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Sample records for acute pulmonary tuberculosis

  1. [Clinical diagnosis of HIV infection in patients with acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Nguen, V Kh; Stroganov, P V; Geshelin, S A

    2011-09-01

    The results of treatment of 81 patients, suffering tuberculosis and operated in emergency for an acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs, are adduced, in 29 of them--nonspecific diseases of nontuberculosis genesis were diagnosed. In 52 patients the indication for emergency operation performance were complications of abdominal tuberculosis (perforation of the tuberculosis ulcers of small intestine--in 37, the tuberculosis mesadenitis--in 15), of them in 34--pulmonary tuberculosis was in inactive phase, that's why the HIV presence was supposed. In 26 patients the diagnosis was confirmed, basing on serologic analysis data. The presence of intraabdominal catastrophe, caused by abdominal tuberculosis complications on inactive pulmonary tuberculosis background witnesses with 85.3% probability the HIV-infectioning of the patient.

  2. Non-pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Carrol, E D; Clark, J E; Cant, A J

    2001-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious disease of global importance, with a rising incidence in the developed world in recent years. Tuberculous lymphadenitis, tuberculous meningitis, osteoarticular tuberculosis and miliary tuberculosis are some of the more well-recognised manifestations of non-pulmonary TB in childhood. The diagnosis of non-pulmonary TB poses a particular challenge for clinicians because of the protean ways in which the disease presents. The omission of tuberculosis from the differential diagnosis of patients with obscure illnesses and the relatively insensitive bacteriological methods for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis add to the complexity of the problem. A high index of suspicion is required in order to avoid delays in diagnosis which may influence treatment outcome. The advent of DNA amplification techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction may herald a promising new era in the prompt and accurate management of extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

  3. Differential diagnosis of acute miliary pulmonary tuberculosis from widespread-metastatic cancer for postoperative lung cancer patients: two cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Tian, Yuke; Peng, Feng; Long, Jianlin; Liu, Lan; Lu, You

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary infections and lung cancer can resemble each other on radiographic images, which makes it difficult to diagnosis accurately and apply an appropriate therapy. Here we report two cases that two postoperative patients with lung adenocarcinoma developed diffuse nodules in bilateral lungs in a month which needed to be distinguished between metastatic malignancies and infectious diseases. Although there are much similarities in disease characteristics of two cases, patient in case one was diagnosed as acute miliary pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) while patient in case two was diagnosed as metastatic disease. The symptoms and pulmonary foci on CT scan of patient in case one improved distinctly after the immediate anti-TB treatment, but the disease of patient in case two progressed after chemotherapy. These findings caution us that differential diagnosis is crucial and have significance in guiding clinical work. PMID:28275493

  4. Diagnostic delay of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with aspiration pneumonia: Two case reports and a mini-review from Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Makoto; Sone, Kazuki; Kagawa, Yusuke; Kurokawa, Ryota; Sato, Hidefumi; Kunieda, Takefumi; Muramatsu, Hideki

    2016-08-01

    Diagnosing active tuberculosis in elderly patients presents problems due to nonspecific symptoms and complications such as aspiration pneumonia. The current study presents two cases of pulmonary tuberculosis with bilateral pulmonary infiltrates associated with aspiration pneumonia. The two elderly patients developed acute respiratory distress syndrome as a result of aspiration pneumonia. The diagnoses of pulmonary tuberculosis were delayed in both cases, as the patients were diagnosed with active tuberculosis following discharge from hospital. The sputum test for acid-fast bacillus at the time of administration was smear-negative/culture-positive in these patients. They were treated with isoniazid, rifampicin and ethambutol, and nosocomial transmission of tuberculosis from these patients was not reported. The number of elderly patients with aspiration pneumonia is predicted to increase rapidly, and aspiration pneumonia combined with pulmonary tuberculosis is a major medical and healthcare concern in Japan. The present study concludes that physicians should always consider the complication of pulmonary tuberculosis when treating pneumonia patients, in particular in treating elderly patients with pulmonary infiltrates.

  5. Diagnostic delay of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with aspiration pneumonia: Two case reports and a mini-review from Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Makoto; Sone, Kazuki; Kagawa, Yusuke; Kurokawa, Ryota; Sato, Hidefumi; Kunieda, Takefumi; Muramatsu, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosing active tuberculosis in elderly patients presents problems due to nonspecific symptoms and complications such as aspiration pneumonia. The current study presents two cases of pulmonary tuberculosis with bilateral pulmonary infiltrates associated with aspiration pneumonia. The two elderly patients developed acute respiratory distress syndrome as a result of aspiration pneumonia. The diagnoses of pulmonary tuberculosis were delayed in both cases, as the patients were diagnosed with active tuberculosis following discharge from hospital. The sputum test for acid-fast bacillus at the time of administration was smear-negative/culture-positive in these patients. They were treated with isoniazid, rifampicin and ethambutol, and nosocomial transmission of tuberculosis from these patients was not reported. The number of elderly patients with aspiration pneumonia is predicted to increase rapidly, and aspiration pneumonia combined with pulmonary tuberculosis is a major medical and healthcare concern in Japan. The present study concludes that physicians should always consider the complication of pulmonary tuberculosis when treating pneumonia patients, in particular in treating elderly patients with pulmonary infiltrates. PMID:27446284

  6. [Primary infection and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Toujani, S; Ben Salah, N; Cherif, J; Mjid, M; Ouahchy, Y; Zakhama, H; Daghfous, J; Beji, M; Mehiri-Ben Rhouma, N; Louzir, B

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem worldwide. Indeed, a third of the world population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and more than 8 million new cases of tuberculosis each year. Pulmonary tuberculosis is the most common location. Its diagnosis is difficult and often established with a delay causing a spread of infection. The diagnosis of tuberculosis infection is mainly based on immunological tests represented by the tuberculin skin test and detection of gamma interferon, while the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis is suspected on epidemiological context, lasting general and respiratory symptoms, contrasting usually with normal lung examination, and a chest radiography showing suggestive lesions. The radioclinical feature may be atypical in patients with extreme ages and in case of immunodeficiency. Confirmation of tuberculosis is bacteriological. Conventional bacteriological methods remain the reference. Innovative tests using the technique of molecular biology have improved the diagnosis of tuberculosis in terms of sensitivity and especially speed. However, those techniques are of limited use.

  7. Acute pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jessica; Graham, David; O'Reilly, Sarah; Punton, Gillian

    2016-02-03

    Acute pulmonary oedema is a distressing and life-threatening illness that is associated with a sudden onset of symptoms. For the best possible patient outcomes, it is essential that nurses in all clinical areas are equipped to accurately recognise, assess and manage patients with acute pulmonary oedema. This article outlines the pathophysiology of acute cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, and suggests a systematic approach to the recognition and management of its most serious manifestations. Long-term care and symptom recognition are discussed and suggestions for ongoing patient self-management are provided.

  8. [The causes of death of pulmonary tuberculosis: late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Tomono, K

    1998-12-01

    We investigated the causes of death of late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis. Chronic respiratory failure is one of the most frequent cause of death in the patients of late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis. We compared the long term prognosis of chronic respiratory failure in case of emphysema and pulmonary tuberculosis. In the patients with chronic respiratory failure by pulmonary emphysema, the prognosis was poor in those with pulmonary hypertension. But in case of late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis, prognosis was not affected by presence or absence of pulmonary hypertension. The determinants of prognosis of late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis are the indication of home oxygen therapy, malnutrition, and hypoxemia. Fungal infection, especially aspergilloma, is a common secondary infection of late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis. We investigated forty-two cases of aspergilloma as late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis, and of those 15 patients died. The causes of death were pneumonia and respiratory failure. Measurement of galactomannan antigen of aspergillus in serum using ELISA or PCR, it was apparent that the outcome was poor in the patients positive for antigen. It suggested that the prognosis of the patients with aspergilloma related with some degree of invasion of Aspergillus in parenchyma. It was reported that neoplasm is closely related to chronic tuberculous empyema. Lymphoma is most frequently complicated with chronic tuberculous empyema, and squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, sarcoma and carcinoid were reported as complication of chronic empyema. We reported the case of angiosarcoma, originated from chronic empyema in left thoracic cavity formed after being treated for tuberculosis with artificial pneumothorax. Recently, the number of patients with late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis have been decreased, but some severe cases of patients of pulmonary tuberculosis will suffer from late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis, and

  9. HIV-associated pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nunn, P

    1991-11-01

    The problems of diagnosis, treatment and management of tuberculosis associated with HIV infection in Africa are placed in perspective by the former director of the Kenya Medical Research Institute. Tuberculosis (TB) has increased as much as 3-fold in many African countries due to heightened susceptibility of HIV patients. HIV infection may both re-activate latent TB, which virtually all Africans harbor, or increase the likelihood of exogenous infection or re-infection by TB. In most of Africa diagnosis by stained sputum smear is standard: in late AIDS, this method may yield false negatives due to non-pulmonary TB, or pulmonary TB with a negative smear. Chest x-rays are also atypical, since cavitation of the upper zones is not as common, but lobar consolidation and lower zone involvement, and various unusual findings are likely. There is no evidence that mycobacterium avium intracellular has occurred in Africa. Treatment in Africa often centers on long-term thiazina (thiacetazone and isoniazid combined). HIV+ patients are more prone to skin rashes or even lethal epidermal neurolysis as a complication of treatment. Treated patients should be monitored for other symptoms such as diarrhea, recurrent fevers, other chest infections, cerebral space occupying lesions, urinary infections. Many can be treated with broad spectrum antibiotics such as chloramphenicol. Nursing HIV-infected young adults is an expensive and burdensome prospect for overworked and underpaid staff, but curing TB in AIDS patients is possible and worthwhile because of the public health advantages.

  10. Sweet's syndrome: a very rare association with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Partha Sarathi; Sherpa, Pasang Lahmu; Ray, Achintya Narayan; Saha, Bikram Kr; Santra, Tuhin; Saha, Sanchita; Chakrabarti, Indranil

    2013-05-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is a common infection in developing countries, including India. It can induce several cutaneous reactions such as erythema nodosum, and erythema induratum; however, association of tuberculosis with Sweet's syndrome (also known as acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) is extremely rare. Here we present an interesting case of sputum-positive pulmonary tuberculosis with Sweet's syndrome. A 55-year-old female who was receiving a regimen of four antitubercular drugs (isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, ethambutol- HRZE) for six weeks for sputum-positive pulmonary tuberculosis developed new onset high-grade fever for 15 days along with multiple reddish brown plaques and nodules involving the face as well as all four limbs of the body. Histopathology of the skin lesion was suggestive of Sweet's syndrome. The patient responded well to immunosuppressive steroid therapy.

  11. Public Transportation and Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Pérez, Héctor J.; Sánchez, Inma; Bedoya, Alfredo; Martín, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    The association between public transportation for commuting and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) was analyzed in workers in Lima, Peru. Traveling in minibuses was a risk factor for pulmonary TB. Preventive measures need to be taken by health services to prevent spread of this disease. PMID:18257992

  12. Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, Fawzia; El Hazmi, Malak M

    2010-01-01

    Studies from developed countries have reported that extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) is on the rise due to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. However, similar studies from high-burden countries with low prevalence of HIV like Saudi Arabia are lacking. Therefore, we conducted this study to investigate demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. A retrospective analysis was carried out on all patients (n=431) with a culture - proven diagnosis of tuberculosis seen at University teaching hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from January 2001 to December 2007. A total of 183 (42.5%) pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and 248 (57.5%) extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB) cases were compared in terms of age, sex, and nationality. There were 372 Saudis (SA) (86.3%) and the remaining non-Saudis (NSA) 59 (13.7%). The age distribution of the PTB patients had a bimodal distribution. EPTB was more common at young age (20-29 years). The proportion of EPTB cases was significantly higher among NSA patients (72.9%) compared to SA patients (55.1%). Females had higher proportion (59.5%) of EPTB than males (55.6%). The most common site was lymph node tuberculosis (42%). In conclusion, our data suggest that EPTB was relatively common in younger age, female gender and NSA. Tuberculosis (TB) control program may target those populations for EPTB case-finding.

  13. Acute Intraoperative Pulmonary Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Nason, Katie S

    2015-08-01

    Acute intraoperative aspiration is a potentially fatal complication with significant associated morbidity. Patients undergoing thoracic surgery are at increased risk for anesthesia-related aspiration, largely due to the predisposing conditions associated with this complication. Awareness of the risk factors, predisposing conditions, maneuvers to decrease risk, and immediate management options by the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesia team is imperative to reducing risk and optimizing patient outcomes associated with acute intraoperative pulmonary aspiration. Based on the root-cause analyses that many of the aspiration events can be traced back to provider factors, having an experienced anesthesiologist present for high-risk cases is also critical.

  14. [The diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Koyama, Sekiya; Sakaguchi, Nobuki; Hotta, Jyunnichi

    2012-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infects all organs in the body; however, lung infection is the primary lesion. The total number of infections is decreasing, but the percentage of infections in older people is rising. Because this disease is due to infection with M. tuberculosis, the diagnosis requires the presence of M. tuberculosis. Chest X-ray and CT are very powerful tools to suggest the presence of M. tuberculosis infection. Pathological examination of the tissues also shows the typical findings of M. tuberculosis infection; however, the presence of the bacterium was not proven in certain cases of M. tuberculosis infection, and especially in cases of latent infection. Recently, the whole-blood interferon--gamma test (QuantiFERON-TB, QFT) became more popular than the tuberculin skin test. It is reported that the specificity and sensitivity of QFT are similar to or better than the tuberculin skin test. However, it should be noted that QFT positive does not automatically lead to a diagnosis of active M. tuberculosis infection and that QFT is one of the supplementary tests in the diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection. Currently, massive infection with M. tuberculosis is increasing. The precise responsible linkage in massive infection with M. tuberculosis needs DNA polymorphism analysis using variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTR) or restricted fragment length polymorphism (RFLP).

  15. [Treatment of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and complicated forms of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    2008-09-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important health problems worldwide. In developed countries there is an increased number of cases due to different reasons. The most likely determinant cause is from immigrants coming from high endemic areas. This phenomenon is a direct cause of the increase in extrapulmonary and complicated pulmonary forms of tuberculosis. There are only a few controlled clinical trials evaluating therapies for extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Consequently, documented evidence is scarce, particularly in paediatrics. The majority of therapeutic recommendations are based on series of cases or expert opinions, with a lack of uniformity provided by the different consensus of the main scientific societies. The main objective of this fourth consensus by the Tuberculosis Study Group of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (Sociedad Española de Infectología Pediátrica, SEIP) is to perform a thorough revision of the data obtained from scientific literature, in order to establish recommendations for the treatment of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and complicated forms of pulmonary tuberculosis, adapted to the characteristics and drugs available in Spain.

  16. [Tuberculous cheilitis revealing pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Bricha, Myriem; Slimani, Hajar; Hammi, Sanae; Bourkadi, Jamal Eddine

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the oral cavity is rare. It is associated with clinical polymorphism and poses above all a diagnostic problem. We report the case of a 42-year-old male patient with tubercular cheilitis. This study aims to focus attention on tuberculosis that can be detected exceptionally in specific locations, such as the oral lip.

  17. Immunoadjuvant Therapy and Noninvasive Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure in Lung Tuberculosis: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Franco, René Agustín; Olivas-Medina, Dahyr Alberto; Pacheco-Tena, Cesar Francisco; Duque-Rodríguez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure caused by pulmonary tuberculosis is a rare event but with a high mortality even while receiving mechanical ventilatory support. We report the case of a young man with severe pulmonary tuberculosis refractory to conventional therapy who successfully overcame the critical period of his condition using noninvasive ventilation and immunoadjuvant therapy that included three doses of etanercept 25 mg subcutaneously. We conclude that the use of etanercept along with antituberculosis treatment appears to be safe and effective in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis presenting with acute respiratory failure. PMID:26273486

  18. Intrathoracic goitre associated with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tinu; Gera, Kamal; Modi, Nikhil; Shah, Ashok

    2015-04-01

    Intrathoracic goitre is an uncommon condition which usually occurs in females in the fifth decade. It can cause compression of several mediastinal structures. A 42-year-old female with goitre since childhood was evaluated for dry cough, occasional wheezing and low grade fever. Imaging showed patchy airspace opacities with cavitation in left lung. Imaging of the neck revealed retrosternal extension of the goitre. Stains and cultures of bronchial aspirate were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis with intrathoracic goitre was established, an unusual association.

  19. [Spontaneous pneumothorax associated to active pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Díaz Rojas, F; Córdova Gutiérrez, H; Aguirre Gas, H

    1978-01-01

    This paper reviewed 8 cases of spontaneous pneumothorax, associated to pulmonary tuberculosis during a period of time of two years at the A.L.M. General Hospital of Toluca, Mex. The diagnosis was confirmed by clinical picture, radiology and bacteriology studies. Six males and two females proceding of the low class; farmers all of them. Their age ranged between 18 and 35 years. Two of the patients showed cavitary lesions, five had difusse fibrosis of the lung. We analized the clinical manifestations and reviewed the pathogenic mechanisms as well the medical and surgical treatment. No deaths ocurred en this series. We concluded that the direct relation between active pulmonary tuberculosis and spontaneous pneumothorax is not clear, but their association in this serie suggested further studies to stablished this. We emphasized the importance of this complication rare in the world literature.

  20. Pulmonary gas transfer 20 years after pneumonectomy for pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, F; Kraan, J K; Orie, N G; Peset, R

    1977-01-01

    The changes in pulmonary function after pneumonectomy in 13 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis have been studied. The data at the time of two follow-up studies are compared with those obtained before the pneumonectomy. The first follow-up was carried out between 5 and 30 months postoperatively and the second between 20 and 24 years later. The results of this second follow-up show a relatively normal arterial oxygen saturation and gas transfer factor but an increased residual volume which cannot be explained by increasing age alone. PMID:841538

  1. [Diagnosis delay of pleural and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Cherif, J; Mjid, M; Ladhar, A; Toujani, S; Mokadem, S; Louzir, B; Mehiri, N; Béji, M

    2014-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still being endemic in our country. Time until management determines both evolution and prognosis of this condition. The aim of this work is to evaluate the delay in diagnosis of TB in a respiratory unit from a university hospital series. The authors conducted a cross-sectional study including patients with pulmonary TBC and/or pleural. An evaluation of time management was conducted from the beginning of symptoms and various consultations with reference to the date of hospitalization and treatment set up. One hundred patients were included (pulmonary TB: 68 cases, pleural TB 23 cases, miliary pulmonary TB: 4 cases, pulmonary TB associated with other extrathoracic locations: 5 cases). The mean time of patient delay and total delay institution were respectively 43.6, 25.7 and 69.3 days. Variables responsible for long delays were: number of consultations more than 3 before hospitalization, empirical antibiotic therapy, of a regional hospital first consultation and the presence of extra-respiratory impairment. The patient delay was considered long. A reorganization of the TB control program, in particular by partial decentralization of care and health education is imperative in order to improve the quality of tuberculosis management in our country.

  2. The Transcriptional Signature of Active Tuberculosis Reflects Symptom Status in Extra-Pulmonary and Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Blankley, Simon; Graham, Christine M.; Turner, Jacob; Berry, Matthew P. R.; Bloom, Chloe I.; Xu, Zhaohui; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Breen, Ronan; Santis, George; Blankenship, Derek M.; Lipman, Marc; O’Garra, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is a leading cause of infectious death worldwide. Gene-expression microarray studies profiling the blood transcriptional response of tuberculosis (TB) patients have been undertaken in order to better understand the host immune response as well as to identify potential biomarkers of disease. To date most of these studies have focused on pulmonary TB patients with gene-expression profiles of extra-pulmonary TB patients yet to be compared to those of patients with pulmonary TB or sarcoidosis. Methods A novel cohort of patients with extra-pulmonary TB and sarcoidosis was recruited and the transcriptional response of these patients compared to those with pulmonary TB using a variety of transcriptomic approaches including testing a previously defined 380 gene meta-signature of active TB. Results The 380 meta-signature broadly differentiated active TB from healthy controls in this new dataset consisting of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB. The top 15 genes from this meta-signature had a lower sensitivity for differentiating extra-pulmonary TB from healthy controls as compared to pulmonary TB. We found the blood transcriptional responses in pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB to be heterogeneous and to reflect the extent of symptoms of disease. Conclusions The transcriptional signature in extra-pulmonary TB demonstrated heterogeneity of gene expression reflective of symptom status, while the signature of pulmonary TB was distinct, based on a higher proportion of symptomatic individuals. These findings are of importance for the rational design and implementation of mRNA based TB diagnostics. PMID:27706152

  3. Chronic pneumonia due to Klebsiella oxytoca mimicking pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gera, Kamal; Roshan, Rahul; Varma-Basil, Mandira; Shah, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella species infrequently cause acute community acquired pneumonia (CAP). The chronic form of the disease caused by K. pneumoniae (Friedlander's bacillus) was occasionally seen in the pre-antibiotic era. K. oxytoca is a singularly uncommon cause of CAP. The chronic form of the disease caused by K. oxytoca has been documented only once before. A 50-year-old immunocompetent male smoker presented with haemoptysis for 12 months. Imaging demonstrated a cavitary lesion in the right upper lobe with emphysematous changes. Sputum stains and cultures for Mycobacterium tuberculosis were negative. However, three sputum samples for aerobic culture as well as bronchial aspirate cultured pure growth of K. oxytoca. A diagnosis of chronic pneumonia due to K. oxytoca was established and with appropriate therapy, the patient was largely asymptomatic. The remarkable clinical and radiological similarity to pulmonary tuberculosis can result in patients with chronic Klebsiella pneumonia erroneously receiving anti-tuberculous therapy.

  4. Pulmonary paragonimiasis and tuberculosis in Sorsogon, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Belizario, V; Guan, M; Borja, L; Ortega, A; Leonardia, W

    1997-01-01

    The clinical epidemiology of pulmonary paragonimiasis and tuberculosis was investigated in a known endemic municipality of Sorsogon, Philippines. Records of diagnosed tuberculosis patients on treatment and follow up at the local Rural Health Unit over a two year period from 1993 to 1994 were reviewed to provide an overview of pulmonary tuberculosis in the area, specifically to describe the population at risk, the basis for diagnosis and the proportion of case notification who were sputum negative. Patients from the same group of individuals as well as undiagnosed tuberculosis patients with productive cough, fever with chest and/or back pain, or hemoptysis were examined to look into clinical manifestations, duration of symptoms, history of crab-eating and sputum examination results for acid-fast bacilli and Paragonimus. There was difficulty in determining the number of non-responders as the records did not have any provision for the recording of such. Annual tuberculosis case notification rates for the two years (374 and 401 per 100,000 population) were higher than the national figure in 1991 (325 per 100,000 population) indicating that tuberculosis is still a major health problem in the area and tuberculosis control efforts may have to be more aggressive to better contain the disease. Twenty-six out of 160 individuals surveyed were sputum smear positive for Paragonimus. Paragonimiasis rates were not significantly different in the two groups (15.6% vs 16.9%, respectively) indicating that there is a need for routine sputum examination for Paragonimus which is not available at present. Only six patients surveyed were sputum smear positive for acid-fast bacilli. A high index of suspicion is necessary to diagnose paragonimiasis and to be able to differentiate it from tuberculosis. The diagnosis may be suggested by a patient's place of origin being a known endemic area, a long period of chronic cough and the habit of eating raw or insufficiently cooked crabs or crayfish

  5. Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963

  6. Antimicrobial therapy of pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Walsh

    1960-01-01

    The discovery, some nine years ago, of the highly specific antituberculous drug, isoniazid, marked an important advance in the antimicrobial therapy of tuberculosis, first practised successfully with streptomycin and p-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) in the late 'forties. Isoniazid is relatively non-toxic and, unlike streptomycin, can be administered orally, so that it is eminently suitable for use, either alone or in combination with PAS, in the domiciliary treatment of tuberculous patients. The wisdom of employing it on a large scale in home-treatment programmes, however, has been questioned on the ground that such wide-spread use might result in a spread of tubercle bacilli resistant to the drug. This controversial subject is discussed in some detail in this general review of the chemotherapy of tuberculosis. The author is convinced that, so far, the benefits of isoniazid therapy have outweighed the disadvantages and, though well aware of the possible consequences in terms of isoniazid-resistance, sees no reason at the present time for not making full use of this valuable weapon in the antituberculosis armamentarium. PMID:20604078

  7. Rifapentine for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Munsiff, Sonal S; Kambili, Chrispin; Ahuja, Shama Desai

    2006-12-01

    Rifapentine is a recently approved antituberculosis drug that has not yet been widely used in clinical settings. Clinical data support intermittent use of rifapentine with isoniazid during the continuation phase of tuberculosis treatment. Patients with culture-positive, noncavitary, pulmonary tuberculosis whose sputum smear is negative for acid-fast bacilli at the end of the 2-month intensive treatment phase are eligible for rifapentine therapy. Rifapentine should not be used in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, given their increased risk of developing rifampin resistance with currently recommended dosages. Rifapentine is not currently recommended for children aged <12 years, pregnant or lactating women, or individuals with culture-negative or extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Rifapentine (600 mg) is administered once weekly with isoniazid (900 mg) during the continuation phase of treatment. This combination should only be given under direct observation. As with rifampin, drug-drug interactions are common, and regular patient monitoring is required. Ease of administration makes this regimen attractive both for tuberculosis-control programs and for patients.

  8. Inflammatory and immunogenetic markers in correlation with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Beatriz Lima Alezio; Ramalho, Daniela Maria de Paula; dos Santos, Paula Fernanda Gonçalves; Mesquita, Eliene Denites Duarte; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe serum levels of the cytokines IL-10, TNF-α, and IFN-γ, as well as polymorphisms in the genes involved in their transcription, and their association with markers of the acute inflammatory response in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving 81 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis treated at two referral hospitals. We collected data on sociodemographic variables and evaluated bacteriological conversion at the eighth week of antituberculosis treatment, gene polymorphisms related to the cytokines studied, and serum levels of those cytokines, as well as those of C-reactive protein (CRP). We also determined the ESR and CD4+ counts. RESULTS: The median age of the patients was 43 years; 67 patients (82.7%) were male; and 8 patients (9.9%) were infected with HIV. The ESR was highest in the patients with high IFN-γ levels and low IL-10 levels. IFN-γ and TNF-α gene polymorphisms at positions +874 and −238, respectively, showed no correlations with the corresponding cytokine serum levels. Low IL-10 levels were associated with IL-10 gene polymorphisms at positions −592 and −819 (but not −1082). There was a negative association between bacteriological conversion at the eighth week of treatment and CRP levels. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that genetic markers and markers of acute inflammatory response are useful in predicting the response to antituberculosis treatment. PMID:24473766

  9. Tuberculosis and risk of acute myocardial infarction: a propensity score-matched analysis.

    PubMed

    Huaman, M A; Kryscio, R J; Fichtenbaum, C J; Henson, D; Salt, E; Sterling, T R; Garvy, B A

    2017-02-16

    Several pathogens have been associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Whether this occurs with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is unclear. We assessed if tuberculosis disease increased the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We identified patients with tuberculosis index claims from a large de-identified database of ~15 million adults enrolled in a U.S. commercial insurance policy between 2008 and 2010. Tuberculosis patients were 1:1 matched to patients without tuberculosis claims using propensity scores. We compared the occurrence of index AMI claims between the tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis cohorts using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox Proportional Hazard models. Data on 2026 patients with tuberculosis and 2026 propensity-matched patients without tuberculosis were included. AMI was more frequent in the tuberculosis cohort compared with the non-tuberculosis cohort, 67 (3·3%) vs. 32 (1·6%) AMI cases, respectively, P < 0·01. Tuberculosis was associated with an increased risk of AMI (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1·98, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1·3-3·0). The results were similar when the analysis was restricted to pulmonary tuberculosis (adjusted HR 2·43, 95% CI 1·5-4·1). Tuberculosis was associated with an increased risk of AMI. CVD risk assessment should be considered in tuberculosis patients. Mechanistic studies of tuberculosis and CVD are warranted.

  10. Pulmonary Thromboembolectomy for Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Inho; Cho, Kyu Seok; Kim, Bum Shik; Kim, Soo-Cheol; Kim, Dae Hyun; Kim, Jung-Heon; Youn, Hyo Chul

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute pulmonary thromboembolism is fatal because of abruptly occurring hypoxemia and right ventricular failure. There are several treatment modalities, including anticoagulation, thrombolytics, ECMO (extracorporeal membrane oxygenator), and thromboembolectomy, for managing acute pulmonary thromboembolism. Materials and Methods Medical records from January 1999 to December 2004 at our institution were retrospectively reviewed for pulmonary thromboembolectomy. There were 7 patients (4 men and 3 women), who underwent a total of 8 operations because one patient had post-operative recurrent emboli and underwent reoperation. Surgery was indicatedfor mild hypoxemia and performed with CPB (cardiopulmonary bypass) in a beating heart state. Results The patients had several symptoms, such as dyspnea, chest discomfort, and palpitation. Four patients had deep vein thromboembolisms and 3 had psychotic problems, specifically schizophrenia. Post-operative complications included hemothorax, pleural effusion, and pericardial effusion. There were two hospital deaths, one each by brain death and right heart failure. Conclusion Emergency operation should be performed when medical treatments are no longer effective. PMID:22263185

  11. Sympathetic crashing acute pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Naman; Kumar, Akshay; Aggarwal, Praveen; Jamshed, Nayer

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic crashing acute pulmonary edema (SCAPE) is the extreme end of the spectrum of acute pulmonary edema. It is important to understand this disease as it is relatively common in the emergency department (ED) and has better outcomes when managed appropriately. The patients have an abrupt redistribution of fluid in the lungs, and when treated promptly and effectively, these patients will rapidly recover. Noninvasive ventilation and intravenous nitrates are the mainstay of treatment which should be started within minutes of the patient's arrival to the ED. Use of morphine and intravenous loop diuretics, although popular, has poor scientific evidence. PMID:28149030

  12. Sympathetic crashing acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Naman; Kumar, Akshay; Aggarwal, Praveen; Jamshed, Nayer

    2016-12-01

    Sympathetic crashing acute pulmonary edema (SCAPE) is the extreme end of the spectrum of acute pulmonary edema. It is important to understand this disease as it is relatively common in the emergency department (ED) and has better outcomes when managed appropriately. The patients have an abrupt redistribution of fluid in the lungs, and when treated promptly and effectively, these patients will rapidly recover. Noninvasive ventilation and intravenous nitrates are the mainstay of treatment which should be started within minutes of the patient's arrival to the ED. Use of morphine and intravenous loop diuretics, although popular, has poor scientific evidence.

  13. [Update on the radiological study of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Navarro Ballester, A; Marco Domenech, S F

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis has made a comeback in recent years. This upsurge has been attributed to factors such as increased immigration and the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic. Primary pulmonary tuberculosis manifests radiologically with parenchymal involvement, lymph node involvement, pleural effusion, and/or miliary disease. In post-primary tuberculosis, the earliest radiological sign is small nodules and branching centrilobular lesions that increase in size and coalesce to form ill-defined patchy consolidations; cavitations are very characteristic of active disease. The aim of this article is to describe the radiologic findings for pulmonary tuberculosis and its complications.

  14. Lupus pleuritis: a relevant risk factor for pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pasoto, S G; Borba, E F; Bonfa, E; Shinjo, S K

    2010-12-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate risk factors for pulmonary tuberculosis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Clinical/laboratorial features of 1283 SLE patients (ACR criteria) followed at the Lupus Clinic were obtained from the electronic register database from 2001 to 2009. Pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed in 20 patients (1.6%) (TB+ group). As control group (TB-), 40 patients without tuberculosis matched for age, gender, ethnicity, age at SLE diagnosis, and disease duration were arbitrarily selected. All 20 patients of the TB+ group presented confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis from 1 to 23 years after SLE diagnosis (7.6 ± 8.1 years). Frequencies of previous SLE involvements (cutaneous, articular, hematological, renal, pericarditis, pneumonitis, and central nervous system) were alike in TB+ and TB- groups (p > 0.05). In contrast, prior pleuritis was more frequent in the TB+ group (40% vs. 5%, p = 0.001). In fact, pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed in 8/10 patients with previous pleuritis. Immunosuppressive and corticosteroid therapies at the moment of tuberculosis diagnosis were also similar in both groups (p > 0.05). We have identified pleuritis as a relevant risk factor for pulmonary tuberculosis, suggesting that previous pleural injury is a critical part of the complex interplay between altered immune system, socio-economic conditions, and increased susceptibility to this mycobacterial infection.

  15. [Optimisation of diagnostics and differential diagnostics disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Demikhova, O V; Karpina, N L; Lepekha, L N; Bagirov, M A; Amansakhedov, R B

    2012-01-01

    One of the reasons of dramatic situation with tuberculosis in Russia is untimely diagnostics of tuberculosis. The aim of the study was to identify the causes of diagnostic mistakes when we deal with disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis at current stage and to modernize the diagnostic process. The analysis of the diagnostic activity of the consultative diagnostic center of Central Tuberculosis Research Institute of Russian Academy Medical Sciences for 2011 was performed with special attention on the results of the survey of 505 patients with pulmonary dissemination. The frequency of discrepancies of disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis diagnostics was 96.1%. Based on the studies carried out the main causes diagnostic mistakes in patients with disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis were determined. New directions of improving of tuberculosis diagnostics were developed: overall high-technology examination of patient, adherence to the diagnostic procedure, developed by consultative diagnostic center of Central Tuberculosis Research Institute (CTRI), timely performing fiber-optic bronchoscopy with complex biopsy and diagnostic surgery procedures, further training of primary health care doctors. Implementation of proposed activities will significantly (by 3-5 times) reduce the time for diagnostics of respiratory system disease.

  16. [A case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion, distinguished from pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yosuke; Kurosawa, Takayuki; Hosaka, Kiminori

    2014-09-01

    A case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion is very rare. We report a case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion, distinguished from pulmonary tuberculosis. A 44-year-old man presented to a clinic with a productive cough, sputum, and loss of appetite for several months. Chest X-ray and chest computed tomography (CT) showed right pleural effusion, centrilobular nodules and infiltrative shadows with cavities in the bilateral lung fields. The direct smear examination showed positive acid-fast bacilli (Gaffky 5). He was referred to our hospital for suspected recurrent pulmonary tuberculosis. We started anti-tuberculosis drugs because pulmonary tuberculosis complicated with pleurisy was first suspected from the findings of high ADA level (78.6 IU/l) of the effusion and positive result of interferon-gamma release assay (QuantiFERON TB-2G). But Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium complex was not identified by the polymerase chain reaction method and the culture of the sputum was negative. At a later date, Mycobacterium kansasii was detected by sputum culture. The patient was diagnosed as pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection and treatment with anti-tuberculosis drugs including RFP resulted in a good clinical response. This case was a rare case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion, distinguished from pulmonary tuberculosis.

  17. A Case of Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura Secondary to Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Lalit Kumar; Dalai, Siba Prasad; Nayak, Sachidananda; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The haematological abnormalities associated with active pulmonary tuberculosis were known to human beings since decades but Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP) secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis have been reported only in a couple of instances. We report a 27 year-old male patient who was admitted to our hospital with fever, shortness of breath, haematuria, epistaxis and generalized petechiae. The sputum positivity for Acid Fast Bacilli (AFB) and chest X-ray reports were suggestive of active pulmonary tuberculosis in our patient. Clinical and laboratory parameters including bone marrow aspiration cytology diagnosed the case to be ITP. Patient was put on Directly Observed Treatment and Short course (DOTS) category-1 Anti-Tuberculosis Therapy (ATT) and prednisone following which thrombocytopenia was corrected and there was complete recovery of the patient without recurrence of thrombocytopenia. PMID:27891382

  18. [Four cases of pulmonary tuberculosis among deep-sea fishermen].

    PubMed

    Ono, Hidemaro; Murakami, Reiko; Tsuruwaka, Mia; Suzuki, Yoshihiko

    2003-06-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis among deep-sea fishermen was reported. Four pulmonary tuberculosis cases among fishing boat members engaged in deep-sea fishing were registered at the Kesennuma Health Center during three years period from 2000 to 2002. Crew engaging in deep-sea fishing live together in a narrow cabin with inadequate airconditioning for a long period of time, about 1 year. It is difficult to consult with a medical institution in an open sea. If a tuberculosis patient breaks out in a boat, the risk of transmission of tuberculosis to other members is high. In boats of all four cases in this report, about 30 to 70 percent of crew were Indonesian. Indonesia is one of the high burden countries of tuberculosis in the world. The Japanese fishing boat members have received the medical checkup every year. Indonesians have also received the pre-employment medical checkup, however, the improvement in the quality of this medical checkup is required.

  19. Pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a horse: zoonotic concerns and limitations of antemortem testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A case of pulmonary tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in a horse. Clinical evaluation performed prior to euthanasia did not suggest tuberculosis, but postmortem examination provided pathological and bacteriological evidence of disease. In the lungs, multiple tuberculoid...

  20. Oropharyngeal and miliary pulmonary tuberculosis without respiratory symptom.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jung Hyun; Kang, Ju Wan; Kim, Jeong Hong

    2014-07-01

    Tuberculosis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. We report the case of a 52-year-old man who presented with a two month history of sore throat without other general or respiratory symptoms. Oral ex- amination revealed ulcerative and granulomatous lesions on the soft palate and tonsils. Histological examination of the lesions showed granulomatous tissue with caseaous necrosis consistent with tuberculosis. A chest x-ray and computed to- mography of the chest showed miliary tuberculosis of both lungs. The oral lesions improved with antituberculous medication by one month. Tuberculosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of oral lesions which do not respond to appropriate antibiotic therapy. Pulmonary tuberculosis should also be considered in patients with oral tuberculosis even if they do not have respiratory symptoms.

  1. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humanized Mice Infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Nusbaum, Rebecca J.; Calderon, Veronica E.; Huante, Matthew B.; Sutjita, Putri; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Lancaster, Katrina L.; Hunter, Robert L.; Actor, Jeffrey K.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Aronson, Judith; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Lisinicchia, Joshua G.; Valbuena, Gustavo; Endsley, Janice J.

    2016-01-01

    Co-infection with HIV increases the morbidity and mortality associated with tuberculosis due to multiple factors including a poorly understood microbial synergy. We developed a novel small animal model of co-infection in the humanized mouse to investigate how HIV infection disrupts pulmonary containment of Mtb. Following dual infection, HIV-infected cells were localized to sites of Mtb-driven inflammation and mycobacterial replication in the lung. Consistent with disease in human subjects, we observed increased mycobacterial burden, loss of granuloma structure, and increased progression of TB disease, due to HIV co-infection. Importantly, we observed an HIV-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine signature (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8), neutrophil accumulation, and greater lung pathology in the Mtb-co-infected lung. These results suggest that in the early stages of acute co-infection in the humanized mouse, infection with HIV exacerbates the pro-inflammatory response to pulmonary Mtb, leading to poorly formed granulomas, more severe lung pathology, and increased mycobacterial burden and dissemination. PMID:26908312

  2. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humanized Mice Infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Rebecca J; Calderon, Veronica E; Huante, Matthew B; Sutjita, Putri; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Lancaster, Katrina L; Hunter, Robert L; Actor, Jeffrey K; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Aronson, Judith; Gelman, Benjamin B; Lisinicchia, Joshua G; Valbuena, Gustavo; Endsley, Janice J

    2016-02-24

    Co-infection with HIV increases the morbidity and mortality associated with tuberculosis due to multiple factors including a poorly understood microbial synergy. We developed a novel small animal model of co-infection in the humanized mouse to investigate how HIV infection disrupts pulmonary containment of Mtb. Following dual infection, HIV-infected cells were localized to sites of Mtb-driven inflammation and mycobacterial replication in the lung. Consistent with disease in human subjects, we observed increased mycobacterial burden, loss of granuloma structure, and increased progression of TB disease, due to HIV co-infection. Importantly, we observed an HIV-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine signature (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8), neutrophil accumulation, and greater lung pathology in the Mtb-co-infected lung. These results suggest that in the early stages of acute co-infection in the humanized mouse, infection with HIV exacerbates the pro-inflammatory response to pulmonary Mtb, leading to poorly formed granulomas, more severe lung pathology, and increased mycobacterial burden and dissemination.

  3. 38 CFR 3.370 - Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pulmonary tuberculosis... Rating Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.370 Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in... connection for pulmonary tuberculosis. When under consideration, all available service department films...

  4. Is tuberculosis a lymphatic disease with a pulmonary portal?

    PubMed

    Behr, Marcel A; Waters, W Ray

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis most commonly presents as a pulmonary disease, in which infection, persistence, and induction of transmissible pathology all occur in the lungs. If viewed as a pulmonary disease, enlarged lymph nodes represent reactive adenitis, and extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis (including lymphatic tuberculosis) are not transmissible, hence representing an evolutionary dead-end for the pathogen. In an alternative theory, Mycobacterium tuberculosis passes asymptomatically through the lungs and rapidly establishes a chronic lymphatic infection. After a period of weeks to decades secondary lung pathology develops, ultimately allowing transmission to occur. Evidence that supports this lymphatic model includes historical descriptions of human tuberculosis from the preantibiotic era, analogy with other mycobacterial infections, observations of tuberculosis in non-human hosts, and experimental models of tuberculosis disease. At a fundamental level, a lymphocentric model proposes that spread of organisms outside the lung parenchyma is essential to induce adaptive immunity, which is crucial for the generation of transmissible pathology. Furthermore, a lymphatic model could explain why the lesion associated with primary infection (Ghon focus) is anatomically separated from the most common site of reactivation disease (the apex). More practically, an alternative perspective that classes tuberculosis as a lymphatic disease might affect strategies for preclinical and clinical assessment of novel diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines.

  5. Significance of nutrition in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kant, Surya; Gupta, Harshita; Ahluwalia, Savita

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition and tuberculosis are both problems mostly of the developing countries. Tuberculosis can lead to malnutrition and malnutrition may predispose to tuberculosis. Poor nutrition leads to protein-energy malnutrition and micronutrients deficiencies which lead to immunodeficiency. This secondary immunodeficiency increases the host's susceptibility to infection and hence increase the risk for developing tuberculosis. Tuberculosis itself leads to reduction in appetite, nutrient malabsorption, micronutrient malabsorption, and altered metabolism leading to wasting and poor nutritional status. Nutritional status and dietary intake and hence nutritional status of patients get improved during antituberculosis treatment.

  6. Pulmonary tuberculosis revealed by lupus vulgaris in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Barbareschi, M; Denti, F; Bottelli, S; Greppi, F

    1999-01-01

    A seventy-four-year-old patient had lupus vulgaris associated with the nodular, confluent ulcerated type of pulmonary tuberculosis. The diagnosis had been missed on several occasions. The presence of cutaneous tuberculosis in developed countries is emphasized again. It is also stressed that chronic dermatosis of unknown nature in an immunocompetent patient may have a tubercular origin. Complete resolution of the disease was achieved after almost two years of anti-tubercular therapy.

  7. Transcriptional Blood Signatures Distinguish Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Pulmonary Sarcoidosis, Pneumonias and Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Chloe I.; Graham, Christine M.; Berry, Matthew P. R.; Rozakeas, Fotini; Redford, Paul S.; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Zhaohui; Wilkinson, Katalin A.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Kendrick, Yvonne; Devouassoux, Gilles; Ferry, Tristan; Miyara, Makoto; Bouvry, Diane; Dominique, Valeyre; Gorochov, Guy; Blankenship, Derek; Saadatian, Mitra; Vanhems, Phillip; Beynon, Huw; Vancheeswaran, Rama; Wickremasinghe, Melissa; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Pascual, Virginia; Ho, Ling-pei; Lipman, Marc; O’Garra, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Rationale New approaches to define factors underlying the immunopathogenesis of pulmonary diseases including sarcoidosis and tuberculosis are needed to develop new treatments and biomarkers. Comparing the blood transcriptional response of tuberculosis to other similar pulmonary diseases will advance knowledge of disease pathways and help distinguish diseases with similar clinical presentations. Objectives To determine the factors underlying the immunopathogenesis of the granulomatous diseases, sarcoidosis and tuberculosis, by comparing the blood transcriptional responses in these and other pulmonary diseases. Methods We compared whole blood genome-wide transcriptional profiles in pulmonary sarcoidosis, pulmonary tuberculosis, to community acquired pneumonia and primary lung cancer and healthy controls, before and after treatment, and in purified leucocyte populations. Measurements and Main Results An Interferon-inducible neutrophil-driven blood transcriptional signature was present in both sarcoidosis and tuberculosis, with a higher abundance and expression in tuberculosis. Heterogeneity of the sarcoidosis signature correlated significantly with disease activity. Transcriptional profiles in pneumonia and lung cancer revealed an over-abundance of inflammatory transcripts. After successful treatment the transcriptional activity in tuberculosis and pneumonia patients was significantly reduced. However the glucocorticoid-responsive sarcoidosis patients showed a significant increase in transcriptional activity. 144-blood transcripts were able to distinguish tuberculosis from other lung diseases and controls. Conclusions Tuberculosis and sarcoidosis revealed similar blood transcriptional profiles, dominated by interferon-inducible transcripts, while pneumonia and lung cancer showed distinct signatures, dominated by inflammatory genes. There were also significant differences between tuberculosis and sarcoidosis in the degree of their transcriptional activity, the

  8. Pulmonary Angiography and Embolization for Severe Hemoptysis Due to Cavitary Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyika, Charles; Corr, Peter; Royston, Duncan; Blyth, David F.

    1999-11-15

    Purpose: To identify the role of pulmonary angiography in the diagnosis and treatment of severe hemoptysis due to cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: Selective pulmonary angiography was performed on eight patients with severe hemoptysis uncontrolled by previous bronchial and systemic arterial embolization. Results: Three (38%) patients had Rasmussen aneurysms, which were successfully embolized with steel coils. Five patients demonstrated pulmonary arterial hypoperfusion in the diseased lung. Conclusions: We recommend pulmonary angiography in cavitary tuberculous patients with severe hemoptysis who do not respond to systemic arterial embolization. Rasmussen aneurysms are effectively treated by steel coil occlusion.

  9. [Acute pulmonary edema secondary to acute upper airway obstruction].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ortega, J L; Carpintero-Moreno, F; Olivares-López, A; Borrás-Rubio, E; Alvarez-López, M J; García-Izquierdo, A

    1992-01-01

    We report a 72 years old woman with mild arterial hypertension and no other pathological history who presented an acute pulmonary edema due to acute obstruction of the upper airway secondary to vocal chord paralysis developing during the immediate postoperative phase of thyroidectomy. The acute pulmonary edema resolved after application of tracheal reintubation, mechanical ventilation controlled with end expiratory positive pressure, diuretics, morphine, and liquid restriction. We discuss the possible etiopathogenic possibilities of this infrequent clinical picture and we suggest that all patients who suffered and acute obstruction of the upper airways require a careful clinical surveillance in order to prevent the development of the pulmonary syndrome.

  10. Is tuberculosis a lymphatic disease with a pulmonary portal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB) is commonly viewed as a pulmonary disease, in which infection, persistence, induction of pathology and bacterial expulsion all occur in the lungs. In this model, enlarged lymph nodes represent reactive adenitis and spread of organisms to extrapulmonary sites results in a non-transm...

  11. [A case of pulmonary multiresistant Mycobacterium bovis tuberculosis in Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Ramarokoto, H; Andrianasolo, D; Rasolonavalona, T; Ramaroson, F; Razafitsiarovana, I; Vincent, V; Ratsimba, L; Rasolofo Razanamparany, V

    2003-01-01

    We report a chronic case of pulmonary tuberculosis in a Malagasy citizen from Antsohihy (West of Madagascar), who was infected with a multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium bovis strain. This is the first case reported of the isolation of such a strain in Madagascar.

  12. Opportunistic microorganisms in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Querido, Silvia Maria Rodrigues; Back-Brito, Graziella Nuernberg; dos Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira; Leão, Mariella Vieira Pereira; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial therapy may cause changes in the resident oral microbiota, with the increase of opportunistic pathogens. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of Candida, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas and Enterobacteriaceae in the oral cavity of fifty patients undergoing antibiotic therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis and systemically healthy controls. Oral rinsing and subgingival samples were obtained, plated in Sabouraud dextrose agar with chloramphenicol, mannitol agar and MacConkey agar, and incubated for 48 h at 37°C. Candida spp. and coagulase-positive staphylococci were identified by phenotypic tests, C. dubliniensis, by multiplex PCR, and coagulase-negative staphylococci, Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas spp., by the API systems. The number of Candida spp. was significantly higher in tuberculosis patients, and C. albicans was the most prevalent specie. No significant differences in the prevalence of other microorganisms were observed. In conclusion, the antimicrobial therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis induced significant increase only in the amounts of Candida spp. PMID:24031759

  13. Prevalence of nutritional deficiency in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Piva, Silvana Gomes Nunes; Costa, Maria da Conceição Nascimento; Barreto, Florisneide Rodrigues; Pereira, Susan Martins

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of nutritional deficiency among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study using data obtained from the Brazilian Case Registry Database and from the medical records of patients diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (15-59 years of age) residing in one of the municipalities that make up the 16th Regional Health District of the state of Bahia. We calculated the incidence, lethality, and mortality rates, as well as the prevalence of nutritional deficiency, as evaluated by body mass index. Demographic, social, clinical, and epidemiological data were collected. RESULTS: Of the 72 confirmed cases of tuberculosis, 59 (81.9%) were in males, and 21 (29.2%) of the patients were in the 40-49 year age bracket. The majority (85.3%) described themselves as Mulatto or Black; 55.2% reported using alcohol; and approximately 90% were treated as outpatients. In the district and age bracket studied, the incidence of pulmonary tuberculosis was 30.6/100,000 population. Among the 72 patients, data regarding nutritional status was available for 34. Of those, 50% and 25%, respectively, presented nutritional deficiency at the beginning and at the end of treatment. No statistically significant differences were found between normal-weight and malnourished patients regarding the characteristics studied. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of nutritional deficiency was high among our sample of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. This underscores the importance of nutritional follow-up for the assessment of tuberculosis treatment in the decision-making process regarding therapeutic interventions. PMID:24068270

  14. Tip of nose tuberculosis: A rare presentation of extra pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Darshan K.; Verma, Ajay K.; Jaiswal, Riddhi; Kant, Surya; Patel, Anand; Asnani, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tuberculosis is notorious that it affects various sites of the human body and presents in different ways. One of the uncommon or rather rare presentation of extra pulmonary tuberculosis is nasal tuberculosis. The nose apart from its physiological functions also contributes to facial aesthetics and gives a defined appearance and its deformity imparts cosmetic disfigurement and unsightly appearance. Both primary and secondary forms of nasal tuberculosis are rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of ulcerative or crusting lesions of the nose. Here we report such a case of nasal tuberculosis, which presented as an ulcerative and crusting lesion over the tip of the nose in a female child. The patient was given antituberculous chemotherapy after establishing the diagnosis and responded well to treatment. PMID:27195200

  15. Adverse Outcomes after Non-Chest Surgeries in Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Nationwide Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chao-Shun; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Chung, Chi-Li; Hung, Chih-Jen; Chen, Ta-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background The association between pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and postoperative outcomes remains unknown. This study investigated outcomes following non-chest surgeries in patients with previous pulmonary TB. Methods Using Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database, we analyzed 6911 patients (aged ≥ 20 years) with preoperative diagnosis of pulmonary TB and 6911 propensity score-matched controls receiving non-chest surgeries in 2008–2010. Postoperative outcomes were compared between patients with or without pulmonary TB by calculating adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in the multivariate logistic regressions. Results Surgical patients with pulmonary TB had a significantly higher postoperative complication rates than controls, including septicemia, pneumonia, acute renal failure, deep wound infection, overall complications, and 30-day postoperative mortality (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.07–1.86). The ORs of patients with low-income status were as high as 2.27 (95% CI 1.03–5.03). Preoperative use of TB drugs and TB-related medical expenditure also associated with higher postoperative mortality among surgical patients with pulmonary TB. Conclusions Surgical patients with pulmonary TB have significantly increased risks of postoperative complications and mortality after non-chest surgeries. This study suggests the need to improve postoperative care for surgical patients with pulmonary TB. PMID:26172153

  16. [Alcohol sales and pulmonary tuberculosis mortality in the Republic of Belarus in 1981 to 2001].

    PubMed

    Razvodovskiĭ, Iu E

    2006-01-01

    The fact that there is an association of alcohol abuse with pulmonary tuberculosis is well documented. The effect of alcohol sales per capita on tuberculosis mortality rates is considerably less known. The aim of the study was to evaluate the beverage-specific effect of alcohol on pulmonary tuberculosis mortality rates. Trends in pulmonary tuberculosis mortality rates in Belarus from 1981 to 2001 were analyzed in relation to those in the level of sales of various alcoholic beverages per capita, by applying the time series analysis. The analysis demonstrated a positive and statistically significant effect of changes in per capita alcohol sale levels on pulmonary tuberculosis mortality rates. It suggests that a 1% increase in alcohol sales per capita might cause 0.49 and 0.36% increases in pulmonary tuberculosis mortality rates in males and females, respectively. This study also indicates that tuberculosis prevention programs should place more emphasis on alcohol problems.

  17. Reactivation of Pulmonary Tuberculosis following Treatment of Myelofibrosis with Ruxolitinib.

    PubMed

    Abidi, Maheen Z; Haque, Javeria; Varma, Parvathi; Olteanu, Horatiu; Guru Murthy, Guru Subramanian; Dhakal, Binod; Hari, Parameswaran

    2016-01-01

    Ruxolitinib is widely in use for treatment of myeloproliferative disorders. It causes inhibition of the Janus kinase (JAK) signal transducer and activation of transcription (STAT) pathway, which plays a key role in the underlying pathophysiology of myeloproliferative diseases. We describe a case of reactivation pulmonary tuberculosis in a retired physician while on treatment with ruxolitinib. We also review the literature on opportunistic infections following use of ruxolitinib. Our case highlights the importance of screening for latent tuberculosis in patients from highly endemic areas prior to start of therapy with ruxolitinib.

  18. Reactivation of Pulmonary Tuberculosis following Treatment of Myelofibrosis with Ruxolitinib

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Javeria; Varma, Parvathi; Guru Murthy, Guru Subramanian; Dhakal, Binod; Hari, Parameswaran

    2016-01-01

    Ruxolitinib is widely in use for treatment of myeloproliferative disorders. It causes inhibition of the Janus kinase (JAK) signal transducer and activation of transcription (STAT) pathway, which plays a key role in the underlying pathophysiology of myeloproliferative diseases. We describe a case of reactivation pulmonary tuberculosis in a retired physician while on treatment with ruxolitinib. We also review the literature on opportunistic infections following use of ruxolitinib. Our case highlights the importance of screening for latent tuberculosis in patients from highly endemic areas prior to start of therapy with ruxolitinib. PMID:27843657

  19. Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Recent Advances and Diagnostic Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) persists as a great public health problem in Korea. Increases in the overall age of the population and the rise of drug-resistant TB have reinforced the need for rapid diagnostic improvements and new modalities to detect TB and drug-resistant TB, as well as to improve TB control. Standard guidelines and recent advances for diagnosing pulmonary TB are summarized in this article. An early and accurate diagnosis of pulmonary TB should be established using chest X-ray, sputum microscopy, culture in both liquid and solid media, and nucleic acid amplification. Chest computed tomography, histopathological examination of biopsy samples, and new molecular diagnostic tests can be used for earlier and improved diagnoses, especially in patients with smear-negative pulmonary TB or clinically-diagnosed TB and drug-resistant TB. PMID:25861338

  20. Spatial Analysis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Antananarivo Madagascar: Tuberculosis-Related Knowledge, Attitude and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Rakotosamimanana, Sitraka; Mandrosovololona, Vatsiharizandry; Rakotonirina, Julio; Ramamonjisoa, Joselyne; Ranjalahy, Justin Rasolofomanana; Randremanana, Rindra Vatosoa; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis infection may remain latent, but the disease is nevertheless a serious public health issue. Various epidemiological studies on pulmonary tuberculosis have considered the spatial component and taken it into account, revealing the tendency of this disease to cluster in particular locations. The aim was to assess the contribution of Knowledge Attitude and Practice (KAP) to the distribution of tuberculosis and to provide information for the improvement of the National Tuberculosis Program. Methods We investigated the role of KAP to distribution patterns of pulmonary tuberculosis in Antananarivo. First, we performed spatial scanning of tuberculosis aggregation among permanent cases resident in Antananarivo Urban Township using the Kulldorff method, and then we carried out a quantitative study on KAP, involving TB patients. The KAP study in the population was based on qualitative methods with focus groups. Results The disease still clusters in the same districts identified in the previous study. The principal cluster covered 22 neighborhoods. Most of them are part of the first district. A secondary cluster was found, involving 18 neighborhoods in the sixth district and two neighborhoods in the fifth. The relative risk was respectively 1.7 (p<10−6) in the principal cluster and 1.6 (p<10−3) in the secondary cluster. Our study showed that more was known about TB symptoms than about the duration of the disease or free treatment. Knowledge about TB was limited to that acquired at school or from relatives with TB. The attitude and practices of patients and the population in general indicated that there is still a stigma attached to tuberculosis. Conclusion This type of survey can be conducted in remote zones where the tuberculosis-related KAP of the TB patients and the general population is less known or not documented; the findings could be used to adapt control measures to the local particularities. PMID:25386655

  1. Rifampicin-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation in pulmonary tuberculosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guo; He, Jian-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) induced by daily rifampicin therapy is rare, especially the patient is absent of malignancy, severe infection, and prior exposure to rifampicin. Patient concerns: We report a case of DIC induced by daily rifampicin treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis. A 22-year-old, previously healthy man received an anti-tuberculosis therapy consisting of isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide on the daily dose recommended by the World Health Organization tuberculosis guidelines after a diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. Two weeks later, he was transferred to the West China Hospital with nasal hemorrhage for 1 week, hematochezia, hematuria, and petechiae for 5 days. Diagnoses: Laboratory data and symptoms on admission indicated DIC. Interventions: The anti-tuberculosis drugs were discontinued after admission and he was initiated with targeted treatment for DIC, omeprazole and polyene hosphatidylcholine infusion, as well as nutrition supportive treatment. Five days after admission, ethambutol, moxifloxacin, and amikacin were added to the patient without further active hemorrhage. Eight days after admission, the platelet count had risen gradually. Isoniazid was administered on 24 days after admission, while his liver function tests and platelet counts returned to normal. No recurrence of DIC occurred. The diagnosis of rifampicin-induced DIC was confirmed. Outcomes: The patient recovered and left hospital with isoniazid, ethambutol, levofloxacin, and streptomycin after 4 weeks of hospitalization. There was no recurrence of DIC or hemorrhage during the 8 months of follow-up. The literature review revealed that there were 10 other cases of rifampicin-induced DIC. Only 4 cases received rifampicin on a daily basis for pulmonary tuberculosis treatment and the others were on intermittent dosing schedule for pulmonary tuberculosis or leprosy treatment. Lessons: As a rare adverse effect, DIC induced by

  2. Pulmonary Tuberculosis Diagnosis: Where We Are?

    PubMed

    Leylabadlo, Hamed Ebrahimzadeh; Kafil, Hossein Samadi; Yousefi, Mehdi; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, in spite of medical advancement, tuberculosis (TB) remains a worldwide health problem. Although many laboratory methods have been developed to expedite the diagnosis of TB, delays in diagnosis remain a major problem in the clinical practice. Because of the slow growth rate of the causative agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis, isolation, identification, and drug susceptibility testing of this organism and other clinically important mycobacteria can take several weeks or longer. During the past several years, many methods have been developed for direct detection, species identification, and drug susceptibility testing of TB. A good understanding of the effectiveness and practical limitations of these methods is important to improve diagnosis. This review summarizes the currently-used advances in nonmolecular and molecular diagnostics.

  3. γδ T cells response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in pulmonary tuberculosis patients using preponderant complementary determinant region 3 sequence

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xueyan; Han, Xiqin; Li, Liang; Zhao, Zhendong

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: The unique immunological functions of γδ T lymphocytes to contribute immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis attracted interest of researchers. However, little is known about the specificity of γδ Τ cell in tuberculosis patients and the lack of exact tuberculosis antigen recognized by γδ T cells limited its application. The analysis of complementary determinant region (CDR)3 sequence characteristic in γδ T cells of tuberculosis patients would contribute to understand the distribution specificity of γδ T cell. In present study, we investigated the diversity of the γ9/δ2 T cell immunorepertoire and analysed the specificity of the expressed CDR3 in pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Methods: The total RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cell of 50 pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 10 healthy controls was extracted. The polymerase chain reaction was used to specifically amplify the CDR3 region of γ9 and δ2 chain. The PCR products were ligated into the pGEM-T easy vector. The plasmid DNA was sequenced using the ABI3700 and the T7 primer. Results: Our findings showed that predominant CDR3 sequence of δ2 chain in pulmonary tuberculosis patients was CACDTLVSTDKLIFGKG. The sequence specifically exists in almost all pulmonary tuberculosis patients. The conserved hydrophobic acid residue in 97 positions is present in the γδ T cell reactive to M. tuberculosis. The length of δ2 CDR3 in pulmonary tuberculosis patients has no relation with the disease progress. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results suggest that γδ T cells appear to use CDR3 sequence to recognise M. tuberculosis antigen. γδ T cells reactive to M. tuberculosis were diverse and polyclonal. PMID:21985819

  4. [Acute pulmonary edema as a nursing emergency].

    PubMed

    Navarro Aldana, M C

    2001-01-01

    The presence of Acute Pulmonary Edema represents a severe emergency condition that requires immediate and efficient treatment; otherwise, imminent death of the patient occurs. Therefore it is of utter importance to perform frequent reviews of the literature to keep up with the newest procedures to warrant the best quality nursing care of our patients. This article reviews the physiopathology, clinical manifestations, and medical treatment of the Acute Pulmonary Edema, emphasizing on the nursing aspects of the treatment and pointing out the need to treat the predisposing cardiac alteration as soon as possible.

  5. Pulmonary tuberculosis in severely-malnourished or HIV-infected children with pneumonia: a review.

    PubMed

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Pietroni, Mark A C; Faruque, Abu S G; Ashraf, Hasan; Bardhan, Pradip K; Hossain, Iqbal; Das, Sumon Kumar; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2013-09-01

    Presentation of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) as acute pneumonia in severely-malnourished and HIV-positive children has received very little attention, although this is very important in the management of pneumonia in children living in communities where TB is highly endemic. Our aim was to identify confirmed TB in children with acute pneumonia and HIV infection and/or severe acute malnutrition (SAM) (weight-for-length/height or weight-for-age z score <-3 of the WHO median, or presence of nutritional oedema). We conducted a literature search, using PubMed and Web of Science in April 2013 for the period from January 1974 through April 2013. We included only those studies that reported confirmed TB identified by acid fast bacilli (AFB) through smear microscopy, or by culture-positive specimens from children with acute pneumonia and SAM and/or HIV infection. The specimens were collected either from induced sputum (IS), or gastric lavage (GL), or broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL), or percutaneous lung aspirates (LA). Pneumonia was defined as the radiological evidence of lobar or patchy consolidation and/or clinical evidence of severe/ very severe pneumonia according to the WHO criteria of acute respiratory infection. A total of 17 studies met our search criteria but 6 were relevant for our review. Eleven studies were excluded as those did not assess the HIV status of the children or specify the nutritional status of the children with acute pneumonia and TB. We identified only 747 under-five children from the six relevant studies that determined a tubercular aetiology of acute pneumonia in children with SAM and/or positive HIV status. Three studies were reported from South Africa and one each from the Gambia, Ethiopia, and Thailand where 610, 90, 35, and 12 children were enrolled and 64 (10%), 23 (26%), 5 (14%), and 1 (8%) children were identified with active TB respectively, with a total of 93 (12%) children with active TB. Among 610 HIV-infected children in three studies

  6. Abdominal Tuberculosis with an Acute Abdomen: Our Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Ramprasad; Bhattacharya, Ujjwal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculosis is an important cause of morbidity in India. Abdominal Tuberculosis is a great mimicker and is difficult to diagnose. This prospective observational study is based on those patients who were diagnosed to be suffering from Abdominal Tuberculosis only after they presented with an acute abdomen. This study aims to document the nature of different types of acute presentation in Abdominal Tuberculosis according to involved sites and surgical pathology. The study also discusses the indications and extent of surgical intervention. Materials and Methods: Seventy new cases of Abdominal Tuberculosis (out of 718 cases of acute abdomen) were diagnosed and treated over a period of three years in the surgical ward of Calcutta National Medical College. Macroscopic appearance of abdominal tissues during surgery suggested the diagnosis of tuberculosis. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology and tissue culture. All patients were subsequently treated with a full course of antitubercular drugs (ATD). Results: The clinical presentations of acute abdomen included acute intestinal obstruction, perforative peritonitis and acute appendicitis etc. Terminal ileum and ileocaecal region were predominantly involved. The most common pathology was intestinal stricture with or without perforation. Most of the patients (approx 78.5%) required emergency surgery as a therapeutic intervention. A two-stage procedure was preferred in peritonitis and sepsis. Most of the remaining patients (12.8%) required surgery after initial conservative treatment for the first few days. Undiagnosed Abdominal Tuberculosis represents a notable percentage (10%) of patients who present with an acute abdomen as a surgical emergency. Conclusion: Abdominal Tuberculosis is very difficult to diagnose and diagnosis is often delayed till an acute abdomen is presented with. Almost all patients needed surgical intervention. Irrespective of surgery, all patients of abdominal tuberculosis require a

  7. [Acute heart failure: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Marteles, Marta; Urrutia, Agustín

    2014-03-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock are two of the main forms of presentation of acute heart failure. Both entities are serious, with high mortality, and require early diagnosis and prompt and aggressive management. Acute pulmonary edema is due to the passage of fluid through the alveolarcapillary membrane and is usually the result of an acute cardiac episode. Correct evaluation and clinical identification of the process is essential in the management of acute pulmonary edema. The initial aim of treatment is to ensure hemodynamic stability and to correct hypoxemia. Other measures that can be used are vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, loop diuretics and, in specific instances, opioids. Cardiogenic shock is characterized by sustained hypoperfusion, pulmonary wedge pressure > 18 mmHg and a cardiac index < 2.2l/min/m(2). The process typically presents with hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg or a decrease in mean arterial pressure > 30 mmHg) and absent or reduced diuresis (< 0.5 ml/kg/h). The most common cause is left ventricular failure due to acute myocardial infarction. Treatment consists of general measures to reverse acidosis and hypoxemia, as well as the use of vasopressors and inotropic drugs. Early coronary revascularization has been demonstrated to improve survival in shock associated with ischaemic heart disease.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Malate Synthase- and MPT51-Based Serodiagnostic Assay as an Adjunct to Rapid Identification of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Dong, Yuxin; Holzman, Robert S.; Belisle, John; Kourbeti, Irene S.; Sherpa, Tsering; Condos, Rany; Rom, William N.; Laal, Suman

    2006-01-01

    The 81-kDa malate synthase (MS; Rv 1837c) and the 27-kDa MPT51 (Rv 3803c) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are immunodominant antigens recognized by serum antibodies from ∼80% of human immunodeficiency virus-negative smear-positive tuberculosis patients from India. We now provide evidence that the use of the MS/MPT51-based serodiagnostic assay can serve as an adjunct to sputum microscopy in the rapid diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:17090645

  9. Pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis case with diabetes insipidus and tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ugurlu, E; Altinisik, G; Aydogmus, U; Bir, F

    2017-04-01

    A 19-year-old male patient was observed due to having central diabetes insipidus (DI) for five years. He had a history of smoking 5-10 cigarettes a day for two years, but stopped smoking from the last month. The computerized tomography revealed thin-walled cystic lesions in different sizes more dominantly in the upper lobes and consolidated areas in the left upper and lower lobes. The wedge resection from the right lower lobe revealed pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis. Follow-up acid-fast bacteria (AFB) examinations revealed (+++) and antituberculous treatment was started. On the 40th day of the anti-tuberculosis treatment, the patient applied once again due to fever and chest pain. Although infiltrations persisted in the left upper and middle zones in the postero-anterior lung rontgenogram, right-sided pneumothorax was detected. The case is considered tuberculosis and the patient continued to receive anti-TB treatment under the close supervision.

  10. [The chest CT findings and pathologic findings of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Hideo

    2009-08-01

    The past research of the radiologic manifestations of pulmonary tuberculosis in Japan was based on morphological pathology of the untreated patient autopsy. I would like to show the chest CT scan of tuberculosis diseases with caseous granuloma at its exudative reaction, proliferative reaction, productive reaction, cirrhotic reaction until self cure. This progress reflects the normal cell mediated immunological responses. Also I would like to show the cavitation of granuloma, which results from liquefaction of caseous materials during the course and results in the formation of the source of infection. And finally I would like to show the morphological differences of acinous lesion, acino-nodular lesion and caseous lobular pneumonia. These differences reflect the amount of bacilli disseminated in the peripheral parts under the lobules. In this study, I do not show old age cases and HIV positive cases, who do not form typical granuloma due to the decreased cell mediated immnunity and whose X ray findings are atypical.

  11. An uncommon cause of acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Santosh; Giri, Smith; Bhusal, Mohan; Siwakoti, Krishmita; Pathak, Ranjan

    2016-09-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema secondary to catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy is a very uncommon and fatal initial presentation of pheochromocytoma. However, with early clinical suspicion and aggressive management, the condition is reversible. This case report describes a patient who presented with hypertension, dyspnea, and cough with bloody streaks, and who recovered within 48 hours after appropriate treatment.

  12. Acute Exacerbations of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Collard, Harold R.; Moore, Bethany B.; Flaherty, Kevin R.; Brown, Kevin K.; Kaner, Robert J.; King, Talmadge E.; Lasky, Joseph A.; Loyd, James E.; Noth, Imre; Olman, Mitchell A.; Raghu, Ganesh; Roman, Jesse; Ryu, Jay H.; Zisman, David A.; Hunninghake, Gary W.; Colby, Thomas V.; Egan, Jim J.; Hansell, David M.; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kaminski, Naftali; Kim, Dong Soon; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Lynch, David A.; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Myers, Jeffrey L.; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Selman, Moisés; Toews, Galen B.; Wells, Athol U.; Martinez, Fernando J.

    2007-01-01

    The natural history of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) has been characterized as a steady, predictable decline in lung function over time. Recent evidence suggests that some patients may experience a more precipitous course, with periods of relative stability followed by acute deteriorations in respiratory status. Many of these acute deteriorations are of unknown etiology and have been termed acute exacerbations of IPF. This perspective is the result of an international effort to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding acute exacerbations of IPF. Acute exacerbations of IPF are defined as acute, clinically significant deteriorations of unidentifiable cause in patients with underlying IPF. Proposed diagnostic criteria include subjective worsening over 30 days or less, new bilateral radiographic opacities, and the absence of infection or another identifiable etiology. The potential pathobiological roles of infection, disordered cell biology, coagulation, and genetics are discussed, and future research directions are proposed. PMID:17585107

  13. Genetic diversity and dynamic distribution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates causing pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Srilohasin, Prapaporn; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Nishida, Nao; Prammananan, Therdsak; Smittipat, Nat; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Chaiyasirinroje, Boonchai; Yanai, Hideki; Palittapongarnpim, Prasit

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the genetic diversity and dynamicity of circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in Thailand using nearly neutral molecular markers. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genotypes of 1,414 culture-positive M. tuberculosis isolates from 1,282 pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and 132 extrapulmonary TB (EPTB) patients collected from 1995 to 2011 were characterized. Among the eight SNP cluster groups (SCG), SCG2 (44.1%), which included the Beijing (BJ) genotype, and SCG1 (39.4%), an East African Indian genotype, were dominant. Comparisons between the genotypes of M. tuberculosis isolates causing PTB and EPTB in HIV-negative cases revealed similar prevalence trends although genetic diversity was higher in the PTB patients. The identification of 10 reported sequence types (STs) and three novel STs was hypothesized to indicate preferential expansion of the SCG2 genotype, especially the modern BJ ST10 (15.6%) and ancestral BJ ST19 (13.1%). An association between SCG2 and SCG1 genotypes and particular patient age groups implies the existence of different genetic advantages among the bacterial populations. The results revealed that increasing numbers of young patients were infected with M. tuberculosis SCGs 2 and 5, which contrasts with the reduction of the SCG1 genotype. Our results indicate the selection and dissemination of potent M. tuberculosis genotypes in this population. The determination of heterogeneity and dynamic population changes of circulating M. tuberculosis strains in countries using the Mycobacterium bovis BCG (bacillus Calmette-Guérin) vaccine are beneficial for vaccine development and control strategies.

  14. Co-morbid anxiety and depression among pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Aamir, Siddiqua; Aisha

    2010-10-01

    The need to recognize and manage psychiatric co-morbidity in tuberculosis (TB) patients in primary care settings in order to improve adherence to the treatment is now well documented. Pulmonary TB patients at the District TB Control Office and TB Centre in Haripur from December 2007 to March 2008 were evalute in order to assess the frequency of anxiety and depression and continuation of treatment. Forty seven out of 65 (72%) TB patients had severe/moderate level of anxiety and depression according to Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Fourteen (22%) TB patients with co-morbid anxiety and depression showed multi drug-resistance (MDR-TB).

  15. Effects of gender and age on development of concurrent extrapulmonary tuberculosis in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis: a population based study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Lu, Po-Liang; Lai, Chung-Chih; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Wei-Ru; Huang, Pei-Ming; Chen, Yen-Hsu

    2013-01-01

    Most cases of adult-onset tuberculosis (TB) result from reactivation of a pre-existing Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Mycobacterium tuberculosis usually invades the respiratory tract and most patients develop intrapulmonary TB; however, some patients develop concurrent pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB. The purpose of the present study was to identify the demographic and clinical factors associated with an increased risk of concurrent extra-pulmonary diseases in patients with pulmonary TB. We compared patients who had isolated pulmonary TB with patients who had concurrent pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB. We initially analyzed one-million randomly selected subjects from the population-based Taiwan National Health Insurance database. Based on analysis of 5414 pulmonary TB patients in this database, women were more likely than men to have concurrent extra-pulmonary TB (OR: 1.30, p = 0.013). A separate analysis of the Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital database, which relied on sputum culture-proven pulmonary TB, indicated that women were more likely than men to have concurrent extra-pulmonary TB (OR: 1.62, p = 0.039). There was no significant gender difference in extra-pulmonary TB for patients younger than 45 years in either database. However, for patients 45 years and older, women were more likely than men to have concurrent extra-pulmonary TB (insurance database: 9.0% vs. 6.8%, p = 0.016, OR: 1.36; hospital database: 27.3% vs. 16.0%, p = 0.008, OR = 1.98). Our results indicate that among patients who have pulmonary TB, older females have an increased risk for concurrent extra-pulmonary TB.

  16. Population Structure among Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Realpe, Teresa; Correa, Nidia; Rozo, Juan Carlos; Ferro, Beatriz Elena; Gomez, Verónica; Zapata, Elsa; Ribon, Wellman; Puerto, Gloria; Castro, Claudia; Nieto, Luisa María; Diaz, Maria Lilia; Rivera, Oriana; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Arbelaez, Maria Patricia; Robledo, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Background Phylogeographic composition of M. tuberculosis populations reveals associations between lineages and human populations that might have implications for the development of strategies to control the disease. In Latin America, lineage 4 or the Euro-American, is predominant with considerable variations among and within countries. In Colombia, although few studies from specific localities have revealed differences in M. tuberculosis populations, there are still areas of the country where this information is lacking, as is a comparison of Colombian isolates with those from the rest of the world. Principal Findings A total of 414 M. tuberculosis isolates from adult pulmonary tuberculosis cases from three Colombian states were studied. Isolates were genotyped using IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), spoligotyping, and 24-locus Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units variable number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTRs). SIT42 (LAM9) and SIT62 (H1) represented 53.3% of isolates, followed by 8.21% SIT50 (H3), 5.07% SIT53 (T1), and 3.14% SIT727 (H1). Composite spoligotyping and 24-locus MIRU- VNTR minimum spanning tree analysis suggest a recent expansion of SIT42 and SIT62 evolved originally from SIT53 (T1). The proportion of Haarlem sublineage (44.3%) was significantly higher than that in neighboring countries. Associations were found between M. tuberculosis MDR and SIT45 (H1), as well as HIV-positive serology with SIT727 (H1) and SIT53 (T1). Conclusions This study showed the population structure of M. tuberculosis in several regions from Colombia with a dominance of the LAM and Haarlem sublineages, particularly in two major urban settings (Medellín and Cali). Dominant spoligotypes were LAM9 (SIT 42) and Haarlem (SIT62). The proportion of the Haarlem sublineage was higher in Colombia compared to that in neighboring countries, suggesting particular conditions of co-evolution with the corresponding human population that favor the success of this

  17. Pathology and immune reactivity: understanding multidimensionality in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dorhoi, Anca; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2016-03-01

    Heightened morbidity and mortality in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are consequences of complex disease processes triggered by the causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Mtb modulates inflammation at distinct stages of its intracellular life. Recognition and phagocytosis, replication in phagosomes and cytosol escape induce tightly regulated release of cytokines [including interleukin (IL)-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), IL-10], chemokines, lipid mediators, and type I interferons (IFN-I). Mtb occupies various lung lesions at sites of pathology. Bacteria are barely detectable at foci of lipid pneumonia or in perivascular/bronchiolar cuffs. However, abundant organisms are evident in caseating granulomas and at the cavity wall. Such lesions follow polar trajectories towards fibrosis, encapsulation and mineralization or liquefaction, extensive matrix destruction, and tissue injury. The outcome is determined by immune factors acting in concert. Gradients of cytokines and chemokines (CCR2, CXCR2, CXCR3/CXCR5 agonists; TNF/IL-10, IL-1/IFN-I), expression of activation/death markers on immune cells (TNF receptor 1, PD-1, IL-27 receptor) or abundance of enzymes [arginase-1, matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-1, MMP-8, MMP-9] drive genesis and progression of lesions. Distinct lesions coexist such that inflammation in TB encompasses a spectrum of tissue changes. A better understanding of the multidimensionality of immunopathology in TB will inform novel therapies against this pulmonary disease.

  18. Pulmonary sequestration with tuberculosis confined to the sequestrated lung.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoying; Xu, Xiaomei; Yu, Chang; Fan, Rong; Lu, Yuanyuan; Lu, Sansan; Wang, Liangxing

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary sequestration is a relatively rare malformation. The incidence of common pyogenic infection in this anomaly is very high. We describe a non-symptomatic, 19-year-old man who was misdiagnosed with left lower lobe pneumonia, which was treated with antibiotics for nearly one month. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) with multiplanar reconstruction showed an aberrant artery originated from the left side of the descending aorta, and went through the infiltration of the left lower lobe. The patient underwent surgical removal of the affected lobe. Microscopy demonstrated resected sequestrated lung tissue that was mainly composed of caseous necrosis with Langhans cells. And the tuberculosis was just confined to the sequestrated lung without any other sites of lung tuberculous infection. The patient received subsequent antituberculous chemotherapy after his operation. At 4-month follow-up, his clinical status was excellent. There are few reports of sequestration combined with tuberculosis. This case showed us two things: first, a persistent infiltration or consolidation in a same segment, especially in the lower lobe, reminds us of the possibility of sequestration; and second, even if the diagnosis of sequestrated lung is confirmed, we should consider whether the patient has any other diseases, besides the tuberculosis.

  19. Alteration of serum inflammatory cytokines in active pulmonary tuberculosis following anti-tuberculosis drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Imran Hussain; Ahmed, Albin Mostaque; Choudhuri, Subhadip; Sen, Aditi; Hazra, Avijit; Pal, Nishith Kumar; Bhattacharya, Basudev; Bahar, Bojlul

    2014-11-01

    Active pulmonary tuberculosis (APTB) is associated with a failure of the host immune system to control the invading Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The objective of this study was to quantify and assess the role of serum inflammatory cytokines in active pulmonary tuberculosis patients following anti-tuberculosis drug (ATD) therapy. Blood samples were collected from APTB patients and normal healthy subjects (NHS) (total n=204) at baseline and 2, 4 and 6 months post-therapy and the abundance of serum inflammatory cytokines were measured by cytokine specific ELISA. Compared to NHS, APTB patients at baseline had higher levels of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12p40 (P<0.001), IFN-γ (P<0.001), TNF-α (P<0.01), IL-1β (P<0.001) and IL-6 (P<0.001) and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 (P<0.001) and TGF-β1 (P<0.001) while there was no change in the level of IL-4. In APTB patients, the serum levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and TGF-β1 directly relate to the bacterial load while the TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and TGF-β1 relate to radiological severity. At baseline, the IL-6 level in NHS and APTB patients differed most and following ATD therapy, this level rapidly decreased and stabilized by 4-month in APTB patients. It is concluded that a subtle reduction in the serum level of IL-6 of the APTB patients following ATD therapy might play a vital role in immune-protection of the host against Mtb infection and hence the serum IL-6 level can be a useful marker to diagnose the effectiveness of therapy in the patients.

  20. Plasma Metabolomics in Human Pulmonary Tuberculosis Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Frediani, Jennifer K.; Jones, Dean P.; Tukvadze, Nestan; Uppal, Karan; Sanikidze, Eka; Kipiani, Maia; Tran, ViLinh T.; Hebbar, Gautam; Walker, Douglas I.; Kempker, Russell R.; Kurani, Shaheen S.; Colas, Romain A.; Dalli, Jesmond; Tangpricha, Vin; Serhan, Charles N.; Blumberg, Henry M.; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to characterize metabolites during tuberculosis (TB) disease and identify new pathophysiologic pathways involved in infection as well as biomarkers of TB onset, progression and resolution. Such data may inform development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs. Plasma samples from adults with newly diagnosed pulmonary TB disease and their matched, asymptomatic, sputum culture-negative household contacts were analyzed using liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to identify metabolites. Statistical and bioinformatics methods were used to select accurate mass/charge (m/z) ions that were significantly different between the two groups at a false discovery rate (FDR) of q<0.05. Two-way hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was used to identify clusters of ions contributing to separation of cases and controls, and metabolomics databases were used to match these ions to known metabolites. Identity of specific D-series resolvins, glutamate and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-derived trehalose-6-mycolate was confirmed using LC-MS/MS analysis. Over 23,000 metabolites were detected in untargeted metabolomic analysis and 61 metabolites were significantly different between the two groups. HCA revealed 8 metabolite clusters containing metabolites largely upregulated in patients with TB disease, including anti-TB drugs, glutamate, choline derivatives, Mycobacterium tuberculosis-derived cell wall glycolipids (trehalose-6-mycolate and phosphatidylinositol) and pro-resolving lipid mediators of inflammation, known to stimulate resolution, efferocytosis and microbial killing. The resolvins were confirmed to be RvD1, aspirin-triggered RvD1, and RvD2. This study shows that high-resolution metabolomic analysis can differentiate patients with active TB disease from their asymptomatic household contacts. Specific metabolites upregulated in the plasma of patients with active TB disease, including Mtb-derived glycolipids and resolvins, have potential as biomarkers

  1. Pathophysiology of pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Browne, George W; Pitchumoni, CS

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in its severe form is complicated by multiple organ system dysfunction, most importantly by pulmonary complications which include hypoxia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, atelectasis, and pleural effusion. The pathogenesis of some of the above complications is attributed to the production of noxious cytokines. Clinically significant is the early onset of pleural effusion, which heralds a poor outcome of acute pancreatitis. The role of circulating trypsin, phospholipase A2, platelet activating factor, release of free fatty acids, chemoattractants such as tumor necrsosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-8, fMet-leu-phe (a bacterial wall product), nitric oxide, substance P, and macrophage inhibitor factor is currently studied. The hope is that future management of acute pancreatitis with a better understanding of the pathogenesis of lung injury will be directed against the production of noxious cytokines. PMID:17131469

  2. Surgical embolectomy for acute massive pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Senol; Toktas, Faruk; Goncu, Tugrul; Eris, Cuneyt; Gucu, Arif; Ay, Derih; Erdolu, Burak; Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Karaagac, Kemal; Vural, Hakan; Ozyazicioglu, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is associated with significant mortality rate despite diagnostic and therapeutic advances. The aim of this study was to analyze our clinical outcomes of patients with acute massive PE who underwent emergency surgical pulmonary embolectomy. Methods: This retrospective study included 13 consecutive patients undergoing emergency surgical pulmonary embolectomy for acute massive PE at our institution from March 2000 to November 2013. The medical records of all patients were reviewed for demograhic and preoperative data and postoperative outcomes. All patients presented with cardiogenic shock with severe right ventricular dysfunction confirmed by echocardiography, where 4 (30.8%) of the patients experienced cardiac arrest requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation before surgery. Results: The mean age of patients was 61.8 ± 14 years (range, 38 to 82 years) with 8 (61.5%) males. The most common risk factors for PE was the history of prior deep venous thrombosis (n = 9, 69.2%). There were 3 (23.1%) in-hospital deaths including operative mortality of 7.7% (n = 1). Ten (76.9%) patients survived and were discharged from the hospital. The mean follow-up was 25 months; follow-up was 100% complete in surviving patients. There was one case (7.7%) of late death 12 months after surgery due to renal carcinoma. Postoperative echocardiographic pressure measurements demonstrated a significant reduction (P < 0.001). At final follow-up, all patients were in New York Heart Association class I and no readmission for a recurrent of PE was observed. Conclusion: Surgical pulmonary embolectomy is a reasonable option and could be performed with acceptable results, if it is performed early in patients with acute massive PE who have not reached the profound cardiogenic shock or cardiac arrest. PMID:25664045

  3. Vitamin D status and incidence of tuberculosis among contacts of pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Arnedo-Pena, A; Juan-Cerdán, J V; Romeu-García, A; García-Ferrer, D; Holguín-Gómez, R; Iborra-Millet, J; Gil-Fortuño, M; Gomila-Sard, B; Roach-Poblete, F

    2015-01-01

    A prospective cohort study was conducted from 2009 to 2012 to assess the relationship between serum baseline 25-hydroxivytamin D (vitamin D) status and the incidence of tuberculosis (TB) among 572 contacts of 89 pulmonary TB patients in Castellon, Spain. Three new cases of pulmonary TB occurred, with an incidence density of 3.6 per 1000 person-years. Mean vitamin D status was 13.7 ng/ml for cases and 25.7 ng/ml for non-cases. Vitamin D status showed a significant inverse association with TB incidence (adjusted HR 0.88, 95%CI 0.80-0.97). This result is in line with the hypothesis that vitamin D deficiency is associated with TB incidence.

  4. Clinical value of surfactant protein-A in serum and sputum for pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, H; Teng, G L; Gai, L Z; Yang, Y; Zhu, C J

    2013-10-24

    The aim of this study was to explore the diagnostic and differential diagnosis value of surfactant protein-A (SP-A) in the serum and sputum for pulmonary tuberculosis. A total of 101 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, 85 healthy volunteers, and 30 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients were divided into pulmonary tuberculosis group, healthy control group, and COPD group, respectively. SP-A was determined in the serum and sputum in the three groups by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of SP-A in serum was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the pulmonary tuberculosis group than in the healthy control and COPD groups. There were no differences in the SP-A expression in the sputum among the three groups. There was no significant effect of gender, age, tubercle bacillus antibodies, tuberculin purified protein derivative trial, leukocyte count, neutrophilic granulocyte, lymphocyte percentage, or lung cavities on SP-A levels in serum or sputum for the pulmonary tuberculosis group (P > 0.05). The detection of SP-A in serum and sputum was shown to be of great value for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis, and therefore merits further investigation.

  5. Pulmonary Artery Denervation Reduces Pulmonary Artery Pressure and Induces Histological Changes in an Acute Porcine Model of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Nadine D.; Chang, William; Watson, Oliver; Swift, Andrew J.; Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charlie A.; Kiely, David G.; Suvarna, S. Kim; Gunn, Julian; Lawrie, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background— Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality and limited treatment options. Recent studies have shown that pulmonary artery denervation improves pulmonary hemodynamics in an experimental model and in an early clinical trial. We aimed to evaluate the nerve distribution around the pulmonary artery, to determine the effect of radiofrequency pulmonary artery denervation on acute pulmonary hypertension induced by vasoconstriction, and to demonstrate denervation of the pulmonary artery at a histological level. Methods and Results— Histological evaluation identified a circumferential distribution of nerves around the proximal pulmonary arteries. Nerves were smaller in diameter, greater in number, and located in closer proximity to the luminal aspect of the pulmonary arterial wall beyond the pulmonary artery bifurcation. To determine the effect of pulmonary arterial denervation acute pulmonary hypertension was induced in 8 pigs by intravenous infusion of thromboxane A2 analogue. Animals were assigned to either pulmonary artery denervation, using a prototype radiofrequency catheter and generator, or a sham procedure. Pulmonary artery denervation resulted in reduced mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance and increased cardiac output. Ablation lesions on the luminal surface of the pulmonary artery were accompanied by histological and biochemical alteration in adventitial nerves and correlated with improved hemodynamic parameters. Conclusions— Pulmonary artery denervation offers the possibility of a new treatment option for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Further work is required to determine the long-term efficacy and safety. PMID:26553697

  6. [Intestinal tuberculosis--cause of acute surgical abdomen].

    PubMed

    Ciurea, M; Ion, D; Ionescu, S; Tica, M R

    2001-01-01

    Tuberculosis, in its various forms, remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries in immunodeficitary patients. The indicatives of epidemiology of tuberculosis show that Romania presents a fresh outbreak of the disease in the last few years. The purpose of this paper is to present from the various forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the intestinal tipe which have a high incidence. The authors describe theirs preliminary experience of intraoperative small and large bowel emergencies resections in a short period (1 year) of three young patients (between 30 and 40 years old) with history of pulmonary tuberculosis. The pathology was complex (bowel obstructions, peritonitis) and so were the surgical operations (resections, devirations). The patients showed short and long term good results.

  7. Determinants of active pulmonary tuberculosis in Ambo Hospital, West Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mengiste, Bezatu; Mesfin, Frehiwot; Godana, Wanzahun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with active pulmonary tuberculosis seen in cases in Ambo Hospital, Ethiopia. Design A facility-based prospective case-control study. Setting Patients attending Ambo Hospital from 01 December 2011 to 29 March 2012. Participants The sample included 312 adult patients attending Ambo Hospital. The main outcome measure was presence of active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Explanatory measures Age, gender, occupation, educational status, marital status, place of residence, patient history of TB, family history of TB, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, smoking, alcohol intake, khat chewing, body mass index (BMI), employment, diabetes, history of asthma, previous history of worm infestation, history of hospitalisation, number of adults living in the household (HH), person per room, housing condition. Results A total of 312 study participants, including 104 active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) cases (cases) and 208 non-active PTB cases (controls), were recruited for the present study. Having one or more family member with a history of TB (OR = 4.4; 95% CI: 1.50–12.90), marital status (OR = 7.6; 95% CI: 2.2–12.6), male gender (OR = 3.2; 95% CI: 1.4–7), rural residence (OR = 3.3; P = 0.012), being a current or past smoker (OR = 2.8; 95% CI: 1.1–7.2), BMI < 18.5 (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.03–4.2), HIV infection (OR = 8.8; 95% CI: 2.4–23.8) and a history of worm infestation (OR = 6.4; 95% CI: 2.6–15.4) remained significant independent host-related factors for active PTB. Conclusion Patients who came from a compound with more than two HHs were more likely to develop active PTB than those who came from a compound with only one HH. Those who lived in houses with no windows were more likely to develop active PTB than those who lived in houses with one or more windows, had a family history of TB, lived in rural areas. Sex of the patient was a predicting factor. Not being the owner of the house was

  8. Lumbo-sacral spine disease due to bovine tuberculosis in a patient with concurrent pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nawaid; Srinivasan, Koottalai; Panayi, Jeannette; Moudgil, Harmesh

    2011-12-01

    Lumbo-sacral spinal disease due to bovine tuberculosis (TB) in a patient with concurrent pulmonary disease is rare. We report this unpredicted finding in an immunocompetent patient and discuss the natural history in an area of low prevalence.

  9. Pulmonary intravascular talcosis mimicking miliary tuberculosis in an intravenous drug addict

    PubMed Central

    Altraja, Alan; Jürgenson, Katre; Roosipuu, Retlav; Laisaar, Tanel

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary foreign body granulomatosis following intravenous administration of medications meant for oral use among drug addicts has been occasionally reported. This condition is often misdiagnosed because of its rarity, but rather due to its similarity to other pulmonary diseases that are more common. Here we report a case of pulmonary intravascular talcosis mimicking miliary tuberculosis in a young male intravenous drug addict from North-Eastern Estonia, known as a hotspot for tuberculosis and drug misuse. The condition was caused by intravenous administration of crushed tablets of diphenhydramine, but miliary tuberculosis was misdiagnosed on patient's demographical, clinical and radiological grounds and a decision to start treatment with four first-line antituberculosis drugs followed. The current report refers to the importance of considering rare causes of pulmonary disseminations with attempts to identify the causative agent and warns against the use of antituberculosis treatment without confirmation of microbiological diagnosis of tuberculosis. PMID:24713715

  10. Pulmonary intravascular talcosis mimicking miliary tuberculosis in an intravenous drug addict.

    PubMed

    Altraja, Alan; Jürgenson, Katre; Roosipuu, Retlav; Laisaar, Tanel

    2014-04-08

    Pulmonary foreign body granulomatosis following intravenous administration of medications meant for oral use among drug addicts has been occasionally reported. This condition is often misdiagnosed because of its rarity, but rather due to its similarity to other pulmonary diseases that are more common. Here we report a case of pulmonary intravascular talcosis mimicking miliary tuberculosis in a young male intravenous drug addict from North-Eastern Estonia, known as a hotspot for tuberculosis and drug misuse. The condition was caused by intravenous administration of crushed tablets of diphenhydramine, but miliary tuberculosis was misdiagnosed on patient's demographical, clinical and radiological grounds and a decision to start treatment with four first-line antituberculosis drugs followed. The current report refers to the importance of considering rare causes of pulmonary disseminations with attempts to identify the causative agent and warns against the use of antituberculosis treatment without confirmation of microbiological diagnosis of tuberculosis.

  11. Blood transcriptomic diagnosis of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Jennifer K; Thomas, Niclas; Gil, Eliza; Best, Katharine; Tsaliki, Evdokia; Morris‑Jones, Stephen; Stafford, Sian; Simpson, Nandi; Witt, Karolina D; Chain, Benjamin; Miller, Robert F; Martineau, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Novel rapid diagnostics for active tuberculosis (TB) are required to overcome the time delays and inadequate sensitivity of current microbiological tests that are critically dependent on sampling the site of disease. Multiparametric blood transcriptomic signatures of TB have been described as potential diagnostic tests. We sought to identify the best transcript candidates as host biomarkers for active TB, extend the evaluation of their specificity by comparison with other infectious diseases, and to test their performance in both pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB. METHODS. Support vector machine learning, combined with feature selection, was applied to new and previously published blood transcriptional profiles in order to identify the minimal TB‑specific transcriptional signature shared by multiple patient cohorts including pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB, and individuals with and without HIV-1 coinfection. RESULTS. We identified and validated elevated blood basic leucine zipper transcription factor 2 (BATF2) transcript levels as a single sensitive biomarker that discriminated active pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB from healthy individuals, with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) scores of 0.93 to 0.99 in multiple cohorts of HIV-1–negative individuals, and 0.85 in HIV-1–infected individuals. In addition, we identified and validated a potentially novel 4-gene signature comprising CD177, haptoglobin, immunoglobin J chain, and galectin 10 that discriminated active pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB from other febrile infections, giving ROC AUCs of 0.94 to 1. CONCLUSIONS. Elevated blood BATF2 transcript levels provide a sensitive biomarker that discriminates active TB from healthy individuals, and a potentially novel 4-gene transcriptional signature differentiates between active TB and other infectious diseases in individuals presenting with fever. FUNDING. MRC, Wellcome Trust, Rosetrees Trust, British Lung Foundation, NIHR

  12. Tuberculosis of the manubriosternal joint and concurrent asymptomatic active pulmonary tuberculosis in a patient presenting with a chest wall mass.

    PubMed

    Gorospe, Luis; Ayala-Carbonero, Ana María; Rodríguez-Díaz, Ricardo; García Latorre, Raquel; Muñoz-Molina, Gemma María; Cabañero-Sánchez, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman presented to our hospital with an anterior chest wall swelling. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging showed findings consistent with an infectious arthritis of the manubriosternal joint, and CT images also demonstrated multiple centrilobular nodules in both lungs, suggesting an infectious bronchiolitis. A CT-guided fine needle aspiration of a presternal mass yielded growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Bronchoalveolar lavage confirmed an active pulmonary tuberculosis. Septic arthritis of the manubriosternal joint is exceedingly rare.

  13. [Lupus vulgaris as a complication of pulmonary tuberculosis--case report].

    PubMed

    Owczarek, Witold; Targowski, Tomasz; Kozera-Zywczyk, Anna; Paluchowska, Elwira; Patera, Janusz

    2009-10-01

    Tuberculosis is a contagious disease induced by Mycobacterium species, acid-fast bacilli. These are mostly human type--Mycobacterium tuberculosis, less often cattle type--mycobacterium bovis or other: mycobacterium avium, kansasii, marinom, scrofulaceum, heamophilium, gordonae. The infection can affect all organs, but pulmonary tuberculosis is the most common form. The importance of tuberculosis is definitely rising in the context of massive population migrations in regions affected by its higher incidence, increased HIV infections and AIDS development. Cutaneous tuberculosis is a particular tuberculosis form with differentiated clinical picture. Non-typicalness of skin changes and oligobacilleous course of extrapulmonary tuberculosis forms are repeatedly causing difficulties in adequate diagnosis and early treatment. In differential diagnostics of cutaneous tuberculosis one must take leishmaniasis, actinomycosis, leprosy, syphilis and deep mycosis (among others) into consideration. The study is presenting a case of lupus vulgaris as a complication of past pulmonary tuberculosis. In bacteriological diagnostics of skin changes bioptates, no tuberculosis mycobacteria were found. The disease was diagnosed based on specific granulation presence in histopathology test, tuberculin hypersensivity, bacilli DNA presence in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test and skin changes regression after anti-mycobacterium treatment. According to authors of the study, the described case confirms the usefulness of PCR nucleonic acids amplification test in cutaneous tuberculosis diagnosis.

  14. Co-existing Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Bronchogenic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Helen M.; Quinlan, J. J.; Hiltz, J. E.

    1965-01-01

    Eighty patients with carcinoma of the lung have been treated at the Nova Scotia Sanatorium since 1940; in 15, coexisting active pulmonary tuberculosis was present. No characteristic clinical or roentgenological findings indicated that the tuberculous individual also had lung cancer. In four cases cancer was not diagnosed until the lung was examined by the pathologist. In the others a considerable interval elapsed before carcinoma was suspected. Only four patients with known cancer were considered suitable for thoracotomy. In three, an attempt at curative resection was made. One survived over seven years before accidental death; one is alive less than one year after operation; the third died as a result of the surgery. Bronchogenic carcinoma should be suspected in every tuberculous patient over the age of 50; diagnostic investigations should include bronchoscopy and cytological studies of bronchial secretion and sputum. Suspicion of carcinoma in any such patient constitutes an indication for early resection of the tuberculous disease. PMID:5843871

  15. [MINI-INVASIVE SURGICAL TREATMENTS FOR BILATERAL DESTRUCTIVE PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS].

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    The authors analyze the results of surgical treatment for bilateral destructive pulmonary tuberculosis in 234 patients who have under- gone 449 lung operations. A study group comprised 156 patients who received mini-invasive surgical treatments via mini-accesses under video-assisted thoracoscopic control. A comparison group included 78 patients operated on through standard approaches by the conventional procedures. In the study group, surgery of less duration was attended by less blood loss, a need for fewer blood transfusions, and the lower incidence and severity of intraoperative complications. Complications following mini-invasive surgery occurred 4 times less frequently and postoperative mortality was 5 times less than that in the comparison group. With mini-invasive surgical techniques, a complete clinical effect at surgical hospital discharge was achieved 1.5-fold more frequently and it was more steady-state in the late period.

  16. T Cell Functional Disturbances in Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ostanin, Alexander A.; Khonina, Nataliya A.; Norkin, Maxim N.; Leplina, Olga Yu.; Nikonov, Sergey D.; Ogirenko, Anatoly P.; Chernykh, Helen R.

    2000-04-01

    The investigations of 38 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (PT) revealed combined T cell and monocyte functional disturbances. Indeed, the percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes, proliferative response and IL-2 production, as well as the percentages of HLA DR(+) monocytes and IL-1beta production were significantly decreased in PT patients as compared with normal individuals. Herewith the absolute T lymphocyte number did not undergo the pronounced changes. The decrease of T cell proliferative response was not mediated through immunosuppressive action of monocytes or T lymphocytes since removing of "adherent" cells from patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or pretreatment of PBMC with indomethacin and cyclophosphan failed to recover mitogenic reactivity in vitro. The patient's sera also did not significantly influence on PBMC proliferation. The decrease of IL-2 production and the stimulation of T cell proliferative response via TcR-CD3 complex, i.e. through the classic pathway of activation, indicated the anergy of T lymphocyte in tuberculosis patients. Furthermore, T lymphocytes were characterized by enhanced apoptosis. It should be noted, that patient's sera (especially in the patients with an initially high apoptosis) promoted significant anti-apoptotic activity. It is likely that this mechanism may be an explanation, why absolute T lymphopenia is absent during tuberculosis infection. Our findings suggest, that T lymphocyte dysfunctions in patients with PT are caused by impairments of T cell activation process, which lead to predominance of "negative" response (induction anergy, apoptosis) and to a lesser degree connected with direct suppressive mechanisms mediated by monocytes, T lymphocytes or serum factors.

  17. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  18. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  19. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  20. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  1. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  2. [Computed tomography in the differential diagnosis of disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis and fibrosing alveolitis].

    PubMed

    Mursalova, G Kh

    2007-01-01

    The differential diagnostic signs of disseminated pulmonary processes were defined by computed tomography. A hundred and sixty-seven patients, including 117 (70%) with disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis (DPT) and 50 (30%) with alveolitis, were examined. Their mean age was 32.3 +/- 5.1 years; the history of disease averaged 4.6 +/- 1.2 years. Acute, subacute, and chronic DPT was observed in 17 (14.5%), 32 (27.3%), and 68 (58.1%) patients, respectively. Idiopathic fibrosing alveolitis (IFA) was seen in 38 patients; 12 patients had exogenous allergic alveolitis (EAA). IFA and EAA were chronic. Patients with DPT had most commonly signs, such as focal masses (45.3%), intra- and interlobular septal thickening (35%), lung tissue reticulation (35%), centrilobular empyema (29%), only focal masses being detected in its acute form, and other signs being more pronounced in its subacute and particularly chronic form. Glassy dark patches, the opal glass syndrome, were a common sign in patients with alveolitis. Septal thickening, lung tissue meshwork, and centrilobular emphysema were encountered only in patients with IDA and small-nodular focal masses and bronchial wall thickening were present in those with EAA.

  3. [The effectiveness of ascorbic acid and emoxipin in treatment of infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Volchegorskiĭ, I A; Novoselov, P N; Astakhova, T V

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this prospective placebo-controlled randomized study was to assess the effectiveness of ascorbic acid or emoxipin in the regimen of the therapy of infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis. Emoxipin vs. ascorbic acid favored the eradication of tuberculosis mycobacteria. Both preparations decreased the blood level of the contra-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), shortened time to the closure of degeneration cavities in tubercular infiltrations, decreased the risk of the development of destructive forms, and lowered the need for surgical interventions for infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis.

  4. Microscopic examination and smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Keflie, Tibebe Seyoum; Ameni, Gobena

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis causes illness among millions of people each year and ranks as the second leading cause of death from infectious disease worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the detection rate of microscopic examination and estimate risk of transmission of TB by smear negative pulmonary TB patients. Methods A cross-sectional study and retrospective data analysis on TB were undertaken in Northwest Shewa, Ethiopia. Microscopic examination, bacterial culture and PCR were performed. The statistical analysis was made by using STATA software version 10. Results A total of 92 suspected TB cases was included in the study. Of these, 27.17% (25/92) were positive for microscopic examination and 51% (47/92) for culture. The sensitivity and specificity of microscopic examination with 95% CI were 48.94% (34.08% to 63.93%) and 95.56% (84.82 to 99.33%), respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 92% (73.93% to 98.78%) and 64.18% (51.53% to 75.53%), respectively. Of 8150 pulmonary TB cases in the retrospective study, 58.9% was smear negative. The proportion of TB-HIV co-infection was 28.66% (96/335). Conclusion The sensitivity of microscopic examination was 48.94% which was very low. The poor sensitivity of this test together with the advent of HIV/AIDS elevated the prevalence of smear negative pulmonary TB. This in turn increased the risk of TB transmission. PMID:25810798

  5. Nonlinear pattern of pulmonary tuberculosis among migrants at entry in Kuwait: 1997–2006

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Saeed; Mohammad, Hameed GHH

    2008-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of published data on the pattern of pulmonary tuberculosis among migrant workers entering Middle Eastern countries particularly Kuwait. The objectives of this study were to use routine health surveillance data i) to estimate the prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis among migrant workers at entry in Kuwait and ii) to determine the occurrence of any time trends in the proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis positive workers over the study period. Methods The monthly aggregates of daily number of migrants tested and the number of pulmonary tuberculosis cases detected during routine health examinations of migrant workers from tuberculosis high-prevalence countries were used to generate the monthly series of proportions (per 100,000) of pulmonary tuberculosis cases over 120 months between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 2006 and analysed using time series methods. Results The overall prevalence (per 100,000) of documented pulmonary tuberculosis cases among screened migrants was 198 (4608/2328582). Year-specific prevalence (per 100,000) of tuberculosis cases consistently declined from 456 (95% CI: 424 – 490) in 1997 to 124 (95% CI: 110 – 140) in 2002 before showing a steady increase up to 183 (95% CI: 169–197) in 2006. The second-order polynomial regression model revealed significant (P < 0.001) initial decline, followed by a significant (P < 0.001) increasing trend thereafter in monthly proportions of tuberculosis cases among migrant workers. Conclusion The proportions of documented tuberculosis cases among migrant workers showed a significant nonlinear pattern, with an initial decline followed by a significant increasing trend towards the end of the study period. These findings underscore the need to maintain the current policy of migrants' screening for tuberculosis at entry. The public health authorities in Kuwait and perhaps other countries in the region may consider complementing the current screening protocol with interferon

  6. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Severely-malnourished or HIV-infected Children with Pneumonia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tahmeed; Pietroni, Mark A.C.; Faruque, Abu S.G.; Ashraf, Hasan; Bardhan, Pradip K.; Hossain, Md. Iqbal; Das, Sumon Kumar; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2013-01-01

    Presentation of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) as acute pneumonia in severely-malnourished and HIV-positive children has received very little attention, although this is very important in the management of pneumonia in children living in communities where TB is highly endemic. Our aim was to identify confirmed TB in children with acute pneumonia and HIV infection and/or severe acute malnutrition (SAM) (weight-for-length/height or weight-for-age z score <-3 of the WHO median, or presence of nutritional oedema). We conducted a literature search, using PubMed and Web of Science in April 2013 for the period from January 1974 through April 2013. We included only those studies that reported confirmed TB identified by acid fast bacilli (AFB) through smear microscopy, or by culture-positive specimens from children with acute pneumonia and SAM and/or HIV infection. The specimens were collected either from induced sputum (IS), or gastric lavage (GL), or broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL), or percutaneous lung aspirates (LA). Pneumonia was defined as the radiological evidence of lobar or patchy consolidation and/or clinical evidence of severe/very severe pneumonia according to the WHO criteria of acute respiratory infection. A total of 17 studies met our search criteria but 6 were relevant for our review. Eleven studies were excluded as those did not assess the HIV status of the children or specify the nutritional status of the children with acute pneumonia and TB. We identified only 747 under-five children from the six relevant studies that determined a tubercular aetiology of acute pneumonia in children with SAM and/or positive HIV status. Three studies were reported from South Africa and one each from the Gambia, Ethiopia, and Thailand where 610, 90, 35, and 12 children were enrolled and 64 (10%), 23 (26%), 5 (14%), and 1 (8%) children were identified with active TB respectively, with a total of 93 (12%) children with active TB. Among 610 HIV-infected children in three studies

  7. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by nested polymerase chain reaction in pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens* ,**

    PubMed Central

    Furini, Adriana Antônia da Cruz; Pedro, Heloisa da Silveira Paro; Rodrigues, Jean Francisco; Montenegro, Lilian Maria Lapa; Machado, Ricardo Luiz Dantas; Franco, Célia; Schindler, Haiana Charifker; Batista, Ida Maria Foschiani Dias; Rossit, Andrea Regina Baptista

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the performance of nested polymerase chain reaction (NPCR) with that of cultures in the detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens. METHODS: We analyzed 20 and 78 pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens, respectively, of 67 hospitalized patients suspected of having tuberculosis. An automated microbial system was used for the identification of Mycobacterium spp. cultures, and M. tuberculosis IS6110 was used as the target sequence in the NPCR. The kappa statistic was used in order to assess the level of agreement among the results. RESULTS: Among the 67 patients, 6 and 5, respectively, were diagnosed with pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and the NPCR was positive in all of the cases. Among the 98 clinical specimens, smear microscopy, culture, and NPCR were positive in 6.00%, 8.16%, and 13.26%, respectively. Comparing the results of NPCR with those of cultures (the gold standard), we found that NPCR had a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 83%, respectively, in pulmonary specimens, compared with 83% and 96%, respectively, in extrapulmonary specimens, with good concordance between the tests (kappa, 0.50 and 0.6867, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Although NPCR proved to be a very useful tool for the detection of M. tuberculosis complex, clinical, epidemiological, and other laboratory data should also be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:24473765

  8. A case of multifocal lupus vulgaris that preceded pulmonary tuberculosis in an immune compromised patient.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Manabu; Urabe, Kazunori; Moroi, Yoichi; Koga, Tetsuya; Takeishi, Masaaki; Fujita, Masaki; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Furue, Masutaka

    2004-02-01

    We describe the rare case of a Japanese male with multifocal lupus vulgaris that preceded asymptomatic pulmonary tuberculosis and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). He visited our hospital with multiple reddish plaques and erythema of 4-12 months duration. A skin biopsy revealed non-caseating epithelioid granulomas. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-hybridization from a skin biopsy specimen and was also isolated from a culture of the skin biopsy sample. The result of chest roentogenography was compatible with pulmonary tuberculosis. In addition, the diagnosis of ATL was based upon the presence of atypical lymphocytes with convoluted nuclei in his peripheral blood and a positive anti-ATL antibody reaction. Cases of cutaneous tuberculosis presenting with unusual clinical features may be on the increase, accompanying the spread of tuberculosis in immunosuppressed patients, including those with ATL and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

  9. Glyphosate Poisoning with Acute Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Darshana Sudip; Khot, Rajashree; Joshi, P. P.; Pandharipande, Madhuri; Nagpure, Keshav

    2014-01-01

    GlySH-surfactant herbicide (GlySH), one of the most commonly used herbicides worldwide, has been considered as minimally toxic to humans. However, clinical toxicologists occasionally encounter cases of severe systemic toxicity. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) states that ‘GlySH’ is of relatively low oral and acute dermal toxicity. It does not have anticholinesterase effect and no organophosphate-like central nervous system (CNS) effects. The clinical features range from skin and throat irritation to hypotension and death. Severe GlySH-surfactant poisoning is manifested by gastroenteritis, respiratory disturbances, altered mental status, hypotension refractory to the treatment, renal failure, and shock.[1] GlySH intoxication has a case fatality rate 3.2–29.3%. Pulmonary toxicity and renal toxicity seem to be responsible for mortality. Metabolic acidosis, abnormal chest X-ray, arrhythmias, and elevated serum creatinine levels are useful prognostic factors for predicting GlySH mortality.[2] There is no antidote and the mainstay of treatment for systemic toxicity is decontamination and aggressive supportive therapy. We report a case of acute pulmonary edema, which is a rare but severe manifestation of oral GlySH poisoning, where patient survived with aggressive supportive therapy. PMID:25948977

  10. Risk factors for pulmonary cavitation in tuberculosis patients from China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liqun; Pang, Yu; Yu, Xia; Wang, Yufeng; Lu, Jie; Gao, Mengqiu; Huang, Hairong; Zhao, Yanlin

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary cavitation is one of the most frequently observed clinical characteristics in tuberculosis (TB). The objective of this study was to investigate the potential risk factors associated with cavitary TB in China. A total of 385 smear-positive patients were enrolled in the study, including 192 (49.9%) patients with cavitation as determined by radiographic findings. Statistical analysis revealed that the distribution of patients with diabetes in the cavitary group was significantly higher than that in the non-cavitary group (adjusted odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI)):12.08 (5.75–25.35), P<0.001). Similarly, we also found that the proportion of individuals with multidrug-resistant TB in the cavitary group was also higher than that in the non-cavitary group (adjusted OR (95% CI): 2.48 (1.52–4.07), P<0.001). Of the 385 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, 330 strains (85.7%) were classified as the Beijing genotype, which included 260 strains that belonged to the modern Beijing sublineage and 70 to the ancient Beijing sublineage. In addition, there were 80 and 31 strains belonging to large and small clusters, respectively. Statistical analysis revealed that cavitary disease was observed more frequently among the large clusters than the small clusters (P=0.037). In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that diabetes and multidrug resistance are risk factors associated with cavitary TB. In addition, there was no significant difference in the cavitary presentation between patients infected with the Beijing genotype strains and those infected with the non-Beijing genotype strains. PMID:27729644

  11. Persisting PET-CT lesion activity and M. tuberculosis mRNA after pulmonary tuberculosis cure

    PubMed Central

    Malherbe, Stephanus T.; Shenai, Shubhada; Ronacher, Katharina; Loxton, Andre G.; Dolganov, Gregory; Kriel, Magdalena; Van, Tran; Chen, Ray Y.; Warwick, James; Via, Laura E.; Song, Taeksun; Lee, Myungsun; Schoolnik, Gary; Tromp, Gerard; Alland, David; Barry, Clifton E.; Winter, Jill; Walzl, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The absence of a gold standard to determine when antibiotics have induced sterilizing cure confounds the development of new approaches to treat pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). We detected PET-CT imaging response patterns consistent with active disease along with the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mRNA in sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage samples in a substantial proportion of adult, HIV-negative PTB patients after standard 6-month treatment plus one year follow-up, including patients with a durable cure and others who later developed recurrent disease. The presence of MTB mRNA in the context of non-resolving and intensifying lesions on PET-CT might indicate ongoing transcription, suggesting that even apparently curative PTB treatment may not eradicate all organisms in most patients. This suggests an important complementary role for the immune response in maintaining a disease-free state. Sterilizing drugs or host-directed therapies and better treatment response markers are likely needed for the successful development of improved and shortened PTB treatment strategies. PMID:27595324

  12. Procollagen III N-terminal Propeptide and Desmosine are Released by Matrix Destruction in Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, Jo; Kasprowicz, Victoria; Walker, Naomi F.; Yuen, Ho Ming; Sunpath, Henry; Tezera, Liku; Meintjes, Graeme; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Bishai, William R.; Friedland, Jon S.; Elkington, Paul T.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis is transmitted by patients with pulmonary disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) drive lung destruction in tuberculosis but the resulting matrix degradation products (MDPs) have not been studied. We investigate the hypothesis that MMP activity generates matrix turnover products as correlates of lung pathology. Methods. Induced sputum and plasma were collected prospectively from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive and negative patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and controls. Concentrations of MDPs and MMPs were analyzed by ELISA and Luminex array in 2 patient cohorts. Results. Procollagen III N-terminal propeptide (PIIINP) was 3.8-fold higher in induced sputum of HIV-uninfected tuberculosis patients compared to controls and desmosine, released during elastin degradation, was 2.4-fold higher. PIIINP was elevated in plasma of tuberculosis patients. Plasma PIIINP correlated with induced sputum MMP-1 concentrations and radiological scores, demonstrating that circulating MDPs reflect lung destruction. In a second patient cohort of mixed HIV seroprevalence, plasma PIIINP concentration was increased 3.0-fold above controls (P < .001). Plasma matrix metalloproteinase-8 concentrations were also higher in tuberculosis patients (P = .001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis utilizing these 2 variables demonstrated an area under the curve of 0.832 (P < .001). Conclusions. In pulmonary tuberculosis, MMP-driven immunopathology generates matrix degradation products. PMID:23922364

  13. Is there a rationale for pulmonary rehabilitation following successful chemotherapy for tuberculosis?

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Torrico, Marcela; Rendon, Adrian; Centis, Rosella; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Fuentes, Zhenia; Torres-Duque, Carlos; Mello, Fernanda; Dalcolmo, Margareth; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio; Spanevello, Antonio; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The role of tuberculosis as a public health care priority and the availability of diagnostic tools to evaluate functional status (spirometry, plethysmography, and DLCO determination), arterial blood gases, capacity to perform exercise, lesions (chest X-ray and CT), and quality of life justify the effort to consider what needs to be done when patients have completed their treatment. To our knowledge, no review has ever evaluated this topic in a comprehensive manner. Our objective was to review the available evidence on this topic and draw conclusions regarding the future role of the "post-tuberculosis treatment" phase, which will potentially affect several million cases every year. We carried out a non-systematic literature review based on a PubMed search using specific keywords (various combinations of the terms "tuberculosis", "rehabilitation", "multidrug-resistant tuberculosis", "pulmonary disease", "obstructive lung disease", and "lung volume measurements"). The reference lists of the most important studies were retrieved in order to improve the sensitivity of the search. Manuscripts written in English, Spanish, and Russian were selected. The main areas of interest were tuberculosis sequelae following tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment; "destroyed lung"; functional evaluation of sequelae; pulmonary rehabilitation interventions (physiotherapy, long-term oxygen therapy, and ventilation); and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.The evidence found suggests that tuberculosis is definitively responsible for functional sequelae, primarily causing an obstructive pattern on spirometry (but also restrictive and mixed patterns), and that there is a rationale for pulmonary rehabilitation. We also provide a list of variables that should be discussed in future studies on pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with post-tuberculosis sequelae. PMID:27812638

  14. [Actuality of problem of coexistent diabetes mellitus and pulmonary tuberculosis in patients, when surgical treatment is necessary].

    PubMed

    Opanasenko, M S; Levanda, L I; Kononenko, V A; KYimenko, V I; Tereshkovych, O V; Kalenychenko, M I; Konik, V M; Obrems'ka, O K; Demus, R S; Kshanovs'kyĭ, O E

    2013-10-01

    Actual issue, concerning coexistent pulmonary tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus, was studied. The data about the rate of various types of diabetes mellitus in phthysiosurgery were adduced. The results of surgical treatment of 116 patients, suffering pulmonary tuberculosis on the diabetes mellitus background, were summarized. Total efficacy of the treatment have constituted 96.0%. The surgical complications rate was 12.2%.

  15. Acute pulmonary oedema on the Ruwenzori mountain range.

    PubMed Central

    Naeije, R; Mélot, C

    1990-01-01

    A 40 year old man had an episode of severe pulmonary oedema at 4000-5000 m during the ascent of the Margherita peak (5109 m) of Mount Stanley on the Ruwenzori. He had taken acetazolamide and high dose dexamethasone to treat symptoms of acute mountain sickness. Six years before he had been studied by right heart catheterisation as a healthy volunteer during hypoxic breathing at sea level. His pulmonary vascular reactivity had been within the normal range for 32 healthy subjects. This man had high altitude pulmonary oedema despite currently recommended treatments for acute mountain sickness and normal pulmonary vascular reactivity to hypoxia at sea level. PMID:2271350

  16. Prognostic Scores for Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Morillo, Raquel; Moores, Lisa; Jiménez, David

    2017-02-06

    Rapid and accurate risk stratification is critical in determining the optimal treatment strategy for patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Early identification of patients with normal blood pressure and a favorable prognosis (low-risk PE) might select a subset of patients for outpatient treatment, which is associated with reduced cost and improved patient satisfaction, and has been shown to be effective and safe. Alternatively, identification of normotensive patients deemed as having a high risk for PE-related adverse clinical events (intermediate-high-risk PE) might select a subset of patients for close observation and consideration of escalation of therapy. Clinical prognostic scores have been gaining importance in the classification of patients into these categories. They should be derived and validated following strict methodological standards, and their use in clinical practice should be encouraged.

  17. Drug-induced pulmonary edema and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee-Chiong, Teofilo; Matthay, Richard A

    2004-03-01

    Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, and, to a lesser extent, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are common clinical manifestations of drug-induced lung diseases. Clinical features and radiographic appearances are generally indistinguishable from other causes of pulmonary edema and ARDS. Typical manifestations include dyspnea, chest discomfort, tachypnea, and hypoxemia. Chest radiographs commonly reveal interstitial and alveolar filling infiltrates. Unlike pulmonary edema that is due to congestive heart failure, cardiomegaly and pulmonary vascular redistribution are generally absent in cases that are drug-related. Rare cases of drug-induced myocarditis with heart failure and pulmonary edema have been described. Results from laboratory evaluation and respiratory function tests are nonspecific.

  18. [A report of outbreaks of pulmonary tuberculosis in two bars].

    PubMed

    Ishibatake, H; Onizuka, R

    1997-11-01

    We experienced small outbreaks of M. tuberculosis infection in two bars. 9 patients were diagnosed as tuberculosis by identifying M. tuberculosis from their sputa. Six of them were regular customers or employees of the bar, one of them was a family members. Each outbreak within the two bars was suspected of the common source of infection, because one patient was a regular customer of the both bars. The analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was done on 5 strains of M. tuberculosis which were isolated from five of 9 patients. The result unexpectedly showed that 5 isolates were classified into 3 groups. Within each group, identical fingerprints were shown. It does mean that each outbreak in two bars was originated from independent source. There was also one relapsed case of tuberculosis. He was suspected of relapsed tuberculosis after a period of 7 years because of the similarity of drug resistance compared with his primary tuberculosis. It was cleared up that 3 different strains of M. tuberculosis were concerned with these outbreaks in the two bars. In this case, almost all patients were heavy drinkers, however, liver dysfunction and malnutrition were not recognized among them. These experiences indicate that a place like bar may be a space of infection of M. tuberculosis. We should always keep in mind a spread of tuberculosis in a place like a bar as one of problems in tuberculosis control.

  19. Isolation of Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria in Children Investigated for Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hatherill, Mark; Hawkridge, Tony; Whitelaw, Andrew; Tameris, Michele; Mahomed, Hassan; Moyo, Sizulu; Hanekom, Willem; Hussey, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the frequency and clinical significance of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolates among children investigated for pulmonary tuberculosis in a rural South African community. Methods Children were investigated for pulmonary tuberculosis as part of a tuberculosis vaccine surveillance program (2001–2005). The clinical features of children in whom NTM were isolated, from induced sputum or gastric lavage, were compared to those with culture-proven M. tuberculosis. Results Mycobacterial culture demonstrated 114 NTM isolates from 109 of the 1,732 children investigated, a crude yield of 6% (95% CI 5–7). The comparative yield of positive NTM cultures from gastric lavage was 40% (95% CI 31–50), compared to 67% (95% CI 58–76) from induced sputum. 95% of children with NTM isolates were symptomatic. Two children were HIV-infected. By contrast, M. tuberculosis was isolated in 187 children, a crude yield of 11% (95% CI 9–12). Compared to those with culture-proven M. tuberculosis, children with NTM isolates were less likely to demonstrate acid-fast bacilli on direct smear microscopy (OR 0.19; 95% 0.0–0.76). Children with NTM were older (p<0.0001), and more likely to demonstrate constitutional symptoms (p = 0.001), including fever (p = 0.003) and loss of weight or failure to gain weight (p = 0.04), but less likely to demonstrate a strongly positive tuberculin skin test (p<0.0001) or radiological features consistent with pulmonary tuberculosis (p = 0.04). Discussion NTM were isolated in 6% of all children investigated for pulmonary tuberculosis and in more than one third of those with a positive mycobacterial culture. NTM may complicate the diagnosis of PTB in regions that lack capacity for mycobacterial species identification. The association of NTM isolates with constitutional symptoms suggestive of host recognition requires further investigation. PMID:17183648

  20. Diagnostic Value of Symptom Screening for Pulmonary Tuberculosis in China

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jun; Wang, Lixia; Zhang, Hui; Xia, Yinyin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic value of symptom screening for tuberculosis (TB) case finding defined in National Tuberculosis Control Program in China (China NTP) among elderly people(≥65 years) and younger people(<65 years). Methods We made a secondary analysis in a population-based TB prevalence survey in China in 2010. Questionnaire including information for cough and haemoptysis was completed by face to face interview, and then chest radiography was conducted in all eligible participants. Sputum smear and culture were followed for all TB suspects. We calculated the odds ratios (OR), sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of using different symptoms for screening to detect bacteriologically positive TB in subpopulations stratified by age 65, to evaluate the performance of symptom screening for TB. Findings Of 315 newly diagnosed bacteriologically positive TB, 131 patients (41.59%) were elderly, and 48.57% of TB patients were asymptomatic. Nearly 50% patients did not present cough of any duration, and less than half present cough more than 2 weeks, a defined suspected symptom in China NTP. Cough of any duration was reported more in patients aged under 65 than those in elderly, especially for the acute cough (9.78% vs 6.87%). Those symptoms defined by China NTP were reported by less than half participants in two subpopulations. Acute cough (<2 weeks) was an independent predictor of TB in people aged under 65 (adjusted OR: 3.3, 95% CI: 2.0-5.5), but not in those aged 65 and above (adjusted OR: 1.4, 95% CI: 0.7-2.9). The specificity for each symptom was significantly higher in participants aged under 65 (P<0.01), and sensitivities of most symptoms were significantly higher among elderly (P<0.05 or P<0.01). When compared with cough for 2 weeks and more, using cough of any duration for symptom screening increased the sensitivity from 42

  1. Association of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and HIV in the Mexican Institute of Social Security, 2006-2014

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Velázquez, Rosario; Valle-Alvarado, Gabriel; Arriaga-Nieto, Lumumba; Rojas-Mendoza, Teresita; Rosado-Quiab, Ulises; Grajales-Muñiz, Concepción

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis and HIV remain a public health problem in developed countries. The objective of this study was to analyze the incidence trends of pulmonary TB and HIV comorbidity and treatment outcomes according to HIV during the period 2006 to 2014 in the Mexican Institute of Social Security. Methods Analyzed data from this registry including pulmonary tuberculosis patients aged 15 years and older who had been diagnosed during the years 2006 to 2014 in the Mexican Institute of Social Security. The outcomes that we use were incidents rate, failure to treatment and death. Regression models were used to quantify associations between pulmonary tuberculosis and HIV mortality. Results During the study period, 31,352 patients were registered with pulmonary tuberculosis. The incidence rate observed during 2014 was 11.6 case of PTB per 100,000. The incidence rate for PTB and HIV was 0.345 per 100,000. The PTB incidence rate decreased by 0.07%, differences found in the PTB incidence rate by sex since in women decreased by 5.52% and in man increase by 3.62%. The pulmonary TB with HIV incidence rate decreased by 16.3% during the study period (In women increase 4.81% and in man decrease 21.6%). Analysis of PTB associated with HIV by age groups revealed that the highest incidence rates were observed for the 30 to 44 years old group. Meanwhile, the highest incidence rates of PTB without HIV occurred among the 60 and more years old individuals. We did not find statistically significant differences between treatment failure and PTB patients with HIV and without HIV. The treatment failure was associated with sex and the region of the patient. We found a strong association between HIV and the probability of dying during treatment. Our data suggested that patients suffering from both conditions (PTB and HIV) have no difference in the probability of failure of treatment contrary to other reports. Hypotheses to this is adherence to tuberculosis treatment with people living with

  2. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-03-10

    Essential facts Tuberculosis (TB) is an infection caused by a bacterium, mycobacterium tuberculosis. While it can affect any part of the body, only pulmonary TB is infectious. According to the charity TB Alert, there were 5,758 cases of TB in the UK in 2015 and 39% of them were in London. This represented a fall from a peak of 8,919 cases in 2011. Left untreated, TB is life-threatening, but is usually curable with antibiotics. The sooner it is diagnosed and treated, the better, both for the person's health and in preventing them from passing the infection on to others.

  3. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-02-22

    Essential facts Tuberculosis (TB) is an infection caused by a bacterium, mycobacterium tuberculosis. While it can affect any part of the body, only pulmonary TB is infectious. According to the charity TB Alert, there were 5,758 cases of TB in the UK in 2015 and 39% of them were in London. This represented a fall from a peak of 8,919 cases in 2011. Left untreated, TB is life-threatening, but is usually curable with antibiotics. The sooner it is diagnosed and treated, the better, both for the person's health and in preventing them from passing the infection on to others.

  4. Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Children: Assessment of the 2012 National Institutes of Health Expert Consensus Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Zar, Heather J.; Workman, Lesley J.; Little, Francesca; Nicol, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The 2012 National Institutes of Health (NIH) consensus criteria for standardized diagnostic categories of pulmonary tuberculosis in children have not been validated. We aimed to assess the NIH diagnostic criteria in children with culture-confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis and those in whom tuberculosis has been excluded. Methods. We performed a retrospective analysis of consecutive children hospitalized with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis in Cape Town, South Africa, who were enrolled in a diagnostic study. Children were categorized as definite tuberculosis (culture positive), probable tuberculosis (chest radiograph consistent), possible tuberculosis (chest radiograph inconsistent), or not tuberculosis (improved without tuberculosis treatment). We applied the NIH diagnostic categories to the cohort and evaluated their performance specifically in children with definite tuberculosis and not tuberculosis. Results. Four hundred sixty-four children (median age, 25.1 months [interquartile range, 13.5–61.5 months]) were included; 96 (20.7%) were HIV infected. Of these, 165 (35.6%) were definite tuberculosis, and 299 (64.4%) were not tuberculosis. If strict NIH symptom criteria were applied, 100 (21.6%) were unclassifiable including 21 (21.0%) with definite pulmonary tuberculosis, as they did not meet the NIH criteria due to short duration of symptoms; 71 (71%) had cough <14 days, 48 (48%) had recent weight loss, and 39 (39%) had fever <7 days. Of 364 classifiable children, there was moderate agreement (κ = 0.48) with 100% agreement for definite tuberculosis and moderate agreement for not tuberculosis (220 [60.4%] vs 89 [24.5%]). Conclusions. Entry criteria for diagnostic studies should not be restrictive. Data from this analysis have informed revision of the NIH definitions. PMID:26409280

  5. Protocol for studying cough frequency in people with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bravard, Marjory A; Tracey, Brian H; López, José W; Comina, German; Zimic, Mirko; Coronel, Jorge; O'Neill Lee, Gwenyth; Caviedes, Luz; Luis Cabrera, Jose; Salas, Antonio; Ticona, Eduardo; Kirwan, Daniela E; Friedland, Jon S; Evans, Carlton A; Moore, David A; Gilman, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cough is a key symptom of tuberculosis (TB) as well as the main cause of transmission. However, a recent literature review found that cough frequency (number of coughs per hour) in patients with TB has only been studied once, in 1969. The main aim of this study is to describe cough frequency patterns before and after the start of TB treatment and to determine baseline factors that affect cough frequency in these patients. Secondarily, we will evaluate the correlation between cough frequency and TB microbiological resolution. Methods This study will select participants with culture confirmed TB from 2 tertiary hospitals in Lima, Peru. We estimated that a sample size of 107 patients was sufficient to detect clinically significant changes in cough frequency. Participants will initially be evaluated through questionnaires, radiology, microscopic observation drug susceptibility broth TB-culture, auramine smear microscopy and cough recordings. This cohort will be followed for the initial 60 days of anti-TB treatment, and throughout the study several microbiological samples as well as 24 h recordings will be collected. We will describe the variability of cough episodes and determine its association with baseline laboratory parameters of pulmonary TB. In addition, we will analyse the reduction of cough frequency in predicting TB cure, adjusted for potential confounders. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the ethics committees at each participating hospital in Lima, Peru, Asociación Benéfica PRISMA in Lima, Peru, the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia in Lima, Peru and Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, USA. We aim to publish and disseminate our findings in peer-reviewed journals. We also expect to create and maintain an online repository for TB cough sounds as well as the statistical analysis employed. PMID:27105713

  6. Pulmonary tuberculosis: virulence of Mycobacterium africanum and relevance in HIV co-infection.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christian G; Scarisbrick, Genevieve; Niemann, Stefan; Browne, Edmund N L; Chinbuah, Margaret Amanua; Gyapong, John; Osei, Ivy; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Kubica, Tanja; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Thye, Thorsten; Horstmann, Rolf D

    2008-09-01

    Although Mycobacterium africanum is being isolated in a significant proportion of cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in West Africa, its pathogenic potential remains a matter of discussion. Recent reports leave the question of whether M. africanum causes more severe pathology than M. tuberculosis or resembles opportunistic pathogens and might gain importance in the course of the HIV pandemic. Patients with pulmonary tuberculosis associated with M. africanum (n=556) and M. tuberculosis (n=1350) were studied in Ghana, West Africa, and compared regarding self-reported signs and symptoms, chest radiography, HIV status, mycobacterial drug resistance and mycobacterial clustering as determined by spoligotyping and IS6110 fingerprints. The rate of M. africanum infections was similar in HIV-positive (27%) and HIV-negative (30%) patients. M. africanum clustered less than M. tuberculosis (21% vs 79%; OR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.3-0.5; p<0.001) corresponding to its lower prevalence (29% vs 70%). Clinically and radiographically, no significant differences were found except that M. africanum caused lower-lobe disease less frequently than M. tuberculosis (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.2-0.7; Pc=0.01), whereby this association applied to HIV-negative patients only. No difference in virulence, as assessed by the severity of radiological presentation, was found when the two M. africanum subtypes West African 1 and West African 2 were compared. In the population studied, M. africanum closely resembled M. tuberculosis in pathology and cannot be considered an opportunistic pathogen.

  7. The association of some genetic factors with pulmonary tuberculosis in Georgian and Azeri ethno groups.

    PubMed

    Khukhunaishvili, R; Tskvitinidze, S; Nagervadze, M; Akhvlediani, L; Koridze, M

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary Tuberculosis (TB) is still one of the major public health problems. Over the last half decade the significant problem is an increased ratio of drug-resistant TB cases. TB is as well the most significant infectious disease in the country of Georgia. Pulmonary tuberculosis is assessed as a complex infectious disease affected by both, environmental and genetic factors. Present study was undertaken to find out the correlation between pulmonary tuberculosis and erythrocyte blood groups antigens determinant alleles (ABO - r, p, q; Rh D+, Rh D- and MN - p, q) in two different, Georgian and Azeri, ethno groups. Immune-serological methods, direct reaction of universal monoclonal antibodies were used. Materials processed by biostatistician methods. The study had shown different correlation of pulmonary tuberculosis to erythrocyte blood groups determinant alleles in Georgian and Azeri ethno groups. In Georgian ethno group pulmonary TB correlates with ABO-r and p, Rh-D,+' and MN-p alleles, whether ABO-q, Rh-D,-' and MN-p in Azeri ethno group.

  8. Association of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Diabetes in Mexico: Analysis of the National Tuberculosis Registry 2000–2012

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; García-García, Lourdes; Castellanos-Joya, Martín; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Hernández, Andrés; Ortega-Baeza, Victor Manuel; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Sulca, José Antonio; Martínez-Olivares, Ma. de Lourdes; Mongua-Rodríguez, Norma; Baez-Saldaña, Renata; González-Roldán, Jesús Felipe; López-Gatell, Hugo; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Jiménez-Corona, María Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) remains a public health problem in Mexico while the incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM) has increased rapidly in recent years. Objective To describe the trends of incidence rates of pulmonary TB associated with DM and not associated with DM and to compare the results of treatment outcomes in patients with and without DM. Materials and Methods We analysed the National Tuberculosis Registry from 2000 to 2012 including patients with pulmonary TB among individuals older than 20 years of age. The association between DM and treatment failure was analysed using logistic regression, accounting for clustering due to regional distribution. Results In Mexico from 2000 to 2012, the incidence rates of pulmonary TB associated to DM increased by 82.64%, (p <0.001) in contrast to rates of pulmonary TB rate without DM, which decreased by 26.77%, (p <0.001). Patients with a prior diagnosis of DM had a greater likelihood of failing treatment (adjusted odds ratio, 1.34 (1.11–1.61) p <0.002) compared with patients who did not have DM. There was statistical evidence of interaction between DM and sex. The odds of treatment failure were increased in both sexes. Conclusion Our data suggest that the growing DM epidemic has an impact on the rates of pulmonary TB. In addition, patients who suffer from both diseases have a greater probability of treatment failure. PMID:26075393

  9. [A rare form of acute pulmonary edema: case report].

    PubMed

    Ricardo, José; Anaya, Maria José; Barbosa, Mário; André, Nelson; Magno, Pedro; Morais, José; Proença, Gonçalo; Rabaçal, Carlos; Gil, Victor

    2011-10-01

    We report the case of a 21-year-old man who underwent appendectomy under general anesthesia and developed acute pulmonary edema immediately after extubation. We then review the literature, focusing on the pathophysiology and the most important aspects of diagnosis and treatment of post-extubation pulmonary edema.

  10. The pathogenesis of pulmonary edema in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Warshaw, A L; Lesser, P B; Rie, M; Cullen, D J

    1975-01-01

    Acute pulmonary edema appeared 3 or more days after the onset of acute pancreatitis in 7 patients, an approximate incidence of 8%. The severity of pancreatitis in these patients was characterized by massive requirements for intravenous colloid and by marked hypocalcemia. In addition, at least 5 of the 7 patients had very high serum levels of triglycerides at the time of hospital admission. Hemodynamic studies during pulmonary edema showed normal central venous pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Cardiac index was appropriately elevated. Respiratory treatment, consisting of endotracheal intubation and controlled ventilation with PEEP, was successful in allowing reversal of the pulmonary injury and recovery of respiratory function within 1-2 weeks in all cases. Two patients died later from pancreatic abscesses. The findings indicate that a distinct form of pulmonary injury may occur in acute pancreatitis, characterized by loss of integrity of the alveolar-capilllary membrane, leading to pulmonary edema. The mechanism of injury is not known but may be caused by circulating free fatty acids, phospholipase A, or vasoactive substances. The pulmonary membrane lesion appears to heal during the period of intensive respiratory support. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1101836

  11. Diagnostic value of sputum adenosine deaminase (ADA) level in pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Binesh, Fariba; Jalali, Hadi; Zare, Mohammad Reza; Behravan, Farhad; Tafti, Arefeh Dehghani; Behnaz, Fatemah; Tabatabaee, Mohammad; Shahcheraghi, Seyed Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis is still a considerable health problem in many countries. Rapid diagnosis of this disease is important, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) has been used as a diagnostic test. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of ADA in the sputum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods The current study included 40 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (culture positive, smear ±) and 42 patients with non tuberculosis pulmonary diseases (culture negative). ADA was measured on all of the samples. Results The median value of ADA in non-tuberculosis patients was 2.94 (4.2) U/L and 4.01 (6.54) U/L in tuberculosis patients, but this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.100). The cut-off point of 3.1 U/L had a sensitivity of 61% and a specificity of 53%, the cut-off point of 2.81 U/L had a sensitivity of 64% and a specificity of 50% and the cut-off point of 2.78 U/L had a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 48%. The positive predictive values for cut-off points of 3.1, 2.81 and 2.78 U/L were 55.7%, 57.44% and 69.23%, respectively. The negative predictive values for the abovementioned cut-off points were 56.75%, 57.14% and 55.88%, respectively. Conclusion Our results showed that sputum ADA test is neither specific nor sensitive. Because of its low sensitivity and specificity, determination of sputum ADA for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis is not recommended. PMID:27482515

  12. Pulmonary oedema during treatment of acute water intoxication.

    PubMed Central

    Maclean, D.; Champion, M.; Trash, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    Acute water intoxication with deepening coma and uncontrolled epileptiform seizures in a 25-year-old previously fit male schizophrenic was treated with hypertonic (2 N) saline and a 20% mannitol solution. This improved his neurological state but precipitated severe pulmonary oedema. Intravenous frusemide increased his urinary output sufficiently to clear the pulmonary oedema. In acute water intoxication the use of hypertonic solutions may thus precipitate left heart failure by expanding the intra-pulmonary blood volume beyond the capacity of even a healthy left ventricle to compensate. Simple water restriction will produce a slower but perhaps safer improvement. Images Fig. 1 PMID:981097

  13. Pulmonary cavitation and skin lesions mimicking tuberculosis in a HIV negative patient caused by Sporothrix brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Orofino-Costa, Rosane; Unterstell, Natasha; Carlos Gripp, Alexandre; de Macedo, Priscila Marques; Brota, Arles; Dias, Emylli; de Melo Teixeira, Marcus; Felipe, Maria Sueli; Bernardes-Engemann, Andréa R; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila Maria

    2013-01-01

    A 32-year-old HIV negative male presented with multiple pulmonary cavitation and skin abscesses up to 15 cm in diameter mimicking tuberculosis. Sporothrix brasiliensis was isolated and patient responded well to amphotericin B followed by itraconazole, except the skin lesions that had to be surgical drained to obtain cure. PMID:24432220

  14. 78 FR 66744 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ...: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... industry entitled ``Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' The purpose of the draft guidance is to assist sponsors in the development of antimycobacterial drugs for the treatment of...

  15. 38 CFR 3.370 - Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... connection for pulmonary tuberculosis. When under consideration, all available service department films and subsequent films will be secured and read by specialists at designated stations who should have a current examination report and X-ray. Resulting interpretations of service films will be accorded the...

  16. 38 CFR 3.370 - Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... connection for pulmonary tuberculosis. When under consideration, all available service department films and subsequent films will be secured and read by specialists at designated stations who should have a current examination report and X-ray. Resulting interpretations of service films will be accorded the...

  17. 38 CFR 3.370 - Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... connection for pulmonary tuberculosis. When under consideration, all available service department films and subsequent films will be secured and read by specialists at designated stations who should have a current examination report and X-ray. Resulting interpretations of service films will be accorded the...

  18. 38 CFR 3.370 - Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... connection for pulmonary tuberculosis. When under consideration, all available service department films and subsequent films will be secured and read by specialists at designated stations who should have a current examination report and X-ray. Resulting interpretations of service films will be accorded the...

  19. Pulmonary tuberculosis and mucormycosis co-infection in a diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Deepak; Chander, Jagdish; Janmeja, Ashok K.; Katyal, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled diabetes mellitus is associated with a variety of infections which pose management difficulties. Herein, we report a case of diabetic patient who developed combined pulmonary tuberculosis and mucormycosis. The case illustrates management of this rare co-infection which despite being potentially fatal was treated successfully. PMID:25624598

  20. Pulmonary tuberculosis and mucormycosis co-infection in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Deepak; Chander, Jagdish; Janmeja, Ashok K; Katyal, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled diabetes mellitus is associated with a variety of infections which pose management difficulties. Herein, we report a case of diabetic patient who developed combined pulmonary tuberculosis and mucormycosis. The case illustrates management of this rare co-infection which despite being potentially fatal was treated successfully.

  1. Pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Clinical management of acute and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Torbicki, Adam

    2010-07-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism falls between the areas of pulmonology and cardiology, internal medicine and intensive care, radiology and nuclear medicine, and hematology and cardiothoracic surgery. Depending on their clinical background, physicians faced with a patient with a pulmonary thromboembolism may speak different languages and adopt different treatment approaches. Now, however, there is an opportunity to end the Tower of Babel surrounding pulmonary thromboembolism. There is a growing acknowledgement that the key clinical problems in both acute pulmonary embolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension are linked to right ventricular pressure overload and right ventricular failure. As a result, cardiologists and cardiac intensive care specialists are taking an increasing interest in understanding and combating these conditions. The European Society of Cardiology was the first to elaborate comprehensive clinical practice guidelines for pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The task forces involved in producing these guidelines included radiologists, pulmonologists, hematologists, intensive care physicians and surgeons, which ensured that the final document was universally acceptable. The aim of this article was to provide an overview of the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention of acute pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, while taking into account European Society of Cardiology guidelines and incorporating new evidence where necessary.

  2. [Abdominal pain and flatulence. Intestinal and pulmonary tuberculosis. IgG kappa paraproteinemia].

    PubMed

    Schulthess, G; Osterwalder, P; Valentini, T; Bicik, I; Widmer, U

    1998-03-04

    A 21-year-old woman suffered from cramplike abdominal pain, flatulence and occasional diarrhoea for about one year. Over the past few weeks the abdominal symptoms exacerbated, besides productive cough and subfebrile temperatures developed. Coloscopy revealed two isolated, short ulcers in the proximal colon. The histological examination of the biopsies taken from these ulcers indicated granulomatous inflammation. Moreover small acinar infiltrates in both pulmonary apices were visualized. The findings in this patient originating from Turkey were suspicious for intestinal and pulmonary tuberculosis. Though sensitive methods were used (Ziehl-Neelson stam, amplified M. tuberculosis direct test, a polymerase chain reaction) direct tests allowed no detection of mycobacteria. Antituberculous therapy was initiated on a probatory basis to which the patient responded well and promptly. The diagnosis was confirmed by culture results: M. tuberculosis was grown from colonic biopsies, morning sputa and bronchioalveolar lavage.

  3. [Use of essential oil of peppermint (Mentha piperita) in the complex treatment of patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Shkurupiĭ, V A; Odintsova, O A; Kazarinova, N V; Tkrachenko, K G

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the effects of peppermint (Mentha piperita) essential oil inhaled by patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis in the penitentiary system. This procedure is shown to be most effective in infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis in the phase of resorption of infiltrates and/or closure of decay cavities. The efficiency is determined by the rapid positive changes in a tuberculous process, which appear as a rapider regression of tuberculous inflammation, causing small residual changes. This procedure may be used to prevent recurrences and exacerbations of pulmonary tuberculosis.

  4. Relationship between human LTA4H polymorphisms and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis in an ethnic Han Chinese population in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinghui; Chen, Jin; Yue, Jun; Liu, Lirong; Han, Min; Wang, Hongxiu

    2014-12-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms in Leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) gene were reported to be associated with protection from pulmonary tuberculosis in Vietnamese population. But these associations were not found in the Russians. To investigate the association of LTA4H polymorphisms with tuberculosis in a Han Chinese population in Eastern China, we genotyped 5 SNPs of LTA4H gene in 743 of pulmonary tuberculosis patients, 372 of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 888 of healthy controls individuals. The CC and TT homozygotes of rs1978331 and rs2540474 were identified to have higher rates (P < 0.01) and be risk factors in the patients with extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (OR = 1.412; 95% CI = 1.104-1.804 and(OR = 1.380; 95% CI = 1.080-1.764). However, no significant association was found between any of the SNPs and pulmonary tuberculosis. In the extra-pulmonary tuberculosis subgroups. LTA4H gene were significantly associated with tuberculous meningitis, lymph node tuberculosis, bone tuberculosis and other extra-pulmonary tuberculosis except for pleural tuberculosis. The present findings suggest that polymorphisms in the LTA4H gene may affect susceptibility to extra-pulmonary tuberculosis and change the risk of developing the disease in the Han nationality in the East China.

  5. Pulmonary function after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Nysom, K.; Holm, K.; Olsen, J. H.; Hertz, H.; Hesse, B.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine pulmonary function after acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood and identify risk factors for reduced pulmonary function. We studied a population-based cohort of 94 survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood who were in first remission after treatment without spinal irradiation or bone marrow transplantation. Pulmonary function test results were compared with reference values for our laboratory, based on 348 healthy subjects who had never smoked from a local population study. A median of 8 years after cessation of therapy (range 1-18 years) the participants had a slight, subclinical, restrictive ventilatory insufficiency and reduced transfer factor and transfer coefficient. The changes in lung function were related to younger age at treatment and to more dose-intensive treatment protocols that specified more use of cranial irradiation and higher cumulative doses of anthracyclines, cytosine arabinoside and intravenous cyclophosphamide than previous protocols. We conclude that, 8 years after treatment without bone marrow transplantation or spinal irradiation, survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in first remission were without pulmonary symptoms but had signs of slight restrictive pulmonary disease including reduced transfer factor. The increased dose intensity of many recent protocols for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia may lead to increased late pulmonary toxicity. PMID:9662245

  6. Pulmonary embolism: treatment of the acute episode.

    PubMed

    Casazza, Franco; Roncon, Loris; Greco, Francesco

    2005-10-01

    The prognosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is mainly related to the clinical presentation and circulatory state of the patient: the therapeutic strategy is consequently different, ranging from an aggressive treatment in patients in life-threatening clinical conditions to a "stabilization" treatment in those hemodynamically stable. Since the majority of PE patients are clinically stable, a well conducted anticoagulant therapy, either with unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparins together with a vitamin K antagonist, is sufficient to stop thrombus extension, to minimize the risk of recurrent embolism and prevent mortality. In about 15-20% of cases presenting with clinical instability of variable severity, prompt intravenous thrombolysis with a short-acting compound often represents a life-saving treatment and should be the first-line approach. In normotensive patients with right ventricular dysfunction at echocardiography, who represent about 30% of PE patients, the debate regarding the optimal therapy is still open and further studies are required to document a clinically relevant improvement in the benefit-risk ratio of thrombolytic agents over heparin alone: young people, with a very low risk of bleeding and a concomitant reduction of cardiopulmonary reserve might be the best candidates to systemic thrombolysis. In any case such patients should be admitted to an intensive care unit to monitor the clinical status for at least 48-72 hours and detect signs of possible hemodynamic worsening. Mechanical thrombectomy, either percutaneous or surgical, are ancillary procedures and should be reserved to a minority of highly compromised patients who are unable to receive thrombolysis.

  7. [A rare case of an extra-pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Windler, B

    1989-01-01

    This is a case report on a 42-year old West. German woman suspected of suffering from an extrapulmonary manifestation of mucous membrane tuberculosis of the ethmoid sinuses. The condition did not improve after application of specific chemotherapy. Only after histological examination of several tissue samples was a direct connection with initial stage Wegeners granulomatosis established. Attention must be drawn to the fact that in isolated cases the differentiation between the histological diagnosis of tuberculosis versus Wegeners disease is complex and often faulty.

  8. Coexistence of pulmonary tuberculosis and sarcoidosis: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sanjay Kumar; Ghosh, Sudip; Mondal, Soumya Sarathi; Chatterjee, Sumanta

    2014-12-19

    Tuberculosis and sarcoidosis are multisystem diseases having different aetiology and management; however, they have similar clinical and histological characteristics. Very rarely they may coexist. We report a rare case of a 38-year-old woman who presented with chronic cough, low-grade fever and respiratory distress that was initially diagnosed as miliary tuberculosis. Diagnosis was supported by positive mycobacterial culture and initially responded to antitubercular treatment, but later recurrences led to further investigations and the diagnosis of coexisting sarcoidosis.

  9. Early and Extended Early Bactericidal Activity of Linezolid in Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Dietze, Reynaldo; Hadad, David Jamil; McGee, Bryan; Molino, Lucilia Pereira Dutra; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia; Peloquin, Charles A.; Johnson, Denise F.; Debanne, Sara M.; Eisenach, Kathleen; Boom, W. Henry; Palaci, Moises; Johnson, John L.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Linezolid, the first oxazolidinone approved for clinical use, has effective in vitro and promising in vivo activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Objectives: To evaluate the early and extended early bactericidal activity of linezolid in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: Randomized open label trial. Thirty patients with newly diagnosed smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (10 per arm) were assigned to receive isoniazid (300 mg daily) and linezolid (600 mg twice daily or 600 mg once daily) for 7 days. Sputum for quantitative culture was collected for 2 days before and then daily during 7 days of study drug administration. Bactericidal activity was estimated by measuring the decline in bacilli during the first 2 days (early bactericidal activity) and the last 5 days of study drug administration (extended early bactericidal activity). Measurements and Main Results: The mean early bactericidal activity of isoniazid (0.67 log10 cfu/ml/d) was greater than that of linezolid twice and once daily (0.26 and 0.18 log10 cfu/ml/d, respectively). The extended early bactericidal activity of linezolid between Days 2 and 7 was minimal. Conclusions: Linezolid has modest early bactericidal activity against rapidly dividing tubercle bacilli in patients with cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis during the first 2 days of administration, but little extended early bactericidal activity. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00396084). PMID:18787216

  10. TLR2-targeted secreted proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis are protective as powdered pulmonary vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tyne, Anneliese S; Chan, John Gar Yan; Shanahan, Erin R; Atmosukarto, Ines; Chan, Hak-Kim; Britton, Warwick J; West, Nicholas P

    2013-09-13

    Despite considerable research efforts towards effective treatments, tuberculosis (TB) remains a staggering burden on global health. Suitably formulated sub-unit vaccines offer potential as safe and effective generators of protective immunity. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens, cutinase-like proteins (Culp) 1 and 6 and MPT83, were conjugated directly to the novel adjuvant Lipokel (Lipotek Pty Ltd), a TLR2 ligand that delivers antigen to immune cells in a self-adjuvanting context. Protein-Lipokel complexes were formulated as dry powders for pulmonary delivery directly to the lungs of mice by intra-tracheal insufflation, leading to recruitment of neutrophils and antigen presenting cell populations to the lungs at 72 h, that persisted at 7 days post immunisation. Significant increases in the frequency of activated dendritic cells were observed in the mediastinal lymph node (MLN) at 1 and 4 weeks after homologous boosting with protein-Lipokel vaccine. This was associated with the increased recruitment of effector CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocytes to the MLN and systemic antigen-specific, IFN-γ producing T-lymphocyte and IgG responses. Notably, pulmonary immunisation with either Culp1-6-Lipokel or MPT83-Lipokel powder vaccines generated protective responses in the lungs against aerosol M. tuberculosis challenge. The successful combination of TLR2-targeting and dry powder vaccine formulation, together with important practical benefits, offers potential for pulmonary vaccination against M. tuberculosis.

  11. Tuberculosis and pulmonary candidiasis co-infection present in a previously healthy patient

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez Borré, Gustavo; Gómez Camargo, Doris; Chalavé Jiménez, Neylor; Bellido Rodríguez, Javier; Cuadrado Cano, Bernarda; Navarro Gómez, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Background: The coexistance among fungal pathogens and tuberculosis pulmonary is a clinical condition that generally occurs in immunosuppressive patients, however, immunocompetent patients may have this condition less frequently. Objective: We report the case of an immunocompetent patient diagnosed with coinfection Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Candida albicans. Case Description: A female patient, who is a 22-years old, with fever and a new onset of hemoptysis. Clinical findings and diagnosis: Diminished vesicular breath sounds in the apical region and basal crackling rales in the left lung base were found in the physical examination. Microbiological tests include: chest radiography and CAT scan pictograms in high resolution, Ziehl-Neelsen stain, growth medium for fungus and mycobacteria through Sabouraudís agar method with D-glucose. Medical examinations showed Candida albicans fungus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis present in the patient. Treatment and Outcome: Patient was treated with anti-tuberculosis and anti-fungal medications, which produced good responses. Clinical relevance: Pulmonary tuberculosis and fungal co-infection are not common in immunocompetent patients. However, we can suspect that there is a presence of these diseases by detecting new onset of hemoptysis in patients. PMID:27546933

  12. Genome-wide expression for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis: a multicohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Timothy E; Braviak, Lindsay; Tato, Cristina M; Khatri, Purvesh

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Active pulmonary tuberculosis is difficult to diagnose and treatment response is difficult to effectively monitor. A WHO consensus statement has called for new non-sputum diagnostics. The aim of this study was to use an integrated multicohort analysis of samples from publically available datasets to derive a diagnostic gene set in the peripheral blood of patients with active tuberculosis. Methods We searched two public gene expression microarray repositories and retained datasets that examined clinical cohorts of active pulmonary tuberculosis infection in whole blood. We compared gene expression in patients with either latent tuberculosis or other diseases versus patients with active tuberculosis using our validated multicohort analysis framework. Three datasets were used as discovery datasets and meta-analytical methods were used to assess gene effects in these cohorts. We then validated the diagnostic capacity of the three gene set in the remaining 11 datasets. Findings A total of 14 datasets containing 2572 samples from 10 countries from both adult and paediatric patients were included in the analysis. Of these, three datasets (N=1023) were used to discover a set of three genes (GBP5, DUSP3, and KLF2) that are highly diagnostic for active tuberculosis. We validated the diagnostic power of the three gene set to separate active tuberculosis from healthy controls (global area under the ROC curve (AUC) 0·90 [95% CI 0·85–0·95]), latent tuberculosis (0·88 [0·84–0·92]), and other diseases (0·84 [0·80–0·95]) in eight independent datasets composed of both children and adults from ten countries. Expression of the three-gene set was not confounded by HIV infection status, bacterial drug resistance, or BCG vaccination. Furthermore, in four additional cohorts, we showed that the tuberculosis score declined during treatment of patients with active tuberculosis. Interpretation Overall, our integrated multicohort analysis yielded a three

  13. Evaluation of GeneXpert MTB/RIF for detection of pulmonary tuberculosis at peripheral tuberculosis clinics.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yan; Peng, Hong; Chen, Cheng; Zhu, Tao; Ji, Ming; Jiang, Wei; Zhu, Wei; Zhai, Xiang Jun; Lu, Wei

    2017-02-28

    Tuberculosis is one of the most common infectious diseases in China, while delayed patient finding obstructed disease control, especially for smear-negative patients. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of GeneXpert MTB/RIF compared with conventional methods in the detection of pulmonary tuberculosis patients. A total of 295 spot sputum samples from confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis patients were evaluated from September 2014 to June 2015. Each sample was examined by acid-fast bacillus smear microscopy, culture and GeneXpert MTB/RIF. The sputum culture on Löwenstein-Jensen (L-J) was considered as the gold-standard. After testing by smear, 68.81% (203/295) was negative and 31.19% (92/295) was positive. As the gold-standard, L-J culture detected 37.97% (112/295) positive of all specimens, while the positivity for GeneXpert MTB/RIF was 46.44% (137/295). Compared with L-J culture, the combined sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for GeneXpert MTB/RIF were 94.64%, 82.97%, 77.37% and 96.18% respectively. For smear-negative specimens, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for GeneXpert MTB/RIF were 96.00%, 83.05%, 44.44% and 99.32%; while for smear-positive specimens, the corresponding accuracy values were 94.25%, 80.00%, 98.80% and 44.44%. The findings of study indicated that GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay demonstrated a high sensitivity in detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis compared to smear method and a high NPV among smear negative patients.

  14. [Immunomodulator Intensification of Etioropic Therapy in Patients with Advanced Pulmonary Tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kolomiets, V M; Abramov, A V; Rachina, N V; Rubleva, N V

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed at possible increase of the therapy efficacy in patients with advanced tuberculosis by including immunomodulators to the treatment schemes. The data concerning 6034 patients with advanced tuberculosis, mainly fibrocavernous tuberculosis of the lungs, were analysed. Four groups of the patients were randomized. In group 1 the management of the patients included etiotropic therapy and some treatment and rehabilitation measures with the use of Cycloferon. The group 2 patients in addition to the etiotropic therapy and some treatment and rehabilitation measures were given Omega-3. In group 3 the management included the etiotropic therapy and some treatment and rehabilitation measures. In group 4 the etioropic therapy was used alone. The analysis showed that 3419 patients had primary pulmonary tuberculosis, 340 patients had relapsing tuberculosis and 2275 patients had long-term process. The etiotropic therapy efficacy was estimated after an intensive phase of not more than 3 months. In the cases with Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance and some other unfavourable factors it was estimated after a 5-month intensive phase. The results confirmed that inclusion of immunomodulators to the treatment schemes allowed to increase the therapy efficacy and the patients' adherence to the treatment, as well as to shorten the period of the bacteria carriage. Thus, the use of Cycloferon in the schemes of the treatment of the patients with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis allowed to shorten the period of the pathogen carriage (as well as the drug resistant forms) in 94.1 ± 3.33% of the patients in spite of concomitant diseases. The effect of Cycloferon in such cases was likely due to both its direct immunoprotective action and the improvement of the general state of the patients and their higher adherence to the treatment.

  15. Acute Surgical Pulmonary Embolectomy: A 9-Year Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Alan R.; Manetta, Frank; Lessen, Ronald; Kozikowski, Andrzej; Jahn, Lynda; Akerman, Meredith; Lesser, Martin L.; Glassman, Lawrence R.; Graver, Michael; Scheinerman, Jacob S.; Kalimi, Robert; Palazzo, Robert; Vatsia, Sheel; Pogo, Gustave; Hall, Michael; Yu, Pey-Jen; Singh, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism is a substantial cause of morbidity and death. Although the American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines recommend surgical pulmonary embolectomy in patients with acute pulmonary embolism associated with hypotension, there are few reports of 30-day mortality rates. We performed a retrospective review of acute pulmonary embolectomy procedures performed in 96 consecutive patients who had severe, globally hypokinetic right ventricular dysfunction as determined by transthoracic echocardiography. Data on patients who were treated from January 2003 through December 2011 were derived from health system databases of the New York State Cardiac Surgery Reporting System and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. The data represent procedures performed at 3 tertiary care facilities within a large health system operating in the New York City metropolitan area. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 4.2%. Most patients (68 [73.9%]) were discharged home or to rehabilitation facilities (23 [25%]). Hemodynamically stable patients with severe, globally hypokinetic right ventricular dysfunction had a 30-day mortality rate of 1.4%, with a postoperative mean length of stay of 9.1 days. Comparable findings for hemodynamically unstable patients were 12.5% and 13.4 days, respectively. Acute pulmonary embolectomy can be a viable procedure for patients with severe, globally hypokinetic right ventricular dysfunction, with or without hemodynamic compromise; however, caution is warranted. Our outcomes might be dependent upon institutional capability, experience, surgical ability, and careful patient selection. PMID:25873794

  16. Genetic Association and Expression Studies Indicate a Role of Toll-Like Receptor 8 in Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Davila, Sonia; Hibberd, Martin L.; Hari Dass, Ranjeeta; Wong, Hazel E. E.; Sahiratmadja, Edhyana; Bonnard, Carine; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Szeszko, Jeffrey S.; Balabanova, Yanina; Drobniewski, Francis; van Crevel, Reinout; van de Vosse, Esther; Nejentsev, Sergey; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Seielstad, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Despite high rates of exposure, only 5–10% of people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis will develop active tuberculosis (TB) disease, suggesting a significant role for genetic variation in the human immune response to this infection. Here, we studied TB association and expression of 18 genes involved in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways. Initially, we genotyped 149 sequence polymorphisms in 375 pulmonary TB patients and 387 controls from Indonesia. We found that four polymorphisms in the TLR8 gene on chromosome X showed evidence of association with TB susceptibility in males, including a non-synonymous polymorphism rs3764880 (Met1Val; P = 0.007, odds ratio (OR) = 1.8, 95% c.i. = 1.2–2.7). We genotyped these four TLR8 polymorphisms in an independent collection of 1,837 pulmonary TB patients and 1,779 controls from Russia and again found evidence of association in males (for rs3764880 P = 0.03, OR = 1.2, 95% c.i. = 1.02–1.48). Combined evidence for association is P = 1.2×10−3–6×10−4. In addition, a quantitative PCR analysis indicated that TLR8 transcript levels are significantly up-regulated in patients during the acute phase of disease (P = 9.36×10−5), relative to baseline levels following successful chemotherapy. A marked increase in TLR8 protein expression was also observed directly in differentiated macrophages upon infection with M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Taken together, our results provide evidence, for the first time, of a role for the TLR8 gene in susceptibility to pulmonary TB across different populations. PMID:18927625

  17. Endovascular treatment for acute pulmonary embolism in neurological patient

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Gunchan; Paul, Birinder S; Gautam, Parshotam L; Mohan, Bishav; Sharma, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    Among the spectrum of venous thrombo-embolic disease, acute pulmonary embolism accounts for the most life threatening manifestations with mortality exceeding 50%. It can affect many patient populations across various disciplines, hence immediate attention and aggressive treatment is crucial. With the advancement of technologies, various catheter-based devices are available to treat massive or submassive PE. In this paper we report two patients of acute pulmonary embolism with neurological issues where the life threatening emergency was successfully managed by utilizing endovascular directed thrombolytic reperfusion therapy. PMID:26609298

  18. MARCO variants are associated with phagocytosis, pulmonary tuberculosis susceptibility and Beijing lineage

    PubMed Central

    Thuong, N T T; Tram, T T B; Dinh, T D; Thai, P V K; Heemskerk, D; Bang, N D; Chau, T T H; Russell, D G; Thwaites, G E; Hawn, T R; Caws, M; Dunstan, S J

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) has an important role in the phagocytosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). We hypothesized that MARCO polymorphisms are associated with phagocytosis, tuberculosis (TB) disease susceptibility and presentation, and infecting lineage. We used a human cellular model to examine how MARCO genotype mediates the immune response; a case–control study to investigate tuberculosis host genetic susceptibility; and a host–pathogen genetic analysis to study host–pathogen interactions. Two MARCO heterozygous (AG) genotypes (single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs2278589 and rs6751745) were associated with impaired phagocytosis of M. tuberculosis trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate-cord factor and β-glucan-coated beads in macrophages. The heterozygous genotypes of rs2278589 and rs6751745 were also associated with increased risk of pulmonary TB (PTB; rs2278589, P=0.001, odds ratio (OR)=1.6; rs6751745, P=0.009, OR=1.4), and with severe chest X-ray abnormalities (P=0.007, OR=1.6). These two genotypes were also associated with the Beijing lineage (rs2278589, P=0.001, OR=1.7; rs6751745, P=0.01, OR=1.5). Together, these results suggest that MARCO polymorphisms may regulate phagocytosis of M. tuberculosis and susceptibility and severity of PTB. They also suggest MARCO genotype and Beijing strains may interact to increase the risk of PTB. PMID:27853145

  19. CT findings of pulmonary tuberculosis and tuberculous pleurisy in diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jihyun; Lee, In Jae; Kim, Joo-Hee

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to assess computed tomography (CT) findings of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and TB pleurisy in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients and to evaluate the effect of duration of DM on radiologic findings of pulmonary TB and TB pleurisy. METHODS Ninety-three consecutive patients diagnosed as active pulmonary TB with underlying DM were enrolled in our study. As a control group, 100 pulmonary TB patients without DM were randomly selected. TB patients with DM were subdivided into two subgroups depending on diabetes duration of ≥10 years or <10 years. Medical records and CT scans of the patients were retrospectively reviewed and compared. RESULTS Bilateral pulmonary involvement (odds ratio [OR]=2.39, P = 0.003), involvement of all lobes (OR=2.79, P = 0.013), and lymph node enlargement (OR=1.98, P = 0.022) were significantly more frequent CT findings among TB patients with DM compared with the controls. There were no statistically significant differences in CT findings of pulmonary TB depending on the duration of DM. CONCLUSION Bilateral pulmonary involvement, involvement of all lobes, and lymph node enlargement are significantly more common CT findings in TB patients with underlying DM than in patients without DM. Familiarity with the CT findings may be helpful to suggest prompt diagnosis of pulmonary TB in DM patients. PMID:28185999

  20. The role of bronchoscopy in the diagnosis and management of pediatric pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Goussard, Pierre; Gie, Robert

    2014-02-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is the commonest clinical form of childhood TB occurring in approximately 80% of cases. Traditionally, bronchoscopy in pediatric TB suspects was used to collect specimens for mycobacterial culture using especially bronchoalveolar lavage. New data have described the role of bronchoscopy as a more comprehensive instrument for the diagnosis and management of pulmonary TB in children. Flexible bronchoscopy is an important intervention to evaluated airways disease, collect samples for culture, relieve critical threatening airway obstruction and aid in the management of complicated pulmonary TB disease in children. Airway involvement in children suspected of pulmonary TB has been described in 41-63% of cases. The commonest airways involved are bronchus intermedius, left main bronchus and the trachea. Bronchoscopy is safe in children with severe airway obstruction. As bronchoscope images improve, the working channel size increases new applications for bronchoscopy will be developed making them more applicable in small children.

  1. [The characteristics of operating on and postoperative management in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Voloshyn, Ia M; Kovalenchenko, V F; Podhaievs'kyĭ, S H

    1999-01-01

    Peculiarities of the operations performance and the postoperative period conduction in 128 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus (DM) were enlightened. After the operation in majority of patients it is expedient on the background of diet and insulin therapy to continue conventional chemotherapy. In patients with severe DM, focal pulmonary changes, chronic alcoholism and those to whom the preliminary chemotherapy was not conducted, it is mandatory to prescribe an intensive chemotherapy. For correction of the carbohydrate metabolism disorders it is expedient to conduct electrophoresis of 6% solution of sodium salicilate and 5000 U of heparin according to the elaborated method.

  2. [Meglumine acridonacetate and complex therapy of patients with newly identified advanced pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Pravada, N S; Budritskiĭ, A M; Sukhanov, D S

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and immunological efficacy of meglumine acridonacetate (cycloferon) tablets was evaluated in complex treatment of patients with newly diagnosed advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. It was shown that the use of cycloferon according to our scheme increased the efficacy of the therapy (earlier disappearance of the disease symptoms and bacteria isolation, shorter-terms of cavern healing, more pronounced positive radiographic dynamics vs. the patients under the etiotropic therapy). The use of cycloferon normalized the number of gamma interferon receptors, increased the gamma interferon serum levels, reduced the incidence of the side effects (liver damage) due to the use of TB drugs. Such a use of cycloferon was cost effective. The use of sycloferon is possible in the complex treatment of outpatients with advanced pulmonary tuberculosis.

  3. Adult pulmonary tuberculosis as a pathological manifestation of hyperactive antimycobacterial immune response.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan

    2016-12-01

    The intricate relationship between tuberculosis (TB) and immune system remains poorly understood. It is generally believed that weakening of the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis leads to reactivation of latent infection into the active pulmonary disease. However, heterogeneous nature of TB and failure of rationally designed vaccines in clinical trials raises serious questions against the simplistic view of TB as an outcome of weakened immunity. In the wake of accumulating human TB data, it is argued here that a hyperactive antimycobacterial immune response is to blame for the pathogenesis of pulmonary TB in immunocompetent adults. Direct and indirect evidence supporting this notion is presented in this article. Revisiting the role of immune system in TB pathogenesis will pave the way for effective anti-TB vaccines.

  4. Therapy duration and long-term outcomes in extra-pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is classified as either pulmonary or extra-pulmonary (EPTB). While much focus has been paid to pulmonary tuberculosis, EPTB has received scant attention. Moreover, EPTB is viewed as one wastebasket diagnosis, as “the other” which is not pulmonary. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study of all patients treated for EPTB in the state of Texas between January 2000 and December 2005, who had no pulmonary disease. Clinical and epidemiological factors were abstracted from electronic records of the Report of Verified Case of Tuberculosis. The long-term outcome, which is death by December 2011, was established using the Social Security Administration Death Master File database. Survival in EPTB patients was compared to those with latent tuberculosis, as well as between different types of EPTB, using Cox proportional hazard models. A hybrid of the machine learning method of classification and regression tree analyses and standard regression models was used to identify high-order interactions and clinical factors predictive of long-term all-cause mortality. Results Four hundred and thirty eight patients met study criteria; the median study follow-up period for the cohort was 7.8 (inter-quartile range 6.0-10.1) years. The overall all-cause mortality rate was 0.025 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.021-0.030) per 100 person-year of follow-up. The significant predictors of poor long-term outcome were age (hazard ratio [HR] for each year of age-at-diagnosis was 1.05 [CI: 1.04-1.06], treatment duration, type of EPTB and HIV-infection (HR = 2.16; CI: 1.22, 3.83). Mortality in genitourinary tuberculosis was no different from latent tuberculosis, while meningitis had the poorest long-term outcome of 46.2%. Compared to meningitis the HR for death was 0.50 (CI: 0.27-0.91) for lymphatic disease, 0.42 (CI: 0.21-0.81) for bone/joint disease, and 0.59 (CI: 0.27-1.31) for peritonitis. The relationship between mortality and therapy duration for each type

  5. B cells moderate inflammatory progression and enhance bacterial containment upon pulmonary challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Maglione, Paul J; Xu, Jiayong; Chan, John

    2007-06-01

    Though much is known about the function of T lymphocytes in the adaptive immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, comparably little is understood regarding the corresponding role of B lymphocytes. Indicating B cells as components of lymphoid neogenesis during pulmonary tuberculosis, we have identified ectopic germinal centers (GCs) in the lungs of infected mice. B cells in these pulmonary lymphoid aggregates express peanut agglutinin and GL7, two markers of GC B cells, as well as CXCR5, and migrate in response to the lymphoid-associated chemokine CXCL13 ex vivo. CXCL13 is negatively regulated by the presence of B cells, as its production is elevated in lungs of B cell-deficient (B cell(-/-)) mice. Upon aerosol with 100 CFU of M. tuberculosis Erdman, B cell(-/-) mice have exacerbated immunopathology corresponding with elevated pulmonary recruitment of neutrophils. Infected B cell(-/-) mice show increased production of IL-10 in the lungs, whereas IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-10R remain unchanged from wild type. B cell(-/-) mice have enhanced susceptibility to infection when aerogenically challenged with 300 CFU of M. tuberculosis corresponding with elevated bacterial burden in the lungs but not in the spleen or liver. Adoptive transfer of B cells complements the phenotypes of B cell(-/-) mice, confirming a role for B cells in both modulation of the host response and optimal containment of the tubercle bacillus. As components of ectopic GCs, moderators of inflammatory progression, and enhancers of local immunity against bacterial challenge, B cells may have a greater role in the host defense against M. tuberculosis than previously thought.

  6. Morphine in the treatment of acute pulmonary oedema--Why?

    PubMed

    Ellingsrud, C; Agewall, S

    2016-01-01

    Morphine has for a long time, been used in patients with acute pulmonary oedema due to its anticipated anxiolytic and vasodilatory properties, however a discussion about the benefits and risks has been raised recently. A literature search in Medline and Embase using the keywords "pulmonary oedema" OR "lung oedema" OR "acute heart failure" AND "morphine" was performed. A certain vasodilation has been described after morphine administration, but the evidence for this mechanism is relatively poor and morphine-induced anxiolysis may possibly be the most important factor of morphine in pulmonary oedema and therefore some authors have suggested benzodiazepines as an alternative treatment. Respiratory depression seems to be a less relevant clinical problem according to the literature, whereas vomiting is common, which may cause aspiration. In the largest outcome study, based on the ADHERE registry, morphine given in acute decompensated heart failure was an independent predictor of increased hospital mortality, with an odds ratio of 4.8 (95% CI: 4.52-5.18, p<0.001). Other, smaller studies have shown a significant association between morphine administration and mortality, which was lost after adjusting for confounding factors. Morphine is still used for pulmonary oedema in spite of poor scientific background data. A randomised, controlled study is necessary in order to determine the effect--and especially the risk--when using morphine for pulmonary oedema. Since the positive effects are not sufficiently documented, and since the risk for increased mortality cannot be ruled out, one can advocate that the use should be avoided.

  7. Prevalence and characterization of opportunistic candidal infections among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Astekar, Madhusudan; Bhatiya, Priyanka Sharma; Sowmya, GV

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although Candida albicans remains the most common cause of human candidiasis, the frequency of infection attributed to other members of the genus is also increasing. Hence, the present study was carried out to know the prevalence of opportunistic candidal infection in tuberculosis, and if positive, the species of Candida that is most commonly associated. Materials and Methods: The present study comprised sixty pulmonary tuberculosis patients who were divided into (1) fresh or untreated group, (2A) chronic or treated group having no complications and (2B) having complications, comprising twenty patients each, respectively. The collected sputum samples were initially stained with Ziehl–Neelsen stain for confirmation of presence of tubercle Bacilli. Primary isolation was done on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA). The candidal colonies were confirmed microscopically for the presence of pseudohyphae. Further speciation of the positive candidal samples was carried out using ChromAgar. Result: The total fungal prevalence among 60 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis on SDA was 33 (55%) Candida and 3 (5%) Aspergillus. The prevalence of different candidal species on ChromAgar showed C. albicans as the predominant one, followed by Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei. Freshly diagnosed or untreated group was less commonly associated with pulmonary mycoses than chronic or treated group. The prevalence of Candida had increased with treatment, duration and age, and it was more in males than females. Conclusion: The present study confirms the phenomenon of opportunistic candidal infections in pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Rapid and reliable identification of Candida species is essential as they differ in their virulence and sensitivity to antifungal drugs. PMID:27601806

  8. Occurrence of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Pulmonary Infection in an Endemic Area of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Ana Roberta Fusco; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Lopes, Maria Luiza; Barretto, Adriana Rodrigues; Felicio, João Soares; Sales, Lúcia Helena Messias; Bahia, Jeann Ricardo da Costa; Conceição, Emilyn Costa; Lima, Karla Valéria Batista

    2013-01-01

    The majority of investigations of the epidemiology of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have focused on highly developed nations with a low prevalence of tuberculosis. In contrast, the Para state of north Brazil represents an area of high tuberculosis prevalence and increasing NTM incidence. Toward the goal of understanding the dynamics of infection by all Mycobacterium species, we report patient characteristics and the identification of NTM strains isolated from sputum samples from patients that were residents of Para, a state in the Amazon region, Northern of Brazil, over the period January 2010 through December 2011 (2 years). The 29 NTM patients comprised 13.5% of positive mycobacterial cultures over the 2-year period. A major risk factor for NTM pulmonary disease was previous tuberculosis (76%). Further, the average age of NTM patients (52 years) was significantly higher than that of tuberculosis patients (39 years) and more were female (72.4% vs. 37.4%). Unlike other Brazilian states, NTM pulmonary patients in Para were infected with a different spectrum of mycobacteria; primarily the rapidly growing Mycobacterium massiliense and Mycobacterium simiae complex. PMID:23875055

  9. Immunopathogenesis of Pulmonary Granulomas in the Guinea Pig after Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Oliver C.; Basaraba, Randall J.; Orme, Ian M.

    2003-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis in guinea pigs is similar to the disease in humans and is accordingly widely used as a model to test tuberculosis vaccines. The primary site of expression of acquired immunity and the hallmark of tuberculosis is the granuloma. Granuloma morphology is well described, but there is limited information regarding T-cell subset influx. We monitored the course of pulmonary tuberculosis in guinea pigs and observed four distinct immunohistopathological stages. In all stages there were similar numbers and arrangement of CD4 and CD8 T cells. There were only small numbers of apoptotic lymphocytes, scattered around and within the necrotic core, and acid-fast bacilli were visible both within macrophages and free within airway debris. A key finding of the study was the observation that the development of the necrotic core was an early event and almost certainly preceded the emergence of the acquired immune response. This in turn suggests that innate mechanisms are the basis of the early lesions and that subsequent acquired responses are unable to moderate them. This hypothesis differs from the current dogma that excessive activity of T cells mediates delayed-type hypersensitivity and that cellular cytolysis is the root cause of the necrosis. PMID:12540568

  10. Evidence from Chile that arsenic in drinking water may increase mortality from pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Allan H; Marshall, Guillermo; Yuan, Yan; Liaw, Jane; Ferreccio, Catterina; Steinmaus, Craig

    2011-02-15

    Arsenic in drinking water causes increased mortality from several cancers, ischemic heart disease, bronchiectasis, and other diseases. This paper presents the first evidence relating arsenic exposure to pulmonary tuberculosis, by estimating mortality rate ratios for Region II of Chile compared with Region V for the years 1958-2000. The authors compared mortality rate ratios with time patterns of arsenic exposure, which increased abruptly in 1958 in Region II and then declined starting in 1971. Tuberculosis mortality rate ratios in men started increasing in 1968, 10 years after high arsenic exposure commenced. The peak male 5-year mortality rate ratio occurred during 1982-1986 (rate ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.7, 2.6; P < 0.001) and subsequently declined. Mortality rates in women were also elevated but with fewer excess pulmonary tuberculosis deaths (359 among men and 95 among women). The clear rise and fall of tuberculosis mortality rate ratios in men following high arsenic exposure are consistent with a causal relation. The findings are biologically plausible in view of evidence that arsenic is an immunosuppressant and also a cause of chronic lung disease. Finding weaker associations in women is unsurprising, because this is true of most arsenic-caused health effects. Confirmatory evidence is needed from other arsenic-exposed populations.

  11. Platelet–lymphocyte ratios: a potential marker for pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosis in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guozhong; Wu, Chunling; Luo, Zhiying; Teng, Yiming; Mao, Suping

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent decades, morbidity and mortality have been found to be significantly increased in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) complicated with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Platelet–lymphocyte ratio (PLR) is an indicator for inflammatory diseases. This study aims to investigate whether PLR could act as a potential marker for patients with COPD complicated with PTB. Methods In this retrospective study, laboratory characteristics of 87 COPD patients complicated with PTB (determined by Mycobacterium tuberculosis positive culture from sputum or bronchial lavage fluid) and 83 COPD patients (as the control group, determined by M. tuberculosis culture negativity from sputum or bronchial lavage fluid) were investigated. Data obtained on the day of admission were analyzed. Results PLR >216.82 was identified as the optimal cutoff value for discriminating COPD patients with PTB (sensitivity 92.4%, specificity 84.5%, positive-predictive value 91.6%, negative-predictive value 86.2%, and area under the curve [AUC] was 0.87) from patients with COPD alone. The AUC of PLR was significantly greater than that of neutrophil–lymphocyte count ratio (AUC, 0.74; 95% confidence interval, 0.67–0.81; P<0.01). Conclusion PLR could be developed as a valuable maker for identifying tuberculosis infection in COPD patients. PMID:27843310

  12. Transcriptome analysis of mycobacteria in sputum samples of pulmonary tuberculosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sumedha; Ryndak, Michelle B.; Aggarwal, Ashutosh N.; Yadav, Rakesh; Sethi, Sunil; Masih, Shet; Laal, Suman; Verma, Indu

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis, the disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, still retains a top rank among the deadliest communicable diseases. Sputum expectorated during the disease continues to be a primary diagnostic specimen and also serves as a reservoir of bacteria. The expression pattern of mycobacteria in sputum will lead to an insight into bacterial adaptation at the most highly transmissible stage of infection and can also help in identifying newer diagnostic as well as drug targets. Thus, in the present study, a whole genome microarray of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was used to elucidate the transcriptional profile of mycobacteria in the sputum samples of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Overall, the mycobacteria in sputum appeared to be in a low energy and low replicative state as compared to in vitro grown log phase M. tb with downregulation of genes involved in ATP synthesis, aerobic respiration and translational machinery. Simultaneously, downregulation was also seen in the genes involved in secretion machinery of mycobacteria along with the downregulation of genes involved in the synthesis of phthiocerol dimycocerosate and phenol glycolipids. In contrast, the majority of the genes which showed an upregulation in sputum mycobacteria were of unknown function. Further identification of these genes may provide new insights into the mycobacterial behavior during this phase of infection and may help in deciphering candidates for development of better diagnostic and drug candidates. PMID:28282458

  13. [Non-invasive ventilation and acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema].

    PubMed

    Golmard, Céline

    2015-11-01

    Non-invasive ventilation is an integral part of therapies used in patients presenting acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema. In cardiac intensive care, these patients are treated by teams trained and practised in this technique. The nurses play a central role in the support and monitoring of the patients.

  14. Radiological findings of pulmonary tuberculosis in indigenous patients in Dourados, MS, Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Lachi, Tatiana; Nakayama, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the radiological findings of pulmonary tuberculosis in indigenous patients from the city of Dourados, MS, Brazil, according to age and sex. Materials and Methods Chest radiographic images of 81 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, acquired in the period from 2007 to 2010, were retrospectively analyzed by two radiologists in consensus for the presence or absence of changes. The findings in abnormal radiographs were classified according to the changes observed and they were correlated to age and sex. The data were submitted to statistical analysis. Results The individuals’ ages ranged from 1 to 97 years (mean: 36 years). Heterogeneous consolidations, nodules, pleural involvement and cavities were the most frequent imaging findings. Most patients (55/81 or 67.9%) were male, and upper lung and right lung were the most affected regions. Fibrosis, heterogeneous consolidations and involvement of the left lung apex were significantly more frequent in males (p < 0.05). Presence of a single type of finding at radiography was most frequent in children (p < 0.05). Conclusion Based on the hypothesis that indigenous patients represent a population without genetically determined resistance to tuberculosis, the present study may enhance the knowledge about how the pulmonary form of this disease manifests in susceptible individuals. PMID:26543277

  15. Predictive Role of ADA in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid in Making the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Binesh, Fariba; Halvani, Abolhassan

    2013-01-01

    Current diagnostic tests for tuberculosis (TB) are time-consuming. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of ADA in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in patients with pulmonary TB. A cross-sectional study was performed in Yazd, Iran, between 2009 and 2010. Patients suspected of pulmonary TB with negative sputum smear for AFB were included in the study. Mean ADA levels in BAL fluids were measured and compared between study groups. Sixty-three patients were enrolled in the study among which 15 cases had pulmonary TB, 33 had pulmonary diseases other than TB, and 15 subjects with normal bronchoscopy results were considered as controls. Mean ADA levels in BAL fluid were 4.13 ± 2.55, 2.42 ± 1.06, and 1.93 ± 0.88, respectively. This rate was significantly higher in the pulmonary TB group compared to the other two groups (P = 0.001). Using ROC curve with a cut-off value of 3.5 IU/L, the highest sensitivity (57%) and specificity (84%) were obtained in diagnosis of TB. The results showed that although ADA activity in BAL fluid of pulmonary TB patients was higher than those seen in other diseases, a negative test does not rule out pulmonary TB.

  16. [Acute respiratory distress revealing severe pulmonary leptospirosis].

    PubMed

    Sekkach, Y; Qaçif, H; Jira, M; El Qatni, M; El omri, N; Ghafir, D

    2007-01-01

    We return a clinical case of leptospirose revelated by a complicated febrile harp pneumopathie of a sharp respiratory distress syndrome having required a transfer in resuscitation. The goal of our article is to recall that it is necessary to think systematically about a pulmonary shape of leptospirose facing an atypical pneumopahie.

  17. Delayed consultation among pulmonary tuberculosis patients: a cross sectional study of 10 DOTS districts of Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mesfin, Mengiste M; Newell, James N; Walley, John D; Gessessew, Amanuel; Madeley, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Background Delays seeking care increase transmission of pulmonary tuberculosis and hence the burden of tuberculosis, which remains high in developing countries. This study investigates patterns of health seeking behavior and determines risk factors for delayed patient consultation at public health facilities in 10 districts of Ethiopia. Methods New pulmonary TB patients ≥ 15 years old were recruited at 18 diagnostic centres. Patients were asked about their health care seeking behaviour and the time from onset of symptoms to first consultation at a public health facility. First consultation at a public health facility 30 days or longer after onset of symptoms was regarded as prolonged patient delay. Results Interviews were held with 924 pulmonary patients. Of these, 537 (58%) were smear positive and 387 (42%) were smear negative; 413 (45%) were female; 451 (49%) were rural residents; and the median age was 34 years. Prior to their first consultation at a public health facility, patients received treatment from a variety of informal sources: the Orthodox Church, where they were treated with holy water (24%); private practitioners (13%); rural drug vendors (7%); and traditional healers (3%). The overall median patient delay was 30 days (mean = 60 days). Fifty three percent [95% Confidence Intervals (CI) (50%, 56%)] of patients had delayed their first consultation for ≥ 30 days. Patient delay for women was 54%; 95% CI (54%, 58%) and men 51%; 95% CI (47%, 55%). The delay was higher for patients who used informal treatment (median 31 days) than those who did not (15 days). Prolonged patient delay (≥ 30 days) was significantly associated with both patient-related and treatment-related factors. Significant patient-related factors were smear positive pulmonary disease [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 1.4; 95% CI (1.1 to 1.9)], rural residence [AOR 1.4; 95% CI (1.1 to 1.9)], illiteracy [AOR 1.7; 95% CI (1.2 to 2.4)], and lack of awareness/misperceptions of causes of

  18. [Acute myocardial infarction complicated by acute pulmonary oedema and cardiogenic collapse during dobutamine stress echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Yameogo, Nobila Valentin; Mbaye, Alassane; Kagambega, Larissa Justine; Dioum, Momar; Diagne-Sow, Dior; Kane, Moussa; Diack, Bouna; Kane, Abdoul

    2013-06-23

    Acute myocardial infarction is a rare complication of dobutamine stress echocardiography. We describe the case of a diabetic patient who presented with an anterior myocardial infarction complicated by an acute pulmonary oedema and cardiogenic collapse during dobutamine stress echocardiography, requiring five days' hospitalisation. Coronarography could not be performed because of inadequate medical facilities.

  19. Correlation between the kinetics of Th1, Th2 cells and pathology in a murine model of experimental pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Pando, R; Orozcoe, H; Sampieri, A; Pavón, L; Velasquillo, C; Larriva-Sahd, J; Alcocer, J M; Madrid, M V

    1996-01-01

    T-helper 1 (Th1) Th2 kinetics were studied by immunohistochemistry and molecular biology techniques (reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. RT PCR, Southern-blot) during the course of pulmonary tuberculosis induced in BALB/c mice by the intratracheal instillation of the live and virulent strain H-37Rv. The histopathological study clearly showed two phases of the disease. The first one was an acute phase which was characterized by inflammatory infiltrate in the alveolar capillary interstitium, blood vessel and bronchial wall with formation of granulomas. In this acute phase which lasted from 1 to 28 days, a clear predominance of Th1 cells was observed, manifested by a high percentage of interleukin-2 (IL-2) positive cells in the inflammatory infiltrate and granulomas demonstrated by immunohistology, as well as a gradual increment of interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) m-RNA. This was followed by a chronic or advanced phase characterized by pneumonia, focal necrosis and fibrosis, with a Th0 balance due to an equivalent proportion of IL-2 and IL-4 positive cells in the lung lesions, that coincided with the highest level of INF-gamma and IL-4 mRNA. The cytofluorometric analysis of bronchial lavage cells, showed a predominance of CD4 T cells during the acute phase and CD8 T lymphocytes in the chronic phase, gamma-delta T lymphocytes showed two peaks, at the beginning (3 days) and at the end (4 months) of the infection. These results suggest that T-lymphocyte subset kinetics and the pattern of cytokines produced in the lung during tuberculosis infection changed over time and correlate with the type and magnitude of tissue injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8911136

  20. CT-Guided Transthoracic Core Biopsy for Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Diagnostic Value of the Histopathological Findings in the Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Hozumi Ibukuro, Kenji; Tsukiyama, Toshitaka; Ishii, Rei

    2004-09-15

    We evaluated the value of CT-guided transthoracic core biopsy for the diagnosis of mycobacterial pulmonary nodules. The 30 subjects in this study had pulmonary nodules that had been either diagnosed histopathologically as tuberculosis or were suspected as tuberculosis based on a specimen obtained by CT-guided transthoracic core biopsy. The histopathological findings, the existence of acid-fast bacilli in the biopsy specimens, and the clinical course of the patients after the biopsy were reviewed retrospectively. Two of the three histological findings for tuberculosis that included epithelioid cells, multinucleated giant cells and caseous necrosis were observed in 21 of the nodules which were therefore diagnosed as histological tuberculosis. Six of these 21 nodules were positive for acid-fast bacilli, confirming the diagnosis of tuberculosis. Thirteen of the 21 nodules did not contain acid-fast bacilli but decreased in size in response to antituberculous treatment and were therefore diagnosed as clinical tuberculosis. Seven nodules with only caseous necrosis were diagnosed as suspected tuberculosis, with a final diagnosis of tuberculosis being made in 4 of the nodules and a diagnosis of old tuberculosis in 2 nodules. Two nodules with only multinucleated giant cells were diagnosed as suspected tuberculosis with 1 of these nodules being diagnosed finally as tuberculosis and the other nodule as a nonspecific granuloma. When any two of the three following histopathological findings - epithelioid cells, multinucleated giant cells or caseous necrosis - are observed in a specimen obtained by CT-guided transthoracic core biopsy, the diagnosis of tuberculosis can be established without the detection of acid-fast bacilli or Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  1. Progressive Primary Pulmonary Tuberculosis Presenting as the Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dempers, Johan; Sens, Mary Ann; Wadee, Shabbir Ahmed; Kinney, Hannah C.; Odendaal, Hein J.; Wright, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    The classification of an unexpected infant death as the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) depends upon a complete autopsy and death scene investigation to exclude known causes of death. Here we report the death of a four-month-old infant in a tuberculosis endemic area that presented as a sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) with no apparent explanation based on the death scene characteristics. The autopsy, however, revealed progressive primary pulmonary tuberculosis with intrathoracic adenopathy, compression of the tracheobronchial tree and miliary lesions in the liver. This case underscores the clinical difficulties in the diagnosis of infantile tuberculosis, as well as the possibility of sudden death as part of its protean manifestations. The pathology and clinical progression of tuberculosis in infants differs from older children and adults due to the immature immune response in infants. This case dramatically highlights the need for complete autopsies in all sudden and unexpected infant deaths, as well as the public health issues in a sentinel infant tuberculosis diagnosis. PMID:20705406

  2. Acute respiratory failure and pulmonary thrombosis in leukemic children.

    PubMed

    Marraro, G; Uderzo, C; Marchi, P; Castagnini, G; Vaj, P L; Masera, G

    1991-02-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) in an 11-year-old child with pre-T acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at the beginning of induction therapy was observed, connected with a pulmonary thrombosis and not with an infective origin. A systematic search for this pathology identified six other children with the same pulmonary complication, five of whom where in the early phase of acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL) and one in induction therapy for ALL in marrow relapse. At the beginning of the symptomatology, all children presented severe hypoxia and hypercapnia, with no or minimal chest radiograph abnormalities and no clear hemodynamic involvement. In all patients the arteriography and nuclear imaging studies confirmed the diagnosis. The causes of the thrombi could be connected with neoplastic emboli after cell lysis and/or with the vascular damage resulting from antiblastic therapy. Intravenous urokinase treatment and respiratory assistance had been successfully carried out in six of seven children.

  3. Pulmonary capillaritis: a possible histologic form of acute pulmonary allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Badesch, D B; Zamora, M; Fullerton, D; Weill, D; Tuder, R; Grover, F; Schwarz, M I

    1998-04-01

    Acute rejection after lung transplantation occurs commonly and is usually characterized histologically by a perivascular mononuclear infiltrate. We report five cases of pulmonary capillaritis with a histologic appearance distinct from typical rejection, occurring in patients ranging in age from 18 to 45 years, with a variety of underlying diseases including alpha1 antitrypsin deficiency, pulmonary hypertension, cystic fibrosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Four of the five patients had alveolar hemorrhage histologically, and two had frank hemoptysis. Time of onset ranged from 3 weeks to many months after transplantation. Three cases were fulminant, and there were two deaths. In only one case, with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bronchitis, could infection be established. All were treated with intensification of immunosuppressive therapy. Plasmapheresis was carried out in two cases and coincided with temporary improvement, but its efficacy was questionable because of concurrent immunosuppressive therapy. Two had recurrent biopsy-proven acute rejection within 6 weeks of treatment, and one had recurrent severe pulmonary hemorrhage that abated with total lymphoid irradiation. Our experience suggests that pulmonary capillaritis in lung transplant recipients can be an acute, fatal illness with the potential for recurrence in the survivors. We speculate that it represents a form of acute vascular rejection. Early pathologic diagnosis and aggressive immunosuppressive therapy are recommended. Although a humoral component was not documented, the possible response to plasmapheresis requires continued evaluation.

  4. [Multiple pulmonary nodules and posterior uveitis as unusual manifestation of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Ibarburen González-Arenas, C; Zapatero Gaviria, A; Gómez Santos, D; García-Castaño, B; Tomás Ros, M; Merino Morales, F

    1990-12-01

    Pulmonar tuberculosis still being one of the diseases more frequent in our area, this producing different clinical and radiological presentation. A case with posterior uveitis and bilateral lungs nodules which required a thoracotomy to perform a diagnosis, is presented.

  5. [Changes of proinflammatory cytokines and their receptors in serum from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Tang, Shenjie; Xiao, Heping; Fan, Yihu; Wu, Furong; Zhang, Zhongshun; Li, Hong; Yang, Yan

    2002-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the characteristics and clinical value of serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and its receptor (sTNF-R), interleukin-1beta(IL-1beta) and its receptor(IL-1R), interleukin-6(IL-6) and its receptor(IL-6R) in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, and to evaluate their role in the immunopathogenesis of tuberculosis. METHODS The serum levels of TNF-alpha, sTNF-R Iota IL-1beta,IL-1R, IL-6 and IL-6R were measured using the sandwich ABC-ELISA method in 41 cases of active tuberculosis, 21 cases of inactive tuberculosis and 20 normal controls. The serum levels of the cytokines in 17 cases of active tuberculos is were followed. RESULTS The serum levels of TNF-alpha sTNF-RIota IL-1beta,IL-1R, IL-6 IL-6R and the TNF-alpha/sTNF-RIota ratio were significantly higher in both the active and the inactive tuberculosis groups than those in normal controls (P <0.01 approximately 0.05). The TNF-alpha sTNF-R Iota IL-1 beta, IL-1R, IL-6 IL-6R levels and the TNF-alpha/sTNF-R Iota ratio in the active tuberculosis group were significantly higher than those in the inactive tuberculosis(P <0.01 approximately 0.05). The serum levels of TNF-alpha sTNF-R Iota, IL-1beta and IL-6 and the TNF-alpha,/sTNF-R Iota ratio were significantly lower in cavernous tuberculosis than those in non- cavernous tuberculosis (P < 0.01 approximately 0.05). After 2 months' antituberculosis treatment, the serum levels of TNF-alpha,sTNF-R Iota IL-1 beta, IL-1R,IL-6, IL-6R and the TNF-alpha/sTNF-R Iota ratio in 15(15/17) cases were significantly lower than those before treatment(P < 0.01 approximately 0.05). CONCLUSIONS TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and their receptors may be involved in the immunopathogenesis of tuberculosis. Measuring the serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines and their receptors may be useful in evaluating the activity, the clinical pattern, and the prognosis of the disease and monitoring the clinical effect of antituberculous therapy.

  6. [Pulmonary edemas due to acute heroin poisoning].

    PubMed

    Francois, G; Faizende, J; Reboul, J

    1975-01-01

    Their frequency is estimated with difficulty, although on autopsy pulmonary edema is found almost routinely. It is a major complication of overdoses (48 p. 100 of severe intoxications). Their formation can be suspected, when after the first phase of respiratory depressions, with coma, myosis, and a variable latent period, a second attack of respiratory insufficiency occurs with tachypnea, and cyanosis. The chest X-ray shows diffuse alveolar infiltration, sparing the apices. The heart being generally of normal size. Rapid disappearance of this infiltrate (24 to 48 hours) enables the elimination of two diagnoses: pneumonia due to inhalation of gastric fluid, an infectious pneumonia. Their pathogenesis remains very debatable: - in the majority of cases abrupt L.V.F. can be eliminated: -on the other hand it could be an allergic accident of the anaphylactic type, or local liberation of histamine, or a local toxic action on the pulmonary capillaries; - hypoxia, secondary to respiratory depression, could lead to pulmonary edema, by the same mechanism as at altitude; - finally, owing to the central neurological disorders a neurogenic theory can be put forward. Their treatment is essentially a combination of Nalorphine with oxygen therapy (by mask, or if necessary by assisted, controlled ventilation) with prevention of inhalation of gastric fluid (gastric emptying) or curative treatment of possible aspiration by antibiotics, and cortico-steroids. Diuretics can be useful, as well as cardiotonics.

  7. Problems in defining a “case” of pulmonary tuberculosis in prevalence surveys*

    PubMed Central

    Narain, Raj; Nair, S. S.; Naganna, K.; Chandrasekhar, P.; Rao, G. Ramanatha; Lal, Pyare

    1968-01-01

    An analysis of data from two successive tuberculosis prevalence surveys (conducted at an interval of 18 months) in a random sample of villages in Bangalore District, South India, has shown that the term “a case of pulmonary tuberculosis” does not represent a single uniform entity, but rather embraces cases of several types, differing considerably in their mortality experience, tuberculin sensitivity, results of X-ray and sputum examinations, and in the reliability of their diagnosis. The status at the first survey of the cases found at the resurvey and that at resurvey of those found at the initial survey give an indication of changes with time. Such changes show considerable differences for the various types of cases and provide another dimension to study the differences among them. The authors consider that, in spite of the great need and importance of a single straightforward definition of a case, no such definition is suitable for all situations; there is no other option but to continue to use more than one definition. Although, theoretically, finding a single bacillus in the sputum should be adequate proof of pulmonary tuberculosis, it is shown that finding of a few bacilli, 3 or less, is probably far too often due to artefacts and should not be the basis for a diagnosis. The findings also well bear out the notion that positive radiological findings, in the absence of bacteriological confirmation, indicate, not pulmonary tuberculosis, but only a high risk of the disease. Direct microscopy appears to be a consistent index of disease but, in community surveys, has the limitations of missing a substantial proportion of cases and of adding some false cases. The extent of these limitations, so far as symptomatic patients in a community tuberculosis control programme are concerned, remains to be investigated. PMID:5306123

  8. [Results of use of surfactant in complex therapy of patients with destructive pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Lovacheva, O V; Erokhin, V V; Chernichenko, N V; Evgushchenko, G V; Lepekha, L N; Rozenberg, O A

    2006-01-01

    Many years' experience in studying the surfactant system in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis has allowed recommendation of using surfactant agents in the treatment of tuberculosis. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of surfactant-BL (Russia) as a pathogenetic agent in chemotherapy in patients with destructive pulmonary tuberculosis. The results of treatment were compared in two groups of 70 persons in each, which were matched by gender, age, the extent of a tuberculous process, and the presence of drug resistance in the causative agent, including multidrug resistance. In the study group, the patients received surfactant inhalations (8 weeks) during chemotherapy while the control patients had only chemotherapy. Drugs were chosen on an individual basis, by taking into account the pathogen's drug sensitivity and a patient's tolerability of a drug. The cumulative dose of the surfactant was 700 mg. There were no adverse reactions to the surfactant in the study group of patients. After 2-5 surfactant inhalations, the amount of sputum increase, its discharge became easier, and cough diminished. Following 4 weeks, the level of bacterial isolation decreased in 49 (70.0%) patients from the study group and in 20 (28.6%) from the control one. Two months of treatment, bacterial isolation ceased in 82.9 and 64.3% in the study and control groups, respectively. In the study group, X-ray trend in infiltration resolution and cavernous closure was significantly better in the study group. By month 4, cavernous closure was achieved in 72.9% in the study group and in 41.4% in the control one. The changes in the cellular composition of the lung in surfactant-treated and untreated patients were analyzed by the data on broncho-alveolar lavage. The findings indicate that inhaled Surfactant-BL as a two-month therapy has a pathogenetic effect and during chemotherapy improves the efficiency of treatment reduces its time in pulmonary tuberculosis.

  9. Clinical evaluation of mtp40 polymerase chain reaction for the diagnosis of extra pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kathirvel, Maruthai; Kommoju, Vallayyachari; Brammacharry, Usharani; Ravibalan, Thirumurugan; Ravishankar, Nandikolla; Radhakrishnan, Balu; Muthaiah, Muthuraj

    2014-05-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from patient samples is vital for clinical diagnosis and treatment. The emergence of M. tuberculosis strains with either no copies or only a single copy of IS6110 in Asian countries makes the standard PCR based diagnosis of M. tuberculosis using IS6110 not reliable. We studied the diagnostic efficacy of the in-house PCR amplification of the candidate gene mtp40 as an alternative to IS6110 element based diagnosis. Clinical samples included pulmonary and extra-pulmonary specimens from TB suspected patients residing in Puducherry, South India and were analyzed using in-house PCR procedures targeting IS6110 element and mtp40 genes. Out of 317 clinical specimens analyzed, 132 (41.6 %) and 114 (36 %) were found positive for mtp40 PCR and IS6110 PCR, respectively. However, 18 specimens that were found to negative for IS6110 PCR were found positive for mtp40 PCR, which was further confirmed by DNA sequencing method. PCR amplification of mtp40 gene for the diagnosis of M. tuberculosis in clinical samples is fast, sensitive, and further identified clinical strains that lack IS6110 element in this region. It is clearly demonstrated that there is a significant difference between the two PCR procedures and the sensitivity and specificity levels of mtp40 PCR were found to be higher when compared with DNA sequencing method. Thus, mtp40 based PCR technique will be beneficial in diagnosis of TB where M. tuberculosis strains lack of IS6110 element is predominant.

  10. Mannose-Binding Lectin Promoter Polymorphisms and Gene Variants in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients from Cantabria (Northern Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Lavín-Alconero, Lucía; Sánchez-Velasco, Pablo; Guerrero-Alonso, M.-Ángeles; Ausín, Fernando; Fariñas, M.-Carmen; Leyva-Cobián, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin is a central molecule of the innate immune system. Mannose-binding lectin 2 promoter polymorphisms and structural variants have been associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis. However, contradictory results among different populations have been reported, resulting in no convincing evidence of association between mannose-binding lectin 2 and susceptibility to tuberculosis. For this reason, we conducted a study in a well genetically conserved Spanish population in order to shed light on this controversial association. We analysed the six promoter and structural mannose-binding lectin 2 gene variants in 107 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 441 healthy controls. Only D variant and HYPD haplotype were significantly more frequents in controls which would indicate that this allele could confer protection against pulmonary tuberculosis, but this difference disappeared after statistical correction. Neither the rest of alleles nor the haplotypes were significantly associated with the disease. These results would indicate that mannose-binding lectin promoter polymorphisms and gene variants would not be associated with an increased risk to pulmonary tuberculosis. Despite the slight trend of the D allele and HYPD haplotype in conferring protection against pulmonary tuberculosis, susceptibility to this disease would probably be due to other genetic factors, at least in our population. PMID:23304495

  11. Influence of M. tuberculosis lineage variability within a clinical trial for pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nahid, Payam; Bliven, Erin E; Kim, Elizabeth Y; Mac Kenzie, William R; Stout, Jason E; Diem, Lois; Johnson, John L; Gagneux, Sebastien; Hopewell, Philip C; Kato-Maeda, Midori

    2010-05-20

    Recent studies suggest that M. tuberculosis lineage and host genetics interact to impact how active tuberculosis presents clinically. We determined the phylogenetic lineages of M. tuberculosis isolates from participants enrolled in the Tuberculosis Trials Consortium Study 28, conducted in Brazil, Canada, South Africa, Spain, Uganda and the United States, and secondarily explored the relationship between lineage, clinical presentation and response to treatment. Large sequence polymorphisms and single nucleotide polymorphisms were analyzed to determine lineage and sublineage of isolates. Of 306 isolates genotyped, 246 (80.4%) belonged to the Euro-American lineage, with sublineage 724 predominating at African sites (99/192, 51.5%), and the Euro-American strains other than 724 predominating at non-African sites (89/114, 78.1%). Uneven distribution of lineages across regions limited our ability to discern significant associations, nonetheless, in univariate analyses, Euro-American sublineage 724 was associated with more severe disease at baseline, and along with the East Asian lineage was associated with lower bacteriologic conversion after 8 weeks of treatment. Disease presentation and response to drug treatment varied by lineage, but these associations were no longer statistically significant after adjustment for other variables associated with week-8 culture status.

  12. Influence of M. tuberculosis Lineage Variability within a Clinical Trial for Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nahid, Payam; Bliven, Erin E.; Kim, Elizabeth Y.; Mac Kenzie, William R.; Stout, Jason E.; Diem, Lois; Johnson, John L.; Gagneux, Sebastien; Hopewell, Philip C.; Kato-Maeda, Midori

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that M. tuberculosis lineage and host genetics interact to impact how active tuberculosis presents clinically. We determined the phylogenetic lineages of M. tuberculosis isolates from participants enrolled in the Tuberculosis Trials Consortium Study 28, conducted in Brazil, Canada, South Africa, Spain, Uganda and the United States, and secondarily explored the relationship between lineage, clinical presentation and response to treatment. Large sequence polymorphisms and single nucleotide polymorphisms were analyzed to determine lineage and sublineage of isolates. Of 306 isolates genotyped, 246 (80.4%) belonged to the Euro-American lineage, with sublineage 724 predominating at African sites (99/192, 51.5%), and the Euro-American strains other than 724 predominating at non-African sites (89/114, 78.1%). Uneven distribution of lineages across regions limited our ability to discern significant associations, nonetheless, in univariate analyses, Euro-American sublineage 724 was associated with more severe disease at baseline, and along with the East Asian lineage was associated with lower bacteriologic conversion after 8 weeks of treatment. Disease presentation and response to drug treatment varied by lineage, but these associations were no longer statistically significant after adjustment for other variables associated with week-8 culture status. PMID:20505778

  13. Molecular detection of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis among smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Jigjiga town, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Brhane, Mussie; Kebede, Ameha; Petros, Yohannes

    2017-01-01

    Background Molecular methods that target drug resistance mutations are suitable approaches for rapid drug susceptibility testing to detect multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The aim of the study was to determine MDR-TB cases and to analyze the frequency of gene mutations associated with rifampicin (RIF) and/or isoniazid (INH) resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis among smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Methods Institution-based cross-sectional study design was employed. Sputum specimens were collected, and using a pretested questionnaire, data for associated risk factors for drug resistance were collected from 105 consecutive smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Karamara General Hospital. Specimens were transported to Harar Health Research and Regional Laboratory, Harar, where molecular drug susceptibility testing was performed using GenoType® MTBDRplus assay. Results Of the total 105 sputum specimens, 98 (93.3%) gave interpretable results, in which 67 (68.4%) were new cases and 31 (31.6%) were previously treated cases. Of these, 80 (81.6%) were sensitive to both drugs and 18 (18.4%) were resistant to RIF and/or INH. The prevalences of MDR-TB in total cases, new, and previously treated cases were 10 (10.2%), 3 (4.5%), and 7 (22.6%), respectively. Among the ten total RIF-resistant specimens, eight (80%) had resulted because of absence of rpoB WT8 and presence of MUT3 and in all specimens, the amino acids changed were Ser531Lue. Of the 18 total INH-resistant specimens, 15 (83.3%) had mutations in the katG gene (katG MUT1, Ser315Thr1), indicating high-level resistance, while 3 (14.7%) had mutations in the inhA promoter gene (Cys15Thr), indicating low-level resistance. Conclusion Among the mutations associated with resistance to RIF and INH, the majority were in codon 531 of the rpoB gene and codon 315 of the katG gene. Relatively high prevalence of MDR-TB was observed in the study. PMID:28331348

  14. [Pulmonary actinomycosis and tuberculosis. A comorbidity pediatric case].

    PubMed

    Bisero, Elsa D; Luque, Graciela F; Rizzo, Cristina N; Zapata, Alejandra E; Cuello, María S

    2016-08-01

    La actinomicosis es una infección supurativa crónica, producida por bacterias Gram-positivas anaeróbicas o especies Actinomyces microaerófilas. Es rara en niños y adolescentes; es más común en inmunodeprimidos. El Mycobacterium tuberculosis colabora en el desarrollo de la enfermedad. La afectación pulmonar aparece como un cuadro de condensación crónica que no mejora con el tratamiento antibiótico convencional. Las complicaciones clásicas de afectación de la pared torácica con fistulización y supuración en «granulo de azufre» son descritas con menor frecuencia en la actualidad. El diagnóstico es un verdadero desafío y se establece mediante el aislamiento de las especies de Actinomyces. El tratamiento de elección para todas las formas clínicas de la enfermedad es el uso prolongado de antibióticos. Objetivo. Presentar un caso pediátrico de comorbilidad entre tuberculosis y actinomicosis. Resaltar la importancia de la sospecha diagnóstica de actinomicosis frente a todo proceso supurado crónico.

  15. Prognostic value of computed tomography in acute pulmonary thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Plasencia-Martínez, J M; Carmona-Bayonas, A; Calvo-Temprano, D; Jiménez-Fonseca, P

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being the standard reference for the diagnosis of acute pulmonary thromboembolism, CT angiography of the pulmonary arteries can also provide valuable information about the patient's prognosis. Although which imaging findings are useful for prognosis remains controversial, signs of right ventricular dysfunction on CT are now included in clinical algorithms for the management of pulmonary thromboembolism. However, the optimal method for obtaining these measurements while maintaining a balance between the ease of use necessary to include their evaluation in our daily activity and the loss of precision in its predictive capacity remains to be determined. Moreover, other variables associated with pulmonary thromboembolism that often go unobserved can complement the prognostic information we can offer to clinicians. This review aims to clarify some of the more controversial aspects related to the prognostic value of CT in patients with pulmonary embolisms according to the available evidence. Knowing which variables are becoming more important in the prognosis, how to detect them, and why it is important to include them in our reports will help improve the management of patients with pulmonary embolism.

  16. [Frequency of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis in a reference hospital in Córdoba province, 1991-2003].

    PubMed

    Soldá, P A; Rojo, S C; Cosiansi, M C; Barnes, A I

    2005-01-01

    Tuberculosis continues to be a serious problem of public health causing nearly three million deaths per year all over the world. Despite technologic improvements in the diagnostic methods, it is not possible to control the disease in the absence of surveillance and treatment follow-up programs supervising the ending of treatments, and definitive cure of patients. The frequency of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and simultaneous pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis localization among patients assisted at Tránsito Cáceres de Allende Hospital during thirteen years (1991-2003), was determined. The benefit of inoculating the specimens on Stonebrink medium for the best recuperation of Mycobacterium bovis was herein observed, and the contribution of Ziehl Neelsen staining in extrapulmonary materials was tested as well. Out of 790 cases of tuberculosis diagnosed, 723 were pulmonary, and 48 were extrapulmonary localization (pleural 31, renal 7, ganglionar 5, meningeal 2, genital 1, pericardial 1 and digestive 1), and 19 patients presented both, pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Out of the 723 pulmonary cases, 9 were caused by M. bovis. All M. bovis isolates grew on Stonebrink medium, and only one grew also on Lowenstein Jensen. Smear microscopy using Ziehl Neelsen staining resulted positive in 4 extrapulmonary specimens.

  17. Immunomodulation with Recombinant Interferon-γ1b in Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Rod; Condos, Rany; Tse, Doris; Huie, Maryann L.; Ress, Stanley; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Brauns, Clint; Weiden, Michael; Hoshino, Yoshihiko; Bateman, Eric; Rom, William N.

    2009-01-01

    Background Current treatment regimens for pulmonary tuberculosis require at least 6 months of therapy. Immune adjuvant therapy with recombinant interferon-γ1b (rIFN-γb) may reduce pulmonary inflammation and reduce the period of infectivity by promoting earlier sputum clearance. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a randomized, controlled clinical trial of directly observed therapy (DOTS) versus DOTS supplemented with nebulized or subcutaneously administered rIFN-γ1b over 4 months to 89 patients with cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and blood were sampled at 0 and 4 months. There was a significant decline in levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 in 24-hour BAL supernatants only in the nebulized rIFN-γ1b group from baseline to week 16. Both rIFN-γ1b groups showed significant 3-fold increases in CD4+ lymphocyte response to PPD at 4 weeks. There was a significant (p = 0.03) difference in the rate of clearance of Mtb from the sputum smear at 4 weeks for the nebulized rIFN-γ1b adjuvant group compared to DOTS or DOTS with subcutaneous rIFN-γ1b. In addition, there was significant reduction in the prevalence of fever, wheeze, and night sweats at 4 weeks among patients receiving rFN-γ1b versus DOTS alone. Conclusion Recombinant interferon-γ1b adjuvant therapy plus DOTS in cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis can reduce inflammatory cytokines at the site of disease, improve clearance of Mtb from the sputum, and improve constitutional symptoms. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00201123 PMID:19753300

  18. Calcified Pulmonary Nodules Identified in a 350-Year-Old-Joseon Mummy: the First Report on Ancient Pulmonary Tuberculosis from Archaeologically Obtained Pre-modern Korean Samples.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi-Suk; Lee, In Sun; Oh, Chang Seok; Kim, Myeung Ju; Cha, Soon Chul; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    We found calcified pulmonary nodules in a middle-aged female mummy discovered from 350-yr-old Joseon tomb of Korea. In the CT scan, we found six radiopaque nodules in right lung, through the levels of thoracic vertebrae 1 to 6. We also found presumptive pleural adhesions in right thoracic cavity of CT images. We re-confirmed radiological findings by our post-factum dissection on the same mummy. By the differential diagnosis, we speculate that the radiopaque calcification nodules and associated pleural adhesion could have been caused by tuberculosis. This is the first-ever report on the pulmonary tuberculosis identified in archaeologically obtained, pre-modern Korean samples.

  19. Delay for First Consultation and Its Associated Factors among New Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients of Central Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Mahato, Roshan Kumar; Koju, Rajendra; Vaeteewootacharn, Kriangsak

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major public health challenge in Nepal and worldwide. Most transmissions occur between the onset of symptoms and the consultation with formal health care centers. This study aimed to determine the duration of delay for the first consultation and its associated factors with unacceptable delay among the new sputum pulmonary tuberculosis cases in the central development region of Nepal. An analytical cross-sectional study was conducted in the central development region of Nepal between January and May 2015. New pulmonary sputum positive tuberculosis patients were interviewed by using a structured questionnaire and their medical records were reviewed. Among a total of 374 patients, the magnitude of patient delay was 53.21% (95% CI: 48.12–58.28%) with a median delay of 32 days and an interquartile range of 11–70 days. The factors associated with unacceptable patient delay (duration ≥ 30 days) were residence in the rural area (adj. OR = 3.10, 95% CI: 1.10–8.72; p value = 0.032) and DOTS center located more than 5 km away from their residences (adj. OR = 5.53, 95% CI: 2.18–13.99; p value < 0.001). Unemployed patients were more likely to have patient delay (adj. OR = 7.79, 95% CI: 1.64–37.00; p value = 0.010) when controlled for other variables. PMID:27144020

  20. Effect of yogic breathing techniques in new sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mooventhan, A; Khode, Vitthal; Nivethitha, L

    2014-06-01

    A 24-year-old, unmarried woman diagnosed of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) visited our hospital out-patient department in the month of August-2013. Patient came with the complaint of sever cough with expectoration; evening raise of temperature; gradual loss of appetite and weight since 2-weeks. We referred the patient to our hospital's Revised National Tuberculosis Program, direct observed treatment short-course center for sputum fluorescence microscopic examination (FME). FME report suggested the new smear positive, 2+ PTB. Our patient received yogic breathing techniques (YBT) for 45-min daily under the supervision for three alternate-days/week with anti-tuberculosis treatment (ATT) for the period of 8-weeks. After intervention our result showed better improvement in weight gain, body mass index, symptom scores, pulmonary function and health related quality of life with conversion of positive to negative FME for acid fast bacilli. It suggests YBT with ATT are effective in treating PTB and further studies required to warrant this effect.

  1. BTLA exhibits immune memory for αβ T cells in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jin-Cheng; Lin, Dong-Zi; Yi, Lai-Long; Liu, Gan-Bin; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Wan-Dang; Zhang, Jun-Ai; Wu, Xian-Jing; Xiang, Wen-Yu; Kong, Bin; Chen, Zheng W; Wang, Cong-Yi; Xu, Jun-Fa

    2014-01-01

    Despite past extensive studies, the role of B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) in αβ T cells in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (ATB) remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that BTLA expression on αβ T cells is decreased in patients with M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Particularly, BTLA expression levels are likely critical for αβ T cells to manifest and maintain an active central memory phenotype with high capacity for secretion of IFN-γ and perforin, which are important for immune memory against TB infection. BTLAhigh αβ T cells also exhibited higher capacity in response to Mtb peptide stimulation. In contrast to the role of BTLA played for negative regulation of immune responses, our data in the current studies suggest that BTLA expression on αβ T cells is likely associated with protective immune memory against Mtb infection in the setting of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. This previous unappreciated role for BTLA may have implications for prevention and treatment of patients with Mtb infection. PMID:25360214

  2. Type 2 diabetes mellitus coincident with pulmonary or latent tuberculosis results in modulation of adipocytokines.

    PubMed

    Pavan Kumar, Nathella; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, V V; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Sridhar, Rathinam; Babu, Subash

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is recognized as major risk factor for the progress of active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), although the mechanistic link between diabetes and tuberculosis remains poorly characterized. Moreover, the influence of poorly controlled diabetes on the baseline levels of adipocytokines in the context of tuberculosis has not been explored in detail. To characterize the influence of coexistent DM on adipocytokine levels in pulmonary or latent TB (LTB), we examined circulating levels of adipocytokines in the plasma of individuals with PTB-DM or LTB-DM and compared them with those without DM (PTB or LTB). PTB-DM or LTB-DM is characterized by diminished circulating levels of adiponectin and adipsin and/or heightened circulating levels of leptin, visfatin and PAI-1. In addition, adiponectin and adipsin exhibit a significant negative correlation, whereas leptin, visfatin and PAI-1 display a significant positive correlation with HbA1C levels and random blood glucose levels. Therefore, our data reveal that PTB-DM or LTB-DM is characterized by alterations in the systemic levels of adipocytokines, indicating that altered adipose tissue inflammation underlying Type 2 diabetes potentially contributes to pathogenesis of TB disease.

  3. Rifampin-containing chemotherapy for pulmonary tuberculosis associated with coal workers' pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, F.L. Jr.

    1982-06-01

    The outcomes of 20 anthracite miners with coal workers' pneumoconiosis and culture-proved pulmonary tuberculosis treated with rifampin-containing chemotherapeutic regimens were determined by a retrospective review. Their mean age was 65 yr, and the duration of underground dust exposure averaged 27 yr. Nine miners had simple pneumoconiosis, 11 had progressive massive fibrosis, and 13 had cavitary disease; 3 also had extrapulmonary disease. All patients were given rifampin (mean, 12 months in survivors) plus one or more other effective agents; the mean duration of treatment with 2 or more drugs was 17 months. Follow-up averaged 46 months in those surviving more than 1 yr. Sputum cultures became negative and remained so within 3 months in 17 patients and within 5 months in the remainder. Eighteen patients survived more than 1 yr after completing chemotherapy. No clinical, radiologic, or bacteriologic relapses were observed during follow-up, but 5 patients died of nontuberculous causes. These results are superior to those reported previously in patients with coal workers' pneumoconiosis treated for pulmonary tuberculosis with regimens not containing rifampin. They suggest that treatment of tuberculosis in coal workers, even in the presence of progressive massive fibrosis and cavitary disease, can yield results as favorable as in nonpneumoconiotic patients provided the initial treatment regimen includes rifampin plus one or more other effective agents.

  4. Prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis in Karachi juvenile jail, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shah, S A; Mujeeb, S A; Mirza, A; Nabi, K G; Siddiqui, Q

    2003-07-01

    Jail inmates may be at increased risk of contracting tuberculosis (TB). We studied 386 detainees (mean age 17.7 years) in Karachi juvenile jail to determine the prevalence of TB and possible risk factors for contracting TB. We found a 3.9% prevalence of TB among the inmates, significantly higher than the estimated 1.1% prevalence in the general population of Pakistan. Positive family history of TB was a significant risk factor for TB. Poor adherence of previously diagnosed patients to anti-TB treatment was found. Our study highlights the vulnerability of inmates to TB owing to the presence of highly infectious cases, along with environmental conditions such as overcrowding and poor ventilation. This study strongly indicates the need for an effective treatment programme in the jails as well in the general community.

  5. Update on the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Caminero Luna, J A

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the most important human infectious disease. Currently, the TB diagnosis is still based on the clinical presentation, radiographic findings and microbiological results; all of which have sensitivity or specificity issues. For that reason, the immediate future involves rapid molecular microbiological techniques, in particular GeneXpert (which is more sensitive than bacilloscopy and is able to detect rifampicin resistance) and GenoType. The current six-month treatment for TB has remained unchanged for decades. Attempts to shorten this treatment have failed. In recent years, new drugs have been reported that could contribute to TB treatment in the near future, and are already being used in multi-drug-resistance TB.

  6. Application of the Multistate Tuberculosis Pharmacometric Model in Patients With Rifampicin‐Treated Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Simonsson, USH

    2016-01-01

    This is the first clinical implementation of the Multistate Tuberculosis Pharmacometric (MTP) model describing fast‐, slow‐, and nonmultiplying bacterial states of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Colony forming unit data from 19 patients treated with rifampicin were analyzed. A previously developed rifampicin population pharmacokinetic (PK) model was linked to the MTP model previously developed using in vitro data. Drug effect was implemented as exposure‐response relationships tested at several effect sites, both alone and in combination. All MTP model parameters were fixed to in vitro estimates except Bmax. Drug effect was described by an on/off effect inhibiting growth of fast‐multiplying bacteria in addition to linear increase of the stimulation of the death rate of slow‐ and nonmultiplying bacteria with increasing drug exposure. Clinical trial simulations predicted well three retrospective clinical trials using the final model that confirmed the potential utility of the MTP model in antitubercular drug development. PMID:27299939

  7. Disseminated Penicillium marneffei mimicking paradoxical response and relapse in a non-HIV patient with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping-Huai; Wang, Hao-Chien; Liao, Chun-Hsing

    2015-04-01

    Clinical deterioration during the treatment of tuberculosis remains a diagnostic challenge. We describe the case of a 46-year-old man with a history of oral cancer status after a radical operation who had pulmonary tuberculosis with pleura and neck lymph node involvement. The clinical condition improved after antituberculosis therapy. However, the patient suffered from low-grade fever, progressive dyspnea, and cough after 7 weeks of the therapy. The findings of chest plain films were relapse and progression of left lung haziness. The deterioration was caused by disseminated Penicillium marneffei infection. Disseminated P. marneffei in a non-HIV patient with tuberculosis is rarely seen, and the manifestations are similar to a paradoxical response and relapse of pulmonary tuberculosis, thereby making it difficult to establish a diagnosis.

  8. Inducible nitric oxide synthase in pulmonary alveolar macrophages from patients with tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The high-output pathway of nitric oxide production helps protect mice from infection by several pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, based on studies of cells cultured from blood, it is controversial whether human mononuclear phagocytes can express the corresponding inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS;NOS2). The present study examined alveolar macrophages fixed directly after bronchopulmonary lavage. An average of 65% of the macrophages from 11 of 11 patients with untreated, culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis reacted with an antibody documented herein to be monospecific for human NOS2. In contrast, a mean of 10% of bronchoalveolar lavage cells were positive from each of five clinically normal subjects. Tuberculosis patients' macrophages displayed diaphorase activity in the same proportion that they stained for NOS2, under assay conditions wherein the diaphorase reaction was strictly dependent on NOS2 expression. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens also contained NOS2 mRNA. Thus, macrophages in the lungs of people with clinically active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection often express catalytically competent NOS2. PMID:8642338

  9. Respiratory tract clinical sample selection for microbiota analysis in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Changes in respiratory tract microbiota have been associated with diseases such as tuberculosis, a global public health problem that affects millions of people each year. This pilot study was carried out using sputum, oropharynx, and nasal respiratory tract samples collected from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and healthy control individuals, in order to compare sample types and their usefulness in assessing changes in bacterial and fungal communities. Findings Most V1-V2 16S rRNA gene sequences belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Fusobacteria, with differences in relative abundances and in specific taxa associated with each sample type. Most fungal ITS1 sequences were classified as Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, but abundances differed for the different samples. Bacterial and fungal community structures in oropharynx and sputum samples were similar to one another, as indicated by several beta diversity analyses, and both differed from nasal samples. The only difference between patient and control microbiota was found in oropharynx samples for both bacteria and fungi. Bacterial diversity was greater in sputum samples, while fungal diversity was greater in nasal samples. Conclusions Respiratory tract microbial communities were similar in terms of the major phyla identified, yet they varied in terms of relative abundances and diversity indexes. Oropharynx communities varied with respect to health status and resembled those in sputum samples, which are collected from tuberculosis patients only due to the difficulty in obtaining sputum from healthy individuals, suggesting that oropharynx samples can be used to analyze community structure alterations associated with tuberculosis. PMID:25225609

  10. Validation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1681 Protein as a Diagnostic Marker of Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Macovei, Lilia; Kanunfre, Kelly; Dhiman, Rakesh; Restrepo, Blanca I.; Zarate, Izelda; Pino, Paula A.; Mora-Guzman, Francisco; Fujiwara, Ricardo T.; Michel, Gerd; Kashino, Suely S.

    2013-01-01

    The development of an accurate antigen detection assay for the diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) would represent a major clinical advance. Here, we demonstrate that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1681 protein is a biomarker for active TB with potential diagnostic utility. We initially identified, by mass spectroscopy, peptides from the Rv1681 protein in urine specimens from 4 patients with untreated active TB. Rabbit IgG anti-recombinant Rv1681 detected Rv1681 protein in lysates and culture filtrates of M. tuberculosis and immunoprecipitated it from pooled urine specimens from two TB patients. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay formatted with these antibodies detected Rv1681 protein in unconcentrated urine specimens from 11/25 (44%) TB patients and 1/21 (4.8%) subjects in whom TB was initially clinically suspected but then ruled out by conventional methods. Rv1681 protein was not detected in urine specimens from 10 subjects with Escherichia coli-positive urine cultures, 26 subjects with confirmed non-TB tropical diseases (11 with schistosomiasis, 5 with Chagas' disease, and 10 with cutaneous leishmaniasis), and 14 healthy subjects. These results provide strong validation of Rv1681 protein as a promising biomarker for TB diagnosis. PMID:23390284

  11. Drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis in the Baja California-San Diego County border population.

    PubMed Central

    Peter, C R; Schultz, E; Moser, K; Cox, M; Freeman, R; Ramirez-Zetina, M; Lomeli, M R

    1998-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the frequency of, and risk factors for, drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) among Baja California (BC) and San Diego County (SDC) residents. Another purpose was to document the amount of contact between pulmonary TB patients and residents of the opposite side of the the border. During the period from February 1995 to May 1996, pulmonary TB patients from BC (n = 427) and SDC (n = 331) were evaluated with cultures, drug susceptibility tests, and questionnaires. Drug resistance was found in 41% of the BC Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB) isolates and 20% of the SDC isolates. Resistance to both isoniazid (INH) and rifampin (RIF) varied from 1% of isolates from SDC patients to 17% of isolates from BC patients. Patients with a history of previous treatment had increased odds of drug-resistant disease. Older BC patients were more likely to have INH- or RIF-resistant TB. Although 42% of Tijuana TB patients reported recent contact with residents from SDC, travel to Mexico and contact with residents from Mexico were not significant risk factors for drug-resistant TB among SDC residents. However, the demonstrated contact between TB patients and residents on opposite sides of the border indicates the importance of coordinating efforts internationally to control TB. PMID:9795580

  12. Acute pulmonary edema secondary to hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    PubMed Central

    Obiagwu, Chukwudi; Paul, Vishesh; Chadha, Sameer; Hollander, Gerald; Shani, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of diabetic ulcers, air embolism, carbon monoxide poisoning and gas gangrene with minimal adverse effects. Very few cases of HBOT causing acute pulmonary edema (PE) has been described; with a study on dogs suggesting that a complication of this therapy could be PE. We describe the case of an 80-year-old man with a history of stable systolic heart failure and diabetes mellitus presenting with acute PE following treatment with HBOT for diabetic foot. PMID:25988073

  13. Massive Pulmonary Embolism at the Onset of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sorà, Federica; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Laurenti, Luca; Autore, Francesco; Giammarco, Sabrina; Sica, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Life-threatening bleeding is a major and early complication of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), but in the last years there is a growing evidence of thromboses in APL. We report the first case of a young woman with dyspnea as the first symptom of APL due to massive pulmonary embolism (PE) successfully treated with thrombolysis for PE and heparin. APL has been processed with a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) obtaining complete remission.

  14. Massive Pulmonary Embolism at the Onset of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sorà, Federica; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Laurenti, Luca; Autore, Francesco; Giammarco, Sabrina; Sica, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Life-threatening bleeding is a major and early complication of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), but in the last years there is a growing evidence of thromboses in APL. We report the first case of a young woman with dyspnea as the first symptom of APL due to massive pulmonary embolism (PE) successfully treated with thrombolysis for PE and heparin. APL has been processed with a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) obtaining complete remission. PMID:27413520

  15. Pulmonary tuberculosis in overseas students of higher education is increasing in Edinburgh.

    PubMed

    Faccenda, J; Watt, B; Leitch, A G

    1994-10-01

    In Edinburgh in 1991 a relative excess of pulmonary TB cases in the 15-34 year age group was recorded. Five of 17 notifications in this age group were of overseas students of higher education: three aged 21-29 from Central Africa, one 27-year-old Asian and one 26-year-old Western European. One of the African students was seropositive for HIV infection. Disease presented clinically on average 31 months after entry to the U.K. (range 6-48 months). Four students had smear positive disease. Two patients had had normal chest radiographs 1 and 2 years previously on entry to the U.K.; three students had not previously been radiologically screened. We suggest that students from countries with a high prevalence of tuberculosis should be screened on entry to their course of education and that student health services should develop and maintain a high index of suspicion for tuberculosis in these students.

  16. Pulmonary tuberculosis presenting as post-operative fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Bogue, Patrick; Bolland, Mhairi; How, Peter; Benziger, Harrison

    2017-01-06

    Post-operative fever is common following emergency surgery. Investigation and management of post-operative fever can be challenging when a clear source of sepsis is not evident or the underlying source of infection is not recognised. We herein report a case of secondary pulmonary tuberculosis presenting as post-operative fever following emergency laparotomy for a perforated duodenal ulcer. This case of tuberculosis was diagnosed on day 41 post-operatively and prior inconclusive results meant that we relied mainly on re-visiting history and examination in order to identify 3 targeted investigations: plain chest X-ray, sputum sample and blood test. Accordingly, the co-management of this complex patient achieved a good outcome.

  17. Did successfully treated pulmonary tuberculosis patients undergo all follow-up sputum smear examinations?

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, S; Nagaraja, S B; Kelamane, S; Jaju, J; Chadha, S S; Chander, K; Vishnu, H; Wilson, N C; Harries, A D

    2011-12-21

    To assess response to anti-tuberculosis treatment as per national guidelines, a retrospective record review was undertaken in four districts of Andhra Pradesh, India, in December 2009 to determine whether pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients reported as successfully treated (cured or treatment completed) underwent all scheduled follow-up sputum smear examinations. In a quarterly cohort of 3000 PTB patients reported as successfully treated, 1847 (61.5%) underwent all follow-up sputum examinations, with a higher proportion of new cases (65%) than retreatment cases (45%). The mid-continuation phase follow-up sputum examinations were commonly missed, and 11% patients had not undergone end-of-treatment follow-up sputum examinations.

  18. Pulmonary responses to pathogen-specific antigens in latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Jarvela, Jessica R; Tuscano, Lori; Lee, Hung; Silver, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used ELISPOT to quantify frequencies of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and peripheral blood T cells capable of producing IFNγ in response to PPD, antigen 85B, and Mtb-specific antigens CFP-10 and ESAT-6 in individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and Mtb-naïve controls. Compared to peripheral blood, BAL cells of LTBI subjects displayed significant enrichment for T cells responding to PPD, antigen 85B, and CFP-10, but not to ESAT-6. Baseline BAL cells of LTBI subjects displayed significant production of Mig (CXCL9) in response to PPD, antigen 85B, and CFP-10 as well. These findings suggest that enrichment for Mtb-specific T cells within BAL is not unique to active pulmonary tuberculosis and may, to the contrary, contribute to protection from re-infection in Mtb immune individuals.

  19. [Age- and sex-specific features of new-onset pulmonary tuberculosis in the Krasnoyarsk Territory].

    PubMed

    Koretskaia, N M

    2007-01-01

    A total of 1150 cases of new-onset pulmonary tuberculosis were analyzed. A higher liability to the disease was shown in young females and males of ripe age. There was evidence for that the severer pattern of clinical forms and the nature of the process were directly proportional to the age of patients. Age-specific differences were found in the ways of detecting the disease and in the regularity of control fluorographic studies. The inclusion of persons aged 60 years or older into an increased risk group was justified. A severer pattern of clinical forms and characteristics of the process were established in males, which are largely caused by that the latter had irregularly underwent control fluorographic studies. Age- and gender-specific features of tuberculosis, which are typical of this region, have been identified.

  20. High-Dose Rifapentine with Moxifloxacin for Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jindani, Amina; Harrison, Thomas S.; Nunn, Andrew J.; Phillips, Patrick P.J.; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Charalambous, Salome; Hatherill, Mark; Geldenhuys, Hennie; McIlleron, Helen M.; Zvada, Simbarashe P.; Mungofa, Stanley; Shah, Nasir A.; Zizhou, Simukai; Magweta, Lloyd; Shepherd, James; Nyirenda, Sambayawo; van Dijk, Janneke H.; Clouting, Heather E.; Coleman, David; Bateson, Anna L.E.; McHugh, Timothy D.; Butcher, Philip D.; Mitchison, Denny A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Tuberculosis regimens that are shorter and simpler than the current 6-month daily regimen are needed. METHODS We randomly assigned patients with newly diagnosed, smear-positive, drug-sensitive tuberculosis to one of three regimens: a control regimen that included 2 months of ethambutol, isoniazid, rifampicin, and pyrazinamide administered daily followed by 4 months of daily isoniazid and rifampicin; a 4-month regimen in which the isoniazid in the control regimen was replaced by moxifloxacin administered daily for 2 months followed by moxifloxacin and 900 mg of rifapentine administered twice weekly for 2 months; or a 6-month regimen in which isoniazid was replaced by daily moxifloxacin for 2 months followed by one weekly dose of both moxifloxacin and 1200 mg of rifapentine for 4 months. Sputum specimens were examined on microscopy and after culture at regular intervals. The primary end point was a composite treatment failure and relapse, with noninferiority based on a margin of 6 percentage points and 90% confidence intervals. RESULTS We enrolled a total of 827 patients from South Africa, Zimbabwe, Botswana, and Zambia; 28% of patients were coinfected with the human immunodefiency virus. In the per-protocol analysis, the proportion of patients with an unfavorable response was 4.9% in the control group, 3.2% in the 6-month group (adjusted difference from control, −1.8 percentage points; 90% confidence interval [CI], −6.1 to 2.4), and 18.2% in the 4-month group (adjusted difference from control, 13.6 percentage points; 90% CI, 8.1 to 19.1). In the modified intention-to-treat analysis these proportions were 14.4% in the control group, 13.7% in the 6-month group (adjusted difference from control, 0.4 percentage points; 90% CI, −4.7 to 5.6), and 26.9% in the 4-month group (adjusted difference from control, 13.1 percentage points; 90% CI, 6.8 to 19.4). CONCLUSIONS The 6-month regimen that included weekly administration of high-dose rifapentine and

  1. Nearest patch matching for color image segmentation supporting neural network classification in pulmonary tuberculosis identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulaningtyas, Riries; Suksmono, Andriyan B.; Mengko, Tati L. R.; Saptawati, Putri

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis is a deadly infectious disease which occurs in many countries in Asia and Africa. In Indonesia, many people with tuberculosis disease are examined in the community health center. Examination of pulmonary tuberculosis is done through sputum smear with Ziehl - Neelsen staining using conventional light microscope. The results of Ziehl - Neelsen staining will give effect to the appearance of tuberculosis (TB) bacteria in red color and sputum background in blue color. The first examination is to detect the presence of TB bacteria from its color, then from the morphology of the TB bacteria itself. The results of Ziehl - Neelsen staining in sputum smear give the complex color images, so that the clinicians have difficulty when doing slide examination manually because it is time consuming and needs highly training to detect the presence of TB bacteria accurately. The clinicians have heavy workload to examine many sputum smear slides from the patients. To assist the clinicians when reading the sputum smear slide, this research built computer aided diagnose with color image segmentation, feature extraction, and classification method. This research used K-means clustering with patch technique to segment digital sputum smear images which separated the TB bacteria images from the background images. This segmentation method gave the good accuracy 97.68%. Then, feature extraction based on geometrical shape of TB bacteria was applied to this research. The last step, this research used neural network with back propagation method to classify TB bacteria and non TB bacteria images in sputum slides. The classification result of neural network back propagation are learning time (42.69±0.02) second, the number of epoch 5000, error rate of learning 15%, learning accuracy (98.58±0.01)%, and test accuracy (96.54±0.02)%.

  2. [Pulmonary tuberculosis in infants in Brazzaville, Congo. A review of 117 cases].

    PubMed

    Mabiala-Babela, J R; M'Pemba Loufoua, A B; Mouko, A; Senga, P

    2008-04-01

    Little information is available on pulmonary tuberculosis in infants in sub-Saharan Africa. This retrospective study was conducted in infants ranging in age from 1 to 23 months admitted to the Paediatric Departments of the University Hospital Centre in Brazzaville, Congo for pulmonary tuberculosis between January 1, 1999 and July 1, 2004. Tuberculosis was diagnosed on the basis of epidemiological, clinical, radiological, and follow-up data. All children over 12 months old underwent HIV testing. In case of positive test results, children between the ages of 12 and 18 months were retested after the age of 18 months. Of a total of 803 children admitted for tuberculosis during the study period, 117 (14.6%) were under the age of 24 months (53% males). Mean age was 17.5 months. The BCG test was mentioned in 75.2% of cases. Determination of the contagion in 50.4% of cases indicated that transmission was intrafamilial in 69.3% of cases. The mean delay for hospitalization was 2.6 months (range, 21 days to 16 months). Eighty-one patients (69.2%) presented severe malnutrition. Intrathoracic forms accounted for most cases with bronchopneumopathy (72.6%) and mediastinal adenopathy (40.2%). The incidence of bronchopneumonopathy and isolated forms was significantly higher in children over one year old than in children under one year old: 78.3% versus 21.7 % (p<0.01) and 62.8% versus 37.2% (p<0.001) respectively. A total of 35 children (43.8%) over the age of 12 months presented HIV infection. In comparison with HIV-negative children, HIV-positive children were more likely to present malnutrition and presented a statistically higher incidence of mediastinal adenopathy and multifocal forms. All associated extrathoracic lesions (21.4% of cases) occurred in HIV-positive children. Outcome was favourable in all HIV-negative children while 7 HIV-positive children (20%) died during treatment. Pulmonary tuberculosis in infants in Brazzaville is characterized by frequent association with

  3. Surgery and pleuro-pulmonary tuberculosis: a scientific literature review

    PubMed Central

    Subotic, Dragan; Yablonskiy, Piotr; Sulis, Giorgia; Cordos, Ioan; Petrov, Danail; Centis, Rosella; D’Ambrosio, Lia; Sotgiu, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major public health concern, mostly affecting resource-constrained settings and marginalized populations. The fight against the disease is hindered by the growing emergence of drug-resistant forms whose management can be rather challenging. Surgery may play an important role to support diagnosis and treatment of the most complex cases and improve their therapeutic outcome. We conducted a non-systematic review of the literature based on relevant keywords through PubMed database. Papers in English and Russian were included. The search was focused on five main areas of intervention as follows: (I) diagnosis of complicated cases; (II) elimination of contagious persisting cavities, despite appropriate chemotherapy; (III) treatment of destroyed lung; (V) resection of tuberculomas; (VI) treatment of tuberculous pleural empyema. Although specific practical guidelines concerning surgical indications and approaches are currently unavailable, a summary of the evidence emerged from the scientific literature was elaborated to help the clinician in the management of severely compromised TB patients. The decision to proceed to surgery is usually individualized and a careful assessment of the patient’s risk profile is always recommended before performing any procedure in addition to appropriate chemotherapy. PMID:27499980

  4. Control measures to trace ≤ 15-year-old contacts of index cases of active pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Cláudia Di Lorenzo; de Melo, Angelita Cristine; de Oliveira, Lílian Ruth Silva; Froede, Emerson Lopes; Camargos, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This was descriptive study carried out in a medium-sized Brazilian city. In ≤ 15-year-old contacts of index cases of active pulmonary tuberculosis, we assessed compliance with the Brazilian national guidelines for tuberculosis control. We interviewed 43 contacts and their legal guardians. Approximately 80% of the contacts were not assessed by the municipal public health care system, and only 21% underwent tuberculin skin testing. The results obtained with the Chi-square Automatic Interaction Detector method suggest that health care teams have a biased attitude toward assessing such contacts and underscore the need for training health professionals regarding tuberculosis control programs. PMID:26578137

  5. Mapping the epidemiology and trends of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Bright; Al-Hajoj, Sahal

    2015-12-01

    An extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) infection rate of 30% in Saudi Arabia remains above the global rate. A variable rate of infection in each province has been reported and the involvement of most organs has been cited. Nationwide collective data on the current trends of infection are scarce and the factors behind the increased rate of EPTB are perplexing. This review endeavors to shed light into the epidemiology of EPTB, various types of infections sites, geographical differences in the infection rate, known risk factors, and challenges in the diagnosis and management of EPTB in Saudi Arabia.

  6. [PECULIARITES OF SIMULTANT INTERVENTIONS FOR SOME TYPES OF CHRONIC PHTHISIC PLEURITIS, COEXISTENT WITH PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS].

    PubMed

    Duzhiy, I D; Grehsko, I Ya; Kravets, O V; Oleshchenko, G P; Glazunova, N I

    2016-01-01

    In coincidence of chronic phthisic pleuritis in a rigid stage with pulmonary tuberculosis operative intervention is indicated of a pleuropulmonectomy type, what is a complex situation for performance and preservation of the patient's functional state. Pleuropulmonectomy in some patients is complicated by empyema and pathological processes in bronchi. Possibilities of operative interventions application, alternative to pleuropulmonectomy, were studied. Of 48 patients, to whom pleuropulmonectomy is indicated in accordance to data of clinic-roentgenological investigations, in 7--simultant operative treatment were conducted with positive results.

  7. Serodiagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in Argentina by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of IgG antibody to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 5 and tuberculin purified protein derivative

    PubMed Central

    Balestrino, E. A.; Daniel, T. M.; de Latini, M. D. S.; Latini, O. A.; Ma, Y.; Scocozza, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    IgG antibody to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 5 and tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) was measured, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), in serum samples from 86 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis and 91 non-tuberculous control subjects from Santa Fé, Argentina. The geometric mean titre for the tuberculosis patients was 74.6 with antigen 5 and 99.5 with PPD. In 91 control subjects the geometric mean titres were 3.6 and 15.6 respectively. Titres were not related to tuberculin reactor status or prior BCG vaccination. At a serum dilution end-point of 1:40, ELISA with antigen 5 had a sensitivity of 81.4% and a specificity of 93.4% for tuberculosis. At 1:40, ELISA with PPD showed a sensitivity of 82.6% and a specificity of 54.9% for tuberculosis. Applied at a serum dilution of 1:40 to a hypothetical model population with a tuberculosis prevalence of 2%, ELISA using antigen 5 would correctly classify 93.2% of persons and ELISA with PPD, 55.5%. At a dilution of 1:80, accuracy is increased to 99.3% with antigen 5 and 83.3% with PPD, but sensitivity decreases to 64.0% with antigen 5 and 72.1% with PPD. Thus, antigen 5 is more accurate than PPD for the diagnosis of tuberculosis using ELISA. PMID:6439426

  8. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Rialp Cervera, G; del Castillo Blanco, A; Pérez Aizcorreta, O; Parra Morais, L

    2014-03-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) with conventional therapy improves the outcome of patients with acute respiratory failure due to hypercapnic decompensation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE). This review summarizes the main effects of NIV in these pathologies. In COPD, NIV improves gas exchange and symptoms, reducing the need for endotracheal intubation, hospital mortality and hospital stay compared with conventional oxygen therapy. NIV may also avoid reintubation and may decrease the length of invasive mechanical ventilation. In ACPE, NIV accelerates the remission of symptoms and the normalization of blood gas parameters, reduces the need for endotracheal intubation, and is associated with a trend towards lesser mortality, without increasing the incidence of myocardial infarction. The ventilation modality used in ACPE does not affect the patient prognosis.

  9. Pulmonary tuberculosis - An emerging risk factor for venous thromboembolism: A case series and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amitesh; Mrigpuri, Parul; Faye, Abhishek; Bandyopadhyay, Debdutta; Singla, Rupak

    2017-01-01

    One-third of patients with symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) manifest pulmonary embolism, whereas two-thirds manifest deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Overall, 25%–50% of patients with first-time VTE have an idiopathic condition, without a readily identifiable risk factor, and its association with tuberculosis (TB) is a rare occurrence. Deep venous thrombosis has been associated with 1.5%–3.4% cases of TB. Early initiation of anti-TB treatment along with anticoagulant therapy decreases the overall morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. We report three cases of DVT associated with pulmonary TB who were diagnosed due to high index of suspicion as the risk factors for the development of DVT were present in these cases. PMID:28144063

  10. [Bronchopleurocutaneous Fistula: A Rare Complication of Pulmonary Tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Montez, Ana Sofia José; Coutinho, Daniel; Velez, Jorge; Freitas, Filomena; Oliveira, Célia

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: A tuberculose pulmonar pode cursar com diversas complicações. As fístulas bronco-pleuro-cutâneas consistem em comunicações anormais entre o brônquio, o espaço pleural e a pele.Caso Clínico: Apresentamos o caso de um homem, 47 anos, esquizofrénico, enviado ao Serviço de Urgência por toracalgia esquerda, tosse produtiva e emagrecimento. Apresentava-se caquético, sendo evidente um orifício cutâneo torácico latero-anterior esquerdo com drenagem purulenta, na qual o exame direto revelou bacilos ácido-álcool resistentes. A radiografia torácica evidenciava infiltrado heterogéneo bilateral. Foi internado com o diagnóstico de tuberculose pulmonar fistulizada. Na expetoração, a pesquisa de bacilos ácido-álcool resistentes foi igualmente positiva, sendo evidenciado Mycobacterium tuberculosis por reação de polimerase em cadeia e exame cultural. Iniciou terapêutica antituberculosa quádrupla apresentando evolução clínica favorável.Conclusões: A formação de fístulas bronco-pleuro-cutâneas é atualmente e em países desenvolvidos, uma complicação rara de tuberculose pulmonar. Assim, apesar da tuberculose ser frequente em Portugal, a raridade deste tipo de complicações torna pertinente a apresentação deste caso clínico.

  11. Ayurvedic management of pulmonary tuberculosis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Janmejaya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is a global public health crisis. 25% of world’s TB cases are found in India. Ayurveda, an ancient medical science may offer some solution to this problem. Hence, a systematic review was carried out to assess the role of Ayurveda for the management of TB. Methodology: A systematic review was carried out using published literature obtained through “PubMed” until April 2015. The key words used for literature search include “Ayurveda, role and TB.” Results and Discussion: It was observed that a couple of single and compound drugs have been used for the management of TB. However, none of the studies could reflect the true anti-TB activities of any drug, both single and compound. Two of the studies revealed in vitro anti-TB properties of some herbs which can potentially be brought into the realm of a clinical trial to test their efficacy in a human subject. Most of these Ayurvedic therapeutic preparations studied in different clinical settings primarily reflected their adjunct properties for the management of TB. These studies revealed that Ayurvedic therapeutics was able to reduce associated symptoms and the adverse drug effects of ATDs (anti-TB drugs). Furthermore, some of the preparations showed potential hepato-protective properties that can be simultaneously administered with ATDs. Conclusion: Distressingly research on the role of Ayurveda in the management of TB is very scanty and mostly limited to adjunct or supportive therapy. Being a global public health crisis, it is highly recommended to carry out clinical trials on TB patients using Ayurvedic drugs and therapeutic regimens. PMID:27069721

  12. Pulmonary but Not Subcutaneous Delivery of BCG Vaccine Confers Protection to Tuberculosis-Susceptible Mice by an Interleukin 17-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Aguilo, Nacho; Alvarez-Arguedas, Samuel; Uranga, Santiago; Marinova, Dessislava; Monzón, Marta; Badiola, Juan; Martin, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Some of the most promising novel tuberculosis vaccine strategies currently under development are based on respiratory vaccination, mimicking the natural route of infection. In this work, we have compared pulmonary and subcutaneous delivery of BCG vaccine in the tuberculosis-susceptible DBA/2 mouse strain, a model in which parenterally administered BCG vaccine does not protect against tuberculosis. Our data show that intranasally but not subcutaneously administered BCG confers robust protection against pulmonary tuberculosis challenge. In addition, our results indicate that pulmonary vaccination triggers a Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific mucosal immune response orchestrated by interleukin 17A (IL-17A). Thus, IL-17A neutralization in vivo reduces protection and abrogates M. tuberculosis-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) secretion to respiratory airways and lung expression of polymeric immunoglobulin receptor induced following intranasal vaccination. Together, our results demonstrate that pulmonary delivery of BCG can overcome the lack of protection observed when BCG is given parenterally, suggesting that respiratory tuberculosis vaccines could have an advantage in tuberculosis-endemic countries, where intradermally administered BCG has inefficient effectiveness against pulmonary tuberculosis.

  13. Neutrophil-Derived MMP-8 Drives AMPK-Dependent Matrix Destruction in Human Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ong, Catherine W M; Elkington, Paul T; Brilha, Sara; Ugarte-Gil, Cesar; Tome-Esteban, Maite T; Tezera, Liku B; Pabisiak, Przemyslaw J; Moores, Rachel C; Sathyamoorthy, Tarangini; Patel, Vimal; Gilman, Robert H; Porter, Joanna C; Friedland, Jon S

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary cavities, the hallmark of tuberculosis (TB), are characterized by high mycobacterial load and perpetuate the spread of M. tuberculosis. The mechanism of matrix destruction resulting in cavitation is not well defined. Neutrophils are emerging as key mediators of TB immunopathology and their influx are associated with poor outcomes. We investigated neutrophil-dependent mechanisms involved in TB-associated matrix destruction using a cellular model, a cohort of 108 patients, and in separate patient lung biopsies. Neutrophil-derived NF-kB-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) secretion was up-regulated in TB and caused matrix destruction both in vitro and in respiratory samples of TB patients. Collagen destruction induced by TB infection was abolished by doxycycline, a licensed MMP inhibitor. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) contain MMP-8 and are increased in samples from TB patients. Neutrophils lined the circumference of human pulmonary TB cavities and sputum MMP-8 concentrations reflected TB radiological and clinical disease severity. AMPK, a central regulator of catabolism, drove neutrophil MMP-8 secretion and neutrophils from AMPK-deficient patients secrete lower MMP-8 concentrations. AMPK-expressing neutrophils are present in human TB lung biopsies with phospho-AMPK detected in nuclei. These data demonstrate that neutrophil-derived MMP-8 has a key role in the immunopathology of TB and is a potential target for host-directed therapy in this infectious disease.

  14. Use of conventional PCR and smear microscopy to diagnose pulmonary tuberculosis in the Amazonian rainforest area.

    PubMed

    Carniel, F; Dalla Costa, E R; Lima-Bello, G; Martins, C; Scherer, L C; Rossetti, M L

    2014-12-01

    The diagnostic usefulness of Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN)-stained sputum smears combined with conventional polymerase chain reaction (ZN/PCR) to amplify IS6110 region DNA extracted from ZN slides was evaluated. The objective was to verify if this association could improve tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in patients at remote sites. The study was carried out in 89 patients with culture-confirmed pulmonary TB as defined by the Brazilian Manual for TB Treatment. The participants were recruited in a reference unit for TB treatment in Rondônia, a state in the Amazonian area in northern Brazil. ZN, PCR, and culture performed in the sputum samples from these patients were analyzed in different combinations (i.e., ZN plus PCR and ZN plus culture). The prevalence rates of pulmonary TB in these patients were 32.6 and 28.1% considering culture and ZN/PCR, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of ZN/PCR were 86 and 93%, respectively. ZN/PCR was able to detect more TB cases than ZN alone. This method could offer a new approach for accurate tuberculosis diagnosis, especially in remote regions of the world where culture is not available.

  15. Validation of a Clinical-Radiographic Score to Assess the Probability of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Suspect Patients with Negative Sputum Smears

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Alonso; Solari, Lely; Díaz, Javier; Mantilla, Alberto; Matthys, Francine; van der Stuyft, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical suspects of pulmonary tuberculosis in which the sputum smears are negative for acid fast bacilli represent a diagnostic challenge in resource constrained settings. Our objective was to validate an existing clinical-radiographic score that assessed the probability of smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis (SNPT) in high incidence settings in Peru. Methodology/Principal Findings We included in two referral hospitals in Lima patients with clinical suspicion of pulmonary tuberculosis and two or more negative sputum smears. Using a published but not externally validated score, patients were classified as having low, intermediate or high probability of pulmonary tuberculosis. The reference standard for the diagnosis of tuberculosis was a positive sputum culture in at least one of 2 liquid (MGIT or Middlebrook 7H9) and 1 solid (Ogawa) media. Prevalence of tuberculosis was calculated in each of the three probability groups. 684 patients were included. 184 (27.8%) had a diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. The score did not perform well in patients with a previous history of pulmonary tuberculosis. In patients without, the prevalence of tuberculosis was 5.1%, 31.7% and 72% in the low, intermediate and high probability group respectively. The area under de ROC curve was 0.76 (95% CI 0.72–0.80) and scores ≥6 had a positive LR of 10.9. Conclusions/Significance In smear negative suspects without previous history of tuberculosis, the clinical-radiographic score can be used as a tool to assess the probability of pulmonary tuberculosis and to guide the decision to initiate or defer treatment or to requesting additional tests. PMID:21483690

  16. Immunological Roles of Elevated Plasma Levels of Matricellular Proteins in Japanese Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shiratori, Beata; Zhao, Jingge; Okumura, Masao; Chagan-Yasutan, Haorile; Yanai, Hideki; Mizuno, Kazue; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Idei, Tadashi; Ashino, Yugo; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Hattori, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Elevated matricellular proteins (MCPs), including osteopontin (OPN) and galectin-9 (Gal-9), were observed in the plasma of patients with Manila-type tuberculosis (TB) previously. Here, we quantified plasma OPN, Gal-9, and soluble CD44 (sCD44) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and another 29 cytokines by Luminex assay in 36 patients with pulmonary TB, six subjects with latent tuberculosis (LTBI), and 19 healthy controls (HCs) from Japan for a better understanding of the roles of MCPs in TB. All TB subjects showed positive results of enzyme-linked immunospot assays (ELISPOTs). Spoligotyping showed that 20 out of 36 Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) strains belong to the Beijing type. The levels of OPN, Gal-9, and sCD44 were higher in TB (positivity of 61.1%, 66.7%, and 63.9%, respectively) than in the HCs. Positive correlations between OPN and Gal-9, between OPN and sCD44, and negative correlation between OPN and ESAT-6-ELISPOT response, between chest X-ray severity score of cavitary TB and ESAT-6-ELISPOT response were observed. Instead of OPN, Gal-9, and sCD44, cytokines G-CSF, GM-CSF, IFN-α, IFN-γ, IL-12p70, and IL-1RA levels were higher in Beijing MTB-infected patients. These findings suggest immunoregulatory, rather than inflammatory, effect of MCPs and can advance the understanding of the roles of MCPs in the context of TB pathology. PMID:28025511

  17. Applying patient centered approach in management of pulmonary tuberculosis: A case report from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Atif, M; Sulaiman, Sas; Shafi, Aa; Muttalif, Ar; Ali, I; Saleem, F

    2011-06-01

    A 24 year university student with history of productive cough was registered as sputum smear confirmed case of pulmonary tuberculosis. During treatment, patient suffered from itchiness associated with anti tuberculosis drugs and was treated with chlorpheniramine (4mg) tablet. Patient missed twenty eight doses of anti tuberculosis drugs in continuation phase claiming that he was very busy in his studies and assignments. Upon questioning he further explained that he was quite healthy after five months and unable to concentrate on his studies after taking prescribed medicines. His treatment was stopped based on clinical improvement, although he did not complete six months therapy. Two major reasons; false perception of being completely cured and side effects associated with anti TB drugs might be responsible for non adherence. Non sedative anti histamines like fexofenadine, citrizine or loratidine should be preferred over first generation anti histamines (chlorpheniramine) in patients with such lifestyle. Patient had not completed full course of chemotherapy, which is preliminary requirement for a case to be classified as "cure" and "treatment completed". Moreover, patient had not defaulted for two consecutive months. Therefore, according to WHO treatment outcome categories, this patient can neither be classified as "cure" or "treatment completed" nor as "defaulter". Further elaboration of WHO treatment outcome categories is required for adequate classification of patients with similar characteristics. Likelihood of non adherence can be significantly reduced by applying the WHO recommended "Patient Centered Approach" strategy. Close friend, class mate or family member can be selected as treatment supporter to ensure adherence to treatment.

  18. Postmortem diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in patients with acute respiratory failure - demographics, etiologic and pulmonary histologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Ruppert, Aline D; Canzian, Mauro; Capelozzi, Vera L; Serrano, Carlos V

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Acute respiratory failure is present in 5% of patients with acute myocardial infarction and is responsible for 20% to 30% of the fatal post-acute myocardial infarction. The role of inflammation associated with pulmonary edema as a cause of acute respiratory failure post-acute myocardial infarction remains to be determined. We aimed to describe the demographics, etiologic data and histological pulmonary findings obtained through autopsies of patients who died during the period from 1990 to 2008 due to acute respiratory failure with no diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction during life. METHODS: This study considers 4,223 autopsies of patients who died of acute respiratory failure that was not preceded by any particular diagnosis while they were alive. The diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was given in 218 (4.63%) patients. The age, sex and major associated diseases were recorded for each patient. Pulmonary histopathology was categorized as follows: diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of acute myocardial infarction associated with specific histopathology was determined by logistic regression. RESULTS: In total, 147 men were included in the study. The mean age at the time of death was 64 years. Pulmonary histopathology revealed pulmonary edema as well as the presence of diffuse alveolar damage in 72.9% of patients. Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 11.9% of patients, systemic arterial hypertension in 10.1% and dilated cardiomyopathy in 6.9%. A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant positive association between acute myocardial infarction with diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary edema. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we demonstrated that in autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure as the cause of death, 5% were diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. Pulmonary histology revealed a significant inflammatory response, which has

  19. Delayed Pneumoperitoneum and Acute Pulmonary Edema Secondary to Acute Gastric Dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jae Yun; Kim, Jong Kun

    2015-01-01

    Pneumoperitoneum caused by acute gastric dilatation (AGD) is a very rare complication. We report a case of pneumoperitoneum and acute pulmonary edema caused by AGD in a patient with Parkinson’s disease. A 78-year-old woman presented with pneumonia and AGD. We inserted a nasogastric tube and administered empirical antibiotics. We performed an endoscopy, and perforation or necrosis of the stomach and pyloric stenosis were not observed. Thirty-six hours after admission, the patient suddenly developed dyspnea and shock, and eventually died. We suspected the cause of death was pneumoperitoneum and acute pulmonary edema caused by AGD during the conservative treatment period. Immunocompromised patients with chronic illness require close observation even if they do not show any symptoms suggestive of complications. Even if the initial endoscopic or abdominal radiologic findings do not show gastric necrosis or perforation, follow-up with endoscopy is essential to recognize complications of AGD early. PMID:26668807

  20. Comparison of clinical and laboratory findings between those with pulmonary tuberculosis and those with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Thanachartwet, Vipa; Desakorn, Varunee; Duangrithi, Duangjai; Chunpongthong, Pongsak; Phojanamongkolkij, Kamol; Jitruckthai, Pasakorn; Kasetjaroen, Yuttichai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee

    2014-01-01

    In tuberculosis endemic areas, patients with sputum positive for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) are usually diagnosed and treated for pulmonary tuberculosis. The diagnosis of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) lung disease is often ascertained only after lung disease progression occurs, increasing the risk of severe morbidity and mortality. We conducted a matched case-control study among a prospective cohort of 300 patients with newly diagnosed AFB-positive sputum in Thailand during 2010-2012. We compared clinical and laboratory parameters and outcomes among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, NTM lung disease and NTM colonization. A mycobacterial culture was performed in all patients. Ten patients with NTM lung disease were compared to 50 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 10 patients with NTM colonization. The presence of diabetes mellitus or human immunodeficiency virus infection, were associated with NTM lung disease (p = 0.030). Patients with NTM lung disease had a significantly lower body weight prior to treatment (p = 0.021), a higher body weight change from baseline (p = 0.038), and were more likely to have cavitations on chest radiograph (p = 0.033) than those with NTM colonization. In tuberculosis endemic areas, mycobacterial identification should be performed among patients with impaired immune function. NTM lung disease treatment should be considered in patients with NTM sputum isolates who have a history of significant weight loss or cavitations on chest radiography.

  1. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Teens > Tuberculosis A A A What's in this article? TB ... Duration When to Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis TB Basics Tuberculosis (also known as "TB") is ...

  2. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Teens > Tuberculosis Print A A A What's in this article? ... Duration When to Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis TB Basics Tuberculosis (also known as "TB") is ...

  3. Fixed-dose combinations of drugs versus single-drug formulations for treating pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Carmen R; Rigau Comas, David; Valderrama Rodríguez, Angélica; Roqué i Figuls, Marta; Parker, Lucy Anne; Caylà, Joan; Bonfill Cosp, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Background People who are newly diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) typically receive a standard first-line treatment regimen that consists of two months of isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol followed by four months of isoniazid and rifampicin. Fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) of these drugs are widely recommended. Objectives To compare the efficacy, safety, and acceptability of anti-tuberculosis regimens given as fixed-dose combinations compared to single-drug formulations for treating people with newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, published in the Cochrane Library, Issue 11 2015); MEDLINE (1966 to 20 November 2015); EMBASE (1980 to 20 November 2015); LILACS (1982 to 20 November 2015); the metaRegister of Controlled Trials; and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP), without language restrictions, up to 20 November 2015. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that compared the use of FDCs with single-drug formulations in adults (aged 15 years or more) newly diagnosed with pulmonary TB. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion, and assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from the included trials. We used risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous data and mean differences (MDs) for continuous data with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We attempted to assess the effect of treatment for time-to-event measures with hazard ratios and their 95% CIs. We used the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' assessment tool to determine the risk of bias in included trials. We used the fixed-effect model when there was little heterogeneity and the random-effects model with moderate heterogeneity. We used an I² statistic value of 75% or greater to denote significant heterogeneity, in which case we did not perform a

  4. Acute Exacerbation of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. An International Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Collard, Harold R; Ryerson, Christopher J; Corte, Tamera J; Jenkins, Gisli; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Lederer, David J; Lee, Joyce S; Maher, Toby M; Wells, Athol U; Antoniou, Katerina M; Behr, Juergen; Brown, Kevin K; Cottin, Vincent; Flaherty, Kevin R; Fukuoka, Junya; Hansell, David M; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kaminski, Naftali; Kim, Dong Soon; Kolb, Martin; Lynch, David A; Myers, Jeffrey L; Raghu, Ganesh; Richeldi, Luca; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Martinez, Fernando J

    2016-08-01

    Acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis has been defined as an acute, clinically significant, respiratory deterioration of unidentifiable cause. The objective of this international working group report on acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was to provide a comprehensive update on the topic. A literature review was conducted to identify all relevant English text publications and abstracts. Evidence-based updates on the epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, prognosis, and management of acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are provided. Finally, to better reflect the current state of knowledge and improve the feasibility of future research into its etiology and treatment, the working group proposes a new conceptual framework for acute respiratory deterioration in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and a revised definition and diagnostic criteria for acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  5. Evaluation of the diagnostic utility of fiberoptic bronchoscopy for smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis in routine clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Soto, Alonso; Salazar, Daniela; Acurio, Vilma; Segura, Patricia; Van der Stuyft, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic yield of fiberoptic bronchoscopy for the diagnosis of smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis in patients treated at a referral hospital in Lima, Peru. Of the 611 patients who underwent the procedure, 140 (23%) were diagnosed with tuberculosis based on the analysis of BAL samples. Being young and being male were significantly associated with positive cultures. In addition, 287 patients underwent post-bronchoscopic sputum smear testing for AFB, the results of which increased the diagnostic yield by 22% over that obtained through the analysis of BAL samples alone. We conclude that the analysis of BAL samples and post-bronchoscopic sputum samples provides a high diagnostic yield in smear-negative patients suspected of having pulmonary tuberculosis.

  6. Yield of pulmonary tuberculosis cases by symptoms: Findings from a community survey in Madhya Pradesh, central India.

    PubMed

    Rao, V G; Bhat, J; Yadav, R; Muniyandi, M; Bhondeley, M K; Wares, D F

    2015-04-01

    A cross-sectional tuberculosis prevalence survey was undertaken in Jabalpur district, Madhya Pradesh, central India. All individuals were questioned for chest symptoms. Sputum samples were collected and examined for microscopy and culture. Overall prevalence of sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis was found to be 255.3 per 100,000 population. Cough, with or without other symptoms, was present in 75.5% individuals and yielded 88.2% of the detected pulmonary tuberculosis cases. Elicitation of a previous history of treatment yielded 5.9%, and chest pain 4.5% cases. History of fever alone yielded no cases. The findings suggest that a history of fever alone may be safely excluded from the list of symptoms to be elicited in future TB prevalence surveys in India.

  7. [The immediate and late results of the surgical treatment of patients with complicated forms of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kerimov, R V; Badalov, R K; Medzhidov, F A; Mamedov, R I

    1996-01-01

    Immediate and long-term outcomes of repeated and multistage operations were analyzed in 190 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. The aspects of work rehabilitation were studied in these patients. The efficiency of repeated and stage surgical interventions in patients both with disseminated and complicated types of tuberculosis and with pleural empyemas and in those with uncomplicated postoperative disease is 87.5 and 92.2%, respectively. The long-term results indicated that the complete clinical effect preserved in 79.2% of patients. Work rehabilitation was achieved in 64.8% of the examinees in the long-term postoperative period. The use of repeated and stage surgical interventions in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis may rehabilitate a rather large proportion of those operated on, assuming a great socioeconomic significance.

  8. Delays in diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis in AFB smear-negative patients with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z X; Sng, L-H; Yong, Y; Lin, L M; Cheng, T W; Seong, N H; Yong, F K

    2017-03-16

    BACKGROUND:

    Diagnostic and treatment delays increase the severity and transmission of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). This study aimed to evaluate TB diagnostic and treatment delays in acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear-negative patients.

    METHODS:

    This was a retrospective observational study. Patients with positive AFB culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) were selected from among hospitalised patients with a diagnosis of pneumonia. Admission ward, anti-tuberculosis treatment and the duration of AFB culture were compared between smear-positive and smear-negative patients.

    RESULTS:

    Of the 70 patients with positive isolation of MTC in AFB culture, 27 (38.5%) were smear-negative; of these, 18 (66.7%) were not isolated while in hospital, and 17 (63%) were neither diagnosed nor treated for TB. In contrast, 41 of the 43 smear-positive patients (95.3%) were directly admitted or quickly transferred to the isolation room and started on anti-tuberculosis treatment (P < 0.001). Samples from smear-negative patients required more time to grow MTC in AFB culture than those of smear-positive patients (23 days vs. 14 days, P < 0.001). Diabetes was significantly associated with AFB smear positivity, with an odds ratio of 12.2.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Negative AFB smears caused significant diagnostic and treatment delay. Patients staying in the general ward were exposed to TB patients who were not diagnosed in time.

  9. Accuracy of a new rapid antigen detection test for pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Aliannejad, Rasoul; Bahrmand, Ahmadreza; Abtahi, Hamidreza; Seifi, Mahnaz; Safavi, Enayat; Abdolrahimi, Farid; Shahriaran, Shahriyar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Tuberculosis (TB) is a major problem in the world. Treatment and control of TB needs detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT) in the proper samples. While smear doesn’t have enough sensitivity, culture and PCR are expensive, time consuming and unavailable in many centers. Recent development of a rapid TB antigen detection test (PrTBK) at Pasteur Institute of Iran could give a simple way for diagnosis of TB in about two hours. In this test the antigen-antibody complex will change color when gold conjugated mouse anti-rabbit antibody detects specific MT cell wall antigen in suspected samples. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of PrTBK for diagnosis of pulmonary TB in comparison with smear, culture and PCR techniques in 56 consecutive samples (47 BAL and 13 sputum samples) obtained from patients with clinical suspicion of active TB. Results: Twentynine patients (52%) were female and seven patients were HIV positive. PrTBK was positive in 17 culture positive and 4 culture negative samples (100% sensitivity, 89% specificity and 92% accuracy in comparison with culture method). In two out of four patients with negative culture who were positive for PrTBK, PCR and anti-tuberculosis drugs trial therapy responses were in favor of tuberculosis. If we take this finding into account, the accuracy of PrTBK will rise. Conclusion: High sensitivity and accuracy of PrTBK test enable us to initiate treatment on the basis of this convenient and rapid test. PMID:28210462

  10. Acute Pulmonary Edema Associated With Propofol: An Unusual Complication

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Mian Adnan; Oud, Lavi

    2014-01-01

    Propofol is frequently used in the emergency department to provide procedural sedation for patients undergoing various procedures and is considered to be safe when administered by trained personnel. Pulmonary edema after administration of propofol has rarely been reported. We report a case of a 23-year-old healthy male who developed acute cough, hemoptysis and hypoxia following administration of propofol for splinting of a foot fracture. Chest radiography showed bilateral patchy infiltrates. The patient was treated successfully with supportive care. This report emphasizes the importance of this potentially fatal propofol-associated complication and discusses possible underlying mechanisms and related literature. PMID:25493132

  11. Amlodipine poisioning complicated with acute non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Hasson, Ruairi; Mulcahy, Victoria; Tahir, Hasan

    2011-09-04

    Amlodipine poisoning is an uncommon presentation with potentially life threatening complications. As there are few cases of severe poisoning documented, management guidelines are limited. The authors present the case of a 22-year-old female who presented to hospital 6 h after ingesting 280 mg of amlodipine. She was treated with aggressive fluid resuscitation and calcium gluconate infusion. She went on to develop acute non-cardiogenic pulmonary odema for which she needed a frusemide infusion. She stayed in hospital for 5 days and was discharged after a psychiatric review with no long-term complications. The authors discuss the other management options available for patients presenting with amlodipine overdose.

  12. Amlodipine poisioning complicated with acute non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema

    PubMed Central

    Hasson, Ruairi; Mulcahy, Victoria; Tahir, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Amlodipine poisoning is an uncommon presentation with potentially life threatening complications. As there are few cases of severe poisoning documented, management guidelines are limited. The authors present the case of a 22-year-old female who presented to hospital 6 h after ingesting 280 mg of amlodipine. She was treated with aggressive fluid resuscitation and calcium gluconate infusion. She went on to develop acute non-cardiogenic pulmonary odema for which she needed a frusemide infusion. She stayed in hospital for 5 days and was discharged after a psychiatric review with no long-term complications. The authors discuss the other management options available for patients presenting with amlodipine overdose. PMID:22679190

  13. Adjunctive Phosphodiesterase-4 Inhibitor Therapy Improves Antibiotic Response to Pulmonary Tuberculosis in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Subbian, Selvakumar; Tsenova, Liana; Holloway, Jennifer; Peixoto, Blas; O'Brien, Paul; Dartois, Véronique; Khetani, Vikram; Zeldis, Jerome B.; Kaplan, Gilla

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Adjunctive host-directed therapy is emerging as a new potential approach to improve the outcome of conventional antimicrobial treatment for tuberculosis (TB). We tested the ability of a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor (PDE4i) CC-11050, co-administered with the first-line anti-TB drug isoniazid (INH), to accelerate bacillary killing and reduce chronic inflammation in the lungs of rabbits with experimental Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Methods A rabbit model of pulmonary TB that recapitulates the pathologic manifestations seen in humans was used. Rabbits were infected with virulent Mtb by aerosol exposure and treated for eight weeks with INH with or without CC-11050, starting at four weeks post infection. The effect of CC-11050 treatment on disease severity, pathology, bacillary load, T cell proliferation and global lung transcriptome profiles were analyzed. Results Significant improvement in bacillary clearance and reduced lung pathology and fibrosis were noted in the rabbits treated for eight weeks with INH + CC-11050, compared to those treated with INH or CC-11050 only. In addition, expression of host genes associated with tissue remodeling, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) regulation, macrophage activation and lung inflammation networks was dampened in CC-11050-treated, compared to the untreated rabbits. Conclusions Adjunctive CC-11050 therapy significantly improves the response of rabbits with experimental pulmonary TB to INH treatment. We propose that CC-11050 may be a promising candidate for host directed therapy of patients with pulmonary TB, reducing the duration and improving clinical outcome of antibiotic treatment. PMID:26981575

  14. Potential and development of inhaled RNAi therapeutics for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Man, Dede K W; Chow, Michael Y T; Casettari, Luca; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Lam, Jenny K W

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by the infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), continues to pose a serious threat to public health, and the situation is worsening with the rapid emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) TB. Current TB regimens require long duration of treatment, and their toxic side effects often lead to poor adherence and low success rates. There is an urgent need for shorter and more effective treatment for TB. In recent years, RNA interference (RNAi) has become a powerful tool for studying gene function by silencing the target genes. The survival of Mtb in host macrophages involves the attenuation of the antimicrobial responses mounted by the host cells. RNAi technology has helped to improve our understanding of how these bacilli interferes with the bactericidal effect and host immunity during TB infection. It has been suggested that the host-directed intervention by modulation of host pathways can be employed as a novel and effective therapy against TB. This therapeutic approach could be achieved by RNAi, which holds enormous potential beyond a laboratory to the clinic. RNAi therapy targeting TB is being investigated for enhancing host antibacterial capacity or improving drug efficacy on drug resistance strains while minimizing the associated adverse effects. One of the key challenges of RNAi therapeutics arises from the delivery of the RNAi molecules into the target cells, and inhalation could serve as a direct administration route for the treatment of pulmonary TB in a non-invasive manner. However, there are still major obstacles that need to be overcome. This review focuses on the RNAi candidates that are currently explored for the treatment of TB and discusses the major barriers of pulmonary RNAi delivery. From this, we hope to stimulate further studies of local RNAi therapeutics for pulmonary TB treatment.

  15. Urine lipoarabinomannan testing for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in children: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Nicol, Mark P; Allen, Veronica; Workman, Lesley; Isaacs, Washiefa; Munro, Jacinta; Pienaar, Sandra; Black, Faye; Adonis, Layla; Zemanay, Widaad; Ghebrekristos, Yonas; Zar, Heather J

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Urine tests for mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan might be useful for point-of-care diagnosis of tuberculosis in adults with advanced HIV infection, but have not been assessed in children. We assessed the accuracy of urine lipoarabinomannan testing for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV-positive and HIV-negative children. Methods We prospectively recruited children (aged ≤15 years) who presented with suspected tuberculosis at a primary health-care clinic and paediatric referral hospital in South Africa, between March 1, 2009, and April 30, 2012. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of urine lipoarabinomannan testing with lateral flow assay and ELISA, with mycobacterial culture of two induced sputum samples as the reference standard. Positive cultures were identified by acid-fast staining and tested to confirm Mycobacterium tuberculosis and establish susceptibility to rifampicin and isoniazid. Findings 535 children (median age 42·5 months, IQR 19·1–66·3) had urine and two induced specimens available for testing. 89 (17%) had culture-confirmed tuberculosis and 106 (20%) had HIV. The lateral flow lipoarabinomannan test showed poor accuracy against the reference standard, with sensitivity of 48·3% (95% CI 37·6–59·2), specificity of 60·8% (56·1–65·3), and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0·53 (0·46–0·60) for children without HIV and 0·64 (0·51–0·76) for children with HIV. ELISA had poor sensitivity in children without HIV (sensitivity 3·0%, 95% CI 0·4–10·5) and children with HIV (0%, 0·0–14·3); overall specificity was 95·7% (93·4–97·4). Interpretation Urine lipoarabinomannan tests have insufficient sensitivity and specificity to diagnose HIV-positive and HIV-negative children with tuberculosis and should not be used in this patient population. Funding US National Institutes of Health, the National Health Laboratory Services Research Trust, the Medical Research Council of

  16. Tuberculosis as a three-act play: A new paradigm for the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Lack of access to human tissues with untreated tuberculosis (TB) has forced generations of researchers to use animal models and to adopt a paradigm that granulomas are the characteristic lesion of both primary and post primary TB. An extended search of studies of human lung tissues failed to find any reports that support this paradigm. We found scores of publications from gross pathology in 1804 through high resolution CT scans in 2015 that identify obstructive lobular pneumonia, not granulomas, as the characteristic lesion of developing post-primary TB. This paper reviews this literature together with other relevant observations to formulate a new paradigm of TB with three distinct stages: a three-act play. First, primary TB, a war of attrition, begins with infection that spreads via lymphatics and blood stream before inducing systemic immunity that contains and controls the organisms within granulomas. Second, post-primary TB, a sneak attack, develops during latent TB as an asymptomatic obstructive lobular pneumonia in persons with effective systemic immunity. It is a paucibacillary process with no granulomas that spreads via bronchi and accumulates mycobacterial antigens and host lipids for 1–2 years before suddenly undergoing caseous necrosis. Third, the fallout, is responsible for nearly all clinical post primary disease. It begins with caseous necrotic pneumonia that is either retained to become the focus of fibrocaseous disease or is coughed out to leave a cavity. This three-stage paradigm suggests testable hypotheses and plausible answers to long standing questions of immunity to TB. PMID:26980490

  17. Tuberculosis as a three-act play: A new paradigm for the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Robert L

    2016-03-01

    Lack of access to human tissues with untreated tuberculosis (TB) has forced generations of researchers to use animal models and to adopt a paradigm that granulomas are the characteristic lesion of both primary and post primary TB. An extended search of studies of human lung tissues failed to find any reports that support this paradigm. We found scores of publications from gross pathology in 1804 through high resolution CT scans in 2015 that identify obstructive lobular pneumonia, not granulomas, as the characteristic lesion of developing post-primary TB. This paper reviews this literature together with other relevant observations to formulate a new paradigm of TB with three distinct stages: a three-act play. First, primary TB, a war of attrition, begins with infection that spreads via lymphatics and blood stream before inducing systemic immunity that contains and controls the organisms within granulomas. Second, post-primary TB, a sneak attack, develops during latent TB as an asymptomatic obstructive lobular pneumonia in persons with effective systemic immunity. It is a paucibacillary process with no granulomas that spreads via bronchi and accumulates mycobacterial antigens and host lipids for 1-2 years before suddenly undergoing caseous necrosis. Third, the fallout, is responsible for nearly all clinical post primary disease. It begins with caseous necrotic pneumonia that is either retained to become the focus of fibrocaseous disease or is coughed out to leave a cavity. This three-stage paradigm suggests testable hypotheses and plausible answers to long standing questions of immunity to TB.

  18. Intrauterine Tuberculosis Manifesting as Acute Chorioamnionitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Taweevisit, Mana; Nisagornsen, Charuwan; Thorner, Paul Scott

    2015-01-01

    Congenital tuberculosis involving the placenta is an infrequent diagnosis, and the typical features of tuberculous placentitis involve a granulomatous reaction, reflecting a delayed hypersensitivity immune response in the host. However, the first reaction of the placenta to organisms hematogenously transmitted from the maternal circulation typically involves the innate immune response, manifesting as an acute neutrophilic villitis or intervillositis or both. This acute pattern of response to mycobacteria has only been documented rarely. We present a case of acute mycobacterial infection occurring in a preterm female with 28-weeks gestation, who was delivered by cesarean section because of fetal distress and who was subsequently confirmed to have congenital tuberculosis. The placenta showed an acute chorioamnionitis associated with acid-fast bacilli consistent with Mycobacteria tuberculosis. The mother was found to have a necrotizing granulomatous deciduitis, and that was postulated to have resulted in the direct spread of mycobacteria to the amniotic cavity. Thus, our case extends the acute placental response to mycobacteria to include chorioamnionitis. Although extremely rare, mycobacteria should be considered in the differential diagnosis of infectious agents causing acute chorioamnionitis, especially in geographic areas where tuberculosis is more prevalent.

  19. Surgical treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis: is video-assisted thoracic surgery “better” than thoracotomy?

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yi; Zhen, Dezhi; Liu, Shuku; Qin, Ming; Zhou, Shijie; Yu, Daping; Song, Xiaoyun; Li, Yunsong; Xiao, Ning; Su, Chongyu; Shi, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) lobectomy and conventional open lobectomy in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) who require surgery. Methods Forty patients with pulmonary TB who required lobectomy were randomized to receive either VATS or open lobectomy. Patient demographic, pulmonary function, operative, and postoperative data were compared between the groups. Results There were 20 patients who received VATS lobectomy (median age 31.5 years, range 19-67 years) and 20 that received open lobectomy (median age 33.5 years, range 16-60 years). The two groups were similar with respect to gender, age and pulmonary function (all, P>0.05). Lobectomy was completed by VATS in 19 of 20 patients (95%), and by thoracoscope-assisted mini-incision lobectomy in 1 patient. The median intraoperative blood loss was 345 mL (range, 100-800 mL), and the median duration of pleural cavity closed drainage was 5 days (range, 3-7 days). All open lobectomies were completed successfully, and the median intraoperative blood loss was 445 mL (range, 150-950 mL) and the median duration of pleural cavity closed drainage was 5 days (range, 3-9 days). No statistically significant differences were found between the groups with respect to operation completion rates, type of lung resection, intraoperative blood loss, closed pleural drainage duration and volume of postoperative chest drainage. The operation time, number of postoperative complications, postoperative pain index at 24 hours after surgery and postoperative hospital stay were all significantly less in the VATS group. With a median follow-up duration of 14 months (range, 8-18 months) no positive sputum examination results were found in either group. Conclusions VATS lobectomy is an effective and minimally invasive method for treating patients with pulmonary TB. PMID:26380771

  20. Sociodemographic, Epidemiological, and Clinical Risk Factors for Childhood Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Severely Malnourished Children Presenting With Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tahmeed; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu Syeed Golam; Das, Sumon Kumar; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate sociodemographic, epidemiological, and clinical risk factors for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in children presenting with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and pneumonia. Children aged 0 to 59 months with SAM and radiologic pneumonia from April 2011 to July 2012 were studied in Bangladesh. Children with confirmed PTB (by culture and/or X-pert MTB/RIF) (cases = 27) and without PTB (controls = 81; randomly selected from 378 children) were compared. The cases more often had the history of contact with active PTB patient (P < .01) and exposure to cigarette smoke (P = .04) compared with the controls. In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, the cases were independently associated with working mother (P = .05) and positive tuberculin skin test (TST; P = .02). Thus, pneumonia in SAM children is a common presentation of PTB and further highlights the importance of the use of simple TST and/or history of contact with active TB patients in diagnosing PTB in such children, especially in resource-limited settings. PMID:27335971

  1. Detection of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis patients with the 38-kilodalton antigen from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a rapid membrane-based assay.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, A T; Ma, W L; Zhang, P Y; Cole, R A

    1996-01-01

    A rapid membrane-based serologic assay using the 38-kDa antigen from Mycobacterium tuberculosis for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) was evaluated with 201 patients with pulmonary TB, 67 patients with extrapulmonary TB, 79 Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated healthy controls, and 77 non-TB respiratory patients. The overall sensitivities, specificities, and positive and negative predictive values were, respectively, 92, 92, 84, and 96% for sputum-positive TB patients; 70, 92, 87, and 79% for sputum-negative TB patients; and 76, 92, 80, and 90% for extrapulmonary-TB patients. Only 2% (1 of 44) of the healthy control BCG-vaccinated subjects gave weak positive signals in the assay, indicating that this rapid serological assay is a valuable aid in clinical diagnosis for both pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB. PMID:8705680

  2. Spatial analysis of deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis in the city of São Luís, Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Neto, Marcelino; Yamamura, Mellina; Garcia, Maria Concebida da Cunha; Popolin, Marcela Paschoal; Silveira, Tatiane Ramos dos Santos; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis, according to sociodemographic and operational variables, in the city of São Luís, Brazil, and to describe their spatial distribution. METHODS: This was an exploratory ecological study based on secondary data from death certificates, obtained from the Brazilian Mortality Database, related to deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis. We included all deaths attributed to pulmonary tuberculosis that occurred in the urban area of São Luís between 2008 and 2012. We performed univariate and bivariate analyses of the sociodemographic and operational variables of the deaths investigated, as well as evaluating the spatial distribution of the events by kernel density estimation. RESULTS: During the study period, there were 193 deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis in São Luís. The median age of the affected individuals was 52 years. Of the 193 individuals who died, 142 (73.60%) were male, 133 (68.91%) were Mulatto, 102 (53.13%) were single, and 64 (33.16%) had completed middle school. There was a significant positive association between not having received medical care prior to death and an autopsy having been performed (p = 0.001). A thematic map by density of points showed that the spatial distribution of those deaths was heterogeneous and that the density was as high as 8.12 deaths/km2. CONCLUSIONS: The sociodemographic and operational characteristics of the deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis evaluated in this study, as well as the identification of priority areas for control and surveillance of the disease, could promote public health policies aimed at reducing health inequities, allowing the optimization of resources, as well as informing decisions regarding the selection of strategies and specific interventions targeting the most vulnerable populations. PMID:25410843

  3. [Acute pulmonary embolism: beware of the wolf in sheep's clothing].

    PubMed

    Klok, Frederikus A; Vahl, Jelmer E; Huisman, Menno V; van Dijkman, Paul R M

    2012-01-01

    Two male patients aged 57 and 73 were referred to the cardiologist because of progressive dyspnoea. In one patient, the general practitioner had previously adopted an expectative policy because of a clean chest X-ray. At presentation after 4 weeks, the patient was diagnosed with and treated for acute coronary syndrome because of minor ECG abnormalities. Additional CT scanning showed a large saddle embolus. Despite adequate treatment, the patient suffered an electrical asystole and died. The other patient underwent ECG, bicycle ergometry, MRI adenosine, echocardiography and lung function tests over a period of 5 weeks before pulmonary embolism (PE) was diagnosed. As the signs and symptoms of PE are largely non-specific, diagnostic delay is common, with risk of poor clinical outcome. PE should at least be considered whenever a patient presents with acute or worsening breathlessness, chest pain, circulatory collapse or coughing, particularly in the presence of known thrombotic risk factors or when there is no clear alternative.

  4. IL23R(Arg381Gln) Functional Polymorphism Is Associated with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis Severity

    PubMed Central

    Boukadida, Jalel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the association between a functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the interleukin-23 receptor gene (IL23R; rs11209026, 1142 Gwild type → Areduced function, Arg381Gln) and disease severity outcome in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in the Tunisian population. SNP was investigated in a population of 168 patients with active pulmonary TB (cases were stratified into patients with minimal/moderate lung involvement, i.e., patients with minimal/moderate disease [Pmd], and patients with extensive lung involvement, i.e., patients with active disease [Pad]) and 150 healthy subjects. Genotype analyses were carried out using the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. We have found that the IL23R reduced-function allele 1142A and genotypes AA and AG were overrepresented, especially in the Pad subgroup compared with the control group (51% versus 18% [P = 10−8], 33% versus 5% [P = 10−8], and 36% versus 26% [P = 5 × 10−3], respectively). Additionally, comparison of the Pad and the Pmd groups showed that the A allele and AA genotype seemed to be associated with 2.79-fold (P = 4 × 10−5) and 7.74-fold (P = 10−5) increased risks of TB with minimal/moderate lung involvement, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the reduced-function polymorphism 1142G → A encoded by IL23R influences the outcome of disease severity of active pulmonary TB in Tunisian patients. PMID:22695161

  5. Prevalence, Risk Factors and Social Context of Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis among Prison Inmates in Tajikistan

    PubMed Central

    Winetsky, Daniel E.; Almukhamedov, Olga; Pulatov, Dilshod; Vezhnina, Natalia; Dooronbekova, Aizhan; Zhussupov, Baurzhan

    2014-01-01

    Setting Tuberculosis (TB) is highly prevalent in prisons of the former Soviet Union. Objective To understand the behavioral, demographic and biological factors placing inmates in Tajikistan at risk for active TB. Design We administered a behavioral and demographic survey to 1317 inmates in two prison facilities in Sughd province, Tajikistan along with radiographic screening for pulmonary TB. Suspected cases were confirmed bacteriologically. Inmates undergoing TB treatment were also surveyed. In-depth interviews were conducted with former prisoners to elicit relevant social and behavioral characteristics. Results We identified 59 cases of active pulmonary TB (prevalence 4.5%). Factors independently associated with increased prevalence of active TB were: HIV-infection by self-report (PR 7.88; 95%CI 3.40–18.28), history of previous TB (PR 10.21; 95%CI 6.27–16.63) and infrequent supplemental nutrition beyond scheduled meals (PR 3.00; 95%CI 1.67–5.62). Access to supplemental nutrition was associated with frequency of visits from friends and family and ability to rely on other inmates for help. Conclusion In prison facilities of Tajikistan, HIV-infection, injection drug use and low access to supplemental nutrition were associated with prevalent cases of active pulmonary TB. Policies that reduce HIV transmission among injection drug users and improve the nutritional status of socially isolated inmates may alleviate the TB burden in Tajikistan’s prisons. PMID:24465861

  6. Concurrent evaluation of microscopic observation of drug susceptibility assay for pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zadbuke, Sonali Sudhir; Set, Reena; Khan, Nishat; Shastri, Jayanthi

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Methods for detection and drug susceptibility of tuberculosis (TB) with solid media are inexpensive but slow and laborious. Rapid methods to diagnose TB and multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) are a global priority for TB control. OBJECTIVES: A study was performed to compare the sensitivity of detection of mycobacterial growth and time of culture positivity by microscopic observation of drug susceptibility (MODS) assay with that of Lowenstein–Jensen (LJ) culture in pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB and to evaluate the concordance of the susceptibilities to isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF) by MODS and proportion method on LJ. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective, laboratory-based study was conducted on a total of 300 samples from suspected cases of pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB. Samples were inoculated on LJ medium as per the standard guidelines and MODS assay was performed. RESULTS: Sensitivity of MODS assay was 80% and 83.3% and specificity was 92.9% and 83.3% for pulmonary and extrapulmonary samples, respectively. Difference between mean time to detection of Mycobacterium TB (MTB) by LJ medium and MODS was statistically significant, with MODS being faster. drug susceptibility testing (DST) by MODS when compared to economic variant of proportion method was 87.87% for RIF, 90.9% for INH, and 96.96% for MDR-TB detection. CONCLUSION: MODS assay provides rapid, safe, and sensitive detection of TB faster than the existing gold standard. It is extremely promising in effectively diagnosing MDR-TB. PMID:28367022

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Bacteremia Among Acutely Febrile Children in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Pavlinac, Patricia B; Naulikha, Jaqueline M; John-Stewart, Grace C; Onchiri, Frankline M; Okumu, Albert O; Sitati, Ruth R; Cranmer, Lisa M; Lokken, Erica M; Singa, Benson O; Walson, Judd L

    2015-11-01

    In children, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) frequently disseminates systemically, presenting with nonspecific signs including fever. We determined prevalence of M. tuberculosis bacteremia among febrile children presenting to hospitals in Nyanza, Kenya (a region with high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and M. tuberculosis prevalence). Between March 2013 and February 2014, we enrolled children aged 6 months to 5 years presenting with fever (axillary temperature ≥ 37.5°C) and no recent antibiotic use. Blood samples were collected for bacterial and mycobacterial culture using standard methods. Among 148 children enrolled, median age was 3.1 years (interquartile range: 1.8-4.1 years); 10.3% of children were living with a household member diagnosed with M. tuberculosis in the last year. Seventeen percent of children were stunted (height-for-age z-score < -2), 18.6% wasted (weight-for-height z-score < -2), 2.7% were HIV-infected, and 14.2% were HIV-exposed uninfected. Seventeen children (11.5%) had one or more signs of tuberculosis (TB). All children had a Bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccination scar. Among 134 viable blood cultures, none (95% confidence interval: 0-2.7%) had Mycobacterium isolated. Despite exposure to household TB contacts, HIV exposure, and malnutrition, M. tuberculosis bacteremia was not detected in this pediatric febrile cohort, a finding consistent with other pediatric studies.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Bacteremia among Acutely Febrile Children in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Pavlinac, Patricia B.; Naulikha, Jaqueline M.; John-Stewart, Grace C.; Onchiri, Frankline M.; Okumu, Albert O.; Sitati, Ruth R.; Cranmer, Lisa M.; Lokken, Erica M.; Singa, Benson O.; Walson, Judd L.

    2015-01-01

    In children, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) frequently disseminates systemically, presenting with nonspecific signs including fever. We determined prevalence of M. tuberculosis bacteremia among febrile children presenting to hospitals in Nyanza, Kenya (a region with high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and M. tuberculosis prevalence). Between March 2013 and February 2014, we enrolled children aged 6 months to 5 years presenting with fever (axillary temperature ≥ 37.5°C) and no recent antibiotic use. Blood samples were collected for bacterial and mycobacterial culture using standard methods. Among 148 children enrolled, median age was 3.1 years (interquartile range: 1.8–4.1 years); 10.3% of children were living with a household member diagnosed with M. tuberculosis in the last year. Seventeen percent of children were stunted (height-for-age z-score < −2), 18.6% wasted (weight-for-height z-score < −2), 2.7% were HIV-infected, and 14.2% were HIV-exposed uninfected. Seventeen children (11.5%) had one or more signs of tuberculosis (TB). All children had a Bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccination scar. Among 134 viable blood cultures, none (95% confidence interval: 0–2.7%) had Mycobacterium isolated. Despite exposure to household TB contacts, HIV exposure, and malnutrition, M. tuberculosis bacteremia was not detected in this pediatric febrile cohort, a finding consistent with other pediatric studies. PMID:26324730

  9. P2X7 and NRAMP1/SLC11 A1 gene polymorphisms in Mexican mestizo patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Niño-Moreno, P; Portales-Pérez, D; Hernández-Castro, B; Portales-Cervantes, L; Flores-Meraz, V; Baranda, L; Gómez-Gómez, A; Acuña-Alonzo, V; Granados, J; González-Amaro, R

    2007-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. Several studies have suggested that genetic factors may affect susceptibility to tuberculosis, but the specific genes involved have not yet been fully characterized. NRAMP1/SLC11 A1 and P2X7 genes have been linked to increased risk for tuberculosis in some African and Asiatic populations. To explore the potential role of these genes in the susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis in a Mexican mestizo population, we evaluated the association of D543N and 3′-UTR polymorphisms in NRAMP1/SLC11 A1 and − 762 and A1513C polymorphisms in P2X7 genes with the risk for tuberculosis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of genomic DNA followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and allelic-specific PCR was employed. We found no significant differences in allelic frequency in NRAMP1/SLC11 A1 gene polymorphisms in 94 patients with tuberculosis compared to 100 healthy contacts. Similarly, no significant association of the P2X7−762 gene polymorphism with tuberculosis was detected. In contrast, the P2X7 A1513C polymorphism was associated significantly with tuberculosis (P= 0·02, odds ratio = 5·28, 95% CI, 0·99–37·69), an association that had not been reported previously. However, when the function of P2X7 was assessed by an l-selectin loss assay, we did not find significant differences in patients compared to healthy contacts or between PPD+ and PPD– control individuals. This study further supports the complex role of P2X7 gene in host regulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and demonstrates that different associations of gene polymorphisms and tuberculosis are found in distinct racial populations. PMID:17493019

  10. Health system delay in pulmonary tuberculosis treatment in a country with an intermediate burden of tuberculosis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Delayed diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis increase both the severity of the disease and the duration of infectivity. A number of studies have addressed the issue of health system delays in the treatment of tuberculosis, but mostly in countries with a high or low incidence of the disease. Our understanding of delay is quite limited in settings with an intermediate burden of tuberculosis. We explore the duration and factors associated with delays in the Croatian health system which has free health care and a sufficient network of health services providing tuberculosis diagnosis and care. Methods A total of 241 consecutive adults with culture-confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis were interviewed in seven randomly selected Croatian counties and their medical records were evaluated. A health system delay was defined as the number of days from the first consultation with a physician to the initiation of anti-tuberculosis treatment. A long delay was defined as a period exceeding the median delay, while an extreme delay was considered to be above the 75th percentile delay. Results The median health system delay was 15 days while the 75th percentile was 42 days (the 5th and 95th percentile being 1 and 105 days respectively). Almost 30% of tuberculosis patients remained undiagnosed for more than 30 days after the initial health care visit. Female patients (p = 0.005), patients with a negative sputum smear (p = 0.002) and patients having symptoms other than the usual ones (0.027) were found to be in significant correlation with a long delay. In a multivariate model, a long delay remained associated with the same variables (p = 0.008, p = 0.003, and p = 0.037, respectively). A significant association was demonstrated between both the female gender (p = 0.042) and a negative sputum smear (p < 0.001) and extreme delay, while only a negative sputum smear (p < 0.001) remained significant in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Our

  11. A Novel Scoring System to Measure Radiographic Abnormalities and Related Spirometric Values in Cured Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Báez-Saldaña, Renata; López-Arteaga, Yesenia; Bizarrón-Muro, Alma; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; Mongua-Rodríguez, Norma; García-García, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite chemotherapy, patients with cured pulmonary tuberculosis may result in lung functional impairment. Objective To evaluate a novel scoring system based on the degree of radiographic abnormalities and related spirometric values in patients with cured pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods One hundred and twenty seven patients with cured pulmonary tuberculosis were prospectively enrolled in a referral hospital specializing in respiratory diseases. Spirometry was performed and the extent of radiographic abnormalities was evaluated twice by each of two readers to generate a novel quantitative score. Scoring reproducibility was analyzed by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and the Bland-Altman method. Multiple linear regression models were performed to assess the association of the extent of radiographic abnormalities with spirometric values. Results The intra-observer agreement for scoring of radiographic abnormalities (SRA) showed an ICC of 0.81 (CI:95%, 0.67–0.95) and 0.78 (CI:95%, 0.65–0.92), for reader 1 and 2, respectively. Inter-observer reproducibility for the first measurement was 0.83 (CI:95%, 0.71–0.95), and for the second measurement was 0.74 (CI:95%, 0.58–0.90). The Bland-Altman analysis of the intra-observer agreement showed a mean bias of 0.87% and -0.55% and an inter-observer agreement of -0.35% and -1.78%, indicating a minor average systematic variability. After adjustment for age, gender, height, smoking status, pack-years of smoking, and degree of dyspnea, the scoring degree of radiographic abnormalities was significantly and negatively associated with absolute and percent predicted values of FVC: -0.07 (CI:95%, -0.01 to -0.04); -2.48 (CI:95%, -3.45 to -1.50); and FEV1 -0.07 (CI:95%, -0.10 to -0.05); -2.92 (CI:95%, -3.87 to -1.97) respectively, in the patients studied. Conclusion The extent of radiographic abnormalities, as evaluated through our novel scoring system, was inversely associated with spirometric values, and

  12. Health System Delay among the Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients Presenting in the DOTS Centers of Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Mahato, Roshan Kumar; Koju, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Health system delay is the time for complete diagnosis of the disease after patient approaches a health care provider. Aim The study aims to identify the characteristics and the determinants of unacceptable health system delay (≥ 7 days delay from health system) in diagnosis of new pulmonary tuberculosis patients attending in Direct Observation Treatment Short course (DOTS) centers of Nepal. Materials and Methods An analytical cross-sectional study was conducted by administrating a structured questionnaire interview and reviewing the medical record of the new sputum smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases during January–May 2015. The generalized linear model (GLM) was applied to control the clustering effects. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to identify the association between variables with ≥ 7 days of unacceptable health system delay. Results Of the 374 new sputum smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases, the factors that were associated with unacceptable health system delay (time ≥ 7 days) were doing business (adj.OR= 1.61, 95% CI: 1.22-2.11; p-value <0.001) and unemployed (adj.OR= 3.04, 95% CI: 1.53-6.04; p-value <0.001) had chances of health system delay. However, getting support from parents (adj.OR= 0.55, 95% CI: 0.44-0.68; p-value <0.001), consultation with the private practitioners/ pharmacists (adj.OR= 0.24, 95% CI: 0.07-0.81; p-value 0.021), visiting government health facilities (adj.OR= 0.31, 95% CI: 0.13-0.73; p-value 0.008), using X-ray (adj.OR= 0.69, 95% CI: 0.49-0.97; p-value 0.032) and advance technologies for diagnosis of TB (adj.OR= 0.60, 95% CI: 0.39-0.94; p-value 0.024) were found contributing to reduce health system delay while controlling socio-economic, knowledge, presence of symptoms and attitude factors. Conclusion About a quarter of new TB patients faced health system delay problems. Socioeconomic factors, unemployment, influences the health system delay when controlled for other covariates. PMID

  13. Alleles of HLA-DRB1*04 Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Amazon Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Porto dos Santos, Maisa; de Melo Silva, Cláudia Maria; Alves de Almeida, Vanessa; Assumpção Antunes, Irineide

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenetic host factors are associated with susceptibility or protection to tuberculosis (TB). Strong associations of HLA class II genes with TB are reported. We analyzed the HLA-DRB1*04 alleles to identify subtypes associated with pulmonary TB and their interaction with risk factors such as alcohol, smoking, and gender in 316 pulmonary TB patients and 306 healthy individuals from the Brazilian Amazon. The HLA-DRB1*04 was prevalent in patients with pulmonary TB (p<0.0001; OR = 2.94; 95% CI = 2.12 to 4.08). Direct nucleotide sequencing of DRB1 exon 2 identified nine subtypes of HLA-DRB1*04. The subtype HLA-DRB1*04:11:01 (p = 0.0019; OR = 2.23; 95% CI = 1.34 to 3.70) was associated with susceptibility to pulmonary TB while DRB1*04:07:01 (p<0.0001; OR = 0.02; 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.33) to protection. Notably, the interaction between alcohol and HLA-DRB1*04:11:01 increased the risk for developing pulmonary TB (p = 0.0001; OR = 51.3; 95% CI = 6.81 to 386). Multibacillary pulmonary TB, the clinical presentation of disease transmission, was strongly associated with interaction to alcohol (p = 0.0026; OR = 11.1; 95% CI = 3.99 to 30.9), HLA-DRB1*04:11:01 (p = 0.0442; OR = 2.01; 95% CI = 1.03 to 3.93) and DRB1*04:92 (p = 0.0112; OR = 8.62; 95% CI = 1.63 to 45.5). These results show that HLA-DRB1*04 are associated with pulmonary TB. Interestingly, three subtypes, DRB1*04:07:01, DRB1*04:11:01 and DRB1*04:92 of the HLA-DRB1*04 could be potential immunogenetic markers that may help to explain mechanisms involved in disease development. PMID:26901036

  14. Age-related differences in pulmonary effects of acute and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ozone (O3) is known to induce adverse pulmonary and systemic health effects. Importantly, children and older persons are considered at-risk populations for O3-induced dysfunction, yet the mechanisms accounting for the age-related pulmonary responses to O3 are uncertain. In this study, we examined age-related susceptibility to O3 using 1 mo (adolescent), 4 mo (young adult), 12 mo (adult) and 24 mo (senescent) male Brown Norway rats exposed to filtered air or O3 (0.25and 1.00 ppm), 6 h/day, two days/week for 1 week (acute) or 13 weeks (subchronic). Ventilatory function, assessed by whole-body plethysmography, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) biomarkers of injury and inflammation were used to examine O3-induced pulmonary effects.Relaxation time declined in all ages following the weekly exposures; however, this effect persisted only in the 24 mo rats following a five days recovery, demonstrating an inability to induce adaptation commonly seen with repeated O3 exposures. PenH was increased in all groups with an augmented response in the 4 mo rats following the subchronic O3 exposures. O3 led to increased breathing frequency and minute volume in the 1 and 4 mo animals. Markers ofpulmonary permeability were increased in all age groups. Elevations in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity and lung inflammation following an acute O3 exposure were noted in only the 1 and 4 mo rats, which likely received an increased effective O3 dose. These data demonstrate that ado

  15. [A case of miliary tuberculosis presenting with acute resiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nojima, Daisuke; Ozaki, Shinji; Fujii, Yasuhiro; Wada, Sae; Ono, Katsuichiro; Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Gemba, Kenichi; Kishimoto, Takumi

    2009-03-01

    An 87-year-old woman was admitted because of high fever, progressive dyspnea and abnormal shadows on chest roentgenogram. Laboratory investigation on admission demonstrated a normal white cell count with neutrophilia (4000/microl, 90.5% neutrophils), an erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 10 mm/h and C-reactive protein value of 9.0mg/dl. Roentgenogram and computed tomographic scan of the chest shows bilateral infiltration and diffuse ground glass opacity, indicating acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but disseminated nodules, indicating miliary tuberculosis, were not found. Blood gas analysis demonstrated severe hypoxemia (PaO2 43.2Torr with 6L/ min oxygen). Based on the diagnosis of acute pneumonia and ARDS, intravenous administration of sivelestat sodium hydrate (100 mg/day), and continuous infusion of hydrocortisone (200 mg/day) were started. PaO2/FiO2 ratio improved but X-ray findings showed no improvement and a blood test revealed pancytopenia. Bone marrow biopsy revealed necrotizing epithelioid granuloma and acid-fast bacilli. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test detected Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was also detected in sputum and urine. Therefore, we diagnosed miliary tuberculosis and transferred the patient to an infectious disease hospital. Miliary tuberculosis complicated with ARDS is relatively rare and the prognosis is extremely poor. Miliary tuberculosis should be kept in mind as a cause of ARDS.

  16. Is there a rationale for pulmonary rehabilitation following successful chemotherapy for tuberculosis?

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Torrico, Marcela; Rendon, Adrian; Centis, Rosella; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Fuentes, Zhenia; Torres-Duque, Carlos; Mello, Fernanda; Dalcolmo, Margareth; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio; Spanevello, Antonio; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2016-01-01

    The role of tuberculosis as a public health care priority and the availability of diagnostic tools to evaluate functional status (spirometry, plethysmography, and DLCO determination), arterial blood gases, capacity to perform exercise, lesions (chest X-ray and CT), and quality of life justify the effort to consider what needs to be done when patients have completed their treatment. To our knowledge, no review has ever evaluated this topic in a comprehensive manner. Our objective was to review the available evidence on this topic and draw conclusions regarding the future role of the "post-tuberculosis treatment" phase, which will potentially affect several million cases every year. We carried out a non-systematic literature review based on a PubMed search using specific keywords (various combinations of the terms "tuberculosis", "rehabilitation", "multidrug-resistant tuberculosis", "pulmonary disease", "obstructive lung disease", and "lung volume measurements"). The reference lists of the most important studies were retrieved in order to improve the sensitivity of the search. Manuscripts written in English, Spanish, and Russian were selected. The main areas of interest were tuberculosis sequelae following tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment; "destroyed lung"; functional evaluation of sequelae; pulmonary rehabilitation interventions (physiotherapy, long-term oxygen therapy, and ventilation); and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.The evidence found suggests that tuberculosis is definitively responsible for functional sequelae, primarily causing an obstructive pattern on spirometry (but also restrictive and mixed patterns), and that there is a rationale for pulmonary rehabilitation. We also provide a list of variables that should be discussed in future studies on pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with post-tuberculosis sequelae. RESUMO O papel da tuberculose como uma prioridade de saúde pública e a disponibilidade de ferramentas diagnósticas para avaliar o estado

  17. Cavitating lung disease due to concomitant drug resistant tuberculosis and invasive pulmonary Aspergillosis in a post-partum patient: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ray, Animesh; Suri, J C; Sen, M K; Chakrabarti, S; Gupta, Ayush; Capoor, Malini

    2015-01-01

    Many disorders can present as cavitating lesions in the lung. In this case report, a case of mixed infection with drug resistant tuberculosis and invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in a post-partum patient has been presented.

  18. Calcified Pulmonary Nodules Identified in a 350-Year-Old-Joseon Mummy: the First Report on Ancient Pulmonary Tuberculosis from Archaeologically Obtained Pre-modern Korean Samples

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We found calcified pulmonary nodules in a middle-aged female mummy discovered from 350-yr-old Joseon tomb of Korea. In the CT scan, we found six radiopaque nodules in right lung, through the levels of thoracic vertebrae 1 to 6. We also found presumptive pleural adhesions in right thoracic cavity of CT images. We re-confirmed radiological findings by our post-factum dissection on the same mummy. By the differential diagnosis, we speculate that the radiopaque calcification nodules and associated pleural adhesion could have been caused by tuberculosis. This is the first-ever report on the pulmonary tuberculosis identified in archaeologically obtained, pre-modern Korean samples. PMID:26770051

  19. Gender differentials of pulmonary tuberculosis transmission and reactivation in an endemic area

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez‐Corona, M‐E; García‐García, L; DeRiemer, K; Ferreyra‐Reyes, L; Bobadilla‐del‐Valle, M; Cano‐Arellano, B; Canizales‐Quintero, S; Martínez‐Gamboa, A; Small, P M; Sifuentes‐Osornio, J; Ponce‐de‐León, A

    2006-01-01

    Background In most low income countries there are twice as many cases of tuberculosis (TB) reported among men than among women, a difference commonly attributed to biological and epidemiological characteristics as well as socioeconomic and cultural barriers in access to health care. The World Health Organization has encouraged gender specific comparisons in TB rates to determine whether women with TB are less likely than men with TB to be diagnosed, reported, and treated. A study was undertaken to identify gender based differences in patients with pulmonary TB and to use this information to improve TB control efforts. Methods Individuals with a cough for more than 2 weeks in southern Mexico were screened from March 1995 to April 2003. Clinical and mycobacteriological information (isolation, identification, drug susceptibility testing and IS6110 based genotyping, and spoligotyping) was collected from those with bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary TB. Patients were treated in accordance with official norms and followed to ascertain treatment outcome, retreatment, and vital status. Results 623 patients with pulmonary TB were enrolled. The male:female incidence rate ratio for overall, reactivated, and recently transmitted disease was 1.58 (95% CI 1.34 to 1.86), 1.64 (95% CI 1.36 to 1.98), and 1.41 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.96), respectively. Men were more likely than women to default from treatment (adjusted OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.46 to 7.43), to be retreated (hazard ratio (HR) 3.15, 95% CI 1.38 to 7.22), and to die from TB (HR 2.23, 95% CI 1.25 to 3.99). Conclusions Higher rates of transmitted and reactivated disease and poorer treatment outcomes among men are indicators of gender differentials in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary TB, and suggest specific strategies in endemic settings. PMID:16449260

  20. Multidrug-resistant pulmonary & extrapulmonary tuberculosis: A 13 years retrospective hospital-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Raveendran, Reena; Oberoi, Jaswinder Kaur; Wattal, Chand

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a public health problem of great significance in India. In the present study an attempt was made to analyse the progression of MDR-TB pattern during a course of 13 years (2000-2012) among the patient population at a tertiary care centre in New Delhi, India. Methods: Mycobacterial isolates obtained on Lowenstein-Jensen (L-J) medium/BacT/ALERT 3D were identified using AccuProbe molecular identification system, routine biochemical tests or GenoType Mycobacteria CM. Antimycobacterial susceptibility testing was performed using resistance ratio method on L-J medium (2000-2004) and one per cent proportion method on BacT/ALERT 3D system (2005-2012). Results: Of the total 14,849 samples subjected to mycobacterial culture, 6569 pulmonary and 8280 extrapulmonary, 2364 were detected positive for mycobacteria. The average percentage positivity rate was 15.9 per cent (18.9 and 13.6% in case of pulmonary and extrapulmonary samples, respectively). Our study revealed a significant increase (P<0.001) in multidrug resistance by 12 per cent (4.7% in 2000 to 19.8% in 2012). MDR-TB was more in case of pulmonary (28.2%) than extrapulmonary (11.6%) TB (P<0.001). Only 6.5 per cent (154) of mycobacterial isolates were non-tuberculous mycobacteria and rapid growers represented by Mycobacterium fortuitum and M. abscessus were the most commonly isolated species. Interpretation & conclusions: Increase in prevalence of MDR-TB by 12 per cent in the past 13 years is alarming. Policy modifications may have to be done to strengthen the existing TB control programmes to encourage contact tracing and culture and drug susceptibility testing for all smear positive pulmonary cases to ensure early and appropriate therapy. PMID:26658593

  1. Suspected pulmonary tuberculosis exposure at a remote U.S. army camp in northeastern Afghanistan, 2007.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Remington L; Silvestri, John W; Hu, Zheng; Tobler, Steven K; Trotta, Richard F

    2008-07-01

    Military personnel serving at remote camps in the border regions of northeastern Afghanistan may experience crowded living conditions and may have frequent interaction with local national (LN) workers, increasing the risk of exposure to multiple endemic diseases including tuberculosis (TB). In January 2007, pulmonary TB was clinically suspected in a LN worker who had close contact with a company of 92 U.S. Army personnel at a remote camp in Konar province, Afghanistan, over 4 months. This report describes the results of the contact investigation conducted by the U.S. Army, in which four U.S. personnel were found to have evidence of TB exposure. This investigation raises concerns arising from the high prevalence of drug-resistant TB in the region and in neighboring North West Frontier Province, Pakistan, and demonstrates the challenges of conducting contact investigations and using LN workers in deployed wartime environments.

  2. Prevalence of melioidosis in patients with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis and sputum smear negative for acid-fast bacilli in northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Suntornsut, Pornpan; Kasemsupat, Kriangsak; Silairatana, Santi; Wongsuvan, Gumphol; Jutrakul, Yaowaruk; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Day, Nicholas P J; Peacock, Sharon J; Limmathurotsakul, Direk

    2013-11-01

    The clinical and radiological features of pulmonary melioidosis can mimic tuberculosis. We prospectively evaluated 118 patients with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis who were acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear negative at Udon Thani Hospital, northeast Thailand. Culture of residual sputum from AFB testing was positive for Burkholderia pseudomallei in three patients (2.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.5-7.3%). We propose that in melioidosis-endemic areas, residual sputum from AFB testing should be routinely cultured for B. pseudomallei.

  3. Prevalence and treatment outcome of pulmonary and extrapulmonary pediatric tuberculosis in southwestern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Seyed Mohammad; Salmanzadeh, Shokrollah; Bakhtiyariniya, Pejman; Albagi, Ali; Hemmatnia, Fatemeh; Alavi, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: Knowledge about childhood tuberculosis (TB) in Iran is limited. This study aimed to determine the proportion of tuberculosis in children living in Khuzestan in southwest of Iran and its treatment outcomes. Methods: In this retrospective study, the child’s medical records registered in national TB program (NTP) unit of Khuzestan Health Center (KHC) for TB treatment from 2005 to 2010 were studied. Data including demographic, clinical presentation, laboratory test results, and treatment outcomes were extracted from the files and were analyzed. Results: Of total 4104 new TB cases registered in KHC, 203 (4.9%) were children. The mean age was 10.7±4.3 years, and 75.7% of them were females. More than 84% of TB children cases were 10 years or older, whereas, young children (< 5 years old) accounted for 5.6%. Of the total studied cases, 57.1% were pulmonary TB and 42.9% were extra pulmonary, 91.7% were successfully treated and 8.3% had poor treatment outcome. The main risk factors for poor treatment outcome were: age <5 years (OR: 0.17, 95% CI, 0.04-0.76), low body weight (OR: 0.08, 95% CI, 0.01-0.60), household contact with cases of TB treatment failure (OR: 0.13, 95% CI, 0.03-0.52), and exposure to cigarette smoke odor inside the home (OR: 0.17, 95% CI, 0.05-0.56). Conclusion: The proportion of pediatric TB in the region was lower than expected. The treatment success rate was higher than the rate defined in NTP. Special attention should be given to children aged less than five years, low body weight, contact with TB treatment failure cases, and exposure to cigarette smoke. PMID:26644895

  4. A Prediction Rule to Stratify Mortality Risk of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Helder Novais; Osório, Nuno S; Castro, António Gil; Ramos, Angélica; Carvalho, Teresa; Meira, Leonor; Araújo, David; Almeida, Leonor; Boaventura, Rita; Fragata, Patrícia; Chaves, Catarina; Costa, Patrício; Portela, Miguel; Ferreira, Ivo; Magalhães, Sara Pinto; Rodrigues, Fernando; Sarmento-Castro, Rui; Duarte, Raquel; Guimarães, João Tiago; Saraiva, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis imposes high human and economic tolls, including in Europe. This study was conducted to develop a severity assessment tool for stratifying mortality risk in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients. A derivation cohort of 681 PTB cases was retrospectively reviewed to generate a model based on multiple logistic regression analysis of prognostic variables with 6-month mortality as the outcome measure. A clinical scoring system was developed and tested against a validation cohort of 103 patients. Five risk features were selected for the prediction model: hypoxemic respiratory failure (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.8-7.9), age ≥50 years (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.7-4.8), bilateral lung involvement (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.4-4.4), ≥1 significant comorbidity-HIV infection, diabetes mellitus, liver failure or cirrhosis, congestive heart failure and chronic respiratory disease-(OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3-3.8), and hemoglobin <12 g/dL (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-3.1). A tuberculosis risk assessment tool (TReAT) was developed, stratifying patients with low (score ≤2), moderate (score 3-5) and high (score ≥6) mortality risk. The mortality associated with each group was 2.9%, 22.9% and 53.9%, respectively. The model performed equally well in the validation cohort. We provide a new, easy-to-use clinical scoring system to identify PTB patients with high-mortality risk in settings with good healthcare access, helping clinicians to decide which patients are in need of closer medical care during treatment.

  5. Mouse model of pulmonary cavitary tuberculosis and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9

    PubMed Central

    Ordonez, Alvaro A.; Tasneen, Rokeya; Pokkali, Supriya; Xu, Ziyue; Converse, Paul J.; Klunk, Mariah H.; Mollura, Daniel J.; Nuermberger, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cavitation is a key pathological feature of human tuberculosis (TB), and is a well-recognized risk factor for transmission of infection, relapse after treatment and the emergence of drug resistance. Despite intense interest in the mechanisms underlying cavitation and its negative impact on treatment outcomes, there has been limited study of this phenomenon, owing in large part to the limitations of existing animal models. Although cavitation does not occur in conventional mouse strains after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, cavitary lung lesions have occasionally been observed in C3HeB/FeJ mice. However, to date, there has been no demonstration that cavitation can be produced consistently enough to support C3HeB/FeJ mice as a new and useful model of cavitary TB. We utilized serial computed tomography (CT) imaging to detect pulmonary cavitation in C3HeB/FeJ mice after aerosol infection with M. tuberculosis. Post-mortem analyses were performed to characterize lung lesions and to localize matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) previously implicated in cavitary TB in situ. A total of 47-61% of infected mice developed cavities during primary disease or relapse after non-curative treatments. Key pathological features of human TB, including simultaneous presence of multiple pathologies, were noted in lung tissues. Optical imaging demonstrated increased MMP activity in TB lesions and MMP-9 was significantly expressed in cavitary lesions. Tissue MMP-9 activity could be abrogated by specific inhibitors. In situ, three-dimensional analyses of cavitary lesions demonstrated that 22.06% of CD11b+ signal colocalized with MMP-9. C3HeB/FeJ mice represent a reliable, economical and tractable model of cavitary TB, with key similarities to human TB. This model should provide an excellent tool to better understand the pathogenesis of cavitation and its effects on TB treatments. PMID:27482816

  6. True status of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis defaulters in Malawi.

    PubMed Central

    Kruyt, M. L.; Kruyt, N. D.; Boeree, M. J.; Harries, A. D.; Salaniponi, F. M.; van Noord, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    The article reports the results of a study to determine the true outcome of 8 months of treatment received by smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients who had been registered as defaulters in the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH) and Mlambe Mission Hospital (MMH), Blantyre, Malawi. The treatment outcomes were documented from the tuberculosis registers of all patients registered between 1 October 1994 and 30 September 1995. The true treatment outcome for patients who had been registered as defaulters was determined by making personal inquiries at the treatment units and the residences of patients or relatives and, in a few cases, by writing to the appropriate postal address. Interviews were carried out with patients who had defaulted and were still alive and with matched, fully compliant PTB patients who had successfully completed the treatment to determine the factors associated with defaulter status. Of the 1099 patients, 126 (11.5%) had been registered as defaulters, and the true treatment outcome was determined for 101 (80%) of the latter; only 22 were true defaulters, 31 had completed the treatment, 31 had died during the treatment period, and 17 had left the area. A total of 8 of the 22 true defaulters were still alive and were compared with the compliant patients. Two significant characteristics were associated with the defaulters; they were unmarried; and they did not know the correct duration of antituberculosis treatment. Many of the smear-positive tuberculosis patients who had been registered as defaulters in the Blantyre district were found to have different treatment outcomes, without defaulting. The quality of reporting in the health facilities must therefore be improved in order to exclude individuals who are not true defaulters. PMID:10361755

  7. Applying patient centered approach in management of pulmonary tuberculosis: A case report from Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Atif, M; Sulaiman, SAS; Shafi, AA; Muttalif, AR; Ali, I; Saleem, F

    2011-01-01

    A 24 year university student with history of productive cough was registered as sputum smear confirmed case of pulmonary tuberculosis. During treatment, patient suffered from itchiness associated with anti tuberculosis drugs and was treated with chlorpheniramine (4mg) tablet. Patient missed twenty eight doses of anti tuberculosis drugs in continuation phase claiming that he was very busy in his studies and assignments. Upon questioning he further explained that he was quite healthy after five months and unable to concentrate on his studies after taking prescribed medicines. His treatment was stopped based on clinical improvement, although he did not complete six months therapy. Two major reasons; false perception of being completely cured and side effects associated with anti TB drugs might be responsible for non adherence. Non sedative anti histamines like fexofenadine, citrizine or loratidine should be preferred over first generation anti histamines (chlorpheniramine) in patients with such lifestyle. Patient had not completed full course of chemotherapy, which is preliminary requirement for a case to be classified as “cure” and “treatment completed”. Moreover, patient had not defaulted for two consecutive months. Therefore, according to WHO treatment outcome categories, this patient can neither be classified as “cure” or “treatment completed” nor as “defaulter”. Further elaboration of WHO treatment outcome categories is required for adequate classification of patients with similar characteristics. Likelihood of non adherence can be significantly reduced by applying the WHO recommended “Patient Centered Approach” strategy. Close friend, class mate or family member can be selected as treatment supporter to ensure adherence to treatment PMID:24826012

  8. A Prediction Rule to Stratify Mortality Risk of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Osório, Nuno S.; Castro, António Gil; Ramos, Angélica; Carvalho, Teresa; Meira, Leonor; Araújo, David; Almeida, Leonor; Boaventura, Rita; Fragata, Patrícia; Chaves, Catarina; Costa, Patrício; Portela, Miguel; Ferreira, Ivo; Magalhães, Sara Pinto; Rodrigues, Fernando; Sarmento-Castro, Rui; Duarte, Raquel; Guimarães, João Tiago; Saraiva, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis imposes high human and economic tolls, including in Europe. This study was conducted to develop a severity assessment tool for stratifying mortality risk in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients. A derivation cohort of 681 PTB cases was retrospectively reviewed to generate a model based on multiple logistic regression analysis of prognostic variables with 6-month mortality as the outcome measure. A clinical scoring system was developed and tested against a validation cohort of 103 patients. Five risk features were selected for the prediction model: hypoxemic respiratory failure (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.8–7.9), age ≥50 years (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.7–4.8), bilateral lung involvement (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.4–4.4), ≥1 significant comorbidity—HIV infection, diabetes mellitus, liver failure or cirrhosis, congestive heart failure and chronic respiratory disease–(OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3–3.8), and hemoglobin <12 g/dL (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1–3.1). A tuberculosis risk assessment tool (TReAT) was developed, stratifying patients with low (score ≤2), moderate (score 3–5) and high (score ≥6) mortality risk. The mortality associated with each group was 2.9%, 22.9% and 53.9%, respectively. The model performed equally well in the validation cohort. We provide a new, easy-to-use clinical scoring system to identify PTB patients with high-mortality risk in settings with good healthcare access, helping clinicians to decide which patients are in need of closer medical care during treatment. PMID:27636095

  9. Etanercept Exacerbates Inflammation and Pathology in a Rabbit Model of Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsenova, Liana; O'Brien, Paul; Holloway, Jennifer; Peixoto, Blas; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Fallows, Dorothy; Subbian, Selvakumar

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) antagonists has been associated with increased risk of tuberculosis (TB). We examined the usefulness of the rabbit model of active pulmonary TB for studying the impact of the human immune modulatory reagent etanercept on the host immune response. Control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, disease pathology, and the global transcriptional response in Mtb-infected lungs of rabbits were studied. Etanercept treatment exacerbated disease pathology and reduced bacillary control in the lungs, compared with infected untreated animals. Reduced collagen and fibrin deposition in the granulomas was associated with significant downregulation of the collagen metabolism and fibrosis network genes and upregulation of genes in the inflammatory response and cell recruitment networks in the lungs of etanercept treated, compared with untreated rabbits. Our results suggest that targeting the TNF-α signaling pathway disrupts the tissue remodeling process, which is required for the formation and maintenance of well-differentiated granulomas and for control of Mtb growth in the lungs. These results validate the use of the rabbit model for investigating the impact of selected human immune modulatory drugs, such as a TNF-α antagonist, on the host immune response and pathogenesis in TB. PMID:24831609

  10. Surgical interventions for pulmonary tuberculosis in Mumbai, India: surgical outcomes and programmatic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Shirodkar, S.; Anande, L.; Dalal, A.; Desai, C.; Corrêa, G.; Laxmeshwar, C.; Mansoor, H.; Remartinez, D.; Trelles, M.; Isaakidis, P.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: While surgery for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is considered an important adjunct for specific cases, including drug-resistant tuberculosis, operational evidence on its feasibility and effectiveness is limited. Objective: To describe surgical outcomes and programmatic challenges of providing surgery for PTB in Mumbai, India. Design: A descriptive study of routinely collected data of surgical interventions for PTB from 2010 to 2014 in two Mumbai hospitals, one public, one private. Results: Of 85 patients, 5 (6%) died and 17 (20%) had complications, with wound infection being the most frequent. Repeat operation was required in 12 (14%) patients. Most procedures were performed on an emergency basis, and eligibility was established late in the course of treatment. Median time from admission to surgery was 51 days. Drug susceptibility test (DST) patterns and final treatment outcomes were not systematically collected. Conclusion: In a high-burden setting such as Mumbai, important data on surgery for PTB were surprisingly limited in both the private and public sectors. Eligibility for surgery was established late, culture and DST were not systematically offered, the interval between admission and surgery was long and TB outcomes were not known. Systematic data collection would allow for proper evaluation of surgery as adjunctive therapy for all forms of TB under programmatic conditions. PMID:27695683

  11. IMPACT OF CIGARETTE SMOKING ON RATES AND CLINICAL PROGNOSIS OF PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS IN SOUTHERN MEXICO

    PubMed Central

    Bonacci, Robert A.; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; García-García, Lourdes; Reynales-Shigematsu, Luz Myriam; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Bobadilla-del-Valle, Miriam; Canizales-Quintero, Sergio; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Téllez-Vázquez, Norma; Mongua-Rodríguez, Norma; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Martínez-Gamboa, Rosa Areli; Cano-Arellano, Bulmaro; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; de León, Alfredo Ponce

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between cigarette smoking and incidence and mortality rates of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and treatment outcomes. Materials From 1995-2010, we analyzed data from 1062 patients with TB and from 2001-2004, 2951 contacts in Southern Mexico. Patients with acid-fast bacilli or Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum samples underwent epidemiological, clinical and mycobacteriological evaluation and received treatment by the local DOTS program. Results Consumers of 1-10 (LS) or 11 or more (HS) cigarettes per day incidence (1.75 and 11.79) and mortality (HS,17.74) smoker-nonsmoker rate ratios were significantly higher for smokers. Smoker population was more likely to experience unfavorable treatment outcomes (HS, adjusted OR 2.36) and retreatment (LS and HS, adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 2.14 and 2.37). Contacts that smoked had a higher probability of developing active TB (HR 2.38) during follow up. Conclusions Results indicate the need of incorporating smoking prevention and cessation, especially among men, into international TB control strategies. PMID:22982014

  12. Rapid diagnosis of childhood pulmonary tuberculosis by Xpert MTB/RIF assay using bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qing-Qin; Jiao, Wei-Wei; Han, Rui; Jiao, An-Xia; Sun, Lin; Tian, Jian-Ling; Ma, Yu-Yan; Rao, Xiao-Chun; Shen, Chen; Li, Qin-Jing; Shen, A-Dong

    2014-01-01

    In order to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay on childhood pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) using bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), we evaluated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of Xpert MTB/RIF assay using BALF in comparison with acid-fast bacilli (AFB) microscopy and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) culture for diagnosing childhood PTB using Chinese "composite clinical reference standard" (CCRS) as reference standard. Two hundred fifty-five children with suspected PTB were enrolled at Beijing Children's Hospital from September 2010 to July 2013. Compared with Chinese CCRS, the sensitivity of AFB microscopy, MTB culture, and Xpert MTB/RIF assay was 8.4%, 28.9%, and 53.0%, respectively. The specificity of three assays was all 100%. Xpert MTB/RIF assay could detect 33.9% of cases with negative MTB culture, and 48.7% of cases with negative AFB microscopy. Younger age (<3 years), absence of BCG scar, and contact with TB patient were found significantly associated with a positive result of Xpert MTB/RIF assay. In conclusion, Xpert MTB/RIF assay using BALF can assist in diagnosing childhood PTB much faster when fiberoptic bronchoscopy is necessary according to the chest radiograph.

  13. Surgical interventions for pulmonary tuberculosis in Mumbai, India: surgical outcomes and programmatic challenges.

    PubMed

    Shirodkar, S; Anande, L; Dalal, A; Desai, C; Corrêa, G; Das, M; Laxmeshwar, C; Mansoor, H; Remartinez, D; Trelles, M; Isaakidis, P

    2016-09-01

    Setting: While surgery for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is considered an important adjunct for specific cases, including drug-resistant tuberculosis, operational evidence on its feasibility and effectiveness is limited. Objective: To describe surgical outcomes and programmatic challenges of providing surgery for PTB in Mumbai, India. Design: A descriptive study of routinely collected data of surgical interventions for PTB from 2010 to 2014 in two Mumbai hospitals, one public, one private. Results: Of 85 patients, 5 (6%) died and 17 (20%) had complications, with wound infection being the most frequent. Repeat operation was required in 12 (14%) patients. Most procedures were performed on an emergency basis, and eligibility was established late in the course of treatment. Median time from admission to surgery was 51 days. Drug susceptibility test (DST) patterns and final treatment outcomes were not systematically collected. Conclusion: In a high-burden setting such as Mumbai, important data on surgery for PTB were surprisingly limited in both the private and public sectors. Eligibility for surgery was established late, culture and DST were not systematically offered, the interval between admission and surgery was long and TB outcomes were not known. Systematic data collection would allow for proper evaluation of surgery as adjunctive therapy for all forms of TB under programmatic conditions.

  14. Duration of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Infectiousness under Adequate Therapy, as Assessed Using Induced Sputum Samples

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Yousang; Shin, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Young Seok; Lee, Suh-Young; Park, So Young; Mo, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Changhwan

    2017-01-01

    Background A sputum culture is the most reliable indicator of the infectiousness of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB); however, a spontaneous sputum specimen may not be suitable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the infectious period in patients with non–drug-resistant (DR) PTB receiving adequate standard chemotherapy, using induced sputum (IS) specimens. Methods We evaluated the duration of infectiousness of PTB using a retrospective cohort design. Results Among the 35 patients with PTB, 22 were smear-positive. The rates of IS culture positivity from baseline to the sixth week of anti-tuberculosis medication in the smear-positive PTB group were 100%, 100%, 91%, 73%, 36%, and 18%, respectively. For smear-positive PTB cases, the median time of conversion to culture negativity was 35.0 days (range, 28.0–42.0 days). In the smear-negative PTB group (n=13), the weekly rates of positive IS culture were 100%, 77%, 39%, 8%, 0%, and 0%, respectively, and the median time to conversion to culture-negative was 21.0 days (range, 17.5–28.0 days). Conclusion The infectiousness of PTB, under adequate therapy, may persist longer than previously reported, even in patients with non-DR PTB. PMID:28119744

  15. [Results of surgical intervention depending on duration of preoperative treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis patients].

    PubMed

    Grigorian, V A; Golovchenko, R N; Ustinov, A I

    2001-01-01

    The case histories of 428 patients operated on for tuberculosis were analyzed. Three groups were identified. They were as follows: 1) 121 patients untreated with bactericidal drugs before surgery; 2) 247 patients treated less than 6 months before it; 3) 160 patients treated more than 6 months before surgery. Various complications due to resection of the lung were observed in 30 (7%) patients undergone surgery. They were 6.6, 6.8, and 7.5% in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. A clinical effect was achieved in 99.8% of cases. The late outcomes of surgical intervention were studied within 1 to 10 years in 354 patients, including 102, 119, and 133 patients in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Progressive and recurrent tuberculosis was revealed in 7 (6.8%), 11 (9.2%), and 18 (13.5%), respectively. Thus, immediate and late outcomes of surgical treatment were not worse in patients with tuberculomas untreated with bactericidal drugs before surgery than in those who receive long-term therapy that substantially reduces the duration of therapy, which is a most important task of modern phthisiology. So patients should be operated on when they are found to have pulmonary tuberculomas without signs of a progressive tuberculous process.

  16. Pulmonary tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have come into contact with the TB bacteria. It does not mean that you have active ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  17. Detection and Quantification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the Sputum of Culture-Negative HIV-infected Pulmonary Tuberculosis Suspects: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Madico, Guillermo; Mpeirwe, Moses; White, Laura; Vinhas, Solange; Orr, Beverley; Orikiriza, Patrick; Miller, Nancy S.; Gaeddert, Mary; Mwanga-Amumpaire, Juliet; Palaci, Moises; Kreiswirth, Barry; Straight, Joe; Dietze, Reynaldo; Boum, Yap; Jones-López, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Rapid diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is critical for timely initiation of treatment and interruption of transmission. Yet, despite recent advances, many patients remain undiagnosed. Culture, usually considered the most sensitive diagnostic method, is sub-optimal for paucibacillary disease. Methods We evaluated the Totally Optimized PCR (TOP) TB assay, a new molecular test that we hypothesize is more sensitive than culture. After pre-clinical studies, we estimated TOP’s per-patient sensitivity and specificity in a convenience sample of 261 HIV-infected pulmonary TB suspects enrolled into a TB diagnostic study in Mbarara, Uganda against MGIT culture, Xpert MTB/RIF and a composite reference standard. We validated results with a confirmatory PCR used for sequencing M. tuberculosis. Measurements and Results Using culture as reference, TOP had 100% sensitivity but 35% specificity. Against a composite reference standard, the sensitivity of culture (27%) and Xpert MTB/RIF (27%) was lower than TOP (99%), with similar specificity (100%, 98% and 87%, respectively). In unadjusted analyses, culture-negative/TOP-positive patients were more likely to be older (P<0·001), female (P<0·001), have salivary sputum (P = 0·05), sputum smear-negative (P<0.001) and less advanced disease on chest radiograph (P = 0.05). M. tuberculosis genotypes identified in sputum by DNA sequencing exhibit differential growth in culture. Conclusions These findings suggest that the TOP TB assay is accurately detecting M. tuberculosis DNA in the sputum of culture-negative tuberculosis suspects. Our results require prospective validation with clinical outcomes. If the operating characteristics of the TOP assay are confirmed in future studies, it will be justified as a “TB rule out” test. PMID:27391604

  18. Sputum Collection and Disposal Perceptions and Practices Among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients from Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Vipin; Goel, Shewtank

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Even a single case of pulmonary Tuberculosis (TB) can infect many others. Hence, to ensure better control of the disease, it is imperative that all patients dispose their sputum safely. Outcomes of this study would highlight the gaps need to be bridged in order to curtail transmission of TB. Aim To analyse and ascertain perceptions about the disease and determine the sputum collection and disposal practices followed by sputum-positive TB patients. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, 422 sputum-positive TB patients aged more than 15 years registered in the Tuberculosis Unit Ambala city from January 2012 – September 2012 formed the study population. After enrolment, at the end of one month, they were assessed for sputum collection and disposal practices by a trained person at their place of residences. Questionnaire was framed to collect relevant data. Results Safe sputum disposal was practised by 46.4% of the study subjects. More females than males disposed of sputum safely (70.4% vs. 29.6%), as did more subjects of low than middle socio-economic status (74.1% vs. 25.9%). 70.9% (n=66) of the subjects with a family history of TB practiced safe sputum disposal methods as compared to 39.5% (n=130) subjects without a family history of TB practiced the same. Similarly more literate than illiterate subjects (n=150, 57.5% vs. n=46, 28.6%) practiced safe sputum disposal methods. (p< 0.001). Regarding knowledge of causation of TB only 63% of the study subjects were in the view that this disease is caused by germs. Conclusion The study demonstrated that a large number of pulmonary TB patients practiced unsafe sputum disposal. Unsafe sputum disposal was higher among males, illiterate patients and those belonging to the lower socio-economic group. Therefore, it is need of the hour to launch Information, Education and Communication (IEC) activities so as to improve the sputum disposal practices among tuberculosis patients. PMID:28208887

  19. Pulmonary tuberculosis among tribals in India: A systematic review & meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Beena E.; Adinarayanan, Srividya; Manogaran, C.; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: There has been limited investigation on the prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) in tribal communities in India, a vulnerable section of Indian society. The lack of a population-based estimate prompted us to conduct a meta-analysis of existing studies to provide a single, population-based estimate of the TB prevalence for tribals. Methods: Literature search was conducted in PubMed using the keywords - “tuberculosis”, “tribals”, “India”, “prevalence”, and “survey”. References cited in the articles retrieved were also reviewed, and those found relevant were selected. TB prevalence rates estimated by the studies were used for our calculation of a pooled-estimate. Results: The pooled estimate, based on the random effects model, was 703 per 100,000 population with a 95 % CI of 386-1011. The associated heterogeneity measures in terms of Cochran's Q was significant (P=0 0.08 <0.1) and I2 was moderate at 48 per cent. Interpretation & conclusions: The meta-analysis demonstrated a large variability in pulmonary TB prevalence estimates among the different studies with poor representation of the various tribal groups. The moderate level of heterogeneity found across the studies suggests that the pooled-estimate needs to be treated with caution. Our findings also highlight the need to assess the pulmonary TB burden in India. PMID:26139779

  20. Effective Treatment of Acute and Chronic Murine Tuberculosis with Liposome-Encapsulated Clofazimine

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Linda B.; Sinha, Indu; Franzblau, Scott G.; Krahenbuhl, James L.; Mehta, Reeta T.

    1999-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of liposomal clofazimine (L-CLF) was studied in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Erdman. Groups of mice were treated with either free clofazimine (F-CLF), L-CLF, or empty liposomes twice a week for five treatments beginning on day 1 (acute), day 21 (established), or day 90 (chronic) postinfection. One day after the last treatment, the numbers of CFU of M. tuberculosis in the spleen, liver, and lungs were determined. F-CLF at the maximum tolerated dose of 5 mg/kg of body weight was ineffective; however, 10-fold-higher doses of L-CLF demonstrated a dose response with significant CFU reduction in all tissues without any toxic effects. In acutely infected mice, 50 mg of L-CLF/kg reduced CFU 2 to 3 log units in all three organs. In established or chronic infection, treated mice showed no detectable CFU in the spleen or liver and 1- to 2-log-unit reduction in the lungs. A second series of L-CLF treatments cleared M. tuberculosis in all three tissues. L-CLF appears to be bactericidal in the liver and spleen, which remained negative for M. tuberculosis growth for 2 months. Thus, L-CLF could be useful in the treatment of tuberculosis. PMID:10390215

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria from Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Otchere, ID; Asante-Poku, A; Osei-Wusu, S; Aboagye, SY; Yeboah-Manu, D

    2017-01-01

    Background Nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) species are assuming public health importance in pulmonary diseases; they are increasingly being isolated, and importantly, most NTMs do not respond to routine tuberculosis (TB) drugs. This study aimed to identify NTMs isolated from pulmonary TB cases and also determine their susceptibility to streptomycin (STR), isoniazid (INH), and rifampicin (RIF). Methods A total of 1755 mycobacterial isolates, obtained between August 2012 and July 2014, from 2036 smear-positive pulmonary cases were identified using polymerase chain reaction amplification of IS6110, and hsp65 gene sequencing analysis. Drug susceptibility testing (DST) was then performed for the identified NTMs against STR, INH, and RIF using microplate Alamar blue assay. The results were analyzed against patients’ biodata for statistical associations. Results Of the 1755 analyzed isolates, we identified 43 (2.5%) NTMs, which included 18 (41.9%) Mycobacterium intracellulare, 13 (30.2%) Mycobacterium avium subs. paratuberculosis, 5 (11.3%) Mycobacterium abscessus, 3 (7.0%) each of Mycobacterium mucogenicum and Mycobacterium colombiense, and 1 (2.3%) Mycobacterium simiae. Patients infected with NTMs (52.0%) were more likely to be human immunodeficiency virus-positive (P = 0.001, odds ratio = 6.6, 95% confidence interval = 2.7–16.2) than those infected with M. tuberculosis complex (5.8%). All the 43 (100%) NTMs were resistant to INH, whereas 32 (74%) and 19 (44%) were resistant to RIF and STR, respectively. Furthermore, 16 (37.2%) NTMs were resistant to all three drugs, 20 were resistant to INH and RIF, and 3 were resistant to STR and INH. All the M. abscessus isolates were resistant to all the three drugs, whereas all the M. avium isolates were resistant to INH and RIF, but only three were resistant to STR. Among the M. intracellulare isolates, 8, 18, and 15 isolates were resistant to STR, INH, and RIF, respectively. Conclusion The observed high-resistance level to

  2. Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis with cervical lymph node involvement, and coexistence with pulmonary tuberculosis and right pneumothorax: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Gao, Limin; Li, Huifang; Li, Gandi; Liu, Weiping; Li, Jinnan; Zhang, Wenyan

    2015-01-01

    We report an uncommon 22-year-old male Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (PLCH) case which co-existed with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Unlike the common PLCH cases, this PLCH case has cervical lymph node involvement and right pneumothorax. The diagnosis was established by the imaging of lung and the biopsies of the lung and left neck lymph node. Imaging of the chest showed characteristic small nodules and thin-walled cysts and right pneumothorax. The LCH cells in the lung and left neck lymph node were characterized by large convoluted nuclei with cerebriform indentations of the nuclear envelope and longitudinal grooves. The nuclei contained small eosinophilic nucleoli and moderate amount cytoplasm. Immunohistochemically, the histiocytoid cells were positive for Langerin, CD1a and S-100. Acid-fast bacilli were found in sputum and lung biopsy tissue. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of PLCH with cervical lymph node involvement, and coexisted with pulmonary tuberculosis, right pneumothorax. A contribution of this case and review three of the five cases of PLCH with extrapulmonary involvement to lymph nodes resolved spontaneously after smoking cessation constitute a novel addition that it is inappropriate to regard pulmonary/nodal LCH as multi-organ or disseminated disease, and the treatment methods are the same whether the PLCH patient with lymph node involvement or not.

  3. Influence of old pulmonary tuberculosis on the management of secondary spontaneous pneumothorax in patients over the age of 70 years

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Cjeol

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the treatment outcomes and influence of old pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in elderly patients (over 70 years) with secondary spontaneous pneumothorax (SSP). Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on patients with SSP between January 2002 and December 2014. Treatment outcomes including chest tube duration (CTD), type and complication of surgery, recurrence and survival rate were obtained from the review of medical records and analyzed statistically. Results Two hundred and sixteen consecutive cases were recruited. Of these, 134 (62.0%) did not have old pulmonary TB [non-tuberculosis (NTB) group], and the other 82 (38.0%) had experienced pulmonary TB (TB group). More thoracoscopic surgeries had been performed in the NTB group (P=0.038). More postoperative complications developed in the TB group (P=0.038). Total CTD and postoperative CTD in the TB group were significantly longer (P=0.015 and 0.030, respectively). However, recurrence-free survival and overall survival rate were not significantly different between the TB and NTB groups. Conclusions Old pulmonary TB in elderly patients with SSP made their treatment more complicated. However, surgery might be considered in highly selected patients regardless of old pulmonary TB, and could be conducted with acceptable morbidity and mortality. PMID:27867567

  4. IL23R(Arg381Gln) functional polymorphism is associated with active pulmonary tuberculosis severity.

    PubMed

    Ben-Selma, Walid; Boukadida, Jalel

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the association between a functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the interleukin-23 receptor gene (IL23R; rs11209026, 1142 G(wild type) → A(reduced function), Arg381Gln) and disease severity outcome in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in the Tunisian population. SNP was investigated in a population of 168 patients with active pulmonary TB (cases were stratified into patients with minimal/moderate lung involvement, i.e., patients with minimal/moderate disease [Pmd], and patients with extensive lung involvement, i.e., patients with active disease [Pad]) and 150 healthy subjects. Genotype analyses were carried out using the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. We have found that the IL23R reduced-function allele 1142A and genotypes AA and AG were overrepresented, especially in the Pad subgroup compared with the control group (51% versus 18% [P = 10(-8)], 33% versus 5% [P = 10(-8)], and 36% versus 26% [P = 5 × 10(-3)], respectively). Additionally, comparison of the Pad and the Pmd groups showed that the A allele and AA genotype seemed to be associated with 2.79-fold (P = 4 × 10(-5)) and 7.74-fold (P = 10(-5)) increased risks of TB with minimal/moderate lung involvement, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the reduced-function polymorphism 1142G → A encoded by IL23R influences the outcome of disease severity of active pulmonary TB in Tunisian patients.

  5. Oral Tolerance to Environmental Mycobacteria Interferes with Intradermal, but Not Pulmonary, Immunization against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Price, Dominique N.; Kusewitt, Donna F.; Lino, Christopher A.; McBride, Amber A.; Muttil, Pavan

    2016-01-01

    Bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) is currently the only approved vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) and is administered in over 150 countries worldwide. Despite its widespread use, the vaccine has a variable protective efficacy of 0–80%, with the lowest efficacy rates in tropical regions where TB is most prevalent. This variability is partially due to ubiquitous environmental mycobacteria (EM) found in soil and water sources, with high EM prevalence coinciding with areas of poor vaccine efficacy. In an effort to elucidate the mechanisms underlying EM interference with BCG vaccine efficacy, we exposed mice chronically to Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), a specific EM, by two different routes, the oral and intradermal route, to mimic human exposure. After intradermal BCG immunization in mice exposed to oral M. avium, we saw a significant decrease in the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ, and an increase in T regulatory cells and the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 compared to naïve BCG-vaccinated animals. To circumvent the immunosuppressive effect of oral M. avium exposure, we vaccinated mice by the pulmonary route with BCG. Inhaled BCG immunization rescued IFN-γ levels and increased CD4 and CD8 T cell recruitment into airways in M. avium-presensitized mice. In contrast, intradermal BCG vaccination was ineffective at T cell recruitment into the airway. Pulmonary BCG vaccination proved protective against Mtb infection regardless of previous oral M. avium exposure, compared to intradermal BCG immunization. In conclusion, our data indicate that vaccination against TB by the pulmonary route increases BCG vaccine efficacy by avoiding the immunosuppressive interference generated by chronic oral exposure to EM. This has implications in TB-burdened countries where drug resistance is on the rise and health care options are limited due to economic considerations. A successful vaccine against TB is necessary in these areas as it is both effective and economical. PMID:27153120

  6. Severe Acute Pulmonary Toxicity Associated with Brentuximab in a Patient with Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sabet, Yasmin; Ramirez, Saul; Rosell Cespedes, Elizabeth; Rensoli Velasquez, Marimer; Porres-Muñoz, Mateo; Gaur, Sumit; Figueroa-Casas, Juan B.; Porres-Aguilar, Mateo

    2016-01-01

    Acute pulmonary toxicity associated with brentuximab appears to be a rare but serious adverse effect that can be potentially fatal. We report the case of a twenty-nine-year-old female with Hodgkin's lymphoma who was treated with brentuximab and later presented with severe acute pulmonary toxicity; she improved after the discontinuation of brentuximab and administration of antibiotics and glucocorticoid therapy. Currently there is very little data in the literature in regard to the clinical manifestations and characteristics of patients taking brentuximab and the potential development of acute severe pulmonary toxicity, as well as the appropriate therapeutic approach, making this particular case of successful treatment and resolution unique. PMID:27190667

  7. [Main reasons for a need for retreatment of pulmonary tuberculosis in Armenia in the past 10 years].

    PubMed

    Adzhemian, A A; Markarian, N R; Mkrtchian, M M

    2009-01-01

    250 patients in need of retreatment for pulmonary tuberculosis were enrolled in the study. The later indicated that there was a preponderance of males constituting all-bodied age population groups aged 25 to 64 years in the age and gender structure of the examinees. The major factors contributing to reactivation of the tuberculous process and poor outcomes of a previous course of specific therapy were extensive X-ray changes in the lung, drug resistance of the pathogens of tuberculosis to first-line drugs, and neglect of X-ray findings in the determinants of the duration of treatment. The use of the standard short-term course of chemotherapy was found to result in incomplete cure of disseminated and moderately disseminated processes, particularly in drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and in concomitant diseases, which becomes a cause of early and late recurrences.

  8. Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis infection in the dialysis patients with end stage renal diseases: case reports and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-fang; Han, Fei; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Jiang-hua

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) seems relatively difficult due to the absence of specific symptoms and signs in patients on peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis. We report four cases of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis on dialysis, with two cases on peritoneal dialysis and two cases on hemodialysis. The presentations, therapy, and outcomes of TB infection in these patients were reviewed. Otherwise, the English literature published in the PubMed database associating extra-pulmonary tuberculosis on dialysis over the last three decades is reviewed. A total of 61 studies containing 70 cases were included. The most common primary disease was diabetic nephropathy (22.86%, 16/70). The peritoneum (31.42%, 22/70), bone (21.42%, 15/70), and lymph node (20%, 14/70) were the most frequently infected. Single organ infection was common (90%, 63/70). Fever (58.57%, 41/70), pain (35.71%, 25/70), and enlarged lymph node (20%, 14/70) were the most common symptoms. Biopsy (67.14%, 47/70) and culture (40%, 28/70) provided most reliable methods for clear diagnosis of tuberculosis. The combined treatment of isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol (44.29%, 31/70) was the most common therapy. The majority of patients improved (82.86%, 58/70); however, 12 cases got worse (17.14%), with 10 of them dying (14.29%). Physicians should be aware of the non-specific symptoms and location of infection, and consider tuberculosis in their differential diagnoses in dialysis patients presenting with symptoms such as fever, pain, and weight loss.

  9. Gas exchange and pulmonary hypertension following acute pulmonary thromboembolism: has the emperor got some new clothes yet?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Patients present with a wide range of hypoxemia after acute pulmonary thromboembolism (APTE). Recent studies using fluorescent microspheres demonstrated that the scattering of regional blood flows after APTE, created by the embolic obstruction unique in each patient, significantly worsened regional ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) heterogeneity and explained the variability in gas exchange. Furthermore, earlier investigators suggested the roles of released vasoactive mediators in affecting pulmonary hypertension after APTE, but their quantification remained challenging. The latest study reported that mechanical obstruction by clots accounted for most of the increase in pulmonary vascular resistance, but that endothelin-mediated vasoconstriction also persisted at significant level during the early phase. PMID:25006441

  10. Gas exchange and pulmonary hypertension following acute pulmonary thromboembolism: has the emperor got some new clothes yet?

    PubMed

    Tsang, John Y C; Hogg, James C

    2014-06-01

    Patients present with a wide range of hypoxemia after acute pulmonary thromboembolism (APTE). Recent studies using fluorescent microspheres demonstrated that the scattering of regional blood flows after APTE, created by the embolic obstruction unique in each patient, significantly worsened regional ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) heterogeneity and explained the variability in gas exchange. Furthermore, earlier investigators suggested the roles of released vasoactive mediators in affecting pulmonary hypertension after APTE, but their quantification remained challenging. The latest study reported that mechanical obstruction by clots accounted for most of the increase in pulmonary vascular resistance, but that endothelin-mediated vasoconstriction also persisted at significant level during the early phase.

  11. Genetic Structure and Drug Susceptibility Patterns of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains Responsible of Human Pulmonary Tuberculosis in the Major Rearing Region in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Koro Koro, Francioli; Um Boock, Alphonse; Kaiyven, Afi Leslie; Noeske, Juergen; Gutierrez, Cristina; Kuaban, Christopher; Etoa, François-Xavier; Eyangoh, Sara Irène

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cameroon this last decade continues to present a low contribution of M. africanum and M. bovis in human tuberculosis (TB), while M. bovis was prevalent in cattle but all these pieces of information only concerned West and Center regions. Methods. We carried out the first study in Adamaoua, one of the most rearing regions of Cameroon, on the genetic structure and drug susceptibility of the MTBC strains isolated from newly diagnosed sputum smear-positive patients aged 15 years and above. For that purpose, spoligotyping, a modified 15 standard MIRU/VNTR loci typing, and the proportion method were used. Results. Four hundred and thirty-seven MTBC isolates were analyzed by spoligotyping. Of these, 423 were identified as M. tuberculosis, within the Cameroon family being dominant with 278 (65.7%) isolates; twelve (2.75%) isolates were classified as M. africanum and two as M. bovis. MIRU/VNTR typing of the most prevalent sublineage (SIT 61) suggested that this lineage is not a unique clone as thought earlier but could constitute a group of strains implicated to different pocket of TB transmission. Only M. tuberculosis sublineages were associated with antituberculosis drug resistance. Conclusion. These results showed the weak contribution of M. africanum and M. bovis to human active pulmonary tuberculosis in Cameroon even in the rearing region.

  12. Genetic Structure and Drug Susceptibility Patterns of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains Responsible of Human Pulmonary Tuberculosis in the Major Rearing Region in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Um Boock, Alphonse; Noeske, Juergen; Gutierrez, Cristina; Kuaban, Christopher; Etoa, François-Xavier; Eyangoh, Sara Irène

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cameroon this last decade continues to present a low contribution of M. africanum and M. bovis in human tuberculosis (TB), while M. bovis was prevalent in cattle but all these pieces of information only concerned West and Center regions. Methods. We carried out the first study in Adamaoua, one of the most rearing regions of Cameroon, on the genetic structure and drug susceptibility of the MTBC strains isolated from newly diagnosed sputum smear-positive patients aged 15 years and above. For that purpose, spoligotyping, a modified 15 standard MIRU/VNTR loci typing, and the proportion method were used. Results. Four hundred and thirty-seven MTBC isolates were analyzed by spoligotyping. Of these, 423 were identified as M. tuberculosis, within the Cameroon family being dominant with 278 (65.7%) isolates; twelve (2.75%) isolates were classified as M. africanum and two as M. bovis. MIRU/VNTR typing of the most prevalent sublineage (SIT 61) suggested that this lineage is not a unique clone as thought earlier but could constitute a group of strains implicated to different pocket of TB transmission. Only M. tuberculosis sublineages were associated with antituberculosis drug resistance. Conclusion. These results showed the weak contribution of M. africanum and M. bovis to human active pulmonary tuberculosis in Cameroon even in the rearing region. PMID:28119925

  13. Effect of Active Case Finding on Prevalence and Transmission of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Dhaka Central Jail, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Banu, Sayera; Rahman, Md. Toufiq; Uddin, Mohammad Khaja Mafij; Khatun, Razia; Khan, Md. Siddiqur Rahman; Rahman, Md. Mojibur; Uddin, Syed Iftekhar; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Heffelfinger, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding tuberculosis (TB) transmission dynamics is essential for establishing effective TB control strategies in settings where the burden and risk of transmission are high. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of active screening on controlling TB transmission and also to characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains for investigating transmission dynamics in a correctional setting. Methods The study was carried out in Dhaka Central Jail (DCJ), from October 2005 to February 2010. An active case finding strategy for pulmonary TB was established both at the entry point to the prison and inside the prison. Three sputum specimens were collected from all pulmonary TB suspects and subjected to smear microscopy, culture, and drug susceptibility testing as well as genotyping which included deletion analysis, spoligotyping and analysis of mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRU). Results A total of 60,585 inmates were screened during the study period. We found 466 inmates with pulmonary TB of whom 357 (77%) had positive smear microscopy results and 109 (23%) had negative smear microscopy results but had positive results on culture. The number of pulmonary TB cases declined significantly, from 49 cases during the first quarter to 8 cases in the final quarter of the study period (p=0.001). Deletion analysis identified all isolates as M. tuberculosis and further identified 229 (70%) strains as ‘modern’ and 100 (30%) strains as ‘ancestral’. Analysis of MIRU showed that 347 strains (85%) exhibited unique patterns, whereas 61 strains (15%) clustered into 22 groups. The largest cluster comprised eight strains of the Beijing M. tuberculosis type. The rate of recent transmission was estimated to be 9.6%. Conclusions Implementation of active screening for TB was associated with a decline in TB cases in DCJ. Implementation of active screening in prison settings might substantially reduce the national burden of TB in Bangladesh

  14. Clinical and morphologic features of acute, subacute and chronic cor pulmonale (pulmonary heart disease).

    PubMed

    Roberts, William Clifford; Shafii, Alexis E; Grayburn, Paul A; Ko, Jong Mi; Weissenborn, Matthew R; Rosenblatt, Randall L; Guileyardo, Joseph M

    2015-03-01

    Described are certain clinical and morphologic features of one patient with acute, another with subacute, and one with chronic cor pulmonale. All 3 had evidence of severe pulmonary hypertension. The patient with acute cor pulmonale 4 days after coronary bypass for unstable angina pectoris suddenly developed severe breathlessness with cyanosis and had fatal cardiac arrest and necropsy disclosed massive pulmonary embolism. The patient with subacute cor pulmonale had severe right-sided heart failure for 5 weeks and necropsy disclosed microscopic-sized neoplastic pulmonary emboli from a gastric carcinoma without parenchymal pulmonary metastases. The patient with chronic cor pulmonale had evidence of right-sided heart failure for years, the result of primary or idiopathic pulmonary hypertension almost certainly present from birth because the pattern of elastic fibers in the pulmonary trunk was that seen in newborns where the pressure in the pulmonary trunk and ascending aorta are similar. The patient with chronic cor pulmonale had plexiform pulmonary lesions indicative of irreversible pulmonary hypertension. Neither the acute nor the subacute patient had chronic pulmonary vascular changes. All 3 patients had dilated right ventricular cavities and non-dilated left ventricular cavities and only the patient with chronic cor pulmonale had right ventricular hypertrophy.

  15. [A case of pulmonary tuberculosis complicated with spinal caries improved by the nutrition management of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy].

    PubMed

    Tsukagoshi, Masaaki

    2009-04-01

    The case was 71-year-old woman. She was diagnosed as drug sensitive pulmonary tuberculosis (bII3 by the GAKKAI classification) and the chemotherapy with INH, RFP, EB and PZA was started. Two months later back pain and hemiparesis of both lower limbs appeared and it was diagnosed as caries of the 10th thoracic vertebrae. Because she was confined to bed and impossible to eat orally, the parenteral-hyperalimentaiton therapy was started with the central vein catheter. Howerer, nutritional state, pulmonary tuberculosis lesions and caries symptoms deteriorated. Then percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was performed and enteral nutrition was started. Since then nutritional state and tuberculosis lesions including caries improved gradually. It was estimated that the enteral nutrition brought about recovery of function and immunity of her digestive tract. For patients with advanced tuberculosis with poor nutritional state, the enteral nutrition is a useful adjuvant therapy, and the gastrostoma is considered to be one of the effective administrational routes when oral ingestion is difficult.

  16. Miliary tuberculosis and adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Piqueras, A R; Marruecos, L; Artigas, A; Rodriguez, C

    1987-01-01

    Although, miliary tuberculosis is an unusual cause of severe acute respiratory failure, we describe nine patients with miliary tuberculosis who developed adult respiratory distress syndrome. This complication occurred in seven patients despite treatment with antituberculous drugs. In two patients who developed the syndrome, miliary tuberculosis was diagnosed only at postmortem. The presence of pulmonary hypertension in all cases and disseminated intravascular coagulation in seven cases suggests a possible pathophysiologic relationship with severe pulmonary vascular damage. The high mortality rate (88.8%) was associated with nonpulmonary organ system failure. Miliary tuberculosis should be considered in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome of unknown etiology, and simple diagnostic procedures such as sputum, bronchial brushing, and gastric examination should be followed by invasive diagnostic procedures to confirm this etiology. Since untreated miliary tuberculosis is usually fatal, early recognition of this disease is of great importance, and specific therapy may play a lifesaving role.

  17. The Role of Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Therapeutic Resection for Medically Failed Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yau-Lin; Chang, Jia-Ming; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Cheng, Lili; Chen, Ying-Yuan; Wu, Ming-Ho; Lu, Chung-Lan; Yen, Yi-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There are few reports regarding video-assisted thoracoscopic therapeutic resection for medically failed pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). We reviewed our surgical results of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) therapeutic resection for pulmonary TB with medical failure, and its correlation with image characteristics on chest computed tomography (CT) scan. Between January 2007 and December 2012, among the 203 patients who had surgery for TB, the medical records of 89 patients undergoing therapeutic resection for medically failed pulmonary TB were reviewed. Clinical information and the image characteristics of CT scan were investigated and analyzed. Forty-six of the 89 patients undergoing successful VATS therapeutic resection had significantly lower grading in pleural thickening (P < 0.001), peribronchial lymph node calcification (P < 0.001), tuberculoma (P = 0.015), cavity (P = 0.006), and aspergilloma (P = 0.038); they had less operative blood loss (171.0 ± 218.7 vs 542.8 ± 622.8 mL; P < 0.001) and shorter hospital stay (5.2 ± 2.2 vs 15.6 ± 15.6 days; P < 0.001). They also had a lower percentage of anatomic resection (73.9% vs 93.0%; P = 0.016), a higher percentage of sublobar resection (56.5% vs 32.6%; P = 0.023), and a lower disease relapse rate (4.3% vs 23.3%; P = 0.009). Eighteen of the 38 patients with multi-drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (MDRTB) who successfully underwent VATS had significantly lower grading in pleural thickening (P = 0.001), peribronchial lymph node calcification (P = 0.019), and cavity (P = 0.017). They were preoperatively medicated for a shorter period of time (221.6 ± 90.8 vs 596.1 ± 432.5 days; P = 0.001), and had more sublobar resection (44.4% vs 10%), less blood loss (165.3 ± 148.3 vs 468.0 ± 439.9 mL; P = 0.009), and shorter hospital stay (5.4 ± 2.6 vs 11.8 ± 6.9 days; P = 0.001). Without multiple

  18. The predictive value of echocardiography for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension after acute pulmonary embolism in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Sup; Ahn, Jinhee; Choi, Jung Hyun; Lee, Hye Won; Oh, Jun-Hyok; Lee, Han Cheol; Cha, Kwang Soo; Hong, Taek Jong

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a life-threatening complication after acute pulmonary embolism (APE) and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of CTEPH after APE in Korea and to determine echocardiographic predictors of CTEPH. Methods Among 381 patients with APE confirmed by chest computed tomography (CT) between January 2007 and July 2013, 246 consecutive patients with available echocardiographic data were enrolled in this study. CTEPH was defined as a persistent right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) greater than 35 mmHg on echocardiography during follow-up and persistent pulmonary embolism on the follow-up CT. Results Fifteen patients (6.1%) had CTEPH. The rate of right ventricular (RV) dilatation (66.7% vs. 28.1%, p = 0.002) and the RVSP (75.5 mmHg vs. 39.0 mmHg, p < 0.001) were significantly higher in the CTEPH group. D-dimers, RV dilatation, RV hypertrophy, RVSP, and intermediate-risk APE were associated with the risk of CTEPH after APE (odds ratio [OR] 0.59, 5.11, 7.82, 1.06, and 4.86, respectively) on univariate analysis. RVSP remained as a significant predictor of CTEPH on multivariate analysis (OR, 1.056; 95% confidence interval, 1.006 to 1.109; p = 0.029). Conclusions This study showed that the incidence of CTEPH after APE in Korea was 6.1% and that initial RVSP by echocardiography was a strong prognostic factor for CTEPH. PMID:27044855

  19. Impact of tuberculosis treatment on health-related quality of life of pulmonary tuberculosis patients: a follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background At present, much of the attention within tuberculosis (TB) management is spent on microbiological cure, and its impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is either undervalued or seldom considered. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of TB treatment on HRQoL of new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients. Moreover, we also aimed to determine whether the selected socio-demographic and clinical variables were predictive of variability in the HRQoL scores over time. Methods This was a prospective follow-up of new smear positive PTB patients who were diagnosed at the chest clinic of Penang General Hospital between March 2010 and February 2011. All eligible patients (i.e., a new case of smear positive PTB, literate and aged 18 years or above) were asked to self-complete the SF-36v2 questionnaire at the start of their treatment, and then subsequently after the intensive phase and at the end of the treatment. A score on a health domain or component summary measure that was less than 47 norm-based scoring (NBS) point was considered indicative of impaired function within that health domain or dimension. Likewise, an individual having mental component summary (MCS) score ≤ 42 NBS point was considered to be at the risk of depression. Repeated measures ANOVA test was performed to examine how the summary scores varied over time, and to determine whether independent variables were predictive of variability in the physical component summary (PCS) and MCS scores over time. Results A total of 216 patients completed the SF-36v2 questionnaire at the start of their treatment. Out of these, 177 and 153 completed the questionnaire at the second and third follow-ups, respectively. The mean PCS scores at the start of the treatment, after the intensive phase and at the end of treatment were 41.9 (SD 5.1), 45.8 (SD 4.8) and 46.0 (SD 6.9), respectively. Similarly, the mean MCS scores at the start of the treatment, after the intensive phase

  20. Adjunctive Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement for Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, V. M.; Lee-Llacer, J.; Williams, J.; Ubaissi, H.; Gutierrez, G.

    2010-08-15

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are sometimes placed as an adjunct to full anticoagulation in patients with significant pulmonary embolism (PE). We aimed to determine the prevalence of adjunctive IVC filter placement in individuals diagnosed with PE, as well as the effect of adjunctive filter placement on mortality in patients with right heart strain associated with PE. This was a retrospective study of patients with acute PE treated with full anticoagulation admitted to a single academic medical center. Information abstracted from patient charts included presence or absence of right heart strain and of deep-vein thrombosis, and whether or not an IVC filter was placed. The endpoint was in-hospital mortality. Over 2.75 years, we found that 248 patients were diagnosed with acute PE, with an in-hospital mortality rate of 4.4%. The prevalence of adjunctive IVC filter placement was 13.3% (33 of 248), and the prevalence of documented right heart strain was 27.0% (67 of 248). In-hospital mortality was 10.2% in the non-filter-treated group (5 of 49), whereas there were no deaths in the filter-treated group (0 of 18); however, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.37). Both the presence of deep-vein thrombosis and of right heart strain increased the likelihood that an adjunctive IVC filter was placed (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001, respectively). At our institution, patients were treated with IVC filters in addition to anticoagulation in 13.3% of cases of acute PE. Prospective studies or large clinical registries should be conducted to clarify whether this practice improves outcomes.

  1. miRNA Signatures in Sera of Patients with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Ilaria C.; Norbis, Luca; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Bosu, Roberta; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Codecasa, Luigi R.; Goletti, Delia; Matteelli, Alberto; Ntinginya, Elias N.; Aloi, Francesco; Heinrich, Norbert; Reither, Klaus; Cirillo, Daniela M.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies showed that assessing levels of specific circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) is a non-invasive, rapid, and accurate method for diagnosing diseases or detecting alterations in physiological conditions. We aimed to identify a serum miRNA signature to be used for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). To account for variations due to the genetic makeup, we enrolled adults from two study settings in Europe and Africa. The following categories of subjects were considered: healthy (H), active pulmonary TB (PTB), active pulmonary TB, HIV co-infected (PTB/HIV), latent TB infection (LTBI), other pulmonary infections (OPI), and active extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB). Sera from 10 subjects of the same category were pooled and, after total RNA extraction, screened for miRNA levels by TaqMan low-density arrays. After identification of “relevant miRNAs”, we refined the serum miRNA signature discriminating between H and PTB on individual subjects. Signatures were analyzed for their diagnostic performances using a multivariate logistic model and a Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) model. A leave-one-out-cross-validation (LOOCV) approach was adopted for assessing how both models could perform in practice. The analysis on pooled specimens identified selected miRNAs as discriminatory for the categories analyzed. On individual serum samples, we showed that 15 miRNAs serve as signature for H and PTB categories with a diagnostic accuracy of 82% (CI 70.2–90.0), and 77% (CI 64.2–85.9) in a RVM and a logistic classification model, respectively. Considering the different ethnicity, by selecting the specific signature for the European group (10 miRNAs) the diagnostic accuracy increased up to 83% (CI 68.1–92.1), and 81% (65.0–90.3), respectively. The African-specific signature (12 miRNAs) increased the diagnostic accuracy up to 95% (CI 76.4–99.1), and 100% (83.9–100.0), respectively. Serum miRNA signatures represent an interesting source of biomarkers for TB disease with the

  2. Acute ECG ST-segment elevation mimicking myocardial infarction in a patient with pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common cardiovascular emergency, but it is still often misdiagnosed due to its unspecific clinical symptoms. Elevated troponin concentrations are associated with greater morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary embolism. Right ventricular ischemia due to increased right ventricular afterload is believed to be underlying mechanism of elevated troponin values in acute pulmonary embolism, but a paradoxical coronary artery embolism through opened intra-artrial communication is another possible explanation as shown in our case report. PMID:21106090

  3. Adenosine deaminase in CSF and pleural fluid for diagnosis of tubercular meningitis and pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nepal, A K; Gyawali, N; Poudel, B; Mahato, R V; Lamsal, M; Gurung, R; Baral, N; Majhi, S

    2012-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most common infectious diseases in developing countries including Nepal. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis results in poor prognosis of the disease. This study was conducted to estimate diagnostic cut off values of Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and pleural fluid and to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values ofADA in pleural fluid and CSF from patients with tuberculous and non-tuberculous disease. A total of 98 body fluid (CSF: 24, Pleural fluid: 74) specimens were received for the estimation of ADA. ADA activity was measured at 37 degrees C by spectrophotometric method of Guisti and Galanti, 1984 at 625nm wavelength. Among the patients enrolled for the study subjects for which CSF were received (n = 24) included 8 tuberculous meningitis (TBM), and 16 non-tubercular meningitis (NTM). Pleural fluid samples (n = 74) were received from 19 pulmonary TB with pleural effusion, 17 PTB without pleural effusion and 37 of non-tuberculous disease patients. CSF ADA activity were (11. 1 +/- 2.03 IU/L) and (5.3 +/- +1.89 IU/L) (p <00001) in TM and non-NTM groups and Pleural fluid ADA activity were (10 +/- 22.18 IU/L) and (23.79 +/- 11.62 IU/L) (p < 0.001) in PTB and non-TB groups respectively. ADA test in body fluids, which is simple, cost-effective and sensitive, specific for the tubercular disease is recommended to perform before forwarding the cumbersome and expensive procedures like culture and PCR for TB diagnosis.

  4. Glucose Metabolism Disorder Is Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Individuals with Respiratory Symptoms from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Simone; Cafezeiro, Aparecida S.; Daltro, Carla; Netto, Eduardo M.; Kornfeld, Hardy; Andrade, Bruno B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) has been associated with increased risk for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in endemic settings but it is unknown whether PTB risk is also increased by pre-DM. Here, we prospectively examined the association between glucose metabolism disorder (GMD) and PTB in patients with respiratory symptoms at a tuberculosis primary care reference center in Brazil. Methods Oral glucose tolerance test was performed and levels of fasting plasma glucose and glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) were measured in a cohort of 892 individuals presenting with respiratory symptoms of more than two weeks duration. Patients were also tested for PTB with sputum cultures. Prevalence of pre-DM and DM (based on HbA1c) was estimated and tested for association with incident PTB. Other TB risk factors including smoking history were analyzed. Results The majority of the study population (63.1%) exhibited GMD based on HbA1c ≥5.7%. Patients with GMD had higher prevalence of PTB compared to normoglycemic patients. Individuals with DM exhibited increased frequency of TB-related symptoms and detection of acid-fast bacilli in sputum smears. Among patients with previous DM diagnosis, sustained hyperglycemia (HbA1c ≥7.0%) was associated with increased TB prevalence. Smoking history alone was not significantly associated with TB in our study population but the combination of smoking and HbA1c ≥7.0% was associated with 6 times higher odds for PTB. Conclusions Sustained hyperglycemia and pre-DM are independently associated with active PTB. This evidence raises the question whether improving glycemic control in diabetic TB patients would reduce the risk of TB transmission and simultaneously reduce the clinical burden of disease. A better understanding of mechanisms underlying these associations, especially those suggesting that pre-DM may be a factor driving susceptibility to TB is warranted. PMID:27078026

  5. Association of HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1 with pulmonary tuberculosis in western Javanese Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Yuliwulandari, Rika; Sachrowardi, Qomariyah; Nakajima, Humiaki; Kashiwase, Koichi; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Mabuchi, Akihiko; Sofro, Abdul Salam Mudzakir; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2010-07-01

    Genetic studies of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), including those of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, have been reported in several populations. Some studies also have reported these genes to have a stronger role in severe tuberculosis. We investigated HLA class I and II alleles and haplotypes to ascertain their role in susceptibility and resistance to new and recurrent PTB in 257 PTB patients (216 new and 41 recurrent PTB patients) and 236 healthy controls in Western Javanese (Indonesia). HLA-B*4006 was associated with new PTB (p = 0.044, p(adj) = ns), whereas HLA-B*1802, HLA-B*4001 and HLA-DRB1*1101 were associated with recurrent PTB (p = 0.013, p(adj) = 0.016; p = 0.015, p(adj) = 0.028; and p = 0.008, p(adj) = 0.027 for new PTB vs recurrent PTB, respectively). Except for HLA-B*4006, those associations remained significant after adjustment for age and gender by logistic regression analysis, although they disappeared after correction for multiple testing. Haplotype HLA-B*1802-DRB1*1202 was associated with susceptibility to recurrent PTB (p = 0.014, odds ratio = 3.8, 95% confidence interval = 1.18-12.27). In contrast, HLA-DRB1*1202 in the absence of HLA-B*1802 showed a significant association with resistance to recurrent PTB (p = 8.2 x 10(-4), odds ratio = 0.32, 95% confidence interval = 0.16-0.64), suggesting that stronger susceptibility effect of HLA-B*1802 masked the protective effect of HLA-DRB1*1202. Further studies using larger number of patients with recurrent PTB will be needed to confirm our findings.

  6. Mantle cell lymphoma involvement of the pleura and tuberculous pleurisy with pulmonary tuberculosis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Anai, Satoshi; Hashisako, Mikiko; Ikegame, Satoshi; Wakamatsu, Kentarou; Nagata, Nobuhiko; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Kajiki, Akira

    2012-04-01

    A 78-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital for fever, dry cough, and right pleural effusion. She was diagnosed with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) at 73 years of age and was treated with carcinostatics, but MCL was refractory. Chest computed tomography (CT) on admission revealed a localized trabecular shadow in the middle lobe of the right lung and right pleural effusion with thickened visceral pleura. Right pleural effusion was exudative, lymphocytes were dominant, and adenosine deaminase isoenzymes were elevated. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT revealed positive findings in the right thickened visceral pleura and right middle lobe. We suspected tuberculosis, but bronchoscopy revealed that the washing fluid was negative for Ziehl-Neelsen staining. Thoracoscopy under local anesthesia revealed redness on the parietal and visceral pleura and fibrin network. Pathological findings from pleural biopsy included granulomas, Langhans-type giant cells, and diffuse invasion of lymphocytes with atypical nuclei. Immunophenotypes were CD5(+), CD10(-), CD19(+), CD20(+), λ(+), CD25(+) by flow cytometry and CD20(+), CD45RO(-), cyclin D1(+), bcl2(+), bcl6(-) by immunohistochemistry. We diagnosed MCL involvement of the pleura, and highly suspected tuberculous pleurisy. The patient received antituberculosis therapy with rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol. After 4 weeks, culture of bronchoscopy washing fluid was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis. Patients with malignant lymphoma are vulnerable to tuberculosis. In addition to diagnosing MCL involvement of the pleura, it is important to consider the possibility of complication with tuberculosis.

  7. Genetic polymorphisms of IL-17A, IL-17F, TLR4 and miR-146a in association with the risk of pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Xu, Guisheng; Lü, Lingshuang; Xu, Kun; Chen, Yongzhong; Pan, Hongqiu; Burstrom, Bo; Burstrom, Kristina; Wang, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors affect host susceptibility to pathogens. In this population-based case control study, we explored the genetic polymorphisms of IL-17, TLR4 and miR-146a in association with pulmonary tuberculosis in a Chinese Han population. We recruited 1601 pulmonary tuberculosis patients matched with 1526 healthy controls and genotyped twelve functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). After the correction for multiple comparisons, two SNPs (rs10759932 and rs2737190) in the TLR4 gene remained significant. Individuals carrying the rs2737190-AG genotype (vs. AA) had a significantly increased risk of either clinical tuberculosis (OR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.11–1.53) or sputum smear-positive tuberculosis (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.13–1.61). Stratification analysis revealed that the effects of genetic variations on tuberculosis were more evident among non-smokers. People with haplotype TLR4 rs10983755G–rs10759932C had a significantly increased risk of tuberculosis (OR: 3.43, 95% CI: 2.34–5.05). Moreover, we found that SNPs of rs3819024 in IL-17A and rs763780 in IL-17F were weakly related to a prognosis of tuberculosis. Our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms of IL-17 and TLR4 may play a role in host susceptibility to tuberculosis in the Chinese Han population. More work is necessary to identify specific causative variants of tuberculosis underlying the observed associations. PMID:27339100

  8. MULTIFOCAL TUBERCULOSIS VERRUCOSA CUTIS

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Jiby; Mathai, Ashok Thomas; Prasad, P V S; Kaviarasan, P K

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis has been a well-known affliction of human kind, since antiquity. Cutaneous tuberculosis constitutes only a small proportion of extra pulmonary tuberculosis and multifocal involvement of cutaneous tuberculosis is an even rarer manifestation. We report one such case of multifocal tuberculosis verrucosa cutis in a 17-year old male patient in the absence of any primary tuberculous focus. PMID:21772603

  9. Treatment outcome of new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Penang, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background According to the World Health Organization’s recent report, in Malaysia, tuberculosis (TB) treatment success rate for new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients is still below the global success target of 85%. In this study, we evaluated TB treatment outcome among new smear positive PTB patients, and identified the predictors of unsuccessful treatment outcome and longer duration of treatment (i.e., > 6 months). Methods The population in this study consisted of all new smear positive PTB patients who were diagnosed at the chest clinic of Penang General Hospital between March 2010 and February 2011. During the study period, a standardized data collection form was used to obtain socio-demographic, clinical and treatment related data of the patients from their medical charts and TB notification forms (Tuberculosis Information System; TBIS). These data sources were reviewed at the time of the diagnosis of the patients and then at the subsequent follow-up visits until their final treatment outcomes were available. The treatment outcomes of the patients were reported in line with six outcome categories recommended by World Health Organization. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to find the independent risk factors for unsuccessful treatment outcome and longer treatment duration. Data were analyzed using the PASW (Predictive Analysis SoftWare, version 19.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp). Results Among the 336 PTB patients (236 male and 100 female) notified during the study period, the treatment success rate was 67.26% (n = 226). Out of 110 patients in unsuccessful outcome category, 30 defaulted from the treatment, 59 died and 21 were transferred to other health care facilities. The mean duration of TB treatment was 8.19 (SD 1.65) months. In multiple logistic regression analysis, risk factors for unsuccessful treatment outcome were foreign nationality, male gender and being illiterate. Similarly, risk factors for mortality due to TB

  10. Nanoparticle conjugation and pulmonary delivery enhance the protective efficacy of Ag85B and CpG against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ballester, Marie; Nembrini, Chiara; Dhar, Neeraj; de Titta, Alexandre; de Piano, Cyntia; Pasquier, Miriella; Simeoni, Eleonora; van der Vlies, André J; McKinney, John D; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Swartz, Melody A

    2011-09-16

    Vaccines that drive robust T-cell immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) are needed both for prophylactic and therapeutic purposes. We have recently developed a synthetic vaccine delivery platform with Pluronic-stabilized polypropylene sulfide nanoparticles (NPs), which target lymphoid tissues by their small size (∼ 30 nm) and which activate the complement cascade by their surface chemistry. Here we conjugated the tuberculosis antigen Ag85B to the NPs (NP-Ag85B) and compared their efficacy in eliciting relevant immune responses in mice after intradermal or pulmonary administration. Pulmonary administration of NP-Ag85B with the adjuvant CpG led to enhanced induction of antigen-specific polyfunctional Th1 responses in the spleen, the lung and lung-draining lymph nodes as compared to soluble Ag85B with CpG and to the intradermally-delivered formulations. Mucosal and systemic Th17 responses were also observed with this adjuvanted NP formulation and vaccination route, especially in the lung. We then evaluated protection induced by the adjuvanted NP formulation following a Mtb aerosol challenge and found that vaccination with NP-Ag85B and CpG via the pulmonary route displayed a substantial reduction of the lung bacterial burden, both compared to soluble Ag85B with CpG and to the corresponding intradermally delivered formulations. These findings highlight the potential of administrating NP-based formulations by the pulmonary route for TB vaccination.

  11. Rapid Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis with the LCx Mycobacterium tuberculosis Assay and Comparison with Conventional Diagnostic Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Rohner, Peter; Jahn, Esther I. M.; Ninet, Beatrice; Ionati, Concetta; Weber, Rainer; Auckenthaler, Raymond; Pfyffer, Gaby E.

    1998-01-01

    The LCx MTB amplification assay is a nucleic acid amplification test intended for the direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in respiratory specimens. We evaluated its performance on 2,001 consecutive respiratory specimens; 78 were culture positive for M. tuberculosis. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of this assay for all specimens compared to culture results were 88.5, 97.7, 60.5, and 99.5%, respectively. When referred to resolved clinical diagnosis of active tuberculosis, these values improved to 90.2, 98.4, 72.8, and 99.5%, respectively. PMID:9738065

  12. Quantification of Pulmonary Inflammatory Processes Using Chest Radiography: Tuberculosis as the Motivating Application.

    PubMed

    Giacomini, Guilherme; Miranda, José R A; Pavan, Ana Luiza M; Duarte, Sérgio B; Ribeiro, Sérgio M; Pereira, Paulo C M; Alves, Allan F F; de Oliveira, Marcela; Pina, Diana R

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a quantitative method for evaluating the pulmonary inflammatory process (PIP) through the computational analysis of chest radiography exams in posteroanterior (PA) and lateral views. The quantification procedure was applied to patients with tuberculosis (TB) as the motivating application.A study of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) examinations of patients with TB was developed to establish a relation between the inflammatory process and the signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) measured in the PA projection. A phantom essay was used to validate this relation, which was implemented using an algorithm that is able to estimate the volume of the inflammatory region based solely on SDNR values in the chest radiographs of patients.The PIP volumes that were quantified for 30 patients with TB were used for comparisons with direct HRCT analysis for the same patient. The Bland-Altman statistical analyses showed no significant differences between the 2 quantification methods. The linear regression line had a correlation coefficient of R = 0.97 and P < 0.001, showing a strong association between the volume that was determined by our evaluation method and the results obtained by direct HRCT scan analysis.Since the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with TB is commonly performed using X-rays exams, the method developed herein can be considered an adequate tool for quantifying the PIP with a lower patient radiation dose and lower institutional cost. Although we used patients with TB for the application of the method, this method may be used for other pulmonary diseases characterized by a PIP.

  13. Post-Inhaled Corticosteroid Pulmonary Tuberculosis Increases Lung Cancer in Patients with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Frank Cheau-Feng; Nfor, Oswald Ndi; Jhang, Kai-Ming; Ku, Wen-Yuan; Ho, Chien-Chang; Lung, Chia-Chi; Pan, Hui-Hsien; Wu, Min-Chen; Wu, Ming-Fang; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the association between post-inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), pneumonia and lung cancer in patients with asthma. Methods The study samples were collected from the National Health Insurance Database. Asthmatic patients who were first-time users of ICS between 2003 and 2005 were identified as cases. For each case, 4 control individuals were randomly matched for sex, age and date of ICS use. Cases and matched controls were followed up until the end of 2010. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to determine the hazard ratio for pulmonary infections and lung cancer risk in the ICS users and non-users. Results A total of 10,904 first-time users of ICS were matched with 43,616 controls. The hazard ratios for lung cancer were: 2.52 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22–5.22; p = 0.012) for individuals with post-ICS TB, 1.28 (95%CI, 0.73–2.26; p = 0.389) for post-ICS pneumonia, 2.31(95%CI, 0.84–6.38; p = 0.105) for post-ICS pneumonia+TB, 1.08 (95%CI, 0.57–2.03; p = 0.815) for TB, 0.99 (95%CI, 0.63–1.55; p = 0.970) for pneumonia, and 0.32 (95%CI, 0.05–2.32; p = 0.261) for pneumonia+ TB, respectively. Conclusions Post-ICS TB increased lung cancer risk in patients with asthma. Because of the high mortality associated with lung cancer, screening tests are recommended for patients with post-ICS TB. PMID:27448321

  14. Acute right ventricular failure caused by concomitant coronary and pulmonary embolism: successful treatment with endovascular coronary and pulmonary thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Sasha; Roijer, Anders; Holmqvist, Jasminka; Keussen, Inger; Cwikiel, Wojciech; Öhlin, Bertil; Erlinge, David

    2013-01-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is present in approximately 25% of the general population. PFO is characterized by intermittent shunting of blood from the right to the left atrium, especially in the context of increased right-sided filling pressures, with risk of paradoxical embolism. We describe a 69-year-old woman presenting with acute chest pain, severe dyspnoea, and acute inferolateral ST-segment elevation on the electrocardiogram. The patient was diagnosed with myocardial infarction and failure of the right cardiac ventricle, which was considered to be secondary to extensive pulmonary embolism leading to increased filling pressures and paradoxical coronary embolism. The patient underwent emergent percutaneous interventions with coronary thrombus extraction and pulmonary thrombus fragmentation and local thrombolysis. The patient was free of symptoms at follow up 6 months later and echocardiography showed substantially improved right ventricular function. We discuss issues related to the diagnosis, treatment, and secondary prevention for patients with concomitant pulmonary and coronary arterial thrombosis. PMID:24222822

  15. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dheda, Keertan; Barry, Clifton E; Maartens, Gary

    2016-03-19

    Although the worldwide incidence of tuberculosis has been slowly decreasing, the global disease burden remains substantial (∼9 million cases and ∼1·5 million deaths in 2013), and tuberculosis incidence and drug resistance are rising in some parts of the world such as Africa. The modest gains achieved thus far are threatened by high prevalence of HIV, persisting global poverty, and emergence of highly drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is also a major problem in health-care workers in both low-burden and high-burden settings. Although the ideal preventive agent, an effective vaccine, is still some time away, several new diagnostic technologies have emerged, and two new tuberculosis drugs have been licensed after almost 50 years of no tuberculosis drugs being registered. Efforts towards an effective vaccine have been thwarted by poor understanding of what constitutes protective immunity. Although new interventions and investment in control programmes will enable control, eradication will only be possible through substantial reductions in poverty and overcrowding, political will and stability, and containing co-drivers of tuberculosis, such as HIV, smoking, and diabetes.

  16. Evaluation of the GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay for rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis and detection of rifampin resistance in pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens.

    PubMed

    Zeka, Arzu N; Tasbakan, Sezai; Cavusoglu, Cengiz

    2011-12-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains one of the most significant causes of death from an infectious agent. The rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis and detection of rifampin (RIF) resistance are essential for early disease management. The GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay is a novel integrated diagnostic device for the diagnosis of tuberculosis and rapid detection of RIF resistance in clinical specimens. We determined the performance of the MTB/RIF assay for rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis and detection of rifampin resistance in smear-positive and smear-negative pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens obtained from possible tuberculosis patients. Two hundred fifty-three pulmonary and 176 extrapulmonary specimens obtained from 429 patients were included in the study. One hundred ten (89 culture positive and 21 culture negative for M. tuberculosis) of the 429 patients were considered to have tuberculosis. In pulmonary specimens, sensitivities were 100% (27/27) and 68.6% (24/35) for smear-positive and smear-negative specimens, respectively. It had a lower sensitivity with extrapulmonary specimens: 100% for smear-positive specimens (4/4) and 47.7% for smear-negative specimens (21/44). The test accurately detected the absence of tuberculosis in all 319 patients without tuberculosis studied. The MTB/RIF assay also detected 1 RIF-resistant specimen and 88 RIF-susceptible specimens, and the results were confirmed by drug susceptibility testing. We concluded that the MTB/RIF test is a simple method, and routine staff with minimal training can use the system. The test appeared to be as sensitive as culture with smear-positive specimens but less sensitive with smear-negative pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens that include low numbers of bacilli.

  17. A real-time PCR signature to discriminate between tuberculosis and other pulmonary diseases.

    PubMed

    Laux da Costa, Lucas; Delcroix, Melaine; Dalla Costa, Elis R; Prestes, Isaías V; Milano, Mariana; Francis, Steve S; Unis, Gisela; Silva, Denise R; Riley, Lee W; Rossetti, Maria L R

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this study was to identify a host gene signature that can distinguish tuberculosis (TB) from other pulmonary diseases (OPD). We conducted real-time PCR on whole blood samples from patients in Brazil. TB and OPD patients (asthma and non-TB pneumonia) differentially expressed granzyme A (GZMA), guanylate binding protein 5 (GBP5) and Fc gamma receptor 1A (CD64). Receiver operating characteristic, tree classification and random forest analyses were applied to evaluate the discriminatory power of the three genes and find the gene panel most predictive of patients' disease classification. Tree classification produced a model based on GBP5 and CD64 expression. In random forest analysis, the combination of the three genes provided a robust biosignature to distinguish TB from OPD with 95% specificity and 93% sensitivity. Our results suggest that GBP5 and CD64 in tandem may be the most predictive combination. However, GZMA contribution to the prediction model requires further investigation. Regardless, these three genes show promise as a rapid diagnostic marker separating TB from OPD.

  18. A real-time PCR signature to discriminate between tuberculosis and other pulmonary diseases

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Lucas Laux; Delcroix, Melaine; Dalla Costa, Elis R.; Prestes, Isaías V.; Milano, Mariana; Francis, Steve S.; Unis, Gisela; Silva, Denise R.; Riley, Lee W.; Rossetti, Maria L. R.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify a host gene signature that can distinguish tuberculosis (TB) from other pulmonary diseases (OPD). We conducted real-time PCR on whole blood samples from patients in Brazil. TB and OPD patients (asthma and non-TB pneumonia) differentially expressed granzyme A (GZMA), guanylate binding protein 5 (GBP5) and Fc gamma receptor 1A (CD64). Receiver operating characteristic, tree classification and random forest analyses were applied to evaluate the discriminatory power of the three genes and find the gene panel most predictive of patients’ disease classification. Tree classification produced a model based on GBP5 and CD64 expression. In random forest analysis, the combination of the three genes provided a robust biosignature to distinguish TB from OPD with 95% specificity and 93% sensitivity. Our results suggest that GBP5 and CD64 in tandem may be the most predictive combination. However, GZMA contribution to the prediction model requires further investigation. Regardless, these three genes show promise as a rapid diagnostic marker separating TB from OPD. PMID:26025597

  19. Tomographic Aspects of Advanced Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Evaluation of Sequelae following Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Domenico; Mafort, Thiago; Mogami, Roberto; Rodrigues, Rosana de Souza; Menna Barreto, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate tomographic changes in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), degree of agreement among three radiologists regarding tomographic diagnoses, and sequelae following treatment. Methods. Cross-sectional and descriptive study of 74 TB patients confirmed by sputum culture and chest computed tomography before (CT1) and 6 months after (CT2) drug therapy. Results were performed by three radiologists blinded to clinical and laboratory results. Results. Main findings in CT1 included nodules indicating the presence of a tree-in-bud pattern in 93% of cases, ill-defined nodules in 84% of cases, consolidation in 77% of cases, architectural distortion in 71% of cases, cavitary lesions in 62% of cases, and ground glass opacities in 37% of cases. Airway involvement, characterized by increased thickness and dilatation of the bronchial walls, occurred in 93% of cases. Pleural involvement occurred in 54%. There was an agreement on active TB among the three radiologists in 85% of cases. The results in CT2 indicated the presence of architectural distortion in 91% of cases and cylindrical bronchiectasis in 86%. Conclusions. The study established a tomographic pattern for diagnosis of active TB characterized by the presence of airway nodules, consolidation, architectural distortion, and cavitary lesions, and an almost complete degree of agreement (Kappa) was observed among the radiologists (0.85). CT after treatment assists in defining the cure. PMID:28261498

  20. The Poor Survival among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Chiapas, Mexico: The Case of Los Altos Region.

    PubMed

    Nájera-Ortiz, J C; Sánchez-Pérez, H J; Ochoa-Díaz-López, H; Leal-Fernández, G; Navarro-Giné, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To analyse survival in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and factors associated with such survival. Design. Study of a cohort of patients aged over 14 years diagnosed with PTB from January 1, 1998 to July 31, 2005. During 2004-2006 a home visit was made to each patient and, during 2008-2009, they were visited again. During these visits a follow-up interview was administered; when the patient had died, a verbal autopsy was conducted with family members. Statistical analysis consisted of survival tests, Kaplan-Meier log-rank test and Cox regression. Results. Of 305 studied patients, 68 had died due to PTB by the time of the first evaluation, 237 were followed-up for a second evaluation, and 10 of them had died of PTB. According to the Cox regression, age (over 45 years) and treatment duration (under six months) were associated with a poorer survival. When treatment duration was excluded, the association between poorer survival with age persisted, whereas with having been treated via DOTS strategy, was barely significant. Conclusions. In the studied area it is necessary that patients receive a complete treatment scheme, and to give priority to patients aged over 45 years.

  1. High social anxiety and poor quality of life in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kibrisli, Erkan; Bez, Yasin; Yilmaz, Ahmet; Aslanhan, Hamza; Taylan, Mahsuk; Kaya, Halide; Tanrikulu, Abdullah Cetin; Abakay, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PT) has been previously related with various psychosocial adverse consequences including stigmatization and social isolation.Social anxiety is a psychiatric condition that may be associated with social isolation and fear of social exclusion.To date no study has investigated social anxiety and its impact on quality of life (QoL) among patients with PT. Therefore, we aimed to determine the severity of social anxiety in a group of patients with PT.Among patients who were recently discharged from hospital with the diagnosis of PT 94 patients and 99 healthy control subjects who had similar demographical features have been included in the study. A psychiatrist interviewed all participants and a semistructured interview form, which was prepared by the authors, Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), and Short Form-36 were administered to them.Patients with PT showed higher levels of performance avoidance and social avoidance than healthy control subjects. They reported lower QoL scores across all dimensions. Among patients women showed higher levels of LSAS subscale scores and total score. Fear of social exclusion was predicted by perceived illness severity and emotional role difficulty. On the other hand, perceived illness severity was predicted by fear of exclusion and sedimentation level.PT patients seem to experience higher levels of social anxiety and associated fear of social exclusion that add to their worse QoL during the earlier months of their disease. Among them fear of social exclusion is related with perceived illness severity.

  2. The Poor Survival among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Chiapas, Mexico: The Case of Los Altos Region

    PubMed Central

    Nájera-Ortiz, J. C.; Sánchez-Pérez, H. J.; Ochoa-Díaz-López, H.; Leal-Fernández, G.; Navarro-Giné, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To analyse survival in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and factors associated with such survival. Design. Study of a cohort of patients aged over 14 years diagnosed with PTB from January 1, 1998 to July 31, 2005. During 2004–2006 a home visit was made to each patient and, during 2008-2009, they were visited again. During these visits a follow-up interview was administered; when the patient had died, a verbal autopsy was conducted with family members. Statistical analysis consisted of survival tests, Kaplan-Meier log-rank test and Cox regression. Results. Of 305 studied patients, 68 had died due to PTB by the time of the first evaluation, 237 were followed-up for a second evaluation, and 10 of them had died of PTB. According to the Cox regression, age (over 45 years) and treatment duration (under six months) were associated with a poorer survival. When treatment duration was excluded, the association between poorer survival with age persisted, whereas with having been treated via DOTS strategy, was barely significant. Conclusions. In the studied area it is necessary that patients receive a complete treatment scheme, and to give priority to patients aged over 45 years. PMID:22701170

  3. Predictors of favorable results in pulmonary tuberculosis treatment (Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil, 2001-2004).

    PubMed

    Sassaki, Cinthia Midori; Scatena, Lucia Marina; Gonzales, Roxana Isabel Cardozo; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Hinos, Paula; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena

    2010-06-01

    Based on data available in the Information System for Notifiable Diseases, predictive factors of favorable results were identified in the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, diagnosed between 2001 and 2004 and living in Recife-PE, Brazil. Uni- and multivariate logistic regression methods were used. In multivariate analysis, the following factors remained: Age (years), 0 to 9 (OR = 4.27; p = 0.001) and 10 to 19 (OR = 1.78; p = 0.011), greater chance of cure than over 60; Education (years), 8 to 11 (OR = 1.52; p = 0.049), greater chance of cure than no education; Type of entry, ne wcase s (OR = 3.31; p < 0.001) and relapse (OR = 3.32; p < 0.001), greater chances of cure than restart after abandonment; Time (months) 2, 5--6 (OR = 9.15; p < 0.001); 6--9 (OR = 27.28; p < 0.001) and More than 9 (OR = 24.78; p < 0.001), greater chances of cure than less than 5; Health Unit District, DSII (OR = 1.60; p = 0.018) and DSIIV (OR = 2.87; p < 0.001), greater chance sof cure than DS II.

  4. Iron homeostasis and progression to pulmonary tuberculosis disease among household contacts.

    PubMed

    Minchella, Peter A; Donkor, Simon; McDermid, Joann M; Sutherland, Jayne S

    2015-05-01

    Early identification of individuals at risk for progressing to active tuberculosis (TB) disease may limit new transmission and improve clinical outcomes. Evidence indicates altered iron homeostasis may identify those at greater risk of disease progression in HIV co-infection. We aimed to investigate iron homeostasis biomarkers as risk factors for progression to TB. Archived plasma samples were analyzed from household contacts of pulmonary TB index cases in The Gambia. Contacts were classified as asymptomatic non-progressors (n = 17) or TB-progressors (n = 10), which included two HIV-infected participants. Iron homeostasis (hemoglobin, ferritin, hepcidin, soluble transferrin receptor, transferrin) was assessed in all contacts at study recruitment. Plasma was collected a median of 910 days prior to TB diagnosis. Low transferrin around the time of known exposure to infectious TB was a disease progression risk factor among all TB-progressors (Poisson incidence rate ratio: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.35-0.89). Iron homeostasis also differed between early and delayed TB-progressors, with higher ferritin and hepcidin concentrations observed among early TB-progressors (mean ferritin 50.2 vs. 26.2 ng/ml; P = 0.027; mean hepcidin 37.7 vs. 5.6 ng/ml; P = 0.036). Iron homeostasis is associated with progression to TB among household contacts. Further studies are needed to elucidate mechanisms and determine the clinical utility of monitoring iron homeostasis biomarkers.

  5. A genome wide association study of pulmonary tuberculosis susceptibility in Indonesians

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is reason to expect strong genetic influences on the risk of developing active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) among latently infected individuals. Many of the genome wide linkage and association studies (GWAS) to date have been conducted on African populations. In order to identify additional targets in genetically dissimilar populations, and to enhance our understanding of this disease, we performed a multi-stage GWAS in a Southeast Asian cohort from Indonesia. Methods In stage 1, we used the Affymetrix 100 K SNP GeneChip marker set to genotype 259 Indonesian samples. After quality control filtering, 108 cases and 115 controls were analyzed for association of 95,207 SNPs. In stage 2, we attempted validation of 2,453 SNPs with promising associations from the first stage, in 1,189 individuals from the same Indonesian cohort, and finally in stage 3 we selected 251 SNPs from this stage to test TB association in an independent Caucasian cohort (n = 3,760) from Russia. Results Our study suggests evidence of association (P = 0.0004-0.0067) for 8 independent loci (nominal significance P < 0.05), which are located within or near the following genes involved in immune signaling: JAG1, DYNLRB2, EBF1, TMEFF2, CCL17, HAUS6, PENK and TXNDC4. Conclusions Mechanisms of immune defense suggested by some of the identified genes exhibit biological plausibility and may suggest novel pathways involved in the host containment of infection with TB. PMID:22239941

  6. Preventing Infectious Pulmonary Tuberculosis Among Foreign-Born Residents of the United States

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Dolly; Ghosh, Smita; Blumberg, Henry; Tamhane, Ashutosh; Sevilla, Anna; Reves, Randall

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We described risk factors associated with infectious tuberculosis (TB) and missed TB-prevention opportunities in foreign-born US residents, who account for almost two thirds of the nation’s TB patients. Methods. In a cross-sectional study at 20 US sites of foreign-born persons diagnosed with TB in 2005 through 2006, we collected results of sputum smear microscopy for acid-fast bacilli (a marker for infectiousness) and data on visa status, sociodemographics, TB-related care seeking, and latent TB infection (LTBI) diagnosis opportunities. Results. Among 980 persons with pulmonary TB who reported their visa status, 601 (61%) were legal permanent residents, 131 (13.4%) had temporary visas, and 248 (25.3%) were undocumented. Undocumented persons were more likely than permanent residents to have acid-fast bacilli–positive smears at diagnosis (risk ratio = 1.3; 95% confidence interval = 1.2, 1.4). Of those diagnosed 1 year or more after arrival, 57.3% reported LTBI screening opportunities; fewer than 25% actually were. Undocumented persons reported fewer LTBI screening opportunities and were less likely to be tested. Conclusions. Progress toward TB elimination in the United States depends upon expanding opportunities for regular medical care and promotion of LTBI screening and treatment among foreign-born persons. PMID:26180947

  7. Pulmonary tuberculosis among migrants in Shandong, China: factors associated with treatment delay

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chengchao; Chu, Jie; Geng, Hong; Wang, Xingzhou; Xu, Lingzhong

    2014-01-01

    Objective A timely initiation of treatment is crucial to better control tuberculosis (TB). The aim of this study is to describe treatment delay among migrant patients with TB and to identify factors associated with treatment delay, so as to provide evidence for strategy development and improvement of TB control among migrants in China. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in Shandong province of China. A total of 314 confirmed smear positive migrant patients with pulmonary TB were included. Univariate logistic regression was used to analyse the association of variables with treatment delay among migrant patients with TB. A multilogistic regression model was developed to further assess the effect of variables on treatment delay. Results Of 314 migrant patients with TB, 65.6% experienced treatment delay (>1 day). Household income level, diagnosis symptom severity, understanding of whether TB is curable or not and knowledge about the free TB treatment policy are factors significantly associated with treatment delay. Conclusions Economic status and knowledge about TB are key barriers to accessing TB treatment. An integrated policy of carrying out TB-related health education and publicising the free TB treatment policy among migrants is needed. Health insurance schemes for migrants should be modified to make them transferrable and pro-poor. PMID:25534210

  8. Rapid Accumulation of Eosinophils in Lung Lesions in Guinea Pigs Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lasco, Todd M.; Turner, Oliver C.; Cassone, Lynne; Sugawara, Isamu; Yamada, Hiroyuki; McMurray, David N.; Orme, Ian M.

    2004-01-01

    Guinea pig eosinophils were positively identified in bronchoalveolar lavage populations and in the lung granulomas of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected guinea pigs. It is possible that the rapid influx of these cells, and their subsequent degranulation during acute pulmonary tuberculosis, may play a key role in the susceptibility of this animal model. PMID:14742563

  9. Management of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremy M

    2009-01-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (CPE) is a pathology frequently seen in patients presenting to emergency departments (EDs) and can usually be attributed to preexisting cardiovascular disease. Heart failure alone accounts for more than 1 million hospital admissions annually and has one of the highest ED morbidity and mortality to date (). Historically, CPE has been managed by the treating clinician in a manner that is based largely on anecdotal evidence. Furosemide (Lasix), morphine, and nitroglycerin have historically been the baseline standard for drug therapy in CPE management. A lack of drastic improvement in the patient's condition over the course of the ED visit may reflect a management style that results in higher morbidity and mortality for CPE patients. Several recent articles provide evidence-based outcomes that suggest changing standard therapy along with the adjunctive use of other medications. These articles also describe treatment modalities that result in a marked improvement in the management of patients with CPE along with decreases in adverse outcomes and hospital length of stay. The goal of this article is to present a summary of the evidence regarding the management of CPE and discuss the implications for current practice.

  10. Syncope as a presentation of acute pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Altınsoy, Bülent; Erboy, Fatma; Tanrıverdi, Hakan; Uygur, Fırat; Örnek, Tacettin; Atalay, Figen; Tor, Meltem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Syncope is an atypical presentation for acute pulmonary embolism (APE). There are conflicting data concerning syncope and prognosis of APE. Patients and methods One hundred and seventy-nine consecutive patients aged 22–96 years (median, 68 years) with APE were retrospectively enrolled in the study. Results Prevalence of syncope was 13% (n=23) at the time of presentation. Compared to patients without syncope, those with syncope had a higher rate of central embolism (83% vs 43%, respectively, P=0.002), right ventricular dysfunction (91% vs 68%, P=0.021), and troponin positivity (80% vs 39%, P=0.001) but not 30-day mortality (13% vs 10%, P=0.716). Multivariate analysis showed that central localization (odds ratio: 9.08) and cardiac troponin positivity (odds ratio: 4.67) were the independent correlates of the presence of syncope in the patients with APE. Frequency of cardiopulmonary disease was lower, and duration from symptom onset to hospital admission was shorter in patients with syncope (P=0.138 and 0.118, respectively), although not significant. Conclusion Syncope most likely represents an intermediate condition between massive APE and hypotension. In APE patients with syncope, the prognosis seems to depend on the underlying pathology, the patient’s age, comorbidities and duration from symptom onset to hospital admission, and the use of thrombolytic therapy. PMID:27390523

  11. Acute kidney injury in patients with pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Fu, Chung-Ming; Fan, Pei-Chun; Chen, Shao-Wei; Chang, Su-Wei; Mao, Chun-Tai; Tian, Ya-Chung; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Chen, Tien-Hsing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI) is overlooked in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). Risk factors for and long-term outcomes of this complication remain unknown. This study evaluated the predictors and prognosis of AKI in patients with PE. This retrospective cohort study used Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. We enrolled a total of 7588 patients who were admitted to a hospital for PE from January1997 to December 2011 and administered anticoagulation or thrombolytic agents. All demographic data, risk factors, and outcomes were analyzed. AKI was diagnosed in 372 (4.9%) patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed pre-existing chronic kidney disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, massive PE, anemia, and sepsis as independent risk factors for AKI. In the long-term follow-up, the survival rate was similar in the AKI and non-AKI groups. Careful risk factor screening and intensive intervention in patients with AKI might yield outcomes similar to those in patients without AKI. PMID:28248851

  12. Efficiency and Safety of Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    He, Mei; Yu, Sue; Wang, Lemin; Lv, Hanjing; Qiu, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is able to improve dyspnea, endurance capacity, and health-related quality of life in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, but it is rarely used in China. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness and safety of PR after exacerbation of COPD. Material/Methods Patients admitted to hospital due to an exacerbation of COPD were randomized to receive either PR or routine care (control group). The PR program was performed from the second day of admission until discharge. The pre-post changes in 6-minute walk distance (6MWD), self-reported quality of life (QOL) assessed by CAT score and CRQ-SAS score, and activity of daily life assessed by ADL-D score were determined. The perceived end-effort dyspnea (Borg scale) was measured throughout the study. Results A total of 101 patients were enrolled, of whom 7 withdrew after randomization, and 94 completed this study. There were 66 patients in the PR group and 28 in the control group. The 6MWD, resting SpO2, and exercise Borg dyspnea score were significantly improved in the PR group. In addition, the PR group had greater improvement in the total CRQ-SAS score and had a lower CAT score. Significant improvements were also found in the ADL-D and BODE index in the PR group. No adverse events were recorded during exercise. Conclusions Our study provides evidence that it is safe and feasible to apply an early PR in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD. PMID:25783889

  13. Real-time fluorescence Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) for rapid and reliable diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Donglin; Hu, Liangshan; Lin, Maorui; Li, Mingyou; Ye, Zebing; Sun, Hongtao; Huang, Jiwei; Yang, Huawen; Tian, Junzhang

    2015-02-01

    A reliable, simple and rapid diagnostic method that can be helpful in pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosis is urgently needed. Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) allows DNA to be amplified rapidly at a constant temperature. In this study, real-time fluorescence LAMP was evaluated to rapidly detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum and was compared to the performance of real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (Q-PCR). All the standard MTB strains were successfully detected and limit of detection (LOD) was 10(2)CFU/mL by real-time fluorescence LAMP within 20min. In light of MTB in sputum, the real-time fluorescence LAMP method yielded a sensitivity of 98.0% and a specificity of 78.3%, compared to Q-PCR assay, which yielded a sensitivity of 96.0% and a specificity of 82.6% for PTB diagnosis. There was an excellent overall agreement between LAMP and Q-PCR for PTB (κ=0.315) and non-PTB (κ=0.862). Therefore, the real-time fluorescence LAMP assay is a rapid, sensitive, and specific method to detect pulmonary tuberculosis.

  14. Isoniazid Mono-Resistant Tuberculosis: Impact on Treatment Outcome and Survival of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Southern Mexico 1995-2010

    PubMed Central

    Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; García-García, Lourdes; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; Montesinos-Castillo, Marlene; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Bobadilla-del-Valle, Miriam; Canizales-Quintero, Sergio; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Téllez-Vázquez, Norma; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Yanes-Lane, Mercedes; Mongua-Rodriguez, Norma; Martínez-Gamboa, Rosa Areli; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Background Isoniazid mono-resistance (IMR) is the most common form of mono-resistance; its world prevalence is estimated to range between 0.0 to 9.5% globally. There is no consensus on how these patients should be treated. Objective To describe the impact of IMR tuberculosis (TB) on treatment outcome and survival among pulmonary TB patients treated under programmatic conditions in Orizaba, Veracruz, Mexico. Materials and Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of pulmonary TB patients in Southern Mexico. From 1995 to 2010 patients with acid-fast bacilli or culture proven Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum samples underwent epidemiological, clinical and microbiological evaluation. We included patients who harbored isoniazid mono-resistant (IMR) strains and patients with strains susceptible to isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and streptomycin. All patients were treated following Mexican TB Program guidelines. We performed annual follow-up to ascertain treatment outcome, recurrence, relapse and mortality. Results Between 1995 and 2010 1,243 patients with pulmonary TB were recruited; 902/1,243 (72.57%) had drug susceptibility testing; 716 (79.38%) harbored pan-susceptible and 88 (9.75%) IMR strains. Having any contact with a person with TB (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)) 1.85, 95% Confidence interval (CI) 1.15–2.96) and homelessness (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2.76, 95% CI 1.08–6.99) were associated with IMR. IMR patients had a higher probability of failure (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 12.35, 95% CI 3.38–45.15) and death due to TB among HIV negative patients (aHR 3.30. 95% CI 1.00–10.84). All the models were adjusted for socio-demographic and clinical variables. Conclusions The results from our study provide evidence that the standardized treatment schedule with first line drugs in new and previously treated cases with pulmonary TB and IMR produces a high frequency of treatment failure and death due to tuberculosis. We recommend re-evaluating the optimal

  15. [Prognostication of acute-pancreatitis-associated pulmonary injury based on determination of cytokines levels].

    PubMed

    Fedorkiv, M B; Hudz, I M; Shevchuk, I M

    2013-07-01

    The results of examination of 68 patients, admitted to hospital for an acute pancreatitis during 48 h from its occurrence, were analyzed. In all the patients the cytokines (IL-8, IL-10, TNF-alpha) content was determined in the blood, using immunoenzymal analysis. Algorithm of prognostication of an acute pancreatitis-associated pulmonary injury, basing on determination of the cytokines contents, was elaborated.

  16. LED fluorescence microscopy increases the detection of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in medical colleges of India.

    PubMed

    Reza, L W; Satyanarayana, S; Pandey, A; Kumar, S; Devendrappa, N M; Anand, L; Singh, G; Kumar, A M V; Chadha, S S; Wilson, N; Sachdeva, K S; Nair, S A

    2013-09-21

    In July 2012, light-emitting diode fluorescence microscopy (LED-FM) replaced conventional light microscopy using Ziehl-Neelsen stain in the detection of sputum-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in 190 microscopy centres of medical colleges operating under India's Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme. We compared the performance of LED-FM (July-December 2012) to that of conventional microscopy (July-December 2011) across 190 sites. Of 222 658 patients examined using conventional microscopy, 28 042 (12.6%) were smear-positive, while of 224 714 examined using LED-FM, 33 552 (14.9%) were smear-positive, an additional yield of 5251 cases after adjusting for the increase in patients examined. We recommend replacing conventional microscopy with LED-FM in high workload microscopy centres in India.

  17. Granulocytic Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells Expansion during Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis Is Associated with High Nitric Oxide Plasma Level

    PubMed Central

    El Daker, Sary; Sacchi, Alessandra; Tempestilli, Massimo; Carducci, Claudia; Goletti, Delia; Vanini, Valentina; Colizzi, Vittorio; Lauria, Francesco Nicola; Martini, Federico; Martino, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still the principal cause of death caused by a single infectious agent, and the balance between the bacillus and host defense mechanisms reflects the different manifestations of the pathology. The aim of this work was to study the role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) during active pulmonary tuberculosis at the site of infection. We observed an expansion of MDSCs in the lung and blood of patients with active TB, which are correlated with an enhanced amount of nitric oxide in the plasma. We also found that these cells have the remarkable ability to suppress T-cell response, suggesting an important role in the modulation of the immune response against TB. Interestingly, a trend in the diminution of MDSCs was found after an efficacious anti-TB therapy, suggesting that these cells may be used as a potential biomarker for monitoring anti-TB therapy efficacy. PMID:25879532

  18. Systematic review: Comparison of Xpert MTB/RIF, LAMP and SAT methods for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liping; Xiao, Heping; Zhang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances in nucleic acid amplification have led to breakthroughs in the early detection of PTB compared to traditional sputum smear tests. The sensitivity and specificity of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), simultaneous amplification testing (SAT), and Xpert MTB/RIF for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis were evaluated. A critical review of previous studies of LAMP, SAT, and Xpert MTB/RIF for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis that used laboratory culturing as the reference method was carried out together with a meta-analysis. In 25 previous studies, the pooled sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of tuberculosis were 93% and 94% for LAMP, 96% and 88% for SAT, and 89% and 98% for Xpert MTB/RIF. The I(2) values for the pooled data were >80%, indicating significant heterogeneity. In the smear-positive subgroup analysis of LAMP, the sensitivity increased from 93% to 98% (I(2) = 2.6%), and specificity was 68% (I(2) = 38.4%). In the HIV-infected subgroup analysis of Xpert MTB/RIF, the pooled sensitivity and specificity were 79% (I(2) = 72.9%) and 99% (I(2) = 64.4%). In the HIV-negative subgroup analysis for Xpert MTB/RIF, the pooled sensitivity and specificity were 72% (I(2) = 49.6%) and 99% (I(2) = 64.5%). LAMP, SAT and Xpert MTB/RIF had comparably high levels of sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of tuberculosis. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of three methods were similar, with LAMP being highly sensitive for the diagnosis of smear-positive PTB. The cost effectiveness of LAMP and SAT make them particularly suitable tests for diagnosing PTB in developing countries.

  19. Factors Affecting Recovery Time of Pulmonary Function in Hospitalized Patients With Acute Asthma Exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Jung; Lee, Jaemoon; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Park, So-Young; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Kim, Tae-Bum; Moon, Hee-Bom

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prolonged recovery time of pulmonary function after an asthma exacerbation is a significant burden on asthmatics, and management of these patients needs to be improved. The aim of this study was to evaluate factors associated with a longer recovery time of pulmonary function among asthmatic patients hospitalized due to a severe asthma exacerbation. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 89 patients who were admitted for the management of acute asthma exacerbations. The recovery time of pulmonary function was defined as the time from the date each patient initially received treatment for asthma exacerbations to the date the patient reached his or her previous best FEV1% value. We investigated the influence of various clinical and laboratory factors on the recovery time. Results The median recovery time of the patients was 1.7 weeks. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that using regular inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) before an acute exacerbation of asthma and concurrent with viral infection at admission were associated with the prolonged recovery time of pulmonary function. Conclusions The prolonged recovery time of pulmonary function after a severe asthma exacerbation was not shown to be directly associated with poor adherence to ICS. Therefore the results indicate that an unknown subtype of asthma may be associated with the prolonged recovery of pulmonary function time after an acute exacerbation of asthma despite regular ICS use. Further prospective studies to investigate factors affecting the recovery time of pulmonary function after an asthma exacerbation are warranted. PMID:27582400

  20. Role of B Cells in Mucosal Vaccine-Induced Protective CD8+ T Cell Immunity against Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Khera, Amandeep K; Afkhami, Sam; Lai, Rocky; Jeyanathan, Mangalakumari; Zganiacz, Anna; Mandur, Talveer; Hammill, Joni; Damjanovic, Daniela; Xing, Zhou

    2015-09-15

    Emerging evidence suggests a role of B cells in host defense against primary pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). However, the role of B cells in TB vaccine-induced protective T cell immunity still remains unknown. Using a viral-vectored model TB vaccine and a number of experimental approaches, we have investigated the role of B cells in respiratory mucosal vaccine-induced T cell responses and protection against pulmonary TB. We found that respiratory mucosal vaccination activated Ag-specific B cell responses. Whereas respiratory mucosal vaccination elicited Ag-specific T cell responses in the airway and lung interstitium of genetic B cell-deficient (Jh(-/-) knockout [KO]) mice, the levels of airway T cell responses were lower than in wild-type hosts, which were associated with suboptimal protection against pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. However, mucosal vaccination induced T cell responses in the airway and lung interstitium and protection in B cell-depleted wild-type mice to a similar extent as in B cell-competent hosts. Furthermore, by using an adoptive cell transfer approach, reconstitution of B cells in vaccinated Jh(-/-) KO mice did not enhance anti-TB protection. Moreover, respiratory mucosal vaccine-activated T cells alone were able to enhance anti-TB protection in SCID mice, and the transfer of vaccine-primed B cells alongside T cells did not further enhance such protection. Alternatively, adoptively transferring vaccine-primed T cells from Jh(-/-) KO mice into SCID mice only provided suboptimal protection. These data together suggest that B cells play a minimal role, and highlight a central role by T cells, in respiratory mucosal vaccine-induced protective immunity against M. tuberculosis.

  1. Respiratory viruses in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Parvaiz A; Mir, Hyder; Akram, Shabir; Potdar, Varsha; Chadha, Mandeep S

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) cause significant morbidity, mortality, and an inexorable decline of lung function. Data from developed countries have shown viruses to be important causes of AECOPD, but data from developing countries like India are scant. We set out to determine the contribution of viruses in the causation of hospitalized patients with AECOPD. Methods: Twin nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs collected from 233 patients admitted with an acute AECOPD and tested for respiratory viruses including respiratory syncytial virus A and B, parainfluenza were (PIV) 1, 2, 3, and 4, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) A and B, influenza A and B, enterovirus, corona NL65, OC43, and 229E viruses, adenovirus 2 and 4, rhinovirus, and bocavirus, by duplex real time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) using CDC approved primers and probes. Samples positive for influenza A were subtyped for A/H1N1pdm09 and A/H3N2 whereas influenza B samples were subtyped into B/Yamagata and B/Victoria subtypes, using primers and probes recommended by CDC, USA. Results: Respiratory viruses were detected in 46 (19.7%) cases, influenza A/H3N2 and rhinoviruses being the most common viruses detected. More than one virus was isolated in four cases consisting of hMPV-B + adeno-2 + Inf-B; rhino + H3N2, PIV-1 + rhino; and PIV-1+ hMPV-B in one case each. Ancillary supportive therapeutic measures included bronchodilators, antibiotics, steroids, and ventilation (noninvasive in 42 and invasive in 4). Antiviral therapy was instituted in influenza-positive patients. Three patients with A/H3N2 infection died during hospitalization. Conclusions: We conclude that respiratory viruses are important contributors to AECOPD in India. Our data calls for prompt investigation during an exacerbation for viruses to obviate inappropriate antibiotic use and institute antiviral therapy in viral disease amenable to antiviral therapy. Appropriate

  2. Pulmonary circulatory parameters as indices for the early detection of acute rejection after single lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Okada, M; Tobe, S; Tsuji, F; Ohbo, H; Nakamura, H; Yamashita, C

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the changes in the pulmonary blood flow and histology during acute rejection following single lung transplantation. In single lung transplantation using adult mongrel dogs, immunosuppression with cyclosporine and azathioprine was discontinued after postoperative day 14 to induce rejection. Doppler flow probes were placed adjacent to the ascending aorta and the left pulmonary artery to measure the blood flow on a daily basis. In addition, chest roentgenograms were also examined daily. The pulmonary pressure was measured using a Swan-Ganz catheter prior to and following the induction of rejection. Open lung biopsies were performed when the left pulmonary artery flow decreased to half of the prerejection value. The pulmonary artery flow decreased to 14.3% of the aortic flow 5 days after the discontinuation of immunosuppression. The graft pulmonary vascular resistance increased significantly compared to the prerejection values (P < 0.001). This was not accompanied by any abnormalities on chest roentgenography. The histology was consistent, with marked perivascular lymphocytic infiltration with little alveolar or interstitial changes. During rejection, the increased pulmonary vascular resistance in the graft was probably the result of perivascular inflammatory cell infiltration, which was seen prior to changes on chest roentgenography. Changes in the left pulmonary artery flow and histology thus appear to be closely correlated in the early stages of acute rejection.

  3. Outcome of pulmonary tuberculosis treatment in the tertiary care setting -- Toronto 1992/93

    PubMed Central

    Wobeser, W; Yuan, L; Naus, M

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Completion of treatment of active cases of tuberculosis (TB) is the most important priority of TB control programs. This study was carried out to assess treatment completion for active cases of pulmonary TB in Toronto. METHODS: Consecutive cases of culture-proven pulmonary TB were obtained from the microbiology laboratories of 5 university-affiliated tertiary care centres in Toronto in 1992/93. A standard data-collection tool was used to abstract information from inpatient and outpatient charts. For patients who were transferred to other treatment centres or lost to follow-up, the local health unit was contacted for information about treatment completion. If incomplete information was obtained from these sources, data from the provincial Reportable Disease Information System were also reviewed. The main outcome analysed was treatment outcome, with cases classified as completed (record of treatment completion noted), transferred (patient transferred to another centre but no treatment results available), defaulted (record of defaulting in patient chart but no record of treatment completion elsewhere, or patient still receiving treatment more than 15 months after diagnosis) or dead (patient died before treatment completion). RESULTS: Of the 145 patients 84 (58%) completed treatment, 25 (17%) died, 22 (15%) defaulted and 14 (10%) were transferred. The corresponding values for the 22 patients with HIV coinfection were 6 (27%), 5 (23%), 8 (36%) and 3 (14%). Independent predictors of failure to complete treatment were injection drug use (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 5.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5 to 22.0), HIV infection (adjusted OR 4.6, 95% CI 1.4 to 14.7) and adverse drug reaction (adjusted OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.1 to 7.9). Independent predictors of death included age more than 50 years (adjusted OR 16.7, 95% CI 2.6 to 105.1), HIV infection (adjusted OR 16.1, 95% CI 3.9 to 66.4), immunosuppressive therapy (adjusted OR 8.0, 95% CI 1.9 to 34.4) and infection with

  4. Outcome for adult contacts of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in the absence of X-ray follow-up: 2000-03.

    PubMed

    Ormerod, L P; Green, R M; Broadfield, E

    2004-06-01

    The effects of the policy change in X-ray follow-up of adult tuberculin-positive close contacts of sputum microscopy positive pulmonary tuberculosis made by the Joint Tuberculosis Committee of the British Thoracic Society in 2000 were monitored prospectively from late 2000 until the end of 2003. No cases in contacts that could have been detected by interval X-rays at three and 12 months were found. The data, on 291 cases, support the abandonment of X-ray follow-up in favour of an 'inform and advise' strategy after an initial normal chest X-ray in this category of tuberculosis contact.

  5. Moxifloxacin population pharmacokinetics in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and the effect of intermittent high-dose rifapentine.

    PubMed

    Zvada, Simbarashe P; Denti, Paolo; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Meredith, Sandra; van As, Danelle; Hatherill, Mark; Hanekom, Willem; Wiesner, Lubbe; Simonsson, Ulrika S H; Jindani, Amina; Harrison, Thomas; McIlleron, Helen M

    2012-08-01

    We described the population pharmacokinetics of moxifloxacin and the effect of high-dose intermittent rifapentine in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who were randomized to a continuation-phase regimen of 400 mg moxifloxacin and 900 mg rifapentine twice weekly or 400 mg moxifloxacin and 1,200 mg rifapentine once weekly. A two-compartment model with transit absorption best described moxifloxacin pharmacokinetics. Although rifapentine increased the clearance of moxifloxacin by 8% during antituberculosis treatment compared to that after treatment completion without rifapentine, it did not result in a clinically significant change in moxifloxacin exposure.

  6. Moxifloxacin Population Pharmacokinetics in Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis and the Effect of Intermittent High-Dose Rifapentine

    PubMed Central

    Zvada, Simbarashe P.; Denti, Paolo; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Meredith, Sandra; van As, Danelle; Hatherill, Mark; Hanekom, Willem; Wiesner, Lubbe; Simonsson, Ulrika S. H.; Jindani, Amina; Harrison, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We described the population pharmacokinetics of moxifloxacin and the effect of high-dose intermittent rifapentine in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who were randomized to a continuation-phase regimen of 400 mg moxifloxacin and 900 mg rifapentine twice weekly or 400 mg moxifloxacin and 1,200 mg rifapentine once weekly. A two-compartment model with transit absorption best described moxifloxacin pharmacokinetics. Although rifapentine increased the clearance of moxifloxacin by 8% during antituberculosis treatment compared to that after treatment completion without rifapentine, it did not result in a clinically significant change in moxifloxacin exposure. PMID:22585223

  7. Tuberculosis in the lung (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is caused by a group of organisms: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M bovis , M africanum and a few other rarer subtypes. Tuberculosis usually appears as a lung (pulmonary) infection. However, ...

  8. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Mumbai, India: Factors Responsible for Patient and Treatment Delays

    PubMed Central

    Tamhane, Ashutosh; Ambe, Girish; Vermund, Sten H; Kohler, Connie L; Karande, Alka; Sathiakumar, Nalini

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the factors responsible for patient delay and treatment delay in newly diagnosed sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients. Methods: Study subjects (N = 150) were randomly selected from municipal health centers in Mumbai, India. Duration of symptoms, treatment, and reason for delay were assessed using interviews and medical records. We defined patient delay as presentation to a health care provider (HCP) >20 days of the onset of TB-related symptoms and treatment delay as therapy initiated more than 14 days after the first consultation (for TB-related symptoms) with an HCP. Results: Of the 150 subjects, 29% had patient delays and 81% had treatment delays. In multivariable analysis, patient delay was significantly associated with the self-perception that initial symptoms were due to TB [odds ratio (OR) = 3.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1–12.6] and perceived inability to pay for care (OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.2–7.1). Treatment delay was significantly associated with consulting a non-allopathic provider (OR = 12.3, 95% CI = 1.4–105) and consulting >3 providers (OR = 5.0, 95% CI = 1.4–17.4). Patient interval was half the treatment interval (median days: 15 vs. 31). Women were slightly more likely to experience patient and treatment delays than men. For two-thirds of the patients, another TB patient was a source of TB-related knowledge, while health education material (16%) and television (10%) played a smaller role. Conclusion: Treatment delay, primarily due to diagnosis delay, was a greater problem than patient delay. Expanding public–public and public–private partnerships and regular training sessions for HCPs might decrease treatment delay. Media coverage and cured TB patients as peer advocates may help to reinforce TB-related health education messages. PMID:22973488

  9. Risk prediction of pulmonary tuberculosis using genetic and conventional risk factors in adult Korean population

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Eun Pyo; Go, Min Jin; Kim, Hyung-Lae

    2017-01-01

    A complex interplay among host, pathogen, and environmental factors is believed to contribute to the risk of developing pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). The lack of replication of published genome-wide association study (GWAS) findings limits the clinical utility of reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We conducted a GWAS using 467 PTB cases and 1,313 healthy controls obtained from two community-based cohorts in Korea. We evaluated the performance of PTB risk models based on different combinations of genetic and nongenetic factors and validated the results in an independent Korean population comprised of 179 PTB cases and 500 healthy controls. We demonstrated the polygenic nature of PTB and nongenetic factors such as age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) were strongly associated with PTB risk. None of the SNPs achieved genome-wide significance; instead, we were able to replicate the associations between PTB and ten SNPs near or in the genes, CDCA7, GBE1, GADL1, SPATA16, C6orf118, KIAA1432, DMRT2, CTR9, CCDC67, and CDH13, which may play roles in the immune and inflammatory pathways. Among the replicated SNPs, an intergenic SNP, rs9365798, located downstream of the C6orf118 gene showed the most significant association under the dominant model (OR = 1.59, 95% CI 1.32–1.92, P = 2.1×10−6). The performance of a risk model combining the effects of ten replicated SNPs and six nongenetic factors (i.e., age, sex, BMI, cigarette smoking, systolic blood pressure, and hemoglobin) were validated in the replication set (AUC = 0.80, 95% CI 0.76–0.84). The strategy of combining genetic and nongenetic risk factors ultimately resulted in better risk prediction for PTB in the adult Korean population. PMID:28355295

  10. Intention to Quit Smoking and Associated Factors in Smokers Newly Diagnosed with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Aryanpur, Mahshid; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Hosseini, Mostafa; Jamaati, Hmidreza; Tabarsi, Payam; Soori, Hamid; Heydari, Gholam Reza; Kazempour-Dizaji, Mehdi; Emami, Habib; Mozafarian, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several studies have shown that smoking, as a modifiable risk factor, can affect tuberculosis (TB) in different aspects such as enhancing development of TB infection, activation of latent TB and its related mortality. Since willingness to quit smoking is a critical stage, which may lead to quit attempts, being aware of smokers’ intention to quit and the related predictors can provide considerable advantages. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, subjects were recruited via a multi-stage cluster sampling method. Sampling was performed during 2012–2014 among pulmonary TB (PTB) patients referred to health centers in Tehran implementing the directly observed treatment short course (DOTS) strategy and a TB referral center. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS version 22 and the factors influencing quit intention were assessed using bivariate regression and multiple logistic regression models. Results: In this study 1,127 newly diagnosed PTB patients were studied; from which 284 patients (22%) were current smokers. When diagnosed with TB, 59 (23.8%) smokers quit smoking. Among the remaining 189 (76.2%) patients who continued smoking, 52.4% had intention to quit. In the final multiple logistic regression model, living in urban areas (OR=8.81, P=0.003), having an office job (OR= 7.34, P=0.001), being single (OR=4.89, P=0.016) and a one unit increase in the motivation degree (OR=2.60, P<0.001) were found to increase the intention to quit smoking. Conclusion: The study found that PTB patients who continued smoking had remarkable intention to quit. Thus, it is recommended that smoking cessation interventions should be started at the time of TB diagnosis. Understanding the associated factors can guide the consultants to predict patients’ intention to quit and select the most proper management to facilitate smoking cessation for each patient. PMID:27403174

  11. Pulmonary tuberculosis incidence and risk factors in rural areas of China: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Shu, Wen; Wang, Min; Hou, Yongchun; Xia, Yinyin; Xu, Weiguo; Bai, Liqiong; Nie, Shaofa; Cheng, Shiming; Xu, Yihua

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis (TB) and its risk factors in China remains unclear. This study examined TB incidence and relative risk factors in rural areas of China. Participants (n = 177,529) were recruited in Xiangtan County (in the central area of China) and in Danyang County (in the eastern area of China) in 2009 and a followed-up study was conducted for one year. The incidence density of pulmonary TB and smear-positive TB were 91.6 (95% CI: 78.7, 106.0) per 100,000 person-year and 36.7 (95% CI: 33.1, 52.4) per 100,000 person-year respectively in Xiangtan, and 47.3 (95% CI: 38.2, 57.5) per 100,000 person-year and 22.7 (95% CI: 16.5, 30.8) per 100,000 person-year in Danyang. The medical history of TB was associated with TB, with the relative risk (RR) of 7.00 (95% CI: 2.76, 17.18) in Xiangtan and that of 31.08 (95% CI: 13.22, 73.10) in Danyang. The association between TB and per capita living space over median was found in Xiangtan, with the RR of 1.86 (95% CI: 1.15, 3.01). No association was found between TB and the insurance status, the contact history with TB, the history of diabetes, smoking, or per capita annual income. The host genetic susceptibility, and social factors such as education and income could be considered in future studies.

  12. Co-endemicity of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Intestinal Helminth Infection in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Ren, Zhou-Peng; Wang, Li-Xia; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Jin-Feng; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2016-03-01

    Both pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and intestinal helminth infection (IHI) affect millions of individuals every year in China. However, the national-scale estimation of prevalence predictors and prevalence maps for these diseases, as well as co-endemic relative risk (RR) maps of both diseases' prevalence are not well developed. There are co-endemic, high prevalence areas of both diseases, whose delimitation is essential for devising effective control strategies. Bayesian geostatistical logistic regression models including socio-economic, climatic, geographical and environmental predictors were fitted separately for active PTB and IHI based on data from the national surveys for PTB and major human parasitic diseases that were completed in 2010 and 2004, respectively. Prevalence maps and co-endemic RR maps were constructed for both diseases by means of Bayesian Kriging model and Bayesian shared component model capable of appraising the fraction of variance of spatial RRs shared by both diseases, and those specific for each one, under an assumption that there are unobserved covariates common to both diseases. Our results indicate that gross domestic product (GDP) per capita had a negative association, while rural regions, the arid and polar zones and elevation had positive association with active PTB prevalence; for the IHI prevalence, GDP per capita and distance to water bodies had a negative association, the equatorial and warm zones and the normalized difference vegetation index had a positive association. Moderate to high prevalence of active PTB and low prevalence of IHI were predicted in western regions, low to moderate prevalence of active PTB and low prevalence of IHI were predicted in north-central regions and the southeast coastal regions, and moderate to high prevalence of active PTB and high prevalence of IHI were predicted in the south-western regions. Thus, co-endemic areas of active PTB and IHI were located in the south-western regions of China, which

  13. Pulmonary Tuberculosis Incidence and Risk Factors in Rural Areas of China: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Hou, Yongchun; Xia, Yinyin; Xu, Weiguo; Bai, Liqiong; Nie, Shaofa; Cheng, Shiming; Xu, Yihua

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis (TB) and its risk factors in China remains unclear. This study examined TB incidence and relative risk factors in rural areas of China. Participants (n = 177,529) were recruited in Xiangtan County (in the central area of China) and in Danyang County (in the eastern area of China) in 2009 and a followed-up study was conducted for one year. The incidence density of pulmonary TB and smear-positive TB were 91.6 (95% CI: 78.7, 106.0) per 100,000 person-year and 36.7 (95% CI: 33.1, 52.4) per 100,000 person-year respectively in Xiangtan, and 47.3 (95% CI: 38.2, 57.5) per 100,000 person-year and 22.7 (95% CI: 16.5, 30.8) per 100,000 person-year in Danyang. The medical history of TB was associated with TB, with the relative risk (RR) of 7.00 (95% CI: 2.76, 17.18) in Xiangtan and that of 31.08 (95% CI: 13.22, 73.10) in Danyang. The association between TB and per capita living space over median was found in Xiangtan, with the RR of 1.86 (95% CI: 1.15, 3.01). No association was found between TB and the insurance status, the contact history with TB, the history of diabetes, smoking, or per capita annual income. The host genetic susceptibility, and social factors such as education and income could be considered in future studies. PMID:23554875

  14. Prospective cross-sectional evaluation of the small membrane filtration method for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jones-López, Edward; Manabe, Yukari C; Palaci, Moises; Kayiza, Carol; Armstrong, Derek; Nakiyingi, Lydia; Ssengooba, Willy; Gaeddert, Mary; Kubiak, Rachel; Almeida Júnior, Pedro; Alland, David; Dietze, Reynaldo; Joloba, Moses; Ellner, Jerrold J; Dorman, Susan E

    2014-07-01

    Smear microscopy has suboptimal sensitivity, and there is a need to improve its performance since it is commonly used to diagnose tuberculosis (TB). We prospectively evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the small membrane filtration (SMF) method, an approach that uses a vacuum manifold and is designed to concentrate bacilli onto a filter that can be examined microscopically. We enrolled hospitalized adults suspected to have pulmonary TB in Kampala, Uganda. We obtained a clinical history and three spontaneously expectorated sputum specimens for smear microscopy (direct, concentrated, and SMF), MGIT (mycobacterial growth indicator tube) 960 and Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) cultures, and Xpert MTB/RIF testing. We performed per-specimen (primary) and per-patient analyses. From October 2012 to June 2013, we enrolled 212 patients (579 sputum specimens). The participants were mostly female (63.2%), and 81.6% were HIV infected; their median CD4 cell count was 47 cells/μl. Overall, 19.0%, 20.4%, 27.1%, 25.2%, and 25.9% of specimens tested positive by direct smear, concentrated smear, MGIT culture, LJ culture, and Xpert test, respectively. In the per-specimen analysis, the sensitivity of the SMF method (48.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 37.4 to 59.6) was lower than those of direct smear (60.9%; 51.4 to 70.5 [P = 0.0001]) and concentrated smear (63.3%; 53.6 to 73.1 [P < 0.0001]). Subgroup analyses showed that SMF performed poorly in specimens having a low volume or low bacterial load. The SMF method performed poorly compared to standard smear techniques and was sensitive to sample preparation techniques. The optimal laboratory SMF protocol may require striking a fine balance between sample dilution and filtration failure rate.

  15. Discovery and verification of serum differential expression proteins for pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiping; He, Xiao; Li, Hongtao; Zhou, Yi; Zang, Ning; Hu, Shuixiu; Zheng, Yanyan; He, Min

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is a chronic disease and has remained a severe threat to public health. Valuable biomarkers for improving the detection rate are crucial for controlling this disease. The purpose of this study was to discover potential biomarkers in sera from PTB patients compared with pneumonia patients and normal healthy controls. A total of 336 human serum specimens were enrolled in this study. Differentially expressed proteins were identified using iTRAQ method combining with MALDI-TOF-MS. Data was analyzed using relative bioinformatics methods. Potential biomarkers were further validated by IHC, ELISA and Western blot. As a result, 489 non-redundant proteins were identified in the sera, and 159 of which could be quantified by calculating their iTRAQ ratios. Compared to the controls, 26 differentially expressed proteins were recognized among PTB patients, including 16 overexpressed proteins and 10 downregulated proteins. Analysis of their functional interactions revealed that 12 proteins appeared in the center of the functional network. One of these key proteins, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), was found to be significantly elevated among PTB patients as compared with the controls examined by IHC, ELISA and Western blot. This result was consistent with the iTRAQ result. An independent blinded testing set to examine serum SHBG by ELISA achieved an accuracy of 78.74%, sensitivity of 75.6% and specificity of 91.5% in diagnosing PTB. In summary, iTRAQ in combination with MALDI-TOF-MS technology can efficiently screen differentially expressed proteins in sera from the PTB patients. SHBG is suggested to be a possible and novel serum biomarker for PTB.

  16. Feasibility of the TBDx automated digital microscopy system for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Havumaki, Joshua; Ha, Dang Thi Minh; Caceres, Tatiana; Hang, Pham Thu; Collantes, Jimena; Thi Ngoc Lan, Nguyen; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Denkinger, Claudia M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Improved and affordable diagnostic or triage tests are urgently needed at the microscopy centre level. Automated digital microscopy has the potential to overcome issues related to conventional microscopy, including training time requirement and inconsistencies in results interpretation. Methods For this blinded prospective study, sputum samples were collected from adults with presumptive pulmonary tuberculosis in Lima, Peru and Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. TBDx performance was evaluated as a stand-alone and as a triage test against conventional microscopy and Xpert, with culture as the reference standard. Xpert was used to confirm positive cases. Findings A total of 613 subjects were enrolled between October 2014 and March 2015, with 539 included in the final analysis. The sensitivity of TBDx was 62·2% (95% CI 56·6–67·4) and specificity was 90·7% (95% CI 85·9–94·2) compared to culture. The algorithm assessing TBDx as a triage test achieved a specificity of 100% while maintaining sensitivity. Interpretation While the diagnostic performance of TBDx did not reach the levels obtained by experienced microscopists in reference laboratories, it is conceivable that it would exceed the performance of less experienced microscopists. In the absence of highly sensitive and specific molecular tests at the microscopy centre level, TBDx in a triage-testing algorithm would optimize specificity and limit overall cost without compromising the number of patients receiving up-front drug susceptibility testing for rifampicin. However, the algorithm would miss over one third of patients compared to Xpert alone. PMID:28253302

  17. Retrospective cohort evaluation on risk of pneumonia in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tsui-Ming; Mou, Chih-Hsin; Shen, Te-Chun; Yang, Chien-Lung; Yang, Min-Hui; Wu, Fang-Yang; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTb) and pneumonia are diseases that may exist concomitantly. Population study investigating the subsequent pneumonia development in PTb patients is limited. This study compares the risk of pneumonia between cohorts with and without PTb.We used the claims data of the Taiwan National Health Insurance to identify a cohort with PTb (N = 3417) newly diagnosed in 2000-2006 without pneumonia history, and a randomly selected comparison cohort (N = 6834) free of PTb and pneumonia, frequency matched by propensity score. Incidence rates and hazard ratios of pneumonia were calculated by sex, age, and comorbidity starting in the 7th month after the cohorts being established until the end of 2011.We found the incidence of pneumonia to be 1.9-fold higher in the PTb cohort than in the PTb free cohort (51.6 vs 27.0 per 1000 person-years). The PTb cohort had a Cox method estimated adjusted hazard ratio of 2.14 (95% confidence interval = 1.96-2.32). We also found that the risk was greater for men than for women, but lower for young adults aged 20-39 years. Comorbidity interacted with PTb by aggravating the pneumonia risk, particularly for those with asthma. For PTb patients comorbid with asthma, the pneumonia incidence was 2.5-fold higher than for PTb patients free of comorbidities (75.9 vs 29.3 per 1000 person-years).Our results display that PTb patients have an elevated risk of developing pneumonia. Adequate follow-up should be provided to the PTb patients, especially those with comorbidity.

  18. Erythrocyte receptor (CD2)-bearing T lymphocytes are affected by diet in experimental pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bartow, R A; McMurray, D N

    1990-01-01

    Outbred (Hartley) and inbred (strain 2 and 13) guinea pigs were vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis BCG and placed on isocaloric, purified diets containing either 10 or 30% ovalbumin or on commercial guinea pig chow. Six weeks later, the animals were challenged by the respiratory route with virulent M. tuberculosis H37Rv. At intervals postchallenge, groups were tuberculin tested and sacrificed. Thymus-dependent (T) lymphocytes were enumerated either by rosette formation with rabbit erythrocytes or by the indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) with a guinea pig pan-T-cell monoclonal antibody, 8BE6. Protein-deficient guinea pigs of all three strains had significantly fewer erythrocyte rosette-forming (CD2+) T cells in the peripheral blood, and malnourished strain 2 and Hartley guinea pigs exhibited reduced levels of CD2+ T cells in the thymus. In contrast, animals of all three strains fed the low-protein diet harbored more CD2+ T cells in the bronchotracheal lymph nodes than did their control-fed counterparts. A larger proportion of lymphocytes from the blood and lymph nodes of all three strains were IFA positive than formed erythrocyte rosettes regardless of diet treatment. Diet had no effect on IFA-positive lymphocytes in those organs. Protein deficiency is associated with significant alterations in the number and/or distribution of T lymphocytes expressing functional CD2-receptors in BCG-vaccinated animals exposed to virulent mycobacteria by the pulmonary route. These alterations may contribute to the reduction in BCG vaccine efficacy observed in this model. PMID:1971259

  19. Prospective Cross-Sectional Evaluation of the Small Membrane Filtration Method for Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Yukari C.; Palaci, Moises; Kayiza, Carol; Armstrong, Derek; Nakiyingi, Lydia; Ssengooba, Willy; Gaeddert, Mary; Kubiak, Rachel; Almeida Júnior, Pedro; Alland, David; Dietze, Reynaldo; Joloba, Moses; Ellner, Jerrold J.; Dorman, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Smear microscopy has suboptimal sensitivity, and there is a need to improve its performance since it is commonly used to diagnose tuberculosis (TB). We prospectively evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the small membrane filtration (SMF) method, an approach that uses a vacuum manifold and is designed to concentrate bacilli onto a filter that can be examined microscopically. We enrolled hospitalized adults suspected to have pulmonary TB in Kampala, Uganda. We obtained a clinical history and three spontaneously expectorated sputum specimens for smear microscopy (direct, concentrated, and SMF), MGIT (mycobacterial growth indicator tube) 960 and Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) cultures, and Xpert MTB/RIF testing. We performed per-specimen (primary) and per-patient analyses. From October 2012 to June 2013, we enrolled 212 patients (579 sputum specimens). The participants were mostly female (63.2%), and 81.6% were HIV infected; their median CD4 cell count was 47 cells/μl. Overall, 19.0%, 20.4%, 27.1%, 25.2%, and 25.9% of specimens tested positive by direct smear, concentrated smear, MGIT culture, LJ culture, and Xpert test, respectively. In the per-specimen analysis, the sensitivity of the SMF method (48.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 37.4 to 59.6) was lower than those of direct smear (60.9%; 51.4 to 70.5 [P = 0.0001]) and concentrated smear (63.3%; 53.6 to 73.1 [P < 0.0001]). Subgroup analyses showed that SMF performed poorly in specimens having a low volume or low bacterial load. The SMF method performed poorly compared to standard smear techniques and was sensitive to sample preparation techniques. The optimal laboratory SMF protocol may require striking a fine balance between sample dilution and filtration failure rate. PMID:24808236

  20. Diagnostic Delay and Antibiotic Overuse in Acute Pulmonary Blastomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Alpern, Jonathan D.; Bahr, Nathan C.; Vazquez-Benitez, Gabriela; Boulware, David R.; Sellman, Jonathan S.; Sarosi, George A.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of blastomycosis is often delayed. We identified 28 cases of pulmonary blastomycosis in a retrospective chart review. Most patients received multiple antibiotic courses before being diagnosed, and the sputum KOH smear was rarely used. Diagnostic delay can be decreased with higher suspicion for pulmonary blastomycosis and early use of the sputum KOH smear. PMID:27419155

  1. Xpert(®) MTB/RIF under routine conditions in diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis: a study in two hospitals in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shah, S K; Kumar, A M V; Dogar, O F; Khan, M A; Qadeer, E; Tahseen, S; Masood, F; Chandio, A K; Edginton, M E

    2013-03-21

    Xpert(®) MTB/RIF testing was offered to consecutive patients with presumptive tuberculosis (TB) attending two hospitals in Pakistan during April-May 2012, in addition to routine diagnostic protocol (smear microscopy, chest radiography and clinical judgement). We assessed the relative contribution of each tool in detecting pulmonary TB under routine conditions. Of 606 participants, 121 (20%) were detected as pulmonary TB: 46 (38%) by microscopy, 38 (31%) by Xpert alone and 37 (31%) on clinical and radiological grounds; 41 (65%) were detected by both Xpert and microscopy. One patient had rifampicin resistance. Although Xpert detected approximately twice as many TB cases as microscopy (n = 79, 65%), clinical judgement remained favoured by clinicians even when smear and Xpert were negative.

  2. The hidden harm of home-based care: pulmonary tuberculosis symptoms among children providing home medical care to HIV/AIDS-affected adults in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Cluver, Lucie; Orkin, Mark; Moshabela, Mosa; Kuo, Caroline; Boyes, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Millions of children in sub-Saharan Africa undertake personal and medical care for family members who are unwell with AIDS. To date, no research has investigated whether such care provision places children at heightened risk for pulmonary tuberculosis. This study aimed to address this gap by identifying risk factors for paediatric pulmonary tuberculosis symptomatology. In 2009-2011, 6002 children aged 10-17 years were surveyed using door-to-door household sampling of census enumeration areas. These were randomly sampled from six urban and rural sites with over 30% HIV prevalence, within South Africa's three highest tuberculosis-burden provinces. Validated scales and clinical tuberculosis symptom checklists were modelled in multivariate logistic regressions, controlling for socio-demographic co-factors. Findings showed that, among children, severe pulmonary tuberculosis symptomatology was predicted by primary caregiver HIV/AIDS-illness [odds ratio (OR): 1.63, confidence interval (CI): 1.23-2.15, p<0.001], and AIDS-orphanhood (OR: 1.44, CI: 1.04-2.00, p<0.029). Three-fold increases in severe tuberculosis symptoms were predicted by the child's exposure to body fluids through providing personal or medical care to an ill adult (OR: 3.12, CI: 1.96-4.95, p<0.001). Symptoms were also predicted by socio-economic factors of food insecurity (OR: 1.52, CI: 1.15-2.02, p<0.003) and household overcrowding (OR: 1.35, CI: 1.06-1.72, p<0.017). Percentage probability of severe tuberculosis symptoms rose from 1.4% amongst least-exposed children, to 18.1% amongst those exposed to all above-stated risk factors, independent of biological relationship of primary caregiver-child and other socio-demographics. Amongst symptomatic children, 75% had never been tested for tuberculosis. These findings identify the risk of tuberculosis among children providing home medical care to their unwell caregivers, and suggest that there are gaps in the health system to screen and detect these cases of

  3. MCP-1 -2518 A/G functional polymorphism is associated with increased susceptibility to active pulmonary tuberculosis in Tunisian patients.

    PubMed

    Ben-Selma, Walid; Harizi, Hedi; Boukadida, Jalel

    2011-11-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) plays crucial role in protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT). In this study, we examined whether single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) -2518 A/G (rs 1024611) of MCP-1 affect the susceptibility to active tuberculosis (TB) in Tunisian populations. Genomic DNA from patients with active TB (168 cases of pulmonary TB and 55 cases of extrapulmonary TB) and ethnically controls (150 cases) was genotyped for the MCP-1 -2518 A/G SNP by polymerase chain reaction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). We observed that -2518 G allele and GG genotype (high MCP-1 producer) frequencies were significantly more elevated in active pulmonary TB group in comparison to control group [34 vs. 22%; P = 0.0007; 15 vs. 5%, P corrected for the number of genotypes (Pc) = 0.015; respectively]. Additionally, they were associated with increased risk development of this clinical form of TB [odds ratio (OR) = 1.83, 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 1.26-2.66; OR = 3.1, 95% CI = 1.28-7.76; respectively]. However, wild type allele -2518 A and AA genotype were over-represented in control group (78 and 62%) and seem to be protective factors against TB. Moreover, -2518 AA genotype was more frequent in control group and was associated with resistance against development of active pulmonary TB (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.35-0.89, Pc = 0.03). Our findings confirm the key role of -2518 A/G SNP of MCP-1 and support its association with resistance/susceptibility to the development of active pulmonary TB in the Tunisian population.

  4. Acute myocardial infarction with concomitant pulmonary embolism as a result of patent foramen ovale.

    PubMed

    Hayıroğlu, Mert İlker; Bozbeyoğlu, Emrah; Akyüz, Şükrü; Yıldırımtürk, Özlem; Bozbay, Mehmet; Bakhshaliyev, Nijad; Renda, Emir; Gök, Gülay; Eren, Mehmet; Pehlivanoğlu, Seçkin

    2015-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) and pulmonary embolism canal one lead to life-threatening conditions such as sudden cardiac death and congestive heart failure. We discuss a case of a 74-year-old man presented to the emergency department with acute dyspnea and chest pain. Acute anterior MI and pulmonary embolism concomitantly were diagnosed. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention performed because of preliminary acute anterior MI diagnosis. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed to determine further complications caused by acute MI because patient had a continuous tachycardia and dyspnea although hemodynamically stable. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a thrombus that was stuck into the patent foramen ovale with parts in right and left atria. Anticoagulation therapy was started; neither fibrinolytic therapy nor operation was performed because of low survey expectations of the patient's recently diagnosed primary disease stage IV lung cancer. Patient was discharged on his 20th day with oral anticoagulation and antiagregant therapy.

  5. Acute Pulmonary Edema in an Eclamptic Pregnant Patient: A Rare Case of Takotsubo Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Karamchandani, Kunal; Bortz, Brandon; Vaida, Sonia

    2016-09-23

    BACKGROUND Acute pulmonary edema in a pregnant patient is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Takotsubo syndrome, or stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is a rare cause of acute pulmonary edema in a pregnant patient, especially prior to delivery of the fetus. CASE REPORT We describe a case of a pregnant patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and eclampsia and was found to have Takotsubo syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, eclampsia as a precipitating factor for Takotsubo syndrome has not been described in literature. CONCLUSIONS Clinicians taking care of pregnant patients should be aware of the potential link between eclampsia and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Prompt correction of the precipitating cause along with supportive management as described is the key to a successful outcome.

  6. Acute Pulmonary Edema in an Eclamptic Pregnant Patient: A Rare Case of Takotsubo Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karamchandani, Kunal; Bortz, Brandon; Vaida, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 35 Final Diagnosis: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy Symptoms: Seizures Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cesarean section Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Acute pulmonary edema in a pregnant patient is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Takotsubo syndrome, or stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is a rare cause of acute pulmonary edema in a pregnant patient, especially prior to delivery of the fetus. Case Report: We describe a case of a pregnant patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and eclampsia and was found to have Takotsubo syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, eclampsia as a precipitating factor for Takotsubo syndrome has not been described in literature. Conclusions: Clinicians taking care of pregnant patients should be aware of the potential link between eclampsia and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Prompt correction of the precipitating cause along with supportive management as described is the key to a successful outcome. PMID:27658947

  7. Subclavian steal syndrome presenting as recurrent pulmonary oedema associated with acute left ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mangialavori, Giuseppe; Ballo, Piercarlo; Michelagnoli, Stefano; Ercolini, Leonardo; Barbanti, Enrico; Passuello, Franco; Abbondanti, Alessandro; Consoli, Lorenzo; Chechi, Tania; Fibbi, Veronica; Nannini, Marco; Chiodi, Leandro; Zuppiroli, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Subclavian steal syndrome typically presents as angina in patients with internal mammary artery grafts. Atypical clinical presentations have been rarely described. We report an unusual case of subclavian steal syndrome presenting as pulmonary oedema with acute left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and preserved ejection fraction in a patient with internal mammary artery graft and severe stenosis of the proximal left subclavian artery. After successful angioplasty and stenting of subclavian artery, the patient remained asymptomatic for six months, but then experienced acute diastolic dysfunction and recurrent pulmonary oedema associated with critical subclavian in-stent restenosis with stent deformation. This report points out that, in patients with internal mammary-to-LAD grafts, subclavian steal syndrome may present as acute left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and pulmonary oedema even in the presence of normal ejection fraction.

  8. Acute vasoreactivity test results in severe pulmonary hypertension patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: our experience with 29 cases

    PubMed Central

    Asker, Selvi; Asker, Muntecep

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of the current study is to evaluate acute vasoreactivity test (AVT) results in severe pulmonary hypertension patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and to compare the demographical, clinical, and laboratory variables in positive and negative cases. Methods This retrospective, clinical study was performed on 29 cases in the departments of cardiology and chest diseases of our tertiary care center. AVT was positive in 12 (41.4%) cases and negative in 17 (58.6%) cases. Demographical variables, cardiopulmonary indicators, and laboratory findings were compared in these two subgroups. Results The mean age was 62.3±7.8 years for AVT negative group, while it was 64.8±7.3 years in AVT positive group (P=0.38). Except for the changes in systolic, diastolic, and mean pulmonary arterial pressures before and after iloprost administration, there were no statistically significant differences regarding any of the parameters under investigation in both groups. Conclusion Despite the high rate of positivity for AVT in severe pulmonary hypertension patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, none of the variables under investigation displayed a noteworthy difference between AVT negative and positive groups. Identification of factors likely to influence AVT results is important for establishment of appropriate treatment protocols especially for AVT negative cases. PMID:26064044

  9. Risk factors for tuberculosis treatment failure among pulmonary tuberculosis patients in four health regions of Burkina Faso, 2009: case control study

    PubMed Central

    Sawadogo, Bernard; Tint, Khin San; Tshimanga, Mufuta; Kuonza, Lazarus; Ouedraogo, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In Burkina Faso, the tuberculosis (TB) treatment failure rate increased from 2.5% in 2000 to 8.3% in 2006. The risk factors for TB treatment failure in the country are not well known. The study aims to determine the risk factors for treatment failure among pulmonary tuberculosis patients in four health region of Burkina Faso and to recommend appropriate interventions. Methods A case control study was conducted among pulmonary TB patients who began TB treatment in 2009. A case was any patient who remained smear-positive at fifth month of TB treatment and a control was a patient who tested smear-negative at fifth month of treatment. A structured questionnaire was administered to one hundred cases and one hundred controls to collect information on exposure factors. Odds ratio were calculated using bivariate and multivariate analysis to determine the association between exposures and outcome. Results Multivariate analysis showed that independent risk factors for TB treatment failure were fail to take TB drugs for more than 14 consecutive days (OR = 18.53; 95% CI:4.56 - 75.22), sputum smear-positive at two months of treatment (OR = 11.52; 95%CI:5.18-25.60), existence of comorbidity (OR = 5.74; 95%CI:1.69-19.44), and use of traditional medicines or herbs (OR = 2.97; 95%CI:1.12-7.85). Conclusion Early identification of patients with the above risk factors for intense case management will improve TB treatment outcome. Patient with smear positive at 2ndnd month of treatment require more intense follow-up, and involving traditional healers who provide traditional medicines or herbs in the educational programme on TB are required. The national referral laboratory capacity needs to be strengthened to do drug susceptibility testing and routine drug monitoring on cases of non conversion at 2nd month of treatment. PMID:26327989

  10. Paradoxical Tuberculosis Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (TB-IRIS) in HIV Patients with Culture Confirmed Pulmonary Tuberculosis in India and the Potential Role of IL-6 in Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Brian O.; Chandrasekhar, Chockalingam; Venkatesan, Perumal; Menon, Pradeep A.; Subramanian, Sudha; Anbalagan, Selvaraj; Bhavani, Kannabiran P.; Sekar, Sathiyavelu; Padmapriyadarshini, Chandrasekaran; Kumar, Satagopan; Ravichandran, Narayanan; Raja, Krishnaraj; Bhanu, Kesavamurthy; Mahilmaran, Ayyamperumal; Sekar, Lakshmanan; Sher, Alan; Sereti, Irini; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence, manifestations, outcome and clinical predictors of paradoxical TB-IRIS in patients with HIV and culture confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in India have not been studied prospectively. Methods HIV+ patients with culture confirmed PTB started on anti-tuberculosis therapy (ATT) were followed prospectively after anti-retroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Established criteria for IRIS diagnosis were used including decline in plasma HIV RNA at IRIS event. Pre-ART plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between baseline variables and IRIS. Results Of 57 patients enrolled, 48 had complete follow up data. Median ATT-ART interval was 28 days (interquartile range, IQR 14–47). IRIS events occurred in 26 patients (54.2%) at a median of 11 days (IQR: 7–16) after ART initiation. Corticosteroids were required for treatment of most IRIS events that resolved within a median of 13 days (IQR: 9–23). Two patients died due to CNS TB-IRIS. Lower CD4+ T-cell counts, higher plasma HIV RNA levels, lower CD4/CD8 ratio, lower hemoglobin, shorter ATT to ART interval, extra-pulmonary or miliary TB and higher plasma IL-6 and CRP levels at baseline were associated with paradoxical TB-IRIS in the univariate analysis. Shorter ATT to ART interval, lower hemoglobin and higher IL-6 and CRP levels remained significant in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Paradoxical TB–IRIS frequently complicates HIV-TB therapy in India. IL-6 and CRP may assist in predicting IRIS events and serve as potential targets for immune interventions. PMID:23691062

  11. Assessment of heat shock proteins and endothelial dysfunction in acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    İn, Erdal; Deveci, Figen; Kaman, Dilara

    2016-06-01

    We determined the levels of some heat shock proteins (HSP27, HSP70, and HSP90), L-arginine, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) levels in patients with acute pulmonary embolism. The present case-control study comprised a healthy control group (n = 57) and patients with acute pulmonary embolism (n = 84). HSPs, L-arginine, ADMA, and SDMA levels were measured in all of the cases. The mean age of the control group was 56.72 ± 8.44 years, and the mean age of the patients with acute pulmonary embolism was 60.20 ± 16.56 years (P = 0.104). Compared with controls, patients with acute pulmonary embolism had significantly higher mean serum HSP27, HSP90, and ADMA levels, whereas the mean serum L-arginine and SDMA levels were lower (P < 0.001, for all parameters). In patients with acute pulmonary embolism serum HSP27, HSP70, and ADMA levels were negatively correlated with partial pressures of arterial oxygen levels (r = -0.281, P = 0.01; r = -0.263, P = 0.016; and r = -0.275, P = 0.011, respectively) and arterial oxygen saturation (r = -0.225, P = 0.039; r = -0.400, P < 0.001; r = -0.299, P = 0.006, respectively). The findings of the present study demonstrated that oxidative stress and endothelial damage increase in acute pulmonary embolism.

  12. Epithelial sodium channel is involved in H2S-induced acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Wang, Yixin; Su, Chenglei; Sun, Hao; Zhang, Huazhong; Zhu, Baoli; Zhang, Hengdong; Xiao, Hang; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jinsong

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary edema is one of the major outcomes of exposure to high levels of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). However, the mechanisms involved in H2S-induced acute pulmonary edema are still poorly understood. Therefore, the present study is designed to evaluate the role of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in H2S-induced acute pulmonary edema. The Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to sublethal concentrations of inhaled H2S, then the pulmonary histological and lung epithelial cell injury were evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin staining and electron microscopy, respectively. In addition to morphological investigation, our results also revealed that H2S exposure significantly decreased the alveolar fluid clearance and increased the lung tissue wet-dry ratio. These changes were demonstrated to be associated with decreased ENaC expression. Furthermore, the extracellular-regulated protein kinases 1/2 pathway was demonstrated to be implicated in H2S-mediated ENaC expression, because PD98059, an ERK1/2 antagonist, significantly mitigated H2S-mediated ENaC down-regulation. Therefore, our results show that ENaC might represent a novel pharmacological target for the treatment of acute pulmonary edema induced by H2S and other hazardous gases.

  13. Recurrent acute pulmonary oedema after aortic and mitral valve surgery due to trachea malacia and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sankatsing, S.U.C.; Hanselaar, W.E.J.J.; van Steenwijk, R.P.; van der Sloot, J.A.P.; Broekhuis, E.; Kok, W.E.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this report we describe a patient with recurrent episodes of acute pulmonary oedema after aortic and mitral valve surgery. The first episode of pulmonary oedema was caused by mitral valve dysfunction. The second episode of pulmonary oedema was not clearly associated with a mitral valve problem, but reoperation was performed in the absence of another explanation. After the third episode of acute pulmonary oedema occurred, the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) was considered and confirmed. After starting treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) during his sleep the patient had no further episodes of acute respiratory failure. Our case demonstrates that acute pulmonary oedema after cardiothoracic surgery can be caused or at least be precipitated by OSAS and should be suspected in patients with unexplained episodes of (recurrent) pulmonary oedema. (Neth Heart J 2008;16:310-2.) PMID:18827875

  14. Improving diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis among HIV/AIDS patients: literature review and experience in a teaching hospital in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Rewata, Lidya; Rutherford, Merrin; Apriani, Lika; Janssen, Willem; Rahmadi, Andri; Parwati, Ida; Yuwono, Arto; van Crevel, Reinout

    2009-07-01

    HIV infection hampers diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) because many pathogens cause pulmonary infection in HIV people and the load of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is lower in HIV patients. We conducted a literature review and prospectively examined clinical, radiological, and laboratory diagnosis of PTB in 71 HIV-patients (29 inpatients and 42 outpatients) in a teaching hospital in West Java, Indonesia. For both in- and outpatients, signs and symptoms were sensitive but not specific for PTB. Chest X-ray (CXR) was sensitive but less specific. Among hospitalized PTB suspects, 28,8% could not expectorate sputum. Compared to culture, ZN had a sensitivity of 11.1% and 66.7% for in- and outpatients, respectively. From the literature, fluorescence microscopy, liquid culture, and nucleic acid assays can improve diagnosis of PTB in HIV, while IFNg-release assays lack sensitivity, especially in advanced HIV. The current practice of using CXR and microscopy lacks sensitivity for diagnosing PTB in HIV patients. Sputum culture is more sensitive but slow. Fluorescence microscopy might be a quick, relatively sensitive and feasible option in Indonesia. However, because of the frequent absence of sputum, especially in patients with advanced HIV-AIDS patients, there is an urgent need for alternative diagnostic methods using blood or urine.

  15. Vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis BCG affects the distribution of Fc receptor-bearing T lymphocytes in experimental pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bartow, R A; McMurray, D N

    1989-01-01

    Inbred strain 2 guinea pigs were vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis BCG or were left unvaccinated and challenged 6 weeks later by the respiratory route with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis. By using a double rosette assay with isotype-specific antibody-coated ox and uncoated rabbit erythrocytes, the proportions of T lymphocytes bearing Fc receptors for immunoglobulin G (IgG) (T gamma cells) or IgM (T mu cells) were quantified in tissues taken from animals that were killed within 4 weeks postchallenge. Tuberculin reactivity in vivo and in vitro and antimycobacterial resistance were also measured. BCG vaccination protected the guinea pigs and resulted in significantly enhanced proportions of T mu cells in the blood during the first 3 weeks and in the spleen during weeks 2 and 3 postchallenge. Levels of T gamma cells declined in all tissues during the first 3 weeks of infection and were unaffected by prior vaccination with BCG. Increased proportions of T mu cells in the blood were accompanied by dramatic tuberculin skin reactions and purified protein derivative-induced lymphoproliferation in BCG-vaccinated guinea pigs during the first 2 weeks following virulent pulmonary challenge. Peak levels of T mu cells in the spleens of vaccinated animals at 2 weeks coincided with the first appearance of virulent mycobacteria in that organ. BCG vaccination appears to influence immunoregulatory events in pulmonary tuberculosis through effects on the distribution of IgM Fc receptor-bearing (T mu cell) T lymphocytes. PMID:2523350

  16. Application of Oxidation-Reduction Assay for Monitoring Treatment of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Farnia, Parissa; Mohammadi, Foroazan; Mirsaedi, Mehdi; Zarife, Abolhasan Zia; Tabatabee, Javad; Bahadori, Katayoon; Bahadori, Muslem; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2004-01-01

    By oxidation-reduction assay, the viability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum specimens was evaluated. The technique is based on the Alamar Blue and Malachite Green dyes, which change their color in response to M. tuberculosis growth. The method is simple, permits visual reading of results, and is applicable for laboratories with limited resources. PMID:15243106

  17. A Phase 2 Randomized Trial of a Rifapentine plus Moxifloxacin-Based Regimen for Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Marcus B.; Mello, Fernanda C. Q.; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Cavalcante, Solange C.; Rolla, Valeria; Dalcolmo, Margareth; Loredo, Carla; Durovni, Betina; Armstrong, Derek T.; Efron, Anne; Barnes, Grace L.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Savic, Radojka M.; Dooley, Kelly E.; Cohn, Silvia; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Chaisson, Richard E.; Dorman, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The combination of rifapentine and moxifloxacin administered daily with other anti-tuberculosis drugs is highly active in mouse models of tuberculosis chemotherapy. The objective of this phase 2 clinical trial was to determine the bactericidal activity, safety, and tolerability of a regimen comprised of rifapentine, moxifloxacin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide administered daily during the first 8 weeks of pulmonary tuberculosis treatment. Methods Adults with sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were randomized to receive either rifapentine (approximately 7.5 mg/kg) plus moxifloxacin (investigational arm), or rifampin (approximately 10 mg/kg) plus ethambutol (control) daily for 8 weeks, along with isoniazid and pyrazinamide. The primary endpoint was sputum culture status at completion of 8 weeks of treatment. Results 121 participants (56% of accrual target) were enrolled. At completion of 8 weeks of treatment, negative cultures using Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) medium occurred in 47/60 (78%) participants in the investigational arm vs. 43/51 (84%, p = 0.47) in the control arm; negative cultures using liquid medium occurred in 37/47 (79%) in the investigational arm vs. 27/41 (66%, p = 0.23) in the control arm. Time to stable culture conversion was shorter for the investigational arm vs. the control arm using liquid culture medium (p = 0.03), but there was no difference using LJ medium. Median rifapentine area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-24) was 313 mcg*h/mL, similar to recent studies of rifapentine dosed at 450–600 mg daily. Median moxifloxacin AUC0-24 was 28.0 mcg*h/mL, much lower than in trials where rifapentine was given only intermittently with moxifloxacin. The proportion of participants discontinuing assigned treatment for reasons other than microbiological ineligibility was higher in the investigational arm vs. the control arm (11/62 [18%] vs. 3/59 [5%], p = 0.04) although the proportions of grade 3 or higher adverse events were

  18. PCR could be a method of choice for identification of both pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nucleic acid amplification assays including PCR have revolutionized the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). Tuberculosis spread to almost every organ of the body and is characterized on the basis of localization of infection. Therefore, different types of body fluids and tissues can be used for the detection of MTB. From 2004 to 2010 total 766 different types of smear negative samples from patients, clinically suspected for tuberculosis were received and investigated at Division of Molecular Diagnostics, University of the Punjab Lahore for the diagnosis of tuberculosis. Mycobacterial DNA was extracted followed by PCR amplification. Findings A total of 356 (46.5%) samples were found positive by PCR for MTB. These included; serum (4.8%), blood (36.3%), urine (46.6%), cerebro spinal fluid (CSF) (42.1%), ascetic fluid (67.6%), pleural fluid (52%), pericardial fluid (30%), pus (38.6%), bone marrow (60%), sputum (38.8%) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) (70%). Over all there was no significant difference in males and females neither in different age groups for the identification of MTB. Conclusion We conclude that PCR is a useful and sensitive tool for the early diagnosis of MTB in variety of clinical samples. PMID:21899772

  19. Keratinocyte growth factor administration attenuates murine pulmonary mycobacterium tuberculosis infection through granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent macrophage activation and phagolysosome fusion.

    PubMed

    Pasula, Rajamouli; Azad, Abul K; Gardner, Jason C; Schlesinger, Larry S; McCormack, Francis X

    2015-03-13

    Augmentation of innate immune defenses is an appealing adjunctive strategy for treatment of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections, especially those caused by drug-resistant strains. The effect of intranasal administration of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), an epithelial mitogen and differentiation factor, on M. tuberculosis infection in mice was tested in prophylaxis, treatment, and rescue scenarios. Infection of C57BL6 mice with M. tuberculosis resulted in inoculum size-dependent weight loss and mortality. A single dose of KGF given 1 day prior to infection with 10(5) M. tuberculosis bacilli prevented weight loss and enhanced pulmonary mycobacterial clearance (compared with saline-pretreated mice) for up to 28 days. Similar effects were seen when KGF was delivered intranasally every third day for 15 days, but weight loss and bacillary growth resumed when KGF was withdrawn. For mice with a well established M. tuberculosis infection, KGF given every 3 days beginning on day 15 postinoculation was associated with reversal of weight loss and an increase in M. tuberculosis clearance. In in vitro co-culture experiments, M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages exposed to conditioned medium from KGF-treated alveolar type II cell (MLE-15) monolayers exhibited enhanced GM-CSF-dependent killing through mechanisms that included promotion of phagolysosome fusion and induction of nitric oxide. Alveolar macrophages from KGF-treated mice also exhibited enhanced GM-CSF-dependent phagolysosomal fusion. These results provide evidence that administration of KGF promotes M. tuberculosis clearance through GM-CSF-dependent mechanisms and enhances host defense against M. tuberculosis infection.

  20. A sociological study of awareness of symptoms among persons with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Banerji, D.; Andersen, Stig

    1963-01-01

    In 39 randomly selected villages and towns in Tumkur District, South India, approximately 2000 persons, tuberculosis cases and matched controls, were interviewed in order to determine how many had symptoms suggestive of tuberculosis. Approximately 70% of the bacteriologically confirmed cases and over half the radiologically active or probably active cases had at least one major symptom. The authors discuss these findings in the light of the results of certain other studies they have carried out—for example, on present action-taking among tuberculosis sufferers. They conclude that under present circumstances in India, it is epidemiologically and economically justified to base tuberculosis control programmes on the persons who seek assistance because of worry over symptoms. Only when services satisfying the needs of the already worried tuberculosis sufferers are well developed, may mass case-finding be considered as an additional measure. PMID:14102040

  1. Factors Associated with Treatment Delay among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Public and Private Health Facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Adenager, Getinet Shewaseged; Alemseged, Fessahaye; Asefa, Henok

    2017-01-01

    Background. Early detection and diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) and the timely commencement of antituberculosis (anti-TB) treatment are the parts of efficient tuberculosis prevention and control program. Delay in the commencement of anti-TB treatment worsens the prognosis and increases the risk of death and the chance of transmission in the community and among health care workers. Objective. To assess tuberculosis treatment delay and associated factors among pulmonary TB patients in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 10 public and 10 private health facilities that provide TB treatment. The data were collected from 425 newly registered pulmonary TB patients using pretested structured questionnaire from April to June 2012. Data were entered in EPI info version 3.5.1 and analyzed using SPSS version 16.0. Findings. The median durations of a patient, health care system, and total treatment delays were 17, 9, and 35 days, respectively. Overall 179 (42.1%), 233 (54.8%), and 262 (61.6%) of patients experienced patient delay, health care system delay, and total treatment delay, respectively. Distance more than 2.5 km from TB treatment health facility [AOR = 1.6, 95% CI (1.1–2.5)] and the presence of TB-associated stigma [AOR = 2.1, 95% CI (1.3, 3.4)] indicate higher odds of patient delay, whereas, being unemployed, patients with the hemoptysis symptom complain indicated lower odds of health care system delay [AOR = 0.41, 95% CI (0.24, 0.70)] and [AOR = 0.61 (0.39, 0.94)], respectively. Conclusions. A significant proportion of clients experienced patient and health care system delay. Thus, there is a need for designing and implementing appropriate strategies to decrease the delays. Efforts to reduce delays should give focus on integrating prevention programs such as active case detection and expanding access to TB care. PMID:28348887

  2. Review article: lack of effect of opiates in the treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Sosnowski, Marcin A

    2008-10-01

    Opiates have traditionally been used as one of the main treatments of acute heart failure and are still recognized as such. Most current textbooks and official guidelines advise the use of morphine as one of the first-line treatments for patients in acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema and a majority of physicians accept it to be the case. The author performed an extensive literature search in order to validate the evidence for the use of opiates in this condition. A total of seven papers, six in English and one in Polish, were found that directly investigated or reported the clinically important outcomes of treatment of acute pulmonary oedema. Only five of these dealt specifically with the effects of administration of opiates in acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema. None of the above publications suggested a clinically significant improvement in outcomes of patients treated with morphine, although early research did suggest reduced anxiety, blood pressure and pulse rate as well as a reduction in arterial oxygen contents. The more recent studies suggest a strong association between increased mortality and morbidity (e.g. intensive care unit admissions or intubation rates), although causality is difficult to establish because of research methodologies. The current evidence does not support the routine use of opiates in the treatment of acute pulmonary oedema.

  3. Air Pollution and Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Nested Case–Control Study among Members of a Northern California Health Plan

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Geneé S.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Garcia, Cynthia; Shan, Jun; Baxter, Roger; Herring, Amy H.; Richardson, David B.; Van Rie, Annelies; Emch, Michael; Gammon, Marilie D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ecologic analyses, case–case comparisons, and animal experiments suggest positive associations between air pollution and tuberculosis. Objectives: We evaluated this hypothesis in a large sample, which yielded results that are applicable to the general population. Methods: We conducted a case–control study nested within a cohort of Kaiser Permanente of Northern California members. All active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) cases newly diagnosed between 1996 and 2010 (n = 2,309) were matched to two controls (n = 4,604) by age, sex, and race/ethnicity on the index date corresponding with the case diagnosis date. Average individual-level concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3), and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5) and 10 μm (PM10) for 2 years before diagnosis/entry into the study were estimated using measurements from the California Air Resources Board monitor closest to the participant’s residence. Results: In single-pollutant adjusted conditional logistic regression models, the pulmonary TB odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for the highest quintile (vs. lowest) were 1.50 (95% CI: 1.15, 1.95) for CO and 1.42 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.84) for NO2. Corresponding estimates were higher among never [1.68 (95% CI: 1.26, 2.24)] than ever [1.19 (95% CI: 0.74, 1.92)] smokers for CO. In contrast, for NO2, estimates were higher among ever [1.81 (95% CI: 1.13, 2.91)] than never [1.29 (95% CI: 0.97, 1.71)] smokers. O3 was inversely associated for smokers [0.66 (95% CI: 0.43, 1.02)] and never smokers [0.65 (95% CI: 0.52, 0.81)]. No other consistent patterns were observed. Conclusions: In this first, to our knowledge, U.S. nested case–control study on air pollution and pulmonary TB, we observed positive associations with ambient CO and NO2, which require confirmation. Citation: Smith GS, Van Den Eeden SK, Garcia C, Shan J, Baxter R, Herring AH, Richardson DB, Van Rie A, Emch M

  4. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Karen R

    2017-02-07

    This issue provides a clinical overview of tuberculosis, focusing on screening, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  5. Adjuvant Efficacy of Nutrition Support During Pulmonary Tuberculosis Treating Course: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Si, Zhuang-Li; Kang, Ling-Ling; Shen, Xu-Bo; Zhou, Yuan-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition and tuberculosis (TB) tend to interact with each other. TB may lead to nutrition deficiencies that will conversely delay recovery by depressing immune functions. Nutrition support can promote recovery in the subject being treated for TB. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of nutrition support on promoting the recovery of adult pulmonary TB patients with anti-TB drug therapy. Methods: English database of the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, PubMed, EMBASE, and Chinese database of CBM, CNKI, VIP, and WANFANG were searched. Randomized controlled trials comparing nutrition support (given for more than 2 weeks) with no nutrition intervention, nutrition advice only, or placebo-control for TB patients being anti-TB treated were included. Two reviewers conducted data extraction, assessed the quality of the studies independently, and any discrepancies were solved by the third reviewer. Data were entered and analyzed by RevMan 5.2 software, and meta-analysis was done using risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous variables and mean differences (MDs) for continuous variables with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: A total of 19 studies (3681 participants) were included. In nutritional support for TB patients, pooled RR and its 95% CI of sputum smears- or culture-negative conversion rate and chest X-ray (CXR) absorption rate were 1.10 (1.04, 1.17) and 1.22 (1.08, 1.39), respectively, the pooled MD and its 95% CI of body mass index (BMI) and time of sputum smears or culture negativity were 0.59 (0.16, 1.2) and − 5.42 (−7.93, −2.92), respectively, compared with the control group. The differences in outcomes of CXR zone affected, TB score, serum albumin, and hemoglobin were not statistically significant (P = 0.76, 0.24, 0.28, and 0.20, respectively) between the intervention group and the control group. No systemic adverse events were recorded. Conclusions: During anti-TB course, nutrition support may be helpful in treatment

  6. Pretreatment neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in peripheral blood was associated with pulmonary tuberculosis retreatment

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yongmei; Kuai, Shougang; Liu, Jun; Zhang, YingYing; Shan, Zhongbao; Gu, Lan; Huang, Qiusheng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is a readily available biomarker associated with recurrence and survival in various diseases. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between NLR and pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) retreatment. Material and methods This was a case-control study that included 306 newly diagnosed cases of PTB in the clinical database of the Infectious Hospital of Wuxi from December 2009 to December 2011. Of the 306 patients, a total of 68 cases were followed up with TB retreatment. The remaining 238 PTB patients who completed anti-TB treatment and were cured without retreatment were selected as controls. Results According to the ROC curve, the best cut-off value of NLR was 2.53, with a sensitivity of 70.6% and a specificity of 45.4%. The NLR ≥ 2.53 before anti-TB treatment was associated with PTB retreatment (OR = 1.994, 95% CI: 1.116–3.564; adjusted OR (AOR) = 2.409, 95% CI: 1.212–4.788). The retreatment rates with NLR ≥ 2.53 and NLR < 2.53 were 27.1% and 15.5%, respectively, with a significant difference (log-rank test; p = 0.010). Additionally, cavitation on chest X-ray (OR = 2.922, 95% CI: 1.654–5.411; AOR = 2.482, 95% CI: 1.230–5.007), history of smoking (OR = 2.202, 95% CI: 1.158–3.493; AOR = 2.321, 95% CI: 1.135–4.745) and age ≥ 60 (OR = 3.828, 95% CI: 1.626–9.015; AOR = 2.931, 95% CI: 1.122–7.653) were also associated with PTB retreatment. Conclusions NLR ≥ 2.53 is predictive of PTB retreatment. Otherwise, initial cavitation on chest X-ray, history of smoking, and age of ≥ 60 are also risk factors for PTB retreatment. PMID:28261295

  7. Characterization of the Genetic Diversity of Extensively-Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates from Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, Omar; Rastogi, Nalin; Bartra, Carlos; Couvin, David; Galarza, Marco; Asencios, Luis; Mendoza-Ticona, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Background Peru holds the fourth highest burden of tuberculosis in the Americas. Despite an apparently well-functioning DOTS control program, the prevalence of multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) continues to increase. To worsen this situation, cases of extensively drug resistance tuberculosis (XDR-TB) have been detected. Little information exists about the genetic diversity of drug-susceptible vs. MDR-TB and XDR-TB. Methods Cryopreserved samples of XDR strains from 2007 to 2009 (second semester), were identified and collected. Starting from 227 frozen samples, a total of 142 XDR-TB strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC; 1 isolate per patient) were retained for this study. Each strain DNA was analyzed by spoligotyping and the 15-loci Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit (MIRU-15). Results Among the 142 isolates analyzed, only 2 samples (1.41%) could not be matched to any lineage. The most prevalent sublineage was Haarlem (43.66%), followed by T (27.46%), LAM (16.2%), Beijing (9.15%), and X clade (1.41%). Spoligotype analysis identified clustering for 128/142 (90.1%) isolates vs. 49/142 (34.5%) with MIRUs. Of the samples, 90.85% belonged to retreated patients. The drug resistant profile demonstrated that 62.67% showed resistance to injectable drugs capreomycin (CAP) and kanamycin (KAN) vs. 15.5% to CAP alone and 21.8% to KAN alone. The SIT219/T1 and SIT50/H3 were the most prevalent patterns in our study. The spoligoforest analysis showed that SIT53/T1 was at the origin of many of the T lineage strains as well as a big proportion of Haarlem lineage strains (SIT50/H3, followed by SIT47/H1, SIT49/H3, and SIT2375/H1), as opposed to the SIT1/Beijing strains that did not appear to evolve into minor Beijing sublineages among the XDR-TB strains. Conclusion In contrast with other Latin-American countries where LAM sublineage is the most predominant, we found the Haarlem to be the most common followed by T sublineage among the XDR-TB strains. PMID

  8. Interferon gamma +874T/A polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to active pulmonary tuberculosis development in Tunisian patients.

    PubMed

    Ben Selma, Walid; Harizi, Hedi; Bougmiza, Iheb; Hannachi, Naila; Ben Kahla, Imen; Zaieni, Radhia; Boukadida, Jalel

    2011-06-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is a key cytokine involved mainly in the defense against intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Given its key role in the control of tuberculosis (TB), in the present article we have investigated a possible association between IFN-γ gene single-nucleotide polymorphism linked to high and low producer phenotypes (IFN-γ [+874T(high) → A(low)]) (rs2430561) and risk development of active TB in Tunisian patients. Genomic DNA samples were obtained from 223 patients with active TB (168 pulmonary and 55 extrapulmonary cases) and 150 healthy blood donors. Genotypes were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The +874 AA genotype (low IFN-γ producer) was significantly associated with increased risk of developing of active pulmonary TB (odds ratio [OR] = 2.18; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 1.33-3.57; P corrected for the number of genotypes [Pc] = 0.003). By contrast, the AT genotype was found to be significantly associated with resistance to pulmonary TB (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.28-0.74; Pc = 0.0018) and extrapulmonary TB development (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.23-0.91; Pc = 0.045). Collectively, our data showed that the IFN-γ +874T/A polymorphism is a determinant in the resistance or susceptibility to the development of active TB in the studied population.

  9. Evaluation of public awareness and attitude to pulmonary tuberculosis in a Nigerian rural community

    PubMed Central

    Anochie, Philip Ifesinachi; Onyeneke, Edwina Chinwe; Onyeozirila, Anthony Chidiebere; Igbolekwu, Leonard Chibuzo; Onyeneke, Bestman Chukwuemeka; Ogu, Angelina Chinyere

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Community based interventions have long been linked to tuberculosis control efforts. Effectively treated and cured patients living within their home communities are often the best advocates and may become the drivers of social mobilization to support control of tuberculosis. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional knowledge, attitude, behavioral and practice (KABP) survey on tuberculosis was carried out in a rural Nigerian community. We used the multi-stage sampling method for subject selection. We administered an interview schedule consisting of a pre-tested structured interviewer-administered questionnaire, together with in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. Results We applied the questionnaire to 1186 people in designated rural households. Most of the participants, (1154, 97.3%) had prior knowledge and awareness about tuberculosis as a disease, 612 (51.6%) considered tuberculosis a result of HIV/AIDS epidemics or malnutrition, and 451 (38%) believed that it can be cured by Western medicine. The unwillingness of respondents to relate with TB patients was generally high (97%, 1150), even where levels of awareness and knowledge were high. Conclusion These results should be used to orient tuberculosis control programs, especially those aimed at mobilizing people for tuberculosis control and eradication. PMID:24432287

  10. Mycobacterium genotypes in pulmonary tuberculosis infections and their detection by trained African giant pouched rats.

    PubMed

    Mgode, Georgies F; Cohen-Bacrie, Stéphan; Bedotto, Marielle; Weetjens, Bart J; Cox, Christophe; Jubitana, Maureen; Kuipers, Dian; Machang'u, Robert S; Kazwala, Rudovick; Mfinanga, Sayoki G; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Drancourt, Michel

    2015-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in low-income countries is mainly done by microscopy. Hence, little is known about the diversity of Mycobacterium spp. in TB infections. Different genotypes or lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vary in virulence and induce different inflammatory and immune responses. Trained Cricetomys rats show a potential for rapid diagnosis of TB. They detect over 28 % of smear-negative, culture-positive TB. However, it is unknown whether these rats can equally detect sputa from patients infected with different genotypes of M. tuberculosis. A 4-month prospective study on diversity of Mycobacterium spp. was conducted in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. 252 sputa from 161 subjects were cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen medium and thereafter tested by rats. Mycobacterial isolates were subjected to molecular identification and multispacer sequence typing (MST) to determine species and genotypes. A total of 34 Mycobacterium spp. isolates consisting of 32 M. tuberculosis, 1 M. avium subsp. hominissuis and 1 M. intracellulare were obtained. MST analyses of 26 M. tuberculosis isolates yielded 10 distinct MST genotypes, including 3 new genotypes with two clusters of related patterns not grouped by geographic areas. Genotype MST-67, shared by one-third of M. tuberculosis isolates, was associated with the Mwananyamala clinic. This study shows that diverse M. tuberculosis genotypes (n = 10) occur in Dar es Salaam and trained rats detect 80 % of the genotypes. Sputa with two M. tuberculosis genotypes (20 %), M. avium hominissuis and M. intracellulare were not detected. Therefore, rats detect sputa with different M. tuberculosis genotypes and can be used to detect TB in resource-poor countries.

  11. Decreased Expression of T-Cell Costimulatory Molecule CD28 on CD4 and CD8 T Cells of Mexican Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bernal-Fernandez, German; Espinosa-Cueto, Patricia; Leyva-Meza, Rosario; Mancilla, Nathalie; Mancilla, Raul

    2010-01-01

    Patients with tuberculosis frequently develop anergy, a state of T-cell hyporesponsiveness in which defective T-cell costimulation could be a factor. To know if the expression of T-cell costimulatory molecules was altered in tuberculosis, we analyzed the peripheral blood T-cell phenotype of 23 Mexican patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. There was severe CD4 (P < .001) and CD8 (P < .01) lymphopenia and upregulation of costimulatory molecule CD30 on CD4 and CD8 T cells (P < .05); this increase was higher in relapsing tuberculosis. The main finding was severe downregulation of the major costimulatory molecule CD28 on both CD8 and CD4 T cells (P < .001). Depletion of the CD4/CD28 subset, a hitherto undescribed finding, is relevant because CD4 T cells constitute the main arm of the cell-mediated antimycobacterial immune response. PMID:22567259

  12. An interesting cause of pulmonary emboli: Acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Sevinc, A.; Savli, H.; Atmaca, H.

    2005-07-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning, a public health problem of considerable significance, is a relatively frequent event today, resulting in thousands of hospitalizations annually. A 70-year-old lady was seen in the emergency department with a provisional diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning. The previous night, she slept in a tightly closed room heated with coal ember. She was found unconscious in the morning with poor ventilation. She had a rare presentation of popliteal vein thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, and possible tissue necrosis with carbon monoxide poisoning. Oxygen treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin (nadroparine) and warfarin therapy resulted in an improvement in both popliteal and pulmonary circulations. In conclusion, the presence of pulmonary emboli should be sought in patients with carbon monoxide poisoning.

  13. Acute pulmonary edema after diazepam-ketamine in a dog.

    PubMed

    Boutureira, Joseph; Trim, Cynthia M; Cornell, Karen K

    2007-09-01

    An 8-year-old mixed-breed dog was anesthetized for colonoscopy. Moderate sedation was produced by premedication with glycopyrrolate, acepromazine, and hydromorphone, and anesthesia was induced by IV injection of diazepam and ketamine. Frothy, reddish-colored fluid flowed from the endotracheal tube immediately after endotracheal intubation but ceased after several minutes. Furosemide was injected IV. Anesthesia was maintained by sevoflurane in oxygen. Ventilation and arterial blood pressure were satisfactory, however, after oxygen was administered to maintain normal hemoglobin saturation. Radiography revealed changes consistent with a diagnosis of pulmonary edema. The following day, ventricular premature contractions developed and atrial dissociation, valvular regurgitation, and pulmonary hypertension were diagnosed on echocardiography. The proposed etiology is either profound transient hypotension and/or pulmonary hypertension induced by ketamine. The cardiac abnormalities that were present the following day suggest that myocardial dysfunction after induction of anesthesia was more severe than was apparent as assessed by routine physical examination and monitoring methods.

  14. [From acute pulmonary embolism to chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: Pathobiology and pathophysiology].

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Gámez, Miguel E; Sandoval-Zárate, Julio; Pulido, Tomás

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) represents a unique subtype of pulmonary hypertension characterized by the presence of mechanical obstruction of the major pulmonary vessels caused by venous thromboembolism. CTEPH is a progressive and devastating disease if not treated, and is the only subset of PH potentially curable by a surgical procedure known as pulmonary endarterectomy. The clot burden and pulmonary embolism recurrence may contribute to the development of CTEPH however only few thrombophilic factors have been found to be associated. A current hypothesis is that CTEPH results from the incomplete resolution and organization of thrombus modified by inflammatory, immunologic and genetic mechanisms, leading to the development of fibrotic stenosis and adaptive vascular remodeling of resistance vessels. The causes of thrombus non-resolution have yet to be fully clarified. CTEPH patients often display severe PH that cannot be fully explained by the degree of pulmonary vascular obstruction apparent on imaging studies. In such cases, the small vessel disease and distal obstructive thrombotic lesions beyond the sub-segmental level may contribute for out of proportion elevated PVR. The processes implicated in the development of arteriopathy and micro-vascular changes might explain the progressive nature of PH and gradual clinical deterioration with poor prognosis, as well as lack of correlation between measurable hemodynamic parameters and vascular obstruction even in the absence of recurrent venous thromboembolism. This review summarizes the most relevant up-to-date aspects on pathobiology and pathophysiology of CTEPH.

  15. Sporadic Multicentric Right Atrial and Right Ventricular Myxoma Presenting as Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyajit; Tripathy, Mahendra Prasad; Mohanty, Bipin Bihari; Biswas, Sutapa

    2016-01-01

    Multicentric cardiac myxoma is a rare syndrome; usually it is familial. We report a rare case of sporadic right atrium (RA) and right ventricle (RV) myxoma in a 26-year-old female presenting to our hospital for the evaluation of sudden onset of dyspnea and left precordial pain attributed to the embolization of degenerating tumor fragments to the pulmonary artery (PA). The exact incidence of sporadic multicentric RA and RV myxoma presenting as acute pulmonary embolism is unknown as multicentric RA and RV myxoma are very rare. Myxomas presenting as pulmonary embolism is <10%. Majority of cardiac myxomas present as exertional dyspnea, chest pain, positional syncope, fever, weight loss and other constitutional symptoms. Any young patient presenting with acute onset dyspnea with multiple cardiac masses may have tumor embolization to the PA diagnosis with transthoracic echocardiography and high-resolution computed tomography of thorax, fast-tracks patient transfer for urgent cardiac surgery to prevent further embolization.

  16. [Cardiogenic pulmonary edema following β2 agonist infusion for acute, severe asthma].

    PubMed

    Bahloul, M; Chaari, A; Dammak, H; Medhioub, F; Abid, L; Chtourou, K; Rekik, N; Chelly, H; Kallel, H; Bouaziz, M

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a severe acute pulmonary edema secondary to the administration of salbutamol to a patient admitted for severe asthma. The diagnosis of acute pulmonary edema was suspected on the clinical examination, chest radiography, biological (plasmatic Pro-BNP rate) and echocardiographic findings. Rapid improvement under dobutamine and mechanical ventilation argue in favour of cardiogenic pulmonary edema. The young age of our patient, the absence of history of cardiovascular disease and the chronology of this complication onset regarded to salbutamol infusion could suggest β2 agonist involvement in this event. The improvement of cardiac function on echocardiography and the normal results obtained with myocardial perfusion scintigraphy performed 35 days later show the left ventricular reversible dysfunction.

  17. [Acute pulmonary edema from inhalation of the bite-block after anesthesia with a laryngeal mask].

    PubMed

    Banchereau, F; Marié, S; Pez, H; Boully-Balihaut, A; Tueux, O

    2001-12-01

    We report a case of acute pulmonary oedema, consecutive to upper airway obstruction due to the inhalation of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) bite block during recovery. The LMA was used for general anaesthesia with the bite-block provided in France. No trouble occurred during LMA insertion and anaesthesia. Symptomatic treatment provided complete resolution within a few days.

  18. PULMONARY AND CARDIAC GENE EXPRESSION FOLLOWING ACUTE ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLE INHALATION IN HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhalation of ultrafine carbon particles (ufCP) causes cardiac physiological changes without marked pulmonary injury or inflammation. We hypothesized that acute ufCP exposure of 13 months old Spontaneously Hypertensive (SH) rats will cause differential effects on the lung and hea...

  19. Improved Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis by Combining Antigen and Antibody Detection

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Sarah M.; Smedema, Melinda L.; Durkin, Michelle M.; Herman, Katie M.; Hage, Chadi A.; Fuller, Deanna; Wheat, L. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis can be severe, especially following heavy inoculum exposure. Rapid diagnosis is critical and often possible by detection of antigen, but this test may be falsely negative in 17% of such cases. Antibody detection by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) may increase sensitivity and permit the measurement of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) classes of antibodies separately. Methods. Microplates coated with Histoplasma antigen were used for testing of serum from patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis and controls in the MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA. Results for IgG and IgM were reported independently. Results. IgG antibodies were detected in 87.5%, IgM antibodies in 67.5%, and IgG and/or IgM antibodies in 88.8% of patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis in this assay, while immunodiffusion, complement fixation, and antigen testing showed sensitivities of 55.0%, 73.1%, and 67.5%, respectively (n = 80). Combining antigen and antibody detection increased the sensitivity to 96.3%. Conclusions. The MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA offers increased sensitivity over current antibody tests while also allowing separate detection of IgG and IgM antibodies and complementing antigen detection. Combining antigen and EIA antibody testing provides an optimal method for diagnosis of acute pulmonary histoplasmosis. PMID:26797210

  20. Cathepsin K Contributes to Cavitation and Collagen Turnover in Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kubler, Andre; Larsson, Christer; Luna, Brian; Andrade, Bruno B; Amaral, Eduardo P; Urbanowski, Michael; Orandle, Marlene; Bock, Kevin; Ammerman, Nicole C; Cheung, Laurene S; Winglee, Kathryn; Halushka, Marc; Park, Jin Kyun; Sher, Alan; Friedland, Jon S; Elkington, Paul T; Bishai, William R

    2016-02-15

    Cavitation in tuberculosis enables highly efficient person-to-person aerosol transmission. We performed transcriptomics in the rabbit cavitary tuberculosis model. Among 17 318 transcripts, we identified 22 upregulated proteases. Five type I collagenases were overrepresented: cathepsin K (CTSK), mast cell chymase-1 (CMA1), matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1), MMP-13, and MMP-14. Studies of collagen turnover markers, specifically, collagen type I C-terminal propeptide (CICP), urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD), and urinary helical peptide, revealed that cavitation in tuberculosis leads to both type I collagen destruction and synthesis and that proteases other than MMP-1, MMP-13, and MMP-14 are involved, suggesting a key role for CTSK. We confirmed the importance of CTSK upregulation in human lung specimens, using immunohistochemical analysis, which revealed perigranulomatous staining for CTSK, and we showed that CTSK levels were increased in the serum of patients with tuberculosis, compared with those in controls (3.3 vs 0.3 ng/mL; P = .005).

  1. Acute vasoreactivity testing with nicardipine in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Miyaji, Katsumasa; Akagi, Satoshi; Mizoguchi, Hiroki; Ogawa, Aiko; Fuke, Soichiro; Fujio, Hideki; Kiyooka, Takahiko; Nagase, Satoshi; Kohno, Kunihisa; Morita, Hiroshi; Kusano, Kengo F; Matsubara, Hiromi; Ohe, Tohru; Ito, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Acute vasoreactivity testing for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has been reported to be useful to identify patients with sustained beneficial response to oral calcium-channel blockers (CCBs), but there is a risk of exacerbation during the testing with oral CCBs. Therefore, we developed a testing method utilizing intravenous nicardipine, a short-acting CCB, and examined the safety and usefulness of acute vasoreactivity testing with nicardipine in PAH patients. Acute vasoreactivity testing with nicardipine was performed in 65 PAH patients. Nicardipine was administered by short-time continuous infusion (1 μg·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ for 5 min and 2 μg·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ for 5 min) followed by bolus injection (5 μg/kg). Hemodynamic responses were continuously measured using a right heart catheter. Acute responders were defined as patients who showed a decrease in mean pulmonary artery pressure of at least 10 mmHg to an absolute level below 40 mmHg with preserved or increased cardiac output. Two acute responders and sixty-three non-acute responders were identified. There was no hemodynamic instability requiring additional inotropic agents or death during the testing. Acute responders had good responses to long-term oral CCBs. The acute vasoreactivity testing with nicardipine might be safe and useful for identifying CCB responders in PAH patients.

  2. Pulmonary mucormycosis with embolism: two autopsied cases of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kogure, Yasunori; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Shinozaki-Ushiku, Aya; Watanabe, Akira; Kamei, Katsuhiko; Yoshizato, Tetsuichi; Nannya, Yasuhito; Fukayama, Masashi; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2014-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an increasingly important cause of morbidity and mortality for patients with hematological malignancies. The diagnosis of mucormycosis usually requires mycological evidence through tissue biopsy or autopsy because the signs and symptoms are nonspecific and there are currently no biomarkers to identify the disease. We herein present two autopsied cases of acute myeloid leukemia with prolonged neutropenia who developed invasive mucormycosis accompanied by pulmonary artery embolism. Our cases were featured by unexplained fever and rapidly progressive dyspnea. Computed tomography scan detected nodular lesions or nonspecific consolidations in the lungs. Cultures, cytological study, and serum fungal markers consistently gave negative results. Autopsy revealed embolism of the pulmonary artery which consisted of fibrin clots by filamentous fungi. Genomic DNA was extracted from the paraffin-embedded clots and was applied to polymerase chain reaction amplification, leading to the diagnosis of infection by Rhizopus microsporus. We should carefully search for life-threatening pulmonary embolism when patients with hematological malignancies develop pulmonary mucormycosis.

  3. Effect of Poor Glycemic Control in Newly Diagnosed Patients with Smear-Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mahishale, Vinay; Avuthu, Sindhuri; Patil, Bhagyashri; Lolly, Mitchelle; Eti, Ajith; Khan, Sujeer

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence that diabetes mellitus (DM) is an important risk factor for tuberculosis (TB). A significant number of DM patients have poor glycemic control. This study was carried out to find the impact of poor glycemic control on newly diagnosed smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus in a tertiary care hospital. Methods: In a hospital-based prospective study, newly diagnosed smear-positive pulmonary TB with DM patients were classified as poorly controlled diabetes (HBA1C≥7%) and optimal control diabetics (HbA1c<7%). Patients were started on anti-TB treatment and followed for 2 years for severity and treatment outcome. ANOVA was used for numerical variables in the univariable analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used for multivariable analysis of treatment outcome. The significance level was kept at a P≤0.05. Results: A total of 630 individuals who met the inclusion criteria were analyzed; of which 423 patients had poor glycemic control (PGC) and 207 patients had optimal glycemic control (OGC). The average HbA1c was 10±2.6 and 5±1.50 in the PGC and OGC groups, respectively. The mean symptom score was significantly higher in the PGC group compared with patients in the OGC group (4.55±0.80 vs. 2.70±0.82, P<0.001). PGC was associated with more extensive lung disease, lung cavitation, and positive sputum smear at the baseline. In PGC, sputum smears were significantly more likely to remain positive after 2 months of treatment. PGC patients had significantly higher rates of treatment failure (adj. OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.58-0.74, P<0.001) and relapse (adj. OR 2.83, 95% CI 2.60-2.92, P<0.001). Conclusion: Poor glycemic control is associated with an increased risk of advanced and more severe TB disease in the form of lung cavitations, positive sputum smear, and slower smear conversion. It has a profound negative effect on treatment completion, cure, and relapse rates in patients with pulmonary

  4. Suspected acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as an outcome measure in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis has become an important outcome measure in clinical trials. This study aimed to explore the concept of suspected acute exacerbation as an outcome measure. Methods Three investigators retrospectively reviewed subjects enrolled in the Sildenafil Trial of Exercise Performance in IPF who experienced a respiratory serious adverse event during the course of the study. Events were classified as definite acute exacerbation, suspected acute exacerbation, or other, according to established criteria. Results Thirty-five events were identified. Four were classified as definite acute exacerbation, fourteen as suspected acute exacerbation, and seventeen as other. Definite and suspected acute exacerbations were clinically indistinguishable. Both were most common in the winter and spring months and were associated with a high risk of disease progression and short-term mortality. Conclusions In this study one half of respiratory serious adverse events were attributed to definite or suspected acute exacerbations. Suspected acute exacerbations are clinically indistinguishable from definite acute exacerbations and represent clinically meaningful events. Clinical trialists should consider capturing both definite and suspected acute exacerbations as outcome measures. PMID:23848435

  5. Evaluation of the anti-mycobacterium tuberculosis activity and in vivo acute toxicity of Annona sylvatic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent emergence of extensively multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains has further complicated the control of tuberculosis. There is an urgent need for the development of new molecular candidates antitubercular drugs. Medicinal plants have been an excellent source of leads for the development of drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of 28 alcoholic extracts and essential oils of native and exotic Brazilian plants against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and to further study these extracts through chemical fractionation, the isolation of their constituents, and an evaluation of the in vivo acute toxicity of the active extracts. To the best of our knowledge this is the first chemical characterization, antituberculosis activity and acute toxicity evaluation of Annona sylvatica. Methods The anti-mycobacterial activity of these extracts and their constituent compounds was evaluated using the resazurin reduction microtiter assay (REMA). To investigate the acute toxicity of these extracts in vivo, female Swiss mice were treated with the extracts at doses of 500, 1000 and 2000 mg · kg-1 of body weight. The extracts were characterized by LC-MS, and the constituents were isolated and identified by chromatographic analysis of spectroscopic data. Results Of the 28 extracts, the methanol extract obtained from the leaves of Annona sylvatica showed anti-mycobacterial activity with an minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 184.33 μg/mL, and the ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) resulting from liquid-liquid partitioning of the A. sylvatica extract showed an MIC of 115.2 μg/mL. The characterization of this extract by LC-MS identified flavonoids and acetogenins as its main constituents. The phytochemical study of the A. sylvatica EAF resulted in the isolation of quercetin, luteolin, and almunequin. Conclusions Among the compounds isolated from the EAF, luteolin and almunequin were the most promising, with MICs of 236.8

  6. [Echocardiography in acute pulmonary embolism. Not a routine method but useful in the diagnosis of simultaneous hemodynamic disorders].

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, A

    1998-08-19

    Echocardiographic diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism as illustrated by three case reports is discussed in the article. Acute pulmonary embolism was diagnosed by demonstration of right heart strain in one case, of long vermiform thrombi floating in the right atrium in another, and in the third case by demonstration of a long thrombus lodged in the foramen ovale, astride the atrial septum, and with its ends floating in either atrium. Thus, as echocardiography enables pulmonary embolism to be diagnosed by demonstration either of right heart strain or of intracardial thrombi, it is a useful diagnostic tool in cases of haemodynamic compromise, though it does not detect minor pulmonary embolism.

  7. Assess drug resistance pattern and genetic profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates by molecular typing methods using direct repeats and IS6110 in pulmonary tuberculosis cases

    PubMed Central

    Kalo, Deepika; Kant, Surya; Srivastava, Kanchan; Sharma, Ajay K

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB), a highly contagious disease that sees no gender, age, or race is mainly a disease of lungs. According to World Health Organization, a TB patient can be completely cured with 6–9 months of anti-TB treatment under directly observed treatment short course. Objectives: The aim of this study was to check the mono, multi- and triple-drug resistance to first line drugs (FLDs) among TB patients and to access their genetic profile using DR 3074, DR 0270, DR 0642, DR 2068, and DR 4110 using molecular techniques. Material and Methods: To gain a better understanding of drug resistant TB, we characterized 121 clinical isolates recovered from 159 drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis patients by IS6110 genotyping. MTB isolates recovered from HIV- negative, and smear positive cases of both genders, age varied from 18 to 70 years with drug resistant-TB that was refractory to chemotherapy given for > 12 months. Of a total of 159 sputum smear positive patients sum number of male and female patients was 121 (76.10%) and 38 (23.89%), respectively. Among these patients, number of literate and illiterate patients were 123 (77.3%) and 36 (22.6%). 25 (15.7%) patients had farming as their occupation, 80 (50.3%) had nonagricultural occupation and 54 (33.9%) women were housewives. Results: Mono drug resistant, multi-drug resistant, and totally drug resistant (TDR) cases of TB were calculated as 113.83%, 125.1%, and 67.9%. Isoniazid showed the highest percentage of resistance among the patients. Conclusion: Any noncompliance to TB medications, lack of knowledge, and poor management in health centers, etc., results in the emergence of deadly direct repeat forms of TB, which are further complicated and complex to treat. PMID:28360464

  8. Infection Rate and Tissue Localization of Murine IL-12p40-Producing Monocyte-Derived CD103+ Lung Dendritic Cells during Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Leepiyasakulchai, Chaniya; Taher, Chato; Chuquimia, Olga D.; Mazurek, Jolanta; Söderberg-Naucler, Cecilia; Fernández, Carmen; Sköld, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Non-hematopoietic cells, including lung epithelial cells, influence host immune responses. By co-culturing primary alveolar epithelial cells and monocytes from naïve donor mice, we show that alveolar epithelial cells support monocyte survival and differentiation in vitro, suggesting a role for non-hematopoietic cells in monocyte differentiation during the steady state in vivo. CD103+ dendritic cells (αE-DC) are present at mucosal surfaces. Using a murine primary monocyte adoptive transfer model, we demonstrate that αE-DC in the lungs and pulmonary lymph nodes are monocyte-derived during pulmonary tuberculosis. The tissue localization may influence the functional potential of αE-DC that accumulate in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected lungs. Here, we confirm the localization of αE-DC in uninfected mice beneath the bronchial epithelial cell layer and near the vascular wall, and show that αE-DC have a similar distribution in the lungs during pulmonary tuberculosis and are detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from infected mice. Lung DC can be targeted by M. tuberculosis in vivo and play a role in bacterial dissemination to the draining lymph node. In contrast to other DC subsets, only a fraction of lung αE-DC are infected with the bacterium. We also show that virulent M. tuberculosis does not significantly alter cell surface expression levels of MHC class II on infected cells in vivo and that αE-DC contain the highest frequency of IL-12p40+ cells among the myeloid cell subsets in infected lungs. Our results support a model in which inflammatory monocytes are recruited into the M. tuberculosis-infected lung tissue and, depending on which non-hematopoietic cells they interact with, differentiate along different paths to give rise to multiple monocyte-derived cells, including DC with a distinctive αE-DC phenotype. PMID:23861965

  9. Defining the optimal dose of rifapentine for pulmonary tuberculosis: Exposure-response relations from two phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Savic, R M; Weiner, M; MacKenzie, W R; Engle, M; Whitworth, W C; Johnson, J L; Nsubuga, P; Nahid, P; Nguyen, N V; Peloquin, C A; Dooley, K E; Dorman, S E

    2017-01-25

    Rifapentine is a highly active antituberculosis antibiotic with treatment-shortening potential; however, exposure-response relations and the dose needed for maximal bactericidal activity have not been established. We used pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic data from 657 adults with pulmonary tuberculosis participating in treatment trials to compare rifapentine (n = 405) with rifampin (n = 252) as part of intensive-phase therapy. Population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses were performed with nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Time to stable culture conversion of sputum to negative was determined in cultures obtained over 4 months of therapy. Rifapentine exposures were lower in participants who were coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus, black, male, or fasting when taking drug. Rifapentine exposure, large lung cavity size, and geographic region were independently associated with time to culture conversion in liquid media. Maximal treatment efficacy is likely achieved with rifapentine at 1,200 mg daily. Patients with large lung cavities appear less responsive to treatment, even at high rifapentine doses.

  10. [The values of the lipid peroxidation-antioxidative defense system as predictors of the poor course of infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Volchegorskiĭ, I A; Novoselov, P N; Bolotov, A A

    2008-01-01

    The authors have studied whether an indirect clinical-and-laboratory assessment of the extent of a destructive process in the tuberculous infiltrates and that of concomitant pleural affection can be made from the values of the lipid peroxidation-antioxidative defense (PLO-AOD) system in the blood of patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis (IPT). Regression analysis has indicated that PLO-AOD values significantly reflect the extent of X-ray verified destructions in the tuberculous infiltrates, concomitant pleural involvements, the specific features of immunity of patients with IPT. The neural network technology used to analyze the baseline PLO-AOD values has been ascertained to permit a reliable prognosis of decay cavity closure 4 months after the initiation of medical treatment and of a need for surgical treatment for IPT.

  11. Risk factors for pulmonary tuberculosis in Croatia: a matched case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a necessary, but not sufficient, cause of tuberculosis. A number of studies have addressed the issue of risk factors for tuberculosis development. Croatia is a European country with an incidence rate of 14/100 000 which is slowly decreasing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential demographic, socioeconomic, behavioural and biological risk factors for tuberculosis in Croatia in comparison to other high-income, low-incidence European countries. Methods A total of 300 tuberculosis patients were matched for age, sex and county of residence to 300 controls randomly selected from general practitioners’ registers. They were interviewed and their medical records were evaluated for variables broadly described as potential risk factors. Results In multiple logistic regression, the following factors were significant: parents born in a particular neighbouring county (Bosnia and Herzegovina) (OR = 3.90, 95% CI 2.01-7.58), the lowest level of education (OR = 3.44, 95% CI 1.39-8.50), poor household equipment (OR = 4.72, 95% CI 1.51-14.76), unemployment (OR = 2.69, 95% CI 1.18-6.16), contact with tuberculosis (OR = 2.19, 95% CI 1.27-3.77), former (OR = 2.27, 95% CI 1.19-4.33) and current smoking habits (OR = 2.35, 95% CI 1.27-4.36), diabetes (OR = 2.38, 95% CI 1.05-5.38), a malignant disease (OR = 5.79, 95% CI 1.49-22.42), being underweight in the previous year (OR = 13.57, 95% CI 1.21-152.38). Conclusion In our study, the identified risk groups for tuberculosis reflect a complex interaction between socioeconomic conditions, lifestyle and non-communicable diseases. Interventions focused on poverty will undoubtedly be useful, but not sufficient. Tuberculosis control would benefit from a combination of broad public health activities aimed at the prevention and control of risky lifestyles and non-communicable diseases, interventions outside the health sector, and efforts to constantly

  12. [Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Skalická, Hana; Bělohlávek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is a clinical syndrome manifested by rapidly progressive respiratory distress leading, without therapy, to severe respiratory insufficiency and subsequent multiorgan failure. The pathophysiological causes are: the change in the pressure gradients in the pulmonary capillaries, the impaired membrane permeability of the alveolocapillary in the lungs, and impaired lymphatic drainage. Unlike in cardiogenic pulmonary edema, cardiac disease is not a cause, and there is no increase in wedge pressure (< 18 mm Hg). The aetiological base is diverse and includes more clinical pathological factors. The diagnosis and evaluation are usually very difficult due to the rapidly deteriorating clinical condition of the patients. A decisive, quick and comprehensive approach, using all available invasive and non-invasive methods is necessary. The basic steps of treatment are: the use of different types of ventilatory support in order to achieve adequate oxygenation, dealing with possible hemodynamic instability, and, when needed, other specific procedures. It is always important to keep in mind that this is a very serious condition with a high mortality rate. And there is a need for fast and efficient access to the best specialized clinic.

  13. Relationship between single nucleotide polymorphism of interleukin-18 and susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis in the Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Han, Min; Yue, Jun; Lian, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Yan-Lin; Wang, Hong-Xiu; Liu, Li-Rong

    2011-06-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a multi-functional cytokine capable of inducing either Th1 or Th2 polarization depending on the immunologic milieu. IL-18 may influence the host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) infection. To investigate the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms of the IL-18 and susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis in the Chinese Han population, the IL-18 gene was sequenced to detect polymorphisms and to examine the genotype frequencies in 300 patients and 702 healthy controls. DNA sequencing revealed three IL-18 variants: rs1946518, rs5744247, and rs549908. It also revealed that allele A of rs1946518 confers a 1.47-fold increased risk of developing tuberculosis (TB) (P = 0.0001, OR [95%CI] = 1.47 [1.21-1.78]), and that the C allele of rs5744247 confers a 0.77-fold decreased risk of disease (P = 0.01, R [95%CI] = 0.77 [0.632-0.937]). The genotypes rs1946518, rs5744247 and rs549908 were found to be significantly associated with TB. Estimation of the frequencies of haplotypes revealed a potential risk haplotype AGA (P = 0.01, OR [95%CI] = 1.41 [1.15-1.72]) and a protective haplotype CCA (P = 0.01, OR [95%CI] = 0.70 [0.57-0.85]) for TB. The present findings suggest that polymorphisms in the IL-18 gene may affect susceptibility to TB and increase the risk of developing the disease in the Chinese Han population.

  14. Comparison of the safety and efficacy of a fixed-dose combination regimen and separate formulations for pulmonary tuberculosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiun-Ting; Chiu, Chien-Tung; Wei, Yu-Feng; Lai, Yung-Fa

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Fixed-dose combination formulations, which simplify the administration of drugs and prevent the development of drug resistance, have been recommended as a standard anti-tuberculosis treatment regimen. However, the composition and dosage recommendations for fixed-dose combination formulations differ from those for separate formulations. Thus, questions about the effectiveness and side effects of combination formulations remain. The aim of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of these two types of anti-tuberculosis regimens for pulmonary tuberculosis treatment. METHOD: A prospective, randomized controlled study was conducted using the directly observed treatment short-course strategy. Patients were randomly allocated to one of two short-course regimens. One year after completing the treatment, these patients' outcomes were analyzed. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00979290. RESULTS: A total of 161 patients were enrolled, 142 of whom were evaluable for safety assessment. The two regimens had a similar incidence of adverse effects. In the per-protocol population, serum bilirubin concentrations at the peak level, at week 4, and at week 8 were significantly higher for the fixed-dose combination formulation than for the separate formulations. All patients had negative sputum cultures at the end of the treatment, and no relapse occurred after one year of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: In this randomized study, transient higher serum bilirubin levels were noted for the fixed-dose combination regimen compared with the separate formulations during treatment. However, no significant difference in safety or efficacy was found between the groups when the directly observed treatment short-course strategy was used. PMID:26106962

  15. Intravital excitation increases detection sensitivity for pulmonary tuberculosis by whole-body imaging with β-lactamase reporter enzyme fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Cheng, Yunfeng; Durkee, Madeleine S; Xie, Hexin; Rao, Jianghong; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Maitland, Kristen C

    2016-10-18

    Tuberculosis is a pulmonary disease with an especially high mortality rate in immuno-compromised populations, specifically children and HIV positive individuals. The causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is a very slow growing and difficult organism to work with, making both diagnosis and development of effective treatments cumbersome. We utilize a fiber-optic fluorescence microendoscope integrated with a whole-body imaging system for in vivo Mtb detection. The system exploits an endogenous enzyme of Mtb (β-lactamase, or BlaC) using a BlaC-specific NIR fluorogenic substrate. In the presence of BlaC, this substrate is cleaved and becomes fluorescent. Using intravital illumination of the lung to excite this probe, sensitivity of the optical system increases over trans- and epi-illumination methods of whole-body fluorescence imaging. We demonstrate that integration of these imaging technologies with BlaC-specific fluorescent reporter probe improves the level of detection to ∼100 colony forming units, a 100× increase in sensitivity in comparison to epi-illumination and a 10× increase in sensitivity in comparison to previous work in intravital excitation of tdTomato-expressing Mtb. This lower detection threshold enables the study of early stage bacterial infections with clinical strains of Mtb and longitudinal studies of disease pathogenesis and therapeutic efficacy with multiple time points in a single animal.

  16. Protective Effect of a Lipid-Based Preparation from Mycobacterium smegmatis in a Murine Model of Progressive Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    García, Maria de los Angeles; Lanio, Maria E.; Tirado, Yanely; Alvarez, Nadine; Puig, Alina; Aguilar, Alicia; Canet, Liem; Mata Espinoza, Dulce; Barrios Payán, Jorge; Sarmiento, María Elena; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Norazmi, Mohd-Nor; Acosta, Armando

    2014-01-01

    A more effective vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) is urgently needed. Based on its high genetic homology with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the nonpathogenic mycobacteria, Mycobacterium smegmatis (Ms), could be an attractive source of potential antigens to be included in such a vaccine. We evaluated the capability of lipid-based preparations obtained from Ms to provide a protective response in Balb/c mice after challenge with Mtb H37Rv strain. The intratracheal model of progressive pulmonary TB was used to assess the level of protection in terms of bacterial load as well as the pathological changes in the lungs of immunized Balb/c mice following challenge with Mtb. Mice immunized with the lipid-based preparation from Ms either adjuvanted with Alum (LMs-AL) or nonadjuvanted (LMs) showed significant reductions in bacterial load (P < 0.01) compared to the negative control group (animals immunized with phosphate buffered saline (PBS)). Both lipid formulations showed the same level of protection as Bacille Calmette and Guerin (BCG). Regarding the pathologic changes in the lungs, mice immunized with both lipid formulations showed less pneumonic area when compared with the PBS group (P < 0.01) and showed similar results compared with the BCG group. These findings suggest the potential of LMs as a promising vaccine candidate against TB. PMID:25548767

  17. Trend of Smear-positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Iran during 1995–2012: A Segmented Regression Model

    PubMed Central

    Khazaei, Salman; Soheilyzad, Mokhtar; Molaeipoor, Leila; Khazaei, Zaher; Rezaeian, Shahab; Khazaei, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Describing trend in tuberculosis (TB) over time can play an important role to assess the disease control strategies and predict the future morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to determine the incidence trend of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (SPPT) in sub-age and sex groups during the years of 1995–2012. Methods: This retrospective cohort study was performed in 2015 by using the dataset regarding National Statistics of SPPT reported by World Health Organization during 1995–2012. Annual percent changes (APCs) and average annual percent changes (AAPCs) were estimated to determine the summery statistics of trend using segmented regression model. Results: During 1995–2012, there were 96,579 SPPT case notifications in Iran (male to female ratio: 0.99). There was only one change point in 1997 for SPPT incidence in subgroups of age and sex during 1995–2012. The AAPCs for both genders and also all three age groups had a significant descending trend during the time period (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our results showed a downward trend in the SPPT incidence. It seems that to achieve the set goals and high successful in TB control program especially reduction in SPPT, pay more attention to old age and males should be considered. In addition, improvement of clinical and medical care services and notification processes would be imperative. PMID:27413517

  18. Diagnosis of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis based on detection of mycobacterial antigen 85B by immuno-PCR.

    PubMed

    Singh, Netrapal; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Gupta, Krishna B; Chaudhary, Anil; Mittal, Anshu; Varma-Basil, Mandira; Prasad, Rajendra; Gakhar, Surender K; Khuller, Gopal K; Mehta, Promod K

    2015-12-01

    We developed a novel indirect sandwich immuno-polymerase chain reaction (I-PCR) assay for the detection of mycobacterial antigen 85B (Ag85B, 30kDa, Rv1886c) in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) patients. The amino-modified reporter DNA was covalently attached with the antidetection antibody through a heterobifunctional cross-linking agent succinimidyl 4-[N-maleimidomethyl]-cyclohexane-1-carboxylate. The detection limit of Ag85B by I-PCR was found to be 1 femtogram (fg)/mL, which was 10(6)-fold lower than an analogous enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The sensitivities of 85% and 77% with I-PCR and 77.6% and 62.5% with ELISA were observed in smear-positive and smear-negative PTB patients, respectively, with high specificity. On the other hand, sensitivities of 84% and 63.7% with I-PCR and 68% and 47.5% with ELISA were observed in confirmed and clinically suspected EPTB cases, respectively, with high specificity.

  19. Transgenic tomato expressing interleukin-12 has a therapeutic effect in a murine model of progressive pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Elías-López, A L; Marquina, B; Gutiérrez-Ortega, A; Aguilar, D; Gomez-Lim, M; Hernández-Pando, R

    2008-10-01

    Host control of mycobacterial infection, in both human and mouse models, has been shown to be associated with the production of interferon (IFN)-gamma by CD4(+) T cells. Interleukin (IL)-12 is known to be a crucial cytokine in the differentiation of IFN-gamma-producing T helper 1 (Th1) cells. To determine whether continuous administration of IL-12 expressed in transgenic tomato (TT-IL-12) has therapeutic efficacy in a murine model of pulmonary tuberculosis, BALB/c mice were infected with either Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv strain or a multi-drug-resistant clinical isolate (MDR) and treated with a daily oral dose of TT-IL12 crude fruit extracts. For the early H37Rv infection, TT-IL-12 administration was started 1 day before infection and continued for 60 days. In the H37Rv or MDR late infection, treatment was started 60 days after infection and continued for another 60 days. In both phases of infection, TT-IL-12 administration resulted in a reduction of bacterial loads and tissue damage compared with wild-type tomato (non-TT). The Th1 response was increased and the Th2 response was reduced. In the late infection, a long-term treatment with TT-IL-12 was necessary. We demonstrate that TT-IL-12 increases resistance to infection and reduces lung tissue damage during early and late drug-sensitive and drug-resistant mycobacterial infection.

  20. Prevalence of extended treatment in pulmonary tuberculosis patients receiving first-line therapy and its association with recurrent tuberculosis in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Xia, YinYin; Goel, Sonu; Harries, Anthony D.; Zhang, ZhiGuo; Gao, TieJie; Wang, LiXia; Cheng, ShiMing; Lin, Yan; Du, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Background In China, it is known that extended treatment is given to patients with pulmonary TB after they have successfully completed 6 months of first-line treatment. This practice is not officially reported to the National Tuberculosis Control Programme, so there are no data on its prevalence, its possible benefits in terms of preventing recurrent disease or the costs. This study aimed to provide information, from a single TB dispensary in Beijing, China, on the prevalence of extended anti-TB treatment and its relationship with recurrent TB. Methods Retrospective cohort study using the electronic national TB information system and dispensary medical records. Results Of 935 patients with pulmonary TB who completed 6–7 months of first-line drug treatment, 399 (43%) were given extended treatment. This was more common in patients with smear-positive disease, and those with lung cavities and more extensive radiographic lobar involvement at the time of diagnosis. Over 3–4 years' follow-up, recurrent disease was not significantly different in patients who received extended treatment (2.8%, 11/399) as compared to those who received the standard 6-month treatment (3.7%, 20/534). The median length of extended treatment was 89 days at a median cost of US$111 for drugs and US$32 for laboratory examinations. Conclusions This study shows that extended treatment is common in one TB dispensary in Beijing. Further studies are needed to determine the countrywide prevalence of this practice and ascertain more conclusively the apparent lack of benefit. PMID:24864048

  1. First insight into the genetic population structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Diab, Hassan Mahmoud; Nakajima, Chie; Kotb, Saber A; Mokhtar, Alaa; Khder, Nagwa F M; Abdelaal, Ahmed S A; Hegazy, Azza; Poudel, Ajay; Shah, Yogendra; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess the population structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates from Egypt. A total of 230 MTB isolates were analysed using spoligotyping, large sequence polymorphism (LSPs), mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The majority of isolates (93.0%) belonged to lineage 4, including 44.3, 13.4 and 10.8% of the ill-defined T clade, LAM and Haarlem families, respectively, and lineage 3 was identified in 7.0% of the isolates. MIRU-VNTRs typing allowed efficient discrimination of the spoligotype-defined clusters, including spoligo-international types (SIT) 53, 34, and 4, into 56 patterns, including 13 clusters and 43 unique patterns. A new SNP at position 311614 was identified in all six isolates to form the biggest MIRU-VNTR cluster, which suggested a recent clonal expansion. This SNP could possibly be used as a genetic marker for robust discriminations of Egyptian MTB isolates belonging to SIT53. The combination of spoligotyping, 12 MIRU-VNTRs loci and MLST provided insight into the genetic diversity and transmission dynamics of the Egyptian MTB genotypes and could be a key to implementation of effective control measures by public health authorities.

  2. A patient with possible TRALI who developed pulmonary hypertensive crisis and acute pulmonary edema during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Taiki; Nishisako, Ryo; Sato, Hideo

    2012-06-01

    There are very few case reports of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) under close hemodynamic monitoring. We encountered a case of possible TRALI during on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). A 66-year-old man who had undergone on-pump CABG was administered fresh frozen plasma (FFP). One hour after FFP transfusion, pulmonary hypertensive crisis and subsequent hypoxic decompensation occurred. A second cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) was needed for circulatory and respiratory deterioration. Extracorporeal life support (ECLS), intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP), and nitric oxide therapy were required after the surgery. Despite the severity of the initial state, his recovery was comparatively smooth. ECLS and IABP were removed on postoperative day (POD)1; the patient was extubated and discharged from the ICU on POD7 and POD12, respectively. The diagnosis of TRALI was confirmed by human leukocyte antigen antibody detection in the administered FFP. In addition, lymphocytic immunofluorescence test showed that a cross-match of the plasma from the pooled FFP against the recipient leukocytes was positive. The clinical course of the pulmonary artery hypertension was followed by a decrease in dynamic lung compliance. The mechanism of this phenomenon is unclear. However, it might suggest the possibility of vasoconstriction or obstruction of the peripheral pulmonary artery preceding lung damage, as in the case in animal models reported previously.

  3. Endovascular Management of Acute Pulmonary Embolism Using the Ultrasound-Enhanced EkoSonic System.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    Acute, symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) in the massive and submassive categories continues to be a healthcare concern with significant risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Despite increased awareness and venous thromboembolism prophylaxis, endovascular treatment is still an important option for many of these patients. There are a variety of techniques and devices used for treating PE, but none have been evaluated as extensively as the EkoSonic endovascular system that is also currently the only FDA-approved device for the treatment of pulmonary embolism. This article describes the use of the EkoSonic device for this patient population.

  4. Algorithm for the diagnosis and follow-up of acute pulmonary embolisms.

    PubMed

    Calvillo Batllés, P

    The urgent diagnosis of acute pulmonary thromboembolism benefits from the use of evidence-based clinical guidelines that improve patients' prognoses and reduce the unnecessary use of imaging tests. This article explains the diagnostic algorithms for pulmonary thromboembolism most recently published by the relevant scientific societies both for the general population and for special situations, trying to clear up common doubts and analyzing persistent controversies. It also discusses the need to follow up the thromboembolism after anticoagulation treatment, which is not currently recommended in the guidelines.

  5. Prevalence of pulmonary edema among the deceased cases with acute Methadone poisoning: A report from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Eizadi-Mood, Nastaran; Naeini, Seyed Amir Hossein Madani; Hedaiaty, Mahrang; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Moudi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Methadone poisoning is common in our society, mainly in drug addicts. One of its lethal complications is pulmonary edema. Therefore, we evaluated the prevalence of pulmonary edema in the deceased cases with methadone poisoning and its possible relationship with some medical variables. Methods: In this cross-sectional study which was done in 2014, we have investigated the deceased patients with methadone toxicity who underwent autopsy at Isfahan Forensic Medicine Department (Iran). All variables including age, gender, and autopsy findings were recorded and analyzed. Demographic characteristics and medical complications of the patients were compared between the patients with or without pulmonary edema in the autopsy findings. Findings: There were 64 cases who died with methadone poisoning during the 1-year study period. The average age of cases (±standard deviation) was 32.1 ± 10.29 years, among which 92.2% were male. Based on the autopsy findings, 64.1% were diagnosed with pulmonary edema. There was no statistically significant relationship between pulmonary edema and age, gender, history of addiction, and hepatic or cardiovascular complications. Conclusion: Pulmonary edema is a common finding in deceased methadone poisoning cases and must be considered and ruled out in patients with acute methadone toxicity. PMID:27843967

  6. Xpert® Mtb/Rif assay for pulmonary tuberculosis and rifampicin resistance in adults

    PubMed Central

    Steingart, Karen R; Schiller, Ian; Horne, David J; Pai, Madhukar; Boehme, Catharina C; Dendukuri, Nandini

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate, rapid detection of tuberculosis (TB) and TB drug resistance is critical for improving patient care and decreasing TB transmission. Xpert® MTB/RIF assay is an automated test that can detect both TB and rifampicin resistance, generally within two hours after starting the test, with minimal hands-on technical time. The World Health Organization (WHO) issued initial recommendations on Xpert® MTB/RIF in early 2011. A Cochrane Review on the diagnostic accuracy of Xpert® MTB/RIF for pulmonary TB and rifampicin resistance was published January 2013. We performed this updated Cochrane Review as part of a WHO process to develop updated guidelines on the use of the test. Objectives To assess the diagnostic accuracy of Xpert® MTB/RIF for pulmonary TB (TB detection), where Xpert® MTB/RIF was used as both an initial test replacing microscopy and an add-on test following a negative smear microscopy result. To assess the diagnostic accuracy of Xpert® MTB/RIF for rifampicin resistance detection, where Xpert® MTB/RIF was used as the initial test replacing culture-based drug susceptibility testing (DST). The populations of interest were adults presumed to have pulmonary, rifampicin-resistant or multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), with or without HIV infection. The settings of interest were intermediate- and peripheral-level laboratories. The latter may be associated with primary health care facilities. Search methods We searched for publications in any language up to 7 February 2013 in the following databases: Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; MEDLINE; EMBASE; ISI Web of Knowledge; MEDION; LILACS; BIOSIS; and SCOPUS. We also searched the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) and the search portal of the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform to identify ongoing trials. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials, cross-sectional studies, and cohort studies using respiratory specimens that allowed for

  7. Acute pulmonary edema following inflation of arterial tourniquet.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, M C B; Pai, R B; Rao, R P

    2014-10-01

    Arterial tourniquets are used as one of the methods for reducing blood loss and for allowing blood free surgical field. A 20-year-old, 45 kg healthy female with a sphere shaped pendunculated hemangioma in the popliteal fossa of her left lower limb was applied with arterial tourniquet after exsanguination. The procedure was performed under general anesthesia. Soon after exsanguination and tourniquet inflation, the patient developed pulmonary edema which subsided after deflating the tourniquet. The clinical evolution, treatment and pathophysiology of this complication are described.

  8. Assessment and prevalence of pulmonary oedema in contemporary acute heart failure trials: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Platz, Elke; Jhund, Pardeep S.; Campbell, Ross T.; McMurray, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Pulmonary oedema is a common and important finding in acute heart failure (AHF). We conducted a systematic review to describe the methods used to assess pulmonary oedema in recent randomized AHF trials and report its prevalence in these trials. Methods and results Of 23 AHF trials published between 2002 and 2013, six were excluded because they were very small or not randomized, or missing full-length publications. Of the remaining 17 (n = 200–7141) trials, six enrolled patients with HF and reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF) and 11, patients with both HF-REF and HF with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF). Pulmonary oedema was an essential inclusion criterion, in most trials, based upon findings on physical examination (‘rales’), radiographic criteria (‘signs of congestion’), or both. The prevalence of pulmonary oedema in HF-REF trials ranged from 75% to 83% and in combined HF-REF and HF-PEF trials from 51% to 100%. Five trials did not report the prevalence or extent of pulmonary oedema assessed by either clinical examination or chest x-ray. Improvement of pulmonary congestion with treatment was inconsistently reported and commonly grouped with other signs of congestion into a score. One trial suggested that patients with rales over >2/3 of the lung fields on admission were at higher risk of adverse outcomes than those without. Conclusion Although pulmonary oedema is a common finding in AHF, represents a therapeutic target, and may be of prognostic importance, recent trials used inconsistent criteria to define it, and did not consistently report its severity at baseline or its response to treatment. Consistent and ideally quantitative, methods for the assessment of pulmonary oedema in AHF trials are needed. PMID:26230356

  9. Spontaneous splenic rupture in an acute leukemia patient with splenic tuberculosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Tingting; Zeng, Hui; Zhao, Bing; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Xiaohuan; Han, Wei; Hu, Yanping; Liu, Fengge; Shan, Zhijuan; Gao, Weifeng; Zhou, Hebing

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous splenic rupture, also referred to as atraumatic splenic rupture, is a rare but life-threatening emergency condition. Without timely diagnosis and treatment, the mortality rate of splenic rupture approaches 100%. The etiology of atraumatic splenic rupture varies; it is reportedly associated with neoplasms or splenic infection, but is rarely encountered in patients with both conditions. We herein report the case of a 58-year-old male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) complicated by splenic tuberculosis (TB), who presented with spontaneous rupture of the spleen. Pathological examination of the resected spleen revealed multifocal granulomatosis with caseous necrosis. However, with timely diagnosis and surgical intervention, the patient recovered successfully and is currently on consolidation therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of spontaneous splenic rupture in AML with splenic TB. The relevant literature on spontaneous splenic rupture was also reviewed and the potential etiology and treatment were discussed. PMID:28357096

  10. Psychiatric Morbidity and Other Factors Affecting Treatment Adherence in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pachi, Argiro; Bratis, Dionisios; Moussas, Georgios; Tselebis, Athanasios

    2013-01-01

    As the overall prevalence of TB remains high among certain population groups, there is growing awareness of psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression and its role in the outcome of the disease. The paper attempts a holistic approach to the effects of psychiatric comorbidity to the natural history of tuberculosis. In order to investigate factors associated with medication nonadherence among patients suffering from tuberculosis, with emphasis on psychopathology as a major barrier to treatment adherence, we performed a systematic review of the literature on epidemiological data and past medical reviews from an historical perspective, followed by theoretical considerations upon the relationship between psychiatric disorders and tuberculosis. Studies reporting high prevalence rates of psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression, as well as specific psychological reactions and disease perceptions and reviews indicating psychiatric complications as adverse effects of anti-TB medication were included. In sum, data concerning factors affecting medication nonadherence among TB patients suggested that better management of comorbid conditions, especially depression, could improve the adherence rates, serving as a framework for the effective control of tuberculosis, but further studies are necessary to identify the optimal way to address such issues among these patients. PMID:23691305

  11. Genitourinary and pulmonary multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in an Asian elephant (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    Dumonceaux, Genevieve A; St Leger, Judy; Olsen, John H; Burton, Michael S; Ashkin, David; Maslow, Joel N

    2011-12-01

    A female Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) developed vaginal and trunk discharge. Cultures were positive for pan-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Isoniazid and pyrazinamide were given rectally and monitored by serum levels. After being trained at 10 mo to accept oral dosing, treatment was changed and rifampin was added. Oral medications were administered for another 10 mo. A year after completion of therapy, the vaginal discharge increased and cultures yielded M. tuberculosis, resistant to isoniazid and rifampin. Treatment with oral ethambutol, pyrazinamide, and enrofloxacin and intramuscular amikacin was initiated. Although followup cultures became negative, adverse reactions to medications precluded treatment completion. Due to public health concerns related to multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis (MDR-TB), the elephant was euthanized. Postmortem smears from the lung, peribronchial, and abdominal lymph nodes yielded acid-fast bacteria, although cultures were negative. This case highlights important considerations in the treatment of M. tuberculosis in animals and the need for a consistent approach to diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.

  12. Half of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Cases Were Left Undiagnosed in Prisons of the Tigray Region of Ethiopia: Implications for Tuberculosis Control

    PubMed Central

    Adane, Kelemework; Spigt, Mark; Ferede, Semaw; Asmelash, Tsehaye; Abebe, Markos; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prison settings have been often identified as important but neglected reservoirs for TB. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed pulmonary TB and assess the potential risk factors for such TB cases in prisons of the Tigray region. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted between August 2013 and February 2014 in nine prisons. A standardized symptom-based questionnaire was initially used to identify presumptive TB cases. From each, three consecutive sputum samples were collected for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) microscopy and culture. Blood samples were collected from consented participants for HIV testing. Result Out of 809 presumptive TB cases with culture result, 4.0% (95% CI: 2.65–5.35) were confirmed to have undiagnosed TB. The overall estimated point prevalence of undiagnosed TB was found to be 505/100,000 prisoners (95% CI: 360–640). Together with the 27 patients who were already on treatment, the overall estimated point prevalence of TB would be 793/100,000 prisoners (95% CI: 610–970), about four times higher than in the general population. The ratio of active to passive case detection was 1.18:1. The prevalence of HIV was 4.4% (36/809) among presumptive TB cases and 6.3% (2/32) among undiagnosed TB cases. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, chewing Khat (adjusted OR = 2.81; 95% CI: 1.02–7.75) and having had a close contact with a TB patient (adjusted OR = 2.18; 95% CI: 1.05–4.51) were found to be predictors of undiagnosed TB among presumptive TB cases. Conclusions This study revealed that at least half of symptomatic pulmonary TB cases in Northern Ethiopian prisons remain undiagnosed and hence untreated. The prevalence of undiagnosed TB in the study prisons was more than two folds higher than in the general population of Tigray. This may indicate the need for more investment and commitment to improving TB case detection in the study prisons. PMID:26914770

  13. Pulmonary tuberculosis diagnostic delays in Chad: a multicenter, hospital-based survey in Ndjamena and Moundou

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in low-resource countries. One contagious patient can infect 10 to 20 contacts in these settings. Delays in diagnosing TB therefore contribute to the spread of the disease and sustain the epidemic. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess delays in diagnosing tuberculosis and the factors associated with these delays in the public hospitals in Moundou and Ndjamena, Chad. Methods A structured questionnaire was administered to 286 new tuberculosis patients to evaluate patient delay (time from the onset of symptoms to the first formal or informal care), health-care system delay (time from the first health care to tuberculosis treatment) and total delay (sum of the patient and system delays). Logistic regression was used to identify risk factors associated with long diagnostic delays (defined as greater than the median). Results and discussion The median [interquartile range] patient delay, system delay and total delay were 15 [7–30], 36 [19–65] and 57.5 [33–95] days, respectively. Low economic status (aOR [adjusted odds ratio] =2.38 [1.08-5.25]), not being referred to a health service (aOR = 1.75 [1.02- 3.02]) and a secondary level education (aOR = 0.33 [0.12-0.92]) were associated with a long patient delay. Risk factors for a long system delay were a low level of education (aOR = 4.71 [1.34-16.51]) and the belief that traditional medicine and informal care can cure TB (aOR = 5.46 [2.37-12.60]). Conclusion Targeted strengthening of the health-care system, including improving patient access, addressing deficiencies in health-related human resources, and improving laboratory networks and linkages as well as community mobilization will make for better outcomes in tuberculosis diagnosis. PMID:22776241

  14. Rosiglitazone dampens pulmonary inflammation in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mirakaj, Valbona; Mutz, Christian; Vagts, Dierk; Henes, Janek; Haeberle, Helene A; Husung, Susanne; König, Tony; Nöldge-Schomburg, Gabriele; Rosenberger, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The hallmarks of acute lung injury (ALI) are the compromised alveolar-capillary barrier and the extravasation of leukocytes into the alveolar space. Given the fact that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist rosiglitazone holds significant anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone could dampen these hallmarks of local pulmonary inflammation in a porcine model of lung injury. For this purpose, we used a model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 50 μg/kg)-induced ALI. One hundred twenty minutes following the infusion of LPS, we started the exposure to rosiglitazone through inhalation or infusion. We found that intravenous rosiglitazone significantly controlled local pulmonary inflammation as determined through the expression of cytokines within the alveolar compartment. Furthermore, we found a significant reduction of the protein concentration and neutrophil activity within the alveolar space. In summary, we therefore conclude that the treatment with rosiglitazone might dampen local pulmonary inflammation during the initial stages of ALI.

  15. 18F-flouro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging of solitary prostatic and pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kadihasanoglu, Mustafa; Yildiz, Tekin; Atahan, Safak; Ausmus, Andrew; Atahan, Ozcan

    2015-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis (TB) is a common type of extrathoracic TB and can be found in isolation or associated with pulmonary TB. It contributes to 10-14% of extrapulmonary TB. Prostate TB is rare and usually found incidentally following transurethral resection of the prostate for treatment of benign prostatic obstruction as an isolated lesion in immunocompetant patient. The authors report a case of prostatic and pulmonary TB in animmunocompetant patient investigating for the positive positron emission tomography in lung and prostate. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature presenting with simultaneous hypermetabolic lesions in the prostate and lung.

  16. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with altered CD8(+) T and natural killer cell function in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nathella P; Sridhar, Rathinam; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2015-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with expanded frequencies of mycobacterial antigen-specific CD4(+) T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 cells in individuals with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). No data are available on the role of CD8(+) T and natural killer (NK) cells in TB with coincident DM. To identify the role of CD8(+) T and NK cells in pulmonary TB with diabetes, we examined mycobacteria-specific immune responses in the whole blood of individuals with TB and DM (TB-DM) and compared them with those without DM (TB-NDM). We found that TB-DM is characterized by elevated frequencies of mycobacterial antigen-stimulated CD8(+) T cells expressing type 1 [interferon-γ and interleukin-2 (IL-2)] and type 17 (IL-17F) cytokines. We also found that TB-DM is characterized by expanded frequencies of TB antigen-stimulated NK cells expressing type 1 (tumour necrosis factor-α) and type 17 (IL-17A and IL-17F) cytokines. In contrast, CD8(+) T cells were associated with significantly diminished expression of the cytotoxic markers perforin, granzyme B and CD107a both at baseline and following antigen or anti-CD3 stimulation, while NK cells were associated with significantly decreased antigen-stimulated expression of CD107a only. This was not associated with alterations in CD8(+) T-cell or NK cell numbers or subset distribution. Therefore, our data suggest that pulmonary TB complicated with type 2 DM is associated with an altered repertoire of cytokine-producing and cytotoxic molecule-expressing CD8(+) T and NK cells, possibly contributing to increased pathology.

  17. Nicardipine-Induced Acute Pulmonary Edema: A Rare but Severe Complication of Tocolysis

    PubMed Central

    Serena, Claire; Begot, Emmanuelle; Cros, Jérôme; Hodler, Charles; Fedou, Anne Laure; Nathan-Denizot, Nathalie; Clavel, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We report four cases of acute pulmonary edema that occurred during treatment by intravenous tocolysis using nicardipine in pregnancy patients with no previous heart problems. Clinical severity justified hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU) each time. Acute dyspnea has begun at an average of 63 hours after initiation of treatment. For all patients, the first diagnosis suspected was pulmonary embolism. The patients' condition improved rapidly with appropriate diuretic treatment and by modifying the tocolysis. The use of intravenous nicardipine is widely used for tocolysis in France even if its prescription does not have a marketing authorization. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this complication remain unclear. The main reported risk factors are spontaneous preterm labor, multiple pregnancy, concomitant obstetrical disease, association with beta-agonists, and fetal lung maturation corticotherapy. A better knowledge of this rare but serious adverse event should improve the management of patients. Nifedipine or atosiban, the efficiency of which tocolysis was also studied, could be an alternative. PMID:25215245

  18. One Center’s Guide to Outpatient Management of Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Acute Pulmonary Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Muirhead, Corinne A.; Sanford, Jillian N.; McCullar, Benjamin G.; Nolt, Dawn; MacDonald, Kelvin D.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic disorder characterized by acute pulmonary exacerbations that comprise increased cough, chest congestion, increased mucus production, shortness of breath, weight loss, and fatigue. Typically, severe episodes are treated in the inpatient setting and include intravenous antimicrobials, airway clearance therapy, and nutritional support. Children with less-severe findings can often be managed as outpatients with oral antimicrobials and increased airway clearance therapy at home without visiting the specialty CF center to begin treatment. Selection of specific antimicrobial agents is dependent on pathogens found in surveillance culture, activity of an agent in patients with CF, and the unique physiology of these patients. In this pediatric review, we present our practice for defining acute pulmonary exacerbation, deciding treatment location, initiating treatment either in-person or remotely, determining the frequency of airway clearance, selecting antimicrobial therapy, recommending timing for follow-up visit, and recognizing and managing treatment failures. PMID:27429564

  19. Nicardipine-induced acute pulmonary edema: a rare but severe complication of tocolysis.

    PubMed

    Serena, Claire; Begot, Emmanuelle; Cros, Jérôme; Hodler, Charles; Fedou, Anne Laure; Nathan-Denizot, Nathalie; Clavel, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We report four cases of acute pulmonary edema that occurred during treatment by intravenous tocolysis using nicardipine in pregnancy patients with no previous heart problems. Clinical severity justified hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU) each time. Acute dyspnea has begun at an average of 63 hours after initiation of treatment. For all patients, the first diagnosis suspected was pulmonary embolism. The patients' condition improved rapidly with appropriate diuretic treatment and by modifying the tocolysis. The use of intravenous nicardipine is widely used for tocolysis in France even if its prescription does not have a marketing authorization. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this complication remain unclear. The main reported risk factors are spontaneous preterm labor, multiple pregnancy, concomitant obstetrical disease, association with beta-agonists, and fetal lung maturation corticotherapy. A better knowledge of this rare but serious adverse event should improve the management of patients. Nifedipine or atosiban, the efficiency of which tocolysis was also studied, could be an alternative.

  20. Acute promyelocytic leukemia presenting as pulmonary thromboembolism: Not all APLs bleed

    PubMed Central

    Vaid, Ashok K; Batra, Sandeep; Karanth, Suman S; Gupta, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) presenting as pulmonary thromboembolism being misdiagnosed as community-acquired pneumonia. Thrombotic phenomenon in APL are poorly understood and grossly underreported. In our case, following no response to standard antibiotic treatment, the patient was further investigated and detected to have an acute pulmonary thromboembolism following right lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Though, complete blood picture revealed only mild hyperleukocytosis, bone marrow biopsy and aspiration revealed 60% blasts and a positive t (15,17)(q22,12) and PML retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) fusion protein on molecular cytogenetics. He was diagnosed as APL and received treatment with all-transretinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) and therapeutic anticoagulation PMID:26629469

  1. [Effect of artificial ventilation on pulmonary capillary pressure in acute respiratory insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Labrousse, J; Tenaillon, A; Massabie, P; Simonneau, G; Lissac, J

    1977-05-07

    To determine the influence of intermittent positive pressure breathing (IPPB), the level of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) was compared during IPPB and after a short period off the respirator in 68 occasions on 42 patients with an acute respiratory failure (ARF) of various etiologies. During IPPB, the average PCWP was in the normal range in patients with toxic or neurologic comas and in cases of increased pulmonary capillary permeability edema (IPCPE), PCWP slightly increased within chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) complicated with ARF and in hemodynamic acute pulmonary edema (HAPE). During the weaning stage, PCWP decreased in the groups of coma, COPD, and IPCPE, but increased in HAPE. The weaning test demonstrates that IPPB influenced PCWP in all patients. Therefore, PCWP cannot be assumed to represent the left ventricle filling pressure. The weaning test allows differentiation of IPCPE from HAPE. In the event of over-infusion or hypovolemia, PCWP measured under IPPB can lead to misinterpretation if not followed up by a second measurement off the respirator.

  2. Assessment of right ventricular afterload by pressure waveform analysis in acute pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Grignola, Juan C; Domingo, Enric; Devera, Lucía; Ginés, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To characterize hydraulic right ventricle (RV) afterload by pulmonary arterial pressure waveform analysis in an acute pulmonary hypertension (PH) model. METHODS: Pulmonary artery (PA) flow and pressure were recorded in six anesthetized sheep. Acute isobaric PH was induced by phenylephrine (active) and PA mechanical constriction (passive). We estimated the amplitude of the forward and reflected pressure waves according to the inflection point. In most cases the inflection pressure was smooth, thus the inflection point was defined as the time at wh