively. RESULTS: Group A showed a significant decrease in maximal inspiratory pressures when compared to group B. No significant difference was found between the spirometric values of the two groups, nor was there any difference between maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure values in group A compared to the lower limit values proposed as reference. CONCLUSION: Children with acute leukemia, myeloid or lymphoid, during the maintenance phase of chemotherapy exhibited unchanged spirometric variables and maximal expiratory pressure; However, there was a decrease in inspiratory muscle strength. PMID:25510995

  1. Association of physical examination with pulmonary artery catheter parameters in acute lung injury*

    PubMed Central

    Grissom, Colin K.; Morris, Alan H.; Lanken, Paul N.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Orme, James F.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Thompson, B. Taylor

    2016-01-01

    Objective To correlate physical examination findings, central venous pressure, fluid output, and central venous oxygen saturation with pulmonary artery catheter parameters. Design Retrospective study. Setting Data from the multicenter Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial of the National Institutes of Health Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network. Patients Five hundred thirteen patients with acute lung injury randomized to treatment with a pulmonary artery catheter. Interventions Correlation of physical examination findings (capillary refill time >2 secs, knee mottling, or cool extremities), central venous pressure, fluid output, and central venous oxygen saturation with parameters from a pulmonary artery catheter. Measurements We determined association of baseline physical examination findings and on-study parameters of central venous pressure and central venous oxygen saturation with cardiac index <2.5 L/min/m2 and mixed venous oxygen saturation <60%. We determined correlation of baseline central venous oxygen saturation and mixed venous oxygen saturation and predictive value of a low central venous oxygen saturation for a low mixed venous oxygen saturation. Measurements and Main Results Prevalence of cardiac index <2.5 and mixed venous oxygen saturation <60% was 8.1% and 15.5%, respectively. Baseline presence of all three physical examination findings had low sensitivity (12% and 8%), high specificity (98% and 99%), low positive predictive value (40% and 56%), but high negative predictive value (93% and 86%) for cardiac index <2.5 and mixed venous oxygen saturation <60%, respectively. Central venous oxygen saturation <70% predicted a mixed venous oxygen saturation <60% with a sensitivity 84%, specificity 70%, positive predictive value 31%, and negative predictive value of 96%. Low cardiac index correlated with cool extremities, high central venous pressure, and low 24-hr fluid output; and low mixed venous oxygen saturation correlated with knee mottling and

  2. Upregulation of Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein by Hypoxia Stimulates Aldosterone Synthesis in Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cells to Promote Pulmonary Vascular Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Oldham, William M.; Chan, Stephen Y.; Vargas, Sara O.; Arons, Elena; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanism(s) regulating hypoxia-induced vascular fibrosis are unresolved. Hyperaldosteronism correlates positively with vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), suggesting that aldosterone may contribute to the pulmonary vasculopathy of hypoxia. The hypoxia-sensitive transcription factors c-Fos/c-Jun regulate steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), which facilitates the rate-limiting step of aldosterone steroidogenesis. We hypothesized that c-Fos/c-Jun upregulation by hypoxia activates StAR-dependent aldosterone synthesis in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) to promote vascular fibrosis in PAH. Methods and Results Patients with PAH, rats with Sugen/hypoxia-PAH, and mice exposed to chronic hypoxia expressed increased StAR in remodeled pulmonary arterioles, providing a basis for investigating hypoxia-StAR signaling in HPAECs. Hypoxia (2.0% FiO2) increased aldosterone levels selectively in HPAECs, which was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Increased aldosterone by hypoxia resulted from enhanced c-Fos/c-Jun binding to the proximal activator protein (AP-1) site of the StAR promoter in HPAECs, which increased StAR expression and activity. In HPAECs transfected with StAR-siRNA or treated with the AP-1 inhibitor, SR-11302, hypoxia failed to increase aldosterone, confirming that aldosterone biosynthesis required StAR activation by c-Fos/c-Jun. The functional consequences of aldosterone were confirmed by pharmacological inhibition of the mineralocorticoid receptor with spironolactone or eplerenone, which attenuated hypoxia-induced upregulation of the fibrogenic protein connective tissue growth factor and collagen III in vitro, and decreased pulmonary vascular fibrosis to improve pulmonary hypertension in Conclusions Our findings identify autonomous aldosterone synthesis in HPAECs due to hypoxia-mediated upregulation of StAR as a novel molecular mechanism that promotes pulmonary vascular

  3. Particle-Induced Pulmonary Acute Phase Response Correlates with Neutrophil Influx Linking Inhaled Particles and Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Lamson, Jacob Stuart; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Nyendi, Allen Njimeri; Wahlberg, Pia; Madsen, Anne Mette; Jackson, Petra; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    Background Particulate air pollution is associated with cardiovascular disease. Acute phase response is causally linked to cardiovascular disease. Here, we propose that particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response provides an underlying mechanism for particle-induced cardiovascular risk. Methods We analysed the mRNA expression of Serum Amyloid A (Saa3) in lung tissue from female C57BL/6J mice exposed to different particles including nanomaterials (carbon black and titanium dioxide nanoparticles, multi- and single walled carbon nanotubes), diesel exhaust particles and airborne dust collected at a biofuel plant. Mice were exposed to single or multiple doses of particles by inhalation or intratracheal instillation and pulmonary mRNA expression of Saa3 was determined at different time points of up to 4 weeks after exposure. Also hepatic mRNA expression of Saa3, SAA3 protein levels in broncheoalveolar lavage fluid and in plasma and high density lipoprotein levels in plasma were determined in mice exposed to multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Results Pulmonary exposure to particles strongly increased Saa3 mRNA levels in lung tissue and elevated SAA3 protein levels in broncheoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma, whereas hepatic Saa3 levels were much less affected. Pulmonary Saa3 expression correlated with the number of neutrophils in BAL across different dosing regimens, doses and time points. Conclusions Pulmonary acute phase response may constitute a direct link between particle inhalation and risk of cardiovascular disease. We propose that the particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response may predict risk for cardiovascular disease. PMID:23894396

  4. Simple pulmonary eosinophilia

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary infiltrates with eosinophilia; Loffler syndrome; Eosinophilic pneumonia; Pneumonia - eosinophilic ... simple pulmonary eosinophilia is a severe type of pneumonia called acute idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia.

  5. Acute pulmonary edema following liposuction due to heart failure and atypical pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Graf, Andreas; Hanisch, Volkmar

    2015-05-01

    Microcannular liposuction in tumescent anesthesia is the most effective treatment for painful lipedema. Tumescent anesthesia is an established and safe procedure in local analgesia when performed according to guidelines. Major adverse effects are rare. In patients with advanced lipedema, however, the commonly presented comorbidities bear additional risks.We report on post-surgical acute pulmonary edema after tumescent liposuction according to guidelines in a 52-year-old female patient with lipedema of the legs. We discuss in detail possible scenarios that might be involved in such emergency. In the present case the most likely was a retarded community acquired atypical pneumonia with aggravation of pre-existent comorbidities.A combined treatment with intravenous b-lactam antibiosis, positive pressure ventilation, and continuous venovenous hemodialysis and filtration resulted in complete remission in a couple of days. In conclusion, tumescent liposuction of advanced lipedema patients should only be performed in well-trained centers with sufficient infrastructure.

  6. Acute exacerbation of combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema associated with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Keishi; Gocho, Kyoko; Kikuchi, Naoshi; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Uekusa, Toshimasa; Homma, Sakae

    2016-03-01

    A 30-year-old male smoker with congenital amblyopia and oculocutaneous albinism was admitted to our hospital complaining of progressive dyspnea on exertion. Chest computed tomography images revealed diffuse reticular opacities and honeycombing in the bilateral lower lobes with sparing of the subpleural region along with emphysema predominantly in the upper lobes. Lung biopsy specimens showed a mixture of usual interstitial pneumonia and a non-specific interstitial pneumonia pattern with emphysema. Of note, cuboidal epithelial cells with foamy cytoplasm on the alveolar walls and phagocytic macrophages with ceroid pigments in the fibrotic lesions were observed. The patient was diagnosed with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) associated with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE). Six years following the patient's initial admission to our hospital, he died from acute exacerbation (AE) of CPFE associated with HPS. This is one of only few reports available on the clinicopathological characteristics of AE in CPFE associated with HPS. PMID:26839694

  7. Pathogen-directed Therapy in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Fernando J.

    2007-01-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are important events in the natural history of this chronic lung disorder. These events can be caused by a large number of infectious and noninfectious agents and are associated with an increased local and systemic inflammatory response. Their frequency and severity have been linked to progressive deterioration in lung function and health status. Infectious pathogens ranging from viral to atypical and typical bacteria have been implicated in the majority of episodes. Most therapeutic regimens to date have emphasized broad, nonspecific approaches to bronchoconstriction and pulmonary inflammation. Increasingly, therapy that targets specific etiologic pathogens has been advocated. These include clinical and laboratory-based methods to identify bacterial infections. Further additional investigation has suggested specific pathogens within this broad class. As specific antiviral therapies become available, better diagnostic approaches to identify specific pathogens will be required. Furthermore, prophylactic therapy for at-risk individuals during high-risk times may become a standard therapeutic approach. As such, the future will likely include aggressive diagnostic algorithms based on the combination of clinical syndromes and rapid laboratory modalities to identify specific causative bacteria or viruses. PMID:18073397

  8. Arginase 1: An Unexpected Mediator of Pulmonary Capillary Barrier Dysfunction in Models of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Rudolf; Czikora, Istvàn; Sridhar, Supriya; Zemskov, Evgeny A.; Oseghale, Aluya; Circo, Sebastian; Cederbaum, Stephen D.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Fulton, David J.; Caldwell, Robert W.; Romero, Maritza J.

    2013-01-01

    The integrity of epithelial and endothelial barriers in the lower airspaces of the lungs has to be tightly regulated, in order to prevent leakage and to assure efficient gas exchange between the alveoli and capillaries. Both G− and G+ bacterial toxins, such as lipopolysaccharide and pneumolysin, respectively, can be released in high concentrations within the pulmonary compartments upon antibiotic treatment of patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or severe pneumonia. These toxins are able to impair endothelial barrier function, either directly, or indirectly, by induction of pro-inflammatory mediators and neutrophil sequestration. Toxin-induced endothelial hyperpermeability can involve myosin light chain phosphorylation and/or microtubule rearrangement. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was proposed to be a guardian of basal barrier function, since eNOS knock-out mice display an impaired expression of inter-endothelial junction proteins and as such an increased vascular permeability, as compared to wild type mice. The enzyme arginase, the activity of which can be regulated by the redox status of the cell, exists in two isoforms – arginase 1 (cytosolic) and arginase 2 (mitochondrial) – both of which can be expressed in lung microvascular endothelial cells. Upon activation, arginase competes with eNOS for the substrate l-arginine, as such impairing eNOS-dependent NO generation and promoting reactive oxygen species generation by the enzyme. This mini-review will discuss recent findings regarding the interaction between bacterial toxins and arginase during acute lung injury and will as such address the role of arginase in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:23966993

  9. Key Molecular Mechanisms of Chaiqinchengqi Decoction in Alleviating the Pulmonary Albumin Leakage Caused by Endotoxemia in Severe Acute Pancreatitis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Luo, Ruijie; Lin, Ziqi; Xia, Qing

    2016-01-01

    To reveal the key molecular mechanisms of Chaiqinchengqi decoction (CQCQD) in alleviating the pulmonary albumin leakage caused by endotoxemia in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) rats. Rats models of SAP endotoxemia-induced acute lung injury were established, the studies in vivo provided the important evidences that the therapy of CQCQD significantly ameliorated the increases in plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), sCd14, and Lbp, the elevation of serum amylase level, the enhancements of systemic and pulmonary albumin leakage, and the depravation of airways indicators, thus improving respiratory dysfunction and also pancreatic and pulmonary histopathological changes. According to the analyses of rats pulmonary tissue microarray and protein-protein interaction network, c-Fos, c-Src, and p85α were predicted as the target proteins for CQCQD in alleviating pulmonary albumin leakage. To confirm these predictions, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were employed in in vitro studies, which provide the evidences that (1) LPS-induced paracellular leakage and proinflammatory cytokines release were suppressed by pretreatment with inhibitors of c-Src (PP1) or PI3K (LY294002) or by transfection with siRNAs of c-Fos; (2) fortunately, CQCQD imitated the actions of these selective inhibitions agents to inhibit LPS-induced high expressions of p-Src, p-p85α, and c-Fos, therefore attenuating paracellular leakage and proinflammatory cytokines release. PMID:27413385

  10. Key Molecular Mechanisms of Chaiqinchengqi Decoction in Alleviating the Pulmonary Albumin Leakage Caused by Endotoxemia in Severe Acute Pancreatitis Rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Luo, Ruijie; Lin, Ziqi; Xia, Qing; Xue, Ping

    2016-01-01

    To reveal the key molecular mechanisms of Chaiqinchengqi decoction (CQCQD) in alleviating the pulmonary albumin leakage caused by endotoxemia in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) rats. Rats models of SAP endotoxemia-induced acute lung injury were established, the studies in vivo provided the important evidences that the therapy of CQCQD significantly ameliorated the increases in plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), sCd14, and Lbp, the elevation of serum amylase level, the enhancements of systemic and pulmonary albumin leakage, and the depravation of airways indicators, thus improving respiratory dysfunction and also pancreatic and pulmonary histopathological changes. According to the analyses of rats pulmonary tissue microarray and protein-protein interaction network, c-Fos, c-Src, and p85α were predicted as the target proteins for CQCQD in alleviating pulmonary albumin leakage. To confirm these predictions, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were employed in in vitro studies, which provide the evidences that (1) LPS-induced paracellular leakage and proinflammatory cytokines release were suppressed by pretreatment with inhibitors of c-Src (PP1) or PI3K (LY294002) or by transfection with siRNAs of c-Fos; (2) fortunately, CQCQD imitated the actions of these selective inhibitions agents to inhibit LPS-induced high expressions of p-Src, p-p85α, and c-Fos, therefore attenuating paracellular leakage and proinflammatory cytokines release. PMID:27413385

  11. Resistin deficiency in mice has no effect on pulmonary responses induced by acute ozone exposure.

    PubMed

    Razvi, Shehla S; Richards, Jeremy B; Malik, Farhan; Cromar, Kevin R; Price, Roger E; Bell, Cynthia S; Weng, Tingting; Atkins, Constance L; Spencer, Chantal Y; Cockerill, Katherine J; Alexander, Amy L; Blackburn, Michael R; Alcorn, Joseph L; Haque, Ikram U; Johnston, Richard A

    2015-11-15

    Acute exposure to ozone (O3), an air pollutant, causes pulmonary inflammation, airway epithelial desquamation, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Pro-inflammatory cytokines-including IL-6 and ligands of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 [keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2], TNF receptor 1 and 2 (TNF), and type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1α and IL-1β)-promote these sequelae. Human resistin, a pleiotropic hormone and cytokine, induces expression of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 (the human ortholog of murine KC and MIP-2), and TNF. Functional differences exist between human and murine resistin; yet given the aforementioned observations, we hypothesized that murine resistin promotes O3-induced lung pathology by inducing expression of the same inflammatory cytokines as human resistin. Consequently, we examined indexes of O3-induced lung pathology in wild-type and resistin-deficient mice following acute exposure to either filtered room air or O3. In wild-type mice, O3 increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) resistin. Furthermore, O3 increased lung tissue or BALF IL-1α, IL-6, KC, TNF, macrophages, neutrophils, and epithelial cells in wild-type and resistin-deficient mice. With the exception of KC, which was significantly greater in resistin-deficient compared with wild-type mice, no genotype-related differences in the other indexes existed following O3 exposure. O3 caused AHR to acetyl-β-methylcholine chloride (methacholine) in wild-type and resistin-deficient mice. However, genotype-related differences in airway responsiveness to methacholine were nonexistent subsequent to O3 exposure. Taken together, these data demonstrate that murine resistin is increased in the lungs of wild-type mice following acute O3 exposure but does not promote O3-induced lung pathology. PMID:26386120

  12. Acute responses to exercise training and relationship with exercise adherence in moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Amanda K; Wardini, Rima; Chan-Thim, Emilie; Bacon, Simon L; Lavoie, Kim L; Pepin, Véronique

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of our study were to (i) compare, in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, acute responses to continuous training at high intensity (CTHI), continuous training at ventilatory threshold (CTVT) and interval training (IT); (ii) examine associations between acute responses and 12-week adherence; and (iii) investigate whether the relationship between acute responses and adherence is mediated/moderated by affect/vigour. Thirty-five COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 second = 60.2 ± 15.8% predicted), underwent baseline assessments, were randomly assigned to CTHI, CTVT or IT, were monitored throughout about before training, and underwent 12 weeks of exercise training during which adherence was tracked. Compared with CTHI, CTVT was associated with lower respiratory exchange ratio, heart rate and respiratory rate (RR), while IT induced higher [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]maximal voluntary ventilation, RR and lower pulse oxygen saturation. From pre- to post-exercise, positive affect increased (F = 9.74, p < 0.001) and negative affect decreased (F = 6.43, p = 0.005) across groups. CTVT reported greater end-exercise vigour compared to CTHI (p = 0.01) and IT (p = 0.02). IT exhibited lowest post-exercise vigour (p = 0.04 versus CTHI, p = 0.02 versus CTVT) and adherence rate (F = 6.69, p = 0.004). Mean [Formula: see text] (r = -0.466, p = 0.007) and end-exercise vigour (r = 0.420, p = 0.017) were most strongly correlated with adherence. End-exercise vigour moderated the relationship between [Formula: see text] and adherence (β = 2.74, t(32) = 2.32, p = 0.03). In summary, CTHI, CTVT and IT improved affective valence from rest to post-exercise and induced a significant 12-week exercise training effect. However, they elicited different acute physiological responses, which in turn were associated with differences in 12-week adherence to the target training intensity. This association was moderated by acute end-exercise vigour.

  13. Acute hemodynamic effects of inhaled sodium nitrite in pulmonary hypertension associated with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Marc A.; Vanderpool, Rebecca R.; Nouraie, Mehdi; Bachman, Timothy N.; White, Pamela M.; Sugahara, Masataka; Gorcsan, John; Parsley, Ed L.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with poor outcomes, yet specific treatments only exist for a small subset of patients. The most common form of PH is that associated with left heart disease (Group 2), for which there is no approved therapy. Nitrite has shown efficacy in preclinical animal models of Group 1 and 2 PH, as well as in patients with left heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). We evaluated the safety and efficacy of a potentially novel inhaled formulation of nitrite in PH-HFpEF patients as compared with Group 1 and 3 PH. METHODS. Cardiopulmonary hemodynamics were recorded after acute administration of inhaled nitrite at 2 doses, 45 and 90 mg. Safety endpoints included change in systemic blood pressure and methemoglobin levels. Responses were also compared with those administered inhaled nitric oxide. RESULTS. Thirty-six patients were enrolled (10 PH-HFpEF, 20 Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension patients on background PH-specific therapy, and 6 Group 3 PH). Drug administration was well tolerated. Nitrite inhalation significantly lowered pulmonary, right atrial, and pulmonary capillary wedge pressures, most pronounced in patients with PH-HFpEF. There was a modest decrease in cardiac output and systemic blood pressure. Pulmonary vascular resistance decreased only in Group 3 PH patients. There was substantial increase in pulmonary artery compliance, most pronounced in patients with PH-HFpEF. CONCLUSIONS. Inhaled nitrite is safe in PH patients and may be efficacious in PH-HFpEF and Group 3 PH primarily via improvements in left and right ventricular filling pressures and pulmonary artery compliance. The lack of change in pulmonary vascular resistance likely may limit efficacy for Group 1 patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01431313 FUNDING. This work was supported in part by the NIH grants P01HL103455 (to MAS and MTG), R01HL098032 (to MTG), and R01HL096973 (to MTG), and Mast Therapeutics, Inc. PMID

  14. Successful Management of Intraoperative Acute Bilateral Pulmonary Embolism in a High Grade Astrocytoma Patient

    PubMed Central

    Khraise, Wail N.; Allouh, Mohammed Z.; Hiasat, Mohammad Y.; Said, Raed S.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 39 Final Diagnosis: Acute bilateral pulmonary embolism Symptoms: Headache • amnesia • seizure • urinary incontinence Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Anesthesiology Objective: Management of emergency care Background: Intraoperative pulmonary embolism (PE) is a rare life-threatening complication in patients undergoing surgical intervention. Generally, cancer patients have a higher risk for developing this complication. Unfortunately, there is no standard procedure for its management. Case Report: We report the case of a 39-year-old woman with high-grade glioma in the right frontal lobe who was admitted to the surgical theater for craniotomy and excision of the tumor. During the general anesthesia procedure and just before inserting the central venous line, her end-tidal CO2 and O2 saturation dropped sharply. The anesthesiologist quickly responded with an aggressive resuscitation procedure that included aspiration through the central venous line, 100% O2, and IV administration of ephedrine 6 mg, colloid 500 mL, normal saline 500 mL, and heparin 5000 IU. The patient was extubated and remained in the supine position until she regained consciousness and her vital signs returned to normal. Subsequent radiological examination revealed a massive bilateral PE. A retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter was inserted, and enoxaparin anticoagulant therapy was prescribed to stabilize the patient’s condition. After 3 weeks, she underwent an uneventful craniotomy procedure and was discharged a week later under the enoxaparin therapy. Conclusions: The successful management of intraoperative PE requires a quick, accurate diagnosis accompanied with an aggressive, fast response. Anesthesiologists are usually the ones who are held accountable for the diagnosis and early management of this complication. They must be aware of the possibility of such a complication and be ready to react properly and decisively in the operation theater. PMID

  15. Acute effect of glucan-spiked office dust on nasal and pulmonary inflammation in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Straszek, S P; Adamcakova-Dodd, A; Metwali, N; Pedersen, O F; Sigsgaard, T; Thorne, P S

    2007-11-01

    The acute effects of pure inhaled glucan on respiratory inflammation remain inconclusive and not sufficiently examined with regards to the simultaneous interaction of glucan, endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS), and house dust in airway inflammation. This study aims at determining effects of simultaneous exposure to office dust and glucan on nasal and pulmonary inflammation. This is relevant for humans with occupational exposure in waste handling and farming and buildings with mold problems. Office dust collected from Danish offices was spiked with 1% (1-3)-beta-glucan (curdlan). Guinea pig nasal cavity volume was measured by acoustic rhinometry (AR) and animals were exposed by inhalation for 4 h to curdlan-spiked dust, unspiked dust, purified air (negative controls), or LPS (positive controls). After exposure (+5 h) or the following day (+18 h), measurements were repeated by AR and followed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Total and differential cell counts, interleukin (IL)-8 in BAL fluid, and change in nasal volume were compared between groups. A 5-10% increase in nasal volume was seen for all groups including clean air except for a significant 5% decrease for spiked-dust inhalation (+18 h). No marked differences were observed in BAL cells or IL-8 except in LPS-exposed controls. The delayed decrease of nasal cavity volume after exposure to glucan spiked dust suggests a slow effect on the upper airways for curdlan and office dust together, though no pulmonary response or direct signs of inflammation were observed. Glucan-spiked office dust exposures produced a delayed nasal subacute congestion in guinea pigs compared to office dust alone, but extrapolated to nasal congestion in humans, paralleling the nasal congestion seen in human volunteers exposed to the same dust, this may not have clinical importance. PMID:17966063

  16. SYSTEMIC IMBALANCE OF ESSENTIAL METALS AND CARDIAC GENE EXPRESSION IN RATS FOLLOWING ACUTE PULMONARY ZINC EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have recently demonstrated that PM containing water-soluble zinc may cause cardiac injury following pulmonary exposure. To investigate if pulmonary zinc exposure causes systemic metal imbalance and direct cardiac effects, we intratracheally (IT) instilled male Wistar Kyoto (WK...

  17. Predicting mortality after acute coronary syndromes in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Smeeth, Liam; Pearce, Neil; Herrett, Emily; Timmis, Adam; Hemingway, Harry; Wedzicha, Jadwiga; Quint, Jennifer K

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the accuracy of Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) scores in predicting mortality at 6 months for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to investigate how it might be improved. Methods Data were obtained on 481 849 patients with acute coronary syndrome admitted to UK hospitals between January 2003 and June 2013 from the Myocardial Ischaemia National Audit Project (MINAP) database. We compared risk of death between patients with COPD and those without COPD at 6 months, adjusting for predicted risk of death. We then assessed whether several modifications improved the accuracy of the GRACE score for people with COPD. Results The risk of death after adjusting for GRACE score predicted that risk of death was higher for patients with COPD than that for other patients (RR 1.29, 95% CI 1.28 to 1.33). Adding smoking into the GRACE score model did not improve accuracy for patients with COPD. Either adding COPD into the model (relative risk (RR) 1.00, 0.94 to 1.02) or multiplying the GRACE score by 1.3 resulted in better performance (RR 0.99, 0.96 to 1.01). Conclusions GRACE scores underestimate risk of death for people with COPD. A more accurate prediction of risk of death can be obtained by adding COPD into the GRACE score equation, or by multiplying the GRACE score predicted risk of death by 1.3 for people with COPD. This means that one third of patients with COPD currently classified as low risk should be classified as moderate risk, and could be considered for more aggressive early treatment after non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction or unstable angina. PMID:27177534

  18. Pulmonary vasodilation in acute and chronic heart failure: empiricism and evidence.

    PubMed

    Guglin, Maya

    2011-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in heart failure is associated with exercise intolerance and adverse outcomes. With the availability of multiple drugs that cause pulmonary vasodilation and decrease pulmonary arterial pressure, pulmonary hypertension becomes an attractive therapeutic target. Out of several classes of medications, oral phosphodiesterase inhibitors emerge as the most promising in terms of symptomatic improvement, hemodynamic benefits, reverse cardiac remodeling, and functional capacity. Future trials will show whether the use of these drugs translates to decreased morbidity and mortality in heart failure.

  19. VEGF‐D promotes pulmonary oedema in hyperoxic acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Teruhiko; Paquet‐Fifield, Sophie; Harris, Nicole C; Roufail, Sally; Turner, Debra J; Yuan, Yinan; Zhang, You‐Fang; Fox, Stephen B; Hibbs, Margaret L; Wilkinson‐Berka, Jennifer L; Williams, Richard A; Stacker, Steven A; Sly, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Leakage of fluid from blood vessels, leading to oedema, is a key feature of many diseases including hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI), which can occur when patients are ventilated with high concentrations of oxygen (hyperoxia). The molecular mechanisms driving vascular leak and oedema in HALI are poorly understood. VEGF‐D is a protein that promotes blood vessel leak and oedema when overexpressed in tissues, but the role of endogenous VEGF‐D in pathological oedema was unknown. To address these issues, we exposed Vegfd‐deficient mice to hyperoxia. The resulting pulmonary oedema in Vegfd‐deficient mice was substantially reduced compared to wild‐type, as was the protein content of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, consistent with reduced vascular leak. Vegf‐d and its receptor Vegfr‐3 were more highly expressed in lungs of hyperoxic, versus normoxic, wild‐type mice, indicating that components of the Vegf‐d signalling pathway are up‐regulated in hyperoxia. Importantly, VEGF‐D and its receptors were co‐localized on blood vessels in clinical samples of human lungs exposed to hyperoxia; hence, VEGF‐D may act directly on blood vessels to promote fluid leak. Our studies show that Vegf‐d promotes oedema in response to hyperoxia in mice and support the hypothesis that VEGF‐D signalling promotes vascular leak in human HALI. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. PMID:26924464

  20. Pulmonary clearance of radiotracers after positive end-expiratory pressure or acute lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Barrowcliffe, M.P.; Zanelli, G.D.; Jones, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    In anesthetized rabbits we measured clearance from lung to blood of eight aerosolized technetium-99m-labeled compounds: diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (99mTc-DTPA); cytochrome c; myoglobin; a myoglobin polymer; albumin; and anionic, cationic, and neutral dextrans of equivalent molecular size. We investigated the effect of applying positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and, on a subsequent occasion, of injecting oleic acid intravenously to produce acute lung injury on the pulmonary clearance rate. Base-line clearance rates were monoexponential and varied with the molecular weights of the radiotracers. For each tracer the rate of clearance was increased a similar degree by either PEEP or oleic acid. However, with PEEP, clearance remained monoexponential, whereas after oleic acid, smaller molecular-weight radiotracers had multiexponential clearance curves. This suggests that after oleic acid the alveolar epithelium breaks down in a nonuniform fashion. We conclude that differentiation of the effect of PEEP from that of severe lung injury caused by oleic acid is not readily accomplished by either increasing the size of the tracer molecule or by varying the molecular charge.

  1. Plasma Leptin Is Elevated in Acute Exacerbation of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mengshu; Swigris, Jeffery J; Wang, Xin; Cao, Min; Qiu, Yuying; Huang, Mei; Xiao, Yonglong; Cai, Hourong

    2016-01-01

    Background. The natural history of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is very complex and unpredictable. Some patients will experience acute exacerbation (AE) and fatal outcomes. Methods. The study included 30 AE-IPF patients, 32 stable IPF (S-IPF) patients, and 12 healthy controls. We measured the plasma concentrations of leptin and KL-6. Simple correlation was used to assess associations between leptin and other variables. Plasma leptin levels were compared between AE-IPF and S-IPF subjects, decedents, and survivors. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to display survival and Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine risk factors for survival. Results. In subjects with AE-IPF, plasma leptin was significantly greater than in subjects with S-IPF (p = 0.0003) or healthy controls (p < 0.0001). Plasma leptin was correlated with BMI, KL-6, LDH, CRP, and PaO2/FiO2 (p = 0.007; p = 0.005; p = 0.003; p = 0.033; and p = 0.032, resp.). Plasma leptin was significantly greater in 33 decedents than in the 23 survivors (p = 0.007). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed leptin (>13.79 ng/mL) was an independent predictor of survival (p = 0.004). Conclusions. Leptin could be a promising plasma biomarker of AE-IPF occurrence and predictor of survival in IPF patients. PMID:27642238

  2. VEGF-D promotes pulmonary oedema in hyperoxic acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sato, Teruhiko; Paquet-Fifield, Sophie; Harris, Nicole C; Roufail, Sally; Turner, Debra J; Yuan, Yinan; Zhang, You-Fang; Fox, Stephen B; Hibbs, Margaret L; Wilkinson-Berka, Jennifer L; Williams, Richard A; Stacker, Steven A; Sly, Peter D; Achen, Marc G

    2016-06-01

    Leakage of fluid from blood vessels, leading to oedema, is a key feature of many diseases including hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI), which can occur when patients are ventilated with high concentrations of oxygen (hyperoxia). The molecular mechanisms driving vascular leak and oedema in HALI are poorly understood. VEGF-D is a protein that promotes blood vessel leak and oedema when overexpressed in tissues, but the role of endogenous VEGF-D in pathological oedema was unknown. To address these issues, we exposed Vegfd-deficient mice to hyperoxia. The resulting pulmonary oedema in Vegfd-deficient mice was substantially reduced compared to wild-type, as was the protein content of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, consistent with reduced vascular leak. Vegf-d and its receptor Vegfr-3 were more highly expressed in lungs of hyperoxic, versus normoxic, wild-type mice, indicating that components of the Vegf-d signalling pathway are up-regulated in hyperoxia. Importantly, VEGF-D and its receptors were co-localized on blood vessels in clinical samples of human lungs exposed to hyperoxia; hence, VEGF-D may act directly on blood vessels to promote fluid leak. Our studies show that Vegf-d promotes oedema in response to hyperoxia in mice and support the hypothesis that VEGF-D signalling promotes vascular leak in human HALI. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  3. Plasma Leptin Is Elevated in Acute Exacerbation of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Cao, Min; Qiu, Yuying; Huang, Mei; Xiao, Yonglong

    2016-01-01

    Background. The natural history of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is very complex and unpredictable. Some patients will experience acute exacerbation (AE) and fatal outcomes. Methods. The study included 30 AE-IPF patients, 32 stable IPF (S-IPF) patients, and 12 healthy controls. We measured the plasma concentrations of leptin and KL-6. Simple correlation was used to assess associations between leptin and other variables. Plasma leptin levels were compared between AE-IPF and S-IPF subjects, decedents, and survivors. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to display survival and Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine risk factors for survival. Results. In subjects with AE-IPF, plasma leptin was significantly greater than in subjects with S-IPF (p = 0.0003) or healthy controls (p < 0.0001). Plasma leptin was correlated with BMI, KL-6, LDH, CRP, and PaO2/FiO2 (p = 0.007; p = 0.005; p = 0.003; p = 0.033; and p = 0.032, resp.). Plasma leptin was significantly greater in 33 decedents than in the 23 survivors (p = 0.007). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed leptin (>13.79 ng/mL) was an independent predictor of survival (p = 0.004). Conclusions. Leptin could be a promising plasma biomarker of AE-IPF occurrence and predictor of survival in IPF patients. PMID:27642238

  4. Plasma Leptin Is Elevated in Acute Exacerbation of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Cao, Min; Qiu, Yuying; Huang, Mei; Xiao, Yonglong

    2016-01-01

    Background. The natural history of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is very complex and unpredictable. Some patients will experience acute exacerbation (AE) and fatal outcomes. Methods. The study included 30 AE-IPF patients, 32 stable IPF (S-IPF) patients, and 12 healthy controls. We measured the plasma concentrations of leptin and KL-6. Simple correlation was used to assess associations between leptin and other variables. Plasma leptin levels were compared between AE-IPF and S-IPF subjects, decedents, and survivors. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to display survival and Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine risk factors for survival. Results. In subjects with AE-IPF, plasma leptin was significantly greater than in subjects with S-IPF (p = 0.0003) or healthy controls (p < 0.0001). Plasma leptin was correlated with BMI, KL-6, LDH, CRP, and PaO2/FiO2 (p = 0.007; p = 0.005; p = 0.003; p = 0.033; and p = 0.032, resp.). Plasma leptin was significantly greater in 33 decedents than in the 23 survivors (p = 0.007). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed leptin (>13.79 ng/mL) was an independent predictor of survival (p = 0.004). Conclusions. Leptin could be a promising plasma biomarker of AE-IPF occurrence and predictor of survival in IPF patients.

  5. Plasma copeptin for short term risk stratification in acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Wyzgał, Anna; Koć, Marcin; Pacho, Szymon; Bielecki, Maksymilian; Wawrzyniak, Radosław; Kostrubiec, Maciej; Ciurzyński, Michał; Kurnicka, Katarzyna; Goliszek, Sylwia; Paczyńska, Marzena; Palczewski, Piotr; Pruszczyk, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    Copeptin (COP) was reported to have prognostic value in various cardiovascular diseases. We hypothesized that COP levels reflect the severity of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and may be useful in prognostic assessment. Plasma COP concentrations were measured on the Kryptor Compact Plus platform (BRAHMS, Hennigsdorf, Germany). The study included 107 consecutive patients with diagnosed acute PE (47 males, 60 females), with median age of 65 years (range 20-88). High risk PE was diagnosed in 3 patients (2.8 %), intermediate risk in 69 (64.5 %), and low risk PE in 35 (32.7 %) patients. Control group included 64 subjects (25 males, 39 females; median age 52.5 year, range 17-87). Four patients (3.7 %) died during 30-day observation. Complicated clinical course (CCC) was experienced by 10 (9.3 %) patients. COP level was higher in PE patients than in controls [11.55 pmol/L (5.16-87.97), and 19.00 pmol/L (5.51-351.90), respectively, p < 0.0001], and reflected PE severity. COP plasma concentration in low risk PE was 14.67 nmol/L (5.51-59.61) and in intermediate/high risk PE 19.84 mol/L (5.64-351.90) p < 0.05. Median COP levels in nonsurvivors was higher than in survivors, 84.6 (28.48-351.9) pmol/L and 18.68 (5.512-210.1) pmol/L, respectively, p = 0.009. Subjects with CCC presented higher COP levels than patients with benign clinical course 53.1 (17.95-351.9) pmol/L and 18.16 (5.51-210.1) pmol/L, respectively, p = 0.001. Log-transformed plasma COP was the significant predictor of CCC, OR 16.5 95 % CI 23.2-111.9, p < 0.001. AUC-for prediction of CCC using plasma COP was 0.811 (95 % CI 0.676-0.927). The COP cut off value of 17.95 nmol/l had sensitivity of 100 %, specificity 49.5 %, positive predictive value of 16.9 % and negative predictive value of 100 %. We conclude that plasma COP levels can be regarded for promising marker of severity of acute PE and show potential in risk stratification of these patients. PMID:26438275

  6. Outcomes associated with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder requiring hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Gaude, Gajanan S; Rajesh, BP; Chaudhury, Alisha; Hattiholi, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (AECOPD) are known to be associated with increased morbidity and mortality and have a significant socioeconomic impact. The factors that determine frequent hospital readmissions for AECOPD are poorly understood. The present study was done to ascertain failures rates following AECOPD and to evaluate factors associated with frequent readmissions. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective study among 186 patients with COPD with one or more admissions for acute exacerbations in a tertiary care hospital. Frequency of previous re-admissions for AECOPD in the past year, and clinical characteristics, including spirometry were ascertained in the stable state both before discharge and at 6-month post-discharge. Failure rates following treatment were ascertained during the follow-up period. All the patients were followed up for a period of 2 years after discharge to evaluate re-admissions for the AECOPD. Results: Of 186 COPD patients admitted for AECOPD, 54% had one or more readmission, and another 45% had two or more readmissions over a period of 2 years. There was a high prevalence of current or ex-heavy smokers, associated co-morbidity, underweight patients, low vaccination prevalence and use of domiciliary oxygen therapy among COPD patients. A total of 12% mortality was observed in the present study. Immediate failure rates after first exacerbation was observed to be 34.8%. Multivariate analysis showed that duration >20 years (OR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.10-0.86), use of Tiotropium (OR = 2.29; 95% CI: 1.12-4.69) and use of co-amoxiclav during first admission (OR = 2.41; 95% CI: 1.21-4.79) were significantly associated with higher immediate failure rates. The multivariate analysis for repeated admissions revealed that disease duration >10 years (OR = 0.50; 95% CI: 0.27-0.93), low usage of inhaled ICS + LABA (OR = 2.21; 95% CI: 1.08-4.54), and MRC dyspnea grade >3 (OR = 2.51; 95% CI: 1.08-5.82) were

  7. Prognostic models in acute pulmonary embolism: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Antoine; Mallett, Susan; Daoud-Elias, Marie; Poggi, Jean-Noël; Clarke, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the evidence for existing prognostic models in acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and determine how valid and useful they are for predicting patient outcomes. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources OVID MEDLINE and EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library from inception to July 2014, and sources of grey literature. Eligibility criteria Studies aiming at constructing, validating, updating or studying the impact of prognostic models to predict all-cause death, PE-related death or venous thromboembolic events up to a 3-month follow-up in patients with an acute symptomatic PE. Data extraction Study characteristics and study quality using prognostic criteria. Studies were selected and data extracted by 2 reviewers. Data analysis Summary estimates (95% CI) for proportion of risk groups and event rates within risk groups, and accuracy. Results We included 71 studies (44 298 patients). Among them, 17 were model construction studies specific to PE prognosis. The most validated models were the PE Severity Index (PESI) and its simplified version (sPESI). The overall 30-day mortality rate was 2.3% (1.7% to 2.9%) in the low-risk group and 11.4% (9.9% to 13.1%) in the high-risk group for PESI (9 studies), and 1.5% (0.9% to 2.5%) in the low-risk group and 10.7% (8.8% to12.9%) in the high-risk group for sPESI (11 studies). PESI has proved clinically useful in an impact study. Shifting the cut-off or using novel and updated models specifically developed for normotensive PE improves the ability for identifying patients at lower risk for early death or adverse outcome (0.5–1%) and those at higher risk (up to 20–29% of event rate). Conclusions We provide evidence-based information about the validity and utility of the existing prognostic models in acute PE that may be helpful for identifying patients at low risk. Novel models seem attractive for the high-risk normotensive PE but need to be externally validated then be assessed in impact studies. PMID

  8. Plasma copeptin for short term risk stratification in acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Wyzgał, Anna; Koć, Marcin; Pacho, Szymon; Bielecki, Maksymilian; Wawrzyniak, Radosław; Kostrubiec, Maciej; Ciurzyński, Michał; Kurnicka, Katarzyna; Goliszek, Sylwia; Paczyńska, Marzena; Palczewski, Piotr; Pruszczyk, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    Copeptin (COP) was reported to have prognostic value in various cardiovascular diseases. We hypothesized that COP levels reflect the severity of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and may be useful in prognostic assessment. Plasma COP concentrations were measured on the Kryptor Compact Plus platform (BRAHMS, Hennigsdorf, Germany). The study included 107 consecutive patients with diagnosed acute PE (47 males, 60 females), with median age of 65 years (range 20-88). High risk PE was diagnosed in 3 patients (2.8 %), intermediate risk in 69 (64.5 %), and low risk PE in 35 (32.7 %) patients. Control group included 64 subjects (25 males, 39 females; median age 52.5 year, range 17-87). Four patients (3.7 %) died during 30-day observation. Complicated clinical course (CCC) was experienced by 10 (9.3 %) patients. COP level was higher in PE patients than in controls [11.55 pmol/L (5.16-87.97), and 19.00 pmol/L (5.51-351.90), respectively, p < 0.0001], and reflected PE severity. COP plasma concentration in low risk PE was 14.67 nmol/L (5.51-59.61) and in intermediate/high risk PE 19.84 mol/L (5.64-351.90) p < 0.05. Median COP levels in nonsurvivors was higher than in survivors, 84.6 (28.48-351.9) pmol/L and 18.68 (5.512-210.1) pmol/L, respectively, p = 0.009. Subjects with CCC presented higher COP levels than patients with benign clinical course 53.1 (17.95-351.9) pmol/L and 18.16 (5.51-210.1) pmol/L, respectively, p = 0.001. Log-transformed plasma COP was the significant predictor of CCC, OR 16.5 95 % CI 23.2-111.9, p < 0.001. AUC-for prediction of CCC using plasma COP was 0.811 (95 % CI 0.676-0.927). The COP cut off value of 17.95 nmol/l had sensitivity of 100 %, specificity 49.5 %, positive predictive value of 16.9 % and negative predictive value of 100 %. We conclude that plasma COP levels can be regarded for promising marker of severity of acute PE and show potential in risk stratification of these patients.

  9. Acute pulmonary embolism in the era of multi-detector CT: a reality in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The advantages of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) have made it the imaging modality of choice for some patients with suspected cardiothoracic disease, of which pulmonary embolism (PE) is an exponent. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of PE in patients with clinical suspicion of acute PE using MDCT in a sub-Saharan setting, and to describe the demographic characteristics of these patients. Methods Consecutive records of patients who underwent MDCT pulmonary angiography for suspected acute PE over a two-year period at the Radiology Department of a university-affiliated hospital were systematically reviewed. All MDCT pulmonary angiograms were performed with a 16-detector computed tomography (CT) scanner using real-time bolus tracking technique. Authorization for the study was obtained from the institutional authorities. Results Forty-one MDCT pulmonary angiograms were reviewed of which 37 were retained. Of the 4 excluded studies, 3 were repeat angiograms and 1 study was not technically adequate. Twelve of 37 patients (32.4%) had CT angiograms that were positive for PE, of which 7 were males. The mean age of these patients was 47.6±10.5 years (age range from 33 to 65 years). Twenty five patients out of 37 (67.6%) had CT angiograms that were negative for PE. Eleven PE-positive patients (91.7%) had at least 1 identifiable thromboembolic risk factor whilst 5 PE-negative patients (20%) also had at least a thromboembolic risk factor. The relative risk of the occurrence of PE in patients with at least a thromboembolic risk factor was estimated at 14.4. Conclusion Acute PE is a reality in sub-Saharan Africa, with an increased likelihood of MDCT evidence in patients with clinical suspicion of PE who have at least a thromboembolic risk factor. The increasing availability of MDCT will help provide more information on the occurrence of PE in these settings. PMID:23072500

  10. Pulmonary Infection Caused by Gymnascella hyalinospora in a Patient with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Iwen, Peter C.; Sigler, Lynne; Tarantolo, Stefano; Sutton, Deanna A.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Lackner, Rudy P.; McCarthy, Dora I.; Hinrichs, Steven H.

    2000-01-01

    We report the first case of invasive pulmonary infection caused by the thermotolerant ascomycetous fungus Gymnascella hyalinospora in a 43-year-old female from the rural midwestern United States. The patient was diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia and treated with induction chemotherapy. She was discharged in stable condition with an absolute neutrophil count of 100 cells per μl. Four days after discharge, she presented to the Cancer Clinic with fever and pancytopenia. A solitary pulmonary nodule was found in the right middle lobe which was resected by video-assisted thoracoscopy (VATHS). Histopathological examination revealed septate branching hyphae, suggesting a diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis; however, occasional yeast-like cells were also present. The culture grew a mold that appeared dull white with a slight brownish tint that failed to sporulate on standard media. The mold was found to be positive by the AccuProbe Blastomyces dermatitidis Culture ID Test (Gen-Probe Inc., San Diego, Calif.), but this result appeared to be incompatible with the morphology of the structures in tissue. The patient was removed from consideration for stem cell transplant and was treated for 6 weeks with amphotericin B (AmB), followed by itraconazole (Itr). A VATHS with biopsy performed 6 months later showed no evidence of mold infection. In vitro, the isolate appeared to be susceptible to AmB and resistant to fluconazole and 5-fluorocytosine. Results for Itr could not be obtained for the case isolate due to its failure to grow in polyethylene glycol used to solubilize the drug; however, MICs for a second isolate appeared to be elevated. The case isolate was subsequently identified as G. hyalinospora based on its formation of oblate, smooth-walled ascospores within yellow or yellow-green tufts of aerial hyphae on sporulation media. Repeat testing with the Blastomyces probe demonstrated false-positive results with the case isolate and a reference isolate of G

  11. Mechanisms of worsening gas exchange during acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barberà, J A; Roca, J; Ferrer, A; Félez, M A; Díaz, O; Roger, N; Rodriguez-Roisin, R

    1997-06-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the mechanisms that determine abnormal gas exchange during acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Thirteen COPD patients, hospitalized because of an exacerbation, were studied after admission and 38+/-10 (+/-SD) days after discharge, once they were clinically stable. Measurements included forced spirometry, arterial blood gas values, minute ventilation (V'E), cardiac output (Q'), oxygen consumption (V'O2), and ventilation/perfusion (V'A/Q') relationships, assessed by the inert gas technique. Exacerbations were characterized by very severe airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 0.74+/-0.17 vs 0.91+/-0.19 L, during exacerbation and stable conditions, respectively; p=0.01), severe hypoxaemia (ratio between arterial oxygen tension and inspired oxygen fraction (Pa,O2/FI,O2) 32.7+/-7.7 vs 37.6+/-6.9 kPa (245+/-58 vs 282+/-52 mmHg); p=0.01) and hypercapnia (arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa,CO2) 6.8+/-1.6 vs 5.9+/-0.8 kPa (51+/-12 vs 44+/-6 mmHg); p=0.04). V'A/Q' inequality increased during exacerbation (log SD Q', 1.10+/-0.29 vs 0.96+/-0.27; normal < or = 0.6; p=0.04) as a result of greater perfusion in poorly-ventilated alveoli. Shunt was almost negligible on both measurements. V'E remained essentially unchanged during exacerbation (10.5+/-2.2 vs 9.2+/-1.8 L x min(-1); p=0.1), whereas both Q' (6.1+/-2.4 vs 5.1+/-1.7 L x min(-1); p=0.05) and V'O2 (300+/-49 vs 248+/-59 mL x min(-1); p=0.03) increased significantly. Worsening of hypoxaemia was explained mainly by the increase both in V'A/Q' inequality and V'O2, whereas the increase in Q' partially counterbalanced the effect of greater V'O2 on mixed venous oxygen tension (PV,O2). We conclude that worsening of gas exchange during exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is primarily produced by increased ventilation/perfusion inequality, and that this effect is amplified by the decrease of mixed venous oxygen

  12. Autoantibody-Targeted Treatments for Acute Exacerbations of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Donahoe, Michael; Valentine, Vincent G.; Chien, Nydia; Gibson, Kevin F.; Raval, Jay S.; Saul, Melissa; Xue, Jianmin; Zhang, Yingze; Duncan, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe acute exacerbations (AE) of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are medically untreatable and often fatal within days. Recent evidence suggests autoantibodies may be involved in IPF progression. Autoantibody-mediated lung diseases are typically refractory to glucocorticoids and nonspecific medications, but frequently respond to focused autoantibody reduction treatments. We conducted a pilot trial to test the hypothesis that autoantibody-targeted therapies may also benefit AE-IPF patients. Methods Eleven (11) critically-ill AE-IPF patients with no evidence of conventional autoimmune diseases were treated with therapeutic plasma exchanges (TPE) and rituximab, supplemented in later cases with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Plasma anti-epithelial (HEp-2) autoantibodies and matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7) were evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence and ELISA, respectively. Outcomes among the trial subjects were compared to those of 20 historical control AE-IPF patients treated with conventional glucocorticoid therapy prior to this experimental trial. Results Nine (9) trial subjects (82%) had improvements of pulmonary gas exchange after treatment, compared to one (5%) historical control. Two of the three trial subjects who relapsed after only five TPE responded again with additional TPE. The three latest subjects who responded to an augmented regimen of nine TPE plus rituximab plus IVIG have had sustained responses without relapses after 96-to-237 days. Anti-HEp-2 autoantibodies were present in trial subjects prior to therapy, and were reduced by TPE among those who responded to treatment. Conversely, plasma MMP7 levels were not systematically affected by therapy nor correlated with clinical responses. One-year survival of trial subjects was 46+15% vs. 0% among historical controls. No serious adverse events were attributable to the experimental medications. Conclusion This pilot trial indicates specific treatments that reduce autoantibodies

  13. Late outcomes after acute pulmonary embolism: rationale and design of FOCUS, a prospective observational multicenter cohort study.

    PubMed

    Konstantinides, Stavros V; Barco, Stefano; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Lankeit, Mareike; Held, Matthias; Gerhardt, Felix; Bruch, Leonard; Ewert, Ralf; Faehling, Martin; Freise, Julia; Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir; Grünig, Ekkehard; Halank, Michael; Heydenreich, Nadine; Hoeper, Marius M; Leuchte, Hanno H; Mayer, Eckhard; Meyer, F Joachim; Neurohr, Claus; Opitz, Christian; Pinto, Antonio; Seyfarth, Hans-Jürgen; Wachter, Rolf; Zäpf, Bianca; Wilkens, Heinrike; Binder, Harald; Wild, Philipp S

    2016-11-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a frequent cause of death and serious disability. The risk of PE-associated mortality and morbidity extends far beyond the acute phase of the disease. In earlier follow-up studies, as many as 30 % of the patients died during a follow-up period of up to 3 years, and up to 50 % of patients continued to complain of dyspnea and/or poor physical performance 6 months to 3 years after the index event. The most feared 'late sequela' of PE is chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), the true incidence of which remains obscure due to the large margin of error in the rates reported by mostly small, single-center studies. Moreover, the functional and hemodynamic changes corresponding to early, possibly reversible stages of CTEPH, have not been systematically investigated. The ongoing Follow-Up after acute pulmonary embolism (FOCUS) study will prospectively enroll and systematically follow, over a 2-year period and with a standardized comprehensive program of clinical, echocardiographic, functional and laboratory testing, a large multicenter prospective cohort of 1000 unselected patients (all-comers) with acute symptomatic PE. FOCUS will possess adequate power to provide answers to relevant remaining questions regarding the patients' long-term morbidity and mortality, and the temporal pattern of post-PE abnormalities. It will hopefully provide evidence for future guideline recommendations regarding the selection of patients for long-term follow-up after PE, the modalities which this follow-up should include, and the findings that should be interpreted as indicating progressive functional and hemodynamic post-PE impairment, or the development of CTEPH. PMID:27577542

  14. Late outcomes after acute pulmonary embolism: rationale and design of FOCUS, a prospective observational multicenter cohort study.

    PubMed

    Konstantinides, Stavros V; Barco, Stefano; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Lankeit, Mareike; Held, Matthias; Gerhardt, Felix; Bruch, Leonard; Ewert, Ralf; Faehling, Martin; Freise, Julia; Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir; Grünig, Ekkehard; Halank, Michael; Heydenreich, Nadine; Hoeper, Marius M; Leuchte, Hanno H; Mayer, Eckhard; Meyer, F Joachim; Neurohr, Claus; Opitz, Christian; Pinto, Antonio; Seyfarth, Hans-Jürgen; Wachter, Rolf; Zäpf, Bianca; Wilkens, Heinrike; Binder, Harald; Wild, Philipp S

    2016-11-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a frequent cause of death and serious disability. The risk of PE-associated mortality and morbidity extends far beyond the acute phase of the disease. In earlier follow-up studies, as many as 30 % of the patients died during a follow-up period of up to 3 years, and up to 50 % of patients continued to complain of dyspnea and/or poor physical performance 6 months to 3 years after the index event. The most feared 'late sequela' of PE is chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), the true incidence of which remains obscure due to the large margin of error in the rates reported by mostly small, single-center studies. Moreover, the functional and hemodynamic changes corresponding to early, possibly reversible stages of CTEPH, have not been systematically investigated. The ongoing Follow-Up after acute pulmonary embolism (FOCUS) study will prospectively enroll and systematically follow, over a 2-year period and with a standardized comprehensive program of clinical, echocardiographic, functional and laboratory testing, a large multicenter prospective cohort of 1000 unselected patients (all-comers) with acute symptomatic PE. FOCUS will possess adequate power to provide answers to relevant remaining questions regarding the patients' long-term morbidity and mortality, and the temporal pattern of post-PE abnormalities. It will hopefully provide evidence for future guideline recommendations regarding the selection of patients for long-term follow-up after PE, the modalities which this follow-up should include, and the findings that should be interpreted as indicating progressive functional and hemodynamic post-PE impairment, or the development of CTEPH.

  15. Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    McCurdy, BR

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary In July 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) evidentiary framework, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding treatment strategies for patients with COPD. This project emerged from a request by the Health System Strategy Division of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that MAS provide them with an evidentiary platform on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of COPD interventions. After an initial review of health technology assessments and systematic reviews of COPD literature, and consultation with experts, MAS identified the following topics for analysis: vaccinations (influenza and pneumococcal), smoking cessation, multidisciplinary care, pulmonary rehabilitation, long-term oxygen therapy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure, hospital-at-home for acute exacerbations of COPD, and telehealth (including telemonitoring and telephone support). Evidence-based analyses were prepared for each of these topics. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed where appropriate. In addition, a review of the qualitative literature on patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on living and dying with COPD was conducted, as were reviews of the qualitative literature on each of the technologies included in these analyses. The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mega-Analysis series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: http://www.hqontario.ca/en/mas/mas_ohtas_mn.html. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Evidentiary Framework Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Smoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Community-Based Multidisciplinary Care for Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive

  16. Redistribution of pulmonary blood flow impacts thermodilution-based extravascular lung water measurements in a model of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Easley, R. Blaine; Mulreany, Daniel G.; Lancaster, Christopher T.; Custer, Jason W.; Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Simon, Brett A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies using transthoracic thermodilution have demonstrated increased extravascular lung water (EVLW) measurements attributed to progression of edema and flooding during sepsis and acute lung injury. We hypothesize that redistribution of pulmonary blood flow can cause increased apparent EVLW secondary to increased perfusion of thermally silent tissue, not increased lung edema. Methods Anesthetized, mechanically ventilated canines were instrumented with PiCCO® (Pulsion Medical, Munich, Germany) catheters and underwent lung injury by repetitive saline lavage. Hemodynamic and respiratory physiologic data were recorded. After stabilized lung injury, endotoxin was administered to inactivate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Computerized tomographic imaging was performed to quantify in vivo lung volume, total tissue (fluid) and air content, and regional distribution of blood flow. Results Lavage injury caused an increase in airway pressures and decreased arterial oxygen content with minimal hemodynamic effects. EVLW and shunt fraction increased after injury and then markedly following endotoxin administration. Computerized tomographic measurements quantified an endotoxin-induced increase in pulmonary blood flow to poorly aerated regions with no change in total lung tissue volume. Conclusions The abrupt increase in EVLW and shunt fraction after endotoxin administration is consistent with inactivation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and increased perfusion to already flooded lung regions that were previously thermally silent. Computerized tomographic studies further demonstrate in vivo alterations in regional blood flow (but not lung water) and account for these alterations in shunt fraction and EVLW. PMID:19809280

  17. Timing of Discharge Follow-up for Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Vinson, David R.; Ballard, Dustin W.; Huang, Jie; Rauchwerger, Adina S.; Reed, Mary E.; Mark, Dustin G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Historically, emergency department (ED) patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) have been admitted for several days of inpatient care. Growing evidence suggests that selected ED patients with PE can be safely discharged home after a short length of stay. However, the optimal timing of follow up is unknown. We hypothesized that higher-risk patients with short length of stay (<24 hours from ED registration) would more commonly receive expedited follow up (≤3 days). Methods This retrospective cohort study included adults treated for acute PE in six community EDs. We ascertained the PE Severity Index risk class (for 30-day mortality), facility length of stay, the first follow-up clinician encounter, unscheduled return ED visits ≤3 days, 5-day PE-related readmissions, and 30-day all-cause mortality. Stratifying by risk class, we used multivariable analysis to examine age- and sex-adjusted associations between length of stay and expedited follow up. Results The mean age of our 175 patients was 63.2 (±16.8) years. Overall, 93.1% (n=163) of our cohort received follow up within one week of discharge. Fifty-six patients (32.0%) were sent home within 24 hours and 100 (57.1%) received expedited follow up, often by telephone (67/100). The short and longer length-of-stay groups were comparable in age and sex, but differed in rates of low-risk status (63% vs 37%; p<0.01) and expedited follow up (70% vs 51%; p=0.03). After adjustment, we found that short length of stay was independently associated with expedited follow up in higher-risk patients (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 3.5; 95% CI [1.0–11.8]; p=0.04), but not in low-risk patients (aOR 2.2; 95% CI [0.8–5.7]; p=0.11). Adverse outcomes were uncommon (<2%) and were not significantly different between the two length-of-stay groups. Conclusion Higher-risk patients with acute PE and short length of stay more commonly received expedited follow up in our community setting than other groups of patients. These practice

  18. Functional characterisation of human pulmonary monocyte-like cells in lipopolysaccharide-mediated acute lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously reported the presence of novel subpopulations of pulmonary monocyte-like cells (PMLC) in the human lung; resident PMLC (rPMLC, HLA-DR+CD14++CD16+cells) and inducible PMLC (iPMLC, HLA-DR+CD14++CD16- cells). iPMLC are significantly increased in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid following inhalation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We have carried out the first functional evaluation of PMLC subpopulations in the inflamed lung, following the isolation of these cells, and other lineages, from BAL fluid using novel and complex protocols. Methods iPMLC, rPMLC, alveolar macrophages (AM), neutrophils, and regulatory T cells were quantified in BAL fluid of healthy subjects at 9 hours post-LPS inhalation (n = 15). Cell surface antigen expression by iPMLC, rPMLC and AM and the ability of each lineage to proliferate and to undergo phagocytosis were investigated using flow cytometry. Basal cytokine production by iPMLC compared to AM following their isolation from BAL fluid and the responsiveness of both cell types following in vitro treatment with the synthetic corticosteroid dexamethasone were assessed. Results rPMLC have a significantly increased expression of mature macrophage markers and of the proliferation antigen Ki67, compared to iPMLC. Our cytokine data revealed a pro-inflammatory, corticosteroid-resistant phenotype of iPMLC in this model. Conclusions These data emphasise the presence of functionally distinct subpopulations of the monocyte/macrophage lineage in the human lung in experimental acute lung inflammation. PMID:24684897

  19. Performance of five different bleeding-prediction scores in patients with acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Klok, F A; Niemann, C; Dellas, C; Hasenfuß, G; Konstantinides, S; Lankeit, M

    2016-02-01

    Bleeding-prediction scores may help guiding management of patients with pulmonary embolism (PE), although no such score has been validated. We aimed to externally validate and compare two bleeding-prediction scores for venous thromboembolism to three scores developed for patients with atrial fibrillation in a real-world cohort of PE patients. We performed a prospective observational cohort study in 448 consecutive PE patients who were treated with heparins followed by vitamin-K-antagonists. The Kuijer, RIETE, HEMORR2HAGES, HAS-BLED and ATRIA scores were assessed at baseline. All patients were followed for the occurrence of major bleeding over a 30-day period. The accuracies of both the overall, original 3-level and newly defined optimal 2-level outcome of the scores were evaluated and compared, both for the 30-day period as well as for bleeding occurring in versus after the first week of treatment. 20 of 448 patients suffered major bleeding resulting in a cumulative incidence of 4.5 % (95 % CI 2.5-6.5). The predictive power of all five scores for bleeding was poor (c-statistics 0.57-0.64), both for the 3-level and 2-level score outcomes. No individual score was found to be superior. The HAS-BLED score had a good c-statistic for bleedings occurring after the first week of treatment (0.75, 95 % CI 0.47-1.0). Current available scoring systems have insufficient accuracy to predict overall anticoagulation-associated bleeding in patients treated for acute PE. To optimally target bleeding-prevention strategies, the development of a high quality PE-specific risk score is urgently needed. PMID:26091712

  20. The lung at high altitude: bronchoalveolar lavage in acute mountain sickness and pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Schoene, R B; Swenson, E R; Pizzo, C J; Hackett, P H; Roach, R C; Mills, W J; Henderson, W R; Martin, T R

    1988-06-01

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), a severe form of altitude illness that can occur in young healthy individuals, is a noncardiogenic form of edema that is associated with high concentrations of proteins and cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (Schoene et al., J. Am. Med. Assoc. 256: 63-69, 1986). We hypothesized that acute mountain sickness (AMS) in which gas exchange is impaired to a milder degree is a precursor to HAPE. We therefore performed BAL with 0.89% NaCl by fiberoptic bronchoscopy in eight subjects at 4,400 m (barometric pressure = 440 Torr) on Mt. McKinley to evaluate the cellular and biochemical responses of the lung at high altitude. The subjects included one healthy control (arterial O2 saturation = 83%), three climbers with HAPE (mean arterial O2 saturation = 55.0 +/- 5.0%), and four with AMS (arterial O2 saturation = 70.0 +/- 2.4%). Cell counts and differentials were done immediately on the BAL fluid, and the remainder was frozen for protein and biochemical analysis to be performed later. The results of this and of the earlier study mentioned above showed that the total leukocyte count (X10(5)/ml) in BAL fluid was 3.5 +/- 2.0 for HAPE, 0.9 +/- 4.0 for AMS, and 0.7 +/- 0.6 for controls, with predominantly alveolar macrophages in HAPE. The total protein concentration (mg/dl) was 616.0 +/- 3.3 for HAPE, 10.4 +/- 8.3 for AMS, and 12.0 +/- 3.4 for controls, with both large- (immunoglobulin M) and small- (albumin) molecular-weight proteins present in HAPE.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3403445

  1. [Clinical diagnosis of HIV infection in patients with acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Nguen, V Kh; Stroganov, P V; Geshelin, S A

    2011-09-01

    The results of treatment of 81 patients, suffering tuberculosis and operated in emergency for an acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs, are adduced, in 29 of them--nonspecific diseases of nontuberculosis genesis were diagnosed. In 52 patients the indication for emergency operation performance were complications of abdominal tuberculosis (perforation of the tuberculosis ulcers of small intestine--in 37, the tuberculosis mesadenitis--in 15), of them in 34--pulmonary tuberculosis was in inactive phase, that's why the HIV presence was supposed. In 26 patients the diagnosis was confirmed, basing on serologic analysis data. The presence of intraabdominal catastrophe, caused by abdominal tuberculosis complications on inactive pulmonary tuberculosis background witnesses with 85.3% probability the HIV-infectioning of the patient.

  2. The effect of matrix metalloproteinase-3 deficiency on pulmonary surfactant in a mouse model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Cory M; Cybulskie, Candice; Milos, Scott; Zuo, Yi Y; McCaig, Lynda A; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2016-06-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by arterial hypoxemia accompanied by severe inflammation and alterations to the pulmonary surfactant system. Published data has demonstrated a protective effect of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (Mmp3) deficiency against the inflammatory response associated with ARDS; however, the effect of Mmp3 on physiologic parameters and alterations to surfactant have not been previously studied. It was hypothesized that Mmp3 deficient (Mmp3(-/-)) mice would be protected against lung dysfunction associated with ARDS and maintain a functional pulmonary surfactant system. Wild type (WT) and Mmp3(-/-) mice were subjected to acid-aspiration followed by mechanical ventilation. Mmp3(-/-) mice maintained higher arterial oxygenation compared with WT mice at the completion of ventilation. Significant increase in functional large aggregate surfactant forms were observed in Mmp3(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. These findings further support a role of Mmp3 as an attractive therapeutic target for drug development in the setting of ARDS.

  3. Health-related QOL in acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Doll, Helen; Miravitlles, Marc

    2005-01-01

    There is a lack of emphasis on health-related QOL (HR-QOL) changes associated with acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (CB) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this review is to examine the use of HR-QOL instruments to evaluate acute exacerbation of CB or COPD, so as to form recommendations for future research.A literature search of papers published between 1966 and July 2003 identified more than 300 articles that used acute exacerbation of CB or COPD as the search term. However, only 21 of these studies employed HR-QOL measures as predictors of outcome or in the assessment of the impact, evolution or treatment of acute exacerbations of COPD or CB. A variety of HR-QOL measures were used, both generic and disease specific. The disease-specific St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), devised for patients with stable CB and with a recall period of 1-12 months, was the most widely used measure, with the Chronic Respiratory disease Questionnaire (CRQ) and the Baseline and Transitional Dyspnoea Index (BDI, TDI) being the only other disease-specific measures used. Most measures, both generic and disease specific, performed adequately when used during acute exacerbation of CB or COPD and indicated poor HR-QOL during acute exacerbation, which improved on resolution of the exacerbation. Relationships were evident between HR-QOL during an acute exacerbation and various outcomes, including post-exacerbation functional status, hospital re- admission for acute exacerbation or COPD, and mortality. There is a need for studies of treatments for acute exacerbation of CB or COPD to include an appropriate HR-QOL instrument to aid in the stratification of patients so as to target the right treatment to the right patient group. While a new instrument could be developed to measure HR-QOL during acute exacerbation of CB or COPD, currently available disease-specific measures such as the CRQ and the SGRQ appear to be acceptable to patients during acute

  4. Pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary artery dissection

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Ricardo de Amorim; Silva, Luciana Cristina dos Santos; Rezende, Cláudia Juliana; Bernardes, Rodrigo Castro; Prata, Tarciane Aline; Silva, Henrique Lima

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary artery dissection is a fatal complication of long-standing pulmonary hypertension, manifesting as acute, stabbing chest pain, progressive dyspnea, cardiogenic shock, or sudden death. Its incidence has been underestimated, and therapeutic options are still scarce. In patients with pulmonary hypertension, new chest pain, acute chest pain, or cardiogenic shock should raise the suspicion of pulmonary artery dissection, which can result in sudden death. PMID:23670510

  5. Severe Tumor Lysis Syndrome and Acute Pulmonary Edema Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Following Initiation of Chemotherapy for Metastatic Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Ethan; Wolbrink, Traci; Mack, Jennifer; Rowe, R Grant

    2016-05-01

    We present an 8-year-old male with metastatic alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) who developed precipitous cardiopulmonary collapse with severe tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) 48 hr after initiation of chemotherapy. Despite no detectable pulmonary metastases, acute hypoxemic respiratory failure developed, requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Although TLS has been reported in disseminated ARMS, this singular case of life-threatening respiratory deterioration developing after initiation of chemotherapy presented unique therapeutic dilemmas. We review the clinical aspects of this case, including possible mechanisms of respiratory failure, and discuss the role of ECMO utilization in pediatric oncology. PMID:26713672

  6. The clinical usefulness of extravascular lung water and pulmonary vascular permeability index to diagnose and characterize pulmonary edema: a prospective multicenter study on the quantitative differential diagnostic definition for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by features other than increased pulmonary vascular permeability. Pulmonary vascular permeability combined with increased extravascular lung water content has been considered a quantitative diagnostic criterion of ALI/ARDS. This prospective, multi-institutional, observational study aimed to clarify the clinical pathophysiological features of ALI/ARDS and establish its quantitative diagnostic criteria. Methods The extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) and the pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) were measured using the transpulmonary thermodilution method in 266 patients with PaO2/FiO2 ratio ≤ 300 mmHg and bilateral infiltration on chest radiography, in 23 ICUs of academic tertiary referral hospitals. Pulmonary edema was defined as EVLWI ≥ 10 ml/kg. Three experts retrospectively determined the pathophysiological features of respiratory insufficiency by considering the patients' history, clinical presentation, chest computed tomography and radiography, echocardiography, EVLWI and brain natriuretic peptide level, and the time course of all preceding findings under systemic and respiratory therapy. Results Patients were divided into the following three categories on the basis of the pathophysiological diagnostic differentiation of respiratory insufficiency: ALI/ARDS, cardiogenic edema, and pleural effusion with atelectasis, which were noted in 207 patients, 26 patients, and 33 patients, respectively. EVLWI was greater in ALI/ARDS and cardiogenic edema patients than in patients with pleural effusion with atelectasis (18.5 ± 6.8, 14.4 ± 4.0, and 8.3 ± 2.1, respectively; P < 0.01). PVPI was higher in ALI/ARDS patients than in cardiogenic edema or pleural effusion with atelectasis patients (3.2 ± 1.4, 2.0 ± 0.8, and 1.6 ± 0.5; P < 0.01). In ALI/ARDS patients, EVLWI increased with increasing pulmonary vascular permeability (r = 0.729, P < 0.01) and was weakly

  7. Development of acute pulmonary hypertension after bortezomib treatment in a patient with multiple myeloma: a case report and the review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Akosman, Cengiz; Ordu, Cetin; Eroglu, Elif; Oyan, Basak

    2015-01-01

    Bortezomib is widely used in treatment of multiple myeloma. In recent years, severe bortezomib-induced lung injury has been reported. The clinical course is generally characterized with fever and dyspnea, followed by respiratory failure with pulmonary infiltrates. Herein, we report a 57-year-old man with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma admitted with dyspnea, fever, and hypotension on the third day of the first dose of bortezomib therapy. He had bilateral jugular venous distention, crackles at the bases of the lungs and hepatomegaly. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed acute pulmonary hypertension (PH) with an estimated pressure of 70 mm Hg. The perfusion scintigraphy ruled out pulmonary embolism, and microbiological examination was negative. On his course, fever, dyspnea, hypoxia, and pulmonary vascular pressure subsided rapidly. The sudden onset of PH and its rapid decrement without any treatment suggests bortezomib as the underlying cause. Subsequently, the patient did not respond to vincristine-doxorubicin-dexamethasone regimen and thalidomide. Bortezomib treatment was repeated, and no pulmonary adverse reactions occurred. Follow-up echocardiographies revealed pulmonary arterial pressures to be maximally of 35 mm Hg. To our knowledge, this is the first case of acute PH after front-line bortezomib therapy. In this report, we review bortezomib-related pulmonary complications in the literature and possible underlying mechanisms.

  8. Pulmonary fungal infections in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia: is it the time to revise the radiological diagnostic criteria?

    PubMed

    Maccioni, Francesca; Vetere, Simone; De Felice, Carlo; Al Ansari, Najwa; Micozzi, Alessandra; Gentile, Giuseppe; Foà, Robin; Girmenia, Corrado

    2016-06-01

    The definition of pulmonary fungal infections (PFI) according to the EORTC-MSG criteria may lack diagnostic sensitivity due to the possible presentation of PFI with different radiological pictures. We evaluated the hypothesis to apply less restrictive radiological criteria to define PFI in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) submitted to chemotherapy. Overall, 73 consecutive episodes of pulmonary infiltrates associated to positive serum galactomannan test or fungal isolation or galactomannan detection from respiratory specimens were considered. CT scans acquired at the onset of symptoms (time-0) and within 4 weeks (time-1) were analysed to identify specific (group A) or aspecific radiological signs (group B). Pulmonary infiltrates fulfilled the EORTC-MSG criteria in 49 patients (group A), whereas in 24 patients (group B) they did not reach the criteria due to aspecific CT findings at time-0. Eleven of 21 (52.4%) patients of the group B evaluable for the evolution of the radiological findings fulfilled EORTC-MSG criteria at time-1. All the analysed clinical and mycological characteristics, response to antifungal therapy and survival were comparable in the two groups. Our study seems to confirm the possibility to extend the radiological suspicion of PFI to less restrictive chest CT findings when supported by microbiological criteria in high-risk haematological patients. PMID:26865204

  9. A Giant Mesenteric Desmoid Tumor Revealed by Acute Pulmonary Embolism due to Compression of the Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Palladino, Elisa; Nsenda, Joseph; Siboni, Renaud; Lechner, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 69 Final Diagnosis: Mesenteric desmoid tumor Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Intra-abdominal fibromatosis is a benign rare tumor of fibrous origin with a significant potential for local invasion and no ability to metastasize, but it can recur. The etiology of desmoid tumors is unknown. It is often associated with conditions such as familial adenomatous polyposis and Gardner syndrome. Case Report: We report the case of a 69-year-old man who presented to our hospital with an acute pulmonary embolism. The patient had a past history of colic surgery for a polyp with a high-grade dysplasia. Pulmonary angiography showed partial occlusion of the right superior lobe artery and partial occlusion of the middle lobe artery. The patient was given thrombolytic therapy. Abdominal computerized tomography revealed a mesenterial giant mass with compression of the inferior vena cava (IVC). A biopsy of the mass, confirming aggressive fibromatosis. A laparotomy was performed, which revealed a massive growth occupying the abdomen and attached to the previous ileocolic anastomosis. One day after surgery, his condition deteriorated. Conclusions: This report underlines the potential of imaging investigations of abdomen and vena cava if pulmonary embolism is suspected, especially when there is no evidence of peripheral venous thrombosis or other predisposing factors. Unfortunately, data on the surgical management of desmoid tumor is scarce. Therefore, the standard of treatment is a surgical resection for resectable tumors. PMID:25180474

  10. Ambient air pollution particles and the acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation has repeatedly demonstrated an association between exposure to ambient air pollution particles and numerous indices of human morbidity and mortality. Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are among those with an increased sensitivity to air p...

  11. Acute right atrial and pulmonary artery bone cement mass emboli following vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Diab, Amr; Dihmis, Walid; Diab, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac and pulmonary artery emboli are lethal complications following vertebroplasty. Clinicians should recognise these fatal complications immediately and surgical extraction is mandatory and provides the best outcome. PMID:27293775

  12. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Camcıoğlu, Burcu; Boşnak-Güçlü, Meral; Karadallı, Müşerrefe Nur; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Türköz-Sucak, Gülsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS. PMID:26060589

  13. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks.

    PubMed

    Camcıoğlu, Burcu; Boşnak-Güçlü, Meral; Karadallı, Müşerrefe Nur; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Türköz-Sucak, Gülsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS. PMID:26060589

  14. Omeprazole does not Potentiate Acute Oxygen Toxicity in Fetal Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells Exposed to Hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ananddeep; Zhang, Shaojie; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Shivanna, Binoy

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoxia contributes to the pathogenesis of broncho-pulmonary dysplasia (BPD), which is a developmental lung disease of premature infants that is characterized by an interruption of lung alveolar and pulmonary vascular development. Omeprazole (OM) is a proton pump inhibitor that is used to treat humans with gastric acid related disorders. Earlier we observed that OM-mediated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation attenuates acute hyperoxic lung injury in adult mice and oxygen toxicity in adult human lung cells. However, our later studies in newborn mice demonstrated that OM potentiates hyperoxia-induced developmental lung injury. Whether OM exerts a similar toxicity in primary human fetal lung cells is unknown. Hence, we tested the hypothesis that OM potentiates hyperoxia-induced cytotoxicity and ROS generation in the human fetal lung derived primary human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC). OM activated AhR as evident by a dose-dependent increase in cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 mRNA levels in OM-treated cells. Furthermore, OM at a concentration of 100 μM (OM 100) increased NADP(H) quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) expression. Surprisingly, hyperoxia decreased rather than increase the NQO1 protein levels in OM 100-treated cells. Exposure to hyperoxia increased cytotoxicity and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels. Interestingly, OM 100-treated cells exposed to air had increased H2O2 levels. However, hyperoxia did not further augment H2O2 levels in OM 100-treated cells. Additionally, hyperoxia-mediated oxygen toxicity was similar in both vehicle- and OM-treated cells. These findings contradict our hypothesis and support the hypothesis that OM does not potentiate acute hyperoxic injury in HPMEC in vitro. PMID:26779382

  15. The risk factors and prognostic implication of acute pulmonary edema in resuscitated cardiac arrest patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dae-hyun; Kim, Joonghee; Rhee, Joong Eui; Kim, Taeyun; Kim, Kyuseok; Jo, You Hwan; Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Yu Jin; Hwang, Seung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pulmonary edema is frequently observed after a successful resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Currently, its risk factors and prognostic implications are mostly unknown. Methods Adult OHCA patients with a presumed cardiac etiology who achieved sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in emergency department were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were grouped according to the severity of consolidation on their initial chest X-ray (group I, no consolidation; group II, patchy consolidations; group III, consolidation involving an entire lobe; group IV, total white-out of any lung). The primary objective was to identify the risk factors of developing severe pulmonary edema (group III or IV). The secondary objective was to evaluate the association between long-term prognosis and the severity of pulmonary edema. Results One hundred and seven patients were included. Total duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and initial pCO2 level were both independent predictors of developing severe pulmonary edema with their odds ratio (OR) being 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00 to 1.04; per 1 minute) and 1.04 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.07; per 1 mmHg), respectively. The long term prognosis was significantly poor in patients with severe pulmonary edema with a OR for good outcome (6-month cerebral performance category 1 or 2) being 0.22 (95% CI, 0.06 to 0.79) in group III and 0.16 (95% CI, 0.04 to 0.63) in group IV compared to group I. Conclusion The duration of CPR and initial pCO2 level were both independent predictors for the development of severe pulmonary edema after resuscitation in emergency department. The severity of the pulmonary edema was significantly associated with long-term outcome.

  16. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John H.

    2005-01-01

    The modern era in cardiopulmonary medicine began in the 1940s, when Cournand and Richards pioneered right-heart catheterization. Until that time, no direct measurement of central vascular pressure had been performed in humans. Right-heart catheterization ignited an explosion of insights into function and dysfunction of the pulmonary circulation, cardiac performance, ventilation–perfusion relationships, lung–heart interactions, valvular function, and congenital heart disease. It marked the beginnings of angiocardiography with its diagnostic implications for diseases of the left heart and peripheral circulation. Pulmonary hypertension was discovered to be the consequence of a large variety of diseases that either raised pressure downstream of the pulmonary capillaries, induced vasoconstriction, increased blood flow to the lung, or obstructed the pulmonary vessels, either by embolism or in situ fibrosis. Hypoxic vasoconstriction was found to be a major cause of acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension, and surprising vasoreactivity of the pulmonary vascular bed was discovered to be present in many cases of severe pulmonary hypertension, initially in mitral stenosis. Diseases as disparate as scleroderma, cystic fibrosis, kyphoscoliosis, sleep apnea, and sickle cell disease were found to have shared consequences in the pulmonary circulation. Some of the achievements of Cournand and Richards and their scientific descendents are discussed in this article, including success in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and management of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:15994464

  17. Hepatic and Pulmonary Toxicogenomic Profiles in Mice Intratracheally Instilled With Carbon Black Nanoparticles Reveal Pulmonary Inflammation, Acute Phase Response, and Alterations in Lipid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Bourdon, Julie A.; Halappanavar, Sabina; Saber, Anne T.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Williams, Andrew; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla; Yauk, Carole L.

    2012-01-01

    Global pulmonary and hepatic messenger RNA profiles in adult female C57BL/6 mice intratracheally instilled with carbon black nanoparticles (NPs) (Printex 90) were analyzed to identify biological perturbations underlying systemic responses to NP exposure. Tissue gene expression changes were profiled 1, 3, and 28 days following exposure to 0.018, 0.054, and 0.162 mg Printex 90 alongside controls. Pulmonary response was marked by increased expression of inflammatory markers and acute phase response (APR) genes that persisted to day 28 at the highest exposure dose. Genes in the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase pathway were increased, and those involved in cholesterol efflux were decreased at least at the highest dose on days 1 and 3. Hepatic responses mainly consisted of the HMG-CoA reductase pathway on days 1 (high dose) and 28 (all doses). Protein analysis in tissues and plasma of 0.162 mg Printex 90–exposed mice relative to control revealed an increase in plasma serum amyloid A on days 1 and 28 (p < 0.05), decreases in plasma high-density lipoprotein on days 3 and 28, an increase in plasma low-density lipoprotein on day 28 (p < 0.05), and marginal increases in total hepatic cholesterol on day 28 (p = 0.06). The observed changes are linked to APR. Although further research is needed to establish links between observations and the onset and progression of systemic disorders, the present study demonstrates the ability of NPs to induce systemic effects. PMID:22461453

  18. Inhibition of pulmonary nuclear factor kappa-B decreases the severity of acute Escherichia coli pneumonia but worsens prolonged pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Nuclear factor (NF)-κB is central to the pathogenesis of inflammation in acute lung injury, but also to inflammation resolution and repair. We wished to determine whether overexpression of the NF-κB inhibitor IκBα could modulate the severity of acute and prolonged pneumonia-induced lung injury in a series of prospective randomized animal studies. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to undergo intratracheal instillation of (a) 5 × 109 adenoassociated virus (AAV) vectors encoding the IκBα transgene (5 × 109 AAV-IκBα); (b) 1 × 1010 AAV-IκBα; (c) 5 × 1010 AAV-IκBα; or (d) vehicle alone. After intratracheal inoculation with Escherichia coli, the severity of the lung injury was measured in one series over a 4-hour period (acute pneumonia), and in a second series after 72 hours (prolonged pneumonia). Additional experiments examined the effects of IκBα and null-gene overexpression on E. coli-induced and sham pneumonia. Results In acute pneumonia, IκBα dose-dependently decreased lung injury, improving arterial oxygenation and lung static compliance, reducing alveolar protein leak and histologic injury, and decreasing alveolar IL-1β concentrations. Benefit was maximal at the intermediate (1 × 1010) IκBα vector dose; however, efficacy was diminished at the higher (5 × 1010) IκBα vector dose. In contrast, IκBα worsened prolonged pneumonia-induced lung injury, increased lung bacterial load, decreased lung compliance, and delayed resolution of the acute inflammatory response. Conclusions Inhibition of pulmonary NF-κB activity reduces early pneumonia-induced injury, but worsens injury and bacterial load during prolonged pneumonia. PMID:23622108

  19. Non-invasive ventilation: comparison of effectiveness, safety, and management in acute heart failure syndromes and acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Pladeck, T; Hader, C; Von Orde, A; Rasche, K; Wiechmann, H W

    2007-11-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure ventilation (CPAP) and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) are accepted treatments in acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE) and acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). The aim of the study was a comparison of effectiveness, safety, and management of NPPV in ACPE and AECOPD trying to find an approach for standard management in intensive care. Thirty patients with acute respiratory failure (14 due to ACPE, 16 due to AECOPD) were prospectively included into the study. If clinical stability could not be achieved by standard therapy (pharmacological therapy and oxygen) patients were treated by non-invasive ventilation (NPPV) using a BiPAP-Vision device in S/T-mode. During the first 90 min after the onset of NPPV respiratory and vital parameters were documented every 30 min. Additional relevant outcome parameters (need for intubation, duration of ICU stay, complications and mortality) were monitored. We found that 85.7% of the ACPE patients and 50.0% of the AECOPD patients were treated successfully with NPPV. Intubation rate was 31.2% in the AECOPD group and 14.3% in the ACPE group. 78.6% of the ACPE patients and 43.8% of the AECOPD patients were regularly discharged from hospital in a good condition. In the first 90 min of NIV, there was a significant amelioration of respiratory and other vital parameters. In ACPE patients there was a significant increase in PaO2 from 58.9 mmHg to 80.6 mmHg and of oxygen saturation (SaO2) from 85.1% to 93.1% without changing the inspiratory O2 concentration. This effect was comparable in the AECOPD group, but only could be achieved by increasing the inspiratory ventilation pressure. In the ACPE group inspiratory ventilation pressure could be reduced. In conclusion, in acute respiratory failure, ACPE patients comparably profit from NPPV as do patients with AECOPD, but the algorithm of titration for non-invasive ventilation pressure is different.

  20. Genome Anatomy of Streptococcus parasanguinis Strain C1A, Isolated from a Patient with Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Reveals Unusual Genomic Features

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kim Tien; Pang, Yong Kek; Chong, Teik Min; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Yin, Wai-Fong; Tee, Kok Keng

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus parasanguinis causes invasive diseases. However, the mechanism by which it causes disease remains unclear. Here, we describe the complete genome sequence of S. parasanguinis C1A, isolated from a patient diagnosed with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Several genes that might be associated with pathogenesis are also described. PMID:26021924

  1. Acute invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, shortly after occupational exposure to polluted muddy water, in a previously healthy subject

    PubMed Central

    Pilaniya, Vikas; Gera, Kamal; Gothi, Rajesh; Shah, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) predominantly occurs in severely neutropenic immunocompromised subjects. The occurrence of acute IPA after brief but massive exposure to Aspergillus conidia in previously healthy subjects has been documented, although only six such cases have been reported. The diagnosis was delayed in all six of the affected patients, five of whom died. We report the case of a 50-year-old HIV-negative male, a water pipeline maintenance worker, who presented with acute-onset dyspnea and fever one day after working for 2 h in a deep pit containing polluted, muddy water. Over a one-month period, his general condition deteriorated markedly, despite antibiotic therapy. Imaging showed bilateral diffuse nodules with cavitation, some of which were surrounded by ground-glass opacity suggestive of a halo sign (a hallmark of IPA). Cultures (of sputum/bronchial aspirate samples) and serology were positive for Aspergillus fumigatus. After being started on itraconazole, the patient improved. We conclude that massive exposure to Aspergillus conidia can lead to acute IPA in immunocompetent subjects. PMID:26578140

  2. The novel marker LTBP2 predicts all-cause and pulmonary death in patients with acute dyspnoea.

    PubMed

    Breidthardt, Tobias; Vanpoucke, Griet; Potocki, Mihael; Mosimann, Tamina; Ziller, Ronny; Thomas, Gregoire; Laroy, Wouter; Moerman, Piet; Socrates, Thenral; Drexler, Beatrice; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Kas, Koen; Mueller, Christian

    2012-11-01

    The risk stratification in patients presenting with acute dyspnoea remains a challenge. We therefore conducted a prospective, observational cohort study enrolling 292 patients presenting to the emergency department with acute dyspnoea. A proteomic approach for antibody-free targeted protein quantification based on high-end MS was used to measure LTBP2 [latent TGF (transforming growth factor)-binding protein 2] levels. Final diagnosis and death during follow-up were adjudicated blinded to LTBP2 levels. AHF (acute heart failure) was the final diagnosis in 54% of patients. In both AHF (P<0.001) and non-AHF (P=0.015) patients, LTBP2 levels at presentation were significantly higher in non-survivors compared with survivors with differences on median levels being 2.2- and 1.5-fold respectively. When assessing the cause of death, LTBP2 levels were significantly higher in patients dying from pulmonary causes (P=0.0005). Overall, LTBP2 powerfully predicted early pulmonary death {AUC (area under the curve), 0.95 [95% CI (confidence interval), 0.91-0.98]}. In ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve analyses for the prediction of 1-year mortality LTBP2 achieved an AUC of 0.77 (95% CI, 0.71-0.84); comparable with the predictive potential of NT-proBNP [N-terminal pro-B-type natriuruetic peptide; 0.77 (95% CI, 0.72-0.82)]. Importantly, the predictive potential of LTBP2 persisted in patients with AHF as the cause of dypnea (AUC 0.78) and was independent of renal dysfunction (AUC 0.77). In a multivariate Cox regression analysis, LTBP2 was the strongest independent predictor of death [HR (hazard ratio), 3.76 (95% CI, 2.13-6.64); P<0.0001]. In conclusion, plasma levels of LTBP2 present a novel and powerful predictor of all-cause mortality, and particularly pulmonary death. Cause-specific prediction of death would enable targeted prevention, e.g. with pre-emptive antibiotic therapy.

  3. Contribution of influenza to acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Kashmir, India, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Koul, Parvaiz A; Khan, Umar H; Asad, Romana; Yousuf, Rubaya; Broor, Shobha; Lal, Renu B; Dawood, Fatimah S

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the contribution of influenza to hospitalizations for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) in Kashmir, India. Prospective surveillance for influenza among patients hospitalized with AECOPD was conducted at a tertiary care hospital. Patients had clinical data collected and nasal/throat swabs tested for influenza viruses. Outcomes among patients with and without influenza were compared with logistic regression adjusting for age and underlying conditions. During October 2010-September 2012, 498 patients hospitalized with AECOPD were enrolled, of whom 40 (8%) had received influenza vaccine. Forty (8%) had influenza; influenza virus detection peaked in winter (January-March). Patients with influenza were more likely to die during hospitalization (adjusted OR 3.4, CI 1.0-11.4) than those without.

  4. Salmonella myocarditis in a young adult patient presenting with acute pulmonary edema, rhabdomyolysis, and multi-organ failure.

    PubMed

    Al-aqeedi, Rafid Fayadh; Kamha, Ahmed; Al-aani, Fuad K; Al-ani, Ahmed A

    2009-12-01

    The mortality and morbidity of salmonella infections is seriously underestimated. Salmonella myocarditis is an unusual complication of salmonella sepsis in adults. Cases that do occur may be associated with high morbidity and mortality. We present a rare case of salmonella myocarditis with multi-organ failure in a previously healthy young adult man who was brought to the emergency room with fever, diarrhea, shortness of breath, and altered sensorium, discovered to have acute pulmonary edema and respiratory compromise for which he was assisted with mechanical ventilation for 8 days. Blood culture grew Salmonella typhi. Biochemically he exhibited myocardial, hepatic, and muscular enzymatic surge with renal failure, features of rhabdomyolysis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. The patient showed a progressive improvement on treatment with ceftriaxone for 2 weeks in addition to decongestive therapy. He was discharged in good condition afterward. PMID:19944325

  5. Successful management of acute respiratory failure in an Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis patient using an extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal system.

    PubMed

    Vianello, Andrea; Arcaro, Giovanna; Paladini, Luciana; Iovino, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) requiring Invasive Mechanical Ventilation (IMV) following unsuccessful treatment with Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV) have a high mortality rate. IMV is, moreover, an independent predictor of poor outcome during the post-transplantation period in patients on waiting lists for Lung Transplantation (LT). Here we describe the successful management of an IPF patient with acute respiratory failure (ARF) using a pump-assisted veno-venous system for extracorporeal CO2 removal (ECCO2R) (ProLUNG® system) as an alternative to endotracheal intubation (ETI) following NIV failure. Given this positive experience, further studies are warranted focusing on the ECCO2R system's tolerability, safety, and efficacy in patients with IPF and severe ARF in whom NIV alone is ineffective. PMID:27537725

  6. Successful management of acute respiratory failure in an Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis patient using an extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal system.

    PubMed

    Vianello, Andrea; Arcaro, Giovanna; Paladini, Luciana; Iovino, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) requiring Invasive Mechanical Ventilation (IMV) following unsuccessful treatment with Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV) have a high mortality rate. IMV is, moreover, an independent predictor of poor outcome during the post-transplantation period in patients on waiting lists for Lung Transplantation (LT). Here we describe the successful management of an IPF patient with acute respiratory failure (ARF) using a pump-assisted veno-venous system for extracorporeal CO2 removal (ECCO2R) (ProLUNG® system) as an alternative to endotracheal intubation (ETI) following NIV failure. Given this positive experience, further studies are warranted focusing on the ECCO2R system's tolerability, safety, and efficacy in patients with IPF and severe ARF in whom NIV alone is ineffective.

  7. Pulmonary function abnormalities and asthma are prevalent in children with sickle cell disease and are associated with acute chest syndrome.

    PubMed

    Intzes, Stefanos; Kalpatthi, Ram V; Short, Robert; Imran, Hamayun

    2013-11-01

    Pulmonary diseases form major sources of morbidity and mortality in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of lung function abnormalities and asthma and their association with acute chest syndrome (ACS) in children with SCD. This was a cross-sectional retrospective study of 127 children with SCD; we collected information regarding ACS and asthma and pulmonary function test (PFT) data. Based on PFT results, the patients were assigned to one pattern of lung function [normal, obstructive lung disease (OLD), restrictive lung disease (RLD)]. Statistical analyses included Pearson correlation, prevalence odds ratio (POR), cross-tabulation, and multiple binary logistic regression. OLD was noted in 35% and RLD in 23% of the patients, with the remainder exhibiting a normal PFT pattern. Forty-six percent of patients had asthma, 64% of whom had a history of ACS. OLD (r = .244, P = .008, POR = 2.8) and asthma (r = .395, P < .001, POR = 5.4) were significantly associated with a history of ACS. There was a negative correlation between having normal PFT data and a history of ACS (r = -.289, P = .002, POR = .3). Asthma and pulmonary function abnormalities are prevalent in children with SCD, with OLD being more common than RLD. There is an association between asthma, OLD, and ACS, however causality cannot be proven due to the study design. We stress the importance of actively investigating for a clinical diagnosis of asthma in all patients with SCD and suggest that PFT data may help detect patients at lower risk for ACS.

  8. Resolution of hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury after treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis without the use of corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Constance A A; Araujo, Nicole A A; Daher, Elizabeth F; Oliveira, José Daniel B; Kubrusly, Marcos; Duarte, Pastora M A; Silva, Sonia L; Araujo, Sonia M H A

    2013-03-01

    Abstract. Hypercalcemia caused by tuberculosis is rare and it is usually asymptomatic. Tuberculosis (TB) -related hypercalcemia associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) is rarely reported. We report a case of a 22-year-old immunocompetent man with 1-month history of daily fever, asthenia and weight loss. Laboratory findings on admission included serum calcium 14.9 mg/dL, urinary Ca(2+) 569.6 mg/24 hours, low level of parathyroid hormone, serum creatinine = 2.2 mg/dL and sodium fractional excretion (FeNa) 2.73%. The result of the tuberculin skin test was 17 mm. A chest X-ray revealed micronodular pulmonary infiltrate in the apex of the right lung, which was confirmed by computed tomography scan. The patient was diagnosed with hypercalcemia associated with pulmonary TB and AKI. A general improvement of the hypercalcemia and renal function was observed in the first 2 weeks after effective hydration and treatment of TB without corticosteroids. The patient was discharged with normal calcium levels and renal function.

  9. Lymphatic fluctuation in the parenchymal remodeling stage of acute interstitial pneumonia, organizing pneumonia, nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Parra, E R; Araujo, C A L; Lombardi, J G; Ab'Saber, A M; Carvalho, C R R; Kairalla, R A; Capelozzi, V L

    2012-05-01

    Because the superficial lymphatics in the lungs are distributed in the subpleural, interlobular and peribroncovascular interstitium, lymphatic impairment may occur in the lungs of patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) and increase their severity. We investigated the distribution of lymphatics in different remodeling stages of IIPs by immunohistochemistry using the D2-40 antibody. Pulmonary tissue was obtained from 69 patients with acute interstitial pneumonia/diffuse alveolar damage (AIP/DAD, N = 24), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia/organizing pneumonia (COP/OP, N = 6), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP/NSIP, N = 20), and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia (IPF/UIP, N = 19). D2-40+ lymphatic in the lesions was quantitatively determined and associated with remodeling stage score. We observed an increase in the D2-40+ percent from DAD (6.66 ± 1.11) to UIP (23.45 ± 5.24, P = 0.008) with the advanced process of remodeling stage of the lesions. Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed a better survival for patients with higher lymphatic D2-40+ expression than 9.3%. Lymphatic impairment occurs in the lungs of IIPs and its severity increases according to remodeling stage. The results suggest that disruption of the superficial lymphatics may impair alveolar clearance, delay organ repair and cause severe disease progress mainly in patients with AIP/DAD. Therefore, lymphatic distribution may serve as a surrogate marker for the identification of patients at greatest risk for death due to IIPs.

  10. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F.; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M.; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S.; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N.; Thorneloe, Kevin S.; Bradshaw, Heather B.; Matalon, Sadis

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  11. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N; Thorneloe, Kevin S; Bradshaw, Heather B; Matalon, Sadis; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2014-07-15

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  12. Use of noninvasive ventilation at the pulmonary infection control window for acute respiratory failure in AECOPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Le; Ren, Peng-Wei; Liu, Xue-Ting; Zhang, Chao; Zuo, Hong-Xia; Kang, De-Ying; Niu, Yu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to comprehensively examine the efficacy and safety of noninvasive ventilation used at the pulmonary infection control (PIC) window for acute respiratory failure (ARF) in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). Seven electronic databases and relevant resources were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing patients using noninvasive ventilation at PIC window with those continuing receiving invasive ventilation. Retrieved citations were screened, risk of bias was assessed, and data were extracted by 2 independent review authors. Overall effect sizes were synthesized by using meta-analyses. Quality of evidence was rated by using Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. A total of 17 trials involving 959 participants were included for this review. Compared with continuous invasive ventilation, noninvasive ventilation used at PIC window significantly reduced mortality, ventilator-associated pneumonia, weaning failures, reintubations, duration of invasive ventilation, total duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay (LOS) in intensive care unit, and LOS in hospital as well as hospital costs. Of these, mortality significantly decreased (risk ratio = 0.27, 95% confidence interval: 0.17–0.42, P < 0.001) without significant heterogeneity (I2 = 0%, P = 0.99). Quality of evidence regarding the 9 outcomes across the included studies was rated from moderate to low. Use of noninvasive ventilation at PIC window showed beneficial effects across identified trials for ARF in AECOPD patients. Considering the absence of high quality of available evidence and the uncertainty of long-term effect of this intervention, a weak recommendation for clinical practice was generated, and further well-designed and adequately powered RCTs are required to validate this conclusion. PMID:27310978

  13. Early Embolization for Ruptured Aneurysm in Acute Stage of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage with Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Meguro, T.; Rada, K. TE; Hirotsune, N.; Nishino, S.; Asano, T.; Manabe, T.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Four cases of ruptured aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) presented with severe neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE). On admission, two patients were grade IV and two were grade V according to Hunt and Hess grading. All patients needed respiratory management with the assistance of a ventilator. Three of them underwent endovascular treatment for the ruptured aneurysms within three days from onset after ensuring hemodynamic stability. Immediately after the endovascular treatment, lumbar spinal drainage was inserted in all the patients. The pulmonary edema findings disappeared rapidly after the respiratory management. The results were good recovery in two, and moderate disability in two. We concluded that early embolization of ruptured aneurysm and placement of spinal drainage is a satisfactory option for severe SAH with NPE. PMID:20566097

  14. Complicated Azygos Vein Aneurysm in an Infant Presenting with Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Song, Jinyoung; Huh, June; Kang, I-Seok; Yang, Ji-Hyuk; Jun, Tae-Gook

    2016-03-01

    Azygos vein aneurysm is a rare cause of mediastinal mass. Most cases present as an incidental finding on imaging modalities, but in few cases the thrombosis in the aneurysm leads to pulmonary thromboembolism, which may require surgical resection. We present a case where, for the first time, a case of a complicated azygos vein aneurysm was diagnosed in infancy, which required surgical resection. PMID:27014359

  15. The Endothelial Glycocalyx: Emerging Concepts in Pulmonary Edema and Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Stephen R.; Blank, Randal S.; Deatherage, Lindy S.; Dull, Randal O.

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx is a dynamic layer of macromolecules at the luminal surface of vascular endothelium that is involved in fluid homeostasis and regulation. Its role in vascular permeability and edema formation is emerging but is still not well understood. In this special article, we highlight key concepts of endothelial dysfunction with regards to the glycocalyx and provide new insights into the glycocalyx as a mediator of processes central to the development of pulmonary edema and lung injury. PMID:23835455

  16. Physiology in medicine: acute altitude exposure in patients with pulmonary and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Seccombe, Leigh M; Peters, Matthew J

    2014-03-01

    Travel is more affordable and improved high-altitude airports, railways, and roads allow rapid access to altitude destinations without acclimatization. The physiology of exposure to altitude has been extensively described in healthy individuals; however, there is a paucity of data pertaining to those who have reduced reserve. This Physiology in Medicine article discusses the physiological considerations relevant to the safe travel to altitude and by commercial aircraft in patients with pulmonary and/or cardiac disease.

  17. Differential prognostic utility of NTproBNP and Cystatin C in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Calvo, Juan I; Sánchez-Marteles, Marta; Ruiz-Ruiz, Francisco-José; Morales-Rull, José-Luis; Nieto-Rodríguez, José-Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether serum Cystatin C (CysC) and NTproBNP have prognostic value among patients with long-standing chronic lung disease. Design Prospective, observational, non-interventional study. Setting CysC and NTproBNP are prognostic markers in several cardiac conditions. In addition, CysC acts as an antiprotease following Cathepsin activation, which has been involved in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Participants Patients with a basal functional status of II-IV (NYHA), admitted for an acute exacerbation of chronic pulmonary diseases and no previous history of symptoms related to pulmonary hypertension or heart failure. Main outcome measures NTproBNP and CysC were determined at admission in 107 patients with acute exacerbation of chronic lung disease. During 12-month follow-up, mortality, new hospital admissions and prescription of diuretics were recorded. Results During follow-up there were eight patient deaths (7.5%). Mean NTproBNP among the deceased was 1510.20 pg/mL (95% CI 498.44–4628.55) vs 502.70 pg/mL (95% CI 395.44–645.48) among survivors (p = 0.01). Twenty-seven patients (25%) were prescribed loop diuretics. Mean concentration of CysC was 1.45 mg/dL (95% CI 1.21–1.69 mg/dL) vs 1.17 mg/dL (95% IC 1.09–1.25 mg/dL) in those not prescribed (p = 0.004). NTproBNP concentration was 837.14 pg/mL (95% CI 555.57–1274.10 pg/mL) in patients prescribed diuretics vs 473.42 pg/mL (95% CI 357.80–632.70 pg/mL) in those not prescribed (p = 0.03). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a significant difference between death and diuretic prescription during follow-up when cut-off value for NTproBNP was 550 pg/mL (p = 0.03 and p = 0.02, respectively). For 1.16mg/dL of CsysC, a significant difference was only observed in diuretic prescription (p = 0.007). Conclusions In patients with chronic respiratory diseases NTproBNP has predictive value in terms of mortality whereas CysC does not. However, it is still possible that both can

  18. Evaluation of Pulmonary and Systemic Toxicity of Oil Dispersant (COREXIT EC9500A®) Following Acute Repeated Inhalation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jenny R; Anderson, Stacey E; Kan, Hong; Krajnak, Kristine; Thompson, Janet A; Kenyon, Allison; Goldsmith, William T; McKinney, Walter; Frazer, David G; Jackson, Mark; Fedan, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Oil spill cleanup workers come into contact with numerous potentially hazardous chemicals derived from the oil spills, as well as chemicals applied for mitigation of the spill, including oil dispersants. In response to the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, a record volume of the oil dispersant, COREXIT EC9500A, was delivered via aerial applications, raising concern regarding potential health effects that may result from pulmonary exposure to the dispersant. METHODS The current study examined the effects on pulmonary functions, cardiovascular functions, and systemic immune responses in rats to acute repeated inhalation exposure of COREXIT EC9500A at 25 mg/m3, five hours per day, over nine work days, or filtered air (control). At one and seven days following the last exposure, a battery of parameters was measured to evaluate lung function, injury, and inflammation; cardiovascular function; peripheral vascular responses; and systemic immune responses. RESULTS No significant alterations in airway reactivity were observed at one or seven days after exposure either in baseline values or following methacholine (MCh) inhalation challenge. Although there was a trend for an increase in lung neutrophils and phagocyte oxidant production at one-day post exposure, there were no significant differences in parameters of lung inflammation. In addition, increased blood monocytes and neutrophils, and decreased lymphocyte numbers at one-day post exposure also did not differ significantly from air controls, and no alterations in splenocyte populations, or serum or spleen immunoglobulin M (IgM) to antigen were observed. There were no significant differences in peripheral vascular responsiveness to vasoconstrictor and vasodilator agonists or in blood pressure (BP) responses to these agents; however, the baseline heart rate (HR) and HR responses to isoproterenol (ISO) were significantly elevated at one-day post exposure, with resolution

  19. Diagnostic and therapeutic approach to acute pulmonary embolism in an emergency department.

    PubMed

    Tilli, P; Testa, A; Covino, M; Portale, P; Capaldi, L; Carbone, L; Silveri, N Gentiloni

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is the obstruction of the pulmonary arteries by the dislodging and embolization of thrombotic material coming in most cases from the deep veins of the leg. PE is a relatively common disease with an estimated annual incidence up to 37 cases diagnosed per 100,000 persons it is the third cause of death in the United States. Clinical signs and symptoms are non specific and in the 70% of cases there isn't a correct diagnosis. The aim of this review is to summarize the state of the art of the diagnostic and treatment algorithms of PE in the evidence based medicine in order to minimize the "clinician gestalt" by the only guide for the early diagnosis and treatment of the disease. A correct diagnosis based on pre test probability, the use of computed tomographic pulmonary angiography, early anticoagulation/fibrinolysis started in the Emergency Department can change the natural history of the disease. In perspective, a combined approach of localyzed fibrinolysis and mechanical fragmentation could improve the overall outcome of these patients. PMID:16705955

  20. Chinese Herbal Medicine (Weijing Decoction) Combined with Pharmacotherapy for the Treatment of Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuhua; Guo, Xinfeng; Xue, Charlie Changli

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Weijing decoction combined with routine pharmacotherapy (RP) for the treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). Methods. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) evaluating Weijing decoction for AECOPD were included. English, Chinese, and Japanese databases were searched from their respective inceptions to June 2013. The methodological quality was assessed according to the Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias tool. All data were analyzed and synthesized using RevMan 5.2 software. Results. Fifteen (15) studies involving 986 participants were included. Participants were diagnosed with COPD in the acute exacerbation stage. In addition, most of studies reported that they included participants with the Chinese medicine syndrome, phlegm-heat obstructing the Lung. Weijing decoction combined with RP improved lung function (forced expiratory volume in one second; FEV1), arterial blood gases (PaO2 and PaCO2), clinical effective rate, and reduced inflammatory biomarkers (TNF-α and IL-8) when compared with RP alone. No severe adverse events were reported in these studies. Conclusions. Weijing decoction appeared to be beneficial for AECOPD and well-tolerated when taken concurrently with RP, such as antibiotics, bronchodilators (oral and inhaled), and mucolytics. PMID:25165477

  1. Combination of lung ultrasound (a comet-tail sign) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in differentiating acute heart failure from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma as cause of acute dyspnea in prehospital emergency setting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We studied the diagnostic accuracy of bedside lung ultrasound (the presence of a comet-tail sign), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and clinical assessment (according to the modified Boston criteria) in differentiating heart failure (HF)-related acute dyspnea from pulmonary (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/asthma)-related acute dyspnea in the prehospital setting. Methods Our prospective study was performed at the Center for Emergency Medicine, Maribor, Slovenia, between July 2007 and April 2010. Two groups of patients were compared: a HF-related acute dyspnea group (n = 129) and a pulmonary (asthma/COPD)-related acute dyspnea group (n = 89). All patients underwent lung ultrasound examinations, along with basic laboratory testing, rapid NT-proBNP testing and chest X-rays. Results The ultrasound comet-tail sign has 100% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 100% negative predictive value (NPV) and 96% positive predictive value (PPV) for the diagnosis of HF. NT-proBNP (cutoff point 1,000 pg/mL) has 92% sensitivity, 89% specificity, 86% NPV and 90% PPV. The Boston modified criteria have 85% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 80% NPV and 90% PPV. In comparing the three methods, we found significant differences between ultrasound sign and (1) NT-proBNP (P < 0.05) and (2) Boston modified criteria (P < 0.05). The combination of ultrasound sign and NT-proBNP has 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% NPV and 100% PPV. With the use of ultrasound, we can exclude HF in patients with pulmonary-related dyspnea who have positive NT-proBNP (> 1,000 pg/mL) and a history of HF. Conclusions An ultrasound comet-tail sign alone or in combination with NT-proBNP has high diagnostic accuracy in differentiating acute HF-related from COPD/asthma-related causes of acute dyspnea in the prehospital emergency setting. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01235182. PMID:21492424

  2. Acute and chronic exposure to Tyrophagus putrescentiae induces allergic pulmonary response in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Nuñez, Nailê Karine; dos Santos Dutra, Moisés; Barbosa, Gustavo Leivas; Morassutti, Alessandra Loureiro; de Souza, Rodrigo Godinho; Vargas, Mauro Henrique Moraes; Antunes, Géssica Luana; Silveira, Josiane Silva; da Silva, Guilherme Liberato; Pitrez, Paulo Márcio

    2016-01-01

    Background Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Tp) is a source of aeroallergen that causes allergic diseases. Objective To describe an acute and chronic murine model of allergic asthma with Tp extract with no systemic sensitization and no use of adjuvant. Methods Mites from dust sample were cultured and a raw extract was produced. Female BALB/c mice (6-8 weeks) were challenged intranasally with Tp extract or Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline, for 10 consecutive days (acute protocol) or for 6 weeks (chronic protocol). Twenty-four hours after the last intranasal challenge, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was performed for total and differential cells count, cytokine analysis, and eosinophil peroxidase activity. Lung tissue was also removed for histopathologic analysis. Results Tp extract has shown a significant increase in total cells count from BALF as well as an increase in absolute eosinophils count, eosinophil peroxidase activity, interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13 levels, in both acute and chronic protocols. Peribronchovascular infiltrate, goblet cells hyperplasia and collagen deposition were shown in the airways of acute and chronic Tp-exposed mice. Conclusion Our data suggest that the intranasal exposure to Tp extract, with no systemic sensitization and no use of adjuvants, induces a robust allergic inflammation in the lungs of mice, in both acute and chronic models. Our Tp extract seems to be a potent allergen extract which may be used in asthma model studies. PMID:26844220

  3. [Acute poisoning of an infant by cutaneous application of a local counterirritant and pulmonary antiseptic salve].

    PubMed

    Dupeyron, J P; Quattrocchi, F; Castaing, H; Fabiani, P

    1976-01-01

    The case of acute poisoning reported here raises the question of the harmlessness of preparations destined for cutaneous application in infants. After describing the method perfected for the identification and estimation of camphor, menthol and thymol in biological material, the authors present the toxicological, clinical and biological arguments in favour of the notion that the cutaneous resorption of these substances was responsible for this acute intoxication in an infant. Particular attention should be paid to poisoning which may result, in the newborn and infant, from the cutaneous application of active substances. PMID:1010000

  4. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the clinical management of an acute exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, J; Wedzicha, J

    2004-01-01

    Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease impose a considerable burden of morbidity, mortality, and health care cost. Management guidelines outlining best practice, based largely on consensus expert opinion, were produced by a number of organisations during the last decade. Current interest in the field is high. This has resulted in the publication of many further studies which have extended our understanding of the pathology involved and provided, for the first time, an evidence base for many of the therapeutic options. In this review we aim to bring the non-specialist reader up to date with current management principles and the evidence underlying such interventions. PMID:15356350

  5. Acute Hypercalcaemia and Hypervitaminosis D in an Infant with Extra Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Devi; Didel, Siya Ram; Agarwal, Sikha; Sachdeva, Naresh; Singh, Meenu

    2015-10-01

    In patients with tuberculosis, abnormal extrarenal production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 by activated macrophages in granulomatous tissues may result in hypercalcaemia. More commonly reported in adults with active pulmonary tuberculosis, this complication may rarely occur in extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and children. The hypercalcaemia may be precipitated by usually recommended vitamin D and calcium supplementation in patients with tuberculosis. We report here an infant with tubercular meningitis who developed hypercalcaemia 12 days after starting routine vitamin D and calcium supplementation. This communication highlights the importance of close monitoring of calcium levels in patients with tuberculosis, especially if started on vitamin D and calcium replacement before anti-tubercular therapy. PMID:26557587

  6. Oral sildenafil as a rescue therapy in presumed acute pulmonary hypertensive crisis.

    PubMed

    Maxted, Andrew Peter; Hill, Abigail; Davies, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    A 23-week-old baby, born at 26(+2) weeks, presented to the hospital with critical respiratory failure, which was impossible to stabilize. She had unstable oxygen saturations between 35% and 95%. A presumptive diagnosis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia with associated pulmonary hypertensive crisis was made. In the absence of inhaled nitric oxide, 2 oral doses of 1 mg/kg sildenafil were given, with a dramatic improvement 30 to 45 minutes later. Her oxygenation index fell from 43 to 14. She made a full recovery and was discharged from the hospital 2 weeks later.

  7. Acute pulmonary function response to ozone in young adults as a function of body mass index

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have shown enhanced responsiveness to ozone in obese mice. Adiposity has not been examined as a possible modulator of ozone response in humans. We therefore examined the relationship between body mass index and the acute spirometric response to ozone (O(3)) exposur...

  8. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces peripheral metabolic alterations in animals and humans. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for ozone-induced systemic metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wis...

  9. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats#

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces metabolic alterations in animals and humans. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for both ozone-induced metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats ...

  10. Acute secondhand smoke-induced pulmonary inflammation is diminished in RAGE knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Wood, Tyler T; Winden, Duane R; Marlor, Derek R; Wright, Alex J; Jones, Cameron M; Chavarria, Michael; Rogers, Geraldine D; Reynolds, Paul R

    2014-11-15

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) has increasingly been demonstrated to be an important modulator of inflammation in cases of pulmonary disease. Published reports involving tobacco smoke exposure have demonstrated increased expression of RAGE, its participation in proinflammatory signaling, and its role in irreversible pulmonary remodeling. The current research evaluated the in vivo effects of short-term secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure in RAGE knockout and control mice compared with identical animals exposed to room air only. Quantitative PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry revealed elevated RAGE expression in controls after 4 wk of SHS exposure and an anticipated absence of RAGE expression in RAGE knockout mice regardless of smoke exposure. Ras activation, NF-κB activity, and cytokine elaboration were assessed to characterize the molecular basis of SHS-induced inflammation in the mouse lung. Furthermore, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was procured from RAGE knockout and control animals for the assessment of inflammatory cells and molecules. As a general theme, inflammation coincident with leukocyte recruitment was induced by SHS exposure and significantly influenced by the availability of RAGE. These data reveal captivating information suggesting a role for RAGE signaling in lungs exposed to SHS. However, ongoing research is still warranted to fully explain roles for RAGE and other receptors in cells coping with involuntary smoke exposure for prolonged periods of time.

  11. Pulmonary effects of acute exposure to degradation products of sulphur hexafluoride during electrical cable repair work.

    PubMed Central

    Kraut, A; Lilis, R

    1990-01-01

    Six electrical workers accidentally exposed to degradation products of sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) during electrical repair work were followed up for one year. One degradation product, sulphur tetrafluoride (SF4), was identified from worksite measurements. Unprotected exposure in an underground enclosed space occurred for six hours over a 12 hour period. Initial symptoms included shortness of breath, chest tightness, productive cough, nose and eye irritation, headache, fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. Symptoms subsided when exposure was interrupted during attempts to identify the cause of the problem. Although exposure ended after several hours, four workers remained symptomatic for between one week and one month. Pulmonary radiographic abnormalities included several discrete areas of transitory platelike atelectasis in one worker, and a slight diffuse infiltrate in the left lower lobe of another. One worker showed transient obstructive changes in tests of pulmonary function. Examination at follow up after one year showed no persistent abnormalities. Preliminary data from this paper were presented at the VIIth international pneumoconioses conference. Pittsburgh, PA, August 1988. PMID:2271390

  12. Comparison of isoflurane and α-chloralose in an anesthetized swine model of acute pulmonary embolism producing right ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Beam, Daren M; Neto-Neves, Evandro M; Stubblefield, William B; Alves, Nathan J; Tune, Johnathan D; Kline, Jeffrey A

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death, and a model is needed for testing potential treatments. In developing a model, we compared the hemodynamic effects of isoflurane and α-chloralose in an acute swine model of PE because the choice of anesthesia will likely affect the cardiovascular responses of an animal to PE. At baseline, swine that received α-chloralose (n = 6) had a lower heart rate and cardiac output and higher SpO2, end-tidal CO2, and mean arterial pressure than did those given isoflurane (n = 9). After PE induction, swine given α-chloralose compared with isoflurane exhibited a lower heart rate (63 ± 10 compared with 116 ± 15 bpm) and peripheral arterial pressure (52 ± 12 compared with 61 ± 12 mm Hg); higher SpO2 (98% ± 3% compared with 95% ± 1%), end-tidal CO2 (35 ± 4 compared with 32 ± 5), and systolic blood pressure (121 ± 8 compared with 104 ± 20 mm Hg); and equivalent right ventricular:left ventricular ratios (1.32 ± 0.50 compared with 1.23 ± 0.19) and troponin I mean values (0.09 ± 0.07 ng/mL compared with 0.09 ± 0.06 ng/mL). Isoflurane was associated with widely variable fibrinogen and activated partial thromboplastin time. Intraexperiment mortality was 0 of 6 animals for α-chloralose and 2 of 9 swine for isoflurane. All swine anesthetized with α-chloralose survived with sustained pulmonary hypertension, RV-dilation-associated cardiac injury without the confounding vasodilatory or coagulatory effects of isoflurane. These data demonstrate the physiologic advantages of α-chloralose over isoflurane for anesthesia in a swine model of severe submassive PE. PMID:25730758

  13. D-dimer testing for safe exclusion and risk stratification in patients with acute pulmonary embolism in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhou; Chen, Yiyi; Xie, Qiong; Shao, Zhexin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Safe exclusion and risk stratification are currently recommended for the initial management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE). The aim of this study was to assess the safe exclusion and risk stratification value of D-dimer (DD) for APE when tested at the beginning of admission. Materials and Methods: All consecutive Chinese APE patients and controls were recruited from January 2010 to December 2012. All measurements of serum indexes were made in duplicate and blinded to the patients’ status. All the 40 patients with the first episode of APE were confirmed by multi-detector computed tomographic pulmonary angiography. The plasma prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, fibrinogen, and DD levels were measured within 24 h of admission. We used the Mann-Whitney U-test to determine the differences between groups and drew receiver operator characteristic curve to evaluate the indexes’ value in the APE screening. Results: The PT and DD in the APE group were significantly higher than those in the disease control group (P < 0.05). Taking PT and DD as the useful screening tests for APE and AUC was 0.765 and 0.822, respectively. DD yielded the higher screening efficiency, with DD >1820 μg/L as cut-off value, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value was 82.5%, 75.2%, 56.9%, and 91.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The patients with APE showed significant higher DD levels compared with disease controls, suggesting a negative qualitative DD test result can safely and efficiently exclude APE in primary care. PMID:26622257

  14. Study of Cardiac Arrest Caused by Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism and Thrombolytic Resuscitation in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lian-Xing; Li, Chun-Sheng; Yang, Jun; Tong, Nan; Xiao, Hong-Li; An, Le

    2016-01-01

    Background: The success rate of resuscitation in cardiac arrest (CA) caused by pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is low. Furthermore, there are no large animal models that simulate clinical CA. The aim of this study was to establish a porcine CA model caused by PTE and to investigate the pathophysiology of CA and postresuscitation. Methods: This model was induced in castrated male pigs (30 ± 2 kg; n = 21) by injecting thrombi (10–15 ml) via the left external jugular vein. Computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) was performed at baseline, CA, and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). After CTPA during CA, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with thrombolysis (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator 50 mg) was initiated. Hemodynamic, respiratory, and blood gas data were monitored. Cardiac troponins T, cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase-MB, myoglobin, and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data were compared between baseline and CA with paired-sample t-test and compared among different time points for survival animals with repeated measures analysis of variance. Results: Seventeen animals achieved CA after emboli injection, while four achieved CA after 5–8 ml more thrombi. Nine animals survived 6 h after CPR. CTPA showed obstruction of the pulmonary arteries. Mean aortic pressure data showed occurrence of CA caused by PTE (Z = −2.803, P = 0.002). The maximal rate of mean increase of left ventricular pressure (dp/dtmax) was statistically decreased (t = 6.315, P = 0.000, variation coefficient = 0.25), and end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PetCO2) decreased to the lowest value (t = 27.240, P = 0.000). After ROSC (n = 9), heart rate (HR) and mean right ventricular pressure (MRVP) remained different versus baseline until 2 h after ROSC (HR, P = 0.036; MRVP, P = 0.027). Myoglobin was statistically increased from CA to 1 h after ROSC (P = 0.036, 0.026, 0.009, respectively), and BNP was increased

  15. Respiratory care year in review 2011: long-term oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, airway management, acute lung injury, education, and management.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Patrick J; Macintyre, Neil R; Schmidt, Ulrich H; Haas, Carl F; Jones-Boggs Rye, Kathy; Kauffman, Garry W; Hess, Dean R

    2012-04-01

    For the busy clinician, educator, or manager, it is becoming an increasing challenge to filter the literature to what is relevant to one's practice and then update one's practice based on the current evidence. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent literature related to long-term oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, airway management, acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, respiratory care education, and respiratory care management. These topics were chosen and reviewed in a manner that is most likely to have interest to the readers of Respiratory Care. PMID:22472499

  16. Pulmonary function in firefighters: acute changes in ventilatory capacity and their correlates.

    PubMed Central

    Musk, A W; Smith, T J; Peters, J M; McLaughlin, E

    1979-01-01

    A group of 39 firefighters was examined during routine firefighing duty. Following smoke exposure the average decrease in one-second forced expiratory volume (FEV1.0) was 0.05 litre (137 observations). This decline in FEV1.0 was related to the severity of smoke exposure as estimated by the firefighter and to the measured particulate concentration of the smoke to which he was exposed. Decreases in FEV1.0 in excess of 0.10 litre were recorded in 30% of observations. Changes in FEV1.0 resulting from a second exposure to smoke on the same tour of duty were greater when smoke exposure at the previous fire was heavy. The repeated episodes of irritation of the bronchial tree that have been documented in this investigation may explain the origin of the previously observed chronic effect of firefighting on respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function. PMID:444439

  17. Pulmonary effects after acute inhalation of oil dispersant (COREXIT EC9500A) in rats.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jenny R; Reynolds, Jeffrey S; Thompson, Janet A; Zaccone, Eric J; Shimko, Michael J; Goldsmith, William T; Jackson, Mark; McKinney, Walter; Frazer, David G; Kenyon, Allison; Kashon, Michael L; Piedimonte, Giovanni; Castranova, Vincent; Fedan, Jeffrey S

    2011-01-01

    COREXIT EC9500A (COREXIT) was used to disperse crude oil during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. While the environmental impact of COREXIT has been examined, the pulmonary effects are unknown. Investigations were undertaken to determine whether inhaled COREXIT elicits airway inflammation, alters pulmonary function or airway reactivity, or exerts pharmacological effects. Male rats were exposed to COREXIT (mean 27 mg/m(3), 5 h). Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed on d 1 and 7 postexposure. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and albumin were measured as indices of lung injury; macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils were quantified to evaluate inflammation; and oxidant production by macrophages and neutrophils was measured. There were no significant effects of COREXIT on LDH, albumin, inflammatory cell levels or oxidant production at either time point. In conscious animals, neither breathing frequency nor specific airway resistance were altered at 1 hr, 1 d and 7 d postexposure. Airway resistance responses to methacholine (MCh) aerosol in anesthetized animals were unaffected at 1 and 7 d postexposure, while dynamic compliance responses were decreased after 1 d but not 7 d. In tracheal strips, in the presence or absence of MCh, low concentrations of COREXIT (0.001% v/v) elicited relaxation; contraction occurred at 0.003-0.1% v/v. In isolated, perfused trachea, intraluminally applied COREXIT produced similar effects but at higher concentrations. COREXIT inhibited neurogenic contractile responses of strips to electrical field stimulation. Our findings suggest that COREXIT inhalation did not initiate lung inflammation, but may transiently increase the difficulty of breathing.

  18. Effect of drugs on the pulmonary changes in experimental acute pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, A R; Taylor, T V

    1982-01-01

    Respiratory complications of acute pancreatitis are well recognised and are closely related to a poor prognosis. Using an experimental model in the rat, a decrease in lung compliance and an increase in lung weight were produced in acute pancreatitis. The effects of dexamethasone, heparin, and aspirin on these changes were studied. The mean specific lung compliance was reduced by 16% in the pancreatitis group compared with the control group (p less than 0.05) and this change was abolished by dexamethasone (p less than 0.02), heparin (p less than 0.01), and aspirin (p less than 0.001). Percentage lung weight (as percentage of total body weight) was raised by 22% in the pancreatitis group compared with the sham operation group (p less than 0.01) and this change was abolished by heparin (p less than 0.01) and aspirin (p less than 0.05), but not affected by dexamethasone (p less than 0.5). The results indicate that 'stiff' and heavy lungs occur in experimental acute pancreatitis. The fact that these changes are abolished by heparin and improved by aspirin suggests that intrapulmonary fibrin deposition is a factor in the pathogenesis of the important respiratory complications of this condition. PMID:7076022

  19. Use of Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Band Gap to Develop a Predictive Paradigm for Oxidative Stress and Acute Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Ji, Zhaoxia; Xia, Tian; Meng, Huan; Low-Kam, Cecile; Liu, Rong; Pokhrel, Suman; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Pei; Wang, Meiying; Li, Linjiang; Rallo, Robert; Damoiseaux, Robert; Telesca, Donatello; Mädler, Lutz; Cohen, Yoram; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Nel, Andre E.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate for 24 metal oxide (MOx) nanoparticles that it is possible to use conduction band energy levels to delineate their toxicological potential at cellular and whole animal levels. Among the materials, the overlap of conduction band energy (Ec) levels with the cellular redox potential (−4.12 to −4.84 eV) was strongly correlated to the ability of Co3O4, Cr2O3, Ni2O3, Mn2O3 and CoO nanoparticles to induce oxygen radicals, oxidative stress and inflammation. This outcome is premised on permissible electron transfers from the biological redox couples that maintain the cellular redox equilibrium to the conduction band of the semiconductor particles. Both single parameter cytotoxic as well as multi-parameter oxidative stress assays in cells showed excellent correlation to the generation of acute neutrophilic inflammation and cytokine responses in the lungs of CB57 Bl/6 mice. Co3O4, Ni2O3, Mn2O3 and CoO nanoparticles could also oxidize cytochrome c as a representative redox couple involved in redox homeostasis. While CuO and ZnO generated oxidative stress and acute pulmonary inflammation that is not predicted by Ec levels, the adverse biological effects of these materials could be explained by their solubility, as demonstrated by ICP-MS analysis. Taken together, these results demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to predict the toxicity of a large series of MOx nanoparticles in the lung premised on semiconductor properties and an integrated in vitro/in vivo hazard ranking model premised on oxidative stress. This establishes a robust platform for modeling of MOx structure-activity relationships based on band gap energy levels and particle dissolution. This predictive toxicological paradigm is also of considerable importance for regulatory decision-making about this important class of engineered nanomaterials. PMID:22502734

  20. Utility of serum procalcitonin values in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cautionary note

    PubMed Central

    Falsey, Ann R; Becker, Kenneth L; Swinburne, Andrew J; Nylen, Eric S; Snider, Richard H; Formica, Maria A; Hennessey, Patricia A; Criddle, Mary M; Peterson, Derick R; Walsh, Edward E

    2012-01-01

    Background Serum procalcitonin levels have been used as a biomarker of invasive bacterial infection and recently have been advocated to guide antibiotic therapy in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, rigorous studies correlating procalcitonin levels with microbiologic data are lacking. Acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) have been linked to viral and bacterial infection as well as noninfectious causes. Therefore, we evaluated procalcitonin as a predictor of viral versus bacterial infection in patients hospitalized with AECOPD with and without evidence of pneumonia. Methods Adults hospitalized during the winter with symptoms consistent with AECOPD underwent extensive testing for viral, bacterial, and atypical pathogens. Serum procalcitonin levels were measured on day 1 (admission), day 2, and at one month. Clinical and laboratory features of subjects with viral and bacterial diagnoses were compared. Results In total, 224 subjects with COPD were admitted for 240 respiratory illnesses. Of these, 56 had pneumonia and 184 had AECOPD alone. A microbiologic diagnosis was made in 76 (56%) of 134 illnesses with reliable bacteriology (26 viral infection, 29 bacterial infection, and 21 mixed viral bacterial infection). Mean procalcitonin levels were significantly higher in patients with pneumonia compared with AECOPD. However, discrimination between viral and bacterial infection using a 0.25 ng/mL threshold for bacterial infection in patients with AECOPD was poor. Conclusion Procalcitonin is useful in COPD patients for alerting clinicians to invasive bacterial infections such as pneumonia but it does not distinguish bacterial from viral and noninfectious causes of AECOPD. PMID:22399852

  1. All-transretinoic acid (ATRA) treatment-related pancarditis and severe pulmonary edema in a child with acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Işık, Pamir; Çetin, Ilker; Tavil, Betul; Azik, Fatih; Kara, Abdurrahman; Yarali, Nese; Tunc, Bahattin

    2010-11-01

    Use of all-transretinoic acid (ATRA) with other chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has been shown to cause the differentiation of abnormally granulated specific blast cells into mature granulocytes by acting on the t(15; 17) fusion gene product. The complete remission rate is increased and survival time is prolonged in APL patients who receive chemotherapy plus ATRA, whereas ATRA syndrome and other ATRA-related adverse effects including pseudo tumor cerebri, headache, severe bone pain, mucosal and skin dryness, hypercholesterolemia, and cheilitis may be observed especially during induction phase of the treatment. In this paper, we report a 9-year-old girl with APL who developed pancarditis while receiving the APL-93 treatment protocol. In our patient, endocarditis and myocarditis were initially determined after ATRA treatment during the induction part of the protocol. All findings disappeared after ATRA was discontinued. When ATRA was readministered in the maintenance part of the treatment protocol, she developed pancarditis and severe pulmonary edema. As her symptoms decreased dramatically with the discontinuation of ATRA and the initiation of steroid treatment, the clinical picture strongly suggested the ATRA treatment as the causative factor. To the best of our knowledge, this clinical picture of pancarditis secondary to ATRA treatment has not been reported earlier in the English literature. PMID:20881874

  2. Elevated levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in pulmonary edema fluid are associated with mortality in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Priya; Ware, Lorraine B; White, Kimberly E; Cross, Michael T; Matthay, Michael A; Olman, Mitchell A

    2003-07-01

    The alveolar fibrinolytic system is altered in acute lung injury (ALI). Levels of the fibrinolytic protease inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), are too low in bronchoalveolar lavage to address its prognostic significance. This study was performed to assess whether PAI-1 antigen in undiluted pulmonary edema fluid levels can identify patients with ALI and predict their outcome. PAI-1 antigen levels in both plasma and edema fluid were higher in ALI compared with hydrostatic edema, and edema fluid PAI-1 values identified those with ALI with high sensitivity and specificity. Both the high plasma and edema fluid PAI-1 antigen values were associated with a higher mortality rate and fewer days of unassisted ventilation in patients with ALI. Differences in PAI-1 activity were concordant with levels of PAI-1 antigen. Although the fibrin-derived alveolar D-dimer levels were strikingly similar in both groups, ALI patients had a higher relative proportion of D-monomer. In conclusion, PAI-1 levels in edema fluid and plasma identify those with ALI that have a poor prognosis. The data indicate that fibrin turnover in early ALI is a consequence of a rapid fibrinogen influx and fractional fibrinolytic inhibition.

  3. Pulmonary effects of acute and chronic antigen exposure of immunized guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Paré, P D; Michoud, M C; Boucher, R C; Hogg, J C

    1979-02-01

    Subdivisions of lung volume and pressure-volume (PV) curves of the lung and chest wall were measured in guinea pigs immunized to ovalbumin before and after acute (group 1) and chronic (group 2) antigen exposure. The histopathology produced in chronically exposed animals was also assessed. Animals were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium and studied in a pressure-sensitive body plethysmograph, using a fluid-filled esophageal catheter to measure transpulmonary pressure (PL). Functional residual capacity (FRC) was determined by the Boyle's law technique; total lung capacity (TLC) was defined as the lung volume at a PL of 30 cmH20, and residual volume (RV) was defined as the lung volume at a transrespiratory pressure of -50 cmH2O. Acute antigen challenge of group 1 animals resulted in a decrease in TLC (22%), and increases in FRC (20%) and RV (110%), suggesting combined bronchoconstriction and alveolar duct constriction. Chronic antigen exposure of group 2 animals resulted in minimal changes in subdivisions of lung volume and PV curves, and produced a histological lesion resembling allergic alveolitis rather than asthma. PMID:422452

  4. Fatal systemic adenoviral infection superimposed on pulmonary mucormycosis in a child with acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yu Mi; Hwang-Bo, Seok; Kim, Seong koo; Han, Seung Beom; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Kang, Jin Han

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Although adenovirus (ADV) infection usually causes self-limiting respiratory disorders in immune competent children; severe and systemic ADV infection in children undergoing chemotherapy for leukemia has been continuously reported. Nevertheless, there has been no consensus on risk factors and treatment strategies for severe ADV infection in children undergoing chemotherapy. Case summary: We report a case of a 15-year-old boy with a fatal systemic ADV infection. He had received reinduction chemotherapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia under continuing antifungal therapy for previously diagnosed fungal pneumonia. He complained of fever and right shoulder pain 4 days after completing the reinduction chemotherapy. In spite of appropriate antibiotic and antifungal therapy, pneumonia was aggravated and gross hematuria was accompanied. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction test for respiratory viruses was positive for ADV in a blood sample, and a urine culture was positive for ADV. He received oral ribavirin, intravenous immunoglobulin, and intravenous cidofovir therapy; however, he eventually died. Relapsed leukemia, concurrent fungal pneumonia, and delayed cidofovir administration were considered the cause of the grave outcome in this patient. Conclusion: ADV may cause severe infections not only in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients, but also in patients undergoing chemotherapy for acute leukemia. The risk factors for severe ADV infection in patients undergoing chemotherapy should be determined in the future studies, and early antiviral therapy should be administered to immune compromised patients with systemic ADV infection. PMID:27749571

  5. Pediatric Craniospinal Axis Irradiation With Helical Tomotherapy: Patient Outcome and Lack of Acute Pulmonary Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Penagaricano, Jose; Moros, Eduardo; Corry, Peter; Saylors, Robert; Ratanatharathorn, Vaneerat

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To present the patient outcomes and risk of symptomatic acute radiation pneumonitis (ARP) in 18 pediatric patients treated with helical tomotherapy to their craniospinal axis for a variety of neoplasms. Methods and Materials: A total of 18 patients received craniospinal axis irradiation with helical tomotherapy. The median age was 12 years (range, 2.5-21). The follow-up range was 3-48 months (median, 16.5). Of the 18 patients, 15 received chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, or concomitant setting. Chemotherapy was tailored to the particular histologic diagnosis; 10 of 18 patients underwent surgical removal of the gross primary tumor. The patients were followed and evaluated for ARP starting at 3-6 months after completion of craniospinal axis irradiation. ARP was graded using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3. Results: At the last follow-up visit, 14, 2, and 2 patients were alive without disease, alive with disease, and dead of disease, respectively. The cause-specific survival rate was 89% (16 of 18), disease-free survival rate was 78% (14 of 18), and overall survival rate was 89% (16 of 18). No patient had treatment failure at the cribriform plate. No patient developed symptoms of ARP. Conclusion: Craniospinal axis irradiation using helical tomotherapy yielded encouraging patient outcomes and acute toxicity profiles. Although large volumes of the lung received low radiation doses, no patient developed symptoms of ARP during the follow-up period.

  6. Matrikines are key regulators in modulating the amplitude of lung inflammation in acute pulmonary infection

    PubMed Central

    Akthar, Samia; Patel, Dhiren F.; Beale, Rebecca C.; Peiró, Teresa; Xu, Xin; Gaggar, Amit; Jackson, Patricia L.; Blalock, J. Edwin; Lloyd, Clare M.; Snelgrove, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive matrix fragments (matrikines) have been identified in a myriad of disorders, but their impact on the evolution of airway inflammation has not been demonstrated. We recently described a pathway where the matrikine and neutrophil chemoattractant proline–glycine–proline (PGP) could be degraded by the enzyme leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H). LTA4H classically functions in the generation of pro-inflammatory leukotriene B4, thus LTA4H exhibits opposing pro- and anti-inflammatory activities. The physiological significance of this secondary anti-inflammatory activity remains unknown. Here we show, using readily resolving pulmonary inflammation models, that loss of this secondary activity leads to more pronounced and sustained inflammation and illness owing to PGP accumulation. PGP elicits an exacerbated neutrophilic inflammation and protease imbalance that further degrades the extracellular matrix, generating fragments that perpetuate inflammation. This highlights a critical role for the secondary anti-inflammatory activity of LTA4H and thus has consequences for the generation of global LTA4H inhibitors currently being developed. PMID:26400771

  7. 17β-Estradiol mediates superior adaptation of right ventricular function to acute strenuous exercise in female rats with severe pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lahm, Tim; Frump, Andrea L; Albrecht, Marjorie E; Fisher, Amanda J; Cook, Todd G; Jones, Thomas J; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Whitson, Jordan; Fuchs, Robyn K; Liu, Aiping; Chesler, Naomi C; Brown, M Beth

    2016-08-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) exerts protective effects on right ventricular (RV) function in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Since acute exercise-induced increases in afterload may lead to RV dysfunction in PAH, we sought to determine whether E2 allows for superior RV adaptation after an acute exercise challenge. We studied echocardiographic, hemodynamic, structural, and biochemical markers of RV function in male and female rats with sugen/hypoxia (SuHx)-induced pulmonary hypertension, as well as in ovariectomized (OVX) SuHx females, with or without concomitant E2 repletion (75 μg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) immediately after 45 min of treadmill running at 75% of individually determined maximal aerobic capacity (75% aerobic capacity reserve). Compared with males, intact female rats exhibited higher stroke volume and cardiac indexes, a strong trend for better RV compliance, and less pronounced increases in indexed total pulmonary resistance. OVX abrogated favorable RV adaptations, whereas E2 repletion after OVX markedly improved RV function. E2's effects on pulmonary vascular remodeling were complex and less robust than its RV effects. Postexercise hemodynamics in females with endogenous or exogenous E2 were similar to hemodynamics in nonexercised controls, whereas OVX rats exhibited more severely altered postexercise hemodynamics. E2 mediated inhibitory effects on RV fibrosis and attenuated increases in RV collagen I/III ratio. Proapoptotic signaling, endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation, and autophagic flux markers were affected by E2 depletion and/or repletion. Markers of impaired autophagic flux correlated with endpoints of RV structure and function. Endogenous and exogenous E2 exerts protective effects on RV function measured immediately after an acute exercise challenge. Harnessing E2's mechanisms may lead to novel RV-directed therapies. PMID:27288487

  8. Mixed Pulmonary Infection with Penicillium notatum and Pneumocystis jiroveci in a Patient with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Shabnam; Hemmatian, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Penicillium notatum is a fungus that widely exists in the environment and is often non-pathogenic to humans. However, in immunocompromised hosts it may be recognized as a cause of systemic mycosis. A 44-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was admitted to our hospital with fever and neutropenia. Due to no improvement after initial treatment, he underwent bronchoscopy. The patient was found to have P. notatum and Pneumocystis jiroveci infection, and therefore was given voriconazole, primaquine and clindamycin. The patient was successfully treated and suffered no complications. Conclusion: This case highlights P. notatum as a cause of infection in immunocompromised patients. To the best of our knowledge, mixed lung infection with P. notatum and P. jiroveci in a patient with AML has not been previously reported. PMID:27403180

  9. Cardiac and mitochondrial dysfunction following acute pulmonary exposure to mountaintop removal mining particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Cody E; Shepherd, Danielle L; Knuckles, Travis L; Thapa, Dharendra; Stricker, Janelle C; Stapleton, Phoebe A; Minarchick, Valerie C; Erdely, Aaron; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Alway, Stephen E; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R; Hollander, John M

    2015-12-15

    Throughout the United States, air pollution correlates with adverse health outcomes, and cardiovascular disease incidence is commonly increased following environmental exposure. In areas surrounding active mountaintop removal mines (MTM), a further increase in cardiovascular morbidity is observed and may be attributed in part to particulate matter (PM) released from the mine. The mitochondrion has been shown to be central in the etiology of many cardiovascular diseases, yet its roles in PM-related cardiovascular effects are not realized. In this study, we sought to elucidate the cardiac processes that are disrupted following exposure to mountaintop removal mining particulate matter (PM MTM). To address this question, we exposed male Sprague-Dawley rats to PM MTM, collected within one mile of an active MTM site, using intratracheal instillation. Twenty-four hours following exposure, we evaluated cardiac function, apoptotic indices, and mitochondrial function. PM MTM exposure elicited a significant decrease in ejection fraction and fractional shortening compared with controls. Investigation into the cellular impacts of PM MTM exposure identified a significant increase in mitochondrial-induced apoptotic signaling, as reflected by an increase in TUNEL-positive nuclei and increased caspase-3 and -9 activities. Finally, a significant increase in mitochondrial transition pore opening leading to decreased mitochondrial function was identified following exposure. In conclusion, our data suggest that pulmonary exposure to PM MTM increases cardiac mitochondrial-associated apoptotic signaling and decreases mitochondrial function concomitant with decreased cardiac function. These results suggest that increased cardiovascular disease incidence in populations surrounding MTM mines may be associated with increased cardiac cell apoptotic signaling and decreased mitochondrial function.

  10. Successful Management of Intraoperative Acute Bilateral Pulmonary Embolism in a High Grade Astrocytoma Patient.

    PubMed

    Khraise, Wail N; Allouh, Mohammed Z; Hiasat, Mohammad Y; Said, Raed S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intraoperative pulmonary embolism (PE) is a rare life-threatening complication in patients undergoing surgical intervention. Generally, cancer patients have a higher risk for developing this complication. Unfortunately, there is no standard procedure for its management. CASE REPORT We report the case of a 39-year-old woman with high-grade glioma in the right frontal lobe who was admitted to the surgical theater for craniotomy and excision of the tumor. During the general anesthesia procedure and just before inserting the central venous line, her end-tidal CO2 and O2 saturation dropped sharply. The anesthesiologist quickly responded with an aggressive resuscitation procedure that included aspiration through the central venous line, 100% O2, and IV administration of ephedrine 6 mg, colloid 500 mL, normal saline 500 mL, and heparin 5000 IU. The patient was extubated and remained in the supine position until she regained consciousness and her vital signs returned to normal. Subsequent radiological examination revealed a massive bilateral PE. A retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter was inserted, and enoxaparin anticoagulant therapy was prescribed to stabilize the patient's condition. After 3 weeks, she underwent an uneventful craniotomy procedure and was discharged a week later under the enoxaparin therapy. CONCLUSIONS The successful management of intraoperative PE requires a quick, accurate diagnosis accompanied with an aggressive, fast response. Anesthesiologists are usually the ones who are held accountable for the diagnosis and early management of this complication. They must be aware of the possibility of such a complication and be ready to react properly and decisively in the operation theater. PMID:27578311

  11. Acute effects of 0. 2 ppm ozone in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Solic, J.J.; Hazucha, M.J.; Bromberg, P.A.

    1982-06-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) might be more sensitive than normal persons to the respiratory effects of oxidant pollutant exposure. Our study was designed to determine the response of patients with COPD to ozone. Thirteen white men with nonreversible airways obstruction (mean FEV1/FVC, 58%), of whom 8 were current smokers, were randomly exposed for 2 h to air and to 0.2 ppm ozone on 2 consecutive days using a single-blind crossover design. During either exposure, subjects exercised for 7.5 min every 30 min. Measures of respiratory mechanics obtained pre-exposure and postexposure were not significantly affected by either exposure. Similarly, ventilation and gas exchange measured during exercise showed no difference either between exercise periods or exposure days. However, arterial O/sub 2/ saturation (SaO/sub 2/), measured by ear oximetry during the final exercise period each day was lower (94.8%) at the end of O/sub 2/ exposure, than SaO/sub 2/ obtained at the end of air exposure (95.3%), the difference (0.48%) being significant (p . 0.008). Because normal subjects undergoing comparable exposures show a threshold for respiratory mechanical effects at about 0.3 ppm ozone, our data suggest that mild to moderate COPD is not associated with increased sensitivity to low ozone concentrations. However, our data do not rule out the possibility that the response of such subjects might be exaggerated at higher ozone concentrations. The consistent (in 11 of 13 subjects), though small, decrease in SaO/sub 2/ may indicate that indexes of ventilation/perfusion distribution might be more sensitive measures of ozone effect in this compromised patient group than are conventional respiratory mechanics measures.

  12. Cell- and isoform-specific increases in arginase expression in acute silica-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Poljakovic, Mirjana; Porter, Dale W; Millecchia, Lyndell; Kepka-Lenhart, Diane; Beighley, Christopher; Wolfarth, Michael G; Castranova, Vincent; Morris, Sidney M

    2007-01-15

    Arginase induction was reported in several inflammatory lung diseases, suggesting that this may be a common feature underlying the pathophysiology of such diseases. As little is known regarding arginase expression in silicosis, the induction and cellular localization of arginase were elucidated in lungs of Sprague-Dawley rats 24 h following exposure to varying doses of silica by intratracheal instillation. Arginase expression was evaluated by activity assay, quantification of arginase I and arginase II mRNA levels using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and immunohistochemistry. Analyses of cells and fluid obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) showed that markers of pulmonary inflammation, tissue damage, activation of alveolar macrophages (AM) and NO production were significantly increased by all silica doses. Arginase activity was increased also in AMs isolated from BAL fluid of silica-treated rats. Silica produced two- and three-fold increases in arginase activity of whole lung at doses of 1 and 5 mg/100 g body weight, respectively. Levels of arginase I mRNA, but not of arginase II mRNA, were similarly elevated. In control lungs, arginase I immunoreactivity was observed only in AMs sparsely dispersed throughout the lung; no inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) immunoreactivity was detected. In silica-treated lungs, arginase I and iNOS were co-expressed in most AMs that were abundantly clustered at inflammatory foci. The rapid induction of arginase I expression in inflammatory lung cells, similar to induction of arginase in other inflammatory lung diseases, implicates elevated arginase activity as a factor in the development of lung damage following exposure to silica. PMID:17365572

  13. Cell- and Isoform-specific Increases in Arginase Expression in Acute Silica-induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Poljakovic, Mirjana; Porter, Dale W.; Millecchia, Lyndell; Kepka-Lenhart, Diane; Beighley, Christopher; Wolfarth, Michael G.; Castranova, Vincent; Morris, Sidney M.

    2009-01-01

    Arginase induction was reported in several inflammatory lung diseases, suggesting that this may be a common feature underlying the pathophysiology of such diseases. As little is known regarding arginase expression in silicosis, the induction and cellular localization of arginase was elucidated in lungs of Sprague-Dawley rats 24 hr following exposure to varying doses of silica by intratracheal instillation. Arginase expression was evaluated by activity assay, quantification of arginase I and arginase II mRNA levels using real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Analyses of cells and fluid obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) showed that markers of pulmonary inflammation, tissue damage, activation of alveolar macrophages (AM) and NO production were significantly increased by all silica doses. Arginase activity was increased also in AMs isolated from BAL fluid of silica-treated rats. Silica produced 2- and 3-fold increases in arginase activity of whole lung at doses of 1 and 5 mg/100g body weight, respectively. Levels of arginase I mRNA, but not of arginase II mRNA, were similarly elevated. In control lungs, arginase I immunoreactivity was observed only in AMs sparsely dispersed throughout the lung; no iNOS immunoreactivity was detected. In silica-treated lungs, arginase I and iNOS were co-expressed in most AMs that were abundantly clustered at inflammatory foci. The rapid induction of arginase I expression in inflammatory lung cells, similar to induction of arginase in other inflammatory lung diseases, implicates elevated arginase activity as a factor in the development of lung damage following exposure to silica. PMID:17365572

  14. Effect of acute food restriction on pulmonary growth and protein turnover in preterm guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Kelly, F J; Fussell, J C; Postle, T D

    1992-02-01

    The effects of food restriction on the growth and protein turnover of the immature lung were investigated. Preterm guinea pigs, delivered by cesarean section at 65 days gestation (term = 68 days), were given free access to a lactating dam or restricted from feeding for 48 h. Food restriction resulted in significantly reduced body and lung (P less than 0.05) weight compared with fed controls. The rate of pulmonary protein synthesis determined in vivo was reduced by 33% in the food-restricted pups (28.9 +/- 10.2 vs. 19.4 +/- 4.5%, P less than 0.05 for control and food-restricted pups, respectively), whereas the calculated rate of protein breakdown remained unchanged. The inhibition of protein synthesis was accounted for by a 36% decrease in ribosomal efficiency (11.03 +/- 2.61 vs. 7.04 +/- 1.26%, P less than 0.01 for control and food-restricted pups, respectively), whereas ribosomal capacity was unaltered. Polyribosomal analysis indicated an increase in the proportion of RNA present in polysomes and a fall in the free monomer pool (26%), suggesting that food restriction blocked translation by reducing the rate of peptide chain elongation. This finding was confirmed by the analysis of ribosome transit times, which indicated a significant increase in the elongation rate in the lungs from food-restricted pups (0.51 +/- 0.11 vs. 0.94 +/- 0.19 min, P less than 0.05 for control and food-restricted pups, respectively). These results imply that nutrient supply plays an important role in protein deposition and hence growth and repair capacity of the immature lung. PMID:1539652

  15. Acute toxicity of lead particulates on pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Ultrastructural and microanalytical studies

    SciTech Connect

    deVries, C.R.; Ingram, P.; Walker, S.R.; Linton, R.W.; Gutknecht, W.F.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Although it is well established that respiratory uptake of lead-containing particles plays a substantial role in the epidemiology of plumbism, relatively little is known about the role of the pulmonary alveolar macrophage in lead poisoning. An in vitro system was designed to investigate the effects of lead oxide particles of respirable size on the rabbit alveolar macrophage. The studies were concerned with the intracellular solubility of PbO and Pb/sub 3/O/sub 4/ and changes in fine structure attributable to lead toxicity. The distribution of phagocytosed lead and its intracellular reprecipitation complexes was established by electron microprobe analysis and secondary ion mass spectroscopy in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and backscatter imaging. It was found that Pb/sub 3/O/sub 4/, PbO and PbO-coated particles were ingested by the rabbit alveolar macrophages and that each of these lead oxide compounds produced similar damage to the fine structure of the cell. Swelling of the mitochondria, nuclear membrane, and endoplasmic reticulum was common, as well as were characteristic reprecipitation complexes of lead, phosphorous, and calcium within the nuclear heterochromatin and cytoplasm of the cell. The precipitation complexes were not seen in cells incubated with the particles if phagocytosis was blocked by 0.22-microns, membrane filters. It was concluded that phagocytosis of these lead oxide particles was necessary to produce the cytopathic changes. It is suggested that solubilization of lead from the ingested particles in phagosomes of macrophages results in the liberation of intracellular lead with the resultant formation of reprecipitation complexes.

  16. Fibrinolysis for Acute Care of Pulmonary Embolism in the Intermediate Risk Patient.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Guy; Planquette, Benjamin; Sanchez, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    Controversy over the role of fibrinolysis in patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism (PE) has persisted because of the lack of adequately sized trials. The PEITHO study now allows a more precise estimate of the risk to benefit ratio of fibrinolysis in these patients. This trial enrolled patients with intermediate-risk PE who were randomized to receive heparin with either tenecteplase or placebo. Fibrinolysis was associated with a significant reduction in the combined end-point of death or hemodynamic decompensation, but also with a significant increase in the risk of major bleeding. The primary efficacy end-point occurred in 2.6 % of the patients in the tenecteplase group and in 5.6 % of the patients in the placebo group (OR, 0.44; 95 % CI, 0.23 to 0.87), conversely, major extracranial bleeding occurred in 6.3 % and 1.2 % in the tenecteplase and placebo groups, respectively (OR, 5.55; 95 % CI, 2.3 to 13.39) and stroke occurred in 2.4 % and in 0.2 % of the patients in the tenecteplase group and in the placebo group, respectively (OR, 12.10; 95 % CI, 1.57 to 93.39). No difference was observed for the risk of death alone and the risk of full-dose thrombolytic therapy outweighs its benefit in patients with intermediate-risk PE. Recent meta-analyses suggest that fibrinolysis may be associated with a slight reduction in overall mortality offset by an increase in major bleeding. Two pilot studies suggest that a reduced dose of fibrinolysis may produce significant hemodynamic improvement with a low risk of major bleeding. These options need to be evaluated in larger studies including patients with a higher risk of adverse outcome than those included in the PEITHO study.

  17. Acute effects of oxygen administration on transmural pulmonary artery pressure in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Marrone, O; Bellia, V; Pieri, D; Salvaggio, A; Bonsignore, G

    1992-04-01

    In order to investigate the role of hypoxia on the cyclic oscillation of transmural pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) in obstructive sleep apnea, oxygen was administered during one half of the night to six patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome during a nocturnal polysomnographic study. In each patient, transmural PAP measurements were performed on 15 randomly selected apneas recorded while breathing room air, and on 15 during O2 administration. During O2 administration in all patients, apneas were associated with a higher oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2), a smaller SaO2 swing, and a higher transcutaneous PCO2. The mean highest level of transmural PAP in the apneic episodes, commonly reached at their end, was significantly lower than while breathing room air in only two patients; however, due to a decrease in the mean lowest PAP level (at the beginning of apneas), the extent of the PAP increase within apneas did not differ between air and O2 breathing; these patients showed the smallest increase in transcutaneous PCO2 in our sample. End-apneic transmural PAP during O2 administration was significantly higher in one subject (for systolic values) and was not significantly different in the remaining three subjects. The extent of the increase in transmural PAP within apneas was greater in one patient; it was smaller in another one, but only for the diastolic values; and it did not differ significantly with respect to the value observed while breathing room air in all of the other subjects. The results suggest that hypoxia in obstructive apneas, at least in some patients, may lead to a steady increase in PAP, detectable both at the beginning and at the end of the episodes; conversely, the increase in PAP within apneas does not seem to be influenced by the simultaneous decrease in SaO2. PMID:1555416

  18. Ambient air pollution particles and the acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Sint, Thaw; Donohue, James F; Ghio, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    Investigation has repeatedly demonstrated an association between exposure to ambient air pollution particles and numerous indices of human morbidity and mortality. Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are among those with an increased sensitivity to air pollution particles. Current and ex-smokers account for 80 to 85% of all those with COPD. The human breathing in an urban site with a significant level of particulate matter (PM) may be exposed to 720 microg daily. A single cigarette introduces 15,000 to 40,000 microg particle into the respiratory tract of the smoker. It is subsequently confounding why such a relatively small mass of airborne PM should have any biological effect in the patient with COPD, as these individuals are repeatedly exposed to particles (with a similar size and composition) at perhaps a thousandfold the mass of ambient PM. Regarding this increased sensitivity of COPD patients to air pollution particles, there are several possible explanations for this seeming contradiction, including correlations of PM levels with other components of air pollution, an accumulation of multiple independent risk factors in a patient, changes in individual activity patterns, disparities in dosimetry between healthy subjects and COPD patients, and some unique characteristic of an ambient air pollution PM. Regardless of the underlying mechanism for the increased sensitivity of COPD patients, exposures of these individuals to elevated levels of PM should be discouraged. To provide a greater awareness of PM levels, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency now includes levels of air pollution particles in an air quality index.

  19. Changes in cholesterol homeostasis and acute phase response link pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes to risk of cardiovascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, Sarah S.; Saber, Anne T.; Mortensen, Alicja; Szarek, Józef; Wu, Dongmei; Williams, Andrew; Andersen, Ole; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Yauk, Carole L.; Wallin, Håkan; Halappanavar, Sabina; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-03-15

    Adverse lung effects following pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are well documented in rodents. However, systemic effects are less understood. Epidemiological studies have shown increased cardiovascular disease risk after pulmonary exposure to airborne particles, which has led to concerns that inhalation exposure to MWCNTs might pose similar risks. We analyzed parameters related to cardiovascular disease, including plasma acute phase response (APR) proteins and plasma lipids, in female C57BL/6 mice exposed to a single intratracheal instillation of 0, 18, 54 or 162 μg/mouse of small, entangled (CNT{sub Small}, 0.8 ± 0.1 μm long) or large, thick MWCNTs (CNT{sub Large}, 4 ± 0.4 μm long). Liver tissues and plasma were harvested 1, 3 and 28 days post-exposure. In addition, global hepatic gene expression, hepatic cholesterol content and liver histology were used to assess hepatic effects. The two MWCNTs induced similar systemic responses despite their different physicochemical properties. APR proteins SAA3 and haptoglobin, plasma total cholesterol and low-density/very low-density lipoprotein were significantly increased following exposure to either MWCNTs. Plasma SAA3 levels correlated strongly with pulmonary Saa3 levels. Analysis of global gene expression revealed perturbation of the same biological processes and pathways in liver, including the HMG-CoA reductase pathway. Both MWCNTs induced similar histological hepatic changes, with a tendency towards greater response following CNT{sub Large} exposure. Overall, we show that pulmonary exposure to two different MWCNTs induces similar systemic and hepatic responses, including changes in plasma APR, lipid composition, hepatic gene expression and liver morphology. The results link pulmonary exposure to MWCNTs with risk of cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: • Systemic and hepatic alterations were evaluated in female mice following MWCNT instillation. • Despite being physicochemically

  20. Regional pulmonary inflammation in an endotoxemic ovine acute lung injury model.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Bustamante, A; Easley, R B; Fuld, M; Mulreany, D; Chon, D; Lewis, J F; Simon, B A

    2012-08-15

    The regional distribution of inflammation during acute lung injury (ALI) is not well known. In an ovine ALI model we studied regional alveolar inflammation, surfactant composition, and CT-derived regional specific volume change (sVol) and specific compliance (sC). 18 ventilated adult sheep received IV lipopolysaccharide (LPS) until severe ALI was achieved. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from apical and basal lung regions were obtained at baseline and injury time points, for analysis of cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β), BAL protein and surfactant composition. Whole lung CT images were obtained in 4 additional sheep. BAL protein and IL-1β were significantly higher in injured apical vs. basal regions. No significant regional surfactant composition changes were observed. Baseline sVol and sC were lower in apex vs. base; ALI enhanced this cranio-caudal difference, reaching statistical significance only for sC. This study suggests that apical lung regions show greater inflammation than basal ones during IV LPS-induced ALI which may relate to differences in regional mechanical events.

  1. Protective effect of pilin protein with alum+naloxone adjuvant against acute pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    PubMed

    Banadkoki, Abbas Zare; Keshavarzmehr, Morteza; Afshar, Zahra; Aleyasin, Neda; Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; Behrouz, Bahador; Hashemi, Farhad B

    2016-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic human pathogen that causes a wide variety of severe nosocomial infections. Type IV pili of P. aeruginosa are made up of polymerized pilin that aids in bacterial adhesion, biofilm formation and twitching motility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of alum and naloxone (alum+NLX) as an adjuvant for P. aeruginosa recombinant PilA (r-PilA) as a vaccine candidate in the improvement of humoral and cellular immunity. Primary immunization with r-PilA in combination with alum+NLX followed by two booster shots was sufficient to generate robust cellular and humoral responses, which were Th1 and Th2 type responses consisting of IgG1 and IgG2a subtypes. Analysis of the cytokine response among immunized mice showed an increased production of IL-4, INF-γ and IL-17 by splenocytes upon stimulation by r-PilA. These sera were also able to reduce bacterial load in the lung tissue of challenged mice. The reduction of systemic bacterial spread resulted in increased survival rates in challenged immunized mice. In conclusion, immunization with r-PilA combined with alum+NLX evokes cellular and humoral immune responses, which play an important role in providing protection against acute P. aeruginosa lung infection among immunized mice. PMID:27427517

  2. Acute hemoptysis and pulmonary hemorrhage after judo as presentation of intralobar sequestration.

    PubMed

    Kleffner, Tim; Holzer, Matthias; Hülskamp, Georg; Feindt, Peter; Groetzner, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Intralobar sequestration (ILS) is a rare anomaly that is usually diagnosed with symptoms of cough, expectoration, or recurrent pneumonia in children. We experienced a case of an 11-year-old boy with massive hemoptysis after judo sports. He was admitted to hospital and intubated due to respiratory failure. His chest computed tomography (CT) scan which was performed without contrast agent revealed a large intrapulmonary hematoma or tumor, mimicking traumatic hemothorax. Due to blood loss and circulatory instability, emergency thoracotomy was performed and a massive intralobar hemorrhage due to a ruptured ILS artery was found. After lobectomy including resection of the ILS, the patient was stabilized and extubated. Aspergillus was detected in the resected lobe and postoperatively acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and invasive aspergillosis occurred and was treated specifically. However, the young patient was discharged home 3 weeks later. In young patients with hemoptysis and intrapulmonary hemorrhage after trauma, the possibility of ruptured ILS should be kept in mind. This report shows that ILS can have a dramatic course of disease, and for this reason a nonurgent resection should be considered in all patients when this diagnosis is made. PMID:22535674

  3. [An outbreak of acute pulmonary histoplasmosis among travelers to a bat-inhabited cave in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Suzaki, A; Kimura, M; Kimura, S; Shimada, K; Miyaji, M; Kaufman, L

    1995-04-01

    Histoplasmosis is known to be endemic in various parts of the world, especially in North and Latin America. In Japan, Histoplasma capsulatum has rarely been isolated from the natural environment. To date, only seven cases of histoplasmosis have been reported in Japan including some that were contracted in foreign countries. Herein, we report the occurrence of acute histoplasmosis among Japanese travelers who were exposed to bat guano in a cave near Manaus, Brazil. A group of 8 Japanese travelers entered a cave for a total of 2 hours in March, 1993. All the visitors had been healthy and had no history of abnormal chest roentgenograms. From 10 to 20 days after the exposure, 7 (87.5%) of the 8 individuals developed abnormal symptoms including fever, malaise, loss of appetite, myalgia, arthralgia, chest pain and dry cough. Five (62.5%) had nodular infiltrative shadows with or without hilar lymphadenopathy in the chest roentgenograms. Eight (100%) of the individuals showed serologic evidence of histoplasmosis. Despite the small number of subjects, this high rate of infection may be related to the fact that the subjects stayed in an enclosed area where air exchange was minimal, at the end of a deep cave infested with numerous bats. The cave involved has never been documented as being endemic for histoplasmosis. The threat of H. capsulatum infection in bat-inhabited caves should be emphasized to travelers and also to physicians. PMID:7751754

  4. Role of ppGpp in Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute pulmonary infection and virulence regulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohui; Yu, Hua; Zhang, Di; Xiong, Junzhi; Qiu, Jing; Xin, Rong; He, Xiaomei; Sheng, Halei; Cai, Wenqiang; Jiang, Lu; Zhang, Kebin; Hu, Xiaomei

    2016-11-01

    During infection, bacteria might generate adaptive responses to facilitate their survival and colonization in the host environment. The alarmone guanosine 5'-triphosphate-3'-diphosphate (ppGpp), the levels of which are regulated by the RelA and SpoT enzymes, plays a critical role in mediating bacterial adaptive responses and virulence. However, the mechanism by which ppGpp regulates virulence-associated traits in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is poorly understood. To investigate the regulatory role of ppGpp, the ppGpp-deficient strain ΔRS (relA and spoT gene double mutant) and the complemented strain ΔRS(++) (complemented with relA and spoT genes) were constructed. Herein, we reported that the ΔRS strain showed decreased cytotoxicity towards A549 human alveolar adenocarcinoma cell lines and led to reduced mortality, lung edema and inflammatory cell infiltration in a mouse model of acute pneumonia compared to wild-type PAO1 and the complemented strain ΔRS(++). Subsequent analyses demonstrated that the ΔRS strain displayed reduced T3SS expression, decreased levels of elastase activity, pyocyanin, pyoverdin and alginate, and inhibited swarming and biofilm formation compared to PAO1 and the complemented strain ΔRS(++). In addition, the results demonstrate that ppGpp-mediated regulation of T3SS, virulence factor production, and swarming occurs in a quinolone quorum-sensing system-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that ppGpp is required for virulence regulation in P. aeruginosa, providing new clues for the development of interference strategies against bacterial infection. PMID:27664726

  5. Role of ppGpp in Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute pulmonary infection and virulence regulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohui; Yu, Hua; Zhang, Di; Xiong, Junzhi; Qiu, Jing; Xin, Rong; He, Xiaomei; Sheng, Halei; Cai, Wenqiang; Jiang, Lu; Zhang, Kebin; Hu, Xiaomei

    2016-11-01

    During infection, bacteria might generate adaptive responses to facilitate their survival and colonization in the host environment. The alarmone guanosine 5'-triphosphate-3'-diphosphate (ppGpp), the levels of which are regulated by the RelA and SpoT enzymes, plays a critical role in mediating bacterial adaptive responses and virulence. However, the mechanism by which ppGpp regulates virulence-associated traits in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is poorly understood. To investigate the regulatory role of ppGpp, the ppGpp-deficient strain ΔRS (relA and spoT gene double mutant) and the complemented strain ΔRS(++) (complemented with relA and spoT genes) were constructed. Herein, we reported that the ΔRS strain showed decreased cytotoxicity towards A549 human alveolar adenocarcinoma cell lines and led to reduced mortality, lung edema and inflammatory cell infiltration in a mouse model of acute pneumonia compared to wild-type PAO1 and the complemented strain ΔRS(++). Subsequent analyses demonstrated that the ΔRS strain displayed reduced T3SS expression, decreased levels of elastase activity, pyocyanin, pyoverdin and alginate, and inhibited swarming and biofilm formation compared to PAO1 and the complemented strain ΔRS(++). In addition, the results demonstrate that ppGpp-mediated regulation of T3SS, virulence factor production, and swarming occurs in a quinolone quorum-sensing system-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that ppGpp is required for virulence regulation in P. aeruginosa, providing new clues for the development of interference strategies against bacterial infection.

  6. Prevalence and Prognostic Significance of Hyponatremia in Patients with Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Data from the Akershus Cardiac Examination (ACE) 2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Brynildsen, Jon; Høiseth, Arne Didrik; Følling, Ivar; Brekke, Pål H.; Christensen, Geir; Hagve, Tor-Arne; Verbalis, Joseph G.; Omland, Torbjørn; Røsjø, Helge

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia is prevalent and associated with mortality in patients with heart failure (HF). The prevalence and prognostic implications of hyponatremia in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary (AECOPD) have not been established. Method We included 313 unselected patients with acute dyspnea who were categorized by etiology of dyspnea according to established guidelines (derivation cohort). Serum Na+ was determined on hospital admission and corrected for hyperglycemia, and hyponatremia was defined as [Na+]<137 mmol/L. Survival was ascertained after a median follow-up of 816 days and outcome was analyzed in acute HF (n = 143) and AECOPD (n = 83) separately. Results were confirmed in an independent AECOPD validation cohort (n = 99). Results In the derivation cohort, median serum Na+ was lower in AECOPD vs. acute HF (138.5 [135.9–140.5] vs. 139.2 [136.7–141.3] mmol/L, p = 0.02), while prevalence of hyponatremia (27% [22/83] vs. 20% [29/143], p = 0.28) and mortality rate (42% [35/83] vs. 46% [66/143], p = 0.56) were similar. By univariate Cox regression analysis, hyponatremia was associated with increased mortality in acute HF (HR 1.85 [95% CI 1.08, 3.16], p = 0.02), but not in AECOPD (HR 1.00 [0.47, 2.15], p = 1.00). Analogous to the results of the derivation cohort, hyponatremia was prevalent also in the AECOPD validation cohort (25% [25/99]), but not associated with mortality. The diverging effect of hyponatremia on outcome between AECOPD and acute HF was statistically significant (p = 0.04). Conclusion Hyponatremia is prevalent in patients with acute HF and AECOPD, but is associated with mortality in patients with acute HF only. PMID:27529844

  7. Acute respiratory changes and pulmonary inflammation involving a pathway of TGF-β1 induction in a rat model of chlorine-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wigenstam, Elisabeth; Elfsmark, Linda; Koch, Bo; Bucht, Anders; Jonasson, Sofia

    2016-10-15

    We investigated acute and delayed respiratory changes after inhalation exposure to chlorine (Cl2) with the aim to understand the pathogenesis of the long-term sequelae of Cl2-induced lung-injury. In a rat model of nose-only exposure we analyzed changes in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammatory responses in airways, expression of pro-inflammatory markers and development of lung fibrosis during a time-course from 5h up to 90days after a single inhalation of Cl2. A single dose of dexamethasone (10mg/kg) was administered 1h following Cl2-exposure. A 15-min inhalation of 200ppm Cl2 was non-lethal in Sprague-Dawley rats. At 24h post exposure, Cl2-exposed rats displayed elevated numbers of leukocytes with an increase of neutrophils and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and edema was shown both in lung tissue and the heart. At 24h, the inflammasome-associated cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 were detected in BAL. Concomitant with the acute inflammation a significant AHR was detected. At the later time-points, a delayed inflammatory response was observed together with signs of lung fibrosis as indicated by increased pulmonary macrophages, elevated TGF-β expression in BAL and collagen deposition around airways. Dexamethasone reduced the numbers of neutrophils in BAL at 24h but did not influence the AHR. Inhalation of Cl2 in rats leads to acute respiratory and cardiac changes as well as pulmonary inflammation involving induction of TGF-β1. The acute inflammatory response was followed by sustained macrophage response and lack of tissue repair. It was also found that pathways apart from the acute inflammatory response contribute to the Cl2-induced respiratory dysfunction. PMID:27586366

  8. Age-related differences in pulmonary effects of acute and subchronic episodic ozone exposures in Brown Norway rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone (O3) is known to induce adverse pulmonary and systemic health effects. Importantly, children and older persons are considered at-risk populations for O3-induced dysfunction, yet the mechanisms accounting for the age-related pulmonary responses to O3 are uncertain. In this s...

  9. Changes in cholesterol homeostasis and acute phase response link pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes to risk of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Sarah S; Saber, Anne T; Mortensen, Alicja; Szarek, Józef; Wu, Dongmei; Williams, Andrew; Andersen, Ole; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Yauk, Carole L; Wallin, Håkan; Halappanavar, Sabina; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-03-15

    Adverse lung effects following pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are well documented in rodents. However, systemic effects are less understood. Epidemiological studies have shown increased cardiovascular disease risk after pulmonary exposure to airborne particles, which has led to concerns that inhalation exposure to MWCNTs might pose similar risks. We analyzed parameters related to cardiovascular disease, including plasma acute phase response (APR) proteins and plasma lipids, in female C57BL/6 mice exposed to a single intratracheal instillation of 0, 18, 54 or 162μg/mouse of small, entangled (CNTSmall, 0.8±0.1μm long) or large, thick MWCNTs (CNTLarge, 4±0.4μm long). Liver tissues and plasma were harvested 1, 3 and 28days post-exposure. In addition, global hepatic gene expression, hepatic cholesterol content and liver histology were used to assess hepatic effects. The two MWCNTs induced similar systemic responses despite their different physicochemical properties. APR proteins SAA3 and haptoglobin, plasma total cholesterol and low-density/very low-density lipoprotein were significantly increased following exposure to either MWCNTs. Plasma SAA3 levels correlated strongly with pulmonary Saa3 levels. Analysis of global gene expression revealed perturbation of the same biological processes and pathways in liver, including the HMG-CoA reductase pathway. Both MWCNTs induced similar histological hepatic changes, with a tendency towards greater response following CNTLarge exposure. Overall, we show that pulmonary exposure to two different MWCNTs induces similar systemic and hepatic responses, including changes in plasma APR, lipid composition, hepatic gene expression and liver morphology. The results link pulmonary exposure to MWCNTs with risk of cardiovascular disease.

  10. A Rare Occurrence of Simultaneous Venous and Arterial Thromboembolic Events – Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Thromboembolism as Initial Presentation in Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kutiyal, Aditya S.; Dharmshaktu, Pramila; Kataria, Babita; Garg, Abhilasha

    2016-01-01

    The development of acute myeloid leukemia has been attributed to various factors, including hereditary, radiation, drugs, and certain occupational exposures. The association between malignancy and venous thromboembolism events is well established. Here, we present a case of a 70-year-old Indian man who had presented with arterial and venous thrombosis, and the patient was later diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In our case, the patient presented with right lower limb deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism four months prior to the diagnosis of APL. Although thromboembolic event subsequent to the diagnosis of malignancy, and especially during the chemotherapy has been widely reported, this prior presentation with simultaneous occurrence of both venous and arterial thromboembolism has rarely been reported. We take this opportunity to state the significance of a complete medical evaluation in cases of recurrent or unusual thrombotic events. PMID:26949347

  11. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients with acute spinal cord injury: a comparison with nonparalyzed patients immobilized due to spinal fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, P.; Kammonen, M.; Rokkanen, P.; Boestman, O.L.; Lalla, M.; Laasonen, E.

    1985-06-01

    The occurrence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was studied in the series of 23 consecutive patients with acute spinal cord injury and 14 immobilized patients with spinal fractures without paralysis. The incidence of DVT in paralyzed patients was 100% as detected by the /sup 125/I-labeled fibrinogen test and confirmed by contrast venography, and 64% as detected by repeated clinical examinations and confirmed by contrast venography. The respective incidence of DVT in nonparalyzed patients with spinal fractures was 0%. The diagnosis of DVT was reached earlier with the radiofibrinogen test than with the clinical followup (5 days vs. 25 days). Two of the 23 paralyzed patients (9%) developed nonfatal clinical pulmonary embolism (PE). There were no differences in the values of routine coagulation tests. The result justifies prophylactic anticoagulant therapy in all cases of spinal cord injury during the acute post-traumatic phase.

  12. [Successful management of sigmoidectomy with sildenafil citrate in a patient with acute exacerbation of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Mita, Norikatsu; Takahashi, Toshikazu; Kuroda, Masataka; Kagaya, Shin; Miyoshi, Sohtaro; Okada, Takayoshi

    2013-10-01

    An 84-year-old woman with pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to chronic pulmonary thromboembolism suffered from continuous warfarin dependent bleeding from sigmoid colon cancer. Sigmoidectomy was scheduled to control continuous bleeding. Six hours after discontinuation of anticoagulant therapy for elective sigmoidectomy, the patient showed hypoxia, pulmonary thromboembolism and pulmonary hypertension with right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) of 81 mmHg. The operation was postponed and heparin was infused. Since two-day heparinization therapy did not improve PH, oral administration of sildenafil citrate 60 mg daily was initiated. Seven days after initiation of sildenafil administration, RVSP decreased to 49 mmHg without improvement of hypoxia. Sigmoidectomy was performed under general anesthesia. The patient showed severe hypotension managed with noradrenaline and dopamine infusion during and after surgery, resulting from interaction between sildenafil and vasodilators. The patient was discharged 36 days after the operation without complications. PMID:24228461

  13. Pulmonary embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnick, N.R.; Newman, G.E.; Perlmutt, L.M.; Braun, S.D.

    1988-11-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common medical problem whose incidence is likely to increase in our aging population. Although it is life-threatening, effective therapy exists. The treatment is not, however, without significant complications. Thus, accurate diagnosis is important. Unfortunately, the clinical manifestations of pulmonary embolism are nonspecific. Furthermore, in many patients the symptoms of an acute embolism are superimposed on underlying chronic heart or lung disease. Thus, a high index of suspicion is needed to identify pulmonary emboli. Laboratory parameters, including arterial oxygen tensions and electrocardiography, are as nonspecific as the clinical signs. They may be more useful in excluding another process than in diagnosing pulmonary embolism. The first radiologic examination is the chest radiograph, but the clinical symptoms are frequently out of proportion to the findings on the chest films. Classic manifestations of pulmonary embolism on the chest radiograph include a wedge-shaped peripheral opacity and a segmental or lobar diminution in vascularity with prominent central arteries. However, these findings are not commonly seen and, even when present, are not specific. Even less specific findings include cardiomegaly, pulmonary infiltrate, elevation of a hemidiaphragm, and pleural effusion. Many patients with pulmonary embolism may have a normal chest radiograph. The chest radiograph is essential, however, for two purposes. First, it may identify another cause of the patient's symptoms, such as a rib fracture, dissecting aortic aneurysm, or pneumothorax. Second, a chest radiograph is essential to interpretation of the radionuclide V/Q scan. The perfusion scan accurately reflects the perfusion of the lung. However, a perfusion defect may result from a variety of etiologies. Any process such as vascular stenosis or compression by tumor may restrict blood flow. 84 references.

  14. Pulmonary Response to Surface-Coated Nanotitanium Dioxide Particles Includes Induction of Acute Phase Response Genes, Inflammatory Cascades, and Changes in MicroRNAs: A Toxicogenomic Study

    PubMed Central

    Halappanavar, Sabina; Jackson, Petra; Williams, Andrew; Jensen, Keld A; Hougaard, Karin S; Vogel, Ulla; Yauk, Carole L; Wallin, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nanoTiO2) are used in various applications including in paints. NanoTiO2 inhalation may induce pulmonary toxicity and systemic effects. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, the effects of inhaled surface-coated nanoTiO2 on pulmonary global messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) expression in mouse were characterized to provide insight into the molecular response. Female C57BL/6BomTac mice were exposed for 1 hr daily to 42.4 ± 2.9 (SEM) mg surface-coated nanoTiO2/m3 for 11 consecutive days by inhalation and were sacrificed 5 days following the last exposure. Physicochemical properties of the particles were determined. Pulmonary response to nanoTiO2 was characterized using DNA microarrays and pathway-specific PCR arrays and related to data on pulmonary inflammation from bronchial lavages. NanoTiO2 exposure resulted in increased levels of mRNA for acute phase markers serum amyloid A-1 (Saa1) and serum amyloid A-3 (Saa3), several C-X-C and C-C motif chemokines, and cytokine tumor necrosis factor genes. Protein analysis of Saa1 and 3 showed selective upregulation of Saa3 in lung tissues. Sixteen miRNAs were induced by more than 1.2-fold (adjusted P-value < 0.05) following exposure. Real time polymerase chain reaction confirmed the upregulation of miR-1, miR-449a and revealed dramatic induction of miR-135b (60-fold). Thus, inhalation of surface-coated nanoTiO2 results in changes in the expression of genes associated with acute phase, inflammation and immune response 5 days post exposure with concomitant changes in several miRNAs. The role of these miRNAs in pulmonary response to inhaled particles is unknown and warrants further research. Environ. Mol. Mutagen., 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.† PMID:21259345

  15. Impact of catheter fragmentation followed by local intrapulmonary thrombolysis in acute high risk pulmonary embolism as primary therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Bishav; Aslam, Naved; Kumar Mehra, Anil; Takkar Chhabra, Shibba; Wander, Praneet; Tandon, Rohit; Singh Wander, Gurpreet

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary embolism (PE) with more than 50% compromise of pulmonary circulation results significant right ventricular (RV) afterload leading to progressive RV failure, systemic hypotension and shock. Prompt restoration of thrombolysis, surgical embolectomy, or percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) prevents progressive hemodynamic decline. We report our single center experience in high risk PE patients treated with standard pigtail catheter mechanical fragmentation followed by intrapulmonary thrombolysis as a primary therapy. Methods 50 consecutive patients with diagnosis of high risk PE defined as having shock index >1 with angiographic evidence of >50% pulmonary arterial occlusion are included in the present study. All patients underwent emergent cardiac catheterization. After ensuring flow across pulmonary artery with mechanical breakdown of embolus by rotating 5F pigtail catheter; bolus dose of urokinase (4400 IU/kg) followed by infusion for 24 h was given in the thrombus. Hemodynamic parameters were recorded and follow up pulmonary angiogram was done. Clinical and echo follow up was done for one year. Results Pigtail rotational mechanical thrombectomy restored antegrade flow in all patients. The mean pulmonary artery pressure, Miller score, Shock index decreased significantly from 41 ± 8 mmHg, 20 ± 5, 1.32 ± 0.3 to 24.52 ± 6.89, 5.35 ± 2.16, 0.79 ± 0.21 respectively (p < 0.0001). In-hospital major complications were seen in 4 patients. There was a statistically significant reduction of PA pressures from 62 ± 11 mmHg to 23±6 mmHg on follow up. Conclusions Rapid reperfusion of pulmonary arteries with mechanical fragmentation by pigtail catheter followed by intrapulmonary thrombolysis results in excellent immediate and intermediate term outcomes in patients presenting with high risk pulmonary embolism. PMID:24973834

  16. Comparison of quantitative computed tomography analysis and single-indicator thermodilution to measure pulmonary edema in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare quantitative computed tomography (CT) analysis and single-indicator thermodilution to measure pulmonary edema in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Method Ten patients with ARDS were included. All underwent spiral CT of the thorax for estimating gas content of lung (GVCT), tissue volume of lung (TVCT), tissue volume index (TVI), mean radiographic attenuation (CTmean) for the whole lung and gas-to-tissue ratio (g/t). Pulmonary thermal volume (PTV) and extravascular lung water index (ELWI) were determined by the PiCCO plus system. CT or single-indicator thermodilution variables were correlated with respiratory system compliance (Crs), PaO2/FiO2, and Acute Physiology And Chronic Health EvaluationII (APACHE II) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores. Results 1) TVCT and PTV were positively correlated (r =0.8878; P = 0.0006; equation of regression line: PTV = 1.0793 × TVCT + 179.8) as were TVI and ELWI (r =0.9459; P < 0.0001; equation of regression line: ELWI = 1.4506 × TVI-8.7792). The bias between TVCT and PTV as well as TVI and ELWI was -277 ± 217 and 0.62 ± 4.56, respectively. 2) ELWI and CT distribution of lung-tissue compartments were not correlated. 3) CT or single-indicator thermodilution variables were not correlated with Crs, PaO2/FiO2 or APACHE II or SOFA score. Conclusion Quantitative CT analysis and single-indicator thermodilution showed good agreement in measuring pulmonary edema. PMID:24625023

  17. Histoplasmosis - acute (primary) pulmonary

    MedlinePlus

    ... It is commonly found in the soil in river valleys. It gets into the soil mostly from ... eastern United States near the Ohio and Mississippi river valleys, and being exposed to the droppings of ...

  18. Pulmonary Strongyloidiasis Masquerading as Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Gourahari; Behera, Priyadarshini; Bhuniya, Sourin; Mohapatra, Prasanta Raghab; Turuk, Jyotirmayee; Mohanty, Srujana

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary strongyloidiasis is an uncommon presentation of Strongyloides infection, usually seen in immunocompromised hosts. The manifestations are similar to that of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Therefore, the diagnosis of pulmonary strongyloidiasis could be challenging in a COPD patient, unless a high index of suspicion is maintained. Here, we present a case of Strongyloides hyperinfection in a COPD patient mimicking acute exacerbation, who was on chronic steroid therapy. PMID:27790284

  19. Factors influencing development and mortality of acute respiratory failure in hospitalized patient with active pulmonary tuberculosis: a 10-year retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Maneenil, Kunlatida

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary tuberculosis with acute respiratory failure is fatal and is a burden in the intensive care units and leads to mortality. This retrospective study identifies the factors influencing the development of pulmonary tuberculosis requiring mechanical ventilation (TBMV) and mortality in the hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods The medical records of hospitalized adult patients with pulmonary tuberculosis were retrospectively reviewed. Demographic data, clinical presentations, radiographic findings, biochemical tests, and clinical outcomes were collected. Data were compared by Student’s t-test and Chi-square test between groups. Select variables that were statistically significant with P values <0.1 were introduced into a forward, stepwise, logistic regression model. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) identified the independent influencing factors in the development of TBMV and mortality. Results Of 268 enrolled patients, 185 (69.0%) were male. The patients were equally divided between the TBMV and non-TBMV groups. The shorter duration of illness (OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.98–0.99), underlying disease of AIDS (OR, 14.55; 95% CI, 1.71–123.91), presentation of fever (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.20–3.71) and dyspnea (OR, 3.51; 95% CI, 2.02–6.11), large amount of acid fast bacilli on sputum smear (OR, 3.76; 95% CI, 1.90–7.47), lower serum albumin level (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.26–0.59), and delayed initiation of anti-tuberculosis agents (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.00–1.12) were independent factors to develop TBMV. Male gender (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.01–4.61), consolidation pattern on chest X-ray (OR, 2.41; 95% CI, 1.17–4.98), and lower serum albumin (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.21–0.71) were correlated to mortality. Conclusions The incidence and mortality rate of TBMV patients were high. Acute tuberculous pneumonia, underlying disease of AIDS, amount of acid fast bacilli, and delayed administration of anti-tuberculosis agents

  20. Detection of Acute Pulmonary Embolism by Bedside Ultrasound in a Patient Presenting in PEA Arrest: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chung-Esaki, Hangyul; Knight, Roneesha; Noble, Jeanne; Wang, Ralph; Coralic, Zlatan

    2012-01-01

    Optimal management of the critically ill patient in shock requires rapid identification of its etiology. We describe a successful application of an emergency physician performed bedside ultrasound in a patient presenting with shock and subsequent cardiac arrest. Pulmonary embolus was diagnosed using bedside echocardiogram and confirmed with CTA of the thorax. Further validation and real-time implementation of this low-cost modality could facilitate the decision to implement thrombolytics for unstable patients with massive pulmonary embolism who cannot undergo formal radiographic evaluation. PMID:23326723

  1. [Pulmonary melioidosis].

    PubMed

    Perret, J L; Vidal, D; Thibault, F

    1998-12-01

    Melioidosis is most frequently encountered in pulmonary localization. Melioidosis is an infectious disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei first described by Whitmore in 1912 in Burma. B. pseudomallei is a Gram negative rod belonging to the Pseudomonadaceae family. Soil and water are the natural reservoirs for the germ which is a specific pathogen for several mammal species. Long endemic in Southeast Asia and several tropical zones, B. pseudomallei has recently been found in temperate zones, including France. Human contamination occurs via the transcutaneous route and often leads to dormant inapparent infection. Many conditions, such as diabetes, renal lithiasis, various circumstances of immunodepression or stress, facilitate clinical manifestations which vary greatly. Pulmonary manifestations may be acute and extensive, producing a torpid pseudo-tuberculous condition or a variety of clinical and radiological features mimicking other diseases. Bacteriological and serological tests may be negative. Exposure in an endemic zone, the notion of a favorable context, weight loss, cavitary images on successive chest x-rays and the presence of extra-pulmonary localizations may be suggestive. Ceftazidime or the amoxicillin-clavulanic acid combination are indicated, but mortality in acute forms still reaches 40%. Relapse can be expected if the treatment duration is too short. PMID:10100350

  2. Antimicrobials in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - An analysis of the time to next exacerbation before and after the implementation of standing orders

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Rob D; McNeil, Shelly A; Slayter, Kathryn L; McIvor, R Andrew

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the mean time to next exacerbation in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) before and after the implementation of standing orders. SETTING: Tertiary care hospital, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. POPULATION STUDIED: The records of 150 patients were analyzed, 76 were in the preimplementation group, 74 in the postimplementation group. INTERVENTION: The management and outcomes of patients admitted with an acute exacerbation of COPD before and after the implementation of standing orders were compared. DESIGN: A retrospective chart review. MAIN RESULTS: There was no difference in the mean time to next exacerbation between treatment groups (preimplementation group: 310 days, postimplementation group: 289 days, P=0.53). Antibiotics were used in 90% of the cases (preimplementation group: 87%, postimplementation group: 93%). The postimplementation group had a 20% increase in the use of first-line agents over the preimplementation group. Overall, first-line agents represented only 37% of the antibiotic courses. CONCLUSIONS: The implementation of standing orders encouraged the use of first-line agents but did not influence subsequent symptom resolution, length of hospital stay, or the infection-free interval in patients with acute exacerbations of COPD. PMID:18159466

  3. Role of Cardiovascular Disease-associated iron overload in Libby amphibole-induced acute pulmonary injury and inflammation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by asbestos is thought to be mediated through redox-cycling of fiber-bound and bioavailable iron (Fe). We hypothesized that Libby amphibole (LA)-induced cute lung injury will be exacerbated in rat models of cardiovascular disease (CVD)-associated Fe-ove...

  4. ACUTE PULMONARY AND SYSTEMIC EFFECTS OF INHALED COAL FLY ASH IN RATS: COMPARISON TO AMBIENT ENVIRONMENTAL PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although primary particle emissions of ash from coal-fired power plants are well controlled, coal fly ash (CFA) can still remain a significant fraction of the overall particle exposure for some plant workers and highly impacted communities. The effect of CFA on pulmonary and syst...

  5. Acute Ozone (O3) Exposure Enhances Aortic Contraction in Healthy Rats while Exacerbating Pulmonary Injury in Diabetics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollution exposure affects health adversely in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and diet induced obesity (DIO). We hypothesized that T2D and DIO would exacerbate O3 induced pulmonary responses and alter arterial reactivity. Male Wistar and Goto Kakizaki (GK) rats, a l...

  6. Acute respiratory symptoms in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in other subjects living near a coal-fired plant

    SciTech Connect

    Pershagen, G.

    1984-01-01

    Daily symptom rates in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in other subjects with presumed high sensitivity to air pollution who lived near a coal-fired power plant were compared with 24 h ambient air concentrations of NO/SUB/2, SO/SUB/2, soot and suspended particles, as well as with emissions from the plant. The mean concentrations of each of the pollutants during the 4-month study period were below 30GAMMA/m/SUP/3, and no single 24h concentration exceeded 100GAMMA/m/SUP/3. There were no consistent associations between plant emissions and pollutant levels, or between these two variables and daily symptom rates. The results indicate that the coal-fired plant was not of major importance for the occurrence of acute respiratory symptoms in the surrounding population.

  7. Peri-partum cardiomyopathy in a pregnant woman at term revealed by acute pulmonary edema: what to do in front this catastrophic situation?

    PubMed Central

    Abdedaim, Hatim El ghadbane; Benali, Zine el abidine; Omari, Driss; Mohammed, Drissi; Hicham, Balkhi; Charki, Haimeur

    2014-01-01

    Peripartum Cardiomyopathy is insufficient congestive heart occurring in the last month of pregnancy and 5 months after delivery, in the absence of preexisting heart disease and identified etiology. This heart disease is associated with echocardiography systolic dysfunction and left ventricular dilatation. Its incidence ranges from 1/3000 to 1/15000, depending on the region, including much higher in some African countries, it particularly concern women over 30 years, multiparous and multiple pregnancies. The pathogenesis remains unclear, the prognosis is closely related to the complete recovery of cardiac function. We report through the clinical case of a woman aged 33 years admitted to the ICU for acute pulmonary edema of sudden onset of a term pregnancy and what to do before this critical situation PMID:25368718

  8. Compensated overexpression of procollagens alpha 1(I) and alpha 1(III) following perilla mint ketone-induced acute pulmonary damage in horses.

    PubMed

    Schmidbauer, S-M; Venner, M; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, G; Drommer, W; Gruber, A D

    2004-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease with chronic fibrosis is a frequent cause of reduced performance in horses. The aim of this study was to establish a model of acute alveolar damage and interstitial lung disease in horses that could be used to monitor the histopathological lesions and changes in expression levels of genes relevant to pulmonary fibrosis. Six adult horses were given a single intravenous injection (6 mg per kg body weight) of perilla mint ketone (PMK). Transthoracic lung biopsy samples (1 x 0.2 x 0.2 cm) were collected before and after (days 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25 and 29) the administration of PMK. Light and electron microscopy revealed severe acute alveolar damage (days 1 to 4), proliferation of type II pneumocytes (days 4 to 11) and finally complete healing at about day 18. However, unexpectedly severe clinical signs necessitated euthanasia in two horses on days 9 and 11. The expression levels of the collagen genes COL1AI and COL3AI as well as transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta were examined in the biopsy samples by reverse transcription-real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. COL1AI and COL3AI gene expressions were upregulated (3- and 17-fold, respectively) between days 1 and 29 in all six horses, whereas TGF-beta was upregulated in two horses (2- and 4-fold, respectively), between days 4 and 18. Although the gene expression analyses indicated a strong activation of the pro-fibrotic pathway, no interstitial fibrosis was seen in any horse. A complete necropsy performed on day 60 revealed complete recovery of the lungs of the four surviving horses, with no evidence of fibrosis. Unidentified compensatory mechanisms may have prevented pulmonary fibrosis, despite strong upregulation of pro-fibrotic genes.

  9. Use of noninvasive ventilation at the pulmonary infection control window for acute respiratory failure in AECOPD patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis based on GRADE approach.

    PubMed

    Peng, Le; Ren, Peng-Wei; Liu, Xue-Ting; Zhang, Chao; Zuo, Hong-Xia; Kang, De-Ying; Niu, Yu-Ming

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to comprehensively examine the efficacy and safety of noninvasive ventilation used at the pulmonary infection control (PIC) window for acute respiratory failure (ARF) in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD).Seven electronic databases and relevant resources were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing patients using noninvasive ventilation at PIC window with those continuing receiving invasive ventilation. Retrieved citations were screened, risk of bias was assessed, and data were extracted by 2 independent review authors. Overall effect sizes were synthesized by using meta-analyses. Quality of evidence was rated by using Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach.A total of 17 trials involving 959 participants were included for this review. Compared with continuous invasive ventilation, noninvasive ventilation used at PIC window significantly reduced mortality, ventilator-associated pneumonia, weaning failures, reintubations, duration of invasive ventilation, total duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay (LOS) in intensive care unit, and LOS in hospital as well as hospital costs. Of these, mortality significantly decreased (risk ratio = 0.27, 95% confidence interval: 0.17-0.42, P < 0.001) without significant heterogeneity (I = 0%, P = 0.99). Quality of evidence regarding the 9 outcomes across the included studies was rated from moderate to low.Use of noninvasive ventilation at PIC window showed beneficial effects across identified trials for ARF in AECOPD patients. Considering the absence of high quality of available evidence and the uncertainty of long-term effect of this intervention, a weak recommendation for clinical practice was generated, and further well-designed and adequately powered RCTs are required to validate this conclusion. PMID:27310978

  10. Pulmonary edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... congestion; Lung water; Pulmonary congestion; Heart failure - pulmonary edema ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  11. Massive Pulmonary Embolism Mimicking Acute Myocardial Infarction: Successful use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support as bridge to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yung-Kun; Siao, Fu-Yuan; Chiu, Chun-Chieh; Yen, Hsu-Heng; Chen, Yao-Li

    2016-07-01

    Prolonged cardiac arrest with pulseless electrical activity (PEA) results in death if its aetiology cannot be corrected immediately. We describe the case of a 75-year-old man with chest pain and his electrocardiogram (ECG) revealing ST-segment elevation in leads II, III, and aVf. Inferior wall myocardial infarction was subsequently diagnosed. Before performing emergency coronary angiography, however, a sudden cardiac arrest with PEA developed and the patient was placed on advanced cardiac life support. Oxygenation support for the extracorporeal membrane was initiated approximately 65min after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Emergency coronary arteriogram showed no obstructive lesions in the right coronary artery. This result, however, was not consistent with the ECG findings, and thus, a massive pulmonary embolism was suspected. Subsequent pulmonary artery angiography showed severe emboli in bilateral branches of the pulmonary arteries. Catheter-directed thrombolysis with urokinase was administered, which ultimately failed, and surgical embolectomy was performed with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. After the above intervention, the patient was discharged on hospital day 60 without any sequelae or neurological deficits. PMID:26935163

  12. Lipoxin Inhibits Fungal Uptake by Macrophages and Reduces the Severity of Acute Pulmonary Infection Caused by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Laura R R; Loures, Flávio V; de Araújo, Eliseu F; Feriotti, Cláudia; Costa, Tânia A; Serezani, Carlos Henrique; Jancar, Sonia; Calich, Vera L G

    2015-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) and lipoxins (LXs) are lipid mediators that control inflammation, with the former inducing and the latter inhibiting this process. Because the role played by these mediators in paracoccidioidomycosis was not investigated, we aimed to characterize the role of CysLT in the pulmonary infection developed by resistant (A/J) and susceptible (B10.A) mice. 48 h after infection, elevated levels of pulmonary LTC4 and LXA4 were produced by both mouse strains, but higher levels were found in the lungs of susceptible mice. Blocking the CysLTs receptor by MTL reduced fungal loads in B10.A, but not in A/J mice. In susceptible mice, MLT treatment led to reduced influx of PMN leukocytes, increased recruitment of monocytes, predominant synthesis of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented expression of 5- and 15-lipoxygenase mRNA, suggesting a prevalent LXA4 activity. In agreement, MTL-treated macrophages showed reduced fungal burdens associated with decreased ingestion of fungal cells. Furthermore, the addition of exogenous LX reduced, and the specific blockade of the LX receptor increased the fungal loads of B10.A macrophages. This study showed for the first time that inhibition of CysLTs signaling results in less severe pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis that occurs in parallel with elevated LX activity and reduced infection of macrophages.

  13. Lipoxin Inhibits Fungal Uptake by Macrophages and Reduces the Severity of Acute Pulmonary Infection Caused by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Laura R. R.; Loures, Flávio V.; de Araújo, Eliseu F.; Feriotti, Cláudia; Costa, Tânia A.; Serezani, Carlos Henrique; Jancar, Sonia; Calich, Vera L. G.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) and lipoxins (LXs) are lipid mediators that control inflammation, with the former inducing and the latter inhibiting this process. Because the role played by these mediators in paracoccidioidomycosis was not investigated, we aimed to characterize the role of CysLT in the pulmonary infection developed by resistant (A/J) and susceptible (B10.A) mice. 48 h after infection, elevated levels of pulmonary LTC4 and LXA4 were produced by both mouse strains, but higher levels were found in the lungs of susceptible mice. Blocking the CysLTs receptor by MTL reduced fungal loads in B10.A, but not in A/J mice. In susceptible mice, MLT treatment led to reduced influx of PMN leukocytes, increased recruitment of monocytes, predominant synthesis of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented expression of 5- and 15-lipoxygenase mRNA, suggesting a prevalent LXA4 activity. In agreement, MTL-treated macrophages showed reduced fungal burdens associated with decreased ingestion of fungal cells. Furthermore, the addition of exogenous LX reduced, and the specific blockade of the LX receptor increased the fungal loads of B10.A macrophages. This study showed for the first time that inhibition of CysLTs signaling results in less severe pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis that occurs in parallel with elevated LX activity and reduced infection of macrophages. PMID:26635449

  14. Intensive care unit nurses' perceptions of patient participation in the acute phase of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation: an interview study

    PubMed Central

    Kvangarsnes, Marit; Torheim, Henny; Hole, Torstein; Öhlund, Lennart S

    2013-01-01

    Aim To report a study conducted to explore intensive care unit nurses’ perceptions of patient participation in the acute phase of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation. Background An acute exacerbation is a life-threatening situation, which patients often consider to be extremely frightening. Healthcare personnel exercise considerable power in this situation, which challenges general professional notions of patient participation. Design Critical discourse analysis. Methods In the autumn of 2009, three focus group interviews with experienced intensive care nurses were conducted at two hospitals in western Norway. Two groups had six participants each, and one group had five (N = 17). The transcribed interviews were analysed by means of critical discourse analysis. Findings The intensive care nurses said that an exacerbation is often an extreme situation in which healthcare personnel are exercising a high degree of control and power over patients. Patient participation during exacerbation often takes the form of non-involvement. The participating nurses attached great importance to taking a sensitive approach when meeting patients. The nurses experienced challenging ethical dilemmas. Conclusion This study shows that patient participation should not be understood in universal terms, but rather in relation to a specific setting and the interactions that occur in this setting. Healthcare personnel must develop skill, understanding, and competence to meet these challenging ethical dilemmas. A collaborative inter-professional approach between physicians and nurses is needed to meet the patients’ demand for involvement. PMID:22512673

  15. Vitamin D/VDR signaling attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury by maintaining the integrity of the pulmonary epithelial barrier

    PubMed Central

    SHI, YONG-YAN; LIU, TIAN-JING; FU, JIAN-HUA; XU, WEI; WU, LIN-LIN; HOU, A-NA; XUE, XIN-DONG

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D and its receptor have a protective effect on epithelial barriers in various tissues. Low levels of vitamin D are associated with numerous pulmonary diseases, including acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome. The present study investigated whether the vitamin D/vitamin D receptor (VDR) pathway may ameliorate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI through maintaining the integrity of the alveolar epithelial barrier. This was investigated by exposing wild-type (WT) and VDR knockout C57BL/6J mice to LPS, then comparing the healthy and LPS-treated mice lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). More specifically, lung histology, mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and protein expression levels of tight junction proteins were determined. In addition, a vitamin D analog (paricalcitol) was administered to WT mice in order to investigate the effect of vitamin D on the alveolar epithelial barrier following exposure to LPS. VDR knockout mice exhibited severe lung injuries (P<0.001), increased alveolar permeability [demonstrated by a higher wet-dry ratio of lung weight (P<0.05), greater expression levels of BALF protein (P<0.001) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated 4 kDa dextran (P<0.001) leakage into the alveolar space], elevated proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine mRNA levels, as demonstrated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (P<0.05), and decreased protein and mRNA expression levels of occludin (P<0.01) and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1; P<0.01) compared with WT mice. Paricalcitol treatment partially inhibited these pathological changes in WT mice by maintaining the mRNA and protein expression levels of occludin (P<0.01) and ZO-1 (P<0.05). A lack of VDRs in the pulmonary epithelial barrier appeared to compromise its defense, leading to more severe LPS-induced lung injury. Furthermore, vitamin D treatment alleviated LPS-induced lung injury and preserved alveolar barrier function

  16. Vitamin D/VDR signaling attenuates lipopolysaccharide‑induced acute lung injury by maintaining the integrity of the pulmonary epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yong-Yan; Liu, Tian-Jing; Fu, Jian-Hua; Xu, Wei; Wu, Lin-Lin; Hou, A-Na; Xue, Xin-Dong

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D and its receptor have a protective effect on epithelial barriers in various tissues. Low levels of vitamin D are associated with numerous pulmonary diseases, including acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome. The present study investigated whether the vitamin D/vitamin D receptor (VDR) pathway may ameliorate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‑induced ALI through maintaining the integrity of the alveolar epithelial barrier. This was investigated by exposing wild‑type (WT) and VDR knockout C57BL/6J mice to LPS, then comparing the healthy and LPS‑treated mice lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). More specifically, lung histology, mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and protein expression levels of tight junction proteins were determined. In addition, a vitamin D analog (paricalcitol) was administered to WT mice in order to investigate the effect of vitamin D on the alveolar epithelial barrier following exposure to LPS. VDR knockout mice exhibited severe lung injuries (P<0.001), increased alveolar permeability [demonstrated by a higher wet‑dry ratio of lung weight (P<0.05), greater expression levels of BALF protein (P<0.001) and fluorescein isothiocyanate‑conjugated 4 kDa dextran (P<0.001) leakage into the alveolar space], elevated proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine mRNA levels, as demonstrated by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction (P<0.05), and decreased protein and mRNA expression levels of occludin (P<0.01) and zonula occludens‑1 (ZO‑1; P<0.01) compared with WT mice. Paricalcitol treatment partially inhibited these pathological changes in WT mice by maintaining the mRNA and protein expression levels of occludin (P<0.01) and ZO‑1 (P<0.05). A lack of VDRs in the pulmonary epithelial barrier appeared to compromise its defense, leading to more severe LPS‑induced lung injury. Furthermore, vitamin D treatment alleviated LPS‑induced lung injury and preserved alveolar

  17. Acute pulmonary toxicity and inflammation induced by combined exposure to didecyldimethylammonium chloride and ethylene glycol in rats.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Do Young; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Kim, Eunji; Lim, Yeon-Mi; Kim, Pilje; Choi, Kyunghee; Kwon, Jung-Taek

    2016-02-01

    Didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC), an antimicrobial agent, has been reported to induce pulmonary toxicity in animal studies. DDAC is frequently used in spray-form household products in combination with ethylene glycol (EG). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the toxic interaction between DDAC and EG in the lung. DDAC at a sub-toxic dose (100 μg/kg body weight) was mixed with a non-toxic dose of EG (100 or 200 μg/kg body weight), and was administrated to rats via intratracheal instillation. Lactate dehydrogenase activity and total protein content in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were not changed by singly treated DDAC or EG, but significantly enhanced at 1 d after treatment with the mixture, with the effect dependent on the dose of EG. Total cell count in BALF was largely increased and polymorphonuclear leukocytes were predominantly recruited to the lung in rats administrated with the mixture. Inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 also appeared to be increased by the mixture of DDAC and EG (200 μg/kg body weight) at 1 d post-exposure, which might be associated with the increase in inflammatory cells in lung. BALF protein content and inflammatory cell recruitment in the lung still remained elevated at 7 d after the administration of DDAC with the higher dose of EG. These results suggest that the combination of DDAC and EG can synergistically induce pulmonary cytotoxicity and inflammation, and EG appears to amplify the harmful effects of DDAC on the lung. Therefore pulmonary exposure to these two chemicals commonly found in commercial products can be a potential hazard to human health. PMID:26763389

  18. Fatal acute pulmonary embolism in a patient with pelvic lipomatosis after surgery performed after transatlantic airplane travel.

    PubMed

    Gajic, Ognjen; Sprung, Juraj; Hall, Brian A; Lightner, Deborah J

    2004-10-01

    We describe a case of a 37-yr-old patient who traveled from Europe to the United States and succumbed to a massive pulmonary embolism 6 days after elective pelvic surgery despite routine postoperative thrombotic prophylaxis. In retrospect, he was likely to have developed a deep venous thrombosis during the transatlantic trip to our hospital. Anesthesiologists and other physicians involved in perioperative management need to be aware of the prevalence of venous thromboembolism in patients with a history of recent prolonged air travel. This is particularly true in tertiary referral centers, where patients with rare diseases may have a major surgical intervention within days of prolonged air travel.

  19. Diagnostic enigma: primary pulmonary artery sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Krishna; Hallam, Jane; Antippa, Phillip; Larobina, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Primary angiosarcoma of pulmonary artery is a very rare lesion. We present a case of primary angiosarcoma that was initially misdiagnosed as a subacute massive pulmonary thromboembolism in a 30-year-old man. This rare disease is usually indistinguishable from acute or chronic thromboembolic disease of the pulmonary arteries. The clinical and radiological findings of pulmonary artery angiosarcoma are similar to those of pulmonary thromboembolism. Although the incidence of pulmonary artery angiosarcoma is very low, our case demonstrates that this disease entity should be included in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism. Patients with early identification can have curative potential with aggressive surgical intervention. PMID:22159261

  20. Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Powerful Modality for Pulmonary Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Hua-Ping; Li, Yan-Ming; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute and lethal clinical syndrome that is characterized by hypoxemic respiratory failure and diffuse alveolar inflammatory damage. This review aimed to search and discuss the mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic studies on different subsets of ARDS patients. Data Sources: Original research articles were collected from the PubMed database published in English up to December 2015. Study Selection: The literature search was done using the term “(acute lung injury OR acute respiratory distress syndrome) AND (proteomics OR proteome OR mass spectrum OR differential in-gel electrophoresis OR two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis)”. Related original research articles were included and were carefully analyzed. Results: Eight original proteomic researches on ARDS patients were found. The common proteomic modalities were two-dimensional (2D) high-performance liquid chromatography-based electronic spray ion-MS/MS and 2D-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/differential in-gel electrophoresis-based matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/MS. They compared the proteome between ARDS patients and normal controls and analyzed the dynamic changes of proteome at different ARDS stages or severity. The disturbed proteome in ARDS patients includes plasma acute-phase proteins, inflammatory/immune-associated proteins, and coagulation proteins. Conclusions: Although several previous studies have provided some useful information about the lung proteome in ARDS patients and gained several interesting disease-associated biomarkers, clinical proteomic studies in ARDS patients are still in the initial stage. An increased cooperation is still needed to establish a global and faithful database containing disease-specific proteome from the largest ARDS subsets. PMID:27647196

  1. Differences in care between general medicine and respiratory specialists in the management of patients hospitalized for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wijayaratne, Kurugamage; Wilson, Jessica; Sivakumaran, Pathmanathan; Sriram, Krishna B.

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT: Hospitalized patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) may be managed by either respiratory specialists (RS) or general medicine physicians (GMP). While previous studies have audited the hospital AECOPD management of RS, only a small number of studies have evaluated the management of GMP. AIMS: The aims of this study were to firstly examine the differences in AECOPD management of GMP and RS and secondly compare their care to national COPD guidelines. METHODS: A retrospective review was undertaken of consecutive AECOPD patients admitted to two hospitals (one hospital where all AECOPD patients were managed by RS and another where all AECOPD patients were managed by GMP) over a 3-month period. Electronic medical records, medical case notes, pathology and radiology data for the admission were reviewed. RESULTS: There were 201 COPD exacerbations in 169 patients (49.7% male, mean age 72.3). GMP managed 84 (41.7%) exacerbations. In comparison to RS, GMP performed fewer spirometry tests, blood gas analysis and less frequently treated patients with guideline-recommended medications. Referral to pulmonary rehabilitation was poor for both groups of clinicians. Median length of stay was shorter in GMP patients versus RS patients (3 days vs. 5 days, P = 0.001). There were no differences in the 12-month re-admission (41.7% vs. 38.5%, P = 0.664) and mortality rates (10.7% vs. 6%, P = 0.292) between both groups of patients. CONCLUSION: Our study found differences in the hospital AECOPD management of GMP and RS, but these did not translate into different clinical outcomes between their patients. We also found suboptimal adherence to national COPD guidelines, suggesting that there is scope for improvement in the AECOPD management of both groups of clinicians. PMID:24250732

  2. Intrauterine exposure to fine particulate matter as a risk factor for increased susceptibility to acute broncho-pulmonary infections in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Jedrychowski, Wiesław A; Perera, Frederica P; Spengler, John D; Mroz, Elzbieta; Stigter, Laura; Flak, Elżbieta; Majewska, Renata; Klimaszewska-Rembiasz, Maria; Jacek, Ryszard

    2013-07-01

    Over the last decades many epidemiologic studies considered the morbidity patterns for respiratory diseases and lung function of children in the context of ambient air pollution usually measured in the postnatal period. The main purpose of this study is to assess the impact of prenatal exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) on the recurrent broncho-pulmonary infections in early childhood. The study included 214 children who had measurements of personal prenatal PM2.5 exposure and regularly collected data on the occurrence of acute bronchitis and pneumonia diagnosed by a physician from birth over the seven-year follow-up. The effect of prenatal exposure to PM2.5 was adjusted in the multivariable logistic models for potential confounders, such as prenatal and postnatal ETS (environmental tobacco smoke), city residence area as a proxy of postnatal urban exposure, children's sensitization to domestic aeroallergens, and asthma. In the subgroup of children with available PM2.5 indoor levels, the effect of prenatal exposure was additionally adjusted for indoor exposure as well. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for incidence of recurrent broncho-pulmonary infections (five or more spells of bronchitis and/or pneumonia) recorded in the follow-up significantly correlated in a dose-response manner with the prenatal PM2.5 level (OR=2.44, 95%CI: 1.12-5.36). In conclusion, the study suggests that prenatal exposure to PM2.5 increases susceptibility to respiratory infections and may program respiratory morbidity in early childhood. The study also provides evidence that the target value of 20μg/m(3) for the 24-h mean level of PM2.5 protects unborn babies better than earlier established EPA guidelines.

  3. The biological effects of higher and lower positive end-expiratory pressure in pulmonary and extrapulmonary acute lung injury with intra-abdominal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical ventilation with high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has been used in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), but the role of PEEP in minimizing lung injury remains controversial. We hypothesized that in the presence of acute lung injury (ALI) with IAH: 1) higher PEEP levels improve pulmonary morphofunction and minimize lung injury; and 2) the biological effects of higher PEEP are more effective in extrapulmonary (exp) than pulmonary (p) ALI. Methods In 48 adult male Wistar rats, ALIp and ALIexp were induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide intratracheally and intraperitoneally, respectively. After 24 hours, animals were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated (tidal volume of 6 mL/kg). IAH (15 mmHg) was induced and rats randomly assigned to PEEP of 5 (PEEP5), 7 (PEEP7) or 10 (PEEP10) cmH2O for 1 hour. Results In both ALIp and ALIexp, higher PEEP levels improved oxygenation. PEEP10 increased alveolar hyperinflation and epithelial cell damage compared to PEEP5, independent of ALI etiology. In ALIp, PEEP7 and PEEP10 increased lung elastance compared to PEEP5 (4.3 ± 0.7 and 4.3 ± 0.9 versus 3.1 ± 0.3 cmH2O/mL, respectively, P <0.01), without changes in alveolar collapse, interleukin-6, caspase-3, type III procollagen, receptor for advanced glycation end-products, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expressions. Moreover, PEEP10 increased diaphragmatic injury compared to PEEP5. In ALIexp, PEEP7 decreased lung elastance and alveolar collapse compared to PEEP5 (2.3 ± 0.5 versus 3.6 ± 0.7 cmH2O/mL, P <0.02, and 27.2 (24.7 to 36.8) versus 44.2 (39.7 to 56.9)%, P <0.05, respectively), while PEEP7 and PEEP10 increased interleukin-6 and type III procollagen expressions, as well as type II epithelial cell damage compared to PEEP5. Conclusions In the current models of ALI with IAH, in contrast to our primary hypothesis, higher PEEP is more effective in

  4. Study of Pre-disposing Factors of Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Antibiotic Prescribing Pattern with Reference to Antibiotic Sensitivity Test.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, R; Shrestha, B; Shakya Shrestha, S; Pant, A; Prajapati, B; Karmacharya, B M

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) affects about 329 million people worldwide, which is nearly 5% of the entire global population. In the context of Nepal, COPD accounts for 43% of the non-communicable disease burden and 2.56% of hospitalizations. Various pre-disposing factors like bacterial, viral, fungal, smoking, occupational exposures and genetic factors have been proposed to precipitate COPD and its exacerbation though, the definitive pre-disposing factors and factors related to acute exacerbation have not been determined in the context of Nepal. Objective To find out the pre-disposing factors and the related causative agents for COPD. Method A cross sectional study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital. Patients of all age group who were diagnosed as COPD and admitted in the hospital were included in this study. Patients were interviewed using structured questionnaire. The sociodemographic data including personal and medical history were recorded from those participants. In addition, sputum from those patients was sent for culture to investigate the possible responsible pathogens as well as its antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Result A total of 150 patients having Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (AECOPD) who have admitted from either emergency or out-patient department of the hospital were included in this study. Among the total number of patients, more than half of them were female (n=82). In addition, analysis of occupations shows that most of them were either farmer (36.0%) or housewife (30.7%). In total studied patients (n=150), most of them were using traditional firewood (83%) for cooking purpose and majority of patients (91%) were smokers. Most of the sputum samples show growth of gram-positive cocci (26.7%) and gram negative bacilli (27.5%). Considering the overall sensitivity pattern, the higher sensitivity was recorded for Co-trimoxazole and Ciprofloxacin while higher rate of resistance was noted

  5. The significance of mitral and tricuspid valve systolic lateral annular velocities in the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism in patients with chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Targoński, Ryszard; Januszko-Giergielewicz, Beata; Ostrowski, Philip; Pruszczyk, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism (APE) in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) remains a difficult task, despite the refinement of imaging techniques. The goal of this study was to assess the value of measuring tricuspid and mitral valve systolic annular velocities in CHF patients with suspected PE by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI). Material and methods The study included 75 patients with previously diagnosed CHF, admitted due to resting dyspnea, with a maximum tricuspid regurgitation pressure gradient (TRPG) of ≥ 35 mm Hg and positive D-dimer assay. Spiral computed tomography (sCT) was performed on all subjects to confirm APE. Acute pulmonary embolism was diagnosed in 35 patients (PE+), and excluded in 40 others (PE–). Tissue Doppler imaging was performed to measure maximum systolic lateral annular velocities in the mitral (SmLV) and tricuspid (SmRV) valves, as well as the SmRV/SmLV ratio. Results PE+ subjects were found to have higher SmLV than PE– subjects (6.0 cm/s (2.0–13.8 cm/s) vs. 4.2 cm/s (1.3–9.1 cm/s), p = 0.003). SmRV/SmLV ratios were 1.05 (0.50–2.50) and 1.56 (0.62–4.30), respectively (p < 0.0001). Areas under ROC curves for diagnosis of APE were 0.700 for SmLV and 0.789 for SmRV/SmLV. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, only SmRV/SmLV was statistically significant, with an odds ratio for APE of 6.26 (95% CI: 1.53–25.59; p = 0.009). Conclusions Tissue Doppler imaging of the lateral tricuspid and mitral annuli is a useful clinical tool that can help identify PE in CHF patients. Those patients who fulfill these criteria should be considered for further diagnostic studies to confirm PE. PMID:24701212

  6. [Percutaneous rheolytic thrombectomy in the treatment of high-risk acute pulmonary embolism: Initial experience of a single center].

    PubMed

    Faria, Rita; Oliveira, Márcia; Ponte, Marta; Pires-Morais, Gustavo; Sousa, Marta; Fernandes, Paula; Rodrigues, Alberto; Braga, Pedro; Gonçalves, Manuel; Gama, Vasco

    2014-06-01

    For years, the treatment of high-risk pulmonary embolism (PE) was based on two well-defined strategies: thrombolysis, whose benefits have been documented in randomized trials, and surgical embolectomy. However, mechanical reperfusion by percutaneous techniques is used in an increasing number of patients, and is a valid therapeutic option when there is a formal contraindication to thrombolysis, as rescue therapy when thrombolysis fails to improve hemodynamics, and/or when emergency surgical thrombectomy is unavailable or contraindicated. This article discusses the indications for the use of percutaneous techniques in PE, reports the initial experience of our center with the AngioJet® thrombectomy device (Possis Medical Inc, Minneapolis, MN, USA) and reviews the available evidence, the most recent recommendations and the main complications associated with this procedure.

  7. Prediction of key genes and miRNAs responsible for loss of muscle force in patients during an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yanhong; Zhou, Min; Xiao, Jian; Wu, Chaomin; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Feng; Du, Chunling; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify genes and microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) that were abnormally expressed in the vastus lateralis muscle of patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). The gene expression profile of GSE10828 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, and this dataset was comprised of 4 samples from patients with AECOPD and 5 samples from patients with stable COPD. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened using the Limma package in R. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of DEGs was built based on the STRING database. Module analysis of the PPI network was performed using the ClusterONE plugin and functional analysis of DEGs was conducted using DAVID. Additionally, key miRNAs were enriched using gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) software and a miR-gene regulatory network was constructed using Cytoscape software. In total, 166 up- and 129 downregulated DEGs associated with muscle weakness in AECOPD were screened. Among them, NCL, GOT1, TMOD1, TSPO, SOD2, NCL and PA2G4 were observed in the modules consisting of upregulated or downregulated genes. The upregulated DEGs in modules (including KLF6 and XRCC5) were enriched in GO terms associated with immune system development, whereas the downregulated DEGs were enriched in GO terms associated with cell death and muscle contraction. Additionally, 39 key AECOPD-related miRNAs were also predicted, including miR-1, miR-9 and miR-23a, miR-16 and miR-15a. In conclusion, DEGs (NCL, GOT1, SOD2, KLF6, XRCC5, TSPO and TMOD1) and miRNAs (such as miR-1, miR-9 and miR-23a) may be associated with the loss of muscle force in patients during an acute exacerbation of COPD which also may act as therapeutic targets in the treatment of AECOPD.

  8. Predictors of Pulmonary Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Miniati, Massimo; Bottai, Matteo; Ciccotosto, Cesario; Roberto, Luca; Monti, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the setting of acute pulmonary embolism (PE), pulmonary infarction is deemed to occur primarily in individuals with compromised cardiac function. The current study was undertaken to establish the prevalence of pulmonary infarction in patients with acute PE, and the relationship between infarction and: age, body height, body mass index (BMI), smoking habits, clot burden, and comorbidities. The authors studied prospectively 335 patients with acute PE diagnosed by computed tomographic angiography (CT) in 18 hospitals throughout central Italy. The diagnosis of pulmonary infarction on CT was based on Hampton and Castleman's criteria (cushion-like or hemispherical consolidation lying along the visceral pleura). Multivariable logistic regression was used to model the relationship between covariates and the probability of pulmonary infarction. The prevalence of pulmonary infarction was 31%. Patients with infarction were significantly younger and with significantly lower prevalence of cardiovascular disease than those without (P < 0.001). The frequency of infarction increased linearly with increasing height, and decreased with increasing BMI. In logistic regression, the covariates significantly associated with the probability of infarction were age, body height, BMI, and current smoking. The risk of infarction grew with age, peaked at approximately age 40, and decreased afterwards. Increasing body height and current smoking were significant amplifiers of the risk of infarction, whereas increasing BMI appeared to confer some protection. Our data indicate that pulmonary infarction occurs in nearly one-third of the patients with acute PE. Those with infarction are often young and otherwise healthy. Increasing body height and active smoking are predisposing risk factors. PMID:26469892

  9. Successful management of pulmonary hemorrhage and aspergillosis in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M3).

    PubMed

    Gunbatar, Hulya; Demir, Cengiz; Kara, Erdal; Esen, Ramazan; Sertogullarindan, Bunyamin; Asker, Selvi

    2015-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with a one month history of gingival bleeding. He was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML-M3). During treatment he developed alveolar hemorrhage for which he was treated with a steroid. After the steroid treatment he developed a nodule, a cavitary lesion and atelectasia in the left lung. He was treated with voriconazole. After therapy with voriconazole his lesion significantly decreased. This case illustrates the efficacy and safety of antifungal therapy with voriconazole for aspergillosis complicated by AML. PMID:26744658

  10. Successful management of pulmonary hemorrhage and aspergillosis in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M3)

    PubMed Central

    Gunbatar, Hulya; Demir, Cengiz; Kara, Erdal; Esen, Ramazan; Sertogullarindan, Bunyamin; Asker, Selvi

    2015-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with a one month history of gingival bleeding. He was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML-M3). During treatment he developed alveolar hemorrhage for which he was treated with a steroid. After the steroid treatment he developed a nodule, a cavitary lesion and atelectasia in the left lung. He was treated with voriconazole. After therapy with voriconazole his lesion significantly decreased. This case illustrates the efficacy and safety of antifungal therapy with voriconazole for aspergillosis complicated by AML. PMID:26744658

  11. Predictive Factors for the Effect of Treatment by Noninvasive Ventilation in Patients with Respiratory Failure as a Result of Acute Exacerbation of the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pejkovska, Sava; Kaeva, Biserka Jovkovska; Goseva, Zlatica; Arsovski, Zoran; Janeva, Jelena Jovanovska; Zeynel, Sead

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) applies ventilator support through the patient’s upper airway using a mask. AIM: The aim of the study is to define factors that will point out an increased risk of NIV failure in patients with exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients over the age of 40, treated with NIV, were prospectively recruited. After data processing, the patients were divided into two groups: 1) successful NIV treatment group; 2) failed NIV treatment group. RESULTS: On admission arterial pH and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) levels were lower (pH: p < 0.05, GCS: p < 0.05), and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE) score and PaCO2 were higher (p < 0.05) in the NIV failure group. Arterial pH was lower (p < 0.05) and PaCO2 and respiratory rate were higher (p < 0.05) after 1h, and arterial pH was lower (p < 0.05) and PaCO2 (p < 0.05), respiratory and heart rate were higher (p < 0.05) after 4h in the NIV failure group. CONCLUSION: Measurement and monitoring of certain parameters may be of value in terms of predicting the effectiveness of NIV treatment. PMID:27275303

  12. TAT-SNAP-23 treatment inhibits the priming of neutrophil functions contributing to shock and/or sepsis-induced extra-pulmonary acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jianwen; Tang, Lunxian; Lomas-Neira, Joanne; Chen, Yaping; McLeish, Kenneth R; Uriarte, Silvia M; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Ayala, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory burst function of neutrophils is thought to play a pivotal role in the development of pathologies such as indirect (extra-pulmonary) acute lung injury (iALI), as well as sepsis. The current study was conducted to determine the effect of an HIV transactivator of transcription (TAT)-fusion protein containing a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor domain from synaptosome-associated protein-23 (SNAP-23) on the shock/sepsis- and sepsis-enhanced neutrophil burst capacity using the clinical relevant two-hit iALI mouse model and the classical cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) septic model. TAT-SNAP-23 significantly decreased the blood neutrophil respiratory burst in vitro, and also in vivo in CLP and hemorrhaged mice. We found that the neutrophil influx to the lung tissue, as measured by myeloperoxidase levels and neutrophil-specific esterase(+) cells, was also decreased in the TAT-SNAP-23-treated group. Consistent with this, treatment of TAT-SNAP-23 significantly reduced the disruption of lung tissue architecture and protein concentration of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in iALI mice compared with vehicle-treated iALI mice. In addition, although TAT-SNAP-23 did not alter the extent of local cytokine/chemokine expression, the in vitro migration capacity of neutrophils was blunted from septic and hemorrhagic mice. These data support our hypothesis that TAT-SNAP-23 reduces neutrophil dysfunction in iALI and sepsis by inhibiting neutrophil respiratory burst.

  13. Effects of Mikania glomerata Spreng. and Mikania laevigata Schultz Bip. ex Baker (Asteraceae) extracts on pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress caused by acute coal dust exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, T.P.; Silveira, P.C.; Rocha, L.G.; Rezin, G.T.; Rocha, J.; Citadini-Zanette, V.; Romao, P.T.; Dal-Pizzol, F.; Pinho, R.A.; Andrade, V.M.; Streck, E.L.

    2008-12-15

    Several studies have reported biological effects of Mikania glomerata and Mikania laevigata, used in Brazilian folk medicine for respiratory diseases. Pneumoconiosis is characterized by pulmonary inflammation caused by coal dust exposure. In this work, we evaluated the effect of pretreatment with M. glomerata and M. laevigata extracts (MGE and MLE, respectively) (100 mg/kg, s.c.) on inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters in lung of rats subjected to a single coal dust intratracheal instillation. Rats were pretreated for 2 weeks with saline solution, MGE, or MLE. On day 15, the animals were anesthetized, and gross mineral coal dust or saline solutions were administered directly in the lung by intratracheal instillation. Fifteen days after coal dust instillation, the animals were killed. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was obtained; total cell count and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity were determined. In the lung, myeloperoxidase activity, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) level, and protein carbonyl and sulfhydryl contents were evaluated. In BAL of treated animals, we verified an increased total cell count and LDH activity. MGE and MLE prevented the increase in cell count, but only MLE prevented the increase in LDH. Myeloperoxidase and TBARS levels were not affected, protein carbonylation was increased, and the protein thiol levels were decreased by acute coal dust intratracheal administration. The findings also suggest that both extracts present an important protective effect on the oxidation of thiol groups. Moreover, pretreatment with MGE and MLE also diminished lung inflammatory infiltration induced by coal dust, as assessed by histopathologic analyses.

  14. Probability of Treatment Following Acute Drop in Lung Function in Children with Cystic Fibrosis is related to baseline pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Wayne J.; Wagener, Jeffrey S.; Yegin, Ashley; Pasta, David J.; Millar, Stefanie J.; Konstan, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To hypothesize whether the association between high forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and increased rate of decline in FEV1 in children with cystic fibrosis could be due to less frequent intervention after acute drops (sudden decline events) in FEV1. Study design Patients with CF aged 6-17 years enrolled in ESCF were assessed for a sudden decline event, defined as a 10% relative drop in FEV1 % predicted from an average of 3 consecutive stable baseline spirometries. The likelihood of therapeutic intervention within 14 days before and 56 days after this event was then related to their baseline FEV1 % predicted age-specific decile using a logistic regression adjusting for age group (6-12y, 13-17y) and presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on respiratory culture. Results 10,888 patients had at least one sudden decline event in FEV1. Patients in the highest FEV1 decile were significantly less likely than those in the lowest decile to receive intravenous antibiotics (odds ratio [OR], 0.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.11-0.18; P<.001) or be hospitalized (OR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.14-0.23; P<.001) following decline. Conclusions Children and adolescents with high baseline lung function are less likely to receive a therapeutic intervention following an acute drop in FEV1, which may explain their greater rate of FEV1 decline. PMID:23810128

  15. Pulmonary atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease - pulmonary atresia; Cyanotic heart disease - pulmonary atresia; Valve - disorder pulmonary atresia ... septum may also have a poorly developed tricuspid valve. They may also have an underdeveloped right ventricle ...

  16. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... people who have COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), sarcoidosis (sar-koy-DOE-sis), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis , or ...

  17. The acute effects of low flow oxygen and isosorbide dinitrate on left and right ventricular ejection fractions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, D.; Caldwell, J.; Lakshminaryan, S.; Ritchie, J.L.; Kennedy, J.W.

    1983-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of low flow oxygen and isosorbide dinitrate on rest and exercise biventricular ejection fractions in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and to relate these ejection fraction responses to changes in pressure and flow. Nine patients with stable, moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who had no prior history of heart failure performed supine exercise with simultaneous hemodynamic and radionuclide ventriculographic monitoring. Eight patients performed a second exercise during low flow oxygen breathing and five performed a third exercise after ingesting 10 mg oral isosorbide. Oxygen led to a decrease in exercise pulmonary artery pressure in all subjects and a decline in total pulmonary resistance in five of the seven in whom it was measured. Right ventricular ejection fraction increased 0.05 or more only in subjects who had a decrease in total pulmonary resistance. Isosorbide led to an increase in rest and exercise right and left ventricular ejection fractions with simultaneous decreases in pulmonary artery pressure, total pulmonary resistance, blood pressure and arterial oxygen tension. These results suggest that in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease but without a history of right heart failure, the right ventricular systolic functional response to low flow oxygen and isosorbide at rest and exercise is, in part, determined by changes in total pulmonary resistance. The chronic relation between right ventricular ejection fraction and pulmonary hemodynamics in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remains to be evaluated.

  18. Contemporary management of acute right ventricular failure: a statement from the Heart Failure Association and the Working Group on Pulmonary Circulation and Right Ventricular Function of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Čelutkienė, Jelena; Bettex, Dominique; Bueno, Hector; Chioncel, Ovidiu; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G; Falk, Volkmar; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Gibbs, Simon; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Lassus, Johan; Masip, Josep; Mueller, Christian; Mullens, Wilfried; Naeije, Robert; Nordegraaf, Anton Vonk; Parissis, John; Riley, Jillian P; Ristic, Arsen; Rosano, Giuseppe; Rudiger, Alain; Ruschitzka, Frank; Seferovic, Petar; Sztrymf, Benjamin; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Yilmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2016-03-01

    Acute right ventricular (RV) failure is a complex clinical syndrome that results from many causes. Research efforts have disproportionately focused on the failing left ventricle, but recently the need has been recognized to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of RV anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology, and of management approaches. Right ventricular mechanics and function are altered in the setting of either pressure overload or volume overload. Failure may also result from a primary reduction of myocardial contractility owing to ischaemia, cardiomyopathy, or arrhythmia. Dysfunction leads to impaired RV filling and increased right atrial pressures. As dysfunction progresses to overt RV failure, the RV chamber becomes more spherical and tricuspid regurgitation is aggravated, a cascade leading to increasing venous congestion. Ventricular interdependence results in impaired left ventricular filling, a decrease in left ventricular stroke volume, and ultimately low cardiac output and cardiogenic shock. Identification and treatment of the underlying cause of RV failure, such as acute pulmonary embolism, acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute decompensation of chronic pulmonary hypertension, RV infarction, or arrhythmia, is the primary management strategy. Judicious fluid management, use of inotropes and vasopressors, assist devices, and a strategy focusing on RV protection for mechanical ventilation if required all play a role in the clinical care of these patients. Future research should aim to address the remaining areas of uncertainty which result from the complexity of RV haemodynamics and lack of conclusive evidence regarding RV-specific treatment approaches. PMID:26995592

  19. Contemporary management of acute right ventricular failure: a statement from the Heart Failure Association and the Working Group on Pulmonary Circulation and Right Ventricular Function of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Čelutkienė, Jelena; Bettex, Dominique; Bueno, Hector; Chioncel, Ovidiu; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G; Falk, Volkmar; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Gibbs, Simon; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Lassus, Johan; Masip, Josep; Mueller, Christian; Mullens, Wilfried; Naeije, Robert; Nordegraaf, Anton Vonk; Parissis, John; Riley, Jillian P; Ristic, Arsen; Rosano, Giuseppe; Rudiger, Alain; Ruschitzka, Frank; Seferovic, Petar; Sztrymf, Benjamin; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Yilmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2016-03-01

    Acute right ventricular (RV) failure is a complex clinical syndrome that results from many causes. Research efforts have disproportionately focused on the failing left ventricle, but recently the need has been recognized to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of RV anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology, and of management approaches. Right ventricular mechanics and function are altered in the setting of either pressure overload or volume overload. Failure may also result from a primary reduction of myocardial contractility owing to ischaemia, cardiomyopathy, or arrhythmia. Dysfunction leads to impaired RV filling and increased right atrial pressures. As dysfunction progresses to overt RV failure, the RV chamber becomes more spherical and tricuspid regurgitation is aggravated, a cascade leading to increasing venous congestion. Ventricular interdependence results in impaired left ventricular filling, a decrease in left ventricular stroke volume, and ultimately low cardiac output and cardiogenic shock. Identification and treatment of the underlying cause of RV failure, such as acute pulmonary embolism, acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute decompensation of chronic pulmonary hypertension, RV infarction, or arrhythmia, is the primary management strategy. Judicious fluid management, use of inotropes and vasopressors, assist devices, and a strategy focusing on RV protection for mechanical ventilation if required all play a role in the clinical care of these patients. Future research should aim to address the remaining areas of uncertainty which result from the complexity of RV haemodynamics and lack of conclusive evidence regarding RV-specific treatment approaches.

  20. Pulmonary toxicity of simulated lunar and Martian dusts in mice: II. Biomarkers of acute responses after intratracheal instillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T.; Latch, Judith N.; Hamilton, Raymond F Jr; Holian, Andrij

    2002-01-01

    Volcanic ashes from Arizona and Hawaii, with chemical and mineral properties similar to those of lunar and Martian soils, respectively, are used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to simulate lunar and Martian environments for instrument tests. NASA needs toxicity data on these volcanic soils to assess health risks from potential exposures of workers in facilities where these soil simulants are used. In this study we investigated the acute effects of lunar soil simulant (LSS) and Martian soil simulant (MSS), as a complement to a histopathological study assessing their subchronic effects (Lam et al., 2002). Fine dust of LSS, MSS, TiO(2), or quartz suspended in saline was intratracheally instilled into C57Bl/6J mice (4/group) in single doses of 0.1 mg/mouse or 1 mg/mouse. The mice were euthanized 4 or 24 h after the dust treatment, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was obtained. Statistically significant lower cell viability and higher total protein concentration in the BALF were seen only in mice treated with the high dose of quartz for 4 h and with the high dose of MSS or quartz for 24 h, compared to mice treated only with saline. A significant increase in the percentage of neutrophils was not observed with any dust-treated group at 4 h after the instillation, but was observed after 24 h in all the dust-treated groups. This observation indicates that these dusts were not acutely toxic and the effects were gradual; it took some time for neutrophils to be recruited into and accumulate significantly in the lung. A statistically significant increase in apoptosis of lavaged macrophages from mice 4 h after treatment was found only in the high-dose silica group. The overall results of this study on the acute effects of these dusts in the lung indicate that LSS is slightly more toxic than TiO(2), and that MSS is comparable to quartz. These results were consistent with the subchronic histopathological findings in that the order of severity of

  1. Correlation between single nucleotide polymorphisms in hypoxia-related genes and susceptibility to acute high-altitude pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Wu, A L; Xiong, Y S; Li, Z Q; Liu, Y G; Quan, Q; Wu, L J

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the relationship between genetic changes and high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) susceptibility, and to screen for the key single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci in the HAPE-susceptibility gene, by investigating the SNPs occurring in hypoxia-related genes in HAPE-susceptible and control (non-susceptible) populations. This research was conducted on Han recruits, who travelled to the Lhasa plateau (altitude, 3658 m). Ten loci located on ten genes extracted from the HAPE and healthy populations were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and subsequently sequenced. The investigated genes included those coding for aldosterone synthase 2 (CYP11B2), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), nitric oxide synthetase (NOS), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), prolyl hydroxylase (EGLN1), and zinc finger protein A20. The gene distribution of each SNP loci and its correlation with HAPE was analyzed. Statistical analyses of the genotype frequencies of the SNPs revealed significant differences in the ACE (rs4309), EGLN1 (rs480902), SP-A2 (rs1965708), HSP70 (rs1008438), PAI-1 (rs1799889), and NOS (rs199983) expressions between the HAPE and healthy control groups (P < 0.05); therefore, these SNP loci were believed to indicate HAPE susceptibility. HAPE is correlated with multiple- SNP loci. A correlation analysis between genetic polymorphism and HAPE susceptibility revealed that 6 hypoxia-related genes were key sites accounting for HAPE. These findings could help assess the risk of HAPE in populations expressing different genotypes, in order to reduce the occurrence of HAPE. PMID:26436397

  2. The association between glucose levels and hospital outcomes in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Ebtesam A.; Limsuwat, Chok; Nantsupawat, Teerapat; Berdine, Gilbert G.; Nugent, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Corticosteroids used for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations can cause hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients, and hyperglycemia may be associated with increased mortality, length of stay (LOS), and re-admissions in these patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We did three retrospective studies using charts from July 2008 through June 2009, January 2006 through December 2010, and October 2010 through March 2011. We collected demographic and clinical information, laboratory results, radiographic results, and information on LOS, mortality, and re-admission. RESULTS: Glucose levels did not predict outcomes in any of the studied cohorts, after adjustment for covariates in multivariable analysis. The first database included 30 patients admitted to non-intensive care unit (ICU) hospital beds. Six of 20 non-diabetic patients had peak glucoses above 200 mg/dl. Nine of the ten diabetic patients had peak glucoses above 200 mg/dl. The maximum daily corticosteroid dose had no apparent effect on the glucose levels. The second database included 217 patients admitted to ICUs. The initial blood glucose was higher in patients who died than those who survived using bivariate analysis (P = 0.015; odds ratio, OR, 1.01) but not in multivariable analysis. Multivariable logistic regression analysis also demonstrated that glucose levels did not affect LOS. The third database analyzing COPD re-admission rates included 81 patients; the peak glucose levels were not associated with re-admission. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that COPD patients treated with corticosteroids developed significant hyperglycemia, but the increase in blood glucose levels did not correlate with the maximum dose of corticosteroids. Blood glucose levels were not associated with mortality, LOS, or re-admission rates. PMID:25829959

  3. Passage of CD18- and CD18+ bovine neutrophils into pulmonary alveoli during acute Pasteurella haemolytica pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M R; Kehrli, M E; Brogden, K A

    1996-11-01

    CD18 is a subunit for three beta 2 integrin molecules (Mac-1, p150, 95, LFA-1), which are expressed on the plasma membrane of neutrophils. These molecules mediate passage of neutrophils into sites of infection. In children and animals that lack CD18 expression, neutrophil infiltration is impaired in most tissues. However, in lung, CD18- neutrophils have been identified in the airway spaces during spontaneous episodes of pneumonia. To determine whether CD18 is vital for passage through the pulmonary alveolar wall, lung lobes of cattle with neutrophils that were deficient in CD18 expression (CD18-) and cattle with normal CD18 expression (CD18+) were inoculated with Pasteurella haemolytica by fiberoptic bronchoscopy; control lobes were inoculated with pyrogen-free saline (PFS). Neutrophil passage into alveolar lumina at 4 and 6 hours postinoculation was measured by computerized image analysis. Blood levels of neutrophils for CD18- cattle ranged from 12- to 26-fold higher than for CD18+ cattle prior to inoculation, and counts in both groups rose slightly postinoculation. In P. haemolytica-inoculated lobes, total numbers of neutrophils in alveolar lumina of the two groups were similar. An increase in the number of neutrophils in the alveolar wall was fourfold greater in CD18- cattle than in CD18+ cattle. In PFS-inoculated lobes, the number of neutrophils in the alveolar wall was sixfold higher in CD18 cattle than in CD18+ cattle. This work shows that by 4 and 6 hours, CD18- neutrophils enter the alveolar lumen at a rate similar to that in CD18+ cattle. Higher numbers of CD18- neutrophils are present in the alveolar wall of control (PFS) and bacteria-inoculated lobes. Thus, the CD18- cells are increased in the walls of alveoli and numbers of neutrophils that enter the alveolar lumen are similar in CD18+ and CD18- cattle. PMID:8952022

  4. Imaging of congenital pulmonary malformations.

    PubMed

    Praticò, Francesco Emanuele; Corrado, Michele; Della Casa, Giovanni; Parziale, Raffaele; Russo, Giuseppe; Gazzani, Silvia Eleonora; Rossi, Enrica; Borgia, Daniele; Mostardi, Maurizio; Bacchini, Emanuele; Cella, Simone; De Filippo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary malformations represent a broad spectrum of anomalies that may result in varied clinical and pathologic pictures, ranging from recurrent pulmonary infections and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which require timely drug therapy, up to large space-occupying lesions needing surgical treatment. This classification includes three distinct anatomical and pathological entities, represented by Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation, Bronchopulmonary Sequestration and Congenital Lobar Emphysema. The final result in terms of embryological and fetal development of these alterations is a Congenital Lung Hypoplasia. Since even Bronchial Atresia, Pulmonary Bronchogenic Cysts and Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernias are due to Pulmonary Hypoplasia, these diseases will be discussed in this review (1, 2). PMID:27467867

  5. Acute effect of pretreatment with single conventional dose of salmeterol on dose-response curve to oxitropium bromide in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Cazzola, M.; Di, P; Centanni, S.; Califano, C.; Donner, C. F.; D'Amato, M.; D'Amato, G.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—An earlier study documented that, in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), addition of ipratropium bromide at the clinically recommended dose (40 µg) does not produce any further bronchodilation than that achieved with salmeterol 50 µg alone. However, the dose of ipratropium bromide needed to produce near maximal bronchodilation is several times higher than the customary dosage. The full therapeutic potential of combined salmeterol plus an anticholinergic drug can therefore only be established using doses higher than those currently recommended in the marketing of these agents. A study was undertaken to examine the possible acute effects of higher than conventional doses of an anticholinergic agent on the single dose salmeterol induced bronchodilation in patients with stable and partially reversible COPD.
METHODS—Thirty two outpatients received 50 µg salmeterol or placebo. Two hours after inhalation a dose-response curve to inhaled oxitropium bromide (100 µg/puff) or placebo was constructed using one puff, one puff, two puffs, and two puffs—that is, a total cumulative dose of 600 µg oxitropium bromide. Dose increments were given at 20 minute intervals with measurements being made 15 minutes after each dose. On four separate days all patients received one of the following: (1) 50 µg salmeterol + 600 µg oxitropium bromide; (2) 50 µg salmeterol + placebo; (3) placebo + 600 µg oxitropium bromide; (4) placebo +placebo.
RESULTS—Salmeterol induced a good bronchodilation (mean increase 0.272 l; 95% CI 0.207 to 0.337) two hours after its inhalation. Oxitropium bromide elicited an evident dose-dependent increase in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and this occurred also after pretreatment with salmeterol with a further mean maximum increase of 0.152 l (95% CI of differences 0.124 to 0.180).
CONCLUSIONS—This study shows that acute pretreatment with 50 µg salmeterol does not block the possibility of

  6. β-Blockers for the prevention of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (βLOCK COPD): a randomised controlled study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Surya P; Connett, John E; Voelker, Helen; Lindberg, Sarah M; Westfall, Elizabeth; Wells, J Michael; Lazarus, Stephen C; Criner, Gerard J; Dransfield, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A substantial majority of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-related morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs are due to acute exacerbations, but existing medications have only a modest effect on reducing their frequency, even when used in combination. Observational studies suggest β-blockers may reduce the risk of COPD exacerbations; thus, we will conduct a randomised, placebo-controlled trial to definitively assess the impact of metoprolol succinate on the rate of COPD exacerbations. Methods and analyses This is a multicentre, placebo-controlled, double-blind, prospective randomised trial that will enrol 1028 patients with at least moderately severe COPD over a 3-year period. Participants with at least moderate COPD will be randomised in a 1:1 fashion to receive metoprolol or placebo; the cohort will be enriched for patients at high risk for exacerbations. Patients will be screened and then randomised over a 2-week period and will then undergo a dose titration period for the following 6 weeks. Thereafter, patients will be followed for 42 additional weeks on their target dose of metoprolol or placebo followed by a 4-week washout period. The primary end point is time to first occurrence of an acute exacerbation during the treatment period. Secondary end points include rates and severity of COPD exacerbations; rate of major cardiovascular events; all-cause mortality; lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)); dyspnoea; quality of life; exercise capacity; markers of cardiac stretch (pro-NT brain natriuretic peptide) and systemic inflammation (high-sensitivity C reactive protein and fibrinogen). Analyses will be performed on an intent-to-treat basis. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol has been approved by the Department of Defense Human Protection Research Office and will be approved by the institutional review board of all participating centres. Study findings will be disseminated through presentations at national

  7. Prevalence of anemia and its impact on mortality in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a developing country setting.

    PubMed

    Rahimi-Rad, Mohammad Hossein; Sadighi, Tannaz; Rabieepour, Masomeh; Dinparast, Reza; RahimiRad, Shagayegh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is going to be the third most common cause of death worldwide. The natural course of COPD is interrupted by acute exacerbations (AECOPD) with an overall mortality rate of 10%. Anemia is a well-known independent predictor of mortality in several chronic diseases. Little is known about the impact of anemia on mortality in AECOPD. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of anemia in AECOPD patients and its impact on mortality in a developing country setting. We retrospectively studied 200 hospitalized patients with AECOPD (100 died in hospital and 100 survived) in Imam Khomeini teaching hospital, Urmia, Iran. Prevalence of anemia between deceased and surviving patients compared by using x-square test. Mean admission day Hb and Hct level were compared between the two groups by using Student t-test. Anemia was defined according to WHO criteria: Hb<13 g/dl in males; Hb<12 g/dl in females. The prevalence of anemia was significantly higher in patients who died in hospital compared to those who survived (72% vs. 49%, p=0.001 and OR=2.68). The mean ±SD Hb level was 11.5±2.7 g/dl among deceased patients vs. 13.0±2.0 g/dl among survivors (p value<0.001). The duration of hospitalization was significantly higher (p<0,001) in anemic patients (mean 13.28 days in anemic vs. 7.0 days in non-anemic patients). In bivariate correlation analysis, Hb was positively correlated with FEV1 (r=+0.210, p=0.011) and negatively with duration of hospitalization (r=-0.389, p=0.000). Anemia was common in AECOPD patients in this developing country setting and was significantly associated with in hospital mortality.

  8. Analysis of blood neutrophil elastase, glutathione levels and pathological findings in postoperative acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis associated with lung cancer: Two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Sugino, Keishi; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Muramatsu, Yoko; Hata, Yoshinobu; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Homma, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Acute exacerbation (AE) of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by severe worsening dyspnea and high mortality. It has been proven that the serum neutrophil elastase (NE) level, in addition to the serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6) and surfactant protein-D (SP-D) levels, was elevated in patients with IPF-AE. Glutathione (GSH) is the major antioxidant involved in cell metabolism and survival. It is also known that IPF is characterized by reduced GSH levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and blood. Case 1 was a 67-year-old man who was referred to our hospital complaining of a 2-year history of progressive dyspnea on exertion (DOE). The patient was initially diagnosed with IPF, followed by inhaled N-acetylcysteine monotherapy. Two years later, left upper lobectomy with lymph node dissection was performed due to primary lung cancer, which was large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (pT2aN2M0, stage IIIA). Five days after lung surgery, the patient developed AE. Case 2 was a 67-year-old man who was referred to our hospital with suspected lung cancer, complaining of dry cough and DOE. The patient underwent left upper lobectomy with lymph node dissection for primary lung cancer, which was diagnosed as well-differentiated adenocarcinoma (pT2aN2M0, stage IIIA). Ten days after lung surgery, the patient developed AE. The levels of biomarkers, such as serum NE, redox balance [reduced GSH (rGSH)/oxidized GSH (GSSG)] in the blood, as well as the correlation between serial changes of these biomarkers and prognosis, were analyzed in 2 patients with postoperative IPF-AE associated with lung cancer. Interestingly, the serial changes of the serum rGSH/GSSG ratio may suggest the possibility of predicting the onset of postoperative AE and/or survival, along with serum NE levels.

  9. Acute effects of light emitting diodes therapy (LEDT) in muscle function during isometric exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: preliminary results of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Eduardo Foschini; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Marchetti, Paulo Henrique; Dal Corso, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are susceptible to early muscle fatigue. Light-emitting diodes therapy (LEDT) has been used to minimize muscle fatigue in athletes and healthy subjects. The aim of this study is to investigate the acute effects of LEDT on muscle fatigue and perception of effort in patients with COPD during isometric endurance test of the quadriceps femoris (QF). Ten patients (VEF₁ 50 ± 13% of predicted) underwent a single LEDT and sham application, 48 h apart, in a randomized crossover design. The LEDT and sham were applied in three localized areas of the QF (rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, and vastus medialis). Before and after exposure to LEDT and sham, the patients performed an isometric endurance test (60 % of the maximum voluntary isometric contraction), until the limit of tolerance concomitant to surface electromyography recording (median frequency as mean outcome). The slope obtained from linear regression analysis of the median frequency (MF) over endurance time was also used as an endurance index. Endurance time increased significantly after exposure to LEDT (from 26 ± 2 to 53 ± 5 s) as compared to sham (from 23 ± 3 to 30 ± 4 s) (F = 64, P = 0.0001). A greater decline in MF was observed during isometric endurance test after sham, compared to LEDT (F = 14.6, P = 0.004). The slope of the MF over time was lower post-LEDT compared to post-sham (-0.7 ± 0.3 vs. -1.5 ± 0.8; P = 0.004). The dyspnea score corrected for endurance time was lower post-LEDT (P = 0.008) but similar for fatigue both post-LEDT and post-sham. A single application of LEDT minimizes muscle fatigue and increases isometric endurance time.

  10. Effects of acute inhalation of aerosols generated during resistance spot welding with mild-steel on pulmonary, vascular and immune responses in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Meighan, Terence G.; Erdely, Aaron; Fedan, Jeffrey S.; Thompson, Janet A.; Bilgesu, Suzan; Waugh, Stacey; Anderson, Stacey; Marshall, Nikki B.; Afshari, Aliakbar; McKinney, Walter; Frazer, David G.; Antonini, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Spot welding is used in the automotive and aircraft industries, where high-speed, repetitive welding is needed to join thin sections of metal. Epoxy adhesives are applied as sealers to the metal seams. Pulmonary function abnormalities and airway irritation have been reported in spot welders, but no animal toxicology studies exist. Therefore, the goal of this study was to investigate vascular, immune and lung toxicity measures after exposure to these metal fumes in an animal model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed by inhalation to 25 mg/m3 to either mild-steel spot welding aerosols with sparking (high metal, HM) or without sparking (low metal, LM) for 4 h/d for 3, 8 and 13 d. Shams were exposed to filtered air. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), lung gene expression and ex vivo BAL cell challenge were performed to assess lung toxicity. Lung resistance (RL) was evaluated before and after challenge with inhaled methacholine (MCh). Functional assessment of the vascular endothelium in isolated rat tail arteries and leukocyte differentiation in the spleen and lymph nodes via flow cytometry was also done. Immediately after exposure, baseline RL was significantly elevated in the LM spot welding aerosols, but returned to control level by 24 h postexposure. Airway reactivity to MCh was unaffected. Lung inflammation and cytotoxicity were mild and transient. Lung epithelial permeability was significantly increased after 3 and 8 d, but not after 13 d of exposure to the HM aerosol. HM aerosols also caused vascular endothelial dysfunction and increased CD4+, CD8+ and B cells in the spleen. Only LM aerosols caused increased IL-6 and MCP-1 levels compared with sham after ex vivo LPS stimulation in BAL macrophages. Acute inhalation of mild-steel spot welding fumes at occupationally relevant concentrations may act as an irritant as evidenced by the increased RL and result in endothelial dysfunction, but otherwise had minor effects on the lung. PMID:25140454

  11. Therapeutic Effects of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Models of Pulmonary and Extrapulmonary Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; He, Hongli; Liu, Airan; Xu, Jingyuan; Han, Jibin; Chen, Qihong; Hu, Shuling; Xu, Xiuping; Huang, Yingzi; Guo, Fengmei; Yang, Yi; Qiu, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) offer a promising therapy for acute lung injury (ALI). However, whether the same MSC treatments possess similar potential for different ALI models is not fully clear. The present study evaluated the distribution and therapeutic effects of intravenous MSC administration for the treatment of intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intrapulmonary ALI and intravenous LPS/zymosan-induced extrapulmonary ALI, matched with lung injury severity, at 30 min and 1, 3, and 7 days. We found that MSC transplantation attenuated lung injury and inhibited lung inflammation in both ALI models. The benefits of MSCs were more significant in the intrapulmonary ALI mice. In vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging showed that MSCs primarily homed into the lung. However, more MSCs were recruited into the lungs of the intrapulmonary ALI mice than those of the extrapulmonary ALI mice over the time course. A few MSCs were also detected in the liver and spleen at days 3 and 7. In addition, the two ALI models showed different extrapulmonary organ dysfunction. A lower percentage of cell apoptosis and SDF-1α levels was found in the liver and spleen of the intrapulmonary ALI mice than in those of the extrapulmonary ALI mice. These results suggested that the two ALI models were accompanied with different degrees of extrapulmonary organ damage, which resulted in differences in the trafficking and accumulation of MSCs to the injured lung and consequently accounted for different therapeutic effects of MSCs for lung repair in the two ALI models. These data suggest that intravenous administration of MSCs has a greater potential for the treatment of intrapulmonary ALI than extrapulmonary ALI matched with lung injury severity; these differences were due to more recruitment of MSCs in the lungs of intrapulmonary ALI mice than those of extrapulmonary ALI mice. This finding may contribute to the clinical use of MSCs for the treatment of ALI. PMID

  12. Safety and Efficacy of Combined Extracorporeal Co2 Removal and Renal Replacement Therapy in Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Acute Kidney Injury: The Pulmonary and Renal Support in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Study*

    PubMed Central

    Castanier, Matthias; Signouret, Thomas; Soundaravelou, Rettinavelou; Lepidi, Anne; Seghboyan, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining extracorporeal Co2 removal with continuous renal replacement therapy in patients presenting with acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury. Design: Prospective human observational study. Settings: Patients received volume-controlled mechanical ventilation according to the acute respiratory distress syndrome net protocol. Continuous venovenous hemofiltration therapy was titrated to maintain maximum blood flow and an effluent flow of 45 mL/kg/h with 33% predilution. Patients: Eleven patients presenting with both acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury required renal replacement therapy. Interventions: A membrane oxygenator (0.65 m2) was inserted within the hemofiltration circuit, either upstream (n = 7) or downstream (n = 5) of the hemofilter. Baseline corresponded to tidal volume 6 mL/kg of predicted body weight without extracorporeal Co2 removal. The primary endpoint was 20% reduction in Paco2 at 20 minutes after extracorporeal Co2 removal initiation. Tidal volume was subsequently reduced to 4 mL/kg for the remaining 72 hours. Measurements and Main Results: Twelve combined therapies were conducted in the 11 patients. Age was 70 ± 9 years, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II was 69 ± 13, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score was 14 ± 4, lung injury score was 3 ± 0.5, and Pao2/Fio2 was 135 ± 41. Adding extracorporeal Co2 removal at tidal volume 6 mL/kg decreased Paco2 by 21% (95% CI, 17–25%), from 47 ± 11 to 37 ± 8 Torr (p < 0.001). Lowering tidal volume to 4 mL/kg reduced minute ventilation from 7.8 ± 1.5 to 5.2 ± 1.1 L/min and plateau pressure from 25 ± 4 to 21 ± 3 cm H2O and raised Paco2 from 37 ± 8 to 48 ± 10 Torr (all p < 0.001). On an average of both positions, the oxygenator’s blood flow was 410 ± 30 mL/min and the Co2 removal rate was 83 ± 20 mL/min. The oxygenator blood flow (p <0.001) and the Co2 removal rate (p = 0.083) were higher when

  13. Acute mountain sickness

    MedlinePlus

    High altitude cerebral edema; Altitude anoxia; Altitude sickness; Mountain sickness; High altitude pulmonary edema ... Acute mountain sickness is caused by reduced air pressure and lower oxygen levels at high altitudes. The faster you ...

  14. World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of New-Onset Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and WTC-Related Acute Traumatic Injury to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program conducted a review of published, peer-reviewed epidemiologic studies regarding potential evidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and acute traumatic injury among individuals who were responders to or survivors of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The Administrator of the WTC Health Program (Administrator) found that these studies provide substantial evidence to support a causal association between each of these health conditions and 9/11 exposures. As a result, the Administrator is publishing a final rule to add both new-onset COPD and WTC-related acute traumatic injury to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions eligible for treatment coverage in the WTC Health Program.

  15. World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of New-Onset Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and WTC-Related Acute Traumatic Injury to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program conducted a review of published, peer-reviewed epidemiologic studies regarding potential evidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and acute traumatic injury among individuals who were responders to or survivors of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The Administrator of the WTC Health Program (Administrator) found that these studies provide substantial evidence to support a causal association between each of these health conditions and 9/11 exposures. As a result, the Administrator is publishing a final rule to add both new-onset COPD and WTC-related acute traumatic injury to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions eligible for treatment coverage in the WTC Health Program. PMID:27382662

  16. [EFFICIENCY OF COMBINATION OF ROFLUMILAST AND QUERCETIN FOR CORRECTION OXYGEN- INDEPENDENT MECHANISMS AND PHAGOCYTIC ACTIVITY OF MACROPHAGE CELLS OF PATIENTS WITH ACUTE EXACERBATION OF CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE WHEN COMBINED WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Gerych, P; Yatsyshyn, R

    2015-01-01

    Studied oxygen independent reaction and phagocytic activity of macrophage cells of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) II-III stage when combined with coronary heart disease (CHD). The increasing oxygen independent reactions monocytes and neutrophils and a decrease of the parameters that characterize the functional state of phagocytic cells, indicating a decrease in the functional capacity of macrophage phagocytic system (MPS) in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD, which runs as its own or in combination with stable coronary heart disease angina I-II. FC. Severity immunodeficiency state in terms of cellular component of nonspecific immunity in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD II-III stage in conjunction with the accompanying CHD increases with the progression of heart failure. Inclusion of basic therapy of COPD exacerbation and standard treatment of coronary artery disease and drug combinations Roflumilastand quercetin causes normalization of phagocytic indices MFS, indicating improved immune status and improves myocardial perfusion in terms of daily ECG monitoring.

  17. Patterns, Trajectories, and Predictors of Functional Decline after Hospitalization for Acute Exacerbations in Men with Moderate to Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Bernabeu-Mora, Roberto; García-Guillamón, Gloria; Valera Novella, Elisa; Gacto-Sánchez, Mariano; García-Vidal, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospitalization for acute exacerbations (AE) of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is common, but little is known about the impact of hospitalization on the development of disability. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate and time course of functional changes 3 months after hospital discharge for AE-COPD compared with baseline levels 2 weeks before admission, and to identify predictors of functional decline. Methods This was a prospective study including 103 patients (age mean, 71 years; standard deviation, 9.1 years) who were hospitalized with AE-COPD. Number of dependencies in Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) was measured at the preadmission baseline and at weeks 6 and 12 after discharge. Patterns of improvement, no change, and decline were defined over 3 consecutive intervals (baseline and weeks 6 and 12). Trajectories grouped patients with similar time courses of disability. Recovery was defined as returning to baseline function after functional decline. Univariate and multivariate multiple logistic regression was used to determine predictors of functional decline after week 12. Results Six trajectories of functional changes were found. From baseline to 12 weeks, 50% of patients continued to have the same function whereas 31% experienced functional decline after 6 weeks; 16.7% recovered over subsequent weeks. At week 12, as a consequence of all trajectories, 38% of patients showed functional declines compared with baseline function, 57% had not declined, and 6 improved. Length of stay (odds ratio [OR] = 1.12;95% [confidence interval] CI 1.03–1.22), dyspnea (OR = 1.85; 95% CI 1.05–3.26), and frailty (OR = 3.97; 95% CI 1.13–13.92) were independent predictors of functional decline after 12 weeks. Conclusions Hospitalization for AE-COPD is a risk factor for the progression of disability. More than one third of patients hospitalized for AE-COPD declined during the 12 weeks following discharge, with most of this decline

  18. Different characteristics associated with intensive care unit transfer from the medical ward between patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with and without pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hong-Joon; Park, Cheol-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Ok; Ban, Hee-Jung; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Yu-Il; Kwon, Yong-Soo; Kim, Young-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Background The rate of hospitalization due to acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is increasing. Few studies have examined the clinical, laboratory and treatment differences between patients in general wards and those who need transfer to an intensive care unit (ICU). Methods We retrospectively reviewed clinical, laboratory, and treatment characteristics of 374 patients who were initially admitted to the general ward at Chonnam National University Hospital in South Korea due to AECOPD (pneumonic, 194; non-pneumonic, 180) between January 2008 and March 2015. Of these patients, 325 were managed at the medical ward during their hospitalization period (ward group), and 49 required ICU transfer (ICU group). We compared the clinical, laboratory, and treatment characteristics associated with ICU transfer between patients with AECOPD with and without pneumonia. Results Male patients were 86.5% in the ward group and 79.6% in the ICU group. High glucose levels [median 154.5 mg/dL, interquartile range (IQR) 126.8–218.3 in ICU group vs. median 133.0, IQR 109.8–160.3 in ward group], high pneumonia severity index scores (median 100.5, IQR 85.5–118.5 vs. median 86.0, IQR 75.0–103.5), low albumin levels (median 2.9 g/dL, IQR 2.6–3.6 vs. median 3.4, IQR 3.0–3.7), and anemia (73.3% vs. 43.3%) independently increased the risk of ICU transfer in the pneumonic AECOPD group. High PaCO2 levels (median 53.1 mmHg in ICU group, IQR 38.5–84.6 vs. median 39.7, IQR 34.2–48.6 in ward group) independently increased the risk of ICU transfer in the non-pneumonic AECOPD group. Treatment with systemic corticosteroids (≥30 mg of daily prednisolone) during hospitalization in the medical ward independently reduced the risk of ICU transfer in both groups. Conclusions The characteristics associated with ICU transfer differed between the pneumonic and non-pneumonic AECOPD groups, and systemic corticosteroids use was associated with lower rate of ICU

  19. Effects of acute inhalation of aerosols generated during resistance spot welding with mild-steel on pulmonary, vascular and immune responses in rats.

    PubMed

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Meighan, Terence G; Erdely, Aaron; Fedan, Jeffrey S; Thompson, Janet A; Bilgesu, Suzan; Waugh, Stacey; Anderson, Stacey; Marshall, Nikki B; Afshari, Aliakbar; McKinney, Walter; Frazer, David G; Antonini, James M

    2014-10-01

    Spot welding is used in the automotive and aircraft industries, where high-speed, repetitive welding is needed to join thin sections of metal. Epoxy adhesives are applied as sealers to the metal seams. Pulmonary function abnormalities and airway irritation have been reported in spot welders, but no animal toxicology studies exist. Therefore, the goal of this study was to investigate vascular, immune and lung toxicity measures after exposure to these metal fumes in an animal model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed by inhalation to 25 mg/m³ to either mild-steel spot welding aerosols with sparking (high metal, HM) or without sparking (low metal, LM) for 4 h/d for 3, 8 and 13 d. Shams were exposed to filtered air. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), lung gene expression and ex vivo BAL cell challenge were performed to assess lung toxicity. Lung resistance (R(L)) was evaluated before and after challenge with inhaled methacholine (MCh). Functional assessment of the vascular endothelium in isolated rat tail arteries and leukocyte differentiation in the spleen and lymph nodes via flow cytometry was also done. Immediately after exposure, baseline R(L) was significantly elevated in the LM spot welding aerosols, but returned to control level by 24 h postexposure. Airway reactivity to MCh was unaffected. Lung inflammation and cytotoxicity were mild and transient. Lung epithelial permeability was significantly increased after 3 and 8 d, but not after 13 d of exposure to the HM aerosol. HM aerosols also caused vascular endothelial dysfunction and increased CD4+, CD8+ and B cells in the spleen. Only LM aerosols caused increased IL-6 and MCP-1 levels compared with sham after ex vivo LPS stimulation in BAL macrophages. Acute inhalation of mild-steel spot welding fumes at occupationally relevant concentrations may act as an irritant as evidenced by the increased R(L) and result in endothelial dysfunction, but otherwise had minor effects on the lung. PMID:25140454

  20. Effects of acute inhalation of aerosols generated during resistance spot welding with mild-steel on pulmonary, vascular and immune responses in rats.

    PubMed

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Meighan, Terence G; Erdely, Aaron; Fedan, Jeffrey S; Thompson, Janet A; Bilgesu, Suzan; Waugh, Stacey; Anderson, Stacey; Marshall, Nikki B; Afshari, Aliakbar; McKinney, Walter; Frazer, David G; Antonini, James M

    2014-10-01

    Spot welding is used in the automotive and aircraft industries, where high-speed, repetitive welding is needed to join thin sections of metal. Epoxy adhesives are applied as sealers to the metal seams. Pulmonary function abnormalities and airway irritation have been reported in spot welders, but no animal toxicology studies exist. Therefore, the goal of this study was to investigate vascular, immune and lung toxicity measures after exposure to these metal fumes in an animal model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed by inhalation to 25 mg/m³ to either mild-steel spot welding aerosols with sparking (high metal, HM) or without sparking (low metal, LM) for 4 h/d for 3, 8 and 13 d. Shams were exposed to filtered air. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), lung gene expression and ex vivo BAL cell challenge were performed to assess lung toxicity. Lung resistance (R(L)) was evaluated before and after challenge with inhaled methacholine (MCh). Functional assessment of the vascular endothelium in isolated rat tail arteries and leukocyte differentiation in the spleen and lymph nodes via flow cytometry was also done. Immediately after exposure, baseline R(L) was significantly elevated in the LM spot welding aerosols, but returned to control level by 24 h postexposure. Airway reactivity to MCh was unaffected. Lung inflammation and cytotoxicity were mild and transient. Lung epithelial permeability was significantly increased after 3 and 8 d, but not after 13 d of exposure to the HM aerosol. HM aerosols also caused vascular endothelial dysfunction and increased CD4+, CD8+ and B cells in the spleen. Only LM aerosols caused increased IL-6 and MCP-1 levels compared with sham after ex vivo LPS stimulation in BAL macrophages. Acute inhalation of mild-steel spot welding fumes at occupationally relevant concentrations may act as an irritant as evidenced by the increased R(L) and result in endothelial dysfunction, but otherwise had minor effects on the lung.

  1. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary embolism is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot ... loose and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a serious condition that can ...

  2. Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the tissue deep in your lungs becomes scarred over time. This tissue ... may not get enough oxygen. Causes of pulmonary fibrosis include environmental pollutants, some medicines, some connective tissue ...

  3. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary Rehabilitation If you have shortness of breath because of lung problems, you may have asked yourself: • Can I ... medications do I really need to take? Pulmonary rehabilitation can help answer these and other questions. Enrolling ...

  4. Pulmonary Hypertension Secondary to COPD.

    PubMed

    Shujaat, Adil; Bajwa, Abubakr A; Cury, James D

    2012-01-01

    The development of pulmonary hypertension in COPD adversely affects survival and exercise capacity and is associated with an increased risk of severe acute exacerbations. Unfortunately not all patients with COPD who meet criteria for long term oxygen therapy benefit from it. Even in those who benefit from long term oxygen therapy, such therapy may reverse the elevated pulmonary artery pressure but cannot normalize it. Moreover, the recent discovery of the key roles of endothelial dysfunction and inflammation in the pathogenesis of PH provides the rationale for considering specific pulmonary vasodilators that also possess antiproliferative properties and statins.

  5. Pulmonary hypertension associated with acute or chronic lung diseases in the preterm and term neonate and infant. The European Paediatric Pulmonary Vascular Disease Network, endorsed by ISHLT and DGPK.

    PubMed

    Hilgendorff, Anne; Apitz, Christian; Bonnet, Damien; Hansmann, Georg

    2016-05-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is the most common neonatal form and mostly reversible after a few days with improvement of the underlying pulmonary condition. When pulmonary hypertension (PH) persists despite adequate treatment, the severity of parenchymal lung disease should be assessed by chest CT. Pulmonary vein stenosis may need to be ruled out by cardiac catheterisation and lung biopsy, and genetic workup is necessary when alveolar capillary dysplasia is suspected. In PPHN, optimisation of the cardiopulmonary situation including surfactant therapy should aim for preductal SpO2between 91% and 95% and severe cases without post-tricuspid-unrestrictive shunt may receive prostaglandin E1 to maintain ductal patency in right heart failure. Inhaled nitric oxide is indicated in mechanically ventilated infants to reduce the need for extracorporal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and sildenafil can be considered when this therapy is not available. ECMO may be indicated according to the ELSO guidelines. In older preterm infant, where PH is mainly associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or in term infants with developmental lung anomalies such as congenital diaphragmatic hernia or cardiac anomalies, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction/left atrial hypertension or pulmonary vein stenosis, can add to the complexity of the disease. Here, oral or intravenous sildenafil should be considered for PH treatment in BPD, the latter for critically ill patients. Furthermore, prostanoids, mineralcorticoid receptor antagonists, and diuretics can be beneficial. Infants with proven or suspected PH should receive close follow-up, including preductal/postductal SpO2measurements, echocardiography and laboratory work-up including NT-proBNP, guided by clinical improvement or lack thereof. PMID:27053698

  6. Pulmonary hypertension associated with acute or chronic lung diseases in the preterm and term neonate and infant. The European Paediatric Pulmonary Vascular Disease Network, endorsed by ISHLT and DGPK.

    PubMed

    Hilgendorff, Anne; Apitz, Christian; Bonnet, Damien; Hansmann, Georg

    2016-05-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is the most common neonatal form and mostly reversible after a few days with improvement of the underlying pulmonary condition. When pulmonary hypertension (PH) persists despite adequate treatment, the severity of parenchymal lung disease should be assessed by chest CT. Pulmonary vein stenosis may need to be ruled out by cardiac catheterisation and lung biopsy, and genetic workup is necessary when alveolar capillary dysplasia is suspected. In PPHN, optimisation of the cardiopulmonary situation including surfactant therapy should aim for preductal SpO2between 91% and 95% and severe cases without post-tricuspid-unrestrictive shunt may receive prostaglandin E1 to maintain ductal patency in right heart failure. Inhaled nitric oxide is indicated in mechanically ventilated infants to reduce the need for extracorporal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and sildenafil can be considered when this therapy is not available. ECMO may be indicated according to the ELSO guidelines. In older preterm infant, where PH is mainly associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or in term infants with developmental lung anomalies such as congenital diaphragmatic hernia or cardiac anomalies, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction/left atrial hypertension or pulmonary vein stenosis, can add to the complexity of the disease. Here, oral or intravenous sildenafil should be considered for PH treatment in BPD, the latter for critically ill patients. Furthermore, prostanoids, mineralcorticoid receptor antagonists, and diuretics can be beneficial. Infants with proven or suspected PH should receive close follow-up, including preductal/postductal SpO2measurements, echocardiography and laboratory work-up including NT-proBNP, guided by clinical improvement or lack thereof.

  7. Pulmonary oedema of immersion.

    PubMed

    Koehle, Michael S; Lepawsky, Michael; McKenzie, Donald C

    2005-01-01

    Acute pulmonary oedema has been described in individuals participating in three aquatic activities: (i) scuba diving; (ii) breath-hold diving; and (iii) endurance swimming. In this review, 60 published cases have been compiled for comparison. Variables considered included: age; past medical history; activity; water depth, type (salt or fresh) and temperature; clinical presentation; investigations; management; and outcome. From these data, we conclude that a similar phenomenon is occurring among scuba, breath-hold divers and swimmers. The pathophysiology is likely a pulmonary overperfusion mechanism. High pulmonary capillary pressures lead to extravasation of fluid into the interstitium. This overperfusion is caused by the increase in ambient pressure, peripheral vasoconstriction from ambient cold, and increased pulmonary blood flow resulting from exercise. Affected individuals are typically healthy males and females. Older individuals may be at higher risk. The most common symptoms are cough and dyspnoea, with haemoptysis also a frequent occurrence. Chest pain has never been reported. Radiography is the investigation of choice, demonstrating typical findings for pulmonary oedema. Management is supportive, with oxygen the mainstay of treatment. Cases usually resolve within 24 hours. In some cases, diuretics have been used, but there are no data as to their efficacy. Nifedipine has been used to prevent recurrence, but there is only anecdotal evidence to support its use.

  8. Acute Ozone (O3) Exposure Accelerates Diet-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Metabolic Alterations in a Rat Model of Type II Diabetes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract for Society of Toxicology, March 22-25, 2015, San Diego, CAAcute Ozone (O3) Exposure Accelerates Diet-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Metabolic Alterations in a Rat Model of Type II DiabetesS.J. Snow1,3, D. Miller2, V. Bass2, M. Schladweiler3, A. Ledbetter3, J. Richards3, C...

  9. Pulmonary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Troosters, Thierry; Demeyer, Heleen; Hornikx, Miek; Camillo, Carlos Augusto; Janssens, Wim

    2014-03-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is a therapy that offers benefits to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease that are complementary to those obtained by pharmacotherapy. The main objective of pulmonary rehabilitation is to restore muscle function and exercise tolerance, reverse other nonrespiratory consequences of the disease, and help patients to self-manage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its exacerbations and symptoms. To do so, a multidisciplinary program tailored to the patient in terms of program content, exercise prescription, and setting must be offered. Several settings and programs have shown to spin off in significant immediate results. The challenge lies in maintaining the benefits outside the program. PMID:24507849

  10. Clinical Decision-Making Tool for Safe and Effective Prescription of Exercise in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Results From an Interdisciplinary Delphi Survey and Focus Groups

    PubMed Central

    Reid, W. Darlene; Chung, Frank; Kirkham, Ashley; Brooks, Dina; Goodridge, Donna; Marciniuk, Darcy D.; Hoens, Alison M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise is recommended for people with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD), yet there is little information to guide safe and effective mobilization and exercise for these patients. Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop a clinical decision-making tool to guide health care professionals in the assessment, prescription, monitoring, and progression of mobilization and therapeutic exercise for patients with AECOPD. Design and Methods A 3-round interdisciplinary Delphi panel identified and selected items based on a preselected consensus of 80%. These items were summarized in a paper-based tool titled Mobilization in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (AECOPD-Mob). Focus groups and questionnaires were subsequently used to conduct a sensibility evaluation of the tool. Results Nine researchers, 13 clinicians, and 7 individuals with COPD identified and approved 110 parameters for safe and effective exercise in AECOPD. These parameters were grouped into 5 categories: (1) “What to Assess Prior to Mobilization,” (2) “When to Consider Not Mobilizing or to Discontinue Mobilization,” (3) “What to Monitor During Mobilization for Patient Safety,” (4) “How to Progress Mobilization to Enhance Effectiveness,” and (5) “What to Confirm Prior to Discharge.” The tool was evaluated in 4 focus groups of 18 health care professionals, 90% of whom reported the tool was easy to use, was concise, and would guide a health care professional who is new to the acute care setting and working with patients with AECOPD. Limitations The tool was developed based on published evidence and expert opinion, so the applicability of the items to patients in all settings cannot be guaranteed. The Delphi panel consisted of health care professionals from Canada, so items may not be generalizable to other jurisdictions. Conclusions The AECOPD-Mob provides practical and concise information on safe and

  11. Relapsing acute respiratory failure induced by minocycline.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Mauro; Liaudet, Lucas; Lepori, Mattia; Broccard, Alain F; Schaller, Marie-Denise

    2003-06-01

    The antibiotic minocycline, which is used in the treatment of acne, has been associated with various pulmonary complications such as pulmonary lupus and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. We now report a particularly severe case of minocycline-related pulmonary toxicity that was characterized by a relapsing form of hypersensitivity eosinophilic pneumonia complicated by acute respiratory failure.

  12. Pulmonary edema of scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Hampson, N B; Dunford, R G

    1997-01-01

    A syndrome of acute pulmonary edema has been previously reported among scuba divers in cold, European waters. Because of the temperatures involved, the name "cold-induced pulmonary edema" was coined in the original 1989 description. We report six individuals who developed the identical syndrome, five while diving in Puget Sound and one in the Gulf of Mexico. The four women and two men ranged in age from 24 to 60 yr. They experienced one to six episodes apiece, each with the development severe dyspnea at depth without excessive exertion. Associated symptoms included cough, weakness, expectoration of froth, chest discomfort, orthopnea, wheezing, hemoptysis, and dizziness. Emergency medical evaluation of four divers revealed rales on examination and pulmonary edema on chest radiograph. In one diver with pulmonary edema on chest radiograph, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was normal when measured acutely. Symptoms resolved either spontaneously over 1-2 days or with standard medial treatment for pulmonary edema. Prior history of cardiovascular disease was negative except for hypertension and mitral valve prolapse in one diver. Cardiac evaluations following recovery from the acute episodes were normal. Episodes in the cold waters of Puget Sound sometimes occurred despite the use of dry suits. Furthermore, one diver developed recurrent episodes in 27 degrees C water off Cozumel, Mexico. Development of pulmonary edema while scuba diving constitutes a distinct clinical entity which may occur in either "cold" or "warm" water. It is not associated with a decompression mechanism. Personnel caring for divers should be aware of the syndrome in order to provide optimal medical management.

  13. Splenectomy and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jais, X; Ioos, V; Jardim, C; Sitbon, O; Parent, F; Hamid, A; Fadel, E; Dartevelle, P; Simonneau, G; Humbert, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: An increased prevalence of splenectomy has been reported in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Examination of small pulmonary arteries from these subjects has revealed multiple thrombotic lesions, suggesting that thrombosis may contribute to this condition. Based on these findings, we hypothesised that splenectomy could be a risk factor for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), a condition defined by the absence of thrombus resolution after acute pulmonary embolism that causes sustained obstruction of the pulmonary arteries and subsequent pulmonary hypertension. Methods: The medical history, clinical characteristics, thrombotic risk factors and haemodynamics of 257 patients referred for CTEPH between 1989 and 1999 were reviewed. In a case-control study the prevalence of splenectomy in patients with CTEPH was compared with that of patients evaluated during the same period for idiopathic pulmonary hypertension (n = 276) or for lung transplantation in other chronic pulmonary conditions (n = 180). Results: In patients with CTEPH, 8.6% (95% CI 5.2 to 12.0) had a history of splenectomy compared with 2.5% (95% CI 0.7 to 4.4) and 0.56% (95% CI 0 to 1.6) in cases of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and other chronic pulmonary conditions, respectively (p<0.01). Conclusion: Splenectomy may be a risk factor for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:16085731

  14. The effect of composition, size, and solubility on acute pulmonary injury in rats following exposure to Mexico city ambient particulate matter samples.

    PubMed

    Snow, Samantha J; De Vizcaya-Ruiz, Andrea; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Thomas, Ronald F; Schladweiler, Mette C; McGee, John; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2014-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM)-associated metals can contribute to adverse cardiopulmonary effects following exposure to air pollution. The aim of this study was to investigate how variation in the composition and size of ambient PM collected from two distinct regions in Mexico City relates to toxicity differences. Male Wistar Kyoto rats (14 wk) were intratracheally instilled with chemically characterized PM10 and PM2.5 from the north and PM10 from the south of Mexico City (3 mg/kg). Both water-soluble and acid-leachable fractions contained several metals, with levels generally higher in PM10 South. The insoluble and total, but not soluble, fractions of all PM induced pulmonary damage that was indicated by significant increases in neutrophilic inflammation, and several lung injury biomarkers including total protein, albumin, lactate dehydrogenase activity, and γ-glutamyl transferase activity 24 and 72 h postexposure. PM10 North and PM2.5 North also significantly decreased levels of the antioxidant ascorbic acid. Elevation in lung mRNA biomarkers of inflammation (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α and macrophage inflammatory protein [MIP]-2), oxidative stress (heme oxygenase [HO]-1, lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor [LOX]-1, and inducibile nitric oxide synthase [iNOS]), and thrombosis (tissue factor [TF] and plasminogen activator inhibitor [PAI]-1), as well as reduced levels of fibrinolytic protein tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), further indicated pulmonary injury following PM exposure. These responses were more pronounced with PM10 South (PM10 South > PM10 North > PM2.5 North), which contained higher levels of redox-active transition metals that may have contributed to specific differences in selected lung gene markers. These findings provide evidence that surface chemistry of the PM core and not the water-soluble fraction played an important role in regulating in vivo pulmonary toxicity responses to Mexico City PM. PMID:25119738

  15. [Pulmonary rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Senjyu, Hideaki

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation commenced in Japan in 1957. However, the development of pulmonary rehabilitation took a long time due to the lack of the necessary health and medical services. Pulmonary rehabilitation is a comprehensive intervention based on a thorough patient assessment followed by patient-tailored therapies that include, but are not limited to, exercise training, education, and behavior change, designed to improve the physical and psychological condition of people with chronic respiratory disease and to promote the long-term adherence to health-enhancing behaviors. The benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation include a decrease in breathlessness and an improvement in exercise tolerance. It is important that the gains in exercise tolerance lead to an increase in daily physical activity. PMID:27254948

  16. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... that damage the lungs, such as scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis Birth defects of the heart Blood clots in the lung ( pulmonary embolism ) Heart failure Heart valve disease HIV infection Low oxygen levels in the blood ...

  17. Pulmonary aspergilloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coccidioidomycosis Cystic fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung abscess Lung cancer Sarcoidosis See also: Aspergillosis Symptoms You may not have ... fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung cancer - small cell Pulmonary tuberculosis Sarcoidosis Update Date 8/31/2014 Updated by: Jatin ...

  18. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  19. Adjuvant therapy with methylene blue in the treatment of right ventricular failure after pulmonary embolectomy.

    PubMed

    Raikhelkar, Jayashree K; Milla, Federico; Darrow, Bruce; Scurlock, Corey

    2011-04-01

    Severe pulmonary embolism often leads to right ventricular failure after surgical embolectomy secondary to ischaemia reperfusion injury and acute lung injury (ALI). Acute right ventricular dysfunction is traditionally treated with inotropes and vasopressors to maintain cardiac output and coronary perfusion as well as selective pulmonary vasodilators to provide right ventricular afterload reduction. We report the first case of utilisation of methylene (MB) in a patient with acute right ventricular failure and vasoplegic shock after surgical pulmonary embolectomy. PMID:20952252

  20. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  1. Acute pulmonary pathology and sudden death in rats following the intravenous administration of the plasticizer, DI (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, solubilized with Tween surfactants. [pathology of vinyl plastics poisoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, C. O.; Rubin, R. J.; Hutchins, G. M.

    1975-01-01

    Intravenous administration of 200-300 mg/kg of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) solubilized in aqueous solutions of several Tween surfactants caused respiratory distress in rats. There was a dose-dependent lethality with death generally occurring within 90 minutes after injection. The lungs from DEHP:Tween treated animals were enlarged, generally darkened, and in some cases showed hemorrhagic congestion. Neither the overt symptoms nor the morphologic alterations resulting from DEHP:Tween administration could be reproduced by intravenous administration of aqueous Tween solutions alone. The absence of pulmonary abnormalities following the intravenous administration of DEHP as an aqueous emulsion given either alone or even as soon as 2 minutes after pretreatment with Tween 80, suggests that the specific in vivo interaction between DEHP and Tween surfactants depends on the prior formation of water-soluble micelles of DEHP.

  2. Naloxone-induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, J A; Koenigsberg, M D

    1987-11-01

    We present the case of a 68-year-old woman with acute pulmonary edema secondary to the administration of naloxone to reverse an inadvertent narcotic overdose. The patient presented following a 12-hour history of increasingly bizarre behavior and confusion. A total IV dose of 1.6 mg naloxone was administered in an attempt to reverse the suspected overconsumption of a codeine-containing cough suppressant. She immediately became agitated, tachycardic, and diaphoretic; a clinical diagnosis of acute pulmonary edema was made. Following treatment with furosemide, nitroglycerin, and morphine sulfate, the patient recovered completely without further incident. Although naloxone is thought to be a safe drug with few complications, it should not be used indiscriminantly, and the smallest doses necessary to elicit the desired response should be used. PMID:3662194

  3. Early Supported Discharge/Hospital At Home For Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Echevarria, Carlos; Brewin, Karen; Horobin, Hazel; Bryant, Andrew; Corbett, Sally; Steer, John; Bourke, Stephen C

    2016-08-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to assess the safety, efficacy and cost of Early Supported Discharge (ESD) and Hospital at Home (HAH) compared to Usual Care (UC) for patients with acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD). The structure of ESD/HAH schemes was reviewed, and analyses performed assuming return to hospital during the acute period (prior to discharge from home treatment) was, and was not, considered a readmission. The pre-defined search strategy completed in November 2014 included electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Amed, BNI, Cinahl and HMIC), libraries, current trials registers, national organisations, key respiratory journals, key author contact and grey literature. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing ESD/HAH to UC in patients admitted with AECOPD, or attending the emergency department and triaged for admission, were included. Outcome measures were mortality, all-cause readmissions to 6 months and cost. Eight RCTs were identified; seven reported mortality and readmissions. The structure of ESD/HAH schemes, particularly selection criteria applied and level of support provided, varied considerably. Compared to UC, ESD/HAH showed a trend towards lower mortality (RRMH = 0.66; 95% CI 0.40-1.09, p = 0.10). If return to hospital during the acute period was not considered a readmission, ESD/HAH was associated with fewer readmissions (RRMH = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.60-0.90, p = 0.003), but if considered a readmission, the benefit was lost (RRMH = 0.84; 95% CI 0.69-1.01, p = 0.07). Costs were lower for ESD/HAH than UC. ESD/HAH is safe in selected patients with an AECOPD. Further research is required to define optimal criteria to guide patient selection and models of care. PMID:26854816

  4. PULMONARY TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary disease and dysfunction exact a tremendous health burden on society. In a recent survey of lung disease published by the American Lung Association in 2012, upwards of 10 million Americans were diagnosed with chronic bronchitis while over 4 million Americans had emphysem...

  5. Pulmonary ascariasis.

    PubMed

    Mukerjee, C M; Thompson, J E

    1979-07-28

    A case of pulmonary ascariasis is reported for the first time in Australia. Because of increasing immigration from countries which have a high incidence of ascariasis (especially those of South-East Asia), and increasing travel to Asian countries, the awareness of this infestation as a cause of respiratory disease may be of great importance. PMID:40103

  6. Pulmonary schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Hill, I R; Turk, E P

    1980-09-01

    Two cases are reported of the incidental finding of pulmonary schistosomiasis in the victims of a fatal aircraft accident. The presence of this disease had no bearing on the causation of the accident, but it gives insight into the potential hazards of dissemination of diseases by travellers. The finding also emphasises the value of routine postmortems and histology in all aircraft accident victims.

  7. VASCULAR AND THROMBOGENIC EFFECTS OF PULMONARY EXPOSURE TO LIBBY AMPHIBOLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute pulmonary injury and chronic disease can impact the systemic vasculature through the release of inflammogenic and vasoactive mediators from the lung into the circulation. Exposure to Libby amphibole (LA) asbestos is associated with increased human cardiovascular mortality a...

  8. Endobronchial ultrasound for the detection of chronic pulmonary artery thrombus.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Samjot Singh; Harris, Kassem

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) has been shown to be able to successfully identify acute/subacute pulmonary thromboembolism (PE). Most reported cases have required confirmation by computerized tomography (CT) angiography. This report demonstrates a case where CT angiography was not conclusive and the EBUS was useful in clarifying the chronic process inside the pulmonary artery compatible with clinical diagnosis of chronic pulmonary artery thrombosis. PMID:27503162

  9. The management of acute pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Wells, T A; Curzen, N P

    2005-01-01

    Acute pericarditis is usually a benign self-limiting condition, often of unexplained or viral aetiology, involving inflammation of the pericardial layers. It is often part of the differential diagnosis in patients admitted with acute chest pain and can be confused with acute myocardial infarction, acute pulmonary embolism and pleurisy. Occasionally it can result in cardiac tamponade and, if associated with myocarditis, in heart failure. This article sets out how to diagnose acute pericarditis, the common underlying causes, the possible treatment options and outcomes. PMID:21655516

  10. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout ... is too high, it is called pulmonary hypertension (PH). How the pressure in the right side of ...

  11. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension? Pulmonary hypertension (PH) begins with inflammation and changes in the ... different types of PH. Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may have no known cause, or the ...

  12. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, pregnancy, and a pulmonary endarterectomy: a rare challenge

    PubMed Central

    Biscotti, Mauer; Cleary, Kirsten; Smiley, Richard; Bacchetta, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It is well described that patients with group 1 forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension have a high risk of mortality during pregnancy and in the early postpartum period. However, to the authors’ knowledge, the diagnosis and management of group 4 pulmonary hypertension due to chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) during pregnancy with early postpartum pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) has not been previously reported. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman who received a diagnosis of CTEPH during her pregnancy, was managed as an inpatient by a multidisciplinary team throughout the pregnancy and early postpartum period, and underwent PEA 6 weeks after delivery. While the management of acute pulmonary embolus in pregnancy is well described, this unique case of CTEPH diagnosed during pregnancy illustrates several challenging management issues. PMID:27683616

  13. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, pregnancy, and a pulmonary endarterectomy: a rare challenge.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Erika B; Biscotti, Mauer; Cleary, Kirsten; Smiley, Richard; Bacchetta, Matthew D

    2016-09-01

    It is well described that patients with group 1 forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension have a high risk of mortality during pregnancy and in the early postpartum period. However, to the authors' knowledge, the diagnosis and management of group 4 pulmonary hypertension due to chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) during pregnancy with early postpartum pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) has not been previously reported. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman who received a diagnosis of CTEPH during her pregnancy, was managed as an inpatient by a multidisciplinary team throughout the pregnancy and early postpartum period, and underwent PEA 6 weeks after delivery. While the management of acute pulmonary embolus in pregnancy is well described, this unique case of CTEPH diagnosed during pregnancy illustrates several challenging management issues. PMID:27683616

  14. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, pregnancy, and a pulmonary endarterectomy: a rare challenge

    PubMed Central

    Biscotti, Mauer; Cleary, Kirsten; Smiley, Richard; Bacchetta, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It is well described that patients with group 1 forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension have a high risk of mortality during pregnancy and in the early postpartum period. However, to the authors’ knowledge, the diagnosis and management of group 4 pulmonary hypertension due to chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) during pregnancy with early postpartum pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) has not been previously reported. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman who received a diagnosis of CTEPH during her pregnancy, was managed as an inpatient by a multidisciplinary team throughout the pregnancy and early postpartum period, and underwent PEA 6 weeks after delivery. While the management of acute pulmonary embolus in pregnancy is well described, this unique case of CTEPH diagnosed during pregnancy illustrates several challenging management issues.

  15. Patient characteristics associated with risk of first hospital admission and readmission for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) following primary care COPD diagnosis: a cohort study using linked electronic patient records

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, L C; Lee, R J; Butcher, I; Weir, C J; Fischbacher, C M; McAllister, D; Wild, S H; Hewitt, N; Hardie, R M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate patient characteristics of an unselected primary care population associated with risk of first hospital admission and readmission for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). Design Retrospective open cohort using pseudonymised electronic primary care data linked to secondary care data. Setting Primary care; Lothian (population approximately 800 000), Scotland. Participants Data from 7002 patients from 72 general practices with a COPD diagnosis date between 2000 and 2008 recorded in their primary care record. Patients were followed up until 2010, death or they left a participating practice. Main outcome measures First and subsequent admissions for AECOPD (International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 10 codes J44.0, J44.1 in any diagnostic position) after COPD diagnosis in primary care. Results 1756 (25%) patients had at least 1 AECOPD admission; 794 (11%) had at least 1 readmission and the risk of readmission increased with each admission. Older age at diagnosis, more severe COPD, low body mass index (BMI), current smoking, increasing deprivation, COPD admissions and interventions for COPD prior to diagnosis in primary care, and comorbidities were associated with higher risk of first AECOPD admission in an adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression model. More severe COPD and COPD admission prior to primary care diagnosis were associated with increased risk of AECOPD readmission in an adjusted Prentice-Williams-Peterson model. High BMI was associated with a lower risk of first AECOPD admission and readmission. Conclusions Several patient characteristics were associated with first AECOPD admission in a primary care cohort of people with COPD but fewer were associated with readmission. Prompt diagnosis in primary care may reduce the risk of AECOPD admission and readmission. The study highlights the important role of primary care in preventing or delaying a first AECOPD admission. PMID:26801463

  16. The protective effect of amifostine on radiation-induced acute pulmonary toxicity: Detection by {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA transalveolar clearances

    SciTech Connect

    Uzal, Cem . E-mail: cemuzal@yahoo.com; Durmus-Altun, Gulay; Caloglu, Murat; Erguelen, Alev; Altaner, Semsi; Yigitbasi, N. Omer

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine by using {sup 99m}Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) lung scintigraphy whether amifostine given before irradiation protects alveolocapillary integrity in a rabbit model. Methods and materials: Twenty white New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups: (1) control (CONT), (2) amifostine alone (AMF), (3) radiation (RAD), and (4) radiation plus amifostine (RAD+AMF). The AMF and RAD+AMF groups received amifostine. The RAD and RAD+AMF groups were irradiated to the right hemithorax with a single dose of 20 Gy using a {sup 60}Co treatment unit. Amifostine (200 mg/kg) was given i.p. 30 min before irradiation. The {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA radioaerosol study was performed 14 day after irradiation. Results: The mean clearance rate of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA in control subjects was 140 {+-} 21 min. The highest t{sub 1}/2 value was noted in the RAD group (603 {+-} 105 min, p = 0.001). There were no significant differences between the {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA lung clearance rates of the CONT, RAD+AMF (238 {+-} 24 min), and AMF groups (227 {+-} 54 min). The mean penetration index values of CONT, RAD, AMF, and RAD+AMF are 63% {+-} 1.6%, 63% {+-} 2.5%, 60% {+-} 2.9%, and 63% {+-} 2%, respectively. Conclusions: We concluded that amifostine treatment before the lung irradiation protects the lung alveolocapillary integrity. This study confirms the protective effect of amifostine in an acute phase of radiation lung injury.

  17. Aneurysm of the pulmonary vein: an unusual cause of stroke.

    PubMed

    Emmert, Alexander; Jebran, Ahmad Fawad; Schmidt, Karsten; Hinterthaner, Marc; Bohnenberger, Hanibal; Bähr, Mathias; Schöndube, Friedrich A; Danner, Bernhard C

    2014-11-01

    This clinical report deals with a giant true pulmonary venous aneurysm, which was partially thrombosed. The overall incidence of pulmonary venous aneurysms is unknown, and they are reported only occasionally. We present the case of a previously healthy man with acute onset of ischemic cerebral stroke. The cause was a thrombus in a huge aneurysm of the left superior pulmonary vein. The patient subsequently underwent uncomplicated therapy for stroke, including thrombolysis followed by excision of the giant pulmonary venous aneurysm. As curative therapy we recommend complete resection of this rare entity.

  18. [Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma mimicking pulmonary carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Uçvet, Ahmet; Tözüm, Halil; Gürsoy, Soner; Gülle, Ali Alper; Yaldiz, Sadik; Aydoğdu Dinç, Zekiye

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma is a rare fibrosing nodular disease of the lung characterized by solitary or multiple pulmonary nodules. They can occur after inflammatory or post-inflammatory changes. A 60 years old asymptomatic patient admitted to our clinic because of a solid mass of 6 cm in his routine chest radiography. A lobectomy was performed and the histological diagnosis was reported as pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma. This case, mimicking pulmonary carcinoma, is rarely found in the literature. PMID:16615022

  19. Role of Vasodilator Testing in Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Abhishek; Obiagwu, Chukwudi; Mezue, Kenechukwu; Garg, Aakash; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Haythe, Jennifer; Shetty, Vijay; Einstein, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is clinically defined by a mean pulmonary artery (PA) pressure of 25mm Hg or more at rest, as measured by right heart catheterization. To identify patients who are likely to have a beneficial response to calcium channel blockers (CCBs) and therefore a better prognosis, acute vasodilator testing should be performed in patients in certain subsets of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). A near normalization of pulmonary hemodynamics is needed before patients can be considered for therapy with CCBs. Intravenous adenosine, intravenous epoprostenol, inhaled nitric oxide, or inhaled iloprost are the standard agents used for vasoreactivity testing in patients with idiopathic PAH. In this review we describe the various aspects of vasodilator testing including the rationale, pathophysiology and agents used in the procedure.

  20. Lung transcriptional profiling: insights into the mechanisms of ozone-induced pulmonary injury in Wistar Kyoto rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized in rats; however, mechanistic understanding of the pathways involved is limited. We hypothesized that acute exposure of healthy rats to ozone will cause transcriptional alterations, and comprehensive ana...

  1. Regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate on pulmonary neutrophil aggregation mediated by nuclear factor-κB in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongman; Zhao, Jiping; Xue, Guansheng; Wang, Junfei; Wu, Jinxiang; Wang, Donghui; Dong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 (ENA-78) on pulmonary neutrophil (PMN) accumulation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mice, and the therapeutic effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), was investigated. BALB/c mice were divided into control, LPS and PDTC + LPS groups using a random number table. The phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was detected using a western blot, and the mRNA expression levels of CINC were evaluated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The expression of NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 was detected using immunohistochemistry. The production of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-10 in serum and broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The total number of leukocytes and proportion of PMNs in BALF was also determined. Following injection with LPS (20 mg/kg), the expression levels of p-NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 were increased in lung tissue, and the expression levels of IL-8, IL-10 and the number of PMNs increased in serum and BALF. However, in comparison with the LPS group, the degree of lung injury was reduced in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC. In addition, the expression level of p-NF-κB and the production of chemokines in lung tissue decreased in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC, and the number of PMNs in BALF also decreased. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that the LPS-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB may result in the synthesis and release of CINC and ENA-78, which induce the accumulation of PMNs in the lung. Therefore, PDTC may be used to reduce the production of chemokines and cytokines, thereby decreasing the activation of PMNs in lung tissue and reducing the damage of lung tissue in ARDS. PMID:27602092

  2. Regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate on pulmonary neutrophil aggregation mediated by nuclear factor-κB in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongman; Zhao, Jiping; Xue, Guansheng; Wang, Junfei; Wu, Jinxiang; Wang, Donghui; Dong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 (ENA-78) on pulmonary neutrophil (PMN) accumulation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mice, and the therapeutic effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), was investigated. BALB/c mice were divided into control, LPS and PDTC + LPS groups using a random number table. The phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was detected using a western blot, and the mRNA expression levels of CINC were evaluated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The expression of NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 was detected using immunohistochemistry. The production of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-10 in serum and broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The total number of leukocytes and proportion of PMNs in BALF was also determined. Following injection with LPS (20 mg/kg), the expression levels of p-NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 were increased in lung tissue, and the expression levels of IL-8, IL-10 and the number of PMNs increased in serum and BALF. However, in comparison with the LPS group, the degree of lung injury was reduced in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC. In addition, the expression level of p-NF-κB and the production of chemokines in lung tissue decreased in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC, and the number of PMNs in BALF also decreased. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that the LPS-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB may result in the synthesis and release of CINC and ENA-78, which induce the accumulation of PMNs in the lung. Therefore, PDTC may be used to reduce the production of chemokines and cytokines, thereby decreasing the activation of PMNs in lung tissue and reducing the damage of lung tissue in ARDS.

  3. Xuan Bai Cheng Qi formula as an adjuvant treatment of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease of the syndrome type phlegm-heat obstructing the lungs: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is used to treat AECOPD as adjunctive therapy. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the TCM formula Xuan Bai Cheng Qi as an adjuvant therapy for AECOPD patients with the syndrome type of phlegm-heat obstructing the lungs. Methods A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted. A total of 244 patients were divided into the intervention group (n = 122, treated with conventional medicine and Xuan Bai Cheng Qi) and the control group (n = 122, treated with conventional medicine and placebo). Total symptom scores (cough, phlegm, wheezing, chest congestion) before treatment and at 3, 5, 7, 10 days post-treatment were recorded. Lung function, arterial blood gas, serum inflammatory cytokines, oxidation/anti-oxidation index were observed before treatment and at the end of the 10-day treatment. Results A total of 242 patients completed the study. The full analysis set (FAS) population was 244 and the per-protocol analysis set (PPS) population was 229. After the 10-day treatment, symptom scores of the Xuan Bai Cheng Qi group were significantly lower over time compared with the control group (FAS: mean difference -1.84, 95% CI -2.66 to -1.03, P < .001; PPS: mean difference -1.87, 95% CI -2.71 to -1.03, P < .001). FEV1, FVC, and FEV1%pred were significantly higher over time in the Xuan Bai Cheng Qi group compared with those in the control group (day 10, FAS and PPS: P < .05). PaO2 and PaCO2 were significantly improved in the Xuan Bai Cheng Qi group (day 10, FAS and PPS: P < .05). Xuan Bai Cheng Qi was also found to ameliorate cytokine levels and oxidation/antioxidant index compared with placebo. There were no differences in safety variables and adverse events between the two groups. Conclusions Xuan Bai Cheng Qi formula appears to be a

  4. Electrocardiographic findings in pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Boey, Elaine; Teo, Swee-Guan; Poh, Kian-Keong

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) poses a challenge to physicians, as it can be difficult to diagnose but results in significant mortality and morbidity in patients. Diagnosing PE requires an integrated approach using clinical findings, electrocardiography (ECG), blood investigations and imaging modalities. Abnormalities in ECG are common among patients with massive acute PE and can serve as a prognostic indicator. In this article, we describe the ECG presentations of two patients diagnosed with PE, and review the literature on the various types of ECG presentations and their role in predicting the prognosis of PE.

  5. Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension. Epidemiology and Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Delcroix, Marion; Kerr, Kim; Fedullo, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a rare complication of pulmonary embolism. As for most rare diseases, epidemiologic data are scarce, but recent registries suggest an incidence of at least 5 per million inhabitants per year. A history of massive or recurrent acute pulmonary embolism is observed in most patients with CTEPH, but the proportion of patients who develop CTEPH after acute pulmonary embolism is a matter of debate, further complicated by the possible misdiagnosis of CTEPH as acute pulmonary embolism. A complete resolution of thrombi is usually not achieved after acute pulmonary embolism, and the clinical relevance of a "postpulmonary embolism syndrome" with persistent perfusion defects and exercise intolerance is discussed. Risk factors most consistently associated with CTEPH are circulating anti-phospholipid antibodies or lupus anticoagulant, increased factor VIII, non-O blood groups, and chronic inflammatory diseases. There is no female predominance, and it is a disease of older age. Survival in the absence of specific surgical or medical treatment is poor and depends on the hemodynamic severity. PMID:27571001

  6. [Pulmonary complications of malaria: An update].

    PubMed

    Cabezón Estévanez, Itxasne; Górgolas Hernández-Mora, Miguel

    2016-04-15

    Malaria is the most important parasitic disease worldwide, being a public health challenge in more than 90 countries. The incidence of pulmonary manifestations has increased in recent years. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is the most severe form within the pulmonary complications of malaria, with high mortality despite proper management. This syndrome manifests with sudden dyspnoea, cough and refractory hypoxaemia. Patients should be admitted to intensive care units and treated with parenteral antimalarial drug treatment and ventilatory and haemodynamic support without delay. Therefore, dyspnoea in patients with malaria should alert clinicians, as the development of respiratory distress is a poor prognostic factor.

  7. Pulmonary endarterectomy after pulmonary infectious embolisms

    PubMed Central

    Heiberg, Johan; Ilkjær, Lars B.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) is a well-established procedure in the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTPH). The procedure is known to increase functional outcome and to raise the 5-year survival rate. We report 2 cases of pulmonary valve endocarditis and secondary embolisms causing sustained pulmonary hypertension. Both were treated with PEA. In none of the cases, a cleavage between the thrombotic masses and the vessel wall was obtainable, and both attempts were therefore inadequate. Based on our reports, we recommend not attempting PEA in cases of CTPH after infectious embolisms. PMID:23248168

  8. Interim prostacyclin therapy for an isolated disconnected pulmonary artery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Disconnected pulmonary arteries are unusual and may result in pulmonary hypertension with acute right heart failure. Case presentation We report a case of a three-month-old Asian girl who presented with heart failure and severe pulmonary hypertension due to a disconnected right pulmonary artery. An epoprostenol (prostacyclin) infusion was instrumental in lowering pulmonary artery pressures and stabilizing the child prior to surgery. Conclusions This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of successful prostacyclin usage in such a situation. PMID:20525186

  9. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here: Health Information > Condition Information Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis: Overview When two or more members within the ... Associate Professor View full profile More Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Information Forms Causes Genetic Counseling Print Page Email ...

  10. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis? Pulmonary fibrosis (PULL-mun-ary fi-BRO-sis) is a ... time. The formation of scar tissue is called fibrosis. As the lung tissue thickens, your lungs can' ...

  11. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Hantavirus Share Compartir Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Severe HPS. Image courtesy D. ... the workers showed evidence of infection or illness. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Topics Transmission Where HPS is ...

  12. Who Needs Pulmonary Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... other symptoms. Examples of interstitial lung diseases include sarcoidosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis . Cystic fibrosis (CF). CF ...

  13. Physiological mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    MacIver, David H; Adeniran, Ismail; MacIver, Iain R; Revell, Alistair; Zhang, Henggui

    2016-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is usually related to obstruction of pulmonary blood flow at the level of the pulmonary arteries (eg, pulmonary embolus), pulmonary arterioles (idiopathic pulmonary hypertension), pulmonary veins (pulmonary venoocclusive disease) or mitral valve (mitral stenosis and regurgitation). Pulmonary hypertension is also observed in heart failure due to left ventricle myocardial diseases regardless of the ejection fraction. Pulmonary hypertension is often regarded as a passive response to the obstruction to pulmonary flow. We review established fluid dynamics and physiology and discuss the mechanisms underlying pulmonary hypertension. The important role that the right ventricle plays in the development and maintenance of pulmonary hypertension is discussed. We use principles of thermodynamics and discuss a potential common mechanism for a number of disease states, including pulmonary edema, through adding pressure energy to the pulmonary circulation. PMID:27659877

  14. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 ...

  15. Hantavirus fever without pulmonary syndrome in Panama.

    PubMed

    Armien, Blas; Pascale, Juan M; Muñoz, Carlos; Mariñas, Jamileth; Núñez, Heydy; Herrera, Milagro; Trujillo, José; Sánchez, Deyanira; Mendoza, Yaxelis; Hjelle, Brian; Koster, Frederick

    2013-09-01

    In Panama, hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is caused by Choclo virus, a species phylogenetically related to Andes and Maporal viruses. Up to 60% of the population has been positive for specific serum antibody in community-based surveys, but mortality is very uncommon. In four western Panama clinics, we tested individuals presenting with a severe febrile prodrome for acute hantavirus (HV) infection by immunoglobulin M enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction as well as clinically similar infections, such as dengue and leptospirosis. From 2006 to 2009, at least 21% of 117 patients diagnosed with HV infection had HV Fever (HF) with no evidence of pulmonary edema (no respiratory distress or radiographic lung infiltrates), and 44% of patients had very mild HPS (radiographic pulmonary edema but no respiratory insufficiency). HV infection caused by Choclo virus in Panama presents often as HF, which contrasts with HV in the Americas but is consistent with the high seroprevalence in endemic regions.

  16. Diagnosis and Vasculopathy in Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is characterized by pulmonary hypertension caused by nonresolving thromboemboli of the pulmonary artery. However, up to 40% of CTEPH patients have had no clinically apparent acute pulmonary embolic episodes. In addition, both a female predominance and an association of HLA with CTEPH unrelated to deep vein thrombosis are observed in Japan, thus suggesting this condition to be a type of pulmonary vasculopathy. The key for making an accurate diagnosis is to consider CTEPH in any patients with dyspnea on exertion. Perfusion scans provide an excellent noninvasive tool for distinguishing between pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and CTEPH, while CT angiography is useful for differentiating arteritis, tumor, and a congenital anomaly of the pulmonary artery from CTEPH. Pulmonary angiography (PAG) is still considered the gold standard for evaluating CTEPH. No subpleural perfusion in any segments by PAG with high pulmonary vascular resistance is might be related to small vessel disease, thus resulting in a poor outcome after surgery. Recent data suggest a potential therapeutic benefit of antiproliferative therapy for cells isolated from endarterectomized tissue. PMID:23555373

  17. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma.

    PubMed

    Gans, S J; van der Elst, A M; Straks, W

    1988-04-01

    A patient with pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) is presented. PHG is a rare disease with very specific histological characteristics. Roentgenograms display multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules which may be cavitated. Evidence exists that the nodules are the result of an exaggerated chronic immune response. The course of the disease is generally favourable. PHG should be considered in patients showing multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules. PMID:2456228

  18. [Interstitial pulmonary diseases].

    PubMed

    Brasch, F

    2006-03-01

    Interstitial pneumonia is a rare disease, posing a diagnostic challenge to pneumologists, pediatricians, radiologists and pathologists. Only by the combined efforts of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the American Thoracic Society (ATS) has has been possible to standardize the formerly different European and Northern American nomenclature of interstitial lung diseases (alveolitis versus interstitial pneumonia) in adults and to clearly and unambiguously define the diagnostic criteria. The ATS/ERS classification of 2002 comprises seven entities: usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP), respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), lymphocyte interstitial pneumonia (LIP), and acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP). Using the ATS/ERS classification of interstitial pulmonary diseases in premature infants, infants and children is problematic, since UIP, RB-ILD and AIP do not occur at this age. Although infants with severe respiratory insufficiency may sometimes show morphological features similar to DIP or NSIP, this entity should rather be classified as chronic pneumonitis of infancy (CPI) because of differences in etiology, pathogenesis and prognostic outcome.

  19. The right ventricle: interaction with the pulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The primary role of the right ventricle (RV) is to deliver all the blood it receives per beat into the pulmonary circulation without causing right atrial pressure to rise. To the extent that it also does not impede left ventricular (LV) filling, cardiac output responsiveness to increased metabolic demand is optimized. Since cardiac output is a function of metabolic demand of the body, during stress and exercise states the flow to the RV can vary widely. Also, instantaneous venous return varies widely for a constant cardiac output as ventilatory efforts alter the dynamic pressure gradient for venous return. Normally, blood flow varies with minimal changes in pulmonary arterial pressure. Similarly, RV filling normally occurs with minimal increases in right atrial pressure. When pulmonary vascular reserve is compromised RV ejection may also be compromised, increasing right atrial pressure and limiting maximal cardiac output. Acute increases in RV outflow resistance, as may occur with acute pulmonary embolism, will cause acute RV dilation and, by ventricular interdependence, markedly decreased LV diastolic compliance, rapidly spiraling to acute cardiogenic shock and death. Treatments include reversing the causes of pulmonary hypertension and sustaining mean arterial pressure higher than pulmonary artery pressure to maximal RV coronary blood flow. Chronic pulmonary hypertension induces progressive RV hypertrophy to match RV contractility to the increased pulmonary arterial elastance. Once fully developed, RV hypertrophy is associated with a sustained increase in right atrial pressure, impaired LV filling, and decreased exercise tolerance. Treatment focuses on pharmacologic therapies to selectively reduce pulmonary vasomotor tone and diuretics to minimize excessive RV dilation. Owning to the irreversible nature of most forms of pulmonary hypertension, when the pulmonary arterial elastance greatly exceeds the adaptive increase in RV systolic elastance, due to RV dilation

  20. [Pulmonary hemodynamics following experimental myocardial ischemia after the blockade of adrenergic receptors].

    PubMed

    Evlakhov, V I; Poiasov, I Z

    2015-01-01

    In acute experiments in anesthetized rabbits the changes of the pulmonary hemodynamics following 60 s myocardial ischemia in the region of the descendent left coronary artery were studied in control animals and after the blockade of α-adrenoreceptors by phentolamine or β-adrenoreceptors by propranolol. Following myocardial ischemia in control animals the pulmonary artery pressure and flow decreased, the pulmonary vascular resistance did not change, the left atrial pressure elevated; the cardiac output decreased more than pulmonary artery flow. Following myocardial ischemia after the blockade of β-adrenoreceptors the pulmonary artery pressure decreased more than in control animals, the pulmonary artery flow was decreased in the same level as in the last case. The pulmonary vascular resistance was diminished, the left atrial pressure increased; the pulmonary artery flow and cardiac output decreased in the same level. Following myocardial ischemia after the blockade of β-adrenoreceptors the pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance decreased more than after the blockade of α-adrenoreceptors, the left atrial pressure did not change. In both cases the pulmonary artery flow decreased in the same level and its changes were correlated with venous return shifts. The differences of the pulmonary artery changes following myocardial ischemia after the blockade of α- and β-adrenoreceptors are caused not only the different pulmonary vascular resistance changes, but also the left atrial pressure.

  1. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Placement

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Lourdes R.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart disease and pulmonary valve disease need multiple procedures over their lifetimes to replace their pulmonary valves. Chronic pulmonary stenosis, regurgitation, or both have untoward effects on ventricular function and on the clinical status of these patients. To date, all right ventricle–pulmonary artery conduits have had relatively short lifespans. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation, although relatively new, will probably reduce the number of operative procedures that these patients will have to undergo over a lifetime. Refinement and further development of this procedure holds promise for the extension of this technology to other patient populations. PMID:26175629

  2. An unusual cause of flash pulmonary oedema

    PubMed Central

    Palkar, Atul Vijay; Shrivastava, Makardhwaj Sarvadaman; Moulick, Nivedita D

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of young woman who presented with acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema and respiratory failure. She underwent emergent endotracheal intubation and was transferred to the intensive care unit. She responded to intravenous diuretics and positive pressure ventilation. Subsequent workup revealed that she had Graves’ disease and was in thyrotoxic crisis. Therapy with propranolol and propylthiouracil was instituted to which she showed remarkable improvement. PMID:22707683

  3. Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation are Modulated by Adrenal-Derived Stress Hormones

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone exposure promotes pulmonary injury and inflammation. Previously we have characterized systemic changes that occur immediately after acute ozone exposure and are mediated by neuro-hormonal stress response pathway. Both HPA axis and sympathetic tone alterations induce the rel...

  4. [Prophylaxis of Pulmonary Aspiration during General Anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Mori, Yosuke; Sumikura, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary aspiration of gastric or esophageal contents is uncommon; however, it is one of the most severe complications in the perioperative period. The aspiration is associated with possible clinical outcomes, ranging from mild asymptomatic limited episodes of bronchial injury up to the development of a severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. To reduce the incidence of pulmonary aspiration, rapid sequence induction and intubation and awake tracheal intubation are commonly chosen anesthetic techniques for the management of patients at risk of aspiration of gastric or esophageal contents. Although there have been innumerable reports that describe prophylaxis of pulmonary aspiration, currently, there is insufficient evidence to prevent passive regurgitation in at-risk anesthetized patients. Some techniques to prevent pulmonary aspiration entered medical practice on a limited evidence base, but with common sense supporting its use. Properly applied techniques are probably effective at preventing regurgitation in the perioperative period although more randomized controlled trials are awaited to confirm this. Pulmonary aspiration should be prevented using multidisciplinary techniques and considerations that have been shown to improve effectiveness of prophylaxes. However, further research is necessary to support this strategy. PMID:27004384

  5. Severe Pulmonary Toxicity After Myeloablative Conditioning Using Total Body Irradiation: An Assessment of Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, Chris R.; Horwitz, Mitchell E.; Chino, Junzo P.; Craciunescu, Oana; Steffey, Beverly; Folz, Rodney J.; Chao, Nelson J.; Rizzieri, David A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To assess factors associated with severe pulmonary toxicity after myeloablative conditioning using total body irradiation (TBI) followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Methods and Materials: A total of 101 adult patients who underwent TBI-based myeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies at Duke University between 1998 and 2008 were reviewed. TBI was combined with high-dose cyclophosphamide, melphalan, fludarabine, or etoposide, depending on the underlying disease. Acute pulmonary toxicity, occurring within 90 days of transplantation, was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Actuarial overall survival and the cumulative incidence of acute pulmonary toxicity were calculated via the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using a log-rank test. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed to assess factors independently associated with acute severe pulmonary toxicity. Results: The 90-day actuarial risk of developing severe (Grade 3-5) pulmonary toxicity was 33%. Actuarial survival at 90 days was 49% in patients with severe pulmonary toxicity vs. 94% in patients without (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, the number of prior chemotherapy regimens was the only factor independently associated with development of severe pulmonary toxicity (odds ratio, 2.7 per regimen). Conclusions: Severe acute pulmonary toxicity is prevalent after TBI-based myeloablative conditioning regimens, occurring in approximately 33% of patients. The number of prior chemotherapy regimens appears to be an important risk factor.

  6. Life-threatening Dobrava hantavirus infection with unusually extended pulmonary involvement.

    PubMed

    Schütt, M; Meisel, H; Krüger, D H; Ulrich, R; Dalhoff, K; Dodt, C

    2004-07-01

    In Europe, hantavirus infections usually present as hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and its mild form nephropathia epidemica, while clinical cases with severe pulmonary affections are extremely rare and appear to be confined to infections by New World hanta viruses in the Americas. We report on a female patient from Northern Germany, who suffered primarily from severe acute respiratory distress syndrome-like pulmonary failure due to Dobrava hantavirus infection that was complicated by acute renal insufficiency.

  7. Letter to the Editor Reply to commentary by G. Sikri and S. Dua on the article "Correlation between single nucleotide polymorphisms in hypoxia-related genes and susceptibility to acute high-altitude pulmonary edema" published in Genetics and Molecular Research 14 (3): 11562-11572 to the letter published in Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4): 15904-15905.

    PubMed

    Wu, L J

    2016-03-24

    The object in this study was a Han Chinese population in Lhasa, with 3658 m in altitude from Chengdu, which has 505 m in altitude by air. Within 24 to 48 h before the subjects arrived in the plateau, they completed a basic situation questionnaire, under the guidance of medical staff. Within 24 to 48 h after they reached the plateau, the subjects completed an acute plateau disease questionnaire. The diagnostic standard of HAPE and the diagnosis of acute plateau disease were adopted by the Lake Louise diagnostic standards in 1991 and the Chinese Medical Association promulgated the domestic diagnostic criteria on the Third National Plateau Medical Academic Seminar. Other diseases that cause acute symptoms of altitude sickness, such as plateau pulmonary edema, plateau cerebral edema, acute respiratory infections and neurosis, were excluded. According to the Lake Louise standard, questionnaire and symptom score values >3 points were diagnosed as HAPE. According to the national standard, the questionnaire and symptom score values >5 points were diagnosed as HAPE. At the present, morbidity of HAPE remains relatively high in China. The research shows that usually in the case of not taking preventive measures, according to the factors such as altitude, speed, and time of arrival, the incidence of HAPE is 30% to 90%. Epidemiological survey shows that HAPE happens at an altitude of 2500 m above the plateau. And an altitude of 3000 m above the plateau of China is occupied 1/6 of the total land area, the population of permanent residents is more than sixty million. We detected the 200 cases who adapted to plateau and the 106 cases of patients with HAPE susceptibility genes SNP locus, and got the key SNP loci of HAPE susceptibility genes. We maked the corresponding gene chip diagnostic kits.

  8. Letter to the Editor Reply to commentary by G. Sikri and S. Dua on the article "Correlation between single nucleotide polymorphisms in hypoxia-related genes and susceptibility to acute high-altitude pulmonary edema" published in Genetics and Molecular Research 14 (3): 11562-11572 to the letter published in Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4): 15904-15905.

    PubMed

    Wu, L J

    2016-01-01

    The object in this study was a Han Chinese population in Lhasa, with 3658 m in altitude from Chengdu, which has 505 m in altitude by air. Within 24 to 48 h before the subjects arrived in the plateau, they completed a basic situation questionnaire, under the guidance of medical staff. Within 24 to 48 h after they reached the plateau, the subjects completed an acute plateau disease questionnaire. The diagnostic standard of HAPE and the diagnosis of acute plateau disease were adopted by the Lake Louise diagnostic standards in 1991 and the Chinese Medical Association promulgated the domestic diagnostic criteria on the Third National Plateau Medical Academic Seminar. Other diseases that cause acute symptoms of altitude sickness, such as plateau pulmonary edema, plateau cerebral edema, acute respiratory infections and neurosis, were excluded. According to the Lake Louise standard, questionnaire and symptom score values >3 points were diagnosed as HAPE. According to the national standard, the questionnaire and symptom score values >5 points were diagnosed as HAPE. At the present, morbidity of HAPE remains relatively high in China. The research shows that usually in the case of not taking preventive measures, according to the factors such as altitude, speed, and time of arrival, the incidence of HAPE is 30% to 90%. Epidemiological survey shows that HAPE happens at an altitude of 2500 m above the plateau. And an altitude of 3000 m above the plateau of China is occupied 1/6 of the total land area, the population of permanent residents is more than sixty million. We detected the 200 cases who adapted to plateau and the 106 cases of patients with HAPE susceptibility genes SNP locus, and got the key SNP loci of HAPE susceptibility genes. We maked the corresponding gene chip diagnostic kits. PMID:27050977

  9. Acute kidney injury with hypoxic respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Zachary; Hoffmann, Paul; Owshalimpur, David

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old Caucasian man was transferred from a remote clinic with acute kidney injury for the prior 7–10 days preceded by gastroenteritis. His kidney biopsy showed non-specific mesangiopathic glomerular changes, minimal tubulointerstitial disease without sclerosis, crescents, nor evidence of vasculitis. On his third hospital day, he developed acute hypoxic respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. Pulmonary renal syndromes ranked highest on his differential diagnosis. He was extubated after 2 days of mechanical ventilation and after pulse dose steroids. His lung biopsy showed pulmonary capillaritis. Our case describes a patient with clinically appearing renopulmonary syndrome, but found to have pulmonary capillaritis, a rare form of lung disease that may also cause acute kidney injury. PMID:25246473

  10. At high cardiac output, diesel exhaust exposure increases pulmonary vascular resistance and decreases distensibility of pulmonary resistive vessels.

    PubMed

    Wauters, Aurélien; Vicenzi, Marco; De Becker, Benjamin; Riga, Jean-Philippe; Esmaeilzadeh, Fatemeh; Faoro, Vitalie; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; van de Borne, Philippe; Argacha, Jean-François

    2015-12-15

    Air pollution has recently been associated with the development of acute decompensated heart failure, but the underlying biological mechanisms remain unclear. A pulmonary vasoconstrictor effect of air pollution, combined with its systemic effects, may precipitate decompensated heart failure. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) under resting and stress conditions but also to determine whether air pollution may potentiate acquired pulmonary hypertension. Eighteen healthy male volunteers were exposed to ambient air (AA) or dilute DE with a particulate matter of <2.5 μm concentration of 300 μg/m(3) for 2 h in a randomized, crossover study design. The effects of DE on PVR, on the coefficient of distensibilty of pulmonary vessels (α), and on right and left ventricular function were evaluated at rest (n = 18), during dobutamine stress echocardiography (n = 10), and during exercise stress echocardiography performed in hypoxia (n = 8). Serum endothelin-1 and fractional exhaled nitric oxide were also measured. At rest, exposure to DE did not affect PVR. During dobutamine stress, the slope of the mean pulmonary artery pressure-cardiac output relationship increased from 2.8 ± 0.5 mmHg · min · l (-1) in AA to 3.9 ± 0.5 mmHg · min · l (-1) in DE (P < 0.05) and the α coefficient decreased from 0.96 ± 0.15 to 0.64 ± 0.12%/mmHg (P < 0.01). DE did not further enhance the hypoxia-related upper shift of the mean pulmonary artery pressure-cardiac output relationship. Exposure to DE did not affect serum endothelin-1 concentration or fractional exhaled nitric oxide. In conclusion, acute exposure to DE increased pulmonary vasomotor tone by decreasing the distensibility of pulmonary resistive vessels at high cardiac output. PMID:26497960

  11. At high cardiac output, diesel exhaust exposure increases pulmonary vascular resistance and decreases distensibility of pulmonary resistive vessels.

    PubMed

    Wauters, Aurélien; Vicenzi, Marco; De Becker, Benjamin; Riga, Jean-Philippe; Esmaeilzadeh, Fatemeh; Faoro, Vitalie; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; van de Borne, Philippe; Argacha, Jean-François

    2015-12-15

    Air pollution has recently been associated with the development of acute decompensated heart failure, but the underlying biological mechanisms remain unclear. A pulmonary vasoconstrictor effect of air pollution, combined with its systemic effects, may precipitate decompensated heart failure. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) under resting and stress conditions but also to determine whether air pollution may potentiate acquired pulmonary hypertension. Eighteen healthy male volunteers were exposed to ambient air (AA) or dilute DE with a particulate matter of <2.5 μm concentration of 300 μg/m(3) for 2 h in a randomized, crossover study design. The effects of DE on PVR, on the coefficient of distensibilty of pulmonary vessels (α), and on right and left ventricular function were evaluated at rest (n = 18), during dobutamine stress echocardiography (n = 10), and during exercise stress echocardiography performed in hypoxia (n = 8). Serum endothelin-1 and fractional exhaled nitric oxide were also measured. At rest, exposure to DE did not affect PVR. During dobutamine stress, the slope of the mean pulmonary artery pressure-cardiac output relationship increased from 2.8 ± 0.5 mmHg · min · l (-1) in AA to 3.9 ± 0.5 mmHg · min · l (-1) in DE (P < 0.05) and the α coefficient decreased from 0.96 ± 0.15 to 0.64 ± 0.12%/mmHg (P < 0.01). DE did not further enhance the hypoxia-related upper shift of the mean pulmonary artery pressure-cardiac output relationship. Exposure to DE did not affect serum endothelin-1 concentration or fractional exhaled nitric oxide. In conclusion, acute exposure to DE increased pulmonary vasomotor tone by decreasing the distensibility of pulmonary resistive vessels at high cardiac output.

  12. [Pulmonary hypertension: current aspects].

    PubMed

    Tello de Meneses, R; Gómez Sánchez, M A; Delgado Jiménez, J; Gómez Pajuelo, C; Sáenz de la Calzada, C; Zarco Gutiérrez, P

    1996-08-01

    Primary pulmonary hypertension, although less frequent than secondary forms, represents the true paradigm of this disease. The recent investigations on pulmonary vascular response mechanisms to different stimuli has increased our knowledge about the mechanism of high pulmonary pressure. Molecular biology of the endothelial cell has provided evidence that endothelial injury plus a genetic individual predisposition may be the pathogenic mainstream of this disease. The histologic findings of pulmonary hypertension are still a matter of controversy, although the clinical, epidemiological and prognostic features are better defined. Therapeutically, there has been important advances, specially with various vasodilators, like calciumantagonists, prostacyclin, adenosine and nitric oxide, as well as new routes of administration. In more advance stages of the disease, atrial septostomy (only paliative) and pulmonary or cardio-pulmonary transplantation, are other therapeutic options to consider, after an adequate selection of patients.

  13. Cystic pulmonary hydatidosis

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Pathania, Rajnish; Jhobta, Anupam; Thakur, Babu Ram; Chopra, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a zoonotic parasitic disease caused by the larval stages of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus. Worldwide, pulmonary hydatid cyst is a significant problem medically, socially, and economically. Surgery is the definitive therapy of pulmonary hydatidosis. Benzimidazoles may be considered in patients with a surgical contraindication. This review will focus on pathogenesis, lifecycle, clinical features, and management of pulmonary hydatid disease. PMID:27051107

  14. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma Masquerading as Chronic Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Ugur; Calpar, Ilknur; Yildizeli, Bedrettin; Yanartas, Mehmet; Filinte, Deniz; Kucukoglu, Mehmet Serdar

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with pulmonary artery sarcoma, a very rare tumor of the cardiovascular system. Her tumor was initially misdiagnosed as chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, and she underwent pulmonary endarterectomy. Early diagnosis of primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is crucial. That alternative should always be considered before settling on a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Suspicion should be aroused by the failure of anticoagulant treatment to alleviate pulmonary perfusion abnormalities and systemic symptoms. Surgical resection of the tumor—preferably by pulmonary endarterectomy, followed by reconstruction as needed—is currently the most promising treatment for pulmonary artery sarcoma. PMID:25425987

  15. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... To Look for the Underlying Cause of Pulmonary Hypertension PH has many causes, so many tests may ...

  16. CT Pulmonary Angiography: Increasingly Diagnosing Less Severe Pulmonary Emboli

    PubMed Central

    Schissler, Andrew J.; Rozenshtein, Anna; Kulon, Michal E.; Pearson, Gregory D. N.; Green, Robert A.; Stetson, Peter D.; Brenner, David J.; D'Souza, Belinda; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Schluger, Neil W.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Background It is unknown whether the observed increase in computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) utilization has resulted in increased detection of pulmonary emboli (PEs) with a less severe disease spectrum. Methods Trends in utilization, diagnostic yield, and disease severity were evaluated for 4,048 consecutive initial CTPAs performed in adult patients in the emergency department of a large urban academic medical center between 1/1/2004 and 10/31/2009. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) findings and peak serum troponin levels were evaluated to assess for the presence of PE-associated right ventricular (RV) abnormalities (dysfunction or dilatation) and myocardial injury, respectively. Statistical analyses were performed using multivariate logistic regression. Results 268 CTPAs (6.6%) were positive for acute PE, and 3,780 (93.4%) demonstrated either no PE or chronic PE. There was a significant increase in the likelihood of undergoing CTPA per year during the study period (odds ratio [OR] 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04–1.07, P<0.01). There was no significant change in the likelihood of having a CTPA diagnostic of an acute PE per year (OR 1.03, 95% CI 0.95–1.11, P = 0.49). The likelihood of diagnosing a less severe PE on CTPA with no associated RV abnormalities or myocardial injury increased per year during the study period (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.10–1.75, P = 0.01). Conclusions CTPA utilization has risen with no corresponding change in diagnostic yield, resulting in an increase in PE detection. There is a concurrent rise in the likelihood of diagnosing a less clinically severe spectrum of PEs. PMID:23776522

  17. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when ...

  18. Miliary pulmonary cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Shane; Marriott, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year-old HIV positive male presents with fevers and a non-productive cough. Initial X-ray and subsequent computerised tomography of the chest shows a bilateral miliary pattern of pulmonary infiltration highly suggestive of disseminated tuberculosis. However subsequent results were consistent with disseminated cryptococcosis, including pulmonary involvement, with cryptococcus identified on transbronchial tissue biopsy, and on blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures. Imaging features of pulmonary cryptococcosis are generally of well-defined pleural-based nodules and less commonly alveolar infiltrates, lymphadenopathy, pleural effusions or cavitating lesions. Miliary pulmonary infiltrates are an exceptionally rare presentation. PMID:25379393

  19. Improving pulmonary rehabilitation services.

    PubMed

    Beckford, Katy

    The Clinical Audit of Pulmonary Rehabilitation Services in England and Wales was the first national audit of pulmonary rehabilitation services in England and Wales. Forming part of the National Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Audit Programme, it was commissioned by Healthcare Quality Improvement Programme and conducted by the Royal College of Physicians and British Thoracic Society. The audit was undertaken to geographically map pulmonary rehabilitation services and identify how they can improve. This article summarises the key findings of the audit, and its recommendations. PMID:27400620

  20. Neostigmine and pulmonary oedema

    PubMed Central

    Nagella, Amrutha Bindu; Bijapur, Mubina Begum; Shreyavathi, Shreyavathi; R S, Raghavendra Rao

    2014-01-01

    A 1-year-old child with no pre-existing cardiac or respiratory disease developed frank pulmonary oedema after administration of a neostigmine–glycopyrrolate mixture to reverse neuromuscular blockade during general anaesthesia. Possible cardiac and extra-cardiac factors that could cause pulmonary oedema in this child were ruled out by appropriate investigations. As the pulmonary oedema manifested shortly after administration of the neostigmine–glycopyrrolate mixture, we concluded that neostigmine was the most probable cause. This article briefly reports the occurrence of events and successful management of perioperative pulmonary oedema. PMID:25199191

  1. An unusual cause of acute cor pulmonale – Significance of the ‘continuous diaphragm sign’

    PubMed Central

    Mohanan, Sandeep; Sajeev, C.G.; Muneer, Kader; Rajesh, G.; Krishnan, M.N.; Pillai, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    A patient presented with chest pain and clinical features of acute right heart failure. Initial work up revealed the presence of severe PAH. Acute pulmonary embolism is the commonest and most life-threatening cause for acute cor pulmonale. Even though the clinical picture suggested pulmonary embolism, a subtle sign was missed from the first chest X-ray taken in the emergency department. However on reanalysis the ‘continuous diaphragm sign’ later guided us towards the diagnosis. Our case represents one of the first reports of a rare etiology for acute cor pulmonale – hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Right ventricular dysfunction was caused by an acute rise in pulmonary artery pressures as well as by the compressive effects of pneumomediastinum. We emphasize the role played by a good quality chest X-ray early in the management of acute chest pain syndromes. However pulmonary embolism should be ruled out conclusively before redirecting attention to less malignant conditions. PMID:25443610

  2. PULMONARY CIRCULATION AT EXERCISE

    PubMed Central

    NAEIJE, R; CHESLER, N

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a high flow and low pressure circuit, with an average resistance of 1 mmHg.min.L−1 in young adults, increasing to 2.5 mmHg.min.L−1 over 4–6 decades of life. Pulmonary vascular mechanics at exercise are best described by distensible models. Exercise does not appear to affect the time constant of the pulmonary circulation or the longitudinal distribution of resistances. Very high flows are associated with high capillary pressures, up to a 20–25 mmHg threshold associated with interstitial lung edema and altered ventilation/perfusion relationships. Pulmonary artery pressures of 40–50 mmHg, which can be achieved at maximal exercise, may correspond to the extreme of tolerable right ventricular afterload. Distension of capillaries that decrease resistance may be of adaptative value during exercise, but this is limited by hypoxemia from altered diffusion/perfusion relationships. Exercise in hypoxia is associated with higher pulmonary vascular pressures and lower maximal cardiac output, with increased likelihood of right ventricular function limitation and altered gas exchange by interstitial lung edema. Pharmacological interventions aimed at the reduction of pulmonary vascular tone have little effect on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships in normoxia, but may decrease resistance in hypoxia, unloading the right ventricle and thereby improving exercise capacity. Exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension is associated with sharp increases in pulmonary artery pressure and a right ventricular limitation of aerobic capacity. Exercise stress testing to determine multipoint pulmonary vascular pressures-flow relationships may uncover early stage pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:23105961

  3. Chronic Left Lower Lobe Pulmonary Infiltrates During Military Deployment.

    PubMed

    Hunninghake, John C; Skabelund, Andrew J; Morris, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    Deployment to Southwest Asia is associated with increased airborne hazards such as geologic dusts, burn pit smoke, vehicle exhaust, or air pollution. There are numerous ongoing studies to evaluate the potential effects of inhaled particulate matter on reported increases in acute and chronic respiratory symptoms. Providers need to be aware of potential causes of pulmonary disease such as acute eosinophilic pneumonia, asthma, and vocal cord dysfunction that have been associated with deployment. Other pulmonary disorders such as interstitial lung disease are infrequently reported. Not all deployment-related respiratory complaints may result from deployment airborne hazards and a broad differential should be considered. We present the case of a military member with a prolonged deployment found to have lobar infiltrates secondary to pulmonary vein stenosis from treatment for atrial fibrillation. PMID:27483542

  4. Pulmonary edema associated with scuba diving : case reports and review.

    PubMed

    Slade, J B; Hattori, T; Ray, C S; Bove, A A; Cianci, P

    2001-11-01

    Acute pulmonary edema has been associated with cold-water immersion in swimmers and divers. We report on eight divers using a self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) who developed acute pulmonary edema manifested by dyspnea, hypoxemia, and characteristic chest radiographic findings. All cases occurred in cold water. All scuba divers were treated with complete resolution, and three have returned to diving without further episodes. Mechanisms that would contribute to a raised capillary transmural pressure or to a reduced blood-gas barrier function or integrity are discussed. Pulmonary edema in scuba divers is multifactorial, and constitutional factors may play a role. Physicians should be aware of this potential, likely underreported, problem in scuba divers.

  5. Biomarkers in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mokra, Daniela; Kosutova, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and its milder form acute lung injury (ALI) may result from various diseases and situations including sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, acute pancreatitis, aspiration of gastric contents, near-drowning etc. ALI/ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar injury, lung edema formation, neutrophil-derived inflammation, and surfactant dysfunction. Clinically, ALI/ARDS is manifested by decreased lung compliance, severe hypoxemia, and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Severity and further characteristics of ALI/ARDS may be detected by biomarkers in the plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (or tracheal aspirate) of patients. Changed concentrations of individual markers may suggest injury or activation of the specific types of lung cells-epithelial or endothelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages, etc.), and thereby help in diagnostics and in evaluation of the patient's clinical status and the treatment efficacy. This chapter reviews various biomarkers of acute lung injury and evaluates their usefulness in diagnostics and prognostication of ALI/ARDS.

  6. Pulmonary Function Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ranu, Harpreet; Wilde, Michael; Madden, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests are valuable investigations in the management of patients with suspected or previously diagnosed respiratory disease. They aid diagnosis, help monitor response to treatment and can guide decisions regarding further treatment and intervention. The interpretation of pulmonary functions tests requires knowledge of respiratory physiology. In this review we describe investigations routinely used and discuss their clinical implications. PMID:22347750

  7. Primary pulmonary leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Venkatachalam, Jonathen; Lee, Victor Kwan Min; Tan, Sze Khen

    2016-05-01

    Leiomyoma is a smooth muscle neoplasm that commonly occurs in the genitourinary system and the gastrointestinal tract of the body. Primary pulmonary leiomyoma is rarely reported in literature. We report a rare case of primary pulmonary leiomyoma of a 55-year-old male patient presenting with symptoms of cough for six months. PMID:27516882

  8. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Zonzin, Pietro; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Favretto, Giuseppe

    2003-10-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is due to unresolved or recurrent pulmonary embolism. In the United States the estimated prevalence is 0.1-0.5% among survived patients with pulmonary embolism. The survival rate at 5 years was 30% among patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure > 40 mmHg at the time of diagnosis and only 10% among those with a value > 50 mmHg. The interval between the onset of disturbances and the diagnosis may be as long as 3 years. Doppler echocardiography permits to establish the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Radionuclide scanning determines whether pulmonary hypertension has a thromboembolic basis. Right heart catheterization and pulmonary angiography are performed in order to establish the extension and the accessibility to surgery of thrombi and to rule out other causes. The surgical treatment is thromboendarterectomy. A dramatic reduction in the pulmonary vascular resistance can be achieved; corresponding improvements in the NYHA class--from class III or IV before surgery to class I-II after surgery--are usually observed. Patients who are not considered candidates for thromboendarterectomy may be considered candidates for lung transplantation. PMID:14664293

  9. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More What is Pulmonary Hypertension? Updated:Aug 12,2014 Is pulmonary hypertension different ... content was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  10. Pulmonary Paragonimiasis Mimicking Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kj; Basu, Arup; Khana, Shilpi; Wattal, Chand

    2015-08-01

    Paragonimiasis is a disease which is frequently misdiagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis. In the areas where people eat crab/crayfish this disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis to avoid antituberculosis treatment for a non-tubercular condition. We are reporting a case of pulmonary paragonimiasis who had been treated for tuberculosis. PMID:27604443

  11. Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE): an entity different from emphysema or pulmonary fibrosis alone

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huijin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIP), with different radiological, pathological, functional and prognostic characteristics, have been regarded as separate entities for a long time. However, there is an increasing recognition of the coexistence of emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis in individuals. The association was first described as a syndrome by Cottin in 2005, named “combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE)”, which is characterized by exertional dyspnea, upper-lobe emphysema and lower-lobe fibrosis, preserved lung volume and severely diminished capacity of gas exchange. CPFE is frequently complicated by pulmonary hypertension, acute lung injury and lung cancer and prognosis of it is poor. Treatments for CPFE patients with severe pulmonary hypertension are less effective other than lung transplantation. However, CPFE has not yet attracted wide attention of clinicians and there is no research systematically contrasting the differences among CPFE, emphysema/COPD and IIP at the same time. The authors will review the existing knowledge of CPFE and compare them to either entity alone for the first time, with the purpose of improving the awareness of this syndrome and exploring novel effective therapeutic strategies in clinical practice. PMID:25973246

  12. Pulmonary Talcosis in an Immunocompromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thanh-Phuong; Muddaraju, Manjunath; Greene, John N.

    2016-01-01

    The first case of pulmonary talcosis or talc pneumoconiosis related to inhalation of talc during its extraction and processing in mines was described by Thorel in 1896. Pulmonary talcosis is most commonly seen secondary to occupational exposure or intravenous (IV) drug abuse and, occasionally, in excessive use of cosmetic talc. Based on literature review, there has been an increase in reported incidents of pulmonary talcosis due to various forms of exposure to the mineral. We report an 82-year-old man who is diagnosed with Philadelphia chromosome positive pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with palliative imatinib who presented with chronic hemoptysis and dyspnea shortly after his diagnosis. His symptoms were initially thought to be due to an infectious etiology due to his malignancy, immunocompromised state, and radiographic findings until high-resolution computerized tomographic (HRCT) findings showed a diffuse pulmonary fibrosis picture that prompted further questioning and a more thorough history inquiry on his exposure to causative agents of interstitial lung disease. Very often, patients do not recognize their exposure, especially in those whose exposure is unrelated to their occupation. Our case emphasizes the need for thorough and careful history taking of occupational and nonoccupational exposure to known causative agents of interstitial lung disease. PMID:27446215

  13. Diagnosis and classification of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kekevian, Alana; Gershwin, M Eric; Chang, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a difficult disease to diagnose. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a member of a class of diseases known as idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. Other members include nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia. Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) is the pathological equivalent of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Prior to 2011, the diagnosis was based on major and minor criteria, but because these criteria were not evidence based, the criteria were modified by consensus from the American Thoracic Society, the European Respiratory Society, the Japanese Respiratory Society, and the Latin American Thoracic Association. These new criteria now include satisfying three core requirements, including exclusion of other possible cause of interstitial lung disease, specific findings of usual interstitial pneumonia on high resolution computed tomography, and a combination of "possible UIP" findings on high resolution computed tomography and UIP findings on lung biopsy. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a severe, progressive disease with limited treatment options, and exacerbations are associated with a high degree of morbidity and mortality.

  14. [High-altitude pulmonary edema in Japan].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T

    1995-12-01

    To understand the pathophysiology of high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), we examined the pathway of adaptation to high altitude in lifelong of Tibet. The Tibetan natives had higher exercise performance, but lower maximal oxygen uptake and lower blood lactate concentrations than did acclimatized Han newcomers. Clinical and basic studies done to determine the pathophysiologic characteristics of 47 patients with HAPE and of subjects susceptible to HAPE. The altitude of onset was 2,680 m to 3,190 m above sea level. Results of hemodynamic studies and the presence of protein-rich edema fluid indicated that HAPE is noncardiogenic and is a type of increased permeability edema. The levels of IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-alpha in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from subjects with HAPE were high on admission. The subjects susceptible to HAPE had much greater increases in an index of pulmonary vascular resistance than did the controls, which resulted in much higher levels of pulmonary arterial pressure during both acute hypoxia and hypobaria. The subjects susceptible to HAPE also has blunted hypoxic ventilatory drives. We studied whether human leukocyte antigen DR-6 functions as a genetic predisposition to HAPE. The frequency of DR-6 was increased in the subjects susceptible to HAPE, which suggests that they have a constitutional abnormality in the pulmonary circulatory, and ventilatory responses to hypoxia and hypobaria, and that genetic factors may be involved in the development of HAPE.

  15. Pulmonary extramedullary hematopoiesis involving the pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Monga, Varun; Silverman, Margarida

    2015-02-24

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) occurs as a complication of hematologic disorders such as myelofibrosis, sickle cell anemia and thalassemia. The extramedullary tissue usually involves liver, spleen and lymph nodes, less frequently the chest. We present a recent case of a man with myeloproliferative neoplasm who developed pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to EMH in the lung and pulmonary artery. Radiation therapy was considered the best approach, but it didn't work and the patient died a week after radiation therapy was completed. We also review herein the present literature. PMID:25852851

  16. Perioperative management of the patient with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fox, Daniel L; Stream, Amanda R; Bull, Todd

    2014-12-01

    Patients with pulmonary hypertension are at increased risk for perioperative morbidity and mortality. Elective surgery is generally discouraged in this patient population; however, there are times when surgery is deemed necessary. Currently, there are no guidelines for the preoperative risk assessment or perioperative management of subjects with pulmonary hypertension. The majority of the literature evaluating perioperative risk factors and mortality rates is observational and includes subjects with multiple etiologies of pulmonary hypertension. Subjects with pulmonary arterial hypertension, also referred to as World Health Organization group I pulmonary hypertension, and particularly those receiving pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific therapy may be at increased risk. Perioperative management of these patients requires a solid understanding and careful consideration of the hemodynamic effects of anesthetic agents, positive pressure ventilation and volume shifts associated with surgery in order to prevent acute right ventricular failure. We reviewed the most recent data regarding perioperative morbidity and mortality for subjects with pulmonary hypertension in an effort to better guide preoperative risk assessment and perioperative management by a multidisciplinary team. PMID:24828282

  17. Influenza leaves a TRAIL to pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Rena; Chen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Influenza infection can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), leading to poor disease outcome with high mortality. One of the driving features in the pathogenesis of ARDS is the accumulation of fluid in the alveoli, which causes severe pulmonary edema and impaired oxygen uptake. In this issue of the JCI, Peteranderl and colleagues define a paracrine communication between macrophages and type II alveolar epithelial cells during influenza infection where IFNα induces macrophage secretion of TRAIL that causes endocytosis of Na,K-ATPase by the alveolar epithelium. This reduction of Na,K-ATPase expression decreases alveolar fluid clearance, which in turn leads to pulmonary edema. Inhibition of the TRAIL signaling pathway has been shown to improve lung injury after influenza infection, and future studies will be needed to determine if blocking this pathway is a viable option in the treatment of ARDS. PMID:26999598

  18. Cardiac manifestations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Abhinav; Verma, Isha; Shah, Varun; Agarwal, Abhishek; Sikachi, Rutuja R

    2016-05-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic, progressive, parenchymal disease of the lung with an estimated prevalence of 14-43 per 100,000. Patient usually presents with coughing and exertional dyspnea, which can lead to acute respiratory failure. IPF has been associated with various co-morbidities such as lung cancer, emphysema, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), GERD and multiple cardiovascular consequences. The cardiovascular manifestations of IPF include pulmonary hypertension, heart failure, coronary artery disease, cardiac arrhythmias & cardiac manifestations of drugs used to treat IPF. This review will outline evidence of the association between IPF and cardiovascular conditions and attempt to provide insights into the underlying pathophysiology. We also discuss the impact of these cardiovascular diseases on patients with IPF including increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:27195188

  19. Cardiac manifestations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Abhinav; Verma, Isha; Shah, Varun; Agarwal, Abhishek; Sikachi, Rutuja R

    2016-01-01

    Summary Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic, progressive, parenchymal disease of the lung with an estimated prevalence of 14–43 per 100,000. Patient usually presents with coughing and exertional dyspnea, which can lead to acute respiratory failure. IPF has been associated with various co-morbidities such as lung cancer, emphysema, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), GERD and multiple cardiovascular consequences. The cardiovascular manifestations of IPF include pulmonary hypertension, heart failure, coronary artery disease, cardiac arrhythmias & cardiac manifestations of drugs used to treat IPF. This review will outline evidence of the association between IPF and cardiovascular conditions and attempt to provide insights into the underlying pathophysiology. We also discuss the impact of these cardiovascular diseases on patients with IPF including increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:27195188

  20. Pulmonary edema following closed-circuit oxygen diving and strenuous swimming.

    PubMed

    Shupak, Avi; Guralnik, Ludmila; Keynan, Yoav; Yanir, Yoav; Adir, Yochai

    2003-11-01

    Acute pulmonary edema may be induced by diving and strenuous swimming. We report the case of a diver using closed-circuit, scuba equipment who developed acute dyspnea, hemoptysis, and hypoxemia following a dive in 18 degreesC (64.4 degrees F) water and physical exertion during the swim back to shore. With the growing popularity of recreational scuba diving, emergency physicians are liable to be faced with increasing numbers of diving-related medical problems. Diving-induced pulmonary edema should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute hypoxemia, sometimes accompanied by acid-base abnormalities, when this is seen in a diver.

  1. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Kim, Nick H; Delcroix, Marion; Jenkins, David P; Channick, Richard; Dartevelle, Philippe; Jansa, Pavel; Lang, Irene; Madani, Michael M; Ogino, Hitoshi; Pengo, Vittorio; Mayer, Eckhard

    2014-10-01

    Since the last World Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension in 2008, we have witnessed numerous and exciting developments in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). Emerging clinical data and advances in technology have led to reinforcing and updated guidance on diagnostic approaches to pulmonary hypertension, guidelines that we hope will lead to better recognition and more timely diagnosis of CTEPH. We have new data on treatment practices across international boundaries as well as long-term outcomes for CTEPH patients treated with or without pulmonary endarterectomy. Furthermore, we have expanded data on alternative treatment options for select CTEPH patients, including data from multiple clinical trials of medical therapy, including 1 recent pivotal trial, and compelling case series of percutaneous pulmonary angioplasty. Lastly, we have garnered more experience, and on a larger international scale, with pulmonary endarterectomy, which is the treatment of choice for operable CTEPH. This report overviews and highlights these important interval developments as deliberated among our task force of CTEPH experts and presented at the 2013 World Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension in Nice, France. (J Am Coil Cardiol 2013;62:D92-9) ©2013 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

  2. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage due to Acute Mitral Valve Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Marak, Creticus P; Joy, Parijat S; Gupta, Pragya; Bukovskaya, Yana; Guddati, Achuta K

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) can be caused by several etiologies including vasculitis, drug exposure, anticoagulants, infections, mitral valve stenosis, and regurgitation. Chronic mitral valve regurgitation (MR) has been well documented as an etiological factor for DAH, but there have been only a few cases which have reported acute mitral valve regurgitation as an etiology of DAH. Acute mitral valve regurgitation can be a life-threatening condition and often requires urgent intervention. In rare cases, acute mitral regurgitation may result in a regurgitant jet which is directed towards the right upper pulmonary vein and may specifically cause right-sided pulmonary edema and right-sided DAH. Surgical repair of the mitral valve results in rapid resolution of DAH. Acute MR should be considered as a possible etiology in patients presenting with unilateral pulmonary edema, hemoptysis, and DAH.

  3. Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced pulmonary vascular endothelial injury.

    PubMed Central

    Goldblum, S E; Hennig, B; Jay, M; Yoneda, K; McClain, C J

    1989-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mediates components of the acute-phase response, stimulates granulocyte metabolism, and induces endothelial cell surface changes. We studied whether human recombinant TNF-alpha (rTNF-alpha) could increase pulmonary edema formation and pulmonary vascular permeability. Rabbits preinfused with 125I-albumin were administered rTNF-alpha or saline. Animals were sacrificed, and lung wet/dry weight ratios as well as bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma 125I activities were determined. rTNF-alpha increased lung wet/dry weight ratios by 151% (P less than 0.02) and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid/plasma 125I activity ratios by 376% (P less than 0.01) compared with values for saline controls. Electron microscopy of lung sections demonstrated endothelial injury, perivascular edema, and extravasation of an ultrastructural permeability tracer. To demonstrate that rTNF-alpha could directly increase pulmonary vascular endothelial permeability in vitro, we studied albumin transfer across cultured porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayers. rTNF-alpha induced time-dependent dose-response increments in transendothelial albumin flux in the absence of granulocyte effector cells. These observations suggest that rTNF-alpha can provoke acute pulmonary vascular endothelial injury in vivo as well as in vitro. Images PMID:2925247

  4. Pulmonary function tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... measured to estimate the lung volume. To measure diffusion capacity , you breathe a harmless gas, called a ... on your report after pulmonary function tests include: Diffusion capacity to carbon monoxide (DLCO) Expiratory reserve volume ( ...

  5. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoung-Doo

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) is a frequent sequelae after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia, truncus arteriosus, Rastelli and Ross operation. Due to patient growth and conduit degeneration, these conduits have to be changed frequently due to regurgitation or stenosis. However, morbidity is significant in these repeated operations. To prolong conduit longevity, bare-metal stenting in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstruction has been performed. Stenting the RVOT can reduce the right ventricular pressure and symptomatic improvement, but it causes PR with detrimental effects on the right ventricle function and risks of arrhythmia. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with pulmonary valve insufficiency, or stenotic RVOTs. PMID:23170091

  6. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cough, shortness of breath, fatigue and low blood oxygen levels. Pulmonary fibrosis can be caused by an ... breath. Your health care provider may notice the oxygen levels in your blood drop when you walk. ...

  7. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Measurements of blood oxygen level (arterial blood gases) Pulmonary function tests 6-minute walk test Tests for connective tissue diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis , lupus, or scleroderma Open lung (surgical) lung biopsy

  8. Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Belts! For PFF Spend an evening with the stars on Monday, February 27, 2017. MORE PFF Moved ... Patients The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation has a four-star rating from Charity Navigator and is a Better ...

  9. Pulmonary hyalinizing granulomas.

    PubMed

    Macedo, E V; Adolph, J

    1985-03-01

    Little has been written about pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma as a cause of nodules in the lungs. In a patient with a past history of carcinoma of the breast, the diagnosis made a significant difference in the prognosis. PMID:2984210

  10. Pulmonary rehabilitation in adults.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation can help people with long-term lung conditions whose symptoms, such as breathlessness and being easily tired out by daily activities, seriously impact their lives. PMID:27408642

  11. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Diagnosis and Clinical Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yutaro; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a parenchymal lung disease characterized by progressive interstitial fibrosis. The clinical course of IPF can be unpredictable and may be punctuated by acute exacerbations. Although much progress is being made in unraveling the mechanisms underlying IPF, effective therapy for improving survival remains elusive. Longitudinal disease profiling, especially in terms of clinical manifestations in a large cohort of patients, should lead to proper management of the patients and development of new treatments for IPF. Appropriate multidisciplinary assessment in ongoing registries is required to achieve this. This review summarizes the current status of the diagnosis and clinical manifestations of IPF. PMID:27625576

  12. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in a postpartum woman

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Pooja R.; Ucchil, Rajesh; Shah, Unmil; Chaudhari, Dipak

    2016-01-01

    Hantavirus infection, a rare disease diagnosed in India and carries a very high mortality. There are no reports of this infection in association with pregnancy or postpartum period in our country. We present a case of a 30-year-old female diagnosed to have hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in the postpartum period. We intend to create awareness about this infection and consider it in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan dysfunction in association with pregnancy and postpartum period. PMID:27688634

  13. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in a postpartum woman.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Pooja R; Ucchil, Rajesh; Shah, Unmil; Chaudhari, Dipak

    2016-09-01

    Hantavirus infection, a rare disease diagnosed in India and carries a very high mortality. There are no reports of this infection in association with pregnancy or postpartum period in our country. We present a case of a 30-year-old female diagnosed to have hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in the postpartum period. We intend to create awareness about this infection and consider it in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan dysfunction in association with pregnancy and postpartum period. PMID:27688634

  14. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in a postpartum woman

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Pooja R.; Ucchil, Rajesh; Shah, Unmil; Chaudhari, Dipak

    2016-01-01

    Hantavirus infection, a rare disease diagnosed in India and carries a very high mortality. There are no reports of this infection in association with pregnancy or postpartum period in our country. We present a case of a 30-year-old female diagnosed to have hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in the postpartum period. We intend to create awareness about this infection and consider it in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan dysfunction in association with pregnancy and postpartum period.

  15. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Diagnosis and Clinical Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yutaro; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a parenchymal lung disease characterized by progressive interstitial fibrosis. The clinical course of IPF can be unpredictable and may be punctuated by acute exacerbations. Although much progress is being made in unraveling the mechanisms underlying IPF, effective therapy for improving survival remains elusive. Longitudinal disease profiling, especially in terms of clinical manifestations in a large cohort of patients, should lead to proper management of the patients and development of new treatments for IPF. Appropriate multidisciplinary assessment in ongoing registries is required to achieve this. This review summarizes the current status of the diagnosis and clinical manifestations of IPF.

  16. Effect of aerosolized milrinone during drug-induced pulmonary hypertension in lambs.

    PubMed

    Gelvez, Javier; Fakioglu, Harun; Olarte, Jose L; Soliz, Amed; Totapally, Balagangadhar R; Torbati, Dan

    2004-07-01

    We tested whether aerosolized milrinone in lambs selectively reduces drug-induced acute pulmonary hypertension without reducing the mean systemic blood pressure (MSBP). Seven, 2-3-week-old lambs were anesthetized (50 mg/kg ketamine), paralyzed (0.1 mg/kg vecuronium bromide) and mechanically ventilated. A femoral artery, pulmonary artery, and jugular vein were catheterized for continuous monitoring of MSBP, mean pulmonary artery pressure, periodic gas-exchange analyses, and determination of cardiac output by thermodilution technique. An Airlife Misty nebulizer was used in a dry state to establish a stable baseline of an inspired fraction of oxygen (FiO(2)) at 0.21. Acute pulmonary hypertension with hypoxemia was then induced by increasing the mean pulmonary artery pressure up to 30-35% of the MSBP using 2-6 microg/kg/min of Thromboxane A(2) mimetic (U-46619), intravenously. The lambs were then subjected to 15 min of saline nebulization without milrinone followed by 30 min saline nebulization with a relatively high concentration of milrinone (10 mg/ml, total dose of 40 mg). Aerosolized milrinone had no effect on systemic or pulmonary artery pressure during combined acute pulmonary hypertension and hypoxemia. We speculate that our nebulization procedures failed to deliver sufficient amount of milrinone for producing a detectable hemodynamic effect. PMID:15082033

  17. Acute exacerbation of COPD.

    PubMed

    Ko, Fanny W; Chan, Ka Pang; Hui, David S; Goddard, John R; Shaw, Janet G; Reid, David W; Yang, Ian A

    2016-10-01

    The literature of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is fast expanding. This review focuses on several aspects of acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) including epidemiology, diagnosis and management. COPD poses a major health and economic burden in the Asia-Pacific region, as it does worldwide. Triggering factors of AECOPD include infectious (bacteria and viruses) and environmental (air pollution and meteorological effect) factors. Disruption in the dynamic balance between the 'pathogens' (viral and bacterial) and the normal bacterial communities that constitute the lung microbiome likely contributes to the risk of exacerbations. The diagnostic approach to AECOPD varies based on the clinical setting and severity of the exacerbation. After history and examination, a number of investigations may be useful, including oximetry, sputum culture, chest X-ray and blood tests for inflammatory markers. Arterial blood gases should be considered in severe exacerbations, to characterize respiratory failure. Depending on the severity, the acute management of AECOPD involves use of bronchodilators, steroids, antibiotics, oxygen and noninvasive ventilation. Hospitalization may be required, for severe exacerbations. Nonpharmacological interventions including disease-specific self-management, pulmonary rehabilitation, early medical follow-up, home visits by respiratory health workers, integrated programmes and telehealth-assisted hospital at home have been studied during hospitalization and shortly after discharge in patients who have had a recent AECOPD. Pharmacological approaches to reducing risk of future exacerbations include long-acting bronchodilators, inhaled steroids, mucolytics, vaccinations and long-term macrolides. Further studies are needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of these interventions in preventing COPD exacerbations.

  18. Brain natriuretic peptide levels in six basic underwater demolitions/SEAL recruits presenting with swimming induced pulmonary edema (SIPE).

    PubMed

    Shearer, Damon; Mahon, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Swimming induced pulmonary edema (SIPE) is associated with both SCUBA diving and strenuous surface swimming; however, the majority of reported cases and clinically observed cases tend to occur during or after aggressive surface swimming. Capillary stress failure appears to be central to the pathophysiology of this disorder. Regional pulmonary capillaries are exposed to relatively high pressures secondary to increased vascular volume, elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance, and regional differences in perfusion secondary to forces of gravity and high cardiac output. Acute pulmonary edema can be classified as either cardiogenic or noncardiogenic or both. Cardiogenic pulmonary edema occurs when the pulmonary capillary hydrostatic pressure exceeds plasma oncotic pressure. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema occurs when pulmonary capillary permeability is increased. Given the pathophysiology noted above, SIPE can be described as a cardiogenic pulmonary edema, at least in part, since an increased transalveolar pressure gradient has been implicated in the pathogenesis of SIPE. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is used in the clinical setting to differentiate cardiac from pulmonary sources of dyspnea, specifically to diagnose cardiogenic pulmonary edema. During clinical management, BNP levels were drawn on six BUD/S recruits simultaneously presenting with pulmonary complaints consistent with SIPE, after an extended surface bay swim. This paper analyzes that data after de-identification and reviews the pathophysiology and clinical management of SIPE.

  19. Pulmonary embolism following celiac plexus block and neurolysis

    PubMed Central

    Raizada, Miles S.; Kelly, Seth M.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute pain in chronic disease requires the physician to choose from an arsenal of pain management techniques tailored to the individual patient. Celiac plexus block and neurolysis are commonly employed for the management of chronic abdominal pain, especially in debilitating conditions such as cancer or chronic pancreatitis. The procedure is safe, well tolerated, and produces few complications. We present a case of pulmonary embolism following a celiac plexus block and neurolysis procedure. Further study is required to determine if celiac plexus ablation, alone or in combination with other risk factors, may contribute to increased risk for pulmonary embolism in patients seeking treatment for chronic upper abdominal pain conditions. PMID:27365890

  20. Definition and classification of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Marc; Montani, David; Evgenov, Oleg V; Simonneau, Gérald

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is defined as an increase of mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥25 mmHg at rest as assessed by right heart catheterization. According to different combinations of values of pulmonary wedge pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance and cardiac output, a hemodynamic classification of pulmonary hypertension has been proposed. Of major importance is the pulmonary wedge pressure which allows to distinguish pre-capillary (pulmonary wedge pressure ≤15 mmHg) and post-capillary (pulmonary wedge pressure >15 mmHg) pulmonary hypertension. Pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension includes the clinical groups 1 (pulmonary arterial hypertension), 3 (pulmonary hypertension due to lung diseases and/or hypoxia), 4 (chronic thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension) and 5 (pulmonary hypertension with unclear and/or multifactorial mechanisms). Post-capillary pulmonary hypertension corresponds to the clinical group 2 (pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases).

  1. Patients with chronic pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Caron M; Galvagno, Samuel M

    2013-11-01

    Chronic pulmonary disease is common among the surgical population and the importance of a thorough and detailed preoperative assessment is monumental for minimizing morbidity and mortality and reducing the risk of perioperative pulmonary complications. These comorbidities contribute to pulmonary postoperative complications, including atelectasis, pneumonia, and respiratory failure, and can predict long-term mortality. The important aspects of the preoperative assessment for patients with chronic pulmonary disease, and the value of preoperative testing and smoking cessation, are discussed. Specifically discussed are preoperative pulmonary assessment and management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, restrictive lung disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and obesity. PMID:24182721

  2. Pulmonary hypertension imitating HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A case of undiagnosed pulmonary hypertension in a woman with mixed connective tissue disease presenting with microangiopathic haemolysis, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzymes imitating severe preeclampsia (HELLP syndrome) is described. Connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. Maternal mortality rates with pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy are extremely high. All women with connective tissue disorders should have pulmonary hypertension excluded by echocardiography before attempting conception. End-stage pulmonary hypertension may be associated with haemolysis and thrombocytopenia and thus may imitate severe preeclampsia in pregnant women. There may be a role for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in the peripartum management of women with severe pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27656251

  3. Pulmonary hypertension imitating HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A case of undiagnosed pulmonary hypertension in a woman with mixed connective tissue disease presenting with microangiopathic haemolysis, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzymes imitating severe preeclampsia (HELLP syndrome) is described. Connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. Maternal mortality rates with pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy are extremely high. All women with connective tissue disorders should have pulmonary hypertension excluded by echocardiography before attempting conception. End-stage pulmonary hypertension may be associated with haemolysis and thrombocytopenia and thus may imitate severe preeclampsia in pregnant women. There may be a role for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in the peripartum management of women with severe pulmonary hypertension.

  4. A SCUBA diver with acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Patrick James; Kelly, Yvelynne; Ni Sheaghdha, Eadaoin; Lappin, David

    2015-01-01

    An otherwise healthy young man was transferred to our hospital after a diving incident. He had made an uncontrolled ascent from 10 m. On arrival he appeared well. No hypotensive episodes occurred during the transfer. He denied having arthralgias, back pain, dyspnoea or neurological symptoms. Laboratory investigations revealed acutely elevated creatinine (170 µmol/L) and creatine kinase (909 U/L). Radiology was consistent with a focus of pulmonary barotrauma and intrinsic renal disease. Creatine kinase is a marker of arterial gas embolism (AGE). We determined that our patient suffered acute kidney injury as a result of gas embolisation to his renal vasculature from an area of pulmonary barotrauma. Creatinine fell the following day in response to aggressive intravenous fluids. This is the first reported case of acute kidney injury secondary to AGE. Biochemical studies should be part of the routine assessment of patients involved in diving incidents. PMID:25948841

  5. A SCUBA diver with acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Patrick James; Kelly, Yvelynne; Ni Sheaghdha, Eadaoin; Lappin, David

    2015-01-01

    An otherwise healthy young man was transferred to our hospital after a diving incident. He had made an uncontrolled ascent from 10 m. On arrival he appeared well. No hypotensive episodes occurred during the transfer. He denied having arthralgias, back pain, dyspnoea or neurological symptoms. Laboratory investigations revealed acutely elevated creatinine (170 µmol/L) and creatine kinase (909 U/L). Radiology was consistent with a focus of pulmonary barotrauma and intrinsic renal disease. Creatine kinase is a marker of arterial gas embolism (AGE). We determined that our patient suffered acute kidney injury as a result of gas embolisation to his renal vasculature from an area of pulmonary barotrauma. Creatinine fell the following day in response to aggressive intravenous fluids. This is the first reported case of acute kidney injury secondary to AGE. Biochemical studies should be part of the routine assessment of patients involved in diving incidents.

  6. Massive Pulmonary Embolism: Treatment with the Rotarex Thrombectomy System

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Sheng; Shi Haibin; Gu Jianping; Yang Zhengqiang; Chen Liang; Lou Wensheng; He Xu; Zhou Weizhong; Zhou Chungao; Zhao Linbo; Xia Jinguo; Li Linsun

    2011-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) for acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE). Fourteen patients (8 men, 6 women) with a mean age of 55.4 (range, 38-71) years with acute massive PE were initially diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) and confirmed by pulmonary angiography. All patients presented with acute PE symptoms and hemodynamic compromise. Each patient was treated with Straub Rotarex thrombectomy device and five patients received additional thrombolysis. Technique success and clinical improvement were achieved in all patients without major complications. The mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) decreased from 37.6 {+-} 6.6 to 29 {+-} 6.4 mmHg (P < 0.01) after PMT. Partial arterial pressures of O{sub 2} (PaO{sub 2}) increased from 61.1 {+-} 9.2 to 88 {+-} 5.1 mmHg (P < 0.01). The Miller index was 0.67 {+-} 0.11 and 0.37 {+-} 0.13 (P < 0.01), respectively, before and after PMT (P < 0.01). Eleven patients had no recurrence of PE on a mean follow-up of 28.3 months, whereas the other three patients were lost to follow-up. The preliminary experience in our series suggests that the Straub Rotarex thrombectomy device, which has been utilized in peripheral arteries, also is useful for the treatment of acute massive PE.

  7. Pulmonary hypertension in the intensive care unit. Expert consensus statement on the diagnosis and treatment of paediatric pulmonary hypertension. The European Paediatric Pulmonary Vascular Disease Network, endorsed by ISHLT and DGPK.

    PubMed

    Kaestner, Michael; Schranz, Dietmar; Warnecke, Gregor; Apitz, Christian; Hansmann, Georg; Miera, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    Acute pulmonary hypertension (PH) complicates the course of several cardiovascular, pulmonary and other systemic diseases in children. An acute rise of RV afterload, either as exacerbating chronic PH of different aetiologies (eg, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), chronic lung or congenital heart disease), or pulmonary hypertensive crisis after corrective surgery for congenital heart disease, may lead to severe circulatory compromise. Only few clinical studies provide evidence on how to best treat children with acute severe PH and decompensated RV function, that is, acute RV failure. The specific treatment in the intensive care unit should be based on the underlying pathophysiology and not only be focused on so-called 'specific' or 'tailored' drug therapy to lower RV afterload. In addition therapeutic efforts should aim to optimise RV preload, and to achieve adequate myocardial perfusion, and cardiac output. Early recognition of patients at high risk and timely initiation of appropriate therapeutic measures may prevent the development of severe cardiac dysfunction and low cardiac output. In patients not responding adequately to pharmacotherapy, (1) novel surgical and interventional techniques, temporary mechanical circulatory support with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, (2) pumpless lung assist devices (3) and/or lung or heart-lung transplantation should be timely considered. The invasive therapeutic measures can be applied in a bridge-to-recovery or bridge-to-lung transplant strategy. This consensus statement focuses on the management of acute severe PH in the paediatric intensive care unit and provides an according treatment algorithm for clinical practice. PMID:27053699

  8. Pulmonary hypertension in the intensive care unit. Expert consensus statement on the diagnosis and treatment of paediatric pulmonary hypertension. The European Paediatric Pulmonary Vascular Disease Network, endorsed by ISHLT and DGPK.

    PubMed

    Kaestner, Michael; Schranz, Dietmar; Warnecke, Gregor; Apitz, Christian; Hansmann, Georg; Miera, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    Acute pulmonary hypertension (PH) complicates the course of several cardiovascular, pulmonary and other systemic diseases in children. An acute rise of RV afterload, either as exacerbating chronic PH of different aetiologies (eg, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), chronic lung or congenital heart disease), or pulmonary hypertensive crisis after corrective surgery for congenital heart disease, may lead to severe circulatory compromise. Only few clinical studies provide evidence on how to best treat children with acute severe PH and decompensated RV function, that is, acute RV failure. The specific treatment in the intensive care unit should be based on the underlying pathophysiology and not only be focused on so-called 'specific' or 'tailored' drug therapy to lower RV afterload. In addition therapeutic efforts should aim to optimise RV preload, and to achieve adequate myocardial perfusion, and cardiac output. Early recognition of patients at high risk and timely initiation of appropriate therapeutic measures may prevent the development of severe cardiac dysfunction and low cardiac output. In patients not responding adequately to pharmacotherapy, (1) novel surgical and interventional techniques, temporary mechanical circulatory support with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, (2) pumpless lung assist devices (3) and/or lung or heart-lung transplantation should be timely considered. The invasive therapeutic measures can be applied in a bridge-to-recovery or bridge-to-lung transplant strategy. This consensus statement focuses on the management of acute severe PH in the paediatric intensive care unit and provides an according treatment algorithm for clinical practice.

  9. Hantavirus Fever without Pulmonary Syndrome in Panama

    PubMed Central

    Armien, Blas; Pascale, Juan M.; Muñoz, Carlos; Mariñas, Jamileth; Núñez, Heydy; Herrera, Milagro; Trujillo, José; Sánchez, Deyanira; Mendoza, Yaxelis; Hjelle, Brian; Koster, Frederick

    2013-01-01

    In Panama, hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is caused by Choclo virus, a species phylogenetically related to Andes and Maporal viruses. Up to 60% of the population has been positive for specific serum antibody in community-based surveys, but mortality is very uncommon. In four western Panama clinics, we tested individuals presenting with a severe febrile prodrome for acute hantavirus (HV) infection by immunoglobulin M enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction as well as clinically similar infections, such as dengue and leptospirosis. From 2006 to 2009, at least 21% of 117 patients diagnosed with HV infection had HV Fever (HF) with no evidence of pulmonary edema (no respiratory distress or radiographic lung infiltrates), and 44% of patients had very mild HPS (radiographic pulmonary edema but no respiratory insufficiency). HV infection caused by Choclo virus in Panama presents often as HF, which contrasts with HV in the Americas but is consistent with the high seroprevalence in endemic regions. PMID:23836565

  10. The role of iron in pulmonary pathology.

    PubMed

    Khiroya, Heena; Turner, Alice M

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory disease accounts for a large proportion of emergency admissions to hospital and diseaseassociated mortality. Genetic association studies demonstrate a link between iron metabolism and pulmonary disease phenotypes. IREB2 is a gene that produces iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2), which has a key role in iron homeostasis. This review addresses pathways involved in iron metabolism, particularly focusing on the role of IREB2. In addition to this, environmental factors also influence phenotypic variation in respiratory disease, for example inhaled iron from cigarette smoke is deposited in the lung and causes tissue damage by altering iron homeostasis. The effects of cigarette smoke are detailed in this article, particularly in relation to lung conditions that favour the upper lobes, such as emphysema and lung cancer. Clinical applications of iron homeostasis are also discussed in this review, especially looking at the pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer, pulmonary infections and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Promising new treatments involving iron are also covered. PMID:26629341

  11. Mortality risk assessment and the role of thrombolysis in pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Lankeit, Mareike; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2011-10-01

    Acute venous thromboembolism remains a frequent disease, with an incidence ranging between 23 and 69 cases per 100,000 population per year. Of these patients, approximately one-third present with clinical symptoms of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and two-thirds with deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Recent registries and cohort studies suggest that approximately 10% of all patients with acute PE die during the first 1 to 3 months after diagnosis. Overall, 1% of all patients admitted to hospitals die of acute PE, and 10% of all hospital deaths are PE-related. These facts emphasize the need to better implement our knowledge on the pathophysiology of the disease, recognize the determinants of death or major adverse events in the early phase of acute PE, and most importantly, identify those patients who necessitate prompt medical, surgical, or interventional treatment to restore the patency of the pulmonary vasculature. PMID:22082522

  12. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve. Some drug-induced lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis, may never go away. ... Complications that may develop include: Diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) Respiratory failure

  13. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a preventable and treatable disease that makes it difficult to empty air out of the lungs. This difficulty in ...

  14. Surfactant treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Herce, J.; de Lucas, N.; Carrillo, A.; Bustinza, A.; Moral, R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine prospectively the efficacy of surfactant in acute respiratory distress syndrome.
STUDY DESIGN—Twenty patients, 1 month to 16 years of age, diagnosed with an acute pulmonary disease with severe hypoxaemia (PaO2/FiO2 < 100) (13 with systemic or pulmonary disease and seven with cardiac disease) were treated with one to six doses of 50-200 mg/kg of porcine surfactant administered directly into the trachea. The surfactant was considered to be effective when the PaO2/FiO2 improved by > 20%.
RESULTS—After initial surfactant administration the PaO2/FiO2 increased significantly in patients with systemic or pulmonary disease from 68 to 111, and the oxygenation index (OI) diminished significantly from 36.9 to 27.1. The PaO2/FiO2 and OI did not improve in children with cardiac disease. The improvement of the patients who survived was greater than that of those who died.
CONCLUSIONS—Surfactant moderately improves oxygenation in some children with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to pulmonary or systemic disease.

 PMID:10325705

  15. Modelling pulmonary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Tawhai, Merryn H.; Burrowes, Kelly S.

    2008-01-01

    Computational model analysis is a method that has been used widely to understand and interpret complexity of interactions in the pulmonary system. Pulmonary blood transport is a multi-scale phenomenon that involves scale-dependent structure and function, therefore requiring different model assumptions for the microcirculation and the arterial or venous flows. The blood transport systems interact with the surrounding lung tissue, and are dependent on hydrostatic pressure gradients, control of vasoconstriction, and the topology and material composition of the vascular trees. This review focuses on computational models that have been developed to study the different mechanisms contributing to regional perfusion of the lung. Different models for the microcirculation and the pulmonary arteries are considered, including fractal approaches and anatomically-based methods. The studies that are reviewed illustrate the different complementary approaches that can be used to address the same physiological question of flow heterogeneity. PMID:18434260

  16. Aging and Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Selman, Moisés; Buendía-Roldán, Ivette; Pardo, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic, progressive, and usually fatal lung disorder of unknown etiology. The disease likely results from the interaction of genetic susceptibility architecture, environmental factors such as smoking, and an abnormal epigenetic reprogramming that leads to a complex pathogenesis. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis occurs in middle-aged and mainly elderly adults, and in this context age has emerged as its strongest risk factor. However, the mechanisms linking it to aging are uncertain. Recently, nine molecular and cellular hallmarks of aging have been proposed: genomic instability, telomere attrition, epigenetic alterations, loss of proteostasis, deregulated nutrient sensing, mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular senescence, stem cell exhaustion, and altered intercellular communication. In this review, we provide an overview of these molecular mechanisms and their involvement in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, while emphasizing that the studies on this disease are few and the findings are not definitive. PMID:27103043

  17. Treatment of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rajendrakumar; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Patel, Laxeshkumar; Gandhi, Kaushang; Desai, Harit; Kaul, Dhiraj; Sahgal, Sumir P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic progressive disease of the pulmonary vasculature characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and secondary right ventricular failure. PAH is considered a life-threatening condition unless treated. This article provides a comprehensive review of controlled and uncontrolled trials to define the risk-benefit for different therapeutic options of this clinical disorder. Relevant published articles were identified through searches of the National Center for Biotechnology PubMed database. All therapeutic measures for PAH were discussed. Six drugs have been approved in the United States for the treatment of PAH. Extensive medical advancement has been achieved in treatment of PAH. However, none of the approved therapies have shown ability to cure the disease. New research should be performed to develop promising new therapies. PMID:22460104

  18. Symptomatic pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, J; Mehta, J B; Taylor, R A; Byrd, R P; Roy, T M

    1998-09-01

    An otherwise healthy 37-year-old man came to the emergency room with left-sided dull chest pain of 4 weeks' duration. Physical examination, laboratory studies, and electrocardiogram were all unremarkable. A chest x-ray film revealed calcified pulmonary nodules. Computed tomography of the chest confirmed bilateral parenchymal cavitary lesions. Via limited thoracotomy, a tan nodule measuring 2.5 to 3.0 cm in diameter was excised from the left upper lobe. Histopathologic examination revealed a well circumscribed lesion and extensive lamellar hyalinization. A few foci of finely granular calcification were present within the hyalinizing areas. After surgery and short-term use of nonnarcotic analgesics, the chest pain resolved. Although pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) is known to produce cavitating lesions, calcification at multiple sites is also consistent with this diagnosis. Clinicians should remember to include PHG in the differential diagnosis of multiple pulmonary nodules. PMID:9743062

  19. Monoparesis in association with feline pulmonary carcinoma: A literature review with 3 new cases

    PubMed Central

    van Stee, Lucinda; Boston, Sarah; Singh, Ameet; Park, Fiona; Richardson, Danielle; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony; Vince, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    We describe 3 cases of cats that were presented with a sudden onset of monoparesis as a result of arterial thromboembolism without evidence of cardiovascular disease that were subsequently diagnosed with a primary pulmonary carcinoma. Arterial tumor thromboemboli due to pulmonary carcinoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases of lameness or paresis in older cats. We theorize that large tumor emboli may obstruct peripheral arteries leading to acute monoparesis. PMID:25183892

  20. Pulmonary hypertensive crisis following ethanol sclerotherapy for a complex vascular malformation.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Schmidt, G; Wallenstein, M B; Ozen, M; Shah, N A; Jackson, E; Hovsepian, D M; Palma, J P

    2014-09-01

    Anhydrous ethanol is a commonly used sclerotic agent for treating vascular malformations. We describe the case of a full-term 15-day-old female with a complex venolymphatic malformation involving the face and orbit. During treatment of the lesion with ethanol sclerotherapy, she suffered acute pulmonary hypertensive crisis. We discuss the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension related to ethanol sclerotherapy, and propose that hemolysis plays a significant role. Recommendations for evaluation, monitoring and management of this complication are also discussed.

  1. Negative pressure pulmonary edema following choking on a cookie.

    PubMed

    Toukan, Yazeed; Gur, Michal; Bentur, Lea

    2016-07-01

    A 12-year-old boy developed severe acute respiratory distress during a school break requiring resuscitative measures. The episode started shortly after a short choking episode with a cookie. History, physical examination, laboratory results, chest X-ray, and clinical course supported the diagnosis of negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE). NPPE occurring outside a hospital setting, especially following a short episode of choking on a cookie, is rarely reported in children. Understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to pulmonary edema can help in distinguishing NPPE from other causes of fulminant respiratory distress, and especially from other causes of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:E25-E27. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Bilateral pulmonary edema after endoscopic sympathectomy in a patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lan, C J; Luk, H N; Wu, C T; Chang, W K; Tsou, M Y; Lui, P W; Lee, T Y

    2001-01-01

    Transaxillary endoscopic sympathectomy of thoracic ganglia (T2-T3) has recently gained wider acceptance as the treatment of choice for palmar hyperhidrosis. It requires one-lung ventilation to facilitate the surgery. One-lung ventilation, however, is not without complications, among which acute pulmonary edema has been reported. In this case report, we present a patient with palmar hyperhidrosis complicated by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency, who received bilateral endoscopic sympathectomy under alternate one-lung anesthesia, and developed acute pulmonary edema immediately after recruitment of the successive collapsed lung. The effects of hypoxemia, G-6-PD deficiency and sympathectomy might all add to the development of acute pulmonary edema secondary to reexpansion of each individual lung after alternate one-lung ventilation. The possibilities of the inferred causes are herein discussed. PMID:11152024

  3. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma.

    PubMed

    Yousem, S A; Hochholzer, L

    1987-01-01

    Pulmonary hyalinizing granulomas are distinct fibrosing lesions of lung, having central whorled deposits of lamellar collagen. Twenty-four cases of this unusual pulmonary lesion are reported herein. Hyalinizing granulomas occur in middle-aged persons and are frequently mistaken for metastatic carcinoma radiographically. More than half of the patients had autoimmune phenomena or previous exposures to mycobacterial or fungal antigens. Four patients had sclerosing mediastinitis develop. A progressive debilitating clinical course was related to increasing dyspnea and bilateral disease on chest radiographs. A discussion of the histogenesis and histologic differential diagnosis is presented. PMID:3799538

  4. [Pulmonary Echinococcosis: Surgical Aspects].

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, M E; Hoffmann, H; Dienemann, H

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary cystic echinococcosis is a very rare disease in Germany. It is caused by the larvae of the dog tapeworm (echinococcus granulosus). The liver is the most affected organ, followed by the lungs. Surgery remains the main therapeutic approach for pulmonary CE. Whenever possible, parenchyma-preserving lung surgery should be preferred over anatomic lung resections. To ensure best therapeutic results, surgery needs to be performed under precise consideration of important infectiological aspects and patients should be treated in specialised centres based on interdisciplinary consensus. In addition to surgical aspects, this review summarises special infectiological features of this disease, which are crucial to the surgical approach. PMID:26351761

  5. Acute Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorguner, Metin; Akgun, Metin

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled substances may cause injury in pulmonary epithelium at various levels of respiratory tract, leading from simple symptoms to severe disease. Acute inhalation injury (AII) is not uncommon condition. There are certain high risk groups but AII may occur at various places including home or workplace. Environmental exposure is also possible. In addition to individual susceptibility, the characteristics of inhaled substances such as water solubility, size of substances and chemical properties may affect disease severity as well as its location. Although AII cases may recover in a few days but AII may cause long-term complications, even death. We aimed to discuss the effects of short-term exposures (minutes to hours) to toxic substances on the lungs. PMID:25610115

  6. Reexpansion pulmonary edema in children

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Antonio Lucas L.; Lopes, Carlos Eduardo; Romaneli, Mariana Tresoldi das N.; Fraga, Andrea de Melo A.; Pereira, Ricardo Mendes; Tresoldi, Antonia Teresinha

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To present a case of a patient with clinical and radiological features of reexpansion pulmonary edema, a rare and potentially fatal disease. CASE DESCRIPTION An 11-year-old boy presenting fever, clinical signs and radiological features of large pleural effusion initially treated as a parapneumonic process. Due to clinical deterioration he underwent tube thoracostomy, with evacuation of 3,000 mL of fluid; he shortly presented acute respiratory insufficiency and needed mechanical ventilation. He had an atypical evolution (extubated twice with no satisfactory response). Computerized tomography findings matched those of reexpansion edema. He recovered satisfactorily after intensive care, and pleural tuberculosis was diagnosed afterwards. COMMENTS Despite its rareness in the pediatric population (only five case reports gathered), the knowledge of this pathology and its prevention is very important, due to high mortality rates. It is recommended, among other measures, slow evacuation of the pleural effusion, not removing more than 1,500 mL of fluid at once. PMID:24142327

  7. Pathways and Drugs in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension - Focus on the Role of Endothelin Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Madonna, Rosalinda; Cocco, Nino; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a group of diseases characterized by a progressive increase of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), initially due to abnormal pulmonary vasoconstriction in response to endothelial injury. Recent studies have here confirmed the prominent role of endothelin (ET)-1 in vasoconstriction and remodelling of the pulmonary microcirculation. In patients who are acute-vasoreactive, classical treatments for PAH are calcium channels blockers (CCBs), while drugs targeting the prostacyclin, nitric oxide and endothelin pathways, i.e., prostanoids, phosphodiesterase (PDE)-5 inhibitors and endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs), respectively, are indicated in non-vasoreactive patients or in vasoreactive patients not responding to initial CCB therapy. Randomised, placebo-controlled trials have shown that ERAs improve pulmonary haemodynamics, exercise capacity, functional status and clinical outcome in patients with PAH. Here we provide an overview of the currently recommended diagnostic and therapeutic work-up in PAH, with special emphasis on ERAs. PMID:26145170

  8. Pulmonary vascular resistance and compliance relationship in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chemla, Denis; Lau, Edmund M T; Papelier, Yves; Attal, Pierre; Hervé, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    Right ventricular adaptation to the increased pulmonary arterial load is a key determinant of outcomes in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and total arterial compliance (C) quantify resistive and elastic properties of pulmonary arteries that modulate the steady and pulsatile components of pulmonary arterial load, respectively. PVR is commonly calculated as transpulmonary pressure gradient over pulmonary flow and total arterial compliance as stroke volume over pulmonary arterial pulse pressure (SV/PApp). Assuming that there is an inverse, hyperbolic relationship between PVR and C, recent studies have popularised the concept that their product (RC-time of the pulmonary circulation, in seconds) is "constant" in health and diseases. However, emerging evidence suggests that this concept should be challenged, with shortened RC-times documented in post-capillary PH and normotensive subjects. Furthermore, reported RC-times in the literature have consistently demonstrated significant scatter around the mean. In precapillary PH, the true PVR can be overestimated if one uses the standard PVR equation because the zero-flow pressure may be significantly higher than pulmonary arterial wedge pressure. Furthermore, SV/PApp may also overestimate true C. Further studies are needed to clarify some of the inconsistencies of pulmonary RC-time, as this has major implications for our understanding of the arterial load in diseases of the pulmonary circulation.

  9. Pulmonary hemorrhage following anabolic agent abuse: Two cases.

    PubMed

    Hvid-Jensen, Helene S; Rasmussen, Finn; Bendstrup, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Numerous adverse effects follow anabolic agent abuse. Pulmonary hemorrhage is not considered one of them. We present two cases of young male bodybuilders who developed diffuse alveolar bleeding as a result of anabolic steroid abuse. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with anabolic agent abuse has not been described previously in the literature. Both patients developed acute dyspnea and hemoptysis with consistent radiological findings. In both cases symptoms promptly resolved with cessation of exposure and no medical intervention was required and no signs of persistent lung damage were seen. It is crucial to be aware of pulmonary hemorrhage as an acute complication of anabolic agent abuse. It should be considered an important differential diagnosis in the athletic patient presenting with respiratory symptoms.

  10. Angiotensin II prevents hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and vascular changes in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovitch, M.; Mullen, M.; Rosenberg, H.C.; Maruyama, K.; O'Brodovich, H.; Olley, P.M. )

    1988-03-01

    Angiotensin II, a vasoconstrictor, has been previously demonstrated to produce a secondary vasodilatation due to release of prostaglandins. Because of this effect, the authors investigated whether infusion of exogenous angiotensin II via miniosmopumps in rats during a 1-wk exposure to chronic hypobaric hypoxia might prevent pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy, and vascular changes. They instrumented the rats with indwelling cardiovascular catheters and compared the hemodynamic and structural response in animals given angiotensin II, indomethacin in addition to angiotensin II (to block prostaglandin production), or saline with or without indomethacin. They then determine whether angiotensin II infusion also prevents acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. They observed that exogenous angiotensin II infusion abolished the rise in pulmonary artery pressure, the right ventricular hypertrophy, and the vascular changes induced during chronic hypoxia in control saline-infused rats with or without indomethacin. The protective effects of angiotensin II was lost when indomethacin was given to block prostaglandin synthesis. During acute hypoxia, both antiotensin II and prostacyclin infusion similarly prevented the rise in pulmonary artery pressure observed in saline-infused rats and in rats given indomethacin or saralasin in addition to angiotensin II. Thus exogenous angiotensin II infusion prevents chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, associated right ventricular hypertrophy, and vascular changes and blocks acute hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, and this is likely related to its ability to release vasodilator prostaglandins.

  11. Giant pulmonary bulla with mediastinal shift in a 12 1/2 year old girl.

    PubMed

    Fatimi, Saulat Hasnain; Jafferani, Asif; Ashfaq, Awais

    2012-05-01

    Pulmonary bulla in children represent interesting entities. Mostly congenital bronchopulmonary foregut malformations and acquired cysts like pneumatocoeles have also been described. We present a case of a 12 1/2 years old girl with acute onset respiratory distress symptoms harbouring a huge pulmonary cyst exhibiting mass effects, resulting in mediastinal deviation. Following initial workup, cyst excision was carried out which revealed presence of fungal hyphae that was susceptible to Fluconazole therapy post operatively. The case points out how a pulmonary cyst can present in older children with symptoms of respiratory distress and mass effects.

  12. Early posttraumatic pulmonary platelet trapping and its potentiation by oral pretreatment with alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Thoerne, J.B.; Blomquist, S.; Elmer, O.; Joensson, B.A.L.; Lindahl, S.; Strand, S.E.

    1986-02-01

    Soft tissue trauma is associated with platelet aggregation and sequestration in the lungs. This is believed to be an early step in the later development of adult respiratory distress syndrome. In the present experiment using a new method for in vivo dynamic studies of platelet sequestration, we wanted to evaluate the effect of soft tissue trauma on pulmonary platelet trapping in pigs and the influence of acute alcohol intoxication. The results show that significant pulmonary platelet trapping is registered within minutes of trauma and that alcohol significantly increases platelet sequestration in the lungs. This indicates an increased risk for posttraumatic pulmonary problems in alcohol-intoxicated trauma victims.

  13. Pulmonary hypertension and hepatic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Téllez Villajos, L; Martínez González, J; Moreira Vicente, V; Albillos Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a relatively common phenomenon in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and can appear through various mechanisms. The most characteristic scenario that binds portal and pulmonary hypertension is portopulmonary syndrome. However, hyperdynamic circulation, TIPS placement and heart failure can raise the mean pulmonary artery pressure without increasing the resistances. These conditions are not candidates for treatment with pulmonary vasodilators and require a specific therapy. A correct assessment of hemodynamic, ultrasound and clinical variables enables the differential diagnosis of each situation that produces pulmonary hypertension in patients with cirrhosis.

  14. Aortic lesion simulating pulmonary disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    do Amaral, Ricardo Holderbaum; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; Nin, Carlos Schuler; Pedraza, Cesar Adrian Alvarez; Biegelmeyer, Júlia; Maciel, Antonio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The authors report the case of an elderly woman assessed for dyspnea and right costal margin pain, whose chest radiography demonstrated opacity simulating pulmonary lesion, and computed tomography revealed the vascular origin of the condition. Acute aortic syndrome due to ruptured atheromatous plaque penetrating through the elastic lamina in association with aortic hematoma and aneurysm is a relevant differential diagnosis to be considered in these cases.

  15. Nodular pulmonary amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, A; Rasmussen, S L; Campbell, T M; Lester, W M

    1984-01-01

    An elderly man had a 10-year history of multiple pulmonary nodules that he had refused to have investigated. He died of a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. At autopsy the nodules were shown to consist of amyloid. There was no evidence of systemic amyloidosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6744167

  16. [Pulmonary involvements of sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Ohmichi, M; Hiraga, Y; Hirasawa, M

    1990-01-01

    We reported about intrathoracic changes and prognosis of 686 patients with sarcoidosis diagnosed in our hospital between 1963 and 1988. We evaluated CT findings in 135 patients with sarcoidosis and found pulmonary involvements in 81. We analyzed CT findings according to the classification by Tuengerthal which classified radiographic findings combining ILO classification of pneumoconiosis and characteristic findings of bronchovascular sheath with sarcoidosis. The CT findings were as follows: small opacities (44 out of 81 cases, 54.3%), large opacities (37 cases, 46.7%). Additional findings were as follows: peribronchial marking (42 cases, 51.9%), contraction (17 cases, 21.0%), pleural involvement (9 cases, 11.1%), bulla (5 cases, 6.2%). The characteristic CT findings of serious sarcoidosis were extasis of bronchus, thickening of the bronchial wall, unclearness of vascular shadow, atelectasis and thickening of pleura. Concerning the prognosis of pulmonary involvement, according to age, patients younger than 30 years old at initial diagnosis were better than those of 30 years and over in terms of disappearance of pulmonary involvements. According to stage, patients of stage I and stage II were better than those of stage III. Among the patients we were able to observe chest X-ray findings during five years according to the character of shadow, ill-defined shadow of small opacities and rounded shadows of large opacities had a higher disappearance rate of pulmonary involvements than irregular shadows of large opacities, atelectasis and contraction.

  17. [Multiple pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma].

    PubMed

    Haro, M; Ruiz, J; Vila, X; Avellanet, M; Izquierdo, J

    1994-01-01

    The causes of multiple pulmonary nodules are many, with metastasis being the most feared. A rare but possible etiology, however, is hyalinizing multiple granuloma. We present a case that allows us to review this condition and its course, as well as a variety of associated immunological changes and possible complications. PMID:8087395

  18. [Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma].

    PubMed

    Westhoff, M; Litterst, P; Albert, M; Welim, B

    2015-01-01

    Benign lesions as pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma may mimic a malign disease. A 63-year old patient complained dyspnea and a weight loss of 30 kg. CT-thorax scans showed a destructive and infiltrative pulmonary process with pleural thickening. Histologic examination of transbronchial and transthoracic biopsies as well as of biopsies taken by minithoracotomy was not conclusive. Due to further progression the patient underwent a left-sided pleuropneumonectomy despite a VO2 peak of 9 ml/kg/min. Histology revealed DIP-like infiltrations, a histiocytic reaction and hyaline granulomas. Among less than 100 published cases of pulmonary hyaline granuloma a comparable rapid progression with a total functional loss of the affected lung is not reported. Mostly hyalinizing granuloma presents with infiltrations, which may mimic lung cancer, or nodular lesions, partly with cavitations or calcifications. The etiology is unknown, a persistent immunologic response to an antigenic stimulus is discussed. Associations with infections, lymphomas, amyloidosis or IgG4-related disease are reported. Some cases have features of multifocal fibrosis. In the case reported none of these associations could be found. The prognosis of pulmonary hyaline granuloma is regarded as benign. There is no effective treatment yet. Once the diagnosis has been established a conservative approach as well as a resection of nodules and a therapeutic attempt with steroids are an option. Extensive resections as pleuropneumonectomy are an exception. PMID:25599140

  19. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma.

    PubMed

    Maijub, A G; Giltman, L I; Verner, J L; Peace, R J

    1985-03-01

    We describe a recent case of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma presenting classically in a young black American female. The diagnosis was made by histopathologic examination. The etiology of this entity remains elusive, however, an abnormal response involving the immune system to an undefined agent (or agents) is the most likely explanation. PMID:3977139

  20. Solitary pulmonary nodule

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest x-ray Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan Respiratory system References Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  1. Primary Pulmonary Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer, Shumaila; El Damati, Ahmed; El Baz, Ayman; Alsayyah, Ahmed; ElSharkawy, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary Hodgkin lymphoma (PPHL) is a rare disease. Herein, we report a case of PPHL with diagnostic concerns encountered during initial evaluation which is of paramount importance to keep the differential diagnosis in cases with high index of suspicion for this rare entity. PMID:26788271

  2. Acute and subacute idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) may have an acute or subacute presentation, or acute exacerbation may occur in a previously subclinical or unrecognized chronic IIP. Acute or subacute IIPs include acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AE-IPF) and AE-NSIP. Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) including connective tissue disease (CTD) associated ILD, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, drug-induced lung disease and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage need to be differentiated from acute and subacute IIPs. Despite the severe lack of randomized controlled trials for the treatment of acute and subacute IIPs, the mainstream treatment remains corticosteroid therapy. Other potential therapies reported in the literature include corticosteroids and immunosuppression, antibiotics, anticoagulants, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, autoantibody-targeted treatment, antifibrotics and hemoperfusion therapy. With regard to mechanical ventilation, patients in recent studies with acute and subacute IIPs have shown better survival than those in previous studies. Therefore, a careful value-laden decision about the indications for endotracheal intubation should be made for each patient. Noninvasive ventilation may be beneficial to reduce ventilator associated pneumonia. PMID:27123874

  3. Acute and subacute idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) may have an acute or subacute presentation, or acute exacerbation may occur in a previously subclinical or unrecognized chronic IIP. Acute or subacute IIPs include acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AE-IPF) and AE-NSIP. Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) including connective tissue disease (CTD) associated ILD, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, drug-induced lung disease and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage need to be differentiated from acute and subacute IIPs. Despite the severe lack of randomized controlled trials for the treatment of acute and subacute IIPs, the mainstream treatment remains corticosteroid therapy. Other potential therapies reported in the literature include corticosteroids and immunosuppression, antibiotics, anticoagulants, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, autoantibody-targeted treatment, antifibrotics and hemoperfusion therapy. With regard to mechanical ventilation, patients in recent studies with acute and subacute IIPs have shown better survival than those in previous studies. Therefore, a careful value-laden decision about the indications for endotracheal intubation should be made for each patient. Noninvasive ventilation may be beneficial to reduce ventilator associated pneumonia.

  4. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management: the evidence base.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, N R

    2001-11-01

    In long-term management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a number of medications improve pulmonary function test results. The long-term clinical benefits of those drugs would seem intuitive, but there is very little strong evidence that long-term outcomes in COPD are substantially affected by those drugs. Nevertheless, symptom improvement such as dyspnea reduction is certainly strong reason to use those agents. The 2 most compelling bodies of evidence in stable COPD are for oxygen therapy in the chronically hypoxemic patient and pulmonary rehabilitation to improve exercise tolerance and dyspnea. Inhaled corticosteroids also appear to be useful in patients at risk for frequent exacerbations. In acute exacerbations, the rationale for therapy comes in part from the large body of literature regarding acute asthma therapy. Bronchodilator therapy and corticosteroids both seem to reduce the severity and the duration of exacerbations. Moreover, routine antibiotic use seems beneficial, and the role of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation with patients suffering impending respiratory failure from acute COPD exacerbations is well supported by the literature. PMID:11679148

  5. Pulmonary function in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. B.; Elliott, A. R.; Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    The lung is exquisitely sensitive to gravity, and so it is of interest to know how its function is altered in the weightlessness of space. Studies on National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Spacelabs during the last 4 years have provided the first comprehensive data on the extensive changes in pulmonary function that occur in sustained microgravity. Measurements of pulmonary function were made on astronauts during space shuttle flights lasting 9 and 14 days and were compared with extensive ground-based measurements before and after the flights. Compared with preflight measurements, cardiac output increased by 18% during space flight, and stroke volume increased by 46%. Paradoxically, the increase in stroke volume occurred in the face of reductions in central venous pressure and circulating blood volume. Diffusing capacity increased by 28%, and the increase in the diffusing capacity of the alveolar membrane was unexpectedly large based on findings in normal gravity. The change in the alveolar membrane may reflect the effects of uniform filling of the pulmonary capillary bed. Distributions of blood flow and ventilation throughout the lung were more uniform in space, but some unevenness remained, indicating the importance of nongravitational factors. A surprising finding was that airway closing volume was approximately the same in microgravity and in normal gravity, emphasizing the importance of mechanical properties of the airways in determining whether they close. Residual volume was unexpectedly reduced by 18% in microgravity, possibly because of uniform alveolar expansion. The findings indicate that pulmonary function is greatly altered in microgravity, but none of the changes observed so far will apparently limit long-term space flight. In addition, the data help to clarify how gravity affects pulmonary function in the normal gravity environment on Earth.

  6. Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  7. Pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Günther, Sven; Dorfmüller, Peter; Perros, Frédéric; Girerd, Barbara; Garcia, Gilles; Jaïs, Xavier; Savale, Laurent; Artaud-Macari, Elise; Price, Laura C; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  8. Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin against septic acute lung injury and acute respir atory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Rongju; Li, Yana; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Fei; Li, Tanshi

    2015-01-01

    Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin (UTI) against septic acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We randomly divided 80 cases of severe sepsis-induced ALI and ARDS into a UTI group and a ginsenosides (GS)+UTI group. Continuous electrocardiac monitoring of pulse, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and heart rate; invasive hemodynamic monitoring; ventilator-assisted breathing and circulation support; and anti-infection as well as UTI treatment were given in the UTI group with GS treatment added for 7 consecutive days in the GS+UTI group. The indicators of pulmonary vascular permeability, pulmonary circulation, blood gases, and hemodynamics as well as APACHE II and ALI scores were detected on days 1, 3, and 7. The ALI score in the GS+UTI group was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) compared with that of the UTI group, and the indicators of pulmonary capillary permeability such as pulmonary vascular permeability index, extravascular lung water index, and oxygenation index, in the GS+UTI group improved significantly more than that of the UTI group. The indicators of hemodynamics and pulmonary circulation such as cardiac index, intrathoracic blood volume index, and central venous pressure improved significantly (P < 0.05), and the APACHE II score in the GS+UTI group was lower than that of the UTI group. GS can effectively collaborate with UTI against ALI and/or ARDS. PMID:26261640

  9. Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin against septic acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rongju; Li, Yana; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Fei; Li, Tanshi

    2015-01-01

    Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin (UTI) against septic acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We randomly divided 80 cases of severe sepsis-induced ALI and ARDS into a UTI group and a ginsenosides (GS)+UTI group. Continuous electrocardiac monitoring of pulse, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and heart rate; invasive hemodynamic monitoring; ventilator-assisted breathing and circulation support; and anti-infection as well as UTI treatment were given in the UTI group with GS treatment added for 7 consecutive days in the GS+UTI group. The indicators of pulmonary vascular permeability, pulmonary circulation, blood gases, and hemodynamics as well as APACHE II and ALI scores were detected on days 1, 3, and 7. The ALI score in the GS+UTI group was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) compared with that of the UTI group, and the indicators of pulmonary capillary permeability such as pulmonary vascular permeability index, extravascular lung water index, and oxygenation index, in the GS+UTI group improved significantly more than that of the UTI group. The indicators of hemodynamics and pulmonary circulation such as cardiac index, intrathoracic blood volume index, and central venous pressure improved significantly (P < 0.05), and the APACHE II score in the GS+UTI group was lower than that of the UTI group. GS can effectively collaborate with UTI against ALI and/or ARDS.

  10. Central Versus Peripheral Pulmonary Embolism: Analysis of the Impact on the Physiological Parameters and Long-term Survival

    PubMed Central

    Alonso Martinez, José Luis; Anniccherico Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Urbieta Echezarreta, Miren Aranzazu; García, Ione Villar; Álvaro, Jorge Rojo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies aimed at assessing whether the emboli lodged in the central pulmonary arteries carry a worse prognosis than more peripheral emboli have yielded controversial results. Aims: To explore the impact on survival and long-term prognosis of central pulmonary embolism. Patients and Methods: Consecutive patients diagnosed with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism by means of computed tomography (CT) angiography were evaluated at episode index and traced through the computed system of clinical recording and following-up. Central pulmonary embolism was diagnosed when thrombi were seen in the trunk or in the main pulmonary arteries and peripheral pulmonary embolism when segmental or subsegmental arteries were affected. Results: A total of 530 consecutive patients diagnosed with pulmonary embolism were evaluated; 255 patients had central pulmonary embolism and 275 patients had segmental or subsegmental pulmonary embolism. Patients with central pulmonary embolism were older, had higher plasma levels of N-terminal of the prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-ProBNP), troponin I, D-dimer, alveolar-arterial gradient, and shock index (P < .001 for each one). Patients with central pulmonary embolism had an all-cause mortality of 40% while patients with segmental or subsegmental pulmonary embolism (PE) had an overall mortality of 27% and odds ratio of 1.81 [confidence interval (CI) 95% 1.16-1.9]. Survival was lower in patients with central PE than in patients with segmental or subsegmental pulmonary embolism, even after avoiding confounders (P = .018). Conclusions: Apart from a greater impact on hemodynamics, gas exchange, and right ventricular dysfunction, central pulmonary embolism associates a shorter survival and an increased long-term mortality. PMID:27114970

  11. Immunoadjuvant Therapy and Noninvasive Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure in Lung Tuberculosis: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Franco, René Agustín; Olivas-Medina, Dahyr Alberto; Pacheco-Tena, Cesar Francisco; Duque-Rodríguez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure caused by pulmonary tuberculosis is a rare event but with a high mortality even while receiving mechanical ventilatory support. We report the case of a young man with severe pulmonary tuberculosis refractory to conventional therapy who successfully overcame the critical period of his condition using noninvasive ventilation and immunoadjuvant therapy that included three doses of etanercept 25 mg subcutaneously. We conclude that the use of etanercept along with antituberculosis treatment appears to be safe and effective in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis presenting with acute respiratory failure. PMID:26273486

  12. Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Larissa A; Laurie, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complex, progressive condition arising from a variety of genetic and pathogenic causes. Patients present with a spectrum of histologic and pathophysiological features, likely reflecting the diversity in underlying pathogenesis. It is widely recognized that structural alterations in the vascular wall contribute to all forms of pulmonary hypertension. Features characteristic of the remodeled vasculature in patients with pulmonary hypertension include increased stiffening of the elastic proximal pulmonary arteries, thickening of the intimal and/or medial layer of muscular arteries, development of vaso-occlusive lesions and the appearance of cells expressing smooth muscle specific markers in normally non-muscular small diameter vessels, resulting from proliferation and migration of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and cellular trans-differentiation. The development of several animal models of pulmonary hypertension has provided the means to explore the mechanistic underpinnings of pulmonary vascular remodeling, although none of the experimental models currently used entirely replicates the pulmonary arterial hypertension observed in patients. Herein, we provide an overview of the histological abnormalities observed in humans with pulmonary hypertension and in preclinical models and discuss insights gained regarding several key signaling pathways contributing to the remodeling process. In particular, we will focus on the roles of ion homeostasis, endothelin-1, serotonin, bone morphogenetic proteins, Rho kinase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells, highlighting areas of cross-talk between these pathways and potentials for therapeutic targeting. PMID:23334338

  13. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Sherif R.; Greer, Patricia w.; Coffield, Lisa M.; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Nolte, Kurt B.; Foucar, Kathy; Feddersen, Richard M.; Zumwalt, Ross E.; Miller, Gayle L.; Khan, Ali S.; Rollin, Pierre E.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Mahy, Brian W.J.; Peters, Clarence J.

    1995-01-01

    A recent outbreak of a severe pulmonary disease in the southwestern United States was etiologically linked to a previously unrecognized bantavirus. The virus has been isolated from its majorreservoir, the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus,and recently named Sin Nombre virus. Clinically, the disease has become known as the bantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). Since May 1993, 44 fatal cases of HPS have been identified through clinicopathological review and immunobistochemical(IHC) testing of tissues from 273 patients who died of an unexplained noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. In 158 cases for which suitable specimens were available, serologicaltesting and/or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of extracted RNA was also performed. IHC, serological, and PCR results were concordant for virtually all HPS and non-HPS patients when more than one assay was performed. The prodromal ilness of HPS is similar to that of many other viral diseases. Consistent bematological features include thrombocytopenia, bemoconcentration, neutropbilic leukocytosis with a left shift, and reactivel lymphocytes. Pulmonary bistopatbological features were similar in most of the fatal HPS cases (40/44) and consisted of an interstitial pneumonitis with a variable mononuclear cell infiltrate, edema, and focal byaline membranes. In four cases, bowever, pulmonary features were significantly different and included diffuse alveolar damage and variable degrees of severe air space disorganization. IHC analysis showed widespread presence of bantaviral antigens in endothelial cells of the microvasculature, particularly in the lung. Hantaviral antigens were also observed within follicular dendritic cells, macrophages, and lymphocytes. Hantaviral inclusions were observed in endothelial cells of lungs by thinsection electron microscopy, and their identity was verified by immunogold labeling. Virus-like particles were seen in pulmonary endothelial cells and macropbages. HPS is

  14. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Mas, Arantxa; Masip, Josep

    2014-01-01

    After the institution of positive-pressure ventilation, the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) through an interface substantially increased. The first technique was continuous positive airway pressure; but, after the introduction of pressure support ventilation at the end of the 20th century, this became the main modality. Both techniques, and some others that have been recently introduced and which integrate some technological innovations, have extensively demonstrated a faster improvement of acute respiratory failure in different patient populations, avoiding endotracheal intubation and facilitating the release of conventional invasive mechanical ventilation. In acute settings, NIV is currently the first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation as well as for acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and should be considered in immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory insufficiency, in difficult weaning, and in the prevention of postextubation failure. Alternatively, it can also be used in the postoperative period and in cases of pneumonia and asthma or as a palliative treatment. NIV is currently used in a wide range of acute settings, such as critical care and emergency departments, hospital wards, palliative or pediatric units, and in pre-hospital care. It is also used as a home care therapy in patients with chronic pulmonary or sleep disorders. The appropriate selection of patients and the adaptation to the technique are the keys to success. This review essentially analyzes the evidence of benefits of NIV in different populations with acute respiratory failure and describes the main modalities, new devices, and some practical aspects of the use of this technique. PMID:25143721

  15. Characterization of the phase dependent pulmonary response following irritant inhalation exposure to nitrogen dioxide gas

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    The present study utilized NO{sub 2} to fingerprint the biochemical reaction of the pulmonary compartment to oxidative damage and to correlate this with histopathology following acute and subacute exposures to NO{sub 2}. Acute exposure to NO{sub 2} produced dose-dependent immediate increases in the nonenzymatic parameters of pulmonary protein content, protease inhibitor activity and lung weight. The enzymatic activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), choline kinase and beta-glucuronidase were elevated by two days following acute exposure. All of the above parameters were elevated following subacute exposure, however, nonenzymatic manifestations were attenuated with respect to enzymatic alterations. Hydroxyurea-induced granulocytopenia attenuated the increases in activities of LDH and beta-glucuronidase following acute, but not subacute exposures. Cycloheximide-induced protein synthesis inhibition decrease the LDH and beta-glucuronidase response to NO{sub 2} without altering the increases in protein content or protease inhibitor activity.

  16. An orally active TRPV4 channel blocker prevents and resolves pulmonary edema induced by heart failure.

    PubMed

    Thorneloe, Kevin S; Cheung, Mui; Bao, Weike; Alsaid, Hasan; Lenhard, Stephen; Jian, Ming-Yuan; Costell, Melissa; Maniscalco-Hauk, Kristeen; Krawiec, John A; Olzinski, Alan; Gordon, Earl; Lozinskaya, Irina; Elefante, Lou; Qin, Pu; Matasic, Daniel S; James, Chris; Tunstead, James; Donovan, Brian; Kallal, Lorena; Waszkiewicz, Anna; Vaidya, Kalindi; Davenport, Elizabeth A; Larkin, Jonathan; Burgert, Mark; Casillas, Linda N; Marquis, Robert W; Ye, Guosen; Eidam, Hilary S; Goodman, Krista B; Toomey, John R; Roethke, Theresa J; Jucker, Beat M; Schnackenberg, Christine G; Townsley, Mary I; Lepore, John J; Willette, Robert N

    2012-11-01

    Pulmonary edema resulting from high pulmonary venous pressure (PVP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in heart failure (HF) patients, but current treatment options demonstrate substantial limitations. Recent evidence from rodent lungs suggests that PVP-induced edema is driven by activation of pulmonary capillary endothelial transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channels. To examine the therapeutic potential of this mechanism, we evaluated TRPV4 expression in human congestive HF lungs and developed small-molecule TRPV4 channel blockers for testing in animal models of HF. TRPV4 immunolabeling of human lung sections demonstrated expression of TRPV4 in the pulmonary vasculature that was enhanced in sections from HF patients compared to controls. GSK2193874 was identified as a selective, orally active TRPV4 blocker that inhibits Ca(2+) influx through recombinant TRPV4 channels and native endothelial TRPV4 currents. In isolated rodent and canine lungs, TRPV4 blockade prevented the increased vascular permeability and resultant pulmonary edema associated with elevated PVP. Furthermore, in both acute and chronic HF models, GSK2193874 pretreatment inhibited the formation of pulmonary edema and enhanced arterial oxygenation. Finally, GSK2193874 treatment resolved pulmonary edema already established by myocardial infarction in mice. These findings identify a crucial role for TRPV4 in the formation of HF-induced pulmonary edema and suggest that TRPV4 blockade is a potential therapeutic strategy for HF patients.

  17. A neurogenic basis for acute altitude illness.

    PubMed

    Krasney, J A

    1994-02-01

    Acute altitude illnesses include acute mountain sickness (AMS), a benign condition involving headache, nausea, vomiting, irritability, insomnia, dizziness, lethargy, and peripheral edema, and potentially lethal high-altitude cerebral edema and pulmonary edema (HAPE). Recent evidence is summarized that AMS is related to cerebral edema secondary at least in part to hypoxic cerebral vasodilation and elevated cerebral capillary hydrostatic pressure. This results in reduced brain compliance with compression of intracranial structures in the absence of altered global brain metabolism. It is postulated that these primary intracranial events elevate peripheral sympathetic activity that acts neurogenically in the lung possibly in concert with pulmonary capillary stress failure to cause HAPE and in the kidney to promote salt and water retention. The adrenergic responses are likely modulated by striking increases of aldosterone, vasopressin and atrial natriuretic peptide. The effects of exercise on altitude-induced illness and various therapeutic regimens (acetazolamide, CO2 breathing, dexamethasone, and alpha adrenergic inhibitors) are discussed in light of this hypothesis.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Maron, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that is precipitated by hypertrophic pulmonary vascular remodeling of distal arterioles to increase pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance in the absence of left heart, lung parenchymal, or thromboembolic disease. Despite available medical therapy, pulmonary artery remodeling and its attendant hemodynamic consequences result in right ventricular dysfunction, failure, and early death. To limit morbidity and mortality, attention has focused on identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying aberrant pulmonary artery remodeling to identify pathways for intervention. While there is a well-recognized heritable genetic component to PAH, there is also evidence of other genetic perturbations, including pulmonary vascular cell DNA damage, activation of the DNA damage response, and variations in microRNA expression. These findings likely contribute, in part, to dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis signaling pathways akin to what is observed in cancer; changes in cellular metabolism, metabolic flux, and mitochondrial function; and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition as key signaling pathways that promote pulmonary vascular remodeling. This review will highlight recent advances in the field with an emphasis on the aforementioned molecular mechanisms as contributors to the pulmonary vascular disease pathophenotype. PMID:27213345

  19. Subpleural pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma presenting as a solitary pulmonary nodule.

    PubMed

    Na, Kook Joo; Song, Sang Yun; Kim, Jo Heon; Kim, Young Chul

    2007-08-01

    We introduce a case of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma presented as a solitary pulmonary nodule located subpleurally. The patient was a 57-year-old man who had abnormal chest roentgenograms showing a solitary pulmonary nodule in the right lower lung field. The nodule was resected for definitive diagnosis and histopathologically proved to be pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma. In previously reported cases, most patients had ill-defined margins and usually bilateral, multiple lesions radiographically. In our case, the subpleural location is an uncommon location of this rare entity. PMID:17762348

  20. Acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Graves, Nancy S

    2013-09-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a common infectious disease syndrome, causing a combination of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. There are more than 350 million cases of acute gastroenteritis in the United States annually and 48 million of these cases are caused by foodborne bacteria. Traveler's diarrhea affects more than half of people traveling from developed countries to developing countries. In adult and pediatric patients, the prevalence of Clostridium difficile is increasing. Contact precautions, public health education, and prudent use of antibiotics are necessary goals in decreasing the prevalence of Clostridium difficle. Preventing dehydration or providing appropriate rehydration is the primary supportive treatment of acute gastroenteritis.